Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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1



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HIGH
LOW

“Sate. —- SUNSHINE

Volume: 101 No.117





78F |
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“tom BREEZY, CLOUDS,





Man loses foot as
vehicle cut in two

& By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

A YOUNG man is fighting
for his life after a car crash
ripped his foot off and tore his
vehicle in half.

At 4.35pm yesterday, the
driver of a 1990 Honda Civic,
licence plate number 12890,
was travelling north on the Sir
Miio Builer highway when he
suddenly lost “control of his
vehicle and crashed into two
trees.

When the car, carrying
three passengers, hit the first
tree it bounced off and collid-
ed with a second tree, which
tore the vehicle in two.

The driver was immediately
tushed to hospital following
the accident, where up until

press time last night, doctors
were fighting to save his life as
well as re-attach his foot.
When The Tribune arrived
on the scene, officers of the
fire department were in the
process of using the “jaws of
life” to retrieve the driver’s
left foot from the wreckage.
It was secured in a bag of ice,
and rushed to the hospital by a

pclice vehicie in an attempt.
‘to save it.

According to police,
although the Honda’s two
women passengers were not

physically injured, they were.

traumatised by the incident.
Police claimed that “speed
was a factor” in the accident.
The women were also taken
to hospital.
Investigations continue.

Teen apprehended in
connection with stabbing
is the son of police officer

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE teenager apprehended in connection with the stabbing
~ death of a 15-year-old boy is the son of a senior police officer, it was

revealed yesterday.

Aelphonzia Williamson, the father of victim Alando Williamson,
communicated the information The Tribune yesterday afternoon.
It was confirmed by Assistant Commissioner in charge of crime

Reginald Ferguson.

The name and rank of the officer in question must be withheld
to protect the identity of the suspect, who according to police is also

SEE page 16

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BAHAMAS EDITION

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FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005

Cis Mea io. Dan

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter




HARBOUR ISLAND,
Eleuthera - The decision by
Harbour Island’s local govern-
ment council to approve in prin-
ciple Parmenter Reality’s
Remora Bay Development has
left those opposed to the devel-
opment saddened.

The council reportedly
approved the development in a
five to two vote.

This decision was made after
a very tense “semi-judicial”
hearing in the island’s magis-
trate’s court.

The focus of the hearing was
Darryl Parmenter and his
Remora Bay Development.

Elizabeth E M Thompson,
co-counsel — lawyer Fred
Smith is expected to be lead
counsel — representing the
Harbour Island Home Owners
Association, who is also a
descendent of Harbour Island,
said that her clients were sad-
dened by the decision. “I
believe this proposal is an insult
to the people of Harbour Island
























— Island is approved —

and the Bahamas in sence It
appears that there has been
very little information provided
by Parmenter Reality partners

_ as to the size and scope of this

development. I would hope that
Parmenter would not approach
a decision-making body any-
where in the world with such
flimsy and incomplete plans.
“T had hoped that local gov-
ernment would have had the
courage to require that appli-

cants meet a higher standard of |

disclosure by requiring and
Environmental Impact Assess-
ment. I had hoped that the pro-
ject would have been rejected in
its entirety or at the very least
be approved upon strict condi-
tions,” said Ms Thompson.
The home owners association
claimed that Mr Parmenter has
no real interest in Harbour
Island. They believe he is more
interested in making money.

However, Mr Parmenter-

rejects this simplified analysis

of his motives.

SEE page two







YOUR WORLD-CLASS



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PRINT AND ON-LINE

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ae mn mn Keod Smith under
| fire for LNG letter

By PAUL G
TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter

MP KEOD SMITH, chair-
man of the BEST Commission,
was under fire last night,
accused of writing what critics
called an “inappropriate” let-
ter to a company trying to set
up an LNG facility in the
Bahamas.

Mr Smith sent the letter to
Mr Fred Smith, lawyer for
Tractebel Bahamas LNG Lim-
ited, and appeared to advise the
firm how to proceed with its
application. -

The letter lists six points to
follow that would allow the
company’s LNG proposal for
Freeport Harbour to “be seen
in a better light.”

Written on December 22,
2004, the letter refers to a meet-
ing in Miami, Florida, on
December 21, with Jim Ebling,
Tractebel’s vice-president of
business development, along
with Dr Doswell Coakley, and
Mr Gregory Moss, president
and vice-president respectively





of the Bahamas Chamber ee.
Commerce.

A high-ranking official in
Grand Bahama, who did not
want to be named, said he was
shocked at how Mr Keod Smith
could personally meet with a
company in Florida while his
office was reviewing a proposal
from them.

AES, the company behind
the rival LNG proposal at
Ocean Cay, told The Tribune
yesterday that it had never had
meetings with Mr Smith.

Recently Mr Smith attempted
to silence a member of the
BEST Commission from mak-
ing a presentation in Cat Cay
that was favourable to the AES
project planned for Ocean Cay.

A letter was sent to Dr
Ronald Cooper telling him that
Mr Smith was “shocked” to
learn of his intended presenta-
tion to Cat Cay residents with-
out his knowledge or approval.

That letter, sent by Mr Smith
to Dr Cooper, read: “You are
not permitted or otherwise

SEE page 16





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PAGE 2, FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005

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AGAINST LNG

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Fax to 242-393-7604 or mail to: N 302, Nassau, The panaitios

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





Harbour Island development |

FROM page one

“T have been coming here for 30
years and this is my personal
favourite destination. I am as con-
cerned as anyone else that Harbour
Island does not become over devel-
oped, but persons have to realise
that Harbour Islanders deserve to
have responsible growth on their
island. We would not want to see a
10-story hotel on Harbour Island
either,” he said.

The Save Harbour Island group
contends that the proposed marina,
which will be built as a part of the
development, is too large and will
destroy the cove and be environ-
mentally disastrous to the commu-
nity.

However, Mr Parmenter wad

there should be no concerns over ,

the proposed scope of the con-
struction of the dock.

“One, we won’t be providing
fuel. So where fuel spills can be a
concern, it won’t arise at our mari-
na. We will also be providing a
pumping system for waste so boat

owners won’t dump their waste in .

the water,” he said... pee

Structure

Another issue, which concerns
those opposed to the Remora Bay
development, is the possibility that
the structure of the condominiums
will be as “intrusive and ugly” as
some perceive the buildings at
Valentines to be.

There are also fears that the pro-
posed condominiums will add the
equivalent of 40 additional houses
at one time, contributing to the con-
gestion on the island and setting ‘a
dangerous precedent for future
Gevelapmients,

Mr Parmenter, however, con-
tends that this will not be the case.

“First and foremost it will be a
low density development. Valen-
tine’s has approximately the same
number of units on less than half of

the space we have. Not passing:

judgment on Valentines in one way
or the next, but it is a very different
concept,’ * he said.

The Remora Bay development
will be a 40-room hotel/condo-

’ minium unit with a 46-slip marina.

target?





a CONSTRUCTION at the Valentines Jacvelapuieni in

Harbour Island.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

“We have gone to great lengths
to explain the development to the
local residents, not so much the
winter residents who seem to be
the most concerned about the
development, more so. than the
people of Harbour Island,” said Mr
Parmenter.

Beyond the ecological concerns
surrounding the development are
the economic aspirations of some of
the Harbour Islanders.

“You have to understand that
not everyone on Harbour Island is
rich and has money. The truth is
some of us not only want, but we
need to make more than we are
making now. What’s wrong with
that? Some of the winter residents
are just being selfish and are not
seeing it from our point of view,’
said oné resident.

Mr Parmenter said that his group
did an economic analysis on what
benefit the presence the develop-



ment will have on the island and
Harbour Island and the Bahamas
stand to benefit greatly from it.

“(Stop over) visitors spend on
average $150 a day per person on
goods services and food. If one
were to consider the number of
people who we should have here
on any given day it amounts to mil-
lions of dollars of expenditure and
that is not counting water taxies,
golf cart rentals and others who
would benefit,” he said.

However, some residents of Har-
bour Island “are not buying into
this” and claim that Mr Parmenter

_ has made unrealistic promises to

residents.

“He has been telling them that in
a year or two there will be millions
of dollars floating around and a lot
of people have not had much mon-
ey and to have all of this dangling in
front of them is very tempting. But
what most people don’t realise is
that if this goes on you are killing
your grand children,” she said.

The resident also contended that

" there is currently enough develop-

ment on the island to sustain the
population.

“This development will be using
mainly imported labour, when I say

’ ampotted I mean not from Harbour
‘Island and that is because every-
‘one on the islafid who waits to

work has.a job and it’s not that peo-
ple coming here are bad in and of
itself but it can get overwhelming,”
the resident said.

Nevertheless Ms Thompson said
that the issue is mainly an environ-
mental one.

Preservation

“Any right thinking Bahamian .
should be concerned about the con-
servation and preservation of our
natural resources and of the pristine
and quaint ambiance of Harbour
Island. I am convinced that this
development in conjunction in what
is happening at Valentines at this
time is right for Harbour Island. It
changes completely the landscape
of Harbour Island and puts a dire
stain on the natural resources.

“When IJ was on the island from
the 13th to the 14th I experienced
two power outages and a lack of
water,” she said.

The home owners association
asserts that the island already has a
problem disposing of its waste.

“They believe that every: boat
that docks here will want to dump
their trash.

“A marina is a source of signifi-
cant non-source pollution. When it
rains the run off from all of the hard
surfaces will bring pollutants into
the bay. It should be noted that the
Harbour Island water table is a
finite resource and large extraction
of water from it directly impacts all
Harbour Islanders and all visitors to
Harbour Island to meet their per-
sonal and business needs,” the asso-
ciation said.

However, Mr Parmenter con-
tends that there are a limited
amount of persons on Harbour
Island who are concerned about his
development.

“We are mainly getting opposi-
tion from those who have homes
on the coast near the marina but
as I have said to them we will be
well within the confines of our
property line,” he said.

Ms Thompson, who cross-exam-
ined Mr Parmenter during the hear-
ing on Wednesday, said that the
organisation of the proceedings left
much to be desired.

“I was totally unaware that we
were going to be involved in a semi
judicial meeting. I found the fact
that when I arrived Mr Parmenter
already had an agenda for the
meeting and I had to request that
on behalf of my clients. During the
proceedings it appeared to me that
Mr Parmenter was arrogant in his
treatment of the islanders con-
cerns,” she said

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EXTERMINATORS

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005, PAGE 3

it 2 Sa ee eee eee



The shape of things to come

By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE design for the new mul-
ti-million dollar national stadi-
um was unveiled yesterday as
part of the master plan for a
national sporting complex
expected to be “second to none
in the region.”

Bahamian and Chinese gov-
ernment officials yesterday
signed the agreement for the
$30 million stadium, funded by
the Chinese, and revealed the
blueprint for the future nation-
al sports complex at the Queen
Elizabeth Sports Centre.

Speaking at a press confer-
ence yesterday, Prime Minister
Perry Christie said that upon
completion, the national stadi-
um “will usher in a new temple
of Bahamian sports.”

“The new stadium will form
the heart of the new national
sporting complex at Oakes
Field and its construction will

Designs are revealed for 30,000 seat
stadium funded by Chinese government



include ancillary works, which
together will transform the
entire complex into a set of
facilities second to none in the
region in both functionality and
appearance,” he said.

“We are coming near to the
point where the national stadi-
um complex will rise from the
ground to preside over the new
golden age of Bahamian athlet-
ics,” he said.

Phases

_" Mr Christie said that the plan,
which was formulated by
Bahamian and Chinese techni-
cal teams, would be carried out



_US passport
policy date
under review

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE United States is review-
ing the proposed January 2006
deadline for the new passport
policy which many believe will
have negative economic impli-
cations for the Bahamas.

Following the announcement
of a new law requiring all US
citizens and foreigners travel-
ling from the Bahamas and re-
entering the US to present a
valid passport as of January 1
2006, local and Caribbean
tourism officials say that the
implementation timetable could
have a detrimental impact on
visitor arrivals.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, US ambassador John
D Rood said that his embassy is
currently “working closely with
the cruise industry, the tourism
industry as well as Atlantis and
other hotels,” to address the
concerns.

The ambassador explained
that the information collected
from the Bahamian tourism
industry will then be used to
“provide comment to the US
State Department”.

The Bahamas Hotel Associ-
ation (BHA) has written letters
to both the US Ambassador
and Minister of Foreign Affairs
Fred Mitchell, requesting that
the implementation deadline





SAT RE VIE W FOR JUNE ON

REGISTRATION IN PROG

BGCSE SPANISH GRAD

for tourists visiting the Bahamas
be on par with the January 1
2008 deadline for Canada and
Mexico.

BHA executive vice-presi-
dent Frank Comito said that
implementation in 2006 would

_ “without question have a detri-

mental impact on our arrivals,
government revenue, and pos-
sibly even employment levels.”

The president of the Florida-
Caribbean Cruise Association
Michelle Page said that the 2006
deadline is “criminal” and “out-
rageous and disrespectful
towards the Caribbean.”

Atlantis said that although it
supports “the effort of the US
government to strengthen and
improve the security of its bor-
ders,” it believes believe “that
the requirement that the new
measures be implemented as
soon as January 2006 will be
extremely onerous for con-
sumers from our largest market.”

Atlantis further stated that
“the current timing does not
allow for a thorough commu-
nications programme which
may very well result in a severe
and detrimental impact on the
Bahamas tourism industry next
year.”

Currently any American citi-
zen can re-enter the US with a
birth certificate stating they
were born in the US and gov-
ernment issued photo ID.

in three phases.

The first phase includes the
construction of the national sta-
dium, which will eventually seat
up to 30,000 spectators, and the
relocation and integration of
the baseball and softball stadi-
ums, the Thomas A Robinson
stadium and Aquatic Centre
into the new complex.

The second phase will deal
with the Kendall G L Isaacs
Gymnasium, the Nati
nis Centre, and: th
Heroes Hall of Fame.

“It also anticipates the con-
struction of a new multi-pur-
pose indoor facility, which will
accommodate up to 10,000
spectators at a time,” he said.



The third phase will then
include the cycling track, the
soccer facilities and an upgrad-
ed outdoor facility for recre-
ational sports, which is now
located at the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex.

Mr Christie said that he was
especially proud of the fact that
the master plan makes provi-
sions for the integration of the
“Big Pond” into the national
sports complex.

The prime minister said he
anticipated that construction of
the stadium would be complete
“as early as June 2007, but no
later than January 2008.”

Approval of the technical
preliminary design is expected

RCC mOrhanetater
concessions dismissed

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

RESIDENTS of Guana
Cay remain dissatisfied with
the planned Passerine Devel-
opment despite the developers
modifying and downscaling
proposals for a new marina.

“Guana residents have not
compromised,” the Save Gua-
na Cay Reef group (SGCR)
said yesterday.

Members of the group are
still dissatisfied with the envi-
ronmental impact the $500
million Baker’s Bay develop-
ment would have on the small
island. They also claim the
developers have still not held
public consultations.

“The developers are now
trying to persuade the rest of
Abaco and the Bahamas that
they have our best interest at
heart and our trying to meet
local objections. But they have
not had a public meeting with
us,” said SGCR co-chairman
Troy Albury.

Mr Albury said that it was
upsetting that the developers
have admitted to only meet-
ing with local government offi-
cials in Abaco and seeking
input from the Out Island Pro-
motion Board.

“T ask the public, does that

sound like you spoke to the
actual people that live on
Guana Cay?” he said.

Although the proposed
Passerine marina has been
reduced from 240 to 180 slips,
“it will still be the largest mari-
na in the Bahamas and will
still harm a pristine harbour
that is situated in a protected
turtle nesting area,” he added.

The SGCR group has fur-
ther researched the new golf
drainage system and special
grass which has been proposed
by the developers of the Dis-
covery Land company.

“A closed drainage system
on these carbonate islands
with cores of Pleistocene
Rock, will in fact run off from
the golf course, despite the
grass, into the ground water
and will affect the reef,” said
the group’s environmental
expert Mike Risk.

Mr Albury added: “We
want them to stop saying they
are giving us a preserve and a
five-acre park. “That is our
land. They took it at ‘market
value’, which we question,
then took the best parts out
and are now saying they are
giving us a beach and park.
There is no sand on their pro-
posed beach-front park. It is
all rock. How generous.”





to be obtained by mid-August
this year, with the detailed
drawings to be completed and
submitted by the Chinese archi-
tectural team by early Decem-
ber and approved that same
month.

Construction

“After that the Chinese gov-
ernment will select an appro-

‘priate construction company.

from China, whose principals
will then come to the Bahamas
for the formal signing of a con-
struction agreement with the
government of the Bahamas,”
the prime minister said.

“We expect that equipment,
supplies and Bahamian labour
would be mobilised and con-
struction should begin no later
than February next year,” he
said.

Prime Christie said that the
plan re-enforced “our serious,
uncompromising commitment
to ensure that we have created
in the our country a centre for
sporting activity second to none
in the region, which we hope
will produce and continue to
produce athletes of renown in
all of the disciplines.”

Minister of Sports, Youth and
Culture Neville Wisdom further
emphasised that the stadium
would be used for important
national and cultural events. _

The ambassador of the:Peo-
ple’s Republic of Chi
-Yuanming, said that th



. “iam would.bé'a symbol’ofthe

friendship* between the
Bahamas and China, and signi-
fies the understanding and co-

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L _——————





PAGE 4, FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005

THE TRIBUNE -



: EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR i

Politicians should
not make promises
they won't keep ©

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M. G3 M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242).502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

. Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Inagua investor handled badly |

IN NOVEMBER 2003 Prime Minister’
" Christie, reminding his ministers of the stan-
dard of integrity required of them, warned
Bahamians not to mislead foreign investors
into spending significant sums of money.
’ He made the statement in the House of
Assembly in connection with the Korean boat
scandal and the resignation of MP Sidney
Stubbs as chairman of BAIC.
“Tam very sorry for any kind of disap-
intment and cost that might have been
: incurred by. the (Korean): investors in this
matter,” Mr Christie told the House at the
__ time, adding that the “Bahamas government
. most certainly will never set out to deliberately
approach these matters with casual indiffer-
% ence.”. a é
_. | ‘If this is so, then how can the prime minis-
_ter ‘and ‘certain members of his government
explain the run-around given to a potential
investor —.as described by lawyer William
Holowesko in a letter published in The Tri-
‘bune-« on April12?)

- We are not here to argue the merits or
‘demerits of the American investor or his pro-
‘posed investment — a $20 million seafood

_ production plant in Inagua — but only to con-
* demn what has been described as the “dither-

ing and indecision of the Bahamas govern i

ment” i in handling his project.

' Instead of the investor being told that eee

: ernment was not interested in his proposal,

he was encouraged to go to the expense of .

- getting an Environmental Impact Assessment

(EIA) done. This will cost him about another
_ quarter of a million dollars. He has already
spent more than $2 million to prepare the

" project for government’s consideration.

.. : But in view of what Prime Minister Christie

told the House just before debate ended at.

10 o’clock Wednesday night, the guillotine

"has already come down on the Ocean Farms of
the Bahamas project.
Why didn’t he say so long ago, and let the

_investor find a new site on which to spend his

- $20 million?

'. \ According to Mr Christie the investor has to
satisfy government on two points before his
project — which has been roosting in govern-
ment’s rafters for six years — can be approved.

- _ Firstly, he has to satisfy the prime minister
that he has the $20 million to fund the project,

- and secondly, he has to submit an EIA study to
prove that his project is scientifically “feasible
-and sensible”.

'_ Why should he do the latter, when, obvi-

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ously from Mr Christie’s comments in the
House, he has not satisfied the former?

And in view of what Mr Holowesko says his
client was told — in his presence — by gov-
ernment’s scientific adviser, Dr Livingstone
Marshall — “I have stopped you now and I'll
stop you from here on out” and “don’t expect
your EIA will be approved by BEST” — it
seems brazen to lead the investor astray with

_ the hope that an EIA will be the secret key to

open the locked door to the fish farm project.

This appears to be the perfect example of an
investor being misled into spending signifi-
cant sums of money, unnecessarily — the very
thing that Mr Christie warned against.

In winding up the Inter-American Bank
loan debate in the House late Wednesday
night, Mr Christie said he had been challenged
to “talk about Inagua.”

“T respected Mr (William) Holowesko up to
the time he wrote something in that newspaper
and made a statement about me,” said Mr
Christie as he warmed to his subject.

“T have the responsibility of governing this
country and I could walk in here with court
dockets today and lay them on the table and
you will understand why I say: ‘Mr, man, you
want to invest, show me that you have the

capacity ‘6 spend $20 million on investment in

Inagua.’:

“Show me,” he continued, waving a sheef of.

documents in front of him, “that what I know
to be your corporate background is not present

-here today in the Bahamas. And then once

you do that show this country an Environ-
ment Impact Assessment that we are able to
agree that in the face of scientific advice that
what you want to do is feasible and sensible.
Now, what would it look like for me as Prime
Minister to get caught up in this — personal
attacks that are levied and say do you think
that if I have a document (again waving the
document, then dashing it to the table) that
tells me that someone was in business before
and has been bankrupt and millions of dollars
are lost — it goes beyond that, but don’t let’s
go beyond that now. But this information is
acessible; it is known and a government is
expected to make questions and raise ques-
tions on it”.

Why has it taken Mr Christie so long so say

so? No matter who the investor, he i is owedan .

apology.

This behaviour gives little confidence to
future investors to step forward with projects
for the Bahamas.



* Men's Clothing

* Uniforms

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* Children’s Clothing

* Underwear for Everybody

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EDITOR, The Tribune.

I REALLY thought the:

Rev CB Moss had more
smarts than to fall for a trick
like believing Bradley
Roberts when he promised
in 2002 that he would resign
midway in his term in office
to allow him (Senator Moss)
to run for Bain and Grants
Town. Brother. Moss,
haven’t you learned as yet
that a promise is merely a
comfort to a fool? Did you
really believe that any of
those guys would give up
any of their sweetness for
you? They hardly ever want
to leave office; even if they
are on their death beds. This
is not the first. time the
Christie camp made that
kind of a promise and you
are not the first one his
camp made look like a fool.

During the race, for the’
leadership of the PLP when

Dr Bernard Nottage chal-
lenged both Mr Christie and
Mr Galanis, all kinds of
Government jobs and Sen-
ate appointments were

promised by the Christie.

and the Galanis camps;
Christie promised a number
of us, after he made his very

' first Senate appointments,

that he would appoint new
Senators after two and one

half years or halfway into

the Senator’s term in office
— it never happened. I
promise you, Rev Moss, that
one of these days, when I
really get ticked off with
these political hypocrites, I
will tell you the names of
those sitting around the
table, in the government,
who had nothing good to say
about Christie behind his

_ back but after they received
. their promise, they desert-

ed Dr Nottage and went

‘with the flow. I can assure

you that the names include
many of those who are now
singing his (Christie’s) prais-
es around the Cabinet table
every Tuesday morning.
Politicians should be care-
ful not to make promises
they have no intentions of
keeping. It doesn’t matter
how Christie and Roberts
rant and rave, the fact of the
matter is that Roberts made
the promise to Rev Moss
and he should keep his
promise; they certainly held
Hubert Ingraham to his
commitment not to serve as

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Prime Minister for more
than ten years;
Bradley Roberts should
have resigned, anyway,
when those charges of
alleged rape were lodged
against him a short time ago
— that would have been the
proper time to go; but like I
said, these guys would not
go even if they are on their
death beds.

It bothers me, however, to
see three grown men, lead-
ers in our government no
less — Moss, Roberts and
Christie — argue. and fight
over something so trivial
when there are thousands of
Bahamians in Grand
Bahama who are catching
hell due to being unem-
ployed.

Bradley said that Moss
should know that he
(Bradley) is a man of his
word, an honourable man;
but should he? You said you
would resign, but you
haven’t. Is that being an
honourable man of your
word? I don’t think so. But
integrity is a rare commodi-
ty, especially among our
politicians. I have a certain




EDITOR, The Tribune. |

for public office.

JOHN ANTHONY
Nassau,
April 7, 2005.





besides:

‘Hitting out at
union president

JUDGING from recent events, the Hotel Union, its Pres-.
ident, Mr Bain, and his executive, seem hell bent on dictat-
ing terms of employment to the country at large and instruct-
ing the police and the Government, the Ministry of Labour
in particular, on how to do their jobs.

In between seemingly condoning acts of hooliganism by
their members, which coincidentally are largely overlooked
by the police, they should perhaps purchase a hotel or
restaurant, enlist in the police reserves and consider running

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TA CAMMOAN CHADEHOAT NERC

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COMMONWEALTH BANK
TO COMMON SHAREHOLDERS





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of 5 cents per share, on Common Shares, to all
shareholders of record at April 22, 2005:-

The payment will be made on April 29, 2005,
through Colina Financial Advisors Ltd., the
Registrar and Transfer Agent, in the usual manner.

Charlene A. Pinder Higgs
Corporate Secretary

admiration, in retrospect of
course, for Mr Ingraham
who honoured his commit-
ment to leave office after
ten years as Prime Minister
and he didn’t allow his party
to coerce him into breaking
his word either — not so in
the case with Roberts.

The book of Psalms was
written between 1440 and
586BC, King David is cred-
ited with writing 73 chap-
ters, books or however you
refer to them. In Psalms .15
verse 4, and I will para-
phrase - “He who keeps his
promise, even if it ruins him,
shall stand firm forever.”
(see the Life Application
translation).

Now that Rev Moss has
had his disagreement with
the big Boys publicly, he is
as good as dead politically.
He will be treated like a
cancer from here on in just
like Senator Edison Key was
treated. I wonder, though,
if Rev Moss has the guts
and/or the pride in himself
to resign, like Senator Key
did, before he is abused any

_ further — we shall see.

FORRESTER
CARROLL
Freeport,
Grand Bahama.
March 23, 2005.

























THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005, PAGE 5





Heated debate at Rotary



@ By KILAH ROLLE
Tribune Staff Reporter

TEMPERS flared during a ~

weekly Rotary meeting as pres-
ident of the Public’ Transit
Association (PTA) attempted
to persuade members that jit-
neys can generate millions and
offer considerable profit to any
investor willing to buy into a
much needed rehabilitation
programme.

Reuben Rahming told the
Rotary Club of West Nassau
yesterday that the public transit
system can easily generate $40
million a year, said it was
incumbent upon them to help,
“even if you just do it for your
own selfish reasons.”

“A lot of people are seem-
ingly unaware of the signifi-
cance of this industry,” he said,
“and are irresponsible enough
to assume that we jitneys have

no bearings on their business,

but with 90,000 movements a
day along various business

routes, this system has a direct —

impact on the income of your
business as far as sales and
retail is concerned.”
@
Admitted

Mr Rahming admitted that
he came prepared to speak with
the group armed with “a bit of
arrogance and confidence,”
because he knew he was being
thrown in the “midst of a lion’s
den.”

He insisted that any investor
who injected funds into the
industry would see a range of
38 to 69 per cent return on that

‘investment, “with no risk."

“The fact remains that every

_one dollar invested in the
improvement, betterment and
expansion of the public trans-



portation system as it relates to
operational capital will trans-
late into that return based upon
the community in that area.

However when he asked the
group to bang the table if they
agreed that this is a good invest-
ment, his question was met with
a resounding silence.

Failing

Rotarians pointed out that
although Mr Rahming had
some good ideas, he was fail-
ing to address some of the
issues which hinder the credi-
bility of the hundreds of jitneys
that drive the streets of New
Providence.

“These jitneys are reckless
drivers,” one Rotarian said,
“and on top of that, there are
civil servants out there who
own franchises, what do you
have to say about that?”

Mr Rahming said he was
aware that there are many civ-
il servants who are in the sys-
tem, and said that “under law
they probably should not have
a franchise.”

“We must solve these irregu-
larities in this association,” he
said, “we can’t talk regularisa-
tion if we have a lot of people
in the closet but as long as that
environment of culture is there
we will never get to where we
need to go. We must have
transparency, honesty and be
open so we can fix it.”

One way to address these
irregularities proposed by the
PTA president, is to implement
a unified hiring process in the
PTA.

“A unified code of hiring will
kill a lot of the ills we have in
the system,” he explained, “and

all drivers who come will have °

to be registered and docu-

mented in the PTA, allowing
us to reward the good and deal
with bad appropriately. This
would help bring about some
sort of stability in this business.”

When this idea was rejected
by one Rotarian, Mr Rahming
responded: “I will speak to you
like a Rotarian. I don’t think
we’ve dialogued enough for
you to, in an educated way,
determine how it cannot hap-
pen. I would expect of you as
businessmen to understand
what being a visionary is, you
know about struggle, you know
what it takes to turn over a
business and have faith in your
product even though it is floun-
dering.”

Mr Rahming said that the
average quota earned by jitney
operators is around $180 a day,

’ and said that this total is easily

achieved.

“The fundamental problem
is honesty,” he said, “you'll find
one driver who is out by 12
noon, comes in brings his.$180
and goes back on the road and
works for himself. We have a
lot of this happening.”

Problems

He also said that in the indus-.

try, he has noticed a lot of drug
and alcohol problems, poor
self-management ability, and a
lack of professionalism.

“This industry is capable of
generating in excess of 40 mil-
lion dollars easily,’ Mr Rahming
continued, “but we need help
right now because the psycho-
logical impact of years of abuse,
neglect, and political interfer-
ence that has been affected on
us has caused a stagnation. That
is about to change under our
structure, we are awakening
our people.”



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who wants the government to
take action against the spread
of ramshackle Haitian homes
across the island, believes
witchcraft is behind the locals’
silence.

But he warned that, if they

“don’t speak out, Bahamian
“ society on Abaco will be

swamped by an alien culture.

Mr Cooper, an entrepreneur,
said he feels he is fighting a
lone campaign against a prob-
lem that could have far-reach-
ing implications for Abaco in
the future.

He estimated that Haitians
already outnumber Bahamians

* five-to-one on Abaco and

warned that the island would
become a satellite of Haiti

Me within ten years if no action is
. taken.

The middle-aged father-of-
two, who made headlines a few
weeks ago when-he dismantled
a half-built Haitian shack,
wants Prime Minister Perry
Christie to address what he
sees as a real danger to the
island’s future.

He hopes to meet both Mr
Christie and Works Minister
Bradley Roberts in the near
future in a bid to spark official
















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action.
Meanwhile, he wants Aba-
conians to become more vocal

. against a situation which he

claims gets worse by the week.
“The problem is that most
Bahamians are afraid of being
fixed by obeah,” he said. “They
really believe that if they chal-
lenge the Haitians in any way,
they will use spells on them.”
Mr Cooper described local
superstitions as “idiotic” and
said he did not believe in
obeah. “I believe in God

Almighty,” he said, adding that |

Bahamians’ failure to act will
result in a Haitian takeover.

There is growing dismay on
Abaco about uncontrolled
building activity in the pine
barrens. Residents claim immi-
grants are creating new settle-
ments in bush areas near Trea-
sure Cay.

At Marsh Harbour, the two
shanty settlements, The Mud
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(Photo: Mario Duncanson/.
Tribune Staff).

mw By TIFFANY GRANT .
- Tribune Staff Re orter_

PROPER preparabontt is

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This week, individuals —

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CERT wile allow. volune

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nity level. It is our hope and
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Bahamas,” said Mr Smith.
‘When The Tribune arrived.
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held at-the New Pr
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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005

THE TRIBUNE

Group demands funding
for opponents of CSME

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Tribune Staff Reporter

AN INTERNATIONAL trade pres-
sure group is urging Prime Minister
Perry Christie to make equal funding
available to both sides of the CSME
debate.

In a press release yesterday, Bahami-
ans Agitating for a Referendum on the
Free Trade Areas of the Americas
(BARE) said that Foreign Affairs Min-
ister Fred Mitchell and CARICOM
Ambassador Leonard Archer appeared
to have engaged in a series of events
designed to orient Bahamians to the
Caribbean Single Market Economy
(CSME) and commit the country to
the regime through the auspices of the
government.

However, claimed BARF president
Paul Moss, there has been no debate or
agreement on the country’s participa-
tion in the CSME.

“Are these gentlemen speaking for
the government of the Bahamas? Do

their views represent those of Cabinet |

or parliament?” it asked.
Treaty

Mr Moss said that if government
wishes the Bahamas to join the
CSME, it must refrain from continuing
to argue that the treaty will assist the

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to the WTO.

He said officials must also stop sug-
gesting that “Bacardi is not able to sell
its rum to the Caribbean unless we
join.”

Mr Moss said the two arguments are
overused and worthless.

He said that the rules of WTO are
aimed at eliminating the diversity of
national policies, priorities and cultures
to create the uniform world sought by
multi-national corporations.

“It is an organisation that a devel-

oping country such as the Bahamas
should avoid at all costs,” he said..

Bacardi

Mr Moss added that if Bacardi can-
not sell its products in CARICOM,
then it is the fault of the government
for not responding to help Bacardi.

“T say go to, bat for Bacardi, but do
not seek to commit the country because
of government passivity,” he said.

Addressing suggestions that the
Bahamas might be granted exemption
from some of the terms of the COME
agreement, for example the free mceve-
ment of people, Mr Moss said: “Would
any right thinking person believe that
the reservations are guarantees to the
country and that Caricom would
respect it?”





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@ BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

" FREEPORT - A new junior
high school is urgently needed
on Grand Bahama to combat
overcrowding in the public
schools, a Bahamas Union of
Teachers (BUT) executive hgas
claimed.

“We need at least one of the
two junior high schools that
were promised available by the
start of school year or we are
going to have some serious
overcrowding on Grand
Bahama,” warned Frances
Friend, BUT area vice presi-
dent for Grand Bahama.

Ms Friend said the union is
very concerned about the nega-
tive implications that over-
crowding could have on both
teachers and students.

Prior to his death last Decem-
ber, then-chairman of the
Grand Bahama Port Authority
Edward St George pledged
financial assistance for the con-
struction of two new junior high
schools.

If a new junior high school is
not available by September, Ms
Friends said the Ministry of
Education would have to make
some provision to accommo-
date students.

She added that industrial

a FRED Mitchell has been accused of comuittiog
the country to the CSME



‘Urgent need’ for
new school on
Grand Bahama

action could follow if nothing .
is done to address the issue of
overcrowding.

Repairs

Another area of concern is
the unfinished repairs at the
schools in west Grand Bahama,
including West End primary,

* Holmes Rock primary and Mar-

tin Town primary.

‘Ms Friend was very con-
cerned about bathroom access
at Holmes Rock primary. She
noted that students are forced
to hop over a board at the door-
way to gain access to the facili-
ties.

“It would be one year since
the hurricane this coming Sep-
tember, and I would hope that
repairs at all of the schools are
completed in its entirety by that
time,” said Ms Friend.

Turning her attention-to
school security, Ms Friend stat-
ed that security at all of ‘the
schools has significantly
improved.

After serving a several years
as area vice president for the
Grand Bahama district, Ms
Friend announced that she will
be offering running for the
BUT presidency. Elections are
slated for June 8.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005, PAGE 7

Centre



saan after Deqotintiona.



& BCPO president Robert Farquharson speaking to reporters outside Bahamas Telecommiunica- _issues on the table are a pro-

tions last month



Louis Vu
product
‘sold illeg

@ By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

LOUIS Vuitton items are a
common sight on the streets of
Nassau — yet,no one in the
Bahamas is authorised to sell
the brand.

So said Lewis Nadel, is an‘

investigator with Forensic
Investigative Associates, whose
client is LVMH (Louis Vuitton,
Moet, Hennessey).

He was one of the presenters
at a one-day seminar held yes-
terday on counterfeiting and
copyright:

Bahamian law enforcement
officers attended the seminar,
which included presentations
from representatives of some
of the companies whose prod:
ucts are most extensively pirat-
ed in the country.

"It is a very challenging issue
for the people of the Bahamas.
Even though there is an existing

. law that resides on the books,
the actual enforcement of this

_ law is now being handled with a
lot of strategic planning and
investigations are well engi-

“neered," said Mr Nadel.

Consumers should be aware,
he added, that these fake goods
are often being made in sweat-
shops where young children
work 12 to 14-hour days in sub-

' standard conditions.
"Legitimate goods are made
under very strict quality con-
trol processes and inspections,"
_ he said. "These products
undergo none of them. They
are mass manufactured out





ally’

of the cheapest goods.

“The proceeds of these goods
go into other markets such as
money laundering, weapons,
drugs — it’s a whole subculture
that derives from the proceeds
of the counterfeit market.".

Quality

Mr Nadel claimed that one
of his client’s concerns is that
when fake Louis Vuitton prod-
ucts become worn and tattered
because the leather has not
been cut properly, or when the
stitching begins to show, it
reflects badly on the authentic
manufacturer.

