Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text








CLOUDS AND |
SUNSHINE



|
B4F
70F |
|
|



m Lhe Tribune

i'm lovin’ It. |





BAHAMAS EDITION



_ JEANS -

; «TOPS
*e SKIRTS

* PANTS

° DRESSES

From
$5.00 to $15.00













Volume: 101 No.275

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005

sections inside

THURSDAY JUNE 19 oy

PRICE —50¢_





Hundreds gather
in Rawson Square

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter



HIUNDREDS of union mem-
bers descended on Rawson
Square yesterday for the sec-
ond time this month as tensions
between the public service and
government again reached a
boiling point.

Close to 300 members and
supporters of the Bahamas Pub-

ic Service Union (BPSU) gath-

ered in front ‘of parliament in —

protest against government’s
latest proposal for pay increas-
es within the new industrial
agreement.

Union members said the:

protest was the only avenue left
to them to voice their discon-
tent as government had “tricked
and misled” them,

However, members of the

government’s negotiation team,

said discussions about the con-
ditions of the new agreement
had not even begun yet.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, Frank Carter, an
industrial relations consultant
on the government’s. negotia-
tion team, said the actions of
the union were “very Pie
ture.”

Mr Carter explained that
talks had been scheduled earli-
er to open today at 10am,

_ “We haven't even begun dis-:

cussing the terms of this new
agreement. The date was set for
(today). And we will be there,”
he said.

Mr Carter added that the
team would engage the BPSU
at the negotiating table and not
in the streets.

Burning copies of the draft

“agreement yesterday, dissatis-
fied union members, called on



Minister of Public Service Fred
Mitchell and Prime Minister
Perry Christie. to “come out and
talk to us.”’

Several unionists also called
on former Prime Minister
‘Hubert Ingraham to join the
protesters in talks,

“[’m a PLP, but it was under
the FNM government that I
received my fairest treatment.
Bring out Hubert Ingraham —
he’ll get the job done,” one pro-
tester called out.

Mr Ingraham, however, did
not attend yesterday’s House

- of Assembly session.

Addressing the media and the
crowd, BPSU president John
Pinder said that on the surface
the industrial agreement
appeared to meet the payment
of $1,800 which the union had
requested, But a closer look
showed that government

intends to pay out the sum ovet

a five-year period.

“We asked for $1,800 across
the board for the first year,
some benefits in the second
year, and $2,000 in the third
year. Their offer is $600 in the
first year of the contract, $600
the second year of the contract,
nothing in the third year and
$600 in the fourth year and
nothing in the fifth year. It’s a
five-year proposal and in our
proposal we asked them for a
three-year proposal.

“No-one in their right mind
can conceive what these people
are trying to do,” he said.

- Asked if the union could not
have delayed its protest while
the country is struggling with
the aftermath of a devastating
hurricane, Mr Pinder said that

SEE page nine

® Village Rd. Roundabout
* Harold

i ° Prince Charles Plane

Roa







HOUSES are partially submerged i in Eients Mile Rock after flooding due to Hurricane Wilma. ° See story on page five. ;
7 (Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)

svenseeveceveeeeye reeeees,

PM: Grand Bahama s suffering
is highest spenuing priority.

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
_ Chief Reporter

IN A fiery speech delivered
in the House of Assembly yes-
terday, Prime Minister Perry
Christie gave what some viewed
as an admonition to union lead-
ers. He said government will
keep the welfare of those suf-
fering in Grand Bahama as the

SEE page nine |






Mitchell responds

to demonstration

@ By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter

AS NEGOTIATIONS with
the Bahamas Public Service
Union have just started, For-
eign Affairs Minister Fred
Mitchell, who is responsible for
the public service, did not
understand the need for yester-
day’s protest.

SEE page nine










Body found
with rannshot

wound to

the head

’ THE body of a young man
has been found tied up with duct
tape and a gunshot wound to
his head,

The gruesome series of mur--

ders continued in New Provi-
dence on Tuesday afternoon as
police discovered the body of a

“man believed to be in his early

20s in a house on Lyford Cay
Road,

According to reports, the 43rd
murder victim of the year was
found inside a house that was
still under construction,

“His legs and arms were
secured with duct tape and he
had a gunshot wound to his
head. He was wearing a pair of
short jeans, a white T-shirt and
sandals on his feet,” press liaison
officer Inspector Walter Evans
told The Tribune yesterday.

Up until press time last night
police had not released the iden-
tity of the man.

Investigations are contin-
uing,

paper





JACKIE MOXEY
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/
Tribune staff)

Softball’s

_ Jackie Moxey
“dies of injuries

SOFTBALL star Jackie ‘lil
stunt’ Moxey died yesterday
in the Princess Margaret
Hospital from extensive
injuries she sustained during
an argument with a man in
his forties. Ms Moxey was 44
etre ele

° See Sports Section,





rAUE 2, IMURSUAY, ULI UBEH 2/, 2UU9



The Management and Staff

of

Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd.

are pleased to announce
the opening of the







a



Customers are invited to conduct
regular banking transactions



Monday - Thursday: 9:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Friday: 9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Branch Manager: Grace Campbell

Tel: 242-336-4651-5

| We welcome the opportunity to serve you!

x —













us O° B

aot 2-3
BREATH TAKING RESIDE ES ON PARADISE TSLA ND, BAHAMAS FROM SA THO 6 MILLION
Illustration is far conceptual purpases only-and is subjegt to chang Unit anection and pricing are subject to availability. This is nol an offer ar solicitation in any state in which the legal requirements for such an offering have not been met.



yoy
| (ocean







BEWU turns out to
| protest labour issues



@ BEC workers (in blue shirts)

and

Pinder (third from left) in Rawson Square yesterday

lm By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas Electrical
Workers Union (BEWU) yes-
terday joined forces with public
service workers to protest the
government’s handling of
labour issues. hy

Demonstrating in Rawson
Square as parliamentarians
arrived for the yesterday’s ses-
sion of the House of Assem-

Cli.



sancti bres ldences. cam



bly, BEWU members marched
in a row holding signs demand-
ing respect and better treat-
ment.

Speaking with The Tribune,
BEWU president Dennis
Williams said that union mem-
bers had no choice but to pub-
licly protest after BEC man-

agement reneged on two con- .

tracts that both parties had
agreed upon.
“We had an agreement with
the board of directors and one
with the executive management,

both we held in good faith, both

were reneged on.

“We are here to protest
today. We have exhausted
every other avenue, talks at the
table have failed, our conscience
is very clear,” he said.

Following BEWU’s strike on
Tuesday, the union executives
said in a statement that they
had unsuccessfully attempted
to resolve various outstanding
issues with BEC management
in an amicable manner - but are
now being forced to take more
drastic measures.

Mr Williams said that
although it was unfortunate that
the protest had to take place
only two days after Hurricane



other public servants stand firm with BPSU president John

o rm



(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)

Wilma devastated parts of
Grand Bahama, union execu-
tives have an obligation to pro-
tect the rights of their workers.

“Government has a respon-

’ sibility to govern but the union

must protect the interests of its
members,” he said. ;

According to union trustee
Herman Rolle, the workers had |
given management “ample time
to avoid all this.”

Mr Rolle said that negotia-
tions have been ongoing since
June of last year.

“BEC keeps sending people .
to the bargaining table that are
not major decision makers, °
They make a statement and lat-
er it gets knocked down,” he
claimed.

According to Mr Rolle, who
has been a union member for
18 years, the practice of sending
representatives who lack
authority to make decisions is a
tactic that has been used by the
management as the end of
every contract approaches.

No government, he said, has
been willing or able to do any-
thing about it. eS §

“Is BEC more powerful than
the government? If so, we

would like to know,” he said.







THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 3



BT C: only |
minor
damage
caused
by Wilma

THE Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company (BTC)
announced that the country’s
communications grid suffered
only minor damages during
Hurricane Wilma.

However according to a com-
pany statement yesterday, some
communities in the Family
Islands did experience disrup-
tions late Monday afternoon.

These included Bimini and
Grand Bahama, which bore the
brunt of the storm, and BFC
said disruptions on these islands
were due to power failures and
downed lines.

“Electrical poles along with
BTC’s cables blew down in
Bimini affecting areas like
South Bimini, while areas like
McCleans Town and Taino
Beach in Grand Bahama expe-

rienced extended service dis-

ruptions for quite some time
after the storm.

“However, for the most part
BTC was able to maintain the
integrity of its major switching
centres throughout Grand
Bahama and service has been
virtually restored to most of the
affected areas,” the statement
said.

BTC president and CEO
Michael Symonette said: “Major
assessment efforts are still
-presently underway to fully deter-
mine the impact on our business
and residential customers with a
view to restoring service disrup-
tions not associated with power
failures expeditiously.”

He said that despite the dis-
ruptions, he is extremely
pleased that throughout the
storm, “islands affected were
able to maintain. contact with
the capital as a result of BTC’s
reliable network”.

Ex-policema

found guilty of |

@ By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

A FORMER police officer
was yesterday found guilty of
armed robbery, while his co-
accused was acquitted.

Kendal Hanna, formerly .
attached to Cable Beach sta- -

tion, was found guilty of com--
mitting armed robbery on June
29, 2001.

Owner of Centerville Auto
Rental Nigel Bethel told the
court that on that date, his
company was robbed of $5,000
cash.

Police reported that two
unmasked men entered the
establishment, one of them
brandishing a handgun.

Fredrick Rigby, a prosecu-
tion witness, placed Hanna
at the scene during the rob-
bery. Mr Rigby said he was
inside. Centerville Auto
Rental waiting to be served
at the time.

During Mr Bethel's testi-’
mony, he said he remembered

_ the face of Patrick Strachan at

the scene. 2 ee

The jury, however, found
insufficient evidence to con-
vict Strachan.

He was unanimously found
not guilty, while Hanna was
found guilty 8-3. There were
only eleven jurors. j

One juror was dismissed yes-
terday after she failed to
attend the trial at the sched-
uled times.

Sandradee Gardiner prose-
cuted the pair. Ramona Far-



@ FORMER policeman Kendal Hanna, leaving the court after
his conviction for armed robbery. His co-accused Patrick

' Strachan (right) was acquitted. However, he was also taken to
Her Majesty's Prison as he is incarcerated on another matter.

quharson represented Hanna,
while Perry Albury represent-
ed Strachan.

Despite the decision, both
men were led away from the
Supreme Court in handcuffs.

Although Strachan was
acquitted, he is still remanded
on other matters. Hanna was
on bail, but will now serve his
prison sentence.

(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)

Senior Justice Anita Allen
‘deferred sentencing for four
weeks on the request of Miss
Farquharson, who asked for a
Social Services report attest-
ing to her client's character.
She said her client was a good
citizen with no previous con-
victions.

She also plans to appeal the
decision.

BTC announces 58 per cent
hike in telephone line rates

& By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter

NEW service rates for BTC
customers may come into effect
by December 1.

The: Public Utilities Commis-
sion:(PUC) has announced that
it has concluded its public con-
sultation on the Bahamas
Telecommunications Compa-
ny’s (BTC) application to

increase monthly rates for tele-

phone lines.

“The PUC has given approval
for BTC to increase monthly
rates/prices for telephone lines
from $9.50 to $15 for residential
customers and from $20 to $36
for business customers all in
accordance with its application,”
read a notice from the commis-
sion.

The PUC added that the
approval was granted on the
condition that a discount be
introduced for senior citizens.

uals
ars cues
PEST CONTROL

Batya

a Te 5 a

Fy) Darfield Plaza
Madeiria Street &
; Mount Royal Avenue
P.O.Box N -8814 Nassau, Bahamas
email: natures spa@yahoo.com

Special of the Month
October 2005

Ladies, treat yourself to a relaxing
and rejuvenating Swedish
Massage normally priced at
$85.00

now for this month,

Book your appointment before
this special offer expires.

Other services also available....
Manicures, Pedicures & Facials
Savings! Savings! Savings!



Call Nature's Spa for details.
Telephone:
(242) 328-1250/ 328-1253

“After due consultation with

BTC, the PUC requires BTC
to introduce a senior citizen
package based on a 20 per cent
discount on the new monthly
rate/prices for a residential tele-
phone line for qualified appli-
cants,” said the release.
According to Barrett Russell,
executive director of the PUC,
the new rates will come into
effect 30 days after BTC and

the PUC have signed the newly- .

modified licence.

“The licence has to be modi-

fied, which we are in the process
of doing now, and then BTC
has to agree to it and sign it.
Once, that is completed, it will
take 30 days for it to come into
effect.”

In a letter to the PUC in
August, Felicity Johnson, BTC’s
vice-president of legal and reg-
ulatory affairs, said the compa-
ny has not been allowed to raise
local access rates for 20 years.

“The existing ‘below cost
rates’ for the local residential
services, which were appropri-
ate in the monopoly era, are
inconsistent with the develop-
ment of competition and the

maximising of social welfare.
“As a result, the existing
below cost rates inhibit market

entry, distort competition and ~
harm subscribers,” the letter -

said.

The All Eleuthera Association

will be holding an Election of Officers

at

3:00pm on Sunday 27th November 2005

at the

Hotel Training College Campus
on Thompson Boulevard. .
All residents, non-resident and Descendants of
Eleuthera are invited to participate.
The deadline to register to vote is 15th November.
A registration fee of $10.00 must be paid on or before the deadline.

’ Please contact Nichola Sands at 356-5702,
Edith Sturrup at 393-2175 or Roscoe Sands at.302-2668
for further information concerning Voter Registration.

bs

Costumes

“Dora the- bgloer

“Spongebob
. Pirates”.

Princess’ Hats
. Nascar: Racing
Vampires.

Wigs

Teeth:
Flashli

Fake

Makeup
“Wings

— Capes

~ Mask
Swords .

"Halloween ‘Néceisories
Scary (D's:

© Strobe Lights’

Fogger & Fog Juice
eoMirror Ball”

© Black Lights:

- Flying Gh ost

nl Aissories

i - Decorations
Spider Webs

~- Party Goods:
~~ Bucket & Bags
Lights
Yard Decorations
© Table Accessories
bis Candles :

blood

s

ee Fabrics, Crafts & eee AY fers) d

Th aie |

Madeira St [242] 325-8233 e ES it [242] 322-3080



Cx



4, Woman suffers
stroke after
_ being robbec

armed robbery in the street

MIDDLE-AGED
eee woman suffered a
slight stroke after being
robbed in a Nassau street, it
emerged last night.

The slightly-built woman
was attacked from behind by
aman who grabbed her hand-
bag and fled with $800.

The incident occurred in
Frederick Street in broad aa
light.

Yesterday, the woman told
The Tribune: “I banged the
right side of my head against a
wall and was left lying on the
sidewalk.

“When I recovered con-
sciousness, there was a loss of
mobility in my left hand and
arm. I went to the hospital
and they told me I had suf-

: — fered a mild stroke.”
The robbery happened as .

public concern grew over ris-
. Ing crime in Nassau. Last
_week, an elderly woman was









mugged outside her sister’s
home off the Eastern Road.
She later required stitches in
cuts to her head and face.

This latest attack came as
the-victim was on her way to
the bank.

“T heard a voice behind me
say something like ‘it looks
liké you have a lot of money’,
then I was knocked against a
building and lost. conscious-
ness.

“When I came to, my purse
and belongings were scattered
on the sidewalk. Fortunately,
I did not have my passport
with me, and-he did not take
my ID.”

The woman believes she
was attacked because she was
small and unaccompanied.
She did not see the robber
and did not recognise his
voice.

The matter was reported to
police, who are investigating.

ait cd

TS) tet ae

would like to inform the general public
that the

_ 2006 DIRECTORY CANVASS
WILL, BE CLOSING NOVEMBER 25TH

All interested advertisers
can choose to call one of our
sales representatives at 394-7988
or send an email to
-~ bdm @bahamasgp.com

"to reserve your advertising space for next issue.

logo on to WwW. bahamasgp.com



Rare Oy se dEs aks

ORTH CO

The Mall-at-Miarathon
BOX OFFICE OPENS AT 10:00 AM DAILY

LEGEND OF ZORRO NEW Frm aay | WA [00 | 620 | 105 |

=m
a,>

ef |
fea [won [ra be

S

x
ALO ]a &
a Eee

a

TWO FOR THE MONEY

WALLACE & GROMIT
INTO THE BLUE
LIGHT PLAN

a
pS
S

[NA_| 7.00] 10:0]
[6:30 [| exa0 | 10:35
soo | sat]
ody Q
a eT
[wallace s apowy ___A | was | sao {ozo Ta

rrr rrrrry rrr yy

X ° 393-94





PAGE 4, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005 .

_ EDITORIAL/LETTERS. TO

THE TRIBUNE ~



omer a neaeae Waren ht ene rate nn en RE ren one er

pen IR ERIE Pm et et eke AAI eft nen EASR NNO LOA Sn OOPSLA LE

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

‘Published Daily Monday to Saturday _

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

‘

- TELEPHONES

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352



How PLP treated Barry Malcolm |

SPURRED by a comment made last week °
on a radio talk show by a caller to the effect.

that only under the present PLP government
did he feel free to express his opinions, we
started to tell the story in this column yesterday
of what “freedom” was like under the old PLP
government. ;

In fact during the Pindling years this was —
such a frightened society that few had the’

temerity to express their views openly. Those
who did never forgot the wrath of “the Chief”.
For politicians it spelled the-end of their polit-
ical careers, for private citizens it could mean
the end, either of a promotion, or a job.

And this is what happened to Mr Barry Mal-
colm, today an executive with the Grand
Bahama Port Authority, but in those days
BORCO’s senior Bahamian executive.

BORCO at the time was the Bahamas’ pre-
mier employer with 800 full-time and 400 con-
tracted employees —- a total of 1,200 persons
working in the Grand Bahama facility around
the clock processing crude oil into basic prod-
ucts, — eal gg
In the 1980s BORCO employees were the
highest paid workers with the best benefits in
the Bahamas. An employee’s average income
was $45,000 a year. This did not include over-
time pay. The company spent about $800,000
annually on training programmes for their
workers. :

.’ The fight to unionise BORCO went through
the 1982 election, continuing up to and into the
1987 election. : ae

BORCO employees accused prime minister
Lynden Pindling of “using his office to intim-
idate the workers at BORCO and Syntex”.

When The Tribune reporter tried to find
out why PLP Senator Jeff Thompson, a formet:
PLP Cabinet Minister, was so determined to
head a union to represent the foreign firms’

workers, our reporter was told: “To give Jeffa '

platform for his political endeavours”. Mr
Thompson was being proposed at thé time —

February 1980 —-as a PLP candidate for one of

the Grand Bahama constituencies. _
In 1990 Chevron Corporation of the US,

_ then owners of BORCO, sold to Petroleos de

Venezuela, SA (PD VSA), the present owners.
Sir Lynden and his government failed to
force a union on BORCO, but their failure
took its toll on'the immediate future of the
company’s senior Bahamian executive.
We don’t know what Mr Malcolm had done

to offend the PLP, unleéss, of coursé, he had :

failed to assist them in their efforts to force a
union on his company. anes OE,
In the early nineties BORCO’s Veriezue-

lan owners were negotiating with Sir Lyn-.

den’s government for a seabed lease. The

hours of 11:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. as follows:




001-700
701-1200

November 4 | 1801-2400 November 29







November 7



a || November 10 | 4201-4500

; | November 11

4501-4800.





November 14 | 4801-5100



TEACHERS AND SALARIED WORKERS
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LIMITED ©

NOTICE TO OUR
VALUED SHAREHOLDERS

Please be advised that Interest/Dividend payments for the year 2004
will be distributed effective Tuesday November 1, 2005 during the

, November 25
| iE 1201-1800 November 28

November 24

nowhere,” said Mr Malcolm.

Then one day Luther Smith, then Permanent
Secretary to Minister Darrell Rolle, arrived
in Freeport with a message.

_ Mr Smith said he had been sent by govern-

negotiations dragged on. “They were going

ment to see José Solano, BORCO?’s president... .

“The seabed agreement will not be con-
cluded as long as Barry Malcolm is in the posi-
‘tion he is in. We want him removed,” was the
, content of the message sent by Sir Lynden’s
government. '

“José Solano came into my office, which

was just next door, he was absolutely ashen,”

Mr Malcolm recalled. “He was the president —
and'I was the vice president. We were very:

close — he was a real gentleman, he was new
- to the island and so I was the eyes and ears of
the company on the local scene.”,

. Mr Malcolm knew the company had to

move on and to do so the seabed agreement
was important to its future. :
It was decided that as Mr Malcolm was a
senior executive in the company he should be
. transferred to Venezuela. Oe
There for eight months he worked at the

headquarters in Caracas, where all of the oil

trading was done; moved to Maricabo, the city

located at the mouth of Lake Maricabo, where
the shipping offices were located, then to Cabi-
mas, where the oil was pumped off the lake to
the large refineries in Paraguana.

He had moved from the central office, to the —

shipping offices, the oil fields and the refinery.
“It was a great experience and I learned to
speak Spanish,” said Mr Malcolm.

~ He came home as an adviser, kept in the
‘background, .to Mr Solano. On the death of

FNM leader, Sir Cecil Wallace-Whitfield, he. .

became the FNM’s campaign manager in the
Freeport by-election that resulted.

It was during this election that Sir Lynden

made his historic prediction that whoever won
Freeport, would win the government. The
FNM won the by-election.
It was.:then that Mr Malcolm took a leave of
" absence from BORCO to become the FNM’s
coordinator of the Northern. Bahamas. He
devoted all his energies to making certain that
Sir Lynden’s prediction came true.
On the long stretched the PLP did not dam-
age Mr Malecolm’s career, but it was not
_ because they did not try. .
_ This is an example of what used to happen
~~ Mr talk-show Caller — for 25 years under

' the PLP administration. Every time yout pick,

up the telephone today. to call in to a talk-
show to express your opinions, just remem-
ber to whom you owe your new found freedom
of speech. -. °°



















7201-7500.
7501-7800
7801-8100
8101-8400




9501-10000
10001-10500



10501-11300



EDITOR, The Tribune _

PLEASE allow me space in .

your valued column to express
my displeasure of the so-called
myth of racism in the Bahamas.

I said so-called because during,
“my 60-plus years, I have never

seen any sign forbidding any
particular racial grouping from
going anywhere in the
Bahamas. ;
What I have experienced,
however, and this has nothing to

do with colour, but what could

be classified as “classism,”
where a particular group
because of economic or social
standing, would discriminate
against others of less social or
economic standing.

I experienced organised

_racism for the first time in the

early 1950s when I went to work
in the United States. I will
always remember that date, it
was November 22, 1954 when I

_ boarded a Flying Tiger aircraft

at Oakes Field International
Airport, one hour and forty-five
minutes later, we arrived at
West Palm Beach International
Airport, where I went through
immigration, and customs, and
was given my letter of assign-

~ ment to work for Tom Hinman

in Homestead. '
J boarded the Greyhound bus

and saw in bold letters: “I-c-c - .
Federal Regulations requires all

other passengers to'proceed to
the back of -white line.” Later
that evening in South Miami, at
a bus stop, more passengers
boarded the bus, and an elderly
black lady sat in a seat in the
white section. ,

The driver apparently saw’

her through the rear view mir-
ror, pulled off the road, went

to the lady in a hostile manner
‘and forced her out of the seat.
On seeing this, I stood up and

allowed the lady to have my

seat. ] remained standing until ©
- some passengers got off in Per-_
‘rine. * 2

In ‘August 1955, 14-year-old
Emmit Tell was racially mur-
dered in Mississippi for alleged-

ly whistling at a white woman. -

Later in December of the same
year while I was yet in Home-
stead, Florida, Mrs Rosa Parks

_was arrested in Montgomery,
- Alabama, for refusing to give

up her seat on the bus to a
white person. This is institu-

' tionalised racism on every pub-
lic place, on water fountains

were marked “white”

“coloured” on-restroom doors

lady”. “coloured
“white men”,

“white
woman”, .

’ “coloured”. =

‘During this period, black men
never got beyond “boy” in the

Dtribunem



eyes of white America. As a
young man, back then, I devel-

oped a disdain for the system,

but was able to outgrow it over
the years. I realised that their
action was based on sheer igno-
rance. That is why we owed our
present and future generation
the true history of our country.
If we feed them false informa-

‘tion when they research and |

find the true history, they would
condemn us.
Politicians who feed false

- information to score political
points should be swept into a

garbage tin of history. Mr

“Honest George” Mackey, a

well respected Bahamian histo-
rian, wrote in The Tribune
recently that Sir Stafford Sands,
more precisely young Stafford
Sands, on graduation from Gov-



' EDITOR, The Tribune

TOMMY Turnquest, the
leader of the Free National
Movement today, was not the
person who piloted the FNM
in the last General Election.
The piloting of the FNM ship

Minister.

He, in keeping with the
long established tradition in
Bahamian party politics of the
election leader signing all the
nomination'papers of the
General Election candidates,
signed all the FNM nomina-
tions, including that of Mr
Turnquest.

In addition the proposed
turnover of authority to Mr
Turnquest was not to occur

. itself was completed.

Moreover, in the post elec-
tion post-mortem, all analy-
sis in the media agreed on the
main cause of the FNM loss,
in the face of a very creditable
performance as a government.

The general view was that
the loss was in fact a reflection

‘| of the dissatisfaction of the

electorate with certain aspects
of the performance of the
FNM Prime Minister. He in
effect was so out of favour that
he was in need of a spanking,
which was administered to the
entire slate of candidates of
the party, regardless of the
very creditable performance

‘Truth about Turnquest

| was done by the former Prime -

. leader, in charge of the elec-

in pointing this fact out to
“those callers to his pro-

until the General Election:

ernment High School, went:to
be articled in the office of A:F

‘Adderley to become a lawyér,

so was he really a racist?

PRINCE G SMITH
Nassau
October 13 2005

(Sir Stafford Sands was an
articled law student in the
chambers of his uncle, Sir Ken-
neth Solomon, who was presi-
dent of the Senate. However,
when Sir Kenneth left the island
for any length of time his
nephew, Stafford, was left under

‘Mr Adderley’s supervision. Sir

Kenneth’s clients were also left
with Mr Adderley. It shows the.
high regard in which this com-
munity held the late A F
Adderley, a black man.

(Up to the time of his death,
Sir Stafford addressed his men-
tor as “Mr Adderley”, while to
Mr Adderley his pupil remained
“Stafford”. There was respect
on both sides. — Ed).



of the government otherwise!
_' Hence the loss in the last
election was under the former
PM’s leadership! It is there*
fore wholly incorrect for any-
one to try to pin'this loss on
Mr Turnquest, who in the
next general election will
therefore be leading the Free
National Movement as its










,

tion, for the first time.
Mr Darrel Miller, was
therefore 100 per cent correct






gramme who mistakenly
placed the loss of the last
General Election on the
wrong shoulders.

While Bahamians are often
accused of having short mem-
ories, not all of us suffer from
this malady, and it is impor:
tant to set the record straight.

For those still in doubt, turn
your mind’s eye back, exam‘
ine the facts of that period
and see if you don’t agree
with me that this last FNM
loss was a reflection of the
common view taken of the
last Prime Minister’s conduct
and resultant loss of grace
with the Bahamian public. |’

Let’s be fair to Mr Turn-
quest. Let’s make sure that
the record is kept straight.


















" DEXTER JOHNSON
_ Nassau —
October 5 2005







11301-12100
[December 9° | 12101-13000 }
i | November 18

ora
[a











November 15 } 5101-5400










November 16 | 5401-5700 .






2401-3000 | November 30 | 8401-8700 |

»° Visit'us and see:other used cars...
~ and make your own deal!
ran auto
QUALI ; sales |
LIMITED
#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS i
EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 * 325-3079

Vistt our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals * Queen's Highway * 352-6122





November 17 | 5701-6000 13001-14000







14001-15000
15001-16000 .
16001-17000 ©











te!
t

Rosetta St, Palmdale
Tel: (242) 322 7496




17001-18207





“THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS



Aid agencies bring urgent supplies

to residents in Grand Bahama

m By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

A GROUP of agencies and
aid organizations have
already stepped in to devas-
tated areas throughout Grand
Bahama to bring water, food,
and hope to many stranded,

“hopeless, and homeless
_.Bahamians.

With most of the homes
along Bay Shore Road in
Eight Mile Rock destroyed
by Hurricane Wilma, Inter-
national Rescue, along with
Island Helicopters, Million
Air, and the New Providence
Community Church have col-
laborated to quickly bring aid

.to those residents in need.

Yesterday the group, along
with Our Lucaya, the Rotary
Club of Grand Bahama and
the FNM began distributing
food into the devastated com-
munities.

Darren Adler, the chief
officer of International Res-

FNM leader
makes relief
aid trip to
hurricane-hit
communities

lm By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

SENATOR and leader of the
FNM Tommy Turnquest yes-
terday made a trip to Grand
Bahama to take relief aid to res-
idents affected by Hurricane
Wilma.

Speaking near the smoulder-
ing remains of a resident’s home
that had burned down earlier
that day, Mr Turnquest said he
“could not in good conscience”
visit with the residents without
bringing them some supplies.

“We have come down here
with a team. The deputy leader,
the deputy treasurer, etc, and
we are giving out water, ice, and

sandwiches from McDonalds ©

and Burger King.

“We are just trying to supply
some immediate relief for
immediate needs. We could not
come down here in good con-
science without bringing some-
thing,” he said.

Mr Turnquest outlined the
need to respond to natural dis-
asters of such a magnitude on a
timely basis while comforting a
resident who had just seen his
home burn down earlier in the
day.

“We need to respond to the
needs in a timely manner. You
can talk all you want about
help, but bring some help now,”
he said.

For other residents in the
area, many of their landmarks

»were completely destroyed.

“Twenty-seven 12 x 12 buildings

along the water’s edge near Pin-
der’s Point were nothing but
debris — littering the northern
side of the road.

As one resident stated, in the
blink of an eye, the equivalent
of Nassau’s Fish Fry, Pinder’s
Point “Sunset Village” was no
more.

“My building used to be the
Blue Lagoon,” Joanna Forbes, a
vendor for three years, said as
she pointed to a piece of her
building, now littering the police
station compound.

“I’m hoping we can get some
assistance from the government
or whoever so that we can
rebuild,” she said.

Senator Turnquest noted that
since last. year’s hurricanes, the
National Emergency Manage-
‘ment Agency (NEMA) has yet
to submit any proper account-
ing to his party for the financing
and donations they received.
He wondered why the agency
was taking so long to do so.

“We should have received
something within three weeks,
and at the outset two to three
months — but we haven’t
received anything as yet.

“See, my difficulty is that it
seems as if we are more con-
cerned with setting up a democ-
racy than responding to these
people’s needs,” he said.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Ay OUR!

ye ea ed
322-2197



\y

cue in the Bahamas encour-
aged other thoughtful persons
wishing to donate or help to
continue to do so, despite the
“technical” pitfalls they may
encounter.

Last year International
Rescue along with other
agencies such as the Rotary
Club of Grand Bahama and
many other private individu-
als were hindered by the
National Emergency Man-
agement Agency (NEMA) in
delivering donated relief sup-
plies to areas affected by
Hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne.

Since then, relief organiza-
tions have asked for a more
flexible input from NEMA in
times of national disasters.

“Individual resourcefulness
of persons who want to
donate and help is what we
need to encourage,” Mr
Adler said.

“After last years fiasco, we
need NEMA as a facilitator





rather than a manager,” he
said.

William Wong from the
NPCC along with a group of
volunteers disbursed food

and much needed water
throughout Pinder’s Point’s.

outer-ring communities such
as Hunters and Lewis Yard.

International Rescue set up
a depot at St Stephen’s Parish
Hall in Pinder’s Point and dis-
persed food rations and water
bottles shortly after noon and
continued to organize the
ration and aid disbursement
throughout the rest of the
day.

Residents lined the streets

and crowded around the cars
and vans as the caravan with
relief aid drove through the
communities.

Looking ahead, Mr Adler
said that tomorrow will bring
much of the same as they fly
in to the island again to bring
much needed relief to the
devastated communities.











i MARTIN Town Primary School:
takes a big blow from Wilma, with
the roof torn off one section

FT.& BRIDAL REGISTR
aoe

TOMMY Turnquest stops to comfort Oswald Williams after he lost his house to a fire yesterday — | e-s Harbour Bay Shopping Centre ;

in Pinders Point.











PUG Ue UY

BEGINNER’S SPANISH ¢ FRENCH
¢e CREOLE
For Adults

Don’t Delay... Register Now!!
ILR GROSVENOR ACADEMY OF LANGUAGES

Tel: 323-2078 ® FAX: 323-6914 * E-MAIL: ilr@batelnet.bs

Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family

Baypar! Building, Parliament Street
Tel: 322-8393/328-7157

www.colesofnassau.com * P.O. Box N-121



(Photos: Mario Dunéanson/ Tribune Staff). :

Bb

Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448 it












: Enter to win in NASSAU or FREEPORT!
Both winners will be drawn Friday, Nev. (25th.

COMMONWEALTH BUILDING SUPPLIES 2

- NASSAU: 3252505 ¢ ROBINSON RD. FREEPORT: 351¢1310 * LOGWOOD RD.

email: ebs@chsbahamas.com Employees of CBS not eligible for entry. Prize cannol be “ae ‘



PAGE 6, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



2000
re me

$9,900

Includess Insurance, license &

inspection, $20 gas & 3 months warranty!

We NEVER
tamper with the
odometer! —
We NEVER import
accident cars period!
Most of our cars
CANNOT be
purchased in Miami
with duty paid
LOWER than our
price!

VILLAGE ROAD NEAR SHIRLEY STREET

‘isk 394.0823/78
OR 39451977

Great economical cars with the BEST Reputation
for warranty service on the island!



Halloween Supplies |

¢ Pumpkins

arty Decorations

Barbie
Clown
Alien

are
Scooby Doo

Doctor

Wreaths
Make-up
Brooms
Face Paints
and much
Make) a=)

e Fairies
Pee Tek) |

Pee Tek =v drat 1a)
e Ballerinas
e Angel
e Princess

THE MALLAT MARATHON: 9AM- 8PM: MON-FRI

@ ANGELO “Nasty” Brennen leaving the Supreme Court yesterday. His murder and attempted

murder trial continues today.

@ By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

A 16-YEAR-OLD girl told
the Supreme Court that she
was shot by Angelo “Nasty”
Brennen, who is accused of

OES on BRED BH Beh



killing her mother on October
29 last year.

Calvonya Grant wept as she
recalled the day that her moth-
er Ruthmae Alfreda Pinder was
shot to death in front of her and
her younger sister.

| SUPERVISOR
FOR THE BLOOD BANK

QUALIFICATIONS
° Baccalaureate Degree in Medical

Technology

-© Certification by AMT or ASCP

e Minimum of 5 years experience in Blood
Bank Department

© Computer Literate

e Excellent written and oral communication

skills

e Excellent interpersonal skills

POSITION SUMMARY
The successful candidate will coordinate the
daily running of Blood Bank, including:

e Supervising and scheduling staff

¢ Controlling inventory

¢ Meeting the blood supply demands

e Ensuring safety of blood units leaving the

Department

Salary commensurate with experience

Excellent benefits

meee ovals eet to: The Human Peery
Doctors Hospital | P.O. Box N-3018 | Nassau, Bahamas |:

In observance of Breast Cancer Awareness Month redeem this
voucher for 50% off the cost of a mammogram at Doctors Hospital*

Mammograms save lives, schedule yours today!

“Women who have not had a mammogram performed at Doctors Hospital. §

*Women with a strong family history of breast cancer, i.e. mother, sister or grandmother.

Mammogram Tip of the Day

Don’t wear deodorant, powder, or cream under your arms —
it may interfere with the quality of the mammogram.

THE TRIBUNE

OBSERVES

becisinticloned 28D





(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson) |

Miss Grant was brought in |
the court by wheelchair, and'

‘ broke down repeatedly as she.

attempted to recall the incident. :

Her younger sister, 10 year-’
old Amy Pinder, also gave an:
emotional testimony. She told:
the court that she saw Brennen:
pointing a gun at her older sister:'

Miss Grant testified that on:
the day of the incident, Bren-'
nen called her mother. She lis-' .
tened to the phone conversa-:
tion, during which she said she
heard him apologising to her
mother.

Miss Grant said she heard her
mother tell Brennen to leave
her alone or else she would call
the police. :

She said she left her home
with her mother and sister and
arrived at the bus stop on Far-
rington Road around 2pm.

At the same time, she said
she saw a red Nissan Sentra pull
up and Brennen get out. He
then went up to her mother and
said: “Freda, why are you doing
this to me?” ye

According to Miss Grant, her
mother told Brennen to, “Go
where you are going".

She said she saw Brennen
pull a gun from his waist at
point it at her mother. She said

_ She closed her eyes when gun

shots rang out, and she opened
them to see her mother on ‘the
ground, while Brennen crossed .
the street and the car sped off.

Her little sister told the court
that she saw the accused point-
ing the gun at her older sister.

"He lowered his hand (from
her chest) and then he shot
her,” said Miss Pinder.

Ingrid Brennen also took the
stand. Ms Brennen told the
Court that Angelo Brennen had
been her friend for about 20
years. During that time, she said
Mr Brennen borrowed her car
on many occasions.

On October 29, 2004, she said
she loaned her burgundy Nis-
san Sentra to Brennen. He
parked his car in her yard and
left in her car alone, she said.

That was at 10.40am, she tes-
tified. She said she never got
her car back from Brennen.

Detective Jermaine Stubbs

ald the court that Ms Pinder

iffered from bullet wounds to
the right and left side of the
chest. One bullet went in
through the front of the right
side of the chest, and exited at
the same position at the back.
The other bullet entered the left
side of her chest and was lodged
in her body.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
emaking news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story. _





THE TRIBUNE

LOC

L NEWS

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 7



Infidelity and physical abuse end.



quarter of all Bahamian marriages

ONE out of every two
Bahamian marriages end in
divorce — with half of those due
to infidelity and/or physical
abuse.

This is the grim reality
according to Dr David Allen,
clinical psychologist and author
who practises in Nassau and
Virginia.

In a presentation last Satur-
day, Dr Allen kicked off the
country’s first free legal clinic:
“Information you need for the
life you want” hosted by Hals-
bury Chambers.

Dr Allen addressed the top-
ic: “Divorce: Before seeing the
lawyers — when counselling can
save a marriage.”

According to Dr Allen, the
divorce rate in the Bahamas is
steadily climbing.

Highlighting how often
physical abuse is reported as a

factor in divorces, he revealed

that about 40 per cent of last
year’s murders were “crimes
of passion”.

According to Dr Allen,
divorce can actually be a good
thing if a marriage has deteri-
orated to “the point of no
return.”

Stress-filled marriages, he
said, can have physical affects
on a person’s health.

“Partners can become over-
whelmed and shell-shocked.
This powerful paroxysmal
physiological reaction with
anger can cause increased
heart rate, pulse and/or metab-
olism. ;

“If one is frequently flooded,
hormonal upsets occur and
blood pressure rises. Weight
gain or loss is also a factor.
Marital problems can serious-
ly affect the physical well-being
of a person.”

Dr Allen recommended not





@ A YOUNG man takes the opportunity to the ask advice on
personal legal matters at the Halsbury Chambers free legal clinic

Clarks Shoe Store, iG ny Village & John’s are the
ONLY authorized retailers in the Bahamas to sell
authentic Clarks Shoes!









divorcing while experiencing
feelings that are violent, vin-
dictive, or feelings that are
characterised by loneliness or
inadequacy.

“It’s time to divorce when a
partner cannot or will not stop
emotional, physical or sexual
abuse toward the spouse or
children,” he said.

Dr Allen said that a spouse
should only think of leaving
when they feel that they’ve
exhausted the opportunity to
change or grow in a relation-
ship.

“Only consider divorce, after
you have fully examined your
own issues and not just your
partner’s,” he said.

The free clinic drew more
than 200 persons on Saturday,
with dozens taking advantage
of private consultations with
the Halsbury Chambers team
of lawyers.

Second —

free legal
clinic

offered
for the
public

THE second in a two-part

series of free legal clinics spon-

sored by the law firm of Hals-
bury Chambers is set for Sat-
urday, October 29.

Experts from the public and
private sector and the firm’s
lawyers will participate in the
event, which will be held at
Halsbury Commercial Centre
on Village Road north.

This Saturday’s session will
focus on practical business, cor-
porate and financial matters.

Speakers will include nation-
al planning co-ordinator in the
Office of the Prime Minister
Malcolm Martini; Philip
Simon, executive director of
the Bahamas Chamber of

- Commerce; Ehurd Cunning-

ham, secretary for revenue in
the Ministry of Finance; Bank
of the Bahamas deputy man-
aging director of IT and
human resources Vaughn
Delaney; and Terrance
Knowles, chairman of the

-Bahamas Contractors Associ-

ation.

There will be a special pre-
sentation on labour law at
9.15am by Court of Appeal
Justice Emmanuel Osadebay,
author of Labour Laws of the
Bahamas.

‘Interactive discussions will
be held from 9.45am to lpm

and lawyers will be available

for consultation until Spm.

Free parking will be avail-
able at Family Guardian head-
quarters on Village Road.

Supervised child care will be
provided by the Meridian
School.

Interested persons can call
393-4551 to reserve a space.







BB DR David Allen








John S.G e01ge

( Helpsyou coun tdown to Chit bras

“. John S. George

“Here to help, every step of the way!”

CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

Tue Most THOROUGH Restoration & CLEANING Ever, oR THe Jos 1s Free!
Nassau’s ONLY PROFESSIONAL, CERTIFIED Stone Carrer & UpHoLsTery CARE SYSTEMS.




¢ Carpet, Upholstery, Stone and Marble Cleaning &
Restoration Specialist.








¢ Prochem Cleaning Systems removes Deep.& Heavy
Soil, Bacteria, Grease, Watermarks and Stains from
Carpeting & Furniture, restoring them to like new
at a fraction of replacement cost. :






* Carpet, Sofa’s, Loveseats, Chairs, Dining Chairs, Cars,
Boats, Grout, Tiles, Marble & Stone




¢ Persian, Wool & Silk Carpet Cleaning Specialist



* Restoration & Care








Authorized StoneTech Professional Contractor




- YOUR LOCAL MEMBER OF THE-





CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS PROHEM SYSTEM (sm)
PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594 :
ONLY WE CAN DO IT RIGHT!





www.prochemsystem.com * www.stonetechpro.com * www.licrc.org
* psp@coralwave.com *







#






VISA and Master Credit Cards
ices good while supplies last. Sale excludes spr

John §. George Company Limited Main Branch,
Palmdale Shopping Plaza, Madeira Street
_ Phone: 242-322-8421 Fax: 242-328-2067









Suzanne Smith

56

Ne TRACE elt

Member of Sister, Sister Breast Cancer Support Group
Breast Cancer Diagnosis February 1999

Number of years as a survivor 6 years

“Greater is He that is in me
than he that is in the world.”



PMT Ca By ty Be Cancer Awareness Month - October 2005 :



* KNOW your body:
Knowledge is power;

Nobody knows your body better than you do;
Only a few minutes are needed for BSE - it could save your life;
When detected early and treated promptly, breast cancer can be cured.

® Registered Trademark of Kimberly Clark Worldwide, Inc @2005 KCWW

Kotex Tips for Life’

\







PAGE 8, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



2 a ae es eee eee ee
Recovering from Wilma’s wrath

Hersicane Wilma
swept through the

northern Bahamas leaving in its
path death and destruction.
Once again it seems as if Grand
Bahama was hardest hit.

A 15-month-old baby tragi-
cally died in the storm while at
least 100 homes were destroyed
and many more damaged. In
the communities of Pinder’s
Point, Hepburn Town, Bootle
Bay and others in the western
district of Grand Bahama,
blocks of neighbourhoods were
totally levelled.

It was truly a heart-wrenching
sight to walk through these
communities and see people
picking through the rubble
looking for whatever belong-
ings they could salvage.

«I recall one elderly woman’s
daughter shouting to her moth-
er, “Here mom, I found your
photo” and the mother shouting
back, “I was hoping I would

find that.” She then showed me
and others the photo, finding a
bit of humour in the midst of
her tragedy by saying: “This was
me one time ago.” In a modest
attempt at comforting her, I
replied: “That is still you.”

On visiting another home
which was not levelled but
which suffered extensive water
damage, I learned from the 76-
year-old owner that last year
she had suffered similar dam-
age.

She told me that she had not
sought any help from the gov-
ernment but was able to restore
her home and fully furnish it.
Now she was back to the same
place she was following the hur-
ricanes of last year and she did
not know how she would do
what she did before. This story
could be told over and over
again.

Recovering from Wilma’s
wrath will be difficult, psycho-
logically, physically and finan-

STRAIGHT Up TALK



ZA
cially. Many people in Grand
Bahama have yet to fully recov-
er from the storms last year.

The struggling economy of
the nation’s second most popu-
lated island will not make that
recovery easy either. The imme-
diate challenge will be finding
housing for the homeless and
providing them with food, water
and clothing.

QO ver the medium term,
homes must be rebuilt

but the big question will be

‘where? It will be a difficult deci-

sion to rebuild those homes on
the coast, given that these hur-
ricanes are an annual feature of
Bahamian life and the hurri-

Submit a cute photo of your baby ond: you c could WIN
fantastic prizes just in time for Christmas!

Now through December 9 submit a photo with two empty Drypers packs
(any size) and a completed eney form to Lowe’s Wholesale on Soldier Road.

$500.00 cash & a Drypers Club Pack . |

Ze $300.00 cash & a Drypers Club Pack

ze $200.00 cash & a Drypers Club Pack

Twe entries will be chosen every week and they will be
featured in our Bobies do fhe Cufest Things newspoper
ad. These entries will qualify for grand prize drawing
December 16 of Lowe's Pharmacy, Soldier Road and
cnnounsed five on air thaf day beiween 2pm - Love 97, ,

Entry forms available at Lowe's Pharmacy
_ & Super Saver locations



Ensuring your information

is secure

and available

EDUCATION

VARGO



NG

cane season is expected to be
extraordinarily active for some
time to come.

People cannot endure an
annual cycle of destruction and
restoration of their lives and the
country’s resources cannot sup-
port such. Over the long term,
decisions have to be made
about protecting our coastal
areas that have suffered exten-
sive damage.

The absence of vegetation
along the bay areas of many of
our communities has made
them more vulnerable to ero-
sion from harsh weather condi-
tions and have put lives along
the coast more at risk.

Prime Minister Perry Christie
and his team have their work
cut out for them. They saw the
devastation first-hand during
their tour on Tuesday. Their
rapid presence in the affected
areas was a good thing; that
must be followed by a rapid
response to the immediate
needs of the people, who need
shelter, food, water and cloth-
ing.

LA

I was encouraged by some
statements made by

Shane Gibson, who noted that
the government was looking
into hotel and rental accommo-
dation for some of the displaced

to rebuild and/or repair their
homes. This should be done
immediately, especially with
respect to areas where the dam-
age is so clear and complete.
In this regard, it is important
that the government works
closely with hardware suppliers
in Grand Bahama, especially
Freeport, to define a process that
appreciates the unique boud-sys-
tem of the port area and the
operating needs of businesses.

Sâ„¢ people have asked
me if Grand Bahama

’ was done worse by Wilma than

by Jeanne and Frances. I say

yes and no. In terms of the

ings were not issued by the
weather people or by the media
but this much seemed clear to
me - while the weather chan-
nels in Florida kept saying that
Wilma was a dangerous hurri-
cane, no such regular warnings
were heard by me from our
media.

The Florida station, as they
typically do, focused on Florida,
yet given that Wilma’s eye was
passing directly across South
Florida and the storm had:a
200-mile span, I felt that its
impact on the Bahamas, partic.
ularly the northern Bahamas,
would be significant.

As such, I cancelled a speak;
ing engagement in Guyana and



It will be a difficult decision | :
to rebuild those homes on the’
coast, given that these ;

hurricanes are an annual

feature of Bahamian life and
the hurricane season is
expected to be extraordinarily
active for some time to come. .,

island-wide disruption that
occurred from Jeanne and
Frances and the near despera-
tion created at all levels of the
society, Wilma was not worse.
However, in terms of the



It is important that the
government works closely
with hardware suppliers in
Grand Bahama, especially
Freeport, to define a process
that appreciates the unique
| bond-system of the port area
and the operating needs of |

businesses



persons. This makes sense from
many perspectives, most partic-
ularly because it could mean an
immediate source of shelter for
people, the filling of empty
hotel rooms and a slight eco-
nomic boost for the sickly hotel
sector of the island.

As long as the government
carefully defines its budget for
the programme and clearly
defines the rules of the game to
avoid any advantage taking, this
should work out well for those
devastated by the storm.

The government will need to
issue an exigency order for duty
exemption on building supplies
once again for those who need

PRODUCTIVITY
BUSINESS

ELECTROJACK INCREDIBLE CYBERJACK

Town Center Mall

Tel: 356 - 6206/356 - 5971
Fax: 356 - 6206

Mall at Marathon

Tel: 394 - 6254/394 - 6255
Fax: 394- 6211



number of local communities
totally devastated by Wilma, the
storm did affect Grand Bahama
worse. Whatever the situation,
this much is true, Grand
Bahama will endure and its peo-
ple will move on.

WAS OUR WARNING
SYSTEM LACKING?

ravel throughout
Grand Bahama and
you will hear the same thing
over and over again: “The
media seemed to underestimate
Wilma.”
I cannot myself say that warn-






REFRIGERATOR

Model RM46-W

9.6 Cube Feet

ORALEE’S FASHIONS

is having an end of summer g

including formals up to 75% off
Starting Friday, October 28th, 2005

Mackey Street * Telephone: 393-0744
Monday - Saturday 9am - 6pm

QUALITY INSIDE
AND OUT

stayed home to protect my fam
ily and my home. The Florida
warnings made me take. the
storm seriously. I would not
have taken things so seriously
had I only listened to the
Bahamian media because they
gave the impression, for the
most part, that the storm would
not reach the Bahamas with the
severity that it did.

In fact, people who endured
six to seven feet waves on the
southern side of Grand Bahama
felt especially let down that they
did not get more accurate warn-
ings from the media; this accord;

~ ing to many with whom I spoke.

Blame will not be helpful,ta
us in our recovery efforts but
assessing the strength or weak-
ness of our warning system: in
this instance could be. Some-
thing seemed out of place about
the way we prepared for Wilma
and we need to find out what
that was.

In the end, however, every
man and woman who values
life, family and property needs
to be accountable to himself or
herself and get as much infor-
mation as possible in these
stormy seasons and act in their
own best judgment. The fact
that others got things wrong will
not make your loss any easier:

THOUGHT FOR ~~
THE WEEK

[oe which does not
destroy me will make
me better, if I let it. 3

chivargolaing@botmsil.com






APPLIANCES BY FRIGIDAIRE
WE ACCEPT ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS
Montrose Avenue (Just North of Bahamas Bus & Truck Co.)
322-2536 ¢ 325-2040 © 323-7758 © 328-7494



N



se

. Pinder) sat down at the

THE TRIBUNE



Fred Mitchell
responds to
demonstration
| F ROM page one

‘Mr Mitchell was
responding in the House
of Assembly to a demon-
stration of about 300 mem-
bers and supporters of the
BPSU in front of parlia-
ment yesterday. They were
protesting government’s
latest proposal for pay
increases in the new indus-
trial agreement.
“Yesterday BPSU mem-
bers claimed they had
been “tricked and misled”
by government in the new
industrial proposal. How-
ever, according to Mr
Mitchell, discussions in
terms of the “conditions of
the agreement have not
even begun as yet and
therefore I do not under-
stand why union members
are in protest.”

“In respect to the press
conference yesterday
(Tuesday) the negotiators
told him (Mr Pinder) what
the government offer was
in the document that was
some 43 articles. He (Mr

FROM page one

highest priority when spending
public funds.

Bahamas Public Services
Union President John Pinder
and other union leaders led a
protest in against governmen-
t’s latest proposal of a new
industrial agreement in Raw-
son Square.

“As long as we do what is
good we do not fear the con-
sequences. I ran in six consec-
utive elections. I have always
placed myself at the will of the .
people of my constituency
because they are the ultimate
custodians of the future of our
country.

table and thanked the gov-
ernment for their offer,
said he’s very pleased at
it said Mr Mitchell.
“Now normally when an
offer is given to you at the
table you say ‘thank you
very much for this, I will
review it and I’ll come
back and tell you what I
think of it’. However he
(Mr Pinder) said that he
agreed with it, that is until
he-went home and read
it”?
_ According to Mr
Mitchell, Mr Pinder has no
réason to say that he was

FROM page one

LOCAL NEWS

“IT must observe that when I
came to the House this morn-
ing I had no idea of any source
other than Mr Pinder of the
Public Service for industrial
agitation. It is important for
me to say to the people of the
country that it will always be
your choice. I have served a
full political life in parliament
all of the tenants of democracy
I respect, but God knows what
I saw yesterday where men
and women and children were
crying because their homes
and personal possessions were
taken away from them by the
forces of nature. We do not
have the right in this country
to compromise on the relief

they must get,” Mr Christie
said beginning debate on the
second reading of the disaster
preparedness bill.

Mr Christie acknowledged
that there is now a need to
spend more money in the
reconstruction and delivery of
aid to Grand Bahama.

“We spent $8 million of
what we projected to be a $24
million expenditure. That was
not planned for as a result of
Hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne and we are spending as
we speak because we have not
completed the restoration after

hurricanes. Frances and
Jeanne.
“We have completed

Hundreds gather
in Rawson Square

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 9

PM: Grand Bahama suffering
is highest spending priori ty

(restoration) in all the islands
of the Bahamas except for
Grand Bahama. It is important
so far as recovery and recon-
struction is concerned that we
move as quickly as possible to

complete this project or pro-.

jects as quickly as possible,”
said Mr Christie.

The prime minister said that
it is his obligation to ensure
that his people are fully aware
that the country may be “head-
ing to choices”.

- “T have told my Cabinet that
I do not propose as prime min-
ister to increase taxes to the
Bahamian people when IJ have
fought so hard against the
advice of the International



Monetary Fund not to increase
the taxes of the Bahamian peo-
ple,” said Mr Christie.

He pointed out that as prime
minister he does not own the
funds and assets of the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas.

“Tam only a caretaker, my
government only exists with
the full consent and approval
democratically endowed by the
people of this country. It is the
constitutional duty therefore
of the prime minister to always
ensure that the people of the
country know that they may
be called upon to make their
choice,” said the prime minis-
ter. ,

WE PUT A
NEW BATHTUB

OVER YOUR
OLD ONEâ„¢







The Affordable Solution
to Worn-Out Bathtubs .

many BPSU members were also affected by

for demonstration

a balance.

“The workers are not asking government
to turn its back on the victims of the hurri-
cane, but government must also be able to

&
* Bathtub Liners are designed to fit over worn-out bathtubs
*Wall Surrounds to cover existing bath walls: In simulated Tile and Marble
* Shower Base Liners to go over existing. Shower bases
* Cultured Marble Vanity Tops and Sinks
’ * Great Shower Door selection
* Quality Faucets, All-Wood Vanities





www.rebathbahamas.com

déceived.

