Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Volume: 101 No.245

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ami Herald —

BAHAMAS EDITION

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

e SEE TRIBUNE

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Tropical storm
Rita expected to
yather strength

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

.THE BAHAMAS is under a
hurricane watch and tropical
storm warning as forecasters
expect the 2005 hurricane sea-
son’s newest tropical storm, Rita,
to evolve into the year’s 18th
hurricane.

Tropical Depression Number
18, now Tropical Storm Rita,
was projected to become Hur-
ricane Rita within the next two
days and the Bahamas Meteo-
rological., department. issued.a
strong warning that, persons liv-
ing in the southeastern and cen-
tral Bahamas, should complete
all necessary preparations for
tropical storm conditions.

Rainfall

Heavy rainfall and severe
thunderstorms were expected in
the southeastern Bahamas yes-
térday as the storm was expected
to dump.a maximum of eight
inches of rain on the island.

Tropical Storm warnings are
in effect for Exuma, Cat Island,
Long Island, San Salvador, Rum
Cay, Ragged. Island, Crooked

Island, Acklins, Mayaguana and’

Tnagua.

These islands may experience
tropical storm conditions within
24 hours.

A hurricane watch was put
into effect for Grand Bahama,

‘Abaco, Bimini, the Berry
Islands, Andros, New Provi-
dence and Eleuthera.

_ These Islands may experience
hurricane conditions in the next
36 hours.

At 11 am on Sunday, tropical
depression number. 18 was 390
miles east-southwest of Nassau.

A hurricane watch has been
issued for the northwest
Bahamas. :

For the islands of, Grand
Bahama, The Abacos, Bimini,
the Berry Islands, Andros, New
Providence and Eleuthera, the
Meteorological office said that
hurricane conditions could be
experienced in 36 hours.

The devastating hurricane
Katrina formed as a tropical
depression east of the Bahamas.

If Tropical Depression Num-
ber 18 develops into a hurricane,
it could be the ninth hurricane of
the year. It also would be 18th
named storm. ,

Meteorologist Neil Armstrong
at the Bahamas Meteorological
Department, told The Tribune
that the depression is not expect-
ed to become a hurricane until it
moves into the Florida Straits.

The warning, he said, was
issued primarily because of the
country’s proxiniity to the storm
and because the system is show-
ing signs of development.

“It does not mean that we
will have a hurricane in the
Bahamas but because of its prox-
imity it is something we defi-
nitely need to be watching,” he
said.

The system was expected to
move south of the Florida main-
land because of a ridge of high
pressure north of it, pushing it to
the west.

On Sunday, the.National Hur-
ricane Centre also was monitor-
ing Tropical Storm Philippe,
which was about 425 miles east-
southeast of the Leeward
Islands. It was forecast to build
into the eighth hurricane of the
season within the next day and
aim north into the Atlantic with-
out threatening the US coast-
line.

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ROR fo a este OAR se Yen A EET UCR AL







Two young women found dead

Hi By PAUL G
TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter

POLICE are investigating two

deaths over the weekend, both

involving young women, __
Early yesterday morning after
6am, a young woman’s body was

discovered hanging from the ceil- -

ing of a home in the Bluff, South
Andros.

According to press liaison
Inspector Walter Evans, the 25-
year-old woman is believed to be
from India, and was in the country



visiting a relative.

At this stage foul play is not sus-
pected Mr Evans said. However,
officers from the detective unit
were currently in Andros to inves-
tigate the matter.

On Friday evening shortly after

" 2pm, police ‘received a report of a

missing woman.
According to Mr Evans, they
received a report at 6pm‘ from a

person in the Augusta and Fergu- |

son Streets area complaining of a
“heavy stench or odour” coming
from a nearby house.
“On arrival police met the: body
\

ofa fomniet it a crouched position
in the bathroom of the house from
where the odour was emanating
from.

“The body was in an advanced
stage of decomposition. Her iden-
tity may be that of a 33-year-old
who lives off McCullough Cor-
ner,” he said.

Mr Evans said police believe
that this woman may be the per-
son reported missing earlier that
day. An autopsy is planned to clar-
ify her identity, and to ascertain
the cause of death. Police investi-
gations into both matters continue.

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BEC workers’
action delays
repairs to

power outage

lm By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

BEC WORKERS partici-

i. pating in what management

has called “if-not illegal, then
premature” industrial action
over the weekend delayed
repairs to areas affected by a
power outage caused by a
thunderstorm Saturday.
General Manager of the
corporation Kevin Basden
said that while most of the
areas affected by the outage
should have been corrected ©
in two hours, sectors which
that were more severely dam-
age suffered longer because
workers were directed by theâ„¢
union to “work no overtime
and make repairs slowly.”
“We want to indicate that
management’s first responsi-
bility is to the customers and
every effort-is made to ensure
that inconveniences are kept
to a minimum and we are
extremely concerned about
any kind of industrial action
negatively ‘impacting the
smooth operation of the sup-

SEE page 10



US Ambassador:
Bahamas should
not lose sight of
Cuba and China’s
human rights issues

lm By CARA BRENNEN
and KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporters

THE Bahamas should con-
sider focusing more attention
on the human rights practices
of its trading Pas Cuba
and China.

US. Ambassador John D
Rood made this suggestion
on. Saturday at the US
Embassy-hosted media semi-
nar held at the British Colo-
nial Hilton. The ambassador
said that the United States

" respects the Bahamas’ sover-

eign right to have relation-
ships with Cuba and. China,
but he hopes the Bahamas
does not lose sight of the
human rights issues in those
two countries.

However, he emphasized:
“I believe the government
can make its own decisions,
we are not here to tell you

SEE page two











| Submit your nomination today. Nomination forms available at Ministry of Tourism offices throughout The Bahamas or submit online at www.caciqueawards.com

PAGE 2, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005





expected to affect the B

li By PAULG
TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter

WITH two of the five largest
airlines in North America filing
for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, min-
istry officials are confident that
the tourism product in the
Bahamas will not be negatively
affected as the airlines reorga-
nize their operations.

Last week, Delta and North-
west Airlines filed for Chapter
11 bankruptcy protection, cit-

ing that they both have been hit .

by high fuel costs.

Northwest Airlines currently
has the highest labour costs in
the industry and has been losing
more than $4 million a day.
Delta has heavy pension oblig-
ations and its total debt is
roughly $20.5 billion.

According to-the Associated

Telecommunications/Computer Network Design
installation & Maintenance

Press, Delta and Northwest Air-
lines have started a lengthy and
costly road to recovery that will
likely include cutting employ-
ee rolls, pensions and routes.

Schedules

Passengers for both airlines
probably won’t notice any
immediate effects from the fil-
ings as both carriers announced
that they will continue their nor-

mal schedules while they reor-

ganize.

Noting that Delta operates
four flights a day to, the
Bahamas, Tourism Minister
Obie Wilchcombe said that the
Bahamas is an extremely prof-
itable route for the airline: He
did not foresee the Bahamas
being cut from the airline’s
schedules. -

“This is really an effort to
reorganize their airline and

LOCAL NEWS

Airline bankruptcy ruling ‘not

«

allow them to be more compet-
itive. We are a profitable route
for Delta, and they have been
with us for a while.

“Don’t forget Song is a part
of Delta as well and they have

“done very well.

“In this ever changing world,
the Bahamas is ever ready to
deal with the challenges and
that’s why we steadily grow. But

‘so far we have not been affect-

ed and we look pretty good for
the coming holiday season,” he
said.

Echoing these sentiments was
Tyrone Sawyer, the airlift direc-

‘tor in the Ministry of Tourism.

Mr Sawyer said the Bahamas
has had a very good and long
term relationship with Delta

Airlines, and that he did not

expect the bankruptcy ruling to

affect the country negatively.
“No we don’t expect any cuts

in Delta’s service into our des-

‘tination. The airline will still be

ahamas’

operating and we really don’t

expect the bankruptcy ruling to .

affect us negatively. It’s still
business as usual basically.

Carrier

“Delta has non stop service
from Atlanta into Nassau and
Atlanta’ into: Freeport. Service
from LaGuardia into Nassau as
well. We see Delta as a key car-

tier. It’s a hub and spoke air-

line,” he said.

This, Mr Sawyer explained
means that with carriers like
Delta, which has a-large route

network with a central: hub

(Atlanta), the airline can bring
the Bahamas guest stopovers
across their entire route net-

work through their Atlanta

hub.
“That makes them a very
important partner for us,” he

said.

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Winners of the Minister of Tourism’s Award for Hospitality
embody Bahamian hospitality through genuine

friendliness and concern for our visitors.
the perfect description of Margo Wring throughout his
career, particularly in the airline industry in which he has

This has been

helped countless visitors through sometimes challenging
circumstances. Margo Wring’s personality and demeanor
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Margo Wring
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US Ambassador

FROM page one

what to do or to suggest that there will be reper-

cussions for anything you do because: that does ;

not make any sense.’

Ambassador Rood conceded that in the past
the US government may have concentrated too
much on the differences in policy between the US

and the Bahamas, and not on what the two coun- .

tries have in common.
He said that his policy has always been to focus

on the 80 per cent of policies that the two coun- '

tries do share. :

“No relationship can ever be 100 per cent,
there will be things we agree on and things we
don’t. I feel that if a relationship — one between
husband and wife or one between two countries
—can be 20/80 then it’s a good relationship,” he
said.

He also said that in the instance of Cuba,
although the US.not does share the Bahamas’

viewssthe- Bahamas gevernm enimayebe able tg:-
“use its*réla onship"
somé influence on how Cuba deals with viola :




Hithat country to exert



tions against human Tights.’ » *
Also addressing the topic of PetroCaribe and

the concerns of some analysts that, the cheap-
‘fuel accord with Venezuela could damage the

US/Bahamas relationship, the ambassador said
that in his‘ opinion the agreement is strictly a
business issue.

He added, however, that although he did not
know any of the details of the PetroCaribe agree-
ment, it has been his experience that govern-
ments have more success when “they stick to
basic administration,” and leave the running of
businesses, such as hotels and fuel management to
the private sector.

“Usually when goverment becomes involved
in things they don’t do well. If the government

were to get involved in petrol distribution it may .



te A Oth, anes



.US AMBASSADOR John Rood ,

speaks at the media seminar.

not. do as an effective job as it were a private
entity,” he said.
' Ambassador Rood on the weekend addressed
members of the Bahamian media houses during a
special one-day seminar which focused on the
topics of investigative reporting and the ques-
tion of ethics and accountability in journalism.
Karl Idsvoog, a veteran broadcast journalist
and associate professor at Kent State University,
offered two workshop sessions— one on inves-
tigative reporting and the other on news gather-

ing techniques.

Following the workshops a special panel com-
prised of veteran Bahamian journalists such as
Mike Smith, Sir Arthur Foulkes, Oswald T Brown
and Professor Idsvoog, then dealt with the issue of
ethics i in today’s media.


















¢

sponsorediby

The Bahamas
Ministry of Tourism

faba Harias







THE TRIBUNE



Third victim
of traffic
accident dies

A THIRD victim of
Wednesday’s double fatali-
_ ty in.Grand Bahama died

: over the weekend.

Max Smith, 19, the third
occupant of the ill-fated
purple coloured Toyota,
died as a result of his
injuries around 3 am Satur-.

: day at the Princess Mar-

garet Hospital.
His death pushes Grand

: Bahama’s traffic fatality to

17 for the year.

The other two occu-
pants, Merrill Dorsette Jr,
23, of Waterfall Drive, the
driver, was killed on
impact while Jeffrey Pin-
der, also 23, died at the
Rand Memorial Hospital
later that evening.

Mr Smith, who was a
rear seat passenger in the ©
vehicle, was later airlifted
to the hospital in Nassau. -
with multiple injuries. He
never recovered conscious-.
ness.

Shonette Rolle, 28,-who |

i was driving the other vehi-

cle which collided with the
Toyota, and her two
daughters were treated at
the hospital and dis-
charged.

Investigators determined,
that Mr Dorsette was trav-:
elling in a westerly direc-
tion on the highway when
he attempted to overtake

i another car, colliding with

‘Ms Rolle who was driving
in the opposite direction —
going east.

The two vehicles were
damaged beyond repair.

Man found
dead in car

By PAULG
- TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

!, FREEPORT, Grand
i Bahama -‘At about 8am ~
' yesterday.acallcame into.

the police dispatch centre to
inform officers that a man
had just been found sitting
behind the wheel of a‘car,
parked in a yard at the
intersection of Columbus
Drive and Explorers Way:
Hewasdead. >
Officers from the uni-
formed and plainclothes
divisions were dispatched to

: ' the location where they

found the dead man who
they would only identify as
“a well known local
mechanic”. However he was.
later identified at the scene |
by his brother as 64-year-old
Wendell Albert Gibson.

The circumstances sur-
rounding Mr Gibson’s death
are still unknown. He wore
a blue shirt, blue trousers,
and was sitting at the wheel
of his blue 1989 Dodge —
Aries Car, clutching.a bottle
of Tylenol pills between his
legs.

According to the Mobile
Patrol Division and the
Scene-of-Crime officers
from the Central Detective
Unit, there were no visible
signs of injury to the body.
Police investigations into
the incident are underway.

Also around 3.15am yes-
terday, officers from the
mobile patrol division were
making a routine check in
the vicinity of Club Rock at:
the International Bazaar

i when they saw a man in the

parking lot with what :
appeared to be a firearm
pushed into the waist of his
trousers.

When the man saw the
police, he fled on foot but
was quickly apprehended
and the object, which turned
out to be a 4.5mm BB gun,
was taken from him.

The 20-year-old resident
of Abaco Drive, Hawksbill
was arrested and taken into
custody at the Central
Detective unit. He is expect-
ed to be formally charged —
this morning with posses-
sion of an imitation firearm.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005, PAGE 3



BECAUSE of the number of
Haitian immigrants already here
- legally and illegally - the
Bahamas cannot continue to add
significant numbers from a nation
of seven million people, said
FNM leadership candidate Dion
Foulkes at a meeting of the Blue
Hills Constituency Association of
the Free National Movement at
Garvin Tynes Primary School.

Mr Foulkes unveiled a 17-page
statement which he described as a
“comprehensive, balanced and
responsible” contribution to the
current debate on the nation’s
immigration problems.

Mr Foulkes, a candidate for
leader of the Free National
Movement, said national security
is a critical job for government
and that immigration is a key part
of his own national security agen-
da.

He suggested structural reform,

including the transfer of the —

Department of Immigration to
the Ministry of National Security.

He pledged to modernise the
Department of Immigration by
boosting its human resources and
the technological capacity to deal
with both legal and illegal immi-
gration.

Complaints

He also proposed the creation
of an independent oversight
group, similar but not identical
to the United Kingdom’s Inde-
pendent Police Complaints Com-
mission, which will monitor seri-
ous complaints by the public in
connection with the conduct of
law enforcement officers, includ-
ing immigration personnel.

“As I listen to the immigra-
tion debate it often seems incom-
plete and unfocused. And it usu-
ally focuses only on illegal immi-
gration.” He stressed that
Bahamians are often squeezed
from the top by legal immigra-
tion and squeezed from the bot-
tom by illegal immigration.

“Too many companies have
been complacent or sluggish in
training Bahamians to take over
various functions. There are still
too many examples of expats who

have come on short term or medi- ©

um term work permits but who
have had their permits extended
repeatedly, even though there are
qualified Bahamians in their
field,” said Mr Foulkes.
Commenting on Haitian immi-
gration Mr Foulkes said that
“what is significant is that because
of the vast number of Haitian
immigrants already here — legally
and illegally — we cannot continue
to add significant numbers indef-

initely. A nation of 300,000 peo- -

ple cannot continue to allow
unlimited immigration from a
nation of seven million people.”

He said that the current level
and pattern of immigration from
Haiti is economically and socially
unsustainable.

Mt Foulkes said that his main
strategy for dealing with illegal
immigration is a policy of deter-
rence.

“Because prevention is better
than cure and usually cheaper,
the Bahamas may need to switch
its strategic focus if it wishes to
dramatically confront the flood
of illegal migration from the
Republic of Haiti and other
nations.

“T use the term deterrence
rather than interdiction, because
interdiction is only one element of
a broader deterrence strategy. In
this context, deterrence includes a
mix of tools which will prevent

people from coming to the.
Bahamas in the first place or stop- .

ping them very early in their jour-
ney and returning them swiftly to
their country of origin,” said the
former Education Minister.

Mr Foulkes said that the
Bahamas should utilise Inagua as

a southern command centre to ©

effectively police the waters of
the southern Bahamas. This polic-
ing would of course include other
activities besides illegal immigra-
tion.

“A Defence Force base with
marine and air capabilities and a
detention and processing centre
would be set up to facilitate this
strategy. This complex will need
State of the art information and
communications technology if it is
to be successful,” he said

Mr Foulkes said insufficient
attention is being paid to the prin-
ciples which should guide the
immigration debate. He offered
five principles for consideration,
Bahaminization, adherence to the
rule of law, preserving our iden-
tity and way of life, creating eco-
nomic opportunity and human
rights.

“In terms of legal immigration
my belief is simple: If there is a
qualified Bahamian for a posi-
tion:then that Bahamian shou!d
get the job. This also means that if
we can’t find a resident Bahamian
we are prepared to look outside
fora qualified Bahamian,” he
said: i

He said that if there isno qual-



LOCAL NEWS

NM leadership candidate
Dion Foulkes unveils statement | brings more than
on immigration problems







@ DION A. FOULKES, FNM leadership candidate, presented his 17 page comprehensive
plan to deal with legal and illegal immigration in the Bahamas at a forum sponsored by the
Blue Hills FNM -Constituency Association at Garvin Tynes Primary School. Among the large
crowd in attendance were from left: Princess Flowers, Association Secretary; Nelson
Ferguson, Chairman, Mr. Foulkes, and Floyd Pratt, Vice Chairman.

ified Bahamian, then a non-

Bahamian may be brought in
until a Bahamian becomes quali-
fied or can be successfully trained.

“You can be. assured that my
government will not be bringing
in any Korean fishermen to do
what Bahamians have been doing
for generations. But Bahaminiza-
tion also means something else
to me. It means that those who
have permanent residence with
the right to work and those seek-
ing citizenship must also be
Bahamianized or integrated into
our way of life,” he said.

The former minister said that a
government run by him will
aggressively prosecute those who
smuggle illegal immigrants from
any country into the Bahamas.

Penalties

“Some persons may be offered
leniency if they cooperate in
assisting the government in suc-
cessfully prosecuting the ring-
leaders, the worst abusers of the
law. Secondly, those who break
Bahamian immigration laws will
have to suffer the penalties the
law imposes. This means. that
those who come here illegally will
not be granted the right to work,”
he said.

Mr Foulkes proposed a more
sophisticated computerized data-
base to better track those who
have come to the Bahamas ille-

gally yet still apply for work per--

mits and a policy of refusing to
grant work permits to those who
enter as visitors. -

“The reason many people have
come to our (country) is because
they wish to share in its benefits.
We should celebrate this and also
cherish our Bahamian identity.
But the very way of life many
seek here will be destroyed if it is
overrun by attitudes and behav-
iour which are not consistent with
our democratic heritage, basic

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civilities and social stability,” he
said.

A part of the problem with the
dialogue on immigration, he said,
is that the Bahamas is not always
sure of the overall economic
direction it wants to take. ~

“Such a direction will tell us
about the type and quality. of
labour our economy needs. Such
a plan must be the context in
which you create an effective
immigration policy.

“My immigration policy will
ensure that Bahamians are con-
sidered first, but that we will be
open to expatriate expertise when

it is required,” said Mr
Foulkes.

Bahamian immigration poli-
cies, said the FNM leadership
candidate, must adhere to basic
standards of human rights, includ-
ing our policies on detention and
repatriation.

“We must ensure that those
few officials and others who treat

illegal immigrants improperly are

dealt with in the appropriate
manner.

“We uphold our own dignity
by speaking forthrightly yet
respectfully about those who are
strangers in our land,” he said.

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a Ornicen

$10,000 donation

200 wheelchairs
for disabled

The Bahamas Association for
the Physically Disabled
(BAPD) was established 34
years ago at the urging of
young Bahamians who had
suffered spinal cord injuries
and abruptly found themselves
confined to wheelchairs.
These young adults knew their
lives could be more complete
and yet they understood that
in. order to find that
‘completeness they needed a
robust support structure
around them. A tremendous
success story, the Association
has grown to become a
vigorous organization, meeting
much more than the needs of
those confined to wheelchairs.

Today, BAPD provides “the
best possible service” to the
disabled of our community
through a vanety of programs,
including special education,
physical therapy, speech
therapy, computer training,
social interaction and
independent living skills.
‘Throughout it all, the need for
wheelchairs is constant.

The $10,000 donation has
enabled a full container, more
than 200 wheel chairs, to be
shipped to Nassau. BAPD
Administrator Linda Smith,
remarked that the delivery is
coming at a critical time. “We
have been out of chairs for
some time now,” she said, “and
this shipmentis sorely need
The Holowesko Foundation is
very pleased to support this
importantendeavor.

With written criteria in place to
guide selection BAPD ensures
that needy individuals who
cannot afford to purchase a
wheelchair on their own are the
first recipients. And, with the
support of service clubs BAPD
will disburse the wheelchairs
throughout the country.

BAPD reminds us that a
person who 1s physically
challenged is “an individual
who has the same goals.as
people everywhere - to get the
most from life, to achieve:
independence, to be pro-
ductive, and to have friends.”



Tue Hotowesko Founpation was established to support and
bring attention to the many good works being carried out in
our society. Requests for information can only be made in
writing to P.O. Box N 942, Nassau, Bahamas.

The Mall-et-Maratien
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PAGE 4, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI





Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, CM.G, M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

Last of Erickson pioneers dies

THE OBITUARY of Mrs Louise Erick-
son— the last of a pioneering New England

family that went to Inagua in the mid-thirties.

determined to resurrect that island’s once
prosperous salt industry — is published on
page 12 of today’s Tribune.

Originally the rebuilding of Inagua was the
dream of Jim Erickson, the second of three
brothers — Arioch Wentworth, Jr., better
known as Bill, and the youngest, Douglas
“Doug”.

A Harvard graduate, Jim visited the
Bahamas during the year that he was taking
business courses at the Massachusetts Insti-
tute of Technology. On that visit he became
interested in reviving the defunct salt pans at
Great Inagua.

It took a while to ingnite enthusiasm for the
project in brothers, Bill and Doug. Bill was
the first to join him. And with his wife, Louise,
and their two-year-old son, Wenty, in tow
arrived in Mathew Town in 1936.

Already Jim and his wife, Margery were
settled in Inagua. In 1986, after the death of
her husband in April, 1967, Margery wrote
and illustrated a book, with the simple title:
“Great Inagua”. It is the incredible story of a
pioneering family — husbands, wives and chil-
dren — and their effort to create an industry
on a barren, forgotten island. They lived an
almost kibbutz- -type existence — but instead of
cultivating land, they were cultivating salt.
The women shared the housework and the
care of all of the children.

Today’s generation of Bahamians probably
think of Inagua with Mayaguana as the most
southerly of the Bahamas islands, where noth-
ing much happens. For them Inagua probably
means flamingoes, wild donkeys and salt pans.

Morton Salt is the island’s main employer
and a resort, which has approval, but is having

difficulty hopping over government’s red car- -

pet for investors, hopes to create a second
source of employment — eco-tourism that will
exploit the beauty of the island and its flamin-
goes.

But in a long ago past before the First
World War Inagua had its hour: of fame.
Margery Erickson describes it in “Inagua”.

“The salt industry,”. she says, “had col-
lapsed because the price of salt fell very low
after the First World War. Salt company after
salt company went broke overnight, natives
lost their jobs and their families suffered
severely in consequence. The pans fell into
disuse — walls crumbled, canals became
clogged with debris.

“Before the panic on Inagua,” she contin-

ued, “landowners had led a luxurious life there.



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Broughams and hansoms pulled by matching
pairs of horses had rolled over the broad road-
ways of Mathew Town and balls were given by
moonlight; wines from Spain and France filled
the cellars of the well-to-do and one resident
had a piano swung ashore from a clipper ship.
The ladies wore silks and taffetas from Paris
and lace from Brussels, while the men had a
crack polo team and played matches on the
Parade Ground.”

“After the calamity struck, the owners
departed almost overnight, salt ships stopped
calling for cargo and the native population

sank into poverty. It was this isolated place, not .

too remote from the Florida coast, that Jim
wanted to restore to economic life,” his wife
wrote. “The idea of bringing about a rebirth of
Inagua and thus succouring almost a thou-
sand forgotten human beings so inspired Jim
that he persuaded his brothers to come in with

him and his parents to offer financial back-_

ing. Jim was convinced that by using fewer
labourers and: more machinery, salt making
on Inagua could again become a prosperous
undertaking.”

The family worked hard but their company
— West India Chemicals Ltd - faced increasing
difficulties in the forties and fifties. The build-
ing of a magnesium plant at the beginning of
World War II with no return on the investment
so depleted the family fortune that they were
forced to sell. In 1955 Morton Salt Company
took over West India Chemicals.

The late Sir: Etienne Dupuch, who repre-
sented Inagua in the House of Assembly from
1925 to 1942 often talked of Inagua’s golden
years. He would tell stories of three or four
powerful Inagua merchants who controlled
the island and traded in gold coins that they
kept in a chest under the counters of their
small stores.

In his book — “Salute to Friend and Foe” .
— he referred to direct service by German —

and Dutch ships from New York to Inagua, to
pick up stevedore labourers for discharge of
their cargoes in central and South America.
This collapsed in 1914 at the outbreak of the
First. World War.

During the drug era of the eighties: there
was much gossip in Nassau about some of the
fancy homes being built in Inagua, a few from
unknown sources of wealth. There was also
gossip about the difficulty at times of trans-
acting business in the local shops because
there was no change for the US$100 bills that
were floating around the island — even in the
hands of children.

Inagua is indeed an interesting island. It

too has kad its day in the sun.




















Forgiveness
after attack
on America

EDITOR, The Tribune

TODAY is Sunday, Sep-
tember 11 2005 and the fourth
anniversary of that horrible
terrorist attack on America
that saw the death of thou-
sands. Throughout America,
the theme for church services
was a day of remembrance.
Many people took time out to

-reflect upon that dreadful inci-

dent and a number of official
ceremonies were held mark-

* ing this anniversary.

In particular, ceremonies
were held at the sites of the
tragedy, the World Trade Cen-
tre in New York, the Penta-
gon in Virginia and in the
fields of Pennsylvania where
the United Airlines flight
crashed.

I attended Saint Anthony’s
Shrine, a church noted for its
treatment of the homeless and
afflicted here in downtown
Boston and also the site of one
of the remembrance cere-
monies. One of four of the
Remembrance Bells con-
structed by the Franciscan
Centre of Wilmington,
Delaware for post-September
11 memorials was rung after
the service.

More than three hundred
people from Massachusetts
had died in the 911 attack and

. So the fourth bell was placed in

Boston, the capital of Massa-
chusetts. These bells all weigh
Several tons each and so their
toll was heard for many miles
past Boston Harbour and
beyond. It was a sad and
solemn occasion. As each toll
was rung, chills went down the
spine of those who stood in
silence.

Despite the sad reality of the
occasion, Father Gary Con-
vertino tried ‘to conduct an
upbeat service. He did not
focus on the murderous atroc-
ities of September 11, instead
his homily focused on forgive-
ness, the very foundation of
the Christian faith.

His. homily reminded us of
the story of Peter who tried to

get Jesus to define what is an.

acceptable form of forgiveness.
Peter suggested to forgive
someone seven times over, but
Jesus corrected him when he
said that we should forgive sev-
enty times seven times. I
admire Father Convertino as
he reminds me so much of
Monsignor Ambrose McKin-
non of Mary Star of the Sea in

.. Freeport with his’sénse of

humour. | ;
But more ee they

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maintain an uncompromising
re-enforcement of the teach-
ings of Jesus: We were actual-
ly requested to forgive those
evil perpetrators of this bar-

. baric act that resulted in the
. death of so many innocent per-
-sons. That’s the way Jesus

would have wanted it! '

To illustrate his point of for-
giveness, Father Convertino
told us of the story of a ser-
vant who owed his master a
large sum of money. The.mas-

ter summoned him and

demanded payment. The ser-

. vant got on his knees and

begged the master to give him
more time to pay. The master

‘was so touched that he forgave
the entire debt owed to him by

that same servant. .

Incredibly, someone: else’

owed the same servant a small
sum of money. The servant
brutalized the: person owing

him just a small sum with the:

threat of more punishment
until he paid up. Upon hearing
this story of the ungrateful ser-
vant, the master cancelled the
debt forgiveness and had the

servant thrown into prison. °

Had he forgiven as he was for-
given, his rewards would have
been much greater.

The; final story on forgive-
ness by Father Convertino

involves two Jewish concen- -

tration camp survivors during
the Nazi Holocaust. Needless
to say they were both tortured

and abused during.their deten- ..

tion. When asked if they for-
gave their Nazi captors, one
survivor without hesitation said
that he did. The other said that
he would never forgive those

- bastards. For the rest of his life -

he vowed to hate and resent
them. Then, said the other,

“you are still in prison”.

What is so interesting in the
Bahamas is that the UBP has
been out of office for almost
40 years. Yet, despite being a

country that observes Christian

values, far too many still vent
their hatred for alleged racist
practices of the UBP. i
This whole issue of the
removal of Sir Stafford Sands

from the $10 bill is centred —

around the fact that some per-

--ceived him. as racist. But was

he? Many credible persons

who truly knéw Sir Stafford ©

from all areas, including the
PLP, have publicly stated that
the suggestion of Sir Stafford
being a-‘racist was a myth pro-
moted mainly because of polit-
ical mischief.

This was the position of a

black Bahamian who had been
a PLP all of his life and had
grown up with Sir Stafford. Sir
Stafford did have the reputa-
tion, however, of looking after
his friends. It didn't matter if
you were white, black or in
between, if you were his friend
he looked after you. On the
other hand if he was against
you, the colour was not an
issue.

Over the years the propa-
ganda promoted by the PLP
was the claim that Sir Stafford
left the Bahamas because he

‘didn’t want to live under a
.. black government. This, of

course, was a bold face lie. This
statement was recently contra*.
dicted by Arthur “Midge”
Hanna, who revealed that the
real reason Sir Stafford did not
return was due to fear of ptos-
ecution.

This was a very valid reason
not to return, since the PLP’
government could not be trust-,
ed to fairly administer justice;
Just look at the D’Arcy Ryan
case, when the PLP govern-

‘ment contemptuously ignored
_the ruling of the Privy Council,

the Bahamas’ highest court. It
is doubtful under the circum-
stances that Sir Stafford would
have received a fair trial.
The hatred for the UBP is,
passed on from one generation’
to the next. Most of the people:
voicing protest against him
never knew him. For example,
the PLP chairman, Raynard
Rigby, was a little infant in dia-
pers when the UBP was the
government of the Bahamas.

-Yet he pretends to be an

expert on the UBP. All Mr
Rigby and*others like him
know about the UBP is what
had been handed down to
them. This is unfair as those
handing down the history of
the UBP do so with their idea
of what happened.

Exploiting the racial card by:
practising reverse discrimina-:
tion has worked well for the:

. PLP. However, it is high time:

they forgive the UBP, other
wise they will be the ones’
whose minds. are still i ea

- oned.

By going on the Darold.
Miller show to publicly explain
the true meaning of the colours’

‘on the flag, Arthur Hanna,

Paul Adderley and Sit
Clement Maynard are finally’
forgiving the UBP by correct-

- ing the misrepresentation pro-'

moted by the PLP which:
racially divided the Bahamas.

for decades.

DR LEATENDOR
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Boston
Massachusetts
September 11 2005









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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 1y, -



i ,



Wis it was set up
immediately follow-

ing the last world war, NATO
was described by Winston
Churchill, one of its architects,
as a mechanism to keep “Amer-
ica in, Germany down and Rus-
sia out” of Europe.

Since that time, the western
alliance has discernibly mor-
phed several times as the glob-
al political environment has
changed around it.

First and foremost, the end
of fhe Cold War created the
context for the alliance’s most
important adjustment exercise.
Buf more recently, it is the
growing importance of the
European Union, with which it
is exactly coincident neither in
terms of membership nor of
interests, that has been the most
important factor of change. So
much so that, these days, there

» are many who question the
long-term viability of the
alliance altogether.

And of all the member states,
it is Germany (the country that
it was set up to keep down) that
has become the forum for the
most crucial test of the old
alliance.

As Germany went to the
polls (on Sunday), the question
of what role Germany will play
in NATO (and, relatedly, what
role the alliance will. playin, the
power politics of the world) is
very much on the minds of the
German electorate — and many
of those watching from without.

Mi people around
the world will

remember Chancellor Schroed-
er chiefly as the European
leader who, together with

France’s Jacques Chirac,



And of all the member states,
it.is Germany (the country that
it‘was set up to keep down)
that has become the forum for
the most crucial test of the old.

alliance.



PERSPECTIVES

AEN DREW Astieot EN



refused to be bullied into lend-
ing legitimacy to the illegal inva-
sion of Iraq in 2003. Like most
people in the world, he knew
the planned invasion to be a
purposeful act of aggression
whose pretext was conjured out

of thin air by English-speaking.

politicians. But unlike many, he

did not shy away from saying

sO.
On that and other occasions,

- Schroeder has demonstrated a

rare competence, integrity and
independence in the area of for-
eign policy. He has also played
a more effective game of simul-
taneously courting and con-
taining the Russian bear ‘than
any of his recent predecessors.
Unlike Helmut Kohl, whose

famously eventful relationship
-with Russia was developed

entirely within the context of
Cold War global politics,
Schroeder has managed to bal-
ance legitimate Russian fears
of encirclement against the
unreasonable Russian tendency
to view its Eastern European
neighbours as satellites or

’ buffers.

His efforts have produced
something close to friendship
between Russia and Western
Europe, even while the old
buffer states are stripped away
one by one and taken into the
embrace of an EU that contin-



ues to spurn Russia herself. For
this achievement, win or lose,
Mr. Schroeder leaves an impor-
tant legacy.

Cems however, are
more likely to

remember him as the Chancel-
lor who declared, in his suc-
cessful campaign of 1998, that if
he could not bring unemploy-
ment down below the 10.5 per
cent that he met it at, then he
was not worthy of re-election.
After seven years of his admin-
istration, unemployment now
stands at close to 12 per cent.
As an act of political theatre, it
was most unfortunate.

It certainly cost’him’a good .

_ deal of legitimacy and gave to

Angela Merkel, his rather unin-

spiring CDU rival, the upper
hand in the early opinion polls.
But, as the polls came in on
‘Sunday evening, it is clear that
Germans were not so keen on
change of the kind Mrs. Merkel

represents as many at first

assumed.

A CDU poll lead of nearly |

20 per cent had, by polling
day, shrunk to practical non-
existence, as exit polls seemed
to point to a certain failure on
Mrs. Merkel’s part to achieve
an absolute majority when

combined with her favoured.





nan calls for the world

community to Support |



AS Haiti prepares for elec-
tions in November and Decem-
ber with United Nations help,
Seeretary-General Kofi Annan

has called on the world com- :

munity to provide necessary aid
to help to re-establish order and
spur development in the impov-
erished country, which has been
plagued by unrest for many
years.

“Countries in all parts of the
world, from time to time, face
grave challenges that they can-
not address on their own. This is
such a time for Haiti, and the
country's people and leaders
have turned to the internation-
al.community for help,” Mr
Annan told a high-level minis-
terial meeting at UN Head-
quarters in New York yester-
day, which included interim
Haitian prime minister Gerard

’ Latortue.

“The United Nations and its
partners must not let them
down. And we must work along-
side them for the long term,” he
added at the session of the Core

Group, established by the Secu- .

rity Council last year to help the
country recover after an insur-
gency forced elected President
Jean-Bertrand Aristide to go.
into exile in February: 2004.
The group ingludes: Mr.

RRR Ea

' . MONDAY,
: SEPTEMBER 19
6:30 Bahamas @ Sunrise-Live

41:00 . Immediate Response
t2noon ZNS News Update Live

;






























12:03 Caribbean Today News Update
12:05 Immediate Response
1:00 Health For The Nation
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2:30 Treasure Attic
3:00 David Pitts
3:30 - Bishop Neil Ellis
4:00 Video Gospel
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4:58 ZNS News Update

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6:00 One Cubed

6:25. Life Line

6:30 News Night 13

7:00 Bahamas Tonight
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Annan’s Special Representative
Juan Gabriel Valdés, who heads
the UN Stabilization Mission in
Haiti (MINUSTAH), MINUS-
TAH Force Commander and
representatives of the Organi-
zation of American States
(OAS), the Caribbean Com-

munity (CARICOM), other.

regional and sub-regional orga-

nizations and the international .

. financial institutions (IFIs).
Mr Annan said it was essen-

tial for the Haitian authorities to ©

work closely with the interna-
tional community to resolve
outstanding technical impedi-
ments to the elections. “More

fundamentally, we must do our ~

utmost to ensure that the elec-
tions are inclusive, and that they
contribute to reconciliation and
stability,” he added.

On promoting security and

the rule of law, he noted that.

MINUSTAH's military and
civilian police components,
working with the Haitian
National Police, “are tackling
difficult tasks with courage,” but
the emergence of an effective
rule-of-law culture will depend
upon Haiti's leadership. Provi-
sion of technical aid by the Core
Group must be linked with the
_ development of appropriate
’ professional standards to'ensure
that abuses of human rights by
those charged with law-enforce-
ment will not be tolerated.
Stressing the need for devel-
opment, he said: “Haiti will not

achieve stability without a con- |

certed attack on poverty and

deprivation. This is a long-term -

project, of course, but people
will be especially anxious for
concrete progress in the days
after a new administration takes
office. Assistance from the Core
Group can make an important
difference.”

MINUSTAH has more than
7,660 uniformed personnel in
Haiti, including 6,263 troops
and 1,401 civilian police, sup-
ported by.423 international
civilian personnel, about 443
local civilian staff and 147 UN
Volunteers. Its mandate ranges
from ensuring a secure and sta-
ble environment to helping to
organize free and fair elections
to promoting human rights.

° See page 14

TROPICAL
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PHONE: 822-2157





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grand coalition for Germany?



Schroeder has managed to
balance legitimate Russian
fears of encirclement against
the unreasonable Russian
tendency to view its Eastern
European neighbours as
satellites or buffers...



coalition partners.

That can only mean one
thing: a so-called ‘grand coali-
tion’ with Mr. Schroeder’s par-
.ty. For Germany and.for the
Western Alliance, this would
be a good thing — or at least a
better thing than the alterna-
tive: °
While it is most unlikely that
an outright win for Mrs. Merkel

‘ would translate into a far more

“Atlanticist” foreign policy (in
Germany, her passive support
for the war in Iraq is seen as an
electoral liability, which she is
increasingly keen to downplay),

the message that it would send
to the new members of,the |
European family would be most
unfortunate.

Poland, the Czech Repnblic
and others, having emerged
from the dark decades of Sovi-
et rule with a tendency to over-
compensate on the side of the

. west, obviously require more

lessons in compromise.

- A few more years of a Ger-
many that is pro-European first _
and pro-Western second would,
together with a similarly mind-
ed France, be a good thing for
that process.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005 THE TRIBUNE ~





Why Hurricane Katrina presents
an opportunity for the Caribbean

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company standards and Peres



Data Processing Clerk

¢ The successful applicant must possess strong © ae

computer skills. Experience or knowledge of - “

the As/400 is an asset. | 2 BAHAMAS Dae earrane OF IC :
¢ Must possess good Ieedterelip and prepersonal ee AC ANTS (BICA)
° a be able to snplement and maintain | : ‘ NOTICE OF LOCATION

company standards and procedures : 01 HYUNDAI ELAN RA

+ Applicants must be between the ages of 20-30 | ~ ’ mv iStA us apes See other used cars” eee oes tees eae

now located in Malborough House
Please send or hand deliver resume to: — au to sot,
CONFIDENCE INSURANCE BROKERS sales @)
& BROKERS AGENTSLID. sf}. | | ‘e

(immediately west of Pirates of Nassau). Our |
new contact numbers are as follows: .
Shirley Street (Standard Services Building)
Nassau, Bahamas #1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS

EAGT SHIRLEY STREET » 929-3775 © 39869079 Please visit our website at www.bica.bs

Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Fraepor) Ltd for similar deals + Gkeen's Highway * 352-6122

BICA Telephone - 326-6619
BICA Fax - 326-6618





THE TRIBUNE

_.ARTHUR FOULKES:
UNIVERSAL PERSPECTIVE,

LOCAL NEWS

NOTED JOURNALIST,
HISTORICAL CONTEXT

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005, PAGE 7

A MUST-READ COLUMN THAT GETS To THE POINT



Youngsters volunteer to help
clean beach for world event

HORE than 250 local student
voliinteers turned out to partic-
ipate. in the Ocean Conservan-
cy’s ‘twentieth annual “Interna-
tional Coastal Cleanup Day”.

‘Hosted by Dolphin Encoun-
ters’ Project BEACH as a
Béach Buddies Programme, the
eyent attracted members of the

‘ernor General’s Youth
Award chapters from CI Gib-
son: RM Bailey, St Anne’s, St
Augustine’ s, Temple Christian,
Queen’s College: St Augustine’s
College, The College of The
Bahamas, Government High
School,. St John’s College,
Aquinas, Doris Johnson High
School, Mount Carmel, CC
S ting, Prince William, CV
Bethel and the entire sixth grade
class of Yellow Elder Primary
School. The volunteers teamed
up at:JAWS Beach near Clifton
Pierito clear the coast of an
overwhelming amount of trash.


y (ICC) is the world’s largest
one- 0a) volunteer event aimed
atscontrolling pollution of the
ai environment. Last year,

re than.300,000 people in 88
cqguntries took part, collecting
débris from more than 11,000
miles of:.beaches, riverbanks,

me lakefronts and collecting a, an’

astonishing four million pounds
of trash, despite widespread
postponements along the East
Coast and Caribbean due to sev-
eral hurricanes.

The ICC started as a local
programme in Texas and grad-
ually expanded to include every
major body of water in the
world. As such, it not only
makes a powerful statement
about global concern for the
environment, it also empowers
local communities to do some-
thing about pollution.

Buddies

Originally inspired by the
ICC and designed with the
guidelines from the Ocean Con-
servancy, the Beach Buddies
Programme is offered year-
round by Dolphin Encounters-
Project BEACH as a marine
conservation field trip.

_ Student volunteers learned
that removing debris from

Shorelines can prevent the -
deaths of thousands of marine

animals, including seabirds,

whales, dolphins, sea turtles and
fish, which routinely ingest or

become entangled in the debris.

' “This is’ such’ an important’

event for our youth to partici-

pate in,” said Denise Mortimer,
the National Director of the
Governor General’s Youth
Award Programme.

“Part of the responsibility of
being a member of the GGYA
is to keep the environment
clean. Young people take things
for granted. By seeing the
amount of debris out here today
and learning about the destruc-

tion it causes to our. natural

resources, they learn the impor-
tance of keeping our. environ-
ment clean.”

Kazzie Burrows, 17, and
Codero McKenzie, 16, both of
Government High School
agreed..

“We should all keep the .

beaches clean for all the kids
that come up after us so they
won’t have dirty beaches. We
need to keep our beaches for
every generation.”

“Tourism is our main indus-
try,” adds McKenzie. “We don’t
want tourists to come and see
dirty beaches, it gives the wrong
impression and tourism could
decline.”

After hours cleaning the
beach, the youngsters sorted
their refuse by type and wrote
down their findings on detailed

Ministry Of Education
Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute

NOTICE

TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF
COMPUTER EQUIPMENT

The Ministry of Education invites sealed bids persons td tender for
provision of COMPUTER EQUIPMENT for BAHAMAS
TECHNICAL & VOCATIONAL INSTITUTE, ue I rail Road,
New Providence, Bahamas.

2.0

Interested Bidders may inspect/collect the bidding se aunents

from the Supplies Section of the BAHAMAS TECHNICAL &
VOCATIONAL INSTITUTE, Old Trail Road, New Providence,

Bahamas from Wednesday 7th September,

2005.

Bids must be in English and should be enclosed in a sealed envelope
bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the subject
- bided on (e.g. “Computer Equipment”.)

Bids must be deposited : in the tender box provided at the address
shown below, on or before Friday 23rd September, 2005 by 4:30pm
(local time). Overseaas companies who may wish to tender can
submit their bid by mail. Late bids will be rejenies and returned

unopened.

Bids will be opened at a public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidders or their Representatives who choose to attend, at 10am
on Tuesday 27th September, 2005 at the address below.

The Chairman Tender

_ data cards. The eee

will be submitted to the Ocean
Conservancy to help them con-
tinue to track common_types of
litter and try to prevent these
items from ending up on our
beaches in the future.

an, Litter

“Too many people just don’t
realise that trash travels,” said
Janeen Bullard, a member of
the Education Department at
Dolphin Encounters who
organised the JAWS Beach
clean up. “The garbage they
leave on a beach — after having
a picnic, for example, or by
dumping cigarette butts there
— ends up polluting our waters
and killing or maiming many,
many animals.”

Sixth graders of Yellow Elder
Primary School were also very
concerned about the trash they
found. Andrewnique Curry, 10,
said, “It is very important for
everyone to pick up trash and to
keep the ocean and beach.clean,
because if they don’t the fish
and other animals will die and
the beaches will look bad and
tourists will not come.”

Portia Sweeting, Education

Officer for Primary Science at
the Ministry of Education
addéd: “It is important our chil-
dren learn about. the necessity
of keeping our environment
clean at an early age. They learn
to see the bigger picture and to
become responsible.and to
respect their natural resources.

“The amount of garbage on
some of our beaches is absolute-
ly astonishing,” said Robert
Meister, Managing Director of
Dolphin Encounters, who also
participated in the clean up.

“The kids did an amazing job
and we commend them.for their
interest and great effort. Dol-
phin Encounters remains com-
mitted to offering programmes
that teach the importance of
keeping the marine environ-
ment clean and safe. We hope
that others will join us next year
for International Coastal Clean
Up Day and throughout the
year to keep our beautiful envi-
ronment clean.”

To learn more visit
www.oceanconservancy.org.
For information on the many
outreach programmes offered
by Dolphin Encounters-Project
BEACH call Annette Dempsey

at 394-2200 or visit www. Bek

Pena com: me}

Tl

of The Bahamas

Vererinary House Catt Senvice
b ©
Appoi elk

Dr. Dwight A. Dorsett

Veterinarian

a

~ Dogs ¢ Cats © Small Pets"

¢ Vaccination

BON) iim @rlas
¢ Affiliated with full service
_ Animal Hosptials

Call Dr. D...
ym ye vIL

24hrs/7 days Emergency Service



H. Wayne Huizenga School

of Business and Entrepreneurship

presents its

Distinguished Speakers Series

William C. Johnson, Ph.D.

Tuesday, October 11, 2005
8:30 a.m.

