Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Volume: 102 No.11









Two assault rifles are.

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seized within a week

@ By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

WITH two Russian AK 47s
being confiscated within the
span of a week, police warn that
under ordinary circumstances,
if such a weapon were in the
hands of “the wrong person”,
they could easily outgun a
police officer.

Also known as the Kalash-
nikov, the AK 47 has a “killing
range” of 1,500 metres and can
fire 600 rounds of ammunition a
minute. Traditionally, only
police and military officers have
access to such weapons.

Developed for motorised
~ infantry by the Soviet Army in
1949, the AK 47 has built a sub-
stantial reputation as a “gueril-
la weapon” among revolution-

aries and weapons enthusiasts
for its reliability under the worst
possible conditions.

Therefore, police are encour-
aging the public to continue to
support them in their attempts
to rid the streets of such high-
powered weapons.

On Wednesday, police found
an AK 47 with a full magazine
of ammunition at a home off
Soldier Road, days after find-
ing another such weapon
onboard a sloop anchored in
the harbour off Arawak Cay.

Reginald Ferguson, assistant
commissioner in charge of
crime, admitted that such a
weapon is “substantially more
sophisticated and powerful”
than a weapon a police officer
would have on normal patrol.

SEE page 11

Pn





@ PAUL ADDERLEY is sworn in as Acting Governor-General
by Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall. Prime Minister Perry Christie

(background left) looks on.

(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)

SHIP BAHAMIAN

Betsy Rodriquez
St. Johns Shipping
Ware House #4
1800 S.E. 19th Ave.
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316
Phone: 1 (954) 527-0034
Fax: 1 (954) 522-4828





Tel: (242) 393-2628
Fax: (242) 394-0847

Tel: (242) 351-1501

lm By NATARIO MCKENZIE

Tribune





es

JENNIFER Johnson (left)
and Joerezz Abraham of
Oakes Field Primary School,
perform at the College of the
Bahamas ‘A Gift To Our
Community — an afternoon of
Carols & Cheer’ yesterday.
(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)















Ministry team tours —
China in preparation
for potential visitors.

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

Search for men
missing at sea

POLICE on Cat Island are searching for two
men who disappeared at sea on Wednesday
after their vessel capsized.

Press liaison officer Walter Evans said
Rudolph Hart, Godfrey Pearce, Mervin Davis
and Nathaniel Larimore, all of Old Bight, Cat
Island, were on board a 14-ft vessel near Green-
wood, Cat Island, after 9am on Wednesday
when they encountered rough waters.

SEE page 11

TAKING first steps to prepare for poten- :
tially millions of Chinese visitors to the }
Bahamas in the near future, a Ministry of :
Toursim team is touring China on a fact-find-
ing mission. ;

Senior tourism officials are in talks with :
Chinese government officials and tour opera- }

SEE page 11

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Carl Bethel hits
out at Mitchell’s
visa claims

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

CLAIMS by Foreign Affairs
Minister Fred Mitchell that mem-
bers of the former FNM govern-
ment used their positions to
obtain visas for foreign nationals
are nothing more than a diver-
sionary tactic, Senator Carl
Bethel said yesterday.

“They are nothing more than
red herrings thrown out to divert
public attention away from the
very serious allegations made,”
he told the Senate.

Minister Mitchell in a state-
ment to the House of Assembly
on Wednesday said that Mr
Bethel had misled the public with
claims of the minister’s involve-
meént in the issuance of visas.

Mr Mitchell further refuted Mr
Bethel’s claim that the number
of visas issued to Chinese nation-
als had quadrupled since he came
to office.

However, in his communica-
tion to the Senate yesterday, Mr
Bethel said that he never alleged

SEE page 11

Man wanted
in connection
with murder
expected to
appear in court

i By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - A third man,
wanted in connection with mur-
der, is expected to be arraigned
in the Magistrate’s Court in
Freeport on Friday.

Assistant press liaison officer
Loretta Mackey said the 18-
year-old suspect is to be charged
in connection with the shooting
death of 34-year-old Tanya Pin-
der.

The teenager is believed to
be a resident of Beginning Dri-
ve, South Bahamia.

Ms Pinder, an office clerk,
was shot to death during an
attempted armed robbery on
November 25 at Cool Breeze
Apartments on ‘Hudson
Avenue. :

Two persons, Raymond Dar-
ling, 22, and a 17-year-old juve-
nile, were charged Wednesday
in connection with the matter.
Darling was also charged with

SEE page 11





PAGE 2, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005



LOCAL NEWS

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bE re wd

done senaie “be seman th Senin mee an! a MgB LU a A AR ALASTAIR EE ATRIAL REET TACT



Residents demand action
on barge from government

i By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

CONCERNED environmentalists
and Abaco residents are urging the gov-
ernment to ensure that a gounded
barge causing irreparable damage to
the area’s coral is removed quickly.

For most of the year, fishermen have
complained that the Louis J Goulet a
220-foot Canadian oil drill barge poses
a threat to the reefs surrounding the
Abacos.

Exuma residents have also raised
concerns that the barge has been seen
floating in shallow waters near one of
the country’s national parks at Con-
ception Islands.

The barge was taken from Exuma to
Walker’s Cay, where it remained until
it was displaced again during Hurri-
cane Wilma.

It now sits near Man-O-War Cay —
another environmental rich area,
according to the Bahamas National
Trust Director Eric Carey.

He told The Tribune that the trust
has been very concerned about the
damage the displaced barge may pose
on the environment.

Mr Carey said that based on video he
has seen, the barge is clearly resting on
and destroying the coral bed.

“It is patently obvious that it is caus-
ing direct, immense and substantial
damage.”

He said he was amazed and outraged
that the boat has yet to be removed,
adding that the size of the vessel and the
weight of the anchor on the coral bed
has probably caused irreparable damage.

He added that he was aware that the
boat had leaked sludge and said while
he was not aware that any oil had
escaped, it could become a possibility
should the boat capsize.

Mr Carey added that until the barge
can be removed, experts would not be
able to go in and assess damage.

To add to the problem, residents say
the barge has now taken in water, which
only compounds the problem.

“We really need an engineer to come
in and assess the best way ‘to remove
the boat,” a resident told The Tribune.

They said that there is no equipment
on the island capable of removing the

barge, particularly watle the noaes water

weight.

@ THE oil barge Louis J Goulet,
which is stranded on a reed off Abaco

Whoever moves the boat may have
to weld the boat underwater- which
would entail adding a layer of metal
over the hole and airbagging the boat
and move it in pieces, or airbagging the
barge and refloat, they said. Whatever
method, is used, there would be con-
siderable expense involved.

Early last month, the Port Depart-
ment under Captain Anthony Allans
has said they had contacted the owners
of the vessel — the Liberty Oil Compa-
ny whom, they claim, have assured
them that they were working to move
the barge quickly.

However, to date nothing has hap-
pened.

_Neither Captain Allans or Liberty

president Kermit Waters could be
‘ reached for comment.

The Ministry of Tourism

In Cooperation with

The Bahamas Hotel Association's Annual

General Meeting

Presents

ra tie
Craft Show

MOTHS featuning:

Christmas ornaments & aseessories





Turks and

Caicos group
give S34k for.
hurricane ail.

FREEPORT - A charitable
group from the ‘Turks ane
Caicos Islands has contributed)
$34,000 in hurricane relief aid
during a humanitarian trip to
Grand Bahama on Thursday. -”

Bishop Colleta Willams and
his wife, Chiquita, of Abundanit
Life in the Turks and Caicos,
organised a fundraising drive
called “Operation Grand
Bahama” to raise money {0
assist victims of Hurricane
Wilma.

He made a contribution éf
$22,500 to the Grand Bahama
Christian Council, and $12,000
to NEMA during a lunch host:
ed by the GBCC at Our Lucaya

§ Resort.

Bishop Williams and a group
of religious, community, and
governmeni leaders [lew to
Freeport by private charter
flight donated by SkyKing.
Accompanying him were the
Minister of Education, Youth,
and Sports.and Gender Affairs.
Dr Lillian Boyce and Leader of
the Opposition Derek ‘Taylor. «

GBCC president Bishop
Ricardo Grant took them on a
tour of storm-ravaged settle
ments of Mack Town, Hunters,
Lewis Yard and Pinder's Point.

Bishop Williams said mem»
bers of “Operation Grant
Bahama” would continue to
raise funds through a telethon
to assist those in need on Gr any
Bahama.

“We have solicited and can-
vassed across the Turks ang
Caicos to be aisle to raise funds.
We are delighted to be here
share with our brothers and sis-
ters in Grand Bahama, and sim-
ply to say we care and we loved
them,” he said.

Education Minister Dr Lil¥
lian Boyce said: “We bring
words of encouragement anté
cheer to you from the govern
ment and our people. Our chief

: minister came before and now
i the church is coming and | think
: itis very good that the church is
coming to our brothers and sif+
ter’s rescue,” she said. ;

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urday, Decetiher ", “anos

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BALLROOM FOYER, CABLE BEACH

Sponsors: J.S. Johnson, Royal Bank of Canada, Bahamas Development
Bank, Purity Bakery, D’ Albenas Agency Ltd., Scotiabank Bahamas Ltd.,
Solomon & Associates.

Bacardi’s Nassau Royale

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But if anything should happen to me | know they are still protected.
That’s the confidence | have in Colinalmperial.

“ Colinalmperial.
Insurance Ltd.
Confidence for Life





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, DECEMbEN 2, cuud, rAUE 3





Pink Sands
voted top
Atlantic
resort

HARBOUR ISLAND -
Readers of Condé Nast Trav-
eler Magazine have voted Pink
Sands on Harbour Island the
number four top Atlantic
Ocean resort with a rating of
83.3 per cent.

The results of the publica-
tion’s 2005 Readers' Choice
Awards are published in the
November issue.

“We owe a great ‘thank you’
to our guests who took the time
to cast their votes for us; to the
travel agents and partners, and
to our dedicated teams on Har-
bour Island and around the
world, whose efforts and hard
work enable us to achieve such
recognition,” said general man-
ager Clemens von Merveldt.

For the Condé Nast Traveler
award, resorts were rated in the
categories of rooms, service,
food/dining, location, overall
design and activities/facilities.

Every year since 1988, a
select sample of Condé Nast
Traveler readers have taken the
Readers Choice Survey.

In 2005, the questionnaire
was made available to 387,205
subscribers.

The final tabulations of
27,957 responses were done by
Mediamark Research of New
York City.

$50,000
of relief to
children
with AIDS

SCOTIABANK has donated
$50,000 to help bring relief to
children with AIDS. ;

Management and staff pre-
sented the cheque to Dr Perry
Gomez, AIDS Secretariat to
the Bahamas, yesterday, which
was recognised as National
AIDS Day.

Scotiabank’s managing direc-
tor Minna Israel said the funds
would be used to purchase a
testing machine capable of
detecting AIDS in children two
years and under.

The testing machine, known
as a‘ DNA/PCR machine, is the
gold:standard in the diagnosis of
HIV/AIDS in children, the
bank said in a statement.

Through various internal and
extérnal projects, Scotiabank’s
teani members raised half the
money, and were matched by
the: Scotiabank head office in
Canada.

CARICOM
to monrtor
St Viecent
e@te« frome

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

Rene eis
. Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

: A eee
: Ce A) o/





@ By KARIN HERIG and
CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporters

IN WHAT some saw as his official
expulsion from the Free National Move-
ment, Bamboo Town MP Tennyson
Wells was told by party leader Hubert
Ingraham that he is “no longer an
FNM”.

Mr Ingraham’s statement came while
congratulations were being extended
to him by the government and inde-
pendent MPs for assuming the position
of leader of the official opposition.

Mr Wells noted that Mr Ingraham
had said he was committed to trans-
parency, accountability and high ethical
standards in the House of Assembly.

“I am sure the member will do what
he has to do and J hope that he will
uphold the standards that he espoused.
I trust we will see that in action during
the course of the remaining tenure of
this particular parliament.

“We will be watching both sides (gov-
ernment and opposition), and we will
leave no stone unturned to let the peo-
ple know when we See injustice or
wrong-doing taking place or when we

BPSU of









Ei MP Tennyson Wells

have to alert the public to people who
say one thing and (do) something else,”
Mr Wells said.

It was his next comment that
prompted the opposition leader to
respond. “I want to say that the FNM —
my party — did what they thought was
best for them at this time and I wish

them well,’ Mr Wells said.

Mr Ingraham immediately stood up
and said that in his capacity as party
leader, “I declare that he (Mr Wells) is
no longer an FNM.”

“Knowing the member for North
Abaco, | understand why he would
make a comment like that, it tells me
that he has not changed,” was Mr Wells’
response.

He added that in any democratic sys-
tem, there is a method for dealing with
members who may be out of order.

“Tf Tam out of order, if I have done
anything wrong to anybody then I
would ask that there be a public cry
and let them lay their charges,” he said.

St Margarets MP Pierre Dupuch said
the FNM he knew would have not
“arbitrarily” expelled a member.

-He said it was customary to send
notices to members that are to be
expelled, in which the reasons for their
expulsion are explained.

Mr Dupuch said that considering Mr
Ingraham’s ambition of returning to
office, he would caution the Bahamian
people that the populist president of
Venezuela, Hugo Chavez, was democ-
ratically elected, too.



i BY NATARIO MCKENZIE

BAHAMAS Public Services
Union (BPSV) officials sought
to set the record straight yes-
terday on the recently signed
five-year industrial agreement
with the government.

The BPSU officials said mis-
understandings about the con-
tract have caused misconcep-
tions to arise among their
members.

Speaking at a press confer-
ence yesterday, BPSU presi-
dent John Pinder said that
many public servants are con-
fused about the “lump sum”
payouts that are referred to in
the agreement.

“One of the misconceptions

was that they were getting $100,

dollars added to their retroac-
tive pay ($600) and that was a
one-time thing. But the $100
is permanent and will be added

to the base salary,” Mr Pinder:

explained.
Mr Pinder said that the $700

-retroactive pay that public ser-

vants will receive today is
inclusive of $100 for the pur-

We're Celebrating ASN) SINE SISTA TLL

Thursday........
aa .

chase of Christmas ham and
turkey, as the union will not
be able to provide this service
this year because, it will be
making contributions to hur-
ricane relief efforts instead.

Mr Pinder explained that the
$100 increase will continue to
be added to monthly pay from
January to June 2006, along
with an additional $50.

In July 2006, the beginning
of the government’s fiscal year,
an additional $50 will be added
to the base salary of all public
servants.

Mr Pinder assured that the
increases will be paid with
increments.

Increments, he said, can

amount to anywhere:between .-.:
$400 to $1,000.and.are,




the anniversary of the day a
person joined the public ser-
vice.

In year three of the con-
tract, a compensation study
will be done to evaluate work-
er performance and efficiency.

In year four, there will be an
additional $63 per month
added to base salary.

(Uti Ronee i fies
CIA UO Se

mum of his or he salary scale



‘wants to’ increase the pay of

In year five (2009) there will
be a high performance evalua-
tion study. This means that “an
employee who is at the maxi-

and achieves an above aver-
age performance appraisal rat-
ing may be awarded a lump
sum payment equal to the
increment of his or her salary.”

Mr Pinder called this a “mer-
it pay” system used to evaluate
persons who hold similiar posi-
tions.

Keith Archer, the govern-
ment’s industrial relations con-
sultant, said that teachers will
not receive any salary increas-
es as the Bahamas Union of
Teachers did not agree to the
five-year deal.

‘He said the government

teachers and is willing to work
out a deal with the Bahamas
Union of Teachers as soon as
possible.

Mr Archer also clarified
rumours that increments could
be taken away, explaining that
this is not so.



The Miall-a
BOX OFFICE OPENS AT 10:00 AM DAILY

‘ THE MIX



| HARRYPOTIER. CT POTTER
FT RICH OR DIE TR
DERAILED

Bahamasair
denies planes
grounded in
Miama

BAHAMASAIR has refuted a dai-
ly newspaper report which claimed
that a number of its planes were
impounded in Miami on Wednesday.

The airline’s managing director Paul
Major said yesterday that the report,
published in the Nassau Guardian,
was incorrect.

Mr Major said that the Bahamasair
flight number 230 was not seized by
US Customs, but cancelled to avoid a
possible heavy fine because the air-
line’s bond was not up to date.

Mr Major said that Bahamasair had
decided not to operate the 6.40pm
flight out of Miami after learning that
their bond had “surprisingly expired”.

“It seems that while our insurance
carrier had issued the bond, it did not
reach US Customs in Miami in time
for a bond number to be assigned due
to the Thanksgiving holiday,” he said
in press statement.

Arrangements for Bahamasair pas-
sengers to be transported to and from
Miami and Fort Lauderdale were
made immediately to minimise any
inconvenience to them while the situ-
ation was being dealt with, Mr Major
said.

He added that the matter was final-
ly resolved with the co-operation of
US Customs in Nassau and in Mia-
mi, and that the aircraft was able to
operate the last flight out of Miami on
Tuesday night.

All services into Florida operated as
normal yesterday and “will continue
to do so,” Mr Major said.

Down Town Nassau

- Two Storey Building
4,700 sq. feet ground floor
_ 4,700 sq. feet first floor
Serious inquires only -

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE:



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”



289 Market St. South ¢ ¢ P.O. Box N-7984 ¢ Nassau, Bahamas
I «in a world of superlatives, ‘God is
the greatest.”
FOUR SUNDAY SERVICES
7:00am, 9:00am, 11:00am & 7:00pm

PASTOR EARLE FRANCIS J.P.,D.D.
Marriage Officer, Counsellor, Intercessor
Phone: 323-6452 ¢ 393-5798
Fax: 326-4488/394-4819

Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa

Invite application for the following positions:

ENTERTAINMENT DIRECTOR
SPA DIRECTOR
JAPANESE AMBASSADOR

* Christmas Cards

Applicant must be experienced in their field with at
least three years experience, excellent communication
skills written and oral strong organizational and
leadership skills. The position offers attractive
compensation packages.

* Journals

* Gift Items Galore
* Books/ Bibles/ Bible Cases

BTC’s eighty
per cent
hike in rates

EDITOR, The Tribune

PLEASE permit me space to
comment on the Public Utili-
ties Commission’s (PUC) recent
rubber-stamping of the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company’s (BTC) 80 per cent
rate hike on business customers.
BTC’s request to burden resi-
dential customers with a 58 per
cent increase received similar
endorsement.

The PUC noted, however,
that it could not impose stan-
dards on BTC to force the com-
pany to deliver some modicum
of service quality to its cus-
tomers.

I was out of the country when

‘BTC tendered its rate increase

application. I was again out of
the country when public meet-
ings to discuss the proposed
increases were held.

As J understand it, BTC prof-
fered that line rates had to be
increased because long distance
revenues had fallen dramatical-
ly due to recently introduced
competition. Competition forced

BTC to reduce rates 50 per cent ©

in its long distance arena.

Cable Bahamas, with cable
service already existing to a
majority of Bahamas house-
holds, can readily provide tele-
phone service to such house-
holds. Competition reduced the
oppressive long distance rates
subscribers were paying. It will
be interesting to see the impact
competition will have on line
rates which BTC had described

Daa M PS

letters@tribunemedia.net




as being “below cost”.

The Bahamas lags far behind
most other Caribbean locations
in liberalising the telecommu-
nications market place.

Cellular telephone service is
another arena where competi-
tion can be readily introduced.
Handled properly, liberalisation
of cell phone service can prove
a win-win situation for the Gov-
ernment and cellular phone
subscribers. The Jamaican Gov-
ernment successfully sold three
cell phone licenses to Cable and
Wireless’ (C&W) competitors
for close to US$100 million.
Digicel, whose cell phone cus-
tomer base now exceeds that of
C&W, paid US$45 manon for
its license.

Competition forced rates to
plummet and service quality to
improve.

BTC’s announced $50 million
southern Bahamas fibre cable
installation, made shortly after
Cable Bahamas received
approval for its southern
Bahamas fibre optic cable link

(following protracted regulato- .

ry and environmental deliber-
ations), is deserving of mention.

Cable Bahamas’ installation is
to pass through the southern
Bahamas and tie into cable sys-
tems owned by its partners,
facilitating improved communi-

cations between Jamaica, the
US mainland, and beyond.
Cable Bahamas can anticipate
earning significant revenues
from its investment. Cable sub-
scribers in the southern
Bahamas will experience
improved service as a consée-
quence of the cable’s routing: :

The capacity for BTC to earn
adequate revenues from the
southern Bahamas islands
(where its cable is to terminate),
to justify its investment, does
not presently exist and will like-
ly not exist over the anticipated
life of the cable.

Furthermore, BTC can easily
avoid the significant capital
investment by contracting-to
lease excess fibre capacity (dark
fibre) in the Cable Bahamas
cable.

BTC’s cable, like Cabté
Bahamas’, will have the poten;
tial to facilitate communications
to locations further afield, such
as the Dominican Republic,
Haiti, Cuba and Jamaica, and
thus provide a healthy revenue
stream to the company. .

Efforts must either be diréct-
ed towards harnessing such
potential, or the proposed cap-
ital expenditure, which has seri-
ous cost implications for BTC’s
customers, should be scrapped
and BTC should look to piggy-
back on the Cable Bahamas
venture.

MICHAEL R MOSS
Freeport, Bahamas
November 22 2005

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ZNS tapes could |
clear up this matter

EDITOR, The Tribune

I READ The Tribune of
December 1 2005 and am very
surprised to hear Mr Keod
Smith deny that he made a com-
ment in the House of Assem-
bly about blood letting or blood
spilling.

I watched the proceedings of
Parliament on Wednesday,
November 23, 2005 and the
audio which came across was
clear that someone behind
where Opposition Leader
Hubert Ingraham and Deputy
Leader Brent Symonette were
sitting made a remark about
blood.

I would think it to be a simple

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matter for the ZNS tapes of
Wednesday, November 23, 2005
to be obtained, viewed and this
matter cleared up to determine
who said what if Mr Smith or
any of his colleagues want the

_ truth brought to life so that-we

the Bahamian public know the
truth.

A CONCERNED
BAHAMIAN
Eleuthera
December 1 2005

(We also had a call from a

- television viewer informing us

that the exchange between
Keod Smith and Mr Ingraham,

’ which our reporters could not

hear in the House, was picked
up by ZNS microphones and
was heard by the listening pub-
lic. They said that after Mr
Ingraham announced that:he
would be officially sworn ini ‘as
House leader on Monday they
distinctly heard the voice of a
person sitting behind Mr Ingra-
ham remark: “Let the blood-
letting begin!” They were satis-
fied that the voice was that of
Mount Moriah MP Keod
Smith.

(Mr Smith has denied dhe he
spoke the words. Therefore, as
the Eleutheran letter writer sug-

. gests the truth will-be:found, Lon

TV-13’s video tapes for, Novein:
ber 23. —Ed).

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS|

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005, PAGE





In brie |



Ministry’s
message of
sympathy
for teacher

WHILE staff and students at
Garvin Tynes Primary School
are undergoing counseling ses-
sions after the death of the ©
school's principal Vanessa
Munroe-Coakley, the Ministry
of Education is sending formal
condolences to her family.

Minister Alfred Sears
expressed sorrow at Ms
Munroe-Coakley's death, say-
ing she was “a devoted educator
of 38 years".

The ministry noted that she
served as a primary school
teacher for many years before
being promoted to senior mis-
tress and then vice Principal at
Cleveland Eneas Primary
School.

She served as the principal of
Garvin Tynes since the school’s
inception in 1999.

Ms Munroe-Coakley is cred-
ited with setting a high standard
at Garvin Tynes, one which
earned the institution recogni-
tion from private and public
educators.

School
plans
steak-out
fundraiser

THE Parent and Teachers
Association of Xavier’s Lower
School plans to hold a steak-
out on Saturday, December 3,
in the school’s grounds on West
Bay Street.

_-The steak-out, the school’s
major annual fund-raising
event, will be held from noon
to 5pm.

The school, with an enrol-
ment of more than 400 students,
is headed by Principal Cynthia
Moss. Ms Denise Cooper is the
vice principal.

Farm Road
marching
band to play
concert

THE Farm Road Urban
Renewal Project will present its
marching band in concert on
Sunday, December 4.

.The concert is being held
under the patronage of Prime
Minister Perry Christie and Mrs
Bernadette Christie.

It will take place at the Wyn-

dham Nassau Resort and Crys-
tal. Palace Casino on Cable
Beach at 7pm. ,
: For more information or to
buy tickets, contact the Farm
Road Project office at 323-5314
or 323-5326.

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‘FOCOL considers puttin
Shell on stock mark

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

IN the wake of the successful purchase
of Shell Bahamas’ retail market, FOCOL
director Franklyn Wilson announced yes-
terday that the company is now examining
the option of making Shell a publicly trad-
ed company.

Speaking at the presentation of a
$250,000 cheque by the Action Bahamas
Committee to victims of Hurricane Wilma,
Mr Wilson took a moment to speak to the
press about FOCOL’s recent purchase.

“It was about a year ago Shell began
soliciting investors for the purchase of
their investments in the Bahamas as well
as in the Turks and Caicos. It was a very
extensive process, and FOCOL along with
a goodly number of others participated in
it. So it took virtually a year to come to
fruition,” he explained.

Mr Wilson painted out that FOCOL is
already one of the most successfully trad-
ed companies in the history of the
Bahamas International Stock Exchange
and will continue to provide opportuni-
ties for other investors to participate.

“In the first instance, we are doing an
offering for $25 million dollars of perpet-
ual preferred shares. Those are being han-
dled by Colina Financial Services. Subse-
quently there will be opportunities for
other investments. We believe in wide

Mr Wilson said that selling price for
Shell’s interest was actually far more than
the previously reported $25 million.

“This deal would not have been possible
unless one was able to command and
organise some $60 million, in terms of
consideration, and in terms of guarantees
to be provided,” he said.

Mr Wilson said FOCOL wants to let
station dealers know that the company

will guarantee them excellent service and
the best possible prices on oil products.

He pointed out that FOCOL had low-
ered its fuel prices in Grand Bahama despite
constant mark ups in New Providence.

Mr Wilson said the company will con-
tinue to behave “in the national interest”
at all times.

_ We are Bahamians, we don’t see this is
a short term investment. We are here for the







long haul. So when appropriate
and when required we musi do
things in the national interest.
“Our shareholders have got
to sacrifice, realising that in the
long run everyone benefits.
That’s our philosophy and we
hold it very deeply,” he said.



















Bian
DECEMBER













diversification in ownership.

“We have options - we can either issue
more shares in Freeport Oil or we can in fact
make Shell a publicly traded company. We

@ FRANKLYN Wilson presents the $250,000 cheque to Perry Christie on behalf of
the Action Bahamas Committee, wacthed by from FNM ministerAlgernon Allen

and Bishop Neil Ellis \

are examining that as an option,” he said.

Warning to ‘disaster prone’ Caribbean

THE Bahamas and other
small countries in the
Caribbean are now part of
one of the most disaster-prone
regions of-the world, an
expert has warned.

And the prospect of
increased hurricane activity
over the next 20 years is all
down to the lifestyles of big-
ger countries, said ex-diplo-
mat Sir Ronald Sanders.

The Caribbean itself is
responsible for less than one
per cent of global greenhouse

gas emissions. Yet, over the
last 30 years, the seven small-
est eastern Caribbean states
ranked in the top ten in terms
of natural disasters per square
mile.

Sir Ronald’s disturbing
assessment came during a lec-
ture in London to UK gov-
ernment officials, business-
men and foreign diplomats.

Between 1995 and 2005,
hurricane damage in the
wider Caribbean ran into bil-
lions of dollars, making the
region poorer and setting
back economies.

“The wider Caribbean is
one of the most disaster. prone
regions of the world for rea-
sons of geography, and now,
increasingly, because of the
lifestyles of larger countries
whose greenhouse gas emis-
sions are contributing to glob-
al warming,” he said.

Sir Roland, speaking at Lon-
don Metropolitan University,
repeated experts’ fears that the
Atlantic has entered a period
of heightened storm activity
that could Jast 20 more years.

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“Nothing emphasises this
more than the 2005 Atlantic
hurricane season which wit-
nessed the naming of a record
number of 24 storms and 12
hurricanes that inflicted bil-
lions of dollars in damage and
considerable loss of life.”

Meanwhile, The IJnterna-
tional Herald Tribune had
reported scientists’ fears that
irreversible warming was
already happening and would
continue for a century even if
pollution emissions were con-
trolled by the Kyoto Protocol.

He said: “Although the sci-
entific community appears to
be divided on the extent of
the damage to the world’s
environment from climate
change and the length of time
that it will take for such dam-
age to be irreparable, the fact
is that damage is being done
now.

“A further fact is that small
islands of the Caribbean and
elsewhere are. already suffer-
ing as are the coastlines of
many countries which can ill-
afford the high cost of contin-
uously maintaining sea
defences.

Sir Ronald hit out at the
United States for its refusal
to sign the Kyoto Protocol.
He said smaller Caribbean
countries were left powerless
as they suffered the effects of
global warming without con-
tributing to it in any signifi-
cant way.

“So, where does this all
leave countries in the wider
Caribbean? The truth is, it
leaves them victims of the

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refusal of both the United
States and large developing
countries, such as China and
India, to curb harmful green-
house gas emissions.

“In the 21st century, there
should be a more enlightened
approach to governance of the
common areas of mankind’s
survival.”

Sir Ronald also mentioned
the lack of effective interna-
tional machinery to help
countries adapt to climate

change and reconstruct in the.

(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)

wake of storms.

But he said small and vulner-
able hurricane-prone Caribbean
countries needed the means to
help them prepare for disasters.

“In the absence of such a
facility, Caribbean countries
could be faced, year after year,
with the costs of rebuilding after
hurricanes, but with no place to
turn for financing. This will
increase unemployment and
poverty in the region and, in
turn, it. will adversely affect
crime rates.and investment.” .,

John; Bull

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



Minister denies sewage damage |
to Registrar General’s files -

FINANCIAL Services and
Investments Minister Allyson
Maynard-Gibson has refuted
claims that some files were
damaged at the Registrar Gen-
eral’s office during a sewage
leak.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
the claim, which was made by
opposition Senator John
Delaney, is completely false.

“It is unfortunate that FNM
Senator John Delaney contin-
ues to spread false information
in a desperate effort to under-
mine the hard work of the fine
staff of the department who
have made tremendous strides
in transforming the way that
business is done at the registry”
she said.

. Mr Delaney was quoted in
Wednesday’s Tribune as claim-



ing that the Registrar Gener-
al’s office “suffered a sewerage
back up this summer — one of
several in the last two years —
which resulted in the area con-
taining corporate files being
contaminated by sewerage.”

Mrs Maynard-Gibson agreed
that an incident did occur in
July, in which “stagnant water
from a clogged face-basin in the
law firm directly above the
department’s 50 Shirley Street
Office escaped onto the floor
directly above the Registrar
General’s Department and
leaked through the ceiling into
the office below.”

She added, however, that all
files were immediately covered

in protective plastic, and “out _

of an abundance of caution”
staff members were given per-

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mission to leave the office for
a short time while the area was
ventilated and any lingering
smell removed. “There was no
sewerage leak,” the minister

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
the incident restricted the
public’s access to the Depart-
ment for at most a few hours;

“not for any extended period
of time as Mr Delaney would
mischievously like to suggest.”

She said that Mr Delaney

_.. had aimed to cause a scandal

with his comments in an effort
to score political points.

“Mr Delaney was a paid
consultant during the previ-
ous administration which

presided over the near
destruction of the financial
services sector of the
Bahamas. Now that Mr
Delaney is on the public pay-
roll at the Senate, he must not
be allowed to further destroy
the financial sector through
deliberate misrepresentations
in the media,” she said.



@ FINANCIAL Services and Investments Minister Allyson Maynard- LGibson

Southern Bahamas to
have electronic access
to Registrar records

THE Southern Bahamas will
soon have fast and easy access
to the records kept at the Reg-

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ETO UTR LEE

istrar General’s Department,
Financial Services and Invest-
ments Minister Allyson May-
nard-Gibson announced yes-
terday.

She said the first step in the
process is being taken today
in Ragged Island, where her-
self and Agriculture Minis-
ter Alfred Gray will be on
hand “to commission a new
system which will bring access
to the records of the depart-
ment at the touch of a button
to the residents there.”

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
this step will be repeated
“from island to island”, in the
coming months starting next
week in Grand Bahama,

“until the entire Bahamas has -

immediate electronic access
to all the records of the
department.” .

Mrs Maynard said the plan
will transform the pace at
which business functions

everywhere in the country.

. She added that complete ©
electronic access to the

records, with the exception of
intellectual property infor-
mation, should be available
by January 2006.

“The delivery systems for
this cutting-edge service are
being beta tested as we speak
and the diligence of the staff
at the department and at the
government’s Data Process-
ing Unit will ensure a suc-
cessful launch.

“The public should know
that the Department of the
Registrar General is dedicat-
ed to transforming the sys-
tems of record keeping and
public access and continually
updating and refining the
state-of the art technology
introduced under the PLP
administration until the ser-
vice is second to none, Mrs
Maynard-Gibson said.



In brief

| Freeport

_ Players plan
Christmas
performance

THE Freeport Players’ Guild
will present the Regency
Singers and the Lois Seiler
Academy of Dance in their tra-
ditional performance, “Many
Moods of Christmas” at the
Regency Theatre on December
3 and 4. :

The presentation is in keep-
ing with the traditional festivi-
ties begun by Festival Noel and
the annual Christmas tree light-
ing at Port Lucaya.

Last year, due to the destruc-
tion at the theatre caused by
Hurricane Frances, concerts
were held at the Church of the
Ascension, the Lucaya Presby-
terian Kirk and at Our Lucaya
Resort.

The Regency Singers group.
performs classical to gospel
music. The group’s renditions
of Negro Spirituals are particu-
larly popular. This year, a Hait-
ian Carol has been added to
their repertoire.

Lois Seiler’s Academy of

:.. Dance exhibits a wide range of

dance styles from classical ballet
to tap and hip-hop.

Saturday night’s performance
begins with a reception at 7pm .
when traditional Christmas
treats and punch will be served
prior to the show.

Sunday’s performance starts
at 3pm. Tickets can be obtained’
at Sweet P’s Lunch Café, the
Seventeen Shop, GB Fitness
Centre and Fortune Hills Golf
Club.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS





RACE AND POLITICS ARE
STILL A TOXIC MIXTURE

RACE remains a prickly subject in the Bahamas and
even more so now as the racial insecurities of some
Bahamians are being displayed in both the political arena
and broader society.

Even today, race and politics are as muddled as conch
salad!

Historian Virginia Cyrus defines race as a complex

i social construct based upon social values. Professor John

Hope Franklin views race as a concept developed by
whites to subordinate and control another group of
people, particularly blacks.

In the Bahamas, the question of race and racial
prejudice still plague our country in the 21st century,
although it was contained and more silently expressed
until recent political manifestations of bigotry.

~ In order to speak of race and politics today, a brief
examination of this part of the history of the Bahamas
must be undertaken.

In 1834 and 1838, the Abolition and Emancipation Acts
officially ended the system of slavery in the Bahamas.
According to Gail Saunders, after 1838 the ex-slaves were
officially free on paper, at least from punishments, to
cultivate their own lands, in their movements and ability to
choose certain things (not vote). These stipulations were
the extent to which the former slaves were free, as the
rigid class system present during slavery continued well
into the 20th century (Saunders).

