Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Former financial
controller accused of
stealing almost $140,000

& By NATARIO McKENZIE

THE former financial con-
troller of the Bank of the
Bahamas was charged in the
Magistrate’s Court yesterday
with stealing almost $140,000.

“Terry Murray, 44, appeared -

before Magistrate Marilyn
Meers in Court 5 on Bank Lane
to answer to 14 counts of steal-
ing.

According to court dockets,
Mr Murray is accused of
stealing a total of $139,800
Over a period of three
months.

The offences are alleged to
have begun on November 2,
2004, when he is accused of
stealing $9,500.

‘Mr Murray is also accused of

stealing an additional $14,350
on November 9, $7,000 on
November 17 and a total of
$14,000 between November 25
and 30.

In December 2004, Mr Mur-
ray is alleged to have stolen
more than $50,000 from the
bank. :

He is also accused of stealing
more than $40,009 from the
bank between January 5 and
February 9 of this year.

Mr Murray, who was repre-
sented by lawyer Wilbert Moss,
pleaded not guilty to all of
the charges and was granted
$50,000 bail with two
sureties. ,

The case was adjourned to
July 12 when a preliminary
inquiry will be held.

enn

anti-clevelopment protest

u

rs

THE war of words on Harbour Island reached new heights

_yesterday, with anti-development protesters facing “self inter-
est” allegations from a leading Bahamian businessman.

Mr Warren Grant said many winter residents opposing expan-
sion plans at Romora Bay Marina feared their home rentals

‘would be hit.

. And he dismissed their over-development concerns, claiming
Harbour Island could absorb investment for at least another 50

‘years.

| Mr Grant, who owns the Royal Palm Hotel and several oth-
er businesses on Harbour Island, challenged residents’ claims

SEE page 13

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The

Tribune





Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

sections inside

at. s



has all you
A casual wear
= in wonderful








i By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter





THE implementation of the
United States’ new passport
policy discriminates against

. the Caribbean and could have
serious economic implications
for the Bahamas, tourism offi-
cials have told The Tribune.

The recent announcement
of a new law which requires
all US citizens and foreigners
travelling from the Bahamas
and re-entering the United
States to present a valid pass-
port as of January 1, 2006, has
the Caribbean tourism indus-
try alarmed, and fearing for
significant customer and rev-
enue loss.

Currently any US citizen



















Nassau and Bahama

Tourism industry
fears over new US
passport policy

@ TERRY MURRAY (centre) on his way to court yesterday.

can re-enter the US with a
birth certificate stating they
were born in the US and gov-
ernment issued photo ID.
Tourists visiting the
Bahamas, or other countries
in the Caribbean region, Cen-
tral and South America, have
been given a January 2006
deadline, whereas Canada and
Mexico were given until Jan-
uary 1 2008 to comply with
new travel requirements.
“This will without question
have a.detrimental impact on
our arrivals, government rev-
enue, and possibly even
employment levels,” said
Frank Comito, executive vice-
president of the Bahamas
Hotel Association (BHA).

SEE page 12





Seeceseeneenensncceseseecees vee neecenenesesecuerecsecsecesssoescees.

(Photo: Mario Duncanson)

Government official
Claims Police Staff
Association Executive -
Chairman ‘violated rules’

_ By TIFFANY GRANT

Tribune Staff Reporter

POLICE Staff. Association

Executive Chairman Inspector
Bradley Sands violated the rules
governing the association by
speaking out on recent police
promotions, a high-level gov-
ernment official told The Tri-
bune.
The Act establishing the
Police Association says that
Association officials are allowed
to comment on questions of pay
and conditions of service for
officers, but not on promotions
or disciplinary matters.

Mr Sands was quoted last

week in the media as making
several comments about a
recent round of promotions.

Yesterday, he gave The Tri-
bune a press statement criticis-
ing the promotions as unfair
and politically motivated.

According to an editorial in

the Freeport News on Tuesday,
Mr Sands noted, concerning the
recent police promotions, that
some officers with up to 17
years in rank were bypassed,
while others with only two years
experience were on the promo-
tion list.

“He wanted to know what

SEE page 13





PAGE 2, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



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@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie, told members of the
House of Assembly he “resents
the imputation” that there was

in the round of police promo-

@ PERRY Christie speaking in the House yesterday

any “political involvement”

tions earlier this month.

His comments came yester-
day on the heels of the Police
Staff Association executive

chairman Inspector Bradley -

Sands’ claims that the police
promotions were influenced by
favoritism and were politically

_ motivated.

alli ion 0 Lae in ‘LNG profits,
hile we. get loose. change

ia

and take all the risks?

3. Should our government gamble A
~ with our environment, our fishing
industry, our tourist economy, ©
our safety and our children’s lives -
for the benefit of wealthy foreign
LNG investors who can never



4

’

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Christie rejects
allegations of —
promotion bias

Mr Christie said that despite
officers who had been over-
looked visiting his office and
calling him from around the

- Bahamas to express their griev-

ances, he had made no recom-
mendations for their promotion.
' He said there is “no police
officer or commissioner of
police who can indicate that I
made one representation to
them”.

Claims

Inspector Sands claimed last
week that there are many

, reports of individual officers =f
“and some senior officers tele-
phoning ‘high: -rankirig politicians

to. petition them for assistance:
He also claimed that as a
result, there was more than one
list of recommended promo-
tions and officers who had not
met the basic criteria of exams

-- who ended up being promoted.

“The process has been conta-
minated and integrity has. been
lost,” the inspector alleged.

Commissioner of Police Paul
Farqhuarson said he knew that
the promotion board ,had act-
ed fairly and that every officer
who was promoted earned their
way on to the promotion list.

He said that outsiders are
involved to ensure the promo-
tion process was fair:

“There is no promotion sys-
tem in the Bahamas as trans-
parent,” said Mr Farqhuarson.



“Copyrighted Material
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THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 3







“Any fool can see that we have
an epidemic as it relates to school
violence. We can pretend as though
we have things under control in that
aspect or we can be real with our-
selves,” he said.

Mr Reid said that the govern-
ment should “stop playing with the
fate of our young a ag and estab-
lish a gang unit.” 2

Unit

“We have an AIDS unit, we
have a drug unit, now we need a
special gang unit because violence
among youth has become an epi-
demic,” he said.

A further concern, Mr Reid said,
is the apparent general lack of
respect that Bahamian youths have
for the law.

“Let’s remember now that this
ed that they had apprehended and —_ young man was stabbed and killed
had in custody a 15-year-old sus- _rjght near the police station, what
pect. does this say to us? Our young peo-

Mr Reid said that violence ple have no regard for the law,” he
among youth “has become anepi- said.
demic,” and that is “high time for The YAV director, a former
the government to step in and do —_ gang member himself, said that his
something.” . organisation has also proposed the

HINA rm child’s medical fund:

By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

FOLLOWING Tuesday’s stab-
bing death of a 15-year-old CV
Bethel student and a second stab-
bing incident at Government high
school which left a 17-year-old stu-
dent in hospital with serious injuries,
a call has gone out for government
to establish a special unit to deal
with youth violence.

Speaking with The Tribune yes-
..terday, director of the Youth
inst. Violence (YAV) pro-
me Carlos Reid said that he is
disturbed about the most
ecent murder of a 15-year-old.”

“Even more disturbing is the fact
that another 15-year-old of the
same school is alleged to have killed
him,” he said.

After the incident, police report-







BES

—



MEMBERS of the public are being asked to assist a little girl
who desperately needs serious medical attention.

Four-year old Tyiece Bennett was born with several medical con-
ditions, including spina bifida, hydrocephalus and anorectal malfor-
mations.

She is without bladder or bowel control as a result of her conditions
and is consigned to wearing diapers at all times. Tyeice was born with
her spine exposed and with fluid on the brain.

Tyeice underwent extensive medical treatment in the Bahamas
under the care of Dr Ekedede Magnus and Dr Locksley Munroe who
performed a procedure to close her spine in Nassau.

However she needs to go to the Miami Children’s Hospital for fur-
ther treatment to repair her bladder and bowels and allow her to be
diaper free. The surgery should be done as soon as possible so that
she can start primary school.

Dr Rafael Gosalbez of Miami Children’s Hospital has told Tyiece’s
mother Octavier Thurston, who works as a production assistant at
The Tribune, that the surgery would successfully correct the condition.

However the operation and post surgical care will cost tens of thou-
sands of dollars.

Ms Thurston said that Tyiece.would have to spend six weeks in
Miami to recover. She said that she, her sister and mother plan to take
turns staying in Miami with Tyiece.

“It has been a very strenuous task taking care e of Tyiece as a single
mom. Having to travel back and forth to doctors is hard and expen-
sive. I also have to deal with diapers because she goes through about
eight diapers a day. I hope the surgery would help her greatly
because she gets a lot of urinary tract infections and because of the
cost of pampers.”

She added that it has been hard finding a school for Tyiece, as many
schools will not take her because of her medical complications.

Tyeice has told her mother that she can’t wait to have her surgery
so that she can wear her panties like her cousins and said she would
then be.a “a big girl.”

Ms Thurston has held several fund-raising events to raise money
for the surgery, including a steak-out and fundraising T-shirts sales.

However much more is needed.

Anyone who can assist in Tyiece’s medical fund can contact The
Tribune at 322-1986, or if they wish, can make a deposit into an
account which has been established at The Royal Bank of Canada-
account number 7021785.










































if

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Accountants

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With —
The Compliance Commission
on

“Risk Based Approach to KYC and Auditing
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Representatives from the following regulatory bodies
will be presenting:

* The Compliance Commission

* Securities Commission of The Bahamas

¢ The Central Bank of The Bahamas

* Inspector-Financial & Corporate Service
Providers

° Registrar of Insurance Companies

Venue: WYNDHAM NASSAU RESORT
Date: Tuesday April 19th, 2605
; Time: 9:00am - 5:00pm

This workshop will cover seven (7) CPE hours

Cost: Members: $100 Non members: $125
| | RSVP: (242) 394-3439 (Phone) (242)394-3629 (Fax)

| Payments due on or before April 19th, there will be
“| NO BILLINGS for this workshop

“| | Please visit our website at www.bica.bs for additional
information and updates.

alls for t he government to
stablish youth violence unit

establishment of a youth centre to
the government.

year and a half ago, and we still
have not gotten a response. I am

resource centre as well as a safe
haven for our young people to go to
if they are suspended from school
or need some place to relax and
feel safe without pressure.”

could “educate young people, teach





truth to the accusations.





_LOCAL NEWS.



he said.

The YAV director is expected
to meet with Minister of Education
Alfred Sears sometime today, “to
discuss how we can partner with

and preserving the future of our
young people,” he said.

Mr Reid said his organisation
also proposes that churches be used
as youth centres.

them non-violent conflict resolu-
tion, but not only them, also teach
the teachers and parents and the

“We sent the proposal about a
community as a whole.”

very disappointed,” he said. “T call on all the churches that his ministry to help bring some solu-
Mr Reid said that the project Investors are playing church to stop, andstart _ tions to the probiem of youth vio-
‘Hope Centre’ could be used “as a The YAV director said that pri- the process of building lives,” _lence.”

. vate investors are standing by to
supply the necessary funding for
such a centre, “to see this project
become a reality.”

“We are waiting on the govern-
ment to stop dragging their feet and
let’s get serious about protecting




























He added that a youth centre

Investigation into
corruption rumours

i By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter



AN INVESTIGATION will be launched into rumours of
corruption against officers working under Labour and Immi-
gration Minister Vincent Peet.

Responding to a question in the House of Assembly, Mr |.
Peet said he has turned over all allegations of corruption involv-
ing his subordinates to the police for investigation.

It was not revealed whether the allegations referred to Immi-
gration officers, Labour officials, or Ministry staff.

The statement from Mr Peet came in response to a question
put to him by Independent MP Whitney Bastian.

Mr Bastian asked what was being done about allegations of
corruption detailed in a letter currently being “circulated”.

“Can you please tell me what you are doing to get to the bot-
tom of this,” he asked.

Mr Peet said that he had also seen a copy of the letter, the |.
details of which he did not disclose.

The minister responded that he has referred the matter to
Commissioner of Police Paul Farquharson for a full investiga-
tion so that appropriate action can be taken if there is any



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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005 THE TRIBUNE

eae eee ere
EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited Te achers have

been left behind
and abandoned

EDITOR, The Tribune.

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986.
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Limits to moral behaviour

SEVERAL YEARS ago a senior citizen
of Savannah Sound observed that “our peo-
ple are honest only because of lack of oppor-
tunity.”

What an indictment on the moral con-
science of a nation.

Last month Deputy Prime Minister Cyn-
thia Pratt,-speaking at a function in a now
thriving Exuma, noted that “our personal
standards and an acceptance of what is right
and wrong seem to have declined in direct
proportion to our level-of prosperity.”

Now that Bahamians have more opportu-
nities their integrity is being tested. Will the
words of the old Savannah Sound man prove
prophetic — Bahamians are only honest
because they have had no opportunities to be
dishonest? Opportunity is now knocking at
their door.

“Sadly, however,” commented the deputy
prime minister, “one must proclaim that this
generation in large numbers has abandoned
faith, values, morality and other virtues as
being relics of the past.

“All of us must surely know the limits of
moral behaviour, self discipline, tolerance,
respect for individuals, and love and charity i in
our hears for one another.

“No society can hope to progress, much
less hope to survive without the underpin-
nings: of these.core: values i in place,” she said.

The attitude of many Bahamians — an
"” stéroids were widely. used by players. Not

attitude that‘ goes way: back in'time — is that
we are a special people. Visitors must accept
us as we are — slow, inefficient, backsliding,
often light-fingered with the property of oth-
ers, but on the whole, happy-go-lucky, pleas-
ant souls. Our watches are set on “Bahamian
time”, and even this supposedly is a part of
our charm. This attitude is not original with
our youth — they have inherited it.

Our belief in our own special culture sur-.

faced as recently as 1997 when in his days as
a lawyer, Prime Minister Perry Christie, rep-
resenting the late, former prime minister Sir
Lynden Pindling, tried to explain to a spe-
cially appointed commission of inquiry into
the Bahamas Hotel Corporation that “there
is a peculiar fiscal culture in the Bahamas
based upon the absence of income tax and
other factors which would excuse any or all of
the irregularities of which evidence was giv-
en. a
In their report the commissioners, headed
by Sir William Randolph Douglas, had to
remind Mr Christie that “there is a universal
_ doctrine of accountability which transcends all
boundaries”. Said the report: “The Commis-

sion holds that integrity and accountability in
national life and in the conduct of public
affairs are indispensable features of the sys-
tem of parliamentary democracy guaranteed
by the Constitution of the Bahamas”.

Many Bahamians are not as fine tuned to
what is right and what as wrong as they
should be.

And this is-where much of the problem
begins — a lack of example at the top.
Bahamians watch, read and listen to stories of

~ how some of their politicians behave within

their own “peculiar culture”. No wonder
young people have lost respect for authority.

Recently we listened to a conversation
between a group of young people. What

‘seemed obviously wrong to us, was not so

obvious to them. What was a clear case of
cheating to us was not so clear to them. It was
apparent that they had been surrounded for
so long by so much dishonesty — the belief
that anything goes as long as one is not caught
— that they were having difficulty’ sorting
out right from wrong.

Their conversation arose from the recent
Senate hearings into performance-enhanc-
ing steroids, which are widely used by major-
league baseball players.

The hearings were launched after former ,

Oakland A’s slugger José Canseco and Ken

~ Caminiti, the‘National League’s most valu- |

able player in 1996, now retired, said that .

only were they smashing all slugging records,
but they were damaging their health. Doctors
warned of long-term health risks, including
heart disease and cancer.

The senators were concerned at the mes-
sage that was being sent to young people
looking for an edge in high school sports or
just to improve their appearance.

The young people, although concerned
about the health risks, could not see — until
it was explained in great detail to them — that
these players were cheating. They were
breaking the rules by taking drugs to give

’ them a powerful edge over their colleagues.

This was only a game. But like the game of
life, it has rules. If it is all right to break base-
ball rules, it is all right to break other rules.
And like a pebble thrown into a calm body of

' water, the ever-widening ripple touches and

moves the remaining water until it grows into
a threatening wave.

So it is in life, as principle after principle
goes down like nine-pins, our moral fibre as
a nation is weakened and eventually
destroyed.



I WISH to borrow a line
from the present President of
the Bahamas Union of Teach-
ers, Mr Kingsley L Black, who
is often quoted as saying
“teachers are working for
peanuts”, which is the
absolute truth.

The salary of a teacher with
a Master’s degree is in no way
comparable to that of other
workers with the same quali-
fications.

While the base salary of a
teacher with a Master’s degree
is much less than the base
wage for a worker with the
same degree in other areas of
the private sector and public
corporations these anomalies
have not been addressed.

Additionally the pay differ-
ential between a teacher with
a Master’s degree and his
counterpart with a Bachelotr’s
degree and multiple years
experience is virtually negli-
gible.

Teachers who wear the hat
of being members of “the pro-
fession of professions” have
been left behind and forgot-
ten. The anomalies which
exists between teachers and
their counterparts is obvious-
ly a pet peeve of all teachers in
the public education system.

It is a fact that in many cas-

__ es even the students, with min-

imal experience go on to earn
significantly more than their
struggling teachers.

Hence, it would not be pre-
sumptuous to advise that this
be the first item on the agenda
of the Collective, Bargaining
Agreement Committee as
they deliberate.

When this is addressed then
it is most probable that teach-
ers will benefit from the Nova
University Master’s Degree
Programme, around which an
executive of the union’s cam-
paign is centred.

The truth of the matter is
that the difference between
the earnings of a teacher with
a Master’s and that of a Bach-
elor’s degree is not within
itself a compelling reason to
do additional studies.

Let us set the record
straight.

Some teachers come to the
job already having earned

their Master’s degree, but they

have limited work experience,
others who are practising
teachers acquire an in-service
award or a scholarship and










































[oO uboG

letters@trlbunemedia.net

attain their Master’s, while
other individuals can and do
take advantage of the Mas-
ter’s Programme while they
have their paid job and they
supervise their own time.

However, the ordinary
classroom teacher who has
responsibility for planning,
teaching, preparing exams,
marking exams, attending pro-
fessional development cours-
es, as well as personal and
family commitments faces an
additional challenge which
includes finding the necessary
funds to pay for the pro-
gramme as well the time to
study.

They have been left behind
and appear to have been

EDITOR, The Tribune.

demnation.
them or not at all.

ty and the country?



SHIRLEA VOTER
Nassau,
April 8, 2005.

Bahamas heading back
to those ‘old days’

IT SEEMS that The Bahamas is again heading down the
path to those “old days” when the major objective of gaining
public office was to retain power at all costs. Large segments of
the population could not voice their opinions.

‘Lest we forget upon assuming office, these newcomers spent
practically all of their time so far disparaging all of the good eco-
nomic and social development by the previous government.
When they got tired of complaining, they enthusiastically
embraced the $1 billion Atlantic Phase III as their own initiative.
Then they proceeded to implement and continue the FNM
policies left in place. While in opposition the sale of properties
to investors was ridiculed as “selling out The Bahamas”. The
Clifton Cay project which would have preserved artifacts found
at the site for Bahamians had to be abandoned. Yet there were
jobs for Bahamians. Even some of. the clergy joined. in con-

What was most disturbing was that certain FNMs believed the
lies told and decided to “spite” the FNM party by voting against

The leadership struggle was devastating. Once a decision is
taken, why not rally around the leader for the good of the par-

It is never worth it to drastically penalise the party like that.
The result now is that the people holding power will grasp at any
and everything to retain that power as was done in the past.

Instead it was the FNM that led the way to a new day, new
ways of governing, new opportunities for all Bahamians.

We are now back to the “old days” of the “sweet talk” and
handouts to favourite folks to gain control of minds with a
view to retaining power to bolster their egos. Is there no way out
of this slippery downward slope?

abandoned by those whom
they have entrusted the
responsibility to bargain for
them in good faith.

It would seem reasonable
therefore, that the mere
teacher on whose behalf the’
select comunittee is negotiating
would see the wisdom of con-
sulting broadly, rather than go
through the charade of “talk
and no see” or approved in
ignorance.

This suggested approach is
in conformity with the gener-
al principle of democracy
which contemplates trans-
parency and accountability,
and an informed citizenry.

VILLADALE F BAIN
Vice-Presidential Candidate
BUT Elections June, 2005 ©

‘ Nassau,
March 23, 2005.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 5



Developments ‘may
destroy Harbour

Island economy’

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

HARBOUR ISLAND,
ELEUTHERA - The econom-
ic base of what has been
described as the archetype of
the “idyllic Family Island com-
munity” may soon disappear
due to the encroachment of two
intrusive new developments, a
local businessman told The Tri-
bune yesterday.

Richard Malcolm, whose
family founded and operated
the famed Pink Sands Resort
for many years, said that the
proposed development at the
Romora -Bay Marina and
Valentines Bay may chase away
the winter residents who have
brought the island “enormous
success.”

He pointed out that winter
residents come to Harbour
Island for what “is naturally
here,” and said that any disrup-
tion in the tranquil scenery may
destroy what has made the
island famous.

“Even when the Minister of



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Tourism (Obie Wilchcombe)
was down here, he expressed
discomfort with the Valentine
development, because it is not
what is normally seen in Har-
bour Island,” claimed Mr Mal-
colm.

He described the two devel-
opments as “overkill” and said
it would be better suited and
more needed on the Eleuthera
mainland, a few miles away.

“Harbour Island has negative
unemployment — as many as 300
people come here from
Eleuthera as far as Palmetto
Point, for (construction jobs),”
he explained.

Mr Malcolm said that Har-
bour Island is used by the Min-
istry of Tourism as the “poster
child” for Family Island tourism
in general.

“Harbour Island has gained
tremendous success from
tourism and foreign investors
over the years, because it is qui-
et, quaint and is ‘the Family
Island’,” he said.

Mr Malcolm fears that the

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i RICHARD Malcolm says the developments may impact on the island’s tranquility ry
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff SS

island’s quaintness is being lost
because “the wrong type of
development” is being intro-
duced.

“All governments, even
before independence spoke
about equal tourism and pre-
serving the Family Islands, and
this is diametrically opposed to
it,” he said.

Fears

Mr Malcolm pointed out that
the Valentines development
“will be sitting in the middle of
a 200-year old settlement,”
which was expected to soon be
declared a historical site by the
Antiquities, Monuments and
Museums Corporation.
“The idea is to protect and
preserve that,” said Mr Mal-
colm.

Local businessman’ Neville ie

Barretta Major further the two
developments as “ugly,” and
said that more development on
the island would overwhelm
what is already becoming a.con-
gested population.

“If I had known that Perry
Christie had come down here
to break ground on a three-
storey ugly place like that, I
would have taken the shovel
out of his hand,” he said.

Protests against the planned ©

developments in Harbour
Island have grown in the past
few weeks, with residents
expressing their concerns about
the rapid expansion.

fecdes in an effort to foster
some kind of understanding
between the two parties.

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DARYL
Parmenter,
president of
Remora Bay
Marina
(Photo:
Felipé Major/
Tribune staff

HARBOUR ISLAND,

of one of the developments

tility down to fear of change.

_“not bad.”
He said that as long as the

| dently”, there is no reason for
the residents to be afraid.

Mr Parmenter was speaking
at a “semi-judicial hearing”
look into the unrest the devel-
opments have created.

He acknowledged that one
of the issues raised by resi-



Developer pledges his
concern for environment |

ELEUTHERA - The owner .
. have not been done.
under fire in Harbour Island -”
_yesterday put residents’ hos-. :company plans to have an.

Daryl Parmenter, who is the _
president of thé Remora Bay ©
Marina; said that the develop- 7 8
‘ments at Valentines Bay and.
his property are. in themselves: Be
-abuse the facilities. . -

projects are handled “pru- a

fuel spills.

. dumped into the water.

















- dents is that. Huvironmedtal
Impact Assessments (EIAs)




“Mr Parmenter said that his









EIA. conducted “very. short- *;
ly”. He pointed out that mari- | ~
na See eements in: ae














Mr Parmenter.said that as
he. would not be providing ‘a
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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



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Turks and Caicos in
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THE Bahamas’ nearest island
neighbours, Turks and Caicos, is
involved in a gay cruise contro-
versy Similar to the one that hit
Nassau several years ago.

But both government and
opposition leaders have spoken
out strongly against the gay
lifestyle, leading a travel website
to declare homosexuals
“unwanted” in the islands.

The row erupted after a
cruise docked at Grand Turk
with 2,000 passengers, all gays
and lesbians.

Opposition leader Derek
Taylor accused the Turks and
Caicos government of being
prepared to “prostitute” the
colony’s future in the name of
development and financial gain.

He expressed outrage at what

he called “a financially and -



EE EE A

v

SSS NSN SN SS OG) SA Sw

morally bankrupt government”,
claiming the islands were in dire
financial straits.

Chief Minister Michael Mis-
ick responded by saying he and
his government were unaware
of plans for the ship’s visit - and
denied Mr Taylor’s claims on
the islands’ financial state.

Liberty

And he added: “Whilst as a
government we respect civil lib-
erties, the freedom of choice
and we do refrain from dis-
criminating, we are in no way
supportive of or encourage the
alternative lifestyle of these
individuals.

“We regret that-our people
and especially our children have
been exposed to this type of

activity and express concern in
this regard.”

But Mr Misick said Mr Tay-
lor’s words were “very hypo-
critical”, considering it was his
signature that had made gay
and lesbian relationships legal
on the islands.

It was under Mr Taylor’s
PDM administration, he said,
that a White Paper was signed
accepting the alternative
lifestyle and allowing a local
resort to host a gay convention.

Standards

Mr Misick assured the peo-
ple that his government upheld
the country’s moral standards
while seeking avenues of devel-
opment consistent with local
culture.



Bahamasair management

training is launched

NAMING 2005 the “year
of quality service”, Bahama-
sair yesterday launched a
management training semi-
nar at the Nassau Beach
Hotel.

All customer service staff
have already been trained in
the areas. of service quality,
grooming, and deportment in
accordance with Bahama-
sair’s “New Attitude” cam-
paign, airline officials said.

According to Bahamasair
Holdings chairman Basil
Sands, the airline is ensuring
that good principles and ser-
vice quality practices are
instilled in managerial
employees.

“All of this training is in
keeping with the airline’s
“New Attitude” theme in
raising the service quality bar

gence of the low-cost carri-
ers, Mr Sands said.

Mr Sands said: “This train-
ing will provide the answer
to those problems. We have
seen much improvement over
the Easter holiday in man-
agement of peak traffic.
Delays were minimal and in
most cases their causes were
external to us and primarily
due to some of the runways
undergoing construction.”

The airline is facing pri-
vatisation and attempting to
cope with an influx of low-
cost carriers to the local mar-
ket such as Jet Blue and Spir-
it Airlines.

Mr Sands admitted that
quality service and price will
be the determining factors in
whether Bahamasair will be
able to compete with the new
carriers.

“Once our on-time perfor-

public will view Bahamasair
as the airline of choice.



He countered Mr Taylor’s
claims on the financial front by
saying the colony had a healthy
bank balance and bright finan-
cial future.

Website

The travel website Turbo
News, in reporting the row, said:
“Gays and lesbians might just
as well erase Turks and Caicos
from their list of travel destina-
tions.”

A similar row erupted in Nas-
sau in the 1990s, but the gov-
ernment made it clear there was
no policy of discrimination
against gays.

Bay Street traders have
admitted that gays make good
customers, especially in the jew-
ellery and perfume business.

With no families to support,
and no school fees to find, their
disposable income is generally
much higher than that of het-
erosexuals.



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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 7.



House briefs

@ New House rules to come
into effect April 27 2005

MEMBERS of the
House of Assembly
yesterday voted
unanimously that the new
rules governing conduct in
the House of Assembly will
take effect from April 27.

The new code of conduct
marks the first time House
rules have been amended
since the Bahamas gained
independence.

The new rules will
regulate, among other
things, the length of time
members can contribute to
a debate and eliminates the
rule that members have to
wear dark clothing inside
the chamber.

@ Bermuda Delegation
Visits House of Assembly

A DELEGATION
representing the Bermuda
Independence Commission
yesterday observed the
proceedings in the House
of Assembly as that
country continues its
preparations to move
towards independence.

The group, which
comprised of chairman
Bishop Vernon Lambe,
advisor Dame Lois
Browne-Evans, and
commissioners Marc Bean
and Derrick Burgess, were
welcomed to the
proceedings by House
Speaker Oswald Ingraham.

While in the country,
they also met with several
government officials.

@ Labour Officials
continue Royal Oasis
Investigation

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie and Labour
Minister Vincent Peet
yesterday assured workers
affected by the closing of
the Royal Oasis Hotel on
Grand Bahama that the
government is working to
bring them relief.

Mr Christie told
members of the House of
Assembly that he is
confident that, in the near
future, the government will
have news that will be
pleasing to the workers and
to the country as a whole.

Mr Peet added that at
present, labour officials are
working to identify and
correct an apparent
discrimination in the
figures regarding the
proposed settlement for
workers.

He said the ministry
understood the urgency of
the situation and is moving

“post-haste” to resolve the
issue.

@ PM not to release Baha
Mar Heads of Agreement

y PRIME Minister Perry
Christie denied a request

| by opposition House leader

“| Alvin Smith be shown a
copy of the recently signed
Heads of Agreement for
the proposed billion-dollar
Cable Beach redevelopment
project.

Mr Christie said that it
would not be correct for
the government to release
the agreement until the sale
‘of the hotels is completed.

However, he said that
once all sales are
completed, which should be
before the end of the
month, he would release
the agreement
immediately.

Mr Christie described the
negotiation process for the
investment as one of the
most complex and vexing in
the country's history.

Mr Christie said that he
would not respond to the
recent comments made by
FNM chairman Carl Bethel
concerning the project.

The Tribune wants to hear

j from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Call us
on 322-1986 and share
your story.





iment to take out loan



to pay for hurricane repairs

Bank to provide $16.7 million to
cover Frances and Jeanne damage

By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie yesterday tabled a res-
olution in the House of Assem-
bly which would allow the gov-
ernment to borrow almost $17
million to replace funds used
for repairs following hurricanes
Frances and Jeanne.

The funds would be loaned
by the Inter-American Devel-

opment Bank and would be
returned to the public treasury
Mr Christie explained, as the
government had to use money
originally allocated for other
projects to respond to the
emergency situation caused by
last year’s hurricanes.

Repairs

The resolution states that the
bank has agreed to grant the
government up to $16,700,00 to
address the needs of temporary
reconstruction, stabilisation and
repair of infrastructure across
the Bahamas.

The government is to provide
the remaining 20 per cent of the
amount used for hurricane relief
—some $4.3 million.

The terms of the resolution
state that repayments must start
before July 31 2010 and finish
no later than January 31, 2025.

The work covered by the loan
will be carried out by the Min-
istry of Works and Utilities.

Works

Mr Christie said that most of
the work, which has been
underway since late last year,
would be undertaken on Grand
Bahama, Abaco, San Salvador,
Cat Island, Eleuthera and New
Providence and would include
repairs to schools and other



& PM Perry Christie

public buildings, temporary
housing and repair of infra-
structure works such as docks,
roads and bridges.

Mr Christie said last year’s
hurricane season had proved
challenging because Hurricane
Frances was the only hurricane
to affect the entire country since
the 1800s.

Lessons

He noted that there are a
number of lessons which need-
ed to be learnt from last year’s
hurricane season, which
exposed a number of short-
comings in communication
between islands, evacuation reg-
ulations and shelters.

The resolution was second by
Adelaide MP Michael Halkitis
and several members made
their contributions to the debate
in the afternoon session.



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THE TRIBUNE












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HEALTHY public
debate on The
Bahamas’ participation in the
proposed Free Trade Area of
the Americas (FTAA), the
World Trade Organisation
(WTO) and the Caribbean
Single Market and Economy
(CSME) would be a good
thing.

’ However, we cannot have
such a debate when govern-
ment officials like Minister
Fred Mitchell continue to mis-
inform the Bahamian people,



Spring Js ¢tere| Fred Mitchell

STRAIGHT UP TALK.



—

when he said that the FNM
signed the country onto the
FTAA. Agreeing to negotiate
a contract is not the same as
signing one.

Second, Mr Mitchell was
wrong, dead wrong, to say that
having agreed to negotiate a
FTAA agreement, the former



“Mr Mitchell is a novice to
international trade matters
and joined the government
only three years ago. He
cannot say what the former
administration would have

done.”



either out of sheer ignorance
or as a matter of pure poli-

- ticking. The fact is that Mr

Mitchell has been embarrass-
ingly wrong on a number of
his public utterances on trade
matters.

To begin with, the former
administration under the lead-
ership of the Right Hon
Hubert Ingraham never signed
The Bahamas onto the FTAA
because there was and is now
no PTAA.

In 1994, Mr Ingraham along
with the other 33 leaders who
attended the Summit of the
Americas in Miami merely
signed a “Declaration of Prin-
ciples”, which resolved to,
among other things, negotiate
a FTAA agreement by 2005.

Today, there is no FTAA,
only a third draft agreement,
which remains highly con-
tentious and unlikely to be
concluded earlier than 2007.

Mr Mitchell was simply,wrong .

administration would have
signed on at the end of the
day. This goes against all logic
and is frankly surprising to
hear from Minister Mitchell
who seems to revel in the leg-
end of his own intelligence.

I spent five years in the
Ingraham administration as a
cabinet minister and at no time
was there any determination
to sign onto the FTAA no
matter what. We participated
in the negotiations to see

VARGO



LA CNG

whether at the end of the day
there was an agreement that
would be beneficial to sign.

Only after completing nego-
tiations could we know such a
thing and the process ‘was so
far from complete that no
determination could be made
in advance.



r Mitcheit is a
novice to interna-
tional trade matters and joined
the government only three
years ago. He cannot say what
the former administration
would have done. Indeed, I
challenge him to produce one
shred of evidence that the
FNM-government would have
simply signed onto the FTAA
once negotiations were com-
plete.

Third, no matter how often
Mr Mitchell ignorantly or
deceivingly states that the
Bahamas has not applied for
full membership in the World
Trade Organisation (WTO) he

-is wrong, dead wrong.

Both the records of the gov-
ernment of The Bahamas as
well as the WTO will show
that he is wrong. The fact is
that I, as then Minister of Eco-
nomic Development, made the
application in Geneva,
Switzerland, in July, 2001, one
full year following our becom-

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 9



US Ambassador praises joint initiatives.

wrong again

ing an observer in the organi-
sation. I was duly authorised to
do so by the Cabinet of The
Bahamas.

The consultants of which Mr
‘ Mitchell spoke were hired to
help us prepare a Memoran-
dum of Trade Regime, which
_, would be submitted after the
- application was made. The
application was made and the
memorandum is being pre-
pared.

‘Quite frankly, this is all easy
to verify. Mr Mitchell need
only to ask the ministry
responsible for WTO matters
whether this is the case rather
“ipa continue to mislead the
~ Bahamian public on the same.

Fourth, when I questioned
the fact that Mr Mitchell so
. frequently speaks on trade
. matters when his colleague,
‘the real minister of trade, the
’ ‘Hon Leslie Miller, is so silent,
’ T meant all trade matters, not
_ merely the CSME, which
: “seems to’ be some personal pet
"project of his of late.

Mr Mitchell is quoted in the
_ press speaking frequently on
the FTAA and WTO, neither
of which is in his portfolio, at
* Jeast not according to the offi-
cial gazette of portfolio allo-
cations. Mr Miller, Minister of
‘ Trade and Industry, is respon-
_ sible for LOME, NAFTA,
EU/ACP, WTO and FTAA.

S the minister of
trade should have more
accurate information to offer
the people on these matters
than the minister who is not
responsible for such matters.
Perhaps Mr Miller’s recent
silence on these issues reflects
his disgust with Mr Mitchell’s
usurping his authority.

As adjunct, I do not need to
..Sow discord among govern-
ment ministers in the PLP, as
«Mr Mitchell suggested. Minis-
ter Mitchell and his colleagues
are doing an excellent job of
that all by themselves.

Finally, Mr Mitchell wants

».-the FNM fo join him on, ts: a
; M doe

not need to join Mr Mitchell
because the only position The
Bahamas has on CSME to
date is the one put by former
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham when he told his col-
league heads of government
in a meeting in Nassau in 2001
that the only way The
Bahamas could join the COME
was if it had exemption from
the free movement of labour,
among other things.

Mr Mitchell seems to be
telling the public that such an
exemption has been given but
he offers no official notifica-
tion from CARICOM to that
effect.

Bahamians must be careful
of this personal campaign to
join the CSME that Mr
Mitchell seems to be on. It is
curious that his colleagues
have not expressed support for
his enthusiasm or his comfort
about joining the CSME.

In fact, it seems sometimes
that he is trying harder to per-
suade them of the need to join
the CSME than ae Bahamian
public.

Mr Mitchell says that he was
“embarrassed”; I understand
his embarrassment quite well.
It is embarrassing to be a part
of the incompetence and inde-
cisiveness that he and his col-
leagues have displayed since
coming to office some three
years ago. Perhaps this is why
the minister laments about
these things privately from
time to time.

DECISION TIME

inister Mitchell says

that we have debat-

ed the CSME for too long and
that it is time to make a deci-









SAT REVIEW FOR JUNE SOW
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'[.CALLILR/ GROSVENOR ACADEM

sion. He might be right but
who does he want to make the
decision?

he People of The

Bahamas elected him
and his colleagues to decide
on these matters. If the minis-
ter feels that the debate is fin-
ished, then he and his col-
leagues should go ahead and
decide.

We know that he wants to
join the CSME. Therefore, if
the government is not making
a decision, it must be that his
colleagues have not made up
their minds. ;

Perhaps Mr Mitchell now
needs the FNM and the
Bahamian public to help
persuade his colleagues to do
so.

If this is so, he will need to
find another way. As far as I
know, the FNM’s position on
the matter is clear and the
Bahamian public has not been

convinced?to this date by Mr.

Mitchell that they should join
the CSME.

Perhaps it would have been
easier to convince the public if
Mr Mitchell and his colleagues

did not muddy the water on ©

trade matters with half-truths,
innuendos and misinformation
while seeking to win the

government in the last elec- .

tion.
It will take a lot of work to
make these waters clear.

THOUGHT
FOR THE WEEK

Look where I stand today, it
is much. different because of
where I sit.






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Tribune Freeport Reporter _

FREEPORT - JOINT US-

Bahamas initiatives against illegal. .

narcotics and migrant smuggling
have been very beneficial to both

countries said US. Ambassador ..
‘| John Rood.

Reporting a 10 per cent decline
in drug trafficking from the
Bahamas to the United States, Mr
Rood said the $30 million OPBAT
co-operative counter-drug effort
has resulted in the seizures of tons
of cocaine and marijuana each
year.

He also pointed to the thou-

sands of illegal immigrants appre-
hended in joint operations in 2004.

Mr Rood stressed the impor-
tance of staying ahead of smug-

gler.activities by acquiring more. .

sophisticated equipment to detect
well concealed drugs or migrants

and better. radar:to detect-boats -

and air

He reported that the co-opera-
tive efforts of the US Coast Guard
and the Defence Force has been
successful ‘in the interdiction of
over 5,000 illegal migrants at sea
last year.

Ambassador Rood said the US
and the Bahamas also share a good
working relationship with law

enforcement on anti-terrorism.
“We are aware of the devasta-
tion that would occur if there were
a terrorist attack in the Bahamas
and the implication of that.
“We have worked with Bahami-
ans on identifying potential risks
and evaluating what security is nec-

essary and what is in place. And |

the container port is an area that

we worked together really closely .

on,” he said.

During his visit to Grand
Bahama, the Ambassador read to
students at the Walter Parker Pri-
mary School. He also presented a
$1,000 certificate to the principal
for the purchase of books.

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005 THE TRIBUNE






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CARMICHAEL CONSTITUENCY NOTICE
THE monthly meeting of the Carmichael branch of the
Progressive Liberal Party will be held on Tuesday, April
19 at 7pm at the Gerald Cash primary school. The topic to
be discussed will be the Caribbean Single Market and
Economy (CSME). There will be a special guest speaker
j : -at the meeting. Member of parliament for Carmichael
| aoe 3 Ses John Carey will be in attendance. Chairman Andrew
FonceninnmaietnnenntnT TT oe ag Knowles will chair the meeting. Refreshments will be
: served.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
funwalk@atlantichouse.com.bs

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THE TRIBUNE . THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 11

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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



industry fears

FROM page one

He said that the Associa-
tion is “deeply concerned”

with the implementation
timetable and feels that
there is not sufficient time
until December “to devel-

you shop * we ship « ‘you

opment an awareness (of the

new regulation) in the trav-
elling public, wholesalers
and other businesses.”

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& the Cancer Society of The Bahamas
invite you to join us on our
: “All Together Better” fun walk.

An “All Together Better”
way to start the day!

THE EVENT BEGINS AT 6.30A.M.

President of the Florida-
Caribbean Cruise Associa-
tion Michelle Page said that
the deadline set for the
Caribbean region is “crimi-
nal.”

“It is outrageous and dis-
respectful towards the
Caribbean, they give Mexico
until 2008, but only give the
Caribbean a few months to
adjust and prepare,” she
said.

Mrs Page pointed out that
only 14-15 per cent of
Americans are in possession
of a valid passport, “and
that there is no way for the
other 85 per cent to apply
for and receive passports
until December.”

“This will have serious
consequences for the econ-
omy, I don’t know if the US
State Department plans to
write a cheque to the gov-
ernment of the Bahamas to
compensate for lost rev-
enues and help feed their
people, because money and
jobs will be lost,” she said.

Mr Comito explained that
a large number of Ameri-
cans visiting the Bahamas
are ‘impulse travellers’,
“often from Florida,” who
do not possess a passport.

“Another sizable group
without passports are those

THE ROUTE commences from MONTAGU BEACH then WEST on
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The event dedicated email address is funwalk@atlantichouse.com.bs
Freeport Fun Walk - April 30th,2005

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FOR ADDITIONAL ENTRIES DUPLICATE THIS FORM.

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Personal & Business Insurance: Group Pensions: Group Medical: Life Assurance & Investments



attending conferences and
have made travel arrange-
ments many months in
advance,” he said.

Mr Comito said that the
tourism industry needs
“adequate time” to prepare
for the new regulations.

“While we understand the
reasoning behind the ruling
and certainly do not want to
compromise the security and
safety of our respective
nations and the travelling
public, the implementation
timetable presents the
industry and the Bahamas
with a huge challenge,” he
said.

A spokesman for Atlantis
said that they also support
“the effort of the US gov-
ernment to strengthen and
improve the security of its
borders.

“However we believe that
the requirement that the
new measures be imple-
mented as soon as January
2006 will be extremely
onerous for consumers from
our largest market.”

Atlantis further said in its
statement that “with over 90
per cent of our overall busi-
ness from the United States
the current timing does not
allow for a thorough com-
munications programme
which may very well result
in a severe and detrimental
impact on the Bahamas’
tourism industry next year.”
~“-We-would-prefer more
time.to allow US visitors to

comply with the require- .

ments, by allowing a similar
timeline to that proposed
for Mexico and Canada,
which is January 2008,” the
Atlantis spokesman said.
Mr Comito said that the

Hotel Association has
already made requests to
both the US Ambassador
John Rood and the Minis-
ter of Foreign Affairs Fred
Mitchell to extend the dead-
line to 2008.

“We are asking them to
give the Bahamas the same
courtesy they are giving
Mexico and Canada,” he
said.

Chief Political, Economic
and Public Relations Offi-
cer with the US Embassy
Michael Taylor explained
that the 2006 deadline
affects the . Caribbean
region, Central and South
America, “with Canada and
Mexico being phased in at a
later point in time, simply
because of the high volume
of traffic, especially across
land boarders.”

Mr Taylor said that “every
effort” is being made to
inform US citizens of the
change in policy, including
a “year-long outreach pro-
gramme focused on getting
this information out there,
especially informing tour
companies, cruise lines and
airlines.

The US Passport Office is
further increasing its staff
by approximately 50 per
cent to deal with the antici-
pated number of applica-
tions, he said.

Mr Taylor added that
although the information
campaign will be mainly

' directed at Americans inside

the US, “the US Embassy is
also committed to inform-
ing US citizens residing in
the Bahamas, to urge them

- to submit their applications

in a timely fashion and not
wait right up until deadline.”

QUIZNOS SUB

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A rapidly expanding fast food entity is seeking the
services of a General Manager for its Freeport, Grand

Bahama operation:

The successful candidate should have:

- Some experience in Restaurant Management.

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- Be willing to train abroad and to develop and
implement employee training programmes.

Strong supervisory and motivational skills are essential.

Applications may be sent to:

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P.O. Box F-2468, Freeport, Grand Bahama

or

P.O. Box N-4066, Nassau, Bahamas

HARBOUR BAY
(242) 394 5767







THE TRIBUNE



from

official

FROM page one

contributions the officers,
with two years experience,
made in that period of time,
that the officer with 17 years
in one rank did not make,”
stated the editorial.

According to the Royal
Bahamas Police Staff Asso-
ciation Act, 1997, part II
“Constitution and Adminis-
tration”, outlines certain
matters, such as welfare and
pay, that members of the
association are able to bring
to the commissioner’s notice.

However, bringing mat-
ters related to promotion is
not allowed, according to the
act.

The act states: “The
objects of the association
shall be to enable members
of the association to consid-
er and bring to the notice of
the commissioner matters
affecting their welfare and
efficiency, including pay,
pensions and conditions of
service, other than matters
relating to discipline and
promotion affecting individ-
ual members of the force.”

In an interview with The
Tribune yesterday, the issue
of Mr Sands breaching the
rules by speaking out on the
recent promotions was
brought up to Commissioner
of Police Paul Farquharson.

“It is laid down in black
and white,” Mr Farquharson
replied. “Whatever you see
in the staff association’s act,
that is what everybody
should abide by.”

He added: “What Mr
Sands said, I would not wish
to add any credence to. The
promotion board has done
its job and every officer is
entitled to that promotion.
I think everyone in the coun-
try should be elated and cel-
ebrate with these officers
who are long overdue for
promotion.”









FROM page one

that a meeting on Monday night
had been sabotaged by pro-
Romora agitators.

And he denied that a vocal
drunk had been “fuelled up”
by others to cause disruption.

Mr Grant told The Tribune:
“I was at the meeting and of
the 200 people there about 175
were in favour of the Romora
Bay development.

“Some people were outspo-
ken, but I deny there was a
drunk there. Whoever says that
is telling a lie.

“The place was full and some
were standing outside. But
those who are against this pro-
ject were heavily outnumbered
and most were winter residents.

