Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Volume: 102.No.19



ARCHBISHOP TO

RETIRE IN 2008

° SEE TRIBUNE PAGE I FIVE °



BDM leader hits
out over education

By CARA BRENNEN
: Tribune Staff Reporter

: BOTH major parties came
under intense fire Jast night
after a shocking report disclosed
that Bahamian public high

schools recorded an average F- ~

plus last year in BGCSE exams.
The dire performance placed

‘the country in peril, according ©

to Bahamas Democratic Move-

ment leader Cassius Stuart. He ~~

said both the PLP and FNM
had failed Bahamian children.

Mr Stuart expressed outrage
‘following The Tribine’s lead
story on Saturday which stated
that students from public high
schools who sat the BGCSE
exams last year achieved an
average grade of “F+” across
the board.

The article, which quoted a-

Ministry of Education report,

added that it was only thanks.

to the country’s private schools

and a few select public schools

that the country’s average grade
- wasa“D”,

Mr Stuart told The Tribune
that he was horrified by the
grades. He said it was a failure
of not just the PLP, with Alfred
Sears as minister, but the FNM
as well because grades were
lousy when Dion Foulkes was
minister.

He said the results proved
that both parties cared-more

about building roads and homes .

than they did about educating
the future of the Bahamas. It
was an indictment that both

parties were only concerned |

about material things, he added.

“Why aren’t they concerned
with the quality of life for
Bahamians, why aren’t they
-braggirig about the number of
PhDs we have in the country
and the amount of intelligent
young people we have?” he
asked.





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Mr Stuart said the same
homes government is so proud
to have built are the very homes
of children who can’ only
achieve an “F” im school.

_He said the disclosures made
it obvious that Mr Sears needed
to resign and proved that the
government did not have the
interests of children at heart.

“Otherwise, they would have

appointed a eecieated minis-

‘ter;*-he said.- - e
Mr Stuart added fiat students

leaving schools with minimal
qualifications were the very
ones who may have to run the
country within 20 years.

“We are planting sour seeds
and-we will soon reap nothing

‘but sour seeds,” he added.

Mr Stuart said a BDM gov-
ernment would definitely put
more effort into the ‘country’ s
education." -

_ While he applauded the gov-
ernment for calling an end to
social promotion, he said too
many students were still gradu-
ating without sufficient educa-
tional qualifications.

He said his party would like
to see the school day extended
from 9am to 4pm, giving stu-
dents a much needed extra hour
of class time.

In addition, he said, there
were too many adults in need of
remedial education. He sug-
gested that the schools also
open from. 6pm-9pm for adult
classes. ’ /

“We have no. natural
resources as such. All we have is

our people and an educated
people means a powerful POO",

ple,” he said.

The Tribune’s. story was
based on a report which has yet
to be Officially released. Critics
believe it has been kept under
wraps because officials are
deeply embarrassed.

SEE page 15.



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“jaws of life” to free a woman

_yards into the undergrowth.

“There was loud screaming





The Miami

Herald —

BAHAMAS EDITION

~ MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005

FIREMEN had to use the

from a car wreck during the ear-
ly hours of yesterday morning.

They dashed to the scene
after Lyford Cay police heard
screaming from the bush along-
side the road to South Ocean
Beach.

. Then a man was seen crawling
on to the roadside. He told offi-
cers that a woman was trapped __
inside the car, which had veered
out of control and ploughed 60













_ The vehicle struck severai
trees before coming to rest.
A source told The Tribune:




from the bush, but no-one could
pinpoint the direction.

“It was only when the man
came crawling out-of the bush
that we were able to locate the:
car.

“It seéms it just went out of
control on a straight road and
ploughed into the trees. It even-
tually hit a pie tree.”

The incident happened about.
3am. Both the man and woman
were taken to hospital, but there
was no information at press time
on their injuries or condition.



















(Photo: Felipé Major/ |
Tribune staff)

‘TRAFFICKERS
_ OFF OFFICIALS

Pat Strachan to sce
FNM nomination for |
St Thomas More

i By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter |













‘Jaws of life’ free woman from wreck






PAT STRACHAN, president of the Bahamas Real
Estate Association and a former champion boxer, is to
seek the FNM’s nomination for the St Thomas More

constituency in the next general election. i
In an interview with The Tribune on Saturday, Mr -:

Strachan said he had been toying with the idea of run-
ning for the past year. A deciding factor, he said, was the

election of Hubert Ingraham as party leader. i
“T am/a son of the soil in St Thomas More.I grew up. ; -

there, my family and friends are there and my office is

there,” he said.

“T have given this serious thought and have spoken. to
a number of persons in the constituency who have

assured me of their support.”

Mr Strachan said he has always had a strong desire to
serve his country and uplift the lives of the downtrodden.

“T want the best for the country,” he said..

Mr Strachan said he has the leadership abilities to

become a member of parliament.

“Fused to be a two-time championship boxer known
as The Centreville Assassin. I am also a past president

SEE page 15

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Teenage tourist is
seriously injured
in jet-ski collision

A TEENAGE cruise ship
passenger from Florida became
Nassau’s latest jet-ski victim.
-over the weekend.

Last night, there was a new
call for tighter jet-ski controls
after 19-year-old Jose Ruben
Reyes was seriously injured off
Cabbage Beach on Saturday.

The youth was riding a rented
high-powered machine when it
was. in collision with another

“jet-ski. He was dragged ashore
with what: were thought to be
severe chest and hand injuries.

A nursing team from Atlantis
was quick to respond and oxy-
gen was being administered to
the distressed victim as he lay
on the beach waiting for para-
medics to arrive.

Eventuaily, he was
stretchered from the beach after
an ambulance crew had sta-
bilised his neck and back. He
was then rushed to hospital.

A tourist who saw the after-
math of the collision said: “This
poor guy was pulled off the
machine and on to the beach. I
dread to think what that might
have done to him if he had
spinal injuries.”

The Tribune was on the scene
within minutes.of the crash: Dis-

' traught friends and relatives sur-

SEE page 15

FBI searching
after woman
_ disappears from
cruise ship on
way to Nassau

i By PAUL. G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE FBI and US Coast
Guard are searching for a Cana-
dian woman who vanished from
a cruise ship on its way to Nas-
sau.

Jill Begora, 56, was reported
missing by her husband on Sat-
urday around 9am as the Royal
Caribbean vessel arrived at
Prince George Dock.

There was no record of her
disembarking and.a search by
the-crew found no trace of her.
Coast Guard officials were -
alerted in case Mrs Begora had
fallen overboard.

A helicopter and C-130 plane
began to search 20 miles east
of Nassau, where the ship was
located when Mrs Begora’s
absence was first noted.

Lt Commander Terry Johns,

SEE page 15

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



Fears grow
concerning |
srounded |
freighter —

FEARS of diesel oil pollu-
tion are growing as waves batter
a freighter which ran aground
off Paradise Island several
weeks ago.

Residents are concerned that
the hull will split, releasing fuel
on to nearby Paradise Island
Beach.

The vessel was first seen
around the third week of Octo-
ber, but has yet to be moved.

A small oil boom is floating
around the ship, but this is not
considered helpful unless there
is a way to remove the oil from
the boom: It is unclear who
owns the vessel or why no
preparation has been made for
its removal.

Residents say the vessel
should be moved as soon as
possible to prevent damage to
the environment.

LOCAL NEWS

The situation appears similar
to that of the 220-foot Canadian
oil drilling barge Louis J Goulet,
which has been in Bahamian
waters for some nine months.

In March, Exuma residents
and the Bahamas National :
Trust raised concerns over the ?
barge, which was reportedly
seen floating in shallow waters
near one of the country’s
national parks at the Concep-
tion Islands.

The barge was later removed
and taken to Walkers Cay,



where it remained until Hurri-

vessel then drifted until it ran
aground on the edge of a reef
about 100 yards off Man 0’ War





(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)

<<< 58 Haitian migrants are

Cay.
The process of removing :
water from the boat to lightenit

for removal has now begun.

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@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

ANOTHER Haitian sloop
was apprehended over the
weekend as it tried to land ille-
gal immigrants.

The Royal Bahamas Defence
Force cornered the 40-foot ves-
sel in the Exumas. HMBS P-42
apprehended 58 suspected
undocumented Haitian immi-
grants while on routine patrol
on Saturday.

The sloop was 13 miles off
Cistern Cay at the time. Fifty-
three males and five females
-were aboard.

Because of unsanitary condi-
tions on the sloop, the Haitians
were taken aboard the Defence

Force vessel and brought to the
Coral Harbour base late Satur-
day night.

The Haitians, who appeared
to be in good condition, were
turned over to immigration offi-
cials for processing, and are
being held at Carmichael Road:
Detention Centre.

Late last night, Lt Comman-
der Terry Johns confirmed that
the US Coast Guard was help-
ing the Defence Force locate
another Haitian vessel, believed
to be somewhere off Andros.

A C-130 Coast Guard aircraft
out of Clearwater, Florida, was
helping search for the vessel,
suspected to have a number of
Haitian immigrants aboard.



Journalist
was victim
of mistaken
identity

A TRIBUNE journalist was
the victim of mistaken identity
when police told him they need-
ed to question him in connec-
tion with “human trafficking”.

Features sub-editor Samora
St Rose was waiting for his wife
in the Mall at Marathon’s food
courtyard on Friday evening.

Around 7pm, he said, three
uniformed police officers sur-
rounded him.

One asked Mr St Rose, who
was sitting down, to accompany
them to the police station for
questioning. “I need to see you,
you know. We need you to
come back to the station with us
for questioning," he said.

“For what?" asked Mr St
Rose.

“Human trafficking,” said the
second officer as the third
closed in.

“Human trafficking...you’ve
got the wrong guy because I
don’t have anything to do with
that sort of thing,” Mr St Rose
told the officers.

“Do you have any identifica-
tion?” the officer asked. After
showing his driver’s licence, the
officer said: “You must have a
twin.”

The officers then apologised

















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Mi SAMORA St Rose
to Mr St Rose for the inconve-
nience. “It was quite an embar-
rassing moment for me but at
least they said sorry,” Mr St
Rose said.

He said he hoped the officers

found who they were looking
for.





THE TRIBUNE





Mani in
hospital

following
shooting

AN employee of a local meat
mart is in hospital with gunshot
wounds after an attempted
armed robbery.

According to Reginald Fer-
guson, assistant commissioner
of police with responsibility for
crime, the lone gunman entered
the Fox Hill Meat Mart on
Bernard Road around lpm on
Thursday.

The gunman reportedly
demanded cash and fired shots
in the direction of a male
employee of the store, wound-
ing the man.

The robber reportedly fled the
scene with no cash but managed
to snatch a purse from a female
customer before escaping.

The employee was reported-
ly conscious when taken to the
hospital. His condition was
unknown up to press time.

shopkeeper |
and public
overpower
robber

PASSERS-BY helped a
shopkeeper overpower an
armed robber in Palmdale over
the weekend.

Police said the would-be thief
had either a screwdriver or
knife in his possession. He was
held until officers arrived to
arrest him.

The name of the store and its
owner have not been released.

/ : eta?
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Available from Commercial News Providers”





















LOCAL NEWS




‘(RELIES West End deal





& PRIME Minister Perry Christie and Bobby Ginn are seen at the signing of the hheaile of
agreement for the proposed $3.7 billion resort project at West End. Seen in rear are various

cabinet ministers.

(Photo: Denise Maycock)



be built next year’

& By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE liquefied natural gas
(LNG) proposal by AES
Ocean Express is expected to
be approved by government
before the end of the year,
with construction of the 53.6
mile pipeline due in the third
quarter of 2000.

Prime Minister Perry
Christie hinted recently that
the government was near to
finalising its agreement to

enable the regasification com-.

pany to be given a licence
“very shortly”.
The AES project is a pro-

posed natural gas pipeline to

transport 842 million cubic feet
of natural gas to south-eastern
Florida. The project consists
of a new 53.62 mile interstate
26-inch natural gas pipeline
extending from the Exclusive
Economic Zone (EEZ)
boundary between the United
States and Ocean Cay in the

Biminis, to interconnect with
the Florida Gas Transmission
(FGT) system in Broward
County, Florida.

The project has sparked
heated debate among local
environmentalists and Ameri-
can anti-LNG lobbyists who
have been challenging the pro-
posal.

However, government and
independent consultants main-
tain that the plan is a safe one,
and that globally, LNG regasi-
fication and transportation is
continuing to grow as a safe
and viable industry.

Before leaving the Bahamas
to attend the World Trade
Organisation (WTO) meeting
in Hong Kong, Minister of
Trade and Industry Leslie
Miller said the project will be a
“win-win. situation” for the
people of Florida and the
Bahanias.:

“There are many senators,
including the governor of
Florida, who are very, very,

very anxious to have this AES
project get off the ground to
enable us to assist Florida in
satisfying their energy needs.

“Of course, it appears to us
that it is a win-win situation
for the people of Florida as
well as for the people of the
Bahamas with the execution
of the agreement that we have
before us,” he said.

Mr Miller said he hopes that,
with the blessing of the prime
minister, the final decision on
the proposal will be forthcom-
ing “very shortly”.

As it has already met all of
its environmental require-
ments, the BEST Commission
has already greenlighted the
project with the US-based
AES Corporation, one of the
world’s leading power compa-
nies.

The AES Corporation is
already operating an LNG ter-
minal and natural gas pipeline
at AES Andres in the Domini-
can Republic.

Call for government to
crack down on real estate

& By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas Real
Estate Association has
called on government to
stop large sums of money
leaving the country in
allegedly “illegal” real
estates transactions.

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According to Pat Strachan,
president of BREA, under the
Real Estate Brokers and Sales-
man Act of 1995, it is illegal and
punishable by law for a person
to sell, list, and collect a com-
mission for Bahamian real
estate without a licence.

He said the association is
concerned about the vast num-
ber of real estate transactions
taking place outside the country,
particularly for the new Kerzner
Residences on Paradise Island.

Mr Strachan said listings for
all 510 of the luxurious homes
are with a Florida real estate
company with each expected to
fetch between $685,000-$2.5
million.

He said not one of the resi-
dences is listed with a BREA
agent, which means that, when
sold, the profits from the sale, as
well as the commission, all goes
directly out of the country.

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"I am concerned from a
national level about the amount
of money going out of the coun-
try," he said.

"I need to know if my agents
will be involved in the listing
and selling of these properties.”

In addition to the Kerzner
Residences, Mr Strachan said
similar situations exist in Abaco
and Harbour Island.

"It has come to a point where
we say, who is looking out for
Bahamians?" he said.

Mr Strachan said BREA is
working tirelessly to prepare
proposed amendments it hopes
will fill any loopholes.

2G

MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 3



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PAGE 4, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited



NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI






Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608



appears to be running into more trouble
following a recent defeat in a House of
Commons vote, a new rising star has
emerged onto the British political scene.

The Conservative (also known as Tory) par- -

ty, which boasts such political giants as Win-
ston Churchill and Margaret Thatcher as
former leaders and prime ministers, has cho-
sen 39-year-old David Cameron as its new
leader — the fourth to face Mr Blair since he
defeated sitting prime minister John Major
at the 1997 General Election.

Last week, the charismatic Cameron saw
off his chief rival, the 56-year-old experi-

‘ enced David Davis who started the contest’

as the bookmakers’ favourite, by an over-
whelming two to one margin in a postal bal-
lot of Tory party members across the UK.

Recognising the urgent need for Conser-
vatives to offer the electorate a fresh
approach to politics and new ideas after los-
ing the last three elections, Mr Cameron
has called for a’ “modern compassionate
conservatism” with a pledge to roll back
the power and interference of state and
reassert individual choice and control in
everyday life. In his acceptance speech he
~also declared that he was fed up with the
' “Punch and Judy politics of Westminster

and the name calling, back biting, point
scoring, finger pointing...”

These are early days because, whatever
the personal political fortunes of Mr Blair
‘himself, his Labour government was re-
elected in May for a maximum five-year
term; so, barring wholly unforeseen cir-
’ cumstances, Britain will not go to the polls
again until 2009 at the earliest.

That should work to the benefit of Mr
Cameron who has been an MP for only four
years, is relatively untested in the political
arena and needs time to build up and con-
solidate his new role as leader. But his youth
should be an asset — it is worth remember-
ing that John F Kennedy was only 43 years
old when he became US president.

If he is to succeed, however, he will need
to take an early opportunity to overcome
what some see as the handicap — in the
culture of envy and resentment in a still

class-ridden modern Britain — of attend- -



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WHILE Tony Blair’s premiership

ing elitist Eton College and Oxford Uni-
versity. For, to be able to reach out to a
cross section of the electorate, he will have
to show himself as a man of the people. But
already the signs are good as he presents
himself as genuinely unpretentious and
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fashion in British politics. The coming battle
between the two mainstream parties will be
for the centre ground, now occupied by New
Labour which was forced to ditch Clause 4
(common ownership of the means of pro-
duction and control of industry and ser-
vices) of the original Labour party consti-
tution in order to put itself in a position to
win the 1997 election.

To make themselves electable, the Con-
servatives, in their turn, will have to override
the residual influence of the party’s right
wing dinosaurs. They will also have to pre-
sent a united front on Europe, undertaking
that Britain should continue to play an influ-
ential role in an expanded European Union
while at the same time taking a stand against
the growing power of Brussels bureaucrats

’ and their interference in domestic issues.
For Bahamians watching this fascinating

story unfold, there are some interesting par-
allels and perhaps some lessons as well. The
emergence of an exciting new leader to
strengthen the main opposition party in one
of the world’s oldest.democracies reminds us
that an effective parliamentary opposition is
the essence of stable government in a
democracy.

A vigilant, free and independent press
also plays a role because our rulers need to
be kept under constant scrutiny to ensure
that their excesses are curbed and that good
governance prevails.

As our nation gears up for a General Elec-
tion — perhaps as early as next year — let
us hope that the resurgent Free National
Movement under its new, but well tried and
tested, leader Hubert Ingraham will become
as effective in opposition as Britain’s revi-

‘talised Conservatives promise to be under

theirs.

(*This is a guest editorial).

98
01H






















Doctors, bir
flu, petrol
and health

EDITOR, The Tribune

MINISTER Miller seems to
have been seduced into the
Socialist camp of President
Chavez of Venezuela by the lure
of cheap Petrocaribe gasoline.
Next to fall into the Socialist
camp was Minister Bethel,
swung by Castro and his “free
sample” of Cuban eye doctors,
followed in short order by anoth-
er ‘free sample”: Cuban dentists!

Where is this all going, and

is there a link between this -
* introductory, free sample of

Cuban medical care and the
proposed PLP National Health
Tax?

Is it the intention of this gov-
ernment to out source Bahami-
an medical care to Castro, to
be serviced by Cuban doctors
and Cuban medical facilities?
It surely seems so! Is it the
intention of Mr Bethel to have a
Cuban Construction Brigade
brought here to build the pro-
posed new Princess Margaret
and Rand Memorial hospitals
he promised in his recent
speeches? I think so!

Do we really think that Cuba
will do all this for nothing? If so
we all still believe in the tooth
fairy, and will purchase the Par-
adise Island Bridge from any
joneser!

Nothing is ever ‘free’ here on
earth! All this will be paid for
by good old hard Bahamian
cash, which you the taxpayer
will cough up! Tell me which
insurance company will indem-
nify Cuban doctors when they
mess up your medical treat-
ment? Will this be paid for by
the Bahamian government,
your tax dollars?

My friend, hospitals are
among. the most.expénsive
buildings to build and equip.
They cost here on average
between $200 to $500 per
square foot. This means that a
four hundred plus bed hospital
like the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital can be expected to cost
around $150 to $200 million to
construct and equip. Add
another $50 to $100 million to
construct and equip the Rand
Hospital. Major borrowing or
taxation will be needed to pay
for this. I note that Mr James
Smith only spoke of money to
build and improve the airport!
He is the authority. man on
spending government money,
not the Senator minister for
Health.

New hospitals should be built
by the private sector and the
social partners. We should have
a Baptist Hospital here, sup-
ported in part by the huge Bap-
tist community. This would be a

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worthy use of your tithes.
Unions could partner with the
Baptists in this. Tell me a better
way for union funds to help the
workers than providing them
with a hospital! Let government
be the regulator of all this! Can-
cel the proposed health tax!

In the 1950s the Roman
Catholic diocese took the lead
with educational medical and
child care facilities. Time for
Baptists and unions to the take
the lead.

Government can give the
social partners and the private
sector concessions to provide
and operate these facilities, or is
it that concessions can only be
given to foreign investors to
exploit this country? This would
be a good use for Crown land!

In Barbados, Jamaica and
other Caribbean islands there
are hospitals owned and oper-
ated by religious groups such as
the Adventist and Roman
Catholics. Government gives
them a supplement. I have per-
formed surgical operations in
some of these fine institutions
and speak from personal expe-
rience!

USA medical care is of a high
standard to avoid medicolegal
liability. What will guarantee
the Cuban standard, and who
will pay for the cases which are
messed up due to negligence?
Will this. be paid by the
Bahamas government, ie you

-the taxpayer? In Grenada in

the eighties [ had a cadre of
Cuban surgeons. serving under

me, and spent many hours cor- ‘

recting their mistakes! You will
need to provide for damages.
Which of our doctors will try
to sell you this pig in a poke,
Mr Bethel or Senator Nottage?
It will certainly not be the
Bahamas Medical Association!
The association was not con-
sulted on this despite the fre-
quent claims that the PLP is a
“consultative” government. Is
it that they know the concerns
of our doctors regarding the
safety of all this? There is no
eye or tooth epidemic to justify
the lack of consultation?
While this government is
playing games on us with Cuba,
we are faced with real problems

_if this Bird flu epidemic sur-

faces, since the government
with the facilities to produce
both vaccine and aintiviral
drugs is the USA. Now tell me
why would the USA want to
help us out given the pro Social-

ist country stance the PLP i is:
taking?

They will tell us to ask
Chavez or Castro, our Socialist:
friends for flu vaccine and anti-
viral drugs! Or they may say ask:
CHINA!

So to all those who see no-
problem with Cuban doctors.
and Venezuela oil deals I say:
pray hard that there is no Bird
Flu epidemic, since this gov-
ernment is kicking the USA-in
the teeth on a daily basis. Have
they forgotten that President
Bush is in charge? We all heard:
him say ‘if you are not with me
you are against me’! Can you
see him being in a hurry to sup-
ply us with bird flu vaccine or
aintiviral drugs with our current
pro-socialist foreign policy? -I
do not think we will get a single
vaccine!

The PLP should be worrying
about where to get vaccine if
this bird flu epidemic strikes!
We don’t need eye doctors, or:
dentists. We need a guaranteed
source of vaccine!

I hope no one thinks that the
Americans don’t see that the
Bahamas is helping Cuba ‘to.
beat the US trade embargo. The:
Americans are not fooled by:
the Petrocaribe deal. They sus-
pect that there must be a kick
back somewhere by Chavez:to
Castro for these medical doe:
tors! The PLP is playing a dan=
gerous game, and one if it back
fires will mean full graveyards:
of Bahamians who would oth?
erwise have been saved bya
more sensible foreign policy. .»*

I suggest that you look for:
the next “free sample”: Cubar:.
nurses! How will these be jusfi«”
fied? There used to be a
Bahamaiansation policy, cham-
pidnedbya true: PLPONT
Arthur Hanna! Has’ the ‘new
PLP party departed, from. this;
policy even before the passage”
of this National Hero! The;
Cubanisation of our health sér-"
vices is only the first step in the
Cubanisation of all our services.
I guess it will only sink in when_
Cubans take hotel jobs. By then”
it will be far too late!

If Bahamians die from Bird
flu it will be due to the mié-
guided pro-socialist foreign pol=
icy of the PLP government who;:
in my view, have worked hard”
to alienate our traditional alliés,**
the USA. We need a new and
more sensible foreign policy
immediately or sooner! 3

-BAHAMIAN mals

NATIONALIST — owas

DEXTER JOHNSON «°°

Law Lecturer “4

Nassau

December 2005

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 5



Preservation
group hosts
fundraising
weekend

@ By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Millar’s Creek Preser-
vation Group had its first fund-
raising event this weekend with
two days and nights of real
Caribbean-style partying.

The Bacardi Road Park
came alive on Saturday and
Sunday to the sounds of soca,
calypso, merengue, junkanoo,
rake n’ scrape, creole music,
and more, when entertainers
from around the region came
together to deliver Caribinale
2005.

The Millar’s Creek Preser-
vation group is a non-profit
organisation endorsed by the
National Trust, which is com-
mitted to preserving the only
creek left in New Providence,
which runs from the Coral
Harbour canal through the
Bone Fish Pond in South
‘Beach.

According to group chair-
man Emmanuel McKenzie, the
areas around the creek have
been used for many years as
dumping grounds by “careless
individuals".

"The damage is quite exten-
sive and will take the assistance
of the community and the gov-
ernment to restore,” he said.

Proceeds will go towards
purchasing a truck and other
tools to help clean and further
restore Millar’s Creek and
Bone Fish Pond.

Mr McKenzie said he hoped
the event was successful in
knitting Caribbean countries
together through cultural
exchange, and in encouraging
residents in the area to have
pride for these delicate parts
of the island’s ecosystem.

Saturday’s opening ceremo-
ny, which featured a national
anthem medley, paying respect
to each country represented,
followed by a flag display.

(dee Or Mom on!
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“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

RRR Ea

MONDAY,
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@ By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

WHILE the Ministry of
Financial Services gears up to
sign a landmark agreement for
Mayaguana in January, offi-
cials of the Teachers and
Salaried Workers Co-opera-
tive Credit Union claim their
proposal to complement the
proposed development by the
I-Group has been "snubbe".

The proposal, said one of the
union's leaders, was presented
to Minister Allyson Maynard-
Gibson on September 19. But
to date, he said, there had been
no response from the ministry.

"The government said they
would be rolling out the red
carpet for both Bahamian and
foreign investors," he said.
"But in this instance, the red
carpet is only being rolled out

for the I-Group. Here you
have a strictly Bahamian com-
pany with sufficient financial
resources to participate mean-
ingfully in the development of
the Family Islands, and we are
being pushed aside for foreign
investors."

Minister Maynard-Gibson
announced last week that the
I-Group would be signing a
heads of agreement with the
Bahamas government in Janu-
ary to make Mayaguana a
"free zone", similar to
Freeport, run by the Grand
Bahama Port Authority.

She said the venture would
be 50/50 between the govern-
ment and the foreign investors,
and would make Mayaguana
"the premier vacation destina-
tion in the southern Bahamas".

According to a board of direc-
tors proposal to the ministry: "It

is fair to assume that under the
leads of agreement to be
announced, there will be the
grant of considerable Crown
land to cause the proposal to be
successful. This, for all intent and
purpose, is standard operating
procedure. A modus operandi
and provision, we believe, are
also available to Bahamian com-
panies willing to take advantage
of such concessions.

“We are not aware that any
Bahamian counterparts have
been given concessions, nor
were they invited to provide
concessions for the communi-
ties which might not have been

a part of the agreement which, °-

when put in place, would have
transformed those communities
to the point where Bahamians
could own and operate many
of the local businesses along-

side their foreign counterparts."

The credit union's propos-
als include:

e To assist Bahamians, and
more particularly natives and
descendants of Mayaguana,
obtain ownership of their first
home and for descendants out-
side Mayaguana second home
ownership by creating housing
sub-divisions in Pirate's Well,
Abraham's Bay and Betsy
Bay, and providing mortgages.

e Create a business centre
in the capital town of Abra-
ham's Bay by providing shops
and other rental facilities.

¢ Construct a shopping com-
plex to include a retail food
store, laundry and rental
spaces.

¢ Open a branch of the
Teacher's Credit Union in

Mayaguana for the purpose of ~

members and residents who
may wish to save and to facili-

Archbishop to retire in 2008

ARCHBISHOP Drexel
Gomez has confirmed that he
will stand down from office
as Bishop of the Diocese of
the Bahamas and the Turks
and Caicos Islands at the end
of December 2008.

Although there are various
ages for retirement for a bish-
op within the Province of the
West Indies, Archbishop
Gomez has decided to stand
down at the age of 72.

He leaves office one full
month before his 72nd birth-
day in January, 2009. He
believes that in this way,
things would flow easier for
the new bishop, who could
begin serving at the begin-
ning of 2009.

Seventy-two is also the
retirement age for the Bishop
in Jamaica, although in this
case, there is provision for an
extension under certain cir-
cumstances.

And, having retired as
diocesan bishop, it is manda-
tory that Archbishop Gomez
also demit office as Arch-
bishop and Metropolitan of
the Province of the West
Indies.

Meantime, a special synod
— called the Elected Assem-
bly — will be held in early
February to elect a co-adjutor

NOT



@ ARCHBISHOP Drexel
Gomez

bishop, who will automati-
cally succeed the diocesan
bishop when he leaves office.

Archbishop Gomez said he
made the request for a co-
adjutor bishop at the 105th
session of Synod during Octo-
ber, one of the main reasons’
being continuity.

He explained that the Dio-
cese of the Bahamas and the
Turks and Caicos Islands is
engaged in a diocesan-wide
project in mission and min-
istry, and in this exercise, “we
are trying to involve as many
people in the diocese in com-

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ing up with a new mission state-
ment for the diocese, and to
provide a strategic plan for the
diocese for the next five to’ 10
years.”

Archbishop Gomez said: “I
thought that in what we are

doing as a diocese, continuity.

would be important, so if a per-

son is elected, which I hope a:

person would be elected and
consecrated in 2006, we would
have someone who is already
involved in the process and
would be able to take over
automatically when I retire.”

He said continuity in that
leadership would be of
“extreme importance” if this
diocese is to be effective in its
work.

The archbishop said ‘he also
asked for a co-adjutor bishop
because the sooner his successor
is determined the better it
would be for the Diocese.

He could have asked for
another suffragan bishop to suc-
ceed Bishop Gilbert Thompson,
who retired in late October.

But, in Archbishop Gomez’s
opinion, this was not the route
to follow, as it would have

meant that when he demitted) f=...
office the Diocese would shave =e

electing a:diocesan bishop.
The archbishop said he was

_ happy: that synod concurred

with his proposal.

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By SIR RONALD
SANDERS
(/he writer is a business exec-
aid former Caribbean
diplomat who publishes widely
ou Small States in the global
COMMA ).

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r problem of climate change

Canada last week — the United
Nations Conference on Climate
Change.

And for a change, it recorded
some success despite the posi-
tion of the United States.

The countries, represented
at the Conference, agreed to
extend a climate pact, called the
Kyoto Protocol, beyond 2012
when it was due to expire.

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governments in the region were
not represented at a high level
at the meeting.

It is good news because cli-
mate change is linked to the vio-
lent hurricanes and other dis-
turbing weather that the region
has been experiencing in recent
years with dreadful conse-
quences.

Now, if the Caribbean is to
capitalise on this movement in
Montreal, climate change must
become a priority of policy
development and a key part of
the work of foreign ministries.

The breakthrough in Mon-
treal occurred largely because
the governments of the Euro-
pean Union (EU), Japan and
Canada support the Protocol
and the lowering of gas emis-
sions that hurt the environment.

It was their active work, sup-
ported by developing countries,
that resulted in ministers agree-
ing to launch new, open-ended
discussions on ways to fight
global warming despite objec-
tions from the US.

The Kyoto Protocol sets out
limits by which industrialised
countries must reduce green-

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house gas emissions and five
other gases by 2012. The US is
not a signatory to the Protocol
since the administration of Pres-
ident George W Bush withdrew
the US after the former gov-
ernment of President Bill Clin-
ton had signed it.

Now, with the decision in
Montreal, the Protocol will not
expire and countries, which have
signed it, will be held to lowering
these emissions. However, this
will not include the US.

Therefore, before the world
starts cheering at what hap-
pened in Montreal, it has to be
recalled that the United States
alone accounts for about 25 per
cent of gas emissions that are
linked to climate change.

So, while a decision has been
made by the signatories to the



Climate change
is linked to
the violent
hurricanes and
other disturbing
weather that the
region has been
experiencing in
recent years
with dreadful
consequences.



Protocol to extend it and to
seek new commitments beyond
2012 as early as possible, major
polluters are still in business
with no internationally binding
restriction.

mong those countries
with no restriction are

«China and India‘who have no
“targets under Kyoto and who

say that rich industrial states,

such as the United States, have
to take the lead in cutting emis-
sions because they have already
developed their economies with
coal, oil and gas. Now, they
argue, it is the turn of the large
developing countries.

On the other hand, both Pres-
ident Bush and a significant
membership of the US Congress
contend that China and India
ought to be included among the
countries that are restricted since
their industries would be com-
peting against US companies on
an uneven playing field.

There is merit in both argu-
ments, but the perceived short
term national interests of coun-
tries should not be paramount
over the long term interest of
the world as a whole.

Further, when climate change
is evidently adversely affecting
countries in the Caribbean and

Colors:
Bronze, Gold,

Blue, Black, Pink.

Rosetta St.





SIR Ronald Sanders

the Pacific and even coastal
communities in Canada, Europe
and Asia, the issue should not
be one for barter.

In this regard, the govern-
ments of the United States,
Australia, China, India and
Brazil, who are major emitters
of harmful gasses, need to be
engaged by the rest of the glob-
al community — including the
Caribbean — to persuade them
to compromise in the wider
global interest.

The argument that the US
economy would be harmed if
the US cut back on its green-
house gas emissions is not a
position supported by former
US President Bill Clinton.

Indeed, Mr Clinton turned
up at the Montreal Conference
at the invitation of a Canadian
group to declare Mr Bush’s
position to be “flat wrong”.

He also said: “There’s no
longer any serious doubt that cli-
mate change is real, accelerating
and caused by human activities”.

Mr Clinton is not the. only
senior and serious US citizen to
believe this. So, too, does a
leading US climate scientist, Dr
James Hansen, who has warned
that the world has just.10 years
to act on climate change.

Dr Hansen says that a rise
of just one degree Celsius in
temperature would take the
Earth into climate. patterns it

has not seen for at least 500,000.

years.
Well what does all that
mean? Simply, that if the entire
world — but especially the
United States and other large
countries — does not do some-
thing fast and together about
greenhouse gas emissions, cli-
mate change will destroy many
countries, and kill many more
hundreds of thousands of peo-
ple over the next few years.

t the Montreal Con-

ference, the World
Wildlife Fund (WWF) con-
firmed in a report what we all
instinctively felt: 2005 was the
worst year for extreme weather
— with the hottest tempera-

THE TRIBUNE



tures, most Arctic melting, worst
Atlantic hurricane season and
the warmest Caribbean waters.

And, increasingly the scien-
tific community is saying that if
the present trend continues, the
world will not avoid an irre-
versible environmental cata-
strophe.

This is bad news for every-
one, but especially bad for the
Caribbean which has been bat-
tered by hurricanes continu-
ously now for ten agonising
years, with a prediction of a fur-
ther 20 years to come.

It is time for Caribbean gov-
ernments to ratchet up the issue
of climate change on their for-
eign policy agenda.

For climate change will affect
everything: more frequent and
powerful storms in the region
will turn away investment, par-
ticularly in the crucial tourism
industry on which the region ©
has become highly dependent,
hurricane devastation, flooding
caused by greater rainfall, and
stronger earthquakes will dam-
age economies so continuously
that recovery will be a struggle;
and, of course, the lives and
livelihoods of the Caribbean
people will be gravely affected. ,

The writing for this is already ~
on the wall. The Caribbean
region cannot afford to wait for
what looks like the inevitable
before acting to influence the
positions of those. countries
whose activities are direct con-
tributors to climate change.’

Just as the European Union’s
decisions to cut the prices :for

’ the Caribbean’s sugar by 36 per-

cent and to remove preferences
for bananas galvanised govern-
ments to action, climate chahge



The Caribbean
region cannot |
afford to wait. :
for what
looks like the
inevitable
before acting to
influence the
positions of
those countries
whose activities
are direct
contributors to
climate change.



should rouse them to action as
well. For, the consequences are
arguably even more dreadful,
because they will be more wide-
spread.

Action for deeper cuts in gas-
es from burning fossil fuels in
power plants, autos and facto-
ries in large countries should
now be an important priority
for the Caribbean to help stave
off the disastrous consequences
of climate change on its eco-
nomic and cultural survival.

(responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com)

Phone : 325 - 3336





WIVINUAT, VEUCIVIDEN Ic, CUU0, FAUE /

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Pri







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PAGE 8, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005

Cc

COMMONWEALTH BANK

ployment O;

Senior P prsanal Banking Officer
Freeport Branch



Commonwealth Bank is the premier Bahamian Bank with
branches located in New Providence, Abaco and Grand.
Bahama. We are committed to delivering superior quality
service, to training and developing our employees, to creating
value for our shareholders and to promoting economic growth
and stabilicy in the community.

Core Job Responsibilities:
* Carrying out a range of lending activities, including but not limited to:
- Interviewing applicants to determine purpose of credir
requirements, 1.e. mortgage, loan, overdraft
- Advising applicants of financing options - cerms, rate costs, etc.
- Determining credit acceprabilicy based on credit score and
other tools
. Providing rationale and approving credit within authorized
limit or making recommendations to Management for those in
excess of lending authority
Maintaining ongoing customer relationships and participating in
Branch Marketing efforts
Selling new deposit and investment accounts
Carrying out a range of administrative functions in support of
customers’ personal banking
Providing strong leadership for Branch personnel

Qualifications, Skills and Experience:

» Five years commercial banking experience with some experience
in Lending ;
Strong Leadership skills and coaching skills
Ability to deal ractfully with customers
Excellence communication skills, boch wrircen and ‘oral -
Commitment to Customer Service Excellence
Strong Sales abilicy

Some Accounting knowledge is helpful but not essential
Strong PC skills (MS Word, MS Excel)

‘Remuneration Package:
We offer an excellent remuneration and benefits package, which
includes performance based incentives; health, vision, dental and life
insurances; and a pension plan.

Interested persons should submit their resumes and copies of certificates
in WRITING or E-mail along with copies of their certificates before
December 16, 200

HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT
“Re: SENIOR PERSONAL BANKING OFFICER, Freeport Branch”
Head Office, The Plaza, 2 Floor, Mackey Street
PO. Box §8-6263
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 394-0758
E-mail address: Tanya. Astwood@combankitd.com



Pallet Racking

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Actors, actresses and
filmmakers have flocked
to the Bahamas for the
Bahamas International
Film Festival. On
Thursday night, people
gathered for a screening
of Jim Jarmusch’s new
film, Broken Flowers,
and a dessert reception
at Atlantis’ Lagoon Bar







@ ACTOR and former LA Lakers star Rick Fox





(Photos: Sid McLean/
Tribune staff

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MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 9

THE TRIBUNE

‘LOCAL NEWS





ARTHUR FOULKES: NOTED JOURNALIST,
UNIVERSAL PERSPECTIVE, HISTORICAL CONTEXT - A MUST-READ COLUMN THAT GETS TO THE POINT





etre sroe eos 2pm:

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é (BIS Photo: Derek Smith)

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SNIFT_ the future







parents led a young Bahamian
doctor to produce a book about
the institution known as the
Princess Margaret Hospital.

As a result the Bahamas owes
a debt of gratitude to Dr Harold
Munnings Jr, for his dedication
and application to the task of
writing the first comprehensive
history of the life of this “trea-
sured Bahamian institution”.
He did all the research and writ-
ing, as he says, “on family time”.

Harold’s grandfather, Edgar
Munnings, was a respected
stonemason and builder in his
day and “sometime around
1920 he contracted tetanus and
was admitted to the Bahamas
General Hospital (later to
become the PMH)”. Edgar fell,
in love with his nurse, Dorothy
Dorsett, a twenty-three-year-
old native of Eleuthera, and
they were married. Harold’s
father was their first child.

It was while searching for
information on the Bahamas
General Hospital where his
grandparents met that Harold
suggested to the Librarian; Miss

ES ES E
@ DR Harold Munnings Jr

0 N15 iH 0 (y ‘ S WHAT grew out ofasearch Virginia Ballance, a respected healthcare professionals and in
for information about his grand-

scholar and historian in herown __ the diversity of disciplines.”

right, that perhaps he should
write a history of the hospital.
He had no idea what he had got

himself into.

He visited, photographed and
transcribed every commemora-
tive plaque on the hospital com-
pound. These plaques mark the
official completion of various
hospital projects and each one
has a story to tell, he says in his
introduction.

Although he says he has only
scratched the surface, it was a
bold initiative that places on
record 52 years of outstanding
progress at PMH. And he
records: “The life-extending
upgrades to the hospital have
allowed it to play a significant

. part in the national develop-

ment and its history has become
part of the Bahamian heritage.”

As Lady Marguerite Pindling
remarked on the 50th anniver-
sary of the hospital in 2003:
“The PMH has come from hum-
ble beginnings to a now state-
of-the-art facility. It has experi-
enced tremendous growth, in
terms of development of our




(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)

_ Responsibilities include:

Dr Munnings, who was edu-

cated at Queen’s College in...

Nassau, McGill University in
Canada and at the University
of the West Indies in Jamaica,
traces the development of the
first hospitals from the African
Hospital, which first appeared
on a 1788 map of Nassau on
West Hill Street. That hospital
was built around 1780, primari-
ly for the use of slaves.

It is not clear how long this
hospital remained in use, but
was probably gradually decom-

missioned after emancipation.

(1834).

Then there was the Quaran-
tine Hospital. Quarantine of
persons entering the Bahamas
was enforced at least from the
1700s. The objective was the
protection of residents from
infectious diseases, such as
smallpox and cholera. Passen-
gers could be quarantined
onboard ship in the harbour or
on land at Athol Island, “where
an eighteen-bed quarantine sta-
tion was built for this purpose”.

Then there was the Poor
House, which cared for the poor
and needy, where food, shelter
and basic medical care could be
obtained. But up to the 20th
century “the out islands had no
medical facilities whatsoever.”

It was the Geographical Soci-
ety Expedition of 1903 from
Baltimore to the Bahamas that
first mentioned the prevalence

_of leprosy in the country.

And it was in 1908 that the.,

Bahamas General Hospital was .

established on the present site:

of PMH.

Dr Munnings traces in some.

detail the hospital’s develop-
ment following the seminal

Beveridge Report, which was .

the first report of a consultant to _

the government on healthcare
in the Bahamas (1927).

Sir Wilfred Beveridge, an -
eminent British doctor, spent _
four weeks in the colony, visit-

ing hospitals, the prison and .
police barracks. He toured.

over-the-hill Bain Town and
Grants Town, “where there was

still neither potable water nor a.

sewerage system”. F
The report, says Dr
Munnings, was “a model of

e Arrange the Executive’s schedule and itinerary
e Handle all Executive correspondence
¢ Record minutes at meetings and produce accurate transcripts
* Carry out administrative duties relative to an Executive Office
© Preparing draft replies for standard correspondence

e Maintaining a proper filing system

Candidates should possess:.

¢ 2 years job related experience

¢ Associate’s Degree in Busines

would be a plus

Personal Attributes

e Highly confidential in nature
° Good oral, written and human relations skills
° Ability to deal tactfully with customers
e Excellent work attitude, punctuality and attendance record
¢ Matured and responsible

¢ Proficiency in Microsoft Word & Excel
¢ Typing skills of 50 w.p.m

s Administration or a related field

Interested persons should submit their resumes in WRITING along
with copies of their certificates on/before Tuesday December 20,

2005.

to:

Human Resources Department
Re: Administrative Assistance

P.O. Box N-3482
Nassau, Bahamas

Or

Fax: 1 (242) 323-7086





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 13



LOCAL NEWS



history of a Bahamian institution

careful observation, thorough-
ness and diplomatic criticism”.

The damning report stung the
government to improve condi-
tions at the 75-bed hospital,
while Sir Wilfred went on to
lasting acclaim in British histo-
ry: he was the architect and
founder of the British National
Health Service.

It can be said that from that
time the country became aware
that healthcare was not a Juxu-
ry but a necessity for the future
development of the Bahamas.

The old Victoria Jubilee Hos-
pital stood until the early 1970s.
It was demolished to make way
for' the Outpatient’s extension
and the Private Ward building,
constructed in 1922, which is
still in use. It is now part of the
oncology complex.

It was during Princess Mar-
garet’s tour of the Bahamas in
1955 that the hospital was
named in her honour.

But it was to be a series of
unfortunate and horrifying
accidents that led to major
changes in the fortunes of
PMH, when it became evi-
dent that the hospital could
not cope with such traumas
that afflict modern-day
society.

It’s a shame that a pic-
ture of Dr Jan Steele-
Perkins, who was to have
such an influence on the
development of the
nation, could not be
traced for inclusion in
Dr Munnings’ book. He tells
the story of how the retired
British naval officer and opthal-
mologist — one of the first spe-
cialists and the first in eye dis-
eases — arrived at the hospital in
1954 and set up practice.

It was in that year that a
young Lynden Oscar Pindling,
newly returned barrister from
England, was struck in the left
eye while playing baseball at
the Southern Recreation
Grounds. The British doctor
and his skilful team saved Pin-
dling’s eye. The young lawyer
went on to become this coun-
try’s first prime minister and
was knighted by the Queen.

The hospital is also indebted
to-such generous donors as
Hyman J Sobiloff for the Eye
Wing; Eunice, Lady Oakes for

the Children’s Ward; and James
Henry Rand for the Rand Lab-
oratory and Pathology Depart-
ment. After Rand’s death in
1968 the Grand Bahama Clinic
was renamed the Rand Memo-
rial Hospital in his honour.
Amazingly, when the new
hospital was built in 1952, there
was still no provision for a sep-
arate tuberculosis (TB) ward.
A new Chest Wing was built in
1961 at a cost of £450,000 with
152 beds, which almost doubled
the full patient bed complement
at PMH.
And from that time the bud-
get for healthcare in the
Bahamas has climbed
from










£1.67 million
to over $150 million a year.

The period from 1965 to1980
Dr Munnings calls the “adoles-
cence” period of PMH as it
marked the hospital’s experi-
ence with mass casualties and
a new found awareness of the
importance of disaster pre-
paredness. One disaster fol-
lowed closely by another.