He added that millions of
dollars are being lost interna-
tionally because of this trade,
as most transactions are con-
ducted over the Internet, mak-
ing the job of law enforcement
officers much more difficult.

The Bahamas Copyright Act
allows for hefty fines and seri-
ous jail terms for those involved
in the illegal reproduction of
DVDs, CDs and videotapes,
the selling fake upscale prod-
ucts, or any other form of coun-
terfeiting or pirating. Con-
sumers are not exempt from
prosecution before the courts.

Mr Nadel said that educat-
ing the Bahamian public was
important, especially vendors
in the straw market, where he
says that counterfeit items are
still being sold and vendors
have “significant investments”
in these items.

Police seminar
On retiring with
peace and dignity

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Royal Bahamas Police
Force has held a two-day retire-
ment training seminar aimed at
helping its employees enter the
next stage of life with a degree
of certainty and peace of mind.

The seminar, which is to be
an annual event, was launched
under the theme “providing the
help you need today, to secure
the future you want tomorrow”
at the police headquarters cafe-
teria yesterday and will contin-
ue today.

The objectives of the semi-
nar are to help employees iden-
tify and address concerns about
retirement, to provide a frame-
work to assist in planning long-
term and short-term goals and
to provide strategies to help

participants plan investments in
advance,
. Officers will also be offered
information on pensions, finan-
cial planning and estate man-
agement.

“Too many police officers
and civilians have retired from
this organisation and found
themselves confronted with sit-
uations less than suitable for
them to comfortably maintain a
particular lifestyle.

“That is why this workshop
is SO appropriate and most
timely and I trust that the
information shared will provoke
you to quickly make the neces-
sary adjustment that will ensure
that your retirement days are
spent with some degree of com-
fort,” Commissioner of Police
Paul Farquharson told the offi-
cers.

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

EMPLOYEES at the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
yesterday held a “go-slow
protest”, a well placed sources
told The Tribune. |

According to the source, the
action took place following a
meeting held with management
on Wednesday night.

The source claimed that union
officials were unhappy with the
results and therefore told their
members to report to work but
not to do anything while there.

Executives of the Bahamas
Communications and Public
Officers Union, the bargaining
unit for BTC, have been in con-
tract negotiations since their. con-
tract expired in December 2004.

Last month, workers staged a

for workers over the next five
years, the question of paternity
leave, share offerings (which
have not been offered before),
mortgage subsidiaries and bill
payment incentives.

Employees who sat-out had
called for the entire manage-
ment team to be dismissed, say-
ing that the terms the workers
were negotiating are not unac-
ceptable and do not reflect the
current rise in the cost of liv-
ing.

In a press release responding
to the action, BTC claimed that
the work stoppage was illegal.

After a meeting with Mr
Brown, the workers returned
to work the following day. Yes-
terday, The Tribune could not

reach Robert Farquharson or-

BTC management to confirm
the “go-slow.”

promotes
theatre
skills

THE Dundas Centre for
the Performing Arts is set
to launch a series of read-
ings for plays headed for
stage and screen.

The centre is calling on
actors, poets, directors, pro-
ducers, set designers, and
back-stagers to come to the
Dundas on Mackey Street
on Sunday April 17 at 4pm.

The first in the series will
focus on poetry dedicated to
mothers.

“Interested persons are
invited to come out and be
involved in the perfor-
mances, and the Dundas

seeks the renaissance of the-
atre in the Bahamas,” the

centre said.

For further information,
call 325-0005 or fax 325-
5005.



sit-in in order to force a meeting
|. with Reno J Brown, the execu-
tive director of BTC after nego-
tiations with management
reached a stalemate.

According to BCPO president
Robert Farquharson, among the

SAT REVIEW -or sunec
REGISTRATION IN
BGCSE SPANISH

CALL ILR/ GROSVENOR /







posed six per cent pay increase

16 April 2005
: Rae iatare Medical,

The Bahamas Diabetic Association __
& the Cancer Slefei 9] of The PE

invite you to join us on our
“All Together Better” fun walk.

An“All Together Better”
way to start the day!
THE EVENT BEGINS AT 6.30 A.M.

THE ROUTE commences from MONTAGU BEACH then WEST on

Shirley Street, NORTH on Church Street, OUTWARD across

“New Paradise Island Bridge” to the round-about at Paradise Island Golf Course,
BACK to New Providence via the “Old Paradise Island Bridge”, EAST on

East Bay Street and back to Montagu Beach.

TROPHIES ARE AWARDED TO WINNERS BY THE
FOLLOWING CATEGORIES (Male & Female):

A. 12 & UNDER (CHILDREN) B. 13-18 C. 19-30

D. 31-45: E. 46-59 F. “Age Ain’t Nothin’ But a Number” 60+

...With a special floating trophy being awarded to the company
and civic organisation with the most entrants.

- The event dedicated email address is funwalk@atlantichouse.com.bs
Freeport Fun Walk - April 30th,2005

official registration form

/ Atlantic Medical is not liable for injuries incurred by participants at this event.
$15.00 Adults / $12.00 Children: includes “T-shirt, Fruits, Water and a Special Gift”
Deliver to Atlantic Medical Insurance, 5th floor Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Ave.

Tel: 326-8191 or Fax this form to: 326-8189.
FOR ADDITIONAL ENTRIES DUPLICATE THIS FORM.

NAME: ‘ AGE:
COMPANY/ORGANIZATION: EMAIL:

T-SHIRT SIZE. S M LL XL XXL XXXL (circle choice)

\ RACE CATEGORY: A B C D F

CWeightWatchers

ED |
The Bahamas Diabetic Association exam All an t IC M ed ICa |
ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE LIMITED
ATLANTIC HOUSE 2nd TERRACE &COLLINS AVENUE PO BOX SS 5915 NASSAU

TEL: (242) 326-8191 FAX: (242) 326-8189

A member of Colonial Group International Ltd.
Personal & Business Insurance: Group Pensions: Group Medical: Life Assurance & Investments







PAGE 8, FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005



A VISIT to Atlantis’ Dis-
covery Channel Camp
topped the agendas of more
than 20, excited fifth and
sixth grade students of the
Lowe Sound Primary
School, during a recent fun
packed field trip to New
Providence. The Discovery
Channel Camp at Atlantis,
is a unique children’s camp
designed for young Atlantis
guests and children from the
local school community. The
camp fosters learning
through science, arts and
craft in a fun filled, exciting
and secured environment.

The students from Andros
had lots of fun exploring the
ancient ruins of Atlantis.
The youngsters expressed a
keen interest in the marine
animals on display, in par-
ticular the sharks.

Sharks

Not only did they observe
various species of sharks, but
also had an opportunity to
learn how these animals
function. The youngsters got
an opportunity to see a repli-
ca of a row of shark teeth as
well as paint miniature
sharks made of wood.

Leria Archer- McKenzie,
Director of the Discovery
Channel Camp at Atlantis
said Atlantis was very
pleased to have the students
of Lowe Sound Primary
School visit the facilities as a
part of the Discovery Chan-
nel Camp’s partnership with
the community. She said,
over the years, the camp has
become a tool for local edu-
cators who use the facility as
a resource site for educa-
tional field trips.

McKenzie said, “Our local
school programme has
grown tremendously since its

inception four years ago...



_LOCAL NEWS

H@ EDU-TAINMENT! Antionette Hanna,
Senior Camp Counsellor at the Discovery Chan-
nel Camp shows students of the Lowe Sound
Primary School a row of shark teeth.

(Photo: Anastasia Stubbs)

| This only reinforces Atlantis’

commitment to impact the
lives of our young people in
the entire Bahamas, not ip
New, Providence.”

_ Mel ose Devine- Moss, a’



Senior Assistant and
Teacher.at Lowe Sound Pri-
mary School said, “Even
though we are from Andros

, sand, live near the water, the

students don’t have an

opportunity to experience
close up encounters with the
fish, sharks, manta rays and
other sea creatures. So this
trip was really fascinating for
them.”

THE TRIBUNE



Following their visit at
Atlantis the youngsters were
off to Government House
and the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force.

The field trip was organ- ,



ised by administrators of

- Lowe Sound Primary School

in conjunction with the Min-.
istry of Education’s Science
and Fechnolepy Depart:
ment. i

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS



Government

appoints youth

and culture >
co-ordinators

. @ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

TWELVE people have been
appointed by the government
to develop youth and culture
programmes on the family
islands.

The co-ordinators will work
with central and family author-
ities and community organiza-
tions to introduce, co—ordinate
and assist with programmes,
projects and events.

Culture Minister Neville Wis-
dom made the announcement
in the House of Assembly on
Wednesday, saying that the
posts were created in line with
budgetary constraints and in an
attempt to reduce the amount
of officers needed to carry out
ministry functions.

He said that the officers who
will co-ordinate the activities

were multi-talented in youth,
sports culture and community
work.

“Their skills together with the
support of the Ministry staff,
would help to effectively take
the Ministry’s mission to devel-
op youth excel in sports and



Marsulette Patram



WTR cement ele

Nerissa Lockhart -
Robbie Smith -
Lovinia Woodside =
Kelson Morley -
Ishmael Morley =
Ann Brown -
Marvin Storr -
. Brian Cleare -
Donald Saunders =,
Mark Wells -
Zanta Lightbourne -



preserve Bahamian culture to
the family island,” he said.

He added that this is the first
step to strengthen the process
of bringing full time youth offi-
cers, sports officers, and cultur-
al affairs officers to each family
island in the future.



Grand Bahama

Bimini / Berry Island
Crooked Island

Exuma /Ragged Isiand
Abaco

Cat Island

San Salvador

North Andros

South Andros :
Long Island / Rum Cay .
Inagua / Mayaguana
Eleuthera












Freeport Junkanoo
competition announced



@ C-Cube public relations director and president of Creative Works Peter Adderley, centre, along
with Valley Boys chairman Brian Adderley, right, chairman of the Grand Bahama Coalition
Junkanoo Group Ken Ferguson, second from left, and junkanoo representatives.

FREEPORT - A JUNKANOO competition
called “Feel The Rush” will be held in down-

town Freeport on July 31.

More than $75,000 in prizes will be up for grabs



in the Grand Bahama competition, which was
announced during a press conference held in

Rawson Square on Wednesday by organisers

C-Cube

@ Marketing manager Leah Davis with the Johnsons

Shopper tearing down the aisles

A SHOPPER was able to shop to his heart’s
content when he went on a two-minute spree

at Solomon’s Super Centre.

Cyril Johnson raced down the aisle after
his wife won the spree. The Jolinsons were

the second winners in the store’s promotion,
through which it will give away four sprees.

Shoppers have a chance of winning the



remaining three and four-minute sprees with
a minimum $25 purchase.






HURRICANE HOLE MARINA

Yacht Show Hours: Friday/Saturday 10am-5pm
Sunday 1 lam-5pm

MILLION AIR JET CENTER

Aircraft Show Hours: Friday/Saturday 10am-5pm

‘4th annual International
Yacht and Jet Show
and spend a few days

relaxing in Paradise.

JHE ISLANDS OF

QOrnebahamas

INTERNATIONAL






£.
Aig Can
“Celebrating Food in Plight”





PAGE 10, FRIDAY, APRIL 15,



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2005

THE TRIBUNE.







ARO UN D



NASSAU













Be Parties, Nightclubs
Bena & Restaurants

Pink and White Bashment @ BFM Diplomat
Centre to launch the Kingdom Vibes TV Show
Cable 12. Friday, April. {5 @ 7.30pm sharp.
Appearing: Mr Link, DJ Counsellor, Kristine,
Solo and Chariots of Fire. Admission: $12
(includes a free CD of your choice). Tickets @

‘BEM, Faith Life, Oasis Music Centre, The Juke-

box, Bucks Gospel.

Girl Power, featuring Novie, Destra, Faye Ann
(Trint Road March Queen 2K3), Spice and Lady
E. @ Cable Beach Grounds. Saturday, April 16 @
Cable Beach Grounds. Admission: $20 (advance),
$25 (at the gate). Ticket location: Alpha Sounds.
Hosted by JJ, backed by Visage.

Exotic Saturdays @ Fridays Soon Come starts
with 3 for $10 drink specials. Admission: $40
before midntght and $15 after. Ladies free before
tl pm.

Rave Saturdays @ Club Ectipse. DJ Scoobz
spinning the best in Old Skool. Admission $35, all
inclusive food and drink.

Fever @ Bahama Boom, Elizabeth St, down-
town, every Friday night. Admission $10 before
midnight. First 50 women get free champagne.
First 50 men get a free Greycliff cigar. Dress to
impress. For VIP reservations call 356- 4612.

Coot Runnings is b@k with a Conscious Party
@ Hard Rock Cafe, Charlotte St North every Fri-
day. Classic reggae style music. Admission $10.

Mellow Moods every Sunday: @ Fluid Lounge

_ and ‘Nightclub, Bay St; featuring hits’ from*yes-~

terday — old school reggae and rockers down-

_ Stairs, and. golden oldies upstairs. Admission:

Free. Doors open 9pm.

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters Sperts

Bar. Drink speciats alt might long, tncluding
karaoke warm-up drink to get you started. Party
from 8pm-until.

Karaoke Mights @ Fluid Lounge and Nigtt-
club. Begins 10pm every Tuesday. Weekly winners
selected as Vocalist of the Week — $250 cash prize.

Winner selected at endl of month frong finalists —-

cash prize $1,000. Admission $10 with one free
drink.

Regeae Tuesdays @ Bahama Boom. Cover
charge includes a free Guinness.and there should
be lots of prizes and surprises. Admission: Ladies
$10 and Men $15,

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports
Bar every Wednesday Spm-Spm. Free. Appetiz-
ers and numerous drink spectals.

Mash Nights @ Club Fluid every Thursday. The
ultimate Ladies Night. Join Nassau’s and Mianu
Beach’s finest men. Ladies only before | 1.30pm
with free champagne. Guys allowed after 11.30pm
with $20 cover.

The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday.
Doors open at Ypne showtime 1f.30pm. Cover
charge $15. $10 with ftyer.

Fantasy Mridays @ Huid Lounge, featuring late
“80s music in the VIP Lounge, Top of the Charts
in the Main Lounge# icon lights and. Go Go
dancers. Glow sticks for all in before midnight.
Admission: Ladies free before Lipm, tle after;
Guys $20 all night.

Dicky Mo’s Mridays @ Cable Beach. Happy
Hour - 3 for $10 mixed drinks aad $f shots.

Fwisted Boodah Lounge @ Cafe Segafredo,
Charlotte St kicks off carly thes F riday at 6pm
with deep house to hard house music, Seaturing
CraivBOO, Unkle Funky and Swor?wide on the
decks.

Chill Owt Sundays @ Coco Loco, Sandyport,
from 4pm-until, playing deep, funky chill moods

i terereous
Ty CaN



®

YA Hs





f

REVEL in the Arts, a celebration of the
visual, musical and culinary arts, hosted by the
Lyford Cay Scholars’ Association (LCSA), will
be held on Saturday, April 16 at 7pm at Mount-
batten Hoase & Gardens, West Hill Street.

_ The gala cocktail benefits the Harry C Moore
Memorial Scholarship in the Arts, to fund the
education of Bahamian arts students. Thirty
well-known artists have donated artwork fow a
silent auction. Opening bids will begin at half
the value, providing the “rare”? opportunity to
obtain your favourite artist's work at very good
prices. e @

Revel in fine food, wine, live music, live food

with world beats.



Sweet Sunday Chill Out Seiree Lounge, every

Sunday, 4pm-midnight.@ Patio Grille, British

Colonial Hotel.

" Wet Siindays, every Sunday, noon-midnight @'

Crystal Cay Beach. Admission $10, ladies free.

Carib Scene @ Club Fluid every Sunday. A
night of Caribbean, Latin and Reggae flavours
for all audiences. Latin Flair in the VIP Lounge;
Old School Reggae and Soca in the Main Lounge.
‘Ladies in free before [1pma. $10 after {1pm. Men,
$15 cover charge.

Jay Mitehell amd Hot KC @ Patm Court
Lounge, British Colontal Hilton, Wednesday-
Thursday Spin-l2am.

Sunday Night Inter’ hide @ Briteley’s Restaurant
& Lounge, Eneas St off Poinciana Drive.
turing Frankie Victory at the key board in ihe
After Dark Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to mud-
night. Fire food and drinks.

Paul Hanna, Tabatha and Geraie, and the
Caribbean Express perform at ‘Traveller’s Rest,
West Bay St, every Sunday, 6.30pm-9.30pm.

The Arts

Revel im the Arts, a pala cockttal
fundraiser eetebrating the visual, musical
and culinary arts, will be held at Mount-
batten House & Gardens, West Hull Street
on Saturday, April 16. Featuring: an Art
a Services auction; door prizes; Jive music;
and Dine Arousid, a culinary feast featuring
‘the cuisine of Naau® most exclusive
restaurants. Hosted by the Lyford Cay
Scholars’ Association (LCSA). Dress: island

elegance. Time: 7pm. Procecds in aid of
the Lyford Cay Foundation's Harry C
Moore Memortal Scholarship iw the Arts.
Tickets @ $75 can be purchased by con-
tacting Monique Hinsey, 362-4910; John A
C Benjamin, 394-9541; Mark A Jordan, 361-
5220 ext 264; “Erica James, 328-5800 ext
227.

Bond, an exhibition of recent works by .

mother and son artists Sue Bennett-

Williams and Jason Bennett will run this
month at Popostudios Gallery tn Chip-



Fea-





demonstrations and much more.

The gala event will also introduce the much
anticipated “Dine Around”, where cuisine from
the island’s finest restaurants will be available.
Gifests will also have an opportunity to retain
tite in-house services of some of the Bahamas’
top chefs, and the services of numerous pro-

’ fessionals im fields including graphic design,

personal care and assistance.

° For tickets @ $75, contact Monique Hinsey,
362-4910; John AC Benjamin, 394-9541; Mark
A Jordan, 301-5220 ext 264; Erica James, 328-
5800 ext 227. Door prizes will also be avail-

pata A oat eat apc neers eee

Ping hiun. An ail day open house will be

held on Saturday. April 9, 12pm-7pm..The
exhibition features paintings, mixed media
and.ceramics. ss



Talking Canvases, a solo exhibition by
artist Marlon Hunt at the Central Bank
Art Gallery, Market St, he show runs
through April 28,

The Natioual Collection @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, an exhibition that
takes the viewer on a journey through the his-
tory of fine art in the Bahamas. It features sig-
nature pieces from the national collection,
including recent acquisitions by Blue Curry,
Antonius Roberts and Dionne Benjamin-Smith.
Gallery hours, Tuescday-Saturday, llam-4pm.
Call 328-5800 to book tours.

Past, Present and Personal The Dawn Davies
Collection @ the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, Villa Doyle, West and West Hill Streets.
‘The exhibition is part of the NAGB’s Collector’s
Series. Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 1lam-
4pm. Call 328-5800 to book tours.

‘The Awakening Landscape: The Nassau
Watercolours of Gaspard Le Marchand Tupper,
from the collection of Orjan and Amanda Lin-
droth @ the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas. The mid-nineteenth century paintings
that make up the exhibition are part of one of
the earliest suites of paintings of Nassau and its
environs.

Tupper was a British military officer sta-

tioned at Fort Charlotte in the 1850s. The works |

show a pre-modern Bahamas through the
decidely British medium of watercolour.
Gallery hours, ‘Vuesday-Saturday, 1lam-4pm.
Call 328-5800 to book tours.

Health
Doctors Hospital Distinguished Lecture

Series: High blood pressure affects one in four
adults. Distinguished physician Dr Judson

Eneas will discuss “Hypertension, the Silent

Killer Exposed” on Thursday, April 21 at 6pm
in the Doctors Hospital conference room. This
lecture will incrcase awareness and educate
persons about how to prevent, treat, and man-
age high blood pressure as well as the related
cardiovascular diseases. The lecture is free to
the general public. Free blood pressure, cho-
lesterol and glucose screenings will be per-
formed between Spm and 6pm. To ensure



~ Call 323-4482 for more info.

- the warning signs of respiratory arrest and gives





























available seating RSVP 302-4603.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5.30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at
their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville.

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the
third Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors Hos-
pital conference room.

The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2.30pm (except August and
December) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor
Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital, the official training centre
of the American Heart Association offers CPR
classes certified by the AHA. The course defines

prevention strategies to avoid:sudden death syn-
drome and the most common serious injuries and
choking that can occur in adults, infants and chil-
dren. CPR and First Aid classes are offered every
third Saturday of the month from 9am-1pm. Con-
tact a Doctors Hospital Community Training Rep-
resentative at 302-4732 for more information and
learn to save a life today.

REACH - Resources & Education for
Autism and related Challenges meets from
7pm — 9pm the second Thursday of each month
in the cafeteria of the BEC building, Blue Hill
Road.



Civic Clubs



Toastmasters Club 1905 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm
@ BEC Cafe, Tucker Rd. Club 9477 meets Friday,
7pm @ Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm
A19, Jean St. Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pm
@ British Colonial Hilton. Club 1600 meets Thurs-
day, 8.30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes. Club 7178
meets Tuesday, 6pm @ The J Whitney Pinder
Building, Collins Ave. Club 2437 meets every
second, fourth and fifth Wednesday at the J Whit-
ney Pinder Building, Collins Ave ai 6pm. Club
612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau
Resort, Cable Beach. Club 753494 meets every
Wednesday, 6pm-8pm in the Solomon’s Build-
ing, East-West Highway: All are welcome.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @
the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau
Resort, Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first
Tuesday, 7pm @ Gaylord’s Restaurant,
Dowdeswell St. Please cel 502-4842/377-4589 for

more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second
Tuesday, 6.30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office;
4th floor meeting room.

The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month
in the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, Bay St.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus
meets the second and fourth Wednesday of the
month, 8pm @ St Augustine’s Monestary.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every sec-
ond Friday of each month, 7.30pm at Emmaus
Centre at St Augustine’s Monestary. For more
info call 325-1947 after 4pm.

International Association of Administrative
Professionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third
Thursday of every month @ Superclubs Breezes,
Cable Beach, 6pm.

AMISTAD, a Spanish club meets the third Fri-
day of the month at COB’s Tourism Training
Centre at 7pm in Room 144 during the academic
year. The group promotes the Spanish language
and culture in the community.

Send all your civic and social events to The
Tribune via fax: 328-2398 or e-mail:
outthere@tribunemedia.net



5









THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005, PAGE 11





Public encouraged.
to get involved in
fun walk for health

THE public is being asked to
get involved in the annual Fun
Walk on Saturday — and there is
the chance of prizes for those
who do.

The walk will start at Mon-
tagu Beach at 6:30am and par-
ticipants will travel west on
Shirley Street, to Church Street,
north to the new Paradise
Island Bridge, east of the bridge
to the Paradise Island Golf
Course and then back to Mon-
tagu Beach via the old Paradise
Island Bridge, and finally east
on East Bay Street back to
Montagu Beach.

For the first time, organiser
Atlantic Medical will give each
participant of the walk an
opportunity to win prizes.



First prize:is a round trip
for two to New York on Jet
Blue Airways. Second prize is a
three-month membership
at Better Bodies Gym, and
third prize is two three-month
memberships to Weight
Bahamas.

Executive vice-president and

general manager of Atlantic
Medical Insurance, Lynda Gib-
son expressed her enthusiasm
about the event this year, which
she predicts will be the biggest

Health

“The company is always
seeking to find ways to sensi-

ECO Cr mclacn et ae
~ MONTROSE AVE.



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St. George’s Anglican Church

Montrose Avenue
Tel: (242) 322-1139

tize the general public about
ways to prevent the onset of
various diseases through incor-
porating good healthy living
into their diet and lifestyles.
Walking is the perfect way,”
said Mrs Gibson.

Medical

Participants will include
Atlantic Medical clients, Weight
Watchers members and mem-
bers of the general public. In
past years medical professionals
and doctors and members of
the Bahamas Cancer Society
also attended the walk.

“Their participation is a clear
indication of importance of reg-
ular exercise in the fight against
cancer,” added Mrg.Gibson.

The event, now in its éventh
year, has also won the endorse-
ment of Miss Bahamas Denia
Nixon and Governor General
Dame Ivy Dumont

Proceeds from this walk will
be donated to The Cancer
Society of The Bahamas and
The Bahamas Diabetic Associ-
ation

Anyone interested in taking
part is asked to contact Atlantic
Medical to pre-register at 326-
8191 or Weight Watchers at
394-0148.



MISS Bahamas Denia Nixon with Alana Ingraham and
Darren Bastian of Atlantic Medical Insurance




Website: www.saintgeorgesbahamas.com

“Sharing The Gospel, Living The Ministry”

GOOD NEWS, SHARE IT



i GOVERNOR General Dame Ivy Dumont backs the walk



we love must someday pass
ond our present sight.....

t leave us and the world we know
Without thier radiant light.







-. But we know that like a candle

Their lovely light will shine

To brighten up another place
More perfect more divine.

And in the realm of heaven
‘Where they shine so warm and bright
Our loved ones live forever more
In God’s eternal light.....

Sadly missed by father Colin, sisters Michele and
Siobhan” son Alistair; daughter V’Alonee; brother Perry;.
uncle Egbert; nephews Philip and Michael; nieces Litza |
and Aprial, numerous other relatives and friends. ~

GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN

ia
My
'

+4



TENDER FOR GSM CONTENT SERVICES












The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) is seeking suitably ;

4 | | qualified companies to submit tenders to provide the company with GSM
e ° - 5 ° | e * :

join St. George’s Anglican Church Family | “omtent Services.

Celebrates its 56th Patronal Festival Please note that companies must fully meet all pre-qualification specifications
prior to obtaining the actual tender document. The pre-qualification

specifications are listed below:



1) Company profile of tenderer (overview of company, company
background, number of years in operation, listing of present and
past clients including contact information).

2) Company must be 100% Bahamian owned.

3) Company ownership (listing of principal/beneficial owners,
directors and operators of company. If a joint venture, specify.
participants and terms of joint venture).

4) Full liability insurance of $1, 000,000.00.

AS 5) Agopy of valid businessylicense. a:

ee a 6) Cone *e National Insurance certificate. .

7) Total number of employees.

8) Three written references from persons/businesses for which
similar contracts were successfully completed within the last
three years and the Company must provide references from
current clients utilizing their content services.

9) Bank reference showing financial viability.

10) Copies of financial statements (audited/unaudited) for last three
years of operation.

11) Company must have provided Content services for a period of

3 to 5 years.

12) Company must be able to provide local and international (North

America, Caribbean and the U.K) content.

Good News Service nightly at 7:00 pm
Tuesday 19th - Thursday 21st, April, 2005.
Missioner: Fr. Atma Budhu
Rector: St. Gregory’s
Theme:
“Evangelism through
MISSION, LITURGY, MINISTRY” —





Mass, Holy Eucharist
Sunday, 24th April, 2005 ¢ 9:00 am»
~ Guest Preacher:
Fr. Ernest Pratt, Rector
Companion Parish of St. Paul’s,
Long Island

Fr. Ernest Pratt



Pre-qualification items must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked “
PRE-QUALIFICATION INFORMATION FOR GSM CONTENT
SERVICES “, and delivered on or before 4:00 pm. on April. 28, 2005 to
the attention of:

Service of Thanksgiving Procession,
Benediction & Fellowship
Sunday, 24th April, 2005 ¢ 3:30 pm
Guest Preacher: Canon Harry Bain
Rector, Pro - Cathedral, ©

Christ The King Parish
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Mr. Michael J. Symonette

President & CEO

The Bahamas Telecommunications Co. Ltd.
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive

P.O. Box N-3048

Nassau, The Bahamas





Canon Harry Bain



Saturday, 23rd April 9:00 am
Addington House

Family Entertainment
Featuring “Da bes’ Talent in Da Valley"

Friday, 22nd April, 7:00 pm



PAGE 12, FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005 THE TRIBUNE



FRIDAY EVENING APRIL 15, 2005

7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

Sra est eta Vat es)

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Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun

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Airbender — Airbender 1 (CC) Teenage Robot |Parents “ (CC)|"Joey's Place” |(CC)
NT e

:00) JAG “Un- |The Contender (N) © (CC Largo Winch News 1 (CC) |News
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TBN Scenes (CC) (CC) Price (CC)

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THE TRIBUNE






Ss





@ MINISTER of Tourism, Obie Wilchcombe (right) and Deputy Director-General, Vernice

Walkine, (centre) chats with Max Mayfield, director of the National Hurricane Centre, USA at

the 2005 Weather Conference.

focus of

LAST year’s hurricane sea-
son, which severely impacted
some of the Islands of the
Bahamas while leaving others
virtually untouched, emphasised
the absolute importance of the
annual weather conference,
Minister of Tourism, Obie
Wilchcombe told delegates on
Thursday morning. :

Officially opening the ninth
Bahamas Weather Conference,
Mr Wilchcombe thanked the
over 100 meteorologists and
journalists attending the event
for their very accurate reports
on hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne last year.

He also noted that because
tourism is the mainstay of the
Bahamas, it is very important

during natural disasters such as

the 2004 hurricanes that visitors
know exactly which islands are
affected.

This year’s conference, heid
‘at the Atlantis Resort on Par-
adise Island, is the largest host-
ed by the Ministry so far. The
conference explored the nature
of tracking tropical storms, the
geography of the Bahamas,
island safety procedures, hurri-
cane climatology, evacuation
logistics for the Bahamas and

the United States and the very -

important role the media plays
during these types of natural
disasters.

Overview

Conference delegates were
also given an overview of the
extensive media coverage the
very active 2004 hurricane sea-

son garnered. Minister Wilch--

combe noted that in the major-

‘ity of the reports on the
Bahamas, meteorologists iden-
tified the individual islands by
name and location.

Referring to these reports, he
added: “The investment
inputted by the Ministry of
Tourism in the annual Weather
Conference is obviously paying
off as international meteorolo-
gists are aware of the individu-
ality of the islands.”

The minister also shared with

the meteorologist and journal-__

ists how quickly tourism on the
hurricane-affected islands was
able to rebound following the
2004 hurricanes. “Less than ten
months later, tourism on virtu-
ally all of the islands affected is
now back to pre-hurricane lev-
els.

“And even though Grand
Bahama was affected so badly,





Warve»ness

only one hotel is still down,” he
said. “We have rebounded and
we are celebrating and I think it
has to do with what you did for
us. The prime minister and all
the people of the Bahamas
appreciate you and appreciate
this conference.”

The 2005 Weather Confer-
ence featured guest speakers
from the US National Hurri-
cane Centre, the Federal Emer-
gency Management Association
(FEMA), the Weather Chan-
nel, USA Today and other
regional emergency manage-
ment offices.

Renowned Hurricane Expert
and former director of the
National Hurricane Centre, Dr
Robert Sheets acted as confer-
ence facilitator.

During the conference, many
of the journalists and meteorol-
ogists from major network affil-

-iates along the eastern United
States staged live broadcasts to
-their home audiences via Satel-
lite. This allowed television

(BIS Phote: Derek Smith)





viewers of stations like WTVJ,
Miami and WSOC, Charlotte
the opportunity to see their
weather forecast against the
backdrop of the beautiful sun,
sand and sea of Paradise Island,
Bahamas.

Impact

Through hosting the annual

: Weather Conference, the Min-

istry of Tourism-seeks to min-
imise the impact of hurricanes
on visitors and residents by
encouraging the dissemination
of accurate, timely information
regarding hurricanes.
A secondary goal is to empha-
sise the geography of the
Bahamas.

The annual Weather Confer-
ence has grown to become a
mainstay of journalist and mete-
orologists worldwide and is now
recognised by the National
Weather Association as an ofti-
cial seminar for earning industry
credits.



FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005, PAGE 13

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PAGE 14, FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



Harewood Sinclair Higgs LF.D.
Pre emanate: Director



CAMERON

DELMANO

KNOWLES
WALLACE, 25

A resident of Simms,
Long Island, will be
held on Saturday April
16th 2005 at 1:00 pm
at Church of God,
Bernard Road.
interment will follow in
the Old Trail Cemetery,
Abundant Life Road.



Officating will be Pastor Dr J L Ferguson, assisted by |

Pastor charles gardiner and Daniel Hall. Service have
been entrusted to Gateway Memorial Funeral Chapel
Wulff Road and Primrose Sireet.

Left with cherished memory are his wife Chantal
"Chante" Knowles; his son Cameron Jr.; his stepson,
Dwayne; father and stepmother Calvin and Fearlease
Wallace; step father Christopher Major; four (4) sisters
Theresa Kelly, Deandra Knowles, Crystal Major and
Shandra Munroe; five (5) brother Christopher Jr.,
Almond and De' Angelo Major, Chaneil and Lamont
Wallace; two (2) grandmothers Delma Knowles of
Simms, Long Island, Vera Wallace of Ragged Island;
mother-in-law, Judy Isaaca of South Africa; three (3)
nieces Tyresha and Terrica Miller and Kenudra Munroe;
one (i) nephew, Quentin Knowles; sisters-inlaw
Madeleine Etzhold of Germany and Elke Griffith of
South Africa; brothers-in-law, Keno Munroe and Earl
Isaacs of Germany; ten (10) aunts, Malvease,
Charmaine, Loraine, Debbie and Denise Knowles
Alfreda Thirston, Mary Rolle, Nurse Prescola Hall,
Eunice and Ann Wallace; eleven (11) uncles, Wilfred
aka "Willia Love" and Charles of Freeport, Henry of
Long Island, John, Wesley and Ernest Knowles, John,
Percy and Lester Wallace of Bimini, William Hall and
Fredrick Rolle; four (4) grand uncles gerald, Exekiel

| of Cat Island, Paul‘and Claudius Taylor of Daytona

tf
|

. Beach, Florida; three (3) grand aunts Castella, Pricella
I and Dorothy Taylor: godmothers, Doras Romer and

Angie Clarke; a host of other relatives and friends -

| Meroe Neil, Youlander, Kishlane, Shanrese, Rafell,

. Monolisa, Avarlo, Carlos, Ray Minus Jr" Jamal, Darlo;

Elkin and Jerry Butler, Jerome Ellis, Bernard’ Rolle,
dr. Munir Rashad, Ruark Rodenwalt, the Knowles,
| Taylor. and Wallace families, Derick Coakley, Rev
Urban knowles and family and Rev Alvin Gray and
| family.

Public viewitig will take place at Gateway Memorial
‘Funeral chapel on Friday from 10:00 am To 6:00 pm
and’on. patureny from 12:00 noon to service time at
the church. : ,

SONIA "TON"
JOSEPH, 64,

A: resident of
Culmersville, will be
held on Saturday April
16th 2005 at 11:00 am
at Faith Temple
Ministries, Maderia
Street.. Interment will
follow in the Lakeview
Gardens and
Mausolems, John F
Kennedy Drive.



Officiating will be Bishop Lester Cox, assisted Pastor |

Laurant Papouloute. Services have been entrused to
Gateway Memorial Funeral.Chapel, Wulff Road and
Primrose Street.

Left with cherished memeory are her five (5) daughters
Clel Y Syndic of Haiti, Maria and Venice Joseph, Mrs
Nasette Sawyer, Mrs Madeleine Williams; three (3)
sons Gilbert Monstaine of Orlando, Florida, Max
Joseph and James Smith; ten (10) grandchildren,
Magdala and Ralph of Haiti, Manishka Joseph, Erica

Joseph of Orlando, Florida, John Brown Jr, Kevin:

Sawyer Jr, Keanu Sawyer, Glen Williams III, and
Janess Smith; one (1) great grand child; two (2 ) sisters
Clemise and Agath Joseph of Haiti, two (2) sons-in-
law Kevin Sawyer Sr, and Glen Williams II; three (3)
daughters-in-law Mrs Charlene Joseph, Mrs Vanessa
Smith and Nicole Gelin; other relatives and friends
Villanma and Sonia Pierre, Willie and Exana Pierre,
John Brown, Mrs Pican, Annette Darllus, Villardia,
Jeanne, Nelta, Wilkinson and Mason Pierre, Sandra
Roache, Ghiseine Richemond, Gloria Moss, Raymond
Felix, Velea Pierre, Marie, Telezna, Mona Boyer,
Nadine Alexis, Mrs Mercidieu, Odette, Verdieu Marie,
Debbir Kemp and family, Yvonne Bevans and family,
the Richemond family, Anerose Gelin, Sheila Joseph,
Laurencia Regis,Lesly Joseph, Sharon Tomlin and
family, the Gilbert family, the Dean family, Veronica
Clarke, Dr Patricia Fort, Juliette Josey and family,
Anlde and family and the Culmersville Community.

Public viewing will take place at Gateway Memorial
Funeral Chapel on Friday from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm
and on Saturday from 10:00 am to service time at the
church.

