Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text


eee
he Siami ‘Herald

O5F
SANAMAS EDITION





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SUNSHINE







PRICE — 50¢



Further claims in
‘gay shoes’ row

l By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

Montagu MP
could stand for
deputy position

CONCERN over heightened homophobia in
the Bahamas has arisen again after two girl stu
dents, who were forced to stand outside in the
sun for allegedly wearing “gay shoes”, yesterday.

' made further claims against C V Bethel Senior



@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

BRENT Symonette said yes-
terday he is seriously consider-
ing a bid for the deputy leader-
ship of the Free National Move-
ment when the party conven-
tion is held.in November.

The MP: for Montagu told
The Tribune that he has given
the matter serious thought and
will probably announce his deci-
sion when the House of Assem-
bly meets in October following
the summer break.

Mr Symonette said he is
aware that Sidney Collie may
also plan:to contest the posi-
tion; but is not sure who else
might be in the field.

He said the leadership of the

party is still “very much up in

the air” but did not say how
much of an impact that could
have on his decision to run as
deputy. —

He said he had been.

approached to run for the
deputy’s position by a number
of persons.

(cnsidered

Mr Symonette, the only FNM
candidate to win a seat in New
Providence in the May 2002
election, has considered the post
of leader twice. This created
speculation on whether the
country would accept the possi-
bility of a white prime minister.

At the party’s last conven-
tion, Mr Symonette decided
against running in the interest of
party unity, claiming it had not







sufficiently recovered from its
2002 defeat at the polls.

In August, Mr Symonette
announced again that he would
not contest the leadership. Yes-
terday, he explained that his
decision not.to run for leader
this time was based more on the
fact that he wanted to focus his

‘attention on serving his*Mon-

tagu constituents.

However, both times he said
his decision had no bearing on
the colour of his skin.

In August, he hinted on a
possible. deputy bid by saying:
“Today was the post of leader,
tomorrow is another day. I am
not ruling out the possibility
that I may run for another posi-
tion in the party.” ‘

Candidates

Former education minister
Dion Foulkes has already
announced his intention to run
against current leader Tommy
Turnquest:

Although many have specu-
lated on a Hubert Ingraham/
Brent Symonette ticket, both
men have remained silent on
that possibility.

Yesterday, independent MP
Pierre Dupuch weighed in on
the issue by saying there is no
reason why Mr Symonette
should not run.

However, he said he was dis-
appointed with politicians play-
ing cat-and-mouse games with
the Bahamian people about
whether they would run for
office. He said it is a disgrace
as people have a right to know.

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@ Frank Smith. talks to Rusty of Kemp Road during a walkabout of the
Urban Renewal Project. ¢ See pages 14-15 for the story

(Photo: Mario Duncanson/ Tribune Staff)



RBDF officer fears
are ‘unfounded’

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

IN response to a front page article in The Tri-
bune regarding morale at the Royal Bahamas

Defence Force being at an “all time low”, ministry

officials have stated that concerns expressed by
officers are unfounded.

In July, Deputy Prime-Minister and Minister of
National Security Cynthia Pratt announced that
the RBDF would undergo a four-stage review
beginning in July and ending in December.

Mrs Pratt said the purpose of the review would

_ be “to determine how the organisation:can opti-

mise its functioning.”
- However, earlier this week three RBDF offi-
cers claimed that low morale.and serious unrest

was brewing in Defence Force ranks due to what

SEE page 10

Ground-breaking
at Old Bahama Bay

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Prime Minister Perry
Christie was in Grand Bahama | yesterday
for the ground-breaking of the $585 million
Phase III expansion at Old Bahama Bay
Resort and Yacht Harbour at West End.

During his keynote address, Mr Christie
pledged his government's commitment to the
further development of West Grand Bahama.

This was the prime minister's first address
in Grand Bahama since suffering a stroke.

He told his audience that Grand Bahama's
future is bright and announced that other

‘multi-million dollar investment projects are in

the pipeline for Freeport.
In addition to the proposed $250 million

SEE page 10

High School.

Last week, more than SO girls from that school
from grades 10 through 12 were allegedly pun;
ished for wearing unisex shoes to school. se

One of the school’s teachers corroborated the
accusation and now two’students.are claiming.
they were made to stand outside their classroom
again the following day.

SEE page 12

Fe

Bahamas to host
Bond film again

@ By KARIN HERIG -
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas is set to experience a significant
windfall as the country gets ready to play host to
the new launch:of the James Bond franchise.

The Tribune has learnt that after an almost 20-
year absence, James Bond is posed to return to the
Bahamas once again with.Casino Royale, the 21st
instalment of the series.

Director of Film with the Ministry of Tourism
Craig Woods yesterday said that pre-production is
scheduled to start-this Fall.

“This is a wonderful thing, we are extremely
excited. We will be the first country in the world to
showcase the new James Bond,” he said.

Mt Woods said that having such a distinguished
projéct filmed in the Bahamas will not only give
local film crews work and high-level experience,

SEE page 12



inside

RRs

Ragged Island fury

FURIOUS residents of
Ragged Island claim they stand
to lose thousands of dollars in
spoiled goods because govern-
ment has “grounded” their
mailboat in Nassau.:

° See page three.



Bahamas is Gmmoral’

THE “serious problem” of
homosexuality among young
women is amindication that
morality is no longer a part of
Bahamian society, according to
National Youth Advisory Panel
chairman Mattie Nottage.

° See page five

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Rosetta Street

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff
Reporter

THE dump at Staniel
Cay, is in a “deplorable
state” according to locals
on the small Exuma island,

According to one local,
Solomon Robinson, the
community as a whole is
extremely concerned about
the problem, and is crying
out for help.

Mr Robinson told The

‘Tribune yesterday that the

entire island, which has a
population of about 100, is
upset by the condition of
the local dump.

He said that trash from
the dump has spilled over

onto some of the winter

residents’ property, “and
these people are very
angry.’

“No one knows what is
going to happen. This
dump is actually coming
out into the road; rats are
running all over the place -
it’s deplorable,” Mr Robin-
son said.

Concerned:

“It seems that nobody is ;

hearing the people of
Staniel Cay. I am very con-
cerned about the health
hazards. The dump is over-
full and running out into
the street and it is coming
in on people’s private
property,” said Mr Robin-
son.

“JT don’t want to bad
mouth the government. I
understand it is not easy to
run this country, but this
situation needs to be
addressed,” he added.

The same problem exist-
ed on Staniel Cay two
years ago, he said, adding
that Long Island residents
who owned heavy equip-
ment had to be paid to
come and clear the garbage
from private property and
push it back into the dump.

Local government repre-
sentative for Staniel Cay
and deputy chief council-
lor for the Exuma Cays
Brooks Miller agreed that
the condition of the dump
has been a serious problem










a LOCALS say the dump at Staniel Cay is in a ‘deplorable state’.

§ Community ‘crying
out for help’ over
iel Cay dump

for quite some time. ,
“For the last year or so, I.

have been trying to deal

with the government to try

‘and deal with the situa-

tion,” said Mr Miller.

Mr Miller said that he
met the director of Envi-
ronmental Health last
week who promised to
work on it.

He added that he report-
ed the matter to an Envi-
ronmental Health Depart-
ment official in Exuma and
that he gave.a letter along

with pictures to the official,

which were to be sent to
the permanent secretary in
the Ministry of Health.

Mr Miller recommended
that a-road be constructed
at a height around the
dump, so that garbage:
could be dumped down
into the area.

Director of Environmen-
tal Health Melony McKen-
zie said that-her depart-
ment is aware of the prob-
lem and will render assis-
tance.

She said that a mainte-
nance crew with heavy duty

equipment will be sent to

the island to clean the site.
The department is also
looking into reconstructing
barriers known as berms at
the dump site, she said.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005, PAGE 3





esidents’ fury over ‘grounded’ mailboat

FURIOUS residents of Ragged
Island claim they stand to lose
thousands of dollars in spoiled
goods because government has
“orounded” their mailboat in
Nassau.

The motor vessel Captain C,
they claim, was prevented from
making its weekly trip because of
“safety issues” after it had been
loaded with groceries, gasoline
and other supplies.

Now they say non-perishable
goods will rot on the boat while
island fishermen will have no fuel
for their vessels.

“It looks like they (the govern-
ment) want everyone to leave
Ragged Island,” deputy chief
councillor Leander Maycock said
yesterday.

“They should have given us
some notice, but they waited until
everyone got their stuff aboard
before making the decision to halt
the mailboat.”

Inspection

However, Ministry of Trans-
port and Aviation permanent sec-
retary Archie Nairn said that a
nautical inspector from the
Bahamas Maritime Authority
told the ministry he performed
an inspection on the Captain C
in an effort to ensure the mail-
boat was up to certain Interna-
tional Maritime Organisation
(IMO) standards.

The boat, said Mr Nairn, comes
under the jurisdiction of both the
Bahamas Maritime Authority and
the Boat Registration Act.

“The inspector has the author-
ity to inspect the boats at will and
record his findings related to safe-
ty. Some were very serious and
in many cases these deficiencies
are not brought to the fore until
an inspection is carried out and
several deficiencies were listed,”
said Mr Nairn.

One of the more serious infrac-
tions was that the minimum safe-
ty manning level had not been
met, which meant that various
positions had to be filled, and

Ragged Islanders claim they
stand to ‘lose thousands’.



these persons must have the req-
uisite qualifications.

“They also had a problem with
the lifeboat, which is critical to
any seagoing vessel. The lifeboat
was damaged beyond repair and
it’s not simply a case of just
replacing the life raft with anoth-
er boat — certain equipment
needed to be in place and
approved under the regulations.

“Because the Port Department
is now aware of these things,
which have to be rectified, I
believe that the captain is working
with the port department to cor-
rect the situation,” he said.

Nevertheless, Ragged Islanders
are ‘so angry over the situation
that a petition is being sent to
Prime Minister Perry Christie and
other ministers alleging victimi-
sation. Ay os

One of them, Charlene Lock-
hart-Bain, said: “This is ridicu-
lous. It is another example of how
Ragged Island is treated like the
Cinderella island of the
Bahamas.”

She said groceries, including
birthday cakes and other items,
were now sitting aboard the mail-
boat at Potter’s Cay.

“Who is going to sustain this
loss?” she asked. “There are
thousands of dollars worth of
goods aboard. It isn’t the boat
captain’s fault, so who is going to
foot the bill?”

She added: “This is the second
time in three months that our
mailboat has been grounded. The
last time they sent a substitute
boat, but our fishermen lost craw-
fish and conch because the whole
lot was spoiled.”

She claimed the replacement
boat had a big hole in it and was
in worse condition than the regu-
lar mailboat.

“There is a very strong feeling



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here that we are being vic-
timised,” she said, “We under-
stand this is a safety issue, but
why wait until everything is
loaded before grounding the
boat?

Fuel

“Our fishermen, who depend .

on the mailboat for fuel, are not
able to go out until it gets here.”
Mrs Maycock said that,
because the boat was not running,
she had to charter a plane for
$2,800 to get her family to Nassau
for a funeral. With no regular air
service to the island, she had no
choice but to hire an aircraft.
Captain Etienne Maycock of



Damaged

the Captain C told The Tribune
last night that his boat had been
grounded for alleged minor
infringements. He said he had
been told “a couple of things” on
the boat were outdated.

However, he was aggrieved
because he felt all boats should
have been subjected to the same
treatment. He said he was pre-
vented from operating while oth-
er vessels were allowed to leave
the dock.

“They (ministry officials) came
without notice. I am the only one
they stopped,” he said. Howev-
er, he believes his cargo will be
saved because of his refrigeration
facilities.

Captain Maycock accepted that

some boats needed upgrading.
But he said higher fuel costs were
preventing maintenance work
being done. .
- The mailboat association is
believed to be seeking higher gov-
ernment. subsidies to meet
increased running. costs.

boats remain

ALMOST a year after hurricanes
Francis and Jeanne hit the Bahamas,
boats damaged during the storms
remain at Potter’s Cay Dock. The Tri-
bune has brought attention to these
vessels, but the boats: have yet to be

removed. :

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

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tions on behalf of Hurricane Katrina victims.

A spokesman said yesterday that all funds received in the
Bahamas will be sent to the American Red Cross through the
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eties.

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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited



NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI





Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt .

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

LAST WEEK The Ministry of Financial
Services and Investments — “billed as the
ministry on the move” — published an inter-

esting tabloid supplement outlining its achieve-

ments and the major foreign direct invest-
ments, either approved or awaiting approval.

After reading about Bermuda’s tremen-
dous success as the world’s insurance Mecca
and its secret of attracting business, we read
Minister Allyson Maynard Gibson’s statement
in her ministry’s supplement in which she said
that the Bahamas’ “environment for invest-
ment opportunities remains robust, and the
government continues to commit to encour-
aging foreign direct investment and its policy
of the implementation of anchor develop-
ments in the Family Islands.” .

A few days later the following Tribune
headline caught our eye:

“Bureaucracy stalls $3.6m investment for
two years — developers pinpoint lack of coor-
dination and problems with Lands and Surveys
for holding back eco-tourism resort”.

The reference was to Flamingo Nest resort.

We then went back to the ministry’s special
supplement to get a progress report on Flamin-
go Nest resort, the only anchor development
proposed for Inagua. Flamingo Nest was list-
ed under “approved projects not commenced”.

Since the Christie government came to pow-
er in May, 2002 much has been ‘heard about
this Ministry’s red carpet. It was a carpet laid
down to smooth the way to the one-stop-shop

that was to welcome investors, cut through .

all red tape and poy their investment
approvals.

However, there must be something wrong
with that carpet — it probably should go back
to the manufacturers — because we have
heard nothing but complaints about its many
pitfalls.

According to Robert DeRose, assistant vice
president at AM Best: “Bermuda’s growth
and enhanced tourist market position are the
result of the island’s now legendary operating
platform, which enables Bermuda companies

to set-up shop quickly and allows them to

operate with substantial competitive advan-
tages over competitors in the United States
and Europe.”

It seems that the difference between
Bermuda and the Bahamas is that the former
is a land of action, while the latter is a land of
talk. We hear so many complaints from per-
sons trying to do business in the Bahamas that
‘we are convinced that every time an investor
casts his line it is caught in a net of bureau-
cracy.

According to the Ministry of Financial Ser-
vices and Investment the proposals for an eco-
tourism resort at Inagua has been approved.

lo

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May God continue to bless




According to Flamingo Nest development
Corporation it has had official approval for

two years, but can’t turn the first sod of earth .

at Inagua because Lands and Surveys has
failed to determine whether its project has
met the requirements of its leasing contract. If
it gets clearance it can purchase the Crown
Land.

But, said one of the three American partners

' in the development, the project has been on
hold indefinitely because of the problems with -
‘ various government departments. Obviously, :

the red carpet and the one-stop-shop has failed
this company and an island that would wel-
come another employment outlet. Presently
Morton Salt Company is the main employer at
Inagua.

The partner said that the company had wait-
ed four years for a Lands and Surveys official

to survey the property, but no one ever came. -

As a result the company hired a local survey-
or, only to be told that his report would not be
accepted because he was not government
licensed. “So it was a total waste of money,”
said the investor.

Where was the one-stop-shop with its red
carpet and the helping hand?

From time to time government officials

would visit Inagua on a tourism development

' trip, praise Flamingo Nest’s proposed project,

but did nothing to hélp the company: cut
through the red tape. Meanwhile, the com-
pany held off investing money ina property it
didn’t own.

The building permit was another issue. Local

’ Government Council in Inagua issued a build-

ing permit, only to be told by central govern-
ment in Nassau that it had no authority to do
so. All permits to a foreign company have to

. be issued from Nassau.

Another problem was the death of the.com-
pany’s Bahamian partner, who willed his inter-

est to his daughter. However, she is having

difficulty getting the necessary documents
transferred into her name.

One of the American partners said they
were encouraged to invest in the Bahamas,
but they have had to put their investors on
hold because they can’t in good faith invite

people to invest in something knowing that so _

many things are still up in the air.

And so the Ministry’s listing of Flamingo
Nest as an investment that has been approved
is misleading. It seems that the ministry’s red
carpet has been pulled from under the Nest. It
would be interesting to know how many oth-
er projects listed in this supplement are having
similar problems.

Can one imagine such things being allowed
to happen in Bermuda’s efficient business cen-
tre?
































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Suggestions on
tackling illegal
immigration

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I HEREBY offer my third

chapter on the issue of illegal
immigration for your consid-
eration, as promised. This
part will deal with the solu-
tion/s as I see it, to this very
serious problem, but it is not
a fix all compilation nor is it
an exhaustive list, but rather
a guideline. Assuming that I
haven’t worn out my wel-
come, I thank you.in advance
for your accommodation.
Bahamians, and .our gov-
ernment, need to understand
that this vexing quandary of
illegal immigration is not oné
that will be fixed easily, or
without the utmost dedica-
tion. Quite frankly, I don’t
see this thing being fixed.

' Illegal immigration has sim-

ply become an accepted fact
of life to many Bahamians,

~ and to every government that

has ever occupied our hal-
lowed halls.of Parliament.

Nevertheless, here are my
basic guidelines:

1) There. must be an ulti-
matum issued by govern-
ment, stating that all immi-.
grants have a time limit (that
will be predetermined) in
which they must register with
the appropriate authority, for
legal status. This includes all

children born illegally in this*

country as well. They will be
issued an ID of some sort
that will indicate that. their

application is pending, and

therefore immune ‘to immie-
diate deportation upon detec-
tion. Residency in this coun-
try of at least 10 years will
have to be proven. Anybody
not able to qualify, needs to
get their affairs in order, in
expectation of beng deport-
ed.

.2) An additional ultimatum
must be issued to Bahamians
who employ illegal aliens as
their main labour force, stat-
ing that they also have a pre-
determined time period with-
in which they must cease and
desist from this practice. Fail-
ure to do so will result in
heavy fines. An efficient
process (who am I kidding)
by which Bahamians may
apply on behalf of foreign
nationals for their legal'work-
ing status in this country must
be put into place.

3) Immediately after the
grace period expires, there
will be sweeps carried out to
detect, detain, and deport
illegals. These sweeps will

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etters@tribunemedia.net



come under the Immigration
Department, but they will be
backed up by Police and
heavily armed Defence Force
personnel. Why the Defence
Force? Because of too many
reports of illegal weapons
being hidden in these shanty
towns where a lot of illegals
live. There must be an order
issued stating that there, must
not be any violence or the
threat thereof perpetrated
upon the arresting authori-
ties. Any such action will be
met with counter measures.

4) There may be allowed:

international observers —
except for Jimmy Carter —
who. will not interfere, but
rather observe and report.
This will help to keep our

guys in line in the execution

of this duty. On second
thought, scrap the outside
observers. Too many bleed-
ing hearts that think the
Bahamas is simply supposed
to maintain an open door
policy, without complaint,
towards illegal immigration.

5) . After the very long
and tedious job of cleaning
up this mess, land must :be
made available to the quali-
fying immigrants, which they

can purchase. at a very..com-.
fortable fee; and upon which:

they can build in accordance
with the building codes of
this country. Or, if they wish,
they may build in existing
communities along the same
guidelines that Bahamians
have to follow.

6) Our borders have to be
sealed. Well, actually that is
almost impossible due to our
geographical layout, but we
have to find ways in. which to

clamp down on the future.

influx of illegal immigrants,
who must be immediately
returned from whence they
came.

These are very basic guide-

‘lines, but you get the picture

right? This will be a very
involved process, one that
will require not only dedica-
tion, but sustainability. A
simple raid from time to
time, on the whim of some
politician i is not good enough.
Sure, such tactics get rid of
a few illegals, but by the time

' we get around to the next

raid, many of those illegals
have already returned.

. Governments are good at
appointing committees, and
our present government is no
exception. I hope the com-
mittee being appointed to
“look into” the situation of
illegal immigration here in
Abaco is looking at ways to
implement a policy by which
the illegals can be removed,
rather than trying to estab-
lish whether or not we have a
problem, because that would
be a jolly good waste of tax
payer dollars, wouldn’t it?

Just as sure as my Ma
named me William, this ille-
gal immigration problem will
be a permanent.one. And
problems, when left
unchecked, become worse
and worse.

_Unfortunately, come elec-
tion time in 2007, all we gat is
PLP or FNM, and the two a
dem mix up right now. We
ain sure who is da leader in
either one. And, neither one
of them has shown any real
zeal-in even trying to fix this
problem.

So, now what? The best
advice I can give you is to
pray, hard. The problems fac-
ing this country right now,

‘especially this one of illegal

immigration, is just as much
the fault of complacent lead-~:
ership, both present and past,
as it is the fault of those actu-

_ ally physically perpetrating.

the problems...
God help us! How much
more are we supposed to be

“expected to take?

Oh, one more thing. I
heard it said that there area
lot of Bahamians who are
afraid to tackle this problem
because they are scared that
they will be “fixed” by.
Haitians and their voodoo,
or obeah. ©

I simply refuse to accept .
that. It is too,stupid of a sug-
gestion for me to consider. It
simply cannot be true that we
have Bahamians, supposed-
ly a Christian people, who
are afraid of a less powerful
force, even if it is only in

' their minds.

Again, God help us!

WILLIAM (BILLY)
ROBERTS, |
Defender of the realm.
Abaco,

Bahamas,

September Ts 2005,

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 20vs, r.



NN ————EEe
Panel voices concern |
over homosexuality |

among young women

Industry
veterans set.
for medal
honour —

THE coveted Bahamahost
Medal will be awarded to 10
industry veterans, it has been
announced.

Since 1978, 23,000 persons
have graduated from the
Bahamahost programme “and
have gone on to make mean-
ingful contributions to the
hospitality industry,” accord-
ing to the Ministry of
Tourism.

Top honours will be given
Sir Clement T Maynard,
founder of the Bahamahost
programme.

The committee has also
announced that Mrs Iris Fin-
layson will receive special
recognition for her assistance
during the Bahamahost
design and structuring phase.

Other receiving awards are:

e Julia Burnside - senior
manager at the Ministry of
Tourism

e Renee Mayers - director
of human resources at the
Ministry of Tourism

¢ Berkley Pilgrim - trainer

° Andrew Curry - educator
and music director

¢ Telzena Coakley - retired
educator

Bradley Bain - tennis train-
er and educator

° Iris.Dean - retired educa-
tor and trainer

e Beverley Saunders - vice
president, Atlantis, trainer

¢ Athama Bowe - Ministry
of Tourism consultant, train-
er. hie

The winners will be pre-
sented with the Bahamahost
Commemorative Medal by
Governor General Dame Ivy
Dumont during an awards
ceremony at Government
House on Friday, September
16, at 6pm.

Minister of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe will address the
awards ceremony.

In expressing his continu-
ous support for the pro- ¢
gramme and the training and
education department of the
Ministry of Tourism, Mr’:
Wilchcombe recognised and
congratulated those being ~
honoured for their pioneering
contributions to tourism and
the high standards they have
set.

TV SCHEDULE

THURSDAY
SEPTEMBER 15

16:30am Community Pg./1540
11:00 — {mmediate Response
‘| 12:00 ~ ZNS News Update
i Caribbean Today News
Update

- Immediate Response Cont'd.

Ethnic Health America

Spiritual Impact

Mr. Ballooney B.

Treasure Attic

Bishop Leroy Emmanuel

Gilbert Patterson

Video Gospel

Gospel Grooves

ZNS News Update

Caribbean News Line _

Legends Whence We Came:

Anthony Carroll

Caribbean Newsline

News Night 13

The Bahamas Tonight

Native Stew

Da’ Down Home Show

Black.College Talent Hour
* News Night 13

The Bahamas Tonight

Immediate Response

Community Page

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves

the right to make last minute
programme changes!

@ By KARAN MINNIS

THE “serious problem” of homosexuality among
young women is an indication that morality is no
longer a part of Bahamian society, according to
National Youth Advisory Panel chairman Mattie
Nottage.

Speaking at a press conference yesterday, Mrs
Nottage said: “It seems as.if we have become a peo-
ple that are lawless, have no respect for others and
no regard for human life.”

Mrs Nottage said she was referring’ to the fact
that “homosexuality amongst other problems such as
incest, gangs and drugs, are now a serious problem
in the Bahamas among young women.

“We now have a myriad of problems that have
contributed to the continual growth of social ills,”
she said. “The television, music, media, advertise-
ments and the Internet are sending subliminal mes-
sages that target our young people, by introducing
them to perversion, gang violence, homosexuality,
drugs and alcohol abuse.”

Lifestyle

According to Mrs Nottage, the panel, along with
the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture, refuses to
accept homosexuality and lesbianism as a normal
lifestyle.

“We will not lower our moral standards for a few

‘misguided individuals who are confused as to who
_ they are, why they are here and where they are

going. We do, however, empathise with every young
person that has been raped, molested, or lured into
a negative way of life,” she said.

“In recent times, representatives.from this small

. nation have graced international platforms around

the world as a result of significant and noteworthy

accomplishments in the athletic world and music -

industry. However, due to a recent slate of events,
the positive inroads that our young people have



“The television, music, media,
advertisements and the Internet
are sending subliminal messages
that target our young people, by
introducing them to perversion,
gang violence, homosexuality,

_ drugs and alcohol abuse.”



National Youth Advisory Panel
chairman Mattie Nottage

been making are now subject to challenge,” she
said.

“Three out of every ten females that visit the
doctor are diagnosed with some form of sexually
transmitted disease,” she claimed. “Incest, rape and
molestation have reached cataclysmic proportions.
Females are becoming more actively involved in
gangs, namely lesbian gangs, especially in our
schools.”

Mrs Nottage said “the recent tsunami ravaged
Indonesia and caught the attention of an interna-
tional audience, but in our opinion, an even greater
tragedy looms among our nation’s youth.”

“When young people can bluntly and proudly
announce their lesbian lifestyle and expect us, as
the Bahamian society, to accept this as normalcy, this
is a greater travesty,” she said. “We will be silent no
more. We refuse to accept anything that is thrown at
us, such as drugs, alcohol, homosexuality, or anything
else that adds to the moral decay of our nation: We
will not compromise our standards; moral or family
values,” she said. ¢

“The Bahamas stands united on our views on
homosexuality and it should be noted that Freeport
has already launched their campaign and will be
holding their Prayer and Praise Youth Rally on Fri-
day night of this week,” Mrs Nottage said.



Push for tourism integration

UNITED NATIONS, New
York -— Government leaders
joined the heads of major Unit-
ed Nations agencies, civil soci-
ety and the travel industry in a
call for the integration of

? tourism in national aevelons
- ment plans.: id

The Declaration on Tourism
and the Millennium Develop-
ment Goals was endorsed yes-
terday morning and will be pre-
sented to the full UN Summit,
which opened today.

The heads of UNICEF,
UNCTAD, UNDP, ICAO, and
the World Tourism Organisa-
tion endorsed the declaration.

They will join with the 20
countries represented at the
ministerial level to present the
call to the summit session of
the UN General Assembly.

Executive director: of
UNICEF Ann Veneman said
sustainable tourism develop-
ment can protect children of
the world from abuse and
exploitation.

She-urged others to endorse
the declaration.

Secretary General of the UN
Conference on Trade and
Development Dr Supachai

Panitchpakdi. said that as -

investors attach more impor-
tance to local technical skills
and efficient services than to
cheap labour, poorer countries
"will harness their assets of nat-
ural beauty and cultural wealth
for development gains."

Lelei LeLaulu of Counter-

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part International represented
civil society organisations at
the high level Roundtable on
Harnessing Tourism for the
Millennium Development

Goals, held at UNICEF head- .

quarters.,
» LeLaulu called for the teach-

ing of tourism at the elemen-
‘tary school level to ensure that
- the "best and brightest" can

see Careers in the industry "as
the first, and not the last,
resort."

LeLaulu noted that visitors
from richer states take more
cash to the developing coun-
tries than their governments
give in aid, and suggested that
the World Bank and other
financial institutions look at
funding air services to coun-



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tries without reliable airlift.
"These should be seen as
important aerial highways
bringing valuable foreign
exchange — just like the terres-
trial asphalt highways," he said.

_-Francesco ,Frangiallj,. Secres.

tary Generalof.the World

Tourism Organisatidn; under- .
scoring the:size of the world’s >

largest industry, said that last
year, 763 million trips were tak-
en by tourists, who spent $622
billion.

Developing countries

received $177 billion in tourism.

receipts in 2004 which was the
primary source of foreign
exchange earnings in 46 of the
49 poorest nations which the
UN calls the “least developed
countries”.

Strategies being
_ launched to

_ tackle problem
_ of ‘at risk’

_ young women

@ By KARAN MINNIS

THE government is trying to:

get youth groups and churches
involved in a campaign to tackle
the problem of at-risk young
women.

To this end, the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture has
invited youth leaders and church
heads to attend a meeting at 7
o’clock tonight at the Ministry
of Youth.

_The public is also being called
on to join the effort by taking
part in a mass youth prayer and
praise rally this Saturday at 6pm
on Windsor Park.

Effort

At a press conference yester-
day, Minister of Youth, Sports,
-and Culture Neville Wisdom and
National Youth Advisory Panel
chairman Pastor Mattie Nottage

outlined several strategies that:

are being launched in an effort to
protect vulnerable women.

_. They said that over the next
few months, there will be a series
of meetings between the min-
istry and various youth leaders in
a effort to tackle the issue.

According to Mr Wisdom, the
ministry is beginning “to see



@ MINISTER of Youth,
Sports and Culture —
Neville Wisdom.

some very serious challenges and

very serious concerns in connec-
tion with the behaviour of some
of our young women.”

Mr Wisdom explained that the
term “at risk youth” refers to
young persons “whose academic
and social development have
been significantly impaired due
to'serious behavioral challenges,”

He said it also refers to those
who “constantly exhibit delin-
quent behaviour and anti-social
tendencies.”

Mrs Nottage said the Youth
Advisory Council has souyht to
put in place youth programmes
specifically designed to educate,
rehabilitate and transform young
persons who have been exposed

o “negative lifestyles”.

Speaking to the press yester-
day, Mrs Nottage said, “We are
calling on religious and civic lead-
ets to open the doors of your
churches and organisational facil-
ities and, making it readily avail-
able with planned youth activities

' between the hours of 3pm and

5pm.”

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



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Rosetta Street, Palmdale

LOCAL NEWS

‘

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

A leading company has a vacancy for the position of:

Sales Representative

Responsibilities:

To develop consultative relationship with customers and
utilize in-depth knowledge of competitive sales tactics,
efficient operating practices, adequate customer service,
provide advice and assistance to customers in making
business decisions to improve business profitability.

Qualifications & Competencies: __
¢ Bachelor degree in Matketng. 0 Business Administration
or Related Fields.
¢ 4-5 Years of Experience in sales.
¢ Marketing and business skills
° Building Customer Loyalty
¢ Sales ability _
¢ Making Formal presentations.
¢ Leading by example & influencing others.
e Expertise in products, market & industry

6 Proficiency in Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint,

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¢ Strong organizational, oral, and creative writing skills.

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¢ Understanding market research..

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SECURITY supervisor Anthony Plakaris, Mr Munnings;



Sacked staff rejoin
old security fir

a



Acribba Wemyss-Solomon (CEO’s assistant), Gladstone Bur-
rows and security officer Lenamae Cleare.

A GROUP of staff members
who were previously laid off
have rejoined the ranks of
Wemco Security.

_ Some weeks ago, an altered
client contract at Wemco result-
ed in the redundancy of several
employees.

Wemco CEO Henry Wemyss
said: “There is now an upward
trend at Wemco and we are
overjoyed, because our highly
trained staff are this company’s
best assets.

“We are proud to have them
back to continue the process of
building one of the best securi-
ty firms in the Bahamas”.

Among the 10 employees
returning to work at Wemco
Security is woman security offi-
cer Lenamae Cleare, who
protested her layoff on ZNS
television news.

“I couldn’t believe it, because

“everyone recognised. me from

TV,” Said«Ms: Cleare;.“‘but my
experience showed ‘me that
Wemco is the place to be. It is
such a pleasure to be back at

Wemco.”

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Returning security supervisor
Anthony Plakaris noted: “The
training and caliber of a compa-
ny’s people is very important to
its success. I am glad to be called
back and I will continue to serve .
to the best of my ability”.

“T have worked with several
security firms and there is no
comparison to Wemco” said
returning security officer Glad-
stone Burrows

Security officer Christopher
Munnings, now again in charge
of one of Wemco’s most sensi-
tive security areas, said: “Wem-
co may not be the best, but
we’re better than the rest”.

Mr Wemyss said that the
return of the staff members was
the result of positive business
trends for the company and the
fulfillment of a promise he
made. “I told the staff that they
would be back at the first
opportunity. Wemco and our
clients have always appreciat-.
ed their professionalism and
dedication to duty and we.are -
happy to welcome their return
to our winning team.”

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THE TRIBUNE



ni i
Bethel: Government

will not discriminate
against immigrants

IT is government policy not
to discriminate in the delivery of
health care to immigrants —
despite the significant drain this
causes on the medical system.

This was the announcement
of Minister of Health Dr Mar-
cus Bethel yesterday, in respon-
seto findings of the “Report on
the Impact of Immigrants of
Haitian and Other National
Origins on Health Care and
Environmental Services pro-
vided by the Government of the
Bahamas”.

“This report is significant in
that it not only provides current
information on health trends
among immigration popula-
tions, but it also provides an
indication of the extent of usage
of health and environmental
facilities by immigrants and
their communities, bearing in.
mind that health care is regard-
ed as a fundamental right,” Dr
Bethel said.

Relative to child births, the
report reveals that between
1998 to 2003, the total number
of births to mothers of Haitian
origin was 559, (11.2 per cent
of all births), with 3.5 per cent to
mothers of Jamaican origin and
81.8 per cent of births to
Bahamian mothers.

“While our activities in dis-

ease surveillance, prevention.

and control have reduced inci-
dences of transmission of infec-
tious diseases, Haitian immi-
grants currently represent
approximately 28 percent of
HIV/AIDS infections, 21 per-
cent of tuberculosis (TB) infec-
tions, and 67 percent of malaria
infections in the country,” Dr
Bethel said.

Haitian immigrants comprise
34 per cent of total Visits to
antenatal services — however,
this particular service is
accessed more than any other

type of service offered at clinics |

by this population grouping.

The second leading cause of

0



@ DR Marcus Bethel

illness among Haitian immi-
grant in-patients was infectious
and parasitic diseases.

Dr Bethel also disclosed that
the vector control programme
has been included as part of an
expanded project targeting
Haitian communities on New








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Providence that addresses
broader environmental issues,
including clean-up activities and
solid and bulk waste removal.

The current policy clearly lays
out specific fees for non-resi-
dents and residents needing
accident and emergency depart-
ment, and a standard rate for
all other services.

Maternal and child health ser-
vices are free for children up to
five years old. Free services are
also provided for the elderly.

Dr Bethel also stressed that
the Bahamas, which is a mem-
ber of the World Health Organ-
isation (WHO) and the Pan
American Health Organisation
(PAHO), does not discriminate
in health care delivery.

“When you start including
practices that are not consid-
ered humane then you become
blacklisted which then has a
penalty as a part of the inter-
national community of nations.”












THURSDAY, SEF leMwben is, cuue, PAGE /

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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



A few timely suggestions for the

HERE is no question
that difficulties at the
beginning of the year for public
schools is a perennial problem.
Repairs not completed, grounds
not prepared and all personnel

not in place are a constant.
Yet, some years are far worse
than others. The Hon Alfred
Sears, Minister of Education,
has had a succession of poor
school openings since coming
to office. In frustration, the min-

ister has laid the blame at the
feet of the Ministry of Public
Works, which he says lacks the
capacity to effect all the work
needed to ensure that public
school openings are successful.

The minister’s solution is to

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) is
pleased to invite Tenders to provide the Company with Motor

Insurance coverage.

Interested companies/firms may collect a Tender Specification
from BTC’s Security’s Desk located in its administrative building
on John F. Kennedy Drive, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Tenders must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked
“TENDER FOR MOTOR INSURANCE”, and delivered on or

of:

Mr. Michael J. Symonette
President & CEO

‘The Bahamas Telecommunications Conipand Ltd.
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048 .
Nassau, The Bahamas

before 5:00 pm on Friday, September 30, 2005 to the attention

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provide the Ministry of Educa-
tion with its own technical team
to plan and carry public works
to school facilities. | can only
say to the minister that the Min-
istry of Education has been
down the road before and the
same obstacles that prevented
the initiative from succeeding
before remain in place today.
If he has not done so, per-
haps the minister should care-
fully review the files on this
matter and try to determine
exactly why it was the initiative
never quite got off the ground.
I know from experience that
the years with the least
amount of problems are those
when the minister paid close
attention to the preparations
made for school opening and

worked hand-in-hand with a

functioning director of educa-
tion in doing so. This was
especially the case when the
minister was being held to
account by a prime minister

STRAIGHT Up TALK



ZH

who took pride in smooth
school openings.

Successful school openings,
however, should not rely pre-
dominantly on-the vigilance of
political directorates at the lev-
els of ministers and prime min-
isters. This creates too many
possibilities for changing for-
tunes for the public education
system because political direc-
torates come and go.

School openings should rely
instead on a system with built-in
accountability at the level of
local communities. It is with this
in mind that I offer some sug-
gestions to the Minister of Edu-
cation to rid himself of some of
the perennial issues that tend
to plague the education system.

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‘September 15th
Children’s Health
Dr. Percival McNeil

October 20th
Cancer

Dr. Theodore
Turnquest

November 17th
Diabetes
Dr. Christine Chin

December 15th
Managing Stress

& Depression

Dr. Timothy Barrett



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GIVE ELECTED LOCAL
GOVERNMENT MORE
RESPONSIBILITY FOR

SCHOOLS

irst, persuade the gov-
ernment to transfer all
the responsibility of building,
maintaining and repairing

‘schools from the central gov-

ernment to elected local gov-
ernment and give it the capital

‘and recurrent budget to meet

the responsibility.

Think about it, who would
have a greater interest in the
integrity of the schools children
attend than the people who
send them to those schools?

Why wouldn’t we expect peo-
ple who live in a community to
have a keen interest in where a
school is built for their children
in their community, how the
school is built, how it is'main-
tained, and how it is prepared
for school opening?

Who would have a greater
desire to be accountable for
problems that occur with the
school, a politician who lives in
Nassau miles away from watch-
ful, activist parents or local offi-
cials elected by those parents?

For those who say that this is
too heavy a burden to place on
local government and that giv-
ing them such a burden will
result in huge mistakes?--------- --

Well, the burden now rests
on the central government and
it makes mistakes. At times it
even learns from them. People
elected to-local. government °
come equipped with many tal-
ents and no doubt spearhead
operations of their own.

They ,too can make mistakes
and learn from them’and when

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005, PAGE



Ministry of Education

they do, the local community is
that much richer for it. If we
are worried about the abilities
of the people elected to local

government, be sure of this, give .

local government more power
and more serious and capable
people will opt to participate in
it.

GIVE SCHOOL BOARDS
MORE RESPONSIBILITY
FOR SCHOOL OPERA-
TIONS

econd, give school
boards full responsibility
for the security, custodial care,
school supplies and other oper-
ational necessities of their
schools and provide them with
' the recurrent and capital budget
to carry out their responsibility.
Once again, you have people
from the schools’ communities
with a vested interest in their
care who will bring a level of
vigilance that no central author-
_ity can bring. The more power
you give them, the more seri-
ously they will take their
responsibility.

PREPARE PERSONNEL.

PLAN EARLY AND STICK

TOIT

hird, uphold the long-
standing policy of the
Ministry of Education that the
Department of Education have
prepared by May of each year
the personnel plan for proceed-
ing school year.

This plan would include all
placements of admitiistrators,
teachers, guidance counsellors
and custodial staff. By the time
they leave for summer vacation,
all principals, vice-principals,
senior masters, senior mistress-
es, etc should know where they
will be assigned for the upcom-
ing year.

This will avoid the ridiculous
practice of having schools still
waiting to find out who will be
their principals or principals
waiting to find out which will
be their school.at the beginning
ofthé school year. ;

This will. especially prevent

thstances of teachers in the

Family Islands going on sum-
mer break not knowing whether
they will be returning to the
island on which they taught
over the last year.

You say this means a great
deal of adjustment in the sys-

tem, including at the level of.

the Public Service Commission?
So be it! We are talking about
fixing problems in education.

It also means political direc- .

torates being disciplined enough
to resist the temptation to do
political favours for teachers
and others seeking preferential
treatment and doing so no mat-



Give local
government
more power
and more
serious and
capable people
will opt to
participate in it



ter how poorly the tiniing is for
the system or at what cost to it.
Planning is key and, with a good
plan well executed, we can
achieve some extraordinary
results in education.

- HOLD PRE-SCHOOL
OPENING MEETINGS
WITH PARENTS

Fee. how about hold-
ing meetings with par-
ents in advance of school open-
ing to inform them of opportu-

nities and challenges for the:

upcoming year?
There is already a policy in
the Department of Education

’ of meeting with parents of new

students a week in advance of
school opening to orientate
them about the school.

This meeting can be broad-
ened and stretched over a week
to meet with all parents to
update them about unforeseen
problems that arose. Would it
not be better to have met with

parents weeks before school
opening to advise of building.
repair, maintenance and staffing
issues than having to make cri-
sis Management trips to ease
parents’ tension?

Reasonable people prefer to
be informed in advance about
problems so that they can make

‘adjustments where necessary, if

only in their expectations,
rather than being taken by sur-
prise because no-one had the
courtesy to give them prior
notice.

BROADEN THE SEARCH

FOR SCHOOL MAN-
AGERS AND LEADERS

Fie. who says that the
head of a school must

be a veteran educator? Organi- ©

sations are run by management
experts and leaders. It often
does not matter if they come to
the assignment with technical
expertise, so long as they know
the organisation’s mission,
know how to draw out a vision
for the organisation, strategies
for its realisation and marshal
the resources necessary to make
it happen.

A veteran educator may be
principal of a school; especially
if he or she has been thorough-
ly trained for the task of man-
aging and leading an organisa-
tion. Otherwise, if one cannot
find a' veteran educator, hire
someone who is not.

Such.a person will know how
to get the technical expertise
where it is needed. This should-
n’t be so far-fetched because
the minister of education is
often not an educator and relies
on the technical expertise of his
chief adviser,
education and other tech-
nocrats.

Capable management and
leadership personnel at the
head of public schools will avert
many of the perennial problems
the schools face because they
will have the insight, foresight,
fortitude and resourcefulness to
address them proactively.

I can assure you that a com-
petent manager will sound the
alarm about problems in his or
her organisation leading up to a

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major opening long before the
opening arrives.