«This is the governmen-
t’s opening position, in
other words it is the first
proposal. It is not the final
proposal,” he said. “This is
in our view a reasonable
opening position.”

“Mr Mitchell said the
negotiations will continue
in'terms of this agreement. ©



Hurricane Wilma and needed their money now
more than ever.

He said the draft ° industrial
agreement was drawn up before the hurri-
cane occurred.

Leader of the opposition in the House of
Assembly Alvin Smith said that,
while he believes all Bahamians would
agree that victims of Hurricane
Wilma should’be top priority at the moment,
it is the government’s job to strike

dreams with:

e Flexible features to suit your needs
e No hidden fees
e Competitive interest rates

Let us help make your dreams come true!

Call or visit your nearest RBC Royal Bank of Canada branch

for more details.

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean

@® Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada

RBC

deal with its employees in a fair and amica-
ble manner,” he said.

Mr Carter, however, emphasised that
although this is a time when government is
concerned foremost about the country’s
economy and the affect Hurricane Wilma
will have on Grand Bahama and several of
the Family Islands, the goals regarding the
BPSU remain in achieving “fairness and
equity.”






Telephone

(242) 393-8501



E*BATH BAHAMA

“Bahamas Only One-day Bath Remodeler”

Visit our Showroom & Office located at the Red Carpet Inn,












“Authorized Dealer”
East Bay Street

POLO JEANS CO, RALPH LAUREN

_GANAE. GET INVOLVED. VOLUNTEER. EXCEED.

Summer Clearence

40% to 50% off

Womens Jeans Saturday

Womens Jeans Saturday

Womens fashion jeans

Men’s Jeans Brixton

Royal Bank

â„¢ The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada -

RBC mes canada

Men’s Jeans Fashion Brixton

men’s & women

Reg $54 Now $32
Reg $66 Now $34
All 50% off

Reg $60 Now $39
Reg $93 Now $54

Mens’ & women clearance 50% off |





PAGE 10, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005





DOCTORS HOSPITAL

HIP AND KNEE

REPLACEMENT
CONSULTATIONS

Date: Wednesday, November 2
Time: 3:00pm — 8:00pm

FOR AN APPOINTMENT

CALL 302-4684

And he had one here.

Do you have daily joint pain? Do you
suffer from severe Osteoarthritis? Does
your pain affect your daily activities?
‘Do you have stiffness of your knee
or hip joint?

Dr. Jimmy Lee M.D., F.A.C.S.,
Orthopedic and Total Joint
Replacement Surgeon will be
conducting his monthly Total Joint
(hip and knee) Replacement
Consultations at the Doctors Hospital
Sessional Clinic. Join the many
patients who lead an active lifestyle
and now live pain free.

For more information, or to schedule
an appointment call Doctors Hospital’s
Sessional Clinic at (242) 302-4684.

wee DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Think. Feel. Drive.

Our parts department is- fully stocked, with every component to ensure
that your vehicle runs trouble free Trained technicians on duty.

TYREFLEX STAR MOTORS

‘Products you know, People vou (rust.
BPE 3.496 1

Health For Life







NST mae Telephone:



Impreza 1.6 Sedan
Equipped with unbelievable power.
All weather grip, all wheel drive.
Fuel efficient, cool and sporty.

$18,999"

LE OLLIE LEE EOE EE LEASES IEEE ARIE ILE ELLE LEELA LEIS

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

GRAND Bahamians are no
strangers to the destructive

_ power of hurricanes.

Last year, the island was
ravaged by two of the Atlantic
season’s most formidable
storms.

However, few Grand
Bahamians seemed to have
been prepared for the utter
ruin left in the wake of Hurri-
cane Wilma — a mere catego-
ry two storm.

According to local weather
experts, the fact that Wilma
approached from the south
may go a long way to explain-
ing the extent of the damage.

Tropical storm systems
usually form off western
Africa and travel across the
Atlantic to threaten the north
coast of Grand Bahama.

Like Katrina and Rita before
it however, Hurricane Wilma
formed in the Caribbean.

The storm initially moved
into the Gulf of Mexico and
after ravishing the Yucatan
Peninsula, headed for the
southern coast of Grand
Bahama.

Experts say this area of the
island is particularly vulnera-
ble: unlike the north coast,

which is skirted by the

Atlantic Ocean, southern

Grand Bahama is. bordered

by shallow banks which allow
destructive storm surges to
gain momentum.

And some experts believe
that the changing global cli-
mate means that the
Bahamas will continue to face
unfamiliar hurricane scenar-
ios in the future.

Photos by Felipé Major/

Tribune staff

SUBARU







@ THIS coffin lies broken and open in Eight Mile Rock after it was shattered by a storm

surge

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Multistore, Retail Company offering career opportunities.

Store Managers:

Minimum 3 years experience .

Organizational and supervisory skills essential
Computer experience required

Merchandising aptitude/experience — an asset
Ability to work flexible hours

Competitive benefit package with medical

Salary commensurate with experience

Senior Sales Staff:
Minimum 3 years experience
Computer experience essential |
Merchandising experience/aptitude — an asset
Sales driven personality
Competitive benefit package with medical
Salary commensurate with experience

Warehouse Manager:
Minimum 3 years experience in:
receiving/processing/inventory management
Computer experience necessary
Organizational and supervisory skills essential .
Some flexibility in operating hours required
Compeniye benefit package

Drivers/Equipment Assembly Personal:
Current drivers license — 3 years minimum — experience
in both manual and automatic vehicles
Ability to assemble basic mechanical consumer products
Some flexibility in operating hours required
Competitive benefit package

Please send resume to:

c/o DA 2167
The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas





THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 11











@ (Left) TWO girls sit down
in two chairs which they found
by their former home in
Pinders Point and stare in
shock at the wreckage

OFFICE PREMISES FOR RENT
AT LYFORD MANOR
LYFORD CAY

* approx. 1,300 s.f.
* fully fitted out
* 1,2 or 3 offices, secretarial pool,
utility/filing room




(Below) A YOUNG boy :

sits near what remains of his ; * Shared conferen eee VE
home in Eight Mile Rock, c 2e oom/library,
while behind him a woman : bathrooms and kitchenette

tries to salvage her
possessions

3 * Ready for occupancy
- Contact: 362-5787 for details

TTS
Pr ae se

SALE

e Fashion Hand Bags
e Dresses

e Pants Suits

e Ladies Underwear
e Hats

e Scarfs

e Fashion Jewelr ai

° * e e
e Cosmetics Except Toiletries 20% OFF

WOMAN’S VARIETY

Bay Street, three doors est of Elizabeth Avenue
° Nassau Telephone: 326-6988

BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

. BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established
_ international private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland,
is presently seeking a Bahamian national for the position of

ACCOUNTANT

-, Reporting to the Deputy Financial Controller, the Accountant must i
a Certified Public Accountant or hold a similar BICA-approved certification,
: with at least three years’ post-qualification experience at an international
- bank. The successful candidate should have an in-depth understanding
_ of all aspects of the general ledger, be familiar with current banking

: regulations in relation to local and international reporting requirements, | Our responsi bi ity

» investment funds, trusts and be able to meet strict deadlines.

“ The job requires the individual to

' 2 x s , s ;:
record, analyse and prepare financial statements for use by . Brake Service SUSHEnSiOn d Aignment Exhaust
management and other regulatory bodies in accordance with BSIOB’s Oil, Lube 4 Filler GOODVEAR TYRES"

policies and procedures
supervise a small trust department, liaising with Searaueinen and

statutory authorities on accounting and reporting issues *American & Imported Cars Light Tucks Vans & SUV's

organise and control the timely payment of duly authorised expenses

of BSIOB for services and goods received * Complete Inspection & Estimates Before we start the work

act for the Deputy Financial Controller and Financial Controller if and
when required LOCATIONS 10 SERVE 0
prepare and analyse

Bey io Be Sc anit at oe MACKEY ST. & ROOSEVELT AVENUE © EAST ST. & SOLDIER RD
eee ees ~ Tel: 398-6651 or 393-6693 ‘Tel 356-2940 or 356-2941
reports for the Central Bank of The Bahamas and Securities

Commission of The Bahamas | | Open: Monday - Saturday
Resumes should be faxed to #702 1253 or mailed or delivered to the Sam-opmn

offices of BSI, addressed to :-.
Personnel Officer Fax 326-4865 * P 0. Box $S-6766 Nassau, Bahamas: /
BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited __ AUTO SYSTEM EXPERTS Se )

Bayside Executive Park, W. Bay St. & Blake Road i ne
P. O. Box N-7130 =

Nassau, Bahamas : "Midas is a business based on service, quality and reliability.
hy Factory scheduled maintenance is car care.

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE) Peverre Midas services your car fully. Our system takes the guesswork
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted. hy out of auto care for every car model out there





PAGE 12, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005



BACARDI & COMPANY LIMITED

Bacardi & Company Limited is seeking
candidates for the position of

Assistant Controller of Finance.

The Company has been based in Nassau for over 40 years with
significant manufacturing operations in the areas of bulk rum
production and bottling of various spirit beverages, primarily for
export markets.

The Assistant Controller will be responsible for leading the budgeting
and analysis functions within the Finance department. While
reporting to the Financial Controller the incumbent will be required
to plan and implement the annual budget and quarterly revised
estimate processes across the entire organisation. In addition the
successful candidate is expected to manage the budget reporting
submissions into the parent company including treasury forecasts.
Other key duties include the performance of quarterly financial
statement variance analysis and management of our global product
costing system.

The successful candidate must hold a professional designation
with ten (10) to fifteen (15) years experience.

A CA or CPA designation is preferred.
Furthermore the individual must possess the ability to work
independently under pressure to consistently meet deadlines.
Must be a self starter and a team player.

Salary and benefits are commensurate with experience.

Interested candidates should forward copies of their curriculum
vitae directly to the Bacardi & Company Limited P.O. Box N-4880,
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas. =~
Attention The Human Resources Manager

Information may also be forwarded via e-mail to
dacartwright@bacardi.com

Application Deadline: October 28, 2005

BACARDI AND THE BAT DEVICE ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF BACARDI & COMPANY LIMITED

THE TRIBUNE



Freeport



in shoc

at the destruction

,



& THIS house was completely moved and thrown 50ft from its foundations in Eight Mile Rock,

along with the car that now lies in the debris

Join

Dr. Myles Munroe

and guest speakers _

from around

the world as

theyhelpyou :

todevelop “THE SPIRIT OF INNOVATIVE LEADERSHIP”

ert 461-6400 to ering

| COORDINATOR FOR
THE MATERNITY UNIT

QUALIFICATIONS

e Registered Nurse/Registered Midwife with
BSN degree MBA/MHA preferred

e Minimum 5 years nursing/midwifery
experience required

® Minimum 2 years managerial experience in a
hospital setting required

¢ Computer literate

e Excellent written and oral communication
skills

e Excellent interpersonal skills

POSITION SUMMARY
The successful candidate will:

° Be responsible for the cost-effective
implementation of total patient-care for
Maternity Unit;

¢ Provide direct supervision and evaluation of
nursing staff to meet the patients' needs;

¢ Coordinate the support services and resources
to facilitate patient care and smooth
functioning of the Maternity Unit.

Salary commensurate with experience
Excellent benefits -

Please submit resume to: The Human Resources Department
Doctors Hospital | P.O. Box N-3018 1 Nassau, Bahamas





-PAGE 13, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005 THE TRIBUNE









THIS cemetery in Eight Mile Rock by the coast lies in a shambles after Hurricane Wilma has
. taken its toll 3






Ye satneonaannngtive

KIA MOTORS

The Power to Suprise

eo — Thompson Boulevard, Oakes Field, Nassau, Bahamas, P.O. Box GT-2947
Tel: 326-6377, 326-6464/5, 326-0013/4, 326-6382 ¢ Fax: 326-6315
imal sanput vehicles a cocawaye. com.









a

‘The Only Questi

iis

She has yet to learn her ABC’s but that doesn’t matter. When it’s
time for her to go to college, she won't have to worry about whether
we can afford it or not. With a plan from Colinalmperial, we know
that we can give her the education she needs to succeed. Harvard,
Oxford, University of The Bahamas? The choice will be hers...but a
college education is definitely in her future!

a Colinalmperial.

Insurance Ltd.

Confidence for Life



ve
~_,
4



PAGE 14, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005 THE TRIBUNE

fe.









Beginning the slow
rk of rebuilding

2
.












Features for 1.6 litre model include: automatic Features for 1.8 litre model include: automatic
transmission, air conditioning, power windows, transmission, air conditioning, power windows,
locks & mirrors, immobiliser and CD player. locks & mirrors, immobiliser and remote keyless

. entry, alloy wheels, dual airbags, leather
upholstery and CD changer.

TOYOTA

Backed by the only 3-year/60,000 mile warranty in the Bahamas

: Colli S 6
EXECUTIVE Oper: Mon to Fa am "3a0 pm
MOTORS LID Tel: 322-6705/6 © Fax: 322-6714 4

E-mail: execmotor@batelnet.bs
AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER | Salesperson: Pam Palacious,
Parts and service guaranteed | Barry Pinder, Terrol Cash











Ata eae





wee Pees ese : a’
i NET Ye PWN *excluding items on consignment
as i Monday Oct 24




AND ACCESSORIES - : thru Saturday Nov 5

Ladders, Brushes,
Rollers and more!




POWEITDOLS (00 TN 2A rice

DEWALT [cE

High Performance Industrial Toota Power Tools








Power Tools

fly MACKS.DECKER Ta , —_ : : | AAA TAATOA c




This position requires an individual who is dependable, detail
oriented, well organized and is efficient working in a team

SUG USAR GUL Ue < eaa
Tee eee —— 7 . Protecto-Coat environment. }

VR p TY
Bre es Ge Qtek | Responsibilities include:
“ne Pa cs 4
fee: ; r Gar OF ITEMS ( be e Preparation of monthly financial statements

Ti LE ACC ES SO Ri ES $1 >) Ca ° Preparation of budgets and forecasts

'e Processing of accounts receivable, accounts payable and payroll
THIN-SET, GROUT & ADHESIVES, TOOLS ¢ Working with the external auditors and reporting to the Directors
Ceramic Tile

starts at $1.15 per sq. ft.













Requirements





¢ Minimum of 5 years experience in bookkeeping/accounting’
e Prior supervisory experience

¢ Excellent oral and written communication skills

° General computing skills

* Knowledge of Insurance and processing of claims










Salary will be commensurate with experience.






Mural | BUILDING SUPPLIES LUMBER & PLUMBING
Cow Manure $5.45 nett WULFF ROAD (OPP. MACKEY ST.) WILTON ST. (NEXT TO DW DAVIS)
CN SU Mee eur TEL: 393-8006 OR 393-8225 TEL: 325-3507 OR 394-0641

cNuggets $3.95 nett :
ie STORE HOURS: 7:00am - 4:00pm Monday - Friday ° Saturday 7:00am - 3:00pm

OLLI LR ES ETE IPE PE ES SELES PEPE mSrTe er ant soe

Please send your resume and salary requirements to:



Bookkeeper/Accountant : .
P.O. Box N-529 ”
Nassau, Bahamas







il THIS man walks through the remains of a house in E
Rock to see what is left after Hurricane Wilma





SRG LeBBESOP pet BEER AHP ATES ROOST eB OS SER SU RET DH SARE TR

osturepecic

Support you trust, Comfort





row ll lov









AVAILABLE AT FINE FURNITURE STORES
THROUGHOUT THE GAHAMAS







Donald's Furniture - 322-3875 » Best Buy Furniture - 394-2378
Roberts Furniture - 322-8862 * Palmdale Furniture - 322-3703 |
The Sleep Gallery - 327-5338 * Home Furniture - 322-8646
Wood You Furniture - 325-9663 ¢ Bahama Beds - 394-8015





QAP Ete Ease te efi dee Be eH sa god ef ce te i 2 ES Se

@ THIS Haitian national a ere 3 = vo yee
holds on to a house which was a Se ; (242)-352-66 | i
uprooted during Hurricane ee
Wilma in Pinders Point

© 2005 ADWORKS












Affordable,
Spacious,
& pietelie



aie sshd at $30, 000
Down payments -
as low as S $3, 000

‘Monthly payments
starting at $327

Interior lots
average 17,400sq. ft.)

Approval within hours

hee CSDATENO HE Loy Gornysete: tees at. sie



UNG and suparsielis Any aid all Corsiilunlegdors
Ben Yau and whe developer ot iia reproscniative.



call before 2 na pens

You'll want to admit youre over thirty if you insure with us!

We offer reduced rates for drivers over thirty, plus emergency

roadside service, and etched ID numbers on your windshield

for instant identification if your car is st °>. Call us for
further details.

nassau t 242.328.7888 f 242.325.3151

freeport t 242.352.4564 f 242.352.5118 is ae ot
www.rsabahamas.com





PAGE 16, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005 THE TRIBUNE

LA Ei rien 3 aoe tones cerwsee nn '

RETNA TEE PSP SNR RPL PIERS RA ARLE AGE ILENE TIESTO BIT AG yA MPR PINUS EPAIPTIN ELODIE INEM BPW IET AYA A PURELY ETI A





a | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 17

THE TRIBUNE







_ “Our advertising needs to reach as many
shoppers as possible. When considering
newspapers, The Tribune is the first choice;
it offers coverage that drives our sales.

The Tribune is my newspaper.”

LEAH DAVIS

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
SOLOMON’S SUPERCENTRE





\
4





PAGE 18, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005 come UNE

ea hs TNT LEN





LOCAL NEWS



«

a « sf

Kerzner makes furniture donation {20
to assist in hurricane relief effort “oe

Sum lars

KERZNER International Development he wae - »" ”
Limited donated two containers full of fur-
niture to the National Emergency Manage-
ment Agency (NEMA) on Monday, October
17.

According to Kerzner, the donation is part.
of the company’s ongoing efforts to assist
the Bahamas and is to be distributed to per-
sons who were affected by last year’s hurri-
canes throughout the Family Islands.

The furniture, which included colourful
lounge chairs, sofas, drapery and lamps, was
off-loaded by a group of workers and hand-
ed over to NEMA.

Last September, Kerzner International
Bahamas Limited donated $1 million to the
National Disaster Relief Fund following the
devastation caused by Hurricane Frances.

Tino Clarke of Kerzner Development pre-
sented the furniture to Daniel .Ferguson,
materials management consultant at NEMA.

“We are very pleased to make this dona-
tion because there are a lot of people still suf-
fering and still without certain necessities a
year later after the hurricanes of last year
which really hurt the Bahamas,” Clarke said.

“It gives us great pleasure to be able to
help alleviate the suffering and give back to
the community as much as we can.”

He explained that the donation is.a part of
an on-going exercise which coincides with the
renovation of Atlantis.

Clarke pointed out that the resort is
putting in new furniture and rather than dis-
card the original furniture, the company.
thought it best to give it to people that can
use it.

“It’s a win-win situation. We are improv-
ing the product for Atlantis for our guests
and at the same time we are helping the

people of the Bahamas that are suffering
still from the hurricanes,” stated Clarke. @ KERZNER International presents NEMA with furniture to assist persons affected by last year’s itipelaba:

Ferguson said the furniture will be put to _—- Pictured are O’Neil Meadows of Pinders Custom Brokerage; Daniel Ferguson, materials management
good use and thanked Kerzner Internation- consultant with NEMA; Tino Clarke of Kerzner International Development; and Drexon Thompson,
al for its assistance. supervisor with Kerzner Development. i

“Copyrighted Material
i Syndicated Content
i Available from Commercial News Providers”



a STAT MQ aia
BS eed BD sor di

WPL

MAP Mm UA ERT ORE
TULL (eh

Seema w nauk UC) Oy
Sales: in our ei plus Se



AT WULFF ROAD











hachadd sald applic
carburetor or fuel inpatient
Settings —












PATROL a NRA nN NR LR rar

‘Front Brake Job

ESA RNAS IESE DTA AANA ROSA UT NUR

SPECIAL PRICE:








SPECIAL PRICE:

UU

sistaxengueseuanesnias a

Muffler Installation

SPECIAL PRICE:






AEN RYAN ANSP RY SAS OIE ANIA PAA NEE ANEARUANA

“AC System — Charge
(COMPLETE)

"ca aS RRRE NARNIA a

SPECIAL PRICE:





Includes; Welding






( olinton::
tebour




nr Meena SAN ASD ANE RN SN

Drive Shaft Installation

SPECIAL PRICE:





Includes:
Labour for complete Drive Shaft












Tlech Transmission |
\_ Aut Change

SPECIAL PRICE: eae :

ee Machine



he 14 au of. Texaco Tansnission Fluid



A.LD. ~— Automotive & industrial Distributors
Wulff Road, Nassau, The Bahamas | Phone: 393-7481 | Fax: 393-4258





i
j
I
g

We | ‘ ;
Bahamas Frat oneal Insurance AutoSate * A.LD. www.aidbahamaislands.com
pO see* ae Freeport, Marsh Harbour, Rock Sound, —_‘ Nicholl’s Town, George Towa,
| oon a Grand Bahama Abaco Elauthera Andros Exuma

i

© 32-8071 367-2077 334-2060 329-4184 336-2780

Ca AAR ROPE OAOAER



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OC IOBEH 2/7, 2UUD, FAUE 1Y

INTERNATIONAL NEWS



German court rules in tavour
ish heirs who lost

of Tew

Copyrighted Material,,;<

retay pekeasec

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”




_ GREAT WESTERN .
CONVENIENCE STORE

LE

October 24th - November 7th




$29.95



1.12 pe Router Bit Set





2. 24V. Cordless Hammer Drill $98.95



3, 350 Watt Power Inverter $72.95




4.7 1/4” Carbide Tip Saw Blades $ 8.95
$9.95
$107.00






5. 3 pc Wood Chisel Set





6. Complete Toilet Set
' (Tank, Bowl & Seat)

AND
MUCH
MORE!!!

Your One Step Shop”
OPEN 7 DAYS

TEL: (242) 323-4375
St. Alban’s-Drive (East)













THE MALL At
MARATHON

hag a treat for you this
Halloween at our

TRICK OR TREAT



Trick or Treat







Monday, October 31
4pm - 7pm
RS Costume required
Fe Children under 10

ce














Wery’s

IN ADELAIDE
| RESTAURANT & BAR

We are Open again!!!

¢ Native Dishes
¢ Fine Wines
¢ Daiquiris & Good Drinks

Rake & Scrape
on the patio

friday’s
ONLY!

Open 11am to 11pm
Except Mondays (CLOSED)

362-1547



BAY STREET -
P.O. BOX N-1411 NASSAU, BAHAMAS _

PHONE (242) 322-1179

50% OFF HOUSEHOLD LINENS| |
CLEARANCE SALE!

(“Regular prices)

(Credit Cards 45% Off) .

-¢ Table Clothes e Runners ¢ Doilies
¢ Pillow Cases |

e Shower Curtains and much more -

Harbour Bay
393-6923
Marathon Mall

393-4146

Madeira Plaza
322-7647
Robinson Road
322-3213

+) ehdebbhecdehecia tS
3



=,
fag gn?

Proudly Serving the Bahamian People since 1 974.

Thursday, 27th October~
thru
Saturday, 5th November prsener a items





SAV.A.CHEK ‘Extra-Special’: on each item you purchase, over
THe yop YY a dollar, with One filled SAV.A.CHEK certificate get a Dollar Off!

REDEEM your SAV-A-CHEK now at:
Johns S George, Sandys, Epic Battery, GNC,
Home Fabrics, Godetts Jewelry.
FREEPORT: Dolly Madison Home Centre, GNC, Epic ey eau Time rere

STORE MON. - SAT. 7:30AM - 9:00PM Extra Extra!

HOURS: SUN.: 7:00AM - 12:00PM °¢ 7:00AM - 2: oe vARSOUR B87 ONL! SAV.A. CHEK Special!





UTE AEG i a aT

Sen, | CHUNK LITE
Boost | TUNA WATER

66 - OZ
5G" AS
of , WHOLE p HH EEASYIRON-
DOG FOOD 3 CORN | ~ | NONSTICK STARCH

17.5 LBS . 29 -OZ 20 - OZ

$479

MEAL SUPPLEMENT




















TOMATOES







ROMAI ues DL LEE FRESH CUT MINI
S$ 49 fy = ARTS CHESSE-N-CRACKERS 24 - 02Z....... 7 Salon TURKEY Pp ORK
EACH eae EACH || LIBBY’S PICNIC | WINGS RIBS







VIENNA SAUSAGE
REGULAR & CHX EACH. esssssssessssees



“MIX-N-MATCH
RED, SEEDLESS &GLOBE POTATOES -
JUMBO GRAPES

$ q@ 99
s4°e a 1







CRACKING
GOOD BIG 60 .









LIM ES pad =" ASSTD COOKIES 24 - PK cssssssssssesesens ,
|\47S4°C2, = $4 49,, || s8








COCONUT WATER 6 - PK....





PRESTIGE




NATURE VALLEY |
GRANOLA BARS ASSORTED 12-pak.$3.99
















SIRLOIN

SPREAD “SLICE CHEESE REGULAR | SIRLOIN

$j so eS ough

BEEF PHONE

9 |$ 99

LB.







CADBURY
CHOCOLATES





pepe a ahs ASSTD BISCUITS
YOGURTS AND BA GLES ASSORTED 4.5 - OZ.-sceseeesssesnteessses
2/3 4 49 oz > “4+ re oz DELMONTE




FRUIT CUPS PEACHES, MIX FRUIT &
CHERRY 11.5 - OZ.essessesssssersessnseeeseenns





w/D ERIDGE FARM

CORN ON LAYER CAKES
THE COB ASST ca
S$Q42 12 - ee S3s2 19-02







REYNOLDS |
STANDARD FOIL 24-FT eeserecsesenerseerens 1249





ROTISSERIE . MACARONI





w/D WINN-DIXIE GWALLNEY CHICKEN SALAD
ASSTD REG &
MIX VEGETABLES ICE CREAM HOT DOGS OR BOLOGNA EACH....... a $8 ‘4 22 EACH Sap29 EACH
| +4 fee oz $s rhage :

POWER BUYS
LIBBYS




fe ara AS
EVERCANE

POWER BUYS
CARIBBEAN

POWER BUYSE
PAR-EXCELLENCE | -






CARDINAL
EVAPORATED >

AQUA PURE



CORNED CHUNK LITE | | PARBOILED)
SUGAR BEEF ao TUNA (WATER)|| RICE |







$4 s9

POWER BUYS

$429

POWER BUYS POWER BUYS H POWER led



POWER BUYS



1POWER BUYS























ROBIN HOOD | | FRANCO AMERICAN KELLOGS ‘QUAKER ACT 11
FLOUR) | sxcncmn, | CORN. | SSSare>" |atacorenen| ROE CORN,
& Mego ok FLAKES One WEDDING OATS ASSORTED
5-LBS 14.75 ae tl
3 99 z ss a S 19
4 °es2 E°®'2 || sgoe






TOOTHPASTE} | RICH TEA = CAKE | |KETCHUP
REGULAR _ BUSCUITS FROSTINGS | MIXES || Botte



$959 $499) |\s- 79s -4 72



THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 21
INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Lebanese military

sieps up pressure

against pro-Syrian
Palestinian militants





Viountain basc
6s surrounded

“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”



° Buy any two participating items and have a cashier

: verify products re a -

‘© Put your name and phone number on the back of receipt

_anddropinentry boxes provided :
Winners announced Wednesday, 30 November on Love 97

pe



balan oe
oat EFS:



eae

ae

‘pr eters

atthe «Oe eo

SN eT

"RBC ROVAL BANK OF CANADE

DS \\ RS
BS IA LVS SNG ROR QING ANY
ee
is considering applications for _
Customer Service

S CONSE ere OY
Representative

YSIS SARS
EC
(Part-time with opportunities for full-time employment)

gaa aoa aaa aaa aa

The successful candidate should possess the
following qualifications:
e¢ A minimum of four BGCSE with “C” or above
passes (including Math and English).
At least two or more years banking experience.
Previous experience as a Customer Service
Representative would be an asset
Key skills include: customer-oriented,
communications, confidentiality, initiative and
pro-activity and must be a team player.
Must be computer literate.
Must be able to maximize opportunity spotting
with all customers to enhance referrals, sales
activities and contribute to customer care.

as coassresceasciascassc



HOURS OF WORK:
Regular Weeks Sign-Out
Time

BS
S
S
S
i
E
RB
:
iS
;
S
5
;
4
FE
iS
f
SS
Ss
RS
R
:
e
Rf
S
:
:
S
:
Fe

Monday-Thursday 11:00am
Friday 11:00am

Total Hours

Government

Pay Week
Monday-Thursday
Friday

Total Hours

A competitive compensation package (base salary
& bonus) will commensurate with relevant
experience and qualifications.

Please apply before November 4, 2005 to:

The Manager
Human Resources

Bahamas & Caribbean .
Royal Bank of Canada The Tribune wants to hear

P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas from people who are
making news in their

Via fax: (242)328-7145 : neighbourhoods. Perhaps
Via email: bahcayjp@rbc.com q a are raising funds fac a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





AOR,



Ps

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean RBC

Royal Bank

© Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada d =
* The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada} LOY of Canada



BS





_ PAGE 22, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005 THE TRIBUNE.
INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Suicide bombing in
sraeli town kills five





HALSBURY
CHAMBERS
Counsel and Attorneys-at-Law

Notaries Public —

Presents

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

Free Legal Clinic
“Information You Need
For the Life You Want”

opt me oe

Saturday October 29
Halsbury Commercial Centre



JOB OPPORTUNITY
PHOTO/VIDEO MANAGER

The successful candidate is expected to be responsible for the
smooth and efficient operation of a photo and video department.

Village Road North

9:15 am
Special Guest Speaker (prior to start of Legal Clini)
Justice Emmanuel Osadebay
Author of ‘Labour Laws of The Bahamas’







Responsibilities:




¢ Supervision and training of staff within the department.
- © Promote photo and video sales to guests.
* Ordering of photographic and video supplies.
¢ Maintenance of all photographic and video equipment.
° Keep abreast of the latest see oa eeyclonaent in the
industry.

Skills: :

¢ Excellent interpersonal skills.

¢ Excellent managerial skills.

* Excellent oral and written communication skills.

* Strong organizational and implementation skills.

¢ A team player with the ability to-work independently.
¢ Ability to work in a fast paced environment.

Knowledge and Education:

¢ A minimum of five years experience in a managerial capacity.
eA euch in photography and/or related field.








Facilitator aes Time*” i
Mr. Terrance Knowles 9:45 am | Contractor Responsibilities
Mr. Ehurd Cunningham = — 10:15am _ Stamp Tax Act 2005
Mr. Philip Simon “1115.am Importance of Networking
Mr. Malcolm Martini 11:30am National & Local Planning |
Mr. Vaughn Delaney 12:00 pm Confidentiality and
| | Identity Theft






Apply in writing to:
The Human Resources Manager.
‘Box SS-5490
Nassau, The Bahamas




Group presentations, individual discussions, a rare opportunity.
Lawyers available for information until 5 pm —
Call 393-4551 to reserve your seat. Space is limited!
Free parking courtesy of Family Guardian, Village Road
Free child care activities supervised by the staff of The Meridian School




Applications must be received no later than October 27, 2005.



HUGE SALE © psi

MASSIVE PRICE REDUCTIONS... IT ALL MUST GO!
| SALE ENDS OCTOBER 31ST

The Endellion String Quartet

Monday, October 31st, 2005 at 8:00pm_
GOVERNMENT HOUSE BALLROOM

Tuesday, November Ist, 2005 at 12:00noon
CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL

Box Office: A.D. Hanna & Co: 322-8306
Nassau Music Society: 327-7668
Tickets: Monday Concert: Members; $25,
Non-Members: $35
Students: $5
Tuesday Concert: $15, Students: Free
www.nassaumusicsociety.com





THE TRIBUNE | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 23

INTERNATIONAL NEWS:

Florida’s long lines for supplies



a. - —



Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa

SECURITY & LOSS PREVENTION
MANAGER

Sandals is seeking a suitable qualified applicant with
‘drive and ambition to fill the position of Security &
‘Loss Prevention Manager.








“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”








Key selection criteria include:

¢ Sound knowledge on preventive Security principles
& practices.

* Service as a Royal Bahamas Police or Defense
Force.

¢ ‘A Minimum of three years as Head of A private
Security Services.

¢ Knowledge of Microsoft Word, Excel and Internet
applications.

¢ Hospitality loss and prevention experience; _

° Ability to Train /Supervise and work with a team

concept;

Disaster Management Training/ Basic Accounting.













Excellent benefit package offered.





Interested persons should send resumes with cover
letter to:






Human Resources
P.O. Box CB-13005
Nassau.

cmajor @srb.sandals.com









P 9. BOX 8S. 6321 TEL: (242) ¢ 324-7302
BERNARD ROAD @. (242) 324-8147 ers.
NASSAU, BAHAMAS "FAX: (243) ‘32atB086 es

OCTOBER ON




All Asian Pots
Huge Selection





‘Tne fine line of General Electric appliances found at Geoffrey Jones cater to today’s busy households
and fit every lifestyle. Our wide variety of GE appliances are designed to suite your needs, providing the

ultimate in convenience, performance and style. With the best that technology has to offer, competitive

SUONEPY BANEAD sQ0zZO

pricing and a full service department, Geoffrey Jones is your ultimate appliance centre.

You'll wonder how you ever got along without It.

elcome at sternite Department Rosetta & Montgomery Streets | 322-2188/9 [eV ¥ Yore)





PAGE 24, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005

THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL NEWS



EU says dangerous bird flu strain found in

os

LYFORD FINANCIAL CENTRE
‘OFFICE PREMISES FOR RENT



UPPER FLOOR PREMISES

3,600 SQUARE FEET FOR FIT-OUT BY 1 OR 2 TENANTS

12 ont PARKING SPACES INCLUDET

AUTOMATIC STANDBY GENERATOR

HURRICANE WINDOWS

ELEVATOR

oo CALL MIKE KLONARIS



AT:

(W) 362.5787 OR (H) 362.4124

® Midnight Eyeliner Bene

¢ Botanical Clay Masque

¢ Botanical Skin Purifier UN

¢ FF Logo Keychain .

_@ Leopard Print Cosmetic Bag

With SPF 15- Sun feet: 100% Oil and Fragrance Free
Provides excellent coverage without the look

or feel of wearing makeup.

$23

Also Vitamin E enriched lipsticks
in new shades of Reckless, Rampage and Rebel.
$14

Mall at Marathon
Palmdale
Port Lucaya, Freeport

One Gift Per Customer
while Supplies Last

Bay Street
Sandyport

AL
ra



Facts, Pare

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

*@ eres T beer of

CAOVGHCC
elelies

Clearan

g
Cc
g

Cc

Accredited - Registered - Re

Call us at Ph: 394-8570 « Or Fax: 394-8623
DU Or visit us at www.sdc.edu

information and registration or at Gold Circle House, East Bay Street.





iMG wowune (HUMOWAT, Gu iUbEM a,, 2009, brow...





INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Croatia: new outbreak discovered in Chi






a
“Copyrighted Material

- Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”




INITIATE LAUNCH

Sit here and the count down begins, check the chrome ringed barrel like performance gauges, adjust the flush mounted
audio and climate controls to your desired settings, and make sure you establish the proper mood with the industry
. first driver contifurable MyColour instrument panel lighting that allow you to select your own colour dash lighting.

Thoroughly modern and unmistakably MUSTANG, its always all systems go in here.

¢ Power Chairs | oe 2005 Ford Mustang, standard shift / leather, loaded

Bs Oa © Mobili
The Tribune wants to hear Scooters Special Cash Price $33, 384, 00

| from people who are | Coc 86° Lift Chairs | ,
c cmaen® Wheel Chairs | qr) of 2005 Ford Mustang automatic / leather and loaded —
at , : Special Cash eo $05 400.0

neighbourhoods. Perhaps
Lic & bpestion to birthday, floor mats, full tank of gas, 3 year roadside assistance first 5 services to 12000 miles free.

you are raising funds fora | | pelt oer aa , |
good cause, campaigning F J _ | 3 year or 36000 mile warranty

for improvements in the
‘area or have won an
award, mo. Ve | ds
‘Ifo, call us on 322-1986 | ert hE RENE LID. | | _ THOMPSON BOULEVARD « TEL.: 356-7100 + FAX: 328-8094

cand share your story. i { ee re F oe 8am - 5pm ° ee 394. 4i47- 50

ag

see the full line of all your favourate FORDS at

Come seé our showroom at



a Kitten Formula

@ Original Formula

@ Indoor Formula

| @ Seafood Medley

Grand Bahama: :

ate eHill — Harbour = Port me Queen's Highwa
a 39983938300." T3400 252.3802





PAGE 26, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005 ye THE TRIBUNE





| NASSAU es
Caves Village, Shirley Street, Independence Highway, JFK Drive, Cable Beach Roundabout,

Bers Cay

: GRAND BAHAMA | 7
RND Plaza, Queen’s Highway, Seahorse Plaza

ABACO - =

Queen Elizabeth Drive, Marsh Harbour |
ELEUTHERA & HARBOUR ISLAND

Butler & Sands Governor’s Harbour, Bayside Liquor Store-Harbour Island, Jean’s Bay-
Harbour Island

-KUMA

John Marshall-George Town

BIMINI

Butler & Sands-Alice Town | : ah

WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. NO FURTHER DISCOUNT APPLICABLE ON THESE ITEMS. moe
“\ SE DRINK RESPONSIBLY. eee











TTHURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005

SECTION





business@tribunemedia.net



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street





Money Safe.
Money Fast.

interactional Money Transtar

[® Bank of The Bahamas

INTERNATILONAL

Gniline at
BenkBahamasOniine.com



Roof product

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he founder of a company estab-
lished to distribute the Dura Slate
Bermuda Roof product in this
nation believes that “its proven
ability to withstand hurricane con-
ditions” will create strong demand from Bahami-
an consumers, and may even help bring down
property insurance premiums by causing rein-
surers to look more favourably on this nation.
Guilden Gilbert, founder of Innovative Build-
ing Systems (Bahamas), yesterday told The Tri-
bune that he was motivated to secure an agree-
ment to distribute Dura Slate, an upgrade to
the original limestone Bermuda Roof product
that is now 365 years-old, after hearing about the
devastation caused by Hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne in September 2004.
“I thought it was time for the Bahamas to

look seriously” at obtaining the most hurricane- _

resistant roofing product possible, Mr Gilbert
explained.
“T think there’s a need for a roof that’s proven

to withstand hurricane conditions. The struc-
tures here are built extremely soundly, so if
there’s structural damage it’s by way of the roof.
The actual building structures - they can’t be
built any stronger.”

Mr Gilbert and Innovative: Building Systems
(Bahamas) exhibited Dura Slate at last week-
end’s Bahamas Home and Builders Show, and
he said: “Talking to the organisers after the
show, we were told we were the busiest booth
and most talked-about booth.”

Mr Gilbert, who set up Innovative: Building
Systems six months ago to begin marketing the
Dura Slate product, said independent tests had

shown that it could withstand 150-185 pounds per —

square foot of uplift pressure from winds.

In: contrast, a Category Five hurricane with
wind speeds of 155mph had been shown to exert
81.3 pounds of uplift pressure per square foot,
and one packing 200 mph winds exerted pressure
of 135 pounds per square foot.

While tests had shown that Dura Slate could

SEE page 6B



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor





@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE damage inflicted on
Florida by Hurricane Wilma
has “caused a severe disrup-
tion” to the shipping and trans-
portation operations that are
the “lifeline” for the Bahamas
and its economy, The Tribune

was told yesterday, with the
Port of Miami closed to com-
mercial shipping until this

morning.

Kristof Lingier, the Bahamas
country and operations man-
ager for Seaboard Marine, said



Port closures, fuel shortage and
dock damage in Florida hamper
shipping company operations

that apart from the port clo-
sure and “substantial damage”
inflicted on the company’s
docks and terminals, sunken
yachts and boats were partially

_ blocking the channel leading

to his company’s facilities on
Dodge Island, inthe Port of
Miami.

As a result, “not all our ships .
are able” to enter, Mr Lingier
explained. The. Seaboard
Marine vessel that served Nas-
sau was currently anchored

outside Miami waiting for the

SEE page 5B

ABACO Markets yesterday said its



better than last year”, when Hurricanes
Frances and Jeanne catised a $7 million
insurance claim, although Wilma did
cause “some damage” to freezers and
coolers at its Solomon’s SuperCentre
outlet.

Lesley Davies-Baptista, the BISX-list-
ed retailer’s vice-president of marketing,
told The Tribune that Thompson’s
Wholesale had already re-opened and
was “fine”, while Solomon’s SuperCentre
was set to re-open today after suffering
no structural damage unlike last year,
when the roof on the former Cedar Street
location blew off.

Freeport operations had fared “much .

Abaco Markets fares ‘much better’ in Wilma

However, she added that eae s

‘would open with a temporary “limited

capacity” for frozen goods such as ice
cream and vegetables, due to the wind
damage inflicted by Hurricane Wilma,
which blew off some panels on the store’s

‘freezers.

Summit

“While we did take a hit, it’s certainly
much better than last year,” Ms Davies-
Baptista said. We were able to signifi-
cantly minimise the impact.”

She explained that before the storm
hit, Solomon’s staff had transferred a
substantial amount of frozen and cold
products to refrigerated and frozen trail-
ers that were brought in specially for
Wilma.



As a result, the store had been able to
“safeguard quite a bit of product” from
the damage inflicted on the freezers and
coolers. Product loss:‘had been minimised,
and Solomon’s will be open today with

_ perishable products and meats.

work through our preparation rooms and
work on the perishables”, Ms Davies-.
Baptista said.

Solomon’s staff were in the store on
Monday night to safeguard product as
‘soon as the storm had passed, and the
premises had already been cleaned up.

of the damage were still being done, so it
was impossible to give a monetary figure.




Having the trailers “will.allow us to








Ms Davies-Baptista said assessments








@ PRIME MINISTER PERRY CHRISTIE

PM sounds fiscal
alarm for unions

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie yesterday fired a shot
across the bows of the trade
unions, hinting that their pay
demands could upset the Gov-
ernment’s fiscal position if they
were met, particularly his
pledge that he would impose
no new or increased taxes
despite International Monetary
Fund (IMF) pressure.

- Addressing the House of
Assembly while demonstrators

Local knowledge
key in offshore
investigations

& By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

LOCAL knowledge and expertise are invaluable when con-
ducting fraud and financial investigations in international finan-
cial centres such as the Bahamas, a leading KPMG executive

has said.

Writing in KPMG’s Fighting Fraud publication, Michael Peer,
senior manager of KPMG Forensic in Jersey, who has responsi-
bility for 14 offshore centres, said investigation techniques used in
one country were not always as

effective in another.

Mr Peer said that while an





(FILE photo)

from the Bahamas Public Ser-
vices Union (BPSU) and the
BEC union protested outside,
Mr Christie said: “I have told
my, Cabinet that I do not pro-
pose as Prime Minster to
increase taxes to the Bahamian —
people, when I have fought so
hard against the advice of the
IMF...”

The Government has run
consistent fiscal deficits since
it took office in 2002, showing

SEE page 4B

SEE page 4B




High Interest at Prime Less 2%

SEE page 6B.



The Money Will Be [here When You Need It.

www.BankBahamasOnline. com

@ Bank of The Bahamas

IN 1 BERNAL ILONAL

Proud winuer of the 2004-2005 TAAP Award for Corporate Excellence,





PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005

(HE TRIBUNE





Data security and recovery
key for business re

hether it’s a

malicious

code, a nat-

ural disaster,

hardware
failure or simply a disgruntled
employee, businesses today face
unprecedented levels of risk to
their data. The success of a
company now depends on its
ability to secure and recover its
data.

Securing Your Data

The following items are the
foundation for the security of
your data:

i) Security Policies

ii) Managing Users

iti) Anti-Virus software

iv) Firewall

Security policies should be
developed and implemented. A
security policy is a document
that states in writing how a com-

pany plans to protect its physi-
cal and information technolo-
gy assets. It is essential to ensure
that the policies are enforced, as
many security policies are inef-
fective through not being act-
ed upon. Most people believe
hackers are the biggest threat
to data security. Yet the most
likely threat comes from inside
the organisation in the form of
negligent or disgruntled
employees.

INTERNATIONAL
“A growing and dynamic Bahamian institution”

VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF:
| ASSISTANT MANAGER, CREDIT RISK

| Core responsibilities:

Review, summarize and recommend credit proposals.
Conduct credit reviews.

Recommend and monitor adherence to credit policies and procedures.
Counsel and provide guidance to line lenders in all aspects of credit.

Develop and conduct credit training sessions.
Review credit reports to determine trends and effectiveness of procedures,

policies and make recommendations for improvement.

Recommend debt compromises, forgiveness and debt restructuring.

Assess financial position of impaired loans through cash flow projections, asset |
valuation, credit history and other financial measures; discuss with lenders and
provide guidance and advice.
Recognize and coach line lenders on the balance required between the need for
revenue generation and avoidance of risk of loss.

| Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities:

BA/BSc in Finance, Accounting, Economics or Business Administration, MBA
or other advanced qualifications would be an asset.
5 - 7 years experience in Consumer and Commercial Lending.

Strong analytical skills, particularly 1 in the areas of accounting and credit

assessment.

In depth knowledge of computers to use Bank’s network and its core een:
applications to create presentations, reports and correspondence. ‘
Strong oral and written communication skills, in particular to impact financial

and credit information.

Â¥

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience and |
qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and life insurance; pension |

» scheme.

: Interested persons should apply no later than October 28, 2005 to:

The Manager, Human Resources and Training
Bank of The Bahamas International

Pricing Information As Of:
6 October 2005

P.O. Box N-7118
Nassau, Bahamas



Colina

Financial Advisors Ltd.

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bankâ„¢
Doctor's Hospital

Famguard
Finco "

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete.

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Kerzner International BDRs
Eremicn nce estate ,

12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

“28.00 ABDAB

13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets

Colina Money Market Fund 1.257751"

2.4403 2.0311 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.4403 ***
10.6103 10.0000 _ Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.6103*****
2560 2.1491 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.267097**

1.0686

Colina Bond Fund

1.139546*°"**



There are several ways to
mitigate this threat:

(i) Implement access permis-
sions to files and folders.

(ii) Make staff aware of their :

responsibilities in safeguarding
their user account and password.

(iii) Lock down workstations
using group policies. to prevent
employees from being able to
take data off the premises.

(iv) Conduct frequent network
audits.

(v) Establish a procedure that
requires two or more network
administrators to collaborate on
a single task.

Computer viruses potentially
breach a company’s security on
a daily basis, and they are an
ongoing challenge for network
administrators. We have seen
viruses wreak havoc on com-
puter networks in minutes,
stealing and corrupting infor-
mation and bringing down
entire networks. Implementing
anti-virus software is undeni-
ably essential.

The best line of defence
against these viruses is not a sin-
gle anti-virus software solution.
It is essential to implement a
multi-tiered anti-virus solution,
such as Desktop/Server, as well
as an additional solution at the
gateway. A multi-tiered anti-
virus solution is a more expen-
sive option, but the cost is min-
imal compared to the cost that a
company may face with the
onset of a virus attack.

A Firewall is a software pro-
gram, hardware device or a
combination of both, that mon-
itors the information coming
through the Internet connec-
tion into your Network. Any
well-configured network has at
least one firewall that stands
between the company and the
Internet.

Recovering your Data

File:level security, anti-virus: ©, 6

software and firewalls are all
means of protecting your data.

. However, none of these tech-

nologies provides the ability to
restore lost or corrupted data.
To safeguard your data in the
event of a business disruption, it
is essential to deploy a depend-
able back-up solution. There
are two types of back-up solu-
tions: Continuous Data Protec-
tion (CPD) and Tape Backup.

CPD is a new technology that
can back up data as it is
changed in real time, allowing
users to instantly return to any

‘point to recover a deleted, mod-

ified or corrupted file.

Tape Backup is older but
more réfiable technology than
CDP. Tape Backup technology
enables a copy of the contents
of.all or a designated amount
of data from its usual storage
device to a tape cartridge
device.

Tape Backups can be done
manually or, with appropriate
software, be programmed to
happen automatically. Data is
not saved in real time so that, in
the event that there is a need
to recover data, some data will
always be lost.





BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

\

By Corey Lockhart

CDP has revolutionised data
protection as it keeps downtime
to a minimum, whereas it can
take hours to restore data from
a Tape Backup.

Whichever solution you

choose, the most important
point to remember is mainte-
nance. Maintain the technology
and the operational procedures
that support it. Without main-
tenance, your Data Recovery
solution will be worthless.
Data protection and recov-
ery solutions are essential to
ensuring the continuity of your



company. By implementing the.
guidelines above, you will miti-
gate against the major risks fac-
ing companies today.

To provide feedback on this
column, please e-mail makin-
gITwork@providencetg.com

About the Author:

Corey Lockhart is a technical
analyst at Providence Technol-
ogy Group, one of the leading
IT firms in the Bahamas. Prov-
idence Technology Group spe-
cialises in networking solutions,
consulting and advisory services
and software solutions.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with

Section 137 (4) of the International Business Companies

Act No. 45 of 2000, GRB CONSULTANTS LIMITED,

has been dissolved and struck off the Register according to

the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General
' on the 30th day of September, 2005

Anthony Martin Shield,
~1.0-Carlton Grove,
Queens Drive West,
Ramsey, Isle of Man,

IM8 2JA.
Liquidator



‘ GN-285
3 > _MINISTRY OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY

NOTICE

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT

ACT (CHAPTER 326)
It is hereby notified pursuant to Section 5 of the Industries
Encouragement Act, Chapter 326, that the Minister is about to
consider whether the manufacturer specified in the first column
of the table below should be declared an “APPROVED
MANUFACTURER?” in relation to the products specified in the
third column.

| |MANUFACTURER}| LOCATION OF PRODUCTS
FACTORY PREMISES

Caribbean Fire Trail Road Biodiesel
Biofuels Co. Ltd.

Any interested persons having any objection to such a declaration
should give notice in writing of his objection and of grounds
thereof to the Ministry of Trade and Industry, before the 26th
day of October, 2005, by letter addressed to:-

THE MINISTRY OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
P.O.Box.N-4849
Nassau, N.P.,
THE BAHAMAS

_ HELEN A. EBONG
PERMANENT SECRETARY

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT
ACT (CHAPTER 326)
It is hereby notified pursuant to Section 7 of the Industries
Encouragement Act that the Minister is about to consider whether
the following products should be declared “APPROVED
PRODUCTS” for the purposes of that Act.

PRODUCTS RAW MATERIALS TO BE

USED IN MANUFACTURE

Methanol, Potassium, Sodium
Hydroxide

Biodiesel

Any interested persons having any objection to such a declaration
should give notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds
thereof to the Ministry of Trade and Industry, before the 27th
day of October, 2005, by letter addressed to:-

THE MINISTRY OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today’s Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daity Vol. -

P.O.Box N-4849
Nassau, N.P.,
THE BAHAMAS

Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

**. AS AT SEP. 30, 2005/ **** - AS AT SEP 30, 2005

*- AS AT OCT. 30, 2005/ *** - AS AT SEP. 30, 2005/ ***** AS AT SEP. 30, 2005

HELEN A. EBONG
PERMANENT SECRETARY





THE TRIBUNE

Chamber official named vice-chair of

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 3B



hemispheric private sector grouping

A SENIOR’ Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce offi-
cial has been appointed as vice-
chairman of the Governing
Council, and Caribbean
Region president, of the Exec-
utive Council for the Inter-
American Private Sector
Forum.

‘Khaalis Rolle, who is the
Chamber’s second vice-presi-
dent and chief marketing offi-
cér for Bahamas Ferries, also
represented the Bahamian
body and Caribbean Associa-
tion of Industry and Com-
merce (CAIC) at the Organi-
sation of American States
(OAS).

He participated in the ple-
nary session for the Private

Sector Forum organised by the
Argentina Private Sector
Organisation.

Mr Rolle said of his appoint-
ment: “It gives the Caribbean
region private sector grouping
a strong hemispheric presence,
and strengthens our ability to
address the major concerns
faced by the business commu-
nity, which may differ:in some
regards from the rest of the
Americas.”

Sumunit

The Private Sector Forum
plenary preceded the more for-
mal general assembly, which
will take place during the IV
Summit of the Americas in

Buenos Aires, Argentina, in
November 2005. The theme of
this general assembly will be

Delivering the Benefits of

Democracy through Job Cre-
ation: the Businessmen’s Role.
The initial gathering for the
Council this body took place
in Fort Lauderdale earlier this
year, when a detailed structure
for its launch was developed.
The meeting consisted of rat-
ification of the organisation’s
Charter, the appointment of a
Governing and an Executive
Council, developing the format
and guidelines for construct-
ing regional contributions dur-
ing the General Assembly, and
finalising the agenda for the
IV Summit of the Americas.



Survey
water |

CONSOLIDATED Water’s
consultants are conducting a
survey to determine how much
water is being lost per day from
New Providence’s water distri-
bution system.

Paul Fanner, a water indus-
try specialist with 28 years’
experience, told the Rotary
Club of Sunrise that the Base-
line Survey would develop an
average daily amount for non-
revenue water (NRW), based.
on the International Water
Association’s annual water bal-
ance. Once this is calculated,
targets can be set for reducing
NRW from New Providence’s
water distribution system by
one million gallons per day... .

{

opportunities

services

skills

management

services

SENIOR MANAGER



assesses daily

oss in Nassau

The reduction is part of the
contract awarded to Consoli-
dated Water’s subsidiary,
Waterfields, which saw the
Government give it the right
to construct and operate the
$23 million Blue Hills reverse
osmosis plant.

That plant is expected to
begin service in the 2006 third
quarter, and the NRW project
will be supplemented by train-
ing for Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration personnel, which will
allow the latter to sustain and
continue reduction efforts.

Central Bank warning

@ THE Central Bank of the Bahamas has issued a warn-

ing that an entity called Banque de Bogota may be breach-
ing the Banks and Trust Companies Regulation Act 2000,
_ as it is not licenced to conduct banking or trust business
_ from this nation.

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

Providing strategic direction and overall leadership of Fidelity’s e-finance unit
Being accountable for the business unit’s human and other resources, P&L
and budget performance
e Developing and executing a business plan for card and electronic banking
products and services which identifies and capitalizes on new business

e Preparing Business Requirements for existing.and new si Saucialeeeeioes and
working with the IT Head to develop technical requirements

e Developing and monitoring service level indicators to ensure superior
customer satisfaction, customer retention and growth which complements the
organization’s customer centered strategy
e Working with the Marketing Head to create and execute product plans and
sales and marketing strategies for card and electronic banking products and

MINIMUM COMPETENCIES:

e 10+ years experience in the financial services industry with 5 years
experience in the card and electronic banking services/product development
and business management areas
e A Bachelors.degree in Business Administration, Marketing or related
discipline. MBA preferred
e Business focus with some technical background
e . Demonstrated project management experience and prior work experience
' with either Mastercard or Visa preferred
e Strong communication (verbal and written), organizational, and supervisory

e Strong demonstrated knowledge in banking regulation and operational risk

e Willingness to travel extensively in the Caribbean region to oversee the
development, rollout and ongoing administration of new products and

e Excellent inter-personal skills. Ability to Sfisctively interact with all levels
of management and_a broad range of employees across the organization

Compensation package will include a competitive salary, depending on
experience, together with a comprehensive range of benefits.