Mecxcewme

»

=



oy \-1=1-) 7 an ales



Burtiss Memorial Mortuary

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020¢ Robinson Rd & 5th Street
* Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 ¢ 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

SHEREE MONIQUE
RICHARDSON, 26

on Saturday at 11:00 am at
New Jerusalem Kingdom |
Ministries, Carmichael Road.
Officiating will be Overseer |
Gregory R Minnis assisted by |
other ministers. Interment will
follow in the Southern
Cemetery.

| She is survived by her husband, Michael Richardson; |

mother, Eulease Rolle; father, Joe Lloyd; grandfather,
! Cornelius Rolle; three brothers, Keno, Fenrick and Mario;
} eight aunts, Sybil, Bernice, Joycelyn, Drucilla, Rosalee,




of Malcolm Road will be held |

| Marsha, Deaconess Judy Munroe, Sandra Petterson of |

| Florida and Evangelist Almana Hanna Woodside; eight |

| uncles, Terry, Randy, Ricardo, Otis, Carlton, Cornelius Jr,
| Alfred Johnson and Lenwood Clarke; seven grandaunts,

Sarah, Essie, zona Rolle, Lillian, Deaconess Jenniemae f

| McKenzie, Naomi and Lillian R McKenzie; granduncles,

Allan, Elder William, Elder Newlon, Bishop Hartman Rolle

and Labon McKenzie; brothers-in-law, Tony Burnside,

| Lorenzo Williams and Oscar; sisters-in-law, Denise |
| Richardson and Aldise Williams; host of other relatives |

| and friends including, Neuiza, Robert and David Rolle,
| Marsha, Renae, Richie, Craig, Perry, Donika, Micheala,
| Steven, Dion, Allan, CJ, Octavia, Shameika, Vernette,
| Kimberly, Kesa, Shavanda, Crytal, Mia, Marcus,
Jeffery,Andrew, Rochelle, Malisa, Wendy, Garvin, Phil,
| Shane, Dale, Lisa, Euthlee, Simon, Solomon, Rachell,
Mildred, Lulamae, Dorothy, Nora Stuart, Philip, Junior,
| Lester, Audrey, Donneisha, Vincent, Kay, Kiana, Keron,

| Kendon, Javonno, Joey, Justin, Lashanda Rashad, Rev |
i | Cedric Smith and family, Rev Leslie Curtis and family, Rev |
| Franklyn McKenzie and family, the staff of Esso and |

Texaco, Carlos Saunders, Leolad Storr, Welly and the
| family off Curtis and Stuart Manor,

| The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary,

Exuma. |

| Robinson Road and Fifth Street on Friday from 11:00 am |
| until 6:00 pm and at the church on Saturday from 10:00

f am until service time.

DAVID SAMUEL
"Bookie" JOHNSON,
85



a resident of Bowen Sound,
Andros will

Church, Stanyard Creek,

of Stanyard Creek, Andros and i

be held on
Saturday, April 16, 2005 at |
-11:00 a.m. at Wesley Methodist |

Andros. Officiating will be {
President Kenris Carey assisted }

by. Minister Andre Darville and |
| -Minister~ Earl Pinder. Interment in Wesley: Methodist |

Cemetery; Stanyard Creek

| “He is survived by his wife, Susan Johnson; children, |
* | Rupert, Rodger, Mias, Cheena, Matthew, Timothy, Sean |
| and Dillon Johnson, Otis, Troy, Brandon, Randy Jr., Shirley, |

Miriam, Margurite, Lavanda, Eddison, Sybil and Monica
| Neymour; two sisters, Olive Culmer and Doris Thompson;

| three uncles, James and Willard Johnson (the Bluff, Andros)
| and Joe Johnson (Lowe Sound); 66 grandchildren |

| including, Athena Colleen Johnson-Sealy, Leading Seaman

! Doran J. Johnson, Able Seaman Clint K. Johnson, Raquel |

Sands, Rochelle, Ricardo, Joycelyn, Tiffany, Torron,

| Merranda, Shamarka, Shannie, Ranee of Atlanta, Jan

Johnson, Collett of California, Carla, Tamaro, Myles,
!. Marlene, ‘Musha (Atlanta), Lamond, Timothy Jr., Kashad,

| Byron, Ashley, Kashanna, Muriel, Sean, Bradwin, Sunita f

| Rolle, Shenique Johnson-Miller; 21 great grandchildren —

including Ursula and Pairick Sealy, Jerome and Di Johnson,
| Hriou and Deon Rolle, Juliette Miller, Lashawn, Rodesha,

f Rico, Clint Jr, Dontae and Dalano Johnson; numerous |
} nieces and nephews including Neville and Margaret |

| Woodside, Hansel and Marilyn Johnson, Preskit Turnquest,

| Miriam Young-Jones, Odell Young-Johnson, Cynthia and

Ambi Ambrister, Sylvia and Bernard Bethel (Miami, Florida),

} Rose Mitchell (Eleuthera), Wiliamae Scott, Winnie

| Woodside, Christopher and Joe Cooper, George Burrows
i (Miami), Charles and Eunice Johnson, Amanda and Louis

) Ferguson, Antionette Bain (Andros), Sidney and Una Brice |

(Freeport), Samuel and Janiveive Moncur, Selena and | ©

Lamuel Sweeting, Latina Ferguson-Burrows, Baldwin |

Darling, Franklyn, Betty, Agatha and Shirley Thompson,

Linda Miller, Wesley Thompson, George Brennen, Carnetta }

Carew, Antionette Todd, Paula Brice, Obie Finley, W.P.C.,

Ruthmae Finley and family; numerous grand nieces and |

| nephews including Kenva, Kenneth, King, Alphonso and

| Vashon Johnson, Debbie Deleveaux, Byron and. Neville |
1 Woodside Jr., Carl, Valarie and Pamela Bannister, Elvera |
} Johnson and Phyllis Johnson; daughters-in-law, Isadora |
| T. Johnson, Sharon, Patsy, Karen, Yvonne, Marilyn and |
} Helen Johnson, Arnett, Lakeisha, Gloria and Indira |

| Neymour; sons-in-law, Vernon Grant, Dion Belle and
| Reagan Grindot; brothers-in-law, Horatio Bannister,

| Cleveland, Nathaniel, Emmanuel, Wellington and Herbert |
Curtis and Ruben Nesbitt; sisters-in-law, Vernita Johnson- |

| Mackey, Joyce Bannister-Young, Sheila Bannister,

Emmaline, Joyce, Virginia, Gloria, Marion, Olive and Victoria’

| Curtis and Isabella Nesbitt.

| A host of Bihee relatives: and friends including, Muriel,

| Leona and Mary Tucker, Adeline Wilson, Misty Adderley,
| Maice Wilson, Bishop Cecile Curtis, President Kenris.

| Carey, Sargent Alton Curtis, Cleveland Bastian, Justin,
| Melverne, Marie, Christine, Gloria and lvan Johnson,

Apostle Howard Nesbitt, Oniel, Burnet, Floramae and |
! Millie Nesbitt, Robin Pratt, Bismark Coakley and family, |

| China Ferguson and family, the Cargills, Munnings,
; Duncombe, Lightbourne, Newbold and Potter farnilies,

| Ellis Whymms and family, Dudley, Thomas and Richard |

| Smith and families, Darrell Rolle and family, Patty Miller
| and family, Tina Saunders Ferguson and family, the Hinsey,
| Hanna and Leadon and Strachan families, Oscar Johnson,
} Harry Rolle and family, Greg Burrows, Florinda and Sheila,

| Anthony Aleen Woodside and family, Catechist Adline |
} Wilson, Cecil Leadon and family, the Stanyard Creek

Community families, the Bowen Sound community families,

) doctors and nurses of the Fresh Creek Clinic, nurses and {

doctors of the Princess Margaret Hospital, Male Surgical

Il especially Dr. Brennen, the family of Fresh Creek Andros |

and the Eleuthera family.

| The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Moriuary, |

Robinson Road and Fifth Street on Thursday from12:00
noon until 6:00 p.m. and at the church in Stanyard Creek,
Andros on Friday from 2:00-p. m., until service time on
Saturday.

N may
expand

| muss sion

in Haiti



4 n+ mh ote
> = =

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

' Precet cong

The Tribune wants to hear |
} from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps |
you are raising funds fora §
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.







New partnership bringing
fresh seafood to the world

. | SANTI Gabino (left) with Paradise Fisheries employees and William Malone (right)



Students rewarded for
academic excellence

TWO students at the College
of the Bahamas have been pre-
sented with special awards for
their achievements.

The presentation was made

DR Rodney D
Smith, president of
the College of the
Bahamas (left), and
Dr Nicolette
Bethel, Director of
Culture, Ministry of
Youth, Sports and
Culture (right),
presented the E
Clement Bethel
award to Lou
Adams Sr for his
excellence in the
field of music.
Accepting on behalf
of Mr Adams is Mrs
I Hall.

(Photo:
Raymond Bethel).






\y

during the College of the
Bahamas school of communi-
cation and creative arts cele-
bration of its 16th annual “color
of harmony” event. The event,

described as an exposition of
the artistic talents of students,
was held at the Portia M Smith
student services centre, Oakes
Field Campus.










fond

MeCHICKER
SANDWICH

EATEN IE LCA aa I AS RAIL

a’ DR Rodney D
Smith, president of
the College of the
Bahamas (left), and
Dr Nicolette Bethel,
Director of Culture,
Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture
(right), presented
Antonius Roberts,
an artist and
founder of Junior
Junkanoo (centre)
with the E Clement
Bethel award on
Wednesday, April
6, for excellence in
the field of art.





A SUCCESSFUL partnership between a
Florida-based freight shipping company and
a growing local seafood company has given
the world quick access to Bahamian seafood.

Last week’s third annual Bahamas Hotel
Association trade show brought the two
companies together and gave them both the
chance to display their products and ser-
vices to major players in the hospitality
industry. Paradise Fisheries Limited and
Laser International, a Florida-based inter-
national transport and courier company,
were among 30 companies which partici-
pated in the exhibition held at the Wyndham
Resort.

William Malone, executive assistant to
the president of Paradise Fisheries Limit-
ed, said that the move would take the com-
pany to a new level.

Since it was formed in 1982, Laser Inter-
national has serviced several major compa-
nies in the Bahamas, including Paradise Fish-

eries, Atlantis, the Lyford Cay Club, and .

Domino’s Pizza. It has helped ship seafood
and many other products since 1998.

Santi Gabino, president of the company,
said that this growing success with the
Bahamas has helped his company to grow
from a small courier company to an inter-
national freight company which now has a
daily cargo flight to Nassau, along with its
other flight services to the family islands.

“It is through such international liaisons
that our company can deliver fresh seafood
to any part of the world with just two days
notice, even as far away as Hong Kong, for
example, ” added Mr Malone.








RMS

Students urged
to have pride
in the nation

THE Deputy Prime Minister has
urged students of the Government
High School to guard the legacy left
behind by some of the greatest lead-
ers in The Bahamas.

Cynthia Pratt, Minister of Nation-
al Security, addressing an assembly at

the school on Monday, told the stu-

dents that their conduct after leaving
the school will demonstrate to the
public the capabilities of their teach-
ers.

She said: “Young men and young
ladies, you will take over this coun-
try. You are the ones who will make
the decisions as to what direction
this country goes.”

Ms Pratt told the story of a young
male student at LW Young Sec-
ondary School, who worked
part-time as a packing boy.

Ms Pratt said a lady went into the
food store and picked up some gro-
ceries but did not have enough mon-
ey to pay. She was 45 cents short of
what she needed, but the young man
reached into his pocket and paid the
difference.

To thank the young man, the lady

. wrote to the principal of LW Young

Secondary School.

During a school assembly at LW
Young Secondary, she met the young
man. He needed a hair cut. He was
wearing a shirt that appeared to not
be his own. He did not have a belt for
his worn-out pants.

To reward this young man, the
Deputy Prime Minister paid for his
hair cut and also bought him some
new school clothes, a belt and some
new Timberland shoes.

Se



McFISH
FILLET
SANDWIGK:







fee Le Gee. ee Pe aie ES 0

FROM page one

allowed to discuss any matter
which is being governed by the
BEST Commission. This is to
include but not be limited to
any of the LNG pipeline pro-
posals.”

However, in this second let-
ter, sent by Mr Smith to
Tractebel’s lawyer, point num-
ber four of the recommenda-
tion reads: “Address socio-
economic aspect of the envi-
ronmental sustainability of the
project, by engaging a team of
the undersigned to set up the
framework for negotiation of
the benefit of regasifying LNG
to the Bahamas.”

PAGE 16, FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005

Point number five encour-
aged the company to engage
in discussions with the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce and “a designated
group of persons” from Hep-
burn Town and the Grand
Bahama Port Authority to
“review the viability of relo-
cating residents of Hepburn
Town.”

Earl Deveaux, immediate
former Ambassador for the
Environment and former
chairman of the BEST Com-
mission, said: “Mr Smith’s
wording is careful but what he
is in fact saying by the (words
that the) proposal would be
seen in ‘a better light’ is that if
you do these things over here,

i Ts the Public,

CEE 0 DS OS ES OS 2 2 oo

HOS 0 ST oO Ee ge ee

8 SESOY © AEM 6 ED 8 A

Ss

Please be advised that
Mr. Nolan Carey is no

longer employed with the

| World Bound Couriers

ot Global United) and is not authorized

to conduct any business on behalf of
| Global United or its affiliates.

Management

and get a

community Out West.

Signed

we will bless you.

“That letter is so inappro-
priate. The process of
approval and its regulatory
framework should be trans-
parent. A letter like that
should have been written by
someone with a permanent
office.

“It is difficult not to con-
clude that there is some bias
somewhere as no doubt there
is enormous pressure from
somewhere for them to
approve these things,” he said.

Lawyer Fred Smith was not
available for comment last
night, and Ambassador
Smith said that he had no
comment for The Tribune on
the matter.



vier gated
an impressive development —
and units are going Ga Financing i is available to
qualified buyers.”

William Wong
broker/appraiser



William Wong & Associates
real estate sales, i ental, appraisals

Phone: 242-327-4271 © Fax: 242-327-4273

V3
5
2



ye

NOU

Cell: 242-457-0766 .
West Bay Street

PO. Box SS-19981, Nassau, Bahamas

Email: williamwong@coralwave.com

LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL NEWS



SAAT CAR SNES SRE A CA SY POS EN NSA OY EY OR OSA FR Of MRT ome



THE TRIBUNE



Kofi Annan: US. Britain
share blame tor

Saddam's ill

“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

icit oil fund

Teen is son
of police
officer

FROM. page one

15 years old.
Alando. reportedly died
after being stabbed in the

-chest in an altercation with a

teenager on Tuesday after-
noon.

-.The incident occurred in
the area of East Street and
Victoria Boulevard.

According to police reports,
the victim was rushed to the
Princess Margaret: Hospital, |
where he was pronounced
dead. os

Police reported that a 15-
year-old suspect had been
detained in connection with
the incident later Tuesday
afternoon.

Supt of Police Hulan Han-
na appealed to parents and
adults to try to talk to
the young men in their com-
munity to put an end to’ vio-
lence.

“A lot of our young men
are arming themselves with
knives and machetes and
going about the streets caus-
ing injury and harm to oth-
ers,” he said.

In the wake of the incident,
there have been repeated.calls
for increased measures to
address the issue of youth vio-
lence.

‘Alando was the 13th mur-
der victim for 2005.



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FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005

SECTION



business@100jamz.com



@ By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Tribune Reporter

DECLINING visitor satis-
faction trends yesterday sound-
ed warning bells for the
Bahamian tourism industry, as
Immigration Departure Cards
revealed growing dissatisfaction
with vacation and perceived
value-for-money experiences at

major hotels that left some rat--

ings at “an all-time low” in
December 2004.

The poor attitude some
departing visitors allegedly
encountered from Bahamians
also concerned tourism officials,
and the overall trend of the sur-
vey indicated that the Bahamas
needed to refresh its tourism
product and visitor experiences
to ensure they matched the
price associated with a high-cost
destination.

In a reference to the need for

. the $1 billion Atlantis Phase III
and $1.2 billion Cable Beach
projects, Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace, the Ministry of Touris-
m’s director-general, said:
“Signing multi-billion develop-
ment deals is all well and good,
but even more important is
making sure that once these
come to fruition we have
trained staff, able and willing
to deliver first class products
and service."

While more than 50 per cent
of tourists, when asked how
likely they were to recommend
the Bahamas to others, said
‘very likely’, the percentage of
visitors who said they would do
this fell 6 per cent - from 67 per



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Insurance & Investments

to Build a Better Life
Telephone 242-393-1023



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street



Hi VINCENT Vanderpoo!-Wallace,
the Ministry of Tourism’s director-general.

cent in December 2003 to 61
per cent in December 2004.
The Immigration Departure
Cards showed that while some
71 per cent of visitors said they

New Bahamian bank |
notes to help fight
counterfeiting

"BI By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter














THE Central Bank of the Bahamas yesterday said it expect-
ed to issue a new family of bank notes this year, as part of an ini-
tiative to combat counterfeiting.

The $10 note is expected to be the first Bill produced, and will
be issued in the middle of the year. The entire exercise is
expected to take about 18 months, and the $20 and $50 note are
likely to follow production of the new $10 bills respectively.

In an interview with The Tribune, a senior representative
for the Central Bank said the programme, called Counterfeit
Resistant Integrated Security Product (CRISP), will pave the
way for the introduction of new security features that will make
the Bahamian dollar notes more user-friendly and harder to





copy.

SEE page three

Over the years, the Central Bank has introduced a new series
of bank notes - in 1996, 2000 and again in 2002. While the
security features have been upgraded, the bills have main-

US duty exemption rise
may boost tourist spend

@ By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter

_ EXPENDITURE by US
tourists in the Bahamas may
have received a slight boost yes-
terday, after the personal duty
exemption for American resi-
dents returning from the
Bahamas was increased from
$600 to $800 per person by the
US Customs and Border Pro-
tection Department.

Officials from the Nassau
Tourism and Development
Board see the news as positive

for the tourism sector, with a
potential increase in visitor
spending likely to result from
the US move.

Meanwhile, total visitor
arrivals to the Bahamas for Feb-
ruary 2005 fell slightly when
compared to the same period
last year, dropping by 2 per cent
from a total of 429,017 to
420,293.

Air arrivals for February 2005
fell by 7.5 per cent, dropping
from 135,794 in 2004 to 125,589,
while sea arrivals saw a slight

SEE page three

were likely to recommend the
Bahamas to others in June 2003,

SEE page two

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor




A BAHAMIAN company
was yesterday charged with
"playing a key role in a scheme
that paid millions of dollars in
bribes and kickbacks to for-
mer members of dictator Sad-
dam Hussein’s regime in rela-
tion to the Iraqi Oil-for-Food
programme.

The indictment unveiled in
the southern district of New
York court alleged that Bayoil
Supply & Trading, which it
described as a company
“based in Nassau, Bahamas,
and incorporated in the
Bahamas”, had conspired with

ates “to pay a secret sur-
charge” to members of Sad-
dam’s regime in return for
allocations of Iraqi oil under
the United Nations (UN) man-
aged Oil-for-Food programme.

Alleged
The indictment alleged that
as a result of this scheme,
which at a “conservative esti-

mate” involved oil sales worth
at least $100 million, Bayoil

defendants ensured that the
proceeds raised from these
sales did not benefit the Iraqi
people by denying their use in
the purchase of humanitarian
supplies.

Apart from the Bahamian
company, also charged by the
US Attorney’s Office for the
Southern District of New York
was its sole shareholder, Texan
businessman David Chalmers.
Mr Chalmers was also the only

& Trading’s Houston-based
affiliate, Bayoil (USA), which
was also charged.

its sole shareholder and affili- ©

Supply & Trading and its co-*

shareholder of Bayoil Supply .

t



Other indictees were a UK
oil trader, John Irving, and a
Bulgarian, Ludmil Dionissiev.

Both allegedly purchased Iraqi’

oil for Bayoil Supply & Trad-
ing and its affiliate.

The indictment alleged that
the two Bayoil companies and
their co-accused “participated
in a scheme to pay millions of
dollars in secret kickbacks to

Saddam Hussein’s regime in

Iraq. These secret kickbacks

were paid so that the Bayoil |

companies could continue to
participate in the business of
selling Iraqi oil under the Unit-
ed Nations’ Oil-for-Food pro-
gramme”.

The illegal kickbacks and
surcharges were alleged to

~ have been paid between 2000
“and March -2003."The indict--

ment claimed: “The govern-
ment of Iraq directed that
these surcharges, representing
a percentage of the total
amount of each oil contract
and totalling at least several
hundred million dollars, be
paid to front companies and/or
bank accounts under the con-
trol of the Iraqi government
in various countries in the
Middle East and elsewhere.
From 1997 to 2003,
Chalmers was alleged to have
supervised and directed the
two Bayoil companies’ pur-
chases of Iraqi oil under the
UN programme, dealing with

Indictment — - |
the southern district
of New York court

‘recipients of oil allocations

. Chalmers and his Bahamian









from the Iraqi government or
brokers working on behalf of
those recipients.

Both Chalmers and Bayoil,
paid the official selling price
(OSP) for the Iraqi oil into the
UN Oil-for-Food bank
account, plus a commission
that went to the allocation
holder or broker. |

Advice

Chalmers and Bayoil were
alleged to have offered advice
about ‘oil market conditions to
both UN and Iraqi officials in
a bid to influence the OSP.

Then, in 2000, the Iraqi gov-
ernment began implementing
the kickback scheme, denying
participation in the Oil-for-
Food programme to those who
participated. Afterwards,


















and US companies continued
to lobby the UN on the OSP
price of Iraqi oil, in the hope
this would make it easier for
the Iraqis to collect their kick-
backs.

The indictment alleged that
Bayoil and Chalmers “agreed
to pay, did pay, and caused to
be paid millions of dollars in
secret illegal surcharges to the
government of Iraq”. The pay-

SEE page three












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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page one

this had fallen by 10 per cent
to “an all-time low” - 61 per
cent - in December 2004. __.

The ‘statistics for Hotel Value
for Money revealed that while
2004 hotel occupancy levels and
room rates surpassed those for
2003, overall ratings for hotel val-

@ ue for money fell.

In July 2003, some 38 per cent
of respondents rated their hotel’s
value for money as ‘much better’,
or“better than expected’. In J uly
2004, the percentage was 37 per
cent.

~ Similar declines were also not-
ed:when comparing the period
Atigust-December 2003 with the
same months for 2004. The great-
est disparity was seen in Septem-
ber, with 44 per cent of respon-
dents rating their hotel value for

money as much better or better -

than expected in 2003, compared
to 37 per cent in September 2004.
_ And while 38 per cent of visi-

‘ o*

* Full standby generator.

‘Security services.

14 April 2005

|; * 686 - 4,340 sq.ft. retail & office spaces
Excellent retail and professional location.
Modern.building with spectacular views.

tors in December 2003 rated their
hotel’s value for money as much
better or better than expected,
this had slumped to 34 per cent in
2004.

Among the negative comments

received were: “This should have -

been a great trip. Instead, I felt as

though I was being cheated. Food:

was terrible at hotel and over-
riced.”
Added another: “I was very

disappointed in the resort that we .

stayed at. Brochures and travel
agents were not honest about the
facilities.”

According to the Ministry of

’ Tourism's report, comments from

guests ranged from complaints
about hotel facilities, overpricing
and mediocrity of food, to wide-
spread apathy of hotel staff.
Earle Bethell, president of the
Bahamas Hotel Association
(BHA), yesterday said the:sur-

‘vey results were one of the main

Visitor recommendation

reasons the BHA works hand in

hand with the Ministry of
Tourism in trying to get.the gen-
eral public to understand that vis-

’ itor experience is paramount.

He explained: “We want to do
more training programmes with
the Ministry of Education, at the
high school and college level, and
even have certificate courses for
those people who have left
school.

“We want to-sensitise people —

to the importance of taking care
of the customer no matter where
they are on island." °

Mr Bethell said visitors to the
Bahamas, many of whom have
paid a premium for their vaca-
tion, expect a high level of ser-
vice throughout their stay. When
Atlantis initially came to the mar-
ket, many of the other hotels
looked to improve their proper-
ties to keep pace with the se-chane:
ing destination.

One Sandyport Plaza
West Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel. 242-393-8618
www.bahamasrealty.bs
www.cbrichardellis.com

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ISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
s -Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
‘S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
§. Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day



Dally Vol. -

Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
PIE - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earings
has. AS AT MAR. 31, 2005/ **** - AS AT FEB. 28, 2005



» AS AT MAR. 24, 2005/ *** - AS AT MAR. 31, 2005/ ***** AS AT MAR. 31, 2005



Last 12 Months



These same properties, how-
ever, had not maintained these
improvements, Mr Bethell said.
But based on the destination's
pricing, hoteliers have to bring
up their property levels and main-
tain them if visitors are to feel
they are getting value for their
money.

Mr Bethell said: “We have a
lot of seasoned travellers who are
aware of what to expect at cer-
tain levels at hotels. We are
charging higher prices, and we
know that hotels here get a better
deal on rates, so in order to make
sure we get consistently better
results, all properties must ensure
that training is ongoing for work-
ers. Standards have to be high
when it comes to our customers.
They don't mind paying higher
prices, but they expect value for
their money."

Mr Bethell said the BHA offers
courses and training opportuni-
ties for its members to help
improve standards and ensure a
similar high quality visitor expe-



Dilibaaia

0.00%
6.93%
0.00%

Se Sa





YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

Ps $ - A company's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
i, N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



INTERNATIONAL.

Sd OB VACANCY

MAIN RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

* Planning, directing, and coordinating the human, financial
and physical resources of the Information Technology

Department;

consultants;

Ss
es
=
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ball
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=
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PUG FO 8 ae

* Overseeing and developing all technology related systems,
including telecommunications and security systems;
‘e Establishing key relationships with key IT suppliers and

* Application, selection, development and
implementation of new and existing corporate initiatives;

¢ Provide enabling technologies that make it easier for
customers and suppliers to do business with the Bank.

‘KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS & ABILITIES

° Tertiary level qualifications in computer science,
information technology or related disciplines;
e Expert knowledge of systems analysis development and

planning methods;

¢ Demonstrated experience in managing a network
environment including Windows server 2000/2003
services, Lotus Notes/Domino, hardware firewalls,
routers, AS400, Unix, Oracle and VPN appliances;

* Comprehensive knowledge of database management;

* Knowledge of web base technologies;

* Excellent communication skills, both written and oral;

¢ Demonstrated team building and project management

skills;

* Five years of progressive experience in managing the
delivery of modem enterprise technology services;
¢ IT industry related certifications desirable.

{| The position also offers an attractive compensation package which includes comprehensive group insurance
‘s| Coverage, participation in pension savings and other benefits enjoyed by staff.

Manager, Human Resources/Training
Bank of The Bahamas International
P.O. Box N-7118
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for applications is April 25, 2005.



rience across the board.

Another area that Bahamians
fell short on was in how visitors
rated the attitude of locals during
their visit to Nassau and Paradise
Island.

_Looking at the period June
2003 to December 2004, visitor
satisfaction - saying the experi-
ence was much better or better
than expected - reached a high in
June, July and August 2003, with
some 62 per cent of respondents
satisfied with the attitude of
Bahamians.

Satisfaction levels dipped, how-

ever, falling to a low in March.

and August 2004, at 56 per cent,
and in July and December 2004 at
57 per cent.

Frank Comito, the BHA’s
executive vice-president BHA,
said industry stakeholders cannot
do enough to create the best
impression for visitors.

He said both private and public
stakeholders must continue their
efforts to run people through cus-
tomer service training pro-
grammes, because all it takes is
one bad apple to mar the entire
experience. He added that the
Bahamas simply cannot afford to
have any bad apples.

In 2004, Mr Comito said the
BHA ran hundreds of people
through its customer service train-

ing programmes, while the Min-

istry of Tourism and individual
properties also conducted their
own training facilities.

"We have to realise that we're
a high cost destination, and high
cost means we have to deliver
high quality. When visitors return
home, word of mouth of bad
experience mars the entire desti-
nation. The onus is on all of us to

put our best foot forward,” Mr

Comito said.

-” "To move ‘those percentages

forward, it requires a level of

-commitment across the board to
‘offer the best the Bahamas has

to offer."
Michael Hooper, general man-
ager of the British Colonial

Hilton, said all businesses needed
to continue to focus on improving
customer service and encourage
more visitors to return, not less.
He said that generally, people
needed to take personal respon-
sibility for their actions and know
that every time they interact with

. a visitor it impacts upon whether

that tourist has a good visit or a
poor visit.

"We talk a lot about training in
hopes of changing the behaviour,
but being friendly has nothing to
do with the technical aspect; it's
about taking personal responsi-
bility to be kind and courteous to
the visitor,":Mr Hooper said.

Meanwhile, one bright spot in
the survey was the satisfaction
ratings for hotel rooms, food and

_ service. Statistics showed that

from June 2003 through Decem-
ber 2004, hotel service consis-
tently surpassed the other’ two
categories.

Satisfaction levels for hotel
rooms held relatively steady,
starting with June 2003 at 47 per
cent and edging up slightly to 49
per cent in May 2004, but drop- .
ping in December 2004 to 39 per
cent.

Hotel food showed a similar
pace, with 50 per cent of respon-
dents in June 2003 saying the food
was much better/better than
expected. In May 2004 that fig-
ure increased to 52 per cent, and
in December 2004 it settled to.45
per cent.

For the period, satisfaction lev-
els in June 2003 stood at 54 per
cent, improving to 60 per cent in ~
May 2004. In December 2004,
levels stood at 52 per cent.

"We are encouraged by these
figures because what it tells us is
that the potential to deliver supe-
riot service is. there," minister
of tourism Obie Wilchcombe
said.

“Expanded development will
translate into world class facili-
ties and amenities, thus creating
more evenly balanced hotel sat-
isfaction figures."

TRUST OFFICER ~

SCOTIATRUST invites applications from qualified
Bahamians for the position of Trust Officer with a |
strong background and technical knowledge i in areas
of trust, company and agency management. The
applicant will be involved in the administration of a
medium to high complexity level of accounts of
trusts, companies and agencies. A good level of
accounting knowledge is required. The person i
appointed should hold a four year University Degree @
in a related subject along with professional |
qualifications in the Society of Trust and Estate
Practitioners (STEP) or ACIB. The ideal candidate

| should have a minimum of five years progressive
experience ‘in the industry. Analytical and
communication skills as. well as familiarity with PC
software are essential. Preference will be given to
applicants with language skills. Interested persons

i should submit applications in writing marked Private
and Confidential to the Manager, Client Services,
P.O. Box N-3016, Nassau, Bahamas. Applications
should be received no later than Friday, 22nd April,

2005.

INTERNATIONAL

Fae al or a a oo

SERVICES

OS Re eons Ay

CUCL UCL fe

Eh ry Mall Drive, P.

IReEH Ren CEU
Li

SECURITIES BROKERAGE - ASSET MANAGEMENT -

MONEY MARKET - MUTUAL FUNDS -

RAR TERE

ACT
Bermuda. Flexi-

jmail your resume

CORPORATE FINANCE

i i i 2 i iy NEO i





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005, PAGE 3B



BUSINESS

Bahamian contractors
ain over $15m worth
of Phase III contracts

BAHAMIAN contractors
have been awarded $13 mil-
lion and $2.475 million worth
of work on Kerzner Interna-
tional’s Marina Village and
Phase III developments respec-
tively, with the Atlantis resort
owner’s development arm
announcing plans to join the
Bahamian Contractors Asso-
ciation (BCA).

Accounted

Rick Bodge, Kerzner Inter-

national Development’s senior.

vice-president, said Bahami-
ans accounted for 85 per cent
of the 930 tradesmen working
on the Marina Village and
Phase III projects, including
workers in administrative posi-
tions.

Apart from those two sec-
tions, the $38 million contract
for the Harborside Village
timeshare project had been
awarded to the joint venture
of Osprey Developers and
Woslee Dominion Construc-
tion Company.

At a meeting between the
BCA and Kerzner Interna-
tional Development, Mr

Bodge said the Marina Village
had been a good match for
Bahamian contractors between
capabilities and scope of work,
and many had been perform-
ing well.

However, Mr Bodge added
that there has been some issues
with smaller contractors at the
Marina Village, and cases
where Kerzner International
had to take over or supplement
the work in order to finish a
project.

“We’re getting those sorted
out,” Mr Bodge said.

Ian Stewart, project execu-
tive for PCL Constructors, the
construction managers hired
by Kerzner International for
Atlantis Phase III, said the
team was trying to get the
packages out to as many con-
tractors as possible.

Process

“We have a rigorous pre-
qualifying process. There are
a lot of contractors in our sys-
tem and we don’t want to put
anyone in a situation where
they bite off more than they
can chew,” he said.

Mr Bodge said that in join-
ing the BCA, Kerzner Inter-
national Development would
help the Association develop a
contractors’ licensing pro-
gramme to ensure and
promote international
quality standards in all con-
struction trades in the
Bahamas.

Resource

He added that such a pro-
gramme would provide devel-
opers with a good resource and
save them a lot of effort in
finding qualified Bahamian
contractors.

“It would be great to be able

to go to a licensing bureau and

say “give me a list” and not
have to go through pre-quali-
fying. It would make the
process much easier...

“We will join this organisa-
tion. Once a month or once a
quarter we can sit down and
see how we can pull this pro-
gramme together.

“You set the pace and we’ll
be a part of it,” Mr Bodge told
BCA chairman Terrance
Knowles.

FROM page one

increase, improving to 294,704 in 2004 from
293,223 in 2004 for growth of 0.5 per cent.

For the Nassau/Paradise Island destination, air

and sea arrivals for February were up by 5 per cent.

Air arrivals climbed by 3.1 per cent for the month,
increasing form 87,895 in February 2004 to 90,655.
Sea arrivals also saw an increase improving by 5.6
per cent from 153,898 to 162,522.

Grand Bahama continued to experience a short-
fall in its overall numbers, as tourism slowly returned
to normal following last year's hurricanes. Overall
figures show a total number of visitors to Grand
Bahama for February at 45,974, a drop of 30.3 per
cent when compared to 2004 February figures, which
came in at 65,945.

‘Air arrivals fell almost 40 per cent, from 29,086 in
2004 to 17,773 in 2005S. Sea arrivals also continued to
show an impact from the hurricanes, with arrivals
down 23.5 per cent - from 36,859 in February 2004 to
28,201 in 2005.

The Family Islands posted a somewhat sluggish
performance for February, with total arrivals down
0.1 per cent - from 121,279 in 2004 to 121,142 in
2005. Air arrivals stood at 17,161 for the month,
compared to 18,813 in 2004, a fall of 8.8 per cent.
Sea arrivals, however, showed a slight improve-
ment, going from 102,466 in February 2004 to
103,981 in 2005, an increase of 1.5 per cent.

According to statistics released by the Ministry of
Tourism, Grand Bahama, Abaco, Bimini, Eleuthera,
Long Island, and San Salvador all suffered declines
in the number of air arrivals in February 2005.

Air arrivals for February to Grand Bahama were

New
bank



sahamian firm

FROM page one

US duty exemption

down 39 per cent, Abaco was down 19 per cent,
Bimini off 1 per cent and Eleuthera fell by 10 per
cent, with Long Island seeing a huge decrease of 34
per cent and San Salvador dropping 26 per cent.

A number of islands did, however, experience
increases in air arrivals in February 2005, apart from
the Nassau/Paradise Island destination. Andros saw
growth of 17 per cent, with the Berry Islands show-
ing strong improvement of 24 per cent.

Cat Cay has 2 per cent growth, with Cat Island
posting a strong performance at 95 per cent. Exuma
improved by 5 per cent and air arrivals in Inagua
grew 34 per cent.

Looking at year-to-date figures (YTD), visitor
arrivals overall were up 1 per cent when cameaRSE
to the same period in 2004.

Year-to-date air’ and sea arrivals ‘for the Was-
sau/Paradise Island destination were:up. by:8: per
cent, with Grand Bahama down some’ 15 per’ ¢ent.
The Family Islands were generally down by 5 per
cent.

Looking at cruise figures, the total number of
arrivals for the Bahamas in the first two months
were up by 1 per cent. Cruise arrivals for the
Bahamas for the year to February 2005, by first
port of entry only, were up 4 per cent for the
Bahamas overall.

Cruise arrivals for the Nassau/Paradise Island
destination to February 2005 were up 9 per cent,
while cruise arrivals for Grand Bahama February
were up 12 per cent, even though they were down for
the month of February.



The illegal surcharge pay-
ments were sent via wire trans-
fers to a bank account that





notes
FROM page one

tained the same type of fea-
tures, and their artistic
appearance has remained
virtually the same.