In 1965 the cruise ship
Yarmouth Castle caught fire
and sank on its way to Nassau,
killing almost 100 people. It was
the worst maritime disaster in
recent Bahamian history.

In several important respects
it also changed PMH for the
better, says Dr Munnings.

The hospital’s Intensive Care
Unit was under construction at

CIBC Private
Wealth Management

the time of the disaster and the
incident accelerated its com-
pletion. But it was to be three
years before it was put into
operation, because of the need
for specially trained nurses to
operate it.

Perhaps the greatest benefit
from the disaster was the recog-
nition of the potential role and
value of community volunteers.

Almost immediately after the
disaster, two American resi-
dents of Nassau, Mrs Nancy
Kelly and Mrs Peggy Jones,
formed a Hospital Volunteer
Auxiliary, which became known
as the Yellowbirds. Although
now disbanded, they have the
distinction of being the great-

est patrons of the PMH in

terms of money and
volunteer hours served.
And just two years lat-
er, at a Taylor Gas plant
not far from the hospital

on Collins Avenue, a

huge explosion ripped the

propane gas and storage
distribution firm. Four men
were extensively burned in
the accident and all later
died.

This tragic accident forced

the ICU unit at the hospital

to be opened. From that day
it has never closed.

Dr Munnings deals at length
with these two disasters draw-
ing on newspaper accounts
from the period and showing
how they impacted directly on
the development of PMH.

He proudly records the build-
ing of the new state-of-the-art

Outpatients Wing with its show-.

piece radiology suite. The build-
ing cost $7 million and took four
years to complete.

He tells the story of a part-
time employee of the Frank
Hanna Cleaning company who
worked on that opening: day.
He was a high school student
named Reginald Carey.

“He mopped the front
entrance in preparation for the
arrival of the dignitaries and he
watched the ceremony from the
rear,” writes Dr Munnings. The
teenager later attended the Uni-
versity of the West Indies and
was graduated from the faculty
of Medicine. He subsequently
travelled to England for post-
graduate studies and advanced

CIBC Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited
is presently considering applications for a

Manager, Private Banking

Requirements:

* Applicants should possess a degree in Business
Administration/Finance or Law
* STEP Diploma in International Trust Management
* At least seven (7) years banking experience in a marketing
environment with a strong understanding of international
banking procedures.
* International marketing experience. Will be required to
travel to various regions and utilize a network of existing
contacts and associates.
* Excellent presentation and communication skills in English.
A foreign language will be an asset.
* Selling and negotiating skills; possess a confident and
outgoing personality.
* Good computer literacy on PC and host software.

Duties will include:

* Handling the administration of a high value complex

relationship

* Marketing of trust services to prospective clients
* Marketing of additional services, such as the set-up of
Companies and Foundations as well as administrative

procedures.

* Acquisition and development of new offshore clients and

management of accounts/relationships

* Coaching and training to facilitate team members learning
and career growth.

ONLY BAHAMIANS MEETING
THE ABOVE REQUIREMENTS NEED APPLY.

Applications only should be submitted to:
Manager, Human Resources

P.O. Box N-3933

Nassau, The Bahamas

Fax: 325-3646 (no phone calls accepted)

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS Is

DECEMBER 23, 2005.

tc become head of the depart-
ment of Obstectrics and Gynae-
cology at the hospital.

Dr Munnings writes skilfully
of modern developments at
PMH and how after 30 years
the physical plant is showing its
age and straining from lack of
maintenance.

Deteriorating conditions at

-PMH and increasing demands

forced government to seek
advice from overseas experts.
Several recommendations were
made, some were implemented
but the epidemic of cocaine
abuse in the early ’80s and its
attendant health problems com-
pletely changed the equation
and caused a rethinking of how
the hospital should be devel-
oped, writes Dr Munnings.

This is a book that anyone
interested in the social devel-
opment of this country should
read. There is plenty for the stu-
dent of history and medicine to
build on and perhaps add to the
specialty corps that could be
further researched to show the
accomplishments of a dedicated
cadre of Bahamian doctors who
have achieved wonders under
difficult and trying circum-
stances, _

Dr Munnings is to be com-
mended for his excellent “first”
into the publishing world.

| DUPLICH PUBLICATIONS



(¢ Princess Margaret Hospital: The story of a Bahamian institu-
tion— by Harold Munnings Jr, MD, is available at Island Bookshop,
Logos Bookstore, United Bookshop and Media Enterprises. Dr
Munnings is a specialty trained gastroenterologist and is a consultant
in his specialty at PMH. He founded the Centre for Digestive Health
in Nassau — the first purpose- built ambulatory endoscopy centre in
the English Caribbean region).

NOTICE

=-RIENDLY MOTORS LTD
SANPIN MOTORS LTD.

will be

CLOSED ;

Tuesday, December 13th, 2008
at 12:30p.m.

We will re-open

Wednesday December 14th, 200
at 8:00a.m.

We apologize for any inconvenience
caused.



oe fel Perio Cooper

Well worth the read!
BoC ae ye rats





PAGE 14, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005

os

._ CARIBBEAN NEWS

Diplomat salutes Cuban
human rights activists

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content) -

Mortgage Specialist
RBC FINCO

; i
iS g
| The successful candidate should possess the following |
qualifications: :
S gq
: :
iS

Sales Manager,
Mortgages
RBC FINCO

The successful candidate should possess the following
qualifications:
A college degree in Banking (or a related field)
At least 5 or more years retail. banking experience
in a lending role. Previous experience in portfolio §&
and liability management would be.an asset.
Negotiating/Selling skills
Strong leadership, coaching, relationship building,
problem solving and confi entiality skills
Ability to manage multiple priorities
Ability to make sound credit analysis
Microsoft Office skills (Word, Excel, Power Point)

















e ACIB OR ABIFS Diploma or degree in Banking"
(or a related field)

e At least 5 or more years banking experience.
Previous experience in portfolio and liability
administration would be an asset.

e Negotiating/Selling skills 2

® Strong leadership, coaching, relationship building, |
problem solving and confidentiality skills

e Ability to manage multiple priorities :

e Ability to make sound credit analysis 3

® Microsoft Office skills (Word, Excel, Power Point) 4§




















sooo oooa aoe






Response: bilities include:
Contributing to meeting team sales plans by ‘
acquiring and growing profitable client ;





Responsibilities include: _
Achieving business results through sales and

THE TRIBUNE








market management, implementation of strategic
direction and representation in the market place.
Working in partnership with the Network Sales




LT LETTE ETE TOOT

relationships. |
Providing customized solutions and financial
advice designed to satisfy the client’s long-+t -term
































Teams to implement strategies, processes and
disciplines to achieve sustainable earnings and
revenue growth through the sales force.
Developing an effective adaptable sales force to
maximize revenue and productivity opportunities.
Championing sales management practices to
achieve superior client experience and enhance
employee capability and engagement while
leveraging full RBC Financial Group capabilities
- including branches, alternate delivery. channels
--and service partners... :





; goals on obtaining a mortgage.

© -Seeking out new clients by developing
relationships within the community and local
centres of influence.

* Enhancing the experience of existing clients by :
providing accessibility and one-on-one advice
and valuable information on the intricacies of
having a mortgage.

e@ Successfully anchoring clients with the appropriate |
delivery channel within RBC Financial Group:






Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa : |







‘Invites application for the following positions: : [:

A competitive ‘compensation package (base salary &
bonus) will commensurate with relevant experience |
and qualifications. E

A tit tion package (base salary & Tappanyaki =
competitive compensation package (base salary 3 i espe
bonus) will be commensurate with relevant experience Chef/TrainerExperienced Cooks.

and qualifications.











Please apply before December 16, 2005 to:
The Manager
Human Resources
Bahamas & Caribbean
Royal Bank of Canada
A Bahamas Regional Office
Re P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, N.P, Bahamas

Via fax: (242)328-7145
Via email:bahcayjp@rbc.com

Applicants must be experienced with excellent. |
communication skills

Both written and oral must also be a team
player.





Please apply before December 16, 2005 to:
The Manager
. Human Resources
Bahamas & Caribbean s
Royal Bank of Canada ;
Bahamas Regional Office
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, N.P, Bahamas

Via fax: (242)328-7145 .
Via email: baheayjp@rbe.cc com






Address your resume to:







SOATEST NINN ET

RBC
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© Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada RBC
â„¢ The Lion & Globe symbol and REC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada _ vs

¢.major@srb.sandals.com

Hand deliver or faxed to 327-6961

Human Resource Manager :
Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa. mabe!
P O Box CB-13005 | .







@ Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada
â„¢ The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are wademark of Roy Bank of Canada



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THE TRIBUNE

Strachan |

FROM page one

of the Rotary Club of West Nassau,
a worldwide service organisation. I
am also a past and present president
of the Bahamas Real Estate Associ-
ation. I am also vice-chairman of
Bahamas Boxing Commission. |
have the leadership skills to take St

Thomas More to another level,” he

said.

Mr Strachan noted that among resi- .

dents he had spoken to, many felt they
did not have access to current MP
Frank Smith, something he says he can
change.

“T feel I can offer them leadership
and commitment,” he said.

In addition to addressing the area’s
needs, if elected Mr Strachan said he
was deeply concerned about the Baha
Mar deal.

“I want to ask the government if }

Goodman’s Bay has been sold and for
an immediate response to details which
presently exist,” he said.

Another area of concern is illegal
immigration.

“T feel illegal immigration should be
a top priority right up there with
employment. The government needs
to take proactive and aggressive action.”

Mr Strachan suggested that illegal
immigrants be given four weeks to vol-
untarily leave the country and then,
whoever is left, the government needed
to round them up and deport them.

Mr Strachan said he is equally con-
cerned about crime.

Deputy Prime Minister and Minis-
ter of National Security Cynthia Pratt
needed to be more aggressive, he said.

For example, he said, despite the law
stating the sentence for possession of an
unlicensed firearm should be two years
imprisonment, persons convicted of the
crime often escape jail time. Instead,
he said they are often released on bail
and in some cases commit other crimes.

Mr Strachan said the country is at a
disadvantage because it is so small.
Most persons arrested either know a
politician or police, which takes away
the desire to do what needs to be done.

In addition, Mr Strachan said that “
the government should not get into bed
with Venezuela” as it relates to the
PetroCaribe initiative.

Instead, he said government should
relax its taxes on gas, which would allow
dealers to pass the savings to con-
sumers.

ON FRIDAY, for the first time, the Bar call was held outside the Supreme Court to accommodate the large party. Special permis ‘

LOCAL NEWS

Pane oe i.e

MON

Bytes:

Ei! Association for the ceremony to take place. For many years Sir Burton Hall has advocated a change of venue because the current court ~ spread over four buildings
is too small for such events and for the justices themselves.

Pictured in the front row from left are (italics indicate called to the Bar

): Attorney General Alfred Sears, Charles Robert M Patron, Christopher Jason Wells, Tami-

ka Anastacia Thompsen, Caleb Alexander Dorsett, Thomas Trevor Dean, Julie L Adderley, Kristan B V Stubbs, Richette Percentie, Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall, Justice

John Lyon, Tessa L Turnquest, Racquel J Jones, Nadia H Johnson, Inger T Simms, Christopher J Jenkins, Estena Newbold, M
outside of the National Centre for the Performing Arts on Shirley Street. Also pictured are presenters of the petition and other colleagues.

Tourist injured in
jet-ski collision

FROM page one

rounded Mr Reyes as he tried

:' to communicate through his

oxygen mask.
One said: “He was on the Car-
nival cruise ship and was only

-here for the day. He has been

complaining of chest pains and I
believe his right wrist is also bro-
ken.”

The incident sparked off more
calls for jet-ski controls.

, One resident described the
scene at Cabbage Beach over the
weekend as “mayhem - a jet-ski
free-for-all in which injuries are
inevitable.”

. Hoteliers have called repeat-
edly for proper licensing and zon-
ing procedures, and tougher
enforcement of existing regula-
tions.

‘ But most jet-ski operators con-
tinue to engage in highly danger-
ous practices, and rent out
machines to people who have no
idea how to ride them.

‘One source said: “Some of
these operators are the lowest of
the low. It was sickening how
some of them were laughing
among themselves after Satur-
day’s crash.

RE ed ae teen nated un eer eaten ete lod

“They obviously had no inter-
est in the young man’s welfare
and were only interested taking
people’s money.

“They are a disgrace to the
Bahamas. If we had a government
with any guts, they would have
been dealt with long ago. But no
doubt they have political connec-
tions, so they are allowed to car-
ry on.”

Critics have repeatedly
attacked the way jet-ski opera-
tors have commandeered local
beaches, forcing swimmers into
tightly controlled areas.

They allege jet-skis spoil the
environment and create endless
hazards for people on the beach
and in the sea.

“Some of the operators are lit-
tle more than children themselves
who show off and pose major
dangers for everyone in the area,”
said one.

“This situation must be taken
in hand quickly. Other accidents
are bound to happen - and the
Bahamas’ image suffers every
time.”

Last night, hospital authorities
were unable to release Mr Reyes’
condition. :

Peg Pe ae a eB al rte ater)

j CPP PCPEPPPEEREP ER PER DERE [Maa Ue Me ee Sale ee Ga
LUNG igi addearaeus ae da Vad paap eid aaa Tea ea eee y

Deere et ctr eaten

bahamas saffrey square be

i y
aa iloimeco tide] nel

FROM page one

US Coast Guard press liaison officer, said.
although it was very unlikely they would have
found someone at night, they conducted a
search around 7pm on Saturday as well.

“Of course it was very unlikely we would
find somebody at night like that, but we tried
anyway. We don’t know if this'is a criminal act

FROM page one

However, its findings

came as no surprise to teach- -

ers who have worked in the
system.

“It’s F-for-Failure, I’m .

afraid,” said one, “The
Bahamas education system
is a disaster. There are one
or two bright spots, but over-
all the standards are atro-
ciOUs. .

“This is due largely to a

So ag ae et oN Rea ee a cod oil atl tert cet arena

ary Susan Bain and Charlton Heston Smith

(Photo by Franklyn GF

FBI searching after
woman goes missi

1g

or an accidental thing.
“We don’t even know if she fell overboard

he said.

Evergl:

FBL

total lack of discipline i
schools, where disrupliv
elements are allowed to pre-
vail. However, these disrup-
tive elements are a product
of a failing society.

“The country is full of:

one-parent families where
education is often of low pri-
ority. Children are coming
out of school unable to read
or write properly. And
mathematics are often just a
joke.

“The only way to solve

The Royal C
es yesterday, where the Coast
Guard is expected to conduct an onboard
investigation and turn over its findings to the

‘complaiz

- we only know that the woman did not dis-
embark the vessel. She has simply vanished,”

ribbean arrived back in Port

BDM leader hits out over education

this problem is by radical

rm, and I’m afraid that
sa complete change in
attitude through Bahamian
society.
“Politicians are constantly
ng about foreign-
ers taking jobs, but that’s
because the schools are pro-
ducing Baham who
aren't fit to do at
while job. That’s the
truth. Thirty years after
independence we are a semi-
literate nation.”





"PAGE 16, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



“With the purchase of. any Davidoff fragrance,
enter to win ‘one of twelve fabulous prizes including the -

Grand Prize 2006 Ford Escape!







Former

p olicemat



receives









a BASIL E Dean, senior vice-president ‘of security and
surveillance at Kerzner International, greets Prime Minister
Perry Christie moments after being presented with the QPM by ©
Dame Ivy Dumont during her last official role as Governor

General of the Bahamas.

AFTER 32 years of unwa-

vering commitment to his coun-
try, former Assistant Commis-
sioner of Police Basil E Dean

was presented with the Queen’s

Police. Medal (QPM) for his
contribution to law enforcement
during an. investiture marking
the Quéen’s Birthday Honours

at Government House.

.Dean, Kerzner Internation-

‘ al’s senior ‘vice-president of
security and surveillance, was

one of several distinguished
community builders recognised
for invaluable contributions to

~ the community.

Inspired by highly respected
policemen such as the late
Roland Pierre and others, who
he remembers quite vividly

growing up as a child in the Far-

rington Road community, Dean
always felt that his calling was

-law enforcement.

His passion, fuelled by an
incident-in which an individual
was taken advantage of, result-

ed in him vowing to always do .

his best to combat crime — a
promise he would keep
throughout his lifetime.

Dean joined the Royal
Bahamas Police Force as a con-
stable and gradually moved up
the ranks'to that of an assistant
commissioner.

While on the force, he spent
most of his years working in the
Criminal Investigation Depart-
ment (CID) helping combat

major crimes such as drug traf-.

ficking and corruption as head



(Photo: BIS)

‘of the flying squad.

The decorated veteran law

‘enforcer attended local and

international courses on polic-
ing: He also had the privilege
of representing The Bahamas
at the United Nations’ 1987
Commission on Narcotics in

‘Vienna, Austria.

A humbled Dean remarked
that he felt honoured to receive
the award. “I am grateful to the
country and The Bahamas gov-

ernment for recommending me

and Her Majesty (Queen Eliza-
beth II) for giving me an award
of the Queen’s Police Medal.

“I do not consider that I did
anything out of the ordinary
really other than doing my
duties,” said Dean.

“When I-was a policeman I

sought to serve my country to

the best of my ability and I was
not seeking any reward other
than for ensuring that The

_ Bahamas was as safe as I possi-

bly could help to make it while
I was there,” he added.
Although he has shifted gears
somewhat, Dean continues to
play an active role in policing
on Nassau/Paradise Island. As
head of Kerzner International's
security team for the past nine
years, he has ensured the safety
of guests and employees as well
as protecting Kerzner Interna-

tional’s assets at its Paradise

Island properties, Atlantis, One
and Only Ocean Club and Har-
borside Resort at Atlantis.
Dean also works closely with
the Paradise Island Tourism
Development Association and
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force which help maintain law
and order on Paradise Island.

your |

news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their -2=4
neighbourhoods. Perhaps:
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
“for improvements in the
area or have won an

award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



THE TRIBUNE | __ MONDAY, DECEMBER 12; 2005, PAGE 17

i

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re ree





PAGE 18, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005

THE TRIBUNE ,





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This year, along with their annual holiday
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an annual event for Disney Cruise Lines
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Parliamentary secretary in the Ministry of
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Singers set for
overnment
House concert

,

legacy that Clement left to the.
country," said Pauline Glas-
by, who had been the choir's

THE Nassau Renaissance
Singers will host a special per-
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ditional and contemporary
choral music by many 20th
century composers of classi-
cal style.

Beginning as a quartet in
1965 under the direction of
David Fysh, organist and
choirmaster at Christ Church
Cathedral, the Singers grew
over the years into the coun-
try's premier vocal group, per-
forming at many national
events.

From 1967 to 1987 the
choir was directed by the late
Clement Bethel, a Bahamian
who was a graduate of the
Royal Academy of Music in
London.

"The Renaissance Singers
consider themselves an inte-
gral part of the vast musical






UMBING

ie eee eta the Nassau Renaissance last one in 2000 when they
shingles, weed” + Non-yellowing Singers have been inspiring joined with the Diocesan
audiences with classical, tra- Chorale and the Bahamas

Concert Orchestra to perform
Handel's Messiah in Govern-
ment House grounds.

From 1968 the annual
Christmas concerts were held
in the Government House
Ballroom.

The choir has performed on
two occasions at Carnegie
Hall and for many national
functions. The choir is made
up of 35 volunteers who
rehearse rigorously through-
out the year.

Tickets may be obtained
from A.D. Hanna and Ca,
Deveaux Street, north of The
Tribune. Only a limited num:
ber of tickets are available,
Those ordered by telephone
must be collected and paid for
within 48 hours. Z



THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 19
INTERNATIONAL NEWS -

Elephant gives birth
to calf in Isracl after
rare fertility treatment

@ «= «©




“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content.

rom Commercial News Providers”



YOUR CONWECTICN TO THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

During this upcoming busy holiday season, The Bahamas
Telecommunications Company Limited is looking to make life
easier and simpler for all of its valued customers.






As a result, all residential customers desiring new service or
telephone transfers, are kindly asked to apply and pay for your
service before December 16th, 2005 in order to guarantee installation
on or before December 23, 2005.

Your request can be easily made by either visiting our Customer
Services Department located at The Mall-At-Marathon or John F.
Kennedy Drive, or by dialing 225-5282 and choosing option three.

BTC wishes everyone a:safe and happy holiday season.

Lecture Series | FREE Public Health Talk
Schedule ~ Every 3rd Thursday

ke Speaker: Dr. Timothy Barrett
December 15, 2005

Managing Stress Topic: Managing Stress & Depression

‘& Depression _
"Dr, Timothy Barrett Date: Thursday, December 15, 2005

Family Medicine .
Time: 6:00pm - 7:00pm

January 19, 2006

Women’s Health

Dp Reginald Care) Q&A: — Question and Answer Session
Obstetrician/Gynecologist

Venue: Doctors Hospital Conference Room

RSVP: To ensure available seating.
February 16, 2006

Heart Month Screenings: Free Blood Pressure, Cholesterol and
Dr. Delton Farquharson Glucose screenings between 5pm & 6pm.

Vascular Surgeon . 3 ;
Please join us as our guest every month for this

scintillating series of the most relevant health issues

March 16, 2006 : :
affecting society today.

Diabetes & Kidney

Disease

Refreshments will be provided.

RSVP 302-4603

. DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Heath Pov Life





AGE 20, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005 THE TRIBUNE. :
i
_ INTERNATIONAL NEWS : | De a ee





YOUR CONNECTION*TO THE WORLD



: - Copyrighted Material
| UNDERGROUND AND AERIAL COPPER CABLE | Ml @@RSYNdicated Content augue ge

TENDER FOR THE DISPOSAL OF SCRAP





Available from Commercial News Providers”

| The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. is pleased to invite
| qualified companies to submit tender for disposal of scrap underground
{| and aerial copper cable. | |



Interested companies may collect a Tender Specification from BTC’s
administration building on John F. Kennedy Drive, between the hours . Z
of 9:00am to 5:00pm Monday through Friday.



Tender must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked “TENDER
| FOR THE DISPOSAL OF SCRAP UNDERGROUND AND

i AERIAL COPPER CABLE” and delivered to the attention of: Pr ;
Pee as eee a mc saves that ( hristmas is
: Mr. Michael J. Symonette :

President & CEO ; , , ms < +
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. : ie uate d y CORSUMICT See
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive °
P.O.Box N-3048 |
~.. Nassau, The Bahamas



Bids should reach the company’s administration office on John F.
Kennedy Drive Dy 5:00pm on Thursday, December 22, 2005.

| BTC reserves the right to areiect any or fe senders:

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PAGE 22, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005 THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Ow wee be coe Gee
we ee Ree ea

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.
















owe! Ss. Soldier Road i is
celebrating the season!

Spend *25 Or mere on these
Proctor & Gambie products — Always,
Bounty, Charmin, Dawn, Downy,
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2 to 4pm and geta free gift basket.

Plus
Enter to win i of 3 $100 cash prizes
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Deveaux Street, (North of The Tribune ses To volunteer contact Victoria Bethell by email at :
Tickets: $40. 00 Victoria.Bethell@kerzner.com or call at 363-2000 °

ext.64561 by January 6, 2006.









THE TRIBUNE

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i Kassafina Decorative Towels 25% off | JWin Alarm Clock Radio #JL-204 $14.79
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i HI-FI VVCRs $99.99

| SALE STARTS: MONDAY, DECEMBER 5TH - SATURDAY, DECEMBER 10TH, 2005 j

Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center
Ph: 393-4440 or ———

DISCOUNT
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Wedding Gift Registry

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Throw Pillows Cutlery Sets Chair Pads
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Christmas Decorations
Christmas Trees

| VEGETABLE/CORN/
CANOLA

J SALE:STARTS MONDAY, ‘DECEMBER 12TH.- SATURDAY, DECEMBER 17TH, 2005

WE ACCEPT AMERICAN EXPRESS MASTER, VISA AND SUNCARD, WE ALSO REDEEM QUALITY STAMP CARDS
MACKEY STREET, TOP OF THE HILL (next to Super Value) PHONE: 393-3411/393-5569









PAGE 24, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005 THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL NEWS:



| \ climate conference ends with deal to
negotiate ‘second phase’ of emission cuts .

Lorrcrmoant bw more than |S)

if ‘ Snot among them

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 25



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| MONDAY EVENING DECEMBER 12, 2005





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Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun

{T\

?m lovin’ it





































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THE TRIBUNE MONDA BER iz, 2005, PAL
INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Explosions at fuel depot
rock area north of London





Available from Commercial News Providers”

Seow

bees © = get & we

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“SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005





Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street



‘ g¥Colinalmperal

Insuranee bid



Education ‘revolutio
have tourism.

By NEIL HARTNELL-
Tribune Business Editor

n economic. impact

“equal to the year-

around tourism and

offshore

activities of -the

1950s” could bé sparked if the Gov-
ernment created an education ‘“revo-
lution” by implementing the reforms

suggested in a report prepared for the .

business community and trade unions.

Bahamian Youth: The Untapped
Resource, a hard-hitting report that
reveals ‘the extent’to which the edu-
cation system and wider society are

banking:

letting down future generations of
- Bahamians, said reform was urgently

needed to maintain this nation’s eco-
- nomic competitiveness, given that

human ‘capital was the. key factor of
- production in the.21st century.

Report _

. ‘The report, prepared for The Coali-
tion for Education Reform, a bi-par-
tisan coalition formed from various
employer groups and trade ‘unions,
said the “revolution” that caused by.
implementing its 14 strategiés would
aim to dlupheate the Irish ee s

SUCCESS.

The Coalition report called for ~.
schools to extend their hours after
school time, so children were given
extra tuition, apprenticeship pro-.”

grammes and extracurricular activi-
ties.

It urged that the Summer School’ :

programme, to. help remedial learn-
ing, be made mandatory and students
who failed to pass be made to epee
grades. .

Ireland began its investment in its

‘workforce, through education in the

1960s; and in 1983 the Irish Develop-

ment ‘Agency was able to change. the -
focus of its marketing campaign to.
‘international businesses to emphasise



its poaele: as opposéd to” tax. and
:, Investment incentives.

Dubbed»

By 1996, Iréland had been dubbed:

as Europe’s shining light...... its: Emer- _
_ald Ti iger by the Ecorfomist magazine,
", and thé Coalition report. said: “All

Bahamians should work: for the day
when entrepreneurs‘ see the ‘unques-"~
tioned virtues ofits people and-invest
in the Bahamas.

“However, getting there. will require
an unprecedented national awareness

- and political will.”

The Tribune reported on on. Sataday





“how the report revealed. that students
‘from public-high schools in New Prov-
_ idence who sat BGCSE exams in sum-

” mer 2004 achieved an average grade

of. ‘F+’, a “truly. disturbing” perfor-
mance: :

It exposed how future generations
of Bahamians are being left behind,
many. Jacking even the basic reading,
_ writing and arithmetic skilis, let alone
- Computer and IT knowledge, to make
_ themselves and. this nation’s econo-
“my competitive in an age Where trade
"barriers: have come down. They gen-

“ ” SEE page 4B

Only 12.5% of
Bahamian ‘students

meeting formal college

baie) dial



a By NEIL HARTNELL:
~ Tribune Business Editor:

- THERE isa “severe disconnect?” hetweeti the general itblig:
and. education.system, on one’side, and the Bahamian tourism ~
industry on the other, a hard-hitting réport reveals, with this
fation generating a “serious lack of graduates prepared to enter

college”.
A report prepared for. The

Nassau airport ' ‘not resolved’ to ministry’ S liking

i. By NEIL HARTNELL -
Tribune. Business Editor

' THE Ministry of ‘Tourism has ben

‘unable “to resolve to our satisfaction” the.
_concerns it has with Nassau International , °
Airport (NIA), a:senior official told The

Tribune, with the level of visitor complaints

. showing it is still negatively impacting
tourist perceptions and eee of the
’. Bahamas. ‘

Ellison ‘Tommy’, Thompson, ‘the Min-
istry’s deputy director-general, confirmed

in an interview that the airport was still

-“the one area where we get the most com:

plaints”, adding-that-it was “absolutely
vital” for this nation’s tourism industry

«The airport is a. concern to us xi we Ve.

‘not resolved it to our satisfaction yeh ” Mr

* Thompson said. .
“The Nassau airport is the’one area |
where we get the most com laints, ‘so the: :

quicker we get it resolved, the better. It’s ©
the last impression; the last experiénce the

. visitor has, so if weé’re able to:make it bet-
ter, it-will improve the visitor’ s perception ee
“of me destination.”

- Complaints _

Amon the biggest causes of-visitor com-
plaints about NIA have been its cleanli-

‘ness, the state of the facility itself, and -
large bottlenecks i in going through US see

clearance,

hopes for turning the NIA situation around
on signing a management contract that
‘would allow a private operator to: take
over the: airport’ Ss operations and. trans-
form it into. a world-class facility.

_The Govyernineént announced Tate last
"year that YVRAS, the subsidiary. of Van-

~ -couver Airport Services, had been selected

‘as the preferred bidder on the NIA man-
_ agement contract.‘However, no agreement
. has been signed yet..

“Mr Thompson told The Tibi that he
had been out of office for several weeks
and so was not fully briefed on the status of
talks with YVRAS, but added: “As far as
Iknow, it hasn’ t been signed as yet. I think

Coalition for Education Reform,

SEE pate 7B |

Chamber helps in India
trade mission plans :

@ By NEIL aH

Tribune Business Editor -

THE Ministry ae Perign
Affairs is putting together a~.

three-week*trade and diplo-

matic mission to India that is -

scheduled to take place at: the

end of January/beginning of. .
February 2006, with the -

Bahamian private sector for-
mally involved in the trip’ s
planning for the “first time”. _

-Philip Simon,: the Bahamas

Chamber of Commerce’s exec-.. _
utive director, said their coun- ~

terparts from India had
requested the Chamber’s inclu-

sion at ‘ ‘every. level”, realising’
that the private sector had-to, °
work hand-in- pe with! ‘the.

SEE page 6B





@ TANYA ner

Engineers Board to be.
appointed ‘ ‘very shortly’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL «=
Tribune Business. Editor:

MEMBERS * of
Bahamas’ first Professional

Engineers Boatd will ‘receive .

their letters of. appointment
“very shortly”
public works and utilities ‘has
revealed, énabling-the Engi-
neers Act to be fully imple-
mented and enforced.

Addressing the Bahamas ~
Society of Engineers’ Officers
Installation and Awards Cere- ~

mony, Mr Roberts said: “May I
emphasise that the appoint-
ment of this Board signals a

tte:

, the minister of--

major milestone i in the devel-
opment. of; and the building of, .
"ational capacity in. local pro-

fessional engineers in this coun-

try?

The Board’s appointment

will effectively enable the’. -
’ Bahamian engineering profes-
- sion to self-regulate itself, and.
“weed-out any: “bad apples...

The Board’s first members are
Melanie Roach,,Paul Hanna,

Barret Russell, Howard Rak- .*
ming; Sonia Brown, Michelle

Gomez and Ray McKenzie.

SEE page SB.

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

# 56 Madeira Street, Palmdale
P.O. Box SS-6270. Nassau, Bahamas



242 328.3043

and wider economy that the. situation: be
‘rectified. +: : .

1

‘The Govetitinent has- been pinning its”

SEE p page 2B

reiahals wc OF OPPORTUNII
with managed EDUCATION INV.

iavent

e-mail

b infoemiccone bs |



ie BAS 4 =)

St a

Offering the latest technology for todays. _
. business, with the experience:and know-how

to make it all worn seamiesly together.

Web Site: WWW. vimicronet, bs

sattwai Poem | a 0





PAGE 2B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005

BUSINESS.

THE TRIBUNE



}
'
}

Stock Market

FINDEX 435.63 YTD 1.321%

_BISX | CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML $0.73 $- 0 -33.64%
BAB $1.10 $. 0 14.58%

BBL $0.80 $: 0 -5.88%

BOB $6.90 $: 3840 20.00%

| BPF $10.25 $- 0 28.13%
BSL $12.75 $- 0 -1.92%
BWL $1.27 $- 0 -29.44%

CAB $9.60 $. 900 35.21%

CBL $9.10 $- 98 28.17%
CHL $1.64 $- 1346 -25.45%

| CIB $10.05 $- 100 34.18%

| DHS $2.17 $- 0 44.67%

FAM $6.05 $1.70 5000 52.78%

FCC $1.15 $- 0 42.21%

| FCL $10.00 $- 0 25.00%

FIN $10.90 $ - 2100 12.37%
ICD $9.95 $-0.20 1500 0.61%

| ISI $8.75 $: 0 6.45%

“KZLB $6.75 $0.17 0 11.39%
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%

| DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:

j

e Benchmark (Bahamas) (BBL) has declared a dividend of
$0.01 payable on December 15, 2005, to all common share-
holders as at record date November 30, 2005.

e FamGuard Company (FAM) has declared a dividend of |

$0.06 payable on December 14, 2005, to all common share-
holders as at record date December 9, 2005.

¢ Freeport Oil Holdings (FCL) has declared an extraordi-
nary dividend of $0.06 payable on December 14, 2005, to all
common shareholders as at record date November 30, 2005.

¢ Commonwealth Bank (CBL) has declared a dividend of

_ $0.08 payable on December 31, 2005, to all common share-

| holders as at record date December 15, 2005.

: ¢ Consolidated Water Company (CWCO) has declared a div-

4

‘| idend of $0.012 per BDR payable on February 7, 2006, to all
common shareholders as at record date December 31, 2005. -



onl Bank
of Canada’

Financing up to 72 monins
ith 18 per cent dawn





s&.

P| | ~~

FIDELITY MARKET WRAP



@ By Fidelity Capital
Markets

t was a quiet trading

week in the Bahamian

market. Investors

seemed to direct their

attention at the
upcoming holidays and less on
the market as only 14,884
shares changed hands. For the
week, the market saw eight out
of its 19 listed stocks trade, of
which one advanced, one
declined and six remained
unchanged.

‘The volume leader and big
advancer for the week was
FamGuard Company (FAM),
with 5,000 shares changing
hands and accounting for 34
per cent of the total shares
traded. FAM's share price rose
by an astonishing $1.70 or 39.18
per cent to close the week at its
new 52-week high of $6.05.

The leap in FAM's share
price was driven by investor
reaction to its upcoming Ten-
der Offer, in which existing
shareholders will be able to sell
back their shares to FamGuard
at $6.20. On the down side,
ICD Utilities (ICD) lost $0.20
to end the week at $9.95.

COMPANY NEWS

Freeport Oil Holdings

Company (FCL) -

FOR the quarter ending
October 31, 2005, FCL posted
net income of $1.9 million, rep-
resenting an increase of
$328,000 or 21 per cent% over
the same period last year.

Total revenues grew by $7.2
million or 40.9 per cent to total
$24.8 million, while costs'and
expenses increased by $6.9 mil-
lion or 43.3 per cent to total
$22.9 million.

International
Markets

FOREX Rates

Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold

Weekly

1.1570
1.7550
1.1811

% Change
-0.38

1.27
0.81

% Change

0.12
4.28

Weekly

$59.39
$538.10

International Stock Market Indexes:

Weekly % Change

-0.91
-0.45
-0.73
--0.11

10,778.58
1,259.37
2,256.73
15,404.05



NASSAU MOTOR CO

Shirley Street © 328-3908
Fax: 323-7272 ¢ info@nassaumotor.com



during the rants = December



www.chevroletbahamas.com

Year-over-year operating
income increased by $268,000
to total $1.8 million. Earnings
per share was up $0.04 to total
$0.22 as at October 31, 2005.
Return on shareholders equity
stood at 8.78 per cent com-
pared to 8.47 per cent for the
equivalent period last year.

In related news, at its Extra-
ordinary meeting held on
December 7, 2005, FCL's
shareholders approved resolu-
tions to increase the company's
share capital from $100,000 to
$1 million, with the creation of
60 million preference shares
and 30 million ordinary shares,
both with $0.01 par
value. Additionally, the
approval for a $25 million Pref-
erence share offering was
granted.

Colina Holdings (CHL) -

For the 2005 third quarter,
CHL posted net income of
$551,000, which represents a
decline of $518,000 or 48 per

cent from the same period last.

year. Only $440,000 is attrib-
utable to the shareholders of
CHL.

Total revenue increased by
$18.6 million or 88 per cent to

’ total $39.7 million, while bene-

each customer will
entary coupon.

fits and expenses also grew by
$19 million or 96 per cent to
total $39.1 million. As at Sep-
tember 30, 2005, total assets:
stood at $398 million, com~
pared to $256 million for the
equivalent period last year.

Investors Tip of the week —

Tips for a Debt-free
Christmas

* Plan Ahead — Work out
how much you can realistically
afford before you start spend;
ing.

* Put aside a little every
week in an interest bearing
Christmas Savings Account.

* Set a limit on how much
you are going to spend on each
person and stick to the budget.

* Make a ‘no present” pact,
with close friends and adult
family members. is

* Try to shop with cash —
leave the credit cards at home.

* Shop around — you might
find it cheaper elsewhere. .:

* Finally, don’t ignore your
regular monthly bills. These
priority bills, such as electricity,
mortgage/rent, telephone,
should be kept current even
during this holiday period.”





Nassau airport —
‘not resolved’ to

FROM page 1B

they were very close.”

He said of the need to get
NIA right: “It’s absolutely vital.
Nassau has the majority of the
tourism product so it has the
ability to affect the entire
nation.

“Tt’s so important to have the
facility properly managed and
equipped to meet the require-
ments and. demands of all agen-

_ cies.”

The Government announced
late last year that YVRAS, the
subsidiary of Vancouver Air-
port Services, had been select-
ed as the preferred bidder on
the NIA management contract.

Talks between YVR and the
Government have dragged on
for the best part of a year, and
The Tribune understands that
they have not been going well,
with the Canadian group at one
stage threatening to pull out
entirely. However, they are still
at the table.

In the end, the Government
is likely to enter into a man-
agement contract that will be
for a term of 15 to 25 years. It is
negotiating a Build/Oper-
ate/Transfer (BOT) agreement
for Nassau International Air-
port's long-term development.

Under the proposed BOT
arrangement, the Airport
Authority would continue to

INSIGHT

Pre a

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays





ministry's liking

own Nassau International Air-
port. A management company
such as YVR would operate
and develop the facility. for
between 20-30 year, upgrading
it before transferring:it-back:to
the Airport Authority. The. lat-
ter would also receive fee pay-
ments from YVR forthe lifé-
time of the agreement. :

As part of the much-needed
upgrade to Nassau Interna-
tional Airport, the Govern-
ment is looking for a new $200-
250 million terminal to be con-
structed, but YVR is no
stranger to either that or the
BOT arrangement in the
Caribbean.

It already has a 30-year cor:

tract, as part of a consortium,

to manage and develop Sang?
ster International Airport ir
Montego Bay, Jamaica. As part
of the arrangement it will
expand the existing terminal
facility to a capacity of six mil-
lion passengers, requiring am
investment of about $200 mil-~
lion over the contract's lifes:
pan

Through YVRAS subsidiary}
YVR operates 14 airports im
five different countries, includ
ing Providenciales Interna
tional Airport in Turks &
Caicos, where it has a 15-year
contract to manage the termi;
nal, Santiago in Chile and six
Dominican Republic Airports!

An increase in the number
of US Customs and Border
Patrol Officers at NIA, plug
new and expanded security
measures, are being looked at
to ease congestion and bottle:
necks in pre-clearance. j

Meanwhile, Mr Thompson
said the Bahamas was on target
to meet the January 1, 2006,
deadline for installing US- -man:
dated baggage security screen:
ing machines, something that
is needed to safeguard pre:
clearance status.

He added: “My anderstana!
ing is that we’ll be able to meet
those deadlines. We’re well on
the way to hitting them.”

receive a

’'m lovin’ it



THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 3B

Chinese tourism
approvals to come
‘“n next 3-4 months’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ahamian tourism

operators should

have the neces-

sary approvals

from the author-

ities in Beijing “within the next

three to four months” that will

allow them to begin receiving
Chinese tourists.

Ellison ‘Tommy’ Thompson,

the Ministry of Tourism’s

deputy director-general, told

the Caribbean Media
Exchange (Cmex) conference
that although the Bahamas as a
nation had received ‘Approved
Destination’ status from Chi-
na in February 2005, Bahamian
tourism operators still needed
to be approved by the China
National Tourism Authority.

Number

“There are a number of
approvals that are necessary.
Our local operators need to be

approved by the China Nation-
al Tourism Authority,” Mr

‘Thompson said.

“The Bahamas should have
those approvals within the next
three to four months.”

He added that a team from
the Ministry of Tourism, head-
ed by director-general Vernice
Walkine, had visited China in
July to prepare the ground,

meeting with media organisa- °

tions, tourism operators and
airlines.
But before the Bahamas

TRUST MANAGER POSITION

Our client, a trust company, is seeking applications for a Trust Manager.

JOB OBJECTIVE:

Employment Opportunity

Financial Institution is seeking an

Administrative Assistant /
Receptionist

Requirements:

Strong Communication (Verbal & Written),
Time Management and Interpersonal
Skills

Perform reception duties in an efficient,
professional and courteous manner
Ability to multi-task and perform clerical
tasks as assigned | |
Knowledge of Microsoft Office 2003
Knowledge of Basic Accounting Skills and
the use of Account Software a plus

could think about a major
influx of Chinese visitors, Mr
Thompson said there was still
much work to do. This included
having Chines-speaking tour
guides in place, an adequate
number of Chinese restaurants,
which was “very important”,
good shopping destinations,
and signs and menus that were
in Chinese.

“We also have the challenge
of visas,” Mr Thompson added.
The British Embassy in Beijing
currently dealt with visas as the
Bahamas had no diplomatic
mission yet, and there were
also concerns that some Chi-
nese visitors “may not be legit-
imate”.

Pointed

Mr Thompson pointed to the
experience of Australian
tourism officials, who had seen
a whole busload of Chinese
tourists disappear during a bus
ride from Sydney to Mel-
bourne.

He added: “That is a concern
for the Bahamas, being on the
doorstep of the US. We have to
make sure they are legitimate
visitors.”

One way of doing this, he
added, was to do background
checks with US, UK and Cana-
dian visa applications.

Mr Thompson said: “We
don’t expect China to be
turned on overnight. This is a
push over several years before
we get significant numbers.”

-Likening it to the “march of
a thousand miles”, he added
that the Bahamas had “taken
the first step”.

Please fax resumes to:
326-7336 .
or mail to
P.O. Box SS-19051

Employment Opportunities

MANAGER
Previous food & beverage or franchise managerial
experience required.

GAMES SUPERVISOR
Minimum 1-year.supervisory experience and ability to
trouble shoot electronic equipment.

CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVES
Previous customer service experience is a plus.

Interested persons must be able to work shifts between
the hours of 9am & 11pm and available on weekends
and holidays.

Interested persons should submit a resume with

passport photo to Mr. Pretzels at The Mall at
Marathon.



We are doing it again, just in time for Christmas!

DOUBLE YOUR DOLLARS

~ The Trust Manager will have responsibility for a small portfolio of complex trust clients
and will provide trust advice to trust officers/administrators. :

with the $700.00 Deposit for loan of $1,400.00

REQUIREMENTS:

REQUIREMENTS & PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

Candidates should meet the following criteria:

ACIB &/or STEP Qualifications om.

Bachelor’s Degree or higher in a related discipline from an accredited University
Minimum of five years experience in a bank and trust environment, preferably
at a management level with significant exposure to operations

Exposure to diverse risk management

Experience in managing complex trusts and aneicniie fiduciary standards
Strong technical and managerial skills

Proficient i in the use of the Microsoft range of applications

Expertise in current banking & trust legislation and regulations

Excellent written and oral skills

Excellent organizational, time management and communication skills

Team Player with the ability to add value and strength to the team and team goals
Honest, hardworking and ability to meet deadlines

Bahamian status required

New Members

Existing M embers

¢ Employment Letter ¢ Employment Letter
¢ Current Salary Slip * Current Salary Slip
¢ Photo I.D. (Passport or Drivers Licence)
¢ National Insurance Card
¢ Confirmation of address:

(present one of the following:

utility bill, voters card or credit card bill)
e Entrance Fee $8.00

VISIT ANY OF OUR BRANCHES

Accepting Loan Applications:
9:30 am to 4:00 pm
Check collection:

2:00 pm to 5:00 pm

The position offers an attractive salary and benefits package, reflecting the successful &

applicant’s experience and qualifications, including a performance bonus, pension,
medical, dental & life insurance coverage.

Qualified individuals should submit complete resumés including references before
December 21, 2005 to:

Mark E. Munnings
Partner
Deloitte & Touche
P. O. Box N-7120
Nassau, Bahamas
or
Email:mmunnings @ deloitte.com.bs

Deloitte.

East Street and Independence Drive, (Nassau) * Telephone (242) 323- 4495/6 |
Seventeen Shopping Center, (Freeport) ¢ TelephoneL (242) 351-6185/9
B & L Plaza, (Abaco) Telephone: (242) 367-3612

Offer good December Sth to December 31st, 2005
SOME RESTRICTIONS MAY APPLY!





PAGE 4B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005

Education ‘revolution’ ma

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE...





have tourism GDP impact

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SOLDREN CAPITAL LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business Companies
Act. 2000, SOLDREN CAPITAL LTD. is in dissolution
as of December 9, 2005.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A

Regent Street, P.O. Box -1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR





yPricing Information As Of:

Symbol
Abaco Markets
* Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Kerzner International BDRs

Y!
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)



Bahamas Supermarkets

Fund Name
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
Colina MS! Preferred Fund

|} BISX ALL SHARE INDE X - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
B S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

# S2wk-Lo.’
g Previous Close

- Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
- Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

W Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

H Daily Vol.

Change - Change in closing price from day to day
- Number of‘total shares traded today

H DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
i Rie - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings



ema

OR

9 GSES SS EN SEM SC



- AS AT AUG. 10, 2005/ ***" -




AS AT OCT. 31, 2005

frO FRADE. CAL SOE



OPERATIONS ENGINEER
ROLE: |

Colina

Financial Advisors Ltd.

