Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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US withdraws
2006 deadline

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

BAHAMIAN tourism offi-
cials yesterday breathed a sigh
of relief as the United States
withdrew the proposed Decem-

ber 31 2006 deadline for the

implementation of its new pass-
port rules, thus averting a pos-
sible multi-million revenue loss,
for the industry.

The US State Department on
Wednesday announced that the
deadline for the Western Hemi-
sphere Travel Initiative, which
requires all US citizens to pre-
sent a valid passport upon
returning from the Bahamas,
Caribbean countries, and Cen-
tral and South America, is now
under review.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, Minister of Tourism
Obie Wilchcombe said that this
development “will benefit the
entire Caribbean”.

“The review of the timeline is
indicative of our desire to be
flexible, practical, and pragmatic
and to listen to public feed-
back,” State Department
spokesman Steve Pike told the
US media.

In the Bahamas, Michael

Taylor, chief political, econom-
ic, and public relations officer at
the US Embassy, also con-
firmed that the implementation
deadline is now being revised.
“The deadline is being
revised. We do not have a new
deadline as yet, but expect that
information soon,” he said.
The US Embassy in a press
release stated that the Depart-
ments of State and Homeland
Security recognised that imple-
menting the requirements of

the passport legislation would
have “potentially significant
implications.”

“For this reason, we have
reviewed our initial proposed
timeline that had suggested a
three-phased schedule.

“The Administration is now
proposing a revised timeline for
implementation. This imple-
mentation schedule will be pub-
lished in the Federal Register
in the near future,” the state-
ment said.

Mr Wilchcombe attributed
the withdrawal of the Decem-
ber 2006 deadline to the com-
bined efforts of ali the
Caribbean countries and those
who fought the issue on their
behalf.

“We are obliged to the CTO
(Caribbean Tourism Organisa-

-tion) who became involved' in

June, as well as to Congress-
man Charles Rangel (of New
York), and especially to

Ambassador John Rood who.

spoke on our behalf, so we are
sending him a big ‘thank you’,”

he said.

Following the initial
announcement of the new pass-
port rules, Caribbean countries
raised the concern that the
December déadline would not
give travellers sufficient time to
apply for the necessary docu-
ments, thereby leading to a sig-
nificant decrease in American
visitors to the region.

As travellers to Mexico and
Canada were given until 2008
to comply with the policy, the
Caribbean also felt discriminat-
ed against.

A study prepared for the

SEE page 11



Nassau and JByeVe¥-boe te) Islands

@ The Prince Brigades and Princess Guides wate the gate to their tabernacle, where Hinech services are conducted daily.
_(Phato: Mario Duncanson/ Tribune Seafp)

Rasta fury after ‘police raid’

@ By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter |

THE local Rasta church is up in arms
about an early morning raid conducted
at their Fire Trail Road headquarters.
They claim that their priests and their
order of service were grossly disrespect-
ed by DEU agents.

They are calling on the Bahamas gov-
ernment and society to respect their

church, which is officially registered with
the United Nations. The Rastas say that
for too long, the police have violated
their human rights. They believe the
action of the police yesterday was “blas-
phemous".

Priest Philip Gibson told The Tribune .

yesterday that just after completing an
all-night church service in honour of
Marcus Mosiah Garvey,. and just as the
morning roll call service had begun,

more than a dozen officers bombarded
the premises.

“We had just carried up Psalms read-.
ing after 8am when our service was rude-

' ly interrupted by a force of officers,” he

said yesterday.

“We told them to take off their shoes,
because they were standing on holy
ground. We told them that guns. and

SEE page 11

Answers soon on
petroleum leak | â„¢ssing American

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE public should know by
the weekend whether an appar-
ent petroleum leak near a local
service station has contaminat-
ed nearby ground water and
soil.

Parliamentary Secretary in
the Ministry of Health Ron Pin-
der told The Tribune yesterday
that the Environmental Moni-
toring Risk Assessment Depart-




MINTCRAFT
BARREL BOLT



ment has completed its test of
soil and water samples taken
from the ground in front of the
Shell Service Station on East
Bay Street and given the
Department of Environmental
Health a report which he was
preparing to make public.

It was about two weeks ago
that what was believed to have
been a leak was discovered. At
that time, management at the

SEE page 11




BRONZE
Meh BACK

’ Leading Newspaper



Investigation into

POLICE are taining an
investigation into the disap-
pearance of an American
man who was last seen alive
on Andros more than 22
years ago.

In a remarkable series of

articles published in the Mia-
mi New Times, widow Donna
Weaver recounts the search
for her husband, Gary
Weaver, who she believes dis-
appeared during a botched

* 1983 FBI drug operation.

Mrs Weaver believes that





ar





her husband was shot and
buried next to an Andros
airstrip during the operation
which is believed to have
involved crooked FBI agents.
Bahamas Royal Police
Force Superintendent Glen
Miller told The Tribune yes-
terday that while police are
still trying to “establish that
there was a death” they have
launched an active investiga-
tion into discovering what

SEE page 11

ials?

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PAGE 2, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005 (rt TRIBUNE

‘LOCAL NEWS



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brown complexion, slim
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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005, PAGE 3





Hi MINISTER of Trade and Industry Leslie Miller
standing alongside his daughter’s ‘fuel efficent’ car.
(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)



Minister listens to
vendors’ concerns

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
and ADRIAN GIBSON

MINISTER of Trade and Industry Leslie Miller, on an impromp-
tu walkabout of the Straw Market, made a personal inspection for sus-
pected illegal aliens and took time out to listen to the concerns of the
local vendors.

The vendors repeated their pleas for more fans and better ventila-
tion in the market and asked Mr Miller to do something about the
number of illegal immigrants who allegedly still permeate the market.

“You come in and move them out, and then they right back in. It’s

* ridiculous,” one vendor said.

Mr Miller replied: “But now let us get this straight. Every illegal in
here was sent down by some Bahamian. They don’t have a licence to
be here, but when we find out the Bahamian that is leasing out their
stall to these people, they will be gone as well,” he said.

\ @ @
Training

Many vendors also complained that better service training is des-
perately needed at the market, as some vendors curse around and even
at tourists.

“I was told by a young man just the other day,” Mr Miller inter-
jected, “that he was in here with a white ‘tourist woman. When the
woman didn’t buy anything the vendor cursed them out.

“Now how can you have that? The customer is supposed to be
supreme. But I can tell you one thing, actions like that will not be tol-
erated,” the minister promised.

“These vendors need to get back to the Bahama Host training,” one
vendor shouted, “but I doubt that will even.make any difference,” she
said.

During the walk through, vendors approached the minister claim-
ing that every kind of drug is presently being sold in the market dai-
ly by “footmen” meandering throughout the tent.

“But Mr Miller can’t do everything, he ain’t God” one lady shout-
ed over the crowd. “He already put in all these fans. I think he’s
done more than enough.”

Mr Miller promised speedy action with regards to the problems
expressed by the vendors, and today, he along with other officials will
make another visit-to the market to continue talks with vendors and
conduct further checks for possible illegal immigrants.

using gas efficient car
till ‘price of fuel decreases’

@ By ADRIAN GIBSON

MINISTER of Trade and
Industry Leslie Miller says he
has been forced to drive his
daughter’s Volkswagen Beetle
because of the skyrocketing
price of gasoline.

Yesterday, Mr Miller drove
to The Tribune in the small, gas
efficient vehicle that he said he
intended to drive until, “gas
gets all the way down to the
way it should be with Petro-
Caribe.”

“I will continue to use this
car until the price of fuel
decreases. Because we tell the
Bahamian people to carpool,
drive smaller cars and get

officers are
back to work

ll By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Immigration
officers on Grand Bahama are ©
back to work in full force after

- staging a two-day sick-out
over the issue of overtime pay-
ments owed to them by govern-
ment.

Minister of Labour and
Immigration Vincent Peet said
he was very perturbed by the
action.

About 95 per cent of the offi-
cers called in sick on Monday
and Tuesday when they had
not been received their over-
time cheques as previously
promised by the minister back
in April.

Bahamas Public Services
Union president John Pinder
said that the officers would
return to work only after a reso-
lution was reached ensuring
that their overtime cheques
would be paid no later than Fri-
day.

Overtime

He said that Immigration
officers in Freeport have been
having problems with overtime
payments for over a year.

He noted that the officers. _
became frustrated knowing that
their counterparts in Nassau
and Customs officers in Grand
Bahama were being paid.

Weston Saunders, assistant
director of Immigration in
Freeport, reported that all of
the officers returned back to
work on Wednesday.

He said the sick-out caused
no major interruptions of Immi-
gration services in Freeport. |

“We had sufficient manpow-
er to man the ports of entry,
and clerical staff at the depart-
ment filled in. We are pleased
to report that everything is now
back to normal:in Freeport, ” he
said.

Minister driving daughter’s Beetle

dropped off to work, I gotta
show them by leading by exam-

‘ple man” he-said.

Mr Miller said that he had to
leave the car designated to cab-
inet ministers in his garage
because he could not afford to
pay the high prices of fuel
“being inflicted upon the
Bahamian people”.

“I hope in another couple of
months we can see tke virtue
of PetroCaribe. With this new
agreement the Bahamian peo-

ple will save between 65-80.

cents on the gallon. |
“We will cut the margins of
the retailers and lead with the



government cutting its tax by
16 cents.

., Plus,.there will be another
30 cents’ saved because Petro-
Caribe calls for direct ship-
ments” he said.

Committee

Mr Miller said that the gov-
ernment has organised a “first
class” fuel usage committee to
serve as a watchdog on gas pric-
ing. He said the committee
includes Pierre Dupuch, Vince
Coleby, Brenda Lockhart,

Deepak Battnagger, Jerry

Worth and two another consul-
tants.

“They are a good team that is
working hard. They are a group
of persons from all walks of life
and will make a valuable con-
tribution to bring these prices

' down man.”

He said: “I hope the oil com-
panies would work to help bring
about PetroCaribe. It will save
BEC and people money. BEC
will save $10 million per year
and reduce the surcharge that is
killing people right now.

Addressing the opposition to
the PetroCaribe agreement the
minister said:

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY:
PROJECT MANAGER

Project Manager wanted for the construction and delivery of new
Headquarters and Commercial complex with responsibility for qualicy
control, design and construction coordination and contract management.

Project Manager will be expected to:

@ Participate in the planning and formulation of design alternatives and solutions of
construction, plans and specifications from planning and design phase to completion
‘of construction documents, process to include full interpretation and review of

proposed designs, architectural drawings and building specifications, including
assessment of structural and electrical enginecring;

~ Develop and administer project budgets, estimates and fiscal controls, monitor
contracts and quality and cost control provisions;

Oversee all aspects of the day-to-day management of construction, including

coordination and monitoring of work performed bv architectural, engineering and
construction subcontractors to ensure quality and maximize meeting of deadlines

Liaise with institutional, government and local entities and initiate and coordinate

revisions where appropriate after review with client;

Ensure project operations comply with design specifications and government
regulatory policies and regulations;

Establish performance and delivery criteria, ensuring that client and institutional

requirements are being met; coordinate procurements as appropriate;

Advise and make recommendations as they relate to contracts, purchase orders,
_ change orders and contractor payment invoices;

Research and prepare various reports as they relate to operations, equipment, policies.

Perform miscellaneous job-related duties as assigned.

® Bank of The Bahamas

INTERNATIONAL

To obtain a copy of the Project Plan, letters of request with credentials should be sent to
Laura Williams © RO, Box N 7118 © Nassau, Bahamas

Requests must be received no later than Friday, September 2, 2005.



Cuba” and trying to discredit
the Bahamas’ ties with that

“There’s a group in the coun-

try today that is against any-
thing that uplifts the masses.
Isn’t it that all the countries in
South America have signed
onto PetroAmerica?

“In fact more than 30 coun-
tries have - so, why is it that
they see the benefits and critics
can’t ever be assured with
accepting the benefits?” he
asked.

Mr Miller said that he read a
press release by the Nassau
Institute yesterday, “bashing

nation.

“Why don’t they go Over-
the-Hill and tell poor persons
there that they cant have cheap-
er fuel?” he asked.

tia HL
EXTERMINATORS

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited



NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI





Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

_ Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 i
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
‘ Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
. Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

THE TRIBUNE’S Back-to-School
Supplement, published this week, broke
from tradition by leading with a story
about the importance of students having
the right food to make it through the day.

Our editors thought this was an impor-
tant enough subject to highlight because
of the tremendous increase in obesity
among our youth.

But we also believe that the proper
nutrition not only provides fuel for the
body, but also'stokes the brain. Numer-
ous studies have been done on this:sub-
ject to show that a properly balanced
nutritious diet can add stamina, energy
and drive to all student activities.

Therefore it is interesting that just yes-
terday the Ministry of Education released
its report on the annual examination
results for the nation and noted that

“there has been a slight improvement in
the BJC results and a significant i TAPIOvE:
ment in the BGCSE” results.

Seven thousand.and sixty-two students

} “from the private and public high schools

"sat the BJC exams, each taking an aver-
age of five of the 10 subjects offered.

“Of the 10 subjects offered, only Reli-
gious Studies showed overall improve-
ment in student performance in compar-
ison to 2004”, said a press release from
the Ministry of Education. The subjects
with the lowest performance ratings — E
level— were mathematics and general

science.

Said the Ministry: “The overall mean
BJC performance for the year is D. And
this mean grade of D has remained con-
sistent over the past six years,”

Forty-two schools performed above the
average D level, meaning they achieved a.
D+ or better. But only one schoel , NGM
Major High (Abaco) achieved a B result.
Several, including Aquinas College, For-

-est Heights Academy (Abaco), Lucaya
International, Prince Williams High, St

Andrews High, St. Augustine’s College,

Sunland Baptist — all received C+ results
in their BJCs.

At the BGCSE level, 5,762 students
from 78 schools sat the: national exam,
taking an average of six subjects each.

“The overall mean for the subjects in
the BGCSE this year has risen to D+”,

Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Our Bahamian students’ report card



‘aaid the Ministry. “This marks the sec-
ond time that the mean grade has reached
this pinnacle. The first was recorded in
2000.”

From the years 2001-2004 the overall
national mean for this exam remained at
D. So it means that although the Min-

istry is patting itself on the back fgr
' achieving a D+ level, it is in fact just gre

ting back to the average that the schy
had already achieved in 2000. So reall§&
we are being realistic, it means we dite
no further forward in our school system
than we were five years ago — and that is
not very good news for the country.

Of the 78 schools entered, 29 recorded
improvements in students’ performance
compared to last year. No school record-
ed better than a C average with just three

schools — St Andrew’s, St Augustine’s and

NGM Major — recording a C+ average.

The school recording the largest per-
centage of students taking five or more
subjects with a C level grade or higher
was St Augustine’s, with 112 of 157 stu-
dents (71 per cent).

Speak with any employer in the coun-
try today and he or she will tell you‘that
90 per cent of applicants are unable to

write proper English or do simple —

accounts.

‘ However, there are still some brilliant
students in the country who have shown
that outstanding results are possible. Ken-
neth Scott, a Long Island student of
NGM Major High school, obtained seven

‘A’s and one B level in his BJC exams,

and Sherrelle Ferguson of St Andrew’s
School earned 11 A’s in her BGCSE
exams. We wish her continued success at
Harvard University where she isan
undergraduate.

Getting back to the giiestion of proper
nutrition for students, yesterday’s Mia-
mi Herald reported that the American
Beverage Association is recommending
limiting the availability of sodas in s¢
in a move to curb the epidemic of
hood obesity in the US. Perhaps the
istry might also look into this ques
as there is no doubt that drinking sotas
all day long to quench the thirst in this

summer heat can result in serious health

problems.


































Uncovering
the hidden |
issues Of race

EDITOR, The Tribune

I would like to respond to
Nicki Kelly’s column in the
August 11 edition of The Punch
where she asserts that “all
things considered, race relations
are probably better in The
Bahamas than they are in most
places in the world. And whites
and blacks are steadily joining
common causes to preserve

‘their environment, culture and

identity in the face of encroach-

, ing globalization.”

I would like to suggest that
she has unfortunately misun-
derstood the degree to which
race and class shape attitudes
and values in Bahamian society
today.

To begin with, Ms. Kelly
apparently took issue with com-
ments I had. made in an inter-
view with a Tribune reporter
the previous week. Ip the inter-
view given, I provided an analy-
sis of residential segregation
based on Colin Hughes’ seminal
work Race and Politics in The
Bahamas.

He noted that “although the
census had listed the white pop-
ulation at 15 percent of the total
reported as white, alarmingly
93 per cent of whites resided in
districts where more than 20 per
cent of the population was
white.”

He concluded from this data
that “residential segregation of
whites was far from complete,

being largely confined to a thin.“

line of housing along the north-
ern shore of the island and a
substantial, and growing pocket
at Centreville on the eastern
edge of the old city of Nassau.”

While it is true that his
research is largely dated and
confined to the pre-indepen-
dence period, it is worth noting
that more recent studies sup-
port the underlining conclusions
of this earlier work.

The extent to which race is
still a dominant feature in
Bahamian national identity in
the post independence period
is the central focus of a study
that I conducted in 2003.
Arguably, and in agreement
with Nicki Kelly’s analysis, the
post-independence period has
revealed the development of a
healthy and burgeoning black
middle class that has certainly
made inroads into areas that
Colin Hughes might have dis-
tinguished as “white enclaves”.

More to the point, since
Majority Rule and Indepen-
dence, black Bahamian entre-
preneurs have had some degree
of success in breaking the hege-
mony of Bay Street while mov-
ing out of traditional black

‘Over the Hill’ areas into sub-

divisions to the East and the
West that would be deemed
more respectable. Yet survey
data suggests that in attitudes
towards social interaction, resi-

dential preferences and in the i

IDEA BE

letters@tribunemedia.net



nents. As such, the all white
Family Island communities of
Spanish Wells and Hope Town
as well as the black community
of Bain Town in New Provi-
dence were targeted. Addition-
ally, biracial bifurcated com-
munities of Rock Sound, Marsh
Harbour and Harbour Island
were surveyed. For each com-
munity targeted, individuals
residing within the community
itself conducted a survey of 20
respondents.

The level of social interac-
tion determined the response
to many of the questions in the
survey. For example, 92 per
cent of all respondents felt.com-
fortable around people of
another race yet only 79 per
cent acknowledged that they
had friends of another race.
Business and work related inter-
action were evident where 84.7
per cent.did business with per-
sons of another race, 88.8 per
cent would employ a person of
another race’and 68 per cent
worked or went to classes with
persons of another race. Inter-
action declined with involve-
ment in recreational or sport-
ing activities where only 51 per
cent of respondents participated

_with people of another race.

Declining interaction outside

-of formal business and work

areas was evident where only

54.5 ‘per cent of respondents

would date someone of another
race. The persistence of resi-
dential segregation was also evi-
dent, in that only 58 per cent of
respondents lived in a residen-
tial area with persons of anoth-
er race and only 50 per cent of
persons living in an all white or
all black community would con-
sider living in a mixed residen-
tial area. In general terms, the
persistence of racism in the var-
ious communities was evident
where 64.6 per cent of respon-
dents agreed that there was
racism in their community and
62.2 per cent had experienced
personally some form of racism.

The opinionated questions
also verified the persistence of
racism in The Bahamas. As to
whether racism is a problem in
the Bahamas today, 42 per cent
strongly agreed, 36 per cent
agreed while on the other hand
only 14 per cent of respondents

‘disagreed and 8 per cent strong-

ly disagreed.
Perhaps more telling was the



289 Market St. South « PO. Box N-7984 e Nassau, Bahamas

“It’s a noble thing to give

question of racial harmony in
the community. Only 33. per
cent strongly agreed that there
was racial harmony in their
community. In general, the sur-
vey results suggest that interac-
tion between individuals of dif-
ferent races takes place but that
less formal, social or intimate
relations are still unacceptable
for most Bahamians surveyed.
In essence, while Bahamians
were willing to do business and
employ persons of another race,
dating, playing sports or other
recreational activities was less ©
appealing. Additionally, it was
evident from newspaper reports
dating back to 1977 and more
current headlines, that in the

- political arena the race card has

still not been flogged to death.

Even Ms Kelly herself in an —
article entitled “Brent Bar from
Leadership Race Could Brand
FNM as Racist,” cited by-S.
Wilson Bahama Journal, (April
7 2003), noted that because of .
his colour and political
antecedents, Brent Symonette
should abandon the idéa of
aspiring to the leadership of his
party. Kelly concluded that “it
would take another 50 years
before the black majority
accepts a white man whose fam-
ily was associated with white
minority rule in a leadership
position.” ©

In the final analysis, I would
like to point out to Ms. Kelly
the fact that race and class have
always been inextricably con-
nected in Bahamian society.
While it is true that in the post
independence period, overt and
explicit forms of racism ‘have
waned and there has been grad-
ual improvement for blacks in
the socio-economic arena, there
are still latent forms of racism
and residual antagonisms that
exist.

In essence, while class issues
may seem on the surface to be

more relevant than race, the _.

survey suggests underneath this
smooth veneer are racial issues
that remain unresolved." °

Of course.this analysis has
not even touched on the grow-
ing antagonism that now exists
between Bahamians and those
of Haitian heritage. It is only

’ through open and frank discus-

sion of the present realities that
exist that we as a nation can
move forward, upward, onward,
together.

CHRISTOPHER CURRY
History Lecturer .
The College of The Bahamas
Nassau - f

August 17 2005



thanks” \





political arena race is still a
major issue.

The survey represented a
stratified modified model in that
it targeted specific Family Island
and New Providence commu-
nities with varied racial compo-

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THE TRIBUNE

Foniwnt, nhuuvuet

19, CVYUy, why



By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas Human Society is helping to resurrect pro-
posed legislation for improved animal welfare and control in

the Bahamas.

“We want better laws to regulate pet shops, breeding and
boarding kennels and on the commercial use of horses, said
Kevin Degenhard executive director of the Bahamas Human

Society.

The Humane Society said it is pushing for this legislation as
a result of regular complaints about pet shops being over-
crowded and providing poor accommodation for animals.
Also, numerous complaints have been received abou stray

and nuisance animals.

Mr Degenhard said that part of the problem with dotitrole -
ling dogs in particular is that the current laws are no! ade-

quate.

He said that they do not put enough responsibilty: on dog
owners and in any case, are not often applied fully,
“What we want is a more robust law that is going to be

applied.” he said.

Mr Degenhard said that he is pleased with the Ministry of
Agriculture for showing its initiative in recognising the need
for improved animal control and for making owners more

responsible.

Speaking about the problem of stray dogs in the Bahamas,
Mr Degenhard said: “If anyone thinks that the problem will
be resolved by sending people out just to catch and kill the
dogs, that is a very naive view that is not going to resolve the

problem.”

He explained that the issue has to be approached i ina
“dynamic” manner and in conjunction with thorough new

education programmes.

BV REE Ea Ti

FRI., AUG. 19


























6:30 Bahamas @ Sunrise
- live
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Noon ZNS News Update - live
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programme changes! ©

This Generation






LOCAL NEWS

Humane Society | OAS donates trade reference centres

seeks improved |
animal welfare

i By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Organisation of Ameri-
can States has donated two trade
reference centres to the Bahamas
to assist the public in receiving up
to date information on trade nego-
tiations, their benefits and oppor-
tunities

In a press release yesterday, the
OAS noted that one centre will
be situated in the main library of
the College of the Bahamas and
the other at the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce.

Each site will have a computer
containing the trade information
database, customised especially

for the Bahamas.

The OAS said in a statement
yesterday that the organisation
feels the gift will prove valuable to
the academic community, business
persons, entrepreneurs, indepen-
dent researchers and other inter-
ested members of civil society.

‘, Tool

It added that the centres will
serve as an important tool as the
Bahamas seeks to define its role in
international trade communities
such as Caricom and the FTAA.

The statement. went on to
explain that the idea of the

research centres arose at the
FTAA donor co-ordination meet-
ing held in Washington DC in
October, 2003 when representa-
tives from Caricom countries artic-
ulated their trade capacity building
needs. |

This included the desire for
countries to participate fully in
trade negotiations.

Among the needs identified
were access to relevant and up to
date trade information, and a

’ method of facilitating participa-

tion of civil society groups by dis-
seminating information on trade
negotiations.

Pamela Coke Hamilton, the co-
ordinator of the Caricom Seperate

Capacity Building Project, noted
that stemming from that the meet-
ing, it was decided to customise .
trade information databases for
each Caricom country. .

Agreements

These datebases, she said, will
include full texts of trade agree-
ments, bilateral investment

‘treaties, national legislation in

trade-related disciplines, trade and
tariff data and relevant articles
and studies.

The official presentation to
COB is scheduled for August 23,
2005.

Extension on duty exemptions in Grand Bahama

GOVERNMENT has announced that it will
grant another extension on the duty exemptions
granted in Grand Bahama after hurricanes Fran-

cis and Jeanne.

According to NEMA co-ordinator Canard
Bethel, exigency orders seven, eight, and nine,
which allowed for the duty-free importation of

they are late.

certain materials, expired March 31 2005, but

the government originally extended this time to

June 30.

“At this time quite a number of persons have
not yet brought in all of their items; some people
in fact have not brought in anything yet due toa
number of reasons, ie late insurance settlement,
late processing of loans, unavailability of sup-
plies in Florida and elsewhere, and so the public
is being given another chance,” Mr Bethel said.

He said any person who is continuing to bring
in merchandise, or-who is now bringing in mer-
chandise for the first time, “must get a letter to
the desk of the undersecretary in the office of the -
prime minister, (Mr Bethel, 4th floor of the gov-
ernment complex on the Mall), explaining why

Merchandise

“This letter must refer to all those approvals for
merchandise, other than vehicles; that was'done
as at the end. of March 31, 2005,” he said. _ |

Mr Bethel said that if a person got an approval
for a car, “if that approval was obtained before
the 31 December or on the 31 of December 2004,

then a letter explaining why the vehicle or vehi- .
cles were not brought in will be entertained.
“Again, if approval was not achieved as at the
end of December 31, 2004, then consideration for
late bring-in will not be given.
“T am asking the public to expedite those let-

ters to me by the close of work on Monday,
August 22, 2005, because government in Nas-

sau has agreed to give a 30-day extension, pro-
vided approval had been achieved, for vehicles

-- December 31, 2004, or for merchandise other

away.

than.vehicles, March 31, 2005.”

Mr Bethel said the public, “should not expect
another extension as there has been a long time
of this, and one would have thought that the
extra work involved with this would have gone

hosts senior citizens luncheon

Second event of the year

@.3y DUDLEY BYFIELD
Bahamas Information
. Services

FREEPORT - Continuing a

- programme of providing care

and cheer for seniors, the Min-
istry of Social Services and
Community Development host-
ed a luncheon for senior citi-
zens from West End at the
Bahamas Public Service Union
Hall in Freeport.

The luncheon, hosted in con-
junction with the Urban
Renewal Project, was the sec-
ond such event this year.

Patrice Johnson, community
affairs officer with the Ministry
of Social Services, described
Wednesday’ s activity as a senior

citizens’ field trip.

Ms Johnson said she aiid her
colleagues were mandated by
Social Services Minister
Melanie Griffin, “to implement
programmes in the community

. of Grand Bahama, and the lun-

cheon on Wednesday was just
one of the programmes, taking
senior citizens from their con-
stituency on a tour, and provid-
ing them with lunch, entertain-
ment and a commemorative gift
bag to take back home. Just giv-
ing them a fun-filled day,” she
explained.

“We are working along with

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Urban Renewal, and today it is
Urban Renewal for the West
Grand Bahama area - Eight
Mile Rock and West End.
“Last week we did one for
the High Rock sector. And it
really turned out.

Bags

“For the Western area we got
confirmation for 31 persons,
however only 25 of them par-
ticipated. The persons who are

unable to walk or to get on ‘or’

off the bus, we ate receiving
bags sent to them compliments
of Ministry of Social Services
and Community Development.”
What’s in the gift bags?

“All types of goodies,”. said

Store

Village Road

i vices:
- Bahamas. ! ’
For the West End field trip



Johnson. “We have .got

MB:

their own personal face cloth |

and bathing cloth; a back scrub;
the men have neck ties, hand-
kerchiefs, their own shoe pol-
ish kit, a bag of candy and a
men’s toiletry bag with cologne
inside. ~

“The women have a pill box,
handkerchiefs, bedroom slip-
pers, a fan and a fingernail clip-
per.”

Ms Johnson’s area of respon-
sibility covers the community

: development side-of social ser-
the: ‘Nor thern:

for .

and luncheon she was able to
work with Linda Moxey, the
ministry’s office manager in



(éls

Ph. 394-2378

West End, who supplied the
names of persons and the drop-
off and pickup points that facil-
itated a smooth operation.

“We did the same thing with
the East End area where we
also worked with Urban
Renewal. And it works, it
works,” declared Ms Johnson,
“because they have the hands-
on and they know who, what or
where. And that’s what makes it
easier for us out of the con-
stituency.”

Ms Johnson had high praise —

for Urban Renewal.

“Urban Renewal plays a real-
ly big part in Grand Bahama;
if people could only stop and

see what they are really doing,” a

aie said.

‘= MS JOHNSON said slic’

and her colleagues were man-
dated by Social Services Min-
ister Melanie Griffin (right)



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Bahamas looks on helplessly
as Haiti sinks into turmoil
Our country suffers directly from the tribulations of

Haiti - yet it seems there is nothing we can do as it
falls into chaos before the November elections.



AROUND 170,000 small
arms are being used by former
military personnel and criminal
gangs to commit grave human
rights abuses as Haiti prepares
for elections, Amnesty Interna-
tional says ina newly-released
report.

Amnesty has called on the
interim government and the UN
Stabilisation Mission in Haiti
(MINUSTAH) to implement
without delay a comprehensive
disarmament, demobilisation
and reintegration programme.

“Small arms are being used
by illegal armed groups and for-
mer military to kidnap, sexual-
ly abuse and kill Haitians with
absolute impunity. Without dis-
armament and effective justice
for the victims, Haiti will sink
further into crisis,” said the
human rights group.

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The report “Haiti: Disarma-
ment delayed, justice denied”,
shows how in several parts of
the country, where state author-
ity remains frail, armed groups
and individuals continue to ille-
gally control territory and pop-
ulation and commit criminal
acts without being challenged
by national authorities, includ-
ing the National police, or by
MINUSTAH officials.

Attempts to disarm illegal
armed groups have been insuf-
ficient, showing the Haitian

. authorities’ unwillingness to

implement an effective aisals
mament plan.

In March 2005, 325 former
military personnel symbolically
turned in seven weapons in
Cap-Haitien, marking their

return to civilian life. Since then,

no serious attempts have been
made to disarm the former mil-
itary and rebel groups.

The lack of political will from
the interim government to put
in place urgently needed
reforms of the National Hait-
ian Police (HNP) or to imple-
ment.a disarmament. pro-
gramme is hampering the

efforts of MINUSTAH to solve _

the crisis.