While I was minister of state
in education | certainly thought
about and discussed with edu-
cation officials many of these
issues. In some instances a plan-
ning process toward seeking.to
have them implemented had
been initiated.

Alas, a year in the ministry
was not enough time to make
much progress. Perhaps Minis-
ter Sears might find the sugges-
tions useful points for his con-
sideration. That is the spirit in
which they are offered.

THOUGHT FOR THE
WEEK

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



5 New Restaurants,
21 New Shops,

All in the heart
of paradise.





eo
A whele new experience has been unveiled on Paradise Island. Marina
Village at Atlantis offers the finest in world-class shopping and dining.
Youll find brand names from around the world offering everything from
exquisite jewelry and timepieces ta resort wear and accessories. After you
visit the 21 boutiques, dine at one of the -new restaurants, with dishes to

satisfy even the most refined palate. The village is situated at the eastern
end of The Marina at Atlantis, just over the Paradise Island Bridge.

ef

“nas “hos

VILLAGE

eb AT

_For.more: information, visit Atlantis.com





‘



FROM page one

condo investment by Erik
Christiansen, Mr Christie
revealed that government has
received an application for
another $150 million invest-
ment for Freeport.

"I have confidence in Grand
Bahama's future," said Mr
Christie.

Old Bahama Bay has
received government approval
to expand the size and scope
of its development, which
includes the construction of a
new luxury hotel, 450 multi-
family condominium units and
the expansion of the marina
facility to 180 slips.

The project also includes
development of 45 to 50
additional single family
home sites and other state-








Ground breaking at resort



















of-the-art amenities.
Attendees included Minister

of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe,

and Grand Bahama Port

M@ PERRY Christie and others at the event

Authority officials, chairman
Julian Francis, co-chairman Sir
Albert Miller and deputy co-
chairman Willie Moss.






(Photo: Denise Maycock)








Pratt defends RBDF review

FROM page one

they termed “a lack of progress”
being made on the recently
announced review board.

The permanent secretary in
the Ministry of National Secu-
rity Mark Wilson said the
review board report would bea
public document.

Mr Wilson said that, as time
goes by, the report will provide
a means by which the public will
be able to assess the govern-
ment’s performance in bringing
about “meaningful and neces-
sary changes” to the force. ~

“Very little in the concerns
expressed: and the questions
raised by this article rises to the

BAHAMAS INSTITUTE OF
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level of information that:is
beyond the easy reach of any
officer of the RBDF,” Mr Wil-
son said.

“On July 29, the minister
announced the review board
and the work schedule of the
board that would extend over
five months and culminate: in
the production of a report by
the end of the year.

“The review board has peut
its work and has, in fact, made a
visit to the Defence Force base
at Coral Harbour,” he said. ‘

Mr Wilson said that specific
reference was made to changes in
the Police Command and:to
salary increases following the
police review. “The Minister of
National Security,” said Mr Wil-

son, “has consistently assured the

law enforcement agencies and
the public of her commitment to
work towards effecting parity in
the pay scales of those agencies

‘and parity of salaries is a focused

concern in the current Public Ser-
vice salary negotiations.”

Mr Wilson hinted that the
complaints could be politically

motivated.

“These . complaints. ‘and
charges come at a time when
salary negotiations are in full’
gear and when the winds of elec-;
tioneering are beginning to stir.
It is difficult to conclude that

“these aré not what ‘these com-

plaints are all about,” he said.

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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Further claims in school
row about unisex shoes



80th Annivers
Saturday, 22nd
alkooe, Wyndham Nassau Resort -

Cocktails at ZOO pm ©
For information call: 362-2922/424-2744 or 356-5460

The Crystal B









Mr. Datrick J. Seymour



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ear



The Government High School
80th Anniversary
Celebrations Committee

Salutes

T.C., BSc., M.A., Ed

A veteran educator for over 55 years
and past Principal of The Government
High School.



tober, 2005

Dinner at 8:00. pm:






The Government High School
80th Anniversary
Celebrations Committee



FROM page one

“When we came to school on
Tuesday last week, they started
looking for people with infrac-
tions of their uniforms and even
‘the girls with boys shoes on’.

“Then (the teacher) made us
stand up in the sun again the fol-
lowing day, saying that we looked
gay in the shoes, and even called
one of my friends gay. The senior
mistress and the principal were
saying that the shoes were unisex
but (the teacher) didn’t care,”
one of the girls claimed.

The second student said: “This
teacher then called me over say-
ing ‘Hey you, gay girl, come
here’. Then I was asked when I
was going to change my shoes,
and I said my mommy don’t have
money to buy me new shoes..So
the teacher then said to go to the
Salvation Army and get some.”

The students said the teacher
in question had already been
approached by parents who
insisted that the “eye and ‘L’
stick” Clark shoes’ that the girls
were wearing were, in fact, unisex
shoes.

Last week, Erin. Greene,
spokesperson for gay rights
organisation the Rainbow
Alliance, said they would launch

their own investigation.

“At the present moment we
are shocked to see this level of
hysteria operating in the public

of conduct,” she said.

One concerned grandmother
called The Tribune last night stat-
ing that her granddaughter had
also informed her of the incident
and expressed her utter outrage
over the actions taken at the
school.

“I never hear about a pair of
sissy shoes in my life,” she said.
“So if I have my head tied up ina
head cloth then am I in a gang?
I’m a woman who likes to wear
her hair short so am J a lesbian?

“Ain’t no-one ga’ get off call-
ing my child a sissy. Even if she is
then that’s her right. How can
you label someone by their cloth-
ing? Everyone knows there are
gay people out there but that’s
their lifestyle. I can’t condemn
no-one for what they do, only.
God can do that.

“I’m only here for the rights of
my child. You need to tell this
teacher, in particular, to stop and

if the principal tells them they can.
wear the shoes, who is this teacher ,

to:say they are sissies for wearing
them?” she asked.

. Permanent secretary in the
Ministry of Education Creswell
Sturrup said the situation should
be addressed in terms of the
school’s dress code and that it
should not be sensationalised as
being a “gay issue”

“The school has policies. ‘I
don’t know why they are trying
to use descriptions of gay and

007 to return to
Bahamas for 21st
movie outing

FROM page one

but also bring substantial
financial gain for the country.

“The benefits will be sig-
nificant, the crews will need
hotel accommodation, food,
beverages. Plus they all get
hefty per diem which they
will spend in the casinos and
at the fish fry,” he said.

Mr Woods said the min-
istry will showcase all of the
Bahamas’ cultural aspects for
the film crews, to perhaps
incorporate into the movie.

“The pre-production phase

begins around the same time ~

as Junkanoo preparations
take place. Junkanoo is a
colourful cultural event, so
there might be a chance that
the production company will
want to include it in the
movie. We will show them
all the Bahamas has to offer,
nothing will be hidden,” he
said.

Although Mr Woods could
not disclose the identity of

the actor selected to follow in .

the footsteps of Pierce Bros-
nan, the director of film said

the production company a
ft

chosen someone less wé!

known: ae
“He ide-younger man, a

very energetic man, who I

Connery,.

of the suave secret agent...

Before the decision was
made to shoot in the
Bahamas, the new 007 movie:
was scheduled to be filmed in.
South Africa. However, after.
the production company Eon:
experienced difficulties
securing shooting locationis,:
the film-makers were forced’
to relocate, the James Bond
website commanderbond.net
reported this week. |

The website further
reported that the film’s direc-
tor Martin Campbell and,

director of photography Phil’

Meheux are currently on
Paradise Island scouting for
suitable shooting locations. .

James Bond is no stranger
to the Bahamas, and Casino:
Royale would ‘be the fran-
chise’s sixth visit to the coun-.
try. ;

In 1965, the film crew Of
Thunderball, including the
first actor to play 007, Sean
visited the
Bahamas where they filmed
scenes in various locations in:
New Providence. and the
Exumas.

Key underwater scenes.
featured in The Spy Who
Loved Me and For Your
Eyes Only were also filmed
in-Bahamian waters, and the

Salutes education system. We are cer- stuff. But I don’t know the facts, believe will bring some fresh 1983 ‘unofficial’ Bond movie’
tain that the Ministry of Edu- as it has not been escalated to energy to the franchise,” he Never Say Never Again was
Mr. Ernest John (E J) cation is aware of its obligation my desk for any reason. This is'a _ said. ‘extensively shot here.
to the bisexual, gay, lesbian, matter to get in contact with the According to reports, The last. Bond film to be
Bowe and transgender youth in the — school’s principal for,” he said. however, British actor shot in the Bahamas was A

A promoter of the Bahamian Credit
Union Movement for almost three
decades and past Principal of the

Government High School.



country, and we are certain
they are actively investigating
this seemingly inappropriate act

However, attempts to reach
the school’s principal Eulease
Beneby were unsuccessful. ‘

Daniel Craig, 37, of movies
such as Road to Perdition,
Elizabeth, has won the part

Licence to Kill in 1989.
Casino Royale is slated for
a late 2006 release.






8Oth Anniversary Gala Banquet
Saturday, 22nd October, 2005

The Crystal Ballroom, Wyndham Nassau Resort

Cocktails at 7:00 pm Dinner at 8:00 pm

For information call: 362+2922/424-2744 or 356-5460







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The Government High School
80th Anniversary
Celebrations Committee

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Salutes

Mrs. Anatol Carridad
Reeves Rodgers

One of the first Bahamians to be
employed as a teacher at The
Government High School and eventually
the first female Head Mistress of the
school.

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Marathon Mall & RND Plaza, Freeport

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& Nine West |
Marathon Mall
wishes to advise —ss—«w™
the public that on
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we will be
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Tel: 356 - 6206/356 - 5971 Tel: 394 - 6254/394 - 6255
Fax: 356 - 6206 Fax: 394 - 6211

: FINANCING AVAILABLE

We will RE-OPEN on
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16th.











THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005, PAGE 13
THE TRIBUNE

hl

"Reigate,
IO pitta
Lyle te,

e

Appearing will be various gospel artist such as:
Christian Massive, Shabbak, Voices Of Praise,
___ Bahamas Harvest Praise Team, Five Porches
_ Believers Faith Chain Breakers, Dance Grou





PAGE 14, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005

THE TRIBUNE:



# By ATHENA DAMIANOS

UNTIL SGT 1554 Mather
and her team arrived, a pocket
of the St Thomas More con-
stituency off East Shirley Street
could best be described as
‘Streets of The Lost.’

In this neighborhood of the

underprivileged, gamblers and
other dubious characters,
youngsters played truant and
used their free time to practise
graffiti art, fight and steal fruit
from people’s yards.

They left their identities on
many a shop and office wall.

Strange names like Eyes

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(IMAGING DEPARTMENT)

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Ultrasound training and competency

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Excellent customer service skills
Excellent written and-oral.
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The successful candidate will:

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x-ray procedures;
Rotate and/or cross-train through
various modalities.



Excellent benefits

Salary. commensurate. with experience

‘



Please: submit letters to: Human Resources Department
Doctors Hospital | P.O. Box N-3018 |. Nassau, Bahamas



VISA and Mast
John $. George Company Limited Main B
Phone: 242-322-



LOCAL NEWS

How the police are bringing hope

Done, Mr Screw, Spinal, Stut-
ter, Little Man, DPG (Dog
Pound Gangster), Kill Cops,
Garlic and Mob or Get Rob. |

They range in age from six to
15 - young brothers tagging
along with older siblings.

“It was really frustrating,”
said an office manager at a
nearby business. “Every time
we tried to beautify our build-
ing, crack users from the alleys
stole our plants. We have actu-
ally padlocked our hibiscus to
the walls.

“Then the kids came along
and started defacing our nice,
freshly painted walls. I was
about to give up.”

The office manager probably
would have given up — as other
businesses in the area did.

However, a few days later, a
Kemp Road Urban Renewal
Project police car pulled into
the office parking lot. The car
idled in the lot for a few min-
utes; the three policemen inside
looked around and then left.

The next day, it returned.

Sgt Mather went into the

office and introduced herself.

She explained that she and
her team — Constables 2214
Brooks and 2756 Burrows - had
been given the task of protect-
ing and reforming the area —
and reform the area they would.

Listening to this no nonsense
woman from Harbour Island,
the manager believed her.

Within two weeks, the
“Kemp Road cops” rounded up
a group of the young graffiti
artists and gave them a stern
talking to.

Then, Sgt Mather called upon
the various shop and office peo-
ple and told them if they sup-
plied the paint, the youngsters
would apply a fresh coat. They
would be held responsible for
their actions.

Not only have the youngsters
turned their “art” skills to good
use, but they have apologised
to the business people.

According to Sgt Mather,
these are not hard-boiled little
gangsters, but children crying

it‘for lové and-attention: ~~"

Many of them; she said, come
from single parent homes and

. that parent is frequently absent.

They are often hungry and to
them, heaven means going to

Officers from the Kemp Road |
Urban Renewal Project are making
a difference to children’s lives



I KEMP Road Urban Renewal Project — police touring the area _

sleep with a full stomach.

One businessman was so
moved by the plight of these
youngsters that, after they
painted over their graffiti, he
bought each of them a pair of
shoes and a hot meal.

The youngsters have devel-
oped a deep affection for their
police guardians.

They spent the summer
school break at the community
police station on St James Road
where they were supervised by
the police.

In a large room with chairs
and tables borrowed from a
nearby church, the children
learned shell and floral art from
Sgt Mather, a talented teacher.

Sgt Mather and her officers
practice drills for the marching
youth band they are determined
to form:

“Come September, this street
is going to be empty. Every

child is going to be in school. .

Not one child will be left
behind,” she vowed.

“We have told the parents
that if their children are not in
school, they wilkbe prosecuted
to the full extent of the law.
There is no reason why these
children shouldn’t be in
school.”

Const Brooks agrees. He
points out that it’s illegal to
leave minors unattended, and
it’s time the parents are made
responsible for their children.

‘The problem is these chil-
dren have too much spare time
by themselves,’ he says.

‘Most of them come from sin-
gle homes. A lot of these par-
ents are unemployed and are at
home, but don’t supervise or
check for their children. They
have no discipline. They’re just
left to run loose.’

Many of the parents are
known to Social Services. They
will take food stamps and sell
them, using the money to buy
gin from a nearby liquor store.

Their children scrounge for
food, annoying people outside

‘the nearby shops with ‘spon-

sorship’ forms.
Some of the mothers roam

the streets at night. Some are

on the road gambling while
Spinal and Kill Cops are leaving
their signatures on the walls at
the néarby shopping centre.

Sgt Mather is enthusiastic
about the youngsters’ potential.

“You should see the good-
ness you can get out of these
children, but no-one’s checking
for them. So they’re going out
there to scrap for what they
have.”

Sgt Mather brought a child
who recently lost a parent into
her fold and used tough love to
win him over.

“He was so excited. On his
birthday, we decorated the sta-
tion with crepe paper and
ordered pizza. I got him a cake.
He said he never had a cake in
his life.”





The number of ‘police chil-
dren’ has grown from 12 to 28.

Sgt Mather and her team
have a lot of work to do.

Not far away, a crack user
wheels a stolen food store trol-
ley down the street in broad
daylight. It’s full of stolen
plants.

The adults are on the road
throwing dice.

The children have returned
to school. They will need help
with their homework.

But the “Kemp Road cops”
are undaunted.

This is a new breed of police
officers who are using old-fash-
ioned discipline and tough love
to turn potential “bad boys’ into
productive citizens.

With public support, hegre can:
make significant inroads.

,



M@ POLICE officers of the Urban Renewal Project take a look:
around a run-down home in the Kemp Road area.

‘Come and try our for the National Choir of The Bahamas

‘Monday, September 26, 2005
College of The Bahamas, Music Block
@ storey building opposite McDonalds)

7:30. pm

Must be at least 25 years old. No upper age limit.

Come prepared to sing a song.

Only those accepted may participate in a Choral Workshop to be
conducted by Dr. Jefferson Johnson, Director of Choral Activities at
the University of Kentucky, to be held in Nassau on October 21 and
22, 2005. |

For further information call 356-2691/2 or

302-4512.



GZ
g
Ce
Y

MldaserrserrrnanitlON



THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, SEPT EMBEH 19, 2UU5, FAGe «Lu

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a REV Butler chats with Ms Tucker of Culmers Alley, while Sgt 1554 Mather and Frank Smith
look on

(Photos: Mario
Duncanson/ Tribune Staff)

What you ap do

DON’T throw away that old couch.

The Kemp Road Urban Renewal Project is a
shell of a two story building, furnished with a
few chairs and tables borrowed from a nearby
church.

The project can use anything.

Books for children ages six to 15, craft kits
and supplies, chairs and tables — even a sec-
ond hand generator — would be welcome.

Unlike the conventional stations, the project

‘does not have a standby generator.

Some of these children go to school on an
empty stomach. Staples such as grits and rice
also would be appreciated.

However You Exercise

Receive an umbrella FREE from SEVEN SEAS with the purchase of
two bottles of SPORTFLEX from any foodstore or pharmacy.

Just bring the empty bottles of SPORTFLEX to
Bahamas Supply Agencies Ltd, located in the BAKCO Building opposite
Ebenezer Church, Shirley Street, Nassau and collect your FREE umbrella.

Offer limited to 1 umbrella per person. * Offer good while stocks last.

Distributed in The Bahamas by

Bahamas Supply Agencies Ltd.

(Opposite Ebenezer Methodist Church)
East Shirley Street ¢ Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 393-2966 °Fax: (242) 393-2523

HARBOUR BAY.
(242) 3945767 «

MALL AT MARATHON |
42) 393 6073

ABACO(242) 367°5792 ,





PAGE 16, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





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LOCAL NEWS



Conference

for c



urch

leaders in
Florida

MIAMI, Florida — The.

Bahamas Consulate General in
Miami hosted a mini-pastoral
conference to help boost soli-
darity among Bahamian-Amei-
icans living in Florida.

About 20 Bahamian-Ameri-
can pastors and youth leaders
took part in the conference
which was held under the
theme: “Reconnecting with our
heritage and roots”

The pastors represented com-
munities from as far away as
Lakeland, Florida.

The conference was one of
many programmes being spear-
headed by Consul General
Alma Adams in an effort to
promote Bahamian unity in
South Florida.

It-is the first of a series. of
events expected to be sponsored
by the Bahamas Consulate. in
Miami in the upcoming months.

‘ Opening the conference, Con-

sul General Adams, reminded
the pastors of the important part
Bahamian migrants played in

- the history of South Florida and

the establishment of ‘the char-
ter of the City of Miami...

A group of Bahamians were
invited to act as signatories of
the charter in 1896.

Mrs Adams also recalled how
Bahamians were instrumental

in the establishment of many
early black churches in Dade
County and throughout South
Florida.

“Our forefathers came bearintg
gifts — skills of talented masons,
carpenters, whose workmanship
is evidenced particularly in the
Coconut Grove and Perrine
area, to name a few.”

Ministry of Health Parlia-
mentary Secretary Ron Pinder
told the religious leaders and
youth representatives that they

are much more than pilgrims or, °
migrants who have moved from:

one land to another.
“You are more than a’mere

social grouping who come
together from time to time to:
celebrate special events and.
anniversaries; you are in’fact’
representatives and ambas-
sadors; representatives of the
Bahamian people and ambas-

sadors from the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas to the United
States of America,” he said:

' Round table discussions led

by Mr Pinder focused on the
theme: “As leaders and citizens,

what do you want for your
country, the Bahamas?”

The conference was held on
September 1 at the Club Room |
at the Mark Yacht Club in Mia-

Share your news:

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their

neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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The Tribune _

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005

SECTION





business@tribunemedia.net



tocks, Analysis, Wall

BUSINESS

Miami Herald Business,

treet

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|@ Bank of The Bahamas

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m By YOLANDA

unique for them to spend mon-

the next two to five years we

@ By. NEIL HARTNELL just

how disadvantaged

‘Something new Peele uraiaratec

needed for S2bn Fame): building
aStiomyysrerrs industry stalled

Association’s money.

DELEVEAUX
Senior Business
Reporter

VERNICE WALKINE, the
Ministry of Tourism’s direc-
tor-general, said yesterday that
the industry’s goal was still to
generate $2 billion in rev-
enues, a feat it was on track
to accomplish in 2004 prior to
the hurricanes.

To reach that. mark, Ms

Walkine said, along with an

increase in arrivals numbers,
the Ministry would like to see
spending for stopover visitors,
who average a four night stay
or more, increase to $1,000,
with spending by cruise pas-
sengers increasing to $100.

“If we can get visitors to
spend $1 more, that's some-
thing for people to think
about; that's $5 million right
there,” she added.

In an intetview with The Tri-

bune, Ms Walkine said raising
the level of visitor spending
will require the creation of

ey on"

As part of the Ministry’ s ini-
tiative going forward, there
will be a significant thrust
towards the creation of new
attractions, tours and restau-
rants.

Faced with a number of
issues that need to be
addressed before the industry
will be able to realise substan-
tial growth, Ms Walkine iden-
tified five of the most impor-
tant areas.

Properties

Visitor research had shown
that Nassau/Paradise Island
needed more properties posi-
tioned in the mid-price range
of the market, while Grand
Bahama needed more room
inventory.

In terms of the cruise indus-
try, Ms Walkine said Nassau's
cruise port needs to be
expanded and Grand Bahama
needs a new port facility. “If
these things can happen over

will be in good shape,” she
said. .

Ms Walkine also identified
Nassau International Airport
(NIA) as a key component of
the industry's continued suc-
cess that is in need of urgent
attention. As part of the com-
mittee, along with members of
the Ministry of Transport and
the Airport Authority, that is

in negotiations with Vancou-.

ver Airport Services (YVR)
for the contract to manage
NIA, Ms Walkine said she was
aware that the committee was
close to concluding discussions
with them and.

Addressing the graduation
ceremony of the BahamaHost
programme, held at Super-

‘clubs Breezes, Ms Walkine

said the continuing develop-
ment of airlift, particularly
low-cost carriers, into the des-
tination is also an area that the
Ministry will monitor and
encourage going forward.
The knock-on effect has

SEE page 6B

Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian Contractors .

Association (BCA) has told The
Tribune that its push for a Local
Preference Act to ‘level the
playing field’ with foreign con-
tractors has been delayed, after
Deloitte & Touche said it was
unable to compile a study criti-
cal to moving the initiative for-
ward.

Terrance Knowles, the

BCA’s president, said the Min af

istry of Financial Services an
Investments was seeking infor-
mation from the Association on

Bahamian companies were in
comparison to foreign contrac-
tors before they would move
forward on a Local Preference
Act.

The BCA had last year hired

Deloitte & Touche to perform .

such a study, which would have
quantified the extent to which
Bahamian companies were
operating at a disadvantage.
“That really is the document

we need to move forward,” Mr _

Knowles said:. However,
Deloitte & Touche had told the

BCA it was “unable to compile

it for us” and returned the

As a result, Mr Knowles said
the BCA will now have to
“source another consulting firm
to do it on our behalf”.

Mr Knowles had previously
told The Tribune that the BCA
wanted to know whether it was
competing at a “5 per-cent or 10
per cent” disadvantage against
foreign contractors, some of
whom had not been paying
business licence fees.

Amendments to the Business
Licence Act have/attempted to
combat this, with foreign con-

SEE page 2B

Bank of the Bahamas

wins top global award

BANK of the Bahamas International has achieved

“something new and fresh and



Bahamian engineers, builders must link-up

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN contractors and engineering
firms must jink-up in a “syndicate” if they hope
to defeat international competitors and win
major contracts from developers of multi-mil-
lion dollar investment projects, a senior Baha
Mar Development Company executive said yes-
terday.

Robert Sands, vice-president of administra-
tion and external relations for the $1.2 billion
Cable Beach developer, told the Bahamas Soci-
ety of Engineers that “co-operation” among
Bahamian companies was the only way they
could “take advantage of opportunities” pro-
vided by tenders for major investment contracts.

He added that in comparison to major multi-
national companies, who often responded to
Requests for Proposal (RFP) tenders on such
contracts, by themselves Bahamian construction
and engineering companies often lacked the

manpower and administrative resources to com-

pete. ‘ “a

There were also issues, over indemnification
and putting up performance bonds and insur-
ance, Mr Sands said. “Are companies prepared to

indemnify companies such as Baha Mar for ongo-'

ing liability issues that arise?” he queriéd.

Mr Sands said: “I believe that [this is} the way
forward for a number of Bahamian engineering
and construction companies. There is no question
in my mind that you have the expertise, the abil-

ity, the know-how, but do you have the financial .

wherewithal to back you up and support you if
things go wrong?

“Then there is] managing to execute in a time-
ly fashion and the financial resources to fund
your project, not depending on the timelines of
the company that has contracted you.”

Mr Sands added: “To me, an opportunity can
exist, but it only exists if Bahamian: contractors

SEE page 8B

a first for the Bahamas, being named as one.of the
world’s top financial institutions by The Banker
magazine, which presented it with the coveted coun-
try Bank of the Year Bracken Award for 2005.

A spokesman for The Banker said that in the six
years the award has been in. existence, no other
Bahamian bank has been considered.

More than 500 institutional financial services
providers entered, hoping to make the list that is

published annually by the magazine, a member of .

the Financial Times group.

Bank of the Bahamas International won one of
the 128 coveted awards, which was presented during
a black tie banquet in London that drew top finan-
cial players from around the world.

“Bank of The Bahamas International’s successful
performance has been reflected in good:overall
growth, return to positive profit increase and double-
digit ROE (Return on Equity),” The Banker’s Coun-
try Awards report declared.

“The bank is growing at a fast pace, planning to
expand outside the country, and its assets have gone
from $193 million in 1999 to just below $400 million
earlier in 2005.” By the end of June, Bank of the

. Bahamas International’ s assets had leapt to $450

million.

‘Paul McWeeney, Bank of the Bahamas Titerna- :

tional’s. managing director, received the Bracken
award at the London:event. The award is a bust of

SEE page 8B



#@ STEPHEN TIMEWELL (right), editor-in- -
chief of the Banker magazine, presents the coveted
Bracken Award for country Bank of the Year 2005 .
to Paul McWeeney, managing director 0f Bank of
the Bahamas International, during a gala event in
London on September 6. It was the first time a
Bahamian bank was recognised. More than 500
financial institutions entered, hoping for a spot on
the:world’s best banks list published annually by The

Insurance Act
set to remove
‘undesireables’
from industry

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A BAHAMIAN insurance
broker said he hopes the new
Insurance Act and accompany-
ing regulations will remove

“undesireables” from his pro-
fession, particularly those who
are totally unqualified or lack
the qualifications for the insur-
ance they are writing.

Bruce Ferguson, the
Bahamas Insurance Brokers’
Association’s vice-president,
told the Rotary Club of Nas-
sau: “Unfortunately, there are
still a number of brokers out
there who are either totally
unqualified or who are unqual-
ified for the type of business
they are writing, for example,
life & health brokers writing
property insurance.

“It is, however, hoped that
the new Insurance Act and
Regulations will clear out most
if not all of these undesirables.”

‘Mr Ferguson, who was speak-
ing to Rotarians on the topic of
insurance and hurricanes, said
the impact from Hurricane Kat-
rina and other storms to impact
the Caribbean and US in the
past few years showed why it
was important for Bahamians
to use an independent, quali-
fied broker.

He added: “I say ‘indepen-

dent’ because some of the
largest so-called brokers in the
local market have very incestu-
ous conflicts of interest, either

owning an insurance company

or being owned by it.”

Mr Ferguson said it was “too:

early” to make any assessment

of Hurricane Katrina’s impact ©

on the future cost and avail-
ability of hurricane insurance
in the Bahamas, especially as

there were still two-and-a-half .
-months of hurricane season to

run.

Total insured losses caused
by Katrina were already pre-
dicted at between $25-$40 bil-
lion, making the storm the
costliest natural disaster in his-
tory and far surpassing the costs
of Hurricane Andrew in 1992.

Mr Ferguson reminded
Rotarians that many insurance
companies pulled out of writ-
ing hurricane-related. business
in the Caribbean region follow-
ing Andrew, making it very dif-
ficult to offer hurricane insur-
ance. The’ company he then
worked for had to stop writing
new storm-related business for a
year until capacity came back
in.

“The local insurance indus-
try, while very reliant on for-
eign reinsurers for capacity and

SEE page 8B

Banker, part of the Financial Times group



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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





IT workers must add value
through skills eee

ny organisa-
tion that has
ever been in
the market for
a Network
Administrator, Software
Developer or any skilled IT
position for that matter, quick-
ly comes to realise that there is
a desperate shortage of skilled
IT professionals in the
Bahamas. Sure, there are lots

of people who respond to ads

for IT-related jobs, but few

possess the necessary skills to

get the job done.

In a growing and developing
nation such as the Bahamas,
this represents a very real prob-
lem, particularly for companies
that depend on IT to stay in
business. Study after study has
shown that more than any oth-
er ingredient, skilled IT pro-
fessionals are the key to obtain-
ing any real value from IT
investments.

If you are in the IT field, this

represents a tremendous

opportunity to not only help
develop our nation, but also to
add tremendous value to your
organisation and attract higher

‘salaries while you are at it.

However, it also represents a
very real challenge to ensure
that your skill level is where it
needs to be.

In this article, I will share
some simple steps you need to
take to ensure your skill level
gets to where it needs to be and
stays there.

Certification Required .

Based on an informal count,
it would appear that few local
IT professionals are actually
certified in their chosen area
of specialism. The explanation
often given is that some of the
best people in the field are not
certified, and that some of the
certified people are really not
all that good.

While this argument may be
true in a small percentage of
cases, certification is not

optional, in my view. More
than anything, it demonstrates
to your employer and to your
peers that you possess the nec-

_ essary discipline and commit-
ment to prepare for, and pass,

an internationally- recognised
series of exams.
Moreover, no matter how
good you think you are,
becoming certified helps to test
all facets of your knowledge-
base and can reveal holes you
may not even be aware of.

By Tan 1 Hepburn |



Beperioace Required

Contrary to what appears to

be popular opinion locally, cer-
tification only brings you to the
starting line in the IT profes-
sion. On its own, it is not a tick-

et to high salaries and guru sta- -

tus. Only now can you begin
the hard work of gaining the
necessary experience that must
be added.in large amounts to
your certification to be of any
real value.

In my view, the IT profes-

sion can learn much from the
legal and accounting profes-
sions in this regard. Getting
called to the Bar or passing
your CPA is only the begin-

‘ning to years of study and
understudy towards becoming

respected in the field.
Unlike the legal and account-

ing professions, however, IT.

professionals have the added
challenge of ensuring their cer-
tifications are kept current
every two or three years, I can-
not'stress enough that re-certi-
fication is not optional. Too
often, IT professionals contin-

_ ue to highlight certifications on

resumes that have long since
expired.

Managing Others -

The reward for acquiring the
necessary certifications and
technical experience is often a
promotion from managing
yourself to managing others.
Without a doubt, this is one of
the most difficult transitions
you will face in your IT career.
_ The difficulty comes.as a
result of the dramatic shift in
the way your performance is
measured. No longer is your

job to be the best with the tech-

nology, but to build and man-
age a team of IT professionals

_who are able to deliver value.

Key to your success will be
recognising three key shifts: (1)
team performance.is more
important than your personal
performance; (2) time spent
developing your team is more

important than time spent
sharpening your own technical
skill; and (3) rely on others to

get things done and not jump .

to do it yourself.

IT managers who do not
recognise and embrace these, -
shifts continue to act and per-_
form like nothing more than |
expert technicians, miss the real
opportunity to add value, and
often become frustrated and
burnt-out.

Get Started.

Without doubt, the IT pro-
fession is one of the most excit-
ing places that any bright mind |
can make into a rewarding
career. The key, however, is to
ensure your skill level gets to
where it needs to be and stays.
there. It will take lots of study,
examination, hands-on experi-
ence and career transitions, but
in the end you can help to
develop a nation, add real val-
ue to your organisation and get
paid well while you are at it.

To provide feedback on this

‘column, please e-mail makin-

glTwork@providencetg.com

About the Author:

fan Hepburn is the founder
and managing director of Prov-
idence Technology Group, one

‘of the leading IT firms in the

Bahamas. Providence Tech-
nology Group specialises in net-
working solutions, consulting
and advisory services and soft-
ware solutions.

Preference Act

FROM page one

tractors now réquiréd to pay'1 per cent of the Valué of each contract
they obtain to the Government.

However, the BCA sees.a Local Preference Act, similar to legislation
in force in Dade County, Broward County and Palm Beach’ County i
Florida, as critical to enabling them to compete on more level terms.

Bahamian companies see foreign contractors as access to greater man-
power resources and lower borrowing costs, as in the US they can obtain
financing at interest rates of 3 per cent, compared to the 8-9 per cent rates
commonly encountered in this nation.

US contractors were able to bring in equipment on leases, unlike their
Bahamian counterparts, and the bonds on leased equipment aré relatively
expensive for companies in this nation.

Meanwhile, Bahamian contractors had made progress in obtaining
contracts from foreign developers to work on major investment pro-
jects. Mr Knowles said BCA members were now getting in contact with
the principals behind major developments, meeting with them “face-
to-face” and “trying to position our association and members in a positive
light”. 2

The employment of Bahamian contractors on major investment pro-
jects was “relatively good compared to where we were a few years ago”,
Mr Knowles said. “I think we’ve made significant inroads.”

The BCA has been pushing for the creation of a Construction and
Development Advisory Committee, which would establish better relations
with developers and advise government ministries on issues relating to the
construction industry

Although the BCA had not-achieved that objective “in the sense we
would like”, it was in continuous dialogue with the Ministry of Financial
Services and Investments, whereas before there had been none. When
issues relating to the construction industry arose, Mr Knowles said the

‘ BCA was being consulted and asked for its input.
' “We're satisfied progress is being made,” he added.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1a, ..

and Internet subscriber
growth drives Cable profit



@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

SUBSCRIBER growth in
both its core cable television
and Internet businesses was the
key driver behind Cable

. Bahamas’ 22 per cent increase
in net income for the first six
months in 2005, the company
said yesterday.

Shareholders

In his report to sharehold-
ers; Brendan Paddick, Cable
Bahamas chairman, said cable
television subscribers had
increased from 64,541 to 67,607
during the 2005 first half, rep-
resenting growth of 5 per cent.

And on the Internet side,
Coralwave subscribers had
increased by 23 per cent year-
‘on-year as at June 30, 2005,
growing from 22,000 the year
before to more than 27,000.

Mr Paddick said: “This note-
worthy increase in Internet
subscribers speaks volumes of
the calibre of services this busi-
ness segment delivers, and also
of the comprehensive customer
support provided, which when
combined have resulted in our
Internet service garnering sub-
stantial customer confidence.

“The ‘Online Assistance’ ser-
vice, which was launched in late

2004, has significantly impacted
the success of the Internet sup-
port aspect of the business.”
Mr Paddick said the compa-
ny’s progress towards com-
pleting its 2005 capital projects
had been “very encouraging”.
Cable Bahamas had spent
$10.8 million on capital pro-
jects during the 2005 first half,
with some $6.8 million of that

spent during the second quar- _

ter.

The capital spending during
the three months to June 30,
2005, went on the highly publi-
cised launch of Cable
Bahamas’ digital cable televi-
sion services, plus upgrades to
infrastructure and Interhet
equipment. The digital service
is expected to generate further
subscriber growth.

Mr Paddick said: “Significant

progress was made on the con-.

struction of the Freeport metro
telecommunications hub, which
when completed will enable
customers to enjoy the benefit
of fully diverse connectivity on

.the Freeport fibre network.

_ “The new headend in Abaco
will be completed and fully
operational in the third quarter
with all data, Internet and

video services transferred to

the new facility.”

The old headend had

remained fully operational dur-

ing the September 2004 hurri-
canes, Mr Paddick said, but the
new facility.had been designed
to be “even more robust” to

‘reduce the possibility of ser-

vice disruption during future
storms.

““To further minimise the
adverse effects of hurricanes,
the company also continued to
harden its power back-up facil-
ities in all of its key operational
control points.

“Redundant power genera-
tors have been installed and
commissioned at six locations

_on the islands of New Provi-

dence, Grand Bahama, Abaco °
and Eleuthera,” Mr Paddick
added.

Cable Bahamas said second
quarter 2005. cable revenues,
which account for about 60 per
cent. of total revenues,
increased by 5 per cent over
the previous year comparative
to reach $8.3: million. Total
cable revenues for the first six
months were $16.4 million,
compared to $15.3 million for
the same period last year.

Revenues

‘Second aiketer Internet rev-
enues were 24 per cent ahead
of their 2004 comparative at $4
million..For the first six months
in 2005, Internet revenues

Automatic gratuity
‘an obstacle to. better
tourism services

@ By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter

MINISTRY of Tourism exec-

utive believe a number of indus-
try workers would have given
better service over the years had
it not been for the automatic 15
per cent gratuity.

Explaining that there was a
direct correlation between the
level of customer service and a
visitor either returning to the
Bahamas or encouraging some-
one to come to the Bahamas,
senior manager of industry
training for the Ministry of
Tourism, Diana Black-Brooks,
said that if the automatic 15 per
cent gratuity had not been
implemented, it was likely that
a significant number of work-
ers would have improved their
level of service over the years.

Meanwhile, the Ministry of
Tourism’s manager of industry
training said yesterday excel-
lent customer service provided
to the country's 5.1 million vis-
itors was key to ensuring that

the Bahamas remains competi-..

tive in tourism.

Sherry Collie, was speaking”

at a half-day ceremony, held to

bring together BahamaHost

_ graduates and other key indus-

try stakeholders, to share the:

vision of the Ministry of
Tourism going forward.

Ms Brooks-Black added that
in looking at the country's num-
ber one industry, it was impor-
tant for workers to know. who
Bahamians were as a people,
and also be knowledgeable
about the country, its history,
culture and the other features
that make it uniquely Bahami-
an.

She said many visitors coming
to the Bahamas already have a
base of knowledge about the
country, making it important
for front-line workers, in par-
ticular, to have as much infor-
mation about the country as
possible.

Customer service and the atti-
tude of tourism workers toward
visitors and Bahamians alike,
however, is perhaps the key fac-
tor in building a strong industry
and a destination that visitors

look to return to as often as pos- :

sible. Ms Black-Brooks said that
without this element, the level
of knowledge becomes less
important.

Leslie Norville; acting gener-
al manager for training and edu-
cation at the Ministry of
Tourism, said visitor feedback
had shown that customer ser-
vice continues to be lacking in
the Bahamas. And according to
‘statistics, some 90 per cent of





guests never complain, which
means that the number of visi-
tors who feel they have had a
bad experience could be signif-
icantly higher than may first be
apparent.

“Despite the poor service,
these guests are still paying for
a service, but if they are given
what they expect, they would
reciprocate by coming back,”
she said.

Along with the BahamaHost
programme, the Ministry of
Tourism, in a renewed effort to

galvanise the community and |

industry stakeholders to build
the sector, is focusing on. the

training and education of indus- °

try personnel, other profession-
als, students and the wider com-
munity.

Other programmes include
the Sales, Marketing and Royal
Treatment (SMART) customer
service initiative that is aimed at
front-line employees and entre-
preneurs.

Bartenders :

The Small Hotels Unit is a
skills-based programme that

“works with associates in house-

keeping, at the front desk, bar-
tenders.and restaurant servers,
to improve their customer ser-
vice skills.

The Tourism Awareness pro-
gramme is a broad-based edu-
cation initiative aimed at stu-
dents. The unit focuses on
preparing students to work in.
the industry and making them
aware of the career opportuni-
ties that exist. _

It helps prepare their inter-
personal skills and seeks to
make them more marketable
once they graduate. The bigger
mandate for the unit is to entice
the brightest minds to look at

the industry as their first career’

choice.
The Tourism Education
Awareness Module (TEAM) is

_ another education and training

initiative aimed at Bahamian
students, primarily those in
grades six through 11.

The focus of TEAM is to
demonstrate to the students the
importance of the industry to
the economy, and the need to
choose a career in the tourism
sector.

There is also a Fly Fishing
Certification programme that
provides training for industry
personnel to enhance their
skills, so that they can offer bet-
ter service.

According to Ms Black-
Brooks, the Ministry has been
inundated with calls from vari-
ous sectors that want to be



ved intthe ‘training ‘pro

grammes. She said the pro-

grammes have been a great suc-
cess, with many individuals
becoming ambassadors for the
country...

She noted; ‘however, that.
while the programmes have
been a success, with Ministry
officials focused on giving the
information and educating the
industry, students and partici-
pants must be willing to take
the information on board and
put it into practice for there to
be improvement.

From an internal perspective, .
Ms Norville said, the Ministry
has also begun focusing on staff
development, in an effort to
transform employees into pro-
ductive, service-oriented indi-
viduals.

In establishing the Ministry ©
of Tourism's Training Initiative,
officials are looking to put

‘together a curriculum of cours-

es that will eventually be
offered to. staff to improve their

. performance and enhance their

development.



Pricing Information As Of:
13 September 2005

S2wk-Hi






S2wk-Low
Abaco Markets

stood at $7.7 million, compared
to $6.2 million the year before.

Revenue from data opera-
tions during the three months
to June was 4 per cent ahead of
the first quarter, and revenues
from this business now account
for 12 per cent of Cable
Bahamas’ total revenue

streams.

Data revenues from the sec-
ond quarter stood at $1.7 mil-
lion, compared to $1.4 million
for the year before period,
while total monthly recurring
revenue had risen to $0.6 mil-
lion from $0.5 million.

Overall, Cable Bahamas’ sec-

ond quarter net income was 10
per cent higher than the first
quarter, with operating income
also up by 6 per cent at $6.8
million compared to $6.4 mil-
lion.

Second quarter. revenues
were over 3 per cent ahead of
the 2005 first quarter.







SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1

The Cancer Society of The Bahamas is celebrating
the opening of The Cancer Caring Centre.
Please help us give cancer patients and their relatives
a home away from home during treatment.

























men For LIFE

6am sharp at The Cancer Caring Centre
East Terrace, Centreville.



