Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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\



The Tribune

The Miami





erald



BAHAMAS EDITION

THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005

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Questions as

company of |
superintendent
— wins contract

& By PAUL TURNQUEST
and KRISTINA McNEIL

FORMER consultant in the
Prime Minister’s office and
recently installed Superinten-
dent of the Prison, Dr Elliston
Rahming, came under fire yes-
terday as his company “The
Intertech Group” was awarded
a portion of BaTelCo’s security
contract.

Last week 20 security officers
at Wemco were unexpectedly
laid off when the company lost
“a portion” of its contract with
BaTelCo (BTC) to Intertech. |
- Leader of the opposition in
the House of Assembly Alvin
Smith said he is interested to
see what other contracts
Jntertech.has been awarded.

“* “Now I want to know when

this contract was given? Was —

this while he was a.consultant at
the PM’s office or was this after
he was posted as head of the
‘prison? That’s what I want to
know,” said Mr Smith. In Mr
Smith’s opinion whatever the
“situation he has an unfair
advantage, whether he was at
the PM’s office or now.”
_ “There are many Bahamians
out there who are trying to
make ends meet, and many who
don’t have second jobs like Dr
-Rahming whose whole liveli-
hood, is the security firm. I
would not have had any prob-
-lem with his company getting
- any portion of the contract only

Paradise istand
Vilage Shopping
fete ae Sch oy ed

ares

if he was not in such an advan-
tageous position,” he said.

However, Coalition .for
Democratic Reform (CDR)
leader Cassius Stuart lashed
out at what he called “the same
old wind” of the previous PLP
government.

In the opinion of Mr Stuart
this was “a serious conflict of
interest.” :

Mr Stuart said as this
involved a government contract
“we have to reach a point where
we pass giving out political
patronage. You know how
many families were affected
that that company lost that con-
tract?

“The PLP doesn’t seem to
realise it, but they are the same
old wind we regretted back in
1992. They need to be exposed
and these people need to step
down. Under the FNM the
same thing happened and this
needs to stop. As a new gener-
ation of politicians we are going
to. stop that,”, Mr Stuart
promised.

Mr Stuart said it brought
tears to his eyes that the country
is still at the same point. He
wished it could move beyond
“political patronage”.

“So are what they saying is
that those who do not believe in
the PLP will starve as long as
the PLP is in power?” he asked,
reminding government that

SEE page 14

Oakes Fizid
Shopping
crak

at as

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

A TOURIST died while swimming
off Rose Island yesterday.

Details of the death are sketchy,
however police confirmed that a man
who was engaged in water activities

Island residents
balk at prices
for gasoline |

B By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

RESIDENTS of Moores Island, a
small island just south of Abaco, are
suffering under “excessive” prices for
gasoline and. other petroleum prod-

ucts.

With only a little over a week
remaining before the opening of the
crawfish season, the fishermen are
worried that the price could exceed
its current high of $5.50, and reach
well beyond the $6.00 mark.

Predominantly a fishing community,
the residents have been struggling to
cope with the closure of the only gas
station on the island following last
year’s active hurricane season.

If having to pay $5.50 a gallon for

SEE page 14

near Rose.Island on Wednesday died
after experiencing some difficulties.
When The Tribune arrived on the
scene at Montagu Beach,.a crowd was
walking away from the pier. AS The
Tribune got closer, there was a lifeless
body lying on the wooden portion of
the pier. Emergency medical assis-

US company
could face legal
action for plan
to provide VoIP

i By DANIELLE STUBBS
Tribune Staff Reporter

LEGAL action could be taken against
a US company if it follows through on its
plan to provide voice-over Internet pro-
tocol (VoIP) products to the Bahamas.

The company, Viper Networks Incor-
porated, said its new Bahamas venture
aims to “capture a significant amount of
new consumers”. '

However, according to Executive
Director at the Public Utilities Commis-
sion (PUC) Barrett Russell: “No com-
pany other than BTC has ever had a
licence to offer VoIP services or any oth-
er telecommunications service, and we

SEE page 14



@ OFFICIALS bring the
tourist’s body back to shore after
he ran into problems when swim-
ming off Rose Island

(Photo: Mario Duncanson/
Tribune Staff)

tance was also on the scene.
According to press liaison officer
Walter Evans, the man is believed to
be a US resident and appeared to be
in his mid-fifties.
A bystander on the beach said that

SEE page 14 —

eee ae
never been
on safety list’

@ By DANIELLE STUBBS
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas has never been on the
advisory list of the US Consumer Prod-
ucts Safety Commission for items
recalled from the market.

According to Steve Ford, a public
affairs officer at the Bethesda, Mary-
land head office of the Consumer Prod-
ucts Safety Commission (CPSC), the
Bahamas can be added to the commis-
sion’s list to receive notification in the
case of major US recalls with just a
phone call or e-mail.

Mr Ford’s response came after a Tri-
bune investigation into who was respon-

‘sible for notifying the Bahamas and

SEE page 14





rAUGL <,



PLIVIIOWANI, VYL!

el, ouve



eho





Unexpected visit by cruise liner
makes traders’ day in Bay Street

@ By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter

BAY Street merchants yes-
terday experienced an increase
in revenues when the Bahamas
unexpectedly played host to
more than 2,000 cruise passen-
gers whose ship had to be divert-
ed due to Hurricane Emily.

The cruise ship Carnival Ela-
tion carrying 2488 passengers





docked in Nassau yesterday
morning after its route was
adjusted to avoid areas affected
by the category three hurri-
cane.

The Elation was originally
scheduled to visit Mexico’s
Yucatan Peninsula and Belize,
but instead the passengers
found themselves vacationing
in the Bahamas.

Speaking with The Tribune

antl



yesterday afternoon, a Bay
Street businessman said his
store had already experienced
an increase in revenue intake.

He explained that the down-
town.merchants look forward
to cruise ships like the Elation
visiting Nassau.

“Unlike the cruises that only.
charge $299 per person, and
where the passengers are
unwilling to spend large
amounts of money in ports, this
kind of ship that goes on 7 to 10
day cruises to Mexico has high-

er fares and the people tend to’

spend more,” he said.

The Bay Street merchant said
that he was “very happy” with
the unexpected amount of mon-
ey the Elation passengers spent
in his shop.

Carnival Cruise spokesman
Michael Hall said that the Ela-
tion was docked in Nassau from
7am to 11pm yesterday, with
the next port of call scheduled
to be Freeport today.

“This of course brings a large
number of unexpected visitors
to the Bahamas, and especially
to Nassau. With the ship being
in port until 11pm there should
be significant revenue,” he
added. +.

Mr Hall explained that
although the cruise line usually

, does not receive complaints

from passengers onboard re-
routed ships, the company’s pol-
icy is to give its customers free’

and discounts on future cruise
trips:
“After all, hurricanes are an

‘act of God, but we still give.out
discounts to appease our pas-"

sengers. But most of the time

as long as Carnival keeps the -
. passengers happy onboard the

ships, and as long as the ship
makes a port of call, and espe-
cially at such a popular place
like the Bahamas, there are no
complaints,” he said.
Hurricane Emily, the second
hurricane of the 2005 Atlantic
season, hit Northeastern Mexi-



co with 125mph winds yester-
day.

The eye of the storm came
ashore before dawn near San

‘Fernando, about 75 miles south

of the.US-Mexico border.

On Saturday Mexican author-
ities ordered the evacuation of
30,000 tourists from the resort
city of Cancun. A large num-
ber of vacationers with book-
ings for Cancun opted to come
the Bahamas instead, Tourism
Minister Obie Wilchcombe said.

The hurricane also led to the
evacuation of more than 85,000

@ THE Carnival Elation
in dock yesterday



people along more than 100
miles of coast from Holbox
Island to Tulum, including the

‘stretch known. as the ‘Riviera

Maya’. /

Mexico and US oil compa-
nies also evacuated 16,000
workers from offshore installa-
tions in the northern Gulf of
Mexico.

Forecasters predicted that the
storm could dump up to 15
inches of rain as it moves inland
over mountains, and could
cause flash floods and land-

‘slides.

passes for certain attractions



Tributes for restaurateur

By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE late owner of the Palm Tree restau-
rant was yesterday hailed as an over-the-hill
businessman “who set a trend of industry

and hard work”.

FNM Leader Tommy Turnquest said
James Alfred Gregory Russell inspired oth-
ers to shun mediocrity.

Mr Russell died on July 7 at the age of 87.
Funeral services will be held at Salem
Union Baptist Church on Saturday at 10am.

“Beyond Mr Russell’s reputation as a
licenssed plumber and founder of a unique

food outlet, which attracted patrons from all
over New Providence, he was among that
group. of business pioneers who, back in
1952, pooled their resources and established
the People’s Penny Savings bank,” said Mr
Turnquest.

“That was back in a time when many
black Bahamians had great difficulty secur-
ing financing from the establishment bank-
ing institutions,” he explained.

He said that Mr Russell was also a
social and political activist who was
involved in the Citizens Committee, a
political.group headed by the late Justice

.Maxwell Thompson that worked for

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equality and fairness for the masses.

Mr Russell, he said, was not an individual
to “sit back and hope that unjust matters
would resolve themselves, but always
pitched in on what he felt was the right side
to do his duty.”

Mr Turnquest said: “The Bahamas, and
particularly the Over-the Hill community,
have lost a noble son of enterprise and
industry. .

“He long ago demonstrated the way pro-
gressive and productive citizens should go,
whose example will hopefully assist today’s
and succeeding generations in making their
mark,” said Mr Turnquest.

pee:

1995 2008



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THE TRIBUNE



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m ALL SMILES: Zip with trainee veterinary technician Olivia Smith and Inspector Car] Thurston

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happy

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE ailing French Mastiff Zip,
who was cruelly snatched from
the Bahamas Humane Society
over the weekend, is now safe at
home thanks to an anonymous
caller.

. The Society raised the alarm
because Zip is on medication that
he needs to stay alive.

Staff feared that after being
missing for two days, Zip’s time
was running out.

Stephan Turnquest, an officer
at the Humane Society said that
after Zip’s story appeared in
Wednesday’s Tribune, the Society
received an anonymous call from
a person who knew he was being
kept.

Mr Turnquest said the caller

Romanda Curtis rire
saResenl strangulation’ ©

a a By ADRIAN GIBSON.

begin work as a security guard at Atlantis’ sie



ing lot.

THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005, 1998, PAGE 3

Hot dog enjoys
homecoming

was able to direct them to a home
in the back of the Christie base-
ball park, where a weak and hun-
gry Zip was tied to a tree in a
backyard.

“We were able to untie him
and bring him home,” said Mr
Turnquest.

Zip was examined and pro-
nounced to be in good health,
despite being slightly malnour-
ished and dehydrated.

Society employees were
delighted to see their friend
back at home, where he can con-




tinue with his medical
treatment, f

Mr Turnquest said that the !
problem of animal theft is grow-
ing in the Bahamas, particularly
in the summer months.

He said that Zip is not the first '
Society animal to become the vic- .
tim of thieves, who often enter
through the Botanical Gardens
and climb over the back wall.

Mr Turnquest said the matter
has been turned over to the
police, who are launching inves-
tigations.

Fabulous



THE autopsy of Romanda Curtis’ body has
indicated that she died from strangulation.
Assistant Commissioner of police in charge of

crime Reginald Ferguson confirmed the autop-
sy results late last night.

Almost a week after Romanda’s disappear-
ance and following complaints by her family
that not enough was being done by police, the
autopsy on Mrs Curtis was completed on
Wednesday.

According to police, the investigation into

- Mrs Curtis’ murder continues.

The badly decomposed body of the 20-year-
old was discovered on Sands Lane behind Love
97 on Thursday night.

She was reported to be missing since early

Her husband, Ricardo Curtis, Sho works
the night shift at the same-parking lot, reported
his wife missing after arriving at their Thompson
Lane home around 5am to take her to

work.
Identified

In an interview with The Tribune, Mrs Cur-
tis' mother and stepfather, Wescola and Douglas
Larrimore, said that they identified their daugh-
ter's body around 11 am Friday.

Her husband Ricardo was initially taken in by
officers of the Central Detective Unit, but has
since been released from custody and is not a

suspect.

Saturday morning, when she was scheduled to





Bahamas Bar Association
VP summoned to appear
_ before Supreme. Court

. By DANIELLE STUBBS, ,

Tribune Staff Reporter"

THE vice president of the
Bahamas Bar Association has
been summoned to appear before
the Supreme Court to answer alle-
gations that she fail to deliver on a
housing deal after accepting more
than $10,000.

Newton and Yvonne Neilly

have filed a statement of claim
against Bahama Isles Realty Lim-
ited and realtor Sheila Young over

the $10,200 they allegedly paid.to -

the company in October of 2004.
The defendants have 14 days to
appear in court to answer the Sut
mons.
-Acéording to cqurt documents,

the couple believes the company it
has either shut down or relocated. «#9 '"°
‘without notifyin;



a them, ‘because
to,contact their office
and Ms Young has failed.

In the statement of claim, filed_,
_ last,Friday, the Neillys alleged that
“Bahama Isles and Ms Young

failed to locate a suitable property






- payin
- CivilProcedure of Interest Act



_to construc a home for them, as
Wa agiéed' ‘by both parties on,
_ October 4, 2004. ‘

Despite continued: demands, the
Neillys claim that “neither
Bahama Isles or Ms Young has
delivered any or any adequate
information, location or explana-
tion” as to why property has not
been allocated for the construc-
tion of their home.

In addition to the full refund of

$10, 200, the couple are askiny to

atded interest on the down
mt in accordance with the

1992; additional costs, and further




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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



is

: The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

TRADE and Industry Minister Leslie
Miller, the driving force behind signing the
Bahamas onto the PetroCaribe agreement
for cheaper oil, accuses his critics of trying
to “drive some kind of wedge between the
Bahamas and the US”.

Mr Miller claims that what his critics are
missing is the fact that “fuel consumed by
Bahamians provided by Shell, Esso and Tex-
aco comes out of Curacao from PDVSA,
which is the national oil company of
Venezuela.” And it is the same Venezuelan
oil that the Bahamas will buy — without the
extra cost of middle men — from PetroCaribe.

This statement shows that it is Mr Miller
who has missed the point of the argument, not
the critics of the PetroCaribe Energy Co-
Operation Agreement signed by him in Puer-
to la Cruz on June 20.

No one objects to the purchase of
Venezuelan oil. What is objected to is his
signing an agreement that lassoes the
Bahamas into President Hugo Chavez’s
scheme to control the Caribbean region and
go: head-to-head with the US’s Free Trade
Area of the Americas (FTAA).

Mr Miller should not accuse his critics of
trying to put a-wedge between the Bahamas
and the US. He did that himself when he put
his signature to that piece of paper.that based
the delivery of'energy resources “entirely”
on Mr Chavez’s- Bolivarian Alternative for
the Americas (ALBA). Cuba’s Fidel Castro is
the leftist Chavez’s partner in the ALBA
scheme. Castro’s presence certainly would
make that wedge even harder for the Amer-
icans to tolerate.

There are so many questions to be
answered about this agreement. Although
Mr Miller assures the public that he has Cab-
inet backing, the Christie government has
remained mute to public demands for an
explanation.

For example, as the objective for creating
- PetroCaribe involves foreign relations using
oil as the vehicle, why wasn’t Foreign Affairs
Minister Fred Mitchell a part of the Miller
delegation to Venezuela? From its very first
paragraph the agreement intrudes far into
Mr Mitchell’s portfolio. The fact that Mr
Mitchell has washed his hands of it completely
— making it clear that this is Mr Miller’s
affair not his, suggests that Cabinet did not
know the details of what was being signed.

No one — including the three oil companies
’ that have for many generations supplied this



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Published Daily Monday to Saturday .

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas ©
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Explanation neede on PetroCaribe

country with its fuel — knows whether they are
to be squeezed out by the deal. According to
Chavez’s public pronouncements, they will
be. For example, he told BBC news that this
new business must be between governments.
According to the BBC Chavez said the
“region could not hand any more over to Tex-
aco and other private companies”.

One respected US oilman believed
Chavez’s move would fail. He explained that
Venezuela supplies many countries with oil.
When they learn of the special concessions
being given the Caribbean, they will start
making their own demands. “This will put
him out of business,” was this gentleman’s
expert opinion.

And should this happen, what happens to
the Bahamas?

After all, the oil companies because of
their international connections can tap many
sources to keep the oil flowing in case any
supplier fails. ‘This will not happen in future if
the Bahamas has only one supplier and that
supplier can’t deliver.

We hope that the Bahamas government is
aware of Chavez’s increasingly strident
thetoric as he prepares to defend ‘himself
against US “imperialism.” Andres Oppen-
heimer, an authority on Latin American
affairs, and a senior columnist with the Miami
Herald, wrote an interesting article about
Chavez’s bold move to politicise his armed
forces. The article, which was published in
the Miami Herald’s International edition in
The Tribune of July 14, should be read by
Cabinet.

Chavaz is convinced that the United States
intends.to attack Venezuela. At a recent cer-
emony he announced that the “Cuban and
Venezuelan revolutions are already one and
only” and will defend one another against a
potential US invasion.

As Chavez is busy arming civilian groups’

answerable only to him in preparation for a
US attack that exists only in his troubled
imagination, his critics believe that this is his
smokescreen to allow him to establish a police
state in Venezuela. In Oppenheimer’s opinion
“if Chavez means to do half of what he says,
his transformation of Venezuela’s armed
forces ... will haunt Venezuela for decades to
come.”

Let’s hope that when the bullets start fly-
ing, the Bahamas government will have

Bahamians in the right camp with all the so-

called wedges removed.

FNM lacking
any decent
leadership

EDITOR, The Tribune

THERE is a severe leader-
ship crisis in the defunct FNM,
despite the half-hearted
attempts by its nominal leader,
Tommy Turnquest, and his
“self promoting” national chair-
man, Carl Wilshire Bethel, to
deny otherwise.

Since the 2002 debacle, all of

~them appear to be in a shell-

shocked state.
They are rudderless and have

yet to present an alternative .

platform to the nation, as
opposed to the “new” PLP. All
they appear to be good for is to
critique each and every action
of the government, without
sound evidence or facts on the
ground.

Bethel is recognised as
national chairman, but how
many branches has he organ-
ised or reorganised since his ele-
vation? New Providence con-
tains the bulk of the seats in the
House of Assembly and one
would have thought that, by
now, Bethel and his defunct
party would:have launched a
massive campaign to recapture
New Providence. There is not a
single piece of evidence to sug-
gest that they will do this any
time soon.

It'is my considered opinion,
after canvassing a large cross
section of average Bahamians
in New Providence, that the
FNM will never win the gov-
ernment under the leadership
of Turnquest. Carl Bethel, him-
self, will have to do much more
to be re-elected to Holy Cross.
Sidney Stubbs has hit the

|... ground running since his return
to the House of Assembly. He
_ is to be seen all over his con-

stituency, interacting with his
constituents on a daily basis.
More importantly, he has
shown contriteness and humili-
ty since his bankruptcy deba-
cle.

Yes, my friends, unless
Hubert Ingraham retakes the
leadership of the FNM, ‘with
Dion Foulkes as his deputy, the
FNM will remain in the political
wilderness until the second
coming of Jesus Christ. No man
knows the hour or the day, but
it will not be.any time soon,
God wiiling.

Until then, the PLP is in
excellent hands in the form of
Cynthia ‘Mother’ Pratt (PLP-
St Cecelia). The Prime Minister,
Perry Christie (PLP-Bain &
Grants Town), should contin-
ue resting and recuperating
from his recent stroke. He

should not rush back to his offi- -

cial duties just to show us that
he is a superman or something

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LETTERS

latters@tribunemedia.net



of the sort. His health and well
being must remain of para-

‘mount importance to himself

and his immediate family.
The nation is functioning well
under the direction of our ener-

getic and motivated Acting -

Prime Minister and Minister of
Finance. Did you see her on the
jitney the other day? What oth-
er leader, except for Sir. Lyn-
den, has ever publicly ridden a
jitney so as to gain a hands on

experience of what riders have
to endure each day? This

woman of God is proving to be

‘just what the doctor ordered’
for the Bahamas.

In fact, if she were to lead the
re-energized PLP into the next
General Election, the FNM
would get exactly four seats
throughout the entire nation.
She has achieved many firsts so
far, she may as well go straight
to the top of the greasy pole...
first substantive female Prime
Minister.

ORTLAND H BODIE JR"
Nassau
June 2005

Minister not
living up to
expectations

EDITOR, The Tribune

THE Minister of Financial
Services and Investment’s
comment on .Caymans
prowess on fund manage-
ment and our financial ser-
vices sector could be easily
solved if the Minister would

‘ go-see who runs and man-
ages Caymans’ fund services.

It is as simple as that — now
has the minister the foresight,
guts and sense to do the rest
is obviously the next big

' question. No, we will worry
about a couple of hundred
work permits — the massive
economic impact to the
advantage ‘of solely Bahami-
ans in that the housing is
owned by Bahamians — pur-
chase of motor vehicles —
customs duties — consider-
able. multi-thousand dollar
annual expending into the
resident economy which only
Bahamians will enjoy and
domestic employment
(house staff, etc, etc), but
realising that’s why Cayman
has all the International
Fund business.

Representation of the

’ Ministry of Financial Ser-
vices and Investment on
Grand Bahama — unless the
Minister can see the urgency,
potentially the negative polit-

ical repercussions in Election -
2007, I would like to propose
the minister is blatantly blind
to the reality of the state of
affairs in Grand Bahama.

Has anyone carefully exam-’
ined the grave and serious
problems that will arise from
the petty personal squabbling
at the Registrar General’s
office? What if all documents .
that Acting Registrar Gener-
al Shane Miller signed are
found to be invalid? Who is
going to pay for the massive
liabilities to correct?

Just why is it when the
Minister of Financial Ser- |.
vices and Investment talks |
absolutely everything in the
Ministry is well, whilst the
place is under siege?

The Prime Minister might
not wish to move any of his
mministers so late in his first
term but, it is my opinion
that unless things start to be
created this minister is going
to be a liability in many ways
by election 2007.

Remember in 2002 it was
“jobs, jobs and jobs”, Prime
Minister? Many are asking,
does this minister under-
stand?

N RUSSELL
Nassau
July 6 2005



The Brass & Leather Shops Ltd
Charlotte St off Bay St. Tel 322-3806. Mall At Marathon, Tel 394-5676
Abaco Shopping Centre, Marsh Harbour. Tel 367-3643

The Luggage Store
East Av & Sixth Terrace, Opp Centreville Food Market. Tel 328-1477





THE TRIBUNE



Tenants complain about sewer [Ta

THURSDAY, JULY ci.

ae ae ee §
’ ad

system spilling onto the streets

® By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

TENANTS and patrons of a building
complex on East Bay Street are com-
plaining about a severe sewerage prob-
lem which in the Jast few weeks has led
o “faeces floating in the streets”.
Employees:of the establishments in
the complex between East Bay Street
and Okra Hill yesterday said the prob-
lem i is now becoming unbearable.
‘For the past three “weeks the contents
‘of the underground sewer system have

problem is heightened during heavy rain
falls the employees say.

Following a heavy rain shower yester-
day after Spm, a female employee of the
DHL shipping company contacted The
Tribune with her concerns.

“It’s especially bad when it rains, all
the stuff from the toilets comes up and
floats in the streets. The smell is unbear-
able. It’s horrible,” she said.

The DHL employee is especially con-
cerned about the health risks posed by
the sewerage problem.

“It’s extremely unsanitary. All the
workers can’t wait until closing time so

they can get out of here. I imagine it’s
also bad for the two popular eateries
in the building and their guests,” she
said.

Investigation

Parliamentary Secretary of Environ-
mental Health Ron Pinder said that he
had no knowledge of the problem, but
assured those affected that he will be
on-site today to investigate. :

Mr Pinder said that he will not be able

until he had seen it first hand.

“At the moment I can’t say what is
causing it, I will first have to go on-site
and meet with Water and Sewerage per-
sonnel as well as with experts from the
Environmental Health Department,” he
said. .

Mr Pinder speculated that the problem
may originate from the. building’s
drainage system.

He said that while it cannot yet be
determined if the situation is cause for
health concerns, “every time you have a
situation of a open sewer, there is the
possibility of contamination.” .



to San
Andros

soon
back on

@ BY NATARIO
McKENZIE

OFFICIALS in the Min-.

‘istry of Transport and Avia-

tion say flight services to the:
San Andros airport will soon:

been spilling out onto the streets. The



“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

Ae 8) BS

THURSDAY
JULY 21

6:30am Community Pg./1540
11:00 _ Immediate Response
12:00 ZNS News Update
12:03 Caribbean News Update
12:05’ _ Immediate Response
1:00° ° Ethnic Health America
1:30 Spiritual Impact
Mr. Ballooney B.
_ Treasure Attic
Bishop Leroy Emmanuel
’ Gilbert ‘Patterson
"Eugene Cole & Persuaded
Gospel Grooves
News Update
Caribbean Newsline
Legends From Whence We
Came: Telator-Strachan
_.News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight

li By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - Power chiefs
have implored the public on
Grand Bahama to conserve
energy by turning off all non-
essential lights. and appliances
for the next two-and-half days.

The Grand. Bahama Power
‘Company said in‘a press release

demands are not reduced, it
may be necessary to initiate a
strategy which would result in
power cuts.

A defect in Unit 13, the
largest generator with a capaci-
ty of 40 megawatts, caused it to
be taken off-line shortly before

0°: The Bahamas Tonight
Immediate Response
Gommunity Page

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves
the right to make last minute
programme changes!



on, Monday. that if load.

midnight on Monday.

“Should load demand during
the next two-and-half days be
at the same level as that of
Monday it may be necessary to
institute rotating load-shed-
ding,” stated the release.

The company is therefore
appealing to the public and its
customers to turn off pool
pumps, water heaters, set air-
condition temperature to no
lower than 75 degrees, and

ensure that all non-essential
lights and appliances are turned

off.

The island's 18,000 residen-
tial customers have been urged
to conserve energy especially

during peak evening hours

between 7pm and 10pm..

| :
«} Nassau: 32502505 ¢ FAX: 325¢1204 # ROBINSON ROAD



to say what the cause for the problem is

Public appeal to save energy

Community relations direc-
tor at the company Roger John-
son indicated that if the public
complies with the request pow-
er cuts could be reduced.

Over the past several weeks,
there have been a number of
power outages on the Grand
Bahama.

The company says it plans to
commission a new generation
unit at its plant on Queens
Highway and West Sunrise
Highway.

The Power Company apolo-
gised for any inconvenience that
has been caused and assured
the public that its team will do
everything possible to return
Unit 13 to service and the sys-
tem back to normal.

resume as measures have;
already been taken to secure,
temporary facilities. :

The San Andros airport
terminal was ravaged by fire
two weeks ago, in what
police have determined was.
an arson attack. i

The police station, custom
office, immigration office,
Western Air office, airport
snack bar and a snack booth;
which were housed in the
terminal building, were all
completely destroyed. j

According to Transport
and Aviation deputy perma-
nent secretary Rudolph
Pratt, three structures have
already been secured and up
to yesterday afternoon
efforts were being made ta
ship them to San Andros. ;

The structures, known as
“modulars”, will serve as
temporary terminal facilities
until a permanent structure
canbe constructed. . — |

Mr Pratt told The Tribune
it had been brought to his
attention that because of thé
width of the modulars, there
might be a problem trans:
porting them over a particu:
lar bridge to San Andros
from Fresh Creek.

In light of this, he said
that shipping the modulars
on a barge was being viewed
as the more viable alterna-
tive.

According to Mx Pratt, it
is hoped that the modulars
will get to San Andros by
weeks end.

The-San.Andros airport i is
the gateway: to ‘North
Andros and the blaze has
raised much concern among
local residents over the eco-
nomic future of the area.



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?PAGi. 3, [HURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Funeral service
for John R Morley



B JOHN R MORLEY

THE funeral service for
prominent businessman and
realtor John R Morley will be
held at St Matthew’s Anglican
Church, Shirley Street at 4pm
Saturday, July 23.

Mr Morley died at the age of
72 at his Montagu Foreshore- -.

~ home on Sunday at:10.35pm
after suffering for some time
with a brain tumour.

He was voted “Business Per-
son of the Year” by the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce in 1999, and devoted his
time and energies to the

. Bahamas Real Estate Associa-
tion from 1962.

In.1965..he formed a real

estate partnership, Morley and



O’Brien, specialising in resi-

dential and commercial sales -

throughout the Bahamas. Later
the firm was merged with
McPherson and Brown, to form
Real Estates Sales and Rentals
(Bahamas) Limited, a complete

brokerage-and property mrafi-"~

agement company.

Contributed

Together the partners con-
tributed substantially to real
estate development in the
Bahamas.

Mr Morley continued on his
entrepreneurial journéy as he

and his two partners formed...

Brown, Morley and Smith Real
Estate in the 1980s. Together

they concentrated on the devel-
opment of two subdivisions,

Westridge Estates and South .
- Westridge.

The partners were particular-
ly proud of this development as

David Morley. He was prede-
ceased by his daughter, Debo-
rah Morley.

Grandchildren

almost every lot was sold.to_.......

“Bahamians.

Mr Morley developed several
commercial properties, includ-
ing Norfolk House, Indepen-
dence Shopping Centre and
Green Shutters in New Provi-
dence.

His latest achievement came
through his partnership in the
Mall of Marathon. j;

He is survived by his wife,

Diane Cole Morley, his.daugh-

ters, Ann: Morley Carmel, Janet
Morley Lovely and Tara and

Sarah Morley, and his son, -

He is also survived by his
sons-in-law, Jeffrey Carmel and
Rod Lovely, daughter-in-law,
Susan Morley, and grandchil-
dren, Alexandra Carmel, Jay
and Chase Carmel, Morgan
Lovely, Emily, Laura and
Peter Morley, his mother-in-
law, Marion Cole, and his in-
laws, Hugh and _ Linda
Pritchard, Denis and Nikki
Cole, Peter and Phillippa Cole,
Brock and Annabel Cole,
James Cole and numerous
nieces and nephews.



Formal
diplomatic
' relations
established
between the
Bahamas
and Sri Lanka

SRI Lanka and the
Bahamas have estab-
lished formal diplomat-

“ic relations by-signing |

a Joint Agreement in
New York on Tuesday,
according to the Sri
Lankan newspaper.

In an online article,
The Daily News credit-
ed the Sri Lankan Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs ©
with saying that the
Agreement “will |
strengthen friendship
and develop bilateral
co-operation in politi-
cal, economic, social ~
and cultural spheres



between the two coun-
tries based on the prin-
ciples and norms of the
United Nations Char-
ter and international
law.”

me Signed :

The Agreement was .
signed on behalf of Sri
Lanka by the perma-
nent representative of
Sri Lanka to the Unit-
ed Nations, Ambas-
sador Prasad
Kariyawasam and for
the Bahamas by its
permanent representa-
tive to the United
Nations, Ambassador
Paulette A Bethel. .

“The Sri Lankan rep-
resentative congratu- -
lated the government
of the Commonwealth
of Bahamas for taking
the initiative for the
establishment of for-
mal diplomatic rela-
tions and observed that
although separated by.
a great distance, the —
people of Sri Lanka
and Bahamas shared
much in common as
developing nations and
in particular Sri Lanka
as an Island nation and
Bahamas as a nation of
Islands,” the article
said.

Decision expected on
former BTU officers

@ By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

Congress president Obie Ferguson. Mr
Moncur and Mr Sawyer are representing
; themselves.

SUPREME Court Justice Hartman : Mr Moncur was expelled from the
Longley is expected to decide today Rod- union by the executive board.

ney Moncur’s and Mark Sawyer’s future
involvement in the Bahamas Taxicab. Election
Mr Sawyer was an-executive board

Union (BTU).
member when he was discharged from:

After months of legal wrangling, the
two officers, who were expelled from the

the union after being voted out in a con-
troversial election on January 17 of this

union, were yesterday. hoping to be
year.

allowed to re-join BTU.
If Justice Longley rules in their favour,
Also expelled were former vice-presi-
dent Cheryl Bethel and executive mem-

the men say they intend to run in the
ber Sigmund Bethel.

BTU annual elections on August 4.
The four were voted out in an election

The judge was slated to announce his
decision yesterday but postponed his

that they maintain was unfair and against
the union’s constitution.

judicial review report until Thursday.
Proceedings occurred in closed cham-

' The Department of Labour certified

the election results on January 19.

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It quoted Paulette
Bethel as saying that
the initiative was the
logical outcome of ‘the
Bahamas government’s
desire “to _promote
peace and friendship,
develop cultural ties
and strengthen eco-
nomic and technical
co-operation with
members of the United
Nations.as wellas ...;
Commonwealth ‘fami-
ly.” | Bs
“The establishment
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relations is expected to
further advance frater-
nal ties of friendship
and co-operation
between Sri Lanka and
‘the Bahamas in the
years to come,” the
article said.

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broad cross section of commercial and private clients. An
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The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
| you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
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If so, call us on 322-1986
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|HE TRIBUNE





Poor tree maintenance ORALEE’S
| NEW ARRIVALS

LOCAL NEWS

‘could affect tourism’

@ By KARAN MINNIS

THE lack of good tree main-
“tenance could lead to a possible
decrease in tourism according
to environmentalist and attor-
ney Pericles Maillis.

. Mr Maillis was speaking at
the first informative seminar
held by A-1 Tree Services.

The’ company, which is
owned by Joy Burrows, has
been in operation for 25: years
and is dedicated to proper tree
maintenance.

‘The seminar was held yes-
terday at the British Colonial
Hotel under the theme: “Trees:
Valuable assets to our econo-
my, environment and commu-
nity.” ,

Mr Maillis said that if tourist



@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

Seminar highlights
‘valuable assets’

see a lack of trees and a lack
of proper tree maintenance,
they will be less inclined to
revisit the Bahamas.

“One of these days we will
see a collapse,” he said. “This is

mainly because with the lack’
of trees we will not have a place’

worth looking at.”

Also speaking at the seminar
was chief meteorologist Basil
Dean, who said that trees play a

Parents to take complaints
to Director of Education



major role in preserving the
environment and the ecologi-
cal balance.

Weather

“From a weather and climate
perspective, trees play a partial
but very vital role in protect-
ing against erosion,” he said.
“This role of trees may appear
insignificant to us, however you

They claim that their complaints have not
received enough attention.





FRUSTRATED Gregory Town Eleuthera
parents who want their children relocated'to a
school in Palmetto Point have vowed to take
their complaints to the Director of Education.

In an article appearing in Monday’s Tribune,
several parents said they are concerned that
their children will be at “a severe disadvan-
tage” by the end of the school year because
they have been left stranded whenever the Glass
Window Bridge is closed due to extreme weath-
er or-for other reasons.

_ Transferred

The parents are asking that the 16 students in
Gregory Town be transferred from North
Eleuthera High to Lower Bogue to attend Cen-
tral Eleuthera High School in Palmetto Point.

The parents said that they have been com-
plaining for more than two years and are fed up
with the situation, which has caused the stu-
dents to miss school repeatedly, sometimes for
weeks at a time.

Originally the parents took their complaints
to the district education officer Ross
Smith. ,

The parents say they are now desperate and
intend to write a letter to Education Director

_Iris Pinder, after learning that the director had

not been aware of their concerns.

Media

Speaking with The Tribune yesterday, PTA
president Rebecca Quatermine said the par-
ents had listened intently to the media reports
regarding the recent Education conference held
earlier this month in Nassau. me
'- She said they were very disappointed when
there was no mention of the Eleuthera situation.

Mrs Quatermine.said the parents are left to

wonder if the ministry has any concern for the
future of the children.

PTA chaplain Diane Thompson said yester-
day that the parents cannot not understand why
the ministry is unable to find space for the 16
children.



may recall that last year during
the passage of hurricane
Jeanne, approximately 2500
people died in Haiti-as a result
of deforestation.”

Mr Dean explained that trees
“can also be used to shade
roads and parking lots, which
could otherwise become very
hot during the day and which
store heat for later release at
night.”

Joy Burrows, the owner of
A-1 Tree Services, stated that
“poorly maintained trees, or
trees that.are not maintained,
can be a significant liability.”

“We have three problems,”
she said. “They are clear-cut-
ting, tree topping and don’t
care attitudes.” t

She explained that “topping
is the senseless practice of indis-
criminately removing the
majority ofa tree’s branches.”

“Trees that have been
topped are prone to insects, dis-
‘eases, weak limbs, and rapid
new growth,” she said.

Evidence

Mrs Burrows also provided

_the audience with evidence.

from a study completed by the
University of Illinois proving
that the amount of vegetation
in an area can effect the crime
rate of that area.

According to Mrs Burrows,
the studies discovered that
areas with more vegetation usu-
ally have a lower crime
rate than those with less vege-
tation.

“In areas that have more
trees, persons are more likely to
go out and to interact with their
neighbors,” she said.

“And because of this inter-

action, they will be more watch-
ful.”

Mrs Burrows says she plans
to host more seminars to
encourage Bahamians to be
more conscious about tree pro-
tection and its effect on the
environment.



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THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005, PAGE 9



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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Our nation is still adrift — and
it seems to be getting worse

QC) UR nation is still feel-
ing the frustration of

“drift. We are still uncertain of
our direction and unsure of
what we are about. This is a
genuine problem in a globalised
world with all its pressing inter-
national issues, including the
push for free trade, economic
integration and compliance with
stricter international standards.

It is especially dangerous in a

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world where global terrorism is
the new norm. Our government
is clumsy, seemingly confused
and overwhelmed. Our nation is
growing older but we don’t
seem to be maturing as we
ought to be. From a national
performance perspective, we
appear aimless and purposeless.

Aimlessness and purpose-
lessness promote uncertainty
and confusion. This coupled
with economic ecabieulty encour-

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ages panic, which leads to acts
of desperation.

It might be that some of the
social ills we observe today rep-
resent the onset of this panic.
Such ills include shocking acts
of violence, the highly intensi-
fied frustration with the illegal

. immigration problem, increase

tensions in labour relations, the
accident-prone driving on the
streets, increased levels of post-
traumatic stress disorder,
untimely deaths from stress
related factors, and the general

. malaise throughout the Bahami-

an society.

In an environment like this,
our leaders must offer cause to
believe that better will: come.
They do this by acting wisely,
revealing a genuine under-

standing of the problems we
face and strategic approaches

to solving them. Empty rhetoric
will not do.

: In an environment like this,
Bahamians need motivation by
passionate leaders whose pas-
sion stems from a confident and
focused pursuit of the nation’s
best interest. In an environment
like this, leaders must elevate
their example by demonstrat-
ing honesty, integrity and
accountability.

W e Bahamians have
: good reasons to be

concerned about the state of

‘affairs in our nation-and we are

right to point to the government
as contributing significantly to
that state of affairs.

At this point we do not know
what is happening with our
Prime Minister. Every now and
again he pops up in the press
performing ceremonial duties,
even on occasions doing his

- famous “Perry Shuffle”: Yet,

on the weighty issues con-
fronting our nation, we cannot
hear from hin.

Does “light duties” mean that
our Prime Minister cannot

PRESS RELEASE |

KING OF BARTENDERS WILFRED SANDS’
ACCOMPLISHMENT ACCLAIMED

On Wednesday, 6th July 2005, Mr. Paul Thompson, managing director, management and staff
of the Lyford Cay Club acknowledged the success of its famous bartender Mr. Wilfred Sands,
supervisor of the Men’s Locker Room, applauding him for having won the bronze medal at the
“Taste of the Caribbean” culinary classic in a recognition event.

. Wilfred, sponsored by the Lyford Cay-Club-and Bacardi in the bartenders’ contest at the recent
culinary classic in Miami, utilized originality, taste and color to dazzle and woo the judges,
particularly being at ease with the old time favorite Rum Dum which he has served to numerous

. members and guests at the Lyford Cay Club since he stamped his identity on it in 1971. Ever
the consummate gentleman, Wilfred sought to please all, those who Snior alcoholic and those

- who do not, by inventing the Yellow Elder, a predominately flavored Pabatamangs drink, just

for the contest as well.

As Wilfred’s drinks are known to tantalize ¢ the alate and awaken the taste: buds, so too did his
victory release spontaneous accolades from all and sundry at the club and elsewhere.

Wilfred, having won the bronze medal so soon after our managing director had won the Cacique
award’s Hotelier of the Year, allowed the Lyford Cay Club to once again make’ ‘history, engraving
another name on the Bahamian historical and social landscape.

The Lyford Cay Club’s Wilfred Sands, our king of bartenders, has shown the judges and the
world at the culinary classic, “Taste of the Caribbean” why he is king.

Hats off to Mr. Wilfred Sands!

Standing left to right at the recognition event are: Mr. Nolan Johnson, beverage and catering
manager; Mrs. Janette Smith, senior assistant manager, Clubhouse Operations; Mr. Wilfred
Sands, bronze medal winner at the ““Taste of the Caribbean” culinary classic; Mr. Paul Thompson,
managing director of the Lyford Cay Club and Ms. Mary Deleveaux, director, human resources.



STRAIGHT UP TALK



Pe

address important issues for us
at all or does it mean that he is
not expected to give a full day’s
work to them? As he recovers,
we do not want him to over-
extend himself but no Prime
Minister can avoid considering
or commenting on matters of
national issues, even if he is not
in his best health and especially
if his mind is healthy.

VARGO



L A

NG

stage and the audience are the
ones to whom they play. Unless
they satisfy the audience their
acting, no matter how dramatic,
will all be in vain.

It seems here that a drama
that would truly impress a
Bahamian audience today is
one that addresses in a very
focused and substantive way the
many national and global issues



Attendance at national func-
tions should not be addressed
as a racial or political issue but

rather as a matter of interest.



While the Prime Minister
continues his partial convales-
cence, his cabinet ministers
seem to be running a muck of
the government, signing,
approving, rejecting, dismissing
whatever they want. There is
no apparent rhyme or reason
to their behaviour.

The strength of cabinet-gov-

ernment is its collective respon-
sibility, where the weight of dis-
course and decision-making is
carried out by a mature group
acting in the interest of the pub-
lic as opposed to self-promot-
ing individuals pursuing their
personal political agendas. Too
many times this does not seem
to be the order of the day in the
government of PM Christie.
Meanwhile the nation’s looks
on in disgust and disappoint-
ment. Rightly the people call
on the government to stop talk-
ing and start doing something
about the state of the nation.

THE NEED FOR '-
EFFECTIVE OPPOSITION

A: opposition in an
environment like the

one we have today should
thrive. It is the opposition’s
democratic duty to clearly and
definitively point out the blun-
ders and missteps of the gov-
ernment while pointing out how
it would do things better.

Both inside and outside of
Parliament, people look to the
opposition to put so. much pres-
sure on an incompetent gov-
ernment that the government
either dramatically improves its
performance, resigns or calls
new elections. People’s expec-

. tation of the opposition in this

regard might be unrealistic, but
it is their expectation and it is
the one that they will look to
as they consider supporting that
opposition in the next election.

While members of the oppo-
sition contend for leadership in
the party, they must not forget
that they are merely actors ona

impacting upon their well-being.
We do have today a much
more enlightened electorate
than we had in times past and
they want greater depth and
imagination from their politi-
cians, both those in government
and those in opposition. Give
them what they want and they
will give you what you want.

DID CABINET
AUTHORISE MINISTER
MILLER TO SIGN ONTO

PETROCARIBE?

( abinet ministers can-
not sign the Bahamas
onto any international agree-
ment without expressed autho-
risation-from the cabinet or the
permission of the Prime Minis-
ter. Did Leslie Miller have such
an approval when he signed the
PetroCaribe Agreement?

One would think that such a
question was a simple one to
answer; however, in the Christie
administration it is a great mys-
tery. Government ministers,
other than Mr Miller are as
silent as a lamb on the issue or
otherwise doing all manner of
verbal gymnastics around it.

This seems typical of this gov-
ernment. They are eager to own
any good thing that happens in
this country, even when they
have had nothing to do with it,
yet when something curious
happens, mum’s the word. This
is not responsible government
and it only leads people to
believe that PM Christie has no
control of his government and
that the government is acting
in a herky jerky fashion. We can
do better than this and we must
do better than this.

NIKKI KELLY WAS

RIGHT ABOUT
PATRIOTISM

I: her most recent column,

Nikki Kelly was right to —

point out that “patriotism is
more than waving flags'and
public posturing”. It certainly
is not proven by. attending
national functions because
sometimes you can and some-
times you can’t.