FROM page 1B

_ erally lack the basic education

to get a job and make them-
selves attractive to employers.
Drawing on real life anec-
dotes, the report recorded: “A
recent high school graduate in
a beginning class at the
Bahamas Vocational and Tech-
nical Institute answered ‘22’ to
the question ‘What does 2
times 2 equal?’ The next ques-
tion: ‘What does 7 times 7
equal?’ was answered ‘14’.”
Putting the Irish example
into a Caribbean context, the
Coalition Report drew in a 300-
page World Bank study, pub-
lished in April, entitled
Caribbean Development in the
21st Century. Although the
Bahamas was not mentioned
in the study, it identified Bar-
bados as the Caribbean’s best
performer, maintaining educa-
tion quality. and expanding

Previous Close Today's Close.

=) FIDELITY

enrollment to add 1.9 years of
schooling between 1980 and
2000.

However, the Coalition
report pointed: out that Barba-
dos was able to only maintain




force in the same timeframe -
50 per cent more than Barba-
dos.

The Coalition report said
that while the Bahamas was
not mentioned in the World

‘ All Bahamians should work for
he day when entrepreneurs see
the unquestioned virtues of its

_ People and invest in the Bahamas.
_ However, getting there will
_tequire an unprecedented national
_ awareness and political will.”

its relative position of 25th in
the world on developing skills
for knowledge-driven growth,
while South Korea added three
years of schooling to its labour





no
ee 50

AS
Last



MAR ME

* aes
103

2 eee :

“

0.810 Lyne

ae 8



KHMAAG

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask §$ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol.

- Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths,

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX< - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

SSAXXTSAASSSSSSCS{SSSSSSSSSSS

=$SO Standard Oil, S.A., Ltd. is looking for
7alented Candidates for the following position:

Achieve success and flawless execution in Terminal Operations through
managing operations personnel on a day to day basis. Responsible for
product receipt, storage and distribution and all operations related to them.

f=nsure terminal activities are carried out safely and in accordance with
—=sso’s standards and government regulations at an acceptable cost and at

—an extraordinary service euer

NECESSARY SKILLS:

- Bachelor degree in Engineering (Industrial, Electrical or Mechanical) or -

Related Fields

- 3-4 Years of experience in areas of study
- Great Interpersonal Effectiveness & Communication Skills |
- Cognitive/ Technical/ Business Knowledge: Analytical Thinking, Innovation,

Judgement

- Has Commitment to High Standards
- Result Oriented, Committed, with Drive & Perseverance

- Exercises Influence: Demonstrates Self Confidence and Personal Impact

- Demonstrates Leadership

If you fulfill the position’s requirements, please send your resume by
email to: lina.rodriguez@exxonmobil.com

_— Coalition report

Bank study, the BGCSE scores
for 2004 showed that there had

. been little improvement in aca-

demic achievement since 1993,
while the overall level of



The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in their
neighbourhoods.

funds for a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the .
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322- 1986
and share your story.

BLAIRWOOD ACADEMY

Share your news|

Perhaps you are raising ~

achievement was “unaccept-

_ able”.

In addition, it pointed out
that the link between human
capital - the quality of the
workforce’s knowledge base -
and a country’s ability to use
foreign technologies and devel-
op.its own was a key ingredient
for economic growth.

The Coalition report said
“There are two important
inferences for the Bahamas. If
Barbados, the star of the
Caribbean in the World Bank
study, was able to only maifit
tain over the last two decades
its position in the world with
respect to Human Capital, then
the Bahamas’ position in the
world declined during this peri-
od given its academic perfot-
mance. If human capital is the
critical resource in the 21st cen-
tury, then the Bahamas must
urgently pursue an education
reform programme that elimi-
nates its learning gaps.” °













Junior High School Teacher
To Start in January 2006

School is expanding, and we need a dedicated teacher
with special education experience to
teach Math and English.

Very small class size, and congenial teaching
environment.

Blaicwood! is dedicated to helping students grow to
their full potential ;

Call: 393-1303 Fax: 393-6952






NOTICE

The Partners of

Lundy & Company

Counsel & Attorneys-at-Law

are pleased to announce that effective
Monday, December 5th, 2005 the
Firm will do business under the name:

PrideRock Law Chambers >
Counsel & Attorneys-At-Law
Notary Public
PrideRock Corporate Centre
Suite 200
Bay & East Streets
P.O. Box SS-5800
Nassau, The Bahamas






















Telephone: (242) 328-0925
Facsimile: (242) 328-0892 i
Website: www.priderockchambers.com





THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 5B

_ BUSINESS.



Legal Notice

Engineers Board! =.

CONSTITUTION INVESTMENT LIMITED

to b e a O hh 4 € ad NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) CONSTITUTION INVESTMENT LIMITED is in voluntary

dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

6 9 (b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on December 9th,
: 2005 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General. é

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated Ltd. of
Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola BVI.

Dated this 12th day of December, A.D. 2005.

FROM page 1B

Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator

To enhance and build Bahamian engineering
capacity at the Ministry of Works, Mr Roberts
said his ministry was following a seven-point
strategy, which included the promotion of exist-
ing graduate engineers to positions of acting engi-
neers and senior engineers, and the promotion of
long-serving engineers to posts of deputy direc-
tors.

Mr Roberts said another goal was to recruit
staff locally to fill 40 posts at the Ministry, and the
creation of an “aggressive training programme”.

Other goals were the “standardisation of the
scarcity allowance”, and the ‘Bahamianisation’ of
the Ministry’s engineering staff.

Mr Roberts acknowledged that his Ministry
was “acutely short-staffed in the technical area”,
forcing it to hire 17 technical, non-professionally
qualified Bahamians, and 22 expatriate engi-

neers. *
Hired

The 22 engineers would be hired for two to
three years, and as part of their contracts they will
be required to transfer knowledge and skills to
-Bahamians to enable them to take over.

Mr Roberts added: “As we are painfully aware,
the continuous exodus of Bahamian engineers
from the Ministry of Works is directly related
to the more attractive remuneration packages
that they are offered in the private sector. While
on the one hand the country still benefits from
this migration to the private sector, neverthe-
less, the ministry is constantly challenged with the
need to replace such officers as is the current
situation.”

Mr Roberts added that his ministry was review-

-ing the scarcity allowance, in a bid to “standard-
ise” a system that had been graded.

' Established as an incentive programme to
attract qualified expatriates to the Ministry of
Works, while civil engineers get $15,000 per year,
and qualified mechanical and electrical engineers

receive an allowance of $3,500 per annum, archi-
tects and surveyors currently receive nothing.



SOUS CHEF

We are looking for a sous chef to supplement
the existing chef team in our kitchens. The
successful applicant must have leadership
qualities and be able to take charge of
production and service for the various
kitchens on property. A minimum of ten
(10) years experience in a high quality hotel
is essential with European and North
American experience.

Interested persons should fax resumes to
#362-6245 to the attention of:

THE DIRECTOR OF CUISINE
LYFORD CAY CLUB
LYFORD CAY DRIVE
NASSAU, BAHAMAS



SRST

VACANCY NOTICE | Toe UNDEVELOPED PROPERTY MORTGAGE

Senior Internal Auditor

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the above position. Helpi Ins you own»n.

MAIN DUTIES INCLUDE:

¢ To administer the internal auditing activity of an assigned location. ae ur dre alm

* To develop a comprehensive, practical program of audit coverage for the location.

© To accomplish the program in accordance with acceptable audit standards and stipulated
schedules.

¢ To maintain effective working relations with executive and operating management.
AUTHORITY AND RESPONSIBILITY:
“|: Under the general guidance of a Chief Internal Auditor, the Senior Internal Auditor:

° Identifies those activities subject to audit coverage, evaluates their significance, and Dreams come in
assesses the degree of risk inherent in the activity in terms of cost, schedule, and quality. all shapes and sizes.

¢ Prepares a comprehensive, long-range program of audit coverage for the assigned location. |. As the leading mortgage bank in

¢ Provides reports to executive management within the assigned location concerning The Bahamas, RBC FINCO Is
coverage and the results of the audit activity. Interprets those results to improve the audit dedicated to sharing your dreams and
program and its coverage. ; helping you achieve your financial goals.

* Establishes and monitors accomplishment of objectives intended to increase his/her Our mortgage specialists can help you
department’s ability to serve management. build your dreams from the ground up.

QUALIFICATIONS AND REQUIREMENTS:
We offer:

* Professional accounting qualification that entitles one to membership of the Bahamas te
Institute of Chartered Accountants. : Competitive interest rates

ais Meas dsintne eeareses Financing with as little as 5% down

° Minimum of two-years post qualification experience.
; / No penalty for lump sum

e Work or audit experience in a major financial institution. : payments to reduce balance

¢ Computer skills are essential. . Flexible payment terms
with optional weekly or
bi-weekly accelerated

REMUNERATION: payments

The salary for this position is $55,000.00 in the Senior Management Salary Scale (group po Up to 15 years to repay
6) $48,092 x 900 - $58,245. Excellent fringe benefits including group medical/life insurance. : Ability to develop your property

APPLICATION: t while repaying your loan -
i no restrictions!

¢ Strong supervisory, communication and analytical skills.

Application forms may be obtained from the Security Booth of the National Insurance ; :
Board’s Jumbey Village Complex. Interested persons may submit a completed application | Invest in an undeveloped piece of property today! Call or visit our friendly

form along with the necessary proof of qualifications, not later than 4:00 pm on Friday, mortgage specialists at any RBC FINCO branch. We offer FREE financial advice.
December 16, 2005 to: : Asstt elspa hp hog Sa es seh bene



THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD

Headquarters Building
Nassau, Bahamas ® Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada 12d B ei

FINCO

The Senior Manager - Human Resources www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean So RBC

â„¢ The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada





THE TRIBUNE*




PAGE 6B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005



public sector to move this

FROM page 1B

THE CLIFTON
HERITAGE
AUTHORITY

TENDER
SECURITY SERVICES

The Clifton Heritage Authority is pleased to invite
tenders from suitably qualified companies to supply
the Authority with Security Services for the following
property:

¢ THE CLIFTON HERITAGE PARK

Interested companies can collect a specification
document from the Authority’s administration building
located in the Collins House Complex, Shirley Street
and Collins Avenue, with entrance on Collins Avenue,
between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday.

Tender must be sealed in an envelope marked
“TENDER FOR SECURITY SERVICES” and
delivered for the attention of:

Dr. Keith L. Tinker
Secretary
The Clifton Heritage Authority
P.O. Box EE-15082
Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone: 325-1505

Bids should reach the ‘Authority’ s Administrative
Office by 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, December 2 Ist,
2005.

Companies submitting bids are invited to attend a bid
opening on Thursday, 22nd December 2005: at 10:00
a.m. at the Administrative Office, Shirley Street and
Collins Avenue.

The Clifton Heritage Authority reserves the right to
reject any or all tenders.

fF"
BQ
U5
“ae?”

Sheraton:

HOTELS RB RESORTS

WESTIN’

HOTELS & RESORTS

Doct CAREER Mata
LE FOR: One nee

DIRECTOR OF OPERAT Te
PTS ag |

in ee Office, ote Guest See
ts of supervisory experience and will be responsible for’:
rt and long term planning and the day to day operations.
; oi the rooms and its related areas ind bgt Cog,

ie to Ae operations of the eee nae
where: applicable, laundry and valet departments; bu g
staffing, forecasting and financial planning of the
epartments. Must posses Ryn (eyes bose nrs sont jolt experience
with at least 3 years in housekeeping management at
ese D8 higher levels of tesp; nsibility.

LAUNDRY MANAGE
Successful candidate will manager all aspects of ne
cleaning of guests and employees laundry, dry cleaning a
“linen. Must supervise, train, and’counsel staff in addition to
“managing all administrative ratte inclusive of scheduling,
forecasting, and budgetary controls. A minimum OOP (st
apes ee puree nto Alesana) hers

MOP Yetleeine will SS responsible for nae
_and executing group. pyran monito
: agreements pertaining to group’s room b
per Erateh peigel and special concessi¢

’ cr

Te of HG ALE positions WAP ee Dgtiragy Ce
AMO LLL OLED RSC LT Wg atta). 410 i
Excel and Microsoft Word computer. programs. E:

LM ee LR Le ee and resumes One

oe COseeke Ja yeu be
Director sm etrover| Resource
Wiesel Fae AtO ite TH Otte) Eilers
i « P.O. Box. F-42500 eS
ane CGrehalol BE latsNave lates |





BUSINESS

nation forward.

The Ministry had asked oy
the Chamber’s assistance in
putting a delegation together,
and it was currently develop-
ing an itinerary that would
include both accompanying the
ministerial delegation and ini-
tiating its own visits.

Tanya Wright, the Cham-
ber’s president, said of the pro-
posed India visit: “We’ve been
inundated with calls from our
members saying: ‘When’s it
going to come off? We want to
be part of it.”

She added that Bahamian

entrepreneurs had recognised.

that large emerging economies
such as India and China could
provide them with the prod-
ucts and services they required.
Similar to India, China had
through its International Trade
body also extended an invita-
tion to the whole Caribbean
mission to send trade and
diplomatic missions to Beijing.

Meanwhile, the Chamber
and its Globalisation Commit-
tee are planning to stage a
major conference on the sub-

ject in April 2006, with atten-

dees and support.coming from
the CARICOM Regional
Negotiating Machinery, region-
al Chamber of Commerce,
multinational companies, the
UK. Both the European Union
and the World Trade Organi-
sation (WTO) had been
approached for speakers and
interest.

Mr Simon said the Chamber
aimed to act as the bridge
between the private and public
sector. He added that the
Bahamas had a tremendous
comparative advantage that it
needed to exploit, lying as a
potential transhipment hub
between North and South
America, and on to Europe.

Mr Simon said: “We have a
wonderful comparative advan-
tage, and what we have to do
now is increase the compara-
tive advantages we have and
develop new ones.”

Focused

Over the past few years, the
Chamber had focused on the
“macro” issues facing the
Bahamian business community,
such as free trade agreements
and crime. Organisations such
as the Bahamas Employers
Confederation (BeCon), the
Small Business Association, the

Bahamas Real Estate Associa-'

tion, Public-Private Partnership
and Bahamas-China Friend-
ship Society were all based at
its offices and using its facili-
ties, with the Bahamian Con-
tractors Association and
Bahamas Society of Engineers

. interested in doing the same.

The Chamber was now look-
ing to become the ‘Secretari-
at” for private sector organisa-
tions, and Mr Simon said its
success could be seen in the
fact that its fully paid-up mem-

LEGAL NOTICE

_N OTICE

SABACO INVESTMENT ADVISORS LIMITED |

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act, 2000 notice -
is hereby given that SABACO INVESTMENT
ADVISORS LIMITED has been dissolved and struck
off the Register of Companies as of the 20th day of

September 2005.

Dean & Associates
| Professional Insurance
| Consultants Company Limited

_ Wishes to advise
| the general public and
i their valued clients that they
| WILL BE |
RELOCATING

to

mye) e Plaza,
eres Street
co of the FNM Headquarters)
on

ae 1A RS
| - Numbers

ESLe

394-7289.

We look forward to serving
you from our new location.

plans

bers had increased in two-and-
a-half years from 196 to more
than 400.

“We hope we can double it
again. But instead of doubling
it in two-and-half years, dou-
ble it in one year,” Mr Simon
said of the membership.

Mrs Wright added: “The
Chamber is now back to the
fore. It is now the true gate-
way for the private sector’s
views to be managed through.
It has reassumed its true role as
the leading private sector
organisation, but that’s not to
diminish the worth of those
other private sector organisa-
tions.”

The Chamber of Commerce
was backing the growth of
chamber bodies in the Family
Islands, and was now looking
to bring them closer together
for improved collaboration.

Two-and-a-half years ago,
only Grand Bahama and Aba-
co had their own Chambers of
Commerce, but Mr Simon said
now that such bodies existed
on Exuma, and in north, cen-
tral and south Andros. Inter-
est had also been expressed in
creating Chamber-type organ-
isations in Eleuthera, as well
as Long Island.

Mr Simon
Caribbean nations saw the
Bahamian private. sector’s
involvement in regional affairs
as “critical”, regardless of
whether there was a Caribbean
Single.Market & Economy

said other







(CSME) or not.

The likes of the EU, Indja,
and China often only dealt with
regional trade blocs such as,
CARICOM, and Mr Simoni
said: “We have to be involved.”

For the 2006 first quarter, Mr,.
Simon said the Chamber would
again be organising the second,
annual New Business Devel;;
opment and Franchise Show;.
which had led to the franchise ,
deal signed last year between.
Bahamian firm Sun-Tee and.
EmbroidMe. whys

The meeting of the,
Caribbean Association of,
Industry and Commerce’s
(CAIC) vice-presidents’ Board,
of Directors will be held in the;,
Bahamas on March 31, with,
the meeting of the regional.
Chambers of Commerce halt
here the day after, April 1.

Addition —

In addition, the Chamber iis,.
also looking to re- -establish,
relationships with the Coral,
Gable and South Florida.
Chambers of Commerce, and
with the Ministry of Trade and,
Industry.

The Ministry of Financial
Services and Investments has
already pledged to involve. the,
Chamber “much more” with,
the investment projects before,
it, and was looking to formalise.
its role.in giving input on how
licences were distributed.

‘LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
SHREW IN VESTMEN TS LTD.

International Business Companies Act
(No. 45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section j pe
138 (4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of .; f
2000), SHREW INVESTMENTS LTD. is in dissolution. Irene’
Jornod, is the Liquidator and can be contacted at 5, Place du
Molard, 1204 Geneva, Switzerland. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their
names, addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator before the 31st day of December, 2005.

Signed: Irene Jornod
Liquidator

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COMPUTER CITY
The Harbour Bay Shopping Plaza
393-2164





THE TRIBUNE

UTS) It tots)

MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 7B



Only 12.5% of Bahamian ‘students meeting

%

FROM page 1B

a group of business organisa-
tions and trade unions, found
that out of the 5,471 students
who sat BGCSE exams in sum-
mér 2004, only 12.5 per cent or
718 gained a minimum ‘C’
grade average in five subjects -
thé: formal minimum require-
ment for entering higher edu-
cation.

‘Many colleges, though, had
‘open enrollment plans’ where
that requirement was waived.
However, the Coalition report
found a 2002 Ministry of Edu-
cation survey showed that 940
sttidents who graduated high
school that year went on to col-
lege in the Bahamas and
abroad.

“The report said: “This is 34.8
per cent of all responders to
the survey. College entry rates
inthe US are reported in one
survey to be 76.5 per cent -
slightly more than two times
the Bahamian level.”

The disconnect between the
nation’s leading industry,
tourism, and Bahamian society
atid the education system, the
réport said, was shown by two
anecdotes.

~While there were 110 juniors
and seniors enrolled in the
hotel management degree
course at the University of
West Indies (UWI) Tourism

Training Centre, a course con- .

sidered equivalent to the four-
yéar degree at Cornell Univer-
sity, just three were Bahami-
ans.

‘And while 100 graduates

entered the Bahamas Hotel
Training College in 1994, a
course considered by some US
colleges as the equivalent to a
US two-year associate degree
programme, the college had
been taken over by the College
of the Bahamas on August 1,
2000.

Since then, the number of
students entering the pro-
gramme had fallen to 58 in
1999, 17 in 2000 and eight in
2002.

Reported

The Tribune reported on Sat-
urday that the Coalition report
revealed that students from
public high schools in New
Providence who sat BGCSE
exams in summer 2004
achieved an average grade of
‘F+’, which it branded a “truly
disturbing” performance.

The statistic is taken from a
confidential report prepared by
the Ministry of Education’s
Testing and Evaluation Unit,
which also found that the
‘Mean Grade’ achieved by stu-
dents from New Providence
private high schools in the 2004
BGCSE exams was just ‘D+’.

The Ministry of Education
report showed that, out of
4,367 students who sat the
Maths BGCSE in summer
2004, just 141 or three per cent
achieved an ‘A’ grade, with
some 14 per cent or 614 get-
ting a ‘U’ or failed grade. The
average or mean grade for
maths was an ‘BE’.

The results for English were

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
UPWARD SURGE LIMITED

_ {in Voluntary Liquidation) _

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

slightly better, with a mean or
average grade of ‘D-’, but
again, only three per cent or
130 out of the 4,281 who took
the exam achieved an ‘A’
grade.

The Coalition report added
that “a general low level of aca-
demic achievement has indi-
vidual, national and interna-
tional consequences”.

It drew on studies from
Dublin University in Ireland
and in the UK, which had con-
cluded that an adult’s level of
job-related income was heavily
dependent on their “functional
literacy”, and there was a 10
per cent earnings premium
attached to each additional
year of education.

A Hoover Institution report
in also concluded that with
higher academic achievement,
the US economy could see a
0.5 per cent increase in GDP
growth.

The Coalition report said:
“Clearly, a low level of learning
adversely affects labour pro-
ductivity, and this is one ele-
ment that contributes to higher
operating costs. In the case of
the Bahamas, high operating
costs cause a loss of competi-
tiveness as was pointed out in
the Tourism Taskforce Report
of 2003.”

In drew on the experiences

of a Bahamian executive who
interviewed all employment
candidates for his company,
leaving the office during the
interview after asking the can-
didate to write a brief para-
graph containing his name and

description of education and
work experience. “Invariably,
the applicant cannot write a
paragraph with clear sentences,
correctly arranged and with
minimal spelling errors,” the
Coalition report said........

“(The businessman] cannot
help but worry about a world
that is becoming ever more
‘knowledge driven’. Improve-
ments in productivity can come
with the adoption of new tech-
nologies that require increased
worker and managerial skills;
and survival may be possible
only by exploiting new service
industries requiring greater job
skills.”

The Coalition report exposes
how many Bahamian high
school graduates are effective-
ly unemployable, lacking the
skills to compete in a globalised
economy that has no borders.
The lack of qualified Bahami-
ans is also one factor forcing
employers to hire more expa-
triates on work permits than
they would like.

Ministry

The Ministry of Education’s’

BGCSE results for 2004 also
show that the prospects for cre-
ating the next generation of
Bahamian entrepreneurs are
relatively dim.

The 664 students who took
the BGCSE Bookkeeping
exam achieved a mean average
mark of ‘F+’. For. typewriting
and commerce, the mark was a
‘D’, while for office procedures
it was a ‘D+’. The 400 eco-

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE.

TRUE GAINFUL LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

formal college entry requirements

mark, with carpentry and join-
ery, electrical installation and
clothing construction all pro-
ducing ‘C’ or ‘C-’.

nomics candidates generated a

mean average mark of ‘E+’.
Vocational subjects returned

a slightly better mean average

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FRANCILLON PIERREVIL, MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 12TH day of DECEMBER, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.













LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
TUCANA VALLEY CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
‘Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 8th
day of December, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp.
Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



2005
No. 00971

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law and Equity Division *

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot
of land comprising 42,607 square feet being part of
Allotment Number 12 of a Subdivision known and
called “Malcolm Allotments” and situate approximately
3,420 feet South of Soldier Road and about 440 feet
East of East Street in the Southern District of the Island
of New Providence, Bahamas

| Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 8th
t day of December, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp.
Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC. —
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

POLONIUS HOLDINGS CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 8th day of
December 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.Box

} N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

LEDSTON INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
'| is in dissolution, which commenced on the 30th day of
| November 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.Box
| N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator



Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 8th day of
December 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.Box
N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

UYGAR CO. LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 8th day of

N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

COLLINGSWORTH INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

©

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on, the 30th day of November
2005. The Liquidator is Argosa carp Inc., P.O.Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator



December 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.Box .



. AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT
OF 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF
ALLISON E. DELEVEAUX

NOTICE OF PETITION

} Pursuant to an Order of The Supreme Court dated the 11th day
of October, A.D. 2005

The Petition of Allison Deleveaux of Crooked Island
one of the Islands of The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas
showeth in respect of:

ALL THAT piece or parcel of land comprising 42,607
square feet being part of Allotment Number 12 of a
Subdivision known and called “Malcolm Allotments”

’ and situate approximately 3,420 feet South of Soldier
Road and about 440 feet East of East Street in the
Southern District of New Providence, Bahamas, and
bounded on the Northwest by land property of one L.J.
Richardson and running thereon Three Hundred and
Thirty (330) feet and on the Northeast by Lot Number
Fourteen (14) of the said Malcolm Allotments and
running thereon One Hundred and Thirty-two (132)
feet and on the Southeast by land now or formerly the
property of Enid M. Fox and Keath E. Seymour and
running thereon Three Hundred and Thirty (330) feet,
and on the Southwest by a Road Reservation Ten (10)
feet wide and running thereon One Hundred and Thirty-
two (132) feet.

The Petitioner, Allison Delevaux, herein claims to be
the owner in fee simple in possession of the said piece of land
and has made application to The Supreme Court Of The
Commonwealth Of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting

i Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said piece of land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and
declared in a Certificate Of Title to be grated by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of that Act.

Copies of the Plan showing the position boundaries
shape marks and dimensions of the said piece of land may be
inspected during normal office hours at the following places:

(a) The Registry of The Supreme Court, East Street
North, Nassau, Bahamas.

(b) The Chambers of Joseph C. Lédée, Suite No. 6,
Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that any person having Dower
or right to Dower or an Adverse Claim not recognized in the
Petition shall on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days
after the final publication of these presents file at the Registry
of The Supreme Court in the City of Nassau, Bahamas, and
serve on the Petitioner or on the undersigned a Statement of
his/her Claim in the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to
be filed therewith.

| Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement
Of Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days after
the final publication of these presents shall operate as a bar to
such claim.

JOSEPH C. LEDEE, ESQ.
Chambers

Suite No. 6, Grosvenor Close
Shirley Street

Nassau, Bahamas.

Attorney for the Petitioner





PAGE 8B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005 THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS
i COMICS PAGE





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PAGE 10B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005



@ BOXING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

SHERMAN ‘the Tank’
Williams can now add the
World Boxing Council’s
Caribbean Continental heavy-
weight title to his FEDE-
CARIB crown.

After being denied the

opportunity to fight for the lat-.

est title last weekend, Williams
finally got a second chance on
Saturday and he made good of
it against a different opponent.

Instead of facing Levin Castil-
lo from Ecuador, Williams was
matched against Willie Perry-
man from Jamaica and he came
out with a one-sided ten round
unanimous decision at the



the game 60-43.

@ BELOW: Junior All-Stars Shacia Major keeps possession on

-Caribs
the Jr A

BH RIGHT: COB Caribs’ Adina Knowles blocks the All-Stars’
Deandra Williams. The Caribs recovered from a slow start to win

Mohegan Sun Arena in
Uncasville, Connecticut.

The judges scored it 99-91,
99-91 and 98-92.

“A lot of people enjoyed the
fight,” said Williams, who
fought on the undercard of the
middleweight eliminating fight
that saw Ronald ‘Winky’
Wright win a unanimous deci-
sion over Sam Soliman.

“{ feel good. It’s a good
accomplishment for me,”
Williams stated. “It’s a step in
the right direction. Since signing
with my new promoters, we are
getting through a lot of the
things that we agreed to.”

Having relinquished ties with
his former manager, Henry Fos-
ter, Williams said he knew when
Jim Rider came along as his



new manager, things would get
better.

“Last night was evidence of
that and I proved that to all the
none believers and to the

world,” he insisted. “There were

a lot of nay sayers and a lot of
non believers.

“But I trained hard to get this
title. I should have won it last
weekend, but things didn’t work
out until Saturday night when
the gloves didn’t fit. I was able
to overcome all the obstacles. I
just kept the faith.”

Now that he’s claimed the
title, Wiliams said he and his
promotional team, Silver Hawk
Promotions, are pursuing the
chance for him to compete
for the British Commonwealth
title.










SHERMAN ‘THE TANK? WILLIAMS

TRIBUNE SPORTS







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» the break.




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(Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)











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» | Address





P.O. Box



| Telephone



noon

i! be on December 14 before 12:

Drawing w



MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005"

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398
‘Mail: sports@100jamz.com -



Dragons put to the
sword on debut

a BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

» THE LYFORD Dragons’ junior boys team
couldn’t handle the pressure down the stretch
against the CV Bethel Stingers. But their senior
girls gave the CC Sweeting: Cobras a tough

game. . :

‘The Dragons lost both of their games played
on Sunday at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium in
their debut in the Father Marcian Peters Invi-
tational Basketball Tournament.

. However, they madé an.impression on pals
their opponents and the fans.

Lyford Cay took a 7-0 lead into the half,
but didn’t have the legs to stay with CV Bethel
’ when they turned up the‘heat after the, break
and lost 16-10.

‘But despite losing, 21:6 to CC Sweeting,
Lyford Cay made the-Cobras work for every
point that they got with their tenacious defence.

“This was just a practice game for us because
most of thé girls are just coming from playing.
volleyball,” said CC Sweeting’s coach Darnell
Bastian of her senior girls’ team.

“But this was a rough team that we played
-against. They will make any team in the GSS-
SA think twice when they have to play against °
them.”

The Cobras are one.of the top. contenders to"
win the Government Secondary School Sports
Association (GSSSA) title. And they showed:
that as-they out-scored the Dragons in a lop-
sided affair. Ae

But Lyford Cay coach Tony Williams said
this was just a taste of what to expect from:
the Dragons as they prepare to enter the:
Bahamas Association of Independént Sec='
ondary Schools for the first time next year

““We played pretty well. I think what caiiséd '
our downfall was our defence,” he insisted.
“But we are just getting started, so I think we
will only Bet better with time.” :

| - Scoring

- Stiawerte Taylor single-handedly led she.
Cobras past the Dragons with a game high 10:
points, scoring-five in the first quarter and
another five in thé fourth. Garcia Redwood
added five.and Shanigis Sweeting chipped in
with four.

_ -Kah Britton, Julia Haniimerer and Shunda
Blyden all had two points in the loss.

_ Lyford Cay’s junior boys had a totally dif-
ferent outlook in their game against CV
Bethel. The Stingrays pulled off a 16- 10 win:
over the Dragons.: °

After getting shutout in the first half, the
Stingrays exploded for 11 points to surge‘ahead °
11-8 at the end of the thitd gnc they coasted to
victory in the fourth.

George Martin scorediggyen and Jamaal
Moxey had four in the thi quarter as CV
Bethel bounced back. Kefineth Hart addéd
; . three and L. ENON, finished with two to help,
Y ‘out. ---:

: _ Philip Stubbs and Brandon Moxey scored
' four apiece for Lyford Cay.
Coach Sam England said his Dragons’ did
n’t have. any-steam left down the stretch.
: “They just had a lot of players coming off
: . the bench,” England reflected. “Our players
are not used to playing as physical as mney
played.”

In a junior girls’ gate played, the sc
McPherson Sharks held off the CC Sweeting
Scorpions 16-14.

Keva Barry had an opportunity to tie the
‘score at the end of regulation and force over- °
time, but her jumper at the buzzer was riled
‘invalid, ~.

‘J really thought I got the shot off, but they.
said it was too late,” said Barry, who led the
Scorpions with six. “We shouldn't have had to
come down to the late shot. We just didn’t
play good at the beginning.”

_ Atthe beginning of the game, Maleshia Pet-
térson got ‘off to a fast start, scoring five of
her 10 points as the Sharks opened a 7-2 lead
that they extended to 9-4. They pushed it to 12-
8 at the half and 14-10 after the third quarter.

‘Shatyna Stuart also scored four for SC
McPherson.

“This is the first time that my girls played in ©
: any organised basketball, but because of the
i: gymvexcitement, a lot of things that we did in.
practice, we didn’t execute today,” said Sharks”
coach Chevy Simmons.

“But, for the most part, I think they will get
better as the tournament progresses. | think if
we had gone into overtime, it would have been .
good to see what happened. I know we would
have been able to pull it off.”



f@ BASKETBALL é
By KELSIE JOHNSON--
Junior Sports Reporter



THE. COB Caribs turned up the heat in
the second half of play on Saturday night to -
trounce the Jr All-Stars.

After a slow start in the’first-half, in the
New Providence Women’s Basketball Asso-.
ciation (NPWBA) opening game, the Caribs .
adjusted to defeat the All-Stars 60-43-

But the win didn’t come that easy for the -

Caribs. Late in the fourth quarter, the Alls,”
Stars capitalised on the mistakés made by.
the Caribs second string team. #

The All-Stars were on a 12:3 run befare,”

the Caribs head coach Dr Linda Davis: .
called a time-out. 7

Still having control of the board, the Al
Stars made a fast break to the basket, but. -
the fresh legs of Kavionne Newbold, Caribs 7’
power forward, frightened. Shadia’ Major,

causing hier to miss ‘the baseline lay-up.

Admitting that the junior team still has a.
lot of things to work out to improve their.
game. head coach of thé team Sharelle Cash.

said that her teatn’s biggest: downfall is the -
size of their opponents each night... "=

She said: “I don’t want anyone to sleep ony. °
this team. this is a good team. All the girls” ,
have the fundamentals they. need to win .
big games, but the fundamentals dren’t the
things that are hurting the team. 2 :

“The team is scared, basically that’s ig
Every night they come to the game and
they are afraid of playing’ some: of the older
play ers.

~They come. to me and say coach, you
see how big these girls are-who we are going
to plav, the intimidation factor is valready |
there. : :

“By the team they realise that” they. ca.
play with these teams it is a’ little too. late,”
the game is already far gone... * @

“But I will remind éveryone.in this: league: -
that this junior team will improve and that’
they will win more games. Tonight’s late
surge is a great example of their skills.” >

Evenly |

The All-Stars were evenly cut with. the
Caribs in the first quarter. By the end‘of this ..
quarter the team was down by four points .
and down by one point by the end of the- : *
first half, *

They had produced enough points to.
keep them close in the game, as‘a team they |
shot 5 5-for-29 trom the field in the first-half
and 3-for-8 from the free throw line, while’
all three attempts from behind the arch

failed. :

For the Caribs, the slow game. give the:
second string playing time also allowing
coach Davis to experiment with, the differ
ent players.

But the experimental process was forced’.
to shut down when the All ‘Stars defence.
picked.up. =

Besides the run the. team made in- the
fourth quarter, the All-Stars had now taken’
control of the boards. :

Offensively the team were getting much
needed second and third shot attempts, on
the defensive end they were out JUMPING
and hustling the Caribs.

The team snatched down 10 Ofte. ng
boards, six of which came in the opening. :
minutes of the fourth. Defensively they
were able to get 24 rebounds.’ s

Stepping up big for the team was Major,
who scored 15 points, six rebounds and’one.
assist and steal. Chipping in was Deandra~
Williams with 12 points, éight rebounds,
one block and three steals.

For the Caribs. starting point guard Chris~
tine. Sinclair returned to “the game to ensure
the win, finishing up with 17 points, seven °
rebounds. and’a steal.

Alyse Dean also helped the cause with 13

points, six rebounds, two steals and, \
assists. The tournament heats up today when the

Play action in the league will continue: : Family Island teams arrive. The action starts at
on Tuesday at the DW Davis gym with two as ‘/ COB Caribs’ Christine Sinclair looks for a a as Keva Davy of the Junior All Stars plays some tight defence. : 10am.
games on schedule. ~ ; pee Salen _ Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune ea). aS







‘








me os Sweet Onion
“aac fo Giitken teriyaki







The stories behind the news



‘Let’



en

«

or visa rac

s clean up t





ecret meetings In a car
park at Norfolk House, the
%, Bahamas visa office in
fm) Nassau, are far more than
Ped” they appear to be.,

‘On the face of it, two people shake
hands, chat briefly, then say their
farewells. But it’s what passes between
them that ought to be of concern to
the public at large.

Packets containing dozens, and
probably scores, of stamped passports
are handed to a man whose human
trafficking exploits earn him hundreds
of thousands of dollars a year.

“Fhe person handing over. the
pr ocessed documents is a ‘government
employee whose share of the spoils
makes these clandestine dealings very
worthwhile indeed.

Informed sources who claim to have
seen these transactions take place
have been talking to INSIGHT fol-
lowing disturbing disclosures at the
recent FNM rally about a large-scale
visa racket. 4

if true, the information is a stag-
gering indictment of government’s
failure to properly monitor the visa
issuing procedure at Norfolk House.
And it points to organised corruption
at the heart of the visa processing
operation.

“The truth is, there are some dis-



honest people in the government ser- §

vice who are selling our birthright,”
INSIGHT was told.

“They are stamping dozens and
probably hundreds of passports on an
ongoing basis for under-the-table pay-
ments. ‘And these, in turn, are allowing
a flow of immigrants int@ our country
— people who merge into the commu-
nity and never go home again,”

The sources are now calling for a
full independent inquiry into the
alleged racket, saying something rad-
ical needs to be done to bring the visa
scam to an end.

“In these days when security is such
a major issue, hundreds of Haitians
and Chinese are coming into our
country with no checks at all,” they
said.

“What these people are doing is dri-
ving the Bahamas to ruination. There
is a clique at work who are liaising
with human traffickers to set up a pro-
cedure by which Haitians and Chi-
nese can get into the Bahamas by pay-
ing thousands of dollars for visas
which often go unrecorded.”

The disclosures follow last month’s
alarming allegations by former Attor-
ney General Carl Bethel, who said
visas issued to Haitians had jumped
from 102 in 2002 to more than 2,200 in
2004 - a 20-fold increase per annum.
Mr Bethel also said visas issued to
Chinese nationals had quadrupled in
the same period.

Foreign Affairs Minister Fred
Mitchell. whose portfolio covers the
visa department, later denied Mr
Bethel’s claims of “direct political
involvement at the highest level” and

aa i OY

A MAJOR visa scam is allowing hundreds of Haitians and
Chinese to enter the Bahamas unchecked, and some well-
placed officials are earning a fortune in pay-offs for their
part in the scandal, according to informed sources who
oS what they claim is solid inside information.

@ HAITIANS take a risky voyage from northern Haiti in search of a new life in the Bahamas.

said a police inquiry and an internal
review were underway.

But the sources who approached
INSIGHT last week stressed that
internal investigations are not enough.
There had to be a proper indepen-
dentiinquiry because the official num-
bers - disturbing as they were - told
only a small part of the story. Of
greater concern, they said, were the
numbers of unrecorded visas being
issued,

Meanwhile, they revealed details of
a continuing scam allegedly involving

up to six traffickers who arrange.

smuggling operations from Haiti and
Cuba, enabling hundreds of illegal
immigrants to filter into the Bahamas
with no checks of any kind.

One of the six specialises in Chi-
nese immigrants. These are believed
to stem from an illicit trafficking oper-
ation in Cuba.

The rest deal with Haitians, who
are loaded on to sloops at Port-de-
Paix in northern Haiti for-voyages to a
new life in Nassau.

INSIGHT reports. ‘

a |

One trafficker is thought to be sell-
ing visas to desperate Haitians at
between $1,800 and $3,000 a time. For
this, he also organises sloop trips -

‘one vessel can make up to 40 such

passages per year - and arranges
“receptions” by fellow Haitians when
the immigrants dock at Arawak Cay.

The operation ensures that immi-

‘grants achieve ‘a smooth entry into

the country, sometimes with the com-
plicity of corrupt, Defence Force offi-
cers. |

“Everything: we say is! true,” said

the sources, “the government is play-
ing games. Three-month visas are
being issued all the time - some for
boat passengers, some for air passen-
gers. }

“Monday, Tuesday and Friday are
visa days, and this is when these trans-
actions take place. One guy goes into
the car park at Norfolk House to col-
lect his passports. He drops them off
in the morning and collects them, ful-
ly stamped, in the afternoon.

“Then he eee them back to Haiti



(FILE photo)

and returns them to their owners for a
. sum of money. It is a highly lucrative

racket netting him probably hundreds
of thousands a year.

“However, this operation would not
be possible without the active co-oper-
ation of some well-placed officials.
Now there needs to be a full-scale
independent inquiry.”

Under the scheme, Haitian women
aré being charged more for visas than

men. This is because of their potential

to produce Bahamian-born babies.
“The thinking is that anyone with the
capacity to produce more ‘Bahami-

ans’ ought to pay more for their pas- _

sage,” said one source.

“AIl this is being eased along by
some corrupt Defence Force officers.
Boat skippers are given money at the
start of their journey in Haiti to pay
off officers in Nassau.

“Lf this money is handed over, you
wil not hear about the sloop’s arrival.
If, for some reason, the money is not
handed over, the officers make arrests
and it gets into the newspapers.”

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Some time ago, he said, a boat skip-
per refused to pass on the “pay off”
cash, preferring to hang on to it him-
self. As a result, he and everyone on
board his boat were taken into cus-
tody.

“The traffickers may walk around
looking like bums but they can get
between $40,000 and $60,000 per boat-
load leaving Haiti.

“As a boat takes about eight days to
make a round trip, it’s possible for
one sloop to make close to 40 trips a -
year. That means a lot of money is
involved. But some has to be paid to
corrupt officials to make the operation
possible.

“What the government needs to do
is tap into the lifestyles of some of its
officials and see how this checks out
against their regular income.

“It makes me sick that we talk bad
about Haitians yet we are selling
everything to them. We say we hate
them, yet we are picking ae money
under the table.

“What makes this even worse is that
legitimate Haitians who want regular

' $55 visas to get to and from Haiti on

business are given a hard time.

“The backer ounds of all immigrants
are supposed to be checked, but under
this scam no checks are being made.
The visas are issued with no pictures,
no faces. We don’t know who’s com-
ing in because no security is done on
them.

“This country could be straight if
we wanted to be straight. But there is
too much craziness going on here. We
need a proper US-style ‘sting’ opera-
tion to ensure these people get locked
away.

“When people are doing dirt, word
travels. Everyone knows who is selling
visas. I think this has always happened
to some extent, but nothing like as
bad as now. It has got out of hand
because people get greedy.”

The information ties in with human
smuggling operations which have been
going on for years, using the Bahamas
chain as transhipment points for
onward trafficking to the United

tates.

Haitians are often brought through
the Bahamas by sloop, kept in safe
houses in Nassau, then taken on to
Bimini when their US “documenta-
tion” is ready for swift passage by go-
fast boats to the Florida coast.

One young Haitian, who waited for
months in Nassau until his “papers”
were ready, told INSIGHT: “My
brothers are involved in the human
smuggling business and $40,000 per
boat trip is nothing for them.

“They are earning major money
because Haitians back in their home-
land who have been receiving money
from relatives working abroad will
pay anything lo get a passage to the
US.

SEE page 3C

31. 2005!

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oe
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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005

THE TRIBUNE.



read with interest

your recent "Insight"

with respect to. The

Mud fire in Marsh

Harbour. I happen to
have lived my entire life in the
Abacos and can trace my
ancestry through 1783 when
the Loyalists populated these
islands.

The Abacos are a special
place to me for several rea-
sons, chief among which is its
diverse resources, both natur-
al and human.

I note the tenor and tone of
your article and, while I
respect your right to editorial
liberty, it seems rather harsh
to revert to derogatory and, in
fact, inflammatory language.

Both the tone and tenor of
your article are vitriolic and,
in fact, disparaging to an
entire race of people who
have struggled since the birth
of their republic 200 years
ago.

People

. The Haitian people have
been manipulated and raped
by successive colonial powers
over the past few centuries in

order to maintain the caste
systems and contingent bene- -
fits. It seems to me that the
absence of stability in this -
republic is more celebrated ;

' that scorned and, in fact, true -

thirst for democracy ‘and
human freedom should start
in the bosom of the western
hemisphere and not the Mid-
dle East.

Is it not curious that Haiti
and Cuba remain the way
they are despite the new phi-
losophy of "liberation" of
nations that promote totalitar-
ianism and tyranny? I wonder
aloud about how serious we
are about freedom when we
fail to expose the glaring con-
tradictions boldly exhibited at
Guantanamo - when we allow
multinational companies to ~
engage today's Haitian popu-
lace in a modern system of
slavery for a mere pittance in
order to ensure the survival of
capitalism in the great USA.

We need to speak truthfully —

about humanity and the con-
ditions within which our
human brothers find them-
selves. This truth demands
and requires that we examine
the history of Haitian
exploitation in the Abacos in

_ particular.

If one were to look objec-

” tively at the development of

modern industry in the Aba-
cos, it becomes clear that over
the past 50 years Haitian
labour has featured promi-
nently.

It is upon their shoulders
and the shoulders of a more
desirable migrant.(Turks and.
Caicos Islanders) that we
have built pine lumbering,
sugar prodcution and fruits

, and vegetables.

The Scott and Mattson
Farms (J B Crockett), Hevea-
tex Plantation (Abaco Farms
Limited), Key and Sawyer
Farms, B G Harmon, Sugar-
land Farms, Bahama Palm



Groves, Bahama Star Farms

-etc. have all maximised their

profits through minimum
wages to these migrants.

Note

You will note that as far
back as the Scott and Mattson
farms in the late fifties and
sixties there was a desire on
the part of these migrants for
a better way of life and living
conditions, to which they
added strong protest even
then.

Many communities rejected
this initial Haitian presence,
particularly the Marsh Har-
bour and Murphy Town resi-
dents who, through a sup-
posed superior position,
found their cohabitation total-
ly unacceptable.

_ They insisted that "their.
Haitian" should live in a pre-

“scribed manner in the bushes

out of sight and took great
pains in facilitating the con-
struction of homes on these
prescribed sites, inclusive of
utilities and other necessities.
In the 1970s and well into
the 1980s The Mud was no
major problem because it was
exactly that, undesirable land
requiring no great interest



excess baggage

beyond illegal shops which
were busted by police periodi-
. cally in order to maintain a
sense of order and control.
Some conscientious citizens
and Family Island-commis--~~----

sioners took it upon them-
selves to remove buildings
that began to escalate in num-
ber, only to find themselves
speedily transferred to Nassau
upon the intervention of the
local protectorate, whose
profit margins would be ~
adversely impacted by the loss
of their Haitians.

The desire for dignity and
respect yearned.in the hearts:
of second and third genera-
tion Haitians, who upon
attaining the age of status
qualification, found their par-
ents’ occupations and the dis-
dain with which they were col-
lectively treated unacceptable
and at best reprehensible.

They committed themselves
to academic and vocational
excellence and vowed never
to be.yard weeders,
farmhands, handymen or
housekeepers, but to assume
proper careers. Many never
returned from United States
colleges and universities, but
opted for Wall Street success
or other such occupations,



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%

thus draining resources from
the island from which they
were nurtured.