Send resume no later than November 7, 2005 to:
Senior Manager Electronic Banking

=) FIDELITY |
51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
Fax 326.3000

e-mail: info@fidelitybahamas.com





= ) FIDELITY

invites applications for the position of

SENIOR MANAGER, ELECTRONIC
BANKING AND CARD OPERATIONS

The successful candidate will have regional responsibility for Fidelity’s card and
electronic banking business and ‘will be required to manage the card products
(credit and debit) and electronic banking delivery systems (ATMs, internet and
telephone banking) to a measured plan





















































Are you looking for a new challenge?

We are currently seeking qualified Managers to join our Freeport Audit practice.

Successful candidates for the Manager position will have a minimum of six years
professional public accounting experience, two of which will: have been at a
supervisory level. The individual will also hold a CPA, CA or other professional
designation recognized by the Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants.

Excellent opportunities exist in our Freeport office to broaden your professional
experience in a varied practice that offers competitive compensation and benefits
packages.

Applicants should submit a cover letter, resume and a copy of their professional certification to: KPMG, Human
Resources Manager, P.O. Box N123, Nassau, Bahamas or tdavies@kpmg.com.bs.

AUDIT « TAX ® ADVISGRY

© 2005. KPMG, a Bahamian partnership, the Bahamian member firm of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved.





nop your a secure their financial future...



witha BA Corporate Pension Plan.

It’s no secret that employee satisfaction and successful business
British American Insurance

results go hand in hand. In today’s competitive market, : pein
; Pension Services include:

attracting performance driven, Joyal and motivated personnel is

a challenge that all businesses face - large or small. We believe Dynamic & Flexible Design Options

that helping your employees secure their financial future will sie ETE EIICES
Record Keeping and Administrative Services
keep your employees ~ yours! ,
Receipt and Collection of Pension Contributions

6 ‘ Trustee and Compliance Services
British American Insurance Company provides top-notch : :
pee P Accounting Services and Actuary Reports

Corporate Pension Plan Solutions. We offer defined benefit, Timely Employee Statements

defined contribution, saving plans, personal pensions, executive Employee Seminars & Consultations



pensions and annuities. We offer dynamic and flexible

investment options.

For more information on our Corporate Pension, Personal
Pensions, Annuities and Mortgage Services, call the
Financial Services And Investments Team at 461-1000



PRISE
u AMERICAN

a strong link in your financial future

sats

Esfodlishest 1920

Lefer atin if
Vasgh 5

1920 = 2005



British American Insurance Company of The Bahamas Limited
Independence Drive, P.O. Box N-4815 * Nassau, NP, The Bahamas
Tel (242) 461-1000 Fax (242) 361-2525
bafinancial@babinsurance.com



PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE



Royal C

aribbean’s profits rise

5%

~Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

te.
Egavailable from’Commercial News Providers”

PM sounds fiscal alarm for unions

FROM page 1B.

little sign of getting to grips
with ever-increasing expendi-
tures, particularly recurrent
expenditure, which goes on

wages, emoluments and rent...

The Central Bank of the
' Bahamas said the fiscal deficit

for-2604-2005 was likely to-be~:

around $160 million, little dif-
ferent from 2003-04; although
that is being disputed by the
Government, which believed
improved revenue collections
may have brought the fiscal
deficit in at about $140 million.

Nevertheless; whichever way
the Government spins it, the
constant fiscal deficits mean
the national debt is ‘steadily ris-

Prime Minister made his veiled
warning to the trade unions
yesterday.

Essentially, he warned that
their demands were irrespon-
sible given the current fiscal
climate and the damage inflict-

Grand Bahama, which is likely
to add additional capital expen-

projections.

Mr Christie also made refer-
ence to the fact that he fought
against legislation that the for-

mer FNM administration -
‘sought to enact, and was sub-

sequently shelved, that would
have imposed restrictions on
industrial actions taken by
trade unions.

for this to be brought back on
to the legislative front burner.

Brian Nutt, the Bahamas
Employers Confederation’s
president (BECon), previously
told The Tribune that a possi-
ble: solution in stopping dis-

od. by Hurricane Wilma.in...ruptions to essential. services.

and other negative strategies
used by union officials when

-diture-for-the-Government:inry negotiating: industrial-agnee-
fiscal 2005-2006 beyond initial °

ments, would be to implement
the Trade Union and Labour
Relations Bill that was shelved
by the former FNM govern-
ment in 2001.

The Trade Union and
Labour Relations Bill provided

definitions of legal industrial —
actions; and also placed sub- —

stantial restrictions on what
actions union officials could
legally engage in when disputes





FROM page 1B

“expanding network of Mutual Legal Assis-

tance Treaties (MLATs) and other coopera-

~ tive-regulation avenues had aided informa--

tion gathering, “cultural, logistical and legal”
issues relevant to each nation needed to be
handled carefully.

He added: “For example, offshore juris-
dictions can be geographically small, so there
can be a significant danger of tipping off the
perpetrators that an investigation is under-
Way... Landing a team of three or four
foreign investigators on an island of that size
is unlikely to go unnoticed.

“On the ground knowledge of close friend-
ships, collegial relations, family ties and oth-



Local knowledge key in
offshore investigations

er social and business networks is essential.
You never know who the taxi driver taking
you from the airport is talking to.”

Mr Peer said communications were among
the issues that had to be considered in under-
taking investigations in international financial
centres, using the example of UK-registered
cell phones not being able to work in the

Bahamas. Obtaining work permits was anoth- "|:

er problem.

He added: “Although global fraud and
investigations are now commonplace, the
value of understanding local island culture
cannot be underestimated.

“Encountering an offshore financial centre
during an investigation does not have to be
intimidating, as local resources and knowl-
edge can overcome some of the barriers.”



ing, which is probably why the

LEGALNOTICE .

XAKIS LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation) —

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the dissolution of XAKIS LIMITED, has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
teas (Liquidator)
“f eGal NORGE

MAXIMILLAN HOLDI
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
26th day of September, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., of P.0:Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Employers. have long called
Beg te EE : "arose.

‘MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE
FISHERIES AND LOCAL
GOVERNMENT

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENT

The Department of Agriculture wishes
to remind all importers and the general
public that under the plants protection
act (chapter 250) and the plants
protection rules, no permits will.be
issued for the importation of pine trees.

There is a significant threat of accidental
introduction of insects and disease
pathogens on imported pine trees that
can adversely affect the continued
development and health of the Bahamian
pine forests.

Persons who wish to apply for a permit
to import Christmas Trees should note
that only species of Fir and Spruce
would be considered.

All requests for such imports must be
submitted in writing to the director of
agriculture, department of agriculture,
P.O.Box N-3704, Nassau, the Bahamas.

Director of Agriculture
October 17, 2005





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given. that ANDY CARRALERO-GOMEZ, OF
WILD TAMARIND CAY, EXUMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the

Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send.a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 27TH day of
OCTOBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, RO.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOT CE

NOTICE is hereby given that SILVA DAMARIS COLLAZO-GOMEZ,
OF WILD TAMARIND CAY, EXUMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 27TH day of
OCTOBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, RO.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

FOR RENT

Prime Location
Down Town Nassau







Two Storey Building
4,700 sq. feet ground floor
4,700 sq. feet first floor
Serious inquires only

OIL OLE IE ELL



}

Pri thimmVuiInwe

IHURSDAY, OU LOBER 2/, 20U5, PAGE 9b





Economy’s
supply chain
faces ‘severe

disruption’

FROM page 1B

port to open.

Mr Lingier said: “I can’t say
with any guarantee, but hope-
fully our ship for the Nassau
service will be in the Port of
Miami for Friday, so hopefully
we will have some supplies
coming in for Saturday, but
there’s still a big question
mark.”

He added that Port Ever-
glades, the port from which
Seaboard Marine served
Freeport and Grand Bahama,
was also “in pretty bad shape”.

It is unclear how badly
affected other Bahamas-based
shipping companies have been
by the Wilma-inflicted devas-
tation in Florida, as others con-

_tacted by The Tribune did not

return this newspaper’s calls.

There was better news for
shipping companies who use
West Palm Beach, though, as
that port was open yesterday
for commercial shipping.

Of the general situation, Mr
Lingier said: “It’s [Wilma]
caused a big disruption. A lot
of businesses and suppliers in
the Miami and South Florida
area are still not operational.
They’re still without power and
our office [there] does not have
power. They’re running on
generator, which allows us lim-
ited capabilities.”

. The Seaboard Marine exec-

utive said “customers are call-
ing me like-crazy” to find out
where their cargoes and goods
were, which emphasises the
importance of shipping opera-
tions to the well-being of the
Bahamas and its economy.

Without the supply chain
link provided by the shipping
companies, Bahamian busi-
nesses will rapidly run out of
goods and inventory, damag-
ing the entire economy.

Mr Lingier said yesterday:
“Tt became very clear after 9/11
that without shipping into the
Bahamas, the Bahamas only
has supplies and food for two
weeks. We are the lifeline for
the Bahamas.”

Another issue affecting the
supply chain for the Bahami-
an economy was the scarcity of
fuel in south Florida, as Wilma
had destroyed many gas sta-
tions, while many of those
remaining were closed or had
run out of supplies.

As a result, the transporta-
tion companies that brought
goods to Florida ports for

onward shipping into the .

Bahamas would have difficulty
in obtaining fuel for their vehi-
cles, making it difficult for them
to perform this task.

Mr Lingier said there was a

large supply chain involved in

providing goods to the
Bahamas, and a disruption to

just one link could mean “lots -

of effects on the end of the
chain”.

Seaboard Marine was doing
everything it could to return
operations to normal, Mr
Lingier added, holding two
company-wide conference calls
per day for 50-70 people,
updating them on the positions
of cargoes and ships, plus the
Port of Miami’s status. °

“I want to reassure the
Bahamian public we will do
whatever is in our power and
beyond to put everything back

in place. Whatever we can do, °

we do,” Mr Lingier said.

“We are already on top of
things. There are a lot of things
we have no control over, and
now we have to wait for the
US coastguard to open the
ports.”

INCL

- For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



A LEADING BAHAMIAN PROPERTY
DEVELOPMENT COMPANY



- ig now recruiting for a senior construction executive oversee a world class 900 acre
' development in The Family Islands. The project will include a hotel, a marina,

marina village complex, condominiums, luxury estates and all associated
infrastructure. Additional facilities shall also be developed for air transportation

_ services.

Director of Construction and Project Management (PM-1)

Revo to the Chief Operations Officer, the primary peepOneP ues of the
Director of Construction are:

¢ The development and control of all project programme schedules and
construction activities;

¢ Direct responsibility for all construction staff including project foremen,
internal QS, engineering and administrative staff;

¢ Managing and coordinating all the commercial, contractual, procurement
and legal activities through government ministries and local authorities,
consultants, architects, construction contractors, utility companies and
suppliers;

¢ Direct responsibility for all third-part contractors and development activities,
both on and off the island.

Requirements

_ ¢ Engineering degree and at least 10 years senior level construction
management experience in resort development projects in the Bahamas
¢ Professional designations of FFB, ABEng, MAPM, MWOBO or equivalent
is an absolute requirement.
_ ¢ With a recognized track record for outstanding Project Management
delivering projects on time and on budget
¢ Brown-field start-up experience is an absolutely requirement.
¢ Prior experience in project management in the Family Island is highly
desired.
¢ Ability to think strategically and the leadership skills to effectively manage
both the internal team and third-party contractors under the evolving —
circumstances and huge logistical demands of this substantial development.
* Excellent knowledge of Microsort Project and Excel programs, together
with AutoCAD and 3D modeling software, such as Land Development
Desktop (LDD) is required.

The position is initially situated in Nassau with relocation to the building site in
the Family Islands in the near-term. Frequent travel including international travel
may be required. The salary and benefits package shall be commensurate with the
senior responsibilities and experience of the successful candidate.

Contact

Please send cover letter and resume by email quoting above reference (PM-1) to
island_development1 @yahoo.com or by post mail to P.O.Box N-9322, Nassau,
The Bahamas.

The closing date for receipt of application shall be October 28, 2005.





BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK

Cable Beach, West Bay Street, P.O. Box N-3034
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 327- '5780/327-5793-6
Fax: (242) 327-5047, 327-1258
www.bahamasdevelopmentbank.com

Vessels For Sale



“MV. LisaJ3

~ Loa 122’

Beam 27.5

Depth 10.5’

Year/Mk/Eng 1960 Single Screw Steel

Hull Vessel New —-

Caterpilla Engine - Needs
to be installed

Location Bradford Grand Bahama
Queens Hwy Freeport; :

Grand Bahama



M.V. Mal-dack

M.V. Lady Eddina |
2 ie Loa 121’
- Loa 155.6’ - Beam 30°
Beam 38.0’ Depth ‘7.0’
Depth 12.5” Year/Mk/Eng 1989 Twin Screw Steel
Year/Mk/Eng 1989 Twin Screw Steel Hull Vessel GM
Hull ro-ro Freight Vessel GM Engine 8V71N
Engine V12671 Location Bradford Grand
Location _ Bradford Grand Bahama Bahama Queens Hwy
Queens Hwy Freeport, Grand
Freeport, Grand Bahama Bahama

Serious inquires only. Sealed bids marked “Tender” should be submitted to Bahamas Development Bank,
P.O. Box N-3034, Nassau, Bahamas or'telephone 327-5780 for additional information. Please note that all
bids on the aforementioned assets should be received by October 31, 2005. The Bahamas Development
Bank reserves the right to reject am or all offers. All assets are sold as is.

PUBLIC NOTICE
STATEMENT OF RESULTS

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANY'S
(BTC’S) APPLICATION TO INCREASE MONTHLY
RATES/PRICES FOR TELEPHONE LINES

The PUC has concluded its public consultation on BTC’s application to
increase monthly rates/prices for telephone lines. This Statement of
Results summarizes, and responds to, the substantive comments received
by the PUC on this matter. The PUC has given approval for BTC to
increase monthly rates/prices for telephone lines from $9.50 to $15 for
residential customers and from $20 to $36 for business customers all in
accordance with its application to increase these rates/prices. After due
consultation with BTC, the PUC requires BTC to introduce a Senior
Citizen Package based on a 20% discount on the new monthly rate/prices
for a residential telephone line for qualified applicants.

The PUC will amend Schedule 1 of BTC’s Licence to reflect the foregoing
decisions. BTC shall implement the new rates/prices and the Senior
Citizen Package no earlier than thirty (30) days from the signing of the
amendment to its Licence.

In processing BTC’s application, the PUC has been cognizant of the
requirement for it to exercise its powers and functions in a manner that
is transparent, objective, non-discriminatory and consistent with the
objectives of the Telecommunications Act, 1999, particularly section
6(4), the Telecommunications Sector Policy and BTC’s Licence.

Copies of the Statement of Results analyzing the comments received
may be obtained from the PUC’s Office, Fourth Terrace, East, Collins
Avenue; Nassau, Bahamas or downloaded from the PUC’s website

(www.pucbahamas. gov.bs).

Barrett A. Russell
Executive Director





PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





Roof product may help ease property rates

FROM page 1B

withstand Category Five force
winds, and fasteners were also
added to secure the roof, Mr
Gilbert, who is also president
of the Bahamas Insurance Bro-
kers Association (BIBA), was
quick to point out that no prod-
uct was foolproof.

He added, though, that the
product had been field-tested
in Bermuda, drawing on an
example from when Hurricane
Fabian hit that island in 2004.

Dura Slate differs from the
traditional limestone slate that
formed the bedrock of the
Bermuda Roof when intro-
duced in 1640, in two ways.
Dura Slate, made from an

Autoclave Aerated Concrete,
is half the weight of limestone
slate, weighing 13 pounds per
square foot compared to 26
pounds. In addition, Dura Slate
has fasteners to aid its ability to
withstand wind uplift.

Mr Gilbert pointed to the
example of the Tucker’s Point
development in Bermuda,
where the developer was scep-

Abaco Markets fares
‘much better’ in Wilma

Ms Davies-Baptista said: “We just can't

FROM page 1B

However, any insurance claim is likely to be
TURAL ROR ORL acer
Pee Ce Mer ee Com AA
PERM MOU CMECmtae Cait
the store’s busiest weekend during the pre-
SINTERED EAPO MCDM STE LE LOR Cre cat

ye CoO MELLEL



thank the staff enough. They

are really

pulling us through.”

Qua oe

During the second quarter for its finan-
cial year ending on January 31, 2006, Abaco
Markets said the $2.5 million balance
received for its Hurricane Frances
Jeanne claims finalised the $7 million hurri-
cane insurance settlement, less $200,000 in

and



tical of Dura Slate’s merits and
refused to use it, yet some
clients who owned multi-mil-
lion dollar homes on the prop-
erty decided to use it.

Out of the first five homes
built, one used limestone slate
and the others used Dura Slate.
When Hurricane Fabian, a Cat-
egory Three storm, hit Bermu-
da, the only home out of the
five with roof damage was the
limestone one, Mr Gilbert said.

He added that insurers and
reinsurers were also looking
favourably on Bermuda due to
the minimal level of residen-
tial damage caused during Hur-
ricane Fabian. American Re, a
large property reinsurer,
described the style of roof in
Bermuda as “probably the
biggest reason why residential
damage was minor”, as the
roofs were “sealed from the
elements and difficult for wind
to penetrate”.

Mr Gilbert said property
insurance premiums in Bermu-
da were on average 0.85 per
cent of the rebuilding value,
while in the Bahamas they
were between 1.2-1.6 per cent,
“so in some cases in Bermuda

it’s half the premium”.

“If the roof stays on, you
don’t get as much structural
damage,” Mr Gilbert said. If
more homes here have hurri-
cane resistant roofs, it’s possi-
ble you may see the reinsurers
look more favourably on the
Bahamas.

“This is showing there is a
way to save On some premium
costs. When hurricanes hit in
Bermuda, you don’t get the
wild fluctuations in premium
costs you do here.”

Mr Gilbert, a native Bermu-
dian who is married to a
Bahamian, said he had been
able to obtain the Bahamian

and Caribbean distribution.

rights through his familiarity
with Dura Slate, coupled with
the fact that his parents lived
just up the road from the man-
ufacturer, Matthew Waite.
Manufacturing had since
moved to Jacksonville, making
it easy for Dura Slate to be

. Shipped to the Bahamas. Mr

Gilbert said one developer set
to break ground on a project

‘within the next few weeks had

already committed to using
Dura Slate.

MINISTRY OF TRANSPORT

AND AVIATION

NEW BOAT LICENCE NEW PROVIDENCE

Notice Of Sitting For New Providence Port Authority Board

He added that he also con-
trolled Premier Roofing
(Bahamas), which traded under
the name Bermuda True Roof,
and which was used to install
Dura Slate roofs.

Mr Gilbert said the product
was very competitive in terms
or price and ease of installa-
tion when compared to the Sty-
rofoam Bermuda Rood being
sold here, which was developed
and patented in 1968.



GN - 284



To Consider Application For Licence Under The Boat See



Act Chapter (277) REGNO' APPLICANT BOATNAME CLASS PASS USE
NB/01/05 Reno Water Sports Banana Boat’ B 12 Rental
ie . : : . 4 : Nassau,Bahamas
Notice is hereby given that a meeting of the New Providence Port Authority Board for
New Providence and the Family Islands will be held at the Port Administration NB/02/05 Reno Water Sports Banana Boat B 12 Rental
Building Prince George Wharf on the 1+ Nedembe« 2005 at 3:00pm for the PUP ORE Nassau,Bahamas
of erannne Licenses under The Boat Registration Act Chapter (277) ;
NB/03/05 Smith L. Brian Mini Boat B 3 Rental
Any person entitled to and wishing to object to any application. should do so at least _ . Nassau,Bahamas ian
six (6) day before the date’ of the hearing by submitting b his/her objections in writing t to. ee 2 bad bs es
Ye : NB/04/05 :
the Board and to the. applicant. ce : os a 5 2 Roe
NB/05/05 Mini Boat B 3 Rental
Persons attending the meeting on behalf of an applicant must produce written Smith L. Brian
Authorization at the meeting. Nassau,Bahamas
NB/06/05 Mini Boat B 3 Rental
Applicants for renewals are not oud to attend, unless they have received written rae ea
Notification from the New Providence Port Authority. bere 0 Charter
. : NB/07/05 Tycoon Management _ Carizzal A
The under mentioned persons have applied for grant of licenses as specified below: Ltd
: Nassau, Bahamas
| f NB/08/05 Bannister Pedro BananaBoat D 10 Rental
RENEWAL JET SKI NEW PROVIDENCE Nassau, Bahamas
Tycoon Management is
REG. NO APPLICANT BOAT NAME CLASS_ PASS USE NB/09/05 Ltd Barge A 0 ; Charter
Nassau, Bahamas
NP:136 ATE Rufus Storr No Name D 2 Rental
P.O.Box FH-14334 NB/10/05 Tycoon Management Tug Boat A 0. Charter
Nassau, Bahamas Ltd :
Nassau, Bahamas
NP: 105 ATE Rufus Storr NO Name D 2 Rental ‘
P.O Box FH-14334 .NEW MASTER s LICENCE NEW PROVIDENCE
Nassau, Bahamas REG NO _ APPLICANT CLASS
‘NP: 106ATE No Name _ D 2 ~ Rental |
Rufus Storr NM/01/05 Deveaux Reno B
P.O.Box FH-14334 P.O.Box SB-51528
Nassau, Bahamas Nassau, Bahamas
NP: 506 SAN No Name D 2 Rental
Rodino Sands
Nassau, Bahamas -NM/03/05 Griffin Eric
NP: 509 SAN NO Name D 2 Rental Nassau, Bahamas .
Rodino Sands
Nassau, Bahamas RENEWAL MASTER’S LICENCE FAMILY ISLAND
NO Name D 2: Rental
NP: 510SAN Rodino Sands HeENEr s NAME CLASS
Nassau, Bahamas
NP: 508SAN Rodino Sands NO Name D 2 Rental iy Edgecombe Anthony A
Nassail, Bahamas Marsh Harbour, Abaco
6536 Smith Joel A
Stanie] Cay.Exuma
NP: 743 RCB Rodino Sands NO Name D 2 Rental 10he Wells Christopher A
Nassau, Bahamas : Sandy Point, Abaco
NP: 745RCB_ Sean Lewis " NO Name D 2 Rental RENEWAL MASTER’S LICENCE NEW PROVIDENCE
Nassau, Bahamas
, LICENCE # NAME CLASS
NP: 744 RCB Sean Lewis No Name’ D 2 Rental 6145 Major Inez
Nassau, Bahamas P.O.Box SS-5414 A
Nassau, Bamahas
7070 © Moxey Gerard B
Nassau, Bahamas .
7860 Obrien Noel B
P.O.Box N-10090
Nassau, Bahamas
RENEWAL BOAT LICENCE NEW PROVIDENCE
7388 Palmer Lavance B
Nassau, Bahamas
REG NO APPLICANT BOAT NAME CLASS_ PASS USE :
NP:652 Sea Island Adventure _‘ Fiesta II B 250 Charter Captain Anthony J. Allens

P.O.Box SS-5414
Nassau, Bahamas

Port Controller







“THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS









lites -MILLARS HEIGHTS
ieee SUBDIVISION
a (Nassau)

Lot #12 Block #3, a sixteen year old,
single story triplex with floor area of
2,378 sq. ft., each apartment consist
of 2 bed, 1 bath, living, dining area and
kitchen. Lot size is 7,500 sq. ft. 75 x
100.

Appraisal: $268,411.00

Heading west on Carmichael Road, enter West Ave., on the southside immediately
after Topps Laundermat. Take first right which is Wimpole St, go around curve on
left which is London Ave., travelsouth on London Ave., property is 2nd to last
building on the right before T, Junction (High street) L shape triplex, painted green,
trimmed white. ~

No. 8 BELL SNOW CLOSE
BEL-AIR ESTATES SUB.
(Nassau)

All that piece parcel or lot of land having
an area of 6,000 sq. ft. (60 x 100)

Subdivision, situated on Turtle Drivve
on Bel Snow Close, being the fourth
lot east of Turtle Drive, on the south
| side of the road. The subject property
is on flat terrain with grass lawn and
paved driveway in front, the grounds are competley enclosed and fairly maintained.
This property consist of a 6 year old single story, 4 bedroom, 2 bathroom, livingroom,
diningroom, familyroom and kitchen single family residence with floor area of 1,711

sq. ft.



Appraisal: $1 93,200.00

Driving west on Carmichael Road until you reach Turtle Drive, turn left onto Turtle
Drive and Bel Snow Close is the first corner on the left after the Fedder Road that
runs parallel to Charmichael Road. The house is the 4th on the right painted white
trimmed pink with wall in front. -

DUNDAS TOWN. _
_.. s(Abaco)

2 storey, 4 bed, 2 bath on 1/2 acre lot
no. 25, living room, dining room, family
room, kitchen downstairs, upstairs there
are 4 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms.Age
is 16 years, color is yellow trimmed with
white, upperlevel 1,080 sq. ft., lower
level, 1080 sq. ft., garage 420 sq. ft.,
covered verahandahs 390 sq. ft., the
land is portion W of one of the Dundas

Town Crown Allotment parcels situated
near Forest Drive being just under half acre in size. Located on the southern side
of a ridge being 12 feet plus above sea level with little likelinood of flooding grounds
well kept with above average landscaping including grass cover with palms and










citrus trees. Enclosed on 3 sides with a 6 ft., metal fences and ficus trees at the

fron. 30 ft., by 36 ft., roof garage now used as a nursery school. At the upper level
on the eastern side is covered wooden verandah 6 ft., x 30 ft., interior walls
concrete, ceiling of sheet rock and floor of ceremic tiles.

Appraisal: $267,987.91
















designated as lot No. 348 of Bel-Air

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 7B

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY
MUST SELL

MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES

October 27th, 20

CYCLOPS GARDEN
(Nassau)



All that lot of land numbering as “H” being
one of several lots in Cyclops Gardens
| located off the northern side of Cowpen
Road one corner west of Faith Avenue
Junction. This property comprise of a
two and a half year old single storey
duples with a gross floor area of 1,512.42
sq. ft., each unit consisting of 2 bedrooms

aaa all wth wall airconditioning units, 1
bathroom, living, dining and kitchen building is effectively new.

Appraisal: $219,450.00

Heading south on Faith Avenue to junction off Cowpen road make a right then
first right again. The subject property is the 4th on the right tan trimmed brown.

WEST RIDGE ESTATES.
(Nassau)








1 All that piece parcel or lot of land
having an area of 34,089 sq. ft, being
1 lot #152, of West Ridge Estates —f
Subdivision, Zoining is single family
residential with all utilities avvailable.
| The subject property is on hilly terrain
at the top of a ridge that offers a lovely
view to the northeast. The grounds

are attractively landscaped with a |
grass lawn, ornamental shrubs and flowering plants. Other improvements include
chain link fencing along the sides and rear boundaries, with a concrete block wall
at the front with asphalt paved driveway.

Appraisal: $1,049,788.90

There are two buildings located on this property. The main 2 storey house is
located at the highest point of the poroperty. This house has an approximate
gross floor area of 4,8000 sq. ft., upstairs consist of 3 full bedroom suites (each
with a full bathroom), inlcuding a master bedroom suite, an office with a bathroom
(shower only) and sitting room. Downstairs consist of living room, formal dining
area, casual dining area, powder room and spacious kitchen (at least 500 sq ft)

JOHNSON ROAD
~ (Nassau) ©








| All that lot of land having an area of
| 5,520 sq. ft., (60 x 92) situated on the
| corner of Johnson Road and Step
| Streeet. This property is rectangular
and comprised of a 12 year old single
| storey house that consist of 3
bedrooms, 1 bathroom, living, dining
1 room and kitchen. Also an efficiency

apartment attached. The subject
property is slightly above the level of the abutting roadways with minimal
landscaping. The property is open with chain link fencing along its western
boundries.

Appraisal: $139,868.40
Heading east along Bernard Road, turn through Johnson Road opposite St

Augustine’s College Drive all the way to the curve heading west the subject house
is first house on the right all white trimmed yellow.



ALLOTMENT 67, MARRIGOLD FARM ROAD (NASSAU), All that lot of land having an area of 1.173 acres being lot No. and is situated on Marigold
Farm Road in the ara known as allotment 67, a said subdivision situated in the south eastern district of new Providence, Bahamas. This property

is Vacant and area has all utilities & services. Appraisal: $148,50.00

Travelling on Joe Farrington Road turn onto Marrigold Farm Road heading south, the subject is the second to last propert on the left hand side of

the road near the pond.



Uiereie Male) eLetter







NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA), Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and bounded on North by Early Settler Drive and South by
Deal Investment Ltd., this is a single family zoning and 50 ft., above sea level. This site encompasses a foundation with plumbing and roughing
inplace and well compacked quarry fill. The concrete floor has not been poured as yet. The foundation is 2,511 sq. ft. Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles
east wardly of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is vacant and a hill over looking the Atlantic Ocean. Appraisal: $46,167.18



BAHAMA SOUND (EXUMA), Lot #7088 situated in Bahama Sound, Exuma section 10 East. Great Exuma approximately 10.5 miles west of George
Town lot is square in shape on elevation of approximately 15 ft., above sea level contains 10,000 sq. ft., No adverse site conditions noted. This
property is single family residence. Property is located on the northwestern side of the Queen’s Highway, about 10.5 miles northwest of George
Town. Appraisal: $27,562.50



MURPHY TOWN (ABACO) Lot #78B vacant land, the property has average surface drainage and is not suseptible to flooding under normal
conditions. Land size 104 x 78 approximately 11,277 sq. ft. Estimated Value: $18,649.33



LOWE SOUND (ANDROS) All that parcel of lot of land located next door to the New Mt Freedom Baptist Church or approximately five miles from
the administrative complex approximately 5,000 sq. ft., and rectangular in shape with a 3 bed, 1 bathroom wooden residence. Appraisal: $52,258.50

FLAMINGO BAY SECTION 3 (EXUMA) Lot #102, Palm Hill situated inland in the Flamingo Bay development. It is Hillside Residential and has 150
ft., footage on Hill Road and contains 10, 438 sq. ft., in area. This property is undeveloped. The subject property is about one mile south of the
George Town township. Appraisal: $33,075.00 .

BAHAMA SOUND (EXUMA) Lots 12571 & 12572 Bahama Sound of Exuma No. 10 underveloped residenial lots located near the Forest and Mt
Thompson on Utopia Drive. 80 feet frontage and depth of 125 ft 10,000 sq. ft., in area each there is no service in the area. The road is gravel George
Town - 10 miles away. Appraisal: $26,250.00 EACH :

BAHAMA SOUND NO. 18 (EXUMA) Lot No. 17861 Bahama Sound of Exuma No. 18 a subdivision situate approximately 2.5 miles north westwardly
of George Town. The property is zoned residential and is level. Electricity, paved roads, water, telephone lines and cable tv services are available
along Queen’s Highway. Water is also available from dug wells but city supply is available. The propert is undeveloped. Land size 82.10 x 122.11 x
82.10 x 121.0 Estimated Value: $33,075.00

For conditions of sale and other information contact
Philip White @ 502-3077 email philip.white@scotiabank.com or
Harry Collie @ 502-3034 email harry.collie@scotiabank.com







Please visit www.fsbobahamas.com for interior photos





FAUL OD, INUNOVAYT, VUIUDEN ¢/, cuuo IHt |RIBUNE BUSINESS

COMICS PAGE

hi ty - oF

Pm | Fe







sS

i io f Lael



St Set BOS
— .
rv i:

i “a “Copyrighted I Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”



~~ & oo
i=

-_ 7 = — —-

rTHeHeA Leet



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 9B



“THURSDAY EVENING OCTOBER 27, 2005
. | 7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30
NETWORK CHANNELS




rior to |The Perilous Fight: America’s

New Florida 1 |The Perilous Fight: America’s World War Il in Color The years
World War Il in Color 1 (CC)

WPBT the outbreak of World War II through the Nazi invasion of Poland; the
" buildup of the country’s military and preparations for D-Day. 1

The Insider (N) [Survivor: Guatemala - The Maya |CSI: Crime Scene Investigation Without a Trace “Honor Bound” (N)
@ WFOR}n cc) Empire ‘Surprise Enemy Visit” (N) Grissom connects a suicide toa | (CC)
: (CC) multiple murder in suburbia. 1
| oe Access ay Joey Joey disci- Will & Grace |The Apprentice The candidates _|(9:59) ER “Time of Death” A stom-
WTV4 |wood (N} (CC) _plines a child ac- |Grace’s date with |compete in the business of sporting Jach ache tums into something far
br A (CC) Nick. (CC) goods. (N) M (CC) more serious. 1 (CC)

Deco Drive |MLB Baseball World Series Game 5 -- Chicago White Sox at Houston Astros. If necessary. From Minute Maid
WSVN Park in Houston. Altemate prime-time lineup: “Maid in Manhattan” and local programming. (Live) (CC)

i Tae Jeopardy! (N) {Alias “Out of the Box” Sydney and |Night Stalker Kolchak follows a trail] Primetime (CC)

WPLG (cc). Tom are under siege by mercenar- jof mysterious deaths. (N) © (CC)
ies who want the container.
: CABLE CHANNELS

American Jus- |Cold Case Files DNAevidence —|Cold Case Files ‘The Closers; The First 48 Miami detectives probe

‘A&E tice helps police crack an 8-year-old | Caught by an Eyelash” (CC) the murder of a college student.
ae murder case in Virginia. (CC) (CC)
BBC News World Business /BBC News Talking Movies |BBC News Asia Today
‘BBCI (Latenight). |Report (Latenight). (Latenight).

% & CAUGHT UP (1998, Drama} Bokeem Woodbine, Cynda Williams, Made You Look: |To Be An-
‘BET. Joseph Lindsey. An ex-con struggles to rehabilitate his life, BET nounced

‘CBC Coronation The Canadian Antiques Road- |The Passionate Eye (CC) The National (CC)

show (CC) C |

:00) Onthe © |The Apprentice: Martha Stewart /Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch }

CN BC | Money “Every log Has His Day” (N) 1. es Let ha eles the

:00) Anderson {Paula Zahn Now (CC Larry King Live (CC) NewsNight With Aaron Brown a : ee
CNN (ei fare Bahamian Puppet and

a Reno 911! Con- |The Daily Show |The Colbert Re- [Comedy Central |South Park Cart-/South Park (CC) |The Showbiz ] ] ]
COM traband fireworks.| With or Stew- |port (CC) Presents Scott ccaseens] i oe hi = Sl d eki ck 2 Se rek P ut 2 ie
(CC) art (CC) Kennedy. group. avid Spade some smi | eson y ee

s Shootings |The Investigators “Inside the Yel- [Forensic Files |Body ofEvi- |Double Jeopardy
COURT ji, tee cities, low Line” Unsolvable cases. lei d s’s cf aces

; DISN That’s So Raven| x % THE LITTLE VAMPIRE (2000, Fantasy) Jonathan Lipnicki, Richard |The Buzzon _|Sister, Sister

Point of No Re- |E. Grant, Jim Carter. An American boy befriends a family of Scottish vam-/Maggie Hal- |The twins get
DIY This Old House |Weekend Wood Works —_|Freeform Furni- DIY to the Res- |DIY to the Res-
0 (CC) Handyman ture (N) cue cue





wm wo
3 q
23] 2
85| =

QoQ
So





tum pires. ‘PG’ (CC) loween. (CC) — jmake-overs. 1

Bring your children to the

z
o
3
5

DW Journal: In Journal: Europa Aktuell Journal: In Euromaxx

Depth Tagestema Depth : D | a

101 Best Kept Hollywood Secrets |101 Best Kept Hollywood Secrets |101 Best Kept Hollywood Secrets ; }
E! ibaa aLaee Kote sees ne McHappy Hour at McDonald's in

lege Football Boston College at Virginia Tech. (Live) (CC SportsCenter
ESPN _ [College Football Boston Colege at Virginia Tech, (Live) (CC) lve) (cc) Marlborough every Thursday
‘ Beisbol Este . MLB Baseball World Series Game 5 -- Chicago White Sox at Houston Astros. If necessary. From Minute Maid a, \
-LESPNI Noche“ [Parkin Huston. (Lie) " from 3:30pm to 4:50pm during the
he EWTN Daily Mass: Our |Life on the Rock ‘|Back Stage |The Holy Rosary|Gospel of John |In the Heart of ;
Le ay , the Chute month of October 2005,
FIT TV (00) FitTV's _|Insider Training “Golf Golf tech- |Deadly Arts “Karate” 0 No Opportunity Wasted “Bull Rid-
F lousecalls (CC) jniques. (N) er” 0 (CC) ‘

| FOX-NC Fox Report- |The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) {Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van



Shepard Smith Susteren (Live) (CC)
FSN FL: (:00) NHL Hockey Florida Panthers at Philadelphia Flyers. From the Wa- |Best Damn Sports Show Period Best Damn a ni 7
chovia Center in Philadelphia. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) (Live) (CC) ! Sports Show ‘ ‘
GOLF _ [Sof Central Post Game Show (Live) PGA Golf Champions Tour - Charles Schwab Cup Championship ~- First Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.
. (Live) Round. From Sonoma, Calif. :

; Lingo (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire |The Amazing Race “Race to the |Dog Eat Dog 1 (CC)
GSN (cc) FFinish? 1 (Part 2 of 2) (CC)
“le (:00) Attack of {Fastlane “Strap On” 1 (CC) Game Makers |Cinematech |The Man Show |The Man Show
G4Tech | “Call of Duty. (CC) (cc)
. (00) Walker, | Walker, Texas Ranger Walker OUT OF THE WOODS (2005, Drama) Ed Asner, Jason London. A self-
HALL exas Ranger [races to rescue an oil rig from radi- |absorbed lawyer visits his eccentric grandfather. (CC)
“Deep Cover’ —_|cal environmentalists. (\ (CC)
aes Dream House Holmes on Homes “House 2 Real Renos “Not )Restaurant The Block A newspaper article dis-
-PHGTV {a (cc) Home” 1 (Part 1 of 2). (CC) So Nicé Nei” \ |Makeover The [closes information about Dani's
a (CC} Babelfish Bistro. |past. O (CC)
Morris Cerullo |Breakthrough jLoveaChild Inspiration To- |Life Today (CC) |This Is Your Day | Valerie Saxion
[INSP eee ee eae

Slike Transformers Sabrina, the . |My Wifeand. |My Wife and . |Friends Rachel |Everybod Everybody .
'KTLA __ {Cybertron ‘Hid- [Teenage Witch Kids “Anniver. {Kids “legal :
pire den” sary” (CC)

(1995)

i'm lovin’ it






ry a3
Jdreams about... {Loves Raymond|Loves Raymond} | gm
n 0 (CC) (CC) 1C ’

Smile” (CC) Joey. A (CC) razy Chin

MARY. HIGGINS CLARK’S REMEMBER ME (1995) |x % THE CRYING CHILD (1996, Drama) Mariel Hemingway, Finola
LIFE Kelly McGillis, Cotter Smith. A piel couple moves ' |Hughes, George Delhoyo. An old house’s strange sounds torment a re-
Pee into a house presumably haunted. (CC) covering wife. Tec}

Sn :00) Hardball - /Countdown With Keith Olber- Rita Cosby Live & Direct Scarborough Country
([usnec [¢**" io
NICK Jimmy Neutron: |SpongeBob = Romeo! ‘Pin- |Full House \ Fresh Prince of |Fresh Prince of |The Cosh
Boy Genius {SquarePants © |head’ M (CC) |(CC) Bel-Air Bel-Air Show 1 tec)
iss NTV Will & Grace C\ |Survivor: Guatemala - The Maya |The Apprentice “Take Me Outto |News (CC) |News ;
SAN, (CC) Empire “Surprise Enemy Visit” —_|the Boardroom” (N) M (CC) ae eae ee Se :
em Ultimate Shark {Dangerous Hunting Adven- |Benelli’s Dream |Expedition'Sa- |Ultimate Shark Tournament ee ree
_ INASCAR Be- |The Chase Is On|Car Crazy (N) . |Barrett-Jackson 2005: The Auc- {NASCAR Beyond the Wheel ~ ; . 7
SPEED ‘ |vond the whee! ee ee ()

Nee Praise the Lord |Behind the Michael Youssef |Bishop T.D. —_| This Is Your Day |Praise the Lord (CC)
“-TBN (CC) Scenes (CC) —|(CC) Jakes (CC) (CC)

Te Everybody Friends Phoebe (Friends 0 (CC) | & * & THE MASK OF ZORRO (1998, Adventure) (PA) Antonio Ban-
TBS Loves Raymond |tries to prevent a deras, Anthony Hopkins, Catherine Zeta-Jones. Zorro's protege crosses
Messe Marital woes. suicide. (CC) swords with a returning tyrant. (CC) :

lis (:00 Mss Psychic Witness “Shattered Fami- |Psychic Witness: “Fall of the Serial Dead Tenants “The Last Resort’ A
| TLC of Noah's Flood |ly’ A woman is beaten to death with |Killer’ Psychics help catch killers. headless 2-year-old boy's ghost
thew (CC) a hammer. (N) makes a man lose sleep.

NBA Preseason Basketball Miami Heat at Orlando Magic. From the TD Waterhouse Cen- |NBA Preseason Basketball Golden
ct ENT tre in Orlando, Fla. (Live) (CC) rte Hae at Phoenix Suns.
‘ ive

see ‘{Aloha, Scooby-Doo The gang travels to Hawaii fora |Home for Imagi-|Cartoon.Car- Ed, Edd'n Eddy | Yu-Gi-Oh! G/X:
‘| TOON surfing contest. nary Friends toons (Part 1 of 2)

TV5 LaSyrieau |Envoyé spécial “Tout cru-Carnet de route: le jade” ~~ |Une santé qui nous est chére _ /TV5 Le Journal
; coeur

o- 6:00) Weather: |Storm Stories [Storm Stories / Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
“TWC M Edition (CC) |(CC) (cc)

pe :00) Pielde Contra Viento y Marea La Esposa Virgen ' Aqui y Ahora
av
oi" valientes, ;

00) Law & Or- jLaw & Order: Criminal intent * * THE STORY OF US (1999, aoe ee Bruce Willis, Michelle
|USA der: Special Vic-|“Con-Text’ A self-help guru is impli- |Pfeiffer, Tim Matheson. Premiere. A couple's marriage crumbles over the
tims Unit © — |cated in murder. 4 (CC) course of 15 years.

WHA 00) | Love the |I Love the '80s: 3D “1985” 9 | Love the ’80s: 3D “1986” (N) 1 |I Love the ’80s: 3D “1987” (N) 0
80s: 3D “1984”

Weed 00) America’s | x % &»% THE HORSE WHISPERER (1998, Drama) Rabert Redford, Kristin Scott Thomas, Sam Neill. A gentle
WGN panies vad cowboy heals a girl and her horse’s wounded souls. (CC)
wae ideos

; Everybody Smallville ‘Thirst’ Lana decides to |Everwood On a camping trip with |WB11 News at Ten With Kai

WPIX Loves Raymond |enroll at Metropolis University and is|Andy and Harold, Ephram reveals Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano

“Crazy Chin” —_|forced to join a sorority. _|the reason he returned. (N) (CC) —|& Mr. G (CC)

ardyl! (N) |Everybo Love, Inc. Eve Rita threat- {Cuts Kevin plans |Dr. Phil
WSBK (cc) Hates chs (N) |‘Amen” (N) © Jens to leave the to be rich. (N)
1A (CC) (CC) partnership. (N) (CC)
PREMIUM CHANNELS

ae ak Inside the NFL (CC) + & % MARIA FULL OF GRACE (2004, Drama) is Jarhead:

HBO-E __|LOVEDoN’ Catalina Sandino Moreno. A pregnant teenager be- | HBO First Look
COSTATHING | . comes a drug mule. (Subtitled-English) © ‘R'(CC) —_|(N) (CC)

4:45) x x [Real Time TV host Tucker Carlson. | * x FAT ALBERT (2004, Comedy) Kenan Thompson, |Legendary
HBO-P iP heen 0 (CC) Kyla Pratt. The aa character nannies realand |Nights ( (CC)
UNTER (1978) helps a lonely teen. ‘PG’ (CC)

} N’T
| hod Costas NOW 1 (CC) (i! 5) & * LOVE DON’T COST A THING (2003, Romance-Comedy) Nick
OHNNY ENG- annon, Christina Milian, Kenan Thompson.:A teen hires a cheerleader to
ISH (2003) 0 pose as his girlfriend. © ‘PG-13' (CC)







SS =
=
>

a
ao
So

a

Zs

HBO-W :
HBO-S pe RAY (2004, Biography) Jamie Foxx, | * * THE DOOR IN THE FLOOR (2004, Drama) Jeff Bridges, Kim

erry Washington. Ray Charles overcomes hardships rag Jon Foster. An author and painter drives his wife to infidelity. ©
to become a legend. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC) 'R’ (CC)

oe wee THE | & %% FLIGHT OF THE PHOENIX (2004, Adventure) Dennis Quaid, Gio- | x x ALONG CAME POLLY (2004,
MAX-E [BIG BOUNCE __|vanni Ribisi, Tyrese Gibson. Plane-crash survivors endure hardships in Ramanee-Conedy Ben Stiller, Jen-
(2004) ‘PG-13' the Gobi desert. M ‘PG-13' (CC) - nifer Aniston. © ‘PG-13' (CC)

Cs COLLATERAL (2004, Suspense) Tom ans TITANIC (1997, Drama Ceara Be ie Mase ly : oe ge oe e eo fi Le
ane. Oscar-winning account of the doome ocean liner. ( ‘PG-
me (Movie Gift Certificates





MOMAX

ruise, Jamie Foxx, Jada Pinkett Smith. A contract
killer uses a cabdriver for his jobs. 'R’ (CC)





'45)SHO Me — |x & THE PRINCE & ME (2004, Romance-Comedy) Julia Stiles, Luke | * & x WHILE YOU WERE SLEEP- £ ]
SHOW - tow “Paycheck” |Mably, Ben Miller. ‘TV. A collegian and a Danish prince fall in love. (\ {ING (1995, Comedy) Sandra Bul-
: hon Pah iby NG Cont _ make great gi

a % DES- | & IN THE ARMY NOW (1994, Comedy) Pauly (38) % & NO LOOKING BACK (1998, Drama) Lauren
ERATE MEA- |Shore, Andy Dick. A free-spirited slacker and his pal | Holly, Edward Burns. A man returns home to win back
SURES 'R’ join the Army Reserve. ( ‘PG’ (CC) his former girlfriend. © ‘R’

TMC













PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Wildcats line-up won't be ‘>

SPORTS

the same without Jackie

STUBBS



OPINION



W HENEVER the
Electro Telecom

Wildcats hit the field to play in
the Bahamas Softball Federa-
tion’s National Round Robin
Tournament this weekend,
their line-up won’t be the
same.

Even their mission will be
slightly different as they go
after their fifth national title.

They will be focussing their
emphasis on playing for their
jovial right-fielder Jackie ‘Lil
Stunt’ Moxey, who died on
Wednesday at the Princess
Margaret Hospital after being

rushed to the accident and

emergency department on
Tuesday night. —

For at least 30 years, the
compact Moxey was a house-
hold name in the NPSA’s fast-
pitch, the Bahamas Govern-
ment Departmental Softball
Association’s slow-pitch
league and the Baptist Sports



“When most of her
team-mates would decline to
speak to the media about their
thrill of victory or even their
agony of defeat, Moxey was
never one to back down.”



Council’s modified pitch
league.

Whenever she came to play,
you knew she was in the game
because she had one of the
loudest mouths on the team,
cheering her team-mates on
and annoying her rivals.

When most of her team-
mates would decline to speak
to the media about their thrill
of victory or even their agony
of defeat, Moxey was never
one to back down. She was a
reporter's delight because of

the comments she made.

As her Wildcats team, who
were sponsored by either
Graycliff or the Electro Tele-
com, were either blowing out
a series or getting ready to
clinch a title, Moxey would
enthusiastically state how
many games were left.

In most cases, she was right
on the money as the Wildcats
would go on to live up to her
predictions.

As a lefty, Moxey rarely
dropped a ball in right field

where she was considered a
“golden glove”.

She also had the speed to
track down any balls that got
past her.

Her game had started to
diminish with each passing
year, but whenever Moxey
came up to bat, she was still
considered to be a threat to
score once she got on base.
She was the lead off batter
who normally made things
happen. ~

It was a difficult pill to swal-
low as I watched her once
vibrant body lay motionless
on the table hooked up to the
life support system. It was
hard to believe that she won't
be able to spark the Wildcats
rally when they go for their
fifth straight national title.

The Wildcats will now have
to dig down deep within them-
selves to get the motivation to
play for Moxey instead — as
number five will not be there
in right field.

St Thomas

More
FROM page one

Bullard, who worked his way

inside to complete a three-point

play to put the Sparks up 3-1

for good before Sands con-

nected on a free throw before
. the end of the quarter.

Only one point would score
in the entire season quarter and
that came‘on a free throw from
Sands.

Then in the third quarter, St
Thomas More started to pull
away, Opening up as much as a
ten-point lead as Bullard kissed
the glass for a jumper as he got
around the defence of St.

Bede’s Kaylica Laing,
the only female player in the
game.

After Thorne Curry hit a
jumper for Crushers’ 7-3 deficit,
the Sparks surged ahead 13-3
when Paul Smith got an offen-
sive rebound and hit a lay-up
and Daniel Bullard came up
with two quick steals that he
converted on lay-ups.

From there, St. Thomas More
stayed one step ahead of St.
Bede’s, whose coach ,Maurice
Fawkes tried all he could to get
them to pick up their offence
down the stretch.

“I’m proud of them. I see
them doing a lot. more things
aggressively that they haven’t
been doing before,” he pointed
out. “We just have to make bet-
ter inbound passes and be more
aggressive.’

While Theron Taylor led St.
Bede’s with seven points,
Thorne Curry scored two and
Dwayne Rolle added a free
throw. Rolle, however, had a
couple of key block shots as he
took advantage of his height
inside.

The league will take ; a break
because of the mid-term break.
Action will pick up next Tues-
day when Our Lady’s travel to
St. Cecilia’s and St.Thomas
More go to St. Francis/Joseph.

The tournament was official-
ly opened by Charles ‘Chuck’
Mackey, the vice principal of
the RM Bailey Secondary High
School.



@ ST BEDE’S THERON TAYLOR drives the ball to the basket yesterday at St Thomas More. .

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Twelve schools ready to compete in
DW Davis Junior High School Classic

@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

AFTER a year’s break, the DW
Davis Junior High School will host its
second basketball classic this. week-
end at the DW Davis Gym.

Dubbed the “Junior Hugh Camp-
bell Classic”, twelve schools, including
the visiting Harbour Island High, have
confirmed their participation in the
tournament that opened yesterday.

The competition, which will divide
the teams into two different pools, will
start tonight and run through the mid-
term break with the championship
game being played on Sunday.

The DW Davis Pitbulls, the defend-
ing champions, will head Pool One
that will include the St. Andrew’s Hur-
ricanes, HO Nash Lions, Harbour
Island, SC McPherson Sharks and

Faith Temple Warriors.

The Jordan Prince William Falcons,
AF Adderley Fighting Tigers, LW
Young Golden Eagles, St. John’s
Giants, CH Reeves Raptors and St.
Anne’s Bluewaves make up Pool Two.

Quest

DW Davis, in their quest to repeat

-as champions, will be coached by

Rubin Mounts, who guided the Pit-
bulls to the Government Secondary
Schools Sports Association’s junior
boys pennant and championship i in his
first year back.

And Ricardo Ferguson, the founder
of the tournament and coach of the
Pitbulls when they won the first title
two years ago, is now at AF Adderley.

Alfred Forbes, who has the respon-
sibility of putting the schedule togeth-
er, said, based on the teams entered,

the tournament should be very com-
petitive this year.

“Again this year, we have 12 teams
and they will come from both the pri-
vate and public schools,” said Forbes,
who has also been responsible for
putting the schedule together for the
Hugh Campbell Basketball Classic,
organised in February by AF Adder-
ley. °

“This tournament, even though it’s
just the second one, is preferred as
the junior Hugh Campbell Classic and
it should be keenly contested between
the public and private schools. We will
also have a Family Island team entered
for the first time.”

Despite the inclement weather expe-
rienced on Monday because of Hurri-
cane Wilma, Forbes said the organisers
are anticipating that the weather will
clear up and everything will be in
order for this weekend.

“DW Davis are the defending cham-
pions of their own tournament, but
competition is expected from St.
Andrew’s, St. Anne’s, HO Nash,
Prince William and AF Adderley,”
Forbes stated.

“They are considered the top teams
in the tournament.”

Four games are on the schedule
today with AF Adderley taking on
LW Young at 3pm. At 4pm, St.
Andrew’s will take on HO Nash. CH
Reeves and St. Anne’s will play at
5pm and the feature game at 6pm will
showcase SC McPherson and Faith
Temple.

On Friday, another four games are

. set, starting at 3pm.

Then on Saturday, ten games are
scheduled from 9am.

The playoffs will get started at lpm
on Sunday with the championship to
follow.

~ ; ;

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

| Available from Commercial News Providers”

~~ «= “f° *Eg= i)



PIP Gwe er hey ee OO, Pee



PPM Ve Yrtnin

roe :
i oe



SPORTS



o- -* — a * - © oo — -— Oo o/ wee lem

Cracked Conchs play host to English side

er

Vener ateong

Copyrighted Material
England Syndicated ( Content

Ty. !. —_- . ~~
Available from’ Commiercial|News. ‘Providers”

e= «= .



> - - ~_—> _ -_- =



_ Ee = -——_— =

ae ce
Name:

Address

P.O. Box

Telephone Cth

ORRY NO PHOTOCOPIES 3, NEWSPAPER t PRINT ONLY __

ee

sate





THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

Tributes paid to

e



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS



Jackie Moxey

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THE tight-knit Electro Telecom
Wildcats suffered a major blow on
Wednesday when their rightfielder
Jackie ‘Lil Stunt’ Moxey died in hos-
pital. She was 44.

Outside of the Accident and Emer-
gency Department of the hospital on
Tuesday, where the Wildcats assem-
bled with family members, friends and
New Providence Softball Associa-
tion’s rivals, there was a somber
moment with many in a state of shock
and disbelief.

At least two Ministers of New Des-
tiny Full Gospel Baptist Church,
Tyrone Knowles and Stefan Edge-
combe, stood by the bedside of their
member, as people arrived to. give
their Support:

St Thomas
More keep
their spark
in opener

&@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter

THE St. Thomas More
Sparks may have lost some of
their key players from last
year’s championship team. But
they still had enough weapons
left to out-last the St. Bede’s
Crushers in the Catholic Pri-
mary Schools’ basketball sea-
son opener.

Playing before a large crowd
on their home turf, the two-time
defending champions Sparks
pulled off a 16-10 victory over
the Crushers on Wednesday in
a real defensive battle.