I recall distinctly that duti g
the term of the FNM, few well-
known PLPs, some of whom
were former cabinet ministets
and parliamentarians, and many
not so well-known PLPs, sup-
ported national events. It was
as if they considered those
events FNM events because” ‘tHe
FNM was the governing party.
Many of these same people,
however, came out and ‘still
come out in great numbers’ ‘to
national events now thatthe
PLP is in office. Businessman
and PLP-supporter Frankly in
Wilson, once rightly pointed th
out.

Attendance at national func-
tions should not be addrésséd
as a racial or political issue but
rather as a matter of interest.
Many Bahamian patriots do not
attend national events becaiise
they simply find them too rou-
tine. If one attends 32 Indeped-
dence celebrations and all ‘32
are the same, it’s almost, J like
going to watch a movie 32
times. While you may have
appreciated the movie the first
two or three times,.to watch ‘iit

‘ another 30 times and perhaps

40 more times would seem abit
much.

A patriot would gladly suffer
over and over again for the.
cause of the nation when he « or
she has to, be it in war against
outside enemies or in a-civic
struggle with enemies within.
Among such patriots are both
black and white Bahamians.
However, the same patriots
would think it no harm to Oc¢a-

_ Sionally miss a routine celebra-

tion he or she has seen a dozen
times before.

Do we not have the creativity
and dynamism to vary ‘our

‘national celebrations enough to -

intrigue all and sundry to come
out? Yes we do! Let’s use that
creativity and dynamism,' then
we will not have to be discugsing
who-came and did not comé ne
rather, we will discuss whaty
pened.
Patriotism is a matter sti th

heart and is demonstrated: by
one’s commitment to the*sdod
order and well-being of dne’s
nation. It is demonstrated: by
one’s contributions to the devel-

_ opment of one’s country, both

in private‘and public life. Wav-
ing a flag, attending a national
event or pledging allegiahce
only symbolise national pride, it
is consistent performance of
one’s duties as a citizen of the
state that concretises it.

THOUGHT FOR’ THE:
WEEK SOF

CG (
overnment:
trust, and: the

officers of the government ‘are

trustees; and both the trust And

the trustees are created for ‘the

benefit of the people.”
— Henry Claya



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THE TRIBUNE

"NEW Grand Bahama Port
‘Authority Co-chairman Julian
Francis will be speaking at the
commencement ceremony for
the Success Training College’s
“Freeport campus.

_ Ina release, the college said

‘that for the sixth consecutive

year, Grand Bahamians will ~

_Join the graduating cluster of
_Students in a week of activities
‘surrounding the commence-
_ment ceremony.

This year, it said, the associ-
“ate of science degree will be
conferred by Success president
‘Dr Deswell Forbes on 51 grad-
uands, the largest cluster to be

' graduated since the establish-
_ ment of the Freeport campus.

The commencement cere-
“mony on July 29 - to be held in
‘thé Grand Ballroom at the
“Westin at Our Lucaya at 7pm -
will be the highlight of the

' ; planned events.

“Mr Francis will attend this
Ceremony and deliver as the
- Distinguished Commencement
“SP éaker.

MT he release said that cere-
m ony will be preceded by a
‘ eae of celebrations, during ©
Ww ich “a flurry of activities™
cw will be held.

7 The selected theme for this
vyear celebrations is “I’m
Sfronger now!”

The opening event of the,
“week will be the Baccalaure-
‘ate thanksgiving service on
Sunday July 24, starting at
3.30pm in St Paul’s Methodist
‘Church East Sunrise Highway.

Rev Dr J Emmette Weir,
‘Superintendent Emeritus, will
deliver the.sermon.

ie “The Mary Star of the Sea
Choir, renowned for its stellar
»pérformances, will lead the ser-
‘vice and render musical selec-
tions (under the direction of
Mr, Basil Hanna). Musical ren-
ditions by Mrs Linda Wild-
goose (Soprano) will also be a
highlight of the worship expe-
Hence,’ ’ the release said.





2005 Lecture Series
Schedule

July 21st
Sports Medicire
Ds. Willard Thompson

August 18th
Mental Health
Alzheimer’s Disease

September 15th
Children’s Health

October 20th
Cancer

November 17th
Diabetes

December 15th
Managing Stress &
Depression

_.Speaker:

Q&A:

LOCAL NEWS



“As the week continues, the
members of the graduating
class are expected to pay a

courtesy call on Mrs Diana .

‘Swann (deputy general man-
ager) and the staff of ZNS as
well as tour the facilities on
Monday July 25.

“Then, on Tuesday July 26,
the graduating class will visit
and serve lunch to the residents
and staff of the GB Home for
the Aged as well as make a
monetary donation as a token
of their respect to our senior



citizens,” it said.

Wednesday July 27 and
Thursday July 28 will be
reserved, respectively, for the
president’s reception and the
final rehearsals for the com-
mencement ceremony.

“Finally, on Saturday July
30, the celebrations will con-
clude with a post-commence-

ment beach party in honour of

the graduates of the Freeport
campus and those of the Nas-
sau campus who will comprise
the large contingent of guests

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coming into Freeport for the
ceremony.

“Families of graduates are
also expected. The festivities
will include food and drinks,
music, the annual beach vol-
leyball game, a domino tour-
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The release said the public
is invited to support the gradu-

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July 24 and the commencement
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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





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Activities announced
for summer holidays

B By Bahamas Information
Services

TWO government agencies
have recently joined forces to
assist parents by introducing
numerous summer programmes
for children for the next two
months.

Mrs Nicole Allen of the Par-
ent Teacher Association at
Thelma Gibson Primary School,
said it is extremely important
to have children involved with
activities over the summer vaca-
tion “because children are just

wondering the streets and being
raised by the streets.”

“This is the opportunity for
parents to have their children
attended educational pro-
grammes without the stress of
worrying where they are and
what they are doing,” Mrs Allen
said.

The Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture is offering
a variety of-activities that began
July 12, including computers,
swimming, aerobic dancing,
music and arts.

In addition, three other pro-



“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

Share your news

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you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
dnd share your story.

but not at Lhe Tribune

The Tribune is preparing its biopest ever

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send in a photograph of themselves, and we need schools to supply information
on plans for the new academic year, plus any appropriate photos,

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THE TRIBUNE

tare



ew ITC president

pledges growth

THE INCOMING council
president of the International
‘Training in Communication
(ITC) group has vowed to help
‘the organisation achieve new
heights in the coming years.

ITC was founded in 1938 for
the purpose of practicing and
-training its members in the art
bfcomnmunication and leader-
“Sbip.
yn her acceptance speech,
‘Shellyn Ingraham, newly elect-
'éd; president of ITC’s second
‘level Council V, said that she
lcomes all challenges that her
“post might bring.
£1 Since ITC’s inception, mem-
‘bers have been meeting regu-
‘larly, helping each other devel-
‘@p poise and confidence in
‘Many areas where communica-






US condemns trial of men
‘working to strengthen
democracy’ in Venezuela

:1THE US State Department has declared

tion is a major factor.

To fulfill the organisation’s
mandate, members create and
deliver speeches, debates, pan-
el discussions, workshops and
other forms of education.

ITC operates two clubs in
Nassau, the Essence Club and
Valentine Communications,
and the Yellow Elder Club in
Freeport.

“Tt is this incoming presiden-
t’s desire to see more together-
ness. We need more social activ-
ities at this level. We need to
incorporate more knowledge
and be reminded of what ITC is
all about. We need to encour-
age and uplift each other, set
positive examples,” Ms Ingra-
ham told the ITC members at
the council’s recent fourth quar-

spiracy’ for accepting a $31,000 grant from

terly meeting at the British
Colonial Hilton.

Ms Ingraham especially
thanked her predecessor Gar-
dena Evans, “who has without
doubt left an indelible footprint
that could only encourage this
organisation to soar to even
greater heights”.

Before being elected to the
post of Council V president, Ms
Ingraham served as the head of
ITC’s first level at the Essence
Club.

‘““Your support over the years
has left me eager to serve at your
command,” she told the council.

Trade Union Congress Presi-
dent Obie Ferguson was the
guest speaker at the ITC meet-
ing, which was held under the
theme “aim to achieve”.



THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005, PAGE 13







& TARA Smith, Essence Club; Shellyn Ingraham, president 2005/6; Obie Ferguson; Gardenia
Evans, president 2004/5; and Dr Bastian; Daphne Johnson, Essence Club; Olive Burns-Forbes,
Essence Club; Andrea Adderley, Essence Club; Sherman Stevens, Valentine Communicators,

Patrice Roberts, Essence; and Dianne Miller, Essence Club.



for basic rights.

These judicial actions are a






Dishwashers

Housemen
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its ‘disappointment at a Venezuelan court
er bringing charges against three men who
Usays were working to. strengthen democ-
'Facy in their country.
«iVenezuela has been mentioned in the
‘Bahamian news since gavernment signed
‘tHe PetroCaribe oil agreement with the
‘Vénezuelan authorities earlier this month.
aA statement from State Department act-
spokesman Tom Casey read:
aa'We are very disappointed by the July 7
‘decision of a Venezuelan judge to try the
four leaders of the civic, non-governmental
organisation Simate on charges of ‘con-



t
’
te




Mrasilian

Pit dat

Frarohia CFI eS Commission

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

the National Endowment for Democracy
(NED) to carry-out voter education activi-
ties.

“The Venezuelan government’s charges
against Maria Corina Machado, Alejan-
dro Plaz, Luis Enrique Palacios and Ricar-
do Estévez are without merit. The NED-
supported activities were aimed at
strengthening citizen participation in the

democratic, constitutional processes of

their country.

“Sumate is an internationally respected
civic organisation committed to promoting
free and fair electoral processes and respect

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ar ‘wwe at



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Senior

The rapid evolution of the telecommunications sector combined with’ novel

approaches to regulating the sector has made it mandatory for the Public Utili-

Regulatory Economist

ties Commission (PUC) to strengthen its capacity in Fou oly economic

analyses.

The Job

The successful applicant for the position will provide specialist advice on the
economic and financial performance of regulated utilities. He will also work as
an integral part of a multi-disciplinary team of professionals to ensure effective
oversight by the PUC of the various providers of utility services in The Bahamas.
The candidate will perform market research and other economic studies relevant

to the current and future development of the telecommunications, electricity,

and water and sewerage sectors in The Bahamas.

Training

The candidate will be trained to carry out economic and financial analyses

This

involving market research, and changes in price setting methodologies.

specialist training will be offered principally via short courses and seminars, in

The Bahamas and overseas.

ualifications

Bachelor's Degree in Economics or Economics and Accounting; and

Master’s Degree in Economics, or Finance; and

Minimum of five (5) years relevant experience.

Remuneration

The PUC offers a very attractive benefits package and excellent opportunities for

further development.

experience. Further information about the PUC could be obtained from

Starting salary will be commensurate with relevant

our website at: www.PUCBahamas.gov.bs.

Applications should be received by 29 July, 2005

“linterested Prey ee ah May deliver or: ae resumes to:
Executive Director, Public Utilities Commission: »
‘4th Terrace East, Collins Avenue
Fax No. (242) 323-7288

Sea aiN ns

‘-PUC@pucbahamas.gov.bs





transparent part of a Venezuelan govern-
ment campaign designed to intimidate
members of civil suciety for exercising their
democratic rights.”

Mr Casey said the State Department
remains “seriously concerned about politi-
cal persecution and continued threats to
democratic rights and institutions in
Venezuela.

“We urge the government of Venezuela
to honour its commitments under the Inter-
American Democratic Charter to guarantee
the civil and political rights of all its. citi-
zens.”

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



Complaints at gas prices on islans

FROM page one

gas was not enough, residents on
Moores Island complain that they are
also having to pay $5.50 as well for a
gallon of kerosene.

Currently the price for a gallon of
gasoline at the pumps in New Provi-
dence averages about $3.72. Although
kerosene is not a price controlled item,

it is being sold in Nassau for $4. 10 a

gallon.
Icelyn Hanna, a resident of Moores
Island, said that the fishermen on the

island are dumbfounded at the prices
they are being forced to pay for gas.

“The fishermen here are complain-
ing but there isn’t a thing they can do.
First it was $5.00 now they raised it to
$5.50 a gallon the last trip the mail-
boat made.

“They need it so. they have to pay it.
We have to send drums into Nassau
and then pay for the freight and stuff.
The crawfish season is opening the first
of next month, so we expect it go even
higher because they are going to need
the gas,” she said.

Sherman Stuart, another resident
and fisherman for over 30 years said
that with the current prices it doesn’t
make much sense for locals to even go
out in their boats to try and make a
living.

“A lot of the fishermen want to go
out but they can’t afford to get gas to
go. It’s hard man. Every time you go
out you are looking at $85 for gas, and
that’s with a small engine. Other fellas
spend like $120 on gas to get out and if
they don’t make that then they lose
out.

“When people start stealing you real-
ly can’t blame them. We have it.tough.
Right now conch is the only thing that
is selling, and it’s at what we call its
summer peak of $2.50 to $2.75 a
pound, but they are scarce.

“So when the fella go out he may
only get 50 to 60 pounds, and after you
take out for gas and oil there ain’t
nothing to share between two divers.

You might have enough to buy a cart of

soda,” he said.
Minister of Trade and In





that such prices are being charged on
the island. me OY
- The minister said that last year, ‘fol-
lowing the devastation of hurricanes
Frances and Jeanne, he warned met-

‘chants about price gouging, but cau-
‘tioned that there will be no warning

this time.
. “That’s clearly against the law. We
Héed to look into that. Now you could
¢ why we need PetroCaribe to get. a
ak. That is price gouging. That? s
hat that is. They need to cease. and
‘sist immediately,” he said.

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Leslie Miller said he couldn’t by



‘FROM page one

“they are the government of all
the people, not just the PLP.”
The same day the Wemco
officers were laid off, new secu-
rity officers were at their posts.
The Soldier Road BTC
exchange offices and radio, the
Camperdown offices and
Pinewood offices were identi-
fied by a long-time employee
of both Wemco and Intertech
as now under Intertech security.
"There are new faces and dif-
ferent uniforms," said a senior
technical associate at the Sol-

dier Road exchange office.

"The change came into effect —

on Friday."

According to a well placed
government source, the board
of directors at BTC decided that
instead of allowing Wemco to
control the contract with BTC,
it was best to share around the
policing of BTC by offering
Intertech and other security
companies a portion of the busi-
ness. They decided to “split up
the pie,” the source explained.

Dr Rahming, who is also the
president of Intertech, was
reluctant to confirm that any

BTC.

“T didn' t sign a contract sith
BaTelCo, but maybe my com-
pany did,” Dr Rahming said. “I
don’t have anything to do with
those decisions.”

Refusing to discuss “other
business” while at the Prison,
Dr Rahming simply added that,
“the same company that has the _
contract with BaTelCo for the
past few years still has 70-80. per
cent of the contract.”

The Intertech Group, which
employs almost 100 Bahamians
in security operations and inves-

tigation on New Froviaciais,
had applied for the whole
BaTelCo contract but only Bot
20 out of a possible 90 per ¢ent.

Trevor Clarke, general maty-
ager at Intertech, refused to
comment on the BTC contract.

"I don't have'a comment’ on
that right now. Even though he
is the president, Dr Rahming
doesn't deal with the dayto-
day goings on of the companys
said Mr Clarke.

BTC representatives were
unavailable to provide further
details on the reason for the
switch in security at their offices.



Legal action possible Bahamas ‘not on list’

FROM page one

have no intentions on issuing
any others.”

In a press statement, San
Diego-based Viper Incorporat-
ed announced its newest distri-
bution partner, Viper Systems
Networks (VSN) of the
Bahamas.

The statement said VSN
principal managing partner
Elwood Rolle and his team
“have built a formidable launch
programme consisting of print
advertising. and other. market-
ing campaigns to penetrate the
Bahamas and Eastern
Caribbean markets and bring

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Viper Networks products and
services to the region.”

However, Mr Russell con-
firmed yesterday that neither -
Viper Incorporated nor VSN
have a licence to operate in the |
Bahamas and said that if either
company opens up shop in the
country, it “would most cer-
tainly be an illegal act.”

If this occurs, he said, the
PUC can prosecute.

Two to three months ago, Mr
Russell said, the PUC pub-
lished an advertisement in local
newspapers advising the

lic that VoIP services outside.:.:}..::¢

of those offered by the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company (BTC) are illegal and
that Bahamians should refrain

_ from supporting such opera-

tions.

However, he said, if it is the
company’s intention to conduct
business outside: of the
Bahamas, “there is nothing we
(the PUC) can do about it.”

The Tribune was unable to
contact either the management
of Viper Incorporated or
Elwood Rolle yesterday.



FROM page one

other international countries
about products recalled from
the market in the US because
of safety concerns.

The investigation was
sparked after The Tribune
contacted several local depart-
ment stores on. Tuesday that
were unaware that they were
selling or had orderéd:a cer-
tain brand of baby’ strollers
that had been recalled in the
US for safety reasons.

Graco Children’s Products
Incorporated ordered a recall
on July 7 of more than one
million of its Duo Tandem
and MetroLite strollers after
reports of hundreds of injuries
and unexpected collapses due
to faulty latches.

However, none of the local

stores that either sold both ,

models or had them on ‘order
were aware of the recall.
‘Mr Ford said that because

the CPSC has primary respon-..

’ sibility for the US, international
buyers and sellers of products
made in the US would need to
make the necessary requests

for recall notifications. -

The CPSC, an independent
federal regulatory agency, is
charged with protecting the
public from unreasonable risks
-of serious injury or death from
more than 15,000 types of con-
sumer products under the
agency's jurisdiction.

The CPSC’s purpose is to
protect consumers from prod-
ucts that pose a fire, electri-
cal, chemical, or mechanical
hazard or can injure children.

At present, Mr Ford said
the only country outside of the
US that the CPSC notifies
occasionally is Canada. * .

He said Health Canada,
which is an agency equivalent
to that of the CPSC ‘has
arranged for notifications ‘and
has been receiving informa-
tion from his office for some
time.

If we intend to be jafotaed
regularly, Mr Ford said'the
Bahamas can make a similar
arrangement as Canada.

The Tribune made several
unsuccessful attempts to:con-
tact Trade and Industry Minis-
ter Leslie Miller for comment.



Man dies while out swimming

FROM page one

when she saw the ambulance
arrive at the beach she wanted
to find out what. was going on.
"When. I got there, I saw a
lot of people standing around
on the pier. There appeared to
be a white male lying on the
pier face up and he was already
blue in the face," she said.
Lathario Barnett, a lifeguard
on Sunshine Cruises, said they
were snorkelling on Rose Island

reef when he heard a cry for help.

"I was assisting someone
with their equipment when I got
a cry for help. I swam over and
assisted a gentleman and then
swam over to the boat," said
Mr Barnett.

He added: "We checked for
his pulse and he had a very
weak pulse. I started CPR and
was assisted by another life-
guard and two tourists. We did
CPR until we got here (Mon-
tagu Beach)."

Mr Evans said that the:man
was pronounced dead at Mon-
tagu Beach.

When The Tribune left the
scene the body was still on the
pier.

A Bahamian eyewitness “who
appeared on ZNS evening news
said, the body was left out on
the pier for two hours.

Up to press time, the police
did not know the man’s identity.
Police are continuing their
investigations into the matter:

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|}HE TRIBUNE

-LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2UU5, FAUE iT



@ By Krystal Knowles
Bahamas Information
Services

-GOVERNOR_ General
Beak Ivy Dumont is in good
health, experts from the Public
Hospitals Authority (PHA)
said during a health screening
exercise at Government House
on July 4.

_ The PHA was responding to
EY challenge by the Governor-
General issued in December,

2004, for health personnel to’

be ambassadors for health.

’ The screening exercise
entailed an examination of a
number of factors, including
weight, height, and blood pres-
sure.

“e{This programme is neces-
saty and I am pleased that it is
happening because it is a mat-
ter that I discussed with care
givers last.Christmas,” the gov-
ermor general said. “Concern
arose because I realised that
care givers themselves were
-obese and I did not think that
this set a very good example.
for.the rest of us. ,
>o“The fact that the Ministry
of-Health is making this a
national programme is signifi-
‘cant because we often read in
the papers that diabetes is a
very serious problem, both
jationally and internationally.
‘People who are obese usually



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are also diabetics. It is critical,
in my. view, that national atten-
tion is paid to obesity.”

Screening



Dame Ivy said she is partic-
ularly interested in the health
screening programme because
she has a son who is a diabetic, -
and is aware of the attendant
complications of this disease.



@ THE Public Hospitals
Authority personnel conducted
its first health screening exer-
cise at Government House on
July 4. Tests were carried out
on Governor General Dame
Ivy Dumont and Government
House employees. Dame Ivy
challenged health workers in
December, 2004, to be ambas-
sadors of good health. From
left are Dr Catherine Conliffe;
Rhoda Bullard-Stamp, admin-
istrative officer; Sandra Rolle,
senior clinical nursing officer;
Pandora Hanna, nursing offi-
cer; Emily Osadebay, principal
nursing officer, Princess Mar-
garet Hospital; Sharon Turn-
quest, senior trained clinical |
nurse; Angie Adderley, senior
trained clinical nurse; Dr Cher-
ilyn Hanna-Hennis, consultant;
Patricia Morley. ©

(BIS Photos:
Raymond Bethel)



She also suggested that com-
panies should make contact
with the Ministry of Health to
have their employees screened
because it would be beneficial
to the individual, the company
and the nation.

The governor general said
she looks forward to losing
another four pounds over the
next four months.

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@ EMILY Osadebay, principal nursing officer at the Princess Margaret Hospital Genta right),
screens Michelle Fergurson, senior clerk at Government House on J uly 4. Standing from left are
Rhoda Bullard- -Stamp, administrative officer; Pandora Hanna, nursing officer; Sandra Rolle,
senior clinical nursing officer; Dr Cherilyn Hanna-Hennis, consultant; Angie Adderley, senior
trained clinical nurse; Sharon Turnquest, senior trained dinical nurse; Dr Catherine Conliffe and
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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005

JACKSON Ritchie

‘Global United Limited, for-
merly Tanja Enterprises Com-

pany Limited, will officially

open its Nassau headquarters
tomorrow.

The company’s new offices
are located in the Airport indus-
trial park and will combine all
its Nassau operations under one
roof.

Prior to the amalgamation of



_Strength_

in numbers

Jennifer Bain, FLMI, FAHM, CLU,

Financial Services Representative in Nassau,
has earned another significant industry
designation: "Fellow, Financial Services
Institute (FFSI)." She is the first Bahamian
to achieve this credential.

The FFSI programme comprises a series”

of self-study courses designed by the. Life Office
Management Association of Atlanta, Georgia,
and provides a context for understanding the
design, support, and marketing of all major
financial services.. Students focus a portion

of their studies in a particular product area such
as retirement plans, mutual funds/investments,

annuities, or banking.

Family Guardian congratulates this dedicated
professional for her commitment to personal
development and customer service excellence.



its operations, Global United
Limited conducted business

from its Saunders Beach and -
Claridge offices. All of the .

company’s Nassau employees
will now be based in its new

‘ headquarters.

Global: United Limited was
originally established in Freeport
in 1991 as TANJA Enterprises

and now has subsidiaries that

include Global United (Freeport)
» Lhe Travel Network and United

Shipping , as well.as Nassau
operations comprised of Global ’:

United (Nassau) , Ritchie Avia-
tion and Seair Airways. Global
United (Nassau) recently

acquired Global Customs Bro-..

kers and World Bound Couriers.

’ Whilst its primary business

THE TRIBUNE



Global United opens
Nassau corporate office



started with services to the mar-:
itime industry, in the past 14:
years Global has expanded. to.
deal with customs clearance and’
brokerage and travel services:
to it clients.

Jackson Ritchie, from Global:
United, said: “We claim to be‘
the largest ship services and
logistics company in the.
Bahamas. We have assets of $34°

- million, a truly good client base*

and employ some 240 Bahami-.
ans.. Now headquartered in.
Nassau, our goal is to open sub’
office in many of the Caribbean:
islands within the next 24.
months and to have a presence:
in many of the major maritime:

centres of the world within the:

next five years.’

’



Preacher's daughter graduates:

CHARISA Munroe, eldest _

child of Dr:Myles and Ruth
Munroe, president and senior
of Bahamas Faith Ministries
International, has completed
her Bachelor of Science degree
in social work.

She is pictured during her
graduation exercises from Oral
Roberts University in. Tulsa
Oklahoma on April 30, 2005.

Charisa maintained an overall

Raab cn eee





GPA of 3.20 and siived asa cam-
pus resident advisor for her dorm.
She is a former student of
Temple Christian School in
Nassau, and plans to continue
her studies by pursuing a\mias-
ters degree in social work\and
public health at the University
of Michigan, where she has
already been accepted.
Charisa plans to complete
studies at the doctoral level. |

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005, PAGE 17

Be Tor) i =a eS)

celebrates
National Pride

& A SECTION of the combined Prison Mass Choir performs one of their many selections during
National Pride Day at Her Majesty’s Prison, Fox Hill. The 50-member choir sang together for the
first time, drawing applause and cheers from the many family, friends and staff members who
attended the event.

B SUPERINTENDENT of Prisons Dr Elliston Rahming (second left) enjoys some of the
festivities of National Pride Day at Her Majesty’s Prison, Fox Hill. Inmates of the facility treated
family, friends and staff members to a day of poetry, song, dance and a speech, competition. Also
from left are Assistant Superintendent of Prisons Dennis Gilbert, who serves as director of the
central intake facility, records and reception; Superintendent Rahming; Assistant Superintendent
of Prisons Stevenson Smith, director of the inmate industries programme; and Assistant
Superintendent of Prisons James Farrington, director of the maximum security unit.

, (BIS photos:

SUPERINTENDENT of Prisons Dr Elliston Rahming (fourth left) presented the top three
finishers in the first Her Majesty’s Prison Speech Competition with their trophies during the
Prison National Pride Day. The inmates presented family, friends and staff members with a
competition on the theme: “Of Thee Bahamas, Nevertheless I Sing”. The competition was won by
Norris Rolle. Also from left are Sergeant Stephanie Pratt, public affairs officer and deputy ,
chairwoman of the sspecial events committee; toastmaster Sherman Bethel, chief judge; James
Dean, second place finisher; Superintendent Rahming; Norris Rolle, winner; Barrington North,
third place finisher; Tiska Pratt, secretary, special events Committee; and Deputy Superintendent
of Prisons, Mr Charles Rolle. ;





PAGE 18, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005 [HE TRIBUNE

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The successful candidate will be mainly
responsible for the supervision of the
Security Staff, supervising the maintenance

projects on the site, along with other duties.

Interested persons should submit a resume
along with three references that will include
one from the candidates Church Pastor to:

Ms Kelcine Hamilton
Academy Affairs Manager



: Kingsway Academy
All Honda vehicles are serviced by NMC’s factory-trained Business Office
HONDA technicians using manufacturer parts and recommended Bernard Road
service routines suitable for our severe driving conditions. Your
The Power of Dreams vehicle should be serviced every three months or 3,000 miles ,

for maximum performance and safety.

Telephone contact:
324-6887, 324-6269; Fax 393-6917



Dowdeswell Street
322-4626

E-mail: service@nassaumotor.com

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS -
FRIDAY, AUGUST 5, 2005





Poon IMIDUINE

LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL NEWS



A BUSINESS that has been
in one family for three genera-
tions celebrated a milestone
with the opening of new store.

Master Technicians, estab-
lished in June 1965, is celebrat-
ing its 40th anniversary this year
as a retail trade business dealing
with home appliances, elec-
tronics, entertainment systems,
and house-wares.

The business, now in its third

_ generation of leadership, was
started by well-known busi-
nessman Herbert Treco. In the
late 1970s through 2003, the
business was shared by Mr Tre-

Master Technicians officially
opened its new store on Village
Road in late June. It is equipped
with state-of-the-art technolo-
gy, and a new showroom that is
more than double the display
area of its previous store.

Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of National Security,
Cynthia Pratt, delivered the
keynote address at the grand
opening ceremony. The leader
of the FNM, Senator Tommy
Turnquest, also attended.

Master Technicians carries
Whirlpool appliances, Kitchen
Aid products, Samsung appli-

ys CYCaA He

has been set-up for William
{Billy} Francis Hall {Pepsi}
at The Royal Bank of Canada,
Palmdale Branch in the name

of Hall’s Medical Fund,

Account #7200215 to help
defray medical bills that arose
during his illness. At this time

we would like to
thank all who have made a
donation.

Celebration as family
business opens store ©

as
fe Oe77)) VA

ances and electronics, Sub Zero
appliances, Avanti appliances,
Sharp electronics, JVC elec-
tronics, and a variety of house-
wares.

co’s sons, Gregory and Ricar-
do; and tow the third genera-
tion, from 2003, is being led by
Derek Francis, Mr Treco’s
grandson.

@ GENERAL manager
Derek Francis at the launch



Slaes Christopher & Mark atl





Indonesian government
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ounsellor, Christian
ndLord and others

he medical expenes of

as shot in April 2005.

2ts can be purchased at:
ian Bookshop (Rosetta Street)
%, Bible Bookstore (Mall at Marathon)
~ Johnson’s Tailoring (Wulff Road)
ACE Lawn Mower (McCullogh Corner)

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PAGE 20, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005 THE TRIBUNE

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making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
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PAGE 22, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005 | . _ THETRIBUNE







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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005, PAGE 25

Clinton, Tanzanian president
launch HIV/AIDS program



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Syndicated Content
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a ic fi i THe store seeks qualifie
Bou N ee ie NTL of:

Successful applicant should possess:

¢ A high school diploma
¢ Good customer service skills
° Good written and oral communication skills

Fax resume to 393-3320 or send resume to
P.O. Box N-1277

A leading clothing store seeks qualified
applicants for the position of:

SOY

The sicessful candidate will assist the manager with the day-to-day
functions of the store.

Applicant should possess: e @
¢ A minimum of 3 years experience in a similar position F rstC a rl b b e a Nn

° Good customer service skills

¢ Good written and oral communication skills C a ree r O p po rtu n ity

: ° Experience in retail merchandising . :
Fax resume to 393-3320 or send resume to P.O. Box N-1277 a RR :
, | MANAGER, SOURCING AND SUPPLY MANAGEMENT
os : FirstCaribbean International Bank is the ‘combination of CIBC and Barclays Bank in the Caribbean, Bahamas

and Belize. We are the region's largest publicly traded bank with over 3,000 staff serving over 5.3 million
people in 16 countries. We manage over a00, 000 active accounts through more than 80 branches and centres.



Responsibilities:

¢ To manage and develop a_ professional and fully integrated client/practice facing country Sourcing Team

* To assist in the development and maintenance of close working relationships between the Sourcing Team and the
Strategic Business Units

* To implement processes for the selection, appraisal and management of suppliers

* To ensure compliance with Sourcing and Supply Management's policies and procedures so that commercial, financial
and service delivery risks are mitigated wherever possible

° To initiate, approve and administer local supply and service contracts

Prerequisites:

* 8-10 years' experience in a commercial environment with 2 years at a Senior Management Level operating in a
client-facing practice

° 3-5 years' experience of successfully managing a Sourcing Team

¢ Experience in conducting negotiations with regards to the provision of 3rd party goods aid services

° Chartered Institute of Pursasing and Supply (CIPS) or Institute of Supply Management (ISM) qualified or equivalent
will be an asset

We offer an attractively structured compensation and reward package as well as performance bonuses.
Applications with detailed résumés should be submitted no later than 5th August, 2005 to:

Karen Bynoe

Administrative Assistant

Human Resources Department

Head Office

Warrens

Barbados

Email: karen.bynoe@firstcaribbeanbank.com

Only applicants who are short-listed will be contacted.

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

Caribbean Pride. International Strength. Your Financial Partner.

Ex g luding Mitchell Gold Products FirstCaribbean International Bank is an Associated Company

of Barclays Bank PLC and CIBC,

ay Sa PAW ra ors GAG rarag BL ae
© Tel: 242-356-7302
_¢ email: ariana@batalnet.bs :





PAGE 24, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005 | THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL NEWS








. Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”





Support you trust. Comfort you'll



Donald's Furniture - 322-3875 ¢ Best Buy Furniture - 394-2378
Roberts Furniture - 322-8862 ¢ Palmdale Furniture - 322-3703

The Sleep Gallery - 327-5338 © Home Furniture - 322-8646
Wood You Furniture - 325-9663




¢ Power Chairs
¢ Mobility
Scooters

e Lift Chairs

Wheel Chairs













Come see our showroom at

SCOTTDALE BEDDING CO. LTD.

; Hill Top on the East West Highway
Open: Monday - Friday 8am - 5pm ° Telephone: 394-4147-50




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THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005

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“= Telephone: (242) 302-9250 .






i By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor




hile the
Bahamas has
“so far been
fortunate” as

dation in the number of inter-
national financial centres
used for private wealth man-
agement, attorneys yesterday
said this nation had to ensure
it remained “relevant” to
client needs if it was to sur-
vive.

PricewaterhouseCoopers
(PwC) global private bank-
ing/wealth management sur-
vey for 2005, which drew
responses from 130 partici-
pants including some based
in the Bahamas, found there

See WEALTH, 5B

a “net gainer” from consoli- ~

Bahamas is ‘ne
gainer’ through
private wealth

consolidation























Bahamas seventh _

: most reliant nation

on tourism for jobs

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
- Tribune Business Editor

~~ THE Bahamas will this year be
the world’s seventh most-reliant
nation on the tourism industry to
provide the bulk of employment
for its workforce, with some 68.7
per cent or 115,900 jobs relying
directly on the sector.
And the World Travel and
Tourism Council’s (WITC) 2005
, country report for the Bahamas
- projected that this reliance was
set to further increase over the
‘next 10 years, with tourism
* becoming responsible for 145,293
jobs or 70.1 per cent of total
émployment by 2015.
_ While tourism was set to create
one in every 1.5. jobs in the
Bahamas in 2005, this ratio was
| Set to decrease by one in every
- 1.4 jobs in 2015.

- However, the WTITC survey
ranked the Bahamas 90th out of
about 170 nations surveyed for
, the annualised 10-year real
~ growth rate in jobs generated by
. the tourism industry, placing this
' at 2.3 per cent between 2005 and

2015. ;
. But while tourism may be
_ ‘king’ as far as the Bahamian

a ie



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ae

vise. Stat

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economy is concerned, the fact
that this nation continues to

- punch above its size and weight

on the world stage is shown by
the‘ fact that it only has 0.1 per

cent of the global tourism mar- .
_ ket share for 2005. .

While the travel and ‘tourism
industry is set to generate $3.883
billion in gross domestic product
(GDP) in 2005, giving this nation
the highest annual growth rate in
the Caribbean region at 11 per
cent, its 10-year annualised

growth rate through to 2015 is .

among the lowest.

According to the WTTC, the
Bahamas will only enjoy a growth
rate of 2.7 per cent, ranking it
167th, although this equals
Jamaica and is ahead of Cuba.
The Bahamian travel and tourism
industry is projected to generate
$6.981 billion in GDP for this
nation by 2015.

The direct and indirect impact |

from the Bahamian travel and
tourism industry will account for
54.7 per cent of this nation’s total
GDP in 2005, again making this
country the seventh-most reliant
in the world upon the tourism
industry for the lifeblood of its
economy.




Sa








Price: $1,550,000.







family island properties.












fi By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business
Reporter





THE Our Lucaya resort does

Capri casino, the hotel union
president said yesterday, with
the unemployment situation on
Grand Bahama now in danger
of becoming “uncontrollable”
after the US-based gaming
operator laid off 13 per cent of

years of net losses.

Pat Bain, head of’ the
Bahamas Hotel, Catering and
Allied Workers Union
(BHAWU), said Grand
Bahama’s economy was in a
state of readjustment:as it now
began to feel the full impact of
the 10-month closure of the
Royal Oasis Crowne Plaza &
Golf resort.

"Grarid Bahama has always
been a cyclical tourism destina-
tion, but with the Our Lucaya
not able to sustain the kind of

_ By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
- Senior Business Reportet

‘THE proposed increases in pilot lan
_ unlikely to have a negative impact or
_ industry, the Ministry of Tourism sai

Basil Smith, its director of communications,

_tions were ongoing between the Minist
| Ministry of Transport to ensure that for
- operators and private pilots - are a

changesinatimelymanner. =
. Inan interview with The Tribune

cerns voiced by Bahamian pilots, saying go
_-do not expect the proposed new fees



not attract enough tourists to ,
sustain the troubled Isle of

its workforce in response to two

numbers that would sustain the:

Isle of Capri, adjustments need

to be made as the question of.

the rate of unemployment now
becomes a situation that is

uncontrollable,” Mr Bain said. .

“There are still fears that shops
will close at the International

‘Bazaar. What you are now see-
‘ing are the after-effects of the

closure of the Royal Oasis."
While the Crowne Plaza
Country Club, Royal Oasis Golf

Resort and its casino still in lim- -
bo, and the Government con-

tinuing to look for a buyer, Mr
Bain said it was likely many
residents of Grand Bahama will
have to leave the island to seek

‘employment elsewhere in the
‘Bahamas.

He added that with the pro-

Bahama unemployment in danger
of becoming ‘uncontrollable’

t| Our Lucaya hotel
“cannot sustain’
Isle of Capri

al

Hotel union chief sa

Cen

Ci




posed improvements to the
Cable Beach hotels under the
$1.2 billion Baha Mar develop-
ment, those Grand Bahamians .
who have skills that can be used
would probably come to New
Providence. Ongoing tourism

. developments in Eleuthera,

Exuma and Abaco were also
expected to attract workers
from Grand Bahama.

"Our people must be pre-.
pared to move where the job
opportunities are because we
are no longer able to languish
either in the place of our birth
or comfort,” Mr Bain said.
“Look at the Americans, the
Asians and the Indians. They

See HOTEL, 3B

| Union body presses

for amendments to
labour legislation

@ By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business
Reporter

THE National Congress of

Trade Unions (NCTU) yester- .

day accused the Government
of failing to introduce draft leg-
islation to amend the country's
labour laws, and called on the

HERE’S THE LOW-COST DIGITAL

administration to right what it
sees as laws that stifle the eco-
nomic development of the
Bahamian labour force.

In an interview with The Tri-
bune, NCTU president Pat
Bain said union officials were
unhappy with the fact that

SEE page 5B



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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





Marketing IT’s value
to Bahamian firms

nformation Technolo-

gy, while one of the

most integral compo-

nents of a company, is

also arguably the most
undermarketed and therefore.
the most misunderstood func-
tion.

The business in most cases
has a negative perception of
IT’s effort and productivity. IT
services are believed to be
high-cost and low-quality.
Within any organisation, there
are usually a plethora of people
who are very vocal about IT’s
inability to deliver..The inter-
esting aspect of this negative
perception is that it does not
seem to matter whether IT is
delivering or not: the percep-
tion will most likely still be that
IT does not deserve the funds it
receives. ,

Without a proactive and
interactive marketing strategy,
this perception of IT will not
change. Marketing of IT is
essential to obtaining support
and resources, and is one criti-
cal step in transforming IT
from being treated as a cost
centre to being a strategic part-

‘ner of the business.

Definition of IT Marketing
IT marketing has- been
defined by the Enterprise
Computing Institute as: “The
art of appropriately setting

expectations between customer
and service provider such that
both entities enjoy a mutually
beneficial economic relation-
ship”. The essence of the defi-
nition is that although commu-
nication is a key part of an IT
marketing strategy, it is also
about quality, consistency and
interaction with key business
stakeholders.

For IT marketing strategies
to be successful, a consistent
level of service is required.
From this point on, IT market-
ing strategies must be focused
on achieving a higher quality

of service, increasing their .

understanding of the business
requirements as well as on

proactive communication cam- -

paigns. Otherwise, IT market-
ing activities may undermine
IT’s reputation, and all com-
munication will be viewed with
derision.

IT Marketing Strategies

Magnolia Communications’
Marketing Maturity Grid
shows a distinct correlation
between the level of market-
ing focus and activity, and the
role of IT within that organisa-
tion. The following summarises
their findings:

1. Ad Hoc: Reactive com-
munication,.and the primary
marketing tools are status
reports/briefings. IT’s role

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tends to be as a Cost Centre.
2. Demand Driven: Commu-

nication is demand driven and

reactive, and the primary mar-

keting tools are project level :
scorecards. IT’s role is again as _

a Cost Centre.

3, Process-Based: Communi-
cation is regular and based on
status updates. The primary
marketing tools are newslet-
ters and recurring planning
meetings. IT tends to be a’Pre-
ferred Partner of the business.

4. Customer Proactive: Com-
munication with the business
is based on pr interac-



tion to address current and
future performance. The main
marketing tools are quarterly
business reviews, newsletters
and scorecards. IT is a’Pre-
ferred Partner of the business.

5. Enterprise and IT Proac-

tive: Communication is based

on proactive interaction with
the entire customer communi-
ty and individual customers.
The primary marketing tools

are Annual Report-style infor-

mation, comprehensive score-
cards and IT information avail-
able in real time. IT tends to
be a Strategic Partner of the

business.

In addition, a recent survey
conducted by CIO Magazine
clearly demonstrated that IT
Managers who implemented

comprehensive marketing.

strategies gained significant
benefits in terms of their rela-
tionship with the business. The
study showed these companies
achieved the best results in
terms of closer alignment with
the business, increased IT cred-
ibility and improved customer
service and loyalty. °

Getting Started

Implementing a comprehen-
sive marketing campaign can-
not be achieved overnight.
Some of the activities that can
form the foundation of a mar-
keting strategy include:

1. Identify the target audi-
ences. IT will have multiple tar-
get audiences - from end users
through to the Board of Direc-
tors. For effective communica-
tion, messages must be tailored
to each audience.

2. Identify the key messages
and themes to convey. For

. example, a solid infrastructure ©

produces value etc

3. Brand IT. IT projects and
services have been found to be
far more interesting to business
people when they have a mean-
ingful and memorable brand

. hame

4. Consistent interaction and

‘communication. Develop a

strategy of regular face-to-face
activities with the business ..

5. Publish. Develop a strate-
gy of print vehicles that will
carry your messages to the
business.

6. Track service: levels.
Understand IT’s performance
and communicate the.good
with the bad goth EM

\

Business people are not psy-
chic. Without a consistent mar-
keting campaign, IT’s value
and achievements will remain
under the radar or be swamped .
by the business’s focus on IT
issues. Marketing and com-
munications are an essential
part of doing business, particu-
larly in an environment where
IT is largely misunderstood. _

To provide feedback on this
column, please e-mail Makin-
glTwork@providencetg.com

About the Author:

Caroline Moncur is manager,
business development at Prov-
idence Technology Group. Ms
Moncur has over 10 years’ busi-
ness development experience,
primarily within the Informa-
tion Technology industry. Prov-
idence Technology Group is
one of the Bahamas’ leading
IT firms, specialising in net-
working solutions, consulting
and advisory services.and soft- -
ware solutions.

Harbour Island extends —

the Bahamas’ ‘hot strea

HARBOUR Island has been

2005 SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAMME

KPMG is currently accepting applications for its 2005 scholarship programme.:
This programme provides financial support for students attending Bahamian
and North American Colleges with the career goal of becoming Certified Public ©

Accountants.

The scholarship will be awarded to a deserving Bahamian student with
outstanding scholastic achievement. Interested candidates should submit a
cover letter, resume, school transcripts and at least two recommendations to
KPMG, Human Resources Manager, P.O. Box N 123, Nassau, Bahamas.

AUDIT ¢ TAX ¢ ADVISORY

©2005, KPMG, a Bahamian partnership, the Bahamian member firm of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved.

BIS!

Pricing Information As Of:



Abaco Markets




Benchmark

Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson










0:42, BND Holdin

98.00 ABDAB




Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Bahamas Waste

Commonwealth Bank
Doctor's Hospital

Freeport Concrete
Kerzner International BDRs

12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.35 aes Holdings




















Bid $
12.25

Ei eer



Fund Name
Colina,Money Market Fund

1.240183"

2.3657 2.0018 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.3657 ***
§ 10.4330 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.4330*****
2.2528 2.1164 Colina MS! Preferred Fund 2.252768**

1.0510

1.1200



Colina Bond Fund

MLL ES

1.120044****



BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

Colina

Financial Advisors Ltd.










2b

ranked as the best island in the
Caribbean by Travel + Leisure

' magazine, following the recent
‘ ‘rating of its beaches as being

among the top.10 in the world

. by Caribbean Travel & Life
Magazine.

In its 10th annual poll, Trav-
el + Leisure’s readers ranked
Harbour Island as the
Caribbean leader on the
World’s Best Cities and Islands
list.