“If this was something where
they could make money, they
would have been for it. But
Romora Bay is going to take
business away from some of
them. They are motivated by
self-interest.”

Mr Grant said some foreign
home-owners make between
$4,000 and $12,000 a week from
their island homes. In a 40-
week season, they:could clear at
least $160,000 a year.

“We are talking about people
who, in some cases, are on Har-
bour Island for only two weeks
a year. The rest of the time
their property is making money
which goes straight out of the
country.”

Mr Grant also accused organ-
isers of Monday’s meeting of

_ not inviting black Bahamians

along, adding that both
Bahamian “chairpersons”,
Ithalia Johnson and Ann
Sawyer, were reading material
prepared for them by other
people.



LOCAL NEWS

He said most Bahamian resi-
dents were in favour of the
Romora Bay expansion project
because it would bring more
work.

The protesters, however,
were mostly people who came
to Harbour Island during the
winter and brought everything
with them except milk and
fresh vegetables.

“They spend a little some-
thing, but they don’t spend
what they should,” he said.
“Most of these winter residents
are investors who have their
own golf carts to rent and earn
plenty money from home
rentals.”

If Romora Bay adds more
yacht accommodation, Harbour
Island’s young men would be
able to earn up to $300 a day
cleaning boats, said Mr Grant.

Predicting a prosperous
future for Harbour Island, Mr
Grant said property prices had
risen by 200 per cent or more in
the last ten years.

Some homes that were for
sale at $60,000 in 1995 are now
worth $1 million.

“Harbour Island is providing
work for 700 people from
Eleuthera,” he said, “In fact,
our island helps Eleuthera to
survive.

“The protesters are a small
minority who are doing this to
protect their own interests. You
could not find three of them
who were born in Harbour
IsIand, and you would not find
ten who are Bahamians.”

Of Monday’s meeting, he
said: “I don’t think it was a
rowdy meeting. It was only
rowdy for those who don’t go
to meetings. As far as I was
concerned, this was just a
straightforward meeting.”

Dismissing suggestions that

Sri
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Hosanna Baptist Church
Baptist Convention Headquarters
Baillou Hill Road

>

Cordially invite you
to celebrate the

Church's Second

Anniversary

Under the theme:
‘It's a Revived Church”

Acts 1:8

By participating and sharing in the
following activities:

Prayer Breakfast

Saturday, April 16, 2005
SuperClubs Breezes at 7:30 a.m.

Worship Service

Sunday, April 17, 2005 1

at 8:00 a.m.



| CALLILR/ GROSVENOR ACADE! Y 32.

Rev, Dr. Duily Kiang
Pastor

Rev, Dr. Elkin Symonette, Pastor
Ebenezer Mission Baptist Church

Rev. Dr. Roslyn Astwood, Pastor |

St. Steven's Baptist church

Rev. Dr. Everette Brown, Pasto
New Bethlehem Baptist church

Rev. Ellington Ferguson

bor Full Gospel Baptist Churc’

the dispute was tearing the
community apart, he added: “If
we can’t row, there is no point
in having a meeting. I think
Harbour Island is the best place
in the Bahamas and the rela-
tionship is good between the
Bahamian and foreign commu-
nities.

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 13 13

raeee Businessman hits back at protesters

“Winter residents have a
right to say what they think,
but I don’t think they have an
equal right with Bahamians
who were born on the island.”

Although he thinks Harbour
Island can continue to develop
for a long time, Mr Grant feels
the government should pay






more attention to its infra-
structure.

He also believes the problem
of illegal Haitian immigrants
needs to be tackled.

“We don’t have a customs or

- immigration officer. The gov-

ernment needs to give us more
funds,” he said.

RESTAURANT MANAGERS
AND ASSISTANT MANAGERS

The successful applicant must have at least three (3)
years experience in Food and Beverage operations,
fast food preferably.

Must possess good leadership and interpersonal skills.

Must have good written and oral communication skills.

Must be able to implement and maintain company
standards and procedures.

Must be self motivated.

Must be able to work flexible hours, including late
nights, weekends and holidays.

INTERESTED PERSONS SHOULD
SEND RESUME WITH LETTER OF

REFERENCE TO: |
#12 Bradley Street, Palmdale,
‘P.O. Box N-8425, Nassau, Bahamas,
. or Tel: 322-586516, oS

British American Insurance Company

of The Bahamas Limited would like to

announce that the following person

‘no longer works for the company and

is not authorized to transact any

business on our behalf.

Shorn Williams

Celebration Services 6h RAR BRITISH
Monday, April 18, 2005 thru Wednesday,
Apn20 2005 at 7. 0 p. i Established 1920 AMERICAN

Rev. Cedric Smith, Pastor
Mt Sinai Full Gospel Baptist Churc'
Stuart Manor, Exuma

A strong link in your financial future

Telephone: (242) 461-1000
Fax: (242) 361-2424





PAGE 14, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

























This superb assemblage
| instructed for final
auction disposal,
significant Bank
securities ordered for
compulsory sale in
Xercise of lien against
substantial unpaid loan,
TEL Milena Mr eS
for lavish interior
design projects
MU LaToleiIN=t¢cte mele Le, ar0) a
NoCArcIO MULTI AC Lae
comparably

distinguished, precious -
and unusual properties

required for immediate

unavoidable clearance —

by private and corporate
‘owners concerned - the
collection selected &
Colao ice oval cea
jotable relevance to |
RET LS
connoisseur market

DOE Cia Tie
‘Checks, Major Credit Cards ©

f @ 15% Freight and Handling
Charges to be added to each
Rais

Keene Customs se



eA ee

AFTER four long and hard
years of trying, Queen’s Col-
lege has finally won the Nation-
al Speech and Debate competi-

. tion organised by the Rotary
clubs of New Providence and
Abaco.

The Model United Nations
Session (MUNS) was held at
the Radisson Hotel at Cable
Beach on Monday, March 14,

@ THE proud team poses
with their trophies and
certificates. From left: Arielle
Higgs, Yasmin Andrews,
Michael Wing, Caroline Hale
and Tajh Ferguson.

and included schools from all
over the Bahamas.

“MUNS is a great opportu-
nity for students to find out
about the workings of the Unit-
ed Nations and the difficulties
of international relations in
understanding the different
views of countries with very dif-
ferent political systems, reli-
gious views and ideologies,”
said a school spokesman.

“Much credit has to be given
to the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs who support the Rotary
clubs in making this competi-
tion happen on an annual basis,
and for giving the young people

THE TRIBUNE

Students to go on trip to
New York after winning
Rotary competition



of the Bahamas these opportu-
“nities,” he added.

At previous debates the
Queen’s College team has
enjoyed representing Libya and
discussing international law on
terrorism, China in debating dis-
armament of weapons of mass
destruction, and came second
last year when representing
Uganda in the struggle to make
sure the international commu-
nity achieves the millennium
development goals by 2015.

This year, QC played the role
of Rumania debating the place
of unilateralism at the UN.

“This: was a very interesting
debate and whilst many coun=
tries were concerned about
America’s recent activities
regarding the war on Iraq,
Rumania had an exciting view
of being more concerned by the
slowness of the United Nations
‘organisation to make decisions
and was keen to stress the
need for staying focused on
achieving goals and taking deci-

@

, Construction .
* Equipment *

_§ Seissor Lifts °

sive action when it was neces-
sary,” said the spokesman.
Queen’s College said it is very
proud of teacher'adviser Mike
Wing and the debate team,
which consisted ofigrade 12 stu-
dent Yasmin Andrews, who
gave the rebuttal; Arielle Higgs,
from grade 11, who was 'the
main speaker; Tajh Ferguson
and Caroline Hale, from grade
11 and 10 respectively, who
were the chief researchers and
led the caucus to gain support

for their country’s views.

Trip

Asa result of winning this
year’s competition, the t¢éam
will be jetting off to New Yjork
later this year to attend an offi-
cial UN meeting with Minister ,
Fred Mitchell, as guests of. the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

“Congratulations to this team
on a superb performance, and
well done to all competing
schools,” said the spokesman.




Afspmo





\



A ree network ei rot mace ers
sand Meg leading as

x Pobcat

Ca

ahamas:

Wersatilin: —*

Crawford St.

Tels 323-5171



ey RTE RAM EA tein

eae

Onkes Field
TB areas aes ed)

py Pe eat i ee cian merit C ea

selected specifically for discerning Bahamas market

e sold:mainly under pressurised disposal instructions"
offering exceptional acquisition opportun

High Value, Finest Quality Luxurious Decorative One-of-a-Kind
All 100% Guaranteed Authentic Genuine & Handknotted

CONNOISSEUR & DECORATIVE PERSIAN & EASTERN CARPETS»

Due to the critical status effecting the majority of entries in this auction,
more than 65% of the Lots will be sold ENTIRELY WITHOUT RESERVE

The auction collection includes many outstanding silk and part silk
Investment Category examples, large and very large room-sized
decorative carpets, unusual & striking village and nomad items, and

/ an excellent selection of runners and corridors.

Rug and carpet sizes from small scatter to over 14’ x 10’, runner sizes
from standard hallway lengths in various widths
up to a magnificent 15’8 x 2°7'

All Lots to be sold piece-by-piece in a single auction session on

SUNDAY APRIL 17 ONLY
AUCTION AT5 PM ON VIEW FROM 4 PM -
BRITISH COLONIAL HILTON HOTEL

Numiber One Bay Street, Nassau

eC TS ee Ta) Mee EU le Sie te a rence iret recta :
Parle 2) 323 4535~ Fax: a 323. xy)





Yate

TATAT

ete ate tehac ater at ata

ALRTAT A ATA aT AT ATA A ATA at AAT &

wavavetaratacat

aTatate ates a ata?

PAGE 15. THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

Se uu cee



Promotion ends April 23, 2005. Some restrictions appl



Hee eae

Old Trail Road © Mon-Sat: 8am-9pm



© Sun: 7am-12noon



THE TRIBUNE

Adrian Saunders - Winners of the
TMMINUTE Shopping Spree
__is pictured with Dino Duncombe.

fae

ity



-R Marketing Manager Leah Davis,

2 minute spree winner Deborah Johnson,
"Customer Service Manager Glenn Francis &
"husband Cyril Johnson. :



YOU CAN HAVE IT ALL!





PAGE 16, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005



Wedding belles
show off some
nuptial fashion




i THIS year’s Bridal Show

showed many wedding styles which

have been created and enhance.

The show this year felt as if it was

on Broadway, with a runway that
ran into the audience








Challenge
| regatta on
Saturday

THE Royal Bahamas
Defence will stage its 2nd
Annual Commander
Defence Force Challenge
| Cup Regatta onSaturday at
| the Montagu foreshores.
This event is being held in
















conjunction with the local
sailing clubs, the Bahamas
Boat Owners Sailing Asso-
ciation and the Common-
wealth Sailing Association .

Activities kick off with a
special challenge “C” Class
race at 10am. Twelve boats
will compete for the top
prize in the Sunfish races,
which will start at noon.

Defending Champ in the
“C” Class, Good Night
Irene, skippered by Clyde
Rolle, will be out to defend
her title, when the first of
three series races starts at
2pm. A total of 13 boats are
expected to compete for the
“C”- Class title.

There will be a bouncing
castle for the children and
games, including whist and
dominoes.










| The Tribune wants to hear
| from people who are

| making news in their

f neighbourhoods. Perhaps
} you are raising funds for a
| good cause, campaigning

; for improvements in the

j area or have wonan —

4 award.

| If so, call us on 322-1986

! and share your story.





@ A NEW trend in
wedding attire says it’s
okay for men in the
bridal party to wear
jeans




& THE bridal party can
wear simple tops and
jeans if it is a garden
wedding, especially in
spring

(Photos: Mario Duncanson)

Julie Adderley: -MclIntosh
DRT Life Memb

05 Area Chair,
IDRT International
embership:



Ison Smith

ArT ACT

THE TRIBUNE
























in numbers
Family Guardian congratulates the ten
outstanding members of the company’s

Financial Services Division who qualified for
the 2005 Million Dollar Round Table (MDRT).

The premier association of financial
professionals, MDRT membership

is an exclusive honour achieved only by

a small percentage of all life insurance
and financial services advisors worldwide.

MDRT membership is recognized as _
the international standard of sales excellence

in the life insurance industry.

MDRT is an international, independent association
of more than 29,000 of the world’s best life
insurance and financial services professionals
from more than 76 nations and territories.







INSURANCE
COMPANY





ee ye ey ey ee

[HE TRIBUNE



Every Woman, Every Occasion.

s
¢



Palmdale - Madiera St. - Mall at Marath



PAGE 18, THURSDAY, APRIL 14,2005.

LOCAL NEWS



- THE TRIBUNE





@ ABOUT 20 per cent of the white-crowned pigeons (above) breeding in Florida remain there
year-round, but the rest migrate to Caribbean islands for the winter, including the Bahamas.

i

d Optimist sailin ,
& Dominoes _

_ j2 Featuring Lae
arrant Officers and Senior Rates —

i dE a
Pa a
a
eon)

Trackin

FOR thousands of years the
Bahamas has attracted many
species of migratory birds that
spend the winter months here
or simply stop en route to more
southerly destinations. Two
research ecologists, Ken Meyer
and Gina Zimmerman of the
Avian Research and Conserva-
tion Institute in Gainesville,
Florida, visited the Bahamas in
late February in search of
migratory white-crowned
Pigeons that they had fitted with
radio-transmitters in the Florida
Keys. Their project, which has
captured and radio tagged 85



down

Research ecologists
search in Bahamas



pigeons over the last three nest-
ing seasons, is answering ques-
tions about the birds’ migration,
habitat needs, and survival.
About 20 per cent of the white-
crowned pigeons breeding in
Florida remain there year-

round, but the rest migrate to

‘Caribbean islands for the win-

ter, including the Bahamas.
Meyer and Zimmerman bor-
rowed a small plane donated to
the cause by local businessman
and the owner of Tile King



“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 19





the migratory w hite- crowned pigeon

Enterprises. Mark Roberts’
Cessna was used to scan for the
radio signals of their birds to
get an idea of the percentage
of Florida’s white-crowned
Pigeons that winter here. Mey-
er and Zimmerman also spent
time on the ground to see what
the pigeons are eating and what
habitats they occupy during the
winter. Meetings with Bahami-
an biologists and conservation-
ists helped them learn more
about the biology of Florida’s
migrants as well as the popula-
tion that remains in the islands
all year.

The white-crowned Pigeon
inhabits the islands and coastal
margins of the Caribbean. Local
populations have suffered from
hunting and the loss of critical
habitats, with some islands
experiencing severe declines.
Although relatively numerous
in the Bahamas, the population
of white-crowned Pigeons is at
risk in the United States
because it is very small, geo-
graphically limited to southern
Florida, dependent on an
increasingly rare and vulnera-
ble plant community for food,
migratory and exposed to heavy
legal and illegal hunting pres-
sure when wintering in the
Caribbean. Florida’s breeding
population is estimated at 7,500
pairs. The species is state-list-
ed as “threatened” in Florida
and has been under considera-
tion for the equivalent federal
listing by the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service.

Significant

Meyer and Zimmerman have
been organising an internation-
al workshop to bring together
ecologists and conservationists
from the Caribbean Islands with
significant populations of white-
crowned Pigeons. The goal of
this meeting will be to gather
all available information on the
population’s distribution, abun-
dance, status and trends and to
identify ways to address threats,
conservation needs and policy

resolutions to national govern-.

ments that would ensure the
long-term survival of white-
crowned Pigeons over their
entire range. This will be the
first attempt to review the status
and management needs of the
white-crowned Pigeon since a
1974 meeting organised by the
Bahamas National Trust
(BNT). Prior to arriving, Meyer
and Zimmerman had commu-
nicated with Eric Carey and
Tony White of BNT seeking
representatives from the
Bahamas for the Florida meet-
ing. Carey and White were
helpful in recommending a
Strategy for their trip and pro-
viding sound advice on logis-
tics.

While in the Bahamas, Mey-
er and Zimmerman were able
to meet with Paul Dean, Lee
Hanna and Lionel Levine who
provided valuable information
on where white-crowned
pigeons nest, feed, winter and

are hunted. They also outlined
some of the conservation con-
cerns in the Bahamas. Based on
their suggestions of where
pigeons are concentrated this
time of year (Andros,
Eleuthera, and Green Cay),
Meyer and Zimmerman adjust-
ed their plans to cover those
areas thoroughly.

During their brief but pro-
ductive travels through the
Bahamas, they spent 13 hours
over a three-day period flying in
the donated Cessna 172.

They outfitted the plane with
strut-mounted radio antennas
to listen for the unique fre-,

quencies of 64 radio- -tagged *

VHF radio transmitters that
might still have been operating
(the transmitters, which are
attached with a harness like a
small backpack, have. batteries
that last about 17 months).
Based in Nassau, their aerial
searches ultimately covered
New Providence Island, the
Berry Islands, Andros, Green
Cay, the Exuma Cays, northern
Long Island, Cat Isiand and
Eleuthera. ©.

“We had no idea how many
radio-tagged birds we would
locate, or which islands they
would be on.

“We felt that any data would
be helpful, whether we found
one, ten, or even no radio-
tagged birds,” said Meyer.’

They did, in fact, find what
they were searching for - thrée




of the 64 birds they had held
and carefully fitted with trans-
mitters in Florida. One of these
birds was just northeast of the
Nassau airport, probably near
The Caves. ©

“It was amazing that within
five minutes of take off; we
heard one of the radio-tagged
birds from the Florida Keys. We
had high hopes that we would
be hearing more of them in the
next three days,” said Zimmer-
man.

Shoreline

jf The other two detected

pigeons were on South Andros
in the Kemps Bay area, within a
mile of the shoreline. After
hearing these two birds, Meyer
and Zimmerman spent the sec-
ond half of their trip on the
island trying to get a look at the
habitat and fruiting trees in the
area, hoping all the time to
catch a glimpse of the white-
crowned pigeons they had last
seen eight months before.
From the ground, they were
able to hear the birds’ radio sig-
nals, but the pigeons’ wary and
secretive nature kept them from
view.

“We learned a lot of valuable

information from the few birds

we heard in the Bahamas. Most
importantly, we got to see what

conditions and foraging oppor- -
_ tunities white-crowned pigeons

have on Andros,” Meyer said.
The habitat used by the

criticises Cuba's
ecord on abuses

ee

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

iv etenm ©"

pigeons on South Andros Island
consisted of thick, expansive
hardwood forest characterised
by its production of an array of
seasonal fruit — an excellent
source, of food for the white-
crowned pigeon and many.oth-
er species of resident and
migrant birds.

Trees that were fruiting at the
time of Meyer and Zimmer-
man’s’ fieldwork were
Kamalame (gumbo limbo), poi-
sonwood, coco plum and but-
tonwood.

How much of this habitat
remains on the islands occupied
by white-crowned pigeons?
How does the Caribbean’s
pigeon population distribute
itself in the winter, and which













areas critical to their survival
are most threatened? What are
the potential long-term impacts
of the various degrees of hunt-
ing pressure experienced by this
highly mobile species over its

_entire geographic range and

annual cycle? These are the
types of questions the Florida
biologists hope to see addressed
over the next few years.

e
Uncertain
The white-crowned pigeon
occupies many Caribbean
nations, and the population’s
reduced size and uncertain
future draws international con-

cern. Avian Research and Con;
servation Institute hopés to

Queer eey RAL te

HAM RIO MS ee

~ (DURING their travels
through the Bahamas, the team
spent 13 hours over a three-day
period flying in the donated
Cessna 172. This was their view
over South Andros.



facilitate sharing of information,
~ collaboration among Caribbean

biologists, and. training where
needed to craft a conservation
strategy that will protect these
birds and their habitats for the
future. !
Although this first trip to the

‘Bahamas was brief, ARCI’s

biologists learned a great deal
thanks to the cooperation and
support they received.

Meyer and Zimmerman plan
to return for further study in
the fall, when their study sub-
jects from Florida (including 50
pigeons newly tagged this com-
ing summer) once again to
make their long and risky over-
water journey to winter in the
Bahamas.



RCA Store

Rosetta Street Palmdale
(24:2) 322.4001
Hours: Monday - Saturday 8:30am -

5:30pm

GREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
SEE STORE FOR DETAILS

ese saASASAASEANASSSSANUAANSANS ASSASSINS



PAGE 20, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

THE TRIBUNE.



Atlantis staff give home for the

STAFF from Atlantis have
adopted the A&A Comfort
Home for the Elderly in
Pinewood Gardens.

A team of workers made up
of managers and line staff from
the housekeeping and public
areas departments went to the
home, which houses 18 persons,
to perform a number of tasks
on March 15 and 16.

On the first day, Atlantis
employees pressure cleaned the
building, which is comprised of
three bedrooms, a kitchen, a
sitting area, and administration
office. This took approximately
four hours to complete.

Following the pressure clean- °

ing, the windows, rooms and
beds were given a thorough
clean-up.

The volunteers spent the
remainder of the day sealing
cracks found on the corners of
the boxing around the building
and painting the exterior of the
home.

On the second day, the bed-
rooms, hallway, door and win-
dow frames and the front porch
were painted.

Company

In the process of completing
all this vigorous work, Atlantis’
employees still found time to
chitchat with the residents of
the home.

Bridgette Outten, assistant

manager in the Royal Towers .

housekeeping department, said:
“The employees were very

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27, 2005.

TENDER NOTICE

COURIER SERVICE

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. is
pleased to invite suitably qualified companies to tender
for Courier Services.

Interested companies can pick up a specification
- document from BTC’s administration building on John

F. Kennedy Drive, between. the hours of 9:00am to
~ 5pm Monday through Friday.

Tender must be sealed in an envelope marked “Tender
for Courier Services” and delivered to the attention

Mr. Michael J. Symonette
| President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunication Company Ltd

P.O.Box N-3048

Nassau, Bahamas

Bids should reach th company’s administrative office
on John F. Kenedy Drive by 5pm on Wednesday, April

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.

excited to participate in this pro-
gramme, which is actually apart
of the goals for our department.
We had a choice of working
with the elderly or some young
people and decided to go ahead
with the elderly in the commu-
nity.”

Atlantis’ housekeeping and
public areas management team
also presented Esther Bain, pro-
prietor of the home, with food
items, blankets, and toiletries.

Ms Bain, who is also a regis-
tered nurse, said: “They did a
marvellous job... They gave the
place a face-lift and everything
looks so bright.”

Atlantis team members plan
to visit the home again later this
month. Their next project will
include providing the home with
a covered porch, with screens
on all sides, along with patio
chairs and tables.

A&A was established in 1997
and has a Staff of six that main-
tain 24-hour service. The home
also caters to daycare and vaca-
tion clients.

elderly a good spring clean




























@ ABOVE: Pictured are
Ephegena Burrows, space:
cleaner; Sharon Stubbs,
housekeeping manager; and
Desmond Conyers,
houseman.

@ LEFT: Atlantis’ Royal |"
Towers housekeeping and —
public areas departments . ©
reach out to the elderly.
Pictured from left to right are:
Anita Williams, housekeeping
‘manager; registered nurse -
Esther Bain, owner and
operator of A&A Comfort
Home for the Elderly; and
“Yvette Cummings,
housekeeping co-ordinator

‘

hp: Sweeting!

S

"SHOES FOR ALL WALKS OF LIFE" -

Located in the Madeira Shopping Plaza

We apologize for the
inconvenience while we renovate
to serve you better. Our entrance
has moved to the Plaza side next

to Shayne’s.

Thank you for shopping at
The Shoe Village and please visit
our other locations.

Marathon Mall
Opposite B.E.C.
393-6113

RND Plaza
Freeport
351-3274

Madeira Shopping
Plaza
328-0703



THE TRIBUNE







99¢ SALE



DELMAR THRIFTY MAID ECKRICH FLORIDA
FLAKE TUNA||CORNED | | CHICKEN VIENNA NATURAL APPLE
IN WATER BEEF SAUSAGE JUICE COCKTAIL
G6-oz 12-0o0Z S- oz 411.5 - oz
2/.99¢|| ._Y9YVa 2/.99¢
99¢ SALE | 99¢ SALE 9 99¢ SALE [J 99¢ SALE i 99¢ SALE






3-02

5/.99¢



RED APPLES







HOT HOUSE
3-LB BAG EACH
Ss 4 2392 $ 4 49

PLUMS RED CABBAGE
AND BLACK GREEN

EACH

$499 59a

GLOBEGRAPES “WHITE S.LB
aoe = ko



SY
WINN - DIXIE.

KERRY GOLD
BUTTER REG& SLICE CHEESE
UNSALTED
2/$469 _ $2979
NASSAU ONLY PILLSBURY

TAMPICO ASSTD PUNCHES moras Sct

Ba 2 ae ee





PEPPERIDGE

FARM LAYER cont ON THE HE COB

CAKES ASST $999
S$ z 9 ; 16 - EAR
. PILSBURY
WINN - DIXIE TOASTER STRUDELS

ICE CREAM CINAMON, STRAWBERRY,

SANDWICH BLUEBERRY, ey & CHERRY

F<. $372 11.5 - OZ

CAMPBELLS

CHICKEN NOODLE & |

HUGGIES |
ULTRA TRIM,
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24,28,34,40

VEGETABLE SOUP

10-02

-<29C¢)|
POWER BUYS
CADBURY








POWER BUYS
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BREEZE, FLORAL,
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QUAKER








STORE MON. - SAT.: 7:30AM - 9:00P |
HOURS: SUN.: 7:00AM - 12:00PM ¢ 7:00AM - 2:00PM CABLE BEACH &

99¢ SALE

THRIFTY MAID WINN DIXIE TM peualerv ec coun
RAMEN NOODLES PLAIN & TM HAND a CORLL clicaoe
ASST’D FLAVOURS| | !ODIZED SALT TOWELS & CUT BEETS







RED SEEDLESS& .POTATOES





CLOROX . acne s GAIN
BLE ACH TISSUE LIQUID
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POWER BUYS POWER BUYS POWER BUYS
CH TE HEARTY LOAF | | _ FABRUC
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$499 2/$ 4 89) | 2/$300

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 21

, ur wa te SAV.A.CHEK ‘Extra-Special’: on each item you purchase, over |
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15-02







CHICKEN TURKEY MADISON |

DUNSTAS| nts | FRANKS

120Z - EACH |] |



|SNACKS _
ASSORTED 1.7-0z wiewiceaiewen
| CHEF BOY ARDEE
SPAGHETTI &
MEATBALLS is - 02 w.ss000 abaneeee
KOOLAID .




























PIES ASSORTED 11.5 - OZ saunas — " clr. BONE IN suis WLES TWIN PACK |
KOOLAID WUTTON | CHVOLROST. | GAME HENS

JAMMERS VARIETY |
JUICES 6.75 - 02 sscseesensenaennennnonane
SUNCY
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PAGE 22, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005 THE TRIBUNE
INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Bid to toughen marine pollution standards
as cruise ships aim to clean up their act





“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”
CA-TMaAlUall POLICE

director pleads guilty

e- «

mn

ares o@e of



POSITION: Development Conshucton Manager
REPORTS TO: Vice President of peas

I cE N D ER | O [( \ ESSENTIAL FUNCTION: . :
Plans, directs, and coordinates activities of designated projects to ensure that goals and ablectives of

’ the development are accomplished within prescribed time frame and funding parameters by perform-
ing the following duties personally or through subordinate.supervisors. Manage the construction of
assigned project site improvements including amenities on-site and off-site infrastructure construction.

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd., DUTIES & RESPONSIBLITIES:
° ° ° 8 ° E] Manage and assist the design team in reviewing construction plans, suggesting cost and time
see to ae ea for oS ee ean ot - saving methods, and improving construction coordination and equipment ufilization.
ustomer vervice bullding In simms, Long Island.

EI Manage and assist the design team in expediting subdivision approvals and other permits.

Inter ested companies may collect a tender specification El Prepare field reports, status reports, Redcat reports, construction schedules and other information
from the office of the Vice President/Planning & ee :

Engineering i in BIC’ S administrative building on John _EIAssist in the bidding and negotiation of construction contracts with general contractors.

F ° Kennedy Drive or at BTC’ S Office i In Deadman’ S Cay, &] Administer the construction contracts and changes thereto, protecting Project's interest at all times.

Long Island, between the hours of 9:00 am and 5:00
pm, Monday through Friday.

| Establish good working relationships with governmental inspectors, the design feam and general
contractors.

{J} Monitor civil construction costs during construction and suggest ways fo avoid unnecessary costs.

Tenders are to. be in a sealed envelope marked
“TENDER FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE BUILDING” and f Provide construction quality control, through regular monitoring of construction.
deliver ed to the attention of: Gl Participate in meetings with developer and design team as requested.

[1 Establish work plan for staff and contractors

Mr. Michael J. Symonette |
President & CEO rs f Direct and coordinate activities of project personnel contractors to ensure project progresses on
Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited schedule and within prescribed budget.
John F. Kennedy Drive Review status reports prepared by project contractors and modifies schedules or plans as required.

Nassau, Bahamas

& Prepare project reports for owners, management, and others.

{41 Coordinate project activities with activities of government regulatory or other governmental
agencies.

All tenders must be received by 5:00 pm on Monday,
May 2, 2005. Tenders received after this date will not
be considered.

Douglas A Shipman
V.P. of Development, Discovery Land
Bakers Bay Golf and Ocean Club
Great Guana Cay, Bahamas
dshipman@discoverylandco.com

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.



Deadline for Receipt of Applications is April 27, 2005



‘
1
q
1



THE TRIBUNE

Reyes

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 23



Ministry of Tourism hosts “sc

ninth weather conference .-

A PANEL of experts on
hurrficanes and other weath-

.. @E eonditions met yesterday for ~

the start of the ninth annual
Bahamas Weather Conference.

Each year, the conference
agenda explores the nature
and tracking of tropical storms,
island safety procedures, hur-
ricane climatology, evacuation
logistics for the Bahamas and
US coastal areas, regional
geography and the role of the
media.

This year’s agenda will
include a special review of hur-
ricanes Frances and Jeanne
with a panel discussion of
impacts and media reporting;
predicted and observed storm
surge; emergency management
issues and a look at media cov-
erage of storms in light of the
expanded five-day forecast
track.

Dr Robert Sheets is leading
the panel, which includes Max
Mayfield, director of the US
National Hurricane Centre and
Dr William Gray of Colorado
State University in examining

varied aspects of hurricanes at.

' the ninth annual

The yearly gathering of
research and broadcast mete-
orologists, created by the Min-
istry of Tourism, will be on
until Sunday at the Atlantis
Paradise Island Resort.

| Speakers

The 2005 Bahamas Weath-
er Conference will feature
guest speakers from the
National Hurricane Centre,
Federal Emergency Manage-
ment Association (FEMA),
the Weather Channel, USA
Today and various regional
emergency management
offices.

Dr Sheets, a renowned hur-
ricane expert and former direc-
tor of the National Hurricane

Centre is acting as conference

facilitator.

More than 90. broadcasters:

Br
OAS



will be expecte

Officers.




Contact:

P. O. Box N-7768
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 325-0524

ANSBACHER

ANSBACHER (BAHAMAS

with regard to monitoring q
against agreed benchmarks.

* Assist with the preparation o
the setting of appropriate performance benchmarks.

Series 7 certification and evidence of contin
would be an advantage.

Human Resource mana
Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited

from major. market North
American television stations
are expected to benefit from

this impressive gathering of ©

hurricane authorities.

“We’re pleased that meteo-
rologists have taken to heart
our message of the Bahamas
being an expansive destination
that requires accurate'reporting
with great attention to geogra-
phy,” said Vincent Vander-
pool-Wallace, director gener-
al of the Ministry of Tourism.
“While The Bahamas is often
threatened, hurricanes rarely
strike or affect the entire coun-
try.”’.

) LIMITED

_ Ansbacher in The Bahamas invites applications from
qualified individuals for the position of:

INVESTMENT ADMINISTRATOR

The successful applicant will report to the Head of Investment Services and
to assist Trust Officers in fulfilling their fiduciary obligations
uoted investments and tracking their performance

Essential Required Attributes:

* Strong analytical skills

*» Understanding of basic investment management and capital markets

* Good communication skills, verbal and written

*» Team player with proven ability to contribute to the overall success of
investment risk management .

** Computer literate in Microsoft Office; particularly in the use of Excel
spreadsheets, Bloomberg proficiency and database skills.

f Trustee Investment Policy Statements and

Undertake investment performance reviews by sourcing relevant information
from trustees, valuations, internal and external managers and comparing
the results to the agreed benchmark and providing the results of such
reviews to the Head of Investments and the Trust Officers.

Ensure receipt of and collate quarterly performance and transactional
documentation from 3rd party investment managers.

Update and maintain client ledgers to reflect transactions over 3rd party
investment accounts.

Ensure that all 3rd party investment business activities are monitored in
accordance with Group policies and procedures.

Keep abreast of entire Ansbacher service offering,
the Head of Investments,

ger

give feedback and recommendations to Trust

ued professional development

a MINISTER of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe is interviewed at the conference

Many conference partici-
pants from local affiliates along
the eastern seaboard and
across the country will bring
the Bahamas to their
home audiences live via satel-
lite.

Millions of viewers of sta-
tions like WTVJ in Miami,
WMAR in Baltimore, WSOC
in Charlotte and WHDH in
Boston, will see their weather
forecast against the backdrop
of Bahamian sun and sand dur-
ing the conference.

“As the first Caribbean
nation to address hurricanes
directly, the, Bahamas, as well

iG


























and in conjunction with









as the meteorological com-

munity, has benefited greatly
_ from this respected annual

event,” Obie Wilchcombe,
Minister of Tourism said. _
By spearheading the ninth
annual Conference, the Min-
istry of Tourism seeks to min-
imise the impact of hurricanes
on visitors and residents who
travel to the Bahamas and the
Caribbean by encouraging the

dissemination of accurate and

timely information.

A secondary goal is to
emphasise the geography of
the Bahamas.

The conference will also pro- ;





mote and further the cause
of research on tropical weath-
er systems, hurricane crisis
management, building codes,
emergency and safety proce-
dures and the role of the
National Hurricane Centre and
other federal agencies.-
According to Alan Sealls,
co-chairman of the NWA’s

Broadcast Seal of Approval

Committee, the approach to
hurricane crisis communica-
tions is “in sync” with the
NWA’s mission to foster accu-

rate and timely weather fore- -

casting for the purpose of pub-
lic safety. he

S

il 16: 10am-:

and units are going fast
qualified buyers.” —

William Wong

~ ae se

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

broker/appraiser

~~ William Wong & Associates
real estate sales, rental, appraisals

Phone: 242-327-4271 © Fax: 242-327-4273

Cell: 242-457-0766
West Bay Street

P.O. Box SS-19981, Nassau, Bahamas
Email: williamwong@coralwave.com







PAGE 24, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

ANYA
ALLEN, Queen’s
College, poses
with Mis Raquel
Edgecombe,
Home Economics
teacher and
competition coach





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variety of Body, trim, and pick up box configurations no wonder its been the best selling full size pick up for
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that produces 231 HP, body colored bumpers and a long list of standard features, as you
can see, this Pick-Up is as unique as_you are.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE:
friendlymotorsbahamas.c





ANYA Allen, a highly cre-
ative ninth grade student of
Queen’s College was the win-
ner of the Junior National
Young Chef culinary scholar-
ship competition.

The competition is spon-
sored by the Ministry of Edu-
cation in conjunction with Asa
H Prichard Limited.

Anya’s road to success
began in her family and con-
sumer sciences education class,
where her teacher Mrs Edge-
combe announced the plans
for this year’s competition.

Anya would not only have
to win her school’s competi-

THE TRIBUNE

tion, but also place 1st or 2nd

at the’ New. Providence level.

in order to move on to the
national competition.”

After much deliberation,
‘she decided td,compete.

Work

Anya spent many hours
readjusting and practising her
recipes. Her hard work paid
off on Saturday, January 29,
when she won Queen’s Col-
lege’s Young Chef competi-
tion.

Then on Thursday, Febru-
ary 10, she won the New Prov-



- S
@ ANYA shares her proud moment with Mr Henry Knowles, Deputy Head



tion BVO. there
Finally on Monday, March

idence inter-island competi-

* 14, Anya won the National .

Young Chef competition...

Anya Said she is grateful for
the experience’ and thankful,
firstly’to:God, and then to her
parents Mr and Mrs Allen, her
teacher Mrs Edgecombe, chef
Michael Turner and to the
team of chefs from the Lyford
Cay Club.

Anya’s winning recipes were
her Junkanoo guava roll, and
her Bahamian calypso rice,
which won the competition’s
“best rice” award.



and Mrs Shawn Turnquest, Vice Principal of Queen’s College High School.



¢

@ ANYA Allen is being interviewed by Native Stew while her teacher,
Mrs Raquel Edgecombe and her mother, Mrs Sherry Allen look on.

, s Right Sa ee

, ‘Salmon R

we
” wn

Combine all ingredients.

Serves 4-6

2 cups Mahatma® Gold Rice, cooked

1 cup celery, sliced

1/2 cup green onions, sliced

1/2. cup sweet pickle relish
1 cup salad dressing
1/2 teaspoon black pepper

2 cans boneless pink salmon
{/2 cup red pepper, chopped

1/2 cup sliced almonds
1 cup frozen peas, thawed

Romaine lettuce or fresh spinach leaves
Lemon, sliced in rings for garnish

spinach leaves. Garnish with lemon rings.

oe!

THE NUMBER 0

Toss lightly. Chill. Serve on lettuce or:

Ta ee MMO Rr te Ue

Distributed by ASA H. PRITCHARD, LTD.

Robinson & Claridge Roads - Tel:



393-2437 |



a

‘release from JS Johnson.

THE TRIBUNE _..- THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 25

has the recipe for success







2 3/4 cups water ; Thyme
1 1/2 cups white rice Salt















2 cloves garlic, chopped Black pepper

1 large grouper fillet, cubed Garlic salt/powder
2 Lobster tails cubed Seasoning salt

1/2 small red bell pepper, diced Parsley flakes

Bring water to a boil. Add rice, reduce heat,
cover and cook over medium low heat until ten-
der; 15 to 20 minutes.

Heat skillet or large non-stick skillet over high
heat. Add ‘garlic to the pan. Add peppers and

1/2 small green bell pepper, diced
1/2 small yellow bell pepper, diced
1/2 small orange bell pepper, diced
1/2 cup native sweet potato

1/2 cup cassava onions to the pan and quick stir-fry veggies two
1/2 cup pumpkin minutes. Add ise to the pan See with
1/2 cup plantain veggies. Fry rice with veggies two or three min-
Cayenne pepper utes. Add grouper and lobster and stir fry one
1 goat pepper minute more, add thyme and seasonings, season

to taste. Then serve.

‘FAST ACTING, LONG LASTING



() Anya’s Guava Pineapple Roll

until batter is smooth. Pour in to pan, spread-
ing batter to corners.
‘1/3-cup water Bake 12:to 15 minutes or until wooden
1-teaspoon vanilla-extract pick or skewer inserted into centre comes
1 cup cake flour or out clean.
1 cup all-purpose flour Loosen cake from edges from pan; invert
1-teaspoon baking powder on towel sprinkled with confectioners’ sugar.
1 teaspoon salt ; Carefully remove from wax paper or foil,
trim of stiff edges if necessary.
Heat oven to 375 degrees. Line jelly roll While hot, roll cake and towel from narrow
pan (15 inch x 10 inch x 1 inch) with alu- end.
minium foil or waxed paper; grease. In a Cool on wire rack.
small mixing bowl, beat eggs about five min- Unroll cake; remove towel. Spread guava
utes or until very thick and lemon coloured. _ jam over cake surface place spread whipped
Pour eggs into a large mixing bowl; gradual- _ filling over cake, place guava pieces over fill-
ly beat in granulated sugar. On low speed, ing, place pineapple over guava, sprinkle
blend in water and vanilla. Gradually add coconut flakes over pineapple.
flour, baking powder and salt, beating just Roll up and then serve.





3 eggs
1 cup granulated sugar




















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Hugh Sands named chairman
of JS Johnson and Company

HUGH Sands, CMG; has ”
been appointed chairman
of JS Johnson and Compa-
ny, Limited.

The company said Mr
Sands brings “a wealth of
experience to the board
and is looking forward to
working with the manage-
ment team to develop
new strategies for contin-
ued growth in this impor-
tant area of financial ser-
vices.”

Retired

‘Mr Sands recently retired ”
as chairman of the Bank of
the Bahamas and currently
sits on the boards of sev-
eral civic and charitable
organisations as well as
public and private compa-
nies including the Insur-
ance Company of the
Bahamas.

He joined JS Johnson's
board on October 1, 2004,
along with Betty Roberts
who until recently was the
managing director of SG
Hambros Bank and Trust
Limited.

Career

“Mrs Roberts also has a
long and distinguished
career in the financial ser- faithful service to the com-
vices industry,” said a pany.

: Mr Fernie, who was ini-

In announcing Mr Sands’ | tially the company’s man-
appointment, the company aging director, served as
also thanks former chair- chairman for the last 30
man Charles T Fernie, who years.





retired on December 31,
2004, for his long and

He remains on the board
as a director.










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hs @



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All funds go to fun





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SECTION



' business@100jamz.com

FIU sees 10%
growth in
| suspicious
| transactions

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor







THE Financial Intelli-
gence Unit (FIU) saw a 10
| per cent increase in suspi-
| cious transactions reports
| (STRs) made to it during
2003, compared to the pre-
vious year, with just over 20
per cent passed on to the
Royal Bahamas Police
Force for investigation.

The FIU’s annual report
for 2003, which was only
tabled in the House of.
| Assembly yesterday - some

16 months after the period
in question ended, and four
months after fiscal 2004
closed - detailed that out of
| the 176 total STR’s it

received, some 37 or 21.02
| per cent were passed on to
the police for investigation.

A further 39 STRs or
22.16 per cent of reports
| received were anlaysed and
the FIUs investigations into
them closed, with the
| remaining 100 reports still
| “pending”.

The FIU annual report
said the 176 STRs covered
total assets worth some
$84.386 million, with the 37
reports passed on for the
police for investigation cov-
ering total assets worth $47.4
million or some 56.2 pe
cent of the total. cae

Outlining one case, the
FIU said that following
receipt of an STR, $401,600
was restrained and then
frozen in one account. The.

SEE page five










































li By NEIL HARTNELL



THE Bahamas Hotel Asso-
ciation (BHA) has written to
the US Ambassador urging
that the deadline for all Amer-
icans to possess passports when
travelling to this nation be
extended to conform with the
timeframe allowed for Mexico
and Canada. The BHA fears
the policy could cost the
' tourism industry and govern-
ment significant revenue, plus
jobs, from reduced tourism
| arrivals.

While the BHA said it fully

| new policy, which the US
| Department of Homeland

the US.

- travelling to the Bahamas.

Bahamas come from the US.

SEE page six

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

Hotels fear US passport
policy may cost revenue

Tribune Business Editor

_ understands and supports the - §

' Security is implementing to fur-

ther tighten border controls

’ against terrorists, it wants “the implementation date for the
Bahamas to be on par with that of Mexico and Canada”.

The Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative’s proposed
timetable, which has yet to be finalised, will require all US cit-
' izens returning from the Bahamas by land or sea to possess a
| passport by December 31, 2005, so they can be re-admitted to

__ However, the BHA is pointing out that US citizens travelling
_ to Mexico and Canada will only be required to possess a pass-
| port by December 31, 2006, a year later than those Americans

Timetable

It is warning that the Bahamas faces “a huge challenge” in

; meeting the proposed US implementation timetable, which
| will be formalised later this year following a public review.
. More than 80 per cent of the annual tourist visitors to the

In the letter, which was also sent to Fred Mitchell, minister of
. foreign affairs, Earle Bethell, the BHA’s president, wrote on
| behalf of the organisation: “While we understand the reasoning
| behind the ruling and certainly do not wish to compromise the
| security of our respective nations and the travelling public, the
| implementation timetable presents the industry and the
' Bahamas with a huge challenge.
| “As you know, a large number of Americans visiting the
. Bahamas do not travel with a passport. Many of these visitors

_ are ‘impulse’ travellers, often from Florida, who make last
' minute travel decisions and do not possess passports.
“Another sizeable group of travellers without passports are

| those attending conferences, meetings, etc. - whose travel -
' arrangements are made many months in advance.”

| And Mr Bethell added: “Without sufficient time to educate

_ the travelling public regarding these new requirements, coupled

| with the time required to secure a passport, we believe the

| December 31, 2005, implementation date will have a detri-
| mental impact on our visitor arrivals.

“This will have a corresponding negative effect on industry

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

usha Cay —_
buys PI land for $11:

@ By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Tribune Senior Reporter

JOHN MELK, the US-based
developer and owner of Musha
Cay in the Exumas, yesterday
confirmed he had purchased the
Paradise Island real estate for-
merly owned by Marriott Vaca-
tion Club International for an
estimated $11 million.

In an exclusive interview with
The Tribune, Mr Melk said a
decision will be made in the
next 30 to 60 days about the
property’s future development.

He indicated that his compa-
ny has spent some time getting
approvals for the construction
of 100 low-rise luxury condo-
miniums, but has also received
two unsolicited offers for pur-
chase of the Paradise Island
land that he is also considering.

"We bought it because it's the
last, best piece of property on
Paradise Island and its next to
the Ocean Club,” Mr Melk said.

“What we've done is all the
marketing studies and we think
it is an excellent opportunity.
The product that we would
offer would be something not
available in Nassau - a luxury
resort comparable to the Ocean
Club and the Ocean Club
Estates."

Mr Melk, who is also the
owner of Fisher Island, a 650-
unit luxury residence in Florida
that some consider the most

“expensive postal.code in the US,

indicated further that he was
still considering whether to
introduce a small number of
town houses to the develop-
ment.






























@ BHA’s president
Earle Bethel]






































_ The Tribune



Melk plans 100 luxury condos or
possible sale of land, but deal does not
include Paradise Island Beach Club or
Paradise Harbour Club and Marina

people all made the Bahamas
one of the top destinations in
the world.

Mr Melk said: “We like it and



said he has been doing business.
in the Bahamas for more than
10 years. Its stability, proximity
to the US, warm weather and

Already familiar with the
Bahamas market, through his
reported $50 million develop-
ment.at Musha Cay, Mr Melk

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ALLYSON MAYNARD-GIBSON,
minister of financial services and invest-
ments, yesterday dismissed calls for a Non-
Citizen Investment Act, saying it would
create “more bureaucracy” as she defend-
ed the current level of transparency in the
investment approvals process.