Coach Leo Delaney had a
broad smile on his face as he |
complimented his squad.

“Y’m happy with it. It was a
little bit sloppy, but it was
expected because this is the first
time that a lot of these guys are
playing together,” he stated.

The Sparks were riding on
the back of their star guard
Daniel Bullard. But once he
fouled out in the fourth quarter,
Paul Smith stepped up and pro-
vided the defensive spark that
they needed to keep St. Thomas
More ahead.

When Bullard exited the
game with about four minutes

. left and St Thomas More lead-
ing 16-10, coach Delaney said
he became congerned.

“But I knew that if our team
played defence, we would be
able to still pull off the game,”
he added. “I was happy that
they were able to do that.”

Before leaving the game,
Bullard made his contribution
with a game high 10 points.
Smith, in picking up the slack —
in the fourth quarter, chipped in
with four and Yorick Sands
added a pair of free throws.

St. Bede’s, who didn’t make
the playoffs last year, got the
first point of the game on one of
two free throws from Theron
Taylor.

But they couldn’t contain

SEE page 10B

For every McDonald’s Cookie you purchase

Shock after player’s death



Everybody knew that.they had to
prepare for the inevitable. .

“It’s really a sad day,” said left-
fielder Renee ‘Sunshine’ Sweeting.

Centrefielder Vernie Curry said,
when she looks to her right, she won’t
see Moxey there.

Difficult

She said it’s going to be difficult to
play without her.

Ace pitcher Mary ‘Cruise’ Edge-
combe came to tears as she noted that
she had just talked to Moxey the night
before about the schedule for the

BSF’s nationals this weekend.

Jean ‘Bubbles’ Minus, the’ team’s
utility player, called it a “sad day” for
sports in the country.

“Jackie is like a sister. We’re all
just one family. This is just a really
sad day for sports,” Minus insisted.

“{ just saw Jackie on Sunday when
we played in the championship in the
Bahamas Government Departmen-
tal Softball League. We were just hav-
ing fun. She was the last out at the
plate.

“We just embraced and parted
ways.”

@ JACKIE ‘LIL STUNT’ MOKEY









Round robin
_ tournament:
will go ahead

@ SOFTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
‘Reporter

DESPITE the tragic
death of Electro Telecom
Wildcats’ right-fielder | |
Jackie ‘Lil Stunt’ Moxéy,
the Bahamas Softball
Federation’s national
round robin tournament
will still be played this
weekend.

‘The nationals were put
on hold last week
because of the passing of
Hurricane Wilma. But,
this weekend, it will be
staged in conjunction
with the Austin ‘King
Snake’ Knowles National
High School Tourna-
ment.

But Knowles said it’s
best that they play the
nationals, instead of post-
poning it.

Emotional

“It’s going to be-very
emotional for all of us
during the opening cere-
monies. I hope I don’t
cry,” Knowles stated.
“But, knowing Jackie,
she will want us to play.

_ “T know it’s going to be
very hard, but we have to
try and do this one for
her.”

The opening cere-
monies for the nationals
are scheduled for Friday.

The Wildcats will be
seeking their fifth
straight national title, but
they will have to do it
without Moxey.

“Jackie has been one of
.the most inspiring ath-
letes. She’s been playing
for a very long time,”
Knowles reflected. “She’s
been a great motivator,
especially when I’m
down. It’s hard for me
right now.’

Members of the Wild-
cats were scheduled to
meet on the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex where
Moxey played her last
softball game on Sunday
in the Bahamas Govern-
ment Departmental Soft-
ball Association.

Gathering

Leftfielder Renee ‘Stin-

‘shine’ Curry said they

were gathering to deter-
mine what they will do
this weekend in.the
nationals.

“We know she would
want us to play,” she
pointed out. “We don’t
know what will happen
when we get on the field.
But we will decide what
we will do.”

Sweeting said every-
body was shaken up on
Tuesday night when they
met at the hospital. .

“Everybody cried,”
Curry said. “I know when
we heard the news today
that she died, we cried
some more. I guess when
we go out on the field to
play again, we will proba-
bly cry some more. She
won’t be in right field
anymore.”

during the month

of October 2005, McDonald’s will make a donation to the ©













mM

im lovin’ it






SECTION



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005



The Tribune







Sermons, Church Activities, Awards



‘He need Jesus,

he need Jesus’
See hesale 2¢








Christian Council spearheads
spiritual outreach to men

& By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

embers of

the Bahamas

Christian

community

are taking a
stand, having made the deci-
sion to stop talking and to do
something about the numerous
issues that plague today’s soci-
ety, including violent behav-
iour, poor communication
skills, conflict resolution fail-
ures, infidelity, and other prob-
lems that Bahamian men strug-
gle with.

"We recognize that we have
to talk about it. We have held
many discussions. We have
been thinking about it and talk-
ing about it for far too long.
Now, we have decided to act,"
Alfred Stewart, assistant pas-
tor at New Mount Zion Mis-
sionary Baptist Church, told
Tribune Religion yesterday.

Mr Stewart is chairman of
the Bahamas Christian Coun-
cil's committee for its upcom-
ing spiritual outreach to the
men of this country, "Bahamas
Awakening 2005 and Beyond".
The council has invited all of its
member churches to partici-
pate in this landmark effort
which will be held in conjunc-
tion with the United States-
based programme, Promise
Keepers Movement, which
subscribes to the belief that if
you want to change the world,
change its men.

Promise Keepers Movement
(PK) was born in March, 1990,
when Bill McCartney, then
head football coach for the
University of Colorado, and his
friend, Dave Wardell, were on
a drive from Denver to Pueblo,

Rev Neilly ordained to Holy Minist

Colorado. They thought of how
they could reach men in their
community. Subsequently, a
group of men was organised to

form a plan that would hope-,

fully rejuvenate Christian men
with a new spiritual emphasis.

Everything came together -

eventually, and in 1993, PK was
born. Its rallies, which are con-
ducted periodically in various

parts of the country, continue -

to attract thousands of men,
many of whom travel great dis-
tances to attend.

"Bahamas Awakening 2005
and Beyond", comes a at time
when many persons in the
church and the wider society
have expressed "grave con-
cern" over the lack of direc-
tion and motivation on the part
of many of the males in
Bahamian society.

"This couldn't have come at
a better time. When we look
at the lives of our men, the
murders, the serious crime, the
wave of crime, it's a reminder
to us as a nation that our men

are challenged, particularly our

young men," said the chairman.

There may be programmes
currently available that seek to
positively influence the behav-
jour of men through teaching
practical ways of resolving con-
flicts, but Mr Stewart believes
that these efforts often miss a
vital point. In his opinion
deviant behaviour is the root
of a much greater problem, a
spiritual one. "We have to rec-
ognize that we need to get to
the root of the problem; that
is to the spirit of man. You
have to first begin with the
root, then you get change. We
want to reach the young men,
and seek divine intervention."

A highlight of "Bahamas



@ PASTOR ALFRED STEWART



of Word, Sacrament and Order

REV Marie Neilly was ordained to the
Holy Ministry of Word, Sacrament and
Order last week. The ordination service
took place at Wesley Methodist church, :

Harbour Island.

. Kenris Carey, President of the Methodist
Church of the Bahamas, performed the
Act of Ordination and preached the

charge.

Born in Nassau, Rev Neilly spent her

childhood in'the settlement of Lower
Bogue, Eleuthera. She lived with her
grandparents, Alma and Stafford Neilly,
and received her early education at the
Lower Bogue All Age School and the
Governor’s Harbour High School, gradu-
ating as head girl in 1989. At the age of
fourteen she accepted the Lord Jesus
Christ as her personal saviour.’

Rev Neilly relocated to Nassau to live
with her mother, Edith Neilly, and attend-
ed the College of the Bahamas (COB)
where she majored in accounting and book
keeping. She was graduated from COB,
obtaining an Associate and Bachelors






@ REV MARIE NEILLY

degree in accounting and book’ keeping

and became. a certified business studies.

teacher.

_ While studying at COB, Rev Neilly wor- -
‘shipped at Curry Memorial Methodist

Church, South Beach, where she became
the Sunday School: superintendent, and
youth coordinator.

For six years Rev Neilly taught eco-
nomics and accounting at H O Nash and R
M Bailey. It was during this time that she
received her call to enter the ministry and
became a candidate through the Bahamas
conference of the Methodist church. In
2001 she withdrew from the teaching: pro-
fession and began her studies at the-Can-
dler School of Theology, Emory Universi-
ty in Atlanta.

At Candler Seminary, Rev Neilly
obtained the Masters of Divinity degree

and certificates in both Christian education

and clinical pastoral education. While at

SEE page 2C



Awakening 2005 and Beyond"
will be the national solemn
assembly on Friday, Novem-

ber 11, and a mass rally on Sat-_

urday, November 12. Both
events will be held at Clifford
Park, beginning at 6pm. There
will also be a T-Shirt Day, and
Men's March on Sunday,
November 6.

The purpose of the solemn
assembly is to bring together
men of the church, the state,
and civil society to seek the
face of God in prayer for the
men of our nation,.as well as to
lay the proper. spiritual foun-
dation for the ongoing efforts
of "Bahamas Awakening".

In his recent Synod address,

‘Bishop Drexel Gomez, head of

the Anglican diocese of the
Bahamas, said the purpose of
this effort is also to bring about
a night of national repentance
for the sins of the men of the
Bahamas.

"This repentance, in its com-
plete form, will:be about:a

change of mind, heart and.

direction for the men of our
nation. I believe that the pro-
posed Awakening has the
potential for renewal and trans-
formation at a time when so
many negative influences are

adversely impacting the peo-'-

ple of our nation."

Archbishop Gomez went on
to encourage the men of the
Anglican faith to join with men
of other denominations in what
he hailed as an important
national endeavour.

Among the speakers sched-
uled to address the rally are
Archbishop Gomez; Joe White
of the Promise Keepers Move-
ment; Mike. Silver; Dr Myles
Munroe, senior pastor of
Bahamas Faith Ministries



International, and Bishop Neil
Ellis, pastor of Mount Tabor
Full Gospel Baptist Church.
The committee also expects
greetings from Prime Minister
Perry Christie and president of
the Promise Keepers Move-
ment Dr Thomas Fortson.
The philosophy of the
Promise Keepers is based upon
the premise that Christian
growth begins by making |
promises. And as a guideline
it has constructed seven princi-
ples for its: organisation.
According to Mr Stewart,

. "Bahamas Awakening" has

adopted these promises as the
goals for the local effort:

e To see the men of the
Bahamas committed to fearing
God, leading to repentance,
salvation and a commitment to
honour Jesus Christ through.
worship, prayer, and obedience
to God’s Word in the power of
the Holy Spirit.

e To see the men of the

‘Bahamas committed to pursu-

ing vital relationships with oth-
er men, understanding that
they need brothers to help
them keep their promises.

e To see the men of the
Bahamas committed to prac-
ticing spiritual, moral, ethical,
and sexual purity.

-®@ To'see the men of the
Bahamas committed to build-
ing strong marriages and fami-
lies through love, protection
and biblical values.

e To see the men of the
Bahamas committed to sup-
porting the mission of their
churches by honoring and pray-
ing for their church leaders and
by giving their time and

SEE page 2C

Bible Balme eth Sho

"Making Fishers of Men"



PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005

a | oo | HIBUNE



Ba arco



stick.

It is true that the best
example has not always
been set. However, that does
not give anyone license to
degrade and condemn peo-
ple. Too many of us want to
be God, to judge and con-
demn people to hell. God
moves :too slow and is too
merciful for some of us. But
isn't God an all knowing and
all seeing God. If no one
else in this life knows what
they are doing, God surely
knows what He is doing.

I know it is disappointing
when you trust and look up,
only to be let down, but that
does not mean that we are
to pass condemnation on
people. GOD is the judge of
us all and He will have the
last say. We need to stop
killing.each other with the
pink rag in our mouths. The
damage it does is unbeliev-
able. I am proud to be a part
of something that makes a
positive change and I will
not allow the devil or any
demon he uses to change

m@ By ALLISON MILLER



"HE need Jesus, he need
Jesus", was the call that
echoed out, just as the mes-
sage of John the Baptist
when he cried out in the
wildness "Make straight,
prepare ye the way of the
Lord”. The voice said it
twice and it caused me to
think that after all the scruti-
ny and bad mouthing "The
Church" suffers, it still all
boils down to the fact that
people need the Lord.

Example

I was privileged to hear a
conversation that my col-
leagues were having. They
were discussing the poor
example set by people in the

-church, especially the lead-
ers. Someone jumped ‘up
and said, "That's Allie and
*John’s people." John quick-
ly got up to defend the
church he was a member of,
but I explained to him that it
did not matter what local







ALL Saints on Calvary Hill
Anglican Church, Joan’s
Heights, will honour three for-
mer rectors during a gala ban-
quet on Friday, October 28,
at the Cable Resort. The
event, titled ‘ Men of Distinc-
tion’, will pay tribute to Father
Addison Turnquest, Father









@ ALLISON MILLER

Harry Ward.

Father Sebastian Campbell,
current rector, said that this
is the perfect time, the 30th
Anniversary of the parish, to
honour these distinguished
men of faith who have impact-
ed the members and the com-
munities of South Beach, Joan
Heights, Bamboo Town and
Pinewood Gardens in partic-
ular.

“ As we embark on another
mile of our journey, we must







“After all that
God has done
for us, even
when we suffer











enter ee the worst trial or that. hee that have brought us ths

Church body and will have Condemnation, Suffer far and give them their praise

Panter ie Gale. while they are alive,” Father
After considering what I God is worth it After all that God has | | Campbell stated.

said, he paused and ay 1 thank Him done for us, even when we Father Addison Turnquest

suffer the worst trial or con-
demnation, God is worth it
all. I thank Him for making

explained. "It's not the
church you know, it's per-
sons who take decisions to



Bishop Eldon charged
Father Turnquest with the
responsibility to build a church




for making life






represent it in a derogatory ‘oat life worth living. He keeps :

manner. God isn't lacking in worth living. us, forgives, comforts and SN ee ate
anything, He is perfect. It is He kee Ss us loves us regardless. Many of GROWS the HeSEtEE cone t
just that we fail in our many p ’ us can say, "Had it not been at Christ the King, Ri aes d



for the Lord on my side
where would I be." God is a
good God and His love and
kindness is greater than life



attempts of living the way
He says that we are to live."
I couldn't have said it bet-
ter myself.

forgives, comforts
and loves us

Park, encouraged a few mem-
bers from that parish to join




land for the church was gen-





one else has to suffer the-
blame. There are however,
peoplé who live exactly the “7
way God says they-are to
live and we can not beat
them with the hypocrisy



their son, Stanley Bethel, and



* * John’s name has hebh
changed to protect his iden-

Bethel.




Saints was held in a tent bor-
rowed from St Gregory’s,
Carmichael Road, and the







_ Cedar’s of Lebanon
|Cathedral Union Baptist Church
Look where the Lord has brought us now...

He has brought us a mighty long way, to God be ihe Glory!




Word from the Servant of God








On October 5th, 1995, I was commissioned by our Lord and Saviour Jesus
Christ, under the leadership of Rev. Dr. Earl Francis, Pastor of First Baptist
Church, to start a mission as a branch of First Baptist Church. I accepted
this challenge with feat enthusiasm. I was over whelmed for such a gigantic

task,

We had our first service that Sunday morning at 11:00 am, we were small
in number, but we were not discouraged, because we moved on faith and
on the word of God, when he said “wherever two or three are gathered
together, touching anything in my name he promised to be in the midst”.
From that day, to this present time, we have seen the wondrous working
power of God. He continues to bless us mightily in Cedars. It's neity:
whatever we ask the Lord. for, He grants to us.
















Five years ago we started this mission and now we are having our sixth
anniversary service to thank the Lord for all of the blessings he has bestowed
upon us. We have only just begun, there is much land to possess, there are
souls to be rescued, there are souls to save. We in Cedar's of Lebanon Union. |
Baptist Church have a pide by our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ and that is “to go in the highways, the byways
and compel them to come to Know the Lord Jesus Christ as their Lord and personal Saviour”



Ist Lady aay Mae Paie Co
Rev. Dr. Char les Crewtwell Rolle, J.P. Pastor










We are getting better and better every Sunday, please pray for us, and lend us your support, GOD BLESS YOU!





. Rev. Dr. Charles C. Rolle, J.P.

‘Pastor



You are Re A TMOG ne
celebrate with us, our Church’s
Te TTA

This Sunday, October eila0
3pm

Location:
Nassau Village, Button Wood Drive

| AYA OLE ME LAA LLG
Come one , come all...

Patrick Johnson and Father .

Unfortunately, what hap- regardless.” itself. I am grateful to Him
pens is that some persons set 8 d for having me be a part of Staal a oe ae ee
a bad example and every- —A Miller His Kingdom. and cleared for. building by.

grandsons, sary and Michael...
- Father James Moultrie, Father

The Test service ee ‘All Samuel Stirrup and Father |

altar donated by the late
Father Anthony Roberts.
After many cookouts the
church building was dedicated
on January 18, 1976.

Father Turnquest stayed

‘with the Parish until 1982 after

“AS We ©
embark on —
another mile |
of our journey,
we must
reflect on the
contribution
of those that —
have brought
us this far and
give them their
praise while —
they are alive’
— Fr Sebastian Campbell

him in the undertaking. The

which several priests, includ-
ing Father Murillo Bonaby,

Patrick Adderley, served until
a permanent replacement was
made in the person Father S.

‘He need Jesus, Former
he need Jesus’ to be honoured
at gala banquet

Patrick Johnson.

Father S. Patrick Johnson

Father Johnson’ was
appointed to All Saints Parish.
in August 1988. He immedi-
ately took on the challenge of
enhancing the spiritual life of
the church. Under his lead-
ership the church’s mortgage
was paid off and additional
property purchased to the
east. Father Johnson is also
credited for settling the choir.
He and his wife Ethel were
instrumental in the establish-
ment of the Friday morning
breakfast mass. Mrs Johnson.
also taught Sunday school dur-
ing her husband’s stay at All
Saints.

Cursillo was also introduced
at All Saints in 1985, under
Father Johnson and today the
Parish is at the fore-front of
this spiritual renewal pro-
gramme within the Anglican

_ church in the Bahamas and

Caribbean. Father Johnson
has also worked with the
ACM in walk-abouts in the
Pinewood Gardens area to
bring new members into the
church. He also instituted the
hospital visitation programme |
that still exists today.

Father Harry Ward
Father Ward replaced.
Father Johnson in September
1988 and served until August
1990. His contributions to All

Saints included exercising

astute management over the

Parish’s business, settling the

vestry and strengthening

youth groups and their activi-

ties. He also introduced the

Discovery, Renewal and Cou-
ples Club and the experimen-

tal ‘Even Song’ of the.
Province.

] | Rev Neilly ordained

to Holy Ministry of
Word, Sacrament ©
and Order

FROM page 1C

Candler Seminary, Rev Neilly
served as president of the Can-
dler International Association,
treasurer of the Candler Stu-
dent’s Association and prayer
band leader at Turner Village.

After graduating from Can-

dler Seminary, Rev Neilly was
placed at Wesley Methodist
Church in Harbour Island dur-
ing her probationary year.

She has since been stationed
by the Conference to the North
Eleuthera Region to serve as
the minister of Wesley
Methodist Church, Harbour
Island.

Christian eNTTeT

oO State
outreach to men



FROM page 1C

resources.

e To see the men of the
Bahamas committed to reach-
ing beyond any ethnic, nation-
al and denominational barrier
in a way that demonstrates the
power of biblical unity.

¢ To see the men of the
Bahamas committed to chang-
ing their world by being obedi-
ent to the great commandment
(Mark 12:30-31) and the great



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

commission (Matthew 28:19-
20).

Though this effort is expect-
ed to attract men of all ages,
the committee has decided to
target males as young as 13
years old.

"We want to reach young
men because that's where the
problem begins. This is where
serious crimes manifest and
start to develop. We hope to
change that," Mr Stewart
added.















IHE | RIBUNE

VAM OAON Sharing Our Stories:
Discovering



@ By Fr HENRY CHARLES

(This is the second part of a
three-part series on the spiritu-
ality of work. The first article
was published on October 13).

WORK is full of paradoxes. It
frees and liberates us in many
ways. Yet it also binds us and
ties us down to fixed schedules
and timetables.

Work makes a variety of
things more available to us in
greater proliferation; yet we
must make ourselves more
available in the process. We
must work longer hours, bear

greater workloads, and spend’

more hours on call, outside of
working hours, and so on.

Work simultaneously enrich-
es and impoverishes. Harder
work means more production
but also more monotony. Work
makes us powerful and at the
same times increases our depen-
dence.

Through work we make
things serve ends that we deter-
mine, yet we grow more depen-
dent on the very things wermake
to serve us.

Work increases our human

sense of worth and achievement.
Modern living comforts, quick
communications, space exploits,
technological innovation are all
achievements we can be proud
of.

Yet mass production and
standardisation suggest some-
times that we ourselves are just
so many sheep following stan-
dardised living patterns imposed
on us by the work of our own
hands.

Again, through work we have
created forces and energies we
can no longer control. Atomic
energy is one of the most strik-
ing of these creations.

What was at first a sign of
ingenuity and creativeness has
become the very symbol of our

inability to control what we have

made. Self-expression through
inventiveness has resulted in the
real possibility of self-destruc-
tion. :
From the Protestant Refor-
mation came the notion of work
as a “calling” or “vocation.”
This was opposed to the
Catholic notion of calling as per-
taining only to those in religious
life. The conjunction of work
and calling has had the merit of
making work a religious, i.e. not
a purely secular, phenomenon.
Its religious meaning did not
depend on the religious attitude
you brought to work. Religious
meaning was inherent. Luther
thus settled in one stroke some-
thing that still dominates the
religious discussion of work:

Pastor Ben Bailey
Program Organizer
The Prophetic Voice

P. O. Box N-9518

Nassau, Bahamas

boils to afflict the man’s physical



@ FR H CHARLES

how can I bring my faith and
my work together?

Luther's answer was that you
don't have to bring them togeth-
er; they already are. Your work
is your calling, your vocation; it

- is there that you serve God most

ordinarily and organically. The
notion, however, has two short-
comings.

First, it implies a singleness
and permanence of vocation
that no longer corresponds to
much of human work experi-
ence. Luther did not envisage
that many “callings” are possible
in a single life, as more and
more people have discovered,
or are discovering. Secondly, the
vocational understanding of

work as calling has not been |

sensitive to the potential of work
for dehumanising and alienat-
ing people.

The emphasis on staying
where you were called overrode
every, other consideration —.or
better, blocked. the emergence
of any other perspective. _

One may take any of three
approaches to a theology or a
spirituality of work, or better,
have a perspective that gives
varying weight and attention to
three dimensions.

As I indicated last week, a

negative view of work has dom-.
inated its understanding histor- _

ically. To this corresponds what
we may call the penitential per-
spective. ,
Work is a punishment for sin.
Before the Fall work is part of
God's plan for creation, Adam
is put in the garden to “till it

and keep it ” (Gen 2:15 ). Work

was a constituent feature of
human existence.

After the Fall, there's a dras-
tic change. Yahweh cries out:

“Cursed is the ground because

of you; in toil you shall eat all

the days of your life; thorns and .

thistles it shall bring forth to
you; and you shall eat the plants
of the field. In the sweat of your
brow you shall eat bread, till
you return to the dust, for out of
it you were taken .”

Note that the curse falls pri-

marily on the soil, the work field

_ assigned to human beings to cul-

tivate. Work, which should have
been a purely humanising activ-
ity, now becomes painful.

Work is hard. Humans dis-
cover with difficulty the powers
of nature and the energies that
go into the formation of the
world.

The Bible thus sees a connec-
tion between disobedience and
the oppressiveness, fatigue,
drudgery, and labouriousness of
work.

A second approach is the cre-
ationist view. Humans also have
a mandate to be stewards of the
earth, to cultivate and take care
of it (2:15 ).

Work is co-creative activity,
cooperation with God in the
continuing act of creation. We
are free to shape and determine
creation as something that has
been entrusted to us. In the
exercise of this responsibility we
act in the “image” of God.

In both accounts of creation
in Genesis we see different
aspects of creation itself as work.
In the first account there is the
joyous surprise of God when he
seés the final result of his cre-

ativity. “God saw everything -

that he had made, and behold it
was very good ” (1:31 ).
In the second account God

makes the human being propri-:

etor of the garden, committing
him to the work that maintains
God's own work. In naming
things the human being is a part-
ner with God in bringing things

into existence and conferring ;

meaning on them.

The big value of the second
account is its dynamism and pos-
itive character, in contrast to the
resignation that stems from the
penitential view. The second
view also embraces an evolu-
tionary perspective. Human col-
laboration with the divine plan is
an ongoing activity.

A third view of work departs
from the Second Coming, with
its vision of a néw heaven and a
new earth. One may interpret

this in either of two ways: first, .

in the sense of a complete dis-

‘ ruption between the work of our

hands and the new creation.

From this point of view, the
new creation is completely and
entirely God's doing. One may
also see the newness in terms of
continuity, mysterious as this
must remain.

In this perspective, the fruit
of our labour, in all the forms
that this assumes, will form part
of the new heavens and new
earth. The value of work is not
destructible. It is something

caught up for ever in the plan of

God for creation.

The Character of God: Part One .

Scripture Text: Old Testament Psalm 15:1-5

The greatest compliment God can extend to a man; is to. point out
to his sworn enemy, the obvious reflection of God’s Character upon
that individual. A Colonial expression relative to a man’s character,
praised the person for possessing a sterling character. God asked
the ‘Accuser’ whether he had considered Job’s commitment towards
God. Satan’s response was that Job was only serving God as a
result of the personal possessions he received from God. ©

Satan is given permission to move without restrictions against Job’s
possessions; and used two elements of nature, lightning and a
windstorm; combined with two groups of the man’s common enemies
to aid in the destruction of his possessions. What was Job’s reaction
to this series of devastating events? Job‘arose, tore his robe, shaved
his head; and fell to the ground and worshiped. Satan is given
permission once again to move without restrictions against Job;
this time however, the person of the man faced jeopardy. The
powerful and unrestrained ferocity of the enemy: is now displayed
through the fifth and final strike against Job. Satan used painful

body.

Let us not hasten to judge the wife too quickly without considering that during the first set of troubles,
‘both the man and his wife were collectively afflicted by the loss of their possessions and offspring.
However, in this matter it appears that Job isolated his feelings from her when the attack was
personally directed at him. Harold St. John rightly comments concerning Louise Haughton’s thoughts
‘relative to the matter, “As long as job’s wife could share in his sorrows she bore up bravely, but as
‘soon as he enters a fresh chamber of suffering and leaves her outside, then she breaks down: for
her, the intolerable woe is, that, which she is forbidden to share with him.” ~

The account of the patriarch job called into question the Godly character of God from the five
participants in the book: Job, Eliphaz, Bildad, Zophar and Elihu: Job once he is afflicted; is visited
by his friends, whose original intent was to comfort him, but soon wound up debating among
themselves, reasons for his condition. Is there any wonder, then, why Job refers to his friends as
‘miserable comforters?’ In times of great distress and unbearable sorrow, a troubled man should
look to Jesus, a ‘Balm in Gilead.’ Job declares his innocence throughout the book, and indirectly
sought to accuse God for his dilemma. As the debates progresses, Job’s understanding concerning
God increases more and more, despite the miserable counsels of his friends.

The narrative is designed to bring ‘peace of mind’ to persons who anguish over whether their suffering
is the result of God’s punishment, which many times, may not be the case. It also relieves the guilty
conscience from imagined sins, when one is faced with painful events. What happened to Job clearly
demonstrates a righteous person may be completely innocent and still be made to suffer pain and
anguish. The point we make here, is this, do not beat yourself too hard, because nobody but God
knows what God is doing when you experience difficult times in your life.

Once Job and his friends iad exhausted all debate without satisfactorily resolving the question of
the reason of his afflictions; God intervened and crushed all previous arguments, considered ‘words
of wisdom’ spoken in His Name. All who thought they knew God, whether they spoke innocently,
experientially, observationally, religiously, anciently, legalistically, or academically, proved themselves
presumptuous, because they failed to consider the Immutability, Omnipotence, and Sovereignty of

God.

‘So Eliphaz the Temanite and Bildad the Shuhite and Zaphar the Naamathite went and did as the
‘Lord commanded them; for the Lord had accepted Job. The Lord restored Job’s losses when he
“prayed for his friends. Indeed the Lord gave Job twice as much as he had before.” Job 42: “Now
the Lord blessed the latter days of Job more than his beginning; for he had fourteen thousand sheep,
-six thousand camels, one thousand yoke of oxen, and one thousand female donkeys. He also had
“seven sons and three daughters. After this Job lived one hundred and forty years, and saw his
‘children and grandchildren for four generations. Job died, old and full of days.”

.We wish to interject these appropriate words from Andreae, more recently quoted by Otto Zockler,
“The same storm which on the one side is sent upon the lands for punishment and destruction; is
at the same time appointed on the other side to bless them abundantly, and to make them fruitful.

‘Thus, even the judgments of God are ever to be regarded as at the same time a Source out of which

divine grace distils forth.”

IHURSVDAY, UC LUBER Z/, ZUU0, FAUL SU



Our Heroes |

m@ By REV ANGELA
PALACIOUS

-MR C Robinson’s funeral
was a most touching and
wonderful celebration of a
great life and acknowledg-
ment of the depth of the loss

of one with so much love to
give. He was an obvious

hero for many persons.
What made it even more
poignant for me was that he
died at 94 just.as my father

“had done in 2002.

It is a humbling thing to
observe the cycle of human

‘life and realise that forces

beyond our control bring us
full circle.
Up to several months

‘before his death, my father

was witty and sharp and yet

‘so playful and gently affec-
tionate. He, who had the ©

dignity of a man and wisdom
of a sage, was now in some
ways like my baby: The pil-

: lows in the hospital bed here’

at home reminded me of the
bumpers in my son’s crib;

‘between the mouthfuls of
food spooned on “weak”

days, there was the toothless

‘ grin; bathing and dressing

were all blessed moments of

-ministry to one who once

stood over six feet tall. Bent
with age, his head against

“mine, or shoulder to shoul-
der, arms wrapped around
each other’s waists, we shuf-

fled along the hall.

Who was I for him? At
times I was the mother from
whom he hid the uneaten
food in little bags he would

. throw away secretly. I was
* the dutiful daughter who fol-

Speaker:
BISHOP
ANDREW STEWART

PART TWO



@ REV PALACIOUS

“Itisa |
humbling
thing to
observe the
cycle of
human life
and realise
- that forces
beyond our
control bring
us full circle”

—RevA Palacious

Corner Stone Zion Ministries Int’l

at 10:30am

lowed instructions when his
tone shifted and he tem-
porarily re-established _his
authority. I was the loving
servant who saw Christ in
the face of an ancient par-
ent, whose modern mind dis-
cussed world events and
local talk with the same ease
as he recalled lamp-lighters
extinguishing street lights at
dawn, and maiden flights of
airplanes to sleepy island vil-
lages. Able to list the names
of all his classmates’ eighty-
plus years ago, he surpassed
my memory searching to
recall my long forgotten
- friends.

On occasion, as I stood
quietly at the foot of the bed
to see if there was any sign
of breathing, I wondered:
“How will I release you back
to God?” In time, I came to
know how a motherly
daughter feels when it is
time to say farewell to one
who had opened his heart to
us and allowed us to see who
he really was, a true hero in
his own way.

We do not always have
the time to prepare for
death, and we do not always
live to see old age. None of
us know the day or the hour
that. we will die. Do you
have a will, life insurance
and a possible guardian for
young children? Do you
have a plan in place to care
for aging parents? Let us do
all that we'can to find joy in
the present, seek hope for
the future and learn wisdom
from the past. Do not wait
until it is too late to love
your heroes. ,



Speaker:
BISHOP
E. RANDY FRASER
Pilgrim Baptist Temple
at 3:30am

Sunday, October 30, 2005
Services will be held at 10:30am & 3:30pm
Baillou Hill Road, South
Nassau, Bahamas







PAGE 4C, THURSDAY, OCTBER 27, 2005

Your Bahamian Supermarkets"

SUPER
VALUE

y TIFAGn i ae eer
@ SUNCARD CO Roar Me a
QUALITY RIGHTS AND PRICES RESERVED 3

SUNLIGHT
VEGETABLE chit Ss |

OL

$10°

TT Ce BUMBLE BEE
WHOLE KERNEL IN OIL/WATER

CORN
ro) ee
SLICED

CARNATION
EVAPORATED

O 3 pa
Sadate el QUEEN | s Sa
rel te) ae al alas
PEAS j\§ | i aS es

15-0Z

BUMBLE BEE ~ ee GENERIC

‘yf BLEAC

‘GALL

$499

99° OZ

ror = ons

ae
71 LIQUID
Me Ie

CHARMIN | GAIN

BATH |
vissu- aU

FEU fo)

yaaa
TDA

CAMPBELLS
SUPERIORE

SPAGHETTI
W/MEATBALLS

SUNCHY
MALT
rey

DOWNY

NON-CONCENTRATE |

FABRIC

CHARMIN

Ti

24 - ROLLS

THE TRI





THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 5C

MSCOUM bles

SMOKED



AMS
39

PER - LBS

assis seraecnesecortecntaranrnaasaa



U.S. CHOICE
FRESH





MAS SHEER RIERNINEEN een eanaaaeaee ga RU ae

Moire Hampers ¢ Sheet Sets ° ° Comforters ° Mattress Pads e Place Mats ° Table Cloths
¢ Rugs « Tea Kettles « Pot Sets * Flatware Sets ¢ Dinnerware Sets « -Glass Sets ¢ Wall
Dies Carpet Sweeper ¢ Wall Mirrors ° Telephones * Toasters ¢ lrons:* Throw Pillows
e Drapes







U.S. CHOICE TTVA GAY GRILLMASTER

CHUCK en G| §6BEEF
BCT ancist

WE ACCEPT AMERICAN EXPRESS TASER VISA AND SUNCARD, WE ALSO REDEEM QUALITY STAMP. CARDS
. MACKEY STREET, TOP OF THE Be (next to Super Value) PHONE: 393-3411/393-5569
PER - LB 75. LB BOX



BED BATH & HOME

HOME SALE



GALAXY SANDWICH 10-0Z STARFRITES 2.5-LB BAG

FRENCH FRIES $1.89

FROSTY ACRE — 8-EARS
CORN ON COB $2.69

CHEESE $1.39

DKOTA ASST’D 16-0Z

BAGLES $1.79

TAMPICO ASST’D =>. GAL
FRUIT DRINKS $2.99

PEPPERIDGE FARM 19-02
LAYER CAKES $3.99












OSCAR MAYER
BEEF/JUMBO &
BUN LENGTH

FRANKS



ee ay

WHOLE ROTISSERIE

CHICKENS



99.

escent











HARVEST FRESH

BROCCOLI

BUNCH
$4 99
HARVEST FRESH

GREEN
PEPPERS

Shea

SWEET RED RED OR GOLDEN

GRAPES APPLES

: $499 PER - LB 3/ $400

SWEET DELICIOUS IDAHO BAKING

MANGOES |POTATOES

2/$<300 3/$ q 90



Rugs Wall Clocks
Towels Bathroom Accessories Wall Pictures
Sheet Sets Lamps Picture Frames
Tablecloths Blenders Flatware Sets
Throw Pillows : Figurines Cookware Sets
Comforter Sets Bakewares Glassware Sets
Shower Curtains Dinnerware Sets









SALE STARTS MONDAY, OCTOBER 24TH- SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29TH, 2005

Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448

eae ie eee ee ule ere See:

i 1





PAGE 6C, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005



THE TRIBUNE

RELIGION

@ DEPUTY Prime Minister and Minister
of National Security Cynthia Pratt (fifth
from left in front row) is pictured with
Minister Charlene Paul, Pastor Kenneth
Adderley, general presbyter, and some
of the women who were honoured.

Fifty three women honoured



@ By MINISTER E LUCINDA ROLLE,
National Women’s Ministries
Director

THE Assemblies of God National

Women’s Ministries honoured fifty-three
women throughout the Bahamas during
its 18th Annual Conference this month
with a luncheon and dinner. These women
served in the Assemblies of God churches
for twenty-five years or more.

‘They served in various capacities such as’

Sunday school teachers, evangelists, lay
ministers, choir directors, intercessors,
fund raisers, church organizers, coordina-
tors, custodians, nursery facilitators, musi-
cians, women’s ministries presidents and
the list goes on.

Ministry

They were recognized for their-resilience
in ministry, fortitude, sacrifice and dedi-

cation in service. ..



Many of:the honorees were unable to
attend due to failing health.

The Assemblies of God churches they
attend assisted the honorees from the
islands of Grand Bahama, Eleuthera, Aba-
co, and New Providence to be in the Capi-
tol for celebrations. :

The National Women’s Ministries Direc-

_tor, Minister E. Lucinda Rolle, who host-
ed the 18th Annual Women’s Ministries
Conference in Nassau at the British Colo-
nial Hilton, initiated the event. ~ ot








To Observe



THE event, sponsored
by the Bahamas Christian
Council, is scheduled to
meet in a national solemn
assembly on Friday,
November 11. The group
will also host a mass rally
on Saturday, November 12.
Both events will be held at
Clifford Park, beginning at
6pm. There will also be a
T-Shirt Day, and Men's
March on Sunday, Novem-
ber 6.
Registration for the
Men’s March will be held
at Rawson Square from
11am to 3pm on Friday,
November 4 and Saturday,
November 5.

8th PASTORAL
ANNIVERSARY

JUDAEA Baptist
Church invites you to cele-
brate with their pastor, Rev
Dr Marina P Sands, on her
8th pastoral anniversary
under the theme, “A faith-
ful woman of passion and
pride for such a time as
this”,

The celebration ends
with two services - at
10:30am and 3:30pm - on
October 30.

57th
ANNIVERSARY
OF DEDICATION

ST. GEORGE’S Angli-
can Church celebrated its
57th anniversary of dedica-
tion last Sunday.

Mission Services are
being held nightly until
October 27. The theme for
the mission is “Sharing the
Gospel — Living the Min-
istry through Time, Talent
and Treasure”.

On Thursday, October
27, the preacher will be Fr.

Colin Saunders, Priest-in-

Extends

a

Sincere Invitation

ALL SOULS’ DAY

In a service of prayer and thanksgiving.
_, for all departed loved ones.

6:00 pm
Soldier Road

We honour the memory of those buried at

Charge of St. Ambrose
Parish.

And on Friday, October
28, at 7 pm, the celebra-
tions will close with a cul-
tural evening and family
night.

SIXTH
PASTORAL
ANNIVERSARY

APOSTLE Phalmon and
Lady Sophia Ferguson of
United Faith Ministries
International, Summer-
winds Plaza, Hartold Road,
will celebrate their sixth
pastoral anniversary service
under the theme "Maxi-
mizing our Potential
through Grace:. Shepherd-
ing God's People".

The services are being
held until October 28,
nightly at 7.30 o’clock and
on Sunday, October 30, at
10.30am.

Speakers will include
Bishop Eliakim Ferguson,

_ Church of God of Prophe-

cy, Soldier Road, Apostle
C. Clifford Smith III,
Southside Christian Min-
istries International, Pastor
Ranford Patterson, Cousin
McPhee, Cathedral AME
Church, Overseer Arnold
Josey, Commonwealth Mis-
sion Baptist Church and
Bishop Sterling Moss,
Church of God of Prophe-
cy, Gambier. The services
are open to the public.

‘MEN OF
DISTINCTION’

ALL Saints Anglican
Church, Joan’s Heights, is
scheduled to honour three
of its former rectors during
a banquet on Friday, Octo- -
ber 28, at the Radisson
Cable Beach resort.. The
event titled, “Men of Dis-
tinction”, will pay tribute
to Father Addison Turn-
quest, Father Patrick John-
son and Father Harry
Ward.



WOODLAWN GARDENS LIMITED





On the 2nd November, 2005

at Woodlawn Gardens






Woodlawn Gardens. Join us as we pray and
give thanks for their lives.




Qabattamias
of"

g pao
od “Oe
: ee

9 @
Q







t ing TES.
Benes Pizza

AmericanAirlines®




































THE TRIBUNE

Bahamas Awakening Men’s March - aren re at Pe

Bahamas Awakening Rally - Friday & Saturday, Na Wht: 3 12th, PII
(Rallies will be held at CLIFFORD PARK - ic 00 P.M.)
For more information eles Telephone: 341-1804 - Fax: ve -3726 / ee 0409






Message

b ;
The President of the
Bahamas Christian
Council

Dr. WILLIAM
THOMPSON

| would like to thank Bahamas Awakening 2005 &
Beyond Committee for their leadership in an
initiative aimed at our men, which, | sincerely
believe. will-turn-out-to be the most exciting and
nation changing move of God that our country has
ever experienced.

Bahamas "Awakening" 2005 & Beyond is a
partnership launched under the auspices of the
Bahamas Christian Council between the men of
the Christian Church of The Bahamas and Promise
Keepers International. This initiative will be
Ongoing and is being established to create a
spiritual awakening among the men of The
Bahamas that will.lead'them-o a discovery and an
acceptance. their responsibility to. ie Godly
living.

I'm sure you will all agree with me thatitis past time
for the men of the Church throughout all of The
Bahamas to wake.up and to take appropriate

-} action to address thé needs “orallthe mien ofthe

nation.
The vision of Bahamas Awakening is to see the

men.of The Bahamas spiritually transformed. Our -

mission is to mobilize and unite the men of the
Church to model Godly living as we reach out to the.
men and boys of the nation. We have adopted the

Seven Promises of Promise Keepers and are |.

using them to establish the following goals:

1. To see the men of The Bahamas

committed to fearing God, leading to repentance,

salvation and a commitment to honor Jesus Christ
through worship, prayer and obedience to God's
_ wordin the power ofthe Holy Spirit.

Zi To see_the men of The Bahamas
~~ Committed to pursuing vital relationships with other
men, understanding that they need brothers to
help them keep their promises. -

3. ° To see the men of The Bahamas
committed to practicing spiritual, moral, ethical and
sexual purity.

4. To see the men of The Bahamas
committed to building strong marriages and.
families through love, protection and_ biblical.
values.

5; To see the men of the Bahamas
committed to support the mission of their churches
by honoring and praying for their church leaders
and by giving of their time and resources.

6. To see the men of The Bahamas
committed to reach beyond-any ethnic, national
and denominational barriers in a way that
demonstrates the power of biblical unity.

7. To see the men of The Bahamas
committed to changing their world by being
obedient to the great commandment and the great
commission.

How do we seek to accomplish the goals? It's
going to take the united efforts of all of the men of
the Church in all of The Bahamas and the men of all
_ other civic and social organizations where our
young men and older men are represented. We are
seeking to secure the full support and participation
of every Pastor, Church, Men's Ministry Leaders,
every man of every Church and every man ofeve
organization throughout the length and breadth of
The Bahamas at the National Solemn Assembly
and The Awakening event on Friday November 11
and Saturday November 12.

We are also be seeking the financial support of our
Churches, civic and social organizations,
individuals and the business community to assist
us in covering the cost of this massive undertaking.
My fellow men of The Bahamas, let us all join
together and recommit to the values that
- distinguishes us as a people of God, so that we
may accomplish the will of God to see our men, our
marriages, our families, our churches, our
communities and our nation spiritually awakened
and transformed by God's Holy Spirit.

“among the men of The Bahamas that will lead them to a discovery and an



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 7C



UPDATE

By The Chairman
Mr. Alfred Stewart

When | was invited by Rev. Dr. William Thompson, ©
President of The Bahamas Christian Council late last year
to Chair a committee to oversee the staging of a Promise
Keepers Rally in The Bahamas, | accepted the invitation as | was convinced that such an event
could be the start of something important that God is wanting to do among the men of The °
Bahamas. | knew the powerful and beneficial impact that Promise Keepers has had upon men
across the United States and the transformation that has taken place as men fill football and
baseball stadiums and arenas. | knew about the power of fifty thousand men assembled to
praise God and commit to those values that produce Godly lives and values. So I was excited
by the prospect of being involved in a process that could have the same impact upon our men.














| believe that the time has come for all good men throughout The Bahamas to wake up and
respond to the alarms that are going off all around us.. The alarms are warnings to the
challenges facing our homes, our communities and our nation. We are in a fight for our very
souls, a fight we cannot afford to loose. It is time for all of us to wake up.

“The Bahamas Awakening 2005 & Beyond Committee which was established under the
auspices of The Bahamas Christian Council. will partner with Promise Keepers International
and conduct a major men's Rally at Clifford Park November 11-12, 2005.

Bahamas Awakening was established for the purpose: of creating a spiritual awakening
among the men of The Bahamas that will challenge them to recommit to the Biblical values
and way of living that will result in spiritual transformation and peace in our land.

“Two significant events are planned for Clifford Park to mobilize ’our men to action. The firstis a

National Solemn Assembly that will start at 6 pm on Friday, November 11, where the men of
". the Bahamas assemble at Clifford Park to confess before the Lord the sins of the men of our
nation, seek His forgiveness for our sins and pray for His Divine intervention in causing a
spiritual awakening and transformation to take place in the lives of our men leading eventually ©
to healing of our land. :



What Is Bahamas Awakening 2005 and Beyond?

Bahamas "Awakening" 2005 and Beyond is an initiative of the Christian Church
men of The Bahamas launched under the auspices of the Bahamas Christian
Council between in partnership with Promise Keepers International. Bahamas:
Awakening was established for the purpose of creating a spiritual awakening











Immediately after the Solemn Assembly, and continuing at. 6 pm on Saturday, November 12,

the Bahamas "Awakening" Committee.and Promise: Keepers International will co-produce
-. The Awakening Rally, calling every man to a discovery and an acceptance their God given
responsibility to model Godly living and lead in the transformation of our homes and the nation.














- If it is the desire-of your heart to see our nation transformed by God's power, then make.a
promisé to be'patt of The Awakening. Join hands with Bahamas Awakening 2005 & Beyond at
Clifford Park on Friday, November 11 and on Saturday, November 12 for and become a part of
what God is about to do in our midst.

septance their God given responsibility to model Godly, living. ©



Whats Promise Keepers?

Promise Keepers, Christian movement for men in which ee in 1990, when Bill
McCartney, then head football coach at the University of Colorado, expressed to.a
friend his dream of filling stadiums with Christian men. From that beginning,
Promise Keepers has encouraged men to keep promises made to God, their
families, and their churches through rallies held in sports stadiums across
America. Promise Keepers states that the organization seeks to unite Christian
men across racial, socioeconomic, and cultural lines. Members believe that by
gathering and worshiping together, men can help one another learn to devote
more time to their wives and children. Promise Keepers marked its 10th
anniversary in the year 2000, having reached more than 3.5 million men through
98 stadium and arena conferences.



u&




Waa sche: KEEPERS

Rae Goals of CELE as ENTE rN Beyond

ee io WSC CU OMS esnOl es i Promise cal







Tuas) to Go God, ee to eens
; : t Christ:through. werent FEN ciaeLile)
Se ear Sk the Holy Spirit.







2. To see the men.of The Crees committed to pursuing vital relationships with
OUTER Ne Murs shea Ms brothers 1) ae ag their promises.

How Did All This Come About?”

In February 2004, a formal invitation was extended to Promise Keepers by The
Right Honourable Perry G. Christie, Prime Minister .of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas on behalf of the government and the people of The Bahamas to stage a
“friendly invasion of our shores with the message and mission which we know will
ignite a new appreciation in all our people on the responsibilities of Christian
manhoad.”




3. To see the eG ui
P| onl ean









Lue (oe a
Se 0 ; churches by ne Me and| rie) leaders and by giving of their time

The Bahamas Christian Council was charged with the responsibility to facilitate the . Sa
“friendly invasion”. Since that time a vision to mobilize the men of the Church of »
The Bahamas to take the lead in addressing issues related to the men of our nation
has emerged. To launch this initiative, a series of activities have been planned in
cooperation with Promise Keepers International, the highlight of which will be a
“National Solemn Assembly” and “'Awakening" Rally” on Friday and Saturday
November 11 and 12, 2005. The events will have both spiritual and economic
benefits to The Bahamas in that hundreds of Promise Keepers from the United

States is expected to participate



Cj in see the men Ci The peer eae Loo es beyond any ethnic, national
acu denominational Eu ina CO CO the.power of biblical unity.





7. To see the men yi The Bahamas Reverie to Ue) their world by being
Pye aa On UN ce commandment and the great commissio!








Do Our Men Really Need A Spiritual Awakening?

A casual social review of our country tells the tale that our men are in a crisis
socially, spiritually and morally. In looking at the crisis situation in The Bahamas,
the father of our nation, Sir Lynden Pindling, in one of his final interviews said, if he
had it to do over again, he would make the male crisis in our country a top priority.
There is a need for an awakening among the men our land. Absentee fathers,
among other challenges and short comings in the home, work place, church, civic
and national life, is calling us to a real and meaningful awakening at this time. We
believe that such an awakening can only come about through God inspired
initiatives, activities and programs such as what is being presented by Bahamas
Awakening 2005 & Beyond.









é addressed the
with Church




| leaders in our remaining Family islands ai te ‘i
. continues. oS









So What Can Church Leaders Do?

Encourage the all the men of your congregation to attend the “National Solemn
Assembly” and “The Awakening Rally” on Friday, November a and Saturday,
November 12, beginning at6 p.m. at Clifford Park.



objective was achieved and the first meeting of the st
early August. Members of the steering
playing a vital role in guiding the planning
Solemn Assembly and The Awakening Ral
respectively. The Committee has also t
"> progress and secure their Paneneiy ands





| Commit your congregation to prayer for the success of Bahamas
"Awakening" and a move of God that would awaken our men to their
God-given responsibilities as men.

1 Share in the financial cost of this outreach by making a financial
contribution.

1 Provide volunteers to assist with the various jobs that are required to
make this effort a success.

1 Use every opportunity to promote the rallies during your Church services
and meetings, your TV and/or radio broadcasts and your Church
bulletins.

) Clear your calendar so that the rallies may proceed with your support and
without competition.

( Embrace the opportunity to fellowship with our visiting brothers from the
USA who will travel to Nassau to attend the rallies during the week of
November 7-12. There will be ministry opportunities and People-to-
People opportunities.













- that rally, they personally invited the U. . Particip
rally planned for Nassau. As a result of this e














signing-up and gearing-up for REA Ral
men of the Bahamas to take a stand for righteous
especially for the men of the Church, to comm

th ie for all
ng. This i is the time,










THE TRIBUNE



PAGE 8C, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005

MINISTRIES

“Making Discipies for the
Twenty First Century aad



LON

Hi ag
at
Pea
SSR ERE

LY OF GOD



ovision”
our hands, the Church;'

My brothers and sisters, | want to challenge you to
look at the resources in your hands and the say. “Lord
here they # are, use them for your purpose’

(4) Tape Series
“Undestanding
Holiness” - $15.00

(4) Tape Series
**“Temptations to
Holiness’”’ - $15.00

(5) Tape Series
"Power of |.
Deliverence" -
$20.00

(1) Tape "Power of
the Blessing" -
$5.00 ,

(3) Tape “Power of
Fasting’’ - $12.00

Coming soon Miri
Book “Temptation of
a Believer”





1 Timothy 6:17-19
1 Corinthians 4:16

Listen to Joy 101.9
from 11:45am to
12:00noon every

last Thursday of the

Month for our Radio

Broadcast.





TU
‘Tubes |

al

Ertl ee dte
: : :

—
o-s

Available
“y

‘a i]

4

-

Pp ROPE Ge PPO MP OT EET NEE HE





° i
; el |
. ’ 7 . . |
+ PPrerPeecee er eeard be Mbegedlerergegiget: teh hit: ‘ :
. ; ‘ ; lr ;
‘._ ; "eer : et. arteet ben ‘erheehb. Se
ve ’ ' t ef : . : “te . 7 eile .
' ' . e _s =
; = Gee @ See Fee Getetee © Oe ste a : » *
.
e . ° . ' -
. = ' 7 ' ' - : . : : i 7 : ' : ’ : : ;
; ; : ° © © ' . ' . . '
"af wie tet tera’ : ‘te at : ‘etetart «eh. !
ey ev : te : 4) ‘he
'
' tT -* as L. 6 © * Gee * Fe ts : : : : ' |
Vy Hj
> i.
‘7 stare .
§ ante
it
pu
‘oe c
yp
’ | 5 e
ie ° i 2
5 “ft t
: —
; a
=
a pring
; =
a : see ce 5 cow |
i A
- i]
- CG
rer > py
- pupa
i,
i a
° ‘i
7 ~
i i]






te 1
“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content)’

a : : >= ;
from Commercial News Prov

~



=>



=

lt
a
-_ —_—-

=

t
t

H

')
ea




oe

‘=





rs.

» OD oo

ee pyr
ea ‘* debei
Olt oe
wo of

Sele







PAGE 10C, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005 | THE TRIBUNE





© xCE SS|

Save up to ° 65% as
Drop your bags off the day before you travel, :

S h dl S N Ow, F ‘ y L a ter and they'll be waiting for you when you arrive!

baggage



on airline excess baggage fees

We accept most oversize/overweight items and boxes!
Bags arrive 1lam | Pay in Nassau

*American Eagle’s published excess baggage t Hees on your third bag, if it is oversize
and overweight at 75lbs, is $230. Withesmessbaggage you can pay as little as $75
for the same bag. We are cheaper than the competition in all other comparisons too.



Drop Off: Miami §= —_—s—~wPick Up: Nassau
4005 NW 28th St. _ Customs Hall
(305) 871-0571 | Ss (242) 377-6593 ©
(between TORY and Budget) (inside the Airport Terminal)

)

- Take a look at our other services :





xexpres pdaxmailbox | pdxcargo
next day courier . unlimited US mail ~—_ bulk freight |
with delivery | Se ed eOMINg soon



Get more information at
www.pdxbahamas.com _

>> affordable air freight
(242) 341-6593 ) :



Use this coupon to get your first shipment

FREE 3

(5 Ibs or less) when you ship with pPpaaexpress

Use this coupon to save

$10

off every bag you ship with



Not combinable with any other offer. Only one coupon per

_ customer per visit. One offer per household or business, on first
shipment with pdxexpress. If package exceeds 5 Ibs, a $5
discount off of our regular rates will be offered instead. Account
required. Weight is calculated as dimensional or actual, which-
ever is greater. Offer only valid Miami to Nassau.

Coupon not valid after Nov 20, 2005

www.pdxbahamas.com a F periatio ar tet
(242) 341-6593 iD a "

Not combinable with any other offer. Only one coupon per
customer per visit. Only applies to bags under 100 Ibs. Bags
over 100Ibs will be charged the full rate of $1 per Ib. Only
applies to bags under 63 linear inches (L + W + H). Bags over 63
linear inches may be charged oversize fees.