The Central Bank is now
moving to change the family
of Bahamian bank notes,
with various posters placed
in banking institutions show-
casing the new designs the
public can expect to see over
the upcoming months. The
colour and schematics of the
notes will remain the same,
but with a greater degree of
enhanced features.

One change the public will
notice is that the pictures of
Queen Elizabeth II, Sir Milo
Butler and that of former
prime minister, Sir Lynden
Pindling, will be changed.

| No word has been given,
however, on whether the
pictures of either Sir Roland
Symonette and Sir Stafford
Sands will remain on their
respective notes, or if their
photographs will be
changed.

In terms of counterfeiting,
while not a huge problem in
the Bahamas, banks and cur-
rency dealers are always try-
ing to stay ahead of coun-
terfeiters.

"We believe this series,
the CRISP, to be easy for
the public. It has a lot of
security features to be
detected, it’s people friendly,
the design is live and it’s
completely innovative.
They've done a lot of work
with it,” the Central Bank
source said.





ments covered Iraqi oil pur-
chases made by the two Bay-
oil companies from a foreign
company, “whose operations
were funded almost exclu-
sively by Chalmers and the
Bayoil companies”.

The indictment alleged: “To
conceal these illegal surcharge
payments, Chalmers agreed to
pay the foreign company inflat-
ed commission prices on the
original oil transactions, with the
knowledge and expectation that
the foreign company would then
make the surcharge payments
to the government of Iraq.”



belonged to Al Wasel and Babel
General Trading, a front com:
pany for the Hussein regime
that was based in the United
Arab Emirates.

The indictment detailed three
wire transfers made by
Chalmers and the two Bayoil
companies, where almost $2 mil-
lion ended up in the hands of
Hussein regime acolytes as
alleged illegal kickbacks.

The US government is seek-
ing the forfeiture of at least $100
million in assets from the defen-
dants.



















Abaco Markets Limited
the leading food distribution company
is looking for a

Junior Accountant

to join our corporate team

| Requirements:

- Bachelors degree in accounting or finance;
At least 2 years of relevant experience;

Excellent PC skills;

Must be willing to travel.

General support for all areas with the Accounting

Department;

Preparation of month end journal entries, account |

reconciliations,

expense report processing, and date entry;
Assisting with budget preparation and special
projects, as assigned.

To apply for this position, please e-mail your detailed
resume and cover letter to hr@abacomarkets.com or
fax to 356-7855.







& PICTURED here fromleft are: Godfrey Forbes, vice-chairman, BCA; Mark Piekarz, senior::’

cost manager, Kerzner International Development; lan Stewart, project executive, PCL Cori=>
structors Bahamas;' ‘Terrance Knowles, chairman, BCA; Robyn Ogilvie, secretary, BCA; anid:
Rick Bodge, senior vice-president, Kerzner International Development Sut

“on

3 bedroom, 2 bath, 3 Satellite TVs, 3 climate zones, Bow Thurster, |].
Bench Matched Raytheon Navigation/Radar Group; 0 Care Batteries ||
Super Antena; Twin Caterpillar Diesels 680HP tot approx 350 hours.
Cruises at 20 knots: built 1999, delivered new April 2000. Looks and _
acts new. Can now:be viewed on New Providence. Built by Sea Ray. *

Call or fax 1-805-565-1237 (info 327-5695)
“. Best offer over $300,000

45°5” (13.84m)
..14°3” (4.34m)
37” (94 cm)
27,000 Ibs (12,247)
350 gal (1,324.8 L)
120 gal (454.2 L)

Water Cue 35 cal (O08 21)
gal :

Holding Tank

NO

VACANCY

The American Embassy i is presently considering SSpHCABORS
.. for the following position

we
my

[ 1. LANSYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR

Duties include: the operational support of the Local Area Network, |
| which includes. 13 servers, and approximately 120 networked

| stations and also support for numerous stand-alone computers.

Also, assists and performs installation of systems and peripheral
equipment including file servers, workstations, network interface
cards, fax/modem cards, cdrom's, printers, floppy and hard drives Ham
= and backup tape systems. We reserve the right to administer Hae
testing to ascertain experience.

This position is open to candidates with the following
requirements:

| 2. Baccalaureate Degree or host country equivalent in the field
of Computer Information Systems. Certification in A+, MCP in
Windows; 2000 or. Windows 2003 is required “Additional

| certifications such as network plus and security plus will be |
required to pass the probarionary period. Excellent command of
the English Language, both written and oral



= Personal attributes:

-Excellent work attitude, punctuality and attendance record §
-Highly confidential in nature

-Ability to interact with others in a professional manner
-Ability to prioritize tasks

-Initiative and ability to learn new tasks quickly

SS | Benefits provided include:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation §
package including outstanding benefits such as performance-based §

@ incentives, medical and dental insurances, life insurance, pension |
and opportunities for training and development.

A 3. Applicants must be Bahamian Citizens or other Country |
Nationals who are eligible for employment under Bahamian laws
and regulations.

Application forms are available from 8:00 am to 5:30 pm, Monday
; through Friday at the security area of the American Embassy,
Queen Street, completed applications should be returned to the |
Embassy: attention of the Human Resources Office no later than
| April 25, 2005.



PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



Insurance agency

plans new website

WEEROINL
Middle Income Home, Suffolk Unit 2, Block #51, Lot #2,

3 bed, 2.5 bath, central air, fully landscape, washer & dryer.

Freeport, Grand Bahama « Phone: 359-2190

We OUR CK OS

Employment Opportunity — Nortel PBX and Key System
Engineer

Indigo N Networks is seeking to fill a senior position in its Technical
Services department for an experienced Nortel
telecommunications engineer.

Applications are invited from individuals who have:

e Aminimum of 10 years in a Nortel telecommunications
technical support role.
In depth Design, Programming, Implementation, and
Maintenence of Nortel: Norstar, BCM, Meridian Option
11C and 81C.
Knowledge of PBX Networking and VOIP Integration.
Knowledge of Routing, Trunking, and VLANS.
Excellent customer service skills -
Good oral and written skills
Ability to work with minimum supervision.

A competitive salary commensurate with experience is offered
: along with product training, medical, pension and car allowance
| after a qualifying period.

interested candidates should submit their resumes in writing to
Indigo Networks PO BOX N-3920 for the attention of the
Technical Services Manager.



NOTICE
FOR SALE BY PUBLIC TENDER

PARADISE ISLAND COLONY SUBDIVISION
Section C. Property Size: 21,562 Sq. Ft.

There are presently two partly built Apartment Buildings on the
property. The buildings were constructed without proper
permission and in breach of the covenants and restrictions.
‘Paradise Island limited who are responsible for all the Covenants
and Restrictions applicable to the said lot have advised that they
require the buildings to be demolished and the site cleared
within 3 months. The costs of demolition would be an expense
for the purchaser.

The above property is being sold under a Power of Sale contained
in a Supplemental Mortgage dated November 3, 1993 to Gulf
Union Bank (Bahamas) Limited. Recorded in book 6216, at pages
247 to 261. —

interested parties should submit written offers with telephone
contacts and postal addresses to the Joint Official Liquidators,
P. 0. Box N-3748, Nassau, Bahamas.

Telephone enquiries: 302-4862
Fax: 302-4870

Terms: 10% deposit upon acceptance of aren balance upon
completion.

All Offers must be received by 19 April, 2005 _

THE LIQUIDATORS RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT AND/OR REFUSE ANY
OFFER.



@ SURPRISE AND DELIGHT — Linda Gibson, general manager, Star General Insurance
Agency (GB), presents a cheque from the company to Karon Pinder - Johnson, executive

director, YMCA Ltd

STAR General Insurance
Agency is planning to launch a
new website, following close
behind the opening of its new
$2.5 million Grand Bahama
office complex.

James M Pinder, Star Gen-
eral’s chairman, speaking at the
complex’s official opening, said
the building was “not only as a
symbol of our past, but also as a
vivid reminder of our mission

Lot 4, Block 6, ..|.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DIANE BENSON, FIRST
TERRACE CENTERVILLE. APT #7, P.O.BOX CB-11853, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 15TH day of APRIL, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DUKRKENE BLANC, YELLOW
ELDER, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written



and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days |

from the 8TH day of APRIL, 2005 to the Minister responsible
toy Matonallty and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
ahamas

eg



to pursue excellence in the

-future. Our aim is not only to

serve you, but to serve-you bet-
ter”.

He added: “We have posi-:
tioned ourselves to take advan-
tage of the opportunities to
come by investing in the right
kinds of technological solutions;
delivering paramount service at
every level in our. organisation;
building a strong consumer
brand that you can become
even more proud of; further

‘enhancing the quality of our

human resources by facilitating '
training, skills and development —
opportunities; and assuming
additional responsibilities as
corporate citizens to a world-
class island nation, and its
world-class people.”

During the opening, Star
General also made a donation
to the Grand Bahama YMCA,

Star General Insurance
Agency (Grand Bahama),
founded in 1995, is: part of the
Star General Group of Compa-
nies, which was formed in 1987.

The group also includes Star
General Insurance Agents and
Brokers Ltd (Nassau); Star
General Investments (Grand
Bahama); Star General Hold-.

_ ings; atid Star Bahamas Gene =
sycee Aly Ansttante Company: aie



Take care of your day-to-day banking needs, quickly, easily and securely. Here’s

what you can do:

* View account balances
¢ Make bill payments

* View account history - Up to 365 days
(Up to 30 days for credit card and ScotiaLine accounts)

* Transfer funds between your accounts
* Make credit card and ScotiaLine payments

¢ Access Small Business accounts

Take control of your banking with the convenience of Scotiabank’s Internet

Banking. Call or visit us for more details today.

& Scotiabank

Life. Money. Balance both.

© Trademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia. Trademarks used under license and contro! of The Bank of Nova Scotia.



\

New Providence °\.
242-356-1697 thru 9

Toll-free Family Islands
242-300-6600

Toll-free from the U.S.
1-800-472-4648



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL'15, 2005, PAGE 5B



@ By LINDSAY THOMPSON
Bahamas Information
Services

BAHAMIAN credit unions,
which boast of a membership
in excess of 28,000 and have
total assets estimated at $170
million, are aiming to have a
market penetration of 45 per
cent and assets of over $1 billion
dollars.

In the Bahamas, co-opera-
tives have grown steadily, with
15 credit unions and five pro-
ducer/supplier co-operatives.

“This is a significant achieve-
ment,” said V Alfred Gray,
minister of agriculture, fisheries
and local government, “as these
funds represent 100 per cent
Bahamian investment and these
investments must be protected
at all costs.”

Mr Gray said there can be no
economic or social progress
without a sound financial sys-
tem managed by competent,
qualified and trained individu-
als.

He was addressing a one-
week Credit Union Supervisory
Workshop for regional inspec-
tors at the Wyndham Nassau
Resort & Crystal Palace Casino.

The workshop is being spon-
sored by the Caribbean Region-
al Technical Assistance Centre
(CARTAC) and hosted by the
Department of Co-operative
Development.

Mr Gray told participants
from the Bahamas, Guyana,
Dominica and Belize that cur-
rent global trends in the finan-
cial services industry have
caused. policymakers to assess
and reassess their regulatory
agencies, in order to meet new
challenges.

“The Government of the
Bahamas is totally committed
to ensuring that the highest lev-
el of investor protection exists
in our country, for both local

BUSINESS ©

Credit unions aiming for 45% market penetration



@ MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES
& LOCAL GOVERNMENT V ALFRED GRAY

and international investors,” he
said.

With regards to credit union
investments, Mr Gray said the
Government was fully commit-
ted to ensuring the Department
of Co-operative Developmen-
t’s regulatory role was given the
tools and resources necessary
to guarantee that investors in
such organisations are always
protected.

“This, in my view, is critical to
the strengthening of the co-

operative regulatory authority.

and the modernisation of the
legal framework within which

technically competent staff per- —

form their various tasks,” Mr
Gray said.

He noted that Parliament
recently enacted a new Co-
operative Societies Act 2004 to

' strengthen the internal capabil-

ity and output of the Depart-
ment of Co-operative Develop-
ment, in its inspection and
supervisory roles of .co-opera-
tive and credit union enterpris-
es.

Mr Gray said it was also

expected that the new legisla-
tion would equip the depart-

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~ ~ Panoramic views

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Contact
Stuart Halbert
Bahamas Realty Limited
242-393-8618 Ex.234 BAHAMAS

_ 242-477-7908

REALTY
=

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
AYNSLEY LIMITED

‘Notice is hereby given that in accordance with

ment in fulfilling its legal man-
date of ensuring the safety and

soundness of members’ invest-
ments in co-operative societies.

“This new regulatory frame-
work, I am advised, is necessary
because the oversight of credit
unions and co-operatives had
been significantly out-stripped
by their growth, diversity,
sophistication, and complexity.
Hence, risk management need-
ed to be regulated,” Mr Gray
said.

He said the workshop was
timely, as the training of credit
union inspectors in the effec-

‘ tive supervision of credit unions

can only enhance and strength-
en the regulatory regimes, and
will also serve to maintain the
confidence of members of co-
operatives and credit unions
and the public.

“Effective supervision is an
important part of any effective

BRADLEY & SEAN
_ CALLENDER, |

regulation,” Mr Gray said. “In
the financial sector it is also an
essential component, of any
strong regulated economic envi-
ronment.

“Tn fact, there can be no eco-
nomic or social progress without
a sound and stable financial sys-
tem - supervised by competent,

qualified and trained individu-
als.”

Mr Gray also said credit
union supervision is of great
importance to the Government.
“We seek to always say with
certainty that our people’s

SEE page six

NOTICE

| NOTICE is hereby given that PAUL ALEXANDER CcOx,
WOODS ALLEY, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 15TH day of APRIL, 2005 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.

Legal Notice

Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the dissolution of AYNSLEY LIMITED, has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

_ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

WENDOVER INVESTMENT CORP.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with

Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, the dissolution of WENDOVER
INVESTMENT CORP. has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore
been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

the Partners of the Firm of Sean B.

Callender & Co., are pleased to
announce the opening of the Abaco

Branch of their Law Chambers, situate
-at the Sea Star Building, Nathan Key

Drive, Marsh Harbour, Abaco.

Telephone Nos: 242 367 - 0432-3
Telefax No: 242 367 - 0434
Email: sbcallender@batelnet.bs

OE address: P.O.Box F-44636, .
Freeport, Sretite! Bahama

Legal Notice

NOTICE

POWLSON CORPORATION

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act No. 45 of
2000, POWLSON CORPORATION, has been dissolved and struck
off the Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued
by the Registrar General on the 7th day of April, 2005.

Mr. Badri Gobechia,
6 Kipshidze Str., App. 5,
Tbilisi 380030,
Republic of Georgia
Liquidator



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

SITI SYAFEI LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance’ with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the dissolution of SITI SYAFEI LIMITED, has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
HEARTS ADRIFT HOLDINGS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the dissolution of HEARTS ADRIFT HOLDINGS
LIMITED, has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck
off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

BLUEBIRD CAPITAL HOLDINGS LIMITED

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137(4)
of the International Business Companies Act No. 45 of 2000, BLUEBIRD
CAPITAL HOLDINGS LIMITED has been dissolved and struck ofthe
Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the eee
General on the 18th day of March, a

. Hamilton Management Services Limited
of Fiman House,
La Hougue du Valle,
Vale, Guernsey, GY3 5TE,
Channel Islands
Liquidator



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
SAFESTAYS HOLDINGS LTD.

_ {in Voluntary Liquidation) a
Notice is hereby given that the above-name
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 13th

day. of April, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., of
P.O. box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
KOTZEBUE LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the dissolution of KOTZEBUE LIMITED, has been

. completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
_(Liquidator)(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

DURAL ZWEI INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the dissolution of DURAL ZWEI INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





|

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eee

cs





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Sse



The woild’s local bank

Consolidated Balance Sheet at 31 December 2004

ASSETS

Cash and short-term funds

Placings with banks maturing
aftcr one month

. Certificates of deposit

Hong Kong SAR Government certificates
of indebtedness

Securities held for dealing purposes

Long-term investments

Advances to customers

Amounts due from fellow subsidiary
companies

Investments in associated companies

Tangible fixed assets

Other assets

LIABILITIES

Hong Kong SAR currency notes in
circulation

Current, savings and other deposit
accounts

Deposits by banks

Amounts due to fellow subsidiary
companies

Amounts due to ultimate holding.
company :

Other liabilities

CAPITAL RESOURCES

Loan capital

Minority interests

Share capital.

Reserves : ‘
Proposed final interim dividen
Shareholders’ funds

Directors

David G Eldon

Michael R P Smith
Vincent Cheng Hoi Chuen

The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation Limited

Office: 1 Queen's Road Central, Hong Kong



2004 2003
Note HK$m HK$m
9 501,261 353,137
10a 74,481 113,322
/] 57,418 56,893
12 92,334 85,294
13a 71,747 82,239
14a 430,469 399,642
15 919,253 815,004
18 82,592 57,389
20a 16,918 1,564
2la 42,080 34,875
22 170,492 143,382
2,459,045 2,148,741
12 92,334 85,294
23 1,880,673 1,669,704
24 73,098 68,111
26 17,137 11,328
479 375
27 220,327 175,071
2,284,048 2,009,883
29 11,142 12,855
16,360 15,991
30 51,603
3] 49,959
8 8,450
147,495 110,012
174,997 138,858
2,459,045 2,148,741
Secretary

M W Scales

28 February 2005

Consolidated Profit and Loss Account for the Year Ended 31 December 2004

Interest income

Interest expense

Net interest income

Other operating income

Operating income

Operating expenses

Operating profit before provisions

Provisions for bad and doubtful debts

Provisions for contingent liabilities
and commitments

Operating profit

Profit on tangible fixed assets
and long-term investments

Surplus / (deficit) arising on property
revaluation cs

Share of profits less losses

* of associated companies

Profit on ordinary activities before tax

Tax on profit on ordinary activities

Profit on ordinary activities after tax

Minority interests

Profit attributable to shareholders

Retained profits at 1 January

Exchange and other adjustments

Transfer of depreciation to premises
revaluation reserve ~

Transfer to premises revaluation reserves

Realisation on disposal of premises and
investment properties

Dividends (including amounts attributable
to preference shareholders)

Retained profits at 31 December

We have audited the financial statements of The
Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation
Limited for the year ended 31 December 2004, from
which the summarized financial information set out
above has been derived, in accordance with
Statements of Auditing Standards issued by the Hong
Kong Society of Accountants. In our report dated 28
February 2005 we expressed an unqualified opinion
on those financial statements.

Respective Responsibilities of Directors
and Auditors

The Hong Kong Companies Ordinance requires the
Directors to prepare accounts which give a true and fair
view. In preparing accounts which give a true and fair
view it is fundamental that appropriate accounting
policies are sélected and applied consistently, that
judgements and estimates are made which are prudent
and reasonable and that the reasons for any significant
departure from applicable accounting standards are
stated,

It is our responsibility to form an independent
opinion, based on our audit, on those accounts and to
report our opinion solely to you, as a body, in
accordance with section 141 of the Hong Kong
Companies Ordinance, and for no other purpose. We
do not assume responsibility towards or accept liability
to any other person for the contents of this report.

Basis of Opinion

We conducted cur audit in accordance with Statements

' of Auditing Standards issued by the Hong Kong
Institute of Certified Public Accountants. An audit
includes examination, on a test basis, of evidence
relevant to the amounts and disclosures in the accounts.
{t also includes an assessment of the significant
estimates and judgements made by the Directors in the
preparation of the accounts, and of whether the
accounting policies are appropriate to the cir-
cumstances of the Bank and of the group, consistently
applied and adequately disclosed.



2004 2003
Note HKS$m HK$m
da 57,911 $5,770
4b (19,679) ( 17,032)
38,232 38,738 -
4c 29,421 22,627
67,653 61,365
4d (26,992) (24,024)
40,661 37,341
4e 812 (3,386)
28b (43) (76)
41,430 33,879
5 2,098 1,013
2!ld 1,024 (234) :
414 139
44,966 34,797
6a. (7,086) (5,387)
37,880 29,410
(4,315) (3,613)
33,565 25,797
af 37,764 28,952
777 1,089
298 240
- (273)
519 233
(21,840) . (18,274)

31 51,083 37,764

Auditors’ Report to the Shareholders of The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking
Corporation Limited {incorporated in the Hong Kong SAR with limited liability)

We planned and performed our audit so as to obtain
all the information and explanations which we
considered necessary in order to provide us with
sufficient evidence to give reasonable assurance as to
whether the accounts are free from material
misstatement. In forming our opinion we also evaluated
the overall adequacy of the presentation of information
in the accounts. We believe that our audit provides a
reasonable basis for our opinion.

Opinion

_In our opinion, the accounts give a true and fair view of

the state of affairs of the Bank and of the group as at 31

December 2004 and of the profit and cash flows of the:
group for the year then ended and have been properly
prepared in accordance with the Hong Kong

Companies Ordinance.

KPMG
Certified Public Accountants

Hong Kong, 28 February 2005



The summarized financial information set out above is derived from the financial statements of The Hongkong and Shanghai
Banking Ccrporation Limited for the year ended 31 December 2004. The full set of financial statements can be obtained from
The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation Limited, Suite 306, Centre of Commerce, One Bay Street, P. O. Box N-4917,

Nassau, Bahamas.



PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005 THE TRIBUNE.

Winn-Dixie seeks
ankruptcy case
= “Copyrighted Material(ta@

oa Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”



ROxechts :
FROM page five ©

investments in these organisa-'
tions are safe and secured,” he:
said. “We want also to be con-:
fident that our supervisory offi-'
cers are properly equipped and:
trained in order to perform their;
various duties.” «i

Credit unions serve moré:
than 20 million members in 87:
countries worldwide. The main-
‘objective is to help people cre-
ate a better future for them-
selves and their families.

In The Bahamas, co-opera-’
tives have grown steadily with:
15 credit unions and five pro- :
ducer/supplier co-operatives. A ;
goal is to have a market pene-
tration of 45 per cent and assets
of over $1 billion dollars. Cred- :
it unions boast of membership .
in excess of 28,000 with assets '
estimated at $170 million. “This :
is a significant achievement,” | -
said Mr Gray, “as these funds |
represent 100 per cent Bahami- |
an investment and these invest- :
ments must be protected at all!

_ costs.”

Also addressing the work?
shop were Rufus Johnson, pres.. ,
ident, Bahamas Co-operative |
League Limited; Diana Men? : .
.doza, financial sector supervi~
Sion advisor, Caribbean Region-
‘al Technical Assistance Centre;
and Julian Francis, governor,
Central Bank of the Bahamas.

FOR SALE OR RENT

Fully Furnished Executive Office Suites
plus Utilities Global Maritime Center
(Formerly Tanja)
2nd Floor, 2,500 sq. ft
Internet Ready, Computer & Network Support
State Of The Art Phone & Voice Mail Systems
Dedicated Phone Lines
Conference Facilities
Professional Work Space

Office Space - Unfurnished
1,250 sq ft

Global Maritime Centre
Queens Highway, Freeport, Bahamas

Contact 351-9026 or 351-1601 For Viewing
Or Additional,Information. 3... 4... ..
Global United, Formerly TANIA is... |.
moving it’s operation to the «- Vs eee
Former United Shipping Building at the Harbour



GOVERNMENT NOTICE

) MINISTRY OF TRANSPORT & AVIATION
DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL AVIATION

_ Publication By The Ministry Of Transport &:
Aviation Department Of Civil Aviation —
Particulars Of An Application
To Operate Scheduled Air Services

In accordance with the provisions of Regulation 9 of the Civil Aviation
(Licensing of Air Services) Regulations 1976, the Minister responsible
for Aviation hereby publishes the following particulars of the under-
mentioned applicant to operate scheduled air services to and from The
Bahamas. .

PARTICULARS OF APPLICATION

1. Application: VIRGIN ATLANTIC AIRWAYS LIMITED

2. Date of tirst publication: 15.04.2005

3. Routes: BETWEEN LONDON GATWICK ON THE.ONE HAND
AND NASSAU ON THE OTHER.

4. Purpose of services: Passenger, mail and freight.

5. Provisional time table:

Local Times

0930/1330
1600/0510

LONDON GATWICK/NASSAU
NASSAU/LONDON GATWICK

0930/1400
1630/0530

LONDON GATWICK/NASSAU
NASSAU/LONDON GATWICK

6. Frequency of flights: See above time-table.

7. Type of Aircraft: Boeing 744

Any representation regarding or objection thereto in accordance with
Regulation 10 must be received by the Permanent Secretary, Ministry of
Transport & Aviation & the Department of Civil Aviation within fourteen
(14) days after the date of first publication of this Notice.

ARCHIE NAIRN
PERMANENT SECRETARY





THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005, PAGE 7B
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PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005



ms) 10) 50 BS)

Debbie Ferguson making |z:

progress after surgery

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



SPRINTER Debbie Ferguson
was resting comfortably in her
room at the Kendall Regional
Medical Centre yesterday, two
days after she had an emergency
surgery for her appendix.

“So far, the pain is to a mini-
mum. It’s less than it was before,”
Ferguson insisted in a telephone
interview from her room. “They
still have me in some tubes from
my stomach.”

At this point, Beranewh said
she’s still not being able to eat any-
thing.

“They’re still waiting to give me
some more IVs,” she stressed. “I
guess it’s just one day at a time.
But I’m making some progress.

“I’m good,” she noted.

Ferguson, 29, is expected to
remain in hospital through the
weekend. Her mother, Elka Fer-
guson, is visiting her. Other fami-
ly members are expected to join
her. ~

For Ferguson, the surgery
couldn’t have come at a worse
time.

“Training had just picked up,”
she insisted of her preparations
for the outdoor season under the
watchful eyes of Amy Beem, the

head women’s coach at the Uni-
versity of Miami.

“I was.doing much better than I
got started before this came about.
But what else can I do?”

It during her training in Miami

‘that Ferguson experienced the

pain. It first happened on Saturday
and Ferguson immediately called
her mother.

Two days later, Ferguson said
the pain got worse and, after she
called her mother again, she decid-
ed to go to the doctor, only to be
told that it was her appendix.

Appendix

She was immediately admitted
in Kendall Regional Medical Cen-
tre where surgery was performed
to remove the appendix on Tues-
day night. |

“T’m just glad that the surgery is
over,” Ferguson stated.

However, Ferguson will have
to wait a little longer before she
can find out exactly when she will
be allowed to resume her training
for the upcoming season.

She was expected to return to
the Drake Relays in Des Moines,
Iowa at the end of the month
where she was lined up to com-
pete in the open women’s 100
metres.

Additionally, she was expected
to be the second Bahamian and
the 196th athlete overall to be
inducted into the Drake Relays’
Hall of Fame.

But Ferguson is not looking
towards fufilling that obligation
just yet.

“We will have to see how things
go. If I do go, I won’t be running,”
she stated. “But I doubt that I will
be going.”

Ferguson, who is being hon-
-oured for her stellar performance
at the University of Georgia, will
join retired Golden Girl Pauline

Davis-Thompson, who was.

enshrined as a quarter-miler for
the University of Alabama with
American quarter-miler Michael
Johnson and decathlete Kip Jan-
vrin in 1996.

Ferguson said she’s thrilled to
receive another accolade.

“The last time I went there in
the rain and hail and performed
very well,” Ferguson recalled. “I
was glad that they invited me back
to induct. me into the Hall of Fame
and run the 100.

“It’s something special.”

But as she recuperates in bed,
Ferguson requested that the
Bahamian public keep her in their
prayers so that she can have a
speedy and healthy recovery.

Knowles and Nestor
KO'd in: a oyatlede match’

TRIBUNE SPORTS

er surgery.


























































@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

and Daniel Nestor’s trip to Monte Carlo was cut
short in the quarter-final of the ATP Masters
Series event yesterday.

They had every opportunity to win, but the top
seeded team couldn’t pull off the big points and
were ousted by the French team of Michael Llodra
and Fabrice Santoro 7-6 (4), 1-6, 6-4.

“We had a ton of chances, but it was just brutal
out there tonight,” said Knowles from his hotel
room last night. “We just couldn’t win the match.”

Set
Knowles admitted that the first set could have
gone cither way, but the Frenchmen just played
better than they did to pulliit off.

However, in the second:set, Knowles said he
and Nestor: played ts ular as they almost















But he said nee vas a total different ball
game. : a
“They hada lot of lucky shots,” Knowles noted.
“We had three break points. But they got-break
point at 4-3 and all of a sudden, they raised their
game a little bit just for the last two games.
“They broke us another to win the game. But we
dominated the match. We just couldn’t get it

done.”

FROM page one

track, the soccer facility and an
upgraded facility for recre-
ational sports now located at
the Baillou Hills Sporting Com-
plex.

“We are still in discus-
sions,” said Wisdom, about
the relocation of the sporting
facilities when the construc-
tion work commences. “We
do know that softball will
move to the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex among oth-
er venues.

“No one will be inconve-
nienced. It’s just that we will
have to find temporary sites
when the construction begins.
Provisions will be made for
night play.”

As for the naming of the
new stadium and the other
facilities that will be con-
structed, Wisdom said they
are still deliberating with the
technical committee, which is
headed by Thomas A. Robin-
son.

With regards to ‘boxing,
which is have its national
training site at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex, Wis-
dom said they will be using
the Nassau Stadium for train-
ing, along with other satellite
stations around the island’and
in Grand Bahama: ».

But he said. once:the new
multi-purpose indoor facility
is completed, that .will be used
to host the various boxing
matches and also competition
for volleyball and other
indoor sports. a

The Kendal Isaacs Gymna-
‘sium will remain for:the sole
purpose of playing basketball.

MARK Knowles called it a “brutal” match as he




Knowles said this match was “brutal” because
“we won the match. We had all of the opportuni-
ties. We did | everything right, but just didn’t win the
big points.” ©

Looking back at how they played, Knowles said
they should have won the first set, but after
“killing” them in the second, they should have
won the third. |

“We were leading them two breaks in the third,
but they had..one or two points and they were
right back if the match and they ended up win-
ning,” Knowles reflected... ... ..

“It was a very tough loss. Obviously \ we wanted
to do well here, but it was tough. That’s the nature
of the game.

“That’s the beast.”

Knowlesjand Nestor will return to New York
today to train before they head to Houston, Texas
for their n “t tournament next week.

“The style. 2 of play is a little different, as opposed
to hard coutt, ” said Knowles, who will play'the rest
of the tournaments on the'red clay courts through:
the French'@pen hext month. *~”

“That’s how we got burned tonight. We didn’t
hit a couple of balls that were returned to us.,We |.
have to be ready at‘all times. We just have to.‘
regroup. We did all we could. We just didn’t get
the job done.”

The. disappointing. loss, according to: Knowles, .
will just givé them the incentive to try. arid get
better as théy continue to progress through the
remainder of the season.















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FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com





MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

& THE breath-taking design for the new stadium.



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



EXECUTIVES from softball and base-
ball were excited about the plans for the
transformation of the Queen Elizabeth
Sports Centre, thanks to the $30 million
“sift” from the People’s Republic of Chi-
na.

Teddy Sweeting and Dave Wood rep-
resented baseball, while Rommel

Knowles and Burkett Dorsett were on
hand for softball as Prime Minister Perry
Christie unveiled the plans for the stadium
at his Cabinet office in the Churchill build-
ing yesterday.

“It’s an exciting moment in this country
to witness the signing of this contract,”
said Sweeting, the secretary of the
Bahamas Baseball Federation and a play-
er/sponsor-with-the Dudley’s Panthers
baseball team in the New Providence
Baseball Association.

Reality

“T think the reality that we will have a
state of the art facility to propel track and
field to another level in the country and

will give us more pride about our.accom-

plishments on the international scene.”

Sweeting said he can’t wait to watch it
all transpire. But he’s eager to see what
will occur for baseball at the same time.

“T think the plans for baseball call for
the construction of a new Andre Rodgers
Baseball Stadium with two adjacent fields,
which will assist us in hosting interna-
tional events, which we have done in the
past and which we intend to do in the
future.”

Sweeting said they are finally getting
what they have been asking for and so
it’s just a matter of them sitting down
around the table and making sure that
everything is done to their liking.

Wood, an executive with the Bahamas
Baseball Association, said it’s time for
the construction of a new national stadi-
um.

~ Softball and baseball



representatives on
major development



“T think it will motivate kids in the
Bahamas and it will be an eye opener,
not only for track, but also for baseball
because of the plans that they have for the
sport,” Wood reflected.

“The Bahamas is getting into all sports,
we just had a young player drafted in
football, but we hope that this new stadi-
um will help us to get one or two
players drafted in baseball like we did in
the past.”

Knowles, the president of the Bahamas
Softball Federation, called the signing of
the contracts yesterday as a historic one
for the Bahamas.

“When the minister announced it two
years ago about having this national sta-
dium, we all laughed and said ‘yeah,
another politician talking,” Knowles
reflected. “But to see it happen today,
it’s historic.”

Knowles, however, had mixed reac-
tions about the relocation of the Churchill
Tener Knowles National Softball Stadi-
um.

“Obviously, it was not what we shad in
mind, but in speaking with the minister,
we will be involved in the future plans
for the facility,” Knowles declared.

If there’s anything in particular that
Knowles would like to see, it would be the
construction of more than one softball
field — as is being done for baseball.

“Gone are the days when we can just
build one field and call it a national soft-
ball stadium, especially when we are being



considered to host more international
events,” Knowles stressed.

“We will need to have more than one
facility with a certain seating capacity and
so if the minister intends to host interna-
tional events that will include more than
just track and field, it will require more
than one field for softball.”

While Knowles called it a historic day

* for the Bahamas, he also indicated that he

wished that more emphasis will now be
placed on the Family Islands in an effort
to ensure that they are not left too far
behind.

Knowles’ first vice president, Dorsett,
called it a “red letter day” in the Bahamas.

Facilities

“The softball complex will allow us to
put inside the facilities that have been
mandated by the ISF, including the Hall
of Fame room, a board room, VIP sec-
tion, proper scoring section, the umpire’s
section and proper seating facilities and
other amenities,” he proclaimed.

Dorsett, who also serves as the com-
missioner for the New Providence Softball
Association, said originally they heard
that the new softball stadium would be
located at the fields at the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex.

But he said he understand that the
plans call for all of the core sports to be
included in the same area, which he said
is an ideal situation for the country.

PM hails ‘major development

for a small country like ours’

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

WHEN the $30 million “gift” of
the National Stadium Complex by
The People’s Republic of China is
completed within the next 2-3 years,
the Bahamas will have a facility that
is second to none in the Caribbean.

In reviewing the official plans for
the 15,000 seat facility at his Cabi-
net office in the Churchill Building
yesterday, Prime Minister Perry
Christie said this is a major develop-
ment for a small country such as ours.

Significant

“This is an incredibly significant
day in the history of our country
because it represents a paradigm shift
in my view to. putting the correct
degree of emphasis on providing a

first class facility for our athletes,”

Mr Christie stressed.

Minister of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture Neville-Wisdom was also pre-
sent and clearly delighted with the
announcement.

The new stadium, which will com-
pletely transform the Queen Eliza:
beth Sports Centre into a mecca
sporting venue, will be constructed in
three phases by the People’s Repub-
lic of China.

Construction, according to the
prime minister, will begin no later
than February next year with the
completion date set as early as
June, 2007, but not later than

B ROMMEL KNOWLES

January, 2008. .

The first section will comprise of
the construction of the new National
Stadium, which will be placed adja-
cent to the Thomas A Robinson
Track and Field Stadium. :

It will replace the existing Andre
Rodgers Baseball Stadium, the Tony
Curry and. Anthony McKenzie Base-
ball Parks and the Churchill Tener
Knowles National Softball Stadium.

Wisdom revealed 'that the three
baseball fields will be relocated to
the western end of the Thomas A.
Robinson Track and Field Stadium
on the land that is directly in the back
of Shell Service Station.

He further noted that the softball
stadium will be relocated to the land
south of the Betty Kelly Kennig
Aquatic Centre, opposite the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium, occupying some
of the space that. currently houses
the BHRA.

While the aquatic centre will

‘ remain on the premises, Wisdom said

they have not yet determined exact-
ly where the BHRA will be relocat-
ed.

Section two of the plan, according
to Christie, will involve a new multi-

‘purpose 10,000 seat indoor facility,

which is expected to be located next
to the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium and
on the land that is considered the:
Carnival site.

And section three, Christie further:
revealed, will include the cycling:

SEE page 8B





#@ BURKETT DORSETT





Section
Missing
or
Unavailable



Full Text




1



?m lovin’ it. |

HIGH
LOW

“Sate. —- SUNSHINE

Volume: 101 No.117





78F |
GOF |

“tom BREEZY, CLOUDS,





Man loses foot as
vehicle cut in two

& By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

A YOUNG man is fighting
for his life after a car crash
ripped his foot off and tore his
vehicle in half.