William C. Johnson, Ph.D., professor of
marketing at the H. Wayne Huizenga

School of Business and Entrepreneurship,
will discuss how to embrace and implement
a value-based philosophy into your organi-
zation. In his presentation, Zhe 70 Keys of
Customer Value, you can learn how to suc-
cessfully adapt your business practices to
become more customer-focused, and make
the customer an integral part of your organi-—

zation’s goals.

British Colonial | Hilton Hotel
Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas

This Distinguished Speaker Series is offered FREE of charge as a public
service by the Huizenga School of Nova Southeastern University. Seating

is limited to those who RSVP by September 30.

Reserve your place today by Ny

Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield
Cable Beach

P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 327-1530

calling Laquel Miller at

(242) 364-6766, ext. 0,

or by emailing to
nsu-bahamas@nsu.nova.edu.

NOVA
SOUTHEASTERN
UNIVERSITY

“Beupna Vhe Classvouw—

Nova Southeastern University admits students of any race, color, and national or ethnic origin. " Nova Southeastern University is accredited by the
Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097, Telephone number:
404-679-4501) to award associate's, bachelor’s, master's, educational specialist, and doctoral degrees. 08-24605 gi!





PAGE 8, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS





CELEBRATING close to
three decades of quality cus-
tomer service training, Bahama-
host used the platform of
Bahamahost Week 2005 to get
Bahamians excited about the
course again.

Bahamahost is a general atti-
tude and service training pro-
gramme implemented through
the Ministry of Tourism in 1978.

The week, which began on
September 11, opened with a






























half day Bahamahost seminar,
an official proclamation read-
ing in Rawson Square, a clean
up of certain areas of New
Providence and distribution of
food items to the needy. |
With over 23,000 graduates
working in all facets of tourism
in the Bahamas, there was much
to see at the Bahamahost exhi-
bition Jaunched at the main post

Monday.

SHOE STORE.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.




Madeira
Shopping Plaza
Tel: 328-0703

Marathon Mall
Tel: 393-6113

RND Plaza, Freeport
Tel: 351-3274













7

Rivet Shelving

Pallet Jac ks



Mobile Shelving Mezzanines





sae | Vee
hanna-mayson.com
Cg ayson.com

church service and included a ©

office on East Hill Street on -



ent opening all part

Founder of Bahamahost opens
exhibition about programme









@ SIR Clement and Lady Maynard take in some of the history of Bahamahost, an attitude and ser- «
vice training programme he implemented as minister of tourism in the late 1970s. Also pictured is
Sammy Gardiner, senior director of education and training in the Ministry of Tourism.

(Photo: Derek Smith).









Members of the Bahamahost Week committee joined the team at Environmental Health Services
to provide Rawson Square with a little sprucing up Thursday morning.

(Photo: Martella Matthews).

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) is
pleased to invite Tenders to provide the Company with Motor
Insurance coverage.

Interested companies/firms may collect a Tender Specification
from BTC’s Security’s Desk located in its administrative building
on John F. Kennedy Drive, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Tenders must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked
“TENDER FOR MOTOR INSURANCE”, and delivered on or
before 5:00 pm on Friday, September 30, 2005 to the attention
of:

Mr. Michael J. Symonette

President & CEO

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive

P.O. Box N-3048

Nassau, The Bahamas

BTC reserves the right to reject any, or all Tenders.





THE TRIBUNE | | MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005, PAGE 9

Rl S See



Piizver | Sie the led



ete lie 8
: “Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”



ap National Choir of The Bahamas

~ AUDITIONS

“Come and Try out for the National Choir a The Bahamas






a THE Bahamahost Week committee members double-teamed litter on the island on Thursday.
Four members of the committee tackled the trash on Poinciana Drive working from the College of
the Bahamas campus to Blue Hill Road.





(Photo: Martella Matthews).





Monday, September, 25th
College of The Bahamas, Music Block
(2 storey building opposite McDonalds)
7:00 pm





“Must be at least 25 years old. No upper age limit.





| Jefferson Johison: ; Ae .
Come prepared to sing any song.





Only those accepted may participate in a Choral Workshop to be
conducted by Dr. Jefferson Johnson, Director of Choral Activities at
the University of Kentucky, to be held in Nassau on October 21 and
22, 2005.









For further information call 356-2691/2 or
302-4512.





Hl FORMER minister of tourism and founder of Hahaiiahost Sir Cletient Maynard with Lady
Maynard cut the ribbon, officially opening the month-long exhibition while Sammy Gardiner,
senior t director of education and eating at the Ministry of Tourism, and others look on.

(Photo: "Derek Smith)



FORES TER |



ir responsibility

‘Brake Service * Suspension & Alignment * Exhaust
OIL Lube & Filler “GOODYEAR TYRES”

“hmerican & Imported Gars Light Trucks Vans & SUV's

Complete Inspection & Estimates Betore we slart the Work a . . oe a

WACKEY ST. & ROOSEVELT AVENUE EAST ASML nD RY OREENEEEE Forester 2.0X. With its boxer
lel: 393-6651 or 393-6693 Tel: 300-2940 Or 356-2941 Re / : : : : . : engine, 64.1 cubic feet cargo

eae Sata” Bll wheels deve:
Open: Monday - - Saturday space, and all wheel drive
‘Sam ‘Spin





This vehicle goes everywhere!

Our parts department is fully stocked,

Fa 3064865 * PO. BoxSS-618 ssa bones are : with very stmponene se ensure tha
AUTO SYSTEM EXPERTS | :



‘Trained technicians on duty.

ae VS
“Midas is a business hased on service, quality and reliability.
AS | Factory scheduled maintenance is car care. | _ TYREFLEX rye nk OTORS
gia > Midas services your car fully. Our system takes the guesswork | Te

out of auto care for every car model out there. : arate Telephone: 325 4901



People ee LO i

~



LETHE EAE AS ERR TA EINE SLL EON ER





PAGE 10, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



BEC workers’
action delays —
repairs to

power es

FROM page one




’
‘




4 G6

ply of electricity,” said Mr Basden.

He said that management knows
of no issues being discussed by the
union that would warrant industrial
action.

“The normal dispute procedure was
not followed so industrial action, if
not illegal was premature,” he said.

While Saturday’s outage was not
island wide, many areas of the island
were left without power for as long as
two hours.

Mr Basden said that there were
smaller areas that needed more seri- , }
ous repairs and required that work
teams carry out those repairs.

The BEC manager said that
because of the industrial action the
teams refused to work and were slow
in making the repairs.

He would not say, however, what
kind.of disciplinary action would be
taken against those persons who
refused to work. He said he would
address the issue at a press confer-
ence later today.

“I can say that we view this action
very seriously. and hope that they
would realise that our duty is first to
the customer, but we are conducting a
review of the whole situation,” he
said.

O





syn

from



° 9
or the chow s
exciting new season.

: Wednesday, September 28, 2005 =} »

e St. John’s College Auditorium,
Bishop Eldon Drive
(off Bethel Avenue)

° 7:00pm

e Must be 15-27 years old

¢ Come prepared to sing any song



FREAG SUKATLON Nim ber



> a

_—.
Commercial News

‘ru



rl

icated Content) 4

ighted
d

YOU already know

ally accompanies the
most serious purchasers
when they go to look at
homes for a potential
purchase.

But if you’re planning
to list your home in the
upcoming months, here’s
‘a sobering US statistic:
70 percent of purchasers
view and compare pic-
tures online before
deciding which homes
they would like to visit. I
am sure our local per-
centage is constantly
growing. .

While they say one
shouldn’t judge a book
by its cover, it’s a sure
bet ‘that those buyers are
doing just that.

So what can you do to
improve your chances of
being selected for a clos-
er look? Go out and
take a picture!

Celebrating the opening af the Cancer Luring Centro, a home away from heme for

Cancer pationts and their relatives.



Narne,
P.O. Box

E-mail



Maile YO a cancer survivar? Yes

Participant categories: B. 13-28 years

T-Shirt Size: Medium (M

Donation: 6-22 years $10

Centrevi ese d

Telephene 325-2483 or 323-4482
I hereby assume full and complete responsit
participation in this event or while on the pr
Cancer Society, its pertners and snonsors
participation in this event ach

3 personal injury or damacestifFe

c, 26-

40 years

ality for any injury or accident which may eccur during my
gnf this event, and T hereby release and hold harmless the
am any less, ladiity or claims I may have arising out of my

“BY me.



ibe ‘Tribune Liv
Sister Sister

Ye EEG

Lim BRITISH
a ea) AMERICAN

that a BREA agent usu- .

>t af

Materia



“Bahamas real

estate today

Carmen Massoni

Now take an objective
look.

Are the shrubs neatly
manicured?

Is the lawn mowed and
are the edges trimmed?
Are there some eye-
catching landscape ele-
ments? —

Is the exterior pres-

sure-washed, painted and.

sparkling? Is the front
porch and entry inviting?

If you still have to
make some cosmetic
improvements once a

purchaser is already .

inside your. home, there

_ is always an opportunity

to offer an explanation
or to assuage concerns.





after hear

Providers?



Pretty as a picture

These days, however,
you may not ever get the,
chance if you don’t offer:
stunning “curb appeal.” :

Before listing, have!
your BREA agent per-;
form a “walk through”?
and take photos of the!
exterior. ‘

Follow suggestions for,
improvements, and you'll:
soon be enjoying many;
visits from potential pur-:
chasers and then a “pic-:

ture perfect” sale!



THE TRIBUNE me MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005, PAGE 11
a ee Sa a

- SAV.A.CHEK ‘Extra-Special’: on each item you purchase, over
eave a dollar, with One filled SAV.A.CHEK certificate get a Dollar Off!








REDEEM your SAV-A-CHEK now at:
Johns S George, Sandys, Epic Battery, GNC,
Home Fabrics, Godetts Jewelry.
FREEPORT: Dolly Madison Home Centre, GNC, Epic Battery, Play Time Sports

- SAT. 7:30AM - 9:00PM Extra Extra!

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

’ THE TRIBUNE.



LOCAL NEWS

Nene a
Last in line of the ©

Inagua salt industry
pioneers dies at 94.

THE last of the original New
England family that pioneered
the salt industry in Inagua in
the last century died in West-
on on Monday, September 5.
She was 94.

A memorial service, for
Louise Paine Erickson, daugh-
ter of John Bryant and Louise

_ We accept

Visa, Mastercard, Sun Card
5% Discount with Credit-Card:- .



| Rey. Dr. Stephen E. Thompson
2004 = Present

Frazer Paine of Weston, Mass.,
will be held at St Mary’s
Church, 260 Concord Street,
Newton Lower Falls at 2pm on
Saturday, September 24. A
reception will follow the ser-
vice.

’ Instead of flowers, the family
has asked friends to consider a

REFRIGERATORS - 15 cu. ft. and up.

donation to a charity of their
choice or the relief effort in the
aftermath of Hurricane Katri-
na.

Weston, where Louise Erick-
son died peacefully two weeks
ago, was both her childhood
home and the home she shared
with her late husband, Bill (Ari-

r Home

rt
ee tier

FOR YOUR HOME!

10% CASH DISCOUNT
ee

REFRIGERATORS - wide with ice & wath

BUILT-IN-DISHWASHERS
OOP Sess

GAS RANGES - pilot lite
AON Cay \N elas
BUILT-IN GAS OVENS
BUILT-IN GAS COOK TOPS

LC} $650
from $721
Hon ATT
from $71 +}

MiCecd lata eek AM CHIC LOMRN NACHNA URI IRDA Me) eel telaresy
New installations are subject to an extra fee.

SO ats

SHIRLEY STREET ¢ TEL: 322-8941





Rev. Dr. Garnet King, O.B-E.
1977 ~ 2004

OPEN: MON - FRI 7:30 am - 4:30 pm
SAT 8:00 am - 12 noon .



Rev. Charles H. Thompson
1927 - 1977

Transfiqueation Baptist Chure

Invite you to celebrate their

8" Anniversary

Theme:

Fruition Gf Vision: Through Unity

Habakkuk 2:1-3, Luke 14:25 - 35

- Opportunities for worship



Raotor Cyril Ganeds

VM iiinday 19 at 230 pm.



Bastor OP bur ©:
“Wednesday 27 at 280 p.m. |







sD
Sak

a ugha Cush

stride 22" at 720 p.m.

Sunday 25th September, 2005, 10:00a.m.
Speaker: Rev. Dr. Stephen E. Thompson, Pastor

@ Louise Paine Erickson, pictured with her hsband Bill

och Wentworth Erickson, Jr.)
after 35 years of living and rais-
ing a family at Inagua.

Bill and Louise Erickson and
their two-year-old son, Wenty,
started life in Mathew Town,
Inagua, in 1936."

"They joined Bill’s younger
brother, Jim Erickson, who was

determined to restore Inagua’s.

salt industry, which had col-

‘lapsed after the First World

War. The brothers established

’ West India Chemicals Limit-

ed.

Talented in music, Louise,

began playing the piano at age

~ within a week of her death. She

studied at the Paris Conserva-
tory of Music, and became a
teacher to many and an accom-
panist at church, as well as play-
ing for the pleasure of family
and friends.

A committed Christian, she

‘found her life renewed in mid-

dle years in the Evangelical
Church. Of a compassionate
nature, Louise helped with
school and library and gave
untold ‘assistance within the
community. In retirement, new
and continued friendships with
all.ages blossomed until her

' Predeceased by her husband
Bill and son Wenty (A. Went-
worth Erickson, III), she is sur-
vived by three children: Louise
Ulbrich of Maine, Lee Ingram
of Bellingham, WA, and Peter

' Erickson of Seattle, WA.; six

grandchildren: Cecile Ulbrich
Tucker, Wilhemina Ulbrich,

-Stede Ingram, Celise Ingram

and Alexander Erickson and
Eva Erickson, and two great-
grandchildren, Vakaris Arioch
Ingram and Amelia Kane
Tucker; also by her sister, Sal
Paine Forbes of Sheridan,
Wyoming and many nieces and



five and continued daily until _ death. nephews.
PA orders drinks =| New bab
' ‘rhg haerrs ' rmgys € e
“meernt Ms —™ stew Ac joy for
ae Freeport

“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”



couple

. A SON was born to Leo,
wife of Mr Ricardo (Ricky)
Munnings of Freeport,
Grand Bahama at 4.31pm,
August 31, at Rand Memor-
ial Hospital, Freeport.
Dakota Wyatt Munnings,
who weighed 7lbs 80zs at
_birth, is the first grandson
and fourth grandchild of
Ralph and Joan Munnings
of Freeport.

Thursday, September 29, 2005

wo



Hon Bradley B. Roberts
Minister of Works & Utilities

Abaco Beach Resort

8:45am

-._ Welcome Address
Abaco Chamber of Commerce

Moderators :

Silbert Mills s

Jack Thompson <

| THEME: | :

“MANAGING THE CHALLENGES OF GROWTH”
Presenters Topics

¢ Managing the Challenges of Growth | :

Panel of Government Corporations Officials

Anthony Ferguson
Colina Financial-Advisors

Don Cornish
Ministry of Tourism

Dale McHardy a8
Bahamas Development Bank

Michael Braynen
Director of Fisheries

Errol W. Berkeley
Inter-American Institute
for Cooperation on Agriculture

Lenora J. Black
Ministry of Education .

Doug Shipman
Livingston Marshall, Ph D



Baker’s Bay Golf & Ocean Club

REGISTER AT:
www.tclevents.com






* Maximizing Tourism



° Small Business Devel

° Growing the Returns: Appreciating ‘the Stock

e Agribusiness -A Growth Industry

* Planning Financial Growth



and Expansion

e Abaco’s Future Workforce - What Are They Learning?

What Should They Be Learning?

¢ Baker’s Bay: A Model for Bahamian Development

SPONSORS



THE COUNSELLORS LTD. ie
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P.O.BOX N3220



MOA



tel: 322-7505/6 ¢ fax: 325-2482
adagency@thecounsellorsitd.com



LN ert CRSA ELAN TERT SPS VEST NGS STRIP BE PLAID AOD REL CET ETA? DENT? NET Ns he fy mnbtinets "peer ens Pre



-ABACO: 1 242 300-0649 (TOLL EREE )



THE TRIBUNE

NOW ACCEPTING
me SUNCARD
Ve Bohorin Ge Cad
QUALITY RIGHTS AND PRICES RESERVED
Se



SPECIALS GOOD:
SEPT 19TH - SEPT 21ST 2005

MIS CUT

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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005,PAGE 13

BATH & HOME

HOME SALE

RUGS BATHROOM ACCESSORIES WALL CLOCKS

TOWELS LAMPS WALL PICTURES
SHEET SETS; BLENDERS — - . PICTURE FRAMES

TABLECLOTHS FIGURINES — FLATWARE SETS
THROW PILLOWS BAKEWARES COOKWARE SETS
COMFORTER SETS GLASSWARE SETS

SHOWER CURTAINS — Ses DINNERWARE SETS



on oS GOOD MONA SEPTEMBER 19TH'- SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24TH, 2005 .

Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448 _ _..



Mm OLA SLAYE
FEATHER BEDS WALL PICTURES
COMFORTERS LAUNDRY HAMPERS



MATTRESS PADS WALL PICTURES
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SHOWER CURTAINS HOT PLATES
RUGS IRONING BOARDS
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DINNERWARE SETS SCHOGL SUPPLIES

POT SETS

SAL, .TARTS MONDAY, AUGUST 29TH'- SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER Rat Ost)

WE ACCEPT AMERICAN EXPRESS MASTER, VISA AND SUNCARD, WE ALSO REDEEM QUALITY STAMP CARDS
MACKEY STREET, TOP OF THE HILL (next to Super Value) PHONE: 393-3411/393-5569



)s





PAGE 14, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005 | THE TRIBUNE:
LOCAL NEWS





mR

51,000 Customer CASH BACK Incentive For September}

jon 2005 Ford Caflorers

That’s right the worlds #1 spot utility is now on sale,
so come on in and. take advantage of the best deal in
_ the Bahamas on a full size American Built SUV.

EA

Rie See








AMBASSADOR Sears chats with members of the international a department at Howard Uni-
versity in Washington DC. (1-r) Gloria Prentiss; Lanisa Kichiner, associate director for international
affairs programmes; Ralph Bunche, International Affairs Centre; Ambassador to the US and OAS.
Joshua Sears; Betty J Aitkens, dirsector of study abroad programme; Michelle Sears and Carolyn
M King of the public affairs programe at Howard University.

ERD pa R SN Se






(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)



e This picture was originally published in The Tribune on Saturday September 17. It is republished
here because of an error with the.original caption



STS eet



i
i
i
i
q
H
H
ql

Secretary-general of
N warns jailing
litical opponents



2005 FORD EXPLORER



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(astro meets with
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Village Road Ph: 393-5310







THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005, PAGE iv

Queen’s College holds activities fair

Queen’s College High
School mounted their
annual Activities Fair on
September 16 when more
than 25 groups showcased
the various aspects of their
clubs.

High school students
were introduced to clubs
which included traditional
organizations such as Key
Club, Students’ Christian
Movement, Computer Club
and ranged through Gov-
ernor General’s Youth
Award, Students’ Repre-
sentative Council, Band to
Chess Club, the Math Soci-
ety and the Anime Club.

Students expressed their
interest.in many of these -
and were able to sign up to
become members.

Six new clubs were
added, including , the
Needlework Club, Dance

and Aerobics and the Inter-
@ A SENIOR student, Derreck Johnson, national People to People a SCIESKA Kilo ics. High School Librarian, talks with

joins the membership of the Queen's College Cjyb, based in America. Students about the newly launched High School Book Club. The Book
High School Student Credit Union, a popular = — Cyybg will begin operating Club is one of six new organizations added to the: ,

@ A SEVENTH grade student signs up to join organisation for students within the High immediately.’ extra-curricular activities available within Queen’s College High

the Interact Club School. School.

eaders complain that 40
per cent of world is living —
on less than US$2 a day









Yom & oe

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”





Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.












Kotex fits. Period:








aC oy ana LAY a PERFORMANCE, PURE CONFIDENCE... ALL THE WAY DOWN THE ROAD.
CeO te



PAGE 16, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005 THE TRIBUNE.
OCA

Immigration officers on parade















if ee ig

oe — : ce - ae " ll THE Royal Bahamas Police Force Band perform a musical selection
& GRADUATES march in unison during a demonstration at the Bahamas Immigration Depart- ve

ment's Class of 2005 graduation ceremony last Friday at the Police Training College.



Help your employees secure their financial future...

& THELMA
Beneby, perma-
nent secretary in
the Ministry of
Labour and Immi-
gration, presents
the Outstanding
Officer award to
Darren Deveaux





1 3

orate Pension Plan.

















STHELMA §| Oe Drrrmr,,D,,r,.,hlC Ss Oe ae

Beneby, Per-

manent Secre- vo eventos
tary in the Min- British Amerinan beste Basta
istry of Labour eeanits go bund in thand., Jin today’s comypadiitive mnarkes, ‘ RIOT | PRET R J
and Immigra- - e Pension Sermons iaveder ..°

tion, presents otinntigg perro anor driven, loyal aad methated perenne is





the Academic a athatlorge shat gill baainaes ince ~ Range ox sonal. We beliewe » Eye er Design Options
sNeMievemicat + sik Archon scm operons oncume thelr ranciad hatane will I howtnent Sendo : i
award to Loto- Sr aN ee D Rannd Raping vont

sca Mortimer inate omit empilegtai Ey ot ok iad












aren | i ope ynnstalls
ie abhor duties benott,







BNL: Vaart

fadiamondtonicn Driv, BN, eax NER > Romeo, AHP, The Bieaeinns
: ‘Deo RARE AOS Ren MATE Be h-ReRE








SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

“MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

The Tribune



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street



PetroCaribe |
unlikely
to lower

gas prices

@ By NEIL HARTNELL i
Tribune Business Editor :

ESSO Standard Oil’s
country manager has told
The Tribune that Petro-
Caribe is unlikely to lower
gas prices at the pumps for
Bahamian consumers,
explaining that he under-,
stood the potential agree-
ment with Venezuela to just
involve purchasing oil on
credit.

Troy Simms said it
“sounds more and more that
Venezuela is offering a
financing deal”, adding that
the oil companies were con-
cerned about supply chain
reliability if the Bahamas
signed a bilateral agreement
with the Chavez agreement
to bring PetroCaribe into
effect. :
Mr Simms said: “What ?’'m a
hearing, and whatIunder-
stand, is it’s primarily a .
financing deal. We would
buy product from the
National Energy Agency at
what is referred to as market
price. I don’s have any rea-
son to believe, from what
I’ve seen and heard, that
pump prices will be low-
ered.....:

“From what I’ve seen so
far, the Venezuelan offer
doesn’t seem to decrease the
cost of fuel for the Bahamas
except in the financing.

. “T don’t think the Govern-
ment of the Bahamas wants
to get into subsidising the
pump price as you pay for it
elsewhere.”

Venezuela tied, through’ i h

its membership of the
Organisation of Petroleum:
Exporting Countries (Opec), »
to selling crude oil at the pre- :
vailing global market price.
This is the stage in the oil
and petroleum supply chain
that is most volatile, and
what has ultimately caused
. gas prices in the Bahamas to
rise.

SEE page 4B

| Colinalmperial
lines up a new
president

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor ;
_ GREGORY Sweeting,
. British American Insurance
.Company’s former presi-
dent, is being lined up to
réplace Guy Richard as
head of ColinaImperial
Insurance Company,
sources have informed The
Tribune.

Mr Sweeting, who was
one of the original ‘Group
- of 10’ that opposed Colina

Insurance Company’s merg-

‘er with Imperial Life, and
has been replaced at the
British American helm by
Chester Cooper, is under-
stood to be set to take over
from Mr Richard as presi-
dent later this year, possi-
bly in November when the
latter is due to leave. Mr
Richard has Bag nothing
wrong.

‘The timing of the move is
surprising, since Colinalm-
perial and its parent, Colina
Holdings (Bahamas), are.
undergoing a regulatory
review being performed by
KPMG at the behest of the
financial services regulators,
who are headed by the
Securities Commission.

Meanwhile, sources have

SEE page 4B





‘Micron

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY
* Sales ¢ Rentals * Supplies * Services

Bahamas
2-5 night c

& By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor _ Editor

THE Bahamas’ share of two
to five-night cruises in the
Caribbean declined by 30 per
cent in the eight years to 2003, a’
confidential report for the Min-

istry of Tourism reveals, rais-

ing further questions about
whether this nation’s tourism
sector is growing and remains
competitive.

The document, prepared in
March 2004 by the Florida-
based Management Resource
Group (MRG), reported that
the Bahamas’ share of all two
and five-night cruises in the
Caribbean had fallen from 76
per cent in 1995 to 46 per cent
in 2003. It attributed this drop
largely to the attractiveness and
growth in capacity of Cozumel,
particularly from Gulf Coast

‘home ports such as Houston.

The report on Cruise Tourism
Policies was intended to help
shape a consensus in the Gov-
ernment and private sector as
to how the Bahamas should
maximise the economic bene-
fits from the cruise ship indus-
try, particularly since the Cruise
Overnight Incentive Act
expired at the end of 2003.

However, nothing . has
changed since the date the
report was drafted, and the
Bahamas is still operating with-
out a formalised incentive pro-
gramme for the cruise ship
industry. It is undexstood: that
rather than use legislation,
many in “:12 private sector want
the incentive programme to

Robin Hood

up for sale?

®@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FREEPORT Concrete’s
chief executive was tight-lipped
on Friday when The Tribune
contacted him about reports
that the BISX-listed coinpany
was in discussions that could
result in the sale of its Robin
Hood retail format.

Ray Simpson said: “I’ve got
no comment at this stage”,
when asked whether Freeport
Concrete was looking to sell the
business to a buyer linked to
the executive who currently
runs Robin Hood, Brooklyn-
born American, pouty Schae-
fer.

Mr Schaefer was part of the
group who initially brought
Robin Hood to the Bahamas,
and stayed on in the post of
vice-president to manage day-
to-day operations after Freeport
Concrete bought a 62.5 per cent
stake in the business for
$500,000 back in February 2002.

Mr Schaefer has an agree-
ment with Freeport Concrete
that sees him earn a commis-
sion of between 1.5 to3 per cent
of gross sales per annum that
are made by Robin Hood. In
2004, this was $231,489.

Mr Simpson’s remark indi-
cates that while a deal may be
on the table, it has not been
sealed.

Several sources expressed:
surprise to The Tribune that the
retail format might be on the
market, given that it was a
prime driver of Freeport Con-
crete’s revenues. Increased sales
at Robin Hood pushed
Freeport Concrete’s sales to just

SEE page 6B

‘Since 1983

Computers « Copiers * Printers * Fax Machines
Supplies *Accessories* Software

Delta fate last [aey aay

‘vate

“strength”



Confidential study shows nation |
losing out to Caribbean competitors
and cruise lines’ private islands

take the form of an agreement.
The MRG report illustrates

. that despite growth in raw num: -

bers, in terms of cruise passen-
ger arrival figures, the Bahamas
is not deriving the maximum
possible economic benefits from
the cruise ship industry, with
the lines increasingly using pri-
islands. .and other
Caribbean ports.

The report said: “Since the

passage of cruise incentive leg-
islation [in 1995], the capacity
for three and four night cruises

to the Bahamas-has changed

very little; rising from: about
840,000 passengers to about

880, 000 passengers (a 5 per cent

increase).

“During the same period, the

capacity of all two to five night
cruises to the Bahamas and the
Caribbean rose by 57 per cent
from 1. 1 million to 1.7 million
passengers.”

The MRG report acknowl-
edged that total cruise visitors to
the Bahamas had risen from 1.7
million to three million between
1995. and:2002,: largely due to
in the three-night
cruise business and the private
islands on seven-day and longer





" cruises. i
Private islands such-as Coco

MoneyGrows@ColinaFinancial.com |

CFAL has provided the Shin tn pelea We Meare arom iis deeaitiin ikea ps SHS STE
When invedting, srt beet pe eas

{

Cay in the Berry Islands and
Half Moon Cay near Cat Island
have become increasingly
attractive for the:cruise ship

_ industry, but their use has

FATE to end monitoring
of Bahamas i in October

’ @ By YOLANDA, DELEVEAUX

Senior Business Reporter

. . THE Financial Action Task Force (FATE) i is
‘expected to remove the Bahamas from the’ list of
countries is is continuing to monitor at its Octo-
ber meeting in Paris, Allyson Maynard-Gibson,
the minister of financial services and invest ments

said.

The Bahamas was first ‘blacklisted’ bly the
FATF in 2000 over concerns that this nation was
‘non-cooperative’ in the global fight against; mon-
ey laundering, and did not respond to requests for

radius the ‘trickle down’ of
incoitne into the Bahamian
economy and workers’ hands;
especially if ships do not also
call in Nassau of Grand
Bahaina.,

The MRG report said, in ref-

di
vi

i
—t-



information from regulatory counterparts ibither [a

im 4 timely matter.op-at all:

The Bahamas’ removal from the FATF’s mon-

SEE page 6B -

i ;




Toshiba copiers have more eel oad more functions,
more sec nnentay:

sonithsenPaAEALMAIRNteRan Ane

iio des

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millions of doillars in personal wealth. Why arent

you claiming your share?

inaiamtantrthase fehycswca ten ttn cathy Ala shasta eh a eth httth



For professional financial advice ina friendly atmosphere, you should «zl

olina.

Financial.Advisors
| "Make Your Money Caow



_ MALLYSO
minister of financial services and investments



erence to private islands that
“Bahamian businesses derive

little or no revenue from them”
_ and that they “produce limited
- economic benefits for Bahami-

SEE page 7B





MAYNARD-GIBSON, the




















PAGE 2B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

Bar Association ‘holding
back’ financial services



THE TRIBUNE





By YOLANDA expertise for the financial sex;- _ firm, estimated that there were market, which covered areas Earlier, Allyson Maynard- fund administrators in the
DELEVEAUX vices industry, and its attemyst between 12 and 15 lawyers that such as real estate and litiga- | Gibson, minister of financial Bahamas than the Cayman
Senior Business to stymie changes to the did significant business in the tion, meant that Bahamian _ services and investments, said Islands, adding that Govern-
Reporter nation’s immigration policy «m _ financial services industry. lawyers did not have toturnto the Government was looking ment policy decisions will guide

THE Bahamas Bar Associa-

tion has been called to task for
failing to provide adequate

permitting foreign lawyers to

work in the Bahamas.
Michael Paton, a partner

with the Lennox Paton law

Domestic

He said a strong domestic

) BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY’ CORPORATION

INSTALLATION OF TWO (2) YOUNG MODEL HC- 1066-
V400T40 RADIATORS & JRRELATED

IVIL CHANICAL/ELECTRIC AL WORKS AT THE

BAILEY TOWN, BIMINI BAHAMAS POWER STATION

TENDER No. 585/05

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible
bidders for the installation of two (2) Young: model HC-1066-V400T40 ©
radiators and related civil/mechanical/electrical works at the power
station located at BAILEY TOWN, BIMINI, BAHAMAS.

Interested persons may collect the tender documents from the
Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads, by contacting:-

‘Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

_Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 28 September 2005 by
4:00p.m. and addressed as follows:

The General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
-Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 585/05

| The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.









Pricing information As Of:
46 September 2005










S2wk-Hi S2tet owe pa Symbol Prisvious Siose Zeday’s lose. 5 hangs. = Daily Vol. EPss DN $. oe Yield ing and Allied Workers Union where we must respect the.
-10. 5 aco Markets . i : -0.207 . iM 0.00%, : oan :
10.00 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 40.06 10.00 _ 0.00 "1452 0340 69 3.40% (BHCAWU) said In a state- individual rights of others and.
6.90 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 6.88 6.88 0.00 o.561 0.330 423 480%) ment thatit had filed anappli- there are legitimate processes
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.204 0.010 3.9 1.25% : : ining ri am ig
4.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 4.40 1.40 LPs 0.00 0.126 0.060° 14.1 4 29% cation for bargai g rights sta in place by the Department of
115 0.87. Fidelity Bank 1.10 10 | 9.00 0.066 0.030 16.7 2.73% tus on September 12. Labour to oversee fair play
8.86 6.90 Cable Bahamas 8.81 8.86 ! 0.05 1,000 0618 0.240 143. 2.71% ‘ ee and due process.
2.20 1.69 Colina Holdings 1.68 1.69 0.00 0.004 0.000 NM 0.00% ° .
9.10 6.75 Commonwealth Bank 9.08 9.09 9.00 0.705 0.410 12.9 4.51% Unionising . “Once this course of action,
2.50 0.67 Doctor's Hospital 2.40 2.40 0.00 0.429 0.000 56 . .000% ‘is taken and the workers at,
.20 3.85 Famguard 4.20 4.20 0.00 0.428 0.240 9.8 5.71% Bai +s _ :
10.70 9.25 Finco ' 10.76 10.70 | 0.00 1,500 0.695 0.510 15.4 4.77%} Pat Bain, the union’s presi Hard Rock Cafe have their say
9.60 6.99 FirstCaribbean 9.80 9.50 0.00 0.695 0.380 - 13.7 4.00% dent, claimed management at regarding the hotel union as.
9.21 8.34 Focol 9.21 9.21 0.00. 0.675 0.500 13.6 5.43%) ; ;
4.99 1.27 Freeport Concrate 4.15 1.45 0.00. - 0.022 0.000 52.3 . G00% Hard Rock Cafe, which is _ their official bargaining agents,.
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.90 9.90 0.00 0.526 0.405 188 ' 4.09% located on Charlotte and Bay the union would be satisfied,
ip ye : § Johan Sass ee a0 e08 490 toed ae shit one Streets, had tried to discour- and respect the outcome.” -
! .erzner internationa: 3 = '. . . . a 4 Yo} = * 7
40.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.760 49 zeo%| age employees from unionis- The BHCAWU represents
Fidelity Over-The-Caunter Securities ‘ : ing. about 7,000 Bahamian.employ-
i S2wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS.$ Div $ PIE Yield | ; tq. 6 : :
2 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 \ 41.00 1.488 0.960 9.4 7,25% Mr Bain said: These ate Coss
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref} 40.00 10.35 10.00 0.900 0.800 NM. 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.84 | 0,00 0.044 0.000 NM 0.00% ;
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities :
43 00. 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41,00 2.220 '0.000 19.4 0.00%F ; : . . :
16.06 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.33 13.33 42.50 » 4.105 0.810 14.6 G.93%' .
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings © 0.29 0.54 , 0.35 “0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%) are our news
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
S2wk-Hi _ S2wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last'12 Months Div $ * Yield % :
4.1846 Colina Money Market Fund 1.252089* \ o7
2.4169 2.0134 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.4169 *"* The Tr ibune wants to hear
105576 100000 ~—-Fidality Prime Income Fund 10.5576" from people who are
2.2560 2.1494 Colina MSt Preferred Fund 2.255981"" i j i
1.1273 4.0576 Colina Bond Fund making news 1n their

FINDEX: CLOSE $35,630 /YTD 1.421% / 2003 44.88%



pw Colina

ee Financial Advisors Ltd.


































“" 4.427305"""

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Des 02 â„¢ 1,000.00

Bla ssuna

ISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES - VISIT WYWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,240.35 / CHG 00.04 / %CHG 00.00 / YTD 200.97 / YTD % 19.34

the financial services sector for
business.

In the Cayman Islands, how-
ever, most attorneys and law
firms were connected to the
industry. Mr Paton added that
the Bar Association did not
want to open up the profession
to allow foreign attorneys in.

When he first began practis-
ing law, Mr Paton said he and
his father focused on the finan-
cial services sector because the
market for real estate and oth-
er legal business was crowded,
leaving financial services wide
open.

"He added that a growing
trend of consolidation will
mean that the Bahamas must
consider the question of how
to remain viable as a financial
services centre.

Mr Paton was part of a pan-
el discussion held during the
Ernst & Young third annual
Investment Fund Symposium.
Other panellists included
David Thain, managing direc-
tor of Arner Bank & Trust
(Bahamas); Hillary Deveaux,
acting executive director of the
Securities Commission of the
Bahamas; and Michelle
Thompson, a partner with
Ernst & Young.

Addressing the issue of the
European Union (EU) Savings
Tax Directive, Mr Thain said
are questioning its impact on
their investments in the
Bahamas. He said that already,
his bank had lost three invest-
ment funds as a result of clients
being worried about the impact
on their investment.

Directive

Mr Deveaux said eight funds
have left the jurisdiction
because of issues relating to the
EU Savings Tax Directive. He
said also that the directive may
become a question of choice,
the Bahamas’ willingness to
give up one thing to keep
another.

Ultimately, however, he said
it was a policy decision for the
Government.

'
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

at the issues surrounding the
Directive with experts it has
retained.

Meanwhile, Mr Thain exam-
ined the importance of brand
recognition to institutions in
the industry. He said the addi-
tion of more brand-named ser-
vice providers would be a good
thing for the Bahamas, allow-
ing it to better compete for
international clients.

Providers

The difficult question, how-
ever, was how to go about get-
ting those service providers
into the jurisdiction, and what
the Bahamas can offer that is
not currently being served by
existing jurisdictions.

Mr Thain said the calibre of
fund administrators in the
Bahamas was just as good:as
elsewhere, but without regis-
tered brand names it had
become difficult to attract the
broadest possible base of
clients.

He added, however, that the
cost of doing business “per
head” was likely higher in the
Cayman Islands, where a sig-
nificant number of industry
participants were foreigners
and required expensive work
permits.

Mr Thain said that although -

the Cayman Islands had signif;
icantly more investment.funds

. than the Bahamas, that posi-

tion was not necessarily a neg-
ative if the Bahamas could

position itself to serve as -

administrator for those funds.
Mr Deveaux added that
there were more investment

the market’s growth going for-
ward.

As the Bahamas looks to cre-
ate a number of products that
will help secure its position, Mr
Thain said he has seen already
some interest from clients in
the SMART Fund.

Touching on the SMART
Fund, Mr Paton agreed that it
was a product that could raise
the profile of the Bahamas.
Looking at other means of pro-
moting the industry, he said
there was a role to play in
encouraging mutual recogni-
tion and respect from external:
regulators.

Mr Deveaux said jurisdic-
tions place an emphasis on
exchange of information, and
that an ongoing concern is the
Bahamas being on the Finan-
cial Action Task Force’s
(FATF) list of countries that
are monitored because they
have failed to respond to
requests for information in a
timely manner, or at all.

Regime

Meanwhile, Mr Deveaux
criticised industry participants
for their lack of understanding.
of the jurisdiction’s regularly
régime, specifically regulations
and requirements that affect:
licencees of the Securities
Commission.

He said that applicants to the
Securities Commission often:

submit incomplete applications.

He told participants that
there have been a number of
cases where fraudulent docu-.
ments were submitted to the
Commission.

Bi acomtinttost
Brea eiten screed

Rock Cafe status)



THE he hotel union has
filed an application with the
Department of Labour to be
recognised as the bargaining
agent and representative for
workers at downtown Nassau’s
Hard Rock Cafe.

The Bahamas Hotel, Cater-



} neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a

times when the average work-.
er of this country is facing seri-,
ous challenges in the work-
place.

Respect |

s
“We are in an age now






good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the

| area or have won an

| award.

If so, call us on 322-1986

j and share your story.

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in jast 52 weeks

S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeke

Previous Close - Pravious day's waighted price for daily volume

Today’s Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 14 months

PIE - Closing price divided by the last 12. month earnings

**~AS AT AUG. 31, 2005) ""* - AS AT JUL 31, 2005

*-AS AT SEPT. 9, 2005/ *** - AS AT AUG. 31, 2005) ***** AS AT AUG, 34, 2008
ITO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 / FIDELITY 242-386-1764

Bid $- > Buying price of Colina and Fidality

Ask $- Selling price of Colina ard fidelity

Last Frice - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of ihe prior week

EPS $- A company's reported earings per share for the jast 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningfui

FINDEX - The Fidelity Baliamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994. = 10¢
















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THE TRIBUNE

CeBIT



MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, cu.

creates Bahamian opportunities

@ By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business
Reporter



RAPID growth in the Cay-
man Islands hedge fund sector
has created opportunities that
Bahamas-based fund adminis-
trators and other financial ser-
vices professionals can capi-
talise on.

Mike Mannisto, a partner
with Ernst and Young’s Cay-
man Islands office, and head
of its Business Risk Services
(BRS) and Technology and
Security Risk Services (SRS)
divisions, said Cayman-domi-
ciled investment funds were
only required to have local
auditors. This had left the door
open for funds registered in
Cayman to be overseen by
Bahamas-based fund adminis-
trators.

The growth in the Cayman
Islands’ hedge and investment
fund sectors had also created
an opportunity for Bahamians
to provide independent direc-
tor services for these funds.

Changing

Mr Mannisto said the role of
the independent director was
.changing, as directors held
more liability and were being
called on to take a more active
role in reviewing fund activi-
ties.

Fees for independent direc-
tors had increased significantly,
as hedge funds and other finan-
cial services entities sought
greater accountability from

their directors. Directors’ fees
have grown from $5,000 to
$20,000 per annum, and now
to $40,000 and even higher.

Boasted

The Cayman Islands boasted
some 6,500 hedge funds as at
June 30, 2005, and eight out of
10 of the world’s new hedge
funds are being domiciled in
that nation. Some 1,100 were
set up in 2004.

New fund domiciled in the
Cayman Islands increased by
21 per cent in the six months

ended June 2005, when com- '

pared to the same period in
2004.

Also, analysts estimate that
between 50 and 75 per cent of
the world’s hedge funds are
based in the Cayman Islands.

Markets that the Cayman
Islands financial services sec-

tor has been able to tap into’

are Asia and Japan. The Asian
presence in the Cayman Islands
has increased by 150 per cent
between 2004 and 2005, and
has been a major driver of
hedge fund growth in that juris-

diction. Mr Mannisto said -

Asian clients are primarily
using the Cayman Islands as a
conduit to invest in the US
debt and equity markets.

As the Bahamas looks to
grow its own investment funds
sector, he added that it may be
necessary to follow some of the
examples and trends already
defined by the Cayman Islands.

The implementation of effec-
tive regulation, and an empha-
sis on forecasting relevant

issues, had allowed the Cay-
man Islands to be proactive.
Another factor that has con-
tributed to its success, and
allows it to remain on top, is
that Cayman boasts a world-
class body of service providers
supported’ by an efficient, sec-
tor-friendly immigration policy.

Companies submit a business
plan that outlines their person-

nel needs, including a docu-_

ment showing how Caymani-
ans will ultimately take the
place of expatriates being
brought in. Of the 40,000 resi-
dents of Cayman,.about half -

some 20,000 - are work per- |

mit holders, with 8,000 to
10,000 of those individuals in
the financial services sector.

Expertise

The presence of globally-
recognised fund administrators,
law and auditing firms, which
provide the expertise required
to conduct business in offshore
jurisdictions; has also con-
tributed to the success enjoyed
by Cayman.

The Cayman Islands Mone-
tary Authority (CIMA), the
sector regulator, has also

worked to build the industry

by having an aggressive pro-

‘ gramme that includes travel-

ling to target markets to meet
with sector regulators, finan-

cial institutions, intermediaries :

and clients.

The Cayman government
and the island’s private sector
financial institutions were said
to have.a close relationship,
created in an effort to provide

Foreign regulatory



4

@ By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business.
Reporter



THE Haliamian financial ser-
vices industry is being harmed
by outdated views held by for-
eign regulators, Wendy War-
ren, executive director and
chief executive of the Bahamas
' Financial Services Board
(BFSB), said. .

Ms Warren said the question
for external regulators seems
always to be: “Can an inde-
pendent country provide the
same level of service that is
capable of complementing
those offered by their home
jurisdiction”.

Critical.

Addressing the Ernst &
‘Young third annual Investment
Fund Symposium, Ms Waren
said relationship, reputation
and results were the three crit-
ical areas the Bahamas must
examine if it is to achieve con-
tinued growth and develop-
ment.

She said relationships needed
to be developed over time with
‘key entities that have contacts
with potential clients in the
Bahamas’ target market.

It is this relationship that will
give Bahamas-based financial
services, businesses access to

clients, and cause these people |

to consider the offer being put
forward. The intermediary,
client advisor, or auditor of an
existing client may also be the
advisor or auditor of a sought-
after client. ;
Ms Warren said that if
Bahamians had limited visibil-
ity when key clients were avail-
able, it could result in a lost
opportunity. Therefore, it was
essential that stakeholders in
the financial services industry
continually built partnerships.
The Bahamas’ reputation,
Ms Warren added, would con-
tinually be a factor. Clients had
to ‘have a level of trust in the
jurisdiction they were ‘doing
business in, and in the service
provider that they had selected

‘

eliefs.



to hold their assets.

Ms Warren said that where
the Be,hamas was not the first,
or a clefault selection of the
client. regulatory recognition
was key. “Our reputation
determines how many deals we
seal,.” she added.

In. licensing funds, ihé-élien-
t’s Level of confidence in the
legeal system of the Bahamas
was key.

If the Bahamas was able to

~ est ablish.an International Arbi-

trition Centre, it could solidify
its position in the funds sector.
The Bahamas is recognised for
having greater compliance with
the: Basle Accord and Interna-
tiomal Organisation of Securi-
ties Commission (IOSCO).

Challenges

Mis Warren said the
Bahamas remained committed
to its private and institutional
cliesats. With no easy answers to
how the nation will address the
issues that negatively impact
its perception in the interna-
tion al marketplace, many chal-
lenges remain for the private
and public sector to tackle. She
noted that there was no one
single thing that can be done
to change the industry over
nighit.

4 advet Preity



hhurt Bahamas.



wise stewardship for the finan-
cial industry.

Mr Mannisto said that over-
sight and regulations, while
adequate, are not onerous or
punitive.

FirstCaribbean
Career Opportunity |
MANAGER, SOURCING AND SUPPLY MANAGEMENT

FirstCaribbean International Bank is the combination of CIBC and Barclays Bank in the Caribbean, Bahamas
and Belize. We are the region’s largest publicly traded bank with over 3,000 staff serving over 5.3 million
people in 16 countries. We manage over 500,000 active accounts through more than 80 branches and centres.

Responsibilities:

The absence of exchange
controls also contribute to the
attractiveness of the Cayman
Islands.

Mr Mannisto said there were
no restrictions imposed by the



Cayiian soverniient on the.
amount of foreign currency
that can be bought by nationals
or the amount of domestic cur-
rency available to non-nation-
als.

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Contact our

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° To manage and develop a professional and fully integrated client/practice facing country Sourcing Team

° To assist in the development. and maintenance of close working relationships between the Sourcing Team and the
Strategic Business Units

° To implement processes for the selection, appraisal and management of suppliers

* To ensure compliance with Sourcing and Supply Management's policies and procedures so that consinercial financial

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client- facing practice

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We offer an attractively structured compensation and reward package as well as performance bonuses.

Applications with detailed résumés should be submitted no later than 30th September, 2005 to:

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Administrative Assistant
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Head Office
Warrens
Barbados

Email: karen.bynoe@firstcaribbeanbank.com

Only applicants who are short-listed will be contacted.

