Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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The Tribune ==

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Volume: 102 No.8

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e SEE TRIBUNE SPORTS SECTION



Christie hits out
over comments on
recent investments,
Grand Bahama

@ By CARA BRENNEN
& KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporters

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie has blasted former
prime minister Hubert Ingra-
ham for his “immature” char-
acterisation of recent invest-
ments and his comments about
the Grand Bahama economy.

Mr Christie, flanked by
almost his entire Cabinet, held a
press conference immediately
after his return. from.the 20th
Commonwealth Heads of Gov-
ernment Meeting in Malta, in
the VIP lounge of Nassau Inter-
national Airport yesterday
afternoon. °

The Prime Minister said he
felt obligated to immediately
respond to comments Mr Ingra-
ham had made in his absence
regarding the BahaMar devel-

opment and the Grand Bahama
economy.

However, last night Mr Ingra-
ham said he had heard Mr
Christie’s comments and was
prepared to respond to his
“charges.” (See Mr Ingraham’s
reply below).

Referring yesterday to Mr

‘Ingraham’s claim that the PLP

government handled the Royal
Oasis closure badly, causing a
severe increase in unemploy-
ment on Grand Bahama, Mr
Christie said that "it is wrong."

“It is wrong and not becom-
ing someone who has held the
high office of state in this coun-
try to take such an approach to
an issue of this kind that deals
with people’s lives. It doesn’t
make sense,” he said.

The prime minister said that

SEE page nine

ENM leader hits back
at criticism by PM

@ By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter

FORMER prime minister Hubert Ingraham has suggested that
Prime Minister Perry Christie “not lower the standard of public
debate by labelling his opponent and likely his replacement as

399

‘immature’ or ‘irresponsible.

Speaking in response to charges made by Mr Christie yesterday
in reference to the FNM and Mr Ingraham himself, Mr Ingraham
last night said that “we don’t need to go down that road.”

“Mr Christie ought to stop looking in the mirror and seeing
himself and saying ‘it’s me’,” he said. “He knows better and if he
doesn’t, he will be reminded, often if necessary, during the course

of the coming campaign.”

Yesterday Prime Minister Christie held a press conference imme-
diately after his return from the 20th Commonwealth Heads of
Government Meeting in Malta, stating that he felt obligated to

SEE page nine

gy



BAHAMAS EDITION

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005



@ PRIME MINISTER Perry
Christie speaks yesterday.
(Photo:. Mario Duncanson/
Tribune staff)




Ingraham
sworn in
as official
| Leader of
| Opposition

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff

Reporter

HUBERT INGRA-

HAM has been sworn in

as the official Leader of

the Opposition in the

House of Assembly for

i the second time in his
political career.

As one of her last offi-
cial acts as Governor-
General, Dame Ivy
Dumont presented Mr
Ingraham with the instru-
ment of constitutional
office yesterday after-
noon at Government
House.

Thanking his wife






























@ LEADER of the Opposition Hubert Ingraham receiving
his instrument of appointment from the Governor General
Dame Ivy Dumont yesterday at Government House.
(Photo By: Franklyn G Ferguson)



Deported criminals ‘ are
putting Bahamas at risk’









FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY



Dolores for her atten-
dance, Mr Ingraham said
this appointment is all the
more “personal and spe-
cial” because it was unex-
pected and in response to

a “definite call from the
Beane. of the Bahamas
for my return to public
service.’

Mr Ingraham said that
this is his second appoint-

SEE page 10













TENS of thousands of crimi-
nals deported from first world
nations are putting the Bahamas
and other Caribbean nations at
risk, it has emerged.

The villains bring with them
contacts that “enhance the inter-
national reach” of criminal ele-
ments in the region, a former
envoy has claimed.

And they have contributed to
a crime increase “beyond the
capacity of police forces in the
region to cope with it.”

The claims were made by for-
mer Caribbean diplomat Sir

Ronald Sanders during a lecture

at London Metropolitan Uni-
versity.

He said there was anecdotal
evidence of a correlation
between the deportees and rising
crime.

“Whatever the truth of that
claim, there has certainly been a
significant rise in crime - and

SEE page 10

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ingraiiam

US concern that
Bahamas area
is being used

as a ‘drop
off’ zone for

Cuban migrants

i M By PAULG
i TURNQUEST
i Tribune Staff Reporter

US AUTHORITIES are
concerned that Cay Sal
Bank, a remote part of the
Bahamas, is being used by
smugglers as a “drop off”
zone for Cuban migrants

- attempting to reach landfall
in Florida.

US Coast Guard press liai-
son officer Lt Commander
Terry Johns said they inter-
cepi smugglers almost on a
daily. basis, with the latest
incident happening over the
weekend.

During November, 217
Cuban migrants have
already been apprehended,
with almost 20 per cent of
them being seized in the Cay
Sal Bank area.

From Cay Sal, it is a short
60-mile run via a “go fast”
boat to Florida, making the

i area a prime location for
i smugglers to either deposit
or retrieve their cargo.

SEE page 10

ero Afevadtaevesesepuct Sstsispoetsbotvvadsbaaabaias aH

_ Third person
charged in
connection

with murder

i fl By A FELICITY
/ INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

A THIRD person has
been charged in connection
with the murder of a Haitian
man last month.

While the first two
arraigned for the death-of
Michael Bissainthe are of
Haitian-Bahamian descent,
the third is a Bahamian.

Yesterday, 30-year-old
Montry Thompson of Kenil-
worth Street was charged.

Magistrate Roger Gomez
told Thompson that he is
charged with murder, con-
trary to Section 291 of the
Penal Code. He, being con-
cerned with others, is alleged
to have caused the death of

SEE page 10





Nassau and Bahama Islands’ Leading Newspaper



PAGE 2, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS
EB

The will of God and the will

of man in the political arena

| HE debate over free will and

determinism is as old as the
hills and there is no end in sight. Pro-
fessor Paul Davies of Macquarie Uni-
versity of Sydney, Australia, observes
that it is picking up steam and he is
worried about it.

Writing in the magazine Foreign Pol-
icy, Professor Davies points out that
belief in some measure of free will is
common to all cultures and a large part
of what makes us human.

“It is also,” he says, “fundamental to
our ethical and legal systems. Yet
today’s scientists and philosophers are
busily chipping away at this social pillar
- apparently without thinking what
might replace it.

. But even if they are right, and
free will really is an illusion, it may still
be a fiction worth maintaining.”

To most Christians, God-given free
will is an article of faith. It was defined
in the fourth century by the great North
African doctor of the church St Augus-
tine of Hippo in his book On Free
Choice Of The Will.

The vast majority of Bahamians claim
to be Christian, yet there is in our
national psyche strong elements of
determinism and fatalism.

This is attributed to God rather than
the scientific model in which every
event and act is said to be wholly attrib-
utable to a chain of prior occurrences.
In other words, whatever happens is
the will of God.

Some take delight in quoting that old
saw, “the voice of the people is the
voice of God”, apparently oblivious to
the untenable conclusions it can lead
to. If that were true then we would have
a sure method of settling all: moral and
religious issues: ‘tefer them to popular
vote.

y ears ago I attended the funer-
al of a young man who had
been killed by another in a senseless
act of violence and I recoiled in disbe-
lief when the presiding minister told
the family and the congregation to
accept their loss as the will of God.
The death of that young man was, it
seemed to me, due not to the will of

God but to the’ ‘immoral exercise of noes





will by another human béiiig.

A variation on this theme is the grow=.’

ing tendency of some in the Bahamian
political arena to attribute their actions
to the will of God.

Writing in the Religion Section of
The Tribune of November 17, Clement
Johnson expressed some unease over
the use of religion in the political arena.
He quoted a. young lady who said.that
the over-use of religious jargon at the





recent party conventions was “almost
sickening”.
He also quoted Deacon King of the
Baptist Church:
“What bothered me most was the
way people were dancing to religious

because I also believe that his political
talents — and that of others — are wast-
ed in splinter parties.

But what if some of his colleagues in
the CDR believe that it was a mistake?
That the CDR does have a future? That
the PLP is on the wrong track? Would
that mean they are opposing what God
has ordained? And that Dr Nottage did
not do what God ordained until he was
convinced by Leslie Miller?!

The decision to join a particular polit-
ical party is, generally speaking, a
morally neutral choice. If the party
under consideration is overtly commit-
ted to evil like the Nazi party in Ger-
many in the early part of the last cen-
tury then the choice is clear.

In the context of the Bahamas — and
most western democracies — the citizen
does not face such a stark choice but
may still be inclined to make finer judg-
ments based on his own particular
moral compass.

Pesors something St Augustine
said about free will and moral

choices can be useful to politicians mak-
ing political choices and to all of us
about all the other choices we make.
We should consider both consequences
and motives because:

“Fear attacks from one side and
desire from the other; from one side,
anxiety; from the other, an empty and
deceptive happiness; from one side, the
agony of losing what.one loved; from
the other, the passion to acquire what
one did not have; from one side, the
pain of an injury received; from the
other, the burning desire to avenge it.



History is replete with examples of
Christians blaming God for their own
foolish and malicious acts, including
murder, war and persecution.

music, and how some of the speakers
... Were going on like they were preaching.
Our people need to decide: if they are -
going to be political leaders or evan- :

gelical preachers.”

In this column last week I expressed
disappointment in Dr Bernard Nottage
for saying he had been convinced that
his rejoining the PLP was “ordained
by God”.

I happen to believe that it was a good
thing Dr Nottage decided to join one of
the two major political parties if only

For more information contact our Life Department today

242-322- LIFE (5433)



* “Wherever you turn, avarice can

pinch, extravagance squander, ambi-.

tion destroy, pride swell, envy torment,
apathy crush, obstinacy incite, oppres-
sion chafe, and countless other evils
crowd the realm of inordinate desire
and run not}

History is replete with examples of
Christians blaming God for their own
foolish and malicious acts, including
murder, war and persecution. The cru-
sading princes of the West, under the

banner of the Cross of Christ, inflicted
the most horrendous atrocities against
Muslims.

One of them recorded how the Holy
City of Jerusalem was ankle-deep in
“the blood of the infidels”. They had
apparently forgotten the command of
Jesus Christ to put away the sword. For
evil measure, these same Christian cru-
saders from the West also slaughtered
Christians in the East.

So it has continued. In Europe,
Catholics and Protestants persecuted
each other in turn, and today some
western “princes” believe they are
ordained by God to wage aggressive
war against other people and to drop
bombs on their cities.

B ahamian politicians ~ indeed,
all of us — should guard against
the temptation to affect moral and spir-
itual superiority over others by claiming
the personal direction and approval of
God for our very human deeds.

This tendency has not yet reached
dangerous levels. In fact, it is some-
times quite pathetic and occasionally
laughable. But it can become danger-
ous.

We are fortunate to live in a country
where there is religious freedom; where
there is harmony between the various
denominations; where there ‘is a con-
sensus which allows co-operation
between church and state for the good
of God’s people; but where there is also
a healthy separation of church and
state, and no state church.

In our political parties there are
Christians of all denominations and,
while we are called upon as citizens to
make political judgments, it is not for us
to judge who is trying the hardest to
do God’s will. Certainly, nobody should
be impressed by the number of times
one says “Lord, Lord”.

None of us should claim God as a
member of our political party, or as our
personal political consultant, or as being
on our side in the political arena.

Instead we should all get on our
knees and, remembering the human
tendencies St Augustine spoke about,
ask God to help us be on His side and
to give us the grace to tell the difference
between self-will and His will.

When we are tempted to shout loud-
est about how God.is directing us, per-
haps that is when we should consider
most carefully our motives: the pas-
sion to acquire, the desire to avenge,
avarice, ambition, envy, pride and
countless other evils which crowd the
realm of inordinate desire and run riot.

Website: www. bahamapundit. type-
pad.com: E-mail:
sirarthurfoulkes@hotmail.com



or email sjohnson@jsjohnson.com

visit us online at www.jsjohnson.com







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FAMILY ISLANDS Freeport 242-352-7119 © Abaco 242-367-2688 © Exuma 242-336-2420





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If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



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you are raising funds for a







Meeting
held on
question of
extradition

@ By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter

EXTRADITIONS should
not be carried out without
strong judicial evidence against
a Bahamian citizens.

Dr Gilbert Morris, a presen-
ter at an upcoming town meet-
ing on the issue, said that extra-
dition is one of the most impor-
tant national issue that needs
to be addressed.

“This is a topic that is of
grave concern to the nation,”
he said. “It is not something that
should just continue to be an
issue without some type of
address.”

Tomorrow Island Promotions
International will be holding the
meeting at the British Colonial

Hilton.

Beginning at 7pm, the town
meeting in the Hilton’s ball-
room, will include presenters
such as Rawle Maynard, Dr
Morris, Paul Moss Jr and Mau-
tice Glinton.

“Extradition is one of the
most important subjects in any
country because it goes to the
heart of the countries constitt-
tion and it goes to the heart of
citizenship,” Dr Morris said. —.

Dr Morris said that “it
shouldn’t be that the US gov-
ernment can make an applica-
tion with your name on it and in
making that application aécuse
you of being a fugitive even
through you are not on the run
from anyone... on the basis ofa
statement made by a man who
is on bail in the US and
attempting to save himself.”

Ac trevets
protest the
Geet?
pere'ty

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 3







In brief

Tynes wins
praise in
Senate by
Turnquest

@ By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE LIFE and work of Cyril
Tynes was lauded in the Sen-
ate chambers on Monday.

Senate leader for the oppo-
sition Tommy Turnquest hailed
Mr Tynes as a politician and
nation builder.

Mr Turnquest said that Mr
Tynes was in a similar position
in the Opposition as that he
faced. He called it a "hybrid
situation", as the leader of the
Opposition in the House of
Assembly was someone other
than the leader of the FNM.

During Mr Tynes' tenure, he
served as Leader of the Oppo-
sition in the House, although

he was not leader of the FNM.

What is sad, said Mr Turn-
quest, is that great men like Mr
Tynes are hardly known for
their work, if they are known
at all.

However, he feels that their
contribution to the country
should be documented for
future generations to appreci-
ate.

Government Senate Leader
Dr Marcus Bethel also offered
accolades for Mr Tynes, the for-
mer MP and Free National
Movement politician.

He expressed his condolences
to the Tynes family on behalf
of the Bahamas government.

GB police
arrest men
following
robberies

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama Police have taken two
men in custody in connection
with an armed robbery at the
Hawksbill Service Station on
Saturday.

Police intercepted a vehicle
with two male occupants in the
Hunters area around 1.25pm.
One of the men in the vehicle
had matched the description of
the gunman who held up the
service station on West Sunrise
Highway several minutes earli-
er.

Service station employees
told police that around 1.18pm

a man was wearing a tam, long.

brown pants and a blue T-shirt
robbed the establishment of an
undetermined amount of cash.

Assistant press liaison officer
Inspector Loretta Mackey said
officers were immediately dis-

patched to the scene to investi-

gate. At the same time, she said,
police received assistance from
residents of the Grand Bahama
community.

¢ Insp Mackey said police are
currently investigating the
armed robbery of the World
Champion Liquor Store on
Coral Road.

A masked gunman entered
the store around 9.30pm and
robbed the female employee of
$250 cash. The culprit was wear-

ing a black mask, light color:

shirt and blue jeans.

_. © A third man is also in cus-
tody for questioning in connec-
tion with the armed robbery of
the Queens Highway Service
Station on November 23.



















Boy questioned.
after shooting
of woman

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - A 17-year-
old boy is in custody and being

questioned about the murder -

of 34-year-old Tanya Margu-
rite “Penny” Pinder.

Ms Pinder was shot and
killed on Friday by a gunman
during an attempted armed-
robbery at the Cool Breeze
Apartments on Hudson
Avenue, where she was
employed for 14 years as an
office clerk.

Her death was the 14th
homicide for the year in Grand
Bahama.

Assistant press liaison offi-
cer Inspector Loretta Mackey
confirmed that a young man,

_is assisting them with investi-

gations into the matter.

According to reports, Ms
Pinder was at work around
11.35am when a masked man
armed with a shotgun attempt-
ed to rob her.

She was shot in the head just
below the left ear, police.

There was no money at the
office, because the owner of
the complex had left with the
cash five minutes prior to the
shooting.

_ Group



i PENNY Pinder

Ms Pinder was discovered
lying on the floor near the
southern door of the Bud Ann
Investment office; located at
Cool Breeze Apartments. She
was taken to Rand Memorial
Hospital, where she later died.

Ms Pinder, a resident of
Beachway Drive, leaves behind
an 11-year-old son.

Relatives are still trying to
come to grips with the tragedy,

according to Desi Wallace-

Swain, a close relative.
“It is still very difficult for
everyone, especially for her

urging

financial aid for
hurricane victims

HUMAN rights activists
are calling on the govern-
ment to amend the Banks
and Trust Companies Act to
provide home and property
owners with financial relief
in the aftermath of natural
disasters.

Following three devastat-
ing hurricanes to hit the
northern Bahamas within the
space of a year, the Grand
Bahama Human Rights
Association (GBHRA) is
now urging government to
include provisions in the Act
which would give people
relief from paying loans dur-
ing the processing of their
insurance claims after dam-
age sustained during natural
disasters and pending recov-
ery of insurance claims.

The association is further
calling upon Grand Bahama
banks and insurance compa-
nies to advance premiums to
the victims of Hurricanes
Frances, Jeanne and Wilma.

The Association is sug-
gesting that banks and insur-
ance companies offer to pay
premiums on behalf of their
customers or add them to the
mortgage, which would then
be blended into the repay-
ment schedule

“Many banks have done
this and this has been very
helpful to the home and
property owners. However,
some institutions have not
and this has been to the

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detriment not only of the unin-
sured homeowner but also the
lending institution. People are
catching eternal hell in Grand
Bahama, and any help which
the banks can give would be
greatly appreciated,” the Asso-
ciation said.

In addition to this, the asso-
ciation is urging the banks and
lending institutions to lend
money to property owners
whilst their insurance claims are
being processed, “because many
insurance companies do not
process claims quickly and
many homeowners need to
effect urgent repairs.”

“The Bahamas is not a
wealthy country and foreign
banks and foreign insurance
companies make greater profits
on consumer lending than other
third world countries, princi-
pally because there is no con-
sumer protection or any penal-
ties as there is for the consumer
or the bank customer in the
United States,” the GBHRA
said.



mother because Penny still
lived at home. And her son,
Dylan, cries from time to time.

“They were very close and
I think that the reality of her

death hasn’t sunken in yet,”

she said.

She said that in preparation
for Christmas, Penny had
already bought her son the toy
motorcycle that he had always
wanted, as well as everything
she needed for the new duplex
that she and her sister were in
the process of building together.

Mrs Wallace-Swain described
Penny, her first cousin, as a very
sociable person who always had
a smile on her face.

“There was never a dull
moment when Penny was
around. She was a positive per-
son and always looked at the
bright side of things, even in
bad situations. She is going to
be missed terribly.

“It is seems so senseless and
the family just want to know
why the person did what he
did,” said Mrs Swain.

In light of the recent spate of
armed robberies , police are
appealing to persons particu-
larly business owners and
employees — to be extremely
vigilant.





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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005

a
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ip Bil Saas Sy Bi pase iach Rn oh




NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama



Serious allegations should be answered

MR CARL Bethel, who received his letters
of appointment at Government House this
morning as an FNM Senator, has made very

- serious allegations about the issue of visas

by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Mr Bethel
has suggested “direct political involvement at
the highest level of the Christie administra-

- tion” in what has become known as the “visa _

‘ scandal”.

|
4

§



According to Mr Bethel visas issued in

~ the Bahamas to Haitians have grown from

102 in 2002 to more than 2,200 in 2004. Also
visas. issued to Chinese nationals have

‘quadrupled since 2002.

Mr Bethel hinted that his allegations were
of such a serious nature that there should be

an independent public inquiry into them. The ~
- inquiry should be headed by a Supreme
Court or Court of Appeals judge, he said.

At the PLP convention Foreign Affairs
Minister Fred Mitchell assured delegates that
no scandal of any kind had been uncovered in
his ministry. He dismissed Mr Bethel’s alle-
gations as FNM propaganda. But Mr Bethel
continued the attack.

Mr Mitchell replied that after a prekink:
nary examination of the FNM’s evidence the
explanations were “entirely innocent and
consistent with the routine work” of his min-
istry.

He considered the allegations.a police mat-
ter and instructed the Police Commissioner to
determine the quality of Mr Bethel’s evi-
dence and to “determine how stolen docu-
ments of the Ministry came to be in their
(FNM) possession.” .

In our opinion if the FNM have what they
claim to have, this is a matter for a commis-
sion of inquiry, not the police.

However, our main concern today is that st. «
the focus should be concentrated on the alles.

gations, not the whistleblower:

The public i is not concerned with how the
FNM got whatever information they claim
to have.

They are only concerned with whether
their accusations are true or false.

As a matter of fact, so much is wrong in
governments and big corporations today that
the world smiles kindly on the “whistleblow-
er”.

Deflecting attention from embarrassing
questions or revelations was the usual tactic
of the laic Sir Lynden Pindling’s PLP gov-
ernment. ,

We recall the times when Norman
Solomon; then Opposition leader, would
stand on the floor of the House with infor-
mation leaked from a government depart-
ment, only to be shouted down by Sir Lynden
with demands to know how he got his infor-
mation. The PLP government wiped his ques-
tions off the table and spent their energies try-
ing te ferret out the informant. There is a

| different temper in this country today, where
d-such tactics will not work. | - :

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We recall how foolish they made them-
selves look in 1968 less than year after com-
ing to power when, in an attempt to save
face, they bungled the Coon case.

Last week in this column we briefly
referred to the Coon case without calling
names. Mrs Coon was the daughter of Dr
Arthur Weiland, founder of Miami’s Vari-
ety Children’s Hospital, and head of the firm
whose doctors, through the Crippled Chil-
dren’s Committee, held free clinics twice a
year for more than 20 years at the Princess
Margaret Hospital for the Bahamas’ crip-

pled children.

Mrs Coon, 28, her husband and three-year-
old daughter arrived in Nassau to go deep sea
fishing in the Exumas. Mrs Coon was in the
early stages of pregnancy, and was making the
trip with the full approval of her doctor. How-

ever, something went wrong on her first night °

here. Mrs Coon needed urgent medical atten-
tion, but no doctor could be found. She was
rushed to the Princess Margaret Hospital.
On arrival at PMH it was obvious she was in
labour. “White lady, wait your turn,” was all
the sympathy she got from a black nurse’s
aide. In the end, in the most squalid condi-
tions, Mrs Coon, with the help of Nurse Inez
Nairn, delivered her own son, who died short-
ly afterwards. Mrs Coon left the hospital and
flew back to Miami without ever having been
seen by a doctor.
_ Dr Weiland flew to Nassau to bring his
daughter’s disgraceful treatment to the atten-
tion of the government to make certain that
such a scandalous event should never happen
again. .

Instead of investigating the hospital, Milo

Butler, then Minister of Health, later the

Bahamas’ first governor general, asked 15

innocuous questions on the floor of the.
: House: These questions included questions as‘ -
' to why-a private doctor did not answer the

hotel’s call; whether on her return to Miami,
Mrs Coon reported the matter to her doctor;
whether her doctor called PMH to find out

. what happened; whether she was in the care

of a doctor before leaving Miami and whether

- he had given her permission to travel, etc.

Mr Butler said that only when his 15 ques-
tions had been answered could he say “what

really happened at the Princess Margaret
Hospital to Mrs Coon.” What he didn’t say _

was that all of his foolish 15 questions had

been answered before he even went to the

House.

Dr Weiland was furious. The matter was: —

headlined in The Miami Herald. Dr Weiland
wrote a letter to Sir Milo, which he copied to
US Secretary of State Dean Rusk and Sena-
tor Claude Pepper. In it he suggested that
because of all of Sir Milo’s factual errors, he
must have confused his daughter with anoth-
er patient.

Today Bahamians will not stand for such -

nonsense.

responsible for

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NOTICE is hereby given that FABIENNE ST. LOUIS, LAIRD ST.,
BAIN TOWN, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
Nationality and Citizenship,
registration/naturalization as a citizen.of The Bahamas, and: that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 29th day of
NOVEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

[QUALITY INSIDE
AND OUT

THE TRIBUNE





EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

The home
that the PM is
a product of

EDITOR, The Tribune

On.two recent occasions your
editorials have alluded to the
political affiliation of my father
Gladstone L Christie. I would

therefore be most appreciative

if you would print my attached

response to clarify any misin- |

formation that you may be act-
ing on.

Again, I thank you for your
attention to this matter.

Gary W Christie.
EDITOR, The Tribune

WILLIAM J Bennet in his
book The Moral Compass said
“All children need bread and
shelter. But a true home of
course is much more than that.
Children also need love and
order and because they are not
born knowing the difference
between right and wrong, they
need a place where they can
begin to develop a moral sense.
Our moral sense emerges from
the examples set by mother,
father, sisters and brothers. In
the familiar world of home, we
learn the habits of virtue that
will strengthen us when we ven-
ture into the world”.

As both of my parents have
passed on to'be with their God,
I am obliged to respond to your
November 23 editorial to clari-
fy-and challenge any misinfor-
mation and untruths regarding
the “home” that nurtured the
political direction and philoso-
phy of the Prime Minister, The
Rt Hon Perry Gladstone
Christie.

In The Tribune’s archives is a
feature article entitled “Glad-
stone, Christie: A Chocolate
Dandy Life”, written by Earlin
Williams over several interview
sessions with my father for pos-
terity. The story was graciously

carried in your October 13,1999

issue, just prior to my father’s
death. Please allow me to quote
liberally from Mr William’s arti-
cle to give you a clear and fac-
tual portrayal of the political
affiliations of Gladstone
Christie during the sordid reign
of the United Bahamian Party.

Excerpts from Mr William’s
story states. The winds of
change were blowing through
the colonies and Mr Christie’s
trip into the United States in
the late 1930’s had broadened
his horizons to the extent that
when taxi men came together
to form the Bahamas Taxicab
Union in 1940, the country’s
first trade union was born and
Mr Christie became its Trea-
surer. He worked tirelessly for









for






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LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net




the good of the finances of the
union and his insight along with
that of Sir Clifford Darling,
Prince Huyler, Lochinvar Lock-
hart lead to the formation of
Taxico, a tour company, gas sta-
tion, and auto parts shop and
on the social end, death benefits
for members’ survivors and
assistance in their children’s
education needs. Discrimina-
tion was ugly back then, so it
was only natural that when the
Progressive Liberal Party led
by Lynden Pindling, was elected
to the house in 1953 along with
Milo Butler, that the Bahamas
Taxicab Union gravitated to the
PLP.

With Taxi men having their
livelihoods threatened in 1953
when the white led Government
attempted to stop taxis from
operating at The Nassau Inter-
national Airport, the PLP led
the political charge and the taxi
union became a willing thor-
oughbred steed. Mr Christie as
Treasurer provided all of the
meals for the general strike par-
ticipants at the airport. He put
in place a strike fund to assist as
the men parked their vehicles
in protest over the Govern-
ment’s move. The Government

backed down and the union and —

PLP won, forging a brother-
hood that exists today with the
taxi union. In Gladstone
Christie’s words, “The PLP rep-
resented to us what we wanted
the future to be for ourselves
and our children. Back then taxi
men could take home as much
as $300 per day. But something
was not right with the racial sit-
uation. The union made a firm
resolve to work with the PLP
to bring about majority rule.
We made it a reality on January
10, 1967.”

Mr Christie opened the
union’s coffers to the PLP help-
ing out in every way imagin-
able. He recalls an incident
where a PLP Acklins/Crooked
Island candidate contacted Nas-
sau expressing his disappoint-
ment that he needed to charter
a small boat to get around: the
district in time for the general
election. ‘I called the taxi men
together and we put in the hat

that day $1,000 and sent it up to
him so he could do what he had
to do,” said Mr Christie.

He has been honoured by the

’ Taxicab Union on two occa-

sions and he is also one of the
country’s first holders of The
National Tourism Achievement
award. Mr Christie has also
been honoured by Her Majesty,
the Queen with a Certificate
and Badge of Honour. But he
counts as his real meaningful
achievement the role he played
in the Bahamas Taxicab Union
alongside Presidents Mr P
Huyler, Sir Clifford Darling,
Lochinvar Lockhart and others
in bringing about majority rule.

All of the above is taken from
Mr William’s feature story
“Gladstone Christie: A Choco-
late Dandy Life.” A living con-
temporary of my father Sir Clif-
ford Darling, spoke at his funer-
al. He knows the history of my
father’s politics and social com-
mitment to majority rule.,

My earliest recollection of
homespun political education
was driving the streets in 1956
with my father in his big taxi,
blowing car horns and shouting
Fawkes & Pindling, All The
Way, while not appreciating the
significance of the event. I
rémember it clearly because my
father who was not a very social,
man was unusually ecstatic. ;I
further recollect being taken by
my parents to a mass PLP rally
on Clifford Park in 1962. and
sharing their disappointment : at
the PLP’s loss in the ensuing
general election.

Anyone who knew my moth:
er Nurse Naomi Christie would
have known of her passionate
commitment to her family;.her
church, her patients and her
party..Her party was, unques-
tionably the Progressive Liber-
alParty. ~~

T hope that I have been Sutti
ciently enlightening so that you

_ and your readership now have a

more accurate.portrayal of the
kind of home the Prime Minis-
ter is a product of. Perry’s sense
of morality, justice and service
to community are virtues learnt
from his parents, as is his bond
to the Progressive Liberal Party.
I thank you for your time and
space. ,

GARY W CHRISTIE
Nassau
November 24 2005

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS





In )

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“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

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NOVEMBER 29

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11:00 Investiture Ceremony at
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1:00 Bernstein Bears Xmas Tree

1:30 Yes Virginia There’s A Santa
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2:00 Micah’s Christmas Treasure

13:00 Durone Hepburn

3:30 Paul S. Morton

4:00 Gospel Video

4:30 Gospel Grooves
ZNS News Update
Caribbean Newsline
The Trolls & The Christmas
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Bahamian Things
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6ft. Pinte Garland ....ccccccccssscosneene ? OOF

education complex

at College of the Bahamas

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter _

THE COLLEGE of the
Bahamas moved one step clos-
er to university status with. the
official opening of its educa-
tional complex.

Yesterday, College of the
Bahamas (COB) officials, invit-
ed guests and members of gov-
ernment gathered for a short
ceremony in front of the col-
lege's Thompson Boulevard
complex, to mark the event.

Acting COB president Rhon-
da Chipman-Johnson said that
the complex is a symbol of

= progress in the college's 30th

year.

The college purchased the
former Boulevard Building in
April, as part of the first stage of
its acquisition target for 2005-
2006.

The. complex, opposite the
main campus, houses a two-
storey bookstore, "Chapter
One", a specialty café, "First
Edition", and a business cen-
tre, "Copy Right."

Education Minister Alfred
Sears in his address said that
the educational complex is the

fulfilment of the vision of the _

college's past presidents.

"The institution must ensure
that all students and faculty
members have access to a broad
range of learning resources to

support its purpose and pro-
grammes.

"It is my hope that those who
take advantage of the services
which the complex has to offer
will do so cognizant of the fact
that they are part of the invest-
ment in the present of the insti-
tution, and indeed the country,"
said Mr Sears.

The facility also offers seven
conventional classrooms, three
graduate conference-type
rooms, and two theatre lecture
rooms. The faculty and staff of
the school's of Education and
Social Science, as well as, a
department of graduate stud-
ies, are accommodated in the
complex. There is also an office
for the president emeritus.

The complex will"be named
after the chairman emeritus of
COB, Bishop Michael Eldon.
Bishop Eldon served as college
council chairman for 20 consec-
utive years.

The bishop is currently rest-

ing at home, having slipped into °

a coma earlier in the year after
complications arising from a
bout of pneumonia.

A formal naming ceremony
will be held early next year.

COB has started a number of
structural changes throughout
the year. Mr Sears said that
ground was broken for the erec-
tion of new and expanded facil-
ities for the northern campus

Family seeks
autopsy at

A BAHAMIAN family is
fighting the Princess Margaret
Hospital in an effort to prevent
an autopsy being performed on
51-year-old deceased kidney
patient Hollis Saundets. °

The family said that the
unwillingness of the attending
doctors to sign his death certifi-
cate without the autopsy is sim-
ply prolonging the suffering of
his surviving family members.

The sister of the deceased
Bernita Saunders spoke to The
Tribune yesterday and said her
family feels that an autopsy on
Hollis’ body would be nothing
more than a “desecration”.

“He was very thin - there is
nothing on him to cut. He suf-
fered in that hospital many days

. I don’t feel it is necessary
because for 15 years he was a
dialysis patient. Whatever they
had to do with him they did,”
Ms Saunders said.

The decision by hospital doc-
tors, she said, is placing undue
stress on her 84-year-old moth-
er and her wheelchair-bound
father.

According to Ms Saunders,
hospital officials say another
factor is delaying the release of
Hollis’ body.

She said doctors claimed that

ll sizes i

they ran tests on Mr Saunders
before he died and are waiting
on the results.

“T don’t see why they have to
have his body in the morgue
waiting on tests. That won’t
bring him back,” said Ms Saun-
ders.

“We are trying to get his
insurance; that’s the only way
they can bury him. We don’t
have the money saved up for
that. We have already called a
priest and his funeral was to be
on Saturday and we don’t even
know if that is going to happen
because we don’t have the
body,” she said.

Ms Saunders also criticised
the doctor attending her broth-
er for not being sympathetic to
the desires of her family.

“Why hinder people from
doing what they want to do. My
mother gave him birth and she
does not want his autopsy. At
one point the (doctor) who saw
him told my sister that he won’t
sign the death certificate until
he was sure of what he was sign-
ing.

“My mother has had restless
nights where she can’t sleep
and my father has been so wor-
ried about this he said that he

does not know if he will attend

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#@ ACTING Prime Minister Cynthia ‘Mother’ Pratt officially opens the new educational complex,
watched by acting COB president Rhonda PEERS and Frankie Wilson, chaiman of the
COB council

(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)

on Grand Bahama. Ground was
broken for the establishment of
the Harry Moore Library and
Resource Centre, and a band-
shell was built.

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because of the stress its putting
on his heart,” Mr Saunders said.
Attempts to contact hospital
officials for commient on the’
matter were unsuccessful. ........:,}..,

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005




SENIORS in the Marathon
constituency got a special gift from
Sandals Royal Bahamian resort
staffers — a full-course thanksgiving
meal
\ssisted by the Marathon Girls
Pursuing Dreams Club team,
seniors from the government’s
Soldier Road Home, the private
(sood Samaritan and Golden Age
retirement homes, and other seniors
in the community were treated to all
they could eat and drink. Sandals
spokesperson Stacey Mackey said it
was important for the employees to
he there to serve the seniors. The
_cyent was part of Marathon’s
community outreach programme.