Previous Close

8.06 Bahamas Property Fund 9.50 °
6.90 5:55 Bank of Bahamas 6.88
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80
1.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 1.49
4.46 0.87 Fidetity Bank 1.410
8.84 6.96 Cable Bahamas 8.84
20. 1.69 - Colina Hoidings 1.69
19.40 6.75 . Cammonwealth Bank 9.10
2:50 0.67 . Doctors Hospital 2.46
4.42 3.85 Famguard 4.12
10.70 9.25 Finco “10. 6o
9.50 6.99 FirstCanbbean 9.50
19,24 8.31 Foco} 9,24
4.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.46
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.80
3.50 8,20 J. §. Johnson 8.50
4.36 Kerzner international BDRs 5.84






0.35 RND Holdings



Premier Real Estate

12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets

Fund Name

4.2521 4.4846 Colina Money Market Fund 4.252089*°
2.4169 2.0131 Fidelity Bahamas G & { Fund 2.4169 ***
10.5576 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 40.5576"""**
2.2560 2.1491 Colina MS! Preferred Fund 2.255981**
4.4273 4.0576 Colina Bond Fund 4.127305*°**



BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 =

52wk-Hi -

#,000.00
Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day‘s weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
PIE - Closing price divided by the iast 12 month earnings
“.~AS AT AUG. 31, 2005/ *““* ~ AS AT JUL 31, 2005






Today's Close






os for every ve s
To. register, please call f
325-2483 « or 323-4482 —



9. 85
{ 6.88 0.00
0.80 0.00
1.40 9.00
1.40 0.00
8.81 0.00
1.69 0.00
9.40 0.00
2.46 0.00
4.42 0.00
10.70 0.10
9.50 0.00
9.21 0.00
4.45 0.00
9.90 0.10
8.50 0.00
5 0.01



SN en i | SO

Last 12 Months

ve Soe Vol.

5,006

* 3,500
2,105

2,000

NOK

ons






































NN

EPS $
0.207
1.452
0.561
0.204
0.426
0.066
0.618
0.004
0.705
0.429
0.428
0.695
0.695
0.675
0.022
0.526
0.526
. Sed



































15.4
13.7
13.6
52.3
18.8
16.2
ie 2
























. 2 > Se oT
- oe 7 ao ve

‘ 108

one

0.810 ins

N/M

eee










MAMMA kh

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by clasing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Val. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $- A company's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock {ndex. January 1, 1994 = 10C

CA—>K[CKO GK

IKK AN



PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005 THE TRIBUNE
EWEN sss

Bahamas website a ‘one stop
resource’, says US TV network

ISLANDBRIDES.com, the
NOTICE Bahamian-built destination
wedding website for the
Caribbean, has been featured [_
on the ABC Television net- .
work in Boston as the “one-







| (NASHPORT INVESTMENTS LTD.)

In Voluntary Liquidation stop resource” for destination
weddings in “a tropical island
paradise”. .

The website’s Bahamian par-

Notice is hereby given that the liquidation sht-coninanye Thyine (Online,
yesterday said more than

| of the above company commenced on the 18th ha
35,000 brides-to-be were visit-

day of May, 2005 and that AB. Lilia Salazar | ing islandbrides.com per

ws p month, while 250 were regis-
| Chiriboga of Arguelles #339 y Francisco Segura. tering to use free planning tools

| Guayaquil Ecuador has been appointed liquidator | every month.
Ben Jamieson, Thyme

1 of the Company. | Online’s chief executive, said:

i “We were delighted to see the. .

site being noticed by the US

. Dated this 18th day of May A.D., 2005. media. Combine this with our
aggressive online marketing

' campaign and we are well on

| y t ki thi
AB. LILIA SALAZAR CHIRIBOGA Bahaniceialk oN ; te the are
Liquidator mier online'resource for desti-

nation weddings to the region.”

_ Due to the publicity the web-"
site had received in the media, —
Thyme Online said vendors in
the islandbrides.com online
wedding directory were seeing The ing Planner —
an increase in the e-mail ry
inquiries from brides-to-be
looking for their services. This
translated into an overall

St. Augustine *s College ; increase in business for all wed-

ding vendors listed in the site.

The Best Man's Duties



Beach Wedding Dress



NOTICE

NEEDED IMMEDIATELY

Teacher of General Science and Chemistry to teach grades
eight through ten. Experience with preparing candidates
for external examinations preferred.



NOTICE






‘(SHALFORD INVESTMENTS, LTD.)

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
In Voluntary Liquidation

(No 45 of 2000)

_ IVOR COMPANY LIMITED

All applicants must hold a degree from an accredited .
In Voluntary Liquidation

University and a Teacher’s Certificate or must have some
teaching experience. Two letters of reference, copies of
all degrees and certificates, proof of teaching experience
and two passport size photos should be submitted. A
commitment to the values of Catholic, Benedictine
' edécation is expected for our teachers. Only those persons »
who have no difficulty with Roman Catholic beliefs and
teaching need apply. Please submit applications and
required documents to:

Notice is hereby given that the liquidation of the

above company commenced on the Ist day of

July, 2005 and that Antonova Liudmila of Russia .
Moscow. 26 Bakinskih Komissarov str., house

4. build-1, flat 89 has been appointed liquidator
- of the Company. ne

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section.137 (4) of the International Business ;}.....<

| Companies Act (No 45. of 2000), IVOR COMPANY-}**"
LIMITED is in Dissolution”.

The date of commencement of dissolution is 15th
day of August, 2005 oe cok taney. . me
ee Dated this 1st day of July A.D., 2005 ©
Epsilon Management Ltd.,
2 Commercial Centre Square,
Alofi, Niue.
Liquidator

__. THE PRINCIPAL
ST. AUGUSTINE’S COLLEGE
P.O. BOX N-3940

- NASSAU, BAHAMAS

_ The Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture is now registering for the

fifth (Sth) Session of the National Youth Leaders Certification Programme,
schedule to commence on Tuesday 27th September, 2005. .

ANTONOVA LIUNMILA
Liquidator







The Ministry invites all interested Youth Leaders or Youth Workers to.
pic: ‘p application forms from the Ministry’s Headquarters on Thompson
Boulevard, Ministry of Education Building, 2nd Floor, West Wing, Monday -.
Friday between the hours of 9:00 am - 5:00 pm. -






_. . For further information please contact Mr. Gregory Butler, Deputy
Director of Youth at telephone numbers 502-0600 - 5.

oo) Employment Opportunity West Nassau



A leading conservation organization is seeking competent individuals with a positive
attitude to fill the following positions:

Bookkeeper and Accountant's Assistant

Location: New Providence cs

The successful candidate will provide support to the Finance Department through
the performance of a variety of routine and non-routine accounting and clerical
tasks. :




Please note effective Thursday, September
8th, The Rotary Club of West Nassau will
be meeting at Chez Willie West Bay Street.






Database and Membership Officer

Location: New Providence 7
The successful candidate will be responsible for the development of membership
database and for extending service to the general membership. Location

Rand Nature Centre Administrative and Education Specialist

Location: Grand Bahama s

The successful candidate will be responsible for the development and to oversee
educational programs and outreach activities for the Rand Nature Centre, Peterson
Cay and Lucayan National Parks.





Parking is available at the rear on Virginia
Street or just west of Chez Willie in the
Parking lot.





For additional duties and responsibilities for these positions please visit our website
at www.thebahamasnationaltrust.org or call the Human Resources Department at
393-1317.






THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS














THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005, PAGE 5B

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY
MUST SELL

MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES




left green trimmed white.

Bubject property









RAINBOW BAY SUBDIVISION
(ELEUTHERA)

Lot #44, Block 5, Section A. The lot is on a hill overlooking the Atlantic Ocean. Area is
approximately 10,800 sq. ft. This site encompasses a two storey apartment block of
two apartments. One upstairs and one downstairs. Each comprising one bedroom one
bathroom, front room, dining, kitchen. There is a wooden porch approximately 8 - 6
feet wide on the upper level secured with a wooden handrail. The garage area has
been converted into a efficiency apartment and now houses one bedroom/frontroom
in one and one bathroom. Age: is 7 years old. The apartments could be rented at $700
per month partly furnished. The efficiency rented at $400 per month.

Appraisal: $308,402.00

MURPHY TOWN
(ABACO)

Lot #60 with a structure, lot size 60 x 115 ft., 6,900 sq. ft., 10 ft., above sea level but
below road level and would flood in a severe hurricane the duplex has dimensions of
60 ft by 30 ft partly of wood and partly of cement blocks with one section vinoaly
finished and occupled with blocks up to window level and floor ready to be poured.
The roof is asphalt shingles, the interior walls and ceiling are of 1x6 pine and the
floor of ceramic tiles. The finished work Is averagé/below, 2 bedrooms, one bath,
living/dining. The occupied portion of the structure is not complete. Age: 10 years
old.

Appraisal: $80,498.00

ROCK SOUND
(ELEUTHERA)
All that piece parcel or lot of land and improvements having an area of 22,800 sq ft

situated on Fish Street.in the vicinity of Rock Sound Primary School on the island of
Eleuthera, Bahamas. This property is comprised of a 38 year old single storey residence

’ consisting of approximately 1,332.18 sq ft of. enclosed living area and inclusive of,

living room, dining room, kitchen, 3 bed rooms, two bathrooms and sitting room. The
home is in fair condition, there is also carport but in poor condition. The neighbourhood
is quiet and peaceful and has a topography of approximately 2 ft.

’ Appraisal: $57,853.95

The said piece parcel orlot:of land and improvements is located in the settlement of
Rock Sound, on the island of Eleuthera. .

LOT #127 WINTON MEDOWS
(NASSAU) -

All that Lot of Land Having an:area of 8,000 sq. ft. being lot #127 Knollwood Drive of
the Subdivision known as Winton Meadows, situated in the eastern district of New
Providence this property is comprised of a 7 yr old single family residence consisting
of approximately 2,149 sq. ft., of enclosed living space with 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms,
living, dining room and kitchen. There is 619 sq. ft. dirveway and a 125 sq. ft. patio at
the rear and an enclosed 2 car garage also included. The land is on a'grade and level
and appear to be sufficiently elevated to dissallow flooding during annual ieavy rainy
periods. The grounds are fairly kept with fairly maintained !awn and low shrubs. Yard is
not enclosed. ie

Appraisal: $275,747.43

Traveling east along Prince Charles, take the corner on the right just before Winton

Super Value (Jasmin Drive), then 2nd corner right (Knollwood Road) drive all the way around the curve the subject property Is the 4th property

NO. 3 LEXINGTON SUBDIVISION
(NASSAU)

All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 7,752 sq. ft. (77.5 x 100) situated
in the southern district of New Providence being lot No. 3 in an area known as Richville
of Malcolm Road west. This property is spacious and can probably accommodate
another house at the rear. It is landscaped and enclosed by a wall in front.with fence
on the side. The property. consist of a single story, 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom, living room
and dining rooms, com

covered front porch (indented) with floor area of 1,374 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $123,000.00

Heading south on East Street turn right onto Malcolm Road, then third corner on the
tight, the house is the 4th on the left painted white trimmed green with wall in front.

- BAHAMA‘PALM SHORES
2 ABACO) 22 S25

" Lot #27, Block #26, 80 x 125 being-section 4, at Bahama Palm Shore, 6 miles, southwest

of Cherokee Sound and 18 miles south of the township of Marsh Harbour. The land is
situated on Ocean View Drive. It is one of the better elevated lots in the subdivision
having an excess of 30ft above sea level, but have no view of the sea, but is about 1,800
feet from the public beach. This property is comprised of a single storey residence with
Bermuda Style Roof containing a large living and dining area split level, with kitchen in
the corner. Three bedrooms and two bathrooms, this building is approximately 7 years

old.
Appraisal: $233,000.00

LOT 7, BLOCK 7 MILLARS HEIGHTS
(NASSAU)

All that lot of land having an area of 7,500 sq. ft. being lot no 7 of the subdivision known
as Millars Heights subdivision situated in the south western district of. new Providence.
This property is comprised of a 7 year old single family/multi family single storey duplex
consisting of approximately 1,533 sq. ft. of enclosed living area inclusive of living room,
dining room, kitchen, 2 bedrooms and 1 bathroom. Both apartments have a wall unit
in one bedroom. The building is well maintained and ‘has an effective age of 3 years.
The land is on flat terrain and appear to be sufficiently elevated above road to disallow
flooding during annual heavy rainy periods. The grounds are fairly maintained and site
improvements includes a grass lawn with fruit trees and a concrete paved driveway
leading to the carport. The yard is open‘along the front with its back and side boundaries
enclosed with chain link fencing.

Appraisal: $231,806.40

Traveling west along Carmichael Road, take the third corner left after the Carmicheal Road Police Station then the first right then first left again
which is Margaret Street the subject property is the third property left painted white trim green with green doors.

LOT NO 220 TWYNAM HEIGHTS
(NASSAU)

All that lot of land having an area of 9,595 sq. ft. being lot 220 of the subdivision known
as Twynam Heights, situated in the eastern district of New Providence this property
is comprised of a single family residence consisting of approximately 2,880 sq. ft. of
enclosed living area inclusive of porch, foyer, living room, dining room, kitchen, breakfast
room, family room, study utility room, powder room, three bedrooms, three bathrooms
and double garage. Ventilation includes central air conditioning the land is on a grade
and level and appear to be sufficiently elevated ‘above road to disallow flooding during
annual heavy rainy periods. The eee are fairly kept, with fairly maintained lawn
and low shrubs, yard enclosed with low wall with open drive way and walkway in front.

Appraisal: $238,400.00

Traveling east along Prince Charles, take the corner on the right Just after Winton Super Value, take 1st corner left the first left again, the
subject property is the is the 4th property left painted yellow trim white opposite unpainted house on the right.

ined, family room, and kitchen, enclosed carport and a roof -











VALENTINES EXTENSION
(NASSAU)

Lot #2 contains a 19 year old 1.1/2 storey four plex with a floor area of 3,621 sq. ft. The »
two storey section consist of a master bedroom, bathroom and sitting area‘upstairs.
and two bedrooms, one bath, living, dining, family room and kitchen downstairs. The.
single storey consist of one two bedroom, one bath apartment and two efficency. .
apartments, land-size 7,500 sq. ft. Multi-Family zoning on.flat land and not subject to ~
flooding. 4

Appraisal: $347,006.00

The subject property is located on the western side of Valentine's Extension Road, just
over one hundred feet north.of the roadway known as Johnson Terrace. Travel east on
Bernard Road, turn left onto Adderley Street which is opposite SAC, continue left at .
the deep bend, take first right into Johnson Terrace, go to T-junction and turn left, then
first right. Property is second building on right, white trimmed brown.



DUNDAS TOWN
(ABACO)

3 two bed, 1 bath triplex:9,000 sq. ft., lot no. 18b with an area for'a small shop. Age 12° ~
years the land is a portion of one of the Dundas Town Crown Allotment parcels stretching *
from Forest Drive to Front Street, being just under a quarter. acte in size:and.on the
lowside. A concrete block structure, with asphalt shingle roof and L-shape:{n‘design
with a total length of 70x26 ft, plus 50 x 22 ft., 2,920 sq. ft., the interior walls are concrete
blocks, ceiling is sheet rock and the floors of vinyl tiles. i ’

Appraisal: $220,500.00



§
KENNEDY SUBDIVISION
(NASSAU)

Lot no. 21 all utilities available 10 year old single story house, 3 bedroom 2 bathroom,
living room, dining area, family room, ‘kitchen, study,. laundry and an entry. porch.

- Appraisal: $175,350.00

' Heading west along Soldier Road take main entrance to Kennedy Subdivision on the

left, then take the 1st corner on the left then 1st right, house is second on your right "~:
with garage. ie :

LOT #17237 BAHAMA
SOUND NO. 18 -
(EXUMA)

All that lot of land-having an area of 10,000 sq. ft. being lot #17237 of Bahama’ Sound
of Exuma no. 18 said subdivision is situated on the southern side of Queen’s:Highway"
about 2 miles northwest of Georgetown. This property comprises of a 25.year'old single
storey single family residence. ; ? Rady ee

Appraisal: $110,250.00...

This property is located on the southeast side of Periwinkle Lane, about 100 ft east of
the junction of Periwinkle and Zareba Circle. ; 5 :





EARLY SETTLERS DRIVE
(ELEUTHERA)

Lot #7 Early Settlers Drive, North Eleuthera Heights, size 11,200 sq. ft., contains incomplete
3 bed, 2.5 bath, living room, dining room, kitchen and tv room. ey

Appraisal: $141,716.40

e

LOT #15 BLOCK #2 WINTON HEIGHTS
_ (NASSAU) or ay

‘|. :All that lot of land haivng an approximate area.of:18,647 sq. ft..being lot #15, block a sg ote

#2. The lot is a corner lot-and Is odd shaped and is situated at the southeast-corner .
‘of Culbert’s Hill and Spencer's Close, this property is comprised of a 2 storey residence
with ground'‘floor consisting of foyer, living room, dining room, a guest sutie, family
room (equipped island cooktop and walk in pantry), breakfast nook, laundry.room,
storage room and a 2 car garage and back pation. The upper floor consists-of the
master suite that includes a bathroom and a walk-in closet. The floor throughout are
ceramic tiled except the bedrooms, This house equipped with central alr and burglar:
bars the house Is well taid out and tastefully decoroated. Also numerous cracks were
observed in the southern walls of the bedrooms upstairs. Bs pee ais

Appraisal: $502,236.73

Traveling east on Prince Charles Drive to corner on the left just before Winton Super Value (Culbert Hill), travel north on Culbert Hill to the
4th corner right, (Spencer's Close), said house is #55 on the corner beige trim pink.

LOT 194 BOYD SUBDIVISION
- (NASSAU)

All that lot of land having an area of 6,400 sq. ft. being lot no 194 of the subdivision
known as Boyd Subdivision, situated in the central district of New Providence this property
is comprised of a 35 year old single family, single story residence encompassing
approximately 1,278 sq. ft. of enclosed living area and inclusive of separate living’ and
dining rooms, and an average size kitchen, three bedrooms, two bathrooms and'an entry
porch, of approximately 88 sq. ft. ventilation is by 2 wall unit air conditioners. The property ~...
is at grade and level with: good drainage, landscaping Is minimal, consisting of lawns |;...:
and shrubs in the front, the subject is enclosed with stone walls mounted with:

iron and chain link fencing and a wrought iron gate in front there is a 208 sq. ft: cement
driveway leading to a singlé covered carport of 250 sq. ft. the subjett-site also has a
concrete block storage shed measuring of approximately 143 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $126,000.00

Traveling west on Boyd‘Road, turn left onto Foster Street, continue on Foster Street to the 4th corner right, (Roland Ave.) the subject property
is the 5th property on the left side painted orange with red/white trim. : : on :

LOT NO 172 BLAIR ESTATES
(NASSAU)

All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 15,403 sq. ft. being lot 172 in the



subdivision known as Blair Estates,.this property is comprised of a single ‘family split ~~ -

level resident consisting of approximately 3,456 sq. ft., of enclosed living space with
three bedrooms, two bathrooms, on the second level and on the first a living and dining’
room, kitchen, utility room, family room, bathroom, an office, a rear uncovered porch, a
covered door entry, walkway and a driveway. Also located on the first level in a 616 sq.
ft. one bedroom, one bathroom, living and dining room, rental unit. The bullding Is in
excellent condition with recent renovation done, there is no signs of structural defects
or termite Infestation the building is adequately ventilated with central air conditioning
‘installed on’ the second floor and in the rental unit the land is rectangular in shape and.
on a level grade slightly elevated above the road to disallow flooding during annual heat
rainy periods. The grounds improvements include landscaping, a concrete block wall
and fence enclosure. on three boundaries, fruit trees and a private water supply.













Appraisal: $642,222.00 _
HAMILTON'S ’ Traveling north on Village Road from the round about take the second corner tight into Blair Estates (St Andrews Drive). Drive to. the t-junction’ :
LONG ISLA ND) and make a left which is Commonwealth Street, continue traveling to the 7th corner which is Clarence Street then drive to Richmond Road
( ’ and make a right. The subject property is the 1st house on the left no 44 painted green trimmed white.

Queen's High Way, lot of land 13,547 sq. ft., dwelling house of solid concrete floors,
foundation column and belt course with finished plaster. Two bedrooms, one bathroom,
kitchen, dining, and living room. Total living space is 1,237 sq. ft., utilities available
are electricity, water, cable tv and telephone.

Appraisal: $98,057.00



CORAL VISTA SUBDIVISION (NASSAU), All that vacant lot of land having an area of approximately 7,500 sq. ft. being lot #61 and is situated on Blue Heron Cresent in the Coral Vista Subdivision a said subdivision situated in the .
western district of New Providence, Bahamas. This property is bounded on the north by Blue Hebron Cresent and running thereon 75 ft, on the west by lot #60 and running 100 ft on the south by portions of lots #72 & 73 and running thereon 75
ft, and on the east by lot #62 and running thereon 100 ft. This area is zoned residential with all utilities and services available. : _ pate Gee

Appraisal: $69,300.00

Travelling from the Coral Harbour round about, (Coral Harbour Road), take ist left (Central Drive East), go across the cross road turn right at Pink Coral Drive west turn 1st left (Blue Heron Drive) the subject property is the 6th on the right sid 6.






GROVE, WEST BAY SUBDIVISION (wassau), Ail that vacant lot of land having an area of approximately 12,000 sq ft being lot #17 block #20 and is situated on’ Bougainvilla Avenue in the Grove Subdivision situated'i

western district of New Providence, Bahamas. The property is retinacula in shape and is bounded on the north by lot #18 and running thereon 120 ft on the west by Bougainvilla Avenue and running 100 ft on the south by lot #16 and running 120

ft, and on the east by lot #8 and running there on 100 ft. This area is zoned residential with all utilities and services available.
Appraisal: $153,300.00 z i Se)
Travelling west on West Bay Street, turn onto Bougainvilla Avenue, travel across the crossroad (Coral Drive) the subject property is the 4th on the left side with broken chain lik fence.

JOHNSON’S HARBOUR VIEW ESTATES SUBDIVISION(ELEUTHERA), All that vacant lot of land having an area of approximately 4,500 sq ft being lots 12E and 13W and is situated in JOhnson Harbour View Estates
Subdivision situated on the island of Eleuthera, Bahamas. Measuring and bounded as follows, northwardly by 20’ wide road reservation and running there on for a distance of 50 ft eastwardly by lot 13E and running thereon for a distance of 90 ft
southwardly by lot 30, and running thereon for a distance of 25 ft and continuing on lot 31 and running thereon a distance of 25 ft westwardly by lot 12W of the said subdivision and running thereon for a distance of 90 ft. This propertyis --*-
well lanscaped and fenced in. This area is quiet and peaceful with all utilities and services available. . eg

Appraisal: $47,250.00

The said pieces parcels or lot of land is situated in Johnson’s Harbour View Estates Subdivision, Harbour Island, Eleuthera.

ALLOTMENT 67, MARRIGOLD FARM ROADvnassau), All that lot of land having an area of 1.173 acres being lot No. and is situated on Marigold Farm Road In the ara known as allotment 67, a said subdivision situated'in .
the south eastern district of new Providence, Bahamas. This property is Vacant and area has all utilities & services. ws 2a

Appraisal: $1 048,050.00



Travelling on Joe Farrington Road turn onto Marrigold Farm Road heading south, the subject is the second to last propert on the left hand side of the road near the pond.

For conditions of sale and other information contact
Philip White @ 502-3077 email philip.white@scotiabank.com or
Harry Collie @ 502-3034 email harry.collie@scotiabank.com

Please visit www.fsbobahamas.com for interior photos









PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005

Position of Accountant |

Candidates must have at least 3 years experience in
accounting in the financial industry with sound
knowledge of but not limited to:



FROM page one

been that with more affordable
airlift coming into the Bahamas,
hotels have been able to raise
their room rates, improve the
salaries of employees and also
make improvements to their
properties.

Other speakers in atten-
dance at the graduation cere-
monies were Samuel Gardiner,
senior director of Training and
Education for the Ministry of
Tourism;. Archdeacon James
Palacious, Dioceason Secre-
tary and Archdeacon for
Administration of the Angli-
can Diocese of the Bahamas;
and Reverend Terrance Mor-
rison, pastor of Zion Baptist
Church, Shirley and East
Streets.

Additional areas that the
Ministry will look to address
and develop going forward are
the issue of cruise conversion
into stopover visitors, plus
increasing the Bahamas’ meet-
ings and groups business with
the introduction of the US con-
vention tax incentive pro-





e Supervising an accounts department and staff



e Formulating budgets
e Managing Accounts Receivables and Payables





¢ Preparation of monthly and annual financial
reports and statements

e Preparation of bank reconciliations and various
general ledger accounts to the sub ledgers






e Co-ordinate the annual audit with external
auditors and preparation of the necessary
schedules.






e Preparing reports for the regulators




e Must be a team player




¢ Must possess people skills and be prepared to
interact with customers. ~
¢ Minimum qualifications: AA in Accounting

Please forward resume before September 21, 2005 to:
P.O. Box N-7544
or email bleccul@bgcfreedom.com





TRANSFER OF COB ACADEMIC UPGRADING COURSES
FROM FACILITIES AT eo
C.C. SWEETING JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL





Please note new class locations listed below:

COURSE ; TIME DAY/S | ROOMS
(Originally
Assigned) °
MATH 046 6:00-7:50 PM CCS -27 |BTTC-11
C
C

MATH 047 6:00-7:50 PM CCS -28 |BTTC-12 —




MATH 048 6:00-7:50 PM CCS-30 |Monday--BLVD2A >
Wednesday--BLVD LT -A

- 28
- MATH 046 6:00-7:50: PM CCS-29 |BLVD-4C
MATH 048 6:00-7:50 PM CS - 31 | CCS Sr. Blocki
:00-7: - 32

: MATH 047 6:00-7:50 PM
“MATH 048 | 3C__| 6:00-7:50PM | MW __|CCS-33 |CCSSr Blocki

=

[ic | soo-rsoru [mw [cos-24 [cos S: Block

MATH 046 . 1c




| ENGOI7, | 4C | 6:00-7:50PM_| TR | CCS-28 |BTIC-8 sd
| ENGOIS | 2C | 6:00-7:50PM | TR |CCS-29 |BTIC-T
6:00-7:50 PM Tuesday-BTTC -3
ee Thursday-BTTC- 2
| ENGO17 | 2C,_| 6:00-7:50PM_[. TR: |.CCS-31
| ENG O17 | 1C__| 6:00-7:50PM_| TR | CCS-32 [CCSSrBlocki
OE Thursday--GSR -1B BLVD

ENG 015 6:00-7:50 PM CCS-27 |BITC-4



1c
4C
2C
5C
2C.,
AC
3C









_ BTTC — Bahamas Tourism Training Centre °
_ BLVD - Boulevard Building - ,
T - Technology Block




BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION



INSTALLATION OF TWO (2) YOUNG MODEL HC-1066-.
V400T40 RADIATORS & RELATED

CIVIL/MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL WORKS AT THE
BAILEY TOWN, BIMINI, BAHAMAS POWER STATION _








TENDER No. 585/05



The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible
- bidders for the installation of two (2) Young model HC-1066-V400T40
radiators and related civil/mechanical/electrical works at the power
station located at BAILEY TOWN, BIMINI, BAHAMAS.






Interested persons may collect the tender documents from the
Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads, by contacting:-



Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

~ Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852






Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 28 September 2005 by
4:00p.m. and addressed as follows: |




The General Manager.
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas




Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour



Marked: Tender No. 585/05



The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.



GCS Sr. Block i a

THE TRIBUNE



‘Something new’ needed
for $2bn visitor spending

gramme beginning in January.

The Ministry will also be
increasing its research and
marketing efforts for a num-
ber of markets, including
Canada, Latin America, China

and India. Product develop-.

ment remains a core initiative,
as is incorporating more sig-
nage and the need to increase
the inventory of tours that are
available in the Bahamas.
The Ministry of Tourism has
appointed Janet Johnson,
director of special projects and
events strategy, to create
things for visitors to enjoy, M
Walkine said. ;
One of the initial projects
that is likely to come on stream
is the creation.of a James Bond
tour, where visitors travel toa
number of sites used for the

four Bond movies filmed in the’

Bahamas. The tour is expected

- to be a land-based transporta-

tion tour, with officials look-
ing to include existing tour bus
and taxi cab drivers in the pro-

ject.
' Another tour being looked’

at, will include the Spanish

Barbs of Abaco, which are a
rare breed of horses. Ministry
officials are in talks with the
local caretaker to create a tour
around the animals. Accord-
ing to Ms: Walkine, a lot of
people are interested in this

kind of experience, which -

involves utilising one of the
best kept secrets of Abaco.
The move to create new
tours, Ms Walkine said, was
the result of continued criti-
cism, particularly by cruise pas-

sengers, that the Bahamas has »

not introduced any new tours
in recent years.

"A lot of cruise passengers
are repeat passengers; they've
been here two, three, four
times, and we've not changed
the tours we offer in 26 years,”
Ms Walkine said.

“I have to assume that if we
create one new tour a year, say
for the next five to six years,
someone will pay $30 to $40
for a new tour or attraction. If

‘only 5 per cent of. passengers

spend money on it that's more
money in the pocket of ground
tour operators and taxi drivers.

Prime Office Suite for Immediate Occupancy

1,390 Sq.Ft. (additional 800 Sq.Ft. optional)
Beautiful Views of Nassau Harbour & Paradise Island —
3 Parking Spaces included In Rental
_ Turnkey Fit-out Office Suite
24 Hr. Automatic Standby Generator
Two Elevators (wired for modern communication needs)
Separate Staff and Secured Client Parking
Automated Gated Entrance & Intercom System
24 Hr. Security Guards
24 Hr. Surveillance Systems (Recorded) & Access Control
Professionally Managed
$5,200.00 Monthly

To.View Contact

Mr. Elmer I.G. Lowe
Bahamas Facility Management Ltd.
Telephone: (242) 328-BFMM or 322-7419
P.O. Box SS-19784
Nassau, Bahamas

Rt. Honourable Perry G. Christie

Prime Minister



It's a real opportunity for them
to offer some things."

Meanwhile, to capitalise on
the new US convention tax °
incentive programme for meet-
ings and conferences in the
Bahamas, Ms Walkine said the
Ministry of Tourism recently
appointed-James Malcolm as
director of group travel.

Mr Malcolm has already
identified members of his team
and is the process of mobils-

ing an overseas sales staff that

will be able to talk to meetings,
and conference planners about

’ the advantages of having con-

ferences and meetings in the
Bahamas.
Ms Walkine the Ministry’
clearly. recognises that it is
important for large and small
hotels to have a base of group
business that will help them
manage their yields a lot bet-
ter, with the property then able’
to have a substantial number
of bookings based on a fixed
rate over a specific timeframe. ,
' The fact that the US tax ini-,
tiative is available to the rest of

_ the Caribbean means that the

Bahamas must provide added
incentives. Already, groups can
benefit from the Ministry's
staff on the ground, who will
support organisations wanting
to have a conference in the
Bahamas, and help facilitate a
positive experience for the
groups that.do come:

One example of the incen-
tives ministry officials will be
able to provide are a dedicated
arrivals and departure experi-
ence. She said that the 'on the

_ ground’ staff can facilitate. a

seamless experience through

immigration and customs, then

into transportation _
“These. are nice things to

. offer, so they don't have to

worry about their delegates at
the airport. This is the kind of
thing we can. promote,” Ms
Walkine said.
’ Mr Malcolm and his team
are expected to travel to
Chicago next month to attend
one of the largést-events in the
meetings and incentives travel
industry, the Incentive Travel
and. Meeting Exposition -
(ITME). chlor antied
Firmly of the view that:a®:
number of major initiatives
that have béen talked about:
for a while are close to being:
executed, Ms Walkine said
there are a number of projécts, :
such as the Downtown Rede-
velopment-Plan, that in anoth- -
er year or two should make.it.
easier for the tourism industry,
to grow and develop for the .
benefit of all stakeholders.

BE QTha

-PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS, Us TOO! International, Inc with headquarters in Downers
Grove, Illinois, USA, was established in 1990 by five prostate cancer survivors, viz
John de Boer, John Moenck, Edwards von Holtz, Ed Kaps and Vincent Young;

* AND WHEREAS, since its establishment as a Cancer Caring Group, more
than 500 Us TOO! Support groups have been established worldwide promoting
health education and support;

AND WHEREAS, Dr Robin Roberts and Mr Clyde B Bethel established
the Us TOO! International, Bahamas Chapter on 20th April, 2001 in association with
the Cancer Society of The Bahamas and -The Association was issued the proper
membership Charter by Us TOO! International Headquarters in Illinois on Ist May,

2001;

‘

AND WHEREAS, since September, 2001 Us TOO! Bahamas Chapter in
collaboration with the Cancer Society of The Bahamas has facilitated and conducted
annual prostate screenings at public community health clinics throughout New

Providence;

AND WHEREAS, since 2001 Us TOO! Bahamas Chapter in conjunction
with the Cancer Society of the Bahamas has each year designated September as
Prostate Cancer Awareness Month to promote awareness and conduct free prostate
screening at the various public health clinics in New Providence for men forty years

and older;

AND WHEREAS, prostate cancer is a life-threatening disease and is on
the increase, the Us TOO! Bahamas Chapter wishes to urge all men, female partners,
family and friends to unite in promoting the theme “Early detection, the Best
Protection’ to sustain life and reduce medical costs;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Perry G Christie, Prime Minister of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim the month of September, 2005
as “PROSTATE CANCER AWARENESS MONTH”. ,

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I
have hereunto set my Hand and
Seal this 31st day of August, 2005.

PERRY CHRISTIE
PRIME MINISTER





THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005, PAGE 7B



Chavez sees PetroCaribe
as challenge to US contro!

* oe - <=.
=—_
—_

“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

The Tribune wants to hear
‘from people who are-
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 |

and share your story. :

a we al

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CELINA CHARLES OFF
CARMICHEAL ROAD LAZARTTO ROAD, P.O. BOX CR - 56717,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as

| a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 11th day of JANUARY, 2005 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-
7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

~ om - e+ :
¢ Nassau & Abaco ;
° 5 years minimum experience

Please send resumes to:
PO. Box N-4827

or pick up an application form at
Bahamas Waste Limied, Elagsione



Join the team!

The Company
Providence Technology Group is one of the leading providers of business critical IT solutions in The
Bahamas. Our core values define how we view our clients, our. work and our interaction with each other:
1. There is no greater privilege than serving our clients
2. Excellence is the only standard by which we measure our work
3. Enjoyment and laughter are at the centre of all we do

Technician ©





Technical Analyst = Tec Me ee ae
Description Description

As a Technical Analyst on the Networking
Solutions Team, you will play a key role in the
design,.deployment and management of business
critical networking solutions. You will be expected

~ to manage multiple engagements over a wide -

range of client environments. This position will
require a strong technical background, sound
writing and communication — skills, good
interpersonal and organizational skills, the ability
to work as a part of a larger team, and a passion
for helping our clients succeed.

Minimum Requirements:
B® At least 4 years relevant working experience.
® Bsc. or Associates Degree in Information
Systems or related field.
® Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer
(MCSE 2003)
@ Cisco Certified Network Associate or
Professional (CCNA/CCNP)
@ Demonstrated proficiency in:
> Network Management Tools
> Security (Firewalls | VPNs)
> Messaging & Collaboration (eMail)
> Data Protection
(Storage | Tape Backup | Online Backup)
> Virus Protection
(Anti-Virus | Patch Management)

How to Apply

As a Technician on the Networking Solutions
Team, you will be responsible for providing a wide-
range of support and assistance to the technical
team. This position will require a sound technical
background, good interpersonal and organizational

skills, the ability to work as a part of a larger team,

and a passion for helping our clients succeed.

Minimum Requirements:

® At least 2 years relevant working experience in
Information Systems or related field.

= Microsoft Certified Professional
(Windows XP/2000 Professional)

@ CompTlA A+ Certification

Please email resumes to jobs@providencetg.com by 19th September 2005. ©

One Montague Place | Level 2 | East Bay Street | P.O. Box N-1081 | Nassau , The Bahamas
1 242.393. 4002 F 242.393.8003 | info@providenceTG.com | www.providenceTG.com



NETWORKING SOLUTIONS 1 CONSULTING & ADVISORY SERVICES | SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS

PUBLIC NOTICE

The public is hereby notified that, with effect |
from Monday 19th September, 2005 the Central
Bank of The Bahamas will relocate its Freeport
Office from its present location in the Regent
Centre West, Explorer’s Way to Office No. 5,
Second Floor, First Commercial Centre
Building, East Mall Drive.
All existing telephone and fax numbers
will remain unchanged. These are as follows:

Telephone: (242) 352-5963

Fax:. (242) 352-5397

CREDIT AGRICOLE SUISSE (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
is presently considering applications fora.

SENIOR MARKETING/ RELATIONSHIP MANAGER
REQUIREMENTS:

¢ Must possess, maintain and expand extensive customer base |
2 Excellent knowledge of Private Banking & Trust Services |
© Ability to fix objectives'for oneself and for subordinates’ * |"
"Languages: English, French, Spanish, (Italian a:plus)
¢ Presentation and communications skills - ability to hold
presentations in public
° At least 10 years private banking experience,
* Proficiency in MS Words Excel, Power Point
¢ Ability ta work under pressure
¢ Willing to travel extensively (4 months per year thinimum)
¢ Bahamian nationality
¢ Possess a contident and outgoing personality

DUTIES WILL INCLUDE:

* Marketing of private banking and portfolis canagemnient
services to prospective clients from Africa, Europe and -
‘North America

¢ Acquisition and development of new clients

¢ Advising clients on investment epporuniie in financial .
instruments ‘

Applications only should be submitted befcie’ October 18th
Human Resources Department

P.O.Box AP 59237
Nassau, The Bahamas

Temple Christian High School
"Teach Me, O Lard, Thy Way". Psat U9-33

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Invites applications from qualified Christian Teachers for
the following positions for the 2005 - 2006 school year.

Chemistry (Gr. 10-12)
Biology (Gr. 10-12))










Applicants must:





° Bea practicing born-again Christian who is willing
to subscribe to the Statement of Faith of Temple
Christian School.

¢ Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or higher form
‘of recognition College or University in the area of

- $pecialization.

° Have a valid Teacher’s Certificate or Diploma.

* Have at least two years teaching experience in the
relevant subject area with excellent communication

~ skills.

¢ Applicant must have the ability to prepare students
for all examinations to the BJC/BGCSE levels.

° Be willing to participate in the high schooh’s extra

curricular programmes.












An application can be obtained from the High School office
on Shirley Street and be returned by the 19th September,
2005, with a full curriculum vitae, recent coloured
photograph, and three references to:





Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application i is September 19th, 2005







PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005

ORS SoS

THE TRIBUNE



Oil prices send stock prices down

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LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
AZZURE HOLDINGS LTD.

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 AZZURE HOLDINGS LTD.
is in Dissolution

The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 24th August 2005.
David Thain of Amer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd., 308 East Street,
| P.O.Box N 3917 is the Liquidator of AZZURE HOLDINGS LTD. All
| persons having claims against the above-named company are required to
send their address and particulars of their debts to the ane before
the 26th September 2005. ,








cfenuee... Storyteller
A ndependent Thinker
| Poet 7
Short Stories, Poems & Literary Gems

By Mackey Williams







Mackey Williams, that inimitable master of st
telling, has scored another direct hit with his “Short Storie
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" Laangstone Evans
The e College of the Bahamas |




_ December 2004 _




Powerfully expressed in simplistic terms, this
: documentary of prose and poetry offers a realistic rendition of
events portraying cultural aspects of Bahamian society. In the
proc revives thrilling memories in the minds of the older
vil ee as an educational experience for the











‘Winston Knight eZ
Former Principal,

St. John’s College
Nassau, Bahamas
January 2005

For further information call: 323-4999
e-mail: franklynsmwilliams@hotmail.com







NOTICE
CHEMIN INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 13th
day of September, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp.
Inc., ef RO.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

_ARGOSA CORP. INC.
~ (Liguidator)



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° Inspect radiator tanks and core

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(Price includes oil filter and 4 quarts engine oil. :
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HONDA

The Power of Dreams

Dowdeswell Street
322-4626

E-mail: service@nassaumotor.com

FROM page one

pricing, has tried in recent years

to smooth out as much as pos-:

sible these. large increases and
reductions,” Mr Ferguson said.

“For example, following Hur-
ricane Andrew in 1993, prices on
property insurance went up some
200-300 per cent, which for sore
people meant that they had to
drop hurricane insurance alto-
gether.

“Following last year, prices
were expected to go up this year
and indeed have done, but the

Insurance

" increases were a lot more palat-

able, roughly in the region of 20-
30 per cent. This is not as drastic
as say Jamaica, where people
were seeing 35 per cent increases
even before they were hit again
this year.”

Hurricanes Jeanne ‘and
Frances caused damage worth
$551 million or 10 per cent of the
Bahamas’. gross domestic prod-
uct (GDP) when they struck in
September. 2004, Mr Ferguson
said. |

Bank of Bahamas
FROM page one

The Banker’s founder and chairman of the Financial Times from 1945-
1958.

“Tt is a great honour for Bank of the Bahamas, a young financial insti-
tution, to be ranked among the leading banks in the world,” said Mr
McWeeney.



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Engineers,
builders

FROM page one

and engineering companies syn-
dicate themselves to be a viable
competitive force, going up
against international companies
that have a proven track
record.” .

The Baha Mar executive
promised that there would be
opportunities for. Bahamian
architects, mechanical, civil,
plumbing and landscaping engi-
neers, and contractors and.con-
sultants to offer “a full comple-
ment of services” once the $1.2
billion redevelopment of Cable
Beach began.

Cyprian Gibson, the:

-Bahamas Society of Engineers’

president, also suggested that
the use of Bahamian engineers |
and other skilled construction |
professionals had to be speci-:
fied in future Heads of Agree-
ment that the Government
signed with developers.

Mr Sands said Baha Mar was.
encouraging MonArch Archi-:
tects, the firm that won the con-
tract to design the West Bay
Village for its development, to”
use Bahamian electricians and
engineers, after he was ques=’,
tioned about the architect pos-.,,
sibly outsourcing work to Flori:.
da-based companies.

Two Bahamians, along with’
some expatriates, had been:
hired as project managers, and
while contracts such as the re-
routing of West Bay Street were
likely to go to major interna-
tional firms, Mr Sands said they
would have to partner with
Bahamian companies, who
would provide services such as
civil engineering and project.
management.

Mr Sands added that “99 per
cent” of the $15 million upgrade ‘
Baha Mar had committed to.
after taking over ownership and
management of the cable Beach
Resorts had been carried out
by Bahamian companies.

Out of that $15 million, some”
$4 million had been allocated;
for the addition of 30 new table, ,
games and 460 slot machines in i
the Crystal Palace Casino. Baha,
Mar, Mr Sands added, was in*
negotiations with a “potential;
global brand casino partner and
hotel operator” to the ‘Las
Vegas style’ casino, which at
75,000 square feet would be the
biggest in the Caribbean.



| THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS : PAGE 9B
ene een ES RE SS a+ TELLS EE ESTES
COMICS PAGE





Y ~y > . 3 =
~*®. “Copyrighted Material
es Syndicated Content .. ~— =
Available from Commercial News Providers”«

ae
. Pease.