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FirstCaribbean International Bank is an Associated Company of Barclays Bank PLC and CIBC.



PAGE.

4B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





PetroCaribe unlikely
to lower gas prices

FROM page one

Once the oil is landed in the
Bahamas, everything is price con-
trolled by the Government. It
takes $1.06 per gallon in duty,
plus levies 7 per cent stamp tax on
the cost of imported fuel (CIF).
The Government also sets the
$0.33 and $0.44 wholesale and
retail margins respectively, so the
administration could gut gas
prices instantly if it cut these or its
own taxes. However, the latter

move would risk internal conflict
because the taxes have already
been budgeted for by the Min-
istry of Finance.

Because Venezuela is tied to
selling crude oil at global market
prices, Mr Simms told The Tri-
bune that he felt the “savings will
be small, if anything” if the
Bahamas signed on to Petro-
Caribe.

The Esso country manager said
the Government and its Petrole-
um Usage Review Committee
had indicated they believed

PetroCaribe would deliver cheap-
er freight costs, due to Venezue-
la’s commitment to charge for this
at “cost price”. Mr Simms,
though, said he was “not sure
what that means”.

“We’re very concerned about
reliability of supply,” he added
of PetroCaribe. Preliminary dis-
cussions with the Review Com-
mittee had indicated that the
three oil companies - Esso, Shell
and Texaco - would not be tied to
purchasing oil and related prod-
ucts through a National Energy

GN-261

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

MINISTRY OF HEALTH
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL |
HEALTH SERVICES

MOSQUITO CONTROL ACT

NEW PROVIDENCE & FAMILY ISLANDS

The Department of Environmental Health Services wishes to inform the
public that during the rainy season there will be an increase in mosquito
populations. In order to effectively address this increase the department has
intensified its control program, however, no “fogging” activities will take
place on days when weather conditions (i.e. rain, wind) are not favourable.
Control activities for mosquito larvae will be sustained as they are not
dependent upon weather conditions.

The public is requested to assist the Department of Environmental Health

Services in its control measures by ensuring that premises are kept free of

any.containers which may accumulate water. Containers which are present
should be covered or turned face down. Water for pets should be regularly
changed. These measures will prevent mosquitoes from breeding and cs
decrease the population:



Sane

Agency, and they could still
source through their own supply
chains.

Mr Simms said that ultimately,
the Government would have to
make a decision on whether it
wanted to trade-off savings that
were likely to be small against
what he felt was the greater risk
of supply chain disruption if it
signed up to PetroCaribe. -

“We want to work with the
Government and the committee
to make sure they see the full pic-
ture,” Mr Simms said. “We’re still
pretty early in the game.”

The oil industry’s. request to
have one of its executives
appointed to the Review Com-
mittee had been refused, but Mr

Simms had already had one inter-.

view with the group and was set
to have further meetings. He had
been asked questions about tank-
age and other details on the oil

.. -industry-supply. chain in-his first

encounter.

“Basically, what they are telling
me, and it seems what they’re:say-
ing in the press, is that they
haven’t decided. about Petro-
- Caribe vet and want to get infor-

-Colinalm

Ce an office ; at 308 Bast Bay
Street.

FROM page one

also informed The Tribune that
_ColinaImperial Insurance Com-
pany is planning to consolidate
operations at two locations by
the end of January 2006 - the
former Imperial Life head-
quarters at 21 Collins Avenue



Telephone:

Fax:

PUBLIC NOTICE ~

The public is hereby notified that, with effect
from Monday 19th September, 2005 the Central .
Bank of The Bahamas will relocate its Freeport ,
Office from its present location in the Regent |
Centre West, Explorer’s Way to Office No. 5,
Second Floor, First Commercial Centre 3
Building, East Mall Drive.

All existing telephone and fax numbers
will remain unchanged. These are as follows:

(242) 352-5963.

| (242) 352-5397

mation to make a recommenda-
tion to the Prime Minister’s
Office,” Mr Simms said.

While the Review Committee
appeared to be going through the
fact finding process, the Esso
country manager said some com-
ments in the media made by its
members indicated that they had
possibly already made up their
minds.

However, Mr Simms said that
it made “quite a bit of sense” for
the Bahamas Electricity Corpo-
ration (BEC) to purchase fuel
under PetroCaribe, since it was
such a large bulk purchaser, buy-
ing around $120 million per year.

He added that BEC could use .
the up-front savings from pur- .
chasing oil on credit to enhance

energy efficiencies and savings,

as well as passing this on to busi- :
ness and residential consumers ;

through lower surcharges.

_.. “There. may. be. some. unique......
benefits to BEC which would |
help,” Mr Simms said. The

Review Committee is also under- '
stood to have recognised the need ;

to look for energy alternatives.

The Esso executive said global

The former would be home
to Colinalmperial’s agent force,
which the company wants to
reduce to 90, information tech-
nology (IT) and customer ser-
vice. departments.

The new 308 Easy Bay Stre et
building, which is presently










4








oil prices were being driven by.
demand, which was rising faster
than supply. Global refining
capacity was also limited, with
Hurricane Katrina having dam-
aged many Gulf Coast refineries

‘and offshore rigs, while British
:Petroleum’s (BP) Texas refinery

had been shut down earlier this
year.
Costs and the difficulties in

_ obtaining permits were also con-

straining the ability to build new
refineries.
If the Government does sign

’ up to PetroCaribe, it will not be
' eliminating the so-called offshore

middleman used by the oil com-
panies, but instead replacing them
with its own National Energy.
Agency. It is questionable
whether any cost savings will
result, especially given govern-
ment’s track record in business.

And due to oil’s volatility, and
the likelihood prices will.continue
to go up, any immediate savings
from PetroCaribe could be off-
set by the increased future price
and rising debt loads from previ-
ous credit purchases.

erial

unoccupied, would contain the

group business and claims
department; risk management;
management; mortgages;
accounting; human resources
and the underwriting depart:
ment.

Sources said No. 308 East

Bay Street is owned by a com:

pany called Bayview House, in
which Emanuel Alexiou, Colina
Holdings (Bahamas) chairman,
is said to hold a ‘55 per cent

stake. Although there is nothing.

wrong with related party trans-

actions such. as. this in and.of
themselves, and there is.nothing.
to suggest anything is amiss,
here, concerns on disclosure of:
By related party dealings is what.
“caused Colina Holdings:
(Bahamas) 2004 annual audit,
to be qualified by the auditors.’

In an e-mail to staff, Glen

Ritchie, Colinalmperial’s vice-:
president of operations, con-
firmed The Tribune’s exclusive

story that the company was

seeking to raise almost $16 mil-
lion by selling its former No.12,

Village Road headquarters, the
former Canada Life building on
Rosetta Street in Palmdale, and
its branch office at No: 56
Collins Avenue.

Mr Ritchie said the consbie
dation into the two new prop-
erties would enhance Coli-
nalmperial’s “financial and
operational” efficiency, as the
current set up had led to “dis-
persed” departments.

In addition, there were ongo-
ing maintenance costs associat-
ed with the current property
portfolio.

KIRK FREEPORT PLAZA LIMITED
PO Box 893 GT, Cardinal Avenue, (rand Cayman, British West Indies
Phone: (345) 949 7477 Fax: (345) 9.49 8124 Email: kirkfree@candw.ky

Kirk Freeport is a leading duty free luxury retailer in the “ayman Islands, carrying
all the top Watch & Jewellery brands. We are cui’rently looking for experienced
Jewellery Sales Associates who are interested in viyorking i in the Cayman Islands,
and would like to be considered for the following position.

JEWELLERY SALES ASSOCIATES

Ideal Applicants:

e 2 years previous experience in fine jewellery & ‘watch sales required

e Graduate Gemologist preferred

-¢ Must be well groomed, reliable and able to work on own initiative

° Must have a pleasant, outgoing personality with good communication skills —

e Must be self-motivated and committed to providing first class customer service -

¢ Must be trustworthy and dependable 3

* Must be willing to work flexible hours, including weekends and Bank Holidays,
when necessary.

We offer an attractive employee package for this: position including:
e Tax free commission based salary, with earnings potential up to US$70, 000

e Medical Insurance and Pension Scheme
© Staff Discount Scheme

!

Please fax resume and two rei‘erences to
Personnel Manager at fax # (c«45) 949 8124
or email to Icw@kirkfree»ort.net





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‘INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY | 2 COMP930 01 WEB PAGE DESIGN W/S 9:30am-4:30PM Thur/Fri 6&7Oct 2 days $500
# {Course Description: This course covers basic concepts of Information Technology. The course provides training COSMETOLOGY
in the following areas; Basic Hardware Proficiency, Application Features Proficiency, Operating System Proficiency, COSMB02 01 MAKE-UP APPLICATION 6:00-9:00PM Mon 30ct Bwesks $005
4 pe ia a el Begins:Wednesday, 28 September 2005 Time:6:00pm - 9:00pm COSM804 01 MANICURE & PEDICURE 6:00-9:00PM Tue 4Oct 8weeks = $225
-| ,-Duration:12 weeks Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees: $450.00 COSM807 01 NAIL ART TECHNICIAN 6:00-9:00PM Mon/Thur 26Sep 6weeks $500
rey DECORATING
Bho UE onaDe AND REPAIR ; stds eat DECO800 . 01 INTERIOR DECORATING | 6:00-9:00PM Tue 40ct = S weeks «$225
|,.Course Description: This course is a hands-on introduction to technology systems for use in information : DECO801 01 INTERIOR DECORATING II - 6:00-9:00PM Wed 5 Oct S weeks $250
1; environments. The course will cover the following topics: Basic Hardware, Operating Systems, Troubleshooting FLOR800 ; 01 FLORAL DESIGN | 6:00-9:00PM Mon 3 Oct 10weeks $225
‘and Repairs. :00-9:
iM Dra. isite:N Begins: Tuesday, 27 September 2005 Time: 6:00pm - 7:300m FLOR801 01 FLORAL DESIGN II 6:00-9:00PM Thur 6 Oct 10 weeks $250
Caria es Tuesdays and Thursdays e Duration:12 weeks FLOR@02 01 ‘FLORAL DESIGNII 6:00-9:00PM Tue 40ct 10 weeks $275
a..j2.Venue: BHTC Computer La ees: .00 ENGLISH
ue QUICKBOOKS ENG 900 01 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS 6:00-9:00PM Tue - 4 Oct 8weeks $225
: ‘Course Description: This course is designed to train new and existing small business entrepreneurs (less that 20 ESL 900 a1 ENGLISH AS ASECOND LANG. — 6:00-9:00PM Mon . 30ct 10weeks~ $250
@,,| . employees) how to organize and manage their accounting activities using QuickBooks Pro software. Students will HEALTH AND FITNESS ; -
''T learn how to set-up their company files, chart of accounts, budget, customers, vendors and employees. MASG900 - 01 MASSAGE THERAPY 6:00-9:00PM Thur 29Sep 10weeks $465
“| ‘Pre-requisite:None Begins:Tuesday, 27 September 2005 Time:6:00pm - 9:00pm ayes ESSENTIALS |
|* Duration: 6 weeks Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees: $330.00 MASG901 01 MASSAGE THERAPY 6:00-9:00PM Mon 26Sep 10weeks $620
ESSENTIALS II
WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP “Anes
Course Description: This course targets persons who would like to create their personal webpages and will cover HLTH 800 Oo GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR —_6:00-9:00PM Thur 29 Sept 10weeks $400
Web page creation, Web site management, and HTML. Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, LANGUAGES : ;
Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages. _ : oy CRE 900 - 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE | 6:00-7:30PM Mon/Wed 3 Oct 10 weeks $225
Pre-requisite: Participants must be computer literate and have a basic knowledge of word-processing CRE 901 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE || —-6:00-7:30PM Tue/Thur 4 Oct 10 weeks $250
Beales (Dette 0S Tne a suse edpm Duration? days SPA 900 01 CONVERSATIONALSPANISH| 6:00-7:30PM MonWed 3Oct 10weeks $225
Venue: CEES Computer Lab _— Fees: $550.00 me SPA 901 01 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH Il —_6:00-7:30PM Tue/Thur 4 Oct 10 weeks $250
Aen e cece ee eennenneeenee ner aenananscsseneeaeeneenaenaeenene nen eneeussensnenenasennaneneneneeneneesensscesenssnsnonscnecasesuevesneucosanenas: SE ere an a tear eee aes FRE 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH | 6:00-7:30PM Tue/Thur 4 Oct 10 weeks $225
COMPUTER WORKSHOP MANAGEMENT |

2, “'Date: Thursday, 6th & Friday 7th October, 2005 Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm

|; -HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP



DE Date: Thutsday, 6th & ‘Friday 7th Oétober, 2005 Time: 9:30am — 4:30pm
#') Venue: Choices Restauirant;"‘Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre Tuition: $350.00

br

i}; HEALTH AND FITNESS COURSE OFFERINGS

eh!
| t+ MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS |

‘[’ areas will include Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Wellness Education (Psychological and Physiological Date: Monday, 26 September 2005
{’ Benefits), Indications and Contraindications, Serving Special Populations and Complementary Bodywork Systems Time: 6:00am - 9:000m
fe) -to include Aromatherapy Essentials. : Ime: : m -UUp :
a {2 Starting:Thursday, September 29, 2005 6:00-9:00pm Duration: 10 Weeks Venue: C.R. Walker Secondary
Hct: Tuition Fee: $465.00 Venue: The College of the Bahamas Prerequisite: None’
| | (MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS II Tuition: $225.00

Z “Oils; relaxation and meditative methods; and hot stone therapy.

. “GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR

fa}: and how to teach group exercise.



@ -|,-computers and would like to create their own web pages are encouraged to attend. Specific topics will include

“id= 1 HIBUNE BUSINESS . : WUNDAI Oe -ieee ye aes 4 ote .

oT a

PENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

COMPUTER OFFERINGS PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT






















































































































































MGMT900 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT. | 6:00-9:00PM Thur - 29Sep . 12weeks $250
MGMT901 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT. tl 6:00-9:00PM Mon 26Sep 12weeks $300





., SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE































i |, This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior customer service. MGMT$902 . 01 HUMAN RESOURCE 6:00-9:00PM- . Thur/Fri 6&70Oct 2days $350
| =It focuses on customer value, retention and relationship building and employee motivation. MANAGEMENT W/S fo
’? Date: 13 October 2005 Time: 9:30am — 4:30pm MEDICAL
'Y"Venue: Choices Restaurant, Bahamas.Tourism and Training Centre Tuition:$170.00 _ MEDT900 01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY | 6:00-9:00PM Thur 6 Oct 1Oweeks $225
:} EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS SEWING

This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. SEW 800 01 BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING — 6:00-9:00PM Thur 6 Oct 10weeks $225
| It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations. SEW 802 01 BASIC OF FREEHAND. CUTTING II 6:00-9:00PM Mon 3 Oct 10weeks $250
'{: Date: 13 October 2005 Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm SEW 805 01 DRAPERY MAKING | 6:00-9:00PM Tue 4 Oct 10 weeks $225
‘/ Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road ; Tuition: $160.00 SEW 811 01 UPHOLSTERY MAKING | 6:00-9:00PM Wed 5 Oct 10 weeks $225



ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-coordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/ 328-1936 or email All fees are included with the
exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of
your passport. CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course



»-WEB PAGE DESIGN .
3}:; This course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy fiddling with








+, Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages.

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

This is an introductory course covering. basic medical terms. Students will be exposed
to terms that will enable them to read and interpret medical reports, charts, and
communications relevant to a variety of health care environments. Major topics
include Word Building Rules, Prefixes, Suffixes, Whole Body Terminology, Integumentary
System, Skeletal System, Muscles and Joints, Nervous System, Blood and Lymphatic
System, Cardiovascular System, Respiratory System and Digestive System.






"(VYenue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road Tuition: $550.00
ie? i









y,this two-day workshop is designed to equip managers and leaders in organizations and enhance the skills of current
;lumari Resource professionals withithe theory, tools and techniques required for effeetive human resource

| management practices in today’s workplace.

















+. This is an introductory course for learning basic techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits: Major topic




















_| This is an advance course for learning techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major topics include
‘/“ introduction to hydrotherapy; spa and body treatments; the basic facial; aromatherapy-fundamentals or essential





ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/ 328-
1936 or email nlacroix@cob.edu.bs All fees are included with the exception of the
application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting application, kindly provide
copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to change
tuition, fees, course content, course schedule and course materials.

CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE

(Formerly School of Hospitality & Tourism Studies)

Industry Training Department
CULINARY COURSES — FALL SEMESTER 042005








i). Starting: Monday, September 26, 2005 © 6:00-9:00pm Duration: 10 Weeks
:4: Tuition Fee:$620.00 ; Venue: The College of the Bahamas









‘| This is an introductory course in teaching group fitness instruction. Major topics of discussion will include basic
anatomy and physiology; choreography and cueing; the five components of fitness, nutrition, basic exercise testing








:42Starting: Thursday, September 29, 2005 © 6:00-9:00pm Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee:$400.00 . Venue: TBA









| TRANSFER OF COB ACADEMIC UPGRADING COURSES
| FROM FACILITIES AT
C.C. SWEETING JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL






































































































































































jeoorsopm [ta [ocs-27 [ero

COURSE CODE | BEGINS |DUR [DAYS |TIME | TUITION&FEE RESOURCE Venue. | Max. Enrol,
: (ADDITIONAL $40 | MATERIALS
: 2 APP FEE FOR
Please note new class locations listed below: St NEWSTUDENTS) ||
1, Bahamian Cuisine COOK 806 | September 29) 6 weeks | Thurs. | 6:00-9:00pm | $225.00 $10-$12 per week | SHTSMain ‘| 15
. : : Kitchen
COURSE SEC | TIME DAY/S | ROOMS 2. Gourmet Cooking! | COOK 823 | October3 | 6weeks | Mon. | 6:00-9:00pm | $200.00 ~-/$20perweek | SHTS Main | 15
fishes (Originally « i to Kitchen
aN a Assigned) 3, Gourmet Cooking II COOK 824 | October 3 6 weeks | Mon. | 6:00-9:00pm | $225.00 $20 per week at 15
: 5 = beech es 4. Kitchen. ss
MATH 046 6:00-7:50 PM | uw{ccs-27 lpoc-11. CSO 8, Cake & Pastry Making | | COOK 813 | October4 | 10 weeks | Tues. | 6:00-9:00pm | $225.00 $10 - $15 per week re 15
MATH 047 6:00-7:50 PM CCS - 28 _| BITC-12 9, Cake & Pastry Making il] COOK 814 | October4 | 10weeks | Tues. | 6:00-9:00m | $250.00 | $10-$15perweek | SHTS Pastry |15
MATH 046 6:00-7:50 PM CCS -29 | BLVD -4C RS Saree MA ane
MATH 048 4C 6:00-7:50 PM | MW CCS - 30 | Monday--BLVD 2A 10. Bread Making COOK 810 | September 29 | 6weeks | Thurs. | 6:00-8:00pm | $200.00 $5-$10perweek | SHTS Larder
| oes yey EEL SA 11. Cake Decorating! | COOK8t7 | § t0weeks | Wed. | 6:009:000m | $225.00 ime eeCE
| MATH 048 [ 2C [6:00-7:50PM | MW | CCS-31 | . Cake Decorating 817 | September 28 | 10 weeks . | 6:00-9:00pm | $225.00 10- $15 per week | St der
MATH 047 600-750 PM GCs =32 12 Ca Deowalo T cookie | Sepenber2s | roweeks | wed | 600 00pm 22500 | §10-$15 per week ale
MATH 048 6:00-7:50 PM CCS - 33_| CCS Sr. Block | : Tier eee 2 daal Kitchen
MATH 046 Cc 6:00-7:50 PM CCS - 34 | CCS Sr. Block i For further information please contact the Industry Training Department of the School of Hospitality & Tourism Studies at 323-5804, 323-6804 or fax 325-8175

CCS - 28 | BTTC -8
00-7:50 PM CCS - 29 | BITC -LT

DIPLOMAS ARE READY
a Teese :

a
Diplomas for December 2004 and April 2005 graduates are
available for collection from the Records Department,
so Monday - Friday from 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Identification
is required for the release of the diploma.

ENG 016 6:00-7:50 PM CS-37 [GSR-1C- BLVD

BTTC — Bahamas Tourism Training Centre
BLVD - Boulevard Building
T - Technology Block








For more information, please call the Records
Department at 302-4522/3.



Visit our website at





PAGE 6B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

FATF to end monitoring
of Bahamas in October





FROM page one

itoring list should further posi-
tion it to grow its financial ser-
vices sector because it is easi-
er, less costly and more efficient
to do business if other jurisdic-
tions and financial institutions
accept that the Bahamas is a fit
and proper jurisdiction.

Giving the opening address
for Ernst & Young’s third annu-
al Investment Fund Symposium,
held at the British Colonial
Hilton, Mrs Maynard-Gibson
told participants that the Finan-
cial Services Regulatory Reform
Commission was expected to
submit its findings to the Gov-
ernment shortly.

Commission member Hillary
Deveaux, who is the acting exec-
utive director at the Securities
Commission, said he would like
to see two regulators for the sec-
tor.

He said-that what could hap-
pen is that the Central Bank of
the Bahamas would remain as
regulator for the banking sec-





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MICHAEL JOSEPH, 5TH.
STREET, THE GROVE, P.O.BOX N3331, NASSAU, -
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 12th day of
SEPTEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

tor. The other four regulators -
the Securities Commission, the
Registrar of Insurance Compa-
nies, the Inspector of Financial
and Corporate Service Providers
and the Compliance Commis-

‘sion - would merge to form a

single body to oversee the rest
of the sector, working in con-
junction with the Central Bank.

Speaking to policy-related
and technological matters, Mrs
Maynard-Gibson. said she had
heard strong concerns about
the level of financial sector
expertise that was available in
the Bahamas. She said a plan to
create a fast-track immigration
policy for financial services pro-
fessionals coming into the
Bahamas was being worked on.

The minister told participants
that the Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company (BTC) has
advised her office that it was
completing the work necessary

- to enable the use BlackBerrys, a

wireless technology that allows
for the remote access of e-mail,
HTML and WAP web pages,












LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

_MAJUMA CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby. given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 15th
day of September, 2005. The Liquidators are Argosa ae
of P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator)
Ck

COMMONWEALTH BANK

Employment Opportuni

Messenger

Commonwealth Bank is the premier Bahamian Bank with
branches located in New Providence, Abaco and Grand Bahama.
We are committed ‘to delivering superior quality service, to training
and developing our employees, to creating value for our
shareholders and to promoting economic growth and stability i in

the community.

Core Job Responsibilities:

* Delivery and collection of mail, documents, parcels and other items
* Assist with sorting incoming and outgoing mail

* Deliver requisitioned items

Qualifications, Skills and Experience
* Two to three years job related experience
* Ability to life and carry moderately heavy packages

¢ A valid Driver's License
* Current Police Certificate

Personal Attributes

* Be matured and responsible (minimum age — 25 years)
» Strong interpersonal and communication skills (oral and written)

Benefits

« Competitive salary commensurate with experience

* Performance-based incentives

* Health, vision and dental insurances

* Life insurance
* Pension plan

* Dynamic working environment’

Interested persons should submit their resumes and copies of certificates

in writing or email before September 23, 2005 to:

HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT

AMS Caine Sohhons

“Re: MESSENGER”
Head Office, The Plaza, 2% Floor, Mackey Street
BO. Box SS-6263,
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 394-0758

E-mail address: Tanya. Astwood@combankltd.com



provides for phone, SMS (short
message service) and text use,
and also acts as an organiser, in
the Bahamas.

BTC had also advised her that
most non-Bahamian cell phones
do work in the Bahamas.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson told
industry participants that the
Government was working with
experts on issues surrounding
the European Union’s Savings

Tax Directive, examining the
impact of the directive on
Bahamas-based institutions and
their clients ,and what the juris-
diction can do to minimise any
negative fallout.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said the
draft of the External Insurance

Bill and the accompanying reg- °

ulations were being completed.
She added that the financial
services sector was a strong pil-

lar of the economy, and that
Government’s action has
demonstrated its clear commit-
ment to the sector.

She said the administration’s
continuing goal, in collabora-
tion with the sector, was to max-
imise its growth potential, while
minimising the risk of illegal
abuses.

The Merrill Lynch and
Capgemini 2004 World Wealth

THE TRIBUNE.

BI

Report stated that the wealth of
high net worth: individuals: was.
expected to grow by 7 per cent,
with total value likely to exceed
$40.7 trillion by 2008. os

With such tremendous growth,
in wealth expected, the
Bahamas had to position itself.
to capitalise on the opportunity
to further develop and
expand the financial services
sector.

up for

over $5.6 million in the quarter to May 31, offsetting the loss from
its concrete operation.

This trend has become more pronounced since the September
2004 hurricanes, which inflicted $1.3 million in damage to the com-
pany’s Freeport-based retail format, The Home Centre. Although
fully insured, this company had to operate out of a badly damaged
building for several months, although the Home Centre is due to
move into its new location in February 2006.

Robin Hood?’s sole Nassau outlet is at the Summerwinds Plaza on
Harrold Road, while its heavy duty appliances are being sold in
Grand Bahama at the former 85,000 sq ft Home Centre location.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that IMMACULA LUMA OF SUNLIGHT
VILLAGE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that










NOTICE i: is hereby given that NELSON JOSEPH, STH:
STREET, THE GROVE, P.O.BOX N3331, NASSAU;
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for:
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as®
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows::
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be®:
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the:
facts within twenty-eight days from the 12th day of.
SEPTEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality.4
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.<







any person-who knows-any: reason why registration/ naturalization:>|r ..».:
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement--[)..; -

of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 19TH -day. of
SEPTEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.

I) 21 09) 2)
Jewelry Sales
Associates

We are looking for male and female
Melba ee Associates. A highly
motivated, energetic team player with
or.¢ ces utoN om tN ery sales! Must be.
well groomed and mature! Base salary
and competitive commission structure.

Please fax resume to: 325-7105

, or email to:
info@coachtothetop.com

call 325-5226
for more details



osition of Accountant

Candidates must have at least 3 years experience in
accounting in the financial industry with sound
knowledge of but not limited to:

Supervising an accounts department and staff
Formulating budgets
Managing Accounts Receivables and Payables

Preparation of monthly and annual financial
reports and statements

Preparation of bank reconciliations and various
general ledger accounts to the sub ledgers

Co-ordinate the annual audit with external
auditors and preparation of the necessary
schedules:

Preparing reports for the regulators
Must be:a team player

Must possess people skills and be prepared to
interact with customers.
Minimum qualifications: AA in Accounting

Please forward resume before September 21, 2005 to:
P.O. Box N-7544
or email bleccul @bgcfreedom.com



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2004/COM/bnk/00064°,

IN'THE SUPREME COURT My
COMMERCIAL DIVISION iy

"at



° Nassau & Abaco.
° 5 years minimum experience” ~~

Please send resumes to:
PO. Box N-4827

or pick up an application form at
Bahamas ols Limited,Gladstone
oad.

IN THE MATTER OF MPI INTERNATIONAL LTD.
(Formerly, Vineries Ventures, Inc.)

(In Compulsory Liquidation)



AND IN THE MATTER OF THE *
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
Ch. 309 Statute Laws of The Bahamas, 2000 Edition h



NOTICE °
TAKE NOTICE (pursuant to Section 60, Companies (Winding Up) Rules) a
persons claiming to be creditors of the above named company are required to
submit on or before the 31st October, 2005 the particulars of their debt or claims
by way of a sworn affidavit, to Mrs. Maria Ferere, the Official Liquidator, cto
Ernst & Young,.One Montague Place, P.O. Box N-3231, Nassau, Bahamas. ‘In
default thereof they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made
by the Official Liquidator. Please contact Mrs. Ferere via email or telefax for: a
copy of the form of affidavit at the following email/fax addressés:
maria.ferere@bs.ev.com; fax: (242) 502- 6090. *

Maria Ferere S
Official Liquidator

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2004/COM/bnk/00064 =

IN THE SUPREME COURT in
COMMERCIAL DIVISION ae

IN THE MATTER OF MOORE PARK FUNDING LTD.

(In Compulsory Liquidation)



AND IN THE MATTER OF THE me
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT i
Ch. 309 Statute Laws of The Bahamas, 2000 Edition i
NOTICE =

it
et

*
fy

TAKE NOTICE (pursuant to Section 60, Companies (Winding Up) Rules) all
persons claiming to be creditors of the above named company are required to
submit on or before the 31st October, 2005 the particulars of their debt or claims
by way of a sworn affidavit, to Mrs. Maria Ferere, the Official Liquidator, c/o
Ernst & Young, One Montague Place, P.O. Box N-3231, Nassau, Bahamas. in
default thereof they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made
by the Official Liquidator. Please contact Mrs. Ferere via email or telefax for'a
copy of the form of affidavit at the following email/fax addresses:
maria.ferere@bs.ev.com; fax: (242) 502-6090. at |



Maria Ferere
Official Liquidator ae







THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005, PAGE 7B





Bahamas loses 30%
2-5 night cruise share

FROM page one

an businesses and citizens”. The

cruise lines tend to control all
activities, ground and shore
excursions on these islands,
efisuring that the lion’s share of
revenues end up in their pock-
ets.
- While statistics, based on
first and second port of
entry, had shown that Nas-
sau cruise visitors had
increased by 70 per cent
between 1996 and 2003,
going from 1.2 million to 2
million, during the same
period private island visitors
increased three-fold, grow-
ing from 538,000 to 1.7 mil-
lion. © on
“Private island visitors
now represent 44 per cent
of total cruise visitors, up
from 24 per cent in 1996,”
the MRG report said.
“Annual increases of 32 per

cent, 44 per cent and 19 per ©

Confidential study shows nation _
losing out to Caribbean competitors
and cruise lines’ private islands

cent occurred in 1999, 2000
and 2002, respectively.

“At the same time, visi-
tors to Grand Bahama
declined by 58 per cent from
602,000 to 250,000, reflect-
ing a further substantial loss
of four night cruise capacity.
Total Caribbean cruise
capacity increased by 84 per
cent during this period.

“In 2003, about 50 per
cent of the Nassau visitors
did not visit another
Bahamian port. About 46
per cent of the private island
visitors did not visit another
Bahamian port.”

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

-Chairman’s Review
Of the Results

The MRG report said the
cruise lines had incorporat-
ed calls to private islands
into three, four, five and
seven-day cruises.

The problem the Bahamas
faces in regard to the pri-
vate islands is that these
locations are perceived as
“always” delivering “the

‘highest levels of passenger

satisfaction”.
“The cruise lines with a
private island in the

Bahamas tend to favour it -

over Nassau. The cruise
lines with no private island
favour Nassau over Grand

- FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

For the nine months ended July 31, 2005

last fiscal year end.

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited earned a consolidated net income and

operating profit for the nine months ending July 31, 2005 of $71.6 million. The operating profit,

i.e. net income before integration charges and goodwill amortisation, improved by $25million or

54% over the same period last year. Earnings per share (based on operating profit) was 59.6
- cents, 20.5 cents greater than the amount for the same period of last year.

' The Bank’s net interest income for the nine month period rose to $92 million, which represented
an increase of $22 million over the same period last year. The Bank’s US dollar bank placements

5, and the securities portfolios continued to yield significantly higher interest income as'the US fed

;; fate rose by 1.5% since October 31, 2004. Consequently the net interest margin for the period

: was 3.7%, which was an increase of 0.8% over last year. Operating expenses are well within the

budgeted expenses for the period.

At July 31, 2005, the total assets of the Banik were $3,421 million, a growth of $219 million or 7%
@. from-this date_last year and $160 million or 5% since last fiscal year end. This growth was

: generated by the increase in loans, both residential mortgages and business loans, which
increased by $90 million and $79 million respectively, from last fiscal year end. Total deposit
liabilities grew by $178 million or 6.6% since this date last year, and by $117 million or 4% from

The return on assets for the nine months was 2.9%, which is an improvement of 0.9% from last
year (before integration and goodwill charges). Likewise the return on equity (before ~

integration and goodwill charges) improved by 8%, increasing from 19% to 27% for the nine

5 months of this year.

Lam satisfied with the performance of the Bank for the first three quarters of this year and look
forward to the continuation of these favorable trends.

he Ww hii ot .
' Michael K. Mansoor
Chairman
3



FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Consefidated Balance Sheet
Bs'e00

Assets
Cagh and due from banks
Seourities
Loans
Goodwill
Fixed assets
Other essets
Total assets
Liabilities

Total deposits
Other liabilities

Tetal liabilities

Equity .

Share capital & reserves
Retained eamings

Total Rabities and shareholders’ equity



Unaudited Unaudited Audited
July 31, 2005 duty 31.2004 Qctober 31, 2004
(Restated)

828,433 930,895 864,055

475,250 372,964 452,145
1,837,127 1,644,341 1,669,007
187,747 187,748 - 187,747

32,335 33,401 35,334

59,932 32,468 52,695
3,420,824” 3,201,817 3,260,983



2,824,252 2,645,854 2,707,621
45,508 46,046 28,270
2,869,760 2.691,900 2,735,891
416,464 414.364 414,364
134,600 95,553 110,728
a Te
551,064 $09,917 $25,092
3,420,824 “_3.201,817 3,260,983

Director

Bahama,” the MRG report
said.
“Neither
Grand Bahama has devel-
oped a strong image of
being a port for shopping,
as have some other ports. In
addition, the opportunities
for interesting sightseeing
excursions may also be con-
sidered somewhat limited.
“For these reasons, and
because there may have
been periods when visitors
did not experience a warm
welcome, the cruise lines on
occasion have.perhaps felt
that passenger satisfaction

Nassau nor -

levels were not what they
should be.”
Nevertheless, the market-
ing and financial value of
the private islands to the
cruise lines were a major
point of leverage for the
Bahamas in negotiations
with the likes of Carnival
and RoyalCaribbean on a
new incentive programme.

“While private islands.

have been developed in
Haiti and the Dominican
Republic for cruises operat-
ing from Florida, the
Bahamas ‘probably offers
the greatest selection of sites
and the best geographic
location for such islands,”
the MRG report said. .
Other points of leverage
enjoyed by the Bahamas

were that, due to the US

Jones Act’s requirement
that the cruise lines call at a
foreign port before return-
ing to the US, the only way

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Consolidated Statement of Changes in Shareholders Equity
BS'000

i

Share Capital &

‘to meet this for three-night

cruises from south Florida
and four-night cruises from
Port Canaveral and the mid-
Atlantic ports was to call in
the Bahamas.

However, the report
pointed out that these
advantages could be lost
when Cuba opens to US
tourism.

“The cruise lines have
contingency plans for enter-
ing the Cubs market as soon
as it opens to US visitors,
and they could quickly rede-
ploy a number of ships to
itineraries that inciude
Cuba,” the report warned.

“Once Cuba is able to
offer port facilities and an
infrastructure to accommo-
date cruise visitors, it is like-
ly that many (if not all) of
the three-night cruises will
discontinue calls in the
Bahamas in favour of
Cuba.”

Resetves Retained Earnings Total

Balance at October 31, 2003, as restated 413,664 87,076 500,740
Net income for the period 46,443 46,443
Dividends (37,266) (37,266)
Transfer to Statutory Reserve Fund - Turks & Caicos Islands 700 ~ (700) Loe
Balance at July 31, 2004 414,364 95,553 509,917
Balance at October 31, 2004 414,364 110,728 : 525,092
Net income for the period 71,654 71,654
Dividends (45,682) (45,682)
Transfer to Statutory Reserve Fund - Turks & Caicos Islands 7

POO og



Balance at July 31, 2005, - 416,464

SY

——..

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Consolidated Statement of Income ,



(2,100)



134,600 351,064

BS'000
Unaudited . Unaudited Andited
Quarter Ended Nine Months Ended Year Ended
July 31,2005 July 31, 2004 July 31 Judy 31, 2004 Qctober 31, 2004

Total interest income 46,826 39,957 137,45 111,293 153,961,
Total interest expenses (16,048) (15,886) (45,668) 41,275) 55,108
Net interest income : 30,778 24,071 91,777 70,018 98,853
Non-interest income ; 10,405 8,693 30,639 988 36,907

41,183 32,764 122,416 99,006 135.760
Non-interest expenses 16,399 16,044 46,563 45,950 65,954
Provision for credit losses 1,519 1,475 4,199 6,090 7,909

17,918 17,519 50,762 52,040 73,863
Operating profit - 23,265 15,245 71,654 46,966 61.897
Integration expenses - 217 - 523 279

Goodwill amortisation

- (4,944) > :



Net income 23.265 19.972 654 gn st
Weighted average number of common

shares outstanding for the period 120,216,204 120,216,204 120,216,204 120,216,204 120.216,204
Earnings per share (in cents) 19.4 16.6 59.6 38.6 513
Eamings per share, before goodwill and

integration expenses (in cents) 19.4 12.7 - 59.6 39.1 51.5

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Ceneolidated Statement of Cash Flows

BS'0e0 ‘
Unaudited Unaudited Audited
Nine Mentis Ended Nine Months Ended Year Ended
duty 31, 2005 July 31, 2004 October 31, 2004

Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities 30,275 (98,456) (89.680)
Net cash used in financing activities (45,682) (37.266) (37,266)
Net cash used in investing activities (20,215) (44,778) (126,908)
Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents (35,622) (180.500) (253,854)
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period 817,993 1,071,847 1,071,847
Cash and cash equivalents, end of period 782,371 891,347 817,993

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Notes to Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

Nine Months Ended :

July 31, 2005

1. Accounting Policies

These consolidated interim financial statements are prepared in accordance with LAS 34 Interim Financial Reporting. The accounting policies used in the
preparation of these consolidated interim financial statements are consistent with those used in the annual financial statements for the year ended October 31,

2004.

The consolidated interim financial statements include the accounts of the following wholly owned subsidiaries:
FirstCaribbean International Finance Corporation (Bahamas) Limited
FirstCaribbean International (Bahamas) Nominees Company Limited
FirstCaribbean International Land Holdings (TCI) Limited

2. Prior Period Adjustment

Other assets balance as previously reported at July 31, 2004 included a receivable amount-of $1.9 million Tepresenting the overpayment of remittances to
Barclays PLC for periods prior to the combination of CIBC Bahamas and Barclays Bahamas. At the time of the combination, the overpayment was accounted
for in the net asset valuation and therefore the other assets balances were incorrectly stated. In accordance with IFRS, the balances for July 31, 2004 are

restated and opening retained earnings for 2004 was reduced accordingly.



PAGE 8B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

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GN-264

SUPREME
COURT

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00322

Whereas William Glen Roberts, of St. Matthew’s
Parish, in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence,
one of the Islands of Commonwealth of The Bahamas has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for
letters of Administration of the real and personal estate of
Henry Roberts a.k.a. Henry Isaacs Roberts, late, of St.
Matthew’s Parish in the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar _



THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00388
Whereas JAMAAL RASHARD JOHNSON of

Robinson Road, Southern District, New Providence, one of
the Islands of Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the only son,

has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas |

for letters of Administration of the real and personal estate
of MILDRED JOHNSON, late, of Robinson Road, Southern
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the eapnoe of 14 days from the
date thereof.

signed

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEP 22, 2005
2005/PRO/npr/00390

. Whereas ELEAZOR T. ROLLE, JR., of Apt #2

_ Canaberry Drive,.Carmichael Road, Western District, New

Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, the Creditor, has made application to the Supreme.
Court of The Bahamas for Letters of Administration as a
Creditor of the real and personal estate of ELEAZOR ROLLE
SR., late, of Rolle Avenue, off Wulff Road, Eastern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be |

heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
~ SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00391

IN THE ESTATE OF Richard L. Anderton, late
of 206 SE East Street, Stuart, in the State of
Florida, one of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by
LOUREY C. SMITH, of No. 4 George Street in the City of
Nassau in the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for Resealing a
Grant of Letters of Administration in the above estate granted
to RICHARD L. ANDERTON by The Circuit Court, Martin
Country in the State of Florida, one of the United States of
America on the 27th day of May A.D. 2003.

' signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

‘THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

?

2005/PRO/npr/00399

In the Estate of JACK V. CROYLE, late of Spring
Hill, Hernando County, United States of America
and formerly of 159 Spring Street, Woonsocket,
United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by
DONNA M. HARDING-LEE, of Dowdeswell & Deveaux

Streets, New Providence, The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is

the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealed Letters of Administration in the above estate granted
to JOHN C. CROYLE, the Personal Representative, by the
Circuit Court for Hernando County, Florida, Probate Division,
on the 16th day of November, 2004.



signed
T. Cumberbatch
(for) Registrar
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00401

Whereas SONIA MICHELLE MARSHALL a.k.a
MICHELLE MARSHALL of Coral Heights, New
Providence, The Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters of Administration
the real and personal estate of SANDY MARSHALL, late,
of Coral Heights, New Providence, The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.



signed
T. Cumberbatch
(for) Registrar
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00406

Whereas PRENETTE BUTLER-EVANS of St:
Vincent Road, New Providence, The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters
of Administration the real and personal estate of MUTEL
BUTTLER, late, of Seabreeze Lane, New Providence, The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be

heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the _

date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson |
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/410
Whereas Samuel Arthur, of the Western District of

the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application to

the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters of

Administration of the real and personal Estate of Willard
Marcian Johnson-Hall, late, of Martin Street in the Southern
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the ‘Commonwealth ‘of:\The: Bahamas, deceased.

« ‘Noticeris hereby: given‘that such applications will be

‘heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the

date thereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00412

In the Estate of SEYMOUR S. EPSTEIN, late,

of 119 Carthage Road, Scarsdale in the State of New

York, one of the States of the United States of
America,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourten

days from the date hereof, application will be made to the .

Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by
BRUNO A. ROBERTS, of Old Post House, Prospect Ridge
of the Western District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, The Executive
Director of the Private Trust Corporation Limited, is the

- Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for the Resealed Grant

of Letters of Testamentary in the above estate granted to
REVA EPSTEIN and SAMUEL P. EPSTEIN the Executors,

Samuel P. Epstein now deceased. By the Surrogate’s Court’

in the State of New York the County of Westchester, U.S.A,
on the 21st day of September, 1996.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT |

PROBATE SIDE
SEP 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00413

Whereas RODERICK WINSLOW PINDER of

Spanish Wells, St. George’s Cay, The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters
of Administration with the Will annexed of the real and
personal Estate of CARL STANFORD PINDER, late, of
Spanish Wells, St. George’s Cay, The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the date
hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/418

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS |

Whereas Simeon R. Brown, of West End, on the

Island of Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the ©

Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application to
the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters of
Administration the real and personal estate of Oglita Brown,
late, of West End in the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00419

IN THE ESTATE OF Anna S. Phillips aka Anna
R. Philips, late of No. 221 Burgandy E. on the
City of Delray Beach in the County of Palm Beach,
in the State of Florida, one of the States of the
United States of America, deceased. oa

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourten
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by
ROLAND J. LOWE of Port New Providence in the City of
Nassau, in the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for Resealing a
Grant of Letters of Administration in the above estate granted
to EDWARD J. ELIN, by The Circuit Court, in and for Palm
Beach County in the State of Florida one of the states of the
United States of America on the 12th day of Seen AD.

2003.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registra

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT, 22 2005

-2005/PRO/npr/00422

Whereas Khalil Simon Moses Jr., of No. 6 Park
Place, Little Blair, in the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas for Letters of Administration of the real and personal
Estate of Khalil Simon Moses, late of No. 6 Park Place,
Little Blair, in the Eastern District,.on the Island of New

Providence, one of the Islands ofthe Commonwealth of The
f Bahamas, deceased. Seistpcet aieeenaatrte Beet eat

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the

date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00424

Whereas Joanne Stewart-Taylor, aka Jodi Stewart-
Taylor, of Sea Beach Estates, in the Western District of the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters of Administration
the real and personal estate of John Patrick Taylor, late, of
Sea Beach Estates in the Western District of the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

signed _
Desiree Robinson .
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00425
Whereas Bateman Bain, of Nassau East North, in

the Western District of the Island of New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made

"application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters

of Administration of the real and personal Estate of Eva Alma
Bain, aka Alina Pinder Bain, late, of Sea Beach Estates in
the Western District of the Island of New Providence one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. deceased

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the ee prauon of 14 days from the date
thereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00427

Whereas Carl Allan Brice of No. 13 Star Lane North,
Sunshine Park, in the Southern District of the Island of New

ee



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005, PAGE 9B



GN-264

SUPREME COURT

(Continued)



Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme Court of the
Bahamas for Letters of Administration with the Will Annexed
of the real and personal Estate of John Brice late of Queen’s
Highway, McKann’s, Long Island, one of the Island of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00433

Whereas PAULINE PARKER-KEMP of Freeport,
Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, the Lawful Widow, has made application to
the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
Administration of the real and personal estate of REUBEN
GODWIN KEMP, late, of #51 Margaret Place, Sunrise
Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEP 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00434

Whereas SHARON ROLLE of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, the Lawful Widow, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
as a Creditor of the real and personal estate of LIVINGSTON

CHARLES ROLLE, late, of 294 John Rut Lane, Freeport, .
Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of :

The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

200S/PRO/npr/00417

Whereas Gregory Ronald Thompson, of Fire Trail
in the Southern District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for
Letters of Administration of the real and personal estate of
Leonard John Thompson, late, of Kennedy Subdivision in
the Southern District of the Island of New Providence, one

. Of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date thereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00435

In the Estate of HAROLD WILLIAM MADEIROS,
late of Greenaway Cottage, 3 Addendum Lane,
Pembroke Parish in the Island of Bermuda,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by
" DOLLY P. YOUNG, of Nassau East North, Eastern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, is the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas
for the Resealed Grant of Probate in the above estate granted
to BARBARA ANN SMITH and PAMELA SHARON
CALDWELL, the Executrices, of the Supreme Court of
Bermuda on the 5th day of August, 2004

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00436

Whereas HOWARD BEVANS of the Settlement of
Hawksbill, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of ‘the
_Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the Son, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters
of Administration the real and personal estate of MIRIAM
_ BEVANS, late, of No. 7 Abaco Drive in the Settlement of
Hawksbill, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.



Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00437

Whereas Lloydel Ellis, of Andros Avenue, on the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application to
the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters of
Administration of the real and personal estate of Brenda-
‘Mae Smith Ellis, late, of Andros Avenue, the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be -

heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00438

Whereas Lennard Miller, of St. Lucia Road, Golden
Gates on the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters of

Administration of the real and personal Estate of Kathy Ann*

Miller, late, of St. Lucia Road, Golden Gates on the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased. .