At 4.35pm yesterday, the
driver of a 1990 Honda Civic,
licence plate number 12890,
was travelling north on the Sir
Miio Builer highway when he
suddenly lost “control of his
vehicle and crashed into two
trees.

When the car, carrying
three passengers, hit the first
tree it bounced off and collid-
ed with a second tree, which
tore the vehicle in two.

The driver was immediately
tushed to hospital following
the accident, where up until

press time last night, doctors
were fighting to save his life as
well as re-attach his foot.
When The Tribune arrived
on the scene, officers of the
fire department were in the
process of using the “jaws of
life” to retrieve the driver’s
left foot from the wreckage.
It was secured in a bag of ice,
and rushed to the hospital by a

pclice vehicie in an attempt.
‘to save it.

According to police,
although the Honda’s two
women passengers were not

physically injured, they were.

traumatised by the incident.
Police claimed that “speed
was a factor” in the accident.
The women were also taken
to hospital.
Investigations continue.

Teen apprehended in
connection with stabbing
is the son of police officer

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE teenager apprehended in connection with the stabbing
~ death of a 15-year-old boy is the son of a senior police officer, it was

revealed yesterday.

Aelphonzia Williamson, the father of victim Alando Williamson,
communicated the information The Tribune yesterday afternoon.
It was confirmed by Assistant Commissioner in charge of crime

Reginald Ferguson.

The name and rank of the officer in question must be withheld
to protect the identity of the suspect, who according to police is also

SEE page 16

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|




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BAHAMAS EDITION

Li at its Presi a}

een s horrific crash.

FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005

Cis Mea io. Dan

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter




HARBOUR ISLAND,
Eleuthera - The decision by
Harbour Island’s local govern-
ment council to approve in prin-
ciple Parmenter Reality’s
Remora Bay Development has
left those opposed to the devel-
opment saddened.

The council reportedly
approved the development in a
five to two vote.

This decision was made after
a very tense “semi-judicial”
hearing in the island’s magis-
trate’s court.

The focus of the hearing was
Darryl Parmenter and his
Remora Bay Development.

Elizabeth E M Thompson,
co-counsel — lawyer Fred
Smith is expected to be lead
counsel — representing the
Harbour Island Home Owners
Association, who is also a
descendent of Harbour Island,
said that her clients were sad-
dened by the decision. “I
believe this proposal is an insult
to the people of Harbour Island
























— Island is approved —

and the Bahamas in sence It
appears that there has been
very little information provided
by Parmenter Reality partners

_ as to the size and scope of this

development. I would hope that
Parmenter would not approach
a decision-making body any-
where in the world with such
flimsy and incomplete plans.
“T had hoped that local gov-
ernment would have had the
courage to require that appli-

cants meet a higher standard of |

disclosure by requiring and
Environmental Impact Assess-
ment. I had hoped that the pro-
ject would have been rejected in
its entirety or at the very least
be approved upon strict condi-
tions,” said Ms Thompson.
The home owners association
claimed that Mr Parmenter has
no real interest in Harbour
Island. They believe he is more
interested in making money.

However, Mr Parmenter-

rejects this simplified analysis

of his motives.

SEE page two







YOUR WORLD-CLASS



Sey RECTORY.
PRINT AND ON-LINE

ON TLaUSII



ae mn mn Keod Smith under
| fire for LNG letter

By PAUL G
TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter

MP KEOD SMITH, chair-
man of the BEST Commission,
was under fire last night,
accused of writing what critics
called an “inappropriate” let-
ter to a company trying to set
up an LNG facility in the
Bahamas.

Mr Smith sent the letter to
Mr Fred Smith, lawyer for
Tractebel Bahamas LNG Lim-
ited, and appeared to advise the
firm how to proceed with its
application. -

The letter lists six points to
follow that would allow the
company’s LNG proposal for
Freeport Harbour to “be seen
in a better light.”

Written on December 22,
2004, the letter refers to a meet-
ing in Miami, Florida, on
December 21, with Jim Ebling,
Tractebel’s vice-president of
business development, along
with Dr Doswell Coakley, and
Mr Gregory Moss, president
and vice-president respectively





of the Bahamas Chamber ee.
Commerce.

A high-ranking official in
Grand Bahama, who did not
want to be named, said he was
shocked at how Mr Keod Smith
could personally meet with a
company in Florida while his
office was reviewing a proposal
from them.

AES, the company behind
the rival LNG proposal at
Ocean Cay, told The Tribune
yesterday that it had never had
meetings with Mr Smith.

Recently Mr Smith attempted
to silence a member of the
BEST Commission from mak-
ing a presentation in Cat Cay
that was favourable to the AES
project planned for Ocean Cay.

A letter was sent to Dr
Ronald Cooper telling him that
Mr Smith was “shocked” to
learn of his intended presenta-
tion to Cat Cay residents with-
out his knowledge or approval.

That letter, sent by Mr Smith
to Dr Cooper, read: “You are
not permitted or otherwise

SEE page 16


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7 AP AA WIRY TTT TTT

She/he Asian BIS Re

PAGE 2, FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005

D to Orlando,
» ACH sg



LNG
DANGER

are che Ls BEE the re

SIGN THE NATIONAL PETITION |
AGAINST LNG

NAME seeeaecceeccescceecscscccccseesceesccseceseccsesens PO. BOX Soeescccoccce

SIGNATURE neneennsseccccsesccecccscescsencccesecsecaaanecesasesssasaaseaseeeeeees

Fax to 242-393-7604 or mail to: N 302, Nassau, The panaitios

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





Harbour Island development |

FROM page one

“T have been coming here for 30
years and this is my personal
favourite destination. I am as con-
cerned as anyone else that Harbour
Island does not become over devel-
oped, but persons have to realise
that Harbour Islanders deserve to
have responsible growth on their
island. We would not want to see a
10-story hotel on Harbour Island
either,” he said.

The Save Harbour Island group
contends that the proposed marina,
which will be built as a part of the
development, is too large and will
destroy the cove and be environ-
mentally disastrous to the commu-
nity.

However, Mr Parmenter wad

there should be no concerns over ,

the proposed scope of the con-
struction of the dock.

“One, we won’t be providing
fuel. So where fuel spills can be a
concern, it won’t arise at our mari-
na. We will also be providing a
pumping system for waste so boat

owners won’t dump their waste in .

the water,” he said... pee

Structure

Another issue, which concerns
those opposed to the Remora Bay
development, is the possibility that
the structure of the condominiums
will be as “intrusive and ugly” as
some perceive the buildings at
Valentines to be.

There are also fears that the pro-
posed condominiums will add the
equivalent of 40 additional houses
at one time, contributing to the con-
gestion on the island and setting ‘a
dangerous precedent for future
Gevelapmients,

Mr Parmenter, however, con-
tends that this will not be the case.

“First and foremost it will be a
low density development. Valen-
tine’s has approximately the same
number of units on less than half of

the space we have. Not passing:

judgment on Valentines in one way
or the next, but it is a very different
concept,’ * he said.

The Remora Bay development
will be a 40-room hotel/condo-

’ minium unit with a 46-slip marina.

target?





a CONSTRUCTION at the Valentines Jacvelapuieni in

Harbour Island.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

“We have gone to great lengths
to explain the development to the
local residents, not so much the
winter residents who seem to be
the most concerned about the
development, more so. than the
people of Harbour Island,” said Mr
Parmenter.

Beyond the ecological concerns
surrounding the development are
the economic aspirations of some of
the Harbour Islanders.

“You have to understand that
not everyone on Harbour Island is
rich and has money. The truth is
some of us not only want, but we
need to make more than we are
making now. What’s wrong with
that? Some of the winter residents
are just being selfish and are not
seeing it from our point of view,’
said oné resident.

Mr Parmenter said that his group
did an economic analysis on what
benefit the presence the develop-



ment will have on the island and
Harbour Island and the Bahamas
stand to benefit greatly from it.

“(Stop over) visitors spend on
average $150 a day per person on
goods services and food. If one
were to consider the number of
people who we should have here
on any given day it amounts to mil-
lions of dollars of expenditure and
that is not counting water taxies,
golf cart rentals and others who
would benefit,” he said.

However, some residents of Har-
bour Island “are not buying into
this” and claim that Mr Parmenter

_ has made unrealistic promises to

residents.

“He has been telling them that in
a year or two there will be millions
of dollars floating around and a lot
of people have not had much mon-
ey and to have all of this dangling in
front of them is very tempting. But
what most people don’t realise is
that if this goes on you are killing
your grand children,” she said.

The resident also contended that

" there is currently enough develop-

ment on the island to sustain the
population.

“This development will be using
mainly imported labour, when I say

’ ampotted I mean not from Harbour
‘Island and that is because every-
‘one on the islafid who waits to

work has.a job and it’s not that peo-
ple coming here are bad in and of
itself but it can get overwhelming,”
the resident said.

Nevertheless Ms Thompson said
that the issue is mainly an environ-
mental one.

Preservation

“Any right thinking Bahamian .
should be concerned about the con-
servation and preservation of our
natural resources and of the pristine
and quaint ambiance of Harbour
Island. I am convinced that this
development in conjunction in what
is happening at Valentines at this
time is right for Harbour Island. It
changes completely the landscape
of Harbour Island and puts a dire
stain on the natural resources.

“When IJ was on the island from
the 13th to the 14th I experienced
two power outages and a lack of
water,” she said.

The home owners association
asserts that the island already has a
problem disposing of its waste.

“They believe that every: boat
that docks here will want to dump
their trash.

“A marina is a source of signifi-
cant non-source pollution. When it
rains the run off from all of the hard
surfaces will bring pollutants into
the bay. It should be noted that the
Harbour Island water table is a
finite resource and large extraction
of water from it directly impacts all
Harbour Islanders and all visitors to
Harbour Island to meet their per-
sonal and business needs,” the asso-
ciation said.

However, Mr Parmenter con-
tends that there are a limited
amount of persons on Harbour
Island who are concerned about his
development.

“We are mainly getting opposi-
tion from those who have homes
on the coast near the marina but
as I have said to them we will be
well within the confines of our
property line,” he said.

Ms Thompson, who cross-exam-
ined Mr Parmenter during the hear-
ing on Wednesday, said that the
organisation of the proceedings left
much to be desired.

“I was totally unaware that we
were going to be involved in a semi
judicial meeting. I found the fact
that when I arrived Mr Parmenter
already had an agenda for the
meeting and I had to request that
on behalf of my clients. During the
proceedings it appeared to me that
Mr Parmenter was arrogant in his
treatment of the islanders con-
cerns,” she said

nate U8
EXTERMINATORS

Ru
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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005, PAGE 3

it 2 Sa ee eee eee



The shape of things to come

By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE design for the new mul-
ti-million dollar national stadi-
um was unveiled yesterday as
part of the master plan for a
national sporting complex
expected to be “second to none
in the region.”

Bahamian and Chinese gov-
ernment officials yesterday
signed the agreement for the
$30 million stadium, funded by
the Chinese, and revealed the
blueprint for the future nation-
al sports complex at the Queen
Elizabeth Sports Centre.

Speaking at a press confer-
ence yesterday, Prime Minister
Perry Christie said that upon
completion, the national stadi-
um “will usher in a new temple
of Bahamian sports.”

“The new stadium will form
the heart of the new national
sporting complex at Oakes
Field and its construction will

Designs are revealed for 30,000 seat
stadium funded by Chinese government



include ancillary works, which
together will transform the
entire complex into a set of
facilities second to none in the
region in both functionality and
appearance,” he said.

“We are coming near to the
point where the national stadi-
um complex will rise from the
ground to preside over the new
golden age of Bahamian athlet-
ics,” he said.

Phases

_" Mr Christie said that the plan,
which was formulated by
Bahamian and Chinese techni-
cal teams, would be carried out



_US passport
policy date
under review

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE United States is review-
ing the proposed January 2006
deadline for the new passport
policy which many believe will
have negative economic impli-
cations for the Bahamas.

Following the announcement
of a new law requiring all US
citizens and foreigners travel-
ling from the Bahamas and re-
entering the US to present a
valid passport as of January 1
2006, local and Caribbean
tourism officials say that the
implementation timetable could
have a detrimental impact on
visitor arrivals.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, US ambassador John
D Rood said that his embassy is
currently “working closely with
the cruise industry, the tourism
industry as well as Atlantis and
other hotels,” to address the
concerns.

The ambassador explained
that the information collected
from the Bahamian tourism
industry will then be used to
“provide comment to the US
State Department”.

The Bahamas Hotel Associ-
ation (BHA) has written letters
to both the US Ambassador
and Minister of Foreign Affairs
Fred Mitchell, requesting that
the implementation deadline





SAT RE VIE W FOR JUNE ON

REGISTRATION IN PROG

BGCSE SPANISH GRAD

for tourists visiting the Bahamas
be on par with the January 1
2008 deadline for Canada and
Mexico.

BHA executive vice-presi-
dent Frank Comito said that
implementation in 2006 would

_ “without question have a detri-

mental impact on our arrivals,
government revenue, and pos-
sibly even employment levels.”

The president of the Florida-
Caribbean Cruise Association
Michelle Page said that the 2006
deadline is “criminal” and “out-
rageous and disrespectful
towards the Caribbean.”

Atlantis said that although it
supports “the effort of the US
government to strengthen and
improve the security of its bor-
ders,” it believes believe “that
the requirement that the new
measures be implemented as
soon as January 2006 will be
extremely onerous for con-
sumers from our largest market.”

Atlantis further stated that
“the current timing does not
allow for a thorough commu-
nications programme which
may very well result in a severe
and detrimental impact on the
Bahamas tourism industry next
year.”

Currently any American citi-
zen can re-enter the US with a
birth certificate stating they
were born in the US and gov-
ernment issued photo ID.

in three phases.

The first phase includes the
construction of the national sta-
dium, which will eventually seat
up to 30,000 spectators, and the
relocation and integration of
the baseball and softball stadi-
ums, the Thomas A Robinson
stadium and Aquatic Centre
into the new complex.

The second phase will deal
with the Kendall G L Isaacs
Gymnasium, the Nati
nis Centre, and: th
Heroes Hall of Fame.

“It also anticipates the con-
struction of a new multi-pur-
pose indoor facility, which will
accommodate up to 10,000
spectators at a time,” he said.



The third phase will then
include the cycling track, the
soccer facilities and an upgrad-
ed outdoor facility for recre-
ational sports, which is now
located at the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex.

Mr Christie said that he was
especially proud of the fact that
the master plan makes provi-
sions for the integration of the
“Big Pond” into the national
sports complex.

The prime minister said he
anticipated that construction of
the stadium would be complete
“as early as June 2007, but no
later than January 2008.”

Approval of the technical
preliminary design is expected

RCC mOrhanetater
concessions dismissed

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

RESIDENTS of Guana
Cay remain dissatisfied with
the planned Passerine Devel-
opment despite the developers
modifying and downscaling
proposals for a new marina.

“Guana residents have not
compromised,” the Save Gua-
na Cay Reef group (SGCR)
said yesterday.

Members of the group are
still dissatisfied with the envi-
ronmental impact the $500
million Baker’s Bay develop-
ment would have on the small
island. They also claim the
developers have still not held
public consultations.

“The developers are now
trying to persuade the rest of
Abaco and the Bahamas that
they have our best interest at
heart and our trying to meet
local objections. But they have
not had a public meeting with
us,” said SGCR co-chairman
Troy Albury.

Mr Albury said that it was
upsetting that the developers
have admitted to only meet-
ing with local government offi-
cials in Abaco and seeking
input from the Out Island Pro-
motion Board.

“T ask the public, does that

sound like you spoke to the
actual people that live on
Guana Cay?” he said.

Although the proposed
Passerine marina has been
reduced from 240 to 180 slips,
“it will still be the largest mari-
na in the Bahamas and will
still harm a pristine harbour
that is situated in a protected
turtle nesting area,” he added.

The SGCR group has fur-
ther researched the new golf
drainage system and special
grass which has been proposed
by the developers of the Dis-
covery Land company.

“A closed drainage system
on these carbonate islands
with cores of Pleistocene
Rock, will in fact run off from
the golf course, despite the
grass, into the ground water
and will affect the reef,” said
the group’s environmental
expert Mike Risk.

Mr Albury added: “We
want them to stop saying they
are giving us a preserve and a
five-acre park. “That is our
land. They took it at ‘market
value’, which we question,
then took the best parts out
and are now saying they are
giving us a beach and park.
There is no sand on their pro-
posed beach-front park. It is
all rock. How generous.”





to be obtained by mid-August
this year, with the detailed
drawings to be completed and
submitted by the Chinese archi-
tectural team by early Decem-
ber and approved that same
month.

Construction

“After that the Chinese gov-
ernment will select an appro-

‘priate construction company.

from China, whose principals
will then come to the Bahamas
for the formal signing of a con-
struction agreement with the
government of the Bahamas,”
the prime minister said.

“We expect that equipment,
supplies and Bahamian labour
would be mobilised and con-
struction should begin no later
than February next year,” he
said.

Prime Christie said that the
plan re-enforced “our serious,
uncompromising commitment
to ensure that we have created
in the our country a centre for
sporting activity second to none
in the region, which we hope
will produce and continue to
produce athletes of renown in
all of the disciplines.”

Minister of Sports, Youth and
Culture Neville Wisdom further
emphasised that the stadium
would be used for important
national and cultural events. _

The ambassador of the:Peo-
ple’s Republic of Chi
-Yuanming, said that th



. “iam would.bé'a symbol’ofthe

friendship* between the
Bahamas and China, and signi-
fies the understanding and co-

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USE YOUR E-CARD TO RESERVE 900-3640 OR WULGALLERIACIEMAS.COM |
L _——————


PAGE 4, FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005

THE TRIBUNE -



: EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR i

Politicians should
not make promises
they won't keep ©

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M. G3 M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242).502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

. Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Inagua investor handled badly |

IN NOVEMBER 2003 Prime Minister’
" Christie, reminding his ministers of the stan-
dard of integrity required of them, warned
Bahamians not to mislead foreign investors
into spending significant sums of money.
’ He made the statement in the House of
Assembly in connection with the Korean boat
scandal and the resignation of MP Sidney
Stubbs as chairman of BAIC.
“Tam very sorry for any kind of disap-
intment and cost that might have been
: incurred by. the (Korean): investors in this
matter,” Mr Christie told the House at the
__ time, adding that the “Bahamas government
. most certainly will never set out to deliberately
approach these matters with casual indiffer-
% ence.”. a é
_. | ‘If this is so, then how can the prime minis-
_ter ‘and ‘certain members of his government
explain the run-around given to a potential
investor —.as described by lawyer William
Holowesko in a letter published in The Tri-
‘bune-« on April12?)

- We are not here to argue the merits or
‘demerits of the American investor or his pro-
‘posed investment — a $20 million seafood

_ production plant in Inagua — but only to con-
* demn what has been described as the “dither-

ing and indecision of the Bahamas govern i

ment” i in handling his project.

' Instead of the investor being told that eee

: ernment was not interested in his proposal,

he was encouraged to go to the expense of .

- getting an Environmental Impact Assessment

(EIA) done. This will cost him about another
_ quarter of a million dollars. He has already
spent more than $2 million to prepare the

" project for government’s consideration.

.. : But in view of what Prime Minister Christie

told the House just before debate ended at.

10 o’clock Wednesday night, the guillotine

"has already come down on the Ocean Farms of
the Bahamas project.
Why didn’t he say so long ago, and let the

_investor find a new site on which to spend his

- $20 million?

'. \ According to Mr Christie the investor has to
satisfy government on two points before his
project — which has been roosting in govern-
ment’s rafters for six years — can be approved.

- _ Firstly, he has to satisfy the prime minister
that he has the $20 million to fund the project,

- and secondly, he has to submit an EIA study to
prove that his project is scientifically “feasible
-and sensible”.

'_ Why should he do the latter, when, obvi-

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ously from Mr Christie’s comments in the
House, he has not satisfied the former?

And in view of what Mr Holowesko says his
client was told — in his presence — by gov-
ernment’s scientific adviser, Dr Livingstone
Marshall — “I have stopped you now and I'll
stop you from here on out” and “don’t expect
your EIA will be approved by BEST” — it
seems brazen to lead the investor astray with

_ the hope that an EIA will be the secret key to

open the locked door to the fish farm project.

This appears to be the perfect example of an
investor being misled into spending signifi-
cant sums of money, unnecessarily — the very
thing that Mr Christie warned against.

In winding up the Inter-American Bank
loan debate in the House late Wednesday
night, Mr Christie said he had been challenged
to “talk about Inagua.”

“T respected Mr (William) Holowesko up to
the time he wrote something in that newspaper
and made a statement about me,” said Mr
Christie as he warmed to his subject.

“T have the responsibility of governing this
country and I could walk in here with court
dockets today and lay them on the table and
you will understand why I say: ‘Mr, man, you
want to invest, show me that you have the

capacity ‘6 spend $20 million on investment in

Inagua.’:

“Show me,” he continued, waving a sheef of.

documents in front of him, “that what I know
to be your corporate background is not present

-here today in the Bahamas. And then once

you do that show this country an Environ-
ment Impact Assessment that we are able to
agree that in the face of scientific advice that
what you want to do is feasible and sensible.
Now, what would it look like for me as Prime
Minister to get caught up in this — personal
attacks that are levied and say do you think
that if I have a document (again waving the
document, then dashing it to the table) that
tells me that someone was in business before
and has been bankrupt and millions of dollars
are lost — it goes beyond that, but don’t let’s
go beyond that now. But this information is
acessible; it is known and a government is
expected to make questions and raise ques-
tions on it”.

Why has it taken Mr Christie so long so say

so? No matter who the investor, he i is owedan .

apology.

This behaviour gives little confidence to
future investors to step forward with projects
for the Bahamas.



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EDITOR, The Tribune.

I REALLY thought the:

Rev CB Moss had more
smarts than to fall for a trick
like believing Bradley
Roberts when he promised
in 2002 that he would resign
midway in his term in office
to allow him (Senator Moss)
to run for Bain and Grants
Town. Brother. Moss,
haven’t you learned as yet
that a promise is merely a
comfort to a fool? Did you
really believe that any of
those guys would give up
any of their sweetness for
you? They hardly ever want
to leave office; even if they
are on their death beds. This
is not the first. time the
Christie camp made that
kind of a promise and you
are not the first one his
camp made look like a fool.

During the race, for the’
leadership of the PLP when

Dr Bernard Nottage chal-
lenged both Mr Christie and
Mr Galanis, all kinds of
Government jobs and Sen-
ate appointments were

promised by the Christie.

and the Galanis camps;
Christie promised a number
of us, after he made his very

' first Senate appointments,

that he would appoint new
Senators after two and one

half years or halfway into

the Senator’s term in office
— it never happened. I
promise you, Rev Moss, that
one of these days, when I
really get ticked off with
these political hypocrites, I
will tell you the names of
those sitting around the
table, in the government,
who had nothing good to say
about Christie behind his

_ back but after they received
. their promise, they desert-

ed Dr Nottage and went

‘with the flow. I can assure

you that the names include
many of those who are now
singing his (Christie’s) prais-
es around the Cabinet table
every Tuesday morning.
Politicians should be care-
ful not to make promises
they have no intentions of
keeping. It doesn’t matter
how Christie and Roberts
rant and rave, the fact of the
matter is that Roberts made
the promise to Rev Moss
and he should keep his
promise; they certainly held
Hubert Ingraham to his
commitment not to serve as

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Prime Minister for more
than ten years;
Bradley Roberts should
have resigned, anyway,
when those charges of
alleged rape were lodged
against him a short time ago
— that would have been the
proper time to go; but like I
said, these guys would not
go even if they are on their
death beds.

It bothers me, however, to
see three grown men, lead-
ers in our government no
less — Moss, Roberts and
Christie — argue. and fight
over something so trivial
when there are thousands of
Bahamians in Grand
Bahama who are catching
hell due to being unem-
ployed.

Bradley said that Moss
should know that he
(Bradley) is a man of his
word, an honourable man;
but should he? You said you
would resign, but you
haven’t. Is that being an
honourable man of your
word? I don’t think so. But
integrity is a rare commodi-
ty, especially among our
politicians. I have a certain




EDITOR, The Tribune. |

for public office.

JOHN ANTHONY
Nassau,
April 7, 2005.





besides:

‘Hitting out at
union president

JUDGING from recent events, the Hotel Union, its Pres-.
ident, Mr Bain, and his executive, seem hell bent on dictat-
ing terms of employment to the country at large and instruct-
ing the police and the Government, the Ministry of Labour
in particular, on how to do their jobs.

In between seemingly condoning acts of hooliganism by
their members, which coincidentally are largely overlooked
by the police, they should perhaps purchase a hotel or
restaurant, enlist in the police reserves and consider running

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TA CAMMOAN CHADEHOAT NERC

DIVIDEND NOTICE

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COMMONWEALTH BANK
TO COMMON SHAREHOLDERS





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Limited has declared an Extraordinary Dividend
of 5 cents per share, on Common Shares, to all
shareholders of record at April 22, 2005:-

The payment will be made on April 29, 2005,
through Colina Financial Advisors Ltd., the
Registrar and Transfer Agent, in the usual manner.

Charlene A. Pinder Higgs
Corporate Secretary

admiration, in retrospect of
course, for Mr Ingraham
who honoured his commit-
ment to leave office after
ten years as Prime Minister
and he didn’t allow his party
to coerce him into breaking
his word either — not so in
the case with Roberts.

The book of Psalms was
written between 1440 and
586BC, King David is cred-
ited with writing 73 chap-
ters, books or however you
refer to them. In Psalms .15
verse 4, and I will para-
phrase - “He who keeps his
promise, even if it ruins him,
shall stand firm forever.”
(see the Life Application
translation).

Now that Rev Moss has
had his disagreement with
the big Boys publicly, he is
as good as dead politically.
He will be treated like a
cancer from here on in just
like Senator Edison Key was
treated. I wonder, though,
if Rev Moss has the guts
and/or the pride in himself
to resign, like Senator Key
did, before he is abused any

_ further — we shall see.

FORRESTER
CARROLL
Freeport,
Grand Bahama.
March 23, 2005.






















THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005, PAGE 5





Heated debate at Rotary



@ By KILAH ROLLE
Tribune Staff Reporter

TEMPERS flared during a ~

weekly Rotary meeting as pres-
ident of the Public’ Transit
Association (PTA) attempted
to persuade members that jit-
neys can generate millions and
offer considerable profit to any
investor willing to buy into a
much needed rehabilitation
programme.

Reuben Rahming told the
Rotary Club of West Nassau
yesterday that the public transit
system can easily generate $40
million a year, said it was
incumbent upon them to help,
“even if you just do it for your
own selfish reasons.”

“A lot of people are seem-
ingly unaware of the signifi-
cance of this industry,” he said,
“and are irresponsible enough
to assume that we jitneys have

no bearings on their business,

but with 90,000 movements a
day along various business

routes, this system has a direct —

impact on the income of your
business as far as sales and
retail is concerned.”
@
Admitted

Mr Rahming admitted that
he came prepared to speak with
the group armed with “a bit of
arrogance and confidence,”
because he knew he was being
thrown in the “midst of a lion’s
den.”

He insisted that any investor
who injected funds into the
industry would see a range of
38 to 69 per cent return on that

‘investment, “with no risk."

“The fact remains that every

_one dollar invested in the
improvement, betterment and
expansion of the public trans-



portation system as it relates to
operational capital will trans-
late into that return based upon
the community in that area.

However when he asked the
group to bang the table if they
agreed that this is a good invest-
ment, his question was met with
a resounding silence.

Failing

Rotarians pointed out that
although Mr Rahming had
some good ideas, he was fail-
ing to address some of the
issues which hinder the credi-
bility of the hundreds of jitneys
that drive the streets of New
Providence.

“These jitneys are reckless
drivers,” one Rotarian said,
“and on top of that, there are
civil servants out there who
own franchises, what do you
have to say about that?”

Mr Rahming said he was
aware that there are many civ-
il servants who are in the sys-
tem, and said that “under law
they probably should not have
a franchise.”

“We must solve these irregu-
larities in this association,” he
said, “we can’t talk regularisa-
tion if we have a lot of people
in the closet but as long as that
environment of culture is there
we will never get to where we
need to go. We must have
transparency, honesty and be
open so we can fix it.”

One way to address these
irregularities proposed by the
PTA president, is to implement
a unified hiring process in the
PTA.

“A unified code of hiring will
kill a lot of the ills we have in
the system,” he explained, “and

all drivers who come will have °

to be registered and docu-

mented in the PTA, allowing
us to reward the good and deal
with bad appropriately. This
would help bring about some
sort of stability in this business.”

When this idea was rejected
by one Rotarian, Mr Rahming
responded: “I will speak to you
like a Rotarian. I don’t think
we’ve dialogued enough for
you to, in an educated way,
determine how it cannot hap-
pen. I would expect of you as
businessmen to understand
what being a visionary is, you
know about struggle, you know
what it takes to turn over a
business and have faith in your
product even though it is floun-
dering.”

Mr Rahming said that the
average quota earned by jitney
operators is around $180 a day,

’ and said that this total is easily

achieved.

“The fundamental problem
is honesty,” he said, “you'll find
one driver who is out by 12
noon, comes in brings his.$180
and goes back on the road and
works for himself. We have a
lot of this happening.”

Problems

He also said that in the indus-.

try, he has noticed a lot of drug
and alcohol problems, poor
self-management ability, and a
lack of professionalism.

“This industry is capable of
generating in excess of 40 mil-
lion dollars easily,’ Mr Rahming
continued, “but we need help
right now because the psycho-
logical impact of years of abuse,
neglect, and political interfer-
ence that has been affected on
us has caused a stagnation. That
is about to change under our
structure, we are awakening
our people.”



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BAHAMIANS fear they will
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claimed yesterday.

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who wants the government to
take action against the spread
of ramshackle Haitian homes
across the island, believes
witchcraft is behind the locals’
silence.

But he warned that, if they

“don’t speak out, Bahamian
“ society on Abaco will be

swamped by an alien culture.

Mr Cooper, an entrepreneur,
said he feels he is fighting a
lone campaign against a prob-
lem that could have far-reach-
ing implications for Abaco in
the future.

He estimated that Haitians
already outnumber Bahamians

* five-to-one on Abaco and

warned that the island would
become a satellite of Haiti

Me within ten years if no action is
. taken.

The middle-aged father-of-
two, who made headlines a few
weeks ago when-he dismantled
a half-built Haitian shack,
wants Prime Minister Perry
Christie to address what he
sees as a real danger to the
island’s future.

He hopes to meet both Mr
Christie and Works Minister
Bradley Roberts in the near
future in a bid to spark official
















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action.
Meanwhile, he wants Aba-
conians to become more vocal

. against a situation which he

claims gets worse by the week.
“The problem is that most
Bahamians are afraid of being
fixed by obeah,” he said. “They
really believe that if they chal-
lenge the Haitians in any way,
they will use spells on them.”
Mr Cooper described local
superstitions as “idiotic” and
said he did not believe in
obeah. “I believe in God

Almighty,” he said, adding that |

Bahamians’ failure to act will
result in a Haitian takeover.

There is growing dismay on
Abaco about uncontrolled
building activity in the pine
barrens. Residents claim immi-
grants are creating new settle-
ments in bush areas near Trea-
sure Cay.

At Marsh Harbour, the two
shanty settlements, The Mud
and Pigeon Pea, are the hub of
Haitian activity on the island.



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seminar.

(Photo: Mario Duncanson/.
Tribune Staff).

mw By TIFFANY GRANT .
- Tribune Staff Re orter_

PROPER preparabontt is

the key to effective and effi-.

| cient response to real-life. —
|", emergency situations: said (

most grateful for th ppor-
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‘is:commiunity based:' —s:.; group ‘is;enthusias

This week, individuals —

from the community are: —
being trained to react to

emergency situations ata
Community Emergency
Response Team (CERT)
seminar.

CERT wile allow. volune

teers in the community to
manage utilities, put out
small fires, treat individuals
for shock, provide basic med-
ical aid, search for and res-





nity level. It is our hope and
desire to’ spread the pro-
gramme throughout the

Bahamas,” said Mr Smith.
‘When The Tribune arrived.
‘at the seminar, which was
held at-the New Pr
- Community Churth, persons
at different statio

ovidence



1

“We have to take disaster.
“management at the commu-

ere





stem

. busily re-enacting emergency :

situations. ;
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the emergency trainin

are receiving. ve].
“They realise the _impor-

tance of it, and I can‘see #'in

the level of participation in.

the course.
“The goal i is to train 3 000 -

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* said Mr Richards.

United States Ambassador
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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005

THE TRIBUNE

Group demands funding
for opponents of CSME

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Tribune Staff Reporter

AN INTERNATIONAL trade pres-
sure group is urging Prime Minister
Perry Christie to make equal funding
available to both sides of the CSME
debate.

In a press release yesterday, Bahami-
ans Agitating for a Referendum on the
Free Trade Areas of the Americas
(BARE) said that Foreign Affairs Min-
ister Fred Mitchell and CARICOM
Ambassador Leonard Archer appeared
to have engaged in a series of events
designed to orient Bahamians to the
Caribbean Single Market Economy
(CSME) and commit the country to
the regime through the auspices of the
government.

However, claimed BARF president
Paul Moss, there has been no debate or
agreement on the country’s participa-
tion in the CSME.

“Are these gentlemen speaking for
the government of the Bahamas? Do

their views represent those of Cabinet |

or parliament?” it asked.
Treaty

Mr Moss said that if government
wishes the Bahamas to join the
CSME, it must refrain from continuing
to argue that the treaty will assist the

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to the WTO.

He said officials must also stop sug-
gesting that “Bacardi is not able to sell
its rum to the Caribbean unless we
join.”

Mr Moss said the two arguments are
overused and worthless.

He said that the rules of WTO are
aimed at eliminating the diversity of
national policies, priorities and cultures
to create the uniform world sought by
multi-national corporations.

“It is an organisation that a devel-

oping country such as the Bahamas
should avoid at all costs,” he said..

Bacardi

Mr Moss added that if Bacardi can-
not sell its products in CARICOM,
then it is the fault of the government
for not responding to help Bacardi.

“T say go to, bat for Bacardi, but do
not seek to commit the country because
of government passivity,” he said.

Addressing suggestions that the
Bahamas might be granted exemption
from some of the terms of the COME
agreement, for example the free mceve-
ment of people, Mr Moss said: “Would
any right thinking person believe that
the reservations are guarantees to the
country and that Caricom would
respect it?”





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@ BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

" FREEPORT - A new junior
high school is urgently needed
on Grand Bahama to combat
overcrowding in the public
schools, a Bahamas Union of
Teachers (BUT) executive hgas
claimed.

“We need at least one of the
two junior high schools that
were promised available by the
start of school year or we are
going to have some serious
overcrowding on Grand
Bahama,” warned Frances
Friend, BUT area vice presi-
dent for Grand Bahama.

Ms Friend said the union is
very concerned about the nega-
tive implications that over-
crowding could have on both
teachers and students.

Prior to his death last Decem-
ber, then-chairman of the
Grand Bahama Port Authority
Edward St George pledged
financial assistance for the con-
struction of two new junior high
schools.

If a new junior high school is
not available by September, Ms
Friends said the Ministry of
Education would have to make
some provision to accommo-
date students.

She added that industrial

a FRED Mitchell has been accused of comuittiog
the country to the CSME



‘Urgent need’ for
new school on
Grand Bahama

action could follow if nothing .
is done to address the issue of
overcrowding.

Repairs

Another area of concern is
the unfinished repairs at the
schools in west Grand Bahama,
including West End primary,

* Holmes Rock primary and Mar-

tin Town primary.

‘Ms Friend was very con-
cerned about bathroom access
at Holmes Rock primary. She
noted that students are forced
to hop over a board at the door-
way to gain access to the facili-
ties.

“It would be one year since
the hurricane this coming Sep-
tember, and I would hope that
repairs at all of the schools are
completed in its entirety by that
time,” said Ms Friend.

Turning her attention-to
school security, Ms Friend stat-
ed that security at all of ‘the
schools has significantly
improved.

After serving a several years
as area vice president for the
Grand Bahama district, Ms
Friend announced that she will
be offering running for the
BUT presidency. Elections are
slated for June 8.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005, PAGE 7

Centre



saan after Deqotintiona.



& BCPO president Robert Farquharson speaking to reporters outside Bahamas Telecommiunica- _issues on the table are a pro-

tions last month



Louis Vu
product
‘sold illeg

@ By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

LOUIS Vuitton items are a
common sight on the streets of
Nassau — yet,no one in the
Bahamas is authorised to sell
the brand.