’“Lack of accountability of
HNP officers and widespread
impunity for human rights abus-
es by armed groups cannot lead
to durable peace in Haiti. The
interim government is failing in
its international and funda-
mental responsibilities to pro-

tect. Haitians and: theiymigst:

basic rights.”
Amid increased violence and
insecurity, MINUSTAH should



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Pam Palacious,
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take more decisive actions. to
fulfil its objectives of protect-
ing civilians, promoting human
rights and fighting impunity.

“Durable peace in Haiti will
never be achieved unless those
responsible for human rights
crimes are held to account and
the victims obtain redress.”

Amnesty International is call-
ing on the Haitian interim gov-
ernment to:

¢ Implement without delay a
comprehensive disarmament,
demobilisation and reintegra-
tion programme.

e Investigate all reports of
human rights violations and
bring those responsible to jus-
tice.

e Provide reparation for vic-
tims of human rights violations.

e Reform the judicial system

in accordance with internation
al human rights legislation and:

end illegal arrests and ‘long-term
detentions for those awaiting
trial.

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5006 PICK UP



ing on the UN Stabilisation Mis-
sion in Haiti to:

e Work together with the
interim government for the
establishment of a disarmament,
demobilisation and reintegra-
tion programme and the inves- °
tigation of human rights abuses.

e Issue frequent, public
reports on the human rights sit-
uation.

-e Vet police officers for
human rights abuses and train
all HNP personnel on human
rights standards and interna-
tional standards for law enforce-
ment officials.

Lastly, the organisation calls

on the governments of neigh-

bouring countries such as the
Dominican Republic, The
Bahamas and the United States
of America to: '

e Allow due process to deter-
mine the possibility that some
Haitian migrants are indeed
fleeing political persecution in
light of the current climate of
political instability in Haiti and
cease automatic repatriation
without claims of political asy-
lum being examined.

e Ensure that those migrants
detained and repatriated are
treated humanely and in accor-
dance with International Stan-
dards.

e For a full copy of the
report: “Haiti: Disarmament
delayed, Justice denied” and

‘AD’s recommendations to Haiti's:
“Interim government, MINUS-:

TAH and the integuational
community, please — see:
hittp://web.amnesty.orglibrary/in
dex/AMR360052005 |

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THE TRIBUNE

‘The Bahamas must
tackle crime now’

CRIME is the single
biggest threat to the Bahamas,
Chamber of Commerce crime
prevention committee chair-
man Branville McCartney
said yesterday.

He vowed to unite the
Bahamian business commu-
nity in the fight against crim-

_ inal activity.

“Perception becomes real-
ity. It may not be crime at all
but fear of crime that could
impact travel to the region
and thus to the Bahamas,”
said McCartney.

“The first thing people look
for when they travel is secu-
rity. We all have acertain lev-
el of security and comfort in
our own homes and in famil-
iar territory.
~ “But add fear of time to
the uncertainty associated
with traveling to a breign
country and you hve a
recipe for disaster. Nothing
could kill tourism — the
engine that drives this ewn-
omy — faster than foreitn-
fear-phobia. .

Mr McCartney admitted
that crime “will happen”, but
said if Bahamians are seen tc
act quickly, “we will be ahead
of the competition”.

The real issue, McCartney .

said, “is to focus attention on
it before the problem gets to
crisis level, to act now, rather
than react later.”
McCartney applauded the
Ministry of Tourism, the
Bahamas Hotel Association
and the Royal Bahamas

Police Force: for their joint

task force on tourist crime

and said some of the options

that committee is exploring



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robbery of two tourists on
Paradise Island over the
veekend and said keeping
tie lines of communication
Oyen to the media and enlist-
ing public help in providing
infermation would be essen-
tial ‘ools in the battle to build
“a cymfort level that protects

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005, PAGE 7





Police search for pair
suspected of defrauding
_ businesses in Freeport

@ BY DENISE MAYCOCK
-- Fribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Grand Bahama
Police are searching for a young
man and woman who allegedly
defrauded a number of businesses in
the Freeport area.

Donavan Adderley and J’Shan-
tae Jones of No 1 Beachway Drive,
Freeport, are wanted by officers of
the Central Detective Unit for ques-
tioning.

Police are seeking the public’s
assistance in locating the pair. Any-
one with information about their

whereabouts is asked to contact,

police at 350-3098, 352-8224 or 911.

e An 18-year-old man was
released on $4,000 bail Tuesday
after pleading not guilty to drug pos-
session in Freeport Magistrate’s
Coutt..

Aaron Rolle, of 2A Cove House,
was charged before Magistrate
Helen Jones with possession dan-
gerous drugs with the intent to sup-

y.

It is alleged that on August 13,
Rolle was found in possession of
one ounce of marijuana at Port



Church games ahead

‘Ml By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE launch of the first ever
Church’ Games has been
announced with a view to unit-
ing religious denominations in
the Bahamas through sports.
~-At a press-conference yester-
day, permanent secretary in the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture Harrison Thompson
announced that the unique ven-
ture is being sponsored by his
ministry and.the Bahamas
Christian Council.

Present at the press confer-
ence. were several prominent
individuals from the sporting
and religious worlds, includ-
ing Bahamas Christian Coun-
cil president Dr William
Thompson and Anglican Suf-
fragan Bishop Gilbert Thomp-
son.

The Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture and the
“Bahamas Christian Council are
sponsoring the event

The games are set for Octo-
ber 11 to 21.:

Preceding. activities are to
include a “Battle of the Bands



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
-and share your story.

Share your news

Lucaya Marketplace.

HARRISON Thompson, permanent secretary at
the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture, centre,
speaks yesterday at a press conference announcing _
the Church Games. Pictured from left are Bahamas
Christian Council President Rev Dr William

-Thompson and Bishop Gilbert Thompson.

(BIS Photo: Tim Aylen)

and Choirs” on September 2
and a “Fun, Run, Walk and
Push” day on September 3.

At the games, eight religious:

denominations from around the
Bahamas will participate in pop-
ular sporting events such as
baseball, basketball, boxing,
cycling, soccer, track and field,

softball, swimming and volley . |

ball.

One of the goals of the games
is to allow churches to reach
outside and interact with the
communities in the surround-
ing areas.

To this end, the games will
consist of events involving both
church and community mem-
bers.

The organisers say the games
will also promote a healthy
sporting environment for all
families in the Bahamas.

Bishop Thompson called the -
games “very exciting” and an —

attempt to bring the Bahamian
people closer together as God’s
people.

“This is going to truly be an
exciting time for all of us and to
learn the spirit of true sports-
manship,” he said.












LOCAL NEWS

Simeon Brown represented Rolle,

‘who is expected to appeats for trial

March 29.
Charges

e Four men and a 16-year-old
male juvenile were arraigned on’
drug possession charges this week
at Marsh Harbour, Abaco.

Nassau residents Ricardo Roberts,
37, of Cowpen Road, Dencil Dames,
30, of Meadows Road, Phillip Smith,
26, of Centerville, a 16-year-old, and
19-year-old Justin Knowles of Marsh

INDEPENDENCE



“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers

Harbour appeared Monday before
Magistrate Crawford McKee.

It is. alleged that on August 13,
the accused:‘men were found in pos-
session of 27 small packets contain-
ing marijuana at the Regattas Hotel
at Marsh Harbour.

They all pleaded not guilty to pos-
session of dangerous drugs with
intent to supply.

The matter was adjourned to
October 20.

Dames was remanded into cus-
tody at Fox Hill Prison.

The other four men were released

‘ on $3,000 bail with two sureties.

NOTICE



4 | The Teachers and Salaried Workers Co-



Refreshments will be served.

BURNS HOUSE GROUP OF COMPANIES

NOTICE
TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC

OUR TELEPHONE NUMBERS HAVE CHANGED AS FOLLOWS:

Burns House Ltd.
Butler & Sands Co. Ltd.
Customer Service

Warehouse

397-1400 Head Office JFK
397-1400 Head Office JFK
397-1413 - 1417
397-1419 - 1424

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY INCONVENCIENCE CAUSED.

THANK YOU - MANAGEMENT



PAGE 8, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005

PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS.



Lifeline: Truth, Music, Life, featuring the
music of Aydee Rolle @ The Buzz on
Wednesday, August 17. Showtime at the
Buzz, located East Bay Street opposite the
marina, upstairs over the old Yahmaha
store, is 10pm; $7 before 9pm, $10 after.

Rendezvous, a two-day event dubbed the
biggest party of the year, featuring music
by DJs from Jamaica, the Bahamas and
New York. Day 1: Saturday, August 20 @
Club Waterloo. Bears open at 8:30pm.
Admission: $20.

Day 2: Sunday, Rogost 21 at Coco Loco's,
Sandyport. Doors open at 12pm. Admis-
sion: $10

Wild Jungle, each and every Wednesday
night @ Club Trappers, Nassau’s “upscale”
gentleman’s club. Featuring a female body
painting extravaganza. Free body painting
@ 8 pm. Ladies always welcome. Admis-
sion: Men free before 10 pm. Females free.
There will be free food and hors d'oeuvres
between 9 and 10 pm. Open until 4 am.

Ladies Night @ Fluid lounge, this and every

Thursday night. Doors open at 10pm.
Ladies free before 1am, $10 after. Guys:

$15 all night. Drink special: 3 @ $10 (Bacar-

di) Giveaways and door prizes every week.

Saturday Night Live every Saturday night
@ Club Fluid, Bay St. The biggest party of
‘the week, pumping all your favourite hits
all night long. Ladies in free before 11pm.
Strict security enforced.

spinning the best in Old Skool. Admission
$35, all inclusive food and drink.

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters
Sports Bar. Drink specials all night long,
including karaoke warm-up drink to get
you started. Party from 8pm-until.

Reggae Tuesdays @. Bahama Boom. Cover

charge includes a free Guinness and there
‘ should be lots of prizes and surprises.

Admission: Ladies $10 and Men $15.



Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters
Sports Bar every Wednesday 5pm-8pm.
Free appetizers and numerous drink SBE
cials.

The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday.
Doors open at 9pm, showtime 11.30pm.
Cover charge $15. $10 with flyer.



Fantasy Fridays @ Fluid Lounge, featuring
late ‘80s music in the VIP Lounge, Top of
the charts in the Main Lounge, neon lights

and Go Go dancers. Admission: Ladies free
before 11pm, $15 after; Guys $20 all night.

Dicky Mo’s @ Cable Beach. Happy Hour
every Friday - 3 for $10 mixed drinks and

$1 shots. Bahamian Night (Free admission)

every Saturday with live music from 8 pm

to midnight. Karaoke Sundays from 8pm to

midnight, $1 shots and dinner specials all
night long.

Twisted Boodah Lounge @.Cafe Segafredo,

‘Charlotte St kicks off Fridays at 6pm with
deep house to hard house music, featuring
CraigBOO, Unkle Funky and Sworl’wide
on the decks.

Chill Out Sundays @ Coco Loco, Sandy-
port, from 4pm-until, playing deep, funky .
chill moods with world beats.

Sweet Sunday Chill Out Soiree Lounge,
every Sunday, 4pm-midnight @ Patio
Grille, British Colonial Hotel.





Rave Saturdays @ Club Eclipse. DJ Scoobz



im S being called the biggest event of the —
year, and any serious partygoer can’t miss

tional party to feature the hottest Jamaican,
Bahamian and New York DJs.

The party will feature the best in soca,

Wet Sundays, every Sunday, noon-midnight

_ @ Crystal Cay Beach. Admission $10, ladies

free.

TooLooSe @ Indigo Restaurant on West
Bay St and Skyline Drive. Singer/song-
writer Steven Holden performs solo with
special guests on Thursday from 9pm - mid-

. night.

The Graham Holden Deal @ The Green
Parrot....David Graham, Steve. Holden, Tim.
Deal and Friends perform Sunday, 7pm -
10pm @ Hurricane Hole on Paradise Island.

Jay Mitchell and Hot KC @ Palm Court
Lounge, British Colonial Hilton, Nvednes:
day-Thursday 8pm-12am.

.Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley’s

Restaurant & Lounge, Eneas St off Poin-
ciana Drive. Featuring Frankie Victory at
the key board in the After Dark Room.
every. Sunday, 8.30pm to midnight. Fine

food and drinks.

Paul Hanna, Tabatha and Gernie, and the
Caribbean Express perform at Traveller’s
Rest, West Bay St, every Sunday, 6.30pm-
9.30pm.

THE ARTS

LOVE, an exhibition featuring Bahamian
artists Jason Bennett, John Cox, Blue Cur-
ry, Michael Edwards, Toby Lunn and
Heino Schmid at Popopstudios and Gallery.

The gallery is located on Dunmore Ave in -

Chippingham, 1/4 mile south of the
Bahamas Humane Society. Gallery hours:
M-F 4.30pm-7. supm.c or call 322-5850 for
appointment.’

Da Spot, a weekly comedy show, features .
skits and spoofs on Bahamian life, with
improv by a talented young cast. The show

is held Tuesdays @ The Dundas at 8pm.

Admission is $10, and tickets are sold at the

- ‘door.

‘This weekend, Hypermedia Entertainment _
: and Bacardi: bring, Rendezvous, an interna-





alypso, Lash Reggae and Reggaetor
among other musical styles.

co Loto! Ss, Snyper | Door

_Aomesion $10.



The National Collection @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, an exhibition that
takes the viewer on a journey through the
history of fine art in the Bahamas. It fea-
tures signature pieces from the national
collection, including recent acquisitions. by
Blue Curry, Antonius Roberts and Dionne
Benjamin-Smith. Call 328-5800 to book
tours. This exhibition closes February 28,
2006.

Past, Present and Personal: The Dawn
Davies Collection @.the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, Villa Doyle, West
and West Hill Streets. The exhibition is
part of the NAGB’s Collector’s Series. Call-
328-5800 to book tours. This exhibition
closes August 31, 2005..

The Awakening Landscape: The Nassau

. Watercolours of Gaspard Le Marchand

Tupper, from the collection of Orjan and
Amanda Lindroth @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas. The mid-nine-
teenth century paintings that make up the
exhibition are part of one of the earliest
suites of paintings of Nassau and its envi-
rons. Tupper was a British military officer
stationed at Fort Charlotte in the 1850s.
The works show a pre-modern Bahamas
through the decidely British medium of

. watercolour. Call 328-5800 to book tours.

This exhibition closes August 31, 2005.
HEALTH

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets
at 5.30pm on the second Tuesday of each
month at their Headquarters at East Ter-
race, Centreville. call 323-4482 for more
info. —

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the
third Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors
Hospital conference room.

The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets
every third Saturday, 2.30pm (except
August and December) @ the Nursing
School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street.







THE TRIBUNE —



Doctors Hospital, the official training cen-
tre of the American Heart Association
offers CPR classes certified by the AHA.
The course defines the warning signs of res-
piratory arrest and gives prevention strate-
gies to avoid sudden death syndrome and
the most common serious injuries and
choking that can occur in adults, infants
and children. CPR and First Aid classes are
offered every third Saturday of the month
from 9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital
Community Training Representative at

' 302-4732 for more information and learn to

save a life today.

REACH - Resources & Education for
Autism and related Challenges meets from
7pm — 9pm the second Thursday of each
month in the cafeteria of the BEC building,

Blue Hill Road.



CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday,
7.30pm: @ C C Sweeting Senior School's -
Dining Room, College Avenue off Moss
Road. Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @
Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm
A19, Jean St. Club 3956 meets Thursday,
7.30pm @ British Colonial Hilton. Club
1600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm @ Super-
Clubs Breezes. Club 7178 meets Tuesday,
6pm @ The J Whitney Pinder Building,
Collins Ave.

Club 2437 meets every second, fourth and
fifth Wednesday at the J Whitney Pinder
Building, Collins Ave at 6pm. Club 612315
meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau
Resort, Cable Beach. Club 753494 meets
every Wednesday, 6pm-8pm in the
Solomon’s Building, East-West Highway.
Club Cousteau 7343 meets every Tuesday
night at 7.30 in the Chickcharney Hotel,
Fresh Creek, Central Andros. All are wel-
come.

' Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi

Omega chapter meets every second Tues-
day, 6.30pm @ the Eleuthera Room in the

‘ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every
first Tuesday, 7pm @ Gaylord’s Restaurant,
Dowdeswell St. Please call 502-4842/377-
4589 for more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every
second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ Atlantic House,
IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room.

The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Coun-
cil (NPHC) meets every third Monday of
the month in the Board Room of the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus
meets the second and fourth Wednesday of
the month, 8pm @ St Augustine’s Mones-
tary.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every sec-
ond Friday of each month, 7.30pm at -
Emmaus Centre at St Augustine’s Mones-
tary. For more info call 325-1947 after 4pm.

International Association of Administra-
tive Professionals, Bahamas Chapter meets
the third Thursday of every month @

_ Superclubs Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.
AMISTAD, a Spanish club meets the third

Friday of the month at COB’s Tourism
Training Centre at 7pm in Room 144 dur- |
ing the academic year. The group promotes

‘the Spanish language and culture in the

community.

Send all your civic and social events to The
Tribune via fax: 328-2398 or e-mail:
outthere@tribunemedia.net

WINES & SPIRITS





FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005, PAGE 9

THE TRIBUNE

ole Ve AS



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yndicated'Content

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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005 | . THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

HE VALLEY OF
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The Tribune

. 1 Material

~,

ome * ‘Syndicated Content .

Available from‘ Commercial News Providers”

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‘marTyes theeerhe ss

7

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WHOHLES





- Police ‘raided’ a
Rasta tabernacle

SY

(HE |RIDUNE

rmivAT, AUQUD)

PDs OUUY, bse



LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one

knives are not allowed on the
premises as the sign at the guard
house:states. We told them that
money, jewellery and other per-
sonal effects must be left at the
guard house because you can’t
bring them into the tabernacle.
But they walked through the
wrong way, stopping and trying
to talk to people during the
prayers, and they leaned up on
the altar in a disrespectful man-
ner even though they were ask-
ing what our faith is really all
about. They should have found
out a better way than that.”

One of the mothers in the
church, known as an
“Empress", asked: “Are they
allowed to bring guns in their
church?”

Mr Gibson said he was under
the tent enjoying a breakfast of
fevergrass tea, chocolate chip
bread and veggie fritters with
about 30 other people when an
officer put handcuffs on him.

When.asked why he was
arrested, he replied: “I don’t
know. They put the warrant in
my hand and said, ‘Read it’.
The warrant said ‘Rasta Camp’.
I know of a few Rasta camps in
Nassau. This is not a camp. This
is the church — the Ethiopia
Africa Black International Con-
gress (EABIC) True Church of
Divine Salvation. We have
branches all over the world on

Police search for man
missing for 22 years

FROM page one |

may. have happened to Mr
Weaver.

“We .are conducting..an,
inquiry into the matter. Mrs_
Weaver shared some informa-

tion ‘with us and we are con-
ducting an investigation as we
speak,” he said.

every continent with thousands
of members worldwide.”

Search.

He said that after the officers
searched some of the homes,
the leading officer said: “Let’s
go, there’s nothing here.” With
that, the officers left without an
apology, said Mr Gibson. They
detained him until after they,
and their German Shepherd
from the canine unit, left with-
out finding anything, he said.
He was particularly concerned
because a summer youth camp
is in progress, and as one of the
moderators, it was humiliating
for him to be arrested, with the
children looking on.

The officers left to the sounds
of dozens of children singing
“songs of freedom and redemp-
tion", he said.

“We call upon the Governor
General to send a representa-
tive here to'get a full under-
standing of what we are all
about. We had a delegation vis-
it her last year, headed by Priest
Michael Ferguson, to inform
her of our aims and objectives,”
said Mr Gibson. |

“We call upon the Bahamas
government to put a stop to the
flimsy excuses from the police
to harass the Rastaman saying
they-:are searching for guns and
drugs. And we call upon all

Mrs Weaver believed that her
husband disappeared in the
Bahamas the day before their
first wedding anniversary in

_4983, and, had been caught up
‘in Opération Airlift, an FBI ..
drug-smuggling ‘investigation ”:

gone haywire.
According to the Miami
New Times, Mrs Weaver had



US to review

deadline for

- passport
regulations

FROM page one

Caribbean Hotel Association
(CHA) by the World Travel
and Tourism Council (WTTC)
further predicted that the 2006
implementation of the passport
requirements could cost the
Bahamas’ tourism industry $446
million in earnings and 13,134 in
jobs: é

That study found that in all,
the policy could risk some $2.6
billion in visitor export earnings
and 188,000 tourism jobs.

Mr Wilchcombe, however,
yesterday said with a later dead-
line:he believes the Bahamas’

1

tourism industry “is going to be
fine.”

The withdrawal of the 2006 .

deadline, also came as a wel-
come development to Frank
Comito, executive vice-presi-
dent of the Bahamas Hotel
Association (BHA).

“This is a very welcome
extension. It will give us and the
travellers more time to prepare
for the new requirements,” he
said.

‘Until the new passport policy
goes into effect, Americans only

‘need birth certificates or dri-

ver's licences for travel to and
from the Bahamas.



Answers on leak

‘by the weekend’

FROM page one

service station called the Water
and Sewerage Corporation
(WSC) because they feared
their sewerage lines were
blocked.

Mr Pinder said that while
WSC was investigating that

problem, they discovered a “_

strong odour of petroleum.”

It-was then that the Depart-
ment of Environmental Health
(DEH) was called to investi-
gate.

Now that the findings are in,
DEH plans to convene a spe-
cial'meeting of all the major
stakeholders, including the
petroleum association, the util-
ities: companies, Ministry of

Works and the Department of

Environmental Health.

The results should be of inter-
est to the Shell Service Station
which told The Tribune shortly
after the incident that they had
checked their equipment and
were confident that none of
their product had leaked or that
any of their equipment was
faulty. !

Manager Vania Musgrove
told The Tribune that the entire
area needed to be tested as it is
a highly contaminated area, in
that the surface ground water
has the residue of Potter’s Cay,
the container docks in addition
to Shell and Texaco Service Sta-
tions. There is also a leaky sew-
erage system in the area.



‘rife with not only smugglers but

members of the public to visit
our Sabbath school every Sat-
urday. There is only right and
wrong in the world. This church
stands for equality and justice
for all people of all walks of
life.”
The church was founded on
March 1, 1956 by Priest



.Emmanuel Charles Edwards,

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

and has its international head-
quarters at Ten Miles, Bull Bay,
Jamaica.

. The Nassau celebrations in
honour of Marcus Garvey was
featured in Wednesday’s Tri-
bune. Last month, the birth of
Emperor Haile Selassie was
honoured with similar celebra-
tions.

A press release from the
EABIC stated:

“As for the Bahamas govern-
ment, the EABIC has lobbied
for freedom, redemption and
international repatriation tire-
lessly, demanding equal rights
and justice. We want human
rights issues, like the. funda- ©
mental rights of the individual,
religious tolerance, an end to
discrimination against the
Rastafari faith, an end to Chris-
tian dogma in the media, an end
to discrimination of Rastafari
children in public and private
schools, an end to cutting Rasta-
fari brethren’s locks in and out-
side of prison, and an end to
discrimination against Rastafari
man, woman and child.”

your
news

tried to initiate an investiga-
tion in the Bahamas back in
the early 1980s, but couldn’t
get anywhere because “she
feared she might never come
home”. ost ee

" “At the-time, the islands were

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are

making news in their... 4.

| neighbourhoods, <->

Call us on 322-1986 and

also corrupt officials,” the story _] share your story.

read.






Commontwealth Funeral Home
ef Independence Drive * Phone: 341-4055 SS
FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

EDNA STUART
BONIMY, 75

affectionately called
"Ma" :









of Dumfries, Cat Island, will
be held on Saturday 10:00
am at Golden Gates
Assembly Ministries,
Carmichael Road. Bishop
Ross Davis assisted by Rev
Troy Ambrose will officiate and
1 interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road:






Cherished memories are held by one daughter, Lescine
Rose Moxey; two sons, Senior Immigration Officer Elverton
Bonimy and Police Sargent Theophilus Bonimy of the -
Royal Bahamas Police; five step children, Wilbert, Anama,
Joycelyn, Prescola and Melony Bonimy; 16 grandchildren,
Constable 3244 Tavares Moxey of the Royal Bahamas
Police Force, Parashio Moxey, Yassen Marshall, Leticia,
Renaldo, Anton, Thea and D'Andre Bonimy, Sheneka -
Evans, Lashanta Beneby, Latisha Davis, Lakeina,
Theophilus Jr, Crisca, Tia and Terell Bonimy; three great
grandchildren, Shardonnay Beneby, Tamila Moxey and
Shyeye Davis Jr; two sisters, Janet Poitier and Sylvia
Turnquest; nieces and nephews inlcude, Rev Alfred
Stubbs, Marion Thompson, Ernestine Haven, Miriam,
Terry, Monique, Kelly, Shantel Abraham, Mario, Arlington
King, Henry and Nehemiah Stubbs of Carol City, Florida,
Frene Storr, Daisy Curry, Delores Farrington, Cartel Stubbs
and Wendell King; one uncle, Alfred Gaitor; two daughters-
in-law, Minister Christine Bonimy and Maryann Bonimy;
three sisters-in-law, Manerve Thompson, Bula Bonimy
and Laura Miller; two grandsons-in-law, Rashad Beneby
and Shyeye Davis Sr; other relatives and friends including,
Sherry Evans, Douglas Marshall, Arlington King and family,
Nehmiah Stubbs of Carol City, Florida, Henry Stubbs,
Daisy Curry and family, Irene Storr, Delores Farrington,
Wendell King, Eulamae Hepburn, Reuben Stubbs,
Harcourt and Laurine Ambrose, Fritz Stubbs, Eva Larimore,
the King family, the Gaitor family, the Stubbs family and
entire community of Dumfries, Cat Island.





























Relatives and friends may view the remains at THE
CHAPEL OF MEMORIES INDEPENDENCE DRIVE on
Friday from 1:00 to 7:00 pm and at the church on Saturday
from 9:00 am to service time.




Butler's Funeral Homes
& Crematoriom

Tel: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Mr. Erskine
McDale Carroll,
Vo

of Deadman’s Cay, Long
Island will be held on
Saturday, August 20th, 2005
at 2:00 p.m. at St.
| Athanasius Anglican
7 Church, Lower Deadman’s
H Cay, Long Island. Officiating
- will be Rev’d Fr. Earnest
Pratt. Interment will follow in the Deadman’s Cay Burial
Society Cemetery, Lower Deadman’s Cay, Long Island.

Loving memories will forever live on in the hearts of his
dearly beloved and faithful Wife: Mavis; his children;
Stephanie and her daughters Nikia and Ravyn; Paulette
and Brian and their children Stephan, Kryston, Justyn
and Brendan; Tony and his daughter Nathalie and his
wife Lynn; Basil, Gregory and his children Greg Jr. and
Kayla and wife Paula; Cecelia and Ernest Jr. and their
daughters Ernelia, Vashti and Cecily; Cliff and Charmaine
and their daughter Casi; Astrid “Joan” and Mark and
their daughters Sasha and Rae-Dawn; Charlene and
Andy and their son Drew; his precious ‘baby girl’ Sancha
and Livingstone and their children Aria and Cory; One

_ (1) Great-grandchild; Ethan; One (1) Sister; Ena Adderley;
Two (2) Brothers-in-law; William Cartwright and Kirtland
McCardy; Three (3) Sisters-in-law; Sybil McCardy, Brenda
Cartwright and Annette Cartwright; Four (4) Uncles;
Kirtland, Gerald, Raleigh and Richard McCardy Two (2)-}
Aunts; Olive Burrows.and Dora Turnquest; Numerous
Nephews, Nieces and Cousins including; Yorick, Algie,
Whalen, Tony, Craig and Marvin McCardy, Garvin and
Leandro Simmons, Endel Adderley, Andre, Carlo and
David Cartwright, Predensia Moore, Gladys, Myrna,
Vangie, Yvette, Helena, Claudette, Janet, Lesa, Dianne,
Rita, Christina and Barbara; Special friends including;
Carl, Effie and Clyde Cartwright, Joanne Wright, Wendell |.
Cartwright, Richard and Beryl Cartwright, Percy and |
Millie Taylor, Arimina Carroll, Iris Farquharson, Ruth
Watkins, Maurice Cartwright, Joseph and Virgie Carroll,
‘Basil Fox, Erma Adderley, Val Carroll, Fr. Earnest Pratt,
St. Paul’s Parish family and the entire community of Long
Island. :

Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers’ Funeral
' Homes and Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets on
Thursday from 12:00noon until 5:00 p.m. and on Friday}
‘from10:00 a.m. until 2:30 p.m. and,from,6:00.p.m. until
service ‘time at the Church in Long Island.






ethel Brothers Morticians
Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.0.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

. GORMAN:
BERRISFORD
BAKER, 73

of #43 Davis Street, Oakes
Field, will be held on Saturday
at 11am at St, Joseph's
Catholic Church, Boyd Road.
Fr. Martin Gomes will officiate.
Interment will be:made in the
Western Cemetery, Nassau
Street.



Ke RG
As “)
|
i
ae









Gorman's survivors include his loving wife, lronaca
Morris-Baker; children, Christine Baker, Teresita Stuart,
Michael, Bernard and Sherrine, Silvan and Linda, Dwight
Sr., Jeffrey and Pearline, Andrew and Sherry, Sharon
and Allison; one sister, Florine Baker of New York; one
brother, Cyril George E. Baker; sisters-in-law including
their families, Mrs. Marjorie Baker, Dr Ilonka Roker,
Mrs. Reorien Rolle, Mrs. Venus Ryan; grandchildren
including, Kristen, Tameko, Lynn, Brenelle, Brianne,
Ryan, E’Layna, Dwight Jr., D’Nae Ashlee, Jeffnae,
Jessica, Jorja; nieces and nephews, Herbert Jr., Sylvia,
Sabrina, Stephen, Gregory, Norman, Denise, Theresa,
Kim, Cyril, Norman uJr., Jamaal; Jerome Smith, Rashida,
Mohammed, Hannifah, Amante, Jonathan David
Williams; numerous relatives and friends includes, Mr.
Davy Rolle, Commodore of the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force and Mrs Rolle and family, Mrs. Omenia Adderley
and family, Dorothy and George Huyler and family,
Telcine and Leslie Albury and family, Maxine Archer
and family, Brenda Ferguson and family, Franklyn and
Sharon Wilson and family, Mr and Mrs David Rahming
and family, the Godet family, the Bowleg family, the
family of late Katrina Thurston and family, Reginald
Poitier and family, Mr Frank and Christine Smith and
family, Mr and Mrs John Duncombe and family, Ms.
Majorie Davis of Florida, Edris and Lee Sparrow of New
York, Terry Duncombe and Jimmy of New Jersey, Mr
and Mrs William Stuart of Miami, Dr. Mary L. Thompson
of Miami, Mrs. Florine Cooper of Miami, the Rodrigues
family of Nassau and Canada, Mr Cornerlius Cooper,
Sister Annie Thompson and the Benedictine Sisters of
St. Martin Monastery, Father Martin Gomes sscc. and
the Parish family of St. Joseph, the Men’s Ministry of
St. Joseph, St. Joseph Senior Choir, Officers and
Members of the Pilot Club of Nassau. ,








































Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers

Morticians #44 Nassau Street on Friday from 10am to

6pm and on Saturday from 10am until service time at
the church.