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PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

‘Athletes make their mark
in a week to remember

BVF to host —
Pro/Am
beach
volleyball
tournament

@ VOLLEYBALL
By KELSIE
JOHNSON
Junior Sports
Reporter

THE Bahamas Vol-
leyball Federation is
hoping to put a differ-
ent spin on the game
in the Bahamas by
introducing beach vol-
leyball.

In a bid to expose the ©

local players to all
aspects of the game, the
BVF will host its first
annual Pro/Am Beach
Volleyball Champi-
onships.

The championships
are set for October
21st-24th at Our Lucaya
Resort, Grand Bahama
Island and will feature
top local players and
semi-professional play-
ers from Florida.

Mandate

According to Presi-
dent of the BVF Don
Cornish, the champi-
onships are a prefect
way to assist with the
federation’s mandate,
hoping to create profes-
sional players from the
beach and hard court
arena.

He said: “The beagh
championships is a high
caliber tournament, one
we are hoping to have

every year.

“Before we decided
to host the tournament
we looked at the many
ways the programme
can benefit from it.

“We want nothing
more than to be able ‘to
diversify the sport and
introduce our local
players to all the
avenues of the
game, from indoor to
outdoor.

“It will give our play-
ers the flexibility to
develop their beach
skills. There will also
be an incentive as they
do so. ,

“We know we have
top athletes throughout
the Caribbean indoors,
but we haven’t given
them full exposure to
outdoor competitions.”

The championships
are a part of the sport-
ing-tourism package
sanctioned by the
Sports Tourism Depart-
ment of the Bahamas
Ministry of Tourism. |

It is being held in
partnership with the - .
BVF and Exclusive
Sports Marketing.

Exclusive Sports Mar-
keting has developed
an annual Pro/Am
Beach Volleyball
Championships within
the Florida region.

Market

. The sporting market
owns the largest ProoAm
Volleyball Series in the
United States, which .
includes eight events in
Florida.

The championships
set for the Bahamas.
will be considered the ©
"Super Bowl" of the
series.

Cornish added: “We
are hoping to develop
more beach competi-
tions throughout the
Bahamas especially in
New Providence where
most of play takes place
indoors.

“New Providence has
a high level of beaches,
but-our only problem is
finding a facility that is
big enough to accom-
modate the number of
courts.

“Most of the beaches
are either behind hotel
properties or in front of
hotels, so our major
thing is working out a
schedule with them so
it can be public access
for the event taking
into the account all the
security issues.”

[es been a momentous
week for the Bahamas in
the world of sports.

Six of our athletes made their
mark on the world athletic
scene, we got our first junior
Grand Slam champion in ten-
nis, a rookie footballer. with
Bahamian roots made a grand
entry into the NFL and four
umpires became internationally
certified in-softball.

The performance of Davis
Cupper Ryan Sweeting will cer-
tainly stand out among the
pack. He achieved a tremen-
dous feat by winning the US
Open j junior boys’ Grand Slam
title in Flushing Meadows, New
York. ;

For his efforts, Sweeting has

' moved up the ladder from num-

ber 21 all the way to No.2 on
the chart. Another remarkable
achievement for the 180-year-
old bound for the University of
Florida.

Sweeting has done what no
other Bahamian has achieved
and he will probably cherish this
moment for years to come. This
should definitely be the impetus
to propel him to even greater
heights on the ATP men’s cir-
cuit.

Education

It’s good to know that, while
he still intends to play on
Futures tournaments, he will be
heading to school to get his edu-
cation.

In the meantime, it would be

Ss good if the Bahamas Lawn Ten-

nis Association can get Timo-
thy Neilly to play under the
Bahamian flag.

Right now, he’s obligated to
the United States because of
the investment that they’ve
made towards his junior career.
But as the No.14 ranked player
on the junior circuit, imagine
the potential success for the

hoon’

STUBBS







Bahamas with both Sweeting
and Neilly playing together.

They did at the US open and,
while they reached the quarter-
final, they showed that they
have the potential to be one of
the best combos in the world.

As Bahamas Lawn Tennis
Association president Mary
Shelley pointed out, it would be
wonderful to see the duo
teamed up with collegian Devin
Mullings and current pro Mar-
vin Rolle.

Add H’Cone Thompson and
Chris Eldon, who is heading
back to college, and the
Bahamas could be heading in
the right direction with a solid
core of young players to get us

- back into the American Zone

One Davis Cup tie in a couple
of years.
Only time, will tell just how

soes red

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much Sweeting’s performance
will help to spark the other
players as they try to fine tune
their games in order to continue
to play on the team.

But Sweeting couldn’t ask for
a better way to put a lid on his
junior career.

There was a lot of focus on
the World Athletics Final in
Monaco over the weekend for
our squad of athletes, who qual-
ified for the season ending
meet.

Olympic and World champi-
on Tonique Williams-Darling
suffered her third consecutive
defeat post-Helsinki to Ameri-
can Sanya Richards.

Rivalry

In the process, Williams-Dar-

"ling dropped from the top of

eres, ame pack at No.7.
’ Also remaining in their same -

the chart to number. two behind

Richards. You can.only assume.

that the intense rivalry will con-
tinue next year.
Christine Amertil remained

spots are Chandra Sturrup at
No.4 in the women’s 100; Lav-
ern Eve at No.5 in the women’s
javelin and Chris Brown at No.5
in the men’s 400.

Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands

was the only other athlete with

a shift, dropping from fifth to
sixth in'the top 10.

. It was another remarkable
showing by our athletes as they

brought a close to their long

season.

As the season opened, it was
good to see Alex Smith get off
to a fast start for the Tampa
Bay Buccaneers. The 71st.pick
overall in the third round from
Stanford University scored
twice Sunday in their 24-13 tri-
umph over the Minnesota
Vikings.

It was only his first. game, but
I’m sure that we will be hearing
a lot: this season from the son of

loss.



@ RYAN SWEETING’S fantastic performance
led him to victory in the US Open junior event.

legendary Ed Smith, who broke
the barrier as the first Bahami-
an in the NFL when he played
for the Denver Broncos in the
1970s.

Whether or not he was born
here, Alex Smith’s roots are
planted here and that should
give us enough reason to cele-
brate his accomplishment.

There was another major
accomplishment for the
Bahamas Softball Federation

when Michael Hanna, Antho-

ny Bowe, Kirk Bowe and Brent
Spence pushed the Bahamian
fraternity of internationally cer-
tified umpires in the Interna-

tional Softball Federation to
eight.

It only goes to show How far
we’ve arrived in the sport, hav-
ing already inducted six
Bahamians, including the first
international certified umpire,
Arthur Thompson, into the
ISF’s Hall.of Fame.

As BSF first vice president
Burkett Dorsett said, it’s only a
matter of time that we get oth-
ers to join Bobby ‘Baylor’ Fer-
nander in the internationally

‘certified coaching ranks.

Things are looking
brighter for sports | in the’
Bahamas.

f

Revenge for.

Hf Saturday’s fixtures i

10am Faith United vs Jubilee (M).
11am Mt. Tabor vs Macedonia (15-and-under).
Noon Calvary Deliverance vs Mt. Tabor (Co-ed).
lpm Calvary Bible vs Mt, Tabor (M).

2pm First Baptist vs Golden Gates (19-and-under).
3pm Macedonia vs Calvary Deliverance (M).

N ew Bethlehem |

a SOFTBALL

. NEW Bethlehem nipped Calvary Deliverance 3-2 to pull off a
stunning victory on Saturday at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex
as the Baptist Sports Council kicked off its 2005 softball season.

It was a rematch of the men's championship last year, but, this
time, the runners-up New Bethlehem got the upper hand on the
defending champions Calvary Deliverance.

In another rematch from last year's final, defending champions

: Macedonia Baptist continued where they left off as they nipped
; -runnet-up Golden Gates Native Baptist 3-2 in a co-ed match-up.

Also Saturday, Macedonia got a double dose of victory as their
men knocked off Calvary Bible 10-6.

i And in the only other game played, Golden Gates held off First
: Baptist 7-6 in an 15-and-under game.

e Here's a summary of the games played:

@ New Bethlehem 3, Calvary Deliverance 2: Dominic Charlow's
RBI. double knocked in Darren Stevens in the first, Eugene Bain. |
: had an RBI double, scoring Tory Stevens, and he came home ona ,
i wild pitch in the second to lead New Bethlehem.
Val Maura went the distance.for the win over Danny Stubbs.
Jason Clarke, last year's batting champion, ripped a two-run in-
the-park home run to score Brad Wood Sr.

Hi Macedonia 3, Golden Gates 2: Tim Clarke singled to centre
field and scored on two consecutive errors for the game winning’
run in the bottom of the fifth inning in this co-ed game. Clarke sin-
gled and scored Macedonia's second run on an error in the third.

Michael Thompson doubled with two out and scored on Christine
Porter's RBI double in the first.

Harold ‘Banker' Fritzgerald got the win over Junior Moss on the
mound.

Kemuel Knowles had a solo in-the-park homer to lead off the
second and Christine Hanna added another in the fifth.

Bi Macedonia 10, Calvary Bible 6: Michael Thompson had a two-
run double, scoring a run to spark an eight-run bottom of the sec-. -
ond inning as Macedonia took control of this men's game. They
added two more in the fourth. Kevin Johnson had ‘two hits and
scored three times in the win.

Harold ‘Banker’ Fritzgerald picked up the win over Lindsay Pin-
der in a battle of two of the oldest pitchers in the league.

Grett Lewis had two hits and Shawn Moree scored twice in the

Golden Gates 7, First Baptist 6: Richard Bastian Jr. and
Jamaal Hanna both had an RBI single in a five-run first inning as
Golden Gates surged on top and never looked back. Bastian and
Kristoff Minus both scored twice in the win as they came up two
more runs in the third.

Jamaal Johnson Jr. had an RBI single to highlight a four-run
third as First Baptist made a comeback attempt. They scored their

first run in the first.

4pm New Bethlehem vs Golden Gates (M).



TRIBUNE SPORTS | THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005, PAGE 11B |



SPORTS



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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

PAU ites Beloit



Uc ecl leer oa

a olacrele CJeYe)g tale)
: as Us ule



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS



Outlines plans for COB

‘

By KELSIE JOHNSON .
Junior Sports Reporter

THE College of the
Bahamas officially announced
Greg Harshaw as its new ath-
letic director yesterday.

Harshaw has previously
directed the athletic pro-
gramme at the University of
California, Santa Cruz, with
direct responsibilities for man-
aging a budget ranging from
$800,000 to $1 million dollars.

His other duties included
building and supervising
fundraising and marketing of
the sports programme.

With his recent agreement
with the College of the
Bahamas, Harshaw is hoping
to extend and improve-on the
already existing athletic pro-
grammes.

Develop

With track and field being
the head of the college’s pro-
gramme, Harshaw is hoping
to develop other sports.

He said: “It is obvious that
track and field will be the
head of the programme, but
we are reviewing other sports
right now.

“We are looking at basket-
ball; soccer — two of the

island’s favourites — and tennis .

and volleyball.

“Right now we are just
looking at where the interest
_ lies and working closely with
the federations and the Min-
istry of Sports.”

Harshaw welcomed the
opportunity to mentor the

College targets
correspondent
programme

ll By KELSIE JOHNSON

Greg Harshaw
aiming to
improve
existing
programme

next generation of leaders in
the field and said it is his plea-
sure to work with the staff to
develop strategies that will
make COB a leader national-
ly and internationally in the
area of sports and athletics.

Dr Rhonda Chipman-John- —

son, acting vice president at
the college, said that the hiring
of the new athletic director
was a step the college took in
hopes of establishing the ath-
letic department and: another
deliberate move to:enhance
the students’ life at the col-

lege.

Initiative
She said: “The initiative
stems from the belief that the
physical development of COB

students should receive .as
much attention as their acad-

‘emic, social and spiritual

development.
“T’ll hope to see a better bal-

ance now, since we have .

revamped our athletic pro-
gramme.

According to Dr Rhonda Chipman-Johnson,







@ NEWLY ANNOUNCED athletic director Greg Harshaw
explains his plans for improving the College of the Bahamas’
athletic programme. Seated next to Mr Harshaw is acting vice
president Dr Rhonda Chapman-Johnson.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)





“We are hoping to attract
more males. Of course there
will be the balance between
academics and athletics, which
can be a factor.

“But we will welcome all
males, so we are hoping to get
more males through such a
programme. -

“Of course attracting more
females who are interested in
sports is also a concern.”

THE NEW 0 ( 5 MUSTANG

The Legend Lives









Junior Sports Reporter

AS THE College of the Bahamas (COB) seeks
to reach university status by 2007, it is also aiming
to take its athletic programme to the next level.

The college is hoping to build on its existing
athletic programme, by trying to secure a corre-
spondent programme with either the National
Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA), the
National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics
(NAIA) or the Central Intercollegiate Athletic
Association (CIAA).

Realising that the goal set will take more than
four years to be fully operative, newly installed
athletic director Greg Harshaw said that, by two
years, the college should be in reach of their
goals.

The minimum sporting disciplines a college
has to be enrolled in order to achiéve NCAA
status is ten.

Mr Harshaw said: “We can become corre-
spondents with the some of the colleges in the
Caribbean first. :

Goal

“Our minimum courses are ten, which will
include men and women’s sports. Our goal is to
become correspondents and hopefully be able to
play teams within the Caribbean in two years.”
Harshaw is willing to recruit athletes from other
countries, but giving Bahamian athletes first pref-
erence.

“We will work with what we have first, but we
will look into recruiting athletes from abroad,”
said Harshaw:

“We haven’t decided if we are going to be divi-
sion J or II as yet, but the plan is to add some
scholarships for young men and women.”

acting vice president at the college, the goal of
introducing a new athletic programme is to attract
and keep some of the. premier student-athletes at
home and to develop strong links to the national
athletic programme.

Harshaw has designed a three step plan which
should assist with reaching the goals of the col-
lege.

The first step listed by Harshaw, was the
reviewing of programmes and structure of the
college’s athletic programme.

He believes that the review will be able to help
the athletic board understand exactly what needs
to be done.

His second objective is to upgrade the facilities
at the school to a world class standard.

The upgrades will ensure that, when the college
does reach university status, they will be able to
host games and teams from colleges in the Unit-
ed States and throughout the Caribbean.

As the college extends its programme by build-
ing games for their teams, the third objective list-
ed on the two year goal plan is to file for corre-
spondence to the NCAA.

Currently, the college’s athletic programme
comprises of the intramural sports, male and
female soccer and basketball.

The men and women’s teams both participate
in the local leagues hosted by the New Provi-
dence Associations.

In assisting with the college’s goals, the gov-
ernment has earmarked a 100-acre subdivision on
Gladstone Road for the expansion of the new
COB.

The college is planning to use portions of this
land to build sporting complexes, a fitness and
wellness centre and dormitory facilities.

The college has decided to work closely with
the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture to
engage the usage of its facilities,



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SECTION



THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005



Sermons, Church Activities, Awards



The Tribune |

Church Notes
‘Page 2C

.



‘We must ask God to spare
us from these hurricanes’

m@ By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

s Bahamians
watch and
read interna-
tional reports

d of the réscue
and relief efforts to restore the
Gulf Coast states affected by
Hurricane Katrina, some reli-
gious leaders say they should
also be in prayer and planning
to ensure that this country is
prepared for a hurricane of that
magnitude,

Bishop Simeon Hall, pastor
of ‘New Covenant Baptist
Church, and former president
of the Bahamas Christian

Cowncil (BCC), seems to be-

leading the call for Bahamians
to ¥eflect on local hurricane
efforts, while they pray for their
neighbours in the US.
~ “Our job now is to pray and
ask-God to have mercy upon us
and spare us from these hurri-
caries. But simultaneously, we
miust have concrete action,” the
pastor tells Tribune Religion.

Bishop Hall has criticised the
current Bahamas Christian
Cotincil administration for its
call for a week of prayer for
the victims of Hurricane Katri-
na.

“Let’s do more than pray,”
he Said,

‘Bishop Hall feels that in this

case, Bahamians should also

not only pray for God’s mercy,
but put their faith into work.
“(Bishop Neil) Ellis was right
to call for proper planning, to
‘call for a proactive approach
to'this natural phenomenon,”
says the pastor. “We know that
‘we are in a storm belt so we
should try to minimise the

Sacred Heart parishioners
worship in ‘partial darkness’

impact in the event there is a
major storm coming our way.”

According to local meteo-
rologists, the Bahamas has nev-
er experienced any storm
above a category four, and one
of Hutricane Katrina’s magni-
tude (a. category tive) would
have defaced Nassau.

Lt Commander Herbert
Bain, deputy co-ordinator at
the National Emergency Man-
agement Agency (NEMA),
says that the Bahamas is on an

“Our job now
is to pray and
ask God to have
mercy upon us and
- spare us from these
hurricanes. But
simultaneously, we
must have concrete
action.”

— Bishop Simeon Hall

upward trajectory towards the
most active hurricane season
within the past 100 years, and
warns that in the next few years
the Bahamas can expect “some
very serious hurricanes”.

“T can’t begin to imagine

what type of catastrophe we
would experience, or what the
effect will be if we do have such
a hurricane,” says Bishop Hall.

“In this country, we tend to
do things on the tail end. But
there is no reason why we car’t
prepare for the onslaught of a

major category five hurricane
like what they experienced in
New Orleans.”

That preparation, says Bish-

op Hall, should begin with the
construction of adequate shel-
ters. :
‘Many of the current shelters
are churches, whose structures
have beén around for years and
are subject to wear and tear,
the Bishop notes. “So there is a
question of how durable these
shelters will be.”

He says that in this instatice,
he is “on the praying side”,
among those who hope that the
Lord would “not permit one of
these serious hurricanes to
come our way”.

Criticising the Bush admin-
istration’s handling of Hurri-
cane Katrina relief, Bishop
Hall says that the response
should have come earlier.

“To. say that the response
was disgraceful is putting it
lightly,” he says. “There is no
reason why it should’ve taken
the federal government so long
to come. to their aid and start
rescuing people. It’s two weeks

‘after the hurricane hit and they

are still trying to find bodies.
“There's the bogeyman of
race again and. we-don’t want

to think-about it,” he adds,. “but.

Mississippi, New Orleans and
Alabama are three of the poor-
est states. So taking so long to
come to their aid doesn’t speak
well of Mr Bush.”

He hopes that in the event
that the Bahamas is affected
by a category five hurricane,
the Bahamian government
would be “more inclined to be
urgent in their response”. But

SEE page 8C



a BISHOP SIMEON HALL, PASTOR OF NEW COVENANT BAPTIST CHURCH

.

"a By CLEMENT JOHNSON

PARISHIONERS at Sacred Heart
Catholic Church celebrated evening mass
_ on Saturday in partial darkness. In the
“absence of electricity, candles and the
evening dusk provided a beautiful light.

Despite the semi—darkness and the heat,
the words to the hymn “Amazing Grace”
were sung spiritedly, accompanied by a
grandfather piano.

The gospel reading of the day demand-
ed and spoke of expressions of love, and
one of the most essential means of main-
taining the unity of Christian community +
the duty of forgiveness.

Gospel

The Gospel speaks frequently of for-
giveness, When Peter asked how often one
must forgive another, Jesus surprised him

and replied, “severity times seven times”,

In the Lord’s Prayer, we ask the Father
to “forgive us our trespasses, as we for-

give those who trespass against us” ;

Yet despite all of this we still find that
most people don’t-really want to forgive
others, even though they say they do; and
most people don’t really want to be for.
given, even though they say so.

Talking

A college student I was speaking. with
the other day claimed that she would nev-
er be able to trust people, nor would she
allow ‘herself to fall in love because she
was hurt as a child. After.hours of talking,
she still nurses her hurt.

I informed her that she needed to forgive
those people who hurt her, also there was
the need for her to forgive herself.

It is only in forgiving that we are truly
able to trust and love as God intended us
to. But many people don’t want to be for-
given nor forgiving.

At some point it is important to say,
“that’s ok”, or to be told, “what you did

was wrong y and you hurt me, but I forgive

you”,

A person who has hurt someone is often
laden with guilt, and feeling guilty is some-
times worse than the sin.

Just how Jesus told Peter forgiveness!

must be continuous, so too must we be
able to forgive. But for forgiveness to be
effective in the one forgiven, the one for-
given must repent and make amends if
possible, But the one forgiving, it is effec-
tive even if the object of forgiveness does-
n't truly repent. It frees us from hatred

_and thoughts of vengeance, and makes us

truly more God-like and enables us to do
his will.

Forgive
Jesus concludes the story by saying, “so
will my heavenly Father do to you, unless

each of you forgive your brother from your
heart”. Jesus is telling us that there is no

SEE page 2C

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PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005



THE TRIBUNE.





SAINT AGNES
ANGLICAN
CHURCH

THE church on Blue Hill
Road is scheduled to hold the
following weekly services and
activities:

September 15, 6:40 am -
Matins, 7 am - Mass, 5 pm - Sr
Boys Brigades, 7 pm - Opening
Service for West Central
Deanery Congress

September 16, 6:40 am -
Matins, 7 am - Mass, 12:30 pm
- Mid-day Mass, 6 pm - David’s
Army, Jr CYM, Sr CYM, 7 pm
- Young Adults, Prayer Band

September 17, 7:30 am -
Mass, 3 pm - Girls Brigade,
4:30 pm - Junior Ushers Prac-
tice, 5 pm - Bell Ringers Prac-
tice, Primary Choir Practice,
Youth Choir Practice -

September 18, 7 am -

Solemn Sung Mass and Ser- .

mon, 10:30 am - Solemn Sung
Mass and Sermon, 11 am -
Sunday School, 7:30 pm -
Solemn Evensong, Sermon
and Benediction

Upcoming Events |

® Annual Prayer Confer-
ence, September 23, 7 to 9 pm,
September 24, 9 am to 3 pm.

ST ANDREW’S
PRESBYTERIAN
KIRK

YOU are invited to worship |

with the church family at 9:30
am or 11 am on Sunday. Sun-
day School meets during the
11 am service and the Youth

Group meets on Friday .

evenings.’

The Kirk is located at the
corner of Peck’s Slope and
Princes' Street, across from the
Central Bank: Parking is avail-
able immediately behind the
Kirk. Visit us also at: pee

www.standrewskirk.com

ZION a4
METHODIST
MINISTRIES

“THE church in the South’.

Beach Shopping Centre, East

‘Street south, is scheduled to






left: Clyde Rashad, Operator
oad; Dr. Davidson Hepburn,
» Board of Trustees, Princess
ital Foundation; Benita

o Marketing Specialist;
Public Relations Officer,
‘garet Haspital; Troy Simms,
Sales Manager; Henderson .
ator Esso Balfour Avenue

hold the following worship ser-
vices:
September 18, 10:15 am -

. Sunday School, 11 am - Divine

Worship Service (Preacher:
Sister Maritta Cartwright-
Brown)

Third Monday, 7:30 pm -
Ladies Ministry

Wednesday, 7:30 pm -
Prayer and Bible Study

Thursday, 7:30 pm - Music
Ministry

Saturday, 3 pm - Dance Min-
istry, 4 pm - Children’s Choir
Ministry

ST BARNABAS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH

THE church on Blue Hill
and Wulff Roads is scheduled
to hold the following services:

September 18, 7 am - Sung

Mass, 10 am - Sunday School

and Adult Bible Classes, 11 am

+ Praise and Worship, Sung



Margaret Hospital Foundation
eded aid. ‘Thanks’ from all of us
ase continue ‘helping us to help’
ach our goal of $35,000.












Mass, 7 pm - Solemn Evensong
and Benediction

Monday, 6:40 am - Mattins
and Mass, 4 pm - Youth Band
Practice, 6:30 pm - Lay Pas-
tors' Training, Laying A Solid
Foundation, Adult Band Prac-
tice

Tuesday, 6:40 am - Mattins
and Mass, 1 pm - Mid-day
Mass, 6 pm - Prayer Chapel, 7
pm - Bible Class

Wednesday, 6:30 am - Mass,
6:30 pm - Marriage Enrich-

ment Class, 7 pm - Prayer .

Band and Bible Class
Thursday, 6:40 am - Mattins
and Mass, 6 pm to 9 pm -
Young Adult Choir Practice,
7 pm - Senior Choir Practice
Friday, 6:40 am -.Mattins
and Mass, 4 pm - Confirma-
tion Classes, 6 pm ~.St
Ambrose Guild, 6:30 pm -
Christian Youth Movement
Saturday, 10 am to 1 pm -
Boys Brigade (ages 5-9), 1 pm
- Youth Alpha (every third
Saturday), 3:30 pm to 4 pm -

- Boys Brigade (ages 10+), 4 pm

- Youth Band Practice, 6 pm -

Altar Guild, 6 pm - Confes- .

sions

EAST ST.
GOSPEL

CHAPEL —
THE church at 83 East

Street, “where Jesus Christ is _

Lord, and everyone is special”,
is scheduled to hold the fol-

- lowing services:

Sunday, 9:45 am - Sunday
School & Adult Bible Class,
11 am - Morning Celebration,
7 pm - Communion Service, 8
pm - ‘Jesus, the Light of
World’ Radio Programme on
ZNS 1 Aan

Tuesday, 8 pm - Chapel
Choir Practice

Wednesday, 8 pm - Mid-
week Prayer Meeting (Second
Wednesday) — Cell Group
Meeting



—— Syndicated Content = ~~

Thursday, 6 pm - Hand Bells
Choir Practice, 8 pm - Men’s
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday), 7:45 pm - Women’s
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday)

Friday, 6:30 pm - Con-

querors for Christ Club (Boys |

& Girls Club), 8 pm ~ East
Street Youth Fellowship Meet-
ing
Saturday, 6:30 am - Early
Morning Prayer Meeting

FIRST
HOLINESS
CHURCH

OF GOD |

THE church on First Holi-
ness Way, Bamboo Town, is
scheduled to hold the following
services: ;

Sunday, 9:45 am - Sunday
School, 11 am - Morning Wor-
ship, 7 pm - Evening Worship

“Monday, 7:30 pm - Prayer
’ Meeting

. Wednesday, noon « Prayer.
& Praise Service, 7:30 pm + -.

Bible Study

Thursday, 7:30 pm ~ Praise

& Worship Service
Friday (2nd and 4th), 7:30
pm - Youth Meeting |

Second Tuesdays, 7:30 pm «

SALT Ministry (Single Adults
Living Triumphantly)

Fourth Saturdays, 4 pm ae
SOME Ministry (Save Our.

Men Evangelism) -

- Ist Sundays - Women's Day.
2nd Sundays - Youths:

Day/Dedication of Infants»
3rd Sundays - Mission
Day/Commiunion

Service ,

ALL SAINTS

ANGLICAN

CHURCH —
SERVICES and meetings to

4th Sundays - Men's Day:

ing

be held at the church on Ail -
Saints Way, South Beach, for
pe week of September 18)to
Sunday (Feast: Pentecost
18), 7 am - Sung Mass and Ser- .
mon (Theme: “Living As The -
People Of God”), 10. am -
Family Eucharist and Sunday +
School, 6:30 pm = Evensong
and Teaching (Topic: Enter-
ing His Presence) ~
. Monday, 7 pm - Education,
For Ministry (EFM), Band.
Practice at St Matthew's 7
Tuesday, 8:30 am - Mass.at;

- St. Luke's Chapel, Princess .

Margaret Hospital, 7:30 pm --
Home Visitation.

Wednesday, 6 am - Mass and
Breakfast, 7 pm - Chorale.
Practice Sia) 4 4 Gaye

Thursday, 6:30 pm - Band
Practice at All Saints, 7:30 pm
« Senior Choir Practice

Friday, 6 at - Sunrise Mass -
and Breakfast, 6:30 pm to 8:30 -
pm - Dance Camp at the Com-.-.
munity Centre ; re

Saturday, 6 am - Prayer.,
Retreat led by Cursilliastas
Renewal Ministries, 2 pm -
Acolyte Practice

(Rector: Rev Fr S Sebastian

~ Campbell)

UNITED
FAITH
MINISTRIES
INT... ¢

THE church in the Summer

Winds Plaza, Harrold Road,.is
scheduled to hold the followitig:
services:. oi
* Sunday, 8 am - Morning
Glory Breakthrough Service,

10:30 am - Divine Worship’
‘Setvice (Live broadcast at 11-
‘am on More 94.9 FM)

Morning Glory Prayer meét-
ig every Wednesday and Sat-

-utday at 5 am

«. Tuesda

y, 7:30 pm - Choit

“Rehearsal
Every Wednesday, 7 pri <

Bible Study __ a
_ Friday, 7 pm - Youth Meet-

For further information, 6-
mail: ufm@bahamas.net.bs ‘ *
or call 328-3737/328-6949. ~

; Pope
Dhenses
Statue

er ona -

“Copyrighted Material — ~

Available from Commercial News Providers”

<-

FROM page 1C

room in the kingdom of heaven for those who
cannot find it in their hearts to forgive, not once
not three times but-always. As always, Jesus
calls us to something diametrically opposed to



‘we say.

for a tooth”.

the prevailing wisdom of the world.

Questions

The gospel then questions each of us. Do we
put limits on our forgiveness? Do we forgive
relatives and friends, but others we do not, so
much so that we want some people removed
from the face of the earth? “Hang them high!” .

Help us help!

During September, for every hamburger you
purchase, McDonald’s will donate 50 cents _
to the victims of Hurricane Katrina.



Or do we still live with the Old Testament
spirituality, which says “an eye for eye, a tooth:

Citizens

The gospel on Saturday reminded us that cits
izens of the Kingdom have different spirituality; .
it is the spirituality of Jesus who forgives totally
and always, lo matter how grievous the offence: .
Where would any of us be if Jesus’ philosophy,

was “three strikes and you’re out?”







fm lovin’ It.



\



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005, PAGS ve





‘Letting go and letting God’

@ By CLEMENT JOHNSON

I AM getting rid of my

6 engagement. I have been

holding on to it for six

years, in addition to that

anything that is holding me

back from getting closer to the Lord I

am letting it go,” said a good friend of

mine after some deep soul searching.

“For too long I have been holding

on to this ring as a symbol of status, or

holding on to old hurts because they

are all I have. But after a week of fast-

ing and praying, God told me to turn

to him and trust him completely,” she
said with joy in her spirit.

Knowledge

D L Moody once said, “the scrip-
tures are given not to increase our
. knowledge but to change our lives”.
Psalm 104:33-34 says that prayer
_ helps us to see ourselves honestly.

Too often we hear the phrase, “Let
go and let God” and for many of us
it’s only a catchy saying, but for others
it’s a continuous struggle and a daily
challenge to let go.

There is the struggle of letting go of
fear in order to love more. There is
the challenge not to try and think we
have all the answers. There is the need
to admit that we are powerless. It is
when we let go that we realise we live
more productive lives, our attitude
becomes more positive.

“Letting go and letting God” does
not mean that we vacate our respon-
sibility of being productive citizens
and upright Christians.

The idea of total trust is difficult
for most of us, even with those we see
and love. The idea of trusting a God
we are not able to see demands great
faith.

In the letter to the Hebrews, 11:1,
we are told, “Now faith is the sub-
stance of things hoped for, the, evi-

dence of things not seen”.

Faith in God comes from having a
relationship with his son Jesus Christ,
who epitomises the meaning of faith
and trust.

Example

When I think of an example of let-
ting go and trusting God, I remem-
ber something that was told to me
some time ago, and most of you have
heard before but I will repeat it
because it drives home a question we
need to continue to ask ourselves, do
we only trust God when times are
good or when our faith is tested or
will we be like Jack?

“A man named Jack was walking
along a steep cliff one day when he
accidentally got too close to the edge
and fell. On the way down he grabbed
a branch, which temporarily stopped
his fall. He looked down and to his
horror saw that the canyon fell straight

‘The ideal of
perfection’

@ By FR HENRY CHARLES

ONWARD, Moderate
Christian Soldiers is the title of
a recent article in the NY
Times ‘by John C Danforth, a
former US senator and Ambas-
sador to the United Nations.
Danforth was arguing that
“moderate” Christians too
have their convictions and are
just as concerned as more rad-
ical Christians to see them
influence public life.

It was an otherwise thought-
ful piece. I say “otherwise,”
because I’m not sure how much
traction you get with moder-
ateness as a form of moral sum-
mons. Danforth may not have
intended it, but that’s where
his article took me. Jesus’ com-
mand, for instance, was “Be ye
therefore perfect.” You destroy
dimensions of possibility to
prefer “Be ye therefore slight-
ly improved.” .

An appeal to become a little
better, or try a little harder, is
mote realistic than “be ye
therefore perfect,” as psychol-
ogists will tell you. If your stan-
dards are impossibly high, you
set yourself up for neurosis.
And yet, standards by defini-
tion orient us in the direction of
what is not only normative but
exacting.

There are several ways to
understand perfection human-
ly, short of meaning “without
lack or flaw,” as some tradi-
tional definitions of God put
it. One way is to see it as a syn-
onym for excellence. But peo-
ple fight shy of this. You get
instead observations flecked
with mistrust, like: “Christians
aren’t perfect, just forgiven.”
Which is, of course, true, but
doesn’t forgiveness imply an
ideal one has fallen from?

It’s difficult to feel unquali-
fied attraction for a moderate
moral standard. Difficult, too,
to feel the same for a moderate
work of art, and the reasons
are basically the same. Noth-
ing commands your attention
totally; nothing warrants undis-
tracted consideration. In oth-
er words, where vision is at
issue, moderateness lacks com-
pelling authority.

Which is exactly what per-
fection has. The authority of

perfection is not one that -

dwarfs or diminishes, but one
that summons to self-transcen-
dence. The drive is towards
transcending even one’s best.
Another meaning of “per-
fection” is life or possibility on
the other side of decadence. At
the end of the third century, to
cite a good example, when
social standards could not have
been worse, numbers of peo-

ple fled the ambience of the .

declining Roman empire and
took to the desert. They were
motivated, historians tell us, by
“the ideal of perfection.” This
was the celebrated “fuga mun-
di,” or “flight from the world.”

One should not interpret this
movement too quickly or
exclusively in spiritual terms.
What it meant was that when
men and women of the day
looked around them, the vision
of possibility they sensed was
bleak indeed. Widespread
decadence made a decent life
seem impossible. To get some-
where, one had to flee. People,
in effect, were saying with their
feet: there is no hope here; let



@ FR H CHARLES

the human experiment contin-
ue elsewhere.

And it did. These years were »--¢h¥;
. the cradle.of monasticism, and
you can’t talk about-the history.

of the latter without dealing



with the preservation of civili-
sation in the West.

But perfection also has other
less dramatic forms. Every gen-
uine artist, for instance, is obe-
dient to a conception of per-



ROA cea td Oe mS

work is constantly referred,.as





sport’ § eee as if

ee ae Se

_ CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ® Tel: 325-2921

will hold
“THE ABUNDANT LIFE CRUSADE”
with Evangelists
Elliott Neilly and Brentford Isaacs
Sunday, October 9th - 16th
Sundays 7:00p.m. ¢ Weeknights 7:30p.m.
“Come and find peace of mind and —
healing for the body and soul”

© ae 8 6A AE 5S 2 6 SE KH 8 8 TO 8 AY

fection to which his or her

it were, to judgment from the
outside. This is not a judgment
of the artists’ making, but.a
standard which they recognise.
In its light, their work receives
its relative weight or value.
The idea of perfection, in
other words, is the abstract but
real idea through which a stan-
dard is.disclosed that puts val-
uation in proper perspective.
It shows, for instance, that real
goodness is quite different from
being passably kind. In the light
of the former, the latter may
not partake of goodness at all.
Perfection thus helps us not to
settle for what may only be
semblance and illusion.
It’s Seas look at
ings front another angle—to
Stop of their



they have much still to learn
or to achieve. It’s a desire hard-
ly rooted in money or fame. By
the time they’ve gotten to
where they are, they’ve had
more than enough of both. The
magnetic pull is toward a spe-
cial excellence. In our estima-
tion they may already have it,
but the matter is not ours to
determine. Perfection is speak-
ing to them, not to us. It’s
entirely fitting that they regard
our comments as of people
who don’t get it, and go their
own way.

The obedience their desire
suggests is not dissimilar to that
of saints and moral heroes.
What unites them is that desire
draws them into an increasing
privacy, where talk serves no
purpose and only amounts to
distraction.

I’ve come some distance
from Danforth and his appeal
to “moderate Christian sol-
diers.” His argument, given the
US political scene within recent
years, is well-intentioned.
Unfortunately, I do not believe
that the Christian vision is
translatable into an appeal
either to moderateness—or
extremism. The ideal of per-
fection does what neither can.
It stretches us in the direction
of excellence and greater self-
discovery, leaving us in every
sphere of life dissatisfied with
settling for less.

This is why an ideal that
seems so forbidding continues —
to have such strange power and
appeal.

e Fr Henry Charles is rector
of St Patrick’s Catholic Church
in Trinidad.



ms 0

i q eneH AEN \
Ee

down for more than one thousand

feet. He couldn’t hang on to the |

branch forever and there was no way
for him to climb up the steep wall of
the cliff. So, Jack began yelling for
help, hoping that someone passing by
would hear him and lower a rope or
something.

Help! Help! Is anyone up there?
Help! He yelled for hours but no one
heard him. He was about to give up
when he heard a voice.

Jack, Jack. Can you hear me?

Yes. Yes! And where are you?

I am the Lord, Jack. Are you all
right?

‘You mean, God.

That’s me.

God please help me! I promise if .

you will get me down from here I'll
stop sinning. I will really be a good
person. I’ll serve you for the rest of my
life. '
Easy on the promises, Jack. Let’s
just get you down from hear, then we



can talk. Now, here’s what I want you
to do. Listen carefully.

Pll do anything, Lord. Just tell me
what to do. Okay. Let go of the
branch.

What!

I said let go of the branch. Just trust
in Me. Let go.

There was a long silence. Finally,
Jack yelled. Help! Help! is anyone
else up there?”

Difficult

Have you ever felt like Jack? We
say that we want to know the will of
God but when we find out what it is
we can’t handle it. It sounds too scary,
too difficult. We decide to look else-
where.

When He says, “Let go of the things
that stand between you and me and
trust me with your life”, it sounds
scary. But when we let go, ve find
freedom and safety in His hands.

+ (7TH 2005

Opening Eucharist - St. Agnes
7 PM Thursday, September 15th

Workshops - Holy Trinity
Friday September 16th,
6 PM (Registration) _

Saturday, September 17th

8:30 AM











RAINBOW .




“Se , | MID MONTH ot) se

|| VALUE ae |

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PAGE 8C, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005
errr a ee ee ee ee ee eee eee ee cee eee ee ce seen cc ee ese RO IIE
RELIGION





gi “THE Earle” and Sweet Potato at his 84th birthday celebration
at Radisson Cable Beach Hotel on Sunday, September 11.





arle’

arke 84th

b lsat oped

na day when
most of the
| United States
y paused to recall

z " the tragedy of
9/11, hronidéedls gathered at the
Radisson Cable Beach Resort
for the 84th birthday celebra-
tion of “King Earle”, Rev Dr
Earle Francis, the proud Pastor
of the First Baptist Church,
Market Street.



4

marked by the presence of
Deputy Prime Minister Cyn-
thia Pratt, other. distinguished
ministers of the gospel, fami-
ly, friends and well wishers.

Celebration

Of course, the birthday cele-
bration could not be complete
without the Earle’s “Sweet
Potato” (Dr Marjorie Francis),
“The Earle’s” companion for

some 58 yeats.

This visionary pioneer, entre-
preneur, ex-serviceman and
statesmen in ministry has
served First Baptist for more
than 43 years.

On lookers laughed with glee
as they sang, “Happy Birthday
to you.,.Sticky” while “King
Earle” and “Sweet Potato” cut
the birthday cake. (“Sticky”
being one of the nicknames of

It was,a tremendous event,

FROM page 1C

he says that a prediction of just how prepared
the government is to handle such a natural dis-
aster cannot be made, sitice it has never had to
face a category five stortn.

“But let’s pray and at the same time plan so
that we would be prepared. It seems that, like
they say, everything nailed down is coming loose,
which has a lot to do with the everits that will
occur in the end times,” he warns.

The pastor says that the Bahamas should also
be very cautious of the laws that it puts in place,

_since he believes that the actions of a nation
can “call down the wrath of God”, which can be
manifested in natural disasters.

“What your private sins are, that’s your busi-

ness, but when we as a nation give licence to it,
and give it our blessing, that’s where we have a

problem,” he adds.

And while Bishop Hallis not “prepared” to
say that such is the case with this recent hurri-
cane, he did note that some aspects of New
Orleans life, for example, are not “holy”,

Regardless of what the lifestyle is in New
Orleans, he feels that the attitude of Bahamians
at this point should not “bring down further
damnation”. They should be in a “helping mode”
instead.

The Catholic Archdiocese has joited with the
other 195 dioceses throughout the United States
who took up a special offering in aid of those
affected in Hurricane Katrina. The money col-
lected from local parishes on September 10 -11

“King Earle” in his early 20s).



will be made to Catholic Relief Services, which
was very generous to the Bahamas in the after-
math of last year’s hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne. The organisation was founded in 1943 by
Catholic bishops in the US.

The government also announced that it would
lead local efforts with a donation of $50,000,
while Franklyn Wilson of Sunshine Holdings,
Wendall Jones, CEO of Jones Communications,
and Bank of the Bahamas chairman, Alfred
Jarett, ate leading another fundraising initia-
tive. Organisers ate asking the public to partic-
ipate in a national prayer service on Thursday,

' September 22 at Mount Tabor Full Gospel Bap-

tist Church, and a National Telethon on Sep-
tember 30 at the Independence Ballroom in the
Radisson Resort on Cable Beach. The website
www.bahamasforamerica.com has also been
established as part of the effort.

McDonalds has also pledged to donate 50
cents from every hamburger sold in September.
The Salvation Army has initiated a “Fund for
Gulf Coast Disaster” where interested persons

can deposit donations at any Royal Bank of ©

Canada, account number 174-498-6, Persons can
also donate online directly to the US Salvation
Army by credit card at www.salvation-
armyusa.org, The Red Cross is also accepting
donations at its John F Kennedy Drive Head-
quarters, by mail at P O Box N-8331, Nassau
Bahamas, of at arty branch of the Royal Banik of
Canada, account number 104-835-4.







ee etree Oe

i “KING Earle” cuts the cake on the occasion of his 84th birthday.
He is helped by his “Sweet Potato”.

hondabahamas.