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00439
Whereas CONSTANCE ELRONE MCDONALD,

of Fortune Village, Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, Attorney By Deed of

Power of Attorney for GREGORY PHILIP GEORGE:

ARANHA, JR., the Lawful Son, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
de bonis non of the real and personal estate of GREGORY
PHILIP GEORGE ARANHA, SR., late of No. 10 Helmlane,
Midshipman Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be

heard by the said Court at the Sxpirauion of 21 days from the

date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEP 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00440

Whereas RENALDO AMAHD FORBS of Hunt’s
Close off Firetrail Road, Western District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
the son has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas for Letters of Administration of the real and personal
Estate of BRENDON GORDON FORBES, late, of Joan’s
Height, Southern District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard

~ by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date



hereof.
signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

’ THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

Baal oc

In the Estate of JOHN C. MCKIE a.k.a. I
CLARENCE MACKIE, late of 7316
Manatee Avenue West Bradenton, Florida,
USA., deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by
DEANNE C. PYFROM, of The Western District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, is the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for the
Resealed Grant of Letters of Administration in the above
estate granted to ROBERT M. ELLIOT, the Personal
Representative, by the Superior Court of Florida, County of
Manatee in the State of Florida, U.S.A., on the 27th day of
April 2004

' signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

BUSINESS

a
Route change for
$45m Jamaica to
Bahamas cable

Fibralink Jamaica, the
Jamaican partner for
Caribbean Crossings on the
$45 million Jamaica Bahamas
Cable System (JBCS), has
obtained a four-month exten-
sion for completion of them
project from the authorities in
its home country.

Fibralink’s contract with the
Jamaican government man-
dated that services on the
JBCS system had to begin no
more than 10 months after its
licence was issued, meaning it
had to commence operation
in October. The four-month
extension takes the start date
to January 2006.

Richard Pardy, Fibralink’s’

head and former Cable
Bahamas chief executive, said
the deadline had been unre-
alistic, as it meant that the
company had to try and

achieve a 24-month process in
12.

In addition, the company
had not obtained all the rele-
vant Jamaican government

approvals.

_ Mr Pardy said the JBCS
route would be changed as a
result of Fibralink’s parent,
Columbus Communications,
acquiring New World Net-
works and its ARCOS fibre
optic cable system.

Rather than running straight
from Jamaica to the Bahamas
and then on to the US, the
JBCS will now run fzom
Jamaica to the Dominican
Republic to the Turks &
Caicos and then the Bahamas.

Fibralink also has an option
to run a different cable from
Jamaica to Cuba and then
on to Freeport in the
Bahamas.

FirstCaribbean

clients can pay
BTC bills on
telephone

and Internet

FirstCaribbean International Bank has announced that Bahamas :
Telecommunications Company (BTC) customers can also now.
pay their telephone, cell phone and Internet bills online and via tele- '
phone using the bank’s internet and telephone banking.

FirstCaribbean said its e-payment options, launched on August.
15, also offers customers the option of making third-party transfers
to other FirstCaribbean accounts in the same country. iy ts



from people who are
making news in their

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have. won an
award. .

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

| neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a













Prime Office Suite f for Immediate Occupancy

1,390 Sq.Ft. (additional 800 Sq.Ft. optional)
Beautiful Views of Nassau Harbour & Paradise Island
3 Parking Spaces included In Rental
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Automated Gated Entrance & Intercom System
. : 24 Hr. Security Guards
24 Hr. Surveillance Systems (Recorded) & Access Control
Professionally Managed
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To View Contact

~ Mr. Elmer I.G. Lowe
Bahamas Facility Management Ltd.
Telephone: (242) 328-BFMM or 322-7419
P.O. Box SS-19784
Nassau, Bahamas





PAGE 10B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





Available

« & Owe ot &

—— .

_with a victory, while quar-

‘the Bahamian athletes to





Fico

Baham
in sea

@ TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
' Reporter

SPRINTER Chandra
Sturrup and quarter-miler
Tonique Williams-Darling
brought their 2005 track
and field stadium to a close

ter-miler Christine Amer-
til had to settle for second.
The trio were the last of

finish their competition for
the season as they partici-
pated in the Shanghai
Golden Grand Prix on Sat-
urday at the Shanghai
Stadium in Shanghai, Chi-
na.

The one-day meet was
the last for the year and
China got a glimpse of:
what to expect when it
hosts the 2008 Olympic
Games in Beijing. It was

meet
China.

the biggest track and field
ever

- Sturrup, who still holds
the world's fastest time this
year, got revenge on World
‘champion Lauryn Williams

opyrightedjM:
yndicated, Content

from Commercial N

aterial

— »



4



Jews Providers”



staged in

as she pulled away from
the American to post a
winning time of 11.02 sec-
onds.
Williams, one of three
women who sped past Stur-
rup in the 4 final stages to

ans impres
on’s climax

deny her a medal at the
10th IAAF World Champi-
onships in Athletics in
Helsinki, Finland in
August, came through in
second in 11.05. Sturrup's
training partner, American

Weather hits
softball playoffs

@ SOFTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THE Degeo Bommers and the Electro
Telecom Dorcy Park Boyz will have to
wait until tonight to go after the sweep in
their respective New Providence Softball
Association's best-of-five playoffs.

The second-place Bommers took a 2-0
lead into Saturday night's opening game
against the third-place DHL Brackettes in
the ladies’ series at the Churchill Tener
Knowles National Softball Stadium, but
their game was rained out.

The Brackettes are having trouble hold-
ing onto the lead.

The pennant-winning Dorcy Park Boyz
also went into the men's feature contest
with a 2-0 advantage over the fourth-
place Nassau Cruisers Stingrays. In order
to force a fourth game, the Stingrays will
have to find a way to stop Dorcy Park
Boyz' ace Edney 'the Heat' Bethel.

So far, Bethel has been stingy on the
mound and hasn’t given up a run. Bethel

has alen heen 2 terror at the hat

Those two games will be made up
tonight. If the Bommers and the Dorcy
Park Boyz win, they will earn their spots
in the best-of-seven championship series
that could start as early as Thursday night.

. That will depend on the outcome of
the other half of the series.

Title

On the ladies' side, the pennant-win-
ning Electro Telecom Wildcats are just
one game away from returning to the
final to defend their title. They hold a 2-
0 lead over the fourth-place Proper Care
Pool Lady Sharks going into game three
on Tuesday night.

Ace Mary ‘Cruise’ Edgecombe has
been too much for the Lady Sharks to
handle, not only on the mound, but at
the plate as well.

And in the men's feature contest, the
second placed TBS Truckers have a 2-0
lead over the third-place Del Sol Arawaks
in a rematch of last year's final.

The Truckers won the title over the
Arawaks

Catcher Jamaal 'Sarge' Johnson has
been a menace for the Arawaks hitting
homer after homer so far in the
series.

The league champions will go on to
represent the NPSA in the Bahamas Soft-
ball Federation's National Round Robin
Tournament that wili be played at the
Churchill Tener Knowles National Sta-
dium and the Baillou Hills Sporting Com-
plex over the Discovery weekend in Octo-
ber.

It would appear that all four series
could end up being swept by the teams
that have a 2-0 upper-hand.

But; from all indications, the final could
be much more exciting once the partici-
pants have been decided.

The NPSA has less than three weeks to
complete the championship series and,
despite the inclement weather, league
officials are confident that they will have
their two champions decided in time for
the national showdown against the visit-
ing Family Island champions.

The nationals are the biggest event on
the BSF's calendar.





Melisa Barber was third in
11.22,

Now the second fearea
quarter-miler in the world,
Williams-Darling easily
won the women's 400 ina
time of 50.25 to get back
on the winning track after
she lost three post-World
Championship races to
American Sanya Richards.

Richards, who surpassed
Williams- Darling as the
world leader. on the latest
IAAF rankings, closed out
her season after winning
the 3rd IAAF World Ath-
letics Final in. Monaco at
the beginning of thie
month. She opted not to.
travel to Shanghai. nN

Battled

Instead, Williams-Dar-
ling had to contend with
two Americans as they bat-
tled for second and third.
Dee Dee Trotter came in
second in 50.90 and
Monique Hennagan was
third in 50.92. .

Amertil, the othiey
Bahamian competing in the
event, also opted not to,
contest the quarter.
Instead, she focussed on
the 200 where she's had
some success this year.

However, Amertil ran
against the world's best 200
metre runner, American
Allyson Felix. Unbeaten
this year, world champion
Felix cruised to a season-
ending victory in 23.09.
Amertil did 23.26 for sec-
ond with Great Britain's
Donna Fraser coming in
third in 23.31.

“



IHIBUNE SPORTS VIUINDAY, SEr iewwown IO, CUYY, Prvie

@ MEACHER MAJOR defeated Jamaican Glenroy
‘Hard Hands’ Beckford on Saturday. The fight was

brought to a halt in the second round.
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

"RUDOLPH HEDGE
takes a’sore one against ©
pe SACe elite Pt tel aay eat

ree aa

Cell:

RY NO PHOTOCOPIES, NEWSPAPER PRINT_O





MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

THe }

‘Pictures from
ihe weekend
exey.darel rte i (ey.





Major comes
out fighting
for victory

& BOXING
By KELSIE JOHNSON

Junior Sports Reporter E

JUST seconds into the sec-
ond round of the co-main event
at the “Redemption”, the fight
between Meacher Major and
Jamaican boxer Glenroy ‘Hard
Hands’ Beckford, the fight was
stopped.

Major was in an attack mode
from the sound of first round
bell, leaving Beckford on the
defence.

With the Jamaican team
already taking the upper hand
on the Bahamian squad, win-
ning the two previous matches,
Major came out firing on all
cylinders, connecting on virtu-
ally every punch thrown.

Beckford in turn tried to cov-
er his face, leaving the body ‘
open.

But Major’s intentions were
to deliver a knockout, claiming
that the two loses by his friends
placed fire in him.

He said: “After learning that
Richard lost and Jerry lost, the
only thing I wanted to do was
take my opponent out.

“T just came off a very tough
loss so I knew he wouldn’t be
able to take it, even if I did
decide to deliver the body
shots.”

Trying to hold out until the
final two rounds proved to be
fruitless for Jerry ‘Big Daddy’
Butler.

Energy

Fighting his first six rounder
match, Butler said he wanted
to save a little of energy to
make a strong comeback in the
final two rounds, but saw him-
self behind in points to his
opponent Carron ‘Able Sea-
man’ Speed of Jamaica.

Speed landed some heavy
shots on Butler, shaking the big
fellow early in the second.

By the third, Butler was seen
gasping for breath, while Speed
pounded away at his body.

Trying to shake his way out
of Speed’s punches, Butler
walked into two right hooks.

Butler said: “I came into the
match with a game plan, this
being my first six round fight,
but the plan didn’t work.

“T had different game plans,
but none worked. I wasn’t
starting to tire, I was trying to
get him to lean on me, so I
could work my upper cuts on
him.

“But after I got that double
head butt in the second round,
boy I started to wobble.”

Butler was able to withstand |}

the punches, but lost out by a
unanimous decision by the
judges.

Bahamian Richard ‘the
Hammer’ Pitt also fell to the
hands of Rudolf ‘Non Stop’ '
Hedge of Jamaica by a unani-

- mous ruling.

Fighting in the featherweight
division, Pitt failed to protect
himself in the second round,
and received a dangerous right
from Hedge that sent Pitt flying
to the ground.

Hedge, who was firing lead
left hands and quick three-
punch combinations, had
placed Pitt in a daze.

Knowing that he was behind
the count in the match, Pitt
tried to deliver some combina-
tions of his own, but the relent-
less Hedge would not be
moved.

Although he received several
blows to the face, Hedge
continued to dance around
Pitt.

Just when Pitt thought it was
all over, Hedge’s open face jab
snapped his head back, sending
Pitt flying to the ropes.



«







Jermain
in seventh heaven

Smith throws

in towel against
title holder

BOXING
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

A VICIOUS combination .

assault by Jermain ‘Choo-
Choo’ Mackey to the open face
of ‘Marvelous’ Marvin Smith
ruptured blood vessels in his
nose and forced him to throw
in the towel on Saturday night
at the Wyndham Nassau
Resort.

Mackey’s strong surge in the

_ final minutes of the fifth round

had shaken up the former
super middleweight title hold-
er, sending medical doctors to
his aid.

Ruled capable of continuing
with the fight, Smith stepped
back into the ring in the sixth
round only to be surprised with
quick right hand jab from
Mackey.

The connection to the face
saw blood stream down Smith’s
face.

He ran to the ropes for a
quick breather, but that escape
route lasted only two seconds.

Opportunity

Jumping on the opportunity

to pin Smith to the rope, Mack-
ey landed punches with Smith
too weak to protect himself.

Mackey said: “My endurance
was great, I knew he wasn’t
able to go 12 rounds and that
he wouldn’t be able to take it
so I was like ‘let me try and
over this one quick’. ©

“He tried to spit out his
mouth piece in the fourth
round when I went to take him
out, but'I still was able to deliv-
er some hits. By him spitting
out his mouthpiece I knew it
was over.

“I just kept the pressure on
him and, like they say, pres-
sure burst pipe so he gave up.”

Smith had tried to dance
around some of the punches,

‘but he couldn’t avoid Mack-

ey’s reach.

Points

By the end of the second
round, however, Smith had

secured some points, by suc- .

cessful landing body shots.

“I wasn’t too disappointed
in the results and seeing him
not come out with anything
early in the fight,” said Mack-
ey.

“Like I told him, he was
great in his time, but it’s my
time. He didn’t want to give it
up so I had'to go in there and
take it.

“TY knew I had it when I

rocked him with the left i the
third round and he tried to hit.
me with some body shots, butt.
didn’t mind.”

This was the second time the
two have fought; the first Smith
was taken out on a stretcher,
suffering from a- prokep
jaw.

On Saturday, trying to avonr
any serious injury, Smith said.
that midway i in the seventh; he.
knew it was over and that the
injury to the nose was taking
its toll on his body. : =

Breathe =

“I have nothing to feel: bad
about,” said Smith. “I really
give it all I had inside of me,.
but after I took some of the
jabs, it dislocated some of the
vessels inside of my nose and I
couldn’t breathe properly
through it every time I tried to
breathe I kept swallowing the
blood.

; “Iam a warrior from heart
and it really hurts me to quit. I
have plenty victories, but I
have only one life. I tip my hat
to him, he withstood my most
fierce rally and he is the win-
ner.

- “T enjoyed my career, Hie: is
much more youthful. Rather
than going through all of this
again I think I.am going to pass
my knowledge onto the
younger guys and try to help
some of them:do some positive
things in their lives and try to
avoid some of the pot holes
and pitfalls that I made very
young in my life.” ‘

Smith’s mom declared that





» Saturday night’s fight will be

the last time her son will step
into the ring.

Although Smith was still
returning some fire in the sixth
and seventh rounds, the’ hard
hits being sent by Mackey
were Starting to put him ina
trance.

Smith was saved by the bell,
with a knockout on the hori-
zon.

Mackey added: “I knew I
had rocked him pretty hard in
the third, so I was like ‘he is
going to give up’.

“But then I said-if he don’t
give up, the referees were
going to have to stop this one,
if the referees don’t then the
doctors will call it.

“T wasn’t about to give up on
him: At.one point he thought
he was wearing me down, but I
came on stronger.”

For Mackey, the dream has
only just begun. After congrat-
ulating Smith on his efforts,
Mackey said he is ready to take
it to the next level.







The Tribune

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005







Within the next week, industrial action can be expect-
ed if government does not “step up to the plate”, John
Pinder, president of the Bahamas Public Service Union,

‘warned last week.

The BPSU held a press conference to respond to the °
government’s committee in charge of negotiating a new
industrial agreement. According to Mr Pinder, industri-
al consultant Keith Archer had stated “unfactual infor-
mation” at the committee’s press conference on Sep-
tember 8. Mr Archer reportedly said the BPSU presiuent
had originally approached the government and asked for
an upfront advance on the contract. However, Mr Pinder

FNM leader Tommy Turnquest
said he. would welcome Brent
Symonette (left) as his deputy, should
the Montagu MP choose to run for
the position. Mr Turnquest told The
Tribune yesterday that the Montagu
MP is very deserving of the post of
deputy leader of the FNM.

On Tuesday, Mr Symonette said
that he is seriously considering run-
ning for the deputy position when
the party goes to convention in

THE Bahamas is set to

| experience a significant wind-
fall as the country gets ready
to play host to the new launch
of the James Bond franchise.

The Tribune has learnt that
after an almost 20-year
absence, James Bond is
posed to return to the
Bahamas once again with
Casino Royale, the 21st



November...

installment of the series...





The Haitian
- SO what is t

By JOHNMARQUIS _

early 40 years
ago, the British
politician
Enoch Powell
was vilified and
‘epncined for warning the
"Westminster government of

. the perils of uncontrolled immi-

gration. He believed old Eng-
land. would soon be overrun by
alien cultures.

Powell told his party col-
leagues “you must be stark,
staring mad” and in what
became known as his “rivers
of blood” speech, he offered
dire predictions if things con-
tinued as they were. Immedi-
ately, Powell was branded a
racist, a right-wing fanatic, and
castigated as‘a rabble-rouser..

, By far the best mind in the
Conservative party of the day
was tossed aside, and his polit-
ical career never recovered
from the venomous bile heaped
upon his head.

Supremacist

_From that day forth, he was
characterised as a wild-eyed
fascist and an irrational dema-
gogue with a race supremacist
agenda.

Today, all but the seriously
deluded have to accept that
what he said was largely true. If
“rivers of blood” have yet to
flow in quite the profusion he
predicted, the overall picture
is far from encouraging.

The London bombings, an
enormous upsurge in drive-by
shootings, gang stabbings and
ethnic conflict of all kinds have
certainly provided more than

: a trickle of Powell’s predicted

; flow of gore. And only fools”
‘ believe there is not yet more

- to come.

Politicians living in fashion-

: able suburbs like Hampstead

1

and Highgate will tell you that

' fun events like the Notting Hill

Carnival tell another story, and
they do. In some respects,
Britain is a multi-cultural suc-
cess story. It’s in the grim urban
areas of the Midlands and the
North where tensions are most-
ly felt. And that’s because there
is So much more at stake.

The dominant impression,
though, is that Britain’s indige-

itian roblem



1



has denied this...



e truth?

Three doctors have expressed alarm at what they consider the
disturbingly high Haitian birthrate at Princess Margaret Hospital. ©
Meanwhile, Bahamians living alongside a Haitian settlement in
Nassau say human bodies are being burned in a pit there. Although
both stories have been rebutted by government politicians, many .

_ people feel they are being denied thi



é truth-about the scale and-

nature of the “Haitian Problem” and its likely consequences.
INSIGHT reports... ?

nous culture is gradually being
engulfed by alien groups, peo-
ple who - for the most part -
have no respect for its way of
life or its institutions, and no
intention at all of assimilating
with the host society. In fact,
some of them are actively
engaged in trying to undermine
everything Britain has tradi-
tionally stood for. Some, admit-
tedly a small minority, openly
advocate insurrection.

Yardie gangs and dope
barons from the West Indies,
gang rapists and cult killers
from Africa, benefit scroungers
from Eastern Europe and, of
course, mad mullahs and ‘their
followers from the Middle East
have infiltrated British inner
cities to such an extent that
entire districts are now foreign
ghettoes, some of them
extremely hostile territory for
ordinary British people.:

‘In a country of 60 million
people, you might expect alien

‘influences to take a long time
to permeate every area of

national life. Yet, over the last
five years the extent of the cul-
tural takeover has suddenly
become apparent. Now it’s
probably too late to halt the
total subjugation of Britishness
as we know it.

Successive

All this has happened with
the connivance - some would
say the wilful co-operation - of
successive British governments

SEE page 4C







.™@ HAITIANS, ‘unlike Bahamians,
are volatile and impatient people.
They like things done their way.



_ (The Tribune archive photo)

qo} an

rio IR nye ITIZ





PAGE 2C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

THE TRIBUNE









Subject: Great Article on
"Lessons from Katrina"

oday's INSIGHT

"Lessons left behind

in Katrina's wake" was

a great article. I] was

never a fan of yours
(although you have recently begun
to get my attention with some hard-
hitting investigative journalism), but
this current article portrays you in a
different light. This one seems to
come from deep within - it shows a
"measure of a man."

It was quite down-to-earth, very
touching and shows your wealth of
experience in journalism - some-
thing that I knew you had, but it
took Katrina and America’s
response to bring it out. It was also
balanced and showed cold hard bru-
tal truths.

I was touched that you also recog-
nised that your country, the UK







(where I studied and
for the first time saw
that the amount of
money I had or did not
have was irrelevant -
what was important
was my “breeding"),
was a Class-divided
society still living in the
past, and that the
USA, with all of its success, seems
to be following.

In my opinion, one of the only
things Britain still has left is an
excellent system of education, but
that, too, needs to be more forward-
thinking. J still cannot understand
how it allowed a country like the
USA, a mere 300-plus years old, to
have surpassed it in everything from
technology fo setting the standards
of education in the post-graduate
world (the Harvard MBA is still the
standard).

I read once about the rise and fall

FEEDBACK







of nations; I can think of Babylon,

of Rome, ‘of Britain, and now the.

US. I see a common: pattern, a
greatness seeming almost invinci-




ble, then by some Godly force, a

breakdown, an Achilles he
reveals itself and the ‘grea
great no more.






more.
John Bain

!



and the response to Kat-
rina was truly priceless.
Two things stick out in
what IJ regard as one of
the best INSIGHT arti-
cles J have read.

Firstly, your comments
about the Bush family liv-

ing in a different galaxy .

were right on the mark.
Barbara Bush’s comments really

_ were beyond the pale. Secondly,

how right you were that prayer and
Godtalk are not enough.
Out West

AT dinner parties around Nas-

sau, John Marquis is the most dis-
‘cussed and reviled person I know.
nds He is opinionated, dogmatic, god-
‘less, brutally frank and all-round

exasperating, and he thinks he

- knows it all.

However, anyone who writes like













he does can be forgiven anything
and everything. The piece on Kat-
rina left me breathless with admi-
ration.

J, Lyford Cay

MARQUIS is a pinko liberal and
always has been. Why he was ever
allowed back into the Bahamas, I'll
never know.

HT, Palmdale






JUST to say how much I enjoyed
your article on Katrina. These
things need to be known, and I
think the United States has to
understand that it can’t go around,
the world doing what it pleases
when its own society is so precari-
ous. 2
Your article said all the right
things and was very well done.

Renton, Nassau


















“The committee was man-
dated to find ways to reduce the
costs of energy in the country.
We have made three presenta-
tions on our findings to the gov-
ernment, especially on the
PetroCaribe accord.

“First we made a presenta-
tion to Minister of Finance
James Smith and some senior
members of his staff. A second

presentation was made to the
prime minister himself.

“And the following day we
made a presentation to the Cab-
inet on the benefits of Petro-
Caribe and other things we
were pursuing in terms of low-
ering the costs of energy in the
Bahamas.”

— Vincent Coleby, chairman
of the Fuel Usage Committee

and a former Shell executive
with over 28 years experience

in the oil industry speaks on Ry

the PetroCaribe agreement.

“Today ‘was the post of
leader, tomorrow is another
day.

“Tam not ruling out the pos-
sibility that I may run for
another position in the party.”

> P
“the F

















f deputy leader when
{ meets in convention
in Nove mber.

“Th a iponderfil thing,
we are jextremely excited. We
will be the first country in the
world to showcase the new
James Bond.”

ich ‘they will Nena in
t the fish fry.”

str of Tourism Craig
th filming of the

Bahamas.

“When we came to school on
Tuesday last week, they ‘start-
ed looking for people with
infractions of their uniforms
and even ‘the girls with boys
shoes.on’.

“Then (the teacher) made us
stand up in the sun again the
following day, saying that we
looked gay in the shoes,.and
even called one of my friends
gay. The senior mistress and
the principal were saying that
the shoes were unisex but (the
teacher) didn’t care.”

— A female student of C V
Bethel High School who claims

she and other girls were disci- |

plined for wearing “gay

‘war the rai moment we
are'shocked to see this level of
hysteria operating in the public
education system. We are cer-
tain that the Ministry of Edu-
cation is aware of its obligation
to the bisexual, gay, lesbian,
and transgender youth in the .
country, and we are certain they
are actively investigating this
seemingly inappropriate act of
conduct.”

— Erin Greene spokesper-
son for Rainbow Alliance, an
advocacy group for the rights
of bisexual, gay, lesbian and
transgenders, responds to
claims that female students at a
public high school were
allegedly disciplined for wear-





Shirley eee re Ree ye Eee ea

De com S Dane diced cia Aa com.



shoes”.

purchase, McDonald's will lorieka: 50 cents
to the victims of Hurricane



ing “gay shoes”.



ier havin’ th.





THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005, PAGE 3C



; oN era

hz ISLANDS OF THE

amas







_ & THOMAS Desmangles (right), safety advisor for Shell Bahamas, last week shows Ron Pinder,
parliamentary secretary in the Ministry of Health, steps taken for an integrity test - to check for
leaks in the fuel pipelines and underground fuel storage systems of petroleum stations.

AFTER numerous presen-
tations, the government is
expected to make a decision
this week on whether the
Bahamas will sign on to the
PetroCaribe accord, it was
announced last week.

Vincent Coleby, chairman
of the Fuel Usage Committee,
which has meticulously
reviewed the PetroCaribe
accord, said that he expects
government to make a
favourable announcement
shortly...

The brainchild of Venezue-

lan president Hugo Chavez, .

PetroCaribe is a government-
, to-government contract to sup-
* ply oil to member nations with
the aim of cutting out the
“middleman”.

Ee ie

THE Bahamas is set to
experience a significant wind-
fall as the country gets ready to
play host to the new launch of
the James Bond franchise.

The Tribune has learnt that
after an almost 20-year
absence, James Bond is posed

_to return to the Bahamas once
again with Casino Royale, the
21st installment of the series.

Director of Film with the
Ministry of Tourism Craig
Woods yesterday said that pre-
production is scheduled to



start this Fall.

eo



CONCERN over height-
ened homophobia in the
Bahamas has arisen again after
two girl students, who were
forced to stand outside in the
sun for allegedly wearing “gay
shoes”, last week made further

‘claims against C V Bethel

Senior High School.

The previous week, more
than 50 girls from that school
from grades 10-12 were
allegedly punished for wear-
ing unisex shoes to school.

One of the school’s teach-

ers corroborated the accusa-

tion and now two students
have claimed they were made
to stand outside their class-
room.again the following day.



WITHIN the next week,
industrial action can be expect-
ed if government does not
“step up to the plate”, John
Pinder, president of the
Bahamas Public Service
Union, warned last week.

The BPSU held a press con-
ference to respond to the gov-

ernment’s committee in charge

of negotiating a new industrial
agreement.
According to Mr Pinder,

(The Tribune archive photo)

industrial consultant Keith
Archer had stated “unfactual
information” at the commit+
tee’s press conference on Sep-
tember 8. :

Mr Archer reportedly said
the BPSU president had orig-
inally approached the govern-
ment and asked for an upfront
advance on the contract. How:
ever, Mr Pinder has denied
this.

deck ck ak ok

FNM leader Tommy Turn-
quest said he would welcome

Brent Symonette as his.



deputy, should the Montagu:
MP choose to run:for the Posie:
tion. ; veh Re

Mr Turnquest told The Tri-
bune yesterday that the Mon-
tagu MP is very deserving of
the post of deputy leader of
the FNM.

On Tuesday, Mr Symonette
said that he is seriously con-
sidering running for the deputy
position when the party goes
to convention in November. |

He said that he would prob-
ably announce his decision
after the House of Assembly
convenes next month.

If Mr Symonette does enter
the race, he may be up against
current deputy leader Sidney
Collie, who according to Mr
Symonette, also plans to run.

School of Hospita
Signature Dishe:

ad Bronze.

Habamas Lid

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iF ll MUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

‘INSIGHT

THE TRIBUNE»







@ POLICE officers (in boat on right)
approach what appears to be a Haitian
sloop entering Nassau Harbour.





(The Tribune archive photo)

































































































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FROM page 1C

who, for reasons best-known
to themselves, have kept the
public in the dark about the
true extent of immigration.
For many years - decades, in

fact - the British government.

has been unable, or unwilling,
to offer meaningful statistics
on the influx of foreigners into
Britain. Frightened of racial
confrontation, sensitive to any-
thing that might be construed
as prejudice, they have pussy-
footed around a problem that is
now totally out of hand.

Even the media is partially
paralysed in its approach to this
most critical aspect of British
life. For the Race Relations
Act virtually rules out open dis-
cussion of anything which casts
aspersions on a particular eth-
nic group.

| Political

For the most part, the com-
fortably off bourgeosie - the
ruling political class - have been
responsible for this myopic
approach to a dangerous and
disturbing situation. And that’s
because they are the least
affected.

Meanwhile, hundreds of
thousands of working-class
British pensioners whose
neighbourhoods have been
largely “ghettoised” are now
terrified of stepping outside
their own front doors.

And fascist thugs, generally
the least intelligent members
of society, are exploiting grow-

ing racial tension in pursuit.of

their own warped philosophy.

Why is all this important to
the Bahamas? Well, many
Bahamians. believe a similar

-process-is happening here, with

local culture under threat from
hordes of people who share
neither their views, their val-
ues, nor their aspirations.

The big difference is that this
country has a population of
only 300,000, roughly that of
the English Midlands city of
Leicester. If immigration con-
tinues unabated here, it will not
take 40 years for the Bahamian
culture to be overwhelmed. In
Abaco, concerned campaign-
ers believe the process willbe
completed in little more than.a
decade. | :

Thus, when Dr Marcus
Bethel or Mr Ron Pinder talk
of irresponsibility and reck-
lessness in discussing the hid-
den impact of the Haitian prob-
lem, many see them only as
manipulators of the truth, part
of a smokescreen to keep
Bahamians in the dark.

Official

Why such official reticence?

“It’s mainly because, politi-
cians don’t like to admit they
have dropped the ball on the
immigration question,” one
observer told INSIGHT.

“All intelligent people know
that Haitians have been coming
into this country virtually

. unchecked for a long time now.

Both the FNM and PLP have
been totally clueless in dealing
with the question, so they are
now covering up.

“It’s not a vote winner to
admit that they have screwed
up over a long period of time
on an issue which; left unad-
dressed, will have the greatest
impact ever on the Bahamian

way of life. So they faff around

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the subject, as though in denial.
For some reason, they expect it
just to go away.”

Diaspora

However, when it comes to
the Haitian diaspora, the poli-
tics and mathematics leave no
room for complacency, inertia
or optimism. And it certainly
isn’t going away.

Haiti is a nation of eight mil-
lion people which is in a state
of permanent turmoil. At its
nearest point, it lies just sixty
miles off the Bahamas shore-
line.

For as long.as Haiti remains
a failed state, a lawless slum
full of desperate people, the
Bahama islands will be seen as
stepping stones to freedom and
sanity. And that’s why those
little sloops with ragged sails
will continue to ply the straits
between purgatory and par-
adise.

For the Bahamas, the impli-
cations are horrendous because
this country and Haiti are as
politically, socially and tem-
peramentally different as it’s
possible to imagine.

Haitians, unlike Bahamians,
-are volatile and impatient peo-

_ ple. They like things done their

way. Twice in their 200 years of
independence they have suc-
ceeded where Guy Fawkes
failed, by blowing up their
rulers in the National Palace
to secure a change of govern-
ment.

Presidents

Since ejecting Napoleon’s
army in 1804, they have had

one king, twe emperors; nine -

presidents for life and 20-odd
leaders who have been vio-
lently overthrown. Two presi-
dents were assassinated, anoth-
er was executed, one commit-
ted suicide and yet another was
torn to shreds by the mob after
being dragged from the French
embassy and impaled on the
perimeter fence..

One of the nation’s founders,
Jean-Jacques Dessalines, failed
to deliver the goods in two
years, as emperor so was sav-
agely dismembered and left in

a public square in Port-au-.

Prince to be devoured by wild
pigs.
What was left of him after
the pigs had finished was
thrown into a hastily dug grave.
Only last year, President

‘Jean-Bertrand Aristide was

spirited out of Haiti when it
was clear his life was in dan-
ger following a rebellion. Had
he stayed, he might well have
become another Dessalines,
butchered by his own people,
or another Cincinnatus Lecon-
te, the president who was incin-
erated in the 1912 palace fire-
ball. ,

When it comes to politics,
Haitians (to use a quaint
Bahamian expression) “don’t
play” - in fact, they create such
mayhem that their country has
become the biggest embarrass-
ment of the western world.

Cultured —

Though there is undoubted-
ly another side to these people
- the best of them are among
the most cultured and creative
in the Caribbean, with strong
family traditions, a tremendous






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work ethic and an artistic her-
itage which is the envy of the
region - their track record in
the area of governance is not
impressive.

_ What some Bahamians fear,
and understandably so, is that if
Haitians establish themselves
in the Bahamas in sufficient

~ numbers, they will begin assert- -

ing their rights in ways local.

people will find hard to under-

stand. *
Haiti, remember, achieved -

' freedom from a European”

nation that was itself in the
midst of post-revolutionary tur-'’
moil. Having guillotined its»
aristocracy, France found itself
ultimately under the command.
of an imperialistic dictator who
plunged it into ruinous wars. -
While Haiti was in the throes
of its own revolution, Napoleon:
was leading his armies towards
major disasters in Europe,:
including the crippling march
on Moscow and the killing:
fields of Waterloo. These were.
not happy times for the little’
emperor or his country. 2

Democratic —

Hence, Haiti had no democ-

‘ratic template on which to

build. It was born amid chaos
and has been in a state of dis-
order and confusion ever since.
‘While the Bahamas has the
oldest parliament in the Com-
monwealth - one that pre-dates
the US Congress by the best
part of half a century - Haiti-
has nought to offer from its
political past but a succession.
of madcap dictators, military
juntas and bloody coups inter- .
spersed by periods of foreign

- -occupation.- ---

In the same way that’
demented mullahs fired-up by
Islamic extremism have no
regard for the nuances of
British law, exciteable Haitians °
with a grudge against society”
cannot be expected to observe
parliamentary protocol and.
democratic niceties in Nassau’
when it comes to the crunch. ©

Throwing the parliamentary
mace out of the window fol-
lowed by the hour-glass, as Sir

_ Lynden Pindling and Sir Milo

Butler did in 1965, does not.
rate much as a political gesture
‘among people who have tradi-
tionally exerted change by

_ extreme force.

Bearing all this in mind, the
Bahamas is embarking on a
perilous course if it allows itself
to be submerged by a culture
which - allowed its head - will
make few allowances for what
has gone before. a

Reasoned -

Some will say all this is high-
ly inflammatory. Others will
see it as a reasoned presenta-.
tion of the truth.

In Abaco, where the Haitian
“problem” is most apparent,
ambivalence in the public’s.
response has already led to a
calamitous situation.

The Mud and Pigeon Pea,
Marsh Harbour’s heaving slum
settlements, are mini-replicas
of Cite Soleil and Bel Air in
Port-au-Prince, congested ghet-
toes where local laws no longer
seem to apply.

_Amid the cramped shacks
and stinking alleyways, an
entire society functions - albeit
haphazardly - with no refer-

' ence to the way neighbouring

Bahamians live their lives.
“There are nightclubs, beau-
ty parlours, barber shops and
eveu convenience stores in
t! xe,” said a Bahamian resi-
dent who has wandered
through the maze. None of

_. these businesses has the usual
permits because their owners

do not. acknowledge that
Bahamian regulations apply to

them.
Civilised

Power-lines plugged (illicitly,
some say) into the local sup-
plies are festooned between’
ramshackle homes, lean-to.

‘sheds, and sundry other

makeshift buildings in ways
that would not, and could not,
be tolerated in the more
civilised host community al
around.

Twice, massive fires have |
swept through these slums, dis-
placing hundreds of people at a,
time.

What many Bahamians now
claim, and resent, is that some
Haitians are no longer the
servile and deferential out-
siders of old, grateful to be giv-
en a chance in life, but increas-
ingly determined and aggres-
sive interlopers who see the’
Bahamas as a convenient and
more congenial extension of
their homeland. ,

SEE page 5C



THE TRIBUNE



F ROM page 4C

The Abaco campaigner Jef-
fery Cooper said: “This island
will become’‘a little Haiti. It is
already well on its way to being
an annexe of that country. And
new arrivals are getting-off the
boats all the time.”

The situation is aggravated

by corruption among Bahami-.

an Officials. “Everyone knows
that Haitians who can raise the
money are able to find their
way here with the active co-
operation of paid-off officials,”
an observer told INSIGHT.

' ‘Trade

ws

“This is common kniowledge.
The ;
Haitians, Peruvians and. Chi-



nese into and through the

Bahamas. There are ‘safe hous-
es’ all over the place which are
pait of the system.”

Once here, poorer Haitians
are frequently subjected to
police protection rackets under
which their continued presence
is assured if they make regular
payments to bent officers,
according to well-placed
sources:

Evidence of this has come
not only from Abaco, but also
N assau itself, where a family’s
Haitian gardener (earmarked
for deportation as an illegal
immigrant) reappeared for
work after paying a policeman
$230, a story reported in The
Tribune only last week.

With the Haitian problem.

pofentially the Bahamas’ pri-

maty social concern for the 21st -

century, one would expect the
government to be in possession
of.detailed statistics about its
extent.

Concerned Bahamians esti-
‘mate that the Haitian popula-
tion in the Bahamas now
stands at between 25 000 and
60,000, though some say the
figure is higher. Mr Cooper
believes Haitians in Abaco out-
number Bahamians, though he
ca get no-one to confirm it.

{ Statistics

So what are the facts? On
the basis that accurate statis-
tics are essential if the Bahamas
is to devise a workable strategy
in dealing with Haitians,
INSIGHT has been conduct-
ing some research. The results
were not encouraging. ~

The Registrar General’s
Office, the Department of Sta-
tistics, Princess Margaret Hos-
pital and the Department of
Immigration were all in the
dark on up-to-date population
numbers, birthrates and death
rates when a reporter called in
search of information.

‘Although Dr Bethel was able
to spirit hospital statistics seem-
ingly out of nowhere to rebut
The Tribune’s birthrate story,
there is no key data available
on which to build anything like
a reasoned appraisal of the
Haitian immigration situation.

“Currently, an international
adyisory group specialising in
immigration is conducting
research in an effort to “get a
handle” on the problem. How-
ever, government sources have
alteady hinted that its findings
will not be made public. .

Although Dr Bethel was

JS an, active trade in ©

quick to counter a doctor’s alle-
gations in The Tribune that
Haitian births at Princess Mar-
garet Hospital were running as
high as nine to one, statistics
he produced at the time were

not rated reliable by medical

staff.

In fact, since the furore
erupted, The Tribune has con-
tinued to receive information
from anonymous medical
sources suggesting that the
truth is being suppressed. No
fewer than three doctors have
now expressed disquiet over
the Haitian birthrate.

The most recent disclosures

came from a Bahamian moth-

er, who'said shé was askéd to”
.vacate her hospital bed to

make way for a Haitian woman
whose labour was more immi-
nent.

“There were two other Hait-
ian mothers waiting behind
me,” she said, “and another
was in the toilet. In the birth
log-book, there were a number
of names like St John, Louis
and suchlike.”

A nurse, meanwhile,
revealed that one day two
weeks ago 17 of 32 births at the
hospital were to Haitian moth-
ers and that the Haitian-
Bahamian birth ratio was run-
ning at five to one.

Observer °

“T believe politicians are
afraid to tell the truth because

-of what Bahamians might do,”

an observer told INSIGHT. “It
is such an emotive issue that

‘

they are afraid the thing will:

blow up.

“But I think we have to get
proper statistics if we are to
look at this situation in a prag-
matic and unemotional way. At
the end of the day, Bahamians
are not aware enough of their
own culture to be able to guard
it jealously. We neéd definitive
figures if we are to plan prop-
erly for the future.”

British culture, by contrast,
stretches way back to pre-
Roman times, nurtured admit-
tedly over many centuries by
a succession of invading forces,
culminating with the Norman
Conquest in 1066. Though
essentially a mongrel race, the
British have established par-
liamentary, cultural and legal
traditions which make them
what many still consider a mod-
el society. -

Yet their vulnerability is as
pronounced today as it’s ever
been, and all because foreign
immigration has been allowed
to run amok over the last half-
century as politicians have
shrunk from their responsibili-
ties.

Immigration

Controlling immigration is
not racism, the Conservative
leader Michael Howard said
recently while reflecting the
British people’s mounting dis-
quiet, it is commonsense. -

Enoch Powell said the same
thing in the Sixties, but was
shouted down and demonised.
He eventually died in 1998,

- having lived his final years in

SEE page 12C

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 719, 2005, PAGE 5C

INSIGHT

LED is a Haitian boat docked at Nassau Harbour.

For a Supple Body



(The Tribune archive photo)





NASSAU MOTOR COL

However You Exercise

Receive an umbrella FREE from SEVEN SEAS with the purchase of
two bottles of SPORTFLEX from any foodstore or pharmacy.

Just bring the empty bottles of SPORTFLEX to
Bahamas Supply Agencies Ltd, located in the BAKCO Building opposite
Ebenezer Church, Shirley Street, Nassau and collect your FREE umbrella.

Offer limited to 1 umbrella per person.

Distributed in The Bahamas by

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Bahamas Supply Agencies Lid.

(Opposite Ebenezer Methodist Church)
East Shirley Street ¢ Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 393-2966 ° Fax: (242) 393-2523





Ar

_ THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS PAGE6C.
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IETHOD (2004, Suspense) Elzabeth Huey, PONS 1988, Horror) Peter O'Too},
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#4 j{ SUNDAY, scr Emiben ey dvee



OPINION

JESUS DIAZ JR., PUBLISHER | TOM FIEDLER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR | JOE OGLESBY, EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

The Miami Herald | EDITORIAL





Sharing the risk of disaster

OUR OPINION: U.S. NEEDS A NATIONAL PROGRAM MODELED ON FLOOD INSURANCE

he appropriation of $62
T billion by Congress to
pay for disaster relief in the
wake of Hurricane Katrina
means that all Americans are
pitching in to pay for this
painful recovery. President
Bush’s speech on Thursday
night ensures that this will be
only the first installment in a
rebuilding effort of unprece-
dented scale. The principle
behind this generous impulse
is that natural disasters are
everyone’s business. If the
pain can’t be distributed
evenly, the expense can be.
Now it’s time for Congress to
realize that the same princi-
ple should apply to insurance
covering major disasters.

As hurricanes like Katrina
become more frequent and
destructive, a catastrophe-in-
surance program modeled on
flood insurance should
become a priority for law-
makers before the next big
disaster strikes.

According to the Insur-
ance Information Institute,
Congress created the
National Flood Insurance
Program in 1968 in response
to “the rising cost of taxpay-
er-funded. disaster relief for
flood victims and the increas-

ing amount of damage caused
by floods.” Substitute the
words hurricane or wind-
storm for flood in the preced-
ing sentence, and you have a
perfect description of today’s
situation with windstorm and
hurricane insurance. The
expense of Katrina and the
accompanying chart are
undeniable evidence of the
rising cost of windstorms.
Meanwhile, 2005’s record
hurricane season — along
with the four hurricanes that
hit Florida last year — should
persuade the most hardened
skeptic that we live in an era
of heightened danger.

Before the flood-insurance
program was created, gov-
ernment-backed relief in
disastrous floods came from
general revenues, in much

the same’ manner as aid is’

provided to the victims of
Katrina today. For taxpayers,
the flood-insurance program
makes more sense because
the NFIP is self-supporting.
Expenses and claims are paid
through premiums collected
for flood-insurance policies,
not by the U.S. government.
Because policies are
required of potential flood
victims across the country,



DATE DISASTER







premiums remain relatively
affordable. In 2004, accord-
ing to the insurance institute,
the average premium was
$411 for coverage of $150,000.
Compare that to the huge
windstorm premiums paid by

residents living in the most _

vulnerable parts of Florida,

and the advantages of a com: -

prehensive national program,
become clear. ;

Of course, no insurance
program can cover all the
expenses of a calamity of
Katrina’s magnitude. Extra
relief will be needed because
many potential victims will



; insurance information institute



C AT. ‘ASTROPHES AND COSTS Bo area
Hurricanes are the most expensive disasters for insurers.




INSURANCE PAYOUTS,
IN BILLIONS OF 2004 DOLLARS






roperty coverage only. —



remain uninsured, and losses
will exceed coverage when
the level of destruction is so
great. Still, the existence of
an insurance program of
national dimensions, ulti-
mately underwritten by the
government, becomes a sig-
nificant mitigating factor.
Here’s another advantage:
Putting flood, windstorm and
other catastrophic events
into one package would mini-
mize the possibility that
disaster victims will be
cheated by insurance compa-
nies. Already, the attorney

general of Mississippi is.








suing five insurance compa-
nies for allegedly cheating
policy-holders by attributing
Katrina’s damage to a flood,
thus avoiding responsibility
for damage covered by wind-
storm policies.

Some will argue, no doubt,
that most Americans aren’t
vulnerable to windstorm and
hurricane damage, so they
shouldn’t be asked to pay for
those who are at risk. This is
the same argument used by
some Floridians who
believed they faced no risk
from hurricanes... until last
year’s storms cut across the
state and damaged inland
areas once considered “safe.”

The facts don’t support
the argument either, accord-
ing to the insurance institute:
In 2003, a fairly typical year,
homeowners’ insurance
losses from wind or hail dam-
age accounted for 25 percent
of all losses nationwide. This
was exceeded only by the 33
percent of losses attributed
to fire, lighting and debris
removal — which is why the
proposed new disaster insur-
ance should cover all major
catastrophes, not just hurri-
canes or floods.

Creating a government

safety net to share the risk
with private insurers is a leg-
islative issue that the entire
Florida delegation should
support. Their constituents
live in the most vulnerable
state. Last year’s storms
erased profits for the state’s
homeowners’ insurance
industry and have led to sig-
nificant premium increases
and surcharges this year.
Incredibly, the state-backed
insurance program of last
resort wants a new round of

- increases, up to 68 percent

for Miami-Dade County, and
50 percent for Broward.
National catastrophe insur-
ance would be fairer to all by
spreading the risk — and the
burden of rate-payers.

No state has benefited as
much from the existence of a
flood-insurance program as
much as Florida — 40 per-
cent of all U.S. flood-insur-
ance policies nationwide
originate in Florida. If a par-
allel catastrophe-insurance
program that includes wind-

storms is created, the same

benefit would accrue to the
state’s overburdened resi-
dents, along with the savings -
of premiums made lower by
spreading the risk.

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“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

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China's explosive growth is the world’s biggest story



OTHER VIEWS |



Prediction: He will support Roe vs. Vi ade

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PAGE 12C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

THE TRIBUN\

Fn eee eee



PICTURED inset and on the right
are suspected illegal Haitan immigrants
who were apprehended in Bahamian
waters.

(The Tribune archive photos)



Esso, a market leader in fuels and
convenience retailing, is looking for
operators/ franchisees for its
service stations across the country.
Retails Sites immediately available
in New Providence.

if you have... j
» Successful experience in sales,

finance, or administration;

A minimum of five years

successfully supervising a team

of workers;

A desire to provide superior

customer service;

Computer literacy;

Organisational discipline;

Access to capital and a good

credit history

2

8

s

We want to know youl





i 7



portunity
jorld Class Retailer

Application forms may be collected at
our Windsor Field Office (immediately
West of Nassau International Airport).

