Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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1 Lhe Tribune

iitmn thowini'itt.. | a



| HIGH
| LOW

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|e BREEZY

Volume: 101 No.115

CV Bethel student

70F
SUNNY AND |

becomes 13th aa
victim of the year

@ By PAUL G
-TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

POLICE reported that
the thirteenth murder of the
year occurred yesterday
when a 15-year-old student
of CV Bethel was stabbed
to death.

The incident occurred

around 3.25pm off East.

Street and Victoria Boule-
vard when an argument
escalated into a fight, and
Alando Williamson was
stabbed with a knife in the
left side of his chest.

According to Chief Super-
intendent Hulan Hanna, the
young man was rushed to
the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital where he was pro-
nounced dead.

Just. before press-time
yesterday, Mr Hanna con-
firmed that police had
apprehended and were
holding in custody a 15-
year-old suspect.

“Tt is believed that this

may have resulted from the
feud that started on Mon-
day,” he said.
. Mr Hanna appealed to
parents and adults to try
and talk to the young men
in their community to stop
this kind of incident from
happening.

TAU) Ins

“A lot of our young men
are arming themselves with
knifes and machetes. and
going about the streets caus-
ing injury and harm to oth-

&Ys.

“Just recently we con-
cluded what we thought wes
a very anti-knife campaign

- in our schools. We saw suc-

cess in that there was a
major reduction in the num-
ber of people we were‘tak-
ing knives from and subse-
quently taking before the
courts.

“But we do have a con-
cern that there still are
young men out there carry-
ing weapons on them. So we
appeal to parents that if you
see your boy acting out of
sorts, who is exhibiting hos-
tility to others and talking
about having an issue with
other young persons.to try
and discourage them or turn
them into law enforcement
so that we can deal with
these matters before we

have anymore incidents of

slayings on our streets,” he’

said. "

Mr Hanna could not con-

firm, but said the fight may

have happened at the City
Market food store near thre
school where it is believed
both young men may
been employed. i

i

‘Che Miami Herald —

BAHAMAS EDITION

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13,

issues and a number of other services.

nen acne

protesters allege
Bioanal one

PROTESTERS against a big marina
development at Harbour Island were
alleging “sabotage” last night after a pub-
lic meeting was reduced to a chaotic slang-
ing match.

About 20 people were said to have
turned up with the sole objective of dis-
rupting the meeting and intimidating
potential speakers.

As a result, several “town elders” who
were to have explained objections to the
proposed Romora Bay Marina expansion
refused to take the microphone.

In addition, a drunk was making con-
stant unpleasant remarks about winter
residents, leaving many people at the
meeting feeling “sick and depressed,”
according to one source. It was claimed
that the drunk was “fuelled up” for ihe
meeting by fellow agitators.

“Tt was a very disturbing experience,” a
resident told The Tribune, “It was a very
rowdy meeting at which the organiser was

SEE page 12

























2005

bahamasgp.co

NG WAcAMGSTIALOManrade OY an OO





@ EMPLOYEES of the British Colonial Hilton were provided with a wide range of health services as part of the hotel’s
annual Health Education Fair yesterday. More than 20 health-related businesses and organisations volunteered their time |
to the 282 employees of the hotel, offering them massages, immunisation shots, screenings, information on important health

FNM sank Cable
Beach project is ‘wrong
deal for the country’

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE recently announced billion dollar .

Baha Mar Cable Beach deal is the “wrong
deal” for the country and has come “at the
wrong time”, claimed FNM chairman Car]
Bethel.

At a recent meeting of the Golden Gates
constituency association of the Free Nation-

al Movement, Mr Bethel said that while

there is tremendous opportunity for a real-
istic, practical and well thought out invest-
ment in Cable. Beach, the project agreed to
by the government does not accomplish
this.

The official Heads of Agreement for the’

development was signed last week after
the Baha Mar investment consortium

announced it had signed a new agreement .

with Philip Ruffin to acquire his proper-
ties.

Construction, scheduled to begin in 2007,
will affect the properties on which the
Radisson Cable Beach Resort, the Nassau

SEE page 12

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

















Bahamas’ inflation
‘currently very low’

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

INFLATION in the Bahamas has sig-
nificantly decreased, according to a Cen-
tral Bank researcher.

Speaking with The Tribune, Kevin’
Demeritte of the Ceritral Bank’s research
department said that-the country’s infla-
tion rate is currently very low. ©

Inflation decreased from three per cent
in 2003, to 0.9 per cent in 2004.

“What we have been seeing in the four
years prior to last year is that inflation
was increasing fairly steadily, but at low
levels because 3 per cent is still very low,”
he said.

Like many other aspects of its economy,
the Bahamas’ inflation is imported. Mr
Demeritte said that the Bahamas’ inflation
“Gs usually the US’ inflation, plus a small
amount from the mark up of local business
persons.”

“Our merchants when they bring in
goods from the United States, they pay
that price and add on their profit mar-
gins. When the price goes up in the Unit-
ed States, you can expect our prices to go

SEE page 12







Victoria Avenue Opp.
Dowdeswell St.
oak 322-1718




arg STENTS Lv eae f
Seu oiareny sti |
Parnell eyez ul

-i<¢ NEW CAR SALES
2002 CHEVY 1995 - 1996

AVALANCE






HONDA INSPIRE
ACURA TL SABER











OF TRUCKS

saralusn!,





~ PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Detention centre boss
pledges better conditions

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE new head of the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre said that since taking up.
the position in February, he has
received no complaints from
detainees about mistreatment.

Former Superintendent of
Prisons Edwin Culmer took

control of the detention centre
at a time when the facility,
which houses illegal immigrants
for processing, was the target
of severe international criticism
for alleged beatings and abuse
of detainees.

In December last year,

Cuban detainees claiming mis-
treatment at the centre rioted

and set fire to a dormitory.













DANGER |

Each LNG Ve: di vee are ?
Equivalent | Z

SIGN THE NATIONAL PETITION.
AGAINST LNG

NAME dabneencededaceaeeteadeeecesesecteea isle ae PO, BOX ssheccisacves

“SIGNATURE s.0fecosc ei

Fax to 242-393-7604 or mail to: N 302, Nassau, The Bahamas

ee Bon eek

Immigration and Defence
Force officers had to fire rubber
bullets into the crowd to sub-
due the rioters, and nine
detainees and 11 guards were
injured.

Also in December 2004
David Bright, a British busi-

nessman who was held at the’

detention centre twice, claimed

that he witnessed brutal beat-—

MAIN SECTION
_Local News...




ings carried out by guards.

“T have witnessed at first
hand, brutal beatings by guards
and been a part of it.

“They become frustrated and
snap having to work in that
environment. They are show-
ing their position of strength
and abuse that:position,” said
Mr Bright.

Mr Culmer told The Tribune



3. Should our government gamble _
_ with our environment, our fishing
_industry, our tourist economy, ©
_ our safety and our children’s lives -
__ for the benefit of wealthy foreign
LNG investors who.can never —

‘guarantee our safety?

4. Do you want our peaceful Bahamas
to become a major LNG terrorist
saree

PT: Mae) EU led of SNES eT CERT ree |

that, in an effort to improve
conditions at the centre, he
plans to submit a list of recom-
mendations to government.

Security

“We need a modern facility.
There is a need for areas
where people -can feel com-
fortable whilst being incarcer-

ated,” said Mr Culmer.

Mr Culmer feels that in order .
to prevent detainees escaping
from the centre, certain securi-
ty issues must urgently be
addressed.

“You must train your staff to
be vigilant and put in restraints
such as razor fences, cameras,
proper lighting and if needed,
dogs,” he said.

Nex wrtty ( comet! be anh te»
Hart) te prews fer stab lity

“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”



hile we stip loose change’ LL .
and take all the risks? >

















Bus project |
encourages
safer sex .

A NEW project to pro-
vide bus passengers with
condoms and other toiletries
hits the streets tomorrow.

Social work students from
the College of the Bahamas |
have partnered with the
Aids Foundation, the Road
Traffic Department and the
Public Transit Authority for
the “Ride the Jitney” pro-
ject.

Tomorrow the students
will ride buses between 7am
and 9am and 3pm and 5pm
distributing 1,000 goody
bags to passengers on at
least 12 different routes.

The bags will contain
leaflets on HIV/AIDS, con-
doms, toiletries and candies.

The objectives of the pro-
gramme are: to provide edu-
cation and awareness about
HIV/AIDS, to encourage
condom use for those adults
who are sexually active; to
encourage abstinence
among teenagers; and to
encourage safer sex among
those teenagers who are sex-
ually active.































TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

Rasy eRU te
PHONE: 322-2157





THE TRIBUNE

VWRVINEOVAT, APHMIL 145, ZUUS, FAGE 3





ANTONE
charged with
MNO eM YALU

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter






THE jitney driver who
allegedly attempted to assault
a 15-year-old passenger on
Saturday was released on
$5,000 bail and has had his
public driver’s licence sus-
.pended after appearing in
Magistrate’s Court on Mon-
day.

Andrew Johnson appeared
before Magistrate Marilyn
Meyers and was charged with
one count of indecent assault.

It is alleged that Johnson
inappropriately touched the
young girl while she was a pas-
senger on his bus on Satur-
day, forcing her to jump out of
the moving vehicle and run to
safety.

As a result, she received
multiple injuries to her stom-
ach and arms.

Johnson pleaded not guilty
to the charge and was granted
$5,000 bail with two sureties.

Concern

Errol McPhee, the deputy
controller of the Department
of Road Traffic expressed
concern about the incident
and told The Tribune that he
met with the bus driver fol-
lowing his court appearance.

Mr McPhee said in light of
the charges, he decided to sus-
pended Johnson’s public dri-
ver’s licence until the matter
has been settled in court.

He said the department and
the Ministry of Transporta-
tion are working towards the
effective enforcement of reg-
ulations to govern jitney dri-
vers. .

It has been said that th
best means of increasing pas-
senger safety and decreasing
the negative perception of jit-
neys might be the creation of
a unified public transportation
system.

Mr McPhee, who heads a
newly formed Transportation
Policy Secretariat, acknowl-
edged this view and said the
ministry continues working
towards making it a reality.

He said draft legislation, is
currently being formulated.

- While he did not elaborate
on-specifics, Mr McPhee said
if the unification process is
approved by Cabinet, it would
do much to address issues
relating to the safety of pas-
sengers on buses.
































































@ By TIFFANY GRANT






FNM ‘will respond’
if Stubbs takes seat

Party's deputy
chairman

on Holy
Gross MP

i By KARIN HERIG and
RUPERT MISSICK Jr

THE Free National Move-
ment is expected to take
action if Holy Cross MP Sid-
ney Stubbs takes his seat in
parliament today.

Speaking with The Tri-
bune yesterday, deputy
chairman of the FNM Sid-
ney Collie said that there
will be a response from the
opposition if Mr Stubbs
appears at today’s session of
the House of Assembly.

He said however that he.
but not could disclose the
nature of the planned action.

“T cannot tell you now, but
you will see what we will
do,” he said.

Mr Collie explained that:
in the eyes of the FNM, Mr
Stubbs is still a bankrupt
MP.

Debtors

“Even though his trustee-
in-bankruptcy may have
accepted some of his debtors
proposals to settle the debts,
the Supreme Court has not
certified yet that he is no
longer bankrupt, nor has the

«Supreme Court, or the Court

w.0f, Appeal or the Privy

“Council vacated the bank-
‘Tuptcy.

“He may appear (in par-
liament), but it is our posi-
tion that he is still an undis-
charged bankrupt,” he said.

Woman charged with stealing $63,000

It was alleged that on April 8, he was found in

# HOLY Cross MP
Sidney Stubbs

Under the Election Act an
MP who is declared
bankrupt cannot retain his
seat.

Last week Mr Stubbs came
to an agreement with his
creditors after a meeting
with the Registrar ‘of the
Supreme Courtis = *

However, the MP may
have to wait for a hearing
before the Privy Council in
London next month before
court officials in the
Bahamas decide on whether





Tribune Staff Reporter





A WOMAN appeared in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday charged with stealing more than $63,000
in cash.

It was alleged that between July 17 and Decem-
ber 31 of last year, Susan Davis of Mermaid Boule-
vard committed 13 counts of stealing cash from
various individuals involved in an ‘asue’ fund.

It was reported that while overseeing the fund,
the accused did not pay out a total of $63,625 to the
participating persons.

Davis was not required to enter a plea.

She was granted $25,000 bail with two sureties
by Magistrate Linda Virgill, and is to reappear in
court on June 21.

In other court news, two men pleaded not guilty
to attempting to bribe an assistant superintendent
of police.

According to court records, Maurice Merizier,
51, of Nichols Court, and Samuel Joseph, 28, of
Firetrail Road pleaded not guilty to offering an
advantage to Assistant Superintendent Theophilus
Cunningham.

The pair allegedly offered $800 to the officer, in
an attempt to induce him to abstain from per-
forming his duty.

Merizier faced two additional charges of pos-
session of lottery instruments and permitting his
premises to be used for lottery.


















Denk



possession of lottery paper and $5,632 cash being
used for a lottery, without being the holder of a
licence.

He was also accused of allowing the use of his
restaurant and bar, the Malaise on Key West
Street, to be used for illegal gambling.

The incident allegedly took place on March 30.

Merizier was granted $5,000 with two sureties.
The case was adjourned to July 7. :

In drug court, a man was sentenced to six
months in prison for possessing dangerous drugs
with intent to supply.

Anthony Knowles, 42, of Parkgate Road, plead-
ed guilty to being in possession of Indian Hemp
with intent to supply.

Also in drug court, an arrest warrant was issued
for an 18-year-old who failed to appear in court.

Jamaal Ferguson, of Charles Vincent Street,
did not present himself to answer to the charge of
marijuana possession.

Kenford Stubbs, 41, of Garden Hills number 2,
pleaded guilty to possession of cocaine. He was
fined $250 or three months in prison.

Mark Anthony Bowe, 20, of Pinewood Gar-
dens, pleaded guilty to possession of a quantity of
marijuana.

He faced a conditional discharge of six months,
treatmerit and random drug testing at the Com-
munity Mental Health Centre. His case was
adjourned to October 12.








The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



to overturn the bankruptcy
tuling.

Mr Stubbs first became the
centre of controversy in
2003, when it was claimed he
had a personal stake in the
alleged illegal entry of a a
fleet of Korean fishing boats
into North Andros.

He resigned from his post
as the corporation’s execu-
tive chairman on November
25, 2003 as a consequence of
the scandal.

The Holy Cross MP’s
problems intensified when
he was declared bankrupt by
the Supreme Court in March
of 2004.

His application for appeal
was rejected and since then

Mr Stubbs has been in and
out of court to clear his
name.

Mr Stubbs is said to have
been declared bankrupt over
a $55,000 debt owed to Gina
Gonzalez.

Satisfied

The MP has since satisfied
the debt, but Mrs Gonaza-
lez’ lawyer Wayne Munroe
said that he MP owes more
than $20,000 in legal fees
ordered against him in his
bankruptcy appeal.

Last month the Supreme
Court registrar advertised
for Mr Stubbs’ creditors to
come forward.



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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PRO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
: Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

‘Doing your duty by the system

HISTORY IS replete with political scan-
.dals that have led to parliamentary resig-
; nations. The Westminster system, the basis
‘of our own political structure, has many
‘ examples.

i Many of our readers will recall the 1963
; resignation of John Profumo, Secretary of
‘ State for War, who had a very brief affair
‘with a showgirl, who also happened to be
| friendly with a Soviet Embassy official. Mr
; Profumo denied there was any “impropriety
i whatever” in the relationship. He later
i ‘resigned after confessing that he had misled
;the House of Commons. A month later
‘Prime Minister Harold Macmillan, whose
‘ill health was exacerbated by the scandal,
; also resigned.
Years later there was the resignation of
‘Home Secretary Reginald Maulding, and
two other MPs who got involved in the busi-
‘ness affairs of architect John Poulson. It was
‘considered that all three ‘had indulged in
‘“conduct inconsistent with the standards
i; which the House is entitled to expect from
"its members”.
' .More recently, there was the case of
iJ onathan Aitken, who violated ministerial
‘rules by allowing an Arab businessman to
‘pay for his stay at the Ritz Carlton in Paris.
‘ This incident involved a libel action in which
ithe newspaper proved that Aitken had lied
‘to the court in his denials of the facts. He
iwas charged with perjury and perverting the
‘course of justice for which he was impris-
;oned. Unable to cover his legal costs, he

‘was declared bankrupt. He resigned from "

ithe Privy Council.

In England there have been many cases’

ie some involving sex, questionable busi-
iness transactions, and the acceptance of gifts
‘considered to have influenced their political
idecisions. In short all behaviour inconsis-
;tent with the standard of conduct required of
‘parliamentarians.

., Even more recently there was the situa-
;tion i in the United States when New J ersey ’s
' fifty-first governor announced that he was-“a
; gay American” and stepped down to prevent
;scandalising his office. His supporters and
detractors were shocked, not so much by
the fact that he had stepped out of the “gay”
closet, but that he was a married man with a
schild, and was committing adultery, albeit
*with another man.

Commenting on Governor James
McGreevey’s announcement, the Monmouth
‘County Republican chairman expressed his
sorrow for the governor and his family.
‘However, he believed the governor’s resig-
mation to be in the “best interest of this
jstate’ $ reputation for a moral and ethical
‘government instead of a reputation forced
‘upon us by a corrupt system and unethical
officials”.

: Closer to home we had the resignation of
‘Montagu MP Brent Symonette during the
Ingraham administration. Mr Symonette

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resigned as chairman of the Airport Author-
ity when he made what he later explained
was the “right decision” for the airport, but
the wrong personal decision for himself as a
politician. He said it was a decision he had to
live with for the rest of his life — a decision
he would always regret. -

Mr Symonette explained that when he
took over as chairman of the Authority, he
found himself under a lot of pressure
because security procedures required by the
FAA had been ignored. At his first meeting,

he was confronted by very hostile FAA rep- -

resentatives who were frustrated that noth-
ing was being done to secure the ‘airport.
Mr Symonette discovered that to meet
FAA.-requirements, $5 million worth of
work had to be.done, and done quickly or

the airport would be ‘downgraded. Among:
- the major work. required was lighting the
apron, securing the perimeter fence around .

the entire airport and upgrading the-road.

Mr Symonette contacted the Ministry of
Works whose engineer invited three con--
tractors to bid on the job. They were asked. .

to submit two bids, one for retaining the
existing ¢ erimeter fence while the road was
repaired, the second was to remove the old
fence, repair the road and then construct a
new fence.

The engineer opened the bids and.sug-
gested that the second highest bidder get
the job. Mr Symonette asked him to study
the bids again and tell him why the Author-

ity should pay $200,000 more than the low-

est bidder.

- The'éngineer did his hictnewotk, estithed
“!to Mr Symonétte and recommended the
lowest ‘bidder. Mr Symonette accepted his

recommendation and awarded the bid to
Bahamas Hot Mix. However, there was one
problem. Mr Symonette, the businessman,
had shares in Bahamas Hot Mix. In view of
this the bid should have gone before the
Airport Authority Board.

Mr Symonette maintained that time was of
the essence, he was under pressure from
the FAA, the airport was about to be down-
graded, and he could not get all board mem-
bers together for an emergency meeting, so
he made the decision.

“The right decision for the airport, the
wrong decision for me,” he would later say.

Mr Symonette resigned as Airport chair-
man.

Assembly who continue to point an accusing
finger at Mr Symonette for making the
wrong personal decision in a conflict of inter-
est situation, instead of scrutinising their
own members and questioning why some
of them have not resigned for even more
serious conduct.

For Mr Symonette it was.a case of
“guilty”, but with an understandable expla-
nation. In the end he made the right decision
— he resigned.































Yet there are those in the House of

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, DONOVAUGHN
DUDLEY SEYMOUR, of , Nassau, Bahamas, intend to
change my name to DONOVAUGHN DUDLEY McNAIR.
If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.



Tell-tale signs o



environmental
degradation

EDITOR, The Tribune.

AS AN environmental
engineer and someone who
has been intimately familiar
with Harbour Island for the
past 38 years, yet removed
enough not to be blinded by
day-to-day exposure, I can-
not help but recognise and
lament that the harbour is
showing all the tell-tale signs
of environmental degrada-
tion.

When I was a little girl in
the 1970’s there were sea
grass and good fish around
the government dock. Now
there is slime on the bottom,
algae floating on top, and the
bottom vegetation is largely
comprised of previously non-

existent, ugly, little broccoli -

looking plants. The only
notable fish are barracuda.
There is also anew and ram-
pant variety of anemone on
the bottom, and the chance
of being stung by jellyfish or
anemone is no longer unlike-

-- ly. Every time I return to

Harbour Island the affected
area has both grown and
worsened. It is sad on a per-
sonal level for Harbour
Island is my family home. But
more importantly, an entire
community is in jeopardy for
I fear that if left unchecked,
the beautiful harbour and
island will spiral downward,
taking the Island’s livelihood,
tourism, along with it.

What is causing the water
quality in the harbour to
deteriorate? The simple
answer is too many nutrients
and too little oxygen, a
process referred to in the sci-

entific world :as-eutrophica-
. tion. But more importantly,,
’ why and how’'is this happén- "

ing? And most importantly,
what can be done to rectify
the situation?

The harbour’s impaired
state is likely the result of five
factors: sewage, garbage,
organic waste, storm water
runoff, and disturbance to the
harbour bottom.

Sewage: Most homes,
hotels and restaurants in Har-
bour Island have septic sys-
tems. There is no sewer sys-
tem, and to my knowledge
none of the hotels has.a treat-
ment system. Over time
nutrients from septic systems
leach into the groundwater
and eventually into the har-
bour. Some of these systems
tie directly into tidally influ-
enced groundwater making
the nutrient’s path to the
harbour a quick one. It may
also be possible that there are
harbour-side: homes and
restaurants whose sewage dis-
charges directly into the har-
bour.

Garbage: The dump and/or








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LETTERS

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transfer station in Harbour
Island has been an ongoing

concern for years. The
dump’s location directly adja-
cent to the harbour means
that there is no buffer
between the garbage and the
water.

‘Because garbage is hauled
to North Eleuthera its sea-
side location may arguably be
necessary. However,
improvements can and should
be made to clean up the area
and better contain the
garbage and the leachate
leaving the site. Garbage is
often dropped into the har-
bour when it is being loaded
onto the barges. Every time it
rains the stormwater that has
come in contact with the
garbage and. all its associat-
ed bacteria, heavy metals,
pollutants, etc. runs off
directly into the harbour.

Organic waste: It is impor-
tant to recognise that
biodegradable refuse can sig-
nificantly contribute to the
degradation of a waterway.
When fish guts, conch slop or
potato peels are thrown into
the sea, large amounts of oxy-
gen are required to break-
down this waste. As a result
the water is depleted of the
oxygen necessary for healthy
marine life.

Stormwater runoff: Every
time it rains, the rainwater
washes the surface of every-
thing it comes in contact with
— roads, docks, rooftops,

“dumps — and. then that rain-
‘water runs downhill to the

nearest body of water carry-
ing with it all the dirt and
grim it picked up along the
way. The gas that was spilled
on the dock will be trans-
ported right into the harbour.
The silt, sand, litter and oil
droppings on the road sur-
faces will run right down Mis-
sion Hill or Big Hill or some
other hill into the harbour.
Stormwater is probably the
largest source of pollution to
waterways, and it is also
probably the most difficult to
treat. However, it can be
managed through minimisa-
tion: minimise the amount of
development and the number
of people on the island and
the number of vehicles and
the amount pollutants on the
roads and docks will auto-
matically be minimised.

Disturbance to the harbour
bottom: Harbour Island sits
on a natural, protected, deep-
water harbour. Historically
dredging has not been a con-
cern or even an ongoing
activity. Things have
changed. It now seems that
every time I visit, there are
dredging operations under-
way — a new deepwater
dock, a man-made beach.
This must stop. I would like
to hope that the individuals
employing the dredging are
simply not versed on these
matters and do not realise the
ramifications it has on the
harbour. What happens to the
bottom of the harbour dur-
ing dredging? The physical
and biological composition of
the area changes. The sand
and bio-matter on the bottom
are turned up. The plant and
animal life is displaced. The
bottom vegetation may never
be re-established or it may be
of.a different type. Natural
filtering of the water may be
impacted. The turbidity of
the water may change. Shal- -
low spawning areas are likely
to. be impacted. Sand, silts
and bio-matter deposited at
the placement location can
choke out the established
vegetation. The bottom line
is drédging changes the nat-
ural delicate balance of the
harbour. ‘

Most of these activities and

’ concerns mentioned above -"

have been ongoing for many
years, seemingly without |
problems. However, as Har- -.
bour Island has grown, the.
Island’s pristine environment
can no longer be maintained
by the status: quo. Moreover ©:
the islandicannot sustain the.’
pressures of big development .
such as that underway at
Valentine’s or proposed ate:
Romora Bay.

The biological and chemi-
cal balance within the har-
bour has clearly changed and,
I am certain, will continue to
change unless steps are taken
by the community to improve _ .;
the situation. :

One of the easiest and most
effective ways of doing this
is to curtail new development
and most especially new
development along the shore-
line.

AMANDA P
MALCOLM, PE

Water Resources Engineer
Maryland Department of
the Environment

April 6, 2005.

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THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005, PAGE 5, =

hock as burglars raid —
government AIDS centre



Sone .
se teke



€

â„¢ By PAULG

TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Ministry of Health’s
HIV/AIDS Centre head-
quarters in Victoria Gardens
was broken into and burgled
on Monday night.

The crooks are believed to

have entered the centre by
pushing one of the wall-
mounted air-conditioner
units into the building and
using the hole as a means of
entry.
The burglars did not gain
access sensitive information
such as the centre’s patient
lists. Nor, she said, had the
centre’s stock of HIV/AIDS
medication been tampered
with.

Rose Mae Bain, the direc-
tor if the centre, explained
that these items were secure-
ly locked away in another
area of the building.

e e
Missing

“We are not sure what all
has been taken because we
find more and more missing.
What we are sure (is miss-
ing) is an air-conditioner, a
lot of food items that we give
out, calculators, and other
small items,” she said.

Once inside, the burglars:
cut a small hole into the stor-
age room door with a hack-
saw and reached inside to
unlock the deadlocks, she
said.

“This was some of the
food items that we give to
our clients like sardines,
Vienna sausages and the
like. We also had a big con-
tainer with coins that was
stolen as well, and a cell
phone,” she said.

Ms Bain said only a small
amount of money was stolen,
as the jar contained coins
that-the staff offered to
clients who need to catch a-
bus home from the centre.

A task force from the Cen-
tral Detective Unit (CDU) ~
has already dusted the centre
for fingerprints. Police inves-
tigations into the matter are
continuing.





A THINK tank which rep-
resents non-givernmental
organisations has applied to
become officially recognised.

According to president-elect
Fred Munnings, Civil Society
Bahamas (CSB) was the brain-
child of the late attorney Regi-
nald Lobosky.

He explained that the soci-
ety is an association that rep-
resents the voices and concerns
of non-government organisa-
tions (NGOs). It began as a
luncheon of persons from a
cross section of the local busi-





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Dead body discovered in church bus

M@ Authorities yesterday taking away the body of homeless Solomon Seymour

@ By A FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

A MAN was found dead in a church |
bus early Tuesday morning on Talbot —

Street.

Sometime after 8am, a resident of a
community off Mount Royal Avenue
reportedly went to the bus looking for

Solomon Seymour, 48, to do some ~

handyman's work for her.
She said that she called to Mr Sey-
mour, as;she, could see him sitting in the

bus, but that he.did not respond.
‘The woman then shook the bus, but,

as there was still no response she con-
tacted the police.

The bus, which belonged to
Victory Chapel Church of the
Nazarene, had been parked in front of



Think tank wants recognition

ness, professionals and society.