So said Lewis Nadel, is an‘

investigator with Forensic
Investigative Associates, whose
client is LVMH (Louis Vuitton,
Moet, Hennessey).

He was one of the presenters
at a one-day seminar held yes-
terday on counterfeiting and
copyright:

Bahamian law enforcement
officers attended the seminar,
which included presentations
from representatives of some
of the companies whose prod:
ucts are most extensively pirat-
ed in the country.

"It is a very challenging issue
for the people of the Bahamas.
Even though there is an existing

. law that resides on the books,
the actual enforcement of this

_ law is now being handled with a
lot of strategic planning and
investigations are well engi-

“neered," said Mr Nadel.

Consumers should be aware,
he added, that these fake goods
are often being made in sweat-
shops where young children
work 12 to 14-hour days in sub-

' standard conditions.
"Legitimate goods are made
under very strict quality con-
trol processes and inspections,"
_ he said. "These products
undergo none of them. They
are mass manufactured out





ally’

of the cheapest goods.

“The proceeds of these goods
go into other markets such as
money laundering, weapons,
drugs — it’s a whole subculture
that derives from the proceeds
of the counterfeit market.".

Quality

Mr Nadel claimed that one
of his client’s concerns is that
when fake Louis Vuitton prod-
ucts become worn and tattered
because the leather has not
been cut properly, or when the
stitching begins to show, it
reflects badly on the authentic
manufacturer.

He added that millions of
dollars are being lost interna-
tionally because of this trade,
as most transactions are con-
ducted over the Internet, mak-
ing the job of law enforcement
officers much more difficult.

The Bahamas Copyright Act
allows for hefty fines and seri-
ous jail terms for those involved
in the illegal reproduction of
DVDs, CDs and videotapes,
the selling fake upscale prod-
ucts, or any other form of coun-
terfeiting or pirating. Con-
sumers are not exempt from
prosecution before the courts.

Mr Nadel said that educat-
ing the Bahamian public was
important, especially vendors
in the straw market, where he
says that counterfeit items are
still being sold and vendors
have “significant investments”
in these items.

Police seminar
On retiring with
peace and dignity

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Royal Bahamas Police
Force has held a two-day retire-
ment training seminar aimed at
helping its employees enter the
next stage of life with a degree
of certainty and peace of mind.

The seminar, which is to be
an annual event, was launched
under the theme “providing the
help you need today, to secure
the future you want tomorrow”
at the police headquarters cafe-
teria yesterday and will contin-
ue today.

The objectives of the semi-
nar are to help employees iden-
tify and address concerns about
retirement, to provide a frame-
work to assist in planning long-
term and short-term goals and
to provide strategies to help

participants plan investments in
advance,
. Officers will also be offered
information on pensions, finan-
cial planning and estate man-
agement.

“Too many police officers
and civilians have retired from
this organisation and found
themselves confronted with sit-
uations less than suitable for
them to comfortably maintain a
particular lifestyle.

“That is why this workshop
is SO appropriate and most
timely and I trust that the
information shared will provoke
you to quickly make the neces-
sary adjustment that will ensure
that your retirement days are
spent with some degree of com-
fort,” Commissioner of Police
Paul Farquharson told the offi-
cers.

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

EMPLOYEES at the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
yesterday held a “go-slow
protest”, a well placed sources
told The Tribune. |

According to the source, the
action took place following a
meeting held with management
on Wednesday night.

The source claimed that union
officials were unhappy with the
results and therefore told their
members to report to work but
not to do anything while there.

Executives of the Bahamas
Communications and Public
Officers Union, the bargaining
unit for BTC, have been in con-
tract negotiations since their. con-
tract expired in December 2004.

Last month, workers staged a

for workers over the next five
years, the question of paternity
leave, share offerings (which
have not been offered before),
mortgage subsidiaries and bill
payment incentives.

Employees who sat-out had
called for the entire manage-
ment team to be dismissed, say-
ing that the terms the workers
were negotiating are not unac-
ceptable and do not reflect the
current rise in the cost of liv-
ing.

In a press release responding
to the action, BTC claimed that
the work stoppage was illegal.

After a meeting with Mr
Brown, the workers returned
to work the following day. Yes-
terday, The Tribune could not

reach Robert Farquharson or-

BTC management to confirm
the “go-slow.”

promotes
theatre
skills

THE Dundas Centre for
the Performing Arts is set
to launch a series of read-
ings for plays headed for
stage and screen.

The centre is calling on
actors, poets, directors, pro-
ducers, set designers, and
back-stagers to come to the
Dundas on Mackey Street
on Sunday April 17 at 4pm.

The first in the series will
focus on poetry dedicated to
mothers.

“Interested persons are
invited to come out and be
involved in the perfor-
mances, and the Dundas

seeks the renaissance of the-
atre in the Bahamas,” the

centre said.

For further information,
call 325-0005 or fax 325-
5005.



sit-in in order to force a meeting
|. with Reno J Brown, the execu-
tive director of BTC after nego-
tiations with management
reached a stalemate.

According to BCPO president
Robert Farquharson, among the

SAT REVIEW -or sunec
REGISTRATION IN
BGCSE SPANISH

CALL ILR/ GROSVENOR /







posed six per cent pay increase

16 April 2005
: Rae iatare Medical,

The Bahamas Diabetic Association __
& the Cancer Slefei 9] of The PE

invite you to join us on our
“All Together Better” fun walk.

An“All Together Better”
way to start the day!
THE EVENT BEGINS AT 6.30 A.M.

THE ROUTE commences from MONTAGU BEACH then WEST on

Shirley Street, NORTH on Church Street, OUTWARD across

“New Paradise Island Bridge” to the round-about at Paradise Island Golf Course,
BACK to New Providence via the “Old Paradise Island Bridge”, EAST on

East Bay Street and back to Montagu Beach.

TROPHIES ARE AWARDED TO WINNERS BY THE
FOLLOWING CATEGORIES (Male & Female):

A. 12 & UNDER (CHILDREN) B. 13-18 C. 19-30

D. 31-45: E. 46-59 F. “Age Ain’t Nothin’ But a Number” 60+

...With a special floating trophy being awarded to the company
and civic organisation with the most entrants.

- The event dedicated email address is funwalk@atlantichouse.com.bs
Freeport Fun Walk - April 30th,2005

official registration form

/ Atlantic Medical is not liable for injuries incurred by participants at this event.
$15.00 Adults / $12.00 Children: includes “T-shirt, Fruits, Water and a Special Gift”
Deliver to Atlantic Medical Insurance, 5th floor Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Ave.

Tel: 326-8191 or Fax this form to: 326-8189.
FOR ADDITIONAL ENTRIES DUPLICATE THIS FORM.

NAME: ‘ AGE:
COMPANY/ORGANIZATION: EMAIL:

T-SHIRT SIZE. S M LL XL XXL XXXL (circle choice)

\ RACE CATEGORY: A B C D F

CWeightWatchers

ED |
The Bahamas Diabetic Association exam All an t IC M ed ICa |
ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE LIMITED
ATLANTIC HOUSE 2nd TERRACE &COLLINS AVENUE PO BOX SS 5915 NASSAU

TEL: (242) 326-8191 FAX: (242) 326-8189

A member of Colonial Group International Ltd.
Personal & Business Insurance: Group Pensions: Group Medical: Life Assurance & Investments




PAGE 8, FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005



A VISIT to Atlantis’ Dis-
covery Channel Camp
topped the agendas of more
than 20, excited fifth and
sixth grade students of the
Lowe Sound Primary
School, during a recent fun
packed field trip to New
Providence. The Discovery
Channel Camp at Atlantis,
is a unique children’s camp
designed for young Atlantis
guests and children from the
local school community. The
camp fosters learning
through science, arts and
craft in a fun filled, exciting
and secured environment.

The students from Andros
had lots of fun exploring the
ancient ruins of Atlantis.
The youngsters expressed a
keen interest in the marine
animals on display, in par-
ticular the sharks.

Sharks

Not only did they observe
various species of sharks, but
also had an opportunity to
learn how these animals
function. The youngsters got
an opportunity to see a repli-
ca of a row of shark teeth as
well as paint miniature
sharks made of wood.

Leria Archer- McKenzie,
Director of the Discovery
Channel Camp at Atlantis
said Atlantis was very
pleased to have the students
of Lowe Sound Primary
School visit the facilities as a
part of the Discovery Chan-
nel Camp’s partnership with
the community. She said,
over the years, the camp has
become a tool for local edu-
cators who use the facility as
a resource site for educa-
tional field trips.

McKenzie said, “Our local
school programme has
grown tremendously since its

inception four years ago...



_LOCAL NEWS

H@ EDU-TAINMENT! Antionette Hanna,
Senior Camp Counsellor at the Discovery Chan-
nel Camp shows students of the Lowe Sound
Primary School a row of shark teeth.

(Photo: Anastasia Stubbs)

| This only reinforces Atlantis’

commitment to impact the
lives of our young people in
the entire Bahamas, not ip
New, Providence.”

_ Mel ose Devine- Moss, a’



Senior Assistant and
Teacher.at Lowe Sound Pri-
mary School said, “Even
though we are from Andros

, sand, live near the water, the

students don’t have an

opportunity to experience
close up encounters with the
fish, sharks, manta rays and
other sea creatures. So this
trip was really fascinating for
them.”

THE TRIBUNE



Following their visit at
Atlantis the youngsters were
off to Government House
and the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force.

The field trip was organ- ,



ised by administrators of

- Lowe Sound Primary School

in conjunction with the Min-.
istry of Education’s Science
and Fechnolepy Depart:
ment. i

*e



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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS



Government

appoints youth

and culture >
co-ordinators

. @ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

TWELVE people have been
appointed by the government
to develop youth and culture
programmes on the family
islands.

The co-ordinators will work
with central and family author-
ities and community organiza-
tions to introduce, co—ordinate
and assist with programmes,
projects and events.

Culture Minister Neville Wis-
dom made the announcement
in the House of Assembly on
Wednesday, saying that the
posts were created in line with
budgetary constraints and in an
attempt to reduce the amount
of officers needed to carry out
ministry functions.

He said that the officers who
will co-ordinate the activities

were multi-talented in youth,
sports culture and community
work.

“Their skills together with the
support of the Ministry staff,
would help to effectively take
the Ministry’s mission to devel-
op youth excel in sports and



Marsulette Patram



WTR cement ele

Nerissa Lockhart -
Robbie Smith -
Lovinia Woodside =
Kelson Morley -
Ishmael Morley =
Ann Brown -
Marvin Storr -
. Brian Cleare -
Donald Saunders =,
Mark Wells -
Zanta Lightbourne -



preserve Bahamian culture to
the family island,” he said.

He added that this is the first
step to strengthen the process
of bringing full time youth offi-
cers, sports officers, and cultur-
al affairs officers to each family
island in the future.



Grand Bahama

Bimini / Berry Island
Crooked Island

Exuma /Ragged Isiand
Abaco

Cat Island

San Salvador

North Andros

South Andros :
Long Island / Rum Cay .
Inagua / Mayaguana
Eleuthera












Freeport Junkanoo
competition announced



@ C-Cube public relations director and president of Creative Works Peter Adderley, centre, along
with Valley Boys chairman Brian Adderley, right, chairman of the Grand Bahama Coalition
Junkanoo Group Ken Ferguson, second from left, and junkanoo representatives.

FREEPORT - A JUNKANOO competition
called “Feel The Rush” will be held in down-

town Freeport on July 31.

More than $75,000 in prizes will be up for grabs



in the Grand Bahama competition, which was
announced during a press conference held in

Rawson Square on Wednesday by organisers

C-Cube

@ Marketing manager Leah Davis with the Johnsons

Shopper tearing down the aisles

A SHOPPER was able to shop to his heart’s
content when he went on a two-minute spree

at Solomon’s Super Centre.

Cyril Johnson raced down the aisle after
his wife won the spree. The Jolinsons were

the second winners in the store’s promotion,
through which it will give away four sprees.

Shoppers have a chance of winning the



remaining three and four-minute sprees with
a minimum $25 purchase.






HURRICANE HOLE MARINA

Yacht Show Hours: Friday/Saturday 10am-5pm
Sunday 1 lam-5pm

MILLION AIR JET CENTER

Aircraft Show Hours: Friday/Saturday 10am-5pm

‘4th annual International
Yacht and Jet Show
and spend a few days

relaxing in Paradise.

JHE ISLANDS OF

QOrnebahamas

INTERNATIONAL






£.
Aig Can
“Celebrating Food in Plight”


PAGE 10, FRIDAY, APRIL 15,



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2005

THE TRIBUNE.







ARO UN D



NASSAU













Be Parties, Nightclubs
Bena & Restaurants

Pink and White Bashment @ BFM Diplomat
Centre to launch the Kingdom Vibes TV Show
Cable 12. Friday, April. {5 @ 7.30pm sharp.
Appearing: Mr Link, DJ Counsellor, Kristine,
Solo and Chariots of Fire. Admission: $12
(includes a free CD of your choice). Tickets @

‘BEM, Faith Life, Oasis Music Centre, The Juke-

box, Bucks Gospel.

Girl Power, featuring Novie, Destra, Faye Ann
(Trint Road March Queen 2K3), Spice and Lady
E. @ Cable Beach Grounds. Saturday, April 16 @
Cable Beach Grounds. Admission: $20 (advance),
$25 (at the gate). Ticket location: Alpha Sounds.
Hosted by JJ, backed by Visage.

Exotic Saturdays @ Fridays Soon Come starts
with 3 for $10 drink specials. Admission: $40
before midntght and $15 after. Ladies free before
tl pm.

Rave Saturdays @ Club Ectipse. DJ Scoobz
spinning the best in Old Skool. Admission $35, all
inclusive food and drink.

Fever @ Bahama Boom, Elizabeth St, down-
town, every Friday night. Admission $10 before
midnight. First 50 women get free champagne.
First 50 men get a free Greycliff cigar. Dress to
impress. For VIP reservations call 356- 4612.

Coot Runnings is b@k with a Conscious Party
@ Hard Rock Cafe, Charlotte St North every Fri-
day. Classic reggae style music. Admission $10.

Mellow Moods every Sunday: @ Fluid Lounge

_ and ‘Nightclub, Bay St; featuring hits’ from*yes-~

terday — old school reggae and rockers down-

_ Stairs, and. golden oldies upstairs. Admission:

Free. Doors open 9pm.

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters Sperts

Bar. Drink speciats alt might long, tncluding
karaoke warm-up drink to get you started. Party
from 8pm-until.

Karaoke Mights @ Fluid Lounge and Nigtt-
club. Begins 10pm every Tuesday. Weekly winners
selected as Vocalist of the Week — $250 cash prize.

Winner selected at endl of month frong finalists —-

cash prize $1,000. Admission $10 with one free
drink.

Regeae Tuesdays @ Bahama Boom. Cover
charge includes a free Guinness.and there should
be lots of prizes and surprises. Admission: Ladies
$10 and Men $15,

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports
Bar every Wednesday Spm-Spm. Free. Appetiz-
ers and numerous drink spectals.

Mash Nights @ Club Fluid every Thursday. The
ultimate Ladies Night. Join Nassau’s and Mianu
Beach’s finest men. Ladies only before | 1.30pm
with free champagne. Guys allowed after 11.30pm
with $20 cover.

The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday.
Doors open at Ypne showtime 1f.30pm. Cover
charge $15. $10 with ftyer.

Fantasy Mridays @ Huid Lounge, featuring late
“80s music in the VIP Lounge, Top of the Charts
in the Main Lounge# icon lights and. Go Go
dancers. Glow sticks for all in before midnight.
Admission: Ladies free before Lipm, tle after;
Guys $20 all night.

Dicky Mo’s Mridays @ Cable Beach. Happy
Hour - 3 for $10 mixed drinks aad $f shots.

Fwisted Boodah Lounge @ Cafe Segafredo,
Charlotte St kicks off carly thes F riday at 6pm
with deep house to hard house music, Seaturing
CraivBOO, Unkle Funky and Swor?wide on the
decks.

Chill Owt Sundays @ Coco Loco, Sandyport,
from 4pm-until, playing deep, funky chill moods

i terereous
Ty CaN



®

YA Hs





f

REVEL in the Arts, a celebration of the
visual, musical and culinary arts, hosted by the
Lyford Cay Scholars’ Association (LCSA), will
be held on Saturday, April 16 at 7pm at Mount-
batten Hoase & Gardens, West Hill Street.

_ The gala cocktail benefits the Harry C Moore
Memorial Scholarship in the Arts, to fund the
education of Bahamian arts students. Thirty
well-known artists have donated artwork fow a
silent auction. Opening bids will begin at half
the value, providing the “rare”? opportunity to
obtain your favourite artist's work at very good
prices. e @

Revel in fine food, wine, live music, live food

with world beats.



Sweet Sunday Chill Out Seiree Lounge, every

Sunday, 4pm-midnight.@ Patio Grille, British

Colonial Hotel.

" Wet Siindays, every Sunday, noon-midnight @'

Crystal Cay Beach. Admission $10, ladies free.

Carib Scene @ Club Fluid every Sunday. A
night of Caribbean, Latin and Reggae flavours
for all audiences. Latin Flair in the VIP Lounge;
Old School Reggae and Soca in the Main Lounge.
‘Ladies in free before [1pma. $10 after {1pm. Men,
$15 cover charge.

Jay Mitehell amd Hot KC @ Patm Court
Lounge, British Colontal Hilton, Wednesday-
Thursday Spin-l2am.

Sunday Night Inter’ hide @ Briteley’s Restaurant
& Lounge, Eneas St off Poinciana Drive.
turing Frankie Victory at the key board in ihe
After Dark Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to mud-
night. Fire food and drinks.

Paul Hanna, Tabatha and Geraie, and the
Caribbean Express perform at ‘Traveller’s Rest,
West Bay St, every Sunday, 6.30pm-9.30pm.

The Arts

Revel im the Arts, a pala cockttal
fundraiser eetebrating the visual, musical
and culinary arts, will be held at Mount-
batten House & Gardens, West Hull Street
on Saturday, April 16. Featuring: an Art
a Services auction; door prizes; Jive music;
and Dine Arousid, a culinary feast featuring
‘the cuisine of Naau® most exclusive
restaurants. Hosted by the Lyford Cay
Scholars’ Association (LCSA). Dress: island

elegance. Time: 7pm. Procecds in aid of
the Lyford Cay Foundation's Harry C
Moore Memortal Scholarship iw the Arts.
Tickets @ $75 can be purchased by con-
tacting Monique Hinsey, 362-4910; John A
C Benjamin, 394-9541; Mark A Jordan, 361-
5220 ext 264; “Erica James, 328-5800 ext
227.

Bond, an exhibition of recent works by .

mother and son artists Sue Bennett-

Williams and Jason Bennett will run this
month at Popostudios Gallery tn Chip-



Fea-





demonstrations and much more.

The gala event will also introduce the much
anticipated “Dine Around”, where cuisine from
the island’s finest restaurants will be available.
Gifests will also have an opportunity to retain
tite in-house services of some of the Bahamas’
top chefs, and the services of numerous pro-

’ fessionals im fields including graphic design,

personal care and assistance.

° For tickets @ $75, contact Monique Hinsey,
362-4910; John AC Benjamin, 394-9541; Mark
A Jordan, 301-5220 ext 264; Erica James, 328-
5800 ext 227. Door prizes will also be avail-

pata A oat eat apc neers eee

Ping hiun. An ail day open house will be

held on Saturday. April 9, 12pm-7pm..The
exhibition features paintings, mixed media
and.ceramics. ss



Talking Canvases, a solo exhibition by
artist Marlon Hunt at the Central Bank
Art Gallery, Market St, he show runs
through April 28,

The Natioual Collection @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, an exhibition that
takes the viewer on a journey through the his-
tory of fine art in the Bahamas. It features sig-
nature pieces from the national collection,
including recent acquisitions by Blue Curry,
Antonius Roberts and Dionne Benjamin-Smith.
Gallery hours, Tuescday-Saturday, llam-4pm.
Call 328-5800 to book tours.

Past, Present and Personal The Dawn Davies
Collection @ the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, Villa Doyle, West and West Hill Streets.
‘The exhibition is part of the NAGB’s Collector’s
Series. Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 1lam-
4pm. Call 328-5800 to book tours.

‘The Awakening Landscape: The Nassau
Watercolours of Gaspard Le Marchand Tupper,
from the collection of Orjan and Amanda Lin-
droth @ the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas. The mid-nineteenth century paintings
that make up the exhibition are part of one of
the earliest suites of paintings of Nassau and its
environs.

Tupper was a British military officer sta-

tioned at Fort Charlotte in the 1850s. The works |

show a pre-modern Bahamas through the
decidely British medium of watercolour.
Gallery hours, ‘Vuesday-Saturday, 1lam-4pm.
Call 328-5800 to book tours.

Health
Doctors Hospital Distinguished Lecture

Series: High blood pressure affects one in four
adults. Distinguished physician Dr Judson

Eneas will discuss “Hypertension, the Silent

Killer Exposed” on Thursday, April 21 at 6pm
in the Doctors Hospital conference room. This
lecture will incrcase awareness and educate
persons about how to prevent, treat, and man-
age high blood pressure as well as the related
cardiovascular diseases. The lecture is free to
the general public. Free blood pressure, cho-
lesterol and glucose screenings will be per-
formed between Spm and 6pm. To ensure



~ Call 323-4482 for more info.

- the warning signs of respiratory arrest and gives





























available seating RSVP 302-4603.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5.30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at
their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville.

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the
third Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors Hos-
pital conference room.

The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2.30pm (except August and
December) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor
Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital, the official training centre
of the American Heart Association offers CPR
classes certified by the AHA. The course defines

prevention strategies to avoid:sudden death syn-
drome and the most common serious injuries and
choking that can occur in adults, infants and chil-
dren. CPR and First Aid classes are offered every
third Saturday of the month from 9am-1pm. Con-
tact a Doctors Hospital Community Training Rep-
resentative at 302-4732 for more information and
learn to save a life today.

REACH - Resources & Education for
Autism and related Challenges meets from
7pm — 9pm the second Thursday of each month
in the cafeteria of the BEC building, Blue Hill
Road.



Civic Clubs



Toastmasters Club 1905 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm
@ BEC Cafe, Tucker Rd. Club 9477 meets Friday,
7pm @ Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm
A19, Jean St. Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pm
@ British Colonial Hilton. Club 1600 meets Thurs-
day, 8.30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes. Club 7178
meets Tuesday, 6pm @ The J Whitney Pinder
Building, Collins Ave. Club 2437 meets every
second, fourth and fifth Wednesday at the J Whit-
ney Pinder Building, Collins Ave ai 6pm. Club
612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau
Resort, Cable Beach. Club 753494 meets every
Wednesday, 6pm-8pm in the Solomon’s Build-
ing, East-West Highway: All are welcome.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @
the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau
Resort, Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first
Tuesday, 7pm @ Gaylord’s Restaurant,
Dowdeswell St. Please cel 502-4842/377-4589 for

more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second
Tuesday, 6.30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office;
4th floor meeting room.

The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month
in the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, Bay St.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus
meets the second and fourth Wednesday of the
month, 8pm @ St Augustine’s Monestary.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every sec-
ond Friday of each month, 7.30pm at Emmaus
Centre at St Augustine’s Monestary. For more
info call 325-1947 after 4pm.

International Association of Administrative
Professionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third
Thursday of every month @ Superclubs Breezes,
Cable Beach, 6pm.

AMISTAD, a Spanish club meets the third Fri-
day of the month at COB’s Tourism Training
Centre at 7pm in Room 144 during the academic
year. The group promotes the Spanish language
and culture in the community.

Send all your civic and social events to The
Tribune via fax: 328-2398 or e-mail:
outthere@tribunemedia.net



5






THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005, PAGE 11





Public encouraged.
to get involved in
fun walk for health

THE public is being asked to
get involved in the annual Fun
Walk on Saturday — and there is
the chance of prizes for those
who do.

The walk will start at Mon-
tagu Beach at 6:30am and par-
ticipants will travel west on
Shirley Street, to Church Street,
north to the new Paradise
Island Bridge, east of the bridge
to the Paradise Island Golf
Course and then back to Mon-
tagu Beach via the old Paradise
Island Bridge, and finally east
on East Bay Street back to
Montagu Beach.

For the first time, organiser
Atlantic Medical will give each
participant of the walk an
opportunity to win prizes.



First prize:is a round trip
for two to New York on Jet
Blue Airways. Second prize is a
three-month membership
at Better Bodies Gym, and
third prize is two three-month
memberships to Weight
Bahamas.

Executive vice-president and

general manager of Atlantic
Medical Insurance, Lynda Gib-
son expressed her enthusiasm
about the event this year, which
she predicts will be the biggest

Health

“The company is always
seeking to find ways to sensi-

ECO Cr mclacn et ae
~ MONTROSE AVE.



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Tel: (242) 322-1139

tize the general public about
ways to prevent the onset of
various diseases through incor-
porating good healthy living
into their diet and lifestyles.
Walking is the perfect way,”
said Mrs Gibson.

Medical

Participants will include
Atlantic Medical clients, Weight
Watchers members and mem-
bers of the general public. In
past years medical professionals
and doctors and members of
the Bahamas Cancer Society
also attended the walk.

“Their participation is a clear
indication of importance of reg-
ular exercise in the fight against
cancer,” added Mrg.Gibson.

The event, now in its éventh
year, has also won the endorse-
ment of Miss Bahamas Denia
Nixon and Governor General
Dame Ivy Dumont

Proceeds from this walk will
be donated to The Cancer
Society of The Bahamas and
The Bahamas Diabetic Associ-
ation

Anyone interested in taking
part is asked to contact Atlantic
Medical to pre-register at 326-
8191 or Weight Watchers at
394-0148.



MISS Bahamas Denia Nixon with Alana Ingraham and
Darren Bastian of Atlantic Medical Insurance




Website: www.saintgeorgesbahamas.com

“Sharing The Gospel, Living The Ministry”

GOOD NEWS, SHARE IT



i GOVERNOR General Dame Ivy Dumont backs the walk



we love must someday pass
ond our present sight.....

t leave us and the world we know
Without thier radiant light.







-. But we know that like a candle

Their lovely light will shine

To brighten up another place
More perfect more divine.

And in the realm of heaven
‘Where they shine so warm and bright
Our loved ones live forever more
In God’s eternal light.....

Sadly missed by father Colin, sisters Michele and
Siobhan” son Alistair; daughter V’Alonee; brother Perry;.
uncle Egbert; nephews Philip and Michael; nieces Litza |
and Aprial, numerous other relatives and friends. ~

GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN

ia
My
'

+4



TENDER FOR GSM CONTENT SERVICES












The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) is seeking suitably ;

4 | | qualified companies to submit tenders to provide the company with GSM
e ° - 5 ° | e * :

join St. George’s Anglican Church Family | “omtent Services.

Celebrates its 56th Patronal Festival Please note that companies must fully meet all pre-qualification specifications
prior to obtaining the actual tender document. The pre-qualification

specifications are listed below:



1) Company profile of tenderer (overview of company, company
background, number of years in operation, listing of present and
past clients including contact information).

2) Company must be 100% Bahamian owned.

3) Company ownership (listing of principal/beneficial owners,
directors and operators of company. If a joint venture, specify.
participants and terms of joint venture).

4) Full liability insurance of $1, 000,000.00.

AS 5) Agopy of valid businessylicense. a:

ee a 6) Cone *e National Insurance certificate. .

7) Total number of employees.

8) Three written references from persons/businesses for which
similar contracts were successfully completed within the last
three years and the Company must provide references from
current clients utilizing their content services.

9) Bank reference showing financial viability.

10) Copies of financial statements (audited/unaudited) for last three
years of operation.

11) Company must have provided Content services for a period of

3 to 5 years.

12) Company must be able to provide local and international (North

America, Caribbean and the U.K) content.

Good News Service nightly at 7:00 pm
Tuesday 19th - Thursday 21st, April, 2005.
Missioner: Fr. Atma Budhu
Rector: St. Gregory’s
Theme:
“Evangelism through
MISSION, LITURGY, MINISTRY” —





Mass, Holy Eucharist
Sunday, 24th April, 2005 ¢ 9:00 am»
~ Guest Preacher:
Fr. Ernest Pratt, Rector
Companion Parish of St. Paul’s,
Long Island

Fr. Ernest Pratt



Pre-qualification items must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked “
PRE-QUALIFICATION INFORMATION FOR GSM CONTENT
SERVICES “, and delivered on or before 4:00 pm. on April. 28, 2005 to
the attention of:

Service of Thanksgiving Procession,
Benediction & Fellowship
Sunday, 24th April, 2005 ¢ 3:30 pm
Guest Preacher: Canon Harry Bain
Rector, Pro - Cathedral, ©

Christ The King Parish
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Mr. Michael J. Symonette

President & CEO

The Bahamas Telecommunications Co. Ltd.
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive

P.O. Box N-3048

Nassau, The Bahamas





Canon Harry Bain



Saturday, 23rd April 9:00 am
Addington House

Family Entertainment
Featuring “Da bes’ Talent in Da Valley"

Friday, 22nd April, 7:00 pm
PAGE 12, FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005 THE TRIBUNE



FRIDAY EVENING APRIL 15, 2005

7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

Sra est eta Vat es)

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THE TRIBUNE






Ss





@ MINISTER of Tourism, Obie Wilchcombe (right) and Deputy Director-General, Vernice

Walkine, (centre) chats with Max Mayfield, director of the National Hurricane Centre, USA at

the 2005 Weather Conference.

focus of

LAST year’s hurricane sea-
son, which severely impacted
some of the Islands of the
Bahamas while leaving others
virtually untouched, emphasised
the absolute importance of the
annual weather conference,
Minister of Tourism, Obie
Wilchcombe told delegates on
Thursday morning. :

Officially opening the ninth
Bahamas Weather Conference,
Mr Wilchcombe thanked the
over 100 meteorologists and
journalists attending the event
for their very accurate reports
on hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne last year.

He also noted that because
tourism is the mainstay of the
Bahamas, it is very important

during natural disasters such as

the 2004 hurricanes that visitors
know exactly which islands are
affected.

This year’s conference, heid
‘at the Atlantis Resort on Par-
adise Island, is the largest host-
ed by the Ministry so far. The
conference explored the nature
of tracking tropical storms, the
geography of the Bahamas,
island safety procedures, hurri-
cane climatology, evacuation
logistics for the Bahamas and

the United States and the very -

important role the media plays
during these types of natural
disasters.

Overview

Conference delegates were
also given an overview of the
extensive media coverage the
very active 2004 hurricane sea-

son garnered. Minister Wilch--

combe noted that in the major-

‘ity of the reports on the
Bahamas, meteorologists iden-
tified the individual islands by
name and location.

Referring to these reports, he
added: “The investment
inputted by the Ministry of
Tourism in the annual Weather
Conference is obviously paying
off as international meteorolo-
gists are aware of the individu-
ality of the islands.”

The minister also shared with

the meteorologist and journal-__

ists how quickly tourism on the
hurricane-affected islands was
able to rebound following the
2004 hurricanes. “Less than ten
months later, tourism on virtu-
ally all of the islands affected is
now back to pre-hurricane lev-
els.

“And even though Grand
Bahama was affected so badly,





Warve»ness

only one hotel is still down,” he
said. “We have rebounded and
we are celebrating and I think it
has to do with what you did for
us. The prime minister and all
the people of the Bahamas
appreciate you and appreciate
this conference.”

The 2005 Weather Confer-
ence featured guest speakers
from the US National Hurri-
cane Centre, the Federal Emer-
gency Management Association
(FEMA), the Weather Chan-
nel, USA Today and other
regional emergency manage-
ment offices.

Renowned Hurricane Expert
and former director of the
National Hurricane Centre, Dr
Robert Sheets acted as confer-
ence facilitator.

During the conference, many
of the journalists and meteorol-
ogists from major network affil-

-iates along the eastern United
States staged live broadcasts to
-their home audiences via Satel-
lite. This allowed television

(BIS Phote: Derek Smith)





viewers of stations like WTVJ,
Miami and WSOC, Charlotte
the opportunity to see their
weather forecast against the
backdrop of the beautiful sun,
sand and sea of Paradise Island,
Bahamas.

Impact

Through hosting the annual

: Weather Conference, the Min-

istry of Tourism-seeks to min-
imise the impact of hurricanes
on visitors and residents by
encouraging the dissemination
of accurate, timely information
regarding hurricanes.
A secondary goal is to empha-
sise the geography of the
Bahamas.

The annual Weather Confer-
ence has grown to become a
mainstay of journalist and mete-
orologists worldwide and is now
recognised by the National
Weather Association as an ofti-
cial seminar for earning industry
credits.



FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005, PAGE 13

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PAGE 14, FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



Harewood Sinclair Higgs LF.D.
Pre emanate: Director



CAMERON

DELMANO

KNOWLES
WALLACE, 25

A resident of Simms,
Long Island, will be
held on Saturday April
16th 2005 at 1:00 pm
at Church of God,
Bernard Road.
interment will follow in
the Old Trail Cemetery,
Abundant Life Road.



Officating will be Pastor Dr J L Ferguson, assisted by |

Pastor charles gardiner and Daniel Hall. Service have
been entrusted to Gateway Memorial Funeral Chapel
Wulff Road and Primrose Sireet.

Left with cherished memory are his wife Chantal
"Chante" Knowles; his son Cameron Jr.; his stepson,
Dwayne; father and stepmother Calvin and Fearlease
Wallace; step father Christopher Major; four (4) sisters
Theresa Kelly, Deandra Knowles, Crystal Major and
Shandra Munroe; five (5) brother Christopher Jr.,
Almond and De' Angelo Major, Chaneil and Lamont
Wallace; two (2) grandmothers Delma Knowles of
Simms, Long Island, Vera Wallace of Ragged Island;
mother-in-law, Judy Isaaca of South Africa; three (3)
nieces Tyresha and Terrica Miller and Kenudra Munroe;
one (i) nephew, Quentin Knowles; sisters-inlaw
Madeleine Etzhold of Germany and Elke Griffith of
South Africa; brothers-in-law, Keno Munroe and Earl
Isaacs of Germany; ten (10) aunts, Malvease,
Charmaine, Loraine, Debbie and Denise Knowles
Alfreda Thirston, Mary Rolle, Nurse Prescola Hall,
Eunice and Ann Wallace; eleven (11) uncles, Wilfred
aka "Willia Love" and Charles of Freeport, Henry of
Long Island, John, Wesley and Ernest Knowles, John,
Percy and Lester Wallace of Bimini, William Hall and
Fredrick Rolle; four (4) grand uncles gerald, Exekiel

| of Cat Island, Paul‘and Claudius Taylor of Daytona

tf
|

. Beach, Florida; three (3) grand aunts Castella, Pricella
I and Dorothy Taylor: godmothers, Doras Romer and

Angie Clarke; a host of other relatives and friends -

| Meroe Neil, Youlander, Kishlane, Shanrese, Rafell,

. Monolisa, Avarlo, Carlos, Ray Minus Jr" Jamal, Darlo;

Elkin and Jerry Butler, Jerome Ellis, Bernard’ Rolle,
dr. Munir Rashad, Ruark Rodenwalt, the Knowles,
| Taylor. and Wallace families, Derick Coakley, Rev
Urban knowles and family and Rev Alvin Gray and
| family.

Public viewitig will take place at Gateway Memorial
‘Funeral chapel on Friday from 10:00 am To 6:00 pm
and’on. patureny from 12:00 noon to service time at
the church. : ,

SONIA "TON"
JOSEPH, 64,

A: resident of
Culmersville, will be
held on Saturday April
16th 2005 at 11:00 am
at Faith Temple
Ministries, Maderia
Street.. Interment will
follow in the Lakeview
Gardens and
Mausolems, John F
Kennedy Drive.



Officiating will be Bishop Lester Cox, assisted Pastor |

Laurant Papouloute. Services have been entrused to
Gateway Memorial Funeral.Chapel, Wulff Road and
Primrose Street.

Left with cherished memeory are her five (5) daughters
Clel Y Syndic of Haiti, Maria and Venice Joseph, Mrs
Nasette Sawyer, Mrs Madeleine Williams; three (3)
sons Gilbert Monstaine of Orlando, Florida, Max
Joseph and James Smith; ten (10) grandchildren,
Magdala and Ralph of Haiti, Manishka Joseph, Erica

Joseph of Orlando, Florida, John Brown Jr, Kevin:

Sawyer Jr, Keanu Sawyer, Glen Williams III, and
Janess Smith; one (1) great grand child; two (2 ) sisters
Clemise and Agath Joseph of Haiti, two (2) sons-in-
law Kevin Sawyer Sr, and Glen Williams II; three (3)
daughters-in-law Mrs Charlene Joseph, Mrs Vanessa
Smith and Nicole Gelin; other relatives and friends
Villanma and Sonia Pierre, Willie and Exana Pierre,
John Brown, Mrs Pican, Annette Darllus, Villardia,
Jeanne, Nelta, Wilkinson and Mason Pierre, Sandra
Roache, Ghiseine Richemond, Gloria Moss, Raymond
Felix, Velea Pierre, Marie, Telezna, Mona Boyer,
Nadine Alexis, Mrs Mercidieu, Odette, Verdieu Marie,
Debbir Kemp and family, Yvonne Bevans and family,
the Richemond family, Anerose Gelin, Sheila Joseph,
Laurencia Regis,Lesly Joseph, Sharon Tomlin and
family, the Gilbert family, the Dean family, Veronica
Clarke, Dr Patricia Fort, Juliette Josey and family,
Anlde and family and the Culmersville Community.