A MEMORIAL SERVICE will be held on Thursday
7pm at St. Joseph's Catholic Church, Boyd Road.





PAGE 12, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005 THE TRIBUNE



NA



a APPEAL Court Justice Emmanuel Osadebay presents Goveinor General Dame Ivy
Dumont with a copy of his book Labour Law in the Bahamas on Wednesday August 17 at
Soveenen House. It is the second book published ty Justice Osadebay. ,

(BIS Photo: Tim A ylen)



i RECIPIENTS of the scholarships and family representatives, wth'(front row) deputy permanent
secretary and head of the technical assistance and corporation unit at the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs Roselyn Horton; hhonorary vice-consul to the Bahamas for Mexico, Barbara Fox; Minister
of Foreign Affairs and the Public Service Fred Mitchell; and Peepent secretary at the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs Dr Patricia Rodgers.

(BIS photo: Eric Rose)

Scholarships to
Mexico awarded

THE Ministry of Foreign
Affairs, in conjunction with the





from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so; call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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the Bahamas”, has announced
the awarding of seven scholar-
ships in areas such as interna-
tional relations, Spanish and
computer science and technol-
ogy. :

Sherry Johnson, Glenn
McPhee, Bianca Brown,
Kimiko Knowles and Channell
Josey will pursue bachelor’s
degrees in international rela-
tions

Telia Shearer will pursue a
diploma programme in Span-
ish and Renaldo Smith will pur-
sue a bachelor’s degree in com-
puter science and technology.

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Dr Davidson Hepburn has
been presented with a 50-year
commemorative pin by the
head of Omega Psi Phi Frater-
nity worldwide, Grand Basileus
Brother George Grace.

Brother Hepburn became a
member of Omega Psi Phi in
1955 and Pi Xi Chapter is
proud of the service that he
has given to the Bahamian

community through many of
the subsequent years, as a for-

mér Ambassador: of the -

Bahamas to the United
Nations and currently, as the
Chairman of the Bahamas
National Commission for
UNESCO, a member of the
Executive Board of UNESCO,
and as the Honourary Consul
to Indonesia.



i GRAND Basileus: :
Grace pinning Brother
Hepburn as Brother |.
Devyon Jones, E
Basileus of New
Providence’s Pi Xi
Chapter looks on.



Dr Hepburn also serves as
chairman of the Governor
General’s Youth Award pro-
gramme in the Bahamas and
is also a recipient of the Legion

of Honour designation, award-
ed by the French government
for Outstanding service ‘to
France, regardless of the social
status or the nationality of
recipients.



SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net



FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005



American Eagle

market share

@ By YOLANDA .
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter

AMERICAN Eagle has lost

10 per cent of its market share .

for the Nassau/Paradise Island
destination over a four-year
period between 2000 and 2004,
Statistics showed yesterday,
although the carrier still remains
the leader for inbound passen-
gers on scheduled airlines.

The Ministry of Tourism's Air
Carrier Performance Report for
2004 said American Eagle’s lost
market share was the result of

other scheduled airlines increas-

ing their occupied seats, with
US Airways almost doubling the
number of passengers brought
into Nassau/Paradise Island
during the same period.

. The report said: “The entry of
other scheduled airlines into the

market has made it difficult for
American Eagle to regain its
former market share. In 2000,
American Eagle had a market
share of 36 per cent, compared
to 32 per cent in 2001, 28 per
cent in 2002, 28 per cent in 2003
and 26 per cent in 2004.

“In 2000, US Airways had
only a 9 per cent of the market
into Nassau, compared to 13 per
cent in 2001, 16 per cent in 2002,
17 per cent in 2003 and 18 per
cent in 2004.”

- Despite the steady surge to
capture a greater percentage of
the Nassau/Paradise Island mar-
ket by US Airways and other
airlines, American Eagle was
still able to hold on to the lion's
share among scheduled airlines
coming into the destination.

In 2004, US Airways came in
second with a market share of
17.6 per cent and total number

of occupied seats of 191,712.
Bahamasair landed in third
position, with the national flag
carrier improving its market
share to 17.4 per cent and
189,700 occupied seats in 2004.
In 2003, Bahamasair hada
market share of 16.5 per cent
and experienced total occupied
seats of 171,176 coming into
Nassau.
Rounding out the top five,
Delta Airlines had 15 per cent
and Continental Connection
had 9 per cent of the market
share of inbound passengers on

. scheduled airlines into:the Nas-

sau/Paradise Island destination.

For the period, the majority-
of inbound passenger traffic
into the Nassau/Paradise Island
destination, 95 per cent, came
by scheduled airlines. The
remaining five per cent arrived
via charter airline.



Living standards under
threat if productivity not
‘deeply entrenched’ —

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Bahamians could lose their
relatively high standard of living
if the workforce fails to adopt
“a more deeply entrenched cul-
ture of productivity”, the strat-

egy paper for establishing a _

Bahamian National Productivi-
ty Centre has warned. .

The paper, produced by the
International Labour Organi-
sation (ILO) as part of its Pro-
gramme for Management-
Labour Co-Operation (PRO-
MALCO) project, said there
was a “growing awareness at

the ground level of the impli-
cations of reduced competitive-
ness” in the Bahamas, sparked
by the aftermath of the Sep-
tember 11 terror attacks and

.2004 hurricanes.

The ILO strategy paper said
there was “an anxiety” among
working Bahamians about the
implications of free trade for
this nation’s economy, plus the
impact of signing on to agree-
ments such as the. Free Trade
Area of the Americas (FTAA).

The paper said: “There is evi-
dence that the general Bahami- .
an citizenry is gradually begin-
ning to appreciate the concept



Foreign reserves continue
‘record accumulation’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas’ foreign
exchange reserves continued
their “record accumulation” to
reach $769 million at the end
of June 2005, a Wall Street
credit rating agency has report-
ed, indicating that this and oth-
er developments are likely to

favourably influence its forth-
coming sovereign credit rating
of this nation.

In its latest credit opinion on
the Bahamas, released this
month, Moody’s said: “The
Bahamian economy continued
to strengthen in the first half
of 2005, with foreign direct

SEE page 3B



Storms cause 23% seat fall
on flights to Grand Bahama

@ By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter

FOLLOWING the devasta-
tion of Hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne and the loss of substan-
tial tourism inventory, Grand

Bahama experienced a 23 per

cent decline in the total num-

ber of available seats on

inbound flights in 2004.
American Eagle, AirTran



Airways, Continental Connec-
tion and US Airways all
decreased the number of flights
offered. By comparison, in 2003
Grand Bahama saw the num-
ber of available seats for sched-
uled airlines decline by 1 per
cent, dropping to 4,690.

In 2004, however, charter air-
lines also experienced a sub-
stantial decline, seeing 58 per

SEE page 6B

a Gresuxaelnceseue






IN the lead article in Tri-
bune Business on August 18,
2005, entitled Colina defends
auditor report on Bond Fund,
the fourth paragraph included
a typographical error that stat-
ed the fund made “total loss-
es” in the year-ended Decem-
ber 31, 2004, of $2.69 million.

This is not correct. The
word “losses” should have
been “loans”, and the fourth



paragraph should have read:
“Total loans amounted to
$2.69 million, which represents
55 per cent of total assets and
exceed asset allocation limits.”

The Tribune apologises for
the error and any distress this
may have caused. As the arti-
cle pointed out in later para-
graphs, the Colina Bond Fund
did produce a profit for
investors in fiscal 2004.













of total factor productivity,
though there may not be a full
understanding of it.
“Productivity and its impor-
tance must be brought from
being just a nebulous concept
to the man in the street, to eas-
ily understandable concepts that
are experienced in the daily
lives of the Bahamian citizen...
“There is a sentiment among
Bahamians that they do enjoy a
relatively high standard of liv-
ing, but that this could be easily
lost unless its comparative nat-
ural advantages are matched

SEE page 2B

-Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street
| Eag Ora Caterer

ON ERS on Nassau-bound
flights rise by 5%






FAMILY _
GUARDIAN

Insurance & Investments
to Build a Better Life
Telephone 242-393-1023

@ BAHAMASAIR has inc reased its number of available seats into Nassau

@ By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter

TOTAL occupied seats'on airline flights
into Nassau increased by 5 per cent in 2004
compared to the year-before, a Ministry of
Tourism report has revealed, an improve-
ment caused because most carriers had load
factors above their 2003 levels.

The report showed Nassau/Paradise Island
experienced. an increase in the total number
of available airline seats by 1 per cent, or
8,413 seats, during 2004, due largely to Jet
Blue and Song, a subsidiary of Delta Air-

j lines, beginning service to the destination.

The increase in available seats in-2004 was

also due to the fact that other airlines, includ-
fm ing Bahamasair, Continental Airlines, at 39

per cent, and US Airways, at 17 per cent, all
increased the number of available seats into
the Nassau/Paradise Island destination.

Air Jamaica increased its number of avail-

able seats by 54 per cent, though it reduced

the actual number of flights into Nassau. The
difference is attributed to the use of larger
planes. ;

The increase in the total number of avail-

able seats was seen despite the fact that some.
of the other major carriers, such as American
Eagle, reduced the number of available seats
into the destination.

Meanwhile, Air Canada, American Eagle,

§ Bahamasair, Comair, Continental Airlines,

Continental Connection, Cubana Airlines

.and Delta Airlinesall operated with load fac-

tors that were higher than levels achieved in
2003. \

For the Nassau/Paradise Island destina-
tion, Air Canada, Jet Blue Airlines, Comair,
Continental Airlines and US Airways oper-

_ated with the highest load factors of the

scheduled. airlines flying into Nassau from
international gateways in 2004.

Bahamasair experienced some of its high-
est load factors for the year during July, at 67
per cent; August, at 83 per cent; and Decem-
ber at 72 per cent.

The report further said that July and
August enjoyed the highest traffic for sched-
uled airlines to the Nassau/Paradise Island
destination, largely as as a result of Bahami-
ans travelling abroad for shopping and vaca-
tion. For the period, August had the highest
flow of inbound traffic and September the
lowest. ae

March, April and December were also very |
high traffic months for the scheduled carriers,
the former two boasting high traffic due to
spring breakers. a

Looking at the charter airline segment,
March saw the highest flow of inbound pas-
sengers for charter. airlines flying into the
Nassau/Paradise Island destination, at 7,764
passengers. April had 7,348 passengers, and

SEE page 4B



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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005

THE TRIBUNE::



BUSINESS

Why businesses cannot |

afford delayed decisions

DECISION making is a fun-
damental part of modern life.
The economic, social and tech-
nological changes that have tak-
en place in recent generations
mean we are faced with many
more decisions than our forefa-
thers. We have to make a myri-
ad number of decisions about
our finances, our relationships,
education and health on a con-
stant basis. It gets even more
complicated when we take deci-
sion making into the business
sector, where we have to make
constant decisions about scarce
resources such as money, staff,
accommodation and materials.

If you are having trouble mak-
ing decisions now, then self-
employment or business owner-
ship is unlikely to be the thing
for you. The business environ-
ment can move at a very quick
pace. Often there is not enough
time to plan or think. There can
be many things to decide on, and
often not enough information
on which to base your decision.

The good news, however, is
that decision-making is a muscle
that can be trained through use.
Decision-making techniques
can also be learned to help you
make better decisions, and I will

‘describe some of these in this

Legal Notice

NOTICE

J N HOOD ASSOCIATES
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 1376 (6) of the
International Business Companies Act, 2000 (No. 45 of 2000) JN HOOD
ASSOCIATES (BAHAMAS) LIMITED is in Dissolution. The date of
commencement of dissolution was the 17th day of August, 2005 ANITA
BAIN of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of JN HOOD ASSOCIATES
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED.

Anita Bain
Liquidator



Legal Notice

NOTICE

CASTALIA PARTNERS
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 1376 (6) of the
International Business Companies Act, 2000 (No. 45 of 2000) CASTALIA
PARTNERS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED is in Dissolution. The date of
commencement of dissolution was the 17th day of August, 2005 ANITA
BAIN of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of CASTALIA PARTNERS
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED.

Anita Bain
Liquidator

column.
So, why.do some people find
it difficult to make decisions?
1. It may have something. to

. do with having a low risk profile

and a fear of making mistakes.
So, more time is spent planning
and getting one’s ducks in line,
instead of taking action and
making decisions.

2. Procrastination, a deadly
sin of antipreneurship, will also
stop you from taking action.
There are several ways of over-
coming procrastination. Focus
on the areas that will take you to
your goals fastest.-Also, try and
do the hardest things first thing
in the morning, and this will set
you up and lighten your day.

3. The sheer size of the prob-
lem to be solved could stop you
from making a-decision. Just in
the same way that you can’t eat
an elephant in one bite, you
must chunk down your prob-













Palmer



lem into little bits and start
working on the little bits. Soon,
the elephant will have whittled
down to size.

Decision making is a key skill
in business whether -yourare self-
employed or business owner.
Do something now that is going
to take you in your chosen
direction. In these fast times of
snap opportunities, the ability
to constantly make decisions
keeps you in the game. Non-
action, or procrastination, will
cause you to lose control, let
your competitors get ahead of
you, and will ultimately take
you nowhere.

When you make your deci-
sion, you must live with it. Make
your bed and sleep in it for a
while. If it turns out it wasn’t
the right decision, learn why
and take quick action to make a
better one. ‘

BOARS, TEE RNR

REAL ESTATE SALES
REPRESENTATIVE

The Abaco Club on Winding Bay, a spectacular 520 acre
International Members Golf & Sporting Estate on Abaco,
is seeking a senior-level REAL ESTATE SALES
REPRESENTATIVE. Candidates must have a minimum
of 5 years experience in luxury market sales. Real Estate
license is preferred. Successful candidate must have
exceptional communication skills, both verbal and written.
Must be personable, professional and willing to commute
or relocate to Abaco. The Abaco Club’s estate lots range
from $875,000 to more then $4 million. Please email cover |
letter and resume to info@theabacoclub.com or fax to 242-
367-2930, Attn: Sales & Marketing.



Let’s now take a look at the
various types of decision-mak-
ing tools that youcan use. .

1. A simple technique that
will aid your decision making is
the Pareto Principle: Pareto said
something to the effect that.20
per cent of our actions will gen-
erate 80 per cent of the results.
List the problems and then rank
them to see which are the most
significant, and then solve the
one with the biggest score. This
will bring you the biggest result
for least effort.

' 2. Another simple tool is cost
benefit analysis, where you
weigh up the costs and benefits

_of implementing a decision and

calculate how quickly you will
get your payback. While it is
quite a simple and effective
method to use, it can get more
complex when you try to put a
value on subjective factors.

3. A favourite tool that is par-
ticularly useful when making a
decision between two courses
of action is Edward.De Bono’s
‘6 Thinking Hats’. It works by
everyone at the same time
putting on different hats to look
at a problem. We all put on a
white hat to look at the facts.
We all put on a yellow hat to
identify all the positive elements
of the course of action. We all

put on a black hat to identify .

all the downsides. We all put
on a red hat to look at a prob-
lem from a pure ‘gut feeling’
emotional perspective. We all
put on a green hat to come up
with creative brainstorming
solutions. The blue hat is worn
by the chair, who decides in
what order we wear the hats. It
is a great system in that it allows
emotional free wheeling, and
harnesses collaborative think-
ing within groups to eliminate
normal confrontational-think-
ing styles.

There are, of course, other
methods of decision making that

cati be learned. Chéck thé‘ Inter!"

net. Choose’ one ‘and ‘usé

Remember, decision-making is a °

muscle that must be trained or it
will go slack. If you are to avoid
antipreneurship, make sure you
spend time practicing and
upgrading your skills in this area.

NB: Adapted from his
upcoming book, Antipreneur-
ship And How To Avoid It,
Mark. draws on 20 years of top
level business, marketing and
communications experience in
London and the Bahamas. He

consults and lives in Eleuthera

with his wife and family, and
can. be contacted’ at
mapalmer@coralwave.com

© Mark Palmer. All rights

reserved





Living
standards
threat

FROM page one

and surpassed by a more-
deeply entrenched culture.
of productivity within its
human resources, its peo-

_ pile.”

Describing the Bahamas
and wider Caribbean as.
“poised at a critical junc-
ture” in their national devel-
opment, with productivity
needing “greater attention
and urgency”, the ILO
paper said any National Pro-
ductivity Centre in this
nation had to identify the
tourism and financial ser-
vices skills this nation pos-
sessed and “further lever-
age these to build interna-
tional competitiveness”. +»

The paper added: “It must’
aim at catalysing diversifi-
cation efforts in critical sec-
toral linkages in the other
islands - agriculture on
Andros, film in Grand
Bahama, and manufactur-
ing for a wider Caribbean
and North American mar-
‘ket. :

“The centre must be able
to lead the debate on the
country’s readiness to face
competition in key areas of
economic life, and it must
be able to provide the ratio-
nale to the Government to
so mobilise the resourcés
required in the supportive
environment in legislative
reform, education and sci
entific and vocational skills
development.” ; ia

Bahamian respondents to-.
an ILO survey said that to
ensure the National Pro-
ductivity Centre was free
from government and polit:
ical interference, it needed’
to become self-financing in’
time. i

But during the start-up.
phase; it was recommended’
that a subvention from the’
Government be provided,
coupled with technical and’
financial support from the’
private sector. Eventually,

“the-strategy paper said the:
“Government ‘subvention®
should not be greater than:
50 per cent ofthe centre’s
revenue. he

For funding, the ILO
paper recommended that:
the National Productivity.
Centre raise revenues from
selling administration and’
consulting services, selling

_ labour and productivity sta~
tistics, and conducting pro-
ductivity audits and surveys:

A hypothetical budget for.
a Bahamian National Pro-
ductivity Centre’s first three
years put expenditure by the:
centre at just over $238,000
for the first year, with this
declining to below $230,000.
for both subsequent years. —

/

“human capital solutions

Chief Executive Officer

Our client, a small but well established and thriving.
bank and trust company based in Nassau, is seeking
a CEO to take over the day-to-day management of the
operations of the company and its wholly owned
subsidiaries. The CEO will have full P&L and
administrative responsibility in respect of existing
businesses but will not be responsible for business
development, the responsibility for which will remain
with the Chairman. The CEO will also be the company’s
principal liaison officer with the regulators.

The candidate must be able to demonstrate solid, hands
on, management, administrative and operational’
experience in an international financial institution, in
various locations. The candidate will almost certainly
have achieved managing director or similar level in a
subsidiary or branch operation. In particular, experience
living and working in Latin America will be a significant
advantage. The candidate must have business fluency
in Spanish and/or Portuguese given the company’s

‘market focus, and a part of the interview will be

conducted in one or other of these languages or both
as appropriate.

In addition, to his/her track record, the candidate will :
be well educated and will most probably have a business |
degree or other professional qualification. The job will ,
be based in Nassau but some travel will be required.

The company offers a competitive base salary -
commensurate with the candidate’s qualifications and -
experience, and performance incentives, as well as -
other benefits.

Please send your CV to Jonathan Ginder, Director,
Human Capital Solutions to: exec@hcscayman.com —
tel: (345) 949-6664.





THE TRIBUNE





EWS acs

FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005, PAGE 3B



$23m water supply contract still
facing challenge from Biwater

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The runner-up in the race for
the $23 million Blue Hills
reverse osmosis plant contract is
still seeking a Supreme Court
order overturning the award to
Consolidated Water, it was
revealed yesterday.

In a release announcing that
its shareholders had agreed to a
two-for-one stock split at its
annual general meeting (AGM)
on Wednesday, Consolidated
Water said that Biwater Inter-

national was still pressing ahead
with its Supreme Court action,
and was seeking an order that it
be handed the contract instead.
Consolidated Water said in its
release: “Accordingly, there can
be no assurances that the con-
tract between the company and
the Water and Sewerage Cor-
poration will remain in effect.
“Water and Sewerage Cor-

poration has agreed to indem- .

nify the company and Water-
fields, a subsidiary of the com-
pany, against all expenses and
losses, including loss of profits,

which they may incur if the
court awards the Blue Hills pro-
ject to the unsuccessful bidder.”

Challenge

This effectively means that
nothing has changed since
Biwater International filed its
Supreme Court challenge earli-
er this year, after the Govern-
ment awarded the contract -
‘part of moves to alleviate New
Providence’s chronic water
shortages and reduce reliance



Agency reports
rise of foreign
reserves to a

record $769m

FROM page one

investment and domestic hous-
ing investment offsetting resid-
ual softness in tourism...

“The record accumulation in
external reserves continued
through June 2005, reaching
$769 million, up from $482 mil-
lion at the end of 2003.”

However, Moody’s warned.

that tourism earnings had still
not fully recovered from the
damage inflicted on Grand
Bahama by the September 2004
hurricanes - the Royal Oasis
resort still remains closed -
despite what it described as
“upbeat trends in New Provi-
dence and the Family Islands”.
The Wall Street credit rating
agency added that retail prices
in June rose by 1.8 per cent,
year-on-year, which was in line
with the Bahamian govern-
ment’s expectations.
Otherwise, little had changed
in Moody’s assessment of the
Bahamas, the main stumbling
block to increasing the respec-
tive A3 and A1 ratings on this
nation’s foreign currency and
local currency debt obligations
being the ongoing fiscal deficit
and public sector debt position.
The Wall Street credit rating
agency added: “The rating
could come under pressure
from a loss of. competitiveness

in the tourism industry or from
additional external shocks
affecting that sector. This would
lead to fiscal slippage and a sig-
nificant build up in government
debt.

“Given the narrow revenue
base, a much greater level of
debt would be hard to sustain.
Slippage in the regulation of
financial services, which account
for 15 per cent of GDP, would
be viewed as negative develop-
ment.”

And for good measure,
Moody’s added: “The underly-
ing strengths of the Bahamas
and the preservation of a rela-
tively strong external position
support a stable outlook,
although the economy faces
challenges posed by the effects
on the tourism sector of terror-
ism and geopolitical uncertain-
ties.

“The Government faces the
task of containing larger fiscal
deficits at a time of uncertain
tourism prospects and subdued
prospects for economic growth.
The Government's response to
the new international financial
regulatory regime, and its abil-
ity to manage economic liberal-
isation as its seeks World Trade
Organisation (WTO) member-
ship, will influence Moody's
credit assessment of the
Bahamas.”

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
(N° 46 of 2000).

RUSHDALE CONSULTANTS LIMITED

IBC N° 77,484 B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 131 (2) (a) of the
International Business Companies Act N°46 of 2000, RUSHDALE ‘i
CONSULTANTS LIMITED is in Dissolution. *



“Copyrighted Material
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Available from Commercial News Providers”





The Tribune wants to hear
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making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.










Any person having a Claim against the above-named Company is required on
or before the 6th of July 2005 to send their name, address and particulars of their
debt or claim to the Liquidator of the Company, or in default thereof they may
be. excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before such claim is
approved. ;

Miguel Antonio Fopiani Bernal of Lista de Correos, 11130 - Chiclana de la
Frontera, Spain, is the Liquidator of RUSHDALE CONSULTANTS LIMITED.









on water barged from Andros —
to Consolidated Water.

The latter has already raised
$10 million in financing for the
Blue Hills plant through a bond
issue to-selected Bahamian
investors, and plans to raise a
further $10 million this autumn
from a Bahamian Depository
Receipt (BDR) offering that
will be placed by Fidelity Mer-
chant Bank and Trust.

Consolidated Water said it
expected the BDR issue to be
completed in the final quarter of
2005.






ED SECURITIES

Previous Close

1.10 0.80 - Akaco Markets 0.80

9.25 8.90 Bahamas Property Fund 9.25

6.50 §.55 Bank of Bahamas 6.50

0.85. 0.70 Benchmark 0.70

1.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 1.40

1.15 0.87 Fidelity Bank 4.15

8.81 6.76 Cable Bahamas 8.73

12.20 1.80 Colina Holdings 1.80

9.08 6.75 Commonwealth Bank 8.62

; 2.50 0.67 Doctér's Hospital 2.24

LEGAL NOTICE 4.12 3.85 Famguard 4.12

: 10.50 9.19 Finco 10.49

NOTICE 9.30 7.00 FirstCaribbean 9.30

8.98 8.31 Focol 8.91

: 1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete , 1.15

a ss f 410.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.60

International Business Companies Act 8.30 8.26 SCO a oa oe ae
0 4 i erzner Internationa Ss x

(N° 45 of 2000) Premier Real Estate _ 10.00

EIDOS MARKETING LIMITED ae

Liquidator’s Notice

Pursuant To Section 137 (6) Of
The International Business Companies Act.



0.40 RND Holdings



.00 ABDAB

0.35 RND Holdings

We, Sovereign Managers Limited, Liquidator of EIDOS MARKETING ed Mutual Funds:











12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

43:00 Bahamas Supermarkets

Fund Name

Counter Securities






LIMITED, hereby certify that the winding-up and dissolution of EIDOS 1.1798 Colina Money Market Fund 1.245420"
MARKETING LIMITED, has been completed in accordance with the aecace Se lay Bahamas G & | Fund 2.381 “**
= : _ . i : idelity Prime {ncome Fund 10.4855***""
Articles of Dissolution. 2.2636 2.1330 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.263627"°
1.1246 1.0544 Colina Bond Fund



Dated this 21st day of July 2005.

SIGNED :
For & On Behalf Of

Sovereign M Limited

nape PIE - Closing price divided by the last 12. month
Liquidator

*- AS AT JULY 29, 2005/ *** - AS AT JULY 31



FINGEX: CLOSE 485.630 / VTD 1.321% 7 2003 14.88%

1.124578*""*

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1.000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price far daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthe

earnings

*- AS AT JUL. 31, 2005/ **** - AS AT JUN 30, 2005

» 2005/ ***** AS AT JULY 31, 200E

LTRADE CALL: COLINA 242-602-7010 7 FIDELITY 242-356-776¢

‘CONSOLIDATE DEBT AND LOWER YOUR PAYMENTS

Colina

‘Financial Advisors Ltd.

SS VISIT WWW BISKBAHAMAS COM FO
IDEX: CLOSE 1,201.54 / CHG -00.95 / %CHG -01

Today's Closé











PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, NATHANIEL PIERRE
MONTGOMERY of Kent Avenue, Nassau East, RO. Box
N-8522, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name
to NATHANIEL PIERRE-HART. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-792, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.













It can happen quickly. All of a sudden you've got more debt than
you're comfortable carrying and “... more month at the end’of the
money.” Let a Scotiabank representative help you .become
financially fit. We offer practical solutions to consolidate your debt
into one affordable monthly payment; access some of the equity
in your home to lower your interest costs; or transfer to a lower
interest credit option. We can introduce you to credit life
protection and even help. you start saving for your childrens
education. Start building a stronger financial future today.

Visit your nearest branch and let's talk.



*

Life. Money. Balance both:

* Trademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia. Trademarks used under authorization and control of The Bank of Nova Scotia.




=) FIDELITY

0.08

















0,80 0.00 -0.207 0.000
9.25 0.00 1.452 0.340
6.50 0.00 0.561 0.330
0.79 0.09 35,800 0.187 0.010
1.40 0.00 0.126 0.060
1.15 0.00 0.062 0.040
8.81 0.08 2,900 0.618 0.240
1.80 0.00 5,154 -0.004 0.000
8.50 -0.12 4,000 0.705 0.410
2.24 0.00 :
4.12 0.00

10.49 0.00

*9.30 0.00
8.91 0.00
1.15 0.00
9.60 0.00
8.27 0.00
5.82 0.00

10.00 0.00

Ask $ Last Price

10.35




0.54

43.00 41.00
14.00 13.00
0.54 0.35




YTD% Last 12 Months



YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weakly Vol. -- Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful’

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 10¢

























PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005

THE TRIBUNE






PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, LEONARDO
MCKINTOSH, of East Street South, Nassau, Bahamas,
intend to change my name to LEONARDO ELIJAH
MCINTOSH BROWN. If there are any objections to this
change of namé by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-792,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.






LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
(N° 46 of 2000)

DARLINGTON HOLDINGS LIMITED

IBC N° 128528 B

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 131 (2) (a) of the
International Business Companies Act (No 46 of 2000), DARLINGTON
HOLDINGS LIMITED, is in Dissolution.

The date of commencement of dissolution was 15th, day of August, 2005.
Redcorn Consultants Limited, c/o Ansbacher House, 2nd Floor, Shirley & East

Sts. North, P.O. Box N-9934 Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of Darlington
Holdings Limited.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

WOLWECK LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a2) WOLWECK LIMITED is in voluntary’ dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on August 17,
-2005 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and registered
by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated Ltd., Pasea
Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI.

Dated this 19th day of August, A.D., 2005.



VERDURO ASSOCIATED LTD.
Liquidator

All children must be upervised b:







f



Insurance company to stage
‘Midsummer’ seminars

BRITISH American Insur-
ance Company will next week
host an evening of free semi-
nars aimed at educating the
Bahamian public on financial
planning, investment and insur-
ance issues.

The event, entitled Midsum-
mer Night School, will be staged
from 6pm to 8.30pm on
Wednesday August 24, at the
company’s headquarters on
Independence Drive.

I Chester Cooper, chief oper-
ating officer and chief execu-
tive-designate for British Amer-
ican Insurance Company, said:
“Midsummer Night School is
the major focus of a series of
events that the company has
planned for this year to cele-
brate its 85th anniversary of
operations in the Bahamas.

“We generally feel that in
addition to helping our clients
create and manage wealth
through our creative products
and services, we have an oblig-
ation to ensure the education

of the public with respect to.

financial matters.
Education

“We believe that education
is one of the first steps in amass-
ing wealth and having people
become financially secure and
financially independent, so this
is why we have launched this
initiative.

“It’s open to our clients, the
public at large, and we hope
that all can be a part and enjoy
the seminars, the mortgage
campaign initiatives and, of
course, the presentations on
legal issues as well as the finan-
cial matters.”

“We generally feel that in
addition to helping our clients
create and manage wealth
through our creative products
and services we have an obliga-
tion to ensure the education of
the public with respect to finan-
cial matters.”

Seminar topics include Finan-
cial Planning & Investments,

Tan cer meee cCCe



o



Violet Perpall, supervisor, mortgages and accounts, British American Insurance Company; John Wil-
son, partner, McKinney Bancroft.and Hughes; I. Chester Cooper, chief operating officer and chief exec- |

British American Insurance Company.

How to Get the Most from
Your Mortgage, Insuring Good
Health - the Foundation of
Wealth, Understanding Life
Insurance and The Inheritance
Laws.

These 30-minute seminars
will be repeated several times
throughout the evening so that
students can attend at least
three sessions. Attendees will
be able to qualify for a mort-
gage at the event with special
incentives onsite, as well as have
free private financial consulta-
tions.

The topic How to Qualify for
a Mortgage is expected to be a
popular session at Midsummer
Night School, and will be led
by Violet Perpall, supervisor for

mortgages: and accounts, with, ..