“What we are now calling
Civil Society is a development
that has come about as a direct
result of the work of various
non-governmental organiza-
tions,” he said at the Chamber
of Commerce yesterday.

While Civil Society had con-
tinued to meet monthly fol-
lowing Mr Lobosky’s death
five years ago, it has never
been officially registered as an
association.

The group has already writ-
ten articles and memorandum



of association and sent them
on for registration and hopes
to be legally constituted soon.

Mr Munnings explained that
it would cause an outcry if gov-
ernment interfered too deeply
in the daily lives and business
transactions of its citizens.

“Hence Civil Society by
virtue of representation of
NGO’s, Private Sector Labour
Civil Society. Organization
(CSO) and individuals can
touch people where govern-
ment would be seen as inter-
fering.”


















TRUST OFFICER

SCOTIATRUST invites applications from qualified
Bahamians for the position of Trust Officer with a
strong background and technical knowledge in areas
of trust, company and agency management. The
applicant will be involved in the administration of a
medium to high complexity level of accounts of
trusts, companies and agencies. A good level of
accounting knowledge is required. The person
appointed should hold a four year University Degree
in a related subject along with professional

| qualifications in the Saciety of Trust and Estate

Practitioners (STEP) or ACIB. The ideal candidate
should have a minimum of five years progressive
experience in the industry. Analytical and
communication skills as well as familiarity with PC
software are essential. Preference will be given to
applicants with language skills. Interested persons
should submit applications in writing marked Private
and Confidential to the Manager, Client Services,
P.O. Box N-3016, Nassau, Bahamas. Applications
should be received no later than Friday, 22nd April,
2005.





Call us on
322-1986
and share

your news.

Got a story?






a mechanic's yard for repairs.

It is believed that Mr Seymour was
homeless and usually made his home in
a cardboard house in an adjacent yard.

’ Makeshift homes constructed out of

old vehicles, cardboard and other mate-
rials could be seen in the area from the
bus, near the remains of a house gutted
by fire.

Mr Seymour's sister, Stephanie




(Photo Felipe Major/ Tribune staff)

Adderley, said that his family
had attempted to pull Mr Seymour
away from the lifestyle he was living,
but that he had been unwilling to listen
to them.

She collected his few peraoual
belongings as his body was taken away.

Inspector Walter Evans said there
were no visible signs of injury and that
foul play is not suspected.



SAT REVIEW con sune exam

REGISTRATION IN
BGCSE SPANISH GRAD









PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005

Top marks for students



@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

FOUR of the nation’s bright-
est young minds paid a visit to
Prime Minister Perry Christie
at his office on Monday after-

noon, where they were awarded
certificates of excellence as part
of the Farm Road Development
Project.

The 11-year-old students,
from two primary schools in the

Farm Road constituency, were
presented the certificates
along with gifts by Galleria
Cinemas and the Creative
Edge advertising company.
Accepting the awards were

British American Insurance Company
of The Bahamas Limited would like to
announce that the following person

no longer works for the company and

is not authorized to transact any

sixth-grade students Alicia
Mcqueen and Denzel Wells
from Stephen Dillet Primary
School, and sixth-grade students
Alexia Rolle and Runako Min-
nis from Our Lady Primary
School.

Runako was the winner of
the annual Catholic school
Spelling Bee.

The presentation was the
first of what is scheduled to be a
monthly award initiative to
recognise top male and female
students from Farm Road
schools and allow them to meet
high-level government officials.

Praise

“This is a wonderful idea.
The fact that we are able to
single out those who are doing
well will serve as an inspira-



ea Rs a

| Mr. Dion Strachan, Chairman of the Board of Directors
of Nassau Flight Services is pleased to announce the
. appointment of

tion to the other students who
will hopefully follow their
example,” Mr Christie said.

Mr Christie said he was par-
ticularly pleased to see the two
young boys being recognised.

“We have this growing trend
of girls leaving boys behind, so
when wé see young men suc-
ceeding we have to be mindful
of the growing gap between
boys and girls,” he said. .

“This project has a special sig-
nificance at Stephen Dillet,”
said principal Wenly Fowler,
“the concept is a wonderful one.

“We especially put emphasis
on our young boys so as to
mould them into positive young
men.” —

Mr Fowler said it was excel-
lence in academics, school lead-
ership and community work
which made this month’s award
recipients stand out.




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Mr. Ricardo Ellis

. as Assistant Manager in the.Maintenance Department.
As such, he will assist the‘manager with the

maintenance of all the ground service equipment in

Nassau, Exuma and San Salvador.







) Mr. Ellis has been
employed as a
mechanic with Nassau
Flight Services for
more than twenty-five
years. —























He attended the Harold
Road Senior High and
the Miami Senior High
Schools. He also
graduated from the
Lindsay Hopkins.
Vocational Schools in
Florida with a
certificate in
Automobile Mechanics.
Mr. Ellis has been
trained on all the ground service equipment at Nassau
International Airport and has participated in overseas
training at the FMC corporation and AID locally
- sponsored classes on various types of. engines.

I TOC One
vam olen

A mechanic with some 35 years experience, he
worships at Holy Family Catholic Church on
Robinson Road, and is a member of the Christophers,
and international church organization. He lists
television viewing and playing dominoes as his



hobbies.




THE TRIBUNE

Pinder
attends

The Parliamentary Secre-
tary in the Ministry of Health
left for Trinidad yesterday
to attend a two day confer-
ence on the Framework
Convention on Tobacco
Control (FCTC) in the
Caribbean.

Traveling with Ron Pin-
der are a host of other
Bahamian delegates, includ-
ing Dr Mavis Hanek-
Holmes, Deputy Permanent
Secretary in the Ministry of
Health, and Angela Albury,
First Assistant Secretary in
the Ministry of Finance.

The workshop in Port-of-
Spain is for high-level deci-
sion makers from diverse
sectors.

It will provide them with
relevant background infor-
mation on the content and
process of FCTC.

The workshop will also
provide representatives with
an opportunity to identify
common priorities and
action plans needed to
ensure the implementation
ofthe convention.

The FCTC is a treaty
negotiated under the
World Health Organisation

(WHO).

Treaty

According to WHO, the
convention is “an evidence-
based treaty that reaffirms
the right of all people to the
highest standard of health.

“The FCTC represents a
paradigm shift in developing
a regulatory strategy to
address addictive substances;

in contrast to-previous drug |

control treaties, the FETC

asserts the importance of.
demand reduction strategies: |

as well as supply issues.”
The FCTC was set up in

response .to the globalisation ‘
_of the.tobacco industry. The |

spread of the industry is
facilitated through a variety
of complex factors with
cross-border effects, includ-

ing trade liberalisation and

direct foreign investment.
“Other factors such as

global marketing,. transna-::

tional tobacco advertising,
promotion and sponsorship,

and the international move-'

ment of contraband and
counterfeit cigarettes have
also contributed to the
explosive increase in tobacco
use,” added a WHO spokes-
man.



NOW HIRING
RESTAURANT MANAGERS
AND ASSISTANT MANAGERS —

The successful applicant must have at least three (3)
years experience in Food and Beverage operations,
fast food preferably. _

Must possess good leadership and interpersonal skills.

Must have good written and oral communication skills.

Must be able to implement and maintain company

standards and procedures.
Must be self motivated.

Must be able to work flexible hours, including late
nights, weekends and holidays.

INTERESTED PERSONS SHOULD
SEND RESUME WITH LETTER OF
REFERENCE TO:

#12 Bradley Street, Palmdale,
P.O. Box N-8425, Nassau, Bahamas,

| or Tel: 322-5865/6

The orporation re reserves the right to acce or
oe any. or all tenders. :

a ee ee 8





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005, PAGE 7



Hotel focus on
healthy living

THE road to a healthy
lifestyle began at work for
employees at the British Colo-
nial Hilton with the hotel’s
annual Health Education Fair.

More than 20 health-related

businesses and organisations

gave their time to the 282
employees of the hotel, offer-
ing them massages, immunisa-
tion shots, screenings, informa-

tion on important health issues _

and a number of other services.

Hilton general manager
Michael Hooper said it was
essential for hotel employees to
live a healthy lifestyle on both a
personal and professional level.

“This is the third year we
have done this and it allows our
people to be more exposed
to various opportunities they
have to maintain good
health,” said Mr Hooper.
“Hopefully it encourages them
‘to either do more exercise or



take care of themselves.”

Mr Hooper said he is expecting
April to be a very busy month
for the hotel, “so it’s important
for us that our team members
are healthy and happy.”

Mark Gibson, 24, works in
the beach and pool department
at the Hilton and was attend-
ing the company’s s health fair
for the first time

“It’s great,” he said, “I am
learning about many things that
I didn’t know about and should
have. I just got a blood pres-
sure check and found out its a
little high. | might not have
checked my pressure for a long
tume but I did because it was
here and it was free. Now Iam
so glad I did.”

Human Resources executive
Lovinia Mcdiarmid worked

with,the Department of Public .

Health to organise the fair.
She explained that this year’s

theme was “Healthy energetic
active living at the Hilton” —
HEALTH.

Last year, most hotel workers
were not following a healthy
diet. The hotel addressed this
by introducing a boiled food
menu and vegetarian specials
to their cafeteria menu.

As well educating the public
about health, prevention and
the resources which are avail-
able to them in the community,
the businesses that participat-
ed in the fair gained a great deal
of exposure for their services.

A spokesman from the
Bahamas Diabetic Association

said: “In addition to educating

people about health issues, this
fair gives us the opportunity to
organise with others in the com-
munity to generate goodwill.”

(Photos: Felipé Major/
Tribune Staff)



SS SS YY YS YY <4

. the Public,





Programme
for women
announced

A transformation pro-
gramme is to be set up for
“at-risk” young women in
New Providence.

Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture Neville Wisdom
announced the new devel-
opment was revealed at the
passing out ceremony of the
National Pilot Programme.

The ceremony last week
marked the graduation of
the first group to attend a
three-month camp for vio-
lent or troubled young men.

Mr Wisdom said the suc-
cess of the skills-training
camp has inspired the gov-
ernment to offer the service
to the country’s troubled
young women, who may
need encouragement to live
productive lifestyles.

The ministry will partner
with non-profit and private
entities to help strengthen
and improve existing pro-
grammes.

“These are exciting times
for my ministry,” he said,
“as we embark on‘a social
transformation that begins
at the very root; the chil-
dren, and by extension, their
families.”

He added that social ills
and lawlessness are weigh-
ing down the nation. :








































Mrs. Delmeta Sey
‘Blue rill @ Tuck Off



Please be advised that
Mr. Nolan Carey is no

longer employed with the
World Bound Couriers

(Global United) and is not authorized

to conduct any business on behalf of

Global United or its affiliates.



il 2008 by 4:00 p.m. and addressed 66









The General Manager
Bahamas El a Corporation

Blue Hill & Tucker Road:
Nassau, Bahamas _






“Attenti on: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Marked: Tender No. 564 5

ENERA \L INSURANCES - ~ ELECTRONIC EQUIPME
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Signed

Management



BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

(2 2 2 2 2 ee
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nies Mel INFORMATION: ee
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POSITION: Development Construction Manager
REPORTS 1: Vice President of Development

ESSENTIAL FUNCTION:
Plans,.directs, and: coordinates activities ot desig vated dojects: to engure that goals and objectives o

the development dre accomplished within prescribed time frame and funding parameters by perform-'"

ing the following duties personally or through subordinate supervisors. Manage the construction of
assigned project site improvements including amenities on-site and off-site infrastructure construction.

DUTIES & RESPONSIBLITIES:
E] Manage and assist the design team in reviewing construction plans, suggesting cost. and time
saving methods, and improving construction coordination and equipment utilization.

J Manage and assist the design team in expediting subdivision approvals and ofher permits.

= Prepare field reports, status reports, incident reports, construction schedules and other information
requested.

fl Assist in the bidding and negotiation of construction contracts with general contractors,

&] Administer the construction contracts and changes thereto, protecting Project's interest at all times.

EF} Establish good working relationships with governmental inspectors, the design team and general
contractors.

Monitor civil construction costs during construction and suggest ways to avoid unnecessary costs.
E] Provide construction quality control, through regular monitoring of construction.

El Participate in meetings with developer and design team as requested.

EJ Establish work plan for staff and contractors

EI Direct and coordinate activities of project personnel contractors to ensure project progresses on
schedule and within prescribed budget.

G} Review status reports preparéd by project contractors and modifies schedules or plans as required.
Ei Prepare project reports for owners, management, and others.

El Coordinate project activities with activities of government regulatory or other.governmental
agencies.

Douglas A Shipman
V.P. of Development, Discovery Land
Bakers Bay Golf and Ocean Club
Great Guana Cay, Bahamas
dshipman@discoverylandco.com

Deadline for Receipt of Applications is April 27, 2005



stal

Awareness



IL is about to gener-

ate a lot of heat in the
Bahamas — in more ways than
one.

Just a few months ago crude
was pegged at about $30 a barrel
—up from prices in the low teens
a couple of years ago. It is now
over $50 a barrel. Gasoline
prices are approaching $4 a gal-
lon locally, and are over $2.50
per gallon in California.

Some analysts are already
predicting 1970s-style price hikes
to over $100 a barrel, which
could have profound impacts.
The 1973 Arab oil embargo and
the 1979 Iranian revolution
caused price rises that triggered
global recessions.

According to the New York
investment bank, Goldman
Sachs, “oil markets may have

entered the early stages of a mul- ©

ti-year trading band of prices
high enough to meaningfully
reduce energy consumption and
recreate a spare capacity cushion
only after which will lower ener-
gy prices return."

What this means is that ener-
gy will cost so much that even-
tually we will use less of it, bring-
ing the price down again. But it
will be painful in the meantime.
The main cause is surging

- demand, in the United States

and especially in the huge
emerging economies of China,
India and Indonesia, which now
account for almost half of world
oil consumption.

Goldman Sachs said US gaso-
line prices may need to exceed
$4 per gallon before American
consumers curb demand and buy
more fuel-efficient vehicles
instead of gas-guzzling SUV’s.
And China’s roaring economy



is unlikely to draw back anytime
soon. That means pump prices
could go much higher in the
Bahamas. ©

But it’s not only our mileage
costs we have to worry about.
The International Air Transport
Association is forecasting loss-
es for the global airline industry
of $5.5 billion this year because
of high oil prices. This will affect
the livelihood of 28 million peo-
ple in aviation and related activ-
ities, including Bahamasair and
other airlines serving the
Bahamas.

And the International Mone-
tary Fund says the world faces a
“permanent oil shock” and must
adjust to sustained high prices
for the next two decades: “We
should expect to live with high
oil prices...(which) will continue
to present a serious risk to the
global economy,” the IMF said
recently.

The Bahamas imports about
1.6 million barrels of gasoline a
year to fuel the 140,000-plus
vehicles on our narrow, con-
gested roads, as well as all the
diesel and bunker C fuel to run
our power stations and kerosene
for our aircraft.

The rising cost of fuel imports
has been amplified, experts say,
because of the weak US dollar,
to which our currency is pegged.
Today, motor gasoline imports
cost us about $94 million a year
in foreign exchange — in 1995

the cost was $38 million.
The government’s responsé ‘

to all this has not been very::

coherent. Basically, Trade Min-

- ister Leslie Miller has been left:

to make occasional noises about’
a regional energy alliance called:
PetroCaribe that has been pro”
posed by Venezuelan strongman’
Hugo Chavez.

Venezuela is the world's fifth+=
largest oil exporter, producing’
up to 3 million barrels a-day?'
Chavez is a former army officer’
elected in 1998 (and again in
2000) as the leader of a so-called”
“Bolivarian Revolution”. Z

Last August, energy officials‘
from Venezuela and the’
Caribbean (including the

Bahamas) apparently agreed to:

form a regional company to dis:
tribute cheaper oil on a govern-*
ment to government basis. But it*
is not clear just what the status of
this proposal is now.

Caricom officials said ork
oil prices threatened to provoke:
"social unrest" and economic:
ruin for cash-strapped Caribbean’
countries. A meeting was set for'
November in Nassau, which nev--
er happened. Another was:
planned for February, but also_
failed to materialise. So Mr
Miller said recently he would
visit Venezuela this month.

There has been no public con-’
sultation on this important issue,‘
which has a lot of teeth. The«
closest thing we have to a report’

British American Insurance Company

i

of The Bahamas | Limited would like to
announce that the following person

no longer works for the company and

is not authorized to transact any

business on our behalf.

it

Established 1920

‘Shorn Williams

BRITISH
MERICAN

AMERICAN

A strong link in your financial future

Telephone: (242) 461-1000
Fax: (242) 361-2424





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005, PAGE 9

and lows of oil prices

i this recent comment from
Mf Miller: “The talks have not
gone as we had anticipated, but
you always have to expect stum-
bling blocks. We're still waiting
to;get the final word from
Vénezuela on whether they
accepted our proposal on the
lowering of fuel costs in this
region."

Venezuela’s state oil compa-
ny;, PDVSA, happens to own the
BORCO transhipment terminal
on: Grand Bahama and has
made noises recently about reha-
biljtating the mothballed refin-
ery, but there has been no offi-
cial comment on this either. In
the 1970s, BORCO was one of
the biggest refineries in the
world, but it closed in 1985 dur-
ing.a world oil glut. It would take
a massive investment to re-open,
but with world refining capacity
now at a premium, experts say it
may be worth the cost.

But all Mr Miller thinks about
is the creation of a national ener-
gy agency to import and distrib-
ute fuel from PetroCaribe — dis-
placing Shell, Esso, Texaco and
Focol — the private companies
that currently supply our fuel.
Presumably, Venezuela will give
Caricom oil at concessionary
prices to buy support for Mr
Chavez’ ongoing confrontation
with the United States, which he
recently described as “the most
negative force in the world.” _

\ / enezuela is a member
of the Organisation of

Petroleum Exporting Countries,
which controls 40 per cent of
global oil production and sets
production volume quotas to
maintain stable prices. But
refined product sales are not
bound by OPEC rules; and nei-
ther are exports of heavy crude
from Venezuela's tar belt, which
could be refined in Trinidad to
supply fuel to the Caribbean.

It is unclear just what our gov-
ernment’s real position on all
this is, as only Mr Miller has
been carrying the ball so far.
What is clear is that we have no
thought-out national energy pol-
icy. ‘And if Mr Miller has his way
we will embark blindly ona cost-
ly initiative with serious conse-
quences — including:-a signifi-

cant expansion of the country’s ®

inefficient public sector.

Experts are sceptical about
such a project. They point to the
capital-intensive nature of the
business — apart from the trans-
portation and storage facilities,
service stations carry million-
dollar price tags and complex
operational and safety proce-
dures are required throughout
the supply chain. They say it
makes sense to keep the financ-
ing of such a high-cost industry
in the private sector..

“Tf the government takes over
fuel buying, transport, and dis-
tribution, it will still have to pay

shipping, storage, trucking and

station costs,” one industry ana-
lyst told Tough Call. “All of this
will have to be managed as well.
So in the end, I can't believe
that costs will go down. Also,
the government would have to
assume.all liabilities, and nation-
al energy companies around the

First of all, some analysts say
the government can keep a lid
on pump prices just by varying
the stamp tax and duty it charges
on imports: ”’There is a windfall
to the treasury when prices go
up, so there should be a float-
ing tax rate that will guarantee

“ The rising cost of fuel
imports has been amplified,
experts say, because of the
weak US dollar, to which our
currency is pegged. Today,
motor gasoline imports cost
us about $94 million a year in
foreign exchange — in 1995
the cost was $38 million.”



world have serious problems,”
he added. “They suffer from
neglect because profits go into
the treasury, and reinvestment
in the energy sector is not a polit-
ical priority.”

For example, Mexico's state-
run oil monopoly, PEMEX,
announced recently that it was
on the verge of bankruptcy, with
total liabilities. of $88.5: billion
and an annual investment
requirement of $10 billion.

And market flexibility is the
key to rational, best-price supply,
experts say: “By maintaining
access to the global oil market
through multiple suppliers you
let competition do the job of reg-

ulating and guaranteeing a best-

price for The Bahamas.

“Only a limited number of
refineriés can process Venezue-
la's heavy crude oil into useable
fuels, so having access to crude is
not even half the battle. A single

. refinery accident, closure, or off-~

cycle maintenance can create a
supply crisis,“ one analyst said.
“Tying yourself to one supplier
and a single logistics and man-
agement chain is a guarantee
that a catastrophic failure will
occur sooner or later.”

And without assured supplies
of fuel, the entire Bahamian

. economy will be forcedto shut
‘down. That will-be a a lot worse® * |

than paying a few cents more at
the pump.

W orld oil demand is
around 80 million

barrels of crude a day. And the
consensus is that OPEC can add
only another million barrels a
day to the total. Since much of
the world's production capacity
is in politically unstable coun-
tries, it is easy to foresee disrup-

‘ tions that will take more than

this out of the market.

So assuming that we are in
for years of rising prices, what
will the impact be?

TT Ra Ye
Mr. Dion Strachan, Chairman of the Board
of Directors of Nassau Flight Services is

pleased to announce the appointment of

Mrs. Tonia Smith

as its first Passenger Service Manager.

Mrs. Smith is a
former Head Girl of
D.W. Davis, who
joined the company
in 1995 as a
Customer Service
Agent. In her ten
years with the
company she has
moved up the ladder
to Operations Agent,
Lead Customer
Service Agent, Duty
Station Manager and
to her latest
appointment.

As Passenger Service Manager she will be
responsible for check-in counters, ticket sales,
gate services and baggage services. NFS
provides these services for Continental
Airlines, Air Canada, Spirit, Cubana, Hooters,
Skyservices, Skyking, Canjet, First Choice
and many Charter Airlines arriving from the
U.S.A., Canada and Europe.

Mrs. Smith is married to Charles Smith and
they have two children, Charles Jr. and

Christian.



revenue projections while keep-
ing prices down.”

A barrel holds 42 gallons of
crude oil, which is refined at a

cost to produce gasoline. Added

to this are shipping costs and
government taxes, plus the 44-

cent and 33-cent markups per ~

gallon for local retailers and
wholesalers. Pump prices in Nas-
sau are now over $3 .50 per gal-
lon — the highest ever. -
According to Revenue. Sec-

retary Ehurd Cunninghan, gov-
ernment revenue is up 4 per
cent, an achievement that he
attributes to improved collec-
tion.

But it is much more likely to
be due to higher oil prices and
increased consumption. We have
to factor in the rising number of
vehicles (including SUV’s) on
our roads, and the fact that
Bahamians use their cars the
way they use phones. Accord-
ing to government figures, some
34,000 cars and trucks are
imported annually.

S: let’s not overlook the
benefits of higher oil
prices, some argue. In the Euro-
pean Union stiff gasoline taxes
have promoted conservation
without damaging the economy.
One analyst told Tough Call that
taxes should be kept high and a
rebate scheme worked out for
construction vehicles, buses,

’ taxis, ambulances and the like. A

lowér fuel tax could also be set
for the Family Islands.

_ Although many industry
‘observers believe increased
exploration and production will

revent prices from spiking over

100 a barrel, the International
Energy Agency, a watchdog
agency set up in 1974 by the
industrialised nations to moni-
tor oil supplies, says high prices
may be necessary to bring

ares

Atlantic Medical,
The Bahamas Diabetic Association

& the Cancer Society of The Bahamas
invite you to join us on our
“All Together Better” fun walk.

- demand in line with supply.

And with higher world
incomes and greater oil efficien-
cy today, “prices could need to
go higher than their 1970s peaks
in real terms before equilibrium

. returns to the market,” accord-

ing to a recent commentary in

the Financial Times.

A draft IEA report suggests
dramatic measures such as
reducing highway speed limits
by 25 per cent, shortening the
work week, imposing driving
bans on private vehicles and pro-
moting public transport. Civil
servants in the Philippines have
already begun four-day work
weeks in a deparate attempt by
that government to cut its oil
bill.

Whatever the analysis, there
is no doubt that we are in for
some serious inflation in the cost
of power and transportation. So
now is the time to put our heads
together and come up witha
national energy policy that takes
account of renewable fuels and
promotes fuel efficiency and
conservation. Is this too much
to ask of our government?

For the long-term, experts say
that plentiful supplies of natural
gas may be the solution to our
energy woes. Gas could become
the preeminent fuel of the 21st
century, but it requires huge
investment in special ships,
regasification terminals, and

pipelines. And, as we have seen

tN

An “All Together Better” “
way to start the day!

THE EVENT BEGINS AT 6.30 A.M.

in the Bahamas, there is a lot of
hostility to such projects.

Both Trinidad and Venezuela
have large natural gas reserves,
and Trinidad is already a major
supplier of LNG to the United
States. Tractebel, one of the
companies vying to set up LNG
terminals in the Bahamas, is a
major investor in Trinidad’s gas
fields.

The comical bust-up between
Manuel Diaz and Leslie Miller
notwithstanding, all indications
are that the government will
approve two LNG plants in the
northern Bahamas to supply
power to South Florida - and
hopefully to our own power sta-
tions.

As Health & Environment
Minister Dr Marcus Bethel
pointed out recently (and as we
have previously noted in this col-
umn) handling LNG is safer
than handling gasoline or diesel.
And it will bring the possibility
of reducing our dependence on
high-priced oil that is a major
environmental pollutant.

But as one energy executive
put it, “Supply is not the issue; it
is the delivery of gas to the mar-
ket.

“Before this transition occurs,
a world-wide infrastructure for
natural gas, such as that now
enjoyed by oil, must emerge."

larry@tribunemedia.net

THE ROUTE commences from MONTAGU BEACH then WEST on
Shirley Street, NORTH on Church Street, OUTWARD across
“New Paradise Island Bridge” to the round-about at Paradise Island Golf Course,
BACK to New Providence via the “Old Paradise Island Bridge”, EAST on

East Bay Street and back to Montagu Beach.

TROPHIES ARE AWARDED TO WINNERS BY THE
FOLLOWING CATEGORIES (Male & Female):
A. 12 & UNDER (CHILDREN) __B.

D. 31-45

E. 46-59

13-18 ~ C.
F. “Age Ain’t Nothin’ But a Number” 60+

19-30

..With a special floating trophy being awarded to the compaly
and civic organisation with the most entrants.

The event dedicated email address is funwalk@atlantichouse.com.bs
Freeport. Fun Walk - eo 30th,2005

official registration form

Atlantic Medical is not liable for injuries incurred by participants at this event.
$15.00 Adults / $12.00 Children: includes “T-shirt, Fruits, Water and a Special Gift”

Deliver to Atlantic Medical Insurance, 5th floor Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Ave.

Tel: 326-8191 or Fax this form to: 326-8189.

FOR ADDITIONAL ENTRIES DUPLICATE THIS FORM.

NAME:

COMPANY/ORGANIZATION:

T-SHIRT SIZE: S M L- XL

XXL

RACE CATEGORY: A B CD

C\WeightWatchers

The Bahamas Diabetic Association

XXXL

AGE:
EMAIL:
(circle choice)

F

a2 Atlantic Medical

ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE LIMITED
ATLANTIC HOUSE 2nd TERRACE &COLLINS AVENUE PO BOX SS 5915 NASSAU
TEL: (242) 326-8191 FAX: (242) 326-8189

A member of Colonial Group International Ltd.

Personal & Business Insurance: Group Pensions: Group Medical: Life Assurance & Investments







PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 12, 2005





WEDNESDAY EVENING m APRIL 13, 2005

| 7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

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James Spader. iTV. © ‘PG-13' —_|mysterious suitcase. 1 'R’ (ch (CC)

6:00) % & & LA| % A GUY THING (2003, Romance-Comedy) Jason -- |(:45) *% BOAT TRIP (2003, Comedy) Cuba Goodin
TMC AN E NIKITA |Lee, Julia Stiles. A groom-to-be wakes up if to his fi i elt Sanz. Fok Y ;

eterosexual (co become

(1991) ‘R’ ancee's cute cousin. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC) _cibooked on an all-gay cruise. ‘R’



CC) |

THE TRIBUNE

. Let Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and ay
his sidekick Derek put ay

some smiles on your

kids’s faces.