THE TRIBUNE



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eee
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O5F
SANAMAS EDITION





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Further claims in
‘gay shoes’ row

l By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

Montagu MP
could stand for
deputy position

CONCERN over heightened homophobia in
the Bahamas has arisen again after two girl stu
dents, who were forced to stand outside in the
sun for allegedly wearing “gay shoes”, yesterday.

' made further claims against C V Bethel Senior



@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

BRENT Symonette said yes-
terday he is seriously consider-
ing a bid for the deputy leader-
ship of the Free National Move-
ment when the party conven-
tion is held.in November.

The MP: for Montagu told
The Tribune that he has given
the matter serious thought and
will probably announce his deci-
sion when the House of Assem-
bly meets in October following
the summer break.

Mr Symonette said he is
aware that Sidney Collie may
also plan:to contest the posi-
tion; but is not sure who else
might be in the field.

He said the leadership of the

party is still “very much up in

the air” but did not say how
much of an impact that could
have on his decision to run as
deputy. —

He said he had been.

approached to run for the
deputy’s position by a number
of persons.

(cnsidered

Mr Symonette, the only FNM
candidate to win a seat in New
Providence in the May 2002
election, has considered the post
of leader twice. This created
speculation on whether the
country would accept the possi-
bility of a white prime minister.

At the party’s last conven-
tion, Mr Symonette decided
against running in the interest of
party unity, claiming it had not







sufficiently recovered from its
2002 defeat at the polls.

In August, Mr Symonette
announced again that he would
not contest the leadership. Yes-
terday, he explained that his
decision not.to run for leader
this time was based more on the
fact that he wanted to focus his

‘attention on serving his*Mon-

tagu constituents.

However, both times he said
his decision had no bearing on
the colour of his skin.

In August, he hinted on a
possible. deputy bid by saying:
“Today was the post of leader,
tomorrow is another day. I am
not ruling out the possibility
that I may run for another posi-
tion in the party.” ‘

Candidates

Former education minister
Dion Foulkes has already
announced his intention to run
against current leader Tommy
Turnquest:

Although many have specu-
lated on a Hubert Ingraham/
Brent Symonette ticket, both
men have remained silent on
that possibility.

Yesterday, independent MP
Pierre Dupuch weighed in on
the issue by saying there is no
reason why Mr Symonette
should not run.

However, he said he was dis-
appointed with politicians play-
ing cat-and-mouse games with
the Bahamian people about
whether they would run for
office. He said it is a disgrace
as people have a right to know.

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@ Frank Smith. talks to Rusty of Kemp Road during a walkabout of the
Urban Renewal Project. ¢ See pages 14-15 for the story

(Photo: Mario Duncanson/ Tribune Staff)



RBDF officer fears
are ‘unfounded’

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

IN response to a front page article in The Tri-
bune regarding morale at the Royal Bahamas

Defence Force being at an “all time low”, ministry

officials have stated that concerns expressed by
officers are unfounded.

In July, Deputy Prime-Minister and Minister of
National Security Cynthia Pratt announced that
the RBDF would undergo a four-stage review
beginning in July and ending in December.

Mrs Pratt said the purpose of the review would

_ be “to determine how the organisation:can opti-

mise its functioning.”
- However, earlier this week three RBDF offi-
cers claimed that low morale.and serious unrest

was brewing in Defence Force ranks due to what

SEE page 10

Ground-breaking
at Old Bahama Bay

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Prime Minister Perry
Christie was in Grand Bahama | yesterday
for the ground-breaking of the $585 million
Phase III expansion at Old Bahama Bay
Resort and Yacht Harbour at West End.

During his keynote address, Mr Christie
pledged his government's commitment to the
further development of West Grand Bahama.

This was the prime minister's first address
in Grand Bahama since suffering a stroke.

He told his audience that Grand Bahama's
future is bright and announced that other

‘multi-million dollar investment projects are in

the pipeline for Freeport.
In addition to the proposed $250 million

SEE page 10

High School.

Last week, more than SO girls from that school
from grades 10 through 12 were allegedly pun;
ished for wearing unisex shoes to school. se

One of the school’s teachers corroborated the
accusation and now two’students.are claiming.
they were made to stand outside their classroom
again the following day.

SEE page 12

Fe

Bahamas to host
Bond film again

@ By KARIN HERIG -
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas is set to experience a significant
windfall as the country gets ready to play host to
the new launch:of the James Bond franchise.

The Tribune has learnt that after an almost 20-
year absence, James Bond is posed to return to the
Bahamas once again with.Casino Royale, the 21st
instalment of the series.

Director of Film with the Ministry of Tourism
Craig Woods yesterday said that pre-production is
scheduled to start-this Fall.

“This is a wonderful thing, we are extremely
excited. We will be the first country in the world to
showcase the new James Bond,” he said.

Mt Woods said that having such a distinguished
projéct filmed in the Bahamas will not only give
local film crews work and high-level experience,

SEE page 12



inside

RRs

Ragged Island fury

FURIOUS residents of
Ragged Island claim they stand
to lose thousands of dollars in
spoiled goods because govern-
ment has “grounded” their
mailboat in Nassau.:

° See page three.



Bahamas is Gmmoral’

THE “serious problem” of
homosexuality among young
women is amindication that
morality is no longer a part of
Bahamian society, according to
National Youth Advisory Panel
chairman Mattie Nottage.

° See page five

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@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff
Reporter

THE dump at Staniel
Cay, is in a “deplorable
state” according to locals
on the small Exuma island,

According to one local,
Solomon Robinson, the
community as a whole is
extremely concerned about
the problem, and is crying
out for help.

Mr Robinson told The

‘Tribune yesterday that the

entire island, which has a
population of about 100, is
upset by the condition of
the local dump.

He said that trash from
the dump has spilled over

onto some of the winter

residents’ property, “and
these people are very
angry.’

“No one knows what is
going to happen. This
dump is actually coming
out into the road; rats are
running all over the place -
it’s deplorable,” Mr Robin-
son said.

Concerned:

“It seems that nobody is ;

hearing the people of
Staniel Cay. I am very con-
cerned about the health
hazards. The dump is over-
full and running out into
the street and it is coming
in on people’s private
property,” said Mr Robin-
son.

“JT don’t want to bad
mouth the government. I
understand it is not easy to
run this country, but this
situation needs to be
addressed,” he added.

The same problem exist-
ed on Staniel Cay two
years ago, he said, adding
that Long Island residents
who owned heavy equip-
ment had to be paid to
come and clear the garbage
from private property and
push it back into the dump.

Local government repre-
sentative for Staniel Cay
and deputy chief council-
lor for the Exuma Cays
Brooks Miller agreed that
the condition of the dump
has been a serious problem










a LOCALS say the dump at Staniel Cay is in a ‘deplorable state’.

§ Community ‘crying
out for help’ over
iel Cay dump

for quite some time. ,
“For the last year or so, I.

have been trying to deal

with the government to try

‘and deal with the situa-

tion,” said Mr Miller.

Mr Miller said that he
met the director of Envi-
ronmental Health last
week who promised to
work on it.

He added that he report-
ed the matter to an Envi-
ronmental Health Depart-
ment official in Exuma and
that he gave.a letter along

with pictures to the official,

which were to be sent to
the permanent secretary in
the Ministry of Health.

Mr Miller recommended
that a-road be constructed
at a height around the
dump, so that garbage:
could be dumped down
into the area.

Director of Environmen-
tal Health Melony McKen-
zie said that-her depart-
ment is aware of the prob-
lem and will render assis-
tance.

She said that a mainte-
nance crew with heavy duty

equipment will be sent to

the island to clean the site.
The department is also
looking into reconstructing
barriers known as berms at
the dump site, she said.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005, PAGE 3





esidents’ fury over ‘grounded’ mailboat

FURIOUS residents of Ragged
Island claim they stand to lose
thousands of dollars in spoiled
goods because government has
“orounded” their mailboat in
Nassau.

The motor vessel Captain C,
they claim, was prevented from
making its weekly trip because of
“safety issues” after it had been
loaded with groceries, gasoline
and other supplies.

Now they say non-perishable
goods will rot on the boat while
island fishermen will have no fuel
for their vessels.

“It looks like they (the govern-
ment) want everyone to leave
Ragged Island,” deputy chief
councillor Leander Maycock said
yesterday.

“They should have given us
some notice, but they waited until
everyone got their stuff aboard
before making the decision to halt
the mailboat.”

Inspection

However, Ministry of Trans-
port and Aviation permanent sec-
retary Archie Nairn said that a
nautical inspector from the
Bahamas Maritime Authority
told the ministry he performed
an inspection on the Captain C
in an effort to ensure the mail-
boat was up to certain Interna-
tional Maritime Organisation
(IMO) standards.

The boat, said Mr Nairn, comes
under the jurisdiction of both the
Bahamas Maritime Authority and
the Boat Registration Act.

“The inspector has the author-
ity to inspect the boats at will and
record his findings related to safe-
ty. Some were very serious and
in many cases these deficiencies
are not brought to the fore until
an inspection is carried out and
several deficiencies were listed,”
said Mr Nairn.

One of the more serious infrac-
tions was that the minimum safe-
ty manning level had not been
met, which meant that various
positions had to be filled, and

Ragged Islanders claim they
stand to ‘lose thousands’.



these persons must have the req-
uisite qualifications.

“They also had a problem with
the lifeboat, which is critical to
any seagoing vessel. The lifeboat
was damaged beyond repair and
it’s not simply a case of just
replacing the life raft with anoth-
er boat — certain equipment
needed to be in place and
approved under the regulations.

“Because the Port Department
is now aware of these things,
which have to be rectified, I
believe that the captain is working
with the port department to cor-
rect the situation,” he said.

Nevertheless, Ragged Islanders
are ‘so angry over the situation
that a petition is being sent to
Prime Minister Perry Christie and
other ministers alleging victimi-
sation. Ay os

One of them, Charlene Lock-
hart-Bain, said: “This is ridicu-
lous. It is another example of how
Ragged Island is treated like the
Cinderella island of the
Bahamas.”

She said groceries, including
birthday cakes and other items,
were now sitting aboard the mail-
boat at Potter’s Cay.

“Who is going to sustain this
loss?” she asked. “There are
thousands of dollars worth of
goods aboard. It isn’t the boat
captain’s fault, so who is going to
foot the bill?”

She added: “This is the second
time in three months that our
mailboat has been grounded. The
last time they sent a substitute
boat, but our fishermen lost craw-
fish and conch because the whole
lot was spoiled.”

She claimed the replacement
boat had a big hole in it and was
in worse condition than the regu-
lar mailboat.

“There is a very strong feeling



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here that we are being vic-
timised,” she said, “We under-
stand this is a safety issue, but
why wait until everything is
loaded before grounding the
boat?

Fuel

“Our fishermen, who depend .

on the mailboat for fuel, are not
able to go out until it gets here.”
Mrs Maycock said that,
because the boat was not running,
she had to charter a plane for
$2,800 to get her family to Nassau
for a funeral. With no regular air
service to the island, she had no
choice but to hire an aircraft.
Captain Etienne Maycock of



Damaged

the Captain C told The Tribune
last night that his boat had been
grounded for alleged minor
infringements. He said he had
been told “a couple of things” on
the boat were outdated.

However, he was aggrieved
because he felt all boats should
have been subjected to the same
treatment. He said he was pre-
vented from operating while oth-
er vessels were allowed to leave
the dock.

“They (ministry officials) came
without notice. I am the only one
they stopped,” he said. Howev-
er, he believes his cargo will be
saved because of his refrigeration
facilities.

Captain Maycock accepted that

some boats needed upgrading.
But he said higher fuel costs were
preventing maintenance work
being done. .
- The mailboat association is
believed to be seeking higher gov-
ernment. subsidies to meet
increased running. costs.

boats remain

ALMOST a year after hurricanes
Francis and Jeanne hit the Bahamas,
boats damaged during the storms
remain at Potter’s Cay Dock. The Tri-
bune has brought attention to these
vessels, but the boats: have yet to be

removed. :

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

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A spokesman said yesterday that all funds received in the
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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited



NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI





Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt .

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

LAST WEEK The Ministry of Financial
Services and Investments — “billed as the
ministry on the move” — published an inter-

esting tabloid supplement outlining its achieve-

ments and the major foreign direct invest-
ments, either approved or awaiting approval.

After reading about Bermuda’s tremen-
dous success as the world’s insurance Mecca
and its secret of attracting business, we read
Minister Allyson Maynard Gibson’s statement
in her ministry’s supplement in which she said
that the Bahamas’ “environment for invest-
ment opportunities remains robust, and the
government continues to commit to encour-
aging foreign direct investment and its policy
of the implementation of anchor develop-
ments in the Family Islands.” .

A few days later the following Tribune
headline caught our eye:

“Bureaucracy stalls $3.6m investment for
two years — developers pinpoint lack of coor-
dination and problems with Lands and Surveys
for holding back eco-tourism resort”.

The reference was to Flamingo Nest resort.

We then went back to the ministry’s special
supplement to get a progress report on Flamin-
go Nest resort, the only anchor development
proposed for Inagua. Flamingo Nest was list-
ed under “approved projects not commenced”.

Since the Christie government came to pow-
er in May, 2002 much has been ‘heard about
this Ministry’s red carpet. It was a carpet laid
down to smooth the way to the one-stop-shop

that was to welcome investors, cut through .

all red tape and poy their investment
approvals.

However, there must be something wrong
with that carpet — it probably should go back
to the manufacturers — because we have
heard nothing but complaints about its many
pitfalls.

According to Robert DeRose, assistant vice
president at AM Best: “Bermuda’s growth
and enhanced tourist market position are the
result of the island’s now legendary operating
platform, which enables Bermuda companies

to set-up shop quickly and allows them to

operate with substantial competitive advan-
tages over competitors in the United States
and Europe.”

It seems that the difference between
Bermuda and the Bahamas is that the former
is a land of action, while the latter is a land of
talk. We hear so many complaints from per-
sons trying to do business in the Bahamas that
‘we are convinced that every time an investor
casts his line it is caught in a net of bureau-
cracy.

According to the Ministry of Financial Ser-
vices and Investment the proposals for an eco-
tourism resort at Inagua has been approved.

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According to Flamingo Nest development
Corporation it has had official approval for

two years, but can’t turn the first sod of earth .

at Inagua because Lands and Surveys has
failed to determine whether its project has
met the requirements of its leasing contract. If
it gets clearance it can purchase the Crown
Land.

But, said one of the three American partners

' in the development, the project has been on
hold indefinitely because of the problems with -
‘ various government departments. Obviously, :

the red carpet and the one-stop-shop has failed
this company and an island that would wel-
come another employment outlet. Presently
Morton Salt Company is the main employer at
Inagua.

The partner said that the company had wait-
ed four years for a Lands and Surveys official

to survey the property, but no one ever came. -

As a result the company hired a local survey-
or, only to be told that his report would not be
accepted because he was not government
licensed. “So it was a total waste of money,”
said the investor.

Where was the one-stop-shop with its red
carpet and the helping hand?

From time to time government officials

would visit Inagua on a tourism development

' trip, praise Flamingo Nest’s proposed project,

but did nothing to hélp the company: cut
through the red tape. Meanwhile, the com-
pany held off investing money ina property it
didn’t own.

The building permit was another issue. Local

’ Government Council in Inagua issued a build-

ing permit, only to be told by central govern-
ment in Nassau that it had no authority to do
so. All permits to a foreign company have to

. be issued from Nassau.

Another problem was the death of the.com-
pany’s Bahamian partner, who willed his inter-

est to his daughter. However, she is having

difficulty getting the necessary documents
transferred into her name.

One of the American partners said they
were encouraged to invest in the Bahamas,
but they have had to put their investors on
hold because they can’t in good faith invite

people to invest in something knowing that so _

many things are still up in the air.

And so the Ministry’s listing of Flamingo
Nest as an investment that has been approved
is misleading. It seems that the ministry’s red
carpet has been pulled from under the Nest. It
would be interesting to know how many oth-
er projects listed in this supplement are having
similar problems.

Can one imagine such things being allowed
to happen in Bermuda’s efficient business cen-
tre?
































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Suggestions on
tackling illegal
immigration

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I HEREBY offer my third

chapter on the issue of illegal
immigration for your consid-
eration, as promised. This
part will deal with the solu-
tion/s as I see it, to this very
serious problem, but it is not
a fix all compilation nor is it
an exhaustive list, but rather
a guideline. Assuming that I
haven’t worn out my wel-
come, I thank you.in advance
for your accommodation.
Bahamians, and .our gov-
ernment, need to understand
that this vexing quandary of
illegal immigration is not oné
that will be fixed easily, or
without the utmost dedica-
tion. Quite frankly, I don’t
see this thing being fixed.

' Illegal immigration has sim-

ply become an accepted fact
of life to many Bahamians,

~ and to every government that

has ever occupied our hal-
lowed halls.of Parliament.

Nevertheless, here are my
basic guidelines:

1) There. must be an ulti-
matum issued by govern-
ment, stating that all immi-.
grants have a time limit (that
will be predetermined) in
which they must register with
the appropriate authority, for
legal status. This includes all

children born illegally in this*

country as well. They will be
issued an ID of some sort
that will indicate that. their

application is pending, and

therefore immune ‘to immie-
diate deportation upon detec-
tion. Residency in this coun-
try of at least 10 years will
have to be proven. Anybody
not able to qualify, needs to
get their affairs in order, in
expectation of beng deport-
ed.

.2) An additional ultimatum
must be issued to Bahamians
who employ illegal aliens as
their main labour force, stat-
ing that they also have a pre-
determined time period with-
in which they must cease and
desist from this practice. Fail-
ure to do so will result in
heavy fines. An efficient
process (who am I kidding)
by which Bahamians may
apply on behalf of foreign
nationals for their legal'work-
ing status in this country must
be put into place.

3) Immediately after the
grace period expires, there
will be sweeps carried out to
detect, detain, and deport
illegals. These sweeps will

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etters@tribunemedia.net



come under the Immigration
Department, but they will be
backed up by Police and
heavily armed Defence Force
personnel. Why the Defence
Force? Because of too many
reports of illegal weapons
being hidden in these shanty
towns where a lot of illegals
live. There must be an order
issued stating that there, must
not be any violence or the
threat thereof perpetrated
upon the arresting authori-
ties. Any such action will be
met with counter measures.

4) There may be allowed:

international observers —
except for Jimmy Carter —
who. will not interfere, but
rather observe and report.
This will help to keep our

guys in line in the execution

of this duty. On second
thought, scrap the outside
observers. Too many bleed-
ing hearts that think the
Bahamas is simply supposed
to maintain an open door
policy, without complaint,
towards illegal immigration.

5) . After the very long
and tedious job of cleaning
up this mess, land must :be
made available to the quali-
fying immigrants, which they

can purchase. at a very..com-.
fortable fee; and upon which:

they can build in accordance
with the building codes of
this country. Or, if they wish,
they may build in existing
communities along the same
guidelines that Bahamians
have to follow.

6) Our borders have to be
sealed. Well, actually that is
almost impossible due to our
geographical layout, but we
have to find ways in. which to

clamp down on the future.

influx of illegal immigrants,
who must be immediately
returned from whence they
came.

These are very basic guide-

‘lines, but you get the picture

right? This will be a very
involved process, one that
will require not only dedica-
tion, but sustainability. A
simple raid from time to
time, on the whim of some
politician i is not good enough.
Sure, such tactics get rid of
a few illegals, but by the time

' we get around to the next

raid, many of those illegals
have already returned.

. Governments are good at
appointing committees, and
our present government is no
exception. I hope the com-
mittee being appointed to
“look into” the situation of
illegal immigration here in
Abaco is looking at ways to
implement a policy by which
the illegals can be removed,
rather than trying to estab-
lish whether or not we have a
problem, because that would
be a jolly good waste of tax
payer dollars, wouldn’t it?

Just as sure as my Ma
named me William, this ille-
gal immigration problem will
be a permanent.one. And
problems, when left
unchecked, become worse
and worse.

_Unfortunately, come elec-
tion time in 2007, all we gat is
PLP or FNM, and the two a
dem mix up right now. We
ain sure who is da leader in
either one. And, neither one
of them has shown any real
zeal-in even trying to fix this
problem.

So, now what? The best
advice I can give you is to
pray, hard. The problems fac-
ing this country right now,

‘especially this one of illegal

immigration, is just as much
the fault of complacent lead-~:
ership, both present and past,
as it is the fault of those actu-

_ ally physically perpetrating.

the problems...
God help us! How much
more are we supposed to be

“expected to take?

Oh, one more thing. I
heard it said that there area
lot of Bahamians who are
afraid to tackle this problem
because they are scared that
they will be “fixed” by.
Haitians and their voodoo,
or obeah. ©

I simply refuse to accept .
that. It is too,stupid of a sug-
gestion for me to consider. It
simply cannot be true that we
have Bahamians, supposed-
ly a Christian people, who
are afraid of a less powerful
force, even if it is only in

' their minds.

Again, God help us!

WILLIAM (BILLY)
ROBERTS, |
Defender of the realm.
Abaco,

Bahamas,

September Ts 2005,

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 20vs, r.



NN ————EEe
Panel voices concern |
over homosexuality |

among young women

Industry
veterans set.
for medal
honour —

THE coveted Bahamahost
Medal will be awarded to 10
industry veterans, it has been
announced.

Since 1978, 23,000 persons
have graduated from the
Bahamahost programme “and
have gone on to make mean-
ingful contributions to the
hospitality industry,” accord-
ing to the Ministry of
Tourism.

Top honours will be given
Sir Clement T Maynard,
founder of the Bahamahost
programme.

The committee has also
announced that Mrs Iris Fin-
layson will receive special
recognition for her assistance
during the Bahamahost
design and structuring phase.

Other receiving awards are:

e Julia Burnside - senior
manager at the Ministry of
Tourism

e Renee Mayers - director
of human resources at the
Ministry of Tourism

¢ Berkley Pilgrim - trainer

° Andrew Curry - educator
and music director

¢ Telzena Coakley - retired
educator

Bradley Bain - tennis train-
er and educator

° Iris.Dean - retired educa-
tor and trainer

e Beverley Saunders - vice
president, Atlantis, trainer

¢ Athama Bowe - Ministry
of Tourism consultant, train-
er. hie

The winners will be pre-
sented with the Bahamahost
Commemorative Medal by
Governor General Dame Ivy
Dumont during an awards
ceremony at Government
House on Friday, September
16, at 6pm.

Minister of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe will address the
awards ceremony.

In expressing his continu-
ous support for the pro- ¢
gramme and the training and
education department of the
Ministry of Tourism, Mr’:
Wilchcombe recognised and
congratulated those being ~
honoured for their pioneering
contributions to tourism and
the high standards they have
set.

TV SCHEDULE

THURSDAY
SEPTEMBER 15

16:30am Community Pg./1540
11:00 — {mmediate Response
‘| 12:00 ~ ZNS News Update
i Caribbean Today News
Update

- Immediate Response Cont'd.

Ethnic Health America

Spiritual Impact

Mr. Ballooney B.

Treasure Attic

Bishop Leroy Emmanuel

Gilbert Patterson

Video Gospel

Gospel Grooves

ZNS News Update

Caribbean News Line _

Legends Whence We Came:

Anthony Carroll

Caribbean Newsline

News Night 13

The Bahamas Tonight

Native Stew

Da’ Down Home Show

Black.College Talent Hour
* News Night 13

The Bahamas Tonight

Immediate Response

Community Page

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves

the right to make last minute
programme changes!

@ By KARAN MINNIS

THE “serious problem” of homosexuality among
young women is an indication that morality is no
longer a part of Bahamian society, according to
National Youth Advisory Panel chairman Mattie
Nottage.

Speaking at a press conference yesterday, Mrs
Nottage said: “It seems as.if we have become a peo-
ple that are lawless, have no respect for others and
no regard for human life.”

Mrs Nottage said she was referring’ to the fact
that “homosexuality amongst other problems such as
incest, gangs and drugs, are now a serious problem
in the Bahamas among young women.

“We now have a myriad of problems that have
contributed to the continual growth of social ills,”
she said. “The television, music, media, advertise-
ments and the Internet are sending subliminal mes-
sages that target our young people, by introducing
them to perversion, gang violence, homosexuality,
drugs and alcohol abuse.”

Lifestyle

According to Mrs Nottage, the panel, along with
the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture, refuses to
accept homosexuality and lesbianism as a normal
lifestyle.

“We will not lower our moral standards for a few

‘misguided individuals who are confused as to who
_ they are, why they are here and where they are

going. We do, however, empathise with every young
person that has been raped, molested, or lured into
a negative way of life,” she said.

“In recent times, representatives.from this small

. nation have graced international platforms around

the world as a result of significant and noteworthy

accomplishments in the athletic world and music -

industry. However, due to a recent slate of events,
the positive inroads that our young people have



“The television, music, media,
advertisements and the Internet
are sending subliminal messages
that target our young people, by
introducing them to perversion,
gang violence, homosexuality,

_ drugs and alcohol abuse.”



National Youth Advisory Panel
chairman Mattie Nottage

been making are now subject to challenge,” she
said.

“Three out of every ten females that visit the
doctor are diagnosed with some form of sexually
transmitted disease,” she claimed. “Incest, rape and
molestation have reached cataclysmic proportions.
Females are becoming more actively involved in
gangs, namely lesbian gangs, especially in our
schools.”

Mrs Nottage said “the recent tsunami ravaged
Indonesia and caught the attention of an interna-
tional audience, but in our opinion, an even greater
tragedy looms among our nation’s youth.”

“When young people can bluntly and proudly
announce their lesbian lifestyle and expect us, as
the Bahamian society, to accept this as normalcy, this
is a greater travesty,” she said. “We will be silent no
more. We refuse to accept anything that is thrown at
us, such as drugs, alcohol, homosexuality, or anything
else that adds to the moral decay of our nation: We
will not compromise our standards; moral or family
values,” she said. ¢

“The Bahamas stands united on our views on
homosexuality and it should be noted that Freeport
has already launched their campaign and will be
holding their Prayer and Praise Youth Rally on Fri-
day night of this week,” Mrs Nottage said.



Push for tourism integration

UNITED NATIONS, New
York -— Government leaders
joined the heads of major Unit-
ed Nations agencies, civil soci-
ety and the travel industry in a
call for the integration of

? tourism in national aevelons
- ment plans.: id

The Declaration on Tourism
and the Millennium Develop-
ment Goals was endorsed yes-
terday morning and will be pre-
sented to the full UN Summit,
which opened today.

The heads of UNICEF,
UNCTAD, UNDP, ICAO, and
the World Tourism Organisa-
tion endorsed the declaration.

They will join with the 20
countries represented at the
ministerial level to present the
call to the summit session of
the UN General Assembly.

Executive director: of
UNICEF Ann Veneman said
sustainable tourism develop-
ment can protect children of
the world from abuse and
exploitation.

She-urged others to endorse
the declaration.

Secretary General of the UN
Conference on Trade and
Development Dr Supachai

Panitchpakdi. said that as -

investors attach more impor-
tance to local technical skills
and efficient services than to
cheap labour, poorer countries
"will harness their assets of nat-
ural beauty and cultural wealth
for development gains."

Lelei LeLaulu of Counter-

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part International represented
civil society organisations at
the high level Roundtable on
Harnessing Tourism for the
Millennium Development

Goals, held at UNICEF head- .

quarters.,
» LeLaulu called for the teach-

ing of tourism at the elemen-
‘tary school level to ensure that
- the "best and brightest" can

see Careers in the industry "as
the first, and not the last,
resort."

LeLaulu noted that visitors
from richer states take more
cash to the developing coun-
tries than their governments
give in aid, and suggested that
the World Bank and other
financial institutions look at
funding air services to coun-



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tries without reliable airlift.
"These should be seen as
important aerial highways
bringing valuable foreign
exchange — just like the terres-
trial asphalt highways," he said.

_-Francesco ,Frangiallj,. Secres.

tary Generalof.the World

Tourism Organisatidn; under- .
scoring the:size of the world’s >

largest industry, said that last
year, 763 million trips were tak-
en by tourists, who spent $622
billion.

Developing countries

received $177 billion in tourism.

receipts in 2004 which was the
primary source of foreign
exchange earnings in 46 of the
49 poorest nations which the
UN calls the “least developed
countries”.

Strategies being
_ launched to

_ tackle problem
_ of ‘at risk’

_ young women

@ By KARAN MINNIS

THE government is trying to:

get youth groups and churches
involved in a campaign to tackle
the problem of at-risk young
women.

To this end, the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture has
invited youth leaders and church
heads to attend a meeting at 7
o’clock tonight at the Ministry
of Youth.

_The public is also being called
on to join the effort by taking
part in a mass youth prayer and
praise rally this Saturday at 6pm
on Windsor Park.

Effort

At a press conference yester-
day, Minister of Youth, Sports,
-and Culture Neville Wisdom and
National Youth Advisory Panel
chairman Pastor Mattie Nottage

outlined several strategies that:

are being launched in an effort to
protect vulnerable women.

_. They said that over the next
few months, there will be a series
of meetings between the min-
istry and various youth leaders in
a effort to tackle the issue.

According to Mr Wisdom, the
ministry is beginning “to see



@ MINISTER of Youth,
Sports and Culture —
Neville Wisdom.

some very serious challenges and

very serious concerns in connec-
tion with the behaviour of some
of our young women.”

Mr Wisdom explained that the
term “at risk youth” refers to
young persons “whose academic
and social development have
been significantly impaired due
to'serious behavioral challenges,”

He said it also refers to those
who “constantly exhibit delin-
quent behaviour and anti-social
tendencies.”

Mrs Nottage said the Youth
Advisory Council has souyht to
put in place youth programmes
specifically designed to educate,
rehabilitate and transform young
persons who have been exposed

o “negative lifestyles”.

Speaking to the press yester-
day, Mrs Nottage said, “We are
calling on religious and civic lead-
ets to open the doors of your
churches and organisational facil-
ities and, making it readily avail-
able with planned youth activities

' between the hours of 3pm and

5pm.”

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THE TRIBUNE



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Rosetta Street, Palmdale

LOCAL NEWS

‘

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

A leading company has a vacancy for the position of:

Sales Representative

Responsibilities:

To develop consultative relationship with customers and
utilize in-depth knowledge of competitive sales tactics,
efficient operating practices, adequate customer service,
provide advice and assistance to customers in making
business decisions to improve business profitability.

Qualifications & Competencies: __
¢ Bachelor degree in Matketng. 0 Business Administration
or Related Fields.
¢ 4-5 Years of Experience in sales.
¢ Marketing and business skills
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Bahamian nationals can submit their electronic resume to
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SECURITY supervisor Anthony Plakaris, Mr Munnings;



Sacked staff rejoin
old security fir

a



Acribba Wemyss-Solomon (CEO’s assistant), Gladstone Bur-
rows and security officer Lenamae Cleare.

A GROUP of staff members
who were previously laid off
have rejoined the ranks of
Wemco Security.

_ Some weeks ago, an altered
client contract at Wemco result-
ed in the redundancy of several
employees.

Wemco CEO Henry Wemyss
said: “There is now an upward
trend at Wemco and we are
overjoyed, because our highly
trained staff are this company’s
best assets.

“We are proud to have them
back to continue the process of
building one of the best securi-
ty firms in the Bahamas”.

Among the 10 employees
returning to work at Wemco
Security is woman security offi-
cer Lenamae Cleare, who
protested her layoff on ZNS
television news.

“I couldn’t believe it, because

“everyone recognised. me from

TV,” Said«Ms: Cleare;.“‘but my
experience showed ‘me that
Wemco is the place to be. It is
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Returning security supervisor
Anthony Plakaris noted: “The
training and caliber of a compa-
ny’s people is very important to
its success. I am glad to be called
back and I will continue to serve .
to the best of my ability”.

“T have worked with several
security firms and there is no
comparison to Wemco” said
returning security officer Glad-
stone Burrows

Security officer Christopher
Munnings, now again in charge
of one of Wemco’s most sensi-
tive security areas, said: “Wem-
co may not be the best, but
we’re better than the rest”.

Mr Wemyss said that the
return of the staff members was
the result of positive business
trends for the company and the
fulfillment of a promise he
made. “I told the staff that they
would be back at the first
opportunity. Wemco and our
clients have always appreciat-.
ed their professionalism and
dedication to duty and we.are -
happy to welcome their return
to our winning team.”

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THE TRIBUNE



ni i
Bethel: Government

will not discriminate
against immigrants

IT is government policy not
to discriminate in the delivery of
health care to immigrants —
despite the significant drain this
causes on the medical system.

This was the announcement
of Minister of Health Dr Mar-
cus Bethel yesterday, in respon-
seto findings of the “Report on
the Impact of Immigrants of
Haitian and Other National
Origins on Health Care and
Environmental Services pro-
vided by the Government of the
Bahamas”.

“This report is significant in
that it not only provides current
information on health trends
among immigration popula-
tions, but it also provides an
indication of the extent of usage
of health and environmental
facilities by immigrants and
their communities, bearing in.
mind that health care is regard-
ed as a fundamental right,” Dr
Bethel said.

Relative to child births, the
report reveals that between
1998 to 2003, the total number
of births to mothers of Haitian
origin was 559, (11.2 per cent
of all births), with 3.5 per cent to
mothers of Jamaican origin and
81.8 per cent of births to
Bahamian mothers.

“While our activities in dis-

ease surveillance, prevention.

and control have reduced inci-
dences of transmission of infec-
tious diseases, Haitian immi-
grants currently represent
approximately 28 percent of
HIV/AIDS infections, 21 per-
cent of tuberculosis (TB) infec-
tions, and 67 percent of malaria
infections in the country,” Dr
Bethel said.

Haitian immigrants comprise
34 per cent of total Visits to
antenatal services — however,
this particular service is
accessed more than any other

type of service offered at clinics |

by this population grouping.

The second leading cause of

0



@ DR Marcus Bethel

illness among Haitian immi-
grant in-patients was infectious
and parasitic diseases.

Dr Bethel also disclosed that
the vector control programme
has been included as part of an
expanded project targeting
Haitian communities on New








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Providence that addresses
broader environmental issues,
including clean-up activities and
solid and bulk waste removal.

The current policy clearly lays
out specific fees for non-resi-
dents and residents needing
accident and emergency depart-
ment, and a standard rate for
all other services.

Maternal and child health ser-
vices are free for children up to
five years old. Free services are
also provided for the elderly.

Dr Bethel also stressed that
the Bahamas, which is a mem-
ber of the World Health Organ-
isation (WHO) and the Pan
American Health Organisation
(PAHO), does not discriminate
in health care delivery.

“When you start including
practices that are not consid-
ered humane then you become
blacklisted which then has a
penalty as a part of the inter-
national community of nations.”












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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



A few timely suggestions for the

HERE is no question
that difficulties at the
beginning of the year for public
schools is a perennial problem.
Repairs not completed, grounds
not prepared and all personnel

not in place are a constant.
Yet, some years are far worse
than others. The Hon Alfred
Sears, Minister of Education,
has had a succession of poor
school openings since coming
to office. In frustration, the min-

ister has laid the blame at the
feet of the Ministry of Public
Works, which he says lacks the
capacity to effect all the work
needed to ensure that public
school openings are successful.

The minister’s solution is to

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) is
pleased to invite Tenders to provide the Company with Motor

Insurance coverage.

Interested companies/firms may collect a Tender Specification
from BTC’s Security’s Desk located in its administrative building
on John F. Kennedy Drive, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Tenders must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked
“TENDER FOR MOTOR INSURANCE”, and delivered on or

of:

Mr. Michael J. Symonette
President & CEO

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before 5:00 pm on Friday, September 30, 2005 to the attention

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provide the Ministry of Educa-
tion with its own technical team
to plan and carry public works
to school facilities. | can only
say to the minister that the Min-
istry of Education has been
down the road before and the
same obstacles that prevented
the initiative from succeeding
before remain in place today.
If he has not done so, per-
haps the minister should care-
fully review the files on this
matter and try to determine
exactly why it was the initiative
never quite got off the ground.
I know from experience that
the years with the least
amount of problems are those
when the minister paid close
attention to the preparations
made for school opening and

worked hand-in-hand with a

functioning director of educa-
tion in doing so. This was
especially the case when the
minister was being held to
account by a prime minister

STRAIGHT Up TALK



ZH

who took pride in smooth
school openings.

Successful school openings,
however, should not rely pre-
dominantly on-the vigilance of
political directorates at the lev-
els of ministers and prime min-
isters. This creates too many
possibilities for changing for-
tunes for the public education
system because political direc-
torates come and go.

School openings should rely
instead on a system with built-in
accountability at the level of
local communities. It is with this
in mind that I offer some sug-
gestions to the Minister of Edu-
cation to rid himself of some of
the perennial issues that tend
to plague the education system.

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‘September 15th
Children’s Health
Dr. Percival McNeil

October 20th
Cancer

Dr. Theodore
Turnquest

November 17th
Diabetes
Dr. Christine Chin

December 15th
Managing Stress

& Depression

Dr. Timothy Barrett



VARGO

LAE N @&

GIVE ELECTED LOCAL
GOVERNMENT MORE
RESPONSIBILITY FOR

SCHOOLS

irst, persuade the gov-
ernment to transfer all
the responsibility of building,
maintaining and repairing

‘schools from the central gov-

ernment to elected local gov-
ernment and give it the capital

‘and recurrent budget to meet

the responsibility.

Think about it, who would
have a greater interest in the
integrity of the schools children
attend than the people who
send them to those schools?

Why wouldn’t we expect peo-
ple who live in a community to
have a keen interest in where a
school is built for their children
in their community, how the
school is built, how it is'main-
tained, and how it is prepared
for school opening?

Who would have a greater
desire to be accountable for
problems that occur with the
school, a politician who lives in
Nassau miles away from watch-
ful, activist parents or local offi-
cials elected by those parents?

For those who say that this is
too heavy a burden to place on
local government and that giv-
ing them such a burden will
result in huge mistakes?--------- --

Well, the burden now rests
on the central government and
it makes mistakes. At times it
even learns from them. People
elected to-local. government °
come equipped with many tal-
ents and no doubt spearhead
operations of their own.

They ,too can make mistakes
and learn from them’and when

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005, PAGE



Ministry of Education

they do, the local community is
that much richer for it. If we
are worried about the abilities
of the people elected to local

government, be sure of this, give .

local government more power
and more serious and capable
people will opt to participate in
it.

GIVE SCHOOL BOARDS
MORE RESPONSIBILITY
FOR SCHOOL OPERA-
TIONS

econd, give school
boards full responsibility
for the security, custodial care,
school supplies and other oper-
ational necessities of their
schools and provide them with
' the recurrent and capital budget
to carry out their responsibility.
Once again, you have people
from the schools’ communities
with a vested interest in their
care who will bring a level of
vigilance that no central author-
_ity can bring. The more power
you give them, the more seri-
ously they will take their
responsibility.

PREPARE PERSONNEL.

PLAN EARLY AND STICK

TOIT

hird, uphold the long-
standing policy of the
Ministry of Education that the
Department of Education have
prepared by May of each year
the personnel plan for proceed-
ing school year.

This plan would include all
placements of admitiistrators,
teachers, guidance counsellors
and custodial staff. By the time
they leave for summer vacation,
all principals, vice-principals,
senior masters, senior mistress-
es, etc should know where they
will be assigned for the upcom-
ing year.

This will avoid the ridiculous
practice of having schools still
waiting to find out who will be
their principals or principals
waiting to find out which will
be their school.at the beginning
ofthé school year. ;

This will. especially prevent

thstances of teachers in the

Family Islands going on sum-
mer break not knowing whether
they will be returning to the
island on which they taught
over the last year.

You say this means a great
deal of adjustment in the sys-

tem, including at the level of.

the Public Service Commission?
So be it! We are talking about
fixing problems in education.

It also means political direc- .

torates being disciplined enough
to resist the temptation to do
political favours for teachers
and others seeking preferential
treatment and doing so no mat-



Give local
government
more power
and more
serious and
capable people
will opt to
participate in it



ter how poorly the tiniing is for
the system or at what cost to it.
Planning is key and, with a good
plan well executed, we can
achieve some extraordinary
results in education.

- HOLD PRE-SCHOOL
OPENING MEETINGS
WITH PARENTS

Fee. how about hold-
ing meetings with par-
ents in advance of school open-
ing to inform them of opportu-

nities and challenges for the:

upcoming year?
There is already a policy in
the Department of Education

’ of meeting with parents of new

students a week in advance of
school opening to orientate
them about the school.

This meeting can be broad-
ened and stretched over a week
to meet with all parents to
update them about unforeseen
problems that arose. Would it
not be better to have met with

parents weeks before school
opening to advise of building.
repair, maintenance and staffing
issues than having to make cri-
sis Management trips to ease
parents’ tension?

Reasonable people prefer to
be informed in advance about
problems so that they can make

‘adjustments where necessary, if

only in their expectations,
rather than being taken by sur-
prise because no-one had the
courtesy to give them prior
notice.

BROADEN THE SEARCH

FOR SCHOOL MAN-
AGERS AND LEADERS

Fie. who says that the
head of a school must

be a veteran educator? Organi- ©

sations are run by management
experts and leaders. It often
does not matter if they come to
the assignment with technical
expertise, so long as they know
the organisation’s mission,
know how to draw out a vision
for the organisation, strategies
for its realisation and marshal
the resources necessary to make
it happen.

A veteran educator may be
principal of a school; especially
if he or she has been thorough-
ly trained for the task of man-
aging and leading an organisa-
tion. Otherwise, if one cannot
find a' veteran educator, hire
someone who is not.

Such.a person will know how
to get the technical expertise
where it is needed. This should-
n’t be so far-fetched because
the minister of education is
often not an educator and relies
on the technical expertise of his
chief adviser,
education and other tech-
nocrats.

Capable management and
leadership personnel at the
head of public schools will avert
many of the perennial problems
the schools face because they
will have the insight, foresight,
fortitude and resourcefulness to
address them proactively.

I can assure you that a com-
petent manager will sound the
alarm about problems in his or
her organisation leading up to a

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major opening long before the
opening arrives.

While I was minister of state
in education | certainly thought
about and discussed with edu-
cation officials many of these
issues. In some instances a plan-
ning process toward seeking.to
have them implemented had
been initiated.

Alas, a year in the ministry
was not enough time to make
much progress. Perhaps Minis-
ter Sears might find the sugges-
tions useful points for his con-
sideration. That is the spirit in
which they are offered.