‘In her book, Bahamian Society After Emancipation,
Gail Saunders highlights the political, social and economic
disadvantages facing the ex-slaves in a society that would
only evolve with time.

_Post-emancipation law, which prevented blacks from
any constructive roles in society and even a chance for
equal justice when challenging white in courts, deepened
coloured and class divisions and increased the control of
the whites.

«, Saunders also notes the apartheid law, which created a
racially tense atmosphere in both New Providence and
Out Islands. This fostered segregation, relegating blacks to
some of the worst living conditions in the Caribbean.

In the years following emancipation and early into the
20th century, a tripartite model of race relations defined
the social, economic and political spectrums, i.e the whites
at the top, the coloured in between and lastly the blacks.

_, According to Nicolette Bethel, in the 1920s, the
expansion of tourism led to a more rigid model of race that
reflected the Jim Crow south of the United States and
divided Bahamian society with the whites at the top and all
non-whites at the bottom.

Then there was the credit, share and truck systems that
Michael Craton and Gail Saunders refer to as’
commercially oppressive systems that deepened poverty
and dependency among blacks, especially as the economy
was in a slump with little monies, meagre. resources, high
land prices and by continuously keeping blacks in debt..

. It is impossible to discuss the social impact of race
relations without addressing the effects of race on politics.
.: After emancipation, racist laws stipulating the need for
acertain amount of property disenfranchised many blacks.
Blacks were restricted from voting, and therefore did not
have a choice in their governance.

‘According to Don Maples, the result was that wealthy
white families continuously ruled the Bahamas until the
PLP era. In describing the election process of the 1880s,
English solicitor LD Powles said that the House of
Assembly was a family of Nassau whites, passing laws to
facilitate their own needs whilst embarrassing the British
flag.

». Although eight members of the House of Assembly
were considered black or coloured in 1949, they were
restricted along colour lines and increasing racial injustice
led to the formation of the PLP, whose initial objectives
were to become the voice of the black labouring class, end
discrimination and to create an equal society.

Historian John Berryman notes that the 1950s signalled
positive changes in race relations beginning in 1956 when
Sir Etienne Dupuch brought forth a resolution to end
racial discrimination in public places and with the
abolition, in 1958, of the property qualification that led to
more black voters.

Although the PLP attained majority rule, Colin Hughes
writes that early on, the whites promoted a racist approach
to smear the first signs of Negro assertiveness with the
primitiveness of pre-colonial Africa and the excesses of
post-independence African regimes that produced an
inevitable reaction.

He said this approach led to biacks developing an
emotional connection with Africa and the PLP. Gail
Saunders says that from this point on, Bahamian politics
became polarised on colour as Sir Lynden Pindling and Sir
Milo Butler appealed to blacks by instigating acrimony
through the use of racist material.

» Although the PLP promoted national identity and
upward mobility for blacks, sadly, they were also skilful in
their use of the race card, sowing seeds of division and
heightening tensions over race (eg showing Roots), which
thas produced much of the racially motivated propaganda
plaguing Bahamian society today.

There has been much hoopla surrounding Brent
Symonette’ s recent ascension to the deputy post of the
ENM. Unfortunately, racial jargon promoted by the ‘new’
‘PLP has limited people’s abilities to look beyond
Symonette’ s skin tone and ancestry.

- Only ignorant people would allow the PLP’s recent
‘scaremongering to rouse their fears of a return to minority
‘tule. Allyson Maynard-Gibson, Kenyatta Gibson, Melanie
Griffin, Alfred Gray and others have all played the race
‘card and spewed venom that illustrates their outright racial
arejudice,

“4 But Kenyatta went a bit further, as he called a senior
‘parliamentarian (Symonette) ‘boy’. So now, we have a

t Juan who not only spews racist propaganda and yet lists his
‘address as the predominantly white Lyford Cay, but he is
“also a junior parliamentarian referring to his senior,
eeeardiess of party, as ‘boy’!? Amazing!

Now that Bernard Nottage is back, Kenyatta should
‘eorry about his seat, because as a friend pointed out to
me, “Kennedy may not be so favourable to him.”

ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com



Restaurant owners’ gesture

to help hurricane victims

@ By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

THEY have never been to
Freeport in their lives, and they
are not familiar with any of the
victims of Hurricane Wilma, but
two small business entrepre-
neurs have opened their big
hearts to start a fund to help
those in the nation's second city.

When Erika and Pepsi
opened their breakfast restau-
rant just over a year ago, they
never knew their specialty
entrees would become so pop-
ular — or that they would be
heading on a plane to Grand
Bahama to give relief to hurri-
cane victims, many of whom are
still left homeless.

They were watching the tele-
vision two days after the hurri-
cane hit, and saw the massive
destruction left behind. It
moved them to put their heads
together and ask: “What can we
do to help?”

Their restaurant, Don’ Wotch
Nuttin’, immediately set up a
hurricane relief fund by placing
a labelled container on their
unique and colorful countertop.
The young ladies are also
donating ten cents out of every
breakfast sale to the fund.

As they prepare to close out

BVLGARI

BULGARI.COM







i DON’ Wotch Nuttin' on Carmichael Road West has a

hurricane relief fund set up for the victims of Hurricane Wilma.
These men say they love eating island style breakfast under the
gazebo and feel more than happy to help by contributing to the

fund set up by owners Erika and Pepsi.

é

3
the fund, Erika said they are
excited, because the customers

gave far more than they ever

expected.

They plan to purchase
household and clothing items,
as well as Christmas gifts for

children, and carry them into ©

the disaster area personally.
They plan to meet the people
there, hear their experiences and
try their best to fill whatever

needs their fund can manage.

“Many people will be shop-
ping, fixing up their homes, and
planning parties for the Christ-
mas; but there are people out
there who have no homes — no
shelter this Christmas,” said
Pepsi. “So we had to do some-
thing.”

Putting smiles on people’s
faces is something these women
take as their mission at their



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t

restaurant, and doing the same
thing for people they may have
never had the opportunity to
meet is just an extension of that
goodwill gesture.

Don’ Wotch Nuttin is a
unique restaurant because it
takes the traditional Bahamian
99 cent breakfast to another lev-
el. The ladies say it is the first
one in Nassau where you can
get items like banana pancakes,
specialty omelets, steak and ’
eggs, and grilled bread straight
from the frying pan.

Their specialty menu reflects
their customers — each one is
named after the regular patrons,
who have even left their names
on the signature board, person-
alising their favourite breakfast
place.

The 16A special, for exam-
ple, is often ordered by the
Carmichael Road bus drivers,
who pass them in the City 2000
Auto Center lot each day. It
consists of a double serving of
mackerel with white rice, or
corned beef hash with chunky
potatoes and rice.

The Bobo special, Pepsi said,
was created for the many Rasta-
farians in the area. It consists of
pancakes garnished with banana
and cinnamon, and spicy mack-
erel stew.






PAGE 8, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



1000th execution looms as lottery of
death reaches shameful milestone ©

A PRISON guard takes
a man out of a prison

cell. The guard leads the man
through a hallway to an execu-
tion chamber and in the pres-
ence of witnesses, the prisoner is
poisoned to death.

The witnesses go home, many
of them traumatised for life.
The prison authorities who
directly participated in extin-
guishing a human life are simi-
larly traumatised. The journal-
ists write stories about the man
that has just been put to death
in front of them. Officials clear
the room until the next time.

In the USA, this scene is fair-
ly routine. Since 1976, when the
death penalty was reinstated by
the US Supreme Court, nearly
1,000 men and women have
been killed by the state in the
name of justice.

In the Bahamas, debate has
focused on a recent period
‘ where no executions have taken
place. Yet the crime rate,
according to a recent police
report, showed reductions in a
number of major crimes. Most
analyses shows that there is no
parallel between the use of the

death penalty and reduction in
serious crimes. In particular,
these are crimes of passion or
with malice of forethought.

In either case, the death
penalty has never been shown
to be any more of a deterrent
than other types of punishment.

Most homicides in the
Bahamas are domestically relat-
ed. Partners killing their part-
ner, whether they are married
or not, is of little consequence.
These cases are more likely to
be tried as non-capital offences
and so they do not have the
death penalty applied in the
sentencing.

As the 1,000th execution in
the US approaches, Amnesty
International, along with a
broad spectrum of human rights
organisations, social justice
groups, and concerned individ-
uals, is calling on US State and
Federal authorities to put an
immediate end to all executions.

“The death penalty is by
nature ineffective, arbitrary and
does not deter crime. On the
contrary, it creates more vic-
tims and demeans society as a
whole”, said Amnesty Interna-
tional.



A disproportionate
number of those exe-

cuted in the USA in thé past

. three decades were economi-

cally disadvantaged, people of
colour, and those who had little
or no access to competent:coun-
sel.

Many suffered from mental
retardation or were child
offenders.— groups that are
exempt from the death penalty
under international human
rights standards. Others suf-

fered severe mental illness.
Many were executed while seri-
ous questions remained con-
cerning their guilt - to date 122
people have been released from
death rows across the country
on grounds of wrongful convic-
tion.

Furthermore, 80 per cent of
all executions have been car-
ried out in the South and con-
centrated in only a handful of
states. Nearly half of the 1,000
executions that have taken
place in the US occurred in two
states, Texas and Virginia.

New York, Illinois and New
Jersey have a hold on execu-
tions and numerous questions
are being raised across the

.country regarding the fairness

and effectiveness of the capital
punishment system. In recent
years the US Supreme Court
has banned the execution of the
mentally retarded and child
offenders.

“This shows that it is possi-
ble to end the use of the
death penalty in the US in the
near future. What is now
needed is for political leaders
at both the federal and state
level to demonstrate courage,



Most analyses shows that
there is no parallel between
the use of the death penalty
and reduction in serious

crimes



wisdom, and leadership and
end the death penalty once
and for all.

“The victims of violent crime
deserve respect, compassion
and justice. The death penalty
offers none of these things. It
is an illusory solution to press-
ing social problems and merely
amounts to a failure of politi-
cal vision,” said Amnesty Inter-
national.

“The resources spent on
these executions could have
been invested in comprehensive
rehabilitation, meaningful vic-
tims services, and other crime
prevention programmes or even
used to reinforce existing law

enforcement efforts.”

A total of 121 countries
have abolished the

death penalty worldwide in law
or practice.

“The execution of 1,000 men
and women by the state has
resulted in immeasurable
human costs - for the victims of
violent crime, for the families
of those who were executed, and
for those who participated. in
these state-sanctioned killings.

_It is time for the US to realise

the ultimate futility of the death
penalty and follow the global
trend towards abolition.”

e For more information,
please see: www.amnesty.org
and www.1000execution.org























Ebenezer

arn
Ca ar EL



OLD Saint Nick aban-
doned his reindeers last week-
end, opting instead to fly in
a helicopter over Atlantis’
“Celebration of Lights” on
the Sun Deck in the Royal
Towers. ;

Guests watched in amaze-
ment as Santa’ Claus descend-
ed from a hovering helicopter,
danced and pranced his way
across a wooden bridge, kick-
ing off the holiday celebra-
tions at the resort.

Santa was later joined bya -

lovely Mrs Claus. The pair

Mi PHOTO shows Jo Kemp from London,
England enjoying the festivities at Atlantis’
recent “Celebration of Lights.”

PRIVATE

embraced guests, sang carols,
played games and listened to
excited guests of all ages as
they recapped their Christ-
mas wish lists.

There was also games, arts
and crafts and music for
everyone to enjoy.

And, of course Christmas
is not the same without a
Christmas tree; nor can there
be a “Celebration of Lights”
without lights. Atlantis’ guests
watched as bright lights lit up
the sky during a special tree
lighting ceremony.





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THE TRIBUNE



In brief —

Bahamas
Forum
meeting

THE next meeting of think
_ tank Bahamian Forum will be
held on December 6.

The topic will be economic
empowerment and the guest
speaker is Halsbury Chambers
senior partner Kenred Dorsette.

The meeting will take place
at the British Colonial Hilton
hotel at 6pm. The public is invit-
ed to attend.

Nutritionist
to explain
new juice
WORLD renowned nutri-
*-tionist Dr Earl Mindell will vis-
- dt the Bahamas next week.
He will be explaining the pur-
- :pose and uses of a product he
formulated called Goji juice.
211 The juice is derived from the
: goji berry, a fruit discovered in
.. the Himalayan mountains.

Dr Mindell describes the goji
“berry as “the most significant
“health discovery of the last 40

years”. .

.“.> He said it is especially effective
~ in treating the major epidemic
diseases affecting Bahamians and
people of African origin. “Type
two diabetes, hypertension and
fenal failure are just the begin-
“Hing of that list,” he said.

‘Dr Mindell will address the
public at Workers House on
Tonique Williams-Darling High-
way on December 5 at 7pm.

Christmas
holidays
announced

_.. THE Cabinet Office has
announced that the Christmas
and Boxing Day holidays will
‘be observed on Monday
ecember 26, and Tuesday
December 27 2005, respectively.
= The New Year’s Day holiday
will be observed on January 2,
2006:°°"



Pye

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005, PAUE 3









Psychiatrist recommends zero
tolerance approach to crime

A ZERO | tolerance
approach to crime must be
adopted before the problem
destroys Bahamian society as
we know it, author and psy-
chiatrist Dr David Allen said.

Dr Allen made this argu-
ment to nearly 150 persons
who packed a meeting room
at the Radisson Cable Beach
Resort on Tuesday for the first
ever Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce Crime

to rob the family and was dis-
turbed by one of the family
members,” said Dr Allen.
“The intruder turned the gun
on them and raped their 12-
year-old daughter in front of
her mother. Imagine the fear,
anger and hopelessness of
knowing you cannot protect
your child or take matters into
your own hands. This is the



Prevention Seminar.

Sponsored by the
Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce, IBM and
the Royal Bahamas
Police Force, the semi-
nar aimed to focus.on
new approaches to over-
coming crime.

The one-day seminar
featured various speak-
ers including Deputy
Prime Minister and
Minister of National
Security Cynthia Pratt
and Assistant Commis-
sioner of Police Regi-
nald Ferguson.

According to Dr
Allen, zero tolerance
must go hand-in-hand
with understanding the
root causes of crime and
how severe its impact is
on victims and society.

“We cannot allow
relentless criminals to
control our country,” Dr
Allen said. “In the past
few weeks we’ve had a teenag-
er killed in front of scores of
witnesses who did nothing to
help and patrons robbed while
dining at Cable Beach restau-
rants.

“On a daily basis, residents
of Eastern Road and Cable
Beach are threatened by
armed robbers, car bumping,
property invasion and rapes.
This has to stop and we as a
society have to stop it,” he
said.

Dr Allen shared the story
of a family that is now trau-
matised as a result of a recent
robbery turned rape.

“Some bold intruder came



@ PSYCHIATRIST Dr David Allen said
that 6 to 8 per cent of chronic criminals
commit 50 per cent of serious crimes. ““The
Bahamas must act now if we are going to
halt the escalation of serious crimes now
taking place in Jamaica and Trinidad,” Dr
Allen said.

grim reality of today’s
Bahamas and sadly it can hap-
pen to any of us.”

Dr Allen said drastic times
call for drastic measures, even
if this means implementing a
tax system to provide the
police force with necessary
equipment, such as electronic
tracking bracelets for released
prisoners.

“We can’t wait for criminals
to commit the crimes,” he said.
“We must start at the schools
to seek out the bullies and tru-
ants and dissuade their pre-
criminal mentality.

“There ought to be zero tol-
erance for violence in the

school - physical or verbal. If
we continue to disregard small
fights or stealing pencils and
pens from desks today, we will

“end up with attempted mur-

derers or armed robbers in the
future.”

Dr Allen told seminar atten-
dees that teachers must be
taught how to identify pre-
criminal symptoms in students,

such as truancy and bul-
lying.

He added that the
government must see to
it that children with vio-
lent characteristics are
placed in reform or
counselling pro-
grammes and are given
effective anger man-
agement tools. }

According to Dr
Allen, the criminal
mind develops in
homes where children
are neglected, abused
and have a consistent
feeling of fear, rejec-
tion, humiliation or
shame.

He referred to a

‘recent survey where 10
criminal cocaine addicts
all cited lack of parental
love as the root cause
of their’) wayward
lifestyles.

“When some of their
fathers where asked
why they didn’t hug
(their sons) and say ‘I

love you’, most stated they felt

this type of male bonding
would make their sons ‘soft’
or homosexual,” he said.

Dr Allen pointed out that
the lack of male love brings
about violence and can lead
neglected sons to develop anx-
iety, take drugs or miss school.
As a result, they resort to
crime to support their addic-
tions.

He added that absent
fathers leave their sons with a
severe deficiency in finding
their masculinity. “A single
mother can’t teach her son
how. to become a man,” he
pointed out..““She may try her

best, but these boys grow up
with the need to. prove their
masculinity and there is no male
to teach it to them. This is why

many end up joining gangs.”

Dr Allen also called upon
persons in authority to make
their voices heard as they can
make a big difference are often

well respected.

“Talks show hosts, govern-
ment leaders, clergymen and
elected officials — get out there
and make yourself known for
not tolerating crime,” Dr Allen
said. “This is your Bahamas,
too, and we all have to work
together.”

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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005



# OKES Field Primary School shows of there stuff at the
College of the Bahamas

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LOCAL NEWS:

School celebration



i THE COB band plays a Christmas tune at the College of the
Bahamas’ A Gift To Our Community — an afternoon of Carols

and Cheer.





a ATHLETE Bradley Cooper playing Santa Claus yesterday at
the College of the Bahamas

Ingraham tours

BBY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - FNM Leader
Hubert Ingraham toured vari-

ous stormed ravaged areas.

along the south-west coast of
Grand Bahama, where he said
many residents are struggling
to repair their homes without
any financial assistance from
NEMA.

Mr Ingraham said the gov-
ernment's response following
Hurricane Wilma to the plight.
of persons that were severely
impacted has been inadequate.

"T don't know enough about
the extent of the response to
articulate to you specifically why
I say generally no. However,
what I have seen and what I've
heard, it appears no," said Thurs-
day while at St Stephen's Angli-
can Church in Eight Mile Rock.

Mr Ingraham, accompanied
to Freeport by deputy party
leader Brent Symonette, said
nothing he's heard or seen on
television could have prepared
him for the devastation he saw
in settlements from Williams
Town to West End.

He stressed that many residents

ck

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services on delinquent accounts.

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\ residing in Nassau or Freeport may apply.

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* Assisting delinquent customers in order to facilitate the recovery
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Head Office, The Plaza, 2â„¢ Floor, Mackey Street
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E-mail address: Tanya.Astwood@combankltd.com

THE TRIBUNE;



Government

- gives building
supplies to
Rita victims

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

AT the official launch of
the Urban Renewal Project
in South Andros yesterday,
the government donated
building supplies to needy
families affected by tropical

storm Rita earlier this year. .
Housing Minister Shane,

Gibson, South Andros MP
Whitney Bastian and other
officials briefly toured areas

of South Andros and met.

with locals to’ discuss any con-
cerns they may have.

"The homes that had minor
damage to them were homes
that would have needed
repairs anyhow, under our
Urban Renewal Programme.
So, we took that opportunity
to have them repaired under
the Urban Renewal Pro-
gramme versus under the
Hurricane Relief Pro-
gramme," Mr Gibson said.

Building supplies worth
$40,000. were donated ‘to
those who could not afford
to repair their own homes.

In an effort to involve the
entire community, the sup-
plies were ordered through
local supplier Norwood Rah-
ming of Rahming Enterprises.

During a breakfast at the
Emerald Palm Resort, South
Androsians aired their con-
cerns about their communi-

ty.

Deputy chairman of ‘town
planning Brian Dean sug-:
gested to the minister that
building inspectors be
engaged to ensure that ‘con-
struction is peHtotmed pIep?
erly.

Wendy Dean, pastor of St
Marks Baptist Church, point-
ed out that some persons are
living in deplorable conditions
in the area. i

She suggested to’ those 4 an-

attendance that’‘it is time for
residents to “be their broth-
er's keeper” and help ose
who are in need.
. Mr Gibson xeaurell
Androsians that everyone:
who qualifies for assistance’
will get help, no matter what’
their political persuasion
might be.

"The reason why I wanted:
to make sure and come fo;
talk about this and also hear
from you is because we want’
ed to make sure that we had
total transparency in this:
whole process.

"We didn't want to deai
with any favouritism. If
you qualify for assistance;
you qualify for assistancé:
If you are a PLP, indepen~
dent, FNM, BDM of
CDR: no matter what you’
are, as long as you are ‘2!
Bahamian and you qualify:
for assistance then your
should get it," said Mr
Gibson.

urricane areas

are concerned about the extent
to which they would be provided
assistance by government.

Some residents, said Mr
Ingraham, complained that
NEMA is denying them finan-
cial assistance even though their
homes were substantially dam-
aged.

Mr Ingraham said that resi-
dents were also very concerned
about some announcement by
government concerning a 'no
build' on the southern side of
Grand Bahama.

Housing Minister Shane Gib-
son announced early this week

that the entire southwest coast-'
line of Grand Bahama has been
declared a 'no build zone,,,
explaining that government!
would no longer allow recon-
struction on land situated off
southern side of the roads in
affected settlements. ey
Mr Gibson, however, noted
that those persons who are giv:
en permission to build, would
have to follow strict guidelines
by incorporating special rein-
forcements when rebuilding. In
low lying areas prone flooding,
homes would have to. be. built
on stilts. | 4

MR
WCE VS Cc

Annual Steak-Out.

The school’s major fund- “raising »
event willbe held on ~
Saturday, December 3,
~ from noonto 5pm
on the school’s grounds
on West Bay Street.



LAWDY LAWDY!!

Look Whos Forty





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005, PAGE 11



“Police

wi, Carl Bethel hits out at
Mitchell’s visa claims

warning
on AK 47s

FROM page one

“That kind of weapon
would outgun a police officer
under ordinary circum-
stances. This is a serious sit-
uation but we have been
picking up this type of
weapon for years from time
to time.

“Every now and then we
would have raided some
place with weapons of this
calibre. These types of
weapons follow the drug
trade. They are normally
used for storage protection,
and we have always been
concerned when we find
- them. Only the military and

the police would have access
to such weapons,” he said.

Inspector Walter Evans,
police press liaison officer,
pleaded for civilians who
have knowledge of such
weapons being housed any-
where in the country to
report them.

“Don’t just be satisfied
after a loved one is hurt -to
notify us. These are very
dangerous weapons. Can you
imagine the effect or impact
they can have on a person?
So we are always asking that
if persons know of people
having such weapons, they
should contact us so we can
get these off the streets,” he
said.

Ironically, however, under
Bahamian law anyone found
with such a weapon would
face, the same penalties as
someone with an unlicensed
revolver.

Mr Ferguson said to his
_knowledge, these finds are
among the most powerful
weapons confiscated in New
Providence.

“Most of the time when
we intercept these types of
weapons it is from the work
of citizens who phone us and
give us intelligence of such
things.

“Of course, there are oth-
er ways of us gaining such
information but there is
nothing like an alert public,”
he said.

Man wanted

in connection |

with murder
is expected
to appear
“ in court
FROM page one

possession of ammunition;
and:the juvenile was charged
with possession of an unli-
censed firearm.

The matters were
adjourned to February 26,
2006.

â„¢ MAN CHARGED
Vieto Pinder, 19, of Free-

town, pleaded guilty in

Freeport Magistrate’s Court
to possession. of an unli-
censed firearm.

Pinder appeared before
Magistrate Franklyn
Williams in Court One. He
was given a conditional dis-
charge for one year. In
default, he is to pay $1,000 or
serve six months in Fox Hill
Prison.

FROM page one

that the number of visas granted
to Chinese nationals had quadru-
pled annually.

The senator said that “by the
minister’s own count the total
number of visas issued to Chinese
nationals between 2003 and 2005
under his watch was 422.”

“If you multiply the 86 visas
issued in all of 2002 to Chinese
nationals by four the total is 344.
In fact the number of visas issued
to Chinese nationals has more
than quadrupled under the watch
of Fred Mitchell. By the minis-
ter’s own facts and figures he had
admitted the allegation,” Mr
Bethel said.

. He emphasised that the exis-
tence of two Chinese passports
with Bahamian visas dated
December 31, 2005, which
expired on March 31, 2005 — “a
fact that I have seen publicly dis-
closed to the Bahamian people”
— is of grave concern.

“And those Chinese nationals
are still here in the Bahamas,
working illegally,” he added.

Mr Bethel said that the ques-

tion now remains how many of
the 422 Chinese who were
allowed into the Bahamas with
visas issued since 2002 actually
returned to China.

The senator said that visas are
being issued to hundreds of Hait-
ian nationals without proper iden-
tification, no photographs and
signed only with an “x”.

“How was one man, whom I
have identified merely as “Mr
Joseph”, able to obtain 84 Haitian
visas over a nine-week period in
2004. The minister failed in his
attempts to offer a credible expla-
nation or response for the astro-
nomical increase in the number of
visas issued from Nassau,” said
the senator.

- He said that the minister’ s
assertion that the thousands of
visas issued in 2004 and 2006 can
be explain by a visiting Haitian
soccer team and an increase of

_ trade to Haiti lacks all credibility.

“A soccer team has only 11
players and several extra support

staff, coaches and trainers,” Mr _

Bethel said.

He said that the minister’s
attempt to “raise the spectre of
ethnic or national prejudice” was

Search for men
missing at sea

FROM page one

Their vessel was overturned and, while Hart and Pearce were able
to make it to shore, Davis and Larimore did not.

Inspector Evans said a team of officers led by Inspector Ashton
Greenwood tried to search for the missing men but were hindered

by rough seas.

At 6am yesterday two search teams were formed in an effort to
find the missing men. Up until press time yesterday Mr Evans
said that there had been no positive reports.

e An aircraft was stolen from Fresh Creek airport in Andros,

according to Inspector Evans.

The owner of a six-seater Seneca aircraft, registration number
N840141, went to the airport around 5.45am yesterday and dis-
covered the plane was missing. Police are searching for the aircraft.

¢ A 28-year-old man is in police custody in connection with a

firearm discovery in Nassau.

Police found an AK 47 with 30 live rounds of ammunition at a
home in Frasiers Sub-division, off Soldier Road.

FROM page one

tors to assess possibilities of
establishing the Bahamas as a
preferred vacation destination
for Chinese travellers, The Tri-
bune has learnt.

Speaking with Chinese
reporters of the news website
Xinhuanet, deputy director gen-
eral of tourism Ellison Thomp-
son said the purpose of the vis-

it included meeting Chinese

tourism officials and providing a
name list of local travel agencies
to host Chinese visitors.

Mr Thompson said Bahamian
tourism operators hope to
design tailored products for
Chinese visitors, and that some
hotels have even tried to devel-
op Chinese menus.

The Bahamas became an
approved travel destination for
China in February this year, giv-
ing the country the chance to
attract the 16 million-plus Chi-
nese who leave mainland China

: . each year for their holidays.

The agreement means that
Chinese tourists - who are only
allowed to travel to countries
that have been granted
“Approved Destination Status”

Ministry
(ADS), such as Thailand and
Australia - will be able to visit
the Bahamas more easily as part
of organised tour groups.

To date, China has signed
ADS agreements with 59 coun-
tries and regions in the world.

In an interview with The Tri-
bune earlier this year, director
of tourism Vernice Walkine
said there was a great need to
inform and educate potential
Chinese travel partners about
the Bahamas,-because while
they are used to visiting places
like Thailand and Bali, most
would never consider choosing
the Bahamas as their vacation

spot.

Mrs Walkine said it was inter-
esting that the Chinese knew
nothing about the Bahamas, but
were impressed when they
learnt more about the country.

She emphasised that while
airlift is a major concern - with
no direct flights between the
Bahamas and China - Virgin
Atlantic, which has a non- stop
flight from London to Nassau,
also has a direct route from
Shanghai to London.

a smoke screen and if entry visas
issued in Nassau to any national-
ity from any part of the globe had
increased 20 times it would
have raised the very same ques-
tions.

Mr Bethel said that despite the
length of the statement and the
“dragging out of a few red her-
rings” the minister has failed to
answer his allegations.

“Those allegations are that
under his watch the policy
restricting the number of visas
issued from Nassau was changed;
that there has been an astronom-
ical increase in the number of
entry visas issued to Haitian

nationals from 102 a year in 2002 -

to 2,200 in 2004; that the number

of visas issued to Chinese nation- °

als has quadrupled; that there are

no mechanisms in place to ensure
that persons who entered with
visas actually left the Bahamas
before those visas expired; that
visas were habitually issued to
persons without proper, full or,
indeed, any identification; that
there was political involvement
at the highest levels of govern-
ment; and that PLP politicians,
family members and political
cronies were sponsoring repeated
groups or batches of Haitian
nationals and Chinese nationals,”
Mr Bethel said.

He said the fact that he as an
MP wrote a letter for a con-
stituent who was seeking visas for
a boat crew is irrelevant.

“MPs write all sorts of letters

- for their constituents, all the time.
I have hundreds of file copies of

letters stacked’ up in boxes at
home, which I have written in the
past on behalf of constituents

Seeking all types of things from

jobs, to contracts, to government
houses; to educational loans yes
even letters seeking work per-
mits.. This is the:everyday job of

“an MP,” ‘he’said.

Mr Bethel-said the fact that the
former deputy prime minister
Frank Watson allegedly intro-
duiced Mr Bruce Bain in a letter
to the former minister of foreign
affairs is not the point.

“The minister has not suggest-
ed that as a result of the former
DPM’s letter Mr Bain received
any carte blanch right to sponsor
additional ‘groups of Haitian
nationals,” he said.



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PAGE 12, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005



LITTLE MISS BAHAMAS PAGEANT: There are 38 lovely little ladies in
this year’s Little Miss Bahamas pageant...Please bring your little love ones to
see the crowning of the new Miss Little Bahamas 2005/2006, or invite others
that you know may have little ones interested in attending. The exciting
event is scheduled for Sunday, December 18 @ 4pm at the Rain Forest The-
atre, Wyndham Crystal Palace. Tickets are available from the Juke Box,
Mall at Marathon, contestants or at the door.

Gospel choirs will be competing each Saturday, for a period of six weeks, at

the Braiders Square at Festival Place on Prince George Wharf. Choirs will be
judged on musicianship, group coordination and symmetry, technique, ver-
satility of chosen song, program choice and presentation of final perfor-
mance. The choir categories include ladies, men, mixed voice, youth and
groups of choirs. The competition will commence with preliminaries in Octo-
ber and finals in November and December. One group will be eliminated each
Saturday. The selection of the winning choir is scheduled to take place at the
Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony on December 10, at 6pm at Festival
Place.

Bacardi Happy Hour @ Power Boat Adventures Bar and Grill (one door east
of Texaco Harbour Bay), every Friday. $3 Bacardi drinks all night and $3 beers.

Ladies Night @ Power Boat Adventures Bar and Grill, every Saturday.
Ladies free, Gents, $10 all night. Bacardi Big Apple and other drink specials
all night long. :

Wild Jungle, each and every Wednesday night @ Club Trappers, Nassau’s
“upscale” gentleman’s club. Featuring a female body painting extravaganza.
Free body painting @ 8 pm. Ladies always welcome. Admission: Men free
before 10 pm. Females free. There will be free food and hors d'oeuvres
between 9 and 10 pm. Open until 4 am.

Ladies Night @ Fluid Lounge, this and every Thursday night. Doors open at
10pm. Ladies free before 1am, $10 after. Guys: $15 all night. Drink special: 3
@ $10 (Bacardi) Giveaways and door prizes every week.

Saturday Night Live every Saturday night @ Club Fluid, Bay St. The biggest
party of the week, pumping all your favourite hits all night long. Ladies in free
before 11pm. Strict security enforced.

Rave Saturdays @ Club Eclipse. DJ Scoobz spinning the best in Old Skool.
Admission $35, all inclusive food and drink.

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters Sports Bar. Drink specials all night

long, including karaoke warm-up drink to get you started. Party from 8pm-

until.

Reggae Tuesdays @ Bahama Boom. Cover charge includes a free Guinness
and there should be lots of prizes and surprises. Admission: Ladies $10 and
Men $15.

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar every Wednesday S5pm-
8pm. Free appetizers and numerous drink specials.

The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday. Doors open at 9pm, showtime
11.30pm. Cover charge $15. $10 with flyer. :

Fantasy Fridays @ Fluid Lounge, featuring late ‘80s music in the VIP Lounge,
Top of the charts in the Main Lounge, neon lights and Go Go dancers.
Admission: Ladies free before 11pm, $15 after; Guys $20 all night.

Dicky Mo’s @ Cable Beach. Flavoured Fridays Happy Hour, every Friday.
Drink specials: Smirnoff Kamikaze Shots, $1; Smirnoff Flavoured Martinis, 2
for $10; Smirnoff Flavoured Mixed Drinks, 3 for $10. Bahamian Night (Free
admiission) every Saturday with live music from 8 pm to midnight. Karaoke
Sundays from 8pm to midnight, $1 shots and dinner specials all night long.

Twisted Boodah Lounge @ Cafe Segafredo, Charlotte St kicks off Fridays at
6pm with deep house to hard house music, featuring CraigBOO, Unkle
Funky and Sworl’wide on the decks.

Chill Out Sundays @ Coco Loco’s, Sandyport, from 4pm-until, playing deep,
funky chill moods with world beats.

Sweet Sunday Chill Out Soiree Lounge, every Sunday, 4pm-midnight @
Patio Grille, British |
Colonial Hotel.

Wet Sundays, every Sunday, noon-midnight @ Crystal Cay Beach. Admission
$10, ladies free. .

TooLooSe @ Indigo Restaurant on West Bay St and Skyline Drive.
Singer/songwriter Steven Holden performs solo with special guests Thursday
from 9pm - midnight.

The Graham Holden Deal @ The Green Parrot....David Graham, Steve
Holden, Tim Deal and Friends perform Sunday, 7pm - 10pm @ Hurricane
Hole on Paradise Island.

Jay Mitchell and Hot KC @ Palm Court Lounge, British Colonial Hilton,
Wednesday-Thursday 8pm-12am.

Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley’s Restaurant & Lounge, Eneas St off
Poinciana Drive. Featuring Frankie Victory at the key board in the After Dark
Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to midnight. Fine food and drinks. ‘

Paul Hanna, Tabatha and Genie, and the Caribbean Express perform at Trav-
eller’s Rest, West Bay St, every Sunday, 6.30pm-9.30pm.



The Arts

STAN BURNSIDE: Recent paintings by the artist will be featured in an exhi-
bition Friday December 2 @ the artist's Home Gallery on Eastern Road, Cor-
ner of Tower Heights, from 6pm - 9pm. Private viewing by appointment.





oa.

SHELDON SAINT is being featured at Ristorante Villaggio, Caves Village
West Bay Street, until December 3 from Spm - 9pm.

Furniture by Margot Bethel and jewellery by Nadia Campbell will be on dis-
play Friday, December 9, at PopopStudios Gallery, Dunmore Lane, Chip-
pingham from 6:30pm - 9:30pm

ART INTERNATIONAL, featuring the work of nine Bahamian artists,
five well known artists from the UK, one from South Africa and one from Zim-
babwe will be held gratis, of the Guaranty Bank, Lyford Manor, just outside
the Lyford Cay gates. The exhibition will be open to the public until the end
of December. The work of the artists on display can be seen in collections
worldwide, and have been shown in numerous exhibitions. Representing the
Bahamas will be; John Beadle; Lillian Blades; John Cox; Claudette Dean;
Tyrone Ferguson; Bo Sigrist Guirey; Nora Smith, Dorman Stubbs and Rupert
Watkins. Lady Connery, Sir Sean’s wife, has kindly agreed to open the exhi-
bition. She is an exceptional artist, and will be exhibiting one of her paintings.