Bring your children tothe
~ McHappy tour at McDonald's in
Oaks Field every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month’ of April 9005.

. Enjoy Great Food, Prizes aa Lots of Fun.

[1\

?m lovin’ it





-THE TRIBUNE : WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005, PAGE 11



Pupils show off
pride in their pets





KINDERGARTEN
pupils at at Xavier’s High
School brought their ani-
mal friends in to school
yesterday for the school's
pet day -











i TOP: Melone Griffin,

with her daughter
Celine Griffin show off
their dog |



calendar photo contest - a celebration of nature

14 winning entries will appear in Family Guardian’s 2006 calendar. Winning entries receive a gift certificate valued at $400 each. Entry deadline is May 31, 2005

RULES
1 Family Guardian’s 40th Anniversary Calendar Photo Contest is open to all photographers. The title for the company’ s 2006 calendar will
be “A CELEBRATION OF NATURE”. Photographs may be of any subject (animate or inanimate) or a scene which is a striking example ot nature
as found in The Bahama Islands. All photographs must be taken in The Bahamas.

2 DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS MAY 31, 2005.

3 All entries are to be delivered to Family Guardian's Corporate Centre,Village and Eastern Road Roundabout, Nassau, between 9: — and
5:00pm weekdays only. Envelopes should be marked “Calendar Contest”.

4 Allentries must be accompanied by an official entry form, available at any Family Guardian office or when published in the newspapers.

5 Only colour images in horizontal format will be considered. Images can be provided as 35mm film or digital images on CD. 35mm film can be
positive (slides) or colour negatives. Digital images must be of high quailty (2700 x 21 00 pixels or larger). Digital images showing signs
of photo manipulation or compression will be rejected. To ensure the best colour reproduction, digital images should be supplied in RAW, TIFF
or high quality JPEG and in the original colour format the camera uses (LAB or RGB). All entries must be supplied with prints which will be
used in the judging process. The photographer's name and photo subject should be written on the reverse of the print. .

Judging of entries will be based-on beauty, interest, composition, colour, originality and quality of photograph. Preference will be given to fauna
photographed in its natural state, rather than in captivity. The photographs selected will appear in Family Guardian's 2006 calendar. The
«decision: ofthe . will be final.




@ BOTTOM: Little
Daane Adderley with
her cocker spaniel















(Photos: Felipé Major/
Tribune Staff)























ued at $400 will be presented for each of the photographs used. More than one entry from a single photographer
aphic credits will be given in the calendar. The number of entries per photographer is limited to a maxinem of S photes.



-_-—=_— -

r 7%
2006 CALENDAR PHOTO CONTEST ENTRY FORM i

DWAR sissies scve RRP sca ctnemneoomnneneoe

HOME ..



“Copyrighted Material TEL BUSINESS ..

Syndicated Content i ; ‘ I ;
Available from Commercial News Providers” i : eS i i : : ) NN cdseseaupsanesssedgonssin



insu: ince Co. Ltd., and | assign to Family Guardian all rights pertaining to its use
haisoever, | also confirm that the photos entered in this contest were taken in
s by the undersigned.



RE
REPORTS HET R eer SEES SPESESU SEO OE ESOS CESS EDD EEEHESSSOSTESSSOOEOLOEROSSESESOROEESSEHE OE HEERED

sssesueees NUMBER OF PHOTOS ENTERED.................

(maximum of 5)

h photos to: Calendar Contest, Family Guardian Corporate
illage & Eastern Road Roundabout, Nassau, Bahamas



INSURANCE
COMPANY





PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005





LOCAL NEWS

arina development protesters

THE TRIBUNE



allege meeting ‘sabotage’

FROM page one

shouted down.

“Also, a drunk was there
verbally intimidating every-
body. Because of the atmos-

phere, some people didn’t

goiinto the meeting at all. It
is very upsetting to see
something like this happen-
ing.”

The three-hour meeting
was called at St John’s
Parish Hall to inform the
public about a planned
major expansion of Romora
Bay Marina. The proposal
is to build more than 40 con-
dos and extend the existing
dock into the bay, covering

Inflation
rate

in the
Bahamas
‘very low’
FROM page one

up if you assume our mer-
chants don’t add anything
extra to their markups,” said
Mr Demeritte.

Based on US inflation, a
person would need approx-
imately $154.05 in 2005 to
purchase the same number
of goods and services that
they did for $150 a week.

Also if you were to buy
exactly the same products
in 2005 and 2004 they would
cost approximately $150 and
$146.06 respectively.


















an estimated 4:5 acres.

Residents are alarmed at
the rapid expansion of Har-
bour Island and its effect on
utilities and the marine envi-
ronment. They fear the
island is already “maxed
out” and facing major envi-
ronmental and social dete-
rioration.

Ms Ithalia Johnson called
the meeting so that various
speakers could explain dif-
ferent problems arising from
what they term “over-devel-
opment” of the island,
including water and power
shortages.

But an island source said:

. “It was a disorderly meet-

ing and there was uncivilised
behaviour. It seemed that a
group of people were there
just to sabotage the whole
thing. a

“The meeting was not
planned to attack Romora
Bay. It was to tell people
what is happening to their
island. =

“However, because of the
drunk - who was shouting
threats and being generally
unpleasant - those who were
planning to speak did not do
so. They stayed in their
seats.

“There is no doubt that

- some people were.at the |

Share your news



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds fora
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an

If so, call us on 322-1986
| and share your story.

award. aa

meeting for the purpose of
intimidating others and pre-
venting people from having
their say.”

One of the claims voiced
most loudly at the meeting
was that foreign home-own-
ers, many of whom are
members of the protest
group, are themselves
investors who generate
income from the island.

But a home-owner told
The Tribune: “Very few of
us make money from Har-
bour Island. Most of those
who rent out their proper-
ties have a job breaking
even because of the high
maintenance costs.

“Island living is not cheap.
The weather takes its toll on
property. But the owners
make a contribution to the
local economy by employ-
ing island labour. They are
not here to earn money
from Harbour Island, they
are here to contribute.”

Some foreign residents
now fear that tensions build-
ing up on Harbour Island
will force a wedge between
the local and expatriate
communities.

. Monday night’s meeting

exposed undercurrents.

which long-term winter res-
idents found unsettling:












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“Some people here have
been linked with Harbour
Island for generations,” said
one foreigner.

“They love it here because
there is a real sense of com-
munity. There are incredi-
ble bonds and connections
and a tremendous amount
of financial commitment.

“It’s interesting that those
who came to disrupt the
meeting were criticising for-
eign home-owners because
the Romora Bay plan will

double the number...and the
new condo-owners will be
interested only in renting
their condos and earning big
money from the island.”

Ill-feeling could flare up
again today when a planning
meeting is held at the island
magistrate’s office. The
Romora Bay project is
expected to be on the agen-
da.

But, though the meeting
is open to the public, only
one representative of the

. care,”

protesters will be allowed to
speak, according to island
sources.

After Monday’s disrupted
meeting, protesters stayed
behind to discuss their strat-
egy.

They claim that islanders
are being denied a proper
hearing in planning matters
that affect everyone.

_ “Nassau doesn’t seem to
said one, “We

are being denied due
process.”






FROM page one

Beach Hotel, the Wyndham Nassau Resort and
Crystal Palace are currently located.

The development is aimed at transforming
the Cable Beach strip into a mega-resort,
and is projected to generate up to 9,000

-jobs in the first three years of operation.

“There is far too much that is wrong
about the recently announced Cable Beach
deal. It is the wrong deal, on the whole
island, in the wrong place, at. the wrong
time and is being done in the wrong man-
ner.”

Mr Bethel claimed that is unacceptable
for the government to “give away” Crown
land to foreign investors because it belongs
to the Bahamian people.

He said if the property sold in the Cable
Beach deal is Crown land then the Bahami-
an people should be given equity shares in
the project.

“The investors are paying a measly $45
million for a hotel which cost Bahamians
more than $125 million to build, and which,
as is, is worth more than $45 million.”

In addition to the hotel, he claimed the
investors will get large areas of prime land
and ownership of the Cable Beach Golf

Course.

Bethel: Cable Beach
project is the ‘wrong
deal for country’

‘glory for having secured the most perni-

* ject will cause enormous disruption to traf-






He asked how government could justify
effectively giving away what he claimed are
“hundreds of acres” to foreign investors
who will sell.it as condominiums for hun-
dreds of thousands of dollars, if not mil-
lions.

He asked that if the foreign investors are
so financially strong, why they needed-a
government hand-out of prime Bahamian
land. As !
“What happened to the FNM’s vision of
creating increased Bahamian ownership in
the Bahamas economy and tourism sector?

“What happened to the FNM’s pro-
grammes to empower small Bahamian busi-
ness? Has this been totally abandoned by a
PLP government that is prepared. to give
away anything to secure a few minutes of










cious give-away of the patrimony of every.
Bahamian in the history of the Bahamas?”
he asked. 3 va

Mr Bethel claimed that the proposed pro-







fic flow, and will be an inconvenience to
thousands of Bahamians who live in West-
ward Villas and the adjoining subdivisions.

He said the project will effectively
segregate Cable Beach from the rest of Nas-
sau. °







‘Tenders are to be hand-delive
April 2005 by 4:00 p.m. and a








WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005

SECTION



business@100jamz.com



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

Jain

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH








NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764




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wipes WAI

analyst's Kerzner
SU ae ree

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business



Editor
A WALL STREET ana-| By YOLANDA
lyst has revealed that $7 DELEVEAUX

could be wiped off its target
share price for Kerzner
International, owner of Par-
adise Island’s Atlantis and
One&Only Ocean Club
resorts, after the UK Gam-
bling Bill was amended to
permit only one super-casino
in that nation.

CIBC World markets ana-
lysts, William Schmitt and
David Katz, in an update to
investors after the UK gov-

Senior Business Reporter

BRITISH Fidelity Assur-
ance will change its name to
Colonial Life Insurance
Company (CLICO),
Trinidadian-based parent, as
executives look to restructure
the company, implementing a
new focus and possibly devel-
oping new products and ini-
tiatives in a move to boost
profitability and encourage



its

these positive rating factors
is the company's geographic
concentration of business, its
relatively high expense struc-
ture, its real estate exposure
in Florida and the Bahamas,
and the challenges British
Fidelity faces to grow its
insurance business."

Ricardo Longchallon, the
A.M. Best analyst who rated
British Fidelity Assurance,
said Colina, with the acquisi-
tion of Imperial Life, will pre-
sent a number of challenges

for British Fidelity, which is a
small company with a
relatively high expense struc-
ture.

Synergies

The insurance company
might be able to realise some
synergies from its Trinidadian
parent, CLICO, that could
open up other opportunities
for it going forward, "maybe
outside the Bahamas, " he

said.

In his analysis, Mr
Longchallon wrote:
“Although premium income
has increased significantly in
recent years, driven mainly by
its group health and pension
and annuity segments, opera-
tions have. been modcatly.
profitable.

“As a small company,
British Fidelity has a rela-
tively high expense structure
due to its lack of critical mass,
and since more than 80 per
cent of the company's total

British Fidelity to
ake CLICO name

premium income is generat-
ed in the Bahamas, changes ©
in regulations, economic con-
ditions and consolidations in
the marketplace can poten-
tially have a significant impact
on British Fidelity’ $ Opera-
tions.

“A. M. Best believes
British Fidelity faces some
challenges to grow its life
insurance business as it com-

‘petes against larger and

stronger insurers in mature
markets."

ernment decided to amend
the Bill to permit only one
super-casino with 1250 slot
machines in a bid to get it
passed by Parliament before
the upcoming general elec-
tion, said the failure to win
regulatory approval would
impact Kerzner Internation-
al’s share price target.

The analysts said they had
assigned more value to
Kerzner International’s
stock price, based on its
three proposed UK casi-
no/hotel ventures, than any
other US gaming company
with similar plans.

Assigned

~ Mr Schmitt and Mr Katz
said: “We have previously
assigned $1 per share in esti-
mated value for Isle of
Capri, $2 in estimated value
for MGM Mirage, and $7 in
estimated value for Kerzn-
er. We will revisit these val-
uations........ when we have
a better sense of the out-
come of the Bill.”

Kerzner International had
been hoping to build three
US-style super-casinos ia the
UK, located in London’s
Millennium Dome, Man-
chester and Glasgow respec- .
tively. Now, only one will get
the go-ahead, and it is by no
means certain that will be
one of Kerzner Internation-
al’s planned projects.



SEE page five






@ By NEIL HARTNELL
.«, Tribune Business Editor

Bank’s e-banking
take-off ‘exceeds
expectations’

growth, The Tribune can
reveal.

When contacted by The Tri-
bune, executives at the com-
pany were reluctant to discuss
the new name and any plans
the company might have for
the short-term.

A senior executive, howev-

r, did confirm that the com-
pany would be changing its
name to CLICO, that of its
parent company.

Image

One insurance industry
source, who requested

. anonymity, told The Tribune

yesterday: “They want to
totally change their image and
have an upgrade. They’re
looking at this CLICO thing
as being an upgrade.”

A.M. Best Company earlier
this year reaffirmed British
Fidelity's B+ (Very Good)
financial strength rating with
a stable outlook, saying this
reflected the company's “con-
sistent premium growth and
modest profitability"

The major international
insurance credit rating agency
said, though, that it believes
British Fidelity Assurance
“faces some challenges" from
larger competitors in the
Bahamian life and health
insurance sector, with its high
cost structure ensuring it has
generated "modest prof-
itability" in recent years
despite growing premium
income.

A. M. Best said: “Offsetting









_SEE page three

~ BANK of the Bahamas International yesterday told The Tri-
bune that its Internet banking operation had “exceeded expec-
- tations” in the 15 months since it was launched, with the site
attracting an average of 4,500 customer visits per month.
Alexander Hanna, vice-president of Providence Technology
Group, the company that created the bank’s website and soft-
‘ware that runs it, said: “The site probably averages in the neigh-
bourhood of 4,500 customer visits per month, and that number
‘continues to increase every month. The word is definitely get-
ting out and the numbers are jumping.”

‘Vaughn Delaney, Bank of the Bahamas International’s
deputy managing director for information technology and
human resources, confirmed that the bank’s electronic banking












AES LNG project to grow
Bimini’s population 8%

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The AES Ocean Express liq-
uefied natural gas (LNG)
regasification terminal and
pipeline will create a 5-8 per
cent increase in Bimini’s popu-
lation to accomodate construc-
tion and permanent workers if
the project received govern-
ment approval, the company
believes.

In its heavily-dated Environ-
mental Impact Assessment
(EIA) produced in 2002, AES
Corporation pegs the total
investment in its LNG plan at

$550 million, and describes the

impact on Bimini’s population
and infrastructure as “minimal”.

However, this has been dis-
puted by environmental oppo-
nents of the project such as
reEarth, which have publicly
questioned the strain hiring 350-
400 workers to construct the
LNG terminal will place on
Bimini’s housing and utilities
infrastructure, such as garbage
collection and sewage.

In its EIA, AES said: “Pro-
ject construction is expected to
employ 450 people, who will be

SEE page five

Pieter See acs mee Pein
_ following IT contract signing

DOCTORS Hospital Health System
(DHHS) yesterday announced it will
invest about $3.5 million over the next
five years on information technology, after
signing a contract with Medical Informa-
tion Technology (MEDITECH) to pro-
vide its fully-integrated Health Care Infor-
mation system (HIS).

DHHS said the . selection of
MEDITECH completed the first phase of
a plan, begun almost a year ago, that
aimed to align the BISX-listed company’s
IT infrastructure with its business objec-
tives.

In a statement, DHHS said
MEDITECH was one of 10 prospéctive
vendors who submitted proposals for the
HIS contract. It was selected from a final
shortlist of two.

Software

The $3.5 million spent by DHHS will
go on software, implementation and train-
ing expenses.

DHHS described MEDITECH as “a
pacesetter” in the healthcare information
industry for the past 35 years, saying it
was selected because of its ability to devel-
op IT tools essential for delivering effi-
cient healthcare.

And DHHS added: “The new HIS will

significantly improve access to clinical
information, streamline workflows and

|

~

decrease repetitive paperwork, improve
communications between caregivers,
enable better co-ordination of care,
enhance medical safety and hasten reim-
bursements.

“Operational efficiency and customer
satisfaction are expected to be the most
immediate gains once the new HIS goes
live. Less paper will have to change hands,
thereby resulting in a substantial deduction
it delays in patient care.

«Doctors Hospital’s staff will be able to
instantly access all patient records and



@ ALL SMILES
AT CONTRACT
SIGNING - (Pictured
from L to R, front row:
Darron Cash, chief
financial officer; Barry
Rassin, chief execu-
tive; Joanne Lowe,
vice-president of cor-
porate finance; Back
row: Chadwick
Williamson, assistant
vice-president of MIS;
Harriet Lundy, assis-
tant co-ordinator of
Laboratory Services;
Jackie Negre, co-oor-
dinator Med/Surg; Dr
Charles Diggiss, chief —
medical officer.

make changes in real time that others using
the same record are able to see.

“Physicians will be able to go to a single
place to get all the information they
need, rather than having to await the
flow of paperwork from different depart-
ments.”

DHHS said: “This efficiency will trans-

_ late into better patient care.

“With medical records and results of
clinical tests available in a timelier manner,
physicians will be able to respond
faster.”







PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005 °

THE TRIBUNE



Attack is the board’
best form of defence

ECENTLY, the

entire board of direc-

tors at an organisa-

tion resigned en

masse, along with the executive
director. This was the result of
years of effort by a single member
who wished to change the direc-
tion of this popular organisation.
This member had, in fact, even-

tually been elected to the board,
but was forced to resign by pop-
ular vote of the general members

at an annual conference. The de-

frocked director subsequently ran
for office again, and was again
re-elected, giving them no doubt
as to his mandate. _

The director then began a
series of costly lawsuits against

COPE AUD

the organisation. Eventually, its
insurance company said it would
not cover any further costs for
lawsuits from this individual. The
board members, being no fools,
recognised they served in order to
help the company be more pro-
fessionally fruitful, rather than
for money or for anything else
central to their lives. Therefore,

Middle Income Home, Suffolk Unit 2, Block #51, Lot #3,
3 bed, 2.5 bath, central air, fully landscape, washer & dryer.

EOL DL ee a











ITHE AMOURY.
| COMPANY LTD.

ERD steno cy

Chal Pat Te Se

£S Ne Ce ach (242) ELy! Phyo

Lal









Department;

consultants;

Sb Cle cy rey cio sy eley.)

Fax: (242)

¢ Planning, directing, and coordinating the human, financial
and physical resources of the Information Technology

¢ Overseeing and developing all technology related systems,
including telecommunications and security systems;
* Establishing key relationships with key IT suppliers and

¢ Application, selection, development and
implementation of new and existing corporate initiatives;

¢ Provide enabling technologies that make it easier for
customers and suppliers to do business with the Bank.



ha Ee

vee re Diels eee ate a Neen re aT ee

the risk of personal impoverish-
ment through legal fees was sim-

ply not worth it, and they

resigned.

We are not conseined here
about whether the member. was
right or wrong, or whether what
the directors did was good or bad,
whether fundamental changes
were or were not needed or desir-
able, or whether the organisation
will survive. .

We are only concerned with
how the board failed to deal with
this novel technique for using the
system as a tool of attack. As
always, when looking at any pol-
icy measures, what should be
done must be judged by the five
basic criteria:

1. What problem is the policy
or measure trying to solve?

2. How can it fail in practice?

3. Given the failure modes,
how well does it solve the prob-
lem? 7

4. What are the costs, both

’ financial and social, associated

with it, and flowing from its unin-
tended consequences?

5. Given the effectiveness and
costs, is the policy or measure
worth it?

In this case, the company sim-
ply did not recognise that it faced
a long term, well-organised and
ongoing threat. Because the mea-
sures they took did not address
the problem (as so often happens,

People rely on digital information, and need a productive
PULSER cle EM UE CE Pasa te ELL ce
Uae PN be eT RT UOT ttm) Ota Pine]

customer's Isjlnatealhelia

08, :

“Document Feeder et Optional



~ INTERNATIONAL

JOB VACANCY
ee Manager, Information Technology eae

. MAIN RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE: KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS & ABILITIES

e Tertiary level qualifications in computer science,
information technology or related disciplines;

* Expert knowledge of systems analysis development and

planning methods;

¢ Demonstrated experience in managing a network:
environment including Windows server 2000/2003
services, Lotus Notes/Domino, hardware firewalls,
routers, AS400, Unix, Oracle and VPN appliances;

* Comprehensive knowledge of database management;

* Knowledge of web base technologies;

* Excellent communication skills, both written and ora

* Demonstrated team building and project management

skills;

* Five years of progressive experience in managing the
delivery of modem enterprise technology services;
¢ IT industry related certifications desirable.

The position also offers an attractive compensation package which includes comprehensive group insurance
coverage, participation in pension savings and other benefits enjoyed by staff.

Manager, Human Resources/Training
Bank of The Bahamas International
P.O. Box N-7118

‘Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for applications is April 25, 2005.

‘ ptice advantage, one that hela lat sacneds wa

tt

as



RoccnKc Measures





















Safe and Secure

nobody ever asked the first ques-
tion), they were simply inade-
quate in dealing with the threat.
Because there was no recogni-
tion that a threat was faced, the
board did not dignify the attacks
with. a meaningful public
response. Since, in the minds of
many, silence is taken as guilt,
this put them at a perception dis-
advantage. Additionally, and
again because the attack was not
taken seriously (largely because
the board members knew they
were not doing anything wrong,
nor acting for their own gain), the
board did not take measures to
either throw the member out or
put in a bylaw change to prevent

members who were expelled from ~

the organisation or forced to

resign from the board from future

participation.

‘When faced with legal action,
the board apparently (we have
had no contact with board mem-
bers, and can only make assump-
tions based on our experience and
what we observed) responded,
but did not counterattack. In fact,
our experience tells us that in cas-
es such as these, if there is no

~ counterattack there is no reason

for the attack to stop.

This last issue points out a final
problem. While not all attorneys
are bad (one attorney pointed out
that their firm was very good, but
that they were so overworked

any one of the following areas.

saries an advantage.

¢ Anti-economic espionage.

sulting

dering Directive of 2001.’

Mid- East and Southeast Asia.

¢ THE articles above




SOME of you have asked what j is the tia Onshis between
Lubrinco, Financial Examinations and Evaluations, and Preventa-
tive Measures. It is just as stated: We work together, and usually on.

° Operational Security (OPSEC): The identification and pro-
tection of information that would give your competitors and adver-

e Sarbanes-Oxley compliance.
e Protection of trade secrets and intellectual assets.
¢ Anti-competitive intelligence.

° International financial investigations and due diligence con-:

e Location and recovery of missing and hidden assets.

* Establishing business relationships and strategic partnerships in
Central and Eastern Europe, the offshore financial centres, Beijing
and Shanghai, Central Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean.

¢ Anti-money laundering and financial fraud requirements under
the International Money Laundering Abatement and Anti-Ter-
rorist Financing Act of 2001 and the EU Revised Money Laun-

¢. Protection of management, staff, and families.
* In the high-threat environments of Latin America, Africa, the

* When travelling and living overseas.
* When transporting items of substantial value.

they never had time to do an ade-
quate job), if you actually become
involved in litigation it is impor-
tant to have a good lawyer. Good
lawyers sometimes cost more per
hour than bad lawyers, but keep
in mind the truism that the only
thing more expensive than 4 good
lawyer is a bad lawyer.

Lawyers, however, don’t exist
in vacuuo. By this, we mean two
things. The first is that all lawyers
don’t know all the same stuff. The
body of law is so enormous that

’ lawyers specialise, and the more

specialised your problem, the
more specialised the lawyer you
should seek out. Thus a lawyer
who is a great collections attorney

“may not be a good attorney for a

libel action. !
The second issue is that you

_have to explain your problem to a

prospective lawyer, make sure
they understand your problem,
and that they can help you solve

‘your problem. You then have to
-work with your lawyer to make

sure they are doing what needs
to be done, and that what they
are doing makes sense. If it does-
n’t make sense, you need to havé
them explain to you why what
they are doing makes sense. IE it,
still doesn’t make sense, you need
to change lawyers.

NB: Gamal Newry is the pres-
ident of Preventative Measures, a

Jaw enforcement and security

consulting company. Comments
can be sent to PO Box N-3154

‘Nassau, Bahamas or. e-mail pre-

ventit@hotmail.com, or visit our
website rs
www.sunnyplace.net/prevent
vent>




























are taken from the case files of The

LUBRINCO Group and Financial Examinations and Evalua-
_tions. They are as seen in the April 2005 AEGIS e-journal. Pre-
ventative Measures represents these companies in the Bahamas.

FOR SALE OR RENT

Fully Furnished Executive Office Suites
plus Utilities Global Maritime Center
(Formerly Tanja)
2nd Floor, 2,500'sq ft
Internet Ready, Computer & Network Support
State Of The Art Phone & Voice Mail Systems
Dedicated Phone Lines
Conference Facilities
Professional Work Space

Office Space

- Unfurnished

1,250 sq ft

Global Maritime Centre
Queens Highway, Freeport, Bahamas

Contact 351-9026 or 351-1601 For Viewing
Or Additional Information.
Global United Formerly TANJA is
moving it’s operation to the
Former United Shipping Building at the Harbour





THE TRIBUNE

“WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005, PAGE 3B ~



Bahamian tourism and financial sector
held up as models by Japanese city

THE Bahamian tourism and
financial services sectors are
being touted as good examples
of a jurisdiction’s ability to draw
capital from around the world,
as financial experts urge offi-
cials in Okinawa, Japan, to

improve the area's investment __ ination.







climate by learning from the
success of a financial resort des-

“Leaders of hedge funds and
US investment banks often
travel to the Bahamas, Bermu-

PR enol
‘exceeds expectations’









FROM page one

operation had “exceeded expectations” since
its soft launch in January 2004.

He added that “everyone was surprised” at
the volume of transactions conducted by both
Bank of the Bahamas International’s retail and
corporate clients via its electronic banking plat-
form.

Mr Delaney said the numerous different
banking applications contained on the bank’s
electronic platform had distinguished. it from
competitors, as it provided an all-in-one solution







value and service.
He added: “We saw it as an opportunity to

sarily unique to the Bahamas, but rather met
customer needs as they pertained to the
Bahamas.

“We're not trying to be different, we’re trying
to be customer focused, and that drove us to be
different.”

Mr Delaney said that while he was not criti-
cising Bank of the Bahamas International’s
competitors, the bank had been “more progre-
sive” in the area of Internet and electronic
banking.

“We have easily had a year’s head start on
most other banks,” he added.

Bank of the Bahamas International’s e-bank-
ing platform provides its existing retail and cor-

porate account holders with services such as

cheque re-ordering, where they are able to
select on-line the branch it is most convenient to
picks We new cheque book up from.

Currency

Other services include foreign currency pick-
ups from the branch most convenient for the
customer to collect the funds from. Mr Delaney
said the Central Bank foreign exchange form
was also available on-line from the bank’s Inter-
net site, and clients could complete it via the
web, meaning that they only had to collect the
funds when they visited the branch.


























tions, Bank of the Bahamas International will
either send an e-mail to their computers or text
message to their cell phone via the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company’s (BTC) Short
Message System to confirm that it is ready or
been approved.

Mr Delaney said that while Bank of the
Bahamas International would probably look at
introducing telephone banking services in the
future, it was concentrating on its Internet oper-
ation because it could provide more functions
online.

He added: “We probably will do telephone
banking at some point, but it’s not a high pri-
ority for us because we think Internet banking
is more beneficial for our customers at the end

‘of the day.”