Those that regard Abaco as
"home" remain a part of the
community, making a contri-
bution. Some, in fact, have
returned as teachers and med-
ical professionals, Customs
and Immigration officers to
boot.

A quick glance at the acad-
emic records of Abaco Cen-
tral High School will reveal ,
the level ofcommitment —_-
made by children of these
communities. They account
for the highest levels of acade-
mic success and the largest
percentage of prefects and
student leaders, such as head
boys and girls and their
deputies.

They resent the reference
to Haitian with the callous
broad stroke by which it is
applied. They yearn for accep-
tance and respect in the only

‘society they know. This has

been the driving force that has
resulted in the second genera-
tion of "Bahamians" of Hait-
ian descent purchasing prop-
erty and building approved
houses and apartments to
improve their lot, fully inte-
grating into society.

Respect ©

"With respect to The Mud

and Pigeon Pea, its ugly twin,
the Haitians would love to
leave there, too. The truth be
told, no migrant without prop-
er status will invest in "high"
level housing. They are on the
fringe because they have been
placed there.

The community is not pow-
erless to control the prolifera-
tion of these communities, it
is complicit in their prolifera-
tion. This complicity is driven
by economic greed and the
perceived superiority that
resulted in their genesis to
begin with.

If the community is wary of
illegals, then it ought to take a
very bold stand and refuse to
hire them, assist the authori-
ties in their apprehension, car-

.-Ty out their.duties as officers -

of the peace as building |
inspectors, town planning
committees, immigration,
police, licensing authorities
and restore public trust in’
their offices.

As an example of the
hypocrisy and the shallowness
of the various public utter-
ances against these "illegal"
communities, take a look at
The Mud. A week before the

~~ firé'in The Mud a house was

constructed directly behind
the old softball park at the
entrance of The Mud, about
20 feet from the main paved
road leading to a popular auto
body shop.

It was not only built in clear
view of any competent
authority or concerned citi-
zen, it was enclosed by a chain

- link fence and a wooden deck

was added.

The so-called "Urban
Renewal" project, initiated by
the administrator and engag-
ing several Haitian-descent
persons, fell on infertile
ground as the committee lost
faith in a system that failed to
compensate them for services
rendered as agreed.

If we cannot keep our word,
we cannot be trusted to secure

--public trust on-pertinent-

issues.

Additionally, data collected
by those persons should be
returned to them and not be
so widely distributed, as it
constitutes severe theft of the
most blatant kind and demon-
strates an absence of integrity
and blanket deception at best.

We ought to find a way to
bridge the gaps between those
disenfranchised Bahamians of
Haitian descent who are con-
tinually pounded upon by
"professionals" and political
types in order to further their
agendas for what it’s worth.

The facts are that there are
fewer "illegal" immigrants
than imagined in the fertile
minds of the ignorant prog-
nosticators. What we do have
are severe anomalies in the
constitution of the Bahamas
that impact disproportionate-
ly on Haitians and their
descendants. While this may
in fact be accidental, the
rhetoric of resolution must
speak to this issue.

The journey to "citizen-
ship" in our great country is
an extremely tedious one.
However, these persons
awaiting status are confined
to a corner of our society in

“which théy huddle without

access to the benefits of high-
er education at COB, or the
right to be employed legally
without a work permit.
Many of these persons are
the children of legal perma-
nent residents and citizens,
formerly of Haiti, residing in

‘this dangerous system an

__ does not only prevail withirt: 2s.

the Bahamas. When we mar- |
ginalise people, we can expect’
animosity and hatred to arise. |
When we insist that even in
death, they must bury their ,
dead in a "different" resting
place in Marsh Harbour, out-
side of prescribed public
cemeteries reserved for the
elite race of Bahamians, we’
are adding pressure to an
overworked nerve.

When we paint with a broad
brush, and without exception: ”
suggest that the so-called . --
Haitian community in Marsh‘ :
Harbour are a cutlass and’ **
knife-wielding bunch, withoit"’
reference to acts of violence’ °
by Bahamian youths upon =”
each other with ssimilar
implements, we are adding to:
the divide.

The "pen is, in fact, mighti-
er than the sword", as some*’ -
luminary is quoted as saying, |
therefore we have a greater’:
obligation to examine the “ °
"facts" presented to us: Any’ |
human being asked to express:
his feelings publicly regarding.
loss of valuable personal» .\’‘
properties is likely-to fall into
the trap of uttering language: °
coloured by desperation.

The individual widely tout-’.
ed as a symbol of the deep, ©
passionate thirst for the blodd’
of Bahamian firemen volun-,"'
‘teering their time should have:
been roundly condemned and,-
in fact, cautioned by the
police.

The media, contrariwise,
recorded this incident as
symptomatic of a wider prob-
lem between the Haitian com-
munity and the authorities,
taking great pains to quote }
alleged incidents of intimida-
tion and mass violence against
community-minded citizens
seeking to extinguish a fire oe
their benefit.

I cannot say how I would ne
feel if I stood helpless to pro-
tect my home from loss in the,
face of an impending threat as
a Bahamian, particularly if, in
my unqualified view, insuffi-
cient efforts were being made

‘to deter it.

In such an emotionally
charged situation, I submit “
that even the most reasoned: '
person would act outside of":
his usual behaviour. Our soci”
ety (The Bahamas) will con?
tinue to be:built upon the °°!
shoulders of all migrants, +°~
whether from Haiti, America;
Cuba, Turks or elsewhere i in
the world. ae

We must be carefulto -'2
maintain standards to which '*!'
we can all properly submit ‘ .
and not so broadly stoke the--
flames of nationalism to the’
nation's detriment. ’

We must build our nation” -
on the willing shoulders of ak
resident partners, irrrespec-':.'
tive of national origin. Whilé’ -
me must guard against inva-
sion of our borders externally;
we must also shore up our ‘-“!
internal efforts to builda -»‘y
strong national character. Our
‘nation will only be as strong ' ue
as we make it. ¥

Our nation has benefited: - '
and continues to benefit from:
the contribution of migrants‘:
from many nations - this will
not change. We must be care-’
ful not to pretend we operate
in a vacuum and allow the
enlightenment necessary to-”’
prepare for globalisation.

But for the Grace of God,
we are moré fortunate than’ »
most of our regional neigh-
bours, to reside in the
Bahamas. Who knows what
tomorrow brings?

— Jacob Saunders

I AM writing this e-mail fo’
give you kudos and thanks for
writing such an awe-inspiring
article that plagues our soci-—
ety. I recently returned honte:,
from school to a system of ‘*”"
who you knows and how well.
do you perform sexually in“ ~”
order to effectively apply one-
self to the development of our
nation.

Prevalence.

There is a prevalence of
dogma in our society that we:

‘must continue to isolate and*.-‘

proactively lobby our goverir=::
ment for radical changes to bé:
made. I, too, am a victim of*=*.

c

must say that I am not even
giving myself a full year to
find my niche within our
labour system.

I must make one note that?
this practice of favouritism =

ies eS A
“Seer Pees.

2 “t AO 8 6.6 8 CET S

ei
Â¥.

=

-

the public sector, it too is &+*.
prevalent in the private sectar,
as for too long the public seers
tor has been the benchmark =>:
for how the private sector ~~~
conducts business.

SEE page 3C



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 3C



2 re ee eee
Has the scramble for degrees gone too far?

FROM page 8C

past would have testified. For a
potter to be able to say “I
worked alongside Bernard
Leach” was the equivalent of
enough degrees to wallpaper
the inside of a fair-sized air-
craft hangar. Now this price-
less transfer of expertise has
given way to the frenzied clam-
our for certificates, many of
which have little or no value in
the world of work.

The huge gulf in time created
over the last 30 years between
high school graduation and
entry into the workplace -
stretching in some cases to sev-
en or eight years of tertiary
education - has given us a gen-
eration of “Don’t knows”, peo-
ple who have no clue where
’ their talents and qualifications
might lead them.

It is a desperately sad situa-
tion, for the longer they stay
in the protected college envi-
ronment, the less sure they
appear to be about emerging
into the cold light of reality.
“I’ve learned so much in the
classroom that I’m now thor-
oughly confused about what I
should be doing in life,” was
the jament of one bright lad in
his early twenties. A girl stu-
dent concurred, adding: “The
world of work fills me with
trepidation, mainly because I

have been in the safe school
environment for so long.”

The suspicion is growing that
academia is now accepting
huge fees for services that fall
far short of expectations, and
fail to serve society’s needs. In
addition, lecturers are leading
young people to believe that
what they are being taught will
make them indispensable
acquisitions for any self-
respecting company or corpo-
ration, and candidates fur
instant advancement. This is
rarely true. ;

Joining

One student joining a news

organisation with her MBA
degree wanted to know, dur-
ing her first week in the office,
when she could take over as
managing editor, even though
she had no newsroom experi-
ence at all. With her treasured
diploma at the ready, she felt
nothing was beyond her, and
that all the tedious preliminar-
ies of a proper hands-on train-
ing had been rendered unnec-
essary by her MBA studies.
No-one had told her that acad-
emic qualifications, in them-
selves, are not enough, and that
years of experience are a nec-
essary part of the promotion
process.

Perhaps society must now

‘Lets clean
up this major
visa racket |

FROM page 1C

“Some end up going to
college and doing well for
themselves. In Haiti, there is
no prospect of a good life.
While waiting for my papers,
I spent my days learning
English. By. coming to Nas-
sau, I managed to make a
future for myself.”

The young man ended up
at college and is now pro-
gressing as a member of the
Florida Haitian community.

It is this prospect of pros-

perity - something unattain-

able in Haiti for all but the
very few - that continues to
fuel the trafficking business
and make it one of the most
_ financially rewarding illicit
enterprises in the region.
During his revelations
about. the alleged visa racket,

Mr Bethel isolated one indi- |
vidual who had managed to ©

acquire an average of nine
visas a week, enabling him
to bring in about. 470
Haitians a year. This person
is not necessarily involved in
illicit activity, but the num-
bers were a cause for con-
cern.

-However, if INSIGHT’s
sources are right, nine visas a.
week are small beer in the
overall scheme of things.

When Bahamians express
alarm about the impending

~ Nobody Gets The Dirt
8 harem eeelei4

GET mci ae
eu
Se UAC OL

6402.(2 quaris} $20.50 -
Bee Omer U ROC)
ee yay |
OMe a (

eevee

Ce CeCe R mate Ik)

Kya YL BL
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a eecey Vise
CSTR GIO
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“creolisation” of their soci-
ety, they. generally see the
influx of immigrants as a
haphazard affair, with
Haitians fleeing into the bush
from grounded sloops. |
However, it seems many
arrive right in the heart of

_ Nassau with their pre-paid .

visas at the ready, their way
smoothed for them by cor-
rupt Bahamians who will sell
the country to the dogs if the
moneyisright. =.

_ Far from being haphazard,
the smuggling operations are
carefully orchestrated, with
the immigrants themselves
seeing their investments as

money well-spent. In fact,

trafficking appears to be
good news for everyone
involved. It’s. the Bahamas
itself that suffers, and the

‘ long-term effects of this con-

tinuing infiltration of out-
siders can only be guessed
at. “It’s time to clean house,”
said INSIGHT’s sources.
“Let’s have transparency.

_Let’s stop leading our coun- ~

try to ruin. Not everyone in —
the visa department is
crooked - but those who
aren’t either don’t know
what’s happening or are too
scared to speak up.”

¢ What do you think? Fax

328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia.net

SpinSweep Outdoor Sweeper

accept that it has been bam-

- boozled by academia into

believing that college gradua-
tion is the only way forward.
In truth, it isn’t. What the
entire education system ought
to be doing is identifying stu-
dents’ strengths from an early
age and guiding them towards
occupations that will offer them
lifetimes of fulfilment and
reward, preferably starting
them on their career paths
between 16 and 19 instead of
plunging them into years of
debt and near penury.

This process would, of
course, require renewed
emphasis on the basics, like
language and mathematics
tuition, plus a wide-ranging
foundation covering history,
geography, general science an
the arts.

A high school diploma -

ought, theoretically, to be
enough to serve as a basis for
on-the-job vocational training
in any of the white collar pro-
fessions as well as the crafts
and trades that help to make
the world go round.
Unfortunately, over the last

.30 or 40 years general educa-

tional standards have fallen so
sharply that a bachelor’s degrée
has now come to serve the
same purpose as five GCE O
levels did in 1960.

Then, five O levels were con-

FROM page 2C_

Continue to write these
articles as you as a journalist
have a fundamental responsi-
bility to create and allow for
national debate on all matters.

Keep up the good work!!!

— Nikita N. Curry

Bachelor of Commerce -

Hospitality and Tourism

Ryerson University -

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

eeee0e0
Bahamian ‘brain drain’

IT is true that many very
well-qualified graduates feel
under-valued in their own
society.

I am extremely well-quali-
fied in my field and work as
an academic. Yet I find that
many attorneys, for instance,
of mediocre academic stan-
dards and inferior working
skills are on far higher pay
scales than I am.

We have economics stu-
dents here who are as good as
you will find anywhere, but
some of them end up as bank
tellers and are stuck with such
positions for years.

I suppose doctors, who have .

to do many years of spe-
cialised study, deserve high
rewards. But you have attor-
neys here who can be earning
$60,000 or $70,000 a year after
only five years in practice.
And many can earn $100,000
or more.

Yet I know a guy witha
PhD and master’s degree in
economics who has 20 years
of experience and he is still
getting under $50,000.

This is very discouraging for
those. who study away for
many years to get good-class
qualifications. And it’s the
reason why so many young

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sidered the dividing line
between blue collar and white
cullar occupations. The BA or
BSc has now taken over that
role. Non-graduates are now
considered the also-rans in
modern society, destined for
semi-skilled or unskilled occu-
pations in which personal ful-
filment is not a high priority.

Looking back on.a fast-fad-
ing 20th century, it is salutary
to consider its icons and ogres
and their place in the educa-
tional firmament.

Consider the following and
ask yourself: where did they go
wrong when it came to learn-
ing?

Sir Winston Churchill, Adolf
Hitler, Elvis Presley, Muham-
mad Ali, Marilyn Monroe,
Pablo Picasso, D H Lawrence,
George Orwell, Thomas Hardy
and Ernest Hemingway were
all non-graduates.

Different

So were,.or are, John Stein-
beck, William Faulkner, The
Beatles, Frank Sinatra, Princess
Diana and Queen Elizabeth IL.
In their different ways, all have
made deep impressions on the
age in which they lived, yet not
one had the benefit of a uni-
versity degree.

Some, of course, were not
obliged to face life in a com-

péople - some of them not
very bright - are attracted to
an already overcrowded legal
profession.

— Graduate -

KUDOS for your article
‘We too, are cast-offs of
Bahamian Society’ written in
The Tribune on Monday,
December 5, 2005. The senti-
ments expressed are exactly
how I feel about the Bahami-
an working society. I too am a
qualified Bahamian who has
been turned down on numer-
ous occasions for different job
vacancies in my field of study
with no reason or explanation
given. Graduates who return

«. Home:-or even Bahamians who

have worked abroad and wish
to come home, become so
frustrated with the system
that they have to question
why their expertise is not
sought after.

The reason why is, there’are
too many persons in senior
positions who feel threatened
because they are unable to
perform even at a satisfactory
level. For example, on my job
I have been asked on numer-
ous occasions by managers
and a senior manager to assist
in completing their tasks. Yet
when I ask for a promotion I
am told that I need more
experience even though I
have been working at that
position for several years. In
addition J have higher qualifi-
cations than some of them.

My sister is presently
attending university and [am
continuously encouraging her
not to return to The Bahamas.
Eventually I also plan to relo-
cate to another country that
will give me a chance to excel
and who will appreciate my

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petitive environment. Others -
Hitler, especially - were prob-
ably prompted by lack of suc-
cess in the classroom to follow
more hideous and destructive
pursuits.

All round, though, their
celebrity or notoriety had lit-
tle to do with scholastic suc-
cess, and one wonders whether

too much emphasis is now -

placed on “qualifications”
which fail to tell the entire sto-
ry about a person’s potential.
After all, universities cannot
teach talent. - and talent, an
inborn gift or aptitude, is so
often the decisive factor in
determining a person’s destiny,
especially in most of the really
worthwhile creative occupa-
tions.

There is no doubt that a col-
lege education still has its place
for many. But, like medicine
and the law, academia’s pur-
pose appears to have been cor-

_rupted and tainted by the lust

for money.

Many universities are now
primarily concerned with gen-
erating revenue. The most suc-
cessful of them are awash with
cash, creating ever more allur-
ing campuses and courses to
titillate the narcissism and self-
regard in all of us. Middle-class
families now regard a degree

-for their children as a necessity

in achieving bourgeois

contribution to their society.
Too many favours are being
promised and too many
exchanges are given in return.
Yet we wonder why the coun-
try’s performance is not as
efficient and prosperous as it
should be. The government is
creating jobs, but the types.of
opportunities that are being
created do not include the
young educated, qualified
Bahamian. Unfortunately, the
Bahamian economy will not .
be able to appreciate the vast
wealth of knowledge it
already possesses because so
many skilled Bahamians are
deciding not to return due to
the ill treatment.of their own

s people. Signed -
‘—D.B.

It’s interesting that the pay
ceiling for even the best quali-
fied academic at COB, for
instance, is about $54,000 a
year - and that is earned only
by PhDs with long experience.

Your article cites the case
of a “government official”
who gets between $60,000 and
$70,000 and is illiterate.
Where is the incentive, you
might ask.
— James, Prince Charles
Drive

WE need to find ways of
trimming down the public ser-
vice, which is stuffed to the
gunwales with highly-paid no-
hopers who are, in the main, a
waste of space and money. .

The money saved could be
pumped into investment



respectability. In return for dol-
lars, lots of them, colleges offer
students an embossed and
flamboyantly signed document
certifying academic excellence.
The obligatory photograph of
smug student in mortarboard
and gown, flanked by proud
parents, has become an inte-
gral feature of life for the aspi-
rational classes, a kind of motif
for success.

' Campus

However, the campus pho-
tocall is often a prelude for dis-
appointment. What colleges fail
to do, in many instances, is pre-
pare students for the world of
work, where the direction and
quality of their lives will be

. decided. Those young people

ay

who find themselves saddled
with a heavy debt, eased only
by a sheet of card lauding their
academic triumphs, are not
always the privileged souls they
appear to be.

They have been led to expect
a gilded life, but for many - and
probably most - the lustre fades
almost as soon as the applause
from the final college convo-
cation dies away.

¢ What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia.net



schemes for bright young
Bahamians making their way
in the world. The best of them

-could create new business and

employment opportunities,
which is the way this country
should be going.

The Bahamas needs more
highly intelligent entrepre-
neurs and fewer civil servants
‘and lawyers. Entrepreneurs
are productive. Civil servants
and attorneys make little or
no contribution to the
nation’s progress. Let’s put .

“the emphasis where it counts.

— B Bennett, Nassau

a Tlie Death Penalty

VERY good article. The
arguments from Amnesty
International and other such
thinkers/philosophies were
dealt with fairly and are basi-
cally impractical and idealistic.

— Trevor R Nottage.

YES, INSIGHT is right
again. The death penalty
should stay for certain cate-
gories of murder, especially
those by hardened criminals
who are in the business of
rubbing out the rest of us in
pursuit of their own ends.

The kneejerk rejection of
capital punishment by the lib-
eral lobby has not served soci-
ety well over the last few
decades. There are times
when, medieval or not, it is
the right course to take.

— Businessman _





ISSUE



We

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2005 2 THE MIAMI HERALD 4C






| Se

“Copyrighted, Material
Syndicated Content ga

Available from | Commercial News. Providers’



NEDIDL
LETT,

THE WORLD CLOSELY WATCHES THE SUCCESS OF THE UPCOMING PRESIDENTIAL VOTE



cpechlte Te teake seem unlikely that any would get the required absolute
In a land where nothing is as certain as uncertainty, majority to ~~ in the first round.
What Haiti won’t be able to do under the latest

—— Haitians will -- maybe — pick a new president early 1 al t ble. despite; . ‘onal
. next year in an election in which both the country and elector meta €, CESpIte mtense internation:
pressure, particularly from the United States, is

the international community have much at stake. : . a .
After at least three postponements under a inaugurate a new president on the constitutionally
mandated date of Feb. 7, 2006.

dysfunctional electoral council and amid ongoing . .
internal turmoil, a first-round vote is set for Jan. 8. oe oak i scileckdes ofthe ncoressiee ata of
If no candidate gets 50 percent plus one of the total ene to nearly ware ye an
rile! P often-brutal Duvalier family dictatorship, and is

vote in the first round, a runoff will be held Feb. 15 . : ae :
between the two top vote-getters. enshrined in the 1987 constitution as Inauguration Day.

— With 35 presidential candidates now listed, it would *TURN TO HAITI

LIBERIA, HAITI |

LIBERIA, HAITI SHARE
MANY OF THE SAME
WOES AND LESSONS

In their quests to achieve a working electoral process, Haiti
and Liberia have learned from each other. One result: the
United Nations won't be leaving either Haiti or Liberia
anytime soon.

- BY JACQUELINE CHARLES
jcharles@herald.com

MONROVIA, Liberia — With its tropical winds and lush land-
scape, its rural thatched roof mud-flat homes and crowded open-air
Duala Market — as congested as the one in downtown Port-au-
Prince — this nation of 3.4 million strongly resembles Haiti.

Liberia, formed by freed American slaves, is more than 4,200
miles away from my mother’s homeland in Haiti, yet both nations
stand as bookends in the post-colonial era. They share a painful his-
tory that offers tough lessons about the difficulties poor nations face
in pursuing democracy when bad governance — exacerbated by
class differences that date back centuries to the era of slavery —
shut doors of opportunity for generations.

Politically troubled and economically depressed, both nations
have spent years mired in conflict brought on by corruption at all
levels and poor leadership. The inevitable result?



LIBERIA’S PRESIDENT-ELECT WELCOMED: Residents of Abidjan, Ivory

Coast, celebrate the arrival at the airport there of
. President-elect Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf on Nov. 29. The trip was
the first foreign journey made by the Liberian president-elect,
4 the first woman to win an African presidential election. The
~ 4 orange-white-green flag is lvory Coast’s; the star-and-stripes is

Liberia’s flag.



MNO TAN



LL
i L





» IU suNDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2005

ELECTIONS IN HAITI

_INTERNATIONAL EDITION.

sd SUES BIS ct cinta Riehl alnanie rea asians least weal

Much at stake in upcoming vote

wv NE VP.

Material
ed Content

—— ™ os



K

Syndicat

pyrighted



Available from ( Commercial News: Providers”








HAITI

But it has become painfully
obvious to all that credible
elections could not be carried
out in time to meet that date,
given the electoral council
disarray and the monumental
logistical problems in a rug-
ged country lacking in mod-
ern infrastructure.

Feb. 24 has been set as the
new inauguration day.

ENDS INTERIM RULE

Practically, and more sig-
nificantly, the election will
end two years of rule under
an interim government,
widely viewed as unpopular
and inept, installed after the
Feb. 29, 2004, departure into
exile of former President
Jean-Bertrand Aristide, under

heavy U.S. and French pres- °

sure.

Meanwhile, many in the
international community, as
well as Haitians, closely
watch the upcoming vote,
which will be the first elec-
tion of any kind there since
disputed parliamentary and
presidential balloting in 2000.

’ Successful and credible
elections would mean a gov-
ernment accepted as legiti-
mate by, the international
community, enabling the
country to move forward eco-
nomically and politically.
That would help bring badly
needed stability to a country
that has seen two foreign mili-
tary interventions since 1994,

and promote greater security
throughout the Caribbean.

For the United States, and
Florida particularly, an elec-
tion result that is accepted by
the voters would alleviate
fears of yet another uncon-
trolled exodus of Haitians —
legal and illegal — fleeing
continued internal turmoil.

It would also provide a
more stable environment to
combat the flow of drugs
through the country to the
United States.

**What is at stake here is
Haiti’s political legitimacy,
economic revival and general
stabilization,” says Claude
Beauboeuf, a Haitian eco-
nomic consultant and analyst.
**A successful electoral pro-
cess would allow the country
to start improving the busi-
ness climate, decreasing
transaction costs, refurbish-
ing its international reputa-
tion and start attracting local,
diaspora and international
investment.”

80 PERCENT REGISTERED

Some 80 percent of the
country’s estimated 4.5 mil-
lion eligible voters have been
registered.

They will select a presi-

dent and a 129-member parlia-
ment, including 30 senators
and 99 deputies. Local elec-

tions for some 10,000 regional -

and municipal officials are
scheduled March 5.
But the balloting has:been

-repeatedly delayed:because of

the enormousness of the task
and the ineptness of the
interim government and the
Provisional Electoral Council
[CEP], the body charged with
carrying out the elections.

“From the start, the CEP
has been plagued with rivalry,
bureaucratic ineptitude, tech-
nical shortcomings and
charges of partisanship and
corruption,” concludes a
recent report on Haiti by the
International Crisis Group, a
respected nongovernmental
organization based in Brus-
sels.

- The Oct.48 appointment of
Jacques Bernard, a prominent
and well-regarded banker, as
director general of CEP oper-
ations helped put order back
into the process, says the Cri-
sis Group, while adding that
“his authority was not defined
and he faces some resistance
from CEP members.” ,

UNPOPULAR

Neither is the interim gov-
ernment, installed following
Aristide’s departure, held in
much higher regard. It has
been accused of both crony-
ism and incompetence. It also
has added to the electoral
confusion by overruling the
country’s Supreme Court on
eligibility of presidential can-
didates.

More recently, Prime Min-
ister Gerard Latortue

announced Dec. 27 as a new
election date, apparently
without consulting with the
CEP, which days later made it
Jan. 8.

Some observers have sug-

* Oo

pete

gested both the interim gov- |

ernment and the electoral
council are deliberately drag-
ging their feet in order to pro-
long the process and their
positions. In addition, the
interim government has been
criticized by international
human rights activists for its
ongoing detention of Yvon
Neptune, Aristide’s former.
prime minister, and Gérard
Jean-Juste, a Roman Catholic
priest and staunch Aristide
supporter.

“No one wants the transi-
tional government to con-
tinue,” says one foreign offi-
cial involved in the process.
“The only purpose of the
transitional government is to
get to elections. They finally
got the message.”

KIDNAPPINGS, CRIME

In addition to the bureau-
cratic disarray of the electoral
council and the interim gov-
ernment, there are other diffi-
culties that will make any
election here difficult. Key
one is the ongoing problem of
the kidnappings for ransom,
down from earlier this. year
but still averaging more than
two a day.

Also, there is the corrupt
and ineffective police force.
Mario Andresol, a respected

police officer who fled the

country under Aristide and
took over as police chief ear-
lier this year, acknowledged
in an October interview after
touring the country’s police
units that “there is a large cor-
ruption problem. About a
quarter of the force is
involved in corruption, kid-
nappings and even arms traf-
ficking.” ,

Criminal activity continues
as well. A new report by the
Geneva-based Small Arms

Survey organization estimates ©

there are some 210,000 fire-









KEEPING THE PEACE: A U.N. peacekeeper stands guard as
voters register at a center opened by Haitian and
international officials in Gonaives, Haiti, in April 2005.

> =





a ald

arms in Haiti, with only about
26,000 of them in the hands of .
United Nations peacekeepers
and Haitian authorities. It also
estimates that 1,600 people.
have died since Aristide’s
flight into exile.

GANG INFLUENCE

Unchecked gang violence,
much of it perpetrated by pro-
Aristide gangs known as chi-
meres, continues — although

there is disagreement about.

how much of an obstacle to

the electoral process these |

pose.

Juan Gabriel Valdés, the
United Nations special envoy
in Haiti, acknowledged in a
recent interview with The
Associated Press that chi-
meres still controlled some
parts of the capital. Haitian
sources report, however, the
7,600 U.N. peacekeepers in
the country — led by Brazil-
ians — have cracked down in
recent weeks in some of the
known chimere strongholds
such as Cité Soleil and Cité
Militaire and that “security
should not be an issue” come
election day.

A major obstacle to the
process, however, could be
the “winner-take-all” nature
of Haitian politics, in which
an election sometimes creates
more problems than it
resolves.

Haitian elections have long
been based on the idea that
“to the winner belongs the
spoils,” rather than compro-
mise and reconciliation for

the betterment of the nation.

‘As a result, “Haiti’s elec-
tions have historically exacer-
bated, not alleviated, its polit-
ical and social divisions,”
observed the International
Crisis Group.

Under the current electoral
system a candidate polling
more than 50 percent in the
first round is automatically
elected. By manipulating the
first round, as Aristide’s Lava-
las party did in the disputed
2000 parliamentary elections,
it won overwhelming control
of the Senate, exacerbating
already-existing political
antagonisms.

“Many of us, including Hai-
tians, believe there is a fatal
flaw in the election process,”
said Robert Maguire, a long-
time Haiti specialist who now
heads the ‘Haiti program at
Trinity University in Wash-
ington. “There is no propor-
tional representation. The
winner takes all, promotes an
adversarial relationship. If a
party wins 10 percent or some
arbitrary number it should
have representation in parlia-
ment.”

Proportional representa-
tion would assure a healthy



parliamentary opposition.

However, with the upcom-
ing election carried out under
international supervision and
with a multitude of parties
and candidates, the new presi-
dent may face the reverse
problem of fragmentation
rather than dominance.

As the International Crisis
Group also suggests, “few
experts expect any party to
win a substantial bloc of [par-
liamentary] seats, let alone a
majority, leaving much of the
nation’s crucial governance
Byzantine and likely paralyz-
ing maneuvers.”

That means the new presi-
dent, whoever it may be, will
face not only the prospect of
parliamentary gridlock, but
the monumental task of
undertaking drastic reforms
in a wide array of governmen-
tal institutions, from justice
and security to finance and
education.

A significant but unknown
factor affecting the election
outcome is what level of Aris-
tide’s support remains among
Haiti’s poor masses and

whether it will go to candi-:

dates identified with his Lava-
las Family Party. If it does, it
could benefit Marc Bazin, or
even René Préval, although
Aristide has said from South
African exile that he is back-
ing no one. [See box at right.]

OUTCOME?

So, what could the out-
come be?

“Haiti could gradually
transform itself into a Carib-
bean Mauritius [a well-gov-
erned island nation in the
Indian Ocean off Africa] if the
electoral process succeeds; or
a Caribbean Somaghanistan
should it fail, a mixture of
Somalia and Afghanistan,”
says Beauboeuf.

“The country has a lot of
potential to perform well at
many levels,’ adds Beau-
boeuf. “Nevertheless, it has
eloquently proven that it has
the potential to become, as
well, a very unstable place
should its structures col-
lapse.”

No matter the election out-
come, success will also
depend heavily on continued
economic and security sup-
port by the international com-
munity, and particularly the
United States, if it is to pre-
vent Haiti from becoming a
failed state.

Don Bohning is a former
Herald Latin America editor
who covered Haiti from 1967 to
2000. He also is the author of
The Castro Obsession: U.S.
Cover Operations Against
Cuba 1959-1965, recently pub-
lished by Potomac Books, Inc.



THE MIAMIHERALD

SOME CANDIDATES
IN HAITI

More than 50 presidential
aspirants, running either —_
as independents or repre-
senting political parties,
signed up by the registra-
tion deadline, with 35 can-. _
didates eventually
approved by the electoral
council. Only a handful of
those — all with wide name
recognition — are given -

any chance of winning. ae




~ Among them are:
e RENE PREVAL, former -
president and an agrono- cs
mist by training, is running —

asthe









newly
formed
_ party. He



strong - /

peasant

— support from Haiti’ s Cen-
tral Plateau region and
widely regarded as the
most likely” winner.

_@ MARC BAZIN, a former
planning minister under — -
Aristide as well asan offi- a
cialin
: previous. S

PREVAL










date ofa _
coalition
between —
his own ar: and afac ©
tion of Aristide’s Lavalas
Family party. He finished a
distant second Q
to Aristide i in the
1990 presidential elec-
‘tion,

e CHARLES HENRI
BAKER is viewed as the
candidate of Haiti s. busi-
ness and upper classes. An |
indica-
tion of
the
industri-
alist’s |
viability.
-isthathe —
obtained —
the
~ 100,000 -
a signa-
: tires needed to get onthe
ballot as an independent;
a minimum of 5,000 sig-
natures is required for a
candidate with party sup- _
port. Baker was among
the leaders of the Group of
184 instrumental in forcing
Aristide into exile.

e EVANS PAUL, a former
mayor of Port-au-Prince, is
alongtime political activist
who was an ardent Aris-
tide sup-
porter
before
becom- —
ing disil-
lusioned
with him.
Domini-
can
Republic
_Presi-
dent Leonel Fernandez is
said to be a financial sup-
porter of his.

e LESLIE MANIGAT, an
academic who served five
months as president in
1988, is seen by some Hai-
tians as‘
perhaps
the best
presi-
dent the
country
has had
since the
Duvalier
dynasty
ended.
Some hold this view even
though he gained office in
asham election orches-
trated by the military after
the November 1987 elec-
tion day massacre.

— DON BOHNING



BAZIN



BAKER



PAUL



MANIGAT





War against
Christmas?



Education ensures prosperity

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PAGE 8C

teem:









® By JOHN MARQUIS



“r= rom the standpoint
of colleges and

universities, the

case for more aca-
is clear enough. More back-




sides on seats mean more rev-

enue.

With some college principals. oat
earning well over $300,000 a
year, and tuition fees running -
at record highs, there is little. -

incentive to “change anything.

Academia has become big:
business and the returns are.
impressive, with a greater’
demand for higher education

than ever hefore
Colleges in ‘the United

States, in particular, are now -
demanding obscene amounts .

of money for tuition, and fam-
ilies are-going deep into debt to

ensure their children go.
through life with letters behind

their names.

Whether students emerging —
from the process get a good
dealis now becoming a matter ©

for conjecture. Some believe
their BA or BSc is a guaran-
ice of suitable employment.
Many are discovering that it
leads them nowhere... .
Last week, a smart and high-
ei articulate Bahamian gradu-
‘told INSIGHT that univer-
sity Was an empowering expe-.’-
ricnce for him. It made him féel:
he could take on, and. conquer:
the world.
The reality is that, in the

Bahamas at least, there is no-

place for him in any job he
feels suitable for his level of

education. Now in his mid-30s, °

he finds himself adrift in his
homeland, an educated man
with a degree which seemingly
counts for nothing. He is plan-
ning to leave the Bahamas next
year for the United States.

Whatever this country invested =

in his education will now be.

lost to a first world society able
to make better use of his learn- -

ing.
Two questions arise: is the
academic route right for every
kind of job? And are students
being lured into courses which
have no application in the
wider society? It’s time educa-
tors took a close look at, both”
with the aim of producing some:
meaningful answers. 7“).
Forty or 50 years ago, réla'-
tively few people in Europe *

went to university. Those who

did were usually destined. for
academic life. If you wanted to

be an architect, journalist,
accountant or solici- —

banker,
tor, the likeliest route would
be via indentureship. Candi-

dates would undergo a proba-..
tionary period, sign articles, bé -
tied to a company for three‘or °
four years, have days off for’:
college study, and take profes-: .

ane qualifications at the end
fitall.

"T he result was that students
emerged from a term of train-
ing properly: prepared for the
job at hand. Trainee journal-
ists actually learned from other

professional journalists. Law-

clerks shadowed working solic=

itors. Accountants began their __
professional lives as articled:

*clorks, sweating over trial bal-

ances en route to eventual.

qualification. And all were able
to earn a living while learning
the skills of their calling.
/scademic snobs scoff at the
system, claiming it deprived
candidates of the subtler
virtues of tertiary education,
but it achieved what it set out
io achieve: properly trained
professionals who acquired
expertise from people who

actually knew what they were ~

doing.

What we have now is an

tended period of education.
is to 20 years in some cases -
at the end of which few of
those involved, and least of all
the students, know what the
outcome will be.

in fact. iL is quite staggering

how many well-qualified uni-”

versity students reach the age

of 22 or 23. or even 25, without:
any professional OBIESIIVES in

sight.

One student told INSIGHT:
~A(tno point in my entire edu-
cation has anyone at school or
college asked me what I want-
ed to do with my life. It’s as
though education is something

demic credentials

, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005

as the

NLC la



grees gone too

Young Bahamian graduates last week lamented this country’s
inability, or. unwillingness, to offer them jobs commensurate
with. their prowess and qualifications. Has the cry for
~ academic credentials gone too far? And. ought there to be.
‘more emphasis on vocational courses? INSIGHT reports...

quite Separate from the process

of professional preparation. I

- am still at a‘loss_as to why this
‘ should be.” <2 -- :
Admittedly, there | was a time’
when children’ of the wealthy ~

indulged themselves with clas--

sical studies, not- necessarily for -

professional preparation but

~ intellectual enrichment. At

Oxford and Cambridge, there
is still'a donnish fringe who see

themselves cloistered amid

their books for the rest of their
lives, writing reseatch papers

- that only fellow Senior acade-

mies will ever want-to read.

The rationale, for-them, is.
that some people, an intellec- |
_ tual ‘elite*yare better equipped



Att no. > point |
in my entire.

x



debt?”

Yet there are still relatively
few higher education. institu-

“tions outside-of téchnical,

teaching, art and nursing col-
leges where professional or
trade preparation are the prime
aims. However; employers are

-becoming increasingly con-

scious of their existence, and

grabbing their alumni whenev:

er they can.
It is interesting, for instance,

that City University in London -

lays great stress on the

. “employability” of its gradu-

~ education has” .

anyone ‘at
~ school or. .
college asked |
me-what I _
wanted to do-
with, ‘my life.
We 'S- aS though -
~ education is.
something quite
separate from
the process of _
professional —
"preparation. A:
-am still ata loss
as to why this
- should be.”

— Anonymous student



: ‘han ethers forlives totally con-
--sumed,’by the.cerebral and

metaphyical. Not.for them the

‘daily Slog of commerce, ‘trade
“or the law.

Nowadays, though, academia

-has-commandeered the minds

of seemingly all but the intel-
lectually challenged: It is now

seen as. virtually imperative
that anyone. who can get from

one end of a sentence to the
other, or add two and two:
together. and get something
close to four; should 80 to uni-
versity.

One-study: suggested that’ an
IQ of 93, plus a reasonable lev-
el of application, will earn you
a third-class degree, while 125
is said to be enough to acquire
a first. It seems anyone but a
certified cretin can-get into a
college of some kind nowadays
so long as they have the where-
withal to pay the bill. The clam-
out for certificates, diplomas -
and degrees in their many guis-
es has never been greater. Stu-
dents are plunging into lifelong

‘debt-to get their hands on a

ribboned document proclaim-
ing them to be smarter than
the average Joe.

The upshot, however, is a
proliferation of young people
with so many options, and so

little focus, that they become
becalmed and directionless in

what can-be a hostile and -

- unforgiving world.:
.. “There.is too little emphasis *
on the. world of. work,”

( a stu-
dent. told INSIGHT, “If edu-
cation isn’t for the purpose of
preparing you for work, what is
it for? How else are you
expected to pay your student

ates. It has. seen through the..

rather threadbare claims of
other institutions which lure
students into courses that teach
little but airy-fairy theory and
are irrelevant to market

requirements. Instead, it sets

itself the task of preparing stu-

- dents for the sometimes brutal

but. demanding world of work.
_ Its. journalism courses, for

ae instance, are well-régarded by

British and Commonwealth
newspapérs because their prod-
ucts are people who ¢an actu-

- ally function effectively in the

newsroom:

City University journalism
lecturers are, in the main, high-
class professional journalists
who are able to impart the ben-
efits of their experience as part
of a curriculum aimed at pro-

' ducing quality performers. All

_ ing modules in media law, local |

studies are conducted under

the auspices of the National,

Council for the Training of
: Journalists, which lays down
industry requirements, includ-

and central government, cur-
rent affairs, newspaper prac-
tice, shorthand and media tech-
nology.

- City University alumni now
occupy key executive positions

.at newspapers, magazines, TV
‘and radio stations all over the
world, creating a network of .

contacts future students. can
~ exploit monenon their

__careers.

City is not alone as a college
with such.a‘cause, but it is still
heavily outnumbered by those

__ which appéar to see learning
and life-preparation as two sep-
arate and distinct entities.

‘Many offer, for instance,
much-derided “media studies”

courses conducted .by, acade- —

. mics who haye no real journal-

istic experience and spend their °
- lessons pontificating on ethical

and theoretical issues. These.

are, frarikly, a waste of time
‘and money and command little

or no respect within the indus-

try.
Certainly, many young.

’ Bahamians are arriving back.

in Nassau from universities.
abroad with unrealistic expec-
tations. Even some with voca-
tionally-based degrees find

themselves unwanted in ae
own land.

The truth is that degrees in

. metallurgy, industrial psychol-

ogy, nuclear physics or avia-

tion design have little or no rel-

- evance to the Bahamian econ-

omy. Whoever suggested to
them that they would? °

- In fact, it’s hard to think of
much outside. the. hotel -and
hospitality business, the finan-
cial services industry, banking,

_ thé legal profession and reli-

gion that would be strictly rel-

evant to the Bahamian way of .

Phage:

If there is a real need, it

‘would be-in business manage-

ment or entrepreneurship, for
inventiveness and commercial
savvy are the areas-in which

‘ the Bahamas falls short at pre-

sent...

_It is far better for the coun-
try’s sake to produce the kind
of people who.can expand the

THE TRIBUNE





scramble for
far?

economy by their enterprise
and imagination in busines§
than stuff the public Service
with yet more unproductive
drones with master’s degrees
and PhDs, or create yet more
attorneys for an already over
loaded legal profession.

One of the great benefits of
the old-fashioned system, of
indentureship and pupillagé
was that students learned at the
master’s knee. Outstanding
practitioners, whatever their
discipline, could pass on the
fruits of their lifetimes of





-endeavour. It worked well, as

many. of the great potters,
painters, musicians, furniture-
makers and silversmiths of the

SEE page 3C

Other Florida Packages also available

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Full Text


FT|





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ce AND CLOUDS |

Volume: 102.No.19



ARCHBISHOP TO

RETIRE IN 2008

° SEE TRIBUNE PAGE I FIVE °



BDM leader hits
out over education

By CARA BRENNEN
: Tribune Staff Reporter

: BOTH major parties came
under intense fire Jast night
after a shocking report disclosed
that Bahamian public high

schools recorded an average F- ~

plus last year in BGCSE exams.
The dire performance placed

‘the country in peril, according ©

to Bahamas Democratic Move-

ment leader Cassius Stuart. He ~~

said both the PLP and FNM
had failed Bahamian children.

Mr Stuart expressed outrage
‘following The Tribine’s lead
story on Saturday which stated
that students from public high
schools who sat the BGCSE
exams last year achieved an
average grade of “F+” across
the board.

The article, which quoted a-

Ministry of Education report,

added that it was only thanks.

to the country’s private schools

and a few select public schools

that the country’s average grade
- wasa“D”,

Mr Stuart told The Tribune
that he was horrified by the
grades. He said it was a failure
of not just the PLP, with Alfred
Sears as minister, but the FNM
as well because grades were
lousy when Dion Foulkes was
minister.

He said the results proved
that both parties cared-more

about building roads and homes .

than they did about educating
the future of the Bahamas. It
was an indictment that both

parties were only concerned |

about material things, he added.

“Why aren’t they concerned
with the quality of life for
Bahamians, why aren’t they
-braggirig about the number of
PhDs we have in the country
and the amount of intelligent
young people we have?” he
asked.





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Mr Stuart said the same
homes government is so proud
to have built are the very homes
of children who can’ only
achieve an “F” im school.

_He said the disclosures made
it obvious that Mr Sears needed
to resign and proved that the
government did not have the
interests of children at heart.

“Otherwise, they would have

appointed a eecieated minis-

‘ter;*-he said.- - e
Mr Stuart added fiat students

leaving schools with minimal
qualifications were the very
ones who may have to run the
country within 20 years.

“We are planting sour seeds
and-we will soon reap nothing

‘but sour seeds,” he added.

Mr Stuart said a BDM gov-
ernment would definitely put
more effort into the ‘country’ s
education." -

_ While he applauded the gov-
ernment for calling an end to
social promotion, he said too
many students were still gradu-
ating without sufficient educa-
tional qualifications.

He said his party would like
to see the school day extended
from 9am to 4pm, giving stu-
dents a much needed extra hour
of class time.

In addition, he said, there
were too many adults in need of
remedial education. He sug-
gested that the schools also
open from. 6pm-9pm for adult
classes. ’ /

“We have no. natural
resources as such. All we have is

our people and an educated
people means a powerful POO",

ple,” he said.

The Tribune’s. story was
based on a report which has yet
to be Officially released. Critics
believe it has been kept under
wraps because officials are
deeply embarrassed.

SEE page 15.



‘Children
© Play Station 2.

© Scooters A
© Bicycles/Tri-eycles
© Roller Blades

© Barbies -

° Cars —

© Electronic Toys

© Games

° Arts & Crafts

© Books

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© Action Figures

° Stuffed Animals
“© Baby Clothes a
© Car Seats/Carriers- |
© Gift Baskets:








Ao: $4 $87



“jaws of life” to free a woman

_yards into the undergrowth.

“There was loud screaming





The Miami

Herald —

BAHAMAS EDITION

~ MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005

FIREMEN had to use the

from a car wreck during the ear-
ly hours of yesterday morning.

They dashed to the scene
after Lyford Cay police heard
screaming from the bush along-
side the road to South Ocean
Beach.

. Then a man was seen crawling
on to the roadside. He told offi-
cers that a woman was trapped __
inside the car, which had veered
out of control and ploughed 60













_ The vehicle struck severai
trees before coming to rest.
A source told The Tribune:




from the bush, but no-one could
pinpoint the direction.

“It was only when the man
came crawling out-of the bush
that we were able to locate the:
car.

“It seéms it just went out of
control on a straight road and
ploughed into the trees. It even-
tually hit a pie tree.”