The Central Bank of the Bahamas is hosting its 22nd Annual Art Competition
and Exhibition. The works are on display until December. The National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas (NAGB) will be hosting a series of workshops
throughout November. Persons interested in attending any of the sessions
should contact the NAGB.

The National Art Gallery of the Bahamas (NAGB) will be hosting a series of
workshops throughout November. Persons interested in attending any of
the sessions should contact the NAGB..

The National Collection @ the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas, an
exhibition that takes the viewer-on a journey through the history of fine art in
the Bahamas. It features signature pieces from the national collection, includ-
ing recent acquisitions by Blue Curry, Antonius Roberts and Dionne Ben-
jamin-Smith. Call 328-5800 to book tours. This exhibition closes February 28,
2006. ,

The Nassau Music Society would like to remind the public of the concerts that
will take place for their: “FESTIVAL OF RUSSIAN ARTISTS 2006”. The

Natalie Gutman Quartet, January 13 @ Government House and January 14 |

@ St Paul’s Church Hall, Lyford Cay. Natalie Gutman is one of the world’s
leading cellists and she will be playing
with the Society’s artistic director, Igor

Rakelson,(piano), her son Sviatoslav,

BRISTOL







THE TRIBUNE



(violin), her daughter in law, Olga Dyachkovskaya (soprano). Yuri Bashmet
and the Moscow Soloists, will be performing February 24 @ the Theatre for
the Performing Arts - (Full orchestra conducted by Yuri Bashmet). There will
be a lunchtime concert for children and an evening concert for adults. February
26 @ Old Fort Bay Club, Buckners private residence (Quintet). February 27
@ Christ Church Cathedral (Full orchestra conducted by Yuri Bashmet).
Guest appearance with the Orchestra ~ Jo Anne Callender. Oleg Polianski will
perform April 7 @ Government House and April 8 @ the Klonaris resi-
dence. Oleg is a well known in Europe as a pianist living in Germany. Details
of the tickets and programmes will be advised shortly.



The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at 5.30pm on the second Tuesday
of each month at their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville. Call 323-4482
for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held 6:30pm Tuesdays and Thurs-
days at Nassau gymNastics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles Drive). Doc-
tor approval is required. Call 364-8423 to register or for more information.

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support group meets the first Monday
of each month at 6.30pm at New Providence Community Centre, Blake
Road. Dinner is provided and free blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol
testing is available. For more info call 702-4646 or 327-2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third Monday every month,
6pm @ Doctors Hospital conference room.

‘The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third Saturday, 2.30pm

(except August and December) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close,
Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital, the official training centre of the American Heart Associ-
ation offers CPR classes certified by the AHA.-The course defines the warn-
ing signs of respiratory arrest and gives prevention strategies to avoid sudden
death syndrome and the most common serious injuries and choking that can
occur in adults, infants and children. CPR and First Aid classes are offered
every third Saturday of the month from 9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital
Community Training Representative at 302-4732 for more information and
learn to save a life today.

REACH - Resources & Education for Autism and related Challenges meets
from 7pm — 9pm the second Thursday of each month in the cafeteria of the
BEC building, Blue Hill Road.

Civic Clubs



JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cycling are pleased to offer a cycling -
clinic for juniors between 10 and 17. The free clinic will be held ever Saturday |
in an effort to encourage kids to cycle. Parents interested in registering their .
children should contact organisers at jarcycling@gmail.com

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incor- ~
porated meets 6:30 pm every third Wednesday at the Bahamas National
Pride Building.

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial Hilton Monday’s at 7pm.

The Bahamas Historical Society will be hosting a presentation by Lionel °
Levine, entitled: "What will be Sir Stafford Sands' niche in Bahamian Histo-
ry?" The meeting is scheduled for December 1 @ 6pm at the museum on
Shirley Street and Elizabeth Avenue. The public is invited to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm @ C C Sweeting Senior ,
School's Dining Room, College Avenue off Moss Road. Club 9477 meets Fri-
day, 7pm @ Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm A19, Jean St. Club 3956
meets Thursday, 7.30pm @ British Colonial Hilton. Club 1600 meets Thurs-. -
day, 8.30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes. Club 7178 meets Tuesday, 6pm @ The J:
Whitney Pinder Building, Collins Ave. soit
Club 2437 meets every second, fourth and fifth Wednesday at the J Whitney,
Pinder Building, Collins Ave at 6pm. Club 612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyn-
dham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach. Club 753494 meets every Wednesday, 6pm- |
8pm in the Solomon’s Building, East-West Highway. Club 3596 meets at the
British Colonial Hilton Mondays at 7pm. Club Cousteau 7343 meets every
Tuesday night at 7.30 in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central |.
Andros. All are welcome.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega chapter meets every second
Tuesday, 6.30pm @ the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach. ed

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday, 7pm @ Gaylord’s °
Restaurant, Dowdeswell St. Please call 502-4842/377-4589 for more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ Atlantic
House, IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room.

The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) meets every third
Monday of the month in the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton Hotel,
Bay St.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets the second and fourth
Wednesday of the month, 8pm @ St Augustine’s Monestary.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Friday of each month, 7.30pm
at Emmaus Centre at St Augustine’s Monestary. For more info call 325-
1947 after 4pm.

International Association of Administrative Professionals, Bahamas Chapter
meets the third Thursday of every month @ Superclubs Breezes, Cable
Beach, 6pm. :

AMISTAD, a Spanish club meets the third Friday of the month at COB’s
Tourism Training Centre at 7pm in Room 144 during the academic year. The
group promotes the Spanish language and culture in the community.

Send all your civic and social events to The Tribune
via fax: 328-2398 or e-mail: outthere@tribunemedia.net

Bist ce ee:



THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005, PAGE 13






anamanian president arrives
in Cuba ahead of eye patients




“Copyri ighted,Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

eo






Butler & Sands Wine Experience 2005
Raises $7,000 for GB Hurricane Relief

Hundreds of wine lovers attended this “This year we decided to use this
year’s Butler & Sands Wine Experience — wonderful event to accomplish two things
to sample some of the company’s best — give our customers an opportunity to
wine offerings and help raise money for _ experience a vast array of different wines
Grand Bahama hurricane relief. and learn more about how to pair them
with food, and more importantly, to

Ticket sales generated $7,000 demonstrate our commitment to
which is being donated to the oo this community. One hundred
Grand Bahama branches of percent of ticket sales from
the Red Cross and the this event will help assist the
Salvation Army. many Grand Bahama victims
of Hurricane Wilma,” he said.










































Back row from left: Guillaume Duverdier, Group
oe ; : Commercial Manager, Burns House Group; Therese
In addition to sampling a wide Demeritte, Brand Manager, New World Wines; Wendell

the Grand Tasting room and variety of spectacular wines Seymour, Marketing Manager, Butler & Sands.

The festive wine tasting
featured more than 50 wines in
attendees who purchased Connoisseur’s attendees were automatically entered in Front from left: Dorothy King, Deputy Director —
: ae : : : General Bahamas Red.Cross; Prisca Gibbs, Executive

Tasting tickets were treated to an adoor prize raffle to win one of five wine Board Member Bahamas Red Cross.

additional 20 super premium wines and flower filled baskets each worth over

including Chateau Margaux, Taittinger $300.00.

Comtes de Champagne and Chateau

Leoville Barton. The Butler & Sands Wine Experience is

has ae the only consumer wine tasting that

LeRoy Archer, Managing Director of focuses on wine and wine alone. Butler
“parent company Burns House Group & Sands, a member of the Burns House
expressed his gratitude to the attendees Group of Companies, is the largest
of the event. distributor of fine wines in the Bahamas.





The Butler & Sands Wine Team
From left: Wendell Seymour- Marketing Manager;
Jerry Joseph, Merchandising Coordinator; Pernell
Poitier, Wine Sales Account Executive; Therese
Demeritte, Brand Manager, New World Wines; Robert
Donathan, Wine Sales Manager; Richard Byer, Wine
Sales Account Executive; Erica Rose, Wine Club
Coordinator; Gregoire Montot, Brand Manager, Old
World Wines; DeCarlo McPhee, Wine Sales Account
Executive; and Densil Deveaux, Brand Manager,
New World Wines.



' The Tribune wants to hear
‘ from people who are
} making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
‘you are raising funds for a
‘good cause, campaigning
por improvements in the
“area or have won an
‘Award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.







PAGE 14, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005 THE TRIBUNE





























Te ITINSVS

Butler & uneral Homes

& (ae

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

DR.
UTTAM
_ CHAVAN

i. memorial
F service will be
‘held at Uriah}
~ McPhee School
at 10:30 a.m. on
| Saturday for the

Tate Dr. Uttam Chavan.



Doc “Syndicated ‘Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”
: : 7

in the war against AIDS

Copyrighted Material 5. g

Hei is survived by his wife: Marie;
One (1) Daughter: Tara; One (1)
Son: Anil; Two (2) Brothers:
“Sabash & Bhagavan; One (1)
Sister: Indu; Cousins: Ashok,
) Miriam; ‘Numerous nieces,
- nephews, aunts and uncles; Friends
in The Bahamas, India, Irel and &
U.S.A.; Other families including
UDrs. Jagadeesh, Hover, Babu,
- Vakil, Shivaji, Mr. & Mrs. Babu
OF Nassau & Shyla.

: His remains can be viewed at the
‘ Chapel of Butlers’ Funeral Homes
and Crematorium, Oxford Avenue
“and Baillou Hill Road on Friday
_ from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. The
cremation will follow on Saturday
-after prayers at 2° Eton
beginning at: ‘12: 30" Ps me



‘Rock of Ages | Hadeken
Huneral Chapel prim

Wulff Road & Pinedale

Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 © Fax: 328-8852 mruriwcr?
Rea (es
LARSNER | choc thon
JEAN, 49
”
a resident of Soldier Road, wi »~!
& formerly of Haiti; will } '
be held at Calvary Haitian Arh aA
Baptist Church, West Ave
off Collins Ave; Sunday o- -

December 4th, 2005 at
2p.m. Officiating will be
Rev. Dr. Henri Cher-
Amie, assisted by Bro.
Solymy Decius & other Ministers of the Gospel.
Interment will be at Southern Cemetery,
| Spikenard & Cowpen Roads.

Left to cherish memories are his wife, Girlaine
Jean; a host of other relatives and friends
including; Rev. Dr. Henri Cher-Amie & The

! Entire Church Board; Bro’s Solimy Decius,
Marcelyn Sylvestre, Paul Justin, Ruben Isnord,
Profiio Pierre, Pierre Joseph & Daniel Calixte;
The Boad of Deacons, Bro’s Dieus Pere St. Louis,

| Petion Belton, Anthony Pierre, Ormeus Pierre,
Tomany Josaphat, Mitial Constantin & Maxius
Brazil: The Board Of Deaconess; sisters
Margarette Cher-Amie, Belzina St. Louis, Navelia
Brazil, Petion Belton & Marie MatheElizee; The
Choir of the Church, The Men, Ladies & Youth,
Sunday School Teachers; Phare Celeste, Mens
Choir, United Gospel Singers, I.J.C., L.E.D.;
Solid Rock Calvary Baptist Church, Coral
Harbour C H.B.C., Light House B.C.,
Resurrection C.B.C. and all Leaders and Members
of the Church.

Cash 20% » Credit ns 1

= St MAJOR CREDIT CARDS

SAV-A-CHEK WILL BE ACCEPTED FOR
REGULAR PRICED ITEMS ONLY

Friends may pay their last respects at The Rock
of Ages Funeral Chapel Wulff Rd. and Pindale

} on Saturday from 10:00a.m. to 6:00p.m. and on
Sunday at the church from 1:00p.m. until funeral
time.







“Being informed about local news, sports,
entertainment and. world events is important to



me. The Tribune is my choice for news and
information. The Tribune is my newspaper.’



JASON RAHMING

ne from your
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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005 THE TRIBUNE |








Butler & Sands
Company Limited

Celebrate with our
new wines
from:






















I ;
Producer: HARDYS E

Wine: Stamp of Australia Cabernet

Regiow: South Eastern Australia
Accompaniment: red meats, pasta &. :
cheeses

ys HARDYS
: Nottage Hill Cabernet Sauvignon/



&

$

vy
eee oe ®

oe &

4

WINERY -
an Merlot

Pye ee
bee ae

&

astern Australia)



&
ent: red curry pork loin, ss
reast & tasmanian shrimp 9°"



cer: JACOB CREEK

e: Chardonnay






dishes

V
- Producer: NOBILO




seafood, &




| Producer:




REDCLIFFE

Wine: Sauvignon Blanc
Region: Marlborough, New Zealand ‘
Accompaniment: salads, light dishes . :

Ve o29.05




Buy 3 bottles of any
Wines (750ml) and get
10% off. Buy 12 bottles
and get 20% off. .

Bo Ae Peo BES 1 DEE

Butler B Sands Wassau, Grand Bahama, Abaco, Andros, Eleuthera & Harbour Island, Birnini, and Exuma
Company Lirnited ;

‘oo 8 Sp oS 6 6 Rin oe © ee ee wee 8 se oes



<«



, 2005, PAGE 17
THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2,

oo B ottle of .
“Pipes Heldaeck










ibe

Sale Date: December ist-December th, 2
WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. MAXIMUM ONE GIFT PER CUSTOMER. OFFERS ARE NOT CUMULATIVE.
: a ONE NET PURCHASE AMOUNT WILL BE TAKEN INTO ACCOUNT. ms



Po



S }

Caves Village, Shirley Street, JFK Drive, Harbour Bay Shopping Center.
Roundabout Cable Beach, East-West Highway, Lyford Cay



Butler & Sands
Company Limited:





PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY.



PAGE 18, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005

THE TRIBUNE â„¢



LOCAL NEWS

Chef savours regional honour

Tracey Sweeting, award-winning chef of
Bahamas Culinary Classic and internation-
al Culinary Olympics fame, returned from
the Martinique Culinary Arts Festival this
past October with another of the region’s
most prestigious culinary honours.

Mr Sweeting has added to his already
full trophy case the Madin’ Gastro Kan-
nari D’or (Golden Pan) Award.

Organised by the Corporation of Cooks
and Pastry Cooks of Martinique, the
Caribbean chefs’ culinary challenge was
designed to reinforce the relationships
between the culinary professionals of the
Caribbean, develop their competitive spir-
it and promote the revaluation of local pro-
duce.

The only native-English speaking candi-
date in the field of seven Francophones
vying for the coveted honour, Mr Sweeting

did not count on bringing the gold home
this time.

The other chefs, favourites from Mar-
tinique, Guadeloupe and Haiti, made for-
midable opponents, he admitted, but ones
that he would ultimately overcome.

For Sweeting, sous chef at the Radisson
Cable Beach Resort, the first challenge lay
in the daunting language barrier.

And not only was he unfamiliar with the
language, he was also new to their regular
diet. The competition called for Sweeting to
create an original three-course meal, devel-
oping entrees featuring five key ingredients.

No difficulty there, except that three of
the five were items totally alien to this
Bahamian chef. Chicken and crayfish he
had prepared many times, but this would
be his first encounter with rabbit, octo-
pus and cobia — a large tropical game

fish also known as black salmon.

Fortunately, this exotic shopping list was
provided to him three weeks in advance
and gave him a chance to do what any oth-
er culinary professional would: “I ordered a
few rabbits and I went to town on them,
learning their texture, how to break them
down and how to work with them.” He
soon found out that rabbit has a consisten-
cy akin to chicken.

The octopus he tackled with a simple
island policy: treat it like conch.

His Tropical Kannari D’or Seafood Sam-
pler blew the judges away, and the Que-
becois chefs who pitied him eventually invit-
ed him to participate in an advanced com-
petition in Quebec.

Chef Sweeting dedicated his Golden Pan
award to his three-year-old daughter Tani-
ah. “Everything I do is for her,” he said.

Now in Fort Lauderdale Airport

Terminal 3 location open as of November 26th

Ship Now, Fly Later

Drop your bags off the day before you travel,
and they'll be waiting for you when you arrive!

We accept most oversize/overweight items and boxes!

Bags arrive 1lam

Drop Off:

Miami Airport

4005 NW 28th St

(305) 871-0571
(between Thrifty and Budget}
Gpen Every Day BAM-8PM

Fort Lauderdale Airport
Bags To Go Inc
(954) 359-8656
(Terminal 3, Lower Level
Next to American Airlines baggage)
Open M-F BAM-8PM -

Save up.to



Pay in Nassau

Pick Up:

Nassau Airport
Customs Hall
(242) 377-6593
(inside the Airport Terminal)
Open on-call 422-2318

Fort Lauderdale
Airport location
operated by
Bags To Go Inc

5%* on airline excess baggage fees

“Some airtines’ published excess baggage fees on your third bag, If it is oversize and over-
weight at 751bs, can be as high as $185, With excesshaggage you can pay as little as $75 for
the same bag, We are cheaper than the competition in all other comparisans too.

Take a look at our other services:

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Get more information at
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(242) 341-6593



pdacmailbox

unlimited US mall

pdaccargo
bulk freight
COMING soon

>> affordable air freight







@ RADISSON sous chef Tracey Sweeting

Colonel’s jackpot
ready for finale



@ MAURICE Williams, winner at the Golden Gates location...
Mr Williams eats at KFC three to four times a week. He is affili- ©
ated with the Salvation Army and plans to make a donation to

that charity and place the remaining funds in his savings account.



Hi WHEN Dave Alvaranga received his winning call he thought
it was a joke. He plans to purchase a laptop computer with his
$1,000 Jackpot winnings.

KFC restaurants continue to
give their customers with tokens
of appreciation as the Colonel’s
Jackpot promotion nears its
end.

The 13-week promotion, on
since early September, offers a
$1,000 prize to nine lucky cus-
tomers each week — $1000 from
every KFC in Nassau — plus a
monthly $10,000 prize for one
lucky customer.

Gabriel Sastre, general man-
ager of Restaurants (Bahamas)
Limited which operates KFC
restaurants in Nassau, said that
the company enjoys promotions
like the Colonel’s Jackpot
because they generate a lot of
excitement around the brand.

“Bahamians are loyal con-
sumers and we feel the best way
to reward their loyalty to KFC
is to give back some of what
makes the consumer machine
tick - money!”

KFC’s Jackpot has enabled
120 people to increase their cash
flow just in time for the holi-
days.

The Colonel’s Jackpot is

in the canisters during the month of November 2005 will be donated to the Ronald — |
| McDonald House Charities and the Bahamas National Children’s Choir. Pim ovine



nearing an end and promises to.
conclude with a big bang when

the third $10,000 prize is

announced at the Golden Gates

KFC on December 12.

Every entry from the Novem-
ber 15 through December 11 is
entered into the final drawing;
and that includes the weekly
$1,000 winners from that period.

Entry involves purchasing
any KFC Combo or more, writ-
ing on the back of the receipt a
name, telephone numbers and
the answer to the question:
“How many KFC restaurants
are there in Nassau?” drop the
entry in the marked box at any
KFC restaurant and wait to be’
called.

Restaurants (Bahamas) Lim-
ited has been serving its prod-
ucts to Bahamians since the ear-
ly 1960s.

It manages nine KFC restau-.
rants in Nassau — Mackey
Street, Oakes Field, Robinson
Road, Prince Charles, Golden
Gates, Village Road, South.
Beach, Marathon Mall and
Saunders Beach.





THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005, PAGE 1°



EU eases way to
increased trade Las
with (Gonyrighted Material
yndicated Content; |




oa aa

Available from Commercial News Providers”



a es

bewom «

Global United’s Gift To You...
a Hassle Free Shipping!

Vatx an cavoy doubts | : entintosca teed oS
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Coming Soon to Sandyport!

The Gul § OK J
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Drop off or ship your goods to our Miami warehouse
and we’ll deliver them direct to you! -



OPEN:
MONDAY - FRIDAY
8:30 am to 6:00 pm
OPEN Weekends



November 19th - December | 8th



Throughout the Bahamas, from Miami or anywhere



SCRUBS & MORE else in the world we take care of your goods from start
Phone: 393-7200 * Kemp Road South 8 to finish!
BI-ANNUAL SALE | | ©. | oe ee a
Thursday, December Ist, ee i ee oe / NASSAU : 4 : i 5 MIAMI : eG a REEPORT
Saturday, December 3rd, 2005

° Scrub Sets $20.00 ¢ Printed V-Neck Scrub Tops |
$12.00 * Snap Tops $15.00

| ¢ Scrub Pants $10.00 ¢ All Clogs $25.00 |

° All Rockers footwear $60.00 ¢ |

| All White Swan & Cherokee Uniforms 10% off |

pect | oe 242.377.1252/0164 305.591.4369 == 242.352.9315











PAGE 20, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005

THE TRIBUNE |



“== BU Parliament backs tough
anti-bird flu measures

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from.Commercial News Providers””

yy -"



PO OUKae IRN EN
W/m ee) loa NcLe I oe

LL GE APPLIANCES
\SH SALES ONLY!

: a Joeem eM eee Reema cl CLT)



GEOFFREY

| Fantastic offer begins
| Thursday, December 1st



and lasts the entire

JONES & GO

month of December.

Don’t let it pass you by! — 322-2188 /9

Sales & Full Service Department



Z
we
&
‘=



Rosetta & Montgomery Sts.



x
o

rr" . Die rweu

Business Analyst (BA-3)
- PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT AND REAL ESTATE

Montana Holdings Ltd is undertaking a major land development programme in
Rum Cay. This project will comprise international hotels, a large marina, over 400
homes and a range of holiday resort facilities in one of the most beautiful Family -
Islands of the Bahamas. We are now seeking a Business Analyst to join our rapidly
expanding Nassau office and to become a team member of a growing property
development business.

Business Analyst (BA-3)

Reporting to the Chief Financial Officer & VP of Corporate Development, the -
Business Analyst will take responsibility for a range of activities.
These shall include, but not be limited to: s

¢ Property sales and conveyance

¢ Coordination and planning

¢ Facilitating various partnership transactions

¢ Monitoring numerous. commercial contractual arrangements
e Supporting key financial and project monitoring processes

Requirements
The ideal candidate shall have at least:

¢ 3 years experience of the real estate business, land development, or the
hotel/holiday resorts business

¢ Educated to a degree level — preferably with conc -ntration in Business
Administration, Finance or a Science Degree

¢ Held positions dealing with executive management

¢ Experienced in managing suppliers as well interfacing with customers

e Excellent communication skills, both written and oral

¢ Must be computer literate with excellent knowledge of Microsoft Office
-and especially proficient in Word and Excel

¢ Experience in Microsoft Project or similar project management software
is highly desired

The successful candidates will be organized, personable, ambitious and very
productive. They shall demonstrate high levels of initiative and the ability to -
manage all allocated activities to an early conclusion. They will have excellent -
written and verbal communication skills and have the ability to write detailed
reports and associated documentation. They will have a strong desire to learn new
skills and to accept more accountability —- and have the highest level of business
acumen and integrity.

This position is situated in Nassau with some travel to the building site in Rum
Cay. International travel may be required. The salary and benefits package shall _
be commensurate with the responsibilities and experience of the successful candidate.

The Montana Holdings office environment is challenging, energetic and very
demanding. It calls for staff to accept responsibility for all types of work activities,
which shall be undertaken to high professional standards.

Contact

Please send cover letter and resume by e-mail quoting above reference (BA-3) to

island_development1@yahoo.com or by post to P.O. Box N-9322, Nassau, The
Bahamas.

The closing date for receipt of applications is December 19, 2005





THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005, PAGE 21



“FRIDAY EVENING DECEMBER 2, 2005

7:30 | 8:00 | 6:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

NETWORK CHANNELS

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Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.


















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PAGE 22, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005 THE TRIBUNE
—



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PAGE 24, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005 THE TRIBUNE

+

Solomon’s SuperCenter ¢ Old Trail Road « Nassau ° 242-393-4041 * Mon-Sat: 8am-9pm & Sun 7am-12noon
Solomon’s ¢ Queen’s Highway ¢ Freeport °242-352-7018 * Mon-Sat:8am-8pm & Sun: 8am-noon
Solomon’s SuperCentere Nathan Key Drive ¢ Marsh Harbour ° 242-367-2601/2 * Mon-Thu 8am-7pm, Fri &Sat: 8am-8pm,Sun: 8am-2pm
Solomon’s Treasure Cay* Treasure Cay Shopping Centre Treasure Cay, Abaco * 2420365-8350 * Mon-Sat: 8am-6pm & Sun: 9am-1pm
Credit cards accepted ¢ Gift cards available



Grand prize winner can chose either one (1) $100 gift card every week for 52 weeks (Total value of $5200 or a one-time instant store credit of $3500).
Winners of monthly groceries can choose either one (1) $100 gift card per week for 4 weeks total value $400 or a one-time instant store credit of $250)







Government

,

-FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005

‘SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis,








Stamp Tax

cash flow

@:By NEIL HARTNELL
_ Tribune Business Editor

overnment revenues are “a lit-
tle ahead of projections” for the
first four months of fiscal 2005-
2006, the minister of state for
finance told The Tribune yester-
‘day, with amendments to the Stamp Tax Act
having improved cash flow through the penalties
for late stamping of documents.
~ James Smith said: “We’re a little ahead of
projections for the first four months on revenue,

and I think it really reflects a combination of ,

increased tourism expenditure and the effect of
foreign direct investment. .
“It could be that the Kerzner project is begin-

ning to gain traction from the employment of

workers and imports.”

Another key factor had been the plugging of
what the Government believed were various
loopholes in the Stamp Tax Act via amendments
enacted earlier this year.

Mr Smith said: “The plugging of the Stamp
Tax is really beginning to show. We’re seeing
impressive growth in Stamp Tax collections.

“It’s improving our cash flow as those respon-

sible for having documents stamped are coming â„¢

forward a little quicker than they used to. I think
we’ve done something.”

.To prevent documents going unstamped for a
long period of time, surcharges of 10 per cent of
the Stamp Tax value and 15 per cent are now

being applied for documents not dealt with for ©

between six-12 months and over one year respec-
tively.

Stamp Tax revenues account for about 19 per
cent of the Government’s total revenues, which
in 2004-2005 totalled about $1.05 billion, but
the Act was amended to plug loopholes created
by company mergers and acquisitions; the use of

’ corporate and trust structures for legal avoid-

,

ance; and certain construction contracts. |
e Central Bank of the Bahamas’ report on
monthly economic developments for October,

Leadenhall liquidation
now court-supervised |

which began in October 2003,
will also be stayed:

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Revenues ‘a little ahead
of projections’ for 2005-
2006 first four months





_ MINISTER JAMES SMITH

Government's fiscal deficit fell by 56.83 per cent
to $20.4 million during the first quarter of its

_ 2005-2006 financial year.

While increased import demand and improved

SEE page 3B ,

x (Heads of Agreement
change aids | process ‘overrides’

}

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Heads of Agreement
process for approving major
investment projects in the Fam-
ily Islands “overrides” local
government and obstructs con-
sultation with local residents

affected by these develop- .

ments, a Freeport-based attor-
ney is arguing.

Fred Smith, of Callenders &
Co, said Heads of Agreement
contracts entered into with
developers by the central Gov-
ernment in Nassau “attempt to
override the Local Govern-
ment Act and dictate what

Islands, whereas the Local
Government Act, duly enacted
by Parliament, requires District
and. Town Councils to make
decisions about Crown Land,
Treasury Land, hotel licencing,
business licencing”.

Act

Describing the Local Gov-
ernment Act as “the founda-.
tion for local consultation for |

development”, Mr Smith said
that while he welcomed foreign
direct investment projects as

drivers of economic growth, “‘it -

cannot be on the basis of giving

_ the Bahamas away and bur-

dening only Bahamians with

local Government

taxation”. :

The attorney, who represents
the Save Guana Cay Reef
Association in its fight against
the Baker’s bay Golf & Ocean
Club development, argued that
Bahamian.developers were not
receiving the same favourable
terms and conditions as their
foreign counterparts. ©

Mr Smith also said that: by
leasing Crown and Treasury
land to foreign developers on
favourable terms, and provid-.
ing incentives that usually
waived the payment of customs
duties, real property taxes,



Tribune Business Editor

LEADENHALL Bank &
Trust’s liquidation has been
transformed from a voluntary
winding-up to one that is court
supervised, under an order
from Justice Jeannie Thomp-
son.

A newspaper advertisement
said the Order had been made
on November 25, and mandat-

_ed “that all actions or other

proceedings against the bank
be stayed pending further
order”.

» That appears to indicate that
the long-running legal dispute
between Leadenhall and Turks
‘& Caicos-based FirstFinancial
Caribbean Trust Company,

Ragged Island to get

A Supreme Court injunction

had frozen the deposits of

Leadenhall’s former Master-
Card clients to protect them
while the dispute with FirstFi-
nancial plays out.

The case had revolved
around a Deed of Retirement,
Appointment and Indemnity
that Leadenhall allegedly exe-
cuted in 2002, appointing First
Financial as the new trustee for
the security deposits.

._ First Financial was alleging
that Leadenhall only trans-
ferred to it $14.25 million of
the $33 million in total deposits

SEE page 5B

electronic access to
Registrar General

-. ELECTRONIC access to

‘records at the Registrar Gen-
eral’s Department for Ragged
island residents will be com-
missioned today, the first stage
‘in a roll-out that will take in

- -all the Bahamas’ islands.

‘ Allyson Maynard-Gibson
said in a statement that she, the
‘Registrar General, V. Alfred

Gray, minister of agriculture, '
. fisheries and local government,

Minister hits
back at Delaney

and two administrators would

visit Ragged Island today to

commission the system.
“This will be repeated in the

SEE page 4B





ASSAU, FREEPORT, A

should happen in the Family

SEE page 5B

Bahamas faces ‘brain drain’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE acting head of the Bahamas’ No.3 polit- °

ical party has warned that this nation is suffering
a “brain drain”, with its most talented and high-
ly-skilled workers and university graduates
remaining abroad to find work after graduat-
ing

ment as acting chief executive of the Coalition

_for Democratic Reform (CDR), told-a Civil

Society Bahamas town meeting on immigration

‘issues that in meetings with Bahamian associa-

tions in South Florida, his political party had
found that “many of our finest sons and daugh-
ters are holding top position in.a variety of
areas”.

Mr Maynard added: “In many. cases, these
Bahamians long to return home and participate
in the building of our nation.” He added that his
party would seek to encourage well-qualified
Bahamians to return home through a combina-
tion of economic incentives and its immigration
policy. .

Meanwhile, the CDR also echoed Civil Soci-

ty Bahamas’ position on the work permit

approvals process, calling for a Special Compli-



3




i S TELL

today!

Charles Maynard, Bernard Nottage’s replace- ~~

ance Unit to be established within the Immi-
gration Department “to police all work permit
agreements”.

It would, according to Mr Maynard, assess
the recruitment process, an applicant’s real qual-
ifications, the training programmes in place to
train up Bahamians to replace expatriates, and
the “transition process” between expatriate
and their replacement by Bahamians.

=.Mr Maynard said an-immigration policy must

be geared towards economic growth, helping to
expand intellectual capacity and build this
nation’s physical infrastructure.

While foreign workers benefited Bahamians
by giving them exposure to “special skills” and
work ethics, many Bahamians were feeling “dis-
advantaged” by the importation of foreign exper-
tise, feeling that expatriates had greater eco-
nomic and professional opportunities than them-
selves.

Mr Maynard said globalisation and the
reliance on foreign direct investment ensured
the Bahamas had to open up to foreign man-
agers, adding: “Let us stop pretending that when
multinational companies meet the prescribed

SEE page 3B






-» College is in his future

Reality Check. ae

You never know what's in yours.

His future and yours can be protected

with the right life insurance or investment plan.
Call or log on to www.familyguardian.com



| Be



. Me INSURA
Sh” cOMPANY
ERA CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O. BOX SS 6232



PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005

THE TRIBUNE’

BUSINESS ©



Purpose and passion
drive business success

ELECTRICITY
CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

TECHNICAL TRAINER
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING DEPARTMENT

A vacancy exists in the Human Resources & Training Division for a Technical Trainer.

The Technical Trainer (Electrical) is responsible for the technical instruction of employees
from all engineering departments within the Corporation encompassing Electrical Engineering,
Transmission and distribution Operations, Power Generation Operations inclusive of Plant
Installation, Maintenance, Operation and Control Workshop.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

¢ Providing instructions and training in engineering trade skills for employees within
the Corporation

¢ Preparing candidates for external examination certification by.local and overseas
organizations

¢ Providing instructions on developing safe and efficient work habits

¢ Providing instructions to participants in classroom workshops and job environments

¢ Preparing program criteria and marking schemes for trade testing in electrical based
trades.

° Preparing timetables and examination schedules for visiting external examiners.

* Identifying, developing and delivering engineering; courses (i.e., Electrical Technician

' Training).

¢ Evaluating, recording and reporting on the progress of students attending training
courses

* Preparing course notes, training aids, evaluating and marking schemes for all courses.

Job requirements include:
¢ A minimum of a Bachelor’s Degree in Electrical Engineer or.an OND in engineering
or equivalent qualifications
¢ A minimum of 10+ years of experience in an industrial training setting
¢ Sound knowledge of technical skills related to electrical engineering principles
¢ Good judgment and sound reasoning ability
¢ Excellent time management skills
¢ Proficient oral and written communication skills
* Ability to keep current with newly installed or modified plant
* Comprehension of schematics, technical reports, drawings, troubleshooting and
technical activities
* Good information transfer skills
¢ Computer literate

Interested persons may apply by completing an internal Application Form forwarded to
reach: The Human Resources Department on or before Tuesday, December 6, 2005.



TECHNICAL VACANCIES

THE BAHAMAS _.
MARITIME AUTHORITY

The Bahamas Maritime Authority is The Bahamas national agency that is responsible
for administering The Bahamas Shipping Register, which is currently the third
largest in the world. The Authority prides itself on high standards and the good
safety record of its fleet. .

Applications are invited for technical positions to be based in London. The successful _

candidates will be members of the Technical Department. The Technical Department
is responsible for all aspects related to ensuring the safety and security of Bahamas
registered ships and the protection of the marine environment, including providing
technical assistance to all the Authority’s stakeholders.

TECHNICAL OFFICER

Applicants for the post should be either a holder of seagoing Officer Certificate
of Competency issued under STCW or a qualified Naval Architect, and have
practical and theoretical knowledge of ships and maritime national and international
requirements. Applicants with other qualifications such as Royal Bahamas Defence
Force, marine inspection/surveying/auditing or other suitable maritime expeneNe
may also be considered. ’

TECHNICAL ASSISTANT

Applicants for the post should be highly organized with a good level of computer
literacy. A familiarity with the use of databases would be an advantage. The position

is ideally suited for a young person, who has some experience of the shipping and |

wishes to broaden his/her knowledge.

Salary is negotiable, dependent on experience and qualification. Applicants are
invited to write in confidence, enclosing a copy of their CV, details of current salary
and copies of certificates to:- Ls

by email: dhutchinson@bahamasmaritime.com
by fax: +44-207-264-2595 or 242-394-3014
by post:

The Director
The Bahamas Maritime Authority
Latham House
16 Minories
London EC3N 1EH
England, UK

or

PO Box N-4679
Nassau, Bahamas

Closing date for receipt of applications is 16th December 2005.