‘British American Insurance

Occupied

FROM page one
September had the lowest

number of passengers at 700.
Twenty-one per cent of the

Company.

According to Ms Perpall, the
main impediments to qualify-
ing for a mortgage are lack of
savings and too much consumer
debt. — ;

Information

She said: “In this seminar we
will provide information on the
debt service ratios that we look
for, as well as the importance
of saving for those out-of- pock-
et expenses associated with the
mortgage — for instance the
legal costs, your down payment
and your commitment fees.”

Midsummer Night School
seminars will be led by finan-

cial, insurance and law experts ..
: from British. American Insur-

‘utive-designate for British American Insurance Company; and Ken Pyfrom, chief financial officer,

ance Company and McKinney
Bancroft & Hughes. =~
‘They include Ken Pyfrom,
chief financial officer, British
American Insurance; Diane
Stewart and John Wilson, attor-
neys, McKinney Bancroft and
Hughes; Stephanie Carroll,
AVP, group employee benefits,
British American Insurance
Company; Hugh Newbold, vice-
president, ordinary division,
British American Insurance
Company; Gilbert Williams,
vice-president, Home Service.
Sales, British American. Insur-
ance Company; Cecillia Cox,
manager, financial services and
investments, British American
Insurance; and Phyllis Meeusen,
client relationship advisor,
British American.Insurance

-Company. eee

seats to Nassau up 5%

passengers who came into the
Nassau/Paradise Island desti-
nation in 2004 came by way of
charter airlines through Toron-
to. 4

AGIon

Rock-wool attic insulation cheaper than
if you do it yourselflll Please check out

www. bahamasinsulation.com for

more

info, detailed comparison and benefits.
LIFETIME WARRANTY AND
FREE QUOTES
on every installation.
Phone: (242) 324-1619

Cell: (242) 424-1518

Email:
bahamasinsulation@gmail.com

Website: www. bahamasinsulation.com



The most popular gateways
for scheduled airlines flying into
the Nassau/Paradise Island des-
tination were Miami, Florida;
Fort Lauderdale, Florida;
Atlanta, Georgia; La Guardia
Airport in New York and Char-
lotte, North Carolina: ~

The most popular gateways
for charter airlines flying into’
the Nassau/Paradise Island des-
tination were Toronto, Cana-
da; Baltimore, Maryland; Chica-
go, Illinois; Atlanta, Georgia;
and Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

In 2004, Florida gateways
accounted for 53 per cent of the
inbound passenger traffic trav-
elling into the Nassau/Paradise
Island destination on scheduled
airlines, with six per cent on
charter airlines. :

Some 29 per cent of all pas-
sengers who came into Nassau
in 2004 by way of scheduled air-
lines, came through Miami,
Florida. Second to Miami, 15
per cent of all passengers on
scheduled airlines came through
Fort Lauderdale, with 9 per cent
coming through Atlanta, 8. per
cent through New York's La
Guardia airport and 7 per cent
through Charlotte, North Car-
olina.

MUST SELL

Vacant Lot No. 5 Block 18 Section B 9,600 sq. ft. on Avacado Drive in Eleuthera Island Shores
Subdivision in North Eleuthera. —

Property is close to Eleuthera Main Highway with available utilities; electricity, city water and

telephone.

For conditions of the sale and any other information, please contact: The Commercial Credit
Collection Unit at: Phone: 356-1686 or 356-1608, Nassau
Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us by no later than September 30, 2005

Financing available for qualified purchaser





THE TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005, PAGE 5B

Colina Holdings
unveils internal
auditor appointee

Colina Holdings (Bahamas),
the BISX-listed holding vehicle
for its life and health insurer,
has appointed Ingrid Culmer as
its internal auditor, with respon-
sibility for implementing and
directing the company’s audit
policies, procedures and stan-
dards.

She will perform the same
function for Colina Holdings’
“subsidiary, Colinalmperial
Insurance, and act in an. advi-





-sory function on all issues
‘regarding internal controls for
‘both entities:

Emanuel Alexiou, Colina
‘Holdings chairman, said the
-appointment was part of the
‘company’s plans to enhance
“corporate governance and boost
shareholder value.

: e e @ 3
Initiatives
“Ms Culmer’s appointment
coincides with many proactive
initiatives we have undertaken
across the entire Group,” said
Mr Alexiou.

“By being the first to adopt
higher financial reporting stan-
dards, we hope to remain ahead
of the field not just in our finan-
‘cial strength but also in terms of
our corporate governance and ff
financial reporting standards.

With Ms Gumers wealth of mINGRID Cabat
experience and impressive pro-

fessional skills, we are certain ‘
she will play a key role in ush- a O i iC 2
ering in-a new era for Colina ,
Holdings.” LS NOTICE is hereby given that FRIDA MOMPREMIER VIRGILE
OF ot BOX GT-2193, niece Ack apogee
e -| to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Exper 1ence for fecistration/naturalization as a ahean oF The pahanias.
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
“Having spent the last three naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
years as the financial controller © -|:and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
of one of the companies within from the 19TH: day of AUGUST, 2005 to the Minister
the group — the Nassau responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Guardian — our confidence in Nassau, Bahamas.
Ms Culmer’s expertise is
through first-hand knowledge

of her abilities.” , ,

A member of the Bahamas A Ti a
Institute of Chartered Accoun-

tants (BICA) and the Ameri- ;

can Institute of Certified Public | NOTICE is hereby given that BASIL PETER GOULANDRIS, OF
Accountants, Ms Culmer P.O. BOX N-858, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister



earned her Certified Public responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
‘Accountant designation in 1987 registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
and has spent 15 years of her any person. who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
career working with two major should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement

accountin g and consultancy of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 11TH day of AUGUST,
firms, both in the Bahamas and 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
abroad. P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

STAFF VACANCIES

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the following position:
Accounts Clerk IV (Northern Bahamas Campus)

The successful candidate will report to the Assistant Vice President, Northern
Bahamas and to the Supervisor, Accounts Receivable, Oakes Field Campus and be
responsible for the following duties:

Daily collection and daily banking of all monies in accordance with Accounting
Department Procedures.

‘Receiving, recording and receipting cash and receivables from tuition, fees,
grants, rents, ancillary enterprises, etc. Issuing official receipts for all income.
Balancing daily end-of-day batches from revenue collections.
Analyzing & Reporting all daily revenue and collections by bank account,
mode of payment and receipt category.

_ Proper and timely reporting and documenting of all overages and/or shortages
to the supervisor.
Keying in all transactions into the Management Information System.
Disbursing petty cash
Any other related duties as required.

Qualifications/Experience/Personality Traits

An Associate Degree in Accounting or Business.

_ Minimum of two (2) years experience in a similar position
Experience with automated financial application is an avaniage
Trustworthy and of good character
Meticulous and ability to work under pressure

Salary Scale: $16,900 x $500- $25,900

Interested candidates should submit a resume with supporting documents through
their Head of Department by Wednesday, August 31, 2005, to:

The Director
Human Resources Department
Oakes Field. Campus
Nassau, Bahamas

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs







,| BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK

Cable Beach, West Bay Street, P.O. Box N-3034
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 327-5780/327-5793-6
Fax: (242) 327-5047, 327-1258
www. bahamasdevelopmentbank. com



PROPERTIES & ASSETS FOR SALE
_NEW PROVIDENCE

1. Lot #13 (5,000 sq. ft.) with duplex (1,344 sq. ft.) white trim lime green - Bancroft Lane Bamboo
Town (Appraised Value $147,000.00)

2. Lot #14, Blk. #7 with sports bar along with restaurant equipment - Key West St & Balfour Ave.
Englerston Subdivision. (Appraised Value $187,000.00)

3. Lot #171 (100’x100’) with two story building - East Street opposite Deveaux Street. Seat
Value $300,000.00)

4. Lot #27A (55’x90’) with neous split level house - Boatswain Hill or Bosua Hill (Appraised
Value $139,580.00)

5. Lot #176 (40’x113’) with 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom house (860 sq. ft.) -. Old Cedar Street, Yellow
Elder Gardens (Appraised Value $52,160.00)

6. Lot #109 (60’x70’) with 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms house - Craven Street, Ridgeland Park. (Appraised
Value $80, 000.00)

7. Vacant lot (18, 644 sq. ft.) - Situated on the western end of Carmichael Road about 250 feet east
of Unison Road. (Appraised Value $95,000.00) -

8. Lot #52 (50’x80’) with house (778 sq. ft.) - Water Street, Big Porid. (Appraised Value $67 800.00)

9, Property (50’x100’) with two houses (660 sq. ft. and 620 sq. ft.) - Franklyn Ave. and Tyler Street
off Boyd Road. (Appraised Value $80,200.00)

10. Property (40° x36’x 100’) with building - Sutton Street next to St. Bed’s Church, Kemp Road
(Appraised Value $73,000.00)

ANDROS

11. Property (4,344 sq. ft.) with nhipléy (1,174 sq. ft. wie in the settlement of Fresh Creek, Central Andros.
(Appraised Value $22,000.00)

12. Vacant Lots #14 - 29, 32, 33, 35 - 38 (290, 400 sq. ft.) -in the settlement of Nicoll’s Town, North. j
Andros. (Appraised Value $364, 600.00)

13. Vacant Property 100’ 150 in the settlement of Pinders, Mangrove cay, South Andros. (Appraised
Value $22,500.00)

GRAND BAHAMA
14. Lot #267 (12,795 sq. ft.) - Caravel Beach Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama. (Appraised
Value $20,000.00)
15. Vacant Lot.#26 (115’x200’x175’) unit forty (40) - Euville Drive, Lucaya Estates Subdivision,
Freeport, Grand Bahama. (Appraised Value $1,500.00)
ABACO .

16. Lot #54 (6,500 sq. ft.) with triplex foundation in Murphy Town, Abaco. (Apratked Value >
$29,916.00)

APA Obey eoiegaay pola es + ELEUTHERA

ei

17. Pro eity 31° - r with House) Lord Street in the settlement of teen Bay, Eleuthera. (Appraised

Value $45,000.00)

18. Vacant Lot #22 (11,659 sq. ft:) in the settlement of North Palmetto Point in an area known as
Skull District, Eleuthera. (Appraised Value $9,000.00)

CAT ISLAND

19, Property 151'x145'x150'x123' with Hardware Building 6, 640 sq. ft.) situated 0.4 miles south of
The Bight Airport, New Bight, Cat Island. (Appraised Value $192,000.00) ;

20. Property with twelve (12) room motel 1.39 acres - in the settlement of Arthur's Town, Cat Island.
(Appraised Value $1.3 Million Dollars)

_EXUMA >

21. Lot #134 a 350 sq. ft.) with two story fuilding 4, 160 sq. ft , apartment upstairs and shop downstairs,
George Town, Exuma. (Appraised Value $468,000. 00). :

INAGUA

22. Lot #43 (9,000 sq. ft.) with house - Matthew Town, Inagua, Russell Street. (Appraised Value
$120,000.00)

“16NG: ISLAND

23. Vacant 10-acre land including 200’ of beachfront property - eae Landing, South of Clarence
Town, Long Island. (Appraised Value $975, 000. 00 O: N. O)

Electronic Equipment Sewing machines
¢ (1) Calculator . ~~ (1) Fleet Wood Sewing Machine
¢ (1) Microwave (1) New Home Sewing Machine

* (1) Compaq Presario Computer Monitor & Tower

Cart —.. ‘Tents
Hot Dog Cart with Umbrella : . (1) Canopy Tent (Plastic)
Tables
(2) Wood Tables (Round)
(1) Marble Table (Rectangle)

(1) Roll Away Bar Counter
Machinery — - Coolers/Freezers
¢ (1) Food Mixer (1) Two Door White Chest Freezer
* (1) Digital Scale (1) Silver Chest Freezer
* (1) Whirlpool Microwave (2) One Door White Chest Freezers
¢ (1) Wall TV Stand (1) Blue Coleman Cooler
Vessels Vehicles
¢ (1) 24’ (2002) Chris Craft w/engine (1) 2001 Ford F-250 Truck
° (1) 29’ (1983) Vessel (Lady Rece) ~ (1) 1996 Ford Explorer

° (1) 28’ Vessel (1) 1997 Dodge Stratus
(1) 53’ (1998) Vessel (Peagasus)
¢ (1) 125’ (1978) Steel Hull Vessel w/1980 50 ton Crane

COOKING UTENSILS POTS, PANS, PLATES, CHAFFING DISHES
DRY CLEANING EQUIPMENT

_ Serious inquiries only. Sealed bids marked “Tender” should: be submitted to:

Bahamas Development Bank |
P.O. Box N-3034, Nassau, Bahamas or telephone 327-5780
‘for additional information

Please note that all bids on the aforementioned properties and assets should be

received by August 29, 2005. | :
- The Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right to reject any or.all offer S.





PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005

FOR THE INCREDIBLE STORY OF THE SMOOTH-TALKING,
ROGUE TRADER DEREK TURNER, AND HIS PLOT TO TRICK
MILLIONS OUT OF INVESTORS AROUND THE WORLD

S E E MonNnNopbDaAY ’ §

insight

_ THE TRIBUNE



Hurricane impact on flights

GN - 256
MINISTRY OF TRAN SPORT & AVIATION

The Commonwealth of The Bahamas
Regulatory Strengthening of Airport Securny,
~. Consulting Services

COUNTRY: THE BAHAMAS

Project: Strengthening of Airport Security Program

Sector: Transport. —

Subject: PREQUALIFICATION FOR CONSULTING SERVICES
Technical Cooperation Agreement No. ATN/MT 9073 - BH
Invitation to Prequalify

‘The Government of The Bahamas. (GOB) has received financial assistance from the

Multilateral Investment Fund (MIF); which is administered by the Inter-American Development

Bank (IDB) , to finance the contracting of services and. procurement.of goods, necessary '

for the execution of a Technical Cooperation agreement to strengthen airport security in the

Bahamas. The Ministry of Transport and Aviation (MOTA) is the executing agency for this
project.

The objective of the project is to strengthen airport security at seven (7) airports in the

Bahamas by updating and modifying the regulations and procedures of the Bahamas Civil ~:
Aviation Department (CAD), training aviation. security.and.operation personnel, and creating es

and effective and efficient security team within related government agencies to meet new
international norms and standards.

a

The project has three inierselated components:

1, Regulatory Strengthening
2. Implementation of New Administrative Services
3. Training

Activities under the Training component of this project encompass:the strengthening of
regulations and procedures required to monitor and oversee the minimum standards and
practices established in the Bahamas National Civil aviation Security Plan and to satisfy
the requirements of the most recent version of ICAO Annex 17 to the Chicago Convention,
and, the procedures and guidance set in the Document 8973 Security Manual for Safeguarding
Civil Aviation against Acts of Unlawful Interference; and the development of relevant
security manuals as well as security certificate programmes.

‘In accordance with the GOB & IDB ’s procurement procedures the MOTA is inviting suitably

' qualified consulting firms to submit expressions of interest for carrying out aspects of the -
Regulatory Strengthening programme in collaboration with the MOTA, including the .

following:

1. Development of a security certification program.

2. The design, development and formalization of a strategy for the financial and :

operational sustainability of present and future airport security systems.
3. The development of an -airport security assessment program.
4. Developing security certification programmes for the Airport Authority, CAD
and Law Enforcement partners.

FROM page one

cent of available seats disap-
pear.

mance Report 2004, the Min-
istry of Tourism noted that

decline in available seats was .

largely due to the fact that

Grand Bahama was hit by two :
‘hurricanes within days of each

other.
It said: “Hurricane Frances

i

In its Air Carer Perfor-

and Hurricane Jeanne both

ploughed into Grand Bahama
in September 2004 and serious-
ly affected both scheduled and
charter service. into the desti-
nation.

“In September, American

‘Eagle reduced the number of.
- flights -into'Grand Bahama by’

60 per cent, AirTran Airways
reduced the number of flights
by 95 per cent, Bahamasair
reduced flights by 93 per cent,

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS + 2005

IN THE SUPREME COURT |

CTE Oe

Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece arch
or tract of land being a portion of a larger tract of land
totalling an area of 15.820 acres known as “The Russell.
Tract” and situate ‘approximately 3,000 feet north of
the southern end of Tilloo Cay in-the Abaco chain of

-. Cays in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas

ba : “ A D : + a
IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Title Act, 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of CHRISTOPHER KEITH
RUSSELL, IAN LAMBERT RUSSELL and BARBARA ANN
SWEETING (As Executors and Trustees-of the Estate of Lionel

Lambert Russell )

a
a

THE PETITION OF CHRISTOPHER KEITH, IAN
LAMBERT RUSSELL and BARBARA ANN SWEETING
(As Executors and Tr ustees of the Estate of Lionel Lambert Russell)

in respect of:--

“ALL THAT ieee parcel or tract of land being a
portion of a larger tract of land.totalling an area of
15.820 acres known as “The Russell Tract” and situate
approximately 3,000 feet north of the southern end

of Tilloo Cay in the Abaco chain of Cays in the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.”

AND also described as:-

“ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land containing
by admeasurement Fifteen and Eight Hundred and
Twenty Hundredths (15.820) acres being portion of
the Russell Tract situate on Tilloo Cay in the Abaco
Cays in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas and the
boundaries of which begins at a point situated on the
western coast of Tilloo Cay approximately: three thousand
feet north of its southern end with coordinates end
n2925233.00 meters and e301868.00 meters; thence
along and with the southern boundary of property claimed
by Eddie Cash n89Y58 31” distance 587. 16ft. and --

is n90Y17. 12” distance 212.68ft. to a point; thence none

and with the high water mark on the eastern coast line

_ southwardly with distance 926.66ft. toa point thence
along and with the northern boundary of land claimed
by Duncan Russell n270Y03 01” distance 719.12 ft. to
a point thence along and with the high water mark of
the western coast line northwardly with a distance
908.12ft.to a point of beginning; the boundaries of which
are more particularly described on the plan attached
which is recorded in the Department of Paods and
Surveys as plan no. 1624ab.”

5. The formalization and strengthening of the current airport security regulatory
framework.

6. Development of specified Aviation Security manuals for the MOTA and CAD.
7. The development of an airport security related public awareness programme.

GOB now invites interested, eligible firms from MIF members countries to submit applications
for prequalification. An official copy of thé prequalification documents, in English, may
be obtained at the address below upon payment of non-refundable fee of eben by cashier’ S
cheque or banker’s draft.

Prequalification will be based on the criteria stated in the prequalification documents. Firms
will be shortlisted in respect to their reponsiveness to the requirements stated in the
prequalification documents and in keeping with the IDB guidelines. A shortlist of three to
six firms will be prequalified. The prequalified firms will be invited to submit technical and
financial proposals.

CHRISTOPHER KEITH RUSSELL, IAN LAMBERT
RUSSELL and BARBARA ANN SWEETING (As Executors
and Trustees of the Estate of Lionel Lambert Russell) claim to be
the owner in fee simple in possesion of the following land and
has made application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas under Section Three (3) of the Quieting Titles
Act, 1959 to have their title to the said land investigated and the
nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate
of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with the provisicns
of the said Act.

Copies of the Petition and Plan of the said land may be inspected
during normal office hours in the following places:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street i in
the City of Nassau, Bahamas; and .

2. The Chambers of Lockhart & Munroe, #35 Buen
Retiro Road, off Shirley Street,Nassau, Bahamas.

The original and two copies of the completed prequalification documents should be submitted
in a sealed envelop, delivered to the address below by 1400 hours on 25 August 2005, and
be clearly marked “Application to prequalify for Regulatory Strengthening of Airport

3. The office of the Commissioner/Administrator at

Abaco ‘Bahamas.

Security.”

Envelopes will be opened at the address below on August 25, 2005 at 1400 hours. Late
applications will not be considered in any citcumstances.

The MIF Project Coordinator
Ministry of Transport and Aviation
Pilot House Complex,
' East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 394-0445/6 or Fax: (242) 394-5920

Further information or clarification may be obtained by e-mail from Mr J erry Hutchinson
at the e-mail address: jerryhutchinson@bahamas.gov.bs.



NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower or right
to dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the
Petition shall on or before the 30th day of September, A.D., 2005
file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioners or the
undersigned a Statement of his claim in the prescribed form
verified by an affidavit to be filed therewith.

. Failure of any. such person to file and: served a Statement of his

Claim on or before the 30th day. of September, A.D., 2005 will
operate as bar to such ‘claim.

LOCKHART & MUNROE
Chambers

#35 Buen Retiro Road

Off Shirley Street

Nassau, Bahamas



Attorneys for the Petitioners

Continental Connection by ‘58
per cent and US Airways by 97,
per cent. Delta Airlines did not’
fly into Grand Bahama in Sep-
tember 2004." i

Meanwhile, in 2004, Delta
Airlines, AirTran Airways atid’

US Airways operated with the

highest load factors, more than
70 per cent, of the scheduled,
airlines flying into Grand’
Bahama from international:
gateways.

The report:also said the total
number of occupied seats into:
Grand Bahama decreased by,

. 13 per cent, despite a 7 per cent’

increase,.to 15,460, in occupied
seats for the scheduled. carriers

~~ ~during 2004.

Charters

‘The increase in occupied
seats to Grand Bahama for.

' scheduled carriers was not,

enough to offset the decline‘in

- occupied seats for charter air-

lines.
Although the importance’ ir
charter airlines to Grand

‘Bahama continued to. decline

in 2004, they remain an integral

ie part of ‘the destination's airline

mix, Charter airlines to Grand
Bahama experienced a 54 per

cent decline, in‘the number of

occupied seats, which con-

-tributed to the overall decline

for the destination...

In 1993, US charters held 70
per cent of the overall market
share of passengers into Grand
Bahama and virtually dominat:
ed the market. He

In 2004, scheduled airlines
brought in 83 per cent of the
inbound passengers to Grand

- Bahama, US’ charters brought

in 16 per cent and Canadian and

- other charter airlines brought
-in 1 per cent.

Charter airlines are now

’ being dominated by Falcon Air-

lines, instead of Laker Airways.

Grand Bahama experienced
its highest traffic period ‘in
March and July for the sched:
uled airlines, with September

~experiencing the least traffic.

January and April had the high-

_est flow of inbound passengers

for charter airlines flying into
Grand Bahama, with Septem-

ber again coming in ast.

_ The most popular gateways
for scheduled airlines flying into
Grand Bahama were Fort
Lauderdale, Florida; Miami,
Florida; Atlanta, Georgia; Char-
lotte, North Carolina; and Bal-
timore, Maryland.

The most popular gateways
for charter airlines flying into
Grand Bahama were Rich-
mond, Virginia; Fort Laud-
erdale, Florida; Cleveland,
Ohio; Cincinnati, Ohio; and

Raleigh- Durham, North Car-

olina... :

Florida gateways accounted °
for 49 per cent of the inbound
passenger traffic to Grand
Bahama in 2004 on scheduled
airlines, compared to 91 per
cent in 2000.

Florida gateways “also
accounted for 18 per cent of the. '
inbound passenger traffic to’
Grand Bahama on charter air-
lines. Of the most popular gate-
ways, Fort Lauderdale was in °
the top five for both scheduled?
and charter airlines to Grand
Bahama in 2004. .

AirTran Airways, Continen-
tal Connection and American
Eagle had the highest percent-
age of market share of inbound
passenger traffic.to Grand
Bahama on scheduled airlines:

AirTran Airways had 22 per
cent of the market share, Con- _
tinental Connection had 20 per. -
cent, American Eagle also had
20 per cent, and US Airways .
had 17 per cent.

Of the. scheduled airlines to
Grand Bahama, AirTran Air-
ways, Continental Connection
and American Eagle had the
highest percentage of the mar-":
ket share of inbound passenger |
traffic.



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS : : 7 FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005, PAGE 7B



FRIDAY EVENING AUGUST 19, 2005

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PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



o

’ wees

for men is announced

Bahamas Basketball |
Association plays host

@ By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

THREE of. the National
Collegiate Athletic Associa-

tion (NCAA) premier bas- .

ketball teams will take part

.in the first annual College.

Jamboree for men, set for
September 3rd-4th, at Sir
Kendal Isaacs gym.

The three division one col-
legiate schools invited are the
national NCAA champions,
University of North Caroli-
na, Troy University and Mar-
shall University.

This is the first time the
Bahamas Basketball Feder-
ation (BBF) will host a tour-
nament for collegiate men.

The BBF has hosted colle-
giate tournaments for women

in the past, including the °

annual Thanksgiving basket-
ball classic, which is played
in Freeport.

The jamboree for colle-

giate men is being made pos-
sible by the Sports Tour, an
organisation that assists with
tours for collegiate teams.

Treasurer

According to Edgar Pick-
stock, the BBF’s treasurer, a
tournament of this nature
should have taken place a
long time ago.

Pickstock said: “Tourna-
ments like these in the
Bahamas are long overdue.
We need these type of tour-
naments to uplift, not only

the local talent, but, hopeful-
ly, secure some scholarships.

“Over the two days of com-

petition we are expecting
some great basketball games.

“When teams like the
national champions are made
available to you, one is quite
certain that the level of play
will be high.

“The other two college
teams coming down to play
are also premier basketball
teams playing in division I of
the NCAA.”

The tournament, which is

- being sanctioned by the BBF,

will also feature local talent.

Four teams representing
the BBF from the local New
Providence Basketball Asso-
ciation will take on the three
college teams.

- Playing for the Bahamas
are the Real Deal Shockers,

‘Wreckers, Coca Cola and the

Giants.
“We tried to:include somie

-of the local teams, especially

the players who just returned
with the team from the
Dominican Republic,” said
Pickstock.

“Hopefully we can secure'a

few scholarships for some of
mess guys, or give them the

exposure they need
to get into division one
schools.

“We have the talent, but it
is hard getting the necessary
exposure for the guys.”

Pickstock added that the
jamboree is not only for the
basketball players, but for
coaches also.

He believes that the local
coaches will be able to pick
up a few pointers from the
college coaches, if they
decide to come to and
participate in the tourna-
ment.

“This tournament is for
everyone, not only the bas-
ketball players so the gener-
al public is also invited,” he
added.

- Tickets for the event go on
sale on Friday September
2nd at the Sir Kendal Isaacs
gym.

Tickets will be priced at $3
for children and $5 for adults. :

Chistian Council announces ‘Church Games’

@ By KELSIE JOHNSON
‘Junior Sports Reporter

UNITING the many religious denom-
inations in the Bahamas through sports is
the main focus of the Bahamas Christ-
ian Council (BCC), as they get set to host
their first annual Church Games.

The Church Games, which are slated

. for October 11th-21st, is just the beginning

for the BCC, which is looking to help

improve the many sporting disciplines 1 in.

the Bahamas.

_ Recognising that sport is a vehicle that
can bring all areas of society together,
president of the council William Thomp-

be a positive point that can unite all.
. Ata press conference yesterday,
Thompson explained why the Christian
council got involved in the idea of imple-
menting the Church Games.

Noting that the church plays a big role

- in the Bahamas, Thompson said: “It is

time the church reaches out beyond its

~ four walls. We are know trying to practise

the art of reaching out into the commu-
nities and helping where necessary.

“Sports is a powerful vehicle, one that
can reach where the other disciplines can
not. The games are to encourage a more
Christ-like attitude and atmosphere back
into sports and the athletes.

- “We want to bring sports back, to”

where it can beconie a fun game, rather
than anger match. We want to bring back
that aspect of sports where people can
come together as one and have clean
fun.”

Disciplines

The games will cater to nine disciplines:
baseball, volleyball, basketball, track and

field, softball, soccer, swimming and box-

ing.

persons are asked to join up with their
respective churches.
No games will be played on any

There is no age limit, but interested.

Speaking on behalf of uniting the
churches at the press conference was .
Gilbert Thompson, who described the
games as an exciting venture, which will
bring the nation closer together as a God’s
people.

Gilbert said: “This.is game is for every-
one, every denomination so they can sit
and watch something they enjoy.

“Sports is a way we can glorify God in
our bodies, it is doesn’t only means sports,
but it also means another way of express-
ing our humanities.

“The intention of these games are not
so much to win, but to take part and learn
the true spirit and meaning of sports-
manship.” -

son believes that games of this nature can

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated, Content 8

Available from" Commercial ‘New s'P Providers”

denomination’ s Sabbath.



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FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

-™ CHANDRA STURRUP, Chris Brown, Christine Amertil and Tonique Williams-Darling are all set to compete in today’s meet in








Zurich. 2
(Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Four aim to shine in
Golden League meet

& By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

FOUR of the Bahamas’ top
athletes will be in action again
today at the Zurich, Golden
League meet.

Chandra Sturrup, Chris
Brown, Christine Amertil and
World and Olympic Champi-
on, Tonique Williams-Darling,
will all take part in the fourth
leg of six meets contesting for
the IAAF TDK million dollar
jackpot.

Although none of the four
athletes are eligible for the
prize, they are still obligated to
participate in the meets.

This will be the first of three
meets the quartet will have to
complete before wrapping-up
their outdoor season.

The quartet opted to finish
off in the IAAF’s Golden
League series, concluding with
the World Athletic Finals.

These finals are set for Sep-
tember 3rd, in Szombathely,
Hungary.

Williams-Darling, who post-
ed the world leading time at
the championships — 49.55 sec-
onds — will contest her title
against the top three finishers
from the games.

Among the field will be fel-
low countryman Amertil,
Americans Monique Henna-
gan, Sanya Richards, and Dee
Dee Trotter.

Representing Russia will be

Athletes ready for
action just days after
World Championships

Svetlana Pospelova and Olesja

- Zykina.

At the World Champi-
onships, which concluded just
days ago, Richards posted a
time of 49.74 seconds for the
second place finish, Guevera
was third in 49.81 seconds and
Pospelova fourth in 50.11 sec-
onds.

Although the 400m is not a
contested race for the jackpot,
the athletes are expecting to
better their times before the
World Athletic Finals.

Race

The women’s 100m race is
expected to be a headliner as
very little separated the.field
at the World Championships.

Winning the century at the
World Championships was
American Lauryn Williams in a
time of 10.93 seconds. Coming
in second was Jamaica’s Veron-
ica Campbell in'10.95 seconds,
Christine Aaron was third with
10.98, with Sturrup in fourth
with 11.09 seconds.



Brown will be the only male
representing the Bahamas at
the meet, which contains over

.19 events.

Competing in his specialty,
the 400m, Brown will have to
face Olympic and World

Champion Jeremy Wariner

once again.

This time Brown will be run-
ning out of lane three instead of
lane eight, a lane assignment
he had at the World Champi-
onships. .

Although Brown ran out of
the toughest lane, he managed
to clock a time of 44.48 seconds
for a fourth place finish.

Wariner won the event in
43.93, a world leading time.

Among the other events
being contested at the meet will
be the 100m and 400m hurdles,
800m, 1,500m and the 3,000.

Also seeing action on the
weekend will be Leevan Sands,
Jackie Edwards and Lavern
Eve.

@ TONIQUE WILLIAMS-
DARLING will be competing
again with Ana Guevara.