THOUGHT FOR THE
WEEK

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insanity is doing

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and expecting different resuits.”
— Benjamin Franklin






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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



5 New Restaurants,
21 New Shops,

All in the heart
of paradise.





eo
A whele new experience has been unveiled on Paradise Island. Marina
Village at Atlantis offers the finest in world-class shopping and dining.
Youll find brand names from around the world offering everything from
exquisite jewelry and timepieces ta resort wear and accessories. After you
visit the 21 boutiques, dine at one of the -new restaurants, with dishes to

satisfy even the most refined palate. The village is situated at the eastern
end of The Marina at Atlantis, just over the Paradise Island Bridge.

ef

“nas “hos

VILLAGE

eb AT

_For.more: information, visit Atlantis.com





‘



FROM page one

condo investment by Erik
Christiansen, Mr Christie
revealed that government has
received an application for
another $150 million invest-
ment for Freeport.

"I have confidence in Grand
Bahama's future," said Mr
Christie.

Old Bahama Bay has
received government approval
to expand the size and scope
of its development, which
includes the construction of a
new luxury hotel, 450 multi-
family condominium units and
the expansion of the marina
facility to 180 slips.

The project also includes
development of 45 to 50
additional single family
home sites and other state-








Ground breaking at resort



















of-the-art amenities.
Attendees included Minister

of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe,

and Grand Bahama Port

M@ PERRY Christie and others at the event

Authority officials, chairman
Julian Francis, co-chairman Sir
Albert Miller and deputy co-
chairman Willie Moss.






(Photo: Denise Maycock)








Pratt defends RBDF review

FROM page one

they termed “a lack of progress”
being made on the recently
announced review board.

The permanent secretary in
the Ministry of National Secu-
rity Mark Wilson said the
review board report would bea
public document.

Mr Wilson said that, as time
goes by, the report will provide
a means by which the public will
be able to assess the govern-
ment’s performance in bringing
about “meaningful and neces-
sary changes” to the force. ~

“Very little in the concerns
expressed: and the questions
raised by this article rises to the

BAHAMAS INSTITUTE OF
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS (BICA)

NOTICE OF RELOCATION

The BICA office has been relocated and is
now located in Malborough House
(immediately west of Pirates of Nassau). Our
new contact numbers are as follows:

BICA Telephone - 326-6619

BICA Fax -

326-6618

Please visit our website at www.bica.bs



level of information that:is
beyond the easy reach of any
officer of the RBDF,” Mr Wil-
son said.

“On July 29, the minister
announced the review board
and the work schedule of the
board that would extend over
five months and culminate: in
the production of a report by
the end of the year.

“The review board has peut
its work and has, in fact, made a
visit to the Defence Force base
at Coral Harbour,” he said. ‘

Mr Wilson said that specific
reference was made to changes in
the Police Command and:to
salary increases following the
police review. “The Minister of
National Security,” said Mr Wil-

son, “has consistently assured the

law enforcement agencies and
the public of her commitment to
work towards effecting parity in
the pay scales of those agencies

‘and parity of salaries is a focused

concern in the current Public Ser-
vice salary negotiations.”

Mr Wilson hinted that the
complaints could be politically

motivated.

“These . complaints. ‘and
charges come at a time when
salary negotiations are in full’
gear and when the winds of elec-;
tioneering are beginning to stir.
It is difficult to conclude that

“these aré not what ‘these com-

plaints are all about,” he said.

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S$ 25) |2/s PAGE 12, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Further claims in school
row about unisex shoes



80th Annivers
Saturday, 22nd
alkooe, Wyndham Nassau Resort -

Cocktails at ZOO pm ©
For information call: 362-2922/424-2744 or 356-5460

The Crystal B









Mr. Datrick J. Seymour



ary Gala Banquet



ear



The Government High School
80th Anniversary
Celebrations Committee

Salutes

T.C., BSc., M.A., Ed

A veteran educator for over 55 years
and past Principal of The Government
High School.



tober, 2005

Dinner at 8:00. pm:






The Government High School
80th Anniversary
Celebrations Committee



FROM page one

“When we came to school on
Tuesday last week, they started
looking for people with infrac-
tions of their uniforms and even
‘the girls with boys shoes on’.

“Then (the teacher) made us
stand up in the sun again the fol-
lowing day, saying that we looked
gay in the shoes, and even called
one of my friends gay. The senior
mistress and the principal were
saying that the shoes were unisex
but (the teacher) didn’t care,”
one of the girls claimed.

The second student said: “This
teacher then called me over say-
ing ‘Hey you, gay girl, come
here’. Then I was asked when I
was going to change my shoes,
and I said my mommy don’t have
money to buy me new shoes..So
the teacher then said to go to the
Salvation Army and get some.”

The students said the teacher
in question had already been
approached by parents who
insisted that the “eye and ‘L’
stick” Clark shoes’ that the girls
were wearing were, in fact, unisex
shoes.

Last week, Erin. Greene,
spokesperson for gay rights
organisation the Rainbow
Alliance, said they would launch

their own investigation.

“At the present moment we
are shocked to see this level of
hysteria operating in the public

of conduct,” she said.

One concerned grandmother
called The Tribune last night stat-
ing that her granddaughter had
also informed her of the incident
and expressed her utter outrage
over the actions taken at the
school.

“I never hear about a pair of
sissy shoes in my life,” she said.
“So if I have my head tied up ina
head cloth then am I in a gang?
I’m a woman who likes to wear
her hair short so am J a lesbian?

“Ain’t no-one ga’ get off call-
ing my child a sissy. Even if she is
then that’s her right. How can
you label someone by their cloth-
ing? Everyone knows there are
gay people out there but that’s
their lifestyle. I can’t condemn
no-one for what they do, only.
God can do that.

“I’m only here for the rights of
my child. You need to tell this
teacher, in particular, to stop and

if the principal tells them they can.
wear the shoes, who is this teacher ,

to:say they are sissies for wearing
them?” she asked.

. Permanent secretary in the
Ministry of Education Creswell
Sturrup said the situation should
be addressed in terms of the
school’s dress code and that it
should not be sensationalised as
being a “gay issue”

“The school has policies. ‘I
don’t know why they are trying
to use descriptions of gay and

007 to return to
Bahamas for 21st
movie outing

FROM page one

but also bring substantial
financial gain for the country.

“The benefits will be sig-
nificant, the crews will need
hotel accommodation, food,
beverages. Plus they all get
hefty per diem which they
will spend in the casinos and
at the fish fry,” he said.

Mr Woods said the min-
istry will showcase all of the
Bahamas’ cultural aspects for
the film crews, to perhaps
incorporate into the movie.

“The pre-production phase

begins around the same time ~

as Junkanoo preparations
take place. Junkanoo is a
colourful cultural event, so
there might be a chance that
the production company will
want to include it in the
movie. We will show them
all the Bahamas has to offer,
nothing will be hidden,” he
said.

Although Mr Woods could
not disclose the identity of

the actor selected to follow in .

the footsteps of Pierce Bros-
nan, the director of film said

the production company a
ft

chosen someone less wé!

known: ae
“He ide-younger man, a

very energetic man, who I

Connery,.

of the suave secret agent...

Before the decision was
made to shoot in the
Bahamas, the new 007 movie:
was scheduled to be filmed in.
South Africa. However, after.
the production company Eon:
experienced difficulties
securing shooting locationis,:
the film-makers were forced’
to relocate, the James Bond
website commanderbond.net
reported this week. |

The website further
reported that the film’s direc-
tor Martin Campbell and,

director of photography Phil’

Meheux are currently on
Paradise Island scouting for
suitable shooting locations. .

James Bond is no stranger
to the Bahamas, and Casino:
Royale would ‘be the fran-
chise’s sixth visit to the coun-.
try. ;

In 1965, the film crew Of
Thunderball, including the
first actor to play 007, Sean
visited the
Bahamas where they filmed
scenes in various locations in:
New Providence. and the
Exumas.

Key underwater scenes.
featured in The Spy Who
Loved Me and For Your
Eyes Only were also filmed
in-Bahamian waters, and the

Salutes education system. We are cer- stuff. But I don’t know the facts, believe will bring some fresh 1983 ‘unofficial’ Bond movie’
tain that the Ministry of Edu- as it has not been escalated to energy to the franchise,” he Never Say Never Again was
Mr. Ernest John (E J) cation is aware of its obligation my desk for any reason. This is'a _ said. ‘extensively shot here.
to the bisexual, gay, lesbian, matter to get in contact with the According to reports, The last. Bond film to be
Bowe and transgender youth in the — school’s principal for,” he said. however, British actor shot in the Bahamas was A

A promoter of the Bahamian Credit
Union Movement for almost three
decades and past Principal of the

Government High School.



country, and we are certain
they are actively investigating
this seemingly inappropriate act

However, attempts to reach
the school’s principal Eulease
Beneby were unsuccessful. ‘

Daniel Craig, 37, of movies
such as Road to Perdition,
Elizabeth, has won the part

Licence to Kill in 1989.
Casino Royale is slated for
a late 2006 release.






8Oth Anniversary Gala Banquet
Saturday, 22nd October, 2005

The Crystal Ballroom, Wyndham Nassau Resort

Cocktails at 7:00 pm Dinner at 8:00 pm

For information call: 362+2922/424-2744 or 356-5460







Faces of GHS

REAL ESTATE OMe

701 East Bay Street
Phone: 322-7979/80 * Fax: 325-6473

The Government High School
80th Anniversary
Celebrations Committee

www.islandlivingrealestate.com

Salutes

Mrs. Anatol Carridad
Reeves Rodgers

One of the first Bahamians to be
employed as a teacher at The
Government High School and eventually
the first female Head Mistress of the
school.

Nek siass

Our NEWEST Agent
Brenda Knowles, Broker

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NOTICE

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005, PAGE 13
THE TRIBUNE

hl

"Reigate,
IO pitta
Lyle te,

e

Appearing will be various gospel artist such as:
Christian Massive, Shabbak, Voices Of Praise,
___ Bahamas Harvest Praise Team, Five Porches
_ Believers Faith Chain Breakers, Dance Grou


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005

THE TRIBUNE:



# By ATHENA DAMIANOS

UNTIL SGT 1554 Mather
and her team arrived, a pocket
of the St Thomas More con-
stituency off East Shirley Street
could best be described as
‘Streets of The Lost.’

In this neighborhood of the

underprivileged, gamblers and
other dubious characters,
youngsters played truant and
used their free time to practise
graffiti art, fight and steal fruit
from people’s yards.

They left their identities on
many a shop and office wall.

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LOCAL NEWS

How the police are bringing hope

Done, Mr Screw, Spinal, Stut-
ter, Little Man, DPG (Dog
Pound Gangster), Kill Cops,
Garlic and Mob or Get Rob. |

They range in age from six to
15 - young brothers tagging
along with older siblings.

“It was really frustrating,”
said an office manager at a
nearby business. “Every time
we tried to beautify our build-
ing, crack users from the alleys
stole our plants. We have actu-
ally padlocked our hibiscus to
the walls.

“Then the kids came along
and started defacing our nice,
freshly painted walls. I was
about to give up.”

The office manager probably
would have given up — as other
businesses in the area did.

However, a few days later, a
Kemp Road Urban Renewal
Project police car pulled into
the office parking lot. The car
idled in the lot for a few min-
utes; the three policemen inside
looked around and then left.

The next day, it returned.

Sgt Mather went into the

office and introduced herself.

She explained that she and
her team — Constables 2214
Brooks and 2756 Burrows - had
been given the task of protect-
ing and reforming the area —
and reform the area they would.

Listening to this no nonsense
woman from Harbour Island,
the manager believed her.

Within two weeks, the
“Kemp Road cops” rounded up
a group of the young graffiti
artists and gave them a stern
talking to.

Then, Sgt Mather called upon
the various shop and office peo-
ple and told them if they sup-
plied the paint, the youngsters
would apply a fresh coat. They
would be held responsible for
their actions.

Not only have the youngsters
turned their “art” skills to good
use, but they have apologised
to the business people.

According to Sgt Mather,
these are not hard-boiled little
gangsters, but children crying

it‘for lové and-attention: ~~"

Many of them; she said, come
from single parent homes and

. that parent is frequently absent.

They are often hungry and to
them, heaven means going to

Officers from the Kemp Road |
Urban Renewal Project are making
a difference to children’s lives



I KEMP Road Urban Renewal Project — police touring the area _

sleep with a full stomach.

One businessman was so
moved by the plight of these
youngsters that, after they
painted over their graffiti, he
bought each of them a pair of
shoes and a hot meal.

The youngsters have devel-
oped a deep affection for their
police guardians.

They spent the summer
school break at the community
police station on St James Road
where they were supervised by
the police.

In a large room with chairs
and tables borrowed from a
nearby church, the children
learned shell and floral art from
Sgt Mather, a talented teacher.

Sgt Mather and her officers
practice drills for the marching
youth band they are determined
to form:

“Come September, this street
is going to be empty. Every

child is going to be in school. .

Not one child will be left
behind,” she vowed.

“We have told the parents
that if their children are not in
school, they wilkbe prosecuted
to the full extent of the law.
There is no reason why these
children shouldn’t be in
school.”

Const Brooks agrees. He
points out that it’s illegal to
leave minors unattended, and
it’s time the parents are made
responsible for their children.

‘The problem is these chil-
dren have too much spare time
by themselves,’ he says.

‘Most of them come from sin-
gle homes. A lot of these par-
ents are unemployed and are at
home, but don’t supervise or
check for their children. They
have no discipline. They’re just
left to run loose.’

Many of the parents are
known to Social Services. They
will take food stamps and sell
them, using the money to buy
gin from a nearby liquor store.

Their children scrounge for
food, annoying people outside

‘the nearby shops with ‘spon-

sorship’ forms.
Some of the mothers roam

the streets at night. Some are

on the road gambling while
Spinal and Kill Cops are leaving
their signatures on the walls at
the néarby shopping centre.

Sgt Mather is enthusiastic
about the youngsters’ potential.

“You should see the good-
ness you can get out of these
children, but no-one’s checking
for them. So they’re going out
there to scrap for what they
have.”

Sgt Mather brought a child
who recently lost a parent into
her fold and used tough love to
win him over.

“He was so excited. On his
birthday, we decorated the sta-
tion with crepe paper and
ordered pizza. I got him a cake.
He said he never had a cake in
his life.”





The number of ‘police chil-
dren’ has grown from 12 to 28.

Sgt Mather and her team
have a lot of work to do.

Not far away, a crack user
wheels a stolen food store trol-
ley down the street in broad
daylight. It’s full of stolen
plants.

The adults are on the road
throwing dice.

The children have returned
to school. They will need help
with their homework.

But the “Kemp Road cops”
are undaunted.

This is a new breed of police
officers who are using old-fash-
ioned discipline and tough love
to turn potential “bad boys’ into
productive citizens.

With public support, hegre can:
make significant inroads.

,



M@ POLICE officers of the Urban Renewal Project take a look:
around a run-down home in the Kemp Road area.

‘Come and try our for the National Choir of The Bahamas

‘Monday, September 26, 2005
College of The Bahamas, Music Block
@ storey building opposite McDonalds)

7:30. pm

Must be at least 25 years old. No upper age limit.

Come prepared to sing a song.

Only those accepted may participate in a Choral Workshop to be
conducted by Dr. Jefferson Johnson, Director of Choral Activities at
the University of Kentucky, to be held in Nassau on October 21 and
22, 2005. |

For further information call 356-2691/2 or

302-4512.



GZ
g
Ce
Y

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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, SEPT EMBEH 19, 2UU5, FAGe «Lu

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a REV Butler chats with Ms Tucker of Culmers Alley, while Sgt 1554 Mather and Frank Smith
look on

(Photos: Mario
Duncanson/ Tribune Staff)

What you ap do

DON’T throw away that old couch.

The Kemp Road Urban Renewal Project is a
shell of a two story building, furnished with a
few chairs and tables borrowed from a nearby
church.

The project can use anything.

Books for children ages six to 15, craft kits
and supplies, chairs and tables — even a sec-
ond hand generator — would be welcome.

Unlike the conventional stations, the project

‘does not have a standby generator.

Some of these children go to school on an
empty stomach. Staples such as grits and rice
also would be appreciated.

However You Exercise

Receive an umbrella FREE from SEVEN SEAS with the purchase of
two bottles of SPORTFLEX from any foodstore or pharmacy.

Just bring the empty bottles of SPORTFLEX to
Bahamas Supply Agencies Ltd, located in the BAKCO Building opposite
Ebenezer Church, Shirley Street, Nassau and collect your FREE umbrella.

Offer limited to 1 umbrella per person. * Offer good while stocks last.

Distributed in The Bahamas by

Bahamas Supply Agencies Ltd.

(Opposite Ebenezer Methodist Church)
East Shirley Street ¢ Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 393-2966 °Fax: (242) 393-2523

HARBOUR BAY.
(242) 3945767 «

MALL AT MARATHON |
42) 393 6073

ABACO(242) 367°5792 ,


PAGE 16, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





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LOCAL NEWS



Conference

for c



urch

leaders in
Florida

MIAMI, Florida — The.

Bahamas Consulate General in
Miami hosted a mini-pastoral
conference to help boost soli-
darity among Bahamian-Amei-
icans living in Florida.

About 20 Bahamian-Ameri-
can pastors and youth leaders
took part in the conference
which was held under the
theme: “Reconnecting with our
heritage and roots”

The pastors represented com-
munities from as far away as
Lakeland, Florida.

The conference was one of
many programmes being spear-
headed by Consul General
Alma Adams in an effort to
promote Bahamian unity in
South Florida.

It-is the first of a series. of
events expected to be sponsored
by the Bahamas Consulate. in
Miami in the upcoming months.

‘ Opening the conference, Con-

sul General Adams, reminded
the pastors of the important part
Bahamian migrants played in

- the history of South Florida and

the establishment of ‘the char-
ter of the City of Miami...

A group of Bahamians were
invited to act as signatories of
the charter in 1896.

Mrs Adams also recalled how
Bahamians were instrumental

in the establishment of many
early black churches in Dade
County and throughout South
Florida.

“Our forefathers came bearintg
gifts — skills of talented masons,
carpenters, whose workmanship
is evidenced particularly in the
Coconut Grove and Perrine
area, to name a few.”

Ministry of Health Parlia-
mentary Secretary Ron Pinder
told the religious leaders and
youth representatives that they

are much more than pilgrims or, °
migrants who have moved from:

one land to another.
“You are more than a’mere

social grouping who come
together from time to time to:
celebrate special events and.
anniversaries; you are in’fact’
representatives and ambas-
sadors; representatives of the
Bahamian people and ambas-

sadors from the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas to the United
States of America,” he said:

' Round table discussions led

by Mr Pinder focused on the
theme: “As leaders and citizens,

what do you want for your
country, the Bahamas?”

The conference was held on
September 1 at the Club Room |
at the Mark Yacht Club in Mia-

Share your news:

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their

neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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The Tribune _

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005

SECTION





business@tribunemedia.net



tocks, Analysis, Wall

BUSINESS

Miami Herald Business,

treet

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m By YOLANDA

unique for them to spend mon-

the next two to five years we

@ By. NEIL HARTNELL just

how disadvantaged

‘Something new Peele uraiaratec

needed for S2bn Fame): building
aStiomyysrerrs industry stalled

Association’s money.

DELEVEAUX
Senior Business
Reporter

VERNICE WALKINE, the
Ministry of Tourism’s direc-
tor-general, said yesterday that
the industry’s goal was still to
generate $2 billion in rev-
enues, a feat it was on track
to accomplish in 2004 prior to
the hurricanes.

To reach that. mark, Ms

Walkine said, along with an

increase in arrivals numbers,
the Ministry would like to see
spending for stopover visitors,
who average a four night stay
or more, increase to $1,000,
with spending by cruise pas-
sengers increasing to $100.

“If we can get visitors to
spend $1 more, that's some-
thing for people to think
about; that's $5 million right
there,” she added.

In an intetview with The Tri-

bune, Ms Walkine said raising
the level of visitor spending
will require the creation of

ey on"

As part of the Ministry’ s ini-
tiative going forward, there
will be a significant thrust
towards the creation of new
attractions, tours and restau-
rants.

Faced with a number of
issues that need to be
addressed before the industry
will be able to realise substan-
tial growth, Ms Walkine iden-
tified five of the most impor-
tant areas.

Properties

Visitor research had shown
that Nassau/Paradise Island
needed more properties posi-
tioned in the mid-price range
of the market, while Grand
Bahama needed more room
inventory.

In terms of the cruise indus-
try, Ms Walkine said Nassau's
cruise port needs to be
expanded and Grand Bahama
needs a new port facility. “If
these things can happen over

will be in good shape,” she
said. .

Ms Walkine also identified
Nassau International Airport
(NIA) as a key component of
the industry's continued suc-
cess that is in need of urgent
attention. As part of the com-
mittee, along with members of
the Ministry of Transport and
the Airport Authority, that is

in negotiations with Vancou-.

ver Airport Services (YVR)
for the contract to manage
NIA, Ms Walkine said she was
aware that the committee was
close to concluding discussions
with them and.

Addressing the graduation
ceremony of the BahamaHost
programme, held at Super-

‘clubs Breezes, Ms Walkine

said the continuing develop-
ment of airlift, particularly
low-cost carriers, into the des-
tination is also an area that the
Ministry will monitor and
encourage going forward.
The knock-on effect has

SEE page 6B

Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian Contractors .

Association (BCA) has told The
Tribune that its push for a Local
Preference Act to ‘level the
playing field’ with foreign con-
tractors has been delayed, after
Deloitte & Touche said it was
unable to compile a study criti-
cal to moving the initiative for-
ward.

Terrance Knowles, the

BCA’s president, said the Min af

istry of Financial Services an
Investments was seeking infor-
mation from the Association on

Bahamian companies were in
comparison to foreign contrac-
tors before they would move
forward on a Local Preference
Act.

The BCA had last year hired

Deloitte & Touche to perform .

such a study, which would have
quantified the extent to which
Bahamian companies were
operating at a disadvantage.
“That really is the document

we need to move forward,” Mr _

Knowles said:. However,
Deloitte & Touche had told the

BCA it was “unable to compile

it for us” and returned the

As a result, Mr Knowles said
the BCA will now have to
“source another consulting firm
to do it on our behalf”.

Mr Knowles had previously
told The Tribune that the BCA
wanted to know whether it was
competing at a “5 per-cent or 10
per cent” disadvantage against
foreign contractors, some of
whom had not been paying
business licence fees.

Amendments to the Business
Licence Act have/attempted to
combat this, with foreign con-

SEE page 2B

Bank of the Bahamas

wins top global award

BANK of the Bahamas International has achieved

“something new and fresh and



Bahamian engineers, builders must link-up

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN contractors and engineering
firms must jink-up in a “syndicate” if they hope
to defeat international competitors and win
major contracts from developers of multi-mil-
lion dollar investment projects, a senior Baha
Mar Development Company executive said yes-
terday.

Robert Sands, vice-president of administra-
tion and external relations for the $1.2 billion
Cable Beach developer, told the Bahamas Soci-
ety of Engineers that “co-operation” among
Bahamian companies was the only way they
could “take advantage of opportunities” pro-
vided by tenders for major investment contracts.

He added that in comparison to major multi-
national companies, who often responded to
Requests for Proposal (RFP) tenders on such
contracts, by themselves Bahamian construction
and engineering companies often lacked the

manpower and administrative resources to com-

pete. ‘ “a

There were also issues, over indemnification
and putting up performance bonds and insur-
ance, Mr Sands said. “Are companies prepared to

indemnify companies such as Baha Mar for ongo-'

ing liability issues that arise?” he queriéd.

Mr Sands said: “I believe that [this is} the way
forward for a number of Bahamian engineering
and construction companies. There is no question
in my mind that you have the expertise, the abil-

ity, the know-how, but do you have the financial .

wherewithal to back you up and support you if
things go wrong?

“Then there is] managing to execute in a time-
ly fashion and the financial resources to fund
your project, not depending on the timelines of
the company that has contracted you.”

Mr Sands added: “To me, an opportunity can
exist, but it only exists if Bahamian: contractors

SEE page 8B

a first for the Bahamas, being named as one.of the
world’s top financial institutions by The Banker
magazine, which presented it with the coveted coun-
try Bank of the Year Bracken Award for 2005.

A spokesman for The Banker said that in the six
years the award has been in. existence, no other
Bahamian bank has been considered.

More than 500 institutional financial services
providers entered, hoping to make the list that is

published annually by the magazine, a member of .

the Financial Times group.

Bank of the Bahamas International won one of
the 128 coveted awards, which was presented during
a black tie banquet in London that drew top finan-
cial players from around the world.

“Bank of The Bahamas International’s successful
performance has been reflected in good:overall
growth, return to positive profit increase and double-
digit ROE (Return on Equity),” The Banker’s Coun-
try Awards report declared.

“The bank is growing at a fast pace, planning to
expand outside the country, and its assets have gone
from $193 million in 1999 to just below $400 million
earlier in 2005.” By the end of June, Bank of the

. Bahamas International’ s assets had leapt to $450

million.

‘Paul McWeeney, Bank of the Bahamas Titerna- :

tional’s. managing director, received the Bracken
award at the London:event. The award is a bust of

SEE page 8B



#@ STEPHEN TIMEWELL (right), editor-in- -
chief of the Banker magazine, presents the coveted
Bracken Award for country Bank of the Year 2005 .
to Paul McWeeney, managing director 0f Bank of
the Bahamas International, during a gala event in
London on September 6. It was the first time a
Bahamian bank was recognised. More than 500
financial institutions entered, hoping for a spot on
the:world’s best banks list published annually by The

Insurance Act
set to remove
‘undesireables’
from industry

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A BAHAMIAN insurance
broker said he hopes the new
Insurance Act and accompany-
ing regulations will remove

“undesireables” from his pro-
fession, particularly those who
are totally unqualified or lack
the qualifications for the insur-
ance they are writing.

Bruce Ferguson, the
Bahamas Insurance Brokers’
Association’s vice-president,
told the Rotary Club of Nas-
sau: “Unfortunately, there are
still a number of brokers out
there who are either totally
unqualified or who are unqual-
ified for the type of business
they are writing, for example,
life & health brokers writing
property insurance.

“It is, however, hoped that
the new Insurance Act and
Regulations will clear out most
if not all of these undesirables.”

‘Mr Ferguson, who was speak-
ing to Rotarians on the topic of
insurance and hurricanes, said
the impact from Hurricane Kat-
rina and other storms to impact
the Caribbean and US in the
past few years showed why it
was important for Bahamians
to use an independent, quali-
fied broker.

He added: “I say ‘indepen-

dent’ because some of the
largest so-called brokers in the
local market have very incestu-
ous conflicts of interest, either

owning an insurance company

or being owned by it.”

Mr Ferguson said it was “too:

early” to make any assessment

of Hurricane Katrina’s impact ©

on the future cost and avail-
ability of hurricane insurance
in the Bahamas, especially as

there were still two-and-a-half .
-months of hurricane season to

run.

Total insured losses caused
by Katrina were already pre-
dicted at between $25-$40 bil-
lion, making the storm the
costliest natural disaster in his-
tory and far surpassing the costs
of Hurricane Andrew in 1992.

Mr Ferguson reminded
Rotarians that many insurance
companies pulled out of writ-
ing hurricane-related. business
in the Caribbean region follow-
ing Andrew, making it very dif-
ficult to offer hurricane insur-
ance. The’ company he then
worked for had to stop writing
new storm-related business for a
year until capacity came back
in.

“The local insurance indus-
try, while very reliant on for-
eign reinsurers for capacity and

SEE page 8B

Banker, part of the Financial Times group



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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





IT workers must add value
through skills eee

ny organisa-
tion that has
ever been in
the market for
a Network
Administrator, Software
Developer or any skilled IT
position for that matter, quick-
ly comes to realise that there is
a desperate shortage of skilled
IT professionals in the
Bahamas. Sure, there are lots

of people who respond to ads

for IT-related jobs, but few

possess the necessary skills to

get the job done.

In a growing and developing
nation such as the Bahamas,
this represents a very real prob-
lem, particularly for companies
that depend on IT to stay in
business. Study after study has
shown that more than any oth-
er ingredient, skilled IT pro-
fessionals are the key to obtain-
ing any real value from IT
investments.

If you are in the IT field, this

represents a tremendous

opportunity to not only help
develop our nation, but also to
add tremendous value to your
organisation and attract higher

‘salaries while you are at it.

However, it also represents a
very real challenge to ensure
that your skill level is where it
needs to be.

In this article, I will share
some simple steps you need to
take to ensure your skill level
gets to where it needs to be and
stays there.

Certification Required .

Based on an informal count,
it would appear that few local
IT professionals are actually
certified in their chosen area
of specialism. The explanation
often given is that some of the
best people in the field are not
certified, and that some of the
certified people are really not
all that good.

While this argument may be
true in a small percentage of
cases, certification is not

optional, in my view. More
than anything, it demonstrates
to your employer and to your
peers that you possess the nec-

_ essary discipline and commit-
ment to prepare for, and pass,

an internationally- recognised
series of exams.
Moreover, no matter how
good you think you are,
becoming certified helps to test
all facets of your knowledge-
base and can reveal holes you
may not even be aware of.

By Tan 1 Hepburn |



Beperioace Required

Contrary to what appears to

be popular opinion locally, cer-
tification only brings you to the
starting line in the IT profes-
sion. On its own, it is not a tick-

et to high salaries and guru sta- -

tus. Only now can you begin
the hard work of gaining the
necessary experience that must
be added.in large amounts to
your certification to be of any
real value.

In my view, the IT profes-

sion can learn much from the
legal and accounting profes-
sions in this regard. Getting
called to the Bar or passing
your CPA is only the begin-

‘ning to years of study and
understudy towards becoming

respected in the field.
Unlike the legal and account-

ing professions, however, IT.

professionals have the added
challenge of ensuring their cer-
tifications are kept current
every two or three years, I can-
not'stress enough that re-certi-
fication is not optional. Too
often, IT professionals contin-

_ ue to highlight certifications on

resumes that have long since
expired.

Managing Others -

The reward for acquiring the
necessary certifications and
technical experience is often a
promotion from managing
yourself to managing others.
Without a doubt, this is one of
the most difficult transitions
you will face in your IT career.
_ The difficulty comes.as a
result of the dramatic shift in
the way your performance is
measured. No longer is your

job to be the best with the tech-

nology, but to build and man-
age a team of IT professionals

_who are able to deliver value.

Key to your success will be
recognising three key shifts: (1)
team performance.is more
important than your personal
performance; (2) time spent
developing your team is more

important than time spent
sharpening your own technical
skill; and (3) rely on others to

get things done and not jump .

to do it yourself.

IT managers who do not
recognise and embrace these, -
shifts continue to act and per-_
form like nothing more than |
expert technicians, miss the real
opportunity to add value, and
often become frustrated and
burnt-out.

Get Started.

Without doubt, the IT pro-
fession is one of the most excit-
ing places that any bright mind |
can make into a rewarding
career. The key, however, is to
ensure your skill level gets to
where it needs to be and stays.
there. It will take lots of study,
examination, hands-on experi-
ence and career transitions, but
in the end you can help to
develop a nation, add real val-
ue to your organisation and get
paid well while you are at it.

To provide feedback on this

‘column, please e-mail makin-

glTwork@providencetg.com

About the Author:

fan Hepburn is the founder
and managing director of Prov-
idence Technology Group, one

‘of the leading IT firms in the

Bahamas. Providence Tech-
nology Group specialises in net-
working solutions, consulting
and advisory services and soft-
ware solutions.

Preference Act

FROM page one

tractors now réquiréd to pay'1 per cent of the Valué of each contract
they obtain to the Government.

However, the BCA sees.a Local Preference Act, similar to legislation
in force in Dade County, Broward County and Palm Beach’ County i
Florida, as critical to enabling them to compete on more level terms.

Bahamian companies see foreign contractors as access to greater man-
power resources and lower borrowing costs, as in the US they can obtain
financing at interest rates of 3 per cent, compared to the 8-9 per cent rates
commonly encountered in this nation.

US contractors were able to bring in equipment on leases, unlike their
Bahamian counterparts, and the bonds on leased equipment aré relatively
expensive for companies in this nation.

Meanwhile, Bahamian contractors had made progress in obtaining
contracts from foreign developers to work on major investment pro-
jects. Mr Knowles said BCA members were now getting in contact with
the principals behind major developments, meeting with them “face-
to-face” and “trying to position our association and members in a positive
light”. 2

The employment of Bahamian contractors on major investment pro-
jects was “relatively good compared to where we were a few years ago”,
Mr Knowles said. “I think we’ve made significant inroads.”

The BCA has been pushing for the creation of a Construction and
Development Advisory Committee, which would establish better relations
with developers and advise government ministries on issues relating to the
construction industry

Although the BCA had not-achieved that objective “in the sense we
would like”, it was in continuous dialogue with the Ministry of Financial
Services and Investments, whereas before there had been none. When
issues relating to the construction industry arose, Mr Knowles said the

‘ BCA was being consulted and asked for its input.
' “We're satisfied progress is being made,” he added.

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¢ Be willing to participate in extra curricular
activities, etc.

ar valid unui December 31st, 2005
Cera aA) Peale who
IB} efareTA
men aaleomasv ie a9} the ICOM ACoN Malays I oxaiq ola
Introductory interest rate available on net
retail pure

Applications must be made in writing together with full
curriculum vitae, a recent color photograph and names of
at least three references, one being that of your Church
Pastor to:
Ms Kelcine Hamilton
Academy Affairs Manager
P.O. Box N-4378
Nassau, Bahamas

FIRST CARIBBEAN

eS Lae BANK :
For further information, please contact the Business Office

pes sae ere Pride. Teuton SLU Your Financial aves at telephone numbers 324-6269 or 324-6887.

Deadline For Applications is Friday, September 16, 2005

FirstCaribbean eat Banik is an Associated a oi eal Be PLC and le


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1a, ..

and Internet subscriber
growth drives Cable profit



@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

SUBSCRIBER growth in
both its core cable television
and Internet businesses was the
key driver behind Cable

. Bahamas’ 22 per cent increase
in net income for the first six
months in 2005, the company
said yesterday.

Shareholders

In his report to sharehold-
ers; Brendan Paddick, Cable
Bahamas chairman, said cable
television subscribers had
increased from 64,541 to 67,607
during the 2005 first half, rep-
resenting growth of 5 per cent.

And on the Internet side,
Coralwave subscribers had
increased by 23 per cent year-
‘on-year as at June 30, 2005,
growing from 22,000 the year
before to more than 27,000.

Mr Paddick said: “This note-
worthy increase in Internet
subscribers speaks volumes of
the calibre of services this busi-
ness segment delivers, and also
of the comprehensive customer
support provided, which when
combined have resulted in our
Internet service garnering sub-
stantial customer confidence.

“The ‘Online Assistance’ ser-
vice, which was launched in late

2004, has significantly impacted
the success of the Internet sup-
port aspect of the business.”
Mr Paddick said the compa-
ny’s progress towards com-
pleting its 2005 capital projects
had been “very encouraging”.
Cable Bahamas had spent
$10.8 million on capital pro-
jects during the 2005 first half,
with some $6.8 million of that

spent during the second quar- _

ter.

The capital spending during
the three months to June 30,
2005, went on the highly publi-
cised launch of Cable
Bahamas’ digital cable televi-
sion services, plus upgrades to
infrastructure and Interhet
equipment. The digital service
is expected to generate further
subscriber growth.

Mr Paddick said: “Significant

progress was made on the con-.

struction of the Freeport metro
telecommunications hub, which
when completed will enable
customers to enjoy the benefit
of fully diverse connectivity on

.the Freeport fibre network.

_ “The new headend in Abaco
will be completed and fully
operational in the third quarter
with all data, Internet and

video services transferred to

the new facility.”

The old headend had

remained fully operational dur-

ing the September 2004 hurri-
canes, Mr Paddick said, but the
new facility.had been designed
to be “even more robust” to

‘reduce the possibility of ser-

vice disruption during future
storms.

““To further minimise the
adverse effects of hurricanes,
the company also continued to
harden its power back-up facil-
ities in all of its key operational
control points.

“Redundant power genera-
tors have been installed and
commissioned at six locations

_on the islands of New Provi-

dence, Grand Bahama, Abaco °
and Eleuthera,” Mr Paddick
added.

Cable Bahamas said second
quarter 2005. cable revenues,
which account for about 60 per
cent. of total revenues,
increased by 5 per cent over
the previous year comparative
to reach $8.3: million. Total
cable revenues for the first six
months were $16.4 million,
compared to $15.3 million for
the same period last year.

Revenues

‘Second aiketer Internet rev-
enues were 24 per cent ahead
of their 2004 comparative at $4
million..For the first six months
in 2005, Internet revenues

Automatic gratuity
‘an obstacle to. better
tourism services

@ By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter

MINISTRY of Tourism exec-

utive believe a number of indus-
try workers would have given
better service over the years had
it not been for the automatic 15
per cent gratuity.

Explaining that there was a
direct correlation between the
level of customer service and a
visitor either returning to the
Bahamas or encouraging some-
one to come to the Bahamas,
senior manager of industry
training for the Ministry of
Tourism, Diana Black-Brooks,
said that if the automatic 15 per
cent gratuity had not been
implemented, it was likely that
a significant number of work-
ers would have improved their
level of service over the years.

Meanwhile, the Ministry of
Tourism’s manager of industry
training said yesterday excel-
lent customer service provided
to the country's 5.1 million vis-
itors was key to ensuring that

the Bahamas remains competi-..

tive in tourism.

Sherry Collie, was speaking”

at a half-day ceremony, held to

bring together BahamaHost

_ graduates and other key indus-

try stakeholders, to share the:

vision of the Ministry of
Tourism going forward.

Ms Brooks-Black added that
in looking at the country's num-
ber one industry, it was impor-
tant for workers to know. who
Bahamians were as a people,
and also be knowledgeable
about the country, its history,
culture and the other features
that make it uniquely Bahami-
an.

She said many visitors coming
to the Bahamas already have a
base of knowledge about the
country, making it important
for front-line workers, in par-
ticular, to have as much infor-
mation about the country as
possible.

Customer service and the atti-
tude of tourism workers toward
visitors and Bahamians alike,
however, is perhaps the key fac-
tor in building a strong industry
and a destination that visitors

look to return to as often as pos- :

sible. Ms Black-Brooks said that
without this element, the level
of knowledge becomes less
important.

Leslie Norville; acting gener-
al manager for training and edu-
cation at the Ministry of
Tourism, said visitor feedback
had shown that customer ser-
vice continues to be lacking in
the Bahamas. And according to
‘statistics, some 90 per cent of





guests never complain, which
means that the number of visi-
tors who feel they have had a
bad experience could be signif-
icantly higher than may first be
apparent.

“Despite the poor service,
these guests are still paying for
a service, but if they are given
what they expect, they would
reciprocate by coming back,”
she said.

Along with the BahamaHost
programme, the Ministry of
Tourism, in a renewed effort to

galvanise the community and |

industry stakeholders to build
the sector, is focusing on. the

training and education of indus- °

try personnel, other profession-
als, students and the wider com-
munity.

Other programmes include
the Sales, Marketing and Royal
Treatment (SMART) customer
service initiative that is aimed at
front-line employees and entre-
preneurs.

Bartenders :

The Small Hotels Unit is a
skills-based programme that

“works with associates in house-

keeping, at the front desk, bar-
tenders.and restaurant servers,
to improve their customer ser-
vice skills.

The Tourism Awareness pro-
gramme is a broad-based edu-
cation initiative aimed at stu-
dents. The unit focuses on
preparing students to work in.
the industry and making them
aware of the career opportuni-
ties that exist. _

It helps prepare their inter-
personal skills and seeks to
make them more marketable
once they graduate. The bigger
mandate for the unit is to entice
the brightest minds to look at

the industry as their first career’

choice.
The Tourism Education
Awareness Module (TEAM) is

_ another education and training

initiative aimed at Bahamian
students, primarily those in
grades six through 11.

The focus of TEAM is to
demonstrate to the students the
importance of the industry to
the economy, and the need to
choose a career in the tourism
sector.

There is also a Fly Fishing
Certification programme that
provides training for industry
personnel to enhance their
skills, so that they can offer bet-
ter service.

According to Ms Black-
Brooks, the Ministry has been
inundated with calls from vari-
ous sectors that want to be



ved intthe ‘training ‘pro

grammes. She said the pro-

grammes have been a great suc-
cess, with many individuals
becoming ambassadors for the
country...

She noted; ‘however, that.
while the programmes have
been a success, with Ministry
officials focused on giving the
information and educating the
industry, students and partici-
pants must be willing to take
the information on board and
put it into practice for there to
be improvement.

From an internal perspective, .
Ms Norville said, the Ministry
has also begun focusing on staff
development, in an effort to
transform employees into pro-
ductive, service-oriented indi-
viduals.

In establishing the Ministry ©
of Tourism's Training Initiative,
officials are looking to put

‘together a curriculum of cours-

es that will eventually be
offered to. staff to improve their

. performance and enhance their

development.



Pricing Information As Of:
13 September 2005

S2wk-Hi






S2wk-Low
Abaco Markets

stood at $7.7 million, compared
to $6.2 million the year before.

Revenue from data opera-
tions during the three months
to June was 4 per cent ahead of
the first quarter, and revenues
from this business now account
for 12 per cent of Cable
Bahamas’ total revenue

streams.

Data revenues from the sec-
ond quarter stood at $1.7 mil-
lion, compared to $1.4 million
for the year before period,
while total monthly recurring
revenue had risen to $0.6 mil-
lion from $0.5 million.

Overall, Cable Bahamas’ sec-

ond quarter net income was 10
per cent higher than the first
quarter, with operating income
also up by 6 per cent at $6.8
million compared to $6.4 mil-
lion.

Second quarter. revenues
were over 3 per cent ahead of
the 2005 first quarter.







SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1

The Cancer Society of The Bahamas is celebrating
the opening of The Cancer Caring Centre.
Please help us give cancer patients and their relatives
a home away from home during treatment.

























men For LIFE

6am sharp at The Cancer Caring Centre
East Terrace, Centreville.