- The call for a Non-Citizen Investment
Act had been made by attorney Fred
Smith, who is representing opponents of...
the controversial $175 million Great Gua-
na Cay development, on the grounds that
it would give investors more transparency
and understanding through laying out the
“A-Z” of investing in the Bahamas.

However, Mrs Maynard-Gibson yester-
day pointed out that the Government had
many websites, such as that of the
Bahamas Investment Authority and the
central government’s own website, where
information on investing in the Bahamas,

. the approvals process and contacts for all
the relevant government agencies and min-
istries were listed.

The Government, the minister said, had
“many formats” where information to
assist potential investors was located,

SEE page six



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Bee ye) (iw Vg) erat gests
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we feel all the Bahamas is being
discovered because of world |
events. The Government is sta-
ble, the climate is nice and the
people are warm and friendly."
Looking at Musha Cay, he
said the resort island had been
fully booked since the begin-
ning of the year. He added that
like this development, any pro-
ject he is involved in will be
environmentally friendly and
seek to enhance the natural
resources already in place.
"[Musha Cay] is a great place

' SEE page five




Minister: No Non-
Investment Xa ree

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[tHe - Closing

PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

ZS
q sh cy

SCHOLARSHIP FOR MARITIME STUDIES

The Bahamas Maritime Authority and the Bahamas Shipowners
Association are both offering attractive scholarships to young
academically sound Bahamians who are keen to train for an exciting
and challenging career in the Shipping Industry. which is galing
increasing national importance.

The scholarship. is inclusive of tuition, fees, course material,
accommodation and transportation cost. Commencing in September
2005, successful candidates will follow a four (4) year degree
programme at the California Maritime Academy in the United States.

Upon completion of the degree, the qualified officers will be expected
to serve on board a Bahamian flagged vessel for at least 2 ae

Applicants should possessor expect to attain a minimum 1 of five (5)

BGCSE passes, including Maths, Physics/ Combined Science and. |

English Language, at grade ‘C’ or above and a minimum. combined
SAT score of 1000. All applicants must be physically fit and possess
good vision.

Further ‘ismiaaod and application forms can be obtained from Mrs.

Erma Rahming Mackey, Assistant Director, Bahamas Maritime —

Authority, P.O.Box N-4679, Nassau, Bahamas, email:
emackey @ bahamasmaritime.com, tel: 394-3024, fax: 394-3014.

Completed applications must be submitted in person or by post, with

copies of academic certificates and proof of Bahamian citizenship,

no later than Monday, 2 May 2005. Interviews will take place in .

Nassau in J une.



Financial na Ltd.

- Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

= over.
“Weelty Vol. - Se ent carrier aa ona
: a

Price divided by the tast 12 month eamings
- AS AT MAR. 31, 2005) "** - AS AT FEB. 28, 2005
y wom

THE TRIBUNE ,



Structuring the
way to project
management

ALL activities require some
form of project management,

be that building a house, plan-

ning a wedding or simply gro-
cery shopping. However, the
larger and more complex the

project, the more structuréd is _
- >the project management ~
approach that is needed.

The project manager is
responsible for the overall suc-

4 cess of the project. The project

management process is a
turnkey-solution that defines
the beginning, the end and the
framework for managing all the
work-in the middle of the pro-

ject. Providence Technology
Group has a comprehensive :

step-by-step approach that
assists with ensuring all projects

are delivered on time and with-

in budget.
| Mobilisation

This is a very critical phase in —

the project management

Dip peaks

per ear fr the tat 42 he

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock index. January 1, 1994 = 100



Bank of The Bahamas:

INTERNATIONAL

JOB VACANCY

fal Manager, Information Technology

MAIN RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

¢ Planning, directing, and coordinating the human, financial
and physical resources of the Information Technology
- Department;

¢ Overseeing and developing all technology related systems,
including telecommunications and security systems;

¢ Establishing key relationships with key IT suppliers and
consultants;

¢ Application, selection, development and
implementation of new and existing corporate initiatives;

¢ Provide enabling technologies that make it easier for
customers and suppliers to do business with the Bank.

planning methods;

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS & ABILITIES ©

o Tertiary level qualifications in computer science,
information technology or related disciplines;
* Expert knowledge of systems ue development and —

¢ Demonstrated experience in managing a network
environment including Windows server 2000/2003
services, Lotus Notes/Domino, hardware firewalls,
routers, AS400, Unix, Oracle and VPN appliances;
* Comprehensive knowledge of database management,
. Knowledge of web base technologies;
© Excellent communication skills, both written and oral;

¢ Demonstrated team building and project management

skills;

* Five years of progressive experience in managing the
delivery of modem enterprise technology services;
¢ IT industry related certifications desirable.

The position also offers an attractive compensation package which includes comprehensive group insurance
ia participation i in pension savings and other benefits enjoyed by staff.

Manager, Human Resources/Training
Bank of The Bahamas International
P.O. Box N-7118
Nassau, Bahamas



Deadline for applications is April 25, 2005.



GEORGETTE ROBINSON |

A businesswoman

in the IT industry
gives her advice on

the road to success

process, as it defines measur-

able deliverables and project

-. goals. : oh
A detailed but realistic pro-

ject plan is prepared with dates,

timeframes ‘and available .

resources:

A kick-off meeting wirth
stakeholders. is absolutely
imperative,as it resolves uncer-

tainties and identifies potential
risks.

@ Plan

If you fail to plan, you are ©
planning to fail. There is no .

such thing as too much plan-
ning.

During this process, business
and technical requirements are
gathered and analysed. These

are then incorporated into the ©

overall design of the solution.

Without architectural plans,
we cannot build a house. Like-
wise, without a formal plan, we
cannot manage a project suc-
cessfully.

i Build and stage

We are ready to begin hands-
on. An execution plan-with a
detailed scope of work is pre-
pared.

Staging all hardware and soft-
ware is vital during this phase,
because we want to eliminate
any surprises.

At this point, the project

‘manager identifies any risk and

reduces this risk through con-

‘tingency plans. The project
__ manager needs to closely watch

activities that may involve scope
creep.
If project definition changes
significantly, the project man-
ager regroups with stakehold-

‘ers, discusses changes and has

these changes approved before
proceeding.

Mi Deploy
Ifyou have followed this pro-

ject management process,
deployment of the overall pro-

ject.should run effortlessly.

All aspects of installation and
configuration are done during
this phase.

The project manager’s goal

. during this phase is to make cer-

tain the project remains on

track and within budget.
‘HiTest

The solution must be tested,
and all problems resolved and
re-tested.

The involvement of key users
during testing is highly recom-
mended, as they know the sys-.
tem better than anyone.

Once this process is compl:*
ed, it is ‘go live’ with the so.
tion.

Mi Stabilise

An integral component o:
successful project is having t
buy-in from users for the so!
tion, and we recommend tt
resources are assigned to ass:
users with any problems or cc
cerns that arise. ;

i Close
The project manager’s Mba

difficult task is closing the pro-
ject. Project owners often have

“the mistaken perception that an

activity is incomplete.

A skilled project manager has
to master closing projects tact-
fully, so as to not offend the
project owner.

Learning tree.com has sum-
marised the essence of project
management thus: “Today’s
project managers and teams
must deliver under great pres-
sure.

“Organising scarce resources,
managing tight budgets and

. deadlines, controlling change

throughout projects and gener-

ating maximum team perfor-
‘mance are key aspects of effec-

tive project management”.
- To provide feedback on this
column, please e-mail Makin-

gl Twork@providencetg.com

Georgette Robinson is the
senior project manager at Prov-
idence Technology Group. Ms.
Robinson has 10 years’ experi-
ence working in IT across Pro-
ject. Management, Business
Analysis and Implementation.
Providence Technology Group
is one of the Bahamas’ lead-
ing IT firms, specialising in
networking solutions, consult-
ing and advisory services and
software solutions.

NDEAUS

INSURANCE BROKER Co. Ltd.

To All Our Valuable Clients,

Please be informed that Ms. Alicia T.
Culmer is no longer an employee of Andeaus
Insurance Broker Company Limited. Ms. Culmer
is not authorized to conduct any business for the
company. Please contact the office at 323-4545
for services. Thank you for your continued

patronage.

Management of
Andeaus Insurance Broker Company Limited





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 3B .



a ae ee eee eee
Contractors push for Advisory Committee

. THE Bahamian Contractors
Association (BCA) is pushing
for the creation of a Construc-
tion and Development Advi-
sory Committee, which would
establish better relations with
developers and advise govern-
ment ministries without the
necessary in-house expertise
on issues relating to the indus-
try.

Terrance Knowles, the
BCA’s chairman, told the
Rotary Club of New Provi-
dence: “This committee would
comprise the various sectors of
the whole decision-making
industry, for example, the Min-
istry of Financial Services and
Investments, the Ministry of
Public Works, developers, and
members of the BCA.

“The purpose of this is real-
ly to provide the expertise and
advice to the Government in
hopes that they will be in a bet-
ter position to make decisions
to ensure greater participation
of Bahamian contractors in
these developments that are
coming on stream in the near
future. The Government has
not said ‘yes’ to this, but we
are strongly encouraged by
their words that this is a possi-
bility to be formulated through
the Ministry of Financial Ser-
vices and Investments.”

Mr Knowles estimated that
there were more than 800
Bahamian contractors, but said
the general impression of the
industry was that some were
unprofessional, unethical and
lacking in competency, exper-
tise and integrity.

“That’s the general percep-

tion, and to a large extent that
is true. The Bahamian Con-
tractors Association acknowl-
edges that, accepts that fact
and is striving to change that
perception so we’re very selec-
tive about the contractors who
enter our association,” Mr
Knowles said.

He added that another BCA
goal was to encourage a policy
statement from the Govern-
ment on a Local Preference
Act, which would enable
Bahamian contractors to bet-
ter compete against their for-
eign counterparts by levelling
out the latter’s cost advantages.

Manpower

Mr Knowles told Rotarians
that foreign contractors had
access to greater manpower
resources, and lower borrowing
costs, since in the US they were
able to obtain financing at
interest rates of around 3 per
cent, compared to the 8-9 per
cent interest rates commonly
faced by Bahamian contractors.

The BCA chairman said: “In
addition, they are able to bring
in their operating equipment
under leasehold agreements
with leasing companies. We, on
the other hand, are unable to
bring in our equipment under
lease agreements.

“We must pay a bond on
them. Plus the deposits neces-
sary to be left with those leas-
ing companies are so outra-
geous, sO you must purchase
the equipment yourself. Also,
because of the cyclical nature

of the construction industry,
expensive equipment may end
up sitting idle for months.” ~~

Mr. Knowles said a Local
Preference act would level the

ATTENTION

CAPITAL, REAL ESTATE & CORPORATE FINANCIAL GROUP
SEEKS ATTORNEY-AT-LAW |

5 years experience in business, commercial, banking, trust and or real estate law.
Salary commensurate with qualifications. Please send cover letter, resumé and
salary history on or before April 22nd, 2005.

Att: Personnel Director Box CB-13356

or
“Fax to: 327-5220







THE LYFORD CAY SCHOLARS’ ASSOCIATION

cordially invites you to



playing field for Bahamian
contractors, putting them in a
better position to win bids as it
would ‘automatically eliminate
the 5-10 per cent cost advan-
tage foreign companies held.
The Local Preference Act

would be similar to legislation °
, cin force in Dae County,
‘| Broward County and Palm

Beach County in Florida.

Perceived

Mr Knowles said the BCA
was no longer perceived as the
‘Bitchin’ Contractors Associa-
tion’ that wants to kick all for-
eign contractors out.

“Although some of our
members still feel the same
way, that,has changed some-
what where we recognise that
we, as Bahamian contractors,
must compete on the same lev-
el as the foreign-based con-
tractors,” Mr Knowles said.

- “Our concerns, however, are



that we must level the playing

field, and if foreign contractors:
are doing business in this coun-

try they must operate under
the laws of the land.
“For example, they must pay

“their business licences like we

all do as business owners, they

sMust pay their national insur-
» ances and they should not be

allowed to operate out of office
trailers that they brought here

“ten years ago.’
© The BCA chairman said the =:
‘group’s lobbying efforts had

already led to an amendment

to the Business Licence Act,

where foreign contractors had
to pay 1 per cent of the value
of each contract they won to
the Government.

Mr Knowles said the pro-
posed Contractors’ Bill, which
includes provisions for the
licensing of the entire con-
struction industry, has been
with successive Governments
for more than 20 years,

ll TERRANCE KNOWLES,
BCA chair, speaks at Rotary. -

However, he said there was a
lack of motivation for any Gov-
ernment to enact this bill
because of the complacency of
contractors and the Bahamian
public in applying pressure for
it to be legislated. He further
stated that governments may
not be motivated to enact the
bill because it may perceived
as nationalistic, protectionist
and exclude foreign participa-
tion in developments.

Mr Knowles said: “The BCA
has undertaken of its own
efforts to say we will licence
our own members regardless
of whether the Government
enacts this bill or not. We are
in the process of developing a
licensing programme for con-
tractors that is based upon the |
State of Florida’s Programme.”

Developers

He explained that the licens-
ing programme will provide
assurance to developers and
homeowners that BCA con- -
tractors are qualified and cer-
tified to meet their obligations
in the same. way that compa-
nies such as Sears and Home -
Depot pre-qualify and stand
behind their own contractors
and tradesmen. -

When the Contractor’ s Bill
is eventually enacted, he said —
the BCA’s licensing pro-
gramme will more than likely

-be adopted by the Govern-

ment.
The BCA is also pressing for
the amalgamation of a Pre-
ferred Contractor’s list for
Mortgage Houses. . ;
Mr Knowles said: “Right
now, the response from the
Government is very good.
They understand and actually

.appreciate what the construc-

tion industry does and the
numbers of people who we
employ.

“We attract the people they
want to get off the streets and I
think they realise that...we’ve
made such great inroads that

- -we must continue the charge.

Now the economy is turning .
around and contractors are
busy again, there’s a tendency
to become complacent but:
we’ve made too much progress" |
and we cannot lose credibility
at this stage.”

Sustainable Urban Planning
— Definitions and Delivery

The College of The Bahamas announces a rare opportunity
for anyone interested in strategic and physical planning and
how they relate to preservation, heritage and sustainability.

The public is cordially invited to attend a lecture by world
renowned planning expert and trained architect
Proteerok Matthew Carmona, BA, BArch, MA, Ph.D, ARB, WATPI,
Director,

Bartlett School of Planning, University College,

London jae





AID OF THE HARRY MOORE MEMORIAL
SCHOLARSHIP IN THE ARTS





Celebrating the Visual, Musical €8 Culinary Arts



Saturday, April 16th 2005 at 7pm When: Monday, April 18, 2005, 7:00-9:00pm _

Mountbatten House & Gardens, West Hill Street vei atade
/ Where: British Colonial Hilton, 1 Bay Street

Who Should Attend?
e Anyone with an interest in planning for preservation,

heritage and sustainability

e Urban Planners

e Architects

e Managers and supervisors whose responsibilities
include strategic and/or physical planning



Delicious Cuisine - all you can eat.
Beautiful Art - bid on your favorite Artist.

Open Wine Bar - all you can drink.
Live Jazz Music - groove to the beat.



How You Will Benefit
¢ Learn how The Bahamas can effect a renaissance in
the old urban areas
e Discover how planning infrastructure can enhance the
quality of life in a small islands state such as The
Bahamas










= International cuisine from Nassau's most
_ exclusive Restaurants, Caterers, and
_ award-winning Bahamian Chefs such as
_ Café Matisse, Lyford Cay Club, Indigo Café,
Goodfellow Farms, Kafé Kalik, Gourmet

:: Silent Art Auction featuring the work of over

35 of the top Bahamian Visual Artists!

:: All types of Artwork from Paintings,
Sculpture, Ceramics, Photography, Jewellery,

_ Silk Paintings and more!






Market, Radisson Hotel, Design Divas,

The White Door, Choices Restaurant,

Alexandra Catering, Glorious Foods,

:: A Surprise Auction Offering from

International Designer Harl Taylor!

e Understand how important strategic and physical

planning are to guarding our heritage







1. Live art expressions from Caricaturists!

: Live Jazz Music from the
Chris Justillien Jazz Quartet!

= Live Musical and Performance Acts!
i Fabulous Door Prizes!

Chef Van Bruguler, Chef Ellie's Duff,
Bahamas Food Services and more!
Live food demonstrations of delicious
new dishes for your sampling!

Open Wine Bar from Bristol Cellars!

ALL ARE WELCOME. COME EARLY.

For more information, please call the Office of the Vice President
of Research, Planning & Development at 302-4308



Tickets: $75 © Call and we’ll daivet your tickets to you!







rere’ Providence Western New Providence Southern New Providence | Nassau
ohn A. C. Benjamin Moniqde Hinsey Mark A. Jordan Erica M. James ge yg ages gO ae
Tel: 424-3717 Tel: 362-4910 Tel: 361-5220, x264 Tel: 323-3669 T I TP C € DLLEC GE C VFI.

Find out more at www.lyfordcayfoundation.com



TN.
| ' me, Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs



PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





Firms’ gift to hurricane relief

TWO Freeport-based busi-
-nesses have donated a comput-
er system to a non-governmen-
tal organisation that is placing
international volunteers into the
Bahamas to assist Grand
-Bahama with post-hurricane
.restoration and recovery.
The Amoury Company
(Freeport) and The Home Cen-
-tre, which is owned by BISX-
-listed Freeport Concrete, gave a
Compaq Computer System to

non-profit organisation created
by New Providence Communi-
ty Church.

Donation

Island: Journeys’ Grand
Bahama Island co-ordinator,
Rebecca Russell, and national
director, Pastor Shaun Ingra-
ham, were on hand to receive
the donation from The Amoury

manager, Tom Leeder, and
Freeport Concrete chief exec-
utive Ray Simpson.

“We work with teams from
all over the Bahamas and many
other countries, so a lot of our
work is done electronically,”
Mrs Russell said.

“With this new computer sys-
tem we'll be able to communi-
cate with volunteer groups,
donors, churches and the gov-

Mr Leeder added: “We know
that there are still many people
in need on Grand Bahama and
we felt that Island Journeys has

an effective plan to meet those
needs.”

Mr Simpson added: “A lot
has been done but there is a lot

more to do, so we are happy
that we can help facilitate the
work of Island Journeys to
rebuild our communities.”

ernment that much more effec-

Island Journeys, the Bahamian Company (Freeport) general tively.”

Employment Opportunity — Nortel PBX and Key System
Engineer

Indigo Networks is seeking to fill a senior position in its Technical
Services department for an experienced .Norte
telecommunications engineer. :



@ THE Amoury Company (Freeport) general manager, Tom Leeder; Island Journeys’ Grand
Bahama co-ordinator Rebecca Russell; Island Journeys’ national director Shaun Ingraham; and
Freeport Concrete chief executive, Ray Simpson

Applications are invited from individuals who have:

5

e Aminimum of 10 years in a Nortel telecommunications
technical support role.
In depth Design, Programming, Implementation, and
Maintenence of Nortel: Norstar, BCM, Meridian Option
11C and 81C.
Knowledge of PBX Networking and VOIP Integration.
Knowledge of Routing, Trunking, and VLANS.
Excellent customer service skills
Good oral and written skills
Ability to work with minimum supervision.

A competitive salary commensurate with experience is offered
along with product training, medical, pension and car allowance
after a qualifying period. ,

$208,000.00

Middle Income Home, Suffolk Unit 2, Block #51, Lot #1,
3 bed, 2.5 bath, central air, fully landscape, washer & dryer.







Interested candidates should submit their resumes in writing to
Indigo Networks PO BOX N-3920 for the attention of the
Technical Services Manager.

Cnn LT ee ae Le





VACANCY

The American Embassy is presently considering applications
for the following position

1. LANSYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR

Duties include: the operational support of the Local Area Network,
which includes 13 servers, and approximately 120 networked §
‘stations and also support for numerous stand-alone computers.
Also, assists and performs installation of systems and peripheral
equipment including file servers, workstations, network interface
cards, fax/modem.cards, cdrom's, printers, floppy and hard drives
and backup tape systems. We reserve the right to administer
testing to ascertain experience. ~

This position is open to candidates with the following
requirements:

2. Baccalaureate Degree or host country equivalent in the field
of Computer Information Systems. Certification in A+, MCP in
Windows 2000 or Windows 2003 is required. Additional
certifications such as network plus and security plus will be
required to pass the probarionary period. Excellent command of
the English Language, both written and oral

Personal attributes:

-Excellent work attitude, punctuality and attendance record
-Highly confidential in nature

-Ability to interact with others in a professional manner
-Ability to prioritize tasks

-Initiative and ability to learn new tasks quickly



Scotiabank’s ‘Forgive & Forget’ Mortgage Campaign HERES POO eae,

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation

| package including outstanding benefits such as performance-based
incentives, medical and dental insurances, life insurance, pension
and opportunities for training and development.

We're giving away Big Bucks!

a1

Have $10,000 or $7,500 of your mortgage balance Forgiven

Or be one of 20 lucky customers to have $250 of a mortgage payment Fergotten
Down-payment as low as 5% (with Mortgage Indemnity Insurance)

Campaign runs until May 13, 2005

3. Applicants must be Bahamian Citizens or other Country
Nationals who are eligible for employment under Bahamian laws
and regulations.:

Call or visit us today and let Scotiabank help you to 'Forgive & Forget’

Application forms are available from 8:00 am to 5:30 pm, Monday
through Friday at the security area of the American Embassy,
Queen Street, completed applications should be returned to the
Embassy: attention of the Human Resources Office no later than
April 25, 2005.



: Life. Money. Balance both:

S Teabarari at Thee Rack of ties Seetia tenchtnnnins weed acraier dante stttaat eek cuntag of Tou Bath Gb Nana fe estie







Ss Sa api ate elo



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 5B



Investment project gives back to Exuma










FROM page one

police and Director of Public
Prosecutions then obtained a
Restraint Order from the
Supreme Court in relation to
the account and funds.

The Supreme Court also
registered a Confiscation
Order, made by the Stuttgart
Regional Court in Germany,
on October 7, 2003. The funds
involved were confiscated by
the Court and returned to
Germany.

The FEU’s 2003 annual
report said that the 39 inves-
tigations which it closed cov-
ered total assets worth $7.298
million or 8.6 per cent of those
caught up in the year’s STRs.

’ Just under $30 million in
total assets is caught up in the
100 “pending” STRs that the
FIU is still investigating.
Domestic/offshore banks

ber of STRs during 2003,

total. Domestic banks and off-
shore banks were the next
most frequent reporters, sub-
mitting 31 per cent and 25 per
cent of the total respectively.

Suspected fraud was the
most common reason trigger-
ing STRs to the FIU during
2003, with some 58 submitted
for this reason. However, 67
were submitted without the

Ten per cent growth

submitted the greatest num- :

some 61 or 35 per cent.of the - Bahamas.



financial institution involved
suspecting precisely what
might going on, just that there
were “suspicious circum-
stances” surrounding the
accounts in question.

Some 19 STRs were sub-
mitted to the FIU where ‘cor-
ruption’ was suspected to be
involved, while 17 were sent in
due to suspicions of drug-
related crimes and two
because of suspected terror-
related offences.

The. FIU’s 2003 annual
report said new customers of
financial institutions account-
ed for 49.4 per cent of STRs
received in 2003, with long-
standing customers account-
ing for 42 per cent.

Some 52.3 per cent or 92 of
the STR subjects were
Bahamian citizens, with a fur-
ther 21 or 15.3 per cent com-
ing from the US. Some 54.5
per cent or 96 STRs involved
subjects residing in the


























In terms of beneficial own-
ers who were subjects of
STRs, some 30.7 per cent
were Americans, 15.3 per
cent Guatemalans and
31.8 per cent Bahamian citi-
zens.

However, some 36.4 per
cent of the beneficial owners
caught up in the STRs were
residents of the Bahamas.









Musha Cay developer
buys PI land

FROM page one

for people to escape to; it’s very private,” Mr Melk said. “We did-

n't disturb what God put here, we enhanced it and we would con-
tinue that on Paradise Island. That's why I bought the island - we
worked hard to maintain its natural beauty and enhance it. We're

just borrowing it for a while."

_ Meanwhile, concerns expressed by owners of timeshare proper-
ties at the Paradise Island Beach Club, formerly managed by Mar-
riott Vacation Club, that the resort was involved in the sale have

been addressed.

The property’s co-owner, Peter Kugler, told The Tribune that nei-
ther the Paradise Island Beach Club nor its sister property, Paradise
Harbour Club and Marina, had been sold or included in Mr Melk’s

deal.

The Paradise Island Beach Club, with 44 timeshare apartments,
was managed by Marriott Vacation Club between 1990 and 2002,
before the two parted company. The property is now managed by

Vacations in Paradise.

According to Mr Kugler, his office was bombarded with calls
from owners who were up in arms, asking how they could sell the
resort. He said: “We are the developers and we own the land and

we have not sold our property." .

The piece of property involved in the sale to Mr Melk, lots G and
H on Paradise Island, are located to the east of the Paradise Island
Beach Club. The six-acre site is development land.

Both the Paradise Island Beach Club and the Paradise Harbour
Club and Marina are owned by Peter Kugler and Christopher

Lightbourne.

Credit Suisse Wealth Management Limited

requires an

OFFICE ASSISTANT

Temporary position for a young person to
perform filing and messenger duties

Please send resume to:

Credit Suisse Wealth Management Limited
P.O. Box N-4801
Nassau, Bahamas

Facsimile No. 302-6398





GRAND Isle Villas, the $100
million upscale residential second
home community next to Emer-
ald'Bay, has improved the quali-
ty of education for 168 Exuma
children by donating desks and
chairs to six schools.

@ MINISTER of Tourism
Obie Wilchcombe, centre,
thanked developers of Grand Isle
Villas in Exuma for donating 168
desks and chairs to fill gaps in
several Exuma schools. Pictured
L to R are Jenevy Dames, deputy
chief councillor; Anthony Moss,
MP for Exuma; Margaret Melvin,
G&G Shipping; Mr Wilchcombe;
Diane Phillips for Grand Isle Vil-
las; Everette Hart, administrator
for Exuma, and Delma Weir,
Bahamas Customs. The develop-
ers of the 71-villa, $100 million
resort community at the highest
peak of Emerald Bay have adopt-
_ed Roker’s Point Primary School
and arranged for or made numer-
ous gifts of educational materi-
als.

(Photo by Christopher Kettel)

e Tribune wants to hear
‘wom people who are

king news in their

ighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Obie Wilchcombe, minister of
tourism, accepted the gift on

behalf of the Government when |

he was in Exuma to honour a pio-
neer in the hospitality industry,
Stan Benjamin, who has owned
and operated Club Peace & Plen-
ty in George Town since 1971.

“We in the Bahamas are
blessed with investors who come
to our shores and fall in love with
our communities, not just because
of the financial opportunities or
rewards they might reap, but
because they become part of the
community,” Mr Wilchcombe
sdid.

“We saw it earlier today when
we honoured a fine gentleman,
Stan Benjamin. and we see it
again in this gesture by the devel-
opers of Grand Isle Villas. It is
my understanding that this is one
of several gifts they have made
and that a real attachment has
developed between them and the
children of Roker’s Point Prima-
ry School, which they adopted in
the Government’s adopt-a-school
programme, and where they have
presented educational materials,
VCRs, text books and trans-
formed a barren

yard into a beautiful playground.”

Christopher Kettel, a driving
force in Exuma education, said:
“Grand Isle Villas has
been such good corporate citi-
zens.

“We wish we could use them as
a model for all investors in the
Exumas in the way they have
demonstrated how much they
care about education and the
young people of this island.

“In the short time they have
been here, they have made a dif-
ference.”

Grand Isle’s developers are
Pamela McCullough and James
Clabaugh.

3 bedroom, 2 bath, 3 Satellite TVs, 3 climate zones, Bow Thurster,
Bench Matched Raytheon Navigation/Radar Group; 0 Care Batteries
Super Antena; Twin Caterpillar Diesels 680HP tot approx 350 hours.
Cruises at 20 knots built 1999, delivered new April 2000. Looks and
acts new. Can now be viewed on New Providence. Built by Sea Ray.

Call or fax 1-805-565-1237 (info 327-5695)

Draft (Inboards)...
Dry Weight
Fuel Capacity...
Water Capacity..
Holding Tank







4



4,800 sq. ft. at $6,000 per month or
2,400 sq. ft. at $3,000 per month

“Summerwinds Plaza, Harrold Road
3 Phone: 424-3889 ¢ 364-0753




Best offer over $300,000







.



~ COMMERCIAL BUILDING
Brand New



Retail & Warehouse Space
32,000 sq. ft. at $12.50 per sq. ft.,
50 plus parking spaces

Summerwinds Plaza, Harrold Road
Phone: 424-3889 © 364-0753

COMMERCIAL BUILDING
Brand New

10,000 sq. ft. at $12.50 sq. ft.
Parking Spaces

Summerwinds Plaza, Harrold Road
Phone: 424-3889 © 364-0753

45°5” (13.84m)
.14°3” (4.34m)
kbd 37” (94 cm)
27,000 Ibs (12,247)
350 gal (1,324.8 L)

120 gal (454.2 L)
55 gal (208.2 L)



HOUSE FOR RENT

5 Bedroom, 4 bathroom, split level,

_ partly furnished.
Nassau East Blvd.,
$2,500.00 per month

Summerwinds Plaza, Harrold Road
Phone: 424-3889 ¢ 364-0753



686 - 4,340 sq.ft. retail & office spaces
Excellent retail and professional location.

Modern building with spectacular views.

Full standby generator.

* : i
Security services.

One Sandyport Plaza
West Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel. 242-393-8618
www.bahamasrealty.bs
www.cbrichardellis.com

BAHAMAS REALTY trp

COMMERCIAL

ins sraveacdne

CBRE

with:

CB RICHARD ELLIS
NAVIGATING A NEW WORLD








PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





Minister: No Non-Citizen
Investment Act required

FROM page one .

including her own Ministry of
Financial Services and Invest-
ments.

Developers were able to
contact her ministry and oth-
ers to answer any questions
they may have, while all the
Bahamas’ Embassies, Con-
sulates and missions abroad

’ possessed information on
investing in this nation. There
were also numerous Bahami-
an lawyers able to advise
developers on the investment
process.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson told
The Tribune: “My point is that
we do not need an Act, defi-
nitely not more bureaucracy.”

Mr Smith, though, had pre-
viously told this newspaper
that a Non-Citizen Investment
Act would ensure that invest-
ment projects did not become
“mired” in what he claimed
was an “arbitrary, secretive”
approvals process.

Mr Smith said: “The great-
est lament of investors for the
last 39 years in the Bahamas is
uncertainty. They never know
where they stand. They never












know what the rules of the
game are. The rules change
from administration to admin-
istration and, indeed, during
administrations.

“The time has come when
we need to be clear with
investors how investment is to
take place. The time has come
for the Bahamas to acknowl-
edge that it is not a third world
country and that serious
investors need to know what
the rules of the game are. The
rules of the game should be
clearly spelt out in laws which
provide what is or what is not
needed.”

But Mrs Maynard-Gibson
disagreed with Mr Smith’s
claims, arguing that there was
plenty of transparency in the
investment process as it cur-
rently stood.

She added that Mr Smith’s
suggestion that responsibility
for negotiating major devel-
opments in the Bahamas be
taken away from the Cabinet
and National Economic Coun-
cil (NEC), and placed in the
hands of government agencies
such as the BEST Commis-
sion, once they were given
statutory authority, indicated



_PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, FALISHA MARIA
PINDER, of Coral Harbour, North Circle Drive, P.O. Box
N-1187, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name
to FALISHA MARIA MALONE. If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (80) days after the
date of publication of this notice.







Bahamas.























NOTICE. |

NOTICE is hereby given that SHERWIN MCPHEE OF
FELTONDALE FOX HILL, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written |.
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days |’
from the 14TH day of APRIL, 2005 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that EMILIA PETIT FRERE EDWARD,
of SUNLIGHT VILLAGE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 14TH
day of APRIL, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Professional Sales Representative

As part of a leading research-driven pharmaceutical products
and services company, we market a broad range of
innovative products to improve human health.

Currently we are searching for qualified candidates to fill
a Professional Sales Representative position open in the
Bahamas territory. This position is responsible for
implementing sales and marketing programs in their
assigned territory with thé objective of increasing sales

and market share.

Minimum Requirements:

* Bacheior’s Degree, MBA or equivalent college degree
* Previous medical sales representative experience preferred.
* Available and willingness to travel

* Excellent oral and written communication in English

language

* Knowledge of PC applications
¢ Valid and active driver’s license
¢ Demonstrated interpersonal and presentation skills.

We strive to create a working environment that rewards
commitment and performance. As such we offer an excellent
compensation and benefit package. «

Qualified candidates may fax or send resumes, with salary

history to:

PSR - MSD

att: Mr S. Van Er
_ Lowe’s Wholesale Drug Agency
Soldier Road
P.O. Box N-7504
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: 1 - 242-393-1527

We are an equal opportunity employer. We take affirmative
action to consider applicants without regards of race, color,
sex, religion, national origin, Vietnam Era and/or Disabled
Veteran Status or individuals with disabilities.



the attorney was being “mis-
chievous”

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
Mr Smith had represented

- developers in the past, and

knew that government agen-
cies and ministries were























FROM page one

in the industry."

bour. =

-come.

guests.






Hotel fears
over US policy
On passports

\
revenue, government revenue, and upon employment levels

Under current regulations, a driver’s licence or other form of
photo identification is all that is required for US citizens to trav-
el to and from that country to its Northern American neigh-

Another group of US tourists that might be impacted by the
new travel regulations are Spring Breakers.

Acknowledging that it will be a “difficult task” to meet the
current timeframe, the BHA said it and its hotel members
would be making “every effort” to extend the December 31
2005, deadline. Its members were being encouraged to repre-
sent their concerns to Mr Mitchell and the US Ambassador,
John Rood, plus anyone else they felt could influence the out-

The BHA’s Board of Directors meeting last week also
advised its‘hotel members to begin including information on the
proposed US policy in all communications with potential

| BAHAMAS DENTAL COUNCIL
P.O. Box N-3345
Nassau, Bahamas

VOTEC-E =

The Bahamas Dental Council wishes to notify the
persons who are now or are planning to study
dentistry, that as of January 2005, graduates of
all “Dental Schools” will have to possess proof of
passing a Dental Board Examination approved by
the Bahamas Dental Council in order to be eligible
for full, temporary, provisional or special
registration. Further information can be obtained
from the office of the Bahamas Dental Council,
P.O. Box N-3345, Nassau, Bahamas.

Signed
Dr. Anthony Davis —
’ Registrar
Bahamas Dental Council

involved in “vetting” an
investment project before it
received approval in principle
from the NEC. They were also
involved after this approval
was given in granting permits,
approving applications and

Jit



TRUST. OFFICER

SCOTIATRUST invites applications from qualified
Bahamians for the position of Trust Officer with a
Be strong background and technical knowledge in areas
of trust, company and agency management. The
applicant will be involved in the administration of a j

medium to high complexity level of accounts of
trusts, companies and agencies. A good level of
accounting knowledge is required. The person
appointed should hold a four year University Degree,
in a related subject along with professional
qualifications in the Society of Trust and Estate
Practitioners (STEP) or ACIB. The ideal candidate
should have a minimum of five years progressive
experience in the industry. Analytical and
communication skills as well as familiarity with PC
software are essential. Preference will be given to
applicants with language skills. Interested persons
should submit applications in writing marked Private
_and Confidential to the Manager, Client Services,
P.O. Box N-5016, Nassau, Bahamas. Applications
should be received no later than Friday, 22nd April,

‘2005.



analysing Environmental
Impact Assessments (EIAs).

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said:
“T think that there is a trans-
parent process. I think
[though] that with everything
in life there is room for
improvement, to the extent
that we may need to tweak
things.”

As the Bahamas was an
open, vibrant democracy, the
minister said the Government
listened very carefully to what
all the voters and stakeholders
were saying, and had not shut
the door on making modifica-

tions to the investment

approvals process if they were
necessary.

A transparent process, Mrs
Maynard-Gibson said, was of
the utmost importance. She
added that Prime Minister
Perry Christie’s government
was committed to consulta-
tion on investment projects,
having used such a process to
sort out teething problems
with Exuma’s Emerald
Bay resort when it came to
office.

“Several town meetings”
had also been held before the
Great Guana Cay investment
projects was approved, includ-
ing two staged by the Ministry
of Financial Services and
Investments.

When The Tribune said that
the Government had not
made public several Heads of











NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MERLINE MOCOMBE, FORT -
FINCASTLE, P.O.BOX SS - 5951, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows. any reason why registration/
"| naturalization should not be granted, should send a written’and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight.days from the
7TH day of APRIL, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Agreement signed by this
administration, specifically
identifying the one agreed
with American investor,
Edward Lauth, for a tourism-
related development at the old
Club Med resort in Gover-
nor’s harbour, Eleuthera, Mrs
Maynard-Gibson said that one
had not been revealed
because the Government was
negotiating an “expansion” of

_ that project.

As a result, the Heads of
Agreement was likely to be
amended.

The Prime Minister yester-
day said he was unable to
table the Heads of Agreement
signed with the Baha Mar con-
sortium for the $1.2 billion
Cable Beach development as
the deals to purchase the
hotels had not been closed.

.Once this was done, the

agreement would be pub-

lished.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
that among the most impor-
tant considerations for
investors was the “free and
unfettered access” they had
to the Bahamian courts and
judicial system.

The separation of powers,
she added, had ensured there
had never been any interfer-
ence by the Government in
judicial matters, which was
something she suggested the
Bahamas should “boast”
about.





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DIEUPHA MOCOMBE, FORT -
FINCASTLE, P.O.BOX SS - 5951, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
7TH day of APRIL, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




























Bahamas.

FOR SALE OR









NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ELDA NORELUS, BLUE HILL
ROAD, NASSAU BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 7TH day of APRIL, 2005 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Fully Furnished Executive Office Suites

plus Utilities Global Maritime Center
(Formerly Tanja) .

2nd Floor, 2,500 sq ft :

Internet Ready, Computer & Network Support

State Of The Art Phone & Voice Mail Systems
Dedicated Phone Lines
Conference Facilities

Professional Work Space

Office Space - Unfurnished
1,250 sq ft

Global Maritime Centre
Queens Highway, Freeport, Bahamas

Contact 351-9026 or 351-1601 For Viewing
Or Additional Information.
Global United Formerly TANJA is |
moving it’s operation to the _
Former United Shipping Building at the Harbour



oN
= N



era

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS





INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY |
MUST SELL

MARSHALL ROAD (NASSAU)

Lot #54, land size 42,130 sq. ft. with a masonry building with eight
inch concrete block walls. The front 2 units are 95% complete.

Appraisal: $256,233.00

Heading west on Blue Hill Road, go pass the intersection of Cowpen
and Blue Hill Road, turn right onto Marshall Road (Adventure
Learning Center Road), follow road to the final.curve before the
beach. The subject property is about 100 feet on the right side,

grey trimmed white with unfinished building attached.

YAMACRAW BEACH ESTATES (NASSAU)

Lot #63, house #19, Cat Island Avenue, a 6 year old single story
house with three bedrooms, one bathroom, living room, dining
room, kitchen and laundry room. Property is 70x100 single - family
residential. This property is on flat terrain and fairly level with road
way. Living area 1,574:sq. ft.

Appraisal: $1 73,000.00

Traveling south on Fox Hill Road, go pass the Prison Compound,
. turn left onto Yamacraw then 1st right, follow the road to ‘st left,
then first right. The road curves to your left, the house is #19 Cat Island Avenue, painted white. The grounds
are attractively landscape and well-kept access into the subject property is provided by a concrete paved
drive way along with the walkways of concrete flagstones.



FRELIA SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)

Lot #24, Land size 6,724 sq. ft. living area 1,223 sq. ft. consisting
of 4 year old three bed, two bath, living, dining, kitchen and utility
room.

Appraisal: $1 51,115.00

Driving west on Carmichael Road until you arrive at road by More
FM, continue driving north thru a series of curves in the road until
you arrive to the double post sign on the right hand side of the road
turn right, house is 5th on right white trim yellow. Subject property is flat and slightly below the level of the



required.
KENNEDY SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)

Lot no. 21 all utilities available 10 year old single story house, 3
bedroom 2 bathroom, living room, dining area, family room, kitchen,
study, laundry and an entry porch.



Appraisal: $175,350.00

Heading west along Soldier Road take main entrance to Kennedy
Subdivision on the left, then take the 1st corner on the left then
1st right, house is second on your right with garage.



KENNEDY SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)

Lot #5 land size 3,600 sq. 40 x 90 ft., contains a 21 year old single
story house’, 3 bed, 1 bath;-living;-dining-and-kitcher:F
_is on flat land and fairly level with the roadway, residentii

family zoning. rte ra

Appraisal: $100,800.00



The subject property is located on the southern side of Soldier
rad about 200 ft., east of the intersection of Kennedy Subdivision
and Soldier Road. Painted blue trimmed white, a low concrete
wall and concrete gateposts are located at the front with a chainlink fencing enclosing the sides and the
back also waikway and driveway in the frontyard. Ground neatly maintained with basic landscaping in
place. Accommodation consist of three bedrooms, one bathroom, living and dining area and kitchen.

DUNDAS TOWN (ABACO)

3 two bed, 1 bath triplex 9,000 sq. ft.; lot no. 18b with an area
for a small shop. Age 12 years the land is a portion of one of
the Dundas Town Crown Allotment parcels stretching from Forest
Drive to Front Street, being just under a quarter acre in size and
on the lowside. A concrete block structure, with asphalt shingle
roof and L-shape in design with a total length of 70x26 ft, plus
50 x 22 ft., 2,920 sq. ft., the interior walls are concrete blocks,
ceiling is sheet rock and the floors of vinyl tiles. :

Appraisal: $220,500.00



BAHAMA SOUND (EXUMA)

Duplex in lot #6625, Bahama Sound #8, East Exuma, trapezium
shaped lot 35 ft above sea level, 10,000 sq. ft., single storey,
10 year old duplex, 2 bed, 1 bath, kitchen, dining and living
room and porch area. Property is landscaped.

Appraisal: $170,047.50



MURPHY TOWN (ABACO)

Crown Allotment #70, singe storey wood and concree
Srinetelel building approximately 758 sq. ft., about 20 years
old.

Appraisal: $71,946.00



MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES








roadway. This is a single family residential zoning, The building is about 4 years old, with remedial work ~














GOLDEN GATES #2 (NASSAU)

Lot #1 490, section 2 with a 25 year old single family residence 2,480
sq. ft. consisting of five bedrooms, two bathrooms, seperate living
and dining room with a spacious kitchen, lot size is 6,000 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $120,000.00

Property is at grade and level with adequate drainage, house situated
on road knowns as “Donahue Road” which is on the southern side
of Carmicheal Road. Last painted green trimmed white. Enclosed
on one side with 5 ft., chain link fencing and at the front with a low cement block wall with two driveways
and a walkway. :

VALENTINES EXTENSION (NASSAU)

Lot #2 contains a 19 year old 1 1/2 storey four plex with a floor
area of 3,621 sq. ft. The two storey section consist of a master
bedroom, bathroom and sitting area upstairs and two bedrooms,
one bath, living, dining, family room and kitchen downstairs. The
single storey consist of one two bedroom, one bath apartment and
two efficency apartments, land size 7,500 sq. ft. Multi-Family zoning
on flat land and not subject to flooding.

Appraisal: $347,006.00

The subject property is located on the western.side of Valentine’s Extension Road, just over one hundred
feet north of the roadway known as Johnson Terrace. Travel east on Bernard Road, turn left onto Adderley
Street which is opposite SAC, continue left.at the deep bend, take first right into Johnson Terrace, go to
T-junction and turn left, then first right. Property is second building on right, white trimmed brown.

GLENISTON GARDENS SUBDIVISION
, (NASSAU)

: 4 30 Year old single story house with floor area of 1,800 sq. ft.,
Lot #28 land size 14,475 ft., consist of 4 bed, 3 baih, living,
dining, kitchen, utility room and carport.

Appraisal: $211,050.00

Driving east on Prince Charles, take the corner before the shopping
centre on the right side, Follow the road around the curve to
the subject house which is painted white trim with blue with a drive way up to the carport.

GOLDEN GATES #1 (NASSAU)

Lot #154, a single story duplex with floor area of 1,460 sq. ft.
Each apartment consist of 2 bed, 1 bath, living and dining area
and kitchen. Lot size is 5,200 sq. ft., 52 x 100

Appraisal: $168,504.00

Heading south on Blue Hill Road, take first left after traffic light
at Blue Hill Rad and Carmichael Road intersection. Take the
second right the subject property is the second on the right. Sisal
Road and Bamboo Court. Painted white, trimmed green.

MURPHY TOWN (ABACO)

Lot #60 with a structure, lot size 60 x.115 ft., 6,900 sq. ft., 10
ft., above sea levelkbut below:road:level and would flood in a
severe hurricane the duplex has dimensions of 60 ft by 30 ft
partly of wood and partly of cement blocks with one section

and floor ready to be poured. The roof is asphalt shingles, the
interior walls and ceiling are of 1x6 pine and the floor of ceramic
‘tiles. The finished work is average/below, 2 bedrooms, one bath,
living/dining. The occupied portion of the structure is not complete.
Age: 10 years old.

Appraisal: $80,498.00

HAMILTON’S (LONG ISLAND)

Queen's High Way, lot of land 13,547 sq. ft., dwelling house
of solid concrete floors, foundation column and belt course
with finished plaster. Two bedrooms, one bathroom, kitchen,
dining, and living room. Total living space is 1,237 sq. ft:, utilities
available are electricity, water, cable tv and telephone.

Appraisal: $98,057.00

RAINBOW BAY SUBDIVISION
(ELEUTHERA)

Lot #44, Block 5, Section A. The lot is on.a hill overlooking the
Atlantic Ocean. Area is approximately 10,800 sq. ft. This site
encompasses a two storey apartment block of two apartments.
One upstairs and one downstairs. Each comprising one bedroom
-one bathroom, front room, dining, kitchen. There is a wooden
porch approximately 8 - 6 feet wide on the upper level secured
-with a wooden handrail. The garage area has been converted
into a efficiency apartment and now houses one
bedroom/frontroom in one and one bathroom. Age: is 7 years
old. The apartments could be rented at $700 per month partly
- furnished. The efficiency rented at $400 per month.

Appraisal: $308,402.00

EARLY SETTLERS DRIVE
. (ELEUTHERA)
Lot #7 Early Settlers Drive, North Eleuthera Heights, size 11,200

sq..ft., contains incomplete 3 bed, 2.5 bath, living room, dining
room, kitchen and tv room.