Section
Missing
or
Unavailable



Full Text
Finally, th the perfect.
Chicken Strip!





m Lhe Tribune

Pm lovin’ it. ,

7 he Miami Herald

80F
BAHAMAS EDITION







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LOW





PARTIAL
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Volume: 101 No.219



FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005

IAAF WORLD Gi ia toasies

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PRICE — 50¢



SUPPLEMENT - INSIDE



US withdraws
2006 deadline

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

BAHAMIAN tourism offi-
cials yesterday breathed a sigh
of relief as the United States
withdrew the proposed Decem-

ber 31 2006 deadline for the

implementation of its new pass-
port rules, thus averting a pos-
sible multi-million revenue loss,
for the industry.

The US State Department on
Wednesday announced that the
deadline for the Western Hemi-
sphere Travel Initiative, which
requires all US citizens to pre-
sent a valid passport upon
returning from the Bahamas,
Caribbean countries, and Cen-
tral and South America, is now
under review.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, Minister of Tourism
Obie Wilchcombe said that this
development “will benefit the
entire Caribbean”.

“The review of the timeline is
indicative of our desire to be
flexible, practical, and pragmatic
and to listen to public feed-
back,” State Department
spokesman Steve Pike told the
US media.

In the Bahamas, Michael

Taylor, chief political, econom-
ic, and public relations officer at
the US Embassy, also con-
firmed that the implementation
deadline is now being revised.
“The deadline is being
revised. We do not have a new
deadline as yet, but expect that
information soon,” he said.
The US Embassy in a press
release stated that the Depart-
ments of State and Homeland
Security recognised that imple-
menting the requirements of

the passport legislation would
have “potentially significant
implications.”

“For this reason, we have
reviewed our initial proposed
timeline that had suggested a
three-phased schedule.

“The Administration is now
proposing a revised timeline for
implementation. This imple-
mentation schedule will be pub-
lished in the Federal Register
in the near future,” the state-
ment said.

Mr Wilchcombe attributed
the withdrawal of the Decem-
ber 2006 deadline to the com-
bined efforts of ali the
Caribbean countries and those
who fought the issue on their
behalf.

“We are obliged to the CTO
(Caribbean Tourism Organisa-

-tion) who became involved' in

June, as well as to Congress-
man Charles Rangel (of New
York), and especially to

Ambassador John Rood who.

spoke on our behalf, so we are
sending him a big ‘thank you’,”

he said.

Following the initial
announcement of the new pass-
port rules, Caribbean countries
raised the concern that the
December déadline would not
give travellers sufficient time to
apply for the necessary docu-
ments, thereby leading to a sig-
nificant decrease in American
visitors to the region.

As travellers to Mexico and
Canada were given until 2008
to comply with the policy, the
Caribbean also felt discriminat-
ed against.

A study prepared for the

SEE page 11



Nassau and JByeVe¥-boe te) Islands

@ The Prince Brigades and Princess Guides wate the gate to their tabernacle, where Hinech services are conducted daily.
_(Phato: Mario Duncanson/ Tribune Seafp)

Rasta fury after ‘police raid’

@ By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter |

THE local Rasta church is up in arms
about an early morning raid conducted
at their Fire Trail Road headquarters.
They claim that their priests and their
order of service were grossly disrespect-
ed by DEU agents.

They are calling on the Bahamas gov-
ernment and society to respect their

church, which is officially registered with
the United Nations. The Rastas say that
for too long, the police have violated
their human rights. They believe the
action of the police yesterday was “blas-
phemous".

Priest Philip Gibson told The Tribune .

yesterday that just after completing an
all-night church service in honour of
Marcus Mosiah Garvey,. and just as the
morning roll call service had begun,

more than a dozen officers bombarded
the premises.

“We had just carried up Psalms read-.
ing after 8am when our service was rude-

' ly interrupted by a force of officers,” he

said yesterday.

“We told them to take off their shoes,
because they were standing on holy
ground. We told them that guns. and

SEE page 11

Answers soon on
petroleum leak | â„¢ssing American

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE public should know by
the weekend whether an appar-
ent petroleum leak near a local
service station has contaminat-
ed nearby ground water and
soil.

Parliamentary Secretary in
the Ministry of Health Ron Pin-
der told The Tribune yesterday
that the Environmental Moni-
toring Risk Assessment Depart-




MINTCRAFT
BARREL BOLT



ment has completed its test of
soil and water samples taken
from the ground in front of the
Shell Service Station on East
Bay Street and given the
Department of Environmental
Health a report which he was
preparing to make public.

It was about two weeks ago
that what was believed to have
been a leak was discovered. At
that time, management at the

SEE page 11




BRONZE
Meh BACK

’ Leading Newspaper



Investigation into

POLICE are taining an
investigation into the disap-
pearance of an American
man who was last seen alive
on Andros more than 22
years ago.

In a remarkable series of

articles published in the Mia-
mi New Times, widow Donna
Weaver recounts the search
for her husband, Gary
Weaver, who she believes dis-
appeared during a botched

* 1983 FBI drug operation.

Mrs Weaver believes that





ar





her husband was shot and
buried next to an Andros
airstrip during the operation
which is believed to have
involved crooked FBI agents.
Bahamas Royal Police
Force Superintendent Glen
Miller told The Tribune yes-
terday that while police are
still trying to “establish that
there was a death” they have
launched an active investiga-
tion into discovering what

SEE page 11

ials?

- .YNIONTOOLS

~ STEEL TRAY
WHEELBARROW

$130


PAGE 2, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005 (rt TRIBUNE

‘LOCAL NEWS



Tributes are paid to murder victim
Brother Roger, Templeton Prize recipient





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He is of medium
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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005, PAGE 3





Hi MINISTER of Trade and Industry Leslie Miller
standing alongside his daughter’s ‘fuel efficent’ car.
(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)



Minister listens to
vendors’ concerns

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
and ADRIAN GIBSON

MINISTER of Trade and Industry Leslie Miller, on an impromp-
tu walkabout of the Straw Market, made a personal inspection for sus-
pected illegal aliens and took time out to listen to the concerns of the
local vendors.

The vendors repeated their pleas for more fans and better ventila-
tion in the market and asked Mr Miller to do something about the
number of illegal immigrants who allegedly still permeate the market.

“You come in and move them out, and then they right back in. It’s

* ridiculous,” one vendor said.

Mr Miller replied: “But now let us get this straight. Every illegal in
here was sent down by some Bahamian. They don’t have a licence to
be here, but when we find out the Bahamian that is leasing out their
stall to these people, they will be gone as well,” he said.

\ @ @
Training

Many vendors also complained that better service training is des-
perately needed at the market, as some vendors curse around and even
at tourists.

“I was told by a young man just the other day,” Mr Miller inter-
jected, “that he was in here with a white ‘tourist woman. When the
woman didn’t buy anything the vendor cursed them out.

“Now how can you have that? The customer is supposed to be
supreme. But I can tell you one thing, actions like that will not be tol-
erated,” the minister promised.

“These vendors need to get back to the Bahama Host training,” one
vendor shouted, “but I doubt that will even.make any difference,” she
said.

During the walk through, vendors approached the minister claim-
ing that every kind of drug is presently being sold in the market dai-
ly by “footmen” meandering throughout the tent.

“But Mr Miller can’t do everything, he ain’t God” one lady shout-
ed over the crowd. “He already put in all these fans. I think he’s
done more than enough.”

Mr Miller promised speedy action with regards to the problems
expressed by the vendors, and today, he along with other officials will
make another visit-to the market to continue talks with vendors and
conduct further checks for possible illegal immigrants.

using gas efficient car
till ‘price of fuel decreases’

@ By ADRIAN GIBSON

MINISTER of Trade and
Industry Leslie Miller says he
has been forced to drive his
daughter’s Volkswagen Beetle
because of the skyrocketing
price of gasoline.

Yesterday, Mr Miller drove
to The Tribune in the small, gas
efficient vehicle that he said he
intended to drive until, “gas
gets all the way down to the
way it should be with Petro-
Caribe.”

“I will continue to use this
car until the price of fuel
decreases. Because we tell the
Bahamian people to carpool,
drive smaller cars and get

officers are
back to work

ll By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Immigration
officers on Grand Bahama are ©
back to work in full force after

- staging a two-day sick-out
over the issue of overtime pay-
ments owed to them by govern-
ment.

Minister of Labour and
Immigration Vincent Peet said
he was very perturbed by the
action.

About 95 per cent of the offi-
cers called in sick on Monday
and Tuesday when they had
not been received their over-
time cheques as previously
promised by the minister back
in April.

Bahamas Public Services
Union president John Pinder
said that the officers would
return to work only after a reso-
lution was reached ensuring
that their overtime cheques
would be paid no later than Fri-
day.

Overtime

He said that Immigration
officers in Freeport have been
having problems with overtime
payments for over a year.

He noted that the officers. _
became frustrated knowing that
their counterparts in Nassau
and Customs officers in Grand
Bahama were being paid.

Weston Saunders, assistant
director of Immigration in
Freeport, reported that all of
the officers returned back to
work on Wednesday.

He said the sick-out caused
no major interruptions of Immi-
gration services in Freeport. |

“We had sufficient manpow-
er to man the ports of entry,
and clerical staff at the depart-
ment filled in. We are pleased
to report that everything is now
back to normal:in Freeport, ” he
said.

Minister driving daughter’s Beetle

dropped off to work, I gotta
show them by leading by exam-

‘ple man” he-said.

Mr Miller said that he had to
leave the car designated to cab-
inet ministers in his garage
because he could not afford to
pay the high prices of fuel
“being inflicted upon the
Bahamian people”.

“I hope in another couple of
months we can see tke virtue
of PetroCaribe. With this new
agreement the Bahamian peo-

ple will save between 65-80.

cents on the gallon. |
“We will cut the margins of
the retailers and lead with the



government cutting its tax by
16 cents.

., Plus,.there will be another
30 cents’ saved because Petro-
Caribe calls for direct ship-
ments” he said.

Committee

Mr Miller said that the gov-
ernment has organised a “first
class” fuel usage committee to
serve as a watchdog on gas pric-
ing. He said the committee
includes Pierre Dupuch, Vince
Coleby, Brenda Lockhart,

Deepak Battnagger, Jerry

Worth and two another consul-
tants.

“They are a good team that is
working hard. They are a group
of persons from all walks of life
and will make a valuable con-
tribution to bring these prices

' down man.”

He said: “I hope the oil com-
panies would work to help bring
about PetroCaribe. It will save
BEC and people money. BEC
will save $10 million per year
and reduce the surcharge that is
killing people right now.

Addressing the opposition to
the PetroCaribe agreement the
minister said:

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY:
PROJECT MANAGER

Project Manager wanted for the construction and delivery of new
Headquarters and Commercial complex with responsibility for qualicy
control, design and construction coordination and contract management.

Project Manager will be expected to:

@ Participate in the planning and formulation of design alternatives and solutions of
construction, plans and specifications from planning and design phase to completion
‘of construction documents, process to include full interpretation and review of

proposed designs, architectural drawings and building specifications, including
assessment of structural and electrical enginecring;

~ Develop and administer project budgets, estimates and fiscal controls, monitor
contracts and quality and cost control provisions;

Oversee all aspects of the day-to-day management of construction, including

coordination and monitoring of work performed bv architectural, engineering and
construction subcontractors to ensure quality and maximize meeting of deadlines

Liaise with institutional, government and local entities and initiate and coordinate

revisions where appropriate after review with client;

Ensure project operations comply with design specifications and government
regulatory policies and regulations;

Establish performance and delivery criteria, ensuring that client and institutional

requirements are being met; coordinate procurements as appropriate;

Advise and make recommendations as they relate to contracts, purchase orders,
_ change orders and contractor payment invoices;

Research and prepare various reports as they relate to operations, equipment, policies.

Perform miscellaneous job-related duties as assigned.

® Bank of The Bahamas

INTERNATIONAL

To obtain a copy of the Project Plan, letters of request with credentials should be sent to
Laura Williams © RO, Box N 7118 © Nassau, Bahamas

Requests must be received no later than Friday, September 2, 2005.



Cuba” and trying to discredit
the Bahamas’ ties with that

“There’s a group in the coun-

try today that is against any-
thing that uplifts the masses.
Isn’t it that all the countries in
South America have signed
onto PetroAmerica?

“In fact more than 30 coun-
tries have - so, why is it that
they see the benefits and critics
can’t ever be assured with
accepting the benefits?” he
asked.

Mr Miller said that he read a
press release by the Nassau
Institute yesterday, “bashing

nation.

“Why don’t they go Over-
the-Hill and tell poor persons
there that they cant have cheap-
er fuel?” he asked.

tia HL
EXTERMINATORS

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PHONE: 322-2157



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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited



NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI





Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

_ Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 i
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
‘ Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
. Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

THE TRIBUNE’S Back-to-School
Supplement, published this week, broke
from tradition by leading with a story
about the importance of students having
the right food to make it through the day.

Our editors thought this was an impor-
tant enough subject to highlight because
of the tremendous increase in obesity
among our youth.

But we also believe that the proper
nutrition not only provides fuel for the
body, but also'stokes the brain. Numer-
ous studies have been done on this:sub-
ject to show that a properly balanced
nutritious diet can add stamina, energy
and drive to all student activities.

Therefore it is interesting that just yes-
terday the Ministry of Education released
its report on the annual examination
results for the nation and noted that

“there has been a slight improvement in
the BJC results and a significant i TAPIOvE:
ment in the BGCSE” results.

Seven thousand.and sixty-two students

} “from the private and public high schools

"sat the BJC exams, each taking an aver-
age of five of the 10 subjects offered.

“Of the 10 subjects offered, only Reli-
gious Studies showed overall improve-
ment in student performance in compar-
ison to 2004”, said a press release from
the Ministry of Education. The subjects
with the lowest performance ratings — E
level— were mathematics and general

science.

Said the Ministry: “The overall mean
BJC performance for the year is D. And
this mean grade of D has remained con-
sistent over the past six years,”

Forty-two schools performed above the
average D level, meaning they achieved a.
D+ or better. But only one schoel , NGM
Major High (Abaco) achieved a B result.
Several, including Aquinas College, For-

-est Heights Academy (Abaco), Lucaya
International, Prince Williams High, St

Andrews High, St. Augustine’s College,

Sunland Baptist — all received C+ results
in their BJCs.

At the BGCSE level, 5,762 students
from 78 schools sat the: national exam,
taking an average of six subjects each.

“The overall mean for the subjects in
the BGCSE this year has risen to D+”,

Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Our Bahamian students’ report card



‘aaid the Ministry. “This marks the sec-
ond time that the mean grade has reached
this pinnacle. The first was recorded in
2000.”

From the years 2001-2004 the overall
national mean for this exam remained at
D. So it means that although the Min-

istry is patting itself on the back fgr
' achieving a D+ level, it is in fact just gre

ting back to the average that the schy
had already achieved in 2000. So reall§&
we are being realistic, it means we dite
no further forward in our school system
than we were five years ago — and that is
not very good news for the country.

Of the 78 schools entered, 29 recorded
improvements in students’ performance
compared to last year. No school record-
ed better than a C average with just three

schools — St Andrew’s, St Augustine’s and

NGM Major — recording a C+ average.

The school recording the largest per-
centage of students taking five or more
subjects with a C level grade or higher
was St Augustine’s, with 112 of 157 stu-
dents (71 per cent).

Speak with any employer in the coun-
try today and he or she will tell you‘that
90 per cent of applicants are unable to

write proper English or do simple —

accounts.

‘ However, there are still some brilliant
students in the country who have shown
that outstanding results are possible. Ken-
neth Scott, a Long Island student of
NGM Major High school, obtained seven

‘A’s and one B level in his BJC exams,

and Sherrelle Ferguson of St Andrew’s
School earned 11 A’s in her BGCSE
exams. We wish her continued success at
Harvard University where she isan
undergraduate.

Getting back to the giiestion of proper
nutrition for students, yesterday’s Mia-
mi Herald reported that the American
Beverage Association is recommending
limiting the availability of sodas in s¢
in a move to curb the epidemic of
hood obesity in the US. Perhaps the
istry might also look into this ques
as there is no doubt that drinking sotas
all day long to quench the thirst in this

summer heat can result in serious health

problems.


































Uncovering
the hidden |
issues Of race

EDITOR, The Tribune

I would like to respond to
Nicki Kelly’s column in the
August 11 edition of The Punch
where she asserts that “all
things considered, race relations
are probably better in The
Bahamas than they are in most
places in the world. And whites
and blacks are steadily joining
common causes to preserve

‘their environment, culture and

identity in the face of encroach-

, ing globalization.”

I would like to suggest that
she has unfortunately misun-
derstood the degree to which
race and class shape attitudes
and values in Bahamian society
today.

To begin with, Ms. Kelly
apparently took issue with com-
ments I had. made in an inter-
view with a Tribune reporter
the previous week. Ip the inter-
view given, I provided an analy-
sis of residential segregation
based on Colin Hughes’ seminal
work Race and Politics in The
Bahamas.

He noted that “although the
census had listed the white pop-
ulation at 15 percent of the total
reported as white, alarmingly
93 per cent of whites resided in
districts where more than 20 per
cent of the population was
white.”

He concluded from this data
that “residential segregation of
whites was far from complete,

being largely confined to a thin.“

line of housing along the north-
ern shore of the island and a
substantial, and growing pocket
at Centreville on the eastern
edge of the old city of Nassau.”

While it is true that his
research is largely dated and
confined to the pre-indepen-
dence period, it is worth noting
that more recent studies sup-
port the underlining conclusions
of this earlier work.

The extent to which race is
still a dominant feature in
Bahamian national identity in
the post independence period
is the central focus of a study
that I conducted in 2003.
Arguably, and in agreement
with Nicki Kelly’s analysis, the
post-independence period has
revealed the development of a
healthy and burgeoning black
middle class that has certainly
made inroads into areas that
Colin Hughes might have dis-
tinguished as “white enclaves”.

More to the point, since
Majority Rule and Indepen-
dence, black Bahamian entre-
preneurs have had some degree
of success in breaking the hege-
mony of Bay Street while mov-
ing out of traditional black

‘Over the Hill’ areas into sub-

divisions to the East and the
West that would be deemed
more respectable. Yet survey
data suggests that in attitudes
towards social interaction, resi-

dential preferences and in the i

IDEA BE

letters@tribunemedia.net



nents. As such, the all white
Family Island communities of
Spanish Wells and Hope Town
as well as the black community
of Bain Town in New Provi-
dence were targeted. Addition-
ally, biracial bifurcated com-
munities of Rock Sound, Marsh
Harbour and Harbour Island
were surveyed. For each com-
munity targeted, individuals
residing within the community
itself conducted a survey of 20
respondents.

The level of social interac-
tion determined the response
to many of the questions in the
survey. For example, 92 per
cent of all respondents felt.com-
fortable around people of
another race yet only 79 per
cent acknowledged that they
had friends of another race.
Business and work related inter-
action were evident where 84.7
per cent.did business with per-
sons of another race, 88.8 per
cent would employ a person of
another race’and 68 per cent
worked or went to classes with
persons of another race. Inter-
action declined with involve-
ment in recreational or sport-
ing activities where only 51 per
cent of respondents participated

_with people of another race.

Declining interaction outside

-of formal business and work

areas was evident where only

54.5 ‘per cent of respondents

would date someone of another
race. The persistence of resi-
dential segregation was also evi-
dent, in that only 58 per cent of
respondents lived in a residen-
tial area with persons of anoth-
er race and only 50 per cent of
persons living in an all white or
all black community would con-
sider living in a mixed residen-
tial area. In general terms, the
persistence of racism in the var-
ious communities was evident
where 64.6 per cent of respon-
dents agreed that there was
racism in their community and
62.2 per cent had experienced
personally some form of racism.

The opinionated questions
also verified the persistence of
racism in The Bahamas. As to
whether racism is a problem in
the Bahamas today, 42 per cent
strongly agreed, 36 per cent
agreed while on the other hand
only 14 per cent of respondents

‘disagreed and 8 per cent strong-

ly disagreed.
Perhaps more telling was the



289 Market St. South « PO. Box N-7984 e Nassau, Bahamas

“It’s a noble thing to give

question of racial harmony in
the community. Only 33. per
cent strongly agreed that there
was racial harmony in their
community. In general, the sur-
vey results suggest that interac-
tion between individuals of dif-
ferent races takes place but that
less formal, social or intimate
relations are still unacceptable
for most Bahamians surveyed.
In essence, while Bahamians
were willing to do business and
employ persons of another race,
dating, playing sports or other
recreational activities was less ©
appealing. Additionally, it was
evident from newspaper reports
dating back to 1977 and more
current headlines, that in the

- political arena the race card has

still not been flogged to death.

Even Ms Kelly herself in an —
article entitled “Brent Bar from
Leadership Race Could Brand
FNM as Racist,” cited by-S.
Wilson Bahama Journal, (April
7 2003), noted that because of .
his colour and political
antecedents, Brent Symonette
should abandon the idéa of
aspiring to the leadership of his
party. Kelly concluded that “it
would take another 50 years
before the black majority
accepts a white man whose fam-
ily was associated with white
minority rule in a leadership
position.” ©

In the final analysis, I would
like to point out to Ms. Kelly
the fact that race and class have
always been inextricably con-
nected in Bahamian society.
While it is true that in the post
independence period, overt and
explicit forms of racism ‘have
waned and there has been grad-
ual improvement for blacks in
the socio-economic arena, there
are still latent forms of racism
and residual antagonisms that
exist.

In essence, while class issues
may seem on the surface to be

more relevant than race, the _.

survey suggests underneath this
smooth veneer are racial issues
that remain unresolved." °

Of course.this analysis has
not even touched on the grow-
ing antagonism that now exists
between Bahamians and those
of Haitian heritage. It is only

’ through open and frank discus-

sion of the present realities that
exist that we as a nation can
move forward, upward, onward,
together.

CHRISTOPHER CURRY
History Lecturer .
The College of The Bahamas
Nassau - f

August 17 2005



thanks” \





political arena race is still a
major issue.

The survey represented a
stratified modified model in that
it targeted specific Family Island
and New Providence commu-
nities with varied racial compo-

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THE TRIBUNE

Foniwnt, nhuuvuet

19, CVYUy, why



By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas Human Society is helping to resurrect pro-
posed legislation for improved animal welfare and control in

the Bahamas.

“We want better laws to regulate pet shops, breeding and
boarding kennels and on the commercial use of horses, said
Kevin Degenhard executive director of the Bahamas Human

Society.

The Humane Society said it is pushing for this legislation as
a result of regular complaints about pet shops being over-
crowded and providing poor accommodation for animals.
Also, numerous complaints have been received abou stray

and nuisance animals.

Mr Degenhard said that part of the problem with dotitrole -
ling dogs in particular is that the current laws are no! ade-

quate.

He said that they do not put enough responsibilty: on dog
owners and in any case, are not often applied fully,
“What we want is a more robust law that is going to be

applied.” he said.

Mr Degenhard said that he is pleased with the Ministry of
Agriculture for showing its initiative in recognising the need
for improved animal control and for making owners more

responsible.

Speaking about the problem of stray dogs in the Bahamas,
Mr Degenhard said: “If anyone thinks that the problem will
be resolved by sending people out just to catch and kill the
dogs, that is a very naive view that is not going to resolve the

problem.”

He explained that the issue has to be approached i ina
“dynamic” manner and in conjunction with thorough new

education programmes.

BV REE Ea Ti

FRI., AUG. 19


























6:30 Bahamas @ Sunrise
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This Generation






LOCAL NEWS

Humane Society | OAS donates trade reference centres

seeks improved |
animal welfare

i By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Organisation of Ameri-
can States has donated two trade
reference centres to the Bahamas
to assist the public in receiving up
to date information on trade nego-
tiations, their benefits and oppor-
tunities

In a press release yesterday, the
OAS noted that one centre will
be situated in the main library of
the College of the Bahamas and
the other at the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce.

Each site will have a computer
containing the trade information
database, customised especially

for the Bahamas.

The OAS said in a statement
yesterday that the organisation
feels the gift will prove valuable to
the academic community, business
persons, entrepreneurs, indepen-
dent researchers and other inter-
ested members of civil society.

‘, Tool

It added that the centres will
serve as an important tool as the
Bahamas seeks to define its role in
international trade communities
such as Caricom and the FTAA.

The statement. went on to
explain that the idea of the

research centres arose at the
FTAA donor co-ordination meet-
ing held in Washington DC in
October, 2003 when representa-
tives from Caricom countries artic-
ulated their trade capacity building
needs. |

This included the desire for
countries to participate fully in
trade negotiations.

Among the needs identified
were access to relevant and up to
date trade information, and a

’ method of facilitating participa-

tion of civil society groups by dis-
seminating information on trade
negotiations.

Pamela Coke Hamilton, the co-
ordinator of the Caricom Seperate

Capacity Building Project, noted
that stemming from that the meet-
ing, it was decided to customise .
trade information databases for
each Caricom country. .

Agreements

These datebases, she said, will
include full texts of trade agree-
ments, bilateral investment

‘treaties, national legislation in

trade-related disciplines, trade and
tariff data and relevant articles
and studies.

The official presentation to
COB is scheduled for August 23,
2005.

Extension on duty exemptions in Grand Bahama

GOVERNMENT has announced that it will
grant another extension on the duty exemptions
granted in Grand Bahama after hurricanes Fran-

cis and Jeanne.

According to NEMA co-ordinator Canard
Bethel, exigency orders seven, eight, and nine,
which allowed for the duty-free importation of

they are late.

certain materials, expired March 31 2005, but

the government originally extended this time to

June 30.

“At this time quite a number of persons have
not yet brought in all of their items; some people
in fact have not brought in anything yet due toa
number of reasons, ie late insurance settlement,
late processing of loans, unavailability of sup-
plies in Florida and elsewhere, and so the public
is being given another chance,” Mr Bethel said.

He said any person who is continuing to bring
in merchandise, or-who is now bringing in mer-
chandise for the first time, “must get a letter to
the desk of the undersecretary in the office of the -
prime minister, (Mr Bethel, 4th floor of the gov-
ernment complex on the Mall), explaining why

Merchandise

“This letter must refer to all those approvals for
merchandise, other than vehicles; that was'done
as at the end. of March 31, 2005,” he said. _ |

Mr Bethel said that if a person got an approval
for a car, “if that approval was obtained before
the 31 December or on the 31 of December 2004,

then a letter explaining why the vehicle or vehi- .
cles were not brought in will be entertained.
“Again, if approval was not achieved as at the
end of December 31, 2004, then consideration for
late bring-in will not be given.
“T am asking the public to expedite those let-

ters to me by the close of work on Monday,
August 22, 2005, because government in Nas-

sau has agreed to give a 30-day extension, pro-
vided approval had been achieved, for vehicles

-- December 31, 2004, or for merchandise other

away.

than.vehicles, March 31, 2005.”

Mr Bethel said the public, “should not expect
another extension as there has been a long time
of this, and one would have thought that the
extra work involved with this would have gone

hosts senior citizens luncheon

Second event of the year

@.3y DUDLEY BYFIELD
Bahamas Information
. Services

FREEPORT - Continuing a

- programme of providing care

and cheer for seniors, the Min-
istry of Social Services and
Community Development host-
ed a luncheon for senior citi-
zens from West End at the
Bahamas Public Service Union
Hall in Freeport.

The luncheon, hosted in con-
junction with the Urban
Renewal Project, was the sec-
ond such event this year.

Patrice Johnson, community
affairs officer with the Ministry
of Social Services, described
Wednesday’ s activity as a senior

citizens’ field trip.

Ms Johnson said she aiid her
colleagues were mandated by
Social Services Minister
Melanie Griffin, “to implement
programmes in the community

. of Grand Bahama, and the lun-

cheon on Wednesday was just
one of the programmes, taking
senior citizens from their con-
stituency on a tour, and provid-
ing them with lunch, entertain-
ment and a commemorative gift
bag to take back home. Just giv-
ing them a fun-filled day,” she
explained.

“We are working along with

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Urban Renewal, and today it is
Urban Renewal for the West
Grand Bahama area - Eight
Mile Rock and West End.
“Last week we did one for
the High Rock sector. And it
really turned out.

Bags

“For the Western area we got
confirmation for 31 persons,
however only 25 of them par-
ticipated. The persons who are

unable to walk or to get on ‘or’

off the bus, we ate receiving
bags sent to them compliments
of Ministry of Social Services
and Community Development.”
What’s in the gift bags?

“All types of goodies,”. said

Store

Village Road

i vices:
- Bahamas. ! ’
For the West End field trip



Johnson. “We have .got

MB:

their own personal face cloth |

and bathing cloth; a back scrub;
the men have neck ties, hand-
kerchiefs, their own shoe pol-
ish kit, a bag of candy and a
men’s toiletry bag with cologne
inside. ~

“The women have a pill box,
handkerchiefs, bedroom slip-
pers, a fan and a fingernail clip-
per.”

Ms Johnson’s area of respon-
sibility covers the community

: development side-of social ser-
the: ‘Nor thern:

for .

and luncheon she was able to
work with Linda Moxey, the
ministry’s office manager in



(éls

Ph. 394-2378

West End, who supplied the
names of persons and the drop-
off and pickup points that facil-
itated a smooth operation.

“We did the same thing with
the East End area where we
also worked with Urban
Renewal. And it works, it
works,” declared Ms Johnson,
“because they have the hands-
on and they know who, what or
where. And that’s what makes it
easier for us out of the con-
stituency.”

Ms Johnson had high praise —

for Urban Renewal.

“Urban Renewal plays a real-
ly big part in Grand Bahama;
if people could only stop and

see what they are really doing,” a

aie said.

‘= MS JOHNSON said slic’

and her colleagues were man-
dated by Social Services Min-
ister Melanie Griffin (right)



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Bahamas looks on helplessly
as Haiti sinks into turmoil
Our country suffers directly from the tribulations of

Haiti - yet it seems there is nothing we can do as it
falls into chaos before the November elections.



AROUND 170,000 small
arms are being used by former
military personnel and criminal
gangs to commit grave human
rights abuses as Haiti prepares
for elections, Amnesty Interna-
tional says ina newly-released
report.

Amnesty has called on the
interim government and the UN
Stabilisation Mission in Haiti
(MINUSTAH) to implement
without delay a comprehensive
disarmament, demobilisation
and reintegration programme.

“Small arms are being used
by illegal armed groups and for-
mer military to kidnap, sexual-
ly abuse and kill Haitians with
absolute impunity. Without dis-
armament and effective justice
for the victims, Haiti will sink
further into crisis,” said the
human rights group.

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The report “Haiti: Disarma-
ment delayed, justice denied”,
shows how in several parts of
the country, where state author-
ity remains frail, armed groups
and individuals continue to ille-
gally control territory and pop-
ulation and commit criminal
acts without being challenged
by national authorities, includ-
ing the National police, or by
MINUSTAH officials.

Attempts to disarm illegal
armed groups have been insuf-
ficient, showing the Haitian

. authorities’ unwillingness to

implement an effective aisals
mament plan.

In March 2005, 325 former
military personnel symbolically
turned in seven weapons in
Cap-Haitien, marking their

return to civilian life. Since then,

no serious attempts have been
made to disarm the former mil-
itary and rebel groups.