Coupon not valid after Nov 20, 2005

www.pdxbahamas.com a F sie ac
(242) 341-6593 | ED BY, sensao arta

ome pen smn ee ace mem ee ee ee cee ee ee eee ee
seems wc ee eee eee eee ee ee ee eee



Full Text










CLOUDS AND |
SUNSHINE



|
B4F
70F |
|
|



m Lhe Tribune

i'm lovin’ It. |





BAHAMAS EDITION



_ JEANS -

; «TOPS
*e SKIRTS

* PANTS

° DRESSES

From
$5.00 to $15.00













Volume: 101 No.275

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005

sections inside

THURSDAY JUNE 19 oy

PRICE —50¢_





Hundreds gather
in Rawson Square

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter



HIUNDREDS of union mem-
bers descended on Rawson
Square yesterday for the sec-
ond time this month as tensions
between the public service and
government again reached a
boiling point.

Close to 300 members and
supporters of the Bahamas Pub-

ic Service Union (BPSU) gath-

ered in front ‘of parliament in —

protest against government’s
latest proposal for pay increas-
es within the new industrial
agreement.

Union members said the:

protest was the only avenue left
to them to voice their discon-
tent as government had “tricked
and misled” them,

However, members of the

government’s negotiation team,

said discussions about the con-
ditions of the new agreement
had not even begun yet.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, Frank Carter, an
industrial relations consultant
on the government’s. negotia-
tion team, said the actions of
the union were “very Pie
ture.”

Mr Carter explained that
talks had been scheduled earli-
er to open today at 10am,

_ “We haven't even begun dis-:

cussing the terms of this new
agreement. The date was set for
(today). And we will be there,”
he said.

Mr Carter added that the
team would engage the BPSU
at the negotiating table and not
in the streets.

Burning copies of the draft

“agreement yesterday, dissatis-
fied union members, called on



Minister of Public Service Fred
Mitchell and Prime Minister
Perry Christie. to “come out and
talk to us.”’

Several unionists also called
on former Prime Minister
‘Hubert Ingraham to join the
protesters in talks,

“[’m a PLP, but it was under
the FNM government that I
received my fairest treatment.
Bring out Hubert Ingraham —
he’ll get the job done,” one pro-
tester called out.

Mr Ingraham, however, did
not attend yesterday’s House

- of Assembly session.

Addressing the media and the
crowd, BPSU president John
Pinder said that on the surface
the industrial agreement
appeared to meet the payment
of $1,800 which the union had
requested, But a closer look
showed that government

intends to pay out the sum ovet

a five-year period.

“We asked for $1,800 across
the board for the first year,
some benefits in the second
year, and $2,000 in the third
year. Their offer is $600 in the
first year of the contract, $600
the second year of the contract,
nothing in the third year and
$600 in the fourth year and
nothing in the fifth year. It’s a
five-year proposal and in our
proposal we asked them for a
three-year proposal.

“No-one in their right mind
can conceive what these people
are trying to do,” he said.

- Asked if the union could not
have delayed its protest while
the country is struggling with
the aftermath of a devastating
hurricane, Mr Pinder said that

SEE page nine

® Village Rd. Roundabout
* Harold

i ° Prince Charles Plane

Roa







HOUSES are partially submerged i in Eients Mile Rock after flooding due to Hurricane Wilma. ° See story on page five. ;
7 (Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)

svenseeveceveeeeye reeeees,

PM: Grand Bahama s suffering
is highest spenuing priority.

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
_ Chief Reporter

IN A fiery speech delivered
in the House of Assembly yes-
terday, Prime Minister Perry
Christie gave what some viewed
as an admonition to union lead-
ers. He said government will
keep the welfare of those suf-
fering in Grand Bahama as the

SEE page nine |






Mitchell responds

to demonstration

@ By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter

AS NEGOTIATIONS with
the Bahamas Public Service
Union have just started, For-
eign Affairs Minister Fred
Mitchell, who is responsible for
the public service, did not
understand the need for yester-
day’s protest.

SEE page nine










Body found
with rannshot

wound to

the head

’ THE body of a young man
has been found tied up with duct
tape and a gunshot wound to
his head,

The gruesome series of mur--

ders continued in New Provi-
dence on Tuesday afternoon as
police discovered the body of a

“man believed to be in his early

20s in a house on Lyford Cay
Road,

According to reports, the 43rd
murder victim of the year was
found inside a house that was
still under construction,

“His legs and arms were
secured with duct tape and he
had a gunshot wound to his
head. He was wearing a pair of
short jeans, a white T-shirt and
sandals on his feet,” press liaison
officer Inspector Walter Evans
told The Tribune yesterday.

Up until press time last night
police had not released the iden-
tity of the man.

Investigations are contin-
uing,

paper





JACKIE MOXEY
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/
Tribune staff)

Softball’s

_ Jackie Moxey
“dies of injuries

SOFTBALL star Jackie ‘lil
stunt’ Moxey died yesterday
in the Princess Margaret
Hospital from extensive
injuries she sustained during
an argument with a man in
his forties. Ms Moxey was 44
etre ele

° See Sports Section,


rAUE 2, IMURSUAY, ULI UBEH 2/, 2UU9



The Management and Staff

of

Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd.

are pleased to announce
the opening of the







a



Customers are invited to conduct
regular banking transactions



Monday - Thursday: 9:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Friday: 9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Branch Manager: Grace Campbell

Tel: 242-336-4651-5

| We welcome the opportunity to serve you!

x —













us O° B

aot 2-3
BREATH TAKING RESIDE ES ON PARADISE TSLA ND, BAHAMAS FROM SA THO 6 MILLION
Illustration is far conceptual purpases only-and is subjegt to chang Unit anection and pricing are subject to availability. This is nol an offer ar solicitation in any state in which the legal requirements for such an offering have not been met.



yoy
| (ocean







BEWU turns out to
| protest labour issues



@ BEC workers (in blue shirts)

and

Pinder (third from left) in Rawson Square yesterday

lm By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas Electrical
Workers Union (BEWU) yes-
terday joined forces with public
service workers to protest the
government’s handling of
labour issues. hy

Demonstrating in Rawson
Square as parliamentarians
arrived for the yesterday’s ses-
sion of the House of Assem-

Cli.



sancti bres ldences. cam



bly, BEWU members marched
in a row holding signs demand-
ing respect and better treat-
ment.

Speaking with The Tribune,
BEWU president Dennis
Williams said that union mem-
bers had no choice but to pub-
licly protest after BEC man-

agement reneged on two con- .

tracts that both parties had
agreed upon.
“We had an agreement with
the board of directors and one
with the executive management,

both we held in good faith, both

were reneged on.

“We are here to protest
today. We have exhausted
every other avenue, talks at the
table have failed, our conscience
is very clear,” he said.

Following BEWU’s strike on
Tuesday, the union executives
said in a statement that they
had unsuccessfully attempted
to resolve various outstanding
issues with BEC management
in an amicable manner - but are
now being forced to take more
drastic measures.

Mr Williams said that
although it was unfortunate that
the protest had to take place
only two days after Hurricane



other public servants stand firm with BPSU president John

o rm



(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)

Wilma devastated parts of
Grand Bahama, union execu-
tives have an obligation to pro-
tect the rights of their workers.

“Government has a respon-

’ sibility to govern but the union

must protect the interests of its
members,” he said. ;

According to union trustee
Herman Rolle, the workers had |
given management “ample time
to avoid all this.”

Mr Rolle said that negotia-
tions have been ongoing since
June of last year.

“BEC keeps sending people .
to the bargaining table that are
not major decision makers, °
They make a statement and lat-
er it gets knocked down,” he
claimed.

According to Mr Rolle, who
has been a union member for
18 years, the practice of sending
representatives who lack
authority to make decisions is a
tactic that has been used by the
management as the end of
every contract approaches.

No government, he said, has
been willing or able to do any-
thing about it. eS §

“Is BEC more powerful than
the government? If so, we

would like to know,” he said.




THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 3



BT C: only |
minor
damage
caused
by Wilma

THE Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company (BTC)
announced that the country’s
communications grid suffered
only minor damages during
Hurricane Wilma.

However according to a com-
pany statement yesterday, some
communities in the Family
Islands did experience disrup-
tions late Monday afternoon.

These included Bimini and
Grand Bahama, which bore the
brunt of the storm, and BFC
said disruptions on these islands
were due to power failures and
downed lines.

“Electrical poles along with
BTC’s cables blew down in
Bimini affecting areas like
South Bimini, while areas like
McCleans Town and Taino
Beach in Grand Bahama expe-

rienced extended service dis-

ruptions for quite some time
after the storm.

“However, for the most part
BTC was able to maintain the
integrity of its major switching
centres throughout Grand
Bahama and service has been
virtually restored to most of the
affected areas,” the statement
said.

BTC president and CEO
Michael Symonette said: “Major
assessment efforts are still
-presently underway to fully deter-
mine the impact on our business
and residential customers with a
view to restoring service disrup-
tions not associated with power
failures expeditiously.”

He said that despite the dis-
ruptions, he is extremely
pleased that throughout the
storm, “islands affected were
able to maintain. contact with
the capital as a result of BTC’s
reliable network”.

Ex-policema

found guilty of |

@ By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

A FORMER police officer
was yesterday found guilty of
armed robbery, while his co-
accused was acquitted.

Kendal Hanna, formerly .
attached to Cable Beach sta- -

tion, was found guilty of com--
mitting armed robbery on June
29, 2001.

Owner of Centerville Auto
Rental Nigel Bethel told the
court that on that date, his
company was robbed of $5,000
cash.

Police reported that two
unmasked men entered the
establishment, one of them
brandishing a handgun.

Fredrick Rigby, a prosecu-
tion witness, placed Hanna
at the scene during the rob-
bery. Mr Rigby said he was
inside. Centerville Auto
Rental waiting to be served
at the time.

During Mr Bethel's testi-’
mony, he said he remembered

_ the face of Patrick Strachan at

the scene. 2 ee

The jury, however, found
insufficient evidence to con-
vict Strachan.

He was unanimously found
not guilty, while Hanna was
found guilty 8-3. There were
only eleven jurors. j

One juror was dismissed yes-
terday after she failed to
attend the trial at the sched-
uled times.

Sandradee Gardiner prose-
cuted the pair. Ramona Far-



@ FORMER policeman Kendal Hanna, leaving the court after
his conviction for armed robbery. His co-accused Patrick

' Strachan (right) was acquitted. However, he was also taken to
Her Majesty's Prison as he is incarcerated on another matter.

quharson represented Hanna,
while Perry Albury represent-
ed Strachan.

Despite the decision, both
men were led away from the
Supreme Court in handcuffs.

Although Strachan was
acquitted, he is still remanded
on other matters. Hanna was
on bail, but will now serve his
prison sentence.

(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)

Senior Justice Anita Allen
‘deferred sentencing for four
weeks on the request of Miss
Farquharson, who asked for a
Social Services report attest-
ing to her client's character.
She said her client was a good
citizen with no previous con-
victions.

She also plans to appeal the
decision.

BTC announces 58 per cent
hike in telephone line rates

& By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter

NEW service rates for BTC
customers may come into effect
by December 1.

The: Public Utilities Commis-
sion:(PUC) has announced that
it has concluded its public con-
sultation on the Bahamas
Telecommunications Compa-
ny’s (BTC) application to

increase monthly rates for tele-

phone lines.

“The PUC has given approval
for BTC to increase monthly
rates/prices for telephone lines
from $9.50 to $15 for residential
customers and from $20 to $36
for business customers all in
accordance with its application,”
read a notice from the commis-
sion.

The PUC added that the
approval was granted on the
condition that a discount be
introduced for senior citizens.

uals
ars cues
PEST CONTROL

Batya

a Te 5 a

Fy) Darfield Plaza
Madeiria Street &
; Mount Royal Avenue
P.O.Box N -8814 Nassau, Bahamas
email: natures spa@yahoo.com

Special of the Month
October 2005

Ladies, treat yourself to a relaxing
and rejuvenating Swedish
Massage normally priced at
$85.00

now for this month,

Book your appointment before
this special offer expires.

Other services also available....
Manicures, Pedicures & Facials
Savings! Savings! Savings!



Call Nature's Spa for details.
Telephone:
(242) 328-1250/ 328-1253

“After due consultation with

BTC, the PUC requires BTC
to introduce a senior citizen
package based on a 20 per cent
discount on the new monthly
rate/prices for a residential tele-
phone line for qualified appli-
cants,” said the release.
According to Barrett Russell,
executive director of the PUC,
the new rates will come into
effect 30 days after BTC and

the PUC have signed the newly- .

modified licence.

“The licence has to be modi-

fied, which we are in the process
of doing now, and then BTC
has to agree to it and sign it.
Once, that is completed, it will
take 30 days for it to come into
effect.”

In a letter to the PUC in
August, Felicity Johnson, BTC’s
vice-president of legal and reg-
ulatory affairs, said the compa-
ny has not been allowed to raise
local access rates for 20 years.

“The existing ‘below cost
rates’ for the local residential
services, which were appropri-
ate in the monopoly era, are
inconsistent with the develop-
ment of competition and the

maximising of social welfare.
“As a result, the existing
below cost rates inhibit market

entry, distort competition and ~
harm subscribers,” the letter -

said.

The All Eleuthera Association

will be holding an Election of Officers

at

3:00pm on Sunday 27th November 2005

at the

Hotel Training College Campus
on Thompson Boulevard. .
All residents, non-resident and Descendants of
Eleuthera are invited to participate.
The deadline to register to vote is 15th November.
A registration fee of $10.00 must be paid on or before the deadline.

’ Please contact Nichola Sands at 356-5702,
Edith Sturrup at 393-2175 or Roscoe Sands at.302-2668
for further information concerning Voter Registration.

bs

Costumes

“Dora the- bgloer

“Spongebob
. Pirates”.

Princess’ Hats
. Nascar: Racing
Vampires.

Wigs

Teeth:
Flashli

Fake

Makeup
“Wings

— Capes

~ Mask
Swords .

"Halloween ‘Néceisories
Scary (D's:

© Strobe Lights’

Fogger & Fog Juice
eoMirror Ball”

© Black Lights:

- Flying Gh ost

nl Aissories

i - Decorations
Spider Webs

~- Party Goods:
~~ Bucket & Bags
Lights
Yard Decorations
© Table Accessories
bis Candles :

blood

s

ee Fabrics, Crafts & eee AY fers) d

Th aie |

Madeira St [242] 325-8233 e ES it [242] 322-3080



Cx



4, Woman suffers
stroke after
_ being robbec

armed robbery in the street

MIDDLE-AGED
eee woman suffered a
slight stroke after being
robbed in a Nassau street, it
emerged last night.

The slightly-built woman
was attacked from behind by
aman who grabbed her hand-
bag and fled with $800.

The incident occurred in
Frederick Street in broad aa
light.

Yesterday, the woman told
The Tribune: “I banged the
right side of my head against a
wall and was left lying on the
sidewalk.

“When I recovered con-
sciousness, there was a loss of
mobility in my left hand and
arm. I went to the hospital
and they told me I had suf-

: — fered a mild stroke.”
The robbery happened as .

public concern grew over ris-
. Ing crime in Nassau. Last
_week, an elderly woman was









mugged outside her sister’s
home off the Eastern Road.
She later required stitches in
cuts to her head and face.

This latest attack came as
the-victim was on her way to
the bank.

“T heard a voice behind me
say something like ‘it looks
liké you have a lot of money’,
then I was knocked against a
building and lost. conscious-
ness.

“When I came to, my purse
and belongings were scattered
on the sidewalk. Fortunately,
I did not have my passport
with me, and-he did not take
my ID.”

The woman believes she
was attacked because she was
small and unaccompanied.
She did not see the robber
and did not recognise his
voice.

The matter was reported to
police, who are investigating.

ait cd

TS) tet ae

would like to inform the general public
that the

_ 2006 DIRECTORY CANVASS
WILL, BE CLOSING NOVEMBER 25TH

All interested advertisers
can choose to call one of our
sales representatives at 394-7988
or send an email to
-~ bdm @bahamasgp.com

"to reserve your advertising space for next issue.

logo on to WwW. bahamasgp.com



Rare Oy se dEs aks

ORTH CO

The Mall-at-Miarathon
BOX OFFICE OPENS AT 10:00 AM DAILY

LEGEND OF ZORRO NEW Frm aay | WA [00 | 620 | 105 |

=m
a,>

ef |
fea [won [ra be

S

x
ALO ]a &
a Eee

a

TWO FOR THE MONEY

WALLACE & GROMIT
INTO THE BLUE
LIGHT PLAN

a
pS
S

[NA_| 7.00] 10:0]
[6:30 [| exa0 | 10:35
soo | sat]
ody Q
a eT
[wallace s apowy ___A | was | sao {ozo Ta

rrr rrrrry rrr yy

X ° 393-94


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005 .

_ EDITORIAL/LETTERS. TO

THE TRIBUNE ~



omer a neaeae Waren ht ene rate nn en RE ren one er

pen IR ERIE Pm et et eke AAI eft nen EASR NNO LOA Sn OOPSLA LE

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

‘Published Daily Monday to Saturday _

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

‘

- TELEPHONES

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352



How PLP treated Barry Malcolm |

SPURRED by a comment made last week °
on a radio talk show by a caller to the effect.

that only under the present PLP government
did he feel free to express his opinions, we
started to tell the story in this column yesterday
of what “freedom” was like under the old PLP
government. ;

In fact during the Pindling years this was —
such a frightened society that few had the’

temerity to express their views openly. Those
who did never forgot the wrath of “the Chief”.
For politicians it spelled the-end of their polit-
ical careers, for private citizens it could mean
the end, either of a promotion, or a job.

And this is what happened to Mr Barry Mal-
colm, today an executive with the Grand
Bahama Port Authority, but in those days
BORCO’s senior Bahamian executive.

BORCO at the time was the Bahamas’ pre-
mier employer with 800 full-time and 400 con-
tracted employees —- a total of 1,200 persons
working in the Grand Bahama facility around
the clock processing crude oil into basic prod-
ucts, — eal gg
In the 1980s BORCO employees were the
highest paid workers with the best benefits in
the Bahamas. An employee’s average income
was $45,000 a year. This did not include over-
time pay. The company spent about $800,000
annually on training programmes for their
workers. :

.’ The fight to unionise BORCO went through
the 1982 election, continuing up to and into the
1987 election. : ae

BORCO employees accused prime minister
Lynden Pindling of “using his office to intim-
idate the workers at BORCO and Syntex”.

When The Tribune reporter tried to find
out why PLP Senator Jeff Thompson, a formet:
PLP Cabinet Minister, was so determined to
head a union to represent the foreign firms’

workers, our reporter was told: “To give Jeffa '

platform for his political endeavours”. Mr
Thompson was being proposed at thé time —

February 1980 —-as a PLP candidate for one of

the Grand Bahama constituencies. _
In 1990 Chevron Corporation of the US,

_ then owners of BORCO, sold to Petroleos de

Venezuela, SA (PD VSA), the present owners.
Sir Lynden and his government failed to
force a union on BORCO, but their failure
took its toll on'the immediate future of the
company’s senior Bahamian executive.
We don’t know what Mr Malcolm had done

to offend the PLP, unleéss, of coursé, he had :

failed to assist them in their efforts to force a
union on his company. anes OE,
In the early nineties BORCO’s Veriezue-

lan owners were negotiating with Sir Lyn-.

den’s government for a seabed lease. The

hours of 11:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. as follows:




001-700
701-1200

November 4 | 1801-2400 November 29







November 7



a || November 10 | 4201-4500

; | November 11

4501-4800.





November 14 | 4801-5100



TEACHERS AND SALARIED WORKERS
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LIMITED ©

NOTICE TO OUR
VALUED SHAREHOLDERS

Please be advised that Interest/Dividend payments for the year 2004
will be distributed effective Tuesday November 1, 2005 during the

, November 25
| iE 1201-1800 November 28

November 24

nowhere,” said Mr Malcolm.

Then one day Luther Smith, then Permanent
Secretary to Minister Darrell Rolle, arrived
in Freeport with a message.

_ Mr Smith said he had been sent by govern-

negotiations dragged on. “They were going

ment to see José Solano, BORCO?’s president... .

“The seabed agreement will not be con-
cluded as long as Barry Malcolm is in the posi-
‘tion he is in. We want him removed,” was the
, content of the message sent by Sir Lynden’s
government. '

“José Solano came into my office, which

was just next door, he was absolutely ashen,”

Mr Malcolm recalled. “He was the president —
and'I was the vice president. We were very:

close — he was a real gentleman, he was new
- to the island and so I was the eyes and ears of
the company on the local scene.”,

. Mr Malcolm knew the company had to

move on and to do so the seabed agreement
was important to its future. :
It was decided that as Mr Malcolm was a
senior executive in the company he should be
. transferred to Venezuela. Oe
There for eight months he worked at the

headquarters in Caracas, where all of the oil

trading was done; moved to Maricabo, the city

located at the mouth of Lake Maricabo, where
the shipping offices were located, then to Cabi-
mas, where the oil was pumped off the lake to
the large refineries in Paraguana.

He had moved from the central office, to the —

shipping offices, the oil fields and the refinery.
“It was a great experience and I learned to
speak Spanish,” said Mr Malcolm.

~ He came home as an adviser, kept in the
‘background, .to Mr Solano. On the death of

FNM leader, Sir Cecil Wallace-Whitfield, he. .

became the FNM’s campaign manager in the
Freeport by-election that resulted.

It was during this election that Sir Lynden

made his historic prediction that whoever won
Freeport, would win the government. The
FNM won the by-election.
It was.:then that Mr Malcolm took a leave of
" absence from BORCO to become the FNM’s
coordinator of the Northern. Bahamas. He
devoted all his energies to making certain that
Sir Lynden’s prediction came true.
On the long stretched the PLP did not dam-
age Mr Malecolm’s career, but it was not
_ because they did not try. .
_ This is an example of what used to happen
~~ Mr talk-show Caller — for 25 years under

' the PLP administration. Every time yout pick,

up the telephone today. to call in to a talk-
show to express your opinions, just remem-
ber to whom you owe your new found freedom
of speech. -. °°



















7201-7500.
7501-7800
7801-8100
8101-8400




9501-10000
10001-10500



10501-11300



EDITOR, The Tribune _

PLEASE allow me space in .

your valued column to express
my displeasure of the so-called
myth of racism in the Bahamas.

I said so-called because during,
“my 60-plus years, I have never

seen any sign forbidding any
particular racial grouping from
going anywhere in the
Bahamas. ;
What I have experienced,
however, and this has nothing to

do with colour, but what could

be classified as “classism,”
where a particular group
because of economic or social
standing, would discriminate
against others of less social or
economic standing.

I experienced organised

_racism for the first time in the

early 1950s when I went to work
in the United States. I will
always remember that date, it
was November 22, 1954 when I

_ boarded a Flying Tiger aircraft

at Oakes Field International
Airport, one hour and forty-five
minutes later, we arrived at
West Palm Beach International
Airport, where I went through
immigration, and customs, and
was given my letter of assign-

~ ment to work for Tom Hinman

in Homestead. '
J boarded the Greyhound bus

and saw in bold letters: “I-c-c - .
Federal Regulations requires all

other passengers to'proceed to
the back of -white line.” Later
that evening in South Miami, at
a bus stop, more passengers
boarded the bus, and an elderly
black lady sat in a seat in the
white section. ,

The driver apparently saw’

her through the rear view mir-
ror, pulled off the road, went

to the lady in a hostile manner
‘and forced her out of the seat.
On seeing this, I stood up and

allowed the lady to have my

seat. ] remained standing until ©
- some passengers got off in Per-_
‘rine. * 2

In ‘August 1955, 14-year-old
Emmit Tell was racially mur-
dered in Mississippi for alleged-

ly whistling at a white woman. -

Later in December of the same
year while I was yet in Home-
stead, Florida, Mrs Rosa Parks

_was arrested in Montgomery,
- Alabama, for refusing to give

up her seat on the bus to a
white person. This is institu-

' tionalised racism on every pub-
lic place, on water fountains

were marked “white”

“coloured” on-restroom doors

lady”. “coloured
“white men”,

“white
woman”, .

’ “coloured”. =

‘During this period, black men
never got beyond “boy” in the

Dtribunem



eyes of white America. As a
young man, back then, I devel-

oped a disdain for the system,

but was able to outgrow it over
the years. I realised that their
action was based on sheer igno-
rance. That is why we owed our
present and future generation
the true history of our country.
If we feed them false informa-

‘tion when they research and |

find the true history, they would
condemn us.
Politicians who feed false

- information to score political
points should be swept into a

garbage tin of history. Mr

“Honest George” Mackey, a

well respected Bahamian histo-
rian, wrote in The Tribune
recently that Sir Stafford Sands,
more precisely young Stafford
Sands, on graduation from Gov-



' EDITOR, The Tribune

TOMMY Turnquest, the
leader of the Free National
Movement today, was not the
person who piloted the FNM
in the last General Election.
The piloting of the FNM ship

Minister.

He, in keeping with the
long established tradition in
Bahamian party politics of the
election leader signing all the
nomination'papers of the
General Election candidates,
signed all the FNM nomina-
tions, including that of Mr
Turnquest.

In addition the proposed
turnover of authority to Mr
Turnquest was not to occur

. itself was completed.

Moreover, in the post elec-
tion post-mortem, all analy-
sis in the media agreed on the
main cause of the FNM loss,
in the face of a very creditable
performance as a government.

The general view was that
the loss was in fact a reflection

‘| of the dissatisfaction of the

electorate with certain aspects
of the performance of the
FNM Prime Minister. He in
effect was so out of favour that
he was in need of a spanking,
which was administered to the
entire slate of candidates of
the party, regardless of the
very creditable performance

‘Truth about Turnquest

| was done by the former Prime -

. leader, in charge of the elec-

in pointing this fact out to
“those callers to his pro-

until the General Election:

ernment High School, went:to
be articled in the office of A:F

‘Adderley to become a lawyér,

so was he really a racist?

PRINCE G SMITH
Nassau
October 13 2005

(Sir Stafford Sands was an
articled law student in the
chambers of his uncle, Sir Ken-
neth Solomon, who was presi-
dent of the Senate. However,
when Sir Kenneth left the island
for any length of time his
nephew, Stafford, was left under

‘Mr Adderley’s supervision. Sir

Kenneth’s clients were also left
with Mr Adderley. It shows the.
high regard in which this com-
munity held the late A F
Adderley, a black man.

(Up to the time of his death,
Sir Stafford addressed his men-
tor as “Mr Adderley”, while to
Mr Adderley his pupil remained
“Stafford”. There was respect
on both sides. — Ed).



of the government otherwise!
_' Hence the loss in the last
election was under the former
PM’s leadership! It is there*
fore wholly incorrect for any-
one to try to pin'this loss on
Mr Turnquest, who in the
next general election will
therefore be leading the Free
National Movement as its










,

tion, for the first time.
Mr Darrel Miller, was
therefore 100 per cent correct






gramme who mistakenly
placed the loss of the last
General Election on the
wrong shoulders.

While Bahamians are often
accused of having short mem-
ories, not all of us suffer from
this malady, and it is impor:
tant to set the record straight.

For those still in doubt, turn
your mind’s eye back, exam‘
ine the facts of that period
and see if you don’t agree
with me that this last FNM
loss was a reflection of the
common view taken of the
last Prime Minister’s conduct
and resultant loss of grace
with the Bahamian public. |’

Let’s be fair to Mr Turn-
quest. Let’s make sure that
the record is kept straight.


















" DEXTER JOHNSON
_ Nassau —
October 5 2005







11301-12100
[December 9° | 12101-13000 }
i | November 18

ora
[a











November 15 } 5101-5400










November 16 | 5401-5700 .






2401-3000 | November 30 | 8401-8700 |

»° Visit'us and see:other used cars...
~ and make your own deal!
ran auto
QUALI ; sales |
LIMITED
#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS i
EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 * 325-3079

Vistt our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals * Queen's Highway * 352-6122





November 17 | 5701-6000 13001-14000







14001-15000
15001-16000 .
16001-17000 ©











te!
t

Rosetta St, Palmdale
Tel: (242) 322 7496




17001-18207


“THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS



Aid agencies bring urgent supplies

to residents in Grand Bahama

m By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

A GROUP of agencies and
aid organizations have
already stepped in to devas-
tated areas throughout Grand
Bahama to bring water, food,
and hope to many stranded,

“hopeless, and homeless
_.Bahamians.

With most of the homes
along Bay Shore Road in
Eight Mile Rock destroyed
by Hurricane Wilma, Inter-
national Rescue, along with
Island Helicopters, Million
Air, and the New Providence
Community Church have col-
laborated to quickly bring aid

.to those residents in need.

Yesterday the group, along
with Our Lucaya, the Rotary
Club of Grand Bahama and
the FNM began distributing
food into the devastated com-
munities.

Darren Adler, the chief
officer of International Res-

FNM leader
makes relief
aid trip to
hurricane-hit
communities

lm By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

SENATOR and leader of the
FNM Tommy Turnquest yes-
terday made a trip to Grand
Bahama to take relief aid to res-
idents affected by Hurricane
Wilma.

Speaking near the smoulder-
ing remains of a resident’s home
that had burned down earlier
that day, Mr Turnquest said he
“could not in good conscience”
visit with the residents without
bringing them some supplies.

“We have come down here
with a team. The deputy leader,
the deputy treasurer, etc, and
we are giving out water, ice, and

sandwiches from McDonalds ©

and Burger King.

“We are just trying to supply
some immediate relief for
immediate needs. We could not
come down here in good con-
science without bringing some-
thing,” he said.

Mr Turnquest outlined the
need to respond to natural dis-
asters of such a magnitude on a
timely basis while comforting a
resident who had just seen his
home burn down earlier in the
day.

“We need to respond to the
needs in a timely manner. You
can talk all you want about
help, but bring some help now,”
he said.

For other residents in the
area, many of their landmarks

»were completely destroyed.

“Twenty-seven 12 x 12 buildings

along the water’s edge near Pin-
der’s Point were nothing but
debris — littering the northern
side of the road.

As one resident stated, in the
blink of an eye, the equivalent
of Nassau’s Fish Fry, Pinder’s
Point “Sunset Village” was no
more.

“My building used to be the
Blue Lagoon,” Joanna Forbes, a
vendor for three years, said as
she pointed to a piece of her
building, now littering the police
station compound.

“I’m hoping we can get some
assistance from the government
or whoever so that we can
rebuild,” she said.

Senator Turnquest noted that
since last. year’s hurricanes, the
National Emergency Manage-
‘ment Agency (NEMA) has yet
to submit any proper account-
ing to his party for the financing
and donations they received.
He wondered why the agency
was taking so long to do so.

“We should have received
something within three weeks,
and at the outset two to three
months — but we haven’t
received anything as yet.

“See, my difficulty is that it
seems as if we are more con-
cerned with setting up a democ-
racy than responding to these
people’s needs,” he said.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Ay OUR!

ye ea ed
322-2197



\y

cue in the Bahamas encour-
aged other thoughtful persons
wishing to donate or help to
continue to do so, despite the
“technical” pitfalls they may
encounter.

Last year International
Rescue along with other
agencies such as the Rotary
Club of Grand Bahama and
many other private individu-
als were hindered by the
National Emergency Man-
agement Agency (NEMA) in
delivering donated relief sup-
plies to areas affected by
Hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne.

Since then, relief organiza-
tions have asked for a more
flexible input from NEMA in
times of national disasters.

“Individual resourcefulness
of persons who want to
donate and help is what we
need to encourage,” Mr
Adler said.

“After last years fiasco, we
need NEMA as a facilitator





rather than a manager,” he
said.

William Wong from the
NPCC along with a group of
volunteers disbursed food

and much needed water
throughout Pinder’s Point’s.

outer-ring communities such
as Hunters and Lewis Yard.

International Rescue set up
a depot at St Stephen’s Parish
Hall in Pinder’s Point and dis-
persed food rations and water
bottles shortly after noon and
continued to organize the
ration and aid disbursement
throughout the rest of the
day.

Residents lined the streets

and crowded around the cars
and vans as the caravan with
relief aid drove through the
communities.

Looking ahead, Mr Adler
said that tomorrow will bring
much of the same as they fly
in to the island again to bring
much needed relief to the
devastated communities.











i MARTIN Town Primary School:
takes a big blow from Wilma, with
the roof torn off one section

FT.& BRIDAL REGISTR
aoe

TOMMY Turnquest stops to comfort Oswald Williams after he lost his house to a fire yesterday — | e-s Harbour Bay Shopping Centre ;

in Pinders Point.











PUG Ue UY

BEGINNER’S SPANISH ¢ FRENCH
¢e CREOLE
For Adults

Don’t Delay... Register Now!!
ILR GROSVENOR ACADEMY OF LANGUAGES

Tel: 323-2078 ® FAX: 323-6914 * E-MAIL: ilr@batelnet.bs

Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family

Baypar! Building, Parliament Street
Tel: 322-8393/328-7157

www.colesofnassau.com * P.O. Box N-121



(Photos: Mario Dunéanson/ Tribune Staff). :

Bb

Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448 it












: Enter to win in NASSAU or FREEPORT!
Both winners will be drawn Friday, Nev. (25th.

COMMONWEALTH BUILDING SUPPLIES 2

- NASSAU: 3252505 ¢ ROBINSON RD. FREEPORT: 351¢1310 * LOGWOOD RD.

email: ebs@chsbahamas.com Employees of CBS not eligible for entry. Prize cannol be “ae ‘
PAGE 6, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



2000
re me

$9,900

Includess Insurance, license &

inspection, $20 gas & 3 months warranty!

We NEVER
tamper with the
odometer! —
We NEVER import
accident cars period!
Most of our cars
CANNOT be
purchased in Miami
with duty paid
LOWER than our
price!

VILLAGE ROAD NEAR SHIRLEY STREET

‘isk 394.0823/78
OR 39451977

Great economical cars with the BEST Reputation
for warranty service on the island!



Halloween Supplies |

¢ Pumpkins

arty Decorations

Barbie
Clown
Alien

are
Scooby Doo

Doctor

Wreaths
Make-up
Brooms
Face Paints
and much
Make) a=)

e Fairies
Pee Tek) |

Pee Tek =v drat 1a)
e Ballerinas
e Angel
e Princess

THE MALLAT MARATHON: 9AM- 8PM: MON-FRI

@ ANGELO “Nasty” Brennen leaving the Supreme Court yesterday. His murder and attempted

murder trial continues today.

@ By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

A 16-YEAR-OLD girl told
the Supreme Court that she
was shot by Angelo “Nasty”
Brennen, who is accused of

OES on BRED BH Beh



killing her mother on October
29 last year.

Calvonya Grant wept as she
recalled the day that her moth-
er Ruthmae Alfreda Pinder was
shot to death in front of her and
her younger sister.

| SUPERVISOR
FOR THE BLOOD BANK

QUALIFICATIONS
° Baccalaureate Degree in Medical

Technology

-© Certification by AMT or ASCP

e Minimum of 5 years experience in Blood
Bank Department

© Computer Literate

e Excellent written and oral communication

skills

e Excellent interpersonal skills

POSITION SUMMARY
The successful candidate will coordinate the
daily running of Blood Bank, including:

e Supervising and scheduling staff

¢ Controlling inventory

¢ Meeting the blood supply demands

e Ensuring safety of blood units leaving the

Department

Salary commensurate with experience

Excellent benefits

meee ovals eet to: The Human Peery
Doctors Hospital | P.O. Box N-3018 | Nassau, Bahamas |:

In observance of Breast Cancer Awareness Month redeem this
voucher for 50% off the cost of a mammogram at Doctors Hospital*

Mammograms save lives, schedule yours today!

“Women who have not had a mammogram performed at Doctors Hospital. §

*Women with a strong family history of breast cancer, i.e. mother, sister or grandmother.

Mammogram Tip of the Day

Don’t wear deodorant, powder, or cream under your arms —
it may interfere with the quality of the mammogram.

THE TRIBUNE

OBSERVES

becisinticloned 28D





(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson) |

Miss Grant was brought in |
the court by wheelchair, and'

‘ broke down repeatedly as she.

attempted to recall the incident. :

Her younger sister, 10 year-’
old Amy Pinder, also gave an:
emotional testimony. She told:
the court that she saw Brennen:
pointing a gun at her older sister:'

Miss Grant testified that on:
the day of the incident, Bren-'
nen called her mother. She lis-' .
tened to the phone conversa-:
tion, during which she said she
heard him apologising to her
mother.

Miss Grant said she heard her
mother tell Brennen to leave
her alone or else she would call
the police. :

She said she left her home
with her mother and sister and
arrived at the bus stop on Far-
rington Road around 2pm.

At the same time, she said
she saw a red Nissan Sentra pull
up and Brennen get out. He
then went up to her mother and
said: “Freda, why are you doing
this to me?” ye

According to Miss Grant, her
mother told Brennen to, “Go
where you are going".

She said she saw Brennen
pull a gun from his waist at
point it at her mother. She said

_ She closed her eyes when gun

shots rang out, and she opened
them to see her mother on ‘the
ground, while Brennen crossed .
the street and the car sped off.

Her little sister told the court
that she saw the accused point-
ing the gun at her older sister.

"He lowered his hand (from
her chest) and then he shot
her,” said Miss Pinder.

Ingrid Brennen also took the
stand. Ms Brennen told the
Court that Angelo Brennen had
been her friend for about 20
years. During that time, she said
Mr Brennen borrowed her car
on many occasions.

On October 29, 2004, she said
she loaned her burgundy Nis-
san Sentra to Brennen. He
parked his car in her yard and
left in her car alone, she said.

That was at 10.40am, she tes-
tified. She said she never got
her car back from Brennen.

Detective Jermaine Stubbs

ald the court that Ms Pinder

iffered from bullet wounds to
the right and left side of the
chest. One bullet went in
through the front of the right
side of the chest, and exited at
the same position at the back.
The other bullet entered the left
side of her chest and was lodged
in her body.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
emaking news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story. _


THE TRIBUNE

LOC

L NEWS

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 7



Infidelity and physical abuse end.



quarter of all Bahamian marriages

ONE out of every two
Bahamian marriages end in
divorce — with half of those due
to infidelity and/or physical
abuse.

This is the grim reality
according to Dr David Allen,
clinical psychologist and author
who practises in Nassau and
Virginia.

In a presentation last Satur-
day, Dr Allen kicked off the
country’s first free legal clinic:
“Information you need for the
life you want” hosted by Hals-
bury Chambers.

Dr Allen addressed the top-
ic: “Divorce: Before seeing the
lawyers — when counselling can
save a marriage.”

According to Dr Allen, the
divorce rate in the Bahamas is
steadily climbing.

Highlighting how often
physical abuse is reported as a

factor in divorces, he revealed

that about 40 per cent of last
year’s murders were “crimes
of passion”.

According to Dr Allen,
divorce can actually be a good
thing if a marriage has deteri-
orated to “the point of no
return.”

Stress-filled marriages, he
said, can have physical affects
on a person’s health.

“Partners can become over-
whelmed and shell-shocked.
This powerful paroxysmal
physiological reaction with
anger can cause increased
heart rate, pulse and/or metab-
olism. ;

“If one is frequently flooded,
hormonal upsets occur and
blood pressure rises. Weight
gain or loss is also a factor.
Marital problems can serious-
ly affect the physical well-being
of a person.”

Dr Allen recommended not





@ A YOUNG man takes the opportunity to the ask advice on
personal legal matters at the Halsbury Chambers free legal clinic

Clarks Shoe Store, iG ny Village & John’s are the
ONLY authorized retailers in the Bahamas to sell
authentic Clarks Shoes!









divorcing while experiencing
feelings that are violent, vin-
dictive, or feelings that are
characterised by loneliness or
inadequacy.

“It’s time to divorce when a
partner cannot or will not stop
emotional, physical or sexual
abuse toward the spouse or
children,” he said.

Dr Allen said that a spouse
should only think of leaving
when they feel that they’ve
exhausted the opportunity to
change or grow in a relation-
ship.

“Only consider divorce, after
you have fully examined your
own issues and not just your
partner’s,” he said.

The free clinic drew more
than 200 persons on Saturday,
with dozens taking advantage
of private consultations with
the Halsbury Chambers team
of lawyers.

Second —

free legal
clinic

offered
for the
public

THE second in a two-part

series of free legal clinics spon-

sored by the law firm of Hals-
bury Chambers is set for Sat-
urday, October 29.

Experts from the public and
private sector and the firm’s
lawyers will participate in the
event, which will be held at
Halsbury Commercial Centre
on Village Road north.

This Saturday’s session will
focus on practical business, cor-
porate and financial matters.

Speakers will include nation-
al planning co-ordinator in the
Office of the Prime Minister
Malcolm Martini; Philip
Simon, executive director of
the Bahamas Chamber of

- Commerce; Ehurd Cunning-

ham, secretary for revenue in
the Ministry of Finance; Bank
of the Bahamas deputy man-
aging director of IT and
human resources Vaughn
Delaney; and Terrance
Knowles, chairman of the

-Bahamas Contractors Associ-

ation.

There will be a special pre-
sentation on labour law at
9.15am by Court of Appeal
Justice Emmanuel Osadebay,
author of Labour Laws of the
Bahamas.

‘Interactive discussions will
be held from 9.45am to lpm

and lawyers will be available

for consultation until Spm.

Free parking will be avail-
able at Family Guardian head-
quarters on Village Road.

Supervised child care will be
provided by the Meridian
School.

Interested persons can call
393-4551 to reserve a space.







BB DR David Allen








John S.G e01ge

( Helpsyou coun tdown to Chit bras

“. John S. George

“Here to help, every step of the way!”

CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

Tue Most THOROUGH Restoration & CLEANING Ever, oR THe Jos 1s Free!
Nassau’s ONLY PROFESSIONAL, CERTIFIED Stone Carrer & UpHoLsTery CARE SYSTEMS.




¢ Carpet, Upholstery, Stone and Marble Cleaning &
Restoration Specialist.








¢ Prochem Cleaning Systems removes Deep.& Heavy
Soil, Bacteria, Grease, Watermarks and Stains from
Carpeting & Furniture, restoring them to like new
at a fraction of replacement cost. :






* Carpet, Sofa’s, Loveseats, Chairs, Dining Chairs, Cars,
Boats, Grout, Tiles, Marble & Stone




¢ Persian, Wool & Silk Carpet Cleaning Specialist



* Restoration & Care








Authorized StoneTech Professional Contractor




- YOUR LOCAL MEMBER OF THE-





CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS PROHEM SYSTEM (sm)
PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594 :
ONLY WE CAN DO IT RIGHT!





www.prochemsystem.com * www.stonetechpro.com * www.licrc.org
* psp@coralwave.com *







#






VISA and Master Credit Cards
ices good while supplies last. Sale excludes spr

John §. George Company Limited Main Branch,
Palmdale Shopping Plaza, Madeira Street
_ Phone: 242-322-8421 Fax: 242-328-2067









Suzanne Smith

56

Ne TRACE elt

Member of Sister, Sister Breast Cancer Support Group
Breast Cancer Diagnosis February 1999

Number of years as a survivor 6 years

“Greater is He that is in me
than he that is in the world.”



PMT Ca By ty Be Cancer Awareness Month - October 2005 :



* KNOW your body:
Knowledge is power;

Nobody knows your body better than you do;
Only a few minutes are needed for BSE - it could save your life;
When detected early and treated promptly, breast cancer can be cured.

® Registered Trademark of Kimberly Clark Worldwide, Inc @2005 KCWW

Kotex Tips for Life’

\




PAGE 8, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



2 a ae es eee eee ee
Recovering from Wilma’s wrath

Hersicane Wilma
swept through the

northern Bahamas leaving in its
path death and destruction.
Once again it seems as if Grand
Bahama was hardest hit.

A 15-month-old baby tragi-
cally died in the storm while at
least 100 homes were destroyed
and many more damaged. In
the communities of Pinder’s
Point, Hepburn Town, Bootle
Bay and others in the western
district of Grand Bahama,
blocks of neighbourhoods were
totally levelled.

It was truly a heart-wrenching
sight to walk through these
communities and see people
picking through the rubble
looking for whatever belong-
ings they could salvage.

«I recall one elderly woman’s
daughter shouting to her moth-
er, “Here mom, I found your
photo” and the mother shouting
back, “I was hoping I would

find that.” She then showed me
and others the photo, finding a
bit of humour in the midst of
her tragedy by saying: “This was
me one time ago.” In a modest
attempt at comforting her, I
replied: “That is still you.”

On visiting another home
which was not levelled but
which suffered extensive water
damage, I learned from the 76-
year-old owner that last year
she had suffered similar dam-
age.

She told me that she had not
sought any help from the gov-
ernment but was able to restore
her home and fully furnish it.
Now she was back to the same
place she was following the hur-
ricanes of last year and she did
not know how she would do
what she did before. This story
could be told over and over
again.

Recovering from Wilma’s
wrath will be difficult, psycho-
logically, physically and finan-

STRAIGHT Up TALK



ZA
cially. Many people in Grand
Bahama have yet to fully recov-
er from the storms last year.

The struggling economy of
the nation’s second most popu-
lated island will not make that
recovery easy either. The imme-
diate challenge will be finding
housing for the homeless and
providing them with food, water
and clothing.

QO ver the medium term,
homes must be rebuilt

but the big question will be

‘where? It will be a difficult deci-

sion to rebuild those homes on
the coast, given that these hur-
ricanes are an annual feature of
Bahamian life and the hurri-

Submit a cute photo of your baby ond: you c could WIN
fantastic prizes just in time for Christmas!

Now through December 9 submit a photo with two empty Drypers packs
(any size) and a completed eney form to Lowe’s Wholesale on Soldier Road.

$500.00 cash & a Drypers Club Pack . |

Ze $300.00 cash & a Drypers Club Pack

ze $200.00 cash & a Drypers Club Pack

Twe entries will be chosen every week and they will be
featured in our Bobies do fhe Cufest Things newspoper
ad. These entries will qualify for grand prize drawing
December 16 of Lowe's Pharmacy, Soldier Road and
cnnounsed five on air thaf day beiween 2pm - Love 97, ,

Entry forms available at Lowe's Pharmacy
_ & Super Saver locations



Ensuring your information

is secure

and available

EDUCATION

VARGO



NG

cane season is expected to be
extraordinarily active for some
time to come.

People cannot endure an
annual cycle of destruction and
restoration of their lives and the
country’s resources cannot sup-
port such. Over the long term,
decisions have to be made
about protecting our coastal
areas that have suffered exten-
sive damage.

The absence of vegetation
along the bay areas of many of
our communities has made
them more vulnerable to ero-
sion from harsh weather condi-
tions and have put lives along
the coast more at risk.

Prime Minister Perry Christie
and his team have their work
cut out for them. They saw the
devastation first-hand during
their tour on Tuesday. Their
rapid presence in the affected
areas was a good thing; that
must be followed by a rapid
response to the immediate
needs of the people, who need
shelter, food, water and cloth-
ing.

LA

I was encouraged by some
statements made by

Shane Gibson, who noted that
the government was looking
into hotel and rental accommo-
dation for some of the displaced

to rebuild and/or repair their
homes. This should be done
immediately, especially with
respect to areas where the dam-
age is so clear and complete.
In this regard, it is important
that the government works
closely with hardware suppliers
in Grand Bahama, especially
Freeport, to define a process that
appreciates the unique boud-sys-
tem of the port area and the
operating needs of businesses.

Sâ„¢ people have asked
me if Grand Bahama

’ was done worse by Wilma than

by Jeanne and Frances. I say

yes and no. In terms of the

ings were not issued by the
weather people or by the media
but this much seemed clear to
me - while the weather chan-
nels in Florida kept saying that
Wilma was a dangerous hurri-
cane, no such regular warnings
were heard by me from our
media.

The Florida station, as they
typically do, focused on Florida,
yet given that Wilma’s eye was
passing directly across South
Florida and the storm had:a
200-mile span, I felt that its
impact on the Bahamas, partic.
ularly the northern Bahamas,
would be significant.

As such, I cancelled a speak;
ing engagement in Guyana and



It will be a difficult decision | :
to rebuild those homes on the’
coast, given that these ;

hurricanes are an annual

feature of Bahamian life and
the hurricane season is
expected to be extraordinarily
active for some time to come. .,

island-wide disruption that
occurred from Jeanne and
Frances and the near despera-
tion created at all levels of the
society, Wilma was not worse.
However, in terms of the



It is important that the
government works closely
with hardware suppliers in
Grand Bahama, especially
Freeport, to define a process
that appreciates the unique
| bond-system of the port area
and the operating needs of |

businesses



persons. This makes sense from
many perspectives, most partic-
ularly because it could mean an
immediate source of shelter for
people, the filling of empty
hotel rooms and a slight eco-
nomic boost for the sickly hotel
sector of the island.

As long as the government
carefully defines its budget for
the programme and clearly
defines the rules of the game to
avoid any advantage taking, this
should work out well for those
devastated by the storm.

The government will need to
issue an exigency order for duty
exemption on building supplies
once again for those who need

PRODUCTIVITY
BUSINESS

ELECTROJACK INCREDIBLE CYBERJACK

Town Center Mall

Tel: 356 - 6206/356 - 5971
Fax: 356 - 6206

Mall at Marathon

Tel: 394 - 6254/394 - 6255
Fax: 394- 6211



number of local communities
totally devastated by Wilma, the
storm did affect Grand Bahama
worse. Whatever the situation,
this much is true, Grand
Bahama will endure and its peo-
ple will move on.

WAS OUR WARNING
SYSTEM LACKING?

ravel throughout
Grand Bahama and
you will hear the same thing
over and over again: “The
media seemed to underestimate
Wilma.”
I cannot myself say that warn-






REFRIGERATOR

Model RM46-W

9.6 Cube Feet

ORALEE’S FASHIONS

is having an end of summer g

including formals up to 75% off
Starting Friday, October 28th, 2005

Mackey Street * Telephone: 393-0744
Monday - Saturday 9am - 6pm

QUALITY INSIDE
AND OUT

stayed home to protect my fam
ily and my home. The Florida
warnings made me take. the
storm seriously. I would not
have taken things so seriously
had I only listened to the
Bahamian media because they
gave the impression, for the
most part, that the storm would
not reach the Bahamas with the
severity that it did.

In fact, people who endured
six to seven feet waves on the
southern side of Grand Bahama
felt especially let down that they
did not get more accurate warn-
ings from the media; this accord;

~ ing to many with whom I spoke.

Blame will not be helpful,ta
us in our recovery efforts but
assessing the strength or weak-
ness of our warning system: in
this instance could be. Some-
thing seemed out of place about
the way we prepared for Wilma
and we need to find out what
that was.

In the end, however, every
man and woman who values
life, family and property needs
to be accountable to himself or
herself and get as much infor-
mation as possible in these
stormy seasons and act in their
own best judgment. The fact
that others got things wrong will
not make your loss any easier:

THOUGHT FOR ~~
THE WEEK

[oe which does not
destroy me will make
me better, if I let it. 3

chivargolaing@botmsil.com






APPLIANCES BY FRIGIDAIRE
WE ACCEPT ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS
Montrose Avenue (Just North of Bahamas Bus & Truck Co.)
322-2536 ¢ 325-2040 © 323-7758 © 328-7494



N
se

. Pinder) sat down at the

THE TRIBUNE



Fred Mitchell
responds to
demonstration
| F ROM page one

‘Mr Mitchell was
responding in the House
of Assembly to a demon-
stration of about 300 mem-
bers and supporters of the
BPSU in front of parlia-
ment yesterday. They were
protesting government’s
latest proposal for pay
increases in the new indus-
trial agreement.
“Yesterday BPSU mem-
bers claimed they had
been “tricked and misled”
by government in the new
industrial proposal. How-
ever, according to Mr
Mitchell, discussions in
terms of the “conditions of
the agreement have not
even begun as yet and
therefore I do not under-
stand why union members
are in protest.”

“In respect to the press
conference yesterday
(Tuesday) the negotiators
told him (Mr Pinder) what
the government offer was
in the document that was
some 43 articles. He (Mr

FROM page one

highest priority when spending
public funds.

Bahamas Public Services
Union President John Pinder
and other union leaders led a
protest in against governmen-
t’s latest proposal of a new
industrial agreement in Raw-
son Square.

“As long as we do what is
good we do not fear the con-
sequences. I ran in six consec-
utive elections. I have always
placed myself at the will of the .
people of my constituency
because they are the ultimate
custodians of the future of our
country.

table and thanked the gov-
ernment for their offer,
said he’s very pleased at
it said Mr Mitchell.
“Now normally when an
offer is given to you at the
table you say ‘thank you
very much for this, I will
review it and I’ll come
back and tell you what I
think of it’. However he
(Mr Pinder) said that he
agreed with it, that is until
he-went home and read
it”?
_ According to Mr
Mitchell, Mr Pinder has no
réason to say that he was

FROM page one

LOCAL NEWS

“IT must observe that when I
came to the House this morn-
ing I had no idea of any source
other than Mr Pinder of the
Public Service for industrial
agitation. It is important for
me to say to the people of the
country that it will always be
your choice. I have served a
full political life in parliament
all of the tenants of democracy
I respect, but God knows what
I saw yesterday where men
and women and children were
crying because their homes
and personal possessions were
taken away from them by the
forces of nature. We do not
have the right in this country
to compromise on the relief

they must get,” Mr Christie
said beginning debate on the
second reading of the disaster
preparedness bill.

Mr Christie acknowledged
that there is now a need to
spend more money in the
reconstruction and delivery of
aid to Grand Bahama.

“We spent $8 million of
what we projected to be a $24
million expenditure. That was
not planned for as a result of
Hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne and we are spending as
we speak because we have not
completed the restoration after

hurricanes. Frances and
Jeanne.
“We have completed

Hundreds gather
in Rawson Square

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 9

PM: Grand Bahama suffering
is highest spending priori ty

(restoration) in all the islands
of the Bahamas except for
Grand Bahama. It is important
so far as recovery and recon-
struction is concerned that we
move as quickly as possible to

complete this project or pro-.

jects as quickly as possible,”
said Mr Christie.

The prime minister said that
it is his obligation to ensure
that his people are fully aware
that the country may be “head-
ing to choices”.

- “T have told my Cabinet that
I do not propose as prime min-
ister to increase taxes to the
Bahamian people when IJ have
fought so hard against the
advice of the International



Monetary Fund not to increase
the taxes of the Bahamian peo-
ple,” said Mr Christie.

He pointed out that as prime
minister he does not own the
funds and assets of the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas.

“Tam only a caretaker, my
government only exists with
the full consent and approval
democratically endowed by the
people of this country. It is the
constitutional duty therefore
of the prime minister to always
ensure that the people of the
country know that they may
be called upon to make their
choice,” said the prime minis-
ter. ,

WE PUT A
NEW BATHTUB

OVER YOUR
OLD ONEâ„¢







The Affordable Solution
to Worn-Out Bathtubs .

many BPSU members were also affected by

for demonstration

a balance.

“The workers are not asking government
to turn its back on the victims of the hurri-
cane, but government must also be able to

&
* Bathtub Liners are designed to fit over worn-out bathtubs
*Wall Surrounds to cover existing bath walls: In simulated Tile and Marble
* Shower Base Liners to go over existing. Shower bases
* Cultured Marble Vanity Tops and Sinks
’ * Great Shower Door selection
* Quality Faucets, All-Wood Vanities





www.rebathbahamas.com

déceived.