Bank of the Bahamas International customers
can also use the Internet banking platform for
ordering Bank Drafts, Foreign Exchange Drafts

and Travellers Cheques. Wire transfers and

NOTICE |











NOTICE i is hereby given that NIKOLAOS PANT SALPADIMOS
OF COLLINS AVENUE, NASSAU BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and |}
that any person who knows any reason why registration/ a
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 6TH day of APRIL, 2005 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.

Credit Suisse Wealth Management-Limited

requires an

OFFICE ASSISTANT

Temporary position for a young person to
perform filing and messenger duties

Please send resume to:

Credit Suisse Wealth Management Limited

P.O. Box N-4801
Nassau, Bahamas

Facsimile No. 302-6398

line: banking in the Bahamas.”

to clients’ e-banking needs, enhancing customer .

really do something we thought was not neces- ©.
y é E company’s presence here ensured it could also

So clients can check the status of transac-.

in a series of letters and numbers that appear on






money transfers, the latter through the bank’s
MoneyGram partnership, loan applications and
transfers between existing Bank of the Bahamas
International accounts could all be effected on-
line.

Mr Delaney described the potential for Inter-
net banking in the Bahamas as “really large”,
and added: “It’s about convenience; doing things
faster, easier. That’s what is going to drive it.” .

Mr Hanna said: “There is a big place for on-






Providence Technology Group’s role in devel-
oping the Bank of the Bahamas International e-
banking. platform, Mr Delaney added, meant
that it was.easier to develop‘a local solution, as
the firm was Bahamian-owned and based. The -

respond rapidly to its client’s needs.

Locally |

Mr Delaney said: “A significant point in my
mind is that it was developed locally. It shows
we have a capable technical resource capability
in this country. No one is saying this is an infe-
rior product; in fact, they would have to say it is
a superior product.

“We do have the capability in this country.
We said we’re a Bahamian bank, so we’ll give a
Bahamian company a chance. This really gives
[Providence Technology Group] a stage, as it
recognises what they:are capable of doing.

“We have these skills and people like Alex
don’t get a chance. often, because Bahamian

~~ don’t:have faith in themselves. He’s more than ale
_~ Shown he’s capable, os



Mr Delaney said Bank of the’ B
national intended to continue ‘déployin
technology to its advantage, in a bid to increase
customer value and save staff time and costs.

He added that the bank had been imaging
cheques for “a year and a half”, enabling bank
customers to monitor their cheque transactions
by seeing actual copies of the cashed cheques
online.

Other services offered by Bank of the
Bahamas International’s e-banking platform
include bill payments to the Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company (BTC) and Bahamas
Electricity Corporation (BEC), plus the ability
to stop payments. ,

Mr Hanna said he believed online banking
among Bahamians would increase once they
became more aware of the multiple functions
that could be performed electronically, and
when they became more comfortable with the
security functions.

Apart from entering an in-line identification
and password, the Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national website also. requires clients to type

a strip. :

Explaining that the websits used “the highest
security”. measures, Mr Hanna said the strip
could not be optically read by hackers, thus
discouraging. them from attempting to break
into the site. Accounts were also disabled after
three invalid attempts to open them.

(BIS

Pricing Information As Of:

SEER SES SSRIS
52wk-HI | S2wk-Low

Famguard
Finco

Focol

52wk-Low

28.00 ABDAB

1.0320

Change -

Colina Bond ee





da and the Cayman Islands to
discuss business strategies with
clients," said Naoki Togashi,
chairman of the Private Bank-
ing Working Group of the Oki-
nawa Special Financial Business
Zone.

Promotion

“These Caribbean islands
became successful as financial
districts because they combined
their resort features with finan-

- cial know-how and business

promotion measures," Mr
Togashi told a seminar in
Ginowan, Okinawa, on Asia-
Latin America relations.
"These efforts will eventually

property.

247 to 261.



: previous Close

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Doctor's Hospital

FirstCaribbean
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson
Kerzner International BDRs

12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets

1.2164 1.1609 Colina Money Market Fund 1.216402"
2.2268 1.9423 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.2268 ***
10.3112 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.3112*****
2.2214 2.0941 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.221401**
1.0931 1 :093141"**"

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-HI - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change In closing price from day to day
pes Dally Vol. ’- Number of total shares traded today
- =. DIV $ - Dividends per share pald in the last 12.months: __
“PEs ‘Closing price ‘divided by the last 12 month eamings
** “AS AT MAR. 31, 2005/ **** - AS AT FEB. 28, 2005
. 34, 2005/ ***** AS AT

'

Colina

Financial Advisors Ltd.

Xi CLOSE 408.630




bring in a greater flow of capi-
tal, giving a boost to the local
economy.”

According to an online
report, the experts said Oki-
nawa's use of tourism assets
must be expanded to people in
other Asian economies.

They also suggested that busi-
ness incentives, such as tempo-
rary, local
tax exemptions, under special
financial business zone initia-
tives launched in 2002, be
expanded.

A total of 260 foreign banks
from 27 countries are operat-
ing in the Bahamas, compared
with zero in Okinawa, according
to the report. The financial ser-

NOTICE

FOR SALE BY PUBLIC TENDER

PARADISE ISLAND COLONY SUBDIVISION - Lot 4, Block 6, ‘
Section C. Property Size: 21,562 Sq. Ft.

There are presently two partly built Apartment Buildings on the
The buildings were constructed without proper
permission and in breach of the covenants and restrictions.
Paradise Island limited who are responsible for all the Covenants
and Restrictions applicable to the said lot have advised that they.
require the buildings to be demolished and the site cleared
within 3 months. The costs of demolition would be an expense
for the purchaser _

The seoes property is being sold under. a Power of Sale contained
in a Supplemental Mortgage dated November 3, 1993 to Gulf
Union Bank (Bahamas) Limited. Recorded in book 6216, at pages

Interested parties should submit written offers with telephone
contacts and postal : ‘addresses to the Joint Official Liquidators,
P. O. Box N-3748, Nassau, Bahamas.

‘Tolophone enquiries: 302-4862

Fax: 302-4870

Terms: 10% deposit upon acceptance of offer; balance upon

completion.

All Offers must be received by 19 April, 2005






THE LIQUIDATORS RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT AND/OR REFUSE ANY

OFFER.

Today's Close






landholding |

Okinawa officials urged to learn success of a financial resort destination



vices sector accounts for 15 to
20 per cent of gross domestic
product (GDP) in the Bahamas,
compared with 5 per cent in
Okinawa.

Okinawa officials were told
the Bahamas charges no corpo-
rate and personal income tax
for foreign investors, and also
charges no consumption tax or
capital gains tax, excluding
domestic transactions.

The event preceded a three-:

day annual meeting of the Inter-
American Development Bank,
which brought together
financial leaders from the
IDB's 47 member countries
including Japan and the United
States.



















































































































2st

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

ay SELEY 3 SEE IOe PPE: BSS

OO OE Ot Pe et wee wr at wt ne wt we nk oh er wn oe ht ne ne ee





PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005

Grant Thornton &

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT AUDITORS

To the Directors of
CROMWELL TRUST COMPANY LIMITED

We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of Cromwell Trust Company Limited (“the Company”) as of
December 31, 2004 and the related statements of operations and accumulated deficit and cash flows for the year
then ended. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility
is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with Intemational Standards on Auditing. Those standards require that
we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of
material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and
disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and
significant estimates made by management as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation.
We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our-opinion.

In our opinion, these financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the
Company as of December 31, 2004 and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the year then ended in
accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards.

9 ae :
Vim We VW
February 11, 2005 CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS

Nassau, The Bahamas

CROMWELL TRUST COMPANY LIMITED
Balance Sheet ;
(Expressed in United States dollars)

December 31, 2004







THE TRIBUNE



-| DHHS appoints

assistant MIS
vice-president

DOCTORS Hospital Health
System (DHHS) has appointed
Chadwick Williamson as its
assistant vice-president for
medical information systems
(MIS).

He brings eight years’ expe-
rience in information technol-
ogy (IT) to DHHS, having cre-
ated and managed the IT
Department at Commonwealth
Brewery, with responsibility for
all Heineken-managed compa-
nies.

In his new role with DHHS,
Mr Williamson’s responsibili-
ties will include the day-to-day
operations and ongoing sup-
port for the hospital’s systems,
plus accountability for Project
Management over the installa-
tion of the hospital’s new HIS
system, including vendor, user
and consultant’s time.





ASSETS 2004 - 2008 _ Mr Williamson will also han-
dle all liaisons between internal
CURRENT ASSETS users and external vendors
Cash at banks (Note 3) $ 6390 $ 25,968 onsib i f
Tem deposit (Note 4) 100,317 100,002 wise aad hea @ CHADWICK WILLIAMSON
Accounts receivable - 1,166 He hold ee
Other assets 1,050 800 __. He holds a degree in infor- *
107,757 127,936 mation system management network certifications, includ- _ Engineer (MSCE), Cisco Cer-
FIXED ASSETS Seay and a specialisation in project ing Microsoft Certify Network. _ tify Network Administrator
urns a Sane aie : ee -Inanagement. Mr Williamson Administrator (MSCA), (CCNA) and Cisco Certify
TAC eer roi 31.530 29,515 has obtained several advanced Microsoft Certify Network Network Profession (CCNP).
Less accumulated depreciation ( 11,155) (| 3,625) : : : fs : 2 z :
a 20,375 25,890
$ 128,132 $ 153,826
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
LIABILITIES
Accounts payable (Note 5) $ 2,500 $ 21,110
‘SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
ein des css Gs ca 100,000 doko The following persons or their nearest relatives are kindly asked to visit the
Conrbnted surplus BS SIO See a PENSION DEPARTMENT of the National Insurance Board located in the
——e en ie Board’s Jumbey Village complex on Baillou Road. For further information,
ene you may contact the Department at telephone number 502-1500.

N.I. NUMBER
12713368
11754354
12904368
13588581
14385716
12521485
15712729
14024446
21205639
11571306

See accompanying notes. Report of Independent Auditors page 1.
Signed half of the Directors

CROMWELL TRUST COMPANY LIMITED
Notes to Financial Statements

BODIE, Joe

DUROZIN, Gue

MILLER, Franklyn
NEWBOLD, Portia

RECKLEY, John
RODRIQUE-MEDRAND, Juan
ROLLE, Thomas

TONEY, Wendy

VALCIN, Fred

December 31, 2004 ae

1. GENERAL
Cromwell Tiust Company Limited (“the Company”) was incorporated on August 28, 2000 under the
provisions of the Companies Act, 1992, of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. The primary business
of the Company is to provide trustee services under a restricted trust license granted to the Company on
November 13, 2000. . K spe :

2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES _.

These financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting
Standards and are expressed in United States dollars. The significant accounting policies are as follows:

Tnvestments

GN 193

C MINISTRY OF TRANSPORT & AVIATION
N . . DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL AVIATION |.

Investments are recorded at the lower of cost or quoted market values.
Foreign currency transactions

The Company's functional currency is the United States ("U.S.") dollar, however, it transacts business in

currencies other than U.S. dollars. Assets and liabilities denominated in currencies other than U.S.

dollars are translated into U.S. dollars at rates in effect at the balance sheet date. Income and expenses

denominated in currencies other than U.S. dollars are translated into U.S. dollars at the rates in effect on
" the transaction dates.

PUBLICATION BY THE MINISTRY OF TRANSPORT & AVIATION
-.., DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL AVIATION
PARTICULARS OF AN APPLICATION TO OPERATE SCHEDULED AIR SERVICES

Fixed assets

Fixed assets are recorded at cost and are depreciated on the straight line basis at the following annual
Tates:

Fumiture and equipment — 20% i ' ante é ace rey : :
In accordance with the provisions of Regulation 9 of the Civil Aviation (Licensing

of Air Services) Regulations 1976, the Minister responsible for Aviation hereby
publishes the following particulars of the under-mentioned application to operate
scheduled air service to and from The Bahamas.

Leasehold improvements — 33 1/3%
Income and expenses

_ Income and.expenses are recorded on the accrual basis of accounting.

PARTICULARS OF APPLICATION
_ 1. Application: CHAUTAUQUA AIRLINES, INC. d/b/a DELTA CONNECTION

CROMWELL TRUST COMPANY LIMITED
Notes to Financial Statements

2. Date of first Publication: 6th April, 2005

3. Routes: BETWEEN TAMPA ON THE ONE HAND AND NASSAU ON THE
OTHER.

December 31, 2004

3. CASH AT BANKS

Cash at banks of $6,390 as at December 31, 2004 is comprised of current accounts with SG Hambros
Bank ‘and Trust (Bahamas) Limited (US$) and with First Caribbean Intemational Bank (Bahamas)
Limited (BS).

4. Purpose of services: Passenger, mail and freight.

oo nee 5. Provisional time table:



The term deposit of US$100,317 as of December 31, 2004 is held at SG Hambros Bank and Trust L 1 Times
(Bahamas) Limited and earns interest at the rate of 1.325% per annum. T. PAINASSA U 0040/11 00
: S: RECCOUNTS EAE ARLE NASSAU/TAMPA 1125/1250
Accounts payable as at December 31, 2004 are comprised of the following:
and a5 TAMPA/NASSAU 1630/1750
NASSAU/TAMPA 1825/1950
Professional fees $ 2,500 $ 3,250
SG Hambros administration fees - 10,000 f
Pension contributions _ ; 7,250 6. Frequency of flights: See above time-table.
_ National insurance : 610
$ 2,500 $21,110

7. Type of Aircraft: Embraer ERJ 135 & 145
6. LEASE COMMITMENT
Any representation regarding or objection thereto in accordance with Regulation
10 must be received by the Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Transport & Aviation
& the Department of Civil Aviation within fourteen (14) days after the date of first
publication of this Notice.

The Company rents office space under a three year operating lease which expires on June 30, 2006 and
the annual rental for which is $16,960. There is an option to extend the lease for an additional period of
three years.

ARCHIE NAIRN
PERMANENT SECRETARY

Report of Independent Auditors page 1.





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005, PAGE 5B





FROM page one

Kerzner International’s
share price on the New York
Stock Exchange (NYSE) ral-
lied slightly yesterday, clos-

ing up 0.57 per cent at $60.19..

It has been in a steady
decline since developments
in the UK first became pub-
lic.

However, the CIBC World
Markets analysts said “most
investors have already
reduced expectations” for
Kerzner International and
other gaming‘stocks due to
“the uncertainty and opposi-
tion to the Gambling Bill
over the past few months”.

As a result, Mr Schmitt and

7 could be wiped
off target share price

Mr Katz said: “As such, we
do not expect shares of those
US companies involved to be
significantly affected.”

The pair added that the UK
Bill did contain a provision
allowing for a future govern-
ment to raise the number of
super-casinos back up to
eight, provided the move was

‘ratified by both Houses of

Parliament.

UK developments are
unlikely to have come as a
total shock to. informed
investors, as analysts warned
earlier this year that “biggest
near term” risk facing Kerzn-
er International’s global
expansion plans was the pas-
sage‘of legislation in that.

AES LNG project to grow
Bimini’s population 8%
FROM page one

housed in temporary quarters, barges or cruise ships anchored
at Ocean Cay.

“During operations, approximately 25-35 people will be
employed by the project on a full-time basis, and new permanent
housing to accommodate this increase in jobs will be con-
structed on South Bimini.

“The new housing represents a potential 5-8 per cent increase
in the population of South Bimini, and will increase the need for
municipal services. Increases in demand for potable water and
energy are anticipated to be offset by new supplies of water. and
natural gas to the Biminis from Ocean Cay.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FRITZ ALEXIS, MARSH HARBOUR,
ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
‘Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a

. | written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 13TH day of APRIL, 2005 to’the Minister responsible for
Nationality and eHesnslieey P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama,
Bahamas. Sak ka.

NOTICE

NOTICE: is hereby given that ODILIA KELLY OF WILTON
STREET OFF MOUNT ROYAL AVENUE, NASSAU
| BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister “responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization. should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 6TH day of APRIL,
2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


















LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE.
EQUITABLE HOLDINGS INC,

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 11th
day of April, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., of

P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
BRAGG CREEK LAKE INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, the dissolution of BRAGG CREEK LAKE
INC., has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator

BUS ass

country.

Analyst Joseph Greff, who
covers Kerzner Internation- ©
al for Wall Street investment
bank Bear Stearns, said in a
report released in January:
“We believe each of Kerzner
International’s three poten-
tial UK casino projects is less .
likely to be successful.

“Additionally, our UK con-
tacts have indicated that the
recent trend — towards
increased government over-
sight of the gaming industry
makes it impossible to gauge
where and subject to what
concessions casino’ licences
will be granted.

“Furthermore, Kerns:
International’s Millennium
Dome project in. London -
the company’s most-likely-to- _
succeed UK development - is
believed to have a lower
chance of implementation
than Caesars Entertainmen-

bebe ove of of

’ t’s Wembley project.”

NOTICE

‘The Aiinnal Meeting of
The Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association
_.. Willbe held atthe .
- National Tennis Centre on
Wednesday 27th, 2005 at 7:00 p.m.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SHARLENE BROWN, GOLDEN
GATES, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 6TH day of APRIL, 2005 to the Minister responsible
| for.Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOREL SATINE, EIGHT MILE ROCK,
PINEDALE, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
_registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written.and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13TH day of APRIL,
2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama; Bahamas.



LEGAL NOTICE
2 NOTICE
_PEACHLAND INVESTMENTS CORP.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

137(8) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000, the

~ dissolution of PEACHLAND INVESTMENTS CORP., has
_ been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
_ Liquidator

. LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

VERNON LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000,
the dissolution of VERNON LIMITED, has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator



Ll. chief to stay silent



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Syndicated Content
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PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that 1, MILDRED DAVIS, of
187 Hawkins Court, Hudson Estate; Grand Bahama,
.Bahamas, intend to change my child’s name from
QUINTON HENCIL WALKES to QUINTON HENCIL
DAVIS. If there are any objections to this change of name
by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no Jater
than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEAN CLAUDE PIERRE, OF
ALLAN DRIVE, P.O. BOX CR-56817, NASSAU BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 5TH day of APRIL, 2005 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas. coe ices

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WILSON ALTIDOR, P.O. BOX N-
4891, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed |
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13TH
day of APRIL, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

















LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
ZUGSPITZE LIMITED

. Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000,
the dissolution of ZUGSPITZE LIMITED, has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.
ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Secretary



LEGAL NOTICE

| NOTICE
STEIERMARK LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 22nd
day of March, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., of
P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator



PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Volleyball federation hoping for
gym time ahead of championships

# By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THE Bahamas Volleyball
Federation is preparing to send
its boys and girls teams off to
the Junior Caribbean Volley-
ball Championships in Aruba
this summer.

But Jason Saunders, one of
the coaches selected, said it’s
going to be important that they
have adequate use of the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium for
training.

The national team assistant
trainer and head coach for the
junior girls team noted that
every year around this time,
they are hampered by not hav-
ing sufficient time to practise in
the gym, but he’s hoping that
will all change.

Concrete

“Our sport calls for us to hit
the floor and roll over and we
can’t do that on the concrete
outdoors,” Saunders stressed.
“They will be intimated by their
surface.

“So we need a floor that is
padded. So we’re hoping that
the government will ensure us
that we will have the use of the
gym to train in.”

At present, Saunders said
they’ve had some problems get-
ting into the Kendal Isaacs Gym
at the appropriate time. But
they’re currently working fever-
ishly with the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture offi-

cials to get in the gym.
However, he said they are not

allowed to use the DW Davis

Gym, the home of the New

‘Sea Wolf’ honoured
at the Stars Rega

THE Nassau Yacht Club honoured legendary Bahamian sailor Sir Durward
Knowles at the Star Western Hemisphere Spring Championships that were
held at the Club last week. :

Sir Durward, a longstanding member of the Nassau Yacht Club, once mem-
orably earned the nickname “Sea Wolf” from the local press during a regat-
ta in Spain for his seemingly uncanny ability to read the wind and seas.

- In honouring Sir Durward, the club chose to retire the name of the Santa
Maria Trophy that since the 1940s has been presented to the winner of the Star
Spring Championships when held in Nassau.

The award was renamed the Sir Durward Knowles Trophy, a name that it
will now carry. In receiving the award, international sailing champion Paul
Cayard, a longtime friend and admirer of Sir Durward, expressed his delight
at being the first winner of the newly renamed trophy.

In his Star “Gem,” Sir Durward has himself been a past world champion
in 1947, in addition to winning a bronze medal in the 1956 Melbourne
Olympics, and the Bahamas first ever Olympic gold medal at the Tokyo
Olympics in 1964, with crew. Cecil Cooke. Astonishingly, Sir Durward’s
Olympic career spanned 40 years, from 1948 to 1988.

Twenty five Star boats manned by world renowned sailors from five.

countries, many of them with Olympic and Americas Cup campaigns to
their credit, competed during the four day regatta. The breezy conditions off
the eastern end of New Providence brought out the best in the competitors.

The world class event has been hosted by the Nassau Yacht Club more
times than any other venue worldwide.

In the three race Harry Knowles series sailed on April 4, fierce competi-
tion saw Canadian skipper Ross MacDonald and crew Mike Wolfs win the
day, with Paul Cayard and Brian Sharp in ‘second place, and John Mac-
Donald and Brian Faith in third.

Not to be outdone, however, veteran campaigner Paul Cayard from the
USA, with crew Brian Sharp, turned the tables on the rest of the fleet in the
three day, six race Spring Championship series with consistent results across
the board. Second place overall went to John Dane III and Austin Sperry who
also distinguished themselves by being the top placed Masters competitor for
those aged over 50. Rick Merriman and Steve Mitchel placed third.

Top Bahamian finisher was Steven Kelly with crew Billy Holowesko,
who placed a highly creditable 14th amongst the 25 entries.

aS

Providence Volleyball Associa-
tion.

In addition, Saunders said
they’ve had to travel to Blake

Road to use a community cen-
tre there, but they are being
charged a fee of $5 per player

_and, in most cases, the cost has







to be absorbed by the coaches
because the players don’t
always have the funds.

“For a national team where
we are just volunteering our ser-
vice and we don’t have any
sponsorship, it could be costly,”
Saunders declared.

Unless the gyms are more
readily available for the nation-
al teams to practise, Saunders
said they could be hard pressed
to perform at their best.

At the last championships in
the Netherlands Antilles two
years ago, the Bahamas came
in second in. the: boys division,
while the girls were fifth place
finishers.

This year, when they travel
to the championships in Aruba
from July 8-18, Saunders said
it’s going to be difficult to
improve on their positions
because the standard of the oth-

er countries has risen so high. -

“Some of those juniors are
actually members of their senior
national volleyball teams,”
Saunders revealed. “So the lev-
el of competition is that much
more intense. :

“At the last junior CVC,
there is a girl who played for
Trinidad and Tobago and she
will be back to play for them;
She won best hitter and most
valuable player at the Senior
CVC last year.” ;

Saunders said the Bahamas’
girls should be in a much better
position to compete with their
peers because they have been
there before. we

But he noted that the boys
may have a more difficult time
because they are going through
a rebuilding stage from the last
championships. ‘

Players :

At present, there are at least
25 players coming out to prac-
tise for both teams. However;
the federation is expected to cut’
the team down to 18 within a.
month’s time. SS

The final selection won’t be.
made until at least a month:
before the team gets set to trav-.
el.

Saunders said they have some:
of the top junior players in the
country trying out for the team:
and he’s confident that they will
select two squads that will rep-
resent the Bahamas well at the
championships. "

But he said that in order for
them to perform at their best,
the national teams will have to:
access to the gym at least four.
days a week. :

Practice is held daily from:
6pm. i

If granted, Saunders said they.
will workout from 8-10 am for'
the junior girls and from 10am-
noon for the junior boys.

While Saunders serves as the
assistant trainer and head coach
of the junior girls, he is expect- ©
ed to be assisted by Laverne
Symonette.

The head trainer is Raymond
Wiison, who also serves as the
head coach for the junior boys’
team: His assistant is expected
to be Mario Dean.

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@ SIR DURWARD is shown with Brian Sharp (left, crew)and Paul Cayard (right, skipper),



winners of the Star Western Hemisphere Spring Championships held at The Nassau Yacht Club.



TRIBUNE SPORTS EDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005, PAGE 7B
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——e_— '
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~~
- “
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_ Africa a
trump v4 f
West #7 _ ,
Indies |




























WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

WITH her work not yet com-
pletely done, Mary Shelley said
she will be offering herself for re-
election as president of the
Bahamas Lawn Tennis Associa-
tion.

The BLTA, which has seen a
transformation over the last few
years from the heated clashes in
the media, will hold its election of
officers at the annual general meet-
ing on Wednesday, April 27 at
7pm at the National Tennis Cen-
tre.

Members are being advised to
renew their membership by 6pm
on Wednesday, April 20 in order
to be eligible to vote.

“J didn’t finish all the work that
I started out to do,” said Shelley,
who took over from Harold Wat-
son last year. “I got most of it
done, but I still have a lot more to
do.
Shelley served the past year with
Dyphany Mortier as her first vice
president; Cylde Rolle as second
vice president; Caroline Moncur
as treasurer and Kevin Major as
secretary.

She noted that she’s not sure
who will be seeking another term
in office, but she will be willing to
work with whoever decides to run.

Looking back at her tenure in
office, Shelley said they had to take
one step backward over the first
four months in order to move for-
ward.

“We finally got our website up,
which was important, and we
immediately got a newsletter out,”
she pointed out. “So we tried very
hard to sort out our communica-
tion level with the executives and
the memberships.

“We were able to sort all of that
out and we were able to get our
junior programme up to a higher
level, which we had to do by com-
municating with the parents.”

Improve

Additionally, Shelley said they
were also able to improve the com-
munication between the BLTA
and the Ministry of Youth, Sports
and Culture.

“T think what we tried to do was
close the gaps where they exist-
ed,” she stated. “We also worked
very hard with our national team
and I think we did a good job with
that.”

She was referring to the Davis
Cup team, which had to utilise the
services of the junior players after
both Mark Knowles and Mark
Merklein opted not to compete.

The BLTA sent the team of
Devin Mullings, Marvin Rolle,
Ryan Sweeting and H’Cone
Thompson to Curacao, Nether-
lands Antilles for the first round of
the American Zone II Davis Cup
tie in February.

The team, captained by John
Farrington, eventually lost 4-1 and
will now have to prepare to play
Colombia in Colombia over the
weekend of July 15-17 in a bid to
stay in Zone II for next year.

“The executives have realised
that there is a lot of work and we
could get worn out, so we need to
have more help,” said Shelley, who
' noted that they are now leaning
| towards rehiring a full-time admin-
| istrator.

In a bid to improve the coaching
level in the sport, Shelley said they

former Davis Cup team captain
John Antonas to run a course very
soon.

“We hope to do a lot of
improvement in that area so we
can bring all of our coaches up to
the modern day techniques of
coaching,” she said.





intend to engage the services of.

f f Lei



i By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



DAVIS Cupper Ryan Sweeting
has been afforded the opportuni-
ty to travel with the International
Tennis Federation’s 18-and-under
International Junior team to
Europe this summer.

Over the course of a three-
month period, Sweeting will get to
compete in a total of ten tourna-
ments that will start at the 27th
Tomeo Internazionale ‘Citta Di
Santa Croce’ in Santa Croce, Italy
from May 9-15 and end with the
Junior Championships at Wim-
bledon in England from June 25-
July 3.

Bahamas Lawn Tennis Associ-
ation’s president Mary Shelley
said it’s a major accomplishment
for the Bahamas to have Sweeting
travelling as a part of the tour.

Sweeting is in Florida training

MIAMI HER



with his Davis Cup team-mate,
Marvin Rolle, who also serves as
his hitting coach.

He was unavailable for com-
ments.