The award was received
from Travel + Leisure on the
Minister of Tourism’s behalf
by Basil Smith, director of com-
munications in the Ministry of
Tourism, at a reception in New
York City on July 14, 2005.

“This recent recognition is
just one of the many interna-
tional awards Harbour Island
has received over the years. We
consider this island one of our
gems within the Islands Of The
Bahamas,” Ms Walkine said.

“What’s even more reward-
ing is the fact that this designa-

tion was awarded by the read- .








GG





0.00%!
3.91%
5.12%
1.25%
4.29%
4.35%
2.82%
2.73%
4.66%!
0.00%
5.83%
4.77%
4.34%!
5.57%
0.00%
4.20%
6.75%








7.25%
7.80%
0.00%



6.93%





og

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price





@ DIRECTOR of Communications at the Ministry of Tourism,
Basil Smith (centre), accepted the Travel + Leisure’s Best
Island in the Caribbean award at a lavish reception in New
York on behalf of the Minister of Tourism, Obie Wilchcombe.
Also pictured are Ellen Asmodeo, vice-president/publisher,
Travel + Leisure (\eft) and Nancy Novogrod, editor-in-chief,

Travel + Leisure

ers of Travel + Leisure, who
would have based their deci-
sion on visits to our beautiful
island.”

Briland’s win extends a hot
streak for the Bahamas in some of
the most widely read magazines
on the globe.

Travel + Leisure’s (circula-
tion 965,000) November 2004
cover asked: What’s Hot Now?
Answer: The Bahamas. The
islands of the Bahamas were

named THE HOT ISLAND
for 2004 by Condé Nast Trav-
eler (circualtion:780,000) in the
magazine’s annual Hot List.

With the hottest islands in
the world, the Bahamas were a
perfect backdrop for the 2005
Sports Illustrated swimsuit
issue. Andros and Exuma
appeared on the cover and
across 11 pages of the issue
perused annually by 59 million
readers.



NOTICE

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
INVITES TENDERS

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA invites tenders for the b

purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel of land being Lot #140, Coral Vista
Subdivision situated in the Western District on the Island of New ff
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas. Situated thereon is Vacant Land.

Property Size: 7,200 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale in a Mortgage d
FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED. }

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Loan Collection Centre,
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “tender 2563” ff

8 All offers must be received by the closed of business 4:00 pm, §f
Friday 29th, July 2005.

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

** - AS AT JUNE. 30, 2005/ **** - AS AT MAY. 31, 2005

*-AS AT JULY 1, 2005/ *** - AS AT JUNE. 30, 2005/ ***** AS AT JUNE. 30, 2005





THE TRIBUNE

Hotel employee wages

THURSDAY, JULY 21, cucr... a



higher in Family Islands

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE average weekly wage
for hotel industry workers in
Grand Bahama and the Family
Islands was slightly higher than
that received by their compa-
triots on New Providence, com-
ing in 2.4 per cent more at $343
compared to $335.

The revelation, contained in
the Department of Statistics
survey of occupations and
wages in’the hotel sector for
2003,.was not explained.

Tou rism (From Page 1B)

impact on the tourism industry.

He, added, though that the
negative reaction before an offi-
cial announcement is made
could create a problem where
there is none, with members of
the public speculating on what is
to occur.

"We do not expect any
adverse affect unless the reac-
tion takes place before an
announcement is made. We
have to remember that mem-
bers of the Government also
live and work in this econo-
my...they are not going to do
anything to the detriment of the
economy,” Mr Smith said.

He added that the increased
fees would be used to maintain
airport facilities, and would also
finance the implementation of
increased security measures

However, the higher wages
for hotel industry workers in
Grand Bahama and the Family
Islands are likely to be
explained because resorts needs
to pay higher salaries to entice
workers to locations that lack
all the attractions and ameni-
ties of New Providence.

The cost of living is also like-
ly to be higher in the Family
Islands, with prices pushed up
due to the fact that goods are in
relatively scarce supply when
compared to Nassau.

The survey, which received

being demanded by the US gov-

- ernment for all ports of entry

to the Bahamas.

The Ministry of Transport is
also expected to engage the avi-
ation sector in discussions
before the formal roll-out of the
new fees, scheduled for October
1, 2005.

Bahamian pilots were said to
be incensed over a proposal to
increase pilot fees, suggesting
that such a move would cripple

their business and possibly open

the door for hackers in unsafe
planes.

The proposed new fees would
include an increase in landing
fees from $8 to $18, licence

renewal fees from $200 to

$1,250 and permits from $500
to $1,200, one private pilot said.
The fee increases are seen as

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
LEPTON INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Séction 137(8).of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, the dissolution of LEPTON INVESTMENTS
PTE. LTD., has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore

been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

BATTERSEN OCEAN
INVESTMENTS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, the dissolution of BATTERSEN OCEAN

information from 50 per cent of
the hotels operating in the
Bahamas during 2003, found
that the average wage for the
entire industry fell slightly com-
pared to 2002, dropping by $11
or 3.2 per cent to $336 from
$347 the year before.

Both male arfd female hotel
workers worked an average of
39 hours per week, but. the aver-
age weekly wage for men was
higher than that paid to women
“in all major occupational
groups” except for so-called
‘Professionals’, where it was the

coming at a particularly sensi-
tive time given the ever increas-
ing price of aviation fuel due to
the volatile world oil markets.
Archie Nairn, permanent sec-
retary at the Ministry of Trans-
port, said Glenys Hanna-Mar-
tin, minister of transport and
aviation, announced the change
in air navigational fees during
her contribution to the



~ While in former year

opportunities, the rece t touri
thai

same. .
For male hotel employees, in
2003 the largest weekly wage
increase of $23 occurred among
skilled agriculture and fisheries
workers, while the greatest
decrease of $24 was recorded
forclerks.

Women senior officials and
managers saw a $71 weekly
wage increase in 2003, though,
although women plant and
machine operators saw their
pay decrease by an average of
$48.

The increase in pay for



2005/2006 budget debate and
they were included in the
Appropriations Bill which that
tabled in the House of Assem-
bly. The private charter and
pilot business is a key aspect of
the Bahamian tourism industry,
with these professionals able to
bring in groups to various des-
tinations in the Family Islands,

’ boosting local economies.



women senior hotel officials and
managers helped push the aver-
age weekly wage for both sexes
employed in this category to

$874, an increase of $40 over

2002. This increase was higher
than for all other occupational
groups working in the hotel
industry.

The Department of Statistics
report said: “In 2003, when
compared to 2002 the average
wage for males was lower in all
but one of the occupational
groups.

However, for females it was
higher in five of the nine major
occupational groups.”

&

Temple Christian Hligh

“Teach Me, 0 Lord, Thy Way”

School

Palin 19:33

Shirley Street

TEACHING VACANCIES

Invites applications from qualified Christian teachers
for the following positions for the 2005-2006 school

year.

Health Science (Gr. 7-9)
General Science (Gr.7-9)-

Applicants must:

A. Beapracticing born- -again Christian who is willing
to subscribe to the Statement of Faith of Temple

Christian School..

Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or higher -
from a recognized College or University in the area

’ of specialization.

Have a valid Teacher’s Certificate or Diploma.
Have at least two year teaching experience in the
relevant subject area with excellent communication

skills.

Applicants must have the ability to prepare students
for all examinations to the BJC/BGCSE levels.
Be willing to participate in the high school’s extra

curricular programmes.

Application must be picked up at the high school office
on Shirley Street and be returned with a full curriculum
vitae, recent coloured photograph and three references

to:

Mr Neil Hamilton
The Principal
_Jemple Christian High School |
P:0. Box N-1566:°~ *
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is August 1st 2005





We are the Caribbean’s largest publicly traded bank, serving over 4 million customers in 16 countries.
We manage over 500,000 active accounts, with over 3,000 staff, 60 branches and a total balance sheet
of USD8bn.

FirstCaribbean is seeking two Risk Management leaders with experience in large, full-service
international banks with operations in multiple countries and Regulatory jurisdictions.

Both positions report to the Chief Risk Officer and are currently based in Barbados.

Head, Operational Risk







Framework.

Responsibilities:

¢ Be responsible for the development of FirstCaribbean’s policy
and strategy for the management of Operational Risk, and
develop and maintain effective supporting tools and services to
be used across the business. P

e Evolve and manage the Operational Risk Management

¢ Provide the methodology, tools and management information
infrastructure to enable the business to carry out Operational

Experience and Expertise required:

To be considered for this role, candidates must

demonstrate solid Operational Risk leadership experience.

In addition, as a result of a series of progressive related
assignments, you have achieved expert-level ability and a

track record of success in the following:
e Embedding Operational Risk policies and procedures

across a large, international, full-service Bank operating
in multiple sovereign states.

INVESTMENTS LTD., has been completed; a Certificate
.. of: Dissolution has been. issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.









Effective at translating and communicating risk profiles
to and winning support of Executive, Board and other
key stakeholders.

Engaging Line-of-Business leaders and influencing the
adoption time of risk mitigating practices.

Leading, managing and developing teams of senior
specialists.

Risk Assessments. _e
° Work with the business lines to bring risk within acceptable
levels and to ensure that matters of compliance with regards to
FirstCaribbean’s operating policies ‘ are strictly adhered to °
throughout the organisation.
¢ Work with senior management to create and maintain °
FirstCaribbean’s Business Continuity Plans.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Head, Market Risk

Responsibilities:

e Establish and maintain internal control and corporate
governance frameworks encompassing policies,
procedures and limits for measuring, monitoring and
controlling Market Risk.

e Accurately identify, assess and measure Market Risk
exposures and provide analytic input on Market Risks to
inform asset/liability management decisions.

e Develop the Market Risk limits framework and risk
measurement models that support business strategies
within.risk tolerance of the bank and recommend risk
tolerance of the bank for approval by Management and
Board.

e Conduct market event impact analysis/assessment and
develop recommendations for follow-up action.

e Identify and assess Market Risks embedded in proposed

new financial products.













Experience and Expertise required:

To be considered for this role, candidates must demonstrate

solid Market Risk leadership experience. In addition, as a result

of a series of progressive related assignments, you have
achieved expert-level ability in the following:

e Banking products and market experience — Retail,
Corporate and Treasury (10 years either in Trading, Trading
Operations and/or Market Risk Management). :

¢ Methodologies for quantifying and analysing trading and
retail banking market risks (a degree in risk management
or statistics is useful, but not mandatory).

e Data extraction from multiple source banking systems and
building of MI databases.

e Presentations to Management / Boards that explain
complex, technical information in simple business terms to
enable transparent understanding and assessment of risks.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
SEBAS MANAGEMENT LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-namied
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 20th

Applications with detailed résumés should be submitted
no later than July 29, 2005 to:

day of July, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., of
P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

Rosemary Jones

Executive Administrative Assistant
FirstCaribbean International Bank

Head Office

Warrens, St. Michael

Barbados

Email: Rosemary.Jones@firstcaribbeanbank.com

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator) oa
Caribbean Pride. Internatlonal Strength. Your Financial Partner.

. it i i i i f Be i
Only applicants who are short-listed will be contacted. FirstCaribbean International Bank is an Associated Company of Barclays Bank PLC and CIBC.







FAG Oo, iniBHSDAY, JULY 21, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



Tourism must be ‘top priority’

ALL Bahamian and Caribbean nationals
must make the tourism business their “top
priority” because of its economic impor-
tance to the region, the Bahamas’ former
tourism director-general said.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, who is now
the Caribbean Tourism Organisation’s

_(CTO) secretary- general, said: “As a result
of tourism’s €cotiomic impact om the ‘tiveli-
hood of people in the Caribbean, we must
stress the importance of making tourism a
top priority from the heads of state down to
individual residents in their homes. Tourism
should be present in every facet of our lives.

“We must educate our children about
careers in tourism and adequately train

NOTICE is hereby given that NALINI MOHAN OF P.O. BOX
N-9841, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 21TH day of JULY, 2005 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

gets.”

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT (No. 45 of 2000)

-GAYNOR HOLDINGS LIMITED

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of
2000), GAYNOR HOLDINGS LIMITED, is in Dissolution.

The date of commencement of dissolution is 7th day of
February, 2005.

Westquay Limited,

P.O. Box 204, 4th floor,
Celtic House, Victoria Street,
Douglas, Isle of Man
IM99 1QZ
Liquidator



_ NOTICE

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA _
~ INVITES FENDERS” ~~

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA invites tenders for the
purchase of the following:
t *

t

“ALL THAT piece parcel of land being Lot No. 16 A, Sandilands

‘Allotment situated in the Eastern District of the Island of New

Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas

situated thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting of 4

bedrooms, 2 bathrooms with a Duplex Apartment consisting of
B it-= 3 bedrooms,-2 bathrooms, 1---2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom.

Property Size: 32,670 sq. ft. Total Land
Building Size: 2,375 sq. ft. Dwelling
Apartment Size: 1,949 Duplex

{This property is being sold under Power of Sale in a Mortgage
(FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

fAll offers should be forwarded in writing in a séaled envelope,
saddressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Loan Collection Centre,
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “tender 0881”
*All offers must be received by the closed of business 4:00 pm,
pe 29th, we 2005.



employees already working in the indus-
try. We must capture the attention of our
politicians so that they make tourism a pri-
ority on their agendas and in their bud-

Tourism accounts for an estimated one in
four jobs throughout the region, and is
_Tesponsible -on_average-for- amore than 30°-~
“per cent of each country’s gross national
product. Speaking on the theme for the
CTO’s 28th annual Caribbean Tourism
Conference, to be held in the US Virgin
Islands from October 21-26, Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace said: “We’re focusing pri-
marily on the business of tourism at this
year’s Caribbean Tourism Conference



because our industry plays a vital role in the
economic stability of the Caribbean region.”

The conference programme will offer site
inspections and niche market workshops
for travel agents, the popular Travel +
Leisure Youth Congress, the Condé Nast

~Fravéel Game, the Travel Writers/Photog-
raphers Awards programme, the CTO press
conference and the closing gala.

The conference is the Caribbean region’s
premier caucus of tourism decision-mak-
ers and an important event on the calendar
of tourism practitioners, as well as individ-
uals seeking to do business with the
Caribbean.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LOUBERT JEAN BAPTISTE, ALLEN
DRIVE, P.O.BOX N-805, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for. Nationality and Citizenship, for

registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21ST day of. JULY,
2005 to the Minister responsible for ene and OECD:

P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas...



Legal Notice
NOTICE

FOXLEIGH LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) FOXLEIGH LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on 19th July, 2005 —
when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and registered by
the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Andrew Ramage of Helvetia
Court, South pePenadys St Peter Port, Guemsey GY1 4EE.

Dated this.21st day of July, A.D., 2005.

Andrew Ramage
Liquidator





uN OTICE

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
‘INVITES "TENDERS

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA invites tenders for the
purchase of the following: ‘

“ALL THAT piece parcel of land being Lot #6, Block #6,
Ridgeland Park in situated in Ceritral District of the Island of New
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting
of 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom.

Property Size: 4,200 sq. ft.
Building Size: 966.68 sq. ft.

‘This property is being sold under Power of Sale in a Mortgage
FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Loan Collection Centre,
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “tender 2308”

All offers must be received ge the closed of business 4: 00 pm,
Aj Friday 29th, July 2005... an Sgeomgeteeeste a





NOTICE

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
=e INVITES TENDERS.

RA ER Ta ia a ea






—

finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders for the
purchase of the following:

Laut THAT piece parcel of land being Lot north of Farrington

fRoad, situated in Western Discrict of the Island of New Providence
oe of the islands of the Commonwealth of the. Bahamas. Situated
piesa is Vacant Land.

Property Size: 4,505 sq. ft.

t
?
4
6
é
sAll offers should be in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed to
ithe Manager, Royal Bank Collection Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
iNassau, Bahamas and marked “tender 0341”. All offers must be
areceived by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 29th Jully, 2005.
‘
E
if
é
3
A
,




EO kr



New and ultra modern four storey building For more. laformation

2108 sq. ft. of office space available

Idyllically located on the Montagu Foreshore, with sea view
Ample parking for staff and clients

Fully automated security system

Full standby generator

Exercise Room
Rental space now available for commencement of interior build-out




-Mouitagu Foreshore, East Bay Street

contact L. Maycock at 322-8571-9

NOTICE

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
INVITES TENDERS

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA invites tenders for the
purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel of land: being Lot on the northern side
of Sandilands Village road situated in the Eastern District of the
Island of New Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas. Situated is Triplex Apartment consisting each of
(2) bedroom, (1) bathroom.

Property Size: 10,320 sq. ft.
Building: 2,700 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale in a Mortgage
FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Loan Collection Centre,
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “tender 2261”
All offers must be received by the closed of business 4:00 pm,
Friday 29th, July 2005.










Artist’s rendition of Ocean Centre

Essay Competition, the. Great.Caribbean.





















@ VINCENT VANDERPOOL-WALLACE

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that. EDLIN LOUIS, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, .and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight. days from the 21ST day of JULY,
2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

BAHAMAS INSULAGION |
HOW TO USE MORE A/C
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ye PPSPETTY? LIFEGIUE UWARRANGY AND
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Please be advised that the Nassau Office of

PRICEWATERHOUSE(COPERS

WILL BE
CLOSED

on
Friday, 22 July 2005
to allow staff to enjoy their

Annual Fun Day.
“We regret any inconvenience ~
this may cause.

Normal working hours will resume
on Monday, 25 July 2005.





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005, PAGE 5B



National Congress of Trade Unions presses

for amendments to labour legislation



FROM page IB

Government “has not seen fit
to introduce or send draft leg-
islation through the trade
union movement dealing with
the Employment Act, Mini-
mum Wage Act, the Industrial
Relations Act and the Health
and Safety Act, so we can have
the amendments approved and
them moved into the House".

NCTU officials want the
Government to implement a
number of changes to the
country's labour laws, includ-
ing:

* Increasing the minimum
wage from $150 to $250-per
week.

* Amending the Health and
Safety Act to introduce a level
of enforceability. The Act cur-
rently speaks about supervi-
sors and fines, but Mr Bain
said that to date no one has
been hired to enforce the Act.

* Amending the Employ-
ment Act to address the ques-
tion of how wages are quali-

Wealth (From page 1B)

was a “continuing trend of ratio-
nalisation in the number of off-
shore centres being. used by
wealth managers”.

In response to the survey’s
question on whether they
planned to “rationalise the
number of offshore centres in
which you operate in the next
three years”, some 14 per cent

of the European-based finan-.

cial institutions and other inter-
mediaries that responded said
this was.indeed their intention.

Out of the Americas and
Asia-Pacific survey respondents,
7 per cent and 20 per cent
respectively confirmed that they
were set to consolidate the
number of international finan-
cial centres they used for pri-
vate banking and wealth man-
agement operations.

_ The survey’s findings are par-
ticularly important:for the
Bahamian financial services
industry, given that it is reliant
on private wealth management
for its market niche and com-
petitive edge.

However, Michael Paton, the
Bahamas Financial Services
Board’s (BFSB) deputy chair-
man, yesterday told The Tri-
bune that’ the Bahamas
appeared to have so far been a
net beneficiary of the ongoing
consolidation, although it need-
ed to maintain its market posi-
tion.

“It certainly is a concern,” Mr
Paton said of the consolidation
trends, “but so far we’ve been
fortunate to have benefited
from them rather than been
adversely impacted.

He pointed to the decisions
of both Banco Santander and
UBS - two traditional ‘giants’
in the global financial services
and private banking markets -
to consolidate their private
client operations from the Cay-
man Islands to the Bahamas as
evidence of this.

Mr Paton, who is an attorney |

and partner in the Lennox
Paton law firm, said: “They are
some examples of us being a
net:gainer out of it so far, but
we'still need to be concerned.

“Obviously, we need to main- -

tain our position as a viable off-
shore centre for these groups.”

Mr Paton said the leading
financial services institutions
were eyeing a strategy where
they had a ‘single presence’ in
regions such as the Far East and
Western Hemisphere.

“Our challenge is to be that

Western Hemisphere pres-
ence,” he said.
_ Mr Paton added that the
Bahamas would also have: to
monitor developments in the
Channel Islands, Singapore and
Dubai, which was also target-
ing financial services.

John Delaney, the FNM Sen-
ator and attorney who advised
the then-government on its 2000
‘blacklisting’ response, said the
key was for the Bahamas to
continue “to be relevant” to the
needs of high-net worth and
ultra high-net worth clients.

He added that ongoing con-
solidation among international
financial centres was nothing
new, the process having been
ongoing for the past five years.
Already, smaller players such
as Grenada and Antigua & Bar-
buda had been effectively
forced out of the market, due
to the increased costs in com-
plying with international best
practices and regulatory stan-
dards. Other factors were also
in play.

fied.

Union officials want the
Government to move what
they see as a “discriminatory”
clause that outlines how wages
are considered. The current
definition omits commissions
and gratuities as a type of
wage.

Mr Bain said that because
of how the Employment Act
is worded, when workers are
terminated employers do not
have to consider the gratuities
and commissions they received
as wages when working out
severance pay.

Mr Bain said the Act was in
contradiction to the National
Insurance Act, which does
include this segment of earn-
ings under the wage category.

The NCTU also wants to
remove certain restrictions
from the Industrial Relations
Act that address the timeframe
for unions to report to the min-

. ister for recognition.

Mr Bain, who called on the

Mr Delaney said that for the
Bahamian financial services sec-
tor to prosper in the private
client market, the cost and qual-
ity of its products had to exceed
those of its competitors. Product
innovation and keeping pace
with regulatory moves was also
required.

The Higgs & Johnson attor-
ney said he “can see happen-
ing” a situation where the

"With the rising cost of living,

a person making $150 a week
cannot make it. The Government
said it's worker friendly, but since

becoming the Government they
have not made any attempt to
make legislation that is worker
friendly, but they are quick to
change legislation for big
business... We have appealed to
the Government, we've sent in
proposals on changes, but |
nothing happens. They cannot
carry this into the New Year."

Bahamas could become the pti- :

vate wealth management hub
for the Western Hemisphere,
with Cayman Islands becoming
the investment fund and insti-
tutional destination of choice.
Bermuda would maintain its
place as the insurance hub.

“T think that to the extent
some offshore centres might be
taken out of the mainstream of
choice for intermediaries, it

— NCTU president Pat Bain ©

would always be a concern of
the Bahamas to be among those

' selected by intermediaries for

their clients,” Mr Delaney said.

He added that the Bahamas,
having focused: on the private
client market through its pri-
vate banking and trust products,
was “certainly ideally placed”
to benefit from the ongoing
consolidation.

And those traditional asset

GN - 236

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER
AND MINISTRY OF NATIONAL SECURITY

POLICE DEPARTMENT

Notice

Members of the public are hereby advised that the services of the Royal Bahamas
Police Force Band will not be available for the period of August 2nd to September
26th 2005, as the Band will be involved with Tourism Promotional exercises outside
of the country and will also be proceeding on vacation leave eR MeLy following

such exercise.

The Royal Bahamas Police Force Band apologizes for any inconvenience as a result |
of this very important exercise.

Cay, Long Island.

of:



Commissioner of Police



Royal Bahamas Police Force.

Mr. Michael J. Symonette
President & CEO
Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
John F. Kennedy Drive
Nassau, Bahamas

TENDER NOTICE

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. wishes to invite
tenders for construction of its Customer Service Building in Deadman’s

Interested companies may collect a tender specification from the
office of the Vice President/ Planning & Engineering in BTC’s
administrative building on John F. Kennedy Drive or at BTC’s office
in Deadman’s Cay, Long Island, between the hours of 9:00a.m. and
5:00p.m. Monday through Friday. .

Tenders are to be in a sealed envelope marked “TENDER FOR
CUSTOMER SERVICE BUILDING” and delivered to the attention

All tenders must be received by 5:00pm on Friday, July 29, 2005.
Tenders received after this date will not be considered.

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.



Government to move post-
haste to table the necessary
amendments, said through
these changes the NCTU was
looking for increased equity in
the country's labour laws, a
fairer distribution of profits for
workers, greater respect from
employers for the efforts of
their employees and respect
from government for the work-
ers of the nation.

He added that while the
business sector continues to
rail about the level of produc-
tivity, it continued to make
profits. As a result of the Gov-
ernment's lack of action, Mr
Bain said the apparent view
developing among members of
the labour movement is that
the Government is taking them
for granted.

He said further that union
officials want something done
about the compendium of leg-
islation, and are prepared to
look at any available gptions:if
the Government failed to

. protection and estate planning

product have been supple-
mented with new legislation
that has introduced purpose
trusts, foundations and the
SMART fund.

Mr Delaney, though,
acknowledged that the
Bahamas had some ground to

- make up on the Cayman Islands

in terms of establishing rela-
tionships with the intermedi-

address the matter.

"With the rising cost of liv-
ing, a person making $150 a
week cannot make it. The
Government said it's worker
friendly, but since becoming
the Government they have not
made any attempt to make leg-
islation that is worker friendly,
but they are quick to change
legislation for big business,”
Mr Bain said. “We have
appealed to the Government,
we've sent in proposals on
changes, but nothing happens. '
They cannot carry this into the |
New Year."

Mr Bain said NCTU officials:
have made their concerns,
known to labour minister Vin-,
cent Peet and Prime Minister:
Perry Christie, but have heard:
nothing in return, except that:
there is a standing committee:
on labour. He pointed out that
this committee has been in-
operation for three years and
nothing has been done to
address the unions’ concerns.



aries that acted for wealthy pri-

vate clients and played a key
role in directing where their
business went.

He also warned that the
British Virgin Islands was look-
ing at making inroads into the
Bahamas’ private wealth man-
agement market share, while
Panama posed an even greater
threat due to its “broader”
product offering.

Tad nal

for 24 apartment condominium on Cable Beach.
References and business experience essential.

The Tribune Limited
DA 3864

P.O. Box N 3207
Nassau, Bahamas

“Please reply to:

UAE alias Located
In The Bahamas

Seeks the following professionals to join our team. Must be self motivated and
willing to be flexible and work various assigned work shifts and have ‘good
communication skills. In our employees, we look for a passion to anticipate and
meet our guests needs and an insatiable desire to attain the highest levels of quality
and guest service. All applicants in the first instant are asked to forward their
application letter with resume, photo and two previous employment references to:

privatedestinations@yahoo.com or mail to: Private Destinations, P.O. Box
CR54697

CLOSING DATE FOR ALL APPLICATIONS: July 24th 2005

GARDNER

Must possess a very good knowledge of the science of growing and maintaining
flowers, plants, shrubs, trees and lawns. Minimum three-years experience and /or
training in related field. Good understanding of landscape planning. Ability to read
and interpret English. Ability to apply common sense understanding to carry out
written or oral instructions. Responsibilities including watering, planting and
maintaining plants, flowers, shrubs, trées and lawns. A knowledge of the use of
chemicals and pesticides would be an advantage.

HOUSEKEEPING SUPERVISOR

Responsible for the maids and houseman assigned to Housekeeping and Laundry
duties. Works closely with the Resort manager to coordinate all Housekeeping and
Laundry cleaning tasks and assignments. This includes but is not limited to:
Purchasing of cleaning and Laundry materials, monitoring all inventories, cleanliness
of all interior and public spaces, setting up appropriate task lists, inspecting guest

rooms and provide on the Job training where and whenever needed. This is a very
hand’s on position. Minimum of 1-year hotel experience in a similar position and
excellent communication skills.

GENERAL MAINTENANCE

Reporting to the Property Manager we seek a general. maintenance individual who
will check and makes repairs to heating, ventilation and air condition systems as
needed. Checks and makes repairs to heating, ventilation and air conditioning
systems as needed. Checks and makes repairs to plumbing systems and fixtures
such as pipe lines, toilets and sinks, kitchen and Jaundry equipment. Checks and
makes repairs to electrical systems such as lighting systems, television sets and
kitchen equipment. Performs repairs to building, furniture, bathrooms, guest rooms
etc., as needed; may perform painting tasks. Ensures that all equipment is functioning
properly and that preventive maintenance measures are performed to preserve the
resort and keep product quality to standard.

MESSAGE THERAPIST
Young professional required. Must have proven experience and certification. Must
be willing to work a very flexible schedule. :

SPECIAL EVENT COORDINATOR/ADMINISTRATOR
Assist in coordinating special events on site. This will involve event planning and
program design, communication with guests and preparation of all communication
associated with events. You will also be expected to be on-site on the day of each
event and coordinate throughout the duration of the event to ensure that the program
runs smoothly from beginning to end. Superior written communication and
intérpersonal skills required. Promptly prepare responses to incoming requests. !
Must be proficient in MS Office. Capable of coordinating several projects and
responsibilities with ease. Must have good typing skills: able to type at least 45‘
w.p.m. accurately. Able to work well independently and as part of a team. Must
be well organized and detail-oriented. Experience in general office duties such as
filling, correspondence, mail, faxing, etc. .

NIGHT DUTY SUPERVISOR

Duties include but not limited to: Monitor and execute evening entertainment,
security of the property and closing procedures. Should possess basic knowledge
of audio and home theatre systems and proven experience within the hospitality
industry. This is a hand’s on multi task position.

GENERAL WORKERS
Required to undertake a multitude of tasks to maintain and upkeep all exterior
areas of the resort.

OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR/RECEPTION
Superior written and oral communication and interpersonal skills required. Excellent
telephone etiquette required. Promptly prepare responses to incoming requests.
Must be proficient in MS Office. Capable of coordinating several projects and
responsibilities with ease. Must have good typing skills: able to type at least 45
w.p.m. accurately. Able to work well independently and as part of a team. Must
he well organized and detail-oriented. Experience in general office duties such as
filing, correspondence, mail, faxing, etc.





PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, JULY 21,2005



VACANCY FOR SENIOR COUNSEL
OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL
CRIMINAL SIDE

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for

appointment as Senior Counsel in the Office of the Attorney General, in the -

Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

Applicants must. be members of the English, Irish, Scottish or
Bahamian Bar or the Bar of any country of The Commonwealth to which a
member of The Bahamas Bar is. admitted without examination. In addition,
they must have had at least five (5) years standing at the Bar or have

_enrolled and have. practiced as a Solicitor for at least fiye (5) yee in the
BPOVE: mentioned countries without e examination. ae

~The ‘duties of the post include: oe titel ae : BN

= 1 "general advice to all Government Departments,
me Ministries and Public Corporations:

ae “carrying out legal researchy.

5 ee oie cxininalie matters i in nthe = Mapiotates Court and
the Supreme Court, and appellate (criminal) matters in
the Court of Appeal and the Judicial Committee of the
Privy Council;

4. | gener advice to the Police on the institution of charged
"and Prosecutions; |

5, Such other matters as may be assigned bya the Director of

ane Public Prosecutions.

as, Prosecutions...

Sota, The appointment will be on n permanent and, pensionable or ¢ contractual a
a fers if-a’ citizen: ‘of The. Bahamas i is: appointed; “or on. contractual terms ifa
“not ahamian is fepomted: an the case. of: a. contractual appointment He eee



VACANCY FOR SENIOR COUNSEL
_ OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL
CIVIL SIDE

Applications, are. invited from. suitably qualified persons for
appointment as Senior Counsel in the Office. of the Attorney General, in the
‘Commonwealth of The Bahamas. ae

Applicants. must: be members of the. ‘English, Irish, Scottish or

: Bahamian Bar. or the Bar of any country of The Cormmonwealth to which a-

-meémber of The Bahamas Bar is admitted. without examination. In addition, |
-. they must have had at least five: (5). years, standing at the Bar or have
ae, ‘enrolled and. have practiced asa Solicitor for’ at least five 6) years in the
cts above- mentioned countries without examination.

“The duties of the post include: ; a



. eee “general advice | to; all Government Departments,
~~" ~ “Ministries and Public Corporations;

oe: carrying out legal research;
3. conducting civil ‘matters in Pee "Magistrates Court,
Supreme Court, Court of Appeal and the Judicial
Committee. of the Pevy: Council; .

i AL : advice on public s service matters; Ze me ate ERS

3. wi? sith Sale matters as : may b be assigned byt the Director of f :

ees Legal Affairs.




o Airs.










” The

: Satisfactory completion of service.






| (242)328-7 -7798 no later than the e298 July 2005.

The successful applicant wall be sine to the Director of Publi

The successful applicant will be :assigned to ) the Director of Legal os

a ppointment will be on permanent: aid pensionable or échtiactial. .
terms if a citizen of The Bahamas is. appointed; ‘or on contractual terms ifa
on-Bahamian ‘is appointed. :. _In:the case of a. contractual appointment a fa Be a
"gratuity: of ’ fifteen ‘percent: (15%). basic. salary. would be > Eevee ° on. the 0 Bo gratuity: of fifteen: ‘percent (15%) of basic ‘alary would be ele: on the: oe
Pree es bape sahetaciory Completion of's service: © kas ie a

sis ‘The slay 0 of the Post is in n Seale B95440 x 700 - $50, 200 per. aa

= ats

annuri,’

umes. abn “with “copies: go et
‘Office of the Attorney General at

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS.

GN - 239

VACANCY FOR CHIEF COUNSEL
OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL
CRIMINAL SIDE

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for.
appointment as Chief Counsel in the Office of the Attorney General, in the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

Applicants must be members of the English, Irish, Scottish or
Bahamian Bar or. the Bar of a country of The Commonwealth to which a

~ member of The Bahamas Bar is admitted without examination. In addition, —
they must have had at least seven (7) years standing at the Bar or have» '
enrolled and have practiced as a Solicitor for at least seven Q) years in. the thy

. above- mentioned countries without examination.

‘The duties of the post include:

_1.>” general advice to ane ‘Govéininent: Departments; &
i ae ‘Ministries and Public Corporations; BR ee
aD ee ‘carrying out legal fesearshi as necessary;
3. prosecuting criminal’ matters in the Magistrates Court
and the Supreme Court, and appellate (criminal) matters
_ in the Court of Appeal and the Judicial Committee of the
Privy Council;

4. general advice to the Police on the institution ae charges
~ and PIEPeUn ONS,

5...” such other matters as ey be assignhd by. the Director of
ee Public Prosecutions.

" Succeaafil applicants will be signed ¢ to ‘the Director of Public :

“ ~ Prosecutions. =

The appointrient will bé on permanent. and pensionable or: coritractnal af ee

a ms . terms ifa citizen of The Bahamas is appointed; or on- contractual terms; if a at
ae NOR -Bahamian is. appointed. . Inthe casé of a contractual ‘appointment. Boas]
' ooo gratuity: of: fifteen percent. (15%) of basic salary would 1 be Payable ‘on. nthe:
an sarisfacibny completion of si service. ae oi oe



. he's slay © of the Post is Seale wu $50; 300 x 700 ‘$54,300 er



i General at (242) 325-7798 vee later that the ere uly 2005,

VACANCY FOR CHIEF COUNSEL .
_ OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL
one CIVEL SIDE

_ Applications are.- invited from. suitably. qualified persons for —
appointment as Chief Counsel in the Office of. the saad General, in the .

: eee cate of The Bahamas.

- Applicants... rriust be members of. the English, Irish, Scottish or.
Bahamian: Bar or. the Bar of a country: of The Commonwealth to which a:

“member of The Bahamas: Bar is admitted without examination. In addition, ”
they must have had ‘at least seven (7) years standing at the Bar or have

enrolled and have. practiced as.a Solicitor for at least seven Hy years in the ia :

aN above-mentioned, countries without examination.

“The duties of the Beet ineluge>

a igs oy geniéial ” “gavide” 18° “a” Civctninent: ‘Departments, . i
Ministriés and Public Corporations; —

2 carrying out legal research as necessary;
3. conducting civil matters in “the Magistrates Court,
; Supreme Court, Court of Appeal and the Judicial
Committee of the bevy’ eouncil

AL advice on public service matters;

5: -. such other matters as. may: b fe Bape by the Director of
oo Legal Affairs. : ;

Successful applicants wil be “assigned to the Director of Legal 3

The appointment t will be on permaiient and 4 pensionable, or : dohtiractual ah

aS ‘ee if-a citizen. of The Bahamas is appointed; or on contractual.terms ifa’:
Ton Bahamian is appointed. In the case of a contractual appointment -a

a salty 0 of the post i is: + Seale. Ju 1 $50 100. x 700 $84 200 ber : “ A




qualifications to the Director of Legal Affairs, Office of the Attorney
General at (242) 325-7798 no later than the 29" July 2005.

‘Seieseatbd: -petsons - omay fa: “thet ‘Tesuimés eng ‘with’ ‘Copies ope



‘INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY
MUST SELL

MWRasme seu aie assis



THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005, PAGE 7B







RAINBOW BAY
SUBDIVISION
(ELEUTHERA)

Lot #44, Block 5, Section A. The lot
is on a hill overlooking the Atlantic
Ocean. Area is approximately 10,800
sq. ft. This site encompasses a two
# storey apartment block of two
apartments. One upstairs and one
downstairs. Each comprising one
bedroom one bathroom, front room,
dining, kitchen. There is a wooden
porch approximately 8 - 6 feet wide

=e on the upper level secured with a
weoden:handrail: The garage area has been converted into a efficiency apartment and
néw houses one bedroom/frontroom in one and one bathroom. Age: is 7 years old.
The apartments could be rented at $700 per month partly furnished. The efficiency
rented at $400 per month. — .

Appraisal: $308,402.00









































MURPHY TOWN
(ABACO)

Lot #60 with a structure, lot size

above sea level but below road
level and would flood in a severe
hurricane the duplex has
dimensions of 60. ft by 30 ft partly
of wood and _ partly of cement
blocks with one section virtually
finished and occupied with blocks
up to window level and floor ready
to be poured. The roof is asphalt
shingles, the interior walls and
ceiling are of 1x6 pine and the floor of ceramic tiles. The finished work is average/below,
2 bedrooms, one bath, living/dining. The occupied portion of the structure is not
complete. Age: 10 years old. ,

Appraisal: $80,498.00 3
‘HAMILTON’S (LONG ~
ISLAND)
Queen’s High Way, lot of land



column: and _ belt course ‘with

one bathroom; kitchen, dining, and
living room. Total living space is
‘1,237.5q. ft.,.utilities available are.
electricity, water, cable: tv and



‘telephone,

EARLY SETTLERS DRIVE
; (ELEUTHERA)

Lot #7 Early Settlers Drive, North
Eleuthera Heights, size 11,200
sq. ft., contains incomplete 3
bed, 2.5 bath, living room, dining
room, kitchen and tv room.

Appraisal: $141,716.40

RAD AWAR ARE KE
s €

Appraisal: $123,000.00 —

C0 SS RSRS

wo Heading south
4th on the left painted white trimmed green with wall in front.

iy

i





, concrete floor has not been poured as yet. The foundation is:2,511 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $43,968.75

BAHAMA CORAL ISLAND (ABACO),

under. normal conditions.

Appraisal: $8,236.00 .

DUNDAS TOWN

(ABACO), Crown Alotment #21- Vacant land 10,810.sq. ft. off
.§.C. Bottle Drive. 2 vas .

Appraisal: $26,250.00

60 x 115 ft., 6,900 sq. ft., 10 ft.,

13,547 sq. ft., dwelling. house of. .
solid concrete floors, foundation —

finished plaster. Two bedrooms, -

Appraisal: $98,057.00 _

s All that.piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 7,752 sq. ft. (77.5 x 100) situated in the southern district of
New Providence being lot No. 3 in an area known as Richville of Malcolm Road west. This property is spacious
and can probably another house at the rear. This property is spacious and can probably accomodate another
house at the rear. It is lanscaped and enclosed by a wall in front with fence on the side. The property consist
j Of a single story, 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom, living room and dining rooms, combined, family room and kitchen,
enclosed carport and a roof covered front proch (indented) with floor area of 1,374 sq. ft..

on East Street turn right onto Malcolm Road, then third corner on the right, the house is the

NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA), Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and bounded on North by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal Investment
Ltd., this is a single family zoning and 50 ft., above sea level. This site encompasses a foundation with plumbing and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry fill. The

Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is vacant and a hill over looking the Atlantic Ocean.

Lot #1, Block A, on Central Abaco. This property is vacant and is approximately 9,100 sq. ft. This property is elevated and should not flood

The property is in the southwestern portion of the Bahama Coral, Coral Island and bounded northwesterly by 60 ft. Wide Road.

BAHAMA SOUND .-(EXUMA), Lot #7088 situated in Bahama Sound, Exuma section 10 East. Great Exuma approximately 10.5 milés west of George Town lot is square in shape on
elevation of approximately 15 ft., above sea level contains 10,000 sq. ft., No adverse site conditions noted. This property is single family residence.

Property is located on the northwestern side of the Queen’s Highway, about 10.5 miles northwest of George Town.

VALENTINES EXTENSION
(NASSAU)














Lot #2 contains a 19 year old 1 1/2
storey four. plex with a floor area of
3,621 sq. ft. The two storey section
consist of a master bedroom,
bathroom.and sitting area upstairs
and two bedrooms, one bath, living,
dining, family room and kitchen
downstairs. The single storey consist
of one two bedroom, one bath
j} apartment and two efficency
apartments, land size 7,500 sq. ft.
Multi-Family zoning on flat land and
not subject to flooding.

Appraisal: $347,006.00

The subject property is located on the western side of Valentine’s Extension Road, just
over one hundred feet north. of the roadway known as Johnson Terrace. Travel east
on Bernard Road, turn left onto Adderley Street.which is opposite SAC, continue left .
at the deep bend, take first right into Johnson Terrace, go to T-junction and turn left,
then first right. Property is. second building on right, white trimmed brown.

DUNDAS TOWN (ABACO)

83 two bed, 1 bath triplex 9,000 sq.
ft., lot no. 18b with an area for a
small shop. Age 12 years the land
is a portion of one of the Dundas
Town Crown Allotment parcels
_ Stretching from Forest Drive to Front
Street, being just-under a quarter
acre in size and on the lowside. A
concrete block structure, with
asphalt shingle roof and L-shape
in:design with a total length of 70x26
ft, plus 50 x 22 ft., 2,920 sq. ft., the
H interior walls are concrete blocks,
~ ceiling is sheet rock and the floors















of vinyl tiles.

Appraisal: $220,500.00

}

| KENNEDY SUBDIVISION
~. (NASSAU)

- Lot ‘no: 21 all utilities available 10
year old single story house, 3
-- bedroom 2. bathroom, living room,
dining area, family room, kitchen,.
q .study, laundry and an entry porch.



iisal: $175,350.00.

hark vi Set valine Bye
‘Heading west along Soldier Road
take main entrance to Kennedy
Subdivision on the left, then take the
second on your right with garage.

MURPHY TOWN (ABACO)

Crown Allotment #70, singe storey

wood and concree commercial

building approximately 758 sq. ft.,
about 20 years old.




1st corner on the left then 1st right, house is

Appraisal: $71 ,946.00



_ NO. 3 LEXINGTON SUBDIVISION
oe (NASSAU) neo.