Completed forms should be addressed
and returned to:

Yorick Cox

Caribbean Sales

Support Co-ordinator
Esso Standard Oil S.A, Ltd.
Windsor Field Road
Nassau, NP

, Bahamas

Applications should be submitted no

later than September 30 2005







ingen

FROM page 5C

political isolation. :

It would be interesting to hear his views now
that fanatical mullahs and other extremist fol-
lowers of Allah are demanding that Britain,
their adopted land, become an Islamic state.

“You must be stark, staring mad,” Powell said
all those years ago while his political colleagues



he
4).



AN

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4
a

5



vty fe
$$ 4
yu

turned away in disgust and resisted all discussion
of the immigration problem. Was he righf-or
was he wrong? a



° What do you think? Fax 328-2398 or e-mail
jmarquis@tribunemedia.net ae

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Section
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Volume: 101 No.245

MACKEY IN



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1

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BAHAMAS EDITION

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

e SEE TRIBUNE

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Tropical storm
Rita expected to
yather strength

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

.THE BAHAMAS is under a
hurricane watch and tropical
storm warning as forecasters
expect the 2005 hurricane sea-
son’s newest tropical storm, Rita,
to evolve into the year’s 18th
hurricane.

Tropical Depression Number
18, now Tropical Storm Rita,
was projected to become Hur-
ricane Rita within the next two
days and the Bahamas Meteo-
rological., department. issued.a
strong warning that, persons liv-
ing in the southeastern and cen-
tral Bahamas, should complete
all necessary preparations for
tropical storm conditions.

Rainfall

Heavy rainfall and severe
thunderstorms were expected in
the southeastern Bahamas yes-
térday as the storm was expected
to dump.a maximum of eight
inches of rain on the island.

Tropical Storm warnings are
in effect for Exuma, Cat Island,
Long Island, San Salvador, Rum
Cay, Ragged. Island, Crooked

Island, Acklins, Mayaguana and’

Tnagua.

These islands may experience
tropical storm conditions within
24 hours.

A hurricane watch was put
into effect for Grand Bahama,

‘Abaco, Bimini, the Berry
Islands, Andros, New Provi-
dence and Eleuthera.

_ These Islands may experience
hurricane conditions in the next
36 hours.

At 11 am on Sunday, tropical
depression number. 18 was 390
miles east-southwest of Nassau.

A hurricane watch has been
issued for the northwest
Bahamas. :

For the islands of, Grand
Bahama, The Abacos, Bimini,
the Berry Islands, Andros, New
Providence and Eleuthera, the
Meteorological office said that
hurricane conditions could be
experienced in 36 hours.

The devastating hurricane
Katrina formed as a tropical
depression east of the Bahamas.

If Tropical Depression Num-
ber 18 develops into a hurricane,
it could be the ninth hurricane of
the year. It also would be 18th
named storm. ,

Meteorologist Neil Armstrong
at the Bahamas Meteorological
Department, told The Tribune
that the depression is not expect-
ed to become a hurricane until it
moves into the Florida Straits.

The warning, he said, was
issued primarily because of the
country’s proxiniity to the storm
and because the system is show-
ing signs of development.

“It does not mean that we
will have a hurricane in the
Bahamas but because of its prox-
imity it is something we defi-
nitely need to be watching,” he
said.

The system was expected to
move south of the Florida main-
land because of a ridge of high
pressure north of it, pushing it to
the west.

On Sunday, the.National Hur-
ricane Centre also was monitor-
ing Tropical Storm Philippe,
which was about 425 miles east-
southeast of the Leeward
Islands. It was forecast to build
into the eighth hurricane of the
season within the next day and
aim north into the Atlantic with-
out threatening the US coast-
line.

(OU COULD WIN!

ROR fo a este OAR se Yen A EET UCR AL







Two young women found dead

Hi By PAUL G
TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter

POLICE are investigating two

deaths over the weekend, both

involving young women, __
Early yesterday morning after
6am, a young woman’s body was

discovered hanging from the ceil- -

ing of a home in the Bluff, South
Andros.

According to press liaison
Inspector Walter Evans, the 25-
year-old woman is believed to be
from India, and was in the country



visiting a relative.

At this stage foul play is not sus-
pected Mr Evans said. However,
officers from the detective unit
were currently in Andros to inves-
tigate the matter.

On Friday evening shortly after

" 2pm, police ‘received a report of a

missing woman.
According to Mr Evans, they
received a report at 6pm‘ from a

person in the Augusta and Fergu- |

son Streets area complaining of a
“heavy stench or odour” coming
from a nearby house.
“On arrival police met the: body
\

ofa fomniet it a crouched position
in the bathroom of the house from
where the odour was emanating
from.

“The body was in an advanced
stage of decomposition. Her iden-
tity may be that of a 33-year-old
who lives off McCullough Cor-
ner,” he said.

Mr Evans said police believe
that this woman may be the per-
son reported missing earlier that
day. An autopsy is planned to clar-
ify her identity, and to ascertain
the cause of death. Police investi-
gations into both matters continue.

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BEC workers’
action delays
repairs to

power outage

lm By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

BEC WORKERS partici-

i. pating in what management

has called “if-not illegal, then
premature” industrial action
over the weekend delayed
repairs to areas affected by a
power outage caused by a
thunderstorm Saturday.
General Manager of the
corporation Kevin Basden
said that while most of the
areas affected by the outage
should have been corrected ©
in two hours, sectors which
that were more severely dam-
age suffered longer because
workers were directed by theâ„¢
union to “work no overtime
and make repairs slowly.”
“We want to indicate that
management’s first responsi-
bility is to the customers and
every effort-is made to ensure
that inconveniences are kept
to a minimum and we are
extremely concerned about
any kind of industrial action
negatively ‘impacting the
smooth operation of the sup-

SEE page 10



US Ambassador:
Bahamas should
not lose sight of
Cuba and China’s
human rights issues

lm By CARA BRENNEN
and KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporters

THE Bahamas should con-
sider focusing more attention
on the human rights practices
of its trading Pas Cuba
and China.

US. Ambassador John D
Rood made this suggestion
on. Saturday at the US
Embassy-hosted media semi-
nar held at the British Colo-
nial Hilton. The ambassador
said that the United States

" respects the Bahamas’ sover-

eign right to have relation-
ships with Cuba and. China,
but he hopes the Bahamas
does not lose sight of the
human rights issues in those
two countries.

However, he emphasized:
“I believe the government
can make its own decisions,
we are not here to tell you

SEE page two








| Submit your nomination today. Nomination forms available at Ministry of Tourism offices throughout The Bahamas or submit online at www.caciqueawards.com

PAGE 2, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005





expected to affect the B

li By PAULG
TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter

WITH two of the five largest
airlines in North America filing
for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, min-
istry officials are confident that
the tourism product in the
Bahamas will not be negatively
affected as the airlines reorga-
nize their operations.

Last week, Delta and North-
west Airlines filed for Chapter
11 bankruptcy protection, cit-

ing that they both have been hit .

by high fuel costs.

Northwest Airlines currently
has the highest labour costs in
the industry and has been losing
more than $4 million a day.
Delta has heavy pension oblig-
ations and its total debt is
roughly $20.5 billion.

According to-the Associated

Telecommunications/Computer Network Design
installation & Maintenance

Press, Delta and Northwest Air-
lines have started a lengthy and
costly road to recovery that will
likely include cutting employ-
ee rolls, pensions and routes.

Schedules

Passengers for both airlines
probably won’t notice any
immediate effects from the fil-
ings as both carriers announced
that they will continue their nor-

mal schedules while they reor-

ganize.

Noting that Delta operates
four flights a day to, the
Bahamas, Tourism Minister
Obie Wilchcombe said that the
Bahamas is an extremely prof-
itable route for the airline: He
did not foresee the Bahamas
being cut from the airline’s
schedules. -

“This is really an effort to
reorganize their airline and

LOCAL NEWS

Airline bankruptcy ruling ‘not

«

allow them to be more compet-
itive. We are a profitable route
for Delta, and they have been
with us for a while.

“Don’t forget Song is a part
of Delta as well and they have

“done very well.

“In this ever changing world,
the Bahamas is ever ready to
deal with the challenges and
that’s why we steadily grow. But

‘so far we have not been affect-

ed and we look pretty good for
the coming holiday season,” he
said.

Echoing these sentiments was
Tyrone Sawyer, the airlift direc-

‘tor in the Ministry of Tourism.

Mr Sawyer said the Bahamas
has had a very good and long
term relationship with Delta

Airlines, and that he did not

expect the bankruptcy ruling to

affect the country negatively.
“No we don’t expect any cuts

in Delta’s service into our des-

‘tination. The airline will still be

ahamas’

operating and we really don’t

expect the bankruptcy ruling to .

affect us negatively. It’s still
business as usual basically.

Carrier

“Delta has non stop service
from Atlanta into Nassau and
Atlanta’ into: Freeport. Service
from LaGuardia into Nassau as
well. We see Delta as a key car-

tier. It’s a hub and spoke air-

line,” he said.

This, Mr Sawyer explained
means that with carriers like
Delta, which has a-large route

network with a central: hub

(Atlanta), the airline can bring
the Bahamas guest stopovers
across their entire route net-

work through their Atlanta

hub.
“That makes them a very
important partner for us,” he

said.

“Homes ® Offices * Subdivisions
Call Us Today!

Tel:

393-7733

E-mail: info@lemeonetworks.com





You can find a Cacique Award
Deadline: October 14, 2005





Winners of the Minister of Tourism’s Award for Hospitality
embody Bahamian hospitality through genuine

friendliness and concern for our visitors.
the perfect description of Margo Wring throughout his
career, particularly in the airline industry in which he has

This has been

helped countless visitors through sometimes challenging
circumstances. Margo Wring’s personality and demeanor
have eamed him the title of Cacique.

Margo Wring
1998 Cacique Award Winner
Minister’s an for Hospitality ©

US Ambassador

FROM page one

what to do or to suggest that there will be reper-

cussions for anything you do because: that does ;

not make any sense.’

Ambassador Rood conceded that in the past
the US government may have concentrated too
much on the differences in policy between the US

and the Bahamas, and not on what the two coun- .

tries have in common.
He said that his policy has always been to focus

on the 80 per cent of policies that the two coun- '

tries do share. :

“No relationship can ever be 100 per cent,
there will be things we agree on and things we
don’t. I feel that if a relationship — one between
husband and wife or one between two countries
—can be 20/80 then it’s a good relationship,” he
said.

He also said that in the instance of Cuba,
although the US.not does share the Bahamas’

viewssthe- Bahamas gevernm enimayebe able tg:-
“use its*réla onship"
somé influence on how Cuba deals with viola :




Hithat country to exert



tions against human Tights.’ » *
Also addressing the topic of PetroCaribe and

the concerns of some analysts that, the cheap-
‘fuel accord with Venezuela could damage the

US/Bahamas relationship, the ambassador said
that in his‘ opinion the agreement is strictly a
business issue.

He added, however, that although he did not
know any of the details of the PetroCaribe agree-
ment, it has been his experience that govern-
ments have more success when “they stick to
basic administration,” and leave the running of
businesses, such as hotels and fuel management to
the private sector.

“Usually when goverment becomes involved
in things they don’t do well. If the government

were to get involved in petrol distribution it may .



te A Oth, anes



.US AMBASSADOR John Rood ,

speaks at the media seminar.

not. do as an effective job as it were a private
entity,” he said.
' Ambassador Rood on the weekend addressed
members of the Bahamian media houses during a
special one-day seminar which focused on the
topics of investigative reporting and the ques-
tion of ethics and accountability in journalism.
Karl Idsvoog, a veteran broadcast journalist
and associate professor at Kent State University,
offered two workshop sessions— one on inves-
tigative reporting and the other on news gather-

ing techniques.

Following the workshops a special panel com-
prised of veteran Bahamian journalists such as
Mike Smith, Sir Arthur Foulkes, Oswald T Brown
and Professor Idsvoog, then dealt with the issue of
ethics i in today’s media.


















¢

sponsorediby

The Bahamas
Ministry of Tourism

faba Harias







THE TRIBUNE



Third victim
of traffic
accident dies

A THIRD victim of
Wednesday’s double fatali-
_ ty in.Grand Bahama died

: over the weekend.

Max Smith, 19, the third
occupant of the ill-fated
purple coloured Toyota,
died as a result of his
injuries around 3 am Satur-.

: day at the Princess Mar-

garet Hospital.
His death pushes Grand

: Bahama’s traffic fatality to

17 for the year.

The other two occu-
pants, Merrill Dorsette Jr,
23, of Waterfall Drive, the
driver, was killed on
impact while Jeffrey Pin-
der, also 23, died at the
Rand Memorial Hospital
later that evening.

Mr Smith, who was a
rear seat passenger in the ©
vehicle, was later airlifted
to the hospital in Nassau. -
with multiple injuries. He
never recovered conscious-.
ness.

Shonette Rolle, 28,-who |

i was driving the other vehi-

cle which collided with the
Toyota, and her two
daughters were treated at
the hospital and dis-
charged.

Investigators determined,
that Mr Dorsette was trav-:
elling in a westerly direc-
tion on the highway when
he attempted to overtake

i another car, colliding with

‘Ms Rolle who was driving
in the opposite direction —
going east.

The two vehicles were
damaged beyond repair.

Man found
dead in car

By PAULG
- TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

!, FREEPORT, Grand
i Bahama -‘At about 8am ~
' yesterday.acallcame into.

the police dispatch centre to
inform officers that a man
had just been found sitting
behind the wheel of a‘car,
parked in a yard at the
intersection of Columbus
Drive and Explorers Way:
Hewasdead. >
Officers from the uni-
formed and plainclothes
divisions were dispatched to

: ' the location where they

found the dead man who
they would only identify as
“a well known local
mechanic”. However he was.
later identified at the scene |
by his brother as 64-year-old
Wendell Albert Gibson.

The circumstances sur-
rounding Mr Gibson’s death
are still unknown. He wore
a blue shirt, blue trousers,
and was sitting at the wheel
of his blue 1989 Dodge —
Aries Car, clutching.a bottle
of Tylenol pills between his
legs.

According to the Mobile
Patrol Division and the
Scene-of-Crime officers
from the Central Detective
Unit, there were no visible
signs of injury to the body.
Police investigations into
the incident are underway.

Also around 3.15am yes-
terday, officers from the
mobile patrol division were
making a routine check in
the vicinity of Club Rock at:
the International Bazaar

i when they saw a man in the

parking lot with what :
appeared to be a firearm
pushed into the waist of his
trousers.

When the man saw the
police, he fled on foot but
was quickly apprehended
and the object, which turned
out to be a 4.5mm BB gun,
was taken from him.

The 20-year-old resident
of Abaco Drive, Hawksbill
was arrested and taken into
custody at the Central
Detective unit. He is expect-
ed to be formally charged —
this morning with posses-
sion of an imitation firearm.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE |
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005, PAGE 3



BECAUSE of the number of
Haitian immigrants already here
- legally and illegally - the
Bahamas cannot continue to add
significant numbers from a nation
of seven million people, said
FNM leadership candidate Dion
Foulkes at a meeting of the Blue
Hills Constituency Association of
the Free National Movement at
Garvin Tynes Primary School.

Mr Foulkes unveiled a 17-page
statement which he described as a
“comprehensive, balanced and
responsible” contribution to the
current debate on the nation’s
immigration problems.

Mr Foulkes, a candidate for
leader of the Free National
Movement, said national security
is a critical job for government
and that immigration is a key part
of his own national security agen-
da.

He suggested structural reform,

including the transfer of the —

Department of Immigration to
the Ministry of National Security.

He pledged to modernise the
Department of Immigration by
boosting its human resources and
the technological capacity to deal
with both legal and illegal immi-
gration.

Complaints

He also proposed the creation
of an independent oversight
group, similar but not identical
to the United Kingdom’s Inde-
pendent Police Complaints Com-
mission, which will monitor seri-
ous complaints by the public in
connection with the conduct of
law enforcement officers, includ-
ing immigration personnel.

“As I listen to the immigra-
tion debate it often seems incom-
plete and unfocused. And it usu-
ally focuses only on illegal immi-
gration.” He stressed that
Bahamians are often squeezed
from the top by legal immigra-
tion and squeezed from the bot-
tom by illegal immigration.

“Too many companies have
been complacent or sluggish in
training Bahamians to take over
various functions. There are still
too many examples of expats who

have come on short term or medi- ©

um term work permits but who
have had their permits extended
repeatedly, even though there are
qualified Bahamians in their
field,” said Mr Foulkes.
Commenting on Haitian immi-
gration Mr Foulkes said that
“what is significant is that because
of the vast number of Haitian
immigrants already here — legally
and illegally — we cannot continue
to add significant numbers indef-

initely. A nation of 300,000 peo- -

ple cannot continue to allow
unlimited immigration from a
nation of seven million people.”

He said that the current level
and pattern of immigration from
Haiti is economically and socially
unsustainable.

Mt Foulkes said that his main
strategy for dealing with illegal
immigration is a policy of deter-
rence.

“Because prevention is better
than cure and usually cheaper,
the Bahamas may need to switch
its strategic focus if it wishes to
dramatically confront the flood
of illegal migration from the
Republic of Haiti and other
nations.

“T use the term deterrence
rather than interdiction, because
interdiction is only one element of
a broader deterrence strategy. In
this context, deterrence includes a
mix of tools which will prevent

people from coming to the.
Bahamas in the first place or stop- .

ping them very early in their jour-
ney and returning them swiftly to
their country of origin,” said the
former Education Minister.

Mr Foulkes said that the
Bahamas should utilise Inagua as

a southern command centre to ©

effectively police the waters of
the southern Bahamas. This polic-
ing would of course include other
activities besides illegal immigra-
tion.

“A Defence Force base with
marine and air capabilities and a
detention and processing centre
would be set up to facilitate this
strategy. This complex will need
State of the art information and
communications technology if it is
to be successful,” he said

Mr Foulkes said insufficient
attention is being paid to the prin-
ciples which should guide the
immigration debate. He offered
five principles for consideration,
Bahaminization, adherence to the
rule of law, preserving our iden-
tity and way of life, creating eco-
nomic opportunity and human
rights.

“In terms of legal immigration
my belief is simple: If there is a
qualified Bahamian for a posi-
tion:then that Bahamian shou!d
get the job. This also means that if
we can’t find a resident Bahamian
we are prepared to look outside
fora qualified Bahamian,” he
said: i

He said that if there isno qual-



LOCAL NEWS

NM leadership candidate
Dion Foulkes unveils statement | brings more than
on immigration problems







@ DION A. FOULKES, FNM leadership candidate, presented his 17 page comprehensive
plan to deal with legal and illegal immigration in the Bahamas at a forum sponsored by the
Blue Hills FNM -Constituency Association at Garvin Tynes Primary School. Among the large
crowd in attendance were from left: Princess Flowers, Association Secretary; Nelson
Ferguson, Chairman, Mr. Foulkes, and Floyd Pratt, Vice Chairman.

ified Bahamian, then a non-

Bahamian may be brought in
until a Bahamian becomes quali-
fied or can be successfully trained.

“You can be. assured that my
government will not be bringing
in any Korean fishermen to do
what Bahamians have been doing
for generations. But Bahaminiza-
tion also means something else
to me. It means that those who
have permanent residence with
the right to work and those seek-
ing citizenship must also be
Bahamianized or integrated into
our way of life,” he said.

The former minister said that a
government run by him will
aggressively prosecute those who
smuggle illegal immigrants from
any country into the Bahamas.

Penalties

“Some persons may be offered
leniency if they cooperate in
assisting the government in suc-
cessfully prosecuting the ring-
leaders, the worst abusers of the
law. Secondly, those who break
Bahamian immigration laws will
have to suffer the penalties the
law imposes. This means. that
those who come here illegally will
not be granted the right to work,”
he said.

Mr Foulkes proposed a more
sophisticated computerized data-
base to better track those who
have come to the Bahamas ille-

gally yet still apply for work per--

mits and a policy of refusing to
grant work permits to those who
enter as visitors. -

“The reason many people have
come to our (country) is because
they wish to share in its benefits.
We should celebrate this and also
cherish our Bahamian identity.
But the very way of life many
seek here will be destroyed if it is
overrun by attitudes and behav-
iour which are not consistent with
our democratic heritage, basic

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civilities and social stability,” he
said.

A part of the problem with the
dialogue on immigration, he said,
is that the Bahamas is not always
sure of the overall economic
direction it wants to take. ~

“Such a direction will tell us
about the type and quality. of
labour our economy needs. Such
a plan must be the context in
which you create an effective
immigration policy.

“My immigration policy will
ensure that Bahamians are con-
sidered first, but that we will be
open to expatriate expertise when

it is required,” said Mr
Foulkes.

Bahamian immigration poli-
cies, said the FNM leadership
candidate, must adhere to basic
standards of human rights, includ-
ing our policies on detention and
repatriation.

“We must ensure that those
few officials and others who treat

illegal immigrants improperly are

dealt with in the appropriate
manner.

“We uphold our own dignity
by speaking forthrightly yet
respectfully about those who are
strangers in our land,” he said.

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$10,000 donation

200 wheelchairs
for disabled

The Bahamas Association for
the Physically Disabled
(BAPD) was established 34
years ago at the urging of
young Bahamians who had
suffered spinal cord injuries
and abruptly found themselves
confined to wheelchairs.
These young adults knew their
lives could be more complete
and yet they understood that
in. order to find that
‘completeness they needed a
robust support structure
around them. A tremendous
success story, the Association
has grown to become a
vigorous organization, meeting
much more than the needs of
those confined to wheelchairs.

Today, BAPD provides “the
best possible service” to the
disabled of our community
through a vanety of programs,
including special education,
physical therapy, speech
therapy, computer training,
social interaction and
independent living skills.
‘Throughout it all, the need for
wheelchairs is constant.

The $10,000 donation has
enabled a full container, more
than 200 wheel chairs, to be
shipped to Nassau. BAPD
Administrator Linda Smith,
remarked that the delivery is
coming at a critical time. “We
have been out of chairs for
some time now,” she said, “and
this shipmentis sorely need
The Holowesko Foundation is
very pleased to support this
importantendeavor.

With written criteria in place to
guide selection BAPD ensures
that needy individuals who
cannot afford to purchase a
wheelchair on their own are the
first recipients. And, with the
support of service clubs BAPD
will disburse the wheelchairs
throughout the country.

BAPD reminds us that a
person who 1s physically
challenged is “an individual
who has the same goals.as
people everywhere - to get the
most from life, to achieve:
independence, to be pro-
ductive, and to have friends.”



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PAGE 4, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI





Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, CM.G, M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

Last of Erickson pioneers dies

THE OBITUARY of Mrs Louise Erick-
son— the last of a pioneering New England

family that went to Inagua in the mid-thirties.

determined to resurrect that island’s once
prosperous salt industry — is published on
page 12 of today’s Tribune.

Originally the rebuilding of Inagua was the
dream of Jim Erickson, the second of three
brothers — Arioch Wentworth, Jr., better
known as Bill, and the youngest, Douglas
“Doug”.

A Harvard graduate, Jim visited the
Bahamas during the year that he was taking
business courses at the Massachusetts Insti-
tute of Technology. On that visit he became
interested in reviving the defunct salt pans at
Great Inagua.

It took a while to ingnite enthusiasm for the
project in brothers, Bill and Doug. Bill was
the first to join him. And with his wife, Louise,
and their two-year-old son, Wenty, in tow
arrived in Mathew Town in 1936.

Already Jim and his wife, Margery were
settled in Inagua. In 1986, after the death of
her husband in April, 1967, Margery wrote
and illustrated a book, with the simple title:
“Great Inagua”. It is the incredible story of a
pioneering family — husbands, wives and chil-
dren — and their effort to create an industry
on a barren, forgotten island. They lived an
almost kibbutz- -type existence — but instead of
cultivating land, they were cultivating salt.
The women shared the housework and the
care of all of the children.

Today’s generation of Bahamians probably
think of Inagua with Mayaguana as the most
southerly of the Bahamas islands, where noth-
ing much happens. For them Inagua probably
means flamingoes, wild donkeys and salt pans.

Morton Salt is the island’s main employer
and a resort, which has approval, but is having

difficulty hopping over government’s red car- -

pet for investors, hopes to create a second
source of employment — eco-tourism that will
exploit the beauty of the island and its flamin-
goes.

But in a long ago past before the First
World War Inagua had its hour: of fame.
Margery Erickson describes it in “Inagua”.

“The salt industry,”. she says, “had col-
lapsed because the price of salt fell very low
after the First World War. Salt company after
salt company went broke overnight, natives
lost their jobs and their families suffered
severely in consequence. The pans fell into
disuse — walls crumbled, canals became
clogged with debris.

“Before the panic on Inagua,” she contin-

ued, “landowners had led a luxurious life there.



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Broughams and hansoms pulled by matching
pairs of horses had rolled over the broad road-
ways of Mathew Town and balls were given by
moonlight; wines from Spain and France filled
the cellars of the well-to-do and one resident
had a piano swung ashore from a clipper ship.
The ladies wore silks and taffetas from Paris
and lace from Brussels, while the men had a
crack polo team and played matches on the
Parade Ground.”

“After the calamity struck, the owners
departed almost overnight, salt ships stopped
calling for cargo and the native population

sank into poverty. It was this isolated place, not .

too remote from the Florida coast, that Jim
wanted to restore to economic life,” his wife
wrote. “The idea of bringing about a rebirth of
Inagua and thus succouring almost a thou-
sand forgotten human beings so inspired Jim
that he persuaded his brothers to come in with

him and his parents to offer financial back-_

ing. Jim was convinced that by using fewer
labourers and: more machinery, salt making
on Inagua could again become a prosperous
undertaking.”

The family worked hard but their company
— West India Chemicals Ltd - faced increasing
difficulties in the forties and fifties. The build-
ing of a magnesium plant at the beginning of
World War II with no return on the investment
so depleted the family fortune that they were
forced to sell. In 1955 Morton Salt Company
took over West India Chemicals.

The late Sir: Etienne Dupuch, who repre-
sented Inagua in the House of Assembly from
1925 to 1942 often talked of Inagua’s golden
years. He would tell stories of three or four
powerful Inagua merchants who controlled
the island and traded in gold coins that they
kept in a chest under the counters of their
small stores.

In his book — “Salute to Friend and Foe” .
— he referred to direct service by German —

and Dutch ships from New York to Inagua, to
pick up stevedore labourers for discharge of
their cargoes in central and South America.
This collapsed in 1914 at the outbreak of the
First. World War.

During the drug era of the eighties: there
was much gossip in Nassau about some of the
fancy homes being built in Inagua, a few from
unknown sources of wealth. There was also
gossip about the difficulty at times of trans-
acting business in the local shops because
there was no change for the US$100 bills that
were floating around the island — even in the
hands of children.

Inagua is indeed an interesting island. It

too has kad its day in the sun.




















Forgiveness
after attack
on America

EDITOR, The Tribune

TODAY is Sunday, Sep-
tember 11 2005 and the fourth
anniversary of that horrible
terrorist attack on America
that saw the death of thou-
sands. Throughout America,
the theme for church services
was a day of remembrance.
Many people took time out to

-reflect upon that dreadful inci-

dent and a number of official
ceremonies were held mark-

* ing this anniversary.

In particular, ceremonies
were held at the sites of the
tragedy, the World Trade Cen-
tre in New York, the Penta-
gon in Virginia and in the
fields of Pennsylvania where
the United Airlines flight
crashed.

I attended Saint Anthony’s
Shrine, a church noted for its
treatment of the homeless and
afflicted here in downtown
Boston and also the site of one
of the remembrance cere-
monies. One of four of the
Remembrance Bells con-
structed by the Franciscan
Centre of Wilmington,
Delaware for post-September
11 memorials was rung after
the service.

More than three hundred
people from Massachusetts
had died in the 911 attack and

. So the fourth bell was placed in

Boston, the capital of Massa-
chusetts. These bells all weigh
Several tons each and so their
toll was heard for many miles
past Boston Harbour and
beyond. It was a sad and
solemn occasion. As each toll
was rung, chills went down the
spine of those who stood in
silence.

Despite the sad reality of the
occasion, Father Gary Con-
vertino tried ‘to conduct an
upbeat service. He did not
focus on the murderous atroc-
ities of September 11, instead
his homily focused on forgive-
ness, the very foundation of
the Christian faith.

His. homily reminded us of
the story of Peter who tried to

get Jesus to define what is an.

acceptable form of forgiveness.
Peter suggested to forgive
someone seven times over, but
Jesus corrected him when he
said that we should forgive sev-
enty times seven times. I
admire Father Convertino as
he reminds me so much of
Monsignor Ambrose McKin-
non of Mary Star of the Sea in

.. Freeport with his’sénse of

humour. | ;
But more ee they

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maintain an uncompromising
re-enforcement of the teach-
ings of Jesus: We were actual-
ly requested to forgive those
evil perpetrators of this bar-

. baric act that resulted in the
. death of so many innocent per-
-sons. That’s the way Jesus

would have wanted it! '

To illustrate his point of for-
giveness, Father Convertino
told us of the story of a ser-
vant who owed his master a
large sum of money. The.mas-

ter summoned him and

demanded payment. The ser-

. vant got on his knees and

begged the master to give him
more time to pay. The master

‘was so touched that he forgave
the entire debt owed to him by

that same servant. .

Incredibly, someone: else’

owed the same servant a small
sum of money. The servant
brutalized the: person owing

him just a small sum with the:

threat of more punishment
until he paid up. Upon hearing
this story of the ungrateful ser-
vant, the master cancelled the
debt forgiveness and had the

servant thrown into prison. °

Had he forgiven as he was for-
given, his rewards would have
been much greater.

The; final story on forgive-
ness by Father Convertino

involves two Jewish concen- -

tration camp survivors during
the Nazi Holocaust. Needless
to say they were both tortured

and abused during.their deten- ..

tion. When asked if they for-
gave their Nazi captors, one
survivor without hesitation said
that he did. The other said that
he would never forgive those

- bastards. For the rest of his life -

he vowed to hate and resent
them. Then, said the other,

“you are still in prison”.

What is so interesting in the
Bahamas is that the UBP has
been out of office for almost
40 years. Yet, despite being a

country that observes Christian

values, far too many still vent
their hatred for alleged racist
practices of the UBP. i
This whole issue of the
removal of Sir Stafford Sands

from the $10 bill is centred —

around the fact that some per-

--ceived him. as racist. But was

he? Many credible persons

who truly knéw Sir Stafford ©

from all areas, including the
PLP, have publicly stated that
the suggestion of Sir Stafford
being a-‘racist was a myth pro-
moted mainly because of polit-
ical mischief.

This was the position of a

black Bahamian who had been
a PLP all of his life and had
grown up with Sir Stafford. Sir
Stafford did have the reputa-
tion, however, of looking after
his friends. It didn't matter if
you were white, black or in
between, if you were his friend
he looked after you. On the
other hand if he was against
you, the colour was not an
issue.

Over the years the propa-
ganda promoted by the PLP
was the claim that Sir Stafford
left the Bahamas because he

‘didn’t want to live under a
.. black government. This, of

course, was a bold face lie. This
statement was recently contra*.
dicted by Arthur “Midge”
Hanna, who revealed that the
real reason Sir Stafford did not
return was due to fear of ptos-
ecution.

This was a very valid reason
not to return, since the PLP’
government could not be trust-,
ed to fairly administer justice;
Just look at the D’Arcy Ryan
case, when the PLP govern-

‘ment contemptuously ignored
_the ruling of the Privy Council,

the Bahamas’ highest court. It
is doubtful under the circum-
stances that Sir Stafford would
have received a fair trial.
The hatred for the UBP is,
passed on from one generation’
to the next. Most of the people:
voicing protest against him
never knew him. For example,
the PLP chairman, Raynard
Rigby, was a little infant in dia-
pers when the UBP was the
government of the Bahamas.

-Yet he pretends to be an

expert on the UBP. All Mr
Rigby and*others like him
know about the UBP is what
had been handed down to
them. This is unfair as those
handing down the history of
the UBP do so with their idea
of what happened.

Exploiting the racial card by:
practising reverse discrimina-:
tion has worked well for the:

. PLP. However, it is high time:

they forgive the UBP, other
wise they will be the ones’
whose minds. are still i ea

- oned.

By going on the Darold.
Miller show to publicly explain
the true meaning of the colours’

‘on the flag, Arthur Hanna,

Paul Adderley and Sit
Clement Maynard are finally’
forgiving the UBP by correct-

- ing the misrepresentation pro-'

moted by the PLP which:
racially divided the Bahamas.

for decades.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 1y, -



i ,



Wis it was set up
immediately follow-

ing the last world war, NATO
was described by Winston
Churchill, one of its architects,
as a mechanism to keep “Amer-
ica in, Germany down and Rus-
sia out” of Europe.

Since that time, the western
alliance has discernibly mor-
phed several times as the glob-
al political environment has
changed around it.

First and foremost, the end
of fhe Cold War created the
context for the alliance’s most
important adjustment exercise.
Buf more recently, it is the
growing importance of the
European Union, with which it
is exactly coincident neither in
terms of membership nor of
interests, that has been the most
important factor of change. So
much so that, these days, there

» are many who question the
long-term viability of the
alliance altogether.

And of all the member states,
it is Germany (the country that
it was set up to keep down) that
has become the forum for the
most crucial test of the old
alliance.

As Germany went to the
polls (on Sunday), the question
of what role Germany will play
in NATO (and, relatedly, what
role the alliance will. playin, the
power politics of the world) is
very much on the minds of the
German electorate — and many
of those watching from without.

Mi people around
the world will

remember Chancellor Schroed-
er chiefly as the European
leader who, together with

France’s Jacques Chirac,



And of all the member states,
it.is Germany (the country that
it‘was set up to keep down)
that has become the forum for
the most crucial test of the old.

alliance.



PERSPECTIVES

AEN DREW Astieot EN



refused to be bullied into lend-
ing legitimacy to the illegal inva-
sion of Iraq in 2003. Like most
people in the world, he knew
the planned invasion to be a
purposeful act of aggression
whose pretext was conjured out

of thin air by English-speaking.

politicians. But unlike many, he

did not shy away from saying

sO.
On that and other occasions,

- Schroeder has demonstrated a

rare competence, integrity and
independence in the area of for-
eign policy. He has also played
a more effective game of simul-
taneously courting and con-
taining the Russian bear ‘than
any of his recent predecessors.
Unlike Helmut Kohl, whose

famously eventful relationship
-with Russia was developed

entirely within the context of
Cold War global politics,
Schroeder has managed to bal-
ance legitimate Russian fears
of encirclement against the
unreasonable Russian tendency
to view its Eastern European
neighbours as satellites or

’ buffers.

His efforts have produced
something close to friendship
between Russia and Western
Europe, even while the old
buffer states are stripped away
one by one and taken into the
embrace of an EU that contin-



ues to spurn Russia herself. For
this achievement, win or lose,
Mr. Schroeder leaves an impor-
tant legacy.

Cems however, are
more likely to

remember him as the Chancel-
lor who declared, in his suc-
cessful campaign of 1998, that if
he could not bring unemploy-
ment down below the 10.5 per
cent that he met it at, then he
was not worthy of re-election.
After seven years of his admin-
istration, unemployment now
stands at close to 12 per cent.
As an act of political theatre, it
was most unfortunate.

It certainly cost’him’a good .

_ deal of legitimacy and gave to

Angela Merkel, his rather unin-

spiring CDU rival, the upper
hand in the early opinion polls.
But, as the polls came in on
‘Sunday evening, it is clear that
Germans were not so keen on
change of the kind Mrs. Merkel

represents as many at first

assumed.

A CDU poll lead of nearly |

20 per cent had, by polling
day, shrunk to practical non-
existence, as exit polls seemed
to point to a certain failure on
Mrs. Merkel’s part to achieve
an absolute majority when

combined with her favoured.





nan calls for the world

community to Support |



AS Haiti prepares for elec-
tions in November and Decem-
ber with United Nations help,
Seeretary-General Kofi Annan

has called on the world com- :

munity to provide necessary aid
to help to re-establish order and
spur development in the impov-
erished country, which has been
plagued by unrest for many
years.

“Countries in all parts of the
world, from time to time, face
grave challenges that they can-
not address on their own. This is
such a time for Haiti, and the
country's people and leaders
have turned to the internation-
al.community for help,” Mr
Annan told a high-level minis-
terial meeting at UN Head-
quarters in New York yester-
day, which included interim
Haitian prime minister Gerard

’ Latortue.

“The United Nations and its
partners must not let them
down. And we must work along-
side them for the long term,” he
added at the session of the Core

Group, established by the Secu- .

rity Council last year to help the
country recover after an insur-
gency forced elected President
Jean-Bertrand Aristide to go.
into exile in February: 2004.
The group ingludes: Mr.

RRR Ea

' . MONDAY,
: SEPTEMBER 19
6:30 Bahamas @ Sunrise-Live

41:00 . Immediate Response
t2noon ZNS News Update Live

;






























12:03 Caribbean Today News Update
12:05 Immediate Response
1:00 Health For The Nation
#:30 On The Yard

2:00 CMJ Club Zone

2:30 Treasure Attic
3:00 David Pitts
3:30 - Bishop Neil Ellis
4:00 Video Gospel
4:30 Gospel Grooves
4:58 ZNS News Update

$:00 ~ Colombia Trade Show 2005
5:30 Cybernet

6:00 One Cubed

6:25. Life Line

6:30 News Night 13

7:00 Bahamas Tonight
8:00 You & Your Money

8:30. Baker's Bay
8:45 - Ardastra Gardens
9:00 - Legends From Whence We
hi Came:

Q:00 Sports Life Styles:

0:30 News Night 13

4:00, Bahamas Tonight

1:30 | Immediate Response

' 30°, Comm. Page 1540AM



NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves
the right to make last minute
programme changes!




Annan’s Special Representative
Juan Gabriel Valdés, who heads
the UN Stabilization Mission in
Haiti (MINUSTAH), MINUS-
TAH Force Commander and
representatives of the Organi-
zation of American States
(OAS), the Caribbean Com-

munity (CARICOM), other.

regional and sub-regional orga-

nizations and the international .

. financial institutions (IFIs).
Mr Annan said it was essen-

tial for the Haitian authorities to ©

work closely with the interna-
tional community to resolve
outstanding technical impedi-
ments to the elections. “More

fundamentally, we must do our ~

utmost to ensure that the elec-
tions are inclusive, and that they
contribute to reconciliation and
stability,” he added.

On promoting security and

the rule of law, he noted that.

MINUSTAH's military and
civilian police components,
working with the Haitian
National Police, “are tackling
difficult tasks with courage,” but
the emergence of an effective
rule-of-law culture will depend
upon Haiti's leadership. Provi-
sion of technical aid by the Core
Group must be linked with the
_ development of appropriate
’ professional standards to'ensure
that abuses of human rights by
those charged with law-enforce-
ment will not be tolerated.
Stressing the need for devel-
opment, he said: “Haiti will not

achieve stability without a con- |

certed attack on poverty and

deprivation. This is a long-term -

project, of course, but people
will be especially anxious for
concrete progress in the days
after a new administration takes
office. Assistance from the Core
Group can make an important
difference.”

MINUSTAH has more than
7,660 uniformed personnel in
Haiti, including 6,263 troops
and 1,401 civilian police, sup-
ported by.423 international
civilian personnel, about 443
local civilian staff and 147 UN
Volunteers. Its mandate ranges
from ensuring a secure and sta-
ble environment to helping to
organize free and fair elections
to promoting human rights.

° See page 14

TROPICAL
at

WT eedaait ates
PHONE: 822-2157





“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”




A



Take an additional ACE anne Er
_www.fashionhallbahamas.com

grand coalition for Germany?



Schroeder has managed to
balance legitimate Russian
fears of encirclement against
the unreasonable Russian
tendency to view its Eastern
European neighbours as
satellites or buffers...



coalition partners.

That can only mean one
thing: a so-called ‘grand coali-
tion’ with Mr. Schroeder’s par-
.ty. For Germany and.for the
Western Alliance, this would
be a good thing — or at least a
better thing than the alterna-
tive: °
While it is most unlikely that
an outright win for Mrs. Merkel

‘ would translate into a far more

“Atlanticist” foreign policy (in
Germany, her passive support
for the war in Iraq is seen as an
electoral liability, which she is
increasingly keen to downplay),

the message that it would send
to the new members of,the |
European family would be most
unfortunate.

Poland, the Czech Repnblic
and others, having emerged
from the dark decades of Sovi-
et rule with a tendency to over-
compensate on the side of the

. west, obviously require more

lessons in compromise.

- A few more years of a Ger-
many that is pro-European first _
and pro-Western second would,
together with a similarly mind-
ed France, be a good thing for
that process.

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e

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005 THE TRIBUNE ~





Why Hurricane Katrina presents
an opportunity for the Caribbean

er ee
em oe Ow meng me Me
i
a — Raat oe & oe he
= Gee of. wed ( + oor ol

Oe gm mee *





“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated|C ontent

- Available from Commercial | News Providers”
! .

* _—_—eto =
,*o = =~
, =. i oc em @

~ = o —_t aw

7 ae . at | -
as Rong The Tribune wants to hear |”
ei ecw eo from people who are _
. - making news in their
——* o neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
‘rece ee geet oe | be ae + Mase good cause, campaigning
sen @tutee | for improvements in the
: ~—meew 0° ated eee Be oe ) = area or have won an
‘ — | award.
ores beng Gree ewe te Ge — If so, call us on 322-1986
~~ «= *& ckheeewee Gee of @ om TTT and share your story.

ee ee
wee emt ee ong fee
“-— > tom

ooo Tn:

Junior Accounting
Clerk (Male) |

¢ Computer skills must include Microsoft Excel
and Microsoft Word.
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skills
¢ Ability to work on own initiative
° Interpersonal skills
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j .* Must be able to implement and maintain —
company standards and Peres



Data Processing Clerk

¢ The successful applicant must possess strong © ae

computer skills. Experience or knowledge of - “

the As/400 is an asset. | 2 BAHAMAS Dae earrane OF IC :
¢ Must possess good Ieedterelip and prepersonal ee AC ANTS (BICA)
° a be able to snplement and maintain | : ‘ NOTICE OF LOCATION

company standards and procedures : 01 HYUNDAI ELAN RA

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THE TRIBUNE

_.ARTHUR FOULKES:
UNIVERSAL PERSPECTIVE,

LOCAL NEWS

NOTED JOURNALIST,
HISTORICAL CONTEXT

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005, PAGE 7

A MUST-READ COLUMN THAT GETS To THE POINT



Youngsters volunteer to help
clean beach for world event

HORE than 250 local student
voliinteers turned out to partic-
ipate. in the Ocean Conservan-
cy’s ‘twentieth annual “Interna-
tional Coastal Cleanup Day”.

‘Hosted by Dolphin Encoun-
ters’ Project BEACH as a
Béach Buddies Programme, the
eyent attracted members of the

‘ernor General’s Youth
Award chapters from CI Gib-
son: RM Bailey, St Anne’s, St
Augustine’ s, Temple Christian,
Queen’s College: St Augustine’s
College, The College of The
Bahamas, Government High
School,. St John’s College,
Aquinas, Doris Johnson High
School, Mount Carmel, CC
S ting, Prince William, CV
Bethel and the entire sixth grade
class of Yellow Elder Primary
School. The volunteers teamed
up at:JAWS Beach near Clifton
Pierito clear the coast of an
overwhelming amount of trash.


y (ICC) is the world’s largest
one- 0a) volunteer event aimed
atscontrolling pollution of the
ai environment. Last year,

re than.300,000 people in 88
cqguntries took part, collecting
débris from more than 11,000
miles of:.beaches, riverbanks,

me lakefronts and collecting a, an’

astonishing four million pounds
of trash, despite widespread
postponements along the East
Coast and Caribbean due to sev-
eral hurricanes.

The ICC started as a local
programme in Texas and grad-
ually expanded to include every
major body of water in the
world. As such, it not only
makes a powerful statement
about global concern for the
environment, it also empowers
local communities to do some-
thing about pollution.

Buddies

Originally inspired by the
ICC and designed with the
guidelines from the Ocean Con-
servancy, the Beach Buddies
Programme is offered year-
round by Dolphin Encounters-
Project BEACH as a marine
conservation field trip.

_ Student volunteers learned
that removing debris from

Shorelines can prevent the -
deaths of thousands of marine

animals, including seabirds,

whales, dolphins, sea turtles and
fish, which routinely ingest or

become entangled in the debris.

' “This is’ such’ an important’

event for our youth to partici-

pate in,” said Denise Mortimer,
the National Director of the
Governor General’s Youth
Award Programme.

“Part of the responsibility of
being a member of the GGYA
is to keep the environment
clean. Young people take things
for granted. By seeing the
amount of debris out here today
and learning about the destruc-

tion it causes to our. natural

resources, they learn the impor-
tance of keeping our. environ-
ment clean.”

Kazzie Burrows, 17, and
Codero McKenzie, 16, both of
Government High School
agreed..

“We should all keep the .

beaches clean for all the kids
that come up after us so they
won’t have dirty beaches. We
need to keep our beaches for
every generation.”

“Tourism is our main indus-
try,” adds McKenzie. “We don’t
want tourists to come and see
dirty beaches, it gives the wrong
impression and tourism could
decline.”

After hours cleaning the
beach, the youngsters sorted
their refuse by type and wrote
down their findings on detailed

Ministry Of Education
Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute

NOTICE

TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF
COMPUTER EQUIPMENT

The Ministry of Education invites sealed bids persons td tender for
provision of COMPUTER EQUIPMENT for BAHAMAS
TECHNICAL & VOCATIONAL INSTITUTE, ue I rail Road,
New Providence, Bahamas.

2.0

Interested Bidders may inspect/collect the bidding se aunents

from the Supplies Section of the BAHAMAS TECHNICAL &
VOCATIONAL INSTITUTE, Old Trail Road, New Providence,

Bahamas from Wednesday 7th September,

2005.

Bids must be in English and should be enclosed in a sealed envelope
bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the subject
- bided on (e.g. “Computer Equipment”.)

Bids must be deposited : in the tender box provided at the address
shown below, on or before Friday 23rd September, 2005 by 4:30pm
(local time). Overseaas companies who may wish to tender can
submit their bid by mail. Late bids will be rejenies and returned

unopened.

Bids will be opened at a public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidders or their Representatives who choose to attend, at 10am
on Tuesday 27th September, 2005 at the address below.

The Chairman Tender

_ data cards. The eee

will be submitted to the Ocean
Conservancy to help them con-
tinue to track common_types of
litter and try to prevent these
items from ending up on our
beaches in the future.

an, Litter

“Too many people just don’t
realise that trash travels,” said
Janeen Bullard, a member of
the Education Department at
Dolphin Encounters who
organised the JAWS Beach
clean up. “The garbage they
leave on a beach — after having
a picnic, for example, or by
dumping cigarette butts there
— ends up polluting our waters
and killing or maiming many,
many animals.”