Sweeting, 17, will also get to
compete in the following tourna-
ments:

° 46th Italian Junior Open in
Milan, Italy from May 16-22.

e 41st Astrid Bowl in Belgium
from May 23-28.

e International Junior Cham-
pionships of France in Paris from
May 29-June 5,

© Queens Club Invitational in
London from June 7-12.

¢ Training Camp in London

‘from June 13-18.

e LTA International Junior
Tennis Championships in Roe-
hampton, London from June 19-
24,

The Wimbledon tournament at

ALD SPORTS







the end. of the tour, will be his
second Grand Slam for the year.
In January, Sweeting played in
the Australian Open in Mel-

‘bourne where he advanced to the

quarter-final round in the junior
boys singles before he lost in
straight sets to number six seed
Sergei Bubka.

Team

He also played doubles with
Miquel Angel Reyes-Varela from
Mexico. They went to the second
round before losing in three sets
to the American team of Jesse
Levine and Michael Shabaz.

Shelley, who got an opportuni-
ty to watch Sweeting play in the
first round of the American Zone
One Davis Cup tie in Curacao in
February against the Netherlands
Antilles, was thrilled when asked
to comment on this major



VOLLEYBALL
toy aeY Vol
HOPING FOR

GYM ACCESS
giclee

@ RYAN SWEETING in
action during a Davis Cup match
in Netherlands Antilles. Sweeting —
will get to compete in ten tourna- —

ments in Europe this summer.

Davis Cup star set to

European tour

achievement by Sweeting.

“J cannot tell you, I’m just
jumping up and down because
this is a wonderful opportunity
for Ryan,” Shelley explained. “To
be selected to go on this tour, this
will really give him the experi-
ence that he wouldn’t have expe-
rienced anywhere else.”

Shelley, who will be seeking her .
second consecutive one-year term
in office when the BLTA holds
its annual general meeting and
election of officers on April 27,
said that to have the entire tour
fully paid for by the ITA makes it
even more encouraging for
Sweeting.

At the end of the tour, Sweeting
should be heading back home to
travel with the BLTA’s team to.
Colombia to compete in the sec-
ond round of the American
Zone IT Davis Cup tie from July
15-17.







WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005



Ground-breaking legislation
to address Bahamian heritage

Proposed Act to
establish first National
Arts, Culture, Science
and Technology Council



@ By ERICA WELLS

THE question of national iden-
tity is a complex one, with many
possible answers, depending on
who’s asking the question and
who’s trying to answer it.

For Bahamians, that question is
especially difficult, given the per-
ception that the Bahamas is far
behind its regional neighbours
when it comes to heritage aware-
ness and cultural development.

But The National Cultural
Development Commission is try-
ing to make that question easier
to answer-through a ground-
breaking piece of legislation that
will address the all important but
often ignored issue of heritage
and artistic development.

. “The commission is interested
in gathering heritage, which
shores up, makes you stronger
and gives you your identity,”
Winston Saunders, co-chairman
of the National Cultural Devel-
opment Commission, told The
Arts in an interview at the com-
mission’s offices in Victoria Gar-
dens.

What Mr Saunders is referring
to is a proposed Act that will
establish the country’s first
National Arts, Culture, Science
and Technology Council.

A draft copy is now before
Cabinet and the commission is
hoping that government will bring
it to Parliament sooner than later.

The Council, along with invest-
ing in talented people and
ground-breaking ideas, will act as
an umbrella organisation for all
areas of the arts, fostering music,

literature, drama, dance and fine:

arts, and bringing some order to
the separate art events now tak-
ing place in sporadic periods.

Activities

“Too many things are happen-
ing in this country, that just spring
up. (The council) will act like an
umbrella for all of these activi-
ties that go-on harem scarem,”
says Mr Saunders, a noted play-
wright.

The council will also have the
power to establish a creative arts
centre and a national theatre, and
produce shows and festivals. And
it will provide an important outlet
for existing artists, related organ-
isations and performing groups.

This comprehensive piece of
legislation will hopefully help
bring the Bahamas more in line
with what has been going on in
other Caribbean countries for
years, in terms of cultural devel-
opment and its value.

Of all of the recommendations
made by the almost three-year-
old commission so far, this one,
says Mr Saunders, is considered
the most pressing.

One of the first projects on the
council’s agenda has to do with
compiling and properly docu-
menting the Bahamas’ music,
dances and stories.

Ethnomusicologist, Dr Nina
Wood, a Bahamian who lives in
Florida, will travel the Family
Islands with director of the
Bahamas National Youth Choir
Cleophas Adderley to study local
music and record the oral tradi-
tions that are in danger of being
lost forever.

One of the purposes behind the
project is to create a proper data

base that will go a long way in-

helping to form in a stronger idea
of Bahamian national identity.
Along the same lines, a repre-

Se

sentative from Britain’s NESTA
(National Endowment for Sci-
ence, Technology and the Arts),
will visit some of the local schools
for a project that will require stu-
dents to interview their elders,
which will be recorded for
research purposes.

It is projects like these that Mr
Saunders and commission mem-
bers believe will help define for
the Bahamas a national identity,
and educate that element in soci-
ety that does not place value on
local arts.

Mr Saunders believes that the
country’s delayed cultural devel-



“The

commission
is interested
in gathering

heritage,

which
shores up,
makes you
stronger
and gives
you your
identity.”

Winston Saunders,
co-chairman of the
National Cultural
Development

‘ Commission.



opment has something to do with
the Bahamas’ rapid development
of its tourism and finance prod-
ucts.

~ “Over the years of develop-
ment, little time was given, ona
wide scale, for scholarship or aes-
thetic,” he says.

“We just went by leaps and
bounds and never really thought
of aesthetics as that serious, much
less as economically viable.
(Some) saw artists, dancers,
actors, as just having fun.” —

The single-minded focus on
that tourist product, although
important for the country’s eco-
nomic sustainability, has con-
tributed to the neglect of heritage
awareness, Mr Saunders believes.

“When the country’s vision and
leadership is poised only on the
$400 million, the $500 million
investment, you tend to sell out a
little bit,” he says, adding that he
does not know of any Heads of
Agreement or contract with a for-

eign hotel investor that encour-

ages a display of local arts.

The economic viability will also
be an issue addressed by the
council.

In terms of living off of one’s
art, the most success has been
seen locally by the country’s fine
artists, who have had relative suc-
cess at home, when compared to
actors, dancers or writers.

The commission has recom-

mended that funding for the
council be drawn from a national
lottery, an idea that the religious
community is vehemently
opposed to. Funding for the coun-
cil is very important if it is to car-
ry out its grand goals, and help
ease the burden already placed
on the Endowment for the Per-
forming Arts, the Lyford Cay
Foundation and Cable Bahamas
Cares Foundation, which provide
much-needed funding for the
country’s many talented local
artists.

Heritage

When the commission was
appointed in 2002, it was given a
specific mandate, along with its
focus on heritage and artistic
development, it was also made
responsible for:

e Establishing a heroes park
and the appropriate location for
the park;

e Appropriate recognition of
Bahamians throughout “our

@ WINSTON Saunders, co-chairman

time” and the manner in which
they are recognised and;

* The specific examination of
the nature in which the country
goes about establishing an hon-
ours system. ,

The commission, which has
already made numerous reports
to government, has started a pro-
gramme of Family Island Heroes
Parks and is in the process of hon-
ouring deserving Bahamians via
naming ceremonies and the rec-
ommendation of an honours sys-
tem that will replace the existing
Queen’s Honours.

A street in The Grove has
already been named after
Bahamian folk artist Amos Fer-
guson; and plans have also been
made to name a road near the
Broadcasting Corporation of the
Bahamas after the much-loved
broadcaster Rusty Bethel.

The local honours system will
comprise various categories, from
the most special category of
National Hero, to an Order of
Distinction, which will encompass
a vast category of people who



have contributed to the country’s
development.

Mr Saunders pointed out that
Jamaica established its national
honours system in 1985, and since
then has named only seven
national heroes.

Though the commission is
expecting a backlash from its rec-
ommendation to do away with
the Queen’s Honours, its research
shows that most of those ques-
tioned on the idea are very
accepting of the concept.

There is also the suggestion
that the National Honours will
run alongside the Queen’s Hon-
ours, which Mr Saunders feel is
bad idea. It is feared that the
Bahamian honours system will
seem inferior next to the British
system, given the psyche of some
Bahamians. Under the proposed
national honours system, a spe-
cial panel will select nominees
from recommendation forms.

“All of this is to try and ele-
vate us as a people. I think that
for too long we have sort of
knocked down and not built our-



of the National Cultural Development Commission and noted playwright is pictured at a
street naming ceremony for renowned Bahamian artist Amos Ferguson. The ceremony is one of numerous ways the commission has rec-
ommended to celebrate Bahamian artists and cultural heroes.

(Photo: Peter Ramsay)

_ Selves up,” says Mr Saunders.

The commission has been
working quietly since it was estab-
lished almost three years ago and
while its regular numbers have
dwindled its determination to ful-
fill its mandate has not weakened.

It continues to address con-
cerns related to the “migratory
aspects of our land” and how that
will impact the Bahamas’ cultur-
al development; the influence of
American culture on young
Bahamians; and the expansion of
local culture beyond Junkanoo.

More than anything, Mr Saun-
ders hopes that the recommen-
dations of the council will help
usher in a renaissance of the arts
that will be sustained for genera-
tions to come.

“What has happened is that we
have bent ourselves to entertain
the tourists, and we don’t enter-
tain ourselves,” says Mr Saun-
ders. “And to me, that is one of
the things that the (council) can
help bring about, teach us to cel-
ebrate us first, to entertain our-
selves first.”



PAGE 2C, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005

Questions of gender and



The following is the third
and final installment of a
lecture delivered as part of
the Sir Lynden Pindling
Memorial Lecture Series on
March 22 at the Dundas Cen-
tre for the Performing Arts.

@ PART THREE
By PATRICIA
GLINTON-MEICHOLAS

OWING to the unfortunate
fact that we have adopted
Junkanoo as a paradigm for the
development of society, culture
and economy, we have failed to
put sufficient emphasis on how
gender identity is constructed in
the Bahamas. While we bemoan
the rise in domestic and public

psychological and physical abuse —

of women and children, the pub-
lic violence among men, we pay
scant attention to the fact that all
too many Bahamian men build
their manhood and self-conse-
quence on domination of their
peers and of women and, in the
words of Martin Duberman, on
an “unmodulated resort to vio-
lence as the preferred means for
resolving conflict”.

The question needs to be asked
and answered as to what extent
gender identity construction and
notions of female and male pow-
er are bound up in the rush to
early sexual relationships and ear-
ly maternity and paternity. Might
this not aid us in formulating
more effective strategies for stem-
ming the floodtide of teen preg-
nancies, HIV/AIDS transmission
and the ‘upward spiral of domestic
violence in this country?

We need to examine more
closely how Bahamian youth
define achievement. For many, it

is “thug life”, exemplified by gold-.

plated American “gangsta” rap-
pers with no high school educa-




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tion and their East Coast-West
_ Coast gun battles; for others, it is
the local drug dealer, who has
managed to parlay as little edu-
cation into an expensive lifestyle
and the slavish worship of many
in their community. For some
young girls, the preferred mod-
els are often the women on the
receiving end of the sexual atten-
tions and largesse of the afore-
mentioned thugs. Surrounded as
they are by so many celebrated
models of easy gain, how, then,
do we expect our youth, espe-
cially the young men, to endure
the slow and painful process of
success that is achieved through
education and other forms of self-
discipline and education?

Patriotism

What is even scarier is that all

too many Bahamians do not have _

a concept of patriotism in and of

itself. Bahamian identity tends ©

only to emerge and be claimed
in opposition and der 3 tion of
some other ethnicity .. identi-
ty—as with “coolie” and “Hait-
ian

Where there is a well-defined

allegiance, it tends not to be to |
the collective but to individual °

achievement and gain. For a seg-

ment of the population allegiance’

tends to be to trends, factions and
the current music stars. A grow-
ing sentiment across sectors is
what your country can do for you
rather than what you can do for
your country, personified as “the
Government dem”, the ultimate
godfather.

We need to be concerned at to
the extent to which political
patronage, cronyism, nepotism
and the consequent failure to
establish a meritocracy in The
Bahamas influence young

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Bahamians’ perception of their
chances of social and economic
mobility under the present sys-
tem?

What is likely to occasion even
more universal damage is policy-
makers’ neglect of the environ-
ment and failure to examine in
depth the links between the

. degradation of the marine envi-

ronment and the failure of a great
many Bahamians to extend their
radius of responsibility beyond
home and Junkanoo group.

Casuarina McKinney, director of
Bahamas Reef Environment
Educational Foundation
(BREEF) offers the following
insight into local beliefs and cus-

‘toms that endanger the marine.

environment:

“There is a general mindset that
the ocean is infinite- an infinite
place to harvest resources (conch,
fish etc) and an infinite place to

‘dump waste. I frequently
encounter fishermen who tell me
that the ocean will never run out

despite the fact that we have so.

much evidence to the contrary.
One mindset is that God put the
fish on the earth and that humans
cannot damage a Godly creation.
I prefer to look at it the other way,
we are stewards of God’s earth
and so we should look after it. It is
rare to hear preachers speaking
this message, and I would like to
hear it more often.”

Not the least of the problems
politics have created is a retarda-
tion in the development of social
capital, which refers to the ability

.of distinct groups in society to
extend their radius of trust and
loyalty beyond the confines of the
group to which they are bound
to a horizon that aligns with the
boundary of nation or the nation-
al collective. Francis Fukuyama,
Hirst Professor of Public Policy at






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George Mason University, has
noted that when people examine
a culture, they pay too much
attention to consumer behaviour,
which he brands “the most super-
ficial aspects of culture”. What
he says we should be more con-
cerned about are the deeper
moral norms that affect how peo-
ple link together and define eco-
nomic activity.

In brief, political patronage, .

patently self-serving interpreta-
tions of holy writ, tourism and a
variety of ill-considered cultural
policies and practices have creat-
ed a new plantation, with new
dependencies and a new elite,
posited not on colour but on
political affiliation, opportunism
and wealth. It is a plantation on
which many Bahamians are
enslaved and robbed of personal
motivation by promises of a
chicken in every pot, a Lexus in
every garage, with minimal effort
on the part of the consumer of
these benefices, and all liberally
seasoned with a healthy dose of
deliberately promoted i ignorance
and intractable prejudices.

Leadership

All too many of our primary
political and civic institutions are
conspiring to perpetuate an
authoritarian system in which the
people are entirely dependent on
their leaders for direction and sus-
tenance. We are dependent on
the Member of Parliament for
our constituency to give us a job
or coerce someone else into giv-
ing us a job. We are count on that
same MP to keep us on that job,
again by coercion, even when we
prove unproductive or dishonest.
We are dependent on our church
leaders to tell us how to vote on
the issues of a referendum, and
many of them, in turn, are guided

by their political affiliations in
directing their congregations in
the most basic obligations of citi-
zenship.

Ultimately, the greatest con-
cern, as relates to the quality of
future national development is
the indication that, beyond the
well-worn “The Bahamas is a
Christian nation”, statements of
identity reflecting values, espe-
cially values of social, economic,
scientific and technological striv-
ing, progress and achievement are
rare. There are few, if any, popu-
lar expressions that speak of
philosophies to guide a balanced
intersection of ecological, social
and economic imperatives in cul-
tural development. Nor are there
allusions to aspirations or ideals
such as integrity, freedom,
democracy and brotherhood.
And while there has been much
to indicate the existence of col-
lective intent at the level of fac-
tion, there. is little evidence that
there are collective ideals for the
nation, except for such worthy
concepts as may: be enshrined in
The Bahamas Constitution.

While Bahamians bitterly
bemoan the fate of our youth,

witness how little investment has -

gone into the sociocultural devel-
opment of Bahamian children
beyond the classroom. Where are
the child- or teen-oriented super-
vised community cultural and
recreational centres that promote

an appreciation for our heritage

and culture and foster the growth
of positive values? To what extent
are citizenship and ethical training

~ incorporated in the national cur-

riculum? How many of us have’

been taught the provisions of the
Bahamas Constitution, especially
with regard to our rights and

- responsibilities?

Perhaps the very worst of it is
that political factions, unions and
other groups have fostered what

THE TRIBUNE.

has been called a “limited aegis
of identification and trust,’

impeding the development of a,
national perspective and the:
social capital needed for eco-:
nomic and social progress. It.
seems that there is sufficient indi-.
cation in all this to make an asser-.,
tion that the work of nation build-.
ing is far from complete in The
Bahamas. Moreover, through:
malfeasance, neglect, indifference,
and ignorance we are creating
values, attitudes and behaviour;
inimical to an equitable partici-,
pation in the global economy and,
the maintenance of the relative.
peace we have come to enjoy in
our land. At

r

Progress |

If one accepts the foregoing as
realistic assessment of the nation-
al profile, obviously the need for
change is indicated. At the Sec-
ond Global Knowledge Confer-
ence of 2000, the fourth Prime
Minister of Malaysia, Dr
Mahathir Mohamad, offered
advice as to how developing
states wishing to make progress in
the newest globalisation revolu-.
tion can help themselves:

“We must be prepared to exam-.
ine every sacred cow, to give up:
every pre-conceived notion. In the,
pursuit of information, knowledge
and wisdom, we must be prepared.
to face reality. We must embrace,
change, pursue novelty, crave.
innovation. We must learn. Even
harder still, we must unlearn.”

This statement encompasses
the fundamentals of change, but is
worth noting a few specifics for.
the Bahamian context. For this,
country, moving into global com-
petition and creating a more just-
society requires creating a true

meritocracy. While political



@ ARTIST, writer and curator Christopher Cozier.

Trinidadian artist
Ozier to give a
visual presentation

TRINIDADIAN artist, writer and curator Christopher Cozi-
er will be the first guest of the National Art Gallery’s Artist and

Critic Programme.

Cozier will give a visual presentation at the gallery on Thurs-
day, April 21, starting at 6pm. And visit local artists in-studio to
discuss their work in relation to regional and international

movements in art.

He is an artist who makes mixed media work, including video,
sound and live performances, and installations with drawings,
constructions and appropriated objects.

Awards

Cozier has had solo exhibitions in Trinidad and Barbados, par-
ticipated in biennials in Cuba and the Dominican Republic,
published works in Small Axe (editor), The Massachusetts
Review (critic) and Art Journal, and has received numerous
awards and grants including the 2004 Pollock-Krasner Grant.

This NAGB programme seeks to bring in regional and inter-
national artists to the Bahamas to present and discuss their

work with Bahamian audiences.

The guest artist and or critic first gives a visual presentation
at the National Art Gallery where they pay particular attention
to shifts in media, subject, content, philosophies etc. in their body
of work, and then visit with local artists in-studio to discuss
their work in relation to regional and international movements

in art.

This event is free and open to the public. Call the gallery at

328-5800 for more information.



M7

THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005, PAGE 3C





identity in the Bahamas

patronage, cronyism and nepo-
tism will always be with us, we
need not allow them to prevail to
the point where excellence dis-
appears from the community, and
the emperor parades naked, while
the whole community blindly
applauds the quality of his cou-
ture. In short, these negative
influences cannot be allowed to
compromise the chances for this
country, its people and products
to find respect and acceptance in
the international community. It
is time to make use of indepen-
dent juries and task forces to pre-
serve some degree of objectivity

- in judging national competitions,

distributing national awards, iden-
tifying national heroes and insti-
tutional leaders, in the design and
construction of public buildings,
in the formulation of educational
curricula, and in the development

- and appointment of national insti-

tutions.

Harmony

For us, moving forward means
promoting a more harmonious
society, the national curriculum
cannot dichotomize culture and
history. There should be neither
Loyalist history nor Black history
taught in our schools, or promot-
ed in the media, but Bahamian
history. We need to understand
that Black History Month is an
imperative for African Ameri-
cans, who represent a minority
group in the United States still
struggling for an equal voice in
the life of their country. If the
history of Africans was neglected
under colonialism and white
minority rule in The Bahamas, as
indeed it was, it takes only a few
strokes of the official planning
and legislative pens in this major-
ity-black, majority-governed
nation to give it an honoured and
rightful place in the national cur-
riculum.

‘By the same token, white
Bahamians must teach their chil-
dren to be fierce in celebrating
their black brethren and fierce in
protecting that aspect of their
country’s heritage that is now
being foolishly isolated as “black

._ history and heritage”,.Further-

more, the men, women and chil-
dren who live in the plush sub-

urbs, who have never pasted a '

Junkanoo costume or beat a
drum, must be recognised and
celebrated as Bahamians as true
as the Junkanoo purist who lives
in Mason’s Addition in the heart
of the inner city, whose swaddling
clothes were made of goatskin
and whose first rattle was a cow-
bell.

A better, stronger Bahamas in
the future means increasing and
maintaining democracy, and for
this our country needs engaged
citizens. Civic education cannot
simply be adjuncts to the content
syllabi. The curricula of our
schools must include substantive
programmes and courses to teach



@ Revel in the Arts —
the event of the season,
The Lyford Cay Schol-
ars Association fund-
raiser is set for Satur-
day April 16 at Mount-
batten House and Gar-
dens, beginning at 7pm.
Tickets cost $75, which
entitles you to a
gourmet selection of
food, wine, the oppor-
tunity to bid on art by
the country’s best artists
and much more.

All proceeds go to the
Harry C Moore Memor-
ial Scholarship in the
Arts.

For tickets contact
dionne@coralwave.com
or call 323-8962.

@ Talking Canvases,
a solo exhibition by artist
Marlon Hunt @ the Cen-
tral Bank Art Gallery
through April 28.

@ Dr Rosalyn W Floyd,
a prominent African-
American pianist, will per-
form at Government
House on Friday, April 22,
8pm. For more informa-
tion contact Artists Guild
International at 326-3608 or
558-7570.

@ The National Collection
@ the National Art Gallery of
the Bahamas, an exhibition
that takes the viewer on a
journey through the history of
fine art in the Bahamas.

It features signature pieces
from the national collection,
including recent acquisitions
by Blue Curry, Antonius
Roberts and Dionne Ben-

4

{

civic knowledge, skills and virtues.
In his essay “Global Trends for
Civic Education”, John J Patrick
notes that “effective civic educa-
tion is an indispensable means to
the establishment and mainte-
nance of democratic ideals and
institutions.” Patrick says in
another essay “Political and civic
engagement, the constructive
interactions of citizens with their
civil society and government,
requires intellectual capital —
knowledge of democratic princi-
ples and practices and cognitive
capacity to apply it to public
affairs.”

In light of increasing globaliza-
tion of trade and The Bahamas’
inevitable participation in region-
al trade combines, education must
serve to create and deepen bene-
ficial respect and reciprocity
between Bahamians and racial
and ethnic groups in partner and
other nations. In other words, we
should not allow the heat from
our navels, in our insular con-
templation thereof, to cloud our
world view or our vision of the
future.

The Ministry of Education has
imported native speakers to teach
Spanish in the primary schools,
so one can assume there is an
understanding of the importance
of being able to communicate
with trade partners. However,
the education paradigm for the
global age must be constructed
on the understanding that

satisfactory communication
requires more than mutual lin-
guistic intelligibility.

Manuel Guilherme argues that
the foreign language curriculum
must “assume a much more
prominent role, if not centre
stage, in the general school cur-
riculum when it comes to dis-
cussing and improving racial and
social relations and helping all
students to acquire the knowl-
edge, attitudes and critical social
skills indispensable to successful-
ly interact in inter-cultural situa-
tions and to take personal, social,
and political action that will help
make the world more democratic
and just.”

But while developing “human

capital” to propel-the national -: .

economy into equitable partici-
pation in global trade‘is of great
importance, development of per-
sons must be central to the edu-
cation paradigm. As Michael W
Apple says:

“The ‘practical’, could never be
divorced from historical, ethical,
and political understanding with-
out losing something in the
process. Schooling should never
be seen as simply training for
industries’ needs.”

There is much to indicate that
economic progress and orderly
social development will, almost
certainly, depend on the extent
to which we develop social capi-
tal, which Francis Fukuyama
defines as “cooperative social

ey ated |



@ Bond, an exhibition of
recent works by mother
and son artists Sue Ben-
nett-Williams and Jason
Bennett will run this month
at Popopstudios Gallery in
Chippingham. The exhibi-
tion features paintings,
mixed media and ceramics.

jamin-Smith. Gallery hours,
Tuesday-Saturday,
llam—4pm. Call 328-5800 to
book tours.

@ Past, Present and Per-
sonal: The Dawn Davies Col-
lection @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, Villa
Doyle, West and West Hill
Streets. The exhibition is part
of the NAGB’s Collector’s
Series. Gallery hours, Tues-
day-Saturday, 1lam—4pm. Call
328-5800 to book tours.

relationships based on norms of
honesty and reciprocity.”

In this country, a variety of
biases still hold subtle but pow-
erful sway. We must work to rid
ourselves of them or, more real-
istically, mitigate their influence
through education and legislation.
There is an urgent need to
address the fact that many
Bahamians are still discriminat-
ed against on the basis of sexual
orientation and the national ori-
gin of their parents. There is need
to recognise and address those
prejudices that have installed
glass ceilings or solid core doors
as immovable barriers to oppor-
tunity for far too many. What is
even more tragic is that, in second

Cultures

millennium since our Lord
walked among us and even after
the terrifying lessons from Bosnia,
Rwanda, the Ivory Coast and the
Sudan in recent times, we are
allowing the seeds of ethnic
cleansing to sown in our own little
Bahamaland, while we insou-
ciantly consume our morning
newspaper, doughnut and coffee
and agree to “Send ‘em back”.

The way forward for develop-

ment in The Bahamas must entail
recognition and respect for the
multiplicity of cultures that make
up the Bahamian culture com-
plex, and an increase in self-
esteem among young black men
and women that does not depend
for its existence on some short-
lived and often dangerous route
to power. To this end, we must
learn and write more of our own
history, more about the many
facets, of our heritage. We must
demonstrate that better and more
enduring sources of power exist
within the individual that cannot
be alienated. The necessary con-
comitant is a far greater commit-

ment to research, writing and.

publication, with funding assis-
tance from the national budget
and agreements with foreign
investors. Our primary school stu-
dents must not he forced to

acquire their knowledge of
Bahamian history, environment
tourist >

and culture from
brochures, posters and postage
stamps, especially those celebrat-
ing pirates.

The way forward must include
if only a modicum of account-
ability on the part cf religious
ministries, in light of their influ-
ence on socioeconomic develop-
ment in The Bahamas. Govern-
ment policy, for instance, might
require churches to be licensed,
and show evidence of supporting
non-exclusionary social pro-
grammes of quality in order to
qualify for rebates on Customs
duties and other forms of taxa-
tion. In the same vein, the church-

Environment

es can become a primary vehicle
for much-needed civic, family

planning and parenting educa-

tion. No doubt this would be too
hot a political potato for govern-
ment administrations to take hold
of, especially for those politicians
who put the “out to lunch” signs
on their doors when any critical
issue arises. The best way to deal
with this situation is, perhaps, to
cultivate a more discerning pop-
ulace that will be more careful in
their choice of shepherds.

The lack of a culture of con-
servation and appreciation of the
environment is evident in the
insouciant boating and fishing
practices of locals, the blind eyes
turned to the harm done to the
marine environment by yacht
tourism, the pollution of our
verges, beaches and waters and

the callous destruction of hills,

forests and wetlands in uncaring
pursuit of maximum concrete
expansion. There is so close an
identification between geograph-
ical territory and nation, the firm-
ness of our grip on tomorrow will
depend heavily upon protective
national policies. It will require

. fostering the proper bonds and
protective attitudes between the -

people and their territorial space,
beyond the visceral repudiation

of Haitians and, to a lesser

degree, other foreign nationals?
Can we not teach.our people. to

love our land and waters as much

as Junkanoo?