Appraisal: $141,716.40

NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA), Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and bounded on North by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal Investment Ltd., this is a
single family zoning and 50 ft., above sea level. This site encompasses a foundation with plumbing and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry fill. The concrete floor has not been poured

as yet. The foundation is 2,511 sq. ft.
Appraisal: $43,968.75

virtually finished and occupied with blocks up to window level -

Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is vacant and a hill over looking the Atlantic Ocean.

BAHAMA CORAL ISLAND (ABACO), Lot #1, Block A, on Central Abaco. This property is vacant and is approximately 9,100 sq. ft. This property is elevated’ and should not flood under normal conditions.
Appraisal: $8,236.00

The property is in the southwestern portion of the Bahama Coral, Coral Island and bounded northwesterly by 60 ft. Wide Road.

BAHAMA SOUND (EXUMA), Lot #7088 situated in Bahama Sound, Exuma section 10 East. Great Exuma approximately 10.5 miles west of George Town lot is square in shape on elevation of approximately
ft., above sea level contains 10,000 sq. ft., No adverse site conditions noted. This property is single family residence. ee . .

Appraisal: $26,250.00

Property is located on the northwestern side of the Queen’s Highway, about 10.5 miles northwest of George Town.

For conditions of sale and other information contact
Philip White @ 502-3077 email philip.white@scotiabank.com or
Harry Collie @ 502-3034 email harry.collie@scotiabank.com

__ Please visit www.fsbobahamas.com for interior photos

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 7B _



































PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005 THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

COMICS PAGE



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PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

SPORTS

THE TRIBUNE



'Team’s absence shouldn't
take away from Nationals

STUBBS

OPINION







Fe the second consecu-
tive time that the
Bahamas Association of Athletic
Associations have decided to
take the National High School
Track and Field Championships
to Grand Bahama, the St
Augustine’s College Big Red
Machines have decided to stay
home.

Many would argue that the Big
Red Machines should be a part
of the field of 30-plus schools
that will be competing at the
Grand Bahama Sports Complex
this weekend.

But the final decision on
whether or not a team represent-
ing the Big Red Machines
should go rests solely on St
Augustine’s College and not the
BAAA’s.

The Nationals is an invitation-
al event and is not mandatory for
the schools to compete, so they
can go if they wish. There is no
penalty if they don’t.

SAC’s primary obligation is to
the Bahamas: Association of
Independent Secondary Schools,

which they fulfilled, winning their -

17th straight championship title.
The BAAA issued more than
50 invitations for schools around

Top four make

the country to compete and SAC
is not the only school that turned
it down.

But because of SAC’s reputa-
tion and their legacy as one of
the top schools in the country,

SAC has a number of medal-
ists from the Carifta team that
came in third during the games
that was held over the Easter
holiday weekend in Tobago.

But the championships must



“The BAAA issued more than 50
invitations for schools around the
country to compete and SAC is not
the only school that turned it

down.”



it’s though that they should be
participating.

It’s like the AF Adderley
Junior High hosting the presti-
gious Hugh Campbell Basketball
Classic for senior boys and the
Taberncle Baptist Falcons or the

Catholic High Crusaders opting |

not to travel here to compete.

No doubt, SAC’s absence in
Grand Bahama will do just that.
It will also deprive some of the
top athletes from displaying their
skills in what is being billed by
the BAAA’s as a showcase of
their “Carifta medalists.”



and will go on.

So really, the focus should be
placed on the schools who have
accepted the invitation to travel
to Grand Bahama to compete.

H« do you think they
would feel if they are
making an effort to send their

teams to Grand Bahama and the
only concern being expressed is

the absence of SAC?

To have 30 or more schools in
Grand Bahama is a mammoth
task.

That means that there will be
at least 20 or more schools that
will make the trek to Grand
Bahama.

It speaks volumes for what the
BAAA is trying to achieve.

W hile I feel the parents
of athletes attending

SAC have a right to voice their
displeasure, it’s a decision that
the administration has made and
it’s something that they need to
deal with at that level.

The BAAA has proposed that
every odd year, they will be tak- -
ing their National High School
Championships to Grand
Bahama.

So that means in 2007, the par-

- ents may be confronted with this

same issue.

But if SAC decides to stick
with their decision not to travel,
then I think the concentration
should be placed on the teams
who are making their way there.

The BAAA won’t stop hosting
the championships because of
SAC’s absence.

The BAAA still has a vast
amount of teams that are
supporting them in their endeay:
ours.



Ray Minus Jt.
























THE top four teams advanced to the men's
semifinals of the Baptist Sports Council 2005
basketball playoffs on Tuesday night at the
Baillou Hills Sporting Complex.

On the president's side, pennant winning

47-36, while second place Calvary Bible routed
third place Faith United 63-26.

Mount Tabor will now have to square off
against Calvary Bible in the divisional finals

tonight at 7pm.

' On the vice president's side, pennant win-
ning Evangelistic Centre held off fourth-place
New Bethlehem 25-21 and second place New
Mount Zion nipped third place BIBA 43-40 to
set-up the other half of the showdown tonight.

It will be played between Evangelistic Centre
and New Mount Zion.

The two winners will clash in the best-of-
three championship series that will start on
Tuesday night at the same venue.

Here's a summary of how they advanced:

# Mount Tabor 47, Golden Gates 36: Albert
Simmons lit up the nets for a game high 17
points, Donny Johnson had 10 and Marvin Hen-
field assisted with eight in the win.







- Available from’ comment Ne



it to BSC semis

Mount Tabor Full Gospel knocked off fourth.
place finishers Golden Gates Native Baptist ~

Syn



Keron Rodgers scored 15, while Edward
Carey had seven and JeRon Cooper added six
in the loss.

@ Calvary Bible 63, Faith United 26: Cal-
vary Bible went on a 23-7 tear in the first quar-

ter and they were never challenged the rest of |

the way as they blew out Faith United.

Marvin Nairn led the way with a game high
17, while Michaelo Kelly contributed 16 and
Tori Clarke added 12 in the win-Ray Napoleon
scored 11 in a losing effort.

H New Mount Zion 43, BIBA 40: Ricardo
Rolle's game high 19 and Raymond Tinker's 14
was good enough to enable New Mount Zion to
pull off their win. Mario Davis helped out with
seven points.Burlington Moss scored 11 in a
losing effort.

@ Evengelistic Centre 25, New Bethlehem
21: Tyrone Sands was unstoppable as he hit
Evengelistic Centre's first eight points and the
last one to finish with a game high 16. Lamont
Bain helped out with five.

Terrell Duncombe scored five in the loss for
New Bethlehem.On Saturday at Baillou Hills,
the BSC will showcase the 15-and-under and 19-
and-under playoffs, starting at 10am.

sCopyrighted Me Mat

dicated Cx Content








erlal,

neh We

33
Prov l Id e rs eae as a result of the tal-

“— =

pays tribute to.
amateur box

LOCAL boxer Cameron Knowles will be laid’ to
rest this weekend following his untimely death. ©

The body of the 24-year- -old from Long Island ‘was
found in the waters of Potters Cay dock last week.

Knowles, who started boxing at.the age of 13,
was a member of the Feast Amateur Boxing

the Carifta Games in Jamaica in 2000 anda bronze
medal winner at the event in 1999.

Champion Boxing Club president Ray Minus Jr
said Knowles was one of his most ‘dedicated students
and trained hard.

“His goal was to become a professional and win
a world title,” Minus said. “He was hoping to be a -
Bahamian champion. He made a strong statement ~
in amateur boxing for the Bahamas by attending
matches in Florida and won a gold medal at the
Bahamas Games.”

As Mr Minus reflected on Knowles’ career he
recalled one particular moment from that gold

’ medal winning run in the 2000 Carifta Games.

“Cameron was in a fight so intense, against an
opponent from Guyana, that both fighters collided
hands. Cameron was so strong-that he broke that
boxer’s hand. He beat the best in Guyana.”

The Champion Amateur Boxing Club sends its
condolences to the family of Cameron Knowles.

The funeral is at 1pm on Saturday at the Church
of God on Bernard Road.

@ CAMERON KNOWLES

Wisdom

praises
Carifta
athletes

MINISTER of Youth, Sports
and Culture Neville Wisdom
offered congratulations to the
members of both the 2005 track
and field and swimming teams
that participated in the Carifta
Games in Tobago and Curacao
respectively.

“I am able to report that at
each destination, both our
junior national teams continued
to expand the rich legacy of the
Bahamas as a regional sports
power despite our limited pop-
ulation base,” Wisdom stated

ent and skills that were\dis-
played in Tobago and again in
Curacao, the Bahamas is well
poised to retain and then main-
tain a leadership position in



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athletics and swimming among
other countries of the
Caribbean.”

Wisdom said the Bahamas
achieved a total of 30 medals,
inclusive of five gold, seven sil-
ver and 18 bronze, but the fig-
ures should have increased by
two if the Under-20 boys pole
vault were not classified as an
exhibition event.

- “T am pleased to report that

much the same successes were
recorded by our Carifta swim
team in Curacao,” he added of
the team, which collected 512
medals, including 24 gold, 20
silver and nine bronze.



IMED 189

WINES & SPIRITS
Fay OY ec OT 0

: Tobacco Smoking may cause Heart Disease or
ung Cancer among other diseases





nee en LO A A A CR TONE NI SS eh ti ener rene nearer eer,

pte e-em - te eS SP SSS se Sis ss vs 7 :

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

GOLDEN Girl Deb-
bie Ferguson will have
another prestigious
accolade added to her
name at the end of the
month.

The most decorated
Bahamian sprinter will
be inducted into the
Drake Relays Athletes
Hall of Fame during a
reception at the Drake
Knapp Center.

But Ferguson may not
be able to attend the
induction reception
unless she's fully recov-
ered from the surgery
she underwent on Tues-
day night for her appen-
dix at Kendall Medical
Centre.

Ferguson's mother,
Elka Ferguson, who
rushed from Nassau to
be with her at the hospi-
tal in Miami on Tuesday,
said her daughter is rest-
ing comfortably after a
successful surgery.

Medication

"She's okay. She's
responding very well,"
said Ms Ferguson. "They
gave her some medica-
tion and she went off to
sleep. But she's doing
very well. She's coming
along very well."

‘Ms Ferguson said her
daughter is expected to
remain in Kendall Med-
ical Centre for the next
four days and should be
released by the end of
the week.

"Once she come out of
the hospital, she will
stay in Miami," said her
mother, who intends to
stay there as long as she
can to take care of her
daughter. "She won't be
able to do any travelling
right now."

Her mother said she
got a call from her
daughter on Saturday
complaining of pain. On
Monday, Ms Ferguson
said Debbie called her
again to inform her that
the pain had gotten
worse. But it wasn't
until Tuesday morning
that she went to the hos-
pital to check it out and
it was recommended
that she had to have the
emergency surgery.

Called

“When she called me
on Tuesday, I left work
and rushed right over
here," her mother stat-
ed.

The operation was
conducted around 9:30
pm Tuesday night and
about a hour or two, her
mother was able to visit
her in the recovery
room. :

"She was able to
recognise who I was,"
her mother stressed.
"That was a good sign."

The reception will be
held during the 96th
annual Drake Relays,
scheduled for April 28-
30 at Drake Stadium in
Des Moines, Iowa.
' Ferguson, 29, will be
the 196th athlete to be
inducted and the second
Bahamian to receive the
honor.

The first Bahamian
inducted was retired
quarter-miler Pauline
Davis, who was inducted
as a member of the Uni-
versity of Alabama in
1996 along with Michael
Johnson from Baylor
and decathlon Kip Jan-
viin from the K&K
Club.






























































ml By BRENT STUBBS


















-ooev1l HERALD SPORTS



a
~~



.Copyrighted| Material
Syndicated Content












~



Available from Commercial News Providers;







Senior Sports .
Reporter

MARK Knowles and
Daniel Nestor, playing on
the red clay courts for the
first time this year, got off
to a good start in their first
match at the Masters Series
Monte-Carlo.

The top seeded team made
quick work of Daniele Brac-
ciali and Giorgio Galimber-
ti of Italy with a 6-1, 6-4 vic-
tory yesterday at the ATP
Masters Series event.

“It was a great start. Obvi-
ously, we played great
today,” said Knowles from
his hotel room in Monte-
Carlo. “We came out really
fast and won the first set
rather easily.

“We also had a pretty
good second set, which is
really important. It’s really a
lot of different conditions on
the red clay, which is a chal-
lenge for us.”

Having played on fast sur-

faces all year long, Knowles

_ Said it’s a good change of

pace to play on the slower
red clay courts.
“It’s a different animal.

4

(

” Doubles pair off to winning

start in Monte Carlo



It’s a lot slower and guys get:

to hit a lot more second and
third shots from the. back,”
Knowles reflected. “It’s a
tournament that we’ve never
won before, so we would
love to do well here.

Battle

“But we know it’s a lot of

work that needs.to be done.

Even our next round is real-
ly tough. We’re playing one
of the best teams on clay in
the next round. So it’s a
tough battle. But we’re look-
ing forward to the chal-
lenge.”

Knowles and Nestor’s next
opponents in the third round
will be the number six seed-
ed team of Michael Llodra
and Fabrice Santoro of
France.

If they stay as focussed as

they were in their second

round match, Knowles is
confident that they can

prevail against the French-
men. Sa
“We have to play a.differ-
ent game plan because the
play is going to be slightly
different,” Knowles antici-
pated. “The ball movement
is on the clay is different, so
either team will have to bat-
fee oe ees oe

“So we just have to be

ready to battle and to go out
there and execute like we
know how too.”

Knowles said there’s a lot of

pressure put on him and
Nestor to succeed, but he
stressed that they’ve been
taking care of. business as
usual. a Sea I
“We’re happy to have the
number one seeding, but it’s
a long year,” he insisted.

_ “We just want to get the win

and be able to move on from
here.” —-:

As.the No.4 seeded team
last. year, Knowles and
Nestor were.eliminated in
the semifinal by the No.7
team of Etlis Gaston and
Martin Rodriguez of
Argentina.

Ousted

Ih 2003 as the top. seeded
team, they were ousted in

the first round by the’

unseeded team of Wayne

Arthurs and Paul Hanley of.

Australia.

Going into Monte-Carlo,
Knowles and Nestor have
only won the ATP Masters
Series in Indiana Wells.
They were also finalists in
Marseilles and semifinalists
in Miami and in Rotterdam.

However, they lost in the
first round of the Australian

Open, the first.Grand slam
for the year.

Knowles said they’re hop-
ing to use this stretch of
tournaments to prepare for
the French open - the sec-
ond Grand Slam of the year
- scheduled to start on May .
23.

After they play in Monte-
Carlo, they will return to the
United States to play in
Houston, Texas at the US
Men’s Claycourt Champi-
onships next week before
they take a week off.

If there is a surface they
enjoy playing on, Knowles
said it would have to the
hard courts where they won
the US Open for their sec-
ond Grand Slam title last
year.

“We’ve done really well
on the clay. We’ve had good
results,” he stated. “But it’s
probably last on our list
because you can play really
well from the back.

“There are a lot of other
great players out there on
clay. They don’t play so
much on the other surfaces
like the hard court because
you have to have all facets of
the game working for you.”








- THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

SECTION



The Tribune



Sermons, Church Activities, Awards

Church Notes

Page 2C



Are we losing respect for

sanctity of the church?



@ BISHOP Ross Davis examines the damage after Golden Gates
Assembly was the target of a burglary.

The life and legacy
of Pope John Paul II

i By FRANCIS NORONHA

_ “BE Not Afraid!” These were among
the first words uttered by the new Pope
John Paul II, with a large crucifix before
him, in October 1978, and these few words
encapsulated the life and work of a man
who has left his mark on history.

In 1848 Polish poet Julius Slowacki pre-
dicted that a Slavic Pope would travel far
and wide and help to put order in a chaot-
ic world.

Student leader, labourer, factory work-
eT, actor, sportsman, theologian and
philosopher (with two doctorates), play-
wright, world traveller, linguist, Pope John

. Paul II lived under Nazism — where he
- was on the blacklist for helping belea-
guered, desperate people, especially Jews

., — Communism (Gorbachev attributed its’
* downfall mainly to him), and Capitalism

(which he advocated should be carefully



(The Tribune archive photo)



HB By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

recent spate of

church vandalism

cases has sparked

concern among local

parishioners who

believe that the country may be losing

its respect for the sanctity of the
church and what it represents.

On Sunday morning, church offi-

cials at the Golden Gates Assembly

World Outreach Ministries on

Carmichael Road arrived to find that.

the church’s office had been broken
into and ransacked. It is unknown
how the intruders entered the build-
ing, but once inside, they smashed in
several doors before using a fire extin-
guisher to break the door leading into
the church’s executive offices. There,
drawers and file cabinets were pried
open and papers thrown everywhere.
Total damage is estimated at a min-
imum of $8,000.
. This unfortunate incident follows

‘another break-in at the Cedars of

Lebanon Cathedral, Buttonwood Dri-
ve in Nassau Village. Over the Easter

holiday, the unfinished facility was

the target of burglars who broke sev-
eral windows and vandalised the
church’s office.

According to Bishop Ross Davis
of Golden Gates Assembly, these
incidents are not isolated.

He has been in contact with pas-
tors throughout New Providence and
learned of other cases of vandalism to
church property that haven’t made
the news.

The Church of God of Prophecy
has experienced break-ins at three of

its churches in the last 10 days;
Englerston, Seven Hills and Mead-
ow Street. The Good Samaritan King-
dom Ministries, Godet Avenue was
broken into on Sunday night, and
Zion South Beach Full Gospel Bap-
tist, Zion Boulevard was broken into
on the first Sunday of this month.

In a sermon following his church’s
break-in, Rev Dr Charles C Rolle,
pastor of Cedars of Lebanon told his
congregation: “The devil is busy.
Thieves have no respect. for God’s
house, disrespecting God’s house and
desecrating His house. Something is

wrong when people have no respect

for the sanctuary of God. It seems as
if men have no respect for God’s
house these days...”

Property.

Bishop Davis agrees, and says that

a disrespect for church property is a

“terrible ongoing problem”.
“Tt is an island-wide epidemic. In

fact, very few churches have not been |

vandalised. If you go in.a church
today, it is common to see church

speakers bolted to the walls, and win- |

dows on the first floor with burglar
bars. That’s not uncommon when
people build a church today, so this is
a sign that times have changed,” Bish-
op Davis told Tribune Religion in an
interview.

“Whenever and wherever we have
wayward persons, persons who are
taking their lives into their own hands,
this will be a common trend,” he adds.

And while the pastor cites these
recent incidents, he noted that this is
not a problem that has just surfaced,
but it has “ashamedly been with us

Df” Uy in

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* Hard Back * Soft Back
WAS $23.98 WAS $15.98
NOW $17.98 NOW $ 9.98

and continually monitored to prevent vio-
lation of basic human rights in the interests

_ of money).

Stressing the ethnic background of the
Church, he said that it is not national or
international but universal, demanding a
“keen sensitivity to authentic cultures.

Travelled

Towards that end, he travelled all over
the world, addressing people in their own
language even if only in a few words. The
Pope stressed the spirit of ecumenism
among all Christians, and friendly dia-
logue among all religions. He encouraged
young people to be idealistic, not materi-
alistic.

Towards those ends, the Pope instituted
World Youth Day (every few years held
on a different continent, and attended by
millions of young people from all over










the world); the World Faiths Meeting,
first held in Assisi in 1986 and then every
few years (attended by representatives of
all Christian denominations, Jews,’ Mus-
lims, Hindus, Buddhists, Jams, Zoroastri-
ans, Shintoists, Sikhs, tribal animists from
Africa, American Indians and others);
and other gatherings of people from all
over the world to meet and exchange
views in endeavours to work for world
peace (he maintained “World peace is
built on the force of law and not on the
law of force”) and raise living standards all
over the world (he stated that teaching
peace, solidarity, justice and liberty was
not enough, it must be “translated into
action” as in the case of Mother Teresa
and Mahatma Gandhi).

A prolific writer, the Pope in his encycli-

See POPE, Page 2C

BNR Or Nima ae Cee aa aaa ae



for a while”.

Last year, the Firetrail Assembly
Church was vandalised on several
occasions, and had to replace stolen
speakers in the majority of these cas-
es, he noted. “They have had proba-
bly 12 speakers stolen. If not 12, more
than six.’

It appears that the church, which

-was once seen as an off-limits target

for criminal activity, no longer has
that status, considering the graffiti-
marred church walls throughout Nas-
sau, and the theft of church equip-
ment.

Said Bishop Davis: “When you
passed a church (in the past) you
would lift your finger, and in my day
we tipped our hats. If you were talk-
ing loudly, you would lower your
voice, to reverence not only the
church building but also the area
around the church. But now, we have
lost it. It’s a sign that we are not what
we.used to be. They have opened our-
selves to spirits that render them not
their own, controlled by somethin
else,” he explains. {

While the intruders may have bro
ken into the church’s office and dam-
aged its structure, it appears that they
did not dampen the spirits of the pas-
tor or his officers. Sunday’s service
went on as planned, ‘regular weekly
services have been held since then,
and business continues to go on as
usual.

Bishop Davis says that the break-in
is unfortunate, but the responsibility
of the church is to now re-claim its
authority, and “re-fire” itself to reach

See CHURCH, Page 2C

Harbour Boy Shopping Cansra
Town Centre Mas!



<>

Bible BOOS $aGift Shop

“Wl sche ius oF Mbew”



(ono. ANG) SLIPS ORISIORD » ab SaaS
WI IOWoile DIswWooLsS8s Ou



PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





Committee to stage ‘one of its
most ambitious fundraisers’

â„¢ By CLEMENT JOHNSON

n Friday, April 22 the
Anglican Central
Education Authori-
ty/Anglican School
Development: Fund
committee will stage one of its most
ambitious fundraisers to date with a
dinner and concert at the Sandals
Royal Bahamian Ballroom.
The dinner will begin at 7pm and
the concert at 9pm.

The featured performer will be |

renowned international gospel singer
Donnie McClurkin.

The money raised from this con-
cert and following events will be used
to continue the tradition of provid-
ing quality education for the Anglican
Schools. Development Fund. Special
emphasis will be on the following pro-
jects:

e Rebuilding of the Science Block
of Freeport Anglican High/Discov-
ery Primary School, which wass
destroyed during hurricanes Frances
and Jeanne in September 2004.

¢ The completion of the cafeteria at
St John’s College: The original cafe-
teria, computer lab and library were
destroyed by fire in September 2002.

® Construction of a clinic, staff
room and computer labs at St Anne’ s
School.

¢ Construction of additional class-
rooms at St Andrew’s Anglican
School in Exuma.

Education

The Anglican Diocese has been
providing quality education for the
children of the Bahamas for more
than 60 years and has produced lead-
ers in all professions, nationally and
internationally.

The Anglican Central Education

Authority has responsibility for a
number of schools. In New Provi-
dence there is St John’s College and
St Anne’s School; in Grand Bahama,
Freeport Anglican High/Discovery
Primary School; and in Exuma, St
Andrew’s Anglican School. ©

The public is being asked to come
out and support this worthwhile
cause. Committee members are Marie
A Roach, director of Education
Anglican Central Education Author-
ity; Elizabeth Grant and Janet Cox.

They can be contacted at the Angli-

can Education Department, seins:
ton House Sands Road. d

This past weekend, hundreds of
gospel lovers braved the cool weath-
er on Saturday night to enjoy an
open-air concert sponsored by the
fund committee.

Incident

The concert marked the start of the
2005 fundraising events. And went
on without incident.

The crowd was entertained by per-
formers like the Caribbean Dancers,
Tennille Burrows and Blessed, .to

name a few.
00000600 00060000000OCCCCOCCOC®E



Church



Bahamians to eather
for evening prayer
and Benediction

A DAY before the 115
Cardinals gather in conclave
in the Sistine Chapel in the
Vatican to begin the process
of selecting a new pope,
Bahamians will gather in
prayer at St Francis Xavier.
Cathedral.

The evening prayer and
Benediction on Sunday,
April 17, will be part ‘of a

, number of activities that
have been organised by

‘Archbishop Patrick Pinder
to celebrate the ‘Year of the
Eucharist’.

The Year of the Eucharist
was proclaimed by the late
John Paul II at the Corpus
Christi celebration in Rome
in June of 2004. In his public |
audience on Sunday, June

13, 2004, the Pope said that -
his proclamation of a spe-
cial Year of the Eucharist
for 2004-2005 was part of his
overall project for the new

+ millennium, to “start out























contemplate the face of
Christ. In that spirit, he
entrusted the Year of the
Eucharist to the Virgin:
Mary.

__.In the Eucharist, the late {
Pope said that the church
celebrates “the central event

‘in history of mankind”. The
Year of the Eucharist began.
with a Eucharistic Congress
in Guadalajara, Mexico in
October 2004. When it con-
cludes in Rome later this
year, with the meeting of the
synod of Bishops in Octo-'
ber, the man, who was
responsible for it will not be -
there.

As Bahamian Catholics
gather around Archbishop
Patrick Pinder to pray, they ©
will be thinking.about who
will be named the next
Pope.

For those wishing to sign
the Book of Condolences
for the late-Pope, the book

~ wilk'témain’ open until Mon-

‘ day;*April 18; in the-foyer

coming the third’Christian of St Francis Xavier-Cathe-

millennium, “Nova Millenio dral. Because so many

Ineunte” the late Pope ~ wished to sign, the book was

encouraged the faithful to kept open for an extra week.











EAST ST GOSPEL
CHAPEL _

.THE church at.83 East Street, “where’

Jesus Christ is Lord, and everyone is spe-
cial”, is scheduled to hold the following
services:
' Sunday, 9:45 am - Sunday School &
Adult Bible Class, 11 am - Morning Cele-
bration, 7 pm:- Communion Service, 8 pm
- ‘Jesus, the Light of World’ Radio Pro-
gramme on ZNS 1

-Tuesday, 8 pm - Chapel Choir Practice |

Wednesday, 8 pm - Midweek Prayer
Meeting (Second Wednesday) — Cell

- Group Meeting

Thursday, 6 pm - Hand Bells Choir Prac-
tice, 8 pm - Men’s Fellowship Meeting
(Every 4th Thursday), 7:45 pm - Women’s

. Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th Thursday)
Friday, 6:30 pm - Conquerors for Christ .

Club (Boys & ’ Gitls Club), 8 pm - East

_ Street Youth Fellowship Meeting

Saturday, 6:30.am - Early ane
Prayer. Meeting

PARISH CHURCH
OF THE MOST
HOLY TRINITY

THE church at 14 T: rinity Way, Staple-

. , don Gardens, is scheduled to hold the fol-
" lowing services:

Sunday, 7 am -' The Holy Eucharist, 9 am
- The Family Eucharist, Sunday School,

6:30 pm - Praise & Worship/Bible Study,

_. Evensong & Benediction

Tuesday, 7:30 pms “The Church At
Prayer

Wednesday, 5:30 am - Intercessory _
Prayer, 6:30 am - The Holy Eucharist, 7:30 -

pm
For further information, call (242)-328-

8677 or visit our website:
www.holytrinitybahamas.org

ST ANDREW’S
PRESBYTERIAN .

YOU are invited to worship with the
church family at 9:30 am or 11 am on Sun-
day. Sunday School meets during the 11

on Friday evenings.
The Kirk is located at the corner of Péck-
’s Slope and Princes' Street, across from the
Central Bank. Parking is available imme-
diately behind the Kirk. Visit us also at:
www.standrewskirk.com

FIRST HOLINESS

CHURCH OF GOD .

THE church on-First Sioliness Way,

Bambog: Town, is scheduled to hold the

. following services:

Sunday, 9:45 am - Sunday School, 11am

« - Morning Worship, 7 pm - Evening Wor-

ship

Monday, 7:30 pm - Prayer Meeting

Wednesday, noon - Prayer & Praise Ser-
vice, 7:30 pm - Bible Study

Thursday, 7:30 pm - Praise & Worship
Service

Friday (2nd and 4th), 7: 30 pm - Youth
Meeting

- Sécond Tuesdays, 7:30 pm - SALT Min-
istry (Single Adults Living Triumphantly)

Fourth Saturdays, 4 pm - SOME Min-
istry (Save Our Men Evangelism)

Ist Sundays - Women's Day

2nd Sundays - Youths Day/Dedication of
Infants ©

3rd Sundays - Mission Day/Communion

4th Sundays - Men's Day Service

UNITED FAITH
. MINISTRIES

am service and the Youth Group meets

INTERNATIONAL

THE church in the Summer Winds
Plaza, Harrold Road, is scheduled to hold
the following services:

Sunday, 8 am - Morning Glory Break-
through Service, 10:30 am - Divine Worship
Service (Live broadcast at 11 am on More

- 94.9 FM)

Morning Glory Prayer meeting every
Wednesday and Saturday at 5 am

Tuesday, 7:30 pm - Choir Rehearsal

Every Wednesday, 7 pm - Bible Study

Friday, 7 pm - Youth Meeting .

For further information, e-mail:
ufm@bahamas.net.bs ;

or call 328-3737/328-6949





May 11 - 15
AU tho
The Diplomat Centre

Call 341-6444 to Pa

Ch urc h (From page 1C)

' out to these individuals.
' “Tt is.up to us now to go to -

the next level. You have to
understand, the people who

. are doing this are from our
» churches, our homes. They are

not foreigners, they are
Bahamians who may have
been deacons or church work-
ers.

“It was like when drugs hit
the Bahamas. It was our chil-
dren that did the raping of our
wealth. So it’s the same thing

here. It’s a sign that our chil-
dren are in need. A profes-
sional thief will not hit the
church first, he would go
somewhere else. But when you
have to break into a church; it

must be your last resort,” said.

the pastor.

While the police conducts its

investigation into the break-
in, the assembly must make
certain that this unfortunate
incident does not repeat itself.

Bishop Davis says that the

church must now be even more
vigilant and careful. Among
other security measures to be
implemented, an alarm system,
which did not go off at the

break-in (for reasons unknown -

to him), will be looked into.
Detectives

. Detectives have dusted the
ransacked area for prints and

‘an investigation into the matter ,

is underway.

While officials could not be
reached for an update, Bishop
Davis says that he is confident
that the perpetrators will be
caught, and very soon,

“These people will be
caught. As we speak, I am
declaring that they will be
caught. I pity them because -
they cannot stand the wrath of ©
God. It’s better for them to be
handled by the police than to
face the wrath of God,” he
says.



Retted Flowers $19.99

Fresh flowers & silk
flowers arrangements.

Mother’s Day

Specials Available





AUT aime) US ae LT ter eT
Phone: 328-21 94






(McCHICKEN
SANDWICH

mn lovin’ it

Pope (From page 1C) |

cal “Centesimus Annus” mentioned cap-
italism as the ideal economic system as
long as it is based on the common good of
the world’s population, with careful safe-
guards for the rights of the workers every-
where.

%

Activist
A world traveller and human rights
activist, the Pope mentioned in 1980 in

_ Kinhasa, Zaire, Africa, about the “scourge

‘of racism”. The same year, in Brazil, South
America, he visited the favelas and main-
tained that “Land is a gift of God to all
human beings”. In 1984 at Yellow Kilife
Canada, in a tepee belonging to Huron
indians he said: “History provides clear
proof that over.the centuries your péo-
ple have been the repeated victims of

. Injustice from new arrivals”. In 1986 in

India, after laying a wreath at the Samad-
hi of Mahatma Gandhi whom he
described as “the apostle of non-violence”

* and “the hero of humanity”, the Pope

said that “the existence of immense arse-
nals of weapons of mass-destruction caus-
es a grave and justified uneasiness in our
minds.”

During his 2002 visit to Mexico, the

‘Pope promoted the rights and culture of

the native Indians, with the result that the

. government, which had planned a new

airport terminal which would displace
many local farmers, reversed its decision,

announcing that it would ‘ ‘put the interest ..

of the ‘campesinos’ first. ‘

In his 1994 book “Crossing the Thresh-

old of Hope”, the Pope mentioned “All
individual and collective suffering caused
by the forces of nature and unleashed by
man’s free will — the wars, the gulags,
and the holocausts: the Holocaust of the
Jews but also, for example, the holocaust
of the black slaves from Africa.

The Pope denounced evils perpetrated ..

by non-Christians and Christians. He
emphasised the sanctity of life from con-
ception to natural death. He.was labelled
in some areas as a “conservative” and in







other areas as a “liberal”, but labels do not
serve to describe him. He believed that .
some areas of Christian teaching are sub-
ject to change, others are not, and that
opinion polls might reflect the views’ of
many, even the majority, but not neces-
sarily the views of God or the Church.

As famous American columnist Wal-
ter Lippman observed in 1926: “There is
nothing in the teachings of Jesus or St
Francis which justifies us in thinking that -
the opinions of 51per cent of a group are
better than the opinions of 49 per cent .”

History

The funeral of Pope John Paul IT was
one of the largest in history, attended by
representatives of many countries around
the globe and also by common people of
numerous nations.

‘The outpouring of love and grief for
Pope John Paul II was worldwide. Here

_was a Man of God who was not afraid to

live nor afraid to die.

McFISH
FILLET
‘SANDWICH







THE TRIBUNE



RELIGION

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 3C

Chosen people



ould the Bahamas

play a significant

part in biblical

history? Could

there be a con-
nection between the Israelites
and the peoples of the shallow
seas?

A group of people who have
devoted their entire lives to the
conviction that these questions
have affirmative answers have
spoken out.

“Bahamas in Prophecy” is a
unique church with the vision
that Bahamians will rise to ful-
fil biblical prophecy once they
heed God’s call and understand
how the ancient text relates to
this day and time.

The prophets of this church,

headed by Micklyn Seymour .

and Marcello Fowler, have pro-
duced a book named after the
church, which outlines similari-
ties between Israel and the
Bahamas, historical events, and
biblical holy days.

“The Bahamas has recently
celebrated its 30th year as an
independent nation,” states the
introduction.

“Thirty is indeed a prophetic
number in the Holy Bible,
which means a time of transi-
tion and beginnings...

“The nation stands at a point
of a prophetic era, a time of
reformation and transforma-

tion, when God will accomplish,

all that he has predestined to
do in and through the Bahamas.
The Bahamas in Prophecy, in
celebration of this most historic
season, takes this opportunity
to present this prophetic docu-
ment to you: the government,
church leaders, and ultimately,
the people of this nation.”

The purpose of this docu- ©

ment, the prophets state, is to
reveal God’s “divine and
redemptive purpose and plan
for this nation” and to illustrate
from the Bible that the
Bahamas is in prophecy — as is
Israel, the USA, Europe and”

%

other nations. * Sk

Said Mr Seymour: “We hope”

| A newly-published booklet suggests the Bahamas has
been divinely selected for a unique purpose in the

world, one decreed in a biblical prophecy.

‘reporter Felicity Ingraham explores its

be received in the spirit in which
it is written and that is, to
inform and enlighten our peo-
ple of our spiritual purpose and
destiny in The Almighty God. It
is in His name and by His inspi-
ration that these declarations
were received and are being
made. We are convinced that
the season in which the contents
of this document are to be ful-
filled is upon us.”

Here are excerpts of the 24-
page booklet, courtesy of
Bahamas in Prophecy:

Revealed

For the past 15 years, God
has revealed through the book
of Isaiah, how this nation will
become a praise, model, witness
and example to other nations
of the world during this millen-
nium. First he did this by reveal-
ing that His Hands are at work
within the history of our nation
and secondly, by showing the
similarities of Biblical and cur-
rent events of the nations of
Israel and The Bahamas. A
close and careful study of our
history will show striking simi-
larities and parallels between
both nations.

The Almighty God would
have us to know that the pur-
pose for the unveiling of the
similarities and parallels

between the two nations, is for °

the government, church and
people to accept that He has
predestined this nation to play a
major role in fulfilling his
redemptive purpose and plan

73, the earth.



“The Holy’ Bible réveals‘that

aS the lightening, shines from
. thé, East tothe’ West, so shall
and trust that this doctimhent will ~

“the coming 'of the Son of Man

be (Matthew 24:27). The Mes-
siah came to the East, now he
must touch down in the West. It
is from these islands of the sea
in which we live, that God’s glo-
ry from the West will be seen.
Isaiah prophesied to this truth:
“to the island will he repay
recompense. So shall they fear
the name of the Lord from the
West and his glory from the ris-
ing of the sun. When the enemy
shall come in like a flood, the
spirit of the Lord shall lift up a
standard against him” (Isaiah
59:18,19).

The prophet Isaiah also
prophesied about ‘the isles of
the sea’ and the fact that God
wili do a new thing in the earth.
According to Isaiah: “Behold
the former things are come to
pass and new things do I
declare. Before they spring
forth I tell you of them. Sing

-unto the Lord a new song and

his praise from the ends of the
earth, Ye that go down to the

‘sea and all that is therein, the

isles and the inhabitants thereof,
let the wilderness and the cities
lift up their voice, the villages
that Kedar doth inhabit, let the
inhabitants of the rock sing, let
them shot from the top of the
mountains; let them give glory
unto the Lord and declare his
praise in the islands” (Isaiah 42:
9-12).

A Biblical chronological
study of the Old Testament will
show that the year 1492 BC was
a very significant year. The
Companion Bible’s chronolog-
ical chart shows that between
1492 and 1491 BC the children
of Israel left Egypt. Clarence

© Larkin, tire his-book Dispensa- . --
tional Truth: (God’s Plan-and....

Purpose ir the-Ages) also wrote
that the H&l Bible was given

eal

. Invites You to Attend The

"FINDING PEACE IN TROUBLED TIMES”

Tom Roberts

Host Pastor

Crusade
2005

with Special Guest

Speaker

Frank Perry

Speaker

Evangelist Frank Perry

April 17th - 24th

Starting at 7:30 pm on weeknights
Sunday at 11:00 am & 7:00 pm

ARE THE PRESSURES OF LIFE GETTING YOU DOWN? _
ARE YOU STRESSED OUT BY THE PROBLEMS OF OUR SOCIETY?
a celle lela eh ea ilar OR THE STRENGTH TO DEAL WITH ~
Vee ila,

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a TOL Hoy-V)\) oles YOU IN THE MIDST laa EM Se (CR eer lol ie
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Plan now to attend, Bring The Whole Family
The Church where “Jesus Christ is Lord & Everyone is Special”

Accept Jesus Now! Receive His Peace Today
Located at #79 East Street, Between Lewis St. & McCollough Corner
Contact the Chuch office at 322-3874
Bus Transportation is Available.



over a period of 1600 years
extending from 1492'BC to 100
AD. This being the case, we can
say that it was exactly 1,492
years from Exodus to the birth
of The Messiah.

The New World was re-dis-

covered when Christopher ©

Columbus sailed from the east
to the west and landed in the
Bahamas in 1492 AD. This
being the case, we can say that
the New World was re-discov-
ered 1,492 years after the birth
of The Messiah. Additionally,
it can be said that the birth of
the Messiah was equidistance
from the Exodus (1492 BC) to
the re-discovery of these islands
(1492 AD).

Enslaved

God allowed the nation of
Israel to be enslaved in Egypt
some 430 years before its Exo-
dus, and another 40 years
before the Israelites entered the

Promised Land. In a similar.

manner, God allowed peoples

' to be enslaved in these islands

shortly after 1492, the majority
of whom were from the land of
Africa. Since then, slavery con-
tinued for more than 400 years.
Physical slavery was supposed-
ly abolished during 1834, but it

was not fully realised until more.

than a century later.
The majority of slaves

Here Tribune :
theories... _

(descendants) were not consid-
ered free until the 1967 general
elections when Majority Rule
began. Please note that it was
exactly 475 years from 1492 to
1967. This is almost similar to
the 470 years plus, when Israel
entered and left Egypt to jour-
ney to the Promised Land.
The general elections that
ushered in majority rule in the
Bahamas took place on the
tenth day of the first month
(January 10, 1967); the same
day God told Moses to prepare
the children of Israel to leave
Egypt. On the evening of the
tenth there was yet no winner.
The elections were tied as both
the Progressive Liberal Party
and the United Bahamian Par-
ty won 18 seats. Three days lat-





er the PLP was successful in.»

soliciting the support of two
independent candidates...and

Sir Lynden Pindling was offi- —
cially recognised as Premier of

The Bahamas. It was at this
point that majority rule began
to take effect. God, in his divine
providence, divinely orches-

trated the dates of this election, _

so as to coincide with the Exo-
dus and Passover of the
Israelites from Egypt.

The book points to Joshua
4:19 and Joshua 5:10 as refer-.

ence scriptures which show the
date the nation of Israel passed
over Jordan to enter the







Promised Land.

The Bahamas in Prophecy
would like to declare that the
date the Bahamas attained
nationhood was also a prophet-
ic one. The Bahamas became
an independent nation on the

tenth day of the seventh month, —

the day the Israelites sounded
the Trumpet of Jubilee on the

Day of Atonement in the land

of Israel.

As with Majority Rule, The
Almighty God wants us to
know that it is He who aligned
our Independence Day with the
nation of Israel’s Jubilee Trum-
pet and Atonement Day.

The Lord wants the govern-
ment, church leaders and all
Bahamians to know that he has
chosen this nation to show forth
His Glory and that we are
indeed the New Providence of
God.

Similarities

He wants us to know that
these similarities are not coin-

_ cidental. The acknowledgment

of these signposts will deter-
mine whether our nation will
be. blessed or cursed.

The book continues with a _
. series of other similarities and
prophecies, and.can be obtained '

at the church office behind
Wonhg’s printing on Chesapeake
Road.

In January this year, the
group held a press conference

‘calling for Majority Rule to be
’ celebrated on January 10 rather
“then January 14. A ZNS inter-
view with Sir Lynden was -

played, where he admits that

January 14, 1967, was the true -
date of Majority Rule.

: ‘Tel: 242-926-641 35 or 242-323-679

c Guest Speaker -
Rev Di . Victor Cooper,
Pastor of .

New. Bethany pony Chur cl

You are also cordially invited to share with us Aoi our
FAMILY WEEK Sunday, April 17 - Saturday, April. 23, 2005

Sunday, April 17th - Family Day - Fill a Pew with Family Members

Family Life Seminars, Sunday - 7:00.pm
Guest Speaker: Minister Nathaniel Beneby

Wednesday, April 20 & Friday, April 22 - 7:00pm,
Topics Include: Health & Social Issues Conducted by various Medical Professionals

11:00am & 7:00pm

OS x



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PAGE 6C, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005



ELIGIO

THE TRIBUNE °°







Efforts for Muslim outreach binds

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Prophetess Francina Norman
Orlando Florida
10:45a.m. - Divine Worship Service

Rev. Dolly King
Hosannah Convention Baptist Church
7:00p.m. -Evening Service

Preceded by:

WOMEN’S CONFERENCE
Saturday April 16th 9:00a.m.

Guest Speakers:

ea a Ve tain Pa a Ta tate aa a Oe Se Po Tie tn he Tea Ven Ba Ci Be Be ta Peg an ha Vin Fes Vis Ea Kea Fa Vir Vin Ves Us Reo Fis Fe Ca Tan Fhe Fin Fo Fala Os Tee Kava Ver aT et aT ae eh eV are T ar Ly



Evangelist Blythe Bailey
Pilgrim Baptist Temple
Morning Speaker

Prophetess Francina Norman
Orlando Florida
Afternoon Speaker

**& COME AND WORSHIP WITH US***
All services will be held at:

Antioch Baptist Church
Mckinney Avenue, Stapledon Gardens
Tel#(242)325-0434(c) Fax:(242)325-0474
email: antbapchurch@batelnet.bs



FAT AT AT AE FI eT ae ea a oe Tae ratte tat



THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

THE TRIBUNE /





‘He loves me, He loves me not’

m@ By REV ANGELA PALACIOUS

here is a game that.

young girls used to play
with the petals of wild
flowers. A blossom was
selected that had an
indeterminable number of petals
which were then plucked out while
reciting the chant “he loves me, he
loves me not”. Heaven forbid if the
last petal fell on “he loves me not”.
The young girl’s fate was supposedly
sealed.
- There are times when we all may
find ourselves playing this game with
God’s love as the unknown quantity.
When things are going well, we con-
sider ourselves loved, and when things
are not God’s love becomes suspect.
We vacillate back and forth with no
stability or security. Like the disciples
on the road to Emmaus, we may not
be able to see God in our circum-
stances, and we may despair and lose
our faith.
Our Lord said to them: “O how




NOW OPEN
Blue Hill Road Store
Store Hours:
Sunday-Thursday 11am-12am (a
Friday-Saturday Tam-lam
_ (Opposite N.1.B)

Call: 325-3998





foolish you are, and how slow of heart
to believe all that the prophets have
declared!” (Luke 24: 25 NRSV). Even-

tually, they recognise Jesus as he -

breaks the bread and distributes it to
them, and they admit that their hearts
had been burning within them while he
“broke open” the Scriptures for them
as well along the road. We are no dif-
ferent when we drift away from the
facts of our faith and become bogged
down by circumstantial evidence which
negatively impacts our emotions. |

Faith

Indeed, we have to pray “open the
eyes of our faith that we may behold
his redeeming work” (BCP).

How much more directly can God

‘speak to us of love than in chapter 43

of the Book of Isaiah? “Do not fear,
for I have redeemed you; I have called
you by name, you are mine. When you
pass through the waters, I will be with
you; and through the rivers, they shall

not overwhelm you; when you pass



MEDITATION



@ REV ANGELA PALACIOUS

through fire you shall not be burned,
and the flame shall not consume you
because you are precious in my sight,
and honoured, and I love you. Every-
one who is called by name, whom I
created for my glory, whom I formed
and made” (vv. 1-7 NRSV): God is
love, creating us in love, saving us in
love and sanctifying us in love.

Assured

We have only to look to the cross to”

be assured of just how much God loves
us and to see what lengths our God is
willing to go to prove it. We were “ran-
somed from the futile ways of our
ancestors, not with imperishable things
like silver and gold, but with the pre-
cious blood of Christ” (1Peter 1: 19-19
NRSV).

Psalm 116: 10 asks the question:.

“How shall I repay the Lord for all
the good things he has done for me?”
And this is an excellent place for us to
begin as well. In light of all that God
has done for us what is a fitting





et Re earth

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1 Large ‘-topping pizza
Pe, chand ee

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1Cheesy Bread and

response?

We too need to do several things:

1. “Offer the sacrifice of thanksgiv-
ing and call upon the name of the
Lord” (Ps. 116:15 NRSV).

2. Speak of what we know: “You

“are my witnesses, says the Lord, and

my servant whom I have chosen, so
that you may know and believe me

“and understand that I am he. Before

me no god was formed, nor shall there
be any after me. I, I am the Lord, and

“beside me there is no saviour” (Is.