«This is the governmen-
t’s opening position, in
other words it is the first
proposal. It is not the final
proposal,” he said. “This is
in our view a reasonable
opening position.”

“Mr Mitchell said the
negotiations will continue
in'terms of this agreement. ©



Hurricane Wilma and needed their money now
more than ever.

He said the draft ° industrial
agreement was drawn up before the hurri-
cane occurred.

Leader of the opposition in the House of
Assembly Alvin Smith said that,
while he believes all Bahamians would
agree that victims of Hurricane
Wilma should’be top priority at the moment,
it is the government’s job to strike

dreams with:

e Flexible features to suit your needs
e No hidden fees
e Competitive interest rates

Let us help make your dreams come true!

Call or visit your nearest RBC Royal Bank of Canada branch

for more details.

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean

@® Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada

RBC

deal with its employees in a fair and amica-
ble manner,” he said.

Mr Carter, however, emphasised that
although this is a time when government is
concerned foremost about the country’s
economy and the affect Hurricane Wilma
will have on Grand Bahama and several of
the Family Islands, the goals regarding the
BPSU remain in achieving “fairness and
equity.”






Telephone

(242) 393-8501



E*BATH BAHAMA

“Bahamas Only One-day Bath Remodeler”

Visit our Showroom & Office located at the Red Carpet Inn,












“Authorized Dealer”
East Bay Street

POLO JEANS CO, RALPH LAUREN

_GANAE. GET INVOLVED. VOLUNTEER. EXCEED.

Summer Clearence

40% to 50% off

Womens Jeans Saturday

Womens Jeans Saturday

Womens fashion jeans

Men’s Jeans Brixton

Royal Bank

â„¢ The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada -

RBC mes canada

Men’s Jeans Fashion Brixton

men’s & women

Reg $54 Now $32
Reg $66 Now $34
All 50% off

Reg $60 Now $39
Reg $93 Now $54

Mens’ & women clearance 50% off |


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005





DOCTORS HOSPITAL

HIP AND KNEE

REPLACEMENT
CONSULTATIONS

Date: Wednesday, November 2
Time: 3:00pm — 8:00pm

FOR AN APPOINTMENT

CALL 302-4684

And he had one here.

Do you have daily joint pain? Do you
suffer from severe Osteoarthritis? Does
your pain affect your daily activities?
‘Do you have stiffness of your knee
or hip joint?

Dr. Jimmy Lee M.D., F.A.C.S.,
Orthopedic and Total Joint
Replacement Surgeon will be
conducting his monthly Total Joint
(hip and knee) Replacement
Consultations at the Doctors Hospital
Sessional Clinic. Join the many
patients who lead an active lifestyle
and now live pain free.

For more information, or to schedule
an appointment call Doctors Hospital’s
Sessional Clinic at (242) 302-4684.

wee DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Think. Feel. Drive.

Our parts department is- fully stocked, with every component to ensure
that your vehicle runs trouble free Trained technicians on duty.

TYREFLEX STAR MOTORS

‘Products you know, People vou (rust.
BPE 3.496 1

Health For Life







NST mae Telephone:



Impreza 1.6 Sedan
Equipped with unbelievable power.
All weather grip, all wheel drive.
Fuel efficient, cool and sporty.

$18,999"

LE OLLIE LEE EOE EE LEASES IEEE ARIE ILE ELLE LEELA LEIS

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

GRAND Bahamians are no
strangers to the destructive

_ power of hurricanes.

Last year, the island was
ravaged by two of the Atlantic
season’s most formidable
storms.

However, few Grand
Bahamians seemed to have
been prepared for the utter
ruin left in the wake of Hurri-
cane Wilma — a mere catego-
ry two storm.

According to local weather
experts, the fact that Wilma
approached from the south
may go a long way to explain-
ing the extent of the damage.

Tropical storm systems
usually form off western
Africa and travel across the
Atlantic to threaten the north
coast of Grand Bahama.

Like Katrina and Rita before
it however, Hurricane Wilma
formed in the Caribbean.

The storm initially moved
into the Gulf of Mexico and
after ravishing the Yucatan
Peninsula, headed for the
southern coast of Grand
Bahama.

Experts say this area of the
island is particularly vulnera-
ble: unlike the north coast,

which is skirted by the

Atlantic Ocean, southern

Grand Bahama is. bordered

by shallow banks which allow
destructive storm surges to
gain momentum.

And some experts believe
that the changing global cli-
mate means that the
Bahamas will continue to face
unfamiliar hurricane scenar-
ios in the future.

Photos by Felipé Major/

Tribune staff

SUBARU







@ THIS coffin lies broken and open in Eight Mile Rock after it was shattered by a storm

surge

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Multistore, Retail Company offering career opportunities.

Store Managers:

Minimum 3 years experience .

Organizational and supervisory skills essential
Computer experience required

Merchandising aptitude/experience — an asset
Ability to work flexible hours

Competitive benefit package with medical

Salary commensurate with experience

Senior Sales Staff:
Minimum 3 years experience
Computer experience essential |
Merchandising experience/aptitude — an asset
Sales driven personality
Competitive benefit package with medical
Salary commensurate with experience

Warehouse Manager:
Minimum 3 years experience in:
receiving/processing/inventory management
Computer experience necessary
Organizational and supervisory skills essential .
Some flexibility in operating hours required
Compeniye benefit package

Drivers/Equipment Assembly Personal:
Current drivers license — 3 years minimum — experience
in both manual and automatic vehicles
Ability to assemble basic mechanical consumer products
Some flexibility in operating hours required
Competitive benefit package

Please send resume to:

c/o DA 2167
The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas


THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 11











@ (Left) TWO girls sit down
in two chairs which they found
by their former home in
Pinders Point and stare in
shock at the wreckage

OFFICE PREMISES FOR RENT
AT LYFORD MANOR
LYFORD CAY

* approx. 1,300 s.f.
* fully fitted out
* 1,2 or 3 offices, secretarial pool,
utility/filing room




(Below) A YOUNG boy :

sits near what remains of his ; * Shared conferen eee VE
home in Eight Mile Rock, c 2e oom/library,
while behind him a woman : bathrooms and kitchenette

tries to salvage her
possessions

3 * Ready for occupancy
- Contact: 362-5787 for details

TTS
Pr ae se

SALE

e Fashion Hand Bags
e Dresses

e Pants Suits

e Ladies Underwear
e Hats

e Scarfs

e Fashion Jewelr ai

° * e e
e Cosmetics Except Toiletries 20% OFF

WOMAN’S VARIETY

Bay Street, three doors est of Elizabeth Avenue
° Nassau Telephone: 326-6988

BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

. BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established
_ international private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland,
is presently seeking a Bahamian national for the position of

ACCOUNTANT

-, Reporting to the Deputy Financial Controller, the Accountant must i
a Certified Public Accountant or hold a similar BICA-approved certification,
: with at least three years’ post-qualification experience at an international
- bank. The successful candidate should have an in-depth understanding
_ of all aspects of the general ledger, be familiar with current banking

: regulations in relation to local and international reporting requirements, | Our responsi bi ity

» investment funds, trusts and be able to meet strict deadlines.

“ The job requires the individual to

' 2 x s , s ;:
record, analyse and prepare financial statements for use by . Brake Service SUSHEnSiOn d Aignment Exhaust
management and other regulatory bodies in accordance with BSIOB’s Oil, Lube 4 Filler GOODVEAR TYRES"

policies and procedures
supervise a small trust department, liaising with Searaueinen and

statutory authorities on accounting and reporting issues *American & Imported Cars Light Tucks Vans & SUV's

organise and control the timely payment of duly authorised expenses

of BSIOB for services and goods received * Complete Inspection & Estimates Before we start the work

act for the Deputy Financial Controller and Financial Controller if and
when required LOCATIONS 10 SERVE 0
prepare and analyse

Bey io Be Sc anit at oe MACKEY ST. & ROOSEVELT AVENUE © EAST ST. & SOLDIER RD
eee ees ~ Tel: 398-6651 or 393-6693 ‘Tel 356-2940 or 356-2941
reports for the Central Bank of The Bahamas and Securities

Commission of The Bahamas | | Open: Monday - Saturday
Resumes should be faxed to #702 1253 or mailed or delivered to the Sam-opmn

offices of BSI, addressed to :-.
Personnel Officer Fax 326-4865 * P 0. Box $S-6766 Nassau, Bahamas: /
BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited __ AUTO SYSTEM EXPERTS Se )

Bayside Executive Park, W. Bay St. & Blake Road i ne
P. O. Box N-7130 =

Nassau, Bahamas : "Midas is a business based on service, quality and reliability.
hy Factory scheduled maintenance is car care.

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE) Peverre Midas services your car fully. Our system takes the guesswork
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted. hy out of auto care for every car model out there


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005



BACARDI & COMPANY LIMITED

Bacardi & Company Limited is seeking
candidates for the position of

Assistant Controller of Finance.

The Company has been based in Nassau for over 40 years with
significant manufacturing operations in the areas of bulk rum
production and bottling of various spirit beverages, primarily for
export markets.

The Assistant Controller will be responsible for leading the budgeting
and analysis functions within the Finance department. While
reporting to the Financial Controller the incumbent will be required
to plan and implement the annual budget and quarterly revised
estimate processes across the entire organisation. In addition the
successful candidate is expected to manage the budget reporting
submissions into the parent company including treasury forecasts.
Other key duties include the performance of quarterly financial
statement variance analysis and management of our global product
costing system.

The successful candidate must hold a professional designation
with ten (10) to fifteen (15) years experience.

A CA or CPA designation is preferred.
Furthermore the individual must possess the ability to work
independently under pressure to consistently meet deadlines.
Must be a self starter and a team player.

Salary and benefits are commensurate with experience.

Interested candidates should forward copies of their curriculum
vitae directly to the Bacardi & Company Limited P.O. Box N-4880,
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas. =~
Attention The Human Resources Manager

Information may also be forwarded via e-mail to
dacartwright@bacardi.com

Application Deadline: October 28, 2005

BACARDI AND THE BAT DEVICE ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF BACARDI & COMPANY LIMITED

THE TRIBUNE



Freeport



in shoc

at the destruction

,



& THIS house was completely moved and thrown 50ft from its foundations in Eight Mile Rock,

along with the car that now lies in the debris

Join

Dr. Myles Munroe

and guest speakers _

from around

the world as

theyhelpyou :

todevelop “THE SPIRIT OF INNOVATIVE LEADERSHIP”

ert 461-6400 to ering

| COORDINATOR FOR
THE MATERNITY UNIT

QUALIFICATIONS

e Registered Nurse/Registered Midwife with
BSN degree MBA/MHA preferred

e Minimum 5 years nursing/midwifery
experience required

® Minimum 2 years managerial experience in a
hospital setting required

¢ Computer literate

e Excellent written and oral communication
skills

e Excellent interpersonal skills

POSITION SUMMARY
The successful candidate will:

° Be responsible for the cost-effective
implementation of total patient-care for
Maternity Unit;

¢ Provide direct supervision and evaluation of
nursing staff to meet the patients' needs;

¢ Coordinate the support services and resources
to facilitate patient care and smooth
functioning of the Maternity Unit.

Salary commensurate with experience
Excellent benefits -

Please submit resume to: The Human Resources Department
Doctors Hospital | P.O. Box N-3018 1 Nassau, Bahamas


-PAGE 13, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005 THE TRIBUNE









THIS cemetery in Eight Mile Rock by the coast lies in a shambles after Hurricane Wilma has
. taken its toll 3






Ye satneonaannngtive

KIA MOTORS

The Power to Suprise

eo — Thompson Boulevard, Oakes Field, Nassau, Bahamas, P.O. Box GT-2947
Tel: 326-6377, 326-6464/5, 326-0013/4, 326-6382 ¢ Fax: 326-6315
imal sanput vehicles a cocawaye. com.









a

‘The Only Questi

iis

She has yet to learn her ABC’s but that doesn’t matter. When it’s
time for her to go to college, she won't have to worry about whether
we can afford it or not. With a plan from Colinalmperial, we know
that we can give her the education she needs to succeed. Harvard,
Oxford, University of The Bahamas? The choice will be hers...but a
college education is definitely in her future!

a Colinalmperial.

Insurance Ltd.

Confidence for Life



ve
~_,
4
PAGE 14, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005 THE TRIBUNE

fe.









Beginning the slow
rk of rebuilding

2
.












Features for 1.6 litre model include: automatic Features for 1.8 litre model include: automatic
transmission, air conditioning, power windows, transmission, air conditioning, power windows,
locks & mirrors, immobiliser and CD player. locks & mirrors, immobiliser and remote keyless

. entry, alloy wheels, dual airbags, leather
upholstery and CD changer.

TOYOTA

Backed by the only 3-year/60,000 mile warranty in the Bahamas

: Colli S 6
EXECUTIVE Oper: Mon to Fa am "3a0 pm
MOTORS LID Tel: 322-6705/6 © Fax: 322-6714 4

E-mail: execmotor@batelnet.bs
AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER | Salesperson: Pam Palacious,
Parts and service guaranteed | Barry Pinder, Terrol Cash











Ata eae





wee Pees ese : a’
i NET Ye PWN *excluding items on consignment
as i Monday Oct 24




AND ACCESSORIES - : thru Saturday Nov 5

Ladders, Brushes,
Rollers and more!




POWEITDOLS (00 TN 2A rice

DEWALT [cE

High Performance Industrial Toota Power Tools








Power Tools

fly MACKS.DECKER Ta , —_ : : | AAA TAATOA c




This position requires an individual who is dependable, detail
oriented, well organized and is efficient working in a team

SUG USAR GUL Ue < eaa
Tee eee —— 7 . Protecto-Coat environment. }

VR p TY
Bre es Ge Qtek | Responsibilities include:
“ne Pa cs 4
fee: ; r Gar OF ITEMS ( be e Preparation of monthly financial statements

Ti LE ACC ES SO Ri ES $1 >) Ca ° Preparation of budgets and forecasts

'e Processing of accounts receivable, accounts payable and payroll
THIN-SET, GROUT & ADHESIVES, TOOLS ¢ Working with the external auditors and reporting to the Directors
Ceramic Tile

starts at $1.15 per sq. ft.













Requirements





¢ Minimum of 5 years experience in bookkeeping/accounting’
e Prior supervisory experience

¢ Excellent oral and written communication skills

° General computing skills

* Knowledge of Insurance and processing of claims










Salary will be commensurate with experience.






Mural | BUILDING SUPPLIES LUMBER & PLUMBING
Cow Manure $5.45 nett WULFF ROAD (OPP. MACKEY ST.) WILTON ST. (NEXT TO DW DAVIS)
CN SU Mee eur TEL: 393-8006 OR 393-8225 TEL: 325-3507 OR 394-0641

cNuggets $3.95 nett :
ie STORE HOURS: 7:00am - 4:00pm Monday - Friday ° Saturday 7:00am - 3:00pm

OLLI LR ES ETE IPE PE ES SELES PEPE mSrTe er ant soe

Please send your resume and salary requirements to:



Bookkeeper/Accountant : .
P.O. Box N-529 ”
Nassau, Bahamas




il THIS man walks through the remains of a house in E
Rock to see what is left after Hurricane Wilma





SRG LeBBESOP pet BEER AHP ATES ROOST eB OS SER SU RET DH SARE TR

osturepecic

Support you trust, Comfort





row ll lov









AVAILABLE AT FINE FURNITURE STORES
THROUGHOUT THE GAHAMAS







Donald's Furniture - 322-3875 » Best Buy Furniture - 394-2378
Roberts Furniture - 322-8862 * Palmdale Furniture - 322-3703 |
The Sleep Gallery - 327-5338 * Home Furniture - 322-8646
Wood You Furniture - 325-9663 ¢ Bahama Beds - 394-8015





QAP Ete Ease te efi dee Be eH sa god ef ce te i 2 ES Se

@ THIS Haitian national a ere 3 = vo yee
holds on to a house which was a Se ; (242)-352-66 | i
uprooted during Hurricane ee
Wilma in Pinders Point

© 2005 ADWORKS












Affordable,
Spacious,
& pietelie



aie sshd at $30, 000
Down payments -
as low as S $3, 000

‘Monthly payments
starting at $327

Interior lots
average 17,400sq. ft.)

Approval within hours

hee CSDATENO HE Loy Gornysete: tees at. sie



UNG and suparsielis Any aid all Corsiilunlegdors
Ben Yau and whe developer ot iia reproscniative.



call before 2 na pens

You'll want to admit youre over thirty if you insure with us!

We offer reduced rates for drivers over thirty, plus emergency

roadside service, and etched ID numbers on your windshield

for instant identification if your car is st °>. Call us for
further details.

nassau t 242.328.7888 f 242.325.3151

freeport t 242.352.4564 f 242.352.5118 is ae ot
www.rsabahamas.com


PAGE 16, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005 THE TRIBUNE

LA Ei rien 3 aoe tones cerwsee nn '

RETNA TEE PSP SNR RPL PIERS RA ARLE AGE ILENE TIESTO BIT AG yA MPR PINUS EPAIPTIN ELODIE INEM BPW IET AYA A PURELY ETI A


a | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 17

THE TRIBUNE







_ “Our advertising needs to reach as many
shoppers as possible. When considering
newspapers, The Tribune is the first choice;
it offers coverage that drives our sales.

The Tribune is my newspaper.”

LEAH DAVIS

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
SOLOMON’S SUPERCENTRE





\
4


PAGE 18, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005 come UNE

ea hs TNT LEN





LOCAL NEWS



«

a « sf

Kerzner makes furniture donation {20
to assist in hurricane relief effort “oe

Sum lars

KERZNER International Development he wae - »" ”
Limited donated two containers full of fur-
niture to the National Emergency Manage-
ment Agency (NEMA) on Monday, October
17.

According to Kerzner, the donation is part.
of the company’s ongoing efforts to assist
the Bahamas and is to be distributed to per-
sons who were affected by last year’s hurri-
canes throughout the Family Islands.

The furniture, which included colourful
lounge chairs, sofas, drapery and lamps, was
off-loaded by a group of workers and hand-
ed over to NEMA.

Last September, Kerzner International
Bahamas Limited donated $1 million to the
National Disaster Relief Fund following the
devastation caused by Hurricane Frances.

Tino Clarke of Kerzner Development pre-
sented the furniture to Daniel .Ferguson,
materials management consultant at NEMA.

“We are very pleased to make this dona-
tion because there are a lot of people still suf-
fering and still without certain necessities a
year later after the hurricanes of last year
which really hurt the Bahamas,” Clarke said.

“It gives us great pleasure to be able to
help alleviate the suffering and give back to
the community as much as we can.”

He explained that the donation is.a part of
an on-going exercise which coincides with the
renovation of Atlantis.

Clarke pointed out that the resort is
putting in new furniture and rather than dis-
card the original furniture, the company.
thought it best to give it to people that can
use it.

“It’s a win-win situation. We are improv-
ing the product for Atlantis for our guests
and at the same time we are helping the

people of the Bahamas that are suffering
still from the hurricanes,” stated Clarke. @ KERZNER International presents NEMA with furniture to assist persons affected by last year’s itipelaba:

Ferguson said the furniture will be put to _—- Pictured are O’Neil Meadows of Pinders Custom Brokerage; Daniel Ferguson, materials management
good use and thanked Kerzner Internation- consultant with NEMA; Tino Clarke of Kerzner International Development; and Drexon Thompson,
al for its assistance. supervisor with Kerzner Development. i

“Copyrighted Material
i Syndicated Content
i Available from Commercial News Providers”



a STAT MQ aia
BS eed BD sor di

WPL

MAP Mm UA ERT ORE
TULL (eh

Seema w nauk UC) Oy
Sales: in our ei plus Se



AT WULFF ROAD











hachadd sald applic
carburetor or fuel inpatient
Settings —












PATROL a NRA nN NR LR rar

‘Front Brake Job

ESA RNAS IESE DTA AANA ROSA UT NUR

SPECIAL PRICE:








SPECIAL PRICE:

UU

sistaxengueseuanesnias a

Muffler Installation

SPECIAL PRICE:






AEN RYAN ANSP RY SAS OIE ANIA PAA NEE ANEARUANA

“AC System — Charge
(COMPLETE)

"ca aS RRRE NARNIA a

SPECIAL PRICE:





Includes; Welding






( olinton::
tebour




nr Meena SAN ASD ANE RN SN

Drive Shaft Installation

SPECIAL PRICE:





Includes:
Labour for complete Drive Shaft












Tlech Transmission |
\_ Aut Change

SPECIAL PRICE: eae :

ee Machine



he 14 au of. Texaco Tansnission Fluid



A.LD. ~— Automotive & industrial Distributors
Wulff Road, Nassau, The Bahamas | Phone: 393-7481 | Fax: 393-4258





i
j
I
g

We | ‘ ;
Bahamas Frat oneal Insurance AutoSate * A.LD. www.aidbahamaislands.com
pO see* ae Freeport, Marsh Harbour, Rock Sound, —_‘ Nicholl’s Town, George Towa,
| oon a Grand Bahama Abaco Elauthera Andros Exuma

i

© 32-8071 367-2077 334-2060 329-4184 336-2780

Ca AAR ROPE OAOAER
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OC IOBEH 2/7, 2UUD, FAUE 1Y

INTERNATIONAL NEWS



German court rules in tavour
ish heirs who lost

of Tew

Copyrighted Material,,;<

retay pekeasec

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”




_ GREAT WESTERN .
CONVENIENCE STORE

LE

October 24th - November 7th




$29.95



1.12 pe Router Bit Set





2. 24V. Cordless Hammer Drill $98.95



3, 350 Watt Power Inverter $72.95




4.7 1/4” Carbide Tip Saw Blades $ 8.95
$9.95
$107.00






5. 3 pc Wood Chisel Set





6. Complete Toilet Set
' (Tank, Bowl & Seat)

AND
MUCH
MORE!!!

Your One Step Shop”
OPEN 7 DAYS

TEL: (242) 323-4375
St. Alban’s-Drive (East)













THE MALL At
MARATHON

hag a treat for you this
Halloween at our

TRICK OR TREAT



Trick or Treat







Monday, October 31
4pm - 7pm
RS Costume required
Fe Children under 10

ce














Wery’s

IN ADELAIDE
| RESTAURANT & BAR

We are Open again!!!

¢ Native Dishes
¢ Fine Wines
¢ Daiquiris & Good Drinks

Rake & Scrape
on the patio

friday’s
ONLY!

Open 11am to 11pm
Except Mondays (CLOSED)

362-1547



BAY STREET -
P.O. BOX N-1411 NASSAU, BAHAMAS _

PHONE (242) 322-1179

50% OFF HOUSEHOLD LINENS| |
CLEARANCE SALE!

(“Regular prices)

(Credit Cards 45% Off) .

-¢ Table Clothes e Runners ¢ Doilies
¢ Pillow Cases |

e Shower Curtains and much more -

Harbour Bay
393-6923
Marathon Mall

393-4146

Madeira Plaza
322-7647
Robinson Road
322-3213

+) ehdebbhecdehecia tS
3



=,
fag gn?

Proudly Serving the Bahamian People since 1 974.

Thursday, 27th October~
thru
Saturday, 5th November prsener a items


SAV.A.CHEK ‘Extra-Special’: on each item you purchase, over
THe yop YY a dollar, with One filled SAV.A.CHEK certificate get a Dollar Off!

REDEEM your SAV-A-CHEK now at:
Johns S George, Sandys, Epic Battery, GNC,
Home Fabrics, Godetts Jewelry.
FREEPORT: Dolly Madison Home Centre, GNC, Epic ey eau Time rere

STORE MON. - SAT. 7:30AM - 9:00PM Extra Extra!

HOURS: SUN.: 7:00AM - 12:00PM °¢ 7:00AM - 2: oe vARSOUR B87 ONL! SAV.A. CHEK Special!





UTE AEG i a aT

Sen, | CHUNK LITE
Boost | TUNA WATER

66 - OZ
5G" AS
of , WHOLE p HH EEASYIRON-
DOG FOOD 3 CORN | ~ | NONSTICK STARCH

17.5 LBS . 29 -OZ 20 - OZ

$479

MEAL SUPPLEMENT




















TOMATOES







ROMAI ues DL LEE FRESH CUT MINI
S$ 49 fy = ARTS CHESSE-N-CRACKERS 24 - 02Z....... 7 Salon TURKEY Pp ORK
EACH eae EACH || LIBBY’S PICNIC | WINGS RIBS







VIENNA SAUSAGE
REGULAR & CHX EACH. esssssssessssees



“MIX-N-MATCH
RED, SEEDLESS &GLOBE POTATOES -
JUMBO GRAPES

$ q@ 99
s4°e a 1







CRACKING
GOOD BIG 60 .









LIM ES pad =" ASSTD COOKIES 24 - PK cssssssssssesesens ,
|\47S4°C2, = $4 49,, || s8








COCONUT WATER 6 - PK....





PRESTIGE




NATURE VALLEY |
GRANOLA BARS ASSORTED 12-pak.$3.99
















SIRLOIN

SPREAD “SLICE CHEESE REGULAR | SIRLOIN

$j so eS ough

BEEF PHONE

9 |$ 99

LB.







CADBURY
CHOCOLATES





pepe a ahs ASSTD BISCUITS
YOGURTS AND BA GLES ASSORTED 4.5 - OZ.-sceseeesssesnteessses
2/3 4 49 oz > “4+ re oz DELMONTE




FRUIT CUPS PEACHES, MIX FRUIT &
CHERRY 11.5 - OZ.essessesssssersessnseeeseenns





w/D ERIDGE FARM

CORN ON LAYER CAKES
THE COB ASST ca
S$Q42 12 - ee S3s2 19-02







REYNOLDS |
STANDARD FOIL 24-FT eeserecsesenerseerens 1249





ROTISSERIE . MACARONI





w/D WINN-DIXIE GWALLNEY CHICKEN SALAD
ASSTD REG &
MIX VEGETABLES ICE CREAM HOT DOGS OR BOLOGNA EACH....... a $8 ‘4 22 EACH Sap29 EACH
| +4 fee oz $s rhage :

POWER BUYS
LIBBYS




fe ara AS
EVERCANE

POWER BUYS
CARIBBEAN

POWER BUYSE
PAR-EXCELLENCE | -






CARDINAL
EVAPORATED >

AQUA PURE



CORNED CHUNK LITE | | PARBOILED)
SUGAR BEEF ao TUNA (WATER)|| RICE |







$4 s9

POWER BUYS

$429

POWER BUYS POWER BUYS H POWER led



POWER BUYS



1POWER BUYS























ROBIN HOOD | | FRANCO AMERICAN KELLOGS ‘QUAKER ACT 11
FLOUR) | sxcncmn, | CORN. | SSSare>" |atacorenen| ROE CORN,
& Mego ok FLAKES One WEDDING OATS ASSORTED
5-LBS 14.75 ae tl
3 99 z ss a S 19
4 °es2 E°®'2 || sgoe






TOOTHPASTE} | RICH TEA = CAKE | |KETCHUP
REGULAR _ BUSCUITS FROSTINGS | MIXES || Botte



$959 $499) |\s- 79s -4 72
THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 21
INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Lebanese military

sieps up pressure

against pro-Syrian
Palestinian militants





Viountain basc
6s surrounded

“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”



° Buy any two participating items and have a cashier

: verify products re a -

‘© Put your name and phone number on the back of receipt

_anddropinentry boxes provided :
Winners announced Wednesday, 30 November on Love 97

pe



balan oe
oat EFS:



eae

ae

‘pr eters

atthe «Oe eo

SN eT

"RBC ROVAL BANK OF CANADE

DS \\ RS
BS IA LVS SNG ROR QING ANY
ee
is considering applications for _
Customer Service

S CONSE ere OY
Representative

YSIS SARS
EC
(Part-time with opportunities for full-time employment)

gaa aoa aaa aaa aa

The successful candidate should possess the
following qualifications:
e¢ A minimum of four BGCSE with “C” or above
passes (including Math and English).
At least two or more years banking experience.
Previous experience as a Customer Service
Representative would be an asset
Key skills include: customer-oriented,
communications, confidentiality, initiative and
pro-activity and must be a team player.
Must be computer literate.
Must be able to maximize opportunity spotting
with all customers to enhance referrals, sales
activities and contribute to customer care.

as coassresceasciascassc



HOURS OF WORK:
Regular Weeks Sign-Out
Time

BS
S
S
S
i
E
RB
:
iS
;
S
5
;
4
FE
iS
f
SS
Ss
RS
R
:
e
Rf
S
:
:
S
:
Fe

Monday-Thursday 11:00am
Friday 11:00am

Total Hours

Government

Pay Week
Monday-Thursday
Friday

Total Hours

A competitive compensation package (base salary
& bonus) will commensurate with relevant
experience and qualifications.

Please apply before November 4, 2005 to:

The Manager
Human Resources

Bahamas & Caribbean .
Royal Bank of Canada The Tribune wants to hear

P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas from people who are
making news in their

Via fax: (242)328-7145 : neighbourhoods. Perhaps
Via email: bahcayjp@rbc.com q a are raising funds fac a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





AOR,



Ps

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean RBC

Royal Bank

© Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada d =
* The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada} LOY of Canada



BS


_ PAGE 22, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005 THE TRIBUNE.
INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Suicide bombing in
sraeli town kills five





HALSBURY
CHAMBERS
Counsel and Attorneys-at-Law

Notaries Public —

Presents

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

Free Legal Clinic
“Information You Need
For the Life You Want”

opt me oe

Saturday October 29
Halsbury Commercial Centre



JOB OPPORTUNITY
PHOTO/VIDEO MANAGER

The successful candidate is expected to be responsible for the
smooth and efficient operation of a photo and video department.

Village Road North

9:15 am
Special Guest Speaker (prior to start of Legal Clini)
Justice Emmanuel Osadebay
Author of ‘Labour Laws of The Bahamas’







Responsibilities:




¢ Supervision and training of staff within the department.
- © Promote photo and video sales to guests.
* Ordering of photographic and video supplies.
¢ Maintenance of all photographic and video equipment.
° Keep abreast of the latest see oa eeyclonaent in the
industry.

Skills: :

¢ Excellent interpersonal skills.

¢ Excellent managerial skills.

* Excellent oral and written communication skills.

* Strong organizational and implementation skills.

¢ A team player with the ability to-work independently.
¢ Ability to work in a fast paced environment.

Knowledge and Education:

¢ A minimum of five years experience in a managerial capacity.
eA euch in photography and/or related field.








Facilitator aes Time*” i
Mr. Terrance Knowles 9:45 am | Contractor Responsibilities
Mr. Ehurd Cunningham = — 10:15am _ Stamp Tax Act 2005
Mr. Philip Simon “1115.am Importance of Networking
Mr. Malcolm Martini 11:30am National & Local Planning |
Mr. Vaughn Delaney 12:00 pm Confidentiality and
| | Identity Theft






Apply in writing to:
The Human Resources Manager.
‘Box SS-5490
Nassau, The Bahamas




Group presentations, individual discussions, a rare opportunity.
Lawyers available for information until 5 pm —
Call 393-4551 to reserve your seat. Space is limited!
Free parking courtesy of Family Guardian, Village Road
Free child care activities supervised by the staff of The Meridian School




Applications must be received no later than October 27, 2005.



HUGE SALE © psi

MASSIVE PRICE REDUCTIONS... IT ALL MUST GO!
| SALE ENDS OCTOBER 31ST

The Endellion String Quartet

Monday, October 31st, 2005 at 8:00pm_
GOVERNMENT HOUSE BALLROOM

Tuesday, November Ist, 2005 at 12:00noon
CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL

Box Office: A.D. Hanna & Co: 322-8306
Nassau Music Society: 327-7668
Tickets: Monday Concert: Members; $25,
Non-Members: $35
Students: $5
Tuesday Concert: $15, Students: Free
www.nassaumusicsociety.com


THE TRIBUNE | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 23

INTERNATIONAL NEWS:

Florida’s long lines for supplies



a. - —



Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa

SECURITY & LOSS PREVENTION
MANAGER

Sandals is seeking a suitable qualified applicant with
‘drive and ambition to fill the position of Security &
‘Loss Prevention Manager.








“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”








Key selection criteria include:

¢ Sound knowledge on preventive Security principles
& practices.

* Service as a Royal Bahamas Police or Defense
Force.

¢ ‘A Minimum of three years as Head of A private
Security Services.

¢ Knowledge of Microsoft Word, Excel and Internet
applications.

¢ Hospitality loss and prevention experience; _

° Ability to Train /Supervise and work with a team

concept;

Disaster Management Training/ Basic Accounting.













Excellent benefit package offered.





Interested persons should send resumes with cover
letter to:






Human Resources
P.O. Box CB-13005
Nassau.

cmajor @srb.sandals.com









P 9. BOX 8S. 6321 TEL: (242) ¢ 324-7302
BERNARD ROAD @. (242) 324-8147 ers.
NASSAU, BAHAMAS "FAX: (243) ‘32atB086 es

OCTOBER ON




All Asian Pots
Huge Selection





‘Tne fine line of General Electric appliances found at Geoffrey Jones cater to today’s busy households
and fit every lifestyle. Our wide variety of GE appliances are designed to suite your needs, providing the

ultimate in convenience, performance and style. With the best that technology has to offer, competitive

SUONEPY BANEAD sQ0zZO

pricing and a full service department, Geoffrey Jones is your ultimate appliance centre.

You'll wonder how you ever got along without It.

elcome at sternite Department Rosetta & Montgomery Streets | 322-2188/9 [eV ¥ Yore)


PAGE 24, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005

THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL NEWS



EU says dangerous bird flu strain found in

os

LYFORD FINANCIAL CENTRE
‘OFFICE PREMISES FOR RENT



UPPER FLOOR PREMISES

3,600 SQUARE FEET FOR FIT-OUT BY 1 OR 2 TENANTS

12 ont PARKING SPACES INCLUDET

AUTOMATIC STANDBY GENERATOR

HURRICANE WINDOWS

ELEVATOR

oo CALL MIKE KLONARIS



AT:

(W) 362.5787 OR (H) 362.4124

® Midnight Eyeliner Bene

¢ Botanical Clay Masque

¢ Botanical Skin Purifier UN

¢ FF Logo Keychain .

_@ Leopard Print Cosmetic Bag

With SPF 15- Sun feet: 100% Oil and Fragrance Free
Provides excellent coverage without the look

or feel of wearing makeup.

$23

Also Vitamin E enriched lipsticks
in new shades of Reckless, Rampage and Rebel.
$14

Mall at Marathon
Palmdale
Port Lucaya, Freeport

One Gift Per Customer
while Supplies Last

Bay Street
Sandyport

AL
ra



Facts, Pare

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

*@ eres T beer of

CAOVGHCC
elelies

Clearan

g
Cc
g

Cc

Accredited - Registered - Re

Call us at Ph: 394-8570 « Or Fax: 394-8623
DU Or visit us at www.sdc.edu

information and registration or at Gold Circle House, East Bay Street.


iMG wowune (HUMOWAT, Gu iUbEM a,, 2009, brow...





INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Croatia: new outbreak discovered in Chi






a
“Copyrighted Material

- Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”




INITIATE LAUNCH

Sit here and the count down begins, check the chrome ringed barrel like performance gauges, adjust the flush mounted
audio and climate controls to your desired settings, and make sure you establish the proper mood with the industry
. first driver contifurable MyColour instrument panel lighting that allow you to select your own colour dash lighting.

Thoroughly modern and unmistakably MUSTANG, its always all systems go in here.

¢ Power Chairs | oe 2005 Ford Mustang, standard shift / leather, loaded

Bs Oa © Mobili
The Tribune wants to hear Scooters Special Cash Price $33, 384, 00

| from people who are | Coc 86° Lift Chairs | ,
c cmaen® Wheel Chairs | qr) of 2005 Ford Mustang automatic / leather and loaded —
at , : Special Cash eo $05 400.0

neighbourhoods. Perhaps
Lic & bpestion to birthday, floor mats, full tank of gas, 3 year roadside assistance first 5 services to 12000 miles free.

you are raising funds fora | | pelt oer aa , |
good cause, campaigning F J _ | 3 year or 36000 mile warranty

for improvements in the
‘area or have won an
award, mo. Ve | ds
‘Ifo, call us on 322-1986 | ert hE RENE LID. | | _ THOMPSON BOULEVARD « TEL.: 356-7100 + FAX: 328-8094

cand share your story. i { ee re F oe 8am - 5pm ° ee 394. 4i47- 50

ag

see the full line of all your favourate FORDS at

Come seé our showroom at



a Kitten Formula

@ Original Formula

@ Indoor Formula

| @ Seafood Medley

Grand Bahama: :

ate eHill — Harbour = Port me Queen's Highwa
a 39983938300." T3400 252.3802


PAGE 26, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005 ye THE TRIBUNE





| NASSAU es
Caves Village, Shirley Street, Independence Highway, JFK Drive, Cable Beach Roundabout,

Bers Cay

: GRAND BAHAMA | 7
RND Plaza, Queen’s Highway, Seahorse Plaza

ABACO - =

Queen Elizabeth Drive, Marsh Harbour |
ELEUTHERA & HARBOUR ISLAND

Butler & Sands Governor’s Harbour, Bayside Liquor Store-Harbour Island, Jean’s Bay-
Harbour Island

-KUMA

John Marshall-George Town

BIMINI

Butler & Sands-Alice Town | : ah

WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. NO FURTHER DISCOUNT APPLICABLE ON THESE ITEMS. moe
“\ SE DRINK RESPONSIBLY. eee








TTHURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005

SECTION





business@tribunemedia.net



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street





Money Safe.
Money Fast.

interactional Money Transtar

[® Bank of The Bahamas

INTERNATILONAL

Gniline at
BenkBahamasOniine.com



Roof product

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he founder of a company estab-
lished to distribute the Dura Slate
Bermuda Roof product in this
nation believes that “its proven
ability to withstand hurricane con-
ditions” will create strong demand from Bahami-
an consumers, and may even help bring down
property insurance premiums by causing rein-
surers to look more favourably on this nation.
Guilden Gilbert, founder of Innovative Build-
ing Systems (Bahamas), yesterday told The Tri-
bune that he was motivated to secure an agree-
ment to distribute Dura Slate, an upgrade to
the original limestone Bermuda Roof product
that is now 365 years-old, after hearing about the
devastation caused by Hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne in September 2004.
“I thought it was time for the Bahamas to

look seriously” at obtaining the most hurricane- _

resistant roofing product possible, Mr Gilbert
explained.
“T think there’s a need for a roof that’s proven

to withstand hurricane conditions. The struc-
tures here are built extremely soundly, so if
there’s structural damage it’s by way of the roof.
The actual building structures - they can’t be
built any stronger.”

Mr Gilbert and Innovative: Building Systems
(Bahamas) exhibited Dura Slate at last week-
end’s Bahamas Home and Builders Show, and
he said: “Talking to the organisers after the
show, we were told we were the busiest booth
and most talked-about booth.”

Mr Gilbert, who set up Innovative: Building
Systems six months ago to begin marketing the
Dura Slate product, said independent tests had

shown that it could withstand 150-185 pounds per —

square foot of uplift pressure from winds.

In: contrast, a Category Five hurricane with
wind speeds of 155mph had been shown to exert
81.3 pounds of uplift pressure per square foot,
and one packing 200 mph winds exerted pressure
of 135 pounds per square foot.

While tests had shown that Dura Slate could

SEE page 6B



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor





@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE damage inflicted on
Florida by Hurricane Wilma
has “caused a severe disrup-
tion” to the shipping and trans-
portation operations that are
the “lifeline” for the Bahamas
and its economy, The Tribune

was told yesterday, with the
Port of Miami closed to com-
mercial shipping until this

morning.

Kristof Lingier, the Bahamas
country and operations man-
ager for Seaboard Marine, said



Port closures, fuel shortage and
dock damage in Florida hamper
shipping company operations

that apart from the port clo-
sure and “substantial damage”
inflicted on the company’s
docks and terminals, sunken
yachts and boats were partially

_ blocking the channel leading

to his company’s facilities on
Dodge Island, inthe Port of
Miami.

As a result, “not all our ships .
are able” to enter, Mr Lingier
explained. The. Seaboard
Marine vessel that served Nas-
sau was currently anchored

outside Miami waiting for the

SEE page 5B

ABACO Markets yesterday said its



better than last year”, when Hurricanes
Frances and Jeanne catised a $7 million
insurance claim, although Wilma did
cause “some damage” to freezers and
coolers at its Solomon’s SuperCentre
outlet.

Lesley Davies-Baptista, the BISX-list-
ed retailer’s vice-president of marketing,
told The Tribune that Thompson’s
Wholesale had already re-opened and
was “fine”, while Solomon’s SuperCentre
was set to re-open today after suffering
no structural damage unlike last year,
when the roof on the former Cedar Street
location blew off.

Freeport operations had fared “much .

Abaco Markets fares ‘much better’ in Wilma

However, she added that eae s

‘would open with a temporary “limited

capacity” for frozen goods such as ice
cream and vegetables, due to the wind
damage inflicted by Hurricane Wilma,
which blew off some panels on the store’s

‘freezers.

Summit

“While we did take a hit, it’s certainly
much better than last year,” Ms Davies-
Baptista said. We were able to signifi-
cantly minimise the impact.”

She explained that before the storm
hit, Solomon’s staff had transferred a
substantial amount of frozen and cold
products to refrigerated and frozen trail-
ers that were brought in specially for
Wilma.



As a result, the store had been able to
“safeguard quite a bit of product” from
the damage inflicted on the freezers and
coolers. Product loss:‘had been minimised,
and Solomon’s will be open today with

_ perishable products and meats.

work through our preparation rooms and
work on the perishables”, Ms Davies-.
Baptista said.

Solomon’s staff were in the store on
Monday night to safeguard product as
‘soon as the storm had passed, and the
premises had already been cleaned up.

of the damage were still being done, so it
was impossible to give a monetary figure.




Having the trailers “will.allow us to








Ms Davies-Baptista said assessments








@ PRIME MINISTER PERRY CHRISTIE

PM sounds fiscal
alarm for unions

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie yesterday fired a shot
across the bows of the trade
unions, hinting that their pay
demands could upset the Gov-
ernment’s fiscal position if they
were met, particularly his
pledge that he would impose
no new or increased taxes
despite International Monetary
Fund (IMF) pressure.

- Addressing the House of
Assembly while demonstrators

Local knowledge
key in offshore
investigations

& By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

LOCAL knowledge and expertise are invaluable when con-
ducting fraud and financial investigations in international finan-
cial centres such as the Bahamas, a leading KPMG executive

has said.

Writing in KPMG’s Fighting Fraud publication, Michael Peer,
senior manager of KPMG Forensic in Jersey, who has responsi-
bility for 14 offshore centres, said investigation techniques used in
one country were not always as

effective in another.

Mr Peer said that while an





(FILE photo)

from the Bahamas Public Ser-
vices Union (BPSU) and the
BEC union protested outside,
Mr Christie said: “I have told
my, Cabinet that I do not pro-
pose as Prime Minster to
increase taxes to the Bahamian —
people, when I have fought so
hard against the advice of the
IMF...”

The Government has run
consistent fiscal deficits since
it took office in 2002, showing

SEE page 4B

SEE page 4B




High Interest at Prime Less 2%

SEE page 6B.



The Money Will Be [here When You Need It.

www.BankBahamasOnline. com

@ Bank of The Bahamas

IN 1 BERNAL ILONAL

Proud winuer of the 2004-2005 TAAP Award for Corporate Excellence,


PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005

(HE TRIBUNE





Data security and recovery
key for business re

hether it’s a

malicious

code, a nat-

ural disaster,

hardware
failure or simply a disgruntled
employee, businesses today face
unprecedented levels of risk to
their data. The success of a
company now depends on its
ability to secure and recover its
data.

Securing Your Data

The following items are the
foundation for the security of
your data:

i) Security Policies

ii) Managing Users

iti) Anti-Virus software

iv) Firewall

Security policies should be
developed and implemented. A
security policy is a document
that states in writing how a com-

pany plans to protect its physi-
cal and information technolo-
gy assets. It is essential to ensure
that the policies are enforced, as
many security policies are inef-
fective through not being act-
ed upon. Most people believe
hackers are the biggest threat
to data security. Yet the most
likely threat comes from inside
the organisation in the form of
negligent or disgruntled
employees.

INTERNATIONAL
“A growing and dynamic Bahamian institution”

VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF:
| ASSISTANT MANAGER, CREDIT RISK

| Core responsibilities:

Review, summarize and recommend credit proposals.
Conduct credit reviews.

Recommend and monitor adherence to credit policies and procedures.
Counsel and provide guidance to line lenders in all aspects of credit.

Develop and conduct credit training sessions.
Review credit reports to determine trends and effectiveness of procedures,

policies and make recommendations for improvement.

Recommend debt compromises, forgiveness and debt restructuring.

Assess financial position of impaired loans through cash flow projections, asset |
valuation, credit history and other financial measures; discuss with lenders and
provide guidance and advice.
Recognize and coach line lenders on the balance required between the need for
revenue generation and avoidance of risk of loss.

| Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities:

BA/BSc in Finance, Accounting, Economics or Business Administration, MBA
or other advanced qualifications would be an asset.
5 - 7 years experience in Consumer and Commercial Lending.

Strong analytical skills, particularly 1 in the areas of accounting and credit

assessment.

In depth knowledge of computers to use Bank’s network and its core een:
applications to create presentations, reports and correspondence. ‘
Strong oral and written communication skills, in particular to impact financial

and credit information.

Â¥

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience and |
qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and life insurance; pension |

» scheme.

: Interested persons should apply no later than October 28, 2005 to:

The Manager, Human Resources and Training
Bank of The Bahamas International

Pricing Information As Of:
6 October 2005

P.O. Box N-7118
Nassau, Bahamas



Colina

Financial Advisors Ltd.

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bankâ„¢
Doctor's Hospital

Famguard
Finco "

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete.

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Kerzner International BDRs
Eremicn nce estate ,

12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

“28.00 ABDAB

13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets

Colina Money Market Fund 1.257751"

2.4403 2.0311 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.4403 ***
10.6103 10.0000 _ Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.6103*****
2560 2.1491 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.267097**

1.0686

Colina Bond Fund

1.139546*°"**



There are several ways to
mitigate this threat:

(i) Implement access permis-
sions to files and folders.

(ii) Make staff aware of their :

responsibilities in safeguarding
their user account and password.

(iii) Lock down workstations
using group policies. to prevent
employees from being able to
take data off the premises.

(iv) Conduct frequent network
audits.

(v) Establish a procedure that
requires two or more network
administrators to collaborate on
a single task.

Computer viruses potentially
breach a company’s security on
a daily basis, and they are an
ongoing challenge for network
administrators. We have seen
viruses wreak havoc on com-
puter networks in minutes,
stealing and corrupting infor-
mation and bringing down
entire networks. Implementing
anti-virus software is undeni-
ably essential.

The best line of defence
against these viruses is not a sin-
gle anti-virus software solution.
It is essential to implement a
multi-tiered anti-virus solution,
such as Desktop/Server, as well
as an additional solution at the
gateway. A multi-tiered anti-
virus solution is a more expen-
sive option, but the cost is min-
imal compared to the cost that a
company may face with the
onset of a virus attack.

A Firewall is a software pro-
gram, hardware device or a
combination of both, that mon-
itors the information coming
through the Internet connec-
tion into your Network. Any
well-configured network has at
least one firewall that stands
between the company and the
Internet.

Recovering your Data

File:level security, anti-virus: ©, 6

software and firewalls are all
means of protecting your data.

. However, none of these tech-

nologies provides the ability to
restore lost or corrupted data.
To safeguard your data in the
event of a business disruption, it
is essential to deploy a depend-
able back-up solution. There
are two types of back-up solu-
tions: Continuous Data Protec-
tion (CPD) and Tape Backup.

CPD is a new technology that
can back up data as it is
changed in real time, allowing
users to instantly return to any

‘point to recover a deleted, mod-

ified or corrupted file.

Tape Backup is older but
more réfiable technology than
CDP. Tape Backup technology
enables a copy of the contents
of.all or a designated amount
of data from its usual storage
device to a tape cartridge
device.

Tape Backups can be done
manually or, with appropriate
software, be programmed to
happen automatically. Data is
not saved in real time so that, in
the event that there is a need
to recover data, some data will
always be lost.





BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

\

By Corey Lockhart

CDP has revolutionised data
protection as it keeps downtime
to a minimum, whereas it can
take hours to restore data from
a Tape Backup.

Whichever solution you

choose, the most important
point to remember is mainte-
nance. Maintain the technology
and the operational procedures
that support it. Without main-
tenance, your Data Recovery
solution will be worthless.
Data protection and recov-
ery solutions are essential to
ensuring the continuity of your



company. By implementing the.
guidelines above, you will miti-
gate against the major risks fac-
ing companies today.

To provide feedback on this
column, please e-mail makin-
gITwork@providencetg.com

About the Author:

Corey Lockhart is a technical
analyst at Providence Technol-
ogy Group, one of the leading
IT firms in the Bahamas. Prov-
idence Technology Group spe-
cialises in networking solutions,
consulting and advisory services
and software solutions.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with

Section 137 (4) of the International Business Companies

Act No. 45 of 2000, GRB CONSULTANTS LIMITED,

has been dissolved and struck off the Register according to

the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General
' on the 30th day of September, 2005

Anthony Martin Shield,
~1.0-Carlton Grove,
Queens Drive West,
Ramsey, Isle of Man,

IM8 2JA.
Liquidator



‘ GN-285
3 > _MINISTRY OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY

NOTICE

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT

ACT (CHAPTER 326)
It is hereby notified pursuant to Section 5 of the Industries
Encouragement Act, Chapter 326, that the Minister is about to
consider whether the manufacturer specified in the first column
of the table below should be declared an “APPROVED
MANUFACTURER?” in relation to the products specified in the
third column.

| |MANUFACTURER}| LOCATION OF PRODUCTS
FACTORY PREMISES

Caribbean Fire Trail Road Biodiesel
Biofuels Co. Ltd.

Any interested persons having any objection to such a declaration
should give notice in writing of his objection and of grounds
thereof to the Ministry of Trade and Industry, before the 26th
day of October, 2005, by letter addressed to:-

THE MINISTRY OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
P.O.Box.N-4849
Nassau, N.P.,
THE BAHAMAS

_ HELEN A. EBONG
PERMANENT SECRETARY

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT
ACT (CHAPTER 326)
It is hereby notified pursuant to Section 7 of the Industries
Encouragement Act that the Minister is about to consider whether
the following products should be declared “APPROVED
PRODUCTS” for the purposes of that Act.

PRODUCTS RAW MATERIALS TO BE

USED IN MANUFACTURE

Methanol, Potassium, Sodium
Hydroxide

Biodiesel

Any interested persons having any objection to such a declaration
should give notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds
thereof to the Ministry of Trade and Industry, before the 27th
day of October, 2005, by letter addressed to:-

THE MINISTRY OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today’s Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daity Vol. -

P.O.Box N-4849
Nassau, N.P.,
THE BAHAMAS

Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

**. AS AT SEP. 30, 2005/ **** - AS AT SEP 30, 2005

*- AS AT OCT. 30, 2005/ *** - AS AT SEP. 30, 2005/ ***** AS AT SEP. 30, 2005

HELEN A. EBONG
PERMANENT SECRETARY


THE TRIBUNE

Chamber official named vice-chair of

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 3B



hemispheric private sector grouping

A SENIOR’ Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce offi-
cial has been appointed as vice-
chairman of the Governing
Council, and Caribbean
Region president, of the Exec-
utive Council for the Inter-
American Private Sector
Forum.

‘Khaalis Rolle, who is the
Chamber’s second vice-presi-
dent and chief marketing offi-
cér for Bahamas Ferries, also
represented the Bahamian
body and Caribbean Associa-
tion of Industry and Com-
merce (CAIC) at the Organi-
sation of American States
(OAS).

He participated in the ple-
nary session for the Private

Sector Forum organised by the
Argentina Private Sector
Organisation.

Mr Rolle said of his appoint-
ment: “It gives the Caribbean
region private sector grouping
a strong hemispheric presence,
and strengthens our ability to
address the major concerns
faced by the business commu-
nity, which may differ:in some
regards from the rest of the
Americas.”

Sumunit

The Private Sector Forum
plenary preceded the more for-
mal general assembly, which
will take place during the IV
Summit of the Americas in

Buenos Aires, Argentina, in
November 2005. The theme of
this general assembly will be

Delivering the Benefits of

Democracy through Job Cre-
ation: the Businessmen’s Role.
The initial gathering for the
Council this body took place
in Fort Lauderdale earlier this
year, when a detailed structure
for its launch was developed.
The meeting consisted of rat-
ification of the organisation’s
Charter, the appointment of a
Governing and an Executive
Council, developing the format
and guidelines for construct-
ing regional contributions dur-
ing the General Assembly, and
finalising the agenda for the
IV Summit of the Americas.



Survey
water |

CONSOLIDATED Water’s
consultants are conducting a
survey to determine how much
water is being lost per day from
New Providence’s water distri-
bution system.

Paul Fanner, a water indus-
try specialist with 28 years’
experience, told the Rotary
Club of Sunrise that the Base-
line Survey would develop an
average daily amount for non-
revenue water (NRW), based.
on the International Water
Association’s annual water bal-
ance. Once this is calculated,
targets can be set for reducing
NRW from New Providence’s
water distribution system by
one million gallons per day... .

{

opportunities

services

skills

management

services

SENIOR MANAGER



assesses daily

oss in Nassau

The reduction is part of the
contract awarded to Consoli-
dated Water’s subsidiary,
Waterfields, which saw the
Government give it the right
to construct and operate the
$23 million Blue Hills reverse
osmosis plant.

That plant is expected to
begin service in the 2006 third
quarter, and the NRW project
will be supplemented by train-
ing for Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration personnel, which will
allow the latter to sustain and
continue reduction efforts.

Central Bank warning

@ THE Central Bank of the Bahamas has issued a warn-

ing that an entity called Banque de Bogota may be breach-
ing the Banks and Trust Companies Regulation Act 2000,
_ as it is not licenced to conduct banking or trust business
_ from this nation.

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

Providing strategic direction and overall leadership of Fidelity’s e-finance unit
Being accountable for the business unit’s human and other resources, P&L
and budget performance
e Developing and executing a business plan for card and electronic banking
products and services which identifies and capitalizes on new business

e Preparing Business Requirements for existing.and new si Saucialeeeeioes and
working with the IT Head to develop technical requirements

e Developing and monitoring service level indicators to ensure superior
customer satisfaction, customer retention and growth which complements the
organization’s customer centered strategy
e Working with the Marketing Head to create and execute product plans and
sales and marketing strategies for card and electronic banking products and

MINIMUM COMPETENCIES:

e 10+ years experience in the financial services industry with 5 years
experience in the card and electronic banking services/product development
and business management areas
e A Bachelors.degree in Business Administration, Marketing or related
discipline. MBA preferred
e Business focus with some technical background
e . Demonstrated project management experience and prior work experience
' with either Mastercard or Visa preferred
e Strong communication (verbal and written), organizational, and supervisory

e Strong demonstrated knowledge in banking regulation and operational risk

e Willingness to travel extensively in the Caribbean region to oversee the
development, rollout and ongoing administration of new products and

e Excellent inter-personal skills. Ability to Sfisctively interact with all levels
of management and_a broad range of employees across the organization

Compensation package will include a competitive salary, depending on
experience, together with a comprehensive range of benefits.