For conditions of sale and other information contact
Philip White @ 502-3077 email philip. white@scotiabank.com or

Harry Collie @ 502-3034 email harry.collie@scotiabank.com
Please visit www.fsbobahamas.com for interior photos









PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005
























LIST OF AUTHORIZED ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS
FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 2006

























THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS. ...
; ont mt

bone gy

















f
‘
{
'
, |
THREE PHASE ELECTRICIANS
[| CNAME ——C*dT*=CiéLISENCCE. [~~~ BUSINESSNAME ~— | ADDRESS —|_—CCITY/ISLAND —s| | TELEPHONE || 14
Patrick’s Electric
Nu-Way Electric Company Ltd. 393-3558
[Alleyne,Louis——s| ThreePhase | C—“‘C;W CL iLO. Box F-40854 | Nassau, Bahamas || 646-4984
c
| Antoine, Guy Charles |ThreePhase | —C—C—“‘CCLiPO.BoxN-853 | Nassau, Bahamas || 3:41-0086 aa
Nassau, Bahamas Z|
_
[Barnett Sr. Paul —| ThreePhase | ss C—“‘(WCLWP.O. Box SS-5085 | Nassau, Bahamas | 323-4132_ 4
[Barnett Jr. Paul =| ThreePhase | —C(“‘(;! CL P.O. Box SS-5085 | Nassau,Bahamas | —323-4132__ Mi
Bi
P.O. Box AB-20192 a
a
yh
Freeport, Grand Bah. a. i
[Bowleg, Nicholas __—'| ThreePhase | *§ ——C—C~“‘;CWdSC&RP*«CO. Box GT-2717 | Nasu, Bahamas | 477-6525 -
Nassau, Bahamas aa
a
Z
7
| P.O. Box N-9073 357-9055 ~
| Edgecombe, Felton _|[ThreePhase | CC—C“‘“‘;CCCdS&P.O. Box F-14391. | Nassau, Bahamas | 324-2423 ;
[Evans,SamuelK. | ThreePhase | CCsC*~‘C*C*d*& «CO. Bo EE-15220 | Nassau, Bahamas | 477-0218 | .
pe:
a:
Three Phase a
| Greene, John ————sd| ThreePhase | = SCC P.O. Box N-10683 | Nassau, Bahamas | 341-4937, | ae
| Hart, Kenneth ———s| ThreePhase [ C~SsCSC*d~&.O. Box. CR-54723 | Naas, Bahamas | 357-7385 “a
oe
a
e
| Hudson, Lewis | ThreePhase | CCSC*d&.. BX F-41846 | Freeport, GB | 373-6610 a
| Johnston, William __| Three Phase _|J&JElectricLimited | P.O. AB-20413_ | Marsh Harbour, Abaco | 367-5145 |” a
| Johnson, George | ThreePhase | = CS P.O. Box'N-8401 | Nassau, Bahamas | 323-4278 a
P.O. Box SS-19924 . a8 |
| King, Garnet_ ss | ThreePhase | SCT P.O. Box'N-1490 | Nassau, Bahamas | 324-1960 i!
=a |
[Laing Kenneth =| ThreePhase [| CCT P.O. Box F-44925 [ Freeport,GB | 374-7710 om
a
me
| Martinborough, Timothy | Three Phase _| Electrical Services Contractors Ltd. | P.O. Box EE-17105 |Nassau,Bahamas | __-393-1079 any
Mevosh buen | Tee Bese. _________{B.0. Box EE {9880_Nassau, Bahamas | 395.817 vf |
Three Phase “yt
| Mcintosh, Sydney | ThreePhase |} CS P.O. Box F-44083 [ Freeport, Grand Bah. | _ 352-3760 __| 4
a
x og!
Pintard, John A. __| Three Phase |
Pratt, Kevin Three Phase | KAP Electrical Contracting Cabbage Pt, Long Is. _ un
Rahming, Drexel Three Phase _| Rahming’s Electrical RE
| Rolle, Levi =} | ThreePhase [9 st P.O, Box F-41558." [ Freeport,GB [352-6290 |
Russell, Jerem P.O. Box EE-17010 | Nassau, Bahamas ‘364-5993 4
_ (Storr, Henry —————=sd|s Three Phase “{“Henry F Storr Electri¢’Co. Ltd! | P.O. Box:'N2945°"" “Nassau, Bahamas j
[ Storr, Stephen "| ‘Three Phase “| Henry F ‘Storr Electric-Co.ttd: | P.O. Box N-945"""!__| Nassau, Bahamas || 393-7777 | “a
P.O. Box GB-12304 uy
P.O. Box CR-54481 | Nassau,Bahamas ss |_——-341-7935 | Hl
Three Phase iq}



SINGLE PHASE ELECTRICIANS





















| CNAME | ~LISENCE [| ~~ BUSINESSNAME ——si|—s ADDRESS ~— | _——sCITY/ISLAND | TELEPHONE | oH
assau, Bahamas ie
“| Andrews, Anthony | SinglePhase | SSCS*~*~SC*dtCGeneerl Delivery | Kemps Bay, Arnos | 369-5143 i
|Bain,Ryan | SinglePhase | SCSCSC*dC& CO. Box SB-52145 | Nassau, Bahamas | 347-1959 | an
Nassau, Bahamas aa
| Brown, Anthon | SinglePhase | —C—“‘SSCN#O#C#C#(#C#C#C#d#*S#&R«CO. Box F-14075 _| Nassau, Bahamas |
ee |
| Butler, Yorick | SinglePhase [| CC~“‘*‘“SCBP.. Box CB-13625 | Nassau, Bahamas :
| Cambridge, Kevin | SinglePhase | —i—“‘“‘CSCOC*C*di‘C&P «CO. Box 51483 Gregory Town, EL my
Sontech Electrical Services Hed
P.O. Box 5896. a
) P.O. Box CB-13096_| Nassau, Bahamas oe
| Deleveaux, Raphael | SinglePhase | —C(‘“‘(‘CSC;C*™*C*C*C P.O. Box N-87444
Nassau, Bahamas ;
Nassau, Bahamas :
| Gilbert, Michael | Single Phase | C—~—“*é‘“C;*C*S:SCSC*C*C*diSC&P «CO. Bo. SB -5:2030__| Nassau, Bahamas :
| Greenslade, Alvin | SinglePhase | —(‘“‘COSOOOCOC#C#d#SU&P.O. Box N-91505 Nassau, Bahamas -
P.O. Box SB50449 __| Nassau, Bahamas =
Johnson, Anderson __ | Single Phase j
Johnson, Philip Single Phase oe
Nassau, Bahamas cote ds
Dove Plaza Marsh Harbour, AB iy
Knowles, Edward ‘Flameless Electrical Cont. Ltd. | P.O. Box SS-5945 - | Nassau,Bahamas _—i| ———«338-8787 |: :
Taylor Industries Limited s
| McQueen, Darvin __—([SinglePhase [| ——~—“‘~‘~*~*S*C~*S**SCSCSCS General Deelivery | San Andros, Andros
Nassau, Bahamas |
Moss, Gladstone
-
P.O. BoxMT-569
Roberts, Richard P. Single Phase | Roberts Electrical & Plumbing P.O. Box AB-22990 | Man-O-War Cay, AB 365-6016
P.O. Box CB-13866 -
reg
{ Rolle, Wilfred Single Phase
Russell, Nero SinglePhase | CS P.O. Box SS-19546 | Nassau, Bahamas | 395-4662 j
Sands, Gary Single Phase
Storr, Terrance Single Phase os
Stuart, Carlington . SinglePhase | SSCS... Box AB-20053 _[ Dundas Town, Abaco | 375-8050. | a
Taylor, Marivin Single Phase
P.O. Box N-10494














ADDRESS

Albury, Morral herokee Sound, Abaco

O. Box 34
O. Box 23002

.O. Box F-41344

eneral Delive
General Delive

Pinder, Rev. Leonard O. Box F-43266 reeport, Grand Bahama

P
-
P
P
Pp
E
P
P
P

Roberts, William O. Box F-41199 reeport, Grand Bahama
.O. Box MT-509

P.O. Box c/o N-1605

P.O. Box 20546 urpy Town, Abaco
Sweetng, Edward P.O. Box c/o N-323

. _RESTRICTED JOURNEYMEN

CITY/ISLAND

Z2|DIOIO

m|—a|o|m

7

?
oopers Town, Abaco

27

atthew Town, Ingaua

reeport, Grand Bahama

n

)

@

regory Town, Eleuthera

TELEPHONE
366-2047
365-0593
334-2260
329-2662
352-8505
347-2414
334-4178
348-3242

_ 373-1610
352-6611
339-1300
352-6611
359-6191
341-4642





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Dr. Phil



THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005, PAGE 96

Let Charlie the |
Bahamian Puppet and . lay
his sidekick Derek put,

some smiles on your

kids si faces.

Bring your children to the
. McHappy Hour at McDonald’s in
Oak's Field every Thursday |
| from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month of July 2005. —

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun,

STORAGE SOLUTIONS |

Small Spaces

eee

: for

525WOOD

: 46 Madeira Street



PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



It’s time to team up
for the wall of fame

STUBBS



OPINION



ALE TINE NN

player goes
national in US



| BH By RENALDO
DORSETT
Junior Sports
Reporter

A LOCAL Bahamian col-
legiate basketball player is
receiving the opportunity of
a lifetime: to play. for a
national team in the United
States.

Jeremy Barr was named
to the United States' Under
21 select team for the Global
Games Basketball tourna-
ment this weekend in Frisco,
Texas.

This is the sixth edition of
the Global Games and it has
become one of the premiere
international basketball
events played in the United
States.

The tournament targets
the world's top basketball
players ages 21 and under.

This year's tournament
includes teams from Lithua-
nia, Nigeria, Slovenia,
Ukraine, and USA Basket- .
ball, Team Africa and the
Texas/USA Select Team
which Barr will be a part of.

Barr created a stir in the
college basketball recruiting
community this summer by
signing with the University
of Southern California after
initially committing to Texas
Tech.

The newest Trojan will
enter his freshman season as
one of the school's most
highly touted recruits, com-
ing from powerhouse West-
bury. Christian Academy in
Houston, Texas.

The 6 foot 8 inch power
forward averaged 19 points
and 9 rebounds for the Wild-

‘cats in his senior season,
drawing interest from a num-
ber of NCAA Division 1 uni-
versities.

He also led the Wildcats
to three straight Texas Asso-
ciation of Private and
Parochial Schools (TAPPS)

‘state titles, while being
named first team All-State
and a McDonalds All-Amer-
ican nominee. . ;

In a press release, Global
Games Executive Director
Michael Sorrell explained the
selection process for the
team.

"It was very important to
the selection committee that
we fielded a team. with young
men of outstanding integrity
and athletic abilities," he
said. "It was equally impor-
tant to us that we surrounded
these players with coaches
who possessed strong bas-
ketball minds, outstanding
communication skills and
impeccable character. On

4 both counts, we have accom-
plished our goal."

A number of current NBA
stars have played in the
Global Games, which have
become something of a right
of passage for many players
en route to the next Jevel.

Some Global Games
Alumni include Yao Ming,
Chris Bosh, Deron Williams,
Darko Milicic, Carlos Booz-
er and Caron Butler.



W HAT?’S the differ-
ence between the

Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture’s National Hall of
Fame and the ministry’s
Sports Heroes Wall of Fame?

Why can’t the two be inter-
twined so that the same faces
placed in the Ministry of
Sports’ office be the same that
grace Nassau’s International
Airport?

Have you ever noticed that
the two, although implement-
ed by the same ministry, do
not match up with each other?

Is there a different criteria
for being named to the
National Hall of Fame as
there is for being selected to
the Sports Heroes Wall of
Fame? -

The Ministry of Sports must
be commended for taking the
initiative of recognising of our
sporting heroes and heroines




of the past and present.

But I would think that if a
person is enshrined in a
national Hall of Fame, their

Sands, basketball executive
Vincent Ferguson, boxing/
cycling star Leonard ‘Boston

Blackie’ Miller, bodybuilder’



“There’s enough space on
both sides of the wall to pack it
with our sporting legends. We
have enough who have :
excelled at the international
level to achieve the same
recognition as those who are

already there.”



performances should have
been noteworthy enough for
them to have their pictures
mounted on a wall of fame.
Take, for example, people
such as disabled athlete John

Kingsley Poitier, multi-talent-
ed Leviticus ‘Uncle Louw’
Adderley, Charlie Major Sr
and Roderick Simms — all
have been inducted into the
Hall of Fame.

However, they have not

been included in the list for |

the Wall of Fame.

And when you consider the
accomplishments they’ve
made, there are some others
who should have been consid-
ered for inclusion.

’ Long jumper Shonel Fergu-

son, who paved the way for
the success our women are
now achieving in athletics,
along with discus/shot putter
Bradley Cooper and Lavern
Eve — two long-time national
icons — have been left out. |

High jumper Troy Kemp
should also be considered.

There’s enough space on
both sides of the wall to pack
it with our sporting legends.
We have enough who have
excelled at the international
level to achieve the same
recognition as those who are
already there.

We don’t want a repeat case

Betty Kelly Kenning Aquatic
Centre chance for youngsters

of where we rushed to hon-
our Andre Rodgers, the first
Bahamian to play in the Major

League, just after he died. ~

This is the Bahamas,’and
there isn’t any reason why
more attention can’t be placed
on giving our athletes as much
exposure as we can.

The wall of fame is the ide-
al spot because it exposes our
athletes to a wide range of
people, not just Bahamians,
but the countless amount of
visitors who pass through the
airport on their arrival here.

Many of the visitors who
have had the opportunity to
view these athletes in action
would be able to identify them
and see how much they are
appreciated on their home
soil.

So let’s add as many of
those athletes who are deserv-
ing of the honor to the wall of
fame.



@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Junior Sports Reporter














HUNDREDS of young, aspiring

tunity to learn at the nation's top swim-
ming facility this-ssummer.

The swimming sector of the Ministry
of Youth, Sports and Culture's Sum-
mer Programme is teaching youngsters
learning to swim and is also fostering
the development of swimming as a com-
petitive sport among a wider variety of
young athletes.

Kevin Colebroke, Manager for the
Betty Kelly Kenning Aquatic Center

istry’s program has been highly antici-



swimmers are being given the oppor-’

said the swimming segment of the Min-.

pated by campers and administrators
alike.
"The swimming sector is something
we have high hopes for and something
we have a lot invested in," he said, "We

wish to see more people take advan- '

tage of this facility."

Dispel

Colebrooke said they: want to dispel
the misconception of the Aquatic Cen-
ter being open to only a select few.

"We want to develop an interest in
swimming among many kids‘that may
not have an opportunity to come here to
swim throughout the year," he said.
He added that, while the main goal is

Syndicated Content

bstenine hundreds of youngsters how
to swim, coaches and instructors also
would like to find a number of campers
with a deep-rooted interest in swim-
ming.

"What we hope to achieve out of this
is that by the time these kids leave here
we anticipate that over 80 per cent of
them will successfully. learn how. to
swim," he said. “What we're also trying
to do here is to keep their interest, we

hepe to target the ones who we think .

have potential and encourage them to
continue."

Ona given day the Aquatic Center _

hosts nearly 1,000 swimmers which
Colebrooke said can be a challenge at
times to monitor.

. skills,"

"We have done a good job of ensur-
ing that the people we have hired are
capable of effectively protecting these
kids while imparting basic swimming
he said.

Instructors

“We have a number of qualified
swimmihg instructors here and. other
instructors are swimmers themselves."

He said the programme can act as
the beginning of a feeder system for
young swimmers.

“As. time goes on we hope to see
more and more of these children com-
ing back to perform at a higher level
of swimming competition."

Available from. Commercial News Providers”





er

TT!

England prepares for Ashes clash

~~





Armstrong holds overs

lead in Tour’s longest stage
a eae

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content “4





THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

Waltia's dream
comes true with
scholarship |

By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

THE dream for a 6-foot-5
14-year-old Bahamian girl
came true yesterday, when
one of the top- ranked High
School’s in Houston, Texas,
recruited her to play her
favourite sport. :

‘Waltia’Rolle was awarded
a full scholarship to the West-
bury Christian High School in
Houston, Texas, for the sport
of basketball, after meeting
up with former Olympic

champion Frank Rutherford. .

Campus

Although the meeting took
place three months ago while
Rolle was walking casually
around her school’s campus,
Rutherford jumped at the
opportunity to help her excel.

Rutherford got the ball
rolling, finalising all negotia-
tions and arrangements, yes-
terday.

Rolle, who is currently in
enrolled at CR Walker Sec-

seedneserensieeeaceeeceeecceesenscceeessseseceeeersnaceeesceseceaeeunsaaesesesssseensasenanassaansnaseneeeananessenseeeeeeeneaeeeseseeesneeeetasesassseeeseeeeeneeeesseseeseeeeeeseneeeeeeeee eens Poo





Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

ondary, opted not to play bas-
ketball for the school after her
grade point average dropped.

Moving into grade 11 at
Westbury, Rolle is expecting
to improve on her skills, so
she can excel and hopefully
make a lasting impression on
the coaches.

She said: “I am. extremely
grateful to Frank Rutherford

- and the coaches at the school

for awarding me the scholar-
ship. This a great opportunity
for me and my main goal is to

make my country and family. .

proud.

“T love sports, especially.

basketball, and I was always
confident that I would be
awarded a scholarship, but I
never knew it would have hap-
pened while I was still fresh
in high school.

“My dream is to go off to
school and play basketball, but
playing on the high school lev-
el in the United States is an
accomplishment. I know that I

will learn a lot from this’

school.”
Rolle has never played on

a special gift from God and

really thankful to the persons
-involved in making her

‘games, so knowing that she



ui
































the national level, but she has
helped the HO Nash Lions
win three straight junior girls
championship titles.
_Her dad, Maxwell Rolle,.
believes that his daughter has

he is really happy that her
dreams are coming true.

Blessing»

He said: “This scholarship
is a blessing from God, I am

dreams come true.

' “This is my only daughter,
so I will be travelling with her.
She is precious tome. When I
found out about the scholar-
ship I got really emotional.

“T always support her, I
attend a fair amount of her

will be playing on a higher lev-
el makes me feel better.”

Rolle will leave for school
in August, and starts on
August Sth. The basketball
season starts in November and
finishes in February.

@ SIX FOOT FIVE Waltia Rolle

INSIDE
Brent Stubbs
Doel
ee



|Dominic ‘takes it easy’ ahead

ll By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter





MVaOUCRMIeT Cait

Athlete rests to focus mentally on race



WITH no major track and field meet









being held before the World Champi-
onships, Dominic Demeritte has decided to
“take it easy”.
_ Although he is still training — a light jog
daily - Demeritte has four days to relax
beforé heading to Helsinki, Finland, for
the 10th annual IAAF games on August
6th-14th.
The rest and relaxation will help him
prepare for the strenuous rounds of the
200m, in which he hopes to better his time.
According to the national record holder
and gold medallist at the 2003 World
Indoor Championships, a period of rest is
good for any athlete, helping them to focus
mentally on the race.

Coach

“Sometimes you just need a day or two
to relax, so this is what I am doing on the
advice of my coach, Henry Rolle,” said
Demeritte.

“Looking back at my performance at
the CAC games I am in need of it. But I
am not fully relaxed, I still have work-out
sessions but they’re not as hard as they
could be.

“JT do a light jog here and there. Working
on my start, making sure that I execute
properly.”

At the Colinalmperial Central Ameri-

can and Caribbean games, Demeritte ran a
time of 20.84 seconds in the preliminary
round for a first place finish and second
fastest time. :

Lining-up in heat three for the semi-
finals, Demeritte managed a time off 20.54
seconds.

This time had lined him in the hunt for a
gold medal, but a sluggish start and slow
reaction to the gun in the finals forced him
to settle for the bronze.

The bronze time was 20.47 seconds. The
winning time, by Usain Bolt, was 20.03
seconds. Trinidad and Tobago’s Aaron
Armstrong ran 20.35 seconds.

He said: “I was really disappointed with
my performance, at least my start. I didn’t
get a good start and that cost me.

“My start was sc nething I was really
concerned about, bt" “mning through the
rounds had built up 1... confides >.

“After I saw the start by the other run-
ners I knew I had to run the curb hard. I
tried to shoot off the curve with good form
to ensure that I would still be in the mix of
the race.”

Demeritte believes opting to travel to
Helsinki before the Bahamian delegation
will also help.

He will have a week to train in Finland,
adjusting to the country’s climate.

The 200m is set for August 9th, the
fourth day of competition, The first heat

will take off at 12.20pm, with the quarter
finals taking place at 7.25pm that after-
noon.. ;

“Tt is always good to go up there and
adjust before the meet so me and my coach
will leave for Finland on Sunday,” said
Demeritte.

“T will train up there, trying to adjust to
the weather. Who knows what might hap-
pen,.one day it might rain, so adjusting is
always a key factor.”

Bronze

Demeritte was a part of the 4x100m
team that ran to a 39.08 seconds for a
bronze medal, a time that was 700 of a
seconds shori of a first World Champi-
onships qualification for the Bahamas in
vic event.

A disappointed Demeritte believes that
the team would have been able to qualify,
if the CAC games wasn’t held so close to
the World Championships.

“We would have qualified, no doubt
about that,” said Demeritte.

“Our main thing was competition. The
race was the first one for the year and that
came so late. If we could have ran in sev-
eral other meets we would have qualified.”

The relays are set for August 12th with
the finals August 13th.






THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005

SECTION

Ministers’ wiv
worship God it

@ By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

LAS VEGAS, Nevada, better
known as ‘Sin City’, is an unlikely
place to host a religious conference.
But a group of ministers’ wives and
widows from the Bahamas now know
that even the most unusual location
can be the ideal place to worship and
praise God.

A delegation of 77 Bahamians,
including members of the Bahamas
Association of Ministers’ Wives and
Widows, a few husbands and pastors’
kids (PKs), recently returned from
the international association’s 65th
annual convention in Las Vegas.

Vernita Josey, who serves as both
the president of the Bahamas Associ-
ation of-Ministers’ Wives and Wid-
ows, as well as vice-president of the
Inter-Continental Region of the inter-
national association (which includes
all countries outside of the United
States), described her Las Vegas expe-
rience as a “memorable blessing”. She
is currently serving her second term.

Holding a conference in Las Vegas,
says Mrs Josey, is like fulfilling the
mandate of Christians to be the “light
in the darkness”.

The delegation from the Bahamas, ;

with their sisters around the world,
brought that light to some 1,200
strong.

Sister Josey tells Tribune Religion:
“Like someone remarked during the
conference, there are believers in Las
Vegas, there are Christians in Las
Vegas and there are a whole lot of
persons who love the Lord there. You
can find sin in every country, but here
it is in Las Vegas, there are people
who love the Lord and they wanted to
have this conference there and.it was
a blessing because people saw us and
they saw the difference.”

According to the president; every- .

‘In our
fathers




Patronal Festival
See Page 2C





& A DELEGATION of 77 Bahamians (some pictured) recently returned from the Bahamas Association of
Ministers’ Wives and Widows 65th annual convention in Las Vegas.

share the word of God and let people
know who they were and who they

‘represented, especially since they were

surrounded by an endless number of
casinos and many aspects of “non-

~ Christian” living while.in Las. Vegas.

The theme for this year’s conven-
tion was “Keeping the Vision Going:
Reaching Out, eee Retain-
ing”.

Most of the sessions, says Sister
Josey, were geared towards the
empowerment of women.

“This year, we really dealt a lot with
us as a sisterhood really making the
difference, transforming lives wher-
ever we go. Not to major in the minor
things you know, like our president
(Dr Janie Charles Holmes) often says,
‘don't sweat the small stuff’. ;

“But there are sisters in our midst

who are going through so many chal-
lenges and she (president) feels that
we ought to be there to help them to
overcome these challenges,” she says.

Sister Josey was the speaker at the ©

President’s Breakfast, held i in, honour
of Dr Holmes.

One of the topics raised bt thie con-
vention dealt with the responsibility of
a minister’s wife in the leadership of
the church.

According to Sister Josey, a minis-
ter’s wife should be his “number one
supporter”, and is also called by God
to stand with her husband. . ©

“It is so important to be there for
that man that God has set as a leader
in the church,” she says. “You ought
to be his number one supporter... If
there is something you need to criti-
cise, then do it constructively and in



are worthy men’

'
1
|
i

love, and not in the presence of others.

“Your duty is to first be loyal to’

your husband and then she can extend
your boundaries once you’ve already
done that — taking care of him, making

Sure that if he has something to do,

then’ you be there to support him,”
she adds.

' According to the president, there
are more than .200 ministers’ wives
and widows registered with the
Bahamas association, yet there
remains many wives and widows who
have still not expressed an interest in
joining the group.

While she acknowledges that there
may be a level of contention between
some wives, Sister Josey is confident
that those who are involved in the
local association uphold a spirit of uni-

ty, where each person bears one





“IN our country, most fathers are wor-
thy men.” These were the words of Rev
Father James Moultrie, Rector of St
Matthew’s Anglican Church as he greet-
ed the fathers of the historic parish. on
Sunday.

St Matthew’s, the oldest edifice in the
Bahamas, is celebrating 203 years of ded-
ication this year.

A part of this year’s celebrations includ-
ed the recognition of eight dedicated sons
of the historic church, who were hon-
oured in a special mass. Joining this list of
honourees were Milo Butler Jr, Dustin
Babbs, Robert Isaacs, Fredrick Raham-
ing, Carl Francis Smith, Herbert Thomp-
son, Dr George White and Jonathan
Mycklewhyte.

The morning was filled with all smiles
and joy as fathers also received a special
treat from the women of the parish, who
sang for the men.

Father Moultrie pointed out that

Bight ‘dedicated sons’ of St Matthew's ‘Anglican
Church are honoured in special mass as historic

church celebrates 203 years of dedication ue

“They are there
when they celebrate
joy and when they
face sadness. They
are there to lift them
up when they fall.”

— Rev Fr James Moultrie

ne

fathers make a point to be there for their
children. “They are there when they cel-
ebrate joy and when they face sadness.

They are there to lift them up when they.

fall.”
He said that fatherhood is all about
love.

dedication on Monday, July 18: And on
Sunday, Fathers Ivan Eldon and Joseph
Mycklewhyte, sons of the parish, cele-
brated the 7.15am mass. Rev Angela

See FATHERS, Page 2C

St Matthew’s eelebrated its feast of

another’s burdens.

“To be honest with you, those who
are really a part of this organisation
have really bonded together,” she
says. “When something happens to
one it Spreads | like wild fire, every-
body gets on the BaiidWabon Aid tries

‘to be there to support that one sister.
_ We are there for each other.”

And while a minister’s wife may do
well on her own without the assistance

- of others, Sister Josey believes that it

is fellowship with individuals who are
acquainted with her concerns and
have personally dealt with certain
issues that can help that minister’s
wife cope with the sometimes daunt-
ing task of pastoring alongside her

See PRAISE, Page 7C

arge 1-topping pizza
Wings & es) Dots

New Locations

j Blue Hill Queen’s
325-3998 358302
: 3802







PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005 THE TRIBUNE

RELIGION





@ The Isaacs family








ST Margaret’s Anglican Mycklewhyte; the final ser-
Church, Kemp Road, will cel- » vice, which will contain the
ebrate its Patronal Festivalon Solemn Eveningsong, Sermon,
Sunday, July 24. Three ser- Procession and Benediction
vices will be held: the first at | led by Preacher Father Laish
7am, by Celebrant and _ Boyd, will begin at 3.30pm. ~
Preacher Archdeacon J Ran- St Margaret’s Anglican
furly Brown; the second ser- Church invites all former
vice will begin at 9.30am'and members and friends of the

will be led by Celebrant and _ Parish to join in these festivi-
~Preacher~Father—J OSEPR--— TES ee






li The White family





The Bahamas.
Christian Council —
in Conjunction with

The Caribbean
Conference Of Churches
— presents an ot



a








@ MILO Butler Jr and daughter during the recognition service. Mr Butler served as Speaker of
the House of Assembly and on several government boards. He also served as MP for Pinedale from
1977 to 1992. Shown presenting the gift to Mr Butler is Steven Mitchell (far left).











Fathers (From page 1C)

Palacious and Rev Beryl Higgs, daughters of | when the St Matthew’s Players put on a talent
the parish, celebrated the 10.30am mass. night.of songs and singing with “Da Funeral”.
The 203 celebration continues this weekend

For Clergy & Lay Leaders Of All |
| Denominations meer whe aneme
“BUILDING A FAITH-BASED RESPONSE

TO HIV/AIDS IN THE CARIBBEAN”

on
Monday, July 25, 2005, 9:00am - 5:00pm
at the British Colonial Hilton












Presenters will include:
* Representatives AIDS Secretariat
* Caribbean Conference of Churches
* Miriam Maluwa of the U.N. |

FREE REGISTRATION

including, lunch & coffee break
Contact Bahamas Christian Council
Tel/Fax 325-7909

Remembered Forever May
- Your Soul Rest In Peace




With Love ;
Your Family The Tribune wants to hear




from people who are
making news in their —
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements i
area or have won an
award. at
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story. °







THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005, PAGE 3C



RELIGION



TURN ROS orem UTEP TENTYo Rye

of Dean Patrick Adderley’s priesthood



@ By CLEMENT JOHNSON

hrist Church Cathedral

was packed on Sunday

as parishioners, family

members and well wish-

ers gathered to celebrate
the 30th anniversary. of priesthood of
Dean Patrick Adderley.

The service was a mass of jubila-
tion and praise, and was part of a
series of activities organised by a spe-
cial committee, spearheaded by Ron
Clarke, the Dean’s Warden.

According to Barbara Hanna-Cox,
the People Warden, church members
were happy to honour their pastor.

Dean Adderley has been at the
cathedral since February 13, 1998 and
has gained the love and trust of parish-
ioners over the past seven years.

“We felt the need to share with the
Dean and his family on such a
momentous occasion. All groups in

the church got together and decided to
celebrate mass on July 13, the actual
date of the anniversary,” said Mrs
Hanna-Cox. “It was also decided that
instead of three masses on Sunday,
there would only be one, which would
allow all Cathedral members the
opportunity to worship as a commu-
nity.”

The special mass was followed by a
reception.

The sermon was delivered by Dean
Adderley, who thanked his family,
parishioners and friends, and shared

his own journey of faith with the con- _

gregation, in the form of stories.

He said he used the method of sto-
ry telling in the same way that Jesus
told his followers stories. And like
Jesus he tried to challenge his-con-
gregation to live lives pleasing to God.

‘The Very Reverend Patrick Adder-
ley is the son of the late Mr and Mrs
Nathaniel Adderley. He was born and



raised in New Providence and attend-
ed St Barnabas Church.

Dean Adderley was graduated from
St John’s College, and later studied
at the House of Sacred Mission in Kel-
ham, England. He holds a bachelor’s
degree in theology from the Univer-
sity of Nottingham, England, and com-

* pleted his post graduate studies in

education at St Martin’s College Lan-
caster.

The Dean was ordained a deacon in
1974 and served his diaconate with

the Society of the Sacred Mission, .

Quermore Park, Lancaster.

On July 13, 1975 he was ordained to
the Sacred Priesthood and served in
the Parishes of St John and St Peter,
Abaco, and taught at the high school
there.

From 1978 to 1982, Dean Adder-
ley served as parish priest at the
Church of the Good Shepherd, Pin-

der’s Point, along with the Church of

St Jude, Smith’s Point, Grand
Bahama.

In addition to parish ministry, Dean
Adderley taught at the Freeport
(Anglican) High School, where he.
served as chaplain and senior master.

Dean Adderley was.appointed prin-
cipal of St Anne’s High School in 1983
and served in that capacity for 10
years, In addition, -he served in the
parishes of All Saints, Joan’s Heights;
Christ the King, Ridgeland Park; and
St Christopher’s Lyford Cay.

In 1993, Dean Adderley was
appointed deputy director of educa-
tion for Anglican schools and served
as coordinator of the Endowment
Fund. He currently serves as chair-
man of the Anglican Central Educa-

~ tion Authority.

He was installed as the eighth, (and
second Bahamian-born) Dean of
Christ Church Cathedral on Febru-
ary 13, 1998.



Safeguarding

wellness of the soul

â„¢@ By REV ANGELA
PALACIOUS

WE need to safeguard the
wellness of our own souls and
that of the next generation: the
health of the inner being, peace
of mind, contentment, passion
for living.

We need to know what chal-
lenges us and inspires us.

Let us pray like Hannah with

the fervency and intensity that.

our nation will be made up of
persons of prayer. We have to
pray for others who cannot
comprehend or articulate their
own spiritual experiences. We
sailed on ships in the decks or
in the hold to get here in order
to make the desert bloom.

' Why not write down three
things that you do to protect
your sanity, to, restore your dig-
nity, revive your spirit and safe-
guard the wellness of your soul.
Often, we do not give ourselves
recovery time, and vacation
time spent shopping from
morning until evening is no rest
time at all.

What three things threaten
the wellness of your soul?
’ If you do not eat properly
and on time, if you do not.exer-
cise, if you do not pray, if you
feed an addiction, if you over-
work, overspend, such things
undermine your equilibrium.

'. How are you applying what
you have learnt from educa-
tion, revelation, inspiration,
and experience? If you are able
to read this meditation you are

listed among the literate of the ©
world. How are you contribut- .

ing to the enlightenment of our
people? How are you positive-
ly influencing those around
you?

Can we teach our children



MEDITATION



@ REV ANGELA PALACIOUS

how to surrender those things
that cannot be changed by us
and not slip into despair? Can
they be taught to creatively
occupy themselves with appro-
priate activities while they are
waiting for God to show them
how to build a life for them-
selves? Can we model for them
the forgiveness that permits

'’ healthy relationships to still

occur after deep wounding?
How frequently do we say
the following?
I am sorry, please forgive n me.
You have hurt me very bad-
ly but I choose to forgive you.
I am grateful for our rela-
tionship.

Can we teach them this level .

of sensitive and honest com-
munication? ©

Imagine that you are a
weaned child on your mother’s
lap, then, transfer the thought
to sitting on God’s lap with no
desire for anything to be still
in the presence of God.

Machines must recover or go.

down when they are in need of
a rest.

How we do we offer the :

example of inner quietness?
On the other hand, do we
laugh and smile? Are we pleas-
ant to be around? Do they see
the joy of the Lord in us?
Ponder these things and then
intentionally safeguard the
wellness of your soul.

THE NASSAU AMATEUR OPERATIC SOCIETY

PROUDLY PRESENTS...

THE FREEPORT PLAYERS’ GUILD

Naa





“ha notat Lhe Fribune

Th L ui is preparing it Digest ever

and needs eraduating and college students, plus schools, to send in as much
information as possible on academic and other achievements. Students should
send in a photograph of themselves, and we need schools to supply information

on plans for the new academic year, plus any appropriate photos.

Ts SUV Ty tl)

Address: Back To School Supplement’
The Tribune
~ P.O. Box N-3207
Shirley & Deveaux Streets
Nassau, Bahamas —

Yo Dundas Oro alex
for the

Performing Arts

July 21st, CoA)
Tae Ware UU

| Contact Saniora St. Rose at The Tribune on 502 -2373 if you have any
queries. Information and pictures can also be emailed (as attachments) to:

longest-running Musical Comedy celebrates Ae PeYeCaerereCNy :
1 tribune @tribunemedia.net

o
entirety tal een the] hors asa Certs romance, marriage,

foe)
lovers, husbands, wives and Fie RAVE

Tickets $20 and $25. Available at Fox Hill Nur. aa
Bernard Road, 10am to 4pm daily. Call 324-61 47

Proceeds from the show will go towards the Rei of the Regency Theatre in
rca srerumn ay La Ree RUT (Og damage from last summer’s hurricanes. A donation will
also be made to the Bahamas Hear Peotone in Memory of Mrs. Kitty Lawrence.

URE AUDIENCES ONLY - No ONE UNDER Stswaua i





PAGE 4C, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005 THE

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IBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005, PAGE 5C



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PAGE 6C, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005 . THE TRIBUNE

DESOLATION
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THE TRIBUNE

ich God wan

Ib By REV JAMES
MOULTRIE



You, therefore, must be per-
ect, as your heavenly Father is
erfect

Fr ent ta

(Matt.5:48).

he Bible spends
some time in con-
versation about
perfection.
Toward the close
of His most significant body of
teaching, the Sermon on the
Mount, Jesus says the words or
our text. There is nothing
ambiguous about that. Perfec-
ition is the ideal condition, the
state of grace and bliss in which
e seek to imitate the Creator,
‘and Jesus tells us how to begin
the process. He first warns us
ithat obedience to the Old Law
lis not sufficient.
| Fidelity to the Ten Com-
‘mandments is not sufficient,
‘contrary to popular belief. In a
lseries of references to the old
tlaw, Jesus proves that they are
{not sufficient. Jesus said, “You
thave heard it said... You shall
(not commit adultery: you shall
(not steal, you shall not bear
{false witness; you shall love
| your neighbour as yourself...
| In them Jesus gives a summary
‘of the morality of Israel, the
‘level of perfection then, from
Moses onward. The keeping of
the law was what made a per-
son good. But then Jesus comes
along, as He often did, and said
it was not good enough just to
obey the Ten Commandments.
He gives new laws which sig-
nificantly modify the old law.

Radical

Jesus gives new, radical laws,
in each case almost reversing
the old law. This is the new per-
fection. Then He introduces
the new level of perfection in
the words of our text. He was
saying that we should be like

PEK eerLH TE tw

God as far as humanly possible.
We should emulate God not
for our own pleasure but
because our efforts represent
the will of God. Perfection is
not intended to create a super
human being, but rather to
reflect the perfect will of God.
But Jesus is no utopian; He
knows that we are imperfect
beings, but that does not mean
that we should not reach for
perfection.

Perfection

There is only one person in
the Bible who became a
byword for perfection: Job.
“There was a man in the land
of Uz whose name was Job,
and that man was blameless
and upright, one who feared
God and turned from evil”
(Job 1:1). Ironically, his
uprightness was the cause of
his troubles. His friends
assumed that trouble naturally
followed sin; it was punishment
and therefore whatever hap-
pened to Job was deserved. But
it was not imperfection that
cause Job trouble, it was per-
fection. The ultimate wisdom
of Job is that his blessings came
not from his own merit but the
mercy of God, and his curses
not from his own fault, but
from-the power of God. Some-
times God needs to get our
attention! The test for Job, and
for us, is whether in the face
of adversity he would be stead-
fast. It all had to do with his
faith in God. That is what Job
meant when he said, “I know
that my Redeemer liveth and
that He shall stand at the latter
day. And though worms
destroy this body, yet in my
flesh shall I see God.” -

Job was a study in steadfast-

ness, in faithfulness, and in the
hope of glory in the face of
despair. He tried to live a per-
fect life in. the midst of imper-
fection. We live in an imper-

RELIGION



Hi REV JAMES MOULTRIE

fect world, in fact we live in a
corrupt world. We learn to live

‘with imperfection. We see the

result of imperfection and a
turning away from God...vio-
lence, poverty, sickness and
new strands of diseases and
invasions of our homes and our
privacy. These are all indica-
tions of imperfection and cor-

. ruption.

Paradise

Any fool can live in Paradise;



it ought to be easy: no right or
wrong, no sin or error, no com-
promises, anything goes. Any
fool can live in utopia, but
utopia does not exist anywhere
in our world. ~

Corrupt

This is not paradise; this is
the real world, and it is not an
entirely pretty place. But it is in
such a corrupt world that we
are called by Jesus to perfec-

_tion. It will be difficult, but

THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005, PAGE /U

obtainable, with the help of
God. This is a call to faithful-
ness to God and His will for
us. Job did not do anything
spectacular; he was rewarded
for his faithfulness and consis-
tency in serving God. And that
work is never done; we will be
spiritually challenged as long
as we live.

Founding

That was foremost in the
minds of the founding fathers
of this church. Matthew was
not perfect, but Jesus saw
something in him and called
him. Matthew’s march toward
perfection began when he got
up and left everything and fol-
lowed Jesus. He was not a sym-
bol of perfection, far from it.
In fact he was of all men most
despised for being in collusion
with the Roman occupiers. But
Jesus saw something unique in
this slick tax collector and
called him to higher service.
Unlike Job, Matthew was seen
by the followers of Jesus as
most unworthy of His call. But
Jesus looked beyond his faults
and saw his need, and he does
the same for us. Some may
believe that we are not worthy

- of the call of God either, but

Jesus looks not with human

eyes. It is clear that his call of

Matthew as not a mistake.
This church as been a bea-
con of hope in this community

for 203 years. That is no small °
-achievement. This church

humanised many who were
dehumanised and showed them
the way to the Kingdom of
Heaven. And it continues to
do that. The ministries of this
church to the poor and vulner-
able are in the tradition of
Jesus. We not only care for the
aged, but we feed the hungry,
give them clothing, and give
them medical assistance. And
we do so in the name of Jesus;
not worrying about their reli-

he perfection|
BUR COM IE Nore



gious affiliation, or even
whether they have a church
home or not. We do not try to
convert anyone; we just do
what Jesus did! We are con-
vinced that no one is beyond
the reach of God and His
redemptive grace.

And so we come, this
evening, in all our imperfec-
tions and unworthiness to
renew our faith in a Good and
Gracious God who has been
perfect in his response to our
failures and requires our per-
fection in our response to Him.
By His grace and mercy we can
achieve that too. Today we
pride ourselves on the recov-
ery of this church as a healing
community for the disadvan-
taged in our world. Healing
ministries, pastoral teams, and
mutual support groups can
flourish in this community if
we reach for the perfection to
which Jesus calls us in our text.

It falls to us in this generation

to keep the vision of St
Matthew’s alive. It is for us to
challenge ourselves to the per-
fection to which we are called
in a world beset with so many
imperfections and corruption.

Imperfect

We may be just like
Matthew: sinful and imperfect.
But God looks beyond our
imperfections and our faults
and He calls us anyway. The
question for each of us as we
celebrate this important mile-
stone is: will we reach for the
perfection which God wants us
to have? What will each of us
do now and in the future? Jesus |
says to us again, “You, there-

‘fore, must be perfect, as your

Heavenly Father is perfect”.
Reach for it tonight!

° Rev James Moultrie is the
Rector of St Matthew’s aes
can Church.



Sou Is (From page 3C)



Teams from churches within the community will be partici-
pating in an effort to foster togetherness, strengthen ties with
the island’s youth and bring them together in a comfortable envi-

ronment.

Our message is a simple one, says Ms Cartwright. “God has a
plan for your life.. The word life does not only encompass the spir-
itual man but it includes the physical man, the emotional man, the
mental capabilities, and so much more.”

“Restoration”, as the name implies, is described by organisers
as a “life changing” conference. It is designed to bring about a
“reality check” and a revival in the souls, hearts and minds of

everyone who attends.

’

Leading in worship will be Psalmist Eileen Johnson from the
‘Church of God Cathedral; and Bishop Charles Gardiner will be

the conference speaker.

“Restoration” kicks off next Friday night with a praise and

worship service.

The Sports Day will be held on Saturday, July 30, from 10am-
Spm at the ball park, and includes egg and spoon and balloon burst
races, and volleyball. The prize game will be basketball, when local
church teams will be vying for a floating trophy.

On Sunday morning, a service will be held at Light House
Church of God, and on Sunday night the conference will culminate
with.a Grand Gospel Concert. The masters of ceremony will be
Picewell “The Down Home Boy” Forbes and Dwight Armbris-

ter.

Praise (From page 1C)

husband.

Moreover, this fellowship '

with other ministers’ wives is
an opportunity for that woman
to do something for herself for
a change.

Sister Josey, who serves as
leader of the Intercessory Min-
istry, Director of Christian
Education and Consultant for
Women’s Affairs at Common-
wealth Mission Baptist Church,
where her husband Rev
Arnold Josey is pastor, knows
firsthand the demands of a pas-
tor’s wife.

Speaking of her own experi-
ence, Sister Josey hopes to
encourage other wives and wid-



ows of ministers to join the
association: “I always tell them
this is something for you,
because when I came into min-
istry with my husband it was
challenging for me. Those
women who have already
blazed the trail helped me to
overcome some situations.
“So I tell them this is some-
thing I went into for myself.
People are drawing from us all .
the time, we need a place to
draw from. When we come
together we draw strength from
each other, because when I lis-
ten someone has already been

through that so they can help |

me get through it.”

cr

aay, the stories behind |

_ the news, read Insight
- on Mondays





Live record





1g concert will be

‘spirit empowering, life changing,

foot stomy



ig and heart fixing’

WITH the mission of propagating the
gospel through many diverse styles of
music, Kemuel Gardiner and Surrender is
a vibrant group of young people in pursuit
of changing their generation.

The group was the dream of director
Kemuel Gardiner, and with God’s help it
became a reality in November of 2001.
The now 14-member group is compiled of
young people that are members through-
out the Church of God. After just over
three years of existence, Gardiner, the
visionary and driving force behind the
ensemble, has led the group in releasing
two singles that are popular on local Chris-
tian radio; the contemporary gospel “I
Won’t Settle” and most recently the reggae
inspired “Our God Is Awesome.”

Surrender is preparing for a live record-
ing on Friday, July 22, under the theme

“Ready To Die.”

According to Gardiner, this thought pro-
voking theme was chosen because the clear
vision of Surrender at this time is to push
Christians and non-Christians alike to set-
tle for nothing less than the best of what
God has to offer.

Christians

“We are called as Christians to live a
Luke 9:23 life and die daily to all selfish
ambitions so that the divine will of God can
be accomplished in the earth, said Gar-
diner. “As people in general we need to
strive to go far above and beyond the lev-
els of mediocrity that contemporary society
may set for us.”

Through the medium of music, Surren-
der seeks to encourage and motivate the
body of Christ by using a mixture of vari-
ous genres of music. All of the songs that

the group uses to minister are Gardiner’s
original compositions. From reggae to rock
and roll, from contemporary gospel to pure
worship music, ministering to the
“churched” and harvesting the
“unchurched” on a level that can be under-
stood is their goal.

“Tt is our hope that our music penetrates
the soul and our lyrics change the charac-
ter and lifestyle of every individual that
listens to what God is saying thorough us,”
said Gardiner.

“We desire to be Godpleasers not men-
pleasers! As a result, when the seasons
change, so will the style and approach to
evangelism.”