43:10-11 NRSV).

3. Respond with “reverent fear”,
trust in God, “faith and hope set on,
God”, “purifying our souls by our obe-

dience.to the truth” and most.impor-

tantly of all, able to demonstrate “gen-
uine mutual love, loving one another
“deeply from the heart”, because we
have been born anew through the liv-
ing enduring word of God” (1Peter 1:

17-22).

When next you think of questioning
God’s love think of Jesus Christ and
throw the flower away.
















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Port Lucaya 373-8000.















393-8000 361-8000 327-80 328-8000 — 393-8080 = 393-8300 Fy





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‘Volume: 101 No.116

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Former financial
controller accused of
stealing almost $140,000

& By NATARIO McKENZIE

THE former financial con-
troller of the Bank of the
Bahamas was charged in the
Magistrate’s Court yesterday
with stealing almost $140,000.

“Terry Murray, 44, appeared -

before Magistrate Marilyn
Meers in Court 5 on Bank Lane
to answer to 14 counts of steal-
ing.

According to court dockets,
Mr Murray is accused of
stealing a total of $139,800
Over a period of three
months.

The offences are alleged to
have begun on November 2,
2004, when he is accused of
stealing $9,500.

‘Mr Murray is also accused of

stealing an additional $14,350
on November 9, $7,000 on
November 17 and a total of
$14,000 between November 25
and 30.

In December 2004, Mr Mur-
ray is alleged to have stolen
more than $50,000 from the
bank. :

He is also accused of stealing
more than $40,009 from the
bank between January 5 and
February 9 of this year.

Mr Murray, who was repre-
sented by lawyer Wilbert Moss,
pleaded not guilty to all of
the charges and was granted
$50,000 bail with two
sureties. ,

The case was adjourned to
July 12 when a preliminary
inquiry will be held.

enn

anti-clevelopment protest

u

rs

THE war of words on Harbour Island reached new heights

_yesterday, with anti-development protesters facing “self inter-
est” allegations from a leading Bahamian businessman.

Mr Warren Grant said many winter residents opposing expan-
sion plans at Romora Bay Marina feared their home rentals

‘would be hit.

. And he dismissed their over-development concerns, claiming
Harbour Island could absorb investment for at least another 50

‘years.

| Mr Grant, who owns the Royal Palm Hotel and several oth-
er businesses on Harbour Island, challenged residents’ claims

SEE page 13

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The

Tribune





Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

sections inside

at. s



has all you
A casual wear
= in wonderful








i By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter





THE implementation of the
United States’ new passport
policy discriminates against

. the Caribbean and could have
serious economic implications
for the Bahamas, tourism offi-
cials have told The Tribune.

The recent announcement
of a new law which requires
all US citizens and foreigners
travelling from the Bahamas
and re-entering the United
States to present a valid pass-
port as of January 1, 2006, has
the Caribbean tourism indus-
try alarmed, and fearing for
significant customer and rev-
enue loss.

Currently any US citizen



















Nassau and Bahama

Tourism industry
fears over new US
passport policy

@ TERRY MURRAY (centre) on his way to court yesterday.

can re-enter the US with a
birth certificate stating they
were born in the US and gov-
ernment issued photo ID.
Tourists visiting the
Bahamas, or other countries
in the Caribbean region, Cen-
tral and South America, have
been given a January 2006
deadline, whereas Canada and
Mexico were given until Jan-
uary 1 2008 to comply with
new travel requirements.
“This will without question
have a.detrimental impact on
our arrivals, government rev-
enue, and possibly even
employment levels,” said
Frank Comito, executive vice-
president of the Bahamas
Hotel Association (BHA).

SEE page 12





Seeceseeneenensncceseseecees vee neecenenesesecuerecsecsecesssoescees.

(Photo: Mario Duncanson)

Government official
Claims Police Staff
Association Executive -
Chairman ‘violated rules’

_ By TIFFANY GRANT

Tribune Staff Reporter

POLICE Staff. Association

Executive Chairman Inspector
Bradley Sands violated the rules
governing the association by
speaking out on recent police
promotions, a high-level gov-
ernment official told The Tri-
bune.
The Act establishing the
Police Association says that
Association officials are allowed
to comment on questions of pay
and conditions of service for
officers, but not on promotions
or disciplinary matters.

Mr Sands was quoted last

week in the media as making
several comments about a
recent round of promotions.

Yesterday, he gave The Tri-
bune a press statement criticis-
ing the promotions as unfair
and politically motivated.

According to an editorial in

the Freeport News on Tuesday,
Mr Sands noted, concerning the
recent police promotions, that
some officers with up to 17
years in rank were bypassed,
while others with only two years
experience were on the promo-
tion list.

“He wanted to know what

SEE page 13


PAGE 2, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



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@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie, told members of the
House of Assembly he “resents
the imputation” that there was

in the round of police promo-

@ PERRY Christie speaking in the House yesterday

any “political involvement”

tions earlier this month.

His comments came yester-
day on the heels of the Police
Staff Association executive

chairman Inspector Bradley -

Sands’ claims that the police
promotions were influenced by
favoritism and were politically

_ motivated.

alli ion 0 Lae in ‘LNG profits,
hile we. get loose. change

ia

and take all the risks?

3. Should our government gamble A
~ with our environment, our fishing
industry, our tourist economy, ©
our safety and our children’s lives -
for the benefit of wealthy foreign
LNG investors who can never



4

’

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Christie rejects
allegations of —
promotion bias

Mr Christie said that despite
officers who had been over-
looked visiting his office and
calling him from around the

- Bahamas to express their griev-

ances, he had made no recom-
mendations for their promotion.
' He said there is “no police
officer or commissioner of
police who can indicate that I
made one representation to
them”.

Claims

Inspector Sands claimed last
week that there are many

, reports of individual officers =f
“and some senior officers tele-
phoning ‘high: -rankirig politicians

to. petition them for assistance:
He also claimed that as a
result, there was more than one
list of recommended promo-
tions and officers who had not
met the basic criteria of exams

-- who ended up being promoted.

“The process has been conta-
minated and integrity has. been
lost,” the inspector alleged.

Commissioner of Police Paul
Farqhuarson said he knew that
the promotion board ,had act-
ed fairly and that every officer
who was promoted earned their
way on to the promotion list.

He said that outsiders are
involved to ensure the promo-
tion process was fair:

“There is no promotion sys-
tem in the Bahamas as trans-
parent,” said Mr Farqhuarson.



“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

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THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 3







“Any fool can see that we have
an epidemic as it relates to school
violence. We can pretend as though
we have things under control in that
aspect or we can be real with our-
selves,” he said.

Mr Reid said that the govern-
ment should “stop playing with the
fate of our young a ag and estab-
lish a gang unit.” 2

Unit

“We have an AIDS unit, we
have a drug unit, now we need a
special gang unit because violence
among youth has become an epi-
demic,” he said.

A further concern, Mr Reid said,
is the apparent general lack of
respect that Bahamian youths have
for the law.

“Let’s remember now that this
ed that they had apprehended and —_ young man was stabbed and killed
had in custody a 15-year-old sus- _rjght near the police station, what
pect. does this say to us? Our young peo-

Mr Reid said that violence ple have no regard for the law,” he
among youth “has become anepi- said.
demic,” and that is “high time for The YAV director, a former
the government to step in and do —_ gang member himself, said that his
something.” . organisation has also proposed the

HINA rm child’s medical fund:

By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

FOLLOWING Tuesday’s stab-
bing death of a 15-year-old CV
Bethel student and a second stab-
bing incident at Government high
school which left a 17-year-old stu-
dent in hospital with serious injuries,
a call has gone out for government
to establish a special unit to deal
with youth violence.

Speaking with The Tribune yes-
..terday, director of the Youth
inst. Violence (YAV) pro-
me Carlos Reid said that he is
disturbed about the most
ecent murder of a 15-year-old.”

“Even more disturbing is the fact
that another 15-year-old of the
same school is alleged to have killed
him,” he said.

After the incident, police report-







BES

—



MEMBERS of the public are being asked to assist a little girl
who desperately needs serious medical attention.

Four-year old Tyiece Bennett was born with several medical con-
ditions, including spina bifida, hydrocephalus and anorectal malfor-
mations.

She is without bladder or bowel control as a result of her conditions
and is consigned to wearing diapers at all times. Tyeice was born with
her spine exposed and with fluid on the brain.

Tyeice underwent extensive medical treatment in the Bahamas
under the care of Dr Ekedede Magnus and Dr Locksley Munroe who
performed a procedure to close her spine in Nassau.

However she needs to go to the Miami Children’s Hospital for fur-
ther treatment to repair her bladder and bowels and allow her to be
diaper free. The surgery should be done as soon as possible so that
she can start primary school.

Dr Rafael Gosalbez of Miami Children’s Hospital has told Tyiece’s
mother Octavier Thurston, who works as a production assistant at
The Tribune, that the surgery would successfully correct the condition.

However the operation and post surgical care will cost tens of thou-
sands of dollars.

Ms Thurston said that Tyiece.would have to spend six weeks in
Miami to recover. She said that she, her sister and mother plan to take
turns staying in Miami with Tyiece.

“It has been a very strenuous task taking care e of Tyiece as a single
mom. Having to travel back and forth to doctors is hard and expen-
sive. I also have to deal with diapers because she goes through about
eight diapers a day. I hope the surgery would help her greatly
because she gets a lot of urinary tract infections and because of the
cost of pampers.”

She added that it has been hard finding a school for Tyiece, as many
schools will not take her because of her medical complications.

Tyeice has told her mother that she can’t wait to have her surgery
so that she can wear her panties like her cousins and said she would
then be.a “a big girl.”

Ms Thurston has held several fund-raising events to raise money
for the surgery, including a steak-out and fundraising T-shirts sales.

However much more is needed.

Anyone who can assist in Tyiece’s medical fund can contact The
Tribune at 322-1986, or if they wish, can make a deposit into an
account which has been established at The Royal Bank of Canada-
account number 7021785.










































if

| “The Bahamas Institute of Chartered
Accountants

FEE EY BERS a0 1K

vo

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- Will co-host a one-day interactive workshop
With —
The Compliance Commission
on

“Risk Based Approach to KYC and Auditing
Requirements”

Representatives from the following regulatory bodies
will be presenting:

* The Compliance Commission

* Securities Commission of The Bahamas

¢ The Central Bank of The Bahamas

* Inspector-Financial & Corporate Service
Providers

° Registrar of Insurance Companies

Venue: WYNDHAM NASSAU RESORT
Date: Tuesday April 19th, 2605
; Time: 9:00am - 5:00pm

This workshop will cover seven (7) CPE hours

Cost: Members: $100 Non members: $125
| | RSVP: (242) 394-3439 (Phone) (242)394-3629 (Fax)

| Payments due on or before April 19th, there will be
“| NO BILLINGS for this workshop

“| | Please visit our website at www.bica.bs for additional
information and updates.

alls for t he government to
stablish youth violence unit

establishment of a youth centre to
the government.

year and a half ago, and we still
have not gotten a response. I am

resource centre as well as a safe
haven for our young people to go to
if they are suspended from school
or need some place to relax and
feel safe without pressure.”

could “educate young people, teach





truth to the accusations.





_LOCAL NEWS.



he said.

The YAV director is expected
to meet with Minister of Education
Alfred Sears sometime today, “to
discuss how we can partner with

and preserving the future of our
young people,” he said.

Mr Reid said his organisation
also proposes that churches be used
as youth centres.

them non-violent conflict resolu-
tion, but not only them, also teach
the teachers and parents and the

“We sent the proposal about a
community as a whole.”

very disappointed,” he said. “T call on all the churches that his ministry to help bring some solu-
Mr Reid said that the project Investors are playing church to stop, andstart _ tions to the probiem of youth vio-
‘Hope Centre’ could be used “as a The YAV director said that pri- the process of building lives,” _lence.”

. vate investors are standing by to
supply the necessary funding for
such a centre, “to see this project
become a reality.”

“We are waiting on the govern-
ment to stop dragging their feet and
let’s get serious about protecting




























He added that a youth centre

Investigation into
corruption rumours

i By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter



AN INVESTIGATION will be launched into rumours of
corruption against officers working under Labour and Immi-
gration Minister Vincent Peet.

Responding to a question in the House of Assembly, Mr |.
Peet said he has turned over all allegations of corruption involv-
ing his subordinates to the police for investigation.

It was not revealed whether the allegations referred to Immi-
gration officers, Labour officials, or Ministry staff.

The statement from Mr Peet came in response to a question
put to him by Independent MP Whitney Bastian.

Mr Bastian asked what was being done about allegations of
corruption detailed in a letter currently being “circulated”.

“Can you please tell me what you are doing to get to the bot-
tom of this,” he asked.

Mr Peet said that he had also seen a copy of the letter, the |.
details of which he did not disclose.

The minister responded that he has referred the matter to
Commissioner of Police Paul Farquharson for a full investiga-
tion so that appropriate action can be taken if there is any



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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005 THE TRIBUNE

eae eee ere
EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited Te achers have

been left behind
and abandoned

EDITOR, The Tribune.

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986.
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Limits to moral behaviour

SEVERAL YEARS ago a senior citizen
of Savannah Sound observed that “our peo-
ple are honest only because of lack of oppor-
tunity.”

What an indictment on the moral con-
science of a nation.

Last month Deputy Prime Minister Cyn-
thia Pratt,-speaking at a function in a now
thriving Exuma, noted that “our personal
standards and an acceptance of what is right
and wrong seem to have declined in direct
proportion to our level-of prosperity.”

Now that Bahamians have more opportu-
nities their integrity is being tested. Will the
words of the old Savannah Sound man prove
prophetic — Bahamians are only honest
because they have had no opportunities to be
dishonest? Opportunity is now knocking at
their door.

“Sadly, however,” commented the deputy
prime minister, “one must proclaim that this
generation in large numbers has abandoned
faith, values, morality and other virtues as
being relics of the past.

“All of us must surely know the limits of
moral behaviour, self discipline, tolerance,
respect for individuals, and love and charity i in
our hears for one another.

“No society can hope to progress, much
less hope to survive without the underpin-
nings: of these.core: values i in place,” she said.

The attitude of many Bahamians — an
"” stéroids were widely. used by players. Not

attitude that‘ goes way: back in'time — is that
we are a special people. Visitors must accept
us as we are — slow, inefficient, backsliding,
often light-fingered with the property of oth-
ers, but on the whole, happy-go-lucky, pleas-
ant souls. Our watches are set on “Bahamian
time”, and even this supposedly is a part of
our charm. This attitude is not original with
our youth — they have inherited it.

Our belief in our own special culture sur-.

faced as recently as 1997 when in his days as
a lawyer, Prime Minister Perry Christie, rep-
resenting the late, former prime minister Sir
Lynden Pindling, tried to explain to a spe-
cially appointed commission of inquiry into
the Bahamas Hotel Corporation that “there
is a peculiar fiscal culture in the Bahamas
based upon the absence of income tax and
other factors which would excuse any or all of
the irregularities of which evidence was giv-
en. a
In their report the commissioners, headed
by Sir William Randolph Douglas, had to
remind Mr Christie that “there is a universal
_ doctrine of accountability which transcends all
boundaries”. Said the report: “The Commis-

sion holds that integrity and accountability in
national life and in the conduct of public
affairs are indispensable features of the sys-
tem of parliamentary democracy guaranteed
by the Constitution of the Bahamas”.

Many Bahamians are not as fine tuned to
what is right and what as wrong as they
should be.

And this is-where much of the problem
begins — a lack of example at the top.
Bahamians watch, read and listen to stories of

~ how some of their politicians behave within

their own “peculiar culture”. No wonder
young people have lost respect for authority.

Recently we listened to a conversation
between a group of young people. What

‘seemed obviously wrong to us, was not so

obvious to them. What was a clear case of
cheating to us was not so clear to them. It was
apparent that they had been surrounded for
so long by so much dishonesty — the belief
that anything goes as long as one is not caught
— that they were having difficulty’ sorting
out right from wrong.

Their conversation arose from the recent
Senate hearings into performance-enhanc-
ing steroids, which are widely used by major-
league baseball players.

The hearings were launched after former ,

Oakland A’s slugger José Canseco and Ken

~ Caminiti, the‘National League’s most valu- |

able player in 1996, now retired, said that .

only were they smashing all slugging records,
but they were damaging their health. Doctors
warned of long-term health risks, including
heart disease and cancer.

The senators were concerned at the mes-
sage that was being sent to young people
looking for an edge in high school sports or
just to improve their appearance.

The young people, although concerned
about the health risks, could not see — until
it was explained in great detail to them — that
these players were cheating. They were
breaking the rules by taking drugs to give

’ them a powerful edge over their colleagues.

This was only a game. But like the game of
life, it has rules. If it is all right to break base-
ball rules, it is all right to break other rules.
And like a pebble thrown into a calm body of

' water, the ever-widening ripple touches and

moves the remaining water until it grows into
a threatening wave.

So it is in life, as principle after principle
goes down like nine-pins, our moral fibre as
a nation is weakened and eventually
destroyed.



I WISH to borrow a line
from the present President of
the Bahamas Union of Teach-
ers, Mr Kingsley L Black, who
is often quoted as saying
“teachers are working for
peanuts”, which is the
absolute truth.

The salary of a teacher with
a Master’s degree is in no way
comparable to that of other
workers with the same quali-
fications.

While the base salary of a
teacher with a Master’s degree
is much less than the base
wage for a worker with the
same degree in other areas of
the private sector and public
corporations these anomalies
have not been addressed.

Additionally the pay differ-
ential between a teacher with
a Master’s degree and his
counterpart with a Bachelotr’s
degree and multiple years
experience is virtually negli-
gible.

Teachers who wear the hat
of being members of “the pro-
fession of professions” have
been left behind and forgot-
ten. The anomalies which
exists between teachers and
their counterparts is obvious-
ly a pet peeve of all teachers in
the public education system.

It is a fact that in many cas-

__ es even the students, with min-

imal experience go on to earn
significantly more than their
struggling teachers.

Hence, it would not be pre-
sumptuous to advise that this
be the first item on the agenda
of the Collective, Bargaining
Agreement Committee as
they deliberate.

When this is addressed then
it is most probable that teach-
ers will benefit from the Nova
University Master’s Degree
Programme, around which an
executive of the union’s cam-
paign is centred.

The truth of the matter is
that the difference between
the earnings of a teacher with
a Master’s and that of a Bach-
elor’s degree is not within
itself a compelling reason to
do additional studies.

Let us set the record
straight.

Some teachers come to the
job already having earned

their Master’s degree, but they

have limited work experience,
others who are practising
teachers acquire an in-service
award or a scholarship and










































[oO uboG

letters@trlbunemedia.net

attain their Master’s, while
other individuals can and do
take advantage of the Mas-
ter’s Programme while they
have their paid job and they
supervise their own time.

However, the ordinary
classroom teacher who has
responsibility for planning,
teaching, preparing exams,
marking exams, attending pro-
fessional development cours-
es, as well as personal and
family commitments faces an
additional challenge which
includes finding the necessary
funds to pay for the pro-
gramme as well the time to
study.

They have been left behind
and appear to have been

EDITOR, The Tribune.

demnation.
them or not at all.

ty and the country?



SHIRLEA VOTER
Nassau,
April 8, 2005.

Bahamas heading back
to those ‘old days’

IT SEEMS that The Bahamas is again heading down the
path to those “old days” when the major objective of gaining
public office was to retain power at all costs. Large segments of
the population could not voice their opinions.

‘Lest we forget upon assuming office, these newcomers spent
practically all of their time so far disparaging all of the good eco-
nomic and social development by the previous government.
When they got tired of complaining, they enthusiastically
embraced the $1 billion Atlantic Phase III as their own initiative.
Then they proceeded to implement and continue the FNM
policies left in place. While in opposition the sale of properties
to investors was ridiculed as “selling out The Bahamas”. The
Clifton Cay project which would have preserved artifacts found
at the site for Bahamians had to be abandoned. Yet there were
jobs for Bahamians. Even some of. the clergy joined. in con-

What was most disturbing was that certain FNMs believed the
lies told and decided to “spite” the FNM party by voting against

The leadership struggle was devastating. Once a decision is
taken, why not rally around the leader for the good of the par-

It is never worth it to drastically penalise the party like that.
The result now is that the people holding power will grasp at any
and everything to retain that power as was done in the past.

Instead it was the FNM that led the way to a new day, new
ways of governing, new opportunities for all Bahamians.

We are now back to the “old days” of the “sweet talk” and
handouts to favourite folks to gain control of minds with a
view to retaining power to bolster their egos. Is there no way out
of this slippery downward slope?

abandoned by those whom
they have entrusted the
responsibility to bargain for
them in good faith.

It would seem reasonable
therefore, that the mere
teacher on whose behalf the’
select comunittee is negotiating
would see the wisdom of con-
sulting broadly, rather than go
through the charade of “talk
and no see” or approved in
ignorance.

This suggested approach is
in conformity with the gener-
al principle of democracy
which contemplates trans-
parency and accountability,
and an informed citizenry.

VILLADALE F BAIN
Vice-Presidential Candidate
BUT Elections June, 2005 ©

‘ Nassau,
March 23, 2005.

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to become available on either the Board of
Directors or The Supervisory Committee at
the 28th Annual General Meeting to be held
on Saturday May 21, 2005.







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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 5



Developments ‘may
destroy Harbour

Island economy’

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

HARBOUR ISLAND,
ELEUTHERA - The econom-
ic base of what has been
described as the archetype of
the “idyllic Family Island com-
munity” may soon disappear
due to the encroachment of two
intrusive new developments, a
local businessman told The Tri-
bune yesterday.

Richard Malcolm, whose
family founded and operated
the famed Pink Sands Resort
for many years, said that the
proposed development at the
Romora -Bay Marina and
Valentines Bay may chase away
the winter residents who have
brought the island “enormous
success.”

He pointed out that winter
residents come to Harbour
Island for what “is naturally
here,” and said that any disrup-
tion in the tranquil scenery may
destroy what has made the
island famous.

“Even when the Minister of



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Tourism (Obie Wilchcombe)
was down here, he expressed
discomfort with the Valentine
development, because it is not
what is normally seen in Har-
bour Island,” claimed Mr Mal-
colm.

He described the two devel-
opments as “overkill” and said
it would be better suited and
more needed on the Eleuthera
mainland, a few miles away.

“Harbour Island has negative
unemployment — as many as 300
people come here from
Eleuthera as far as Palmetto
Point, for (construction jobs),”
he explained.

Mr Malcolm said that Har-
bour Island is used by the Min-
istry of Tourism as the “poster
child” for Family Island tourism
in general.

“Harbour Island has gained
tremendous success from
tourism and foreign investors
over the years, because it is qui-
et, quaint and is ‘the Family
Island’,” he said.

Mr Malcolm fears that the

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i RICHARD Malcolm says the developments may impact on the island’s tranquility ry
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff SS

island’s quaintness is being lost
because “the wrong type of
development” is being intro-
duced.

“All governments, even
before independence spoke
about equal tourism and pre-
serving the Family Islands, and
this is diametrically opposed to
it,” he said.

Fears

Mr Malcolm pointed out that
the Valentines development
“will be sitting in the middle of
a 200-year old settlement,”
which was expected to soon be
declared a historical site by the
Antiquities, Monuments and
Museums Corporation.
“The idea is to protect and
preserve that,” said Mr Mal-
colm.

Local businessman’ Neville ie

Barretta Major further the two
developments as “ugly,” and
said that more development on
the island would overwhelm
what is already becoming a.con-
gested population.

“If I had known that Perry
Christie had come down here
to break ground on a three-
storey ugly place like that, I
would have taken the shovel
out of his hand,” he said.

Protests against the planned ©

developments in Harbour
Island have grown in the past
few weeks, with residents
expressing their concerns about
the rapid expansion.

fecdes in an effort to foster
some kind of understanding
between the two parties.

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DARYL
Parmenter,
president of
Remora Bay
Marina
(Photo:
Felipé Major/
Tribune staff

HARBOUR ISLAND,

of one of the developments

tility down to fear of change.

_“not bad.”
He said that as long as the

| dently”, there is no reason for
the residents to be afraid.

Mr Parmenter was speaking
at a “semi-judicial hearing”
look into the unrest the devel-
opments have created.

He acknowledged that one
of the issues raised by resi-



Developer pledges his
concern for environment |

ELEUTHERA - The owner .
. have not been done.
under fire in Harbour Island -”
_yesterday put residents’ hos-. :company plans to have an.

Daryl Parmenter, who is the _
president of thé Remora Bay ©
Marina; said that the develop- 7 8
‘ments at Valentines Bay and.
his property are. in themselves: Be
-abuse the facilities. . -

projects are handled “pru- a

fuel spills.

. dumped into the water.

















- dents is that. Huvironmedtal
Impact Assessments (EIAs)




“Mr Parmenter said that his









EIA. conducted “very. short- *;
ly”. He pointed out that mari- | ~
na See eements in: ae














Mr Parmenter.said that as
he. would not be providing ‘a
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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



eee eee ee ae
Turks and Caicos in
gay Cruise controversy

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THE Bahamas’ nearest island
neighbours, Turks and Caicos, is
involved in a gay cruise contro-
versy Similar to the one that hit
Nassau several years ago.

But both government and
opposition leaders have spoken
out strongly against the gay
lifestyle, leading a travel website
to declare homosexuals
“unwanted” in the islands.

The row erupted after a
cruise docked at Grand Turk
with 2,000 passengers, all gays
and lesbians.

Opposition leader Derek
Taylor accused the Turks and
Caicos government of being
prepared to “prostitute” the
colony’s future in the name of
development and financial gain.

He expressed outrage at what

he called “a financially and -



EE EE A

v

SSS NSN SN SS OG) SA Sw

morally bankrupt government”,
claiming the islands were in dire
financial straits.

Chief Minister Michael Mis-
ick responded by saying he and
his government were unaware
of plans for the ship’s visit - and
denied Mr Taylor’s claims on
the islands’ financial state.

Liberty

And he added: “Whilst as a
government we respect civil lib-
erties, the freedom of choice
and we do refrain from dis-
criminating, we are in no way
supportive of or encourage the
alternative lifestyle of these
individuals.

“We regret that-our people
and especially our children have
been exposed to this type of

activity and express concern in
this regard.”

But Mr Misick said Mr Tay-
lor’s words were “very hypo-
critical”, considering it was his
signature that had made gay
and lesbian relationships legal
on the islands.

It was under Mr Taylor’s
PDM administration, he said,
that a White Paper was signed
accepting the alternative
lifestyle and allowing a local
resort to host a gay convention.

Standards

Mr Misick assured the peo-
ple that his government upheld
the country’s moral standards
while seeking avenues of devel-
opment consistent with local
culture.



Bahamasair management

training is launched

NAMING 2005 the “year
of quality service”, Bahama-
sair yesterday launched a
management training semi-
nar at the Nassau Beach
Hotel.

All customer service staff
have already been trained in
the areas. of service quality,
grooming, and deportment in
accordance with Bahama-
sair’s “New Attitude” cam-
paign, airline officials said.

According to Bahamasair
Holdings chairman Basil
Sands, the airline is ensuring
that good principles and ser-
vice quality practices are
instilled in managerial
employees.

“All of this training is in
keeping with the airline’s
“New Attitude” theme in
raising the service quality bar

gence of the low-cost carri-
ers, Mr Sands said.

Mr Sands said: “This train-
ing will provide the answer
to those problems. We have
seen much improvement over
the Easter holiday in man-
agement of peak traffic.
Delays were minimal and in
most cases their causes were
external to us and primarily
due to some of the runways
undergoing construction.”

The airline is facing pri-
vatisation and attempting to
cope with an influx of low-
cost carriers to the local mar-
ket such as Jet Blue and Spir-
it Airlines.

Mr Sands admitted that
quality service and price will
be the determining factors in
whether Bahamasair will be
able to compete with the new
carriers.

“Once our on-time perfor-

public will view Bahamasair
as the airline of choice.



He countered Mr Taylor’s
claims on the financial front by
saying the colony had a healthy
bank balance and bright finan-
cial future.

Website

The travel website Turbo
News, in reporting the row, said:
“Gays and lesbians might just
as well erase Turks and Caicos
from their list of travel destina-
tions.”

A similar row erupted in Nas-
sau in the 1990s, but the gov-
ernment made it clear there was
no policy of discrimination
against gays.

Bay Street traders have
admitted that gays make good
customers, especially in the jew-
ellery and perfume business.

With no families to support,
and no school fees to find, their
disposable income is generally
much higher than that of het-
erosexuals.



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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 7.



House briefs

@ New House rules to come
into effect April 27 2005

MEMBERS of the
House of Assembly
yesterday voted
unanimously that the new
rules governing conduct in
the House of Assembly will
take effect from April 27.

The new code of conduct
marks the first time House
rules have been amended
since the Bahamas gained
independence.

The new rules will
regulate, among other
things, the length of time
members can contribute to
a debate and eliminates the
rule that members have to
wear dark clothing inside
the chamber.

@ Bermuda Delegation
Visits House of Assembly

A DELEGATION
representing the Bermuda
Independence Commission
yesterday observed the
proceedings in the House
of Assembly as that
country continues its
preparations to move
towards independence.

The group, which
comprised of chairman
Bishop Vernon Lambe,
advisor Dame Lois
Browne-Evans, and
commissioners Marc Bean
and Derrick Burgess, were
welcomed to the
proceedings by House
Speaker Oswald Ingraham.

While in the country,
they also met with several
government officials.

@ Labour Officials
continue Royal Oasis
Investigation

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie and Labour
Minister Vincent Peet
yesterday assured workers
affected by the closing of
the Royal Oasis Hotel on
Grand Bahama that the
government is working to
bring them relief.

Mr Christie told
members of the House of
Assembly that he is
confident that, in the near
future, the government will
have news that will be
pleasing to the workers and
to the country as a whole.

Mr Peet added that at
present, labour officials are
working to identify and
correct an apparent
discrimination in the
figures regarding the
proposed settlement for
workers.

He said the ministry
understood the urgency of
the situation and is moving

“post-haste” to resolve the
issue.

@ PM not to release Baha
Mar Heads of Agreement

y PRIME Minister Perry
Christie denied a request

| by opposition House leader

“| Alvin Smith be shown a
copy of the recently signed
Heads of Agreement for
the proposed billion-dollar
Cable Beach redevelopment
project.

Mr Christie said that it
would not be correct for
the government to release
the agreement until the sale
‘of the hotels is completed.

However, he said that
once all sales are
completed, which should be
before the end of the
month, he would release
the agreement
immediately.

Mr Christie described the
negotiation process for the
investment as one of the
most complex and vexing in
the country's history.

Mr Christie said that he
would not respond to the
recent comments made by
FNM chairman Carl Bethel
concerning the project.

The Tribune wants to hear

j from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Call us
on 322-1986 and share
your story.





iment to take out loan



to pay for hurricane repairs

Bank to provide $16.7 million to
cover Frances and Jeanne damage

By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie yesterday tabled a res-
olution in the House of Assem-
bly which would allow the gov-
ernment to borrow almost $17
million to replace funds used
for repairs following hurricanes
Frances and Jeanne.

The funds would be loaned
by the Inter-American Devel-

opment Bank and would be
returned to the public treasury
Mr Christie explained, as the
government had to use money
originally allocated for other
projects to respond to the
emergency situation caused by
last year’s hurricanes.

Repairs

The resolution states that the
bank has agreed to grant the
government up to $16,700,00 to
address the needs of temporary
reconstruction, stabilisation and
repair of infrastructure across
the Bahamas.

The government is to provide
the remaining 20 per cent of the
amount used for hurricane relief
—some $4.3 million.

The terms of the resolution
state that repayments must start
before July 31 2010 and finish
no later than January 31, 2025.

The work covered by the loan
will be carried out by the Min-
istry of Works and Utilities.

Works

Mr Christie said that most of
the work, which has been
underway since late last year,
would be undertaken on Grand
Bahama, Abaco, San Salvador,
Cat Island, Eleuthera and New
Providence and would include
repairs to schools and other



& PM Perry Christie

public buildings, temporary
housing and repair of infra-
structure works such as docks,
roads and bridges.

Mr Christie said last year’s
hurricane season had proved
challenging because Hurricane
Frances was the only hurricane
to affect the entire country since
the 1800s.

Lessons

He noted that there are a
number of lessons which need-
ed to be learnt from last year’s
hurricane season, which
exposed a number of short-
comings in communication
between islands, evacuation reg-
ulations and shelters.

The resolution was second by
Adelaide MP Michael Halkitis
and several members made
their contributions to the debate
in the afternoon session.



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THE TRIBUNE












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HEALTHY public
debate on The
Bahamas’ participation in the
proposed Free Trade Area of
the Americas (FTAA), the
World Trade Organisation
(WTO) and the Caribbean
Single Market and Economy
(CSME) would be a good
thing.

’ However, we cannot have
such a debate when govern-
ment officials like Minister
Fred Mitchell continue to mis-
inform the Bahamian people,



Spring Js ¢tere| Fred Mitchell

STRAIGHT UP TALK.



—

when he said that the FNM
signed the country onto the
FTAA. Agreeing to negotiate
a contract is not the same as
signing one.

Second, Mr Mitchell was
wrong, dead wrong, to say that
having agreed to negotiate a
FTAA agreement, the former



“Mr Mitchell is a novice to
international trade matters
and joined the government
only three years ago. He
cannot say what the former
administration would have

done.”



either out of sheer ignorance
or as a matter of pure poli-

- ticking. The fact is that Mr

Mitchell has been embarrass-
ingly wrong on a number of
his public utterances on trade
matters.

To begin with, the former
administration under the lead-
ership of the Right Hon
Hubert Ingraham never signed
The Bahamas onto the FTAA
because there was and is now
no PTAA.

In 1994, Mr Ingraham along
with the other 33 leaders who
attended the Summit of the
Americas in Miami merely
signed a “Declaration of Prin-
ciples”, which resolved to,
among other things, negotiate
a FTAA agreement by 2005.

Today, there is no FTAA,
only a third draft agreement,
which remains highly con-
tentious and unlikely to be
concluded earlier than 2007.

Mr Mitchell was simply,wrong .

administration would have
signed on at the end of the
day. This goes against all logic
and is frankly surprising to
hear from Minister Mitchell
who seems to revel in the leg-
end of his own intelligence.

I spent five years in the
Ingraham administration as a
cabinet minister and at no time
was there any determination
to sign onto the FTAA no
matter what. We participated
in the negotiations to see

VARGO



LA CNG

whether at the end of the day
there was an agreement that
would be beneficial to sign.

Only after completing nego-
tiations could we know such a
thing and the process ‘was so
far from complete that no
determination could be made
in advance.



r Mitcheit is a
novice to interna-
tional trade matters and joined
the government only three
years ago. He cannot say what
the former administration
would have done. Indeed, I
challenge him to produce one
shred of evidence that the
FNM-government would have
simply signed onto the FTAA
once negotiations were com-
plete.

Third, no matter how often
Mr Mitchell ignorantly or
deceivingly states that the
Bahamas has not applied for
full membership in the World
Trade Organisation (WTO) he

-is wrong, dead wrong.

Both the records of the gov-
ernment of The Bahamas as
well as the WTO will show
that he is wrong. The fact is
that I, as then Minister of Eco-
nomic Development, made the
application in Geneva,
Switzerland, in July, 2001, one
full year following our becom-

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Heston Dean on piano, ‘Willie’ on bass, Neil Symonette on drums.



Please call the restaurant for more information = Tel: 327 0962/5


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 9



US Ambassador praises joint initiatives.

wrong again

ing an observer in the organi-
sation. I was duly authorised to
do so by the Cabinet of The
Bahamas.

The consultants of which Mr
‘ Mitchell spoke were hired to
help us prepare a Memoran-
dum of Trade Regime, which
_, would be submitted after the
- application was made. The
application was made and the
memorandum is being pre-
pared.

‘Quite frankly, this is all easy
to verify. Mr Mitchell need
only to ask the ministry
responsible for WTO matters
whether this is the case rather
“ipa continue to mislead the
~ Bahamian public on the same.

Fourth, when I questioned
the fact that Mr Mitchell so
. frequently speaks on trade
. matters when his colleague,
‘the real minister of trade, the
’ ‘Hon Leslie Miller, is so silent,
’ T meant all trade matters, not
_ merely the CSME, which
: “seems to’ be some personal pet
"project of his of late.

Mr Mitchell is quoted in the
_ press speaking frequently on
the FTAA and WTO, neither
of which is in his portfolio, at
* Jeast not according to the offi-
cial gazette of portfolio allo-
cations. Mr Miller, Minister of
‘ Trade and Industry, is respon-
_ sible for LOME, NAFTA,
EU/ACP, WTO and FTAA.

S the minister of
trade should have more
accurate information to offer
the people on these matters
than the minister who is not
responsible for such matters.
Perhaps Mr Miller’s recent
silence on these issues reflects
his disgust with Mr Mitchell’s
usurping his authority.

As adjunct, I do not need to
..Sow discord among govern-
ment ministers in the PLP, as
«Mr Mitchell suggested. Minis-
ter Mitchell and his colleagues
are doing an excellent job of
that all by themselves.

Finally, Mr Mitchell wants

».-the FNM fo join him on, ts: a
; M doe

not need to join Mr Mitchell
because the only position The
Bahamas has on CSME to
date is the one put by former
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham when he told his col-
league heads of government
in a meeting in Nassau in 2001
that the only way The
Bahamas could join the COME
was if it had exemption from
the free movement of labour,
among other things.

Mr Mitchell seems to be
telling the public that such an
exemption has been given but
he offers no official notifica-
tion from CARICOM to that
effect.

Bahamians must be careful
of this personal campaign to
join the CSME that Mr
Mitchell seems to be on. It is
curious that his colleagues
have not expressed support for
his enthusiasm or his comfort
about joining the CSME.

In fact, it seems sometimes
that he is trying harder to per-
suade them of the need to join
the CSME than ae Bahamian
public.

Mr Mitchell says that he was
“embarrassed”; I understand
his embarrassment quite well.
It is embarrassing to be a part
of the incompetence and inde-
cisiveness that he and his col-
leagues have displayed since
coming to office some three
years ago. Perhaps this is why
the minister laments about
these things privately from
time to time.

DECISION TIME

inister Mitchell says

that we have debat-

ed the CSME for too long and
that it is time to make a deci-









SAT REVIEW FOR JUNE SOW
REGISTRATION IN PRO‘
BGCSE SPANISH GRADE

'[.CALLILR/ GROSVENOR ACADEM

sion. He might be right but
who does he want to make the
decision?

he People of The

Bahamas elected him
and his colleagues to decide
on these matters. If the minis-
ter feels that the debate is fin-
ished, then he and his col-
leagues should go ahead and
decide.

We know that he wants to
join the CSME. Therefore, if
the government is not making
a decision, it must be that his
colleagues have not made up
their minds. ;

Perhaps Mr Mitchell now
needs the FNM and the
Bahamian public to help
persuade his colleagues to do
so.

If this is so, he will need to
find another way. As far as I
know, the FNM’s position on
the matter is clear and the
Bahamian public has not been

convinced?to this date by Mr.

Mitchell that they should join
the CSME.

Perhaps it would have been
easier to convince the public if
Mr Mitchell and his colleagues

did not muddy the water on ©

trade matters with half-truths,
innuendos and misinformation
while seeking to win the

government in the last elec- .

tion.
It will take a lot of work to
make these waters clear.

THOUGHT
FOR THE WEEK

Look where I stand today, it
is much. different because of
where I sit.






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@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter _

FREEPORT - JOINT US-

Bahamas initiatives against illegal. .

narcotics and migrant smuggling
have been very beneficial to both

countries said US. Ambassador ..
‘| John Rood.

Reporting a 10 per cent decline
in drug trafficking from the
Bahamas to the United States, Mr
Rood said the $30 million OPBAT
co-operative counter-drug effort
has resulted in the seizures of tons
of cocaine and marijuana each
year.

He also pointed to the thou-

sands of illegal immigrants appre-
hended in joint operations in 2004.

Mr Rood stressed the impor-
tance of staying ahead of smug-

gler.activities by acquiring more. .

sophisticated equipment to detect
well concealed drugs or migrants

and better. radar:to detect-boats -

and air

He reported that the co-opera-
tive efforts of the US Coast Guard
and the Defence Force has been
successful ‘in the interdiction of
over 5,000 illegal migrants at sea
last year.

Ambassador Rood said the US
and the Bahamas also share a good
working relationship with law

enforcement on anti-terrorism.
“We are aware of the devasta-
tion that would occur if there were
a terrorist attack in the Bahamas
and the implication of that.
“We have worked with Bahami-
ans on identifying potential risks
and evaluating what security is nec-

essary and what is in place. And |

the container port is an area that

we worked together really closely .

on,” he said.

During his visit to Grand
Bahama, the Ambassador read to
students at the Walter Parker Pri-
mary School. He also presented a
$1,000 certificate to the principal
for the purchase of books.

_OVERSEAS Sao

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005 THE TRIBUNE






Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd. $500 donation
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Association president Colin
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(eco

CARMICHAEL CONSTITUENCY NOTICE
THE monthly meeting of the Carmichael branch of the
Progressive Liberal Party will be held on Tuesday, April
19 at 7pm at the Gerald Cash primary school. The topic to
be discussed will be the Caribbean Single Market and
Economy (CSME). There will be a special guest speaker
j : -at the meeting. Member of parliament for Carmichael
| aoe 3 Ses John Carey will be in attendance. Chairman Andrew
FonceninnmaietnnenntnT TT oe ag Knowles will chair the meeting. Refreshments will be
: served.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
funwalk@atlantichouse.com.bs

Early risers are needed to walk the walk, with this year’s Atlantic Medical Funwalk.

With our partners, we're once again hoping to remind everyone of their most valuable possession, good
health. At the same time we need to think of those who are touched by illness and offer our support for a

good cause.

Early risers can meet April 16th, 6.30am Montagu Beach. Let’s make it an all together better start to the

_ day.

A. ;
Atlantic Medical | CWeightWatchers

The Bahamas Diabetic Association

ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE LTD.
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TEL. (242) 326-8191 FAX (242) 326-8189
A member of Colonial Group International Ltd.
Personal & Business Insurance: Group Pensions: Group Medical: Life Assurance & Investments










THE TRIBUNE . THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 11

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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



industry fears

FROM page one

He said that the Associa-
tion is “deeply concerned”

with the implementation
timetable and feels that
there is not sufficient time
until December “to devel-

you shop * we ship « ‘you

opment an awareness (of the

new regulation) in the trav-
elling public, wholesalers
and other businesses.”

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Neral AN

PMiPtartts Medical, :
The Bahamas Diabetic Association

& the Cancer Society of The Bahamas
invite you to join us on our
: “All Together Better” fun walk.

An “All Together Better”
way to start the day!

THE EVENT BEGINS AT 6.30A.M.

President of the Florida-
Caribbean Cruise Associa-
tion Michelle Page said that
the deadline set for the
Caribbean region is “crimi-
nal.”

“It is outrageous and dis-
respectful towards the
Caribbean, they give Mexico
until 2008, but only give the
Caribbean a few months to
adjust and prepare,” she
said.

Mrs Page pointed out that
only 14-15 per cent of
Americans are in possession
of a valid passport, “and
that there is no way for the
other 85 per cent to apply
for and receive passports
until December.”

“This will have serious
consequences for the econ-
omy, I don’t know if the US
State Department plans to
write a cheque to the gov-
ernment of the Bahamas to
compensate for lost rev-
enues and help feed their
people, because money and
jobs will be lost,” she said.

Mr Comito explained that
a large number of Ameri-
cans visiting the Bahamas
are ‘impulse travellers’,
“often from Florida,” who
do not possess a passport.

“Another sizable group
without passports are those

THE ROUTE commences from MONTAGU BEACH then WEST on
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East Bay Street and back to Montagu Beach.

TROPHIES ARE AWARDED TO WINNERS BY THE
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A. 12 & UNDER (CHILDREN) B.

D. 31-45

E. 46-59

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19-30

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The event dedicated email address is funwalk@atlantichouse.com.bs
Freeport Fun Walk - April 30th,2005

official registration form

Atlantic Medical is not liable for injuries incurred by participants at this event.
$15.00 Adults / $12.00 Children: includes “T-shirt, Fruits, Water and a Special Gift”

Deliver to Atlantic Medical Insurance, 5th floor Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Ave.

Tel: 326-8191 or Fax this form to: 326-8189.

FOR ADDITIONAL ENTRIES DUPLICATE THIS FORM.

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ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE LIMITED
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FAX: (242) 326-8189

A member of Colonial Group International Ltd.

Personal & Business Insurance: Group Pensions: Group Medical: Life Assurance & Investments



attending conferences and
have made travel arrange-
ments many months in
advance,” he said.

Mr Comito said that the
tourism industry needs
“adequate time” to prepare
for the new regulations.

“While we understand the
reasoning behind the ruling
and certainly do not want to
compromise the security and
safety of our respective
nations and the travelling
public, the implementation
timetable presents the
industry and the Bahamas
with a huge challenge,” he
said.

A spokesman for Atlantis
said that they also support
“the effort of the US gov-
ernment to strengthen and
improve the security of its
borders.

“However we believe that
the requirement that the
new measures be imple-
mented as soon as January
2006 will be extremely
onerous for consumers from
our largest market.”

Atlantis further said in its
statement that “with over 90
per cent of our overall busi-
ness from the United States
the current timing does not
allow for a thorough com-
munications programme
which may very well result
in a severe and detrimental
impact on the Bahamas’
tourism industry next year.”
~“-We-would-prefer more
time.to allow US visitors to

comply with the require- .

ments, by allowing a similar
timeline to that proposed
for Mexico and Canada,
which is January 2008,” the
Atlantis spokesman said.
Mr Comito said that the

Hotel Association has
already made requests to
both the US Ambassador
John Rood and the Minis-
ter of Foreign Affairs Fred
Mitchell to extend the dead-
line to 2008.

“We are asking them to
give the Bahamas the same
courtesy they are giving
Mexico and Canada,” he
said.

Chief Political, Economic
and Public Relations Offi-
cer with the US Embassy
Michael Taylor explained
that the 2006 deadline
affects the . Caribbean
region, Central and South
America, “with Canada and
Mexico being phased in at a
later point in time, simply
because of the high volume
of traffic, especially across
land boarders.”

Mr Taylor said that “every
effort” is being made to
inform US citizens of the
change in policy, including
a “year-long outreach pro-
gramme focused on getting
this information out there,
especially informing tour
companies, cruise lines and
airlines.

The US Passport Office is
further increasing its staff
by approximately 50 per
cent to deal with the antici-
pated number of applica-
tions, he said.