The incident happened about.
3am. Both the man and woman
were taken to hospital, but there
was no information at press time
on their injuries or condition.



















(Photo: Felipé Major/ |
Tribune staff)

‘TRAFFICKERS
_ OFF OFFICIALS

Pat Strachan to sce
FNM nomination for |
St Thomas More

i By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter |













‘Jaws of life’ free woman from wreck






PAT STRACHAN, president of the Bahamas Real
Estate Association and a former champion boxer, is to
seek the FNM’s nomination for the St Thomas More

constituency in the next general election. i
In an interview with The Tribune on Saturday, Mr -:

Strachan said he had been toying with the idea of run-
ning for the past year. A deciding factor, he said, was the

election of Hubert Ingraham as party leader. i
“T am/a son of the soil in St Thomas More.I grew up. ; -

there, my family and friends are there and my office is

there,” he said.

“T have given this serious thought and have spoken. to
a number of persons in the constituency who have

assured me of their support.”

Mr Strachan said he has always had a strong desire to
serve his country and uplift the lives of the downtrodden.

“T want the best for the country,” he said..

Mr Strachan said he has the leadership abilities to

become a member of parliament.

“Fused to be a two-time championship boxer known
as The Centreville Assassin. I am also a past president

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Teenage tourist is
seriously injured
in jet-ski collision

A TEENAGE cruise ship
passenger from Florida became
Nassau’s latest jet-ski victim.
-over the weekend.

Last night, there was a new
call for tighter jet-ski controls
after 19-year-old Jose Ruben
Reyes was seriously injured off
Cabbage Beach on Saturday.

The youth was riding a rented
high-powered machine when it
was. in collision with another

“jet-ski. He was dragged ashore
with what: were thought to be
severe chest and hand injuries.

A nursing team from Atlantis
was quick to respond and oxy-
gen was being administered to
the distressed victim as he lay
on the beach waiting for para-
medics to arrive.

Eventuaily, he was
stretchered from the beach after
an ambulance crew had sta-
bilised his neck and back. He
was then rushed to hospital.

A tourist who saw the after-
math of the collision said: “This
poor guy was pulled off the
machine and on to the beach. I
dread to think what that might
have done to him if he had
spinal injuries.”

The Tribune was on the scene
within minutes.of the crash: Dis-

' traught friends and relatives sur-

SEE page 15

FBI searching
after woman
_ disappears from
cruise ship on
way to Nassau

i By PAUL. G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE FBI and US Coast
Guard are searching for a Cana-
dian woman who vanished from
a cruise ship on its way to Nas-
sau.

Jill Begora, 56, was reported
missing by her husband on Sat-
urday around 9am as the Royal
Caribbean vessel arrived at
Prince George Dock.

There was no record of her
disembarking and.a search by
the-crew found no trace of her.
Coast Guard officials were -
alerted in case Mrs Begora had
fallen overboard.

A helicopter and C-130 plane
began to search 20 miles east
of Nassau, where the ship was
located when Mrs Begora’s
absence was first noted.

Lt Commander Terry Johns,

SEE page 15

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



Fears grow
concerning |
srounded |
freighter —

FEARS of diesel oil pollu-
tion are growing as waves batter
a freighter which ran aground
off Paradise Island several
weeks ago.

Residents are concerned that
the hull will split, releasing fuel
on to nearby Paradise Island
Beach.

The vessel was first seen
around the third week of Octo-
ber, but has yet to be moved.

A small oil boom is floating
around the ship, but this is not
considered helpful unless there
is a way to remove the oil from
the boom: It is unclear who
owns the vessel or why no
preparation has been made for
its removal.

Residents say the vessel
should be moved as soon as
possible to prevent damage to
the environment.

LOCAL NEWS

The situation appears similar
to that of the 220-foot Canadian
oil drilling barge Louis J Goulet,
which has been in Bahamian
waters for some nine months.

In March, Exuma residents
and the Bahamas National :
Trust raised concerns over the ?
barge, which was reportedly
seen floating in shallow waters
near one of the country’s
national parks at the Concep-
tion Islands.

The barge was later removed
and taken to Walkers Cay,



where it remained until Hurri-

vessel then drifted until it ran
aground on the edge of a reef
about 100 yards off Man 0’ War





(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)

<<< 58 Haitian migrants are

Cay.
The process of removing :
water from the boat to lightenit

for removal has now begun.

eee ‘ tase wrRee Avy TNR
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@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

ANOTHER Haitian sloop
was apprehended over the
weekend as it tried to land ille-
gal immigrants.

The Royal Bahamas Defence
Force cornered the 40-foot ves-
sel in the Exumas. HMBS P-42
apprehended 58 suspected
undocumented Haitian immi-
grants while on routine patrol
on Saturday.

The sloop was 13 miles off
Cistern Cay at the time. Fifty-
three males and five females
-were aboard.

Because of unsanitary condi-
tions on the sloop, the Haitians
were taken aboard the Defence

Force vessel and brought to the
Coral Harbour base late Satur-
day night.

The Haitians, who appeared
to be in good condition, were
turned over to immigration offi-
cials for processing, and are
being held at Carmichael Road:
Detention Centre.

Late last night, Lt Comman-
der Terry Johns confirmed that
the US Coast Guard was help-
ing the Defence Force locate
another Haitian vessel, believed
to be somewhere off Andros.

A C-130 Coast Guard aircraft
out of Clearwater, Florida, was
helping search for the vessel,
suspected to have a number of
Haitian immigrants aboard.



Journalist
was victim
of mistaken
identity

A TRIBUNE journalist was
the victim of mistaken identity
when police told him they need-
ed to question him in connec-
tion with “human trafficking”.

Features sub-editor Samora
St Rose was waiting for his wife
in the Mall at Marathon’s food
courtyard on Friday evening.

Around 7pm, he said, three
uniformed police officers sur-
rounded him.

One asked Mr St Rose, who
was sitting down, to accompany
them to the police station for
questioning. “I need to see you,
you know. We need you to
come back to the station with us
for questioning," he said.

“For what?" asked Mr St
Rose.

“Human trafficking,” said the
second officer as the third
closed in.

“Human trafficking...you’ve
got the wrong guy because I
don’t have anything to do with
that sort of thing,” Mr St Rose
told the officers.

“Do you have any identifica-
tion?” the officer asked. After
showing his driver’s licence, the
officer said: “You must have a
twin.”

The officers then apologised

















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Mi SAMORA St Rose
to Mr St Rose for the inconve-
nience. “It was quite an embar-
rassing moment for me but at
least they said sorry,” Mr St
Rose said.

He said he hoped the officers

found who they were looking
for.


THE TRIBUNE





Mani in
hospital

following
shooting

AN employee of a local meat
mart is in hospital with gunshot
wounds after an attempted
armed robbery.

According to Reginald Fer-
guson, assistant commissioner
of police with responsibility for
crime, the lone gunman entered
the Fox Hill Meat Mart on
Bernard Road around lpm on
Thursday.

The gunman reportedly
demanded cash and fired shots
in the direction of a male
employee of the store, wound-
ing the man.

The robber reportedly fled the
scene with no cash but managed
to snatch a purse from a female
customer before escaping.

The employee was reported-
ly conscious when taken to the
hospital. His condition was
unknown up to press time.

shopkeeper |
and public
overpower
robber

PASSERS-BY helped a
shopkeeper overpower an
armed robber in Palmdale over
the weekend.

Police said the would-be thief
had either a screwdriver or
knife in his possession. He was
held until officers arrived to
arrest him.

The name of the store and its
owner have not been released.

/ : eta?
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“Copyrighted Material
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Available from Commercial News Providers”





















LOCAL NEWS




‘(RELIES West End deal





& PRIME Minister Perry Christie and Bobby Ginn are seen at the signing of the hheaile of
agreement for the proposed $3.7 billion resort project at West End. Seen in rear are various

cabinet ministers.

(Photo: Denise Maycock)



be built next year’

& By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE liquefied natural gas
(LNG) proposal by AES
Ocean Express is expected to
be approved by government
before the end of the year,
with construction of the 53.6
mile pipeline due in the third
quarter of 2000.

Prime Minister Perry
Christie hinted recently that
the government was near to
finalising its agreement to

enable the regasification com-.

pany to be given a licence
“very shortly”.
The AES project is a pro-

posed natural gas pipeline to

transport 842 million cubic feet
of natural gas to south-eastern
Florida. The project consists
of a new 53.62 mile interstate
26-inch natural gas pipeline
extending from the Exclusive
Economic Zone (EEZ)
boundary between the United
States and Ocean Cay in the

Biminis, to interconnect with
the Florida Gas Transmission
(FGT) system in Broward
County, Florida.

The project has sparked
heated debate among local
environmentalists and Ameri-
can anti-LNG lobbyists who
have been challenging the pro-
posal.

However, government and
independent consultants main-
tain that the plan is a safe one,
and that globally, LNG regasi-
fication and transportation is
continuing to grow as a safe
and viable industry.

Before leaving the Bahamas
to attend the World Trade
Organisation (WTO) meeting
in Hong Kong, Minister of
Trade and Industry Leslie
Miller said the project will be a
“win-win. situation” for the
people of Florida and the
Bahanias.:

“There are many senators,
including the governor of
Florida, who are very, very,

very anxious to have this AES
project get off the ground to
enable us to assist Florida in
satisfying their energy needs.

“Of course, it appears to us
that it is a win-win situation
for the people of Florida as
well as for the people of the
Bahamas with the execution
of the agreement that we have
before us,” he said.

Mr Miller said he hopes that,
with the blessing of the prime
minister, the final decision on
the proposal will be forthcom-
ing “very shortly”.

As it has already met all of
its environmental require-
ments, the BEST Commission
has already greenlighted the
project with the US-based
AES Corporation, one of the
world’s leading power compa-
nies.

The AES Corporation is
already operating an LNG ter-
minal and natural gas pipeline
at AES Andres in the Domini-
can Republic.

Call for government to
crack down on real estate

& By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas Real
Estate Association has
called on government to
stop large sums of money
leaving the country in
allegedly “illegal” real
estates transactions.

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According to Pat Strachan,
president of BREA, under the
Real Estate Brokers and Sales-
man Act of 1995, it is illegal and
punishable by law for a person
to sell, list, and collect a com-
mission for Bahamian real
estate without a licence.

He said the association is
concerned about the vast num-
ber of real estate transactions
taking place outside the country,
particularly for the new Kerzner
Residences on Paradise Island.

Mr Strachan said listings for
all 510 of the luxurious homes
are with a Florida real estate
company with each expected to
fetch between $685,000-$2.5
million.

He said not one of the resi-
dences is listed with a BREA
agent, which means that, when
sold, the profits from the sale, as
well as the commission, all goes
directly out of the country.

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"I am concerned from a
national level about the amount
of money going out of the coun-
try," he said.

"I need to know if my agents
will be involved in the listing
and selling of these properties.”

In addition to the Kerzner
Residences, Mr Strachan said
similar situations exist in Abaco
and Harbour Island.

"It has come to a point where
we say, who is looking out for
Bahamians?" he said.

Mr Strachan said BREA is
working tirelessly to prepare
proposed amendments it hopes
will fill any loopholes.

2G

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited



NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI






Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608



appears to be running into more trouble
following a recent defeat in a House of
Commons vote, a new rising star has
emerged onto the British political scene.

The Conservative (also known as Tory) par- -

ty, which boasts such political giants as Win-
ston Churchill and Margaret Thatcher as
former leaders and prime ministers, has cho-
sen 39-year-old David Cameron as its new
leader — the fourth to face Mr Blair since he
defeated sitting prime minister John Major
at the 1997 General Election.

Last week, the charismatic Cameron saw
off his chief rival, the 56-year-old experi-

‘ enced David Davis who started the contest’

as the bookmakers’ favourite, by an over-
whelming two to one margin in a postal bal-
lot of Tory party members across the UK.

Recognising the urgent need for Conser-
vatives to offer the electorate a fresh
approach to politics and new ideas after los-
ing the last three elections, Mr Cameron
has called for a’ “modern compassionate
conservatism” with a pledge to roll back
the power and interference of state and
reassert individual choice and control in
everyday life. In his acceptance speech he
~also declared that he was fed up with the
' “Punch and Judy politics of Westminster

and the name calling, back biting, point
scoring, finger pointing...”

These are early days because, whatever
the personal political fortunes of Mr Blair
‘himself, his Labour government was re-
elected in May for a maximum five-year
term; so, barring wholly unforeseen cir-
’ cumstances, Britain will not go to the polls
again until 2009 at the earliest.

That should work to the benefit of Mr
Cameron who has been an MP for only four
years, is relatively untested in the political
arena and needs time to build up and con-
solidate his new role as leader. But his youth
should be an asset — it is worth remember-
ing that John F Kennedy was only 43 years
old when he became US president.

If he is to succeed, however, he will need
to take an early opportunity to overcome
what some see as the handicap — in the
culture of envy and resentment in a still

class-ridden modern Britain — of attend- -



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Rising new star for Tories in UK

WHILE Tony Blair’s premiership

ing elitist Eton College and Oxford Uni-
versity. For, to be able to reach out to a
cross section of the electorate, he will have
to show himself as a man of the people. But
already the signs are good as he presents
himself as genuinely unpretentious and
down to earth despite his ‘privileged back-
ground.

Extremism of the left or right is out of
fashion in British politics. The coming battle
between the two mainstream parties will be
for the centre ground, now occupied by New
Labour which was forced to ditch Clause 4
(common ownership of the means of pro-
duction and control of industry and ser-
vices) of the original Labour party consti-
tution in order to put itself in a position to
win the 1997 election.

To make themselves electable, the Con-
servatives, in their turn, will have to override
the residual influence of the party’s right
wing dinosaurs. They will also have to pre-
sent a united front on Europe, undertaking
that Britain should continue to play an influ-
ential role in an expanded European Union
while at the same time taking a stand against
the growing power of Brussels bureaucrats

’ and their interference in domestic issues.
For Bahamians watching this fascinating

story unfold, there are some interesting par-
allels and perhaps some lessons as well. The
emergence of an exciting new leader to
strengthen the main opposition party in one
of the world’s oldest.democracies reminds us
that an effective parliamentary opposition is
the essence of stable government in a
democracy.

A vigilant, free and independent press
also plays a role because our rulers need to
be kept under constant scrutiny to ensure
that their excesses are curbed and that good
governance prevails.

As our nation gears up for a General Elec-
tion — perhaps as early as next year — let
us hope that the resurgent Free National
Movement under its new, but well tried and
tested, leader Hubert Ingraham will become
as effective in opposition as Britain’s revi-

‘talised Conservatives promise to be under

theirs.

(*This is a guest editorial).

98
01H






















Doctors, bir
flu, petrol
and health

EDITOR, The Tribune

MINISTER Miller seems to
have been seduced into the
Socialist camp of President
Chavez of Venezuela by the lure
of cheap Petrocaribe gasoline.
Next to fall into the Socialist
camp was Minister Bethel,
swung by Castro and his “free
sample” of Cuban eye doctors,
followed in short order by anoth-
er ‘free sample”: Cuban dentists!

Where is this all going, and

is there a link between this -
* introductory, free sample of

Cuban medical care and the
proposed PLP National Health
Tax?

Is it the intention of this gov-
ernment to out source Bahami-
an medical care to Castro, to
be serviced by Cuban doctors
and Cuban medical facilities?
It surely seems so! Is it the
intention of Mr Bethel to have a
Cuban Construction Brigade
brought here to build the pro-
posed new Princess Margaret
and Rand Memorial hospitals
he promised in his recent
speeches? I think so!

Do we really think that Cuba
will do all this for nothing? If so
we all still believe in the tooth
fairy, and will purchase the Par-
adise Island Bridge from any
joneser!

Nothing is ever ‘free’ here on
earth! All this will be paid for
by good old hard Bahamian
cash, which you the taxpayer
will cough up! Tell me which
insurance company will indem-
nify Cuban doctors when they
mess up your medical treat-
ment? Will this be paid for by
the Bahamian government,
your tax dollars?

My friend, hospitals are
among. the most.expénsive
buildings to build and equip.
They cost here on average
between $200 to $500 per
square foot. This means that a
four hundred plus bed hospital
like the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital can be expected to cost
around $150 to $200 million to
construct and equip. Add
another $50 to $100 million to
construct and equip the Rand
Hospital. Major borrowing or
taxation will be needed to pay
for this. I note that Mr James
Smith only spoke of money to
build and improve the airport!
He is the authority. man on
spending government money,
not the Senator minister for
Health.

New hospitals should be built
by the private sector and the
social partners. We should have
a Baptist Hospital here, sup-
ported in part by the huge Bap-
tist community. This would be a

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worthy use of your tithes.
Unions could partner with the
Baptists in this. Tell me a better
way for union funds to help the
workers than providing them
with a hospital! Let government
be the regulator of all this! Can-
cel the proposed health tax!

In the 1950s the Roman
Catholic diocese took the lead
with educational medical and
child care facilities. Time for
Baptists and unions to the take
the lead.

Government can give the
social partners and the private
sector concessions to provide
and operate these facilities, or is
it that concessions can only be
given to foreign investors to
exploit this country? This would
be a good use for Crown land!

In Barbados, Jamaica and
other Caribbean islands there
are hospitals owned and oper-
ated by religious groups such as
the Adventist and Roman
Catholics. Government gives
them a supplement. I have per-
formed surgical operations in
some of these fine institutions
and speak from personal expe-
rience!

USA medical care is of a high
standard to avoid medicolegal
liability. What will guarantee
the Cuban standard, and who
will pay for the cases which are
messed up due to negligence?
Will this. be paid by the
Bahamas government, ie you

-the taxpayer? In Grenada in

the eighties [ had a cadre of
Cuban surgeons. serving under

me, and spent many hours cor- ‘

recting their mistakes! You will
need to provide for damages.
Which of our doctors will try
to sell you this pig in a poke,
Mr Bethel or Senator Nottage?
It will certainly not be the
Bahamas Medical Association!
The association was not con-
sulted on this despite the fre-
quent claims that the PLP is a
“consultative” government. Is
it that they know the concerns
of our doctors regarding the
safety of all this? There is no
eye or tooth epidemic to justify
the lack of consultation?
While this government is
playing games on us with Cuba,
we are faced with real problems

_if this Bird flu epidemic sur-

faces, since the government
with the facilities to produce
both vaccine and aintiviral
drugs is the USA. Now tell me
why would the USA want to
help us out given the pro Social-

ist country stance the PLP i is:
taking?

They will tell us to ask
Chavez or Castro, our Socialist:
friends for flu vaccine and anti-
viral drugs! Or they may say ask:
CHINA!

So to all those who see no-
problem with Cuban doctors.
and Venezuela oil deals I say:
pray hard that there is no Bird
Flu epidemic, since this gov-
ernment is kicking the USA-in
the teeth on a daily basis. Have
they forgotten that President
Bush is in charge? We all heard:
him say ‘if you are not with me
you are against me’! Can you
see him being in a hurry to sup-
ply us with bird flu vaccine or
aintiviral drugs with our current
pro-socialist foreign policy? -I
do not think we will get a single
vaccine!

The PLP should be worrying
about where to get vaccine if
this bird flu epidemic strikes!
We don’t need eye doctors, or:
dentists. We need a guaranteed
source of vaccine!

I hope no one thinks that the
Americans don’t see that the
Bahamas is helping Cuba ‘to.
beat the US trade embargo. The:
Americans are not fooled by:
the Petrocaribe deal. They sus-
pect that there must be a kick
back somewhere by Chavez:to
Castro for these medical doe:
tors! The PLP is playing a dan=
gerous game, and one if it back
fires will mean full graveyards:
of Bahamians who would oth?
erwise have been saved bya
more sensible foreign policy. .»*

I suggest that you look for:
the next “free sample”: Cubar:.
nurses! How will these be jusfi«”
fied? There used to be a
Bahamaiansation policy, cham-
pidnedbya true: PLPONT
Arthur Hanna! Has’ the ‘new
PLP party departed, from. this;
policy even before the passage”
of this National Hero! The;
Cubanisation of our health sér-"
vices is only the first step in the
Cubanisation of all our services.
I guess it will only sink in when_
Cubans take hotel jobs. By then”
it will be far too late!

If Bahamians die from Bird
flu it will be due to the mié-
guided pro-socialist foreign pol=
icy of the PLP government who;:
in my view, have worked hard”
to alienate our traditional alliés,**
the USA. We need a new and
more sensible foreign policy
immediately or sooner! 3

-BAHAMIAN mals

NATIONALIST — owas

DEXTER JOHNSON «°°

Law Lecturer “4

Nassau

December 2005

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 5



Preservation
group hosts
fundraising
weekend

@ By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Millar’s Creek Preser-
vation Group had its first fund-
raising event this weekend with
two days and nights of real
Caribbean-style partying.

The Bacardi Road Park
came alive on Saturday and
Sunday to the sounds of soca,
calypso, merengue, junkanoo,
rake n’ scrape, creole music,
and more, when entertainers
from around the region came
together to deliver Caribinale
2005.

The Millar’s Creek Preser-
vation group is a non-profit
organisation endorsed by the
National Trust, which is com-
mitted to preserving the only
creek left in New Providence,
which runs from the Coral
Harbour canal through the
Bone Fish Pond in South
‘Beach.

According to group chair-
man Emmanuel McKenzie, the
areas around the creek have
been used for many years as
dumping grounds by “careless
individuals".

"The damage is quite exten-
sive and will take the assistance
of the community and the gov-
ernment to restore,” he said.

Proceeds will go towards
purchasing a truck and other
tools to help clean and further
restore Millar’s Creek and
Bone Fish Pond.

Mr McKenzie said he hoped
the event was successful in
knitting Caribbean countries
together through cultural
exchange, and in encouraging
residents in the area to have
pride for these delicate parts
of the island’s ecosystem.

Saturday’s opening ceremo-
ny, which featured a national
anthem medley, paying respect
to each country represented,
followed by a flag display.

(dee Or Mom on!
~(@eod ts ot
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_

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

RRR Ea

MONDAY,
DECEMBER 12

6:30am § Bahamas @ Sunrise - Live
7:30 Community Page 1540AM
11:00 Immediate Response
12:00 ZNS News Update (Live)
12:03 Caribbean News Update
12:30 Immediate Response cont'd
1:00 Lisa Knight & the Round
Table
1:30 This Generation
H 2:00 Gospel Video Countdown
3:00 Treasure Attic
3:30 CMJ Club Zone
4:00 Thousand Dollar Bee
4:30 Kids on the Move
5:00 News Update ZNS
5:30 Cinema, Cinema, Cinema
6:00 Holy Hip Hop
6:25 Life Line
6:30 News Night 13 - Freeport
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News Night 13
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Renegade
Community Page 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
right to make last minute
programme changes!



@ By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

WHILE the Ministry of
Financial Services gears up to
sign a landmark agreement for
Mayaguana in January, offi-
cials of the Teachers and
Salaried Workers Co-opera-
tive Credit Union claim their
proposal to complement the
proposed development by the
I-Group has been "snubbe".

The proposal, said one of the
union's leaders, was presented
to Minister Allyson Maynard-
Gibson on September 19. But
to date, he said, there had been
no response from the ministry.

"The government said they
would be rolling out the red
carpet for both Bahamian and
foreign investors," he said.
"But in this instance, the red
carpet is only being rolled out

for the I-Group. Here you
have a strictly Bahamian com-
pany with sufficient financial
resources to participate mean-
ingfully in the development of
the Family Islands, and we are
being pushed aside for foreign
investors."

Minister Maynard-Gibson
announced last week that the
I-Group would be signing a
heads of agreement with the
Bahamas government in Janu-
ary to make Mayaguana a
"free zone", similar to
Freeport, run by the Grand
Bahama Port Authority.

She said the venture would
be 50/50 between the govern-
ment and the foreign investors,
and would make Mayaguana
"the premier vacation destina-
tion in the southern Bahamas".

According to a board of direc-
tors proposal to the ministry: "It

is fair to assume that under the
leads of agreement to be
announced, there will be the
grant of considerable Crown
land to cause the proposal to be
successful. This, for all intent and
purpose, is standard operating
procedure. A modus operandi
and provision, we believe, are
also available to Bahamian com-
panies willing to take advantage
of such concessions.

“We are not aware that any
Bahamian counterparts have
been given concessions, nor
were they invited to provide
concessions for the communi-
ties which might not have been

a part of the agreement which, °-

when put in place, would have
transformed those communities
to the point where Bahamians
could own and operate many
of the local businesses along-

side their foreign counterparts."

The credit union's propos-
als include:

e To assist Bahamians, and
more particularly natives and
descendants of Mayaguana,
obtain ownership of their first
home and for descendants out-
side Mayaguana second home
ownership by creating housing
sub-divisions in Pirate's Well,
Abraham's Bay and Betsy
Bay, and providing mortgages.

e Create a business centre
in the capital town of Abra-
ham's Bay by providing shops
and other rental facilities.

¢ Construct a shopping com-
plex to include a retail food
store, laundry and rental
spaces.

¢ Open a branch of the
Teacher's Credit Union in

Mayaguana for the purpose of ~

members and residents who
may wish to save and to facili-

Archbishop to retire in 2008

ARCHBISHOP Drexel
Gomez has confirmed that he
will stand down from office
as Bishop of the Diocese of
the Bahamas and the Turks
and Caicos Islands at the end
of December 2008.

Although there are various
ages for retirement for a bish-
op within the Province of the
West Indies, Archbishop
Gomez has decided to stand
down at the age of 72.

He leaves office one full
month before his 72nd birth-
day in January, 2009. He
believes that in this way,
things would flow easier for
the new bishop, who could
begin serving at the begin-
ning of 2009.

Seventy-two is also the
retirement age for the Bishop
in Jamaica, although in this
case, there is provision for an
extension under certain cir-
cumstances.

And, having retired as
diocesan bishop, it is manda-
tory that Archbishop Gomez
also demit office as Arch-
bishop and Metropolitan of
the Province of the West
Indies.

Meantime, a special synod
— called the Elected Assem-
bly — will be held in early
February to elect a co-adjutor

NOT



@ ARCHBISHOP Drexel
Gomez

bishop, who will automati-
cally succeed the diocesan
bishop when he leaves office.

Archbishop Gomez said he
made the request for a co-
adjutor bishop at the 105th
session of Synod during Octo-
ber, one of the main reasons’
being continuity.

He explained that the Dio-
cese of the Bahamas and the
Turks and Caicos Islands is
engaged in a diocesan-wide
project in mission and min-
istry, and in this exercise, “we
are trying to involve as many
people in the diocese in com-

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ing up with a new mission state-
ment for the diocese, and to
provide a strategic plan for the
diocese for the next five to’ 10
years.”

Archbishop Gomez said: “I
thought that in what we are

doing as a diocese, continuity.

would be important, so if a per-

son is elected, which I hope a:

person would be elected and
consecrated in 2006, we would
have someone who is already
involved in the process and
would be able to take over
automatically when I retire.”

He said continuity in that
leadership would be of
“extreme importance” if this
diocese is to be effective in its
work.

The archbishop said ‘he also
asked for a co-adjutor bishop
because the sooner his successor
is determined the better it
would be for the Diocese.

He could have asked for
another suffragan bishop to suc-
ceed Bishop Gilbert Thompson,
who retired in late October.

But, in Archbishop Gomez’s
opinion, this was not the route
to follow, as it would have

meant that when he demitted) f=...
office the Diocese would shave =e

electing a:diocesan bishop.
The archbishop said he was

_ happy: that synod concurred

with his proposal.

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By SIR RONALD
SANDERS
(/he writer is a business exec-
aid former Caribbean
diplomat who publishes widely
ou Small States in the global
COMMA ).

‘a NE of the most
important confer-

ences for the future of
mankind was held in Montreal,


































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GE 6, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005

r problem of climate change

Canada last week — the United
Nations Conference on Climate
Change.

And for a change, it recorded
some success despite the posi-
tion of the United States.

The countries, represented
at the Conference, agreed to
extend a climate pact, called the
Kyoto Protocol, beyond 2012
when it was due to expire.

This is good news for the
Caribbean even though many



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governments in the region were
not represented at a high level
at the meeting.

It is good news because cli-
mate change is linked to the vio-
lent hurricanes and other dis-
turbing weather that the region
has been experiencing in recent
years with dreadful conse-
quences.

Now, if the Caribbean is to
capitalise on this movement in
Montreal, climate change must
become a priority of policy
development and a key part of
the work of foreign ministries.

The breakthrough in Mon-
treal occurred largely because
the governments of the Euro-
pean Union (EU), Japan and
Canada support the Protocol
and the lowering of gas emis-
sions that hurt the environment.

It was their active work, sup-
ported by developing countries,
that resulted in ministers agree-
ing to launch new, open-ended
discussions on ways to fight
global warming despite objec-
tions from the US.

The Kyoto Protocol sets out
limits by which industrialised
countries must reduce green-

ia
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house gas emissions and five
other gases by 2012. The US is
not a signatory to the Protocol
since the administration of Pres-
ident George W Bush withdrew
the US after the former gov-
ernment of President Bill Clin-
ton had signed it.

Now, with the decision in
Montreal, the Protocol will not
expire and countries, which have
signed it, will be held to lowering
these emissions. However, this
will not include the US.

Therefore, before the world
starts cheering at what hap-
pened in Montreal, it has to be
recalled that the United States
alone accounts for about 25 per
cent of gas emissions that are
linked to climate change.

So, while a decision has been
made by the signatories to the



Climate change
is linked to
the violent
hurricanes and
other disturbing
weather that the
region has been
experiencing in
recent years
with dreadful
consequences.



Protocol to extend it and to
seek new commitments beyond
2012 as early as possible, major
polluters are still in business
with no internationally binding
restriction.

mong those countries
with no restriction are

«China and India‘who have no
“targets under Kyoto and who

say that rich industrial states,

such as the United States, have
to take the lead in cutting emis-
sions because they have already
developed their economies with
coal, oil and gas. Now, they
argue, it is the turn of the large
developing countries.

On the other hand, both Pres-
ident Bush and a significant
membership of the US Congress
contend that China and India
ought to be included among the
countries that are restricted since
their industries would be com-
peting against US companies on
an uneven playing field.

There is merit in both argu-
ments, but the perceived short
term national interests of coun-
tries should not be paramount
over the long term interest of
the world as a whole.

Further, when climate change
is evidently adversely affecting
countries in the Caribbean and

Colors:
Bronze, Gold,

Blue, Black, Pink.

Rosetta St.





SIR Ronald Sanders

the Pacific and even coastal
communities in Canada, Europe
and Asia, the issue should not
be one for barter.

In this regard, the govern-
ments of the United States,
Australia, China, India and
Brazil, who are major emitters
of harmful gasses, need to be
engaged by the rest of the glob-
al community — including the
Caribbean — to persuade them
to compromise in the wider
global interest.

The argument that the US
economy would be harmed if
the US cut back on its green-
house gas emissions is not a
position supported by former
US President Bill Clinton.

Indeed, Mr Clinton turned
up at the Montreal Conference
at the invitation of a Canadian
group to declare Mr Bush’s
position to be “flat wrong”.

He also said: “There’s no
longer any serious doubt that cli-
mate change is real, accelerating
and caused by human activities”.

Mr Clinton is not the. only
senior and serious US citizen to
believe this. So, too, does a
leading US climate scientist, Dr
James Hansen, who has warned
that the world has just.10 years
to act on climate change.

Dr Hansen says that a rise
of just one degree Celsius in
temperature would take the
Earth into climate. patterns it

has not seen for at least 500,000.

years.
Well what does all that
mean? Simply, that if the entire
world — but especially the
United States and other large
countries — does not do some-
thing fast and together about
greenhouse gas emissions, cli-
mate change will destroy many
countries, and kill many more
hundreds of thousands of peo-
ple over the next few years.

t the Montreal Con-

ference, the World
Wildlife Fund (WWF) con-
firmed in a report what we all
instinctively felt: 2005 was the
worst year for extreme weather
— with the hottest tempera-

THE TRIBUNE



tures, most Arctic melting, worst
Atlantic hurricane season and
the warmest Caribbean waters.

And, increasingly the scien-
tific community is saying that if
the present trend continues, the
world will not avoid an irre-
versible environmental cata-
strophe.

This is bad news for every-
one, but especially bad for the
Caribbean which has been bat-
tered by hurricanes continu-
ously now for ten agonising
years, with a prediction of a fur-
ther 20 years to come.

It is time for Caribbean gov-
ernments to ratchet up the issue
of climate change on their for-
eign policy agenda.

For climate change will affect
everything: more frequent and
powerful storms in the region
will turn away investment, par-
ticularly in the crucial tourism
industry on which the region ©
has become highly dependent,
hurricane devastation, flooding
caused by greater rainfall, and
stronger earthquakes will dam-
age economies so continuously
that recovery will be a struggle;
and, of course, the lives and
livelihoods of the Caribbean
people will be gravely affected. ,

The writing for this is already ~
on the wall. The Caribbean
region cannot afford to wait for
what looks like the inevitable
before acting to influence the
positions of those. countries
whose activities are direct con-
tributors to climate change.’

Just as the European Union’s
decisions to cut the prices :for

’ the Caribbean’s sugar by 36 per-

cent and to remove preferences
for bananas galvanised govern-
ments to action, climate chahge



The Caribbean
region cannot |
afford to wait. :
for what
looks like the
inevitable
before acting to
influence the
positions of
those countries
whose activities
are direct
contributors to
climate change.



should rouse them to action as
well. For, the consequences are
arguably even more dreadful,
because they will be more wide-
spread.

Action for deeper cuts in gas-
es from burning fossil fuels in
power plants, autos and facto-
ries in large countries should
now be an important priority
for the Caribbean to help stave
off the disastrous consequences
of climate change on its eco-
nomic and cultural survival.

(responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com)

Phone : 325 - 3336


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PAGE 8, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005

Cc

COMMONWEALTH BANK

ployment O;

Senior P prsanal Banking Officer
Freeport Branch



Commonwealth Bank is the premier Bahamian Bank with
branches located in New Providence, Abaco and Grand.
Bahama. We are committed to delivering superior quality
service, to training and developing our employees, to creating
value for our shareholders and to promoting economic growth
and stabilicy in the community.

Core Job Responsibilities:
* Carrying out a range of lending activities, including but not limited to:
- Interviewing applicants to determine purpose of credir
requirements, 1.e. mortgage, loan, overdraft
- Advising applicants of financing options - cerms, rate costs, etc.
- Determining credit acceprabilicy based on credit score and
other tools
. Providing rationale and approving credit within authorized
limit or making recommendations to Management for those in
excess of lending authority
Maintaining ongoing customer relationships and participating in
Branch Marketing efforts
Selling new deposit and investment accounts
Carrying out a range of administrative functions in support of
customers’ personal banking
Providing strong leadership for Branch personnel

Qualifications, Skills and Experience:

» Five years commercial banking experience with some experience
in Lending ;
Strong Leadership skills and coaching skills
Ability to deal ractfully with customers
Excellence communication skills, boch wrircen and ‘oral -
Commitment to Customer Service Excellence
Strong Sales abilicy

Some Accounting knowledge is helpful but not essential
Strong PC skills (MS Word, MS Excel)

‘Remuneration Package:
We offer an excellent remuneration and benefits package, which
includes performance based incentives; health, vision, dental and life
insurances; and a pension plan.

Interested persons should submit their resumes and copies of certificates
in WRITING or E-mail along with copies of their certificates before
December 16, 200

HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT
“Re: SENIOR PERSONAL BANKING OFFICER, Freeport Branch”
Head Office, The Plaza, 2 Floor, Mackey Street
PO. Box §8-6263
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 394-0758
E-mail address: Tanya. Astwood@combankitd.com



Pallet Racking

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Actors, actresses and
filmmakers have flocked
to the Bahamas for the
Bahamas International
Film Festival. On
Thursday night, people
gathered for a screening
of Jim Jarmusch’s new
film, Broken Flowers,
and a dessert reception
at Atlantis’ Lagoon Bar







@ ACTOR and former LA Lakers star Rick Fox





(Photos: Sid McLean/
Tribune staff

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MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 9

THE TRIBUNE

‘LOCAL NEWS





ARTHUR FOULKES: NOTED JOURNALIST,
UNIVERSAL PERSPECTIVE, HISTORICAL CONTEXT - A MUST-READ COLUMN THAT GETS TO THE POINT





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@ THE men of SIGMA Bahamas which comprises Delta Epsilon Sigma (Graduate Chapter) and
Beta Beta Lambda (Collegiate Chapter - COB) embarked on a new project, “Keep our Historical
Site Clean”. Fort Charlotte on Saturday was their first stop. Their plans are to have clean-up
projects at each fort in Nassau once every 3 months.

é (BIS Photo: Derek Smith)

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005 THE TRIBUNE |



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-.. LOCAL NEWS

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SNIFT_ the future







parents led a young Bahamian
doctor to produce a book about
the institution known as the
Princess Margaret Hospital.

As a result the Bahamas owes
a debt of gratitude to Dr Harold
Munnings Jr, for his dedication
and application to the task of
writing the first comprehensive
history of the life of this “trea-
sured Bahamian institution”.
He did all the research and writ-
ing, as he says, “on family time”.

Harold’s grandfather, Edgar
Munnings, was a respected
stonemason and builder in his
day and “sometime around
1920 he contracted tetanus and
was admitted to the Bahamas
General Hospital (later to
become the PMH)”. Edgar fell,
in love with his nurse, Dorothy
Dorsett, a twenty-three-year-
old native of Eleuthera, and
they were married. Harold’s
father was their first child.

It was while searching for
information on the Bahamas
General Hospital where his
grandparents met that Harold
suggested to the Librarian; Miss

ES ES E
@ DR Harold Munnings Jr

0 N15 iH 0 (y ‘ S WHAT grew out ofasearch Virginia Ballance, a respected healthcare professionals and in
for information about his grand-

scholar and historian in herown __ the diversity of disciplines.”

right, that perhaps he should
write a history of the hospital.
He had no idea what he had got

himself into.

He visited, photographed and
transcribed every commemora-
tive plaque on the hospital com-
pound. These plaques mark the
official completion of various
hospital projects and each one
has a story to tell, he says in his
introduction.

Although he says he has only
scratched the surface, it was a
bold initiative that places on
record 52 years of outstanding
progress at PMH. And he
records: “The life-extending
upgrades to the hospital have
allowed it to play a significant

. part in the national develop-

ment and its history has become
part of the Bahamian heritage.”

As Lady Marguerite Pindling
remarked on the 50th anniver-
sary of the hospital in 2003:
“The PMH has come from hum-
ble beginnings to a now state-
of-the-art facility. It has experi-
enced tremendous growth, in
terms of development of our




(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)

_ Responsibilities include:

Dr Munnings, who was edu-

cated at Queen’s College in...

Nassau, McGill University in
Canada and at the University
of the West Indies in Jamaica,
traces the development of the
first hospitals from the African
Hospital, which first appeared
on a 1788 map of Nassau on
West Hill Street. That hospital
was built around 1780, primari-
ly for the use of slaves.

It is not clear how long this
hospital remained in use, but
was probably gradually decom-

missioned after emancipation.

(1834).

Then there was the Quaran-
tine Hospital. Quarantine of
persons entering the Bahamas
was enforced at least from the
1700s. The objective was the
protection of residents from
infectious diseases, such as
smallpox and cholera. Passen-
gers could be quarantined
onboard ship in the harbour or
on land at Athol Island, “where
an eighteen-bed quarantine sta-
tion was built for this purpose”.

Then there was the Poor
House, which cared for the poor
and needy, where food, shelter
and basic medical care could be
obtained. But up to the 20th
century “the out islands had no
medical facilities whatsoever.”

It was the Geographical Soci-
ety Expedition of 1903 from
Baltimore to the Bahamas that
first mentioned the prevalence

_of leprosy in the country.

And it was in 1908 that the.,

Bahamas General Hospital was .

established on the present site:

of PMH.

Dr Munnings traces in some.

detail the hospital’s develop-
ment following the seminal

Beveridge Report, which was .

the first report of a consultant to _

the government on healthcare
in the Bahamas (1927).

Sir Wilfred Beveridge, an -
eminent British doctor, spent _
four weeks in the colony, visit-

ing hospitals, the prison and .
police barracks. He toured.

over-the-hill Bain Town and
Grants Town, “where there was

still neither potable water nor a.

sewerage system”. F
The report, says Dr
Munnings, was “a model of

e Arrange the Executive’s schedule and itinerary
e Handle all Executive correspondence
¢ Record minutes at meetings and produce accurate transcripts
* Carry out administrative duties relative to an Executive Office
© Preparing draft replies for standard correspondence

e Maintaining a proper filing system

Candidates should possess:.

¢ 2 years job related experience

¢ Associate’s Degree in Busines

would be a plus

Personal Attributes

e Highly confidential in nature
° Good oral, written and human relations skills
° Ability to deal tactfully with customers
e Excellent work attitude, punctuality and attendance record
¢ Matured and responsible

¢ Proficiency in Microsoft Word & Excel
¢ Typing skills of 50 w.p.m

s Administration or a related field

Interested persons should submit their resumes in WRITING along
with copies of their certificates on/before Tuesday December 20,

2005.

to:

Human Resources Department
Re: Administrative Assistance

P.O. Box N-3482
Nassau, Bahamas

Or

Fax: 1 (242) 323-7086


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 13



LOCAL NEWS



history of a Bahamian institution

careful observation, thorough-
ness and diplomatic criticism”.

The damning report stung the
government to improve condi-
tions at the 75-bed hospital,
while Sir Wilfred went on to
lasting acclaim in British histo-
ry: he was the architect and
founder of the British National
Health Service.

It can be said that from that
time the country became aware
that healthcare was not a Juxu-
ry but a necessity for the future
development of the Bahamas.

The old Victoria Jubilee Hos-
pital stood until the early 1970s.
It was demolished to make way
for' the Outpatient’s extension
and the Private Ward building,
constructed in 1922, which is
still in use. It is now part of the
oncology complex.

It was during Princess Mar-
garet’s tour of the Bahamas in
1955 that the hospital was
named in her honour.

But it was to be a series of
unfortunate and horrifying
accidents that led to major
changes in the fortunes of
PMH, when it became evi-
dent that the hospital could
not cope with such traumas
that afflict modern-day
society.

It’s a shame that a pic-
ture of Dr Jan Steele-
Perkins, who was to have
such an influence on the
development of the
nation, could not be
traced for inclusion in
Dr Munnings’ book. He tells
the story of how the retired
British naval officer and opthal-
mologist — one of the first spe-
cialists and the first in eye dis-
eases — arrived at the hospital in
1954 and set up practice.

It was in that year that a
young Lynden Oscar Pindling,
newly returned barrister from
England, was struck in the left
eye while playing baseball at
the Southern Recreation
Grounds. The British doctor
and his skilful team saved Pin-
dling’s eye. The young lawyer
went on to become this coun-
try’s first prime minister and
was knighted by the Queen.

The hospital is also indebted
to-such generous donors as
Hyman J Sobiloff for the Eye
Wing; Eunice, Lady Oakes for

the Children’s Ward; and James
Henry Rand for the Rand Lab-
oratory and Pathology Depart-
ment. After Rand’s death in
1968 the Grand Bahama Clinic
was renamed the Rand Memo-
rial Hospital in his honour.
Amazingly, when the new
hospital was built in 1952, there
was still no provision for a sep-
arate tuberculosis (TB) ward.
A new Chest Wing was built in
1961 at a cost of £450,000 with
152 beds, which almost doubled
the full patient bed complement
at PMH.
And from that time the bud-
get for healthcare in the
Bahamas has climbed
from










£1.67 million
to over $150 million a year.

The period from 1965 to1980
Dr Munnings calls the “adoles-
cence” period of PMH as it
marked the hospital’s experi-
ence with mass casualties and
a new found awareness of the
importance of disaster pre-
paredness. One disaster fol-
lowed closely by another.

In 1965 the cruise ship
Yarmouth Castle caught fire
and sank on its way to Nassau,
killing almost 100 people. It was
the worst maritime disaster in
recent Bahamian history.

In several important respects
it also changed PMH for the
better, says Dr Munnings.

The hospital’s Intensive Care
Unit was under construction at

CIBC Private
Wealth Management

the time of the disaster and the
incident accelerated its com-
pletion. But it was to be three
years before it was put into
operation, because of the need
for specially trained nurses to
operate it.

Perhaps the greatest benefit
from the disaster was the recog-
nition of the potential role and
value of community volunteers.

Almost immediately after the
disaster, two American resi-
dents of Nassau, Mrs Nancy
Kelly and Mrs Peggy Jones,
formed a Hospital Volunteer
Auxiliary, which became known
as the Yellowbirds. Although
now disbanded, they have the
distinction of being the great-

est patrons of the PMH in

terms of money and
volunteer hours served.
And just two years lat-
er, at a Taylor Gas plant
not far from the hospital

on Collins Avenue, a

huge explosion ripped the

propane gas and storage
distribution firm. Four men
were extensively burned in
the accident and all later
died.

This tragic accident forced

the ICU unit at the hospital

to be opened. From that day
it has never closed.

Dr Munnings deals at length
with these two disasters draw-
ing on newspaper accounts
from the period and showing
how they impacted directly on
the development of PMH.

He proudly records the build-
ing of the new state-of-the-art

Outpatients Wing with its show-.

piece radiology suite. The build-
ing cost $7 million and took four
years to complete.

He tells the story of a part-
time employee of the Frank
Hanna Cleaning company who
worked on that opening: day.
He was a high school student
named Reginald Carey.

“He mopped the front
entrance in preparation for the
arrival of the dignitaries and he
watched the ceremony from the
rear,” writes Dr Munnings. The
teenager later attended the Uni-
versity of the West Indies and
was graduated from the faculty
of Medicine. He subsequently
travelled to England for post-
graduate studies and advanced

CIBC Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited
is presently considering applications for a

Manager, Private Banking

Requirements:

* Applicants should possess a degree in Business
Administration/Finance or Law
* STEP Diploma in International Trust Management
* At least seven (7) years banking experience in a marketing
environment with a strong understanding of international
banking procedures.
* International marketing experience. Will be required to
travel to various regions and utilize a network of existing
contacts and associates.
* Excellent presentation and communication skills in English.
A foreign language will be an asset.
* Selling and negotiating skills; possess a confident and
outgoing personality.
* Good computer literacy on PC and host software.