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Crime prevention
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THE TRIBUNE



applauds police’s
elevated position

CHAMBER of Com-
merce Crime Prevention
Committee chairman Bran
McCartney has applauded
the return of traffic offi-
cers to elevated stands on
Bay Street.

The effort was recom-
mended by the newly-
formed Bahamas Visitors
Safety and Security Board,
on which Mr McCartney
sits.

“T want to take this
opportunity to express how

pleased I am that the Roy- °

al Bahamas Police Force
once again has high visibil-
ity on Bay Street and, in
particular, in their capacity
as directors of traffic on
prominent stands in the
heart of downtown Nas-
sau,” said McCartney.

“The sight of the proud
Bahamian police officer in
starched uniform with
white glove directing traffic
is so traditional and
uniquely Bahamian,” he
said.

Mr McCartney said that
beyond creating “a won-
derful photo opportunity
for visitors” who love to
pose for pictures beside the
officers, the increased
police presence in down-
town Nassau provides a
level of comfort and secu-
rity for tourists.

“As long as tourism con-
tinues to be the engine that
drives the Bahamian econ-
omy, we need to treat our
visitors with the care they
deserve and this is a step in
the right direction,” Mr
McCartney said.



@ ATTORNEY and former acting magistrate Branville ‘Bran’
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McCartney is pictured with 2903 King.

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THE TRIBUNE

LARRY

SMITH

PRESENTS

Christie appeals

for re-opening
High Commission

be

@ By KARIN HERIG and

CARA BRENNEN

‘Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas will continue to
appeal to the United Kingdom to
review its closure of the British
High Commission in Nassau,
Prime Minister Perry Christie said
yesterday.

Returning from the Common-
wealth Heads of Government
méeting in Malta, Mr Christie said
he used the opportunity provid-
ed by his trip to. Europe to meet
with British Prime Minister Tony
Blair and impress upon him the
importance of a British High
Commission in the Bahamas.

‘Mr Christie said that the clo-
sure of the British High Commis-
sion this year comes at a time
when the Bahamas is in particular
need of a close consular relation-
ship with the UK.

“J made.a.very strong case on
behalf of the Bahamas, for there
to be assistance rendered to the
Bahamas because of seemingly
insurmountable problems caused
by the growing instability of Haiti.

I indicated specifically that all of
this is happening in a time in the
Bahamas when the British High

Commission closed in June of this

year,” he said.

Mr Christie said that given the
“very strong historical ties
between Britain and _ the
Bahamas” and the co-operation
with the UK through the OPBAT
participant Turks and Caicos,
there should be a formal arrange-
ment between the two countries to
interdict illegal immigrants and
drug shipments.

The prime minister said he indi-
cated to Mr Blair that “tremen-
dous discomfort and inconve-
nience” is being experienced by
Bahamian students in the UK,
who since the closure of the High

_ Commission, have had to address
consular matters to Jamaica.

However, the British govern-
ment has indicated a prepared-
ness to immediately open an office
for the purpose of facilitating stu-
dents, Mr Christie said.

The prime minister said, that a

further important factor to be con-

sidered in the review of the clo-

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sure of the British High Commis-
sion is the increased number of vis-
itors from the UK to the Bahamas.

Mr Christie said that with the
launch of Virgin Atlantic’s Nas-
sau/London route, to which more
flights will soon be added, “it
seems to me to be of every advan-
tage to both governments for
there to be a review of the con-
siderations leading to the closure.”

“T have indicated that a letter
will ensue from me to Prime Min-
ister Blair with a view to confirm-
ing the request,” he said.

The British High Commission
closed its doors on June 6 of this
year.

British Foreign Secretary Jack

_ Straw said the British governmen-

t’s decision to close nine embassies
and high commissions worldwide
was necessary for the UK’s For-
eign and Commonwealth Office
“to keep pace with a rapidly chang-
ing international environment”.
It is estimated that the move
will free up £6 million ($10.3 mil-
lion) a year for priorities such as

fighting terrorism, the British gov-

ernment stated.

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Nottage stresses social ills

@ DR Bernard Nottage receiving his instrument of appointment from Governor



General Dame Ivy Dumont yesterday at Government House

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

DR Bernard Nottage
announced yesterday that he
wants to use his new Senate
position to address social ills
such as crime and poverty.

A a ceremony at Gov-
ernment House, Dr Not-
tage was named a PLP sen-

ator and presented with his.

Instruments of Appoint-
ment by Governor-Gener-
al Dame Ivy Dumont.
The new senator’s well-
wishers could not be
accommodated in the

drawing room of Govern-

ment House. The small

Tempo Paris
The Company Polo Jean's

crowd had to therefore be
relocated to the ballroom.

In attendance were
Deputy Prime Minister
Cynthia Pratt, as well as a
number of PLP senators
and relatives of Dr Nottage.

Mrs Pratt said: “I am
grateful that I am here to
witness this afternoon your
return to public life. Dr
Nottage, it is an honour for
all of us to be here to share
with you this moment and
to encourage you. “

In an interview with the
press, Dr Nottage affirmed
that his goal is to serve the
public.

“All of these studies are

(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson).

done and the results are issued,
and then nothing seems.to hap-
pen to deal with the problems
themselves — illegal immigra-
tion for example, how do we
deal with it in an humane way?”
Dr Nottage said leaders need
to be more than just “pure politi-
cians”, but people who are look-
ing at the problems of the coun-
try, and trying to solve them.

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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005




documents

. BUSINESSMAN Gregory
Strachan has volunteered to
maintain the Cable Beach
roundabout at West Bay and
Oxford Streets and turn it into a
sea of purple, lavender and gold.

It is part of a Bahamas

ject to inspire greater partici-
pation by the public in the
maintenance of public spaces.
“We partner with members
of the general public to ensure
that all public areas — streets
roundabouts, lanes — are kept
in attractive conditions,” said
Peter Brown, executive co-ordi-
nator of Bahamas National
Pride Association.
“Traditionally, this was done
by government employees. We
can’t leave everything to gov-
ernment. It is very difficult for

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THE TRIBUNE.



(Photo: BIS/Gladstone Thurston)

Businessman backs
roundabout

the government to do everything.
Besides, it’s our country too. We
need the public’s participation.

“So, one of our aims is to
ensure that as much as possible
public areas are taken over and
maintained by public-spirited
citizens, companies, organisa-
tions and the like.”

On Friday at the roundabout,
Mr Strachan was presented with
the Bahamas National Pride
Association certificate of autho-
risation.

Mr Strachan is not new to
this. His company, Struckum
Pest Control, sponsored the
Harrold Road-Bethel Avenue
roundabout for five years.

“We chose this one because it.

was available,” said Mr Stra=)
chan. “We just want to say our-

thanks to the community for,



lan

supporting us.

“Eventually the primary
colours here are going to be
purple, lavender and gold. ‘We
are going to have other foliage
and maybe some roses in the
background. We will also prune
the palm trees and tidy up the
curbing. ates

“T love gardening and so:I
take a special interest in trying
to add a little beauty where:I
can. Hopefully it will inspire:
Bahamians to take a keener
interest in the beauty of our nat
ural environment.” we

Mr Brown agreed. “Besides.
sun, sand and sea, which many
other destinations have, imagine
what a boost to our touristh’it
would be if we could brag about
what a clean environment’ we,
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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL AND CARIBBEAN NEWS

Prime Minister blasts

Hubert Ingraham

| FROM page one

the PLP inherited the Royal Oasis problem.

. “The fact is why ought I to be dragged into a
debate when my government was the victim of an
original bad decision. We have an exciting pro-
gtamme for Grand Bahama and we must be careful
in how we describe the facts of an economy —
Grenada, Maldives and every small economy affect-
ed by the Tsunami and the hurricanes are reeling
and trying to recover,” he said.

Mr Christie added that while he could not speak
6 all the details, there was an “incredible defin-
ing’ investment portfolio planned for Grand
Bahama.

*He also said that sometime after the FNM’s rally
if-«Grand Bahama, scheduled for Friday week, he
would have to remind him, Mr Ingraham, who runs
the.country.

| Fewill have to remind him that I am the prime
minister of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas and
that. you don’t go around talking about you ‘will
find out and report to the nation’, that is what you do
when you are the prime minister "and I am the prime
minister no matter how you jones for power — that
is a democratic fact that can only be removed by an
election,” he said.

(Mit Christie also criticised Mr Ingraham for claim-
ing that as he had granted the Izmirlian family —
lead investors in BahaMar — their permanent res-
idgney, he was responsible for the BahaMar deal.

gfiis government did give the Izmirlians perma-
nent residency in 1996,” he said, “but the fact that I
want to make to the Bahamian people is that the
family did not make the investment in their time.
The investment came in my government.”

“But do you see how it sounds when a prime min-

Ingraham
hits back

“os

at cr iticism
F ROM page one

iminediately respond to com-
ments Mr Ingraham made in his
absence regarding the BahaMar
development and the Grand
Bahama economy.

~ However, Mr Ingraham said
that ,he had heard Mr Christie’s
comments and was fully prepared
to-respond.

.. According to Mr Ingraham,
“the mess at the Royal Oasis” is
not, the fault of the FNM govern-
ment; as Mr Christie has stated.

“That was certainly not his
position when he and a cadre of
his Ministers presided over the
re-opening of the refurbished
property shortly after coming to
office,” said Mr Ingraham.

: “Tt is unbelievable that he and

his government have been unable
to cause to be resolved the mess
_ at the facility which occurred
completely on their watch. On
.Qur. watch we caused to be pre-
served the jobs of the employees
of the Royal Oasis; on his watch,
the:employees lost their jobs.”

' Last night, Mr Ingraham also
reinforced his claim that the
BahaMar investment was not

ister has to come and talk about who do what, when
a former prime minister comes with this incredible
act of immaturity, talks about I gave him the resi-
dency permit so everything he does after that I can
claim,” he said.

With regards to the BahaMar deal, Mr Christie
accused Mr Ingraham of trying to suggest that the
government had something to hide in the deal.

“There has been either a gross or irresponsible
misunderstanding on the part of the former Prime
Minister or clear negligence on his part in being
inattentive to national events,” said Mr Christie.

' The prime minister pointed out that the BahaMar
deal was a model of transparency, which was pre-
sented to the House of Assembly during the
2005/2006 budget debate, with the major details
published in all the major dailies for several weeks.

“It is so absolutely clear when one reads it that
anyone who would see all the details that are in the
House of Assembly where those who represent the
country are expected to pay attention to what is
happening.’

Mr Christie added that Sarkas Izmirlian held a
meeting with opposition members, including Sena-
tor Tommy Turnquest, Alvin Smith, and Carl Bethel
to which Mr Higratiatn was invited, but declined to
attend.

“How for the life of me would you wish the
Bahamian people to believe that my government has
been less than frank and forthcoming when it has

taken such pains to lay before the Bahamian public |

this issue,” he said.

Mr Christie added that it is important that they
elevate themselves above involving investors in the
day-to-day politics of a country.

“The difficulty is that when you do that you bring

‘ and place investors into a very difficult position.”



completely transparent.

; He said the Prime Minister
knows that to say otherwise
would be untrue. “In due course
the-facts will be laid bare,” said
aa Ingraham.

“He claims that I was invited to
4 meeting to review the invest-
ment proposal with Mr Izmirlian
together with Tommy Turnquest
and other FNMs. That is not true.
He might check his facts on that.”
« He said that Mr Christie

“appears now, at this late date,
to be concerned that internation-
al investors not be brought into
nalione) debate.”

“When did he become a con-
Vet to this way of tailing? he
asked.

+ “Certainly he recalls his col-
leagues lambasting investors
throughout the two terms of the
FNM administration! Where was
he j when a former senior minister
m the PLP Government and now
Deputy to the Governor wrote
threatening letters to Mr Sol
Kefnzer advising what the PLP
would do with his development
and with concessions granted it
shduld the PLP be elected to the
government. If he opposed such
threats no one heard his voice. It
kept silent or very low then.”

: Mr Ingraham said that he and
his party are also being accused of
{bragging about our successes
with investments.” However, “we
are’ -Jjustly proud and will continue
to brag,” he said.

: “caution the Prime Minister
to deal with the investment for
Grand Bahama of which he
speaks with great care,” he said.
‘He ought not ignore the provi-
sions of the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement relative to the grant
of concessions to other investors
greater than those provided for
by that Agreement.”

' “Finally, the Prime Minister
has said that he believes that I
am ‘jonesing for power’. I do not
seek power. If I thought that the
job of Prime Minister was being
done adequately I would not be
seeking to fill it. But there is a
terrible void, and a clarion call
for the void to be filled. I seek to
fill that void.”

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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2095, PAGE 9

Marine completes



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LIEUTENANT Com-
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The course, “Conducting
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Embassy in Nassau.

It was conducted at the
Defence Institute of Inter-
national. Legal Studies
(DILS) in Newport, Rhode
Island.

The curriculum of the
course is geared towards the
professional development of
military officers or their civil-
ian equivalents that may be
called upon to perform
peacekeeping duties.

The 32 participants were
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as Africa, Asia, the
Caribbean, Europe and
South America.

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(CARICOM) peacekeeping
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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



linked to illicit drug traffick-
ing. Drug offenders now
accounted for the majority of
prisoners, he said.

“Located between major
drug supply countries in South
America and the drug demand
markets in North America and
Europe, the wider Caribbean
is a major transit point for
drugs,” he added.

“Narcotics traffickers use
weapons for protecting
shipments, intimidating com-
petitors and executing infor-
mants.

“Dependent drug users tend
also to commit crimes to get

In Loving Memory

FROM page one

particularly in crime involving
drug trafficking and the use of
guns.”

Canada, the US and UK had
over the last few years been
deporting Caribbean nation-
als convicted of criminal activ-
ities, he said.

These returning criminals
brought with them contacts
with the criminal fraternity in
the country from which they
were deported.

Sir Ronald said rising crime
in CARICOM states was









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Boley Ne Se

Deported criminals ‘putting Bahamas at tisk

money to fund their drug
habits and may use firearms
that are illegally obtained to
perpetuate violent crimes.

“The increased number of
murders in some countries of
the region, particularly of
police and law enforcement
officers, is directly linked to
trafficking in drugs and
the associated trafficking in
arms.”

Sir Ronald also discussed
escalation of crime in some
countries to include kidnap-
pings, ritual executions and
casual drive-by murders.

He cited Trinidad as a case
in point, claiming that 330
people had been murdered
this year and more than 200
kidnapped for ransom.

“In many countries, the pri-’

vate sector has become so con-
cerned about the safety of
their businesses that they have
staged public protests, includ-
ing the closure of their opera-
tions.”

Sir Ronald said a leading
Trinidad criminologist had
suggested there may even be
police collusion, part of a web
of corruption that is “the

underlay to the carpet of crime
in the region.”

He said a Caribbean task
force revealed the “uncon-
trollable” rise in crime in some
member states had not only
threatened legitimate govern-
ments but posed a serious
threat to the basic fabric of
society.

“While it is yet to be quan-
tified, it is also obvious that
the growing scale of violent
crime scares away both for-
eign and domestic investment,
particularly in the vital tourism
sector and, consequently, has a
deleterious effect on the eco-
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region. The difficulty is that,
individually, Caribbean gov-
ernments lack the financial
resources necessary to combat
the increasing levels of major
crime in a meaningful way.

“And, so far, in CARICOM,
they have shied away from
establishing joint regional
machinery to fight major
crime collectively and effec-
tively.”










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Ingraham sworn
in as official Leader
of Opposition

FROM page one

ment to leader of the opposi-
tion, pointing out, however,
that he does not expect to
hold the position long.

“Last.time I held this posi-
tion was from May, 1990 to
August, 1992, a long period
of 27 months. I do not expect
to keep this job for that long
this time as general elections
must be held within 18
months and I intend to go
back to another,” he said.

In the weeks and months
ahead, Mr Ingraham said, his
party will define its policies,
articulate its position and
develop programmes which
will be implemented should
the FNM regain the govern-
ment.

The former prime minister
said he is looking forward to
deepening the Bahamas’
democracy, creating a fairer
and more just society, and
establishing a government
that will work for the benefit
and advancement of all
Bahamian people.

“A government that would
remove once again the crite-
rion of political affiliation to
facilitate obtaining a job, ora
contract, or a licence, or'a
favourable government posi;
tion, or a scholarship, or a:
government BROUSORER
house,” he said.

Mr Ingraham added that at
FNM administration wilt
“continue along the path of
removing people from a cul-
ture of dependency on politi-
cians.”

Third person charged in
connection with murder

FROM page one

Bissainthe on October 29, 2005.

On that date, Bissainthe, 41, was reportedly shot and killed
at his home on Faith Avenue south.

He was the nation's 45th murder victim of the year.

On November 23, Smith Charitable, 30, was arraigned before
Magistrate Marilyn Meers in connection with Bissainthe's mur-
der. The previous Friday, Van Fransisco Juste, 27, was charged.

None of the men was allowed to enter a plea. on the charge

of murder.

Thompson's attorney, T Langton Hilton, told the court he
would be seeking to have his client released on bail as "there i is
no evidence against him" in this case.

All three men are to return to court on January 16 for the
beginning of the preliminary inquiry into the matter.

Sgt Barrington Miller is prosecuting.

US concern that Bahamas
area is being used as a ‘drop
off’ zone for Cuban migrants

FROM page one

According to LCDR Johns,
Cay Sal, the Anguilla Cays,
and Elbow Cay are some
examples of islands within the

- Cay Sal Bank region where

migrants are commonly
found.

“It’s hard to tell if the boats
go all the way to Cuba or if
this region is a drop-off area.
Usually the boats we intercept
are US registered — some-
times stolen,” he said.

LCDR Johns said it is diffi-
cult to understand the organ-
isation of the smuggling as it is
still unknown if the arrange-
ments are made in Florida for
recovery of migrants from this
alleged “drop off point” in the
Cay Sal area.

“In November alone 217
Cubans were interdicted by
the US Coast Guard. Of those
10 to 20 per cent were inter-
dicted in the Cay Sal Bank
territory; the others were
caught on their way directly

1

to Florida,” he said.

It is predominantly family
members of residents in Flori-
da who hire smugglers to
bring family members over,
LCDR Johns said.

He warned, however, that
the US Coast Guard will have
to increase their presence in
the Florida Straits to counter
an expected spike in smug-
gling activity as the end of the
year approaches.

“We currently have an
operation going on now in the
Straits of Florida. It’s a pulse
type operation where we have
all types of aircraft, and
numerous vessels patrolling
as we know that during this
time of the year — Novem-
ber and December — the
activity heightens.

“Tf you look at statistics, we
see a large number of
migrants in the November,
December periods. So, seeing
that, we designate more
resources based on that type
of information, and try 40
counteract them,” he said.‘

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THE TRIBUNE





ai PRIME Minister Perry Christie leaving the Commonwealth Heads of Goverunical with
Tourism Minister Obie Wilchcombe

& By Bahamas Information
Services



MATLA, Valletta — The

Bahamas has to become more
competitive in information and
technology, as Caribbean coun-
tries struggle to find other
means of sustaining their fail-
ing agricultural economies,
Prime Minister Perry Christie
said.

He was responding to con-
cerns raised by those
Caribbean-producing countries
over the recent reduction in
trade prices by the European
Union, at the 2005 Common-
wealth Heads of Government
Meeting

Some of the countries have
been placed in very vulnerable
positions. The Prime Minister
of St Kitts and Nevis, Dr Denzil
Douglas, expressed concerned
that his country is now rated
the second highest in debt to
GDP ratio in the world.

Guyana was forced to place
about 100,000 employees i in its
failed sugar. industry out of
work. And Barbados is faced
with spending more than $100

million in finding a substitute
for sugar.

The difficulty the countries
which produce sugar face is that
they have argued for a longer
transition period to enable them
to substitute other industries for
sugar. Unfortunately, that is not
the case.

For the Bahamas, tourism is
its main industry, followed by
financial services.

“Given the fact that both are
relatively effective and efficient
modes of development, there is
early belief that when we look
to alternative revenue for
Caribbean countries, that the
competition will grow. because
tourism and financial services
would become even more
attractive to those countries giv-
en the model that the Bahamas
has established,” Mr Christie
said.

“We aateacate that it is even
more important for the Bahamas
that we make ourselves more
competitive, more efficient,
because of the problems coun-
tries in the Caribbean face, first-
ly with bananas and sugar.”

Mr Christie added:” When

you listen and see the absolute
significant impact on the econ-
omy and loss of revenue in
these countrics,-you know that
they must turn themselves into
fierce competitors in .the
region,” he said.

And, in an intervention by
the Bahamas, focus was brought
to bear on the special vulnera-
bility of economies that can be
wiped out by one disaster.

The Prime Minister also not-
ed that the Bahamas has been
fortunate, despite being affect-
ed by two devastating hurri-
canes in 2004.

Meanwhile, countries.are
looking to the upcoming Sixth
World Trade Organisation
(WTO) Ministerial Conference
slated for Hong Kong on
December 6.

The primary task is to shape ;

the final agreement of the Doha
Development Agenda, which
members hope to complete by
2006.

The agreement calls for,
among other things, determin-
ing the scale of reductions in
tariffs on products and farm
subsidies.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 11

Bahamas must be

Christie tells Commonwealth heads

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 13



Bank

Cacique makes its magic aonaes

under the big top

THE Cacique catering and
events team created a magical
Christmas circus atmosphere at
the Bahamas National Trust’s
annual Jollification festival.

‘Once again, the team treat-
ed Trust members to a spectac-
ular array of goodies, including
coconut shrimp dipped in
Cacique’s special mango chut-
ney and beer battered gator
bites.

They also presented a table

filled with sweet treats including

a 100 per cent-edible ginger-
fend house designed. by
Cacique’s pastry chef Phichol
Smith.

It took two full days to create
the house that Phichol built.

The three-step process
includes preparing all of the
ingredients, including the gin-
gerbread and even some hand-
made candies; constructing it
and finally decorating it. About
20: per cent of the decorations
on the 60-plus pound ginger-.
bread house were added at the
National Trust.

The dessert buffet also
included a time honoured treat
that’s making a big comeback
on the international scene — the
cupcake.

.“The theme this year was
“Under the big top” and that
allowed us to get really creative
and playful. We thought, what
better than a display of colour-

. ful and delicious cupcakes,” said
chef Kyle Sawyer, executive
corporate chef at Cacique Inter-
national.

The peanut butter, red vel-
vet and cheesecake cupcakes

ages, as was the snowman carrot
cake.

In addition to treating Trust
members on Friday night, team
Cacique’s food booth was one
of the hottest stops at the J olli-
fication all weekend.

Chicken kebabs glazed with
Cacique’s specially made gua-
va barbecue sauce and spicy
buffalo chicken wraps were a
crowd pleaser and chef Kyle
says he was especially pleased
that the 100 per cent Bahamian
bratwurst hoagies were a big
seller.

“The sausage for those sand-

_wiches was made here in Nas-

sau by Premium Meat Distrib-
utors and was delivered to our
kitchens Friday evening. You
simply can’t get meat fresher
than that and I’m so glad that
people were willing to try
something different and end-

ed up really enjoying it,” he

said.

Cacique’s president and
CEO, Shawn M Sawyer said he
was thrilled with the response
and commended his team on a
job well done.

“This is something we have
done for three years and each
year when we sit down to
decide what to do, our team
comes up with something bigger
and better. I’m especially proud

that each year we are able to

assist in the longevity of the
Bahamas National Trust.

The Cacique catering and
events team creates one of a
kind meals and experiences -
whether it’s an intimate dinner
for two or an eee feast
for 200.



a CACIQUE staff show off their culinary creations

_ shirts to
hospital
canteen

BANK of the Bahamas Interna-

tional has assisted the Yellow Bird
Canteen by, donating Bank of the
Bahamas yellow golf shirts to staff
members.
The Yellow Bird Canteen, estab-
lished in the early 70’s, was opened
to provide hot and cold snacks to
patients at the Princess Margaret
Hospital (PMH).

The management of the canteen

‘recently acquired the gift shop at

PMH and all profits from the shop
go towards purchasing hospital
equipment.

Bank of the Bahamas Interna-
tional said in a statement that it
fully supports the efforts of the Yel-
low Bird Canteen.

The presentation of the shirts
was made to Mrs Corin Foun-
tain, president of the canteen, at
PMH.

Pictured, from left to right: Paul
McWeeney, managing director of
Bank of the Bahamas Internation-
al); Corin Fountain president of
Yellow Bird Canteen; Betty Mar-
ques; Thelma McWeeney and

_ Anna March,

were a huge hit with kids of all

Now in
Fort Lauderdale Airport!

_ Terminal 3 location open as of November 26th



ei THE Cacique team

S lh i p N © Ww, F j y L ate r Drop your bags off the day before you travel,

and they'll be waiting for you when you arrive!

We accept most oversize/overweight items and boxes!

Bags arrive 11am Pay in Nassau

. Pick Up:
Nassau Airport
Customs Hall

(242) 377-6593
(inside the Alrport Terminal)
Open on-call 422-2318

. Drop Off:
Miami Airport
4005 NW 28th St
; (305) 871-0571
(betwaan Thrifty and Budget)
Open Every Day BAM-8FM

“Save up to

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Fort Lauderdale Alrport
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(954) 359-8656
(Terminal 3, Lower Level
Next to American Airlines baggage)
Open MoF BAM


A THE gingerbread house created by Cacique’s pastry chef Phi-
‘chol Smith

Sonne airlines’ published BHEMKN baggage feos on your third bag, if it e oversize and over:
weight at 7Sibs, can be as high ay $185, With axcessbaggage you can pay as little as $75 for
the same bag. We are cheaper than the competition in all other comparisons too,

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





Get more information at
www.pdxbahamas.com
(242) 341-6593





NDC wean enen









PAGE 14, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005

THE TRIBUNB:



Musical hologram
celebrates Jerse
link to Britain

“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”



It’s ee in Flat, Satin and Seri Gloss.
It’s one coat hiding, easy to apply and
Very affordable.

“eS





| COMMONWEALTH Bank president and CEO William Sands, Jr, left, presents a cheque to
Lyford Cay Foundation director of educational programmes Roger Kelty

Bank supportin
scholarship fun

COMMONWEALTH Bank
has made a donation to the
Lyford Cay Foundation Tech-
nical Training Scholarship Pro-
gramme, in an effort to help
more Bahamians obtain skills
that will be embraced in the
labour market.

The Bahamian job market,
said the bank in a press release,
is one that “cries out for trained
labour and technical support”.

‘This year is the eighth con-
secutive year that the bank
threw its support behind an
awards programme that “recog-
nises the value of well-trained,
skilled and certified mechanics,
construction workers and other
technical tradesmen,” said
William Sands Jr, president and
CEO, who made the presenta-
tion personally.

“Commonwealth Bank has
been proud to partner with the
Lyford Cay Foundation to sup-
port technical training,” Mr
Sands said. “When the Foun-

dation introduced technical
training scholarships in 1994,
the concept, at least for the
Bahamas, was a novel one
because emphasis had always
been placed on academic schol-
arships.

“While the country was
enjoying more Bahamian doc-
tors, accountants and educators,
there was a growing gap in the
hands-on type of skills we need-
ed — people who could install
or repair air-conditioning sys-
tems, work in medical labora-
tories or X-ray and imaging
departments in hospitals or
maintain computer networks.
This programme aimed to fill
that gap and we are grateful to
the Lyford Cay Foundation for
its foresight in establishing the
awards,”

The gratitude was mutual.

“This has been one of the
most important and successful
initiatives the Lyford Cay Foun-
dation has ever: undertaken,”





said Foundation director of edit
cational programmes Roger
Kelty.
“More than 500 men and
women have received technical
training scholarships and have
returned to the Bahama
equipped to work in a broad
range of fields.

“Thanks to the té ehigieal
training programme, there is 4
cadre of skilled persons for the
public and private sectOt +6
draw on in everything ‘from
electrical engineering to animal
husbandry. :

“There are trained’ didsel sin



airplane mechanics working @t

the Royal Bahamas Defense
Force, Nassau Flight ‘Services!
or in private enterprises. There
is a growing number of persons
trained to work in agricultute:
None of this would have been
possible without the support of
a few individuals and caring ‘cor-
porate citizens like Common-
wealth Bank,” he said.” ~ “+,

»





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 15



see Se

Wildlif DS §

'

’

-_—

“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated, ‘Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

‘PARADISE ISLAND RESORT & CASINO
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LTD.

“Partners to Financial Freedom”

DUE TO THE LACK OF A QUORUM

Notice is hereby given that The Twentieth (20th)
Annual General Meeting of the Paradise Island
Resort & Casino Co-operative Credit Union Limited
will now be held on Saturday, December 3rd, 2005

; commencing at 9:00 am ait the Eugene Cooper
Building, #9 Village Road, Nassau, Bahamas. All
members are asked to attend.

| The purpose of this meeting is to:

¢ Receive the report of the Board of Directors for
~ 2004

e To elect members to the Board of Directors

e To receive the audited Accounts for 2004

¢ To discuss the Annual Budget

¢ To take action on matters that may come before
the meeting

The annual report may be viewed under
publications on our website listed below.

www.pircccu.org



over cull Send



Pinder’s Funeral Home

“Service Beyond Measure”

PALMDALE AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
TEL: 322-4570 ¢ NIGHT: 393-1351 CELL: 357-3617

RANNIE PINDER President
Funeral Service for the late

DOUGLAS FRANKLIN
KNOWLES, 55

who died at Doctors Hospital |
on Tuesday, will be held on |
Wednesday, November 30th, 2005 |
at St Anne’s Parish East Bay Street | -
and Fox Hill Road. Burial willbe |

in the church cemetery. Father {
Croslin Walkin officiating.

He is predeceased by his father
and mother, Augustus and Eulalee {

Knowles; one niece, Kristina Knowles, survived by his wife,
Dawn Knowles; two daughters, Clarissa Knowles and Tiffany |

Rivera; one son-in-law, Sam Rivera; three brothers, Charles
“Bronson” Knowles, Eric and Augustus knowles; three sisters,
Mrs Diana Knowles, Patricia Evans and Genevieve Sampey; {
four sisters-in-law, Sylvia, Josephine and Marianne Knowles
and Cecile Barber; four brothers-in-law, Richard Evans, Roy

| Bailey, Clinton “Clint” Bailey (deceased) and David Barber; four |
aunts, Agnes, Edith and Ilva Knowles and Addie Cartwright;
uncle Alvin Richie and family; eight nieces, Donna Lowe, Joy.

f Kane, Suzette Parker, Georgia Russell, Leanne Sawyer, Deanna
Wyrick, Kim Cunningham and Debbie;.12 nephews, Peter, lan, |
Derek, Stefan and Gunnar Knowles, Mark and Stefan Evans,

} Richard and Christopher Sampey, Adam and David Bailey and
Robin Barber; nieces-in-law and nephews-in-law, Gordon Lowe,
Wesley Kane, Quincy Parker, Dax Russell, George Sawyer II,
David Cunnigham, Dawn Evans and Robin Lee Barber; other
relatives include, Chris and Eddie Darville, Beadie and Giles |

{| Newbold and family, Jimmy, Geoffrey, Charlton, Patrick, Alec,

“f. Reggie, Sammy, Donald, Kirk, Debra, Rachael and Chris
Knowles, Winston, Curtis and Steve Cartwright and their families,
| Mary Cartwright and family, Bernadette and Pepi Terrali and

| family Renee Turnquest and family, Rosalee “Tiny” and Mary
Knowles and families, grand nieces and grandnephews, Dylan

’ and Lauren Lowe, Megan Knowles, Maya Parker, Ryan Kane,
Jessica Russell, Apira Evans and George Sawyer Ill and a host
of other relatives and friends including, Elva Knowles and family,

‘{ Sonia Darville and family, Lolitta Knowles, Deborah Carroll,
“Tony Moree, Tony Knowles, Judy “Pepper” Russell, Kenny |
Harris, Steve and Debbie Carey, Sgt James and Paula Cooper,

«y Thelma Sweeting, Albert Pearce, George “Tony” Sawyer Sr, |

’ Jeannette and Jerome Cartwright, Edmond Knowles, Christine |
Lowe, Rosie Roberts, Anthony Nottage, Barbra Algreen, Tommy
Hall, Willard Hanna, Tony Longley, the entire staff of The Crown
Jewellers Stores and members of the Nassau Dart Association,
Abaco Dart Association and Grand Bahama Dart Association.

Friends may pay their last respects on Tuesday, November
29th, 2005 at 5:30pm until 7:30pm at Pinder’s Funeral Home,
Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale.

In lieu of flowers donations can be sent to St Anne’s Social
Outreach Programme, P.O. Box N-1569 and The Ranfurly
Home for Boys in memory of Douglas Knowles, P.O. Box N-
1413. °







3
A

Y

Py





oN) co. 1d



a
“Dispensing A Healthier Life”
Ph: (242) 328-6129 or Ph: (242) 322-3612
Fax: ae 326-7842






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PAGE 16, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005 THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL NEWS



First deaths are recorded among the
Kashmir quake survivors left out in cold
AS i






Sao ae
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presents the



ows
CELEBRITY
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1 Tbisp oil

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1 clove garlic, minced

1 cup mushrooms, sliced

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2 cups Mahatma Gold® rice, cooked

1 egg, beaten

2-1/2 cups part-skim Mozzarella cheese, divided
1/2 cup tomato sauce

1/2 tsp basil, dried

1/4 tsp oregano, dried

1/4 tsp black pepper, freshly ground

1 drop hot sauce

MICHAEL JORDAN

Celebrity Invitational 2006



VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

Kerzner International Bahamas Limited is



recruiting volunteers to assist with the Michael y
. : . Seed bell pepper and cut into strips. In a large skillet, heat oil on medium-high. Stir-fry onion, garlic,
mushrooms and peppers until crisp-tender, about 3-4 minutes. Set aside. In a bowl, combine rice, egg
Jordan Celebrity Invitational Golf Tournament and 1/2 cup grated Mozzarella. Press evenly into an oiled 12" pizza pan. Bake at 400°F for 12-15 min-
utes. Sprinkle crust with half the remaining cheese. Stir tomato sauce, basil, oregano, pepper and hot
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To volunteer contact Victoria Bethell by email at

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ext. 64561 by January 6, 2006. Distributed by ASA H. PRITCHARD, LTD.
Robinson & Claridge Roads : Tel: 393-2437





THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 17



SCULIEIEIE



share your news

| The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.