As the media are a powerful.
force inthe process of accultura- <
tion and cultural development,. ”-
more attention must be paid, not:
to attempts at suppressing for-.

eign or local media,:but.to coun-
tervailing, productive measures.

It would be far better to institute.
a code of ethics for media pro-
duction, publishing and broad- .-

casting, accompanied by.the.cul-

tivation of standards of excellence .
in research, writing, publishing...
and production technology, radio.’

Enterprise

and television programming
through better training and recog-
nition systems..For how long will

politics pit the minor utterances:

of a parliamentary backbencher

at the ribbon cutting for-the ©
launch of a less than spectacular.
project against the country’s:need _

of the broadcast media to edu-
cate Bahamians about citizenship,
history and culture?

In Bahamian culture resides

another potential economic .

strength — the ease with which
Bahamians conceive of and set in
motion informal entrepreneurial

ventures — witness the peanut

man and other the regular road-

‘side vendors, the “hackers” (unli-

censed public transportation), and
the seasonal roadside enterprises
such as holiday gift baskets and
the selling of land crabs and
guineps. If this spirit and
dynamism could be harnessed
and regulated, it could have the

power to reduce unemployment.

and poverty. Fukuyama points
out that it is at this level that the
real entrepreneurial energy lies,
and even the World Bank recog-
nises this and has adjusted its poli-

cies to advocate micro lending.
In the new world order, we
would be wise to discard our
largely unfounded antipathies and
strengthen our ties with the peo-
ples of the region, with whom we
share mutual intelligibility in his-
tory, geography, culture, eco-
nomics and, in many cases, lan-
guage. Together, we are approx-
imately 34 million strong, which
would permit us, in many areas,
to at least develop highly benefi-
cial economies of scale. Bahamas
Director General of Tourism Vin-
cent Vanderpool Wallace appears

-to be like-minded as quoted in
- Basil Springer’s column of Mon-
~ day, March 10, 2003 in the Bar-

bados Advocate:

“If we could create the United
States. of the Caribbean tomor-
row, we would become overnight
one of the blocs with which the
rest of the world had to reckon.
As it stands, we exist in such small
insular and isolated pockets that

‘the forces and talent that we have
. collectively can never be
unleashed.” °

The~.. general Bahamian
response to the Caribbean Single
Market Economy is nowhere

‘near ‘as warm: Thus far, The
‘Bahamas has refused to. accede

to the free movement of skilled

persons within the Caribbean
Community, although one of the '
well-acknowledged characteris-
‘tics of ‘global: trade is rivalry for

-Conclusion

prifesionils with the most com-

petitive-skills, no matter what
their nationality. Were this coun-

‘try to agree to. some flexibility in

this area, immigration policies

- could become an element of strat-

egy in ¢conomic development,
rather than an agent of ancient
and often ill-founded prejudices

~ with a focus on repatriation of
aliens.

Recently; I have had the good

* fortune to read much of Catholic
‘social-thought and have it eluci-

~ dated by an honest and thought-
- fully intellectual friend. I have

been: particularly struck by the

‘tenets outlined by the Jesuit

Father William Byron in his arti-
cle entitled“Ten Principles-of

people desirous of building a
strong and enlightened society,
we would do well-to learn and

hold fast to them:

@ Human Dignity: “Every per-
son—regardless of race, sex, age,
national origin, religion, sexual
orientation, employment or
employnient status, health, intel-
ligence, achievement or any oth-
er differentiating characteristic—
is worthy of respect. The human
person. «-is never a means, always
an end.”

@ Respect for Human Life:
“Human life at every stage of
development and decline is pre-

cious and therefore worthy of

protection and respect.”
. @ Association: “The center-
piece.of society is the family; fam-

». ily .stability must always be pro-

ey
Catholic Social Thought”.:An' °

tected and never undermined. By
association with others—in fami-
lies and in other social institu-
tions that foster growth, protect

‘dignity and promote the common

good—human persons achieve
their fulfillment.

@ Participation: “...Everyoné
has a part to play in the making of
a good society. Each person has
the right not to be shut out from
participating in those institutions
that are necessary for human ful-
fillment. Nor should anyone be
excluded from participation in the
decisions and the formation of
policies that directly affect his or
her personal human develop-
ment.”

@ Preferential Protection for
the Poor and Vulnerable: “If the

good of all, the common good, is .

to prevail, preferential protection
must move toward those affected
adversely by the absence of pow-
er and the presence of privation.”

@ Solidarity: “Learning to
practice the virtue of solidarity
means learning that ‘loving our
neighbour’ has global dimensions
in an interdependent world.”

@ Stewardship: The concept of:

stewardship calls us not only to a
moral responsibility for protecting
our natural inheritance, but also
to good citizenship and the use
of our personal talents for the
common good. ‘

® Subsidiarity: “The principle
of subsidiarity puts a proper lim-
it on government by insjsting that
no higher level of organisation
should perform any function that
can be handled efficiently and
effectively at a lower level of
organisation by human perspns
who, individually or in groups,
are closer to the problems and
closer to the ground.”

@® Human Equality: “Equality
of all persons comes from their
essential dignity... While differ-
ences in talents are a: part of

God’s plan, social and cultural *

discrimination in fundamental
rights...are not compatible with
God’s design.”

‘© The Common Good: results
from the intersection of all the
foregoing virtues, resulting in

social conditions that allow peo-:

ple to reach their full potential
and to realise their human digni-



I alone with wofds drawn from
President .John,, Kennedy’s
address to the Irish Parliament
on-June 20, 1963, when he spoke
encouragingly about the poten-
tial of small states:

“All the Werle owes much to
the little ‘five feet high’ nations.
The greatest art of the world was
the work of little nations. The most

enduring literature of the world’

came from little nations. The hero-
ic deeds that thrill humanity
through generations were the
deeds of little nations fighting for
their freedom ... the humblest
nation of all the world, when clad
in the armour ofa righteous cause
is str onger.than all.’

© Mrs Glinton-Meicholas is
the president of the Bahamas
Association for Cultural Studies.

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PAGE 4C, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



Old-school reggae

fans get an ‘earful’ |
Concepts holds ‘A Natural
Mystic (Reggae Flashback)’

& By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

ans of old-school reggae
got an earful on Saturday
night at Concepts’ “A
Natural Mystic (Reggae
Flashback)”.

The company, which started just a
year ago and enjoyed success with its
inaugural event, (last year’s Heavens
Angels benefit party at Mountbatten
House in aid of the Cancer Society),
decided to hold its second function
with reggae music fans in mind.

“This is the first event I am doing
on my own. We have culture music
right now, and the dancehall thing.
Every other week there is .a dance-
hall instruction party, but I know that
there are a lot of diehard reggae fans
out there. So we wanted to do some-
thing especially for them,” said Leah
Davis, head of Concepts.

“You know, take it back, take it
way back a couple years, and focus on
the music,” she added.

The courtyard of Pirates of Nassau
was the spot on Saturday night, and
into Sunday morning as reggae fans
started to trickle in very slowly when
doors opened at 9pm. But the true
late-night Nassau party goers didn’t
make their entrance until about
11.30pm.

“Naturally, Bahamians party late,
so I expected it to be later crowd,” Ms
Davis told Tribune Entertainment.

But as the crowd thickened Alpha
Sounds continued to play slow paced
music from artists like Barrington
Levy, Freddy McGregor, Dennis
Brown, Everton Blender, Junior
Reid, Half Pint, UB40, Garnet Silk,
Ninja Man, Super Cat, Cobra, Court-
ney Melody, Shabba Ranks, Yellow-
man and Michael Rose, to name a
few.

“We had a cross section of people
that turned out. Everybody was well
behaved, it was just a nice mellow
vibe and everybody seemed to really
be having a good time,” said Ms
Davis, commenting on the success of
the event.

Though the dress code: ‘of irie
colours was not heeded by all, the
mood was energetic. Each person was
fitted with an irie coloured wristband

- and given a stick of incense, in keep-
ing with the natural mystic reggae
theme, which according to Concepts
was chosen to pay homage to Bob
Marley who would have celebrated
his 60th birthday this year.

“He (Marley) was, in my opinion,
the one who started the whole reg-
gae music off,” Ms Davis added.

Anku of Thought Katcher, who
came to enjoy the music, told Tribune
Entertainment that he “totally
enjoyed” the occasion.

“It was nice. The people who came
out really appreciated the music. We
would consider it to be old school
reggae because this is the music that
was around in our teenage years:and
early 20s. Everything was just really
tight and no hassle, ya know. You
had the incense burning...and the
music was lickin’,” he recalls.

As one who loves reggae music,
Natural Mystic was the ideal place
for him to be on Saturday night. “I
also love other music, but roots reg-
gae is where I am rooted. It has a
message alone with the music.”

Along with playing what he con-

siders to be roots reggae, Anku notes
that the event also featured dance-
hall songs. But very different from
the dancing instruction and vulgar
dancehall songs that are in regular
rotation today.

“Dancehall back in the day had
more soul. They were speaking about
something, about somebody’s strug-
gle, like Barrignton Levy’s ‘Work’,”
he explains.

According to Ms Davis, the mystic
vibes didn’t get wrapped up until
around 3am, but apparently nobody
seemed to mind.

Thirty-five year old Michael Pratt,
who went to the event. with a friend,
told Tribune Entertainment that he
loved the combination of old school
reggae and a more mature crowd.
“Usually, you don’t get that any
more.”

The event was advertised for guys
who were 21 years old and older.

“Tt was all right, at least the music
and the atmosphere. There was no
violence, and you had people who
know how to conduct themselves,”
he noted.

Though Mr Pratt said that he was
one who came up on Bahamian music
and was not “exposed” to this type
of music, as he got older he devel-
oped a love for it.

On his appreciation for the music,
-he said: “It gives you a special feeling
because it’s what you call black man
music, African music. Most of the
singers send out positive vibes, and
they are singing about things that hap-
pened not only in Jamaica but all over
the world. And a lot of the things in
the music is out of the Bible.”

Because the event was received so
well, Ms Davis said that reggae lovers
can look forward to a Natural Mystic
2, or another party that will focus on
the reggae flashback aspect, which
will involve an even wider selection
from that genre of music.

“A lot of people have been asking
when the next one is coming up,” she
said. “In terms of the give-aways, we
were giving glow sticks and incense.
What people seem to like and to want
is just something different.”

@ LEAH Davis (left), head
of Concepts, and Maria
Marshall are all smiles
during Concepts’ “A
Natural Mystic (Reggae
Flashback)”.

(Photos courtesy of
Concepts)


























































’

@ FANS of old-school reggae music (pictured) had a blast during Saturday night’s event at Pirates of Nassau.



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Parties, Nightclubs
& Restaurants |



Pink and White Bashment @ BFM Diplomat Cen-
tre to launch the Kingdom Vibes TV Show Cable 12.
Friday, April 15 @ 7.30pm sharp. Appearing: Mr
Link, DJ Counsellor, Kristine, Solo and Chariots of
Fire. Admission: $12 (includes a free CD of your
choice). Tickets @ BFM, Faith Life, Oasis Music
Centre, The Jukebox, Bucks Gospel.

Girl Power, featuring Novie, Destra, Faye Ann
(Trini Road March Queen 2K3), Spice and Lady E.
@ Cable Beach Grounds. Saturday, April 16 @ Cable
Beach Grounds. Admission: $20 (advance), $25 (at
the gate). Ticket location: Alpha Sounds. Hosted
by JJ, backed by Visage.

Exotic Saturdays @ Fridays Soon Come starts
with 3 for $10 drink specials. Admission: $10 before
midnight and $15 after. Ladies free before 11pm.

Rave Saturdays @ Club Eclipse. DJ Scoobz spin-
ning the best in Old Skool. Admission $35, all inclu-
sive food and drink.

Fever @ Bahama Boom, Elizabeth St, downtown,
every Friday night. Admission $10 before midnight.
First 50 women get free champagne. First 50 men get
a free Greycliff cigar. Dress to impress. For VIP
reservations call 356-4612.

Cool Runnings is back with a Conscious Party @
Hard Rock Cafe, Charlotte St North every Friday.
Classic reggae style music. Admission $10.

Mellow Moods every Sunday @ Fluid Lounge
and Nightclub, Bay St, featuring hits from yesterday

old school reggae and rockers downstairs, and
golden oldies upstairs. Admission: Free. Doors epen
9pm.

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters Sports
Bar. Drink specials all night long, including karaoke
warm-up drink to get you started. Party from 8pm-
until.

Karaoke Nights @ Fluid Lounge and Nightclub. ,

Begins 10pm every Tuesday. Weekly winners select-
ed as Vocalist of the Week ~ $250 cash prize. Winner
selected at end of month from finalists - cash prize
$1,000. Admission $10 with one free drink.

Reggae Tuesdays @ Bahama Boom. Cover charge
includes a free Guinness and there should be lots of
prizes and surprises. Admission: Ladies $10 and
Men $15.

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports
Bar every Wednesday Spm-8pm. Free appetizers
and numerous drink specials.

Flash Nights @ Club Fluid every Thursday. The
ultimate Ladies Night. Join Nassau’s and Miami
Beach’s finest men. Ladies only before 11.30pm with
free champagne. Guys allowed after 11.30pm with
$20 cover. ,

The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday. Doors
open at 9pm, showtime 11.30pm. Cover charge $15.
$10 with flyer.

Fantasy Fridays @ Fluid Lounge, featuring late
“80s music in the VIP Lounge, Top of the Charts in
the Main Lounge, neon lights and Go Go dancers.
Glow sticks for all in before midnight. Admission:
Ladies free before 11pm, $15 after; Guys $20 all
night.

Dicky Mo’s Fridays @ Cable Beach. Happy Hour
- 3 for $10 mixed drinks and $1 shots.

Twisted Boodah Lounge @ Cafe Segafredo,
Charlotte St kicks off early this Friday at 6pm with
deep house to hard house music, featuring Craig-
BOO, Unkle Funky and Sworl’wide on the decks.

Chill Out Sundays @ Coco Loco, Sandyport, from
4pm-until, playing deep, funky chill moods with
world beats.

Sweet Sunday Chill Out Soiree Lounge, every
Sunday, 4pm-midnight @ Patio Grille, British Colo-
nial





ARO UN D

‘Revel in the Arts

REVEL in the Arts, a celebration of the
visual, musical and culinary arts, hosted by the
Lyford Cay Scholars’ Association (LCSA), will
_be held on Saturday, April 16 at 7pm at Mount-
batten House & Gardens, West Hill Street.

The gala‘cocktail benefits the Harry C Moore
Memorial Scholarship in the Arts, to fund the
education of Bahamian arts students. Thirty
well-known artists have donated artwork for a

- silent auction. Opening bids will begin at half

the value, providing the “rare” opportunity to
obtain your favourite artist’s work at very good
prices.

Hotel. é

Wet Sundays, every Sunday, noon-midnight @
Crystal Cay Beach. Admission $10, ladies free.

‘Carib Scene @ Club Fluid every Sunday. A night
of Caribbean, Latin and Reggae flavours for all
audiences. Latin Flair in the VIP Lounge; Old School
Reggae: and Soca in the Main Lounge. Ladies in
free before 11pm. $10 after 11pm. Men, $15 cover
charge.

Jay Mitchell and Hot KC @ Palm Court Lounge,
British Colonial Hilton, Wednesday-Thursday 8pm-
12am. :

Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley’s Restaurant &
Lounge, Eneas St off Poinciana Drive. Featuring
Frankie Victory at the key board in the After Dark
Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to midnight. Fine food
and drinks.

Paul Hanna, Tabatha and Gernie, and the
Caribbean Express perform at Traveller’s Rest, West
Bay St, every Sunday, 6.30pm-9.30pm.

The Arts

Revel in the Arts, a gala cocktial fundrais-
er celebrating the visual, musical and culi-
nary arts, will be held at Mountbatten House
& Gardens, West Hill Street on Saturday,
April 16. Featuring: an Art & Services auc-
tion; door prizes; live music; and Dine
Around, a culinary feast featuring the cuisine
of Nassau's most exclusive restaurants. Host-
ed by the Lyford Cay Scholars' Association
(LCSA). Dress: island elegance. Time: 7pm.
Proceeds in aid of the Lyford Cay Founda-
tion's Harry C Moore Memorial Scholarship
in the Arts. Tickets @ $75 can be purchased
by contacting Monique Hinsey, 362-4910; John
A C Benjamin, 394-9541; Mark A Jordan,
361-5220 ext 264; Erica James, oe 5800 ext
227.

Bond, an exhibition of recent works by
mother and son artists Sue Bennett-Williams
and Jason Bennett will run this month at
Popostudios Gallery in Chippingham. An all
day open house will be held on Saturday,
April 9, 12pm-7pm. The exhibition features
paintings, mixed media and ceramics.

Talking Canvases, a solo exhibition by artist



Revel in fine food, wine, live music, live food





demonstrations and much more.

The gala event will also introduce the much
anticipated “Dine Around”’, where cuisine from
the island’s finest restaurants will be available.
Guests will also have an opportunity to retain
the in-house services of some of the Bahamas’
top chefs, and the services of numerous pro-
fessionals in fields including graphic design,
personal care and assistance.

¢ For tickets @ $75, contact Monique Hinsey,
362-4910; John A C- Benjamin, 394-9541; Mark
A Jordan, 361-5220 ext 264; Erica James, 328-
5800 ext 227. Door prizes will also be avail-
able.



Marlon Hunt at the Central Bank Art

Gallery, Market St. The show runs through

April 28.

Henry Wallace, noted wood sculptor and
environmentalist of Red Bays, North Andros,

‘will be the featured artist in the National Art

Gallery’s Medium Specialist Series on Mon-
day April 11 and Tuesday, April 12, ‘6pm-9pm
in Room T-24 @ the College of the Bahamas.
Workshop participants will work with basic
tools, such as crosscut saw, the coping saw,
chisels and gouges. To register call 328-5800.

The workshop is for adults (age 18 and over).

Price: $35 members/$45 non-members.

The National Collection @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, an exhibition that takes
the viewer on a journey through the history of
fine art in the Bahamas. It features signature
pieces from the national collection, including
recent acquisitions by Blue Curry, Antonius
Roberts and Dionne Benjamin-Smith. Gallery
hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 1lam-4pm. Call 328-
5800 to book tours.

Past, Present and Personal: The Dawn Davies
Collection @ the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, Villa Doyle, West and West Hill Streets.
The exhibition is part of the NAGB’s Collector’s
Series. Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 1lam-4pm.
Call 328-5800 to book tours.

The Awakening Landscape: The Nassau Water-
colours of Gaspard Le Marchand Tupper, from
the collection of Orjan and Amanda Lindroth @
the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas. The
mid-nineteenth century paintings that make up the
exhibition are part of one of the earliest suites of
paintings of Nassau and its environs.

Tupper was a British military officer stationed
at Fort Charlotte in ine 1850s. The works show a
pre-modern Bahamas through the decidely British
medium of watercolour. Gallery hours, Tuesday-
Saturday, 1lam-4pm. Call 328-5800 to book tours.

Health

Doctors Hospital Distinguished Leciure Series:
High blood pressure affects one in four adults.
‘Distinguished physician Dr Judson Eneas will aa
cuss “Hypertension, the Silent Killer Exposed” o
Thursday, April 21 at 6pm in the Doctors Hospi
tal conference room. This lecture will increase
awareness and educate persons about how to pre-
vent, treat, and manage high blood pressure as
well as the related cardiovascular diseases. The lec-







THE TRIBUNE

NASSAU



ture is free to the general public. Free blood pres-
sure, cholesterol and glucose screenings will be
performed between 5pm and 6pm. To ensure
available seating RSVP 302-4603.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5.30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at,
their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville. Call
323-4482 for moré info.

" MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third
Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors Hospital con-
ference room.

The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2.30pm (except August and Decem-
ber) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley
Street.

‘Doctors Hospital, the official training centre of the
American Heart Association offers CPR classes cer-
tified by the AHA. The course defines the warning
signs of respiratory arrest and gives prevention strate-

- gies to avoid sudden death syndrome and the most

common serious injuries and choking that can occur
in adults, infants and children. CPR and First Aid
classes are offered every third Saturday of the month
from 9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Com-
munity Training Representative at 302-4732 for
more information and learn to save a life today.

REACH - Resources & Education for Autism
and related Challenges meets from 7pm — 9pm the
second Thursday of each month in the cafeteria of
the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.

“ Civic Clubs



Toastmasters Club 1905 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm @
BEC Cafe, Tucker Rd. Club 9477 meets Friday,
7pm @ Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm .
A19, Jean St. Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pm @
British Colonial Hilton. Club 1600 meets Thursday,
8.30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes. Club 7178 meets
Tuesday, 6pm @ The J Whitney Pinder Building,
Collins Ave. Club 2437 meets every second, fourth
and fifth Wednesday at the J Whitney Pinder Build-
ing, Collins Ave at 6pm. Club 612315 meets Monday
6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach. Club
753494 meets every Wednesday, 6pm-8pm in the
Solomon’s Building, East-West Highway. All are
welcome.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ the —
Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first
Tuesday, 7pm @ Gaylord’s Restaurant, Dowdeswell
St. Please call 502-4842/377-4589 for more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second
Tuesday, 6.30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office,
4th floor meeting room.

The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month in
the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, Bay St.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets
the second and fourth Wednesday of the month,
8pm @ St Augustine’s Monestary.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second
Friday of each month, 7.30pm at Emmaus Centre at
St Augustine’s Monestary. For more info call 325-
1947 after 4pm.

International Association of Administrative Pro-
fessionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third Thurs-
day of every month @ Superclubs Breezes, Cable
Beach, 6pm.

AMISTAD, a Spanish club meets the third Friday
of the month at COB’s Tourism Training Centre at
7pm in Room 144 during the academic year. The
group promotes the Spanish language and culture in
the community.

Send all your civic and social events to The Tri-
bune via fax: 328-2398 or e-mail: outthere@tri-
bunemedia.net

é



Section
Missing
or
Unavailable



Full Text




1 Lhe Tribune

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| HIGH
| LOW

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|e BREEZY

Volume: 101 No.115

CV Bethel student

70F
SUNNY AND |

becomes 13th aa
victim of the year

@ By PAUL G
-TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

POLICE reported that
the thirteenth murder of the
year occurred yesterday
when a 15-year-old student
of CV Bethel was stabbed
to death.

The incident occurred

around 3.25pm off East.

Street and Victoria Boule-
vard when an argument
escalated into a fight, and
Alando Williamson was
stabbed with a knife in the
left side of his chest.

According to Chief Super-
intendent Hulan Hanna, the
young man was rushed to
the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital where he was pro-
nounced dead.

Just. before press-time
yesterday, Mr Hanna con-
firmed that police had
apprehended and were
holding in custody a 15-
year-old suspect.

“Tt is believed that this

may have resulted from the
feud that started on Mon-
day,” he said.
. Mr Hanna appealed to
parents and adults to try
and talk to the young men
in their community to stop
this kind of incident from
happening.

TAU) Ins

“A lot of our young men
are arming themselves with
knifes and machetes. and
going about the streets caus-
ing injury and harm to oth-

&Ys.

“Just recently we con-
cluded what we thought wes
a very anti-knife campaign

- in our schools. We saw suc-

cess in that there was a
major reduction in the num-
ber of people we were‘tak-
ing knives from and subse-
quently taking before the
courts.

“But we do have a con-
cern that there still are
young men out there carry-
ing weapons on them. So we
appeal to parents that if you
see your boy acting out of
sorts, who is exhibiting hos-
tility to others and talking
about having an issue with
other young persons.to try
and discourage them or turn
them into law enforcement
so that we can deal with
these matters before we

have anymore incidents of

slayings on our streets,” he’

said. "

Mr Hanna could not con-

firm, but said the fight may

have happened at the City
Market food store near thre
school where it is believed
both young men may
been employed. i

i

‘Che Miami Herald —

BAHAMAS EDITION

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13,

issues and a number of other services.

nen acne

protesters allege
Bioanal one

PROTESTERS against a big marina
development at Harbour Island were
alleging “sabotage” last night after a pub-
lic meeting was reduced to a chaotic slang-
ing match.

About 20 people were said to have
turned up with the sole objective of dis-
rupting the meeting and intimidating
potential speakers.

As a result, several “town elders” who
were to have explained objections to the
proposed Romora Bay Marina expansion
refused to take the microphone.

In addition, a drunk was making con-
stant unpleasant remarks about winter
residents, leaving many people at the
meeting feeling “sick and depressed,”
according to one source. It was claimed
that the drunk was “fuelled up” for ihe
meeting by fellow agitators.

“Tt was a very disturbing experience,” a
resident told The Tribune, “It was a very
rowdy meeting at which the organiser was

SEE page 12

























2005

bahamasgp.co

NG WAcAMGSTIALOManrade OY an OO





@ EMPLOYEES of the British Colonial Hilton were provided with a wide range of health services as part of the hotel’s
annual Health Education Fair yesterday. More than 20 health-related businesses and organisations volunteered their time |
to the 282 employees of the hotel, offering them massages, immunisation shots, screenings, information on important health

FNM sank Cable
Beach project is ‘wrong
deal for the country’

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE recently announced billion dollar .

Baha Mar Cable Beach deal is the “wrong
deal” for the country and has come “at the
wrong time”, claimed FNM chairman Car]
Bethel.

At a recent meeting of the Golden Gates
constituency association of the Free Nation-

al Movement, Mr Bethel said that while

there is tremendous opportunity for a real-
istic, practical and well thought out invest-
ment in Cable. Beach, the project agreed to
by the government does not accomplish
this.

The official Heads of Agreement for the’

development was signed last week after
the Baha Mar investment consortium

announced it had signed a new agreement .

with Philip Ruffin to acquire his proper-
ties.

Construction, scheduled to begin in 2007,
will affect the properties on which the
Radisson Cable Beach Resort, the Nassau

SEE page 12

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

















Bahamas’ inflation
‘currently very low’

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

INFLATION in the Bahamas has sig-
nificantly decreased, according to a Cen-
tral Bank researcher.

Speaking with The Tribune, Kevin’
Demeritte of the Ceritral Bank’s research
department said that-the country’s infla-
tion rate is currently very low. ©

Inflation decreased from three per cent
in 2003, to 0.9 per cent in 2004.

“What we have been seeing in the four
years prior to last year is that inflation
was increasing fairly steadily, but at low
levels because 3 per cent is still very low,”
he said.

Like many other aspects of its economy,
the Bahamas’ inflation is imported. Mr
Demeritte said that the Bahamas’ inflation
“Gs usually the US’ inflation, plus a small
amount from the mark up of local business
persons.”

“Our merchants when they bring in
goods from the United States, they pay
that price and add on their profit mar-
gins. When the price goes up in the Unit-
ed States, you can expect our prices to go

SEE page 12







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Dowdeswell St.
oak 322-1718




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Seu oiareny sti |
Parnell eyez ul

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2002 CHEVY 1995 - 1996

AVALANCE






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ACURA TL SABER











OF TRUCKS

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~ PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Detention centre boss
pledges better conditions

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE new head of the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre said that since taking up.
the position in February, he has
received no complaints from
detainees about mistreatment.

Former Superintendent of
Prisons Edwin Culmer took

control of the detention centre
at a time when the facility,
which houses illegal immigrants
for processing, was the target
of severe international criticism
for alleged beatings and abuse
of detainees.

In December last year,

Cuban detainees claiming mis-
treatment at the centre rioted

and set fire to a dormitory.













DANGER |

Each LNG Ve: di vee are ?
Equivalent | Z

SIGN THE NATIONAL PETITION.
AGAINST LNG

NAME dabneencededaceaeeteadeeecesesecteea isle ae PO, BOX ssheccisacves

“SIGNATURE s.0fecosc ei

Fax to 242-393-7604 or mail to: N 302, Nassau, The Bahamas

ee Bon eek

Immigration and Defence
Force officers had to fire rubber
bullets into the crowd to sub-
due the rioters, and nine
detainees and 11 guards were
injured.