The lack of political will from
the interim government to put
in place urgently needed
reforms of the National Hait-
ian Police (HNP) or to imple-
ment.a disarmament. pro-
gramme is hampering the

efforts of MINUSTAH to solve _

the crisis.

’“Lack of accountability of
HNP officers and widespread
impunity for human rights abus-
es by armed groups cannot lead
to durable peace in Haiti. The
interim government is failing in
its international and funda-
mental responsibilities to pro-

tect. Haitians and: theiymigst:

basic rights.”
Amid increased violence and
insecurity, MINUSTAH should



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Pam Palacious,
Terrol Cash, LJ Albury, Barry Pinder



take more decisive actions. to
fulfil its objectives of protect-
ing civilians, promoting human
rights and fighting impunity.

“Durable peace in Haiti will
never be achieved unless those
responsible for human rights
crimes are held to account and
the victims obtain redress.”

Amnesty International is call-
ing on the Haitian interim gov-
ernment to:

¢ Implement without delay a
comprehensive disarmament,
demobilisation and reintegra-
tion programme.

e Investigate all reports of
human rights violations and
bring those responsible to jus-
tice.

e Provide reparation for vic-
tims of human rights violations.

e Reform the judicial system

in accordance with internation
al human rights legislation and:

end illegal arrests and ‘long-term
detentions for those awaiting
trial.

In addition, Amnesty is call-

5006 PICK UP



ing on the UN Stabilisation Mis-
sion in Haiti to:

e Work together with the
interim government for the
establishment of a disarmament,
demobilisation and reintegra-
tion programme and the inves- °
tigation of human rights abuses.

e Issue frequent, public
reports on the human rights sit-
uation.

-e Vet police officers for
human rights abuses and train
all HNP personnel on human
rights standards and interna-
tional standards for law enforce-
ment officials.

Lastly, the organisation calls

on the governments of neigh-

bouring countries such as the
Dominican Republic, The
Bahamas and the United States
of America to: '

e Allow due process to deter-
mine the possibility that some
Haitian migrants are indeed
fleeing political persecution in
light of the current climate of
political instability in Haiti and
cease automatic repatriation
without claims of political asy-
lum being examined.

e Ensure that those migrants
detained and repatriated are
treated humanely and in accor-
dance with International Stan-
dards.

e For a full copy of the
report: “Haiti: Disarmament
delayed, Justice denied” and

‘AD’s recommendations to Haiti's:
“Interim government, MINUS-:

TAH and the integuational
community, please — see:
hittp://web.amnesty.orglibrary/in
dex/AMR360052005 |

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THE TRIBUNE

‘The Bahamas must
tackle crime now’

CRIME is the single
biggest threat to the Bahamas,
Chamber of Commerce crime
prevention committee chair-
man Branville McCartney
said yesterday.

He vowed to unite the
Bahamian business commu-
nity in the fight against crim-

_ inal activity.

“Perception becomes real-
ity. It may not be crime at all
but fear of crime that could
impact travel to the region
and thus to the Bahamas,”
said McCartney.

“The first thing people look
for when they travel is secu-
rity. We all have acertain lev-
el of security and comfort in
our own homes and in famil-
iar territory.
~ “But add fear of time to
the uncertainty associated
with traveling to a breign
country and you hve a
recipe for disaster. Nothing
could kill tourism — the
engine that drives this ewn-
omy — faster than foreitn-
fear-phobia. .

Mr McCartney admitted
that crime “will happen”, but
said if Bahamians are seen tc
act quickly, “we will be ahead
of the competition”.

The real issue, McCartney .

said, “is to focus attention on
it before the problem gets to
crisis level, to act now, rather
than react later.”
McCartney applauded the
Ministry of Tourism, the
Bahamas Hotel Association
and the Royal Bahamas

Police Force: for their joint

task force on tourist crime

and said some of the options

that committee is exploring



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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005, PAGE 7





Police search for pair
suspected of defrauding
_ businesses in Freeport

@ BY DENISE MAYCOCK
-- Fribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Grand Bahama
Police are searching for a young
man and woman who allegedly
defrauded a number of businesses in
the Freeport area.

Donavan Adderley and J’Shan-
tae Jones of No 1 Beachway Drive,
Freeport, are wanted by officers of
the Central Detective Unit for ques-
tioning.

Police are seeking the public’s
assistance in locating the pair. Any-
one with information about their

whereabouts is asked to contact,

police at 350-3098, 352-8224 or 911.

e An 18-year-old man was
released on $4,000 bail Tuesday
after pleading not guilty to drug pos-
session in Freeport Magistrate’s
Coutt..

Aaron Rolle, of 2A Cove House,
was charged before Magistrate
Helen Jones with possession dan-
gerous drugs with the intent to sup-

y.

It is alleged that on August 13,
Rolle was found in possession of
one ounce of marijuana at Port



Church games ahead

‘Ml By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE launch of the first ever
Church’ Games has been
announced with a view to unit-
ing religious denominations in
the Bahamas through sports.
~-At a press-conference yester-
day, permanent secretary in the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture Harrison Thompson
announced that the unique ven-
ture is being sponsored by his
ministry and.the Bahamas
Christian Council.

Present at the press confer-
ence. were several prominent
individuals from the sporting
and religious worlds, includ-
ing Bahamas Christian Coun-
cil president Dr William
Thompson and Anglican Suf-
fragan Bishop Gilbert Thomp-
son.

The Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture and the
“Bahamas Christian Council are
sponsoring the event

The games are set for Octo-
ber 11 to 21.:

Preceding. activities are to
include a “Battle of the Bands



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
-and share your story.

Share your news

Lucaya Marketplace.

HARRISON Thompson, permanent secretary at
the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture, centre,
speaks yesterday at a press conference announcing _
the Church Games. Pictured from left are Bahamas
Christian Council President Rev Dr William

-Thompson and Bishop Gilbert Thompson.

(BIS Photo: Tim Aylen)

and Choirs” on September 2
and a “Fun, Run, Walk and
Push” day on September 3.

At the games, eight religious:

denominations from around the
Bahamas will participate in pop-
ular sporting events such as
baseball, basketball, boxing,
cycling, soccer, track and field,

softball, swimming and volley . |

ball.

One of the goals of the games
is to allow churches to reach
outside and interact with the
communities in the surround-
ing areas.

To this end, the games will
consist of events involving both
church and community mem-
bers.

The organisers say the games
will also promote a healthy
sporting environment for all
families in the Bahamas.

Bishop Thompson called the -
games “very exciting” and an —

attempt to bring the Bahamian
people closer together as God’s
people.

“This is going to truly be an
exciting time for all of us and to
learn the spirit of true sports-
manship,” he said.












LOCAL NEWS

Simeon Brown represented Rolle,

‘who is expected to appeats for trial

March 29.
Charges

e Four men and a 16-year-old
male juvenile were arraigned on’
drug possession charges this week
at Marsh Harbour, Abaco.

Nassau residents Ricardo Roberts,
37, of Cowpen Road, Dencil Dames,
30, of Meadows Road, Phillip Smith,
26, of Centerville, a 16-year-old, and
19-year-old Justin Knowles of Marsh

INDEPENDENCE



“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers

Harbour appeared Monday before
Magistrate Crawford McKee.

It is. alleged that on August 13,
the accused:‘men were found in pos-
session of 27 small packets contain-
ing marijuana at the Regattas Hotel
at Marsh Harbour.

They all pleaded not guilty to pos-
session of dangerous drugs with
intent to supply.

The matter was adjourned to
October 20.

Dames was remanded into cus-
tody at Fox Hill Prison.

The other four men were released

‘ on $3,000 bail with two sureties.

NOTICE



4 | The Teachers and Salaried Workers Co-



Refreshments will be served.

BURNS HOUSE GROUP OF COMPANIES

NOTICE
TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC

OUR TELEPHONE NUMBERS HAVE CHANGED AS FOLLOWS:

Burns House Ltd.
Butler & Sands Co. Ltd.
Customer Service

Warehouse

397-1400 Head Office JFK
397-1400 Head Office JFK
397-1413 - 1417
397-1419 - 1424

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY INCONVENCIENCE CAUSED.

THANK YOU - MANAGEMENT
PAGE 8, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005

PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS.



Lifeline: Truth, Music, Life, featuring the
music of Aydee Rolle @ The Buzz on
Wednesday, August 17. Showtime at the
Buzz, located East Bay Street opposite the
marina, upstairs over the old Yahmaha
store, is 10pm; $7 before 9pm, $10 after.

Rendezvous, a two-day event dubbed the
biggest party of the year, featuring music
by DJs from Jamaica, the Bahamas and
New York. Day 1: Saturday, August 20 @
Club Waterloo. Bears open at 8:30pm.
Admission: $20.

Day 2: Sunday, Rogost 21 at Coco Loco's,
Sandyport. Doors open at 12pm. Admis-
sion: $10

Wild Jungle, each and every Wednesday
night @ Club Trappers, Nassau’s “upscale”
gentleman’s club. Featuring a female body
painting extravaganza. Free body painting
@ 8 pm. Ladies always welcome. Admis-
sion: Men free before 10 pm. Females free.
There will be free food and hors d'oeuvres
between 9 and 10 pm. Open until 4 am.

Ladies Night @ Fluid lounge, this and every

Thursday night. Doors open at 10pm.
Ladies free before 1am, $10 after. Guys:

$15 all night. Drink special: 3 @ $10 (Bacar-

di) Giveaways and door prizes every week.

Saturday Night Live every Saturday night
@ Club Fluid, Bay St. The biggest party of
‘the week, pumping all your favourite hits
all night long. Ladies in free before 11pm.
Strict security enforced.

spinning the best in Old Skool. Admission
$35, all inclusive food and drink.

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters
Sports Bar. Drink specials all night long,
including karaoke warm-up drink to get
you started. Party from 8pm-until.

Reggae Tuesdays @. Bahama Boom. Cover

charge includes a free Guinness and there
‘ should be lots of prizes and surprises.

Admission: Ladies $10 and Men $15.



Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters
Sports Bar every Wednesday 5pm-8pm.
Free appetizers and numerous drink SBE
cials.

The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday.
Doors open at 9pm, showtime 11.30pm.
Cover charge $15. $10 with flyer.



Fantasy Fridays @ Fluid Lounge, featuring
late ‘80s music in the VIP Lounge, Top of
the charts in the Main Lounge, neon lights

and Go Go dancers. Admission: Ladies free
before 11pm, $15 after; Guys $20 all night.

Dicky Mo’s @ Cable Beach. Happy Hour
every Friday - 3 for $10 mixed drinks and

$1 shots. Bahamian Night (Free admission)

every Saturday with live music from 8 pm

to midnight. Karaoke Sundays from 8pm to

midnight, $1 shots and dinner specials all
night long.

Twisted Boodah Lounge @.Cafe Segafredo,

‘Charlotte St kicks off Fridays at 6pm with
deep house to hard house music, featuring
CraigBOO, Unkle Funky and Sworl’wide
on the decks.

Chill Out Sundays @ Coco Loco, Sandy-
port, from 4pm-until, playing deep, funky .
chill moods with world beats.

Sweet Sunday Chill Out Soiree Lounge,
every Sunday, 4pm-midnight @ Patio
Grille, British Colonial Hotel.





Rave Saturdays @ Club Eclipse. DJ Scoobz



im S being called the biggest event of the —
year, and any serious partygoer can’t miss

tional party to feature the hottest Jamaican,
Bahamian and New York DJs.

The party will feature the best in soca,

Wet Sundays, every Sunday, noon-midnight

_ @ Crystal Cay Beach. Admission $10, ladies

free.

TooLooSe @ Indigo Restaurant on West
Bay St and Skyline Drive. Singer/song-
writer Steven Holden performs solo with
special guests on Thursday from 9pm - mid-

. night.

The Graham Holden Deal @ The Green
Parrot....David Graham, Steve. Holden, Tim.
Deal and Friends perform Sunday, 7pm -
10pm @ Hurricane Hole on Paradise Island.

Jay Mitchell and Hot KC @ Palm Court
Lounge, British Colonial Hilton, Nvednes:
day-Thursday 8pm-12am.

.Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley’s

Restaurant & Lounge, Eneas St off Poin-
ciana Drive. Featuring Frankie Victory at
the key board in the After Dark Room.
every. Sunday, 8.30pm to midnight. Fine

food and drinks.

Paul Hanna, Tabatha and Gernie, and the
Caribbean Express perform at Traveller’s
Rest, West Bay St, every Sunday, 6.30pm-
9.30pm.

THE ARTS

LOVE, an exhibition featuring Bahamian
artists Jason Bennett, John Cox, Blue Cur-
ry, Michael Edwards, Toby Lunn and
Heino Schmid at Popopstudios and Gallery.

The gallery is located on Dunmore Ave in -

Chippingham, 1/4 mile south of the
Bahamas Humane Society. Gallery hours:
M-F 4.30pm-7. supm.c or call 322-5850 for
appointment.’

Da Spot, a weekly comedy show, features .
skits and spoofs on Bahamian life, with
improv by a talented young cast. The show

is held Tuesdays @ The Dundas at 8pm.

Admission is $10, and tickets are sold at the

- ‘door.

‘This weekend, Hypermedia Entertainment _
: and Bacardi: bring, Rendezvous, an interna-





alypso, Lash Reggae and Reggaetor
among other musical styles.

co Loto! Ss, Snyper | Door

_Aomesion $10.



The National Collection @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, an exhibition that
takes the viewer on a journey through the
history of fine art in the Bahamas. It fea-
tures signature pieces from the national
collection, including recent acquisitions. by
Blue Curry, Antonius Roberts and Dionne
Benjamin-Smith. Call 328-5800 to book
tours. This exhibition closes February 28,
2006.

Past, Present and Personal: The Dawn
Davies Collection @.the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, Villa Doyle, West
and West Hill Streets. The exhibition is
part of the NAGB’s Collector’s Series. Call-
328-5800 to book tours. This exhibition
closes August 31, 2005..

The Awakening Landscape: The Nassau

. Watercolours of Gaspard Le Marchand

Tupper, from the collection of Orjan and
Amanda Lindroth @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas. The mid-nine-
teenth century paintings that make up the
exhibition are part of one of the earliest
suites of paintings of Nassau and its envi-
rons. Tupper was a British military officer
stationed at Fort Charlotte in the 1850s.
The works show a pre-modern Bahamas
through the decidely British medium of

. watercolour. Call 328-5800 to book tours.

This exhibition closes August 31, 2005.
HEALTH

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets
at 5.30pm on the second Tuesday of each
month at their Headquarters at East Ter-
race, Centreville. call 323-4482 for more
info. —

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the
third Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors
Hospital conference room.

The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets
every third Saturday, 2.30pm (except
August and December) @ the Nursing
School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street.







THE TRIBUNE —



Doctors Hospital, the official training cen-
tre of the American Heart Association
offers CPR classes certified by the AHA.
The course defines the warning signs of res-
piratory arrest and gives prevention strate-
gies to avoid sudden death syndrome and
the most common serious injuries and
choking that can occur in adults, infants
and children. CPR and First Aid classes are
offered every third Saturday of the month
from 9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital
Community Training Representative at

' 302-4732 for more information and learn to

save a life today.

REACH - Resources & Education for
Autism and related Challenges meets from
7pm — 9pm the second Thursday of each
month in the cafeteria of the BEC building,

Blue Hill Road.



CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday,
7.30pm: @ C C Sweeting Senior School's -
Dining Room, College Avenue off Moss
Road. Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @
Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm
A19, Jean St. Club 3956 meets Thursday,
7.30pm @ British Colonial Hilton. Club
1600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm @ Super-
Clubs Breezes. Club 7178 meets Tuesday,
6pm @ The J Whitney Pinder Building,
Collins Ave.

Club 2437 meets every second, fourth and
fifth Wednesday at the J Whitney Pinder
Building, Collins Ave at 6pm. Club 612315
meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau
Resort, Cable Beach. Club 753494 meets
every Wednesday, 6pm-8pm in the
Solomon’s Building, East-West Highway.
Club Cousteau 7343 meets every Tuesday
night at 7.30 in the Chickcharney Hotel,
Fresh Creek, Central Andros. All are wel-
come.

' Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi

Omega chapter meets every second Tues-
day, 6.30pm @ the Eleuthera Room in the

‘ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every
first Tuesday, 7pm @ Gaylord’s Restaurant,
Dowdeswell St. Please call 502-4842/377-
4589 for more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every
second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ Atlantic House,
IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room.

The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Coun-
cil (NPHC) meets every third Monday of
the month in the Board Room of the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus
meets the second and fourth Wednesday of
the month, 8pm @ St Augustine’s Mones-
tary.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every sec-
ond Friday of each month, 7.30pm at -
Emmaus Centre at St Augustine’s Mones-
tary. For more info call 325-1947 after 4pm.

International Association of Administra-
tive Professionals, Bahamas Chapter meets
the third Thursday of every month @

_ Superclubs Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.
AMISTAD, a Spanish club meets the third

Friday of the month at COB’s Tourism
Training Centre at 7pm in Room 144 dur- |
ing the academic year. The group promotes

‘the Spanish language and culture in the

community.

Send all your civic and social events to The
Tribune via fax: 328-2398 or e-mail:
outthere@tribunemedia.net

WINES & SPIRITS


FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005, PAGE 9

THE TRIBUNE

ole Ve AS



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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005 | . THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

HE VALLEY OF
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The Tribune

. 1 Material

~,

ome * ‘Syndicated Content .

Available from‘ Commercial News Providers”

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‘marTyes theeerhe ss

7

2

WHOHLES


- Police ‘raided’ a
Rasta tabernacle

SY

(HE |RIDUNE

rmivAT, AUQUD)

PDs OUUY, bse



LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one

knives are not allowed on the
premises as the sign at the guard
house:states. We told them that
money, jewellery and other per-
sonal effects must be left at the
guard house because you can’t
bring them into the tabernacle.
But they walked through the
wrong way, stopping and trying
to talk to people during the
prayers, and they leaned up on
the altar in a disrespectful man-
ner even though they were ask-
ing what our faith is really all
about. They should have found
out a better way than that.”

One of the mothers in the
church, known as an
“Empress", asked: “Are they
allowed to bring guns in their
church?”

Mr Gibson said he was under
the tent enjoying a breakfast of
fevergrass tea, chocolate chip
bread and veggie fritters with
about 30 other people when an
officer put handcuffs on him.

When.asked why he was
arrested, he replied: “I don’t
know. They put the warrant in
my hand and said, ‘Read it’.
The warrant said ‘Rasta Camp’.
I know of a few Rasta camps in
Nassau. This is not a camp. This
is the church — the Ethiopia
Africa Black International Con-
gress (EABIC) True Church of
Divine Salvation. We have
branches all over the world on

Police search for man
missing for 22 years

FROM page one |

may. have happened to Mr
Weaver.

“We .are conducting..an,
inquiry into the matter. Mrs_
Weaver shared some informa-

tion ‘with us and we are con-
ducting an investigation as we
speak,” he said.

every continent with thousands
of members worldwide.”

Search.

He said that after the officers
searched some of the homes,
the leading officer said: “Let’s
go, there’s nothing here.” With
that, the officers left without an
apology, said Mr Gibson. They
detained him until after they,
and their German Shepherd
from the canine unit, left with-
out finding anything, he said.
He was particularly concerned
because a summer youth camp
is in progress, and as one of the
moderators, it was humiliating
for him to be arrested, with the
children looking on.

The officers left to the sounds
of dozens of children singing
“songs of freedom and redemp-
tion", he said.

“We call upon the Governor
General to send a representa-
tive here to'get a full under-
standing of what we are all
about. We had a delegation vis-
it her last year, headed by Priest
Michael Ferguson, to inform
her of our aims and objectives,”
said Mr Gibson. |

“We call upon the Bahamas
government to put a stop to the
flimsy excuses from the police
to harass the Rastaman saying
they-:are searching for guns and
drugs. And we call upon all

Mrs Weaver believed that her
husband disappeared in the
Bahamas the day before their
first wedding anniversary in

_4983, and, had been caught up
‘in Opération Airlift, an FBI ..
drug-smuggling ‘investigation ”:

gone haywire.
According to the Miami
New Times, Mrs Weaver had



US to review

deadline for

- passport
regulations

FROM page one

Caribbean Hotel Association
(CHA) by the World Travel
and Tourism Council (WTTC)
further predicted that the 2006
implementation of the passport
requirements could cost the
Bahamas’ tourism industry $446
million in earnings and 13,134 in
jobs: é

That study found that in all,
the policy could risk some $2.6
billion in visitor export earnings
and 188,000 tourism jobs.

Mr Wilchcombe, however,
yesterday said with a later dead-
line:he believes the Bahamas’

1

tourism industry “is going to be
fine.”

The withdrawal of the 2006 .

deadline, also came as a wel-
come development to Frank
Comito, executive vice-presi-
dent of the Bahamas Hotel
Association (BHA).

“This is a very welcome
extension. It will give us and the
travellers more time to prepare
for the new requirements,” he
said.

‘Until the new passport policy
goes into effect, Americans only

‘need birth certificates or dri-

ver's licences for travel to and
from the Bahamas.



Answers on leak

‘by the weekend’

FROM page one

service station called the Water
and Sewerage Corporation
(WSC) because they feared
their sewerage lines were
blocked.

Mr Pinder said that while
WSC was investigating that

problem, they discovered a “_

strong odour of petroleum.”

It-was then that the Depart-
ment of Environmental Health
(DEH) was called to investi-
gate.

Now that the findings are in,
DEH plans to convene a spe-
cial'meeting of all the major
stakeholders, including the
petroleum association, the util-
ities: companies, Ministry of

Works and the Department of

Environmental Health.

The results should be of inter-
est to the Shell Service Station
which told The Tribune shortly
after the incident that they had
checked their equipment and
were confident that none of
their product had leaked or that
any of their equipment was
faulty. !

Manager Vania Musgrove
told The Tribune that the entire
area needed to be tested as it is
a highly contaminated area, in
that the surface ground water
has the residue of Potter’s Cay,
the container docks in addition
to Shell and Texaco Service Sta-
tions. There is also a leaky sew-
erage system in the area.



‘rife with not only smugglers but

members of the public to visit
our Sabbath school every Sat-
urday. There is only right and
wrong in the world. This church
stands for equality and justice
for all people of all walks of
life.”
The church was founded on
March 1, 1956 by Priest



.Emmanuel Charles Edwards,

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

and has its international head-
quarters at Ten Miles, Bull Bay,
Jamaica.

. The Nassau celebrations in
honour of Marcus Garvey was
featured in Wednesday’s Tri-
bune. Last month, the birth of
Emperor Haile Selassie was
honoured with similar celebra-
tions.

A press release from the
EABIC stated:

“As for the Bahamas govern-
ment, the EABIC has lobbied
for freedom, redemption and
international repatriation tire-
lessly, demanding equal rights
and justice. We want human
rights issues, like the. funda- ©
mental rights of the individual,
religious tolerance, an end to
discrimination against the
Rastafari faith, an end to Chris-
tian dogma in the media, an end
to discrimination of Rastafari
children in public and private
schools, an end to cutting Rasta-
fari brethren’s locks in and out-
side of prison, and an end to
discrimination against Rastafari
man, woman and child.”

your
news

tried to initiate an investiga-
tion in the Bahamas back in
the early 1980s, but couldn’t
get anywhere because “she
feared she might never come
home”. ost ee

" “At the-time, the islands were

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are

making news in their... 4.

| neighbourhoods, <->

Call us on 322-1986 and

also corrupt officials,” the story _] share your story.

read.






Commontwealth Funeral Home
ef Independence Drive * Phone: 341-4055 SS
FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

EDNA STUART
BONIMY, 75

affectionately called
"Ma" :









of Dumfries, Cat Island, will
be held on Saturday 10:00
am at Golden Gates
Assembly Ministries,
Carmichael Road. Bishop
Ross Davis assisted by Rev
Troy Ambrose will officiate and
1 interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road:






Cherished memories are held by one daughter, Lescine
Rose Moxey; two sons, Senior Immigration Officer Elverton
Bonimy and Police Sargent Theophilus Bonimy of the -
Royal Bahamas Police; five step children, Wilbert, Anama,
Joycelyn, Prescola and Melony Bonimy; 16 grandchildren,
Constable 3244 Tavares Moxey of the Royal Bahamas
Police Force, Parashio Moxey, Yassen Marshall, Leticia,
Renaldo, Anton, Thea and D'Andre Bonimy, Sheneka -
Evans, Lashanta Beneby, Latisha Davis, Lakeina,
Theophilus Jr, Crisca, Tia and Terell Bonimy; three great
grandchildren, Shardonnay Beneby, Tamila Moxey and
Shyeye Davis Jr; two sisters, Janet Poitier and Sylvia
Turnquest; nieces and nephews inlcude, Rev Alfred
Stubbs, Marion Thompson, Ernestine Haven, Miriam,
Terry, Monique, Kelly, Shantel Abraham, Mario, Arlington
King, Henry and Nehemiah Stubbs of Carol City, Florida,
Frene Storr, Daisy Curry, Delores Farrington, Cartel Stubbs
and Wendell King; one uncle, Alfred Gaitor; two daughters-
in-law, Minister Christine Bonimy and Maryann Bonimy;
three sisters-in-law, Manerve Thompson, Bula Bonimy
and Laura Miller; two grandsons-in-law, Rashad Beneby
and Shyeye Davis Sr; other relatives and friends including,
Sherry Evans, Douglas Marshall, Arlington King and family,
Nehmiah Stubbs of Carol City, Florida, Henry Stubbs,
Daisy Curry and family, Irene Storr, Delores Farrington,
Wendell King, Eulamae Hepburn, Reuben Stubbs,
Harcourt and Laurine Ambrose, Fritz Stubbs, Eva Larimore,
the King family, the Gaitor family, the Stubbs family and
entire community of Dumfries, Cat Island.





























Relatives and friends may view the remains at THE
CHAPEL OF MEMORIES INDEPENDENCE DRIVE on
Friday from 1:00 to 7:00 pm and at the church on Saturday
from 9:00 am to service time.




Butler's Funeral Homes
& Crematoriom

Tel: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Mr. Erskine
McDale Carroll,
Vo

of Deadman’s Cay, Long
Island will be held on
Saturday, August 20th, 2005
at 2:00 p.m. at St.
| Athanasius Anglican
7 Church, Lower Deadman’s
H Cay, Long Island. Officiating
- will be Rev’d Fr. Earnest
Pratt. Interment will follow in the Deadman’s Cay Burial
Society Cemetery, Lower Deadman’s Cay, Long Island.

Loving memories will forever live on in the hearts of his
dearly beloved and faithful Wife: Mavis; his children;
Stephanie and her daughters Nikia and Ravyn; Paulette
and Brian and their children Stephan, Kryston, Justyn
and Brendan; Tony and his daughter Nathalie and his
wife Lynn; Basil, Gregory and his children Greg Jr. and
Kayla and wife Paula; Cecelia and Ernest Jr. and their
daughters Ernelia, Vashti and Cecily; Cliff and Charmaine
and their daughter Casi; Astrid “Joan” and Mark and
their daughters Sasha and Rae-Dawn; Charlene and
Andy and their son Drew; his precious ‘baby girl’ Sancha
and Livingstone and their children Aria and Cory; One

_ (1) Great-grandchild; Ethan; One (1) Sister; Ena Adderley;
Two (2) Brothers-in-law; William Cartwright and Kirtland
McCardy; Three (3) Sisters-in-law; Sybil McCardy, Brenda
Cartwright and Annette Cartwright; Four (4) Uncles;
Kirtland, Gerald, Raleigh and Richard McCardy Two (2)-}
Aunts; Olive Burrows.and Dora Turnquest; Numerous
Nephews, Nieces and Cousins including; Yorick, Algie,
Whalen, Tony, Craig and Marvin McCardy, Garvin and
Leandro Simmons, Endel Adderley, Andre, Carlo and
David Cartwright, Predensia Moore, Gladys, Myrna,
Vangie, Yvette, Helena, Claudette, Janet, Lesa, Dianne,
Rita, Christina and Barbara; Special friends including;
Carl, Effie and Clyde Cartwright, Joanne Wright, Wendell |.
Cartwright, Richard and Beryl Cartwright, Percy and |
Millie Taylor, Arimina Carroll, Iris Farquharson, Ruth
Watkins, Maurice Cartwright, Joseph and Virgie Carroll,
‘Basil Fox, Erma Adderley, Val Carroll, Fr. Earnest Pratt,
St. Paul’s Parish family and the entire community of Long
Island. :

Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers’ Funeral
' Homes and Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets on
Thursday from 12:00noon until 5:00 p.m. and on Friday}
‘from10:00 a.m. until 2:30 p.m. and,from,6:00.p.m. until
service ‘time at the Church in Long Island.






ethel Brothers Morticians
Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.0.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

. GORMAN:
BERRISFORD
BAKER, 73

of #43 Davis Street, Oakes
Field, will be held on Saturday
at 11am at St, Joseph's
Catholic Church, Boyd Road.
Fr. Martin Gomes will officiate.
Interment will be:made in the
Western Cemetery, Nassau
Street.



Ke RG
As “)
|
i
ae









Gorman's survivors include his loving wife, lronaca
Morris-Baker; children, Christine Baker, Teresita Stuart,
Michael, Bernard and Sherrine, Silvan and Linda, Dwight
Sr., Jeffrey and Pearline, Andrew and Sherry, Sharon
and Allison; one sister, Florine Baker of New York; one
brother, Cyril George E. Baker; sisters-in-law including
their families, Mrs. Marjorie Baker, Dr Ilonka Roker,
Mrs. Reorien Rolle, Mrs. Venus Ryan; grandchildren
including, Kristen, Tameko, Lynn, Brenelle, Brianne,
Ryan, E’Layna, Dwight Jr., D’Nae Ashlee, Jeffnae,
Jessica, Jorja; nieces and nephews, Herbert Jr., Sylvia,
Sabrina, Stephen, Gregory, Norman, Denise, Theresa,
Kim, Cyril, Norman uJr., Jamaal; Jerome Smith, Rashida,
Mohammed, Hannifah, Amante, Jonathan David
Williams; numerous relatives and friends includes, Mr.
Davy Rolle, Commodore of the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force and Mrs Rolle and family, Mrs. Omenia Adderley
and family, Dorothy and George Huyler and family,
Telcine and Leslie Albury and family, Maxine Archer
and family, Brenda Ferguson and family, Franklyn and
Sharon Wilson and family, Mr and Mrs David Rahming
and family, the Godet family, the Bowleg family, the
family of late Katrina Thurston and family, Reginald
Poitier and family, Mr Frank and Christine Smith and
family, Mr and Mrs John Duncombe and family, Ms.
Majorie Davis of Florida, Edris and Lee Sparrow of New
York, Terry Duncombe and Jimmy of New Jersey, Mr
and Mrs William Stuart of Miami, Dr. Mary L. Thompson
of Miami, Mrs. Florine Cooper of Miami, the Rodrigues
family of Nassau and Canada, Mr Cornerlius Cooper,
Sister Annie Thompson and the Benedictine Sisters of
St. Martin Monastery, Father Martin Gomes sscc. and
the Parish family of St. Joseph, the Men’s Ministry of
St. Joseph, St. Joseph Senior Choir, Officers and
Members of the Pilot Club of Nassau. ,








































Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers

Morticians #44 Nassau Street on Friday from 10am to

6pm and on Saturday from 10am until service time at
the church.