Cuba's annual biotech
conference opens

with hundreds of
iepte {Copyrighted Material jor. Thursday, December 1, 7:00pm Gala Premiere

. _ Syndicated Content | Friday, December 2, 7:00pm
Available from Commercial News Providers” | a ae
Saturday, December 3, 12:30 Matinee

Saturday, December 3, 7:00pm

RAMA



ae CHRISTMAS
1005

— ae Cooper City Church of God

| - (Florida) —
~ Church of God Auditorium

Joe Farrington Rd. Nassau, Bahamas






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Tel: 327-POST





THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 18, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005



THE TRIBUNE



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NOVEMBER 29, 2005 |

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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 19

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PAGE 20, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005 THE TRIBUNE

International passengers to be
checked for bird flu in Shanghai





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Losing bidder: Moody’s: tourism
‘still not recovered’

Shell dealers
offered stake

Wells: ‘We had
best bid on price’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A LOSING bidder for Shell (Bahamas) retail
business yesterday told The Tribune that their
bid would have allowed the individual dealers
to, effectively become owners of their busi-
nesses by purchasing a shareholding in the
acquiring company.

Independent MP Tennyson Wells, principal
of Petroleum Energies, said he and his team
had given the individual Shell dealers - most of
whom leases their gas stations from Shell - “the
option to come on board” with their bid by
taking an equity stake.

Mr Wells said: “Some had agreed to do so.
One had paid some money, which we gave
back to him two weeks ago.”

Petroleum Energies was beaten out in the
race for Shell’s retail business in the Bahamas
and Turks & Caicos by the BISX-listed
Freeport Oil Holdings Company (FOCOL),
in a deal thought to be worth $25 million judg-
ing from the $25 million preference share issue

SEE page 5B l TENNYSON WELLS
Keeping resigns
from Cable board

@ By NEIL HARTNELL.

Tribune Business Editor Announcement



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Wall é

credit rating

agency has

warned that the

Bahamian
tourism industry has “not fully
recovered” from the damage
inflicted: by the 2004 hurricane
season, even though it had
largely escaped the 2005 season
despite the brush with Hurri-
cane Wilma.

In its credit opinion on the
Bahamas, published just after
it released its analysis of this
nation’s economy, Moody’s
said: “The 2005 hurricane sea-
son was not as harsh as in 2004,
yet tourism arrivals had not ful-
ly recovered through the first
eight months of 2005.”

Much of the Bahamas’ inabil-
ity to fully rebound from the
2004 storm season, which fea-
tured Hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne, has been due to the clo-
sure of the Royal Oasis resort,
which has reduced Grand
Bahama’s room inventory by
one third and had a knock-on
effect that has impacted every

Street

sector of that island’s economy.

However, Moody’s opinion
may add further fuel to fears
that the Bahamas is slowly, but
surely, losing its competitive
edge against other Caribbean
tourism destinations.

The Tribune revealed yester-
day how Caribbean Tourism
Organisation (CTO) statistics
showed stopover tourist arrivals
to the Bahamas fell by 1.9 per
cent to just over 1,112 million
during the first eight: months of
2005, a decline that contrasted
with the growth enjoyed by
some of its Caribbean competi-
tors.

Period ©

For the January to June peri-
od, which was. before the dev-
astation inflicted by Hurricane

e Wilma, Cancun and Cozumel
in Mexico both enjoyed 7.3 per
cent growth in stopover arrivals
compared to 2004. The Domini-
can Republic, enjoying a repu-
tation as a low-cost destination,
also saw 7.2 per cent growth in
stopover arrivals.

In its analysis of the Bahami-
an economy, Moody’s said the



Bahamas “has not yet been able
to benefit fully” from the rela-
tively buoyant US economy,
where 80 per cent of its visitors

’ come from. :

Tourism provided 40 per cent
of Bahamian GDP, 50 per cent
of direct and indirect jobs, and
70 per cent of foreign exchange
earnings, making the economy
vulnerable to external shocks.

Moody’s' said: “Tourism
arrivals in the first eight months
of 2005 were 6.9 per cent lower
than the same period a year ear-

- lier, although the more eco-

nomically important air arrivals:
were only off 1.9 per cent com-
pared with a 9.1 per cent decline
in sea arrivals.

“The increase in tourist,
spending in New Providence’
was not quite strong enough to
offset continued weakness in
the resorts of Grand Bahama. A
complete recovery from the

‘recent hurricane damage out-

side New Providence will allow
the Bahamas to benefit fully
from the addition of new
tourism capacity.”

SEE page 4B

RND: Two expressions of
‘keen interest’ in.



CABLE Bahamas yesterday
announced the end of an era,
with former chairman and
founder Philip Keeping resign-
ing from its Board to help make
way for the appointments of
two new directors connected to
the company’s largest share-
holder.

In a release, Cable Bahamas
said both Mr Keeping and Gary
Kain had resigned from its
Board to be replaced by John
Risley and Maxwell Parsons.
The latter two will now join
chairman and chief executive,
Brendan Paddick, and Bahami-
ans Al Jarrett and George
Mackey, on the Board.

Both Mr Risley and Mr Par-
sons have links to Cable
Bahamas’ largest shareholder,
Barbados-based Columbus
Communications, which holds
29.8 per cent of the company’s

outstanding stock.

Mr Risley, together with Mr
Paddick, was a shareholder in
Ironbound Holdings (Barba-
dos), the entity that acquired
Columbus Communications
from Mr Keeping and set in
motion the chain of events that
led to yesterday’s announce-
ment.

Mr Parsons is chief financial
officer for Columbus Commu-
nications and its parent, Colum-

heralds end of
era for founder
of BISX-led firm

bus International Inc. The
Board appointments are thus
likely to be interpreted as
Columbus Communications
strengthening its hold over
Cable Bahamas’ future direc-
tion and strategy, and are likely
to come as little surprise to most
market observers.

Under his stewardship, Mr
Keeping built Cable Bahamas

over a 10-year period from

nothing into a company that
now offers broadband services
“to 95 per cent of Bahamian
homes”.

The company’s success was
founded on its securing of a
cable television monopoly from
the former FNM administration
in the mid-1990s, which has pro-
vided the bedrock for its suc-
cess and ability to branch out
into other business areas. These
include the provision of Internet
and digital television services
and, through its Caribbean
Crossings and Maxil Commu-

SEE page 2B

PRIME COMMERCIAL LAND

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA: Two adjacent parcels comprising 3.232
acres each. Across from Mary Star Of The Sea Education Center. Total of
516 feet frontage on East Sunrise Highway and direct access to Atlantic Drive.
Ideal location for a strip shopping center. One parcel for $650,000 or the
entire 6.464 acres for $1 million. #3050 Suzanne Harding: 242.359.1722

Damianos Sotheby's

Sion

lm By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

RND Holdings yesterday said it had
received two expressions of “keen inter-
est” from potential buyers for its Gold’s
Gym franchise, after it placed a newspa-
per advertisement last Friday warning that
the business would close and cease opera-
tions on December 19 this year.

Ken Donathan, RND’s chief operating
officer, said the company had been “con-
tacted” by two separate parties after the
notice was published, and added that he
would prefer to sell Gold’s Gym rather than

close it down and inconvenience its mem-

‘bers and staff.

Mr Donathan. said RND’s Board. of
Directors and senior management had tak-
en the decision to shut Gold’s Gym, which
currently has a staff of about six, after no
buyer had come forward with an accept-

able offer.
Searching

He said: “We’ve been actively searching
for a buyer but none has come to the fore-
front with what we consider a reasonable
offer at this juncture.......

“We carried the gym for a year-and-a-

half, primarily during the time we were

looking for a buyer, and during that time it
cost us financially.”

Mr Donathan ‘said he was “keeping my
fingers crossed” that a buyer could be found
in the three weeks before the December
19 date, adding that the financial drain
imposed on RND meant he had to consid-
er the interests of shareholders above those
of Gold’s Gym members.

If the franchise had to close, Mr

SEE page 5B

JaeUueRael

private bonking | investment management 1 corporate finunce I

ig | stock brokerage § shure registrar and transfe





PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005

iHE TRIBUNE





Reopen public beach access

ack on Septem-
ber 20, 2005, in
this column I
wrote: “Recently,
I was in Grand
Cayman and I couldn’t help but

notice that along the fabled Sev-
en Mile Beach, every couple of
hundred yards, there are well
marked public right-of-way
paths to the beach. What is even
more impressive is that most

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

FLAMING LAMPS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 24th
day of November, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp.

Inc.,

of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

GLOWING RED POPPIES LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the '
24th day of November, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa

Corp. Inc.,

of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



hotel and condominium pro-
jects have incorporated these
right-of-ways into their overall
landscape design.

“In Cayman, the rule applies
equally to everybody. There is
even a pathway along the east-
ern boundary of the Governor’s
Mansion, as there seem to be
no exceptions.

“I mention this because I can-
not help but feel cheated and
betrayed every time I pass a
public beach access sign,
because New Providence was
laid out in exactly the same
manner, with public access
paths every couple hundred
yards. But unlike Cayman, pri-
vate owners have taken it upon
themselves to enclose the public

right-of-ways within their prop- —

erties — effectively eliminating
the public’s birth right.”

Over the years, I have
become progressively more
interested in the issue of public
access to the beaches of the
Bahamas, because options on
New Providence are dwindling
as we approve new develop-
ment projects. The comments
made above were added as a
postscript to an article on a
financial-related topic. Sever-
al readers subsequently sug-
.gested that I make beach access
an article of its own.

I was therefore extremely
interested in the comments
made by Prime Minister Perry
Christie in his keynote address
to the 49th National General
Convention of the PLP, where
he said:

“While on the subject of
beaches, let me say that my
Government has already com-
mitted itself to the acquisition,
by private contract with inter-
ested landowners, of addition-
al beach properties that will be
converted to public use by
Bahamians and visitors alike.

FROM page 1B

nications subsidiaries, operation
of a fibre optic cable system and

web hosting, data and disasterg
recovery services respectively. |.

Cable Bahamas also raised

Further, let me reassure you
that none of the developments
I am discussing this evening will
involve in any way any depri-
vation of the rights of access
to beaches that Bahamians
presently enjoy.

“On the contrary, the thrust
of my Government’s policy in
this area is to augment the
national inventory of public
beaches, especially here in New
Providence, so that all Bahami-
ans will have ready access to a
much greater number of beach-
es than is presently the case.
This will be an important ele-
ment of a new comprehensive
land policy that is right now
the subject of consultation with
our private sector partners.”

This policy position is
extremely commendable ,and
I applaud the Government for
its position in this regard. The
public need well-planned and
well-maintained ‘green spaces’
throughout our more populat-
ed islands, especially picnic
areas, complete with recre-
ational facilities and bathroom
and shower facilities.

Models

The Goodman’s Bay and
Montagu Bay models are
indeed a step in the right direc-
tion, and should be replicated
throughout the nation.

However, while this policy
initiative is positive, it does not
even remotely address a far
more fundamental issue, which
is the reopening of public
access roads and right-of-ways
to existing beaches. ©

I am not a lawyer, so I am
not really aware of what would
be required to correct this bla-
tant wrong. I just do not see
how public access roadways
could be ‘quieted’ or, worse
yet, stolen and everybody just
turns a blind eye. I would not

Financial

Focus

By Larry Gibson



have thought it was legally pos-
sible to acquire public access
roads and easements, making
them private property.

I know that in some

instances Parliamentary

‘ approval has been sought to

reroute certain roads. There-

fore, adjoining land owners

should not be able to enclose
public land for their private
benefit, in clear violation of its
intended purpose. Perhaps
some of my lawyer friends
could offer an opinion.

My view is that the Govern-
ment can save a lot of the mon-
ey that it plans to spend on
buying beachfront properties
by simply reopening the access
roads. There was a very good

- reason for putting them there

in the first place, and this was
fully recognised by the early
town planners.

A cursory search on the
Internet shows that many of
our regional counterparts have
legislation governing beach
access. By far, Barbados has
been the most progressive in
this regard. According to Bar-
bados.org: All beaches in Bar-
bados are open to the public.
Properties which front on to'a
beach may own the land to the
high-water mark only. Access
to the beach is a right for every
Barbadian, and many of the
sea front properties must pro-

vide a public right of way
across their land to the ocean.
This policy applies to hotels
and other tourism-related
properties.

My fundamental question is:
“Do you have the wherewithal
to do what is right? If not, why
not?”

Post Script

Finally, I wish to thank Nicki
Kelly for pointing out a gram-
matical error in my column on
November 15, 2005. I shall
attempt to be more vigilant in
my editing.

Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analyst,
is vice-president - pensions,
Colonial Pensions Servicés'

(Bahamas), a wholly-owned

subsidiary of Colonial Group
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance and
is a major shareholder of Séecu-
rity & General Insurance Cont
pany in the Bahamas. aa Gs

The views expressed are
those of the author and‘do‘not
necessarily represent those’ of
Colonial Group International
or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct\any questions or 'com=
ments to rlgibson@atlanti¢+
house.com.bs



$30 million through an initial
public offering (IPO), the
largest amount of capital ever
raised to date in the Bahamian

capital markets. The Bahamas .

International Securities

' Exchange (BISX) listed com-

AUTO SALE

at

‘AUTO

Nassau, Bahamas

~ Shirley & Mackey Street

Saturday, December 3, 2005

9:00A.M.-3:00P.M.

No reasonable offer
will be refused

We'll take Cash

or Financing Arrangements, |

ptecree ene rtemnen eee tees ete nene eee ere

COME EARLY, GET THE DEAL YOU’VE ALWAYS WANTED.

Autos on gale
are Scotiabank
repossessions

All sales “As ia”

ati



pany has delivered consistent
returns to shareholders ever
since, making it one of the most
successful domestic investments
for retail and institutional buy-
ers.

_ Cable Bahamas now has

some 2,500 shareholders, who
include the National Insurance
Board (NIB) and Bahamas

Electricity. Corporation (BEC): f
~ fibre-rich broadband network

It employs 280 staff.

Mr Keeping said in a state-
ment: “We have built a busi-
ness utilising talented local
expertise, working hand-in-
hand with a small group of
experienced and seasoned
industry professionals, of which
every shareholder and stake-
holder can be proud.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

MARVEL SUNSET LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation) |

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
25th day of November, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., of. P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Copier Technician

We are expanding our technical support team and require an

experienced copier technician.

Micronet Business Technology is a leading business
technology supplier and the exclusive distributor and service
center for Toshiba copiers and fax machines in The Bahamas.

* Great career opportunity and working environment
¢ Will provide extensive Toshiba factory training
¢ Experience in the copier field a plus
¢ Must have your own transportation
-¢ Salary commensurate with experience and qualifications

All applications confidential
No telephone calls. Please reply in writing via email
(subject line: Copier Tech.) or fax to:

Copier Tech. c/o Manager
Micronet Ltd.

P.O. Box SS-6270
Nassau, Bahamas
Email: gpinder@micronet.bs
Fax: 328-3043

TOSHIBA 4Micronet

COPY * FAX # PRINT



BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

Since 1983

“During our 10 short years,,
we have physically bridged the
four principle islands of the
Bahamas with,a state-of- ‘the art,

and offered broadband sérvices
to 95 per cent of Bahamiait
homes."

Mr Paddick added: “Philip
Keeping has proven himself to
be one of the Bahamas' most
accomplished and outstanding
businessmen. Under his leader-
ship, Cable Bahamas has suc-
cessfully brought a suite of
advanced broadband services
to the majority of Bahamian
homes, truly forging the
Bahamas to the right side of the
digital divide and positioning it
as the envy of all the countries
in the region."

Mr Kain worked with Mr
Paddick at Canadian telecom-
munications company Persona,
before it was sold last year to a
private equity group.

Mr Paddick said of the new
appointments: “Both John and

’ Max are accomplished individ-
’ uals, who have distinguished

business careers in Canada.
They are smart, energetic lead-
ers with tremendous strategic
skills and business acumen, and
both, in their own way and style,
will bring a strong voice to the
Cable Bahamas board......

“The company now stands
poised to reap the rewards of
its investments. Philip and Gary
leave behind a dynamic board
of directors and a talented
group of executives who are
confident that they will contin-
ue to deliver fantastic results
for all shareholders".

Mr Risley is chairman of
Clearwater Seafoods, a Halifax,
Nova Scotia-based seafood har-
vester, processor and distributor
quoted on the Toronto Stock,
Exchange. He was a director,
and shareholder in Persona!
until it was taken private in vd uly’
2004.

i
j
}
}
;



Local company
owns ‘tanker that |

AIIM Yom UNS ere RCO)
transport’ LNG





TOKYO Electric Power
Company (TEPCO) last week
said it had established a
Bahamian company to own ai
tanker that will be used to
transport liquefied natural gas
(LNG) to Japan from Russia. |

Cygnus LNG shipping ‘is 70

, per cent owned by Tepco, with

the remainder divided equally,
between a shipping firm and
trading house, the Japan Times
reported.



THE TRIBUNE



Minister hits back at FNM’
‘Companies search’ claims

llyson Maynard-

Gibson, minister

of financial ser-

vices and invest-

ments, has criticised an FNM

Senator’s allegations that com-

pany searches could not be

carried out at the Registrar

General’s Department this
summer as incorrect.

Describing John Delaney’s

criticisms as containing “sig-

nificant errors”, Mrs May-

nard-Gibson said: “At no time

could searches not be done at

the Registrar General’s

Department as was suggest-

ed.”
Address

In his address to the FNM
Convention, Mr Delaney, an
attorney and partner with Hig-
gs & Johnson, said inspections
of corporate files relating to
firms established under the

Companies Act were "made ,

impossible" for several weeks
this summer due to the state
of facilities at the Registrar
General's Department.

He charged: "For several
weeks this past summer, the
state of disrepair of the facili-
ties made impossible physical
inspections of corporate files
of companies registered under
the Companies Act. This
totally contradicts an election
pledge of the present Govy-
ernment to ‘provide the nec-
essary funding and adminis-
trative support’" to the Com-
panies Registry."

Mr Delaney added that the
system for searching deeds
and. documents, essential for
land title searches, was “inad-
equate, inefficient and defec-
tive regarding data commenc-
ing 2003 to present". ,

He described this as a
"nightmare" for lawyers, and
something that left thém at
risk of liability if they told
clients that land had clear title,
only to later discover it did
not.

However, Mrs Maynard-
Gibson told the Bahamas @
Sunrise morning show on ZNS
TV that Mr Delaney’s claims

contained “significant errors”.

Still, she left the door opeu
far enough to indicate there
may have been some merit to
Mr Delaney’s concerns, by
saying that the system permit-
ting Internet searches was still
being beta-tested.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said:
“We have implemented the
ability to search remotely
from your own personal com-
puter, a process that is cur-
rently being beta-tested. And
with any computer system
around the world, particularly
during the implementing and
testing phase, there will be
times when the system will be
down for maintenance or any
number of reasons.”

She added that it was critical
to protect the integrity of the
system being installed at the
Registrar General’s Depart-
ment, which is linked to the
rest of the Government’s com-
puter network.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
that during the beta-testing,
the ability for registered
agents to go online and con-
duct company searches and
incorporations was down, but
people could still go to the
Registrar General’s Depart-
ment, sit at one of its terminals
and conduct searches.

The minister added that
under the previous FNM
administration, it could take
up to three years for deeds
and documents to be returned
after they were recorded.

Process

However, due to the digiti-
sation process at the Registrar
General’s Department, and
the scanning of all records so
they could be made available
electronically, Mrs Maynard-
Gibson said that since June
2005 deeds and documents
were being recorded, indexed,
scanned and handed back to
their owner within 30 days.

“This is an extremely impor-
tant leap and major milestone
in the development of our
country,” Mrs Maynard-Gib-
son said.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
INTERVEC MANAGEMENT LIMITED

An International Business Company

_ (in Voluntary Liquidation)

Pursuant to Section 137(4) of the International Business
Companies Act, 2000 notice is hereby given that the voluntary
winding-up and dissolution of the Company commenced on the 28th
day of November, 2005 and that Pine Limited of Devonshire House,
Queen Street, P.O. Box N-8176, Nassau, Bahamas has been appointed

Liquidator.

Dated this 28th day of November, 2005.

Pine Limited
Liquidator

CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNTANT

We are seeking to fill the following immediate multi-year contract position
for a project on Paradise Island, Bahamas, This position requires experience
-» An all aspects of accounting including, job costing monthly invoicing, bank
reconciliation, pay roll, accounts payable, purchase order control, contract
and change order control and review. Preparation of financial statements

and monthly reports will be required.

This professional candidate must have 5 years or more experience in
construction accounting, hold a Bachelor’s or Masters degree in
Accounting and must have extensive knowledge in ACCPAC, Crystal
Reports and Microsoft Office including Word, Excel & Outlook.

Only a short list of candidates will be contacted,

Please respond by email to:

a

infowe

bwlbahamas.com

Fax: 242.363.1279

Mail to:

PBWL

P.O. Box $$-6386
Nassau, Bahamas —



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 3B

BUSINESS

Joined

“The Bahamas has joined
other countries around the
world in taking government
to the people. This has even
greater meanings for an arch-
ipelagic nation like the
Bahamas.

“In essence, no longer will
persons from the remotest
islands of the Bahamas such
as Inagua, Mayaguana and
Ragged Island have to travel
to New Providence to obtain
any vital information. From
their own communities, they'll
be able to access these ser-
vices.”





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Warehousing
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Ship’s Agency Services
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Drop off or ship your goods to our Miami warehouse

and we’ ll deliver them direct to you!

OPEN:
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November 19th - December 18th

Throughout the Bahamas, from Miami or anywhere
else in the world we take care of your goods from s

to finish!

NCU wre
242.377.1252/0164 305.591.4369





@ ALLYSON Maynard-Gibson, minister of financial services and investments, and
Registrar-General Shane Miller are interviewed on Bahamas @ Sunrise.



PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005

_ THE TRIBUNE



Moody’

FROM page 1B

Meanwhile, Moody’s said

PUBLIC NOTICE

GAMING BOARD FOR
THE COMMONWEALTH
OF THE BAHAMAS

NOTICE

Pursuant to Section 36(3) of the Lotteries
and Gaming Act Chapter 387, notice is hereby
given that BAHA MAR ENTERPRISES
LTD. a Company incorporated under the laws
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
in accordance with the provisions of Section
34(2) of the said Act, made application to the
Secretary of the Gaming Board for The
Bahamas for a licence to manage a casino on
premises situated at The Wyndham Nassau
Resort and Crystal Palace Casino on the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

Notice is also given that on Friday, 9th
December, 2005 at 10:00am at the Magistrate
Court, Garnet Levarity, Justice Centre,
Freeport Grand Bahama, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, the
application of BAHA-MAR ENTERPRISES
LIMITED will be considered by Gaming —
Board.

And notice is also given that any person
who desires to object to the grant of the licence
shall send to The Secretary of the Gaming

.Board for The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, P.O. Box N-4565, Nassau, New
Providence, Bahamas or deliver to the offices
situated in The Renaissance Building, West
Bay Street on or before noon on Thursday,
December 1, 2005, two (2) copies of a brief
statement in wHune of the grounds of the —

~-objection.

support for the Bahamas’ sov-
ereign credit ratings of A3 for
foreign currency bond and bank

signed: Bernard K. Bonamy
Secretary

Gaming Board for
The Commonwealth of The Bahamas



deposit ceilings, and Al for
local currency, came from its
proximity to the US, good eco-
nomic management track
record, and continuing compet-
itiveness in tourism and finan-
cial services.

It added, though, that while
the impact from the September
11 terror attacks appeared to
have “bottomed out”, the Gov-
ernment’s fiscal performance
had still not got back on track.

To improve its sovereign
credit rating, the Bahamas
needed to “reign in” its persis-
tent fiscal deficits and improve







TIN Tess ad

STEAM COOKS

APPLICANTS MUST POSSESS THE FOLLOWING:

* DISCIPLINED IN FOLLOWING AND ADHERING TO SET RECIPES
¢ AT LEAST THREE YEARS EXPERIENCE IN PREP/COOKING

¢ AN APPRECIATION FOR FOOD PREPARATION

¢ AN APPRECIATION FOR CLEANLINESS AND ORDER

¢ STRONG SENSE OF URGENCY

¢ THE ABILITY TO WORK UNDER PRESSURE

FORWARD RESUMES TO EMAIL ADDRESS: RR@SBARROBAHAMAS.COM OR FAX # 356-0333

its debt position, which cur-
rently stands at around $2.5 bil-
lion or about 38 per cent of
gross domestic product (GDP).

Moody’s said: “The tourism
industry, which provides 70 per
cent of the Bahamas’ foreign
exchange earnings, will need to
prove its resiliency to changing
external conditions.

“The rating could come
under pressure from a loss of
competitiveness in the tourism
industry or from additional
external shocks affecting that
sector. This would lead to fis-
cal slippage and a significant








RECEPTIONIST/OFFICE
ASSISTANT

We are seeking to fill the following contract position for a project on
Paradise Island, Bahamas, This position requires experience as a
professional receptionist/office assistant. Call monitoring, Filing,
Preparation of Letters, Spreadsheets, and other documents will be required.

This professional candidate must have 5 years or more experience as a»
receptionist/office assistant dealing with high end clientele, worked in a fast

pace environment, experience with switchboards, and must have extensive

knowledge in Microsoft Office including Word, Excel & Outlook. A

professional certification in this area would be an asset,

Only a short list of candidates will be contacted.

Please respond by email to: info

@pbwibahamas.com

Fax: 242.363.1279

Mail to:

PBWL

P.O. Box $S-6386
Nassau, Bahamas

Scotiabank Building
Bay Street, Downtown
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel. 242-393-8618
www.bahamasrealty.bs
www.cbrichardellis.com

720 - 2,285 sq.ft. office suites.

In the heart of the Bahamas’ financial area. cee

in osvociats

* Excellent visitor and local pedestrial traffic.

* Freatures a full standby generator.

- BAHAMAS REALTY LTD a

ERCHAL

CBRE

CB RICHARD ELLIS

Dedicated parking facilities.



th)

Pricing Information As Of:
28 November 200 5



au Oli

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Kerzner International BDRs

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets

Fund Name

Colina Money Market Fund 1.259334"



2.4766 2.0536 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.4766 ***
10.6711 10.0000 _ Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.6711*****
2.2754 2.1675 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.275422
1.1406

FINDEX: ¢

BISX ALL SHARE INDE X - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV §$ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

**- AS AT AUG. 10, 2005/ **** - AS AT OCT. 31, 2005



Financial Ad visors Ltd.



NAVIGATING A NEW WORLD





108

= JF IDEL



aie

7.5
NM
NM _

10.4

0.810 14.6

ae mee

Last 12 Months





YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol.

- Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



build up in government debt.
Given the narrow revenue base,
a much greater level of debt
would be hard to sustain.....
And Moody’s added: “The
Government faces the task of
containing larger fiscal deficits
at a time of uncertain tourism

tourism ‘still not recovered’

prospects for economic growth.

“The Government’s response
to the new international finati-
cial regulatory regime, and ifs:
ability to manage economic lib-
eralisation as its seeks WTQ;
membership will influence
Moody’s credit assessment of

the Bahamas.” "

ny

prospects and subdued

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that STEVEN MICHAEL WILLIAMS OF #158 ‘i
CLIVE AVENUE, P.O. BOX F-42398, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,; |
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality :|

and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The:}
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/-},
naturalization should not be granted, should: send.a written and,|.
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 22ND, |,
day of NOVEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality, j,
and Citizenship, P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas..,|.



PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

NOTICE

The Public Hospitals Authority invites tenders for ie
the purchase of the following vehicles

- 1. 1998 Daewoo Cielo Sedan 1500cc
2, 1997 Asia Towner Van 800 cc
3. Toyota Hiace Bus

4, 1991 Chevy Pick-Up Truck

Vehicles maybe viewed at Sandilands Rehabilitation » rep
Centre’s Compound, Fox Hill Rd. ;

‘Sealed envelopes, marked tender should be address a
to the Managing Director, Public Hospital Authority, |
_ Manx Corporate Centre/ Dockendale House, :'
. P.O.Box N-8200, and arrive no later than Friday, *:
~ December 30, 2005. :





‘Herbert H. Brown —
Managing Director

PUBLIC NOTICE

GAMING BOARD FOR
THE COMMONWEALTH
OF THE BAHAMAS _

NOTICE

Pursuant to Section 36(3) of the Lotteries
and Gaming Act Chapter 387, notice is hereby
given that PNK (EXUMA) Ltd. a Company
incorporated under the laws of the

- Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has in
accordance with the provisions of Section
34(2) of the said Act, made application to the
Secretary of the Gaming Board for The
Bahamas for a licence to manage a casino on
premises situated at The Four Seasons Hotel
on the Island of Exuma, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

And notice is also given that on Friday, 9th
December, 2005 at 10:00am at the Magistrate
Court, Garnet Levarity, Justice Centre,
Freeport Grand Bahama, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, the *
application of PNK (EXUMA) Limited will ©
be considered by Gaming Board. ,

Notice is also given that any person who “

_desires to object to the grant of the licence {
shall send to The Secretary of the Gaming ©
Board for The Commonwealth of The .
Bahamas, P.O. Box N-4565, Nassau, New
Providence, Bahamas or deliver to the offices -
situated in The Renaissance Building, West -
Bay Street on or before noon on Thursday, :.
December 1, 2005, two (2) copies of a brief
statement in writing of the grounds of the
objection.



signed: Bernard K. Bonamy
Secretary

Gaming Board for ‘
The Commonwealth of The Bahamas

‘





THE TRIBUNE

TUESUDAT, NOVEihigtrn 29, cuuu, Pec. wie



Losing bidder: Shell

BUSINESS



dealers offered stake

FROM page 1B

that FOCOL is seeking share-
holder approval for at a Decem-
ber 7 Extraordinary General
Meeting (EGM).

Shell gas station dealers had
last week told The Tribune that
they were viewing the FOCOL
takeover “in a very positive
light”, although they wanted to
make sure they would retain
thdit dealerships.

Garner Dawkins, head of the
Bahamian Petroleum Retailers
Asséciation and the Shell Gold-
en' Gates dealer, told The Tri-
bun that the dealers hoped to
benefit from the fact that
FOCOL would take decisions
at a local level, whereas with
Shel much of the decision-mak-
ingycame from regional head
offi¢e in Brazil.

‘Mr Dawkins said his canopy
lights were out, and he had been
trying to “get a repair truck for
the past three days. But they
(Shell] say they’re waiting for
authorisation from down south.
It’s ridiculous, simple things like
that. There’s not much you can
do.”

i} However, Mr Wells yesterday

told The Tribune that the Shell
dealers had béen concerned that
they would lose their dealerships
under FOCOL if the company
used the business model it had
adopted in Grand Bahama,

FROM page 1B

where it both owned and ran
service stations.

The MP said: “We had talked
to them and guaranteed to them
that they would remain dealers
of Shell. If we had won the bid,
we guaranteed their continued
operation of the gas stations.”

However, both Shell and
FOCOL said the existing dealer
network would remain.

Bahamian retailers have long
clamoured for the right to own
their gas stations, something that
is likely to have made the Petro-
leum Energies bid especially
attractive to them, since it held
out the promise of equity own-
ership. However, it was Shell’s
regional and global head offices
in Brazil and New York that had
the casting vote when deciding

. the winning bidder, not the deal-

ers.

Mr Wells said he felt Petrole-
um Energies’ bid had been com-
petitive with FOCOL’s in terms
of price, but added that he had
been told his rival was able to
clinch the deal by offering to
contract Shell Western as the
supplier of petroleum products
to its Grand Bahama business
when the current contract with
its existing wholesaler expired.

As a result, apart from sup-

plying FOCOL’s newly-acquired .

business in New Providence
with 60 million gallons of petro-
leum products per year, outside

of its contract with the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation (BEC),
Mr Wells said it would supply
a further 16-18 million gallons to
FOCOL’s Grand Bahama busi-
ness.

“My understanding is that we
had in terms of pricing the best
bid in,” Mr Wells said. ““We’re
disappointed. At one stage, we
thought we had it. That’s what
they indicated.”

He added, though, that Petro- .

leum Energies, which The Tri-
bune undrstands is financially
backed by union monies, would
be prepared to bid should Esso
or Texaco decide to sell their
Bahamian retail networks.:
FOCOL will take over 60
retail service stations and five
depots in the Bahamas and
Turks & Caicos as part of this
deal. Given that the company,
which is a wholesale distributor
of petroleum and LPG products
on Grand Bahama, supplies just

‘20 service stations and marinas

on that island, the Shell pur-
chase more than doubles
FOCOL’s size and geographic
footprint.

The Shell brand will remain
on all the gas stations involved
in the deal, with FOCOL con-
tinuing to use it under a trade-
mark agreement. Shell West will
continue to supply products at
the wholesale level to the sta-
tions.



onathan said all staff would be given the appro-
agate severance packages. Members would be
refunded on a pro rate basis.

! Gold’s Gym lost $117,000 from operations dur-
ing RND’s 2005 fiscal year, which ran until Feb-
ruary29,.with its,total loss amounting to $196,000.
Removing Gold’s Gym would have slashed
RND’ s 2005 full-year loss of $588,782 by one
third.

} Mr Donathan said RND’s real estate portfolio
was Performing i in line with expectations, while its
TicketXpress: ‘online booking and reservations
operations: was “doing fairly much as anticipated”.
| He addéd: “There’s béen: sonie: delays. in the
tolling out of TicketXpress, due to running into
challenges i in the Family Islands relating to Inter-
net connectivity, but we’re over that for the most
art.”
: Mr Donathan indicated this was mostly con-

nected to TixcketXpress’s contract to act as the
exclusive reservations and online booking agent
for the Bahamas Out Island Promotions Board’s
member resorts, some of which were in locations

’ where Internet connectivity was not fully estab-

lished. In some cases, this had caused RND to
“reorganise the process”.

On the Promotions Board agreement, which
sees TicketXpress act as the call centre dealing
with all calls to the Ministry of Tourism’s toll-free
line, Mr Donathan said: “That’s coming on track.
We’ve already started visits to several Family
Island properties.”

All those that had been visited “saw the sense”
in RND’s service, and “embraced it right away”.