Previous Close

8.06 Bahamas Property Fund 9.50 °
6.90 5:55 Bank of Bahamas 6.88
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80
1.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 1.49
4.46 0.87 Fidetity Bank 1.410
8.84 6.96 Cable Bahamas 8.84
20. 1.69 - Colina Hoidings 1.69
19.40 6.75 . Cammonwealth Bank 9.10
2:50 0.67 . Doctors Hospital 2.46
4.42 3.85 Famguard 4.12
10.70 9.25 Finco “10. 6o
9.50 6.99 FirstCanbbean 9.50
19,24 8.31 Foco} 9,24
4.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.46
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.80
3.50 8,20 J. §. Johnson 8.50
4.36 Kerzner international BDRs 5.84






0.35 RND Holdings



Premier Real Estate

12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets

Fund Name

4.2521 4.4846 Colina Money Market Fund 4.252089*°
2.4169 2.0131 Fidelity Bahamas G & { Fund 2.4169 ***
10.5576 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 40.5576"""**
2.2560 2.1491 Colina MS! Preferred Fund 2.255981**
4.4273 4.0576 Colina Bond Fund 4.127305*°**



BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 =

52wk-Hi -

#,000.00
Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day‘s weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
PIE - Closing price divided by the iast 12 month earnings
“.~AS AT AUG. 31, 2005/ *““* ~ AS AT JUL 31, 2005






Today's Close






os for every ve s
To. register, please call f
325-2483 « or 323-4482 —



9. 85
{ 6.88 0.00
0.80 0.00
1.40 9.00
1.40 0.00
8.81 0.00
1.69 0.00
9.40 0.00
2.46 0.00
4.42 0.00
10.70 0.10
9.50 0.00
9.21 0.00
4.45 0.00
9.90 0.10
8.50 0.00
5 0.01



SN en i | SO

Last 12 Months

ve Soe Vol.

5,006

* 3,500
2,105

2,000

NOK

ons






































NN

EPS $
0.207
1.452
0.561
0.204
0.426
0.066
0.618
0.004
0.705
0.429
0.428
0.695
0.695
0.675
0.022
0.526
0.526
. Sed



































15.4
13.7
13.6
52.3
18.8
16.2
ie 2
























. 2 > Se oT
- oe 7 ao ve

‘ 108

one

0.810 ins

N/M

eee










MAMMA kh

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by clasing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Val. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $- A company's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock {ndex. January 1, 1994 = 10C

CA—>K[CKO GK

IKK AN
PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005 THE TRIBUNE
EWEN sss

Bahamas website a ‘one stop
resource’, says US TV network

ISLANDBRIDES.com, the
NOTICE Bahamian-built destination
wedding website for the
Caribbean, has been featured [_
on the ABC Television net- .
work in Boston as the “one-







| (NASHPORT INVESTMENTS LTD.)

In Voluntary Liquidation stop resource” for destination
weddings in “a tropical island
paradise”. .

The website’s Bahamian par-

Notice is hereby given that the liquidation sht-coninanye Thyine (Online,
yesterday said more than

| of the above company commenced on the 18th ha
35,000 brides-to-be were visit-

day of May, 2005 and that AB. Lilia Salazar | ing islandbrides.com per

ws p month, while 250 were regis-
| Chiriboga of Arguelles #339 y Francisco Segura. tering to use free planning tools

| Guayaquil Ecuador has been appointed liquidator | every month.
Ben Jamieson, Thyme

1 of the Company. | Online’s chief executive, said:

i “We were delighted to see the. .

site being noticed by the US

. Dated this 18th day of May A.D., 2005. media. Combine this with our
aggressive online marketing

' campaign and we are well on

| y t ki thi
AB. LILIA SALAZAR CHIRIBOGA Bahaniceialk oN ; te the are
Liquidator mier online'resource for desti-

nation weddings to the region.”

_ Due to the publicity the web-"
site had received in the media, —
Thyme Online said vendors in
the islandbrides.com online
wedding directory were seeing The ing Planner —
an increase in the e-mail ry
inquiries from brides-to-be
looking for their services. This
translated into an overall

St. Augustine *s College ; increase in business for all wed-

ding vendors listed in the site.

The Best Man's Duties



Beach Wedding Dress



NOTICE

NEEDED IMMEDIATELY

Teacher of General Science and Chemistry to teach grades
eight through ten. Experience with preparing candidates
for external examinations preferred.



NOTICE






‘(SHALFORD INVESTMENTS, LTD.)

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
In Voluntary Liquidation

(No 45 of 2000)

_ IVOR COMPANY LIMITED

All applicants must hold a degree from an accredited .
In Voluntary Liquidation

University and a Teacher’s Certificate or must have some
teaching experience. Two letters of reference, copies of
all degrees and certificates, proof of teaching experience
and two passport size photos should be submitted. A
commitment to the values of Catholic, Benedictine
' edécation is expected for our teachers. Only those persons »
who have no difficulty with Roman Catholic beliefs and
teaching need apply. Please submit applications and
required documents to:

Notice is hereby given that the liquidation of the

above company commenced on the Ist day of

July, 2005 and that Antonova Liudmila of Russia .
Moscow. 26 Bakinskih Komissarov str., house

4. build-1, flat 89 has been appointed liquidator
- of the Company. ne

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section.137 (4) of the International Business ;}.....<

| Companies Act (No 45. of 2000), IVOR COMPANY-}**"
LIMITED is in Dissolution”.

The date of commencement of dissolution is 15th
day of August, 2005 oe cok taney. . me
ee Dated this 1st day of July A.D., 2005 ©
Epsilon Management Ltd.,
2 Commercial Centre Square,
Alofi, Niue.
Liquidator

__. THE PRINCIPAL
ST. AUGUSTINE’S COLLEGE
P.O. BOX N-3940

- NASSAU, BAHAMAS

_ The Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture is now registering for the

fifth (Sth) Session of the National Youth Leaders Certification Programme,
schedule to commence on Tuesday 27th September, 2005. .

ANTONOVA LIUNMILA
Liquidator







The Ministry invites all interested Youth Leaders or Youth Workers to.
pic: ‘p application forms from the Ministry’s Headquarters on Thompson
Boulevard, Ministry of Education Building, 2nd Floor, West Wing, Monday -.
Friday between the hours of 9:00 am - 5:00 pm. -






_. . For further information please contact Mr. Gregory Butler, Deputy
Director of Youth at telephone numbers 502-0600 - 5.

oo) Employment Opportunity West Nassau



A leading conservation organization is seeking competent individuals with a positive
attitude to fill the following positions:

Bookkeeper and Accountant's Assistant

Location: New Providence cs

The successful candidate will provide support to the Finance Department through
the performance of a variety of routine and non-routine accounting and clerical
tasks. :




Please note effective Thursday, September
8th, The Rotary Club of West Nassau will
be meeting at Chez Willie West Bay Street.






Database and Membership Officer

Location: New Providence 7
The successful candidate will be responsible for the development of membership
database and for extending service to the general membership. Location

Rand Nature Centre Administrative and Education Specialist

Location: Grand Bahama s

The successful candidate will be responsible for the development and to oversee
educational programs and outreach activities for the Rand Nature Centre, Peterson
Cay and Lucayan National Parks.





Parking is available at the rear on Virginia
Street or just west of Chez Willie in the
Parking lot.





For additional duties and responsibilities for these positions please visit our website
at www.thebahamasnationaltrust.org or call the Human Resources Department at
393-1317.



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS














THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005, PAGE 5B

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY
MUST SELL

MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES




left green trimmed white.

Bubject property









RAINBOW BAY SUBDIVISION
(ELEUTHERA)

Lot #44, Block 5, Section A. The lot is on a hill overlooking the Atlantic Ocean. Area is
approximately 10,800 sq. ft. This site encompasses a two storey apartment block of
two apartments. One upstairs and one downstairs. Each comprising one bedroom one
bathroom, front room, dining, kitchen. There is a wooden porch approximately 8 - 6
feet wide on the upper level secured with a wooden handrail. The garage area has
been converted into a efficiency apartment and now houses one bedroom/frontroom
in one and one bathroom. Age: is 7 years old. The apartments could be rented at $700
per month partly furnished. The efficiency rented at $400 per month.

Appraisal: $308,402.00

MURPHY TOWN
(ABACO)

Lot #60 with a structure, lot size 60 x 115 ft., 6,900 sq. ft., 10 ft., above sea level but
below road level and would flood in a severe hurricane the duplex has dimensions of
60 ft by 30 ft partly of wood and partly of cement blocks with one section vinoaly
finished and occupled with blocks up to window level and floor ready to be poured.
The roof is asphalt shingles, the interior walls and ceiling are of 1x6 pine and the
floor of ceramic tiles. The finished work Is averagé/below, 2 bedrooms, one bath,
living/dining. The occupied portion of the structure is not complete. Age: 10 years
old.

Appraisal: $80,498.00

ROCK SOUND
(ELEUTHERA)
All that piece parcel or lot of land and improvements having an area of 22,800 sq ft

situated on Fish Street.in the vicinity of Rock Sound Primary School on the island of
Eleuthera, Bahamas. This property is comprised of a 38 year old single storey residence

’ consisting of approximately 1,332.18 sq ft of. enclosed living area and inclusive of,

living room, dining room, kitchen, 3 bed rooms, two bathrooms and sitting room. The
home is in fair condition, there is also carport but in poor condition. The neighbourhood
is quiet and peaceful and has a topography of approximately 2 ft.

’ Appraisal: $57,853.95

The said piece parcel orlot:of land and improvements is located in the settlement of
Rock Sound, on the island of Eleuthera. .

LOT #127 WINTON MEDOWS
(NASSAU) -

All that Lot of Land Having an:area of 8,000 sq. ft. being lot #127 Knollwood Drive of
the Subdivision known as Winton Meadows, situated in the eastern district of New
Providence this property is comprised of a 7 yr old single family residence consisting
of approximately 2,149 sq. ft., of enclosed living space with 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms,
living, dining room and kitchen. There is 619 sq. ft. dirveway and a 125 sq. ft. patio at
the rear and an enclosed 2 car garage also included. The land is on a'grade and level
and appear to be sufficiently elevated to dissallow flooding during annual ieavy rainy
periods. The grounds are fairly kept with fairly maintained !awn and low shrubs. Yard is
not enclosed. ie

Appraisal: $275,747.43

Traveling east along Prince Charles, take the corner on the right just before Winton

Super Value (Jasmin Drive), then 2nd corner right (Knollwood Road) drive all the way around the curve the subject property Is the 4th property

NO. 3 LEXINGTON SUBDIVISION
(NASSAU)

All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 7,752 sq. ft. (77.5 x 100) situated
in the southern district of New Providence being lot No. 3 in an area known as Richville
of Malcolm Road west. This property is spacious and can probably accommodate
another house at the rear. It is landscaped and enclosed by a wall in front.with fence
on the side. The property. consist of a single story, 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom, living room
and dining rooms, com

covered front porch (indented) with floor area of 1,374 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $123,000.00

Heading south on East Street turn right onto Malcolm Road, then third corner on the
tight, the house is the 4th on the left painted white trimmed green with wall in front.

- BAHAMA‘PALM SHORES
2 ABACO) 22 S25

" Lot #27, Block #26, 80 x 125 being-section 4, at Bahama Palm Shore, 6 miles, southwest

of Cherokee Sound and 18 miles south of the township of Marsh Harbour. The land is
situated on Ocean View Drive. It is one of the better elevated lots in the subdivision
having an excess of 30ft above sea level, but have no view of the sea, but is about 1,800
feet from the public beach. This property is comprised of a single storey residence with
Bermuda Style Roof containing a large living and dining area split level, with kitchen in
the corner. Three bedrooms and two bathrooms, this building is approximately 7 years

old.
Appraisal: $233,000.00

LOT 7, BLOCK 7 MILLARS HEIGHTS
(NASSAU)

All that lot of land having an area of 7,500 sq. ft. being lot no 7 of the subdivision known
as Millars Heights subdivision situated in the south western district of. new Providence.
This property is comprised of a 7 year old single family/multi family single storey duplex
consisting of approximately 1,533 sq. ft. of enclosed living area inclusive of living room,
dining room, kitchen, 2 bedrooms and 1 bathroom. Both apartments have a wall unit
in one bedroom. The building is well maintained and ‘has an effective age of 3 years.
The land is on flat terrain and appear to be sufficiently elevated above road to disallow
flooding during annual heavy rainy periods. The grounds are fairly maintained and site
improvements includes a grass lawn with fruit trees and a concrete paved driveway
leading to the carport. The yard is open‘along the front with its back and side boundaries
enclosed with chain link fencing.

Appraisal: $231,806.40

Traveling west along Carmichael Road, take the third corner left after the Carmicheal Road Police Station then the first right then first left again
which is Margaret Street the subject property is the third property left painted white trim green with green doors.

LOT NO 220 TWYNAM HEIGHTS
(NASSAU)

All that lot of land having an area of 9,595 sq. ft. being lot 220 of the subdivision known
as Twynam Heights, situated in the eastern district of New Providence this property
is comprised of a single family residence consisting of approximately 2,880 sq. ft. of
enclosed living area inclusive of porch, foyer, living room, dining room, kitchen, breakfast
room, family room, study utility room, powder room, three bedrooms, three bathrooms
and double garage. Ventilation includes central air conditioning the land is on a grade
and level and appear to be sufficiently elevated ‘above road to disallow flooding during
annual heavy rainy periods. The eee are fairly kept, with fairly maintained lawn
and low shrubs, yard enclosed with low wall with open drive way and walkway in front.

Appraisal: $238,400.00

Traveling east along Prince Charles, take the corner on the right Just after Winton Super Value, take 1st corner left the first left again, the
subject property is the is the 4th property left painted yellow trim white opposite unpainted house on the right.

ined, family room, and kitchen, enclosed carport and a roof -











VALENTINES EXTENSION
(NASSAU)

Lot #2 contains a 19 year old 1.1/2 storey four plex with a floor area of 3,621 sq. ft. The »
two storey section consist of a master bedroom, bathroom and sitting area‘upstairs.
and two bedrooms, one bath, living, dining, family room and kitchen downstairs. The.
single storey consist of one two bedroom, one bath apartment and two efficency. .
apartments, land-size 7,500 sq. ft. Multi-Family zoning on.flat land and not subject to ~
flooding. 4

Appraisal: $347,006.00

The subject property is located on the western side of Valentine's Extension Road, just
over one hundred feet north.of the roadway known as Johnson Terrace. Travel east on
Bernard Road, turn left onto Adderley Street which is opposite SAC, continue left at .
the deep bend, take first right into Johnson Terrace, go to T-junction and turn left, then
first right. Property is second building on right, white trimmed brown.



DUNDAS TOWN
(ABACO)

3 two bed, 1 bath triplex:9,000 sq. ft., lot no. 18b with an area for'a small shop. Age 12° ~
years the land is a portion of one of the Dundas Town Crown Allotment parcels stretching *
from Forest Drive to Front Street, being just under a quarter. acte in size:and.on the
lowside. A concrete block structure, with asphalt shingle roof and L-shape:{n‘design
with a total length of 70x26 ft, plus 50 x 22 ft., 2,920 sq. ft., the interior walls are concrete
blocks, ceiling is sheet rock and the floors of vinyl tiles. i ’

Appraisal: $220,500.00



§
KENNEDY SUBDIVISION
(NASSAU)

Lot no. 21 all utilities available 10 year old single story house, 3 bedroom 2 bathroom,
living room, dining area, family room, ‘kitchen, study,. laundry and an entry. porch.

- Appraisal: $175,350.00

' Heading west along Soldier Road take main entrance to Kennedy Subdivision on the

left, then take the 1st corner on the left then 1st right, house is second on your right "~:
with garage. ie :

LOT #17237 BAHAMA
SOUND NO. 18 -
(EXUMA)

All that lot of land-having an area of 10,000 sq. ft. being lot #17237 of Bahama’ Sound
of Exuma no. 18 said subdivision is situated on the southern side of Queen’s:Highway"
about 2 miles northwest of Georgetown. This property comprises of a 25.year'old single
storey single family residence. ; ? Rady ee

Appraisal: $110,250.00...

This property is located on the southeast side of Periwinkle Lane, about 100 ft east of
the junction of Periwinkle and Zareba Circle. ; 5 :





EARLY SETTLERS DRIVE
(ELEUTHERA)

Lot #7 Early Settlers Drive, North Eleuthera Heights, size 11,200 sq. ft., contains incomplete
3 bed, 2.5 bath, living room, dining room, kitchen and tv room. ey

Appraisal: $141,716.40

e

LOT #15 BLOCK #2 WINTON HEIGHTS
_ (NASSAU) or ay

‘|. :All that lot of land haivng an approximate area.of:18,647 sq. ft..being lot #15, block a sg ote

#2. The lot is a corner lot-and Is odd shaped and is situated at the southeast-corner .
‘of Culbert’s Hill and Spencer's Close, this property is comprised of a 2 storey residence
with ground'‘floor consisting of foyer, living room, dining room, a guest sutie, family
room (equipped island cooktop and walk in pantry), breakfast nook, laundry.room,
storage room and a 2 car garage and back pation. The upper floor consists-of the
master suite that includes a bathroom and a walk-in closet. The floor throughout are
ceramic tiled except the bedrooms, This house equipped with central alr and burglar:
bars the house Is well taid out and tastefully decoroated. Also numerous cracks were
observed in the southern walls of the bedrooms upstairs. Bs pee ais

Appraisal: $502,236.73

Traveling east on Prince Charles Drive to corner on the left just before Winton Super Value (Culbert Hill), travel north on Culbert Hill to the
4th corner right, (Spencer's Close), said house is #55 on the corner beige trim pink.

LOT 194 BOYD SUBDIVISION
- (NASSAU)

All that lot of land having an area of 6,400 sq. ft. being lot no 194 of the subdivision
known as Boyd Subdivision, situated in the central district of New Providence this property
is comprised of a 35 year old single family, single story residence encompassing
approximately 1,278 sq. ft. of enclosed living area and inclusive of separate living’ and
dining rooms, and an average size kitchen, three bedrooms, two bathrooms and'an entry
porch, of approximately 88 sq. ft. ventilation is by 2 wall unit air conditioners. The property ~...
is at grade and level with: good drainage, landscaping Is minimal, consisting of lawns |;...:
and shrubs in the front, the subject is enclosed with stone walls mounted with:

iron and chain link fencing and a wrought iron gate in front there is a 208 sq. ft: cement
driveway leading to a singlé covered carport of 250 sq. ft. the subjett-site also has a
concrete block storage shed measuring of approximately 143 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $126,000.00

Traveling west on Boyd‘Road, turn left onto Foster Street, continue on Foster Street to the 4th corner right, (Roland Ave.) the subject property
is the 5th property on the left side painted orange with red/white trim. : : on :

LOT NO 172 BLAIR ESTATES
(NASSAU)

All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 15,403 sq. ft. being lot 172 in the



subdivision known as Blair Estates,.this property is comprised of a single ‘family split ~~ -

level resident consisting of approximately 3,456 sq. ft., of enclosed living space with
three bedrooms, two bathrooms, on the second level and on the first a living and dining’
room, kitchen, utility room, family room, bathroom, an office, a rear uncovered porch, a
covered door entry, walkway and a driveway. Also located on the first level in a 616 sq.
ft. one bedroom, one bathroom, living and dining room, rental unit. The bullding Is in
excellent condition with recent renovation done, there is no signs of structural defects
or termite Infestation the building is adequately ventilated with central air conditioning
‘installed on’ the second floor and in the rental unit the land is rectangular in shape and.
on a level grade slightly elevated above the road to disallow flooding during annual heat
rainy periods. The grounds improvements include landscaping, a concrete block wall
and fence enclosure. on three boundaries, fruit trees and a private water supply.













Appraisal: $642,222.00 _
HAMILTON'S ’ Traveling north on Village Road from the round about take the second corner tight into Blair Estates (St Andrews Drive). Drive to. the t-junction’ :
LONG ISLA ND) and make a left which is Commonwealth Street, continue traveling to the 7th corner which is Clarence Street then drive to Richmond Road
( ’ and make a right. The subject property is the 1st house on the left no 44 painted green trimmed white.

Queen's High Way, lot of land 13,547 sq. ft., dwelling house of solid concrete floors,
foundation column and belt course with finished plaster. Two bedrooms, one bathroom,
kitchen, dining, and living room. Total living space is 1,237 sq. ft., utilities available
are electricity, water, cable tv and telephone.

Appraisal: $98,057.00



CORAL VISTA SUBDIVISION (NASSAU), All that vacant lot of land having an area of approximately 7,500 sq. ft. being lot #61 and is situated on Blue Heron Cresent in the Coral Vista Subdivision a said subdivision situated in the .
western district of New Providence, Bahamas. This property is bounded on the north by Blue Hebron Cresent and running thereon 75 ft, on the west by lot #60 and running 100 ft on the south by portions of lots #72 & 73 and running thereon 75
ft, and on the east by lot #62 and running thereon 100 ft. This area is zoned residential with all utilities and services available. : _ pate Gee

Appraisal: $69,300.00

Travelling from the Coral Harbour round about, (Coral Harbour Road), take ist left (Central Drive East), go across the cross road turn right at Pink Coral Drive west turn 1st left (Blue Heron Drive) the subject property is the 6th on the right sid 6.






GROVE, WEST BAY SUBDIVISION (wassau), Ail that vacant lot of land having an area of approximately 12,000 sq ft being lot #17 block #20 and is situated on’ Bougainvilla Avenue in the Grove Subdivision situated'i

western district of New Providence, Bahamas. The property is retinacula in shape and is bounded on the north by lot #18 and running thereon 120 ft on the west by Bougainvilla Avenue and running 100 ft on the south by lot #16 and running 120

ft, and on the east by lot #8 and running there on 100 ft. This area is zoned residential with all utilities and services available.
Appraisal: $153,300.00 z i Se)
Travelling west on West Bay Street, turn onto Bougainvilla Avenue, travel across the crossroad (Coral Drive) the subject property is the 4th on the left side with broken chain lik fence.

JOHNSON’S HARBOUR VIEW ESTATES SUBDIVISION(ELEUTHERA), All that vacant lot of land having an area of approximately 4,500 sq ft being lots 12E and 13W and is situated in JOhnson Harbour View Estates
Subdivision situated on the island of Eleuthera, Bahamas. Measuring and bounded as follows, northwardly by 20’ wide road reservation and running there on for a distance of 50 ft eastwardly by lot 13E and running thereon for a distance of 90 ft
southwardly by lot 30, and running thereon for a distance of 25 ft and continuing on lot 31 and running thereon a distance of 25 ft westwardly by lot 12W of the said subdivision and running thereon for a distance of 90 ft. This propertyis --*-
well lanscaped and fenced in. This area is quiet and peaceful with all utilities and services available. . eg

Appraisal: $47,250.00

The said pieces parcels or lot of land is situated in Johnson’s Harbour View Estates Subdivision, Harbour Island, Eleuthera.

ALLOTMENT 67, MARRIGOLD FARM ROADvnassau), All that lot of land having an area of 1.173 acres being lot No. and is situated on Marigold Farm Road In the ara known as allotment 67, a said subdivision situated'in .
the south eastern district of new Providence, Bahamas. This property is Vacant and area has all utilities & services. ws 2a

Appraisal: $1 048,050.00



Travelling on Joe Farrington Road turn onto Marrigold Farm Road heading south, the subject is the second to last propert on the left hand side of the road near the pond.

For conditions of sale and other information contact
Philip White @ 502-3077 email philip.white@scotiabank.com or
Harry Collie @ 502-3034 email harry.collie@scotiabank.com

Please visit www.fsbobahamas.com for interior photos






PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005

Position of Accountant |

Candidates must have at least 3 years experience in
accounting in the financial industry with sound
knowledge of but not limited to:



FROM page one

been that with more affordable
airlift coming into the Bahamas,
hotels have been able to raise
their room rates, improve the
salaries of employees and also
make improvements to their
properties.

Other speakers in atten-
dance at the graduation cere-
monies were Samuel Gardiner,
senior director of Training and
Education for the Ministry of
Tourism;. Archdeacon James
Palacious, Dioceason Secre-
tary and Archdeacon for
Administration of the Angli-
can Diocese of the Bahamas;
and Reverend Terrance Mor-
rison, pastor of Zion Baptist
Church, Shirley and East
Streets.

Additional areas that the
Ministry will look to address
and develop going forward are
the issue of cruise conversion
into stopover visitors, plus
increasing the Bahamas’ meet-
ings and groups business with
the introduction of the US con-
vention tax incentive pro-





e Supervising an accounts department and staff



e Formulating budgets
e Managing Accounts Receivables and Payables





¢ Preparation of monthly and annual financial
reports and statements

e Preparation of bank reconciliations and various
general ledger accounts to the sub ledgers






e Co-ordinate the annual audit with external
auditors and preparation of the necessary
schedules.






e Preparing reports for the regulators




e Must be a team player




¢ Must possess people skills and be prepared to
interact with customers. ~
¢ Minimum qualifications: AA in Accounting

Please forward resume before September 21, 2005 to:
P.O. Box N-7544
or email bleccul@bgcfreedom.com





TRANSFER OF COB ACADEMIC UPGRADING COURSES
FROM FACILITIES AT eo
C.C. SWEETING JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL





Please note new class locations listed below:

COURSE ; TIME DAY/S | ROOMS
(Originally
Assigned) °
MATH 046 6:00-7:50 PM CCS -27 |BTTC-11
C
C

MATH 047 6:00-7:50 PM CCS -28 |BTTC-12 —




MATH 048 6:00-7:50 PM CCS-30 |Monday--BLVD2A >
Wednesday--BLVD LT -A

- 28
- MATH 046 6:00-7:50: PM CCS-29 |BLVD-4C
MATH 048 6:00-7:50 PM CS - 31 | CCS Sr. Blocki
:00-7: - 32

: MATH 047 6:00-7:50 PM
“MATH 048 | 3C__| 6:00-7:50PM | MW __|CCS-33 |CCSSr Blocki

=

[ic | soo-rsoru [mw [cos-24 [cos S: Block

MATH 046 . 1c




| ENGOI7, | 4C | 6:00-7:50PM_| TR | CCS-28 |BTIC-8 sd
| ENGOIS | 2C | 6:00-7:50PM | TR |CCS-29 |BTIC-T
6:00-7:50 PM Tuesday-BTTC -3
ee Thursday-BTTC- 2
| ENGO17 | 2C,_| 6:00-7:50PM_[. TR: |.CCS-31
| ENG O17 | 1C__| 6:00-7:50PM_| TR | CCS-32 [CCSSrBlocki
OE Thursday--GSR -1B BLVD

ENG 015 6:00-7:50 PM CCS-27 |BITC-4



1c
4C
2C
5C
2C.,
AC
3C









_ BTTC — Bahamas Tourism Training Centre °
_ BLVD - Boulevard Building - ,
T - Technology Block




BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION



INSTALLATION OF TWO (2) YOUNG MODEL HC-1066-.
V400T40 RADIATORS & RELATED

CIVIL/MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL WORKS AT THE
BAILEY TOWN, BIMINI, BAHAMAS POWER STATION _








TENDER No. 585/05



The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible
- bidders for the installation of two (2) Young model HC-1066-V400T40
radiators and related civil/mechanical/electrical works at the power
station located at BAILEY TOWN, BIMINI, BAHAMAS.






Interested persons may collect the tender documents from the
Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads, by contacting:-



Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

~ Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852






Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 28 September 2005 by
4:00p.m. and addressed as follows: |




The General Manager.
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas




Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour



Marked: Tender No. 585/05



The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.



GCS Sr. Block i a

THE TRIBUNE



‘Something new’ needed
for $2bn visitor spending

gramme beginning in January.

The Ministry will also be
increasing its research and
marketing efforts for a num-
ber of markets, including
Canada, Latin America, China

and India. Product develop-.

ment remains a core initiative,
as is incorporating more sig-
nage and the need to increase
the inventory of tours that are
available in the Bahamas.
The Ministry of Tourism has
appointed Janet Johnson,
director of special projects and
events strategy, to create
things for visitors to enjoy, M
Walkine said. ;
One of the initial projects
that is likely to come on stream
is the creation.of a James Bond
tour, where visitors travel toa
number of sites used for the

four Bond movies filmed in the’

Bahamas. The tour is expected

- to be a land-based transporta-

tion tour, with officials look-
ing to include existing tour bus
and taxi cab drivers in the pro-

ject.
' Another tour being looked’

at, will include the Spanish

Barbs of Abaco, which are a
rare breed of horses. Ministry
officials are in talks with the
local caretaker to create a tour
around the animals. Accord-
ing to Ms: Walkine, a lot of
people are interested in this

kind of experience, which -

involves utilising one of the
best kept secrets of Abaco.
The move to create new
tours, Ms Walkine said, was
the result of continued criti-
cism, particularly by cruise pas-

sengers, that the Bahamas has »

not introduced any new tours
in recent years.

"A lot of cruise passengers
are repeat passengers; they've
been here two, three, four
times, and we've not changed
the tours we offer in 26 years,”
Ms Walkine said.

“I have to assume that if we
create one new tour a year, say
for the next five to six years,
someone will pay $30 to $40
for a new tour or attraction. If

‘only 5 per cent of. passengers

spend money on it that's more
money in the pocket of ground
tour operators and taxi drivers.

Prime Office Suite for Immediate Occupancy

1,390 Sq.Ft. (additional 800 Sq.Ft. optional)
Beautiful Views of Nassau Harbour & Paradise Island —
3 Parking Spaces included In Rental
_ Turnkey Fit-out Office Suite
24 Hr. Automatic Standby Generator
Two Elevators (wired for modern communication needs)
Separate Staff and Secured Client Parking
Automated Gated Entrance & Intercom System
24 Hr. Security Guards
24 Hr. Surveillance Systems (Recorded) & Access Control
Professionally Managed
$5,200.00 Monthly

To.View Contact

Mr. Elmer I.G. Lowe
Bahamas Facility Management Ltd.
Telephone: (242) 328-BFMM or 322-7419
P.O. Box SS-19784
Nassau, Bahamas

Rt. Honourable Perry G. Christie

Prime Minister



It's a real opportunity for them
to offer some things."

Meanwhile, to capitalise on
the new US convention tax °
incentive programme for meet-
ings and conferences in the
Bahamas, Ms Walkine said the
Ministry of Tourism recently
appointed-James Malcolm as
director of group travel.

Mr Malcolm has already
identified members of his team
and is the process of mobils-

ing an overseas sales staff that

will be able to talk to meetings,
and conference planners about

’ the advantages of having con-

ferences and meetings in the
Bahamas.
Ms Walkine the Ministry’
clearly. recognises that it is
important for large and small
hotels to have a base of group
business that will help them
manage their yields a lot bet-
ter, with the property then able’
to have a substantial number
of bookings based on a fixed
rate over a specific timeframe. ,
' The fact that the US tax ini-,
tiative is available to the rest of

_ the Caribbean means that the

Bahamas must provide added
incentives. Already, groups can
benefit from the Ministry's
staff on the ground, who will
support organisations wanting
to have a conference in the
Bahamas, and help facilitate a
positive experience for the
groups that.do come:

One example of the incen-
tives ministry officials will be
able to provide are a dedicated
arrivals and departure experi-
ence. She said that the 'on the

_ ground’ staff can facilitate. a

seamless experience through

immigration and customs, then

into transportation _
“These. are nice things to

. offer, so they don't have to

worry about their delegates at
the airport. This is the kind of
thing we can. promote,” Ms
Walkine said.
’ Mr Malcolm and his team
are expected to travel to
Chicago next month to attend
one of the largést-events in the
meetings and incentives travel
industry, the Incentive Travel
and. Meeting Exposition -
(ITME). chlor antied
Firmly of the view that:a®:
number of major initiatives
that have béen talked about:
for a while are close to being:
executed, Ms Walkine said
there are a number of projécts, :
such as the Downtown Rede-
velopment-Plan, that in anoth- -
er year or two should make.it.
easier for the tourism industry,
to grow and develop for the .
benefit of all stakeholders.

BE QTha

-PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS, Us TOO! International, Inc with headquarters in Downers
Grove, Illinois, USA, was established in 1990 by five prostate cancer survivors, viz
John de Boer, John Moenck, Edwards von Holtz, Ed Kaps and Vincent Young;

* AND WHEREAS, since its establishment as a Cancer Caring Group, more
than 500 Us TOO! Support groups have been established worldwide promoting
health education and support;

AND WHEREAS, Dr Robin Roberts and Mr Clyde B Bethel established
the Us TOO! International, Bahamas Chapter on 20th April, 2001 in association with
the Cancer Society of The Bahamas and -The Association was issued the proper
membership Charter by Us TOO! International Headquarters in Illinois on Ist May,

2001;

‘

AND WHEREAS, since September, 2001 Us TOO! Bahamas Chapter in
collaboration with the Cancer Society of The Bahamas has facilitated and conducted
annual prostate screenings at public community health clinics throughout New

Providence;

AND WHEREAS, since 2001 Us TOO! Bahamas Chapter in conjunction
with the Cancer Society of the Bahamas has each year designated September as
Prostate Cancer Awareness Month to promote awareness and conduct free prostate
screening at the various public health clinics in New Providence for men forty years

and older;

AND WHEREAS, prostate cancer is a life-threatening disease and is on
the increase, the Us TOO! Bahamas Chapter wishes to urge all men, female partners,
family and friends to unite in promoting the theme “Early detection, the Best
Protection’ to sustain life and reduce medical costs;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Perry G Christie, Prime Minister of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim the month of September, 2005
as “PROSTATE CANCER AWARENESS MONTH”. ,

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I
have hereunto set my Hand and
Seal this 31st day of August, 2005.

PERRY CHRISTIE
PRIME MINISTER


THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005, PAGE 7B



Chavez sees PetroCaribe
as challenge to US contro!

* oe - <=.
=—_
—_

“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

The Tribune wants to hear
‘from people who are-
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 |

and share your story. :

a we al

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CELINA CHARLES OFF
CARMICHEAL ROAD LAZARTTO ROAD, P.O. BOX CR - 56717,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as

| a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 11th day of JANUARY, 2005 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-
7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

~ om - e+ :
¢ Nassau & Abaco ;
° 5 years minimum experience

Please send resumes to:
PO. Box N-4827

or pick up an application form at
Bahamas Waste Limied, Elagsione



Join the team!

The Company
Providence Technology Group is one of the leading providers of business critical IT solutions in The
Bahamas. Our core values define how we view our clients, our. work and our interaction with each other:
1. There is no greater privilege than serving our clients
2. Excellence is the only standard by which we measure our work
3. Enjoyment and laughter are at the centre of all we do

Technician ©





Technical Analyst = Tec Me ee ae
Description Description

As a Technical Analyst on the Networking
Solutions Team, you will play a key role in the
design,.deployment and management of business
critical networking solutions. You will be expected

~ to manage multiple engagements over a wide -

range of client environments. This position will
require a strong technical background, sound
writing and communication — skills, good
interpersonal and organizational skills, the ability
to work as a part of a larger team, and a passion
for helping our clients succeed.

Minimum Requirements:
B® At least 4 years relevant working experience.
® Bsc. or Associates Degree in Information
Systems or related field.
® Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer
(MCSE 2003)
@ Cisco Certified Network Associate or
Professional (CCNA/CCNP)
@ Demonstrated proficiency in:
> Network Management Tools
> Security (Firewalls | VPNs)
> Messaging & Collaboration (eMail)
> Data Protection
(Storage | Tape Backup | Online Backup)
> Virus Protection
(Anti-Virus | Patch Management)

How to Apply

As a Technician on the Networking Solutions
Team, you will be responsible for providing a wide-
range of support and assistance to the technical
team. This position will require a sound technical
background, good interpersonal and organizational

skills, the ability to work as a part of a larger team,

and a passion for helping our clients succeed.

Minimum Requirements:

® At least 2 years relevant working experience in
Information Systems or related field.

= Microsoft Certified Professional
(Windows XP/2000 Professional)

@ CompTlA A+ Certification

Please email resumes to jobs@providencetg.com by 19th September 2005. ©

One Montague Place | Level 2 | East Bay Street | P.O. Box N-1081 | Nassau , The Bahamas
1 242.393. 4002 F 242.393.8003 | info@providenceTG.com | www.providenceTG.com



NETWORKING SOLUTIONS 1 CONSULTING & ADVISORY SERVICES | SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS

PUBLIC NOTICE

The public is hereby notified that, with effect |
from Monday 19th September, 2005 the Central
Bank of The Bahamas will relocate its Freeport
Office from its present location in the Regent
Centre West, Explorer’s Way to Office No. 5,
Second Floor, First Commercial Centre
Building, East Mall Drive.
All existing telephone and fax numbers
will remain unchanged. These are as follows:

Telephone: (242) 352-5963

Fax:. (242) 352-5397

CREDIT AGRICOLE SUISSE (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
is presently considering applications fora.

SENIOR MARKETING/ RELATIONSHIP MANAGER
REQUIREMENTS:

¢ Must possess, maintain and expand extensive customer base |
2 Excellent knowledge of Private Banking & Trust Services |
© Ability to fix objectives'for oneself and for subordinates’ * |"
"Languages: English, French, Spanish, (Italian a:plus)
¢ Presentation and communications skills - ability to hold
presentations in public
° At least 10 years private banking experience,
* Proficiency in MS Words Excel, Power Point
¢ Ability ta work under pressure
¢ Willing to travel extensively (4 months per year thinimum)
¢ Bahamian nationality
¢ Possess a contident and outgoing personality

DUTIES WILL INCLUDE:

* Marketing of private banking and portfolis canagemnient
services to prospective clients from Africa, Europe and -
‘North America

¢ Acquisition and development of new clients

¢ Advising clients on investment epporuniie in financial .
instruments ‘

Applications only should be submitted befcie’ October 18th
Human Resources Department

P.O.Box AP 59237
Nassau, The Bahamas

Temple Christian High School
"Teach Me, O Lard, Thy Way". Psat U9-33

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Invites applications from qualified Christian Teachers for
the following positions for the 2005 - 2006 school year.

Chemistry (Gr. 10-12)
Biology (Gr. 10-12))










Applicants must:





° Bea practicing born-again Christian who is willing
to subscribe to the Statement of Faith of Temple
Christian School.

¢ Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or higher form
‘of recognition College or University in the area of

- $pecialization.

° Have a valid Teacher’s Certificate or Diploma.

* Have at least two years teaching experience in the
relevant subject area with excellent communication

~ skills.

¢ Applicant must have the ability to prepare students
for all examinations to the BJC/BGCSE levels.

° Be willing to participate in the high schooh’s extra

curricular programmes.












An application can be obtained from the High School office
on Shirley Street and be returned by the 19th September,
2005, with a full curriculum vitae, recent coloured
photograph, and three references to:





Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application i is September 19th, 2005




PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005

ORS SoS

THE TRIBUNE



Oil prices send stock prices down

“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”













LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
AZZURE HOLDINGS LTD.

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 AZZURE HOLDINGS LTD.
is in Dissolution

The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 24th August 2005.
David Thain of Amer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd., 308 East Street,
| P.O.Box N 3917 is the Liquidator of AZZURE HOLDINGS LTD. All
| persons having claims against the above-named company are required to
send their address and particulars of their debts to the ane before
the 26th September 2005. ,








cfenuee... Storyteller
A ndependent Thinker
| Poet 7
Short Stories, Poems & Literary Gems

By Mackey Williams







Mackey Williams, that inimitable master of st
telling, has scored another direct hit with his “Short Storie
Poems and Literary Gems” in the genre of the gre Se
poet Gibran Khalil Gibran, often quoted by the Tate Joh EF
Kennedy. Williams has spun a spell-binding web of int
and philosophy-with an fyi oe of Caribbean














" Laangstone Evans
The e College of the Bahamas |




_ December 2004 _




Powerfully expressed in simplistic terms, this
: documentary of prose and poetry offers a realistic rendition of
events portraying cultural aspects of Bahamian society. In the
proc revives thrilling memories in the minds of the older
vil ee as an educational experience for the











‘Winston Knight eZ
Former Principal,

St. John’s College
Nassau, Bahamas
January 2005

For further information call: 323-4999
e-mail: franklynsmwilliams@hotmail.com







NOTICE
CHEMIN INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 13th
day of September, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp.
Inc., ef RO.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

_ARGOSA CORP. INC.
~ (Liguidator)



For The Road

‘More Tra velled :

A/C Service

¢ Check refrigerant pressures
-¢ Top up freon if low

e Clean condenser fins

¢ Check compressor drive belt

(Extra charge for any refrigerant or leak detector dye used)

accannnnsaanny seen annaannnne cnecenannvonentane Preece

Brake Service ©

e Treat disc pads with anti squeak
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FROM page one

pricing, has tried in recent years

to smooth out as much as pos-:

sible these. large increases and
reductions,” Mr Ferguson said.

“For example, following Hur-
ricane Andrew in 1993, prices on
property insurance went up some
200-300 per cent, which for sore
people meant that they had to
drop hurricane insurance alto-
gether.

“Following last year, prices
were expected to go up this year
and indeed have done, but the

Insurance

" increases were a lot more palat-

able, roughly in the region of 20-
30 per cent. This is not as drastic
as say Jamaica, where people
were seeing 35 per cent increases
even before they were hit again
this year.”

Hurricanes Jeanne ‘and
Frances caused damage worth
$551 million or 10 per cent of the
Bahamas’. gross domestic prod-
uct (GDP) when they struck in
September. 2004, Mr Ferguson
said. |

Bank of Bahamas
FROM page one

The Banker’s founder and chairman of the Financial Times from 1945-
1958.

“Tt is a great honour for Bank of the Bahamas, a young financial insti-
tution, to be ranked among the leading banks in the world,” said Mr
McWeeney.



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Engineers,
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FROM page one

and engineering companies syn-
dicate themselves to be a viable
competitive force, going up
against international companies
that have a proven track
record.” .

The Baha Mar executive
promised that there would be
opportunities for. Bahamian
architects, mechanical, civil,
plumbing and landscaping engi-
neers, and contractors and.con-
sultants to offer “a full comple-
ment of services” once the $1.2
billion redevelopment of Cable
Beach began.

Cyprian Gibson, the:

-Bahamas Society of Engineers’

president, also suggested that
the use of Bahamian engineers |
and other skilled construction |
professionals had to be speci-:
fied in future Heads of Agree-
ment that the Government
signed with developers.

Mr Sands said Baha Mar was.
encouraging MonArch Archi-:
tects, the firm that won the con-
tract to design the West Bay
Village for its development, to”
use Bahamian electricians and
engineers, after he was ques=’,
tioned about the architect pos-.,,
sibly outsourcing work to Flori:.
da-based companies.

Two Bahamians, along with’
some expatriates, had been:
hired as project managers, and
while contracts such as the re-
routing of West Bay Street were
likely to go to major interna-
tional firms, Mr Sands said they
would have to partner with
Bahamian companies, who
would provide services such as
civil engineering and project.
management.

Mr Sands added that “99 per
cent” of the $15 million upgrade ‘
Baha Mar had committed to.
after taking over ownership and
management of the cable Beach
Resorts had been carried out
by Bahamian companies.