Duties will include:

* Handling the administration of a high value complex

relationship

* Marketing of trust services to prospective clients
* Marketing of additional services, such as the set-up of
Companies and Foundations as well as administrative

procedures.

* Acquisition and development of new offshore clients and

management of accounts/relationships

* Coaching and training to facilitate team members learning
and career growth.

ONLY BAHAMIANS MEETING
THE ABOVE REQUIREMENTS NEED APPLY.

Applications only should be submitted to:
Manager, Human Resources

P.O. Box N-3933

Nassau, The Bahamas

Fax: 325-3646 (no phone calls accepted)

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS Is

DECEMBER 23, 2005.

tc become head of the depart-
ment of Obstectrics and Gynae-
cology at the hospital.

Dr Munnings writes skilfully
of modern developments at
PMH and how after 30 years
the physical plant is showing its
age and straining from lack of
maintenance.

Deteriorating conditions at

-PMH and increasing demands

forced government to seek
advice from overseas experts.
Several recommendations were
made, some were implemented
but the epidemic of cocaine
abuse in the early ’80s and its
attendant health problems com-
pletely changed the equation
and caused a rethinking of how
the hospital should be devel-
oped, writes Dr Munnings.

This is a book that anyone
interested in the social devel-
opment of this country should
read. There is plenty for the stu-
dent of history and medicine to
build on and perhaps add to the
specialty corps that could be
further researched to show the
accomplishments of a dedicated
cadre of Bahamian doctors who
have achieved wonders under
difficult and trying circum-
stances, _

Dr Munnings is to be com-
mended for his excellent “first”
into the publishing world.

| DUPLICH PUBLICATIONS



(¢ Princess Margaret Hospital: The story of a Bahamian institu-
tion— by Harold Munnings Jr, MD, is available at Island Bookshop,
Logos Bookstore, United Bookshop and Media Enterprises. Dr
Munnings is a specialty trained gastroenterologist and is a consultant
in his specialty at PMH. He founded the Centre for Digestive Health
in Nassau — the first purpose- built ambulatory endoscopy centre in
the English Caribbean region).

NOTICE

=-RIENDLY MOTORS LTD
SANPIN MOTORS LTD.

will be

CLOSED ;

Tuesday, December 13th, 2008
at 12:30p.m.

We will re-open

Wednesday December 14th, 200
at 8:00a.m.

We apologize for any inconvenience
caused.



oe fel Perio Cooper

Well worth the read!
BoC ae ye rats


PAGE 14, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005

os

._ CARIBBEAN NEWS

Diplomat salutes Cuban
human rights activists

“Copyrighted Material
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Please apply before December 16, 2005 to:
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Re P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, N.P, Bahamas

Via fax: (242)328-7145
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Applicants must be experienced with excellent. |
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Please apply before December 16, 2005 to:
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Royal Bank of Canada ;
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P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, N.P, Bahamas

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THE TRIBUNE

Strachan |

FROM page one

of the Rotary Club of West Nassau,
a worldwide service organisation. I
am also a past and present president
of the Bahamas Real Estate Associ-
ation. I am also vice-chairman of
Bahamas Boxing Commission. |
have the leadership skills to take St

Thomas More to another level,” he

said.

Mr Strachan noted that among resi- .

dents he had spoken to, many felt they
did not have access to current MP
Frank Smith, something he says he can
change.

“T feel I can offer them leadership
and commitment,” he said.

In addition to addressing the area’s
needs, if elected Mr Strachan said he
was deeply concerned about the Baha
Mar deal.

“I want to ask the government if }

Goodman’s Bay has been sold and for
an immediate response to details which
presently exist,” he said.

Another area of concern is illegal
immigration.

“T feel illegal immigration should be
a top priority right up there with
employment. The government needs
to take proactive and aggressive action.”

Mr Strachan suggested that illegal
immigrants be given four weeks to vol-
untarily leave the country and then,
whoever is left, the government needed
to round them up and deport them.

Mr Strachan said he is equally con-
cerned about crime.

Deputy Prime Minister and Minis-
ter of National Security Cynthia Pratt
needed to be more aggressive, he said.

For example, he said, despite the law
stating the sentence for possession of an
unlicensed firearm should be two years
imprisonment, persons convicted of the
crime often escape jail time. Instead,
he said they are often released on bail
and in some cases commit other crimes.

Mr Strachan said the country is at a
disadvantage because it is so small.
Most persons arrested either know a
politician or police, which takes away
the desire to do what needs to be done.

In addition, Mr Strachan said that “
the government should not get into bed
with Venezuela” as it relates to the
PetroCaribe initiative.

Instead, he said government should
relax its taxes on gas, which would allow
dealers to pass the savings to con-
sumers.

ON FRIDAY, for the first time, the Bar call was held outside the Supreme Court to accommodate the large party. Special permis ‘

LOCAL NEWS

Pane oe i.e

MON

Bytes:

Ei! Association for the ceremony to take place. For many years Sir Burton Hall has advocated a change of venue because the current court ~ spread over four buildings
is too small for such events and for the justices themselves.

Pictured in the front row from left are (italics indicate called to the Bar

): Attorney General Alfred Sears, Charles Robert M Patron, Christopher Jason Wells, Tami-

ka Anastacia Thompsen, Caleb Alexander Dorsett, Thomas Trevor Dean, Julie L Adderley, Kristan B V Stubbs, Richette Percentie, Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall, Justice

John Lyon, Tessa L Turnquest, Racquel J Jones, Nadia H Johnson, Inger T Simms, Christopher J Jenkins, Estena Newbold, M
outside of the National Centre for the Performing Arts on Shirley Street. Also pictured are presenters of the petition and other colleagues.

Tourist injured in
jet-ski collision

FROM page one

rounded Mr Reyes as he tried

:' to communicate through his

oxygen mask.
One said: “He was on the Car-
nival cruise ship and was only

-here for the day. He has been

complaining of chest pains and I
believe his right wrist is also bro-
ken.”

The incident sparked off more
calls for jet-ski controls.

, One resident described the
scene at Cabbage Beach over the
weekend as “mayhem - a jet-ski
free-for-all in which injuries are
inevitable.”

. Hoteliers have called repeat-
edly for proper licensing and zon-
ing procedures, and tougher
enforcement of existing regula-
tions.

‘ But most jet-ski operators con-
tinue to engage in highly danger-
ous practices, and rent out
machines to people who have no
idea how to ride them.

‘One source said: “Some of
these operators are the lowest of
the low. It was sickening how
some of them were laughing
among themselves after Satur-
day’s crash.

RE ed ae teen nated un eer eaten ete lod

“They obviously had no inter-
est in the young man’s welfare
and were only interested taking
people’s money.

“They are a disgrace to the
Bahamas. If we had a government
with any guts, they would have
been dealt with long ago. But no
doubt they have political connec-
tions, so they are allowed to car-
ry on.”

Critics have repeatedly
attacked the way jet-ski opera-
tors have commandeered local
beaches, forcing swimmers into
tightly controlled areas.

They allege jet-skis spoil the
environment and create endless
hazards for people on the beach
and in the sea.

“Some of the operators are lit-
tle more than children themselves
who show off and pose major
dangers for everyone in the area,”
said one.

“This situation must be taken
in hand quickly. Other accidents
are bound to happen - and the
Bahamas’ image suffers every
time.”

Last night, hospital authorities
were unable to release Mr Reyes’
condition. :

Peg Pe ae a eB al rte ater)

j CPP PCPEPPPEEREP ER PER DERE [Maa Ue Me ee Sale ee Ga
LUNG igi addearaeus ae da Vad paap eid aaa Tea ea eee y

Deere et ctr eaten

bahamas saffrey square be

i y
aa iloimeco tide] nel

FROM page one

US Coast Guard press liaison officer, said.
although it was very unlikely they would have
found someone at night, they conducted a
search around 7pm on Saturday as well.

“Of course it was very unlikely we would
find somebody at night like that, but we tried
anyway. We don’t know if this'is a criminal act

FROM page one

However, its findings

came as no surprise to teach- -

ers who have worked in the
system.

“It’s F-for-Failure, I’m .

afraid,” said one, “The
Bahamas education system
is a disaster. There are one
or two bright spots, but over-
all the standards are atro-
ciOUs. .

“This is due largely to a

So ag ae et oN Rea ee a cod oil atl tert cet arena

ary Susan Bain and Charlton Heston Smith

(Photo by Franklyn GF

FBI searching after
woman goes missi

1g

or an accidental thing.
“We don’t even know if she fell overboard

he said.

Evergl:

FBL

total lack of discipline i
schools, where disrupliv
elements are allowed to pre-
vail. However, these disrup-
tive elements are a product
of a failing society.

“The country is full of:

one-parent families where
education is often of low pri-
ority. Children are coming
out of school unable to read
or write properly. And
mathematics are often just a
joke.

“The only way to solve

The Royal C
es yesterday, where the Coast
Guard is expected to conduct an onboard
investigation and turn over its findings to the

‘complaiz

- we only know that the woman did not dis-
embark the vessel. She has simply vanished,”

ribbean arrived back in Port

BDM leader hits out over education

this problem is by radical

rm, and I’m afraid that
sa complete change in
attitude through Bahamian
society.
“Politicians are constantly
ng about foreign-
ers taking jobs, but that’s
because the schools are pro-
ducing Baham who
aren't fit to do at
while job. That’s the
truth. Thirty years after
independence we are a semi-
literate nation.”


"PAGE 16, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



“With the purchase of. any Davidoff fragrance,
enter to win ‘one of twelve fabulous prizes including the -

Grand Prize 2006 Ford Escape!







Former

p olicemat



receives









a BASIL E Dean, senior vice-president ‘of security and
surveillance at Kerzner International, greets Prime Minister
Perry Christie moments after being presented with the QPM by ©
Dame Ivy Dumont during her last official role as Governor

General of the Bahamas.

AFTER 32 years of unwa-

vering commitment to his coun-
try, former Assistant Commis-
sioner of Police Basil E Dean

was presented with the Queen’s

Police. Medal (QPM) for his
contribution to law enforcement
during an. investiture marking
the Quéen’s Birthday Honours

at Government House.

.Dean, Kerzner Internation-

‘ al’s senior ‘vice-president of
security and surveillance, was

one of several distinguished
community builders recognised
for invaluable contributions to

~ the community.

Inspired by highly respected
policemen such as the late
Roland Pierre and others, who
he remembers quite vividly

growing up as a child in the Far-

rington Road community, Dean
always felt that his calling was

-law enforcement.

His passion, fuelled by an
incident-in which an individual
was taken advantage of, result-

ed in him vowing to always do .

his best to combat crime — a
promise he would keep
throughout his lifetime.

Dean joined the Royal
Bahamas Police Force as a con-
stable and gradually moved up
the ranks'to that of an assistant
commissioner.

While on the force, he spent
most of his years working in the
Criminal Investigation Depart-
ment (CID) helping combat

major crimes such as drug traf-.

ficking and corruption as head



(Photo: BIS)

‘of the flying squad.

The decorated veteran law

‘enforcer attended local and

international courses on polic-
ing: He also had the privilege
of representing The Bahamas
at the United Nations’ 1987
Commission on Narcotics in

‘Vienna, Austria.

A humbled Dean remarked
that he felt honoured to receive
the award. “I am grateful to the
country and The Bahamas gov-

ernment for recommending me

and Her Majesty (Queen Eliza-
beth II) for giving me an award
of the Queen’s Police Medal.

“I do not consider that I did
anything out of the ordinary
really other than doing my
duties,” said Dean.

“When I-was a policeman I

sought to serve my country to

the best of my ability and I was
not seeking any reward other
than for ensuring that The

_ Bahamas was as safe as I possi-

bly could help to make it while
I was there,” he added.
Although he has shifted gears
somewhat, Dean continues to
play an active role in policing
on Nassau/Paradise Island. As
head of Kerzner International's
security team for the past nine
years, he has ensured the safety
of guests and employees as well
as protecting Kerzner Interna-

tional’s assets at its Paradise

Island properties, Atlantis, One
and Only Ocean Club and Har-
borside Resort at Atlantis.
Dean also works closely with
the Paradise Island Tourism
Development Association and
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force which help maintain law
and order on Paradise Island.

your |

news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their -2=4
neighbourhoods. Perhaps:
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
“for improvements in the
area or have won an

award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.
THE TRIBUNE | __ MONDAY, DECEMBER 12; 2005, PAGE 17

i

i

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_ Every Woman, Ev





Palmdale e Mall at Marathon e Sandyport e Freeport

= ESOS EIFS CERT TI CEE RITE FEES I PE SOIL IST



re ree


PAGE 18, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005

THE TRIBUNE ,





) you got an iPad - you know,
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YELLS of delight could be heard at the Sta-
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ular Disney characters, Mickey and’ Minnie
Mouse.

This year, along with their annual holiday
gifts, students received a-surprise visit from
Chip, Dale, Stitch, Pluto and. Goofy, Disney’s
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The Disney gift presentation has now become

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an annual event for Disney Cruise Lines
to the Stapledon School for Mentally

Parliamentary secretary in the Ministry of
Tourism, Agatha Marcelle, and Carla Stuart,
director of cruise development, both thanked
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Stapledon students are pictured greeting
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Singers set for
overnment
House concert

,

legacy that Clement left to the.
country," said Pauline Glas-
by, who had been the choir's

THE Nassau Renaissance
Singers will host a special per-
formance at Government



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usual tradition of hosting a
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The choir will not follow its

deputy for several years
before taking over. She is 4
senior lecturer of music at the
College of the Bahamas and
head of the Visual and Per-
forming Arts department. .

Under Ms Glasby's baton,

for one night only, Wednes-
day, December 14.
For more than four decades

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3 eatane
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Wilton Street
Tel: (242) 394-0641, 328-0478 « Fax: (242) 394-0642
Web Site: war |brbuild' com




ditional and contemporary
choral music by many 20th
century composers of classi-
cal style.

Beginning as a quartet in
1965 under the direction of
David Fysh, organist and
choirmaster at Christ Church
Cathedral, the Singers grew
over the years into the coun-
try's premier vocal group, per-
forming at many national
events.

From 1967 to 1987 the
choir was directed by the late
Clement Bethel, a Bahamian
who was a graduate of the
Royal Academy of Music in
London.

"The Renaissance Singers
consider themselves an inte-
gral part of the vast musical






UMBING

ie eee eta the Nassau Renaissance last one in 2000 when they
shingles, weed” + Non-yellowing Singers have been inspiring joined with the Diocesan
audiences with classical, tra- Chorale and the Bahamas

Concert Orchestra to perform
Handel's Messiah in Govern-
ment House grounds.

From 1968 the annual
Christmas concerts were held
in the Government House
Ballroom.

The choir has performed on
two occasions at Carnegie
Hall and for many national
functions. The choir is made
up of 35 volunteers who
rehearse rigorously through-
out the year.

Tickets may be obtained
from A.D. Hanna and Ca,
Deveaux Street, north of The
Tribune. Only a limited num:
ber of tickets are available,
Those ordered by telephone
must be collected and paid for
within 48 hours. Z
THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 19
INTERNATIONAL NEWS -

Elephant gives birth
to calf in Isracl after
rare fertility treatment

@ «= «©




“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content.

rom Commercial News Providers”



YOUR CONWECTICN TO THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

During this upcoming busy holiday season, The Bahamas
Telecommunications Company Limited is looking to make life
easier and simpler for all of its valued customers.






As a result, all residential customers desiring new service or
telephone transfers, are kindly asked to apply and pay for your
service before December 16th, 2005 in order to guarantee installation
on or before December 23, 2005.

Your request can be easily made by either visiting our Customer
Services Department located at The Mall-At-Marathon or John F.
Kennedy Drive, or by dialing 225-5282 and choosing option three.

BTC wishes everyone a:safe and happy holiday season.

Lecture Series | FREE Public Health Talk
Schedule ~ Every 3rd Thursday

ke Speaker: Dr. Timothy Barrett
December 15, 2005

Managing Stress Topic: Managing Stress & Depression

‘& Depression _
"Dr, Timothy Barrett Date: Thursday, December 15, 2005

Family Medicine .
Time: 6:00pm - 7:00pm

January 19, 2006

Women’s Health

Dp Reginald Care) Q&A: — Question and Answer Session
Obstetrician/Gynecologist

Venue: Doctors Hospital Conference Room

RSVP: To ensure available seating.
February 16, 2006

Heart Month Screenings: Free Blood Pressure, Cholesterol and
Dr. Delton Farquharson Glucose screenings between 5pm & 6pm.

Vascular Surgeon . 3 ;
Please join us as our guest every month for this

scintillating series of the most relevant health issues

March 16, 2006 : :
affecting society today.

Diabetes & Kidney

Disease

Refreshments will be provided.

RSVP 302-4603

. DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Heath Pov Life


AGE 20, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005 THE TRIBUNE. :
i
_ INTERNATIONAL NEWS : | De a ee





YOUR CONNECTION*TO THE WORLD



: - Copyrighted Material
| UNDERGROUND AND AERIAL COPPER CABLE | Ml @@RSYNdicated Content augue ge

TENDER FOR THE DISPOSAL OF SCRAP





Available from Commercial News Providers”

| The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. is pleased to invite
| qualified companies to submit tender for disposal of scrap underground
{| and aerial copper cable. | |



Interested companies may collect a Tender Specification from BTC’s
administration building on John F. Kennedy Drive, between the hours . Z
of 9:00am to 5:00pm Monday through Friday.



Tender must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked “TENDER
| FOR THE DISPOSAL OF SCRAP UNDERGROUND AND

i AERIAL COPPER CABLE” and delivered to the attention of: Pr ;
Pee as eee a mc saves that ( hristmas is
: Mr. Michael J. Symonette :

President & CEO ; , , ms < +
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. : ie uate d y CORSUMICT See
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive °
P.O.Box N-3048 |
~.. Nassau, The Bahamas



Bids should reach the company’s administration office on John F.
Kennedy Drive Dy 5:00pm on Thursday, December 22, 2005.

| BTC reserves the right to areiect any or fe senders:

i




It’s time to




“Live your Dreams”



ber, 24th @ 11:00pm. We offer Flexible Annuities starting with



t Ch ll Sint sees ea ng —
phedial C orale followed by | ok an initial contribution of $500 mininaam,
a a with monthly contributions as low as
oe AY $100 per month
: ti Faas â„¢
ia” c Tb re we | ; a
* Retirement — |
- sColfce __‘Siele Annuities with a one ie
SSE Contribution of $2,500 minimum
e Savings

— eTnvestments

Some Facts About our Company:
e We have been operating in the Bahamas since 1920.
e We manage more than 40,000 Policyholders and more than
400 Institutional Clients.
© We offer Professional and Prudent Management of your money.

ANS BRITISH
| itera

me NS URAN CE



A strong link in your financial future

British American Insurance Company of the Bahamas Limited
Telephone: (242) 461-1000 + Fax: (242) 361-2525
Email: bafinancial@babinsurance,com

_ Service of ane


THE IHipune WIVINUAT, VOUCIVIDET ee euuy, nunc











Soa “SAV.A. CHEK ‘Extra- Special’: on each item you purchase, over
“4 a dollar, with One filled SAV.A.CHEK certificate get a Dollar Off!

le = Purchase $50 or more will receive a FREE gift card to Colombian Emeralds Intern
and you will be eligible to enter a drawing to win over $3000 worth of Jew

REDEEM your SAV-A-CHEK now at:
Johns S George, Sandys, Epic Battery, GNC,
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FREEPORT: Dolly Madison Home Centre, GNC, Epic Battery, Play Time Sports $

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nO 7:00AM - 12:00PM ¢ 7:00AM - 2: orFANBOUR BAY ONLY SAV,A. CHEK Special!

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_) SALAD DRESSING |
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mores poURMITA. 2G Sede. CLEANSERS SOAP 3PK

2-02 400 -G

| $4 79

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HICKORY SWEET
THIN CUT BACON 12-02Z...sscsesssecsee $1.99 |.

| | RED GLOBE
juweo aRepseepiess GREEN CABBAGE
JUMBO GRAPES

$j SS .59¢





SUE, MSM |
PIC a Oe
UP HAM . ee _ TURKEY ie LBS UP



ECKRICK




| ORANGES Were Serv || CHICKEN VIENNA SAUSAGE 5 - 07...2/99¢ |
. 4LB BAG 5LB ae .








GROWERS PRIDE
JUICE ASSORTED - APPLE, ORANGE,
GRAPE & FRUIT

IMEDLY ONLY 14.5-OZ cscscscseseeeerecerseeeses .59¢ |.

$2322 Ng SDAP ‘EACH |
LIMES CELLO LETTUCE

4/.99Ge0 FTEs














| LYONS
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PORK LOIN
“ASSORTED aaa
| CHOPS

|| (INCLUDES





ENS
BUTTER REG PLAIN, RAISIN,
& ae ae ey ONION BAGELS

2/ss —_ = ae 2 $49. 02

| RED en momar SWISS id apni
DELI STYLE COLBY AND CHEDDAR ORANGE JUICE

$332, S522










| SUNCHY
MALTA

($10.49 PER CASE) 6-PAK....001000



LIBBY’S

























ca. | MIXED FRUIT OR DICED wo pssst
| PEACHES 4-PACK.crcscssssssssseessssssnssesssee DP OuOD | "ROTISSERIE
GREEN Gli . — ail 4 COOKED HAM : - CHICKEN
| CORN ON COB ___Netetcorn,creen_ | FRANCO AMERICAN $2999 a 8799 :
. BEANS, SWEET PEAS AND 99 TU DINNER et “ . _ EACH
$269 MIXED on | SPAGHETTI & MEATBALLS 7.5-02.....-« ©} pcan conser en ee Pe

. TURKEY COOKED, 2LB OF ‘CHEESE OR WALNUT
| SUFI 2.88 OF HES “o. DANISH RINGS




6 - CT
PEPPERIDGE FARM $249 16-0Z






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LAYER CAKES FUDGE STRIP, COCONUT, GOLDEN, VANILLA, W/D 12 PEOPLE| e
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. GUANA MAN ICE CREAM ALL FLAVOURS | HOT CEREAL REGULAR 23-02...... ES oo 3 we | EACH
: $s 49 | BT cn
S => aS a 2/5 QRTS

POWER BUYS | POWER BUYS a PTC
DOWNY MAHATMA | | 7

JASMINE, WATER] |
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PLANTERS —
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PAGE 22, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005 THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Ow wee be coe Gee
we ee Ree ea

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.
















owe! Ss. Soldier Road i is
celebrating the season!

Spend *25 Or mere on these
Proctor & Gambie products — Always,
Bounty, Charmin, Dawn, Downy,
Gain, Joy, Herbal Essences, Olay,
Pampers, Pantene or Zest on
Saturday, December {7 from

2 to 4pm and geta free gift basket.

Plus
Enter to win i of 3 $100 cash prizes
or 1 of 2 Dinners for two at Luciano’s
Italian Restaurant. Winners will be u Eu

_| announced at the end of the remote.



a



ie URORNETROEN”
S000
























‘ @N es § : Bernard Rd

i of 12 Be fe 2

Oil of Olay gift baskets ac: a
DD
as

Jari s|

Herbal Essences gift baskets _



yor
$100 Cash Prizes :
» Dinners for 2 to Lu es Sabie Heaul, suet af Village Head Nowulstout
*Proctor: & Gamble products.

Italian Restaurant











OneSOnly Resorts’
presents the

cm aw





FO a



CELEBRITY
INVITATIONAL *



MI CHAEL, JORDAN

Celebrity Invitational 2006

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

Performance with buffet to follow. Kerzner International Bahamas Limited is

ONE NIGHT ONLY 2 A | recruiting volunteers to assist with the Michael
Jordan Celebrity Invitational Golf Tournament
to be held on January 26 -29, 2006 at the Ocean
BOX OFFICE: Club Golf Course on Paradise Island.

A.D. Hanna & Ce Pa | scale ca | | .

Deveaux Street, (North of The Tribune ses To volunteer contact Victoria Bethell by email at :
Tickets: $40. 00 Victoria.Bethell@kerzner.com or call at 363-2000 °

ext.64561 by January 6, 2006.






THE TRIBUNE

i Your Beh ain Super rat kets"

NOW ACCEPTING

@ SUNCARD

Tr chorion Geek Cod
QUALITY RIGHTS AND PRIGES RESERVED)

Feather Pillows
20% OFF

Coffee Makers
20% OFF

MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 23

Touch of V Velvet
Sheet Sets
25% OFF

Throw Pillows
20% OFF

Single Pots & Fry Pans
20% OFF

Table Cloths
20% OFF

Feather Beds
20% OFF

Thermal Blankets

20% OFF

Toaster Ovens
20% OFF

Christmas Decorations
20% OFF

EXTRA SAVINGS

20% off Caller ID Phones $14.99

i Kassafina Decorative Towels 25% off | JWin Alarm Clock Radio #JL-204 $14.79
Fitted & Flat Sheets 20% off | JWin Cassette Recorder #IX-R36 $29.69

i HI-FI VVCRs $99.99

| SALE STARTS: MONDAY, DECEMBER 5TH - SATURDAY, DECEMBER 10TH, 2005 j

Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center
Ph: 393-4440 or ———

DISCOUNT
HOME SALBz
Wedding Gift Registry

Ve

H Bed Skirts

SWEET RED GLOBE)(__ HAI

GRAPES

PER - LB

IDAHO BAKING

(iE POTATOES| sii

LOOSE

399°



LIBBY’S

WHOLE KERNEL,
CORN |
OR SLICED

8 ORT EEN ASOT

cen BOOP



Kitchen Curtains Blenders
Table Cloths Blinds
Toys Placemats Coffee Makers
Sheet Sets Space Savers Toasters
Towels Pot Sets Irons
Comforters Stock Pots 4PC Bathroom
Rugs Flatware Sets Accessories
Throw Pillows Cutlery Sets Chair Pads
Shower Curtains Picture Frames Window Curtains
Drapes Wall Pictures Chair Coverings

Christmas Decorations
Christmas Trees

| VEGETABLE/CORN/
CANOLA

J SALE:STARTS MONDAY, ‘DECEMBER 12TH.- SATURDAY, DECEMBER 17TH, 2005

WE ACCEPT AMERICAN EXPRESS MASTER, VISA AND SUNCARD, WE ALSO REDEEM QUALITY STAMP CARDS
MACKEY STREET, TOP OF THE HILL (next to Super Value) PHONE: 393-3411/393-5569






PAGE 24, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005 THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL NEWS:



| \ climate conference ends with deal to
negotiate ‘second phase’ of emission cuts .

Lorrcrmoant bw more than |S)

if ‘ Snot among them

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

Is having a storewide Christmas sale.
50-75% off
of

Selected merchandise
We specialize in the very best in kitchen
and home accessories.

Wusthof Knives, Le Creuset and All Clad
cookware, Cuisnart and Delonghi electrics.
French Presses, Mandolins, Silicone
bakware, Créme Brulee torches, Ramekins,
Panini Grills, Parchement paper
and much more.




Ge w« te Af

: omg i ooce «f





: ww





Come i ihe home store



For A More Beautiful You—All Season Long.
















Enter to win a pair of.
DOLCE & GABBANA
designer. sunglasses ina
a gift basket filled with fabulous
2 Black & Beautiful products!

> From December ito January 31 purchase ~
. 2 or more items in the Black & Beautiful

~ Hair and Skin Care line. Attach receipt to

an entry form and place in a ballot box or
drop off entries by 1pm Tuesday, January -

31 to Lowe's Wholesale on Soldier Road.

‘Winners will be announced Friday, February
3, 2006 on the Love 97 Breakfast Show.







GEOFFREY
Fantastic offer begins

\ Thursday, December 1st
and lasts the entire

month of December. JONES & CO

Don't let it pass you by! 302-28 8/9

nan 7 Sa Sales & Full Service Department
| Rosetta & Montgomery Sts.






GEV gett) c-) atm
Suggested Retail

Values from:
$180 to $245!







2005 CreativeRelations.net

Available at fine pharmacies, beauty supplies and grocery stores throughout Nassau. Loses wholesale, Loose’s Pharmacy empinysies ara disit immediate taraiies are not eligi for entry.
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 25



against \ WTO Hong Kong

Available from Commercial News Providers”



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Syndicated Conten t

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PAGE 26, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005 THE TRIBUNE





| MONDAY EVENING DECEMBER 12, 2005





8:00 | 8:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 10:00 | 10:30
NETWORK CHANNELS j

Antiques Road- |Dr. Wayne Dyer: The Power of Intention Dr. Wayne Dyer euaes the power of intention and how people
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Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun

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?m lovin’ it





































PrANTOns

(1998) 'R’ (CC)




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business@tribunemedia.net

MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005





Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street



‘ g¥Colinalmperal

Insuranee bid



Education ‘revolutio
have tourism.

By NEIL HARTNELL-
Tribune Business Editor

n economic. impact

“equal to the year-

around tourism and

offshore

activities of -the

1950s” could bé sparked if the Gov-
ernment created an education ‘“revo-
lution” by implementing the reforms

suggested in a report prepared for the .

business community and trade unions.

Bahamian Youth: The Untapped
Resource, a hard-hitting report that
reveals ‘the extent’to which the edu-
cation system and wider society are

banking:

letting down future generations of
- Bahamians, said reform was urgently

needed to maintain this nation’s eco-
- nomic competitiveness, given that

human ‘capital was the. key factor of
- production in the.21st century.

Report _

. ‘The report, prepared for The Coali-
tion for Education Reform, a bi-par-
tisan coalition formed from various
employer groups and trade ‘unions,
said the “revolution” that caused by.
implementing its 14 strategiés would
aim to dlupheate the Irish ee s

SUCCESS.

The Coalition report called for ~.
schools to extend their hours after
school time, so children were given
extra tuition, apprenticeship pro-.”

grammes and extracurricular activi-
ties.

It urged that the Summer School’ :

programme, to. help remedial learn-
ing, be made mandatory and students
who failed to pass be made to epee
grades. .

Ireland began its investment in its

‘workforce, through education in the

1960s; and in 1983 the Irish Develop-

ment ‘Agency was able to change. the -
focus of its marketing campaign to.
‘international businesses to emphasise



its poaele: as opposéd to” tax. and
:, Investment incentives.

Dubbed»

By 1996, Iréland had been dubbed:

as Europe’s shining light...... its: Emer- _
_ald Ti iger by the Ecorfomist magazine,
", and thé Coalition report. said: “All

Bahamians should work: for the day
when entrepreneurs‘ see the ‘unques-"~
tioned virtues ofits people and-invest
in the Bahamas.

“However, getting there. will require
an unprecedented national awareness

- and political will.”

The Tribune reported on on. Sataday





“how the report revealed. that students
‘from public-high schools in New Prov-
_ idence who sat BGCSE exams in sum-

” mer 2004 achieved an average grade

of. ‘F+’, a “truly. disturbing” perfor-
mance: :

It exposed how future generations
of Bahamians are being left behind,
many. Jacking even the basic reading,
_ writing and arithmetic skilis, let alone
- Computer and IT knowledge, to make
_ themselves and. this nation’s econo-
“my competitive in an age Where trade
"barriers: have come down. They gen-

“ ” SEE page 4B

Only 12.5% of
Bahamian ‘students

meeting formal college

baie) dial



a By NEIL HARTNELL:
~ Tribune Business Editor:

- THERE isa “severe disconnect?” hetweeti the general itblig:
and. education.system, on one’side, and the Bahamian tourism ~
industry on the other, a hard-hitting réport reveals, with this
fation generating a “serious lack of graduates prepared to enter

college”.
A report prepared for. The

Nassau airport ' ‘not resolved’ to ministry’ S liking

i. By NEIL HARTNELL -
Tribune. Business Editor

' THE Ministry of ‘Tourism has ben

‘unable “to resolve to our satisfaction” the.
_concerns it has with Nassau International , °
Airport (NIA), a:senior official told The

Tribune, with the level of visitor complaints

. showing it is still negatively impacting
tourist perceptions and eee of the
’. Bahamas. ‘

Ellison ‘Tommy’, Thompson, ‘the Min-
istry’s deputy director-general, confirmed

in an interview that the airport was still

-“the one area where we get the most com:

plaints”, adding-that-it was “absolutely
vital” for this nation’s tourism industry

«The airport is a. concern to us xi we Ve.

‘not resolved it to our satisfaction yeh ” Mr

* Thompson said. .
“The Nassau airport is the’one area |
where we get the most com laints, ‘so the: :

quicker we get it resolved, the better. It’s ©
the last impression; the last experiénce the

. visitor has, so if weé’re able to:make it bet-
ter, it-will improve the visitor’ s perception ee
“of me destination.”

- Complaints _

Amon the biggest causes of-visitor com-
plaints about NIA have been its cleanli-

‘ness, the state of the facility itself, and -
large bottlenecks i in going through US see

clearance,

hopes for turning the NIA situation around
on signing a management contract that
‘would allow a private operator to: take
over the: airport’ Ss operations and. trans-
form it into. a world-class facility.

_The Govyernineént announced Tate last
"year that YVRAS, the subsidiary. of Van-

~ -couver Airport Services, had been selected

‘as the preferred bidder on the NIA man-
_ agement contract.‘However, no agreement
. has been signed yet..

“Mr Thompson told The Tibi that he
had been out of office for several weeks
and so was not fully briefed on the status of
talks with YVRAS, but added: “As far as
Iknow, it hasn’ t been signed as yet. I think

Coalition for Education Reform,

SEE pate 7B |

Chamber helps in India
trade mission plans :

@ By NEIL aH

Tribune Business Editor -

THE Ministry ae Perign
Affairs is putting together a~.

three-week*trade and diplo-

matic mission to India that is -

scheduled to take place at: the

end of January/beginning of. .
February 2006, with the -

Bahamian private sector for-
mally involved in the trip’ s
planning for the “first time”. _

-Philip Simon,: the Bahamas

Chamber of Commerce’s exec-.. _
utive director, said their coun- ~

terparts from India had
requested the Chamber’s inclu-

sion at ‘ ‘every. level”, realising’
that the private sector had-to, °
work hand-in- pe with! ‘the.

SEE page 6B





@ TANYA ner

Engineers Board to be.
appointed ‘ ‘very shortly’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL «=
Tribune Business. Editor:

MEMBERS * of
Bahamas’ first Professional

Engineers Boatd will ‘receive .

their letters of. appointment
“very shortly”
public works and utilities ‘has
revealed, énabling-the Engi-
neers Act to be fully imple-
mented and enforced.

Addressing the Bahamas ~
Society of Engineers’ Officers
Installation and Awards Cere- ~

mony, Mr Roberts said: “May I
emphasise that the appoint-
ment of this Board signals a

tte:

, the minister of--

major milestone i in the devel-
opment. of; and the building of, .
"ational capacity in. local pro-

fessional engineers in this coun-

try?

The Board’s appointment

will effectively enable the’. -
’ Bahamian engineering profes-
- sion to self-regulate itself, and.
“weed-out any: “bad apples...

The Board’s first members are
Melanie Roach,,Paul Hanna,

Barret Russell, Howard Rak- .*
ming; Sonia Brown, Michelle

Gomez and Ray McKenzie.

SEE page SB.

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

# 56 Madeira Street, Palmdale
P.O. Box SS-6270. Nassau, Bahamas



242 328.3043

and wider economy that the. situation: be
‘rectified. +: : .

1

‘The Govetitinent has- been pinning its”

SEE p page 2B

reiahals wc OF OPPORTUNII
with managed EDUCATION INV.

iavent

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sattwai Poem | a 0


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005

BUSINESS.

THE TRIBUNE



}
'
}

Stock Market

FINDEX 435.63 YTD 1.321%

_BISX | CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML $0.73 $- 0 -33.64%
BAB $1.10 $. 0 14.58%

BBL $0.80 $: 0 -5.88%

BOB $6.90 $: 3840 20.00%

| BPF $10.25 $- 0 28.13%
BSL $12.75 $- 0 -1.92%
BWL $1.27 $- 0 -29.44%

CAB $9.60 $. 900 35.21%

CBL $9.10 $- 98 28.17%
CHL $1.64 $- 1346 -25.45%

| CIB $10.05 $- 100 34.18%

| DHS $2.17 $- 0 44.67%

FAM $6.05 $1.70 5000 52.78%

FCC $1.15 $- 0 42.21%

| FCL $10.00 $- 0 25.00%

FIN $10.90 $ - 2100 12.37%
ICD $9.95 $-0.20 1500 0.61%

| ISI $8.75 $: 0 6.45%

“KZLB $6.75 $0.17 0 11.39%
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%

| DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:

j

e Benchmark (Bahamas) (BBL) has declared a dividend of
$0.01 payable on December 15, 2005, to all common share-
holders as at record date November 30, 2005.

e FamGuard Company (FAM) has declared a dividend of |

$0.06 payable on December 14, 2005, to all common share-
holders as at record date December 9, 2005.

¢ Freeport Oil Holdings (FCL) has declared an extraordi-
nary dividend of $0.06 payable on December 14, 2005, to all
common shareholders as at record date November 30, 2005.

¢ Commonwealth Bank (CBL) has declared a dividend of

_ $0.08 payable on December 31, 2005, to all common share-

| holders as at record date December 15, 2005.

: ¢ Consolidated Water Company (CWCO) has declared a div-

4

‘| idend of $0.012 per BDR payable on February 7, 2006, to all
common shareholders as at record date December 31, 2005. -



onl Bank
of Canada’

Financing up to 72 monins
ith 18 per cent dawn





s&.

P| | ~~

FIDELITY MARKET WRAP



@ By Fidelity Capital
Markets

t was a quiet trading

week in the Bahamian

market. Investors

seemed to direct their

attention at the
upcoming holidays and less on
the market as only 14,884
shares changed hands. For the
week, the market saw eight out
of its 19 listed stocks trade, of
which one advanced, one
declined and six remained
unchanged.

‘The volume leader and big
advancer for the week was
FamGuard Company (FAM),
with 5,000 shares changing
hands and accounting for 34
per cent of the total shares
traded. FAM's share price rose
by an astonishing $1.70 or 39.18
per cent to close the week at its
new 52-week high of $6.05.

The leap in FAM's share
price was driven by investor
reaction to its upcoming Ten-
der Offer, in which existing
shareholders will be able to sell
back their shares to FamGuard
at $6.20. On the down side,
ICD Utilities (ICD) lost $0.20
to end the week at $9.95.

COMPANY NEWS

Freeport Oil Holdings

Company (FCL) -

FOR the quarter ending
October 31, 2005, FCL posted
net income of $1.9 million, rep-
resenting an increase of
$328,000 or 21 per cent% over
the same period last year.

Total revenues grew by $7.2
million or 40.9 per cent to total
$24.8 million, while costs'and
expenses increased by $6.9 mil-
lion or 43.3 per cent to total
$22.9 million.

International
Markets

FOREX Rates

Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold

Weekly

1.1570
1.7550
1.1811

% Change
-0.38

1.27
0.81

% Change

0.12
4.28

Weekly

$59.39
$538.10

International Stock Market Indexes:

Weekly % Change

-0.91
-0.45
-0.73
--0.11

10,778.58
1,259.37
2,256.73
15,404.05



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during the rants = December



www.chevroletbahamas.com

Year-over-year operating
income increased by $268,000
to total $1.8 million. Earnings
per share was up $0.04 to total
$0.22 as at October 31, 2005.
Return on shareholders equity
stood at 8.78 per cent com-
pared to 8.47 per cent for the
equivalent period last year.

In related news, at its Extra-
ordinary meeting held on
December 7, 2005, FCL's
shareholders approved resolu-
tions to increase the company's
share capital from $100,000 to
$1 million, with the creation of
60 million preference shares
and 30 million ordinary shares,
both with $0.01 par
value. Additionally, the
approval for a $25 million Pref-
erence share offering was
granted.

Colina Holdings (CHL) -

For the 2005 third quarter,
CHL posted net income of
$551,000, which represents a
decline of $518,000 or 48 per

cent from the same period last.

year. Only $440,000 is attrib-
utable to the shareholders of
CHL.

Total revenue increased by
$18.6 million or 88 per cent to

’ total $39.7 million, while bene-

each customer will
entary coupon.

fits and expenses also grew by
$19 million or 96 per cent to
total $39.1 million. As at Sep-
tember 30, 2005, total assets:
stood at $398 million, com~
pared to $256 million for the
equivalent period last year.

Investors Tip of the week —

Tips for a Debt-free
Christmas

* Plan Ahead — Work out
how much you can realistically
afford before you start spend;
ing.

* Put aside a little every
week in an interest bearing
Christmas Savings Account.

* Set a limit on how much
you are going to spend on each
person and stick to the budget.

* Make a ‘no present” pact,
with close friends and adult
family members. is

* Try to shop with cash —
leave the credit cards at home.

* Shop around — you might
find it cheaper elsewhere. .:

* Finally, don’t ignore your
regular monthly bills. These
priority bills, such as electricity,
mortgage/rent, telephone,
should be kept current even
during this holiday period.”





Nassau airport —
‘not resolved’ to

FROM page 1B

they were very close.”

He said of the need to get
NIA right: “It’s absolutely vital.
Nassau has the majority of the
tourism product so it has the
ability to affect the entire
nation.

“Tt’s so important to have the
facility properly managed and
equipped to meet the require-
ments and. demands of all agen-

_ cies.”

The Government announced
late last year that YVRAS, the
subsidiary of Vancouver Air-
port Services, had been select-
ed as the preferred bidder on
the NIA management contract.

Talks between YVR and the
Government have dragged on
for the best part of a year, and
The Tribune understands that
they have not been going well,
with the Canadian group at one
stage threatening to pull out
entirely. However, they are still
at the table.

In the end, the Government
is likely to enter into a man-
agement contract that will be
for a term of 15 to 25 years. It is
negotiating a Build/Oper-
ate/Transfer (BOT) agreement
for Nassau International Air-
port's long-term development.

Under the proposed BOT
arrangement, the Airport
Authority would continue to

INSIGHT

Pre a

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays





ministry's liking

own Nassau International Air-
port. A management company
such as YVR would operate
and develop the facility. for
between 20-30 year, upgrading
it before transferring:it-back:to
the Airport Authority. The. lat-
ter would also receive fee pay-
ments from YVR forthe lifé-
time of the agreement. :

As part of the much-needed
upgrade to Nassau Interna-
tional Airport, the Govern-
ment is looking for a new $200-
250 million terminal to be con-
structed, but YVR is no
stranger to either that or the
BOT arrangement in the
Caribbean.

It already has a 30-year cor:

tract, as part of a consortium,

to manage and develop Sang?
ster International Airport ir
Montego Bay, Jamaica. As part
of the arrangement it will
expand the existing terminal
facility to a capacity of six mil-
lion passengers, requiring am
investment of about $200 mil-~
lion over the contract's lifes:
pan

Through YVRAS subsidiary}
YVR operates 14 airports im
five different countries, includ
ing Providenciales Interna
tional Airport in Turks &
Caicos, where it has a 15-year
contract to manage the termi;
nal, Santiago in Chile and six
Dominican Republic Airports!

An increase in the number
of US Customs and Border
Patrol Officers at NIA, plug
new and expanded security
measures, are being looked at
to ease congestion and bottle:
necks in pre-clearance. j

Meanwhile, Mr Thompson
said the Bahamas was on target
to meet the January 1, 2006,
deadline for installing US- -man:
dated baggage security screen:
ing machines, something that
is needed to safeguard pre:
clearance status.

He added: “My anderstana!
ing is that we’ll be able to meet
those deadlines. We’re well on
the way to hitting them.”

receive a

’'m lovin’ it
THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 3B

Chinese tourism
approvals to come
‘“n next 3-4 months’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ahamian tourism

operators should

have the neces-

sary approvals

from the author-

ities in Beijing “within the next

three to four months” that will

allow them to begin receiving
Chinese tourists.

Ellison ‘Tommy’ Thompson,

the Ministry of Tourism’s

deputy director-general, told

the Caribbean Media
Exchange (Cmex) conference
that although the Bahamas as a
nation had received ‘Approved
Destination’ status from Chi-
na in February 2005, Bahamian
tourism operators still needed
to be approved by the China
National Tourism Authority.

Number

“There are a number of
approvals that are necessary.
Our local operators need to be

approved by the China Nation-
al Tourism Authority,” Mr

‘Thompson said.

“The Bahamas should have
those approvals within the next
three to four months.”

He added that a team from
the Ministry of Tourism, head-
ed by director-general Vernice
Walkine, had visited China in
July to prepare the ground,

meeting with media organisa- °

tions, tourism operators and
airlines.
But before the Bahamas

TRUST MANAGER POSITION

Our client, a trust company, is seeking applications for a Trust Manager.

JOB OBJECTIVE:

Employment Opportunity

Financial Institution is seeking an

Administrative Assistant /
Receptionist

Requirements:

Strong Communication (Verbal & Written),
Time Management and Interpersonal
Skills

Perform reception duties in an efficient,
professional and courteous manner
Ability to multi-task and perform clerical
tasks as assigned | |
Knowledge of Microsoft Office 2003
Knowledge of Basic Accounting Skills and
the use of Account Software a plus

could think about a major
influx of Chinese visitors, Mr
Thompson said there was still
much work to do. This included
having Chines-speaking tour
guides in place, an adequate
number of Chinese restaurants,
which was “very important”,
good shopping destinations,
and signs and menus that were
in Chinese.

“We also have the challenge
of visas,” Mr Thompson added.
The British Embassy in Beijing
currently dealt with visas as the
Bahamas had no diplomatic
mission yet, and there were
also concerns that some Chi-
nese visitors “may not be legit-
imate”.

Pointed

Mr Thompson pointed to the
experience of Australian
tourism officials, who had seen
a whole busload of Chinese
tourists disappear during a bus
ride from Sydney to Mel-
bourne.

He added: “That is a concern
for the Bahamas, being on the
doorstep of the US. We have to
make sure they are legitimate
visitors.”

One way of doing this, he
added, was to do background
checks with US, UK and Cana-
dian visa applications.