Also in December 2004
David Bright, a British busi-

nessman who was held at the’

detention centre twice, claimed

that he witnessed brutal beat-—

MAIN SECTION
_Local News...




ings carried out by guards.

“T have witnessed at first
hand, brutal beatings by guards
and been a part of it.

“They become frustrated and
snap having to work in that
environment. They are show-
ing their position of strength
and abuse that:position,” said
Mr Bright.

Mr Culmer told The Tribune



3. Should our government gamble _
_ with our environment, our fishing
_industry, our tourist economy, ©
_ our safety and our children’s lives -
__ for the benefit of wealthy foreign
LNG investors who.can never —

‘guarantee our safety?

4. Do you want our peaceful Bahamas
to become a major LNG terrorist
saree

PT: Mae) EU led of SNES eT CERT ree |

that, in an effort to improve
conditions at the centre, he
plans to submit a list of recom-
mendations to government.

Security

“We need a modern facility.
There is a need for areas
where people -can feel com-
fortable whilst being incarcer-

ated,” said Mr Culmer.

Mr Culmer feels that in order .
to prevent detainees escaping
from the centre, certain securi-
ty issues must urgently be
addressed.

“You must train your staff to
be vigilant and put in restraints
such as razor fences, cameras,
proper lighting and if needed,
dogs,” he said.

Nex wrtty ( comet! be anh te»
Hart) te prews fer stab lity

“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”



hile we stip loose change’ LL .
and take all the risks? >

















Bus project |
encourages
safer sex .

A NEW project to pro-
vide bus passengers with
condoms and other toiletries
hits the streets tomorrow.

Social work students from
the College of the Bahamas |
have partnered with the
Aids Foundation, the Road
Traffic Department and the
Public Transit Authority for
the “Ride the Jitney” pro-
ject.

Tomorrow the students
will ride buses between 7am
and 9am and 3pm and 5pm
distributing 1,000 goody
bags to passengers on at
least 12 different routes.

The bags will contain
leaflets on HIV/AIDS, con-
doms, toiletries and candies.

The objectives of the pro-
gramme are: to provide edu-
cation and awareness about
HIV/AIDS, to encourage
condom use for those adults
who are sexually active; to
encourage abstinence
among teenagers; and to
encourage safer sex among
those teenagers who are sex-
ually active.































TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

Rasy eRU te
PHONE: 322-2157


THE TRIBUNE

VWRVINEOVAT, APHMIL 145, ZUUS, FAGE 3





ANTONE
charged with
MNO eM YALU

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter






THE jitney driver who
allegedly attempted to assault
a 15-year-old passenger on
Saturday was released on
$5,000 bail and has had his
public driver’s licence sus-
.pended after appearing in
Magistrate’s Court on Mon-
day.

Andrew Johnson appeared
before Magistrate Marilyn
Meyers and was charged with
one count of indecent assault.

It is alleged that Johnson
inappropriately touched the
young girl while she was a pas-
senger on his bus on Satur-
day, forcing her to jump out of
the moving vehicle and run to
safety.

As a result, she received
multiple injuries to her stom-
ach and arms.

Johnson pleaded not guilty
to the charge and was granted
$5,000 bail with two sureties.

Concern

Errol McPhee, the deputy
controller of the Department
of Road Traffic expressed
concern about the incident
and told The Tribune that he
met with the bus driver fol-
lowing his court appearance.

Mr McPhee said in light of
the charges, he decided to sus-
pended Johnson’s public dri-
ver’s licence until the matter
has been settled in court.

He said the department and
the Ministry of Transporta-
tion are working towards the
effective enforcement of reg-
ulations to govern jitney dri-
vers. .

It has been said that th
best means of increasing pas-
senger safety and decreasing
the negative perception of jit-
neys might be the creation of
a unified public transportation
system.

Mr McPhee, who heads a
newly formed Transportation
Policy Secretariat, acknowl-
edged this view and said the
ministry continues working
towards making it a reality.

He said draft legislation, is
currently being formulated.

- While he did not elaborate
on-specifics, Mr McPhee said
if the unification process is
approved by Cabinet, it would
do much to address issues
relating to the safety of pas-
sengers on buses.
































































@ By TIFFANY GRANT






FNM ‘will respond’
if Stubbs takes seat

Party's deputy
chairman

on Holy
Gross MP

i By KARIN HERIG and
RUPERT MISSICK Jr

THE Free National Move-
ment is expected to take
action if Holy Cross MP Sid-
ney Stubbs takes his seat in
parliament today.

Speaking with The Tri-
bune yesterday, deputy
chairman of the FNM Sid-
ney Collie said that there
will be a response from the
opposition if Mr Stubbs
appears at today’s session of
the House of Assembly.

He said however that he.
but not could disclose the
nature of the planned action.

“T cannot tell you now, but
you will see what we will
do,” he said.

Mr Collie explained that:
in the eyes of the FNM, Mr
Stubbs is still a bankrupt
MP.

Debtors

“Even though his trustee-
in-bankruptcy may have
accepted some of his debtors
proposals to settle the debts,
the Supreme Court has not
certified yet that he is no
longer bankrupt, nor has the

«Supreme Court, or the Court

w.0f, Appeal or the Privy

“Council vacated the bank-
‘Tuptcy.

“He may appear (in par-
liament), but it is our posi-
tion that he is still an undis-
charged bankrupt,” he said.

Woman charged with stealing $63,000

It was alleged that on April 8, he was found in

# HOLY Cross MP
Sidney Stubbs

Under the Election Act an
MP who is declared
bankrupt cannot retain his
seat.

Last week Mr Stubbs came
to an agreement with his
creditors after a meeting
with the Registrar ‘of the
Supreme Courtis = *

However, the MP may
have to wait for a hearing
before the Privy Council in
London next month before
court officials in the
Bahamas decide on whether





Tribune Staff Reporter





A WOMAN appeared in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday charged with stealing more than $63,000
in cash.

It was alleged that between July 17 and Decem-
ber 31 of last year, Susan Davis of Mermaid Boule-
vard committed 13 counts of stealing cash from
various individuals involved in an ‘asue’ fund.

It was reported that while overseeing the fund,
the accused did not pay out a total of $63,625 to the
participating persons.

Davis was not required to enter a plea.

She was granted $25,000 bail with two sureties
by Magistrate Linda Virgill, and is to reappear in
court on June 21.

In other court news, two men pleaded not guilty
to attempting to bribe an assistant superintendent
of police.

According to court records, Maurice Merizier,
51, of Nichols Court, and Samuel Joseph, 28, of
Firetrail Road pleaded not guilty to offering an
advantage to Assistant Superintendent Theophilus
Cunningham.

The pair allegedly offered $800 to the officer, in
an attempt to induce him to abstain from per-
forming his duty.

Merizier faced two additional charges of pos-
session of lottery instruments and permitting his
premises to be used for lottery.


















Denk



possession of lottery paper and $5,632 cash being
used for a lottery, without being the holder of a
licence.

He was also accused of allowing the use of his
restaurant and bar, the Malaise on Key West
Street, to be used for illegal gambling.

The incident allegedly took place on March 30.

Merizier was granted $5,000 with two sureties.
The case was adjourned to July 7. :

In drug court, a man was sentenced to six
months in prison for possessing dangerous drugs
with intent to supply.

Anthony Knowles, 42, of Parkgate Road, plead-
ed guilty to being in possession of Indian Hemp
with intent to supply.

Also in drug court, an arrest warrant was issued
for an 18-year-old who failed to appear in court.

Jamaal Ferguson, of Charles Vincent Street,
did not present himself to answer to the charge of
marijuana possession.

Kenford Stubbs, 41, of Garden Hills number 2,
pleaded guilty to possession of cocaine. He was
fined $250 or three months in prison.

Mark Anthony Bowe, 20, of Pinewood Gar-
dens, pleaded guilty to possession of a quantity of
marijuana.

He faced a conditional discharge of six months,
treatmerit and random drug testing at the Com-
munity Mental Health Centre. His case was
adjourned to October 12.








The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



to overturn the bankruptcy
tuling.

Mr Stubbs first became the
centre of controversy in
2003, when it was claimed he
had a personal stake in the
alleged illegal entry of a a
fleet of Korean fishing boats
into North Andros.

He resigned from his post
as the corporation’s execu-
tive chairman on November
25, 2003 as a consequence of
the scandal.

The Holy Cross MP’s
problems intensified when
he was declared bankrupt by
the Supreme Court in March
of 2004.

His application for appeal
was rejected and since then

Mr Stubbs has been in and
out of court to clear his
name.

Mr Stubbs is said to have
been declared bankrupt over
a $55,000 debt owed to Gina
Gonzalez.

Satisfied

The MP has since satisfied
the debt, but Mrs Gonaza-
lez’ lawyer Wayne Munroe
said that he MP owes more
than $20,000 in legal fees
ordered against him in his
bankruptcy appeal.

Last month the Supreme
Court registrar advertised
for Mr Stubbs’ creditors to
come forward.



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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PRO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
: Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

‘Doing your duty by the system

HISTORY IS replete with political scan-
.dals that have led to parliamentary resig-
; nations. The Westminster system, the basis
‘of our own political structure, has many
‘ examples.

i Many of our readers will recall the 1963
; resignation of John Profumo, Secretary of
‘ State for War, who had a very brief affair
‘with a showgirl, who also happened to be
| friendly with a Soviet Embassy official. Mr
; Profumo denied there was any “impropriety
i whatever” in the relationship. He later
i ‘resigned after confessing that he had misled
;the House of Commons. A month later
‘Prime Minister Harold Macmillan, whose
‘ill health was exacerbated by the scandal,
; also resigned.
Years later there was the resignation of
‘Home Secretary Reginald Maulding, and
two other MPs who got involved in the busi-
‘ness affairs of architect John Poulson. It was
‘considered that all three ‘had indulged in
‘“conduct inconsistent with the standards
i; which the House is entitled to expect from
"its members”.
' .More recently, there was the case of
iJ onathan Aitken, who violated ministerial
‘rules by allowing an Arab businessman to
‘pay for his stay at the Ritz Carlton in Paris.
‘ This incident involved a libel action in which
ithe newspaper proved that Aitken had lied
‘to the court in his denials of the facts. He
iwas charged with perjury and perverting the
‘course of justice for which he was impris-
;oned. Unable to cover his legal costs, he

‘was declared bankrupt. He resigned from "

ithe Privy Council.

In England there have been many cases’

ie some involving sex, questionable busi-
iness transactions, and the acceptance of gifts
‘considered to have influenced their political
idecisions. In short all behaviour inconsis-
;tent with the standard of conduct required of
‘parliamentarians.

., Even more recently there was the situa-
;tion i in the United States when New J ersey ’s
' fifty-first governor announced that he was-“a
; gay American” and stepped down to prevent
;scandalising his office. His supporters and
detractors were shocked, not so much by
the fact that he had stepped out of the “gay”
closet, but that he was a married man with a
schild, and was committing adultery, albeit
*with another man.

Commenting on Governor James
McGreevey’s announcement, the Monmouth
‘County Republican chairman expressed his
sorrow for the governor and his family.
‘However, he believed the governor’s resig-
mation to be in the “best interest of this
jstate’ $ reputation for a moral and ethical
‘government instead of a reputation forced
‘upon us by a corrupt system and unethical
officials”.

: Closer to home we had the resignation of
‘Montagu MP Brent Symonette during the
Ingraham administration. Mr Symonette

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resigned as chairman of the Airport Author-
ity when he made what he later explained
was the “right decision” for the airport, but
the wrong personal decision for himself as a
politician. He said it was a decision he had to
live with for the rest of his life — a decision
he would always regret. -

Mr Symonette explained that when he
took over as chairman of the Authority, he
found himself under a lot of pressure
because security procedures required by the
FAA had been ignored. At his first meeting,

he was confronted by very hostile FAA rep- -

resentatives who were frustrated that noth-
ing was being done to secure the ‘airport.
Mr Symonette discovered that to meet
FAA.-requirements, $5 million worth of
work had to be.done, and done quickly or

the airport would be ‘downgraded. Among:
- the major work. required was lighting the
apron, securing the perimeter fence around .

the entire airport and upgrading the-road.

Mr Symonette contacted the Ministry of
Works whose engineer invited three con--
tractors to bid on the job. They were asked. .

to submit two bids, one for retaining the
existing ¢ erimeter fence while the road was
repaired, the second was to remove the old
fence, repair the road and then construct a
new fence.

The engineer opened the bids and.sug-
gested that the second highest bidder get
the job. Mr Symonette asked him to study
the bids again and tell him why the Author-

ity should pay $200,000 more than the low-

est bidder.

- The'éngineer did his hictnewotk, estithed
“!to Mr Symonétte and recommended the
lowest ‘bidder. Mr Symonette accepted his

recommendation and awarded the bid to
Bahamas Hot Mix. However, there was one
problem. Mr Symonette, the businessman,
had shares in Bahamas Hot Mix. In view of
this the bid should have gone before the
Airport Authority Board.

Mr Symonette maintained that time was of
the essence, he was under pressure from
the FAA, the airport was about to be down-
graded, and he could not get all board mem-
bers together for an emergency meeting, so
he made the decision.

“The right decision for the airport, the
wrong decision for me,” he would later say.

Mr Symonette resigned as Airport chair-
man.

Assembly who continue to point an accusing
finger at Mr Symonette for making the
wrong personal decision in a conflict of inter-
est situation, instead of scrutinising their
own members and questioning why some
of them have not resigned for even more
serious conduct.

For Mr Symonette it was.a case of
“guilty”, but with an understandable expla-
nation. In the end he made the right decision
— he resigned.































Yet there are those in the House of

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, DONOVAUGHN
DUDLEY SEYMOUR, of , Nassau, Bahamas, intend to
change my name to DONOVAUGHN DUDLEY McNAIR.
If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.



Tell-tale signs o



environmental
degradation

EDITOR, The Tribune.

AS AN environmental
engineer and someone who
has been intimately familiar
with Harbour Island for the
past 38 years, yet removed
enough not to be blinded by
day-to-day exposure, I can-
not help but recognise and
lament that the harbour is
showing all the tell-tale signs
of environmental degrada-
tion.

When I was a little girl in
the 1970’s there were sea
grass and good fish around
the government dock. Now
there is slime on the bottom,
algae floating on top, and the
bottom vegetation is largely
comprised of previously non-

existent, ugly, little broccoli -

looking plants. The only
notable fish are barracuda.
There is also anew and ram-
pant variety of anemone on
the bottom, and the chance
of being stung by jellyfish or
anemone is no longer unlike-

-- ly. Every time I return to

Harbour Island the affected
area has both grown and
worsened. It is sad on a per-
sonal level for Harbour
Island is my family home. But
more importantly, an entire
community is in jeopardy for
I fear that if left unchecked,
the beautiful harbour and
island will spiral downward,
taking the Island’s livelihood,
tourism, along with it.

What is causing the water
quality in the harbour to
deteriorate? The simple
answer is too many nutrients
and too little oxygen, a
process referred to in the sci-

entific world :as-eutrophica-
. tion. But more importantly,,
’ why and how’'is this happén- "

ing? And most importantly,
what can be done to rectify
the situation?

The harbour’s impaired
state is likely the result of five
factors: sewage, garbage,
organic waste, storm water
runoff, and disturbance to the
harbour bottom.

Sewage: Most homes,
hotels and restaurants in Har-
bour Island have septic sys-
tems. There is no sewer sys-
tem, and to my knowledge
none of the hotels has.a treat-
ment system. Over time
nutrients from septic systems
leach into the groundwater
and eventually into the har-
bour. Some of these systems
tie directly into tidally influ-
enced groundwater making
the nutrient’s path to the
harbour a quick one. It may
also be possible that there are
harbour-side: homes and
restaurants whose sewage dis-
charges directly into the har-
bour.

Garbage: The dump and/or








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LETTERS

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transfer station in Harbour
Island has been an ongoing

concern for years. The
dump’s location directly adja-
cent to the harbour means
that there is no buffer
between the garbage and the
water.

‘Because garbage is hauled
to North Eleuthera its sea-
side location may arguably be
necessary. However,
improvements can and should
be made to clean up the area
and better contain the
garbage and the leachate
leaving the site. Garbage is
often dropped into the har-
bour when it is being loaded
onto the barges. Every time it
rains the stormwater that has
come in contact with the
garbage and. all its associat-
ed bacteria, heavy metals,
pollutants, etc. runs off
directly into the harbour.

Organic waste: It is impor-
tant to recognise that
biodegradable refuse can sig-
nificantly contribute to the
degradation of a waterway.
When fish guts, conch slop or
potato peels are thrown into
the sea, large amounts of oxy-
gen are required to break-
down this waste. As a result
the water is depleted of the
oxygen necessary for healthy
marine life.

Stormwater runoff: Every
time it rains, the rainwater
washes the surface of every-
thing it comes in contact with
— roads, docks, rooftops,

“dumps — and. then that rain-
‘water runs downhill to the

nearest body of water carry-
ing with it all the dirt and
grim it picked up along the
way. The gas that was spilled
on the dock will be trans-
ported right into the harbour.
The silt, sand, litter and oil
droppings on the road sur-
faces will run right down Mis-
sion Hill or Big Hill or some
other hill into the harbour.
Stormwater is probably the
largest source of pollution to
waterways, and it is also
probably the most difficult to
treat. However, it can be
managed through minimisa-
tion: minimise the amount of
development and the number
of people on the island and
the number of vehicles and
the amount pollutants on the
roads and docks will auto-
matically be minimised.

Disturbance to the harbour
bottom: Harbour Island sits
on a natural, protected, deep-
water harbour. Historically
dredging has not been a con-
cern or even an ongoing
activity. Things have
changed. It now seems that
every time I visit, there are
dredging operations under-
way — a new deepwater
dock, a man-made beach.
This must stop. I would like
to hope that the individuals
employing the dredging are
simply not versed on these
matters and do not realise the
ramifications it has on the
harbour. What happens to the
bottom of the harbour dur-
ing dredging? The physical
and biological composition of
the area changes. The sand
and bio-matter on the bottom
are turned up. The plant and
animal life is displaced. The
bottom vegetation may never
be re-established or it may be
of.a different type. Natural
filtering of the water may be
impacted. The turbidity of
the water may change. Shal- -
low spawning areas are likely
to. be impacted. Sand, silts
and bio-matter deposited at
the placement location can
choke out the established
vegetation. The bottom line
is drédging changes the nat-
ural delicate balance of the
harbour. ‘

Most of these activities and

’ concerns mentioned above -"

have been ongoing for many
years, seemingly without |
problems. However, as Har- -.
bour Island has grown, the.
Island’s pristine environment
can no longer be maintained
by the status: quo. Moreover ©:
the islandicannot sustain the.’
pressures of big development .
such as that underway at
Valentine’s or proposed ate:
Romora Bay.

The biological and chemi-
cal balance within the har-
bour has clearly changed and,
I am certain, will continue to
change unless steps are taken
by the community to improve _ .;
the situation. :

One of the easiest and most
effective ways of doing this
is to curtail new development
and most especially new
development along the shore-
line.

AMANDA P
MALCOLM, PE

Water Resources Engineer
Maryland Department of
the Environment

April 6, 2005.

01 HYUNDAI ELANTRA

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THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005, PAGE 5, =

hock as burglars raid —
government AIDS centre



Sone .
se teke



€

â„¢ By PAULG

TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Ministry of Health’s
HIV/AIDS Centre head-
quarters in Victoria Gardens
was broken into and burgled
on Monday night.

The crooks are believed to

have entered the centre by
pushing one of the wall-
mounted air-conditioner
units into the building and
using the hole as a means of
entry.
The burglars did not gain
access sensitive information
such as the centre’s patient
lists. Nor, she said, had the
centre’s stock of HIV/AIDS
medication been tampered
with.

Rose Mae Bain, the direc-
tor if the centre, explained
that these items were secure-
ly locked away in another
area of the building.

e e
Missing

“We are not sure what all
has been taken because we
find more and more missing.
What we are sure (is miss-
ing) is an air-conditioner, a
lot of food items that we give
out, calculators, and other
small items,” she said.

Once inside, the burglars:
cut a small hole into the stor-
age room door with a hack-
saw and reached inside to
unlock the deadlocks, she
said.

“This was some of the
food items that we give to
our clients like sardines,
Vienna sausages and the
like. We also had a big con-
tainer with coins that was
stolen as well, and a cell
phone,” she said.

Ms Bain said only a small
amount of money was stolen,
as the jar contained coins
that-the staff offered to
clients who need to catch a-
bus home from the centre.

A task force from the Cen-
tral Detective Unit (CDU) ~
has already dusted the centre
for fingerprints. Police inves-
tigations into the matter are
continuing.





A THINK tank which rep-
resents non-givernmental
organisations has applied to
become officially recognised.

According to president-elect
Fred Munnings, Civil Society
Bahamas (CSB) was the brain-
child of the late attorney Regi-
nald Lobosky.

He explained that the soci-
ety is an association that rep-
resents the voices and concerns
of non-government organisa-
tions (NGOs). It began as a
luncheon of persons from a
cross section of the local busi-





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Dead body discovered in church bus

M@ Authorities yesterday taking away the body of homeless Solomon Seymour

@ By A FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

A MAN was found dead in a church |
bus early Tuesday morning on Talbot —

Street.

Sometime after 8am, a resident of a
community off Mount Royal Avenue
reportedly went to the bus looking for

Solomon Seymour, 48, to do some ~

handyman's work for her.
She said that she called to Mr Sey-
mour, as;she, could see him sitting in the

bus, but that he.did not respond.
‘The woman then shook the bus, but,

as there was still no response she con-
tacted the police.

The bus, which belonged to
Victory Chapel Church of the
Nazarene, had been parked in front of



Think tank wants recognition

ness, professionals and society.

“What we are now calling
Civil Society is a development
that has come about as a direct
result of the work of various
non-governmental organiza-
tions,” he said at the Chamber
of Commerce yesterday.

While Civil Society had con-
tinued to meet monthly fol-
lowing Mr Lobosky’s death
five years ago, it has never
been officially registered as an
association.

The group has already writ-
ten articles and memorandum



of association and sent them
on for registration and hopes
to be legally constituted soon.

Mr Munnings explained that
it would cause an outcry if gov-
ernment interfered too deeply
in the daily lives and business
transactions of its citizens.

“Hence Civil Society by
virtue of representation of
NGO’s, Private Sector Labour
Civil Society. Organization
(CSO) and individuals can
touch people where govern-
ment would be seen as inter-
fering.”


















TRUST OFFICER

SCOTIATRUST invites applications from qualified
Bahamians for the position of Trust Officer with a
strong background and technical knowledge in areas
of trust, company and agency management. The
applicant will be involved in the administration of a
medium to high complexity level of accounts of
trusts, companies and agencies. A good level of
accounting knowledge is required. The person
appointed should hold a four year University Degree
in a related subject along with professional

| qualifications in the Saciety of Trust and Estate

Practitioners (STEP) or ACIB. The ideal candidate
should have a minimum of five years progressive
experience in the industry. Analytical and
communication skills as well as familiarity with PC
software are essential. Preference will be given to
applicants with language skills. Interested persons
should submit applications in writing marked Private
and Confidential to the Manager, Client Services,
P.O. Box N-3016, Nassau, Bahamas. Applications
should be received no later than Friday, 22nd April,
2005.





Call us on
322-1986
and share

your news.

Got a story?






a mechanic's yard for repairs.

It is believed that Mr Seymour was
homeless and usually made his home in
a cardboard house in an adjacent yard.

’ Makeshift homes constructed out of

old vehicles, cardboard and other mate-
rials could be seen in the area from the
bus, near the remains of a house gutted
by fire.

Mr Seymour's sister, Stephanie




(Photo Felipe Major/ Tribune staff)

Adderley, said that his family
had attempted to pull Mr Seymour
away from the lifestyle he was living,
but that he had been unwilling to listen
to them.

She collected his few peraoual
belongings as his body was taken away.

Inspector Walter Evans said there
were no visible signs of injury and that
foul play is not suspected.



SAT REVIEW con sune exam

REGISTRATION IN
BGCSE SPANISH GRAD






PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005

Top marks for students



@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

FOUR of the nation’s bright-
est young minds paid a visit to
Prime Minister Perry Christie
at his office on Monday after-

noon, where they were awarded
certificates of excellence as part
of the Farm Road Development
Project.

The 11-year-old students,
from two primary schools in the

Farm Road constituency, were
presented the certificates
along with gifts by Galleria
Cinemas and the Creative
Edge advertising company.
Accepting the awards were

British American Insurance Company
of The Bahamas Limited would like to
announce that the following person

no longer works for the company and

is not authorized to transact any

sixth-grade students Alicia
Mcqueen and Denzel Wells
from Stephen Dillet Primary
School, and sixth-grade students
Alexia Rolle and Runako Min-
nis from Our Lady Primary
School.

Runako was the winner of
the annual Catholic school
Spelling Bee.

The presentation was the
first of what is scheduled to be a
monthly award initiative to
recognise top male and female
students from Farm Road
schools and allow them to meet
high-level government officials.

Praise

“This is a wonderful idea.
The fact that we are able to
single out those who are doing
well will serve as an inspira-



ea Rs a

| Mr. Dion Strachan, Chairman of the Board of Directors
of Nassau Flight Services is pleased to announce the
. appointment of

tion to the other students who
will hopefully follow their
example,” Mr Christie said.

Mr Christie said he was par-
ticularly pleased to see the two
young boys being recognised.

“We have this growing trend
of girls leaving boys behind, so
when wé see young men suc-
ceeding we have to be mindful
of the growing gap between
boys and girls,” he said. .

“This project has a special sig-
nificance at Stephen Dillet,”
said principal Wenly Fowler,
“the concept is a wonderful one.

“We especially put emphasis
on our young boys so as to
mould them into positive young
men.” —

Mr Fowler said it was excel-
lence in academics, school lead-
ership and community work
which made this month’s award
recipients stand out.




business on our behalf.

YQ

Established 1920

Patricia Burns

BRITISH
AMERICAN

awe

A strong link in your financial future

Telephone: (242) 461-1000
Fax: (242) 361-2424



Mr. Ricardo Ellis

. as Assistant Manager in the.Maintenance Department.
As such, he will assist the‘manager with the

maintenance of all the ground service equipment in

Nassau, Exuma and San Salvador.







) Mr. Ellis has been
employed as a
mechanic with Nassau
Flight Services for
more than twenty-five
years. —























He attended the Harold
Road Senior High and
the Miami Senior High
Schools. He also
graduated from the
Lindsay Hopkins.
Vocational Schools in
Florida with a
certificate in
Automobile Mechanics.
Mr. Ellis has been
trained on all the ground service equipment at Nassau
International Airport and has participated in overseas
training at the FMC corporation and AID locally
- sponsored classes on various types of. engines.

I TOC One
vam olen

A mechanic with some 35 years experience, he
worships at Holy Family Catholic Church on
Robinson Road, and is a member of the Christophers,
and international church organization. He lists
television viewing and playing dominoes as his



hobbies.




THE TRIBUNE

Pinder
attends

The Parliamentary Secre-
tary in the Ministry of Health
left for Trinidad yesterday
to attend a two day confer-
ence on the Framework
Convention on Tobacco
Control (FCTC) in the
Caribbean.

Traveling with Ron Pin-
der are a host of other
Bahamian delegates, includ-
ing Dr Mavis Hanek-
Holmes, Deputy Permanent
Secretary in the Ministry of
Health, and Angela Albury,
First Assistant Secretary in
the Ministry of Finance.

The workshop in Port-of-
Spain is for high-level deci-
sion makers from diverse
sectors.

It will provide them with
relevant background infor-
mation on the content and
process of FCTC.

The workshop will also
provide representatives with
an opportunity to identify
common priorities and
action plans needed to
ensure the implementation
ofthe convention.