\ sm Busines

“Copyrig hted Material a

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”



@ ao ---

On

-Two experienced Senior Se
electrical project at Paradise Island: Please
P.O. Box N-8195, Nassau, Bahamas.



We've worked hard and now it’s time to relax and enjoy life. Time to
catch up with old friends. Sleep in late if we want to. Pursue our
hobbies. And enjoy our grandchildren. Maybe even take that cruise
we talked about. Retirement is great because we planned ahead
with personal retirement plans from Colinalmperial.



a Colinalmperial.
: lAsuranee (td. ‘
Confidence for Life







THE-TRIBUNE









Es ass

i nn Certs Pea on

| Harbour Island has been vot-
ed the number four top —

Atlantic Ocean Resort, with a

‘rating of 83.3 per. cent, by. the
‘readers of Condé Nast gue Ve :

Caer eval Cee

The resort, which a

oh rE Edo featured
in the magazine’s 2005 Read-

ECO (ese. ar Tce POUL
PI CURT MCMC Ko 10a wl oie
- “We owe a great ‘thank:
PCr Oc ees Cad CoC
i Ma a

ee ee tog

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005, PAGE 3B



BiPlivrvite lemony uae
voted fourth top
Atlantic pce aaa

on us; to the travel agents
PVR leita COIL) aC tC al
icated. teams. on’ Harbour
POPC CRT RTC a CMAQ a I B
whose efforts and hard work
enable us to achieve such -
recognition,”-said Pink

' Sands’ general Manager,
Clemens von Merveldt, in a
‘statement. For the Condé .

Nast Traveler award, resorts
were rated in the categories ©

_of rooms, service, food/din-
ing, location, overall Me
LC pau





Award winners judge
financial essay contest

. fessional of the Year; BFSB’s Donna Nguyen-
Comito; and Paul Winder, Ansbacher Bahamas,
Executive of the Year.

Schools participating in the essay and Speech
Competition this year included Aquinas Col-
lege, C.C. Sweeting Senior High, C.R. Walker
Senior High, Galilee Academy, Government
High School, Queen’s College, Saint Andrew’s
School, and Saint Augustine’s College.

THE winners of the 2005 Financial Services
Industry Excellence Awards were selected as
judges for the Essay and Speech Competitions
hosted as part of the annual Financial Services

School Outreach Programme.

HE PHOTO shows (L to R:) Francelyn Bethel,
Oceanic Bank & Trust, Achiever of the Year;
Crestwell Gardiner, The Fidelity Group, Pro- .



Stamp Tax change aids
Government cash flow

FROM page 1B

revenue collection generated a
23.5 per cent increase in total
tax receipts, the Central Bank
said total government spend-
ing also rose by 12.3 per cent.

Mr Smith yesterday, though,

said ié:was difficult to make

comparisons with previous
years-in relation to the Gov-
ernmignt’s finances, as the year-
before: period in 2004-2005
might-for example, included a
major fepayment of debt prin-
cipal;that did not have to be
made-this fiscal year.

He added that the expendi-
ture side of the Government’s
Budget was “very. difficult to
get a’solid grip on”, as it most-
ly consisted of fixed costs such
as salaries, emoluments, wages
and elas Capital spending was



Bahamas faces ‘brain drain’

FROM page 1B

sdqueements of advertising
available positions, that
Bahamians really have a
chance to receive those posi-
tions, We know that the expa-
‘triates are packed and well on
their- way to the Bahamas by
the time the positions are
advertised.”

As a result, Mr Maynard said

also required for infrastructure
projects such as roads and
schools.

Mr Smith. said the fiscal
deficit for 2005-2006 year-end
was likely to be down from the
previous year, but warned that
it was near impossible to pre-
dict so far ahead.

Positive

“T think we will see positive
economic growth, which will
be reflected in the revenues,
but I’m also cautious, particu-
larly in terms of unforeseen cir-
cumstances that might lead to
greater expenditure,” Mr Smith
said.

“We've been spending quite
a bit on security screening
equipment and testing” for all
the Bahamas’ airports and port
points of entry. The Bahamas

work permits had to be
assigned for a specific period
of time and a time set for when
a Bahamian would step into

. the job. Training programmes

for Bahamians should also be

made a condition for compa-.

nies receiving a certain num-
ber of permits.

However, Mr Maynard said
work permits had to be closely
monitored and “all loopholes
closed” to ensure that positions



*
wf
a

MANAGER

Sepenienes requir ed.

Employment
Opportunities

Previous food & beverage or franchise managerial

GAMES SUPERVISOR

Minimum |-year supervisory experience and ability
fo trouble shoot electronic equipment.

CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVES

Previous customer service experience isa plus.

maisrested persons must be able to work shifts

,to the residential communities

®

has to comply with interna-
tional and US guidelines on
port-of-entry security, and have
the right screening equipment
in place, by the deadline of Jan-
uary 1, 2006.

On Hurricane Wilma’s —}
impact, Mr Smith said it*had’ ©
been confined to the northern
Bahamas, and while it had
caused the loss of some hotel
bookings and economic activi-
ty, in addition to devastating
parts of western Grand
Bahama, the effects were not
widespread.

Mr Smith said: “A lot of the
damage in Grand Bahama was

as opposed to the commercial
areas, so while there’s been
some tightening in Grand
Bahama, in relation to the larg-
er economy I don’t think the
effects will be so dramatic.”

were advertised in such a way
as not to exclude Bahamians
by requiring specialist skills,
only for the expatriate
employed not to possess those
skills.

Pricing Information As Of:
01 December 2005

S2wk-Low
Abaco Markets .

‘Placement — and
‘Experience in teaching advanced courses is

CRITERIA FOR EMPLOYMENT

A minimum of a Bachelor's Degree from a
recognized university confirmed by a
certified copy of certificate

A post graduate certificate in education or a
teaching certificate confirmed by a certitie
copy of certificate
Willingness — to

support thé — school’s

Accelerated Programme, including teaching |
Advanced }

courses . such as
Advanced

advanced
Subsidiary

preferred
Two professional references

9

Successful applicants will be expected tol)

make a commitment to work in harmony

with Christian principles and to support the
emphases of the Bahamas Conference of

The Methodist Church of which the school
18 a part.

*

Colina.

Financial Advisors Ltd.

Bahamas Property Fund

Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol

Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Kerzner International BDRs

12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets

10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

20 20 RNB Hold

28.00 ABDAB
13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
x 0.35 RND Moldings
BISX Listed Mutual Funds — i
52wk-Hi __ 52wk-Low “Fund Name _

Colina Money Market Fu

Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund

10.0000
2.1675



QUEEN'S COLLEGE ...

0.00
0.00
0.14
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Last Price
10.00
0.00

41.00
12.50
0.35

Last 12 Months

nd 1.259334"
2.4766 ***

2.275422**

0.08
ieee

Weekly Vol

Div $

Is the oldest private school in The
Bahamas

Ensures a seamless continuity of education
and a strong sense of community
Offers a rich curriculum

Is staffed by a talented and
teaching staff |
Is a place where excellence is respected |
and pursued, where teaching and learning}
are Innovative and w here caring ‘for other
is intrinsic

Offers. a competitive Kieaetits package,
including gratuity, pension, health
insurance, discount on children’s tuition
Queen's College was established in Nassau
in 188) by The Methodist Church and is a
member of The International Association
of Methodist Schools, Colleges and
Universities TAMSCU}

dedicated j



= FIDELITY

O. TAZ
0.070
0.689
-0.046
0.791
0.429
0.428
0.717
0.695
0.675
0.022
0.526
0.526
0.138
2.036

2,000

2,800

EPS $
0.960
0.800
0.000
0.000
0.810
0.000

Yield %

between the hours of 9am & 11pm and available on
weekends and holidays.

1.0755 Colina Bond Fund 1.140599°***
FINDEX! CLOSE 435:630 / YTD 1.321% /.2003 14.88% ‘

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $-Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

BISX ALL SHARE INDE X - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by’ tne last 12 month earnings

**- AS AT AUG. 10, 2005/ ** - AS AT OCT. 31, 2005

- AS.AT OCT. 28, 2005/ *** - AS AT OCT. 31, 2005/ AS AT OCT. 31, 2005

[eo FRabe. CALL: COLIN 282. 302-7010 ie FIDELITY 242- 356-776 - Ae

assport photo to Mr. Pretzels at The Mall at
Marathon.













PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005

THE TRIBUNE

rece mouscomeame
Stocks rise as



fears are dam



“Copyrighted Material

inflation

$l

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

'e® ee & «= wd

PUBLIC NOTICE











CHARTTON, of #7 Coral Reef. Loop Freeport G.B., intend to
change my child’s name from SHAVAN CLAYVON MOXEY. to

this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box F-43536,
Grand Bahama, no later than thirty (30) days.after the date
of publication of this notice.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS -2005
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Commercial Division COM/bnk/00069

~ THE MATTER OF LEADENHALL BANK & TRUST

COMPANY LIMITED
(in Voluntary Limited) :

AND |
IN THE MATTER OF The Companies Act, 1992
- ORDER

~ UPON the Petition of the above-named Company on the 25th
November, 2005 preferred unto Her Ladyship the Honourable
Miss Jeannie Thompson.

AND UPON HEARING Mr. Sidney A. Cambridge, Jr.,
Esquire of Counsel herein for the Petitioner, LEADENHALL
BANK & TRUST COMPANY LIMITED (In Voluntary
Liquidation) (hereinafter referred to as “the Comp: or “the
Bank”).

AND UPON READING the Affidavit of vain Craig A. Gomez,
filed herein on the 22nd November, 2005 verifying the said
Petition, and the. Nassau Guardian of 16th November, 2005
containing the advertisement of the. said Petition, this cant doth
order as follows:

1. That the voluntary winding up of Leadenhall Bank & Trust
Company Limited be continued, but subject. to the supervision
fof this Court;

‘2. that Mr. Craig A. Gomez be ‘appointed Liquidator of the
cOnpany, without security;

a 3. that the Liquidator do ae three (3) weeks from the date
# hereof and‘henceforth every Three (3) months file with the Court
a Repoft in: writing as to the position of and the progress made
| with the windirg- up of the Bank and with the realization (if) any
f of the assets thereof and as to any other matters connected with
| the winding-up of the Bank as the Court may from time to time
f direct such Reports in writing to be sent to any creditor of the
# Bank who shall so request;

, 4. that no bills of cost and other charges, or expenses, or special
gj remuneration of any attoreney employed by the Liquidator of
the Bank, or any remuneration, charges or expenses of such
Liquidator, or any manager, accountant, auctioneer, broker, or
other person be paid out of the assets of the Bank, unless such
costs, charges, expences or remuneration shall hav been taxed
_or.allowed by the Registrar AND IT IS ORDERED THAT all
such costs, charges, expenses and remuneration be taxed and
ascertained accordingly;

5. that all actions or other proceedings against the Bank be stayed
pending further order;

6. that the cost of the Petitioner be taxed and paid out of the

.assets:of the Bank, and that on such taxation the Petitioner’s

costs.to Comprise all-costs of and incidental to the said Petition;
j 7. that the Liquidator have liberty to appoint Messrs. Callenders

& Co., Counsel and Attorneys, to assist him in the peponeare
_ of his duties; and

8. that the Liquidator have liberty to apply for directions to the
Judge in Chambers generally as may be advised.

DATED the 25th day of November, A.D., 2005.
BY ORDER OF THE COURT

REGISTRAR



i<—-* << —*

FROM page 1B

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, ELLA R. MOXEY ©

coming months from island to
island, including next week in
Grand Bahama, until the entire
Bahamas has immediate elec-
tronic access to all the records

nard-Gibson said.
“In January of 2006 we will
launch complete electronic
access to the records of. the
Department, with the sole
exception of intellectual prop-

SHAVAN CLAYVON KELLY. If there are any objections to .





of the Department,” Mrs May-

NOTICE

ANTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000
No.45 of 2000

SHELBIN INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (8) |
of the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of |
2000, the Dissolution of SHELBIN INVESTMENTS |.

LIMITED has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck

off the Registrar. The date of completion of the dissolution | -

was November 18, 2005.

For: Continental Liquidators, Inc,
Liquidator

NOTICE



NOTICE is hereby given that MARCELLIN DOLCE OF #70 BAY |

BERRY LANE OF FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a.citizen of The Bahamas, and that

any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization:|. --

should not be granted, should send a written and signed ‘statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 25TH day of
NOVEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality. and

‘| Citizenship, P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEAN ROBERT JOSEPH,
KEMP ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the

Minister responsible for ‘Nationality and Citizenship, for]...

registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2ND day of DECEMBER, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that HELGENCE OSCAR,
SOUTHERN HEIGHTS, P.O. BOX CR-54802, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for

‘Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 2ND day of
DECEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas..

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ESTHER ANIZEAY OSCAR,
SOUTHERN HEIGHTS, P.O. BOX CR-54802, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 2ND day of
DECEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

erty searches.”

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
the. delivery systems for the ser-
vice were being beta-tested,
with the technology and record
systems to be continually
updated.

She added: “The staff of the
Department has embraced the
challenge of globalisation and
now Bahamians anywhere in
the Bahamas or, indeed, any-
where..in-the world can look

forward to accessing their.

records at the touch of a but-
ton.”

Meanwhile, Mrs Maynard-
Gibson used the statement to
respond to allegations by FNM

~ Senator John Delaney, who
had ‘said the area’ containing:
-corporate files at the Registrar’

General’s Department had

' been contaminated by a sew-

erage back-up.
Describing this as “assolite:
ly wrong”, the minister said

that in July this year, stagnant
-. water from.a clogged basin in

the law firm above the Regis-
trar General’s Department’s 50
Shirley Street office had

escaped on to the floor and
. leaked down into the. Depart-

ment below.
_ Mrs tee -Gibson said:



“Files were immediately cov-
ered in protective plastic and -
out of an abundance of caution
- staff members were given the
option of a short time away
while the area was ventilated
to remove the unpleasant smell
of the stagnant water. There
was no sewerage leak.

“IT went immediately to
investigate the matter, to meet
with our team and to ensure
that every measure was taken
to effectively deal with pe inci-
dent.

“This unexpected incident
was a small challenge, the like
of which is encountered/from
time to time in daily manage-
ment. It restricted the public’s
access to the: Department for
a maximum of.a few hours on
one day in July, not for any
extended period of time as Mr
Delaney would mischievously
like to suggest.”

She added: “In modernising
the Department of the Regis-
trar General, the Ministry of
Financial Services and Invest-
ments has already accom-
plished what the previous
administration failed to’do in
10 years of office. We are com-
mitted to moving forward, not
backward.” ‘

"NOTICE

NOTICE i is hereby given that NADILIA JEAN, FIRE TRAIL
ROAD, P.O. BOX SB-50076, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality,and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason: why
_registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and. signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 25TH day of NOVEMBER, 2005
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,



| P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advisec! triat 1, KEVIN SOLOMAN, of
the Western District, New Pi: ‘dence, Nassau, Bahamas,
intend to change my name to KEVIN TAYLOR. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, LAVITO T. THOMAS,
of Clive Avenue, #229 Explorers Way, Freeport, Grand
Bahama, Bahamas, intend to change my name to LAVITO
T. MARTIN. If there are any objections to this change of
name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this

notice.
PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL’

The Public is hereby advised that |, MARCELLINE
VICTOR, of Southern District, c/o PO.Box N-8522,
Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name to
MERCELLINE VICTORIA SANDS. If there are any
- objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

























THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2905, PAGE 5B



Heads of Agreement process
‘overrides’ local Government

FROM page 1B

“stamp duty, hotel taxes and business
licence fees, there were questions over
‘whether the Government would be
able to finance its own activities.

He said: “Our Islands are treasures
“which we should respect, cherish and
" protect. If we keep entering into these
‘ giveaway Heads of Agreements, there

will be precious little left for Bahami-

‘ans. Further, if we keep giving away

‘tax concessions, how will the country
finance itself? By giving such unnec-
essary generous tax and Crown Land

concessions, the Government is giving
away our patrimony and is eroding
our tax base.

“If none of these developments pay
taxes, where will the Treasury receive
taxes to pay for schocls, hospitals,
roads, police, judiciary and general
government?

“The answer is simple. Those taxes
will be extracted from Bahamian tax-
payers not the foreign investors. The
backs of Bahamians will be broken
so that we can have nice airports, nice
harbours, nice roads, nice landscap-
ing and nice facilities for tourists and
foreign investors to enjoy.”

Mr Smith, who is a resident of and
works in Freeport, urged the Gov-

ernment to focus its national devel-_

opment efforts on that city, arguing
that it already had an investor incen-
tive template in place through the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement:
Arguing that Freeport and Grand
Bahama already had the existing infra-
structure and land space to. accom-
modate large-scale investment pro-
jects, Mr Smith said the Government

should adopt a position that investors ©

seeking Crown Land and tax incen-
tives should be made to invest in
Freeport.

“By aclopting this approach, Gov-
ernment can stimulate the economy in
Freeport and'provide thousands of
jobs and create .an overnight econom-

ic boom:in'Freeport, and coinciden-

tally hundreds of millions of dollars
per annum for the Public Treasury,”
Mr Smith said.

“Freeport, the Golden Goose, has
historically, and even in its depressed
state, contributed $100 to $150 mil-
lion per annum in taxes, of which very
little comes back to Freeport.

“If the developer insists on devel-
oping elséwhere then, subject to
national land use policies, Local Gov-

ernment re environmental,
health, safety and other regulatory
issues, they should be permitted to do
so.

“But they should not receive free
Crown Land and Treasury Land and
get generous exemptions from hotel
taxes, real property taxes, business
licence taxes, stamp duties and cus-
toms duties.” :

* Mr Smith said that by encouraging
investment projects for other Family
Islands, and providing better incen-
tives that under the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement, the Government was dis-
couraging investment in Freeport.

Pur se

‘>? ~“ = -

Available from Commercial News Providers”

“Copyrighted Materia

» 7, oe

I’ ) eo)

Syndicated Content =;

Leadenhall liquidation
now court-supervised

FROM page 1B

held in trust, forcing it to take
vOut the injunction to protect
rand secure the remainder.

« A number of former execu-
caver and directors of Axxess
: International, the now-closed

Bahamian company that
»administered the MasterCard
portfolio on Leadenhall's
‘behalf, were involved with First

JFinancial and wanted to secure .
ithe deposits so they can issue ©.

imew: cards’ to: customers that
swant them..

+ Leadenhall gountered by
nalleging that it transferred at
cleast $19.7 million in security

deposits to First Financial. It
alleged that it had provided
documents showing that the
remaining balance had been

refunded against debts owed ©

to Leadenhall by cardholders,
and had been effecting refunds
from its own assets.

Leadenhall had hired BDO
Mann Judd to perform a foren-
sic accounting of the security
deposits just before it went into
liquidation.

Resolving the First Financial -
, Situation. is likely, to,.be the, . J,
.., biggest: task, facing. liquidator... |’

Craig ‘Tony’ Gomez, of Gomez

Partners & CO, during the liq-

uidation.

INSIGHT

mem Ue Oe TL:
the news, read Insight
on Mondays

1 COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
to. 2004/FA M/div/656
| IN THE SUPREME COURT
| FAMILY DIVISION

Between

BERNARD WENDELL ROLLE
Petitioner

AND

ESTHER MATHILDA ROLLE
Respondent

ADVERTISEMENT OF NOTICE OF PETITION

TAKE NOTICE that an action has been commenced

against you in the Supreme Court, Divorce and Matrimonial |
| Side, Action No. 2004/656 in which the Petitioner has filed |.
| a Petition on the 8th day of November A.D, 2004 seeking }

4 dissolution of marriage. -

AND TAKE NOTICE that it has been ordered by
the Supreme Court that services of the Petition in the said
action be so effected on you by way of advertisement of the:

:| Notice of Peition on two (2) seperate occasions in two (2) of
‘| the daily newspapers.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that you must
within fourteen (14) days from the date of this advertisement
is published, acknowledge service of the said Petition by
completing a prescribed form of Acknowledgement of Service
which may be obtained on request from the Attorneys whose
name and address appear below, otherwise the Petition will
be heard and determined before the Supreme Court without

you.
Dated this Ist day of December A.D., 2005

LUNDY & COMPANY
Chambers

Priderock Corporate Centre
Suite 200, Bay & East Streets
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioner



4

RND HOLDINGS LIMITED SECOND-QUARTER FINANCIALS #4eiee

LAX MW
Dear Shareholder

The financial results for the second quarter ending August 31st,
2005 shows that the company’s financial: position continues :to

move in the right direction. Gross revenue for the six month —

financial period ended August 31st, 2005 showed an increase of
$90,086 over the six month period ended August 31st, 2004 to
$751,372. This outpaced a $46,015. increase’ in. direct costs to
$137,535 and led to a 44,071 improvement in the company’s gross
margin to $613,837 versus $569,766 recorded for the same period:

An. 2004, Operating, expenses remained relatively flat at $739, 054,

$613, 837 led to an operating loss of 125,217 for the six month

financial period ended August 31st, 2005. Notwithstanding the loss °

tecorded for the period this figure evidenced. a $46,890
improvement in the company’s operating loss versus the same
period for 2004 in which a loss of $172,107 was.recorded.

It should be noted that all of the $125,217 operating loss incurred

by the company for the six month financial period ended August:

31st, 2005 could be directly attributable to the gym operation.

Other than the gym operation the company would have recorded’

a break even operating income performance for the six month
financial period.

Finance. costs improved by $127,584 for the period to $177,845
which resulted in a total loss from ‘continuing operations of
$303,062. This compares with loss of $477,536 for the same = period
in 2004.

Based on the continued declining performance of the gym
operation, the Board of Directors and senior management of RND

UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
2ND QUARTER ENDED AUGUST 31, 2005
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)
31st AUG 2005 31st AUG 2004
ASSETS
CURRENT ASSETS:
Cash 98,871 27,760
Accounts receivable 375,179 370,869
Current portion of note receivable * 4 240,000
Prepayments and deposits 20,624 50,320
Inventory 49,912 34,516 -

Other receivables ~ "1027 206,456
Total current assets 545,613 929,921

- 10,075,790
1,063,895
860,000
111,658

263,770 263,770

$11,957,255: $13,305,034

10,536,723
611,149

INVESTMENT PROPERTY.

PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT
NOTE RECEIVABLE ;
INVESTMENT IN ASSOCIATE, AT EQUITY mee
OTHER ASSETS
TOTAL ASSETS

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
CURRENT LIABILITIES:
Bank overdrafts $
Accounts payable and accrued expenses
Current portion of long-term debt
Other liabilities
Total current liabilities

205,172 $
735,277 1,534,833
322,570 299,745 °
102,224" 9,625

” 1,365,243 2,103,393

259,190

LONG-TERM DEBT 3,702,820 4,041,240.

Total liabilities 5,068,063. - 6,144,633
SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY:
Share capital
Share premium
. Contributed capital
Accumulated deficit
Total shareholders’ equity

88,562
5,934,987
3,175,087
2,309,444
6,889,192

88,562
5,934,987
3,175,087
2,038,235.)
7,160,401
$ 11,957,255

TOTAL $ 13,305,034



Holdings has taken the decision to set a final date of December
~ 19th, 2005. to either sell the gym operation or pormaneuy

ear eonnne its operation in the local market.

_ ‘in terms of the company’s balance sheet, Total Assets declined by

$1,347,779: led primarily by a $1,100,000 decline in the note

-receivable account, which reflected the balance of the cinema sales

. - proceeds owed to the company by Galleria Cinemas. The decline in
this account, reflected the company’s decision to discount and sell
this non-interest bearing receivable, in order to pay down interest

_ bearing trade payables and to fund working capital. Consequently

we were able to pay down $799,556.01 52% of trade payables. Long
term debt declined by $338,420 which reflected the continued pay.
down on this debt.as scheduled. Shareholders equity declined by
$271,209. This was all seen in the accumulated deficit account and

“the change reflected the accumulated loss for the ‘six months-

ended August 31, 2005.

We would like to thank you for your continued support and would

like to reassure you that our management team remains resolute in

the objective of realizing a break even position over the forth

coming 12 months with sustained profitability thereafter.

Kenneth M. Donathan
Managing Director

Jeror e K. Fitzgerald
Chairman

UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME
2ND QUARTER ENDING AUGUST 31, 2005
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

31st AUG 2005 31st AUG 2004

:, CONTINUING OPERATIONS:

~ REVENUE . $
~ DIRECT COSTS

Gross margin

751,372 $ 661,286

137,535 ____ 91,520
613,837 569,766

| OPERATING EXPENSES: ©

Administrative 419,470 453,729
Depreciation 73,047 76,437
Other operating 240,930 208,442

Marketing 5,607 3,265

Total operating expenses 739,054 741,873
‘PROFIT/(LOSS) FROM OPERATIONS
OTHER INCOME (EXPENSES):

Finance costs

(125,217) (172,107)

(177,845) (305,429)

Loss from continuing operations (303,062) (477,536)
DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS:
Loss from cinema assets

Repairs at Prince Charles Drive

Cinema location

(| 70,141)
(| 72,958)

Loss from discontinued operations
NET INCOME (LOSS) $

(143,099)

(303,062) $ (620,635)

The above are the unaudited figures of RND Holdings Limited second quarter
2005/2006 financial period. A copy of the audited companies 2005 Annual
Report may be obtained from Colina Financial Advisors Ltd., Goodman's Bay
Corporate Centre, West Bay Street or RND Holdings Limited, RND Plaza West,
John F. Kennedy Drive.





PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005

TRIBUNE SPORTS



for basketba

m@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

AFTER having American
King Rice as head coach of
the men’s basketball team for
the past three years, the
Bahamas Basketball Federa-
tion is expected to have a
Bahamian coach again as they
head into the 2006 campaign.

However, federation’s vice
president Larry Wilson said
they are not at liberty to
announce who will take over
the reigns until they have con-
firmation from one of their
two choices to replace Rice.

Rice, a former team-mate
of former Boston Celtics/Los
Angeles Lakers’ forward Rick
Fox at the North Carolina Tar
Heels, performed under a lot

of criticism from the local

players and coaches.












BBF vice president looks
towards Jamaican event



Y
But Wilson said they were
very proud of his maturity in
handling the entire ordeal and
they’re hoping that, whenever
the new coach is selected, it
wouldn’t be such a rough tran-

sition.

Travel

The federation’s first mis-
sion is to travel to Jamaica
from June 9-18 to participate
in the Senior Caribbean Bas-
ketball Championships for
both men and women.

Wilson said if the Bahamas

finishes in the top three, “we

would qualify for both the
Centro Basket Tournament in
Panama in July and the Cen-
tral American and Caribbean
Games in Columbia in July as
well.

“That gives us two oppor-
tunities to actually qualify for,
the Olympics (in 2008 in Bei-,

jing, China) because if we go

to Centro Basket and we fin-
ish in the top three there, we
would qualify for the tourna-
ment of Americas (in 2007).
If we go to the tournament of
Americas and we finish in the
top four, we would qualify for
the Olympics.”

In going to Jamaica, the

UNDER THE DISTINGUISHED PATRONAGE, OF LADY MARGUERITE PINDLING





Tringil Hanna

K a Nguyen Jillian Evan;

presents







Bahamas would have to fin-
ish in the top three to advance
to the Centro Basket.

A top four place finish
would enable. the Bahamas to
reach the Pan Am Games and
a top fourth spot there will
earn a berth at the Olympics
in 2008.

“This is a critical year for
us,” Wilson stressed.

To prepare the team, Wil-
son said they are trying to

‘build a data base by contacting

as many of the players over-
seas, either in the pro leagues
or college and universities to
inform them of the pending
dates.

“We have heard from some
of them, who have confirmed
that they will work on getting
themselves ready to come
home,” Wilson said. “So

we've also asked them to get

in contact with some of the



other players that they know
about.”

As for the coaching staff,
Wilson said they have con-
tacted two Bahamians, one of
whom is overseas and the oth-
er locally based on coaching
the team.

Programme

“As for King Rice, he did a
lot of things for us and we still
think he is a good person that
can help the programme, but
we don’t want to make a deci-
sion on him until we get the

‘new coaching staff in place,”

Wilson noted.
“We don’t want to put a

-coach in place and he’s not

comfortable working with
him. So we will wait until we
hear from the Bahamian
coach overseas and the one
here before we make any final

SC MCPHERSON’S Samuel Johnson bumps the ball yesterday against HO Nash.



decision.”

Wilson said they have also
contacted a couple of Bahami-
ans in regards to running the
ladies’ national team, but they
won’t reveal their names
either until they have con-
firmed their commitment.

Next year, the junior men’s
national team will also be trav-
elling. This year, they quali-
fied to participate in the Tour-
nament of Americas that will
be held from June 28-July 2
at the St. Mary’s University in
San Antonio, Texas. |

The team, which is expected
to once again be coached by
Mario Bowleg, Ivan Butler
and Dexter Cambridge, will
have to finish in the top four
in order to qualify for the
World Championsinips in
2007.

The junior girls, however,
won't be travelling next year.

Sharks on
the crest
of a wave

SC MCPHERSON SHARKS pose
with their trophies after winning the
Government Secondary School
Sports Association’s 2005 junior vol-
leybail title.

The Sharks beat the HO Nash Lions
in two sets, 25-7 and 25- Aes to win
the series 3-2.

(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)



(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)



ee

SPORTS







‘Syndicated Content

avon ref a

‘AVailable from'( sommercial News Providers”

Akmal curb nn.
England plans







— —_ ———_ + = _—s
=e ~~. — oo ©&
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. The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
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If so, call us on 322-1986
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"Fax: 323-7272 © infa@nassaumatancem
www.chevrolethbahamas.cam






FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005

SECTION

‘ax: (242) 328-2398 ©

'â„¢ BOXING
L GARTH WRIGHT
TOURNEY

CHAMPION Amateur
Boxing Club will continue its
12th L Garth Wright Golden
Gloves Boxing Tournament
on Saturday at the First
Class Boxing Club on Wulff
Road at 5pm.

It started in October and
will wrap up on December
10.





TENNIS
LYFORD CAY
EXHIBITION

TODAY between the
hours of 3.45-5pm, world:
renowned tennis stars Mark
Knowles, Daniel Nestor,
Niocole Vaidisova and Ryan
Sweeting, among others, will
play an exhibition match at
the Lyford Cay Club. Auto-
graphs will be signed (tennis
balls given away for auto-
graphs) and refreshments
served. The event is part of
the fundraising campaign for
the LCC Endowment Fund. -

if BASKETBALL
SPECIAL OLYMPICS

TEAMS from Grand
Bahama, Long Island, New
Providence, Stapledon
School, Barbados and St.
Kitts & Nevis will participate
in Special Olympics
Bahamas Basketball Invita-
tional at the Jack Hayward
High School Gym in Grand
Bahama today and Saturday.

Games however, will be
played throughout the day.



Here's a look at the fixtures:

Jam - Grand Bahama
vs Stapledon.

10.15am New Providence
vs St. Kitts & Nevis.

11.30pm Long Island
vs Barbados.



12.45pm Stapledon
vs New Providence.



2pm Grand Bahama
vs Barbados.

3.15pm St. Kitts & Nevis
vs Long Island.

7pm Opening Ceremony.
Barbados vs Stapledon.
Long Island
vs New Providence.
Entertainment.
St. Kitts & Nevis v
Grand Bahama.





Ba abana eadeh
adel for BBF

AFTER having American
King Rice as head coach of the
men’s basketball team for the
past three years, the Bahamas
Baskctball Federation is expect-
ed to have a Bahamian coach
again as they head into the 2006
campaign.





° See page 6B

a

SRE STG Ty





E-Mail sports@100jamz.com

eM hea LIers ea Th trea eee ee







Boat: Be ES BESO

i SC MCPHERSON’S
Prince Pinder spikes the ball
during the win against H O
Nash yesterday at the
A F Adderely gym.
(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune Staff)








































































P.O. Box

Telephone:

@ VOLLEYBALL
By BRENT STUBBS.
Senior Sports Reporter

THE .SC- McPhers@a
Sharks saved their best game
of the season for the grand
finale as they swept the HO
Nash Lions in two straight
gamies to clinch the Govern-
ment Secondary Schools
Sports Association’s 2005
junior volleyball title.

The Sharks fed the Lions
a steady diet of spikes, dinks,
blocks and service aces in

pulling off a 25-7 and 25-17

victory on Thursday at the
AF Adderley Gym to secure
a 3-2 decision in the best-of-
five finals.

“It was a long time com-

ing, but I must say I’m thank-:

ful to God and SC McPher-

son for giving me such a

group of boys with a lot of
talent,” said Sharks’ coach
Rodney Farquharason.

“We worked hard for this
all season long, but nothing
happens before it’s time. I
thought we would have been
able to do it yesterday (in
game four), but today was
our day to shine.”

Advantage

SC McPherson, producing
one of the biggest line-ups in

‘the league, took advantage.

of their height as Prince Pin-
der got started early in the
first quarter and his perfor-
mance rubbed off on Samuel
Johnson, who came alive at
the other end of the front-
court.

Together, they helped the
Sharks to race‘out to a quick
4-1 lead and they extended
it to 11-2 with Jarret Miller
serving. Miller would extend
the lead to 16-2 on a couple
of aces.

Then on rotation, Pinder
went to the line and served
from 17-5 to 24-6 with a cou-
ple of aces of his own as team
captain Lorenzo Williams
controlled the front court.

The only thing left for HO
Nash to do was serve the ball
out as SC McPherson went
on to secure the fitst set.

In the second set, the Lions
regrouped and switched the
lead with the Sharks as they
played to an 8-8 tie.

But, after SC McPherson

“surged ahead 12-8, HO

Nash’s coach Preston Albury
pulled-his setter, Graham
Bain, to settle him down.

' By the time he put him
back in the game, the Sharks

nary action.

Rarquhatso)

























HO Na
Made anotl
back. for a@
ing coach F
a time outs







squad. |
Realisig@ ahey were
only two Sway from

the. thril@ageeeytory, th



out and got Game spike fre
Williams an@ Pinder sealéd
the deal with ah ace for thé

_ 25-17 win and the title. © «2

“We prayed in the bus anid.
we came back. and playdd
well: today,” Williams
stressed, “We knew we could
do it. Sree

“We? re just happy tha
are the champions.” —

Counting

While Bain had an off-day
at the office; coach Albury
was counting’ on Juedé¢
Robinson” and Daniel
Williams to make up the diff
ference, especially withoug
the service of.Trevan Gran@
who didn’t play:the last three
games because: of: a disciply







Coach Albury: 3 bid theif

‘problem Was; § imply, that

played better
defence, it'would:have been:a
better: games" he insisted.
“We-couldn’tsplay the way



‘we did’‘and beat this team.”

On his decision to pull
Bain .at.a critieal time in the
game, coach, af bury said as
the sétter,;he had to take
charge of the;team.

/"H6 tried, to blame arere:
one else,” Albury noted. “We
were down 1-0. and we nee:
ed him to step up and set the
ball

“Whatever problems the
Lions encountered, coach
said they were
cutectuine ‘not to allow HO
Nagh 0 fake a‘double dosé
‘of victory after their junige
girlg Won their title in thse
straight games.

“We knew. that. with oir
size, it would have-been dif











ficult for any team out thére

to beat us,” Farquharson stat¢

-ed. “We just: didn’t play-as

well as we’ré capable of play¢
ing when wé lost the twe
games.