Public viewing will take place at Gateway Memorial
Funeral Chapel on Friday from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm
and on Saturday from 10:00 am to service time at the
church.

Mecxcewme

»

=



oy \-1=1-) 7 an ales



Burtiss Memorial Mortuary

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020¢ Robinson Rd & 5th Street
* Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 ¢ 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

SHEREE MONIQUE
RICHARDSON, 26

on Saturday at 11:00 am at
New Jerusalem Kingdom |
Ministries, Carmichael Road.
Officiating will be Overseer |
Gregory R Minnis assisted by |
other ministers. Interment will
follow in the Southern
Cemetery.

| She is survived by her husband, Michael Richardson; |

mother, Eulease Rolle; father, Joe Lloyd; grandfather,
! Cornelius Rolle; three brothers, Keno, Fenrick and Mario;
} eight aunts, Sybil, Bernice, Joycelyn, Drucilla, Rosalee,




of Malcolm Road will be held |

| Marsha, Deaconess Judy Munroe, Sandra Petterson of |

| Florida and Evangelist Almana Hanna Woodside; eight |

| uncles, Terry, Randy, Ricardo, Otis, Carlton, Cornelius Jr,
| Alfred Johnson and Lenwood Clarke; seven grandaunts,

Sarah, Essie, zona Rolle, Lillian, Deaconess Jenniemae f

| McKenzie, Naomi and Lillian R McKenzie; granduncles,

Allan, Elder William, Elder Newlon, Bishop Hartman Rolle

and Labon McKenzie; brothers-in-law, Tony Burnside,

| Lorenzo Williams and Oscar; sisters-in-law, Denise |
| Richardson and Aldise Williams; host of other relatives |

| and friends including, Neuiza, Robert and David Rolle,
| Marsha, Renae, Richie, Craig, Perry, Donika, Micheala,
| Steven, Dion, Allan, CJ, Octavia, Shameika, Vernette,
| Kimberly, Kesa, Shavanda, Crytal, Mia, Marcus,
Jeffery,Andrew, Rochelle, Malisa, Wendy, Garvin, Phil,
| Shane, Dale, Lisa, Euthlee, Simon, Solomon, Rachell,
Mildred, Lulamae, Dorothy, Nora Stuart, Philip, Junior,
| Lester, Audrey, Donneisha, Vincent, Kay, Kiana, Keron,

| Kendon, Javonno, Joey, Justin, Lashanda Rashad, Rev |
i | Cedric Smith and family, Rev Leslie Curtis and family, Rev |
| Franklyn McKenzie and family, the staff of Esso and |

Texaco, Carlos Saunders, Leolad Storr, Welly and the
| family off Curtis and Stuart Manor,

| The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary,

Exuma. |

| Robinson Road and Fifth Street on Friday from 11:00 am |
| until 6:00 pm and at the church on Saturday from 10:00

f am until service time.

DAVID SAMUEL
"Bookie" JOHNSON,
85



a resident of Bowen Sound,
Andros will

Church, Stanyard Creek,

of Stanyard Creek, Andros and i

be held on
Saturday, April 16, 2005 at |
-11:00 a.m. at Wesley Methodist |

Andros. Officiating will be {
President Kenris Carey assisted }

by. Minister Andre Darville and |
| -Minister~ Earl Pinder. Interment in Wesley: Methodist |

Cemetery; Stanyard Creek

| “He is survived by his wife, Susan Johnson; children, |
* | Rupert, Rodger, Mias, Cheena, Matthew, Timothy, Sean |
| and Dillon Johnson, Otis, Troy, Brandon, Randy Jr., Shirley, |

Miriam, Margurite, Lavanda, Eddison, Sybil and Monica
| Neymour; two sisters, Olive Culmer and Doris Thompson;

| three uncles, James and Willard Johnson (the Bluff, Andros)
| and Joe Johnson (Lowe Sound); 66 grandchildren |

| including, Athena Colleen Johnson-Sealy, Leading Seaman

! Doran J. Johnson, Able Seaman Clint K. Johnson, Raquel |

Sands, Rochelle, Ricardo, Joycelyn, Tiffany, Torron,

| Merranda, Shamarka, Shannie, Ranee of Atlanta, Jan

Johnson, Collett of California, Carla, Tamaro, Myles,
!. Marlene, ‘Musha (Atlanta), Lamond, Timothy Jr., Kashad,

| Byron, Ashley, Kashanna, Muriel, Sean, Bradwin, Sunita f

| Rolle, Shenique Johnson-Miller; 21 great grandchildren —

including Ursula and Pairick Sealy, Jerome and Di Johnson,
| Hriou and Deon Rolle, Juliette Miller, Lashawn, Rodesha,

f Rico, Clint Jr, Dontae and Dalano Johnson; numerous |
} nieces and nephews including Neville and Margaret |

| Woodside, Hansel and Marilyn Johnson, Preskit Turnquest,

| Miriam Young-Jones, Odell Young-Johnson, Cynthia and

Ambi Ambrister, Sylvia and Bernard Bethel (Miami, Florida),

} Rose Mitchell (Eleuthera), Wiliamae Scott, Winnie

| Woodside, Christopher and Joe Cooper, George Burrows
i (Miami), Charles and Eunice Johnson, Amanda and Louis

) Ferguson, Antionette Bain (Andros), Sidney and Una Brice |

(Freeport), Samuel and Janiveive Moncur, Selena and | ©

Lamuel Sweeting, Latina Ferguson-Burrows, Baldwin |

Darling, Franklyn, Betty, Agatha and Shirley Thompson,

Linda Miller, Wesley Thompson, George Brennen, Carnetta }

Carew, Antionette Todd, Paula Brice, Obie Finley, W.P.C.,

Ruthmae Finley and family; numerous grand nieces and |

| nephews including Kenva, Kenneth, King, Alphonso and

| Vashon Johnson, Debbie Deleveaux, Byron and. Neville |
1 Woodside Jr., Carl, Valarie and Pamela Bannister, Elvera |
} Johnson and Phyllis Johnson; daughters-in-law, Isadora |
| T. Johnson, Sharon, Patsy, Karen, Yvonne, Marilyn and |
} Helen Johnson, Arnett, Lakeisha, Gloria and Indira |

| Neymour; sons-in-law, Vernon Grant, Dion Belle and
| Reagan Grindot; brothers-in-law, Horatio Bannister,

| Cleveland, Nathaniel, Emmanuel, Wellington and Herbert |
Curtis and Ruben Nesbitt; sisters-in-law, Vernita Johnson- |

| Mackey, Joyce Bannister-Young, Sheila Bannister,

Emmaline, Joyce, Virginia, Gloria, Marion, Olive and Victoria’

| Curtis and Isabella Nesbitt.

| A host of Bihee relatives: and friends including, Muriel,

| Leona and Mary Tucker, Adeline Wilson, Misty Adderley,
| Maice Wilson, Bishop Cecile Curtis, President Kenris.

| Carey, Sargent Alton Curtis, Cleveland Bastian, Justin,
| Melverne, Marie, Christine, Gloria and lvan Johnson,

Apostle Howard Nesbitt, Oniel, Burnet, Floramae and |
! Millie Nesbitt, Robin Pratt, Bismark Coakley and family, |

| China Ferguson and family, the Cargills, Munnings,
; Duncombe, Lightbourne, Newbold and Potter farnilies,

| Ellis Whymms and family, Dudley, Thomas and Richard |

| Smith and families, Darrell Rolle and family, Patty Miller
| and family, Tina Saunders Ferguson and family, the Hinsey,
| Hanna and Leadon and Strachan families, Oscar Johnson,
} Harry Rolle and family, Greg Burrows, Florinda and Sheila,

| Anthony Aleen Woodside and family, Catechist Adline |
} Wilson, Cecil Leadon and family, the Stanyard Creek

Community families, the Bowen Sound community families,

) doctors and nurses of the Fresh Creek Clinic, nurses and {

doctors of the Princess Margaret Hospital, Male Surgical

Il especially Dr. Brennen, the family of Fresh Creek Andros |

and the Eleuthera family.

| The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Moriuary, |

Robinson Road and Fifth Street on Thursday from12:00
noon until 6:00 p.m. and at the church in Stanyard Creek,
Andros on Friday from 2:00-p. m., until service time on
Saturday.

N may
expand

| muss sion

in Haiti



4 n+ mh ote
> = =

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

' Precet cong

The Tribune wants to hear |
} from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps |
you are raising funds fora §
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.




New partnership bringing
fresh seafood to the world

. | SANTI Gabino (left) with Paradise Fisheries employees and William Malone (right)



Students rewarded for
academic excellence

TWO students at the College
of the Bahamas have been pre-
sented with special awards for
their achievements.

The presentation was made

DR Rodney D
Smith, president of
the College of the
Bahamas (left), and
Dr Nicolette
Bethel, Director of
Culture, Ministry of
Youth, Sports and
Culture (right),
presented the E
Clement Bethel
award to Lou
Adams Sr for his
excellence in the
field of music.
Accepting on behalf
of Mr Adams is Mrs
I Hall.

(Photo:
Raymond Bethel).






\y

during the College of the
Bahamas school of communi-
cation and creative arts cele-
bration of its 16th annual “color
of harmony” event. The event,

described as an exposition of
the artistic talents of students,
was held at the Portia M Smith
student services centre, Oakes
Field Campus.










fond

MeCHICKER
SANDWICH

EATEN IE LCA aa I AS RAIL

a’ DR Rodney D
Smith, president of
the College of the
Bahamas (left), and
Dr Nicolette Bethel,
Director of Culture,
Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture
(right), presented
Antonius Roberts,
an artist and
founder of Junior
Junkanoo (centre)
with the E Clement
Bethel award on
Wednesday, April
6, for excellence in
the field of art.





A SUCCESSFUL partnership between a
Florida-based freight shipping company and
a growing local seafood company has given
the world quick access to Bahamian seafood.

Last week’s third annual Bahamas Hotel
Association trade show brought the two
companies together and gave them both the
chance to display their products and ser-
vices to major players in the hospitality
industry. Paradise Fisheries Limited and
Laser International, a Florida-based inter-
national transport and courier company,
were among 30 companies which partici-
pated in the exhibition held at the Wyndham
Resort.

William Malone, executive assistant to
the president of Paradise Fisheries Limit-
ed, said that the move would take the com-
pany to a new level.

Since it was formed in 1982, Laser Inter-
national has serviced several major compa-
nies in the Bahamas, including Paradise Fish-

eries, Atlantis, the Lyford Cay Club, and .

Domino’s Pizza. It has helped ship seafood
and many other products since 1998.

Santi Gabino, president of the company,
said that this growing success with the
Bahamas has helped his company to grow
from a small courier company to an inter-
national freight company which now has a
daily cargo flight to Nassau, along with its
other flight services to the family islands.

“It is through such international liaisons
that our company can deliver fresh seafood
to any part of the world with just two days
notice, even as far away as Hong Kong, for
example, ” added Mr Malone.








RMS

Students urged
to have pride
in the nation

THE Deputy Prime Minister has
urged students of the Government
High School to guard the legacy left
behind by some of the greatest lead-
ers in The Bahamas.

Cynthia Pratt, Minister of Nation-
al Security, addressing an assembly at

the school on Monday, told the stu-

dents that their conduct after leaving
the school will demonstrate to the
public the capabilities of their teach-
ers.

She said: “Young men and young
ladies, you will take over this coun-
try. You are the ones who will make
the decisions as to what direction
this country goes.”

Ms Pratt told the story of a young
male student at LW Young Sec-
ondary School, who worked
part-time as a packing boy.

Ms Pratt said a lady went into the
food store and picked up some gro-
ceries but did not have enough mon-
ey to pay. She was 45 cents short of
what she needed, but the young man
reached into his pocket and paid the
difference.

To thank the young man, the lady

. wrote to the principal of LW Young

Secondary School.

During a school assembly at LW
Young Secondary, she met the young
man. He needed a hair cut. He was
wearing a shirt that appeared to not
be his own. He did not have a belt for
his worn-out pants.

To reward this young man, the
Deputy Prime Minister paid for his
hair cut and also bought him some
new school clothes, a belt and some
new Timberland shoes.

Se



McFISH
FILLET
SANDWIGK:




fee Le Gee. ee Pe aie ES 0

FROM page one

allowed to discuss any matter
which is being governed by the
BEST Commission. This is to
include but not be limited to
any of the LNG pipeline pro-
posals.”

However, in this second let-
ter, sent by Mr Smith to
Tractebel’s lawyer, point num-
ber four of the recommenda-
tion reads: “Address socio-
economic aspect of the envi-
ronmental sustainability of the
project, by engaging a team of
the undersigned to set up the
framework for negotiation of
the benefit of regasifying LNG
to the Bahamas.”

PAGE 16, FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005

Point number five encour-
aged the company to engage
in discussions with the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce and “a designated
group of persons” from Hep-
burn Town and the Grand
Bahama Port Authority to
“review the viability of relo-
cating residents of Hepburn
Town.”

Earl Deveaux, immediate
former Ambassador for the
Environment and former
chairman of the BEST Com-
mission, said: “Mr Smith’s
wording is careful but what he
is in fact saying by the (words
that the) proposal would be
seen in ‘a better light’ is that if
you do these things over here,

i Ts the Public,

CEE 0 DS OS ES OS 2 2 oo

HOS 0 ST oO Ee ge ee

8 SESOY © AEM 6 ED 8 A

Ss

Please be advised that
Mr. Nolan Carey is no

longer employed with the

| World Bound Couriers

ot Global United) and is not authorized

to conduct any business on behalf of
| Global United or its affiliates.

Management

and get a

community Out West.

Signed

we will bless you.

“That letter is so inappro-
priate. The process of
approval and its regulatory
framework should be trans-
parent. A letter like that
should have been written by
someone with a permanent
office.

“It is difficult not to con-
clude that there is some bias
somewhere as no doubt there
is enormous pressure from
somewhere for them to
approve these things,” he said.

Lawyer Fred Smith was not
available for comment last
night, and Ambassador
Smith said that he had no
comment for The Tribune on
the matter.



vier gated
an impressive development —
and units are going Ga Financing i is available to
qualified buyers.”

William Wong
broker/appraiser



William Wong & Associates
real estate sales, i ental, appraisals

Phone: 242-327-4271 © Fax: 242-327-4273

V3
5
2



ye

NOU

Cell: 242-457-0766 .
West Bay Street

PO. Box SS-19981, Nassau, Bahamas

Email: williamwong@coralwave.com

LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL NEWS



SAAT CAR SNES SRE A CA SY POS EN NSA OY EY OR OSA FR Of MRT ome



THE TRIBUNE



Kofi Annan: US. Britain
share blame tor

Saddam's ill

“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

icit oil fund

Teen is son
of police
officer

FROM. page one

15 years old.
Alando. reportedly died
after being stabbed in the

-chest in an altercation with a

teenager on Tuesday after-
noon.

-.The incident occurred in
the area of East Street and
Victoria Boulevard.

According to police reports,
the victim was rushed to the
Princess Margaret: Hospital, |
where he was pronounced
dead. os

Police reported that a 15-
year-old suspect had been
detained in connection with
the incident later Tuesday
afternoon.

Supt of Police Hulan Han-
na appealed to parents and
adults to try to talk to
the young men in their com-
munity to put an end to’ vio-
lence.

“A lot of our young men
are arming themselves with
knives and machetes and
going about the streets caus-
ing injury and harm to oth-
ers,” he said.

In the wake of the incident,
there have been repeated.calls
for increased measures to
address the issue of youth vio-
lence.

‘Alando was the 13th mur-
der victim for 2005.



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FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005

SECTION



business@100jamz.com



@ By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Tribune Reporter

DECLINING visitor satis-
faction trends yesterday sound-
ed warning bells for the
Bahamian tourism industry, as
Immigration Departure Cards
revealed growing dissatisfaction
with vacation and perceived
value-for-money experiences at

major hotels that left some rat--

ings at “an all-time low” in
December 2004.

The poor attitude some
departing visitors allegedly
encountered from Bahamians
also concerned tourism officials,
and the overall trend of the sur-
vey indicated that the Bahamas
needed to refresh its tourism
product and visitor experiences
to ensure they matched the
price associated with a high-cost
destination.

In a reference to the need for

. the $1 billion Atlantis Phase III
and $1.2 billion Cable Beach
projects, Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace, the Ministry of Touris-
m’s director-general, said:
“Signing multi-billion develop-
ment deals is all well and good,
but even more important is
making sure that once these
come to fruition we have
trained staff, able and willing
to deliver first class products
and service."

While more than 50 per cent
of tourists, when asked how
likely they were to recommend
the Bahamas to others, said
‘very likely’, the percentage of
visitors who said they would do
this fell 6 per cent - from 67 per



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Insurance & Investments

to Build a Better Life
Telephone 242-393-1023



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street



Hi VINCENT Vanderpoo!-Wallace,
the Ministry of Tourism’s director-general.

cent in December 2003 to 61
per cent in December 2004.
The Immigration Departure
Cards showed that while some
71 per cent of visitors said they

New Bahamian bank |
notes to help fight
counterfeiting

"BI By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter














THE Central Bank of the Bahamas yesterday said it expect-
ed to issue a new family of bank notes this year, as part of an ini-
tiative to combat counterfeiting.

The $10 note is expected to be the first Bill produced, and will
be issued in the middle of the year. The entire exercise is
expected to take about 18 months, and the $20 and $50 note are
likely to follow production of the new $10 bills respectively.

In an interview with The Tribune, a senior representative
for the Central Bank said the programme, called Counterfeit
Resistant Integrated Security Product (CRISP), will pave the
way for the introduction of new security features that will make
the Bahamian dollar notes more user-friendly and harder to





copy.

SEE page three

Over the years, the Central Bank has introduced a new series
of bank notes - in 1996, 2000 and again in 2002. While the
security features have been upgraded, the bills have main-

US duty exemption rise
may boost tourist spend

@ By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter

_ EXPENDITURE by US
tourists in the Bahamas may
have received a slight boost yes-
terday, after the personal duty
exemption for American resi-
dents returning from the
Bahamas was increased from
$600 to $800 per person by the
US Customs and Border Pro-
tection Department.

Officials from the Nassau
Tourism and Development
Board see the news as positive

for the tourism sector, with a
potential increase in visitor
spending likely to result from
the US move.

Meanwhile, total visitor
arrivals to the Bahamas for Feb-
ruary 2005 fell slightly when
compared to the same period
last year, dropping by 2 per cent
from a total of 429,017 to
420,293.

Air arrivals for February 2005
fell by 7.5 per cent, dropping
from 135,794 in 2004 to 125,589,
while sea arrivals saw a slight

SEE page three

were likely to recommend the
Bahamas to others in June 2003,

SEE page two

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor




A BAHAMIAN company
was yesterday charged with
"playing a key role in a scheme
that paid millions of dollars in
bribes and kickbacks to for-
mer members of dictator Sad-
dam Hussein’s regime in rela-
tion to the Iraqi Oil-for-Food
programme.

The indictment unveiled in
the southern district of New
York court alleged that Bayoil
Supply & Trading, which it
described as a company
“based in Nassau, Bahamas,
and incorporated in the
Bahamas”, had conspired with

ates “to pay a secret sur-
charge” to members of Sad-
dam’s regime in return for
allocations of Iraqi oil under
the United Nations (UN) man-
aged Oil-for-Food programme.

Alleged
The indictment alleged that
as a result of this scheme,
which at a “conservative esti-

mate” involved oil sales worth
at least $100 million, Bayoil

defendants ensured that the
proceeds raised from these
sales did not benefit the Iraqi
people by denying their use in
the purchase of humanitarian
supplies.

Apart from the Bahamian
company, also charged by the
US Attorney’s Office for the
Southern District of New York
was its sole shareholder, Texan
businessman David Chalmers.
Mr Chalmers was also the only

& Trading’s Houston-based
affiliate, Bayoil (USA), which
was also charged.

its sole shareholder and affili- ©

Supply & Trading and its co-*

shareholder of Bayoil Supply .

t



Other indictees were a UK
oil trader, John Irving, and a
Bulgarian, Ludmil Dionissiev.

Both allegedly purchased Iraqi’

oil for Bayoil Supply & Trad-
ing and its affiliate.

The indictment alleged that
the two Bayoil companies and
their co-accused “participated
in a scheme to pay millions of
dollars in secret kickbacks to

Saddam Hussein’s regime in

Iraq. These secret kickbacks

were paid so that the Bayoil |

companies could continue to
participate in the business of
selling Iraqi oil under the Unit-
ed Nations’ Oil-for-Food pro-
gramme”.

The illegal kickbacks and
surcharges were alleged to

~ have been paid between 2000
“and March -2003."The indict--

ment claimed: “The govern-
ment of Iraq directed that
these surcharges, representing
a percentage of the total
amount of each oil contract
and totalling at least several
hundred million dollars, be
paid to front companies and/or
bank accounts under the con-
trol of the Iraqi government
in various countries in the
Middle East and elsewhere.
From 1997 to 2003,
Chalmers was alleged to have
supervised and directed the
two Bayoil companies’ pur-
chases of Iraqi oil under the
UN programme, dealing with

Indictment — - |
the southern district
of New York court

‘recipients of oil allocations

. Chalmers and his Bahamian









from the Iraqi government or
brokers working on behalf of
those recipients.

Both Chalmers and Bayoil,
paid the official selling price
(OSP) for the Iraqi oil into the
UN Oil-for-Food bank
account, plus a commission
that went to the allocation
holder or broker. |

Advice

Chalmers and Bayoil were
alleged to have offered advice
about ‘oil market conditions to
both UN and Iraqi officials in
a bid to influence the OSP.

Then, in 2000, the Iraqi gov-
ernment began implementing
the kickback scheme, denying
participation in the Oil-for-
Food programme to those who
participated. Afterwards,


















and US companies continued
to lobby the UN on the OSP
price of Iraqi oil, in the hope
this would make it easier for
the Iraqis to collect their kick-
backs.

The indictment alleged that
Bayoil and Chalmers “agreed
to pay, did pay, and caused to
be paid millions of dollars in
secret illegal surcharges to the
government of Iraq”. The pay-

SEE page three












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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page one

this had fallen by 10 per cent
to “an all-time low” - 61 per
cent - in December 2004. __.

The ‘statistics for Hotel Value
for Money revealed that while
2004 hotel occupancy levels and
room rates surpassed those for
2003, overall ratings for hotel val-

@ ue for money fell.

In July 2003, some 38 per cent
of respondents rated their hotel’s
value for money as ‘much better’,
or“better than expected’. In J uly
2004, the percentage was 37 per
cent.

~ Similar declines were also not-
ed:when comparing the period
Atigust-December 2003 with the
same months for 2004. The great-
est disparity was seen in Septem-
ber, with 44 per cent of respon-
dents rating their hotel value for

money as much better or better -

than expected in 2003, compared
to 37 per cent in September 2004.
_ And while 38 per cent of visi-

‘ o*

* Full standby generator.

‘Security services.

14 April 2005

|; * 686 - 4,340 sq.ft. retail & office spaces
Excellent retail and professional location.
Modern.building with spectacular views.

tors in December 2003 rated their
hotel’s value for money as much
better or better than expected,
this had slumped to 34 per cent in
2004.

Among the negative comments

received were: “This should have -

been a great trip. Instead, I felt as

though I was being cheated. Food:

was terrible at hotel and over-
riced.”
Added another: “I was very

disappointed in the resort that we .

stayed at. Brochures and travel
agents were not honest about the
facilities.”

According to the Ministry of

’ Tourism's report, comments from

guests ranged from complaints
about hotel facilities, overpricing
and mediocrity of food, to wide-
spread apathy of hotel staff.
Earle Bethell, president of the
Bahamas Hotel Association
(BHA), yesterday said the:sur-

‘vey results were one of the main

Visitor recommendation

reasons the BHA works hand in

hand with the Ministry of
Tourism in trying to get.the gen-
eral public to understand that vis-

’ itor experience is paramount.

He explained: “We want to do
more training programmes with
the Ministry of Education, at the
high school and college level, and
even have certificate courses for
those people who have left
school.

“We want to-sensitise people —

to the importance of taking care
of the customer no matter where
they are on island." °

Mr Bethell said visitors to the
Bahamas, many of whom have
paid a premium for their vaca-
tion, expect a high level of ser-
vice throughout their stay. When
Atlantis initially came to the mar-
ket, many of the other hotels
looked to improve their proper-
ties to keep pace with the se-chane:
ing destination.

One Sandyport Plaza
West Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel. 242-393-8618
www.bahamasrealty.bs
www.cbrichardellis.com

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Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
§. Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day



Dally Vol. -

Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
PIE - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earings
has. AS AT MAR. 31, 2005/ **** - AS AT FEB. 28, 2005



» AS AT MAR. 24, 2005/ *** - AS AT MAR. 31, 2005/ ***** AS AT MAR. 31, 2005



Last 12 Months



These same properties, how-
ever, had not maintained these
improvements, Mr Bethell said.
But based on the destination's
pricing, hoteliers have to bring
up their property levels and main-
tain them if visitors are to feel
they are getting value for their
money.

Mr Bethell said: “We have a
lot of seasoned travellers who are
aware of what to expect at cer-
tain levels at hotels. We are
charging higher prices, and we
know that hotels here get a better
deal on rates, so in order to make
sure we get consistently better
results, all properties must ensure
that training is ongoing for work-
ers. Standards have to be high
when it comes to our customers.
They don't mind paying higher
prices, but they expect value for
their money."

Mr Bethell said the BHA offers
courses and training opportuni-
ties for its members to help
improve standards and ensure a
similar high quality visitor expe-



Dilibaaia

0.00%
6.93%
0.00%

Se Sa





YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

Ps $ - A company's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
i, N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



INTERNATIONAL.

Sd OB VACANCY

MAIN RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

* Planning, directing, and coordinating the human, financial
and physical resources of the Information Technology

Department;

consultants;

Ss
es
=
ee
ball
a
os"
=
iS

PUG FO 8 ae

* Overseeing and developing all technology related systems,
including telecommunications and security systems;
‘e Establishing key relationships with key IT suppliers and

* Application, selection, development and
implementation of new and existing corporate initiatives;

¢ Provide enabling technologies that make it easier for
customers and suppliers to do business with the Bank.

‘KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS & ABILITIES

° Tertiary level qualifications in computer science,
information technology or related disciplines;
e Expert knowledge of systems analysis development and

planning methods;

¢ Demonstrated experience in managing a network
environment including Windows server 2000/2003
services, Lotus Notes/Domino, hardware firewalls,
routers, AS400, Unix, Oracle and VPN appliances;

* Comprehensive knowledge of database management;

* Knowledge of web base technologies;

* Excellent communication skills, both written and oral;

¢ Demonstrated team building and project management

skills;

* Five years of progressive experience in managing the
delivery of modem enterprise technology services;
¢ IT industry related certifications desirable.

{| The position also offers an attractive compensation package which includes comprehensive group insurance
‘s| Coverage, participation in pension savings and other benefits enjoyed by staff.

Manager, Human Resources/Training
Bank of The Bahamas International
P.O. Box N-7118
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for applications is April 25, 2005.



rience across the board.

Another area that Bahamians
fell short on was in how visitors
rated the attitude of locals during
their visit to Nassau and Paradise
Island.

_Looking at the period June
2003 to December 2004, visitor
satisfaction - saying the experi-
ence was much better or better
than expected - reached a high in
June, July and August 2003, with
some 62 per cent of respondents
satisfied with the attitude of
Bahamians.

Satisfaction levels dipped, how-

ever, falling to a low in March.

and August 2004, at 56 per cent,
and in July and December 2004 at
57 per cent.

Frank Comito, the BHA’s
executive vice-president BHA,
said industry stakeholders cannot
do enough to create the best
impression for visitors.

He said both private and public
stakeholders must continue their
efforts to run people through cus-
tomer service training pro-
grammes, because all it takes is
one bad apple to mar the entire
experience. He added that the
Bahamas simply cannot afford to
have any bad apples.

In 2004, Mr Comito said the
BHA ran hundreds of people
through its customer service train-

ing programmes, while the Min-

istry of Tourism and individual
properties also conducted their
own training facilities.

"We have to realise that we're
a high cost destination, and high
cost means we have to deliver
high quality. When visitors return
home, word of mouth of bad
experience mars the entire desti-
nation. The onus is on all of us to

put our best foot forward,” Mr

Comito said.

-” "To move ‘those percentages

forward, it requires a level of

-commitment across the board to
‘offer the best the Bahamas has

to offer."
Michael Hooper, general man-
ager of the British Colonial

Hilton, said all businesses needed
to continue to focus on improving
customer service and encourage
more visitors to return, not less.
He said that generally, people
needed to take personal respon-
sibility for their actions and know
that every time they interact with

. a visitor it impacts upon whether

that tourist has a good visit or a
poor visit.

"We talk a lot about training in
hopes of changing the behaviour,
but being friendly has nothing to
do with the technical aspect; it's
about taking personal responsi-
bility to be kind and courteous to
the visitor,":Mr Hooper said.

Meanwhile, one bright spot in
the survey was the satisfaction
ratings for hotel rooms, food and

_ service. Statistics showed that

from June 2003 through Decem-
ber 2004, hotel service consis-
tently surpassed the other’ two
categories.

Satisfaction levels for hotel
rooms held relatively steady,
starting with June 2003 at 47 per
cent and edging up slightly to 49
per cent in May 2004, but drop- .
ping in December 2004 to 39 per
cent.

Hotel food showed a similar
pace, with 50 per cent of respon-
dents in June 2003 saying the food
was much better/better than
expected. In May 2004 that fig-
ure increased to 52 per cent, and
in December 2004 it settled to.45
per cent.

For the period, satisfaction lev-
els in June 2003 stood at 54 per
cent, improving to 60 per cent in ~
May 2004. In December 2004,
levels stood at 52 per cent.

"We are encouraged by these
figures because what it tells us is
that the potential to deliver supe-
riot service is. there," minister
of tourism Obie Wilchcombe
said.

“Expanded development will
translate into world class facili-
ties and amenities, thus creating
more evenly balanced hotel sat-
isfaction figures."

TRUST OFFICER ~

SCOTIATRUST invites applications from qualified
Bahamians for the position of Trust Officer with a |
strong background and technical knowledge i in areas
of trust, company and agency management. The
applicant will be involved in the administration of a
medium to high complexity level of accounts of
trusts, companies and agencies. A good level of
accounting knowledge is required. The person i
appointed should hold a four year University Degree @
in a related subject along with professional |
qualifications in the Society of Trust and Estate
Practitioners (STEP) or ACIB. The ideal candidate

| should have a minimum of five years progressive
experience ‘in the industry. Analytical and
communication skills as. well as familiarity with PC
software are essential. Preference will be given to
applicants with language skills. Interested persons

i should submit applications in writing marked Private
and Confidential to the Manager, Client Services,
P.O. Box N-3016, Nassau, Bahamas. Applications
should be received no later than Friday, 22nd April,

2005.

INTERNATIONAL

Fae al or a a oo

SERVICES

OS Re eons Ay

CUCL UCL fe

Eh ry Mall Drive, P.

IReEH Ren CEU
Li

SECURITIES BROKERAGE - ASSET MANAGEMENT -

MONEY MARKET - MUTUAL FUNDS -

RAR TERE

ACT
Bermuda. Flexi-

jmail your resume

CORPORATE FINANCE

i i i 2 i iy NEO i


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005, PAGE 3B



BUSINESS

Bahamian contractors
ain over $15m worth
of Phase III contracts

BAHAMIAN contractors
have been awarded $13 mil-
lion and $2.475 million worth
of work on Kerzner Interna-
tional’s Marina Village and
Phase III developments respec-
tively, with the Atlantis resort
owner’s development arm
announcing plans to join the
Bahamian Contractors Asso-
ciation (BCA).

Accounted

Rick Bodge, Kerzner Inter-

national Development’s senior.

vice-president, said Bahami-
ans accounted for 85 per cent
of the 930 tradesmen working
on the Marina Village and
Phase III projects, including
workers in administrative posi-
tions.

Apart from those two sec-
tions, the $38 million contract
for the Harborside Village
timeshare project had been
awarded to the joint venture
of Osprey Developers and
Woslee Dominion Construc-
tion Company.

At a meeting between the
BCA and Kerzner Interna-
tional Development, Mr

Bodge said the Marina Village
had been a good match for
Bahamian contractors between
capabilities and scope of work,
and many had been perform-
ing well.

However, Mr Bodge added
that there has been some issues
with smaller contractors at the
Marina Village, and cases
where Kerzner International
had to take over or supplement
the work in order to finish a
project.

“We’re getting those sorted
out,” Mr Bodge said.

Ian Stewart, project execu-
tive for PCL Constructors, the
construction managers hired
by Kerzner International for
Atlantis Phase III, said the
team was trying to get the
packages out to as many con-
tractors as possible.

Process

“We have a rigorous pre-
qualifying process. There are
a lot of contractors in our sys-
tem and we don’t want to put
anyone in a situation where
they bite off more than they
can chew,” he said.

Mr Bodge said that in join-
ing the BCA, Kerzner Inter-
national Development would
help the Association develop a
contractors’ licensing pro-
gramme to ensure and
promote international
quality standards in all con-
struction trades in the
Bahamas.

Resource

He added that such a pro-
gramme would provide devel-
opers with a good resource and
save them a lot of effort in
finding qualified Bahamian
contractors.

“It would be great to be able

to go to a licensing bureau and

say “give me a list” and not
have to go through pre-quali-
fying. It would make the
process much easier...

“We will join this organisa-
tion. Once a month or once a
quarter we can sit down and
see how we can pull this pro-
gramme together.

“You set the pace and we’ll
be a part of it,” Mr Bodge told
BCA chairman Terrance
Knowles.

FROM page one

increase, improving to 294,704 in 2004 from
293,223 in 2004 for growth of 0.5 per cent.

For the Nassau/Paradise Island destination, air

and sea arrivals for February were up by 5 per cent.

Air arrivals climbed by 3.1 per cent for the month,
increasing form 87,895 in February 2004 to 90,655.
Sea arrivals also saw an increase improving by 5.6
per cent from 153,898 to 162,522.

Grand Bahama continued to experience a short-
fall in its overall numbers, as tourism slowly returned
to normal following last year's hurricanes. Overall
figures show a total number of visitors to Grand
Bahama for February at 45,974, a drop of 30.3 per
cent when compared to 2004 February figures, which
came in at 65,945.

‘Air arrivals fell almost 40 per cent, from 29,086 in
2004 to 17,773 in 2005S. Sea arrivals also continued to
show an impact from the hurricanes, with arrivals
down 23.5 per cent - from 36,859 in February 2004 to
28,201 in 2005.

The Family Islands posted a somewhat sluggish
performance for February, with total arrivals down
0.1 per cent - from 121,279 in 2004 to 121,142 in
2005. Air arrivals stood at 17,161 for the month,
compared to 18,813 in 2004, a fall of 8.8 per cent.
Sea arrivals, however, showed a slight improve-
ment, going from 102,466 in February 2004 to
103,981 in 2005, an increase of 1.5 per cent.

According to statistics released by the Ministry of
Tourism, Grand Bahama, Abaco, Bimini, Eleuthera,
Long Island, and San Salvador all suffered declines
in the number of air arrivals in February 2005.

Air arrivals for February to Grand Bahama were

New
bank



sahamian firm

FROM page one

US duty exemption

down 39 per cent, Abaco was down 19 per cent,
Bimini off 1 per cent and Eleuthera fell by 10 per
cent, with Long Island seeing a huge decrease of 34
per cent and San Salvador dropping 26 per cent.

A number of islands did, however, experience
increases in air arrivals in February 2005, apart from
the Nassau/Paradise Island destination. Andros saw
growth of 17 per cent, with the Berry Islands show-
ing strong improvement of 24 per cent.

Cat Cay has 2 per cent growth, with Cat Island
posting a strong performance at 95 per cent. Exuma
improved by 5 per cent and air arrivals in Inagua
grew 34 per cent.