A MEMORIAL SERVICE will be held on Thursday
7pm at St. Joseph's Catholic Church, Boyd Road.


PAGE 12, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005 THE TRIBUNE



NA



a APPEAL Court Justice Emmanuel Osadebay presents Goveinor General Dame Ivy
Dumont with a copy of his book Labour Law in the Bahamas on Wednesday August 17 at
Soveenen House. It is the second book published ty Justice Osadebay. ,

(BIS Photo: Tim A ylen)



i RECIPIENTS of the scholarships and family representatives, wth'(front row) deputy permanent
secretary and head of the technical assistance and corporation unit at the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs Roselyn Horton; hhonorary vice-consul to the Bahamas for Mexico, Barbara Fox; Minister
of Foreign Affairs and the Public Service Fred Mitchell; and Peepent secretary at the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs Dr Patricia Rodgers.

(BIS photo: Eric Rose)

Scholarships to
Mexico awarded

THE Ministry of Foreign
Affairs, in conjunction with the





from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
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the Bahamas”, has announced
the awarding of seven scholar-
ships in areas such as interna-
tional relations, Spanish and
computer science and technol-
ogy. :

Sherry Johnson, Glenn
McPhee, Bianca Brown,
Kimiko Knowles and Channell
Josey will pursue bachelor’s
degrees in international rela-
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Telia Shearer will pursue a
diploma programme in Span-
ish and Renaldo Smith will pur-
sue a bachelor’s degree in com-
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Dr Davidson Hepburn has
been presented with a 50-year
commemorative pin by the
head of Omega Psi Phi Frater-
nity worldwide, Grand Basileus
Brother George Grace.

Brother Hepburn became a
member of Omega Psi Phi in
1955 and Pi Xi Chapter is
proud of the service that he
has given to the Bahamian

community through many of
the subsequent years, as a for-

mér Ambassador: of the -

Bahamas to the United
Nations and currently, as the
Chairman of the Bahamas
National Commission for
UNESCO, a member of the
Executive Board of UNESCO,
and as the Honourary Consul
to Indonesia.



i GRAND Basileus: :
Grace pinning Brother
Hepburn as Brother |.
Devyon Jones, E
Basileus of New
Providence’s Pi Xi
Chapter looks on.



Dr Hepburn also serves as
chairman of the Governor
General’s Youth Award pro-
gramme in the Bahamas and
is also a recipient of the Legion

of Honour designation, award-
ed by the French government
for Outstanding service ‘to
France, regardless of the social
status or the nationality of
recipients.
SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net



FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005



American Eagle

market share

@ By YOLANDA .
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter

AMERICAN Eagle has lost

10 per cent of its market share .

for the Nassau/Paradise Island
destination over a four-year
period between 2000 and 2004,
Statistics showed yesterday,
although the carrier still remains
the leader for inbound passen-
gers on scheduled airlines.

The Ministry of Tourism's Air
Carrier Performance Report for
2004 said American Eagle’s lost
market share was the result of

other scheduled airlines increas-

ing their occupied seats, with
US Airways almost doubling the
number of passengers brought
into Nassau/Paradise Island
during the same period.

. The report said: “The entry of
other scheduled airlines into the

market has made it difficult for
American Eagle to regain its
former market share. In 2000,
American Eagle had a market
share of 36 per cent, compared
to 32 per cent in 2001, 28 per
cent in 2002, 28 per cent in 2003
and 26 per cent in 2004.

“In 2000, US Airways had
only a 9 per cent of the market
into Nassau, compared to 13 per
cent in 2001, 16 per cent in 2002,
17 per cent in 2003 and 18 per
cent in 2004.”

- Despite the steady surge to
capture a greater percentage of
the Nassau/Paradise Island mar-
ket by US Airways and other
airlines, American Eagle was
still able to hold on to the lion's
share among scheduled airlines
coming into the destination.

In 2004, US Airways came in
second with a market share of
17.6 per cent and total number

of occupied seats of 191,712.
Bahamasair landed in third
position, with the national flag
carrier improving its market
share to 17.4 per cent and
189,700 occupied seats in 2004.
In 2003, Bahamasair hada
market share of 16.5 per cent
and experienced total occupied
seats of 171,176 coming into
Nassau.
Rounding out the top five,
Delta Airlines had 15 per cent
and Continental Connection
had 9 per cent of the market
share of inbound passengers on

. scheduled airlines into:the Nas-

sau/Paradise Island destination.

For the period, the majority-
of inbound passenger traffic
into the Nassau/Paradise Island
destination, 95 per cent, came
by scheduled airlines. The
remaining five per cent arrived
via charter airline.



Living standards under
threat if productivity not
‘deeply entrenched’ —

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Bahamians could lose their
relatively high standard of living
if the workforce fails to adopt
“a more deeply entrenched cul-
ture of productivity”, the strat-

egy paper for establishing a _

Bahamian National Productivi-
ty Centre has warned. .

The paper, produced by the
International Labour Organi-
sation (ILO) as part of its Pro-
gramme for Management-
Labour Co-Operation (PRO-
MALCO) project, said there
was a “growing awareness at

the ground level of the impli-
cations of reduced competitive-
ness” in the Bahamas, sparked
by the aftermath of the Sep-
tember 11 terror attacks and

.2004 hurricanes.

The ILO strategy paper said
there was “an anxiety” among
working Bahamians about the
implications of free trade for
this nation’s economy, plus the
impact of signing on to agree-
ments such as the. Free Trade
Area of the Americas (FTAA).

The paper said: “There is evi-
dence that the general Bahami- .
an citizenry is gradually begin-
ning to appreciate the concept



Foreign reserves continue
‘record accumulation’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas’ foreign
exchange reserves continued
their “record accumulation” to
reach $769 million at the end
of June 2005, a Wall Street
credit rating agency has report-
ed, indicating that this and oth-
er developments are likely to

favourably influence its forth-
coming sovereign credit rating
of this nation.

In its latest credit opinion on
the Bahamas, released this
month, Moody’s said: “The
Bahamian economy continued
to strengthen in the first half
of 2005, with foreign direct

SEE page 3B



Storms cause 23% seat fall
on flights to Grand Bahama

@ By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter

FOLLOWING the devasta-
tion of Hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne and the loss of substan-
tial tourism inventory, Grand

Bahama experienced a 23 per

cent decline in the total num-

ber of available seats on

inbound flights in 2004.
American Eagle, AirTran



Airways, Continental Connec-
tion and US Airways all
decreased the number of flights
offered. By comparison, in 2003
Grand Bahama saw the num-
ber of available seats for sched-
uled airlines decline by 1 per
cent, dropping to 4,690.

In 2004, however, charter air-
lines also experienced a sub-
stantial decline, seeing 58 per

SEE page 6B

a Gresuxaelnceseue






IN the lead article in Tri-
bune Business on August 18,
2005, entitled Colina defends
auditor report on Bond Fund,
the fourth paragraph included
a typographical error that stat-
ed the fund made “total loss-
es” in the year-ended Decem-
ber 31, 2004, of $2.69 million.

This is not correct. The
word “losses” should have
been “loans”, and the fourth



paragraph should have read:
“Total loans amounted to
$2.69 million, which represents
55 per cent of total assets and
exceed asset allocation limits.”

The Tribune apologises for
the error and any distress this
may have caused. As the arti-
cle pointed out in later para-
graphs, the Colina Bond Fund
did produce a profit for
investors in fiscal 2004.













of total factor productivity,
though there may not be a full
understanding of it.
“Productivity and its impor-
tance must be brought from
being just a nebulous concept
to the man in the street, to eas-
ily understandable concepts that
are experienced in the daily
lives of the Bahamian citizen...
“There is a sentiment among
Bahamians that they do enjoy a
relatively high standard of liv-
ing, but that this could be easily
lost unless its comparative nat-
ural advantages are matched

SEE page 2B

-Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street
| Eag Ora Caterer

ON ERS on Nassau-bound
flights rise by 5%






FAMILY _
GUARDIAN

Insurance & Investments
to Build a Better Life
Telephone 242-393-1023

@ BAHAMASAIR has inc reased its number of available seats into Nassau

@ By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter

TOTAL occupied seats'on airline flights
into Nassau increased by 5 per cent in 2004
compared to the year-before, a Ministry of
Tourism report has revealed, an improve-
ment caused because most carriers had load
factors above their 2003 levels.

The report showed Nassau/Paradise Island
experienced. an increase in the total number
of available airline seats by 1 per cent, or
8,413 seats, during 2004, due largely to Jet
Blue and Song, a subsidiary of Delta Air-

j lines, beginning service to the destination.

The increase in available seats in-2004 was

also due to the fact that other airlines, includ-
fm ing Bahamasair, Continental Airlines, at 39

per cent, and US Airways, at 17 per cent, all
increased the number of available seats into
the Nassau/Paradise Island destination.

Air Jamaica increased its number of avail-

able seats by 54 per cent, though it reduced

the actual number of flights into Nassau. The
difference is attributed to the use of larger
planes. ;

The increase in the total number of avail-

able seats was seen despite the fact that some.
of the other major carriers, such as American
Eagle, reduced the number of available seats
into the destination.

Meanwhile, Air Canada, American Eagle,

§ Bahamasair, Comair, Continental Airlines,

Continental Connection, Cubana Airlines

.and Delta Airlinesall operated with load fac-

tors that were higher than levels achieved in
2003. \

For the Nassau/Paradise Island destina-
tion, Air Canada, Jet Blue Airlines, Comair,
Continental Airlines and US Airways oper-

_ated with the highest load factors of the

scheduled. airlines flying into Nassau from
international gateways in 2004.

Bahamasair experienced some of its high-
est load factors for the year during July, at 67
per cent; August, at 83 per cent; and Decem-
ber at 72 per cent.

The report further said that July and
August enjoyed the highest traffic for sched-
uled airlines to the Nassau/Paradise Island
destination, largely as as a result of Bahami-
ans travelling abroad for shopping and vaca-
tion. For the period, August had the highest
flow of inbound traffic and September the
lowest. ae

March, April and December were also very |
high traffic months for the scheduled carriers,
the former two boasting high traffic due to
spring breakers. a

Looking at the charter airline segment,
March saw the highest flow of inbound pas-
sengers for charter. airlines flying into the
Nassau/Paradise Island destination, at 7,764
passengers. April had 7,348 passengers, and

SEE page 4B



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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005

THE TRIBUNE::



BUSINESS

Why businesses cannot |

afford delayed decisions

DECISION making is a fun-
damental part of modern life.
The economic, social and tech-
nological changes that have tak-
en place in recent generations
mean we are faced with many
more decisions than our forefa-
thers. We have to make a myri-
ad number of decisions about
our finances, our relationships,
education and health on a con-
stant basis. It gets even more
complicated when we take deci-
sion making into the business
sector, where we have to make
constant decisions about scarce
resources such as money, staff,
accommodation and materials.

If you are having trouble mak-
ing decisions now, then self-
employment or business owner-
ship is unlikely to be the thing
for you. The business environ-
ment can move at a very quick
pace. Often there is not enough
time to plan or think. There can
be many things to decide on, and
often not enough information
on which to base your decision.

The good news, however, is
that decision-making is a muscle
that can be trained through use.
Decision-making techniques
can also be learned to help you
make better decisions, and I will

‘describe some of these in this

Legal Notice

NOTICE

J N HOOD ASSOCIATES
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 1376 (6) of the
International Business Companies Act, 2000 (No. 45 of 2000) JN HOOD
ASSOCIATES (BAHAMAS) LIMITED is in Dissolution. The date of
commencement of dissolution was the 17th day of August, 2005 ANITA
BAIN of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of JN HOOD ASSOCIATES
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED.

Anita Bain
Liquidator



Legal Notice

NOTICE

CASTALIA PARTNERS
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 1376 (6) of the
International Business Companies Act, 2000 (No. 45 of 2000) CASTALIA
PARTNERS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED is in Dissolution. The date of
commencement of dissolution was the 17th day of August, 2005 ANITA
BAIN of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of CASTALIA PARTNERS
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED.

Anita Bain
Liquidator

column.
So, why.do some people find
it difficult to make decisions?
1. It may have something. to

. do with having a low risk profile

and a fear of making mistakes.
So, more time is spent planning
and getting one’s ducks in line,
instead of taking action and
making decisions.

2. Procrastination, a deadly
sin of antipreneurship, will also
stop you from taking action.
There are several ways of over-
coming procrastination. Focus
on the areas that will take you to
your goals fastest.-Also, try and
do the hardest things first thing
in the morning, and this will set
you up and lighten your day.

3. The sheer size of the prob-
lem to be solved could stop you
from making a-decision. Just in
the same way that you can’t eat
an elephant in one bite, you
must chunk down your prob-













Palmer



lem into little bits and start
working on the little bits. Soon,
the elephant will have whittled
down to size.

Decision making is a key skill
in business whether -yourare self-
employed or business owner.
Do something now that is going
to take you in your chosen
direction. In these fast times of
snap opportunities, the ability
to constantly make decisions
keeps you in the game. Non-
action, or procrastination, will
cause you to lose control, let
your competitors get ahead of
you, and will ultimately take
you nowhere.

When you make your deci-
sion, you must live with it. Make
your bed and sleep in it for a
while. If it turns out it wasn’t
the right decision, learn why
and take quick action to make a
better one. ‘

BOARS, TEE RNR

REAL ESTATE SALES
REPRESENTATIVE

The Abaco Club on Winding Bay, a spectacular 520 acre
International Members Golf & Sporting Estate on Abaco,
is seeking a senior-level REAL ESTATE SALES
REPRESENTATIVE. Candidates must have a minimum
of 5 years experience in luxury market sales. Real Estate
license is preferred. Successful candidate must have
exceptional communication skills, both verbal and written.
Must be personable, professional and willing to commute
or relocate to Abaco. The Abaco Club’s estate lots range
from $875,000 to more then $4 million. Please email cover |
letter and resume to info@theabacoclub.com or fax to 242-
367-2930, Attn: Sales & Marketing.



Let’s now take a look at the
various types of decision-mak-
ing tools that youcan use. .

1. A simple technique that
will aid your decision making is
the Pareto Principle: Pareto said
something to the effect that.20
per cent of our actions will gen-
erate 80 per cent of the results.
List the problems and then rank
them to see which are the most
significant, and then solve the
one with the biggest score. This
will bring you the biggest result
for least effort.

' 2. Another simple tool is cost
benefit analysis, where you
weigh up the costs and benefits

_of implementing a decision and

calculate how quickly you will
get your payback. While it is
quite a simple and effective
method to use, it can get more
complex when you try to put a
value on subjective factors.

3. A favourite tool that is par-
ticularly useful when making a
decision between two courses
of action is Edward.De Bono’s
‘6 Thinking Hats’. It works by
everyone at the same time
putting on different hats to look
at a problem. We all put on a
white hat to look at the facts.
We all put on a yellow hat to
identify all the positive elements
of the course of action. We all

put on a black hat to identify .

all the downsides. We all put
on a red hat to look at a prob-
lem from a pure ‘gut feeling’
emotional perspective. We all
put on a green hat to come up
with creative brainstorming
solutions. The blue hat is worn
by the chair, who decides in
what order we wear the hats. It
is a great system in that it allows
emotional free wheeling, and
harnesses collaborative think-
ing within groups to eliminate
normal confrontational-think-
ing styles.

There are, of course, other
methods of decision making that

cati be learned. Chéck thé‘ Inter!"

net. Choose’ one ‘and ‘usé

Remember, decision-making is a °

muscle that must be trained or it
will go slack. If you are to avoid
antipreneurship, make sure you
spend time practicing and
upgrading your skills in this area.

NB: Adapted from his
upcoming book, Antipreneur-
ship And How To Avoid It,
Mark. draws on 20 years of top
level business, marketing and
communications experience in
London and the Bahamas. He

consults and lives in Eleuthera

with his wife and family, and
can. be contacted’ at
mapalmer@coralwave.com

© Mark Palmer. All rights

reserved





Living
standards
threat

FROM page one

and surpassed by a more-
deeply entrenched culture.
of productivity within its
human resources, its peo-

_ pile.”

Describing the Bahamas
and wider Caribbean as.
“poised at a critical junc-
ture” in their national devel-
opment, with productivity
needing “greater attention
and urgency”, the ILO
paper said any National Pro-
ductivity Centre in this
nation had to identify the
tourism and financial ser-
vices skills this nation pos-
sessed and “further lever-
age these to build interna-
tional competitiveness”. +»

The paper added: “It must’
aim at catalysing diversifi-
cation efforts in critical sec-
toral linkages in the other
islands - agriculture on
Andros, film in Grand
Bahama, and manufactur-
ing for a wider Caribbean
and North American mar-
‘ket. :

“The centre must be able
to lead the debate on the
country’s readiness to face
competition in key areas of
economic life, and it must
be able to provide the ratio-
nale to the Government to
so mobilise the resourcés
required in the supportive
environment in legislative
reform, education and sci
entific and vocational skills
development.” ; ia

Bahamian respondents to-.
an ILO survey said that to
ensure the National Pro-
ductivity Centre was free
from government and polit:
ical interference, it needed’
to become self-financing in’
time. i

But during the start-up.
phase; it was recommended’
that a subvention from the’
Government be provided,
coupled with technical and’
financial support from the’
private sector. Eventually,

“the-strategy paper said the:
“Government ‘subvention®
should not be greater than:
50 per cent ofthe centre’s
revenue. he

For funding, the ILO
paper recommended that:
the National Productivity.
Centre raise revenues from
selling administration and’
consulting services, selling

_ labour and productivity sta~
tistics, and conducting pro-
ductivity audits and surveys:

A hypothetical budget for.
a Bahamian National Pro-
ductivity Centre’s first three
years put expenditure by the:
centre at just over $238,000
for the first year, with this
declining to below $230,000.
for both subsequent years. —

/

“human capital solutions

Chief Executive Officer

Our client, a small but well established and thriving.
bank and trust company based in Nassau, is seeking
a CEO to take over the day-to-day management of the
operations of the company and its wholly owned
subsidiaries. The CEO will have full P&L and
administrative responsibility in respect of existing
businesses but will not be responsible for business
development, the responsibility for which will remain
with the Chairman. The CEO will also be the company’s
principal liaison officer with the regulators.

The candidate must be able to demonstrate solid, hands
on, management, administrative and operational’
experience in an international financial institution, in
various locations. The candidate will almost certainly
have achieved managing director or similar level in a
subsidiary or branch operation. In particular, experience
living and working in Latin America will be a significant
advantage. The candidate must have business fluency
in Spanish and/or Portuguese given the company’s

‘market focus, and a part of the interview will be

conducted in one or other of these languages or both
as appropriate.

In addition, to his/her track record, the candidate will :
be well educated and will most probably have a business |
degree or other professional qualification. The job will ,
be based in Nassau but some travel will be required.

The company offers a competitive base salary -
commensurate with the candidate’s qualifications and -
experience, and performance incentives, as well as -
other benefits.

Please send your CV to Jonathan Ginder, Director,
Human Capital Solutions to: exec@hcscayman.com —
tel: (345) 949-6664.


THE TRIBUNE





EWS acs

FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005, PAGE 3B



$23m water supply contract still
facing challenge from Biwater

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The runner-up in the race for
the $23 million Blue Hills
reverse osmosis plant contract is
still seeking a Supreme Court
order overturning the award to
Consolidated Water, it was
revealed yesterday.

In a release announcing that
its shareholders had agreed to a
two-for-one stock split at its
annual general meeting (AGM)
on Wednesday, Consolidated
Water said that Biwater Inter-

national was still pressing ahead
with its Supreme Court action,
and was seeking an order that it
be handed the contract instead.
Consolidated Water said in its
release: “Accordingly, there can
be no assurances that the con-
tract between the company and
the Water and Sewerage Cor-
poration will remain in effect.
“Water and Sewerage Cor-

poration has agreed to indem- .

nify the company and Water-
fields, a subsidiary of the com-
pany, against all expenses and
losses, including loss of profits,

which they may incur if the
court awards the Blue Hills pro-
ject to the unsuccessful bidder.”

Challenge

This effectively means that
nothing has changed since
Biwater International filed its
Supreme Court challenge earli-
er this year, after the Govern-
ment awarded the contract -
‘part of moves to alleviate New
Providence’s chronic water
shortages and reduce reliance



Agency reports
rise of foreign
reserves to a

record $769m

FROM page one

investment and domestic hous-
ing investment offsetting resid-
ual softness in tourism...

“The record accumulation in
external reserves continued
through June 2005, reaching
$769 million, up from $482 mil-
lion at the end of 2003.”

However, Moody’s warned.

that tourism earnings had still
not fully recovered from the
damage inflicted on Grand
Bahama by the September 2004
hurricanes - the Royal Oasis
resort still remains closed -
despite what it described as
“upbeat trends in New Provi-
dence and the Family Islands”.
The Wall Street credit rating
agency added that retail prices
in June rose by 1.8 per cent,
year-on-year, which was in line
with the Bahamian govern-
ment’s expectations.
Otherwise, little had changed
in Moody’s assessment of the
Bahamas, the main stumbling
block to increasing the respec-
tive A3 and A1 ratings on this
nation’s foreign currency and
local currency debt obligations
being the ongoing fiscal deficit
and public sector debt position.
The Wall Street credit rating
agency added: “The rating
could come under pressure
from a loss of. competitiveness

in the tourism industry or from
additional external shocks
affecting that sector. This would
lead to fiscal slippage and a sig-
nificant build up in government
debt.

“Given the narrow revenue
base, a much greater level of
debt would be hard to sustain.
Slippage in the regulation of
financial services, which account
for 15 per cent of GDP, would
be viewed as negative develop-
ment.”

And for good measure,
Moody’s added: “The underly-
ing strengths of the Bahamas
and the preservation of a rela-
tively strong external position
support a stable outlook,
although the economy faces
challenges posed by the effects
on the tourism sector of terror-
ism and geopolitical uncertain-
ties.

“The Government faces the
task of containing larger fiscal
deficits at a time of uncertain
tourism prospects and subdued
prospects for economic growth.
The Government's response to
the new international financial
regulatory regime, and its abil-
ity to manage economic liberal-
isation as its seeks World Trade
Organisation (WTO) member-
ship, will influence Moody's
credit assessment of the
Bahamas.”

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
(N° 46 of 2000).

RUSHDALE CONSULTANTS LIMITED

IBC N° 77,484 B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 131 (2) (a) of the
International Business Companies Act N°46 of 2000, RUSHDALE ‘i
CONSULTANTS LIMITED is in Dissolution. *



“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”





The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.










Any person having a Claim against the above-named Company is required on
or before the 6th of July 2005 to send their name, address and particulars of their
debt or claim to the Liquidator of the Company, or in default thereof they may
be. excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before such claim is
approved. ;

Miguel Antonio Fopiani Bernal of Lista de Correos, 11130 - Chiclana de la
Frontera, Spain, is the Liquidator of RUSHDALE CONSULTANTS LIMITED.









on water barged from Andros —
to Consolidated Water.

The latter has already raised
$10 million in financing for the
Blue Hills plant through a bond
issue to-selected Bahamian
investors, and plans to raise a
further $10 million this autumn
from a Bahamian Depository
Receipt (BDR) offering that
will be placed by Fidelity Mer-
chant Bank and Trust.

Consolidated Water said it
expected the BDR issue to be
completed in the final quarter of
2005.






ED SECURITIES

Previous Close

1.10 0.80 - Akaco Markets 0.80

9.25 8.90 Bahamas Property Fund 9.25

6.50 §.55 Bank of Bahamas 6.50

0.85. 0.70 Benchmark 0.70

1.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 1.40

1.15 0.87 Fidelity Bank 4.15

8.81 6.76 Cable Bahamas 8.73

12.20 1.80 Colina Holdings 1.80

9.08 6.75 Commonwealth Bank 8.62

; 2.50 0.67 Doctér's Hospital 2.24

LEGAL NOTICE 4.12 3.85 Famguard 4.12

: 10.50 9.19 Finco 10.49

NOTICE 9.30 7.00 FirstCaribbean 9.30

8.98 8.31 Focol 8.91

: 1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete , 1.15

a ss f 410.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.60

International Business Companies Act 8.30 8.26 SCO a oa oe ae
0 4 i erzner Internationa Ss x

(N° 45 of 2000) Premier Real Estate _ 10.00

EIDOS MARKETING LIMITED ae

Liquidator’s Notice

Pursuant To Section 137 (6) Of
The International Business Companies Act.



0.40 RND Holdings



.00 ABDAB

0.35 RND Holdings

We, Sovereign Managers Limited, Liquidator of EIDOS MARKETING ed Mutual Funds:











12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

43:00 Bahamas Supermarkets

Fund Name

Counter Securities






LIMITED, hereby certify that the winding-up and dissolution of EIDOS 1.1798 Colina Money Market Fund 1.245420"
MARKETING LIMITED, has been completed in accordance with the aecace Se lay Bahamas G & | Fund 2.381 “**
= : _ . i : idelity Prime {ncome Fund 10.4855***""
Articles of Dissolution. 2.2636 2.1330 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.263627"°
1.1246 1.0544 Colina Bond Fund



Dated this 21st day of July 2005.

SIGNED :
For & On Behalf Of

Sovereign M Limited

nape PIE - Closing price divided by the last 12. month
Liquidator

*- AS AT JULY 29, 2005/ *** - AS AT JULY 31



FINGEX: CLOSE 485.630 / VTD 1.321% 7 2003 14.88%

1.124578*""*

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1.000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price far daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthe

earnings

*- AS AT JUL. 31, 2005/ **** - AS AT JUN 30, 2005

» 2005/ ***** AS AT JULY 31, 200E

LTRADE CALL: COLINA 242-602-7010 7 FIDELITY 242-356-776¢

‘CONSOLIDATE DEBT AND LOWER YOUR PAYMENTS

Colina

‘Financial Advisors Ltd.

SS VISIT WWW BISKBAHAMAS COM FO
IDEX: CLOSE 1,201.54 / CHG -00.95 / %CHG -01

Today's Closé











PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, NATHANIEL PIERRE
MONTGOMERY of Kent Avenue, Nassau East, RO. Box
N-8522, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name
to NATHANIEL PIERRE-HART. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-792, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.













It can happen quickly. All of a sudden you've got more debt than
you're comfortable carrying and “... more month at the end’of the
money.” Let a Scotiabank representative help you .become
financially fit. We offer practical solutions to consolidate your debt
into one affordable monthly payment; access some of the equity
in your home to lower your interest costs; or transfer to a lower
interest credit option. We can introduce you to credit life
protection and even help. you start saving for your childrens
education. Start building a stronger financial future today.

Visit your nearest branch and let's talk.



*

Life. Money. Balance both:

* Trademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia. Trademarks used under authorization and control of The Bank of Nova Scotia.




=) FIDELITY

0.08

















0,80 0.00 -0.207 0.000
9.25 0.00 1.452 0.340
6.50 0.00 0.561 0.330
0.79 0.09 35,800 0.187 0.010
1.40 0.00 0.126 0.060
1.15 0.00 0.062 0.040
8.81 0.08 2,900 0.618 0.240
1.80 0.00 5,154 -0.004 0.000
8.50 -0.12 4,000 0.705 0.410
2.24 0.00 :
4.12 0.00

10.49 0.00

*9.30 0.00
8.91 0.00
1.15 0.00
9.60 0.00
8.27 0.00
5.82 0.00

10.00 0.00

Ask $ Last Price

10.35




0.54

43.00 41.00
14.00 13.00
0.54 0.35




YTD% Last 12 Months



YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weakly Vol. -- Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful’

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 10¢






















PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005

THE TRIBUNE






PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, LEONARDO
MCKINTOSH, of East Street South, Nassau, Bahamas,
intend to change my name to LEONARDO ELIJAH
MCINTOSH BROWN. If there are any objections to this
change of namé by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-792,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.






LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
(N° 46 of 2000)

DARLINGTON HOLDINGS LIMITED

IBC N° 128528 B

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 131 (2) (a) of the
International Business Companies Act (No 46 of 2000), DARLINGTON
HOLDINGS LIMITED, is in Dissolution.

The date of commencement of dissolution was 15th, day of August, 2005.
Redcorn Consultants Limited, c/o Ansbacher House, 2nd Floor, Shirley & East

Sts. North, P.O. Box N-9934 Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of Darlington
Holdings Limited.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

WOLWECK LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a2) WOLWECK LIMITED is in voluntary’ dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on August 17,
-2005 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and registered
by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated Ltd., Pasea
Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI.

Dated this 19th day of August, A.D., 2005.



VERDURO ASSOCIATED LTD.
Liquidator

All children must be upervised b:







f



Insurance company to stage
‘Midsummer’ seminars

BRITISH American Insur-
ance Company will next week
host an evening of free semi-
nars aimed at educating the
Bahamian public on financial
planning, investment and insur-
ance issues.

The event, entitled Midsum-
mer Night School, will be staged
from 6pm to 8.30pm on
Wednesday August 24, at the
company’s headquarters on
Independence Drive.

I Chester Cooper, chief oper-
ating officer and chief execu-
tive-designate for British Amer-
ican Insurance Company, said:
“Midsummer Night School is
the major focus of a series of
events that the company has
planned for this year to cele-
brate its 85th anniversary of
operations in the Bahamas.

“We generally feel that in
addition to helping our clients
create and manage wealth
through our creative products
and services, we have an oblig-
ation to ensure the education

of the public with respect to.

financial matters.
Education

“We believe that education
is one of the first steps in amass-
ing wealth and having people
become financially secure and
financially independent, so this
is why we have launched this
initiative.

“It’s open to our clients, the
public at large, and we hope
that all can be a part and enjoy
the seminars, the mortgage
campaign initiatives and, of
course, the presentations on
legal issues as well as the finan-
cial matters.”

“We generally feel that in
addition to helping our clients
create and manage wealth
through our creative products
and services we have an obliga-
tion to ensure the education of
the public with respect to finan-
cial matters.”

Seminar topics include Finan-
cial Planning & Investments,

Tan cer meee cCCe



o



Violet Perpall, supervisor, mortgages and accounts, British American Insurance Company; John Wil-
son, partner, McKinney Bancroft.and Hughes; I. Chester Cooper, chief operating officer and chief exec- |

British American Insurance Company.

How to Get the Most from
Your Mortgage, Insuring Good
Health - the Foundation of
Wealth, Understanding Life
Insurance and The Inheritance
Laws.

These 30-minute seminars
will be repeated several times
throughout the evening so that
students can attend at least
three sessions. Attendees will
be able to qualify for a mort-
gage at the event with special
incentives onsite, as well as have
free private financial consulta-
tions.