“But today,: 1 couldn’t asd
them to play:any better :
was obvious that:they, wan
the title and they played :
way:” cae :








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Dolphins vs. Jets

Cell:

__|_____SORRY NO PHOTOCOPIES, NEWSPAPER PRINT ON







Full Text


(My The

i'm fovir’ it.

Volume: 102 No.11









Two assault rifles are.

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seized within a week

@ By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

WITH two Russian AK 47s
being confiscated within the
span of a week, police warn that
under ordinary circumstances,
if such a weapon were in the
hands of “the wrong person”,
they could easily outgun a
police officer.

Also known as the Kalash-
nikov, the AK 47 has a “killing
range” of 1,500 metres and can
fire 600 rounds of ammunition a
minute. Traditionally, only
police and military officers have
access to such weapons.

Developed for motorised
~ infantry by the Soviet Army in
1949, the AK 47 has built a sub-
stantial reputation as a “gueril-
la weapon” among revolution-

aries and weapons enthusiasts
for its reliability under the worst
possible conditions.

Therefore, police are encour-
aging the public to continue to
support them in their attempts
to rid the streets of such high-
powered weapons.

On Wednesday, police found
an AK 47 with a full magazine
of ammunition at a home off
Soldier Road, days after find-
ing another such weapon
onboard a sloop anchored in
the harbour off Arawak Cay.

Reginald Ferguson, assistant
commissioner in charge of
crime, admitted that such a
weapon is “substantially more
sophisticated and powerful”
than a weapon a police officer
would have on normal patrol.

SEE page 11

Pn





@ PAUL ADDERLEY is sworn in as Acting Governor-General
by Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall. Prime Minister Perry Christie

(background left) looks on.

(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)

SHIP BAHAMIAN

Betsy Rodriquez
St. Johns Shipping
Ware House #4
1800 S.E. 19th Ave.
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316
Phone: 1 (954) 527-0034
Fax: 1 (954) 522-4828





Tel: (242) 393-2628
Fax: (242) 394-0847

Tel: (242) 351-1501

lm By NATARIO MCKENZIE

Tribune





es

JENNIFER Johnson (left)
and Joerezz Abraham of
Oakes Field Primary School,
perform at the College of the
Bahamas ‘A Gift To Our
Community — an afternoon of
Carols & Cheer’ yesterday.
(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)















Ministry team tours —
China in preparation
for potential visitors.

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

Search for men
missing at sea

POLICE on Cat Island are searching for two
men who disappeared at sea on Wednesday
after their vessel capsized.

Press liaison officer Walter Evans said
Rudolph Hart, Godfrey Pearce, Mervin Davis
and Nathaniel Larimore, all of Old Bight, Cat
Island, were on board a 14-ft vessel near Green-
wood, Cat Island, after 9am on Wednesday
when they encountered rough waters.

SEE page 11

TAKING first steps to prepare for poten- :
tially millions of Chinese visitors to the }
Bahamas in the near future, a Ministry of :
Toursim team is touring China on a fact-find-
ing mission. ;

Senior tourism officials are in talks with :
Chinese government officials and tour opera- }

SEE page 11

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Carl Bethel hits
out at Mitchell’s
visa claims

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

CLAIMS by Foreign Affairs
Minister Fred Mitchell that mem-
bers of the former FNM govern-
ment used their positions to
obtain visas for foreign nationals
are nothing more than a diver-
sionary tactic, Senator Carl
Bethel said yesterday.

“They are nothing more than
red herrings thrown out to divert
public attention away from the
very serious allegations made,”
he told the Senate.

Minister Mitchell in a state-
ment to the House of Assembly
on Wednesday said that Mr
Bethel had misled the public with
claims of the minister’s involve-
meént in the issuance of visas.

Mr Mitchell further refuted Mr
Bethel’s claim that the number
of visas issued to Chinese nation-
als had quadrupled since he came
to office.

However, in his communica-
tion to the Senate yesterday, Mr
Bethel said that he never alleged

SEE page 11

Man wanted
in connection
with murder
expected to
appear in court

i By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - A third man,
wanted in connection with mur-
der, is expected to be arraigned
in the Magistrate’s Court in
Freeport on Friday.

Assistant press liaison officer
Loretta Mackey said the 18-
year-old suspect is to be charged
in connection with the shooting
death of 34-year-old Tanya Pin-
der.

The teenager is believed to
be a resident of Beginning Dri-
ve, South Bahamia.

Ms Pinder, an office clerk,
was shot to death during an
attempted armed robbery on
November 25 at Cool Breeze
Apartments on ‘Hudson
Avenue. :

Two persons, Raymond Dar-
ling, 22, and a 17-year-old juve-
nile, were charged Wednesday
in connection with the matter.
Darling was also charged with

SEE page 11


PAGE 2, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005



LOCAL NEWS

’
bE re wd

done senaie “be seman th Senin mee an! a MgB LU a A AR ALASTAIR EE ATRIAL REET TACT



Residents demand action
on barge from government

i By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

CONCERNED environmentalists
and Abaco residents are urging the gov-
ernment to ensure that a gounded
barge causing irreparable damage to
the area’s coral is removed quickly.

For most of the year, fishermen have
complained that the Louis J Goulet a
220-foot Canadian oil drill barge poses
a threat to the reefs surrounding the
Abacos.

Exuma residents have also raised
concerns that the barge has been seen
floating in shallow waters near one of
the country’s national parks at Con-
ception Islands.

The barge was taken from Exuma to
Walker’s Cay, where it remained until
it was displaced again during Hurri-
cane Wilma.

It now sits near Man-O-War Cay —
another environmental rich area,
according to the Bahamas National
Trust Director Eric Carey.

He told The Tribune that the trust
has been very concerned about the
damage the displaced barge may pose
on the environment.

Mr Carey said that based on video he
has seen, the barge is clearly resting on
and destroying the coral bed.

“It is patently obvious that it is caus-
ing direct, immense and substantial
damage.”

He said he was amazed and outraged
that the boat has yet to be removed,
adding that the size of the vessel and the
weight of the anchor on the coral bed
has probably caused irreparable damage.

He added that he was aware that the
boat had leaked sludge and said while
he was not aware that any oil had
escaped, it could become a possibility
should the boat capsize.

Mr Carey added that until the barge
can be removed, experts would not be
able to go in and assess damage.

To add to the problem, residents say
the barge has now taken in water, which
only compounds the problem.

“We really need an engineer to come
in and assess the best way ‘to remove
the boat,” a resident told The Tribune.

They said that there is no equipment
on the island capable of removing the

barge, particularly watle the noaes water

weight.

@ THE oil barge Louis J Goulet,
which is stranded on a reed off Abaco

Whoever moves the boat may have
to weld the boat underwater- which
would entail adding a layer of metal
over the hole and airbagging the boat
and move it in pieces, or airbagging the
barge and refloat, they said. Whatever
method, is used, there would be con-
siderable expense involved.

Early last month, the Port Depart-
ment under Captain Anthony Allans
has said they had contacted the owners
of the vessel — the Liberty Oil Compa-
ny whom, they claim, have assured
them that they were working to move
the barge quickly.

However, to date nothing has hap-
pened.

_Neither Captain Allans or Liberty

president Kermit Waters could be
‘ reached for comment.

The Ministry of Tourism

In Cooperation with

The Bahamas Hotel Association's Annual

General Meeting

Presents

ra tie
Craft Show

MOTHS featuning:

Christmas ornaments & aseessories





Turks and

Caicos group
give S34k for.
hurricane ail.

FREEPORT - A charitable
group from the ‘Turks ane
Caicos Islands has contributed)
$34,000 in hurricane relief aid
during a humanitarian trip to
Grand Bahama on Thursday. -”

Bishop Colleta Willams and
his wife, Chiquita, of Abundanit
Life in the Turks and Caicos,
organised a fundraising drive
called “Operation Grand
Bahama” to raise money {0
assist victims of Hurricane
Wilma.

He made a contribution éf
$22,500 to the Grand Bahama
Christian Council, and $12,000
to NEMA during a lunch host:
ed by the GBCC at Our Lucaya

§ Resort.

Bishop Williams and a group
of religious, community, and
governmeni leaders [lew to
Freeport by private charter
flight donated by SkyKing.
Accompanying him were the
Minister of Education, Youth,
and Sports.and Gender Affairs.
Dr Lillian Boyce and Leader of
the Opposition Derek ‘Taylor. «

GBCC president Bishop
Ricardo Grant took them on a
tour of storm-ravaged settle
ments of Mack Town, Hunters,
Lewis Yard and Pinder's Point.

Bishop Williams said mem»
bers of “Operation Grant
Bahama” would continue to
raise funds through a telethon
to assist those in need on Gr any
Bahama.

“We have solicited and can-
vassed across the Turks ang
Caicos to be aisle to raise funds.
We are delighted to be here
share with our brothers and sis-
ters in Grand Bahama, and sim-
ply to say we care and we loved
them,” he said.

Education Minister Dr Lil¥
lian Boyce said: “We bring
words of encouragement anté
cheer to you from the govern
ment and our people. Our chief

: minister came before and now
i the church is coming and | think
: itis very good that the church is
coming to our brothers and sif+
ter’s rescue,” she said. ;

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Solomon & Associates.

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But if anything should happen to me | know they are still protected.
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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, DECEMbEN 2, cuud, rAUE 3





Pink Sands
voted top
Atlantic
resort

HARBOUR ISLAND -
Readers of Condé Nast Trav-
eler Magazine have voted Pink
Sands on Harbour Island the
number four top Atlantic
Ocean resort with a rating of
83.3 per cent.

The results of the publica-
tion’s 2005 Readers' Choice
Awards are published in the
November issue.

“We owe a great ‘thank you’
to our guests who took the time
to cast their votes for us; to the
travel agents and partners, and
to our dedicated teams on Har-
bour Island and around the
world, whose efforts and hard
work enable us to achieve such
recognition,” said general man-
ager Clemens von Merveldt.

For the Condé Nast Traveler
award, resorts were rated in the
categories of rooms, service,
food/dining, location, overall
design and activities/facilities.

Every year since 1988, a
select sample of Condé Nast
Traveler readers have taken the
Readers Choice Survey.

In 2005, the questionnaire
was made available to 387,205
subscribers.

The final tabulations of
27,957 responses were done by
Mediamark Research of New
York City.

$50,000
of relief to
children
with AIDS

SCOTIABANK has donated
$50,000 to help bring relief to
children with AIDS. ;

Management and staff pre-
sented the cheque to Dr Perry
Gomez, AIDS Secretariat to
the Bahamas, yesterday, which
was recognised as National
AIDS Day.

Scotiabank’s managing direc-
tor Minna Israel said the funds
would be used to purchase a
testing machine capable of
detecting AIDS in children two
years and under.

The testing machine, known
as a‘ DNA/PCR machine, is the
gold:standard in the diagnosis of
HIV/AIDS in children, the
bank said in a statement.

Through various internal and
extérnal projects, Scotiabank’s
teani members raised half the
money, and were matched by
the: Scotiabank head office in
Canada.

CARICOM
to monrtor
St Viecent
e@te« frome

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

Rene eis
. Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

: A eee
: Ce A) o/





@ By KARIN HERIG and
CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporters

IN WHAT some saw as his official
expulsion from the Free National Move-
ment, Bamboo Town MP Tennyson
Wells was told by party leader Hubert
Ingraham that he is “no longer an
FNM”.

Mr Ingraham’s statement came while
congratulations were being extended
to him by the government and inde-
pendent MPs for assuming the position
of leader of the official opposition.

Mr Wells noted that Mr Ingraham
had said he was committed to trans-
parency, accountability and high ethical
standards in the House of Assembly.

“I am sure the member will do what
he has to do and J hope that he will
uphold the standards that he espoused.
I trust we will see that in action during
the course of the remaining tenure of
this particular parliament.

“We will be watching both sides (gov-
ernment and opposition), and we will
leave no stone unturned to let the peo-
ple know when we See injustice or
wrong-doing taking place or when we

BPSU of









Ei MP Tennyson Wells

have to alert the public to people who
say one thing and (do) something else,”
Mr Wells said.

It was his next comment that
prompted the opposition leader to
respond. “I want to say that the FNM —
my party — did what they thought was
best for them at this time and I wish

them well,’ Mr Wells said.

Mr Ingraham immediately stood up
and said that in his capacity as party
leader, “I declare that he (Mr Wells) is
no longer an FNM.”

“Knowing the member for North
Abaco, | understand why he would
make a comment like that, it tells me
that he has not changed,” was Mr Wells’
response.

He added that in any democratic sys-
tem, there is a method for dealing with
members who may be out of order.

“Tf Tam out of order, if I have done
anything wrong to anybody then I
would ask that there be a public cry
and let them lay their charges,” he said.

St Margarets MP Pierre Dupuch said
the FNM he knew would have not
“arbitrarily” expelled a member.

-He said it was customary to send
notices to members that are to be
expelled, in which the reasons for their
expulsion are explained.

Mr Dupuch said that considering Mr
Ingraham’s ambition of returning to
office, he would caution the Bahamian
people that the populist president of
Venezuela, Hugo Chavez, was democ-
ratically elected, too.



i BY NATARIO MCKENZIE

BAHAMAS Public Services
Union (BPSV) officials sought
to set the record straight yes-
terday on the recently signed
five-year industrial agreement
with the government.

The BPSU officials said mis-
understandings about the con-
tract have caused misconcep-
tions to arise among their
members.

Speaking at a press confer-
ence yesterday, BPSU presi-
dent John Pinder said that
many public servants are con-
fused about the “lump sum”
payouts that are referred to in
the agreement.

“One of the misconceptions

was that they were getting $100,

dollars added to their retroac-
tive pay ($600) and that was a
one-time thing. But the $100
is permanent and will be added

to the base salary,” Mr Pinder:

explained.
Mr Pinder said that the $700

-retroactive pay that public ser-

vants will receive today is
inclusive of $100 for the pur-

We're Celebrating ASN) SINE SISTA TLL

Thursday........
aa .

chase of Christmas ham and
turkey, as the union will not
be able to provide this service
this year because, it will be
making contributions to hur-
ricane relief efforts instead.

Mr Pinder explained that the
$100 increase will continue to
be added to monthly pay from
January to June 2006, along
with an additional $50.

In July 2006, the beginning
of the government’s fiscal year,
an additional $50 will be added
to the base salary of all public
servants.

Mr Pinder assured that the
increases will be paid with
increments.

Increments, he said, can

amount to anywhere:between .-.:
$400 to $1,000.and.are,




the anniversary of the day a
person joined the public ser-
vice.

In year three of the con-
tract, a compensation study
will be done to evaluate work-
er performance and efficiency.

In year four, there will be an
additional $63 per month
added to base salary.

(Uti Ronee i fies
CIA UO Se

mum of his or he salary scale



‘wants to’ increase the pay of

In year five (2009) there will
be a high performance evalua-
tion study. This means that “an
employee who is at the maxi-

and achieves an above aver-
age performance appraisal rat-
ing may be awarded a lump
sum payment equal to the
increment of his or her salary.”

Mr Pinder called this a “mer-
it pay” system used to evaluate
persons who hold similiar posi-
tions.

Keith Archer, the govern-
ment’s industrial relations con-
sultant, said that teachers will
not receive any salary increas-
es as the Bahamas Union of
Teachers did not agree to the
five-year deal.

‘He said the government

teachers and is willing to work
out a deal with the Bahamas
Union of Teachers as soon as
possible.

Mr Archer also clarified
rumours that increments could
be taken away, explaining that
this is not so.



The Miall-a
BOX OFFICE OPENS AT 10:00 AM DAILY

‘ THE MIX



| HARRYPOTIER. CT POTTER
FT RICH OR DIE TR
DERAILED

Bahamasair
denies planes
grounded in
Miama

BAHAMASAIR has refuted a dai-
ly newspaper report which claimed
that a number of its planes were
impounded in Miami on Wednesday.

The airline’s managing director Paul
Major said yesterday that the report,
published in the Nassau Guardian,
was incorrect.

Mr Major said that the Bahamasair
flight number 230 was not seized by
US Customs, but cancelled to avoid a
possible heavy fine because the air-
line’s bond was not up to date.

Mr Major said that Bahamasair had
decided not to operate the 6.40pm
flight out of Miami after learning that
their bond had “surprisingly expired”.

“It seems that while our insurance
carrier had issued the bond, it did not
reach US Customs in Miami in time
for a bond number to be assigned due
to the Thanksgiving holiday,” he said
in press statement.

Arrangements for Bahamasair pas-
sengers to be transported to and from
Miami and Fort Lauderdale were
made immediately to minimise any
inconvenience to them while the situ-
ation was being dealt with, Mr Major
said.

He added that the matter was final-
ly resolved with the co-operation of
US Customs in Nassau and in Mia-
mi, and that the aircraft was able to
operate the last flight out of Miami on
Tuesday night.

All services into Florida operated as
normal yesterday and “will continue
to do so,” Mr Major said.

Down Town Nassau

- Two Storey Building
4,700 sq. feet ground floor
_ 4,700 sq. feet first floor
Serious inquires only -

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE:



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”



289 Market St. South ¢ ¢ P.O. Box N-7984 ¢ Nassau, Bahamas
I «in a world of superlatives, ‘God is
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Fax: 326-4488/394-4819

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Invite application for the following positions:

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* Journals

* Gift Items Galore
* Books/ Bibles/ Bible Cases

BTC’s eighty
per cent
hike in rates

EDITOR, The Tribune

PLEASE permit me space to
comment on the Public Utili-
ties Commission’s (PUC) recent
rubber-stamping of the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company’s (BTC) 80 per cent
rate hike on business customers.
BTC’s request to burden resi-
dential customers with a 58 per
cent increase received similar
endorsement.

The PUC noted, however,
that it could not impose stan-
dards on BTC to force the com-
pany to deliver some modicum
of service quality to its cus-
tomers.

I was out of the country when

‘BTC tendered its rate increase

application. I was again out of
the country when public meet-
ings to discuss the proposed
increases were held.

As J understand it, BTC prof-
fered that line rates had to be
increased because long distance
revenues had fallen dramatical-
ly due to recently introduced
competition. Competition forced

BTC to reduce rates 50 per cent ©

in its long distance arena.

Cable Bahamas, with cable
service already existing to a
majority of Bahamas house-
holds, can readily provide tele-
phone service to such house-
holds. Competition reduced the
oppressive long distance rates
subscribers were paying. It will
be interesting to see the impact
competition will have on line
rates which BTC had described

Daa M PS

letters@tribunemedia.net




as being “below cost”.

The Bahamas lags far behind
most other Caribbean locations
in liberalising the telecommu-
nications market place.

Cellular telephone service is
another arena where competi-
tion can be readily introduced.
Handled properly, liberalisation
of cell phone service can prove
a win-win situation for the Gov-
ernment and cellular phone
subscribers. The Jamaican Gov-
ernment successfully sold three
cell phone licenses to Cable and
Wireless’ (C&W) competitors
for close to US$100 million.
Digicel, whose cell phone cus-
tomer base now exceeds that of
C&W, paid US$45 manon for
its license.

Competition forced rates to
plummet and service quality to
improve.

BTC’s announced $50 million
southern Bahamas fibre cable
installation, made shortly after
Cable Bahamas received
approval for its southern
Bahamas fibre optic cable link

(following protracted regulato- .

ry and environmental deliber-
ations), is deserving of mention.

Cable Bahamas’ installation is
to pass through the southern
Bahamas and tie into cable sys-
tems owned by its partners,
facilitating improved communi-

cations between Jamaica, the
US mainland, and beyond.
Cable Bahamas can anticipate
earning significant revenues
from its investment. Cable sub-
scribers in the southern
Bahamas will experience
improved service as a consée-
quence of the cable’s routing: :

The capacity for BTC to earn
adequate revenues from the
southern Bahamas islands
(where its cable is to terminate),
to justify its investment, does
not presently exist and will like-
ly not exist over the anticipated
life of the cable.

Furthermore, BTC can easily
avoid the significant capital
investment by contracting-to
lease excess fibre capacity (dark
fibre) in the Cable Bahamas
cable.

BTC’s cable, like Cabté
Bahamas’, will have the poten;
tial to facilitate communications
to locations further afield, such
as the Dominican Republic,
Haiti, Cuba and Jamaica, and
thus provide a healthy revenue
stream to the company. .

Efforts must either be diréct-
ed towards harnessing such
potential, or the proposed cap-
ital expenditure, which has seri-
ous cost implications for BTC’s
customers, should be scrapped
and BTC should look to piggy-
back on the Cable Bahamas
venture.

MICHAEL R MOSS
Freeport, Bahamas
November 22 2005

seeseecensecenceeeeseeseeeeee eee sense eee ee eases eee ee eee ee nese ees eeeeesereneese seas set een en ensees ene eennc ene eneees es sneeeneneeeesensensnee eee esenseneerensseserenasernssrasesnsensnesseses esses senda seeds

ZNS tapes could |
clear up this matter

EDITOR, The Tribune

I READ The Tribune of
December 1 2005 and am very
surprised to hear Mr Keod
Smith deny that he made a com-
ment in the House of Assem-
bly about blood letting or blood
spilling.

I watched the proceedings of
Parliament on Wednesday,
November 23, 2005 and the
audio which came across was
clear that someone behind
where Opposition Leader
Hubert Ingraham and Deputy
Leader Brent Symonette were
sitting made a remark about
blood.

I would think it to be a simple

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Director of Human Resources
P.O. Box CB-13005
Email: cmajor@srb.sandals.com

-* Gift Cards

* Nativities & Other Christmas Decor Items

Rosetta St. @ Mt. Royal Ave.

Ph # 322-1306



matter for the ZNS tapes of
Wednesday, November 23, 2005
to be obtained, viewed and this
matter cleared up to determine
who said what if Mr Smith or
any of his colleagues want the

_ truth brought to life so that-we

the Bahamian public know the
truth.

A CONCERNED
BAHAMIAN
Eleuthera
December 1 2005

(We also had a call from a

- television viewer informing us

that the exchange between
Keod Smith and Mr Ingraham,

’ which our reporters could not

hear in the House, was picked
up by ZNS microphones and
was heard by the listening pub-
lic. They said that after Mr
Ingraham announced that:he
would be officially sworn ini ‘as
House leader on Monday they
distinctly heard the voice of a
person sitting behind Mr Ingra-
ham remark: “Let the blood-
letting begin!” They were satis-
fied that the voice was that of
Mount Moriah MP Keod
Smith.

(Mr Smith has denied dhe he
spoke the words. Therefore, as
the Eleutheran letter writer sug-

. gests the truth will-be:found, Lon

TV-13’s video tapes for, Novein:
ber 23. —Ed).

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS|

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005, PAGE





In brie |



Ministry’s
message of
sympathy
for teacher

WHILE staff and students at
Garvin Tynes Primary School
are undergoing counseling ses-
sions after the death of the ©
school's principal Vanessa
Munroe-Coakley, the Ministry
of Education is sending formal
condolences to her family.

Minister Alfred Sears
expressed sorrow at Ms
Munroe-Coakley's death, say-
ing she was “a devoted educator
of 38 years".

The ministry noted that she
served as a primary school
teacher for many years before
being promoted to senior mis-
tress and then vice Principal at
Cleveland Eneas Primary
School.

She served as the principal of
Garvin Tynes since the school’s
inception in 1999.

Ms Munroe-Coakley is cred-
ited with setting a high standard
at Garvin Tynes, one which
earned the institution recogni-
tion from private and public
educators.

School
plans
steak-out
fundraiser

THE Parent and Teachers
Association of Xavier’s Lower
School plans to hold a steak-
out on Saturday, December 3,
in the school’s grounds on West
Bay Street.

_-The steak-out, the school’s
major annual fund-raising
event, will be held from noon
to 5pm.

The school, with an enrol-
ment of more than 400 students,
is headed by Principal Cynthia
Moss. Ms Denise Cooper is the
vice principal.

Farm Road
marching
band to play
concert

THE Farm Road Urban
Renewal Project will present its
marching band in concert on
Sunday, December 4.

.The concert is being held
under the patronage of Prime
Minister Perry Christie and Mrs
Bernadette Christie.

It will take place at the Wyn-

dham Nassau Resort and Crys-
tal. Palace Casino on Cable
Beach at 7pm. ,
: For more information or to
buy tickets, contact the Farm
Road Project office at 323-5314
or 323-5326.

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‘FOCOL considers puttin
Shell on stock mark

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

IN the wake of the successful purchase
of Shell Bahamas’ retail market, FOCOL
director Franklyn Wilson announced yes-
terday that the company is now examining
the option of making Shell a publicly trad-
ed company.

Speaking at the presentation of a
$250,000 cheque by the Action Bahamas
Committee to victims of Hurricane Wilma,
Mr Wilson took a moment to speak to the
press about FOCOL’s recent purchase.

“It was about a year ago Shell began
soliciting investors for the purchase of
their investments in the Bahamas as well
as in the Turks and Caicos. It was a very
extensive process, and FOCOL along with
a goodly number of others participated in
it. So it took virtually a year to come to
fruition,” he explained.

Mr Wilson painted out that FOCOL is
already one of the most successfully trad-
ed companies in the history of the
Bahamas International Stock Exchange
and will continue to provide opportuni-
ties for other investors to participate.

“In the first instance, we are doing an
offering for $25 million dollars of perpet-
ual preferred shares. Those are being han-
dled by Colina Financial Services. Subse-
quently there will be opportunities for
other investments. We believe in wide

Mr Wilson said that selling price for
Shell’s interest was actually far more than
the previously reported $25 million.

“This deal would not have been possible
unless one was able to command and
organise some $60 million, in terms of
consideration, and in terms of guarantees
to be provided,” he said.

Mr Wilson said FOCOL wants to let
station dealers know that the company

will guarantee them excellent service and
the best possible prices on oil products.

He pointed out that FOCOL had low-
ered its fuel prices in Grand Bahama despite
constant mark ups in New Providence.

Mr Wilson said the company will con-
tinue to behave “in the national interest”
at all times.

_ We are Bahamians, we don’t see this is
a short term investment. We are here for the







long haul. So when appropriate
and when required we musi do
things in the national interest.
“Our shareholders have got
to sacrifice, realising that in the
long run everyone benefits.
That’s our philosophy and we
hold it very deeply,” he said.



















Bian
DECEMBER













diversification in ownership.

“We have options - we can either issue
more shares in Freeport Oil or we can in fact
make Shell a publicly traded company. We

@ FRANKLYN Wilson presents the $250,000 cheque to Perry Christie on behalf of
the Action Bahamas Committee, wacthed by from FNM ministerAlgernon Allen

and Bishop Neil Ellis \

are examining that as an option,” he said.

Warning to ‘disaster prone’ Caribbean

THE Bahamas and other
small countries in the
Caribbean are now part of
one of the most disaster-prone
regions of-the world, an
expert has warned.

And the prospect of
increased hurricane activity
over the next 20 years is all
down to the lifestyles of big-
ger countries, said ex-diplo-
mat Sir Ronald Sanders.

The Caribbean itself is
responsible for less than one
per cent of global greenhouse

gas emissions. Yet, over the
last 30 years, the seven small-
est eastern Caribbean states
ranked in the top ten in terms
of natural disasters per square
mile.

Sir Ronald’s disturbing
assessment came during a lec-
ture in London to UK gov-
ernment officials, business-
men and foreign diplomats.

Between 1995 and 2005,
hurricane damage in the
wider Caribbean ran into bil-
lions of dollars, making the
region poorer and setting
back economies.

“The wider Caribbean is
one of the most disaster. prone
regions of the world for rea-
sons of geography, and now,
increasingly, because of the
lifestyles of larger countries
whose greenhouse gas emis-
sions are contributing to glob-
al warming,” he said.

Sir Roland, speaking at Lon-
don Metropolitan University,
repeated experts’ fears that the
Atlantic has entered a period
of heightened storm activity
that could Jast 20 more years.

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“Nothing emphasises this
more than the 2005 Atlantic
hurricane season which wit-
nessed the naming of a record
number of 24 storms and 12
hurricanes that inflicted bil-
lions of dollars in damage and
considerable loss of life.”

Meanwhile, The IJnterna-
tional Herald Tribune had
reported scientists’ fears that
irreversible warming was
already happening and would
continue for a century even if
pollution emissions were con-
trolled by the Kyoto Protocol.

He said: “Although the sci-
entific community appears to
be divided on the extent of
the damage to the world’s
environment from climate
change and the length of time
that it will take for such dam-
age to be irreparable, the fact
is that damage is being done
now.

“A further fact is that small
islands of the Caribbean and
elsewhere are. already suffer-
ing as are the coastlines of
many countries which can ill-
afford the high cost of contin-
uously maintaining sea
defences.

Sir Ronald hit out at the
United States for its refusal
to sign the Kyoto Protocol.
He said smaller Caribbean
countries were left powerless
as they suffered the effects of
global warming without con-
tributing to it in any signifi-
cant way.

“So, where does this all
leave countries in the wider
Caribbean? The truth is, it
leaves them victims of the

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refusal of both the United
States and large developing
countries, such as China and
India, to curb harmful green-
house gas emissions.

“In the 21st century, there
should be a more enlightened
approach to governance of the
common areas of mankind’s
survival.”

Sir Ronald also mentioned
the lack of effective interna-
tional machinery to help
countries adapt to climate

change and reconstruct in the.

(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)

wake of storms.

But he said small and vulner-
able hurricane-prone Caribbean
countries needed the means to
help them prepare for disasters.

“In the absence of such a
facility, Caribbean countries
could be faced, year after year,
with the costs of rebuilding after
hurricanes, but with no place to
turn for financing. This will
increase unemployment and
poverty in the region and, in
turn, it. will adversely affect
crime rates.and investment.” .,

John; Bull

2N4 Bay Soret, Nassau, Bahamas (242) 322-4252

















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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



Minister denies sewage damage |
to Registrar General’s files -

FINANCIAL Services and
Investments Minister Allyson
Maynard-Gibson has refuted
claims that some files were
damaged at the Registrar Gen-
eral’s office during a sewage
leak.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
the claim, which was made by
opposition Senator John
Delaney, is completely false.

“It is unfortunate that FNM
Senator John Delaney contin-
ues to spread false information
in a desperate effort to under-
mine the hard work of the fine
staff of the department who
have made tremendous strides
in transforming the way that
business is done at the registry”
she said.

. Mr Delaney was quoted in
Wednesday’s Tribune as claim-



ing that the Registrar Gener-
al’s office “suffered a sewerage
back up this summer — one of
several in the last two years —
which resulted in the area con-
taining corporate files being
contaminated by sewerage.”

Mrs Maynard-Gibson agreed
that an incident did occur in
July, in which “stagnant water
from a clogged face-basin in the
law firm directly above the
department’s 50 Shirley Street
Office escaped onto the floor
directly above the Registrar
General’s Department and
leaked through the ceiling into
the office below.”

She added, however, that all
files were immediately covered

in protective plastic, and “out _

of an abundance of caution”
staff members were given per-

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mission to leave the office for
a short time while the area was
ventilated and any lingering
smell removed. “There was no
sewerage leak,” the minister

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
the incident restricted the
public’s access to the Depart-
ment for at most a few hours;

“not for any extended period
of time as Mr Delaney would
mischievously like to suggest.”

She said that Mr Delaney

_.. had aimed to cause a scandal

with his comments in an effort
to score political points.

“Mr Delaney was a paid
consultant during the previ-
ous administration which

presided over the near
destruction of the financial
services sector of the
Bahamas. Now that Mr
Delaney is on the public pay-
roll at the Senate, he must not
be allowed to further destroy
the financial sector through
deliberate misrepresentations
in the media,” she said.



@ FINANCIAL Services and Investments Minister Allyson Maynard- LGibson

Southern Bahamas to
have electronic access
to Registrar records

THE Southern Bahamas will
soon have fast and easy access
to the records kept at the Reg-

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ETO UTR LEE

istrar General’s Department,
Financial Services and Invest-
ments Minister Allyson May-
nard-Gibson announced yes-
terday.

She said the first step in the
process is being taken today
in Ragged Island, where her-
self and Agriculture Minis-
ter Alfred Gray will be on
hand “to commission a new
system which will bring access
to the records of the depart-
ment at the touch of a button
to the residents there.”

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
this step will be repeated
“from island to island”, in the
coming months starting next
week in Grand Bahama,

“until the entire Bahamas has -

immediate electronic access
to all the records of the
department.” .

Mrs Maynard said the plan
will transform the pace at
which business functions

everywhere in the country.

. She added that complete ©
electronic access to the

records, with the exception of
intellectual property infor-
mation, should be available
by January 2006.

“The delivery systems for
this cutting-edge service are
being beta tested as we speak
and the diligence of the staff
at the department and at the
government’s Data Process-
ing Unit will ensure a suc-
cessful launch.

“The public should know
that the Department of the
Registrar General is dedicat-
ed to transforming the sys-
tems of record keeping and
public access and continually
updating and refining the
state-of the art technology
introduced under the PLP
administration until the ser-
vice is second to none, Mrs
Maynard-Gibson said.



In brief

| Freeport

_ Players plan
Christmas
performance

THE Freeport Players’ Guild
will present the Regency
Singers and the Lois Seiler
Academy of Dance in their tra-
ditional performance, “Many
Moods of Christmas” at the
Regency Theatre on December
3 and 4. :

The presentation is in keep-
ing with the traditional festivi-
ties begun by Festival Noel and
the annual Christmas tree light-
ing at Port Lucaya.

Last year, due to the destruc-
tion at the theatre caused by
Hurricane Frances, concerts
were held at the Church of the
Ascension, the Lucaya Presby-
terian Kirk and at Our Lucaya
Resort.

The Regency Singers group.
performs classical to gospel
music. The group’s renditions
of Negro Spirituals are particu-
larly popular. This year, a Hait-
ian Carol has been added to
their repertoire.

Lois Seiler’s Academy of

:.. Dance exhibits a wide range of

dance styles from classical ballet
to tap and hip-hop.

Saturday night’s performance
begins with a reception at 7pm .
when traditional Christmas
treats and punch will be served
prior to the show.

Sunday’s performance starts
at 3pm. Tickets can be obtained’
at Sweet P’s Lunch Café, the
Seventeen Shop, GB Fitness
Centre and Fortune Hills Golf
Club.

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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS





RACE AND POLITICS ARE
STILL A TOXIC MIXTURE

RACE remains a prickly subject in the Bahamas and
even more so now as the racial insecurities of some
Bahamians are being displayed in both the political arena
and broader society.

Even today, race and politics are as muddled as conch
salad!

Historian Virginia Cyrus defines race as a complex

i social construct based upon social values. Professor John

Hope Franklin views race as a concept developed by
whites to subordinate and control another group of
people, particularly blacks.

In the Bahamas, the question of race and racial
prejudice still plague our country in the 21st century,
although it was contained and more silently expressed
until recent political manifestations of bigotry.

~ In order to speak of race and politics today, a brief
examination of this part of the history of the Bahamas
must be undertaken.

In 1834 and 1838, the Abolition and Emancipation Acts
officially ended the system of slavery in the Bahamas.
According to Gail Saunders, after 1838 the ex-slaves were
officially free on paper, at least from punishments, to
cultivate their own lands, in their movements and ability to
choose certain things (not vote). These stipulations were
the extent to which the former slaves were free, as the
rigid class system present during slavery continued well
into the 20th century (Saunders).