The live recording concert, which Gai

diner promises will be “spirit empower-

ing, life changing, foot stomping and heart
fixing,” will be held at the Diplomat Cen-
tre at 7pm.



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The Tribune

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erald



BAHAMAS EDITION

THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005

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Questions as

company of |
superintendent
— wins contract

& By PAUL TURNQUEST
and KRISTINA McNEIL

FORMER consultant in the
Prime Minister’s office and
recently installed Superinten-
dent of the Prison, Dr Elliston
Rahming, came under fire yes-
terday as his company “The
Intertech Group” was awarded
a portion of BaTelCo’s security
contract.

Last week 20 security officers
at Wemco were unexpectedly
laid off when the company lost
“a portion” of its contract with
BaTelCo (BTC) to Intertech. |
- Leader of the opposition in
the House of Assembly Alvin
Smith said he is interested to
see what other contracts
Jntertech.has been awarded.

“* “Now I want to know when

this contract was given? Was —

this while he was a.consultant at
the PM’s office or was this after
he was posted as head of the
‘prison? That’s what I want to
know,” said Mr Smith. In Mr
Smith’s opinion whatever the
“situation he has an unfair
advantage, whether he was at
the PM’s office or now.”
_ “There are many Bahamians
out there who are trying to
make ends meet, and many who
don’t have second jobs like Dr
-Rahming whose whole liveli-
hood, is the security firm. I
would not have had any prob-
-lem with his company getting
- any portion of the contract only

Paradise istand
Vilage Shopping
fete ae Sch oy ed

ares

if he was not in such an advan-
tageous position,” he said.

However, Coalition .for
Democratic Reform (CDR)
leader Cassius Stuart lashed
out at what he called “the same
old wind” of the previous PLP
government.

In the opinion of Mr Stuart
this was “a serious conflict of
interest.” :

Mr Stuart said as this
involved a government contract
“we have to reach a point where
we pass giving out political
patronage. You know how
many families were affected
that that company lost that con-
tract?

“The PLP doesn’t seem to
realise it, but they are the same
old wind we regretted back in
1992. They need to be exposed
and these people need to step
down. Under the FNM the
same thing happened and this
needs to stop. As a new gener-
ation of politicians we are going
to. stop that,”, Mr Stuart
promised.

Mr Stuart said it brought
tears to his eyes that the country
is still at the same point. He
wished it could move beyond
“political patronage”.

“So are what they saying is
that those who do not believe in
the PLP will starve as long as
the PLP is in power?” he asked,
reminding government that

SEE page 14

Oakes Fizid
Shopping
crak

at as

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

A TOURIST died while swimming
off Rose Island yesterday.

Details of the death are sketchy,
however police confirmed that a man
who was engaged in water activities

Island residents
balk at prices
for gasoline |

B By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

RESIDENTS of Moores Island, a
small island just south of Abaco, are
suffering under “excessive” prices for
gasoline and. other petroleum prod-

ucts.

With only a little over a week
remaining before the opening of the
crawfish season, the fishermen are
worried that the price could exceed
its current high of $5.50, and reach
well beyond the $6.00 mark.

Predominantly a fishing community,
the residents have been struggling to
cope with the closure of the only gas
station on the island following last
year’s active hurricane season.

If having to pay $5.50 a gallon for

SEE page 14

near Rose.Island on Wednesday died
after experiencing some difficulties.
When The Tribune arrived on the
scene at Montagu Beach,.a crowd was
walking away from the pier. AS The
Tribune got closer, there was a lifeless
body lying on the wooden portion of
the pier. Emergency medical assis-

US company
could face legal
action for plan
to provide VoIP

i By DANIELLE STUBBS
Tribune Staff Reporter

LEGAL action could be taken against
a US company if it follows through on its
plan to provide voice-over Internet pro-
tocol (VoIP) products to the Bahamas.

The company, Viper Networks Incor-
porated, said its new Bahamas venture
aims to “capture a significant amount of
new consumers”. '

However, according to Executive
Director at the Public Utilities Commis-
sion (PUC) Barrett Russell: “No com-
pany other than BTC has ever had a
licence to offer VoIP services or any oth-
er telecommunications service, and we

SEE page 14



@ OFFICIALS bring the
tourist’s body back to shore after
he ran into problems when swim-
ming off Rose Island

(Photo: Mario Duncanson/
Tribune Staff)

tance was also on the scene.
According to press liaison officer
Walter Evans, the man is believed to
be a US resident and appeared to be
in his mid-fifties.
A bystander on the beach said that

SEE page 14 —

eee ae
never been
on safety list’

@ By DANIELLE STUBBS
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas has never been on the
advisory list of the US Consumer Prod-
ucts Safety Commission for items
recalled from the market.

According to Steve Ford, a public
affairs officer at the Bethesda, Mary-
land head office of the Consumer Prod-
ucts Safety Commission (CPSC), the
Bahamas can be added to the commis-
sion’s list to receive notification in the
case of major US recalls with just a
phone call or e-mail.

Mr Ford’s response came after a Tri-
bune investigation into who was respon-

‘sible for notifying the Bahamas and

SEE page 14


rAUGL <,



PLIVIIOWANI, VYL!

el, ouve



eho





Unexpected visit by cruise liner
makes traders’ day in Bay Street

@ By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter

BAY Street merchants yes-
terday experienced an increase
in revenues when the Bahamas
unexpectedly played host to
more than 2,000 cruise passen-
gers whose ship had to be divert-
ed due to Hurricane Emily.

The cruise ship Carnival Ela-
tion carrying 2488 passengers





docked in Nassau yesterday
morning after its route was
adjusted to avoid areas affected
by the category three hurri-
cane.

The Elation was originally
scheduled to visit Mexico’s
Yucatan Peninsula and Belize,
but instead the passengers
found themselves vacationing
in the Bahamas.

Speaking with The Tribune

antl



yesterday afternoon, a Bay
Street businessman said his
store had already experienced
an increase in revenue intake.

He explained that the down-
town.merchants look forward
to cruise ships like the Elation
visiting Nassau.

“Unlike the cruises that only.
charge $299 per person, and
where the passengers are
unwilling to spend large
amounts of money in ports, this
kind of ship that goes on 7 to 10
day cruises to Mexico has high-

er fares and the people tend to’

spend more,” he said.

The Bay Street merchant said
that he was “very happy” with
the unexpected amount of mon-
ey the Elation passengers spent
in his shop.

Carnival Cruise spokesman
Michael Hall said that the Ela-
tion was docked in Nassau from
7am to 11pm yesterday, with
the next port of call scheduled
to be Freeport today.

“This of course brings a large
number of unexpected visitors
to the Bahamas, and especially
to Nassau. With the ship being
in port until 11pm there should
be significant revenue,” he
added. +.

Mr Hall explained that
although the cruise line usually

, does not receive complaints

from passengers onboard re-
routed ships, the company’s pol-
icy is to give its customers free’

and discounts on future cruise
trips:
“After all, hurricanes are an

‘act of God, but we still give.out
discounts to appease our pas-"

sengers. But most of the time

as long as Carnival keeps the -
. passengers happy onboard the

ships, and as long as the ship
makes a port of call, and espe-
cially at such a popular place
like the Bahamas, there are no
complaints,” he said.
Hurricane Emily, the second
hurricane of the 2005 Atlantic
season, hit Northeastern Mexi-



co with 125mph winds yester-
day.

The eye of the storm came
ashore before dawn near San

‘Fernando, about 75 miles south

of the.US-Mexico border.

On Saturday Mexican author-
ities ordered the evacuation of
30,000 tourists from the resort
city of Cancun. A large num-
ber of vacationers with book-
ings for Cancun opted to come
the Bahamas instead, Tourism
Minister Obie Wilchcombe said.

The hurricane also led to the
evacuation of more than 85,000

@ THE Carnival Elation
in dock yesterday



people along more than 100
miles of coast from Holbox
Island to Tulum, including the

‘stretch known. as the ‘Riviera

Maya’. /

Mexico and US oil compa-
nies also evacuated 16,000
workers from offshore installa-
tions in the northern Gulf of
Mexico.

Forecasters predicted that the
storm could dump up to 15
inches of rain as it moves inland
over mountains, and could
cause flash floods and land-

‘slides.

passes for certain attractions



Tributes for restaurateur

By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE late owner of the Palm Tree restau-
rant was yesterday hailed as an over-the-hill
businessman “who set a trend of industry

and hard work”.

FNM Leader Tommy Turnquest said
James Alfred Gregory Russell inspired oth-
ers to shun mediocrity.

Mr Russell died on July 7 at the age of 87.
Funeral services will be held at Salem
Union Baptist Church on Saturday at 10am.

“Beyond Mr Russell’s reputation as a
licenssed plumber and founder of a unique

food outlet, which attracted patrons from all
over New Providence, he was among that
group. of business pioneers who, back in
1952, pooled their resources and established
the People’s Penny Savings bank,” said Mr
Turnquest.

“That was back in a time when many
black Bahamians had great difficulty secur-
ing financing from the establishment bank-
ing institutions,” he explained.

He said that Mr Russell was also a
social and political activist who was
involved in the Citizens Committee, a
political.group headed by the late Justice

.Maxwell Thompson that worked for

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KYKING

It’s All About
he Guys, Bikes & Cars

Town Centre Mall, 12 Noon - 6pm, July 23rd, 2005

-

The way to fly in the TC] and beyond

equality and fairness for the masses.

Mr Russell, he said, was not an individual
to “sit back and hope that unjust matters
would resolve themselves, but always
pitched in on what he felt was the right side
to do his duty.”

Mr Turnquest said: “The Bahamas, and
particularly the Over-the Hill community,
have lost a noble son of enterprise and
industry. .

“He long ago demonstrated the way pro-
gressive and productive citizens should go,
whose example will hopefully assist today’s
and succeeding generations in making their
mark,” said Mr Turnquest.

pee:

1995 2008



departure taxes included





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THE TRIBUNE



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P.O.Box N-S8]14
Nassau, Bahamas
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m ALL SMILES: Zip with trainee veterinary technician Olivia Smith and Inspector Car] Thurston

Na atuve's Fha|







happy

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE ailing French Mastiff Zip,
who was cruelly snatched from
the Bahamas Humane Society
over the weekend, is now safe at
home thanks to an anonymous
caller.

. The Society raised the alarm
because Zip is on medication that
he needs to stay alive.

Staff feared that after being
missing for two days, Zip’s time
was running out.

Stephan Turnquest, an officer
at the Humane Society said that
after Zip’s story appeared in
Wednesday’s Tribune, the Society
received an anonymous call from
a person who knew he was being
kept.

Mr Turnquest said the caller

Romanda Curtis rire
saResenl strangulation’ ©

a a By ADRIAN GIBSON.

begin work as a security guard at Atlantis’ sie



ing lot.

THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005, 1998, PAGE 3

Hot dog enjoys
homecoming

was able to direct them to a home
in the back of the Christie base-
ball park, where a weak and hun-
gry Zip was tied to a tree in a
backyard.

“We were able to untie him
and bring him home,” said Mr
Turnquest.

Zip was examined and pro-
nounced to be in good health,
despite being slightly malnour-
ished and dehydrated.

Society employees were
delighted to see their friend
back at home, where he can con-




tinue with his medical
treatment, f

Mr Turnquest said that the !
problem of animal theft is grow-
ing in the Bahamas, particularly
in the summer months.

He said that Zip is not the first '
Society animal to become the vic- .
tim of thieves, who often enter
through the Botanical Gardens
and climb over the back wall.

Mr Turnquest said the matter
has been turned over to the
police, who are launching inves-
tigations.

Fabulous



THE autopsy of Romanda Curtis’ body has
indicated that she died from strangulation.
Assistant Commissioner of police in charge of

crime Reginald Ferguson confirmed the autop-
sy results late last night.

Almost a week after Romanda’s disappear-
ance and following complaints by her family
that not enough was being done by police, the
autopsy on Mrs Curtis was completed on
Wednesday.

According to police, the investigation into

- Mrs Curtis’ murder continues.

The badly decomposed body of the 20-year-
old was discovered on Sands Lane behind Love
97 on Thursday night.

She was reported to be missing since early

Her husband, Ricardo Curtis, Sho works
the night shift at the same-parking lot, reported
his wife missing after arriving at their Thompson
Lane home around 5am to take her to

work.
Identified

In an interview with The Tribune, Mrs Cur-
tis' mother and stepfather, Wescola and Douglas
Larrimore, said that they identified their daugh-
ter's body around 11 am Friday.

Her husband Ricardo was initially taken in by
officers of the Central Detective Unit, but has
since been released from custody and is not a

suspect.

Saturday morning, when she was scheduled to





Bahamas Bar Association
VP summoned to appear
_ before Supreme. Court

. By DANIELLE STUBBS, ,

Tribune Staff Reporter"

THE vice president of the
Bahamas Bar Association has
been summoned to appear before
the Supreme Court to answer alle-
gations that she fail to deliver on a
housing deal after accepting more
than $10,000.

Newton and Yvonne Neilly

have filed a statement of claim
against Bahama Isles Realty Lim-
ited and realtor Sheila Young over

the $10,200 they allegedly paid.to -

the company in October of 2004.
The defendants have 14 days to
appear in court to answer the Sut
mons.
-Acéording to cqurt documents,

the couple believes the company it
has either shut down or relocated. «#9 '"°
‘without notifyin;



a them, ‘because
to,contact their office
and Ms Young has failed.

In the statement of claim, filed_,
_ last,Friday, the Neillys alleged that
“Bahama Isles and Ms Young

failed to locate a suitable property






- payin
- CivilProcedure of Interest Act



_to construc a home for them, as
Wa agiéed' ‘by both parties on,
_ October 4, 2004. ‘

Despite continued: demands, the
Neillys claim that “neither
Bahama Isles or Ms Young has
delivered any or any adequate
information, location or explana-
tion” as to why property has not
been allocated for the construc-
tion of their home.

In addition to the full refund of

$10, 200, the couple are askiny to

atded interest on the down
mt in accordance with the

1992; additional costs, and further




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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



is

: The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

TRADE and Industry Minister Leslie
Miller, the driving force behind signing the
Bahamas onto the PetroCaribe agreement
for cheaper oil, accuses his critics of trying
to “drive some kind of wedge between the
Bahamas and the US”.

Mr Miller claims that what his critics are
missing is the fact that “fuel consumed by
Bahamians provided by Shell, Esso and Tex-
aco comes out of Curacao from PDVSA,
which is the national oil company of
Venezuela.” And it is the same Venezuelan
oil that the Bahamas will buy — without the
extra cost of middle men — from PetroCaribe.

This statement shows that it is Mr Miller
who has missed the point of the argument, not
the critics of the PetroCaribe Energy Co-
Operation Agreement signed by him in Puer-
to la Cruz on June 20.

No one objects to the purchase of
Venezuelan oil. What is objected to is his
signing an agreement that lassoes the
Bahamas into President Hugo Chavez’s
scheme to control the Caribbean region and
go: head-to-head with the US’s Free Trade
Area of the Americas (FTAA).

Mr Miller should not accuse his critics of
trying to put a-wedge between the Bahamas
and the US. He did that himself when he put
his signature to that piece of paper.that based
the delivery of'energy resources “entirely”
on Mr Chavez’s- Bolivarian Alternative for
the Americas (ALBA). Cuba’s Fidel Castro is
the leftist Chavez’s partner in the ALBA
scheme. Castro’s presence certainly would
make that wedge even harder for the Amer-
icans to tolerate.

There are so many questions to be
answered about this agreement. Although
Mr Miller assures the public that he has Cab-
inet backing, the Christie government has
remained mute to public demands for an
explanation.

For example, as the objective for creating
- PetroCaribe involves foreign relations using
oil as the vehicle, why wasn’t Foreign Affairs
Minister Fred Mitchell a part of the Miller
delegation to Venezuela? From its very first
paragraph the agreement intrudes far into
Mr Mitchell’s portfolio. The fact that Mr
Mitchell has washed his hands of it completely
— making it clear that this is Mr Miller’s
affair not his, suggests that Cabinet did not
know the details of what was being signed.

No one — including the three oil companies
’ that have for many generations supplied this



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Published Daily Monday to Saturday .

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas ©
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TELEPHONES
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Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
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Explanation neede on PetroCaribe

country with its fuel — knows whether they are
to be squeezed out by the deal. According to
Chavez’s public pronouncements, they will
be. For example, he told BBC news that this
new business must be between governments.
According to the BBC Chavez said the
“region could not hand any more over to Tex-
aco and other private companies”.

One respected US oilman believed
Chavez’s move would fail. He explained that
Venezuela supplies many countries with oil.
When they learn of the special concessions
being given the Caribbean, they will start
making their own demands. “This will put
him out of business,” was this gentleman’s
expert opinion.

And should this happen, what happens to
the Bahamas?

After all, the oil companies because of
their international connections can tap many
sources to keep the oil flowing in case any
supplier fails. ‘This will not happen in future if
the Bahamas has only one supplier and that
supplier can’t deliver.

We hope that the Bahamas government is
aware of Chavez’s increasingly strident
thetoric as he prepares to defend ‘himself
against US “imperialism.” Andres Oppen-
heimer, an authority on Latin American
affairs, and a senior columnist with the Miami
Herald, wrote an interesting article about
Chavez’s bold move to politicise his armed
forces. The article, which was published in
the Miami Herald’s International edition in
The Tribune of July 14, should be read by
Cabinet.

Chavaz is convinced that the United States
intends.to attack Venezuela. At a recent cer-
emony he announced that the “Cuban and
Venezuelan revolutions are already one and
only” and will defend one another against a
potential US invasion.

As Chavez is busy arming civilian groups’

answerable only to him in preparation for a
US attack that exists only in his troubled
imagination, his critics believe that this is his
smokescreen to allow him to establish a police
state in Venezuela. In Oppenheimer’s opinion
“if Chavez means to do half of what he says,
his transformation of Venezuela’s armed
forces ... will haunt Venezuela for decades to
come.”

Let’s hope that when the bullets start fly-
ing, the Bahamas government will have

Bahamians in the right camp with all the so-

called wedges removed.

FNM lacking
any decent
leadership

EDITOR, The Tribune

THERE is a severe leader-
ship crisis in the defunct FNM,
despite the half-hearted
attempts by its nominal leader,
Tommy Turnquest, and his
“self promoting” national chair-
man, Carl Wilshire Bethel, to
deny otherwise.

Since the 2002 debacle, all of

~them appear to be in a shell-

shocked state.
They are rudderless and have

yet to present an alternative .

platform to the nation, as
opposed to the “new” PLP. All
they appear to be good for is to
critique each and every action
of the government, without
sound evidence or facts on the
ground.

Bethel is recognised as
national chairman, but how
many branches has he organ-
ised or reorganised since his ele-
vation? New Providence con-
tains the bulk of the seats in the
House of Assembly and one
would have thought that, by
now, Bethel and his defunct
party would:have launched a
massive campaign to recapture
New Providence. There is not a
single piece of evidence to sug-
gest that they will do this any
time soon.

It'is my considered opinion,
after canvassing a large cross
section of average Bahamians
in New Providence, that the
FNM will never win the gov-
ernment under the leadership
of Turnquest. Carl Bethel, him-
self, will have to do much more
to be re-elected to Holy Cross.
Sidney Stubbs has hit the

|... ground running since his return
to the House of Assembly. He
_ is to be seen all over his con-

stituency, interacting with his
constituents on a daily basis.
More importantly, he has
shown contriteness and humili-
ty since his bankruptcy deba-
cle.

Yes, my friends, unless
Hubert Ingraham retakes the
leadership of the FNM, ‘with
Dion Foulkes as his deputy, the
FNM will remain in the political
wilderness until the second
coming of Jesus Christ. No man
knows the hour or the day, but
it will not be.any time soon,
God wiiling.

Until then, the PLP is in
excellent hands in the form of
Cynthia ‘Mother’ Pratt (PLP-
St Cecelia). The Prime Minister,
Perry Christie (PLP-Bain &
Grants Town), should contin-
ue resting and recuperating
from his recent stroke. He

should not rush back to his offi- -

cial duties just to show us that
he is a superman or something

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LETTERS

latters@tribunemedia.net



of the sort. His health and well
being must remain of para-

‘mount importance to himself

and his immediate family.
The nation is functioning well
under the direction of our ener-

getic and motivated Acting -

Prime Minister and Minister of
Finance. Did you see her on the
jitney the other day? What oth-
er leader, except for Sir. Lyn-
den, has ever publicly ridden a
jitney so as to gain a hands on

experience of what riders have
to endure each day? This

woman of God is proving to be

‘just what the doctor ordered’
for the Bahamas.

In fact, if she were to lead the
re-energized PLP into the next
General Election, the FNM
would get exactly four seats
throughout the entire nation.
She has achieved many firsts so
far, she may as well go straight
to the top of the greasy pole...
first substantive female Prime
Minister.

ORTLAND H BODIE JR"
Nassau
June 2005

Minister not
living up to
expectations

EDITOR, The Tribune

THE Minister of Financial
Services and Investment’s
comment on .Caymans
prowess on fund manage-
ment and our financial ser-
vices sector could be easily
solved if the Minister would

‘ go-see who runs and man-
ages Caymans’ fund services.

It is as simple as that — now
has the minister the foresight,
guts and sense to do the rest
is obviously the next big

' question. No, we will worry
about a couple of hundred
work permits — the massive
economic impact to the
advantage ‘of solely Bahami-
ans in that the housing is
owned by Bahamians — pur-
chase of motor vehicles —
customs duties — consider-
able. multi-thousand dollar
annual expending into the
resident economy which only
Bahamians will enjoy and
domestic employment
(house staff, etc, etc), but
realising that’s why Cayman
has all the International
Fund business.

Representation of the

’ Ministry of Financial Ser-
vices and Investment on
Grand Bahama — unless the
Minister can see the urgency,
potentially the negative polit-

ical repercussions in Election -
2007, I would like to propose
the minister is blatantly blind
to the reality of the state of
affairs in Grand Bahama.

Has anyone carefully exam-’
ined the grave and serious
problems that will arise from
the petty personal squabbling
at the Registrar General’s
office? What if all documents .
that Acting Registrar Gener-
al Shane Miller signed are
found to be invalid? Who is
going to pay for the massive
liabilities to correct?

Just why is it when the
Minister of Financial Ser- |.
vices and Investment talks |
absolutely everything in the
Ministry is well, whilst the
place is under siege?

The Prime Minister might
not wish to move any of his
mministers so late in his first
term but, it is my opinion
that unless things start to be
created this minister is going
to be a liability in many ways
by election 2007.

Remember in 2002 it was
“jobs, jobs and jobs”, Prime
Minister? Many are asking,
does this minister under-
stand?

N RUSSELL
Nassau
July 6 2005



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THE TRIBUNE



Tenants complain about sewer [Ta

THURSDAY, JULY ci.

ae ae ee §
’ ad

system spilling onto the streets

® By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

TENANTS and patrons of a building
complex on East Bay Street are com-
plaining about a severe sewerage prob-
lem which in the Jast few weeks has led
o “faeces floating in the streets”.
Employees:of the establishments in
the complex between East Bay Street
and Okra Hill yesterday said the prob-
lem i is now becoming unbearable.
‘For the past three “weeks the contents
‘of the underground sewer system have

problem is heightened during heavy rain
falls the employees say.

Following a heavy rain shower yester-
day after Spm, a female employee of the
DHL shipping company contacted The
Tribune with her concerns.

“It’s especially bad when it rains, all
the stuff from the toilets comes up and
floats in the streets. The smell is unbear-
able. It’s horrible,” she said.

The DHL employee is especially con-
cerned about the health risks posed by
the sewerage problem.

“It’s extremely unsanitary. All the
workers can’t wait until closing time so

they can get out of here. I imagine it’s
also bad for the two popular eateries
in the building and their guests,” she
said.

Investigation

Parliamentary Secretary of Environ-
mental Health Ron Pinder said that he
had no knowledge of the problem, but
assured those affected that he will be
on-site today to investigate. :

Mr Pinder said that he will not be able

until he had seen it first hand.

“At the moment I can’t say what is
causing it, I will first have to go on-site
and meet with Water and Sewerage per-
sonnel as well as with experts from the
Environmental Health Department,” he
said. .

Mr Pinder speculated that the problem
may originate from the. building’s
drainage system.

He said that while it cannot yet be
determined if the situation is cause for
health concerns, “every time you have a
situation of a open sewer, there is the
possibility of contamination.” .



to San
Andros

soon
back on

@ BY NATARIO
McKENZIE

OFFICIALS in the Min-.

‘istry of Transport and Avia-

tion say flight services to the:
San Andros airport will soon:

been spilling out onto the streets. The



“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

Ae 8) BS

THURSDAY
JULY 21

6:30am Community Pg./1540
11:00 _ Immediate Response
12:00 ZNS News Update
12:03 Caribbean News Update
12:05’ _ Immediate Response
1:00° ° Ethnic Health America
1:30 Spiritual Impact
Mr. Ballooney B.
_ Treasure Attic
Bishop Leroy Emmanuel
’ Gilbert ‘Patterson
"Eugene Cole & Persuaded
Gospel Grooves
News Update
Caribbean Newsline
Legends From Whence We
Came: Telator-Strachan
_.News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight

li By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - Power chiefs
have implored the public on
Grand Bahama to conserve
energy by turning off all non-
essential lights. and appliances
for the next two-and-half days.

The Grand. Bahama Power
‘Company said in‘a press release

demands are not reduced, it
may be necessary to initiate a
strategy which would result in
power cuts.

A defect in Unit 13, the
largest generator with a capaci-
ty of 40 megawatts, caused it to
be taken off-line shortly before

0°: The Bahamas Tonight
Immediate Response
Gommunity Page

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves
the right to make last minute
programme changes!



on, Monday. that if load.

midnight on Monday.

“Should load demand during
the next two-and-half days be
at the same level as that of
Monday it may be necessary to
institute rotating load-shed-
ding,” stated the release.

The company is therefore
appealing to the public and its
customers to turn off pool
pumps, water heaters, set air-
condition temperature to no
lower than 75 degrees, and

ensure that all non-essential
lights and appliances are turned

off.

The island's 18,000 residen-
tial customers have been urged
to conserve energy especially

during peak evening hours

between 7pm and 10pm..

| :
«} Nassau: 32502505 ¢ FAX: 325¢1204 # ROBINSON ROAD



to say what the cause for the problem is

Public appeal to save energy

Community relations direc-
tor at the company Roger John-
son indicated that if the public
complies with the request pow-
er cuts could be reduced.

Over the past several weeks,
there have been a number of
power outages on the Grand
Bahama.

The company says it plans to
commission a new generation
unit at its plant on Queens
Highway and West Sunrise
Highway.

The Power Company apolo-
gised for any inconvenience that
has been caused and assured
the public that its team will do
everything possible to return
Unit 13 to service and the sys-
tem back to normal.

resume as measures have;
already been taken to secure,
temporary facilities. :

The San Andros airport
terminal was ravaged by fire
two weeks ago, in what
police have determined was.
an arson attack. i

The police station, custom
office, immigration office,
Western Air office, airport
snack bar and a snack booth;
which were housed in the
terminal building, were all
completely destroyed. j

According to Transport
and Aviation deputy perma-
nent secretary Rudolph
Pratt, three structures have
already been secured and up
to yesterday afternoon
efforts were being made ta
ship them to San Andros. ;

The structures, known as
“modulars”, will serve as
temporary terminal facilities
until a permanent structure
canbe constructed. . — |

Mr Pratt told The Tribune
it had been brought to his
attention that because of thé
width of the modulars, there
might be a problem trans:
porting them over a particu:
lar bridge to San Andros
from Fresh Creek.

In light of this, he said
that shipping the modulars
on a barge was being viewed
as the more viable alterna-
tive.

According to Mx Pratt, it
is hoped that the modulars
will get to San Andros by
weeks end.

The-San.Andros airport i is
the gateway: to ‘North
Andros and the blaze has
raised much concern among
local residents over the eco-
nomic future of the area.



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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Funeral service
for John R Morley



B JOHN R MORLEY

THE funeral service for
prominent businessman and
realtor John R Morley will be
held at St Matthew’s Anglican
Church, Shirley Street at 4pm
Saturday, July 23.

Mr Morley died at the age of
72 at his Montagu Foreshore- -.

~ home on Sunday at:10.35pm
after suffering for some time
with a brain tumour.

He was voted “Business Per-
son of the Year” by the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce in 1999, and devoted his
time and energies to the

. Bahamas Real Estate Associa-
tion from 1962.

In.1965..he formed a real

estate partnership, Morley and



O’Brien, specialising in resi-

dential and commercial sales -

throughout the Bahamas. Later
the firm was merged with
McPherson and Brown, to form
Real Estates Sales and Rentals
(Bahamas) Limited, a complete

brokerage-and property mrafi-"~

agement company.

Contributed

Together the partners con-
tributed substantially to real
estate development in the
Bahamas.

Mr Morley continued on his
entrepreneurial journéy as he

and his two partners formed...

Brown, Morley and Smith Real
Estate in the 1980s. Together

they concentrated on the devel-
opment of two subdivisions,

Westridge Estates and South .
- Westridge.

The partners were particular-
ly proud of this development as

David Morley. He was prede-
ceased by his daughter, Debo-
rah Morley.

Grandchildren

almost every lot was sold.to_.......

“Bahamians.

Mr Morley developed several
commercial properties, includ-
ing Norfolk House, Indepen-
dence Shopping Centre and
Green Shutters in New Provi-
dence.

His latest achievement came
through his partnership in the
Mall of Marathon. j;

He is survived by his wife,

Diane Cole Morley, his.daugh-

ters, Ann: Morley Carmel, Janet
Morley Lovely and Tara and

Sarah Morley, and his son, -

He is also survived by his
sons-in-law, Jeffrey Carmel and
Rod Lovely, daughter-in-law,
Susan Morley, and grandchil-
dren, Alexandra Carmel, Jay
and Chase Carmel, Morgan
Lovely, Emily, Laura and
Peter Morley, his mother-in-
law, Marion Cole, and his in-
laws, Hugh and _ Linda
Pritchard, Denis and Nikki
Cole, Peter and Phillippa Cole,
Brock and Annabel Cole,
James Cole and numerous
nieces and nephews.



Formal
diplomatic
' relations
established
between the
Bahamas
and Sri Lanka

SRI Lanka and the
Bahamas have estab-
lished formal diplomat-

“ic relations by-signing |

a Joint Agreement in
New York on Tuesday,
according to the Sri
Lankan newspaper.

In an online article,
The Daily News credit-
ed the Sri Lankan Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs ©
with saying that the
Agreement “will |
strengthen friendship
and develop bilateral
co-operation in politi-
cal, economic, social ~
and cultural spheres



between the two coun-
tries based on the prin-
ciples and norms of the
United Nations Char-
ter and international
law.”

me Signed :

The Agreement was .
signed on behalf of Sri
Lanka by the perma-
nent representative of
Sri Lanka to the Unit-
ed Nations, Ambas-
sador Prasad
Kariyawasam and for
the Bahamas by its
permanent representa-
tive to the United
Nations, Ambassador
Paulette A Bethel. .

“The Sri Lankan rep-
resentative congratu- -
lated the government
of the Commonwealth
of Bahamas for taking
the initiative for the
establishment of for-
mal diplomatic rela-
tions and observed that
although separated by.
a great distance, the —
people of Sri Lanka
and Bahamas shared
much in common as
developing nations and
in particular Sri Lanka
as an Island nation and
Bahamas as a nation of
Islands,” the article
said.

Decision expected on
former BTU officers

@ By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

Congress president Obie Ferguson. Mr
Moncur and Mr Sawyer are representing
; themselves.

SUPREME Court Justice Hartman : Mr Moncur was expelled from the
Longley is expected to decide today Rod- union by the executive board.

ney Moncur’s and Mark Sawyer’s future
involvement in the Bahamas Taxicab. Election
Mr Sawyer was an-executive board

Union (BTU).
member when he was discharged from:

After months of legal wrangling, the
two officers, who were expelled from the

the union after being voted out in a con-
troversial election on January 17 of this

union, were yesterday. hoping to be
year.

allowed to re-join BTU.
If Justice Longley rules in their favour,
Also expelled were former vice-presi-
dent Cheryl Bethel and executive mem-

the men say they intend to run in the
ber Sigmund Bethel.

BTU annual elections on August 4.
The four were voted out in an election

The judge was slated to announce his
decision yesterday but postponed his

that they maintain was unfair and against
the union’s constitution.

judicial review report until Thursday.
Proceedings occurred in closed cham-

' The Department of Labour certified

the election results on January 19.

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It quoted Paulette
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Bahamas government’s
desire “to _promote
peace and friendship,
develop cultural ties
and strengthen eco-
nomic and technical
co-operation with
members of the United
Nations.as wellas ...;
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“The establishment
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further advance frater-
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and co-operation
between Sri Lanka and
‘the Bahamas in the
years to come,” the
article said.

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|HE TRIBUNE





Poor tree maintenance ORALEE’S
| NEW ARRIVALS

LOCAL NEWS

‘could affect tourism’

@ By KARAN MINNIS

THE lack of good tree main-
“tenance could lead to a possible
decrease in tourism according
to environmentalist and attor-
ney Pericles Maillis.

. Mr Maillis was speaking at
the first informative seminar
held by A-1 Tree Services.

The’ company, which is
owned by Joy Burrows, has
been in operation for 25: years
and is dedicated to proper tree
maintenance.

‘The seminar was held yes-
terday at the British Colonial
Hotel under the theme: “Trees:
Valuable assets to our econo-
my, environment and commu-
nity.” ,

Mr Maillis said that if tourist



@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

Seminar highlights
‘valuable assets’

see a lack of trees and a lack
of proper tree maintenance,
they will be less inclined to
revisit the Bahamas.

“One of these days we will
see a collapse,” he said. “This is

mainly because with the lack’
of trees we will not have a place’

worth looking at.”

Also speaking at the seminar
was chief meteorologist Basil
Dean, who said that trees play a

Parents to take complaints
to Director of Education



major role in preserving the
environment and the ecologi-
cal balance.

Weather

“From a weather and climate
perspective, trees play a partial
but very vital role in protect-
ing against erosion,” he said.
“This role of trees may appear
insignificant to us, however you

They claim that their complaints have not
received enough attention.





FRUSTRATED Gregory Town Eleuthera
parents who want their children relocated'to a
school in Palmetto Point have vowed to take
their complaints to the Director of Education.

In an article appearing in Monday’s Tribune,
several parents said they are concerned that
their children will be at “a severe disadvan-
tage” by the end of the school year because
they have been left stranded whenever the Glass
Window Bridge is closed due to extreme weath-
er or-for other reasons.

_ Transferred

The parents are asking that the 16 students in
Gregory Town be transferred from North
Eleuthera High to Lower Bogue to attend Cen-
tral Eleuthera High School in Palmetto Point.

The parents said that they have been com-
plaining for more than two years and are fed up
with the situation, which has caused the stu-
dents to miss school repeatedly, sometimes for
weeks at a time.

Originally the parents took their complaints
to the district education officer Ross
Smith. ,

The parents say they are now desperate and
intend to write a letter to Education Director

_Iris Pinder, after learning that the director had

not been aware of their concerns.

Media

Speaking with The Tribune yesterday, PTA
president Rebecca Quatermine said the par-
ents had listened intently to the media reports
regarding the recent Education conference held
earlier this month in Nassau. me
'- She said they were very disappointed when
there was no mention of the Eleuthera situation.

Mrs Quatermine.said the parents are left to

wonder if the ministry has any concern for the
future of the children.

PTA chaplain Diane Thompson said yester-
day that the parents cannot not understand why
the ministry is unable to find space for the 16
children.



may recall that last year during
the passage of hurricane
Jeanne, approximately 2500
people died in Haiti-as a result
of deforestation.”

Mr Dean explained that trees
“can also be used to shade
roads and parking lots, which
could otherwise become very
hot during the day and which
store heat for later release at
night.”

Joy Burrows, the owner of
A-1 Tree Services, stated that
“poorly maintained trees, or
trees that.are not maintained,
can be a significant liability.”

“We have three problems,”
she said. “They are clear-cut-
ting, tree topping and don’t
care attitudes.” t

She explained that “topping
is the senseless practice of indis-
criminately removing the
majority ofa tree’s branches.”

“Trees that have been
topped are prone to insects, dis-
‘eases, weak limbs, and rapid
new growth,” she said.

Evidence

Mrs Burrows also provided

_the audience with evidence.

from a study completed by the
University of Illinois proving
that the amount of vegetation
in an area can effect the crime
rate of that area.

According to Mrs Burrows,
the studies discovered that
areas with more vegetation usu-
ally have a lower crime
rate than those with less vege-
tation.

“In areas that have more
trees, persons are more likely to
go out and to interact with their
neighbors,” she said.

“And because of this inter-

action, they will be more watch-
ful.”

Mrs Burrows says she plans
to host more seminars to
encourage Bahamians to be
more conscious about tree pro-
tection and its effect on the
environment.



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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Our nation is still adrift — and
it seems to be getting worse

QC) UR nation is still feel-
ing the frustration of

“drift. We are still uncertain of
our direction and unsure of
what we are about. This is a
genuine problem in a globalised
world with all its pressing inter-
national issues, including the
push for free trade, economic
integration and compliance with
stricter international standards.

It is especially dangerous in a

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world where global terrorism is
the new norm. Our government
is clumsy, seemingly confused
and overwhelmed. Our nation is
growing older but we don’t
seem to be maturing as we
ought to be. From a national
performance perspective, we
appear aimless and purposeless.

Aimlessness and purpose-
lessness promote uncertainty
and confusion. This coupled
with economic ecabieulty encour-

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ages panic, which leads to acts
of desperation.

It might be that some of the
social ills we observe today rep-
resent the onset of this panic.
Such ills include shocking acts
of violence, the highly intensi-
fied frustration with the illegal

. immigration problem, increase

tensions in labour relations, the
accident-prone driving on the
streets, increased levels of post-
traumatic stress disorder,
untimely deaths from stress
related factors, and the general

. malaise throughout the Bahami-

an society.

In an environment like this,
our leaders must offer cause to
believe that better will: come.
They do this by acting wisely,
revealing a genuine under-

standing of the problems we
face and strategic approaches

to solving them. Empty rhetoric
will not do.

: In an environment like this,
Bahamians need motivation by
passionate leaders whose pas-
sion stems from a confident and
focused pursuit of the nation’s
best interest. In an environment
like this, leaders must elevate
their example by demonstrat-
ing honesty, integrity and
accountability.

W e Bahamians have
: good reasons to be

concerned about the state of

‘affairs in our nation-and we are

right to point to the government
as contributing significantly to
that state of affairs.

At this point we do not know
what is happening with our
Prime Minister. Every now and
again he pops up in the press
performing ceremonial duties,
even on occasions doing his

- famous “Perry Shuffle”: Yet,

on the weighty issues con-
fronting our nation, we cannot
hear from hin.

Does “light duties” mean that
our Prime Minister cannot

PRESS RELEASE |

KING OF BARTENDERS WILFRED SANDS’
ACCOMPLISHMENT ACCLAIMED

On Wednesday, 6th July 2005, Mr. Paul Thompson, managing director, management and staff
of the Lyford Cay Club acknowledged the success of its famous bartender Mr. Wilfred Sands,
supervisor of the Men’s Locker Room, applauding him for having won the bronze medal at the
“Taste of the Caribbean” culinary classic in a recognition event.

. Wilfred, sponsored by the Lyford Cay-Club-and Bacardi in the bartenders’ contest at the recent
culinary classic in Miami, utilized originality, taste and color to dazzle and woo the judges,
particularly being at ease with the old time favorite Rum Dum which he has served to numerous

. members and guests at the Lyford Cay Club since he stamped his identity on it in 1971. Ever
the consummate gentleman, Wilfred sought to please all, those who Snior alcoholic and those

- who do not, by inventing the Yellow Elder, a predominately flavored Pabatamangs drink, just

for the contest as well.

As Wilfred’s drinks are known to tantalize ¢ the alate and awaken the taste: buds, so too did his
victory release spontaneous accolades from all and sundry at the club and elsewhere.

Wilfred, having won the bronze medal so soon after our managing director had won the Cacique
award’s Hotelier of the Year, allowed the Lyford Cay Club to once again make’ ‘history, engraving
another name on the Bahamian historical and social landscape.

The Lyford Cay Club’s Wilfred Sands, our king of bartenders, has shown the judges and the
world at the culinary classic, “Taste of the Caribbean” why he is king.

Hats off to Mr. Wilfred Sands!

Standing left to right at the recognition event are: Mr. Nolan Johnson, beverage and catering
manager; Mrs. Janette Smith, senior assistant manager, Clubhouse Operations; Mr. Wilfred
Sands, bronze medal winner at the ““Taste of the Caribbean” culinary classic; Mr. Paul Thompson,
managing director of the Lyford Cay Club and Ms. Mary Deleveaux, director, human resources.



STRAIGHT UP TALK



Pe

address important issues for us
at all or does it mean that he is
not expected to give a full day’s
work to them? As he recovers,
we do not want him to over-
extend himself but no Prime
Minister can avoid considering
or commenting on matters of
national issues, even if he is not
in his best health and especially
if his mind is healthy.

VARGO



L A

NG

stage and the audience are the
ones to whom they play. Unless
they satisfy the audience their
acting, no matter how dramatic,
will all be in vain.

It seems here that a drama
that would truly impress a
Bahamian audience today is
one that addresses in a very
focused and substantive way the
many national and global issues



Attendance at national func-
tions should not be addressed
as a racial or political issue but

rather as a matter of interest.



While the Prime Minister
continues his partial convales-
cence, his cabinet ministers
seem to be running a muck of
the government, signing,
approving, rejecting, dismissing
whatever they want. There is
no apparent rhyme or reason
to their behaviour.

The strength of cabinet-gov-

ernment is its collective respon-
sibility, where the weight of dis-
course and decision-making is
carried out by a mature group
acting in the interest of the pub-
lic as opposed to self-promot-
ing individuals pursuing their
personal political agendas. Too
many times this does not seem
to be the order of the day in the
government of PM Christie.
Meanwhile the nation’s looks
on in disgust and disappoint-
ment. Rightly the people call
on the government to stop talk-
ing and start doing something
about the state of the nation.

THE NEED FOR '-
EFFECTIVE OPPOSITION

A: opposition in an
environment like the

one we have today should
thrive. It is the opposition’s
democratic duty to clearly and
definitively point out the blun-
ders and missteps of the gov-
ernment while pointing out how
it would do things better.

Both inside and outside of
Parliament, people look to the
opposition to put so. much pres-
sure on an incompetent gov-
ernment that the government
either dramatically improves its
performance, resigns or calls
new elections. People’s expec-

. tation of the opposition in this

regard might be unrealistic, but
it is their expectation and it is
the one that they will look to
as they consider supporting that
opposition in the next election.

While members of the oppo-
sition contend for leadership in
the party, they must not forget
that they are merely actors ona

impacting upon their well-being.
We do have today a much
more enlightened electorate
than we had in times past and
they want greater depth and
imagination from their politi-
cians, both those in government
and those in opposition. Give
them what they want and they
will give you what you want.

DID CABINET
AUTHORISE MINISTER
MILLER TO SIGN ONTO

PETROCARIBE?

( abinet ministers can-
not sign the Bahamas
onto any international agree-
ment without expressed autho-
risation-from the cabinet or the
permission of the Prime Minis-
ter. Did Leslie Miller have such
an approval when he signed the
PetroCaribe Agreement?

One would think that such a
question was a simple one to
answer; however, in the Christie
administration it is a great mys-
tery. Government ministers,
other than Mr Miller are as
silent as a lamb on the issue or
otherwise doing all manner of
verbal gymnastics around it.

This seems typical of this gov-
ernment. They are eager to own
any good thing that happens in
this country, even when they
have had nothing to do with it,
yet when something curious
happens, mum’s the word. This
is not responsible government
and it only leads people to
believe that PM Christie has no
control of his government and
that the government is acting
in a herky jerky fashion. We can
do better than this and we must
do better than this.

NIKKI KELLY WAS

RIGHT ABOUT
PATRIOTISM

I: her most recent column,

Nikki Kelly was right to —

point out that “patriotism is
more than waving flags'and
public posturing”. It certainly
is not proven by. attending
national functions because
sometimes you can and some-
times you can’t.