Sixth graders of Yellow Elder
Primary School were also very
concerned about the trash they
found. Andrewnique Curry, 10,
said, “It is very important for
everyone to pick up trash and to
keep the ocean and beach.clean,
because if they don’t the fish
and other animals will die and
the beaches will look bad and
tourists will not come.”

Portia Sweeting, Education

Officer for Primary Science at
the Ministry of Education
addéd: “It is important our chil-
dren learn about. the necessity
of keeping our environment
clean at an early age. They learn
to see the bigger picture and to
become responsible.and to
respect their natural resources.

“The amount of garbage on
some of our beaches is absolute-
ly astonishing,” said Robert
Meister, Managing Director of
Dolphin Encounters, who also
participated in the clean up.

“The kids did an amazing job
and we commend them.for their
interest and great effort. Dol-
phin Encounters remains com-
mitted to offering programmes
that teach the importance of
keeping the marine environ-
ment clean and safe. We hope
that others will join us next year
for International Coastal Clean
Up Day and throughout the
year to keep our beautiful envi-
ronment clean.”

To learn more visit
www.oceanconservancy.org.
For information on the many
outreach programmes offered
by Dolphin Encounters-Project
BEACH call Annette Dempsey

at 394-2200 or visit www. Bek

Pena com: me}

Tl

of The Bahamas

Vererinary House Catt Senvice
b ©
Appoi elk

Dr. Dwight A. Dorsett

Veterinarian

a

~ Dogs ¢ Cats © Small Pets"

¢ Vaccination

BON) iim @rlas
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_ Animal Hosptials

Call Dr. D...
ym ye vIL

24hrs/7 days Emergency Service



H. Wayne Huizenga School

of Business and Entrepreneurship

presents its

Distinguished Speakers Series

William C. Johnson, Ph.D.

Tuesday, October 11, 2005
8:30 a.m.

William C. Johnson, Ph.D., professor of
marketing at the H. Wayne Huizenga

School of Business and Entrepreneurship,
will discuss how to embrace and implement
a value-based philosophy into your organi-
zation. In his presentation, Zhe 70 Keys of
Customer Value, you can learn how to suc-
cessfully adapt your business practices to
become more customer-focused, and make
the customer an integral part of your organi-—

zation’s goals.

British Colonial | Hilton Hotel
Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas

This Distinguished Speaker Series is offered FREE of charge as a public
service by the Huizenga School of Nova Southeastern University. Seating

is limited to those who RSVP by September 30.

Reserve your place today by Ny

Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield
Cable Beach

P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 327-1530

calling Laquel Miller at

(242) 364-6766, ext. 0,

or by emailing to
nsu-bahamas@nsu.nova.edu.

NOVA
SOUTHEASTERN
UNIVERSITY

“Beupna Vhe Classvouw—

Nova Southeastern University admits students of any race, color, and national or ethnic origin. " Nova Southeastern University is accredited by the
Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097, Telephone number:
404-679-4501) to award associate's, bachelor’s, master's, educational specialist, and doctoral degrees. 08-24605 gi!


PAGE 8, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS





CELEBRATING close to
three decades of quality cus-
tomer service training, Bahama-
host used the platform of
Bahamahost Week 2005 to get
Bahamians excited about the
course again.

Bahamahost is a general atti-
tude and service training pro-
gramme implemented through
the Ministry of Tourism in 1978.

The week, which began on
September 11, opened with a






























half day Bahamahost seminar,
an official proclamation read-
ing in Rawson Square, a clean
up of certain areas of New
Providence and distribution of
food items to the needy. |
With over 23,000 graduates
working in all facets of tourism
in the Bahamas, there was much
to see at the Bahamahost exhi-
bition Jaunched at the main post

Monday.

SHOE STORE.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.




Madeira
Shopping Plaza
Tel: 328-0703

Marathon Mall
Tel: 393-6113

RND Plaza, Freeport
Tel: 351-3274













7

Rivet Shelving

Pallet Jac ks



Mobile Shelving Mezzanines





sae | Vee
hanna-mayson.com
Cg ayson.com

church service and included a ©

office on East Hill Street on -



ent opening all part

Founder of Bahamahost opens
exhibition about programme









@ SIR Clement and Lady Maynard take in some of the history of Bahamahost, an attitude and ser- «
vice training programme he implemented as minister of tourism in the late 1970s. Also pictured is
Sammy Gardiner, senior director of education and training in the Ministry of Tourism.

(Photo: Derek Smith).









Members of the Bahamahost Week committee joined the team at Environmental Health Services
to provide Rawson Square with a little sprucing up Thursday morning.

(Photo: Martella Matthews).

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) is
pleased to invite Tenders to provide the Company with Motor
Insurance coverage.

Interested companies/firms may collect a Tender Specification
from BTC’s Security’s Desk located in its administrative building
on John F. Kennedy Drive, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Tenders must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked
“TENDER FOR MOTOR INSURANCE”, and delivered on or
before 5:00 pm on Friday, September 30, 2005 to the attention
of:

Mr. Michael J. Symonette

President & CEO

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive

P.O. Box N-3048

Nassau, The Bahamas

BTC reserves the right to reject any, or all Tenders.


THE TRIBUNE | | MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005, PAGE 9

Rl S See



Piizver | Sie the led



ete lie 8
: “Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”



ap National Choir of The Bahamas

~ AUDITIONS

“Come and Try out for the National Choir a The Bahamas






a THE Bahamahost Week committee members double-teamed litter on the island on Thursday.
Four members of the committee tackled the trash on Poinciana Drive working from the College of
the Bahamas campus to Blue Hill Road.





(Photo: Martella Matthews).





Monday, September, 25th
College of The Bahamas, Music Block
(2 storey building opposite McDonalds)
7:00 pm





“Must be at least 25 years old. No upper age limit.





| Jefferson Johison: ; Ae .
Come prepared to sing any song.





Only those accepted may participate in a Choral Workshop to be
conducted by Dr. Jefferson Johnson, Director of Choral Activities at
the University of Kentucky, to be held in Nassau on October 21 and
22, 2005.









For further information call 356-2691/2 or
302-4512.





Hl FORMER minister of tourism and founder of Hahaiiahost Sir Cletient Maynard with Lady
Maynard cut the ribbon, officially opening the month-long exhibition while Sammy Gardiner,
senior t director of education and eating at the Ministry of Tourism, and others look on.

(Photo: "Derek Smith)



FORES TER |



ir responsibility

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Complete Inspection & Estimates Betore we slart the Work a . . oe a

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LETHE EAE AS ERR TA EINE SLL EON ER


PAGE 10, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



BEC workers’
action delays —
repairs to

power es

FROM page one




’
‘




4 G6

ply of electricity,” said Mr Basden.

He said that management knows
of no issues being discussed by the
union that would warrant industrial
action.

“The normal dispute procedure was
not followed so industrial action, if
not illegal was premature,” he said.

While Saturday’s outage was not
island wide, many areas of the island
were left without power for as long as
two hours.

Mr Basden said that there were
smaller areas that needed more seri- , }
ous repairs and required that work
teams carry out those repairs.

The BEC manager said that
because of the industrial action the
teams refused to work and were slow
in making the repairs.

He would not say, however, what
kind.of disciplinary action would be
taken against those persons who
refused to work. He said he would
address the issue at a press confer-
ence later today.

“I can say that we view this action
very seriously. and hope that they
would realise that our duty is first to
the customer, but we are conducting a
review of the whole situation,” he
said.

O





syn

from



° 9
or the chow s
exciting new season.

: Wednesday, September 28, 2005 =} »

e St. John’s College Auditorium,
Bishop Eldon Drive
(off Bethel Avenue)

° 7:00pm

e Must be 15-27 years old

¢ Come prepared to sing any song



FREAG SUKATLON Nim ber



> a

_—.
Commercial News

‘ru



rl

icated Content) 4

ighted
d

YOU already know

ally accompanies the
most serious purchasers
when they go to look at
homes for a potential
purchase.

But if you’re planning
to list your home in the
upcoming months, here’s
‘a sobering US statistic:
70 percent of purchasers
view and compare pic-
tures online before
deciding which homes
they would like to visit. I
am sure our local per-
centage is constantly
growing. .

While they say one
shouldn’t judge a book
by its cover, it’s a sure
bet ‘that those buyers are
doing just that.

So what can you do to
improve your chances of
being selected for a clos-
er look? Go out and
take a picture!

Celebrating the opening af the Cancer Luring Centro, a home away from heme for

Cancer pationts and their relatives.



Narne,
P.O. Box

E-mail



Maile YO a cancer survivar? Yes

Participant categories: B. 13-28 years

T-Shirt Size: Medium (M

Donation: 6-22 years $10

Centrevi ese d

Telephene 325-2483 or 323-4482
I hereby assume full and complete responsit
participation in this event or while on the pr
Cancer Society, its pertners and snonsors
participation in this event ach

3 personal injury or damacestifFe

c, 26-

40 years

ality for any injury or accident which may eccur during my
gnf this event, and T hereby release and hold harmless the
am any less, ladiity or claims I may have arising out of my

“BY me.



ibe ‘Tribune Liv
Sister Sister

Ye EEG

Lim BRITISH
a ea) AMERICAN

that a BREA agent usu- .

>t af

Materia



“Bahamas real

estate today

Carmen Massoni

Now take an objective
look.

Are the shrubs neatly
manicured?

Is the lawn mowed and
are the edges trimmed?
Are there some eye-
catching landscape ele-
ments? —

Is the exterior pres-

sure-washed, painted and.

sparkling? Is the front
porch and entry inviting?

If you still have to
make some cosmetic
improvements once a

purchaser is already .

inside your. home, there

_ is always an opportunity

to offer an explanation
or to assuage concerns.





after hear

Providers?



Pretty as a picture

These days, however,
you may not ever get the,
chance if you don’t offer:
stunning “curb appeal.” :

Before listing, have!
your BREA agent per-;
form a “walk through”?
and take photos of the!
exterior. ‘

Follow suggestions for,
improvements, and you'll:
soon be enjoying many;
visits from potential pur-:
chasers and then a “pic-:

ture perfect” sale!
THE TRIBUNE me MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005, PAGE 11
a ee Sa a

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eave a dollar, with One filled SAV.A.CHEK certificate get a Dollar Off!








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2/$ PAGE 12, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

’ THE TRIBUNE.



LOCAL NEWS

Nene a
Last in line of the ©

Inagua salt industry
pioneers dies at 94.

THE last of the original New
England family that pioneered
the salt industry in Inagua in
the last century died in West-
on on Monday, September 5.
She was 94.

A memorial service, for
Louise Paine Erickson, daugh-
ter of John Bryant and Louise

_ We accept

Visa, Mastercard, Sun Card
5% Discount with Credit-Card:- .



| Rey. Dr. Stephen E. Thompson
2004 = Present

Frazer Paine of Weston, Mass.,
will be held at St Mary’s
Church, 260 Concord Street,
Newton Lower Falls at 2pm on
Saturday, September 24. A
reception will follow the ser-
vice.

’ Instead of flowers, the family
has asked friends to consider a

REFRIGERATORS - 15 cu. ft. and up.

donation to a charity of their
choice or the relief effort in the
aftermath of Hurricane Katri-
na.

Weston, where Louise Erick-
son died peacefully two weeks
ago, was both her childhood
home and the home she shared
with her late husband, Bill (Ari-

r Home

rt
ee tier

FOR YOUR HOME!

10% CASH DISCOUNT
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MiCecd lata eek AM CHIC LOMRN NACHNA URI IRDA Me) eel telaresy
New installations are subject to an extra fee.

SO ats

SHIRLEY STREET ¢ TEL: 322-8941





Rev. Dr. Garnet King, O.B-E.
1977 ~ 2004

OPEN: MON - FRI 7:30 am - 4:30 pm
SAT 8:00 am - 12 noon .



Rev. Charles H. Thompson
1927 - 1977

Transfiqueation Baptist Chure

Invite you to celebrate their

8" Anniversary

Theme:

Fruition Gf Vision: Through Unity

Habakkuk 2:1-3, Luke 14:25 - 35

- Opportunities for worship



Raotor Cyril Ganeds

VM iiinday 19 at 230 pm.



Bastor OP bur ©:
“Wednesday 27 at 280 p.m. |







sD
Sak

a ugha Cush

stride 22" at 720 p.m.

Sunday 25th September, 2005, 10:00a.m.
Speaker: Rev. Dr. Stephen E. Thompson, Pastor

@ Louise Paine Erickson, pictured with her hsband Bill

och Wentworth Erickson, Jr.)
after 35 years of living and rais-
ing a family at Inagua.

Bill and Louise Erickson and
their two-year-old son, Wenty,
started life in Mathew Town,
Inagua, in 1936."

"They joined Bill’s younger
brother, Jim Erickson, who was

determined to restore Inagua’s.

salt industry, which had col-

‘lapsed after the First World

War. The brothers established

’ West India Chemicals Limit-

ed.

Talented in music, Louise,

began playing the piano at age

~ within a week of her death. She

studied at the Paris Conserva-
tory of Music, and became a
teacher to many and an accom-
panist at church, as well as play-
ing for the pleasure of family
and friends.

A committed Christian, she

‘found her life renewed in mid-

dle years in the Evangelical
Church. Of a compassionate
nature, Louise helped with
school and library and gave
untold ‘assistance within the
community. In retirement, new
and continued friendships with
all.ages blossomed until her

' Predeceased by her husband
Bill and son Wenty (A. Went-
worth Erickson, III), she is sur-
vived by three children: Louise
Ulbrich of Maine, Lee Ingram
of Bellingham, WA, and Peter

' Erickson of Seattle, WA.; six

grandchildren: Cecile Ulbrich
Tucker, Wilhemina Ulbrich,

-Stede Ingram, Celise Ingram

and Alexander Erickson and
Eva Erickson, and two great-
grandchildren, Vakaris Arioch
Ingram and Amelia Kane
Tucker; also by her sister, Sal
Paine Forbes of Sheridan,
Wyoming and many nieces and



five and continued daily until _ death. nephews.
PA orders drinks =| New bab
' ‘rhg haerrs ' rmgys € e
“meernt Ms —™ stew Ac joy for
ae Freeport

“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”



couple

. A SON was born to Leo,
wife of Mr Ricardo (Ricky)
Munnings of Freeport,
Grand Bahama at 4.31pm,
August 31, at Rand Memor-
ial Hospital, Freeport.
Dakota Wyatt Munnings,
who weighed 7lbs 80zs at
_birth, is the first grandson
and fourth grandchild of
Ralph and Joan Munnings
of Freeport.

Thursday, September 29, 2005

wo



Hon Bradley B. Roberts
Minister of Works & Utilities

Abaco Beach Resort

8:45am

-._ Welcome Address
Abaco Chamber of Commerce

Moderators :

Silbert Mills s

Jack Thompson <

| THEME: | :

“MANAGING THE CHALLENGES OF GROWTH”
Presenters Topics

¢ Managing the Challenges of Growth | :

Panel of Government Corporations Officials

Anthony Ferguson
Colina Financial-Advisors

Don Cornish
Ministry of Tourism

Dale McHardy a8
Bahamas Development Bank

Michael Braynen
Director of Fisheries

Errol W. Berkeley
Inter-American Institute
for Cooperation on Agriculture

Lenora J. Black
Ministry of Education .

Doug Shipman
Livingston Marshall, Ph D



Baker’s Bay Golf & Ocean Club

REGISTER AT:
www.tclevents.com






* Maximizing Tourism



° Small Business Devel

° Growing the Returns: Appreciating ‘the Stock

e Agribusiness -A Growth Industry

* Planning Financial Growth



and Expansion

e Abaco’s Future Workforce - What Are They Learning?

What Should They Be Learning?

¢ Baker’s Bay: A Model for Bahamian Development

SPONSORS



THE COUNSELLORS LTD. ie
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
P.O.BOX N3220



MOA



tel: 322-7505/6 ¢ fax: 325-2482
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THE TRIBUNE

NOW ACCEPTING
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QUALITY RIGHTS AND PRICES RESERVED
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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005,PAGE 13

BATH & HOME

HOME SALE

RUGS BATHROOM ACCESSORIES WALL CLOCKS

TOWELS LAMPS WALL PICTURES
SHEET SETS; BLENDERS — - . PICTURE FRAMES

TABLECLOTHS FIGURINES — FLATWARE SETS
THROW PILLOWS BAKEWARES COOKWARE SETS
COMFORTER SETS GLASSWARE SETS

SHOWER CURTAINS — Ses DINNERWARE SETS



on oS GOOD MONA SEPTEMBER 19TH'- SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24TH, 2005 .

Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448 _ _..



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WE ACCEPT AMERICAN EXPRESS MASTER, VISA AND SUNCARD, WE ALSO REDEEM QUALITY STAMP CARDS
MACKEY STREET, TOP OF THE HILL (next to Super Value) PHONE: 393-3411/393-5569



)s


PAGE 14, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005 | THE TRIBUNE:
LOCAL NEWS





mR

51,000 Customer CASH BACK Incentive For September}

jon 2005 Ford Caflorers

That’s right the worlds #1 spot utility is now on sale,
so come on in and. take advantage of the best deal in
_ the Bahamas on a full size American Built SUV.

EA

Rie See








AMBASSADOR Sears chats with members of the international a department at Howard Uni-
versity in Washington DC. (1-r) Gloria Prentiss; Lanisa Kichiner, associate director for international
affairs programmes; Ralph Bunche, International Affairs Centre; Ambassador to the US and OAS.
Joshua Sears; Betty J Aitkens, dirsector of study abroad programme; Michelle Sears and Carolyn
M King of the public affairs programe at Howard University.

ERD pa R SN Se






(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)



e This picture was originally published in The Tribune on Saturday September 17. It is republished
here because of an error with the.original caption



STS eet



i
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i
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q
H
H
ql

Secretary-general of
N warns jailing
litical opponents



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(astro meets with
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Village Road Ph: 393-5310




THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005, PAGE iv

Queen’s College holds activities fair

Queen’s College High
School mounted their
annual Activities Fair on
September 16 when more
than 25 groups showcased
the various aspects of their
clubs.

High school students
were introduced to clubs
which included traditional
organizations such as Key
Club, Students’ Christian
Movement, Computer Club
and ranged through Gov-
ernor General’s Youth
Award, Students’ Repre-
sentative Council, Band to
Chess Club, the Math Soci-
ety and the Anime Club.

Students expressed their
interest.in many of these -
and were able to sign up to
become members.

Six new clubs were
added, including , the
Needlework Club, Dance

and Aerobics and the Inter-
@ A SENIOR student, Derreck Johnson, national People to People a SCIESKA Kilo ics. High School Librarian, talks with

joins the membership of the Queen's College Cjyb, based in America. Students about the newly launched High School Book Club. The Book
High School Student Credit Union, a popular = — Cyybg will begin operating Club is one of six new organizations added to the: ,

@ A SEVENTH grade student signs up to join organisation for students within the High immediately.’ extra-curricular activities available within Queen’s College High

the Interact Club School. School.

eaders complain that 40
per cent of world is living —
on less than US$2 a day









Yom & oe

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”





Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.












Kotex fits. Period:








aC oy ana LAY a PERFORMANCE, PURE CONFIDENCE... ALL THE WAY DOWN THE ROAD.
CeO te
PAGE 16, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005 THE TRIBUNE.
OCA

Immigration officers on parade















if ee ig

oe — : ce - ae " ll THE Royal Bahamas Police Force Band perform a musical selection
& GRADUATES march in unison during a demonstration at the Bahamas Immigration Depart- ve

ment's Class of 2005 graduation ceremony last Friday at the Police Training College.



Help your employees secure their financial future...

& THELMA
Beneby, perma-
nent secretary in
the Ministry of
Labour and Immi-
gration, presents
the Outstanding
Officer award to
Darren Deveaux





1 3

orate Pension Plan.

















STHELMA §| Oe Drrrmr,,D,,r,.,hlC Ss Oe ae

Beneby, Per-

manent Secre- vo eventos
tary in the Min- British Amerinan beste Basta
istry of Labour eeanits go bund in thand., Jin today’s comypadiitive mnarkes, ‘ RIOT | PRET R J
and Immigra- - e Pension Sermons iaveder ..°

tion, presents otinntigg perro anor driven, loyal aad methated perenne is





the Academic a athatlorge shat gill baainaes ince ~ Range ox sonal. We beliewe » Eye er Design Options
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fadiamondtonicn Driv, BN, eax NER > Romeo, AHP, The Bieaeinns
: ‘Deo RARE AOS Ren MATE Be h-ReRE





SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

“MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

The Tribune



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street



PetroCaribe |
unlikely
to lower

gas prices

@ By NEIL HARTNELL i
Tribune Business Editor :

ESSO Standard Oil’s
country manager has told
The Tribune that Petro-
Caribe is unlikely to lower
gas prices at the pumps for
Bahamian consumers,
explaining that he under-,
stood the potential agree-
ment with Venezuela to just
involve purchasing oil on
credit.

Troy Simms said it
“sounds more and more that
Venezuela is offering a
financing deal”, adding that
the oil companies were con-
cerned about supply chain
reliability if the Bahamas
signed a bilateral agreement
with the Chavez agreement
to bring PetroCaribe into
effect. :
Mr Simms said: “What ?’'m a
hearing, and whatIunder-
stand, is it’s primarily a .
financing deal. We would
buy product from the
National Energy Agency at
what is referred to as market
price. I don’s have any rea-
son to believe, from what
I’ve seen and heard, that
pump prices will be low-
ered.....:

“From what I’ve seen so
far, the Venezuelan offer
doesn’t seem to decrease the
cost of fuel for the Bahamas
except in the financing.

. “T don’t think the Govern-
ment of the Bahamas wants
to get into subsidising the
pump price as you pay for it
elsewhere.”

Venezuela tied, through’ i h

its membership of the
Organisation of Petroleum:
Exporting Countries (Opec), »
to selling crude oil at the pre- :
vailing global market price.
This is the stage in the oil
and petroleum supply chain
that is most volatile, and
what has ultimately caused
. gas prices in the Bahamas to
rise.

SEE page 4B

| Colinalmperial
lines up a new
president

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor ;
_ GREGORY Sweeting,
. British American Insurance
.Company’s former presi-
dent, is being lined up to
réplace Guy Richard as
head of ColinaImperial
Insurance Company,
sources have informed The
Tribune.

Mr Sweeting, who was
one of the original ‘Group
- of 10’ that opposed Colina

Insurance Company’s merg-

‘er with Imperial Life, and
has been replaced at the
British American helm by
Chester Cooper, is under-
stood to be set to take over
from Mr Richard as presi-
dent later this year, possi-
bly in November when the
latter is due to leave. Mr
Richard has Bag nothing
wrong.

‘The timing of the move is
surprising, since Colinalm-
perial and its parent, Colina
Holdings (Bahamas), are.
undergoing a regulatory
review being performed by
KPMG at the behest of the
financial services regulators,
who are headed by the
Securities Commission.

Meanwhile, sources have

SEE page 4B





‘Micron

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY
* Sales ¢ Rentals * Supplies * Services

Bahamas
2-5 night c

& By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor _ Editor

THE Bahamas’ share of two
to five-night cruises in the
Caribbean declined by 30 per
cent in the eight years to 2003, a’
confidential report for the Min-

istry of Tourism reveals, rais-

ing further questions about
whether this nation’s tourism
sector is growing and remains
competitive.

The document, prepared in
March 2004 by the Florida-
based Management Resource
Group (MRG), reported that
the Bahamas’ share of all two
and five-night cruises in the
Caribbean had fallen from 76
per cent in 1995 to 46 per cent
in 2003. It attributed this drop
largely to the attractiveness and
growth in capacity of Cozumel,
particularly from Gulf Coast

‘home ports such as Houston.

The report on Cruise Tourism
Policies was intended to help
shape a consensus in the Gov-
ernment and private sector as
to how the Bahamas should
maximise the economic bene-
fits from the cruise ship indus-
try, particularly since the Cruise
Overnight Incentive Act
expired at the end of 2003.

However, nothing . has
changed since the date the
report was drafted, and the
Bahamas is still operating with-
out a formalised incentive pro-
gramme for the cruise ship
industry. It is undexstood: that
rather than use legislation,
many in “:12 private sector want
the incentive programme to

Robin Hood

up for sale?

®@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FREEPORT Concrete’s
chief executive was tight-lipped
on Friday when The Tribune
contacted him about reports
that the BISX-listed coinpany
was in discussions that could
result in the sale of its Robin
Hood retail format.

Ray Simpson said: “I’ve got
no comment at this stage”,
when asked whether Freeport
Concrete was looking to sell the
business to a buyer linked to
the executive who currently
runs Robin Hood, Brooklyn-
born American, pouty Schae-
fer.

Mr Schaefer was part of the
group who initially brought
Robin Hood to the Bahamas,
and stayed on in the post of
vice-president to manage day-
to-day operations after Freeport
Concrete bought a 62.5 per cent
stake in the business for
$500,000 back in February 2002.

Mr Schaefer has an agree-
ment with Freeport Concrete
that sees him earn a commis-
sion of between 1.5 to3 per cent
of gross sales per annum that
are made by Robin Hood. In
2004, this was $231,489.

Mr Simpson’s remark indi-
cates that while a deal may be
on the table, it has not been
sealed.

Several sources expressed:
surprise to The Tribune that the
retail format might be on the
market, given that it was a
prime driver of Freeport Con-
crete’s revenues. Increased sales
at Robin Hood pushed
Freeport Concrete’s sales to just

SEE page 6B

‘Since 1983

Computers « Copiers * Printers * Fax Machines
Supplies *Accessories* Software

Delta fate last [aey aay

‘vate

“strength”



Confidential study shows nation |
losing out to Caribbean competitors
and cruise lines’ private islands

take the form of an agreement.
The MRG report illustrates

. that despite growth in raw num: -

bers, in terms of cruise passen-
ger arrival figures, the Bahamas
is not deriving the maximum
possible economic benefits from
the cruise ship industry, with
the lines increasingly using pri-
islands. .and other
Caribbean ports.

The report said: “Since the

passage of cruise incentive leg-
islation [in 1995], the capacity
for three and four night cruises

to the Bahamas-has changed

very little; rising from: about
840,000 passengers to about

880, 000 passengers (a 5 per cent

increase).

“During the same period, the

capacity of all two to five night
cruises to the Bahamas and the
Caribbean rose by 57 per cent
from 1. 1 million to 1.7 million
passengers.”

The MRG report acknowl-
edged that total cruise visitors to
the Bahamas had risen from 1.7
million to three million between
1995. and:2002,: largely due to
in the three-night
cruise business and the private
islands on seven-day and longer





" cruises. i
Private islands such-as Coco

MoneyGrows@ColinaFinancial.com |

CFAL has provided the Shin tn pelea We Meare arom iis deeaitiin ikea ps SHS STE
When invedting, srt beet pe eas

{

Cay in the Berry Islands and
Half Moon Cay near Cat Island
have become increasingly
attractive for the:cruise ship

_ industry, but their use has

FATE to end monitoring
of Bahamas i in October

’ @ By YOLANDA, DELEVEAUX

Senior Business Reporter

. . THE Financial Action Task Force (FATE) i is
‘expected to remove the Bahamas from the’ list of
countries is is continuing to monitor at its Octo-
ber meeting in Paris, Allyson Maynard-Gibson,
the minister of financial services and invest ments

said.

The Bahamas was first ‘blacklisted’ bly the
FATF in 2000 over concerns that this nation was
‘non-cooperative’ in the global fight against; mon-
ey laundering, and did not respond to requests for

radius the ‘trickle down’ of
incoitne into the Bahamian
economy and workers’ hands;
especially if ships do not also
call in Nassau of Grand
Bahaina.,

The MRG report said, in ref-

di
vi

i
—t-



information from regulatory counterparts ibither [a

im 4 timely matter.op-at all:

The Bahamas’ removal from the FATF’s mon-

SEE page 6B -

i ;




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SEE page 7B





MAYNARD-GIBSON, the

















PAGE 2B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

Bar Association ‘holding
back’ financial services



THE TRIBUNE





By YOLANDA expertise for the financial sex;- _ firm, estimated that there were market, which covered areas Earlier, Allyson Maynard- fund administrators in the
DELEVEAUX vices industry, and its attemyst between 12 and 15 lawyers that such as real estate and litiga- | Gibson, minister of financial Bahamas than the Cayman
Senior Business to stymie changes to the did significant business in the tion, meant that Bahamian _ services and investments, said Islands, adding that Govern-
Reporter nation’s immigration policy «m _ financial services industry. lawyers did not have toturnto the Government was looking ment policy decisions will guide

THE Bahamas Bar Associa-

tion has been called to task for
failing to provide adequate

permitting foreign lawyers to

work in the Bahamas.
Michael Paton, a partner

with the Lennox Paton law

Domestic

He said a strong domestic

) BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY’ CORPORATION

INSTALLATION OF TWO (2) YOUNG MODEL HC- 1066-
V400T40 RADIATORS & JRRELATED

IVIL CHANICAL/ELECTRIC AL WORKS AT THE

BAILEY TOWN, BIMINI BAHAMAS POWER STATION

TENDER No. 585/05

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible
bidders for the installation of two (2) Young: model HC-1066-V400T40 ©
radiators and related civil/mechanical/electrical works at the power
station located at BAILEY TOWN, BIMINI, BAHAMAS.

Interested persons may collect the tender documents from the
Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads, by contacting:-

‘Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

_Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 28 September 2005 by
4:00p.m. and addressed as follows:

The General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
-Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 585/05

| The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.









Pricing information As Of:
46 September 2005










S2wk-Hi S2tet owe pa Symbol Prisvious Siose Zeday’s lose. 5 hangs. = Daily Vol. EPss DN $. oe Yield ing and Allied Workers Union where we must respect the.
-10. 5 aco Markets . i : -0.207 . iM 0.00%, : oan :
10.00 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 40.06 10.00 _ 0.00 "1452 0340 69 3.40% (BHCAWU) said In a state- individual rights of others and.
6.90 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 6.88 6.88 0.00 o.561 0.330 423 480%) ment thatit had filed anappli- there are legitimate processes
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.204 0.010 3.9 1.25% : : ining ri am ig
4.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 4.40 1.40 LPs 0.00 0.126 0.060° 14.1 4 29% cation for bargai g rights sta in place by the Department of
115 0.87. Fidelity Bank 1.10 10 | 9.00 0.066 0.030 16.7 2.73% tus on September 12. Labour to oversee fair play
8.86 6.90 Cable Bahamas 8.81 8.86 ! 0.05 1,000 0618 0.240 143. 2.71% ‘ ee and due process.
2.20 1.69 Colina Holdings 1.68 1.69 0.00 0.004 0.000 NM 0.00% ° .
9.10 6.75 Commonwealth Bank 9.08 9.09 9.00 0.705 0.410 12.9 4.51% Unionising . “Once this course of action,
2.50 0.67 Doctor's Hospital 2.40 2.40 0.00 0.429 0.000 56 . .000% ‘is taken and the workers at,
.20 3.85 Famguard 4.20 4.20 0.00 0.428 0.240 9.8 5.71% Bai +s _ :
10.70 9.25 Finco ' 10.76 10.70 | 0.00 1,500 0.695 0.510 15.4 4.77%} Pat Bain, the union’s presi Hard Rock Cafe have their say
9.60 6.99 FirstCaribbean 9.80 9.50 0.00 0.695 0.380 - 13.7 4.00% dent, claimed management at regarding the hotel union as.
9.21 8.34 Focol 9.21 9.21 0.00. 0.675 0.500 13.6 5.43%) ; ;
4.99 1.27 Freeport Concrate 4.15 1.45 0.00. - 0.022 0.000 52.3 . G00% Hard Rock Cafe, which is _ their official bargaining agents,.
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.90 9.90 0.00 0.526 0.405 188 ' 4.09% located on Charlotte and Bay the union would be satisfied,
ip ye : § Johan Sass ee a0 e08 490 toed ae shit one Streets, had tried to discour- and respect the outcome.” -
! .erzner internationa: 3 = '. . . . a 4 Yo} = * 7
40.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.760 49 zeo%| age employees from unionis- The BHCAWU represents
Fidelity Over-The-Caunter Securities ‘ : ing. about 7,000 Bahamian.employ-
i S2wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS.$ Div $ PIE Yield | ; tq. 6 : :
2 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 \ 41.00 1.488 0.960 9.4 7,25% Mr Bain said: These ate Coss
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref} 40.00 10.35 10.00 0.900 0.800 NM. 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.84 | 0,00 0.044 0.000 NM 0.00% ;
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities :
43 00. 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41,00 2.220 '0.000 19.4 0.00%F ; : . . :
16.06 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.33 13.33 42.50 » 4.105 0.810 14.6 G.93%' .
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings © 0.29 0.54 , 0.35 “0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%) are our news
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
S2wk-Hi _ S2wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last'12 Months Div $ * Yield % :
4.1846 Colina Money Market Fund 1.252089* \ o7
2.4169 2.0134 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.4169 *"* The Tr ibune wants to hear
105576 100000 ~—-Fidality Prime Income Fund 10.5576" from people who are
2.2560 2.1494 Colina MSt Preferred Fund 2.255981"" i j i
1.1273 4.0576 Colina Bond Fund making news 1n their

FINDEX: CLOSE $35,630 /YTD 1.421% / 2003 44.88%



pw Colina

ee Financial Advisors Ltd.


































“" 4.427305"""

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Des 02 â„¢ 1,000.00

Bla ssuna

ISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES - VISIT WYWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,240.35 / CHG 00.04 / %CHG 00.00 / YTD 200.97 / YTD % 19.34

the financial services sector for
business.

In the Cayman Islands, how-
ever, most attorneys and law
firms were connected to the
industry. Mr Paton added that
the Bar Association did not
want to open up the profession
to allow foreign attorneys in.

When he first began practis-
ing law, Mr Paton said he and
his father focused on the finan-
cial services sector because the
market for real estate and oth-
er legal business was crowded,
leaving financial services wide
open.

"He added that a growing
trend of consolidation will
mean that the Bahamas must
consider the question of how
to remain viable as a financial
services centre.

Mr Paton was part of a pan-
el discussion held during the
Ernst & Young third annual
Investment Fund Symposium.
Other panellists included
David Thain, managing direc-
tor of Arner Bank & Trust
(Bahamas); Hillary Deveaux,
acting executive director of the
Securities Commission of the
Bahamas; and Michelle
Thompson, a partner with
Ernst & Young.

Addressing the issue of the
European Union (EU) Savings
Tax Directive, Mr Thain said
are questioning its impact on
their investments in the
Bahamas. He said that already,
his bank had lost three invest-
ment funds as a result of clients
being worried about the impact
on their investment.

Directive

Mr Deveaux said eight funds
have left the jurisdiction
because of issues relating to the
EU Savings Tax Directive. He
said also that the directive may
become a question of choice,
the Bahamas’ willingness to
give up one thing to keep
another.

Ultimately, however, he said
it was a policy decision for the
Government.

'
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

at the issues surrounding the
Directive with experts it has
retained.

Meanwhile, Mr Thain exam-
ined the importance of brand
recognition to institutions in
the industry. He said the addi-
tion of more brand-named ser-
vice providers would be a good
thing for the Bahamas, allow-
ing it to better compete for
international clients.

Providers

The difficult question, how-
ever, was how to go about get-
ting those service providers
into the jurisdiction, and what
the Bahamas can offer that is
not currently being served by
existing jurisdictions.

Mr Thain said the calibre of
fund administrators in the
Bahamas was just as good:as
elsewhere, but without regis-
tered brand names it had
become difficult to attract the
broadest possible base of
clients.

He added, however, that the
cost of doing business “per
head” was likely higher in the
Cayman Islands, where a sig-
nificant number of industry
participants were foreigners
and required expensive work
permits.

Mr Thain said that although -

the Cayman Islands had signif;
icantly more investment.funds

. than the Bahamas, that posi-

tion was not necessarily a neg-
ative if the Bahamas could

position itself to serve as -

administrator for those funds.
Mr Deveaux added that
there were more investment

the market’s growth going for-
ward.

As the Bahamas looks to cre-
ate a number of products that
will help secure its position, Mr
Thain said he has seen already
some interest from clients in
the SMART Fund.

Touching on the SMART
Fund, Mr Paton agreed that it
was a product that could raise
the profile of the Bahamas.
Looking at other means of pro-
moting the industry, he said
there was a role to play in
encouraging mutual recogni-
tion and respect from external:
regulators.

Mr Deveaux said jurisdic-
tions place an emphasis on
exchange of information, and
that an ongoing concern is the
Bahamas being on the Finan-
cial Action Task Force’s
(FATF) list of countries that
are monitored because they
have failed to respond to
requests for information in a
timely manner, or at all.

Regime

Meanwhile, Mr Deveaux
criticised industry participants
for their lack of understanding.
of the jurisdiction’s regularly
régime, specifically regulations
and requirements that affect:
licencees of the Securities
Commission.

He said that applicants to the
Securities Commission often:

submit incomplete applications.

He told participants that
there have been a number of
cases where fraudulent docu-.
ments were submitted to the
Commission.

Bi acomtinttost
Brea eiten screed

Rock Cafe status)



THE he hotel union has
filed an application with the
Department of Labour to be
recognised as the bargaining
agent and representative for
workers at downtown Nassau’s
Hard Rock Cafe.

The Bahamas Hotel, Cater-



} neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a

times when the average work-.
er of this country is facing seri-,
ous challenges in the work-
place.

Respect |

s
“We are in an age now






good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the

| area or have won an

| award.

If so, call us on 322-1986

j and share your story.

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in jast 52 weeks

S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeke

Previous Close - Pravious day's waighted price for daily volume

Today’s Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 14 months

PIE - Closing price divided by the last 12. month earnings

**~AS AT AUG. 31, 2005) ""* - AS AT JUL 31, 2005

*-AS AT SEPT. 9, 2005/ *** - AS AT AUG. 31, 2005) ***** AS AT AUG, 34, 2008
ITO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 / FIDELITY 242-386-1764

Bid $- > Buying price of Colina and Fidality

Ask $- Selling price of Colina ard fidelity

Last Frice - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of ihe prior week

EPS $- A company's reported earings per share for the jast 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningfui

FINDEX - The Fidelity Baliamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994. = 10¢
















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THE TRIBUNE

CeBIT



MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, cu.

creates Bahamian opportunities

@ By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business
Reporter



RAPID growth in the Cay-
man Islands hedge fund sector
has created opportunities that
Bahamas-based fund adminis-
trators and other financial ser-
vices professionals can capi-
talise on.

Mike Mannisto, a partner
with Ernst and Young’s Cay-
man Islands office, and head
of its Business Risk Services
(BRS) and Technology and
Security Risk Services (SRS)
divisions, said Cayman-domi-
ciled investment funds were
only required to have local
auditors. This had left the door
open for funds registered in
Cayman to be overseen by
Bahamas-based fund adminis-
trators.

The growth in the Cayman
Islands’ hedge and investment
fund sectors had also created
an opportunity for Bahamians
to provide independent direc-
tor services for these funds.

Changing

Mr Mannisto said the role of
the independent director was
.changing, as directors held
more liability and were being
called on to take a more active
role in reviewing fund activi-
ties.

Fees for independent direc-
tors had increased significantly,
as hedge funds and other finan-
cial services entities sought
greater accountability from

their directors. Directors’ fees
have grown from $5,000 to
$20,000 per annum, and now
to $40,000 and even higher.

Boasted

The Cayman Islands boasted
some 6,500 hedge funds as at
June 30, 2005, and eight out of
10 of the world’s new hedge
funds are being domiciled in
that nation. Some 1,100 were
set up in 2004.

New fund domiciled in the
Cayman Islands increased by
21 per cent in the six months

ended June 2005, when com- '

pared to the same period in
2004.

Also, analysts estimate that
between 50 and 75 per cent of
the world’s hedge funds are
based in the Cayman Islands.

Markets that the Cayman
Islands financial services sec-

tor has been able to tap into’

are Asia and Japan. The Asian
presence in the Cayman Islands
has increased by 150 per cent
between 2004 and 2005, and
has been a major driver of
hedge fund growth in that juris-

diction. Mr Mannisto said -

Asian clients are primarily
using the Cayman Islands as a
conduit to invest in the US
debt and equity markets.

As the Bahamas looks to
grow its own investment funds
sector, he added that it may be
necessary to follow some of the
examples and trends already
defined by the Cayman Islands.

The implementation of effec-
tive regulation, and an empha-
sis on forecasting relevant

issues, had allowed the Cay-
man Islands to be proactive.
Another factor that has con-
tributed to its success, and
allows it to remain on top, is
that Cayman boasts a world-
class body of service providers
supported’ by an efficient, sec-
tor-friendly immigration policy.

Companies submit a business
plan that outlines their person-

nel needs, including a docu-_

ment showing how Caymani-
ans will ultimately take the
place of expatriates being
brought in. Of the 40,000 resi-
dents of Cayman,.about half -

some 20,000 - are work per- |

mit holders, with 8,000 to
10,000 of those individuals in
the financial services sector.

Expertise

The presence of globally-
recognised fund administrators,
law and auditing firms, which
provide the expertise required
to conduct business in offshore
jurisdictions; has also con-
tributed to the success enjoyed
by Cayman.

The Cayman Islands Mone-
tary Authority (CIMA), the
sector regulator, has also

worked to build the industry

by having an aggressive pro-

‘ gramme that includes travel-

ling to target markets to meet
with sector regulators, finan-

cial institutions, intermediaries :

and clients.

The Cayman government
and the island’s private sector
financial institutions were said
to have.a close relationship,
created in an effort to provide

Foreign regulatory



4

@ By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business.
Reporter



THE Haliamian financial ser-
vices industry is being harmed
by outdated views held by for-
eign regulators, Wendy War-
ren, executive director and
chief executive of the Bahamas
' Financial Services Board
(BFSB), said. .

Ms Warren said the question
for external regulators seems
always to be: “Can an inde-
pendent country provide the
same level of service that is
capable of complementing
those offered by their home
jurisdiction”.

Critical.

Addressing the Ernst &
‘Young third annual Investment
Fund Symposium, Ms Waren
said relationship, reputation
and results were the three crit-
ical areas the Bahamas must
examine if it is to achieve con-
tinued growth and develop-
ment.

She said relationships needed
to be developed over time with
‘key entities that have contacts
with potential clients in the
Bahamas’ target market.

It is this relationship that will
give Bahamas-based financial
services, businesses access to

clients, and cause these people |

to consider the offer being put
forward. The intermediary,
client advisor, or auditor of an
existing client may also be the
advisor or auditor of a sought-
after client. ;
Ms Warren said that if
Bahamians had limited visibil-
ity when key clients were avail-
able, it could result in a lost
opportunity. Therefore, it was
essential that stakeholders in
the financial services industry
continually built partnerships.
The Bahamas’ reputation,
Ms Warren added, would con-
tinually be a factor. Clients had
to ‘have a level of trust in the
jurisdiction they were ‘doing
business in, and in the service
provider that they had selected

‘

eliefs.



to hold their assets.

Ms Warren said that where
the Be,hamas was not the first,
or a clefault selection of the
client. regulatory recognition
was key. “Our reputation
determines how many deals we
seal,.” she added.

In. licensing funds, ihé-élien-
t’s Level of confidence in the
legeal system of the Bahamas
was key.

If the Bahamas was able to

~ est ablish.an International Arbi-

trition Centre, it could solidify
its position in the funds sector.
The Bahamas is recognised for
having greater compliance with
the: Basle Accord and Interna-
tiomal Organisation of Securi-
ties Commission (IOSCO).

Challenges

Mis Warren said the
Bahamas remained committed
to its private and institutional
cliesats. With no easy answers to
how the nation will address the
issues that negatively impact
its perception in the interna-
tion al marketplace, many chal-
lenges remain for the private
and public sector to tackle. She
noted that there was no one
single thing that can be done
to change the industry over
nighit.

4 advet Preity



hhurt Bahamas.



wise stewardship for the finan-
cial industry.

Mr Mannisto said that over-
sight and regulations, while
adequate, are not onerous or
punitive.

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Mr Mannisto said there were
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PAGE.

4B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





PetroCaribe unlikely
to lower gas prices

FROM page one

Once the oil is landed in the
Bahamas, everything is price con-
trolled by the Government. It
takes $1.06 per gallon in duty,
plus levies 7 per cent stamp tax on
the cost of imported fuel (CIF).
The Government also sets the
$0.33 and $0.44 wholesale and
retail margins respectively, so the
administration could gut gas
prices instantly if it cut these or its
own taxes. However, the latter

move would risk internal conflict
because the taxes have already
been budgeted for by the Min-
istry of Finance.

Because Venezuela is tied to
selling crude oil at global market
prices, Mr Simms told The Tri-
bune that he felt the “savings will
be small, if anything” if the
Bahamas signed on to Petro-
Caribe.

The Esso country manager said
the Government and its Petrole-
um Usage Review Committee
had indicated they believed

PetroCaribe would deliver cheap-
er freight costs, due to Venezue-
la’s commitment to charge for this
at “cost price”. Mr Simms,
though, said he was “not sure
what that means”.

“We’re very concerned about
reliability of supply,” he added
of PetroCaribe. Preliminary dis-
cussions with the Review Com-
mittee had indicated that the
three oil companies - Esso, Shell
and Texaco - would not be tied to
purchasing oil and related prod-
ucts through a National Energy

GN-261

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

MINISTRY OF HEALTH
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL |
HEALTH SERVICES

MOSQUITO CONTROL ACT

NEW PROVIDENCE & FAMILY ISLANDS

The Department of Environmental Health Services wishes to inform the
public that during the rainy season there will be an increase in mosquito
populations. In order to effectively address this increase the department has
intensified its control program, however, no “fogging” activities will take
place on days when weather conditions (i.e. rain, wind) are not favourable.
Control activities for mosquito larvae will be sustained as they are not
dependent upon weather conditions.

The public is requested to assist the Department of Environmental Health

Services in its control measures by ensuring that premises are kept free of

any.containers which may accumulate water. Containers which are present
should be covered or turned face down. Water for pets should be regularly
changed. These measures will prevent mosquitoes from breeding and cs
decrease the population:



Sane

Agency, and they could still
source through their own supply
chains.

Mr Simms said that ultimately,
the Government would have to
make a decision on whether it
wanted to trade-off savings that
were likely to be small against
what he felt was the greater risk
of supply chain disruption if it
signed up to PetroCaribe. -

“We want to work with the
Government and the committee
to make sure they see the full pic-
ture,” Mr Simms said. “We’re still
pretty early in the game.”

The oil industry’s. request to
have one of its executives
appointed to the Review Com-
mittee had been refused, but Mr

Simms had already had one inter-.

view with the group and was set
to have further meetings. He had
been asked questions about tank-
age and other details on the oil

.. -industry-supply. chain in-his first

encounter.

“Basically, what they are telling
me, and it seems what they’re:say-
ing in the press, is that they
haven’t decided. about Petro-
- Caribe vet and want to get infor-

-Colinalm

Ce an office ; at 308 Bast Bay
Street.