Mr Taylor added that
although the information
campaign will be mainly

' directed at Americans inside

the US, “the US Embassy is
also committed to inform-
ing US citizens residing in
the Bahamas, to urge them

- to submit their applications

in a timely fashion and not
wait right up until deadline.”

QUIZNOS SUB

GENERAL MANAGER REQUIRED

A rapidly expanding fast food entity is seeking the
services of a General Manager for its Freeport, Grand

Bahama operation:

The successful candidate should have:

- Some experience in Restaurant Management.

- A Degree/Diploma in the Hospitality field would

be an asset.

- Be willing to train abroad and to develop and
implement employee training programmes.

Strong supervisory and motivational skills are essential.

Applications may be sent to:

Quiznos
P.O. Box F-2468, Freeport, Grand Bahama

or

P.O. Box N-4066, Nassau, Bahamas

HARBOUR BAY
(242) 394 5767




THE TRIBUNE



from

official

FROM page one

contributions the officers,
with two years experience,
made in that period of time,
that the officer with 17 years
in one rank did not make,”
stated the editorial.

According to the Royal
Bahamas Police Staff Asso-
ciation Act, 1997, part II
“Constitution and Adminis-
tration”, outlines certain
matters, such as welfare and
pay, that members of the
association are able to bring
to the commissioner’s notice.

However, bringing mat-
ters related to promotion is
not allowed, according to the
act.

The act states: “The
objects of the association
shall be to enable members
of the association to consid-
er and bring to the notice of
the commissioner matters
affecting their welfare and
efficiency, including pay,
pensions and conditions of
service, other than matters
relating to discipline and
promotion affecting individ-
ual members of the force.”

In an interview with The
Tribune yesterday, the issue
of Mr Sands breaching the
rules by speaking out on the
recent promotions was
brought up to Commissioner
of Police Paul Farquharson.

“It is laid down in black
and white,” Mr Farquharson
replied. “Whatever you see
in the staff association’s act,
that is what everybody
should abide by.”

He added: “What Mr
Sands said, I would not wish
to add any credence to. The
promotion board has done
its job and every officer is
entitled to that promotion.
I think everyone in the coun-
try should be elated and cel-
ebrate with these officers
who are long overdue for
promotion.”









FROM page one

that a meeting on Monday night
had been sabotaged by pro-
Romora agitators.

And he denied that a vocal
drunk had been “fuelled up”
by others to cause disruption.

Mr Grant told The Tribune:
“I was at the meeting and of
the 200 people there about 175
were in favour of the Romora
Bay development.

“Some people were outspo-
ken, but I deny there was a
drunk there. Whoever says that
is telling a lie.

“The place was full and some
were standing outside. But
those who are against this pro-
ject were heavily outnumbered
and most were winter residents.

“If this was something where
they could make money, they
would have been for it. But
Romora Bay is going to take
business away from some of
them. They are motivated by
self-interest.”

Mr Grant said some foreign
home-owners make between
$4,000 and $12,000 a week from
their island homes. In a 40-
week season, they:could clear at
least $160,000 a year.

“We are talking about people
who, in some cases, are on Har-
bour Island for only two weeks
a year. The rest of the time
their property is making money
which goes straight out of the
country.”

Mr Grant also accused organ-
isers of Monday’s meeting of

_ not inviting black Bahamians

along, adding that both
Bahamian “chairpersons”,
Ithalia Johnson and Ann
Sawyer, were reading material
prepared for them by other
people.



LOCAL NEWS

He said most Bahamian resi-
dents were in favour of the
Romora Bay expansion project
because it would bring more
work.

The protesters, however,
were mostly people who came
to Harbour Island during the
winter and brought everything
with them except milk and
fresh vegetables.

“They spend a little some-
thing, but they don’t spend
what they should,” he said.
“Most of these winter residents
are investors who have their
own golf carts to rent and earn
plenty money from home
rentals.”

If Romora Bay adds more
yacht accommodation, Harbour
Island’s young men would be
able to earn up to $300 a day
cleaning boats, said Mr Grant.

Predicting a prosperous
future for Harbour Island, Mr
Grant said property prices had
risen by 200 per cent or more in
the last ten years.

Some homes that were for
sale at $60,000 in 1995 are now
worth $1 million.

“Harbour Island is providing
work for 700 people from
Eleuthera,” he said, “In fact,
our island helps Eleuthera to
survive.

“The protesters are a small
minority who are doing this to
protect their own interests. You
could not find three of them
who were born in Harbour
IsIand, and you would not find
ten who are Bahamians.”

Of Monday’s meeting, he
said: “I don’t think it was a
rowdy meeting. It was only
rowdy for those who don’t go
to meetings. As far as I was
concerned, this was just a
straightforward meeting.”

Dismissing suggestions that

Sri
For Adults
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Hosanna Baptist Church
Baptist Convention Headquarters
Baillou Hill Road

>

Cordially invite you
to celebrate the

Church's Second

Anniversary

Under the theme:
‘It's a Revived Church”

Acts 1:8

By participating and sharing in the
following activities:

Prayer Breakfast

Saturday, April 16, 2005
SuperClubs Breezes at 7:30 a.m.

Worship Service

Sunday, April 17, 2005 1

at 8:00 a.m.



| CALLILR/ GROSVENOR ACADE! Y 32.

Rev, Dr. Duily Kiang
Pastor

Rev, Dr. Elkin Symonette, Pastor
Ebenezer Mission Baptist Church

Rev. Dr. Roslyn Astwood, Pastor |

St. Steven's Baptist church

Rev. Dr. Everette Brown, Pasto
New Bethlehem Baptist church

Rev. Ellington Ferguson

bor Full Gospel Baptist Churc’

the dispute was tearing the
community apart, he added: “If
we can’t row, there is no point
in having a meeting. I think
Harbour Island is the best place
in the Bahamas and the rela-
tionship is good between the
Bahamian and foreign commu-
nities.

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 13 13

raeee Businessman hits back at protesters

“Winter residents have a
right to say what they think,
but I don’t think they have an
equal right with Bahamians
who were born on the island.”

Although he thinks Harbour
Island can continue to develop
for a long time, Mr Grant feels
the government should pay






more attention to its infra-
structure.

He also believes the problem
of illegal Haitian immigrants
needs to be tackled.

“We don’t have a customs or

- immigration officer. The gov-

ernment needs to give us more
funds,” he said.

RESTAURANT MANAGERS
AND ASSISTANT MANAGERS

The successful applicant must have at least three (3)
years experience in Food and Beverage operations,
fast food preferably.

Must possess good leadership and interpersonal skills.

Must have good written and oral communication skills.

Must be able to implement and maintain company
standards and procedures.

Must be self motivated.

Must be able to work flexible hours, including late
nights, weekends and holidays.

INTERESTED PERSONS SHOULD
SEND RESUME WITH LETTER OF

REFERENCE TO: |
#12 Bradley Street, Palmdale,
‘P.O. Box N-8425, Nassau, Bahamas,
. or Tel: 322-586516, oS

British American Insurance Company

of The Bahamas Limited would like to

announce that the following person

‘no longer works for the company and

is not authorized to transact any

business on our behalf.

Shorn Williams

Celebration Services 6h RAR BRITISH
Monday, April 18, 2005 thru Wednesday,
Apn20 2005 at 7. 0 p. i Established 1920 AMERICAN

Rev. Cedric Smith, Pastor
Mt Sinai Full Gospel Baptist Churc'
Stuart Manor, Exuma

A strong link in your financial future

Telephone: (242) 461-1000
Fax: (242) 361-2424


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

























This superb assemblage
| instructed for final
auction disposal,
significant Bank
securities ordered for
compulsory sale in
Xercise of lien against
substantial unpaid loan,
TEL Milena Mr eS
for lavish interior
design projects
MU LaToleiIN=t¢cte mele Le, ar0) a
NoCArcIO MULTI AC Lae
comparably

distinguished, precious -
and unusual properties

required for immediate

unavoidable clearance —

by private and corporate
‘owners concerned - the
collection selected &
Colao ice oval cea
jotable relevance to |
RET LS
connoisseur market

DOE Cia Tie
‘Checks, Major Credit Cards ©

f @ 15% Freight and Handling
Charges to be added to each
Rais

Keene Customs se



eA ee

AFTER four long and hard
years of trying, Queen’s Col-
lege has finally won the Nation-
al Speech and Debate competi-

. tion organised by the Rotary
clubs of New Providence and
Abaco.

The Model United Nations
Session (MUNS) was held at
the Radisson Hotel at Cable
Beach on Monday, March 14,

@ THE proud team poses
with their trophies and
certificates. From left: Arielle
Higgs, Yasmin Andrews,
Michael Wing, Caroline Hale
and Tajh Ferguson.

and included schools from all
over the Bahamas.

“MUNS is a great opportu-
nity for students to find out
about the workings of the Unit-
ed Nations and the difficulties
of international relations in
understanding the different
views of countries with very dif-
ferent political systems, reli-
gious views and ideologies,”
said a school spokesman.

“Much credit has to be given
to the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs who support the Rotary
clubs in making this competi-
tion happen on an annual basis,
and for giving the young people

THE TRIBUNE

Students to go on trip to
New York after winning
Rotary competition



of the Bahamas these opportu-
“nities,” he added.

At previous debates the
Queen’s College team has
enjoyed representing Libya and
discussing international law on
terrorism, China in debating dis-
armament of weapons of mass
destruction, and came second
last year when representing
Uganda in the struggle to make
sure the international commu-
nity achieves the millennium
development goals by 2015.

This year, QC played the role
of Rumania debating the place
of unilateralism at the UN.

“This: was a very interesting
debate and whilst many coun=
tries were concerned about
America’s recent activities
regarding the war on Iraq,
Rumania had an exciting view
of being more concerned by the
slowness of the United Nations
‘organisation to make decisions
and was keen to stress the
need for staying focused on
achieving goals and taking deci-

@

, Construction .
* Equipment *

_§ Seissor Lifts °

sive action when it was neces-
sary,” said the spokesman.
Queen’s College said it is very
proud of teacher'adviser Mike
Wing and the debate team,
which consisted ofigrade 12 stu-
dent Yasmin Andrews, who
gave the rebuttal; Arielle Higgs,
from grade 11, who was 'the
main speaker; Tajh Ferguson
and Caroline Hale, from grade
11 and 10 respectively, who
were the chief researchers and
led the caucus to gain support

for their country’s views.

Trip

Asa result of winning this
year’s competition, the t¢éam
will be jetting off to New Yjork
later this year to attend an offi-
cial UN meeting with Minister ,
Fred Mitchell, as guests of. the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

“Congratulations to this team
on a superb performance, and
well done to all competing
schools,” said the spokesman.




Afspmo





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A ree network ei rot mace ers
sand Meg leading as

x Pobcat

Ca

ahamas:

Wersatilin: —*

Crawford St.

Tels 323-5171



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eae

Onkes Field
TB areas aes ed)

py Pe eat i ee cian merit C ea

selected specifically for discerning Bahamas market

e sold:mainly under pressurised disposal instructions"
offering exceptional acquisition opportun

High Value, Finest Quality Luxurious Decorative One-of-a-Kind
All 100% Guaranteed Authentic Genuine & Handknotted

CONNOISSEUR & DECORATIVE PERSIAN & EASTERN CARPETS»

Due to the critical status effecting the majority of entries in this auction,
more than 65% of the Lots will be sold ENTIRELY WITHOUT RESERVE

The auction collection includes many outstanding silk and part silk
Investment Category examples, large and very large room-sized
decorative carpets, unusual & striking village and nomad items, and

/ an excellent selection of runners and corridors.

Rug and carpet sizes from small scatter to over 14’ x 10’, runner sizes
from standard hallway lengths in various widths
up to a magnificent 15’8 x 2°7'

All Lots to be sold piece-by-piece in a single auction session on

SUNDAY APRIL 17 ONLY
AUCTION AT5 PM ON VIEW FROM 4 PM -
BRITISH COLONIAL HILTON HOTEL

Numiber One Bay Street, Nassau

eC TS ee Ta) Mee EU le Sie te a rence iret recta :
Parle 2) 323 4535~ Fax: a 323. xy)


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ete ate tehac ater at ata

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PAGE 15. THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

Se uu cee



Promotion ends April 23, 2005. Some restrictions appl



Hee eae

Old Trail Road © Mon-Sat: 8am-9pm



© Sun: 7am-12noon



THE TRIBUNE

Adrian Saunders - Winners of the
TMMINUTE Shopping Spree
__is pictured with Dino Duncombe.

fae

ity



-R Marketing Manager Leah Davis,

2 minute spree winner Deborah Johnson,
"Customer Service Manager Glenn Francis &
"husband Cyril Johnson. :



YOU CAN HAVE IT ALL!


PAGE 16, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005



Wedding belles
show off some
nuptial fashion




i THIS year’s Bridal Show

showed many wedding styles which

have been created and enhance.

The show this year felt as if it was

on Broadway, with a runway that
ran into the audience








Challenge
| regatta on
Saturday

THE Royal Bahamas
Defence will stage its 2nd
Annual Commander
Defence Force Challenge
| Cup Regatta onSaturday at
| the Montagu foreshores.
This event is being held in
















conjunction with the local
sailing clubs, the Bahamas
Boat Owners Sailing Asso-
ciation and the Common-
wealth Sailing Association .

Activities kick off with a
special challenge “C” Class
race at 10am. Twelve boats
will compete for the top
prize in the Sunfish races,
which will start at noon.

Defending Champ in the
“C” Class, Good Night
Irene, skippered by Clyde
Rolle, will be out to defend
her title, when the first of
three series races starts at
2pm. A total of 13 boats are
expected to compete for the
“C”- Class title.

There will be a bouncing
castle for the children and
games, including whist and
dominoes.










| The Tribune wants to hear
| from people who are

| making news in their

f neighbourhoods. Perhaps
} you are raising funds for a
| good cause, campaigning

; for improvements in the

j area or have wonan —

4 award.

| If so, call us on 322-1986

! and share your story.





@ A NEW trend in
wedding attire says it’s
okay for men in the
bridal party to wear
jeans




& THE bridal party can
wear simple tops and
jeans if it is a garden
wedding, especially in
spring

(Photos: Mario Duncanson)

Julie Adderley: -MclIntosh
DRT Life Memb

05 Area Chair,
IDRT International
embership:



Ison Smith

ArT ACT

THE TRIBUNE
























in numbers
Family Guardian congratulates the ten
outstanding members of the company’s

Financial Services Division who qualified for
the 2005 Million Dollar Round Table (MDRT).

The premier association of financial
professionals, MDRT membership

is an exclusive honour achieved only by

a small percentage of all life insurance
and financial services advisors worldwide.

MDRT membership is recognized as _
the international standard of sales excellence

in the life insurance industry.

MDRT is an international, independent association
of more than 29,000 of the world’s best life
insurance and financial services professionals
from more than 76 nations and territories.







INSURANCE
COMPANY


ee ye ey ey ee

[HE TRIBUNE



Every Woman, Every Occasion.

s
¢



Palmdale - Madiera St. - Mall at Marath
PAGE 18, THURSDAY, APRIL 14,2005.

LOCAL NEWS



- THE TRIBUNE





@ ABOUT 20 per cent of the white-crowned pigeons (above) breeding in Florida remain there
year-round, but the rest migrate to Caribbean islands for the winter, including the Bahamas.

i

d Optimist sailin ,
& Dominoes _

_ j2 Featuring Lae
arrant Officers and Senior Rates —

i dE a
Pa a
a
eon)

Trackin

FOR thousands of years the
Bahamas has attracted many
species of migratory birds that
spend the winter months here
or simply stop en route to more
southerly destinations. Two
research ecologists, Ken Meyer
and Gina Zimmerman of the
Avian Research and Conserva-
tion Institute in Gainesville,
Florida, visited the Bahamas in
late February in search of
migratory white-crowned
Pigeons that they had fitted with
radio-transmitters in the Florida
Keys. Their project, which has
captured and radio tagged 85



down

Research ecologists
search in Bahamas



pigeons over the last three nest-
ing seasons, is answering ques-
tions about the birds’ migration,
habitat needs, and survival.
About 20 per cent of the white-
crowned pigeons breeding in
Florida remain there year-

round, but the rest migrate to

‘Caribbean islands for the win-

ter, including the Bahamas.
Meyer and Zimmerman bor-
rowed a small plane donated to
the cause by local businessman
and the owner of Tile King



“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 19





the migratory w hite- crowned pigeon

Enterprises. Mark Roberts’
Cessna was used to scan for the
radio signals of their birds to
get an idea of the percentage
of Florida’s white-crowned
Pigeons that winter here. Mey-
er and Zimmerman also spent
time on the ground to see what
the pigeons are eating and what
habitats they occupy during the
winter. Meetings with Bahami-
an biologists and conservation-
ists helped them learn more
about the biology of Florida’s
migrants as well as the popula-
tion that remains in the islands
all year.

The white-crowned Pigeon
inhabits the islands and coastal
margins of the Caribbean. Local
populations have suffered from
hunting and the loss of critical
habitats, with some islands
experiencing severe declines.
Although relatively numerous
in the Bahamas, the population
of white-crowned Pigeons is at
risk in the United States
because it is very small, geo-
graphically limited to southern
Florida, dependent on an
increasingly rare and vulnera-
ble plant community for food,
migratory and exposed to heavy
legal and illegal hunting pres-
sure when wintering in the
Caribbean. Florida’s breeding
population is estimated at 7,500
pairs. The species is state-list-
ed as “threatened” in Florida
and has been under considera-
tion for the equivalent federal
listing by the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service.

Significant

Meyer and Zimmerman have
been organising an internation-
al workshop to bring together
ecologists and conservationists
from the Caribbean Islands with
significant populations of white-
crowned Pigeons. The goal of
this meeting will be to gather
all available information on the
population’s distribution, abun-
dance, status and trends and to
identify ways to address threats,
conservation needs and policy

resolutions to national govern-.

ments that would ensure the
long-term survival of white-
crowned Pigeons over their
entire range. This will be the
first attempt to review the status
and management needs of the
white-crowned Pigeon since a
1974 meeting organised by the
Bahamas National Trust
(BNT). Prior to arriving, Meyer
and Zimmerman had commu-
nicated with Eric Carey and
Tony White of BNT seeking
representatives from the
Bahamas for the Florida meet-
ing. Carey and White were
helpful in recommending a
Strategy for their trip and pro-
viding sound advice on logis-
tics.

While in the Bahamas, Mey-
er and Zimmerman were able
to meet with Paul Dean, Lee
Hanna and Lionel Levine who
provided valuable information
on where white-crowned
pigeons nest, feed, winter and

are hunted. They also outlined
some of the conservation con-
cerns in the Bahamas. Based on
their suggestions of where
pigeons are concentrated this
time of year (Andros,
Eleuthera, and Green Cay),
Meyer and Zimmerman adjust-
ed their plans to cover those
areas thoroughly.

During their brief but pro-
ductive travels through the
Bahamas, they spent 13 hours
over a three-day period flying in
the donated Cessna 172.

They outfitted the plane with
strut-mounted radio antennas
to listen for the unique fre-,

quencies of 64 radio- -tagged *

VHF radio transmitters that
might still have been operating
(the transmitters, which are
attached with a harness like a
small backpack, have. batteries
that last about 17 months).
Based in Nassau, their aerial
searches ultimately covered
New Providence Island, the
Berry Islands, Andros, Green
Cay, the Exuma Cays, northern
Long Island, Cat Isiand and
Eleuthera. ©.

“We had no idea how many
radio-tagged birds we would
locate, or which islands they
would be on.

“We felt that any data would
be helpful, whether we found
one, ten, or even no radio-
tagged birds,” said Meyer.’

They did, in fact, find what
they were searching for - thrée




of the 64 birds they had held
and carefully fitted with trans-
mitters in Florida. One of these
birds was just northeast of the
Nassau airport, probably near
The Caves. ©

“It was amazing that within
five minutes of take off; we
heard one of the radio-tagged
birds from the Florida Keys. We
had high hopes that we would
be hearing more of them in the
next three days,” said Zimmer-
man.

Shoreline

jf The other two detected

pigeons were on South Andros
in the Kemps Bay area, within a
mile of the shoreline. After
hearing these two birds, Meyer
and Zimmerman spent the sec-
ond half of their trip on the
island trying to get a look at the
habitat and fruiting trees in the
area, hoping all the time to
catch a glimpse of the white-
crowned pigeons they had last
seen eight months before.
From the ground, they were
able to hear the birds’ radio sig-
nals, but the pigeons’ wary and
secretive nature kept them from
view.

“We learned a lot of valuable

information from the few birds

we heard in the Bahamas. Most
importantly, we got to see what

conditions and foraging oppor- -
_ tunities white-crowned pigeons

have on Andros,” Meyer said.
The habitat used by the

criticises Cuba's
ecord on abuses

ee

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

iv etenm ©"

pigeons on South Andros Island
consisted of thick, expansive
hardwood forest characterised
by its production of an array of
seasonal fruit — an excellent
source, of food for the white-
crowned pigeon and many.oth-
er species of resident and
migrant birds.

Trees that were fruiting at the
time of Meyer and Zimmer-
man’s’ fieldwork were
Kamalame (gumbo limbo), poi-
sonwood, coco plum and but-
tonwood.

How much of this habitat
remains on the islands occupied
by white-crowned pigeons?
How does the Caribbean’s
pigeon population distribute
itself in the winter, and which













areas critical to their survival
are most threatened? What are
the potential long-term impacts
of the various degrees of hunt-
ing pressure experienced by this
highly mobile species over its

_entire geographic range and

annual cycle? These are the
types of questions the Florida
biologists hope to see addressed
over the next few years.

e
Uncertain
The white-crowned pigeon
occupies many Caribbean
nations, and the population’s
reduced size and uncertain
future draws international con-

cern. Avian Research and Con;
servation Institute hopés to

Queer eey RAL te

HAM RIO MS ee

~ (DURING their travels
through the Bahamas, the team
spent 13 hours over a three-day
period flying in the donated
Cessna 172. This was their view
over South Andros.



facilitate sharing of information,
~ collaboration among Caribbean

biologists, and. training where
needed to craft a conservation
strategy that will protect these
birds and their habitats for the
future. !
Although this first trip to the

‘Bahamas was brief, ARCI’s

biologists learned a great deal
thanks to the cooperation and
support they received.

Meyer and Zimmerman plan
to return for further study in
the fall, when their study sub-
jects from Florida (including 50
pigeons newly tagged this com-
ing summer) once again to
make their long and risky over-
water journey to winter in the
Bahamas.



RCA Store

Rosetta Street Palmdale
(24:2) 322.4001
Hours: Monday - Saturday 8:30am -

5:30pm

GREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
SEE STORE FOR DETAILS

ese saASASAASEANASSSSANUAANSANS ASSASSINS
PAGE 20, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

THE TRIBUNE.



Atlantis staff give home for the

STAFF from Atlantis have
adopted the A&A Comfort
Home for the Elderly in
Pinewood Gardens.

A team of workers made up
of managers and line staff from
the housekeeping and public
areas departments went to the
home, which houses 18 persons,
to perform a number of tasks
on March 15 and 16.

On the first day, Atlantis
employees pressure cleaned the
building, which is comprised of
three bedrooms, a kitchen, a
sitting area, and administration
office. This took approximately
four hours to complete.

Following the pressure clean- °

ing, the windows, rooms and
beds were given a thorough
clean-up.

The volunteers spent the
remainder of the day sealing
cracks found on the corners of
the boxing around the building
and painting the exterior of the
home.

On the second day, the bed-
rooms, hallway, door and win-
dow frames and the front porch
were painted.

Company

In the process of completing
all this vigorous work, Atlantis’
employees still found time to
chitchat with the residents of
the home.

Bridgette Outten, assistant

manager in the Royal Towers .

housekeeping department, said:
“The employees were very

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of:-



27, 2005.

TENDER NOTICE

COURIER SERVICE

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. is
pleased to invite suitably qualified companies to tender
for Courier Services.

Interested companies can pick up a specification
- document from BTC’s administration building on John

F. Kennedy Drive, between. the hours of 9:00am to
~ 5pm Monday through Friday.

Tender must be sealed in an envelope marked “Tender
for Courier Services” and delivered to the attention

Mr. Michael J. Symonette
| President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunication Company Ltd

P.O.Box N-3048

Nassau, Bahamas

Bids should reach th company’s administrative office
on John F. Kenedy Drive by 5pm on Wednesday, April

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.

excited to participate in this pro-
gramme, which is actually apart
of the goals for our department.
We had a choice of working
with the elderly or some young
people and decided to go ahead
with the elderly in the commu-
nity.”

Atlantis’ housekeeping and
public areas management team
also presented Esther Bain, pro-
prietor of the home, with food
items, blankets, and toiletries.

Ms Bain, who is also a regis-
tered nurse, said: “They did a
marvellous job... They gave the
place a face-lift and everything
looks so bright.”

Atlantis team members plan
to visit the home again later this
month. Their next project will
include providing the home with
a covered porch, with screens
on all sides, along with patio
chairs and tables.

A&A was established in 1997
and has a Staff of six that main-
tain 24-hour service. The home
also caters to daycare and vaca-
tion clients.

elderly a good spring clean




























@ ABOVE: Pictured are
Ephegena Burrows, space:
cleaner; Sharon Stubbs,
housekeeping manager; and
Desmond Conyers,
houseman.

@ LEFT: Atlantis’ Royal |"
Towers housekeeping and —
public areas departments . ©
reach out to the elderly.
Pictured from left to right are:
Anita Williams, housekeeping
‘manager; registered nurse -
Esther Bain, owner and
operator of A&A Comfort
Home for the Elderly; and
“Yvette Cummings,
housekeeping co-ordinator

‘

hp: Sweeting!

S

"SHOES FOR ALL WALKS OF LIFE" -

Located in the Madeira Shopping Plaza

We apologize for the
inconvenience while we renovate
to serve you better. Our entrance
has moved to the Plaza side next

to Shayne’s.

Thank you for shopping at
The Shoe Village and please visit
our other locations.

Marathon Mall
Opposite B.E.C.
393-6113

RND Plaza
Freeport
351-3274

Madeira Shopping
Plaza
328-0703
THE TRIBUNE







99¢ SALE



DELMAR THRIFTY MAID ECKRICH FLORIDA
FLAKE TUNA||CORNED | | CHICKEN VIENNA NATURAL APPLE
IN WATER BEEF SAUSAGE JUICE COCKTAIL
G6-oz 12-0o0Z S- oz 411.5 - oz
2/.99¢|| ._Y9YVa 2/.99¢
99¢ SALE | 99¢ SALE 9 99¢ SALE [J 99¢ SALE i 99¢ SALE






3-02

5/.99¢



RED APPLES







HOT HOUSE
3-LB BAG EACH
Ss 4 2392 $ 4 49

PLUMS RED CABBAGE
AND BLACK GREEN

EACH

$499 59a

GLOBEGRAPES “WHITE S.LB
aoe = ko



SY
WINN - DIXIE.

KERRY GOLD
BUTTER REG& SLICE CHEESE
UNSALTED
2/$469 _ $2979
NASSAU ONLY PILLSBURY

TAMPICO ASSTD PUNCHES moras Sct

Ba 2 ae ee





PEPPERIDGE

FARM LAYER cont ON THE HE COB

CAKES ASST $999
S$ z 9 ; 16 - EAR
. PILSBURY
WINN - DIXIE TOASTER STRUDELS

ICE CREAM CINAMON, STRAWBERRY,

SANDWICH BLUEBERRY, ey & CHERRY

F<. $372 11.5 - OZ

CAMPBELLS

CHICKEN NOODLE & |

HUGGIES |
ULTRA TRIM,
CONV, DIAPERS

24,28,34,40

VEGETABLE SOUP

10-02

-<29C¢)|
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CADBURY








POWER BUYS
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BOURIITA ten
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FESTIVAL
MULTI CLEANSER SEA
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LEMON, POTPOURI,
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33 - OZ

$4o9

QUAKER








STORE MON. - SAT.: 7:30AM - 9:00P |
HOURS: SUN.: 7:00AM - 12:00PM ¢ 7:00AM - 2:00PM CABLE BEACH &

99¢ SALE

THRIFTY MAID WINN DIXIE TM peualerv ec coun
RAMEN NOODLES PLAIN & TM HAND a CORLL clicaoe
ASST’D FLAVOURS| | !ODIZED SALT TOWELS & CUT BEETS







RED SEEDLESS& .POTATOES





CLOROX . acne s GAIN
BLE ACH TISSUE LIQUID
iV WHITE | | DETERGENT
= | 100 - OZ
POWER BUYS POWER BUYS POWER BUYS
CH TE HEARTY LOAF | | _ FABRUC
RICH TEA
BISCUIT CHICK DOG FO0D| | ASSORTED
$499 2/$ 4 89) | 2/$300

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 21

, ur wa te SAV.A.CHEK ‘Extra-Special’: on each item you purchase, over |
v yee “" {a dollar, with One filled SAV.A.CHEK certificate get a Dollar Off! |

REDEEM your SAV-A-CHEK now at:
Johns S George, Sandys, Epic Battery, GNC,
= Home Fabrics, Godetts Jewelry.
< | FREEPORT: Dolly Madison Home Centre, GNC, Epic Battery, Play Time Sports |

Extra Extra!
SAV.A.CHEK Special!

adits SALE



RBOUR BAY ONLY

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15-02







CHICKEN TURKEY MADISON |

DUNSTAS| nts | FRANKS

120Z - EACH |] |



|SNACKS _
ASSORTED 1.7-0z wiewiceaiewen
| CHEF BOY ARDEE
SPAGHETTI &
MEATBALLS is - 02 w.ss000 abaneeee
KOOLAID .




























PIES ASSORTED 11.5 - OZ saunas — " clr. BONE IN suis WLES TWIN PACK |
KOOLAID WUTTON | CHVOLROST. | GAME HENS

JAMMERS VARIETY |
JUICES 6.75 - 02 sscseesensenaennennnonane
SUNCY
MALTS - 6-PAK 7. Soin hemtag :
HELLMANS |


















NEW YORK WHITE & YELLOW

PRE MADE LIBERTY

PRE MADE LIBERTY AMERICAN CHEESE
2/s500, $382

6-PK






WHOLE

ROTISSERIE | |
FOUR sR ROAST BEEF CHICKEN | |
$799

EACH








| MIXED FRUITS & DICED
PEACHES - 4PAK 45-02 sess 69 $qgee









Bre a eh AS



POWER BUYS































MAHATMA GOLDEN DORITOS
_ RICE LONG FLAKES
GRAIN & | | ASSORTED CHIP aes
PARBOILED | | (nassau onty)| | INA M
5-LBS 14-OZ 7-O0Z
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PAGE 22, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005 THE TRIBUNE
INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Bid to toughen marine pollution standards
as cruise ships aim to clean up their act





“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”
CA-TMaAlUall POLICE

director pleads guilty

e- «

mn

ares o@e of



POSITION: Development Conshucton Manager
REPORTS TO: Vice President of peas

I cE N D ER | O [( \ ESSENTIAL FUNCTION: . :
Plans, directs, and coordinates activities of designated projects to ensure that goals and ablectives of

’ the development are accomplished within prescribed time frame and funding parameters by perform-
ing the following duties personally or through subordinate.supervisors. Manage the construction of
assigned project site improvements including amenities on-site and off-site infrastructure construction.

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd., DUTIES & RESPONSIBLITIES:
° ° ° 8 ° E] Manage and assist the design team in reviewing construction plans, suggesting cost and time
see to ae ea for oS ee ean ot - saving methods, and improving construction coordination and equipment ufilization.
ustomer vervice bullding In simms, Long Island.

EI Manage and assist the design team in expediting subdivision approvals and other permits.

Inter ested companies may collect a tender specification El Prepare field reports, status reports, Redcat reports, construction schedules and other information
from the office of the Vice President/Planning & ee :

Engineering i in BIC’ S administrative building on John _EIAssist in the bidding and negotiation of construction contracts with general contractors.

F ° Kennedy Drive or at BTC’ S Office i In Deadman’ S Cay, &] Administer the construction contracts and changes thereto, protecting Project's interest at all times.

Long Island, between the hours of 9:00 am and 5:00
pm, Monday through Friday.

| Establish good working relationships with governmental inspectors, the design feam and general
contractors.

{J} Monitor civil construction costs during construction and suggest ways fo avoid unnecessary costs.

Tenders are to. be in a sealed envelope marked
“TENDER FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE BUILDING” and f Provide construction quality control, through regular monitoring of construction.
deliver ed to the attention of: Gl Participate in meetings with developer and design team as requested.

[1 Establish work plan for staff and contractors

Mr. Michael J. Symonette |
President & CEO rs f Direct and coordinate activities of project personnel contractors to ensure project progresses on
Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited schedule and within prescribed budget.
John F. Kennedy Drive Review status reports prepared by project contractors and modifies schedules or plans as required.

Nassau, Bahamas

& Prepare project reports for owners, management, and others.

{41 Coordinate project activities with activities of government regulatory or other governmental
agencies.

All tenders must be received by 5:00 pm on Monday,
May 2, 2005. Tenders received after this date will not
be considered.

Douglas A Shipman
V.P. of Development, Discovery Land
Bakers Bay Golf and Ocean Club
Great Guana Cay, Bahamas
dshipman@discoverylandco.com

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.



Deadline for Receipt of Applications is April 27, 2005



‘
1
q
1
THE TRIBUNE

Reyes

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 23



Ministry of Tourism hosts “sc

ninth weather conference .-

A PANEL of experts on
hurrficanes and other weath-

.. @E eonditions met yesterday for ~

the start of the ninth annual
Bahamas Weather Conference.

Each year, the conference
agenda explores the nature
and tracking of tropical storms,
island safety procedures, hur-
ricane climatology, evacuation
logistics for the Bahamas and
US coastal areas, regional
geography and the role of the
media.

This year’s agenda will
include a special review of hur-
ricanes Frances and Jeanne
with a panel discussion of
impacts and media reporting;
predicted and observed storm
surge; emergency management
issues and a look at media cov-
erage of storms in light of the
expanded five-day forecast
track.

Dr Robert Sheets is leading
the panel, which includes Max
Mayfield, director of the US
National Hurricane Centre and
Dr William Gray of Colorado
State University in examining

varied aspects of hurricanes at.

' the ninth annual

The yearly gathering of
research and broadcast mete-
orologists, created by the Min-
istry of Tourism, will be on
until Sunday at the Atlantis
Paradise Island Resort.

| Speakers

The 2005 Bahamas Weath-
er Conference will feature
guest speakers from the
National Hurricane Centre,
Federal Emergency Manage-
ment Association (FEMA),
the Weather Channel, USA
Today and various regional
emergency management
offices.

Dr Sheets, a renowned hur-
ricane expert and former direc-
tor of the National Hurricane

Centre is acting as conference

facilitator.

More than 90. broadcasters:

Br
OAS



will be expecte

Officers.




Contact:

P. O. Box N-7768
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 325-0524

ANSBACHER

ANSBACHER (BAHAMAS

with regard to monitoring q
against agreed benchmarks.

* Assist with the preparation o
the setting of appropriate performance benchmarks.

Series 7 certification and evidence of contin
would be an advantage.

Human Resource mana
Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited

from major. market North
American television stations
are expected to benefit from

this impressive gathering of ©

hurricane authorities.

“We’re pleased that meteo-
rologists have taken to heart
our message of the Bahamas
being an expansive destination
that requires accurate'reporting
with great attention to geogra-
phy,” said Vincent Vander-
pool-Wallace, director gener-
al of the Ministry of Tourism.
“While The Bahamas is often
threatened, hurricanes rarely
strike or affect the entire coun-
try.”’.

) LIMITED

_ Ansbacher in The Bahamas invites applications from
qualified individuals for the position of:

INVESTMENT ADMINISTRATOR

The successful applicant will report to the Head of Investment Services and
to assist Trust Officers in fulfilling their fiduciary obligations
uoted investments and tracking their performance

Essential Required Attributes:

* Strong analytical skills

*» Understanding of basic investment management and capital markets

* Good communication skills, verbal and written

*» Team player with proven ability to contribute to the overall success of
investment risk management .

** Computer literate in Microsoft Office; particularly in the use of Excel
spreadsheets, Bloomberg proficiency and database skills.

f Trustee Investment Policy Statements and

Undertake investment performance reviews by sourcing relevant information
from trustees, valuations, internal and external managers and comparing
the results to the agreed benchmark and providing the results of such
reviews to the Head of Investments and the Trust Officers.

Ensure receipt of and collate quarterly performance and transactional
documentation from 3rd party investment managers.

Update and maintain client ledgers to reflect transactions over 3rd party
investment accounts.

Ensure that all 3rd party investment business activities are monitored in
accordance with Group policies and procedures.

Keep abreast of entire Ansbacher service offering,
the Head of Investments,

ger

give feedback and recommendations to Trust

ued professional development

a MINISTER of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe is interviewed at the conference

Many conference partici-
pants from local affiliates along
the eastern seaboard and
across the country will bring
the Bahamas to their
home audiences live via satel-
lite.

Millions of viewers of sta-
tions like WTVJ in Miami,
WMAR in Baltimore, WSOC
in Charlotte and WHDH in
Boston, will see their weather
forecast against the backdrop
of Bahamian sun and sand dur-
ing the conference.

“As the first Caribbean
nation to address hurricanes
directly, the, Bahamas, as well

iG


























and in conjunction with









as the meteorological com-

munity, has benefited greatly
_ from this respected annual

event,” Obie Wilchcombe,
Minister of Tourism said. _
By spearheading the ninth
annual Conference, the Min-
istry of Tourism seeks to min-
imise the impact of hurricanes
on visitors and residents who
travel to the Bahamas and the
Caribbean by encouraging the

dissemination of accurate and

timely information.

A secondary goal is to
emphasise the geography of
the Bahamas.

The conference will also pro- ;





mote and further the cause
of research on tropical weath-
er systems, hurricane crisis
management, building codes,
emergency and safety proce-
dures and the role of the
National Hurricane Centre and
other federal agencies.-
According to Alan Sealls,
co-chairman of the NWA’s

Broadcast Seal of Approval

Committee, the approach to
hurricane crisis communica-
tions is “in sync” with the
NWA’s mission to foster accu-

rate and timely weather fore- -

casting for the purpose of pub-
lic safety. he

S

il 16: 10am-:

and units are going fast
qualified buyers.” —

William Wong

~ ae se

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

broker/appraiser

~~ William Wong & Associates
real estate sales, rental, appraisals

Phone: 242-327-4271 © Fax: 242-327-4273

Cell: 242-457-0766
West Bay Street

P.O. Box SS-19981, Nassau, Bahamas
Email: williamwong@coralwave.com




PAGE 24, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

ANYA
ALLEN, Queen’s
College, poses
with Mis Raquel
Edgecombe,
Home Economics
teacher and
competition coach





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in class available payload, box size, low end torque, available towing capacity interior room, anewe widest
variety of Body, trim, and pick up box configurations no wonder its been the best selling full size pick up for
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that produces 231 HP, body colored bumpers and a long list of standard features, as you
can see, this Pick-Up is as unique as_you are.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE:
friendlymotorsbahamas.c





ANYA Allen, a highly cre-
ative ninth grade student of
Queen’s College was the win-
ner of the Junior National
Young Chef culinary scholar-
ship competition.

The competition is spon-
sored by the Ministry of Edu-
cation in conjunction with Asa
H Prichard Limited.

Anya’s road to success
began in her family and con-
sumer sciences education class,
where her teacher Mrs Edge-
combe announced the plans
for this year’s competition.

Anya would not only have
to win her school’s competi-

THE TRIBUNE

tion, but also place 1st or 2nd

at the’ New. Providence level.

in order to move on to the
national competition.”

After much deliberation,
‘she decided td,compete.

Work

Anya spent many hours
readjusting and practising her
recipes. Her hard work paid
off on Saturday, January 29,
when she won Queen’s Col-
lege’s Young Chef competi-
tion.

Then on Thursday, Febru-
ary 10, she won the New Prov-



- S
@ ANYA shares her proud moment with Mr Henry Knowles, Deputy Head



tion BVO. there
Finally on Monday, March

idence inter-island competi-

* 14, Anya won the National .

Young Chef competition...

Anya Said she is grateful for
the experience’ and thankful,
firstly’to:God, and then to her
parents Mr and Mrs Allen, her
teacher Mrs Edgecombe, chef
Michael Turner and to the
team of chefs from the Lyford
Cay Club.

Anya’s winning recipes were
her Junkanoo guava roll, and
her Bahamian calypso rice,
which won the competition’s
“best rice” award.



and Mrs Shawn Turnquest, Vice Principal of Queen’s College High School.



¢

@ ANYA Allen is being interviewed by Native Stew while her teacher,
Mrs Raquel Edgecombe and her mother, Mrs Sherry Allen look on.

, s Right Sa ee

, ‘Salmon R

we
” wn

Combine all ingredients.

Serves 4-6

2 cups Mahatma® Gold Rice, cooked

1 cup celery, sliced

1/2 cup green onions, sliced

1/2. cup sweet pickle relish
1 cup salad dressing
1/2 teaspoon black pepper

2 cans boneless pink salmon
{/2 cup red pepper, chopped

1/2 cup sliced almonds
1 cup frozen peas, thawed

Romaine lettuce or fresh spinach leaves
Lemon, sliced in rings for garnish

spinach leaves. Garnish with lemon rings.

oe!

THE NUMBER 0

Toss lightly. Chill. Serve on lettuce or:

Ta ee MMO Rr te Ue

Distributed by ASA H. PRITCHARD, LTD.

Robinson & Claridge Roads - Tel:



393-2437 |
a

‘release from JS Johnson.

THE TRIBUNE _..- THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 25

has the recipe for success







2 3/4 cups water ; Thyme
1 1/2 cups white rice Salt















2 cloves garlic, chopped Black pepper

1 large grouper fillet, cubed Garlic salt/powder
2 Lobster tails cubed Seasoning salt

1/2 small red bell pepper, diced Parsley flakes

Bring water to a boil. Add rice, reduce heat,
cover and cook over medium low heat until ten-
der; 15 to 20 minutes.

Heat skillet or large non-stick skillet over high
heat. Add ‘garlic to the pan. Add peppers and

1/2 small green bell pepper, diced
1/2 small yellow bell pepper, diced
1/2 small orange bell pepper, diced
1/2 cup native sweet potato

1/2 cup cassava onions to the pan and quick stir-fry veggies two
1/2 cup pumpkin minutes. Add ise to the pan See with
1/2 cup plantain veggies. Fry rice with veggies two or three min-
Cayenne pepper utes. Add grouper and lobster and stir fry one
1 goat pepper minute more, add thyme and seasonings, season

to taste. Then serve.

‘FAST ACTING, LONG LASTING



() Anya’s Guava Pineapple Roll

until batter is smooth. Pour in to pan, spread-
ing batter to corners.
‘1/3-cup water Bake 12:to 15 minutes or until wooden
1-teaspoon vanilla-extract pick or skewer inserted into centre comes
1 cup cake flour or out clean.
1 cup all-purpose flour Loosen cake from edges from pan; invert
1-teaspoon baking powder on towel sprinkled with confectioners’ sugar.
1 teaspoon salt ; Carefully remove from wax paper or foil,
trim of stiff edges if necessary.
Heat oven to 375 degrees. Line jelly roll While hot, roll cake and towel from narrow
pan (15 inch x 10 inch x 1 inch) with alu- end.
minium foil or waxed paper; grease. In a Cool on wire rack.
small mixing bowl, beat eggs about five min- Unroll cake; remove towel. Spread guava
utes or until very thick and lemon coloured. _ jam over cake surface place spread whipped
Pour eggs into a large mixing bowl; gradual- _ filling over cake, place guava pieces over fill-
ly beat in granulated sugar. On low speed, ing, place pineapple over guava, sprinkle
blend in water and vanilla. Gradually add coconut flakes over pineapple.
flour, baking powder and salt, beating just Roll up and then serve.





3 eggs
1 cup granulated sugar




















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Hugh Sands named chairman
of JS Johnson and Company

HUGH Sands, CMG; has ”
been appointed chairman
of JS Johnson and Compa-
ny, Limited.

The company said Mr
Sands brings “a wealth of
experience to the board
and is looking forward to
working with the manage-
ment team to develop
new strategies for contin-
ued growth in this impor-
tant area of financial ser-
vices.”

Retired

‘Mr Sands recently retired ”
as chairman of the Bank of
the Bahamas and currently
sits on the boards of sev-
eral civic and charitable
organisations as well as
public and private compa-
nies including the Insur-
ance Company of the
Bahamas.

He joined JS Johnson's
board on October 1, 2004,
along with Betty Roberts
who until recently was the
managing director of SG
Hambros Bank and Trust
Limited.

Career

“Mrs Roberts also has a
long and distinguished
career in the financial ser- faithful service to the com-
vices industry,” said a pany.

: Mr Fernie, who was ini-

In announcing Mr Sands’ | tially the company’s man-
appointment, the company aging director, served as
also thanks former chair- chairman for the last 30
man Charles T Fernie, who years.





retired on December 31,
2004, for his long and

He remains on the board
as a director.







af andl thy

Tee WR



a = er

Dy





Registration will
April 15- 17 at
Golf Co



hs @



10r



1



All funds go to fun





NationalTeam trip to ingo
on 502-2395





SECTION



' business@100jamz.com

FIU sees 10%
growth in
| suspicious
| transactions

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor







THE Financial Intelli-
gence Unit (FIU) saw a 10
| per cent increase in suspi-
| cious transactions reports
| (STRs) made to it during
2003, compared to the pre-
vious year, with just over 20
per cent passed on to the
Royal Bahamas Police
Force for investigation.

The FIU’s annual report
for 2003, which was only
tabled in the House of.
| Assembly yesterday - some

16 months after the period
in question ended, and four
months after fiscal 2004
closed - detailed that out of
| the 176 total STR’s it

received, some 37 or 21.02
| per cent were passed on to
the police for investigation.

A further 39 STRs or
22.16 per cent of reports
| received were anlaysed and
the FIUs investigations into
them closed, with the
| remaining 100 reports still
| “pending”.

The FIU annual report
said the 176 STRs covered
total assets worth some
$84.386 million, with the 37
reports passed on for the
police for investigation cov-
ering total assets worth $47.4
million or some 56.2 pe
cent of the total. cae

Outlining one case, the
FIU said that following
receipt of an STR, $401,600
was restrained and then
frozen in one account. The.