‘In her book, Bahamian Society After Emancipation,
Gail Saunders highlights the political, social and economic
disadvantages facing the ex-slaves in a society that would
only evolve with time.

_Post-emancipation law, which prevented blacks from
any constructive roles in society and even a chance for
equal justice when challenging white in courts, deepened
coloured and class divisions and increased the control of
the whites.

«, Saunders also notes the apartheid law, which created a
racially tense atmosphere in both New Providence and
Out Islands. This fostered segregation, relegating blacks to
some of the worst living conditions in the Caribbean.

In the years following emancipation and early into the
20th century, a tripartite model of race relations defined
the social, economic and political spectrums, i.e the whites
at the top, the coloured in between and lastly the blacks.

_, According to Nicolette Bethel, in the 1920s, the
expansion of tourism led to a more rigid model of race that
reflected the Jim Crow south of the United States and
divided Bahamian society with the whites at the top and all
non-whites at the bottom.

Then there was the credit, share and truck systems that
Michael Craton and Gail Saunders refer to as’
commercially oppressive systems that deepened poverty
and dependency among blacks, especially as the economy
was in a slump with little monies, meagre. resources, high
land prices and by continuously keeping blacks in debt..

. It is impossible to discuss the social impact of race
relations without addressing the effects of race on politics.
.: After emancipation, racist laws stipulating the need for
acertain amount of property disenfranchised many blacks.
Blacks were restricted from voting, and therefore did not
have a choice in their governance.

‘According to Don Maples, the result was that wealthy
white families continuously ruled the Bahamas until the
PLP era. In describing the election process of the 1880s,
English solicitor LD Powles said that the House of
Assembly was a family of Nassau whites, passing laws to
facilitate their own needs whilst embarrassing the British
flag.

». Although eight members of the House of Assembly
were considered black or coloured in 1949, they were
restricted along colour lines and increasing racial injustice
led to the formation of the PLP, whose initial objectives
were to become the voice of the black labouring class, end
discrimination and to create an equal society.

Historian John Berryman notes that the 1950s signalled
positive changes in race relations beginning in 1956 when
Sir Etienne Dupuch brought forth a resolution to end
racial discrimination in public places and with the
abolition, in 1958, of the property qualification that led to
more black voters.

Although the PLP attained majority rule, Colin Hughes
writes that early on, the whites promoted a racist approach
to smear the first signs of Negro assertiveness with the
primitiveness of pre-colonial Africa and the excesses of
post-independence African regimes that produced an
inevitable reaction.

He said this approach led to biacks developing an
emotional connection with Africa and the PLP. Gail
Saunders says that from this point on, Bahamian politics
became polarised on colour as Sir Lynden Pindling and Sir
Milo Butler appealed to blacks by instigating acrimony
through the use of racist material.

» Although the PLP promoted national identity and
upward mobility for blacks, sadly, they were also skilful in
their use of the race card, sowing seeds of division and
heightening tensions over race (eg showing Roots), which
thas produced much of the racially motivated propaganda
plaguing Bahamian society today.

There has been much hoopla surrounding Brent
Symonette’ s recent ascension to the deputy post of the
ENM. Unfortunately, racial jargon promoted by the ‘new’
‘PLP has limited people’s abilities to look beyond
Symonette’ s skin tone and ancestry.

- Only ignorant people would allow the PLP’s recent
‘scaremongering to rouse their fears of a return to minority
‘tule. Allyson Maynard-Gibson, Kenyatta Gibson, Melanie
Griffin, Alfred Gray and others have all played the race
‘card and spewed venom that illustrates their outright racial
arejudice,

“4 But Kenyatta went a bit further, as he called a senior
‘parliamentarian (Symonette) ‘boy’. So now, we have a

t Juan who not only spews racist propaganda and yet lists his
‘address as the predominantly white Lyford Cay, but he is
“also a junior parliamentarian referring to his senior,
eeeardiess of party, as ‘boy’!? Amazing!

Now that Bernard Nottage is back, Kenyatta should
‘eorry about his seat, because as a friend pointed out to
me, “Kennedy may not be so favourable to him.”

ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com



Restaurant owners’ gesture

to help hurricane victims

@ By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

THEY have never been to
Freeport in their lives, and they
are not familiar with any of the
victims of Hurricane Wilma, but
two small business entrepre-
neurs have opened their big
hearts to start a fund to help
those in the nation's second city.

When Erika and Pepsi
opened their breakfast restau-
rant just over a year ago, they
never knew their specialty
entrees would become so pop-
ular — or that they would be
heading on a plane to Grand
Bahama to give relief to hurri-
cane victims, many of whom are
still left homeless.

They were watching the tele-
vision two days after the hurri-
cane hit, and saw the massive
destruction left behind. It
moved them to put their heads
together and ask: “What can we
do to help?”

Their restaurant, Don’ Wotch
Nuttin’, immediately set up a
hurricane relief fund by placing
a labelled container on their
unique and colorful countertop.
The young ladies are also
donating ten cents out of every
breakfast sale to the fund.

As they prepare to close out

BVLGARI

BULGARI.COM







i DON’ Wotch Nuttin' on Carmichael Road West has a

hurricane relief fund set up for the victims of Hurricane Wilma.
These men say they love eating island style breakfast under the
gazebo and feel more than happy to help by contributing to the

fund set up by owners Erika and Pepsi.

é

3
the fund, Erika said they are
excited, because the customers

gave far more than they ever

expected.

They plan to purchase
household and clothing items,
as well as Christmas gifts for

children, and carry them into ©

the disaster area personally.
They plan to meet the people
there, hear their experiences and
try their best to fill whatever

needs their fund can manage.

“Many people will be shop-
ping, fixing up their homes, and
planning parties for the Christ-
mas; but there are people out
there who have no homes — no
shelter this Christmas,” said
Pepsi. “So we had to do some-
thing.”

Putting smiles on people’s
faces is something these women
take as their mission at their



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PARADISE ISLAND * CRYSTAL COURT AT ATLANTIS, 242 363 5824

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t

restaurant, and doing the same
thing for people they may have
never had the opportunity to
meet is just an extension of that
goodwill gesture.

Don’ Wotch Nuttin is a
unique restaurant because it
takes the traditional Bahamian
99 cent breakfast to another lev-
el. The ladies say it is the first
one in Nassau where you can
get items like banana pancakes,
specialty omelets, steak and ’
eggs, and grilled bread straight
from the frying pan.

Their specialty menu reflects
their customers — each one is
named after the regular patrons,
who have even left their names
on the signature board, person-
alising their favourite breakfast
place.

The 16A special, for exam-
ple, is often ordered by the
Carmichael Road bus drivers,
who pass them in the City 2000
Auto Center lot each day. It
consists of a double serving of
mackerel with white rice, or
corned beef hash with chunky
potatoes and rice.

The Bobo special, Pepsi said,
was created for the many Rasta-
farians in the area. It consists of
pancakes garnished with banana
and cinnamon, and spicy mack-
erel stew.



PAGE 8, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



1000th execution looms as lottery of
death reaches shameful milestone ©

A PRISON guard takes
a man out of a prison

cell. The guard leads the man
through a hallway to an execu-
tion chamber and in the pres-
ence of witnesses, the prisoner is
poisoned to death.

The witnesses go home, many
of them traumatised for life.
The prison authorities who
directly participated in extin-
guishing a human life are simi-
larly traumatised. The journal-
ists write stories about the man
that has just been put to death
in front of them. Officials clear
the room until the next time.

In the USA, this scene is fair-
ly routine. Since 1976, when the
death penalty was reinstated by
the US Supreme Court, nearly
1,000 men and women have
been killed by the state in the
name of justice.

In the Bahamas, debate has
focused on a recent period
‘ where no executions have taken
place. Yet the crime rate,
according to a recent police
report, showed reductions in a
number of major crimes. Most
analyses shows that there is no
parallel between the use of the

death penalty and reduction in
serious crimes. In particular,
these are crimes of passion or
with malice of forethought.

In either case, the death
penalty has never been shown
to be any more of a deterrent
than other types of punishment.

Most homicides in the
Bahamas are domestically relat-
ed. Partners killing their part-
ner, whether they are married
or not, is of little consequence.
These cases are more likely to
be tried as non-capital offences
and so they do not have the
death penalty applied in the
sentencing.

As the 1,000th execution in
the US approaches, Amnesty
International, along with a
broad spectrum of human rights
organisations, social justice
groups, and concerned individ-
uals, is calling on US State and
Federal authorities to put an
immediate end to all executions.

“The death penalty is by
nature ineffective, arbitrary and
does not deter crime. On the
contrary, it creates more vic-
tims and demeans society as a
whole”, said Amnesty Interna-
tional.



A disproportionate
number of those exe-

cuted in the USA in thé past

. three decades were economi-

cally disadvantaged, people of
colour, and those who had little
or no access to competent:coun-
sel.

Many suffered from mental
retardation or were child
offenders.— groups that are
exempt from the death penalty
under international human
rights standards. Others suf-

fered severe mental illness.
Many were executed while seri-
ous questions remained con-
cerning their guilt - to date 122
people have been released from
death rows across the country
on grounds of wrongful convic-
tion.

Furthermore, 80 per cent of
all executions have been car-
ried out in the South and con-
centrated in only a handful of
states. Nearly half of the 1,000
executions that have taken
place in the US occurred in two
states, Texas and Virginia.

New York, Illinois and New
Jersey have a hold on execu-
tions and numerous questions
are being raised across the

.country regarding the fairness

and effectiveness of the capital
punishment system. In recent
years the US Supreme Court
has banned the execution of the
mentally retarded and child
offenders.

“This shows that it is possi-
ble to end the use of the
death penalty in the US in the
near future. What is now
needed is for political leaders
at both the federal and state
level to demonstrate courage,



Most analyses shows that
there is no parallel between
the use of the death penalty
and reduction in serious

crimes



wisdom, and leadership and
end the death penalty once
and for all.

“The victims of violent crime
deserve respect, compassion
and justice. The death penalty
offers none of these things. It
is an illusory solution to press-
ing social problems and merely
amounts to a failure of politi-
cal vision,” said Amnesty Inter-
national.

“The resources spent on
these executions could have
been invested in comprehensive
rehabilitation, meaningful vic-
tims services, and other crime
prevention programmes or even
used to reinforce existing law

enforcement efforts.”

A total of 121 countries
have abolished the

death penalty worldwide in law
or practice.

“The execution of 1,000 men
and women by the state has
resulted in immeasurable
human costs - for the victims of
violent crime, for the families
of those who were executed, and
for those who participated. in
these state-sanctioned killings.

_It is time for the US to realise

the ultimate futility of the death
penalty and follow the global
trend towards abolition.”

e For more information,
please see: www.amnesty.org
and www.1000execution.org























Ebenezer

arn
Ca ar EL



OLD Saint Nick aban-
doned his reindeers last week-
end, opting instead to fly in
a helicopter over Atlantis’
“Celebration of Lights” on
the Sun Deck in the Royal
Towers. ;

Guests watched in amaze-
ment as Santa’ Claus descend-
ed from a hovering helicopter,
danced and pranced his way
across a wooden bridge, kick-
ing off the holiday celebra-
tions at the resort.

Santa was later joined bya -

lovely Mrs Claus. The pair

Mi PHOTO shows Jo Kemp from London,
England enjoying the festivities at Atlantis’
recent “Celebration of Lights.”

PRIVATE

embraced guests, sang carols,
played games and listened to
excited guests of all ages as
they recapped their Christ-
mas wish lists.

There was also games, arts
and crafts and music for
everyone to enjoy.

And, of course Christmas
is not the same without a
Christmas tree; nor can there
be a “Celebration of Lights”
without lights. Atlantis’ guests
watched as bright lights lit up
the sky during a special tree
lighting ceremony.





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THE TRIBUNE



In brief —

Bahamas
Forum
meeting

THE next meeting of think
_ tank Bahamian Forum will be
held on December 6.

The topic will be economic
empowerment and the guest
speaker is Halsbury Chambers
senior partner Kenred Dorsette.

The meeting will take place
at the British Colonial Hilton
hotel at 6pm. The public is invit-
ed to attend.

Nutritionist
to explain
new juice
WORLD renowned nutri-
*-tionist Dr Earl Mindell will vis-
- dt the Bahamas next week.
He will be explaining the pur-
- :pose and uses of a product he
formulated called Goji juice.
211 The juice is derived from the
: goji berry, a fruit discovered in
.. the Himalayan mountains.

Dr Mindell describes the goji
“berry as “the most significant
“health discovery of the last 40

years”. .

.“.> He said it is especially effective
~ in treating the major epidemic
diseases affecting Bahamians and
people of African origin. “Type
two diabetes, hypertension and
fenal failure are just the begin-
“Hing of that list,” he said.

‘Dr Mindell will address the
public at Workers House on
Tonique Williams-Darling High-
way on December 5 at 7pm.

Christmas
holidays
announced

_.. THE Cabinet Office has
announced that the Christmas
and Boxing Day holidays will
‘be observed on Monday
ecember 26, and Tuesday
December 27 2005, respectively.
= The New Year’s Day holiday
will be observed on January 2,
2006:°°"



Pye

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005, PAUE 3









Psychiatrist recommends zero
tolerance approach to crime

A ZERO | tolerance
approach to crime must be
adopted before the problem
destroys Bahamian society as
we know it, author and psy-
chiatrist Dr David Allen said.

Dr Allen made this argu-
ment to nearly 150 persons
who packed a meeting room
at the Radisson Cable Beach
Resort on Tuesday for the first
ever Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce Crime

to rob the family and was dis-
turbed by one of the family
members,” said Dr Allen.
“The intruder turned the gun
on them and raped their 12-
year-old daughter in front of
her mother. Imagine the fear,
anger and hopelessness of
knowing you cannot protect
your child or take matters into
your own hands. This is the



Prevention Seminar.

Sponsored by the
Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce, IBM and
the Royal Bahamas
Police Force, the semi-
nar aimed to focus.on
new approaches to over-
coming crime.

The one-day seminar
featured various speak-
ers including Deputy
Prime Minister and
Minister of National
Security Cynthia Pratt
and Assistant Commis-
sioner of Police Regi-
nald Ferguson.

According to Dr
Allen, zero tolerance
must go hand-in-hand
with understanding the
root causes of crime and
how severe its impact is
on victims and society.

“We cannot allow
relentless criminals to
control our country,” Dr
Allen said. “In the past
few weeks we’ve had a teenag-
er killed in front of scores of
witnesses who did nothing to
help and patrons robbed while
dining at Cable Beach restau-
rants.

“On a daily basis, residents
of Eastern Road and Cable
Beach are threatened by
armed robbers, car bumping,
property invasion and rapes.
This has to stop and we as a
society have to stop it,” he
said.

Dr Allen shared the story
of a family that is now trau-
matised as a result of a recent
robbery turned rape.

“Some bold intruder came



@ PSYCHIATRIST Dr David Allen said
that 6 to 8 per cent of chronic criminals
commit 50 per cent of serious crimes. ““The
Bahamas must act now if we are going to
halt the escalation of serious crimes now
taking place in Jamaica and Trinidad,” Dr
Allen said.

grim reality of today’s
Bahamas and sadly it can hap-
pen to any of us.”

Dr Allen said drastic times
call for drastic measures, even
if this means implementing a
tax system to provide the
police force with necessary
equipment, such as electronic
tracking bracelets for released
prisoners.

“We can’t wait for criminals
to commit the crimes,” he said.
“We must start at the schools
to seek out the bullies and tru-
ants and dissuade their pre-
criminal mentality.

“There ought to be zero tol-
erance for violence in the

school - physical or verbal. If
we continue to disregard small
fights or stealing pencils and
pens from desks today, we will

“end up with attempted mur-

derers or armed robbers in the
future.”

Dr Allen told seminar atten-
dees that teachers must be
taught how to identify pre-
criminal symptoms in students,

such as truancy and bul-
lying.

He added that the
government must see to
it that children with vio-
lent characteristics are
placed in reform or
counselling pro-
grammes and are given
effective anger man-
agement tools. }

According to Dr
Allen, the criminal
mind develops in
homes where children
are neglected, abused
and have a consistent
feeling of fear, rejec-
tion, humiliation or
shame.

He referred to a

‘recent survey where 10
criminal cocaine addicts
all cited lack of parental
love as the root cause
of their’) wayward
lifestyles.

“When some of their
fathers where asked
why they didn’t hug
(their sons) and say ‘I

love you’, most stated they felt

this type of male bonding
would make their sons ‘soft’
or homosexual,” he said.

Dr Allen pointed out that
the lack of male love brings
about violence and can lead
neglected sons to develop anx-
iety, take drugs or miss school.
As a result, they resort to
crime to support their addic-
tions.

He added that absent
fathers leave their sons with a
severe deficiency in finding
their masculinity. “A single
mother can’t teach her son
how. to become a man,” he
pointed out..““She may try her

best, but these boys grow up
with the need to. prove their
masculinity and there is no male
to teach it to them. This is why

many end up joining gangs.”

Dr Allen also called upon
persons in authority to make
their voices heard as they can
make a big difference are often

well respected.

“Talks show hosts, govern-
ment leaders, clergymen and
elected officials — get out there
and make yourself known for
not tolerating crime,” Dr Allen
said. “This is your Bahamas,
too, and we all have to work
together.”

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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005



# OKES Field Primary School shows of there stuff at the
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LOCAL NEWS:

School celebration



i THE COB band plays a Christmas tune at the College of the
Bahamas’ A Gift To Our Community — an afternoon of Carols

and Cheer.





a ATHLETE Bradley Cooper playing Santa Claus yesterday at
the College of the Bahamas

Ingraham tours

BBY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - FNM Leader
Hubert Ingraham toured vari-

ous stormed ravaged areas.

along the south-west coast of
Grand Bahama, where he said
many residents are struggling
to repair their homes without
any financial assistance from
NEMA.

Mr Ingraham said the gov-
ernment's response following
Hurricane Wilma to the plight.
of persons that were severely
impacted has been inadequate.

"T don't know enough about
the extent of the response to
articulate to you specifically why
I say generally no. However,
what I have seen and what I've
heard, it appears no," said Thurs-
day while at St Stephen's Angli-
can Church in Eight Mile Rock.

Mr Ingraham, accompanied
to Freeport by deputy party
leader Brent Symonette, said
nothing he's heard or seen on
television could have prepared
him for the devastation he saw
in settlements from Williams
Town to West End.

He stressed that many residents

ck

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THE TRIBUNE;



Government

- gives building
supplies to
Rita victims

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

AT the official launch of
the Urban Renewal Project
in South Andros yesterday,
the government donated
building supplies to needy
families affected by tropical

storm Rita earlier this year. .
Housing Minister Shane,

Gibson, South Andros MP
Whitney Bastian and other
officials briefly toured areas

of South Andros and met.

with locals to’ discuss any con-
cerns they may have.

"The homes that had minor
damage to them were homes
that would have needed
repairs anyhow, under our
Urban Renewal Programme.
So, we took that opportunity
to have them repaired under
the Urban Renewal Pro-
gramme versus under the
Hurricane Relief Pro-
gramme," Mr Gibson said.

Building supplies worth
$40,000. were donated ‘to
those who could not afford
to repair their own homes.

In an effort to involve the
entire community, the sup-
plies were ordered through
local supplier Norwood Rah-
ming of Rahming Enterprises.

During a breakfast at the
Emerald Palm Resort, South
Androsians aired their con-
cerns about their communi-

ty.

Deputy chairman of ‘town
planning Brian Dean sug-:
gested to the minister that
building inspectors be
engaged to ensure that ‘con-
struction is peHtotmed pIep?
erly.

Wendy Dean, pastor of St
Marks Baptist Church, point-
ed out that some persons are
living in deplorable conditions
in the area. i

She suggested to’ those 4 an-

attendance that’‘it is time for
residents to “be their broth-
er's keeper” and help ose
who are in need.
. Mr Gibson xeaurell
Androsians that everyone:
who qualifies for assistance’
will get help, no matter what’
their political persuasion
might be.

"The reason why I wanted:
to make sure and come fo;
talk about this and also hear
from you is because we want’
ed to make sure that we had
total transparency in this:
whole process.

"We didn't want to deai
with any favouritism. If
you qualify for assistance;
you qualify for assistancé:
If you are a PLP, indepen~
dent, FNM, BDM of
CDR: no matter what you’
are, as long as you are ‘2!
Bahamian and you qualify:
for assistance then your
should get it," said Mr
Gibson.

urricane areas

are concerned about the extent
to which they would be provided
assistance by government.

Some residents, said Mr
Ingraham, complained that
NEMA is denying them finan-
cial assistance even though their
homes were substantially dam-
aged.

Mr Ingraham said that resi-
dents were also very concerned
about some announcement by
government concerning a 'no
build' on the southern side of
Grand Bahama.

Housing Minister Shane Gib-
son announced early this week

that the entire southwest coast-'
line of Grand Bahama has been
declared a 'no build zone,,,
explaining that government!
would no longer allow recon-
struction on land situated off
southern side of the roads in
affected settlements. ey
Mr Gibson, however, noted
that those persons who are giv:
en permission to build, would
have to follow strict guidelines
by incorporating special rein-
forcements when rebuilding. In
low lying areas prone flooding,
homes would have to. be. built
on stilts. | 4

MR
WCE VS Cc

Annual Steak-Out.

The school’s major fund- “raising »
event willbe held on ~
Saturday, December 3,
~ from noonto 5pm
on the school’s grounds
on West Bay Street.



LAWDY LAWDY!!

Look Whos Forty


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005, PAGE 11



“Police

wi, Carl Bethel hits out at
Mitchell’s visa claims

warning
on AK 47s

FROM page one

“That kind of weapon
would outgun a police officer
under ordinary circum-
stances. This is a serious sit-
uation but we have been
picking up this type of
weapon for years from time
to time.

“Every now and then we
would have raided some
place with weapons of this
calibre. These types of
weapons follow the drug
trade. They are normally
used for storage protection,
and we have always been
concerned when we find
- them. Only the military and

the police would have access
to such weapons,” he said.

Inspector Walter Evans,
police press liaison officer,
pleaded for civilians who
have knowledge of such
weapons being housed any-
where in the country to
report them.

“Don’t just be satisfied
after a loved one is hurt -to
notify us. These are very
dangerous weapons. Can you
imagine the effect or impact
they can have on a person?
So we are always asking that
if persons know of people
having such weapons, they
should contact us so we can
get these off the streets,” he
said.

Ironically, however, under
Bahamian law anyone found
with such a weapon would
face, the same penalties as
someone with an unlicensed
revolver.

Mr Ferguson said to his
_knowledge, these finds are
among the most powerful
weapons confiscated in New
Providence.

“Most of the time when
we intercept these types of
weapons it is from the work
of citizens who phone us and
give us intelligence of such
things.

“Of course, there are oth-
er ways of us gaining such
information but there is
nothing like an alert public,”
he said.

Man wanted

in connection |

with murder
is expected
to appear
“ in court
FROM page one

possession of ammunition;
and:the juvenile was charged
with possession of an unli-
censed firearm.

The matters were
adjourned to February 26,
2006.

â„¢ MAN CHARGED
Vieto Pinder, 19, of Free-

town, pleaded guilty in

Freeport Magistrate’s Court
to possession. of an unli-
censed firearm.

Pinder appeared before
Magistrate Franklyn
Williams in Court One. He
was given a conditional dis-
charge for one year. In
default, he is to pay $1,000 or
serve six months in Fox Hill
Prison.

FROM page one

that the number of visas granted
to Chinese nationals had quadru-
pled annually.

The senator said that “by the
minister’s own count the total
number of visas issued to Chinese
nationals between 2003 and 2005
under his watch was 422.”

“If you multiply the 86 visas
issued in all of 2002 to Chinese
nationals by four the total is 344.
In fact the number of visas issued
to Chinese nationals has more
than quadrupled under the watch
of Fred Mitchell. By the minis-
ter’s own facts and figures he had
admitted the allegation,” Mr
Bethel said.

. He emphasised that the exis-
tence of two Chinese passports
with Bahamian visas dated
December 31, 2005, which
expired on March 31, 2005 — “a
fact that I have seen publicly dis-
closed to the Bahamian people”
— is of grave concern.

“And those Chinese nationals
are still here in the Bahamas,
working illegally,” he added.

Mr Bethel said that the ques-

tion now remains how many of
the 422 Chinese who were
allowed into the Bahamas with
visas issued since 2002 actually
returned to China.

The senator said that visas are
being issued to hundreds of Hait-
ian nationals without proper iden-
tification, no photographs and
signed only with an “x”.

“How was one man, whom I
have identified merely as “Mr
Joseph”, able to obtain 84 Haitian
visas over a nine-week period in
2004. The minister failed in his
attempts to offer a credible expla-
nation or response for the astro-
nomical increase in the number of
visas issued from Nassau,” said
the senator.

- He said that the minister’ s
assertion that the thousands of
visas issued in 2004 and 2006 can
be explain by a visiting Haitian
soccer team and an increase of

_ trade to Haiti lacks all credibility.

“A soccer team has only 11
players and several extra support

staff, coaches and trainers,” Mr _

Bethel said.

He said that the minister’s
attempt to “raise the spectre of
ethnic or national prejudice” was

Search for men
missing at sea

FROM page one

Their vessel was overturned and, while Hart and Pearce were able
to make it to shore, Davis and Larimore did not.

Inspector Evans said a team of officers led by Inspector Ashton
Greenwood tried to search for the missing men but were hindered

by rough seas.

At 6am yesterday two search teams were formed in an effort to
find the missing men. Up until press time yesterday Mr Evans
said that there had been no positive reports.

e An aircraft was stolen from Fresh Creek airport in Andros,

according to Inspector Evans.

The owner of a six-seater Seneca aircraft, registration number
N840141, went to the airport around 5.45am yesterday and dis-
covered the plane was missing. Police are searching for the aircraft.

¢ A 28-year-old man is in police custody in connection with a

firearm discovery in Nassau.

Police found an AK 47 with 30 live rounds of ammunition at a
home in Frasiers Sub-division, off Soldier Road.

FROM page one

tors to assess possibilities of
establishing the Bahamas as a
preferred vacation destination
for Chinese travellers, The Tri-
bune has learnt.

Speaking with Chinese
reporters of the news website
Xinhuanet, deputy director gen-
eral of tourism Ellison Thomp-
son said the purpose of the vis-

it included meeting Chinese

tourism officials and providing a
name list of local travel agencies
to host Chinese visitors.

Mr Thompson said Bahamian
tourism operators hope to
design tailored products for
Chinese visitors, and that some
hotels have even tried to devel-
op Chinese menus.

The Bahamas became an
approved travel destination for
China in February this year, giv-
ing the country the chance to
attract the 16 million-plus Chi-
nese who leave mainland China

: . each year for their holidays.

The agreement means that
Chinese tourists - who are only
allowed to travel to countries
that have been granted
“Approved Destination Status”

Ministry
(ADS), such as Thailand and
Australia - will be able to visit
the Bahamas more easily as part
of organised tour groups.

To date, China has signed
ADS agreements with 59 coun-
tries and regions in the world.

In an interview with The Tri-
bune earlier this year, director
of tourism Vernice Walkine
said there was a great need to
inform and educate potential
Chinese travel partners about
the Bahamas,-because while
they are used to visiting places
like Thailand and Bali, most
would never consider choosing
the Bahamas as their vacation

spot.

Mrs Walkine said it was inter-
esting that the Chinese knew
nothing about the Bahamas, but
were impressed when they
learnt more about the country.

She emphasised that while
airlift is a major concern - with
no direct flights between the
Bahamas and China - Virgin
Atlantic, which has a non- stop
flight from London to Nassau,
also has a direct route from
Shanghai to London.

a smoke screen and if entry visas
issued in Nassau to any national-
ity from any part of the globe had
increased 20 times it would
have raised the very same ques-
tions.

Mr Bethel said that despite the
length of the statement and the
“dragging out of a few red her-
rings” the minister has failed to
answer his allegations.

“Those allegations are that
under his watch the policy
restricting the number of visas
issued from Nassau was changed;
that there has been an astronom-
ical increase in the number of
entry visas issued to Haitian

nationals from 102 a year in 2002 -

to 2,200 in 2004; that the number

of visas issued to Chinese nation- °

als has quadrupled; that there are

no mechanisms in place to ensure
that persons who entered with
visas actually left the Bahamas
before those visas expired; that
visas were habitually issued to
persons without proper, full or,
indeed, any identification; that
there was political involvement
at the highest levels of govern-
ment; and that PLP politicians,
family members and political
cronies were sponsoring repeated
groups or batches of Haitian
nationals and Chinese nationals,”
Mr Bethel said.

He said the fact that he as an
MP wrote a letter for a con-
stituent who was seeking visas for
a boat crew is irrelevant.

“MPs write all sorts of letters

- for their constituents, all the time.
I have hundreds of file copies of

letters stacked’ up in boxes at
home, which I have written in the
past on behalf of constituents

Seeking all types of things from

jobs, to contracts, to government
houses; to educational loans yes
even letters seeking work per-
mits.. This is the:everyday job of

“an MP,” ‘he’said.

Mr Bethel-said the fact that the
former deputy prime minister
Frank Watson allegedly intro-
duiced Mr Bruce Bain in a letter
to the former minister of foreign
affairs is not the point.

“The minister has not suggest-
ed that as a result of the former
DPM’s letter Mr Bain received
any carte blanch right to sponsor
additional ‘groups of Haitian
nationals,” he said.



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PAGE 12, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005



LITTLE MISS BAHAMAS PAGEANT: There are 38 lovely little ladies in
this year’s Little Miss Bahamas pageant...Please bring your little love ones to
see the crowning of the new Miss Little Bahamas 2005/2006, or invite others
that you know may have little ones interested in attending. The exciting
event is scheduled for Sunday, December 18 @ 4pm at the Rain Forest The-
atre, Wyndham Crystal Palace. Tickets are available from the Juke Box,
Mall at Marathon, contestants or at the door.

Gospel choirs will be competing each Saturday, for a period of six weeks, at

the Braiders Square at Festival Place on Prince George Wharf. Choirs will be
judged on musicianship, group coordination and symmetry, technique, ver-
satility of chosen song, program choice and presentation of final perfor-
mance. The choir categories include ladies, men, mixed voice, youth and
groups of choirs. The competition will commence with preliminaries in Octo-
ber and finals in November and December. One group will be eliminated each
Saturday. The selection of the winning choir is scheduled to take place at the
Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony on December 10, at 6pm at Festival
Place.

Bacardi Happy Hour @ Power Boat Adventures Bar and Grill (one door east
of Texaco Harbour Bay), every Friday. $3 Bacardi drinks all night and $3 beers.

Ladies Night @ Power Boat Adventures Bar and Grill, every Saturday.
Ladies free, Gents, $10 all night. Bacardi Big Apple and other drink specials
all night long. :

Wild Jungle, each and every Wednesday night @ Club Trappers, Nassau’s
“upscale” gentleman’s club. Featuring a female body painting extravaganza.
Free body painting @ 8 pm. Ladies always welcome. Admission: Men free
before 10 pm. Females free. There will be free food and hors d'oeuvres
between 9 and 10 pm. Open until 4 am.

Ladies Night @ Fluid Lounge, this and every Thursday night. Doors open at
10pm. Ladies free before 1am, $10 after. Guys: $15 all night. Drink special: 3
@ $10 (Bacardi) Giveaways and door prizes every week.

Saturday Night Live every Saturday night @ Club Fluid, Bay St. The biggest
party of the week, pumping all your favourite hits all night long. Ladies in free
before 11pm. Strict security enforced.

Rave Saturdays @ Club Eclipse. DJ Scoobz spinning the best in Old Skool.
Admission $35, all inclusive food and drink.

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters Sports Bar. Drink specials all night

long, including karaoke warm-up drink to get you started. Party from 8pm-

until.

Reggae Tuesdays @ Bahama Boom. Cover charge includes a free Guinness
and there should be lots of prizes and surprises. Admission: Ladies $10 and
Men $15.

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar every Wednesday S5pm-
8pm. Free appetizers and numerous drink specials.

The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday. Doors open at 9pm, showtime
11.30pm. Cover charge $15. $10 with flyer. :

Fantasy Fridays @ Fluid Lounge, featuring late ‘80s music in the VIP Lounge,
Top of the charts in the Main Lounge, neon lights and Go Go dancers.
Admission: Ladies free before 11pm, $15 after; Guys $20 all night.

Dicky Mo’s @ Cable Beach. Flavoured Fridays Happy Hour, every Friday.
Drink specials: Smirnoff Kamikaze Shots, $1; Smirnoff Flavoured Martinis, 2
for $10; Smirnoff Flavoured Mixed Drinks, 3 for $10. Bahamian Night (Free
admiission) every Saturday with live music from 8 pm to midnight. Karaoke
Sundays from 8pm to midnight, $1 shots and dinner specials all night long.

Twisted Boodah Lounge @ Cafe Segafredo, Charlotte St kicks off Fridays at
6pm with deep house to hard house music, featuring CraigBOO, Unkle
Funky and Sworl’wide on the decks.

Chill Out Sundays @ Coco Loco’s, Sandyport, from 4pm-until, playing deep,
funky chill moods with world beats.

Sweet Sunday Chill Out Soiree Lounge, every Sunday, 4pm-midnight @
Patio Grille, British |
Colonial Hotel.

Wet Sundays, every Sunday, noon-midnight @ Crystal Cay Beach. Admission
$10, ladies free. .

TooLooSe @ Indigo Restaurant on West Bay St and Skyline Drive.
Singer/songwriter Steven Holden performs solo with special guests Thursday
from 9pm - midnight.

The Graham Holden Deal @ The Green Parrot....David Graham, Steve
Holden, Tim Deal and Friends perform Sunday, 7pm - 10pm @ Hurricane
Hole on Paradise Island.

Jay Mitchell and Hot KC @ Palm Court Lounge, British Colonial Hilton,
Wednesday-Thursday 8pm-12am.

Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley’s Restaurant & Lounge, Eneas St off
Poinciana Drive. Featuring Frankie Victory at the key board in the After Dark
Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to midnight. Fine food and drinks. ‘

Paul Hanna, Tabatha and Genie, and the Caribbean Express perform at Trav-
eller’s Rest, West Bay St, every Sunday, 6.30pm-9.30pm.



The Arts

STAN BURNSIDE: Recent paintings by the artist will be featured in an exhi-
bition Friday December 2 @ the artist's Home Gallery on Eastern Road, Cor-
ner of Tower Heights, from 6pm - 9pm. Private viewing by appointment.





oa.

SHELDON SAINT is being featured at Ristorante Villaggio, Caves Village
West Bay Street, until December 3 from Spm - 9pm.

Furniture by Margot Bethel and jewellery by Nadia Campbell will be on dis-
play Friday, December 9, at PopopStudios Gallery, Dunmore Lane, Chip-
pingham from 6:30pm - 9:30pm

ART INTERNATIONAL, featuring the work of nine Bahamian artists,
five well known artists from the UK, one from South Africa and one from Zim-
babwe will be held gratis, of the Guaranty Bank, Lyford Manor, just outside
the Lyford Cay gates. The exhibition will be open to the public until the end
of December. The work of the artists on display can be seen in collections
worldwide, and have been shown in numerous exhibitions. Representing the
Bahamas will be; John Beadle; Lillian Blades; John Cox; Claudette Dean;
Tyrone Ferguson; Bo Sigrist Guirey; Nora Smith, Dorman Stubbs and Rupert
Watkins. Lady Connery, Sir Sean’s wife, has kindly agreed to open the exhi-
bition. She is an exceptional artist, and will be exhibiting one of her paintings.