Looking at year-to-date figures (YTD), visitor
arrivals overall were up 1 per cent when cameaRSE
to the same period in 2004.

Year-to-date air’ and sea arrivals ‘for the Was-
sau/Paradise Island destination were:up. by:8: per
cent, with Grand Bahama down some’ 15 per’ ¢ent.
The Family Islands were generally down by 5 per
cent.

Looking at cruise figures, the total number of
arrivals for the Bahamas in the first two months
were up by 1 per cent. Cruise arrivals for the
Bahamas for the year to February 2005, by first
port of entry only, were up 4 per cent for the
Bahamas overall.

Cruise arrivals for the Nassau/Paradise Island
destination to February 2005 were up 9 per cent,
while cruise arrivals for Grand Bahama February
were up 12 per cent, even though they were down for
the month of February.



The illegal surcharge pay-
ments were sent via wire trans-
fers to a bank account that





notes
FROM page one

tained the same type of fea-
tures, and their artistic
appearance has remained
virtually the same.

The Central Bank is now
moving to change the family
of Bahamian bank notes,
with various posters placed
in banking institutions show-
casing the new designs the
public can expect to see over
the upcoming months. The
colour and schematics of the
notes will remain the same,
but with a greater degree of
enhanced features.

One change the public will
notice is that the pictures of
Queen Elizabeth II, Sir Milo
Butler and that of former
prime minister, Sir Lynden
Pindling, will be changed.

| No word has been given,
however, on whether the
pictures of either Sir Roland
Symonette and Sir Stafford
Sands will remain on their
respective notes, or if their
photographs will be
changed.

In terms of counterfeiting,
while not a huge problem in
the Bahamas, banks and cur-
rency dealers are always try-
ing to stay ahead of coun-
terfeiters.

"We believe this series,
the CRISP, to be easy for
the public. It has a lot of
security features to be
detected, it’s people friendly,
the design is live and it’s
completely innovative.
They've done a lot of work
with it,” the Central Bank
source said.





ments covered Iraqi oil pur-
chases made by the two Bay-
oil companies from a foreign
company, “whose operations
were funded almost exclu-
sively by Chalmers and the
Bayoil companies”.

The indictment alleged: “To
conceal these illegal surcharge
payments, Chalmers agreed to
pay the foreign company inflat-
ed commission prices on the
original oil transactions, with the
knowledge and expectation that
the foreign company would then
make the surcharge payments
to the government of Iraq.”



belonged to Al Wasel and Babel
General Trading, a front com:
pany for the Hussein regime
that was based in the United
Arab Emirates.

The indictment detailed three
wire transfers made by
Chalmers and the two Bayoil
companies, where almost $2 mil-
lion ended up in the hands of
Hussein regime acolytes as
alleged illegal kickbacks.

The US government is seek-
ing the forfeiture of at least $100
million in assets from the defen-
dants.



















Abaco Markets Limited
the leading food distribution company
is looking for a

Junior Accountant

to join our corporate team

| Requirements:

- Bachelors degree in accounting or finance;
At least 2 years of relevant experience;

Excellent PC skills;

Must be willing to travel.

General support for all areas with the Accounting

Department;

Preparation of month end journal entries, account |

reconciliations,

expense report processing, and date entry;
Assisting with budget preparation and special
projects, as assigned.

To apply for this position, please e-mail your detailed
resume and cover letter to hr@abacomarkets.com or
fax to 356-7855.







& PICTURED here fromleft are: Godfrey Forbes, vice-chairman, BCA; Mark Piekarz, senior::’

cost manager, Kerzner International Development; lan Stewart, project executive, PCL Cori=>
structors Bahamas;' ‘Terrance Knowles, chairman, BCA; Robyn Ogilvie, secretary, BCA; anid:
Rick Bodge, senior vice-president, Kerzner International Development Sut

“on

3 bedroom, 2 bath, 3 Satellite TVs, 3 climate zones, Bow Thurster, |].
Bench Matched Raytheon Navigation/Radar Group; 0 Care Batteries ||
Super Antena; Twin Caterpillar Diesels 680HP tot approx 350 hours.
Cruises at 20 knots: built 1999, delivered new April 2000. Looks and _
acts new. Can now:be viewed on New Providence. Built by Sea Ray. *

Call or fax 1-805-565-1237 (info 327-5695)
“. Best offer over $300,000

45°5” (13.84m)
..14°3” (4.34m)
37” (94 cm)
27,000 Ibs (12,247)
350 gal (1,324.8 L)
120 gal (454.2 L)

Water Cue 35 cal (O08 21)
gal :

Holding Tank

NO

VACANCY

The American Embassy i is presently considering SSpHCABORS
.. for the following position

we
my

[ 1. LANSYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR

Duties include: the operational support of the Local Area Network, |
| which includes. 13 servers, and approximately 120 networked

| stations and also support for numerous stand-alone computers.

Also, assists and performs installation of systems and peripheral
equipment including file servers, workstations, network interface
cards, fax/modem cards, cdrom's, printers, floppy and hard drives Ham
= and backup tape systems. We reserve the right to administer Hae
testing to ascertain experience.

This position is open to candidates with the following
requirements:

| 2. Baccalaureate Degree or host country equivalent in the field
of Computer Information Systems. Certification in A+, MCP in
Windows; 2000 or. Windows 2003 is required “Additional

| certifications such as network plus and security plus will be |
required to pass the probarionary period. Excellent command of
the English Language, both written and oral



= Personal attributes:

-Excellent work attitude, punctuality and attendance record §
-Highly confidential in nature

-Ability to interact with others in a professional manner
-Ability to prioritize tasks

-Initiative and ability to learn new tasks quickly

SS | Benefits provided include:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation §
package including outstanding benefits such as performance-based §

@ incentives, medical and dental insurances, life insurance, pension |
and opportunities for training and development.

A 3. Applicants must be Bahamian Citizens or other Country |
Nationals who are eligible for employment under Bahamian laws
and regulations.

Application forms are available from 8:00 am to 5:30 pm, Monday
; through Friday at the security area of the American Embassy,
Queen Street, completed applications should be returned to the |
Embassy: attention of the Human Resources Office no later than
| April 25, 2005.
PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



Insurance agency

plans new website

WEEROINL
Middle Income Home, Suffolk Unit 2, Block #51, Lot #2,

3 bed, 2.5 bath, central air, fully landscape, washer & dryer.

Freeport, Grand Bahama « Phone: 359-2190

We OUR CK OS

Employment Opportunity — Nortel PBX and Key System
Engineer

Indigo N Networks is seeking to fill a senior position in its Technical
Services department for an experienced Nortel
telecommunications engineer.

Applications are invited from individuals who have:

e Aminimum of 10 years in a Nortel telecommunications
technical support role.
In depth Design, Programming, Implementation, and
Maintenence of Nortel: Norstar, BCM, Meridian Option
11C and 81C.
Knowledge of PBX Networking and VOIP Integration.
Knowledge of Routing, Trunking, and VLANS.
Excellent customer service skills -
Good oral and written skills
Ability to work with minimum supervision.

A competitive salary commensurate with experience is offered
: along with product training, medical, pension and car allowance
| after a qualifying period.

interested candidates should submit their resumes in writing to
Indigo Networks PO BOX N-3920 for the attention of the
Technical Services Manager.



NOTICE
FOR SALE BY PUBLIC TENDER

PARADISE ISLAND COLONY SUBDIVISION
Section C. Property Size: 21,562 Sq. Ft.

There are presently two partly built Apartment Buildings on the
property. The buildings were constructed without proper
permission and in breach of the covenants and restrictions.
‘Paradise Island limited who are responsible for all the Covenants
and Restrictions applicable to the said lot have advised that they
require the buildings to be demolished and the site cleared
within 3 months. The costs of demolition would be an expense
for the purchaser.

The above property is being sold under a Power of Sale contained
in a Supplemental Mortgage dated November 3, 1993 to Gulf
Union Bank (Bahamas) Limited. Recorded in book 6216, at pages
247 to 261. —

interested parties should submit written offers with telephone
contacts and postal addresses to the Joint Official Liquidators,
P. 0. Box N-3748, Nassau, Bahamas.

Telephone enquiries: 302-4862
Fax: 302-4870

Terms: 10% deposit upon acceptance of aren balance upon
completion.

All Offers must be received by 19 April, 2005 _

THE LIQUIDATORS RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT AND/OR REFUSE ANY
OFFER.



@ SURPRISE AND DELIGHT — Linda Gibson, general manager, Star General Insurance
Agency (GB), presents a cheque from the company to Karon Pinder - Johnson, executive

director, YMCA Ltd

STAR General Insurance
Agency is planning to launch a
new website, following close
behind the opening of its new
$2.5 million Grand Bahama
office complex.

James M Pinder, Star Gen-
eral’s chairman, speaking at the
complex’s official opening, said
the building was “not only as a
symbol of our past, but also as a
vivid reminder of our mission

Lot 4, Block 6, ..|.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DIANE BENSON, FIRST
TERRACE CENTERVILLE. APT #7, P.O.BOX CB-11853, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 15TH day of APRIL, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DUKRKENE BLANC, YELLOW
ELDER, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written



and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days |

from the 8TH day of APRIL, 2005 to the Minister responsible
toy Matonallty and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
ahamas

eg



to pursue excellence in the

-future. Our aim is not only to

serve you, but to serve-you bet-
ter”.

He added: “We have posi-:
tioned ourselves to take advan-
tage of the opportunities to
come by investing in the right
kinds of technological solutions;
delivering paramount service at
every level in our. organisation;
building a strong consumer
brand that you can become
even more proud of; further

‘enhancing the quality of our

human resources by facilitating '
training, skills and development —
opportunities; and assuming
additional responsibilities as
corporate citizens to a world-
class island nation, and its
world-class people.”

During the opening, Star
General also made a donation
to the Grand Bahama YMCA,

Star General Insurance
Agency (Grand Bahama),
founded in 1995, is: part of the
Star General Group of Compa-
nies, which was formed in 1987.

The group also includes Star
General Insurance Agents and
Brokers Ltd (Nassau); Star
General Investments (Grand
Bahama); Star General Hold-.

_ ings; atid Star Bahamas Gene =
sycee Aly Ansttante Company: aie



Take care of your day-to-day banking needs, quickly, easily and securely. Here’s

what you can do:

* View account balances
¢ Make bill payments

* View account history - Up to 365 days
(Up to 30 days for credit card and ScotiaLine accounts)

* Transfer funds between your accounts
* Make credit card and ScotiaLine payments

¢ Access Small Business accounts

Take control of your banking with the convenience of Scotiabank’s Internet

Banking. Call or visit us for more details today.

& Scotiabank

Life. Money. Balance both.

© Trademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia. Trademarks used under license and contro! of The Bank of Nova Scotia.



\

New Providence °\.
242-356-1697 thru 9

Toll-free Family Islands
242-300-6600

Toll-free from the U.S.
1-800-472-4648
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL'15, 2005, PAGE 5B



@ By LINDSAY THOMPSON
Bahamas Information
Services

BAHAMIAN credit unions,
which boast of a membership
in excess of 28,000 and have
total assets estimated at $170
million, are aiming to have a
market penetration of 45 per
cent and assets of over $1 billion
dollars.

In the Bahamas, co-opera-
tives have grown steadily, with
15 credit unions and five pro-
ducer/supplier co-operatives.

“This is a significant achieve-
ment,” said V Alfred Gray,
minister of agriculture, fisheries
and local government, “as these
funds represent 100 per cent
Bahamian investment and these
investments must be protected
at all costs.”

Mr Gray said there can be no
economic or social progress
without a sound financial sys-
tem managed by competent,
qualified and trained individu-
als.

He was addressing a one-
week Credit Union Supervisory
Workshop for regional inspec-
tors at the Wyndham Nassau
Resort & Crystal Palace Casino.

The workshop is being spon-
sored by the Caribbean Region-
al Technical Assistance Centre
(CARTAC) and hosted by the
Department of Co-operative
Development.

Mr Gray told participants
from the Bahamas, Guyana,
Dominica and Belize that cur-
rent global trends in the finan-
cial services industry have
caused. policymakers to assess
and reassess their regulatory
agencies, in order to meet new
challenges.

“The Government of the
Bahamas is totally committed
to ensuring that the highest lev-
el of investor protection exists
in our country, for both local

BUSINESS ©

Credit unions aiming for 45% market penetration



@ MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES
& LOCAL GOVERNMENT V ALFRED GRAY

and international investors,” he
said.

With regards to credit union
investments, Mr Gray said the
Government was fully commit-
ted to ensuring the Department
of Co-operative Developmen-
t’s regulatory role was given the
tools and resources necessary
to guarantee that investors in
such organisations are always
protected.

“This, in my view, is critical to
the strengthening of the co-

operative regulatory authority.

and the modernisation of the
legal framework within which

technically competent staff per- —

form their various tasks,” Mr
Gray said.

He noted that Parliament
recently enacted a new Co-
operative Societies Act 2004 to

' strengthen the internal capabil-

ity and output of the Depart-
ment of Co-operative Develop-
ment, in its inspection and
supervisory roles of .co-opera-
tive and credit union enterpris-
es.

Mr Gray said it was also

expected that the new legisla-
tion would equip the depart-

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=

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
AYNSLEY LIMITED

‘Notice is hereby given that in accordance with

ment in fulfilling its legal man-
date of ensuring the safety and

soundness of members’ invest-
ments in co-operative societies.

“This new regulatory frame-
work, I am advised, is necessary
because the oversight of credit
unions and co-operatives had
been significantly out-stripped
by their growth, diversity,
sophistication, and complexity.
Hence, risk management need-
ed to be regulated,” Mr Gray
said.

He said the workshop was
timely, as the training of credit
union inspectors in the effec-

‘ tive supervision of credit unions

can only enhance and strength-
en the regulatory regimes, and
will also serve to maintain the
confidence of members of co-
operatives and credit unions
and the public.

“Effective supervision is an
important part of any effective

BRADLEY & SEAN
_ CALLENDER, |

regulation,” Mr Gray said. “In
the financial sector it is also an
essential component, of any
strong regulated economic envi-
ronment.

“Tn fact, there can be no eco-
nomic or social progress without
a sound and stable financial sys-
tem - supervised by competent,

qualified and trained individu-
als.”

Mr Gray also said credit
union supervision is of great
importance to the Government.
“We seek to always say with
certainty that our people’s

SEE page six

NOTICE

| NOTICE is hereby given that PAUL ALEXANDER CcOx,
WOODS ALLEY, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 15TH day of APRIL, 2005 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.

Legal Notice

Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the dissolution of AYNSLEY LIMITED, has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

_ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

WENDOVER INVESTMENT CORP.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with

Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, the dissolution of WENDOVER
INVESTMENT CORP. has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore
been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

the Partners of the Firm of Sean B.

Callender & Co., are pleased to
announce the opening of the Abaco

Branch of their Law Chambers, situate
-at the Sea Star Building, Nathan Key

Drive, Marsh Harbour, Abaco.

Telephone Nos: 242 367 - 0432-3
Telefax No: 242 367 - 0434
Email: sbcallender@batelnet.bs

OE address: P.O.Box F-44636, .
Freeport, Sretite! Bahama

Legal Notice

NOTICE

POWLSON CORPORATION

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act No. 45 of
2000, POWLSON CORPORATION, has been dissolved and struck
off the Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued
by the Registrar General on the 7th day of April, 2005.

Mr. Badri Gobechia,
6 Kipshidze Str., App. 5,
Tbilisi 380030,
Republic of Georgia
Liquidator



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

SITI SYAFEI LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance’ with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the dissolution of SITI SYAFEI LIMITED, has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
HEARTS ADRIFT HOLDINGS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the dissolution of HEARTS ADRIFT HOLDINGS
LIMITED, has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck
off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

BLUEBIRD CAPITAL HOLDINGS LIMITED

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137(4)
of the International Business Companies Act No. 45 of 2000, BLUEBIRD
CAPITAL HOLDINGS LIMITED has been dissolved and struck ofthe
Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the eee
General on the 18th day of March, a

. Hamilton Management Services Limited
of Fiman House,
La Hougue du Valle,
Vale, Guernsey, GY3 5TE,
Channel Islands
Liquidator



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
SAFESTAYS HOLDINGS LTD.

_ {in Voluntary Liquidation) a
Notice is hereby given that the above-name
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 13th

day. of April, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., of
P.O. box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
KOTZEBUE LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the dissolution of KOTZEBUE LIMITED, has been

. completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
_(Liquidator)(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

DURAL ZWEI INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the dissolution of DURAL ZWEI INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


|

See

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Sse



The woild’s local bank

Consolidated Balance Sheet at 31 December 2004

ASSETS

Cash and short-term funds

Placings with banks maturing
aftcr one month

. Certificates of deposit

Hong Kong SAR Government certificates
of indebtedness

Securities held for dealing purposes

Long-term investments

Advances to customers

Amounts due from fellow subsidiary
companies

Investments in associated companies

Tangible fixed assets

Other assets

LIABILITIES

Hong Kong SAR currency notes in
circulation

Current, savings and other deposit
accounts

Deposits by banks

Amounts due to fellow subsidiary
companies

Amounts due to ultimate holding.
company :

Other liabilities

CAPITAL RESOURCES

Loan capital

Minority interests

Share capital.

Reserves : ‘
Proposed final interim dividen
Shareholders’ funds

Directors

David G Eldon

Michael R P Smith
Vincent Cheng Hoi Chuen

The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation Limited

Office: 1 Queen's Road Central, Hong Kong



2004 2003
Note HK$m HK$m
9 501,261 353,137
10a 74,481 113,322
/] 57,418 56,893
12 92,334 85,294
13a 71,747 82,239
14a 430,469 399,642
15 919,253 815,004
18 82,592 57,389
20a 16,918 1,564
2la 42,080 34,875
22 170,492 143,382
2,459,045 2,148,741
12 92,334 85,294
23 1,880,673 1,669,704
24 73,098 68,111
26 17,137 11,328
479 375
27 220,327 175,071
2,284,048 2,009,883
29 11,142 12,855
16,360 15,991
30 51,603
3] 49,959
8 8,450
147,495 110,012
174,997 138,858
2,459,045 2,148,741
Secretary

M W Scales

28 February 2005

Consolidated Profit and Loss Account for the Year Ended 31 December 2004

Interest income

Interest expense

Net interest income

Other operating income

Operating income

Operating expenses

Operating profit before provisions

Provisions for bad and doubtful debts

Provisions for contingent liabilities
and commitments

Operating profit

Profit on tangible fixed assets
and long-term investments

Surplus / (deficit) arising on property
revaluation cs

Share of profits less losses

* of associated companies

Profit on ordinary activities before tax

Tax on profit on ordinary activities

Profit on ordinary activities after tax

Minority interests

Profit attributable to shareholders

Retained profits at 1 January

Exchange and other adjustments

Transfer of depreciation to premises
revaluation reserve ~

Transfer to premises revaluation reserves

Realisation on disposal of premises and
investment properties

Dividends (including amounts attributable
to preference shareholders)

Retained profits at 31 December

We have audited the financial statements of The
Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation
Limited for the year ended 31 December 2004, from
which the summarized financial information set out
above has been derived, in accordance with
Statements of Auditing Standards issued by the Hong
Kong Society of Accountants. In our report dated 28
February 2005 we expressed an unqualified opinion
on those financial statements.

Respective Responsibilities of Directors
and Auditors

The Hong Kong Companies Ordinance requires the
Directors to prepare accounts which give a true and fair
view. In preparing accounts which give a true and fair
view it is fundamental that appropriate accounting
policies are sélected and applied consistently, that
judgements and estimates are made which are prudent
and reasonable and that the reasons for any significant
departure from applicable accounting standards are
stated,

It is our responsibility to form an independent
opinion, based on our audit, on those accounts and to
report our opinion solely to you, as a body, in
accordance with section 141 of the Hong Kong
Companies Ordinance, and for no other purpose. We
do not assume responsibility towards or accept liability
to any other person for the contents of this report.

Basis of Opinion

We conducted cur audit in accordance with Statements

' of Auditing Standards issued by the Hong Kong
Institute of Certified Public Accountants. An audit
includes examination, on a test basis, of evidence
relevant to the amounts and disclosures in the accounts.
{t also includes an assessment of the significant
estimates and judgements made by the Directors in the
preparation of the accounts, and of whether the
accounting policies are appropriate to the cir-
cumstances of the Bank and of the group, consistently
applied and adequately disclosed.



2004 2003
Note HKS$m HK$m
da 57,911 $5,770
4b (19,679) ( 17,032)
38,232 38,738 -
4c 29,421 22,627
67,653 61,365
4d (26,992) (24,024)
40,661 37,341
4e 812 (3,386)
28b (43) (76)
41,430 33,879
5 2,098 1,013
2!ld 1,024 (234) :
414 139
44,966 34,797
6a. (7,086) (5,387)
37,880 29,410
(4,315) (3,613)
33,565 25,797
af 37,764 28,952
777 1,089
298 240
- (273)
519 233
(21,840) . (18,274)

31 51,083 37,764

Auditors’ Report to the Shareholders of The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking
Corporation Limited {incorporated in the Hong Kong SAR with limited liability)

We planned and performed our audit so as to obtain
all the information and explanations which we
considered necessary in order to provide us with
sufficient evidence to give reasonable assurance as to
whether the accounts are free from material
misstatement. In forming our opinion we also evaluated
the overall adequacy of the presentation of information
in the accounts. We believe that our audit provides a
reasonable basis for our opinion.

Opinion

_In our opinion, the accounts give a true and fair view of

the state of affairs of the Bank and of the group as at 31

December 2004 and of the profit and cash flows of the:
group for the year then ended and have been properly
prepared in accordance with the Hong Kong

Companies Ordinance.

KPMG
Certified Public Accountants

Hong Kong, 28 February 2005



The summarized financial information set out above is derived from the financial statements of The Hongkong and Shanghai
Banking Ccrporation Limited for the year ended 31 December 2004. The full set of financial statements can be obtained from
The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation Limited, Suite 306, Centre of Commerce, One Bay Street, P. O. Box N-4917,

Nassau, Bahamas.



PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005 THE TRIBUNE.

Winn-Dixie seeks
ankruptcy case
= “Copyrighted Material(ta@

oa Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”



ROxechts :
FROM page five ©

investments in these organisa-'
tions are safe and secured,” he:
said. “We want also to be con-:
fident that our supervisory offi-'
cers are properly equipped and:
trained in order to perform their;
various duties.” «i

Credit unions serve moré:
than 20 million members in 87:
countries worldwide. The main-
‘objective is to help people cre-
ate a better future for them-
selves and their families.

In The Bahamas, co-opera-’
tives have grown steadily with:
15 credit unions and five pro- :
ducer/supplier co-operatives. A ;
goal is to have a market pene-
tration of 45 per cent and assets
of over $1 billion dollars. Cred- :
it unions boast of membership .
in excess of 28,000 with assets '
estimated at $170 million. “This :
is a significant achievement,” | -
said Mr Gray, “as these funds |
represent 100 per cent Bahami- |
an investment and these invest- :
ments must be protected at all!

_ costs.”

Also addressing the work?
shop were Rufus Johnson, pres.. ,
ident, Bahamas Co-operative |
League Limited; Diana Men? : .
.doza, financial sector supervi~
Sion advisor, Caribbean Region-
‘al Technical Assistance Centre;
and Julian Francis, governor,
Central Bank of the Bahamas.

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(Formerly Tanja)
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moving it’s operation to the «- Vs eee
Former United Shipping Building at the Harbour



GOVERNMENT NOTICE

) MINISTRY OF TRANSPORT & AVIATION
DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL AVIATION

_ Publication By The Ministry Of Transport &:
Aviation Department Of Civil Aviation —
Particulars Of An Application
To Operate Scheduled Air Services

In accordance with the provisions of Regulation 9 of the Civil Aviation
(Licensing of Air Services) Regulations 1976, the Minister responsible
for Aviation hereby publishes the following particulars of the under-
mentioned applicant to operate scheduled air services to and from The
Bahamas. .

PARTICULARS OF APPLICATION

1. Application: VIRGIN ATLANTIC AIRWAYS LIMITED

2. Date of tirst publication: 15.04.2005

3. Routes: BETWEEN LONDON GATWICK ON THE.ONE HAND
AND NASSAU ON THE OTHER.

4. Purpose of services: Passenger, mail and freight.

5. Provisional time table:

Local Times

0930/1330
1600/0510

LONDON GATWICK/NASSAU
NASSAU/LONDON GATWICK

0930/1400
1630/0530

LONDON GATWICK/NASSAU
NASSAU/LONDON GATWICK

6. Frequency of flights: See above time-table.

7. Type of Aircraft: Boeing 744

Any representation regarding or objection thereto in accordance with
Regulation 10 must be received by the Permanent Secretary, Ministry of
Transport & Aviation & the Department of Civil Aviation within fourteen
(14) days after the date of first publication of this Notice.

ARCHIE NAIRN
PERMANENT SECRETARY


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005, PAGE 7B
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PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005



ms) 10) 50 BS)

Debbie Ferguson making |z:

progress after surgery

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



SPRINTER Debbie Ferguson
was resting comfortably in her
room at the Kendall Regional
Medical Centre yesterday, two
days after she had an emergency
surgery for her appendix.

“So far, the pain is to a mini-
mum. It’s less than it was before,”
Ferguson insisted in a telephone
interview from her room. “They
still have me in some tubes from
my stomach.”

At this point, Beranewh said
she’s still not being able to eat any-
thing.

“They’re still waiting to give me
some more IVs,” she stressed. “I
guess it’s just one day at a time.
But I’m making some progress.

“I’m good,” she noted.

Ferguson, 29, is expected to
remain in hospital through the
weekend. Her mother, Elka Fer-
guson, is visiting her. Other fami-
ly members are expected to join
her. ~

For Ferguson, the surgery
couldn’t have come at a worse
time.

“Training had just picked up,”
she insisted of her preparations
for the outdoor season under the
watchful eyes of Amy Beem, the

head women’s coach at the Uni-
versity of Miami.

“I was.doing much better than I
got started before this came about.
But what else can I do?”

It during her training in Miami

‘that Ferguson experienced the

pain. It first happened on Saturday
and Ferguson immediately called
her mother.

Two days later, Ferguson said
the pain got worse and, after she
called her mother again, she decid-
ed to go to the doctor, only to be
told that it was her appendix.

Appendix

She was immediately admitted
in Kendall Regional Medical Cen-
tre where surgery was performed
to remove the appendix on Tues-
day night. |

“T’m just glad that the surgery is
over,” Ferguson stated.

However, Ferguson will have
to wait a little longer before she
can find out exactly when she will
be allowed to resume her training
for the upcoming season.

She was expected to return to
the Drake Relays in Des Moines,
Iowa at the end of the month
where she was lined up to com-
pete in the open women’s 100
metres.

Additionally, she was expected
to be the second Bahamian and
the 196th athlete overall to be
inducted into the Drake Relays’
Hall of Fame.

But Ferguson is not looking
towards fufilling that obligation
just yet.

“We will have to see how things
go. If I do go, I won’t be running,”
she stated. “But I doubt that I will
be going.”

Ferguson, who is being hon-
-oured for her stellar performance
at the University of Georgia, will
join retired Golden Girl Pauline

Davis-Thompson, who was.

enshrined as a quarter-miler for
the University of Alabama with
American quarter-miler Michael
Johnson and decathlete Kip Jan-
vrin in 1996.

Ferguson said she’s thrilled to
receive another accolade.

“The last time I went there in
the rain and hail and performed
very well,” Ferguson recalled. “I
was glad that they invited me back
to induct. me into the Hall of Fame
and run the 100.

“It’s something special.”

But as she recuperates in bed,
Ferguson requested that the
Bahamian public keep her in their
prayers so that she can have a
speedy and healthy recovery.

Knowles and Nestor
KO'd in: a oyatlede match’

TRIBUNE SPORTS

er surgery.


























































@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

and Daniel Nestor’s trip to Monte Carlo was cut
short in the quarter-final of the ATP Masters
Series event yesterday.

They had every opportunity to win, but the top
seeded team couldn’t pull off the big points and
were ousted by the French team of Michael Llodra
and Fabrice Santoro 7-6 (4), 1-6, 6-4.

“We had a ton of chances, but it was just brutal
out there tonight,” said Knowles from his hotel
room last night. “We just couldn’t win the match.”

Set
Knowles admitted that the first set could have
gone cither way, but the Frenchmen just played
better than they did to pulliit off.

However, in the second:set, Knowles said he
and Nestor: played ts ular as they almost















But he said nee vas a total different ball
game. : a
“They hada lot of lucky shots,” Knowles noted.
“We had three break points. But they got-break
point at 4-3 and all of a sudden, they raised their
game a little bit just for the last two games.
“They broke us another to win the game. But we
dominated the match. We just couldn’t get it

done.”

FROM page one

track, the soccer facility and an
upgraded facility for recre-
ational sports now located at
the Baillou Hills Sporting Com-
plex.

“We are still in discus-
sions,” said Wisdom, about
the relocation of the sporting
facilities when the construc-
tion work commences. “We
do know that softball will
move to the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex among oth-
er venues.

“No one will be inconve-
nienced. It’s just that we will
have to find temporary sites
when the construction begins.
Provisions will be made for
night play.”

As for the naming of the
new stadium and the other
facilities that will be con-
structed, Wisdom said they
are still deliberating with the
technical committee, which is
headed by Thomas A. Robin-
son.

With regards to ‘boxing,
which is have its national
training site at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex, Wis-
dom said they will be using
the Nassau Stadium for train-
ing, along with other satellite
stations around the island’and
in Grand Bahama: ».

But he said. once:the new
multi-purpose indoor facility
is completed, that .will be used
to host the various boxing
matches and also competition
for volleyball and other
indoor sports. a

The Kendal Isaacs Gymna-
‘sium will remain for:the sole
purpose of playing basketball.

MARK Knowles called it a “brutal” match as he




Knowles said this match was “brutal” because
“we won the match. We had all of the opportuni-
ties. We did | everything right, but just didn’t win the
big points.” ©

Looking back at how they played, Knowles said
they should have won the first set, but after
“killing” them in the second, they should have
won the third. |

“We were leading them two breaks in the third,
but they had..one or two points and they were
right back if the match and they ended up win-
ning,” Knowles reflected... ... ..

“It was a very tough loss. Obviously \ we wanted
to do well here, but it was tough. That’s the nature
of the game.

“That’s the beast.”

Knowlesjand Nestor will return to New York
today to train before they head to Houston, Texas
for their n “t tournament next week.

“The style. 2 of play is a little different, as opposed
to hard coutt, ” said Knowles, who will play'the rest
of the tournaments on the'red clay courts through:
the French'@pen hext month. *~”

“That’s how we got burned tonight. We didn’t
hit a couple of balls that were returned to us.,We |.
have to be ready at‘all times. We just have to.‘
regroup. We did all we could. We just didn’t get
the job done.”

The. disappointing. loss, according to: Knowles, .
will just givé them the incentive to try. arid get
better as théy continue to progress through the
remainder of the season.












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FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2005

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com





MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

& THE breath-taking design for the new stadium.



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



EXECUTIVES from softball and base-
ball were excited about the plans for the
transformation of the Queen Elizabeth
Sports Centre, thanks to the $30 million
“sift” from the People’s Republic of Chi-
na.

Teddy Sweeting and Dave Wood rep-
resented baseball, while Rommel

Knowles and Burkett Dorsett were on
hand for softball as Prime Minister Perry
Christie unveiled the plans for the stadium
at his Cabinet office in the Churchill build-
ing yesterday.

“It’s an exciting moment in this country
to witness the signing of this contract,”
said Sweeting, the secretary of the
Bahamas Baseball Federation and a play-
er/sponsor-with-the Dudley’s Panthers
baseball team in the New Providence
Baseball Association.

Reality

“T think the reality that we will have a
state of the art facility to propel track and
field to another level in the country and

will give us more pride about our.accom-

plishments on the international scene.”

Sweeting said he can’t wait to watch it
all transpire. But he’s eager to see what
will occur for baseball at the same time.

“T think the plans for baseball call for
the construction of a new Andre Rodgers
Baseball Stadium with two adjacent fields,
which will assist us in hosting interna-
tional events, which we have done in the
past and which we intend to do in the
future.”

Sweeting said they are finally getting
what they have been asking for and so
it’s just a matter of them sitting down
around the table and making sure that
everything is done to their liking.

Wood, an executive with the Bahamas
Baseball Association, said it’s time for
the construction of a new national stadi-
um.

~ Softball and baseball



representatives on
major development



“T think it will motivate kids in the
Bahamas and it will be an eye opener,
not only for track, but also for baseball
because of the plans that they have for the
sport,” Wood reflected.

“The Bahamas is getting into all sports,
we just had a young player drafted in
football, but we hope that this new stadi-
um will help us to get one or two
players drafted in baseball like we did in
the past.”

Knowles, the president of the Bahamas
Softball Federation, called the signing of
the contracts yesterday as a historic one
for the Bahamas.

“When the minister announced it two
years ago about having this national sta-
dium, we all laughed and said ‘yeah,
another politician talking,” Knowles
reflected. “But to see it happen today,
it’s historic.”

Knowles, however, had mixed reac-
tions about the relocation of the Churchill
Tener Knowles National Softball Stadi-
um.

“Obviously, it was not what we shad in
mind, but in speaking with the minister,
we will be involved in the future plans
for the facility,” Knowles declared.

If there’s anything in particular that
Knowles would like to see, it would be the
construction of more than one softball
field — as is being done for baseball.

“Gone are the days when we can just
build one field and call it a national soft-
ball stadium, especially when we are being



considered to host more international
events,” Knowles stressed.

“We will need to have more than one
facility with a certain seating capacity and
so if the minister intends to host interna-
tional events that will include more than
just track and field, it will require more
than one field for softball.”

While Knowles called it a historic day

* for the Bahamas, he also indicated that he

wished that more emphasis will now be
placed on the Family Islands in an effort
to ensure that they are not left too far
behind.

Knowles’ first vice president, Dorsett,
called it a “red letter day” in the Bahamas.

Facilities

“The softball complex will allow us to
put inside the facilities that have been
mandated by the ISF, including the Hall
of Fame room, a board room, VIP sec-
tion, proper scoring section, the umpire’s
section and proper seating facilities and
other amenities,” he proclaimed.

Dorsett, who also serves as the com-
missioner for the New Providence Softball
Association, said originally they heard
that the new softball stadium would be
located at the fields at the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex.

But he said he understand that the
plans call for all of the core sports to be
included in the same area, which he said
is an ideal situation for the country.

PM hails ‘major development

for a small country like ours’

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

WHEN the $30 million “gift” of
the National Stadium Complex by
The People’s Republic of China is
completed within the next 2-3 years,
the Bahamas will have a facility that
is second to none in the Caribbean.

In reviewing the official plans for
the 15,000 seat facility at his Cabi-
net office in the Churchill Building
yesterday, Prime Minister Perry
Christie said this is a major develop-
ment for a small country such as ours.

Significant

“This is an incredibly significant
day in the history of our country
because it represents a paradigm shift
in my view to. putting the correct
degree of emphasis on providing a

first class facility for our athletes,”

Mr Christie stressed.

Minister of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture Neville-Wisdom was also pre-
sent and clearly delighted with the
announcement.

The new stadium, which will com-
pletely transform the Queen Eliza:
beth Sports Centre into a mecca
sporting venue, will be constructed in
three phases by the People’s Repub-
lic of China.

Construction, according to the
prime minister, will begin no later
than February next year with the
completion date set as early as
June, 2007, but not later than

B ROMMEL KNOWLES

January, 2008. .

The first section will comprise of
the construction of the new National
Stadium, which will be placed adja-
cent to the Thomas A Robinson
Track and Field Stadium. :

It will replace the existing Andre
Rodgers Baseball Stadium, the Tony
Curry and. Anthony McKenzie Base-
ball Parks and the Churchill Tener
Knowles National Softball Stadium.

Wisdom revealed 'that the three
baseball fields will be relocated to
the western end of the Thomas A.
Robinson Track and Field Stadium
on the land that is directly in the back
of Shell Service Station.

He further noted that the softball
stadium will be relocated to the land
south of the Betty Kelly Kennig
Aquatic Centre, opposite the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium, occupying some
of the space that. currently houses
the BHRA.

While the aquatic centre will

‘ remain on the premises, Wisdom said

they have not yet determined exact-
ly where the BHRA will be relocat-
ed.

Section two of the plan, according
to Christie, will involve a new multi-

‘purpose 10,000 seat indoor facility,

which is expected to be located next
to the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium and
on the land that is considered the:
Carnival site.

And section three, Christie further:
revealed, will include the cycling:

SEE page 8B





#@ BURKETT DORSETT


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