Mr Donathan said of RND’s overall strategy:
“We have a defined plan as to how we intend to
clear out the: financial deficits the company has
been having.;We’re on track.”

ns Ha
OPM ee ey.
Sut

Toc oT ts = se ee ae 8 ee eae ee ee OS

WINTER PROGRAMMES 2006

BTVI is now accepting application forms for the winter
(January) semester 2006 for the following programmes:

¢ Conch Shell Jewelry Manufacturing Day and Night

¢ Drywall Installation
¢ Evening Wear
¢ Painting and Decorating

¢ Roof Construction

Ss Small Gas Engine

oi Tailoring

ine Pie

Day and Night
Night
Day and Night
Night
Day and Night
Day and Night

Application forms are available in the
Admissions Office in the J-Block of the
Campus on Old Trail Road between the

hours of 9:00am and 5:00pm

For additional information contact
Ms Lorraine Knowles or Gene Marshall at
(24 2) 393-2804 or 5, (242) 502-6338.



Credit Cards
are Powerful

Tools...

The Public Treasury
aims to help make life
easier for citizens by
enabling credit card
payments for govern-
ment services.

Credit cards are
powertul tools.

They are convenient.
They make managing
your finances easier, and
they are especially useful
for emergencies.

They should not be used
irresponsibly.

Using a credit card re-
sponsibly builds a good
credit history that can be
a valuable asset when
applying for car loans,
jobs or mortgages.

The rules of
wise credit card
UT - ae

uc least the

~ minimum due every
, month to keep your
: account i in good -

Ne more. SET roe ,
“minimum to reduce the

ree ees ae. or
- you may. be charged
ce ete oe

oe fesponsibly" a
~. don’t exceed your limit,
_ or extra fees. may ol

on thei :

: Cals cone be
Beet mL e
a8 you use your card, and

keep personal infor-

ee aU er wl Cet
ln. case your ct is ho
i stole ee

"| pence a oe Ys Lee
J cle immediately. ©

COMMONWEALTH BANK

m@ RBC ‘
:) Royal Ban
AS of Canada

INTERNATIONAL



GOVERNMENT GUARANTEED
ADVANCED EDUCATION LOAN SCHEME

In collaboration with the Educational Guaranteed Fund Loan Program
of The Ministry of Education, Bank of The Bahamas International is
pleased to advise that the cheque disbursement for ALL Students in
The Loan Program will take place at The Holy Trinity Activities
Centre - Stapledon Gardens from December Ist, 2005 through
December 7th, 2005 from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm as follows:-

NEW STUDENTS (FIRST TIME RECIPIENTS)
AND RETURNING STUDENTS

A-C: Thursday Ist, December 2005
D-I: Friday 2nd, December 2005
J-M: Monday 5th, December 2005
N-S: Tuesday 6th, December 2005
T-Z: Wednesday 7th, December 2005

Time:

Place:

9:00 am - 3:00 pm

Holy Trinity Activities Centre,

Stapledon Gardens

e Returning Students: Both Students OR Guarantors should be present

and must bring relevant Identification.

(Valid Passport and National Insurance Card).

New Students: Both Students AND Guarantors should be present and

bring relevant Identification.

(Valid Passport, National Insurance Card, Current Job Letter and a copy of

Utility Bill)

Cheques will not be released until all necessary documentation has been

completed.

‘NO DISBURSEMENTS WILL BE MADE AT THE BANK!





PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS. -



Major gets his chance for

Bahamas lightweight cr

i BOXING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

MEACHER ‘Pain’ Major,
groomed as the heir to mentor
Ray Minus Jr’s Bahamas light-
weight throne, will finally get

a chance to fight for the

vacant belt.

First Class Promotions,
headed by retired Minus Jr.
and his wife Michelle, will give
him that opportunity on Sat-
urday, December 17 against
Richard ‘the Hammer’ Pitt, at
a venue to be announced.

Michelle Minus said the
only reason Major is just get-

Fighter to take
on Richard Pitt



they haven’t had an opponent
prepared to fight him until
now.

As this is the last show for
the year, Minus said it will be
a great opportunity for Major
to get a national title under
his belt before he pursues the
British Commonwealth title
next year.

“It’s long overdue, but he’s

waited for it,” Minus stressed.
“Now it comes at a time when
he will be going after a possi-
ble British Commonwealth
title.

“The Bahamas Boxing
Commission has submitted his
name, along with Jerome ‘the
Bahamian Bronze Bomber’
Ellis and Jermaine ‘Choo- :
Choo’ Mackey for a British

Commonwealth title, so it will
be something under his belt
that he can take with him.”

This will be Major’s fifth
fight for the year, having gone
4-1 to push his overall win-
loss record to 11-2.

“I’m just staying in great tip
top shape so that I can fight
for the Bahamian lightweight
title,” said Major, who will
remain at home to prepare for
the show. “But I’m really
looking forward to next year.
I have some great things in
store.”

Sometime next year, Major
said he intends to sign a con-
tract with a new manager and
promotional team. But he’s

ting a title shot now is because



# TONIQUE WILLIAMS-DARLING
donated the suit, worn during her victory in
Helsinki, Finland, to Americas project

Ambassador Debbie Ferguson.



& By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



THE body suit that Tonique Williams-
Darling wore to win the 10th IAAF
World Championship’s rain-wrenched
400 metres in August will be auctioned by
the [AAF.

On Saturday, Williams-Darling donat-
ed the suit, worn during her victory in
Helsinki, Finland, to Americas project
Ambassador Debbie Ferguson.

The autographed suit will go towards
the IAAF’s humanitarian project “Ath-
letics for a Better World”.

Donations received will be auctioned at
the end of the year and all profits donat-
ed to the United Nations Associations:
FAO, UNICEF and WEP.

Although she didn’t compete in Helsin-
ki, Ferguson was on hand to present one
of the Bahamian coins she and the Gold-
en Girls received from the government
following their gold medal performance at
the Olympic Games in Sydney, Australia
in 2000.

A number of athletes around the world
have donated items to the IAAF.

Williams-Darling, 29, is coming off a
repeat gold medal at the 2004 Olympic

Games in Athens, Greece and this year’s

IAAF World Championships in Helsinki.
Last year she won half of the TDK

Golden League $1 million jackpot.

Additionally, Williams-Darling ended

the 2004 season with the four fastest per-
formances in the women’s one-lapper and
was ranked World number one in her
event.

This past year, she ran five of the ten
fastest performances.

Last year, Williams-Darling walked
away with the BAAA’s Female Athlete of
the Year award and she was also named
the Jones Communication’s Person of the
Year.

Once again, Williams-Darling will be
the top performer for the BAAA’s
Female Athlete of the Year when the cer-
emony is held next month.

And, although she had very little time
to recuperate from the past season,
Williams-Darling confirmed to the IAAF
on Monday that she will compete in both
the Norwich Union International in Glas-
gow on January 28 and the Norwich
Union Grand Prix in Birmingham in Feb-
ruary.

She joins Russian World and Olympic
pole vault champion Yelena Isinbayeva,

the World Athlete of the Year for the
second consecutive year and Jamaican
sprint champion Veronica Campbell at
Britain’s premier indoor meeting.

Next year, the women’s 400 will also
be one of the ten events on the Golden
League jackpot that will start on Friday,
June 2 in Oslo and conclude on Sunday,
September 3 in Berlin.

Along the way, the athletes will get to
compete in Paris on July 7, Rome on July
14, Zurich on August 18 and Brussels on
August 25.

However, there won’t be an Olympic
Games or World Championships next
year, so the focus for the athletes will be
on the Golden League jackpot during the
summer.

But at the beginning of the year, the
athletes will get to compete in the 11th
IAAF World Indoor Championships in
Moscow, Russia from March 10-12.

@ DEBBIE FERGUSON, pictured
here at the Olympic Games in Athens
in 2004, presented one of the Bahami-

an coins she and the Golden Girls
received from the government follow-
ing their gold medal performance at
the Olympic Games in Sydney, 2000.



not rushing into the process.

In the meantime, he said he
wants to focus on Pitt when
they meet again.

This time, he hope to beat
him more convincingly than
he did in their initial
encounter.

“This is a title fight, so I
know I have to be in tip top
shape,” Major stressed. “I
don’t know what style Pitt will
be coming with, but I just
hope to do my best and hope-
fully I will come out with the
win.

In the co-main event,
Bahamas middleweight cham-
pion Jermaine Mackey will
taking on Jamaican Patrick

ampionship

}



‘Hanger’ Miller over eight.
rounds. ms

So far, there are three fights:
lined up for the undercard.
They will all go four.
rounds.

Elkena ‘Ali’ Saunders will
take on Jamaican Patrick
‘Blaster’ Taylor; Anthony:
‘Syco’ Wood will face Dereck:
‘Castro’ Sawyer and Ricardo:
‘One Shot’ Bethel will battle:
Alpachino ‘Banger’ Allen. =:

Michelle Minus said they:
are anticipating that the show:
will be an exciting one and:
they are encouraging the fanis:
to come out for a treat as they.
close out the year for the pro-*
fessional boxers.

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Shockers
take the

\ first game
against

| Giants

ST FRANCIS/JOSEPH
SHOCKERS took the first
game in the Catholic Dioce-
san Primary Schools primary
school boys basketball cham-
pionship series 35-32 against
Xavier’s Giants Monday at
Loyola Hall.

Game two will take place on
Wednesday. ‘

(Photos: Mario
Duncanson/
Tribune staff)





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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

‘SS BRITE ER ENR SS PENILE EEL EU SEL ETL EN RSI ESS ES RE



BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

ST. FRANCIS/JOSEPH
were a little too much for the
Xavier's Giants to handle as
they took game one of the
Catholic Diocesan Primary
Schools primary school boys
basketball championship
series with a 35-32 victory
Monday at Loyola Hall.

Teran Watson scored a
game high 13 points after he
took over in the final two
minutes when Shaquille Pen-
nerman fouled out. Penner-
man scored 10 points before

_he was ejected.

"When he got fouled out, I
knew I had to slow the ball
down and when the lane
opened up, I was able to pen-
etrate," said Watson, who
contributed the Shockers'
final three points down the
stretch to seal the deal.

Just before he left the
game, Pennerman scored a
lay-up and, on a Xavier's
turnover, he converted one
of two foul shots to put the
Shockers up for good at 33-
30.

Xavier's, who rebounded

from a shaky 0-2 start to earn
their berth in the finals,
played well defensively to
stay in the game. But they
missed a couple of critical
free throws and their two big
men, Brandon Whymms and
Jermaine Smith both fouled
out.
_ Coach Nelson 'Mandella'
Joseph said it was unfortu-
nate that they fouled out
because he felt they had a
chance to win with both of
them in the game.

"Those two guys we lost
really hurt us because they
were where we were getting
most of our rebounds and our
scoring," Joseph stated.
‘Hopefully we will try to tell
them to stay out of foul trou-
ble the next game."

Before they left, Whymms
had five and Smith ended up
with four. The Giants, how-
ever, got a game high nine
from Justin Symonette, while
guards Kent Wood and
Anfernee Seymour scored
seven and five respectively.

Despite the loss, coach
Joseph said he was still
pleased.

"They played great. They
didn't back down. We got
blown out the first game, but
I told my guys that we don't
have nothing to lose, so all
we had to so was come in



vennnnn niin eH neY





L

here and play hard," he
stressed.

Except for the first quarter
when the Shockers rade the
four points from Teran Wat-
son and three from Shaquille
Pennerman to an 11-4 lead
at the first break, the game
was a relatively close one the
rest of the way.



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

st the Giants yesterday.
: hoto: Mario Dun arsond Wine

In fact, the giants turned
things around in the second
half as they out-scored the
Shockers 8-2 to cut the deficit
to 13-12 at the half. Through-
out the second half, both
teams fought to several ties
before St. Francis/Joseph
pulled away down the stretch.

St. Francis/Joseph's coach



ees as a



a REN Ri























Devon Johnson said he knew
it wasn't going to be as easy
as it was in their regular sea-
son meeting when they blew
out Xavier's.

"Like I told my guys,
Xavier's weren’t going to
come here and lay down and
play dead. They made us
play," he stated. "It was a

Name:

great game."

But, come Wednesday
when they play game two,
coach Johnson said they will
be out with a little more
intensity and hopefully they
won't play it so close.

Coach Joseph said they too
will be back and intend to
play more aggressively.









fi BOXING
CHAMPION BOXING
CLUB’S SHOW

CHAMPION Amateur Boxing
Club held a tournament on Satur-
day at the First Class Promotions’
Club on Wulff Road.

e Here’s a look at the results of
the matches contested:

Cleveland Dorsett won over
Raheed Delancy in three rounds;
Tyrone Oliver won over Ramaeo
Andrews in the third as the referee
stopped the contest; Jeremiah
Andrews defeated Avery Francis;
Avery Francis def. Tyrone Oliver,
Kendrick Pratt def. Dwayne Saun-
ders; Byron Ferguson def. Paul
Clarke; McKenzie Telisnord def.
Jamal Rolle; Kevin Telisnord def.
Ricardo Williams; Aprichao Davis
def. Bradley Harris and Rudolf Polo
def. Avery Francis in a three-round
exhibition.

The best fight of the night was
between Ricardo Williams and
Kevin Telunsord; the most improved
boxer was Tyrone Oliver and the
most valuable boxer was Apricho
Davis.

@ TRACK
BAAA’S NATIONAL
CROSS COUNTRY

THE CR Walker Knights and the
CH Reeves Raptors retained their
secondary and junior high school
titles at the BAAA’s Colony Club
Resort National High School Cross
Country Championships.

The event was held on Saturday at
Fort Charlotte.

Marva Miller won the under-20
girls title for CR Walker in a time of
14 minutes and 39.23 seconds with
team-mate Kentisha Miller coming
in second in 15.25.26 and Jordan
Prince Williams’ Alex Pratt was third
in 15.48.17.

Leslie Dorceval of CR Walker
won the under-20 boys division in
16.57.91. CC Sweeting’s Anthony
Saunders was second in 17.13.03 and
CR Walker’s Ken Thomas got third
in 17.20.11. |

While CR Walker took the team
title, CC Sweeting was second and
RM Bailey got third.

In the under-17 girls division,
Monica Woodside of Government
High ran 14.14.13 for the victory.
Her team-mate Carmene Oxgenor
was second in 14.49.20 and Ashley
Hanna of CR Walker came in third .
in 15.41.54.

CW Saunders won the team title
over CR Walker.

Vicknel Servens won the under-27
boys title for DW Davis. Second
place went to Stevano Thompson of
Dame Doris Johnson Mystic Mar-
lins.

Other individual winners were
Lexi Wilson of Westminster in the
under-15 girls’ division; Wilgin Prof-
it of CH Reeves in the under-15 boys
division and Erishia Watt won the
under-13 girls’ division with Garick
Phylum of CH Reeves taking the
under-13 boys division.

@ GOLF
SOUTHERN DIVISION
LADIES’ INSTALLATION

THE executive committee of the
Bahamas Golf Federation’s South-
ern Ladies Division is inviting all
golfers and the public to attend their
pre-Christmas social and member:
ship drive.

The event is scheduled for Satur-
day, December 3 at 6.30pm at the
Sandyport Poop Deck Restaurant. A
donation of $30, which includes two
drinks, is required. Tickets can be
purchased from Ethelyn Davis,
Yvonne Shaw or Sharon Cleare. A

raffle will be drawn and door prizes
will be given out.

ey ta Ce ny



Address





P.O. Box



Telephone:

Cell:





TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005





‘Women striving for

a better Bahamas’

# By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

WOMEN in the Bahamas
raised their voices and banded
together last week to celebrate
an important historical event,
the enfranchisement of
women. It is a celebration that
stands as a testament to wom-
en's rights, going far beyond
the average girl power atti-
tude.

In celebration of National
Women's Week, "Women
Striving For a _ Better
Bahamas" November 20 -27, a
series of events were held in
observance of the 43rd
anniversary of the enfran-
chisement of Bahamian
women.

_ Many Bahamian foremoth-
ers made the fight for suffrage
their’ most fundamental
demand because they saw it
as the defining feature of full
citizenship. It claimed for
women the right to govern
themselves. and choose their
own representatives. It assert-

Events celebrate
anniversary of
enfranchisement of
Bahamian women



ed that women should enjoy
individual rights in the midst
of a philosophy which said
that women, by nature, were
considered to be dependent
on men and subordinate to
them.

Politics

Many thought that women
could not be trusted to exer-
cise the independence of
thought necessary for choos-
ing political leaders responsi-
bly. It was also believed that a

woman's place was in the
home, catering to husband
and caring for children, so
there was no place for voting.
The entry of women into pol-
itics, it was feared, would chal-
lenge the assignment of
women to the home, and
might lead to disruption of the
family unit.

But many Bahamian
women rose above the limita-
tions, and above these fears, to
fight for their right to not only
vote, but be considered as
more than “just a woman”.
An annual observance of this

milestone in the history of the
Bahamas allows women to
remember where they came
from, as well as realise the
need to push forward.

“Many persons wonder why
every year this group of
women (the Minisiry of Social
Services and Community



2005 Bahamas International
Film Festival embraces
young women filmmakers

TWO promising film directors, Moya
Thompson and Maria Govan, have been
selected for the Bahamas International
Film Festival’s (BIFF) Filmmakers Res-
idency Programme, officials announced
yesterday during the launch of the ini-
tiative.

Following in the footsteps of various
festivals and their film “labs”, the
Bahamas International Film Festival’s
goal is to provide a supportive environ-
ment for local filmmakers. Six Bahamian
candidates have been chosen for the
unique learning experience; Maria Gov-
an, Moya Thompson, Kareem Mortimer,
Gustavius Smith, Bernard Petit and Kevin
Taylor. Each of them will be showing a
film during the festival.

Story

Writer/director Maria Govan’s film,
RAIN, is a story of a young Bahamian
girl on a voyage to the big city of Nassau
in search of her estranged mother, who
abandoned her as a child.

Writer/director, Moya Thompson’s film
BABYGIRL, is a hardship.story about a
young girl who is forced to grow up fast
when her mother abandons her and she is
faced with the reality that her father was
a gambling alcoholic. The plot takes an
interesting twist when her father is

Bahamian candidates chosen for
‘unique’ learning experience



stabbed and the community is shocked
by the violence...and news that BABY-
GIRL is the culprit.

A third candidate selected to take part
in the residency programme, Kareem J
Mortimer, writer/director, will be partic-

ipating in the documentary category.

Kareem’s film, FREEDOM, depicts the
filmmaker’s journey to find himself and
his sexual freedom despite the prejudices
and intolerance of the Caribbean com-
munity.

Gustavius Smith, also a writer/direc-
tor, brings THE HMBS FLAMINGO
WRECKAGE to the big screen. The nar-
rative is an account given by the surviving
crew members of a Cuban ship wreck-
age that was found in the Bahamas.

Writer/director Bernard Petit tells the
story of an interracial relationship that
faced challenges from the still-present
caste system in the upper class Bahamas
in RETURN.

The last entrant to the residency pro-
gramme, writer/director Kevin Taylor,
brings QUIRKE to the big screen. Based

CHOOSE

on a screenplay that takes place in North-
ern Ontario, Canada, three men pull
together to clean up their best friends
home after he commits suicide, in an
effort to protect his sister from his truth.
Chaired by award winning director
Spike Lee, the Filmmakers Residency
Programme, in an intense six-hour ses-
sion, is scheduled for December 9 at the
Atlantis Paradise Island Resort.

Producers

Each director will have the opportuni-
ty to mieet one-on-one with US industry
professionals, producers, directors, mar-
keting executives, and sales agents. This
concentrated day will foster dialogue,
build lasting connections and help film-
makers in both their creative and pro-
duction processes. '

The exploration of the Spirit of Free-
dom in world cinema is the consistent
theme of the festival. Films from 26 coun-

SEE page two

Art Supplies

one cae

Computer:

Pee ticle
Ank Cartridges

Dévelopment's Bureau of
Women's Affairs) organises
activities to commemorate
enfranchisement, but this sin-
gle act no doubt provided the
impetus for women to dream
of their daughters and grand-
daughters having.a better way
of life in the Bahamas; a
dream of them participating
on equal footing with their
male counterparts in every
aspect,” said Social Services
minister Melanie Griffin, as
she addressed the National
Women's Week luncheon,
held at SuperClubs Breezes.

"From serving on juries, to -

being members of parliament
and cabinet ministers, to being
managers of banks and major
corporations, to being chief
justices, president of the court
of appeal, governor of the
Central Bank, director gener-

ah

Store Locations



al of Tourism, to being presi-
dent of the Chamber of Com-
merce, to' holding Olympic
gold medals, to becoming
Rhodes Scholars, and of
course many many more,”
Minister Griffin continued.

Society

Women in the Bahamian
society have risen to some of

‘the highest positions in their

field, and in doing so, have
made the foremothers of this
country proud, the minister

- believes. Individuals like Mary

Ingraham, Eugenia Lockhart,
Mable Walker, Georgianna
Symonette and Dame Doris
Johnson, are hailed as "hero-
ines of the suffrage move-

SEE page two

Town Center Mall ¢ Harbour Bay :







PAGE 2C, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005

THE TRIBUNE®



‘Women striving for
a better Bahamas’

FROM page one

ment". Their names are
among scores of women who
have "bravely participated in
the movement to secure the
precious privilege we have
today, the right to vote," Min-
ister Griffin added.

In a passionate and stirring
message to the crowd of
women from various profes-
sions, Minister Griffin warned
women that while they bask
in the advantages that their
foremothers brought about,
they must also contribute to
the further development of
their society. While they enjoy
the benefits of society's
progress toward "full equali-
ty" for women, they must also
acknowledge their special role
in the development of
Bahamian society.

“One look around at many
of the social challenges that
have presented themselves
will tell us that a refocus of
our core values is in order.

“What would our suf-



fragettes think of the turn of
events in our communities and

in our families? It is a shift .

that has seen Bahamian chil-
dren bearing arms and killing
each other, women being
beaten and abused, and
women still being discrimi-
nated against in certain con-
stitutional provisions.

Role

"They perhaps would won-
der whether the women of
today were truly taking an
active role in their own devel-
opment and that of their coun-
try. They perhaps would won-
der whether we have rested
on our laurels and have fallen
prey to complacency," Mrs
Griffin said, offering an
answer to the question she put
forth to the audience.

As the mother of a six year
old daughter, Mrs Griffin said
that of all of the roles she
plays in society, the one that
she esteems most, is that of
mother. Working mothers like

teh Meee ee
Pangea a




Mises

RR ek ERE

ese eed

3-6655

393-8310 FAX
To

5 2

herself, she said, must make
time in their schedules to assist
their children in school work.

While society may blame
women for many of the nega-
tive behaviours of children -
either because they were too
lenient, too tolerant, or too
protective, or too strict - Min-

ister Griffin said that women ,

alone should not be held
accountable. "The overarch-
ing challenge is that women
and men, the two sides of the
leadership in the family unit,
must both re-commit and re-
dedicate themselves to work
at their respective roles in pro-
ducing a balanced, disciplined
and forward-looking happy
and content society."

She charged the women in
the audience to know their
role, and pursue them "enthu-
siastically" and "vigorously":

¢ Women are and should be
the nurturers of the society,
taking the time to make
absolutely sure that the young
are reared with love, disci-
pline, and the proper respect



MALL AT
EV ae MM LOLs

TELEPHONE:
394-5700/4
394-5702 FAX
BeeRsesthclatie






OPEN LATE:

NOV. 28th & Nov. 29th
LC

eNov. 30th Open until 10 p.m.





iM

rm lovin’ it





for their society.

e Women are and should be
the conscience of the society,
with a kind word and a hand
of assistance for those less
unfortunate.

e Women are and should be
the cohesive force of the
nation's families, lovingly pro-
tecting and preserving the

_ most. basic and most impor-

tant unit of our society.
., Giving an encouraging word

to: women's organisations in.

the Bahamas, Minister Grif-
fin urged them to remain
"steadfast" in their communi-

ty efforts regardless of finan-
cial constraints, small num-
bers, and other disheartening
moments. "You will be sur-
prised what can be accom-
plished through the work of a
few dedicated and committed
individuals."

Suffragettes in Bahamian
history, she added, are a stark
reminder of the fact that great
numbers are not a must. Just
as many times they were few
in numbers, but never dis-
heartened and continued the
work, women of today must
continue securing a future for

those women who come
behind," she said. te

"To whom much is givetr,
much is expected.

“Therefore we, who have.
achieved some degree of suc
cess, are obligated to reach
out and lift up our sisters who.
still find themselves in the.
proverbial trenches," Minis;,
ter Griffin charged. "We must,
do so knowing. that our fore:
mothers laid a strong, sound
foundation for us and so we;
too, must do the same;
for future generations of
women. '

dd esececseeceecceuseseccaserenceeseacesracscnusecnscseanaseesseceesseeeneangsasenaaseacnnsssessceasscussennssnasansnsccsseasaseasaseceaseasaseseseasacessaceasasensasccnesecsaseassccanasoassssessnseeee wet

Film Festival embraces

women filmmakers

nurtured by top leading industry professionals
from around the world. It is a tremendous hor
our to have Mr Lee as the quintessential edu’
cator of this programme,” said Leslie Vander-
pool, founder and executive director of B.
Advisors for the Filmmakers Residency Pro”
gramme include: Julie Corman, Lares
screenwriter and wife of Roger. Corman: Nate
Kohn, director of Roger Ebert’ S ‘Overlat ted
Film Festival, and associate director, George
Foster Peabody Awards, Grady, College at
Journalism and Mass Communication Univer;,
sity of Georgia; and William Keys, producer: ;,

' FROM page one

tries will be shown in this beautiful setting.
The residency programme is not only very
important to the festival and its filmmakers
but to the Caribbean and its flourishing film-
making industry.

“It is. important for a festival to make an ,
impact on the country where it is hosted. This ©
is a groundbreaking opportunity for Bahamian
filmmakers to discover their talents and be
provided with a platform where they can be



Best bride at
Mountbatten House

NASSAU’S most exclusive events venue voted Tammie Thompson best bride of the season!
The bride said, “I Do” to Drexon Thompson in a dazzling sunset wedding for 175 guests re
the antique pool terrace set in a lush garden setting at Mountbatten House.

The young “Techno Savvy” bride and her fraternity faithful groom celebrated their nuptials i int
the historic grounds of the most picturesque Old Nassau Mansion. Being best bride, Tammie won!
a day trip to Harbour Island on the BoHengy complete with a golf cart and lunch at the famous
Landing Hotel and Restaurant.

‘ To top off the evening, the bride was presented with an exquisite and coveted Harl Taylor hand}

ag.
Pictured from |-r: Tuesday White, marketing executive, Mountbatten House and Tammid
Thompson, Bride of the Season.

-cemewwerewrrwewr eee wee ee ee

ee an oe nt te,



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 15

INTERNATIONAL NEWS



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over cull proposal
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“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated, Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

“Partners to Financial Freedom”

DUE TO THE LACK OF A QUORUM

Notice is hereby given that The Twentieth (20th).

-Annual General Meeting of the Paradise Island

~ Resort & Casino Co-operative Credit Union Limited

_will now be held on Saturday, December 3rd, 2005
commencing at 9:00 am at the Eugene Cooper
Building, #9 Village Road, Nassau, Bahamas. All
members are asked to attend.

. The purpose of this meeting is to:

* Receive the report of the Board of Directors for
. 2004
_® To elect members to the Board of Directors
¢ To receive the audited Accounts for 2004
_ © To discuss the Annual Budget |
' ¢ To take action on matters that may come before
the meeting

‘The annual report may be viewed under
publications on our website listed below.

www.pircccu.org



FREE:

Pinder’s Funeral Home

“Service Beyond Measure”

PALMDALE AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
TEL: 322-4570 ¢ NIGHT: 393-1351 CELL: 357-3617

RANNIE PINDER President



Wome

\ DOUGLAS FRANKLIN
KNOWLES, 55

who died at Doctors Hospital
on Tuesday, will be held on
Wednesday, November 30th, 2005 |
at St Anne’s Parish East Bay Street
and Fox Hill Road. Burial will be
in the church cemetery. Father

@ Croslin Walkin officiating.

He is predeceased by his father
and mother, Augustus and Eulalee
Knowles; one niece, Kristina Knowles, survived by his wife,
Dawn Knowles; two daughters, Clarissa Knowles and Tiffany
Rivera; one son-in-law, Sam Rivera; three brothers, Charles
“Bronson” Knowles, Eric and Augustus knowles; three sisters,
Mrs Diana Knowles, Patricia Evans and Genevieve Sampey; |
four sisters-in-law, Sylvia, Josephine and Marianne Knowles
and Cecile Barber; four brothers-in-law, Richard Evans, Roy |
Bailey, Clinton “Clint” Bailey (deceased) and David Barber; four
aunts, Agnes, Edith and Ilva Knowles and Addie Cartwright;
uncle Alvin Richie and family; eight nieces, Donna Lowe, Joy
Kane, Suzette Parker, Georgia Russell, Leanne Sawyer, Deanna
Wyrick, Kim Cunningham and Debbie; 12 nephews, Peter, lan,
Derek, Stefan and Gunnar Knowles, Mark and Stefan Evans, |
Richard and Christopher Sampey, Adam and David Bailey and’ |
Robin Barber; nieces-in-law and nephews-in-law, Gordon Lowe,
Wesley Kane, Quincy Parker, Dax Russell, George Sawyer Il,
David Cunnigham, Dawn Evans and Robin Lee Barber; other |
relatives include, Chris and Eddie Darville, Beadie and Giles
Newbold and family, Jimmy, Geoffrey, Charlton, Patrick, Alec,
Reggie, Sammy, Donald, Kirk, Debra, Rachael and Chris
Knowles, Winston, Curtis and Steve Cartwright and their families,
Mary Cartwright and family, Bernadette and Pepi Terrali and
family Renee Turnquest and family, Rosalee “Tiny” and Mary
Knowles and families, grand nieces and grandnephews, Dylan
and Lauren Lowe, Megan Knowles, Maya Parker, Ryan Kane,
Jessica Russell, Apira Evans and George Sawyer Ill and a host _
of other relatives and friends including, Elva Knowles and family,

- Sonia Darville and family, Lolitta Knowles, Deborah Carroll,
Tony Moree, Tony Knowles, Judy “Pepper” Russell, Kenny
Harris, Steve and Debbie Carey, Sgt James and Paula Cooper, .
Thelma Sweeting, Albert Pearce, George “Tony” Sawyer Sr,
Jeannette and Jerome Cartwright, Edmond Knowles, Christine
Lowe, Rosie Roberts, Anthony Nottage, Barbra Algreen, Tommy
Hall, Willard Hanna, Tony Longley, the entire staff of The Crown
Jewellers Stores and members of the Nassau Dart Association, .
Abaco Dart Association and Grand Bahama Dart Association.

Friends may pay their last respects on Tuesday, November
29th, 2005 at 5:30pm until 7:30pm at Pinder’s Funeral Home,
Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale.

In lieu of flowers donations can be sent to St Anne’s Social
Outreach Programme, P.O. Box N-1569 and The Ranfurly
Home for Boys in memory of Douglas Knowles, P.O. Box N- °



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PAGE 16, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005 | THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL NEWS



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PAGE 8C, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005





‘Putting
flowers

to bed’

t is now the time of
year when we can
grow almost anything
in our gardens. The
choice is particularly
wide when it comes to flowers.
Favourites in Canadian and
European summer gardens find
our late autumn and winter
weather very much to their lik-
ing. Some appreciate a little
shade but many enjoy full sun-
shine. ‘
It is a little late to be growing
flowering annuals from seed if
you want a nice show for
Christmas. The answer is to vis-
it your local nursery and buy
flower seedlings that usually
come with several to a pot.
These can be set out in flower
beds taking note of their rela-
tive heights. Taller plants
should, of course, be at the rear
if you are growing close to a
wall and in the middle if you
have a circular or similar bed
that stands on its own. The
smaller flowers should be
grown around the edges.
Because they are so impor-
tant in our summer garden
when the selection of flowers is
limited, we often forget that
zinnias and cosmos do well in
winter as well. They are can-
didates for full sun locations.
A list of flowering annuals I
have grown during cool weath-
er months down the years
would include calendula, core-
opsis, cosmos, dianthus, gail-
lardia, gerbera daisies, gode-
tia, impatiens, marigold, pan-
sies, petunias, poppies, rud-
beckia, salvia, Transvaal
daisies, vinca and zinnias.
The world’s favourite bed-
ding plant is indisputably impa-

tiens. Their pastel flowers come

in dozens of shades and they



Green Scene
by Gardener Jack

cena yo3 pase





flower so prolifically they can
form an avalanche of colour.
It is probably best to keep
‘impatiens as the sole occu-
pants of a flower bed as they
are likely to overpower visual-
ly any slightly more sedate
annual specimen.

The downside of impatiens
is their need for water. They
make lovely hanging baskets
but need to be watered! every
day. Even though impatiens
are annuals they seed very
readily and keep themselves
going (in much reduced num-
bers, of course) from one year
to the next.

Attractive

Poppies do remarkably well
and make really attractive
stands. You can choose a mix-
ture of colours or keep to one
colour, red being the tradition-
al favourite. :

Petunias are a must in any
flower garden. They are cheer-
ful plants that no longer come
only in solid colours but have
wonderful colour combina-
tions, along with pinwheels and
picotees. Petunia limbs can be
pinched off and planted to
form a new entity.

Pansies have the most glori-
ous deep rich colours, unlike
the pastel hues of the plants

’ we have mentioned already.

For this reason.they should also
be grown on their own as they
do not combine very well with
pastel-hued flowers. They too
like plenty of water for a good
show.

GARDENING









Zinnia flowers come in
almost every colour (including
green), size and form of flower.
If you could only have one type
of flower for your garden it
would have to be zinnia. The
different zinnias are so dis-
parate people would think you
had a dozen different types of
flowers. I do not particularly
care for marigolds. I find them
rather ordinary and there is
also the question of their smell.
Today’s margiolds come in
orange and red as well as the
traditional brick yellow.
Transvaal and gerbera
daisies are lovely set a fair dis-
tance apart from each other so
the individual plants receive a
deserved special attention. Low

' lying allysum could fill the gaps

between the plants. The daisies
are also very, expensive.

When setting your seedlings
out it would be wise to sprinkle
some snail bait in the area.
Snails and slugs love little
annuals too.

gardenerjack@
coralwave.com

THE TRIBUNE

ARIGOLDS now come

in red, orange, gold and
lemon shades but they still
have that horrible smell.



colours but the traditional red is still...’
favoured. S



@ RUDBECKIA and other coneflowers make « lovely mass planting.
They tend to flower later in winter than most annuals.