The Central Bank of the Bahamas is hosting its 22nd Annual Art Competition
and Exhibition. The works are on display until December. The National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas (NAGB) will be hosting a series of workshops
throughout November. Persons interested in attending any of the sessions
should contact the NAGB.

The National Art Gallery of the Bahamas (NAGB) will be hosting a series of
workshops throughout November. Persons interested in attending any of
the sessions should contact the NAGB..

The National Collection @ the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas, an
exhibition that takes the viewer-on a journey through the history of fine art in
the Bahamas. It features signature pieces from the national collection, includ-
ing recent acquisitions by Blue Curry, Antonius Roberts and Dionne Ben-
jamin-Smith. Call 328-5800 to book tours. This exhibition closes February 28,
2006. ,

The Nassau Music Society would like to remind the public of the concerts that
will take place for their: “FESTIVAL OF RUSSIAN ARTISTS 2006”. The

Natalie Gutman Quartet, January 13 @ Government House and January 14 |

@ St Paul’s Church Hall, Lyford Cay. Natalie Gutman is one of the world’s
leading cellists and she will be playing
with the Society’s artistic director, Igor

Rakelson,(piano), her son Sviatoslav,

BRISTOL







THE TRIBUNE



(violin), her daughter in law, Olga Dyachkovskaya (soprano). Yuri Bashmet
and the Moscow Soloists, will be performing February 24 @ the Theatre for
the Performing Arts - (Full orchestra conducted by Yuri Bashmet). There will
be a lunchtime concert for children and an evening concert for adults. February
26 @ Old Fort Bay Club, Buckners private residence (Quintet). February 27
@ Christ Church Cathedral (Full orchestra conducted by Yuri Bashmet).
Guest appearance with the Orchestra ~ Jo Anne Callender. Oleg Polianski will
perform April 7 @ Government House and April 8 @ the Klonaris resi-
dence. Oleg is a well known in Europe as a pianist living in Germany. Details
of the tickets and programmes will be advised shortly.



The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at 5.30pm on the second Tuesday
of each month at their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville. Call 323-4482
for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held 6:30pm Tuesdays and Thurs-
days at Nassau gymNastics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles Drive). Doc-
tor approval is required. Call 364-8423 to register or for more information.

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support group meets the first Monday
of each month at 6.30pm at New Providence Community Centre, Blake
Road. Dinner is provided and free blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol
testing is available. For more info call 702-4646 or 327-2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third Monday every month,
6pm @ Doctors Hospital conference room.

‘The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third Saturday, 2.30pm

(except August and December) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close,
Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital, the official training centre of the American Heart Associ-
ation offers CPR classes certified by the AHA.-The course defines the warn-
ing signs of respiratory arrest and gives prevention strategies to avoid sudden
death syndrome and the most common serious injuries and choking that can
occur in adults, infants and children. CPR and First Aid classes are offered
every third Saturday of the month from 9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital
Community Training Representative at 302-4732 for more information and
learn to save a life today.

REACH - Resources & Education for Autism and related Challenges meets
from 7pm — 9pm the second Thursday of each month in the cafeteria of the
BEC building, Blue Hill Road.

Civic Clubs



JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cycling are pleased to offer a cycling -
clinic for juniors between 10 and 17. The free clinic will be held ever Saturday |
in an effort to encourage kids to cycle. Parents interested in registering their .
children should contact organisers at jarcycling@gmail.com

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incor- ~
porated meets 6:30 pm every third Wednesday at the Bahamas National
Pride Building.

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial Hilton Monday’s at 7pm.

The Bahamas Historical Society will be hosting a presentation by Lionel °
Levine, entitled: "What will be Sir Stafford Sands' niche in Bahamian Histo-
ry?" The meeting is scheduled for December 1 @ 6pm at the museum on
Shirley Street and Elizabeth Avenue. The public is invited to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm @ C C Sweeting Senior ,
School's Dining Room, College Avenue off Moss Road. Club 9477 meets Fri-
day, 7pm @ Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm A19, Jean St. Club 3956
meets Thursday, 7.30pm @ British Colonial Hilton. Club 1600 meets Thurs-. -
day, 8.30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes. Club 7178 meets Tuesday, 6pm @ The J:
Whitney Pinder Building, Collins Ave. soit
Club 2437 meets every second, fourth and fifth Wednesday at the J Whitney,
Pinder Building, Collins Ave at 6pm. Club 612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyn-
dham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach. Club 753494 meets every Wednesday, 6pm- |
8pm in the Solomon’s Building, East-West Highway. Club 3596 meets at the
British Colonial Hilton Mondays at 7pm. Club Cousteau 7343 meets every
Tuesday night at 7.30 in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central |.
Andros. All are welcome.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega chapter meets every second
Tuesday, 6.30pm @ the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach. ed

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday, 7pm @ Gaylord’s °
Restaurant, Dowdeswell St. Please call 502-4842/377-4589 for more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ Atlantic
House, IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room.

The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) meets every third
Monday of the month in the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton Hotel,
Bay St.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets the second and fourth
Wednesday of the month, 8pm @ St Augustine’s Monestary.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Friday of each month, 7.30pm
at Emmaus Centre at St Augustine’s Monestary. For more info call 325-
1947 after 4pm.

International Association of Administrative Professionals, Bahamas Chapter
meets the third Thursday of every month @ Superclubs Breezes, Cable
Beach, 6pm. :

AMISTAD, a Spanish club meets the third Friday of the month at COB’s
Tourism Training Centre at 7pm in Room 144 during the academic year. The
group promotes the Spanish language and culture in the community.

Send all your civic and social events to The Tribune
via fax: 328-2398 or e-mail: outthere@tribunemedia.net

Bist ce ee:
THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005, PAGE 13






anamanian president arrives
in Cuba ahead of eye patients




“Copyri ighted,Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

eo






Butler & Sands Wine Experience 2005
Raises $7,000 for GB Hurricane Relief

Hundreds of wine lovers attended this “This year we decided to use this
year’s Butler & Sands Wine Experience — wonderful event to accomplish two things
to sample some of the company’s best — give our customers an opportunity to
wine offerings and help raise money for _ experience a vast array of different wines
Grand Bahama hurricane relief. and learn more about how to pair them
with food, and more importantly, to

Ticket sales generated $7,000 demonstrate our commitment to
which is being donated to the oo this community. One hundred
Grand Bahama branches of percent of ticket sales from
the Red Cross and the this event will help assist the
Salvation Army. many Grand Bahama victims
of Hurricane Wilma,” he said.










































Back row from left: Guillaume Duverdier, Group
oe ; : Commercial Manager, Burns House Group; Therese
In addition to sampling a wide Demeritte, Brand Manager, New World Wines; Wendell

the Grand Tasting room and variety of spectacular wines Seymour, Marketing Manager, Butler & Sands.

The festive wine tasting
featured more than 50 wines in
attendees who purchased Connoisseur’s attendees were automatically entered in Front from left: Dorothy King, Deputy Director —
: ae : : : General Bahamas Red.Cross; Prisca Gibbs, Executive

Tasting tickets were treated to an adoor prize raffle to win one of five wine Board Member Bahamas Red Cross.

additional 20 super premium wines and flower filled baskets each worth over

including Chateau Margaux, Taittinger $300.00.

Comtes de Champagne and Chateau

Leoville Barton. The Butler & Sands Wine Experience is

has ae the only consumer wine tasting that

LeRoy Archer, Managing Director of focuses on wine and wine alone. Butler
“parent company Burns House Group & Sands, a member of the Burns House
expressed his gratitude to the attendees Group of Companies, is the largest
of the event. distributor of fine wines in the Bahamas.





The Butler & Sands Wine Team
From left: Wendell Seymour- Marketing Manager;
Jerry Joseph, Merchandising Coordinator; Pernell
Poitier, Wine Sales Account Executive; Therese
Demeritte, Brand Manager, New World Wines; Robert
Donathan, Wine Sales Manager; Richard Byer, Wine
Sales Account Executive; Erica Rose, Wine Club
Coordinator; Gregoire Montot, Brand Manager, Old
World Wines; DeCarlo McPhee, Wine Sales Account
Executive; and Densil Deveaux, Brand Manager,
New World Wines.



' The Tribune wants to hear
‘ from people who are
} making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
‘you are raising funds for a
‘good cause, campaigning
por improvements in the
“area or have won an
‘Award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.




PAGE 14, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005 THE TRIBUNE





























Te ITINSVS

Butler & uneral Homes

& (ae

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

DR.
UTTAM
_ CHAVAN

i. memorial
F service will be
‘held at Uriah}
~ McPhee School
at 10:30 a.m. on
| Saturday for the

Tate Dr. Uttam Chavan.



Doc “Syndicated ‘Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”
: : 7

in the war against AIDS

Copyrighted Material 5. g

Hei is survived by his wife: Marie;
One (1) Daughter: Tara; One (1)
Son: Anil; Two (2) Brothers:
“Sabash & Bhagavan; One (1)
Sister: Indu; Cousins: Ashok,
) Miriam; ‘Numerous nieces,
- nephews, aunts and uncles; Friends
in The Bahamas, India, Irel and &
U.S.A.; Other families including
UDrs. Jagadeesh, Hover, Babu,
- Vakil, Shivaji, Mr. & Mrs. Babu
OF Nassau & Shyla.

: His remains can be viewed at the
‘ Chapel of Butlers’ Funeral Homes
and Crematorium, Oxford Avenue
“and Baillou Hill Road on Friday
_ from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. The
cremation will follow on Saturday
-after prayers at 2° Eton
beginning at: ‘12: 30" Ps me



‘Rock of Ages | Hadeken
Huneral Chapel prim

Wulff Road & Pinedale

Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 © Fax: 328-8852 mruriwcr?
Rea (es
LARSNER | choc thon
JEAN, 49
”
a resident of Soldier Road, wi »~!
& formerly of Haiti; will } '
be held at Calvary Haitian Arh aA
Baptist Church, West Ave
off Collins Ave; Sunday o- -

December 4th, 2005 at
2p.m. Officiating will be
Rev. Dr. Henri Cher-
Amie, assisted by Bro.
Solymy Decius & other Ministers of the Gospel.
Interment will be at Southern Cemetery,
| Spikenard & Cowpen Roads.

Left to cherish memories are his wife, Girlaine
Jean; a host of other relatives and friends
including; Rev. Dr. Henri Cher-Amie & The

! Entire Church Board; Bro’s Solimy Decius,
Marcelyn Sylvestre, Paul Justin, Ruben Isnord,
Profiio Pierre, Pierre Joseph & Daniel Calixte;
The Boad of Deacons, Bro’s Dieus Pere St. Louis,

| Petion Belton, Anthony Pierre, Ormeus Pierre,
Tomany Josaphat, Mitial Constantin & Maxius
Brazil: The Board Of Deaconess; sisters
Margarette Cher-Amie, Belzina St. Louis, Navelia
Brazil, Petion Belton & Marie MatheElizee; The
Choir of the Church, The Men, Ladies & Youth,
Sunday School Teachers; Phare Celeste, Mens
Choir, United Gospel Singers, I.J.C., L.E.D.;
Solid Rock Calvary Baptist Church, Coral
Harbour C H.B.C., Light House B.C.,
Resurrection C.B.C. and all Leaders and Members
of the Church.

Cash 20% » Credit ns 1

= St MAJOR CREDIT CARDS

SAV-A-CHEK WILL BE ACCEPTED FOR
REGULAR PRICED ITEMS ONLY

Friends may pay their last respects at The Rock
of Ages Funeral Chapel Wulff Rd. and Pindale

} on Saturday from 10:00a.m. to 6:00p.m. and on
Sunday at the church from 1:00p.m. until funeral
time.




“Being informed about local news, sports,
entertainment and. world events is important to



me. The Tribune is my choice for news and
information. The Tribune is my newspaper.’



JASON RAHMING

ne from your
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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005 THE TRIBUNE |








Butler & Sands
Company Limited

Celebrate with our
new wines
from:






















I ;
Producer: HARDYS E

Wine: Stamp of Australia Cabernet

Regiow: South Eastern Australia
Accompaniment: red meats, pasta &. :
cheeses

ys HARDYS
: Nottage Hill Cabernet Sauvignon/



&

$

vy
eee oe ®

oe &

4

WINERY -
an Merlot

Pye ee
bee ae

&

astern Australia)



&
ent: red curry pork loin, ss
reast & tasmanian shrimp 9°"



cer: JACOB CREEK

e: Chardonnay






dishes

V
- Producer: NOBILO




seafood, &




| Producer:




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Region: Marlborough, New Zealand ‘
Accompaniment: salads, light dishes . :

Ve o29.05




Buy 3 bottles of any
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and get 20% off. .

Bo Ae Peo BES 1 DEE

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‘oo 8 Sp oS 6 6 Rin oe © ee ee wee 8 se oes



<«
, 2005, PAGE 17
THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2,

oo B ottle of .
“Pipes Heldaeck










ibe

Sale Date: December ist-December th, 2
WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. MAXIMUM ONE GIFT PER CUSTOMER. OFFERS ARE NOT CUMULATIVE.
: a ONE NET PURCHASE AMOUNT WILL BE TAKEN INTO ACCOUNT. ms



Po



S }

Caves Village, Shirley Street, JFK Drive, Harbour Bay Shopping Center.
Roundabout Cable Beach, East-West Highway, Lyford Cay



Butler & Sands
Company Limited:





PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY.
PAGE 18, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005

THE TRIBUNE â„¢



LOCAL NEWS

Chef savours regional honour

Tracey Sweeting, award-winning chef of
Bahamas Culinary Classic and internation-
al Culinary Olympics fame, returned from
the Martinique Culinary Arts Festival this
past October with another of the region’s
most prestigious culinary honours.

Mr Sweeting has added to his already
full trophy case the Madin’ Gastro Kan-
nari D’or (Golden Pan) Award.

Organised by the Corporation of Cooks
and Pastry Cooks of Martinique, the
Caribbean chefs’ culinary challenge was
designed to reinforce the relationships
between the culinary professionals of the
Caribbean, develop their competitive spir-
it and promote the revaluation of local pro-
duce.

The only native-English speaking candi-
date in the field of seven Francophones
vying for the coveted honour, Mr Sweeting

did not count on bringing the gold home
this time.

The other chefs, favourites from Mar-
tinique, Guadeloupe and Haiti, made for-
midable opponents, he admitted, but ones
that he would ultimately overcome.

For Sweeting, sous chef at the Radisson
Cable Beach Resort, the first challenge lay
in the daunting language barrier.

And not only was he unfamiliar with the
language, he was also new to their regular
diet. The competition called for Sweeting to
create an original three-course meal, devel-
oping entrees featuring five key ingredients.

No difficulty there, except that three of
the five were items totally alien to this
Bahamian chef. Chicken and crayfish he
had prepared many times, but this would
be his first encounter with rabbit, octo-
pus and cobia — a large tropical game

fish also known as black salmon.

Fortunately, this exotic shopping list was
provided to him three weeks in advance
and gave him a chance to do what any oth-
er culinary professional would: “I ordered a
few rabbits and I went to town on them,
learning their texture, how to break them
down and how to work with them.” He
soon found out that rabbit has a consisten-
cy akin to chicken.

The octopus he tackled with a simple
island policy: treat it like conch.

His Tropical Kannari D’or Seafood Sam-
pler blew the judges away, and the Que-
becois chefs who pitied him eventually invit-
ed him to participate in an advanced com-
petition in Quebec.

Chef Sweeting dedicated his Golden Pan
award to his three-year-old daughter Tani-
ah. “Everything I do is for her,” he said.

Now in Fort Lauderdale Airport

Terminal 3 location open as of November 26th

Ship Now, Fly Later

Drop your bags off the day before you travel,
and they'll be waiting for you when you arrive!

We accept most oversize/overweight items and boxes!

Bags arrive 1lam

Drop Off:

Miami Airport

4005 NW 28th St

(305) 871-0571
(between Thrifty and Budget}
Gpen Every Day BAM-8PM

Fort Lauderdale Airport
Bags To Go Inc
(954) 359-8656
(Terminal 3, Lower Level
Next to American Airlines baggage)
Open M-F BAM-8PM -

Save up.to



Pay in Nassau

Pick Up:

Nassau Airport
Customs Hall
(242) 377-6593
(inside the Airport Terminal)
Open on-call 422-2318

Fort Lauderdale
Airport location
operated by
Bags To Go Inc

5%* on airline excess baggage fees

“Some airtines’ published excess baggage fees on your third bag, If it is oversize and over-
weight at 751bs, can be as high as $185, With excesshaggage you can pay as little as $75 for
the same bag, We are cheaper than the competition in all other comparisans too.

Take a look at our other services:

pdxexpress

next day courier
with delivery

Get more information at
www.pdxbahamas.com
(242) 341-6593



pdacmailbox

unlimited US mall

pdaccargo
bulk freight
COMING soon

>> affordable air freight







@ RADISSON sous chef Tracey Sweeting

Colonel’s jackpot
ready for finale



@ MAURICE Williams, winner at the Golden Gates location...
Mr Williams eats at KFC three to four times a week. He is affili- ©
ated with the Salvation Army and plans to make a donation to

that charity and place the remaining funds in his savings account.



Hi WHEN Dave Alvaranga received his winning call he thought
it was a joke. He plans to purchase a laptop computer with his
$1,000 Jackpot winnings.

KFC restaurants continue to
give their customers with tokens
of appreciation as the Colonel’s
Jackpot promotion nears its
end.

The 13-week promotion, on
since early September, offers a
$1,000 prize to nine lucky cus-
tomers each week — $1000 from
every KFC in Nassau — plus a
monthly $10,000 prize for one
lucky customer.

Gabriel Sastre, general man-
ager of Restaurants (Bahamas)
Limited which operates KFC
restaurants in Nassau, said that
the company enjoys promotions
like the Colonel’s Jackpot
because they generate a lot of
excitement around the brand.

“Bahamians are loyal con-
sumers and we feel the best way
to reward their loyalty to KFC
is to give back some of what
makes the consumer machine
tick - money!”

KFC’s Jackpot has enabled
120 people to increase their cash
flow just in time for the holi-
days.

The Colonel’s Jackpot is

in the canisters during the month of November 2005 will be donated to the Ronald — |
| McDonald House Charities and the Bahamas National Children’s Choir. Pim ovine



nearing an end and promises to.
conclude with a big bang when

the third $10,000 prize is

announced at the Golden Gates

KFC on December 12.

Every entry from the Novem-
ber 15 through December 11 is
entered into the final drawing;
and that includes the weekly
$1,000 winners from that period.

Entry involves purchasing
any KFC Combo or more, writ-
ing on the back of the receipt a
name, telephone numbers and
the answer to the question:
“How many KFC restaurants
are there in Nassau?” drop the
entry in the marked box at any
KFC restaurant and wait to be’
called.

Restaurants (Bahamas) Lim-
ited has been serving its prod-
ucts to Bahamians since the ear-
ly 1960s.

It manages nine KFC restau-.
rants in Nassau — Mackey
Street, Oakes Field, Robinson
Road, Prince Charles, Golden
Gates, Village Road, South.
Beach, Marathon Mall and
Saunders Beach.


THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005, PAGE 1°



EU eases way to
increased trade Las
with (Gonyrighted Material
yndicated Content; |




oa aa

Available from Commercial News Providers”



a es

bewom «

Global United’s Gift To You...
a Hassle Free Shipping!

Vatx an cavoy doubts | : entintosca teed oS
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Coming Soon to Sandyport!

The Gul § OK J
Miami Warehouse

1360 NW 78th Avenue, Miami, Fl 33126
Drop off or ship your goods to our Miami warehouse
and we’ll deliver them direct to you! -



OPEN:
MONDAY - FRIDAY
8:30 am to 6:00 pm
OPEN Weekends



November 19th - December | 8th



Throughout the Bahamas, from Miami or anywhere



SCRUBS & MORE else in the world we take care of your goods from start
Phone: 393-7200 * Kemp Road South 8 to finish!
BI-ANNUAL SALE | | ©. | oe ee a
Thursday, December Ist, ee i ee oe / NASSAU : 4 : i 5 MIAMI : eG a REEPORT
Saturday, December 3rd, 2005

° Scrub Sets $20.00 ¢ Printed V-Neck Scrub Tops |
$12.00 * Snap Tops $15.00

| ¢ Scrub Pants $10.00 ¢ All Clogs $25.00 |

° All Rockers footwear $60.00 ¢ |

| All White Swan & Cherokee Uniforms 10% off |

pect | oe 242.377.1252/0164 305.591.4369 == 242.352.9315








PAGE 20, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005

THE TRIBUNE |



“== BU Parliament backs tough
anti-bird flu measures

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from.Commercial News Providers””

yy -"



PO OUKae IRN EN
W/m ee) loa NcLe I oe

LL GE APPLIANCES
\SH SALES ONLY!

: a Joeem eM eee Reema cl CLT)



GEOFFREY

| Fantastic offer begins
| Thursday, December 1st



and lasts the entire

JONES & GO

month of December.

Don’t let it pass you by! — 322-2188 /9

Sales & Full Service Department



Z
we
&
‘=



Rosetta & Montgomery Sts.



x
o

rr" . Die rweu

Business Analyst (BA-3)
- PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT AND REAL ESTATE

Montana Holdings Ltd is undertaking a major land development programme in
Rum Cay. This project will comprise international hotels, a large marina, over 400
homes and a range of holiday resort facilities in one of the most beautiful Family -
Islands of the Bahamas. We are now seeking a Business Analyst to join our rapidly
expanding Nassau office and to become a team member of a growing property
development business.

Business Analyst (BA-3)

Reporting to the Chief Financial Officer & VP of Corporate Development, the -
Business Analyst will take responsibility for a range of activities.
These shall include, but not be limited to: s

¢ Property sales and conveyance

¢ Coordination and planning

¢ Facilitating various partnership transactions

¢ Monitoring numerous. commercial contractual arrangements
e Supporting key financial and project monitoring processes

Requirements
The ideal candidate shall have at least:

¢ 3 years experience of the real estate business, land development, or the
hotel/holiday resorts business

¢ Educated to a degree level — preferably with conc -ntration in Business
Administration, Finance or a Science Degree

¢ Held positions dealing with executive management

¢ Experienced in managing suppliers as well interfacing with customers

e Excellent communication skills, both written and oral

¢ Must be computer literate with excellent knowledge of Microsoft Office
-and especially proficient in Word and Excel

¢ Experience in Microsoft Project or similar project management software
is highly desired

The successful candidates will be organized, personable, ambitious and very
productive. They shall demonstrate high levels of initiative and the ability to -
manage all allocated activities to an early conclusion. They will have excellent -
written and verbal communication skills and have the ability to write detailed
reports and associated documentation. They will have a strong desire to learn new
skills and to accept more accountability —- and have the highest level of business
acumen and integrity.

This position is situated in Nassau with some travel to the building site in Rum
Cay. International travel may be required. The salary and benefits package shall _
be commensurate with the responsibilities and experience of the successful candidate.

The Montana Holdings office environment is challenging, energetic and very
demanding. It calls for staff to accept responsibility for all types of work activities,
which shall be undertaken to high professional standards.

Contact

Please send cover letter and resume by e-mail quoting above reference (BA-3) to

island_development1@yahoo.com or by post to P.O. Box N-9322, Nassau, The
Bahamas.

The closing date for receipt of applications is December 19, 2005


THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005, PAGE 21



“FRIDAY EVENING DECEMBER 2, 2005

7:30 | 8:00 | 6:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

NETWORK CHANNELS

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Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.


















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PAGE 22, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005 THE TRIBUNE
—



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PAGE 24, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005 THE TRIBUNE

+

Solomon’s SuperCenter ¢ Old Trail Road « Nassau ° 242-393-4041 * Mon-Sat: 8am-9pm & Sun 7am-12noon
Solomon’s ¢ Queen’s Highway ¢ Freeport °242-352-7018 * Mon-Sat:8am-8pm & Sun: 8am-noon
Solomon’s SuperCentere Nathan Key Drive ¢ Marsh Harbour ° 242-367-2601/2 * Mon-Thu 8am-7pm, Fri &Sat: 8am-8pm,Sun: 8am-2pm
Solomon’s Treasure Cay* Treasure Cay Shopping Centre Treasure Cay, Abaco * 2420365-8350 * Mon-Sat: 8am-6pm & Sun: 9am-1pm
Credit cards accepted ¢ Gift cards available



Grand prize winner can chose either one (1) $100 gift card every week for 52 weeks (Total value of $5200 or a one-time instant store credit of $3500).
Winners of monthly groceries can choose either one (1) $100 gift card per week for 4 weeks total value $400 or a one-time instant store credit of $250)




Government

,

-FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005

‘SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis,








Stamp Tax

cash flow

@:By NEIL HARTNELL
_ Tribune Business Editor

overnment revenues are “a lit-
tle ahead of projections” for the
first four months of fiscal 2005-
2006, the minister of state for
finance told The Tribune yester-
‘day, with amendments to the Stamp Tax Act
having improved cash flow through the penalties
for late stamping of documents.
~ James Smith said: “We’re a little ahead of
projections for the first four months on revenue,

and I think it really reflects a combination of ,

increased tourism expenditure and the effect of
foreign direct investment. .
“It could be that the Kerzner project is begin-

ning to gain traction from the employment of

workers and imports.”

Another key factor had been the plugging of
what the Government believed were various
loopholes in the Stamp Tax Act via amendments
enacted earlier this year.

Mr Smith said: “The plugging of the Stamp
Tax is really beginning to show. We’re seeing
impressive growth in Stamp Tax collections.

“It’s improving our cash flow as those respon-

sible for having documents stamped are coming â„¢

forward a little quicker than they used to. I think
we’ve done something.”

.To prevent documents going unstamped for a
long period of time, surcharges of 10 per cent of
the Stamp Tax value and 15 per cent are now

being applied for documents not dealt with for ©

between six-12 months and over one year respec-
tively.

Stamp Tax revenues account for about 19 per
cent of the Government’s total revenues, which
in 2004-2005 totalled about $1.05 billion, but
the Act was amended to plug loopholes created
by company mergers and acquisitions; the use of

’ corporate and trust structures for legal avoid-

,

ance; and certain construction contracts. |
e Central Bank of the Bahamas’ report on
monthly economic developments for October,

Leadenhall liquidation
now court-supervised |

which began in October 2003,
will also be stayed:

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Revenues ‘a little ahead
of projections’ for 2005-
2006 first four months





_ MINISTER JAMES SMITH

Government's fiscal deficit fell by 56.83 per cent
to $20.4 million during the first quarter of its

_ 2005-2006 financial year.

While increased import demand and improved

SEE page 3B ,

x (Heads of Agreement
change aids | process ‘overrides’

}

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Heads of Agreement
process for approving major
investment projects in the Fam-
ily Islands “overrides” local
government and obstructs con-
sultation with local residents

affected by these develop- .

ments, a Freeport-based attor-
ney is arguing.

Fred Smith, of Callenders &
Co, said Heads of Agreement
contracts entered into with
developers by the central Gov-
ernment in Nassau “attempt to
override the Local Govern-
ment Act and dictate what

Islands, whereas the Local
Government Act, duly enacted
by Parliament, requires District
and. Town Councils to make
decisions about Crown Land,
Treasury Land, hotel licencing,
business licencing”.

Act

Describing the Local Gov-
ernment Act as “the founda-.
tion for local consultation for |

development”, Mr Smith said
that while he welcomed foreign
direct investment projects as

drivers of economic growth, “‘it -

cannot be on the basis of giving

_ the Bahamas away and bur-

dening only Bahamians with

local Government

taxation”. :

The attorney, who represents
the Save Guana Cay Reef
Association in its fight against
the Baker’s bay Golf & Ocean
Club development, argued that
Bahamian.developers were not
receiving the same favourable
terms and conditions as their
foreign counterparts. ©

Mr Smith also said that: by
leasing Crown and Treasury
land to foreign developers on
favourable terms, and provid-.
ing incentives that usually
waived the payment of customs
duties, real property taxes,



Tribune Business Editor

LEADENHALL Bank &
Trust’s liquidation has been
transformed from a voluntary
winding-up to one that is court
supervised, under an order
from Justice Jeannie Thomp-
son.

A newspaper advertisement
said the Order had been made
on November 25, and mandat-

_ed “that all actions or other

proceedings against the bank
be stayed pending further
order”.

» That appears to indicate that
the long-running legal dispute
between Leadenhall and Turks
‘& Caicos-based FirstFinancial
Caribbean Trust Company,

Ragged Island to get

A Supreme Court injunction

had frozen the deposits of

Leadenhall’s former Master-
Card clients to protect them
while the dispute with FirstFi-
nancial plays out.

The case had revolved
around a Deed of Retirement,
Appointment and Indemnity
that Leadenhall allegedly exe-
cuted in 2002, appointing First
Financial as the new trustee for
the security deposits.

._ First Financial was alleging
that Leadenhall only trans-
ferred to it $14.25 million of
the $33 million in total deposits

SEE page 5B

electronic access to
Registrar General

-. ELECTRONIC access to

‘records at the Registrar Gen-
eral’s Department for Ragged
island residents will be com-
missioned today, the first stage
‘in a roll-out that will take in

- -all the Bahamas’ islands.

‘ Allyson Maynard-Gibson
said in a statement that she, the
‘Registrar General, V. Alfred

Gray, minister of agriculture, '
. fisheries and local government,

Minister hits
back at Delaney

and two administrators would

visit Ragged Island today to

commission the system.
“This will be repeated in the

SEE page 4B





ASSAU, FREEPORT, A

should happen in the Family

SEE page 5B

Bahamas faces ‘brain drain’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE acting head of the Bahamas’ No.3 polit- °

ical party has warned that this nation is suffering
a “brain drain”, with its most talented and high-
ly-skilled workers and university graduates
remaining abroad to find work after graduat-
ing

ment as acting chief executive of the Coalition

_for Democratic Reform (CDR), told-a Civil

Society Bahamas town meeting on immigration

‘issues that in meetings with Bahamian associa-

tions in South Florida, his political party had
found that “many of our finest sons and daugh-
ters are holding top position in.a variety of
areas”.

Mr Maynard added: “In many. cases, these
Bahamians long to return home and participate
in the building of our nation.” He added that his
party would seek to encourage well-qualified
Bahamians to return home through a combina-
tion of economic incentives and its immigration
policy. .

Meanwhile, the CDR also echoed Civil Soci-

ty Bahamas’ position on the work permit

approvals process, calling for a Special Compli-



3




i S TELL

today!

Charles Maynard, Bernard Nottage’s replace- ~~

ance Unit to be established within the Immi-
gration Department “to police all work permit
agreements”.

It would, according to Mr Maynard, assess
the recruitment process, an applicant’s real qual-
ifications, the training programmes in place to
train up Bahamians to replace expatriates, and
the “transition process” between expatriate
and their replacement by Bahamians.

=.Mr Maynard said an-immigration policy must

be geared towards economic growth, helping to
expand intellectual capacity and build this
nation’s physical infrastructure.

While foreign workers benefited Bahamians
by giving them exposure to “special skills” and
work ethics, many Bahamians were feeling “dis-
advantaged” by the importation of foreign exper-
tise, feeling that expatriates had greater eco-
nomic and professional opportunities than them-
selves.

Mr Maynard said globalisation and the
reliance on foreign direct investment ensured
the Bahamas had to open up to foreign man-
agers, adding: “Let us stop pretending that when
multinational companies meet the prescribed

SEE page 3B






-» College is in his future

Reality Check. ae

You never know what's in yours.

His future and yours can be protected

with the right life insurance or investment plan.
Call or log on to www.familyguardian.com



| Be



. Me INSURA
Sh” cOMPANY
ERA CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O. BOX SS 6232
PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005

THE TRIBUNE’

BUSINESS ©



Purpose and passion
drive business success

ELECTRICITY
CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

TECHNICAL TRAINER
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING DEPARTMENT

A vacancy exists in the Human Resources & Training Division for a Technical Trainer.

The Technical Trainer (Electrical) is responsible for the technical instruction of employees
from all engineering departments within the Corporation encompassing Electrical Engineering,
Transmission and distribution Operations, Power Generation Operations inclusive of Plant
Installation, Maintenance, Operation and Control Workshop.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

¢ Providing instructions and training in engineering trade skills for employees within
the Corporation

¢ Preparing candidates for external examination certification by.local and overseas
organizations

¢ Providing instructions on developing safe and efficient work habits

¢ Providing instructions to participants in classroom workshops and job environments

¢ Preparing program criteria and marking schemes for trade testing in electrical based
trades.

° Preparing timetables and examination schedules for visiting external examiners.

* Identifying, developing and delivering engineering; courses (i.e., Electrical Technician

' Training).

¢ Evaluating, recording and reporting on the progress of students attending training
courses

* Preparing course notes, training aids, evaluating and marking schemes for all courses.

Job requirements include:
¢ A minimum of a Bachelor’s Degree in Electrical Engineer or.an OND in engineering
or equivalent qualifications
¢ A minimum of 10+ years of experience in an industrial training setting
¢ Sound knowledge of technical skills related to electrical engineering principles
¢ Good judgment and sound reasoning ability
¢ Excellent time management skills
¢ Proficient oral and written communication skills
* Ability to keep current with newly installed or modified plant
* Comprehension of schematics, technical reports, drawings, troubleshooting and
technical activities
* Good information transfer skills
¢ Computer literate

Interested persons may apply by completing an internal Application Form forwarded to
reach: The Human Resources Department on or before Tuesday, December 6, 2005.



TECHNICAL VACANCIES

THE BAHAMAS _.
MARITIME AUTHORITY

The Bahamas Maritime Authority is The Bahamas national agency that is responsible
for administering The Bahamas Shipping Register, which is currently the third
largest in the world. The Authority prides itself on high standards and the good
safety record of its fleet. .

Applications are invited for technical positions to be based in London. The successful _

candidates will be members of the Technical Department. The Technical Department
is responsible for all aspects related to ensuring the safety and security of Bahamas
registered ships and the protection of the marine environment, including providing
technical assistance to all the Authority’s stakeholders.

TECHNICAL OFFICER

Applicants for the post should be either a holder of seagoing Officer Certificate
of Competency issued under STCW or a qualified Naval Architect, and have
practical and theoretical knowledge of ships and maritime national and international
requirements. Applicants with other qualifications such as Royal Bahamas Defence
Force, marine inspection/surveying/auditing or other suitable maritime expeneNe
may also be considered. ’

TECHNICAL ASSISTANT

Applicants for the post should be highly organized with a good level of computer
literacy. A familiarity with the use of databases would be an advantage. The position

is ideally suited for a young person, who has some experience of the shipping and |

wishes to broaden his/her knowledge.

Salary is negotiable, dependent on experience and qualification. Applicants are
invited to write in confidence, enclosing a copy of their CV, details of current salary
and copies of certificates to:- Ls

by email: dhutchinson@bahamasmaritime.com
by fax: +44-207-264-2595 or 242-394-3014
by post:

The Director
The Bahamas Maritime Authority
Latham House
16 Minories
London EC3N 1EH
England, UK

or

PO Box N-4679
Nassau, Bahamas

Closing date for receipt of applications is 16th December 2005.



\ sm Busines

“Copyrig hted Material a

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”



@ ao ---

On

-Two experienced Senior Se
electrical project at Paradise Island: Please
P.O. Box N-8195, Nassau, Bahamas.