The topic How to Qualify for
a Mortgage is expected to be a
popular session at Midsummer
Night School, and will be led
by Violet Perpall, supervisor for

mortgages: and accounts, with, ..

‘British American Insurance

Occupied

FROM page one
September had the lowest

number of passengers at 700.
Twenty-one per cent of the

Company.

According to Ms Perpall, the
main impediments to qualify-
ing for a mortgage are lack of
savings and too much consumer
debt. — ;

Information

She said: “In this seminar we
will provide information on the
debt service ratios that we look
for, as well as the importance
of saving for those out-of- pock-
et expenses associated with the
mortgage — for instance the
legal costs, your down payment
and your commitment fees.”

Midsummer Night School
seminars will be led by finan-

cial, insurance and law experts ..
: from British. American Insur-

‘utive-designate for British American Insurance Company; and Ken Pyfrom, chief financial officer,

ance Company and McKinney
Bancroft & Hughes. =~
‘They include Ken Pyfrom,
chief financial officer, British
American Insurance; Diane
Stewart and John Wilson, attor-
neys, McKinney Bancroft and
Hughes; Stephanie Carroll,
AVP, group employee benefits,
British American Insurance
Company; Hugh Newbold, vice-
president, ordinary division,
British American Insurance
Company; Gilbert Williams,
vice-president, Home Service.
Sales, British American. Insur-
ance Company; Cecillia Cox,
manager, financial services and
investments, British American
Insurance; and Phyllis Meeusen,
client relationship advisor,
British American.Insurance

-Company. eee

seats to Nassau up 5%

passengers who came into the
Nassau/Paradise Island desti-
nation in 2004 came by way of
charter airlines through Toron-
to. 4

AGIon

Rock-wool attic insulation cheaper than
if you do it yourselflll Please check out

www. bahamasinsulation.com for

more

info, detailed comparison and benefits.
LIFETIME WARRANTY AND
FREE QUOTES
on every installation.
Phone: (242) 324-1619

Cell: (242) 424-1518

Email:
bahamasinsulation@gmail.com

Website: www. bahamasinsulation.com



The most popular gateways
for scheduled airlines flying into
the Nassau/Paradise Island des-
tination were Miami, Florida;
Fort Lauderdale, Florida;
Atlanta, Georgia; La Guardia
Airport in New York and Char-
lotte, North Carolina: ~

The most popular gateways
for charter airlines flying into’
the Nassau/Paradise Island des-
tination were Toronto, Cana-
da; Baltimore, Maryland; Chica-
go, Illinois; Atlanta, Georgia;
and Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

In 2004, Florida gateways
accounted for 53 per cent of the
inbound passenger traffic trav-
elling into the Nassau/Paradise
Island destination on scheduled
airlines, with six per cent on
charter airlines. :

Some 29 per cent of all pas-
sengers who came into Nassau
in 2004 by way of scheduled air-
lines, came through Miami,
Florida. Second to Miami, 15
per cent of all passengers on
scheduled airlines came through
Fort Lauderdale, with 9 per cent
coming through Atlanta, 8. per
cent through New York's La
Guardia airport and 7 per cent
through Charlotte, North Car-
olina.

MUST SELL

Vacant Lot No. 5 Block 18 Section B 9,600 sq. ft. on Avacado Drive in Eleuthera Island Shores
Subdivision in North Eleuthera. —

Property is close to Eleuthera Main Highway with available utilities; electricity, city water and

telephone.

For conditions of the sale and any other information, please contact: The Commercial Credit
Collection Unit at: Phone: 356-1686 or 356-1608, Nassau
Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us by no later than September 30, 2005

Financing available for qualified purchaser


THE TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005, PAGE 5B

Colina Holdings
unveils internal
auditor appointee

Colina Holdings (Bahamas),
the BISX-listed holding vehicle
for its life and health insurer,
has appointed Ingrid Culmer as
its internal auditor, with respon-
sibility for implementing and
directing the company’s audit
policies, procedures and stan-
dards.

She will perform the same
function for Colina Holdings’
“subsidiary, Colinalmperial
Insurance, and act in an. advi-





-sory function on all issues
‘regarding internal controls for
‘both entities:

Emanuel Alexiou, Colina
‘Holdings chairman, said the
-appointment was part of the
‘company’s plans to enhance
“corporate governance and boost
shareholder value.

: e e @ 3
Initiatives
“Ms Culmer’s appointment
coincides with many proactive
initiatives we have undertaken
across the entire Group,” said
Mr Alexiou.

“By being the first to adopt
higher financial reporting stan-
dards, we hope to remain ahead
of the field not just in our finan-
‘cial strength but also in terms of
our corporate governance and ff
financial reporting standards.

With Ms Gumers wealth of mINGRID Cabat
experience and impressive pro-

fessional skills, we are certain ‘
she will play a key role in ush- a O i iC 2
ering in-a new era for Colina ,
Holdings.” LS NOTICE is hereby given that FRIDA MOMPREMIER VIRGILE
OF ot BOX GT-2193, niece Ack apogee
e -| to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
Exper 1ence for fecistration/naturalization as a ahean oF The pahanias.
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
“Having spent the last three naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
years as the financial controller © -|:and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
of one of the companies within from the 19TH: day of AUGUST, 2005 to the Minister
the group — the Nassau responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Guardian — our confidence in Nassau, Bahamas.
Ms Culmer’s expertise is
through first-hand knowledge

of her abilities.” , ,

A member of the Bahamas A Ti a
Institute of Chartered Accoun-

tants (BICA) and the Ameri- ;

can Institute of Certified Public | NOTICE is hereby given that BASIL PETER GOULANDRIS, OF
Accountants, Ms Culmer P.O. BOX N-858, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister



earned her Certified Public responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
‘Accountant designation in 1987 registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
and has spent 15 years of her any person. who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
career working with two major should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement

accountin g and consultancy of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 11TH day of AUGUST,
firms, both in the Bahamas and 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
abroad. P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

STAFF VACANCIES

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the following position:
Accounts Clerk IV (Northern Bahamas Campus)

The successful candidate will report to the Assistant Vice President, Northern
Bahamas and to the Supervisor, Accounts Receivable, Oakes Field Campus and be
responsible for the following duties:

Daily collection and daily banking of all monies in accordance with Accounting
Department Procedures.

‘Receiving, recording and receipting cash and receivables from tuition, fees,
grants, rents, ancillary enterprises, etc. Issuing official receipts for all income.
Balancing daily end-of-day batches from revenue collections.
Analyzing & Reporting all daily revenue and collections by bank account,
mode of payment and receipt category.

_ Proper and timely reporting and documenting of all overages and/or shortages
to the supervisor.
Keying in all transactions into the Management Information System.
Disbursing petty cash
Any other related duties as required.

Qualifications/Experience/Personality Traits

An Associate Degree in Accounting or Business.

_ Minimum of two (2) years experience in a similar position
Experience with automated financial application is an avaniage
Trustworthy and of good character
Meticulous and ability to work under pressure

Salary Scale: $16,900 x $500- $25,900

Interested candidates should submit a resume with supporting documents through
their Head of Department by Wednesday, August 31, 2005, to:

The Director
Human Resources Department
Oakes Field. Campus
Nassau, Bahamas

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs







,| BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK

Cable Beach, West Bay Street, P.O. Box N-3034
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 327-5780/327-5793-6
Fax: (242) 327-5047, 327-1258
www. bahamasdevelopmentbank. com



PROPERTIES & ASSETS FOR SALE
_NEW PROVIDENCE

1. Lot #13 (5,000 sq. ft.) with duplex (1,344 sq. ft.) white trim lime green - Bancroft Lane Bamboo
Town (Appraised Value $147,000.00)

2. Lot #14, Blk. #7 with sports bar along with restaurant equipment - Key West St & Balfour Ave.
Englerston Subdivision. (Appraised Value $187,000.00)

3. Lot #171 (100’x100’) with two story building - East Street opposite Deveaux Street. Seat
Value $300,000.00)

4. Lot #27A (55’x90’) with neous split level house - Boatswain Hill or Bosua Hill (Appraised
Value $139,580.00)

5. Lot #176 (40’x113’) with 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom house (860 sq. ft.) -. Old Cedar Street, Yellow
Elder Gardens (Appraised Value $52,160.00)

6. Lot #109 (60’x70’) with 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms house - Craven Street, Ridgeland Park. (Appraised
Value $80, 000.00)

7. Vacant lot (18, 644 sq. ft.) - Situated on the western end of Carmichael Road about 250 feet east
of Unison Road. (Appraised Value $95,000.00) -

8. Lot #52 (50’x80’) with house (778 sq. ft.) - Water Street, Big Porid. (Appraised Value $67 800.00)

9, Property (50’x100’) with two houses (660 sq. ft. and 620 sq. ft.) - Franklyn Ave. and Tyler Street
off Boyd Road. (Appraised Value $80,200.00)

10. Property (40° x36’x 100’) with building - Sutton Street next to St. Bed’s Church, Kemp Road
(Appraised Value $73,000.00)

ANDROS

11. Property (4,344 sq. ft.) with nhipléy (1,174 sq. ft. wie in the settlement of Fresh Creek, Central Andros.
(Appraised Value $22,000.00)

12. Vacant Lots #14 - 29, 32, 33, 35 - 38 (290, 400 sq. ft.) -in the settlement of Nicoll’s Town, North. j
Andros. (Appraised Value $364, 600.00)

13. Vacant Property 100’ 150 in the settlement of Pinders, Mangrove cay, South Andros. (Appraised
Value $22,500.00)

GRAND BAHAMA
14. Lot #267 (12,795 sq. ft.) - Caravel Beach Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama. (Appraised
Value $20,000.00)
15. Vacant Lot.#26 (115’x200’x175’) unit forty (40) - Euville Drive, Lucaya Estates Subdivision,
Freeport, Grand Bahama. (Appraised Value $1,500.00)
ABACO .

16. Lot #54 (6,500 sq. ft.) with triplex foundation in Murphy Town, Abaco. (Apratked Value >
$29,916.00)

APA Obey eoiegaay pola es + ELEUTHERA

ei

17. Pro eity 31° - r with House) Lord Street in the settlement of teen Bay, Eleuthera. (Appraised

Value $45,000.00)

18. Vacant Lot #22 (11,659 sq. ft:) in the settlement of North Palmetto Point in an area known as
Skull District, Eleuthera. (Appraised Value $9,000.00)

CAT ISLAND

19, Property 151'x145'x150'x123' with Hardware Building 6, 640 sq. ft.) situated 0.4 miles south of
The Bight Airport, New Bight, Cat Island. (Appraised Value $192,000.00) ;

20. Property with twelve (12) room motel 1.39 acres - in the settlement of Arthur's Town, Cat Island.
(Appraised Value $1.3 Million Dollars)

_EXUMA >

21. Lot #134 a 350 sq. ft.) with two story fuilding 4, 160 sq. ft , apartment upstairs and shop downstairs,
George Town, Exuma. (Appraised Value $468,000. 00). :

INAGUA

22. Lot #43 (9,000 sq. ft.) with house - Matthew Town, Inagua, Russell Street. (Appraised Value
$120,000.00)

“16NG: ISLAND

23. Vacant 10-acre land including 200’ of beachfront property - eae Landing, South of Clarence
Town, Long Island. (Appraised Value $975, 000. 00 O: N. O)

Electronic Equipment Sewing machines
¢ (1) Calculator . ~~ (1) Fleet Wood Sewing Machine
¢ (1) Microwave (1) New Home Sewing Machine

* (1) Compaq Presario Computer Monitor & Tower

Cart —.. ‘Tents
Hot Dog Cart with Umbrella : . (1) Canopy Tent (Plastic)
Tables
(2) Wood Tables (Round)
(1) Marble Table (Rectangle)

(1) Roll Away Bar Counter
Machinery — - Coolers/Freezers
¢ (1) Food Mixer (1) Two Door White Chest Freezer
* (1) Digital Scale (1) Silver Chest Freezer
* (1) Whirlpool Microwave (2) One Door White Chest Freezers
¢ (1) Wall TV Stand (1) Blue Coleman Cooler
Vessels Vehicles
¢ (1) 24’ (2002) Chris Craft w/engine (1) 2001 Ford F-250 Truck
° (1) 29’ (1983) Vessel (Lady Rece) ~ (1) 1996 Ford Explorer

° (1) 28’ Vessel (1) 1997 Dodge Stratus
(1) 53’ (1998) Vessel (Peagasus)
¢ (1) 125’ (1978) Steel Hull Vessel w/1980 50 ton Crane

COOKING UTENSILS POTS, PANS, PLATES, CHAFFING DISHES
DRY CLEANING EQUIPMENT

_ Serious inquiries only. Sealed bids marked “Tender” should: be submitted to:

Bahamas Development Bank |
P.O. Box N-3034, Nassau, Bahamas or telephone 327-5780
‘for additional information

Please note that all bids on the aforementioned properties and assets should be

received by August 29, 2005. | :
- The Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right to reject any or.all offer S.


PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005

FOR THE INCREDIBLE STORY OF THE SMOOTH-TALKING,
ROGUE TRADER DEREK TURNER, AND HIS PLOT TO TRICK
MILLIONS OUT OF INVESTORS AROUND THE WORLD

S E E MonNnNopbDaAY ’ §

insight

_ THE TRIBUNE



Hurricane impact on flights

GN - 256
MINISTRY OF TRAN SPORT & AVIATION

The Commonwealth of The Bahamas
Regulatory Strengthening of Airport Securny,
~. Consulting Services

COUNTRY: THE BAHAMAS

Project: Strengthening of Airport Security Program

Sector: Transport. —

Subject: PREQUALIFICATION FOR CONSULTING SERVICES
Technical Cooperation Agreement No. ATN/MT 9073 - BH
Invitation to Prequalify

‘The Government of The Bahamas. (GOB) has received financial assistance from the

Multilateral Investment Fund (MIF); which is administered by the Inter-American Development

Bank (IDB) , to finance the contracting of services and. procurement.of goods, necessary '

for the execution of a Technical Cooperation agreement to strengthen airport security in the

Bahamas. The Ministry of Transport and Aviation (MOTA) is the executing agency for this
project.

The objective of the project is to strengthen airport security at seven (7) airports in the

Bahamas by updating and modifying the regulations and procedures of the Bahamas Civil ~:
Aviation Department (CAD), training aviation. security.and.operation personnel, and creating es

and effective and efficient security team within related government agencies to meet new
international norms and standards.

a

The project has three inierselated components:

1, Regulatory Strengthening
2. Implementation of New Administrative Services
3. Training

Activities under the Training component of this project encompass:the strengthening of
regulations and procedures required to monitor and oversee the minimum standards and
practices established in the Bahamas National Civil aviation Security Plan and to satisfy
the requirements of the most recent version of ICAO Annex 17 to the Chicago Convention,
and, the procedures and guidance set in the Document 8973 Security Manual for Safeguarding
Civil Aviation against Acts of Unlawful Interference; and the development of relevant
security manuals as well as security certificate programmes.

‘In accordance with the GOB & IDB ’s procurement procedures the MOTA is inviting suitably

' qualified consulting firms to submit expressions of interest for carrying out aspects of the -
Regulatory Strengthening programme in collaboration with the MOTA, including the .

following:

1. Development of a security certification program.

2. The design, development and formalization of a strategy for the financial and :

operational sustainability of present and future airport security systems.
3. The development of an -airport security assessment program.
4. Developing security certification programmes for the Airport Authority, CAD
and Law Enforcement partners.

FROM page one

cent of available seats disap-
pear.

mance Report 2004, the Min-
istry of Tourism noted that

decline in available seats was .

largely due to the fact that

Grand Bahama was hit by two :
‘hurricanes within days of each

other.
It said: “Hurricane Frances

i

In its Air Carer Perfor-

and Hurricane Jeanne both

ploughed into Grand Bahama
in September 2004 and serious-
ly affected both scheduled and
charter service. into the desti-
nation.

“In September, American

‘Eagle reduced the number of.
- flights -into'Grand Bahama by’

60 per cent, AirTran Airways
reduced the number of flights
by 95 per cent, Bahamasair
reduced flights by 93 per cent,

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS + 2005

IN THE SUPREME COURT |

CTE Oe

Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece arch
or tract of land being a portion of a larger tract of land
totalling an area of 15.820 acres known as “The Russell.
Tract” and situate ‘approximately 3,000 feet north of
the southern end of Tilloo Cay in-the Abaco chain of

-. Cays in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas

ba : “ A D : + a
IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Title Act, 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of CHRISTOPHER KEITH
RUSSELL, IAN LAMBERT RUSSELL and BARBARA ANN
SWEETING (As Executors and Trustees-of the Estate of Lionel

Lambert Russell )

a
a

THE PETITION OF CHRISTOPHER KEITH, IAN
LAMBERT RUSSELL and BARBARA ANN SWEETING
(As Executors and Tr ustees of the Estate of Lionel Lambert Russell)

in respect of:--

“ALL THAT ieee parcel or tract of land being a
portion of a larger tract of land.totalling an area of
15.820 acres known as “The Russell Tract” and situate
approximately 3,000 feet north of the southern end

of Tilloo Cay in the Abaco chain of Cays in the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.”

AND also described as:-

“ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land containing
by admeasurement Fifteen and Eight Hundred and
Twenty Hundredths (15.820) acres being portion of
the Russell Tract situate on Tilloo Cay in the Abaco
Cays in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas and the
boundaries of which begins at a point situated on the
western coast of Tilloo Cay approximately: three thousand
feet north of its southern end with coordinates end
n2925233.00 meters and e301868.00 meters; thence
along and with the southern boundary of property claimed
by Eddie Cash n89Y58 31” distance 587. 16ft. and --

is n90Y17. 12” distance 212.68ft. to a point; thence none

and with the high water mark on the eastern coast line

_ southwardly with distance 926.66ft. toa point thence
along and with the northern boundary of land claimed
by Duncan Russell n270Y03 01” distance 719.12 ft. to
a point thence along and with the high water mark of
the western coast line northwardly with a distance
908.12ft.to a point of beginning; the boundaries of which
are more particularly described on the plan attached
which is recorded in the Department of Paods and
Surveys as plan no. 1624ab.”

5. The formalization and strengthening of the current airport security regulatory
framework.

6. Development of specified Aviation Security manuals for the MOTA and CAD.
7. The development of an airport security related public awareness programme.

GOB now invites interested, eligible firms from MIF members countries to submit applications
for prequalification. An official copy of thé prequalification documents, in English, may
be obtained at the address below upon payment of non-refundable fee of eben by cashier’ S
cheque or banker’s draft.

Prequalification will be based on the criteria stated in the prequalification documents. Firms
will be shortlisted in respect to their reponsiveness to the requirements stated in the
prequalification documents and in keeping with the IDB guidelines. A shortlist of three to
six firms will be prequalified. The prequalified firms will be invited to submit technical and
financial proposals.

CHRISTOPHER KEITH RUSSELL, IAN LAMBERT
RUSSELL and BARBARA ANN SWEETING (As Executors
and Trustees of the Estate of Lionel Lambert Russell) claim to be
the owner in fee simple in possesion of the following land and
has made application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas under Section Three (3) of the Quieting Titles
Act, 1959 to have their title to the said land investigated and the
nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate
of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with the provisicns
of the said Act.

Copies of the Petition and Plan of the said land may be inspected
during normal office hours in the following places:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street i in
the City of Nassau, Bahamas; and .

2. The Chambers of Lockhart & Munroe, #35 Buen
Retiro Road, off Shirley Street,Nassau, Bahamas.

The original and two copies of the completed prequalification documents should be submitted
in a sealed envelop, delivered to the address below by 1400 hours on 25 August 2005, and
be clearly marked “Application to prequalify for Regulatory Strengthening of Airport

3. The office of the Commissioner/Administrator at

Abaco ‘Bahamas.

Security.”

Envelopes will be opened at the address below on August 25, 2005 at 1400 hours. Late
applications will not be considered in any citcumstances.

The MIF Project Coordinator
Ministry of Transport and Aviation
Pilot House Complex,
' East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 394-0445/6 or Fax: (242) 394-5920

Further information or clarification may be obtained by e-mail from Mr J erry Hutchinson
at the e-mail address: jerryhutchinson@bahamas.gov.bs.



NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower or right
to dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the
Petition shall on or before the 30th day of September, A.D., 2005
file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioners or the
undersigned a Statement of his claim in the prescribed form
verified by an affidavit to be filed therewith.

. Failure of any. such person to file and: served a Statement of his

Claim on or before the 30th day. of September, A.D., 2005 will
operate as bar to such ‘claim.

LOCKHART & MUNROE
Chambers

#35 Buen Retiro Road

Off Shirley Street

Nassau, Bahamas



Attorneys for the Petitioners

Continental Connection by ‘58
per cent and US Airways by 97,
per cent. Delta Airlines did not’
fly into Grand Bahama in Sep-
tember 2004." i

Meanwhile, in 2004, Delta
Airlines, AirTran Airways atid’

US Airways operated with the

highest load factors, more than
70 per cent, of the scheduled,
airlines flying into Grand’
Bahama from international:
gateways.

The report:also said the total
number of occupied seats into:
Grand Bahama decreased by,

. 13 per cent, despite a 7 per cent’

increase,.to 15,460, in occupied
seats for the scheduled. carriers

~~ ~during 2004.

Charters

‘The increase in occupied
seats to Grand Bahama for.

' scheduled carriers was not,

enough to offset the decline‘in

- occupied seats for charter air-

lines.
Although the importance’ ir
charter airlines to Grand

‘Bahama continued to. decline

in 2004, they remain an integral

ie part of ‘the destination's airline

mix, Charter airlines to Grand
Bahama experienced a 54 per

cent decline, in‘the number of

occupied seats, which con-

-tributed to the overall decline

for the destination...

In 1993, US charters held 70
per cent of the overall market
share of passengers into Grand
Bahama and virtually dominat:
ed the market. He

In 2004, scheduled airlines
brought in 83 per cent of the
inbound passengers to Grand

- Bahama, US’ charters brought

in 16 per cent and Canadian and

- other charter airlines brought
-in 1 per cent.

Charter airlines are now

’ being dominated by Falcon Air-

lines, instead of Laker Airways.

Grand Bahama experienced
its highest traffic period ‘in
March and July for the sched:
uled airlines, with September

~experiencing the least traffic.

January and April had the high-

_est flow of inbound passengers

for charter airlines flying into
Grand Bahama, with Septem-

ber again coming in ast.

_ The most popular gateways
for scheduled airlines flying into
Grand Bahama were Fort
Lauderdale, Florida; Miami,
Florida; Atlanta, Georgia; Char-
lotte, North Carolina; and Bal-
timore, Maryland.

The most popular gateways
for charter airlines flying into
Grand Bahama were Rich-
mond, Virginia; Fort Laud-
erdale, Florida; Cleveland,
Ohio; Cincinnati, Ohio; and

Raleigh- Durham, North Car-

olina... :

Florida gateways accounted °
for 49 per cent of the inbound
passenger traffic to Grand
Bahama in 2004 on scheduled
airlines, compared to 91 per
cent in 2000.

Florida gateways “also
accounted for 18 per cent of the. '
inbound passenger traffic to’
Grand Bahama on charter air-
lines. Of the most popular gate-
ways, Fort Lauderdale was in °
the top five for both scheduled?
and charter airlines to Grand
Bahama in 2004. .

AirTran Airways, Continen-
tal Connection and American
Eagle had the highest percent-
age of market share of inbound
passenger traffic.to Grand
Bahama on scheduled airlines:

AirTran Airways had 22 per
cent of the market share, Con- _
tinental Connection had 20 per. -
cent, American Eagle also had
20 per cent, and US Airways .
had 17 per cent.

Of the. scheduled airlines to
Grand Bahama, AirTran Air-
ways, Continental Connection
and American Eagle had the
highest percentage of the mar-":
ket share of inbound passenger |
traffic.
THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS : : 7 FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005, PAGE 7B



FRIDAY EVENING AUGUST 19, 2005

| 7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

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TRIBUNE SPORTS



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for men is announced

Bahamas Basketball |
Association plays host

@ By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

THREE of. the National
Collegiate Athletic Associa-

tion (NCAA) premier bas- .

ketball teams will take part

.in the first annual College.

Jamboree for men, set for
September 3rd-4th, at Sir
Kendal Isaacs gym.

The three division one col-
legiate schools invited are the
national NCAA champions,
University of North Caroli-
na, Troy University and Mar-
shall University.

This is the first time the
Bahamas Basketball Feder-
ation (BBF) will host a tour-
nament for collegiate men.

The BBF has hosted colle-
giate tournaments for women

in the past, including the °

annual Thanksgiving basket-
ball classic, which is played
in Freeport.

The jamboree for colle-

giate men is being made pos-
sible by the Sports Tour, an
organisation that assists with
tours for collegiate teams.

Treasurer

According to Edgar Pick-
stock, the BBF’s treasurer, a
tournament of this nature
should have taken place a
long time ago.

Pickstock said: “Tourna-
ments like these in the
Bahamas are long overdue.
We need these type of tour-
naments to uplift, not only

the local talent, but, hopeful-
ly, secure some scholarships.

“Over the two days of com-

petition we are expecting
some great basketball games.

“When teams like the
national champions are made
available to you, one is quite
certain that the level of play
will be high.

“The other two college
teams coming down to play
are also premier basketball
teams playing in division I of
the NCAA.”

The tournament, which is

- being sanctioned by the BBF,

will also feature local talent.

Four teams representing
the BBF from the local New
Providence Basketball Asso-
ciation will take on the three
college teams.

- Playing for the Bahamas
are the Real Deal Shockers,

‘Wreckers, Coca Cola and the

Giants.
“We tried to:include somie

-of the local teams, especially

the players who just returned
with the team from the
Dominican Republic,” said
Pickstock.

“Hopefully we can secure'a

few scholarships for some of
mess guys, or give them the

exposure they need
to get into division one
schools.

“We have the talent, but it
is hard getting the necessary
exposure for the guys.”

Pickstock added that the
jamboree is not only for the
basketball players, but for
coaches also.

He believes that the local
coaches will be able to pick
up a few pointers from the
college coaches, if they
decide to come to and
participate in the tourna-
ment.

“This tournament is for
everyone, not only the bas-
ketball players so the gener-
al public is also invited,” he
added.

- Tickets for the event go on
sale on Friday September
2nd at the Sir Kendal Isaacs
gym.

Tickets will be priced at $3
for children and $5 for adults. :

Chistian Council announces ‘Church Games’

@ By KELSIE JOHNSON
‘Junior Sports Reporter

UNITING the many religious denom-
inations in the Bahamas through sports is
the main focus of the Bahamas Christ-
ian Council (BCC), as they get set to host
their first annual Church Games.

The Church Games, which are slated

. for October 11th-21st, is just the beginning

for the BCC, which is looking to help

improve the many sporting disciplines 1 in.

the Bahamas.

_ Recognising that sport is a vehicle that
can bring all areas of society together,
president of the council William Thomp-

be a positive point that can unite all.
. Ata press conference yesterday,
Thompson explained why the Christian
council got involved in the idea of imple-
menting the Church Games.

Noting that the church plays a big role

- in the Bahamas, Thompson said: “It is

time the church reaches out beyond its

~ four walls. We are know trying to practise

the art of reaching out into the commu-
nities and helping where necessary.

“Sports is a powerful vehicle, one that
can reach where the other disciplines can
not. The games are to encourage a more
Christ-like attitude and atmosphere back
into sports and the athletes.

- “We want to bring sports back, to”

where it can beconie a fun game, rather
than anger match. We want to bring back
that aspect of sports where people can
come together as one and have clean
fun.”

Disciplines

The games will cater to nine disciplines:
baseball, volleyball, basketball, track and

field, softball, soccer, swimming and box-

ing.

persons are asked to join up with their
respective churches.
No games will be played on any

There is no age limit, but interested.

Speaking on behalf of uniting the
churches at the press conference was .
Gilbert Thompson, who described the
games as an exciting venture, which will
bring the nation closer together as a God’s
people.

Gilbert said: “This.is game is for every-
one, every denomination so they can sit
and watch something they enjoy.

“Sports is a way we can glorify God in
our bodies, it is doesn’t only means sports,
but it also means another way of express-
ing our humanities.

“The intention of these games are not
so much to win, but to take part and learn
the true spirit and meaning of sports-
manship.” -

son believes that games of this nature can

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2005

SECTION



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E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

-™ CHANDRA STURRUP, Chris Brown, Christine Amertil and Tonique Williams-Darling are all set to compete in today’s meet in








Zurich. 2
(Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Four aim to shine in
Golden League meet

& By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

FOUR of the Bahamas’ top
athletes will be in action again
today at the Zurich, Golden
League meet.

Chandra Sturrup, Chris
Brown, Christine Amertil and
World and Olympic Champi-
on, Tonique Williams-Darling,
will all take part in the fourth
leg of six meets contesting for
the IAAF TDK million dollar
jackpot.

Although none of the four
athletes are eligible for the
prize, they are still obligated to
participate in the meets.

This will be the first of three
meets the quartet will have to
complete before wrapping-up
their outdoor season.

The quartet opted to finish
off in the IAAF’s Golden
League series, concluding with
the World Athletic Finals.

These finals are set for Sep-
tember 3rd, in Szombathely,
Hungary.

Williams-Darling, who post-
ed the world leading time at
the championships — 49.55 sec-
onds — will contest her title
against the top three finishers
from the games.

Among the field will be fel-
low countryman Amertil,
Americans Monique Henna-
gan, Sanya Richards, and Dee
Dee Trotter.

Representing Russia will be

Athletes ready for
action just days after
World Championships

Svetlana Pospelova and Olesja

- Zykina.

At the World Champi-
onships, which concluded just
days ago, Richards posted a
time of 49.74 seconds for the
second place finish, Guevera
was third in 49.81 seconds and
Pospelova fourth in 50.11 sec-
onds.

Although the 400m is not a
contested race for the jackpot,
the athletes are expecting to
better their times before the
World Athletic Finals.

Race

The women’s 100m race is
expected to be a headliner as
very little separated the.field
at the World Championships.

Winning the century at the
World Championships was
American Lauryn Williams in a
time of 10.93 seconds. Coming
in second was Jamaica’s Veron-
ica Campbell in'10.95 seconds,
Christine Aaron was third with
10.98, with Sturrup in fourth
with 11.09 seconds.



Brown will be the only male
representing the Bahamas at
the meet, which contains over

.19 events.

Competing in his specialty,
the 400m, Brown will have to
face Olympic and World

Champion Jeremy Wariner

once again.

This time Brown will be run-
ning out of lane three instead of
lane eight, a lane assignment
he had at the World Champi-
onships. .

Although Brown ran out of
the toughest lane, he managed
to clock a time of 44.48 seconds
for a fourth place finish.

Wariner won the event in
43.93, a world leading time.

Among the other events
being contested at the meet will
be the 100m and 400m hurdles,
800m, 1,500m and the 3,000.

Also seeing action on the
weekend will be Leevan Sands,
Jackie Edwards and Lavern
Eve.

@ TONIQUE WILLIAMS-
DARLING will be competing
again with Ana Guevara.


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