Mr Thompson said: “We
don’t expect China to be
turned on overnight. This is a
push over several years before
we get significant numbers.”

-Likening it to the “march of
a thousand miles”, he added
that the Bahamas had “taken
the first step”.

Please fax resumes to:
326-7336 .
or mail to
P.O. Box SS-19051

Employment Opportunities

MANAGER
Previous food & beverage or franchise managerial
experience required.

GAMES SUPERVISOR
Minimum 1-year.supervisory experience and ability to
trouble shoot electronic equipment.

CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVES
Previous customer service experience is a plus.

Interested persons must be able to work shifts between
the hours of 9am & 11pm and available on weekends
and holidays.

Interested persons should submit a resume with

passport photo to Mr. Pretzels at The Mall at
Marathon.



We are doing it again, just in time for Christmas!

DOUBLE YOUR DOLLARS

~ The Trust Manager will have responsibility for a small portfolio of complex trust clients
and will provide trust advice to trust officers/administrators. :

with the $700.00 Deposit for loan of $1,400.00

REQUIREMENTS:

REQUIREMENTS & PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

Candidates should meet the following criteria:

ACIB &/or STEP Qualifications om.

Bachelor’s Degree or higher in a related discipline from an accredited University
Minimum of five years experience in a bank and trust environment, preferably
at a management level with significant exposure to operations

Exposure to diverse risk management

Experience in managing complex trusts and aneicniie fiduciary standards
Strong technical and managerial skills

Proficient i in the use of the Microsoft range of applications

Expertise in current banking & trust legislation and regulations

Excellent written and oral skills

Excellent organizational, time management and communication skills

Team Player with the ability to add value and strength to the team and team goals
Honest, hardworking and ability to meet deadlines

Bahamian status required

New Members

Existing M embers

¢ Employment Letter ¢ Employment Letter
¢ Current Salary Slip * Current Salary Slip
¢ Photo I.D. (Passport or Drivers Licence)
¢ National Insurance Card
¢ Confirmation of address:

(present one of the following:

utility bill, voters card or credit card bill)
e Entrance Fee $8.00

VISIT ANY OF OUR BRANCHES

Accepting Loan Applications:
9:30 am to 4:00 pm
Check collection:

2:00 pm to 5:00 pm

The position offers an attractive salary and benefits package, reflecting the successful &

applicant’s experience and qualifications, including a performance bonus, pension,
medical, dental & life insurance coverage.

Qualified individuals should submit complete resumés including references before
December 21, 2005 to:

Mark E. Munnings
Partner
Deloitte & Touche
P. O. Box N-7120
Nassau, Bahamas
or
Email:mmunnings @ deloitte.com.bs

Deloitte.

East Street and Independence Drive, (Nassau) * Telephone (242) 323- 4495/6 |
Seventeen Shopping Center, (Freeport) ¢ TelephoneL (242) 351-6185/9
B & L Plaza, (Abaco) Telephone: (242) 367-3612

Offer good December Sth to December 31st, 2005
SOME RESTRICTIONS MAY APPLY!


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005

Education ‘revolution’ ma

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE...





have tourism GDP impact

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SOLDREN CAPITAL LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business Companies
Act. 2000, SOLDREN CAPITAL LTD. is in dissolution
as of December 9, 2005.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A

Regent Street, P.O. Box -1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR





yPricing Information As Of:

Symbol
Abaco Markets
* Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Kerzner International BDRs

Y!
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)



Bahamas Supermarkets

Fund Name
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
Colina MS! Preferred Fund

|} BISX ALL SHARE INDE X - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
B S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

# S2wk-Lo.’
g Previous Close

- Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
- Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

W Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

H Daily Vol.

Change - Change in closing price from day to day
- Number of‘total shares traded today

H DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
i Rie - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings



ema

OR

9 GSES SS EN SEM SC



- AS AT AUG. 10, 2005/ ***" -




AS AT OCT. 31, 2005

frO FRADE. CAL SOE



OPERATIONS ENGINEER
ROLE: |

Colina

Financial Advisors Ltd.

FROM page 1B

_ erally lack the basic education

to get a job and make them-
selves attractive to employers.
Drawing on real life anec-
dotes, the report recorded: “A
recent high school graduate in
a beginning class at the
Bahamas Vocational and Tech-
nical Institute answered ‘22’ to
the question ‘What does 2
times 2 equal?’ The next ques-
tion: ‘What does 7 times 7
equal?’ was answered ‘14’.”
Putting the Irish example
into a Caribbean context, the
Coalition Report drew in a 300-
page World Bank study, pub-
lished in April, entitled
Caribbean Development in the
21st Century. Although the
Bahamas was not mentioned
in the study, it identified Bar-
bados as the Caribbean’s best
performer, maintaining educa-
tion quality. and expanding

Previous Close Today's Close.

=) FIDELITY

enrollment to add 1.9 years of
schooling between 1980 and
2000.

However, the Coalition
report pointed: out that Barba-
dos was able to only maintain




force in the same timeframe -
50 per cent more than Barba-
dos.

The Coalition report said
that while the Bahamas was
not mentioned in the World

‘ All Bahamians should work for
he day when entrepreneurs see
the unquestioned virtues of its

_ People and invest in the Bahamas.
_ However, getting there will
_tequire an unprecedented national
_ awareness and political will.”

its relative position of 25th in
the world on developing skills
for knowledge-driven growth,
while South Korea added three
years of schooling to its labour





no
ee 50

AS
Last



MAR ME

* aes
103

2 eee :

“

0.810 Lyne

ae 8



KHMAAG

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask §$ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol.

- Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths,

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX< - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

SSAXXTSAASSSSSSCS{SSSSSSSSSSS

=$SO Standard Oil, S.A., Ltd. is looking for
7alented Candidates for the following position:

Achieve success and flawless execution in Terminal Operations through
managing operations personnel on a day to day basis. Responsible for
product receipt, storage and distribution and all operations related to them.

f=nsure terminal activities are carried out safely and in accordance with
—=sso’s standards and government regulations at an acceptable cost and at

—an extraordinary service euer

NECESSARY SKILLS:

- Bachelor degree in Engineering (Industrial, Electrical or Mechanical) or -

Related Fields

- 3-4 Years of experience in areas of study
- Great Interpersonal Effectiveness & Communication Skills |
- Cognitive/ Technical/ Business Knowledge: Analytical Thinking, Innovation,

Judgement

- Has Commitment to High Standards
- Result Oriented, Committed, with Drive & Perseverance

- Exercises Influence: Demonstrates Self Confidence and Personal Impact

- Demonstrates Leadership

If you fulfill the position’s requirements, please send your resume by
email to: lina.rodriguez@exxonmobil.com

_— Coalition report

Bank study, the BGCSE scores
for 2004 showed that there had

. been little improvement in aca-

demic achievement since 1993,
while the overall level of



The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in their
neighbourhoods.

funds for a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the .
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322- 1986
and share your story.

BLAIRWOOD ACADEMY

Share your news|

Perhaps you are raising ~

achievement was “unaccept-

_ able”.

In addition, it pointed out
that the link between human
capital - the quality of the
workforce’s knowledge base -
and a country’s ability to use
foreign technologies and devel-
op.its own was a key ingredient
for economic growth.

The Coalition report said
“There are two important
inferences for the Bahamas. If
Barbados, the star of the
Caribbean in the World Bank
study, was able to only maifit
tain over the last two decades
its position in the world with
respect to Human Capital, then
the Bahamas’ position in the
world declined during this peri-
od given its academic perfot-
mance. If human capital is the
critical resource in the 21st cen-
tury, then the Bahamas must
urgently pursue an education
reform programme that elimi-
nates its learning gaps.” °













Junior High School Teacher
To Start in January 2006

School is expanding, and we need a dedicated teacher
with special education experience to
teach Math and English.

Very small class size, and congenial teaching
environment.

Blaicwood! is dedicated to helping students grow to
their full potential ;

Call: 393-1303 Fax: 393-6952






NOTICE

The Partners of

Lundy & Company

Counsel & Attorneys-at-Law

are pleased to announce that effective
Monday, December 5th, 2005 the
Firm will do business under the name:

PrideRock Law Chambers >
Counsel & Attorneys-At-Law
Notary Public
PrideRock Corporate Centre
Suite 200
Bay & East Streets
P.O. Box SS-5800
Nassau, The Bahamas






















Telephone: (242) 328-0925
Facsimile: (242) 328-0892 i
Website: www.priderockchambers.com


THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 5B

_ BUSINESS.



Legal Notice

Engineers Board! =.

CONSTITUTION INVESTMENT LIMITED

to b e a O hh 4 € ad NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) CONSTITUTION INVESTMENT LIMITED is in voluntary

dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

6 9 (b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on December 9th,
: 2005 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General. é

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated Ltd. of
Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola BVI.

Dated this 12th day of December, A.D. 2005.

FROM page 1B

Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator

To enhance and build Bahamian engineering
capacity at the Ministry of Works, Mr Roberts
said his ministry was following a seven-point
strategy, which included the promotion of exist-
ing graduate engineers to positions of acting engi-
neers and senior engineers, and the promotion of
long-serving engineers to posts of deputy direc-
tors.

Mr Roberts said another goal was to recruit
staff locally to fill 40 posts at the Ministry, and the
creation of an “aggressive training programme”.

Other goals were the “standardisation of the
scarcity allowance”, and the ‘Bahamianisation’ of
the Ministry’s engineering staff.

Mr Roberts acknowledged that his Ministry
was “acutely short-staffed in the technical area”,
forcing it to hire 17 technical, non-professionally
qualified Bahamians, and 22 expatriate engi-

neers. *
Hired

The 22 engineers would be hired for two to
three years, and as part of their contracts they will
be required to transfer knowledge and skills to
-Bahamians to enable them to take over.

Mr Roberts added: “As we are painfully aware,
the continuous exodus of Bahamian engineers
from the Ministry of Works is directly related
to the more attractive remuneration packages
that they are offered in the private sector. While
on the one hand the country still benefits from
this migration to the private sector, neverthe-
less, the ministry is constantly challenged with the
need to replace such officers as is the current
situation.”

Mr Roberts added that his ministry was review-

-ing the scarcity allowance, in a bid to “standard-
ise” a system that had been graded.

' Established as an incentive programme to
attract qualified expatriates to the Ministry of
Works, while civil engineers get $15,000 per year,
and qualified mechanical and electrical engineers

receive an allowance of $3,500 per annum, archi-
tects and surveyors currently receive nothing.



SOUS CHEF

We are looking for a sous chef to supplement
the existing chef team in our kitchens. The
successful applicant must have leadership
qualities and be able to take charge of
production and service for the various
kitchens on property. A minimum of ten
(10) years experience in a high quality hotel
is essential with European and North
American experience.

Interested persons should fax resumes to
#362-6245 to the attention of:

THE DIRECTOR OF CUISINE
LYFORD CAY CLUB
LYFORD CAY DRIVE
NASSAU, BAHAMAS



SRST

VACANCY NOTICE | Toe UNDEVELOPED PROPERTY MORTGAGE

Senior Internal Auditor

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the above position. Helpi Ins you own»n.

MAIN DUTIES INCLUDE:

¢ To administer the internal auditing activity of an assigned location. ae ur dre alm

* To develop a comprehensive, practical program of audit coverage for the location.

© To accomplish the program in accordance with acceptable audit standards and stipulated
schedules.

¢ To maintain effective working relations with executive and operating management.
AUTHORITY AND RESPONSIBILITY:
“|: Under the general guidance of a Chief Internal Auditor, the Senior Internal Auditor:

° Identifies those activities subject to audit coverage, evaluates their significance, and Dreams come in
assesses the degree of risk inherent in the activity in terms of cost, schedule, and quality. all shapes and sizes.

¢ Prepares a comprehensive, long-range program of audit coverage for the assigned location. |. As the leading mortgage bank in

¢ Provides reports to executive management within the assigned location concerning The Bahamas, RBC FINCO Is
coverage and the results of the audit activity. Interprets those results to improve the audit dedicated to sharing your dreams and
program and its coverage. ; helping you achieve your financial goals.

* Establishes and monitors accomplishment of objectives intended to increase his/her Our mortgage specialists can help you
department’s ability to serve management. build your dreams from the ground up.

QUALIFICATIONS AND REQUIREMENTS:
We offer:

* Professional accounting qualification that entitles one to membership of the Bahamas te
Institute of Chartered Accountants. : Competitive interest rates

ais Meas dsintne eeareses Financing with as little as 5% down

° Minimum of two-years post qualification experience.
; / No penalty for lump sum

e Work or audit experience in a major financial institution. : payments to reduce balance

¢ Computer skills are essential. . Flexible payment terms
with optional weekly or
bi-weekly accelerated

REMUNERATION: payments

The salary for this position is $55,000.00 in the Senior Management Salary Scale (group po Up to 15 years to repay
6) $48,092 x 900 - $58,245. Excellent fringe benefits including group medical/life insurance. : Ability to develop your property

APPLICATION: t while repaying your loan -
i no restrictions!

¢ Strong supervisory, communication and analytical skills.

Application forms may be obtained from the Security Booth of the National Insurance ; :
Board’s Jumbey Village Complex. Interested persons may submit a completed application | Invest in an undeveloped piece of property today! Call or visit our friendly

form along with the necessary proof of qualifications, not later than 4:00 pm on Friday, mortgage specialists at any RBC FINCO branch. We offer FREE financial advice.
December 16, 2005 to: : Asstt elspa hp hog Sa es seh bene



THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD

Headquarters Building
Nassau, Bahamas ® Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada 12d B ei

FINCO

The Senior Manager - Human Resources www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean So RBC

â„¢ The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada


THE TRIBUNE*




PAGE 6B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005



public sector to move this

FROM page 1B

THE CLIFTON
HERITAGE
AUTHORITY

TENDER
SECURITY SERVICES

The Clifton Heritage Authority is pleased to invite
tenders from suitably qualified companies to supply
the Authority with Security Services for the following
property:

¢ THE CLIFTON HERITAGE PARK

Interested companies can collect a specification
document from the Authority’s administration building
located in the Collins House Complex, Shirley Street
and Collins Avenue, with entrance on Collins Avenue,
between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday.

Tender must be sealed in an envelope marked
“TENDER FOR SECURITY SERVICES” and
delivered for the attention of:

Dr. Keith L. Tinker
Secretary
The Clifton Heritage Authority
P.O. Box EE-15082
Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone: 325-1505

Bids should reach the ‘Authority’ s Administrative
Office by 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, December 2 Ist,
2005.

Companies submitting bids are invited to attend a bid
opening on Thursday, 22nd December 2005: at 10:00
a.m. at the Administrative Office, Shirley Street and
Collins Avenue.

The Clifton Heritage Authority reserves the right to
reject any or all tenders.

fF"
BQ
U5
“ae?”

Sheraton:

HOTELS RB RESORTS

WESTIN’

HOTELS & RESORTS

Doct CAREER Mata
LE FOR: One nee

DIRECTOR OF OPERAT Te
PTS ag |

in ee Office, ote Guest See
ts of supervisory experience and will be responsible for’:
rt and long term planning and the day to day operations.
; oi the rooms and its related areas ind bgt Cog,

ie to Ae operations of the eee nae
where: applicable, laundry and valet departments; bu g
staffing, forecasting and financial planning of the
epartments. Must posses Ryn (eyes bose nrs sont jolt experience
with at least 3 years in housekeeping management at
ese D8 higher levels of tesp; nsibility.

LAUNDRY MANAGE
Successful candidate will manager all aspects of ne
cleaning of guests and employees laundry, dry cleaning a
“linen. Must supervise, train, and’counsel staff in addition to
“managing all administrative ratte inclusive of scheduling,
forecasting, and budgetary controls. A minimum OOP (st
apes ee puree nto Alesana) hers

MOP Yetleeine will SS responsible for nae
_and executing group. pyran monito
: agreements pertaining to group’s room b
per Erateh peigel and special concessi¢

’ cr

Te of HG ALE positions WAP ee Dgtiragy Ce
AMO LLL OLED RSC LT Wg atta). 410 i
Excel and Microsoft Word computer. programs. E:

LM ee LR Le ee and resumes One

oe COseeke Ja yeu be
Director sm etrover| Resource
Wiesel Fae AtO ite TH Otte) Eilers
i « P.O. Box. F-42500 eS
ane CGrehalol BE latsNave lates |





BUSINESS

nation forward.

The Ministry had asked oy
the Chamber’s assistance in
putting a delegation together,
and it was currently develop-
ing an itinerary that would
include both accompanying the
ministerial delegation and ini-
tiating its own visits.

Tanya Wright, the Cham-
ber’s president, said of the pro-
posed India visit: “We’ve been
inundated with calls from our
members saying: ‘When’s it
going to come off? We want to
be part of it.”

She added that Bahamian

entrepreneurs had recognised.

that large emerging economies
such as India and China could
provide them with the prod-
ucts and services they required.
Similar to India, China had
through its International Trade
body also extended an invita-
tion to the whole Caribbean
mission to send trade and
diplomatic missions to Beijing.

Meanwhile, the Chamber
and its Globalisation Commit-
tee are planning to stage a
major conference on the sub-

ject in April 2006, with atten-

dees and support.coming from
the CARICOM Regional
Negotiating Machinery, region-
al Chamber of Commerce,
multinational companies, the
UK. Both the European Union
and the World Trade Organi-
sation (WTO) had been
approached for speakers and
interest.

Mr Simon said the Chamber
aimed to act as the bridge
between the private and public
sector. He added that the
Bahamas had a tremendous
comparative advantage that it
needed to exploit, lying as a
potential transhipment hub
between North and South
America, and on to Europe.

Mr Simon said: “We have a
wonderful comparative advan-
tage, and what we have to do
now is increase the compara-
tive advantages we have and
develop new ones.”

Focused

Over the past few years, the
Chamber had focused on the
“macro” issues facing the
Bahamian business community,
such as free trade agreements
and crime. Organisations such
as the Bahamas Employers
Confederation (BeCon), the
Small Business Association, the

Bahamas Real Estate Associa-'

tion, Public-Private Partnership
and Bahamas-China Friend-
ship Society were all based at
its offices and using its facili-
ties, with the Bahamian Con-
tractors Association and
Bahamas Society of Engineers

. interested in doing the same.

The Chamber was now look-
ing to become the ‘Secretari-
at” for private sector organisa-
tions, and Mr Simon said its
success could be seen in the
fact that its fully paid-up mem-

LEGAL NOTICE

_N OTICE

SABACO INVESTMENT ADVISORS LIMITED |

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act, 2000 notice -
is hereby given that SABACO INVESTMENT
ADVISORS LIMITED has been dissolved and struck
off the Register of Companies as of the 20th day of

September 2005.

Dean & Associates
| Professional Insurance
| Consultants Company Limited

_ Wishes to advise
| the general public and
i their valued clients that they
| WILL BE |
RELOCATING

to

mye) e Plaza,
eres Street
co of the FNM Headquarters)
on

ae 1A RS
| - Numbers

ESLe

394-7289.

We look forward to serving
you from our new location.

plans

bers had increased in two-and-
a-half years from 196 to more
than 400.

“We hope we can double it
again. But instead of doubling
it in two-and-half years, dou-
ble it in one year,” Mr Simon
said of the membership.

Mrs Wright added: “The
Chamber is now back to the
fore. It is now the true gate-
way for the private sector’s
views to be managed through.
It has reassumed its true role as
the leading private sector
organisation, but that’s not to
diminish the worth of those
other private sector organisa-
tions.”

The Chamber of Commerce
was backing the growth of
chamber bodies in the Family
Islands, and was now looking
to bring them closer together
for improved collaboration.

Two-and-a-half years ago,
only Grand Bahama and Aba-
co had their own Chambers of
Commerce, but Mr Simon said
now that such bodies existed
on Exuma, and in north, cen-
tral and south Andros. Inter-
est had also been expressed in
creating Chamber-type organ-
isations in Eleuthera, as well
as Long Island.

Mr Simon
Caribbean nations saw the
Bahamian private. sector’s
involvement in regional affairs
as “critical”, regardless of
whether there was a Caribbean
Single.Market & Economy

said other







(CSME) or not.

The likes of the EU, Indja,
and China often only dealt with
regional trade blocs such as,
CARICOM, and Mr Simoni
said: “We have to be involved.”

For the 2006 first quarter, Mr,.
Simon said the Chamber would
again be organising the second,
annual New Business Devel;;
opment and Franchise Show;.
which had led to the franchise ,
deal signed last year between.
Bahamian firm Sun-Tee and.
EmbroidMe. whys

The meeting of the,
Caribbean Association of,
Industry and Commerce’s
(CAIC) vice-presidents’ Board,
of Directors will be held in the;,
Bahamas on March 31, with,
the meeting of the regional.
Chambers of Commerce halt
here the day after, April 1.

Addition —

In addition, the Chamber iis,.
also looking to re- -establish,
relationships with the Coral,
Gable and South Florida.
Chambers of Commerce, and
with the Ministry of Trade and,
Industry.

The Ministry of Financial
Services and Investments has
already pledged to involve. the,
Chamber “much more” with,
the investment projects before,
it, and was looking to formalise.
its role.in giving input on how
licences were distributed.

‘LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
SHREW IN VESTMEN TS LTD.

International Business Companies Act
(No. 45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section j pe
138 (4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of .; f
2000), SHREW INVESTMENTS LTD. is in dissolution. Irene’
Jornod, is the Liquidator and can be contacted at 5, Place du
Molard, 1204 Geneva, Switzerland. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their
names, addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator before the 31st day of December, 2005.

Signed: Irene Jornod
Liquidator

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393-2164


THE TRIBUNE

UTS) It tots)

MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 7B



Only 12.5% of Bahamian ‘students meeting

%

FROM page 1B

a group of business organisa-
tions and trade unions, found
that out of the 5,471 students
who sat BGCSE exams in sum-
mér 2004, only 12.5 per cent or
718 gained a minimum ‘C’
grade average in five subjects -
thé: formal minimum require-
ment for entering higher edu-
cation.

‘Many colleges, though, had
‘open enrollment plans’ where
that requirement was waived.
However, the Coalition report
found a 2002 Ministry of Edu-
cation survey showed that 940
sttidents who graduated high
school that year went on to col-
lege in the Bahamas and
abroad.

“The report said: “This is 34.8
per cent of all responders to
the survey. College entry rates
inthe US are reported in one
survey to be 76.5 per cent -
slightly more than two times
the Bahamian level.”

The disconnect between the
nation’s leading industry,
tourism, and Bahamian society
atid the education system, the
réport said, was shown by two
anecdotes.

~While there were 110 juniors
and seniors enrolled in the
hotel management degree
course at the University of
West Indies (UWI) Tourism

Training Centre, a course con- .

sidered equivalent to the four-
yéar degree at Cornell Univer-
sity, just three were Bahami-
ans.

‘And while 100 graduates

entered the Bahamas Hotel
Training College in 1994, a
course considered by some US
colleges as the equivalent to a
US two-year associate degree
programme, the college had
been taken over by the College
of the Bahamas on August 1,
2000.

Since then, the number of
students entering the pro-
gramme had fallen to 58 in
1999, 17 in 2000 and eight in
2002.

Reported

The Tribune reported on Sat-
urday that the Coalition report
revealed that students from
public high schools in New
Providence who sat BGCSE
exams in summer 2004
achieved an average grade of
‘F+’, which it branded a “truly
disturbing” performance.

The statistic is taken from a
confidential report prepared by
the Ministry of Education’s
Testing and Evaluation Unit,
which also found that the
‘Mean Grade’ achieved by stu-
dents from New Providence
private high schools in the 2004
BGCSE exams was just ‘D+’.

The Ministry of Education
report showed that, out of
4,367 students who sat the
Maths BGCSE in summer
2004, just 141 or three per cent
achieved an ‘A’ grade, with
some 14 per cent or 614 get-
ting a ‘U’ or failed grade. The
average or mean grade for
maths was an ‘BE’.

The results for English were

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
UPWARD SURGE LIMITED

_ {in Voluntary Liquidation) _

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

slightly better, with a mean or
average grade of ‘D-’, but
again, only three per cent or
130 out of the 4,281 who took
the exam achieved an ‘A’
grade.

The Coalition report added
that “a general low level of aca-
demic achievement has indi-
vidual, national and interna-
tional consequences”.

It drew on studies from
Dublin University in Ireland
and in the UK, which had con-
cluded that an adult’s level of
job-related income was heavily
dependent on their “functional
literacy”, and there was a 10
per cent earnings premium
attached to each additional
year of education.

A Hoover Institution report
in also concluded that with
higher academic achievement,
the US economy could see a
0.5 per cent increase in GDP
growth.

The Coalition report said:
“Clearly, a low level of learning
adversely affects labour pro-
ductivity, and this is one ele-
ment that contributes to higher
operating costs. In the case of
the Bahamas, high operating
costs cause a loss of competi-
tiveness as was pointed out in
the Tourism Taskforce Report
of 2003.”

In drew on the experiences

of a Bahamian executive who
interviewed all employment
candidates for his company,
leaving the office during the
interview after asking the can-
didate to write a brief para-
graph containing his name and

description of education and
work experience. “Invariably,
the applicant cannot write a
paragraph with clear sentences,
correctly arranged and with
minimal spelling errors,” the
Coalition report said........

“(The businessman] cannot
help but worry about a world
that is becoming ever more
‘knowledge driven’. Improve-
ments in productivity can come
with the adoption of new tech-
nologies that require increased
worker and managerial skills;
and survival may be possible
only by exploiting new service
industries requiring greater job
skills.”

The Coalition report exposes
how many Bahamian high
school graduates are effective-
ly unemployable, lacking the
skills to compete in a globalised
economy that has no borders.
The lack of qualified Bahami-
ans is also one factor forcing
employers to hire more expa-
triates on work permits than
they would like.

Ministry

The Ministry of Education’s’

BGCSE results for 2004 also
show that the prospects for cre-
ating the next generation of
Bahamian entrepreneurs are
relatively dim.

The 664 students who took
the BGCSE Bookkeeping
exam achieved a mean average
mark of ‘F+’. For. typewriting
and commerce, the mark was a
‘D’, while for office procedures
it was a ‘D+’. The 400 eco-

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE.

TRUE GAINFUL LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

formal college entry requirements

mark, with carpentry and join-
ery, electrical installation and
clothing construction all pro-
ducing ‘C’ or ‘C-’.

nomics candidates generated a

mean average mark of ‘E+’.
Vocational subjects returned

a slightly better mean average

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FRANCILLON PIERREVIL, MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 12TH day of DECEMBER, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.













LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
TUCANA VALLEY CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
‘Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 8th
day of December, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp.
Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



2005
No. 00971

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law and Equity Division *

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot
of land comprising 42,607 square feet being part of
Allotment Number 12 of a Subdivision known and
called “Malcolm Allotments” and situate approximately
3,420 feet South of Soldier Road and about 440 feet
East of East Street in the Southern District of the Island
of New Providence, Bahamas

| Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 8th
t day of December, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp.
Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC. —
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

POLONIUS HOLDINGS CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 8th day of
December 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.Box

} N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

LEDSTON INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
'| is in dissolution, which commenced on the 30th day of
| November 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.Box
| N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator



Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 8th day of
December 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.Box
N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

UYGAR CO. LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 8th day of

N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

COLLINGSWORTH INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

©

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on, the 30th day of November
2005. The Liquidator is Argosa carp Inc., P.O.Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator



December 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.Box .



. AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT
OF 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF
ALLISON E. DELEVEAUX

NOTICE OF PETITION

} Pursuant to an Order of The Supreme Court dated the 11th day
of October, A.D. 2005

The Petition of Allison Deleveaux of Crooked Island
one of the Islands of The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas
showeth in respect of:

ALL THAT piece or parcel of land comprising 42,607
square feet being part of Allotment Number 12 of a
Subdivision known and called “Malcolm Allotments”

’ and situate approximately 3,420 feet South of Soldier
Road and about 440 feet East of East Street in the
Southern District of New Providence, Bahamas, and
bounded on the Northwest by land property of one L.J.
Richardson and running thereon Three Hundred and
Thirty (330) feet and on the Northeast by Lot Number
Fourteen (14) of the said Malcolm Allotments and
running thereon One Hundred and Thirty-two (132)
feet and on the Southeast by land now or formerly the
property of Enid M. Fox and Keath E. Seymour and
running thereon Three Hundred and Thirty (330) feet,
and on the Southwest by a Road Reservation Ten (10)
feet wide and running thereon One Hundred and Thirty-
two (132) feet.

The Petitioner, Allison Delevaux, herein claims to be
the owner in fee simple in possession of the said piece of land
and has made application to The Supreme Court Of The
Commonwealth Of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting

i Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said piece of land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and
declared in a Certificate Of Title to be grated by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of that Act.

Copies of the Plan showing the position boundaries
shape marks and dimensions of the said piece of land may be
inspected during normal office hours at the following places:

(a) The Registry of The Supreme Court, East Street
North, Nassau, Bahamas.

(b) The Chambers of Joseph C. Lédée, Suite No. 6,
Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that any person having Dower
or right to Dower or an Adverse Claim not recognized in the
Petition shall on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days
after the final publication of these presents file at the Registry
of The Supreme Court in the City of Nassau, Bahamas, and
serve on the Petitioner or on the undersigned a Statement of
his/her Claim in the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to
be filed therewith.

| Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement
Of Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days after
the final publication of these presents shall operate as a bar to
such claim.

JOSEPH C. LEDEE, ESQ.
Chambers

Suite No. 6, Grosvenor Close
Shirley Street

Nassau, Bahamas.

Attorney for the Petitioner


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005 THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS
i COMICS PAGE





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PAGE 10B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005



@ BOXING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

SHERMAN ‘the Tank’
Williams can now add the
World Boxing Council’s
Caribbean Continental heavy-
weight title to his FEDE-
CARIB crown.

After being denied the

opportunity to fight for the lat-.

est title last weekend, Williams
finally got a second chance on
Saturday and he made good of
it against a different opponent.

Instead of facing Levin Castil-
lo from Ecuador, Williams was
matched against Willie Perry-
man from Jamaica and he came
out with a one-sided ten round
unanimous decision at the



the game 60-43.

@ BELOW: Junior All-Stars Shacia Major keeps possession on

-Caribs
the Jr A

BH RIGHT: COB Caribs’ Adina Knowles blocks the All-Stars’
Deandra Williams. The Caribs recovered from a slow start to win

Mohegan Sun Arena in
Uncasville, Connecticut.

The judges scored it 99-91,
99-91 and 98-92.

“A lot of people enjoyed the
fight,” said Williams, who
fought on the undercard of the
middleweight eliminating fight
that saw Ronald ‘Winky’
Wright win a unanimous deci-
sion over Sam Soliman.

“{ feel good. It’s a good
accomplishment for me,”
Williams stated. “It’s a step in
the right direction. Since signing
with my new promoters, we are
getting through a lot of the
things that we agreed to.”

Having relinquished ties with
his former manager, Henry Fos-
ter, Williams said he knew when
Jim Rider came along as his



new manager, things would get
better.

“Last night was evidence of
that and I proved that to all the
none believers and to the

world,” he insisted. “There were

a lot of nay sayers and a lot of
non believers.

“But I trained hard to get this
title. I should have won it last
weekend, but things didn’t work
out until Saturday night when
the gloves didn’t fit. I was able
to overcome all the obstacles. I
just kept the faith.”

Now that he’s claimed the
title, Wiliams said he and his
promotional team, Silver Hawk
Promotions, are pursuing the
chance for him to compete
for the British Commonwealth
title.










SHERMAN ‘THE TANK? WILLIAMS

TRIBUNE SPORTS







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(Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)








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» | Address





P.O. Box



| Telephone



noon

i! be on December 14 before 12:

Drawing w
MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005"

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398
‘Mail: sports@100jamz.com -



Dragons put to the
sword on debut

a BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

» THE LYFORD Dragons’ junior boys team
couldn’t handle the pressure down the stretch
against the CV Bethel Stingers. But their senior
girls gave the CC Sweeting: Cobras a tough

game. . :

‘The Dragons lost both of their games played
on Sunday at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium in
their debut in the Father Marcian Peters Invi-
tational Basketball Tournament.

. However, they madé an.impression on pals
their opponents and the fans.

Lyford Cay took a 7-0 lead into the half,
but didn’t have the legs to stay with CV Bethel
’ when they turned up the‘heat after the, break
and lost 16-10.

‘But despite losing, 21:6 to CC Sweeting,
Lyford Cay made the-Cobras work for every
point that they got with their tenacious defence.

“This was just a practice game for us because
most of thé girls are just coming from playing.
volleyball,” said CC Sweeting’s coach Darnell
Bastian of her senior girls’ team.

“But this was a rough team that we played
-against. They will make any team in the GSS-
SA think twice when they have to play against °
them.”

The Cobras are one.of the top. contenders to"
win the Government Secondary School Sports
Association (GSSSA) title. And they showed:
that as-they out-scored the Dragons in a lop-
sided affair. Ae

But Lyford Cay coach Tony Williams said
this was just a taste of what to expect from:
the Dragons as they prepare to enter the:
Bahamas Association of Independént Sec='
ondary Schools for the first time next year

““We played pretty well. I think what caiiséd '
our downfall was our defence,” he insisted.
“But we are just getting started, so I think we
will only Bet better with time.” :

| - Scoring

- Stiawerte Taylor single-handedly led she.
Cobras past the Dragons with a game high 10:
points, scoring-five in the first quarter and
another five in thé fourth. Garcia Redwood
added five.and Shanigis Sweeting chipped in
with four.

_ -Kah Britton, Julia Haniimerer and Shunda
Blyden all had two points in the loss.

_ Lyford Cay’s junior boys had a totally dif-
ferent outlook in their game against CV
Bethel. The Stingrays pulled off a 16- 10 win:
over the Dragons.: °

After getting shutout in the first half, the
Stingrays exploded for 11 points to surge‘ahead °
11-8 at the end of the thitd gnc they coasted to
victory in the fourth.

George Martin scorediggyen and Jamaal
Moxey had four in the thi quarter as CV
Bethel bounced back. Kefineth Hart addéd
; . three and L. ENON, finished with two to help,
Y ‘out. ---:

: _ Philip Stubbs and Brandon Moxey scored
' four apiece for Lyford Cay.
Coach Sam England said his Dragons’ did
n’t have. any-steam left down the stretch.
: “They just had a lot of players coming off
: . the bench,” England reflected. “Our players
are not used to playing as physical as mney
played.”

In a junior girls’ gate played, the sc
McPherson Sharks held off the CC Sweeting
Scorpions 16-14.

Keva Barry had an opportunity to tie the
‘score at the end of regulation and force over- °
time, but her jumper at the buzzer was riled
‘invalid, ~.

‘J really thought I got the shot off, but they.
said it was too late,” said Barry, who led the
Scorpions with six. “We shouldn't have had to
come down to the late shot. We just didn’t
play good at the beginning.”

_ Atthe beginning of the game, Maleshia Pet-
térson got ‘off to a fast start, scoring five of
her 10 points as the Sharks opened a 7-2 lead
that they extended to 9-4. They pushed it to 12-
8 at the half and 14-10 after the third quarter.

‘Shatyna Stuart also scored four for SC
McPherson.

“This is the first time that my girls played in ©
: any organised basketball, but because of the
i: gymvexcitement, a lot of things that we did in.
practice, we didn’t execute today,” said Sharks”
coach Chevy Simmons.

“But, for the most part, I think they will get
better as the tournament progresses. | think if
we had gone into overtime, it would have been .
good to see what happened. I know we would
have been able to pull it off.”



f@ BASKETBALL é
By KELSIE JOHNSON--
Junior Sports Reporter



THE. COB Caribs turned up the heat in
the second half of play on Saturday night to -
trounce the Jr All-Stars.

After a slow start in the’first-half, in the
New Providence Women’s Basketball Asso-.
ciation (NPWBA) opening game, the Caribs .
adjusted to defeat the All-Stars 60-43-

But the win didn’t come that easy for the -

Caribs. Late in the fourth quarter, the Alls,”
Stars capitalised on the mistakés made by.
the Caribs second string team. #

The All-Stars were on a 12:3 run befare,”

the Caribs head coach Dr Linda Davis: .
called a time-out. 7

Still having control of the board, the Al
Stars made a fast break to the basket, but. -
the fresh legs of Kavionne Newbold, Caribs 7’
power forward, frightened. Shadia’ Major,

causing hier to miss ‘the baseline lay-up.

Admitting that the junior team still has a.
lot of things to work out to improve their.
game. head coach of thé team Sharelle Cash.

said that her teatn’s biggest: downfall is the -
size of their opponents each night... "=

She said: “I don’t want anyone to sleep ony. °
this team. this is a good team. All the girls” ,
have the fundamentals they. need to win .
big games, but the fundamentals dren’t the
things that are hurting the team. 2 :

“The team is scared, basically that’s ig
Every night they come to the game and
they are afraid of playing’ some: of the older
play ers.

~They come. to me and say coach, you
see how big these girls are-who we are going
to plav, the intimidation factor is valready |
there. : :

“By the team they realise that” they. ca.
play with these teams it is a’ little too. late,”
the game is already far gone... * @

“But I will remind éveryone.in this: league: -
that this junior team will improve and that’
they will win more games. Tonight’s late
surge is a great example of their skills.” >

Evenly |

The All-Stars were evenly cut with. the
Caribs in the first quarter. By the end‘of this ..
quarter the team was down by four points .
and down by one point by the end of the- : *
first half, *

They had produced enough points to.
keep them close in the game, as‘a team they |
shot 5 5-for-29 trom the field in the first-half
and 3-for-8 from the free throw line, while’
all three attempts from behind the arch

failed. :

For the Caribs, the slow game. give the:
second string playing time also allowing
coach Davis to experiment with, the differ
ent players.

But the experimental process was forced’.
to shut down when the All ‘Stars defence.
picked.up. =

Besides the run the. team made in- the
fourth quarter, the All-Stars had now taken’
control of the boards. :

Offensively the team were getting much
needed second and third shot attempts, on
the defensive end they were out JUMPING
and hustling the Caribs.

The team snatched down 10 Ofte. ng
boards, six of which came in the opening. :
minutes of the fourth. Defensively they
were able to get 24 rebounds.’ s

Stepping up big for the team was Major,
who scored 15 points, six rebounds and’one.
assist and steal. Chipping in was Deandra~
Williams with 12 points, éight rebounds,
one block and three steals.

For the Caribs. starting point guard Chris~
tine. Sinclair returned to “the game to ensure
the win, finishing up with 17 points, seven °
rebounds. and’a steal.

Alyse Dean also helped the cause with 13

points, six rebounds, two steals and, \
assists. The tournament heats up today when the

Play action in the league will continue: : Family Island teams arrive. The action starts at
on Tuesday at the DW Davis gym with two as ‘/ COB Caribs’ Christine Sinclair looks for a a as Keva Davy of the Junior All Stars plays some tight defence. : 10am.
games on schedule. ~ ; pee Salen _ Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune ea). aS







‘








me os Sweet Onion
“aac fo Giitken teriyaki




The stories behind the news



‘Let’



en

«

or visa rac

s clean up t





ecret meetings In a car
park at Norfolk House, the
%, Bahamas visa office in
fm) Nassau, are far more than
Ped” they appear to be.,

‘On the face of it, two people shake
hands, chat briefly, then say their
farewells. But it’s what passes between
them that ought to be of concern to
the public at large.

Packets containing dozens, and
probably scores, of stamped passports
are handed to a man whose human
trafficking exploits earn him hundreds
of thousands of dollars a year.

“Fhe person handing over. the
pr ocessed documents is a ‘government
employee whose share of the spoils
makes these clandestine dealings very
worthwhile indeed.

Informed sources who claim to have
seen these transactions take place
have been talking to INSIGHT fol-
lowing disturbing disclosures at the
recent FNM rally about a large-scale
visa racket. 4

if true, the information is a stag-
gering indictment of government’s
failure to properly monitor the visa
issuing procedure at Norfolk House.
And it points to organised corruption
at the heart of the visa processing
operation.

“The truth is, there are some dis-



honest people in the government ser- §

vice who are selling our birthright,”
INSIGHT was told.

“They are stamping dozens and
probably hundreds of passports on an
ongoing basis for under-the-table pay-
ments. ‘And these, in turn, are allowing
a flow of immigrants int@ our country
— people who merge into the commu-
nity and never go home again,”

The sources are now calling for a
full independent inquiry into the
alleged racket, saying something rad-
ical needs to be done to bring the visa
scam to an end.

“In these days when security is such
a major issue, hundreds of Haitians
and Chinese are coming into our
country with no checks at all,” they
said.

“What these people are doing is dri-
ving the Bahamas to ruination. There
is a clique at work who are liaising
with human traffickers to set up a pro-
cedure by which Haitians and Chi-
nese can get into the Bahamas by pay-
ing thousands of dollars for visas
which often go unrecorded.”

The disclosures follow last month’s
alarming allegations by former Attor-
ney General Carl Bethel, who said
visas issued to Haitians had jumped
from 102 in 2002 to more than 2,200 in
2004 - a 20-fold increase per annum.
Mr Bethel also said visas issued to
Chinese nationals had quadrupled in
the same period.

Foreign Affairs Minister Fred
Mitchell. whose portfolio covers the
visa department, later denied Mr
Bethel’s claims of “direct political
involvement at the highest level” and

aa i OY

A MAJOR visa scam is allowing hundreds of Haitians and
Chinese to enter the Bahamas unchecked, and some well-
placed officials are earning a fortune in pay-offs for their
part in the scandal, according to informed sources who
oS what they claim is solid inside information.

@ HAITIANS take a risky voyage from northern Haiti in search of a new life in the Bahamas.

said a police inquiry and an internal
review were underway.

But the sources who approached
INSIGHT last week stressed that
internal investigations are not enough.
There had to be a proper indepen-
dentiinquiry because the official num-
bers - disturbing as they were - told
only a small part of the story. Of
greater concern, they said, were the
numbers of unrecorded visas being
issued,

Meanwhile, they revealed details of
a continuing scam allegedly involving

up to six traffickers who arrange.

smuggling operations from Haiti and
Cuba, enabling hundreds of illegal
immigrants to filter into the Bahamas
with no checks of any kind.

One of the six specialises in Chi-
nese immigrants. These are believed
to stem from an illicit trafficking oper-
ation in Cuba.

The rest deal with Haitians, who
are loaded on to sloops at Port-de-
Paix in northern Haiti for-voyages to a
new life in Nassau.

INSIGHT reports. ‘

a |

One trafficker is thought to be sell-
ing visas to desperate Haitians at
between $1,800 and $3,000 a time. For
this, he also organises sloop trips -

‘one vessel can make up to 40 such

passages per year - and arranges
“receptions” by fellow Haitians when
the immigrants dock at Arawak Cay.

The operation ensures that immi-

‘grants achieve ‘a smooth entry into

the country, sometimes with the com-
plicity of corrupt, Defence Force offi-
cers. |

“Everything: we say is! true,” said

the sources, “the government is play-
ing games. Three-month visas are
being issued all the time - some for
boat passengers, some for air passen-
gers. }

“Monday, Tuesday and Friday are
visa days, and this is when these trans-
actions take place. One guy goes into
the car park at Norfolk House to col-
lect his passports. He drops them off
in the morning and collects them, ful-
ly stamped, in the afternoon.

“Then he eee them back to Haiti



(FILE photo)

and returns them to their owners for a
. sum of money. It is a highly lucrative

racket netting him probably hundreds
of thousands a year.

“However, this operation would not
be possible without the active co-oper-
ation of some well-placed officials.
Now there needs to be a full-scale
independent inquiry.”

Under the scheme, Haitian women
aré being charged more for visas than

men. This is because of their potential

to produce Bahamian-born babies.
“The thinking is that anyone with the
capacity to produce more ‘Bahami-

ans’ ought to pay more for their pas- _

sage,” said one source.

“AIl this is being eased along by
some corrupt Defence Force officers.
Boat skippers are given money at the
start of their journey in Haiti to pay
off officers in Nassau.

“Lf this money is handed over, you
wil not hear about the sloop’s arrival.
If, for some reason, the money is not
handed over, the officers make arrests
and it gets into the newspapers.”

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Some time ago, he said, a boat skip-
per refused to pass on the “pay off”
cash, preferring to hang on to it him-
self. As a result, he and everyone on
board his boat were taken into cus-
tody.

“The traffickers may walk around
looking like bums but they can get
between $40,000 and $60,000 per boat-
load leaving Haiti.

“As a boat takes about eight days to
make a round trip, it’s possible for
one sloop to make close to 40 trips a -
year. That means a lot of money is
involved. But some has to be paid to
corrupt officials to make the operation
possible.

“What the government needs to do
is tap into the lifestyles of some of its
officials and see how this checks out
against their regular income.

“It makes me sick that we talk bad
about Haitians yet we are selling
everything to them. We say we hate
them, yet we are picking ae money
under the table.

“What makes this even worse is that
legitimate Haitians who want regular

' $55 visas to get to and from Haiti on

business are given a hard time.

“The backer ounds of all immigrants
are supposed to be checked, but under
this scam no checks are being made.
The visas are issued with no pictures,
no faces. We don’t know who’s com-
ing in because no security is done on
them.

“This country could be straight if
we wanted to be straight. But there is
too much craziness going on here. We
need a proper US-style ‘sting’ opera-
tion to ensure these people get locked
away.

“When people are doing dirt, word
travels. Everyone knows who is selling
visas. I think this has always happened
to some extent, but nothing like as
bad as now. It has got out of hand
because people get greedy.”

The information ties in with human
smuggling operations which have been
going on for years, using the Bahamas
chain as transhipment points for
onward trafficking to the United

tates.

Haitians are often brought through
the Bahamas by sloop, kept in safe
houses in Nassau, then taken on to
Bimini when their US “documenta-
tion” is ready for swift passage by go-
fast boats to the Florida coast.

One young Haitian, who waited for
months in Nassau until his “papers”
were ready, told INSIGHT: “My
brothers are involved in the human
smuggling business and $40,000 per
boat trip is nothing for them.

“They are earning major money
because Haitians back in their home-
land who have been receiving money
from relatives working abroad will
pay anything lo get a passage to the
US.