SEE page five










































li By NEIL HARTNELL



THE Bahamas Hotel Asso-
ciation (BHA) has written to
the US Ambassador urging
that the deadline for all Amer-
icans to possess passports when
travelling to this nation be
extended to conform with the
timeframe allowed for Mexico
and Canada. The BHA fears
the policy could cost the
' tourism industry and govern-
ment significant revenue, plus
jobs, from reduced tourism
| arrivals.

While the BHA said it fully

| new policy, which the US
| Department of Homeland

the US.

- travelling to the Bahamas.

Bahamas come from the US.

SEE page six

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

Hotels fear US passport
policy may cost revenue

Tribune Business Editor

_ understands and supports the - §

' Security is implementing to fur-

ther tighten border controls

’ against terrorists, it wants “the implementation date for the
Bahamas to be on par with that of Mexico and Canada”.

The Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative’s proposed
timetable, which has yet to be finalised, will require all US cit-
' izens returning from the Bahamas by land or sea to possess a
| passport by December 31, 2005, so they can be re-admitted to

__ However, the BHA is pointing out that US citizens travelling
_ to Mexico and Canada will only be required to possess a pass-
| port by December 31, 2006, a year later than those Americans

Timetable

It is warning that the Bahamas faces “a huge challenge” in

; meeting the proposed US implementation timetable, which
| will be formalised later this year following a public review.
. More than 80 per cent of the annual tourist visitors to the

In the letter, which was also sent to Fred Mitchell, minister of
. foreign affairs, Earle Bethell, the BHA’s president, wrote on
| behalf of the organisation: “While we understand the reasoning
| behind the ruling and certainly do not wish to compromise the
| security of our respective nations and the travelling public, the
| implementation timetable presents the industry and the
' Bahamas with a huge challenge.
| “As you know, a large number of Americans visiting the
. Bahamas do not travel with a passport. Many of these visitors

_ are ‘impulse’ travellers, often from Florida, who make last
' minute travel decisions and do not possess passports.
“Another sizeable group of travellers without passports are

| those attending conferences, meetings, etc. - whose travel -
' arrangements are made many months in advance.”

| And Mr Bethell added: “Without sufficient time to educate

_ the travelling public regarding these new requirements, coupled

| with the time required to secure a passport, we believe the

| December 31, 2005, implementation date will have a detri-
| mental impact on our visitor arrivals.

“This will have a corresponding negative effect on industry

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

usha Cay —_
buys PI land for $11:

@ By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Tribune Senior Reporter

JOHN MELK, the US-based
developer and owner of Musha
Cay in the Exumas, yesterday
confirmed he had purchased the
Paradise Island real estate for-
merly owned by Marriott Vaca-
tion Club International for an
estimated $11 million.

In an exclusive interview with
The Tribune, Mr Melk said a
decision will be made in the
next 30 to 60 days about the
property’s future development.

He indicated that his compa-
ny has spent some time getting
approvals for the construction
of 100 low-rise luxury condo-
miniums, but has also received
two unsolicited offers for pur-
chase of the Paradise Island
land that he is also considering.

"We bought it because it's the
last, best piece of property on
Paradise Island and its next to
the Ocean Club,” Mr Melk said.

“What we've done is all the
marketing studies and we think
it is an excellent opportunity.
The product that we would
offer would be something not
available in Nassau - a luxury
resort comparable to the Ocean
Club and the Ocean Club
Estates."

Mr Melk, who is also the
owner of Fisher Island, a 650-
unit luxury residence in Florida
that some consider the most

“expensive postal.code in the US,

indicated further that he was
still considering whether to
introduce a small number of
town houses to the develop-
ment.






























@ BHA’s president
Earle Bethel]






































_ The Tribune



Melk plans 100 luxury condos or
possible sale of land, but deal does not
include Paradise Island Beach Club or
Paradise Harbour Club and Marina

people all made the Bahamas
one of the top destinations in
the world.

Mr Melk said: “We like it and



said he has been doing business.
in the Bahamas for more than
10 years. Its stability, proximity
to the US, warm weather and

Already familiar with the
Bahamas market, through his
reported $50 million develop-
ment.at Musha Cay, Mr Melk

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ALLYSON MAYNARD-GIBSON,
minister of financial services and invest-
ments, yesterday dismissed calls for a Non-
Citizen Investment Act, saying it would
create “more bureaucracy” as she defend-
ed the current level of transparency in the
investment approvals process.

- The call for a Non-Citizen Investment
Act had been made by attorney Fred
Smith, who is representing opponents of...
the controversial $175 million Great Gua-
na Cay development, on the grounds that
it would give investors more transparency
and understanding through laying out the
“A-Z” of investing in the Bahamas.

However, Mrs Maynard-Gibson yester-
day pointed out that the Government had
many websites, such as that of the
Bahamas Investment Authority and the
central government’s own website, where
information on investing in the Bahamas,

. the approvals process and contacts for all
the relevant government agencies and min-
istries were listed.

The Government, the minister said, had
“many formats” where information to
assist potential investors was located,

SEE page six



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thus Ee esy Taserayy Loven











Bee ye) (iw Vg) erat gests
oe Telephone: 1242} 302-9250 -







we feel all the Bahamas is being
discovered because of world |
events. The Government is sta-
ble, the climate is nice and the
people are warm and friendly."
Looking at Musha Cay, he
said the resort island had been
fully booked since the begin-
ning of the year. He added that
like this development, any pro-
ject he is involved in will be
environmentally friendly and
seek to enhance the natural
resources already in place.
"[Musha Cay] is a great place

' SEE page five




Minister: No Non-
Investment Xa ree

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[tHe - Closing

PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

ZS
q sh cy

SCHOLARSHIP FOR MARITIME STUDIES

The Bahamas Maritime Authority and the Bahamas Shipowners
Association are both offering attractive scholarships to young
academically sound Bahamians who are keen to train for an exciting
and challenging career in the Shipping Industry. which is galing
increasing national importance.

The scholarship. is inclusive of tuition, fees, course material,
accommodation and transportation cost. Commencing in September
2005, successful candidates will follow a four (4) year degree
programme at the California Maritime Academy in the United States.

Upon completion of the degree, the qualified officers will be expected
to serve on board a Bahamian flagged vessel for at least 2 ae

Applicants should possessor expect to attain a minimum 1 of five (5)

BGCSE passes, including Maths, Physics/ Combined Science and. |

English Language, at grade ‘C’ or above and a minimum. combined
SAT score of 1000. All applicants must be physically fit and possess
good vision.

Further ‘ismiaaod and application forms can be obtained from Mrs.

Erma Rahming Mackey, Assistant Director, Bahamas Maritime —

Authority, P.O.Box N-4679, Nassau, Bahamas, email:
emackey @ bahamasmaritime.com, tel: 394-3024, fax: 394-3014.

Completed applications must be submitted in person or by post, with

copies of academic certificates and proof of Bahamian citizenship,

no later than Monday, 2 May 2005. Interviews will take place in .

Nassau in J une.



Financial na Ltd.

- Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

= over.
“Weelty Vol. - Se ent carrier aa ona
: a

Price divided by the tast 12 month eamings
- AS AT MAR. 31, 2005) "** - AS AT FEB. 28, 2005
y wom

THE TRIBUNE ,



Structuring the
way to project
management

ALL activities require some
form of project management,

be that building a house, plan-

ning a wedding or simply gro-
cery shopping. However, the
larger and more complex the

project, the more structuréd is _
- >the project management ~
approach that is needed.

The project manager is
responsible for the overall suc-

4 cess of the project. The project

management process is a
turnkey-solution that defines
the beginning, the end and the
framework for managing all the
work-in the middle of the pro-

ject. Providence Technology
Group has a comprehensive :

step-by-step approach that
assists with ensuring all projects

are delivered on time and with-

in budget.
| Mobilisation

This is a very critical phase in —

the project management

Dip peaks

per ear fr the tat 42 he

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock index. January 1, 1994 = 100



Bank of The Bahamas:

INTERNATIONAL

JOB VACANCY

fal Manager, Information Technology

MAIN RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

¢ Planning, directing, and coordinating the human, financial
and physical resources of the Information Technology
- Department;

¢ Overseeing and developing all technology related systems,
including telecommunications and security systems;

¢ Establishing key relationships with key IT suppliers and
consultants;

¢ Application, selection, development and
implementation of new and existing corporate initiatives;

¢ Provide enabling technologies that make it easier for
customers and suppliers to do business with the Bank.

planning methods;

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS & ABILITIES ©

o Tertiary level qualifications in computer science,
information technology or related disciplines;
* Expert knowledge of systems ue development and —

¢ Demonstrated experience in managing a network
environment including Windows server 2000/2003
services, Lotus Notes/Domino, hardware firewalls,
routers, AS400, Unix, Oracle and VPN appliances;
* Comprehensive knowledge of database management,
. Knowledge of web base technologies;
© Excellent communication skills, both written and oral;

¢ Demonstrated team building and project management

skills;

* Five years of progressive experience in managing the
delivery of modem enterprise technology services;
¢ IT industry related certifications desirable.

The position also offers an attractive compensation package which includes comprehensive group insurance
ia participation i in pension savings and other benefits enjoyed by staff.

Manager, Human Resources/Training
Bank of The Bahamas International
P.O. Box N-7118
Nassau, Bahamas



Deadline for applications is April 25, 2005.



GEORGETTE ROBINSON |

A businesswoman

in the IT industry
gives her advice on

the road to success

process, as it defines measur-

able deliverables and project

-. goals. : oh
A detailed but realistic pro-

ject plan is prepared with dates,

timeframes ‘and available .

resources:

A kick-off meeting wirth
stakeholders. is absolutely
imperative,as it resolves uncer-

tainties and identifies potential
risks.

@ Plan

If you fail to plan, you are ©
planning to fail. There is no .

such thing as too much plan-
ning.

During this process, business
and technical requirements are
gathered and analysed. These

are then incorporated into the ©

overall design of the solution.

Without architectural plans,
we cannot build a house. Like-
wise, without a formal plan, we
cannot manage a project suc-
cessfully.

i Build and stage

We are ready to begin hands-
on. An execution plan-with a
detailed scope of work is pre-
pared.

Staging all hardware and soft-
ware is vital during this phase,
because we want to eliminate
any surprises.

At this point, the project

‘manager identifies any risk and

reduces this risk through con-

‘tingency plans. The project
__ manager needs to closely watch

activities that may involve scope
creep.
If project definition changes
significantly, the project man-
ager regroups with stakehold-

‘ers, discusses changes and has

these changes approved before
proceeding.

Mi Deploy
Ifyou have followed this pro-

ject management process,
deployment of the overall pro-

ject.should run effortlessly.

All aspects of installation and
configuration are done during
this phase.

The project manager’s goal

. during this phase is to make cer-

tain the project remains on

track and within budget.
‘HiTest

The solution must be tested,
and all problems resolved and
re-tested.

The involvement of key users
during testing is highly recom-
mended, as they know the sys-.
tem better than anyone.

Once this process is compl:*
ed, it is ‘go live’ with the so.
tion.

Mi Stabilise

An integral component o:
successful project is having t
buy-in from users for the so!
tion, and we recommend tt
resources are assigned to ass:
users with any problems or cc
cerns that arise. ;

i Close
The project manager’s Mba

difficult task is closing the pro-
ject. Project owners often have

“the mistaken perception that an

activity is incomplete.

A skilled project manager has
to master closing projects tact-
fully, so as to not offend the
project owner.

Learning tree.com has sum-
marised the essence of project
management thus: “Today’s
project managers and teams
must deliver under great pres-
sure.

“Organising scarce resources,
managing tight budgets and

. deadlines, controlling change

throughout projects and gener-

ating maximum team perfor-
‘mance are key aspects of effec-

tive project management”.
- To provide feedback on this
column, please e-mail Makin-

gl Twork@providencetg.com

Georgette Robinson is the
senior project manager at Prov-
idence Technology Group. Ms.
Robinson has 10 years’ experi-
ence working in IT across Pro-
ject. Management, Business
Analysis and Implementation.
Providence Technology Group
is one of the Bahamas’ lead-
ing IT firms, specialising in
networking solutions, consult-
ing and advisory services and
software solutions.

NDEAUS

INSURANCE BROKER Co. Ltd.

To All Our Valuable Clients,

Please be informed that Ms. Alicia T.
Culmer is no longer an employee of Andeaus
Insurance Broker Company Limited. Ms. Culmer
is not authorized to conduct any business for the
company. Please contact the office at 323-4545
for services. Thank you for your continued

patronage.

Management of
Andeaus Insurance Broker Company Limited


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 3B .



a ae ee eee eee
Contractors push for Advisory Committee

. THE Bahamian Contractors
Association (BCA) is pushing
for the creation of a Construc-
tion and Development Advi-
sory Committee, which would
establish better relations with
developers and advise govern-
ment ministries without the
necessary in-house expertise
on issues relating to the indus-
try.

Terrance Knowles, the
BCA’s chairman, told the
Rotary Club of New Provi-
dence: “This committee would
comprise the various sectors of
the whole decision-making
industry, for example, the Min-
istry of Financial Services and
Investments, the Ministry of
Public Works, developers, and
members of the BCA.

“The purpose of this is real-
ly to provide the expertise and
advice to the Government in
hopes that they will be in a bet-
ter position to make decisions
to ensure greater participation
of Bahamian contractors in
these developments that are
coming on stream in the near
future. The Government has
not said ‘yes’ to this, but we
are strongly encouraged by
their words that this is a possi-
bility to be formulated through
the Ministry of Financial Ser-
vices and Investments.”

Mr Knowles estimated that
there were more than 800
Bahamian contractors, but said
the general impression of the
industry was that some were
unprofessional, unethical and
lacking in competency, exper-
tise and integrity.

“That’s the general percep-

tion, and to a large extent that
is true. The Bahamian Con-
tractors Association acknowl-
edges that, accepts that fact
and is striving to change that
perception so we’re very selec-
tive about the contractors who
enter our association,” Mr
Knowles said.

He added that another BCA
goal was to encourage a policy
statement from the Govern-
ment on a Local Preference
Act, which would enable
Bahamian contractors to bet-
ter compete against their for-
eign counterparts by levelling
out the latter’s cost advantages.

Manpower

Mr Knowles told Rotarians
that foreign contractors had
access to greater manpower
resources, and lower borrowing
costs, since in the US they were
able to obtain financing at
interest rates of around 3 per
cent, compared to the 8-9 per
cent interest rates commonly
faced by Bahamian contractors.

The BCA chairman said: “In
addition, they are able to bring
in their operating equipment
under leasehold agreements
with leasing companies. We, on
the other hand, are unable to
bring in our equipment under
lease agreements.

“We must pay a bond on
them. Plus the deposits neces-
sary to be left with those leas-
ing companies are so outra-
geous, sO you must purchase
the equipment yourself. Also,
because of the cyclical nature

of the construction industry,
expensive equipment may end
up sitting idle for months.” ~~

Mr. Knowles said a Local
Preference act would level the

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playing field for Bahamian
contractors, putting them in a
better position to win bids as it
would ‘automatically eliminate
the 5-10 per cent cost advan-
tage foreign companies held.
The Local Preference Act

would be similar to legislation °
, cin force in Dae County,
‘| Broward County and Palm

Beach County in Florida.

Perceived

Mr Knowles said the BCA
was no longer perceived as the
‘Bitchin’ Contractors Associa-
tion’ that wants to kick all for-
eign contractors out.

“Although some of our
members still feel the same
way, that,has changed some-
what where we recognise that
we, as Bahamian contractors,
must compete on the same lev-
el as the foreign-based con-
tractors,” Mr Knowles said.

- “Our concerns, however, are



that we must level the playing

field, and if foreign contractors:
are doing business in this coun-

try they must operate under
the laws of the land.
“For example, they must pay

“their business licences like we

all do as business owners, they

sMust pay their national insur-
» ances and they should not be

allowed to operate out of office
trailers that they brought here

“ten years ago.’
© The BCA chairman said the =:
‘group’s lobbying efforts had

already led to an amendment

to the Business Licence Act,

where foreign contractors had
to pay 1 per cent of the value
of each contract they won to
the Government.

Mr Knowles said the pro-
posed Contractors’ Bill, which
includes provisions for the
licensing of the entire con-
struction industry, has been
with successive Governments
for more than 20 years,

ll TERRANCE KNOWLES,
BCA chair, speaks at Rotary. -

However, he said there was a
lack of motivation for any Gov-
ernment to enact this bill
because of the complacency of
contractors and the Bahamian
public in applying pressure for
it to be legislated. He further
stated that governments may
not be motivated to enact the
bill because it may perceived
as nationalistic, protectionist
and exclude foreign participa-
tion in developments.

Mr Knowles said: “The BCA
has undertaken of its own
efforts to say we will licence
our own members regardless
of whether the Government
enacts this bill or not. We are
in the process of developing a
licensing programme for con-
tractors that is based upon the |
State of Florida’s Programme.”

Developers

He explained that the licens-
ing programme will provide
assurance to developers and
homeowners that BCA con- -
tractors are qualified and cer-
tified to meet their obligations
in the same. way that compa-
nies such as Sears and Home -
Depot pre-qualify and stand
behind their own contractors
and tradesmen. -

When the Contractor’ s Bill
is eventually enacted, he said —
the BCA’s licensing pro-
gramme will more than likely

-be adopted by the Govern-

ment.
The BCA is also pressing for
the amalgamation of a Pre-
ferred Contractor’s list for
Mortgage Houses. . ;
Mr Knowles said: “Right
now, the response from the
Government is very good.
They understand and actually

.appreciate what the construc-

tion industry does and the
numbers of people who we
employ.

“We attract the people they
want to get off the streets and I
think they realise that...we’ve
made such great inroads that

- -we must continue the charge.

Now the economy is turning .
around and contractors are
busy again, there’s a tendency
to become complacent but:
we’ve made too much progress" |
and we cannot lose credibility
at this stage.”

Sustainable Urban Planning
— Definitions and Delivery

The College of The Bahamas announces a rare opportunity
for anyone interested in strategic and physical planning and
how they relate to preservation, heritage and sustainability.

The public is cordially invited to attend a lecture by world
renowned planning expert and trained architect
Proteerok Matthew Carmona, BA, BArch, MA, Ph.D, ARB, WATPI,
Director,

Bartlett School of Planning, University College,

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e Discover how planning infrastructure can enhance the
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:: A Surprise Auction Offering from

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: Live Jazz Music from the
Chris Justillien Jazz Quartet!

= Live Musical and Performance Acts!
i Fabulous Door Prizes!

Chef Van Bruguler, Chef Ellie's Duff,
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Live food demonstrations of delicious
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Open Wine Bar from Bristol Cellars!

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ohn A. C. Benjamin Moniqde Hinsey Mark A. Jordan Erica M. James ge yg ages gO ae
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PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





Firms’ gift to hurricane relief

TWO Freeport-based busi-
-nesses have donated a comput-
er system to a non-governmen-
tal organisation that is placing
international volunteers into the
Bahamas to assist Grand
-Bahama with post-hurricane
.restoration and recovery.
The Amoury Company
(Freeport) and The Home Cen-
-tre, which is owned by BISX-
-listed Freeport Concrete, gave a
Compaq Computer System to

non-profit organisation created
by New Providence Communi-
ty Church.

Donation

Island: Journeys’ Grand
Bahama Island co-ordinator,
Rebecca Russell, and national
director, Pastor Shaun Ingra-
ham, were on hand to receive
the donation from The Amoury

manager, Tom Leeder, and
Freeport Concrete chief exec-
utive Ray Simpson.

“We work with teams from
all over the Bahamas and many
other countries, so a lot of our
work is done electronically,”
Mrs Russell said.

“With this new computer sys-
tem we'll be able to communi-
cate with volunteer groups,
donors, churches and the gov-

Mr Leeder added: “We know
that there are still many people
in need on Grand Bahama and
we felt that Island Journeys has

an effective plan to meet those
needs.”

Mr Simpson added: “A lot
has been done but there is a lot

more to do, so we are happy
that we can help facilitate the
work of Island Journeys to
rebuild our communities.”

ernment that much more effec-

Island Journeys, the Bahamian Company (Freeport) general tively.”

Employment Opportunity — Nortel PBX and Key System
Engineer

Indigo Networks is seeking to fill a senior position in its Technical
Services department for an experienced .Norte
telecommunications engineer. :



@ THE Amoury Company (Freeport) general manager, Tom Leeder; Island Journeys’ Grand
Bahama co-ordinator Rebecca Russell; Island Journeys’ national director Shaun Ingraham; and
Freeport Concrete chief executive, Ray Simpson

Applications are invited from individuals who have:

5

e Aminimum of 10 years in a Nortel telecommunications
technical support role.
In depth Design, Programming, Implementation, and
Maintenence of Nortel: Norstar, BCM, Meridian Option
11C and 81C.
Knowledge of PBX Networking and VOIP Integration.
Knowledge of Routing, Trunking, and VLANS.
Excellent customer service skills
Good oral and written skills
Ability to work with minimum supervision.

A competitive salary commensurate with experience is offered
along with product training, medical, pension and car allowance
after a qualifying period. ,

$208,000.00

Middle Income Home, Suffolk Unit 2, Block #51, Lot #1,
3 bed, 2.5 bath, central air, fully landscape, washer & dryer.







Interested candidates should submit their resumes in writing to
Indigo Networks PO BOX N-3920 for the attention of the
Technical Services Manager.

Cnn LT ee ae Le





VACANCY

The American Embassy is presently considering applications
for the following position

1. LANSYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR

Duties include: the operational support of the Local Area Network,
which includes 13 servers, and approximately 120 networked §
‘stations and also support for numerous stand-alone computers.
Also, assists and performs installation of systems and peripheral
equipment including file servers, workstations, network interface
cards, fax/modem.cards, cdrom's, printers, floppy and hard drives
and backup tape systems. We reserve the right to administer
testing to ascertain experience. ~

This position is open to candidates with the following
requirements:

2. Baccalaureate Degree or host country equivalent in the field
of Computer Information Systems. Certification in A+, MCP in
Windows 2000 or Windows 2003 is required. Additional
certifications such as network plus and security plus will be
required to pass the probarionary period. Excellent command of
the English Language, both written and oral

Personal attributes:

-Excellent work attitude, punctuality and attendance record
-Highly confidential in nature

-Ability to interact with others in a professional manner
-Ability to prioritize tasks

-Initiative and ability to learn new tasks quickly



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The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation

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and opportunities for training and development.

We're giving away Big Bucks!

a1

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Or be one of 20 lucky customers to have $250 of a mortgage payment Fergotten
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Campaign runs until May 13, 2005

3. Applicants must be Bahamian Citizens or other Country
Nationals who are eligible for employment under Bahamian laws
and regulations.:

Call or visit us today and let Scotiabank help you to 'Forgive & Forget’

Application forms are available from 8:00 am to 5:30 pm, Monday
through Friday at the security area of the American Embassy,
Queen Street, completed applications should be returned to the
Embassy: attention of the Human Resources Office no later than
April 25, 2005.



: Life. Money. Balance both:

S Teabarari at Thee Rack of ties Seetia tenchtnnnins weed acraier dante stttaat eek cuntag of Tou Bath Gb Nana fe estie







Ss Sa api ate elo
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 5B



Investment project gives back to Exuma










FROM page one

police and Director of Public
Prosecutions then obtained a
Restraint Order from the
Supreme Court in relation to
the account and funds.

The Supreme Court also
registered a Confiscation
Order, made by the Stuttgart
Regional Court in Germany,
on October 7, 2003. The funds
involved were confiscated by
the Court and returned to
Germany.

The FEU’s 2003 annual
report said that the 39 inves-
tigations which it closed cov-
ered total assets worth $7.298
million or 8.6 per cent of those
caught up in the year’s STRs.

’ Just under $30 million in
total assets is caught up in the
100 “pending” STRs that the
FIU is still investigating.
Domestic/offshore banks

ber of STRs during 2003,

total. Domestic banks and off-
shore banks were the next
most frequent reporters, sub-
mitting 31 per cent and 25 per
cent of the total respectively.

Suspected fraud was the
most common reason trigger-
ing STRs to the FIU during
2003, with some 58 submitted
for this reason. However, 67
were submitted without the

Ten per cent growth

submitted the greatest num- :

some 61 or 35 per cent.of the - Bahamas.



financial institution involved
suspecting precisely what
might going on, just that there
were “suspicious circum-
stances” surrounding the
accounts in question.

Some 19 STRs were sub-
mitted to the FIU where ‘cor-
ruption’ was suspected to be
involved, while 17 were sent in
due to suspicions of drug-
related crimes and two
because of suspected terror-
related offences.

The. FIU’s 2003 annual
report said new customers of
financial institutions account-
ed for 49.4 per cent of STRs
received in 2003, with long-
standing customers account-
ing for 42 per cent.

Some 52.3 per cent or 92 of
the STR subjects were
Bahamian citizens, with a fur-
ther 21 or 15.3 per cent com-
ing from the US. Some 54.5
per cent or 96 STRs involved
subjects residing in the


























In terms of beneficial own-
ers who were subjects of
STRs, some 30.7 per cent
were Americans, 15.3 per
cent Guatemalans and
31.8 per cent Bahamian citi-
zens.

However, some 36.4 per
cent of the beneficial owners
caught up in the STRs were
residents of the Bahamas.









Musha Cay developer
buys PI land

FROM page one

for people to escape to; it’s very private,” Mr Melk said. “We did-

n't disturb what God put here, we enhanced it and we would con-
tinue that on Paradise Island. That's why I bought the island - we
worked hard to maintain its natural beauty and enhance it. We're

just borrowing it for a while."

_ Meanwhile, concerns expressed by owners of timeshare proper-
ties at the Paradise Island Beach Club, formerly managed by Mar-
riott Vacation Club, that the resort was involved in the sale have

been addressed.

The property’s co-owner, Peter Kugler, told The Tribune that nei-
ther the Paradise Island Beach Club nor its sister property, Paradise
Harbour Club and Marina, had been sold or included in Mr Melk’s

deal.

The Paradise Island Beach Club, with 44 timeshare apartments,
was managed by Marriott Vacation Club between 1990 and 2002,
before the two parted company. The property is now managed by

Vacations in Paradise.

According to Mr Kugler, his office was bombarded with calls
from owners who were up in arms, asking how they could sell the
resort. He said: “We are the developers and we own the land and

we have not sold our property." .

The piece of property involved in the sale to Mr Melk, lots G and
H on Paradise Island, are located to the east of the Paradise Island
Beach Club. The six-acre site is development land.

Both the Paradise Island Beach Club and the Paradise Harbour
Club and Marina are owned by Peter Kugler and Christopher

Lightbourne.

Credit Suisse Wealth Management Limited

requires an

OFFICE ASSISTANT

Temporary position for a young person to
perform filing and messenger duties

Please send resume to:

Credit Suisse Wealth Management Limited
P.O. Box N-4801
Nassau, Bahamas

Facsimile No. 302-6398





GRAND Isle Villas, the $100
million upscale residential second
home community next to Emer-
ald'Bay, has improved the quali-
ty of education for 168 Exuma
children by donating desks and
chairs to six schools.

@ MINISTER of Tourism
Obie Wilchcombe, centre,
thanked developers of Grand Isle
Villas in Exuma for donating 168
desks and chairs to fill gaps in
several Exuma schools. Pictured
L to R are Jenevy Dames, deputy
chief councillor; Anthony Moss,
MP for Exuma; Margaret Melvin,
G&G Shipping; Mr Wilchcombe;
Diane Phillips for Grand Isle Vil-
las; Everette Hart, administrator
for Exuma, and Delma Weir,
Bahamas Customs. The develop-
ers of the 71-villa, $100 million
resort community at the highest
peak of Emerald Bay have adopt-
_ed Roker’s Point Primary School
and arranged for or made numer-
ous gifts of educational materi-
als.

(Photo by Christopher Kettel)

e Tribune wants to hear
‘wom people who are

king news in their

ighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Obie Wilchcombe, minister of
tourism, accepted the gift on

behalf of the Government when |

he was in Exuma to honour a pio-
neer in the hospitality industry,
Stan Benjamin, who has owned
and operated Club Peace & Plen-
ty in George Town since 1971.

“We in the Bahamas are
blessed with investors who come
to our shores and fall in love with
our communities, not just because
of the financial opportunities or
rewards they might reap, but
because they become part of the
community,” Mr Wilchcombe
sdid.

“We saw it earlier today when
we honoured a fine gentleman,
Stan Benjamin. and we see it
again in this gesture by the devel-
opers of Grand Isle Villas. It is
my understanding that this is one
of several gifts they have made
and that a real attachment has
developed between them and the
children of Roker’s Point Prima-
ry School, which they adopted in
the Government’s adopt-a-school
programme, and where they have
presented educational materials,
VCRs, text books and trans-
formed a barren

yard into a beautiful playground.”

Christopher Kettel, a driving
force in Exuma education, said:
“Grand Isle Villas has
been such good corporate citi-
zens.

“We wish we could use them as
a model for all investors in the
Exumas in the way they have
demonstrated how much they
care about education and the
young people of this island.

“In the short time they have
been here, they have made a dif-
ference.”

Grand Isle’s developers are
Pamela McCullough and James
Clabaugh.

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50 plus parking spaces

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Phone: 424-3889 © 364-0753

COMMERCIAL BUILDING
Brand New

10,000 sq. ft. at $12.50 sq. ft.
Parking Spaces

Summerwinds Plaza, Harrold Road
Phone: 424-3889 © 364-0753

45°5” (13.84m)
.14°3” (4.34m)
kbd 37” (94 cm)
27,000 Ibs (12,247)
350 gal (1,324.8 L)

120 gal (454.2 L)
55 gal (208.2 L)



HOUSE FOR RENT

5 Bedroom, 4 bathroom, split level,

_ partly furnished.
Nassau East Blvd.,
$2,500.00 per month

Summerwinds Plaza, Harrold Road
Phone: 424-3889 ¢ 364-0753



686 - 4,340 sq.ft. retail & office spaces
Excellent retail and professional location.

Modern building with spectacular views.

Full standby generator.

* : i
Security services.

One Sandyport Plaza
West Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel. 242-393-8618
www.bahamasrealty.bs
www.cbrichardellis.com

BAHAMAS REALTY trp

COMMERCIAL

ins sraveacdne

CBRE

with:

CB RICHARD ELLIS
NAVIGATING A NEW WORLD





PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





Minister: No Non-Citizen
Investment Act required

FROM page one .

including her own Ministry of
Financial Services and Invest-
ments.

Developers were able to
contact her ministry and oth-
ers to answer any questions
they may have, while all the
Bahamas’ Embassies, Con-
sulates and missions abroad

’ possessed information on
investing in this nation. There
were also numerous Bahami-
an lawyers able to advise
developers on the investment
process.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson told
The Tribune: “My point is that
we do not need an Act, defi-
nitely not more bureaucracy.”

Mr Smith, though, had pre-
viously told this newspaper
that a Non-Citizen Investment
Act would ensure that invest-
ment projects did not become
“mired” in what he claimed
was an “arbitrary, secretive”
approvals process.

Mr Smith said: “The great-
est lament of investors for the
last 39 years in the Bahamas is
uncertainty. They never know
where they stand. They never












know what the rules of the
game are. The rules change
from administration to admin-
istration and, indeed, during
administrations.

“The time has come when
we need to be clear with
investors how investment is to
take place. The time has come
for the Bahamas to acknowl-
edge that it is not a third world
country and that serious
investors need to know what
the rules of the game are. The
rules of the game should be
clearly spelt out in laws which
provide what is or what is not
needed.”

But Mrs Maynard-Gibson
disagreed with Mr Smith’s
claims, arguing that there was
plenty of transparency in the
investment process as it cur-
rently stood.

She added that Mr Smith’s
suggestion that responsibility
for negotiating major devel-
opments in the Bahamas be
taken away from the Cabinet
and National Economic Coun-
cil (NEC), and placed in the
hands of government agencies
such as the BEST Commis-
sion, once they were given
statutory authority, indicated



_PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, FALISHA MARIA
PINDER, of Coral Harbour, North Circle Drive, P.O. Box
N-1187, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name
to FALISHA MARIA MALONE. If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (80) days after the
date of publication of this notice.







Bahamas.























NOTICE. |

NOTICE is hereby given that SHERWIN MCPHEE OF
FELTONDALE FOX HILL, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written |.
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days |’
from the 14TH day of APRIL, 2005 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that EMILIA PETIT FRERE EDWARD,
of SUNLIGHT VILLAGE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 14TH
day of APRIL, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Professional Sales Representative

As part of a leading research-driven pharmaceutical products
and services company, we market a broad range of
innovative products to improve human health.

Currently we are searching for qualified candidates to fill
a Professional Sales Representative position open in the
Bahamas territory. This position is responsible for
implementing sales and marketing programs in their
assigned territory with thé objective of increasing sales

and market share.

Minimum Requirements:

* Bacheior’s Degree, MBA or equivalent college degree
* Previous medical sales representative experience preferred.
* Available and willingness to travel

* Excellent oral and written communication in English

language

* Knowledge of PC applications
¢ Valid and active driver’s license
¢ Demonstrated interpersonal and presentation skills.

We strive to create a working environment that rewards
commitment and performance. As such we offer an excellent
compensation and benefit package. «

Qualified candidates may fax or send resumes, with salary

history to:

PSR - MSD

att: Mr S. Van Er
_ Lowe’s Wholesale Drug Agency
Soldier Road
P.O. Box N-7504
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: 1 - 242-393-1527

We are an equal opportunity employer. We take affirmative
action to consider applicants without regards of race, color,
sex, religion, national origin, Vietnam Era and/or Disabled
Veteran Status or individuals with disabilities.



the attorney was being “mis-
chievous”

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
Mr Smith had represented

- developers in the past, and

knew that government agen-
cies and ministries were























FROM page one

in the industry."

bour. =

-come.

guests.






Hotel fears
over US policy
On passports

\
revenue, government revenue, and upon employment levels

Under current regulations, a driver’s licence or other form of
photo identification is all that is required for US citizens to trav-
el to and from that country to its Northern American neigh-

Another group of US tourists that might be impacted by the
new travel regulations are Spring Breakers.

Acknowledging that it will be a “difficult task” to meet the
current timeframe, the BHA said it and its hotel members
would be making “every effort” to extend the December 31
2005, deadline. Its members were being encouraged to repre-
sent their concerns to Mr Mitchell and the US Ambassador,
John Rood, plus anyone else they felt could influence the out-

The BHA’s Board of Directors meeting last week also
advised its‘hotel members to begin including information on the
proposed US policy in all communications with potential

| BAHAMAS DENTAL COUNCIL
P.O. Box N-3345
Nassau, Bahamas

VOTEC-E =

The Bahamas Dental Council wishes to notify the
persons who are now or are planning to study
dentistry, that as of January 2005, graduates of
all “Dental Schools” will have to possess proof of
passing a Dental Board Examination approved by
the Bahamas Dental Council in order to be eligible
for full, temporary, provisional or special
registration. Further information can be obtained
from the office of the Bahamas Dental Council,
P.O. Box N-3345, Nassau, Bahamas.

Signed
Dr. Anthony Davis —
’ Registrar
Bahamas Dental Council

involved in “vetting” an
investment project before it
received approval in principle
from the NEC. They were also
involved after this approval
was given in granting permits,
approving applications and

Jit



TRUST. OFFICER

SCOTIATRUST invites applications from qualified
Bahamians for the position of Trust Officer with a
Be strong background and technical knowledge in areas
of trust, company and agency management. The
applicant will be involved in the administration of a j

medium to high complexity level of accounts of
trusts, companies and agencies. A good level of
accounting knowledge is required. The person
appointed should hold a four year University Degree,
in a related subject along with professional
qualifications in the Society of Trust and Estate
Practitioners (STEP) or ACIB. The ideal candidate
should have a minimum of five years progressive
experience in the industry. Analytical and
communication skills as well as familiarity with PC
software are essential. Preference will be given to
applicants with language skills. Interested persons
should submit applications in writing marked Private
_and Confidential to the Manager, Client Services,
P.O. Box N-5016, Nassau, Bahamas. Applications
should be received no later than Friday, 22nd April,

‘2005.



analysing Environmental
Impact Assessments (EIAs).

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said:
“T think that there is a trans-
parent process. I think
[though] that with everything
in life there is room for
improvement, to the extent
that we may need to tweak
things.”

As the Bahamas was an
open, vibrant democracy, the
minister said the Government
listened very carefully to what
all the voters and stakeholders
were saying, and had not shut
the door on making modifica-

tions to the investment

approvals process if they were
necessary.

A transparent process, Mrs
Maynard-Gibson said, was of
the utmost importance. She
added that Prime Minister
Perry Christie’s government
was committed to consulta-
tion on investment projects,
having used such a process to
sort out teething problems
with Exuma’s Emerald
Bay resort when it came to
office.

“Several town meetings”
had also been held before the
Great Guana Cay investment
projects was approved, includ-
ing two staged by the Ministry
of Financial Services and
Investments.

When The Tribune said that
the Government had not
made public several Heads of











NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MERLINE MOCOMBE, FORT -
FINCASTLE, P.O.BOX SS - 5951, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows. any reason why registration/
"| naturalization should not be granted, should send a written’and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight.days from the
7TH day of APRIL, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Agreement signed by this
administration, specifically
identifying the one agreed
with American investor,
Edward Lauth, for a tourism-
related development at the old
Club Med resort in Gover-
nor’s harbour, Eleuthera, Mrs
Maynard-Gibson said that one
had not been revealed
because the Government was
negotiating an “expansion” of

_ that project.

As a result, the Heads of
Agreement was likely to be
amended.

The Prime Minister yester-
day said he was unable to
table the Heads of Agreement
signed with the Baha Mar con-
sortium for the $1.2 billion
Cable Beach development as
the deals to purchase the
hotels had not been closed.

.Once this was done, the

agreement would be pub-

lished.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
that among the most impor-
tant considerations for
investors was the “free and
unfettered access” they had
to the Bahamian courts and
judicial system.

The separation of powers,
she added, had ensured there
had never been any interfer-
ence by the Government in
judicial matters, which was
something she suggested the
Bahamas should “boast”
about.





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DIEUPHA MOCOMBE, FORT -
FINCASTLE, P.O.BOX SS - 5951, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
7TH day of APRIL, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




























Bahamas.

FOR SALE OR









NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ELDA NORELUS, BLUE HILL
ROAD, NASSAU BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 7TH day of APRIL, 2005 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Fully Furnished Executive Office Suites

plus Utilities Global Maritime Center
(Formerly Tanja) .

2nd Floor, 2,500 sq ft :

Internet Ready, Computer & Network Support

State Of The Art Phone & Voice Mail Systems
Dedicated Phone Lines
Conference Facilities

Professional Work Space

Office Space - Unfurnished
1,250 sq ft

Global Maritime Centre
Queens Highway, Freeport, Bahamas

Contact 351-9026 or 351-1601 For Viewing
Or Additional Information.
Global United Formerly TANJA is |
moving it’s operation to the _
Former United Shipping Building at the Harbour



oN
= N
era

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS





INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY |
MUST SELL

MARSHALL ROAD (NASSAU)

Lot #54, land size 42,130 sq. ft. with a masonry building with eight
inch concrete block walls. The front 2 units are 95% complete.

Appraisal: $256,233.00

Heading west on Blue Hill Road, go pass the intersection of Cowpen
and Blue Hill Road, turn right onto Marshall Road (Adventure
Learning Center Road), follow road to the final.curve before the
beach. The subject property is about 100 feet on the right side,

grey trimmed white with unfinished building attached.

YAMACRAW BEACH ESTATES (NASSAU)

Lot #63, house #19, Cat Island Avenue, a 6 year old single story
house with three bedrooms, one bathroom, living room, dining
room, kitchen and laundry room. Property is 70x100 single - family
residential. This property is on flat terrain and fairly level with road
way. Living area 1,574:sq. ft.

Appraisal: $1 73,000.00

Traveling south on Fox Hill Road, go pass the Prison Compound,
. turn left onto Yamacraw then 1st right, follow the road to ‘st left,
then first right. The road curves to your left, the house is #19 Cat Island Avenue, painted white. The grounds
are attractively landscape and well-kept access into the subject property is provided by a concrete paved
drive way along with the walkways of concrete flagstones.



FRELIA SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)

Lot #24, Land size 6,724 sq. ft. living area 1,223 sq. ft. consisting
of 4 year old three bed, two bath, living, dining, kitchen and utility
room.

Appraisal: $1 51,115.00

Driving west on Carmichael Road until you arrive at road by More
FM, continue driving north thru a series of curves in the road until
you arrive to the double post sign on the right hand side of the road
turn right, house is 5th on right white trim yellow. Subject property is flat and slightly below the level of the



required.
KENNEDY SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)

Lot no. 21 all utilities available 10 year old single story house, 3
bedroom 2 bathroom, living room, dining area, family room, kitchen,
study, laundry and an entry porch.



Appraisal: $175,350.00

Heading west along Soldier Road take main entrance to Kennedy
Subdivision on the left, then take the 1st corner on the left then
1st right, house is second on your right with garage.



KENNEDY SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)

Lot #5 land size 3,600 sq. 40 x 90 ft., contains a 21 year old single
story house’, 3 bed, 1 bath;-living;-dining-and-kitcher:F
_is on flat land and fairly level with the roadway, residentii

family zoning. rte ra

Appraisal: $100,800.00



The subject property is located on the southern side of Soldier
rad about 200 ft., east of the intersection of Kennedy Subdivision
and Soldier Road. Painted blue trimmed white, a low concrete
wall and concrete gateposts are located at the front with a chainlink fencing enclosing the sides and the
back also waikway and driveway in the frontyard. Ground neatly maintained with basic landscaping in
place. Accommodation consist of three bedrooms, one bathroom, living and dining area and kitchen.

DUNDAS TOWN (ABACO)

3 two bed, 1 bath triplex 9,000 sq. ft.; lot no. 18b with an area
for a small shop. Age 12 years the land is a portion of one of
the Dundas Town Crown Allotment parcels stretching from Forest
Drive to Front Street, being just under a quarter acre in size and
on the lowside. A concrete block structure, with asphalt shingle
roof and L-shape in design with a total length of 70x26 ft, plus
50 x 22 ft., 2,920 sq. ft., the interior walls are concrete blocks,
ceiling is sheet rock and the floors of vinyl tiles. :

Appraisal: $220,500.00



BAHAMA SOUND (EXUMA)

Duplex in lot #6625, Bahama Sound #8, East Exuma, trapezium
shaped lot 35 ft above sea level, 10,000 sq. ft., single storey,
10 year old duplex, 2 bed, 1 bath, kitchen, dining and living
room and porch area. Property is landscaped.

Appraisal: $170,047.50



MURPHY TOWN (ABACO)

Crown Allotment #70, singe storey wood and concree
Srinetelel building approximately 758 sq. ft., about 20 years
old.

Appraisal: $71,946.00



MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES








roadway. This is a single family residential zoning, The building is about 4 years old, with remedial work ~














GOLDEN GATES #2 (NASSAU)

Lot #1 490, section 2 with a 25 year old single family residence 2,480
sq. ft. consisting of five bedrooms, two bathrooms, seperate living
and dining room with a spacious kitchen, lot size is 6,000 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $120,000.00

Property is at grade and level with adequate drainage, house situated
on road knowns as “Donahue Road” which is on the southern side
of Carmicheal Road. Last painted green trimmed white. Enclosed
on one side with 5 ft., chain link fencing and at the front with a low cement block wall with two driveways
and a walkway. :

VALENTINES EXTENSION (NASSAU)

Lot #2 contains a 19 year old 1 1/2 storey four plex with a floor
area of 3,621 sq. ft. The two storey section consist of a master
bedroom, bathroom and sitting area upstairs and two bedrooms,
one bath, living, dining, family room and kitchen downstairs. The
single storey consist of one two bedroom, one bath apartment and
two efficency apartments, land size 7,500 sq. ft. Multi-Family zoning
on flat land and not subject to flooding.

Appraisal: $347,006.00

The subject property is located on the western.side of Valentine’s Extension Road, just over one hundred
feet north of the roadway known as Johnson Terrace. Travel east on Bernard Road, turn left onto Adderley
Street which is opposite SAC, continue left.at the deep bend, take first right into Johnson Terrace, go to
T-junction and turn left, then first right. Property is second building on right, white trimmed brown.

GLENISTON GARDENS SUBDIVISION
, (NASSAU)

: 4 30 Year old single story house with floor area of 1,800 sq. ft.,
Lot #28 land size 14,475 ft., consist of 4 bed, 3 baih, living,
dining, kitchen, utility room and carport.

Appraisal: $211,050.00

Driving east on Prince Charles, take the corner before the shopping
centre on the right side, Follow the road around the curve to
the subject house which is painted white trim with blue with a drive way up to the carport.

GOLDEN GATES #1 (NASSAU)

Lot #154, a single story duplex with floor area of 1,460 sq. ft.
Each apartment consist of 2 bed, 1 bath, living and dining area
and kitchen. Lot size is 5,200 sq. ft., 52 x 100

Appraisal: $168,504.00

Heading south on Blue Hill Road, take first left after traffic light
at Blue Hill Rad and Carmichael Road intersection. Take the
second right the subject property is the second on the right. Sisal
Road and Bamboo Court. Painted white, trimmed green.

MURPHY TOWN (ABACO)

Lot #60 with a structure, lot size 60 x.115 ft., 6,900 sq. ft., 10
ft., above sea levelkbut below:road:level and would flood in a
severe hurricane the duplex has dimensions of 60 ft by 30 ft
partly of wood and partly of cement blocks with one section

and floor ready to be poured. The roof is asphalt shingles, the
interior walls and ceiling are of 1x6 pine and the floor of ceramic
‘tiles. The finished work is average/below, 2 bedrooms, one bath,
living/dining. The occupied portion of the structure is not complete.
Age: 10 years old.

Appraisal: $80,498.00

HAMILTON’S (LONG ISLAND)

Queen's High Way, lot of land 13,547 sq. ft., dwelling house
of solid concrete floors, foundation column and belt course
with finished plaster. Two bedrooms, one bathroom, kitchen,
dining, and living room. Total living space is 1,237 sq. ft:, utilities
available are electricity, water, cable tv and telephone.

Appraisal: $98,057.00

RAINBOW BAY SUBDIVISION
(ELEUTHERA)

Lot #44, Block 5, Section A. The lot is on.a hill overlooking the
Atlantic Ocean. Area is approximately 10,800 sq. ft. This site
encompasses a two storey apartment block of two apartments.
One upstairs and one downstairs. Each comprising one bedroom
-one bathroom, front room, dining, kitchen. There is a wooden
porch approximately 8 - 6 feet wide on the upper level secured
-with a wooden handrail. The garage area has been converted
into a efficiency apartment and now houses one
bedroom/frontroom in one and one bathroom. Age: is 7 years
old. The apartments could be rented at $700 per month partly
- furnished. The efficiency rented at $400 per month.