FROM page one

also informed The Tribune that
_ColinaImperial Insurance Com-
pany is planning to consolidate
operations at two locations by
the end of January 2006 - the
former Imperial Life head-
quarters at 21 Collins Avenue



Telephone:

Fax:

PUBLIC NOTICE ~

The public is hereby notified that, with effect
from Monday 19th September, 2005 the Central .
Bank of The Bahamas will relocate its Freeport ,
Office from its present location in the Regent |
Centre West, Explorer’s Way to Office No. 5,
Second Floor, First Commercial Centre 3
Building, East Mall Drive.

All existing telephone and fax numbers
will remain unchanged. These are as follows:

(242) 352-5963.

| (242) 352-5397

mation to make a recommenda-
tion to the Prime Minister’s
Office,” Mr Simms said.

While the Review Committee
appeared to be going through the
fact finding process, the Esso
country manager said some com-
ments in the media made by its
members indicated that they had
possibly already made up their
minds.

However, Mr Simms said that
it made “quite a bit of sense” for
the Bahamas Electricity Corpo-
ration (BEC) to purchase fuel
under PetroCaribe, since it was
such a large bulk purchaser, buy-
ing around $120 million per year.

He added that BEC could use .
the up-front savings from pur- .
chasing oil on credit to enhance

energy efficiencies and savings,

as well as passing this on to busi- :
ness and residential consumers ;

through lower surcharges.

_.. “There. may. be. some. unique......
benefits to BEC which would |
help,” Mr Simms said. The

Review Committee is also under- '
stood to have recognised the need ;

to look for energy alternatives.

The Esso executive said global

The former would be home
to Colinalmperial’s agent force,
which the company wants to
reduce to 90, information tech-
nology (IT) and customer ser-
vice. departments.

The new 308 Easy Bay Stre et
building, which is presently










4








oil prices were being driven by.
demand, which was rising faster
than supply. Global refining
capacity was also limited, with
Hurricane Katrina having dam-
aged many Gulf Coast refineries

‘and offshore rigs, while British
:Petroleum’s (BP) Texas refinery

had been shut down earlier this
year.
Costs and the difficulties in

_ obtaining permits were also con-

straining the ability to build new
refineries.
If the Government does sign

’ up to PetroCaribe, it will not be
' eliminating the so-called offshore

middleman used by the oil com-
panies, but instead replacing them
with its own National Energy.
Agency. It is questionable
whether any cost savings will
result, especially given govern-
ment’s track record in business.

And due to oil’s volatility, and
the likelihood prices will.continue
to go up, any immediate savings
from PetroCaribe could be off-
set by the increased future price
and rising debt loads from previ-
ous credit purchases.

erial

unoccupied, would contain the

group business and claims
department; risk management;
management; mortgages;
accounting; human resources
and the underwriting depart:
ment.

Sources said No. 308 East

Bay Street is owned by a com:

pany called Bayview House, in
which Emanuel Alexiou, Colina
Holdings (Bahamas) chairman,
is said to hold a ‘55 per cent

stake. Although there is nothing.

wrong with related party trans-

actions such. as. this in and.of
themselves, and there is.nothing.
to suggest anything is amiss,
here, concerns on disclosure of:
By related party dealings is what.
“caused Colina Holdings:
(Bahamas) 2004 annual audit,
to be qualified by the auditors.’

In an e-mail to staff, Glen

Ritchie, Colinalmperial’s vice-:
president of operations, con-
firmed The Tribune’s exclusive

story that the company was

seeking to raise almost $16 mil-
lion by selling its former No.12,

Village Road headquarters, the
former Canada Life building on
Rosetta Street in Palmdale, and
its branch office at No: 56
Collins Avenue.

Mr Ritchie said the consbie
dation into the two new prop-
erties would enhance Coli-
nalmperial’s “financial and
operational” efficiency, as the
current set up had led to “dis-
persed” departments.

In addition, there were ongo-
ing maintenance costs associat-
ed with the current property
portfolio.

KIRK FREEPORT PLAZA LIMITED
PO Box 893 GT, Cardinal Avenue, (rand Cayman, British West Indies
Phone: (345) 949 7477 Fax: (345) 9.49 8124 Email: kirkfree@candw.ky

Kirk Freeport is a leading duty free luxury retailer in the “ayman Islands, carrying
all the top Watch & Jewellery brands. We are cui’rently looking for experienced
Jewellery Sales Associates who are interested in viyorking i in the Cayman Islands,
and would like to be considered for the following position.

JEWELLERY SALES ASSOCIATES

Ideal Applicants:

e 2 years previous experience in fine jewellery & ‘watch sales required

e Graduate Gemologist preferred

-¢ Must be well groomed, reliable and able to work on own initiative

° Must have a pleasant, outgoing personality with good communication skills —

e Must be self-motivated and committed to providing first class customer service -

¢ Must be trustworthy and dependable 3

* Must be willing to work flexible hours, including weekends and Bank Holidays,
when necessary.

We offer an attractive employee package for this: position including:
e Tax free commission based salary, with earnings potential up to US$70, 000

e Medical Insurance and Pension Scheme
© Staff Discount Scheme

!

Please fax resume and two rei‘erences to
Personnel Manager at fax # (c«45) 949 8124
or email to Icw@kirkfree»ort.net


PUTER APPLICATIONS |
Caine Description: This course is for the beginner who knows very little about computers and does : F a ll S emes ft er
not understand how they work. This course covers the major computer concepts with extensive hands on practice :
of various software using: (I) Microsoft Office - Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel - Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft COURSENO. SECT’ COURSE DESCRIPTION TIME DAY START DUR. FEE
Access — Database Management. :
“requisite: Begins:Monday, 26 September 2005 — 6:00pm- 9:00pm Section 01 (CEES ACCOUNTING
Erosion Saturday, 24 Sector 2005 : 10:00an-t ‘00pm Section 02 CEES) ACCA900 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS | 6:00-8:00PM MonWed 26Sep 10weeks $250
Duration:12 weeks Venue:CEES Computer Lab Tuition: $450.00 Reena ; Nee oe aoe i oeaoe Le Be i oe a
; 00-8: ue/Thur
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS Il
| Course Description: This course covers the major advanced concepts with extensive hands-on practice with a age of CREDIT & COLLECTIONS | 6:00-9:00PM Tue 27Sep 8 weeks $295
A |. variety a ee pele ()) Microsat Office — Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel - Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft CUST900 Of SUPERIOR CUSTOMER 9:30AM-4:30PM Thur 13 Oct 1 day $170
Access - Database Management. SERVICE WIS
““Pre-requisite: Computer Applications! | Begins:Thursday, 29 September 2005 Time:6:00pm-9:00pm COMPUTER :
“f"Duration:12 weeks Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees: $550.00 COMP901 01. += COMPUTERAPPLICATIONS! —6:00-9.00PM Mon ~—Ss 26 Sep r2weeks sso
lee COMP901 02 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | 10AM-1:00PM Sat 24Sep 12 weeks
pier et aed bbe cice IEA thle ane OO : COMP902 Of ++» COMPUTERAPPLICATIONS | 6:00-:00PM Thur —»«-29Sep-12weeks ° $560.
-{a-This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. ANG:
Tl It foc i i i i i COMP903 01 INFORMATION TECH. | 6:00-9:00PM Wed 28Sep 12weeks $450
qj uses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations. eae
-requisite: ins: October 2005 Time:9:30am - 4:30 COMP 941 01 QUICKBOOKS 6:00-9:00PM Tue 27Sep 6weeks $330
Pre-requisite: None Begins: Thursday, 13 October ime:9:30am - 4:30pm PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR 6-00-7-30PM t 97 Se i2weeks $500
Hae NOSES ae eee Pee COMP960 of MS POWERPOINT W/S - 9:30AM-4:30PM Thur 13 Oct 1 ay ‘me $160
‘INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY | 2 COMP930 01 WEB PAGE DESIGN W/S 9:30am-4:30PM Thur/Fri 6&7Oct 2 days $500
# {Course Description: This course covers basic concepts of Information Technology. The course provides training COSMETOLOGY
in the following areas; Basic Hardware Proficiency, Application Features Proficiency, Operating System Proficiency, COSMB02 01 MAKE-UP APPLICATION 6:00-9:00PM Mon 30ct Bwesks $005
4 pe ia a el Begins:Wednesday, 28 September 2005 Time:6:00pm - 9:00pm COSM804 01 MANICURE & PEDICURE 6:00-9:00PM Tue 4Oct 8weeks = $225
-| ,-Duration:12 weeks Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees: $450.00 COSM807 01 NAIL ART TECHNICIAN 6:00-9:00PM Mon/Thur 26Sep 6weeks $500
rey DECORATING
Bho UE onaDe AND REPAIR ; stds eat DECO800 . 01 INTERIOR DECORATING | 6:00-9:00PM Tue 40ct = S weeks «$225
|,.Course Description: This course is a hands-on introduction to technology systems for use in information : DECO801 01 INTERIOR DECORATING II - 6:00-9:00PM Wed 5 Oct S weeks $250
1; environments. The course will cover the following topics: Basic Hardware, Operating Systems, Troubleshooting FLOR800 ; 01 FLORAL DESIGN | 6:00-9:00PM Mon 3 Oct 10weeks $225
‘and Repairs. :00-9:
iM Dra. isite:N Begins: Tuesday, 27 September 2005 Time: 6:00pm - 7:300m FLOR801 01 FLORAL DESIGN II 6:00-9:00PM Thur 6 Oct 10 weeks $250
Caria es Tuesdays and Thursdays e Duration:12 weeks FLOR@02 01 ‘FLORAL DESIGNII 6:00-9:00PM Tue 40ct 10 weeks $275
a..j2.Venue: BHTC Computer La ees: .00 ENGLISH
ue QUICKBOOKS ENG 900 01 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS 6:00-9:00PM Tue - 4 Oct 8weeks $225
: ‘Course Description: This course is designed to train new and existing small business entrepreneurs (less that 20 ESL 900 a1 ENGLISH AS ASECOND LANG. — 6:00-9:00PM Mon . 30ct 10weeks~ $250
@,,| . employees) how to organize and manage their accounting activities using QuickBooks Pro software. Students will HEALTH AND FITNESS ; -
''T learn how to set-up their company files, chart of accounts, budget, customers, vendors and employees. MASG900 - 01 MASSAGE THERAPY 6:00-9:00PM Thur 29Sep 10weeks $465
“| ‘Pre-requisite:None Begins:Tuesday, 27 September 2005 Time:6:00pm - 9:00pm ayes ESSENTIALS |
|* Duration: 6 weeks Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees: $330.00 MASG901 01 MASSAGE THERAPY 6:00-9:00PM Mon 26Sep 10weeks $620
ESSENTIALS II
WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP “Anes
Course Description: This course targets persons who would like to create their personal webpages and will cover HLTH 800 Oo GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR —_6:00-9:00PM Thur 29 Sept 10weeks $400
Web page creation, Web site management, and HTML. Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, LANGUAGES : ;
Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages. _ : oy CRE 900 - 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE | 6:00-7:30PM Mon/Wed 3 Oct 10 weeks $225
Pre-requisite: Participants must be computer literate and have a basic knowledge of word-processing CRE 901 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE || —-6:00-7:30PM Tue/Thur 4 Oct 10 weeks $250
Beales (Dette 0S Tne a suse edpm Duration? days SPA 900 01 CONVERSATIONALSPANISH| 6:00-7:30PM MonWed 3Oct 10weeks $225
Venue: CEES Computer Lab _— Fees: $550.00 me SPA 901 01 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH Il —_6:00-7:30PM Tue/Thur 4 Oct 10 weeks $250
Aen e cece ee eennenneeenee ner aenananscsseneeaeeneenaenaeenene nen eneeussensnenenasennaneneneneeneneesensscesenssnsnonscnecasesuevesneucosanenas: SE ere an a tear eee aes FRE 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH | 6:00-7:30PM Tue/Thur 4 Oct 10 weeks $225
COMPUTER WORKSHOP MANAGEMENT |

2, “'Date: Thursday, 6th & Friday 7th October, 2005 Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm

|; -HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP



DE Date: Thutsday, 6th & ‘Friday 7th Oétober, 2005 Time: 9:30am — 4:30pm
#') Venue: Choices Restauirant;"‘Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre Tuition: $350.00

br

i}; HEALTH AND FITNESS COURSE OFFERINGS

eh!
| t+ MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS |

‘[’ areas will include Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Wellness Education (Psychological and Physiological Date: Monday, 26 September 2005
{’ Benefits), Indications and Contraindications, Serving Special Populations and Complementary Bodywork Systems Time: 6:00am - 9:000m
fe) -to include Aromatherapy Essentials. : Ime: : m -UUp :
a {2 Starting:Thursday, September 29, 2005 6:00-9:00pm Duration: 10 Weeks Venue: C.R. Walker Secondary
Hct: Tuition Fee: $465.00 Venue: The College of the Bahamas Prerequisite: None’
| | (MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS II Tuition: $225.00

Z “Oils; relaxation and meditative methods; and hot stone therapy.

. “GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR

fa}: and how to teach group exercise.



@ -|,-computers and would like to create their own web pages are encouraged to attend. Specific topics will include

“id= 1 HIBUNE BUSINESS . : WUNDAI Oe -ieee ye aes 4 ote .

oT a

PENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

COMPUTER OFFERINGS PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT






















































































































































MGMT900 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT. | 6:00-9:00PM Thur - 29Sep . 12weeks $250
MGMT901 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT. tl 6:00-9:00PM Mon 26Sep 12weeks $300





., SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE































i |, This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior customer service. MGMT$902 . 01 HUMAN RESOURCE 6:00-9:00PM- . Thur/Fri 6&70Oct 2days $350
| =It focuses on customer value, retention and relationship building and employee motivation. MANAGEMENT W/S fo
’? Date: 13 October 2005 Time: 9:30am — 4:30pm MEDICAL
'Y"Venue: Choices Restaurant, Bahamas.Tourism and Training Centre Tuition:$170.00 _ MEDT900 01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY | 6:00-9:00PM Thur 6 Oct 1Oweeks $225
:} EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS SEWING

This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. SEW 800 01 BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING — 6:00-9:00PM Thur 6 Oct 10weeks $225
| It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations. SEW 802 01 BASIC OF FREEHAND. CUTTING II 6:00-9:00PM Mon 3 Oct 10weeks $250
'{: Date: 13 October 2005 Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm SEW 805 01 DRAPERY MAKING | 6:00-9:00PM Tue 4 Oct 10 weeks $225
‘/ Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road ; Tuition: $160.00 SEW 811 01 UPHOLSTERY MAKING | 6:00-9:00PM Wed 5 Oct 10 weeks $225



ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-coordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/ 328-1936 or email All fees are included with the
exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of
your passport. CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course



»-WEB PAGE DESIGN .
3}:; This course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy fiddling with








+, Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages.

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

This is an introductory course covering. basic medical terms. Students will be exposed
to terms that will enable them to read and interpret medical reports, charts, and
communications relevant to a variety of health care environments. Major topics
include Word Building Rules, Prefixes, Suffixes, Whole Body Terminology, Integumentary
System, Skeletal System, Muscles and Joints, Nervous System, Blood and Lymphatic
System, Cardiovascular System, Respiratory System and Digestive System.






"(VYenue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road Tuition: $550.00
ie? i









y,this two-day workshop is designed to equip managers and leaders in organizations and enhance the skills of current
;lumari Resource professionals withithe theory, tools and techniques required for effeetive human resource

| management practices in today’s workplace.

















+. This is an introductory course for learning basic techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits: Major topic




















_| This is an advance course for learning techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major topics include
‘/“ introduction to hydrotherapy; spa and body treatments; the basic facial; aromatherapy-fundamentals or essential





ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/ 328-
1936 or email nlacroix@cob.edu.bs All fees are included with the exception of the
application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting application, kindly provide
copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to change
tuition, fees, course content, course schedule and course materials.

CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE

(Formerly School of Hospitality & Tourism Studies)

Industry Training Department
CULINARY COURSES — FALL SEMESTER 042005








i). Starting: Monday, September 26, 2005 © 6:00-9:00pm Duration: 10 Weeks
:4: Tuition Fee:$620.00 ; Venue: The College of the Bahamas









‘| This is an introductory course in teaching group fitness instruction. Major topics of discussion will include basic
anatomy and physiology; choreography and cueing; the five components of fitness, nutrition, basic exercise testing








:42Starting: Thursday, September 29, 2005 © 6:00-9:00pm Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee:$400.00 . Venue: TBA









| TRANSFER OF COB ACADEMIC UPGRADING COURSES
| FROM FACILITIES AT
C.C. SWEETING JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL






































































































































































jeoorsopm [ta [ocs-27 [ero

COURSE CODE | BEGINS |DUR [DAYS |TIME | TUITION&FEE RESOURCE Venue. | Max. Enrol,
: (ADDITIONAL $40 | MATERIALS
: 2 APP FEE FOR
Please note new class locations listed below: St NEWSTUDENTS) ||
1, Bahamian Cuisine COOK 806 | September 29) 6 weeks | Thurs. | 6:00-9:00pm | $225.00 $10-$12 per week | SHTSMain ‘| 15
. : : Kitchen
COURSE SEC | TIME DAY/S | ROOMS 2. Gourmet Cooking! | COOK 823 | October3 | 6weeks | Mon. | 6:00-9:00pm | $200.00 ~-/$20perweek | SHTS Main | 15
fishes (Originally « i to Kitchen
aN a Assigned) 3, Gourmet Cooking II COOK 824 | October 3 6 weeks | Mon. | 6:00-9:00pm | $225.00 $20 per week at 15
: 5 = beech es 4. Kitchen. ss
MATH 046 6:00-7:50 PM | uw{ccs-27 lpoc-11. CSO 8, Cake & Pastry Making | | COOK 813 | October4 | 10 weeks | Tues. | 6:00-9:00pm | $225.00 $10 - $15 per week re 15
MATH 047 6:00-7:50 PM CCS - 28 _| BITC-12 9, Cake & Pastry Making il] COOK 814 | October4 | 10weeks | Tues. | 6:00-9:00m | $250.00 | $10-$15perweek | SHTS Pastry |15
MATH 046 6:00-7:50 PM CCS -29 | BLVD -4C RS Saree MA ane
MATH 048 4C 6:00-7:50 PM | MW CCS - 30 | Monday--BLVD 2A 10. Bread Making COOK 810 | September 29 | 6weeks | Thurs. | 6:00-8:00pm | $200.00 $5-$10perweek | SHTS Larder
| oes yey EEL SA 11. Cake Decorating! | COOK8t7 | § t0weeks | Wed. | 6:009:000m | $225.00 ime eeCE
| MATH 048 [ 2C [6:00-7:50PM | MW | CCS-31 | . Cake Decorating 817 | September 28 | 10 weeks . | 6:00-9:00pm | $225.00 10- $15 per week | St der
MATH 047 600-750 PM GCs =32 12 Ca Deowalo T cookie | Sepenber2s | roweeks | wed | 600 00pm 22500 | §10-$15 per week ale
MATH 048 6:00-7:50 PM CCS - 33_| CCS Sr. Block | : Tier eee 2 daal Kitchen
MATH 046 Cc 6:00-7:50 PM CCS - 34 | CCS Sr. Block i For further information please contact the Industry Training Department of the School of Hospitality & Tourism Studies at 323-5804, 323-6804 or fax 325-8175

CCS - 28 | BTTC -8
00-7:50 PM CCS - 29 | BITC -LT

DIPLOMAS ARE READY
a Teese :

a
Diplomas for December 2004 and April 2005 graduates are
available for collection from the Records Department,
so Monday - Friday from 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Identification
is required for the release of the diploma.

ENG 016 6:00-7:50 PM CS-37 [GSR-1C- BLVD

BTTC — Bahamas Tourism Training Centre
BLVD - Boulevard Building
T - Technology Block








For more information, please call the Records
Department at 302-4522/3.



Visit our website at


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

FATF to end monitoring
of Bahamas in October





FROM page one

itoring list should further posi-
tion it to grow its financial ser-
vices sector because it is easi-
er, less costly and more efficient
to do business if other jurisdic-
tions and financial institutions
accept that the Bahamas is a fit
and proper jurisdiction.

Giving the opening address
for Ernst & Young’s third annu-
al Investment Fund Symposium,
held at the British Colonial
Hilton, Mrs Maynard-Gibson
told participants that the Finan-
cial Services Regulatory Reform
Commission was expected to
submit its findings to the Gov-
ernment shortly.

Commission member Hillary
Deveaux, who is the acting exec-
utive director at the Securities
Commission, said he would like
to see two regulators for the sec-
tor.

He said-that what could hap-
pen is that the Central Bank of
the Bahamas would remain as
regulator for the banking sec-





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MICHAEL JOSEPH, 5TH.
STREET, THE GROVE, P.O.BOX N3331, NASSAU, -
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 12th day of
SEPTEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

tor. The other four regulators -
the Securities Commission, the
Registrar of Insurance Compa-
nies, the Inspector of Financial
and Corporate Service Providers
and the Compliance Commis-

‘sion - would merge to form a

single body to oversee the rest
of the sector, working in con-
junction with the Central Bank.

Speaking to policy-related
and technological matters, Mrs
Maynard-Gibson. said she had
heard strong concerns about
the level of financial sector
expertise that was available in
the Bahamas. She said a plan to
create a fast-track immigration
policy for financial services pro-
fessionals coming into the
Bahamas was being worked on.

The minister told participants
that the Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company (BTC) has
advised her office that it was
completing the work necessary

- to enable the use BlackBerrys, a

wireless technology that allows
for the remote access of e-mail,
HTML and WAP web pages,












LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

_MAJUMA CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby. given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 15th
day of September, 2005. The Liquidators are Argosa ae
of P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator)
Ck

COMMONWEALTH BANK

Employment Opportuni

Messenger

Commonwealth Bank is the premier Bahamian Bank with
branches located in New Providence, Abaco and Grand Bahama.
We are committed ‘to delivering superior quality service, to training
and developing our employees, to creating value for our
shareholders and to promoting economic growth and stability i in

the community.

Core Job Responsibilities:

* Delivery and collection of mail, documents, parcels and other items
* Assist with sorting incoming and outgoing mail

* Deliver requisitioned items

Qualifications, Skills and Experience
* Two to three years job related experience
* Ability to life and carry moderately heavy packages

¢ A valid Driver's License
* Current Police Certificate

Personal Attributes

* Be matured and responsible (minimum age — 25 years)
» Strong interpersonal and communication skills (oral and written)

Benefits

« Competitive salary commensurate with experience

* Performance-based incentives

* Health, vision and dental insurances

* Life insurance
* Pension plan

* Dynamic working environment’

Interested persons should submit their resumes and copies of certificates

in writing or email before September 23, 2005 to:

HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT

AMS Caine Sohhons

“Re: MESSENGER”
Head Office, The Plaza, 2% Floor, Mackey Street
BO. Box SS-6263,
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 394-0758

E-mail address: Tanya. Astwood@combankltd.com



provides for phone, SMS (short
message service) and text use,
and also acts as an organiser, in
the Bahamas.

BTC had also advised her that
most non-Bahamian cell phones
do work in the Bahamas.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson told
industry participants that the
Government was working with
experts on issues surrounding
the European Union’s Savings

Tax Directive, examining the
impact of the directive on
Bahamas-based institutions and
their clients ,and what the juris-
diction can do to minimise any
negative fallout.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said the
draft of the External Insurance

Bill and the accompanying reg- °

ulations were being completed.
She added that the financial
services sector was a strong pil-

lar of the economy, and that
Government’s action has
demonstrated its clear commit-
ment to the sector.

She said the administration’s
continuing goal, in collabora-
tion with the sector, was to max-
imise its growth potential, while
minimising the risk of illegal
abuses.

The Merrill Lynch and
Capgemini 2004 World Wealth

THE TRIBUNE.

BI

Report stated that the wealth of
high net worth: individuals: was.
expected to grow by 7 per cent,
with total value likely to exceed
$40.7 trillion by 2008. os

With such tremendous growth,
in wealth expected, the
Bahamas had to position itself.
to capitalise on the opportunity
to further develop and
expand the financial services
sector.

up for

over $5.6 million in the quarter to May 31, offsetting the loss from
its concrete operation.

This trend has become more pronounced since the September
2004 hurricanes, which inflicted $1.3 million in damage to the com-
pany’s Freeport-based retail format, The Home Centre. Although
fully insured, this company had to operate out of a badly damaged
building for several months, although the Home Centre is due to
move into its new location in February 2006.

Robin Hood?’s sole Nassau outlet is at the Summerwinds Plaza on
Harrold Road, while its heavy duty appliances are being sold in
Grand Bahama at the former 85,000 sq ft Home Centre location.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that IMMACULA LUMA OF SUNLIGHT
VILLAGE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that










NOTICE i: is hereby given that NELSON JOSEPH, STH:
STREET, THE GROVE, P.O.BOX N3331, NASSAU;
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for:
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as®
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows::
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be®:
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the:
facts within twenty-eight days from the 12th day of.
SEPTEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality.4
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.<







any person-who knows-any: reason why registration/ naturalization:>|r ..».:
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement--[)..; -

of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 19TH -day. of
SEPTEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.

I) 21 09) 2)
Jewelry Sales
Associates

We are looking for male and female
Melba ee Associates. A highly
motivated, energetic team player with
or.¢ ces utoN om tN ery sales! Must be.
well groomed and mature! Base salary
and competitive commission structure.

Please fax resume to: 325-7105

, or email to:
info@coachtothetop.com

call 325-5226
for more details



osition of Accountant

Candidates must have at least 3 years experience in
accounting in the financial industry with sound
knowledge of but not limited to:

Supervising an accounts department and staff
Formulating budgets
Managing Accounts Receivables and Payables

Preparation of monthly and annual financial
reports and statements

Preparation of bank reconciliations and various
general ledger accounts to the sub ledgers

Co-ordinate the annual audit with external
auditors and preparation of the necessary
schedules:

Preparing reports for the regulators
Must be:a team player

Must possess people skills and be prepared to
interact with customers.
Minimum qualifications: AA in Accounting

Please forward resume before September 21, 2005 to:
P.O. Box N-7544
or email bleccul @bgcfreedom.com



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2004/COM/bnk/00064°,

IN'THE SUPREME COURT My
COMMERCIAL DIVISION iy

"at



° Nassau & Abaco.
° 5 years minimum experience” ~~

Please send resumes to:
PO. Box N-4827

or pick up an application form at
Bahamas ols Limited,Gladstone
oad.

IN THE MATTER OF MPI INTERNATIONAL LTD.
(Formerly, Vineries Ventures, Inc.)

(In Compulsory Liquidation)



AND IN THE MATTER OF THE *
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
Ch. 309 Statute Laws of The Bahamas, 2000 Edition h



NOTICE °
TAKE NOTICE (pursuant to Section 60, Companies (Winding Up) Rules) a
persons claiming to be creditors of the above named company are required to
submit on or before the 31st October, 2005 the particulars of their debt or claims
by way of a sworn affidavit, to Mrs. Maria Ferere, the Official Liquidator, cto
Ernst & Young,.One Montague Place, P.O. Box N-3231, Nassau, Bahamas. ‘In
default thereof they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made
by the Official Liquidator. Please contact Mrs. Ferere via email or telefax for: a
copy of the form of affidavit at the following email/fax addressés:
maria.ferere@bs.ev.com; fax: (242) 502- 6090. *

Maria Ferere S
Official Liquidator

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2004/COM/bnk/00064 =

IN THE SUPREME COURT in
COMMERCIAL DIVISION ae

IN THE MATTER OF MOORE PARK FUNDING LTD.

(In Compulsory Liquidation)



AND IN THE MATTER OF THE me
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT i
Ch. 309 Statute Laws of The Bahamas, 2000 Edition i
NOTICE =

it
et

*
fy

TAKE NOTICE (pursuant to Section 60, Companies (Winding Up) Rules) all
persons claiming to be creditors of the above named company are required to
submit on or before the 31st October, 2005 the particulars of their debt or claims
by way of a sworn affidavit, to Mrs. Maria Ferere, the Official Liquidator, c/o
Ernst & Young, One Montague Place, P.O. Box N-3231, Nassau, Bahamas. in
default thereof they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made
by the Official Liquidator. Please contact Mrs. Ferere via email or telefax for'a
copy of the form of affidavit at the following email/fax addresses:
maria.ferere@bs.ev.com; fax: (242) 502-6090. at |



Maria Ferere
Official Liquidator ae




THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005, PAGE 7B





Bahamas loses 30%
2-5 night cruise share

FROM page one

an businesses and citizens”. The

cruise lines tend to control all
activities, ground and shore
excursions on these islands,
efisuring that the lion’s share of
revenues end up in their pock-
ets.
- While statistics, based on
first and second port of
entry, had shown that Nas-
sau cruise visitors had
increased by 70 per cent
between 1996 and 2003,
going from 1.2 million to 2
million, during the same
period private island visitors
increased three-fold, grow-
ing from 538,000 to 1.7 mil-
lion. © on
“Private island visitors
now represent 44 per cent
of total cruise visitors, up
from 24 per cent in 1996,”
the MRG report said.
“Annual increases of 32 per

cent, 44 per cent and 19 per ©

Confidential study shows nation _
losing out to Caribbean competitors
and cruise lines’ private islands

cent occurred in 1999, 2000
and 2002, respectively.

“At the same time, visi-
tors to Grand Bahama
declined by 58 per cent from
602,000 to 250,000, reflect-
ing a further substantial loss
of four night cruise capacity.
Total Caribbean cruise
capacity increased by 84 per
cent during this period.

“In 2003, about 50 per
cent of the Nassau visitors
did not visit another
Bahamian port. About 46
per cent of the private island
visitors did not visit another
Bahamian port.”

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

-Chairman’s Review
Of the Results

The MRG report said the
cruise lines had incorporat-
ed calls to private islands
into three, four, five and
seven-day cruises.

The problem the Bahamas
faces in regard to the pri-
vate islands is that these
locations are perceived as
“always” delivering “the

‘highest levels of passenger

satisfaction”.
“The cruise lines with a
private island in the

Bahamas tend to favour it -

over Nassau. The cruise
lines with no private island
favour Nassau over Grand

- FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

For the nine months ended July 31, 2005

last fiscal year end.

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited earned a consolidated net income and

operating profit for the nine months ending July 31, 2005 of $71.6 million. The operating profit,

i.e. net income before integration charges and goodwill amortisation, improved by $25million or

54% over the same period last year. Earnings per share (based on operating profit) was 59.6
- cents, 20.5 cents greater than the amount for the same period of last year.

' The Bank’s net interest income for the nine month period rose to $92 million, which represented
an increase of $22 million over the same period last year. The Bank’s US dollar bank placements

5, and the securities portfolios continued to yield significantly higher interest income as'the US fed

;; fate rose by 1.5% since October 31, 2004. Consequently the net interest margin for the period

: was 3.7%, which was an increase of 0.8% over last year. Operating expenses are well within the

budgeted expenses for the period.

At July 31, 2005, the total assets of the Banik were $3,421 million, a growth of $219 million or 7%
@. from-this date_last year and $160 million or 5% since last fiscal year end. This growth was

: generated by the increase in loans, both residential mortgages and business loans, which
increased by $90 million and $79 million respectively, from last fiscal year end. Total deposit
liabilities grew by $178 million or 6.6% since this date last year, and by $117 million or 4% from

The return on assets for the nine months was 2.9%, which is an improvement of 0.9% from last
year (before integration and goodwill charges). Likewise the return on equity (before ~

integration and goodwill charges) improved by 8%, increasing from 19% to 27% for the nine

5 months of this year.

Lam satisfied with the performance of the Bank for the first three quarters of this year and look
forward to the continuation of these favorable trends.

he Ww hii ot .
' Michael K. Mansoor
Chairman
3



FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Consefidated Balance Sheet
Bs'e00

Assets
Cagh and due from banks
Seourities
Loans
Goodwill
Fixed assets
Other essets
Total assets
Liabilities

Total deposits
Other liabilities

Tetal liabilities

Equity .

Share capital & reserves
Retained eamings

Total Rabities and shareholders’ equity



Unaudited Unaudited Audited
July 31, 2005 duty 31.2004 Qctober 31, 2004
(Restated)

828,433 930,895 864,055

475,250 372,964 452,145
1,837,127 1,644,341 1,669,007
187,747 187,748 - 187,747

32,335 33,401 35,334

59,932 32,468 52,695
3,420,824” 3,201,817 3,260,983



2,824,252 2,645,854 2,707,621
45,508 46,046 28,270
2,869,760 2.691,900 2,735,891
416,464 414.364 414,364
134,600 95,553 110,728
a Te
551,064 $09,917 $25,092
3,420,824 “_3.201,817 3,260,983

Director

Bahama,” the MRG report
said.
“Neither
Grand Bahama has devel-
oped a strong image of
being a port for shopping,
as have some other ports. In
addition, the opportunities
for interesting sightseeing
excursions may also be con-
sidered somewhat limited.
“For these reasons, and
because there may have
been periods when visitors
did not experience a warm
welcome, the cruise lines on
occasion have.perhaps felt
that passenger satisfaction

Nassau nor -

levels were not what they
should be.”
Nevertheless, the market-
ing and financial value of
the private islands to the
cruise lines were a major
point of leverage for the
Bahamas in negotiations
with the likes of Carnival
and RoyalCaribbean on a
new incentive programme.

“While private islands.

have been developed in
Haiti and the Dominican
Republic for cruises operat-
ing from Florida, the
Bahamas ‘probably offers
the greatest selection of sites
and the best geographic
location for such islands,”
the MRG report said. .
Other points of leverage
enjoyed by the Bahamas

were that, due to the US

Jones Act’s requirement
that the cruise lines call at a
foreign port before return-
ing to the US, the only way

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Consolidated Statement of Changes in Shareholders Equity
BS'000

i

Share Capital &

‘to meet this for three-night

cruises from south Florida
and four-night cruises from
Port Canaveral and the mid-
Atlantic ports was to call in
the Bahamas.

However, the report
pointed out that these
advantages could be lost
when Cuba opens to US
tourism.

“The cruise lines have
contingency plans for enter-
ing the Cubs market as soon
as it opens to US visitors,
and they could quickly rede-
ploy a number of ships to
itineraries that inciude
Cuba,” the report warned.

“Once Cuba is able to
offer port facilities and an
infrastructure to accommo-
date cruise visitors, it is like-
ly that many (if not all) of
the three-night cruises will
discontinue calls in the
Bahamas in favour of
Cuba.”

Resetves Retained Earnings Total

Balance at October 31, 2003, as restated 413,664 87,076 500,740
Net income for the period 46,443 46,443
Dividends (37,266) (37,266)
Transfer to Statutory Reserve Fund - Turks & Caicos Islands 700 ~ (700) Loe
Balance at July 31, 2004 414,364 95,553 509,917
Balance at October 31, 2004 414,364 110,728 : 525,092
Net income for the period 71,654 71,654
Dividends (45,682) (45,682)
Transfer to Statutory Reserve Fund - Turks & Caicos Islands 7

POO og



Balance at July 31, 2005, - 416,464

SY

——..

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Consolidated Statement of Income ,



(2,100)



134,600 351,064

BS'000
Unaudited . Unaudited Andited
Quarter Ended Nine Months Ended Year Ended
July 31,2005 July 31, 2004 July 31 Judy 31, 2004 Qctober 31, 2004

Total interest income 46,826 39,957 137,45 111,293 153,961,
Total interest expenses (16,048) (15,886) (45,668) 41,275) 55,108
Net interest income : 30,778 24,071 91,777 70,018 98,853
Non-interest income ; 10,405 8,693 30,639 988 36,907

41,183 32,764 122,416 99,006 135.760
Non-interest expenses 16,399 16,044 46,563 45,950 65,954
Provision for credit losses 1,519 1,475 4,199 6,090 7,909

17,918 17,519 50,762 52,040 73,863
Operating profit - 23,265 15,245 71,654 46,966 61.897
Integration expenses - 217 - 523 279

Goodwill amortisation

- (4,944) > :



Net income 23.265 19.972 654 gn st
Weighted average number of common

shares outstanding for the period 120,216,204 120,216,204 120,216,204 120,216,204 120.216,204
Earnings per share (in cents) 19.4 16.6 59.6 38.6 513
Eamings per share, before goodwill and

integration expenses (in cents) 19.4 12.7 - 59.6 39.1 51.5

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Ceneolidated Statement of Cash Flows

BS'0e0 ‘
Unaudited Unaudited Audited
Nine Mentis Ended Nine Months Ended Year Ended
duty 31, 2005 July 31, 2004 October 31, 2004

Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities 30,275 (98,456) (89.680)
Net cash used in financing activities (45,682) (37.266) (37,266)
Net cash used in investing activities (20,215) (44,778) (126,908)
Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents (35,622) (180.500) (253,854)
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period 817,993 1,071,847 1,071,847
Cash and cash equivalents, end of period 782,371 891,347 817,993

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Notes to Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

Nine Months Ended :

July 31, 2005

1. Accounting Policies

These consolidated interim financial statements are prepared in accordance with LAS 34 Interim Financial Reporting. The accounting policies used in the
preparation of these consolidated interim financial statements are consistent with those used in the annual financial statements for the year ended October 31,

2004.

The consolidated interim financial statements include the accounts of the following wholly owned subsidiaries:
FirstCaribbean International Finance Corporation (Bahamas) Limited
FirstCaribbean International (Bahamas) Nominees Company Limited
FirstCaribbean International Land Holdings (TCI) Limited

2. Prior Period Adjustment

Other assets balance as previously reported at July 31, 2004 included a receivable amount-of $1.9 million Tepresenting the overpayment of remittances to
Barclays PLC for periods prior to the combination of CIBC Bahamas and Barclays Bahamas. At the time of the combination, the overpayment was accounted
for in the net asset valuation and therefore the other assets balances were incorrectly stated. In accordance with IFRS, the balances for July 31, 2004 are

restated and opening retained earnings for 2004 was reduced accordingly.
PAGE 8B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

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GN-264

SUPREME
COURT

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00322

Whereas William Glen Roberts, of St. Matthew’s
Parish, in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence,
one of the Islands of Commonwealth of The Bahamas has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for
letters of Administration of the real and personal estate of
Henry Roberts a.k.a. Henry Isaacs Roberts, late, of St.
Matthew’s Parish in the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar _



THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00388
Whereas JAMAAL RASHARD JOHNSON of

Robinson Road, Southern District, New Providence, one of
the Islands of Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the only son,

has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas |

for letters of Administration of the real and personal estate
of MILDRED JOHNSON, late, of Robinson Road, Southern
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the eapnoe of 14 days from the
date thereof.

signed

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEP 22, 2005
2005/PRO/npr/00390

. Whereas ELEAZOR T. ROLLE, JR., of Apt #2

_ Canaberry Drive,.Carmichael Road, Western District, New

Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, the Creditor, has made application to the Supreme.
Court of The Bahamas for Letters of Administration as a
Creditor of the real and personal estate of ELEAZOR ROLLE
SR., late, of Rolle Avenue, off Wulff Road, Eastern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be |

heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
~ SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00391

IN THE ESTATE OF Richard L. Anderton, late
of 206 SE East Street, Stuart, in the State of
Florida, one of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by
LOUREY C. SMITH, of No. 4 George Street in the City of
Nassau in the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for Resealing a
Grant of Letters of Administration in the above estate granted
to RICHARD L. ANDERTON by The Circuit Court, Martin
Country in the State of Florida, one of the United States of
America on the 27th day of May A.D. 2003.

' signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

‘THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

?

2005/PRO/npr/00399

In the Estate of JACK V. CROYLE, late of Spring
Hill, Hernando County, United States of America
and formerly of 159 Spring Street, Woonsocket,
United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by
DONNA M. HARDING-LEE, of Dowdeswell & Deveaux

Streets, New Providence, The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is

the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealed Letters of Administration in the above estate granted
to JOHN C. CROYLE, the Personal Representative, by the
Circuit Court for Hernando County, Florida, Probate Division,
on the 16th day of November, 2004.



signed
T. Cumberbatch
(for) Registrar
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00401

Whereas SONIA MICHELLE MARSHALL a.k.a
MICHELLE MARSHALL of Coral Heights, New
Providence, The Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters of Administration
the real and personal estate of SANDY MARSHALL, late,
of Coral Heights, New Providence, The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.



signed
T. Cumberbatch
(for) Registrar
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00406

Whereas PRENETTE BUTLER-EVANS of St:
Vincent Road, New Providence, The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters
of Administration the real and personal estate of MUTEL
BUTTLER, late, of Seabreeze Lane, New Providence, The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be

heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the _

date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson |
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/410
Whereas Samuel Arthur, of the Western District of

the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application to

the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters of

Administration of the real and personal Estate of Willard
Marcian Johnson-Hall, late, of Martin Street in the Southern
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the ‘Commonwealth ‘of:\The: Bahamas, deceased.

« ‘Noticeris hereby: given‘that such applications will be

‘heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the

date thereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00412

In the Estate of SEYMOUR S. EPSTEIN, late,

of 119 Carthage Road, Scarsdale in the State of New

York, one of the States of the United States of
America,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourten

days from the date hereof, application will be made to the .

Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by
BRUNO A. ROBERTS, of Old Post House, Prospect Ridge
of the Western District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, The Executive
Director of the Private Trust Corporation Limited, is the

- Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for the Resealed Grant

of Letters of Testamentary in the above estate granted to
REVA EPSTEIN and SAMUEL P. EPSTEIN the Executors,

Samuel P. Epstein now deceased. By the Surrogate’s Court’

in the State of New York the County of Westchester, U.S.A,
on the 21st day of September, 1996.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT |

PROBATE SIDE
SEP 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00413

Whereas RODERICK WINSLOW PINDER of

Spanish Wells, St. George’s Cay, The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters
of Administration with the Will annexed of the real and
personal Estate of CARL STANFORD PINDER, late, of
Spanish Wells, St. George’s Cay, The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the date
hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/418

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS |

Whereas Simeon R. Brown, of West End, on the

Island of Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the ©

Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application to
the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters of
Administration the real and personal estate of Oglita Brown,
late, of West End in the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00419

IN THE ESTATE OF Anna S. Phillips aka Anna
R. Philips, late of No. 221 Burgandy E. on the
City of Delray Beach in the County of Palm Beach,
in the State of Florida, one of the States of the
United States of America, deceased. oa

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourten
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by
ROLAND J. LOWE of Port New Providence in the City of
Nassau, in the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for Resealing a
Grant of Letters of Administration in the above estate granted
to EDWARD J. ELIN, by The Circuit Court, in and for Palm
Beach County in the State of Florida one of the states of the
United States of America on the 12th day of Seen AD.

2003.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registra

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT, 22 2005

-2005/PRO/npr/00422

Whereas Khalil Simon Moses Jr., of No. 6 Park
Place, Little Blair, in the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas for Letters of Administration of the real and personal
Estate of Khalil Simon Moses, late of No. 6 Park Place,
Little Blair, in the Eastern District,.on the Island of New

Providence, one of the Islands ofthe Commonwealth of The
f Bahamas, deceased. Seistpcet aieeenaatrte Beet eat

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the

date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00424

Whereas Joanne Stewart-Taylor, aka Jodi Stewart-
Taylor, of Sea Beach Estates, in the Western District of the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters of Administration
the real and personal estate of John Patrick Taylor, late, of
Sea Beach Estates in the Western District of the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

signed _
Desiree Robinson .
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00425
Whereas Bateman Bain, of Nassau East North, in

the Western District of the Island of New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made

"application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters

of Administration of the real and personal Estate of Eva Alma
Bain, aka Alina Pinder Bain, late, of Sea Beach Estates in
the Western District of the Island of New Providence one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. deceased

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the ee prauon of 14 days from the date
thereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00427

Whereas Carl Allan Brice of No. 13 Star Lane North,
Sunshine Park, in the Southern District of the Island of New

ee
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005, PAGE 9B



GN-264

SUPREME COURT

(Continued)



Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme Court of the
Bahamas for Letters of Administration with the Will Annexed
of the real and personal Estate of John Brice late of Queen’s
Highway, McKann’s, Long Island, one of the Island of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00433

Whereas PAULINE PARKER-KEMP of Freeport,
Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, the Lawful Widow, has made application to
the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
Administration of the real and personal estate of REUBEN
GODWIN KEMP, late, of #51 Margaret Place, Sunrise
Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEP 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00434

Whereas SHARON ROLLE of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, the Lawful Widow, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
as a Creditor of the real and personal estate of LIVINGSTON

CHARLES ROLLE, late, of 294 John Rut Lane, Freeport, .
Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of :

The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

200S/PRO/npr/00417

Whereas Gregory Ronald Thompson, of Fire Trail
in the Southern District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for
Letters of Administration of the real and personal estate of
Leonard John Thompson, late, of Kennedy Subdivision in
the Southern District of the Island of New Providence, one

. Of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date thereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00435

In the Estate of HAROLD WILLIAM MADEIROS,
late of Greenaway Cottage, 3 Addendum Lane,
Pembroke Parish in the Island of Bermuda,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by
" DOLLY P. YOUNG, of Nassau East North, Eastern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, is the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas
for the Resealed Grant of Probate in the above estate granted
to BARBARA ANN SMITH and PAMELA SHARON
CALDWELL, the Executrices, of the Supreme Court of
Bermuda on the 5th day of August, 2004

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00436

Whereas HOWARD BEVANS of the Settlement of
Hawksbill, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of ‘the
_Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the Son, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters
of Administration the real and personal estate of MIRIAM
_ BEVANS, late, of No. 7 Abaco Drive in the Settlement of
Hawksbill, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.



Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00437

Whereas Lloydel Ellis, of Andros Avenue, on the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application to
the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters of
Administration of the real and personal estate of Brenda-
‘Mae Smith Ellis, late, of Andros Avenue, the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be -

heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00438

Whereas Lennard Miller, of St. Lucia Road, Golden
Gates on the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters of

Administration of the real and personal Estate of Kathy Ann*

Miller, late, of St. Lucia Road, Golden Gates on the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased. .

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00439
Whereas CONSTANCE ELRONE MCDONALD,

of Fortune Village, Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, Attorney By Deed of

Power of Attorney for GREGORY PHILIP GEORGE:

ARANHA, JR., the Lawful Son, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
de bonis non of the real and personal estate of GREGORY
PHILIP GEORGE ARANHA, SR., late of No. 10 Helmlane,
Midshipman Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be

heard by the said Court at the Sxpirauion of 21 days from the

date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEP 22, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00440

Whereas RENALDO AMAHD FORBS of Hunt’s
Close off Firetrail Road, Western District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
the son has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas for Letters of Administration of the real and personal
Estate of BRENDON GORDON FORBES, late, of Joan’s
Height, Southern District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard

~ by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date



hereof.
signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

’ THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SEPT 22, 2005

Baal oc

In the Estate of JOHN C. MCKIE a.k.a. I
CLARENCE MACKIE, late of 7316
Manatee Avenue West Bradenton, Florida,
USA., deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by
DEANNE C. PYFROM, of The Western District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, is the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for the
Resealed Grant of Letters of Administration in the above
estate granted to ROBERT M. ELLIOT, the Personal
Representative, by the Superior Court of Florida, County of
Manatee in the State of Florida, U.S.A., on the 27th day of
April 2004

' signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

BUSINESS

a
Route change for
$45m Jamaica to
Bahamas cable

Fibralink Jamaica, the
Jamaican partner for
Caribbean Crossings on the
$45 million Jamaica Bahamas
Cable System (JBCS), has
obtained a four-month exten-
sion for completion of them
project from the authorities in
its home country.