SEE page 3C

31. 2005!

for 25% OFF

rine

C
oe
fm ae
oe
oc:
Ye et
=)
aa
os
0”
PAGE 2C, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005

THE TRIBUNE.



read with interest

your recent "Insight"

with respect to. The

Mud fire in Marsh

Harbour. I happen to
have lived my entire life in the
Abacos and can trace my
ancestry through 1783 when
the Loyalists populated these
islands.

The Abacos are a special
place to me for several rea-
sons, chief among which is its
diverse resources, both natur-
al and human.

I note the tenor and tone of
your article and, while I
respect your right to editorial
liberty, it seems rather harsh
to revert to derogatory and, in
fact, inflammatory language.

Both the tone and tenor of
your article are vitriolic and,
in fact, disparaging to an
entire race of people who
have struggled since the birth
of their republic 200 years
ago.

People

. The Haitian people have
been manipulated and raped
by successive colonial powers
over the past few centuries in

order to maintain the caste
systems and contingent bene- -
fits. It seems to me that the
absence of stability in this -
republic is more celebrated ;

' that scorned and, in fact, true -

thirst for democracy ‘and
human freedom should start
in the bosom of the western
hemisphere and not the Mid-
dle East.

Is it not curious that Haiti
and Cuba remain the way
they are despite the new phi-
losophy of "liberation" of
nations that promote totalitar-
ianism and tyranny? I wonder
aloud about how serious we
are about freedom when we
fail to expose the glaring con-
tradictions boldly exhibited at
Guantanamo - when we allow
multinational companies to ~
engage today's Haitian popu-
lace in a modern system of
slavery for a mere pittance in
order to ensure the survival of
capitalism in the great USA.

We need to speak truthfully —

about humanity and the con-
ditions within which our
human brothers find them-
selves. This truth demands
and requires that we examine
the history of Haitian
exploitation in the Abacos in

_ particular.

If one were to look objec-

” tively at the development of

modern industry in the Aba-
cos, it becomes clear that over
the past 50 years Haitian
labour has featured promi-
nently.

It is upon their shoulders
and the shoulders of a more
desirable migrant.(Turks and.
Caicos Islanders) that we
have built pine lumbering,
sugar prodcution and fruits

, and vegetables.

The Scott and Mattson
Farms (J B Crockett), Hevea-
tex Plantation (Abaco Farms
Limited), Key and Sawyer
Farms, B G Harmon, Sugar-
land Farms, Bahama Palm



Groves, Bahama Star Farms

-etc. have all maximised their

profits through minimum
wages to these migrants.

Note

You will note that as far
back as the Scott and Mattson
farms in the late fifties and
sixties there was a desire on
the part of these migrants for
a better way of life and living
conditions, to which they
added strong protest even
then.

Many communities rejected
this initial Haitian presence,
particularly the Marsh Har-
bour and Murphy Town resi-
dents who, through a sup-
posed superior position,
found their cohabitation total-
ly unacceptable.

_ They insisted that "their.
Haitian" should live in a pre-

“scribed manner in the bushes

out of sight and took great
pains in facilitating the con-
struction of homes on these
prescribed sites, inclusive of
utilities and other necessities.
In the 1970s and well into
the 1980s The Mud was no
major problem because it was
exactly that, undesirable land
requiring no great interest



excess baggage

beyond illegal shops which
were busted by police periodi-
. cally in order to maintain a
sense of order and control.
Some conscientious citizens
and Family Island-commis--~~----

sioners took it upon them-
selves to remove buildings
that began to escalate in num-
ber, only to find themselves
speedily transferred to Nassau
upon the intervention of the
local protectorate, whose
profit margins would be ~
adversely impacted by the loss
of their Haitians.

The desire for dignity and
respect yearned.in the hearts:
of second and third genera-
tion Haitians, who upon
attaining the age of status
qualification, found their par-
ents’ occupations and the dis-
dain with which they were col-
lectively treated unacceptable
and at best reprehensible.

They committed themselves
to academic and vocational
excellence and vowed never
to be.yard weeders,
farmhands, handymen or
housekeepers, but to assume
proper careers. Many never
returned from United States
colleges and universities, but
opted for Wall Street success
or other such occupations,



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thus draining resources from
the island from which they
were nurtured.

Those that regard Abaco as
"home" remain a part of the
community, making a contri-
bution. Some, in fact, have
returned as teachers and med-
ical professionals, Customs
and Immigration officers to
boot.

A quick glance at the acad-
emic records of Abaco Cen-
tral High School will reveal ,
the level ofcommitment —_-
made by children of these
communities. They account
for the highest levels of acade-
mic success and the largest
percentage of prefects and
student leaders, such as head
boys and girls and their
deputies.

They resent the reference
to Haitian with the callous
broad stroke by which it is
applied. They yearn for accep-
tance and respect in the only

‘society they know. This has

been the driving force that has
resulted in the second genera-
tion of "Bahamians" of Hait-
ian descent purchasing prop-
erty and building approved
houses and apartments to
improve their lot, fully inte-
grating into society.

Respect ©

"With respect to The Mud

and Pigeon Pea, its ugly twin,
the Haitians would love to
leave there, too. The truth be
told, no migrant without prop-
er status will invest in "high"
level housing. They are on the
fringe because they have been
placed there.

The community is not pow-
erless to control the prolifera-
tion of these communities, it
is complicit in their prolifera-
tion. This complicity is driven
by economic greed and the
perceived superiority that
resulted in their genesis to
begin with.

If the community is wary of
illegals, then it ought to take a
very bold stand and refuse to
hire them, assist the authori-
ties in their apprehension, car-

.-Ty out their.duties as officers -

of the peace as building |
inspectors, town planning
committees, immigration,
police, licensing authorities
and restore public trust in’
their offices.

As an example of the
hypocrisy and the shallowness
of the various public utter-
ances against these "illegal"
communities, take a look at
The Mud. A week before the

~~ firé'in The Mud a house was

constructed directly behind
the old softball park at the
entrance of The Mud, about
20 feet from the main paved
road leading to a popular auto
body shop.

It was not only built in clear
view of any competent
authority or concerned citi-
zen, it was enclosed by a chain

- link fence and a wooden deck

was added.

The so-called "Urban
Renewal" project, initiated by
the administrator and engag-
ing several Haitian-descent
persons, fell on infertile
ground as the committee lost
faith in a system that failed to
compensate them for services
rendered as agreed.

If we cannot keep our word,
we cannot be trusted to secure

--public trust on-pertinent-

issues.

Additionally, data collected
by those persons should be
returned to them and not be
so widely distributed, as it
constitutes severe theft of the
most blatant kind and demon-
strates an absence of integrity
and blanket deception at best.

We ought to find a way to
bridge the gaps between those
disenfranchised Bahamians of
Haitian descent who are con-
tinually pounded upon by
"professionals" and political
types in order to further their
agendas for what it’s worth.

The facts are that there are
fewer "illegal" immigrants
than imagined in the fertile
minds of the ignorant prog-
nosticators. What we do have
are severe anomalies in the
constitution of the Bahamas
that impact disproportionate-
ly on Haitians and their
descendants. While this may
in fact be accidental, the
rhetoric of resolution must
speak to this issue.

The journey to "citizen-
ship" in our great country is
an extremely tedious one.
However, these persons
awaiting status are confined
to a corner of our society in

“which théy huddle without

access to the benefits of high-
er education at COB, or the
right to be employed legally
without a work permit.
Many of these persons are
the children of legal perma-
nent residents and citizens,
formerly of Haiti, residing in

‘this dangerous system an

__ does not only prevail withirt: 2s.

the Bahamas. When we mar- |
ginalise people, we can expect’
animosity and hatred to arise. |
When we insist that even in
death, they must bury their ,
dead in a "different" resting
place in Marsh Harbour, out-
side of prescribed public
cemeteries reserved for the
elite race of Bahamians, we’
are adding pressure to an
overworked nerve.

When we paint with a broad
brush, and without exception: ”
suggest that the so-called . --
Haitian community in Marsh‘ :
Harbour are a cutlass and’ **
knife-wielding bunch, withoit"’
reference to acts of violence’ °
by Bahamian youths upon =”
each other with ssimilar
implements, we are adding to:
the divide.

The "pen is, in fact, mighti-
er than the sword", as some*’ -
luminary is quoted as saying, |
therefore we have a greater’:
obligation to examine the “ °
"facts" presented to us: Any’ |
human being asked to express:
his feelings publicly regarding.
loss of valuable personal» .\’‘
properties is likely-to fall into
the trap of uttering language: °
coloured by desperation.

The individual widely tout-’.
ed as a symbol of the deep, ©
passionate thirst for the blodd’
of Bahamian firemen volun-,"'
‘teering their time should have:
been roundly condemned and,-
in fact, cautioned by the
police.

The media, contrariwise,
recorded this incident as
symptomatic of a wider prob-
lem between the Haitian com-
munity and the authorities,
taking great pains to quote }
alleged incidents of intimida-
tion and mass violence against
community-minded citizens
seeking to extinguish a fire oe
their benefit.

I cannot say how I would ne
feel if I stood helpless to pro-
tect my home from loss in the,
face of an impending threat as
a Bahamian, particularly if, in
my unqualified view, insuffi-
cient efforts were being made

‘to deter it.

In such an emotionally
charged situation, I submit “
that even the most reasoned: '
person would act outside of":
his usual behaviour. Our soci”
ety (The Bahamas) will con?
tinue to be:built upon the °°!
shoulders of all migrants, +°~
whether from Haiti, America;
Cuba, Turks or elsewhere i in
the world. ae

We must be carefulto -'2
maintain standards to which '*!'
we can all properly submit ‘ .
and not so broadly stoke the--
flames of nationalism to the’
nation's detriment. ’

We must build our nation” -
on the willing shoulders of ak
resident partners, irrrespec-':.'
tive of national origin. Whilé’ -
me must guard against inva-
sion of our borders externally;
we must also shore up our ‘-“!
internal efforts to builda -»‘y
strong national character. Our
‘nation will only be as strong ' ue
as we make it. ¥

Our nation has benefited: - '
and continues to benefit from:
the contribution of migrants‘:
from many nations - this will
not change. We must be care-’
ful not to pretend we operate
in a vacuum and allow the
enlightenment necessary to-”’
prepare for globalisation.

But for the Grace of God,
we are moré fortunate than’ »
most of our regional neigh-
bours, to reside in the
Bahamas. Who knows what
tomorrow brings?

— Jacob Saunders

I AM writing this e-mail fo’
give you kudos and thanks for
writing such an awe-inspiring
article that plagues our soci-—
ety. I recently returned honte:,
from school to a system of ‘*”"
who you knows and how well.
do you perform sexually in“ ~”
order to effectively apply one-
self to the development of our
nation.

Prevalence.

There is a prevalence of
dogma in our society that we:

‘must continue to isolate and*.-‘

proactively lobby our goverir=::
ment for radical changes to bé:
made. I, too, am a victim of*=*.

c

must say that I am not even
giving myself a full year to
find my niche within our
labour system.

I must make one note that?
this practice of favouritism =

ies eS A
“Seer Pees.

2 “t AO 8 6.6 8 CET S

ei
Â¥.

=

-

the public sector, it too is &+*.
prevalent in the private sectar,
as for too long the public seers
tor has been the benchmark =>:
for how the private sector ~~~
conducts business.

SEE page 3C
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 3C



2 re ee eee
Has the scramble for degrees gone too far?

FROM page 8C

past would have testified. For a
potter to be able to say “I
worked alongside Bernard
Leach” was the equivalent of
enough degrees to wallpaper
the inside of a fair-sized air-
craft hangar. Now this price-
less transfer of expertise has
given way to the frenzied clam-
our for certificates, many of
which have little or no value in
the world of work.

The huge gulf in time created
over the last 30 years between
high school graduation and
entry into the workplace -
stretching in some cases to sev-
en or eight years of tertiary
education - has given us a gen-
eration of “Don’t knows”, peo-
ple who have no clue where
’ their talents and qualifications
might lead them.

It is a desperately sad situa-
tion, for the longer they stay
in the protected college envi-
ronment, the less sure they
appear to be about emerging
into the cold light of reality.
“I’ve learned so much in the
classroom that I’m now thor-
oughly confused about what I
should be doing in life,” was
the jament of one bright lad in
his early twenties. A girl stu-
dent concurred, adding: “The
world of work fills me with
trepidation, mainly because I

have been in the safe school
environment for so long.”

The suspicion is growing that
academia is now accepting
huge fees for services that fall
far short of expectations, and
fail to serve society’s needs. In
addition, lecturers are leading
young people to believe that
what they are being taught will
make them indispensable
acquisitions for any self-
respecting company or corpo-
ration, and candidates fur
instant advancement. This is
rarely true. ;

Joining

One student joining a news

organisation with her MBA
degree wanted to know, dur-
ing her first week in the office,
when she could take over as
managing editor, even though
she had no newsroom experi-
ence at all. With her treasured
diploma at the ready, she felt
nothing was beyond her, and
that all the tedious preliminar-
ies of a proper hands-on train-
ing had been rendered unnec-
essary by her MBA studies.
No-one had told her that acad-
emic qualifications, in them-
selves, are not enough, and that
years of experience are a nec-
essary part of the promotion
process.

Perhaps society must now

‘Lets clean
up this major
visa racket |

FROM page 1C

“Some end up going to
college and doing well for
themselves. In Haiti, there is
no prospect of a good life.
While waiting for my papers,
I spent my days learning
English. By. coming to Nas-
sau, I managed to make a
future for myself.”

The young man ended up
at college and is now pro-
gressing as a member of the
Florida Haitian community.

It is this prospect of pros-

perity - something unattain-

able in Haiti for all but the
very few - that continues to
fuel the trafficking business
and make it one of the most
_ financially rewarding illicit
enterprises in the region.
During his revelations
about. the alleged visa racket,

Mr Bethel isolated one indi- |
vidual who had managed to ©

acquire an average of nine
visas a week, enabling him
to bring in about. 470
Haitians a year. This person
is not necessarily involved in
illicit activity, but the num-
bers were a cause for con-
cern.

-However, if INSIGHT’s
sources are right, nine visas a.
week are small beer in the
overall scheme of things.

When Bahamians express
alarm about the impending

~ Nobody Gets The Dirt
8 harem eeelei4

GET mci ae
eu
Se UAC OL

6402.(2 quaris} $20.50 -
Bee Omer U ROC)
ee yay |
OMe a (

eevee

Ce CeCe R mate Ik)

Kya YL BL
: C ) 7
a eecey Vise
CSTR GIO
Rey COMO Una RTC

“creolisation” of their soci-
ety, they. generally see the
influx of immigrants as a
haphazard affair, with
Haitians fleeing into the bush
from grounded sloops. |
However, it seems many
arrive right in the heart of

_ Nassau with their pre-paid .

visas at the ready, their way
smoothed for them by cor-
rupt Bahamians who will sell
the country to the dogs if the
moneyisright. =.

_ Far from being haphazard,
the smuggling operations are
carefully orchestrated, with
the immigrants themselves
seeing their investments as

money well-spent. In fact,

trafficking appears to be
good news for everyone
involved. It’s. the Bahamas
itself that suffers, and the

‘ long-term effects of this con-

tinuing infiltration of out-
siders can only be guessed
at. “It’s time to clean house,”
said INSIGHT’s sources.
“Let’s have transparency.

_Let’s stop leading our coun- ~

try to ruin. Not everyone in —
the visa department is
crooked - but those who
aren’t either don’t know
what’s happening or are too
scared to speak up.”

¢ What do you think? Fax

328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia.net

SpinSweep Outdoor Sweeper

accept that it has been bam-

- boozled by academia into

believing that college gradua-
tion is the only way forward.
In truth, it isn’t. What the
entire education system ought
to be doing is identifying stu-
dents’ strengths from an early
age and guiding them towards
occupations that will offer them
lifetimes of fulfilment and
reward, preferably starting
them on their career paths
between 16 and 19 instead of
plunging them into years of
debt and near penury.

This process would, of
course, require renewed
emphasis on the basics, like
language and mathematics
tuition, plus a wide-ranging
foundation covering history,
geography, general science an
the arts.

A high school diploma -

ought, theoretically, to be
enough to serve as a basis for
on-the-job vocational training
in any of the white collar pro-
fessions as well as the crafts
and trades that help to make
the world go round.
Unfortunately, over the last

.30 or 40 years general educa-

tional standards have fallen so
sharply that a bachelor’s degrée
has now come to serve the
same purpose as five GCE O
levels did in 1960.

Then, five O levels were con-

FROM page 2C_

Continue to write these
articles as you as a journalist
have a fundamental responsi-
bility to create and allow for
national debate on all matters.

Keep up the good work!!!

— Nikita N. Curry

Bachelor of Commerce -

Hospitality and Tourism

Ryerson University -

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

eeee0e0
Bahamian ‘brain drain’

IT is true that many very
well-qualified graduates feel
under-valued in their own
society.

I am extremely well-quali-
fied in my field and work as
an academic. Yet I find that
many attorneys, for instance,
of mediocre academic stan-
dards and inferior working
skills are on far higher pay
scales than I am.

We have economics stu-
dents here who are as good as
you will find anywhere, but
some of them end up as bank
tellers and are stuck with such
positions for years.

I suppose doctors, who have .

to do many years of spe-
cialised study, deserve high
rewards. But you have attor-
neys here who can be earning
$60,000 or $70,000 a year after
only five years in practice.
And many can earn $100,000
or more.

Yet I know a guy witha
PhD and master’s degree in
economics who has 20 years
of experience and he is still
getting under $50,000.

This is very discouraging for
those. who study away for
many years to get good-class
qualifications. And it’s the
reason why so many young

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sidered the dividing line
between blue collar and white
cullar occupations. The BA or
BSc has now taken over that
role. Non-graduates are now
considered the also-rans in
modern society, destined for
semi-skilled or unskilled occu-
pations in which personal ful-
filment is not a high priority.

Looking back on.a fast-fad-
ing 20th century, it is salutary
to consider its icons and ogres
and their place in the educa-
tional firmament.

Consider the following and
ask yourself: where did they go
wrong when it came to learn-
ing?

Sir Winston Churchill, Adolf
Hitler, Elvis Presley, Muham-
mad Ali, Marilyn Monroe,
Pablo Picasso, D H Lawrence,
George Orwell, Thomas Hardy
and Ernest Hemingway were
all non-graduates.

Different

So were,.or are, John Stein-
beck, William Faulkner, The
Beatles, Frank Sinatra, Princess
Diana and Queen Elizabeth IL.
In their different ways, all have
made deep impressions on the
age in which they lived, yet not
one had the benefit of a uni-
versity degree.

Some, of course, were not
obliged to face life in a com-

péople - some of them not
very bright - are attracted to
an already overcrowded legal
profession.

— Graduate -

KUDOS for your article
‘We too, are cast-offs of
Bahamian Society’ written in
The Tribune on Monday,
December 5, 2005. The senti-
ments expressed are exactly
how I feel about the Bahami-
an working society. I too am a
qualified Bahamian who has
been turned down on numer-
ous occasions for different job
vacancies in my field of study
with no reason or explanation
given. Graduates who return

«. Home:-or even Bahamians who

have worked abroad and wish
to come home, become so
frustrated with the system
that they have to question
why their expertise is not
sought after.

The reason why is, there’are
too many persons in senior
positions who feel threatened
because they are unable to
perform even at a satisfactory
level. For example, on my job
I have been asked on numer-
ous occasions by managers
and a senior manager to assist
in completing their tasks. Yet
when I ask for a promotion I
am told that I need more
experience even though I
have been working at that
position for several years. In
addition J have higher qualifi-
cations than some of them.

My sister is presently
attending university and [am
continuously encouraging her
not to return to The Bahamas.
Eventually I also plan to relo-
cate to another country that
will give me a chance to excel
and who will appreciate my

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petitive environment. Others -
Hitler, especially - were prob-
ably prompted by lack of suc-
cess in the classroom to follow
more hideous and destructive
pursuits.

All round, though, their
celebrity or notoriety had lit-
tle to do with scholastic suc-
cess, and one wonders whether

too much emphasis is now -

placed on “qualifications”
which fail to tell the entire sto-
ry about a person’s potential.
After all, universities cannot
teach talent. - and talent, an
inborn gift or aptitude, is so
often the decisive factor in
determining a person’s destiny,
especially in most of the really
worthwhile creative occupa-
tions.

There is no doubt that a col-
lege education still has its place
for many. But, like medicine
and the law, academia’s pur-
pose appears to have been cor-

_rupted and tainted by the lust

for money.

Many universities are now
primarily concerned with gen-
erating revenue. The most suc-
cessful of them are awash with
cash, creating ever more allur-
ing campuses and courses to
titillate the narcissism and self-
regard in all of us. Middle-class
families now regard a degree

-for their children as a necessity

in achieving bourgeois

contribution to their society.
Too many favours are being
promised and too many
exchanges are given in return.
Yet we wonder why the coun-
try’s performance is not as
efficient and prosperous as it
should be. The government is
creating jobs, but the types.of
opportunities that are being
created do not include the
young educated, qualified
Bahamian. Unfortunately, the
Bahamian economy will not .
be able to appreciate the vast
wealth of knowledge it
already possesses because so
many skilled Bahamians are
deciding not to return due to
the ill treatment.of their own

s people. Signed -
‘—D.B.

It’s interesting that the pay
ceiling for even the best quali-
fied academic at COB, for
instance, is about $54,000 a
year - and that is earned only
by PhDs with long experience.

Your article cites the case
of a “government official”
who gets between $60,000 and
$70,000 and is illiterate.
Where is the incentive, you
might ask.
— James, Prince Charles
Drive

WE need to find ways of
trimming down the public ser-
vice, which is stuffed to the
gunwales with highly-paid no-
hopers who are, in the main, a
waste of space and money. .

The money saved could be
pumped into investment



respectability. In return for dol-
lars, lots of them, colleges offer
students an embossed and
flamboyantly signed document
certifying academic excellence.
The obligatory photograph of
smug student in mortarboard
and gown, flanked by proud
parents, has become an inte-
gral feature of life for the aspi-
rational classes, a kind of motif
for success.

' Campus

However, the campus pho-
tocall is often a prelude for dis-
appointment. What colleges fail
to do, in many instances, is pre-
pare students for the world of
work, where the direction and
quality of their lives will be

. decided. Those young people

ay

who find themselves saddled
with a heavy debt, eased only
by a sheet of card lauding their
academic triumphs, are not
always the privileged souls they
appear to be.

They have been led to expect
a gilded life, but for many - and
probably most - the lustre fades
almost as soon as the applause
from the final college convo-
cation dies away.

¢ What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia.net



schemes for bright young
Bahamians making their way
in the world. The best of them

-could create new business and

employment opportunities,
which is the way this country
should be going.

The Bahamas needs more
highly intelligent entrepre-
neurs and fewer civil servants
‘and lawyers. Entrepreneurs
are productive. Civil servants
and attorneys make little or
no contribution to the
nation’s progress. Let’s put .

“the emphasis where it counts.

— B Bennett, Nassau

a Tlie Death Penalty

VERY good article. The
arguments from Amnesty
International and other such
thinkers/philosophies were
dealt with fairly and are basi-
cally impractical and idealistic.

— Trevor R Nottage.

YES, INSIGHT is right
again. The death penalty
should stay for certain cate-
gories of murder, especially
those by hardened criminals
who are in the business of
rubbing out the rest of us in
pursuit of their own ends.

The kneejerk rejection of
capital punishment by the lib-
eral lobby has not served soci-
ety well over the last few
decades. There are times
when, medieval or not, it is
the right course to take.

— Businessman _


ISSUE



We

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2005 2 THE MIAMI HERALD 4C






| Se

“Copyrighted, Material
Syndicated Content ga

Available from | Commercial News. Providers’



NEDIDL
LETT,

THE WORLD CLOSELY WATCHES THE SUCCESS OF THE UPCOMING PRESIDENTIAL VOTE



cpechlte Te teake seem unlikely that any would get the required absolute
In a land where nothing is as certain as uncertainty, majority to ~~ in the first round.
What Haiti won’t be able to do under the latest

—— Haitians will -- maybe — pick a new president early 1 al t ble. despite; . ‘onal
. next year in an election in which both the country and elector meta €, CESpIte mtense internation:
pressure, particularly from the United States, is

the international community have much at stake. : . a .
After at least three postponements under a inaugurate a new president on the constitutionally
mandated date of Feb. 7, 2006.

dysfunctional electoral council and amid ongoing . .
internal turmoil, a first-round vote is set for Jan. 8. oe oak i scileckdes ofthe ncoressiee ata of
If no candidate gets 50 percent plus one of the total ene to nearly ware ye an
rile! P often-brutal Duvalier family dictatorship, and is

vote in the first round, a runoff will be held Feb. 15 . : ae :
between the two top vote-getters. enshrined in the 1987 constitution as Inauguration Day.

— With 35 presidential candidates now listed, it would *TURN TO HAITI

LIBERIA, HAITI |

LIBERIA, HAITI SHARE
MANY OF THE SAME
WOES AND LESSONS

In their quests to achieve a working electoral process, Haiti
and Liberia have learned from each other. One result: the
United Nations won't be leaving either Haiti or Liberia
anytime soon.

- BY JACQUELINE CHARLES
jcharles@herald.com

MONROVIA, Liberia — With its tropical winds and lush land-
scape, its rural thatched roof mud-flat homes and crowded open-air
Duala Market — as congested as the one in downtown Port-au-
Prince — this nation of 3.4 million strongly resembles Haiti.

Liberia, formed by freed American slaves, is more than 4,200
miles away from my mother’s homeland in Haiti, yet both nations
stand as bookends in the post-colonial era. They share a painful his-
tory that offers tough lessons about the difficulties poor nations face
in pursuing democracy when bad governance — exacerbated by
class differences that date back centuries to the era of slavery —
shut doors of opportunity for generations.

Politically troubled and economically depressed, both nations
have spent years mired in conflict brought on by corruption at all
levels and poor leadership. The inevitable result?



LIBERIA’S PRESIDENT-ELECT WELCOMED: Residents of Abidjan, Ivory

Coast, celebrate the arrival at the airport there of
. President-elect Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf on Nov. 29. The trip was
the first foreign journey made by the Liberian president-elect,
4 the first woman to win an African presidential election. The
~ 4 orange-white-green flag is lvory Coast’s; the star-and-stripes is

Liberia’s flag.



MNO TAN



LL
i L


» IU suNDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2005

ELECTIONS IN HAITI

_INTERNATIONAL EDITION.

sd SUES BIS ct cinta Riehl alnanie rea asians least weal

Much at stake in upcoming vote

wv NE VP.

Material
ed Content

—— ™ os



K

Syndicat

pyrighted



Available from ( Commercial News: Providers”








HAITI

But it has become painfully
obvious to all that credible
elections could not be carried
out in time to meet that date,
given the electoral council
disarray and the monumental
logistical problems in a rug-
ged country lacking in mod-
ern infrastructure.

Feb. 24 has been set as the
new inauguration day.

ENDS INTERIM RULE

Practically, and more sig-
nificantly, the election will
end two years of rule under
an interim government,
widely viewed as unpopular
and inept, installed after the
Feb. 29, 2004, departure into
exile of former President
Jean-Bertrand Aristide, under

heavy U.S. and French pres- °

sure.

Meanwhile, many in the
international community, as
well as Haitians, closely
watch the upcoming vote,
which will be the first elec-
tion of any kind there since
disputed parliamentary and
presidential balloting in 2000.

’ Successful and credible
elections would mean a gov-
ernment accepted as legiti-
mate by, the international
community, enabling the
country to move forward eco-
nomically and politically.
That would help bring badly
needed stability to a country
that has seen two foreign mili-
tary interventions since 1994,

and promote greater security
throughout the Caribbean.

For the United States, and
Florida particularly, an elec-
tion result that is accepted by
the voters would alleviate
fears of yet another uncon-
trolled exodus of Haitians —
legal and illegal — fleeing
continued internal turmoil.

It would also provide a
more stable environment to
combat the flow of drugs
through the country to the
United States.

**What is at stake here is
Haiti’s political legitimacy,
economic revival and general
stabilization,” says Claude
Beauboeuf, a Haitian eco-
nomic consultant and analyst.
**A successful electoral pro-
cess would allow the country
to start improving the busi-
ness climate, decreasing
transaction costs, refurbish-
ing its international reputa-
tion and start attracting local,
diaspora and international
investment.”

80 PERCENT REGISTERED

Some 80 percent of the
country’s estimated 4.5 mil-
lion eligible voters have been
registered.

They will select a presi-

dent and a 129-member parlia-
ment, including 30 senators
and 99 deputies. Local elec-

tions for some 10,000 regional -

and municipal officials are
scheduled March 5.
But the balloting has:been

-repeatedly delayed:because of

the enormousness of the task
and the ineptness of the
interim government and the
Provisional Electoral Council
[CEP], the body charged with
carrying out the elections.

“From the start, the CEP
has been plagued with rivalry,
bureaucratic ineptitude, tech-
nical shortcomings and
charges of partisanship and
corruption,” concludes a
recent report on Haiti by the
International Crisis Group, a
respected nongovernmental
organization based in Brus-
sels.

- The Oct.48 appointment of
Jacques Bernard, a prominent
and well-regarded banker, as
director general of CEP oper-
ations helped put order back
into the process, says the Cri-
sis Group, while adding that
“his authority was not defined
and he faces some resistance
from CEP members.” ,

UNPOPULAR

Neither is the interim gov-
ernment, installed following
Aristide’s departure, held in
much higher regard. It has
been accused of both crony-
ism and incompetence. It also
has added to the electoral
confusion by overruling the
country’s Supreme Court on
eligibility of presidential can-
didates.

More recently, Prime Min-
ister Gerard Latortue

announced Dec. 27 as a new
election date, apparently
without consulting with the
CEP, which days later made it
Jan. 8.

Some observers have sug-

* Oo

pete

gested both the interim gov- |

ernment and the electoral
council are deliberately drag-
ging their feet in order to pro-
long the process and their
positions. In addition, the
interim government has been
criticized by international
human rights activists for its
ongoing detention of Yvon
Neptune, Aristide’s former.
prime minister, and Gérard
Jean-Juste, a Roman Catholic
priest and staunch Aristide
supporter.

“No one wants the transi-
tional government to con-
tinue,” says one foreign offi-
cial involved in the process.
“The only purpose of the
transitional government is to
get to elections. They finally
got the message.”

KIDNAPPINGS, CRIME

In addition to the bureau-
cratic disarray of the electoral
council and the interim gov-
ernment, there are other diffi-
culties that will make any
election here difficult. Key
one is the ongoing problem of
the kidnappings for ransom,
down from earlier this. year
but still averaging more than
two a day.

Also, there is the corrupt
and ineffective police force.
Mario Andresol, a respected

police officer who fled the

country under Aristide and
took over as police chief ear-
lier this year, acknowledged
in an October interview after
touring the country’s police
units that “there is a large cor-
ruption problem. About a
quarter of the force is
involved in corruption, kid-
nappings and even arms traf-
ficking.” ,

Criminal activity continues
as well. A new report by the
Geneva-based Small Arms

Survey organization estimates ©

there are some 210,000 fire-









KEEPING THE PEACE: A U.N. peacekeeper stands guard as
voters register at a center opened by Haitian and
international officials in Gonaives, Haiti, in April 2005.

> =





a ald

arms in Haiti, with only about
26,000 of them in the hands of .
United Nations peacekeepers
and Haitian authorities. It also
estimates that 1,600 people.
have died since Aristide’s
flight into exile.

GANG INFLUENCE

Unchecked gang violence,
much of it perpetrated by pro-
Aristide gangs known as chi-
meres, continues — although

there is disagreement about.

how much of an obstacle to

the electoral process these |

pose.

Juan Gabriel Valdés, the
United Nations special envoy
in Haiti, acknowledged in a
recent interview with The
Associated Press that chi-
meres still controlled some
parts of the capital. Haitian
sources report, however, the
7,600 U.N. peacekeepers in
the country — led by Brazil-
ians — have cracked down in
recent weeks in some of the
known chimere strongholds
such as Cité Soleil and Cité
Militaire and that “security
should not be an issue” come
election day.

A major obstacle to the
process, however, could be
the “winner-take-all” nature
of Haitian politics, in which
an election sometimes creates
more problems than it
resolves.

Haitian elections have long
been based on the idea that
“to the winner belongs the
spoils,” rather than compro-
mise and reconciliation for

the betterment of the nation.

‘As a result, “Haiti’s elec-
tions have historically exacer-
bated, not alleviated, its polit-
ical and social divisions,”
observed the International
Crisis Group.

Under the current electoral
system a candidate polling
more than 50 percent in the
first round is automatically
elected. By manipulating the
first round, as Aristide’s Lava-
las party did in the disputed
2000 parliamentary elections,
it won overwhelming control
of the Senate, exacerbating
already-existing political
antagonisms.

“Many of us, including Hai-
tians, believe there is a fatal
flaw in the election process,”
said Robert Maguire, a long-
time Haiti specialist who now
heads the ‘Haiti program at
Trinity University in Wash-
ington. “There is no propor-
tional representation. The
winner takes all, promotes an
adversarial relationship. If a
party wins 10 percent or some
arbitrary number it should
have representation in parlia-
ment.”

Proportional representa-
tion would assure a healthy



parliamentary opposition.

However, with the upcom-
ing election carried out under
international supervision and
with a multitude of parties
and candidates, the new presi-
dent may face the reverse
problem of fragmentation
rather than dominance.

As the International Crisis
Group also suggests, “few
experts expect any party to
win a substantial bloc of [par-
liamentary] seats, let alone a
majority, leaving much of the
nation’s crucial governance
Byzantine and likely paralyz-
ing maneuvers.”

That means the new presi-
dent, whoever it may be, will
face not only the prospect of
parliamentary gridlock, but
the monumental task of
undertaking drastic reforms
in a wide array of governmen-
tal institutions, from justice
and security to finance and
education.

A significant but unknown
factor affecting the election
outcome is what level of Aris-
tide’s support remains among
Haiti’s poor masses and

whether it will go to candi-:

dates identified with his Lava-
las Family Party. If it does, it
could benefit Marc Bazin, or
even René Préval, although
Aristide has said from South
African exile that he is back-
ing no one. [See box at right.]

OUTCOME?

So, what could the out-
come be?

“Haiti could gradually
transform itself into a Carib-
bean Mauritius [a well-gov-
erned island nation in the
Indian Ocean off Africa] if the
electoral process succeeds; or
a Caribbean Somaghanistan
should it fail, a mixture of
Somalia and Afghanistan,”
says Beauboeuf.

“The country has a lot of
potential to perform well at
many levels,’ adds Beau-
boeuf. “Nevertheless, it has
eloquently proven that it has
the potential to become, as
well, a very unstable place
should its structures col-
lapse.”

No matter the election out-
come, success will also
depend heavily on continued
economic and security sup-
port by the international com-
munity, and particularly the
United States, if it is to pre-
vent Haiti from becoming a
failed state.

Don Bohning is a former
Herald Latin America editor
who covered Haiti from 1967 to
2000. He also is the author of
The Castro Obsession: U.S.
Cover Operations Against
Cuba 1959-1965, recently pub-
lished by Potomac Books, Inc.



THE MIAMIHERALD

SOME CANDIDATES
IN HAITI

More than 50 presidential
aspirants, running either —_
as independents or repre-
senting political parties,
signed up by the registra-
tion deadline, with 35 can-. _
didates eventually
approved by the electoral
council. Only a handful of
those — all with wide name
recognition — are given -

any chance of winning. ae




~ Among them are:
e RENE PREVAL, former -
president and an agrono- cs
mist by training, is running —

asthe









newly
formed
_ party. He



strong - /

peasant

— support from Haiti’ s Cen-
tral Plateau region and
widely regarded as the
most likely” winner.

_@ MARC BAZIN, a former
planning minister under — -
Aristide as well asan offi- a
cialin
: previous. S

PREVAL










date ofa _
coalition
between —
his own ar: and afac ©
tion of Aristide’s Lavalas
Family party. He finished a
distant second Q
to Aristide i in the
1990 presidential elec-
‘tion,

e CHARLES HENRI
BAKER is viewed as the
candidate of Haiti s. busi-
ness and upper classes. An |
indica-
tion of
the
industri-
alist’s |
viability.
-isthathe —
obtained —
the
~ 100,000 -
a signa-
: tires needed to get onthe
ballot as an independent;
a minimum of 5,000 sig-
natures is required for a
candidate with party sup- _
port. Baker was among
the leaders of the Group of
184 instrumental in forcing
Aristide into exile.

e EVANS PAUL, a former
mayor of Port-au-Prince, is
alongtime political activist
who was an ardent Aris-
tide sup-
porter
before
becom- —
ing disil-
lusioned
with him.
Domini-
can
Republic
_Presi-
dent Leonel Fernandez is
said to be a financial sup-
porter of his.

e LESLIE MANIGAT, an
academic who served five
months as president in
1988, is seen by some Hai-
tians as‘
perhaps
the best
presi-
dent the
country
has had
since the
Duvalier
dynasty
ended.
Some hold this view even
though he gained office in
asham election orches-
trated by the military after
the November 1987 elec-
tion day massacre.

— DON BOHNING



BAZIN



BAKER



PAUL



MANIGAT


War against
Christmas?



Education ensures prosperity

| : “Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

_- Available from Commercial News Providers”

-. - °° ee"
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PAGE 8C

teem:









® By JOHN MARQUIS



“r= rom the standpoint
of colleges and

universities, the

case for more aca-
is clear enough. More back-




sides on seats mean more rev-

enue.

With some college principals. oat
earning well over $300,000 a
year, and tuition fees running -
at record highs, there is little. -

incentive to “change anything.

Academia has become big:
business and the returns are.
impressive, with a greater’
demand for higher education

than ever hefore
Colleges in ‘the United

States, in particular, are now -
demanding obscene amounts .

of money for tuition, and fam-
ilies are-going deep into debt to

ensure their children go.
through life with letters behind

their names.

Whether students emerging —
from the process get a good
dealis now becoming a matter ©

for conjecture. Some believe
their BA or BSc is a guaran-
ice of suitable employment.
Many are discovering that it
leads them nowhere... .
Last week, a smart and high-
ei articulate Bahamian gradu-
‘told INSIGHT that univer-
sity Was an empowering expe-.’-
ricnce for him. It made him féel:
he could take on, and. conquer:
the world.
The reality is that, in the

Bahamas at least, there is no-

place for him in any job he
feels suitable for his level of

education. Now in his mid-30s, °

he finds himself adrift in his
homeland, an educated man
with a degree which seemingly
counts for nothing. He is plan-
ning to leave the Bahamas next
year for the United States.

Whatever this country invested =

in his education will now be.

lost to a first world society able
to make better use of his learn- -

ing.
Two questions arise: is the
academic route right for every
kind of job? And are students
being lured into courses which
have no application in the
wider society? It’s time educa-
tors took a close look at, both”
with the aim of producing some:
meaningful answers. 7“).
Forty or 50 years ago, réla'-
tively few people in Europe *

went to university. Those who

did were usually destined. for
academic life. If you wanted to

be an architect, journalist,
accountant or solici- —

banker,
tor, the likeliest route would
be via indentureship. Candi-

dates would undergo a proba-..
tionary period, sign articles, bé -
tied to a company for three‘or °
four years, have days off for’:
college study, and take profes-: .

ane qualifications at the end
fitall.

"T he result was that students
emerged from a term of train-
ing properly: prepared for the
job at hand. Trainee journal-
ists actually learned from other

professional journalists. Law-

clerks shadowed working solic=

itors. Accountants began their __
professional lives as articled:

*clorks, sweating over trial bal-

ances en route to eventual.

qualification. And all were able
to earn a living while learning
the skills of their calling.
/scademic snobs scoff at the
system, claiming it deprived
candidates of the subtler
virtues of tertiary education,
but it achieved what it set out
io achieve: properly trained
professionals who acquired
expertise from people who

actually knew what they were ~

doing.

What we have now is an

tended period of education.
is to 20 years in some cases -
at the end of which few of
those involved, and least of all
the students, know what the
outcome will be.

in fact. iL is quite staggering

how many well-qualified uni-”

versity students reach the age

of 22 or 23. or even 25, without:
any professional OBIESIIVES in

sight.

One student told INSIGHT:
~A(tno point in my entire edu-
cation has anyone at school or
college asked me what I want-
ed to do with my life. It’s as
though education is something

demic credentials

, MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2005

as the

NLC la



grees gone too

Young Bahamian graduates last week lamented this country’s
inability, or. unwillingness, to offer them jobs commensurate
with. their prowess and qualifications. Has the cry for
~ academic credentials gone too far? And. ought there to be.
‘more emphasis on vocational courses? INSIGHT reports...

quite Separate from the process

of professional preparation. I

- am still at a‘loss_as to why this
‘ should be.” <2 -- :
Admittedly, there | was a time’
when children’ of the wealthy ~

indulged themselves with clas--

sical studies, not- necessarily for -

professional preparation but

~ intellectual enrichment. At

Oxford and Cambridge, there
is still'a donnish fringe who see

themselves cloistered amid

their books for the rest of their
lives, writing reseatch papers

- that only fellow Senior acade-

mies will ever want-to read.

The rationale, for-them, is.
that some people, an intellec- |
_ tual ‘elite*yare better equipped



Att no. > point |
in my entire.

x



debt?”

Yet there are still relatively
few higher education. institu-

“tions outside-of téchnical,

teaching, art and nursing col-
leges where professional or
trade preparation are the prime
aims. However; employers are

-becoming increasingly con-

scious of their existence, and

grabbing their alumni whenev:

er they can.
It is interesting, for instance,

that City University in London -

lays great stress on the

. “employability” of its gradu-

~ education has” .

anyone ‘at
~ school or. .
college asked |
me-what I _
wanted to do-
with, ‘my life.
We 'S- aS though -
~ education is.
something quite
separate from
the process of _
professional —
"preparation. A:
-am still ata loss
as to why this
- should be.”

— Anonymous student



: ‘han ethers forlives totally con-
--sumed,’by the.cerebral and

metaphyical. Not.for them the

‘daily Slog of commerce, ‘trade
“or the law.

Nowadays, though, academia

-has-commandeered the minds

of seemingly all but the intel-
lectually challenged: It is now

seen as. virtually imperative
that anyone. who can get from

one end of a sentence to the
other, or add two and two:
together. and get something
close to four; should 80 to uni-
versity.

One-study: suggested that’ an
IQ of 93, plus a reasonable lev-
el of application, will earn you
a third-class degree, while 125
is said to be enough to acquire
a first. It seems anyone but a
certified cretin can-get into a
college of some kind nowadays
so long as they have the where-
withal to pay the bill. The clam-
out for certificates, diplomas -
and degrees in their many guis-
es has never been greater. Stu-
dents are plunging into lifelong

‘debt-to get their hands on a

ribboned document proclaim-
ing them to be smarter than
the average Joe.

The upshot, however, is a
proliferation of young people
with so many options, and so

little focus, that they become
becalmed and directionless in

what can-be a hostile and -

- unforgiving world.:
.. “There.is too little emphasis *
on the. world of. work,”

( a stu-
dent. told INSIGHT, “If edu-
cation isn’t for the purpose of
preparing you for work, what is
it for? How else are you
expected to pay your student

ates. It has. seen through the..

rather threadbare claims of
other institutions which lure
students into courses that teach
little but airy-fairy theory and
are irrelevant to market

requirements. Instead, it sets

itself the task of preparing stu-

- dents for the sometimes brutal

but. demanding world of work.
_ Its. journalism courses, for

ae instance, are well-régarded by

British and Commonwealth
newspapérs because their prod-
ucts are people who ¢an actu-

- ally function effectively in the

newsroom:

City University journalism
lecturers are, in the main, high-
class professional journalists
who are able to impart the ben-
efits of their experience as part
of a curriculum aimed at pro-

' ducing quality performers. All

_ ing modules in media law, local |

studies are conducted under

the auspices of the National,

Council for the Training of
: Journalists, which lays down
industry requirements, includ-

and central government, cur-
rent affairs, newspaper prac-
tice, shorthand and media tech-
nology.

- City University alumni now
occupy key executive positions

.at newspapers, magazines, TV
‘and radio stations all over the
world, creating a network of .

contacts future students. can
~ exploit monenon their

__careers.

City is not alone as a college
with such.a‘cause, but it is still
heavily outnumbered by those

__ which appéar to see learning
and life-preparation as two sep-
arate and distinct entities.

‘Many offer, for instance,
much-derided “media studies”

courses conducted .by, acade- —

. mics who haye no real journal-

istic experience and spend their °
- lessons pontificating on ethical

and theoretical issues. These.

are, frarikly, a waste of time
‘and money and command little

or no respect within the indus-

try.
Certainly, many young.

’ Bahamians are arriving back.

in Nassau from universities.
abroad with unrealistic expec-
tations. Even some with voca-
tionally-based degrees find

themselves unwanted in ae
own land.

The truth is that degrees in

. metallurgy, industrial psychol-

ogy, nuclear physics or avia-

tion design have little or no rel-

- evance to the Bahamian econ-

omy. Whoever suggested to
them that they would? °

- In fact, it’s hard to think of
much outside. the. hotel -and
hospitality business, the finan-
cial services industry, banking,

_ thé legal profession and reli-

gion that would be strictly rel-

evant to the Bahamian way of .

Phage:

If there is a real need, it

‘would be-in business manage-

ment or entrepreneurship, for
inventiveness and commercial
savvy are the areas-in which

‘ the Bahamas falls short at pre-

sent...

_It is far better for the coun-
try’s sake to produce the kind
of people who.can expand the

THE TRIBUNE





scramble for
far?

economy by their enterprise
and imagination in busines§
than stuff the public Service
with yet more unproductive
drones with master’s degrees
and PhDs, or create yet more
attorneys for an already over
loaded legal profession.

One of the great benefits of
the old-fashioned system, of
indentureship and pupillagé
was that students learned at the
master’s knee. Outstanding
practitioners, whatever their
discipline, could pass on the
fruits of their lifetimes of





-endeavour. It worked well, as

many. of the great potters,
painters, musicians, furniture-
makers and silversmiths of the

SEE page 3C

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