I recall distinctly that duti g
the term of the FNM, few well-
known PLPs, some of whom
were former cabinet ministets
and parliamentarians, and many
not so well-known PLPs, sup-
ported national events. It was
as if they considered those
events FNM events because” ‘tHe
FNM was the governing party.
Many of these same people,
however, came out and ‘still
come out in great numbers’ ‘to
national events now thatthe
PLP is in office. Businessman
and PLP-supporter Frankly in
Wilson, once rightly pointed th
out.

Attendance at national func-
tions should not be addrésséd
as a racial or political issue but
rather as a matter of interest.
Many Bahamian patriots do not
attend national events becaiise
they simply find them too rou-
tine. If one attends 32 Indeped-
dence celebrations and all ‘32
are the same, it’s almost, J like
going to watch a movie 32
times. While you may have
appreciated the movie the first
two or three times,.to watch ‘iit

‘ another 30 times and perhaps

40 more times would seem abit
much.

A patriot would gladly suffer
over and over again for the.
cause of the nation when he « or
she has to, be it in war against
outside enemies or in a-civic
struggle with enemies within.
Among such patriots are both
black and white Bahamians.
However, the same patriots
would think it no harm to Oc¢a-

_ Sionally miss a routine celebra-

tion he or she has seen a dozen
times before.

Do we not have the creativity
and dynamism to vary ‘our

‘national celebrations enough to -

intrigue all and sundry to come
out? Yes we do! Let’s use that
creativity and dynamism,' then
we will not have to be discugsing
who-came and did not comé ne
rather, we will discuss whaty
pened.
Patriotism is a matter sti th

heart and is demonstrated: by
one’s commitment to the*sdod
order and well-being of dne’s
nation. It is demonstrated: by
one’s contributions to the devel-

_ opment of one’s country, both

in private‘and public life. Wav-
ing a flag, attending a national
event or pledging allegiahce
only symbolise national pride, it
is consistent performance of
one’s duties as a citizen of the
state that concretises it.

THOUGHT FOR’ THE:
WEEK SOF

CG (
overnment:
trust, and: the

officers of the government ‘are

trustees; and both the trust And

the trustees are created for ‘the

benefit of the people.”
— Henry Claya



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E-mail: overflow@batelnet.bs.

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Nassau, Bahamas


THE TRIBUNE

"NEW Grand Bahama Port
‘Authority Co-chairman Julian
Francis will be speaking at the
commencement ceremony for
the Success Training College’s
“Freeport campus.

_ Ina release, the college said

‘that for the sixth consecutive

year, Grand Bahamians will ~

_Join the graduating cluster of
_Students in a week of activities
‘surrounding the commence-
_ment ceremony.

This year, it said, the associ-
“ate of science degree will be
conferred by Success president
‘Dr Deswell Forbes on 51 grad-
uands, the largest cluster to be

' graduated since the establish-
_ ment of the Freeport campus.

The commencement cere-
“mony on July 29 - to be held in
‘thé Grand Ballroom at the
“Westin at Our Lucaya at 7pm -
will be the highlight of the

' ; planned events.

“Mr Francis will attend this
Ceremony and deliver as the
- Distinguished Commencement
“SP éaker.

MT he release said that cere-
m ony will be preceded by a
‘ eae of celebrations, during ©
Ww ich “a flurry of activities™
cw will be held.

7 The selected theme for this
vyear celebrations is “I’m
Sfronger now!”

The opening event of the,
“week will be the Baccalaure-
‘ate thanksgiving service on
Sunday July 24, starting at
3.30pm in St Paul’s Methodist
‘Church East Sunrise Highway.

Rev Dr J Emmette Weir,
‘Superintendent Emeritus, will
deliver the.sermon.

ie “The Mary Star of the Sea
Choir, renowned for its stellar
»pérformances, will lead the ser-
‘vice and render musical selec-
tions (under the direction of
Mr, Basil Hanna). Musical ren-
ditions by Mrs Linda Wild-
goose (Soprano) will also be a
highlight of the worship expe-
Hence,’ ’ the release said.





2005 Lecture Series
Schedule

July 21st
Sports Medicire
Ds. Willard Thompson

August 18th
Mental Health
Alzheimer’s Disease

September 15th
Children’s Health

October 20th
Cancer

November 17th
Diabetes

December 15th
Managing Stress &
Depression

_.Speaker:

Q&A:

LOCAL NEWS



“As the week continues, the
members of the graduating
class are expected to pay a

courtesy call on Mrs Diana .

‘Swann (deputy general man-
ager) and the staff of ZNS as
well as tour the facilities on
Monday July 25.

“Then, on Tuesday July 26,
the graduating class will visit
and serve lunch to the residents
and staff of the GB Home for
the Aged as well as make a
monetary donation as a token
of their respect to our senior



citizens,” it said.

Wednesday July 27 and
Thursday July 28 will be
reserved, respectively, for the
president’s reception and the
final rehearsals for the com-
mencement ceremony.

“Finally, on Saturday July
30, the celebrations will con-
clude with a post-commence-

ment beach party in honour of

the graduates of the Freeport
campus and those of the Nas-
sau campus who will comprise
the large contingent of guests

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coming into Freeport for the
ceremony.

“Families of graduates are
also expected. The festivities
will include food and drinks,
music, the annual beach vol-
leyball game, a domino tour-
nament, swimming, etc,”

The release said the public
is invited to support the gradu-

ates by attending the baccalau- .

reate thanksgiving service on
July 24 and the commencement
ceremony on July 29.

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THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005, PAGE 11

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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





JOHN R. MORLEY

THE OFFICES OF
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WILL CLOSE ON

FRIDAY, JULY 22%, 2005
FROM 12:00 NOON

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Activities announced
for summer holidays

B By Bahamas Information
Services

TWO government agencies
have recently joined forces to
assist parents by introducing
numerous summer programmes
for children for the next two
months.

Mrs Nicole Allen of the Par-
ent Teacher Association at
Thelma Gibson Primary School,
said it is extremely important
to have children involved with
activities over the summer vaca-
tion “because children are just

wondering the streets and being
raised by the streets.”

“This is the opportunity for
parents to have their children
attended educational pro-
grammes without the stress of
worrying where they are and
what they are doing,” Mrs Allen
said.

The Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture is offering
a variety of-activities that began
July 12, including computers,
swimming, aerobic dancing,
music and arts.

In addition, three other pro-



“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
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If so, call us on 322-1986
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but not at Lhe Tribune

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THE TRIBUNE

tare



ew ITC president

pledges growth

THE INCOMING council
president of the International
‘Training in Communication
(ITC) group has vowed to help
‘the organisation achieve new
heights in the coming years.

ITC was founded in 1938 for
the purpose of practicing and
-training its members in the art
bfcomnmunication and leader-
“Sbip.
yn her acceptance speech,
‘Shellyn Ingraham, newly elect-
'éd; president of ITC’s second
‘level Council V, said that she
lcomes all challenges that her
“post might bring.
£1 Since ITC’s inception, mem-
‘bers have been meeting regu-
‘larly, helping each other devel-
‘@p poise and confidence in
‘Many areas where communica-






US condemns trial of men
‘working to strengthen
democracy’ in Venezuela

:1THE US State Department has declared

tion is a major factor.

To fulfill the organisation’s
mandate, members create and
deliver speeches, debates, pan-
el discussions, workshops and
other forms of education.

ITC operates two clubs in
Nassau, the Essence Club and
Valentine Communications,
and the Yellow Elder Club in
Freeport.

“Tt is this incoming presiden-
t’s desire to see more together-
ness. We need more social activ-
ities at this level. We need to
incorporate more knowledge
and be reminded of what ITC is
all about. We need to encour-
age and uplift each other, set
positive examples,” Ms Ingra-
ham told the ITC members at
the council’s recent fourth quar-

spiracy’ for accepting a $31,000 grant from

terly meeting at the British
Colonial Hilton.

Ms Ingraham especially
thanked her predecessor Gar-
dena Evans, “who has without
doubt left an indelible footprint
that could only encourage this
organisation to soar to even
greater heights”.

Before being elected to the
post of Council V president, Ms
Ingraham served as the head of
ITC’s first level at the Essence
Club.

‘““Your support over the years
has left me eager to serve at your
command,” she told the council.

Trade Union Congress Presi-
dent Obie Ferguson was the
guest speaker at the ITC meet-
ing, which was held under the
theme “aim to achieve”.



THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005, PAGE 13







& TARA Smith, Essence Club; Shellyn Ingraham, president 2005/6; Obie Ferguson; Gardenia
Evans, president 2004/5; and Dr Bastian; Daphne Johnson, Essence Club; Olive Burns-Forbes,
Essence Club; Andrea Adderley, Essence Club; Sherman Stevens, Valentine Communicators,

Patrice Roberts, Essence; and Dianne Miller, Essence Club.



for basic rights.

These judicial actions are a






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its ‘disappointment at a Venezuelan court
er bringing charges against three men who
Usays were working to. strengthen democ-
'Facy in their country.
«iVenezuela has been mentioned in the
‘Bahamian news since gavernment signed
‘tHe PetroCaribe oil agreement with the
‘Vénezuelan authorities earlier this month.
aA statement from State Department act-
spokesman Tom Casey read:
aa'We are very disappointed by the July 7
‘decision of a Venezuelan judge to try the
four leaders of the civic, non-governmental
organisation Simate on charges of ‘con-



t
’
te




Mrasilian

Pit dat

Frarohia CFI eS Commission

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

the National Endowment for Democracy
(NED) to carry-out voter education activi-
ties.

“The Venezuelan government’s charges
against Maria Corina Machado, Alejan-
dro Plaz, Luis Enrique Palacios and Ricar-
do Estévez are without merit. The NED-
supported activities were aimed at
strengthening citizen participation in the

democratic, constitutional processes of

their country.

“Sumate is an internationally respected
civic organisation committed to promoting
free and fair electoral processes and respect

amkcl Nenevucian

ar ‘wwe at



UNIQUE JOB OPPORTUNITY
Senior

The rapid evolution of the telecommunications sector combined with’ novel

approaches to regulating the sector has made it mandatory for the Public Utili-

Regulatory Economist

ties Commission (PUC) to strengthen its capacity in Fou oly economic

analyses.

The Job

The successful applicant for the position will provide specialist advice on the
economic and financial performance of regulated utilities. He will also work as
an integral part of a multi-disciplinary team of professionals to ensure effective
oversight by the PUC of the various providers of utility services in The Bahamas.
The candidate will perform market research and other economic studies relevant

to the current and future development of the telecommunications, electricity,

and water and sewerage sectors in The Bahamas.

Training

The candidate will be trained to carry out economic and financial analyses

This

involving market research, and changes in price setting methodologies.

specialist training will be offered principally via short courses and seminars, in

The Bahamas and overseas.

ualifications

Bachelor's Degree in Economics or Economics and Accounting; and

Master’s Degree in Economics, or Finance; and

Minimum of five (5) years relevant experience.

Remuneration

The PUC offers a very attractive benefits package and excellent opportunities for

further development.

experience. Further information about the PUC could be obtained from

Starting salary will be commensurate with relevant

our website at: www.PUCBahamas.gov.bs.

Applications should be received by 29 July, 2005

“linterested Prey ee ah May deliver or: ae resumes to:
Executive Director, Public Utilities Commission: »
‘4th Terrace East, Collins Avenue
Fax No. (242) 323-7288

Sea aiN ns

‘-PUC@pucbahamas.gov.bs





transparent part of a Venezuelan govern-
ment campaign designed to intimidate
members of civil suciety for exercising their
democratic rights.”

Mr Casey said the State Department
remains “seriously concerned about politi-
cal persecution and continued threats to
democratic rights and institutions in
Venezuela.

“We urge the government of Venezuela
to honour its commitments under the Inter-
American Democratic Charter to guarantee
the civil and political rights of all its. citi-
zens.”

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



Complaints at gas prices on islans

FROM page one

gas was not enough, residents on
Moores Island complain that they are
also having to pay $5.50 as well for a
gallon of kerosene.

Currently the price for a gallon of
gasoline at the pumps in New Provi-
dence averages about $3.72. Although
kerosene is not a price controlled item,

it is being sold in Nassau for $4. 10 a

gallon.
Icelyn Hanna, a resident of Moores
Island, said that the fishermen on the

island are dumbfounded at the prices
they are being forced to pay for gas.

“The fishermen here are complain-
ing but there isn’t a thing they can do.
First it was $5.00 now they raised it to
$5.50 a gallon the last trip the mail-
boat made.

“They need it so. they have to pay it.
We have to send drums into Nassau
and then pay for the freight and stuff.
The crawfish season is opening the first
of next month, so we expect it go even
higher because they are going to need
the gas,” she said.

Sherman Stuart, another resident
and fisherman for over 30 years said
that with the current prices it doesn’t
make much sense for locals to even go
out in their boats to try and make a
living.

“A lot of the fishermen want to go
out but they can’t afford to get gas to
go. It’s hard man. Every time you go
out you are looking at $85 for gas, and
that’s with a small engine. Other fellas
spend like $120 on gas to get out and if
they don’t make that then they lose
out.

“When people start stealing you real-
ly can’t blame them. We have it.tough.
Right now conch is the only thing that
is selling, and it’s at what we call its
summer peak of $2.50 to $2.75 a
pound, but they are scarce.

“So when the fella go out he may
only get 50 to 60 pounds, and after you
take out for gas and oil there ain’t
nothing to share between two divers.

You might have enough to buy a cart of

soda,” he said.
Minister of Trade and In





that such prices are being charged on
the island. me OY
- The minister said that last year, ‘fol-
lowing the devastation of hurricanes
Frances and Jeanne, he warned met-

‘chants about price gouging, but cau-
‘tioned that there will be no warning

this time.
. “That’s clearly against the law. We
Héed to look into that. Now you could
¢ why we need PetroCaribe to get. a
ak. That is price gouging. That? s
hat that is. They need to cease. and
‘sist immediately,” he said.

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Leslie Miller said he couldn’t by



‘FROM page one

“they are the government of all
the people, not just the PLP.”
The same day the Wemco
officers were laid off, new secu-
rity officers were at their posts.
The Soldier Road BTC
exchange offices and radio, the
Camperdown offices and
Pinewood offices were identi-
fied by a long-time employee
of both Wemco and Intertech
as now under Intertech security.
"There are new faces and dif-
ferent uniforms," said a senior
technical associate at the Sol-

dier Road exchange office.

"The change came into effect —

on Friday."

According to a well placed
government source, the board
of directors at BTC decided that
instead of allowing Wemco to
control the contract with BTC,
it was best to share around the
policing of BTC by offering
Intertech and other security
companies a portion of the busi-
ness. They decided to “split up
the pie,” the source explained.

Dr Rahming, who is also the
president of Intertech, was
reluctant to confirm that any

BTC.

“T didn' t sign a contract sith
BaTelCo, but maybe my com-
pany did,” Dr Rahming said. “I
don’t have anything to do with
those decisions.”

Refusing to discuss “other
business” while at the Prison,
Dr Rahming simply added that,
“the same company that has the _
contract with BaTelCo for the
past few years still has 70-80. per
cent of the contract.”

The Intertech Group, which
employs almost 100 Bahamians
in security operations and inves-

tigation on New Froviaciais,
had applied for the whole
BaTelCo contract but only Bot
20 out of a possible 90 per ¢ent.

Trevor Clarke, general maty-
ager at Intertech, refused to
comment on the BTC contract.

"I don't have'a comment’ on
that right now. Even though he
is the president, Dr Rahming
doesn't deal with the dayto-
day goings on of the companys
said Mr Clarke.

BTC representatives were
unavailable to provide further
details on the reason for the
switch in security at their offices.



Legal action possible Bahamas ‘not on list’

FROM page one

have no intentions on issuing
any others.”

In a press statement, San
Diego-based Viper Incorporat-
ed announced its newest distri-
bution partner, Viper Systems
Networks (VSN) of the
Bahamas.

The statement said VSN
principal managing partner
Elwood Rolle and his team
“have built a formidable launch
programme consisting of print
advertising. and other. market-
ing campaigns to penetrate the
Bahamas and Eastern
Caribbean markets and bring

THE SIR LYNDEN PINDLING

ARCHDEACON WILLIAM THOMPSON

THE FinLayson Famity SCHOLARSHIP FUND

The Selection Comittee is pleased to announce the 2005 recipients of
The Sir Lynden Pindling and Archdeacon William Thompson Memorial

Scholarships as follows:

‘Kyvtz BaINn

Computer Science



ANDREA Cuber

RayMonpb HuTCHINSON

_ Accounts

Medicine



Byron KNOWLES

y DoMONIQUE McCoy

_ Accounts

Medicine «



Marva McDonaLp

Air Conditioning



ANTONIA McKENZIE

SHANTELL MunroE

_Puarez ROLLE

LaverrE SAUNDERS |

BRIQUEL SHERMAN
CorAIN SMITH
_ MICHELLE THURSTON

SHAMEKA WILLIAMS

Business

Foreign Languages

Medicine
Social Work

Forensic Science

__ Architecture

ee





Viper Networks products and
services to the region.”

However, Mr Russell con-
firmed yesterday that neither -
Viper Incorporated nor VSN
have a licence to operate in the |
Bahamas and said that if either
company opens up shop in the
country, it “would most cer-
tainly be an illegal act.”

If this occurs, he said, the
PUC can prosecute.

Two to three months ago, Mr
Russell said, the PUC pub-
lished an advertisement in local
newspapers advising the

lic that VoIP services outside.:.:}..::¢

of those offered by the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company (BTC) are illegal and
that Bahamians should refrain

_ from supporting such opera-

tions.

However, he said, if it is the
company’s intention to conduct
business outside: of the
Bahamas, “there is nothing we
(the PUC) can do about it.”

The Tribune was unable to
contact either the management
of Viper Incorporated or
Elwood Rolle yesterday.



FROM page one

other international countries
about products recalled from
the market in the US because
of safety concerns.

The investigation was
sparked after The Tribune
contacted several local depart-
ment stores on. Tuesday that
were unaware that they were
selling or had orderéd:a cer-
tain brand of baby’ strollers
that had been recalled in the
US for safety reasons.

Graco Children’s Products
Incorporated ordered a recall
on July 7 of more than one
million of its Duo Tandem
and MetroLite strollers after
reports of hundreds of injuries
and unexpected collapses due
to faulty latches.

However, none of the local

stores that either sold both ,

models or had them on ‘order
were aware of the recall.
‘Mr Ford said that because

the CPSC has primary respon-..

’ sibility for the US, international
buyers and sellers of products
made in the US would need to
make the necessary requests

for recall notifications. -

The CPSC, an independent
federal regulatory agency, is
charged with protecting the
public from unreasonable risks
-of serious injury or death from
more than 15,000 types of con-
sumer products under the
agency's jurisdiction.

The CPSC’s purpose is to
protect consumers from prod-
ucts that pose a fire, electri-
cal, chemical, or mechanical
hazard or can injure children.

At present, Mr Ford said
the only country outside of the
US that the CPSC notifies
occasionally is Canada. * .

He said Health Canada,
which is an agency equivalent
to that of the CPSC ‘has
arranged for notifications ‘and
has been receiving informa-
tion from his office for some
time.

If we intend to be jafotaed
regularly, Mr Ford said'the
Bahamas can make a similar
arrangement as Canada.

The Tribune made several
unsuccessful attempts to:con-
tact Trade and Industry Minis-
ter Leslie Miller for comment.



Man dies while out swimming

FROM page one

when she saw the ambulance
arrive at the beach she wanted
to find out what. was going on.
"When. I got there, I saw a
lot of people standing around
on the pier. There appeared to
be a white male lying on the
pier face up and he was already
blue in the face," she said.
Lathario Barnett, a lifeguard
on Sunshine Cruises, said they
were snorkelling on Rose Island

reef when he heard a cry for help.

"I was assisting someone
with their equipment when I got
a cry for help. I swam over and
assisted a gentleman and then
swam over to the boat," said
Mr Barnett.

He added: "We checked for
his pulse and he had a very
weak pulse. I started CPR and
was assisted by another life-
guard and two tourists. We did
CPR until we got here (Mon-
tagu Beach)."

Mr Evans said that the:man
was pronounced dead at Mon-
tagu Beach.

When The Tribune left the
scene the body was still on the
pier.

A Bahamian eyewitness “who
appeared on ZNS evening news
said, the body was left out on
the pier for two hours.

Up to press time, the police
did not know the man’s identity.
Police are continuing their
investigations into the matter:

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|}HE TRIBUNE

-LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2UU5, FAUE iT



@ By Krystal Knowles
Bahamas Information
Services

-GOVERNOR_ General
Beak Ivy Dumont is in good
health, experts from the Public
Hospitals Authority (PHA)
said during a health screening
exercise at Government House
on July 4.

_ The PHA was responding to
EY challenge by the Governor-
General issued in December,

2004, for health personnel to’

be ambassadors for health.

’ The screening exercise
entailed an examination of a
number of factors, including
weight, height, and blood pres-
sure.

“e{This programme is neces-
saty and I am pleased that it is
happening because it is a mat-
ter that I discussed with care
givers last.Christmas,” the gov-
ermor general said. “Concern
arose because I realised that
care givers themselves were
-obese and I did not think that
this set a very good example.
for.the rest of us. ,
>o“The fact that the Ministry
of-Health is making this a
national programme is signifi-
‘cant because we often read in
the papers that diabetes is a
very serious problem, both
jationally and internationally.
‘People who are obese usually



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are also diabetics. It is critical,
in my. view, that national atten-
tion is paid to obesity.”

Screening



Dame Ivy said she is partic-
ularly interested in the health
screening programme because
she has a son who is a diabetic, -
and is aware of the attendant
complications of this disease.



@ THE Public Hospitals
Authority personnel conducted
its first health screening exer-
cise at Government House on
July 4. Tests were carried out
on Governor General Dame
Ivy Dumont and Government
House employees. Dame Ivy
challenged health workers in
December, 2004, to be ambas-
sadors of good health. From
left are Dr Catherine Conliffe;
Rhoda Bullard-Stamp, admin-
istrative officer; Sandra Rolle,
senior clinical nursing officer;
Pandora Hanna, nursing offi-
cer; Emily Osadebay, principal
nursing officer, Princess Mar-
garet Hospital; Sharon Turn-
quest, senior trained clinical |
nurse; Angie Adderley, senior
trained clinical nurse; Dr Cher-
ilyn Hanna-Hennis, consultant;
Patricia Morley. ©

(BIS Photos:
Raymond Bethel)



She also suggested that com-
panies should make contact
with the Ministry of Health to
have their employees screened
because it would be beneficial
to the individual, the company
and the nation.

The governor general said
she looks forward to losing
another four pounds over the
next four months.

lietecitserttn

-



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AR wakioa pay 8: eh








@ EMILY Osadebay, principal nursing officer at the Princess Margaret Hospital Genta right),
screens Michelle Fergurson, senior clerk at Government House on J uly 4. Standing from left are
Rhoda Bullard- -Stamp, administrative officer; Pandora Hanna, nursing officer; Sandra Rolle,
senior clinical nursing officer; Dr Cherilyn Hanna-Hennis, consultant; Angie Adderley, senior
trained clinical nurse; Sharon Turnquest, senior trained dinical nurse; Dr Catherine Conliffe and
Patricia Mowley..

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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005

JACKSON Ritchie

‘Global United Limited, for-
merly Tanja Enterprises Com-

pany Limited, will officially

open its Nassau headquarters
tomorrow.

The company’s new offices
are located in the Airport indus-
trial park and will combine all
its Nassau operations under one
roof.

Prior to the amalgamation of



_Strength_

in numbers

Jennifer Bain, FLMI, FAHM, CLU,

Financial Services Representative in Nassau,
has earned another significant industry
designation: "Fellow, Financial Services
Institute (FFSI)." She is the first Bahamian
to achieve this credential.

The FFSI programme comprises a series”

of self-study courses designed by the. Life Office
Management Association of Atlanta, Georgia,
and provides a context for understanding the
design, support, and marketing of all major
financial services.. Students focus a portion

of their studies in a particular product area such
as retirement plans, mutual funds/investments,

annuities, or banking.

Family Guardian congratulates this dedicated
professional for her commitment to personal
development and customer service excellence.



its operations, Global United
Limited conducted business

from its Saunders Beach and -
Claridge offices. All of the .

company’s Nassau employees
will now be based in its new

‘ headquarters.

Global: United Limited was
originally established in Freeport
in 1991 as TANJA Enterprises

and now has subsidiaries that

include Global United (Freeport)
» Lhe Travel Network and United

Shipping , as well.as Nassau
operations comprised of Global ’:

United (Nassau) , Ritchie Avia-
tion and Seair Airways. Global
United (Nassau) recently

acquired Global Customs Bro-..

kers and World Bound Couriers.

’ Whilst its primary business

THE TRIBUNE



Global United opens
Nassau corporate office



started with services to the mar-:
itime industry, in the past 14:
years Global has expanded. to.
deal with customs clearance and’
brokerage and travel services:
to it clients.

Jackson Ritchie, from Global:
United, said: “We claim to be‘
the largest ship services and
logistics company in the.
Bahamas. We have assets of $34°

- million, a truly good client base*

and employ some 240 Bahami-.
ans.. Now headquartered in.
Nassau, our goal is to open sub’
office in many of the Caribbean:
islands within the next 24.
months and to have a presence:
in many of the major maritime:

centres of the world within the:

next five years.’

’



Preacher's daughter graduates:

CHARISA Munroe, eldest _

child of Dr:Myles and Ruth
Munroe, president and senior
of Bahamas Faith Ministries
International, has completed
her Bachelor of Science degree
in social work.

She is pictured during her
graduation exercises from Oral
Roberts University in. Tulsa
Oklahoma on April 30, 2005.

Charisa maintained an overall

Raab cn eee





GPA of 3.20 and siived asa cam-
pus resident advisor for her dorm.
She is a former student of
Temple Christian School in
Nassau, and plans to continue
her studies by pursuing a\mias-
ters degree in social work\and
public health at the University
of Michigan, where she has
already been accepted.
Charisa plans to complete
studies at the doctoral level. |

“oud Bchorna
373-8000.

_ ost Bo Golden Gues Cable nano Mala, tl arhou Bay Blue Hill Port Lucoya
3938000 367-8000 ys 393-8080) 1 8300 | 31s3798 | Queen's Hah ay 352; 3002


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005, PAGE 17

Be Tor) i =a eS)

celebrates
National Pride

& A SECTION of the combined Prison Mass Choir performs one of their many selections during
National Pride Day at Her Majesty’s Prison, Fox Hill. The 50-member choir sang together for the
first time, drawing applause and cheers from the many family, friends and staff members who
attended the event.

B SUPERINTENDENT of Prisons Dr Elliston Rahming (second left) enjoys some of the
festivities of National Pride Day at Her Majesty’s Prison, Fox Hill. Inmates of the facility treated
family, friends and staff members to a day of poetry, song, dance and a speech, competition. Also
from left are Assistant Superintendent of Prisons Dennis Gilbert, who serves as director of the
central intake facility, records and reception; Superintendent Rahming; Assistant Superintendent
of Prisons Stevenson Smith, director of the inmate industries programme; and Assistant
Superintendent of Prisons James Farrington, director of the maximum security unit.

, (BIS photos:

SUPERINTENDENT of Prisons Dr Elliston Rahming (fourth left) presented the top three
finishers in the first Her Majesty’s Prison Speech Competition with their trophies during the
Prison National Pride Day. The inmates presented family, friends and staff members with a
competition on the theme: “Of Thee Bahamas, Nevertheless I Sing”. The competition was won by
Norris Rolle. Also from left are Sergeant Stephanie Pratt, public affairs officer and deputy ,
chairwoman of the sspecial events committee; toastmaster Sherman Bethel, chief judge; James
Dean, second place finisher; Superintendent Rahming; Norris Rolle, winner; Barrington North,
third place finisher; Tiska Pratt, secretary, special events Committee; and Deputy Superintendent
of Prisons, Mr Charles Rolle. ;


PAGE 18, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005 [HE TRIBUNE

Blair proposes conference on extremism
as Muslim leaders call for judicial inquiry



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Telephone

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Visit our Showroom & Office located at the Red Carpet Inn, East Bay Street




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has an immediate vacancy for an
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The successful candidate will be mainly
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Ms Kelcine Hamilton
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Poon IMIDUINE

LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL NEWS



A BUSINESS that has been
in one family for three genera-
tions celebrated a milestone
with the opening of new store.

Master Technicians, estab-
lished in June 1965, is celebrat-
ing its 40th anniversary this year
as a retail trade business dealing
with home appliances, elec-
tronics, entertainment systems,
and house-wares.

The business, now in its third

_ generation of leadership, was
started by well-known busi-
nessman Herbert Treco. In the
late 1970s through 2003, the
business was shared by Mr Tre-

Master Technicians officially
opened its new store on Village
Road in late June. It is equipped
with state-of-the-art technolo-
gy, and a new showroom that is
more than double the display
area of its previous store.

Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of National Security,
Cynthia Pratt, delivered the
keynote address at the grand
opening ceremony. The leader
of the FNM, Senator Tommy
Turnquest, also attended.

Master Technicians carries
Whirlpool appliances, Kitchen
Aid products, Samsung appli-

ys CYCaA He

has been set-up for William
{Billy} Francis Hall {Pepsi}
at The Royal Bank of Canada,
Palmdale Branch in the name

of Hall’s Medical Fund,

Account #7200215 to help
defray medical bills that arose
during his illness. At this time

we would like to
thank all who have made a
donation.

Celebration as family
business opens store ©

as
fe Oe77)) VA

ances and electronics, Sub Zero
appliances, Avanti appliances,
Sharp electronics, JVC elec-
tronics, and a variety of house-
wares.

co’s sons, Gregory and Ricar-
do; and tow the third genera-
tion, from 2003, is being led by
Derek Francis, Mr Treco’s
grandson.

@ GENERAL manager
Derek Francis at the launch



Slaes Christopher & Mark atl





Indonesian government
spells out troop withdrawal

ounsellor, Christian
ndLord and others

he medical expenes of

as shot in April 2005.

2ts can be purchased at:
ian Bookshop (Rosetta Street)
%, Bible Bookstore (Mall at Marathon)
~ Johnson’s Tailoring (Wulff Road)
ACE Lawn Mower (McCullogh Corner)

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

Church Of God Convention Centre |
Joe Farrington Road
Friday July 29, 2005, 8:00pm



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PAGE 20, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005 THE TRIBUNE

Dogs join police patrols
on London Underground











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THE TRIBUNE



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Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story. —










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PAGE 22, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005 | . _ THETRIBUNE







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1s nt

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aoa “Copyrighted Material os.
es , Syndicated Content — —

Available from Commercial News Providers”. =

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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005, PAGE 25

Clinton, Tanzanian president
launch HIV/AIDS program



“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”



a ic fi i THe store seeks qualifie
Bou N ee ie NTL of:

Successful applicant should possess:

¢ A high school diploma
¢ Good customer service skills
° Good written and oral communication skills

Fax resume to 393-3320 or send resume to
P.O. Box N-1277

A leading clothing store seeks qualified
applicants for the position of:

SOY

The sicessful candidate will assist the manager with the day-to-day
functions of the store.

Applicant should possess: e @
¢ A minimum of 3 years experience in a similar position F rstC a rl b b e a Nn

° Good customer service skills

¢ Good written and oral communication skills C a ree r O p po rtu n ity

: ° Experience in retail merchandising . :
Fax resume to 393-3320 or send resume to P.O. Box N-1277 a RR :
, | MANAGER, SOURCING AND SUPPLY MANAGEMENT
os : FirstCaribbean International Bank is the ‘combination of CIBC and Barclays Bank in the Caribbean, Bahamas

and Belize. We are the region's largest publicly traded bank with over 3,000 staff serving over 5.3 million
people in 16 countries. We manage over a00, 000 active accounts through more than 80 branches and centres.



Responsibilities:

¢ To manage and develop a_ professional and fully integrated client/practice facing country Sourcing Team

* To assist in the development and maintenance of close working relationships between the Sourcing Team and the
Strategic Business Units

* To implement processes for the selection, appraisal and management of suppliers

* To ensure compliance with Sourcing and Supply Management's policies and procedures so that commercial, financial
and service delivery risks are mitigated wherever possible

° To initiate, approve and administer local supply and service contracts

Prerequisites:

* 8-10 years' experience in a commercial environment with 2 years at a Senior Management Level operating in a
client-facing practice

° 3-5 years' experience of successfully managing a Sourcing Team

¢ Experience in conducting negotiations with regards to the provision of 3rd party goods aid services

° Chartered Institute of Pursasing and Supply (CIPS) or Institute of Supply Management (ISM) qualified or equivalent
will be an asset

We offer an attractively structured compensation and reward package as well as performance bonuses.
Applications with detailed résumés should be submitted no later than 5th August, 2005 to:

Karen Bynoe

Administrative Assistant

Human Resources Department

Head Office

Warrens

Barbados

Email: karen.bynoe@firstcaribbeanbank.com

Only applicants who are short-listed will be contacted.

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

Caribbean Pride. International Strength. Your Financial Partner.

Ex g luding Mitchell Gold Products FirstCaribbean International Bank is an Associated Company

of Barclays Bank PLC and CIBC,

ay Sa PAW ra ors GAG rarag BL ae
© Tel: 242-356-7302
_¢ email: ariana@batalnet.bs :


PAGE 24, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005 | THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL NEWS








. Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”





Support you trust. Comfort you'll



Donald's Furniture - 322-3875 ¢ Best Buy Furniture - 394-2378
Roberts Furniture - 322-8862 ¢ Palmdale Furniture - 322-3703

The Sleep Gallery - 327-5338 © Home Furniture - 322-8646
Wood You Furniture - 325-9663




¢ Power Chairs
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Come see our showroom at

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Open: Monday - Friday 8am - 5pm ° Telephone: 394-4147-50




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THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

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“= Telephone: (242) 302-9250 .






i By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor




hile the
Bahamas has
“so far been
fortunate” as

dation in the number of inter-
national financial centres
used for private wealth man-
agement, attorneys yesterday
said this nation had to ensure
it remained “relevant” to
client needs if it was to sur-
vive.

PricewaterhouseCoopers
(PwC) global private bank-
ing/wealth management sur-
vey for 2005, which drew
responses from 130 partici-
pants including some based
in the Bahamas, found there

See WEALTH, 5B

a “net gainer” from consoli- ~

Bahamas is ‘ne
gainer’ through
private wealth

consolidation























Bahamas seventh _

: most reliant nation

on tourism for jobs

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
- Tribune Business Editor

~~ THE Bahamas will this year be
the world’s seventh most-reliant
nation on the tourism industry to
provide the bulk of employment
for its workforce, with some 68.7
per cent or 115,900 jobs relying
directly on the sector.
And the World Travel and
Tourism Council’s (WITC) 2005
, country report for the Bahamas
- projected that this reliance was
set to further increase over the
‘next 10 years, with tourism
* becoming responsible for 145,293
jobs or 70.1 per cent of total
émployment by 2015.
_ While tourism was set to create
one in every 1.5. jobs in the
Bahamas in 2005, this ratio was
| Set to decrease by one in every
- 1.4 jobs in 2015.

- However, the WTITC survey
ranked the Bahamas 90th out of
about 170 nations surveyed for
, the annualised 10-year real
~ growth rate in jobs generated by
. the tourism industry, placing this
' at 2.3 per cent between 2005 and

2015. ;
. But while tourism may be
_ ‘king’ as far as the Bahamian

a ie



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Contact us or conduct a search on our web-
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T:(242) 393-8618 F:(242) 393-0326 -

economy is concerned, the fact
that this nation continues to

- punch above its size and weight

on the world stage is shown by
the‘ fact that it only has 0.1 per

cent of the global tourism mar- .
_ ket share for 2005. .

While the travel and ‘tourism
industry is set to generate $3.883
billion in gross domestic product
(GDP) in 2005, giving this nation
the highest annual growth rate in
the Caribbean region at 11 per
cent, its 10-year annualised

growth rate through to 2015 is .

among the lowest.

According to the WTTC, the
Bahamas will only enjoy a growth
rate of 2.7 per cent, ranking it
167th, although this equals
Jamaica and is ahead of Cuba.
The Bahamian travel and tourism
industry is projected to generate
$6.981 billion in GDP for this
nation by 2015.

The direct and indirect impact |

from the Bahamian travel and
tourism industry will account for
54.7 per cent of this nation’s total
GDP in 2005, again making this
country the seventh-most reliant
in the world upon the tourism
industry for the lifeblood of its
economy.




Sa








Price: $1,550,000.







family island properties.












fi By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business
Reporter





THE Our Lucaya resort does

Capri casino, the hotel union
president said yesterday, with
the unemployment situation on
Grand Bahama now in danger
of becoming “uncontrollable”
after the US-based gaming
operator laid off 13 per cent of

years of net losses.

Pat Bain, head of’ the
Bahamas Hotel, Catering and
Allied Workers Union
(BHAWU), said Grand
Bahama’s economy was in a
state of readjustment:as it now
began to feel the full impact of
the 10-month closure of the
Royal Oasis Crowne Plaza &
Golf resort.

"Grarid Bahama has always
been a cyclical tourism destina-
tion, but with the Our Lucaya
not able to sustain the kind of

_ By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
- Senior Business Reportet

‘THE proposed increases in pilot lan
_ unlikely to have a negative impact or
_ industry, the Ministry of Tourism sai

Basil Smith, its director of communications,

_tions were ongoing between the Minist
| Ministry of Transport to ensure that for
- operators and private pilots - are a

changesinatimelymanner. =
. Inan interview with The Tribune

cerns voiced by Bahamian pilots, saying go
_-do not expect the proposed new fees



not attract enough tourists to ,
sustain the troubled Isle of

its workforce in response to two

numbers that would sustain the:

Isle of Capri, adjustments need

to be made as the question of.

the rate of unemployment now
becomes a situation that is

uncontrollable,” Mr Bain said. .

“There are still fears that shops
will close at the International

‘Bazaar. What you are now see-
‘ing are the after-effects of the

closure of the Royal Oasis."
While the Crowne Plaza
Country Club, Royal Oasis Golf

Resort and its casino still in lim- -
bo, and the Government con-

tinuing to look for a buyer, Mr
Bain said it was likely many
residents of Grand Bahama will
have to leave the island to seek

‘employment elsewhere in the
‘Bahamas.

He added that with the pro-

Bahama unemployment in danger
of becoming ‘uncontrollable’

t| Our Lucaya hotel
“cannot sustain’
Isle of Capri

al

Hotel union chief sa

Cen

Ci




posed improvements to the
Cable Beach hotels under the
$1.2 billion Baha Mar develop-
ment, those Grand Bahamians .
who have skills that can be used
would probably come to New
Providence. Ongoing tourism

. developments in Eleuthera,

Exuma and Abaco were also
expected to attract workers
from Grand Bahama.

"Our people must be pre-.
pared to move where the job
opportunities are because we
are no longer able to languish
either in the place of our birth
or comfort,” Mr Bain said.
“Look at the Americans, the
Asians and the Indians. They

See HOTEL, 3B

| Union body presses

for amendments to
labour legislation

@ By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business
Reporter

THE National Congress of

Trade Unions (NCTU) yester- .

day accused the Government
of failing to introduce draft leg-
islation to amend the country's
labour laws, and called on the

HERE’S THE LOW-COST DIGITAL

administration to right what it
sees as laws that stifle the eco-
nomic development of the
Bahamian labour force.

In an interview with The Tri-
bune, NCTU president Pat
Bain said union officials were
unhappy with the fact that

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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





Marketing IT’s value
to Bahamian firms

nformation Technolo-

gy, while one of the

most integral compo-

nents of a company, is

also arguably the most
undermarketed and therefore.
the most misunderstood func-
tion.

The business in most cases
has a negative perception of
IT’s effort and productivity. IT
services are believed to be
high-cost and low-quality.
Within any organisation, there
are usually a plethora of people
who are very vocal about IT’s
inability to deliver..The inter-
esting aspect of this negative
perception is that it does not
seem to matter whether IT is
delivering or not: the percep-
tion will most likely still be that
IT does not deserve the funds it
receives. ,

Without a proactive and
interactive marketing strategy,
this perception of IT will not
change. Marketing of IT is
essential to obtaining support
and resources, and is one criti-
cal step in transforming IT
from being treated as a cost
centre to being a strategic part-

‘ner of the business.

Definition of IT Marketing
IT marketing has- been
defined by the Enterprise
Computing Institute as: “The
art of appropriately setting

expectations between customer
and service provider such that
both entities enjoy a mutually
beneficial economic relation-
ship”. The essence of the defi-
nition is that although commu-
nication is a key part of an IT
marketing strategy, it is also
about quality, consistency and
interaction with key business
stakeholders.

For IT marketing strategies
to be successful, a consistent
level of service is required.
From this point on, IT market-
ing strategies must be focused
on achieving a higher quality

of service, increasing their .

understanding of the business
requirements as well as on

proactive communication cam- -

paigns. Otherwise, IT market-
ing activities may undermine
IT’s reputation, and all com-
munication will be viewed with
derision.

IT Marketing Strategies

Magnolia Communications’
Marketing Maturity Grid
shows a distinct correlation
between the level of market-
ing focus and activity, and the
role of IT within that organisa-
tion. The following summarises
their findings:

1. Ad Hoc: Reactive com-
munication,.and the primary
marketing tools are status
reports/briefings. IT’s role

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tends to be as a Cost Centre.
2. Demand Driven: Commu-

nication is demand driven and

reactive, and the primary mar-

keting tools are project level :
scorecards. IT’s role is again as _

a Cost Centre.

3, Process-Based: Communi-
cation is regular and based on
status updates. The primary
marketing tools are newslet-
ters and recurring planning
meetings. IT tends to be a’Pre-
ferred Partner of the business.

4. Customer Proactive: Com-
munication with the business
is based on pr interac-



tion to address current and
future performance. The main
marketing tools are quarterly
business reviews, newsletters
and scorecards. IT is a’Pre-
ferred Partner of the business.

5. Enterprise and IT Proac-

tive: Communication is based

on proactive interaction with
the entire customer communi-
ty and individual customers.
The primary marketing tools

are Annual Report-style infor-

mation, comprehensive score-
cards and IT information avail-
able in real time. IT tends to
be a Strategic Partner of the

business.

In addition, a recent survey
conducted by CIO Magazine
clearly demonstrated that IT
Managers who implemented

comprehensive marketing.

strategies gained significant
benefits in terms of their rela-
tionship with the business. The
study showed these companies
achieved the best results in
terms of closer alignment with
the business, increased IT cred-
ibility and improved customer
service and loyalty. °

Getting Started

Implementing a comprehen-
sive marketing campaign can-
not be achieved overnight.
Some of the activities that can
form the foundation of a mar-
keting strategy include:

1. Identify the target audi-
ences. IT will have multiple tar-
get audiences - from end users
through to the Board of Direc-
tors. For effective communica-
tion, messages must be tailored
to each audience.

2. Identify the key messages
and themes to convey. For

. example, a solid infrastructure ©

produces value etc

3. Brand IT. IT projects and
services have been found to be
far more interesting to business
people when they have a mean-
ingful and memorable brand

. hame

4. Consistent interaction and

‘communication. Develop a

strategy of regular face-to-face
activities with the business ..

5. Publish. Develop a strate-
gy of print vehicles that will
carry your messages to the
business.

6. Track service: levels.
Understand IT’s performance
and communicate the.good
with the bad goth EM

\

Business people are not psy-
chic. Without a consistent mar-
keting campaign, IT’s value
and achievements will remain
under the radar or be swamped .
by the business’s focus on IT
issues. Marketing and com-
munications are an essential
part of doing business, particu-
larly in an environment where
IT is largely misunderstood. _

To provide feedback on this
column, please e-mail Makin-
glTwork@providencetg.com

About the Author:

Caroline Moncur is manager,
business development at Prov-
idence Technology Group. Ms
Moncur has over 10 years’ busi-
ness development experience,
primarily within the Informa-
tion Technology industry. Prov-
idence Technology Group is
one of the Bahamas’ leading
IT firms, specialising in net-
working solutions, consulting
and advisory services.and soft- -
ware solutions.

Harbour Island extends —

the Bahamas’ ‘hot strea

HARBOUR Island has been

2005 SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAMME

KPMG is currently accepting applications for its 2005 scholarship programme.:
This programme provides financial support for students attending Bahamian
and North American Colleges with the career goal of becoming Certified Public ©

Accountants.

The scholarship will be awarded to a deserving Bahamian student with
outstanding scholastic achievement. Interested candidates should submit a
cover letter, resume, school transcripts and at least two recommendations to
KPMG, Human Resources Manager, P.O. Box N 123, Nassau, Bahamas.

AUDIT ¢ TAX ¢ ADVISORY

©2005, KPMG, a Bahamian partnership, the Bahamian member firm of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved.