Section
Missing
or
Unavailable



Full Text


The Tribune ==

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71F



HIGH
LOW

SUNNY AND



WARM

Volume: 102 No.8

SHOGKERS TAKE GANE
ONE AGAINST THE GIANTS

e SEE TRIBUNE SPORTS SECTION



Christie hits out
over comments on
recent investments,
Grand Bahama

@ By CARA BRENNEN
& KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporters

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie has blasted former
prime minister Hubert Ingra-
ham for his “immature” char-
acterisation of recent invest-
ments and his comments about
the Grand Bahama economy.

Mr Christie, flanked by
almost his entire Cabinet, held a
press conference immediately
after his return. from.the 20th
Commonwealth Heads of Gov-
ernment Meeting in Malta, in
the VIP lounge of Nassau Inter-
national Airport yesterday
afternoon. °

The Prime Minister said he
felt obligated to immediately
respond to comments Mr Ingra-
ham had made in his absence
regarding the BahaMar devel-

opment and the Grand Bahama
economy.

However, last night Mr Ingra-
ham said he had heard Mr
Christie’s comments and was
prepared to respond to his
“charges.” (See Mr Ingraham’s
reply below).

Referring yesterday to Mr

‘Ingraham’s claim that the PLP

government handled the Royal
Oasis closure badly, causing a
severe increase in unemploy-
ment on Grand Bahama, Mr
Christie said that "it is wrong."

“It is wrong and not becom-
ing someone who has held the
high office of state in this coun-
try to take such an approach to
an issue of this kind that deals
with people’s lives. It doesn’t
make sense,” he said.

The prime minister said that

SEE page nine

ENM leader hits back
at criticism by PM

@ By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter

FORMER prime minister Hubert Ingraham has suggested that
Prime Minister Perry Christie “not lower the standard of public
debate by labelling his opponent and likely his replacement as

399

‘immature’ or ‘irresponsible.

Speaking in response to charges made by Mr Christie yesterday
in reference to the FNM and Mr Ingraham himself, Mr Ingraham
last night said that “we don’t need to go down that road.”

“Mr Christie ought to stop looking in the mirror and seeing
himself and saying ‘it’s me’,” he said. “He knows better and if he
doesn’t, he will be reminded, often if necessary, during the course

of the coming campaign.”

Yesterday Prime Minister Christie held a press conference imme-
diately after his return from the 20th Commonwealth Heads of
Government Meeting in Malta, stating that he felt obligated to

SEE page nine

gy



BAHAMAS EDITION

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005



@ PRIME MINISTER Perry
Christie speaks yesterday.
(Photo:. Mario Duncanson/
Tribune staff)




Ingraham
sworn in
as official
| Leader of
| Opposition

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff

Reporter

HUBERT INGRA-

HAM has been sworn in

as the official Leader of

the Opposition in the

House of Assembly for

i the second time in his
political career.

As one of her last offi-
cial acts as Governor-
General, Dame Ivy
Dumont presented Mr
Ingraham with the instru-
ment of constitutional
office yesterday after-
noon at Government
House.

Thanking his wife






























@ LEADER of the Opposition Hubert Ingraham receiving
his instrument of appointment from the Governor General
Dame Ivy Dumont yesterday at Government House.
(Photo By: Franklyn G Ferguson)



Deported criminals ‘ are
putting Bahamas at risk’









FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY



Dolores for her atten-
dance, Mr Ingraham said
this appointment is all the
more “personal and spe-
cial” because it was unex-
pected and in response to

a “definite call from the
Beane. of the Bahamas
for my return to public
service.’

Mr Ingraham said that
this is his second appoint-

SEE page 10













TENS of thousands of crimi-
nals deported from first world
nations are putting the Bahamas
and other Caribbean nations at
risk, it has emerged.

The villains bring with them
contacts that “enhance the inter-
national reach” of criminal ele-
ments in the region, a former
envoy has claimed.

And they have contributed to
a crime increase “beyond the
capacity of police forces in the
region to cope with it.”

The claims were made by for-
mer Caribbean diplomat Sir

Ronald Sanders during a lecture

at London Metropolitan Uni-
versity.

He said there was anecdotal
evidence of a correlation
between the deportees and rising
crime.

“Whatever the truth of that
claim, there has certainly been a
significant rise in crime - and

SEE page 10

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ingraiiam

US concern that
Bahamas area
is being used

as a ‘drop
off’ zone for

Cuban migrants

i M By PAULG
i TURNQUEST
i Tribune Staff Reporter

US AUTHORITIES are
concerned that Cay Sal
Bank, a remote part of the
Bahamas, is being used by
smugglers as a “drop off”
zone for Cuban migrants

- attempting to reach landfall
in Florida.

US Coast Guard press liai-
son officer Lt Commander
Terry Johns said they inter-
cepi smugglers almost on a
daily. basis, with the latest
incident happening over the
weekend.

During November, 217
Cuban migrants have
already been apprehended,
with almost 20 per cent of
them being seized in the Cay
Sal Bank area.

From Cay Sal, it is a short
60-mile run via a “go fast”
boat to Florida, making the

i area a prime location for
i smugglers to either deposit
or retrieve their cargo.

SEE page 10

ero Afevadtaevesesepuct Sstsispoetsbotvvadsbaaabaias aH

_ Third person
charged in
connection

with murder

i fl By A FELICITY
/ INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

A THIRD person has
been charged in connection
with the murder of a Haitian
man last month.

While the first two
arraigned for the death-of
Michael Bissainthe are of
Haitian-Bahamian descent,
the third is a Bahamian.

Yesterday, 30-year-old
Montry Thompson of Kenil-
worth Street was charged.

Magistrate Roger Gomez
told Thompson that he is
charged with murder, con-
trary to Section 291 of the
Penal Code. He, being con-
cerned with others, is alleged
to have caused the death of

SEE page 10





Nassau and Bahama Islands’ Leading Newspaper
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS
EB

The will of God and the will

of man in the political arena

| HE debate over free will and

determinism is as old as the
hills and there is no end in sight. Pro-
fessor Paul Davies of Macquarie Uni-
versity of Sydney, Australia, observes
that it is picking up steam and he is
worried about it.

Writing in the magazine Foreign Pol-
icy, Professor Davies points out that
belief in some measure of free will is
common to all cultures and a large part
of what makes us human.

“It is also,” he says, “fundamental to
our ethical and legal systems. Yet
today’s scientists and philosophers are
busily chipping away at this social pillar
- apparently without thinking what
might replace it.

. But even if they are right, and
free will really is an illusion, it may still
be a fiction worth maintaining.”

To most Christians, God-given free
will is an article of faith. It was defined
in the fourth century by the great North
African doctor of the church St Augus-
tine of Hippo in his book On Free
Choice Of The Will.

The vast majority of Bahamians claim
to be Christian, yet there is in our
national psyche strong elements of
determinism and fatalism.

This is attributed to God rather than
the scientific model in which every
event and act is said to be wholly attrib-
utable to a chain of prior occurrences.
In other words, whatever happens is
the will of God.

Some take delight in quoting that old
saw, “the voice of the people is the
voice of God”, apparently oblivious to
the untenable conclusions it can lead
to. If that were true then we would have
a sure method of settling all: moral and
religious issues: ‘tefer them to popular
vote.

y ears ago I attended the funer-
al of a young man who had
been killed by another in a senseless
act of violence and I recoiled in disbe-
lief when the presiding minister told
the family and the congregation to
accept their loss as the will of God.
The death of that young man was, it
seemed to me, due not to the will of

God but to the’ ‘immoral exercise of noes





will by another human béiiig.

A variation on this theme is the grow=.’

ing tendency of some in the Bahamian
political arena to attribute their actions
to the will of God.

Writing in the Religion Section of
The Tribune of November 17, Clement
Johnson expressed some unease over
the use of religion in the political arena.
He quoted a. young lady who said.that
the over-use of religious jargon at the





recent party conventions was “almost
sickening”.
He also quoted Deacon King of the
Baptist Church:
“What bothered me most was the
way people were dancing to religious

because I also believe that his political
talents — and that of others — are wast-
ed in splinter parties.

But what if some of his colleagues in
the CDR believe that it was a mistake?
That the CDR does have a future? That
the PLP is on the wrong track? Would
that mean they are opposing what God
has ordained? And that Dr Nottage did
not do what God ordained until he was
convinced by Leslie Miller?!

The decision to join a particular polit-
ical party is, generally speaking, a
morally neutral choice. If the party
under consideration is overtly commit-
ted to evil like the Nazi party in Ger-
many in the early part of the last cen-
tury then the choice is clear.

In the context of the Bahamas — and
most western democracies — the citizen
does not face such a stark choice but
may still be inclined to make finer judg-
ments based on his own particular
moral compass.

Pesors something St Augustine
said about free will and moral

choices can be useful to politicians mak-
ing political choices and to all of us
about all the other choices we make.
We should consider both consequences
and motives because:

“Fear attacks from one side and
desire from the other; from one side,
anxiety; from the other, an empty and
deceptive happiness; from one side, the
agony of losing what.one loved; from
the other, the passion to acquire what
one did not have; from one side, the
pain of an injury received; from the
other, the burning desire to avenge it.



History is replete with examples of
Christians blaming God for their own
foolish and malicious acts, including
murder, war and persecution.

music, and how some of the speakers
... Were going on like they were preaching.
Our people need to decide: if they are -
going to be political leaders or evan- :

gelical preachers.”

In this column last week I expressed
disappointment in Dr Bernard Nottage
for saying he had been convinced that
his rejoining the PLP was “ordained
by God”.

I happen to believe that it was a good
thing Dr Nottage decided to join one of
the two major political parties if only

For more information contact our Life Department today

242-322- LIFE (5433)



* “Wherever you turn, avarice can

pinch, extravagance squander, ambi-.

tion destroy, pride swell, envy torment,
apathy crush, obstinacy incite, oppres-
sion chafe, and countless other evils
crowd the realm of inordinate desire
and run not}

History is replete with examples of
Christians blaming God for their own
foolish and malicious acts, including
murder, war and persecution. The cru-
sading princes of the West, under the

banner of the Cross of Christ, inflicted
the most horrendous atrocities against
Muslims.

One of them recorded how the Holy
City of Jerusalem was ankle-deep in
“the blood of the infidels”. They had
apparently forgotten the command of
Jesus Christ to put away the sword. For
evil measure, these same Christian cru-
saders from the West also slaughtered
Christians in the East.

So it has continued. In Europe,
Catholics and Protestants persecuted
each other in turn, and today some
western “princes” believe they are
ordained by God to wage aggressive
war against other people and to drop
bombs on their cities.

B ahamian politicians ~ indeed,
all of us — should guard against
the temptation to affect moral and spir-
itual superiority over others by claiming
the personal direction and approval of
God for our very human deeds.

This tendency has not yet reached
dangerous levels. In fact, it is some-
times quite pathetic and occasionally
laughable. But it can become danger-
ous.

We are fortunate to live in a country
where there is religious freedom; where
there is harmony between the various
denominations; where there ‘is a con-
sensus which allows co-operation
between church and state for the good
of God’s people; but where there is also
a healthy separation of church and
state, and no state church.

In our political parties there are
Christians of all denominations and,
while we are called upon as citizens to
make political judgments, it is not for us
to judge who is trying the hardest to
do God’s will. Certainly, nobody should
be impressed by the number of times
one says “Lord, Lord”.

None of us should claim God as a
member of our political party, or as our
personal political consultant, or as being
on our side in the political arena.

Instead we should all get on our
knees and, remembering the human
tendencies St Augustine spoke about,
ask God to help us be on His side and
to give us the grace to tell the difference
between self-will and His will.

When we are tempted to shout loud-
est about how God.is directing us, per-
haps that is when we should consider
most carefully our motives: the pas-
sion to acquire, the desire to avenge,
avarice, ambition, envy, pride and
countless other evils which crowd the
realm of inordinate desire and run riot.

Website: www. bahamapundit. type-
pad.com: E-mail:
sirarthurfoulkes@hotmail.com



or email sjohnson@jsjohnson.com

visit us online at www.jsjohnson.com







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good cause, campaigning
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If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



The Tribune wants to hear

you are raising funds for a







Meeting
held on
question of
extradition

@ By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter

EXTRADITIONS should
not be carried out without
strong judicial evidence against
a Bahamian citizens.

Dr Gilbert Morris, a presen-
ter at an upcoming town meet-
ing on the issue, said that extra-
dition is one of the most impor-
tant national issue that needs
to be addressed.

“This is a topic that is of
grave concern to the nation,”
he said. “It is not something that
should just continue to be an
issue without some type of
address.”

Tomorrow Island Promotions
International will be holding the
meeting at the British Colonial

Hilton.

Beginning at 7pm, the town
meeting in the Hilton’s ball-
room, will include presenters
such as Rawle Maynard, Dr
Morris, Paul Moss Jr and Mau-
tice Glinton.

“Extradition is one of the
most important subjects in any
country because it goes to the
heart of the countries constitt-
tion and it goes to the heart of
citizenship,” Dr Morris said. —.

Dr Morris said that “it
shouldn’t be that the US gov-
ernment can make an applica-
tion with your name on it and in
making that application aécuse
you of being a fugitive even
through you are not on the run
from anyone... on the basis ofa
statement made by a man who
is on bail in the US and
attempting to save himself.”

Ac trevets
protest the
Geet?
pere'ty

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 3







In brief

Tynes wins
praise in
Senate by
Turnquest

@ By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE LIFE and work of Cyril
Tynes was lauded in the Sen-
ate chambers on Monday.

Senate leader for the oppo-
sition Tommy Turnquest hailed
Mr Tynes as a politician and
nation builder.

Mr Turnquest said that Mr
Tynes was in a similar position
in the Opposition as that he
faced. He called it a "hybrid
situation", as the leader of the
Opposition in the House of
Assembly was someone other
than the leader of the FNM.

During Mr Tynes' tenure, he
served as Leader of the Oppo-
sition in the House, although

he was not leader of the FNM.

What is sad, said Mr Turn-
quest, is that great men like Mr
Tynes are hardly known for
their work, if they are known
at all.

However, he feels that their
contribution to the country
should be documented for
future generations to appreci-
ate.

Government Senate Leader
Dr Marcus Bethel also offered
accolades for Mr Tynes, the for-
mer MP and Free National
Movement politician.

He expressed his condolences
to the Tynes family on behalf
of the Bahamas government.

GB police
arrest men
following
robberies

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama Police have taken two
men in custody in connection
with an armed robbery at the
Hawksbill Service Station on
Saturday.

Police intercepted a vehicle
with two male occupants in the
Hunters area around 1.25pm.
One of the men in the vehicle
had matched the description of
the gunman who held up the
service station on West Sunrise
Highway several minutes earli-
er.

Service station employees
told police that around 1.18pm

a man was wearing a tam, long.

brown pants and a blue T-shirt
robbed the establishment of an
undetermined amount of cash.

Assistant press liaison officer
Inspector Loretta Mackey said
officers were immediately dis-

patched to the scene to investi-

gate. At the same time, she said,
police received assistance from
residents of the Grand Bahama
community.

¢ Insp Mackey said police are
currently investigating the
armed robbery of the World
Champion Liquor Store on
Coral Road.

A masked gunman entered
the store around 9.30pm and
robbed the female employee of
$250 cash. The culprit was wear-

ing a black mask, light color:

shirt and blue jeans.

_. © A third man is also in cus-
tody for questioning in connec-
tion with the armed robbery of
the Queens Highway Service
Station on November 23.



















Boy questioned.
after shooting
of woman

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - A 17-year-
old boy is in custody and being

questioned about the murder -

of 34-year-old Tanya Margu-
rite “Penny” Pinder.

Ms Pinder was shot and
killed on Friday by a gunman
during an attempted armed-
robbery at the Cool Breeze
Apartments on Hudson
Avenue, where she was
employed for 14 years as an
office clerk.

Her death was the 14th
homicide for the year in Grand
Bahama.

Assistant press liaison offi-
cer Inspector Loretta Mackey
confirmed that a young man,

_is assisting them with investi-

gations into the matter.

According to reports, Ms
Pinder was at work around
11.35am when a masked man
armed with a shotgun attempt-
ed to rob her.

She was shot in the head just
below the left ear, police.

There was no money at the
office, because the owner of
the complex had left with the
cash five minutes prior to the
shooting.

_ Group



i PENNY Pinder

Ms Pinder was discovered
lying on the floor near the
southern door of the Bud Ann
Investment office; located at
Cool Breeze Apartments. She
was taken to Rand Memorial
Hospital, where she later died.

Ms Pinder, a resident of
Beachway Drive, leaves behind
an 11-year-old son.

Relatives are still trying to
come to grips with the tragedy,

according to Desi Wallace-

Swain, a close relative.
“It is still very difficult for
everyone, especially for her

urging

financial aid for
hurricane victims

HUMAN rights activists
are calling on the govern-
ment to amend the Banks
and Trust Companies Act to
provide home and property
owners with financial relief
in the aftermath of natural
disasters.

Following three devastat-
ing hurricanes to hit the
northern Bahamas within the
space of a year, the Grand
Bahama Human Rights
Association (GBHRA) is
now urging government to
include provisions in the Act
which would give people
relief from paying loans dur-
ing the processing of their
insurance claims after dam-
age sustained during natural
disasters and pending recov-
ery of insurance claims.

The association is further
calling upon Grand Bahama
banks and insurance compa-
nies to advance premiums to
the victims of Hurricanes
Frances, Jeanne and Wilma.

The Association is sug-
gesting that banks and insur-
ance companies offer to pay
premiums on behalf of their
customers or add them to the
mortgage, which would then
be blended into the repay-
ment schedule

“Many banks have done
this and this has been very
helpful to the home and
property owners. However,
some institutions have not
and this has been to the

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detriment not only of the unin-
sured homeowner but also the
lending institution. People are
catching eternal hell in Grand
Bahama, and any help which
the banks can give would be
greatly appreciated,” the Asso-
ciation said.

In addition to this, the asso-
ciation is urging the banks and
lending institutions to lend
money to property owners
whilst their insurance claims are
being processed, “because many
insurance companies do not
process claims quickly and
many homeowners need to
effect urgent repairs.”

“The Bahamas is not a
wealthy country and foreign
banks and foreign insurance
companies make greater profits
on consumer lending than other
third world countries, princi-
pally because there is no con-
sumer protection or any penal-
ties as there is for the consumer
or the bank customer in the
United States,” the GBHRA
said.



mother because Penny still
lived at home. And her son,
Dylan, cries from time to time.

“They were very close and
I think that the reality of her

death hasn’t sunken in yet,”

she said.

She said that in preparation
for Christmas, Penny had
already bought her son the toy
motorcycle that he had always
wanted, as well as everything
she needed for the new duplex
that she and her sister were in
the process of building together.

Mrs Wallace-Swain described
Penny, her first cousin, as a very
sociable person who always had
a smile on her face.

“There was never a dull
moment when Penny was
around. She was a positive per-
son and always looked at the
bright side of things, even in
bad situations. She is going to
be missed terribly.

“It is seems so senseless and
the family just want to know
why the person did what he
did,” said Mrs Swain.

In light of the recent spate of
armed robberies , police are
appealing to persons particu-
larly business owners and
employees — to be extremely
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NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama



Serious allegations should be answered

MR CARL Bethel, who received his letters
of appointment at Government House this
morning as an FNM Senator, has made very

- serious allegations about the issue of visas

by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Mr Bethel
has suggested “direct political involvement at
the highest level of the Christie administra-

- tion” in what has become known as the “visa _

‘ scandal”.

|
4

§



According to Mr Bethel visas issued in

~ the Bahamas to Haitians have grown from

102 in 2002 to more than 2,200 in 2004. Also
visas. issued to Chinese nationals have

‘quadrupled since 2002.

Mr Bethel hinted that his allegations were
of such a serious nature that there should be

an independent public inquiry into them. The ~
- inquiry should be headed by a Supreme
Court or Court of Appeals judge, he said.

At the PLP convention Foreign Affairs
Minister Fred Mitchell assured delegates that
no scandal of any kind had been uncovered in
his ministry. He dismissed Mr Bethel’s alle-
gations as FNM propaganda. But Mr Bethel
continued the attack.

Mr Mitchell replied that after a prekink:
nary examination of the FNM’s evidence the
explanations were “entirely innocent and
consistent with the routine work” of his min-
istry.

He considered the allegations.a police mat-
ter and instructed the Police Commissioner to
determine the quality of Mr Bethel’s evi-
dence and to “determine how stolen docu-
ments of the Ministry came to be in their
(FNM) possession.” .

In our opinion if the FNM have what they
claim to have, this is a matter for a commis-
sion of inquiry, not the police.

However, our main concern today is that st. «
the focus should be concentrated on the alles.

gations, not the whistleblower:

The public i is not concerned with how the
FNM got whatever information they claim
to have.

They are only concerned with whether
their accusations are true or false.

As a matter of fact, so much is wrong in
governments and big corporations today that
the world smiles kindly on the “whistleblow-
er”.

Deflecting attention from embarrassing
questions or revelations was the usual tactic
of the laic Sir Lynden Pindling’s PLP gov-
ernment. ,

We recall the times when Norman
Solomon; then Opposition leader, would
stand on the floor of the House with infor-
mation leaked from a government depart-
ment, only to be shouted down by Sir Lynden
with demands to know how he got his infor-
mation. The PLP government wiped his ques-
tions off the table and spent their energies try-
ing te ferret out the informant. There is a

| different temper in this country today, where
d-such tactics will not work. | - :

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We recall how foolish they made them-
selves look in 1968 less than year after com-
ing to power when, in an attempt to save
face, they bungled the Coon case.

Last week in this column we briefly
referred to the Coon case without calling
names. Mrs Coon was the daughter of Dr
Arthur Weiland, founder of Miami’s Vari-
ety Children’s Hospital, and head of the firm
whose doctors, through the Crippled Chil-
dren’s Committee, held free clinics twice a
year for more than 20 years at the Princess
Margaret Hospital for the Bahamas’ crip-

pled children.

Mrs Coon, 28, her husband and three-year-
old daughter arrived in Nassau to go deep sea
fishing in the Exumas. Mrs Coon was in the
early stages of pregnancy, and was making the
trip with the full approval of her doctor. How-

ever, something went wrong on her first night °

here. Mrs Coon needed urgent medical atten-
tion, but no doctor could be found. She was
rushed to the Princess Margaret Hospital.
On arrival at PMH it was obvious she was in
labour. “White lady, wait your turn,” was all
the sympathy she got from a black nurse’s
aide. In the end, in the most squalid condi-
tions, Mrs Coon, with the help of Nurse Inez
Nairn, delivered her own son, who died short-
ly afterwards. Mrs Coon left the hospital and
flew back to Miami without ever having been
seen by a doctor.
_ Dr Weiland flew to Nassau to bring his
daughter’s disgraceful treatment to the atten-
tion of the government to make certain that
such a scandalous event should never happen
again. .

Instead of investigating the hospital, Milo

Butler, then Minister of Health, later the

Bahamas’ first governor general, asked 15

innocuous questions on the floor of the.
: House: These questions included questions as‘ -
' to why-a private doctor did not answer the

hotel’s call; whether on her return to Miami,
Mrs Coon reported the matter to her doctor;
whether her doctor called PMH to find out

. what happened; whether she was in the care

of a doctor before leaving Miami and whether

- he had given her permission to travel, etc.

Mr Butler said that only when his 15 ques-
tions had been answered could he say “what

really happened at the Princess Margaret
Hospital to Mrs Coon.” What he didn’t say _

was that all of his foolish 15 questions had

been answered before he even went to the

House.

Dr Weiland was furious. The matter was: —

headlined in The Miami Herald. Dr Weiland
wrote a letter to Sir Milo, which he copied to
US Secretary of State Dean Rusk and Sena-
tor Claude Pepper. In it he suggested that
because of all of Sir Milo’s factual errors, he
must have confused his daughter with anoth-
er patient.

Today Bahamians will not stand for such -

nonsense.

responsible for

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NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FABIENNE ST. LOUIS, LAIRD ST.,
BAIN TOWN, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
Nationality and Citizenship,
registration/naturalization as a citizen.of The Bahamas, and: that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 29th day of
NOVEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

[QUALITY INSIDE
AND OUT

THE TRIBUNE





EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

The home
that the PM is
a product of

EDITOR, The Tribune

On.two recent occasions your
editorials have alluded to the
political affiliation of my father
Gladstone L Christie. I would

therefore be most appreciative

if you would print my attached

response to clarify any misin- |

formation that you may be act-
ing on.

Again, I thank you for your
attention to this matter.

Gary W Christie.
EDITOR, The Tribune

WILLIAM J Bennet in his
book The Moral Compass said
“All children need bread and
shelter. But a true home of
course is much more than that.
Children also need love and
order and because they are not
born knowing the difference
between right and wrong, they
need a place where they can
begin to develop a moral sense.
Our moral sense emerges from
the examples set by mother,
father, sisters and brothers. In
the familiar world of home, we
learn the habits of virtue that
will strengthen us when we ven-
ture into the world”.

As both of my parents have
passed on to'be with their God,
I am obliged to respond to your
November 23 editorial to clari-
fy-and challenge any misinfor-
mation and untruths regarding
the “home” that nurtured the
political direction and philoso-
phy of the Prime Minister, The
Rt Hon Perry Gladstone
Christie.

In The Tribune’s archives is a
feature article entitled “Glad-
stone, Christie: A Chocolate
Dandy Life”, written by Earlin
Williams over several interview
sessions with my father for pos-
terity. The story was graciously

carried in your October 13,1999

issue, just prior to my father’s
death. Please allow me to quote
liberally from Mr William’s arti-
cle to give you a clear and fac-
tual portrayal of the political
affiliations of Gladstone
Christie during the sordid reign
of the United Bahamian Party.

Excerpts from Mr William’s
story states. The winds of
change were blowing through
the colonies and Mr Christie’s
trip into the United States in
the late 1930’s had broadened
his horizons to the extent that
when taxi men came together
to form the Bahamas Taxicab
Union in 1940, the country’s
first trade union was born and
Mr Christie became its Trea-
surer. He worked tirelessly for









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LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net




the good of the finances of the
union and his insight along with
that of Sir Clifford Darling,
Prince Huyler, Lochinvar Lock-
hart lead to the formation of
Taxico, a tour company, gas sta-
tion, and auto parts shop and
on the social end, death benefits
for members’ survivors and
assistance in their children’s
education needs. Discrimina-
tion was ugly back then, so it
was only natural that when the
Progressive Liberal Party led
by Lynden Pindling, was elected
to the house in 1953 along with
Milo Butler, that the Bahamas
Taxicab Union gravitated to the
PLP.

With Taxi men having their
livelihoods threatened in 1953
when the white led Government
attempted to stop taxis from
operating at The Nassau Inter-
national Airport, the PLP led
the political charge and the taxi
union became a willing thor-
oughbred steed. Mr Christie as
Treasurer provided all of the
meals for the general strike par-
ticipants at the airport. He put
in place a strike fund to assist as
the men parked their vehicles
in protest over the Govern-
ment’s move. The Government

backed down and the union and —

PLP won, forging a brother-
hood that exists today with the
taxi union. In Gladstone
Christie’s words, “The PLP rep-
resented to us what we wanted
the future to be for ourselves
and our children. Back then taxi
men could take home as much
as $300 per day. But something
was not right with the racial sit-
uation. The union made a firm
resolve to work with the PLP
to bring about majority rule.
We made it a reality on January
10, 1967.”

Mr Christie opened the
union’s coffers to the PLP help-
ing out in every way imagin-
able. He recalls an incident
where a PLP Acklins/Crooked
Island candidate contacted Nas-
sau expressing his disappoint-
ment that he needed to charter
a small boat to get around: the
district in time for the general
election. ‘I called the taxi men
together and we put in the hat

that day $1,000 and sent it up to
him so he could do what he had
to do,” said Mr Christie.

He has been honoured by the

’ Taxicab Union on two occa-

sions and he is also one of the
country’s first holders of The
National Tourism Achievement
award. Mr Christie has also
been honoured by Her Majesty,
the Queen with a Certificate
and Badge of Honour. But he
counts as his real meaningful
achievement the role he played
in the Bahamas Taxicab Union
alongside Presidents Mr P
Huyler, Sir Clifford Darling,
Lochinvar Lockhart and others
in bringing about majority rule.

All of the above is taken from
Mr William’s feature story
“Gladstone Christie: A Choco-
late Dandy Life.” A living con-
temporary of my father Sir Clif-
ford Darling, spoke at his funer-
al. He knows the history of my
father’s politics and social com-
mitment to majority rule.,

My earliest recollection of
homespun political education
was driving the streets in 1956
with my father in his big taxi,
blowing car horns and shouting
Fawkes & Pindling, All The
Way, while not appreciating the
significance of the event. I
rémember it clearly because my
father who was not a very social,
man was unusually ecstatic. ;I
further recollect being taken by
my parents to a mass PLP rally
on Clifford Park in 1962. and
sharing their disappointment : at
the PLP’s loss in the ensuing
general election.

Anyone who knew my moth:
er Nurse Naomi Christie would
have known of her passionate
commitment to her family;.her
church, her patients and her
party..Her party was, unques-
tionably the Progressive Liber-
alParty. ~~

T hope that I have been Sutti
ciently enlightening so that you

_ and your readership now have a

more accurate.portrayal of the
kind of home the Prime Minis-
ter is a product of. Perry’s sense
of morality, justice and service
to community are virtues learnt
from his parents, as is his bond
to the Progressive Liberal Party.
I thank you for your time and
space. ,

GARY W CHRISTIE
Nassau
November 24 2005

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS





In )

Wiimas
$ 700m

damage
to Cube

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

EMRE aid

Naas dpg ili 4 6 ee

Pe eee
meena UE de
822

TV Eee

~ TUESDAY:
NOVEMBER 29

2:00am Community Page/1540 AM

11:00 Investiture Ceremony at
Government House

1:00 Bernstein Bears Xmas Tree

1:30 Yes Virginia There’s A Santa
Claus

2:00 Micah’s Christmas Treasure

13:00 Durone Hepburn

3:30 Paul S. Morton

4:00 Gospel Video

4:30 Gospel Grooves
ZNS News Update
Caribbean Newsline
The Trolls & The Christmas
Express
Bahamian Things
News Night 13
Bahamas Tonight
Kerzner Today
Good News Bahamas
Ethics & Excellence
Da’ Down Home Show
Inside Hollywood
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6ft. Pinte Garland ....ccccccccssscosneene ? OOF

education complex

at College of the Bahamas

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter _

THE COLLEGE of the
Bahamas moved one step clos-
er to university status with. the
official opening of its educa-
tional complex.

Yesterday, College of the
Bahamas (COB) officials, invit-
ed guests and members of gov-
ernment gathered for a short
ceremony in front of the col-
lege's Thompson Boulevard
complex, to mark the event.

Acting COB president Rhon-
da Chipman-Johnson said that
the complex is a symbol of

= progress in the college's 30th

year.

The college purchased the
former Boulevard Building in
April, as part of the first stage of
its acquisition target for 2005-
2006.

The. complex, opposite the
main campus, houses a two-
storey bookstore, "Chapter
One", a specialty café, "First
Edition", and a business cen-
tre, "Copy Right."

Education Minister Alfred
Sears in his address said that
the educational complex is the

fulfilment of the vision of the _

college's past presidents.

"The institution must ensure
that all students and faculty
members have access to a broad
range of learning resources to

support its purpose and pro-
grammes.

"It is my hope that those who
take advantage of the services
which the complex has to offer
will do so cognizant of the fact
that they are part of the invest-
ment in the present of the insti-
tution, and indeed the country,"
said Mr Sears.

The facility also offers seven
conventional classrooms, three
graduate conference-type
rooms, and two theatre lecture
rooms. The faculty and staff of
the school's of Education and
Social Science, as well as, a
department of graduate stud-
ies, are accommodated in the
complex. There is also an office
for the president emeritus.

The complex will"be named
after the chairman emeritus of
COB, Bishop Michael Eldon.
Bishop Eldon served as college
council chairman for 20 consec-
utive years.

The bishop is currently rest-

ing at home, having slipped into °

a coma earlier in the year after
complications arising from a
bout of pneumonia.

A formal naming ceremony
will be held early next year.

COB has started a number of
structural changes throughout
the year. Mr Sears said that
ground was broken for the erec-
tion of new and expanded facil-
ities for the northern campus

Family seeks
autopsy at

A BAHAMIAN family is
fighting the Princess Margaret
Hospital in an effort to prevent
an autopsy being performed on
51-year-old deceased kidney
patient Hollis Saundets. °

The family said that the
unwillingness of the attending
doctors to sign his death certifi-
cate without the autopsy is sim-
ply prolonging the suffering of
his surviving family members.

The sister of the deceased
Bernita Saunders spoke to The
Tribune yesterday and said her
family feels that an autopsy on
Hollis’ body would be nothing
more than a “desecration”.

“He was very thin - there is
nothing on him to cut. He suf-
fered in that hospital many days

. I don’t feel it is necessary
because for 15 years he was a
dialysis patient. Whatever they
had to do with him they did,”
Ms Saunders said.

The decision by hospital doc-
tors, she said, is placing undue
stress on her 84-year-old moth-
er and her wheelchair-bound
father.

According to Ms Saunders,
hospital officials say another
factor is delaying the release of
Hollis’ body.

She said doctors claimed that

ll sizes i

they ran tests on Mr Saunders
before he died and are waiting
on the results.

“T don’t see why they have to
have his body in the morgue
waiting on tests. That won’t
bring him back,” said Ms Saun-
ders.

“We are trying to get his
insurance; that’s the only way
they can bury him. We don’t
have the money saved up for
that. We have already called a
priest and his funeral was to be
on Saturday and we don’t even
know if that is going to happen
because we don’t have the
body,” she said.

Ms Saunders also criticised
the doctor attending her broth-
er for not being sympathetic to
the desires of her family.

“Why hinder people from
doing what they want to do. My
mother gave him birth and she
does not want his autopsy. At
one point the (doctor) who saw
him told my sister that he won’t
sign the death certificate until
he was sure of what he was sign-
ing.

“My mother has had restless
nights where she can’t sleep
and my father has been so wor-
ried about this he said that he

does not know if he will attend

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(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005




SENIORS in the Marathon
constituency got a special gift from
Sandals Royal Bahamian resort
staffers — a full-course thanksgiving
meal
\ssisted by the Marathon Girls
Pursuing Dreams Club team,
seniors from the government’s
Soldier Road Home, the private
(sood Samaritan and Golden Age
retirement homes, and other seniors
in the community were treated to all
they could eat and drink. Sandals
spokesperson Stacey Mackey said it
was important for the employees to
he there to serve the seniors. The
_cyent was part of Marathon’s
community outreach programme.