Fibralink’s contract with the
Jamaican government man-
dated that services on the
JBCS system had to begin no
more than 10 months after its
licence was issued, meaning it
had to commence operation
in October. The four-month
extension takes the start date
to January 2006.

Richard Pardy, Fibralink’s’

head and former Cable
Bahamas chief executive, said
the deadline had been unre-
alistic, as it meant that the
company had to try and

achieve a 24-month process in
12.

In addition, the company
had not obtained all the rele-
vant Jamaican government

approvals.

_ Mr Pardy said the JBCS
route would be changed as a
result of Fibralink’s parent,
Columbus Communications,
acquiring New World Net-
works and its ARCOS fibre
optic cable system.

Rather than running straight
from Jamaica to the Bahamas
and then on to the US, the
JBCS will now run fzom
Jamaica to the Dominican
Republic to the Turks &
Caicos and then the Bahamas.

Fibralink also has an option
to run a different cable from
Jamaica to Cuba and then
on to Freeport in the
Bahamas.

FirstCaribbean

clients can pay
BTC bills on
telephone

and Internet

FirstCaribbean International Bank has announced that Bahamas :
Telecommunications Company (BTC) customers can also now.
pay their telephone, cell phone and Internet bills online and via tele- '
phone using the bank’s internet and telephone banking.

FirstCaribbean said its e-payment options, launched on August.
15, also offers customers the option of making third-party transfers
to other FirstCaribbean accounts in the same country. iy ts



from people who are
making news in their

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have. won an
award. .

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

| neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a













Prime Office Suite f for Immediate Occupancy

1,390 Sq.Ft. (additional 800 Sq.Ft. optional)
Beautiful Views of Nassau Harbour & Paradise Island
3 Parking Spaces included In Rental
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Two Elevators (wired for modern communication needs)

Separate Staff and Secured Client Parking ©
Automated Gated Entrance & Intercom System
. : 24 Hr. Security Guards
24 Hr. Surveillance Systems (Recorded) & Access Control
Professionally Managed
$5,200.00 Monthly

To View Contact

~ Mr. Elmer I.G. Lowe
Bahamas Facility Management Ltd.
Telephone: (242) 328-BFMM or 322-7419
P.O. Box SS-19784
Nassau, Bahamas


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





Available

« & Owe ot &

—— .

_with a victory, while quar-

‘the Bahamian athletes to





Fico

Baham
in sea

@ TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
' Reporter

SPRINTER Chandra
Sturrup and quarter-miler
Tonique Williams-Darling
brought their 2005 track
and field stadium to a close

ter-miler Christine Amer-
til had to settle for second.
The trio were the last of

finish their competition for
the season as they partici-
pated in the Shanghai
Golden Grand Prix on Sat-
urday at the Shanghai
Stadium in Shanghai, Chi-
na.

The one-day meet was
the last for the year and
China got a glimpse of:
what to expect when it
hosts the 2008 Olympic
Games in Beijing. It was

meet
China.

the biggest track and field
ever

- Sturrup, who still holds
the world's fastest time this
year, got revenge on World
‘champion Lauryn Williams

opyrightedjM:
yndicated, Content

from Commercial N

aterial

— »



4



Jews Providers”



staged in

as she pulled away from
the American to post a
winning time of 11.02 sec-
onds.
Williams, one of three
women who sped past Stur-
rup in the 4 final stages to

ans impres
on’s climax

deny her a medal at the
10th IAAF World Champi-
onships in Athletics in
Helsinki, Finland in
August, came through in
second in 11.05. Sturrup's
training partner, American

Weather hits
softball playoffs

@ SOFTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THE Degeo Bommers and the Electro
Telecom Dorcy Park Boyz will have to
wait until tonight to go after the sweep in
their respective New Providence Softball
Association's best-of-five playoffs.

The second-place Bommers took a 2-0
lead into Saturday night's opening game
against the third-place DHL Brackettes in
the ladies’ series at the Churchill Tener
Knowles National Softball Stadium, but
their game was rained out.

The Brackettes are having trouble hold-
ing onto the lead.

The pennant-winning Dorcy Park Boyz
also went into the men's feature contest
with a 2-0 advantage over the fourth-
place Nassau Cruisers Stingrays. In order
to force a fourth game, the Stingrays will
have to find a way to stop Dorcy Park
Boyz' ace Edney 'the Heat' Bethel.

So far, Bethel has been stingy on the
mound and hasn’t given up a run. Bethel

has alen heen 2 terror at the hat

Those two games will be made up
tonight. If the Bommers and the Dorcy
Park Boyz win, they will earn their spots
in the best-of-seven championship series
that could start as early as Thursday night.

. That will depend on the outcome of
the other half of the series.

Title

On the ladies' side, the pennant-win-
ning Electro Telecom Wildcats are just
one game away from returning to the
final to defend their title. They hold a 2-
0 lead over the fourth-place Proper Care
Pool Lady Sharks going into game three
on Tuesday night.

Ace Mary ‘Cruise’ Edgecombe has
been too much for the Lady Sharks to
handle, not only on the mound, but at
the plate as well.

And in the men's feature contest, the
second placed TBS Truckers have a 2-0
lead over the third-place Del Sol Arawaks
in a rematch of last year's final.

The Truckers won the title over the
Arawaks

Catcher Jamaal 'Sarge' Johnson has
been a menace for the Arawaks hitting
homer after homer so far in the
series.

The league champions will go on to
represent the NPSA in the Bahamas Soft-
ball Federation's National Round Robin
Tournament that wili be played at the
Churchill Tener Knowles National Sta-
dium and the Baillou Hills Sporting Com-
plex over the Discovery weekend in Octo-
ber.

It would appear that all four series
could end up being swept by the teams
that have a 2-0 upper-hand.

But; from all indications, the final could
be much more exciting once the partici-
pants have been decided.

The NPSA has less than three weeks to
complete the championship series and,
despite the inclement weather, league
officials are confident that they will have
their two champions decided in time for
the national showdown against the visit-
ing Family Island champions.

The nationals are the biggest event on
the BSF's calendar.





Melisa Barber was third in
11.22,

Now the second fearea
quarter-miler in the world,
Williams-Darling easily
won the women's 400 ina
time of 50.25 to get back
on the winning track after
she lost three post-World
Championship races to
American Sanya Richards.

Richards, who surpassed
Williams- Darling as the
world leader. on the latest
IAAF rankings, closed out
her season after winning
the 3rd IAAF World Ath-
letics Final in. Monaco at
the beginning of thie
month. She opted not to.
travel to Shanghai. nN

Battled

Instead, Williams-Dar-
ling had to contend with
two Americans as they bat-
tled for second and third.
Dee Dee Trotter came in
second in 50.90 and
Monique Hennagan was
third in 50.92. .

Amertil, the othiey
Bahamian competing in the
event, also opted not to,
contest the quarter.
Instead, she focussed on
the 200 where she's had
some success this year.

However, Amertil ran
against the world's best 200
metre runner, American
Allyson Felix. Unbeaten
this year, world champion
Felix cruised to a season-
ending victory in 23.09.
Amertil did 23.26 for sec-
ond with Great Britain's
Donna Fraser coming in
third in 23.31.

“
IHIBUNE SPORTS VIUINDAY, SEr iewwown IO, CUYY, Prvie

@ MEACHER MAJOR defeated Jamaican Glenroy
‘Hard Hands’ Beckford on Saturday. The fight was

brought to a halt in the second round.
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

"RUDOLPH HEDGE
takes a’sore one against ©
pe SACe elite Pt tel aay eat

ree aa

Cell:

RY NO PHOTOCOPIES, NEWSPAPER PRINT_O


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

THe }

‘Pictures from
ihe weekend
exey.darel rte i (ey.





Major comes
out fighting
for victory

& BOXING
By KELSIE JOHNSON

Junior Sports Reporter E

JUST seconds into the sec-
ond round of the co-main event
at the “Redemption”, the fight
between Meacher Major and
Jamaican boxer Glenroy ‘Hard
Hands’ Beckford, the fight was
stopped.

Major was in an attack mode
from the sound of first round
bell, leaving Beckford on the
defence.

With the Jamaican team
already taking the upper hand
on the Bahamian squad, win-
ning the two previous matches,
Major came out firing on all
cylinders, connecting on virtu-
ally every punch thrown.

Beckford in turn tried to cov-
er his face, leaving the body ‘
open.

But Major’s intentions were
to deliver a knockout, claiming
that the two loses by his friends
placed fire in him.

He said: “After learning that
Richard lost and Jerry lost, the
only thing I wanted to do was
take my opponent out.

“T just came off a very tough
loss so I knew he wouldn’t be
able to take it, even if I did
decide to deliver the body
shots.”

Trying to hold out until the
final two rounds proved to be
fruitless for Jerry ‘Big Daddy’
Butler.

Energy

Fighting his first six rounder
match, Butler said he wanted
to save a little of energy to
make a strong comeback in the
final two rounds, but saw him-
self behind in points to his
opponent Carron ‘Able Sea-
man’ Speed of Jamaica.

Speed landed some heavy
shots on Butler, shaking the big
fellow early in the second.

By the third, Butler was seen
gasping for breath, while Speed
pounded away at his body.

Trying to shake his way out
of Speed’s punches, Butler
walked into two right hooks.

Butler said: “I came into the
match with a game plan, this
being my first six round fight,
but the plan didn’t work.

“T had different game plans,
but none worked. I wasn’t
starting to tire, I was trying to
get him to lean on me, so I
could work my upper cuts on
him.

“But after I got that double
head butt in the second round,
boy I started to wobble.”

Butler was able to withstand |}

the punches, but lost out by a
unanimous decision by the
judges.

Bahamian Richard ‘the
Hammer’ Pitt also fell to the
hands of Rudolf ‘Non Stop’ '
Hedge of Jamaica by a unani-

- mous ruling.

Fighting in the featherweight
division, Pitt failed to protect
himself in the second round,
and received a dangerous right
from Hedge that sent Pitt flying
to the ground.

Hedge, who was firing lead
left hands and quick three-
punch combinations, had
placed Pitt in a daze.

Knowing that he was behind
the count in the match, Pitt
tried to deliver some combina-
tions of his own, but the relent-
less Hedge would not be
moved.

Although he received several
blows to the face, Hedge
continued to dance around
Pitt.

Just when Pitt thought it was
all over, Hedge’s open face jab
snapped his head back, sending
Pitt flying to the ropes.



«







Jermain
in seventh heaven

Smith throws

in towel against
title holder

BOXING
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

A VICIOUS combination .

assault by Jermain ‘Choo-
Choo’ Mackey to the open face
of ‘Marvelous’ Marvin Smith
ruptured blood vessels in his
nose and forced him to throw
in the towel on Saturday night
at the Wyndham Nassau
Resort.

Mackey’s strong surge in the

_ final minutes of the fifth round

had shaken up the former
super middleweight title hold-
er, sending medical doctors to
his aid.

Ruled capable of continuing
with the fight, Smith stepped
back into the ring in the sixth
round only to be surprised with
quick right hand jab from
Mackey.

The connection to the face
saw blood stream down Smith’s
face.

He ran to the ropes for a
quick breather, but that escape
route lasted only two seconds.

Opportunity

Jumping on the opportunity

to pin Smith to the rope, Mack-
ey landed punches with Smith
too weak to protect himself.

Mackey said: “My endurance
was great, I knew he wasn’t
able to go 12 rounds and that
he wouldn’t be able to take it
so I was like ‘let me try and
over this one quick’. ©

“He tried to spit out his
mouth piece in the fourth
round when I went to take him
out, but'I still was able to deliv-
er some hits. By him spitting
out his mouthpiece I knew it
was over.

“I just kept the pressure on
him and, like they say, pres-
sure burst pipe so he gave up.”

Smith had tried to dance
around some of the punches,

‘but he couldn’t avoid Mack-

ey’s reach.

Points

By the end of the second
round, however, Smith had

secured some points, by suc- .

cessful landing body shots.

“I wasn’t too disappointed
in the results and seeing him
not come out with anything
early in the fight,” said Mack-
ey.

“Like I told him, he was
great in his time, but it’s my
time. He didn’t want to give it
up so I had'to go in there and
take it.

“TY knew I had it when I

rocked him with the left i the
third round and he tried to hit.
me with some body shots, butt.
didn’t mind.”

This was the second time the
two have fought; the first Smith
was taken out on a stretcher,
suffering from a- prokep
jaw.

On Saturday, trying to avonr
any serious injury, Smith said.
that midway i in the seventh; he.
knew it was over and that the
injury to the nose was taking
its toll on his body. : =

Breathe =

“I have nothing to feel: bad
about,” said Smith. “I really
give it all I had inside of me,.
but after I took some of the
jabs, it dislocated some of the
vessels inside of my nose and I
couldn’t breathe properly
through it every time I tried to
breathe I kept swallowing the
blood.

; “Iam a warrior from heart
and it really hurts me to quit. I
have plenty victories, but I
have only one life. I tip my hat
to him, he withstood my most
fierce rally and he is the win-
ner.

- “T enjoyed my career, Hie: is
much more youthful. Rather
than going through all of this
again I think I.am going to pass
my knowledge onto the
younger guys and try to help
some of them:do some positive
things in their lives and try to
avoid some of the pot holes
and pitfalls that I made very
young in my life.” ‘

Smith’s mom declared that





» Saturday night’s fight will be

the last time her son will step
into the ring.

Although Smith was still
returning some fire in the sixth
and seventh rounds, the’ hard
hits being sent by Mackey
were Starting to put him ina
trance.

Smith was saved by the bell,
with a knockout on the hori-
zon.

Mackey added: “I knew I
had rocked him pretty hard in
the third, so I was like ‘he is
going to give up’.

“But then I said-if he don’t
give up, the referees were
going to have to stop this one,
if the referees don’t then the
doctors will call it.

“T wasn’t about to give up on
him: At.one point he thought
he was wearing me down, but I
came on stronger.”

For Mackey, the dream has
only just begun. After congrat-
ulating Smith on his efforts,
Mackey said he is ready to take
it to the next level.




The Tribune

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005







Within the next week, industrial action can be expect-
ed if government does not “step up to the plate”, John
Pinder, president of the Bahamas Public Service Union,

‘warned last week.

The BPSU held a press conference to respond to the °
government’s committee in charge of negotiating a new
industrial agreement. According to Mr Pinder, industri-
al consultant Keith Archer had stated “unfactual infor-
mation” at the committee’s press conference on Sep-
tember 8. Mr Archer reportedly said the BPSU presiuent
had originally approached the government and asked for
an upfront advance on the contract. However, Mr Pinder

FNM leader Tommy Turnquest
said he. would welcome Brent
Symonette (left) as his deputy, should
the Montagu MP choose to run for
the position. Mr Turnquest told The
Tribune yesterday that the Montagu
MP is very deserving of the post of
deputy leader of the FNM.

On Tuesday, Mr Symonette said
that he is seriously considering run-
ning for the deputy position when
the party goes to convention in

THE Bahamas is set to

| experience a significant wind-
fall as the country gets ready
to play host to the new launch
of the James Bond franchise.

The Tribune has learnt that
after an almost 20-year
absence, James Bond is
posed to return to the
Bahamas once again with
Casino Royale, the 21st



November...

installment of the series...





The Haitian
- SO what is t

By JOHNMARQUIS _

early 40 years
ago, the British
politician
Enoch Powell
was vilified and
‘epncined for warning the
"Westminster government of

. the perils of uncontrolled immi-

gration. He believed old Eng-
land. would soon be overrun by
alien cultures.

Powell told his party col-
leagues “you must be stark,
staring mad” and in what
became known as his “rivers
of blood” speech, he offered
dire predictions if things con-
tinued as they were. Immedi-
ately, Powell was branded a
racist, a right-wing fanatic, and
castigated as‘a rabble-rouser..

, By far the best mind in the
Conservative party of the day
was tossed aside, and his polit-
ical career never recovered
from the venomous bile heaped
upon his head.

Supremacist

_From that day forth, he was
characterised as a wild-eyed
fascist and an irrational dema-
gogue with a race supremacist
agenda.

Today, all but the seriously
deluded have to accept that
what he said was largely true. If
“rivers of blood” have yet to
flow in quite the profusion he
predicted, the overall picture
is far from encouraging.

The London bombings, an
enormous upsurge in drive-by
shootings, gang stabbings and
ethnic conflict of all kinds have
certainly provided more than

: a trickle of Powell’s predicted

; flow of gore. And only fools”
‘ believe there is not yet more

- to come.

Politicians living in fashion-

: able suburbs like Hampstead

1

and Highgate will tell you that

' fun events like the Notting Hill

Carnival tell another story, and
they do. In some respects,
Britain is a multi-cultural suc-
cess story. It’s in the grim urban
areas of the Midlands and the
North where tensions are most-
ly felt. And that’s because there
is So much more at stake.

The dominant impression,
though, is that Britain’s indige-

itian roblem



1



has denied this...



e truth?

Three doctors have expressed alarm at what they consider the
disturbingly high Haitian birthrate at Princess Margaret Hospital. ©
Meanwhile, Bahamians living alongside a Haitian settlement in
Nassau say human bodies are being burned in a pit there. Although
both stories have been rebutted by government politicians, many .

_ people feel they are being denied thi



é truth-about the scale and-

nature of the “Haitian Problem” and its likely consequences.
INSIGHT reports... ?

nous culture is gradually being
engulfed by alien groups, peo-
ple who - for the most part -
have no respect for its way of
life or its institutions, and no
intention at all of assimilating
with the host society. In fact,
some of them are actively
engaged in trying to undermine
everything Britain has tradi-
tionally stood for. Some, admit-
tedly a small minority, openly
advocate insurrection.

Yardie gangs and dope
barons from the West Indies,
gang rapists and cult killers
from Africa, benefit scroungers
from Eastern Europe and, of
course, mad mullahs and ‘their
followers from the Middle East
have infiltrated British inner
cities to such an extent that
entire districts are now foreign
ghettoes, some of them
extremely hostile territory for
ordinary British people.:

‘In a country of 60 million
people, you might expect alien

‘influences to take a long time
to permeate every area of

national life. Yet, over the last
five years the extent of the cul-
tural takeover has suddenly
become apparent. Now it’s
probably too late to halt the
total subjugation of Britishness
as we know it.

Successive

All this has happened with
the connivance - some would
say the wilful co-operation - of
successive British governments

SEE page 4C







.™@ HAITIANS, ‘unlike Bahamians,
are volatile and impatient people.
They like things done their way.



_ (The Tribune archive photo)

qo} an

rio IR nye ITIZ


PAGE 2C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

THE TRIBUNE









Subject: Great Article on
"Lessons from Katrina"

oday's INSIGHT

"Lessons left behind

in Katrina's wake" was

a great article. I] was

never a fan of yours
(although you have recently begun
to get my attention with some hard-
hitting investigative journalism), but
this current article portrays you in a
different light. This one seems to
come from deep within - it shows a
"measure of a man."

It was quite down-to-earth, very
touching and shows your wealth of
experience in journalism - some-
thing that I knew you had, but it
took Katrina and America’s
response to bring it out. It was also
balanced and showed cold hard bru-
tal truths.

I was touched that you also recog-
nised that your country, the UK







(where I studied and
for the first time saw
that the amount of
money I had or did not
have was irrelevant -
what was important
was my “breeding"),
was a Class-divided
society still living in the
past, and that the
USA, with all of its success, seems
to be following.

In my opinion, one of the only
things Britain still has left is an
excellent system of education, but
that, too, needs to be more forward-
thinking. J still cannot understand
how it allowed a country like the
USA, a mere 300-plus years old, to
have surpassed it in everything from
technology fo setting the standards
of education in the post-graduate
world (the Harvard MBA is still the
standard).

I read once about the rise and fall

FEEDBACK







of nations; I can think of Babylon,

of Rome, ‘of Britain, and now the.

US. I see a common: pattern, a
greatness seeming almost invinci-




ble, then by some Godly force, a

breakdown, an Achilles he
reveals itself and the ‘grea
great no more.






more.
John Bain

!



and the response to Kat-
rina was truly priceless.
Two things stick out in
what IJ regard as one of
the best INSIGHT arti-
cles J have read.

Firstly, your comments
about the Bush family liv-

ing in a different galaxy .

were right on the mark.
Barbara Bush’s comments really

_ were beyond the pale. Secondly,

how right you were that prayer and
Godtalk are not enough.
Out West

AT dinner parties around Nas-

sau, John Marquis is the most dis-
‘cussed and reviled person I know.
nds He is opinionated, dogmatic, god-
‘less, brutally frank and all-round

exasperating, and he thinks he

- knows it all.

However, anyone who writes like













he does can be forgiven anything
and everything. The piece on Kat-
rina left me breathless with admi-
ration.

J, Lyford Cay

MARQUIS is a pinko liberal and
always has been. Why he was ever
allowed back into the Bahamas, I'll
never know.

HT, Palmdale






JUST to say how much I enjoyed
your article on Katrina. These
things need to be known, and I
think the United States has to
understand that it can’t go around,
the world doing what it pleases
when its own society is so precari-
ous. 2
Your article said all the right
things and was very well done.

Renton, Nassau


















“The committee was man-
dated to find ways to reduce the
costs of energy in the country.
We have made three presenta-
tions on our findings to the gov-
ernment, especially on the
PetroCaribe accord.

“First we made a presenta-
tion to Minister of Finance
James Smith and some senior
members of his staff. A second

presentation was made to the
prime minister himself.

“And the following day we
made a presentation to the Cab-
inet on the benefits of Petro-
Caribe and other things we
were pursuing in terms of low-
ering the costs of energy in the
Bahamas.”

— Vincent Coleby, chairman
of the Fuel Usage Committee

and a former Shell executive
with over 28 years experience

in the oil industry speaks on Ry

the PetroCaribe agreement.

“Today ‘was the post of
leader, tomorrow is another
day.

“Tam not ruling out the pos-
sibility that I may run for
another position in the party.”

> P
“the F

















f deputy leader when
{ meets in convention
in Nove mber.

“Th a iponderfil thing,
we are jextremely excited. We
will be the first country in the
world to showcase the new
James Bond.”

ich ‘they will Nena in
t the fish fry.”

str of Tourism Craig
th filming of the

Bahamas.

“When we came to school on
Tuesday last week, they ‘start-
ed looking for people with
infractions of their uniforms
and even ‘the girls with boys
shoes.on’.

“Then (the teacher) made us
stand up in the sun again the
following day, saying that we
looked gay in the shoes,.and
even called one of my friends
gay. The senior mistress and
the principal were saying that
the shoes were unisex but (the
teacher) didn’t care.”

— A female student of C V
Bethel High School who claims

she and other girls were disci- |

plined for wearing “gay

‘war the rai moment we
are'shocked to see this level of
hysteria operating in the public
education system. We are cer-
tain that the Ministry of Edu-
cation is aware of its obligation
to the bisexual, gay, lesbian,
and transgender youth in the .
country, and we are certain they
are actively investigating this
seemingly inappropriate act of
conduct.”

— Erin Greene spokesper-
son for Rainbow Alliance, an
advocacy group for the rights
of bisexual, gay, lesbian and
transgenders, responds to
claims that female students at a
public high school were
allegedly disciplined for wear-





Shirley eee re Ree ye Eee ea

De com S Dane diced cia Aa com.



shoes”.

purchase, McDonald's will lorieka: 50 cents
to the victims of Hurricane



ing “gay shoes”.



ier havin’ th.


THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005, PAGE 3C



; oN era

hz ISLANDS OF THE

amas







_ & THOMAS Desmangles (right), safety advisor for Shell Bahamas, last week shows Ron Pinder,
parliamentary secretary in the Ministry of Health, steps taken for an integrity test - to check for
leaks in the fuel pipelines and underground fuel storage systems of petroleum stations.

AFTER numerous presen-
tations, the government is
expected to make a decision
this week on whether the
Bahamas will sign on to the
PetroCaribe accord, it was
announced last week.

Vincent Coleby, chairman
of the Fuel Usage Committee,
which has meticulously
reviewed the PetroCaribe
accord, said that he expects
government to make a
favourable announcement
shortly...

The brainchild of Venezue-

lan president Hugo Chavez, .

PetroCaribe is a government-
, to-government contract to sup-
* ply oil to member nations with
the aim of cutting out the
“middleman”.

Ee ie

THE Bahamas is set to
experience a significant wind-
fall as the country gets ready to
play host to the new launch of
the James Bond franchise.

The Tribune has learnt that
after an almost 20-year
absence, James Bond is posed

_to return to the Bahamas once
again with Casino Royale, the
21st installment of the series.

Director of Film with the
Ministry of Tourism Craig
Woods yesterday said that pre-
production is scheduled to



start this Fall.

eo



CONCERN over height-
ened homophobia in the
Bahamas has arisen again after
two girl students, who were
forced to stand outside in the
sun for allegedly wearing “gay
shoes”, last week made further

‘claims against C V Bethel

Senior High School.

The previous week, more
than 50 girls from that school
from grades 10-12 were
allegedly punished for wear-
ing unisex shoes to school.

One of the school’s teach-

ers corroborated the accusa-

tion and now two students
have claimed they were made
to stand outside their class-
room.again the following day.



WITHIN the next week,
industrial action can be expect-
ed if government does not
“step up to the plate”, John
Pinder, president of the
Bahamas Public Service
Union, warned last week.

The BPSU held a press con-
ference to respond to the gov-

ernment’s committee in charge

of negotiating a new industrial
agreement.
According to Mr Pinder,

(The Tribune archive photo)

industrial consultant Keith
Archer had stated “unfactual
information” at the commit+
tee’s press conference on Sep-
tember 8. :

Mr Archer reportedly said
the BPSU president had orig-
inally approached the govern-
ment and asked for an upfront
advance on the contract. How:
ever, Mr Pinder has denied
this.

deck ck ak ok

FNM leader Tommy Turn-
quest said he would welcome

Brent Symonette as his.



deputy, should the Montagu:
MP choose to run:for the Posie:
tion. ; veh Re

Mr Turnquest told The Tri-
bune yesterday that the Mon-
tagu MP is very deserving of
the post of deputy leader of
the FNM.

On Tuesday, Mr Symonette
said that he is seriously con-
sidering running for the deputy
position when the party goes
to convention in November. |

He said that he would prob-
ably announce his decision
after the House of Assembly
convenes next month.

If Mr Symonette does enter
the race, he may be up against
current deputy leader Sidney
Collie, who according to Mr
Symonette, also plans to run.

School of Hospita
Signature Dishe:

ad Bronze.

Habamas Lid

~~ 8@ba

\. gutter
Comp:

& Sands ,
any Limited


iF ll MUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

‘INSIGHT

THE TRIBUNE»







@ POLICE officers (in boat on right)
approach what appears to be a Haitian
sloop entering Nassau Harbour.





(The Tribune archive photo)

































































































The fine line of General Electric appliances found at Geoffrey Jones cater to today’s busy households

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FROM page 1C

who, for reasons best-known
to themselves, have kept the
public in the dark about the
true extent of immigration.
For many years - decades, in

fact - the British government.

has been unable, or unwilling,
to offer meaningful statistics
on the influx of foreigners into
Britain. Frightened of racial
confrontation, sensitive to any-
thing that might be construed
as prejudice, they have pussy-
footed around a problem that is
now totally out of hand.

Even the media is partially
paralysed in its approach to this
most critical aspect of British
life. For the Race Relations
Act virtually rules out open dis-
cussion of anything which casts
aspersions on a particular eth-
nic group.

| Political

For the most part, the com-
fortably off bourgeosie - the
ruling political class - have been
responsible for this myopic
approach to a dangerous and
disturbing situation. And that’s
because they are the least
affected.

Meanwhile, hundreds of
thousands of working-class
British pensioners whose
neighbourhoods have been
largely “ghettoised” are now
terrified of stepping outside
their own front doors.

And fascist thugs, generally
the least intelligent members
of society, are exploiting grow-

ing racial tension in pursuit.of

their own warped philosophy.

Why is all this important to
the Bahamas? Well, many
Bahamians. believe a similar

-process-is happening here, with

local culture under threat from
hordes of people who share
neither their views, their val-
ues, nor their aspirations.

The big difference is that this
country has a population of
only 300,000, roughly that of
the English Midlands city of
Leicester. If immigration con-
tinues unabated here, it will not
take 40 years for the Bahamian
culture to be overwhelmed. In
Abaco, concerned campaign-
ers believe the process willbe
completed in little more than.a
decade. | :

Thus, when Dr Marcus
Bethel or Mr Ron Pinder talk
of irresponsibility and reck-
lessness in discussing the hid-
den impact of the Haitian prob-
lem, many see them only as
manipulators of the truth, part
of a smokescreen to keep
Bahamians in the dark.

Official

Why such official reticence?

“It’s mainly because, politi-
cians don’t like to admit they
have dropped the ball on the
immigration question,” one
observer told INSIGHT.

“All intelligent people know
that Haitians have been coming
into this country virtually

. unchecked for a long time now.

Both the FNM and PLP have
been totally clueless in dealing
with the question, so they are
now covering up.

“It’s not a vote winner to
admit that they have screwed
up over a long period of time
on an issue which; left unad-
dressed, will have the greatest
impact ever on the Bahamian

way of life. So they faff around

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the subject, as though in denial.
For some reason, they expect it
just to go away.”

Diaspora

However, when it comes to
the Haitian diaspora, the poli-
tics and mathematics leave no
room for complacency, inertia
or optimism. And it certainly
isn’t going away.

Haiti is a nation of eight mil-
lion people which is in a state
of permanent turmoil. At its
nearest point, it lies just sixty
miles off the Bahamas shore-
line.

For as long.as Haiti remains
a failed state, a lawless slum
full of desperate people, the
Bahama islands will be seen as
stepping stones to freedom and
sanity. And that’s why those
little sloops with ragged sails
will continue to ply the straits
between purgatory and par-
adise.

For the Bahamas, the impli-
cations are horrendous because
this country and Haiti are as
politically, socially and tem-
peramentally different as it’s
possible to imagine.

Haitians, unlike Bahamians,
-are volatile and impatient peo-

_ ple. They like things done their

way. Twice in their 200 years of
independence they have suc-
ceeded where Guy Fawkes
failed, by blowing up their
rulers in the National Palace
to secure a change of govern-
ment.

Presidents

Since ejecting Napoleon’s
army in 1804, they have had

one king, twe emperors; nine -

presidents for life and 20-odd
leaders who have been vio-
lently overthrown. Two presi-
dents were assassinated, anoth-
er was executed, one commit-
ted suicide and yet another was
torn to shreds by the mob after
being dragged from the French
embassy and impaled on the
perimeter fence..

One of the nation’s founders,
Jean-Jacques Dessalines, failed
to deliver the goods in two
years, as emperor so was sav-
agely dismembered and left in

a public square in Port-au-.

Prince to be devoured by wild
pigs.
What was left of him after
the pigs had finished was
thrown into a hastily dug grave.
Only last year, President

‘Jean-Bertrand Aristide was

spirited out of Haiti when it
was clear his life was in dan-
ger following a rebellion. Had
he stayed, he might well have
become another Dessalines,
butchered by his own people,
or another Cincinnatus Lecon-
te, the president who was incin-
erated in the 1912 palace fire-
ball. ,

When it comes to politics,
Haitians (to use a quaint
Bahamian expression) “don’t
play” - in fact, they create such
mayhem that their country has
become the biggest embarrass-
ment of the western world.

Cultured —

Though there is undoubted-
ly another side to these people
- the best of them are among
the most cultured and creative
in the Caribbean, with strong
family traditions, a tremendous






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work ethic and an artistic her-
itage which is the envy of the
region - their track record in
the area of governance is not
impressive.

_ What some Bahamians fear,
and understandably so, is that if
Haitians establish themselves
in the Bahamas in sufficient

~ numbers, they will begin assert- -

ing their rights in ways local.

people will find hard to under-

stand. *
Haiti, remember, achieved -

' freedom from a European”

nation that was itself in the
midst of post-revolutionary tur-'’
moil. Having guillotined its»
aristocracy, France found itself
ultimately under the command.
of an imperialistic dictator who
plunged it into ruinous wars. -
While Haiti was in the throes
of its own revolution, Napoleon:
was leading his armies towards
major disasters in Europe,:
including the crippling march
on Moscow and the killing:
fields of Waterloo. These were.
not happy times for the little’
emperor or his country. 2

Democratic —

Hence, Haiti had no democ-

‘ratic template on which to

build. It was born amid chaos
and has been in a state of dis-
order and confusion ever since.
‘While the Bahamas has the
oldest parliament in the Com-
monwealth - one that pre-dates
the US Congress by the best
part of half a century - Haiti-
has nought to offer from its
political past but a succession.
of madcap dictators, military
juntas and bloody coups inter- .
spersed by periods of foreign

- -occupation.- ---

In the same way that’
demented mullahs fired-up by
Islamic extremism have no
regard for the nuances of
British law, exciteable Haitians °
with a grudge against society”
cannot be expected to observe
parliamentary protocol and.
democratic niceties in Nassau’
when it comes to the crunch. ©

Throwing the parliamentary
mace out of the window fol-
lowed by the hour-glass, as Sir

_ Lynden Pindling and Sir Milo

Butler did in 1965, does not.
rate much as a political gesture
‘among people who have tradi-
tionally exerted change by

_ extreme force.

Bearing all this in mind, the
Bahamas is embarking on a
perilous course if it allows itself
to be submerged by a culture
which - allowed its head - will
make few allowances for what
has gone before. a

Reasoned -

Some will say all this is high-
ly inflammatory. Others will
see it as a reasoned presenta-.
tion of the truth.

In Abaco, where the Haitian
“problem” is most apparent,
ambivalence in the public’s.
response has already led to a
calamitous situation.

The Mud and Pigeon Pea,
Marsh Harbour’s heaving slum
settlements, are mini-replicas
of Cite Soleil and Bel Air in
Port-au-Prince, congested ghet-
toes where local laws no longer
seem to apply.

_Amid the cramped shacks
and stinking alleyways, an
entire society functions - albeit
haphazardly - with no refer-

' ence to the way neighbouring

Bahamians live their lives.
“There are nightclubs, beau-
ty parlours, barber shops and
eveu convenience stores in
t! xe,” said a Bahamian resi-
dent who has wandered
through the maze. None of

_. these businesses has the usual
permits because their owners

do not. acknowledge that
Bahamian regulations apply to

them.
Civilised

Power-lines plugged (illicitly,
some say) into the local sup-
plies are festooned between’
ramshackle homes, lean-to.

‘sheds, and sundry other

makeshift buildings in ways
that would not, and could not,
be tolerated in the more
civilised host community al
around.

Twice, massive fires have |
swept through these slums, dis-
placing hundreds of people at a,
time.

What many Bahamians now
claim, and resent, is that some
Haitians are no longer the
servile and deferential out-
siders of old, grateful to be giv-
en a chance in life, but increas-
ingly determined and aggres-
sive interlopers who see the’
Bahamas as a convenient and
more congenial extension of
their homeland. ,

SEE page 5C
THE TRIBUNE



F ROM page 4C

The Abaco campaigner Jef-
fery Cooper said: “This island
will become’‘a little Haiti. It is
already well on its way to being
an annexe of that country. And
new arrivals are getting-off the
boats all the time.”

The situation is aggravated

by corruption among Bahami-.

an Officials. “Everyone knows
that Haitians who can raise the
money are able to find their
way here with the active co-
operation of paid-off officials,”
an observer told INSIGHT.

' ‘Trade

ws

“This is common kniowledge.
The ;
Haitians, Peruvians and. Chi-



nese into and through the

Bahamas. There are ‘safe hous-
es’ all over the place which are
pait of the system.”

Once here, poorer Haitians
are frequently subjected to
police protection rackets under
which their continued presence
is assured if they make regular
payments to bent officers,
according to well-placed
sources:

Evidence of this has come
not only from Abaco, but also
N assau itself, where a family’s
Haitian gardener (earmarked
for deportation as an illegal
immigrant) reappeared for
work after paying a policeman
$230, a story reported in The
Tribune only last week.

With the Haitian problem.

pofentially the Bahamas’ pri-

maty social concern for the 21st -

century, one would expect the
government to be in possession
of.detailed statistics about its
extent.

Concerned Bahamians esti-
‘mate that the Haitian popula-
tion in the Bahamas now
stands at between 25 000 and
60,000, though some say the
figure is higher. Mr Cooper
believes Haitians in Abaco out-
number Bahamians, though he
ca get no-one to confirm it.

{ Statistics

So what are the facts? On
the basis that accurate statis-
tics are essential if the Bahamas
is to devise a workable strategy
in dealing with Haitians,
INSIGHT has been conduct-
ing some research. The results
were not encouraging. ~

The Registrar General’s
Office, the Department of Sta-
tistics, Princess Margaret Hos-
pital and the Department of
Immigration were all in the
dark on up-to-date population
numbers, birthrates and death
rates when a reporter called in
search of information.

‘Although Dr Bethel was able
to spirit hospital statistics seem-
ingly out of nowhere to rebut
The Tribune’s birthrate story,
there is no key data available
on which to build anything like
a reasoned appraisal of the
Haitian immigration situation.

“Currently, an international
adyisory group specialising in
immigration is conducting
research in an effort to “get a
handle” on the problem. How-
ever, government sources have
alteady hinted that its findings
will not be made public. .

Although Dr Bethel was

JS an, active trade in ©

quick to counter a doctor’s alle-
gations in The Tribune that
Haitian births at Princess Mar-
garet Hospital were running as
high as nine to one, statistics
he produced at the time were

not rated reliable by medical

staff.

In fact, since the furore
erupted, The Tribune has con-
tinued to receive information
from anonymous medical
sources suggesting that the
truth is being suppressed. No
fewer than three doctors have
now expressed disquiet over
the Haitian birthrate.

The most recent disclosures

came from a Bahamian moth-

er, who'said shé was askéd to”
.vacate her hospital bed to

make way for a Haitian woman
whose labour was more immi-
nent.

“There were two other Hait-
ian mothers waiting behind
me,” she said, “and another
was in the toilet. In the birth
log-book, there were a number
of names like St John, Louis
and suchlike.”

A nurse, meanwhile,
revealed that one day two
weeks ago 17 of 32 births at the
hospital were to Haitian moth-
ers and that the Haitian-
Bahamian birth ratio was run-
ning at five to one.

Observer °

“T believe politicians are
afraid to tell the truth because

-of what Bahamians might do,”

an observer told INSIGHT. “It
is such an emotive issue that

‘

they are afraid the thing will:

blow up.

“But I think we have to get
proper statistics if we are to
look at this situation in a prag-
matic and unemotional way. At
the end of the day, Bahamians
are not aware enough of their
own culture to be able to guard
it jealously. We neéd definitive
figures if we are to plan prop-
erly for the future.”

British culture, by contrast,
stretches way back to pre-
Roman times, nurtured admit-
tedly over many centuries by
a succession of invading forces,
culminating with the Norman
Conquest in 1066. Though
essentially a mongrel race, the
British have established par-
liamentary, cultural and legal
traditions which make them
what many still consider a mod-
el society. -

Yet their vulnerability is as
pronounced today as it’s ever
been, and all because foreign
immigration has been allowed
to run amok over the last half-
century as politicians have
shrunk from their responsibili-
ties.

Immigration

Controlling immigration is
not racism, the Conservative
leader Michael Howard said
recently while reflecting the
British people’s mounting dis-
quiet, it is commonsense. -

Enoch Powell said the same
thing in the Sixties, but was
shouted down and demonised.
He eventually died in 1998,

- having lived his final years in

SEE page 12C

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 719, 2005, PAGE 5C

INSIGHT

LED is a Haitian boat docked at Nassau Harbour.

For a Supple Body



(The Tribune archive photo)





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two bottles of SPORTFLEX from any foodstore or pharmacy.

Just bring the empty bottles of SPORTFLEX to
Bahamas Supply Agencies Ltd, located in the BAKCO Building opposite
Ebenezer Church, Shirley Street, Nassau and collect your FREE umbrella.

Offer limited to 1 umbrella per person.

Distributed in The Bahamas by

¢ Offer good while

stocks last.

Bahamas Supply Agencies Lid.

(Opposite Ebenezer Methodist Church)
East Shirley Street ¢ Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 393-2966 ° Fax: (242) 393-2523


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#4 j{ SUNDAY, scr Emiben ey dvee



OPINION

JESUS DIAZ JR., PUBLISHER | TOM FIEDLER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR | JOE OGLESBY, EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

The Miami Herald | EDITORIAL





Sharing the risk of disaster

OUR OPINION: U.S. NEEDS A NATIONAL PROGRAM MODELED ON FLOOD INSURANCE

he appropriation of $62
T billion by Congress to
pay for disaster relief in the
wake of Hurricane Katrina
means that all Americans are
pitching in to pay for this
painful recovery. President
Bush’s speech on Thursday
night ensures that this will be
only the first installment in a
rebuilding effort of unprece-
dented scale. The principle
behind this generous impulse
is that natural disasters are
everyone’s business. If the
pain can’t be distributed
evenly, the expense can be.
Now it’s time for Congress to
realize that the same princi-
ple should apply to insurance
covering major disasters.

As hurricanes like Katrina
become more frequent and
destructive, a catastrophe-in-
surance program modeled on
flood insurance should
become a priority for law-
makers before the next big
disaster strikes.

According to the Insur-
ance Information Institute,
Congress created the
National Flood Insurance
Program in 1968 in response
to “the rising cost of taxpay-
er-funded. disaster relief for
flood victims and the increas-

ing amount of damage caused
by floods.” Substitute the
words hurricane or wind-
storm for flood in the preced-
ing sentence, and you have a
perfect description of today’s
situation with windstorm and
hurricane insurance. The
expense of Katrina and the
accompanying chart are
undeniable evidence of the
rising cost of windstorms.
Meanwhile, 2005’s record
hurricane season — along
with the four hurricanes that
hit Florida last year — should
persuade the most hardened
skeptic that we live in an era
of heightened danger.

Before the flood-insurance
program was created, gov-
ernment-backed relief in
disastrous floods came from
general revenues, in much

the same’ manner as aid is’

provided to the victims of
Katrina today. For taxpayers,
the flood-insurance program
makes more sense because
the NFIP is self-supporting.
Expenses and claims are paid
through premiums collected
for flood-insurance policies,
not by the U.S. government.
Because policies are
required of potential flood
victims across the country,



DATE DISASTER







premiums remain relatively
affordable. In 2004, accord-
ing to the insurance institute,
the average premium was
$411 for coverage of $150,000.
Compare that to the huge
windstorm premiums paid by

residents living in the most _

vulnerable parts of Florida,

and the advantages of a com: -

prehensive national program,
become clear. ;

Of course, no insurance
program can cover all the
expenses of a calamity of
Katrina’s magnitude. Extra
relief will be needed because
many potential victims will



; insurance information institute



C AT. ‘ASTROPHES AND COSTS Bo area
Hurricanes are the most expensive disasters for insurers.




INSURANCE PAYOUTS,
IN BILLIONS OF 2004 DOLLARS






roperty coverage only. —



remain uninsured, and losses
will exceed coverage when
the level of destruction is so
great. Still, the existence of
an insurance program of
national dimensions, ulti-
mately underwritten by the
government, becomes a sig-
nificant mitigating factor.
Here’s another advantage:
Putting flood, windstorm and
other catastrophic events
into one package would mini-
mize the possibility that
disaster victims will be
cheated by insurance compa-
nies. Already, the attorney

general of Mississippi is.








suing five insurance compa-
nies for allegedly cheating
policy-holders by attributing
Katrina’s damage to a flood,
thus avoiding responsibility
for damage covered by wind-
storm policies.

Some will argue, no doubt,
that most Americans aren’t
vulnerable to windstorm and
hurricane damage, so they
shouldn’t be asked to pay for
those who are at risk. This is
the same argument used by
some Floridians who
believed they faced no risk
from hurricanes... until last
year’s storms cut across the
state and damaged inland
areas once considered “safe.”

The facts don’t support
the argument either, accord-
ing to the insurance institute:
In 2003, a fairly typical year,
homeowners’ insurance
losses from wind or hail dam-
age accounted for 25 percent
of all losses nationwide. This
was exceeded only by the 33
percent of losses attributed
to fire, lighting and debris
removal — which is why the
proposed new disaster insur-
ance should cover all major
catastrophes, not just hurri-
canes or floods.

Creating a government

safety net to share the risk
with private insurers is a leg-
islative issue that the entire
Florida delegation should
support. Their constituents
live in the most vulnerable
state. Last year’s storms
erased profits for the state’s
homeowners’ insurance
industry and have led to sig-
nificant premium increases
and surcharges this year.
Incredibly, the state-backed
insurance program of last
resort wants a new round of

- increases, up to 68 percent

for Miami-Dade County, and
50 percent for Broward.
National catastrophe insur-
ance would be fairer to all by
spreading the risk — and the
burden of rate-payers.

No state has benefited as
much from the existence of a
flood-insurance program as
much as Florida — 40 per-
cent of all U.S. flood-insur-
ance policies nationwide
originate in Florida. If a par-
allel catastrophe-insurance
program that includes wind-

storms is created, the same

benefit would accrue to the
state’s overburdened resi-
dents, along with the savings -
of premiums made lower by
spreading the risk.

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OTHER VIEWS |



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PAGE 12C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005

THE TRIBUN\

Fn eee eee



PICTURED inset and on the right
are suspected illegal Haitan immigrants
who were apprehended in Bahamian
waters.

(The Tribune archive photos)



Esso, a market leader in fuels and
convenience retailing, is looking for
operators/ franchisees for its
service stations across the country.
Retails Sites immediately available
in New Providence.

if you have... j
» Successful experience in sales,

finance, or administration;

A minimum of five years

successfully supervising a team

of workers;

A desire to provide superior

customer service;

Computer literacy;

Organisational discipline;

Access to capital and a good

credit history

2

8

s

We want to know youl





i 7



portunity
jorld Class Retailer

Application forms may be collected at
our Windsor Field Office (immediately
West of Nassau International Airport).

Completed forms should be addressed
and returned to:

Yorick Cox

Caribbean Sales

Support Co-ordinator
Esso Standard Oil S.A, Ltd.
Windsor Field Road
Nassau, NP

, Bahamas

Applications should be submitted no

later than September 30 2005







ingen

FROM page 5C

political isolation. :

It would be interesting to hear his views now
that fanatical mullahs and other extremist fol-
lowers of Allah are demanding that Britain,
their adopted land, become an Islamic state.

“You must be stark, staring mad,” Powell said
all those years ago while his political colleagues



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turned away in disgust and resisted all discussion
of the immigration problem. Was he righf-or
was he wrong? a



° What do you think? Fax 328-2398 or e-mail
jmarquis@tribunemedia.net ae

Whether they fly or crawl, Baygon Universal's

special formula will help rid your home
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