BIS!

Pricing Information As Of:



Abaco Markets




Benchmark

Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson










0:42, BND Holdin

98.00 ABDAB




Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Bahamas Waste

Commonwealth Bank
Doctor's Hospital

Freeport Concrete
Kerzner International BDRs

12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.35 aes Holdings




















Bid $
12.25

Ei eer



Fund Name
Colina,Money Market Fund

1.240183"

2.3657 2.0018 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.3657 ***
§ 10.4330 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.4330*****
2.2528 2.1164 Colina MS! Preferred Fund 2.252768**

1.0510

1.1200



Colina Bond Fund

MLL ES

1.120044****



BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

Colina

Financial Advisors Ltd.










2b

ranked as the best island in the
Caribbean by Travel + Leisure

' magazine, following the recent
‘ ‘rating of its beaches as being

among the top.10 in the world

. by Caribbean Travel & Life
Magazine.

In its 10th annual poll, Trav-
el + Leisure’s readers ranked
Harbour Island as the
Caribbean leader on the
World’s Best Cities and Islands
list.

The award was received
from Travel + Leisure on the
Minister of Tourism’s behalf
by Basil Smith, director of com-
munications in the Ministry of
Tourism, at a reception in New
York City on July 14, 2005.

“This recent recognition is
just one of the many interna-
tional awards Harbour Island
has received over the years. We
consider this island one of our
gems within the Islands Of The
Bahamas,” Ms Walkine said.

“What’s even more reward-
ing is the fact that this designa-

tion was awarded by the read- .








GG





0.00%!
3.91%
5.12%
1.25%
4.29%
4.35%
2.82%
2.73%
4.66%!
0.00%
5.83%
4.77%
4.34%!
5.57%
0.00%
4.20%
6.75%








7.25%
7.80%
0.00%



6.93%





og

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price





@ DIRECTOR of Communications at the Ministry of Tourism,
Basil Smith (centre), accepted the Travel + Leisure’s Best
Island in the Caribbean award at a lavish reception in New
York on behalf of the Minister of Tourism, Obie Wilchcombe.
Also pictured are Ellen Asmodeo, vice-president/publisher,
Travel + Leisure (\eft) and Nancy Novogrod, editor-in-chief,

Travel + Leisure

ers of Travel + Leisure, who
would have based their deci-
sion on visits to our beautiful
island.”

Briland’s win extends a hot
streak for the Bahamas in some of
the most widely read magazines
on the globe.

Travel + Leisure’s (circula-
tion 965,000) November 2004
cover asked: What’s Hot Now?
Answer: The Bahamas. The
islands of the Bahamas were

named THE HOT ISLAND
for 2004 by Condé Nast Trav-
eler (circualtion:780,000) in the
magazine’s annual Hot List.

With the hottest islands in
the world, the Bahamas were a
perfect backdrop for the 2005
Sports Illustrated swimsuit
issue. Andros and Exuma
appeared on the cover and
across 11 pages of the issue
perused annually by 59 million
readers.



NOTICE

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
INVITES TENDERS

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA invites tenders for the b

purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel of land being Lot #140, Coral Vista
Subdivision situated in the Western District on the Island of New ff
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas. Situated thereon is Vacant Land.

Property Size: 7,200 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale in a Mortgage d
FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED. }

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Loan Collection Centre,
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “tender 2563” ff

8 All offers must be received by the closed of business 4:00 pm, §f
Friday 29th, July 2005.

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

** - AS AT JUNE. 30, 2005/ **** - AS AT MAY. 31, 2005

*-AS AT JULY 1, 2005/ *** - AS AT JUNE. 30, 2005/ ***** AS AT JUNE. 30, 2005


THE TRIBUNE

Hotel employee wages

THURSDAY, JULY 21, cucr... a



higher in Family Islands

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE average weekly wage
for hotel industry workers in
Grand Bahama and the Family
Islands was slightly higher than
that received by their compa-
triots on New Providence, com-
ing in 2.4 per cent more at $343
compared to $335.

The revelation, contained in
the Department of Statistics
survey of occupations and
wages in’the hotel sector for
2003,.was not explained.

Tou rism (From Page 1B)

impact on the tourism industry.

He, added, though that the
negative reaction before an offi-
cial announcement is made
could create a problem where
there is none, with members of
the public speculating on what is
to occur.

"We do not expect any
adverse affect unless the reac-
tion takes place before an
announcement is made. We
have to remember that mem-
bers of the Government also
live and work in this econo-
my...they are not going to do
anything to the detriment of the
economy,” Mr Smith said.

He added that the increased
fees would be used to maintain
airport facilities, and would also
finance the implementation of
increased security measures

However, the higher wages
for hotel industry workers in
Grand Bahama and the Family
Islands are likely to be
explained because resorts needs
to pay higher salaries to entice
workers to locations that lack
all the attractions and ameni-
ties of New Providence.

The cost of living is also like-
ly to be higher in the Family
Islands, with prices pushed up
due to the fact that goods are in
relatively scarce supply when
compared to Nassau.

The survey, which received

being demanded by the US gov-

- ernment for all ports of entry

to the Bahamas.

The Ministry of Transport is
also expected to engage the avi-
ation sector in discussions
before the formal roll-out of the
new fees, scheduled for October
1, 2005.

Bahamian pilots were said to
be incensed over a proposal to
increase pilot fees, suggesting
that such a move would cripple

their business and possibly open

the door for hackers in unsafe
planes.

The proposed new fees would
include an increase in landing
fees from $8 to $18, licence

renewal fees from $200 to

$1,250 and permits from $500
to $1,200, one private pilot said.
The fee increases are seen as

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
LEPTON INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Séction 137(8).of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, the dissolution of LEPTON INVESTMENTS
PTE. LTD., has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore

been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

BATTERSEN OCEAN
INVESTMENTS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, the dissolution of BATTERSEN OCEAN

information from 50 per cent of
the hotels operating in the
Bahamas during 2003, found
that the average wage for the
entire industry fell slightly com-
pared to 2002, dropping by $11
or 3.2 per cent to $336 from
$347 the year before.

Both male arfd female hotel
workers worked an average of
39 hours per week, but. the aver-
age weekly wage for men was
higher than that paid to women
“in all major occupational
groups” except for so-called
‘Professionals’, where it was the

coming at a particularly sensi-
tive time given the ever increas-
ing price of aviation fuel due to
the volatile world oil markets.
Archie Nairn, permanent sec-
retary at the Ministry of Trans-
port, said Glenys Hanna-Mar-
tin, minister of transport and
aviation, announced the change
in air navigational fees during
her contribution to the



~ While in former year

opportunities, the rece t touri
thai

same. .
For male hotel employees, in
2003 the largest weekly wage
increase of $23 occurred among
skilled agriculture and fisheries
workers, while the greatest
decrease of $24 was recorded
forclerks.

Women senior officials and
managers saw a $71 weekly
wage increase in 2003, though,
although women plant and
machine operators saw their
pay decrease by an average of
$48.

The increase in pay for



2005/2006 budget debate and
they were included in the
Appropriations Bill which that
tabled in the House of Assem-
bly. The private charter and
pilot business is a key aspect of
the Bahamian tourism industry,
with these professionals able to
bring in groups to various des-
tinations in the Family Islands,

’ boosting local economies.



women senior hotel officials and
managers helped push the aver-
age weekly wage for both sexes
employed in this category to

$874, an increase of $40 over

2002. This increase was higher
than for all other occupational
groups working in the hotel
industry.

The Department of Statistics
report said: “In 2003, when
compared to 2002 the average
wage for males was lower in all
but one of the occupational
groups.

However, for females it was
higher in five of the nine major
occupational groups.”

&

Temple Christian Hligh

“Teach Me, 0 Lord, Thy Way”

School

Palin 19:33

Shirley Street

TEACHING VACANCIES

Invites applications from qualified Christian teachers
for the following positions for the 2005-2006 school

year.

Health Science (Gr. 7-9)
General Science (Gr.7-9)-

Applicants must:

A. Beapracticing born- -again Christian who is willing
to subscribe to the Statement of Faith of Temple

Christian School..

Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or higher -
from a recognized College or University in the area

’ of specialization.

Have a valid Teacher’s Certificate or Diploma.
Have at least two year teaching experience in the
relevant subject area with excellent communication

skills.

Applicants must have the ability to prepare students
for all examinations to the BJC/BGCSE levels.
Be willing to participate in the high school’s extra

curricular programmes.

Application must be picked up at the high school office
on Shirley Street and be returned with a full curriculum
vitae, recent coloured photograph and three references

to:

Mr Neil Hamilton
The Principal
_Jemple Christian High School |
P:0. Box N-1566:°~ *
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is August 1st 2005





We are the Caribbean’s largest publicly traded bank, serving over 4 million customers in 16 countries.
We manage over 500,000 active accounts, with over 3,000 staff, 60 branches and a total balance sheet
of USD8bn.

FirstCaribbean is seeking two Risk Management leaders with experience in large, full-service
international banks with operations in multiple countries and Regulatory jurisdictions.

Both positions report to the Chief Risk Officer and are currently based in Barbados.

Head, Operational Risk







Framework.

Responsibilities:

¢ Be responsible for the development of FirstCaribbean’s policy
and strategy for the management of Operational Risk, and
develop and maintain effective supporting tools and services to
be used across the business. P

e Evolve and manage the Operational Risk Management

¢ Provide the methodology, tools and management information
infrastructure to enable the business to carry out Operational

Experience and Expertise required:

To be considered for this role, candidates must

demonstrate solid Operational Risk leadership experience.

In addition, as a result of a series of progressive related
assignments, you have achieved expert-level ability and a

track record of success in the following:
e Embedding Operational Risk policies and procedures

across a large, international, full-service Bank operating
in multiple sovereign states.

INVESTMENTS LTD., has been completed; a Certificate
.. of: Dissolution has been. issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.









Effective at translating and communicating risk profiles
to and winning support of Executive, Board and other
key stakeholders.

Engaging Line-of-Business leaders and influencing the
adoption time of risk mitigating practices.

Leading, managing and developing teams of senior
specialists.

Risk Assessments. _e
° Work with the business lines to bring risk within acceptable
levels and to ensure that matters of compliance with regards to
FirstCaribbean’s operating policies ‘ are strictly adhered to °
throughout the organisation.
¢ Work with senior management to create and maintain °
FirstCaribbean’s Business Continuity Plans.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Head, Market Risk

Responsibilities:

e Establish and maintain internal control and corporate
governance frameworks encompassing policies,
procedures and limits for measuring, monitoring and
controlling Market Risk.

e Accurately identify, assess and measure Market Risk
exposures and provide analytic input on Market Risks to
inform asset/liability management decisions.

e Develop the Market Risk limits framework and risk
measurement models that support business strategies
within.risk tolerance of the bank and recommend risk
tolerance of the bank for approval by Management and
Board.

e Conduct market event impact analysis/assessment and
develop recommendations for follow-up action.

e Identify and assess Market Risks embedded in proposed

new financial products.













Experience and Expertise required:

To be considered for this role, candidates must demonstrate

solid Market Risk leadership experience. In addition, as a result

of a series of progressive related assignments, you have
achieved expert-level ability in the following:

e Banking products and market experience — Retail,
Corporate and Treasury (10 years either in Trading, Trading
Operations and/or Market Risk Management). :

¢ Methodologies for quantifying and analysing trading and
retail banking market risks (a degree in risk management
or statistics is useful, but not mandatory).

e Data extraction from multiple source banking systems and
building of MI databases.

e Presentations to Management / Boards that explain
complex, technical information in simple business terms to
enable transparent understanding and assessment of risks.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
SEBAS MANAGEMENT LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-namied
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 20th

Applications with detailed résumés should be submitted
no later than July 29, 2005 to:

day of July, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., of
P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

Rosemary Jones

Executive Administrative Assistant
FirstCaribbean International Bank

Head Office

Warrens, St. Michael

Barbados

Email: Rosemary.Jones@firstcaribbeanbank.com

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator) oa
Caribbean Pride. Internatlonal Strength. Your Financial Partner.

. it i i i i f Be i
Only applicants who are short-listed will be contacted. FirstCaribbean International Bank is an Associated Company of Barclays Bank PLC and CIBC.




FAG Oo, iniBHSDAY, JULY 21, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



Tourism must be ‘top priority’

ALL Bahamian and Caribbean nationals
must make the tourism business their “top
priority” because of its economic impor-
tance to the region, the Bahamas’ former
tourism director-general said.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, who is now
the Caribbean Tourism Organisation’s

_(CTO) secretary- general, said: “As a result
of tourism’s €cotiomic impact om the ‘tiveli-
hood of people in the Caribbean, we must
stress the importance of making tourism a
top priority from the heads of state down to
individual residents in their homes. Tourism
should be present in every facet of our lives.

“We must educate our children about
careers in tourism and adequately train

NOTICE is hereby given that NALINI MOHAN OF P.O. BOX
N-9841, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 21TH day of JULY, 2005 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

gets.”

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT (No. 45 of 2000)

-GAYNOR HOLDINGS LIMITED

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of
2000), GAYNOR HOLDINGS LIMITED, is in Dissolution.

The date of commencement of dissolution is 7th day of
February, 2005.

Westquay Limited,

P.O. Box 204, 4th floor,
Celtic House, Victoria Street,
Douglas, Isle of Man
IM99 1QZ
Liquidator



_ NOTICE

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA _
~ INVITES FENDERS” ~~

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA invites tenders for the
purchase of the following:
t *

t

“ALL THAT piece parcel of land being Lot No. 16 A, Sandilands

‘Allotment situated in the Eastern District of the Island of New

Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas

situated thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting of 4

bedrooms, 2 bathrooms with a Duplex Apartment consisting of
B it-= 3 bedrooms,-2 bathrooms, 1---2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom.

Property Size: 32,670 sq. ft. Total Land
Building Size: 2,375 sq. ft. Dwelling
Apartment Size: 1,949 Duplex

{This property is being sold under Power of Sale in a Mortgage
(FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

fAll offers should be forwarded in writing in a séaled envelope,
saddressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Loan Collection Centre,
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “tender 0881”
*All offers must be received by the closed of business 4:00 pm,
pe 29th, we 2005.



employees already working in the indus-
try. We must capture the attention of our
politicians so that they make tourism a pri-
ority on their agendas and in their bud-

Tourism accounts for an estimated one in
four jobs throughout the region, and is
_Tesponsible -on_average-for- amore than 30°-~
“per cent of each country’s gross national
product. Speaking on the theme for the
CTO’s 28th annual Caribbean Tourism
Conference, to be held in the US Virgin
Islands from October 21-26, Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace said: “We’re focusing pri-
marily on the business of tourism at this
year’s Caribbean Tourism Conference



because our industry plays a vital role in the
economic stability of the Caribbean region.”

The conference programme will offer site
inspections and niche market workshops
for travel agents, the popular Travel +
Leisure Youth Congress, the Condé Nast

~Fravéel Game, the Travel Writers/Photog-
raphers Awards programme, the CTO press
conference and the closing gala.

The conference is the Caribbean region’s
premier caucus of tourism decision-mak-
ers and an important event on the calendar
of tourism practitioners, as well as individ-
uals seeking to do business with the
Caribbean.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LOUBERT JEAN BAPTISTE, ALLEN
DRIVE, P.O.BOX N-805, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for. Nationality and Citizenship, for

registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21ST day of. JULY,
2005 to the Minister responsible for ene and OECD:

P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas...



Legal Notice
NOTICE

FOXLEIGH LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) FOXLEIGH LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on 19th July, 2005 —
when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and registered by
the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Andrew Ramage of Helvetia
Court, South pePenadys St Peter Port, Guemsey GY1 4EE.

Dated this.21st day of July, A.D., 2005.

Andrew Ramage
Liquidator





uN OTICE

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
‘INVITES "TENDERS

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA invites tenders for the
purchase of the following: ‘

“ALL THAT piece parcel of land being Lot #6, Block #6,
Ridgeland Park in situated in Ceritral District of the Island of New
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting
of 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom.

Property Size: 4,200 sq. ft.
Building Size: 966.68 sq. ft.

‘This property is being sold under Power of Sale in a Mortgage
FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Loan Collection Centre,
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “tender 2308”

All offers must be received ge the closed of business 4: 00 pm,
Aj Friday 29th, July 2005... an Sgeomgeteeeste a





NOTICE

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
=e INVITES TENDERS.

RA ER Ta ia a ea






—

finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders for the
purchase of the following:

Laut THAT piece parcel of land being Lot north of Farrington

fRoad, situated in Western Discrict of the Island of New Providence
oe of the islands of the Commonwealth of the. Bahamas. Situated
piesa is Vacant Land.

Property Size: 4,505 sq. ft.

t
?
4
6
é
sAll offers should be in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed to
ithe Manager, Royal Bank Collection Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
iNassau, Bahamas and marked “tender 0341”. All offers must be
areceived by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 29th Jully, 2005.
‘
E
if
é
3
A
,




EO kr



New and ultra modern four storey building For more. laformation

2108 sq. ft. of office space available

Idyllically located on the Montagu Foreshore, with sea view
Ample parking for staff and clients

Fully automated security system

Full standby generator

Exercise Room
Rental space now available for commencement of interior build-out




-Mouitagu Foreshore, East Bay Street

contact L. Maycock at 322-8571-9

NOTICE

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
INVITES TENDERS

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA invites tenders for the
purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel of land: being Lot on the northern side
of Sandilands Village road situated in the Eastern District of the
Island of New Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas. Situated is Triplex Apartment consisting each of
(2) bedroom, (1) bathroom.

Property Size: 10,320 sq. ft.
Building: 2,700 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale in a Mortgage
FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Loan Collection Centre,
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “tender 2261”
All offers must be received by the closed of business 4:00 pm,
Friday 29th, July 2005.










Artist’s rendition of Ocean Centre

Essay Competition, the. Great.Caribbean.





















@ VINCENT VANDERPOOL-WALLACE

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that. EDLIN LOUIS, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, .and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight. days from the 21ST day of JULY,
2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

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Please be advised that the Nassau Office of

PRICEWATERHOUSE(COPERS

WILL BE
CLOSED

on
Friday, 22 July 2005
to allow staff to enjoy their

Annual Fun Day.
“We regret any inconvenience ~
this may cause.

Normal working hours will resume
on Monday, 25 July 2005.


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005, PAGE 5B



National Congress of Trade Unions presses

for amendments to labour legislation



FROM page IB

Government “has not seen fit
to introduce or send draft leg-
islation through the trade
union movement dealing with
the Employment Act, Mini-
mum Wage Act, the Industrial
Relations Act and the Health
and Safety Act, so we can have
the amendments approved and
them moved into the House".

NCTU officials want the
Government to implement a
number of changes to the
country's labour laws, includ-
ing:

* Increasing the minimum
wage from $150 to $250-per
week.

* Amending the Health and
Safety Act to introduce a level
of enforceability. The Act cur-
rently speaks about supervi-
sors and fines, but Mr Bain
said that to date no one has
been hired to enforce the Act.

* Amending the Employ-
ment Act to address the ques-
tion of how wages are quali-

Wealth (From page 1B)

was a “continuing trend of ratio-
nalisation in the number of off-
shore centres being. used by
wealth managers”.

In response to the survey’s
question on whether they
planned to “rationalise the
number of offshore centres in
which you operate in the next
three years”, some 14 per cent

of the European-based finan-.

cial institutions and other inter-
mediaries that responded said
this was.indeed their intention.

Out of the Americas and
Asia-Pacific survey respondents,
7 per cent and 20 per cent
respectively confirmed that they
were set to consolidate the
number of international finan-
cial centres they used for pri-
vate banking and wealth man-
agement operations.

_ The survey’s findings are par-
ticularly important:for the
Bahamian financial services
industry, given that it is reliant
on private wealth management
for its market niche and com-
petitive edge.

However, Michael Paton, the
Bahamas Financial Services
Board’s (BFSB) deputy chair-
man, yesterday told The Tri-
bune that’ the Bahamas
appeared to have so far been a
net beneficiary of the ongoing
consolidation, although it need-
ed to maintain its market posi-
tion.

“It certainly is a concern,” Mr
Paton said of the consolidation
trends, “but so far we’ve been
fortunate to have benefited
from them rather than been
adversely impacted.

He pointed to the decisions
of both Banco Santander and
UBS - two traditional ‘giants’
in the global financial services
and private banking markets -
to consolidate their private
client operations from the Cay-
man Islands to the Bahamas as
evidence of this.

Mr Paton, who is an attorney |

and partner in the Lennox
Paton law firm, said: “They are
some examples of us being a
net:gainer out of it so far, but
we'still need to be concerned.

“Obviously, we need to main- -

tain our position as a viable off-
shore centre for these groups.”

Mr Paton said the leading
financial services institutions
were eyeing a strategy where
they had a ‘single presence’ in
regions such as the Far East and
Western Hemisphere.

“Our challenge is to be that

Western Hemisphere pres-
ence,” he said.
_ Mr Paton added that the
Bahamas would also have: to
monitor developments in the
Channel Islands, Singapore and
Dubai, which was also target-
ing financial services.

John Delaney, the FNM Sen-
ator and attorney who advised
the then-government on its 2000
‘blacklisting’ response, said the
key was for the Bahamas to
continue “to be relevant” to the
needs of high-net worth and
ultra high-net worth clients.

He added that ongoing con-
solidation among international
financial centres was nothing
new, the process having been
ongoing for the past five years.
Already, smaller players such
as Grenada and Antigua & Bar-
buda had been effectively
forced out of the market, due
to the increased costs in com-
plying with international best
practices and regulatory stan-
dards. Other factors were also
in play.

fied.

Union officials want the
Government to move what
they see as a “discriminatory”
clause that outlines how wages
are considered. The current
definition omits commissions
and gratuities as a type of
wage.

Mr Bain said that because
of how the Employment Act
is worded, when workers are
terminated employers do not
have to consider the gratuities
and commissions they received
as wages when working out
severance pay.

Mr Bain said the Act was in
contradiction to the National
Insurance Act, which does
include this segment of earn-
ings under the wage category.

The NCTU also wants to
remove certain restrictions
from the Industrial Relations
Act that address the timeframe
for unions to report to the min-

. ister for recognition.

Mr Bain, who called on the

Mr Delaney said that for the
Bahamian financial services sec-
tor to prosper in the private
client market, the cost and qual-
ity of its products had to exceed
those of its competitors. Product
innovation and keeping pace
with regulatory moves was also
required.

The Higgs & Johnson attor-
ney said he “can see happen-
ing” a situation where the

"With the rising cost of living,

a person making $150 a week
cannot make it. The Government
said it's worker friendly, but since

becoming the Government they
have not made any attempt to
make legislation that is worker
friendly, but they are quick to
change legislation for big
business... We have appealed to
the Government, we've sent in
proposals on changes, but |
nothing happens. They cannot
carry this into the New Year."

Bahamas could become the pti- :

vate wealth management hub
for the Western Hemisphere,
with Cayman Islands becoming
the investment fund and insti-
tutional destination of choice.
Bermuda would maintain its
place as the insurance hub.

“T think that to the extent
some offshore centres might be
taken out of the mainstream of
choice for intermediaries, it

— NCTU president Pat Bain ©

would always be a concern of
the Bahamas to be among those

' selected by intermediaries for

their clients,” Mr Delaney said.

He added that the Bahamas,
having focused: on the private
client market through its pri-
vate banking and trust products,
was “certainly ideally placed”
to benefit from the ongoing
consolidation.

And those traditional asset

GN - 236

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER
AND MINISTRY OF NATIONAL SECURITY

POLICE DEPARTMENT

Notice

Members of the public are hereby advised that the services of the Royal Bahamas
Police Force Band will not be available for the period of August 2nd to September
26th 2005, as the Band will be involved with Tourism Promotional exercises outside
of the country and will also be proceeding on vacation leave eR MeLy following

such exercise.

The Royal Bahamas Police Force Band apologizes for any inconvenience as a result |
of this very important exercise.

Cay, Long Island.

of:



Commissioner of Police



Royal Bahamas Police Force.

Mr. Michael J. Symonette
President & CEO
Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
John F. Kennedy Drive
Nassau, Bahamas

TENDER NOTICE

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. wishes to invite
tenders for construction of its Customer Service Building in Deadman’s

Interested companies may collect a tender specification from the
office of the Vice President/ Planning & Engineering in BTC’s
administrative building on John F. Kennedy Drive or at BTC’s office
in Deadman’s Cay, Long Island, between the hours of 9:00a.m. and
5:00p.m. Monday through Friday. .

Tenders are to be in a sealed envelope marked “TENDER FOR
CUSTOMER SERVICE BUILDING” and delivered to the attention

All tenders must be received by 5:00pm on Friday, July 29, 2005.
Tenders received after this date will not be considered.

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.



Government to move post-
haste to table the necessary
amendments, said through
these changes the NCTU was
looking for increased equity in
the country's labour laws, a
fairer distribution of profits for
workers, greater respect from
employers for the efforts of
their employees and respect
from government for the work-
ers of the nation.

He added that while the
business sector continues to
rail about the level of produc-
tivity, it continued to make
profits. As a result of the Gov-
ernment's lack of action, Mr
Bain said the apparent view
developing among members of
the labour movement is that
the Government is taking them
for granted.

He said further that union
officials want something done
about the compendium of leg-
islation, and are prepared to
look at any available gptions:if
the Government failed to

. protection and estate planning

product have been supple-
mented with new legislation
that has introduced purpose
trusts, foundations and the
SMART fund.

Mr Delaney, though,
acknowledged that the
Bahamas had some ground to

- make up on the Cayman Islands

in terms of establishing rela-
tionships with the intermedi-

address the matter.

"With the rising cost of liv-
ing, a person making $150 a
week cannot make it. The
Government said it's worker
friendly, but since becoming
the Government they have not
made any attempt to make leg-
islation that is worker friendly,
but they are quick to change
legislation for big business,”
Mr Bain said. “We have
appealed to the Government,
we've sent in proposals on
changes, but nothing happens. '
They cannot carry this into the |
New Year."

Mr Bain said NCTU officials:
have made their concerns,
known to labour minister Vin-,
cent Peet and Prime Minister:
Perry Christie, but have heard:
nothing in return, except that:
there is a standing committee:
on labour. He pointed out that
this committee has been in-
operation for three years and
nothing has been done to
address the unions’ concerns.



aries that acted for wealthy pri-

vate clients and played a key
role in directing where their
business went.

He also warned that the
British Virgin Islands was look-
ing at making inroads into the
Bahamas’ private wealth man-
agement market share, while
Panama posed an even greater
threat due to its “broader”
product offering.

Tad nal

for 24 apartment condominium on Cable Beach.
References and business experience essential.

The Tribune Limited
DA 3864

P.O. Box N 3207
Nassau, Bahamas

“Please reply to:

UAE alias Located
In The Bahamas

Seeks the following professionals to join our team. Must be self motivated and
willing to be flexible and work various assigned work shifts and have ‘good
communication skills. In our employees, we look for a passion to anticipate and
meet our guests needs and an insatiable desire to attain the highest levels of quality
and guest service. All applicants in the first instant are asked to forward their
application letter with resume, photo and two previous employment references to:

privatedestinations@yahoo.com or mail to: Private Destinations, P.O. Box
CR54697

CLOSING DATE FOR ALL APPLICATIONS: July 24th 2005

GARDNER

Must possess a very good knowledge of the science of growing and maintaining
flowers, plants, shrubs, trees and lawns. Minimum three-years experience and /or
training in related field. Good understanding of landscape planning. Ability to read
and interpret English. Ability to apply common sense understanding to carry out
written or oral instructions. Responsibilities including watering, planting and
maintaining plants, flowers, shrubs, trées and lawns. A knowledge of the use of
chemicals and pesticides would be an advantage.

HOUSEKEEPING SUPERVISOR

Responsible for the maids and houseman assigned to Housekeeping and Laundry
duties. Works closely with the Resort manager to coordinate all Housekeeping and
Laundry cleaning tasks and assignments. This includes but is not limited to:
Purchasing of cleaning and Laundry materials, monitoring all inventories, cleanliness
of all interior and public spaces, setting up appropriate task lists, inspecting guest

rooms and provide on the Job training where and whenever needed. This is a very
hand’s on position. Minimum of 1-year hotel experience in a similar position and
excellent communication skills.

GENERAL MAINTENANCE

Reporting to the Property Manager we seek a general. maintenance individual who
will check and makes repairs to heating, ventilation and air condition systems as
needed. Checks and makes repairs to heating, ventilation and air conditioning
systems as needed. Checks and makes repairs to plumbing systems and fixtures
such as pipe lines, toilets and sinks, kitchen and Jaundry equipment. Checks and
makes repairs to electrical systems such as lighting systems, television sets and
kitchen equipment. Performs repairs to building, furniture, bathrooms, guest rooms
etc., as needed; may perform painting tasks. Ensures that all equipment is functioning
properly and that preventive maintenance measures are performed to preserve the
resort and keep product quality to standard.

MESSAGE THERAPIST
Young professional required. Must have proven experience and certification. Must
be willing to work a very flexible schedule. :

SPECIAL EVENT COORDINATOR/ADMINISTRATOR
Assist in coordinating special events on site. This will involve event planning and
program design, communication with guests and preparation of all communication
associated with events. You will also be expected to be on-site on the day of each
event and coordinate throughout the duration of the event to ensure that the program
runs smoothly from beginning to end. Superior written communication and
intérpersonal skills required. Promptly prepare responses to incoming requests. !
Must be proficient in MS Office. Capable of coordinating several projects and
responsibilities with ease. Must have good typing skills: able to type at least 45‘
w.p.m. accurately. Able to work well independently and as part of a team. Must
be well organized and detail-oriented. Experience in general office duties such as
filling, correspondence, mail, faxing, etc. .

NIGHT DUTY SUPERVISOR

Duties include but not limited to: Monitor and execute evening entertainment,
security of the property and closing procedures. Should possess basic knowledge
of audio and home theatre systems and proven experience within the hospitality
industry. This is a hand’s on multi task position.

GENERAL WORKERS
Required to undertake a multitude of tasks to maintain and upkeep all exterior
areas of the resort.

OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR/RECEPTION
Superior written and oral communication and interpersonal skills required. Excellent
telephone etiquette required. Promptly prepare responses to incoming requests.
Must be proficient in MS Office. Capable of coordinating several projects and
responsibilities with ease. Must have good typing skills: able to type at least 45
w.p.m. accurately. Able to work well independently and as part of a team. Must
he well organized and detail-oriented. Experience in general office duties such as
filing, correspondence, mail, faxing, etc.


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, JULY 21,2005



VACANCY FOR SENIOR COUNSEL
OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL
CRIMINAL SIDE

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for

appointment as Senior Counsel in the Office of the Attorney General, in the -

Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

Applicants must. be members of the English, Irish, Scottish or
Bahamian Bar or the Bar of any country of The Commonwealth to which a
member of The Bahamas Bar is. admitted without examination. In addition,
they must have had at least five (5) years standing at the Bar or have

_enrolled and have. practiced as a Solicitor for at least fiye (5) yee in the
BPOVE: mentioned countries without e examination. ae

~The ‘duties of the post include: oe titel ae : BN

= 1 "general advice to all Government Departments,
me Ministries and Public Corporations:

ae “carrying out legal researchy.

5 ee oie cxininalie matters i in nthe = Mapiotates Court and
the Supreme Court, and appellate (criminal) matters in
the Court of Appeal and the Judicial Committee of the
Privy Council;

4. | gener advice to the Police on the institution of charged
"and Prosecutions; |

5, Such other matters as may be assigned bya the Director of

ane Public Prosecutions.

as, Prosecutions...

Sota, The appointment will be on n permanent and, pensionable or ¢ contractual a
a fers if-a’ citizen: ‘of The. Bahamas i is: appointed; “or on. contractual terms ifa
“not ahamian is fepomted: an the case. of: a. contractual appointment He eee



VACANCY FOR SENIOR COUNSEL
_ OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL
CIVIL SIDE

Applications, are. invited from. suitably qualified persons for
appointment as Senior Counsel in the Office. of the Attorney General, in the
‘Commonwealth of The Bahamas. ae

Applicants. must: be members of the. ‘English, Irish, Scottish or

: Bahamian Bar. or the Bar of any country of The Cormmonwealth to which a-

-meémber of The Bahamas Bar is admitted. without examination. In addition, |
-. they must have had at least five: (5). years, standing at the Bar or have
ae, ‘enrolled and. have practiced asa Solicitor for’ at least five 6) years in the
cts above- mentioned countries without examination.

“The duties of the post include: ; a



. eee “general advice | to; all Government Departments,
~~" ~ “Ministries and Public Corporations;

oe: carrying out legal research;
3. conducting civil ‘matters in Pee "Magistrates Court,
Supreme Court, Court of Appeal and the Judicial
Committee. of the Pevy: Council; .

i AL : advice on public s service matters; Ze me ate ERS

3. wi? sith Sale matters as : may b be assigned byt the Director of f :

ees Legal Affairs.




o Airs.










” The

: Satisfactory completion of service.






| (242)328-7 -7798 no later than the e298 July 2005.

The successful applicant wall be sine to the Director of Publi

The successful applicant will be :assigned to ) the Director of Legal os

a ppointment will be on permanent: aid pensionable or échtiactial. .
terms if a citizen of The Bahamas is. appointed; ‘or on contractual terms ifa
on-Bahamian ‘is appointed. :. _In:the case of a. contractual appointment a fa Be a
"gratuity: of ’ fifteen ‘percent: (15%). basic. salary. would be > Eevee ° on. the 0 Bo gratuity: of fifteen: ‘percent (15%) of basic ‘alary would be ele: on the: oe
Pree es bape sahetaciory Completion of's service: © kas ie a

sis ‘The slay 0 of the Post is in n Seale B95440 x 700 - $50, 200 per. aa

= ats

annuri,’

umes. abn “with “copies: go et
‘Office of the Attorney General at

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS.

GN - 239

VACANCY FOR CHIEF COUNSEL
OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL
CRIMINAL SIDE

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for.
appointment as Chief Counsel in the Office of the Attorney General, in the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

Applicants must be members of the English, Irish, Scottish or
Bahamian Bar or. the Bar of a country of The Commonwealth to which a

~ member of The Bahamas Bar is admitted without examination. In addition, —
they must have had at least seven (7) years standing at the Bar or have» '
enrolled and have practiced as a Solicitor for at least seven Q) years in. the thy

. above- mentioned countries without examination.

‘The duties of the post include:

_1.>” general advice to ane ‘Govéininent: Departments; &
i ae ‘Ministries and Public Corporations; BR ee
aD ee ‘carrying out legal fesearshi as necessary;
3. prosecuting criminal’ matters in the Magistrates Court
and the Supreme Court, and appellate (criminal) matters
_ in the Court of Appeal and the Judicial Committee of the
Privy Council;

4. general advice to the Police on the institution ae charges
~ and PIEPeUn ONS,

5...” such other matters as ey be assignhd by. the Director of
ee Public Prosecutions.

" Succeaafil applicants will be signed ¢ to ‘the Director of Public :

“ ~ Prosecutions. =

The appointrient will bé on permanent. and pensionable or: coritractnal af ee

a ms . terms ifa citizen of The Bahamas is appointed; or on- contractual terms; if a at
ae NOR -Bahamian is. appointed. . Inthe casé of a contractual ‘appointment. Boas]
' ooo gratuity: of: fifteen percent. (15%) of basic salary would 1 be Payable ‘on. nthe:
an sarisfacibny completion of si service. ae oi oe



. he's slay © of the Post is Seale wu $50; 300 x 700 ‘$54,300 er



i General at (242) 325-7798 vee later that the ere uly 2005,

VACANCY FOR CHIEF COUNSEL .
_ OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL
one CIVEL SIDE

_ Applications are.- invited from. suitably. qualified persons for —
appointment as Chief Counsel in the Office of. the saad General, in the .

: eee cate of The Bahamas.

- Applicants... rriust be members of. the English, Irish, Scottish or.
Bahamian: Bar or. the Bar of a country: of The Commonwealth to which a:

“member of The Bahamas: Bar is admitted without examination. In addition, ”
they must have had ‘at least seven (7) years standing at the Bar or have

enrolled and have. practiced as.a Solicitor for at least seven Hy years in the ia :

aN above-mentioned, countries without examination.

“The duties of the Beet ineluge>

a igs oy geniéial ” “gavide” 18° “a” Civctninent: ‘Departments, . i
Ministriés and Public Corporations; —

2 carrying out legal research as necessary;
3. conducting civil matters in “the Magistrates Court,
; Supreme Court, Court of Appeal and the Judicial
Committee of the bevy’ eouncil

AL advice on public service matters;

5: -. such other matters as. may: b fe Bape by the Director of
oo Legal Affairs. : ;

Successful applicants wil be “assigned to the Director of Legal 3

The appointment t will be on permaiient and 4 pensionable, or : dohtiractual ah

aS ‘ee if-a citizen. of The Bahamas is appointed; or on contractual.terms ifa’:
Ton Bahamian is appointed. In the case of a contractual appointment -a

a salty 0 of the post i is: + Seale. Ju 1 $50 100. x 700 $84 200 ber : “ A




qualifications to the Director of Legal Affairs, Office of the Attorney
General at (242) 325-7798 no later than the 29" July 2005.

‘Seieseatbd: -petsons - omay fa: “thet ‘Tesuimés eng ‘with’ ‘Copies ope
‘INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY
MUST SELL

MWRasme seu aie assis



THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005, PAGE 7B







RAINBOW BAY
SUBDIVISION
(ELEUTHERA)

Lot #44, Block 5, Section A. The lot
is on a hill overlooking the Atlantic
Ocean. Area is approximately 10,800
sq. ft. This site encompasses a two
# storey apartment block of two
apartments. One upstairs and one
downstairs. Each comprising one
bedroom one bathroom, front room,
dining, kitchen. There is a wooden
porch approximately 8 - 6 feet wide

=e on the upper level secured with a
weoden:handrail: The garage area has been converted into a efficiency apartment and
néw houses one bedroom/frontroom in one and one bathroom. Age: is 7 years old.
The apartments could be rented at $700 per month partly furnished. The efficiency
rented at $400 per month. — .

Appraisal: $308,402.00









































MURPHY TOWN
(ABACO)

Lot #60 with a structure, lot size

above sea level but below road
level and would flood in a severe
hurricane the duplex has
dimensions of 60. ft by 30 ft partly
of wood and _ partly of cement
blocks with one section virtually
finished and occupied with blocks
up to window level and floor ready
to be poured. The roof is asphalt
shingles, the interior walls and
ceiling are of 1x6 pine and the floor of ceramic tiles. The finished work is average/below,
2 bedrooms, one bath, living/dining. The occupied portion of the structure is not
complete. Age: 10 years old. ,

Appraisal: $80,498.00 3
‘HAMILTON’S (LONG ~
ISLAND)
Queen’s High Way, lot of land



column: and _ belt course ‘with

one bathroom; kitchen, dining, and
living room. Total living space is
‘1,237.5q. ft.,.utilities available are.
electricity, water, cable: tv and



‘telephone,

EARLY SETTLERS DRIVE
; (ELEUTHERA)

Lot #7 Early Settlers Drive, North
Eleuthera Heights, size 11,200
sq. ft., contains incomplete 3
bed, 2.5 bath, living room, dining
room, kitchen and tv room.

Appraisal: $141,716.40

RAD AWAR ARE KE
s €

Appraisal: $123,000.00 —

C0 SS RSRS

wo Heading south
4th on the left painted white trimmed green with wall in front.

iy

i





, concrete floor has not been poured as yet. The foundation is:2,511 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $43,968.75

BAHAMA CORAL ISLAND (ABACO),

under. normal conditions.

Appraisal: $8,236.00 .

DUNDAS TOWN

(ABACO), Crown Alotment #21- Vacant land 10,810.sq. ft. off
.§.C. Bottle Drive. 2 vas .

Appraisal: $26,250.00

60 x 115 ft., 6,900 sq. ft., 10 ft.,

13,547 sq. ft., dwelling. house of. .
solid concrete floors, foundation —

finished plaster. Two bedrooms, -

Appraisal: $98,057.00 _

s All that.piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 7,752 sq. ft. (77.5 x 100) situated in the southern district of
New Providence being lot No. 3 in an area known as Richville of Malcolm Road west. This property is spacious
and can probably another house at the rear. This property is spacious and can probably accomodate another
house at the rear. It is lanscaped and enclosed by a wall in front with fence on the side. The property consist
j Of a single story, 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom, living room and dining rooms, combined, family room and kitchen,
enclosed carport and a roof covered front proch (indented) with floor area of 1,374 sq. ft..

on East Street turn right onto Malcolm Road, then third corner on the right, the house is the

NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA), Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and bounded on North by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal Investment
Ltd., this is a single family zoning and 50 ft., above sea level. This site encompasses a foundation with plumbing and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry fill. The

Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is vacant and a hill over looking the Atlantic Ocean.

Lot #1, Block A, on Central Abaco. This property is vacant and is approximately 9,100 sq. ft. This property is elevated and should not flood

The property is in the southwestern portion of the Bahama Coral, Coral Island and bounded northwesterly by 60 ft. Wide Road.

BAHAMA SOUND .-(EXUMA), Lot #7088 situated in Bahama Sound, Exuma section 10 East. Great Exuma approximately 10.5 milés west of George Town lot is square in shape on
elevation of approximately 15 ft., above sea level contains 10,000 sq. ft., No adverse site conditions noted. This property is single family residence.

Property is located on the northwestern side of the Queen’s Highway, about 10.5 miles northwest of George Town.

VALENTINES EXTENSION
(NASSAU)














Lot #2 contains a 19 year old 1 1/2
storey four. plex with a floor area of
3,621 sq. ft. The two storey section
consist of a master bedroom,
bathroom.and sitting area upstairs
and two bedrooms, one bath, living,
dining, family room and kitchen
downstairs. The single storey consist
of one two bedroom, one bath
j} apartment and two efficency
apartments, land size 7,500 sq. ft.
Multi-Family zoning on flat land and
not subject to flooding.

Appraisal: $347,006.00

The subject property is located on the western side of Valentine’s Extension Road, just
over one hundred feet north. of the roadway known as Johnson Terrace. Travel east
on Bernard Road, turn left onto Adderley Street.which is opposite SAC, continue left .
at the deep bend, take first right into Johnson Terrace, go to T-junction and turn left,
then first right. Property is. second building on right, white trimmed brown.

DUNDAS TOWN (ABACO)

83 two bed, 1 bath triplex 9,000 sq.
ft., lot no. 18b with an area for a
small shop. Age 12 years the land
is a portion of one of the Dundas
Town Crown Allotment parcels
_ Stretching from Forest Drive to Front
Street, being just-under a quarter
acre in size and on the lowside. A
concrete block structure, with
asphalt shingle roof and L-shape
in:design with a total length of 70x26
ft, plus 50 x 22 ft., 2,920 sq. ft., the
H interior walls are concrete blocks,
~ ceiling is sheet rock and the floors















of vinyl tiles.

Appraisal: $220,500.00

}

| KENNEDY SUBDIVISION
~. (NASSAU)

- Lot ‘no: 21 all utilities available 10
year old single story house, 3
-- bedroom 2. bathroom, living room,
dining area, family room, kitchen,.
q .study, laundry and an entry porch.



iisal: $175,350.00.

hark vi Set valine Bye
‘Heading west along Soldier Road
take main entrance to Kennedy
Subdivision on the left, then take the
second on your right with garage.

MURPHY TOWN (ABACO)

Crown Allotment #70, singe storey

wood and concree commercial

building approximately 758 sq. ft.,
about 20 years old.




1st corner on the left then 1st right, house is

Appraisal: $71 ,946.00



_ NO. 3 LEXINGTON SUBDIVISION
oe (NASSAU) neo.