Appraisal: $308,402.00

EARLY SETTLERS DRIVE
. (ELEUTHERA)
Lot #7 Early Settlers Drive, North Eleuthera Heights, size 11,200

sq..ft., contains incomplete 3 bed, 2.5 bath, living room, dining
room, kitchen and tv room.

Appraisal: $141,716.40

NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA), Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and bounded on North by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal Investment Ltd., this is a
single family zoning and 50 ft., above sea level. This site encompasses a foundation with plumbing and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry fill. The concrete floor has not been poured

as yet. The foundation is 2,511 sq. ft.
Appraisal: $43,968.75

virtually finished and occupied with blocks up to window level -

Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is vacant and a hill over looking the Atlantic Ocean.

BAHAMA CORAL ISLAND (ABACO), Lot #1, Block A, on Central Abaco. This property is vacant and is approximately 9,100 sq. ft. This property is elevated’ and should not flood under normal conditions.
Appraisal: $8,236.00

The property is in the southwestern portion of the Bahama Coral, Coral Island and bounded northwesterly by 60 ft. Wide Road.

BAHAMA SOUND (EXUMA), Lot #7088 situated in Bahama Sound, Exuma section 10 East. Great Exuma approximately 10.5 miles west of George Town lot is square in shape on elevation of approximately
ft., above sea level contains 10,000 sq. ft., No adverse site conditions noted. This property is single family residence. ee . .

Appraisal: $26,250.00

Property is located on the northwestern side of the Queen’s Highway, about 10.5 miles northwest of George Town.

For conditions of sale and other information contact
Philip White @ 502-3077 email philip.white@scotiabank.com or
Harry Collie @ 502-3034 email harry.collie@scotiabank.com

__ Please visit www.fsbobahamas.com for interior photos

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 7B _
































PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005 THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

COMICS PAGE



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PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

SPORTS

THE TRIBUNE



'Team’s absence shouldn't
take away from Nationals

STUBBS

OPINION







Fe the second consecu-
tive time that the
Bahamas Association of Athletic
Associations have decided to
take the National High School
Track and Field Championships
to Grand Bahama, the St
Augustine’s College Big Red
Machines have decided to stay
home.

Many would argue that the Big
Red Machines should be a part
of the field of 30-plus schools
that will be competing at the
Grand Bahama Sports Complex
this weekend.

But the final decision on
whether or not a team represent-
ing the Big Red Machines
should go rests solely on St
Augustine’s College and not the
BAAA’s.

The Nationals is an invitation-
al event and is not mandatory for
the schools to compete, so they
can go if they wish. There is no
penalty if they don’t.

SAC’s primary obligation is to
the Bahamas: Association of
Independent Secondary Schools,

which they fulfilled, winning their -

17th straight championship title.
The BAAA issued more than
50 invitations for schools around

Top four make

the country to compete and SAC
is not the only school that turned
it down.

But because of SAC’s reputa-
tion and their legacy as one of
the top schools in the country,

SAC has a number of medal-
ists from the Carifta team that
came in third during the games
that was held over the Easter
holiday weekend in Tobago.

But the championships must



“The BAAA issued more than 50
invitations for schools around the
country to compete and SAC is not
the only school that turned it

down.”



it’s though that they should be
participating.

It’s like the AF Adderley
Junior High hosting the presti-
gious Hugh Campbell Basketball
Classic for senior boys and the
Taberncle Baptist Falcons or the

Catholic High Crusaders opting |

not to travel here to compete.

No doubt, SAC’s absence in
Grand Bahama will do just that.
It will also deprive some of the
top athletes from displaying their
skills in what is being billed by
the BAAA’s as a showcase of
their “Carifta medalists.”



and will go on.

So really, the focus should be
placed on the schools who have
accepted the invitation to travel
to Grand Bahama to compete.

H« do you think they
would feel if they are
making an effort to send their

teams to Grand Bahama and the
only concern being expressed is

the absence of SAC?

To have 30 or more schools in
Grand Bahama is a mammoth
task.

That means that there will be
at least 20 or more schools that
will make the trek to Grand
Bahama.

It speaks volumes for what the
BAAA is trying to achieve.

W hile I feel the parents
of athletes attending

SAC have a right to voice their
displeasure, it’s a decision that
the administration has made and
it’s something that they need to
deal with at that level.

The BAAA has proposed that
every odd year, they will be tak- -
ing their National High School
Championships to Grand
Bahama.

So that means in 2007, the par-

- ents may be confronted with this

same issue.

But if SAC decides to stick
with their decision not to travel,
then I think the concentration
should be placed on the teams
who are making their way there.

The BAAA won’t stop hosting
the championships because of
SAC’s absence.

The BAAA still has a vast
amount of teams that are
supporting them in their endeay:
ours.



Ray Minus Jt.
























THE top four teams advanced to the men's
semifinals of the Baptist Sports Council 2005
basketball playoffs on Tuesday night at the
Baillou Hills Sporting Complex.

On the president's side, pennant winning

47-36, while second place Calvary Bible routed
third place Faith United 63-26.

Mount Tabor will now have to square off
against Calvary Bible in the divisional finals

tonight at 7pm.

' On the vice president's side, pennant win-
ning Evangelistic Centre held off fourth-place
New Bethlehem 25-21 and second place New
Mount Zion nipped third place BIBA 43-40 to
set-up the other half of the showdown tonight.

It will be played between Evangelistic Centre
and New Mount Zion.

The two winners will clash in the best-of-
three championship series that will start on
Tuesday night at the same venue.

Here's a summary of how they advanced:

# Mount Tabor 47, Golden Gates 36: Albert
Simmons lit up the nets for a game high 17
points, Donny Johnson had 10 and Marvin Hen-
field assisted with eight in the win.







- Available from’ comment Ne



it to BSC semis

Mount Tabor Full Gospel knocked off fourth.
place finishers Golden Gates Native Baptist ~

Syn



Keron Rodgers scored 15, while Edward
Carey had seven and JeRon Cooper added six
in the loss.

@ Calvary Bible 63, Faith United 26: Cal-
vary Bible went on a 23-7 tear in the first quar-

ter and they were never challenged the rest of |

the way as they blew out Faith United.

Marvin Nairn led the way with a game high
17, while Michaelo Kelly contributed 16 and
Tori Clarke added 12 in the win-Ray Napoleon
scored 11 in a losing effort.

H New Mount Zion 43, BIBA 40: Ricardo
Rolle's game high 19 and Raymond Tinker's 14
was good enough to enable New Mount Zion to
pull off their win. Mario Davis helped out with
seven points.Burlington Moss scored 11 in a
losing effort.

@ Evengelistic Centre 25, New Bethlehem
21: Tyrone Sands was unstoppable as he hit
Evengelistic Centre's first eight points and the
last one to finish with a game high 16. Lamont
Bain helped out with five.

Terrell Duncombe scored five in the loss for
New Bethlehem.On Saturday at Baillou Hills,
the BSC will showcase the 15-and-under and 19-
and-under playoffs, starting at 10am.

sCopyrighted Me Mat

dicated Cx Content








erlal,

neh We

33
Prov l Id e rs eae as a result of the tal-

“— =

pays tribute to.
amateur box

LOCAL boxer Cameron Knowles will be laid’ to
rest this weekend following his untimely death. ©

The body of the 24-year- -old from Long Island ‘was
found in the waters of Potters Cay dock last week.

Knowles, who started boxing at.the age of 13,
was a member of the Feast Amateur Boxing

the Carifta Games in Jamaica in 2000 anda bronze
medal winner at the event in 1999.

Champion Boxing Club president Ray Minus Jr
said Knowles was one of his most ‘dedicated students
and trained hard.

“His goal was to become a professional and win
a world title,” Minus said. “He was hoping to be a -
Bahamian champion. He made a strong statement ~
in amateur boxing for the Bahamas by attending
matches in Florida and won a gold medal at the
Bahamas Games.”

As Mr Minus reflected on Knowles’ career he
recalled one particular moment from that gold

’ medal winning run in the 2000 Carifta Games.

“Cameron was in a fight so intense, against an
opponent from Guyana, that both fighters collided
hands. Cameron was so strong-that he broke that
boxer’s hand. He beat the best in Guyana.”

The Champion Amateur Boxing Club sends its
condolences to the family of Cameron Knowles.

The funeral is at 1pm on Saturday at the Church
of God on Bernard Road.

@ CAMERON KNOWLES

Wisdom

praises
Carifta
athletes

MINISTER of Youth, Sports
and Culture Neville Wisdom
offered congratulations to the
members of both the 2005 track
and field and swimming teams
that participated in the Carifta
Games in Tobago and Curacao
respectively.

“I am able to report that at
each destination, both our
junior national teams continued
to expand the rich legacy of the
Bahamas as a regional sports
power despite our limited pop-
ulation base,” Wisdom stated

ent and skills that were\dis-
played in Tobago and again in
Curacao, the Bahamas is well
poised to retain and then main-
tain a leadership position in



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athletics and swimming among
other countries of the
Caribbean.”

Wisdom said the Bahamas
achieved a total of 30 medals,
inclusive of five gold, seven sil-
ver and 18 bronze, but the fig-
ures should have increased by
two if the Under-20 boys pole
vault were not classified as an
exhibition event.

- “T am pleased to report that

much the same successes were
recorded by our Carifta swim
team in Curacao,” he added of
the team, which collected 512
medals, including 24 gold, 20
silver and nine bronze.
IMED 189

WINES & SPIRITS
Fay OY ec OT 0

: Tobacco Smoking may cause Heart Disease or
ung Cancer among other diseases


nee en LO A A A CR TONE NI SS eh ti ener rene nearer eer,

pte e-em - te eS SP SSS se Sis ss vs 7 :

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

GOLDEN Girl Deb-
bie Ferguson will have
another prestigious
accolade added to her
name at the end of the
month.

The most decorated
Bahamian sprinter will
be inducted into the
Drake Relays Athletes
Hall of Fame during a
reception at the Drake
Knapp Center.

But Ferguson may not
be able to attend the
induction reception
unless she's fully recov-
ered from the surgery
she underwent on Tues-
day night for her appen-
dix at Kendall Medical
Centre.

Ferguson's mother,
Elka Ferguson, who
rushed from Nassau to
be with her at the hospi-
tal in Miami on Tuesday,
said her daughter is rest-
ing comfortably after a
successful surgery.

Medication

"She's okay. She's
responding very well,"
said Ms Ferguson. "They
gave her some medica-
tion and she went off to
sleep. But she's doing
very well. She's coming
along very well."

‘Ms Ferguson said her
daughter is expected to
remain in Kendall Med-
ical Centre for the next
four days and should be
released by the end of
the week.

"Once she come out of
the hospital, she will
stay in Miami," said her
mother, who intends to
stay there as long as she
can to take care of her
daughter. "She won't be
able to do any travelling
right now."

Her mother said she
got a call from her
daughter on Saturday
complaining of pain. On
Monday, Ms Ferguson
said Debbie called her
again to inform her that
the pain had gotten
worse. But it wasn't
until Tuesday morning
that she went to the hos-
pital to check it out and
it was recommended
that she had to have the
emergency surgery.

Called

“When she called me
on Tuesday, I left work
and rushed right over
here," her mother stat-
ed.

The operation was
conducted around 9:30
pm Tuesday night and
about a hour or two, her
mother was able to visit
her in the recovery
room. :

"She was able to
recognise who I was,"
her mother stressed.
"That was a good sign."

The reception will be
held during the 96th
annual Drake Relays,
scheduled for April 28-
30 at Drake Stadium in
Des Moines, Iowa.
' Ferguson, 29, will be
the 196th athlete to be
inducted and the second
Bahamian to receive the
honor.

The first Bahamian
inducted was retired
quarter-miler Pauline
Davis, who was inducted
as a member of the Uni-
versity of Alabama in
1996 along with Michael
Johnson from Baylor
and decathlon Kip Jan-
viin from the K&K
Club.






























































ml By BRENT STUBBS


















-ooev1l HERALD SPORTS



a
~~



.Copyrighted| Material
Syndicated Content












~



Available from Commercial News Providers;







Senior Sports .
Reporter

MARK Knowles and
Daniel Nestor, playing on
the red clay courts for the
first time this year, got off
to a good start in their first
match at the Masters Series
Monte-Carlo.

The top seeded team made
quick work of Daniele Brac-
ciali and Giorgio Galimber-
ti of Italy with a 6-1, 6-4 vic-
tory yesterday at the ATP
Masters Series event.

“It was a great start. Obvi-
ously, we played great
today,” said Knowles from
his hotel room in Monte-
Carlo. “We came out really
fast and won the first set
rather easily.

“We also had a pretty
good second set, which is
really important. It’s really a
lot of different conditions on
the red clay, which is a chal-
lenge for us.”

Having played on fast sur-

faces all year long, Knowles

_ Said it’s a good change of

pace to play on the slower
red clay courts.
“It’s a different animal.

4

(

” Doubles pair off to winning

start in Monte Carlo



It’s a lot slower and guys get:

to hit a lot more second and
third shots from the. back,”
Knowles reflected. “It’s a
tournament that we’ve never
won before, so we would
love to do well here.

Battle

“But we know it’s a lot of

work that needs.to be done.

Even our next round is real-
ly tough. We’re playing one
of the best teams on clay in
the next round. So it’s a
tough battle. But we’re look-
ing forward to the chal-
lenge.”

Knowles and Nestor’s next
opponents in the third round
will be the number six seed-
ed team of Michael Llodra
and Fabrice Santoro of
France.

If they stay as focussed as

they were in their second

round match, Knowles is
confident that they can

prevail against the French-
men. Sa
“We have to play a.differ-
ent game plan because the
play is going to be slightly
different,” Knowles antici-
pated. “The ball movement
is on the clay is different, so
either team will have to bat-
fee oe ees oe

“So we just have to be

ready to battle and to go out
there and execute like we
know how too.”

Knowles said there’s a lot of

pressure put on him and
Nestor to succeed, but he
stressed that they’ve been
taking care of. business as
usual. a Sea I
“We’re happy to have the
number one seeding, but it’s
a long year,” he insisted.

_ “We just want to get the win

and be able to move on from
here.” —-:

As.the No.4 seeded team
last. year, Knowles and
Nestor were.eliminated in
the semifinal by the No.7
team of Etlis Gaston and
Martin Rodriguez of
Argentina.

Ousted

Ih 2003 as the top. seeded
team, they were ousted in

the first round by the’

unseeded team of Wayne

Arthurs and Paul Hanley of.

Australia.

Going into Monte-Carlo,
Knowles and Nestor have
only won the ATP Masters
Series in Indiana Wells.
They were also finalists in
Marseilles and semifinalists
in Miami and in Rotterdam.

However, they lost in the
first round of the Australian

Open, the first.Grand slam
for the year.

Knowles said they’re hop-
ing to use this stretch of
tournaments to prepare for
the French open - the sec-
ond Grand Slam of the year
- scheduled to start on May .
23.

After they play in Monte-
Carlo, they will return to the
United States to play in
Houston, Texas at the US
Men’s Claycourt Champi-
onships next week before
they take a week off.

If there is a surface they
enjoy playing on, Knowles
said it would have to the
hard courts where they won
the US Open for their sec-
ond Grand Slam title last
year.

“We’ve done really well
on the clay. We’ve had good
results,” he stated. “But it’s
probably last on our list
because you can play really
well from the back.

“There are a lot of other
great players out there on
clay. They don’t play so
much on the other surfaces
like the hard court because
you have to have all facets of
the game working for you.”





- THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

SECTION



The Tribune



Sermons, Church Activities, Awards

Church Notes

Page 2C



Are we losing respect for

sanctity of the church?



@ BISHOP Ross Davis examines the damage after Golden Gates
Assembly was the target of a burglary.

The life and legacy
of Pope John Paul II

i By FRANCIS NORONHA

_ “BE Not Afraid!” These were among
the first words uttered by the new Pope
John Paul II, with a large crucifix before
him, in October 1978, and these few words
encapsulated the life and work of a man
who has left his mark on history.

In 1848 Polish poet Julius Slowacki pre-
dicted that a Slavic Pope would travel far
and wide and help to put order in a chaot-
ic world.

Student leader, labourer, factory work-
eT, actor, sportsman, theologian and
philosopher (with two doctorates), play-
wright, world traveller, linguist, Pope John

. Paul II lived under Nazism — where he
- was on the blacklist for helping belea-
guered, desperate people, especially Jews

., — Communism (Gorbachev attributed its’
* downfall mainly to him), and Capitalism

(which he advocated should be carefully



(The Tribune archive photo)



HB By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

recent spate of

church vandalism

cases has sparked

concern among local

parishioners who

believe that the country may be losing

its respect for the sanctity of the
church and what it represents.

On Sunday morning, church offi-

cials at the Golden Gates Assembly

World Outreach Ministries on

Carmichael Road arrived to find that.

the church’s office had been broken
into and ransacked. It is unknown
how the intruders entered the build-
ing, but once inside, they smashed in
several doors before using a fire extin-
guisher to break the door leading into
the church’s executive offices. There,
drawers and file cabinets were pried
open and papers thrown everywhere.
Total damage is estimated at a min-
imum of $8,000.
. This unfortunate incident follows

‘another break-in at the Cedars of

Lebanon Cathedral, Buttonwood Dri-
ve in Nassau Village. Over the Easter

holiday, the unfinished facility was

the target of burglars who broke sev-
eral windows and vandalised the
church’s office.

According to Bishop Ross Davis
of Golden Gates Assembly, these
incidents are not isolated.

He has been in contact with pas-
tors throughout New Providence and
learned of other cases of vandalism to
church property that haven’t made
the news.

The Church of God of Prophecy
has experienced break-ins at three of

its churches in the last 10 days;
Englerston, Seven Hills and Mead-
ow Street. The Good Samaritan King-
dom Ministries, Godet Avenue was
broken into on Sunday night, and
Zion South Beach Full Gospel Bap-
tist, Zion Boulevard was broken into
on the first Sunday of this month.

In a sermon following his church’s
break-in, Rev Dr Charles C Rolle,
pastor of Cedars of Lebanon told his
congregation: “The devil is busy.
Thieves have no respect. for God’s
house, disrespecting God’s house and
desecrating His house. Something is

wrong when people have no respect

for the sanctuary of God. It seems as
if men have no respect for God’s
house these days...”

Property.

Bishop Davis agrees, and says that

a disrespect for church property is a

“terrible ongoing problem”.
“Tt is an island-wide epidemic. In

fact, very few churches have not been |

vandalised. If you go in.a church
today, it is common to see church

speakers bolted to the walls, and win- |

dows on the first floor with burglar
bars. That’s not uncommon when
people build a church today, so this is
a sign that times have changed,” Bish-
op Davis told Tribune Religion in an
interview.

“Whenever and wherever we have
wayward persons, persons who are
taking their lives into their own hands,
this will be a common trend,” he adds.

And while the pastor cites these
recent incidents, he noted that this is
not a problem that has just surfaced,
but it has “ashamedly been with us

Df” Uy in

AN qu saotll K WAR! :

* Hard Back * Soft Back
WAS $23.98 WAS $15.98
NOW $17.98 NOW $ 9.98

and continually monitored to prevent vio-
lation of basic human rights in the interests

_ of money).

Stressing the ethnic background of the
Church, he said that it is not national or
international but universal, demanding a
“keen sensitivity to authentic cultures.

Travelled

Towards that end, he travelled all over
the world, addressing people in their own
language even if only in a few words. The
Pope stressed the spirit of ecumenism
among all Christians, and friendly dia-
logue among all religions. He encouraged
young people to be idealistic, not materi-
alistic.

Towards those ends, the Pope instituted
World Youth Day (every few years held
on a different continent, and attended by
millions of young people from all over










the world); the World Faiths Meeting,
first held in Assisi in 1986 and then every
few years (attended by representatives of
all Christian denominations, Jews,’ Mus-
lims, Hindus, Buddhists, Jams, Zoroastri-
ans, Shintoists, Sikhs, tribal animists from
Africa, American Indians and others);
and other gatherings of people from all
over the world to meet and exchange
views in endeavours to work for world
peace (he maintained “World peace is
built on the force of law and not on the
law of force”) and raise living standards all
over the world (he stated that teaching
peace, solidarity, justice and liberty was
not enough, it must be “translated into
action” as in the case of Mother Teresa
and Mahatma Gandhi).

A prolific writer, the Pope in his encycli-

See POPE, Page 2C

BNR Or Nima ae Cee aa aaa ae



for a while”.

Last year, the Firetrail Assembly
Church was vandalised on several
occasions, and had to replace stolen
speakers in the majority of these cas-
es, he noted. “They have had proba-
bly 12 speakers stolen. If not 12, more
than six.’

It appears that the church, which

-was once seen as an off-limits target

for criminal activity, no longer has
that status, considering the graffiti-
marred church walls throughout Nas-
sau, and the theft of church equip-
ment.

Said Bishop Davis: “When you
passed a church (in the past) you
would lift your finger, and in my day
we tipped our hats. If you were talk-
ing loudly, you would lower your
voice, to reverence not only the
church building but also the area
around the church. But now, we have
lost it. It’s a sign that we are not what
we.used to be. They have opened our-
selves to spirits that render them not
their own, controlled by somethin
else,” he explains. {

While the intruders may have bro
ken into the church’s office and dam-
aged its structure, it appears that they
did not dampen the spirits of the pas-
tor or his officers. Sunday’s service
went on as planned, ‘regular weekly
services have been held since then,
and business continues to go on as
usual.

Bishop Davis says that the break-in
is unfortunate, but the responsibility
of the church is to now re-claim its
authority, and “re-fire” itself to reach

See CHURCH, Page 2C

Harbour Boy Shopping Cansra
Town Centre Mas!



<>

Bible BOOS $aGift Shop

“Wl sche ius oF Mbew”



(ono. ANG) SLIPS ORISIORD » ab SaaS
WI IOWoile DIswWooLsS8s Ou
PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





Committee to stage ‘one of its
most ambitious fundraisers’

â„¢ By CLEMENT JOHNSON

n Friday, April 22 the
Anglican Central
Education Authori-
ty/Anglican School
Development: Fund
committee will stage one of its most
ambitious fundraisers to date with a
dinner and concert at the Sandals
Royal Bahamian Ballroom.
The dinner will begin at 7pm and
the concert at 9pm.

The featured performer will be |

renowned international gospel singer
Donnie McClurkin.

The money raised from this con-
cert and following events will be used
to continue the tradition of provid-
ing quality education for the Anglican
Schools. Development Fund. Special
emphasis will be on the following pro-
jects:

e Rebuilding of the Science Block
of Freeport Anglican High/Discov-
ery Primary School, which wass
destroyed during hurricanes Frances
and Jeanne in September 2004.

¢ The completion of the cafeteria at
St John’s College: The original cafe-
teria, computer lab and library were
destroyed by fire in September 2002.

® Construction of a clinic, staff
room and computer labs at St Anne’ s
School.

¢ Construction of additional class-
rooms at St Andrew’s Anglican
School in Exuma.

Education

The Anglican Diocese has been
providing quality education for the
children of the Bahamas for more
than 60 years and has produced lead-
ers in all professions, nationally and
internationally.

The Anglican Central Education

Authority has responsibility for a
number of schools. In New Provi-
dence there is St John’s College and
St Anne’s School; in Grand Bahama,
Freeport Anglican High/Discovery
Primary School; and in Exuma, St
Andrew’s Anglican School. ©

The public is being asked to come
out and support this worthwhile
cause. Committee members are Marie
A Roach, director of Education
Anglican Central Education Author-
ity; Elizabeth Grant and Janet Cox.

They can be contacted at the Angli-

can Education Department, seins:
ton House Sands Road. d

This past weekend, hundreds of
gospel lovers braved the cool weath-
er on Saturday night to enjoy an
open-air concert sponsored by the
fund committee.

Incident

The concert marked the start of the
2005 fundraising events. And went
on without incident.

The crowd was entertained by per-
formers like the Caribbean Dancers,
Tennille Burrows and Blessed, .to

name a few.
00000600 00060000000OCCCCOCCOC®E



Church



Bahamians to eather
for evening prayer
and Benediction

A DAY before the 115
Cardinals gather in conclave
in the Sistine Chapel in the
Vatican to begin the process
of selecting a new pope,
Bahamians will gather in
prayer at St Francis Xavier.
Cathedral.

The evening prayer and
Benediction on Sunday,
April 17, will be part ‘of a

, number of activities that
have been organised by

‘Archbishop Patrick Pinder
to celebrate the ‘Year of the
Eucharist’.

The Year of the Eucharist
was proclaimed by the late
John Paul II at the Corpus
Christi celebration in Rome
in June of 2004. In his public |
audience on Sunday, June

13, 2004, the Pope said that -
his proclamation of a spe-
cial Year of the Eucharist
for 2004-2005 was part of his
overall project for the new

+ millennium, to “start out























contemplate the face of
Christ. In that spirit, he
entrusted the Year of the
Eucharist to the Virgin:
Mary.

__.In the Eucharist, the late {
Pope said that the church
celebrates “the central event

‘in history of mankind”. The
Year of the Eucharist began.
with a Eucharistic Congress
in Guadalajara, Mexico in
October 2004. When it con-
cludes in Rome later this
year, with the meeting of the
synod of Bishops in Octo-'
ber, the man, who was
responsible for it will not be -
there.

As Bahamian Catholics
gather around Archbishop
Patrick Pinder to pray, they ©
will be thinking.about who
will be named the next
Pope.

For those wishing to sign
the Book of Condolences
for the late-Pope, the book

~ wilk'témain’ open until Mon-

‘ day;*April 18; in the-foyer

coming the third’Christian of St Francis Xavier-Cathe-

millennium, “Nova Millenio dral. Because so many

Ineunte” the late Pope ~ wished to sign, the book was

encouraged the faithful to kept open for an extra week.











EAST ST GOSPEL
CHAPEL _

.THE church at.83 East Street, “where’

Jesus Christ is Lord, and everyone is spe-
cial”, is scheduled to hold the following
services:
' Sunday, 9:45 am - Sunday School &
Adult Bible Class, 11 am - Morning Cele-
bration, 7 pm:- Communion Service, 8 pm
- ‘Jesus, the Light of World’ Radio Pro-
gramme on ZNS 1

-Tuesday, 8 pm - Chapel Choir Practice |

Wednesday, 8 pm - Midweek Prayer
Meeting (Second Wednesday) — Cell

- Group Meeting

Thursday, 6 pm - Hand Bells Choir Prac-
tice, 8 pm - Men’s Fellowship Meeting
(Every 4th Thursday), 7:45 pm - Women’s

. Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th Thursday)
Friday, 6:30 pm - Conquerors for Christ .

Club (Boys & ’ Gitls Club), 8 pm - East

_ Street Youth Fellowship Meeting

Saturday, 6:30.am - Early ane
Prayer. Meeting

PARISH CHURCH
OF THE MOST
HOLY TRINITY

THE church at 14 T: rinity Way, Staple-

. , don Gardens, is scheduled to hold the fol-
" lowing services:

Sunday, 7 am -' The Holy Eucharist, 9 am
- The Family Eucharist, Sunday School,

6:30 pm - Praise & Worship/Bible Study,

_. Evensong & Benediction

Tuesday, 7:30 pms “The Church At
Prayer

Wednesday, 5:30 am - Intercessory _
Prayer, 6:30 am - The Holy Eucharist, 7:30 -

pm
For further information, call (242)-328-

8677 or visit our website:
www.holytrinitybahamas.org

ST ANDREW’S
PRESBYTERIAN .

YOU are invited to worship with the
church family at 9:30 am or 11 am on Sun-
day. Sunday School meets during the 11

on Friday evenings.
The Kirk is located at the corner of Péck-
’s Slope and Princes' Street, across from the
Central Bank. Parking is available imme-
diately behind the Kirk. Visit us also at:
www.standrewskirk.com

FIRST HOLINESS

CHURCH OF GOD .

THE church on-First Sioliness Way,

Bambog: Town, is scheduled to hold the

. following services:

Sunday, 9:45 am - Sunday School, 11am

« - Morning Worship, 7 pm - Evening Wor-

ship

Monday, 7:30 pm - Prayer Meeting

Wednesday, noon - Prayer & Praise Ser-
vice, 7:30 pm - Bible Study

Thursday, 7:30 pm - Praise & Worship
Service

Friday (2nd and 4th), 7: 30 pm - Youth
Meeting

- Sécond Tuesdays, 7:30 pm - SALT Min-
istry (Single Adults Living Triumphantly)

Fourth Saturdays, 4 pm - SOME Min-
istry (Save Our Men Evangelism)

Ist Sundays - Women's Day

2nd Sundays - Youths Day/Dedication of
Infants ©

3rd Sundays - Mission Day/Communion

4th Sundays - Men's Day Service

UNITED FAITH
. MINISTRIES

am service and the Youth Group meets

INTERNATIONAL

THE church in the Summer Winds
Plaza, Harrold Road, is scheduled to hold
the following services:

Sunday, 8 am - Morning Glory Break-
through Service, 10:30 am - Divine Worship
Service (Live broadcast at 11 am on More

- 94.9 FM)

Morning Glory Prayer meeting every
Wednesday and Saturday at 5 am

Tuesday, 7:30 pm - Choir Rehearsal

Every Wednesday, 7 pm - Bible Study

Friday, 7 pm - Youth Meeting .

For further information, e-mail:
ufm@bahamas.net.bs ;

or call 328-3737/328-6949





May 11 - 15
AU tho
The Diplomat Centre

Call 341-6444 to Pa

Ch urc h (From page 1C)

' out to these individuals.
' “Tt is.up to us now to go to -

the next level. You have to
understand, the people who

. are doing this are from our
» churches, our homes. They are

not foreigners, they are
Bahamians who may have
been deacons or church work-
ers.

“It was like when drugs hit
the Bahamas. It was our chil-
dren that did the raping of our
wealth. So it’s the same thing

here. It’s a sign that our chil-
dren are in need. A profes-
sional thief will not hit the
church first, he would go
somewhere else. But when you
have to break into a church; it

must be your last resort,” said.

the pastor.

While the police conducts its

investigation into the break-
in, the assembly must make
certain that this unfortunate
incident does not repeat itself.

Bishop Davis says that the

church must now be even more
vigilant and careful. Among
other security measures to be
implemented, an alarm system,
which did not go off at the

break-in (for reasons unknown -

to him), will be looked into.
Detectives

. Detectives have dusted the
ransacked area for prints and

‘an investigation into the matter ,

is underway.

While officials could not be
reached for an update, Bishop
Davis says that he is confident
that the perpetrators will be
caught, and very soon,

“These people will be
caught. As we speak, I am
declaring that they will be
caught. I pity them because -
they cannot stand the wrath of ©
God. It’s better for them to be
handled by the police than to
face the wrath of God,” he
says.



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Pope (From page 1C) |

cal “Centesimus Annus” mentioned cap-
italism as the ideal economic system as
long as it is based on the common good of
the world’s population, with careful safe-
guards for the rights of the workers every-
where.

%

Activist
A world traveller and human rights
activist, the Pope mentioned in 1980 in

_ Kinhasa, Zaire, Africa, about the “scourge

‘of racism”. The same year, in Brazil, South
America, he visited the favelas and main-
tained that “Land is a gift of God to all
human beings”. In 1984 at Yellow Kilife
Canada, in a tepee belonging to Huron
indians he said: “History provides clear
proof that over.the centuries your péo-
ple have been the repeated victims of

. Injustice from new arrivals”. In 1986 in

India, after laying a wreath at the Samad-
hi of Mahatma Gandhi whom he
described as “the apostle of non-violence”

* and “the hero of humanity”, the Pope

said that “the existence of immense arse-
nals of weapons of mass-destruction caus-
es a grave and justified uneasiness in our
minds.”

During his 2002 visit to Mexico, the

‘Pope promoted the rights and culture of

the native Indians, with the result that the

. government, which had planned a new

airport terminal which would displace
many local farmers, reversed its decision,

announcing that it would ‘ ‘put the interest ..

of the ‘campesinos’ first. ‘

In his 1994 book “Crossing the Thresh-

old of Hope”, the Pope mentioned “All
individual and collective suffering caused
by the forces of nature and unleashed by
man’s free will — the wars, the gulags,
and the holocausts: the Holocaust of the
Jews but also, for example, the holocaust
of the black slaves from Africa.

The Pope denounced evils perpetrated ..

by non-Christians and Christians. He
emphasised the sanctity of life from con-
ception to natural death. He.was labelled
in some areas as a “conservative” and in







other areas as a “liberal”, but labels do not
serve to describe him. He believed that .
some areas of Christian teaching are sub-
ject to change, others are not, and that
opinion polls might reflect the views’ of
many, even the majority, but not neces-
sarily the views of God or the Church.

As famous American columnist Wal-
ter Lippman observed in 1926: “There is
nothing in the teachings of Jesus or St
Francis which justifies us in thinking that -
the opinions of 51per cent of a group are
better than the opinions of 49 per cent .”

History

The funeral of Pope John Paul IT was
one of the largest in history, attended by
representatives of many countries around
the globe and also by common people of
numerous nations.

‘The outpouring of love and grief for
Pope John Paul II was worldwide. Here

_was a Man of God who was not afraid to

live nor afraid to die.

McFISH
FILLET
‘SANDWICH




THE TRIBUNE



RELIGION

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005, PAGE 3C

Chosen people



ould the Bahamas

play a significant

part in biblical

history? Could

there be a con-
nection between the Israelites
and the peoples of the shallow
seas?

A group of people who have
devoted their entire lives to the
conviction that these questions
have affirmative answers have
spoken out.

“Bahamas in Prophecy” is a
unique church with the vision
that Bahamians will rise to ful-
fil biblical prophecy once they
heed God’s call and understand
how the ancient text relates to
this day and time.

The prophets of this church,

headed by Micklyn Seymour .

and Marcello Fowler, have pro-
duced a book named after the
church, which outlines similari-
ties between Israel and the
Bahamas, historical events, and
biblical holy days.

“The Bahamas has recently
celebrated its 30th year as an
independent nation,” states the
introduction.

“Thirty is indeed a prophetic
number in the Holy Bible,
which means a time of transi-
tion and beginnings...

“The nation stands at a point
of a prophetic era, a time of
reformation and transforma-

tion, when God will accomplish,

all that he has predestined to
do in and through the Bahamas.
The Bahamas in Prophecy, in
celebration of this most historic
season, takes this opportunity
to present this prophetic docu-
ment to you: the government,
church leaders, and ultimately,
the people of this nation.”

The purpose of this docu- ©

ment, the prophets state, is to
reveal God’s “divine and
redemptive purpose and plan
for this nation” and to illustrate
from the Bible that the
Bahamas is in prophecy — as is
Israel, the USA, Europe and”

%

other nations. * Sk

Said Mr Seymour: “We hope”

| A newly-published booklet suggests the Bahamas has
been divinely selected for a unique purpose in the

world, one decreed in a biblical prophecy.

‘reporter Felicity Ingraham explores its

be received in the spirit in which
it is written and that is, to
inform and enlighten our peo-
ple of our spiritual purpose and
destiny in The Almighty God. It
is in His name and by His inspi-
ration that these declarations
were received and are being
made. We are convinced that
the season in which the contents
of this document are to be ful-
filled is upon us.”

Here are excerpts of the 24-
page booklet, courtesy of
Bahamas in Prophecy:

Revealed

For the past 15 years, God
has revealed through the book
of Isaiah, how this nation will
become a praise, model, witness
and example to other nations
of the world during this millen-
nium. First he did this by reveal-
ing that His Hands are at work
within the history of our nation
and secondly, by showing the
similarities of Biblical and cur-
rent events of the nations of
Israel and The Bahamas. A
close and careful study of our
history will show striking simi-
larities and parallels between
both nations.

The Almighty God would
have us to know that the pur-
pose for the unveiling of the
similarities and parallels

between the two nations, is for °

the government, church and
people to accept that He has
predestined this nation to play a
major role in fulfilling his
redemptive purpose and plan

73, the earth.



“The Holy’ Bible réveals‘that

aS the lightening, shines from
. thé, East tothe’ West, so shall
and trust that this doctimhent will ~

“the coming 'of the Son of Man

be (Matthew 24:27). The Mes-
siah came to the East, now he
must touch down in the West. It
is from these islands of the sea
in which we live, that God’s glo-
ry from the West will be seen.
Isaiah prophesied to this truth:
“to the island will he repay
recompense. So shall they fear
the name of the Lord from the
West and his glory from the ris-
ing of the sun. When the enemy
shall come in like a flood, the
spirit of the Lord shall lift up a
standard against him” (Isaiah
59:18,19).

The prophet Isaiah also
prophesied about ‘the isles of
the sea’ and the fact that God
wili do a new thing in the earth.
According to Isaiah: “Behold
the former things are come to
pass and new things do I
declare. Before they spring
forth I tell you of them. Sing

-unto the Lord a new song and

his praise from the ends of the
earth, Ye that go down to the

‘sea and all that is therein, the

isles and the inhabitants thereof,
let the wilderness and the cities
lift up their voice, the villages
that Kedar doth inhabit, let the
inhabitants of the rock sing, let
them shot from the top of the
mountains; let them give glory
unto the Lord and declare his
praise in the islands” (Isaiah 42:
9-12).

A Biblical chronological
study of the Old Testament will
show that the year 1492 BC was
a very significant year. The
Companion Bible’s chronolog-
ical chart shows that between
1492 and 1491 BC the children
of Israel left Egypt. Clarence

© Larkin, tire his-book Dispensa- . --
tional Truth: (God’s Plan-and....

Purpose ir the-Ages) also wrote
that the H&l Bible was given

eal

. Invites You to Attend The

"FINDING PEACE IN TROUBLED TIMES”

Tom Roberts

Host Pastor

Crusade
2005

with Special Guest

Speaker

Frank Perry

Speaker

Evangelist Frank Perry

April 17th - 24th

Starting at 7:30 pm on weeknights
Sunday at 11:00 am & 7:00 pm

ARE THE PRESSURES OF LIFE GETTING YOU DOWN? _
ARE YOU STRESSED OUT BY THE PROBLEMS OF OUR SOCIETY?
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Plan now to attend, Bring The Whole Family
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Accept Jesus Now! Receive His Peace Today
Located at #79 East Street, Between Lewis St. & McCollough Corner
Contact the Chuch office at 322-3874
Bus Transportation is Available.



over a period of 1600 years
extending from 1492'BC to 100
AD. This being the case, we can
say that it was exactly 1,492
years from Exodus to the birth
of The Messiah.

The New World was re-dis-

covered when Christopher ©

Columbus sailed from the east
to the west and landed in the
Bahamas in 1492 AD. This
being the case, we can say that
the New World was re-discov-
ered 1,492 years after the birth
of The Messiah. Additionally,
it can be said that the birth of
the Messiah was equidistance
from the Exodus (1492 BC) to
the re-discovery of these islands
(1492 AD).

Enslaved

God allowed the nation of
Israel to be enslaved in Egypt
some 430 years before its Exo-
dus, and another 40 years
before the Israelites entered the

Promised Land. In a similar.

manner, God allowed peoples

' to be enslaved in these islands

shortly after 1492, the majority
of whom were from the land of
Africa. Since then, slavery con-
tinued for more than 400 years.
Physical slavery was supposed-
ly abolished during 1834, but it

was not fully realised until more.

than a century later.
The majority of slaves

Here Tribune :
theories... _

(descendants) were not consid-
ered free until the 1967 general
elections when Majority Rule
began. Please note that it was
exactly 475 years from 1492 to
1967. This is almost similar to
the 470 years plus, when Israel
entered and left Egypt to jour-
ney to the Promised Land.
The general elections that
ushered in majority rule in the
Bahamas took place on the
tenth day of the first month
(January 10, 1967); the same
day God told Moses to prepare
the children of Israel to leave
Egypt. On the evening of the
tenth there was yet no winner.
The elections were tied as both
the Progressive Liberal Party
and the United Bahamian Par-
ty won 18 seats. Three days lat-





er the PLP was successful in.»

soliciting the support of two
independent candidates...and

Sir Lynden Pindling was offi- —
cially recognised as Premier of

The Bahamas. It was at this
point that majority rule began
to take effect. God, in his divine
providence, divinely orches-

trated the dates of this election, _

so as to coincide with the Exo-
dus and Passover of the
Israelites from Egypt.

The book points to Joshua
4:19 and Joshua 5:10 as refer-.

ence scriptures which show the
date the nation of Israel passed
over Jordan to enter the







Promised Land.

The Bahamas in Prophecy
would like to declare that the
date the Bahamas attained
nationhood was also a prophet-
ic one. The Bahamas became
an independent nation on the

tenth day of the seventh month, —

the day the Israelites sounded
the Trumpet of Jubilee on the

Day of Atonement in the land

of Israel.

As with Majority Rule, The
Almighty God wants us to
know that it is He who aligned
our Independence Day with the
nation of Israel’s Jubilee Trum-
pet and Atonement Day.

The Lord wants the govern-
ment, church leaders and all
Bahamians to know that he has
chosen this nation to show forth
His Glory and that we are
indeed the New Providence of
God.

Similarities

He wants us to know that
these similarities are not coin-

_ cidental. The acknowledgment

of these signposts will deter-
mine whether our nation will
be. blessed or cursed.

The book continues with a _
. series of other similarities and
prophecies, and.can be obtained '

at the church office behind
Wonhg’s printing on Chesapeake
Road.

In January this year, the
group held a press conference

‘calling for Majority Rule to be
’ celebrated on January 10 rather
“then January 14. A ZNS inter-
view with Sir Lynden was -

played, where he admits that

January 14, 1967, was the true -
date of Majority Rule.

: ‘Tel: 242-926-641 35 or 242-323-679

c Guest Speaker -
Rev Di . Victor Cooper,
Pastor of .

New. Bethany pony Chur cl

You are also cordially invited to share with us Aoi our
FAMILY WEEK Sunday, April 17 - Saturday, April. 23, 2005

Sunday, April 17th - Family Day - Fill a Pew with Family Members

Family Life Seminars, Sunday - 7:00.pm
Guest Speaker: Minister Nathaniel Beneby

Wednesday, April 20 & Friday, April 22 - 7:00pm,
Topics Include: Health & Social Issues Conducted by various Medical Professionals

11:00am & 7:00pm

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ELIGIO

THE TRIBUNE °°







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Orlando Florida
10:45a.m. - Divine Worship Service

Rev. Dolly King
Hosannah Convention Baptist Church
7:00p.m. -Evening Service

Preceded by:

WOMEN’S CONFERENCE
Saturday April 16th 9:00a.m.

Guest Speakers:

ea a Ve tain Pa a Ta tate aa a Oe Se Po Tie tn he Tea Ven Ba Ci Be Be ta Peg an ha Vin Fes Vis Ea Kea Fa Vir Vin Ves Us Reo Fis Fe Ca Tan Fhe Fin Fo Fala Os Tee Kava Ver aT et aT ae eh eV are T ar Ly



Evangelist Blythe Bailey
Pilgrim Baptist Temple
Morning Speaker

Prophetess Francina Norman
Orlando Florida
Afternoon Speaker

**& COME AND WORSHIP WITH US***
All services will be held at:

Antioch Baptist Church
Mckinney Avenue, Stapledon Gardens
Tel#(242)325-0434(c) Fax:(242)325-0474
email: antbapchurch@batelnet.bs



FAT AT AT AE FI eT ae ea a oe Tae ratte tat
THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2005

THE TRIBUNE /





‘He loves me, He loves me not’

m@ By REV ANGELA PALACIOUS

here is a game that.

young girls used to play
with the petals of wild
flowers. A blossom was
selected that had an
indeterminable number of petals
which were then plucked out while
reciting the chant “he loves me, he
loves me not”. Heaven forbid if the
last petal fell on “he loves me not”.
The young girl’s fate was supposedly
sealed.
- There are times when we all may
find ourselves playing this game with
God’s love as the unknown quantity.
When things are going well, we con-
sider ourselves loved, and when things
are not God’s love becomes suspect.
We vacillate back and forth with no
stability or security. Like the disciples
on the road to Emmaus, we may not
be able to see God in our circum-
stances, and we may despair and lose
our faith.
Our Lord said to them: “O how




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foolish you are, and how slow of heart
to believe all that the prophets have
declared!” (Luke 24: 25 NRSV). Even-

tually, they recognise Jesus as he -

breaks the bread and distributes it to
them, and they admit that their hearts
had been burning within them while he
“broke open” the Scriptures for them
as well along the road. We are no dif-
ferent when we drift away from the
facts of our faith and become bogged
down by circumstantial evidence which
negatively impacts our emotions. |

Faith

Indeed, we have to pray “open the
eyes of our faith that we may behold
his redeeming work” (BCP).

How much more directly can God

‘speak to us of love than in chapter 43

of the Book of Isaiah? “Do not fear,
for I have redeemed you; I have called
you by name, you are mine. When you
pass through the waters, I will be with
you; and through the rivers, they shall

not overwhelm you; when you pass



MEDITATION



@ REV ANGELA PALACIOUS

through fire you shall not be burned,
and the flame shall not consume you
because you are precious in my sight,
and honoured, and I love you. Every-
one who is called by name, whom I
created for my glory, whom I formed
and made” (vv. 1-7 NRSV): God is
love, creating us in love, saving us in
love and sanctifying us in love.

Assured

We have only to look to the cross to”

be assured of just how much God loves
us and to see what lengths our God is
willing to go to prove it. We were “ran-
somed from the futile ways of our
ancestors, not with imperishable things
like silver and gold, but with the pre-
cious blood of Christ” (1Peter 1: 19-19
NRSV).

Psalm 116: 10 asks the question:.

“How shall I repay the Lord for all
the good things he has done for me?”
And this is an excellent place for us to
begin as well. In light of all that God
has done for us what is a fitting





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response?

We too need to do several things:

1. “Offer the sacrifice of thanksgiv-
ing and call upon the name of the
Lord” (Ps. 116:15 NRSV).

2. Speak of what we know: “You

“are my witnesses, says the Lord, and

my servant whom I have chosen, so
that you may know and believe me

“and understand that I am he. Before

me no god was formed, nor shall there
be any after me. I, I am the Lord, and

“beside me there is no saviour” (Is.

43:10-11 NRSV).

3. Respond with “reverent fear”,
trust in God, “faith and hope set on,
God”, “purifying our souls by our obe-

dience.to the truth” and most.impor-

tantly of all, able to demonstrate “gen-
uine mutual love, loving one another
“deeply from the heart”, because we
have been born anew through the liv-
ing enduring word of God” (1Peter 1:

17-22).

When next you think of questioning
God’s love think of Jesus Christ and
throw the flower away.
















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