Send resume no later than November 7, 2005 to:
Senior Manager Electronic Banking

=) FIDELITY |
51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
Fax 326.3000

e-mail: info@fidelitybahamas.com





= ) FIDELITY

invites applications for the position of

SENIOR MANAGER, ELECTRONIC
BANKING AND CARD OPERATIONS

The successful candidate will have regional responsibility for Fidelity’s card and
electronic banking business and ‘will be required to manage the card products
(credit and debit) and electronic banking delivery systems (ATMs, internet and
telephone banking) to a measured plan





















































Are you looking for a new challenge?

We are currently seeking qualified Managers to join our Freeport Audit practice.

Successful candidates for the Manager position will have a minimum of six years
professional public accounting experience, two of which will: have been at a
supervisory level. The individual will also hold a CPA, CA or other professional
designation recognized by the Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants.

Excellent opportunities exist in our Freeport office to broaden your professional
experience in a varied practice that offers competitive compensation and benefits
packages.

Applicants should submit a cover letter, resume and a copy of their professional certification to: KPMG, Human
Resources Manager, P.O. Box N123, Nassau, Bahamas or tdavies@kpmg.com.bs.

AUDIT « TAX ® ADVISGRY

© 2005. KPMG, a Bahamian partnership, the Bahamian member firm of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved.





nop your a secure their financial future...



witha BA Corporate Pension Plan.

It’s no secret that employee satisfaction and successful business
British American Insurance

results go hand in hand. In today’s competitive market, : pein
; Pension Services include:

attracting performance driven, Joyal and motivated personnel is

a challenge that all businesses face - large or small. We believe Dynamic & Flexible Design Options

that helping your employees secure their financial future will sie ETE EIICES
Record Keeping and Administrative Services
keep your employees ~ yours! ,
Receipt and Collection of Pension Contributions

6 ‘ Trustee and Compliance Services
British American Insurance Company provides top-notch : :
pee P Accounting Services and Actuary Reports

Corporate Pension Plan Solutions. We offer defined benefit, Timely Employee Statements

defined contribution, saving plans, personal pensions, executive Employee Seminars & Consultations



pensions and annuities. We offer dynamic and flexible

investment options.

For more information on our Corporate Pension, Personal
Pensions, Annuities and Mortgage Services, call the
Financial Services And Investments Team at 461-1000



PRISE
u AMERICAN

a strong link in your financial future

sats

Esfodlishest 1920

Lefer atin if
Vasgh 5

1920 = 2005



British American Insurance Company of The Bahamas Limited
Independence Drive, P.O. Box N-4815 * Nassau, NP, The Bahamas
Tel (242) 461-1000 Fax (242) 361-2525
bafinancial@babinsurance.com
PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE



Royal C

aribbean’s profits rise

5%

~Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

te.
Egavailable from’Commercial News Providers”

PM sounds fiscal alarm for unions

FROM page 1B.

little sign of getting to grips
with ever-increasing expendi-
tures, particularly recurrent
expenditure, which goes on

wages, emoluments and rent...

The Central Bank of the
' Bahamas said the fiscal deficit

for-2604-2005 was likely to-be~:

around $160 million, little dif-
ferent from 2003-04; although
that is being disputed by the
Government, which believed
improved revenue collections
may have brought the fiscal
deficit in at about $140 million.

Nevertheless; whichever way
the Government spins it, the
constant fiscal deficits mean
the national debt is ‘steadily ris-

Prime Minister made his veiled
warning to the trade unions
yesterday.

Essentially, he warned that
their demands were irrespon-
sible given the current fiscal
climate and the damage inflict-

Grand Bahama, which is likely
to add additional capital expen-

projections.

Mr Christie also made refer-
ence to the fact that he fought
against legislation that the for-

mer FNM administration -
‘sought to enact, and was sub-

sequently shelved, that would
have imposed restrictions on
industrial actions taken by
trade unions.

for this to be brought back on
to the legislative front burner.

Brian Nutt, the Bahamas
Employers Confederation’s
president (BECon), previously
told The Tribune that a possi-
ble: solution in stopping dis-

od. by Hurricane Wilma.in...ruptions to essential. services.

and other negative strategies
used by union officials when

-diture-for-the-Government:inry negotiating: industrial-agnee-
fiscal 2005-2006 beyond initial °

ments, would be to implement
the Trade Union and Labour
Relations Bill that was shelved
by the former FNM govern-
ment in 2001.

The Trade Union and
Labour Relations Bill provided

definitions of legal industrial —
actions; and also placed sub- —

stantial restrictions on what
actions union officials could
legally engage in when disputes





FROM page 1B

“expanding network of Mutual Legal Assis-

tance Treaties (MLATs) and other coopera-

~ tive-regulation avenues had aided informa--

tion gathering, “cultural, logistical and legal”
issues relevant to each nation needed to be
handled carefully.

He added: “For example, offshore juris-
dictions can be geographically small, so there
can be a significant danger of tipping off the
perpetrators that an investigation is under-
Way... Landing a team of three or four
foreign investigators on an island of that size
is unlikely to go unnoticed.

“On the ground knowledge of close friend-
ships, collegial relations, family ties and oth-



Local knowledge key in
offshore investigations

er social and business networks is essential.
You never know who the taxi driver taking
you from the airport is talking to.”

Mr Peer said communications were among
the issues that had to be considered in under-
taking investigations in international financial
centres, using the example of UK-registered
cell phones not being able to work in the

Bahamas. Obtaining work permits was anoth- "|:

er problem.

He added: “Although global fraud and
investigations are now commonplace, the
value of understanding local island culture
cannot be underestimated.

“Encountering an offshore financial centre
during an investigation does not have to be
intimidating, as local resources and knowl-
edge can overcome some of the barriers.”



ing, which is probably why the

LEGALNOTICE .

XAKIS LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation) —

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the dissolution of XAKIS LIMITED, has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
teas (Liquidator)
“f eGal NORGE

MAXIMILLAN HOLDI
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
26th day of September, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., of P.0:Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Employers. have long called
Beg te EE : "arose.

‘MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE
FISHERIES AND LOCAL
GOVERNMENT

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENT

The Department of Agriculture wishes
to remind all importers and the general
public that under the plants protection
act (chapter 250) and the plants
protection rules, no permits will.be
issued for the importation of pine trees.

There is a significant threat of accidental
introduction of insects and disease
pathogens on imported pine trees that
can adversely affect the continued
development and health of the Bahamian
pine forests.

Persons who wish to apply for a permit
to import Christmas Trees should note
that only species of Fir and Spruce
would be considered.

All requests for such imports must be
submitted in writing to the director of
agriculture, department of agriculture,
P.O.Box N-3704, Nassau, the Bahamas.

Director of Agriculture
October 17, 2005





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given. that ANDY CARRALERO-GOMEZ, OF
WILD TAMARIND CAY, EXUMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the

Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send.a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 27TH day of
OCTOBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, RO.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOT CE

NOTICE is hereby given that SILVA DAMARIS COLLAZO-GOMEZ,
OF WILD TAMARIND CAY, EXUMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 27TH day of
OCTOBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, RO.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

FOR RENT

Prime Location
Down Town Nassau







Two Storey Building
4,700 sq. feet ground floor
4,700 sq. feet first floor
Serious inquires only

OIL OLE IE ELL
}

Pri thimmVuiInwe

IHURSDAY, OU LOBER 2/, 20U5, PAGE 9b





Economy’s
supply chain
faces ‘severe

disruption’

FROM page 1B

port to open.

Mr Lingier said: “I can’t say
with any guarantee, but hope-
fully our ship for the Nassau
service will be in the Port of
Miami for Friday, so hopefully
we will have some supplies
coming in for Saturday, but
there’s still a big question
mark.”

He added that Port Ever-
glades, the port from which
Seaboard Marine served
Freeport and Grand Bahama,
was also “in pretty bad shape”.

It is unclear how badly
affected other Bahamas-based
shipping companies have been
by the Wilma-inflicted devas-
tation in Florida, as others con-

_tacted by The Tribune did not

return this newspaper’s calls.

There was better news for
shipping companies who use
West Palm Beach, though, as
that port was open yesterday
for commercial shipping.

Of the general situation, Mr
Lingier said: “It’s [Wilma]
caused a big disruption. A lot
of businesses and suppliers in
the Miami and South Florida
area are still not operational.
They’re still without power and
our office [there] does not have
power. They’re running on
generator, which allows us lim-
ited capabilities.”

. The Seaboard Marine exec-

utive said “customers are call-
ing me like-crazy” to find out
where their cargoes and goods
were, which emphasises the
importance of shipping opera-
tions to the well-being of the
Bahamas and its economy.

Without the supply chain
link provided by the shipping
companies, Bahamian busi-
nesses will rapidly run out of
goods and inventory, damag-
ing the entire economy.

Mr Lingier said yesterday:
“Tt became very clear after 9/11
that without shipping into the
Bahamas, the Bahamas only
has supplies and food for two
weeks. We are the lifeline for
the Bahamas.”

Another issue affecting the
supply chain for the Bahami-
an economy was the scarcity of
fuel in south Florida, as Wilma
had destroyed many gas sta-
tions, while many of those
remaining were closed or had
run out of supplies.

As a result, the transporta-
tion companies that brought
goods to Florida ports for

onward shipping into the .

Bahamas would have difficulty
in obtaining fuel for their vehi-
cles, making it difficult for them
to perform this task.

Mr Lingier said there was a

large supply chain involved in

providing goods to the
Bahamas, and a disruption to

just one link could mean “lots -

of effects on the end of the
chain”.

Seaboard Marine was doing
everything it could to return
operations to normal, Mr
Lingier added, holding two
company-wide conference calls
per day for 50-70 people,
updating them on the positions
of cargoes and ships, plus the
Port of Miami’s status. °

“I want to reassure the
Bahamian public we will do
whatever is in our power and
beyond to put everything back

in place. Whatever we can do, °

we do,” Mr Lingier said.

“We are already on top of
things. There are a lot of things
we have no control over, and
now we have to wait for the
US coastguard to open the
ports.”

INCL

- For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



A LEADING BAHAMIAN PROPERTY
DEVELOPMENT COMPANY



- ig now recruiting for a senior construction executive oversee a world class 900 acre
' development in The Family Islands. The project will include a hotel, a marina,

marina village complex, condominiums, luxury estates and all associated
infrastructure. Additional facilities shall also be developed for air transportation

_ services.

Director of Construction and Project Management (PM-1)

Revo to the Chief Operations Officer, the primary peepOneP ues of the
Director of Construction are:

¢ The development and control of all project programme schedules and
construction activities;

¢ Direct responsibility for all construction staff including project foremen,
internal QS, engineering and administrative staff;

¢ Managing and coordinating all the commercial, contractual, procurement
and legal activities through government ministries and local authorities,
consultants, architects, construction contractors, utility companies and
suppliers;

¢ Direct responsibility for all third-part contractors and development activities,
both on and off the island.

Requirements

_ ¢ Engineering degree and at least 10 years senior level construction
management experience in resort development projects in the Bahamas
¢ Professional designations of FFB, ABEng, MAPM, MWOBO or equivalent
is an absolute requirement.
_ ¢ With a recognized track record for outstanding Project Management
delivering projects on time and on budget
¢ Brown-field start-up experience is an absolutely requirement.
¢ Prior experience in project management in the Family Island is highly
desired.
¢ Ability to think strategically and the leadership skills to effectively manage
both the internal team and third-party contractors under the evolving —
circumstances and huge logistical demands of this substantial development.
* Excellent knowledge of Microsort Project and Excel programs, together
with AutoCAD and 3D modeling software, such as Land Development
Desktop (LDD) is required.

The position is initially situated in Nassau with relocation to the building site in
the Family Islands in the near-term. Frequent travel including international travel
may be required. The salary and benefits package shall be commensurate with the
senior responsibilities and experience of the successful candidate.

Contact

Please send cover letter and resume by email quoting above reference (PM-1) to
island_development1 @yahoo.com or by post mail to P.O.Box N-9322, Nassau,
The Bahamas.

The closing date for receipt of application shall be October 28, 2005.





BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK

Cable Beach, West Bay Street, P.O. Box N-3034
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 327- '5780/327-5793-6
Fax: (242) 327-5047, 327-1258
www.bahamasdevelopmentbank.com

Vessels For Sale



“MV. LisaJ3

~ Loa 122’

Beam 27.5

Depth 10.5’

Year/Mk/Eng 1960 Single Screw Steel

Hull Vessel New —-

Caterpilla Engine - Needs
to be installed

Location Bradford Grand Bahama
Queens Hwy Freeport; :

Grand Bahama



M.V. Mal-dack

M.V. Lady Eddina |
2 ie Loa 121’
- Loa 155.6’ - Beam 30°
Beam 38.0’ Depth ‘7.0’
Depth 12.5” Year/Mk/Eng 1989 Twin Screw Steel
Year/Mk/Eng 1989 Twin Screw Steel Hull Vessel GM
Hull ro-ro Freight Vessel GM Engine 8V71N
Engine V12671 Location Bradford Grand
Location _ Bradford Grand Bahama Bahama Queens Hwy
Queens Hwy Freeport, Grand
Freeport, Grand Bahama Bahama

Serious inquires only. Sealed bids marked “Tender” should be submitted to Bahamas Development Bank,
P.O. Box N-3034, Nassau, Bahamas or'telephone 327-5780 for additional information. Please note that all
bids on the aforementioned assets should be received by October 31, 2005. The Bahamas Development
Bank reserves the right to reject am or all offers. All assets are sold as is.

PUBLIC NOTICE
STATEMENT OF RESULTS

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANY'S
(BTC’S) APPLICATION TO INCREASE MONTHLY
RATES/PRICES FOR TELEPHONE LINES

The PUC has concluded its public consultation on BTC’s application to
increase monthly rates/prices for telephone lines. This Statement of
Results summarizes, and responds to, the substantive comments received
by the PUC on this matter. The PUC has given approval for BTC to
increase monthly rates/prices for telephone lines from $9.50 to $15 for
residential customers and from $20 to $36 for business customers all in
accordance with its application to increase these rates/prices. After due
consultation with BTC, the PUC requires BTC to introduce a Senior
Citizen Package based on a 20% discount on the new monthly rate/prices
for a residential telephone line for qualified applicants.

The PUC will amend Schedule 1 of BTC’s Licence to reflect the foregoing
decisions. BTC shall implement the new rates/prices and the Senior
Citizen Package no earlier than thirty (30) days from the signing of the
amendment to its Licence.

In processing BTC’s application, the PUC has been cognizant of the
requirement for it to exercise its powers and functions in a manner that
is transparent, objective, non-discriminatory and consistent with the
objectives of the Telecommunications Act, 1999, particularly section
6(4), the Telecommunications Sector Policy and BTC’s Licence.

Copies of the Statement of Results analyzing the comments received
may be obtained from the PUC’s Office, Fourth Terrace, East, Collins
Avenue; Nassau, Bahamas or downloaded from the PUC’s website

(www.pucbahamas. gov.bs).

Barrett A. Russell
Executive Director


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





Roof product may help ease property rates

FROM page 1B

withstand Category Five force
winds, and fasteners were also
added to secure the roof, Mr
Gilbert, who is also president
of the Bahamas Insurance Bro-
kers Association (BIBA), was
quick to point out that no prod-
uct was foolproof.

He added, though, that the
product had been field-tested
in Bermuda, drawing on an
example from when Hurricane
Fabian hit that island in 2004.

Dura Slate differs from the
traditional limestone slate that
formed the bedrock of the
Bermuda Roof when intro-
duced in 1640, in two ways.
Dura Slate, made from an

Autoclave Aerated Concrete,
is half the weight of limestone
slate, weighing 13 pounds per
square foot compared to 26
pounds. In addition, Dura Slate
has fasteners to aid its ability to
withstand wind uplift.

Mr Gilbert pointed to the
example of the Tucker’s Point
development in Bermuda,
where the developer was scep-

Abaco Markets fares
‘much better’ in Wilma

Ms Davies-Baptista said: “We just can't

FROM page 1B

However, any insurance claim is likely to be
TURAL ROR ORL acer
Pee Ce Mer ee Com AA
PERM MOU CMECmtae Cait
the store’s busiest weekend during the pre-
SINTERED EAPO MCDM STE LE LOR Cre cat

ye CoO MELLEL



thank the staff enough. They

are really

pulling us through.”

Qua oe

During the second quarter for its finan-
cial year ending on January 31, 2006, Abaco
Markets said the $2.5 million balance
received for its Hurricane Frances
Jeanne claims finalised the $7 million hurri-
cane insurance settlement, less $200,000 in

and



tical of Dura Slate’s merits and
refused to use it, yet some
clients who owned multi-mil-
lion dollar homes on the prop-
erty decided to use it.

Out of the first five homes
built, one used limestone slate
and the others used Dura Slate.
When Hurricane Fabian, a Cat-
egory Three storm, hit Bermu-
da, the only home out of the
five with roof damage was the
limestone one, Mr Gilbert said.

He added that insurers and
reinsurers were also looking
favourably on Bermuda due to
the minimal level of residen-
tial damage caused during Hur-
ricane Fabian. American Re, a
large property reinsurer,
described the style of roof in
Bermuda as “probably the
biggest reason why residential
damage was minor”, as the
roofs were “sealed from the
elements and difficult for wind
to penetrate”.

Mr Gilbert said property
insurance premiums in Bermu-
da were on average 0.85 per
cent of the rebuilding value,
while in the Bahamas they
were between 1.2-1.6 per cent,
“so in some cases in Bermuda

it’s half the premium”.

“If the roof stays on, you
don’t get as much structural
damage,” Mr Gilbert said. If
more homes here have hurri-
cane resistant roofs, it’s possi-
ble you may see the reinsurers
look more favourably on the
Bahamas.

“This is showing there is a
way to save On some premium
costs. When hurricanes hit in
Bermuda, you don’t get the
wild fluctuations in premium
costs you do here.”

Mr Gilbert, a native Bermu-
dian who is married to a
Bahamian, said he had been
able to obtain the Bahamian

and Caribbean distribution.

rights through his familiarity
with Dura Slate, coupled with
the fact that his parents lived
just up the road from the man-
ufacturer, Matthew Waite.
Manufacturing had since
moved to Jacksonville, making
it easy for Dura Slate to be

. Shipped to the Bahamas. Mr

Gilbert said one developer set
to break ground on a project

‘within the next few weeks had

already committed to using
Dura Slate.

MINISTRY OF TRANSPORT

AND AVIATION

NEW BOAT LICENCE NEW PROVIDENCE

Notice Of Sitting For New Providence Port Authority Board

He added that he also con-
trolled Premier Roofing
(Bahamas), which traded under
the name Bermuda True Roof,
and which was used to install
Dura Slate roofs.

Mr Gilbert said the product
was very competitive in terms
or price and ease of installa-
tion when compared to the Sty-
rofoam Bermuda Rood being
sold here, which was developed
and patented in 1968.



GN - 284



To Consider Application For Licence Under The Boat See



Act Chapter (277) REGNO' APPLICANT BOATNAME CLASS PASS USE
NB/01/05 Reno Water Sports Banana Boat’ B 12 Rental
ie . : : . 4 : Nassau,Bahamas
Notice is hereby given that a meeting of the New Providence Port Authority Board for
New Providence and the Family Islands will be held at the Port Administration NB/02/05 Reno Water Sports Banana Boat B 12 Rental
Building Prince George Wharf on the 1+ Nedembe« 2005 at 3:00pm for the PUP ORE Nassau,Bahamas
of erannne Licenses under The Boat Registration Act Chapter (277) ;
NB/03/05 Smith L. Brian Mini Boat B 3 Rental
Any person entitled to and wishing to object to any application. should do so at least _ . Nassau,Bahamas ian
six (6) day before the date’ of the hearing by submitting b his/her objections in writing t to. ee 2 bad bs es
Ye : NB/04/05 :
the Board and to the. applicant. ce : os a 5 2 Roe
NB/05/05 Mini Boat B 3 Rental
Persons attending the meeting on behalf of an applicant must produce written Smith L. Brian
Authorization at the meeting. Nassau,Bahamas
NB/06/05 Mini Boat B 3 Rental
Applicants for renewals are not oud to attend, unless they have received written rae ea
Notification from the New Providence Port Authority. bere 0 Charter
. : NB/07/05 Tycoon Management _ Carizzal A
The under mentioned persons have applied for grant of licenses as specified below: Ltd
: Nassau, Bahamas
| f NB/08/05 Bannister Pedro BananaBoat D 10 Rental
RENEWAL JET SKI NEW PROVIDENCE Nassau, Bahamas
Tycoon Management is
REG. NO APPLICANT BOAT NAME CLASS_ PASS USE NB/09/05 Ltd Barge A 0 ; Charter
Nassau, Bahamas
NP:136 ATE Rufus Storr No Name D 2 Rental
P.O.Box FH-14334 NB/10/05 Tycoon Management Tug Boat A 0. Charter
Nassau, Bahamas Ltd :
Nassau, Bahamas
NP: 105 ATE Rufus Storr NO Name D 2 Rental ‘
P.O Box FH-14334 .NEW MASTER s LICENCE NEW PROVIDENCE
Nassau, Bahamas REG NO _ APPLICANT CLASS
‘NP: 106ATE No Name _ D 2 ~ Rental |
Rufus Storr NM/01/05 Deveaux Reno B
P.O.Box FH-14334 P.O.Box SB-51528
Nassau, Bahamas Nassau, Bahamas
NP: 506 SAN No Name D 2 Rental
Rodino Sands
Nassau, Bahamas -NM/03/05 Griffin Eric
NP: 509 SAN NO Name D 2 Rental Nassau, Bahamas .
Rodino Sands
Nassau, Bahamas RENEWAL MASTER’S LICENCE FAMILY ISLAND
NO Name D 2: Rental
NP: 510SAN Rodino Sands HeENEr s NAME CLASS
Nassau, Bahamas
NP: 508SAN Rodino Sands NO Name D 2 Rental iy Edgecombe Anthony A
Nassail, Bahamas Marsh Harbour, Abaco
6536 Smith Joel A
Stanie] Cay.Exuma
NP: 743 RCB Rodino Sands NO Name D 2 Rental 10he Wells Christopher A
Nassau, Bahamas : Sandy Point, Abaco
NP: 745RCB_ Sean Lewis " NO Name D 2 Rental RENEWAL MASTER’S LICENCE NEW PROVIDENCE
Nassau, Bahamas
, LICENCE # NAME CLASS
NP: 744 RCB Sean Lewis No Name’ D 2 Rental 6145 Major Inez
Nassau, Bahamas P.O.Box SS-5414 A
Nassau, Bamahas
7070 © Moxey Gerard B
Nassau, Bahamas .
7860 Obrien Noel B
P.O.Box N-10090
Nassau, Bahamas
RENEWAL BOAT LICENCE NEW PROVIDENCE
7388 Palmer Lavance B
Nassau, Bahamas
REG NO APPLICANT BOAT NAME CLASS_ PASS USE :
NP:652 Sea Island Adventure _‘ Fiesta II B 250 Charter Captain Anthony J. Allens

P.O.Box SS-5414
Nassau, Bahamas

Port Controller




“THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS









lites -MILLARS HEIGHTS
ieee SUBDIVISION
a (Nassau)

Lot #12 Block #3, a sixteen year old,
single story triplex with floor area of
2,378 sq. ft., each apartment consist
of 2 bed, 1 bath, living, dining area and
kitchen. Lot size is 7,500 sq. ft. 75 x
100.

Appraisal: $268,411.00

Heading west on Carmichael Road, enter West Ave., on the southside immediately
after Topps Laundermat. Take first right which is Wimpole St, go around curve on
left which is London Ave., travelsouth on London Ave., property is 2nd to last
building on the right before T, Junction (High street) L shape triplex, painted green,
trimmed white. ~

No. 8 BELL SNOW CLOSE
BEL-AIR ESTATES SUB.
(Nassau)

All that piece parcel or lot of land having
an area of 6,000 sq. ft. (60 x 100)

Subdivision, situated on Turtle Drivve
on Bel Snow Close, being the fourth
lot east of Turtle Drive, on the south
| side of the road. The subject property
is on flat terrain with grass lawn and
paved driveway in front, the grounds are competley enclosed and fairly maintained.
This property consist of a 6 year old single story, 4 bedroom, 2 bathroom, livingroom,
diningroom, familyroom and kitchen single family residence with floor area of 1,711

sq. ft.



Appraisal: $1 93,200.00

Driving west on Carmichael Road until you reach Turtle Drive, turn left onto Turtle
Drive and Bel Snow Close is the first corner on the left after the Fedder Road that
runs parallel to Charmichael Road. The house is the 4th on the right painted white
trimmed pink with wall in front. -

DUNDAS TOWN. _
_.. s(Abaco)

2 storey, 4 bed, 2 bath on 1/2 acre lot
no. 25, living room, dining room, family
room, kitchen downstairs, upstairs there
are 4 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms.Age
is 16 years, color is yellow trimmed with
white, upperlevel 1,080 sq. ft., lower
level, 1080 sq. ft., garage 420 sq. ft.,
covered verahandahs 390 sq. ft., the
land is portion W of one of the Dundas

Town Crown Allotment parcels situated
near Forest Drive being just under half acre in size. Located on the southern side
of a ridge being 12 feet plus above sea level with little likelinood of flooding grounds
well kept with above average landscaping including grass cover with palms and










citrus trees. Enclosed on 3 sides with a 6 ft., metal fences and ficus trees at the

fron. 30 ft., by 36 ft., roof garage now used as a nursery school. At the upper level
on the eastern side is covered wooden verandah 6 ft., x 30 ft., interior walls
concrete, ceiling of sheet rock and floor of ceremic tiles.

Appraisal: $267,987.91
















designated as lot No. 348 of Bel-Air

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 7B

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY
MUST SELL

MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES

October 27th, 20

CYCLOPS GARDEN
(Nassau)



All that lot of land numbering as “H” being
one of several lots in Cyclops Gardens
| located off the northern side of Cowpen
Road one corner west of Faith Avenue
Junction. This property comprise of a
two and a half year old single storey
duples with a gross floor area of 1,512.42
sq. ft., each unit consisting of 2 bedrooms

aaa all wth wall airconditioning units, 1
bathroom, living, dining and kitchen building is effectively new.

Appraisal: $219,450.00

Heading south on Faith Avenue to junction off Cowpen road make a right then
first right again. The subject property is the 4th on the right tan trimmed brown.

WEST RIDGE ESTATES.
(Nassau)








1 All that piece parcel or lot of land
having an area of 34,089 sq. ft, being
1 lot #152, of West Ridge Estates —f
Subdivision, Zoining is single family
residential with all utilities avvailable.
| The subject property is on hilly terrain
at the top of a ridge that offers a lovely
view to the northeast. The grounds

are attractively landscaped with a |
grass lawn, ornamental shrubs and flowering plants. Other improvements include
chain link fencing along the sides and rear boundaries, with a concrete block wall
at the front with asphalt paved driveway.

Appraisal: $1,049,788.90

There are two buildings located on this property. The main 2 storey house is
located at the highest point of the poroperty. This house has an approximate
gross floor area of 4,8000 sq. ft., upstairs consist of 3 full bedroom suites (each
with a full bathroom), inlcuding a master bedroom suite, an office with a bathroom
(shower only) and sitting room. Downstairs consist of living room, formal dining
area, casual dining area, powder room and spacious kitchen (at least 500 sq ft)

JOHNSON ROAD
~ (Nassau) ©








| All that lot of land having an area of
| 5,520 sq. ft., (60 x 92) situated on the
| corner of Johnson Road and Step
| Streeet. This property is rectangular
and comprised of a 12 year old single
| storey house that consist of 3
bedrooms, 1 bathroom, living, dining
1 room and kitchen. Also an efficiency

apartment attached. The subject
property is slightly above the level of the abutting roadways with minimal
landscaping. The property is open with chain link fencing along its western
boundries.

Appraisal: $139,868.40
Heading east along Bernard Road, turn through Johnson Road opposite St

Augustine’s College Drive all the way to the curve heading west the subject house
is first house on the right all white trimmed yellow.



ALLOTMENT 67, MARRIGOLD FARM ROAD (NASSAU), All that lot of land having an area of 1.173 acres being lot No. and is situated on Marigold
Farm Road in the ara known as allotment 67, a said subdivision situated in the south eastern district of new Providence, Bahamas. This property

is Vacant and area has all utilities & services. Appraisal: $148,50.00

Travelling on Joe Farrington Road turn onto Marrigold Farm Road heading south, the subject is the second to last propert on the left hand side of

the road near the pond.



Uiereie Male) eLetter







NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA), Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and bounded on North by Early Settler Drive and South by
Deal Investment Ltd., this is a single family zoning and 50 ft., above sea level. This site encompasses a foundation with plumbing and roughing
inplace and well compacked quarry fill. The concrete floor has not been poured as yet. The foundation is 2,511 sq. ft. Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles
east wardly of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is vacant and a hill over looking the Atlantic Ocean. Appraisal: $46,167.18



BAHAMA SOUND (EXUMA), Lot #7088 situated in Bahama Sound, Exuma section 10 East. Great Exuma approximately 10.5 miles west of George
Town lot is square in shape on elevation of approximately 15 ft., above sea level contains 10,000 sq. ft., No adverse site conditions noted. This
property is single family residence. Property is located on the northwestern side of the Queen’s Highway, about 10.5 miles northwest of George
Town. Appraisal: $27,562.50



MURPHY TOWN (ABACO) Lot #78B vacant land, the property has average surface drainage and is not suseptible to flooding under normal
conditions. Land size 104 x 78 approximately 11,277 sq. ft. Estimated Value: $18,649.33



LOWE SOUND (ANDROS) All that parcel of lot of land located next door to the New Mt Freedom Baptist Church or approximately five miles from
the administrative complex approximately 5,000 sq. ft., and rectangular in shape with a 3 bed, 1 bathroom wooden residence. Appraisal: $52,258.50

FLAMINGO BAY SECTION 3 (EXUMA) Lot #102, Palm Hill situated inland in the Flamingo Bay development. It is Hillside Residential and has 150
ft., footage on Hill Road and contains 10, 438 sq. ft., in area. This property is undeveloped. The subject property is about one mile south of the
George Town township. Appraisal: $33,075.00 .

BAHAMA SOUND (EXUMA) Lots 12571 & 12572 Bahama Sound of Exuma No. 10 underveloped residenial lots located near the Forest and Mt
Thompson on Utopia Drive. 80 feet frontage and depth of 125 ft 10,000 sq. ft., in area each there is no service in the area. The road is gravel George
Town - 10 miles away. Appraisal: $26,250.00 EACH :

BAHAMA SOUND NO. 18 (EXUMA) Lot No. 17861 Bahama Sound of Exuma No. 18 a subdivision situate approximately 2.5 miles north westwardly
of George Town. The property is zoned residential and is level. Electricity, paved roads, water, telephone lines and cable tv services are available
along Queen’s Highway. Water is also available from dug wells but city supply is available. The propert is undeveloped. Land size 82.10 x 122.11 x
82.10 x 121.0 Estimated Value: $33,075.00

For conditions of sale and other information contact
Philip White @ 502-3077 email philip.white@scotiabank.com or
Harry Collie @ 502-3034 email harry.collie@scotiabank.com







Please visit www.fsbobahamas.com for interior photos


FAUL OD, INUNOVAYT, VUIUDEN ¢/, cuuo IHt |RIBUNE BUSINESS

COMICS PAGE

hi ty - oF

Pm | Fe







sS

i io f Lael



St Set BOS
— .
rv i:

i “a “Copyrighted I Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”



~~ & oo
i=

-_ 7 = — —-

rTHeHeA Leet
THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 9B



“THURSDAY EVENING OCTOBER 27, 2005
. | 7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30
NETWORK CHANNELS




rior to |The Perilous Fight: America’s

New Florida 1 |The Perilous Fight: America’s World War Il in Color The years
World War Il in Color 1 (CC)

WPBT the outbreak of World War II through the Nazi invasion of Poland; the
" buildup of the country’s military and preparations for D-Day. 1

The Insider (N) [Survivor: Guatemala - The Maya |CSI: Crime Scene Investigation Without a Trace “Honor Bound” (N)
@ WFOR}n cc) Empire ‘Surprise Enemy Visit” (N) Grissom connects a suicide toa | (CC)
: (CC) multiple murder in suburbia. 1
| oe Access ay Joey Joey disci- Will & Grace |The Apprentice The candidates _|(9:59) ER “Time of Death” A stom-
WTV4 |wood (N} (CC) _plines a child ac- |Grace’s date with |compete in the business of sporting Jach ache tums into something far
br A (CC) Nick. (CC) goods. (N) M (CC) more serious. 1 (CC)

Deco Drive |MLB Baseball World Series Game 5 -- Chicago White Sox at Houston Astros. If necessary. From Minute Maid
WSVN Park in Houston. Altemate prime-time lineup: “Maid in Manhattan” and local programming. (Live) (CC)

i Tae Jeopardy! (N) {Alias “Out of the Box” Sydney and |Night Stalker Kolchak follows a trail] Primetime (CC)

WPLG (cc). Tom are under siege by mercenar- jof mysterious deaths. (N) © (CC)
ies who want the container.
: CABLE CHANNELS

American Jus- |Cold Case Files DNAevidence —|Cold Case Files ‘The Closers; The First 48 Miami detectives probe

‘A&E tice helps police crack an 8-year-old | Caught by an Eyelash” (CC) the murder of a college student.
ae murder case in Virginia. (CC) (CC)
BBC News World Business /BBC News Talking Movies |BBC News Asia Today
‘BBCI (Latenight). |Report (Latenight). (Latenight).

% & CAUGHT UP (1998, Drama} Bokeem Woodbine, Cynda Williams, Made You Look: |To Be An-
‘BET. Joseph Lindsey. An ex-con struggles to rehabilitate his life, BET nounced

‘CBC Coronation The Canadian Antiques Road- |The Passionate Eye (CC) The National (CC)

show (CC) C |

:00) Onthe © |The Apprentice: Martha Stewart /Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch }

CN BC | Money “Every log Has His Day” (N) 1. es Let ha eles the

:00) Anderson {Paula Zahn Now (CC Larry King Live (CC) NewsNight With Aaron Brown a : ee
CNN (ei fare Bahamian Puppet and

a Reno 911! Con- |The Daily Show |The Colbert Re- [Comedy Central |South Park Cart-/South Park (CC) |The Showbiz ] ] ]
COM traband fireworks.| With or Stew- |port (CC) Presents Scott ccaseens] i oe hi = Sl d eki ck 2 Se rek P ut 2 ie
(CC) art (CC) Kennedy. group. avid Spade some smi | eson y ee

s Shootings |The Investigators “Inside the Yel- [Forensic Files |Body ofEvi- |Double Jeopardy
COURT ji, tee cities, low Line” Unsolvable cases. lei d s’s cf aces

; DISN That’s So Raven| x % THE LITTLE VAMPIRE (2000, Fantasy) Jonathan Lipnicki, Richard |The Buzzon _|Sister, Sister

Point of No Re- |E. Grant, Jim Carter. An American boy befriends a family of Scottish vam-/Maggie Hal- |The twins get
DIY This Old House |Weekend Wood Works —_|Freeform Furni- DIY to the Res- |DIY to the Res-
0 (CC) Handyman ture (N) cue cue





wm wo
3 q
23] 2
85| =

QoQ
So





tum pires. ‘PG’ (CC) loween. (CC) — jmake-overs. 1

Bring your children to the

z
o
3
5

DW Journal: In Journal: Europa Aktuell Journal: In Euromaxx

Depth Tagestema Depth : D | a

101 Best Kept Hollywood Secrets |101 Best Kept Hollywood Secrets |101 Best Kept Hollywood Secrets ; }
E! ibaa aLaee Kote sees ne McHappy Hour at McDonald's in

lege Football Boston College at Virginia Tech. (Live) (CC SportsCenter
ESPN _ [College Football Boston Colege at Virginia Tech, (Live) (CC) lve) (cc) Marlborough every Thursday
‘ Beisbol Este . MLB Baseball World Series Game 5 -- Chicago White Sox at Houston Astros. If necessary. From Minute Maid a, \
-LESPNI Noche“ [Parkin Huston. (Lie) " from 3:30pm to 4:50pm during the
he EWTN Daily Mass: Our |Life on the Rock ‘|Back Stage |The Holy Rosary|Gospel of John |In the Heart of ;
Le ay , the Chute month of October 2005,
FIT TV (00) FitTV's _|Insider Training “Golf Golf tech- |Deadly Arts “Karate” 0 No Opportunity Wasted “Bull Rid-
F lousecalls (CC) jniques. (N) er” 0 (CC) ‘

| FOX-NC Fox Report- |The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) {Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van



Shepard Smith Susteren (Live) (CC)
FSN FL: (:00) NHL Hockey Florida Panthers at Philadelphia Flyers. From the Wa- |Best Damn Sports Show Period Best Damn a ni 7
chovia Center in Philadelphia. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) (Live) (CC) ! Sports Show ‘ ‘
GOLF _ [Sof Central Post Game Show (Live) PGA Golf Champions Tour - Charles Schwab Cup Championship ~- First Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.
. (Live) Round. From Sonoma, Calif. :

; Lingo (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire |The Amazing Race “Race to the |Dog Eat Dog 1 (CC)
GSN (cc) FFinish? 1 (Part 2 of 2) (CC)
“le (:00) Attack of {Fastlane “Strap On” 1 (CC) Game Makers |Cinematech |The Man Show |The Man Show
G4Tech | “Call of Duty. (CC) (cc)
. (00) Walker, | Walker, Texas Ranger Walker OUT OF THE WOODS (2005, Drama) Ed Asner, Jason London. A self-
HALL exas Ranger [races to rescue an oil rig from radi- |absorbed lawyer visits his eccentric grandfather. (CC)
“Deep Cover’ —_|cal environmentalists. (\ (CC)
aes Dream House Holmes on Homes “House 2 Real Renos “Not )Restaurant The Block A newspaper article dis-
-PHGTV {a (cc) Home” 1 (Part 1 of 2). (CC) So Nicé Nei” \ |Makeover The [closes information about Dani's
a (CC} Babelfish Bistro. |past. O (CC)
Morris Cerullo |Breakthrough jLoveaChild Inspiration To- |Life Today (CC) |This Is Your Day | Valerie Saxion
[INSP eee ee eae

Slike Transformers Sabrina, the . |My Wifeand. |My Wife and . |Friends Rachel |Everybod Everybody .
'KTLA __ {Cybertron ‘Hid- [Teenage Witch Kids “Anniver. {Kids “legal :
pire den” sary” (CC)

(1995)

i'm lovin’ it






ry a3
Jdreams about... {Loves Raymond|Loves Raymond} | gm
n 0 (CC) (CC) 1C ’

Smile” (CC) Joey. A (CC) razy Chin

MARY. HIGGINS CLARK’S REMEMBER ME (1995) |x % THE CRYING CHILD (1996, Drama) Mariel Hemingway, Finola
LIFE Kelly McGillis, Cotter Smith. A piel couple moves ' |Hughes, George Delhoyo. An old house’s strange sounds torment a re-
Pee into a house presumably haunted. (CC) covering wife. Tec}

Sn :00) Hardball - /Countdown With Keith Olber- Rita Cosby Live & Direct Scarborough Country
([usnec [¢**" io
NICK Jimmy Neutron: |SpongeBob = Romeo! ‘Pin- |Full House \ Fresh Prince of |Fresh Prince of |The Cosh
Boy Genius {SquarePants © |head’ M (CC) |(CC) Bel-Air Bel-Air Show 1 tec)
iss NTV Will & Grace C\ |Survivor: Guatemala - The Maya |The Apprentice “Take Me Outto |News (CC) |News ;
SAN, (CC) Empire “Surprise Enemy Visit” —_|the Boardroom” (N) M (CC) ae eae ee Se :
em Ultimate Shark {Dangerous Hunting Adven- |Benelli’s Dream |Expedition'Sa- |Ultimate Shark Tournament ee ree
_ INASCAR Be- |The Chase Is On|Car Crazy (N) . |Barrett-Jackson 2005: The Auc- {NASCAR Beyond the Wheel ~ ; . 7
SPEED ‘ |vond the whee! ee ee ()

Nee Praise the Lord |Behind the Michael Youssef |Bishop T.D. —_| This Is Your Day |Praise the Lord (CC)
“-TBN (CC) Scenes (CC) —|(CC) Jakes (CC) (CC)

Te Everybody Friends Phoebe (Friends 0 (CC) | & * & THE MASK OF ZORRO (1998, Adventure) (PA) Antonio Ban-
TBS Loves Raymond |tries to prevent a deras, Anthony Hopkins, Catherine Zeta-Jones. Zorro's protege crosses
Messe Marital woes. suicide. (CC) swords with a returning tyrant. (CC) :

lis (:00 Mss Psychic Witness “Shattered Fami- |Psychic Witness: “Fall of the Serial Dead Tenants “The Last Resort’ A
| TLC of Noah's Flood |ly’ A woman is beaten to death with |Killer’ Psychics help catch killers. headless 2-year-old boy's ghost
thew (CC) a hammer. (N) makes a man lose sleep.

NBA Preseason Basketball Miami Heat at Orlando Magic. From the TD Waterhouse Cen- |NBA Preseason Basketball Golden
ct ENT tre in Orlando, Fla. (Live) (CC) rte Hae at Phoenix Suns.
‘ ive

see ‘{Aloha, Scooby-Doo The gang travels to Hawaii fora |Home for Imagi-|Cartoon.Car- Ed, Edd'n Eddy | Yu-Gi-Oh! G/X:
‘| TOON surfing contest. nary Friends toons (Part 1 of 2)

TV5 LaSyrieau |Envoyé spécial “Tout cru-Carnet de route: le jade” ~~ |Une santé qui nous est chére _ /TV5 Le Journal
; coeur

o- 6:00) Weather: |Storm Stories [Storm Stories / Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
“TWC M Edition (CC) |(CC) (cc)

pe :00) Pielde Contra Viento y Marea La Esposa Virgen ' Aqui y Ahora
av
oi" valientes, ;

00) Law & Or- jLaw & Order: Criminal intent * * THE STORY OF US (1999, aoe ee Bruce Willis, Michelle
|USA der: Special Vic-|“Con-Text’ A self-help guru is impli- |Pfeiffer, Tim Matheson. Premiere. A couple's marriage crumbles over the
tims Unit © — |cated in murder. 4 (CC) course of 15 years.

WHA 00) | Love the |I Love the '80s: 3D “1985” 9 | Love the ’80s: 3D “1986” (N) 1 |I Love the ’80s: 3D “1987” (N) 0
80s: 3D “1984”

Weed 00) America’s | x % &»% THE HORSE WHISPERER (1998, Drama) Rabert Redford, Kristin Scott Thomas, Sam Neill. A gentle
WGN panies vad cowboy heals a girl and her horse’s wounded souls. (CC)
wae ideos

; Everybody Smallville ‘Thirst’ Lana decides to |Everwood On a camping trip with |WB11 News at Ten With Kai

WPIX Loves Raymond |enroll at Metropolis University and is|Andy and Harold, Ephram reveals Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano

“Crazy Chin” —_|forced to join a sorority. _|the reason he returned. (N) (CC) —|& Mr. G (CC)

ardyl! (N) |Everybo Love, Inc. Eve Rita threat- {Cuts Kevin plans |Dr. Phil
WSBK (cc) Hates chs (N) |‘Amen” (N) © Jens to leave the to be rich. (N)
1A (CC) (CC) partnership. (N) (CC)
PREMIUM CHANNELS

ae ak Inside the NFL (CC) + & % MARIA FULL OF GRACE (2004, Drama) is Jarhead:

HBO-E __|LOVEDoN’ Catalina Sandino Moreno. A pregnant teenager be- | HBO First Look
COSTATHING | . comes a drug mule. (Subtitled-English) © ‘R'(CC) —_|(N) (CC)

4:45) x x [Real Time TV host Tucker Carlson. | * x FAT ALBERT (2004, Comedy) Kenan Thompson, |Legendary
HBO-P iP heen 0 (CC) Kyla Pratt. The aa character nannies realand |Nights ( (CC)
UNTER (1978) helps a lonely teen. ‘PG’ (CC)

} N’T
| hod Costas NOW 1 (CC) (i! 5) & * LOVE DON’T COST A THING (2003, Romance-Comedy) Nick
OHNNY ENG- annon, Christina Milian, Kenan Thompson.:A teen hires a cheerleader to
ISH (2003) 0 pose as his girlfriend. © ‘PG-13' (CC)







SS =
=
>

a
ao
So

a

Zs

HBO-W :
HBO-S pe RAY (2004, Biography) Jamie Foxx, | * * THE DOOR IN THE FLOOR (2004, Drama) Jeff Bridges, Kim

erry Washington. Ray Charles overcomes hardships rag Jon Foster. An author and painter drives his wife to infidelity. ©
to become a legend. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC) 'R’ (CC)

oe wee THE | & %% FLIGHT OF THE PHOENIX (2004, Adventure) Dennis Quaid, Gio- | x x ALONG CAME POLLY (2004,
MAX-E [BIG BOUNCE __|vanni Ribisi, Tyrese Gibson. Plane-crash survivors endure hardships in Ramanee-Conedy Ben Stiller, Jen-
(2004) ‘PG-13' the Gobi desert. M ‘PG-13' (CC) - nifer Aniston. © ‘PG-13' (CC)

Cs COLLATERAL (2004, Suspense) Tom ans TITANIC (1997, Drama Ceara Be ie Mase ly : oe ge oe e eo fi Le
ane. Oscar-winning account of the doome ocean liner. ( ‘PG-
me (Movie Gift Certificates





MOMAX

ruise, Jamie Foxx, Jada Pinkett Smith. A contract
killer uses a cabdriver for his jobs. 'R’ (CC)





'45)SHO Me — |x & THE PRINCE & ME (2004, Romance-Comedy) Julia Stiles, Luke | * & x WHILE YOU WERE SLEEP- £ ]
SHOW - tow “Paycheck” |Mably, Ben Miller. ‘TV. A collegian and a Danish prince fall in love. (\ {ING (1995, Comedy) Sandra Bul-
: hon Pah iby NG Cont _ make great gi

a % DES- | & IN THE ARMY NOW (1994, Comedy) Pauly (38) % & NO LOOKING BACK (1998, Drama) Lauren
ERATE MEA- |Shore, Andy Dick. A free-spirited slacker and his pal | Holly, Edward Burns. A man returns home to win back
SURES 'R’ join the Army Reserve. ( ‘PG’ (CC) his former girlfriend. © ‘R’

TMC










PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Wildcats line-up won't be ‘>

SPORTS

the same without Jackie

STUBBS



OPINION



W HENEVER the
Electro Telecom

Wildcats hit the field to play in
the Bahamas Softball Federa-
tion’s National Round Robin
Tournament this weekend,
their line-up won’t be the
same.

Even their mission will be
slightly different as they go
after their fifth national title.

They will be focussing their
emphasis on playing for their
jovial right-fielder Jackie ‘Lil
Stunt’ Moxey, who died on
Wednesday at the Princess
Margaret Hospital after being

rushed to the accident and

emergency department on
Tuesday night. —

For at least 30 years, the
compact Moxey was a house-
hold name in the NPSA’s fast-
pitch, the Bahamas Govern-
ment Departmental Softball
Association’s slow-pitch
league and the Baptist Sports



“When most of her
team-mates would decline to
speak to the media about their
thrill of victory or even their
agony of defeat, Moxey was
never one to back down.”



Council’s modified pitch
league.

Whenever she came to play,
you knew she was in the game
because she had one of the
loudest mouths on the team,
cheering her team-mates on
and annoying her rivals.

When most of her team-
mates would decline to speak
to the media about their thrill
of victory or even their agony
of defeat, Moxey was never
one to back down. She was a
reporter's delight because of

the comments she made.

As her Wildcats team, who
were sponsored by either
Graycliff or the Electro Tele-
com, were either blowing out
a series or getting ready to
clinch a title, Moxey would
enthusiastically state how
many games were left.

In most cases, she was right
on the money as the Wildcats
would go on to live up to her
predictions.

As a lefty, Moxey rarely
dropped a ball in right field

where she was considered a
“golden glove”.

She also had the speed to
track down any balls that got
past her.

Her game had started to
diminish with each passing
year, but whenever Moxey
came up to bat, she was still
considered to be a threat to
score once she got on base.
She was the lead off batter
who normally made things
happen. ~

It was a difficult pill to swal-
low as I watched her once
vibrant body lay motionless
on the table hooked up to the
life support system. It was
hard to believe that she won't
be able to spark the Wildcats
rally when they go for their
fifth straight national title.

The Wildcats will now have
to dig down deep within them-
selves to get the motivation to
play for Moxey instead — as
number five will not be there
in right field.

St Thomas

More
FROM page one

Bullard, who worked his way

inside to complete a three-point

play to put the Sparks up 3-1

for good before Sands con-

nected on a free throw before
. the end of the quarter.

Only one point would score
in the entire season quarter and
that came‘on a free throw from
Sands.

Then in the third quarter, St
Thomas More started to pull
away, Opening up as much as a
ten-point lead as Bullard kissed
the glass for a jumper as he got
around the defence of St.

Bede’s Kaylica Laing,
the only female player in the
game.

After Thorne Curry hit a
jumper for Crushers’ 7-3 deficit,
the Sparks surged ahead 13-3
when Paul Smith got an offen-
sive rebound and hit a lay-up
and Daniel Bullard came up
with two quick steals that he
converted on lay-ups.

From there, St. Thomas More
stayed one step ahead of St.
Bede’s, whose coach ,Maurice
Fawkes tried all he could to get
them to pick up their offence
down the stretch.

“I’m proud of them. I see
them doing a lot. more things
aggressively that they haven’t
been doing before,” he pointed
out. “We just have to make bet-
ter inbound passes and be more
aggressive.’

While Theron Taylor led St.
Bede’s with seven points,
Thorne Curry scored two and
Dwayne Rolle added a free
throw. Rolle, however, had a
couple of key block shots as he
took advantage of his height
inside.

The league will take ; a break
because of the mid-term break.
Action will pick up next Tues-
day when Our Lady’s travel to
St. Cecilia’s and St.Thomas
More go to St. Francis/Joseph.

The tournament was official-
ly opened by Charles ‘Chuck’
Mackey, the vice principal of
the RM Bailey Secondary High
School.



@ ST BEDE’S THERON TAYLOR drives the ball to the basket yesterday at St Thomas More. .

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Twelve schools ready to compete in
DW Davis Junior High School Classic

@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

AFTER a year’s break, the DW
Davis Junior High School will host its
second basketball classic this. week-
end at the DW Davis Gym.

Dubbed the “Junior Hugh Camp-
bell Classic”, twelve schools, including
the visiting Harbour Island High, have
confirmed their participation in the
tournament that opened yesterday.

The competition, which will divide
the teams into two different pools, will
start tonight and run through the mid-
term break with the championship
game being played on Sunday.

The DW Davis Pitbulls, the defend-
ing champions, will head Pool One
that will include the St. Andrew’s Hur-
ricanes, HO Nash Lions, Harbour
Island, SC McPherson Sharks and

Faith Temple Warriors.

The Jordan Prince William Falcons,
AF Adderley Fighting Tigers, LW
Young Golden Eagles, St. John’s
Giants, CH Reeves Raptors and St.
Anne’s Bluewaves make up Pool Two.

Quest

DW Davis, in their quest to repeat

-as champions, will be coached by

Rubin Mounts, who guided the Pit-
bulls to the Government Secondary
Schools Sports Association’s junior
boys pennant and championship i in his
first year back.

And Ricardo Ferguson, the founder
of the tournament and coach of the
Pitbulls when they won the first title
two years ago, is now at AF Adderley.

Alfred Forbes, who has the respon-
sibility of putting the schedule togeth-
er, said, based on the teams entered,

the tournament should be very com-
petitive this year.

“Again this year, we have 12 teams
and they will come from both the pri-
vate and public schools,” said Forbes,
who has also been responsible for
putting the schedule together for the
Hugh Campbell Basketball Classic,
organised in February by AF Adder-
ley. °

“This tournament, even though it’s
just the second one, is preferred as
the junior Hugh Campbell Classic and
it should be keenly contested between
the public and private schools. We will
also have a Family Island team entered
for the first time.”

Despite the inclement weather expe-
rienced on Monday because of Hurri-
cane Wilma, Forbes said the organisers
are anticipating that the weather will
clear up and everything will be in
order for this weekend.

“DW Davis are the defending cham-
pions of their own tournament, but
competition is expected from St.
Andrew’s, St. Anne’s, HO Nash,
Prince William and AF Adderley,”
Forbes stated.

“They are considered the top teams
in the tournament.”

Four games are on the schedule
today with AF Adderley taking on
LW Young at 3pm. At 4pm, St.
Andrew’s will take on HO Nash. CH
Reeves and St. Anne’s will play at
5pm and the feature game at 6pm will
showcase SC McPherson and Faith
Temple.

On Friday, another four games are

. set, starting at 3pm.

Then on Saturday, ten games are
scheduled from 9am.

The playoffs will get started at lpm
on Sunday with the championship to
follow.

~ ; ;

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

| Available from Commercial News Providers”

~~ «= “f° *Eg= i)
PIP Gwe er hey ee OO, Pee



PPM Ve Yrtnin

roe :
i oe



SPORTS



o- -* — a * - © oo — -— Oo o/ wee lem

Cracked Conchs play host to English side

er

Vener ateong

Copyrighted Material
England Syndicated ( Content

Ty. !. —_- . ~~
Available from’ Commiercial|News. ‘Providers”

e= «= .



> - - ~_—> _ -_- =



_ Ee = -——_— =

ae ce
Name:

Address

P.O. Box

Telephone Cth

ORRY NO PHOTOCOPIES 3, NEWSPAPER t PRINT ONLY __

ee

sate


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

Tributes paid to

e



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS



Jackie Moxey

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THE tight-knit Electro Telecom
Wildcats suffered a major blow on
Wednesday when their rightfielder
Jackie ‘Lil Stunt’ Moxey died in hos-
pital. She was 44.

Outside of the Accident and Emer-
gency Department of the hospital on
Tuesday, where the Wildcats assem-
bled with family members, friends and
New Providence Softball Associa-
tion’s rivals, there was a somber
moment with many in a state of shock
and disbelief.

At least two Ministers of New Des-
tiny Full Gospel Baptist Church,
Tyrone Knowles and Stefan Edge-
combe, stood by the bedside of their
member, as people arrived to. give
their Support:

St Thomas
More keep
their spark
in opener

&@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter

THE St. Thomas More
Sparks may have lost some of
their key players from last
year’s championship team. But
they still had enough weapons
left to out-last the St. Bede’s
Crushers in the Catholic Pri-
mary Schools’ basketball sea-
son opener.

Playing before a large crowd
on their home turf, the two-time
defending champions Sparks
pulled off a 16-10 victory over
the Crushers on Wednesday in
a real defensive battle.