We've worked hard and now it’s time to relax and enjoy life. Time to
catch up with old friends. Sleep in late if we want to. Pursue our
hobbies. And enjoy our grandchildren. Maybe even take that cruise
we talked about. Retirement is great because we planned ahead
with personal retirement plans from Colinalmperial.



a Colinalmperial.
: lAsuranee (td. ‘
Confidence for Life




THE-TRIBUNE









Es ass

i nn Certs Pea on

| Harbour Island has been vot-
ed the number four top —

Atlantic Ocean Resort, with a

‘rating of 83.3 per. cent, by. the
‘readers of Condé Nast gue Ve :

Caer eval Cee

The resort, which a

oh rE Edo featured
in the magazine’s 2005 Read-

ECO (ese. ar Tce POUL
PI CURT MCMC Ko 10a wl oie
- “We owe a great ‘thank:
PCr Oc ees Cad CoC
i Ma a

ee ee tog

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005, PAGE 3B



BiPlivrvite lemony uae
voted fourth top
Atlantic pce aaa

on us; to the travel agents
PVR leita COIL) aC tC al
icated. teams. on’ Harbour
POPC CRT RTC a CMAQ a I B
whose efforts and hard work
enable us to achieve such -
recognition,”-said Pink

' Sands’ general Manager,
Clemens von Merveldt, in a
‘statement. For the Condé .

Nast Traveler award, resorts
were rated in the categories ©

_of rooms, service, food/din-
ing, location, overall Me
LC pau





Award winners judge
financial essay contest

. fessional of the Year; BFSB’s Donna Nguyen-
Comito; and Paul Winder, Ansbacher Bahamas,
Executive of the Year.

Schools participating in the essay and Speech
Competition this year included Aquinas Col-
lege, C.C. Sweeting Senior High, C.R. Walker
Senior High, Galilee Academy, Government
High School, Queen’s College, Saint Andrew’s
School, and Saint Augustine’s College.

THE winners of the 2005 Financial Services
Industry Excellence Awards were selected as
judges for the Essay and Speech Competitions
hosted as part of the annual Financial Services

School Outreach Programme.

HE PHOTO shows (L to R:) Francelyn Bethel,
Oceanic Bank & Trust, Achiever of the Year;
Crestwell Gardiner, The Fidelity Group, Pro- .



Stamp Tax change aids
Government cash flow

FROM page 1B

revenue collection generated a
23.5 per cent increase in total
tax receipts, the Central Bank
said total government spend-
ing also rose by 12.3 per cent.

Mr Smith yesterday, though,

said ié:was difficult to make

comparisons with previous
years-in relation to the Gov-
ernmignt’s finances, as the year-
before: period in 2004-2005
might-for example, included a
major fepayment of debt prin-
cipal;that did not have to be
made-this fiscal year.

He added that the expendi-
ture side of the Government’s
Budget was “very. difficult to
get a’solid grip on”, as it most-
ly consisted of fixed costs such
as salaries, emoluments, wages
and elas Capital spending was



Bahamas faces ‘brain drain’

FROM page 1B

sdqueements of advertising
available positions, that
Bahamians really have a
chance to receive those posi-
tions, We know that the expa-
‘triates are packed and well on
their- way to the Bahamas by
the time the positions are
advertised.”

As a result, Mr Maynard said

also required for infrastructure
projects such as roads and
schools.

Mr Smith. said the fiscal
deficit for 2005-2006 year-end
was likely to be down from the
previous year, but warned that
it was near impossible to pre-
dict so far ahead.

Positive

“T think we will see positive
economic growth, which will
be reflected in the revenues,
but I’m also cautious, particu-
larly in terms of unforeseen cir-
cumstances that might lead to
greater expenditure,” Mr Smith
said.

“We've been spending quite
a bit on security screening
equipment and testing” for all
the Bahamas’ airports and port
points of entry. The Bahamas

work permits had to be
assigned for a specific period
of time and a time set for when
a Bahamian would step into

. the job. Training programmes

for Bahamians should also be

made a condition for compa-.

nies receiving a certain num-
ber of permits.

However, Mr Maynard said
work permits had to be closely
monitored and “all loopholes
closed” to ensure that positions



*
wf
a

MANAGER

Sepenienes requir ed.

Employment
Opportunities

Previous food & beverage or franchise managerial

GAMES SUPERVISOR

Minimum |-year supervisory experience and ability
fo trouble shoot electronic equipment.

CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVES

Previous customer service experience isa plus.

maisrested persons must be able to work shifts

,to the residential communities

®

has to comply with interna-
tional and US guidelines on
port-of-entry security, and have
the right screening equipment
in place, by the deadline of Jan-
uary 1, 2006.

On Hurricane Wilma’s —}
impact, Mr Smith said it*had’ ©
been confined to the northern
Bahamas, and while it had
caused the loss of some hotel
bookings and economic activi-
ty, in addition to devastating
parts of western Grand
Bahama, the effects were not
widespread.

Mr Smith said: “A lot of the
damage in Grand Bahama was

as opposed to the commercial
areas, so while there’s been
some tightening in Grand
Bahama, in relation to the larg-
er economy I don’t think the
effects will be so dramatic.”

were advertised in such a way
as not to exclude Bahamians
by requiring specialist skills,
only for the expatriate
employed not to possess those
skills.

Pricing Information As Of:
01 December 2005

S2wk-Low
Abaco Markets .

‘Placement — and
‘Experience in teaching advanced courses is

CRITERIA FOR EMPLOYMENT

A minimum of a Bachelor's Degree from a
recognized university confirmed by a
certified copy of certificate

A post graduate certificate in education or a
teaching certificate confirmed by a certitie
copy of certificate
Willingness — to

support thé — school’s

Accelerated Programme, including teaching |
Advanced }

courses . such as
Advanced

advanced
Subsidiary

preferred
Two professional references

9

Successful applicants will be expected tol)

make a commitment to work in harmony

with Christian principles and to support the
emphases of the Bahamas Conference of

The Methodist Church of which the school
18 a part.

*

Colina.

Financial Advisors Ltd.

Bahamas Property Fund

Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol

Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Kerzner International BDRs

12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets

10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

20 20 RNB Hold

28.00 ABDAB
13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
x 0.35 RND Moldings
BISX Listed Mutual Funds — i
52wk-Hi __ 52wk-Low “Fund Name _

Colina Money Market Fu

Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund

10.0000
2.1675



QUEEN'S COLLEGE ...

0.00
0.00
0.14
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Last Price
10.00
0.00

41.00
12.50
0.35

Last 12 Months

nd 1.259334"
2.4766 ***

2.275422**

0.08
ieee

Weekly Vol

Div $

Is the oldest private school in The
Bahamas

Ensures a seamless continuity of education
and a strong sense of community
Offers a rich curriculum

Is staffed by a talented and
teaching staff |
Is a place where excellence is respected |
and pursued, where teaching and learning}
are Innovative and w here caring ‘for other
is intrinsic

Offers. a competitive Kieaetits package,
including gratuity, pension, health
insurance, discount on children’s tuition
Queen's College was established in Nassau
in 188) by The Methodist Church and is a
member of The International Association
of Methodist Schools, Colleges and
Universities TAMSCU}

dedicated j



= FIDELITY

O. TAZ
0.070
0.689
-0.046
0.791
0.429
0.428
0.717
0.695
0.675
0.022
0.526
0.526
0.138
2.036

2,000

2,800

EPS $
0.960
0.800
0.000
0.000
0.810
0.000

Yield %

between the hours of 9am & 11pm and available on
weekends and holidays.

1.0755 Colina Bond Fund 1.140599°***
FINDEX! CLOSE 435:630 / YTD 1.321% /.2003 14.88% ‘

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $-Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

BISX ALL SHARE INDE X - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by’ tne last 12 month earnings

**- AS AT AUG. 10, 2005/ ** - AS AT OCT. 31, 2005

- AS.AT OCT. 28, 2005/ *** - AS AT OCT. 31, 2005/ AS AT OCT. 31, 2005

[eo FRabe. CALL: COLIN 282. 302-7010 ie FIDELITY 242- 356-776 - Ae

assport photo to Mr. Pretzels at The Mall at
Marathon.










PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005

THE TRIBUNE

rece mouscomeame
Stocks rise as



fears are dam



“Copyrighted Material

inflation

$l

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

'e® ee & «= wd

PUBLIC NOTICE











CHARTTON, of #7 Coral Reef. Loop Freeport G.B., intend to
change my child’s name from SHAVAN CLAYVON MOXEY. to

this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box F-43536,
Grand Bahama, no later than thirty (30) days.after the date
of publication of this notice.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS -2005
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Commercial Division COM/bnk/00069

~ THE MATTER OF LEADENHALL BANK & TRUST

COMPANY LIMITED
(in Voluntary Limited) :

AND |
IN THE MATTER OF The Companies Act, 1992
- ORDER

~ UPON the Petition of the above-named Company on the 25th
November, 2005 preferred unto Her Ladyship the Honourable
Miss Jeannie Thompson.

AND UPON HEARING Mr. Sidney A. Cambridge, Jr.,
Esquire of Counsel herein for the Petitioner, LEADENHALL
BANK & TRUST COMPANY LIMITED (In Voluntary
Liquidation) (hereinafter referred to as “the Comp: or “the
Bank”).

AND UPON READING the Affidavit of vain Craig A. Gomez,
filed herein on the 22nd November, 2005 verifying the said
Petition, and the. Nassau Guardian of 16th November, 2005
containing the advertisement of the. said Petition, this cant doth
order as follows:

1. That the voluntary winding up of Leadenhall Bank & Trust
Company Limited be continued, but subject. to the supervision
fof this Court;

‘2. that Mr. Craig A. Gomez be ‘appointed Liquidator of the
cOnpany, without security;

a 3. that the Liquidator do ae three (3) weeks from the date
# hereof and‘henceforth every Three (3) months file with the Court
a Repoft in: writing as to the position of and the progress made
| with the windirg- up of the Bank and with the realization (if) any
f of the assets thereof and as to any other matters connected with
| the winding-up of the Bank as the Court may from time to time
f direct such Reports in writing to be sent to any creditor of the
# Bank who shall so request;

, 4. that no bills of cost and other charges, or expenses, or special
gj remuneration of any attoreney employed by the Liquidator of
the Bank, or any remuneration, charges or expenses of such
Liquidator, or any manager, accountant, auctioneer, broker, or
other person be paid out of the assets of the Bank, unless such
costs, charges, expences or remuneration shall hav been taxed
_or.allowed by the Registrar AND IT IS ORDERED THAT all
such costs, charges, expenses and remuneration be taxed and
ascertained accordingly;

5. that all actions or other proceedings against the Bank be stayed
pending further order;

6. that the cost of the Petitioner be taxed and paid out of the

.assets:of the Bank, and that on such taxation the Petitioner’s

costs.to Comprise all-costs of and incidental to the said Petition;
j 7. that the Liquidator have liberty to appoint Messrs. Callenders

& Co., Counsel and Attorneys, to assist him in the peponeare
_ of his duties; and

8. that the Liquidator have liberty to apply for directions to the
Judge in Chambers generally as may be advised.

DATED the 25th day of November, A.D., 2005.
BY ORDER OF THE COURT

REGISTRAR



i<—-* << —*

FROM page 1B

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, ELLA R. MOXEY ©

coming months from island to
island, including next week in
Grand Bahama, until the entire
Bahamas has immediate elec-
tronic access to all the records

nard-Gibson said.
“In January of 2006 we will
launch complete electronic
access to the records of. the
Department, with the sole
exception of intellectual prop-

SHAVAN CLAYVON KELLY. If there are any objections to .





of the Department,” Mrs May-

NOTICE

ANTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000
No.45 of 2000

SHELBIN INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (8) |
of the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of |
2000, the Dissolution of SHELBIN INVESTMENTS |.

LIMITED has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck

off the Registrar. The date of completion of the dissolution | -

was November 18, 2005.

For: Continental Liquidators, Inc,
Liquidator

NOTICE



NOTICE is hereby given that MARCELLIN DOLCE OF #70 BAY |

BERRY LANE OF FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a.citizen of The Bahamas, and that

any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization:|. --

should not be granted, should send a written and signed ‘statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 25TH day of
NOVEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality. and

‘| Citizenship, P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEAN ROBERT JOSEPH,
KEMP ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the

Minister responsible for ‘Nationality and Citizenship, for]...

registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2ND day of DECEMBER, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that HELGENCE OSCAR,
SOUTHERN HEIGHTS, P.O. BOX CR-54802, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for

‘Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 2ND day of
DECEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas..

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ESTHER ANIZEAY OSCAR,
SOUTHERN HEIGHTS, P.O. BOX CR-54802, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 2ND day of
DECEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

erty searches.”

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
the. delivery systems for the ser-
vice were being beta-tested,
with the technology and record
systems to be continually
updated.

She added: “The staff of the
Department has embraced the
challenge of globalisation and
now Bahamians anywhere in
the Bahamas or, indeed, any-
where..in-the world can look

forward to accessing their.

records at the touch of a but-
ton.”

Meanwhile, Mrs Maynard-
Gibson used the statement to
respond to allegations by FNM

~ Senator John Delaney, who
had ‘said the area’ containing:
-corporate files at the Registrar’

General’s Department had

' been contaminated by a sew-

erage back-up.
Describing this as “assolite:
ly wrong”, the minister said

that in July this year, stagnant
-. water from.a clogged basin in

the law firm above the Regis-
trar General’s Department’s 50
Shirley Street office had

escaped on to the floor and
. leaked down into the. Depart-

ment below.
_ Mrs tee -Gibson said:



“Files were immediately cov-
ered in protective plastic and -
out of an abundance of caution
- staff members were given the
option of a short time away
while the area was ventilated
to remove the unpleasant smell
of the stagnant water. There
was no sewerage leak.

“IT went immediately to
investigate the matter, to meet
with our team and to ensure
that every measure was taken
to effectively deal with pe inci-
dent.

“This unexpected incident
was a small challenge, the like
of which is encountered/from
time to time in daily manage-
ment. It restricted the public’s
access to the: Department for
a maximum of.a few hours on
one day in July, not for any
extended period of time as Mr
Delaney would mischievously
like to suggest.”

She added: “In modernising
the Department of the Regis-
trar General, the Ministry of
Financial Services and Invest-
ments has already accom-
plished what the previous
administration failed to’do in
10 years of office. We are com-
mitted to moving forward, not
backward.” ‘

"NOTICE

NOTICE i is hereby given that NADILIA JEAN, FIRE TRAIL
ROAD, P.O. BOX SB-50076, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality,and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason: why
_registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and. signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 25TH day of NOVEMBER, 2005
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,



| P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advisec! triat 1, KEVIN SOLOMAN, of
the Western District, New Pi: ‘dence, Nassau, Bahamas,
intend to change my name to KEVIN TAYLOR. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, LAVITO T. THOMAS,
of Clive Avenue, #229 Explorers Way, Freeport, Grand
Bahama, Bahamas, intend to change my name to LAVITO
T. MARTIN. If there are any objections to this change of
name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this

notice.
PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL’

The Public is hereby advised that |, MARCELLINE
VICTOR, of Southern District, c/o PO.Box N-8522,
Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name to
MERCELLINE VICTORIA SANDS. If there are any
- objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.






















THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2905, PAGE 5B



Heads of Agreement process
‘overrides’ local Government

FROM page 1B

“stamp duty, hotel taxes and business
licence fees, there were questions over
‘whether the Government would be
able to finance its own activities.

He said: “Our Islands are treasures
“which we should respect, cherish and
" protect. If we keep entering into these
‘ giveaway Heads of Agreements, there

will be precious little left for Bahami-

‘ans. Further, if we keep giving away

‘tax concessions, how will the country
finance itself? By giving such unnec-
essary generous tax and Crown Land

concessions, the Government is giving
away our patrimony and is eroding
our tax base.

“If none of these developments pay
taxes, where will the Treasury receive
taxes to pay for schocls, hospitals,
roads, police, judiciary and general
government?

“The answer is simple. Those taxes
will be extracted from Bahamian tax-
payers not the foreign investors. The
backs of Bahamians will be broken
so that we can have nice airports, nice
harbours, nice roads, nice landscap-
ing and nice facilities for tourists and
foreign investors to enjoy.”

Mr Smith, who is a resident of and
works in Freeport, urged the Gov-

ernment to focus its national devel-_

opment efforts on that city, arguing
that it already had an investor incen-
tive template in place through the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement:
Arguing that Freeport and Grand
Bahama already had the existing infra-
structure and land space to. accom-
modate large-scale investment pro-
jects, Mr Smith said the Government

should adopt a position that investors ©

seeking Crown Land and tax incen-
tives should be made to invest in
Freeport.

“By aclopting this approach, Gov-
ernment can stimulate the economy in
Freeport and'provide thousands of
jobs and create .an overnight econom-

ic boom:in'Freeport, and coinciden-

tally hundreds of millions of dollars
per annum for the Public Treasury,”
Mr Smith said.

“Freeport, the Golden Goose, has
historically, and even in its depressed
state, contributed $100 to $150 mil-
lion per annum in taxes, of which very
little comes back to Freeport.

“If the developer insists on devel-
oping elséwhere then, subject to
national land use policies, Local Gov-

ernment re environmental,
health, safety and other regulatory
issues, they should be permitted to do
so.

“But they should not receive free
Crown Land and Treasury Land and
get generous exemptions from hotel
taxes, real property taxes, business
licence taxes, stamp duties and cus-
toms duties.” :

* Mr Smith said that by encouraging
investment projects for other Family
Islands, and providing better incen-
tives that under the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement, the Government was dis-
couraging investment in Freeport.

Pur se

‘>? ~“ = -

Available from Commercial News Providers”

“Copyrighted Materia

» 7, oe

I’ ) eo)

Syndicated Content =;

Leadenhall liquidation
now court-supervised

FROM page 1B

held in trust, forcing it to take
vOut the injunction to protect
rand secure the remainder.

« A number of former execu-
caver and directors of Axxess
: International, the now-closed

Bahamian company that
»administered the MasterCard
portfolio on Leadenhall's
‘behalf, were involved with First

JFinancial and wanted to secure .
ithe deposits so they can issue ©.

imew: cards’ to: customers that
swant them..

+ Leadenhall gountered by
nalleging that it transferred at
cleast $19.7 million in security

deposits to First Financial. It
alleged that it had provided
documents showing that the
remaining balance had been

refunded against debts owed ©

to Leadenhall by cardholders,
and had been effecting refunds
from its own assets.

Leadenhall had hired BDO
Mann Judd to perform a foren-
sic accounting of the security
deposits just before it went into
liquidation.

Resolving the First Financial -
, Situation. is likely, to,.be the, . J,
.., biggest: task, facing. liquidator... |’

Craig ‘Tony’ Gomez, of Gomez

Partners & CO, during the liq-

uidation.

INSIGHT

mem Ue Oe TL:
the news, read Insight
on Mondays

1 COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
to. 2004/FA M/div/656
| IN THE SUPREME COURT
| FAMILY DIVISION

Between

BERNARD WENDELL ROLLE
Petitioner

AND

ESTHER MATHILDA ROLLE
Respondent

ADVERTISEMENT OF NOTICE OF PETITION

TAKE NOTICE that an action has been commenced

against you in the Supreme Court, Divorce and Matrimonial |
| Side, Action No. 2004/656 in which the Petitioner has filed |.
| a Petition on the 8th day of November A.D, 2004 seeking }

4 dissolution of marriage. -

AND TAKE NOTICE that it has been ordered by
the Supreme Court that services of the Petition in the said
action be so effected on you by way of advertisement of the:

:| Notice of Peition on two (2) seperate occasions in two (2) of
‘| the daily newspapers.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that you must
within fourteen (14) days from the date of this advertisement
is published, acknowledge service of the said Petition by
completing a prescribed form of Acknowledgement of Service
which may be obtained on request from the Attorneys whose
name and address appear below, otherwise the Petition will
be heard and determined before the Supreme Court without

you.
Dated this Ist day of December A.D., 2005

LUNDY & COMPANY
Chambers

Priderock Corporate Centre
Suite 200, Bay & East Streets
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioner



4

RND HOLDINGS LIMITED SECOND-QUARTER FINANCIALS #4eiee

LAX MW
Dear Shareholder

The financial results for the second quarter ending August 31st,
2005 shows that the company’s financial: position continues :to

move in the right direction. Gross revenue for the six month —

financial period ended August 31st, 2005 showed an increase of
$90,086 over the six month period ended August 31st, 2004 to
$751,372. This outpaced a $46,015. increase’ in. direct costs to
$137,535 and led to a 44,071 improvement in the company’s gross
margin to $613,837 versus $569,766 recorded for the same period:

An. 2004, Operating, expenses remained relatively flat at $739, 054,

$613, 837 led to an operating loss of 125,217 for the six month

financial period ended August 31st, 2005. Notwithstanding the loss °

tecorded for the period this figure evidenced. a $46,890
improvement in the company’s operating loss versus the same
period for 2004 in which a loss of $172,107 was.recorded.

It should be noted that all of the $125,217 operating loss incurred

by the company for the six month financial period ended August:

31st, 2005 could be directly attributable to the gym operation.

Other than the gym operation the company would have recorded’

a break even operating income performance for the six month
financial period.

Finance. costs improved by $127,584 for the period to $177,845
which resulted in a total loss from ‘continuing operations of
$303,062. This compares with loss of $477,536 for the same = period
in 2004.

Based on the continued declining performance of the gym
operation, the Board of Directors and senior management of RND

UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
2ND QUARTER ENDED AUGUST 31, 2005
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)
31st AUG 2005 31st AUG 2004
ASSETS
CURRENT ASSETS:
Cash 98,871 27,760
Accounts receivable 375,179 370,869
Current portion of note receivable * 4 240,000
Prepayments and deposits 20,624 50,320
Inventory 49,912 34,516 -

Other receivables ~ "1027 206,456
Total current assets 545,613 929,921

- 10,075,790
1,063,895
860,000
111,658

263,770 263,770

$11,957,255: $13,305,034

10,536,723
611,149

INVESTMENT PROPERTY.

PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT
NOTE RECEIVABLE ;
INVESTMENT IN ASSOCIATE, AT EQUITY mee
OTHER ASSETS
TOTAL ASSETS

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
CURRENT LIABILITIES:
Bank overdrafts $
Accounts payable and accrued expenses
Current portion of long-term debt
Other liabilities
Total current liabilities

205,172 $
735,277 1,534,833
322,570 299,745 °
102,224" 9,625

” 1,365,243 2,103,393

259,190

LONG-TERM DEBT 3,702,820 4,041,240.

Total liabilities 5,068,063. - 6,144,633
SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY:
Share capital
Share premium
. Contributed capital
Accumulated deficit
Total shareholders’ equity

88,562
5,934,987
3,175,087
2,309,444
6,889,192

88,562
5,934,987
3,175,087
2,038,235.)
7,160,401
$ 11,957,255

TOTAL $ 13,305,034



Holdings has taken the decision to set a final date of December
~ 19th, 2005. to either sell the gym operation or pormaneuy

ear eonnne its operation in the local market.

_ ‘in terms of the company’s balance sheet, Total Assets declined by

$1,347,779: led primarily by a $1,100,000 decline in the note

-receivable account, which reflected the balance of the cinema sales

. - proceeds owed to the company by Galleria Cinemas. The decline in
this account, reflected the company’s decision to discount and sell
this non-interest bearing receivable, in order to pay down interest

_ bearing trade payables and to fund working capital. Consequently

we were able to pay down $799,556.01 52% of trade payables. Long
term debt declined by $338,420 which reflected the continued pay.
down on this debt.as scheduled. Shareholders equity declined by
$271,209. This was all seen in the accumulated deficit account and

“the change reflected the accumulated loss for the ‘six months-

ended August 31, 2005.

We would like to thank you for your continued support and would

like to reassure you that our management team remains resolute in

the objective of realizing a break even position over the forth

coming 12 months with sustained profitability thereafter.

Kenneth M. Donathan
Managing Director

Jeror e K. Fitzgerald
Chairman

UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME
2ND QUARTER ENDING AUGUST 31, 2005
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

31st AUG 2005 31st AUG 2004

:, CONTINUING OPERATIONS:

~ REVENUE . $
~ DIRECT COSTS

Gross margin

751,372 $ 661,286

137,535 ____ 91,520
613,837 569,766

| OPERATING EXPENSES: ©

Administrative 419,470 453,729
Depreciation 73,047 76,437
Other operating 240,930 208,442

Marketing 5,607 3,265

Total operating expenses 739,054 741,873
‘PROFIT/(LOSS) FROM OPERATIONS
OTHER INCOME (EXPENSES):

Finance costs

(125,217) (172,107)

(177,845) (305,429)

Loss from continuing operations (303,062) (477,536)
DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS:
Loss from cinema assets

Repairs at Prince Charles Drive

Cinema location

(| 70,141)
(| 72,958)

Loss from discontinued operations
NET INCOME (LOSS) $

(143,099)

(303,062) $ (620,635)

The above are the unaudited figures of RND Holdings Limited second quarter
2005/2006 financial period. A copy of the audited companies 2005 Annual
Report may be obtained from Colina Financial Advisors Ltd., Goodman's Bay
Corporate Centre, West Bay Street or RND Holdings Limited, RND Plaza West,
John F. Kennedy Drive.


PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005

TRIBUNE SPORTS



for basketba

m@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

AFTER having American
King Rice as head coach of
the men’s basketball team for
the past three years, the
Bahamas Basketball Federa-
tion is expected to have a
Bahamian coach again as they
head into the 2006 campaign.

However, federation’s vice
president Larry Wilson said
they are not at liberty to
announce who will take over
the reigns until they have con-
firmation from one of their
two choices to replace Rice.

Rice, a former team-mate
of former Boston Celtics/Los
Angeles Lakers’ forward Rick
Fox at the North Carolina Tar
Heels, performed under a lot

of criticism from the local

players and coaches.












BBF vice president looks
towards Jamaican event



Y
But Wilson said they were
very proud of his maturity in
handling the entire ordeal and
they’re hoping that, whenever
the new coach is selected, it
wouldn’t be such a rough tran-

sition.

Travel

The federation’s first mis-
sion is to travel to Jamaica
from June 9-18 to participate
in the Senior Caribbean Bas-
ketball Championships for
both men and women.

Wilson said if the Bahamas

finishes in the top three, “we

would qualify for both the
Centro Basket Tournament in
Panama in July and the Cen-
tral American and Caribbean
Games in Columbia in July as
well.

“That gives us two oppor-
tunities to actually qualify for,
the Olympics (in 2008 in Bei-,

jing, China) because if we go

to Centro Basket and we fin-
ish in the top three there, we
would qualify for the tourna-
ment of Americas (in 2007).
If we go to the tournament of
Americas and we finish in the
top four, we would qualify for
the Olympics.”

In going to Jamaica, the

UNDER THE DISTINGUISHED PATRONAGE, OF LADY MARGUERITE PINDLING





Tringil Hanna

K a Nguyen Jillian Evan;

presents







Bahamas would have to fin-
ish in the top three to advance
to the Centro Basket.

A top four place finish
would enable. the Bahamas to
reach the Pan Am Games and
a top fourth spot there will
earn a berth at the Olympics
in 2008.

“This is a critical year for
us,” Wilson stressed.

To prepare the team, Wil-
son said they are trying to

‘build a data base by contacting

as many of the players over-
seas, either in the pro leagues
or college and universities to
inform them of the pending
dates.

“We have heard from some
of them, who have confirmed
that they will work on getting
themselves ready to come
home,” Wilson said. “So

we've also asked them to get

in contact with some of the



other players that they know
about.”

As for the coaching staff,
Wilson said they have con-
tacted two Bahamians, one of
whom is overseas and the oth-
er locally based on coaching
the team.

Programme

“As for King Rice, he did a
lot of things for us and we still
think he is a good person that
can help the programme, but
we don’t want to make a deci-
sion on him until we get the

‘new coaching staff in place,”

Wilson noted.
“We don’t want to put a

-coach in place and he’s not

comfortable working with
him. So we will wait until we
hear from the Bahamian
coach overseas and the one
here before we make any final

SC MCPHERSON’S Samuel Johnson bumps the ball yesterday against HO Nash.



decision.”

Wilson said they have also
contacted a couple of Bahami-
ans in regards to running the
ladies’ national team, but they
won’t reveal their names
either until they have con-
firmed their commitment.

Next year, the junior men’s
national team will also be trav-
elling. This year, they quali-
fied to participate in the Tour-
nament of Americas that will
be held from June 28-July 2
at the St. Mary’s University in
San Antonio, Texas. |

The team, which is expected
to once again be coached by
Mario Bowleg, Ivan Butler
and Dexter Cambridge, will
have to finish in the top four
in order to qualify for the
World Championsinips in
2007.

The junior girls, however,
won't be travelling next year.

Sharks on
the crest
of a wave

SC MCPHERSON SHARKS pose
with their trophies after winning the
Government Secondary School
Sports Association’s 2005 junior vol-
leybail title.

The Sharks beat the HO Nash Lions
in two sets, 25-7 and 25- Aes to win
the series 3-2.

(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)



(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)
ee

SPORTS







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avon ref a

‘AVailable from'( sommercial News Providers”

Akmal curb nn.
England plans







— —_ ———_ + = _—s
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. The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
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If so, call us on 322-1986
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Shirley Street * 328-3908
"Fax: 323-7272 © infa@nassaumatancem
www.chevrolethbahamas.cam



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2005

SECTION

‘ax: (242) 328-2398 ©

'â„¢ BOXING
L GARTH WRIGHT
TOURNEY

CHAMPION Amateur
Boxing Club will continue its
12th L Garth Wright Golden
Gloves Boxing Tournament
on Saturday at the First
Class Boxing Club on Wulff
Road at 5pm.

It started in October and
will wrap up on December
10.





TENNIS
LYFORD CAY
EXHIBITION

TODAY between the
hours of 3.45-5pm, world:
renowned tennis stars Mark
Knowles, Daniel Nestor,
Niocole Vaidisova and Ryan
Sweeting, among others, will
play an exhibition match at
the Lyford Cay Club. Auto-
graphs will be signed (tennis
balls given away for auto-
graphs) and refreshments
served. The event is part of
the fundraising campaign for
the LCC Endowment Fund. -

if BASKETBALL
SPECIAL OLYMPICS

TEAMS from Grand
Bahama, Long Island, New
Providence, Stapledon
School, Barbados and St.
Kitts & Nevis will participate
in Special Olympics
Bahamas Basketball Invita-
tional at the Jack Hayward
High School Gym in Grand
Bahama today and Saturday.

Games however, will be
played throughout the day.



Here's a look at the fixtures:

Jam - Grand Bahama
vs Stapledon.

10.15am New Providence
vs St. Kitts & Nevis.

11.30pm Long Island
vs Barbados.



12.45pm Stapledon
vs New Providence.



2pm Grand Bahama
vs Barbados.

3.15pm St. Kitts & Nevis
vs Long Island.

7pm Opening Ceremony.
Barbados vs Stapledon.
Long Island
vs New Providence.
Entertainment.
St. Kitts & Nevis v
Grand Bahama.





Ba abana eadeh
adel for BBF

AFTER having American
King Rice as head coach of the
men’s basketball team for the
past three years, the Bahamas
Baskctball Federation is expect-
ed to have a Bahamian coach
again as they head into the 2006
campaign.





° See page 6B

a

SRE STG Ty





E-Mail sports@100jamz.com

eM hea LIers ea Th trea eee ee







Boat: Be ES BESO

i SC MCPHERSON’S
Prince Pinder spikes the ball
during the win against H O
Nash yesterday at the
A F Adderely gym.
(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune Staff)








































































P.O. Box

Telephone:

@ VOLLEYBALL
By BRENT STUBBS.
Senior Sports Reporter

THE .SC- McPhers@a
Sharks saved their best game
of the season for the grand
finale as they swept the HO
Nash Lions in two straight
gamies to clinch the Govern-
ment Secondary Schools
Sports Association’s 2005
junior volleyball title.

The Sharks fed the Lions
a steady diet of spikes, dinks,
blocks and service aces in

pulling off a 25-7 and 25-17

victory on Thursday at the
AF Adderley Gym to secure
a 3-2 decision in the best-of-
five finals.

“It was a long time com-

ing, but I must say I’m thank-:

ful to God and SC McPher-

son for giving me such a

group of boys with a lot of
talent,” said Sharks’ coach
Rodney Farquharason.

“We worked hard for this
all season long, but nothing
happens before it’s time. I
thought we would have been
able to do it yesterday (in
game four), but today was
our day to shine.”

Advantage

SC McPherson, producing
one of the biggest line-ups in

‘the league, took advantage.

of their height as Prince Pin-
der got started early in the
first quarter and his perfor-
mance rubbed off on Samuel
Johnson, who came alive at
the other end of the front-
court.

Together, they helped the
Sharks to race‘out to a quick
4-1 lead and they extended
it to 11-2 with Jarret Miller
serving. Miller would extend
the lead to 16-2 on a couple
of aces.

Then on rotation, Pinder
went to the line and served
from 17-5 to 24-6 with a cou-
ple of aces of his own as team
captain Lorenzo Williams
controlled the front court.

The only thing left for HO
Nash to do was serve the ball
out as SC McPherson went
on to secure the fitst set.

In the second set, the Lions
regrouped and switched the
lead with the Sharks as they
played to an 8-8 tie.

But, after SC McPherson

“surged ahead 12-8, HO

Nash’s coach Preston Albury
pulled-his setter, Graham
Bain, to settle him down.

' By the time he put him
back in the game, the Sharks

nary action.

Rarquhatso)

























HO Na
Made anotl
back. for a@
ing coach F
a time outs







squad. |
Realisig@ ahey were
only two Sway from

the. thril@ageeeytory, th



out and got Game spike fre
Williams an@ Pinder sealéd
the deal with ah ace for thé

_ 25-17 win and the title. © «2

“We prayed in the bus anid.
we came back. and playdd
well: today,” Williams
stressed, “We knew we could
do it. Sree

“We? re just happy tha
are the champions.” —

Counting

While Bain had an off-day
at the office; coach Albury
was counting’ on Juedé¢
Robinson” and Daniel
Williams to make up the diff
ference, especially withoug
the service of.Trevan Gran@
who didn’t play:the last three
games because: of: a disciply







Coach Albury: 3 bid theif

‘problem Was; § imply, that

played better
defence, it'would:have been:a
better: games" he insisted.
“We-couldn’tsplay the way



‘we did’‘and beat this team.”

On his decision to pull
Bain .at.a critieal time in the
game, coach, af bury said as
the sétter,;he had to take
charge of the;team.

/"H6 tried, to blame arere:
one else,” Albury noted. “We
were down 1-0. and we nee:
ed him to step up and set the
ball

“Whatever problems the
Lions encountered, coach
said they were
cutectuine ‘not to allow HO
Nagh 0 fake a‘double dosé
‘of victory after their junige
girlg Won their title in thse
straight games.

“We knew. that. with oir
size, it would have-been dif











ficult for any team out thére

to beat us,” Farquharson stat¢

-ed. “We just: didn’t play-as

well as we’ré capable of play¢
ing when wé lost the twe
games.

“But today,: 1 couldn’t asd
them to play:any better :
was obvious that:they, wan
the title and they played :
way:” cae :








Chae ee



Dolphins vs. Jets

Cell:

__|_____SORRY NO PHOTOCOPIES, NEWSPAPER PRINT ON