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THE TRIBUNE



applauds police’s
elevated position

CHAMBER of Com-
merce Crime Prevention
Committee chairman Bran
McCartney has applauded
the return of traffic offi-
cers to elevated stands on
Bay Street.

The effort was recom-
mended by the newly-
formed Bahamas Visitors
Safety and Security Board,
on which Mr McCartney
sits.

“T want to take this
opportunity to express how

pleased I am that the Roy- °

al Bahamas Police Force
once again has high visibil-
ity on Bay Street and, in
particular, in their capacity
as directors of traffic on
prominent stands in the
heart of downtown Nas-
sau,” said McCartney.

“The sight of the proud
Bahamian police officer in
starched uniform with
white glove directing traffic
is so traditional and
uniquely Bahamian,” he
said.

Mr McCartney said that
beyond creating “a won-
derful photo opportunity
for visitors” who love to
pose for pictures beside the
officers, the increased
police presence in down-
town Nassau provides a
level of comfort and secu-
rity for tourists.

“As long as tourism con-
tinues to be the engine that
drives the Bahamian econ-
omy, we need to treat our
visitors with the care they
deserve and this is a step in
the right direction,” Mr
McCartney said.



@ ATTORNEY and former acting magistrate Branville ‘Bran’
McCartney visits traffic officers on Bay Street yesterday:
McCartney is pictured with 2903 King.

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THE TRIBUNE

LARRY

SMITH

PRESENTS

Christie appeals

for re-opening
High Commission

be

@ By KARIN HERIG and

CARA BRENNEN

‘Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas will continue to
appeal to the United Kingdom to
review its closure of the British
High Commission in Nassau,
Prime Minister Perry Christie said
yesterday.

Returning from the Common-
wealth Heads of Government
méeting in Malta, Mr Christie said
he used the opportunity provid-
ed by his trip to. Europe to meet
with British Prime Minister Tony
Blair and impress upon him the
importance of a British High
Commission in the Bahamas.

‘Mr Christie said that the clo-
sure of the British High Commis-
sion this year comes at a time
when the Bahamas is in particular
need of a close consular relation-
ship with the UK.

“J made.a.very strong case on
behalf of the Bahamas, for there
to be assistance rendered to the
Bahamas because of seemingly
insurmountable problems caused
by the growing instability of Haiti.

I indicated specifically that all of
this is happening in a time in the
Bahamas when the British High

Commission closed in June of this

year,” he said.

Mr Christie said that given the
“very strong historical ties
between Britain and _ the
Bahamas” and the co-operation
with the UK through the OPBAT
participant Turks and Caicos,
there should be a formal arrange-
ment between the two countries to
interdict illegal immigrants and
drug shipments.

The prime minister said he indi-
cated to Mr Blair that “tremen-
dous discomfort and inconve-
nience” is being experienced by
Bahamian students in the UK,
who since the closure of the High

_ Commission, have had to address
consular matters to Jamaica.

However, the British govern-
ment has indicated a prepared-
ness to immediately open an office
for the purpose of facilitating stu-
dents, Mr Christie said.

The prime minister said, that a

further important factor to be con-

sidered in the review of the clo-

ilectronic Learning Aids

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sure of the British High Commis-
sion is the increased number of vis-
itors from the UK to the Bahamas.

Mr Christie said that with the
launch of Virgin Atlantic’s Nas-
sau/London route, to which more
flights will soon be added, “it
seems to me to be of every advan-
tage to both governments for
there to be a review of the con-
siderations leading to the closure.”

“T have indicated that a letter
will ensue from me to Prime Min-
ister Blair with a view to confirm-
ing the request,” he said.

The British High Commission
closed its doors on June 6 of this
year.

British Foreign Secretary Jack

_ Straw said the British governmen-

t’s decision to close nine embassies
and high commissions worldwide
was necessary for the UK’s For-
eign and Commonwealth Office
“to keep pace with a rapidly chang-
ing international environment”.
It is estimated that the move
will free up £6 million ($10.3 mil-
lion) a year for priorities such as

fighting terrorism, the British gov-

ernment stated.

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IN = DEP TH ARTICLE



Nottage stresses social ills

@ DR Bernard Nottage receiving his instrument of appointment from Governor



General Dame Ivy Dumont yesterday at Government House

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

DR Bernard Nottage
announced yesterday that he
wants to use his new Senate
position to address social ills
such as crime and poverty.

A a ceremony at Gov-
ernment House, Dr Not-
tage was named a PLP sen-

ator and presented with his.

Instruments of Appoint-
ment by Governor-Gener-
al Dame Ivy Dumont.
The new senator’s well-
wishers could not be
accommodated in the

drawing room of Govern-

ment House. The small

Tempo Paris
The Company Polo Jean's

crowd had to therefore be
relocated to the ballroom.

In attendance were
Deputy Prime Minister
Cynthia Pratt, as well as a
number of PLP senators
and relatives of Dr Nottage.

Mrs Pratt said: “I am
grateful that I am here to
witness this afternoon your
return to public life. Dr
Nottage, it is an honour for
all of us to be here to share
with you this moment and
to encourage you. “

In an interview with the
press, Dr Nottage affirmed
that his goal is to serve the
public.

“All of these studies are

(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson).

done and the results are issued,
and then nothing seems.to hap-
pen to deal with the problems
themselves — illegal immigra-
tion for example, how do we
deal with it in an humane way?”
Dr Nottage said leaders need
to be more than just “pure politi-
cians”, but people who are look-
ing at the problems of the coun-
try, and trying to solve them.

aa
gs eas

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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005




documents

. BUSINESSMAN Gregory
Strachan has volunteered to
maintain the Cable Beach
roundabout at West Bay and
Oxford Streets and turn it into a
sea of purple, lavender and gold.

It is part of a Bahamas

ject to inspire greater partici-
pation by the public in the
maintenance of public spaces.
“We partner with members
of the general public to ensure
that all public areas — streets
roundabouts, lanes — are kept
in attractive conditions,” said
Peter Brown, executive co-ordi-
nator of Bahamas National
Pride Association.
“Traditionally, this was done
by government employees. We
can’t leave everything to gov-
ernment. It is very difficult for

November

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December









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@ BAHAMAS National Pride executive co-ordinator Peter Brown (left), businessman Gregory.
Strachan and School Pride Clubs Co-ordinator Bertheria Durham-Pickstock.go over the

THE TRIBUNE.



(Photo: BIS/Gladstone Thurston)

Businessman backs
roundabout

the government to do everything.
Besides, it’s our country too. We
need the public’s participation.

“So, one of our aims is to
ensure that as much as possible
public areas are taken over and
maintained by public-spirited
citizens, companies, organisa-
tions and the like.”

On Friday at the roundabout,
Mr Strachan was presented with
the Bahamas National Pride
Association certificate of autho-
risation.

Mr Strachan is not new to
this. His company, Struckum
Pest Control, sponsored the
Harrold Road-Bethel Avenue
roundabout for five years.

“We chose this one because it.

was available,” said Mr Stra=)
chan. “We just want to say our-

thanks to the community for,



lan

supporting us.

“Eventually the primary
colours here are going to be
purple, lavender and gold. ‘We
are going to have other foliage
and maybe some roses in the
background. We will also prune
the palm trees and tidy up the
curbing. ates

“T love gardening and so:I
take a special interest in trying
to add a little beauty where:I
can. Hopefully it will inspire:
Bahamians to take a keener
interest in the beauty of our nat
ural environment.” we

Mr Brown agreed. “Besides.
sun, sand and sea, which many
other destinations have, imagine
what a boost to our touristh’it
would be if we could brag about
what a clean environment’ we,
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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL AND CARIBBEAN NEWS

Prime Minister blasts

Hubert Ingraham

| FROM page one

the PLP inherited the Royal Oasis problem.

. “The fact is why ought I to be dragged into a
debate when my government was the victim of an
original bad decision. We have an exciting pro-
gtamme for Grand Bahama and we must be careful
in how we describe the facts of an economy —
Grenada, Maldives and every small economy affect-
ed by the Tsunami and the hurricanes are reeling
and trying to recover,” he said.

Mr Christie added that while he could not speak
6 all the details, there was an “incredible defin-
ing’ investment portfolio planned for Grand
Bahama.

*He also said that sometime after the FNM’s rally
if-«Grand Bahama, scheduled for Friday week, he
would have to remind him, Mr Ingraham, who runs
the.country.

| Fewill have to remind him that I am the prime
minister of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas and
that. you don’t go around talking about you ‘will
find out and report to the nation’, that is what you do
when you are the prime minister "and I am the prime
minister no matter how you jones for power — that
is a democratic fact that can only be removed by an
election,” he said.

(Mit Christie also criticised Mr Ingraham for claim-
ing that as he had granted the Izmirlian family —
lead investors in BahaMar — their permanent res-
idgney, he was responsible for the BahaMar deal.

gfiis government did give the Izmirlians perma-
nent residency in 1996,” he said, “but the fact that I
want to make to the Bahamian people is that the
family did not make the investment in their time.
The investment came in my government.”

“But do you see how it sounds when a prime min-

Ingraham
hits back

“os

at cr iticism
F ROM page one

iminediately respond to com-
ments Mr Ingraham made in his
absence regarding the BahaMar
development and the Grand
Bahama economy.

~ However, Mr Ingraham said
that ,he had heard Mr Christie’s
comments and was fully prepared
to-respond.

.. According to Mr Ingraham,
“the mess at the Royal Oasis” is
not, the fault of the FNM govern-
ment; as Mr Christie has stated.

“That was certainly not his
position when he and a cadre of
his Ministers presided over the
re-opening of the refurbished
property shortly after coming to
office,” said Mr Ingraham.

: “Tt is unbelievable that he and

his government have been unable
to cause to be resolved the mess
_ at the facility which occurred
completely on their watch. On
.Qur. watch we caused to be pre-
served the jobs of the employees
of the Royal Oasis; on his watch,
the:employees lost their jobs.”

' Last night, Mr Ingraham also
reinforced his claim that the
BahaMar investment was not

ister has to come and talk about who do what, when
a former prime minister comes with this incredible
act of immaturity, talks about I gave him the resi-
dency permit so everything he does after that I can
claim,” he said.

With regards to the BahaMar deal, Mr Christie
accused Mr Ingraham of trying to suggest that the
government had something to hide in the deal.

“There has been either a gross or irresponsible
misunderstanding on the part of the former Prime
Minister or clear negligence on his part in being
inattentive to national events,” said Mr Christie.

' The prime minister pointed out that the BahaMar
deal was a model of transparency, which was pre-
sented to the House of Assembly during the
2005/2006 budget debate, with the major details
published in all the major dailies for several weeks.

“It is so absolutely clear when one reads it that
anyone who would see all the details that are in the
House of Assembly where those who represent the
country are expected to pay attention to what is
happening.’

Mr Christie added that Sarkas Izmirlian held a
meeting with opposition members, including Sena-
tor Tommy Turnquest, Alvin Smith, and Carl Bethel
to which Mr Higratiatn was invited, but declined to
attend.

“How for the life of me would you wish the
Bahamian people to believe that my government has
been less than frank and forthcoming when it has

taken such pains to lay before the Bahamian public |

this issue,” he said.

Mr Christie added that it is important that they
elevate themselves above involving investors in the
day-to-day politics of a country.

“The difficulty is that when you do that you bring

‘ and place investors into a very difficult position.”



completely transparent.

; He said the Prime Minister
knows that to say otherwise
would be untrue. “In due course
the-facts will be laid bare,” said
aa Ingraham.

“He claims that I was invited to
4 meeting to review the invest-
ment proposal with Mr Izmirlian
together with Tommy Turnquest
and other FNMs. That is not true.
He might check his facts on that.”
« He said that Mr Christie

“appears now, at this late date,
to be concerned that internation-
al investors not be brought into
nalione) debate.”

“When did he become a con-
Vet to this way of tailing? he
asked.

+ “Certainly he recalls his col-
leagues lambasting investors
throughout the two terms of the
FNM administration! Where was
he j when a former senior minister
m the PLP Government and now
Deputy to the Governor wrote
threatening letters to Mr Sol
Kefnzer advising what the PLP
would do with his development
and with concessions granted it
shduld the PLP be elected to the
government. If he opposed such
threats no one heard his voice. It
kept silent or very low then.”

: Mr Ingraham said that he and
his party are also being accused of
{bragging about our successes
with investments.” However, “we
are’ -Jjustly proud and will continue
to brag,” he said.

: “caution the Prime Minister
to deal with the investment for
Grand Bahama of which he
speaks with great care,” he said.
‘He ought not ignore the provi-
sions of the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement relative to the grant
of concessions to other investors
greater than those provided for
by that Agreement.”

' “Finally, the Prime Minister
has said that he believes that I
am ‘jonesing for power’. I do not
seek power. If I thought that the
job of Prime Minister was being
done adequately I would not be
seeking to fill it. But there is a
terrible void, and a clarion call
for the void to be filled. I seek to
fill that void.”

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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2095, PAGE 9

Marine completes



peacekeeping course

LIEUTENANT Com-
mander Rodrick Bowe of

the Royal Bahamas Defence

Force has successfully com-
pleted a six-week peace
keeping operation in the US.

The course, “Conducting
military and peacekeeping
operations in accordance
with the rule of law”, was
facilitated by the American
Embassy in Nassau.

It was conducted at the
Defence Institute of Inter-
national. Legal Studies
(DILS) in Newport, Rhode
Island.

The curriculum of the
course is geared towards the
professional development of
military officers or their civil-
ian equivalents that may be
called upon to perform
peacekeeping duties.

The 32 participants were
drawn from areas as diverse:
as Africa, Asia, the
Caribbean, Europe and
South America.

Some of the topics cov-
ered were international law,
coalition military operations,
peace agreements, human
rights, law of armed conflict,
rules of engagement, and
command and control.

The participants also visit-

’ ed peacekeeping apparatus-

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@ LIEUTENANT Commander Rodrick Bowe

es at the United Nations in
New York and at the Penta-
gon, State Department and
Capital Hill in Washington.

Instructors and prospective
instructors from national
peacekeeping institutes, war
colleges and other training
centers attended the classes.

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Between October 1994
and January 1996, a total of
143 officers and marines of
the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force served-in various
capacities as part of the
Caribbean Community’s
(CARICOM) peacekeeping
efforts in Haiti.



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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



linked to illicit drug traffick-
ing. Drug offenders now
accounted for the majority of
prisoners, he said.

“Located between major
drug supply countries in South
America and the drug demand
markets in North America and
Europe, the wider Caribbean
is a major transit point for
drugs,” he added.

“Narcotics traffickers use
weapons for protecting
shipments, intimidating com-
petitors and executing infor-
mants.

“Dependent drug users tend
also to commit crimes to get

In Loving Memory

FROM page one

particularly in crime involving
drug trafficking and the use of
guns.”

Canada, the US and UK had
over the last few years been
deporting Caribbean nation-
als convicted of criminal activ-
ities, he said.

These returning criminals
brought with them contacts
with the criminal fraternity in
the country from which they
were deported.

Sir Ronald said rising crime
in CARICOM states was









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Boley Ne Se

Deported criminals ‘putting Bahamas at tisk

money to fund their drug
habits and may use firearms
that are illegally obtained to
perpetuate violent crimes.

“The increased number of
murders in some countries of
the region, particularly of
police and law enforcement
officers, is directly linked to
trafficking in drugs and
the associated trafficking in
arms.”

Sir Ronald also discussed
escalation of crime in some
countries to include kidnap-
pings, ritual executions and
casual drive-by murders.

He cited Trinidad as a case
in point, claiming that 330
people had been murdered
this year and more than 200
kidnapped for ransom.

“In many countries, the pri-’

vate sector has become so con-
cerned about the safety of
their businesses that they have
staged public protests, includ-
ing the closure of their opera-
tions.”

Sir Ronald said a leading
Trinidad criminologist had
suggested there may even be
police collusion, part of a web
of corruption that is “the

underlay to the carpet of crime
in the region.”

He said a Caribbean task
force revealed the “uncon-
trollable” rise in crime in some
member states had not only
threatened legitimate govern-
ments but posed a serious
threat to the basic fabric of
society.

“While it is yet to be quan-
tified, it is also obvious that
the growing scale of violent
crime scares away both for-
eign and domestic investment,
particularly in the vital tourism
sector and, consequently, has a
deleterious effect on the eco-
nomic and social development

of the Caribbean.

“The problem is well appre-
ciated by governments in the
region. The difficulty is that,
individually, Caribbean gov-
ernments lack the financial
resources necessary to combat
the increasing levels of major
crime in a meaningful way.

“And, so far, in CARICOM,
they have shied away from
establishing joint regional
machinery to fight major
crime collectively and effec-
tively.”










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Ingraham sworn
in as official Leader
of Opposition

FROM page one

ment to leader of the opposi-
tion, pointing out, however,
that he does not expect to
hold the position long.

“Last.time I held this posi-
tion was from May, 1990 to
August, 1992, a long period
of 27 months. I do not expect
to keep this job for that long
this time as general elections
must be held within 18
months and I intend to go
back to another,” he said.

In the weeks and months
ahead, Mr Ingraham said, his
party will define its policies,
articulate its position and
develop programmes which
will be implemented should
the FNM regain the govern-
ment.

The former prime minister
said he is looking forward to
deepening the Bahamas’
democracy, creating a fairer
and more just society, and
establishing a government
that will work for the benefit
and advancement of all
Bahamian people.

“A government that would
remove once again the crite-
rion of political affiliation to
facilitate obtaining a job, ora
contract, or a licence, or'a
favourable government posi;
tion, or a scholarship, or a:
government BROUSORER
house,” he said.

Mr Ingraham added that at
FNM administration wilt
“continue along the path of
removing people from a cul-
ture of dependency on politi-
cians.”

Third person charged in
connection with murder

FROM page one

Bissainthe on October 29, 2005.

On that date, Bissainthe, 41, was reportedly shot and killed
at his home on Faith Avenue south.

He was the nation's 45th murder victim of the year.

On November 23, Smith Charitable, 30, was arraigned before
Magistrate Marilyn Meers in connection with Bissainthe's mur-
der. The previous Friday, Van Fransisco Juste, 27, was charged.

None of the men was allowed to enter a plea. on the charge

of murder.

Thompson's attorney, T Langton Hilton, told the court he
would be seeking to have his client released on bail as "there i is
no evidence against him" in this case.

All three men are to return to court on January 16 for the
beginning of the preliminary inquiry into the matter.

Sgt Barrington Miller is prosecuting.

US concern that Bahamas
area is being used as a ‘drop
off’ zone for Cuban migrants

FROM page one

According to LCDR Johns,
Cay Sal, the Anguilla Cays,
and Elbow Cay are some
examples of islands within the

- Cay Sal Bank region where

migrants are commonly
found.

“It’s hard to tell if the boats
go all the way to Cuba or if
this region is a drop-off area.
Usually the boats we intercept
are US registered — some-
times stolen,” he said.

LCDR Johns said it is diffi-
cult to understand the organ-
isation of the smuggling as it is
still unknown if the arrange-
ments are made in Florida for
recovery of migrants from this
alleged “drop off point” in the
Cay Sal area.

“In November alone 217
Cubans were interdicted by
the US Coast Guard. Of those
10 to 20 per cent were inter-
dicted in the Cay Sal Bank
territory; the others were
caught on their way directly

1

to Florida,” he said.

It is predominantly family
members of residents in Flori-
da who hire smugglers to
bring family members over,
LCDR Johns said.

He warned, however, that
the US Coast Guard will have
to increase their presence in
the Florida Straits to counter
an expected spike in smug-
gling activity as the end of the
year approaches.

“We currently have an
operation going on now in the
Straits of Florida. It’s a pulse
type operation where we have
all types of aircraft, and
numerous vessels patrolling
as we know that during this
time of the year — Novem-
ber and December — the
activity heightens.

“Tf you look at statistics, we
see a large number of
migrants in the November,
December periods. So, seeing
that, we designate more
resources based on that type
of information, and try 40
counteract them,” he said.‘

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ai PRIME Minister Perry Christie leaving the Commonwealth Heads of Goverunical with
Tourism Minister Obie Wilchcombe

& By Bahamas Information
Services



MATLA, Valletta — The

Bahamas has to become more
competitive in information and
technology, as Caribbean coun-
tries struggle to find other
means of sustaining their fail-
ing agricultural economies,
Prime Minister Perry Christie
said.

He was responding to con-
cerns raised by those
Caribbean-producing countries
over the recent reduction in
trade prices by the European
Union, at the 2005 Common-
wealth Heads of Government
Meeting

Some of the countries have
been placed in very vulnerable
positions. The Prime Minister
of St Kitts and Nevis, Dr Denzil
Douglas, expressed concerned
that his country is now rated
the second highest in debt to
GDP ratio in the world.

Guyana was forced to place
about 100,000 employees i in its
failed sugar. industry out of
work. And Barbados is faced
with spending more than $100

million in finding a substitute
for sugar.

The difficulty the countries
which produce sugar face is that
they have argued for a longer
transition period to enable them
to substitute other industries for
sugar. Unfortunately, that is not
the case.

For the Bahamas, tourism is
its main industry, followed by
financial services.

“Given the fact that both are
relatively effective and efficient
modes of development, there is
early belief that when we look
to alternative revenue for
Caribbean countries, that the
competition will grow. because
tourism and financial services
would become even more
attractive to those countries giv-
en the model that the Bahamas
has established,” Mr Christie
said.

“We aateacate that it is even
more important for the Bahamas
that we make ourselves more
competitive, more efficient,
because of the problems coun-
tries in the Caribbean face, first-
ly with bananas and sugar.”

Mr Christie added:” When

you listen and see the absolute
significant impact on the econ-
omy and loss of revenue in
these countrics,-you know that
they must turn themselves into
fierce competitors in .the
region,” he said.

And, in an intervention by
the Bahamas, focus was brought
to bear on the special vulnera-
bility of economies that can be
wiped out by one disaster.

The Prime Minister also not-
ed that the Bahamas has been
fortunate, despite being affect-
ed by two devastating hurri-
canes in 2004.

Meanwhile, countries.are
looking to the upcoming Sixth
World Trade Organisation
(WTO) Ministerial Conference
slated for Hong Kong on
December 6.

The primary task is to shape ;

the final agreement of the Doha
Development Agenda, which
members hope to complete by
2006.

The agreement calls for,
among other things, determin-
ing the scale of reductions in
tariffs on products and farm
subsidies.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 11

Bahamas must be

Christie tells Commonwealth heads

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 13



Bank

Cacique makes its magic aonaes

under the big top

THE Cacique catering and
events team created a magical
Christmas circus atmosphere at
the Bahamas National Trust’s
annual Jollification festival.

‘Once again, the team treat-
ed Trust members to a spectac-
ular array of goodies, including
coconut shrimp dipped in
Cacique’s special mango chut-
ney and beer battered gator
bites.

They also presented a table

filled with sweet treats including

a 100 per cent-edible ginger-
fend house designed. by
Cacique’s pastry chef Phichol
Smith.

It took two full days to create
the house that Phichol built.

The three-step process
includes preparing all of the
ingredients, including the gin-
gerbread and even some hand-
made candies; constructing it
and finally decorating it. About
20: per cent of the decorations
on the 60-plus pound ginger-.
bread house were added at the
National Trust.

The dessert buffet also
included a time honoured treat
that’s making a big comeback
on the international scene — the
cupcake.

.“The theme this year was
“Under the big top” and that
allowed us to get really creative
and playful. We thought, what
better than a display of colour-

. ful and delicious cupcakes,” said
chef Kyle Sawyer, executive
corporate chef at Cacique Inter-
national.

The peanut butter, red vel-
vet and cheesecake cupcakes

ages, as was the snowman carrot
cake.

In addition to treating Trust
members on Friday night, team
Cacique’s food booth was one
of the hottest stops at the J olli-
fication all weekend.

Chicken kebabs glazed with
Cacique’s specially made gua-
va barbecue sauce and spicy
buffalo chicken wraps were a
crowd pleaser and chef Kyle
says he was especially pleased
that the 100 per cent Bahamian
bratwurst hoagies were a big
seller.

“The sausage for those sand-

_wiches was made here in Nas-

sau by Premium Meat Distrib-
utors and was delivered to our
kitchens Friday evening. You
simply can’t get meat fresher
than that and I’m so glad that
people were willing to try
something different and end-

ed up really enjoying it,” he

said.

Cacique’s president and
CEO, Shawn M Sawyer said he
was thrilled with the response
and commended his team on a
job well done.

“This is something we have
done for three years and each
year when we sit down to
decide what to do, our team
comes up with something bigger
and better. I’m especially proud

that each year we are able to

assist in the longevity of the
Bahamas National Trust.

The Cacique catering and
events team creates one of a
kind meals and experiences -
whether it’s an intimate dinner
for two or an eee feast
for 200.



a CACIQUE staff show off their culinary creations

_ shirts to
hospital
canteen

BANK of the Bahamas Interna-

tional has assisted the Yellow Bird
Canteen by, donating Bank of the
Bahamas yellow golf shirts to staff
members.
The Yellow Bird Canteen, estab-
lished in the early 70’s, was opened
to provide hot and cold snacks to
patients at the Princess Margaret
Hospital (PMH).

The management of the canteen

‘recently acquired the gift shop at

PMH and all profits from the shop
go towards purchasing hospital
equipment.

Bank of the Bahamas Interna-
tional said in a statement that it
fully supports the efforts of the Yel-
low Bird Canteen.

The presentation of the shirts
was made to Mrs Corin Foun-
tain, president of the canteen, at
PMH.

Pictured, from left to right: Paul
McWeeney, managing director of
Bank of the Bahamas Internation-
al); Corin Fountain president of
Yellow Bird Canteen; Betty Mar-
ques; Thelma McWeeney and

_ Anna March,

were a huge hit with kids of all

Now in
Fort Lauderdale Airport!

_ Terminal 3 location open as of November 26th



ei THE Cacique team

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Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
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If so, call us on 322-1986
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Get more information at
www.pdxbahamas.com
(242) 341-6593





NDC wean enen






PAGE 14, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005

THE TRIBUNB:



Musical hologram
celebrates Jerse
link to Britain

“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”



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| COMMONWEALTH Bank president and CEO William Sands, Jr, left, presents a cheque to
Lyford Cay Foundation director of educational programmes Roger Kelty

Bank supportin
scholarship fun

COMMONWEALTH Bank
has made a donation to the
Lyford Cay Foundation Tech-
nical Training Scholarship Pro-
gramme, in an effort to help
more Bahamians obtain skills
that will be embraced in the
labour market.

The Bahamian job market,
said the bank in a press release,
is one that “cries out for trained
labour and technical support”.

‘This year is the eighth con-
secutive year that the bank
threw its support behind an
awards programme that “recog-
nises the value of well-trained,
skilled and certified mechanics,
construction workers and other
technical tradesmen,” said
William Sands Jr, president and
CEO, who made the presenta-
tion personally.

“Commonwealth Bank has
been proud to partner with the
Lyford Cay Foundation to sup-
port technical training,” Mr
Sands said. “When the Foun-

dation introduced technical
training scholarships in 1994,
the concept, at least for the
Bahamas, was a novel one
because emphasis had always
been placed on academic schol-
arships.

“While the country was
enjoying more Bahamian doc-
tors, accountants and educators,
there was a growing gap in the
hands-on type of skills we need-
ed — people who could install
or repair air-conditioning sys-
tems, work in medical labora-
tories or X-ray and imaging
departments in hospitals or
maintain computer networks.
This programme aimed to fill
that gap and we are grateful to
the Lyford Cay Foundation for
its foresight in establishing the
awards,”

The gratitude was mutual.

“This has been one of the
most important and successful
initiatives the Lyford Cay Foun-
dation has ever: undertaken,”





said Foundation director of edit
cational programmes Roger
Kelty.
“More than 500 men and
women have received technical
training scholarships and have
returned to the Bahama
equipped to work in a broad
range of fields.

“Thanks to the té ehigieal
training programme, there is 4
cadre of skilled persons for the
public and private sectOt +6
draw on in everything ‘from
electrical engineering to animal
husbandry. :

“There are trained’ didsel sin



airplane mechanics working @t

the Royal Bahamas Defense
Force, Nassau Flight ‘Services!
or in private enterprises. There
is a growing number of persons
trained to work in agricultute:
None of this would have been
possible without the support of
a few individuals and caring ‘cor-
porate citizens like Common-
wealth Bank,” he said.” ~ “+,

»


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 15



see Se

Wildlif DS §

'

’

-_—

“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated, ‘Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

‘PARADISE ISLAND RESORT & CASINO
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LTD.

“Partners to Financial Freedom”

DUE TO THE LACK OF A QUORUM

Notice is hereby given that The Twentieth (20th)
Annual General Meeting of the Paradise Island
Resort & Casino Co-operative Credit Union Limited
will now be held on Saturday, December 3rd, 2005

; commencing at 9:00 am ait the Eugene Cooper
Building, #9 Village Road, Nassau, Bahamas. All
members are asked to attend.

| The purpose of this meeting is to:

¢ Receive the report of the Board of Directors for
~ 2004

e To elect members to the Board of Directors

e To receive the audited Accounts for 2004

¢ To discuss the Annual Budget

¢ To take action on matters that may come before
the meeting

The annual report may be viewed under
publications on our website listed below.

www.pircccu.org



over cull Send



Pinder’s Funeral Home

“Service Beyond Measure”

PALMDALE AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
TEL: 322-4570 ¢ NIGHT: 393-1351 CELL: 357-3617

RANNIE PINDER President
Funeral Service for the late

DOUGLAS FRANKLIN
KNOWLES, 55

who died at Doctors Hospital |
on Tuesday, will be held on |
Wednesday, November 30th, 2005 |
at St Anne’s Parish East Bay Street | -
and Fox Hill Road. Burial willbe |

in the church cemetery. Father {
Croslin Walkin officiating.

He is predeceased by his father
and mother, Augustus and Eulalee {

Knowles; one niece, Kristina Knowles, survived by his wife,
Dawn Knowles; two daughters, Clarissa Knowles and Tiffany |

Rivera; one son-in-law, Sam Rivera; three brothers, Charles
“Bronson” Knowles, Eric and Augustus knowles; three sisters,
Mrs Diana Knowles, Patricia Evans and Genevieve Sampey; {
four sisters-in-law, Sylvia, Josephine and Marianne Knowles
and Cecile Barber; four brothers-in-law, Richard Evans, Roy

| Bailey, Clinton “Clint” Bailey (deceased) and David Barber; four |
aunts, Agnes, Edith and Ilva Knowles and Addie Cartwright;
uncle Alvin Richie and family; eight nieces, Donna Lowe, Joy.

f Kane, Suzette Parker, Georgia Russell, Leanne Sawyer, Deanna
Wyrick, Kim Cunningham and Debbie;.12 nephews, Peter, lan, |
Derek, Stefan and Gunnar Knowles, Mark and Stefan Evans,

} Richard and Christopher Sampey, Adam and David Bailey and
Robin Barber; nieces-in-law and nephews-in-law, Gordon Lowe,
Wesley Kane, Quincy Parker, Dax Russell, George Sawyer II,
David Cunnigham, Dawn Evans and Robin Lee Barber; other
relatives include, Chris and Eddie Darville, Beadie and Giles |

{| Newbold and family, Jimmy, Geoffrey, Charlton, Patrick, Alec,

“f. Reggie, Sammy, Donald, Kirk, Debra, Rachael and Chris
Knowles, Winston, Curtis and Steve Cartwright and their families,
| Mary Cartwright and family, Bernadette and Pepi Terrali and

| family Renee Turnquest and family, Rosalee “Tiny” and Mary
Knowles and families, grand nieces and grandnephews, Dylan

’ and Lauren Lowe, Megan Knowles, Maya Parker, Ryan Kane,
Jessica Russell, Apira Evans and George Sawyer Ill and a host
of other relatives and friends including, Elva Knowles and family,

‘{ Sonia Darville and family, Lolitta Knowles, Deborah Carroll,
“Tony Moree, Tony Knowles, Judy “Pepper” Russell, Kenny |
Harris, Steve and Debbie Carey, Sgt James and Paula Cooper,

«y Thelma Sweeting, Albert Pearce, George “Tony” Sawyer Sr, |

’ Jeannette and Jerome Cartwright, Edmond Knowles, Christine |
Lowe, Rosie Roberts, Anthony Nottage, Barbra Algreen, Tommy
Hall, Willard Hanna, Tony Longley, the entire staff of The Crown
Jewellers Stores and members of the Nassau Dart Association,
Abaco Dart Association and Grand Bahama Dart Association.

Friends may pay their last respects on Tuesday, November
29th, 2005 at 5:30pm until 7:30pm at Pinder’s Funeral Home,
Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale.

In lieu of flowers donations can be sent to St Anne’s Social
Outreach Programme, P.O. Box N-1569 and The Ranfurly
Home for Boys in memory of Douglas Knowles, P.O. Box N-
1413. °







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a
“Dispensing A Healthier Life”
Ph: (242) 328-6129 or Ph: (242) 322-3612
Fax: ae 326-7842






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PAGE 16, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005 THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL NEWS



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THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 17



SCULIEIEIE



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Tel: 327-POST


THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 18, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005
THE TRIBUNE



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46 Madeira Street
PAGE 20, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005 THE TRIBUNE

International passengers to be
checked for bird flu in Shanghai





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Losing bidder: Moody’s: tourism
‘still not recovered’

Shell dealers
offered stake

Wells: ‘We had
best bid on price’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A LOSING bidder for Shell (Bahamas) retail
business yesterday told The Tribune that their
bid would have allowed the individual dealers
to, effectively become owners of their busi-
nesses by purchasing a shareholding in the
acquiring company.

Independent MP Tennyson Wells, principal
of Petroleum Energies, said he and his team
had given the individual Shell dealers - most of
whom leases their gas stations from Shell - “the
option to come on board” with their bid by
taking an equity stake.

Mr Wells said: “Some had agreed to do so.
One had paid some money, which we gave
back to him two weeks ago.”

Petroleum Energies was beaten out in the
race for Shell’s retail business in the Bahamas
and Turks & Caicos by the BISX-listed
Freeport Oil Holdings Company (FOCOL),
in a deal thought to be worth $25 million judg-
ing from the $25 million preference share issue

SEE page 5B l TENNYSON WELLS
Keeping resigns
from Cable board

@ By NEIL HARTNELL.

Tribune Business Editor Announcement



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Wall é

credit rating

agency has

warned that the

Bahamian
tourism industry has “not fully
recovered” from the damage
inflicted: by the 2004 hurricane
season, even though it had
largely escaped the 2005 season
despite the brush with Hurri-
cane Wilma.