Coach Leo Delaney had a
broad smile on his face as he |
complimented his squad.

“Y’m happy with it. It was a
little bit sloppy, but it was
expected because this is the first
time that a lot of these guys are
playing together,” he stated.

The Sparks were riding on
the back of their star guard
Daniel Bullard. But once he
fouled out in the fourth quarter,
Paul Smith stepped up and pro-
vided the defensive spark that
they needed to keep St. Thomas
More ahead.

When Bullard exited the
game with about four minutes

. left and St Thomas More lead-
ing 16-10, coach Delaney said
he became congerned.

“But I knew that if our team
played defence, we would be
able to still pull off the game,”
he added. “I was happy that
they were able to do that.”

Before leaving the game,
Bullard made his contribution
with a game high 10 points.
Smith, in picking up the slack —
in the fourth quarter, chipped in
with four and Yorick Sands
added a pair of free throws.

St. Bede’s, who didn’t make
the playoffs last year, got the
first point of the game on one of
two free throws from Theron
Taylor.

But they couldn’t contain

SEE page 10B

For every McDonald’s Cookie you purchase

Shock after player’s death



Everybody knew that.they had to
prepare for the inevitable. .

“It’s really a sad day,” said left-
fielder Renee ‘Sunshine’ Sweeting.

Centrefielder Vernie Curry said,
when she looks to her right, she won’t
see Moxey there.

Difficult

She said it’s going to be difficult to
play without her.

Ace pitcher Mary ‘Cruise’ Edge-
combe came to tears as she noted that
she had just talked to Moxey the night
before about the schedule for the

BSF’s nationals this weekend.

Jean ‘Bubbles’ Minus, the’ team’s
utility player, called it a “sad day” for
sports in the country.

“Jackie is like a sister. We’re all
just one family. This is just a really
sad day for sports,” Minus insisted.

“{ just saw Jackie on Sunday when
we played in the championship in the
Bahamas Government Departmen-
tal Softball League. We were just hav-
ing fun. She was the last out at the
plate.

“We just embraced and parted
ways.”

@ JACKIE ‘LIL STUNT’ MOKEY









Round robin
_ tournament:
will go ahead

@ SOFTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
‘Reporter

DESPITE the tragic
death of Electro Telecom
Wildcats’ right-fielder | |
Jackie ‘Lil Stunt’ Moxéy,
the Bahamas Softball
Federation’s national
round robin tournament
will still be played this
weekend.

‘The nationals were put
on hold last week
because of the passing of
Hurricane Wilma. But,
this weekend, it will be
staged in conjunction
with the Austin ‘King
Snake’ Knowles National
High School Tourna-
ment.

But Knowles said it’s
best that they play the
nationals, instead of post-
poning it.

Emotional

“It’s going to be-very
emotional for all of us
during the opening cere-
monies. I hope I don’t
cry,” Knowles stated.
“But, knowing Jackie,
she will want us to play.

_ “T know it’s going to be
very hard, but we have to
try and do this one for
her.”

The opening cere-
monies for the nationals
are scheduled for Friday.

The Wildcats will be
seeking their fifth
straight national title, but
they will have to do it
without Moxey.

“Jackie has been one of
.the most inspiring ath-
letes. She’s been playing
for a very long time,”
Knowles reflected. “She’s
been a great motivator,
especially when I’m
down. It’s hard for me
right now.’

Members of the Wild-
cats were scheduled to
meet on the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex where
Moxey played her last
softball game on Sunday
in the Bahamas Govern-
ment Departmental Soft-
ball Association.

Gathering

Leftfielder Renee ‘Stin-

‘shine’ Curry said they

were gathering to deter-
mine what they will do
this weekend in.the
nationals.

“We know she would
want us to play,” she
pointed out. “We don’t
know what will happen
when we get on the field.
But we will decide what
we will do.”

Sweeting said every-
body was shaken up on
Tuesday night when they
met at the hospital. .

“Everybody cried,”
Curry said. “I know when
we heard the news today
that she died, we cried
some more. I guess when
we go out on the field to
play again, we will proba-
bly cry some more. She
won’t be in right field
anymore.”

during the month

of October 2005, McDonald’s will make a donation to the ©













mM

im lovin’ it



SECTION



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005



The Tribune







Sermons, Church Activities, Awards



‘He need Jesus,

he need Jesus’
See hesale 2¢








Christian Council spearheads
spiritual outreach to men

& By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

embers of

the Bahamas

Christian

community

are taking a
stand, having made the deci-
sion to stop talking and to do
something about the numerous
issues that plague today’s soci-
ety, including violent behav-
iour, poor communication
skills, conflict resolution fail-
ures, infidelity, and other prob-
lems that Bahamian men strug-
gle with.

"We recognize that we have
to talk about it. We have held
many discussions. We have
been thinking about it and talk-
ing about it for far too long.
Now, we have decided to act,"
Alfred Stewart, assistant pas-
tor at New Mount Zion Mis-
sionary Baptist Church, told
Tribune Religion yesterday.

Mr Stewart is chairman of
the Bahamas Christian Coun-
cil's committee for its upcom-
ing spiritual outreach to the
men of this country, "Bahamas
Awakening 2005 and Beyond".
The council has invited all of its
member churches to partici-
pate in this landmark effort
which will be held in conjunc-
tion with the United States-
based programme, Promise
Keepers Movement, which
subscribes to the belief that if
you want to change the world,
change its men.

Promise Keepers Movement
(PK) was born in March, 1990,
when Bill McCartney, then
head football coach for the
University of Colorado, and his
friend, Dave Wardell, were on
a drive from Denver to Pueblo,

Rev Neilly ordained to Holy Minist

Colorado. They thought of how
they could reach men in their
community. Subsequently, a
group of men was organised to

form a plan that would hope-,

fully rejuvenate Christian men
with a new spiritual emphasis.

Everything came together -

eventually, and in 1993, PK was
born. Its rallies, which are con-
ducted periodically in various

parts of the country, continue -

to attract thousands of men,
many of whom travel great dis-
tances to attend.

"Bahamas Awakening 2005
and Beyond", comes a at time
when many persons in the
church and the wider society
have expressed "grave con-
cern" over the lack of direc-
tion and motivation on the part
of many of the males in
Bahamian society.

"This couldn't have come at
a better time. When we look
at the lives of our men, the
murders, the serious crime, the
wave of crime, it's a reminder
to us as a nation that our men

are challenged, particularly our

young men," said the chairman.

There may be programmes
currently available that seek to
positively influence the behav-
jour of men through teaching
practical ways of resolving con-
flicts, but Mr Stewart believes
that these efforts often miss a
vital point. In his opinion
deviant behaviour is the root
of a much greater problem, a
spiritual one. "We have to rec-
ognize that we need to get to
the root of the problem; that
is to the spirit of man. You
have to first begin with the
root, then you get change. We
want to reach the young men,
and seek divine intervention."

A highlight of "Bahamas



@ PASTOR ALFRED STEWART



of Word, Sacrament and Order

REV Marie Neilly was ordained to the
Holy Ministry of Word, Sacrament and
Order last week. The ordination service
took place at Wesley Methodist church, :

Harbour Island.

. Kenris Carey, President of the Methodist
Church of the Bahamas, performed the
Act of Ordination and preached the

charge.

Born in Nassau, Rev Neilly spent her

childhood in'the settlement of Lower
Bogue, Eleuthera. She lived with her
grandparents, Alma and Stafford Neilly,
and received her early education at the
Lower Bogue All Age School and the
Governor’s Harbour High School, gradu-
ating as head girl in 1989. At the age of
fourteen she accepted the Lord Jesus
Christ as her personal saviour.’

Rev Neilly relocated to Nassau to live
with her mother, Edith Neilly, and attend-
ed the College of the Bahamas (COB)
where she majored in accounting and book
keeping. She was graduated from COB,
obtaining an Associate and Bachelors






@ REV MARIE NEILLY

degree in accounting and book’ keeping

and became. a certified business studies.

teacher.

_ While studying at COB, Rev Neilly wor- -
‘shipped at Curry Memorial Methodist

Church, South Beach, where she became
the Sunday School: superintendent, and
youth coordinator.

For six years Rev Neilly taught eco-
nomics and accounting at H O Nash and R
M Bailey. It was during this time that she
received her call to enter the ministry and
became a candidate through the Bahamas
conference of the Methodist church. In
2001 she withdrew from the teaching: pro-
fession and began her studies at the-Can-
dler School of Theology, Emory Universi-
ty in Atlanta.

At Candler Seminary, Rev Neilly
obtained the Masters of Divinity degree

and certificates in both Christian education

and clinical pastoral education. While at

SEE page 2C



Awakening 2005 and Beyond"
will be the national solemn
assembly on Friday, Novem-

ber 11, and a mass rally on Sat-_

urday, November 12. Both
events will be held at Clifford
Park, beginning at 6pm. There
will also be a T-Shirt Day, and
Men's March on Sunday,
November 6.

The purpose of the solemn
assembly is to bring together
men of the church, the state,
and civil society to seek the
face of God in prayer for the
men of our nation,.as well as to
lay the proper. spiritual foun-
dation for the ongoing efforts
of "Bahamas Awakening".

In his recent Synod address,

‘Bishop Drexel Gomez, head of

the Anglican diocese of the
Bahamas, said the purpose of
this effort is also to bring about
a night of national repentance
for the sins of the men of the
Bahamas.

"This repentance, in its com-
plete form, will:be about:a

change of mind, heart and.

direction for the men of our
nation. I believe that the pro-
posed Awakening has the
potential for renewal and trans-
formation at a time when so
many negative influences are

adversely impacting the peo-'-

ple of our nation."

Archbishop Gomez went on
to encourage the men of the
Anglican faith to join with men
of other denominations in what
he hailed as an important
national endeavour.

Among the speakers sched-
uled to address the rally are
Archbishop Gomez; Joe White
of the Promise Keepers Move-
ment; Mike. Silver; Dr Myles
Munroe, senior pastor of
Bahamas Faith Ministries



International, and Bishop Neil
Ellis, pastor of Mount Tabor
Full Gospel Baptist Church.
The committee also expects
greetings from Prime Minister
Perry Christie and president of
the Promise Keepers Move-
ment Dr Thomas Fortson.
The philosophy of the
Promise Keepers is based upon
the premise that Christian
growth begins by making |
promises. And as a guideline
it has constructed seven princi-
ples for its: organisation.
According to Mr Stewart,

. "Bahamas Awakening" has

adopted these promises as the
goals for the local effort:

e To see the men of the
Bahamas committed to fearing
God, leading to repentance,
salvation and a commitment to
honour Jesus Christ through.
worship, prayer, and obedience
to God’s Word in the power of
the Holy Spirit.

e To see the men of the

‘Bahamas committed to pursu-

ing vital relationships with oth-
er men, understanding that
they need brothers to help
them keep their promises.

e To see the men of the
Bahamas committed to prac-
ticing spiritual, moral, ethical,
and sexual purity.

-®@ To'see the men of the
Bahamas committed to build-
ing strong marriages and fami-
lies through love, protection
and biblical values.

e To see the men of the
Bahamas committed to sup-
porting the mission of their
churches by honoring and pray-
ing for their church leaders and
by giving their time and

SEE page 2C

Bible Balme eth Sho

"Making Fishers of Men"
PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005

a | oo | HIBUNE



Ba arco



stick.

It is true that the best
example has not always
been set. However, that does
not give anyone license to
degrade and condemn peo-
ple. Too many of us want to
be God, to judge and con-
demn people to hell. God
moves :too slow and is too
merciful for some of us. But
isn't God an all knowing and
all seeing God. If no one
else in this life knows what
they are doing, God surely
knows what He is doing.

I know it is disappointing
when you trust and look up,
only to be let down, but that
does not mean that we are
to pass condemnation on
people. GOD is the judge of
us all and He will have the
last say. We need to stop
killing.each other with the
pink rag in our mouths. The
damage it does is unbeliev-
able. I am proud to be a part
of something that makes a
positive change and I will
not allow the devil or any
demon he uses to change

m@ By ALLISON MILLER



"HE need Jesus, he need
Jesus", was the call that
echoed out, just as the mes-
sage of John the Baptist
when he cried out in the
wildness "Make straight,
prepare ye the way of the
Lord”. The voice said it
twice and it caused me to
think that after all the scruti-
ny and bad mouthing "The
Church" suffers, it still all
boils down to the fact that
people need the Lord.

Example

I was privileged to hear a
conversation that my col-
leagues were having. They
were discussing the poor
example set by people in the

-church, especially the lead-
ers. Someone jumped ‘up
and said, "That's Allie and
*John’s people." John quick-
ly got up to defend the
church he was a member of,
but I explained to him that it
did not matter what local







ALL Saints on Calvary Hill
Anglican Church, Joan’s
Heights, will honour three for-
mer rectors during a gala ban-
quet on Friday, October 28,
at the Cable Resort. The
event, titled ‘ Men of Distinc-
tion’, will pay tribute to Father
Addison Turnquest, Father









@ ALLISON MILLER

Harry Ward.

Father Sebastian Campbell,
current rector, said that this
is the perfect time, the 30th
Anniversary of the parish, to
honour these distinguished
men of faith who have impact-
ed the members and the com-
munities of South Beach, Joan
Heights, Bamboo Town and
Pinewood Gardens in partic-
ular.

“ As we embark on another
mile of our journey, we must







“After all that
God has done
for us, even
when we suffer











enter ee the worst trial or that. hee that have brought us ths

Church body and will have Condemnation, Suffer far and give them their praise

Panter ie Gale. while they are alive,” Father
After considering what I God is worth it After all that God has | | Campbell stated.

said, he paused and ay 1 thank Him done for us, even when we Father Addison Turnquest

suffer the worst trial or con-
demnation, God is worth it
all. I thank Him for making

explained. "It's not the
church you know, it's per-
sons who take decisions to



Bishop Eldon charged
Father Turnquest with the
responsibility to build a church




for making life






represent it in a derogatory ‘oat life worth living. He keeps :

manner. God isn't lacking in worth living. us, forgives, comforts and SN ee ate
anything, He is perfect. It is He kee Ss us loves us regardless. Many of GROWS the HeSEtEE cone t
just that we fail in our many p ’ us can say, "Had it not been at Christ the King, Ri aes d



for the Lord on my side
where would I be." God is a
good God and His love and
kindness is greater than life



attempts of living the way
He says that we are to live."
I couldn't have said it bet-
ter myself.

forgives, comforts
and loves us

Park, encouraged a few mem-
bers from that parish to join




land for the church was gen-





one else has to suffer the-
blame. There are however,
peoplé who live exactly the “7
way God says they-are to
live and we can not beat
them with the hypocrisy



their son, Stanley Bethel, and



* * John’s name has hebh
changed to protect his iden-

Bethel.




Saints was held in a tent bor-
rowed from St Gregory’s,
Carmichael Road, and the







_ Cedar’s of Lebanon
|Cathedral Union Baptist Church
Look where the Lord has brought us now...

He has brought us a mighty long way, to God be ihe Glory!




Word from the Servant of God








On October 5th, 1995, I was commissioned by our Lord and Saviour Jesus
Christ, under the leadership of Rev. Dr. Earl Francis, Pastor of First Baptist
Church, to start a mission as a branch of First Baptist Church. I accepted
this challenge with feat enthusiasm. I was over whelmed for such a gigantic

task,

We had our first service that Sunday morning at 11:00 am, we were small
in number, but we were not discouraged, because we moved on faith and
on the word of God, when he said “wherever two or three are gathered
together, touching anything in my name he promised to be in the midst”.
From that day, to this present time, we have seen the wondrous working
power of God. He continues to bless us mightily in Cedars. It's neity:
whatever we ask the Lord. for, He grants to us.
















Five years ago we started this mission and now we are having our sixth
anniversary service to thank the Lord for all of the blessings he has bestowed
upon us. We have only just begun, there is much land to possess, there are
souls to be rescued, there are souls to save. We in Cedar's of Lebanon Union. |
Baptist Church have a pide by our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ and that is “to go in the highways, the byways
and compel them to come to Know the Lord Jesus Christ as their Lord and personal Saviour”



Ist Lady aay Mae Paie Co
Rev. Dr. Char les Crewtwell Rolle, J.P. Pastor










We are getting better and better every Sunday, please pray for us, and lend us your support, GOD BLESS YOU!





. Rev. Dr. Charles C. Rolle, J.P.

‘Pastor



You are Re A TMOG ne
celebrate with us, our Church’s
Te TTA

This Sunday, October eila0
3pm

Location:
Nassau Village, Button Wood Drive

| AYA OLE ME LAA LLG
Come one , come all...

Patrick Johnson and Father .

Unfortunately, what hap- regardless.” itself. I am grateful to Him
pens is that some persons set 8 d for having me be a part of Staal a oe ae ee
a bad example and every- —A Miller His Kingdom. and cleared for. building by.

grandsons, sary and Michael...
- Father James Moultrie, Father

The Test service ee ‘All Samuel Stirrup and Father |

altar donated by the late
Father Anthony Roberts.
After many cookouts the
church building was dedicated
on January 18, 1976.

Father Turnquest stayed

‘with the Parish until 1982 after

“AS We ©
embark on —
another mile |
of our journey,
we must
reflect on the
contribution
of those that —
have brought
us this far and
give them their
praise while —
they are alive’
— Fr Sebastian Campbell

him in the undertaking. The

which several priests, includ-
ing Father Murillo Bonaby,

Patrick Adderley, served until
a permanent replacement was
made in the person Father S.

‘He need Jesus, Former
he need Jesus’ to be honoured
at gala banquet

Patrick Johnson.

Father S. Patrick Johnson

Father Johnson’ was
appointed to All Saints Parish.
in August 1988. He immedi-
ately took on the challenge of
enhancing the spiritual life of
the church. Under his lead-
ership the church’s mortgage
was paid off and additional
property purchased to the
east. Father Johnson is also
credited for settling the choir.
He and his wife Ethel were
instrumental in the establish-
ment of the Friday morning
breakfast mass. Mrs Johnson.
also taught Sunday school dur-
ing her husband’s stay at All
Saints.

Cursillo was also introduced
at All Saints in 1985, under
Father Johnson and today the
Parish is at the fore-front of
this spiritual renewal pro-
gramme within the Anglican

_ church in the Bahamas and

Caribbean. Father Johnson
has also worked with the
ACM in walk-abouts in the
Pinewood Gardens area to
bring new members into the
church. He also instituted the
hospital visitation programme |
that still exists today.

Father Harry Ward
Father Ward replaced.
Father Johnson in September
1988 and served until August
1990. His contributions to All

Saints included exercising

astute management over the

Parish’s business, settling the

vestry and strengthening

youth groups and their activi-

ties. He also introduced the

Discovery, Renewal and Cou-
ples Club and the experimen-

tal ‘Even Song’ of the.
Province.

] | Rev Neilly ordained

to Holy Ministry of
Word, Sacrament ©
and Order

FROM page 1C

Candler Seminary, Rev Neilly
served as president of the Can-
dler International Association,
treasurer of the Candler Stu-
dent’s Association and prayer
band leader at Turner Village.

After graduating from Can-

dler Seminary, Rev Neilly was
placed at Wesley Methodist
Church in Harbour Island dur-
ing her probationary year.

She has since been stationed
by the Conference to the North
Eleuthera Region to serve as
the minister of Wesley
Methodist Church, Harbour
Island.

Christian eNTTeT

oO State
outreach to men



FROM page 1C

resources.

e To see the men of the
Bahamas committed to reach-
ing beyond any ethnic, nation-
al and denominational barrier
in a way that demonstrates the
power of biblical unity.

¢ To see the men of the
Bahamas committed to chang-
ing their world by being obedi-
ent to the great commandment
(Mark 12:30-31) and the great



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

commission (Matthew 28:19-
20).

Though this effort is expect-
ed to attract men of all ages,
the committee has decided to
target males as young as 13
years old.

"We want to reach young
men because that's where the
problem begins. This is where
serious crimes manifest and
start to develop. We hope to
change that," Mr Stewart
added.












IHE | RIBUNE

VAM OAON Sharing Our Stories:
Discovering



@ By Fr HENRY CHARLES

(This is the second part of a
three-part series on the spiritu-
ality of work. The first article
was published on October 13).

WORK is full of paradoxes. It
frees and liberates us in many
ways. Yet it also binds us and
ties us down to fixed schedules
and timetables.

Work makes a variety of
things more available to us in
greater proliferation; yet we
must make ourselves more
available in the process. We
must work longer hours, bear

greater workloads, and spend’

more hours on call, outside of
working hours, and so on.

Work simultaneously enrich-
es and impoverishes. Harder
work means more production
but also more monotony. Work
makes us powerful and at the
same times increases our depen-
dence.

Through work we make
things serve ends that we deter-
mine, yet we grow more depen-
dent on the very things wermake
to serve us.

Work increases our human

sense of worth and achievement.
Modern living comforts, quick
communications, space exploits,
technological innovation are all
achievements we can be proud
of.

Yet mass production and
standardisation suggest some-
times that we ourselves are just
so many sheep following stan-
dardised living patterns imposed
on us by the work of our own
hands.

Again, through work we have
created forces and energies we
can no longer control. Atomic
energy is one of the most strik-
ing of these creations.

What was at first a sign of
ingenuity and creativeness has
become the very symbol of our

inability to control what we have

made. Self-expression through
inventiveness has resulted in the
real possibility of self-destruc-
tion. :
From the Protestant Refor-
mation came the notion of work
as a “calling” or “vocation.”
This was opposed to the
Catholic notion of calling as per-
taining only to those in religious
life. The conjunction of work
and calling has had the merit of
making work a religious, i.e. not
a purely secular, phenomenon.
Its religious meaning did not
depend on the religious attitude
you brought to work. Religious
meaning was inherent. Luther
thus settled in one stroke some-
thing that still dominates the
religious discussion of work:

Pastor Ben Bailey
Program Organizer
The Prophetic Voice

P. O. Box N-9518

Nassau, Bahamas

boils to afflict the man’s physical



@ FR H CHARLES

how can I bring my faith and
my work together?

Luther's answer was that you
don't have to bring them togeth-
er; they already are. Your work
is your calling, your vocation; it

- is there that you serve God most

ordinarily and organically. The
notion, however, has two short-
comings.

First, it implies a singleness
and permanence of vocation
that no longer corresponds to
much of human work experi-
ence. Luther did not envisage
that many “callings” are possible
in a single life, as more and
more people have discovered,
or are discovering. Secondly, the
vocational understanding of

work as calling has not been |

sensitive to the potential of work
for dehumanising and alienat-
ing people.

The emphasis on staying
where you were called overrode
every, other consideration —.or
better, blocked. the emergence
of any other perspective. _

One may take any of three
approaches to a theology or a
spirituality of work, or better,
have a perspective that gives
varying weight and attention to
three dimensions.

As I indicated last week, a

negative view of work has dom-.
inated its understanding histor- _

ically. To this corresponds what
we may call the penitential per-
spective. ,
Work is a punishment for sin.
Before the Fall work is part of
God's plan for creation, Adam
is put in the garden to “till it

and keep it ” (Gen 2:15 ). Work

was a constituent feature of
human existence.

After the Fall, there's a dras-
tic change. Yahweh cries out:

“Cursed is the ground because

of you; in toil you shall eat all

the days of your life; thorns and .

thistles it shall bring forth to
you; and you shall eat the plants
of the field. In the sweat of your
brow you shall eat bread, till
you return to the dust, for out of
it you were taken .”

Note that the curse falls pri-

marily on the soil, the work field

_ assigned to human beings to cul-

tivate. Work, which should have
been a purely humanising activ-
ity, now becomes painful.

Work is hard. Humans dis-
cover with difficulty the powers
of nature and the energies that
go into the formation of the
world.

The Bible thus sees a connec-
tion between disobedience and
the oppressiveness, fatigue,
drudgery, and labouriousness of
work.

A second approach is the cre-
ationist view. Humans also have
a mandate to be stewards of the
earth, to cultivate and take care
of it (2:15 ).

Work is co-creative activity,
cooperation with God in the
continuing act of creation. We
are free to shape and determine
creation as something that has
been entrusted to us. In the
exercise of this responsibility we
act in the “image” of God.

In both accounts of creation
in Genesis we see different
aspects of creation itself as work.
In the first account there is the
joyous surprise of God when he
seés the final result of his cre-

ativity. “God saw everything -

that he had made, and behold it
was very good ” (1:31 ).
In the second account God

makes the human being propri-:

etor of the garden, committing
him to the work that maintains
God's own work. In naming
things the human being is a part-
ner with God in bringing things

into existence and conferring ;

meaning on them.

The big value of the second
account is its dynamism and pos-
itive character, in contrast to the
resignation that stems from the
penitential view. The second
view also embraces an evolu-
tionary perspective. Human col-
laboration with the divine plan is
an ongoing activity.

A third view of work departs
from the Second Coming, with
its vision of a néw heaven and a
new earth. One may interpret

this in either of two ways: first, .

in the sense of a complete dis-

‘ ruption between the work of our

hands and the new creation.

From this point of view, the
new creation is completely and
entirely God's doing. One may
also see the newness in terms of
continuity, mysterious as this
must remain.

In this perspective, the fruit
of our labour, in all the forms
that this assumes, will form part
of the new heavens and new
earth. The value of work is not
destructible. It is something

caught up for ever in the plan of

God for creation.

The Character of God: Part One .

Scripture Text: Old Testament Psalm 15:1-5

The greatest compliment God can extend to a man; is to. point out
to his sworn enemy, the obvious reflection of God’s Character upon
that individual. A Colonial expression relative to a man’s character,
praised the person for possessing a sterling character. God asked
the ‘Accuser’ whether he had considered Job’s commitment towards
God. Satan’s response was that Job was only serving God as a
result of the personal possessions he received from God. ©

Satan is given permission to move without restrictions against Job’s
possessions; and used two elements of nature, lightning and a
windstorm; combined with two groups of the man’s common enemies
to aid in the destruction of his possessions. What was Job’s reaction
to this series of devastating events? Job‘arose, tore his robe, shaved
his head; and fell to the ground and worshiped. Satan is given
permission once again to move without restrictions against Job;
this time however, the person of the man faced jeopardy. The
powerful and unrestrained ferocity of the enemy: is now displayed
through the fifth and final strike against Job. Satan used painful

body.

Let us not hasten to judge the wife too quickly without considering that during the first set of troubles,
‘both the man and his wife were collectively afflicted by the loss of their possessions and offspring.
However, in this matter it appears that Job isolated his feelings from her when the attack was
personally directed at him. Harold St. John rightly comments concerning Louise Haughton’s thoughts
‘relative to the matter, “As long as job’s wife could share in his sorrows she bore up bravely, but as
‘soon as he enters a fresh chamber of suffering and leaves her outside, then she breaks down: for
her, the intolerable woe is, that, which she is forbidden to share with him.” ~

The account of the patriarch job called into question the Godly character of God from the five
participants in the book: Job, Eliphaz, Bildad, Zophar and Elihu: Job once he is afflicted; is visited
by his friends, whose original intent was to comfort him, but soon wound up debating among
themselves, reasons for his condition. Is there any wonder, then, why Job refers to his friends as
‘miserable comforters?’ In times of great distress and unbearable sorrow, a troubled man should
look to Jesus, a ‘Balm in Gilead.’ Job declares his innocence throughout the book, and indirectly
sought to accuse God for his dilemma. As the debates progresses, Job’s understanding concerning
God increases more and more, despite the miserable counsels of his friends.

The narrative is designed to bring ‘peace of mind’ to persons who anguish over whether their suffering
is the result of God’s punishment, which many times, may not be the case. It also relieves the guilty
conscience from imagined sins, when one is faced with painful events. What happened to Job clearly
demonstrates a righteous person may be completely innocent and still be made to suffer pain and
anguish. The point we make here, is this, do not beat yourself too hard, because nobody but God
knows what God is doing when you experience difficult times in your life.

Once Job and his friends iad exhausted all debate without satisfactorily resolving the question of
the reason of his afflictions; God intervened and crushed all previous arguments, considered ‘words
of wisdom’ spoken in His Name. All who thought they knew God, whether they spoke innocently,
experientially, observationally, religiously, anciently, legalistically, or academically, proved themselves
presumptuous, because they failed to consider the Immutability, Omnipotence, and Sovereignty of

God.

‘So Eliphaz the Temanite and Bildad the Shuhite and Zaphar the Naamathite went and did as the
‘Lord commanded them; for the Lord had accepted Job. The Lord restored Job’s losses when he
“prayed for his friends. Indeed the Lord gave Job twice as much as he had before.” Job 42: “Now
the Lord blessed the latter days of Job more than his beginning; for he had fourteen thousand sheep,
-six thousand camels, one thousand yoke of oxen, and one thousand female donkeys. He also had
“seven sons and three daughters. After this Job lived one hundred and forty years, and saw his
‘children and grandchildren for four generations. Job died, old and full of days.”

.We wish to interject these appropriate words from Andreae, more recently quoted by Otto Zockler,
“The same storm which on the one side is sent upon the lands for punishment and destruction; is
at the same time appointed on the other side to bless them abundantly, and to make them fruitful.

‘Thus, even the judgments of God are ever to be regarded as at the same time a Source out of which

divine grace distils forth.”

IHURSVDAY, UC LUBER Z/, ZUU0, FAUL SU



Our Heroes |

m@ By REV ANGELA
PALACIOUS

-MR C Robinson’s funeral
was a most touching and
wonderful celebration of a
great life and acknowledg-
ment of the depth of the loss

of one with so much love to
give. He was an obvious

hero for many persons.
What made it even more
poignant for me was that he
died at 94 just.as my father

“had done in 2002.

It is a humbling thing to
observe the cycle of human

‘life and realise that forces

beyond our control bring us
full circle.
Up to several months

‘before his death, my father

was witty and sharp and yet

‘so playful and gently affec-
tionate. He, who had the ©

dignity of a man and wisdom
of a sage, was now in some
ways like my baby: The pil-

: lows in the hospital bed here’

at home reminded me of the
bumpers in my son’s crib;

‘between the mouthfuls of
food spooned on “weak”

days, there was the toothless

‘ grin; bathing and dressing

were all blessed moments of

-ministry to one who once

stood over six feet tall. Bent
with age, his head against

“mine, or shoulder to shoul-
der, arms wrapped around
each other’s waists, we shuf-

fled along the hall.

Who was I for him? At
times I was the mother from
whom he hid the uneaten
food in little bags he would

. throw away secretly. I was
* the dutiful daughter who fol-

Speaker:
BISHOP
ANDREW STEWART

PART TWO



@ REV PALACIOUS

“Itisa |
humbling
thing to
observe the
cycle of
human life
and realise
- that forces
beyond our
control bring
us full circle”

—RevA Palacious

Corner Stone Zion Ministries Int’l

at 10:30am

lowed instructions when his
tone shifted and he tem-
porarily re-established _his
authority. I was the loving
servant who saw Christ in
the face of an ancient par-
ent, whose modern mind dis-
cussed world events and
local talk with the same ease
as he recalled lamp-lighters
extinguishing street lights at
dawn, and maiden flights of
airplanes to sleepy island vil-
lages. Able to list the names
of all his classmates’ eighty-
plus years ago, he surpassed
my memory searching to
recall my long forgotten
- friends.

On occasion, as I stood
quietly at the foot of the bed
to see if there was any sign
of breathing, I wondered:
“How will I release you back
to God?” In time, I came to
know how a motherly
daughter feels when it is
time to say farewell to one
who had opened his heart to
us and allowed us to see who
he really was, a true hero in
his own way.

We do not always have
the time to prepare for
death, and we do not always
live to see old age. None of
us know the day or the hour
that. we will die. Do you
have a will, life insurance
and a possible guardian for
young children? Do you
have a plan in place to care
for aging parents? Let us do
all that we'can to find joy in
the present, seek hope for
the future and learn wisdom
from the past. Do not wait
until it is too late to love
your heroes. ,



Speaker:
BISHOP
E. RANDY FRASER
Pilgrim Baptist Temple
at 3:30am

Sunday, October 30, 2005
Services will be held at 10:30am & 3:30pm
Baillou Hill Road, South
Nassau, Bahamas




PAGE 4C, THURSDAY, OCTBER 27, 2005

Your Bahamian Supermarkets"

SUPER
VALUE

y TIFAGn i ae eer
@ SUNCARD CO Roar Me a
QUALITY RIGHTS AND PRICES RESERVED 3

SUNLIGHT
VEGETABLE chit Ss |

OL

$10°

TT Ce BUMBLE BEE
WHOLE KERNEL IN OIL/WATER

CORN
ro) ee
SLICED

CARNATION
EVAPORATED

O 3 pa
Sadate el QUEEN | s Sa
rel te) ae al alas
PEAS j\§ | i aS es

15-0Z

BUMBLE BEE ~ ee GENERIC

‘yf BLEAC

‘GALL

$499

99° OZ

ror = ons

ae
71 LIQUID
Me Ie

CHARMIN | GAIN

BATH |
vissu- aU

FEU fo)

yaaa
TDA

CAMPBELLS
SUPERIORE

SPAGHETTI
W/MEATBALLS

SUNCHY
MALT
rey

DOWNY

NON-CONCENTRATE |

FABRIC

CHARMIN

Ti

24 - ROLLS

THE TRI


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 5C

MSCOUM bles

SMOKED



AMS
39

PER - LBS

assis seraecnesecortecntaranrnaasaa



U.S. CHOICE
FRESH





MAS SHEER RIERNINEEN een eanaaaeaee ga RU ae

Moire Hampers ¢ Sheet Sets ° ° Comforters ° Mattress Pads e Place Mats ° Table Cloths
¢ Rugs « Tea Kettles « Pot Sets * Flatware Sets ¢ Dinnerware Sets « -Glass Sets ¢ Wall
Dies Carpet Sweeper ¢ Wall Mirrors ° Telephones * Toasters ¢ lrons:* Throw Pillows
e Drapes







U.S. CHOICE TTVA GAY GRILLMASTER

CHUCK en G| §6BEEF
BCT ancist

WE ACCEPT AMERICAN EXPRESS TASER VISA AND SUNCARD, WE ALSO REDEEM QUALITY STAMP. CARDS
. MACKEY STREET, TOP OF THE Be (next to Super Value) PHONE: 393-3411/393-5569
PER - LB 75. LB BOX



BED BATH & HOME

HOME SALE



GALAXY SANDWICH 10-0Z STARFRITES 2.5-LB BAG

FRENCH FRIES $1.89

FROSTY ACRE — 8-EARS
CORN ON COB $2.69

CHEESE $1.39

DKOTA ASST’D 16-0Z

BAGLES $1.79

TAMPICO ASST’D =>. GAL
FRUIT DRINKS $2.99

PEPPERIDGE FARM 19-02
LAYER CAKES $3.99












OSCAR MAYER
BEEF/JUMBO &
BUN LENGTH

FRANKS



ee ay

WHOLE ROTISSERIE

CHICKENS



99.

escent











HARVEST FRESH

BROCCOLI

BUNCH
$4 99
HARVEST FRESH

GREEN
PEPPERS

Shea

SWEET RED RED OR GOLDEN

GRAPES APPLES

: $499 PER - LB 3/ $400

SWEET DELICIOUS IDAHO BAKING

MANGOES |POTATOES

2/$<300 3/$ q 90



Rugs Wall Clocks
Towels Bathroom Accessories Wall Pictures
Sheet Sets Lamps Picture Frames
Tablecloths Blenders Flatware Sets
Throw Pillows : Figurines Cookware Sets
Comforter Sets Bakewares Glassware Sets
Shower Curtains Dinnerware Sets









SALE STARTS MONDAY, OCTOBER 24TH- SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29TH, 2005

Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448

eae ie eee ee ule ere See:

i 1


PAGE 6C, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005



THE TRIBUNE

RELIGION

@ DEPUTY Prime Minister and Minister
of National Security Cynthia Pratt (fifth
from left in front row) is pictured with
Minister Charlene Paul, Pastor Kenneth
Adderley, general presbyter, and some
of the women who were honoured.

Fifty three women honoured



@ By MINISTER E LUCINDA ROLLE,
National Women’s Ministries
Director

THE Assemblies of God National

Women’s Ministries honoured fifty-three
women throughout the Bahamas during
its 18th Annual Conference this month
with a luncheon and dinner. These women
served in the Assemblies of God churches
for twenty-five years or more.

‘They served in various capacities such as’

Sunday school teachers, evangelists, lay
ministers, choir directors, intercessors,
fund raisers, church organizers, coordina-
tors, custodians, nursery facilitators, musi-
cians, women’s ministries presidents and
the list goes on.

Ministry

They were recognized for their-resilience
in ministry, fortitude, sacrifice and dedi-

cation in service. ..



Many of:the honorees were unable to
attend due to failing health.

The Assemblies of God churches they
attend assisted the honorees from the
islands of Grand Bahama, Eleuthera, Aba-
co, and New Providence to be in the Capi-
tol for celebrations. :

The National Women’s Ministries Direc-

_tor, Minister E. Lucinda Rolle, who host-
ed the 18th Annual Women’s Ministries
Conference in Nassau at the British Colo-
nial Hilton, initiated the event. ~ ot








To Observe



THE event, sponsored
by the Bahamas Christian
Council, is scheduled to
meet in a national solemn
assembly on Friday,
November 11. The group
will also host a mass rally
on Saturday, November 12.
Both events will be held at
Clifford Park, beginning at
6pm. There will also be a
T-Shirt Day, and Men's
March on Sunday, Novem-
ber 6.
Registration for the
Men’s March will be held
at Rawson Square from
11am to 3pm on Friday,
November 4 and Saturday,
November 5.

8th PASTORAL
ANNIVERSARY

JUDAEA Baptist
Church invites you to cele-
brate with their pastor, Rev
Dr Marina P Sands, on her
8th pastoral anniversary
under the theme, “A faith-
ful woman of passion and
pride for such a time as
this”,

The celebration ends
with two services - at
10:30am and 3:30pm - on
October 30.

57th
ANNIVERSARY
OF DEDICATION

ST. GEORGE’S Angli-
can Church celebrated its
57th anniversary of dedica-
tion last Sunday.

Mission Services are
being held nightly until
October 27. The theme for
the mission is “Sharing the
Gospel — Living the Min-
istry through Time, Talent
and Treasure”.

On Thursday, October
27, the preacher will be Fr.

Colin Saunders, Priest-in-

Extends

a

Sincere Invitation

ALL SOULS’ DAY

In a service of prayer and thanksgiving.
_, for all departed loved ones.

6:00 pm
Soldier Road

We honour the memory of those buried at

Charge of St. Ambrose
Parish.

And on Friday, October
28, at 7 pm, the celebra-
tions will close with a cul-
tural evening and family
night.

SIXTH
PASTORAL
ANNIVERSARY

APOSTLE Phalmon and
Lady Sophia Ferguson of
United Faith Ministries
International, Summer-
winds Plaza, Hartold Road,
will celebrate their sixth
pastoral anniversary service
under the theme "Maxi-
mizing our Potential
through Grace:. Shepherd-
ing God's People".

The services are being
held until October 28,
nightly at 7.30 o’clock and
on Sunday, October 30, at
10.30am.

Speakers will include
Bishop Eliakim Ferguson,

_ Church of God of Prophe-

cy, Soldier Road, Apostle
C. Clifford Smith III,
Southside Christian Min-
istries International, Pastor
Ranford Patterson, Cousin
McPhee, Cathedral AME
Church, Overseer Arnold
Josey, Commonwealth Mis-
sion Baptist Church and
Bishop Sterling Moss,
Church of God of Prophe-
cy, Gambier. The services
are open to the public.

‘MEN OF
DISTINCTION’

ALL Saints Anglican
Church, Joan’s Heights, is
scheduled to honour three
of its former rectors during
a banquet on Friday, Octo- -
ber 28, at the Radisson
Cable Beach resort.. The
event titled, “Men of Dis-
tinction”, will pay tribute
to Father Addison Turn-
quest, Father Patrick John-
son and Father Harry
Ward.



WOODLAWN GARDENS LIMITED





On the 2nd November, 2005

at Woodlawn Gardens






Woodlawn Gardens. Join us as we pray and
give thanks for their lives.




Qabattamias
of"

g pao
od “Oe
: ee

9 @
Q







t ing TES.
Benes Pizza

AmericanAirlines®

































THE TRIBUNE

Bahamas Awakening Men’s March - aren re at Pe

Bahamas Awakening Rally - Friday & Saturday, Na Wht: 3 12th, PII
(Rallies will be held at CLIFFORD PARK - ic 00 P.M.)
For more information eles Telephone: 341-1804 - Fax: ve -3726 / ee 0409






Message

b ;
The President of the
Bahamas Christian
Council

Dr. WILLIAM
THOMPSON

| would like to thank Bahamas Awakening 2005 &
Beyond Committee for their leadership in an
initiative aimed at our men, which, | sincerely
believe. will-turn-out-to be the most exciting and
nation changing move of God that our country has
ever experienced.

Bahamas "Awakening" 2005 & Beyond is a
partnership launched under the auspices of the
Bahamas Christian Council between the men of
the Christian Church of The Bahamas and Promise
Keepers International. This initiative will be
Ongoing and is being established to create a
spiritual awakening among the men of The
Bahamas that will.lead'them-o a discovery and an
acceptance. their responsibility to. ie Godly
living.

I'm sure you will all agree with me thatitis past time
for the men of the Church throughout all of The
Bahamas to wake.up and to take appropriate

-} action to address thé needs “orallthe mien ofthe

nation.
The vision of Bahamas Awakening is to see the

men.of The Bahamas spiritually transformed. Our -

mission is to mobilize and unite the men of the
Church to model Godly living as we reach out to the.
men and boys of the nation. We have adopted the

Seven Promises of Promise Keepers and are |.

using them to establish the following goals:

1. To see the men of The Bahamas

committed to fearing God, leading to repentance,

salvation and a commitment to honor Jesus Christ
through worship, prayer and obedience to God's
_ wordin the power ofthe Holy Spirit.

Zi To see_the men of The Bahamas
~~ Committed to pursuing vital relationships with other
men, understanding that they need brothers to
help them keep their promises. -

3. ° To see the men of The Bahamas
committed to practicing spiritual, moral, ethical and
sexual purity.

4. To see the men of The Bahamas
committed to building strong marriages and.
families through love, protection and_ biblical.
values.

5; To see the men of the Bahamas
committed to support the mission of their churches
by honoring and praying for their church leaders
and by giving of their time and resources.

6. To see the men of The Bahamas
committed to reach beyond-any ethnic, national
and denominational barriers in a way that
demonstrates the power of biblical unity.

7. To see the men of The Bahamas
committed to changing their world by being
obedient to the great commandment and the great
commission.

How do we seek to accomplish the goals? It's
going to take the united efforts of all of the men of
the Church in all of The Bahamas and the men of all
_ other civic and social organizations where our
young men and older men are represented. We are
seeking to secure the full support and participation
of every Pastor, Church, Men's Ministry Leaders,
every man of every Church and every man ofeve
organization throughout the length and breadth of
The Bahamas at the National Solemn Assembly
and The Awakening event on Friday November 11
and Saturday November 12.

We are also be seeking the financial support of our
Churches, civic and social organizations,
individuals and the business community to assist
us in covering the cost of this massive undertaking.
My fellow men of The Bahamas, let us all join
together and recommit to the values that
- distinguishes us as a people of God, so that we
may accomplish the will of God to see our men, our
marriages, our families, our churches, our
communities and our nation spiritually awakened
and transformed by God's Holy Spirit.

“among the men of The Bahamas that will lead them to a discovery and an



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005, PAGE 7C



UPDATE

By The Chairman
Mr. Alfred Stewart

When | was invited by Rev. Dr. William Thompson, ©
President of The Bahamas Christian Council late last year
to Chair a committee to oversee the staging of a Promise
Keepers Rally in The Bahamas, | accepted the invitation as | was convinced that such an event
could be the start of something important that God is wanting to do among the men of The °
Bahamas. | knew the powerful and beneficial impact that Promise Keepers has had upon men
across the United States and the transformation that has taken place as men fill football and
baseball stadiums and arenas. | knew about the power of fifty thousand men assembled to
praise God and commit to those values that produce Godly lives and values. So I was excited
by the prospect of being involved in a process that could have the same impact upon our men.














| believe that the time has come for all good men throughout The Bahamas to wake up and
respond to the alarms that are going off all around us.. The alarms are warnings to the
challenges facing our homes, our communities and our nation. We are in a fight for our very
souls, a fight we cannot afford to loose. It is time for all of us to wake up.

“The Bahamas Awakening 2005 & Beyond Committee which was established under the
auspices of The Bahamas Christian Council. will partner with Promise Keepers International
and conduct a major men's Rally at Clifford Park November 11-12, 2005.

Bahamas Awakening was established for the purpose: of creating a spiritual awakening
among the men of The Bahamas that will challenge them to recommit to the Biblical values
and way of living that will result in spiritual transformation and peace in our land.

“Two significant events are planned for Clifford Park to mobilize ’our men to action. The firstis a

National Solemn Assembly that will start at 6 pm on Friday, November 11, where the men of
". the Bahamas assemble at Clifford Park to confess before the Lord the sins of the men of our
nation, seek His forgiveness for our sins and pray for His Divine intervention in causing a
spiritual awakening and transformation to take place in the lives of our men leading eventually ©
to healing of our land. :



What Is Bahamas Awakening 2005 and Beyond?

Bahamas "Awakening" 2005 and Beyond is an initiative of the Christian Church
men of The Bahamas launched under the auspices of the Bahamas Christian
Council between in partnership with Promise Keepers International. Bahamas:
Awakening was established for the purpose of creating a spiritual awakening











Immediately after the Solemn Assembly, and continuing at. 6 pm on Saturday, November 12,

the Bahamas "Awakening" Committee.and Promise: Keepers International will co-produce
-. The Awakening Rally, calling every man to a discovery and an acceptance their God given
responsibility to model Godly living and lead in the transformation of our homes and the nation.














- If it is the desire-of your heart to see our nation transformed by God's power, then make.a
promisé to be'patt of The Awakening. Join hands with Bahamas Awakening 2005 & Beyond at
Clifford Park on Friday, November 11 and on Saturday, November 12 for and become a part of
what God is about to do in our midst.

septance their God given responsibility to model Godly, living. ©



Whats Promise Keepers?

Promise Keepers, Christian movement for men in which ee in 1990, when Bill
McCartney, then head football coach at the University of Colorado, expressed to.a
friend his dream of filling stadiums with Christian men. From that beginning,
Promise Keepers has encouraged men to keep promises made to God, their
families, and their churches through rallies held in sports stadiums across
America. Promise Keepers states that the organization seeks to unite Christian
men across racial, socioeconomic, and cultural lines. Members believe that by
gathering and worshiping together, men can help one another learn to devote
more time to their wives and children. Promise Keepers marked its 10th
anniversary in the year 2000, having reached more than 3.5 million men through
98 stadium and arena conferences.



u&




Waa sche: KEEPERS

Rae Goals of CELE as ENTE rN Beyond

ee io WSC CU OMS esnOl es i Promise cal







Tuas) to Go God, ee to eens
; : t Christ:through. werent FEN ciaeLile)
Se ear Sk the Holy Spirit.







2. To see the men.of The Crees committed to pursuing vital relationships with
OUTER Ne Murs shea Ms brothers 1) ae ag their promises.

How Did All This Come About?”

In February 2004, a formal invitation was extended to Promise Keepers by The
Right Honourable Perry G. Christie, Prime Minister .of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas on behalf of the government and the people of The Bahamas to stage a
“friendly invasion of our shores with the message and mission which we know will
ignite a new appreciation in all our people on the responsibilities of Christian
manhoad.”




3. To see the eG ui
P| onl ean









Lue (oe a
Se 0 ; churches by ne Me and| rie) leaders and by giving of their time

The Bahamas Christian Council was charged with the responsibility to facilitate the . Sa
“friendly invasion”. Since that time a vision to mobilize the men of the Church of »
The Bahamas to take the lead in addressing issues related to the men of our nation
has emerged. To launch this initiative, a series of activities have been planned in
cooperation with Promise Keepers International, the highlight of which will be a
“National Solemn Assembly” and “'Awakening" Rally” on Friday and Saturday
November 11 and 12, 2005. The events will have both spiritual and economic
benefits to The Bahamas in that hundreds of Promise Keepers from the United

States is expected to participate



Cj in see the men Ci The peer eae Loo es beyond any ethnic, national
acu denominational Eu ina CO CO the.power of biblical unity.





7. To see the men yi The Bahamas Reverie to Ue) their world by being
Pye aa On UN ce commandment and the great commissio!








Do Our Men Really Need A Spiritual Awakening?

A casual social review of our country tells the tale that our men are in a crisis
socially, spiritually and morally. In looking at the crisis situation in The Bahamas,
the father of our nation, Sir Lynden Pindling, in one of his final interviews said, if he
had it to do over again, he would make the male crisis in our country a top priority.
There is a need for an awakening among the men our land. Absentee fathers,
among other challenges and short comings in the home, work place, church, civic
and national life, is calling us to a real and meaningful awakening at this time. We
believe that such an awakening can only come about through God inspired
initiatives, activities and programs such as what is being presented by Bahamas
Awakening 2005 & Beyond.









é addressed the
with Church




| leaders in our remaining Family islands ai te ‘i
. continues. oS









So What Can Church Leaders Do?

Encourage the all the men of your congregation to attend the “National Solemn
Assembly” and “The Awakening Rally” on Friday, November a and Saturday,
November 12, beginning at6 p.m. at Clifford Park.



objective was achieved and the first meeting of the st
early August. Members of the steering
playing a vital role in guiding the planning
Solemn Assembly and The Awakening Ral
respectively. The Committee has also t
"> progress and secure their Paneneiy ands





| Commit your congregation to prayer for the success of Bahamas
"Awakening" and a move of God that would awaken our men to their
God-given responsibilities as men.

1 Share in the financial cost of this outreach by making a financial
contribution.

1 Provide volunteers to assist with the various jobs that are required to
make this effort a success.

1 Use every opportunity to promote the rallies during your Church services
and meetings, your TV and/or radio broadcasts and your Church
bulletins.

) Clear your calendar so that the rallies may proceed with your support and
without competition.

( Embrace the opportunity to fellowship with our visiting brothers from the
USA who will travel to Nassau to attend the rallies during the week of
November 7-12. There will be ministry opportunities and People-to-
People opportunities.













- that rally, they personally invited the U. . Particip
rally planned for Nassau. As a result of this e














signing-up and gearing-up for REA Ral
men of the Bahamas to take a stand for righteous
especially for the men of the Church, to comm

th ie for all
ng. This i is the time,







THE TRIBUNE



PAGE 8C, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005

MINISTRIES

“Making Discipies for the
Twenty First Century aad



LON

Hi ag
at
Pea
SSR ERE

LY OF GOD



ovision”
our hands, the Church;'

My brothers and sisters, | want to challenge you to
look at the resources in your hands and the say. “Lord
here they # are, use them for your purpose’

(4) Tape Series
“Undestanding
Holiness” - $15.00

(4) Tape Series
**“Temptations to
Holiness’”’ - $15.00

(5) Tape Series
"Power of |.
Deliverence" -
$20.00

(1) Tape "Power of
the Blessing" -
$5.00 ,

(3) Tape “Power of
Fasting’’ - $12.00

Coming soon Miri
Book “Temptation of
a Believer”





1 Timothy 6:17-19
1 Corinthians 4:16

Listen to Joy 101.9
from 11:45am to
12:00noon every

last Thursday of the

Month for our Radio

Broadcast.


TU
‘Tubes |

al

Ertl ee dte
: : :

—
o-s

Available
“y

‘a i]

4

-

Pp ROPE Ge PPO MP OT EET NEE HE





° i
; el |
. ’ 7 . . |
+ PPrerPeecee er eeard be Mbegedlerergegiget: teh hit: ‘ :
. ; ‘ ; lr ;
‘._ ; "eer : et. arteet ben ‘erheehb. Se
ve ’ ' t ef : . : “te . 7 eile .
' ' . e _s =
; = Gee @ See Fee Getetee © Oe ste a : » *
.
e . ° . ' -
. = ' 7 ' ' - : . : : i 7 : ' : ’ : : ;
; ; : ° © © ' . ' . . '
"af wie tet tera’ : ‘te at : ‘etetart «eh. !
ey ev : te : 4) ‘he
'
' tT -* as L. 6 © * Gee * Fe ts : : : : ' |
Vy Hj
> i.
‘7 stare .
§ ante
it
pu
‘oe c
yp
’ | 5 e
ie ° i 2
5 “ft t
: —
; a
=
a pring
; =
a : see ce 5 cow |
i A
- i]
- CG
rer > py
- pupa
i,
i a
° ‘i
7 ~
i i]






te 1
“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content)’

a : : >= ;
from Commercial News Prov

~



=>



=

lt
a
-_ —_—-

=

t
t

H

')
ea




oe

‘=





rs.

» OD oo

ee pyr
ea ‘* debei
Olt oe
wo of

Sele




PAGE 10C, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2005 | THE TRIBUNE





© xCE SS|

Save up to ° 65% as
Drop your bags off the day before you travel, :

S h dl S N Ow, F ‘ y L a ter and they'll be waiting for you when you arrive!

baggage



on airline excess baggage fees

We accept most oversize/overweight items and boxes!
Bags arrive 1lam | Pay in Nassau

*American Eagle’s published excess baggage t Hees on your third bag, if it is oversize
and overweight at 75lbs, is $230. Withesmessbaggage you can pay as little as $75
for the same bag. We are cheaper than the competition in all other comparisons too.



Drop Off: Miami §= —_—s—~wPick Up: Nassau
4005 NW 28th St. _ Customs Hall
(305) 871-0571 | Ss (242) 377-6593 ©
(between TORY and Budget) (inside the Airport Terminal)

)

- Take a look at our other services :





xexpres pdaxmailbox | pdxcargo
next day courier . unlimited US mail ~—_ bulk freight |
with delivery | Se ed eOMINg soon



Get more information at
www.pdxbahamas.com _

>> affordable air freight
(242) 341-6593 ) :



Use this coupon to get your first shipment

FREE 3

(5 Ibs or less) when you ship with pPpaaexpress

Use this coupon to save

$10

off every bag you ship with



Not combinable with any other offer. Only one coupon per

_ customer per visit. One offer per household or business, on first
shipment with pdxexpress. If package exceeds 5 Ibs, a $5
discount off of our regular rates will be offered instead. Account
required. Weight is calculated as dimensional or actual, which-
ever is greater. Offer only valid Miami to Nassau.

Coupon not valid after Nov 20, 2005

www.pdxbahamas.com a F periatio ar tet
(242) 341-6593 iD a "

Not combinable with any other offer. Only one coupon per
customer per visit. Only applies to bags under 100 Ibs. Bags
over 100Ibs will be charged the full rate of $1 per Ib. Only
applies to bags under 63 linear inches (L + W + H). Bags over 63
linear inches may be charged oversize fees.

Coupon not valid after Nov 20, 2005

www.pdxbahamas.com a F sie ac
(242) 341-6593 | ED BY, sensao arta

ome pen smn ee ace mem ee ee ee cee ee ee eee ee
seems wc ee eee eee eee ee ee ee eee