Out of that $15 million, some”
$4 million had been allocated;
for the addition of 30 new table, ,
games and 460 slot machines in i
the Crystal Palace Casino. Baha,
Mar, Mr Sands added, was in*
negotiations with a “potential;
global brand casino partner and
hotel operator” to the ‘Las
Vegas style’ casino, which at
75,000 square feet would be the
biggest in the Caribbean.
| THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS : PAGE 9B
ene een ES RE SS a+ TELLS EE ESTES
COMICS PAGE





Y ~y > . 3 =
~*®. “Copyrighted Material
es Syndicated Content .. ~— =
Available from Commercial News Providers”«

ae
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PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

‘Athletes make their mark
in a week to remember

BVF to host —
Pro/Am
beach
volleyball
tournament

@ VOLLEYBALL
By KELSIE
JOHNSON
Junior Sports
Reporter

THE Bahamas Vol-
leyball Federation is
hoping to put a differ-
ent spin on the game
in the Bahamas by
introducing beach vol-
leyball.

In a bid to expose the ©

local players to all
aspects of the game, the
BVF will host its first
annual Pro/Am Beach
Volleyball Champi-
onships.

The championships
are set for October
21st-24th at Our Lucaya
Resort, Grand Bahama
Island and will feature
top local players and
semi-professional play-
ers from Florida.

Mandate

According to Presi-
dent of the BVF Don
Cornish, the champi-
onships are a prefect
way to assist with the
federation’s mandate,
hoping to create profes-
sional players from the
beach and hard court
arena.

He said: “The beagh
championships is a high
caliber tournament, one
we are hoping to have

every year.

“Before we decided
to host the tournament
we looked at the many
ways the programme
can benefit from it.

“We want nothing
more than to be able ‘to
diversify the sport and
introduce our local
players to all the
avenues of the
game, from indoor to
outdoor.

“It will give our play-
ers the flexibility to
develop their beach
skills. There will also
be an incentive as they
do so. ,

“We know we have
top athletes throughout
the Caribbean indoors,
but we haven’t given
them full exposure to
outdoor competitions.”

The championships
are a part of the sport-
ing-tourism package
sanctioned by the
Sports Tourism Depart-
ment of the Bahamas
Ministry of Tourism. |

It is being held in
partnership with the - .
BVF and Exclusive
Sports Marketing.

Exclusive Sports Mar-
keting has developed
an annual Pro/Am
Beach Volleyball
Championships within
the Florida region.

Market

. The sporting market
owns the largest ProoAm
Volleyball Series in the
United States, which .
includes eight events in
Florida.

The championships
set for the Bahamas.
will be considered the ©
"Super Bowl" of the
series.

Cornish added: “We
are hoping to develop
more beach competi-
tions throughout the
Bahamas especially in
New Providence where
most of play takes place
indoors.

“New Providence has
a high level of beaches,
but-our only problem is
finding a facility that is
big enough to accom-
modate the number of
courts.

“Most of the beaches
are either behind hotel
properties or in front of
hotels, so our major
thing is working out a
schedule with them so
it can be public access
for the event taking
into the account all the
security issues.”

[es been a momentous
week for the Bahamas in
the world of sports.

Six of our athletes made their
mark on the world athletic
scene, we got our first junior
Grand Slam champion in ten-
nis, a rookie footballer. with
Bahamian roots made a grand
entry into the NFL and four
umpires became internationally
certified in-softball.

The performance of Davis
Cupper Ryan Sweeting will cer-
tainly stand out among the
pack. He achieved a tremen-
dous feat by winning the US
Open j junior boys’ Grand Slam
title in Flushing Meadows, New
York. ;

For his efforts, Sweeting has

' moved up the ladder from num-

ber 21 all the way to No.2 on
the chart. Another remarkable
achievement for the 180-year-
old bound for the University of
Florida.

Sweeting has done what no
other Bahamian has achieved
and he will probably cherish this
moment for years to come. This
should definitely be the impetus
to propel him to even greater
heights on the ATP men’s cir-
cuit.

Education

It’s good to know that, while
he still intends to play on
Futures tournaments, he will be
heading to school to get his edu-
cation.

In the meantime, it would be

Ss good if the Bahamas Lawn Ten-

nis Association can get Timo-
thy Neilly to play under the
Bahamian flag.

Right now, he’s obligated to
the United States because of
the investment that they’ve
made towards his junior career.
But as the No.14 ranked player
on the junior circuit, imagine
the potential success for the

hoon’

STUBBS







Bahamas with both Sweeting
and Neilly playing together.

They did at the US open and,
while they reached the quarter-
final, they showed that they
have the potential to be one of
the best combos in the world.

As Bahamas Lawn Tennis
Association president Mary
Shelley pointed out, it would be
wonderful to see the duo
teamed up with collegian Devin
Mullings and current pro Mar-
vin Rolle.

Add H’Cone Thompson and
Chris Eldon, who is heading
back to college, and the
Bahamas could be heading in
the right direction with a solid
core of young players to get us

- back into the American Zone

One Davis Cup tie in a couple
of years.
Only time, will tell just how

soes red

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much Sweeting’s performance
will help to spark the other
players as they try to fine tune
their games in order to continue
to play on the team.

But Sweeting couldn’t ask for
a better way to put a lid on his
junior career.

There was a lot of focus on
the World Athletics Final in
Monaco over the weekend for
our squad of athletes, who qual-
ified for the season ending
meet.

Olympic and World champi-
on Tonique Williams-Darling
suffered her third consecutive
defeat post-Helsinki to Ameri-
can Sanya Richards.

Rivalry

In the process, Williams-Dar-

"ling dropped from the top of

eres, ame pack at No.7.
’ Also remaining in their same -

the chart to number. two behind

Richards. You can.only assume.

that the intense rivalry will con-
tinue next year.
Christine Amertil remained

spots are Chandra Sturrup at
No.4 in the women’s 100; Lav-
ern Eve at No.5 in the women’s
javelin and Chris Brown at No.5
in the men’s 400.

Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands

was the only other athlete with

a shift, dropping from fifth to
sixth in'the top 10.

. It was another remarkable
showing by our athletes as they

brought a close to their long

season.

As the season opened, it was
good to see Alex Smith get off
to a fast start for the Tampa
Bay Buccaneers. The 71st.pick
overall in the third round from
Stanford University scored
twice Sunday in their 24-13 tri-
umph over the Minnesota
Vikings.

It was only his first. game, but
I’m sure that we will be hearing
a lot: this season from the son of

loss.



@ RYAN SWEETING’S fantastic performance
led him to victory in the US Open junior event.

legendary Ed Smith, who broke
the barrier as the first Bahami-
an in the NFL when he played
for the Denver Broncos in the
1970s.

Whether or not he was born
here, Alex Smith’s roots are
planted here and that should
give us enough reason to cele-
brate his accomplishment.

There was another major
accomplishment for the
Bahamas Softball Federation

when Michael Hanna, Antho-

ny Bowe, Kirk Bowe and Brent
Spence pushed the Bahamian
fraternity of internationally cer-
tified umpires in the Interna-

tional Softball Federation to
eight.

It only goes to show How far
we’ve arrived in the sport, hav-
ing already inducted six
Bahamians, including the first
international certified umpire,
Arthur Thompson, into the
ISF’s Hall.of Fame.

As BSF first vice president
Burkett Dorsett said, it’s only a
matter of time that we get oth-
ers to join Bobby ‘Baylor’ Fer-
nander in the internationally

‘certified coaching ranks.

Things are looking
brighter for sports | in the’
Bahamas.

f

Revenge for.

Hf Saturday’s fixtures i

10am Faith United vs Jubilee (M).
11am Mt. Tabor vs Macedonia (15-and-under).
Noon Calvary Deliverance vs Mt. Tabor (Co-ed).
lpm Calvary Bible vs Mt, Tabor (M).

2pm First Baptist vs Golden Gates (19-and-under).
3pm Macedonia vs Calvary Deliverance (M).

N ew Bethlehem |

a SOFTBALL

. NEW Bethlehem nipped Calvary Deliverance 3-2 to pull off a
stunning victory on Saturday at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex
as the Baptist Sports Council kicked off its 2005 softball season.

It was a rematch of the men's championship last year, but, this
time, the runners-up New Bethlehem got the upper hand on the
defending champions Calvary Deliverance.

In another rematch from last year's final, defending champions

: Macedonia Baptist continued where they left off as they nipped
; -runnet-up Golden Gates Native Baptist 3-2 in a co-ed match-up.

Also Saturday, Macedonia got a double dose of victory as their
men knocked off Calvary Bible 10-6.

i And in the only other game played, Golden Gates held off First
: Baptist 7-6 in an 15-and-under game.

e Here's a summary of the games played:

@ New Bethlehem 3, Calvary Deliverance 2: Dominic Charlow's
RBI. double knocked in Darren Stevens in the first, Eugene Bain. |
: had an RBI double, scoring Tory Stevens, and he came home ona ,
i wild pitch in the second to lead New Bethlehem.
Val Maura went the distance.for the win over Danny Stubbs.
Jason Clarke, last year's batting champion, ripped a two-run in-
the-park home run to score Brad Wood Sr.

Hi Macedonia 3, Golden Gates 2: Tim Clarke singled to centre
field and scored on two consecutive errors for the game winning’
run in the bottom of the fifth inning in this co-ed game. Clarke sin-
gled and scored Macedonia's second run on an error in the third.

Michael Thompson doubled with two out and scored on Christine
Porter's RBI double in the first.

Harold ‘Banker' Fritzgerald got the win over Junior Moss on the
mound.

Kemuel Knowles had a solo in-the-park homer to lead off the
second and Christine Hanna added another in the fifth.

Bi Macedonia 10, Calvary Bible 6: Michael Thompson had a two-
run double, scoring a run to spark an eight-run bottom of the sec-. -
ond inning as Macedonia took control of this men's game. They
added two more in the fourth. Kevin Johnson had ‘two hits and
scored three times in the win.

Harold ‘Banker’ Fritzgerald picked up the win over Lindsay Pin-
der in a battle of two of the oldest pitchers in the league.

Grett Lewis had two hits and Shawn Moree scored twice in the

Golden Gates 7, First Baptist 6: Richard Bastian Jr. and
Jamaal Hanna both had an RBI single in a five-run first inning as
Golden Gates surged on top and never looked back. Bastian and
Kristoff Minus both scored twice in the win as they came up two
more runs in the third.

Jamaal Johnson Jr. had an RBI single to highlight a four-run
third as First Baptist made a comeback attempt. They scored their

first run in the first.

4pm New Bethlehem vs Golden Gates (M).
TRIBUNE SPORTS | THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005, PAGE 11B |



SPORTS



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MIAMI HERALD SPORTS



Outlines plans for COB

‘

By KELSIE JOHNSON .
Junior Sports Reporter

THE College of the
Bahamas officially announced
Greg Harshaw as its new ath-
letic director yesterday.

Harshaw has previously
directed the athletic pro-
gramme at the University of
California, Santa Cruz, with
direct responsibilities for man-
aging a budget ranging from
$800,000 to $1 million dollars.

His other duties included
building and supervising
fundraising and marketing of
the sports programme.

With his recent agreement
with the College of the
Bahamas, Harshaw is hoping
to extend and improve-on the
already existing athletic pro-
grammes.

Develop

With track and field being
the head of the college’s pro-
gramme, Harshaw is hoping
to develop other sports.

He said: “It is obvious that
track and field will be the
head of the programme, but
we are reviewing other sports
right now.

“We are looking at basket-
ball; soccer — two of the

island’s favourites — and tennis .

and volleyball.

“Right now we are just
looking at where the interest
_ lies and working closely with
the federations and the Min-
istry of Sports.”

Harshaw welcomed the
opportunity to mentor the

College targets
correspondent
programme

ll By KELSIE JOHNSON

Greg Harshaw
aiming to
improve
existing
programme

next generation of leaders in
the field and said it is his plea-
sure to work with the staff to
develop strategies that will
make COB a leader national-
ly and internationally in the
area of sports and athletics.

Dr Rhonda Chipman-John- —

son, acting vice president at
the college, said that the hiring
of the new athletic director
was a step the college took in
hopes of establishing the ath-
letic department and: another
deliberate move to:enhance
the students’ life at the col-

lege.

Initiative
She said: “The initiative
stems from the belief that the
physical development of COB

students should receive .as
much attention as their acad-

‘emic, social and spiritual

development.
“T’ll hope to see a better bal-

ance now, since we have .

revamped our athletic pro-
gramme.

According to Dr Rhonda Chipman-Johnson,







@ NEWLY ANNOUNCED athletic director Greg Harshaw
explains his plans for improving the College of the Bahamas’
athletic programme. Seated next to Mr Harshaw is acting vice
president Dr Rhonda Chapman-Johnson.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)





“We are hoping to attract
more males. Of course there
will be the balance between
academics and athletics, which
can be a factor.

“But we will welcome all
males, so we are hoping to get
more males through such a
programme. -

“Of course attracting more
females who are interested in
sports is also a concern.”

THE NEW 0 ( 5 MUSTANG

The Legend Lives









Junior Sports Reporter

AS THE College of the Bahamas (COB) seeks
to reach university status by 2007, it is also aiming
to take its athletic programme to the next level.

The college is hoping to build on its existing
athletic programme, by trying to secure a corre-
spondent programme with either the National
Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA), the
National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics
(NAIA) or the Central Intercollegiate Athletic
Association (CIAA).

Realising that the goal set will take more than
four years to be fully operative, newly installed
athletic director Greg Harshaw said that, by two
years, the college should be in reach of their
goals.

The minimum sporting disciplines a college
has to be enrolled in order to achiéve NCAA
status is ten.

Mr Harshaw said: “We can become corre-
spondents with the some of the colleges in the
Caribbean first. :

Goal

“Our minimum courses are ten, which will
include men and women’s sports. Our goal is to
become correspondents and hopefully be able to
play teams within the Caribbean in two years.”
Harshaw is willing to recruit athletes from other
countries, but giving Bahamian athletes first pref-
erence.

“We will work with what we have first, but we
will look into recruiting athletes from abroad,”
said Harshaw:

“We haven’t decided if we are going to be divi-
sion J or II as yet, but the plan is to add some
scholarships for young men and women.”

acting vice president at the college, the goal of
introducing a new athletic programme is to attract
and keep some of the. premier student-athletes at
home and to develop strong links to the national
athletic programme.

Harshaw has designed a three step plan which
should assist with reaching the goals of the col-
lege.

The first step listed by Harshaw, was the
reviewing of programmes and structure of the
college’s athletic programme.

He believes that the review will be able to help
the athletic board understand exactly what needs
to be done.

His second objective is to upgrade the facilities
at the school to a world class standard.

The upgrades will ensure that, when the college
does reach university status, they will be able to
host games and teams from colleges in the Unit-
ed States and throughout the Caribbean.

As the college extends its programme by build-
ing games for their teams, the third objective list-
ed on the two year goal plan is to file for corre-
spondence to the NCAA.

Currently, the college’s athletic programme
comprises of the intramural sports, male and
female soccer and basketball.

The men and women’s teams both participate
in the local leagues hosted by the New Provi-
dence Associations.

In assisting with the college’s goals, the gov-
ernment has earmarked a 100-acre subdivision on
Gladstone Road for the expansion of the new
COB.

The college is planning to use portions of this
land to build sporting complexes, a fitness and
wellness centre and dormitory facilities.

The college has decided to work closely with
the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture to
engage the usage of its facilities,



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SECTION



THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005



Sermons, Church Activities, Awards



The Tribune |

Church Notes
‘Page 2C

.



‘We must ask God to spare
us from these hurricanes’

m@ By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

s Bahamians
watch and
read interna-
tional reports

d of the réscue
and relief efforts to restore the
Gulf Coast states affected by
Hurricane Katrina, some reli-
gious leaders say they should
also be in prayer and planning
to ensure that this country is
prepared for a hurricane of that
magnitude,

Bishop Simeon Hall, pastor
of ‘New Covenant Baptist
Church, and former president
of the Bahamas Christian

Cowncil (BCC), seems to be-

leading the call for Bahamians
to ¥eflect on local hurricane
efforts, while they pray for their
neighbours in the US.
~ “Our job now is to pray and
ask-God to have mercy upon us
and spare us from these hurri-
caries. But simultaneously, we
miust have concrete action,” the
pastor tells Tribune Religion.

Bishop Hall has criticised the
current Bahamas Christian
Cotincil administration for its
call for a week of prayer for
the victims of Hurricane Katri-
na.

“Let’s do more than pray,”
he Said,

‘Bishop Hall feels that in this

case, Bahamians should also

not only pray for God’s mercy,
but put their faith into work.
“(Bishop Neil) Ellis was right
to call for proper planning, to
‘call for a proactive approach
to'this natural phenomenon,”
says the pastor. “We know that
‘we are in a storm belt so we
should try to minimise the

Sacred Heart parishioners
worship in ‘partial darkness’

impact in the event there is a
major storm coming our way.”

According to local meteo-
rologists, the Bahamas has nev-
er experienced any storm
above a category four, and one
of Hutricane Katrina’s magni-
tude (a. category tive) would
have defaced Nassau.

Lt Commander Herbert
Bain, deputy co-ordinator at
the National Emergency Man-
agement Agency (NEMA),
says that the Bahamas is on an

“Our job now
is to pray and
ask God to have
mercy upon us and
- spare us from these
hurricanes. But
simultaneously, we
must have concrete
action.”

— Bishop Simeon Hall

upward trajectory towards the
most active hurricane season
within the past 100 years, and
warns that in the next few years
the Bahamas can expect “some
very serious hurricanes”.

“T can’t begin to imagine

what type of catastrophe we
would experience, or what the
effect will be if we do have such
a hurricane,” says Bishop Hall.

“In this country, we tend to
do things on the tail end. But
there is no reason why we car’t
prepare for the onslaught of a

major category five hurricane
like what they experienced in
New Orleans.”

That preparation, says Bish-

op Hall, should begin with the
construction of adequate shel-
ters. :
‘Many of the current shelters
are churches, whose structures
have beén around for years and
are subject to wear and tear,
the Bishop notes. “So there is a
question of how durable these
shelters will be.”

He says that in this instatice,
he is “on the praying side”,
among those who hope that the
Lord would “not permit one of
these serious hurricanes to
come our way”.

Criticising the Bush admin-
istration’s handling of Hurri-
cane Katrina relief, Bishop
Hall says that the response
should have come earlier.

“To. say that the response
was disgraceful is putting it
lightly,” he says. “There is no
reason why it should’ve taken
the federal government so long
to come. to their aid and start
rescuing people. It’s two weeks

‘after the hurricane hit and they

are still trying to find bodies.
“There's the bogeyman of
race again and. we-don’t want

to think-about it,” he adds,. “but.

Mississippi, New Orleans and
Alabama are three of the poor-
est states. So taking so long to
come to their aid doesn’t speak
well of Mr Bush.”

He hopes that in the event
that the Bahamas is affected
by a category five hurricane,
the Bahamian government
would be “more inclined to be
urgent in their response”. But

SEE page 8C



a BISHOP SIMEON HALL, PASTOR OF NEW COVENANT BAPTIST CHURCH

.

"a By CLEMENT JOHNSON

PARISHIONERS at Sacred Heart
Catholic Church celebrated evening mass
_ on Saturday in partial darkness. In the
“absence of electricity, candles and the
evening dusk provided a beautiful light.

Despite the semi—darkness and the heat,
the words to the hymn “Amazing Grace”
were sung spiritedly, accompanied by a
grandfather piano.

The gospel reading of the day demand-
ed and spoke of expressions of love, and
one of the most essential means of main-
taining the unity of Christian community +
the duty of forgiveness.

Gospel

The Gospel speaks frequently of for-
giveness, When Peter asked how often one
must forgive another, Jesus surprised him

and replied, “severity times seven times”,

In the Lord’s Prayer, we ask the Father
to “forgive us our trespasses, as we for-

give those who trespass against us” ;

Yet despite all of this we still find that
most people don’t-really want to forgive
others, even though they say they do; and
most people don’t really want to be for.
given, even though they say so.

Talking

A college student I was speaking. with
the other day claimed that she would nev-
er be able to trust people, nor would she
allow ‘herself to fall in love because she
was hurt as a child. After.hours of talking,
she still nurses her hurt.

I informed her that she needed to forgive
those people who hurt her, also there was
the need for her to forgive herself.

It is only in forgiving that we are truly
able to trust and love as God intended us
to. But many people don’t want to be for-
given nor forgiving.

At some point it is important to say,
“that’s ok”, or to be told, “what you did

was wrong y and you hurt me, but I forgive

you”,

A person who has hurt someone is often
laden with guilt, and feeling guilty is some-
times worse than the sin.

Just how Jesus told Peter forgiveness!

must be continuous, so too must we be
able to forgive. But for forgiveness to be
effective in the one forgiven, the one for-
given must repent and make amends if
possible, But the one forgiving, it is effec-
tive even if the object of forgiveness does-
n't truly repent. It frees us from hatred

_and thoughts of vengeance, and makes us

truly more God-like and enables us to do
his will.

Forgive
Jesus concludes the story by saying, “so
will my heavenly Father do to you, unless

each of you forgive your brother from your
heart”. Jesus is telling us that there is no

SEE page 2C

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PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005



THE TRIBUNE.





SAINT AGNES
ANGLICAN
CHURCH

THE church on Blue Hill
Road is scheduled to hold the
following weekly services and
activities:

September 15, 6:40 am -
Matins, 7 am - Mass, 5 pm - Sr
Boys Brigades, 7 pm - Opening
Service for West Central
Deanery Congress

September 16, 6:40 am -
Matins, 7 am - Mass, 12:30 pm
- Mid-day Mass, 6 pm - David’s
Army, Jr CYM, Sr CYM, 7 pm
- Young Adults, Prayer Band

September 17, 7:30 am -
Mass, 3 pm - Girls Brigade,
4:30 pm - Junior Ushers Prac-
tice, 5 pm - Bell Ringers Prac-
tice, Primary Choir Practice,
Youth Choir Practice -

September 18, 7 am -

Solemn Sung Mass and Ser- .

mon, 10:30 am - Solemn Sung
Mass and Sermon, 11 am -
Sunday School, 7:30 pm -
Solemn Evensong, Sermon
and Benediction

Upcoming Events |

® Annual Prayer Confer-
ence, September 23, 7 to 9 pm,
September 24, 9 am to 3 pm.

ST ANDREW’S
PRESBYTERIAN
KIRK

YOU are invited to worship |

with the church family at 9:30
am or 11 am on Sunday. Sun-
day School meets during the
11 am service and the Youth

Group meets on Friday .

evenings.’

The Kirk is located at the
corner of Peck’s Slope and
Princes' Street, across from the
Central Bank: Parking is avail-
able immediately behind the
Kirk. Visit us also at: pee

www.standrewskirk.com

ZION a4
METHODIST
MINISTRIES

“THE church in the South’.

Beach Shopping Centre, East

‘Street south, is scheduled to






left: Clyde Rashad, Operator
oad; Dr. Davidson Hepburn,
» Board of Trustees, Princess
ital Foundation; Benita

o Marketing Specialist;
Public Relations Officer,
‘garet Haspital; Troy Simms,
Sales Manager; Henderson .
ator Esso Balfour Avenue

hold the following worship ser-
vices:
September 18, 10:15 am -

. Sunday School, 11 am - Divine

Worship Service (Preacher:
Sister Maritta Cartwright-
Brown)

Third Monday, 7:30 pm -
Ladies Ministry

Wednesday, 7:30 pm -
Prayer and Bible Study

Thursday, 7:30 pm - Music
Ministry

Saturday, 3 pm - Dance Min-
istry, 4 pm - Children’s Choir
Ministry

ST BARNABAS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH

THE church on Blue Hill
and Wulff Roads is scheduled
to hold the following services:

September 18, 7 am - Sung

Mass, 10 am - Sunday School

and Adult Bible Classes, 11 am

+ Praise and Worship, Sung



Margaret Hospital Foundation
eded aid. ‘Thanks’ from all of us
ase continue ‘helping us to help’
ach our goal of $35,000.












Mass, 7 pm - Solemn Evensong
and Benediction

Monday, 6:40 am - Mattins
and Mass, 4 pm - Youth Band
Practice, 6:30 pm - Lay Pas-
tors' Training, Laying A Solid
Foundation, Adult Band Prac-
tice

Tuesday, 6:40 am - Mattins
and Mass, 1 pm - Mid-day
Mass, 6 pm - Prayer Chapel, 7
pm - Bible Class

Wednesday, 6:30 am - Mass,
6:30 pm - Marriage Enrich-

ment Class, 7 pm - Prayer .

Band and Bible Class
Thursday, 6:40 am - Mattins
and Mass, 6 pm to 9 pm -
Young Adult Choir Practice,
7 pm - Senior Choir Practice
Friday, 6:40 am -.Mattins
and Mass, 4 pm - Confirma-
tion Classes, 6 pm ~.St
Ambrose Guild, 6:30 pm -
Christian Youth Movement
Saturday, 10 am to 1 pm -
Boys Brigade (ages 5-9), 1 pm
- Youth Alpha (every third
Saturday), 3:30 pm to 4 pm -

- Boys Brigade (ages 10+), 4 pm

- Youth Band Practice, 6 pm -

Altar Guild, 6 pm - Confes- .

sions

EAST ST.
GOSPEL

CHAPEL —
THE church at 83 East

Street, “where Jesus Christ is _

Lord, and everyone is special”,
is scheduled to hold the fol-

- lowing services:

Sunday, 9:45 am - Sunday
School & Adult Bible Class,
11 am - Morning Celebration,
7 pm - Communion Service, 8
pm - ‘Jesus, the Light of
World’ Radio Programme on
ZNS 1 Aan

Tuesday, 8 pm - Chapel
Choir Practice

Wednesday, 8 pm - Mid-
week Prayer Meeting (Second
Wednesday) — Cell Group
Meeting



—— Syndicated Content = ~~

Thursday, 6 pm - Hand Bells
Choir Practice, 8 pm - Men’s
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday), 7:45 pm - Women’s
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday)

Friday, 6:30 pm - Con-

querors for Christ Club (Boys |

& Girls Club), 8 pm ~ East
Street Youth Fellowship Meet-
ing
Saturday, 6:30 am - Early
Morning Prayer Meeting

FIRST
HOLINESS
CHURCH

OF GOD |

THE church on First Holi-
ness Way, Bamboo Town, is
scheduled to hold the following
services: ;

Sunday, 9:45 am - Sunday
School, 11 am - Morning Wor-
ship, 7 pm - Evening Worship

“Monday, 7:30 pm - Prayer
’ Meeting

. Wednesday, noon « Prayer.
& Praise Service, 7:30 pm + -.

Bible Study

Thursday, 7:30 pm ~ Praise

& Worship Service
Friday (2nd and 4th), 7:30
pm - Youth Meeting |

Second Tuesdays, 7:30 pm «

SALT Ministry (Single Adults
Living Triumphantly)

Fourth Saturdays, 4 pm ae
SOME Ministry (Save Our.

Men Evangelism) -

- Ist Sundays - Women's Day.
2nd Sundays - Youths:

Day/Dedication of Infants»
3rd Sundays - Mission
Day/Commiunion

Service ,

ALL SAINTS

ANGLICAN

CHURCH —
SERVICES and meetings to

4th Sundays - Men's Day:

ing

be held at the church on Ail -
Saints Way, South Beach, for
pe week of September 18)to
Sunday (Feast: Pentecost
18), 7 am - Sung Mass and Ser- .
mon (Theme: “Living As The -
People Of God”), 10. am -
Family Eucharist and Sunday +
School, 6:30 pm = Evensong
and Teaching (Topic: Enter-
ing His Presence) ~
. Monday, 7 pm - Education,
For Ministry (EFM), Band.
Practice at St Matthew's 7
Tuesday, 8:30 am - Mass.at;

- St. Luke's Chapel, Princess .

Margaret Hospital, 7:30 pm --
Home Visitation.

Wednesday, 6 am - Mass and
Breakfast, 7 pm - Chorale.
Practice Sia) 4 4 Gaye

Thursday, 6:30 pm - Band
Practice at All Saints, 7:30 pm
« Senior Choir Practice

Friday, 6 at - Sunrise Mass -
and Breakfast, 6:30 pm to 8:30 -
pm - Dance Camp at the Com-.-.
munity Centre ; re

Saturday, 6 am - Prayer.,
Retreat led by Cursilliastas
Renewal Ministries, 2 pm -
Acolyte Practice

(Rector: Rev Fr S Sebastian

~ Campbell)

UNITED
FAITH
MINISTRIES
INT... ¢

THE church in the Summer

Winds Plaza, Harrold Road,.is
scheduled to hold the followitig:
services:. oi
* Sunday, 8 am - Morning
Glory Breakthrough Service,

10:30 am - Divine Worship’
‘Setvice (Live broadcast at 11-
‘am on More 94.9 FM)

Morning Glory Prayer meét-
ig every Wednesday and Sat-

-utday at 5 am

«. Tuesda

y, 7:30 pm - Choit

“Rehearsal
Every Wednesday, 7 pri <

Bible Study __ a
_ Friday, 7 pm - Youth Meet-

For further information, 6-
mail: ufm@bahamas.net.bs ‘ *
or call 328-3737/328-6949. ~

; Pope
Dhenses
Statue

er ona -

“Copyrighted Material — ~

Available from Commercial News Providers”

<-

FROM page 1C

room in the kingdom of heaven for those who
cannot find it in their hearts to forgive, not once
not three times but-always. As always, Jesus
calls us to something diametrically opposed to



‘we say.

for a tooth”.

the prevailing wisdom of the world.

Questions

The gospel then questions each of us. Do we
put limits on our forgiveness? Do we forgive
relatives and friends, but others we do not, so
much so that we want some people removed
from the face of the earth? “Hang them high!” .

Help us help!

During September, for every hamburger you
purchase, McDonald’s will donate 50 cents _
to the victims of Hurricane Katrina.



Or do we still live with the Old Testament
spirituality, which says “an eye for eye, a tooth:

Citizens

The gospel on Saturday reminded us that cits
izens of the Kingdom have different spirituality; .
it is the spirituality of Jesus who forgives totally
and always, lo matter how grievous the offence: .
Where would any of us be if Jesus’ philosophy,

was “three strikes and you’re out?”







fm lovin’ It.



\
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005, PAGS ve





‘Letting go and letting God’

@ By CLEMENT JOHNSON

I AM getting rid of my

6 engagement. I have been

holding on to it for six

years, in addition to that

anything that is holding me

back from getting closer to the Lord I

am letting it go,” said a good friend of

mine after some deep soul searching.

“For too long I have been holding

on to this ring as a symbol of status, or

holding on to old hurts because they

are all I have. But after a week of fast-

ing and praying, God told me to turn

to him and trust him completely,” she
said with joy in her spirit.

Knowledge

D L Moody once said, “the scrip-
tures are given not to increase our
. knowledge but to change our lives”.
Psalm 104:33-34 says that prayer
_ helps us to see ourselves honestly.

Too often we hear the phrase, “Let
go and let God” and for many of us
it’s only a catchy saying, but for others
it’s a continuous struggle and a daily
challenge to let go.

There is the struggle of letting go of
fear in order to love more. There is
the challenge not to try and think we
have all the answers. There is the need
to admit that we are powerless. It is
when we let go that we realise we live
more productive lives, our attitude
becomes more positive.

“Letting go and letting God” does
not mean that we vacate our respon-
sibility of being productive citizens
and upright Christians.

The idea of total trust is difficult
for most of us, even with those we see
and love. The idea of trusting a God
we are not able to see demands great
faith.

In the letter to the Hebrews, 11:1,
we are told, “Now faith is the sub-
stance of things hoped for, the, evi-

dence of things not seen”.

Faith in God comes from having a
relationship with his son Jesus Christ,
who epitomises the meaning of faith
and trust.

Example

When I think of an example of let-
ting go and trusting God, I remem-
ber something that was told to me
some time ago, and most of you have
heard before but I will repeat it
because it drives home a question we
need to continue to ask ourselves, do
we only trust God when times are
good or when our faith is tested or
will we be like Jack?

“A man named Jack was walking
along a steep cliff one day when he
accidentally got too close to the edge
and fell. On the way down he grabbed
a branch, which temporarily stopped
his fall. He looked down and to his
horror saw that the canyon fell straight

‘The ideal of
perfection’

@ By FR HENRY CHARLES

ONWARD, Moderate
Christian Soldiers is the title of
a recent article in the NY
Times ‘by John C Danforth, a
former US senator and Ambas-
sador to the United Nations.
Danforth was arguing that
“moderate” Christians too
have their convictions and are
just as concerned as more rad-
ical Christians to see them
influence public life.

It was an otherwise thought-
ful piece. I say “otherwise,”
because I’m not sure how much
traction you get with moder-
ateness as a form of moral sum-
mons. Danforth may not have
intended it, but that’s where
his article took me. Jesus’ com-
mand, for instance, was “Be ye
therefore perfect.” You destroy
dimensions of possibility to
prefer “Be ye therefore slight-
ly improved.” .

An appeal to become a little
better, or try a little harder, is
mote realistic than “be ye
therefore perfect,” as psychol-
ogists will tell you. If your stan-
dards are impossibly high, you
set yourself up for neurosis.
And yet, standards by defini-
tion orient us in the direction of
what is not only normative but
exacting.

There are several ways to
understand perfection human-
ly, short of meaning “without
lack or flaw,” as some tradi-
tional definitions of God put
it. One way is to see it as a syn-
onym for excellence. But peo-
ple fight shy of this. You get
instead observations flecked
with mistrust, like: “Christians
aren’t perfect, just forgiven.”
Which is, of course, true, but
doesn’t forgiveness imply an
ideal one has fallen from?

It’s difficult to feel unquali-
fied attraction for a moderate
moral standard. Difficult, too,
to feel the same for a moderate
work of art, and the reasons
are basically the same. Noth-
ing commands your attention
totally; nothing warrants undis-
tracted consideration. In oth-
er words, where vision is at
issue, moderateness lacks com-
pelling authority.

Which is exactly what per-
fection has. The authority of

perfection is not one that -

dwarfs or diminishes, but one
that summons to self-transcen-
dence. The drive is towards
transcending even one’s best.
Another meaning of “per-
fection” is life or possibility on
the other side of decadence. At
the end of the third century, to
cite a good example, when
social standards could not have
been worse, numbers of peo-

ple fled the ambience of the .

declining Roman empire and
took to the desert. They were
motivated, historians tell us, by
“the ideal of perfection.” This
was the celebrated “fuga mun-
di,” or “flight from the world.”

One should not interpret this
movement too quickly or
exclusively in spiritual terms.
What it meant was that when
men and women of the day
looked around them, the vision
of possibility they sensed was
bleak indeed. Widespread
decadence made a decent life
seem impossible. To get some-
where, one had to flee. People,
in effect, were saying with their
feet: there is no hope here; let



@ FR H CHARLES

the human experiment contin-
ue elsewhere.

And it did. These years were »--¢h¥;
. the cradle.of monasticism, and
you can’t talk about-the history.

of the latter without dealing



with the preservation of civili-
sation in the West.

But perfection also has other
less dramatic forms. Every gen-
uine artist, for instance, is obe-
dient to a conception of per-



ROA cea td Oe mS

work is constantly referred,.as





sport’ § eee as if

ee ae Se

_ CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ® Tel: 325-2921

will hold
“THE ABUNDANT LIFE CRUSADE”
with Evangelists
Elliott Neilly and Brentford Isaacs
Sunday, October 9th - 16th
Sundays 7:00p.m. ¢ Weeknights 7:30p.m.
“Come and find peace of mind and —
healing for the body and soul”

© ae 8 6A AE 5S 2 6 SE KH 8 8 TO 8 AY

fection to which his or her

it were, to judgment from the
outside. This is not a judgment
of the artists’ making, but.a
standard which they recognise.
In its light, their work receives
its relative weight or value.
The idea of perfection, in
other words, is the abstract but
real idea through which a stan-
dard is.disclosed that puts val-
uation in proper perspective.
It shows, for instance, that real
goodness is quite different from
being passably kind. In the light
of the former, the latter may
not partake of goodness at all.
Perfection thus helps us not to
settle for what may only be
semblance and illusion.
It’s Seas look at
ings front another angle—to
Stop of their



they have much still to learn
or to achieve. It’s a desire hard-
ly rooted in money or fame. By
the time they’ve gotten to
where they are, they’ve had
more than enough of both. The
magnetic pull is toward a spe-
cial excellence. In our estima-
tion they may already have it,
but the matter is not ours to
determine. Perfection is speak-
ing to them, not to us. It’s
entirely fitting that they regard
our comments as of people
who don’t get it, and go their
own way.

The obedience their desire
suggests is not dissimilar to that
of saints and moral heroes.
What unites them is that desire
draws them into an increasing
privacy, where talk serves no
purpose and only amounts to
distraction.

I’ve come some distance
from Danforth and his appeal
to “moderate Christian sol-
diers.” His argument, given the
US political scene within recent
years, is well-intentioned.
Unfortunately, I do not believe
that the Christian vision is
translatable into an appeal
either to moderateness—or
extremism. The ideal of per-
fection does what neither can.
It stretches us in the direction
of excellence and greater self-
discovery, leaving us in every
sphere of life dissatisfied with
settling for less.

This is why an ideal that
seems so forbidding continues —
to have such strange power and
appeal.

e Fr Henry Charles is rector
of St Patrick’s Catholic Church
in Trinidad.



ms 0

i q eneH AEN \
Ee

down for more than one thousand

feet. He couldn’t hang on to the |

branch forever and there was no way
for him to climb up the steep wall of
the cliff. So, Jack began yelling for
help, hoping that someone passing by
would hear him and lower a rope or
something.

Help! Help! Is anyone up there?
Help! He yelled for hours but no one
heard him. He was about to give up
when he heard a voice.

Jack, Jack. Can you hear me?

Yes. Yes! And where are you?

I am the Lord, Jack. Are you all
right?

‘You mean, God.

That’s me.

God please help me! I promise if .

you will get me down from here I'll
stop sinning. I will really be a good
person. I’ll serve you for the rest of my
life. '
Easy on the promises, Jack. Let’s
just get you down from hear, then we



can talk. Now, here’s what I want you
to do. Listen carefully.

Pll do anything, Lord. Just tell me
what to do. Okay. Let go of the
branch.

What!

I said let go of the branch. Just trust
in Me. Let go.

There was a long silence. Finally,
Jack yelled. Help! Help! is anyone
else up there?”

Difficult

Have you ever felt like Jack? We
say that we want to know the will of
God but when we find out what it is
we can’t handle it. It sounds too scary,
too difficult. We decide to look else-
where.

When He says, “Let go of the things
that stand between you and me and
trust me with your life”, it sounds
scary. But when we let go, ve find
freedom and safety in His hands.

+ (7TH 2005

Opening Eucharist - St. Agnes
7 PM Thursday, September 15th

Workshops - Holy Trinity
Friday September 16th,
6 PM (Registration) _

Saturday, September 17th

8:30 AM








RAINBOW .




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THURSDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 15, 2005

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PAGE 8C, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005
errr a ee ee ee ee ee eee eee ee cee eee ee ce seen cc ee ese RO IIE
RELIGION





gi “THE Earle” and Sweet Potato at his 84th birthday celebration
at Radisson Cable Beach Hotel on Sunday, September 11.





arle’

arke 84th

b lsat oped

na day when
most of the
| United States
y paused to recall

z " the tragedy of
9/11, hronidéedls gathered at the
Radisson Cable Beach Resort
for the 84th birthday celebra-
tion of “King Earle”, Rev Dr
Earle Francis, the proud Pastor
of the First Baptist Church,
Market Street.



4

marked by the presence of
Deputy Prime Minister Cyn-
thia Pratt, other. distinguished
ministers of the gospel, fami-
ly, friends and well wishers.

Celebration

Of course, the birthday cele-
bration could not be complete
without the Earle’s “Sweet
Potato” (Dr Marjorie Francis),
“The Earle’s” companion for

some 58 yeats.

This visionary pioneer, entre-
preneur, ex-serviceman and
statesmen in ministry has
served First Baptist for more
than 43 years.

On lookers laughed with glee
as they sang, “Happy Birthday
to you.,.Sticky” while “King
Earle” and “Sweet Potato” cut
the birthday cake. (“Sticky”
being one of the nicknames of

It was,a tremendous event,

FROM page 1C

he says that a prediction of just how prepared
the government is to handle such a natural dis-
aster cannot be made, sitice it has never had to
face a category five stortn.

“But let’s pray and at the same time plan so
that we would be prepared. It seems that, like
they say, everything nailed down is coming loose,
which has a lot to do with the everits that will
occur in the end times,” he warns.

The pastor says that the Bahamas should also
be very cautious of the laws that it puts in place,

_since he believes that the actions of a nation
can “call down the wrath of God”, which can be
manifested in natural disasters.

“What your private sins are, that’s your busi-

ness, but when we as a nation give licence to it,
and give it our blessing, that’s where we have a

problem,” he adds.

And while Bishop Hallis not “prepared” to
say that such is the case with this recent hurri-
cane, he did note that some aspects of New
Orleans life, for example, are not “holy”,

Regardless of what the lifestyle is in New
Orleans, he feels that the attitude of Bahamians
at this point should not “bring down further
damnation”. They should be in a “helping mode”
instead.

The Catholic Archdiocese has joited with the
other 195 dioceses throughout the United States
who took up a special offering in aid of those
affected in Hurricane Katrina. The money col-
lected from local parishes on September 10 -11

“King Earle” in his early 20s).



will be made to Catholic Relief Services, which
was very generous to the Bahamas in the after-
math of last year’s hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne. The organisation was founded in 1943 by
Catholic bishops in the US.

The government also announced that it would
lead local efforts with a donation of $50,000,
while Franklyn Wilson of Sunshine Holdings,
Wendall Jones, CEO of Jones Communications,
and Bank of the Bahamas chairman, Alfred
Jarett, ate leading another fundraising initia-
tive. Organisers ate asking the public to partic-
ipate in a national prayer service on Thursday,

' September 22 at Mount Tabor Full Gospel Bap-

tist Church, and a National Telethon on Sep-
tember 30 at the Independence Ballroom in the
Radisson Resort on Cable Beach. The website
www.bahamasforamerica.com has also been
established as part of the effort.

McDonalds has also pledged to donate 50
cents from every hamburger sold in September.
The Salvation Army has initiated a “Fund for
Gulf Coast Disaster” where interested persons

can deposit donations at any Royal Bank of ©

Canada, account number 174-498-6, Persons can
also donate online directly to the US Salvation
Army by credit card at www.salvation-
armyusa.org, The Red Cross is also accepting
donations at its John F Kennedy Drive Head-
quarters, by mail at P O Box N-8331, Nassau
Bahamas, of at arty branch of the Royal Banik of
Canada, account number 104-835-4.







ee etree Oe

i “KING Earle” cuts the cake on the occasion of his 84th birthday.
He is helped by his “Sweet Potato”.

hondabahamas.

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