In its credit opinion on the
Bahamas, published just after
it released its analysis of this
nation’s economy, Moody’s
said: “The 2005 hurricane sea-
son was not as harsh as in 2004,
yet tourism arrivals had not ful-
ly recovered through the first
eight months of 2005.”

Much of the Bahamas’ inabil-
ity to fully rebound from the
2004 storm season, which fea-
tured Hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne, has been due to the clo-
sure of the Royal Oasis resort,
which has reduced Grand
Bahama’s room inventory by
one third and had a knock-on
effect that has impacted every

Street

sector of that island’s economy.

However, Moody’s opinion
may add further fuel to fears
that the Bahamas is slowly, but
surely, losing its competitive
edge against other Caribbean
tourism destinations.

The Tribune revealed yester-
day how Caribbean Tourism
Organisation (CTO) statistics
showed stopover tourist arrivals
to the Bahamas fell by 1.9 per
cent to just over 1,112 million
during the first eight: months of
2005, a decline that contrasted
with the growth enjoyed by
some of its Caribbean competi-
tors.

Period ©

For the January to June peri-
od, which was. before the dev-
astation inflicted by Hurricane

e Wilma, Cancun and Cozumel
in Mexico both enjoyed 7.3 per
cent growth in stopover arrivals
compared to 2004. The Domini-
can Republic, enjoying a repu-
tation as a low-cost destination,
also saw 7.2 per cent growth in
stopover arrivals.

In its analysis of the Bahami-
an economy, Moody’s said the



Bahamas “has not yet been able
to benefit fully” from the rela-
tively buoyant US economy,
where 80 per cent of its visitors

’ come from. :

Tourism provided 40 per cent
of Bahamian GDP, 50 per cent
of direct and indirect jobs, and
70 per cent of foreign exchange
earnings, making the economy
vulnerable to external shocks.

Moody’s' said: “Tourism
arrivals in the first eight months
of 2005 were 6.9 per cent lower
than the same period a year ear-

- lier, although the more eco-

nomically important air arrivals:
were only off 1.9 per cent com-
pared with a 9.1 per cent decline
in sea arrivals.

“The increase in tourist,
spending in New Providence’
was not quite strong enough to
offset continued weakness in
the resorts of Grand Bahama. A
complete recovery from the

‘recent hurricane damage out-

side New Providence will allow
the Bahamas to benefit fully
from the addition of new
tourism capacity.”

SEE page 4B

RND: Two expressions of
‘keen interest’ in.



CABLE Bahamas yesterday
announced the end of an era,
with former chairman and
founder Philip Keeping resign-
ing from its Board to help make
way for the appointments of
two new directors connected to
the company’s largest share-
holder.

In a release, Cable Bahamas
said both Mr Keeping and Gary
Kain had resigned from its
Board to be replaced by John
Risley and Maxwell Parsons.
The latter two will now join
chairman and chief executive,
Brendan Paddick, and Bahami-
ans Al Jarrett and George
Mackey, on the Board.

Both Mr Risley and Mr Par-
sons have links to Cable
Bahamas’ largest shareholder,
Barbados-based Columbus
Communications, which holds
29.8 per cent of the company’s

outstanding stock.

Mr Risley, together with Mr
Paddick, was a shareholder in
Ironbound Holdings (Barba-
dos), the entity that acquired
Columbus Communications
from Mr Keeping and set in
motion the chain of events that
led to yesterday’s announce-
ment.

Mr Parsons is chief financial
officer for Columbus Commu-
nications and its parent, Colum-

heralds end of
era for founder
of BISX-led firm

bus International Inc. The
Board appointments are thus
likely to be interpreted as
Columbus Communications
strengthening its hold over
Cable Bahamas’ future direc-
tion and strategy, and are likely
to come as little surprise to most
market observers.

Under his stewardship, Mr
Keeping built Cable Bahamas

over a 10-year period from

nothing into a company that
now offers broadband services
“to 95 per cent of Bahamian
homes”.

The company’s success was
founded on its securing of a
cable television monopoly from
the former FNM administration
in the mid-1990s, which has pro-
vided the bedrock for its suc-
cess and ability to branch out
into other business areas. These
include the provision of Internet
and digital television services
and, through its Caribbean
Crossings and Maxil Commu-

SEE page 2B

PRIME COMMERCIAL LAND

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA: Two adjacent parcels comprising 3.232
acres each. Across from Mary Star Of The Sea Education Center. Total of
516 feet frontage on East Sunrise Highway and direct access to Atlantic Drive.
Ideal location for a strip shopping center. One parcel for $650,000 or the
entire 6.464 acres for $1 million. #3050 Suzanne Harding: 242.359.1722

Damianos Sotheby's

Sion

lm By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

RND Holdings yesterday said it had
received two expressions of “keen inter-
est” from potential buyers for its Gold’s
Gym franchise, after it placed a newspa-
per advertisement last Friday warning that
the business would close and cease opera-
tions on December 19 this year.

Ken Donathan, RND’s chief operating
officer, said the company had been “con-
tacted” by two separate parties after the
notice was published, and added that he
would prefer to sell Gold’s Gym rather than

close it down and inconvenience its mem-

‘bers and staff.

Mr Donathan. said RND’s Board. of
Directors and senior management had tak-
en the decision to shut Gold’s Gym, which
currently has a staff of about six, after no
buyer had come forward with an accept-

able offer.
Searching

He said: “We’ve been actively searching
for a buyer but none has come to the fore-
front with what we consider a reasonable
offer at this juncture.......

“We carried the gym for a year-and-a-

half, primarily during the time we were

looking for a buyer, and during that time it
cost us financially.”

Mr Donathan ‘said he was “keeping my
fingers crossed” that a buyer could be found
in the three weeks before the December
19 date, adding that the financial drain
imposed on RND meant he had to consid-
er the interests of shareholders above those
of Gold’s Gym members.

If the franchise had to close, Mr

SEE page 5B

JaeUueRael

private bonking | investment management 1 corporate finunce I

ig | stock brokerage § shure registrar and transfe


PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005

iHE TRIBUNE





Reopen public beach access

ack on Septem-
ber 20, 2005, in
this column I
wrote: “Recently,
I was in Grand
Cayman and I couldn’t help but

notice that along the fabled Sev-
en Mile Beach, every couple of
hundred yards, there are well
marked public right-of-way
paths to the beach. What is even
more impressive is that most

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

FLAMING LAMPS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 24th
day of November, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp.

Inc.,

of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

GLOWING RED POPPIES LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the '
24th day of November, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa

Corp. Inc.,

of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



hotel and condominium pro-
jects have incorporated these
right-of-ways into their overall
landscape design.

“In Cayman, the rule applies
equally to everybody. There is
even a pathway along the east-
ern boundary of the Governor’s
Mansion, as there seem to be
no exceptions.

“I mention this because I can-
not help but feel cheated and
betrayed every time I pass a
public beach access sign,
because New Providence was
laid out in exactly the same
manner, with public access
paths every couple hundred
yards. But unlike Cayman, pri-
vate owners have taken it upon
themselves to enclose the public

right-of-ways within their prop- —

erties — effectively eliminating
the public’s birth right.”

Over the years, I have
become progressively more
interested in the issue of public
access to the beaches of the
Bahamas, because options on
New Providence are dwindling
as we approve new develop-
ment projects. The comments
made above were added as a
postscript to an article on a
financial-related topic. Sever-
al readers subsequently sug-
.gested that I make beach access
an article of its own.

I was therefore extremely
interested in the comments
made by Prime Minister Perry
Christie in his keynote address
to the 49th National General
Convention of the PLP, where
he said:

“While on the subject of
beaches, let me say that my
Government has already com-
mitted itself to the acquisition,
by private contract with inter-
ested landowners, of addition-
al beach properties that will be
converted to public use by
Bahamians and visitors alike.

FROM page 1B

nications subsidiaries, operation
of a fibre optic cable system and

web hosting, data and disasterg
recovery services respectively. |.

Cable Bahamas also raised

Further, let me reassure you
that none of the developments
I am discussing this evening will
involve in any way any depri-
vation of the rights of access
to beaches that Bahamians
presently enjoy.

“On the contrary, the thrust
of my Government’s policy in
this area is to augment the
national inventory of public
beaches, especially here in New
Providence, so that all Bahami-
ans will have ready access to a
much greater number of beach-
es than is presently the case.
This will be an important ele-
ment of a new comprehensive
land policy that is right now
the subject of consultation with
our private sector partners.”

This policy position is
extremely commendable ,and
I applaud the Government for
its position in this regard. The
public need well-planned and
well-maintained ‘green spaces’
throughout our more populat-
ed islands, especially picnic
areas, complete with recre-
ational facilities and bathroom
and shower facilities.

Models

The Goodman’s Bay and
Montagu Bay models are
indeed a step in the right direc-
tion, and should be replicated
throughout the nation.

However, while this policy
initiative is positive, it does not
even remotely address a far
more fundamental issue, which
is the reopening of public
access roads and right-of-ways
to existing beaches. ©

I am not a lawyer, so I am
not really aware of what would
be required to correct this bla-
tant wrong. I just do not see
how public access roadways
could be ‘quieted’ or, worse
yet, stolen and everybody just
turns a blind eye. I would not

Financial

Focus

By Larry Gibson



have thought it was legally pos-
sible to acquire public access
roads and easements, making
them private property.

I know that in some

instances Parliamentary

‘ approval has been sought to

reroute certain roads. There-

fore, adjoining land owners

should not be able to enclose
public land for their private
benefit, in clear violation of its
intended purpose. Perhaps
some of my lawyer friends
could offer an opinion.

My view is that the Govern-
ment can save a lot of the mon-
ey that it plans to spend on
buying beachfront properties
by simply reopening the access
roads. There was a very good

- reason for putting them there

in the first place, and this was
fully recognised by the early
town planners.

A cursory search on the
Internet shows that many of
our regional counterparts have
legislation governing beach
access. By far, Barbados has
been the most progressive in
this regard. According to Bar-
bados.org: All beaches in Bar-
bados are open to the public.
Properties which front on to'a
beach may own the land to the
high-water mark only. Access
to the beach is a right for every
Barbadian, and many of the
sea front properties must pro-

vide a public right of way
across their land to the ocean.
This policy applies to hotels
and other tourism-related
properties.

My fundamental question is:
“Do you have the wherewithal
to do what is right? If not, why
not?”

Post Script

Finally, I wish to thank Nicki
Kelly for pointing out a gram-
matical error in my column on
November 15, 2005. I shall
attempt to be more vigilant in
my editing.

Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analyst,
is vice-president - pensions,
Colonial Pensions Servicés'

(Bahamas), a wholly-owned

subsidiary of Colonial Group
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance and
is a major shareholder of Séecu-
rity & General Insurance Cont
pany in the Bahamas. aa Gs

The views expressed are
those of the author and‘do‘not
necessarily represent those’ of
Colonial Group International
or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct\any questions or 'com=
ments to rlgibson@atlanti¢+
house.com.bs



$30 million through an initial
public offering (IPO), the
largest amount of capital ever
raised to date in the Bahamian

capital markets. The Bahamas .

International Securities

' Exchange (BISX) listed com-

AUTO SALE

at

‘AUTO

Nassau, Bahamas

~ Shirley & Mackey Street

Saturday, December 3, 2005

9:00A.M.-3:00P.M.

No reasonable offer
will be refused

We'll take Cash

or Financing Arrangements, |

ptecree ene rtemnen eee tees ete nene eee ere

COME EARLY, GET THE DEAL YOU’VE ALWAYS WANTED.

Autos on gale
are Scotiabank
repossessions

All sales “As ia”

ati



pany has delivered consistent
returns to shareholders ever
since, making it one of the most
successful domestic investments
for retail and institutional buy-
ers.

_ Cable Bahamas now has

some 2,500 shareholders, who
include the National Insurance
Board (NIB) and Bahamas

Electricity. Corporation (BEC): f
~ fibre-rich broadband network

It employs 280 staff.

Mr Keeping said in a state-
ment: “We have built a busi-
ness utilising talented local
expertise, working hand-in-
hand with a small group of
experienced and seasoned
industry professionals, of which
every shareholder and stake-
holder can be proud.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

MARVEL SUNSET LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation) |

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
25th day of November, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., of. P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Copier Technician

We are expanding our technical support team and require an

experienced copier technician.

Micronet Business Technology is a leading business
technology supplier and the exclusive distributor and service
center for Toshiba copiers and fax machines in The Bahamas.

* Great career opportunity and working environment
¢ Will provide extensive Toshiba factory training
¢ Experience in the copier field a plus
¢ Must have your own transportation
-¢ Salary commensurate with experience and qualifications

All applications confidential
No telephone calls. Please reply in writing via email
(subject line: Copier Tech.) or fax to:

Copier Tech. c/o Manager
Micronet Ltd.

P.O. Box SS-6270
Nassau, Bahamas
Email: gpinder@micronet.bs
Fax: 328-3043

TOSHIBA 4Micronet

COPY * FAX # PRINT



BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

Since 1983

“During our 10 short years,,
we have physically bridged the
four principle islands of the
Bahamas with,a state-of- ‘the art,

and offered broadband sérvices
to 95 per cent of Bahamiait
homes."

Mr Paddick added: “Philip
Keeping has proven himself to
be one of the Bahamas' most
accomplished and outstanding
businessmen. Under his leader-
ship, Cable Bahamas has suc-
cessfully brought a suite of
advanced broadband services
to the majority of Bahamian
homes, truly forging the
Bahamas to the right side of the
digital divide and positioning it
as the envy of all the countries
in the region."

Mr Kain worked with Mr
Paddick at Canadian telecom-
munications company Persona,
before it was sold last year to a
private equity group.

Mr Paddick said of the new
appointments: “Both John and

’ Max are accomplished individ-
’ uals, who have distinguished

business careers in Canada.
They are smart, energetic lead-
ers with tremendous strategic
skills and business acumen, and
both, in their own way and style,
will bring a strong voice to the
Cable Bahamas board......

“The company now stands
poised to reap the rewards of
its investments. Philip and Gary
leave behind a dynamic board
of directors and a talented
group of executives who are
confident that they will contin-
ue to deliver fantastic results
for all shareholders".

Mr Risley is chairman of
Clearwater Seafoods, a Halifax,
Nova Scotia-based seafood har-
vester, processor and distributor
quoted on the Toronto Stock,
Exchange. He was a director,
and shareholder in Persona!
until it was taken private in vd uly’
2004.

i
j
}
}
;



Local company
owns ‘tanker that |

AIIM Yom UNS ere RCO)
transport’ LNG





TOKYO Electric Power
Company (TEPCO) last week
said it had established a
Bahamian company to own ai
tanker that will be used to
transport liquefied natural gas
(LNG) to Japan from Russia. |

Cygnus LNG shipping ‘is 70

, per cent owned by Tepco, with

the remainder divided equally,
between a shipping firm and
trading house, the Japan Times
reported.
THE TRIBUNE



Minister hits back at FNM’
‘Companies search’ claims

llyson Maynard-

Gibson, minister

of financial ser-

vices and invest-

ments, has criticised an FNM

Senator’s allegations that com-

pany searches could not be

carried out at the Registrar

General’s Department this
summer as incorrect.

Describing John Delaney’s

criticisms as containing “sig-

nificant errors”, Mrs May-

nard-Gibson said: “At no time

could searches not be done at

the Registrar General’s

Department as was suggest-

ed.”
Address

In his address to the FNM
Convention, Mr Delaney, an
attorney and partner with Hig-
gs & Johnson, said inspections
of corporate files relating to
firms established under the

Companies Act were "made ,

impossible" for several weeks
this summer due to the state
of facilities at the Registrar
General's Department.

He charged: "For several
weeks this past summer, the
state of disrepair of the facili-
ties made impossible physical
inspections of corporate files
of companies registered under
the Companies Act. This
totally contradicts an election
pledge of the present Govy-
ernment to ‘provide the nec-
essary funding and adminis-
trative support’" to the Com-
panies Registry."

Mr Delaney added that the
system for searching deeds
and. documents, essential for
land title searches, was “inad-
equate, inefficient and defec-
tive regarding data commenc-
ing 2003 to present". ,

He described this as a
"nightmare" for lawyers, and
something that left thém at
risk of liability if they told
clients that land had clear title,
only to later discover it did
not.

However, Mrs Maynard-
Gibson told the Bahamas @
Sunrise morning show on ZNS
TV that Mr Delaney’s claims

contained “significant errors”.

Still, she left the door opeu
far enough to indicate there
may have been some merit to
Mr Delaney’s concerns, by
saying that the system permit-
ting Internet searches was still
being beta-tested.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said:
“We have implemented the
ability to search remotely
from your own personal com-
puter, a process that is cur-
rently being beta-tested. And
with any computer system
around the world, particularly
during the implementing and
testing phase, there will be
times when the system will be
down for maintenance or any
number of reasons.”

She added that it was critical
to protect the integrity of the
system being installed at the
Registrar General’s Depart-
ment, which is linked to the
rest of the Government’s com-
puter network.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
that during the beta-testing,
the ability for registered
agents to go online and con-
duct company searches and
incorporations was down, but
people could still go to the
Registrar General’s Depart-
ment, sit at one of its terminals
and conduct searches.

The minister added that
under the previous FNM
administration, it could take
up to three years for deeds
and documents to be returned
after they were recorded.

Process

However, due to the digiti-
sation process at the Registrar
General’s Department, and
the scanning of all records so
they could be made available
electronically, Mrs Maynard-
Gibson said that since June
2005 deeds and documents
were being recorded, indexed,
scanned and handed back to
their owner within 30 days.

“This is an extremely impor-
tant leap and major milestone
in the development of our
country,” Mrs Maynard-Gib-
son said.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
INTERVEC MANAGEMENT LIMITED

An International Business Company

_ (in Voluntary Liquidation)

Pursuant to Section 137(4) of the International Business
Companies Act, 2000 notice is hereby given that the voluntary
winding-up and dissolution of the Company commenced on the 28th
day of November, 2005 and that Pine Limited of Devonshire House,
Queen Street, P.O. Box N-8176, Nassau, Bahamas has been appointed

Liquidator.

Dated this 28th day of November, 2005.

Pine Limited
Liquidator

CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNTANT

We are seeking to fill the following immediate multi-year contract position
for a project on Paradise Island, Bahamas, This position requires experience
-» An all aspects of accounting including, job costing monthly invoicing, bank
reconciliation, pay roll, accounts payable, purchase order control, contract
and change order control and review. Preparation of financial statements

and monthly reports will be required.

This professional candidate must have 5 years or more experience in
construction accounting, hold a Bachelor’s or Masters degree in
Accounting and must have extensive knowledge in ACCPAC, Crystal
Reports and Microsoft Office including Word, Excel & Outlook.

Only a short list of candidates will be contacted,

Please respond by email to:

a

infowe

bwlbahamas.com

Fax: 242.363.1279

Mail to:

PBWL

P.O. Box $$-6386
Nassau, Bahamas —



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 3B

BUSINESS

Joined

“The Bahamas has joined
other countries around the
world in taking government
to the people. This has even
greater meanings for an arch-
ipelagic nation like the
Bahamas.

“In essence, no longer will
persons from the remotest
islands of the Bahamas such
as Inagua, Mayaguana and
Ragged Island have to travel
to New Providence to obtain
any vital information. From
their own communities, they'll
be able to access these ser-
vices.”





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to finish!

NCU wre
242.377.1252/0164 305.591.4369





@ ALLYSON Maynard-Gibson, minister of financial services and investments, and
Registrar-General Shane Miller are interviewed on Bahamas @ Sunrise.
PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005

_ THE TRIBUNE



Moody’

FROM page 1B

Meanwhile, Moody’s said

PUBLIC NOTICE

GAMING BOARD FOR
THE COMMONWEALTH
OF THE BAHAMAS

NOTICE

Pursuant to Section 36(3) of the Lotteries
and Gaming Act Chapter 387, notice is hereby
given that BAHA MAR ENTERPRISES
LTD. a Company incorporated under the laws
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
in accordance with the provisions of Section
34(2) of the said Act, made application to the
Secretary of the Gaming Board for The
Bahamas for a licence to manage a casino on
premises situated at The Wyndham Nassau
Resort and Crystal Palace Casino on the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

Notice is also given that on Friday, 9th
December, 2005 at 10:00am at the Magistrate
Court, Garnet Levarity, Justice Centre,
Freeport Grand Bahama, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, the
application of BAHA-MAR ENTERPRISES
LIMITED will be considered by Gaming —
Board.

And notice is also given that any person
who desires to object to the grant of the licence
shall send to The Secretary of the Gaming

.Board for The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, P.O. Box N-4565, Nassau, New
Providence, Bahamas or deliver to the offices
situated in The Renaissance Building, West
Bay Street on or before noon on Thursday,
December 1, 2005, two (2) copies of a brief
statement in wHune of the grounds of the —

~-objection.

support for the Bahamas’ sov-
ereign credit ratings of A3 for
foreign currency bond and bank

signed: Bernard K. Bonamy
Secretary

Gaming Board for
The Commonwealth of The Bahamas



deposit ceilings, and Al for
local currency, came from its
proximity to the US, good eco-
nomic management track
record, and continuing compet-
itiveness in tourism and finan-
cial services.

It added, though, that while
the impact from the September
11 terror attacks appeared to
have “bottomed out”, the Gov-
ernment’s fiscal performance
had still not got back on track.

To improve its sovereign
credit rating, the Bahamas
needed to “reign in” its persis-
tent fiscal deficits and improve







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its debt position, which cur-
rently stands at around $2.5 bil-
lion or about 38 per cent of
gross domestic product (GDP).

Moody’s said: “The tourism
industry, which provides 70 per
cent of the Bahamas’ foreign
exchange earnings, will need to
prove its resiliency to changing
external conditions.

“The rating could come
under pressure from a loss of
competitiveness in the tourism
industry or from additional
external shocks affecting that
sector. This would lead to fis-
cal slippage and a significant








RECEPTIONIST/OFFICE
ASSISTANT

We are seeking to fill the following contract position for a project on
Paradise Island, Bahamas, This position requires experience as a
professional receptionist/office assistant. Call monitoring, Filing,
Preparation of Letters, Spreadsheets, and other documents will be required.

This professional candidate must have 5 years or more experience as a»
receptionist/office assistant dealing with high end clientele, worked in a fast

pace environment, experience with switchboards, and must have extensive

knowledge in Microsoft Office including Word, Excel & Outlook. A

professional certification in this area would be an asset,

Only a short list of candidates will be contacted.

Please respond by email to: info

@pbwibahamas.com

Fax: 242.363.1279

Mail to:

PBWL

P.O. Box $S-6386
Nassau, Bahamas

Scotiabank Building
Bay Street, Downtown
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel. 242-393-8618
www.bahamasrealty.bs
www.cbrichardellis.com

720 - 2,285 sq.ft. office suites.

In the heart of the Bahamas’ financial area. cee

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* Freatures a full standby generator.

- BAHAMAS REALTY LTD a

ERCHAL

CBRE

CB RICHARD ELLIS

Dedicated parking facilities.



th)

Pricing Information As Of:
28 November 200 5



au Oli

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Kerzner International BDRs

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets

Fund Name

Colina Money Market Fund 1.259334"



2.4766 2.0536 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.4766 ***
10.6711 10.0000 _ Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.6711*****
2.2754 2.1675 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.275422
1.1406

FINDEX: ¢

BISX ALL SHARE INDE X - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV §$ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

**- AS AT AUG. 10, 2005/ **** - AS AT OCT. 31, 2005



Financial Ad visors Ltd.



NAVIGATING A NEW WORLD





108

= JF IDEL



aie

7.5
NM
NM _

10.4

0.810 14.6

ae mee

Last 12 Months





YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol.

- Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



build up in government debt.
Given the narrow revenue base,
a much greater level of debt
would be hard to sustain.....
And Moody’s added: “The
Government faces the task of
containing larger fiscal deficits
at a time of uncertain tourism

tourism ‘still not recovered’

prospects for economic growth.

“The Government’s response
to the new international finati-
cial regulatory regime, and ifs:
ability to manage economic lib-
eralisation as its seeks WTQ;
membership will influence
Moody’s credit assessment of

the Bahamas.” "

ny

prospects and subdued

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that STEVEN MICHAEL WILLIAMS OF #158 ‘i
CLIVE AVENUE, P.O. BOX F-42398, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,; |
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality :|

and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The:}
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/-},
naturalization should not be granted, should: send.a written and,|.
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 22ND, |,
day of NOVEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality, j,
and Citizenship, P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas..,|.



PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

NOTICE

The Public Hospitals Authority invites tenders for ie
the purchase of the following vehicles

- 1. 1998 Daewoo Cielo Sedan 1500cc
2, 1997 Asia Towner Van 800 cc
3. Toyota Hiace Bus

4, 1991 Chevy Pick-Up Truck

Vehicles maybe viewed at Sandilands Rehabilitation » rep
Centre’s Compound, Fox Hill Rd. ;

‘Sealed envelopes, marked tender should be address a
to the Managing Director, Public Hospital Authority, |
_ Manx Corporate Centre/ Dockendale House, :'
. P.O.Box N-8200, and arrive no later than Friday, *:
~ December 30, 2005. :





‘Herbert H. Brown —
Managing Director

PUBLIC NOTICE

GAMING BOARD FOR
THE COMMONWEALTH
OF THE BAHAMAS _

NOTICE

Pursuant to Section 36(3) of the Lotteries
and Gaming Act Chapter 387, notice is hereby
given that PNK (EXUMA) Ltd. a Company
incorporated under the laws of the

- Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has in
accordance with the provisions of Section
34(2) of the said Act, made application to the
Secretary of the Gaming Board for The
Bahamas for a licence to manage a casino on
premises situated at The Four Seasons Hotel
on the Island of Exuma, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

And notice is also given that on Friday, 9th
December, 2005 at 10:00am at the Magistrate
Court, Garnet Levarity, Justice Centre,
Freeport Grand Bahama, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, the *
application of PNK (EXUMA) Limited will ©
be considered by Gaming Board. ,

Notice is also given that any person who “

_desires to object to the grant of the licence {
shall send to The Secretary of the Gaming ©
Board for The Commonwealth of The .
Bahamas, P.O. Box N-4565, Nassau, New
Providence, Bahamas or deliver to the offices -
situated in The Renaissance Building, West -
Bay Street on or before noon on Thursday, :.
December 1, 2005, two (2) copies of a brief
statement in writing of the grounds of the
objection.



signed: Bernard K. Bonamy
Secretary

Gaming Board for ‘
The Commonwealth of The Bahamas

‘


THE TRIBUNE

TUESUDAT, NOVEihigtrn 29, cuuu, Pec. wie



Losing bidder: Shell

BUSINESS



dealers offered stake

FROM page 1B

that FOCOL is seeking share-
holder approval for at a Decem-
ber 7 Extraordinary General
Meeting (EGM).

Shell gas station dealers had
last week told The Tribune that
they were viewing the FOCOL
takeover “in a very positive
light”, although they wanted to
make sure they would retain
thdit dealerships.

Garner Dawkins, head of the
Bahamian Petroleum Retailers
Asséciation and the Shell Gold-
en' Gates dealer, told The Tri-
bun that the dealers hoped to
benefit from the fact that
FOCOL would take decisions
at a local level, whereas with
Shel much of the decision-mak-
ingycame from regional head
offi¢e in Brazil.

‘Mr Dawkins said his canopy
lights were out, and he had been
trying to “get a repair truck for
the past three days. But they
(Shell] say they’re waiting for
authorisation from down south.
It’s ridiculous, simple things like
that. There’s not much you can
do.”

i} However, Mr Wells yesterday

told The Tribune that the Shell
dealers had béen concerned that
they would lose their dealerships
under FOCOL if the company
used the business model it had
adopted in Grand Bahama,

FROM page 1B

where it both owned and ran
service stations.

The MP said: “We had talked
to them and guaranteed to them
that they would remain dealers
of Shell. If we had won the bid,
we guaranteed their continued
operation of the gas stations.”

However, both Shell and
FOCOL said the existing dealer
network would remain.

Bahamian retailers have long
clamoured for the right to own
their gas stations, something that
is likely to have made the Petro-
leum Energies bid especially
attractive to them, since it held
out the promise of equity own-
ership. However, it was Shell’s
regional and global head offices
in Brazil and New York that had
the casting vote when deciding

. the winning bidder, not the deal-

ers.

Mr Wells said he felt Petrole-
um Energies’ bid had been com-
petitive with FOCOL’s in terms
of price, but added that he had
been told his rival was able to
clinch the deal by offering to
contract Shell Western as the
supplier of petroleum products
to its Grand Bahama business
when the current contract with
its existing wholesaler expired.

As a result, apart from sup-

plying FOCOL’s newly-acquired .

business in New Providence
with 60 million gallons of petro-
leum products per year, outside

of its contract with the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation (BEC),
Mr Wells said it would supply
a further 16-18 million gallons to
FOCOL’s Grand Bahama busi-
ness.

“My understanding is that we
had in terms of pricing the best
bid in,” Mr Wells said. ““We’re
disappointed. At one stage, we
thought we had it. That’s what
they indicated.”

He added, though, that Petro- .

leum Energies, which The Tri-
bune undrstands is financially
backed by union monies, would
be prepared to bid should Esso
or Texaco decide to sell their
Bahamian retail networks.:
FOCOL will take over 60
retail service stations and five
depots in the Bahamas and
Turks & Caicos as part of this
deal. Given that the company,
which is a wholesale distributor
of petroleum and LPG products
on Grand Bahama, supplies just

‘20 service stations and marinas

on that island, the Shell pur-
chase more than doubles
FOCOL’s size and geographic
footprint.

The Shell brand will remain
on all the gas stations involved
in the deal, with FOCOL con-
tinuing to use it under a trade-
mark agreement. Shell West will
continue to supply products at
the wholesale level to the sta-
tions.



onathan said all staff would be given the appro-
agate severance packages. Members would be
refunded on a pro rate basis.

! Gold’s Gym lost $117,000 from operations dur-
ing RND’s 2005 fiscal year, which ran until Feb-
ruary29,.with its,total loss amounting to $196,000.
Removing Gold’s Gym would have slashed
RND’ s 2005 full-year loss of $588,782 by one
third.

} Mr Donathan said RND’s real estate portfolio
was Performing i in line with expectations, while its
TicketXpress: ‘online booking and reservations
operations: was “doing fairly much as anticipated”.
| He addéd: “There’s béen: sonie: delays. in the
tolling out of TicketXpress, due to running into
challenges i in the Family Islands relating to Inter-
net connectivity, but we’re over that for the most
art.”
: Mr Donathan indicated this was mostly con-

nected to TixcketXpress’s contract to act as the
exclusive reservations and online booking agent
for the Bahamas Out Island Promotions Board’s
member resorts, some of which were in locations

’ where Internet connectivity was not fully estab-

lished. In some cases, this had caused RND to
“reorganise the process”.

On the Promotions Board agreement, which
sees TicketXpress act as the call centre dealing
with all calls to the Ministry of Tourism’s toll-free
line, Mr Donathan said: “That’s coming on track.
We’ve already started visits to several Family
Island properties.”

All those that had been visited “saw the sense”
in RND’s service, and “embraced it right away”.

Mr Donathan said of RND’s overall strategy:
“We have a defined plan as to how we intend to
clear out the: financial deficits the company has
been having.;We’re on track.”

ns Ha
OPM ee ey.
Sut

Toc oT ts = se ee ae 8 ee eae ee ee OS

WINTER PROGRAMMES 2006

BTVI is now accepting application forms for the winter
(January) semester 2006 for the following programmes:

¢ Conch Shell Jewelry Manufacturing Day and Night

¢ Drywall Installation
¢ Evening Wear
¢ Painting and Decorating

¢ Roof Construction

Ss Small Gas Engine

oi Tailoring

ine Pie

Day and Night
Night
Day and Night
Night
Day and Night
Day and Night

Application forms are available in the
Admissions Office in the J-Block of the
Campus on Old Trail Road between the

hours of 9:00am and 5:00pm

For additional information contact
Ms Lorraine Knowles or Gene Marshall at
(24 2) 393-2804 or 5, (242) 502-6338.



Credit Cards
are Powerful

Tools...

The Public Treasury
aims to help make life
easier for citizens by
enabling credit card
payments for govern-
ment services.

Credit cards are
powertul tools.

They are convenient.
They make managing
your finances easier, and
they are especially useful
for emergencies.

They should not be used
irresponsibly.

Using a credit card re-
sponsibly builds a good
credit history that can be
a valuable asset when
applying for car loans,
jobs or mortgages.

The rules of
wise credit card
UT - ae

uc least the

~ minimum due every
, month to keep your
: account i in good -

Ne more. SET roe ,
“minimum to reduce the

ree ees ae. or
- you may. be charged
ce ete oe

oe fesponsibly" a
~. don’t exceed your limit,
_ or extra fees. may ol

on thei :

: Cals cone be
Beet mL e
a8 you use your card, and

keep personal infor-

ee aU er wl Cet
ln. case your ct is ho
i stole ee

"| pence a oe Ys Lee
J cle immediately. ©

COMMONWEALTH BANK

m@ RBC ‘
:) Royal Ban
AS of Canada

INTERNATIONAL



GOVERNMENT GUARANTEED
ADVANCED EDUCATION LOAN SCHEME

In collaboration with the Educational Guaranteed Fund Loan Program
of The Ministry of Education, Bank of The Bahamas International is
pleased to advise that the cheque disbursement for ALL Students in
The Loan Program will take place at The Holy Trinity Activities
Centre - Stapledon Gardens from December Ist, 2005 through
December 7th, 2005 from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm as follows:-

NEW STUDENTS (FIRST TIME RECIPIENTS)
AND RETURNING STUDENTS

A-C: Thursday Ist, December 2005
D-I: Friday 2nd, December 2005
J-M: Monday 5th, December 2005
N-S: Tuesday 6th, December 2005
T-Z: Wednesday 7th, December 2005

Time:

Place:

9:00 am - 3:00 pm

Holy Trinity Activities Centre,

Stapledon Gardens

e Returning Students: Both Students OR Guarantors should be present

and must bring relevant Identification.

(Valid Passport and National Insurance Card).

New Students: Both Students AND Guarantors should be present and

bring relevant Identification.

(Valid Passport, National Insurance Card, Current Job Letter and a copy of

Utility Bill)

Cheques will not be released until all necessary documentation has been

completed.

‘NO DISBURSEMENTS WILL BE MADE AT THE BANK!


PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS. -



Major gets his chance for

Bahamas lightweight cr

i BOXING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

MEACHER ‘Pain’ Major,
groomed as the heir to mentor
Ray Minus Jr’s Bahamas light-
weight throne, will finally get

a chance to fight for the

vacant belt.

First Class Promotions,
headed by retired Minus Jr.
and his wife Michelle, will give
him that opportunity on Sat-
urday, December 17 against
Richard ‘the Hammer’ Pitt, at
a venue to be announced.

Michelle Minus said the
only reason Major is just get-

Fighter to take
on Richard Pitt



they haven’t had an opponent
prepared to fight him until
now.

As this is the last show for
the year, Minus said it will be
a great opportunity for Major
to get a national title under
his belt before he pursues the
British Commonwealth title
next year.

“It’s long overdue, but he’s

waited for it,” Minus stressed.
“Now it comes at a time when
he will be going after a possi-
ble British Commonwealth
title.

“The Bahamas Boxing
Commission has submitted his
name, along with Jerome ‘the
Bahamian Bronze Bomber’
Ellis and Jermaine ‘Choo- :
Choo’ Mackey for a British

Commonwealth title, so it will
be something under his belt
that he can take with him.”

This will be Major’s fifth
fight for the year, having gone
4-1 to push his overall win-
loss record to 11-2.

“I’m just staying in great tip
top shape so that I can fight
for the Bahamian lightweight
title,” said Major, who will
remain at home to prepare for
the show. “But I’m really
looking forward to next year.
I have some great things in
store.”

Sometime next year, Major
said he intends to sign a con-
tract with a new manager and
promotional team. But he’s

ting a title shot now is because



# TONIQUE WILLIAMS-DARLING
donated the suit, worn during her victory in
Helsinki, Finland, to Americas project

Ambassador Debbie Ferguson.



& By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



THE body suit that Tonique Williams-
Darling wore to win the 10th IAAF
World Championship’s rain-wrenched
400 metres in August will be auctioned by
the [AAF.

On Saturday, Williams-Darling donat-
ed the suit, worn during her victory in
Helsinki, Finland, to Americas project
Ambassador Debbie Ferguson.

The autographed suit will go towards
the IAAF’s humanitarian project “Ath-
letics for a Better World”.

Donations received will be auctioned at
the end of the year and all profits donat-
ed to the United Nations Associations:
FAO, UNICEF and WEP.

Although she didn’t compete in Helsin-
ki, Ferguson was on hand to present one
of the Bahamian coins she and the Gold-
en Girls received from the government
following their gold medal performance at
the Olympic Games in Sydney, Australia
in 2000.

A number of athletes around the world
have donated items to the IAAF.

Williams-Darling, 29, is coming off a
repeat gold medal at the 2004 Olympic

Games in Athens, Greece and this year’s

IAAF World Championships in Helsinki.
Last year she won half of the TDK

Golden League $1 million jackpot.

Additionally, Williams-Darling ended

the 2004 season with the four fastest per-
formances in the women’s one-lapper and
was ranked World number one in her
event.

This past year, she ran five of the ten
fastest performances.

Last year, Williams-Darling walked
away with the BAAA’s Female Athlete of
the Year award and she was also named
the Jones Communication’s Person of the
Year.

Once again, Williams-Darling will be
the top performer for the BAAA’s
Female Athlete of the Year when the cer-
emony is held next month.

And, although she had very little time
to recuperate from the past season,
Williams-Darling confirmed to the IAAF
on Monday that she will compete in both
the Norwich Union International in Glas-
gow on January 28 and the Norwich
Union Grand Prix in Birmingham in Feb-
ruary.

She joins Russian World and Olympic
pole vault champion Yelena Isinbayeva,

the World Athlete of the Year for the
second consecutive year and Jamaican
sprint champion Veronica Campbell at
Britain’s premier indoor meeting.

Next year, the women’s 400 will also
be one of the ten events on the Golden
League jackpot that will start on Friday,
June 2 in Oslo and conclude on Sunday,
September 3 in Berlin.

Along the way, the athletes will get to
compete in Paris on July 7, Rome on July
14, Zurich on August 18 and Brussels on
August 25.

However, there won’t be an Olympic
Games or World Championships next
year, so the focus for the athletes will be
on the Golden League jackpot during the
summer.

But at the beginning of the year, the
athletes will get to compete in the 11th
IAAF World Indoor Championships in
Moscow, Russia from March 10-12.

@ DEBBIE FERGUSON, pictured
here at the Olympic Games in Athens
in 2004, presented one of the Bahami-

an coins she and the Golden Girls
received from the government follow-
ing their gold medal performance at
the Olympic Games in Sydney, 2000.



not rushing into the process.

In the meantime, he said he
wants to focus on Pitt when
they meet again.

This time, he hope to beat
him more convincingly than
he did in their initial
encounter.

“This is a title fight, so I
know I have to be in tip top
shape,” Major stressed. “I
don’t know what style Pitt will
be coming with, but I just
hope to do my best and hope-
fully I will come out with the
win.

In the co-main event,
Bahamas middleweight cham-
pion Jermaine Mackey will
taking on Jamaican Patrick

ampionship

}



‘Hanger’ Miller over eight.
rounds. ms

So far, there are three fights:
lined up for the undercard.
They will all go four.
rounds.

Elkena ‘Ali’ Saunders will
take on Jamaican Patrick
‘Blaster’ Taylor; Anthony:
‘Syco’ Wood will face Dereck:
‘Castro’ Sawyer and Ricardo:
‘One Shot’ Bethel will battle:
Alpachino ‘Banger’ Allen. =:

Michelle Minus said they:
are anticipating that the show:
will be an exciting one and:
they are encouraging the fanis:
to come out for a treat as they.
close out the year for the pro-*
fessional boxers.

se neeeenseneeneeeny




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POLL ti, . Bat eet bee) “aeowtly. ce ied

IHIBDUINE OFUNRIO
nn aac
SPORTS a ne ae









Shockers
take the

\ first game
against

| Giants

ST FRANCIS/JOSEPH
SHOCKERS took the first
game in the Catholic Dioce-
san Primary Schools primary
school boys basketball cham-
pionship series 35-32 against
Xavier’s Giants Monday at
Loyola Hall.

Game two will take place on
Wednesday. ‘

(Photos: Mario
Duncanson/
Tribune staff)





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ppeesanet

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sinsisenerrre

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WAGE x




TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

‘SS BRITE ER ENR SS PENILE EEL EU SEL ETL EN RSI ESS ES RE



BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

ST. FRANCIS/JOSEPH
were a little too much for the
Xavier's Giants to handle as
they took game one of the
Catholic Diocesan Primary
Schools primary school boys
basketball championship
series with a 35-32 victory
Monday at Loyola Hall.

Teran Watson scored a
game high 13 points after he
took over in the final two
minutes when Shaquille Pen-
nerman fouled out. Penner-
man scored 10 points before

_he was ejected.

"When he got fouled out, I
knew I had to slow the ball
down and when the lane
opened up, I was able to pen-
etrate," said Watson, who
contributed the Shockers'
final three points down the
stretch to seal the deal.

Just before he left the
game, Pennerman scored a
lay-up and, on a Xavier's
turnover, he converted one
of two foul shots to put the
Shockers up for good at 33-
30.

Xavier's, who rebounded

from a shaky 0-2 start to earn
their berth in the finals,
played well defensively to
stay in the game. But they
missed a couple of critical
free throws and their two big
men, Brandon Whymms and
Jermaine Smith both fouled
out.
_ Coach Nelson 'Mandella'
Joseph said it was unfortu-
nate that they fouled out
because he felt they had a
chance to win with both of
them in the game.

"Those two guys we lost
really hurt us because they
were where we were getting
most of our rebounds and our
scoring," Joseph stated.
‘Hopefully we will try to tell
them to stay out of foul trou-
ble the next game."

Before they left, Whymms
had five and Smith ended up
with four. The Giants, how-
ever, got a game high nine
from Justin Symonette, while
guards Kent Wood and
Anfernee Seymour scored
seven and five respectively.

Despite the loss, coach
Joseph said he was still
pleased.

"They played great. They
didn't back down. We got
blown out the first game, but
I told my guys that we don't
have nothing to lose, so all
we had to so was come in



vennnnn niin eH neY





L

here and play hard," he
stressed.

Except for the first quarter
when the Shockers rade the
four points from Teran Wat-
son and three from Shaquille
Pennerman to an 11-4 lead
at the first break, the game
was a relatively close one the
rest of the way.



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

st the Giants yesterday.
: hoto: Mario Dun arsond Wine

In fact, the giants turned
things around in the second
half as they out-scored the
Shockers 8-2 to cut the deficit
to 13-12 at the half. Through-
out the second half, both
teams fought to several ties
before St. Francis/Joseph
pulled away down the stretch.

St. Francis/Joseph's coach



ees as a



a REN Ri























Devon Johnson said he knew
it wasn't going to be as easy
as it was in their regular sea-
son meeting when they blew
out Xavier's.

"Like I told my guys,
Xavier's weren’t going to
come here and lay down and
play dead. They made us
play," he stated. "It was a

Name:

great game."

But, come Wednesday
when they play game two,
coach Johnson said they will
be out with a little more
intensity and hopefully they
won't play it so close.

Coach Joseph said they too
will be back and intend to
play more aggressively.









fi BOXING
CHAMPION BOXING
CLUB’S SHOW

CHAMPION Amateur Boxing
Club held a tournament on Satur-
day at the First Class Promotions’
Club on Wulff Road.

e Here’s a look at the results of
the matches contested:

Cleveland Dorsett won over
Raheed Delancy in three rounds;
Tyrone Oliver won over Ramaeo
Andrews in the third as the referee
stopped the contest; Jeremiah
Andrews defeated Avery Francis;
Avery Francis def. Tyrone Oliver,
Kendrick Pratt def. Dwayne Saun-
ders; Byron Ferguson def. Paul
Clarke; McKenzie Telisnord def.
Jamal Rolle; Kevin Telisnord def.
Ricardo Williams; Aprichao Davis
def. Bradley Harris and Rudolf Polo
def. Avery Francis in a three-round
exhibition.

The best fight of the night was
between Ricardo Williams and
Kevin Telunsord; the most improved
boxer was Tyrone Oliver and the
most valuable boxer was Apricho
Davis.

@ TRACK
BAAA’S NATIONAL
CROSS COUNTRY

THE CR Walker Knights and the
CH Reeves Raptors retained their
secondary and junior high school
titles at the BAAA’s Colony Club
Resort National High School Cross
Country Championships.

The event was held on Saturday at
Fort Charlotte.

Marva Miller won the under-20
girls title for CR Walker in a time of
14 minutes and 39.23 seconds with
team-mate Kentisha Miller coming
in second in 15.25.26 and Jordan
Prince Williams’ Alex Pratt was third
in 15.48.17.

Leslie Dorceval of CR Walker
won the under-20 boys division in
16.57.91. CC Sweeting’s Anthony
Saunders was second in 17.13.03 and
CR Walker’s Ken Thomas got third
in 17.20.11. |

While CR Walker took the team
title, CC Sweeting was second and
RM Bailey got third.

In the under-17 girls division,
Monica Woodside of Government
High ran 14.14.13 for the victory.
Her team-mate Carmene Oxgenor
was second in 14.49.20 and Ashley
Hanna of CR Walker came in third .
in 15.41.54.

CW Saunders won the team title
over CR Walker.

Vicknel Servens won the under-27
boys title for DW Davis. Second
place went to Stevano Thompson of
Dame Doris Johnson Mystic Mar-
lins.

Other individual winners were
Lexi Wilson of Westminster in the
under-15 girls’ division; Wilgin Prof-
it of CH Reeves in the under-15 boys
division and Erishia Watt won the
under-13 girls’ division with Garick
Phylum of CH Reeves taking the
under-13 boys division.

@ GOLF
SOUTHERN DIVISION
LADIES’ INSTALLATION

THE executive committee of the
Bahamas Golf Federation’s South-
ern Ladies Division is inviting all
golfers and the public to attend their
pre-Christmas social and member:
ship drive.

The event is scheduled for Satur-
day, December 3 at 6.30pm at the
Sandyport Poop Deck Restaurant. A
donation of $30, which includes two
drinks, is required. Tickets can be
purchased from Ethelyn Davis,
Yvonne Shaw or Sharon Cleare. A

raffle will be drawn and door prizes
will be given out.

ey ta Ce ny



Address





P.O. Box



Telephone:

Cell:


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005





‘Women striving for

a better Bahamas’

# By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

WOMEN in the Bahamas
raised their voices and banded
together last week to celebrate
an important historical event,
the enfranchisement of
women. It is a celebration that
stands as a testament to wom-
en's rights, going far beyond
the average girl power atti-
tude.

In celebration of National
Women's Week, "Women
Striving For a _ Better
Bahamas" November 20 -27, a
series of events were held in
observance of the 43rd
anniversary of the enfran-
chisement of Bahamian
women.

_ Many Bahamian foremoth-
ers made the fight for suffrage
their’ most fundamental
demand because they saw it
as the defining feature of full
citizenship. It claimed for
women the right to govern
themselves. and choose their
own representatives. It assert-

Events celebrate
anniversary of
enfranchisement of
Bahamian women



ed that women should enjoy
individual rights in the midst
of a philosophy which said
that women, by nature, were
considered to be dependent
on men and subordinate to
them.

Politics

Many thought that women
could not be trusted to exer-
cise the independence of
thought necessary for choos-
ing political leaders responsi-
bly. It was also believed that a

woman's place was in the
home, catering to husband
and caring for children, so
there was no place for voting.
The entry of women into pol-
itics, it was feared, would chal-
lenge the assignment of
women to the home, and
might lead to disruption of the
family unit.

But many Bahamian
women rose above the limita-
tions, and above these fears, to
fight for their right to not only
vote, but be considered as
more than “just a woman”.
An annual observance of this

milestone in the history of the
Bahamas allows women to
remember where they came
from, as well as realise the
need to push forward.

“Many persons wonder why
every year this group of
women (the Minisiry of Social
Services and Community



2005 Bahamas International
Film Festival embraces
young women filmmakers

TWO promising film directors, Moya
Thompson and Maria Govan, have been
selected for the Bahamas International
Film Festival’s (BIFF) Filmmakers Res-
idency Programme, officials announced
yesterday during the launch of the ini-
tiative.

Following in the footsteps of various
festivals and their film “labs”, the
Bahamas International Film Festival’s
goal is to provide a supportive environ-
ment for local filmmakers. Six Bahamian
candidates have been chosen for the
unique learning experience; Maria Gov-
an, Moya Thompson, Kareem Mortimer,
Gustavius Smith, Bernard Petit and Kevin
Taylor. Each of them will be showing a
film during the festival.

Story

Writer/director Maria Govan’s film,
RAIN, is a story of a young Bahamian
girl on a voyage to the big city of Nassau
in search of her estranged mother, who
abandoned her as a child.

Writer/director, Moya Thompson’s film
BABYGIRL, is a hardship.story about a
young girl who is forced to grow up fast
when her mother abandons her and she is
faced with the reality that her father was
a gambling alcoholic. The plot takes an
interesting twist when her father is

Bahamian candidates chosen for
‘unique’ learning experience



stabbed and the community is shocked
by the violence...and news that BABY-
GIRL is the culprit.

A third candidate selected to take part
in the residency programme, Kareem J
Mortimer, writer/director, will be partic-

ipating in the documentary category.

Kareem’s film, FREEDOM, depicts the
filmmaker’s journey to find himself and
his sexual freedom despite the prejudices
and intolerance of the Caribbean com-
munity.

Gustavius Smith, also a writer/direc-
tor, brings THE HMBS FLAMINGO
WRECKAGE to the big screen. The nar-
rative is an account given by the surviving
crew members of a Cuban ship wreck-
age that was found in the Bahamas.

Writer/director Bernard Petit tells the
story of an interracial relationship that
faced challenges from the still-present
caste system in the upper class Bahamas
in RETURN.

The last entrant to the residency pro-
gramme, writer/director Kevin Taylor,
brings QUIRKE to the big screen. Based

CHOOSE

on a screenplay that takes place in North-
ern Ontario, Canada, three men pull
together to clean up their best friends
home after he commits suicide, in an
effort to protect his sister from his truth.
Chaired by award winning director
Spike Lee, the Filmmakers Residency
Programme, in an intense six-hour ses-
sion, is scheduled for December 9 at the
Atlantis Paradise Island Resort.

Producers

Each director will have the opportuni-
ty to mieet one-on-one with US industry
professionals, producers, directors, mar-
keting executives, and sales agents. This
concentrated day will foster dialogue,
build lasting connections and help film-
makers in both their creative and pro-
duction processes. '

The exploration of the Spirit of Free-
dom in world cinema is the consistent
theme of the festival. Films from 26 coun-

SEE page two

Art Supplies

one cae

Computer:

Pee ticle
Ank Cartridges

Dévelopment's Bureau of
Women's Affairs) organises
activities to commemorate
enfranchisement, but this sin-
gle act no doubt provided the
impetus for women to dream
of their daughters and grand-
daughters having.a better way
of life in the Bahamas; a
dream of them participating
on equal footing with their
male counterparts in every
aspect,” said Social Services
minister Melanie Griffin, as
she addressed the National
Women's Week luncheon,
held at SuperClubs Breezes.

"From serving on juries, to -

being members of parliament
and cabinet ministers, to being
managers of banks and major
corporations, to being chief
justices, president of the court
of appeal, governor of the
Central Bank, director gener-

ah

Store Locations



al of Tourism, to being presi-
dent of the Chamber of Com-
merce, to' holding Olympic
gold medals, to becoming
Rhodes Scholars, and of
course many many more,”
Minister Griffin continued.

Society

Women in the Bahamian
society have risen to some of

‘the highest positions in their

field, and in doing so, have
made the foremothers of this
country proud, the minister

- believes. Individuals like Mary

Ingraham, Eugenia Lockhart,
Mable Walker, Georgianna
Symonette and Dame Doris
Johnson, are hailed as "hero-
ines of the suffrage move-

SEE page two

Town Center Mall ¢ Harbour Bay :




PAGE 2C, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005

THE TRIBUNE®



‘Women striving for
a better Bahamas’

FROM page one

ment". Their names are
among scores of women who
have "bravely participated in
the movement to secure the
precious privilege we have
today, the right to vote," Min-
ister Griffin added.

In a passionate and stirring
message to the crowd of
women from various profes-
sions, Minister Griffin warned
women that while they bask
in the advantages that their
foremothers brought about,
they must also contribute to
the further development of
their society. While they enjoy
the benefits of society's
progress toward "full equali-
ty" for women, they must also
acknowledge their special role
in the development of
Bahamian society.

“One look around at many
of the social challenges that
have presented themselves
will tell us that a refocus of
our core values is in order.

“What would our suf-



fragettes think of the turn of
events in our communities and

in our families? It is a shift .

that has seen Bahamian chil-
dren bearing arms and killing
each other, women being
beaten and abused, and
women still being discrimi-
nated against in certain con-
stitutional provisions.

Role

"They perhaps would won-
der whether the women of
today were truly taking an
active role in their own devel-
opment and that of their coun-
try. They perhaps would won-
der whether we have rested
on our laurels and have fallen
prey to complacency," Mrs
Griffin said, offering an
answer to the question she put
forth to the audience.

As the mother of a six year
old daughter, Mrs Griffin said
that of all of the roles she
plays in society, the one that
she esteems most, is that of
mother. Working mothers like

teh Meee ee
Pangea a




Mises

RR ek ERE

ese eed

3-6655

393-8310 FAX
To

5 2

herself, she said, must make
time in their schedules to assist
their children in school work.

While society may blame
women for many of the nega-
tive behaviours of children -
either because they were too
lenient, too tolerant, or too
protective, or too strict - Min-

ister Griffin said that women ,

alone should not be held
accountable. "The overarch-
ing challenge is that women
and men, the two sides of the
leadership in the family unit,
must both re-commit and re-
dedicate themselves to work
at their respective roles in pro-
ducing a balanced, disciplined
and forward-looking happy
and content society."

She charged the women in
the audience to know their
role, and pursue them "enthu-
siastically" and "vigorously":

¢ Women are and should be
the nurturers of the society,
taking the time to make
absolutely sure that the young
are reared with love, disci-
pline, and the proper respect



MALL AT
EV ae MM LOLs

TELEPHONE:
394-5700/4
394-5702 FAX
BeeRsesthclatie






OPEN LATE:

NOV. 28th & Nov. 29th
LC

eNov. 30th Open until 10 p.m.





iM

rm lovin’ it





for their society.

e Women are and should be
the conscience of the society,
with a kind word and a hand
of assistance for those less
unfortunate.

e Women are and should be
the cohesive force of the
nation's families, lovingly pro-
tecting and preserving the

_ most. basic and most impor-

tant unit of our society.
., Giving an encouraging word

to: women's organisations in.

the Bahamas, Minister Grif-
fin urged them to remain
"steadfast" in their communi-

ty efforts regardless of finan-
cial constraints, small num-
bers, and other disheartening
moments. "You will be sur-
prised what can be accom-
plished through the work of a
few dedicated and committed
individuals."

Suffragettes in Bahamian
history, she added, are a stark
reminder of the fact that great
numbers are not a must. Just
as many times they were few
in numbers, but never dis-
heartened and continued the
work, women of today must
continue securing a future for

those women who come
behind," she said. te

"To whom much is givetr,
much is expected.

“Therefore we, who have.
achieved some degree of suc
cess, are obligated to reach
out and lift up our sisters who.
still find themselves in the.
proverbial trenches," Minis;,
ter Griffin charged. "We must,
do so knowing. that our fore:
mothers laid a strong, sound
foundation for us and so we;
too, must do the same;
for future generations of
women. '

dd esececseeceecceuseseccaserenceeseacesracscnusecnscseanaseesseceesseeeneangsasenaaseacnnsssessceasscussennssnasansnsccsseasaseasaseceaseasaseseseasacessaceasasensasccnesecsaseassccanasoassssessnseeee wet

Film Festival embraces

women filmmakers

nurtured by top leading industry professionals
from around the world. It is a tremendous hor
our to have Mr Lee as the quintessential edu’
cator of this programme,” said Leslie Vander-
pool, founder and executive director of B.
Advisors for the Filmmakers Residency Pro”
gramme include: Julie Corman, Lares
screenwriter and wife of Roger. Corman: Nate
Kohn, director of Roger Ebert’ S ‘Overlat ted
Film Festival, and associate director, George
Foster Peabody Awards, Grady, College at
Journalism and Mass Communication Univer;,
sity of Georgia; and William Keys, producer: ;,

' FROM page one

tries will be shown in this beautiful setting.
The residency programme is not only very
important to the festival and its filmmakers
but to the Caribbean and its flourishing film-
making industry.

“It is. important for a festival to make an ,
impact on the country where it is hosted. This ©
is a groundbreaking opportunity for Bahamian
filmmakers to discover their talents and be
provided with a platform where they can be



Best bride at
Mountbatten House

NASSAU’S most exclusive events venue voted Tammie Thompson best bride of the season!
The bride said, “I Do” to Drexon Thompson in a dazzling sunset wedding for 175 guests re
the antique pool terrace set in a lush garden setting at Mountbatten House.

The young “Techno Savvy” bride and her fraternity faithful groom celebrated their nuptials i int
the historic grounds of the most picturesque Old Nassau Mansion. Being best bride, Tammie won!
a day trip to Harbour Island on the BoHengy complete with a golf cart and lunch at the famous
Landing Hotel and Restaurant.

‘ To top off the evening, the bride was presented with an exquisite and coveted Harl Taylor hand}

ag.
Pictured from |-r: Tuesday White, marketing executive, Mountbatten House and Tammid
Thompson, Bride of the Season.

-cemewwerewrrwewr eee wee ee ee

ee an oe nt te,
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 15

INTERNATIONAL NEWS



S split

over cull proposal
} <= =

=



“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated, Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

“Partners to Financial Freedom”

DUE TO THE LACK OF A QUORUM

Notice is hereby given that The Twentieth (20th).

-Annual General Meeting of the Paradise Island

~ Resort & Casino Co-operative Credit Union Limited

_will now be held on Saturday, December 3rd, 2005
commencing at 9:00 am at the Eugene Cooper
Building, #9 Village Road, Nassau, Bahamas. All
members are asked to attend.

. The purpose of this meeting is to:

* Receive the report of the Board of Directors for
. 2004
_® To elect members to the Board of Directors
¢ To receive the audited Accounts for 2004
_ © To discuss the Annual Budget |
' ¢ To take action on matters that may come before
the meeting

‘The annual report may be viewed under
publications on our website listed below.

www.pircccu.org



FREE:

Pinder’s Funeral Home

“Service Beyond Measure”

PALMDALE AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
TEL: 322-4570 ¢ NIGHT: 393-1351 CELL: 357-3617

RANNIE PINDER President



Wome

\ DOUGLAS FRANKLIN
KNOWLES, 55

who died at Doctors Hospital
on Tuesday, will be held on
Wednesday, November 30th, 2005 |
at St Anne’s Parish East Bay Street
and Fox Hill Road. Burial will be
in the church cemetery. Father

@ Croslin Walkin officiating.

He is predeceased by his father
and mother, Augustus and Eulalee
Knowles; one niece, Kristina Knowles, survived by his wife,
Dawn Knowles; two daughters, Clarissa Knowles and Tiffany
Rivera; one son-in-law, Sam Rivera; three brothers, Charles
“Bronson” Knowles, Eric and Augustus knowles; three sisters,
Mrs Diana Knowles, Patricia Evans and Genevieve Sampey; |
four sisters-in-law, Sylvia, Josephine and Marianne Knowles
and Cecile Barber; four brothers-in-law, Richard Evans, Roy |
Bailey, Clinton “Clint” Bailey (deceased) and David Barber; four
aunts, Agnes, Edith and Ilva Knowles and Addie Cartwright;
uncle Alvin Richie and family; eight nieces, Donna Lowe, Joy
Kane, Suzette Parker, Georgia Russell, Leanne Sawyer, Deanna
Wyrick, Kim Cunningham and Debbie; 12 nephews, Peter, lan,
Derek, Stefan and Gunnar Knowles, Mark and Stefan Evans, |
Richard and Christopher Sampey, Adam and David Bailey and’ |
Robin Barber; nieces-in-law and nephews-in-law, Gordon Lowe,
Wesley Kane, Quincy Parker, Dax Russell, George Sawyer Il,
David Cunnigham, Dawn Evans and Robin Lee Barber; other |
relatives include, Chris and Eddie Darville, Beadie and Giles
Newbold and family, Jimmy, Geoffrey, Charlton, Patrick, Alec,
Reggie, Sammy, Donald, Kirk, Debra, Rachael and Chris
Knowles, Winston, Curtis and Steve Cartwright and their families,
Mary Cartwright and family, Bernadette and Pepi Terrali and
family Renee Turnquest and family, Rosalee “Tiny” and Mary
Knowles and families, grand nieces and grandnephews, Dylan
and Lauren Lowe, Megan Knowles, Maya Parker, Ryan Kane,
Jessica Russell, Apira Evans and George Sawyer Ill and a host _
of other relatives and friends including, Elva Knowles and family,

- Sonia Darville and family, Lolitta Knowles, Deborah Carroll,
Tony Moree, Tony Knowles, Judy “Pepper” Russell, Kenny
Harris, Steve and Debbie Carey, Sgt James and Paula Cooper, .
Thelma Sweeting, Albert Pearce, George “Tony” Sawyer Sr,
Jeannette and Jerome Cartwright, Edmond Knowles, Christine
Lowe, Rosie Roberts, Anthony Nottage, Barbra Algreen, Tommy
Hall, Willard Hanna, Tony Longley, the entire staff of The Crown
Jewellers Stores and members of the Nassau Dart Association, .
Abaco Dart Association and Grand Bahama Dart Association.

Friends may pay their last respects on Tuesday, November
29th, 2005 at 5:30pm until 7:30pm at Pinder’s Funeral Home,
Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale.

In lieu of flowers donations can be sent to St Anne’s Social
Outreach Programme, P.O. Box N-1569 and The Ranfurly
Home for Boys in memory of Douglas Knowles, P.O. Box N- °



“Dispensing A Healthier Life’
Ph: (242) 328-6129 or Ph: (242) 322-3612
Fax: (242) 3260-7842

ae katy

Tealaza\acean: 30th. Od
me ara sume YL 0 ene

on lOa.m. to Ip.m.!!!

We will have FREE:

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Monday to Friday:
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Pharmacy Monday to Friday:
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S aiueday w/ Pharmacy:

Prescriptions
Health & Beauty Aids
Toiletries
Phone Cards
Gift Items
Snacks

Pharmacist:

Todd K. Culmer

- delivery to mailboats
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- Blood Pressure Checks Medical Supplies

WE ACCEPT ALL MAJOR INSURANCE CARDS!


PAGE 16, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005 | THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL NEWS



First deaths are recorded among the
Kashmir quake survivors left out in cold






“Copyrighte eee
yndicated Content







OneSOnly Resorts”
presents the



Ow 5
CELEBRITY
INVITATIONAL



wale ii
\ Grains Of ee N

als Rice That’s Right Every Time...

A y, ‘RICE CRUST
PIZZA’

MICHAEL JORDAN

Ce lebrity Invitational 2006 ae {Topo

1 small onion, sliced

1 clove garlic, minced

1 cup mushrooms, sliced
1 green or bell pepper

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED Sl ae

2-1/2 cups part-skim Mozzarella cheese, divided
1/2 cup tomato sauce
1/2 tsp basil, dried
7 ; oa : 1/4 tsp oregano, dried
Kerzner International Bahamas Limited is iid tap blacl’peniser ereakily axcured
1 drop hot sauce

recruiting volunteers to assist with the Michael

Seed bell pepper and cut into strips. In a large skillet, heat oil on medium-high. Stir-fry onion, garlic,

| : 1 1 mushrooms and peppers until crisp-tender, about 3-4 minutes. Set aside. In a bowl, combine rice, egg
Jordan Celebrity Invitational Golf Tournament and 1/2 cup grated Mozzarella. Press evenly into an oiled 12" pizza pan. Bake at 400°F for 12-15 min-
. utes. Sprinkle crust with half the remaining cheese. Stir tomato sauce, basil, oregano, pepper and hot
ry 7 - sauce. Spread tomato sauce over; then top with vegetables. Sprinkle with remaining mozzarella. Bake
to be held on Janua 26 29, 2006 at the Ocean for about 12-14 minutes or until cheese is bubbly. Let rest 5 minutes before cutting. (Serves 4)

Club Golf Course on Paradise Island.

To volunteer contact Victoria Bethell by email at

Victoria.Bethell@kerzner.com or call at 363-2000 aff MU [ays @} RICE...“ALL oa) ial TTT Se

ext. 64561 by January 6, 2006. Distributed by ASA H. PRITCHARD, LTD.
Robinson & Claridge Roads : Tel: 393-2437




THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 17



CARIBBEAN NEWS





The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their

j neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.













uba's annual biotech
conference opens
with beer ened emnwnwbe .

“Copyrighted Material
iNET Syndicated Content WISTS

Available from Commercial News Providers”
srtee ot 6K EF OR EE



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PAGE 18, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005
:

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PAGE 8C, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2005





‘Putting
flowers

to bed’

t is now the time of
year when we can
grow almost anything
in our gardens. The
choice is particularly
wide when it comes to flowers.
Favourites in Canadian and
European summer gardens find
our late autumn and winter
weather very much to their lik-
ing. Some appreciate a little
shade but many enjoy full sun-
shine. ‘
It is a little late to be growing
flowering annuals from seed if
you want a nice show for
Christmas. The answer is to vis-
it your local nursery and buy
flower seedlings that usually
come with several to a pot.
These can be set out in flower
beds taking note of their rela-
tive heights. Taller plants
should, of course, be at the rear
if you are growing close to a
wall and in the middle if you
have a circular or similar bed
that stands on its own. The
smaller flowers should be
grown around the edges.
Because they are so impor-
tant in our summer garden
when the selection of flowers is
limited, we often forget that
zinnias and cosmos do well in
winter as well. They are can-
didates for full sun locations.
A list of flowering annuals I
have grown during cool weath-
er months down the years
would include calendula, core-
opsis, cosmos, dianthus, gail-
lardia, gerbera daisies, gode-
tia, impatiens, marigold, pan-
sies, petunias, poppies, rud-
beckia, salvia, Transvaal
daisies, vinca and zinnias.
The world’s favourite bed-
ding plant is indisputably impa-

tiens. Their pastel flowers come

in dozens of shades and they



Green Scene
by Gardener Jack

cena yo3 pase





flower so prolifically they can
form an avalanche of colour.
It is probably best to keep
‘impatiens as the sole occu-
pants of a flower bed as they
are likely to overpower visual-
ly any slightly more sedate
annual specimen.

The downside of impatiens
is their need for water. They
make lovely hanging baskets
but need to be watered! every
day. Even though impatiens
are annuals they seed very
readily and keep themselves
going (in much reduced num-
bers, of course) from one year
to the next.

Attractive

Poppies do remarkably well
and make really attractive
stands. You can choose a mix-
ture of colours or keep to one
colour, red being the tradition-
al favourite. :

Petunias are a must in any
flower garden. They are cheer-
ful plants that no longer come
only in solid colours but have
wonderful colour combina-
tions, along with pinwheels and
picotees. Petunia limbs can be
pinched off and planted to
form a new entity.

Pansies have the most glori-
ous deep rich colours, unlike
the pastel hues of the plants

’ we have mentioned already.

For this reason.they should also
be grown on their own as they
do not combine very well with
pastel-hued flowers. They too
like plenty of water for a good
show.

GARDENING









Zinnia flowers come in
almost every colour (including
green), size and form of flower.
If you could only have one type
of flower for your garden it
would have to be zinnia. The
different zinnias are so dis-
parate people would think you
had a dozen different types of
flowers. I do not particularly
care for marigolds. I find them
rather ordinary and there is
also the question of their smell.
Today’s margiolds come in
orange and red as well as the
traditional brick yellow.
Transvaal and gerbera
daisies are lovely set a fair dis-
tance apart from each other so
the individual plants receive a
deserved special attention. Low

' lying allysum could fill the gaps

between the plants. The daisies
are also very, expensive.

When setting your seedlings
out it would be wise to sprinkle
some snail bait in the area.
Snails and slugs love little
annuals too.

gardenerjack@
coralwave.com

THE TRIBUNE

ARIGOLDS now come

in red, orange, gold and
lemon shades but they still
have that horrible smell.



colours but the traditional red is still...’
favoured. S



@ RUDBECKIA and other coneflowers make « lovely mass planting.
They tend to flower later in winter than most annuals.


Section
Missing
or
Unavailable