For conditions of sale and other information contact
Philip White @ 502-3077 email philip. white@scotiabank.com or

Harry Collie @ 502-3034 email harry.collie@scotiabank.com
Please visit www.fsbobahamas.com for interior photos






PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005
























LIST OF AUTHORIZED ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS
FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 2006

























THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS. ...
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THREE PHASE ELECTRICIANS
[| CNAME ——C*dT*=CiéLISENCCE. [~~~ BUSINESSNAME ~— | ADDRESS —|_—CCITY/ISLAND —s| | TELEPHONE || 14
Patrick’s Electric
Nu-Way Electric Company Ltd. 393-3558
[Alleyne,Louis——s| ThreePhase | C—“‘C;W CL iLO. Box F-40854 | Nassau, Bahamas || 646-4984
c
| Antoine, Guy Charles |ThreePhase | —C—C—“‘CCLiPO.BoxN-853 | Nassau, Bahamas || 3:41-0086 aa
Nassau, Bahamas Z|
_
[Barnett Sr. Paul —| ThreePhase | ss C—“‘(WCLWP.O. Box SS-5085 | Nassau, Bahamas | 323-4132_ 4
[Barnett Jr. Paul =| ThreePhase | —C(“‘(;! CL P.O. Box SS-5085 | Nassau,Bahamas | —323-4132__ Mi
Bi
P.O. Box AB-20192 a
a
yh
Freeport, Grand Bah. a. i
[Bowleg, Nicholas __—'| ThreePhase | *§ ——C—C~“‘;CWdSC&RP*«CO. Box GT-2717 | Nasu, Bahamas | 477-6525 -
Nassau, Bahamas aa
a
Z
7
| P.O. Box N-9073 357-9055 ~
| Edgecombe, Felton _|[ThreePhase | CC—C“‘“‘;CCCdS&P.O. Box F-14391. | Nassau, Bahamas | 324-2423 ;
[Evans,SamuelK. | ThreePhase | CCsC*~‘C*C*d*& «CO. Bo EE-15220 | Nassau, Bahamas | 477-0218 | .
pe:
a:
Three Phase a
| Greene, John ————sd| ThreePhase | = SCC P.O. Box N-10683 | Nassau, Bahamas | 341-4937, | ae
| Hart, Kenneth ———s| ThreePhase [ C~SsCSC*d~&.O. Box. CR-54723 | Naas, Bahamas | 357-7385 “a
oe
a
e
| Hudson, Lewis | ThreePhase | CCSC*d&.. BX F-41846 | Freeport, GB | 373-6610 a
| Johnston, William __| Three Phase _|J&JElectricLimited | P.O. AB-20413_ | Marsh Harbour, Abaco | 367-5145 |” a
| Johnson, George | ThreePhase | = CS P.O. Box'N-8401 | Nassau, Bahamas | 323-4278 a
P.O. Box SS-19924 . a8 |
| King, Garnet_ ss | ThreePhase | SCT P.O. Box'N-1490 | Nassau, Bahamas | 324-1960 i!
=a |
[Laing Kenneth =| ThreePhase [| CCT P.O. Box F-44925 [ Freeport,GB | 374-7710 om
a
me
| Martinborough, Timothy | Three Phase _| Electrical Services Contractors Ltd. | P.O. Box EE-17105 |Nassau,Bahamas | __-393-1079 any
Mevosh buen | Tee Bese. _________{B.0. Box EE {9880_Nassau, Bahamas | 395.817 vf |
Three Phase “yt
| Mcintosh, Sydney | ThreePhase |} CS P.O. Box F-44083 [ Freeport, Grand Bah. | _ 352-3760 __| 4
a
x og!
Pintard, John A. __| Three Phase |
Pratt, Kevin Three Phase | KAP Electrical Contracting Cabbage Pt, Long Is. _ un
Rahming, Drexel Three Phase _| Rahming’s Electrical RE
| Rolle, Levi =} | ThreePhase [9 st P.O, Box F-41558." [ Freeport,GB [352-6290 |
Russell, Jerem P.O. Box EE-17010 | Nassau, Bahamas ‘364-5993 4
_ (Storr, Henry —————=sd|s Three Phase “{“Henry F Storr Electri¢’Co. Ltd! | P.O. Box:'N2945°"" “Nassau, Bahamas j
[ Storr, Stephen "| ‘Three Phase “| Henry F ‘Storr Electric-Co.ttd: | P.O. Box N-945"""!__| Nassau, Bahamas || 393-7777 | “a
P.O. Box GB-12304 uy
P.O. Box CR-54481 | Nassau,Bahamas ss |_——-341-7935 | Hl
Three Phase iq}



SINGLE PHASE ELECTRICIANS





















| CNAME | ~LISENCE [| ~~ BUSINESSNAME ——si|—s ADDRESS ~— | _——sCITY/ISLAND | TELEPHONE | oH
assau, Bahamas ie
“| Andrews, Anthony | SinglePhase | SSCS*~*~SC*dtCGeneerl Delivery | Kemps Bay, Arnos | 369-5143 i
|Bain,Ryan | SinglePhase | SCSCSC*dC& CO. Box SB-52145 | Nassau, Bahamas | 347-1959 | an
Nassau, Bahamas aa
| Brown, Anthon | SinglePhase | —C—“‘SSCN#O#C#C#(#C#C#C#d#*S#&R«CO. Box F-14075 _| Nassau, Bahamas |
ee |
| Butler, Yorick | SinglePhase [| CC~“‘*‘“SCBP.. Box CB-13625 | Nassau, Bahamas :
| Cambridge, Kevin | SinglePhase | —i—“‘“‘CSCOC*C*di‘C&P «CO. Box 51483 Gregory Town, EL my
Sontech Electrical Services Hed
P.O. Box 5896. a
) P.O. Box CB-13096_| Nassau, Bahamas oe
| Deleveaux, Raphael | SinglePhase | —C(‘“‘(‘CSC;C*™*C*C*C P.O. Box N-87444
Nassau, Bahamas ;
Nassau, Bahamas :
| Gilbert, Michael | Single Phase | C—~—“*é‘“C;*C*S:SCSC*C*C*diSC&P «CO. Bo. SB -5:2030__| Nassau, Bahamas :
| Greenslade, Alvin | SinglePhase | —(‘“‘COSOOOCOC#C#d#SU&P.O. Box N-91505 Nassau, Bahamas -
P.O. Box SB50449 __| Nassau, Bahamas =
Johnson, Anderson __ | Single Phase j
Johnson, Philip Single Phase oe
Nassau, Bahamas cote ds
Dove Plaza Marsh Harbour, AB iy
Knowles, Edward ‘Flameless Electrical Cont. Ltd. | P.O. Box SS-5945 - | Nassau,Bahamas _—i| ———«338-8787 |: :
Taylor Industries Limited s
| McQueen, Darvin __—([SinglePhase [| ——~—“‘~‘~*~*S*C~*S**SCSCSCS General Deelivery | San Andros, Andros
Nassau, Bahamas |
Moss, Gladstone
-
P.O. BoxMT-569
Roberts, Richard P. Single Phase | Roberts Electrical & Plumbing P.O. Box AB-22990 | Man-O-War Cay, AB 365-6016
P.O. Box CB-13866 -
reg
{ Rolle, Wilfred Single Phase
Russell, Nero SinglePhase | CS P.O. Box SS-19546 | Nassau, Bahamas | 395-4662 j
Sands, Gary Single Phase
Storr, Terrance Single Phase os
Stuart, Carlington . SinglePhase | SSCS... Box AB-20053 _[ Dundas Town, Abaco | 375-8050. | a
Taylor, Marivin Single Phase
P.O. Box N-10494














ADDRESS

Albury, Morral herokee Sound, Abaco

O. Box 34
O. Box 23002

.O. Box F-41344

eneral Delive
General Delive

Pinder, Rev. Leonard O. Box F-43266 reeport, Grand Bahama

P
-
P
P
Pp
E
P
P
P

Roberts, William O. Box F-41199 reeport, Grand Bahama
.O. Box MT-509

P.O. Box c/o N-1605

P.O. Box 20546 urpy Town, Abaco
Sweetng, Edward P.O. Box c/o N-323

. _RESTRICTED JOURNEYMEN

CITY/ISLAND

Z2|DIOIO

m|—a|o|m

7

?
oopers Town, Abaco

27

atthew Town, Ingaua

reeport, Grand Bahama

n

)

@

regory Town, Eleuthera

TELEPHONE
366-2047
365-0593
334-2260
329-2662
352-8505
347-2414
334-4178
348-3242

_ 373-1610
352-6611
339-1300
352-6611
359-6191
341-4642


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THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005, PAGE 96

Let Charlie the |
Bahamian Puppet and . lay
his sidekick Derek put,

some smiles on your

kids si faces.

Bring your children to the
. McHappy Hour at McDonald’s in
Oak's Field every Thursday |
| from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month of July 2005. —

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun,

STORAGE SOLUTIONS |

Small Spaces

eee

: for

525WOOD

: 46 Madeira Street
PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



It’s time to team up
for the wall of fame

STUBBS



OPINION



ALE TINE NN

player goes
national in US



| BH By RENALDO
DORSETT
Junior Sports
Reporter

A LOCAL Bahamian col-
legiate basketball player is
receiving the opportunity of
a lifetime: to play. for a
national team in the United
States.

Jeremy Barr was named
to the United States' Under
21 select team for the Global
Games Basketball tourna-
ment this weekend in Frisco,
Texas.

This is the sixth edition of
the Global Games and it has
become one of the premiere
international basketball
events played in the United
States.

The tournament targets
the world's top basketball
players ages 21 and under.

This year's tournament
includes teams from Lithua-
nia, Nigeria, Slovenia,
Ukraine, and USA Basket- .
ball, Team Africa and the
Texas/USA Select Team
which Barr will be a part of.

Barr created a stir in the
college basketball recruiting
community this summer by
signing with the University
of Southern California after
initially committing to Texas
Tech.

The newest Trojan will
enter his freshman season as
one of the school's most
highly touted recruits, com-
ing from powerhouse West-
bury. Christian Academy in
Houston, Texas.

The 6 foot 8 inch power
forward averaged 19 points
and 9 rebounds for the Wild-

‘cats in his senior season,
drawing interest from a num-
ber of NCAA Division 1 uni-
versities.

He also led the Wildcats
to three straight Texas Asso-
ciation of Private and
Parochial Schools (TAPPS)

‘state titles, while being
named first team All-State
and a McDonalds All-Amer-
ican nominee. . ;

In a press release, Global
Games Executive Director
Michael Sorrell explained the
selection process for the
team.

"It was very important to
the selection committee that
we fielded a team. with young
men of outstanding integrity
and athletic abilities," he
said. "It was equally impor-
tant to us that we surrounded
these players with coaches
who possessed strong bas-
ketball minds, outstanding
communication skills and
impeccable character. On

4 both counts, we have accom-
plished our goal."

A number of current NBA
stars have played in the
Global Games, which have
become something of a right
of passage for many players
en route to the next Jevel.

Some Global Games
Alumni include Yao Ming,
Chris Bosh, Deron Williams,
Darko Milicic, Carlos Booz-
er and Caron Butler.



W HAT?’S the differ-
ence between the

Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture’s National Hall of
Fame and the ministry’s
Sports Heroes Wall of Fame?

Why can’t the two be inter-
twined so that the same faces
placed in the Ministry of
Sports’ office be the same that
grace Nassau’s International
Airport?

Have you ever noticed that
the two, although implement-
ed by the same ministry, do
not match up with each other?

Is there a different criteria
for being named to the
National Hall of Fame as
there is for being selected to
the Sports Heroes Wall of
Fame? -

The Ministry of Sports must
be commended for taking the
initiative of recognising of our
sporting heroes and heroines




of the past and present.

But I would think that if a
person is enshrined in a
national Hall of Fame, their

Sands, basketball executive
Vincent Ferguson, boxing/
cycling star Leonard ‘Boston

Blackie’ Miller, bodybuilder’



“There’s enough space on
both sides of the wall to pack it
with our sporting legends. We
have enough who have :
excelled at the international
level to achieve the same
recognition as those who are

already there.”



performances should have
been noteworthy enough for
them to have their pictures
mounted on a wall of fame.
Take, for example, people
such as disabled athlete John

Kingsley Poitier, multi-talent-
ed Leviticus ‘Uncle Louw’
Adderley, Charlie Major Sr
and Roderick Simms — all
have been inducted into the
Hall of Fame.

However, they have not

been included in the list for |

the Wall of Fame.

And when you consider the
accomplishments they’ve
made, there are some others
who should have been consid-
ered for inclusion.

’ Long jumper Shonel Fergu-

son, who paved the way for
the success our women are
now achieving in athletics,
along with discus/shot putter
Bradley Cooper and Lavern
Eve — two long-time national
icons — have been left out. |

High jumper Troy Kemp
should also be considered.

There’s enough space on
both sides of the wall to pack
it with our sporting legends.
We have enough who have
excelled at the international
level to achieve the same
recognition as those who are
already there.

We don’t want a repeat case

Betty Kelly Kenning Aquatic
Centre chance for youngsters

of where we rushed to hon-
our Andre Rodgers, the first
Bahamian to play in the Major

League, just after he died. ~

This is the Bahamas,’and
there isn’t any reason why
more attention can’t be placed
on giving our athletes as much
exposure as we can.

The wall of fame is the ide-
al spot because it exposes our
athletes to a wide range of
people, not just Bahamians,
but the countless amount of
visitors who pass through the
airport on their arrival here.

Many of the visitors who
have had the opportunity to
view these athletes in action
would be able to identify them
and see how much they are
appreciated on their home
soil.

So let’s add as many of
those athletes who are deserv-
ing of the honor to the wall of
fame.



@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Junior Sports Reporter














HUNDREDS of young, aspiring

tunity to learn at the nation's top swim-
ming facility this-ssummer.

The swimming sector of the Ministry
of Youth, Sports and Culture's Sum-
mer Programme is teaching youngsters
learning to swim and is also fostering
the development of swimming as a com-
petitive sport among a wider variety of
young athletes.

Kevin Colebroke, Manager for the
Betty Kelly Kenning Aquatic Center

istry’s program has been highly antici-



swimmers are being given the oppor-’

said the swimming segment of the Min-.

pated by campers and administrators
alike.
"The swimming sector is something
we have high hopes for and something
we have a lot invested in," he said, "We

wish to see more people take advan- '

tage of this facility."

Dispel

Colebrooke said they: want to dispel
the misconception of the Aquatic Cen-
ter being open to only a select few.

"We want to develop an interest in
swimming among many kids‘that may
not have an opportunity to come here to
swim throughout the year," he said.
He added that, while the main goal is

Syndicated Content

bstenine hundreds of youngsters how
to swim, coaches and instructors also
would like to find a number of campers
with a deep-rooted interest in swim-
ming.

"What we hope to achieve out of this
is that by the time these kids leave here
we anticipate that over 80 per cent of
them will successfully. learn how. to
swim," he said. “What we're also trying
to do here is to keep their interest, we

hepe to target the ones who we think .

have potential and encourage them to
continue."

Ona given day the Aquatic Center _

hosts nearly 1,000 swimmers which
Colebrooke said can be a challenge at
times to monitor.

. skills,"

"We have done a good job of ensur-
ing that the people we have hired are
capable of effectively protecting these
kids while imparting basic swimming
he said.

Instructors

“We have a number of qualified
swimmihg instructors here and. other
instructors are swimmers themselves."

He said the programme can act as
the beginning of a feeder system for
young swimmers.

“As. time goes on we hope to see
more and more of these children com-
ing back to perform at a higher level
of swimming competition."

Available from. Commercial News Providers”





er

TT!

England prepares for Ashes clash

~~


Armstrong holds overs

lead in Tour’s longest stage
a eae

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content “4


THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

Waltia's dream
comes true with
scholarship |

By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

THE dream for a 6-foot-5
14-year-old Bahamian girl
came true yesterday, when
one of the top- ranked High
School’s in Houston, Texas,
recruited her to play her
favourite sport. :

‘Waltia’Rolle was awarded
a full scholarship to the West-
bury Christian High School in
Houston, Texas, for the sport
of basketball, after meeting
up with former Olympic

champion Frank Rutherford. .

Campus

Although the meeting took
place three months ago while
Rolle was walking casually
around her school’s campus,
Rutherford jumped at the
opportunity to help her excel.

Rutherford got the ball
rolling, finalising all negotia-
tions and arrangements, yes-
terday.

Rolle, who is currently in
enrolled at CR Walker Sec-

seedneserensieeeaceeeceeecceesenscceeessseseceeeersnaceeesceseceaeeunsaaesesesssseensasenanassaansnaseneeeananessenseeeeeeeneaeeeseseeesneeeetasesassseeeseeeeeneeeesseseeseeeeeeseneeeeeeeee eens Poo





Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

ondary, opted not to play bas-
ketball for the school after her
grade point average dropped.

Moving into grade 11 at
Westbury, Rolle is expecting
to improve on her skills, so
she can excel and hopefully
make a lasting impression on
the coaches.

She said: “I am. extremely
grateful to Frank Rutherford

- and the coaches at the school

for awarding me the scholar-
ship. This a great opportunity
for me and my main goal is to

make my country and family. .

proud.

“T love sports, especially.

basketball, and I was always
confident that I would be
awarded a scholarship, but I
never knew it would have hap-
pened while I was still fresh
in high school.

“My dream is to go off to
school and play basketball, but
playing on the high school lev-
el in the United States is an
accomplishment. I know that I

will learn a lot from this’

school.”
Rolle has never played on

a special gift from God and

really thankful to the persons
-involved in making her

‘games, so knowing that she



ui
































the national level, but she has
helped the HO Nash Lions
win three straight junior girls
championship titles.
_Her dad, Maxwell Rolle,.
believes that his daughter has

he is really happy that her
dreams are coming true.

Blessing»

He said: “This scholarship
is a blessing from God, I am

dreams come true.

' “This is my only daughter,
so I will be travelling with her.
She is precious tome. When I
found out about the scholar-
ship I got really emotional.

“T always support her, I
attend a fair amount of her

will be playing on a higher lev-
el makes me feel better.”

Rolle will leave for school
in August, and starts on
August Sth. The basketball
season starts in November and
finishes in February.

@ SIX FOOT FIVE Waltia Rolle

INSIDE
Brent Stubbs
Doel
ee



|Dominic ‘takes it easy’ ahead

ll By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter





MVaOUCRMIeT Cait

Athlete rests to focus mentally on race



WITH no major track and field meet









being held before the World Champi-
onships, Dominic Demeritte has decided to
“take it easy”.
_ Although he is still training — a light jog
daily - Demeritte has four days to relax
beforé heading to Helsinki, Finland, for
the 10th annual IAAF games on August
6th-14th.
The rest and relaxation will help him
prepare for the strenuous rounds of the
200m, in which he hopes to better his time.
According to the national record holder
and gold medallist at the 2003 World
Indoor Championships, a period of rest is
good for any athlete, helping them to focus
mentally on the race.

Coach

“Sometimes you just need a day or two
to relax, so this is what I am doing on the
advice of my coach, Henry Rolle,” said
Demeritte.

“Looking back at my performance at
the CAC games I am in need of it. But I
am not fully relaxed, I still have work-out
sessions but they’re not as hard as they
could be.

“JT do a light jog here and there. Working
on my start, making sure that I execute
properly.”

At the Colinalmperial Central Ameri-

can and Caribbean games, Demeritte ran a
time of 20.84 seconds in the preliminary
round for a first place finish and second
fastest time. :

Lining-up in heat three for the semi-
finals, Demeritte managed a time off 20.54
seconds.

This time had lined him in the hunt for a
gold medal, but a sluggish start and slow
reaction to the gun in the finals forced him
to settle for the bronze.

The bronze time was 20.47 seconds. The
winning time, by Usain Bolt, was 20.03
seconds. Trinidad and Tobago’s Aaron
Armstrong ran 20.35 seconds.

He said: “I was really disappointed with
my performance, at least my start. I didn’t
get a good start and that cost me.

“My start was sc nething I was really
concerned about, bt" “mning through the
rounds had built up 1... confides >.

“After I saw the start by the other run-
ners I knew I had to run the curb hard. I
tried to shoot off the curve with good form
to ensure that I would still be in the mix of
the race.”

Demeritte believes opting to travel to
Helsinki before the Bahamian delegation
will also help.

He will have a week to train in Finland,
adjusting to the country’s climate.

The 200m is set for August 9th, the
fourth day of competition, The first heat

will take off at 12.20pm, with the quarter
finals taking place at 7.25pm that after-
noon.. ;

“Tt is always good to go up there and
adjust before the meet so me and my coach
will leave for Finland on Sunday,” said
Demeritte.

“T will train up there, trying to adjust to
the weather. Who knows what might hap-
pen,.one day it might rain, so adjusting is
always a key factor.”

Bronze

Demeritte was a part of the 4x100m
team that ran to a 39.08 seconds for a
bronze medal, a time that was 700 of a
seconds shori of a first World Champi-
onships qualification for the Bahamas in
vic event.

A disappointed Demeritte believes that
the team would have been able to qualify,
if the CAC games wasn’t held so close to
the World Championships.

“We would have qualified, no doubt
about that,” said Demeritte.

“Our main thing was competition. The
race was the first one for the year and that
came so late. If we could have ran in sev-
eral other meets we would have qualified.”

The relays are set for August 12th with
the finals August 13th.



THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005

SECTION

Ministers’ wiv
worship God it

@ By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

LAS VEGAS, Nevada, better
known as ‘Sin City’, is an unlikely
place to host a religious conference.
But a group of ministers’ wives and
widows from the Bahamas now know
that even the most unusual location
can be the ideal place to worship and
praise God.

A delegation of 77 Bahamians,
including members of the Bahamas
Association of Ministers’ Wives and
Widows, a few husbands and pastors’
kids (PKs), recently returned from
the international association’s 65th
annual convention in Las Vegas.

Vernita Josey, who serves as both
the president of the Bahamas Associ-
ation of-Ministers’ Wives and Wid-
ows, as well as vice-president of the
Inter-Continental Region of the inter-
national association (which includes
all countries outside of the United
States), described her Las Vegas expe-
rience as a “memorable blessing”. She
is currently serving her second term.

Holding a conference in Las Vegas,
says Mrs Josey, is like fulfilling the
mandate of Christians to be the “light
in the darkness”.

The delegation from the Bahamas, ;

with their sisters around the world,
brought that light to some 1,200
strong.

Sister Josey tells Tribune Religion:
“Like someone remarked during the
conference, there are believers in Las
Vegas, there are Christians in Las
Vegas and there are a whole lot of
persons who love the Lord there. You
can find sin in every country, but here
it is in Las Vegas, there are people
who love the Lord and they wanted to
have this conference there and.it was
a blessing because people saw us and
they saw the difference.”

According to the president; every- .

‘In our
fathers




Patronal Festival
See Page 2C





& A DELEGATION of 77 Bahamians (some pictured) recently returned from the Bahamas Association of
Ministers’ Wives and Widows 65th annual convention in Las Vegas.

share the word of God and let people
know who they were and who they

‘represented, especially since they were

surrounded by an endless number of
casinos and many aspects of “non-

~ Christian” living while.in Las. Vegas.

The theme for this year’s conven-
tion was “Keeping the Vision Going:
Reaching Out, eee Retain-
ing”.

Most of the sessions, says Sister
Josey, were geared towards the
empowerment of women.

“This year, we really dealt a lot with
us as a sisterhood really making the
difference, transforming lives wher-
ever we go. Not to major in the minor
things you know, like our president
(Dr Janie Charles Holmes) often says,
‘don't sweat the small stuff’. ;

“But there are sisters in our midst

who are going through so many chal-
lenges and she (president) feels that
we ought to be there to help them to
overcome these challenges,” she says.

Sister Josey was the speaker at the ©

President’s Breakfast, held i in, honour
of Dr Holmes.

One of the topics raised bt thie con-
vention dealt with the responsibility of
a minister’s wife in the leadership of
the church.

According to Sister Josey, a minis-
ter’s wife should be his “number one
supporter”, and is also called by God
to stand with her husband. . ©

“It is so important to be there for
that man that God has set as a leader
in the church,” she says. “You ought
to be his number one supporter... If
there is something you need to criti-
cise, then do it constructively and in



are worthy men’

'
1
|
i

love, and not in the presence of others.

“Your duty is to first be loyal to’

your husband and then she can extend
your boundaries once you’ve already
done that — taking care of him, making

Sure that if he has something to do,

then’ you be there to support him,”
she adds.

' According to the president, there
are more than .200 ministers’ wives
and widows registered with the
Bahamas association, yet there
remains many wives and widows who
have still not expressed an interest in
joining the group.

While she acknowledges that there
may be a level of contention between
some wives, Sister Josey is confident
that those who are involved in the
local association uphold a spirit of uni-

ty, where each person bears one





“IN our country, most fathers are wor-
thy men.” These were the words of Rev
Father James Moultrie, Rector of St
Matthew’s Anglican Church as he greet-
ed the fathers of the historic parish. on
Sunday.

St Matthew’s, the oldest edifice in the
Bahamas, is celebrating 203 years of ded-
ication this year.

A part of this year’s celebrations includ-
ed the recognition of eight dedicated sons
of the historic church, who were hon-
oured in a special mass. Joining this list of
honourees were Milo Butler Jr, Dustin
Babbs, Robert Isaacs, Fredrick Raham-
ing, Carl Francis Smith, Herbert Thomp-
son, Dr George White and Jonathan
Mycklewhyte.

The morning was filled with all smiles
and joy as fathers also received a special
treat from the women of the parish, who
sang for the men.

Father Moultrie pointed out that

Bight ‘dedicated sons’ of St Matthew's ‘Anglican
Church are honoured in special mass as historic

church celebrates 203 years of dedication ue

“They are there
when they celebrate
joy and when they
face sadness. They
are there to lift them
up when they fall.”

— Rev Fr James Moultrie

ne

fathers make a point to be there for their
children. “They are there when they cel-
ebrate joy and when they face sadness.

They are there to lift them up when they.

fall.”
He said that fatherhood is all about
love.

dedication on Monday, July 18: And on
Sunday, Fathers Ivan Eldon and Joseph
Mycklewhyte, sons of the parish, cele-
brated the 7.15am mass. Rev Angela

See FATHERS, Page 2C

St Matthew’s eelebrated its feast of

another’s burdens.

“To be honest with you, those who
are really a part of this organisation
have really bonded together,” she
says. “When something happens to
one it Spreads | like wild fire, every-
body gets on the BaiidWabon Aid tries

‘to be there to support that one sister.
_ We are there for each other.”

And while a minister’s wife may do
well on her own without the assistance

- of others, Sister Josey believes that it

is fellowship with individuals who are
acquainted with her concerns and
have personally dealt with certain
issues that can help that minister’s
wife cope with the sometimes daunt-
ing task of pastoring alongside her

See PRAISE, Page 7C

arge 1-topping pizza
Wings & es) Dots

New Locations

j Blue Hill Queen’s
325-3998 358302
: 3802




PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005 THE TRIBUNE

RELIGION





@ The Isaacs family








ST Margaret’s Anglican Mycklewhyte; the final ser-
Church, Kemp Road, will cel- » vice, which will contain the
ebrate its Patronal Festivalon Solemn Eveningsong, Sermon,
Sunday, July 24. Three ser- Procession and Benediction
vices will be held: the first at | led by Preacher Father Laish
7am, by Celebrant and _ Boyd, will begin at 3.30pm. ~
Preacher Archdeacon J Ran- St Margaret’s Anglican
furly Brown; the second ser- Church invites all former
vice will begin at 9.30am'and members and friends of the

will be led by Celebrant and _ Parish to join in these festivi-
~Preacher~Father—J OSEPR--— TES ee






li The White family





The Bahamas.
Christian Council —
in Conjunction with

The Caribbean
Conference Of Churches
— presents an ot



a








@ MILO Butler Jr and daughter during the recognition service. Mr Butler served as Speaker of
the House of Assembly and on several government boards. He also served as MP for Pinedale from
1977 to 1992. Shown presenting the gift to Mr Butler is Steven Mitchell (far left).











Fathers (From page 1C)

Palacious and Rev Beryl Higgs, daughters of | when the St Matthew’s Players put on a talent
the parish, celebrated the 10.30am mass. night.of songs and singing with “Da Funeral”.
The 203 celebration continues this weekend

For Clergy & Lay Leaders Of All |
| Denominations meer whe aneme
“BUILDING A FAITH-BASED RESPONSE

TO HIV/AIDS IN THE CARIBBEAN”

on
Monday, July 25, 2005, 9:00am - 5:00pm
at the British Colonial Hilton












Presenters will include:
* Representatives AIDS Secretariat
* Caribbean Conference of Churches
* Miriam Maluwa of the U.N. |

FREE REGISTRATION

including, lunch & coffee break
Contact Bahamas Christian Council
Tel/Fax 325-7909

Remembered Forever May
- Your Soul Rest In Peace




With Love ;
Your Family The Tribune wants to hear




from people who are
making news in their —
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements i
area or have won an
award. at
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story. °




THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005, PAGE 3C



RELIGION



TURN ROS orem UTEP TENTYo Rye

of Dean Patrick Adderley’s priesthood



@ By CLEMENT JOHNSON

hrist Church Cathedral

was packed on Sunday

as parishioners, family

members and well wish-

ers gathered to celebrate
the 30th anniversary. of priesthood of
Dean Patrick Adderley.

The service was a mass of jubila-
tion and praise, and was part of a
series of activities organised by a spe-
cial committee, spearheaded by Ron
Clarke, the Dean’s Warden.

According to Barbara Hanna-Cox,
the People Warden, church members
were happy to honour their pastor.

Dean Adderley has been at the
cathedral since February 13, 1998 and
has gained the love and trust of parish-
ioners over the past seven years.

“We felt the need to share with the
Dean and his family on such a
momentous occasion. All groups in

the church got together and decided to
celebrate mass on July 13, the actual
date of the anniversary,” said Mrs
Hanna-Cox. “It was also decided that
instead of three masses on Sunday,
there would only be one, which would
allow all Cathedral members the
opportunity to worship as a commu-
nity.”

The special mass was followed by a
reception.

The sermon was delivered by Dean
Adderley, who thanked his family,
parishioners and friends, and shared

his own journey of faith with the con- _

gregation, in the form of stories.

He said he used the method of sto-
ry telling in the same way that Jesus
told his followers stories. And like
Jesus he tried to challenge his-con-
gregation to live lives pleasing to God.

‘The Very Reverend Patrick Adder-
ley is the son of the late Mr and Mrs
Nathaniel Adderley. He was born and



raised in New Providence and attend-
ed St Barnabas Church.

Dean Adderley was graduated from
St John’s College, and later studied
at the House of Sacred Mission in Kel-
ham, England. He holds a bachelor’s
degree in theology from the Univer-
sity of Nottingham, England, and com-

* pleted his post graduate studies in

education at St Martin’s College Lan-
caster.

The Dean was ordained a deacon in
1974 and served his diaconate with

the Society of the Sacred Mission, .

Quermore Park, Lancaster.

On July 13, 1975 he was ordained to
the Sacred Priesthood and served in
the Parishes of St John and St Peter,
Abaco, and taught at the high school
there.

From 1978 to 1982, Dean Adder-
ley served as parish priest at the
Church of the Good Shepherd, Pin-

der’s Point, along with the Church of

St Jude, Smith’s Point, Grand
Bahama.

In addition to parish ministry, Dean
Adderley taught at the Freeport
(Anglican) High School, where he.
served as chaplain and senior master.

Dean Adderley was.appointed prin-
cipal of St Anne’s High School in 1983
and served in that capacity for 10
years, In addition, -he served in the
parishes of All Saints, Joan’s Heights;
Christ the King, Ridgeland Park; and
St Christopher’s Lyford Cay.

In 1993, Dean Adderley was
appointed deputy director of educa-
tion for Anglican schools and served
as coordinator of the Endowment
Fund. He currently serves as chair-
man of the Anglican Central Educa-

~ tion Authority.

He was installed as the eighth, (and
second Bahamian-born) Dean of
Christ Church Cathedral on Febru-
ary 13, 1998.



Safeguarding

wellness of the soul

â„¢@ By REV ANGELA
PALACIOUS

WE need to safeguard the
wellness of our own souls and
that of the next generation: the
health of the inner being, peace
of mind, contentment, passion
for living.

We need to know what chal-
lenges us and inspires us.

Let us pray like Hannah with

the fervency and intensity that.

our nation will be made up of
persons of prayer. We have to
pray for others who cannot
comprehend or articulate their
own spiritual experiences. We
sailed on ships in the decks or
in the hold to get here in order
to make the desert bloom.

' Why not write down three
things that you do to protect
your sanity, to, restore your dig-
nity, revive your spirit and safe-
guard the wellness of your soul.
Often, we do not give ourselves
recovery time, and vacation
time spent shopping from
morning until evening is no rest
time at all.

What three things threaten
the wellness of your soul?
’ If you do not eat properly
and on time, if you do not.exer-
cise, if you do not pray, if you
feed an addiction, if you over-
work, overspend, such things
undermine your equilibrium.

'. How are you applying what
you have learnt from educa-
tion, revelation, inspiration,
and experience? If you are able
to read this meditation you are

listed among the literate of the ©
world. How are you contribut- .

ing to the enlightenment of our
people? How are you positive-
ly influencing those around
you?

Can we teach our children



MEDITATION



@ REV ANGELA PALACIOUS

how to surrender those things
that cannot be changed by us
and not slip into despair? Can
they be taught to creatively
occupy themselves with appro-
priate activities while they are
waiting for God to show them
how to build a life for them-
selves? Can we model for them
the forgiveness that permits

'’ healthy relationships to still

occur after deep wounding?
How frequently do we say
the following?
I am sorry, please forgive n me.
You have hurt me very bad-
ly but I choose to forgive you.
I am grateful for our rela-
tionship.

Can we teach them this level .

of sensitive and honest com-
munication? ©

Imagine that you are a
weaned child on your mother’s
lap, then, transfer the thought
to sitting on God’s lap with no
desire for anything to be still
in the presence of God.

Machines must recover or go.

down when they are in need of
a rest.

How we do we offer the :

example of inner quietness?
On the other hand, do we
laugh and smile? Are we pleas-
ant to be around? Do they see
the joy of the Lord in us?
Ponder these things and then
intentionally safeguard the
wellness of your soul.

THE NASSAU AMATEUR OPERATIC SOCIETY

PROUDLY PRESENTS...

THE FREEPORT PLAYERS’ GUILD

Naa





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Yo Dundas Oro alex
for the

Performing Arts

July 21st, CoA)
Tae Ware UU

| Contact Saniora St. Rose at The Tribune on 502 -2373 if you have any
queries. Information and pictures can also be emailed (as attachments) to:

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PAGE 6C, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005 . THE TRIBUNE

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THE TRIBUNE

ich God wan

Ib By REV JAMES
MOULTRIE



You, therefore, must be per-
ect, as your heavenly Father is
erfect

Fr ent ta

(Matt.5:48).

he Bible spends
some time in con-
versation about
perfection.
Toward the close
of His most significant body of
teaching, the Sermon on the
Mount, Jesus says the words or
our text. There is nothing
ambiguous about that. Perfec-
ition is the ideal condition, the
state of grace and bliss in which
e seek to imitate the Creator,
‘and Jesus tells us how to begin
the process. He first warns us
ithat obedience to the Old Law
lis not sufficient.
| Fidelity to the Ten Com-
‘mandments is not sufficient,
‘contrary to popular belief. In a
lseries of references to the old
tlaw, Jesus proves that they are
{not sufficient. Jesus said, “You
thave heard it said... You shall
(not commit adultery: you shall
(not steal, you shall not bear
{false witness; you shall love
| your neighbour as yourself...
| In them Jesus gives a summary
‘of the morality of Israel, the
‘level of perfection then, from
Moses onward. The keeping of
the law was what made a per-
son good. But then Jesus comes
along, as He often did, and said
it was not good enough just to
obey the Ten Commandments.
He gives new laws which sig-
nificantly modify the old law.

Radical

Jesus gives new, radical laws,
in each case almost reversing
the old law. This is the new per-
fection. Then He introduces
the new level of perfection in
the words of our text. He was
saying that we should be like

PEK eerLH TE tw

God as far as humanly possible.
We should emulate God not
for our own pleasure but
because our efforts represent
the will of God. Perfection is
not intended to create a super
human being, but rather to
reflect the perfect will of God.
But Jesus is no utopian; He
knows that we are imperfect
beings, but that does not mean
that we should not reach for
perfection.

Perfection

There is only one person in
the Bible who became a
byword for perfection: Job.
“There was a man in the land
of Uz whose name was Job,
and that man was blameless
and upright, one who feared
God and turned from evil”
(Job 1:1). Ironically, his
uprightness was the cause of
his troubles. His friends
assumed that trouble naturally
followed sin; it was punishment
and therefore whatever hap-
pened to Job was deserved. But
it was not imperfection that
cause Job trouble, it was per-
fection. The ultimate wisdom
of Job is that his blessings came
not from his own merit but the
mercy of God, and his curses
not from his own fault, but
from-the power of God. Some-
times God needs to get our
attention! The test for Job, and
for us, is whether in the face
of adversity he would be stead-
fast. It all had to do with his
faith in God. That is what Job
meant when he said, “I know
that my Redeemer liveth and
that He shall stand at the latter
day. And though worms
destroy this body, yet in my
flesh shall I see God.” -

Job was a study in steadfast-

ness, in faithfulness, and in the
hope of glory in the face of
despair. He tried to live a per-
fect life in. the midst of imper-
fection. We live in an imper-

RELIGION



Hi REV JAMES MOULTRIE

fect world, in fact we live in a
corrupt world. We learn to live

‘with imperfection. We see the

result of imperfection and a
turning away from God...vio-
lence, poverty, sickness and
new strands of diseases and
invasions of our homes and our
privacy. These are all indica-
tions of imperfection and cor-

. ruption.

Paradise

Any fool can live in Paradise;



it ought to be easy: no right or
wrong, no sin or error, no com-
promises, anything goes. Any
fool can live in utopia, but
utopia does not exist anywhere
in our world. ~

Corrupt

This is not paradise; this is
the real world, and it is not an
entirely pretty place. But it is in
such a corrupt world that we
are called by Jesus to perfec-

_tion. It will be difficult, but

THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2005, PAGE /U

obtainable, with the help of
God. This is a call to faithful-
ness to God and His will for
us. Job did not do anything
spectacular; he was rewarded
for his faithfulness and consis-
tency in serving God. And that
work is never done; we will be
spiritually challenged as long
as we live.

Founding

That was foremost in the
minds of the founding fathers
of this church. Matthew was
not perfect, but Jesus saw
something in him and called
him. Matthew’s march toward
perfection began when he got
up and left everything and fol-
lowed Jesus. He was not a sym-
bol of perfection, far from it.
In fact he was of all men most
despised for being in collusion
with the Roman occupiers. But
Jesus saw something unique in
this slick tax collector and
called him to higher service.
Unlike Job, Matthew was seen
by the followers of Jesus as
most unworthy of His call. But
Jesus looked beyond his faults
and saw his need, and he does
the same for us. Some may
believe that we are not worthy

- of the call of God either, but

Jesus looks not with human

eyes. It is clear that his call of

Matthew as not a mistake.
This church as been a bea-
con of hope in this community

for 203 years. That is no small °
-achievement. This church

humanised many who were
dehumanised and showed them
the way to the Kingdom of
Heaven. And it continues to
do that. The ministries of this
church to the poor and vulner-
able are in the tradition of
Jesus. We not only care for the
aged, but we feed the hungry,
give them clothing, and give
them medical assistance. And
we do so in the name of Jesus;
not worrying about their reli-

he perfection|
BUR COM IE Nore



gious affiliation, or even
whether they have a church
home or not. We do not try to
convert anyone; we just do
what Jesus did! We are con-
vinced that no one is beyond
the reach of God and His
redemptive grace.

And so we come, this
evening, in all our imperfec-
tions and unworthiness to
renew our faith in a Good and
Gracious God who has been
perfect in his response to our
failures and requires our per-
fection in our response to Him.
By His grace and mercy we can
achieve that too. Today we
pride ourselves on the recov-
ery of this church as a healing
community for the disadvan-
taged in our world. Healing
ministries, pastoral teams, and
mutual support groups can
flourish in this community if
we reach for the perfection to
which Jesus calls us in our text.

It falls to us in this generation

to keep the vision of St
Matthew’s alive. It is for us to
challenge ourselves to the per-
fection to which we are called
in a world beset with so many
imperfections and corruption.

Imperfect

We may be just like
Matthew: sinful and imperfect.
But God looks beyond our
imperfections and our faults
and He calls us anyway. The
question for each of us as we
celebrate this important mile-
stone is: will we reach for the
perfection which God wants us
to have? What will each of us
do now and in the future? Jesus |
says to us again, “You, there-

‘fore, must be perfect, as your

Heavenly Father is perfect”.
Reach for it tonight!

° Rev James Moultrie is the
Rector of St Matthew’s aes
can Church.



Sou Is (From page 3C)



Teams from churches within the community will be partici-
pating in an effort to foster togetherness, strengthen ties with
the island’s youth and bring them together in a comfortable envi-

ronment.

Our message is a simple one, says Ms Cartwright. “God has a
plan for your life.. The word life does not only encompass the spir-
itual man but it includes the physical man, the emotional man, the
mental capabilities, and so much more.”

“Restoration”, as the name implies, is described by organisers
as a “life changing” conference. It is designed to bring about a
“reality check” and a revival in the souls, hearts and minds of

everyone who attends.

’

Leading in worship will be Psalmist Eileen Johnson from the
‘Church of God Cathedral; and Bishop Charles Gardiner will be

the conference speaker.

“Restoration” kicks off next Friday night with a praise and

worship service.

The Sports Day will be held on Saturday, July 30, from 10am-
Spm at the ball park, and includes egg and spoon and balloon burst
races, and volleyball. The prize game will be basketball, when local
church teams will be vying for a floating trophy.

On Sunday morning, a service will be held at Light House
Church of God, and on Sunday night the conference will culminate
with.a Grand Gospel Concert. The masters of ceremony will be
Picewell “The Down Home Boy” Forbes and Dwight Armbris-

ter.

Praise (From page 1C)

husband.

Moreover, this fellowship '

with other ministers’ wives is
an opportunity for that woman
to do something for herself for
a change.

Sister Josey, who serves as
leader of the Intercessory Min-
istry, Director of Christian
Education and Consultant for
Women’s Affairs at Common-
wealth Mission Baptist Church,
where her husband Rev
Arnold Josey is pastor, knows
firsthand the demands of a pas-
tor’s wife.

Speaking of her own experi-
ence, Sister Josey hopes to
encourage other wives and wid-



ows of ministers to join the
association: “I always tell them
this is something for you,
because when I came into min-
istry with my husband it was
challenging for me. Those
women who have already
blazed the trail helped me to
overcome some situations.
“So I tell them this is some-
thing I went into for myself.
People are drawing from us all .
the time, we need a place to
draw from. When we come
together we draw strength from
each other, because when I lis-
ten someone has already been

through that so they can help |

me get through it.”

cr

aay, the stories behind |

_ the news, read Insight
- on Mondays





Live record





1g concert will be

‘spirit empowering, life changing,

foot stomy



ig and heart fixing’

WITH the mission of propagating the
gospel through many diverse styles of
music, Kemuel Gardiner and Surrender is
a vibrant group of young people in pursuit
of changing their generation.

The group was the dream of director
Kemuel Gardiner, and with God’s help it
became a reality in November of 2001.
The now 14-member group is compiled of
young people that are members through-
out the Church of God. After just over
three years of existence, Gardiner, the
visionary and driving force behind the
ensemble, has led the group in releasing
two singles that are popular on local Chris-
tian radio; the contemporary gospel “I
Won’t Settle” and most recently the reggae
inspired “Our God Is Awesome.”

Surrender is preparing for a live record-
ing on Friday, July 22, under the theme

“Ready To Die.”

According to Gardiner, this thought pro-
voking theme was chosen because the clear
vision of Surrender at this time is to push
Christians and non-Christians alike to set-
tle for nothing less than the best of what
God has to offer.

Christians

“We are called as Christians to live a
Luke 9:23 life and die daily to all selfish
ambitions so that the divine will of God can
be accomplished in the earth, said Gar-
diner. “As people in general we need to
strive to go far above and beyond the lev-
els of mediocrity that contemporary society
may set for us.”

Through the medium of music, Surren-
der seeks to encourage and motivate the
body of Christ by using a mixture of vari-
ous genres of music. All of the songs that

the group uses to minister are Gardiner’s
original compositions. From reggae to rock
and roll, from contemporary gospel to pure
worship music, ministering to the
“churched” and harvesting the
“unchurched” on a level that can be under-
stood is their goal.

“Tt is our hope that our music penetrates
the soul and our lyrics change the charac-
ter and lifestyle of every individual that
listens to what God is saying thorough us,”
said Gardiner.

“We desire to be Godpleasers not men-
pleasers! As a result, when the seasons
change, so will the style and approach to
evangelism.”

The live recording concert, which Gai

diner promises will be “spirit empower-

ing, life changing, foot stomping and heart
fixing,” will be held at the Diplomat Cen-
tre at 7pm.
ASR peop ee gee FUT yng NNN HANETTP





1d0d3u YSHLVIM SHL

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