The FCTC is a treaty
negotiated under the
World Health Organisation

(WHO).

Treaty

According to WHO, the
convention is “an evidence-
based treaty that reaffirms
the right of all people to the
highest standard of health.

“The FCTC represents a
paradigm shift in developing
a regulatory strategy to
address addictive substances;

in contrast to-previous drug |

control treaties, the FETC

asserts the importance of.
demand reduction strategies: |

as well as supply issues.”
The FCTC was set up in

response .to the globalisation ‘
_of the.tobacco industry. The |

spread of the industry is
facilitated through a variety
of complex factors with
cross-border effects, includ-

ing trade liberalisation and

direct foreign investment.
“Other factors such as

global marketing,. transna-::

tional tobacco advertising,
promotion and sponsorship,

and the international move-'

ment of contraband and
counterfeit cigarettes have
also contributed to the
explosive increase in tobacco
use,” added a WHO spokes-
man.



NOW HIRING
RESTAURANT MANAGERS
AND ASSISTANT MANAGERS —

The successful applicant must have at least three (3)
years experience in Food and Beverage operations,
fast food preferably. _

Must possess good leadership and interpersonal skills.

Must have good written and oral communication skills.

Must be able to implement and maintain company

standards and procedures.
Must be self motivated.

Must be able to work flexible hours, including late
nights, weekends and holidays.

INTERESTED PERSONS SHOULD
SEND RESUME WITH LETTER OF
REFERENCE TO:

#12 Bradley Street, Palmdale,
P.O. Box N-8425, Nassau, Bahamas,

| or Tel: 322-5865/6

The orporation re reserves the right to acce or
oe any. or all tenders. :

a ee ee 8


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005, PAGE 7



Hotel focus on
healthy living

THE road to a healthy
lifestyle began at work for
employees at the British Colo-
nial Hilton with the hotel’s
annual Health Education Fair.

More than 20 health-related

businesses and organisations

gave their time to the 282
employees of the hotel, offer-
ing them massages, immunisa-
tion shots, screenings, informa-

tion on important health issues _

and a number of other services.

Hilton general manager
Michael Hooper said it was
essential for hotel employees to
live a healthy lifestyle on both a
personal and professional level.

“This is the third year we
have done this and it allows our
people to be more exposed
to various opportunities they
have to maintain good
health,” said Mr Hooper.
“Hopefully it encourages them
‘to either do more exercise or



take care of themselves.”

Mr Hooper said he is expecting
April to be a very busy month
for the hotel, “so it’s important
for us that our team members
are healthy and happy.”

Mark Gibson, 24, works in
the beach and pool department
at the Hilton and was attend-
ing the company’s s health fair
for the first time

“It’s great,” he said, “I am
learning about many things that
I didn’t know about and should
have. I just got a blood pres-
sure check and found out its a
little high. | might not have
checked my pressure for a long
tume but I did because it was
here and it was free. Now Iam
so glad I did.”

Human Resources executive
Lovinia Mcdiarmid worked

with,the Department of Public .

Health to organise the fair.
She explained that this year’s

theme was “Healthy energetic
active living at the Hilton” —
HEALTH.

Last year, most hotel workers
were not following a healthy
diet. The hotel addressed this
by introducing a boiled food
menu and vegetarian specials
to their cafeteria menu.

As well educating the public
about health, prevention and
the resources which are avail-
able to them in the community,
the businesses that participat-
ed in the fair gained a great deal
of exposure for their services.

A spokesman from the
Bahamas Diabetic Association

said: “In addition to educating

people about health issues, this
fair gives us the opportunity to
organise with others in the com-
munity to generate goodwill.”

(Photos: Felipé Major/
Tribune Staff)



SS SS YY YS YY <4

. the Public,





Programme
for women
announced

A transformation pro-
gramme is to be set up for
“at-risk” young women in
New Providence.

Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture Neville Wisdom
announced the new devel-
opment was revealed at the
passing out ceremony of the
National Pilot Programme.

The ceremony last week
marked the graduation of
the first group to attend a
three-month camp for vio-
lent or troubled young men.

Mr Wisdom said the suc-
cess of the skills-training
camp has inspired the gov-
ernment to offer the service
to the country’s troubled
young women, who may
need encouragement to live
productive lifestyles.

The ministry will partner
with non-profit and private
entities to help strengthen
and improve existing pro-
grammes.

“These are exciting times
for my ministry,” he said,
“as we embark on‘a social
transformation that begins
at the very root; the chil-
dren, and by extension, their
families.”

He added that social ills
and lawlessness are weigh-
ing down the nation. :








































Mrs. Delmeta Sey
‘Blue rill @ Tuck Off



Please be advised that
Mr. Nolan Carey is no

longer employed with the
World Bound Couriers

(Global United) and is not authorized

to conduct any business on behalf of

Global United or its affiliates.



il 2008 by 4:00 p.m. and addressed 66









The General Manager
Bahamas El a Corporation

Blue Hill & Tucker Road:
Nassau, Bahamas _






“Attenti on: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Marked: Tender No. 564 5

ENERA \L INSURANCES - ~ ELECTRONIC EQUIPME
—& MOBILE RADIOS” ” -






Signed

Management



BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

(2 2 2 2 2 ee
9 ss es ee es ee ee 0 2 es es

SS ee 6) ee ee ee ee ee)

nies Mel INFORMATION: ee
1 tichouse. ects Cy ;

early risers



to “wall

Early risers are needed to walk the walk, with this year’s Atlantic Medical Funwalk.

With our partners, we're once again hoping to remind everyone of their most valuable possession, good
health. At the same time we need to think of those who.are touched by illness and offer our support for a —

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Early risers can meet April | 6th, 6.30am Montagu Beach. Let’s make it an all together better start to the
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ATLANTIC HOUSE 2nd TERRACE & COLLINS AVENUE PO BOX SS

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A member of Colonial Group International Ltd.
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5915 NASSAU


DAN wy ee ee eh by, CU

imc mMIpDVINE



POSITION: Development Construction Manager
REPORTS 1: Vice President of Development

ESSENTIAL FUNCTION:
Plans,.directs, and: coordinates activities ot desig vated dojects: to engure that goals and objectives o

the development dre accomplished within prescribed time frame and funding parameters by perform-'"

ing the following duties personally or through subordinate supervisors. Manage the construction of
assigned project site improvements including amenities on-site and off-site infrastructure construction.

DUTIES & RESPONSIBLITIES:
E] Manage and assist the design team in reviewing construction plans, suggesting cost. and time
saving methods, and improving construction coordination and equipment utilization.

J Manage and assist the design team in expediting subdivision approvals and ofher permits.

= Prepare field reports, status reports, incident reports, construction schedules and other information
requested.

fl Assist in the bidding and negotiation of construction contracts with general contractors,

&] Administer the construction contracts and changes thereto, protecting Project's interest at all times.

EF} Establish good working relationships with governmental inspectors, the design team and general
contractors.

Monitor civil construction costs during construction and suggest ways to avoid unnecessary costs.
E] Provide construction quality control, through regular monitoring of construction.

El Participate in meetings with developer and design team as requested.

EJ Establish work plan for staff and contractors

EI Direct and coordinate activities of project personnel contractors to ensure project progresses on
schedule and within prescribed budget.

G} Review status reports preparéd by project contractors and modifies schedules or plans as required.
Ei Prepare project reports for owners, management, and others.

El Coordinate project activities with activities of government regulatory or other.governmental
agencies.

Douglas A Shipman
V.P. of Development, Discovery Land
Bakers Bay Golf and Ocean Club
Great Guana Cay, Bahamas
dshipman@discoverylandco.com

Deadline for Receipt of Applications is April 27, 2005



stal

Awareness



IL is about to gener-

ate a lot of heat in the
Bahamas — in more ways than
one.

Just a few months ago crude
was pegged at about $30 a barrel
—up from prices in the low teens
a couple of years ago. It is now
over $50 a barrel. Gasoline
prices are approaching $4 a gal-
lon locally, and are over $2.50
per gallon in California.

Some analysts are already
predicting 1970s-style price hikes
to over $100 a barrel, which
could have profound impacts.
The 1973 Arab oil embargo and
the 1979 Iranian revolution
caused price rises that triggered
global recessions.

According to the New York
investment bank, Goldman
Sachs, “oil markets may have

entered the early stages of a mul- ©

ti-year trading band of prices
high enough to meaningfully
reduce energy consumption and
recreate a spare capacity cushion
only after which will lower ener-
gy prices return."

What this means is that ener-
gy will cost so much that even-
tually we will use less of it, bring-
ing the price down again. But it
will be painful in the meantime.
The main cause is surging

- demand, in the United States

and especially in the huge
emerging economies of China,
India and Indonesia, which now
account for almost half of world
oil consumption.

Goldman Sachs said US gaso-
line prices may need to exceed
$4 per gallon before American
consumers curb demand and buy
more fuel-efficient vehicles
instead of gas-guzzling SUV’s.
And China’s roaring economy



is unlikely to draw back anytime
soon. That means pump prices
could go much higher in the
Bahamas. ©

But it’s not only our mileage
costs we have to worry about.
The International Air Transport
Association is forecasting loss-
es for the global airline industry
of $5.5 billion this year because
of high oil prices. This will affect
the livelihood of 28 million peo-
ple in aviation and related activ-
ities, including Bahamasair and
other airlines serving the
Bahamas.

And the International Mone-
tary Fund says the world faces a
“permanent oil shock” and must
adjust to sustained high prices
for the next two decades: “We
should expect to live with high
oil prices...(which) will continue
to present a serious risk to the
global economy,” the IMF said
recently.

The Bahamas imports about
1.6 million barrels of gasoline a
year to fuel the 140,000-plus
vehicles on our narrow, con-
gested roads, as well as all the
diesel and bunker C fuel to run
our power stations and kerosene
for our aircraft.

The rising cost of fuel imports
has been amplified, experts say,
because of the weak US dollar,
to which our currency is pegged.
Today, motor gasoline imports
cost us about $94 million a year
in foreign exchange — in 1995

the cost was $38 million.
The government’s responsé ‘

to all this has not been very::

coherent. Basically, Trade Min-

- ister Leslie Miller has been left:

to make occasional noises about’
a regional energy alliance called:
PetroCaribe that has been pro”
posed by Venezuelan strongman’
Hugo Chavez.

Venezuela is the world's fifth+=
largest oil exporter, producing’
up to 3 million barrels a-day?'
Chavez is a former army officer’
elected in 1998 (and again in
2000) as the leader of a so-called”
“Bolivarian Revolution”. Z

Last August, energy officials‘
from Venezuela and the’
Caribbean (including the

Bahamas) apparently agreed to:

form a regional company to dis:
tribute cheaper oil on a govern-*
ment to government basis. But it*
is not clear just what the status of
this proposal is now.

Caricom officials said ork
oil prices threatened to provoke:
"social unrest" and economic:
ruin for cash-strapped Caribbean’
countries. A meeting was set for'
November in Nassau, which nev--
er happened. Another was:
planned for February, but also_
failed to materialise. So Mr
Miller said recently he would
visit Venezuela this month.

There has been no public con-’
sultation on this important issue,‘
which has a lot of teeth. The«
closest thing we have to a report’

British American Insurance Company

i

of The Bahamas | Limited would like to
announce that the following person

no longer works for the company and

is not authorized to transact any

business on our behalf.

it

Established 1920

‘Shorn Williams

BRITISH
MERICAN

AMERICAN

A strong link in your financial future

Telephone: (242) 461-1000
Fax: (242) 361-2424


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005, PAGE 9

and lows of oil prices

i this recent comment from
Mf Miller: “The talks have not
gone as we had anticipated, but
you always have to expect stum-
bling blocks. We're still waiting
to;get the final word from
Vénezuela on whether they
accepted our proposal on the
lowering of fuel costs in this
region."

Venezuela’s state oil compa-
ny;, PDVSA, happens to own the
BORCO transhipment terminal
on: Grand Bahama and has
made noises recently about reha-
biljtating the mothballed refin-
ery, but there has been no offi-
cial comment on this either. In
the 1970s, BORCO was one of
the biggest refineries in the
world, but it closed in 1985 dur-
ing.a world oil glut. It would take
a massive investment to re-open,
but with world refining capacity
now at a premium, experts say it
may be worth the cost.

But all Mr Miller thinks about
is the creation of a national ener-
gy agency to import and distrib-
ute fuel from PetroCaribe — dis-
placing Shell, Esso, Texaco and
Focol — the private companies
that currently supply our fuel.
Presumably, Venezuela will give
Caricom oil at concessionary
prices to buy support for Mr
Chavez’ ongoing confrontation
with the United States, which he
recently described as “the most
negative force in the world.” _

\ / enezuela is a member
of the Organisation of

Petroleum Exporting Countries,
which controls 40 per cent of
global oil production and sets
production volume quotas to
maintain stable prices. But
refined product sales are not
bound by OPEC rules; and nei-
ther are exports of heavy crude
from Venezuela's tar belt, which
could be refined in Trinidad to
supply fuel to the Caribbean.

It is unclear just what our gov-
ernment’s real position on all
this is, as only Mr Miller has
been carrying the ball so far.
What is clear is that we have no
thought-out national energy pol-
icy. ‘And if Mr Miller has his way
we will embark blindly ona cost-
ly initiative with serious conse-
quences — including:-a signifi-

cant expansion of the country’s ®

inefficient public sector.

Experts are sceptical about
such a project. They point to the
capital-intensive nature of the
business — apart from the trans-
portation and storage facilities,
service stations carry million-
dollar price tags and complex
operational and safety proce-
dures are required throughout
the supply chain. They say it
makes sense to keep the financ-
ing of such a high-cost industry
in the private sector..

“Tf the government takes over
fuel buying, transport, and dis-
tribution, it will still have to pay

shipping, storage, trucking and

station costs,” one industry ana-
lyst told Tough Call. “All of this
will have to be managed as well.
So in the end, I can't believe
that costs will go down. Also,
the government would have to
assume.all liabilities, and nation-
al energy companies around the

First of all, some analysts say
the government can keep a lid
on pump prices just by varying
the stamp tax and duty it charges
on imports: ”’There is a windfall
to the treasury when prices go
up, so there should be a float-
ing tax rate that will guarantee

“ The rising cost of fuel
imports has been amplified,
experts say, because of the
weak US dollar, to which our
currency is pegged. Today,
motor gasoline imports cost
us about $94 million a year in
foreign exchange — in 1995
the cost was $38 million.”



world have serious problems,”
he added. “They suffer from
neglect because profits go into
the treasury, and reinvestment
in the energy sector is not a polit-
ical priority.”

For example, Mexico's state-
run oil monopoly, PEMEX,
announced recently that it was
on the verge of bankruptcy, with
total liabilities. of $88.5: billion
and an annual investment
requirement of $10 billion.

And market flexibility is the
key to rational, best-price supply,
experts say: “By maintaining
access to the global oil market
through multiple suppliers you
let competition do the job of reg-

ulating and guaranteeing a best-

price for The Bahamas.

“Only a limited number of
refineriés can process Venezue-
la's heavy crude oil into useable
fuels, so having access to crude is
not even half the battle. A single

. refinery accident, closure, or off-~

cycle maintenance can create a
supply crisis,“ one analyst said.
“Tying yourself to one supplier
and a single logistics and man-
agement chain is a guarantee
that a catastrophic failure will
occur sooner or later.”

And without assured supplies
of fuel, the entire Bahamian

. economy will be forcedto shut
‘down. That will-be a a lot worse® * |

than paying a few cents more at
the pump.

W orld oil demand is
around 80 million

barrels of crude a day. And the
consensus is that OPEC can add
only another million barrels a
day to the total. Since much of
the world's production capacity
is in politically unstable coun-
tries, it is easy to foresee disrup-

‘ tions that will take more than

this out of the market.

So assuming that we are in
for years of rising prices, what
will the impact be?

TT Ra Ye
Mr. Dion Strachan, Chairman of the Board
of Directors of Nassau Flight Services is

pleased to announce the appointment of

Mrs. Tonia Smith

as its first Passenger Service Manager.

Mrs. Smith is a
former Head Girl of
D.W. Davis, who
joined the company
in 1995 as a
Customer Service
Agent. In her ten
years with the
company she has
moved up the ladder
to Operations Agent,
Lead Customer
Service Agent, Duty
Station Manager and
to her latest
appointment.

As Passenger Service Manager she will be
responsible for check-in counters, ticket sales,
gate services and baggage services. NFS
provides these services for Continental
Airlines, Air Canada, Spirit, Cubana, Hooters,
Skyservices, Skyking, Canjet, First Choice
and many Charter Airlines arriving from the
U.S.A., Canada and Europe.

Mrs. Smith is married to Charles Smith and
they have two children, Charles Jr. and

Christian.



revenue projections while keep-
ing prices down.”

A barrel holds 42 gallons of
crude oil, which is refined at a

cost to produce gasoline. Added

to this are shipping costs and
government taxes, plus the 44-

cent and 33-cent markups per ~

gallon for local retailers and
wholesalers. Pump prices in Nas-
sau are now over $3 .50 per gal-
lon — the highest ever. -
According to Revenue. Sec-

retary Ehurd Cunninghan, gov-
ernment revenue is up 4 per
cent, an achievement that he
attributes to improved collec-
tion.

But it is much more likely to
be due to higher oil prices and
increased consumption. We have
to factor in the rising number of
vehicles (including SUV’s) on
our roads, and the fact that
Bahamians use their cars the
way they use phones. Accord-
ing to government figures, some
34,000 cars and trucks are
imported annually.

S: let’s not overlook the
benefits of higher oil
prices, some argue. In the Euro-
pean Union stiff gasoline taxes
have promoted conservation
without damaging the economy.
One analyst told Tough Call that
taxes should be kept high and a
rebate scheme worked out for
construction vehicles, buses,

’ taxis, ambulances and the like. A

lowér fuel tax could also be set
for the Family Islands.

_ Although many industry
‘observers believe increased
exploration and production will

revent prices from spiking over

100 a barrel, the International
Energy Agency, a watchdog
agency set up in 1974 by the
industrialised nations to moni-
tor oil supplies, says high prices
may be necessary to bring

ares

Atlantic Medical,
The Bahamas Diabetic Association

& the Cancer Society of The Bahamas
invite you to join us on our
“All Together Better” fun walk.

- demand in line with supply.

And with higher world
incomes and greater oil efficien-
cy today, “prices could need to
go higher than their 1970s peaks
in real terms before equilibrium

. returns to the market,” accord-

ing to a recent commentary in

the Financial Times.

A draft IEA report suggests
dramatic measures such as
reducing highway speed limits
by 25 per cent, shortening the
work week, imposing driving
bans on private vehicles and pro-
moting public transport. Civil
servants in the Philippines have
already begun four-day work
weeks in a deparate attempt by
that government to cut its oil
bill.

Whatever the analysis, there
is no doubt that we are in for
some serious inflation in the cost
of power and transportation. So
now is the time to put our heads
together and come up witha
national energy policy that takes
account of renewable fuels and
promotes fuel efficiency and
conservation. Is this too much
to ask of our government?

For the long-term, experts say
that plentiful supplies of natural
gas may be the solution to our
energy woes. Gas could become
the preeminent fuel of the 21st
century, but it requires huge
investment in special ships,
regasification terminals, and

pipelines. And, as we have seen

tN

An “All Together Better” “
way to start the day!

THE EVENT BEGINS AT 6.30 A.M.

in the Bahamas, there is a lot of
hostility to such projects.

Both Trinidad and Venezuela
have large natural gas reserves,
and Trinidad is already a major
supplier of LNG to the United
States. Tractebel, one of the
companies vying to set up LNG
terminals in the Bahamas, is a
major investor in Trinidad’s gas
fields.

The comical bust-up between
Manuel Diaz and Leslie Miller
notwithstanding, all indications
are that the government will
approve two LNG plants in the
northern Bahamas to supply
power to South Florida - and
hopefully to our own power sta-
tions.

As Health & Environment
Minister Dr Marcus Bethel
pointed out recently (and as we
have previously noted in this col-
umn) handling LNG is safer
than handling gasoline or diesel.
And it will bring the possibility
of reducing our dependence on
high-priced oil that is a major
environmental pollutant.

But as one energy executive
put it, “Supply is not the issue; it
is the delivery of gas to the mar-
ket.

“Before this transition occurs,
a world-wide infrastructure for
natural gas, such as that now
enjoyed by oil, must emerge."

larry@tribunemedia.net

THE ROUTE commences from MONTAGU BEACH then WEST on
Shirley Street, NORTH on Church Street, OUTWARD across
“New Paradise Island Bridge” to the round-about at Paradise Island Golf Course,
BACK to New Providence via the “Old Paradise Island Bridge”, EAST on

East Bay Street and back to Montagu Beach.

TROPHIES ARE AWARDED TO WINNERS BY THE
FOLLOWING CATEGORIES (Male & Female):
A. 12 & UNDER (CHILDREN) __B.

D. 31-45

E. 46-59

13-18 ~ C.
F. “Age Ain’t Nothin’ But a Number” 60+

19-30

..With a special floating trophy being awarded to the compaly
and civic organisation with the most entrants.

The event dedicated email address is funwalk@atlantichouse.com.bs
Freeport. Fun Walk - eo 30th,2005

official registration form

Atlantic Medical is not liable for injuries incurred by participants at this event.
$15.00 Adults / $12.00 Children: includes “T-shirt, Fruits, Water and a Special Gift”

Deliver to Atlantic Medical Insurance, 5th floor Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Ave.

Tel: 326-8191 or Fax this form to: 326-8189.

FOR ADDITIONAL ENTRIES DUPLICATE THIS FORM.

NAME:

COMPANY/ORGANIZATION:

T-SHIRT SIZE: S M L- XL

XXL

RACE CATEGORY: A B CD

C\WeightWatchers

The Bahamas Diabetic Association

XXXL

AGE:
EMAIL:
(circle choice)

F

a2 Atlantic Medical

ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE LIMITED
ATLANTIC HOUSE 2nd TERRACE &COLLINS AVENUE PO BOX SS 5915 NASSAU
TEL: (242) 326-8191 FAX: (242) 326-8189

A member of Colonial Group International Ltd.

Personal & Business Insurance: Group Pensions: Group Medical: Life Assurance & Investments




PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 12, 2005





WEDNESDAY EVENING m APRIL 13, 2005

| 7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

NETWORK CHANNELS

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THE TRIBUNE

. Let Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and ay
his sidekick Derek put ay

some smiles on your

kids’s faces.

Bring your children tothe
~ McHappy tour at McDonald's in
Oaks Field every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month’ of April 9005.

. Enjoy Great Food, Prizes aa Lots of Fun.

[1\

?m lovin’ it


-THE TRIBUNE : WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005, PAGE 11



Pupils show off
pride in their pets





KINDERGARTEN
pupils at at Xavier’s High
School brought their ani-
mal friends in to school
yesterday for the school's
pet day -











i TOP: Melone Griffin,

with her daughter
Celine Griffin show off
their dog |



calendar photo contest - a celebration of nature

14 winning entries will appear in Family Guardian’s 2006 calendar. Winning entries receive a gift certificate valued at $400 each. Entry deadline is May 31, 2005

RULES
1 Family Guardian’s 40th Anniversary Calendar Photo Contest is open to all photographers. The title for the company’ s 2006 calendar will
be “A CELEBRATION OF NATURE”. Photographs may be of any subject (animate or inanimate) or a scene which is a striking example ot nature
as found in The Bahama Islands. All photographs must be taken in The Bahamas.

2 DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS MAY 31, 2005.

3 All entries are to be delivered to Family Guardian's Corporate Centre,Village and Eastern Road Roundabout, Nassau, between 9: — and
5:00pm weekdays only. Envelopes should be marked “Calendar Contest”.

4 Allentries must be accompanied by an official entry form, available at any Family Guardian office or when published in the newspapers.

5 Only colour images in horizontal format will be considered. Images can be provided as 35mm film or digital images on CD. 35mm film can be
positive (slides) or colour negatives. Digital images must be of high quailty (2700 x 21 00 pixels or larger). Digital images showing signs
of photo manipulation or compression will be rejected. To ensure the best colour reproduction, digital images should be supplied in RAW, TIFF
or high quality JPEG and in the original colour format the camera uses (LAB or RGB). All entries must be supplied with prints which will be
used in the judging process. The photographer's name and photo subject should be written on the reverse of the print. .

Judging of entries will be based-on beauty, interest, composition, colour, originality and quality of photograph. Preference will be given to fauna
photographed in its natural state, rather than in captivity. The photographs selected will appear in Family Guardian's 2006 calendar. The
«decision: ofthe . will be final.




@ BOTTOM: Little
Daane Adderley with
her cocker spaniel















(Photos: Felipé Major/
Tribune Staff)























ued at $400 will be presented for each of the photographs used. More than one entry from a single photographer
aphic credits will be given in the calendar. The number of entries per photographer is limited to a maxinem of S photes.



-_-—=_— -

r 7%
2006 CALENDAR PHOTO CONTEST ENTRY FORM i

DWAR sissies scve RRP sca ctnemneoomnneneoe

HOME ..



“Copyrighted Material TEL BUSINESS ..

Syndicated Content i ; ‘ I ;
Available from Commercial News Providers” i : eS i i : : ) NN cdseseaupsanesssedgonssin



insu: ince Co. Ltd., and | assign to Family Guardian all rights pertaining to its use
haisoever, | also confirm that the photos entered in this contest were taken in
s by the undersigned.



RE
REPORTS HET R eer SEES SPESESU SEO OE ESOS CESS EDD EEEHESSSOSTESSSOOEOLOEROSSESESOROEESSEHE OE HEERED

sssesueees NUMBER OF PHOTOS ENTERED.................

(maximum of 5)

h photos to: Calendar Contest, Family Guardian Corporate
illage & Eastern Road Roundabout, Nassau, Bahamas



INSURANCE
COMPANY


PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005





LOCAL NEWS

arina development protesters

THE TRIBUNE



allege meeting ‘sabotage’

FROM page one

shouted down.

“Also, a drunk was there
verbally intimidating every-
body. Because of the atmos-

phere, some people didn’t

goiinto the meeting at all. It
is very upsetting to see
something like this happen-
ing.”

The three-hour meeting
was called at St John’s
Parish Hall to inform the
public about a planned
major expansion of Romora
Bay Marina. The proposal
is to build more than 40 con-
dos and extend the existing
dock into the bay, covering

Inflation
rate

in the
Bahamas
‘very low’
FROM page one

up if you assume our mer-
chants don’t add anything
extra to their markups,” said
Mr Demeritte.

Based on US inflation, a
person would need approx-
imately $154.05 in 2005 to
purchase the same number
of goods and services that
they did for $150 a week.

Also if you were to buy
exactly the same products
in 2005 and 2004 they would
cost approximately $150 and
$146.06 respectively.


















an estimated 4:5 acres.

Residents are alarmed at
the rapid expansion of Har-
bour Island and its effect on
utilities and the marine envi-
ronment. They fear the
island is already “maxed
out” and facing major envi-
ronmental and social dete-
rioration.

Ms Ithalia Johnson called
the meeting so that various
speakers could explain dif-
ferent problems arising from
what they term “over-devel-
opment” of the island,
including water and power
shortages.

But an island source said:

. “It was a disorderly meet-

ing and there was uncivilised
behaviour. It seemed that a
group of people were there
just to sabotage the whole
thing. a

“The meeting was not
planned to attack Romora
Bay. It was to tell people
what is happening to their
island. =

“However, because of the
drunk - who was shouting
threats and being generally
unpleasant - those who were
planning to speak did not do
so. They stayed in their
seats.

“There is no doubt that

- some people were.at the |

Share your news



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds fora
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an

If so, call us on 322-1986
| and share your story.

award. aa

meeting for the purpose of
intimidating others and pre-
venting people from having
their say.”

One of the claims voiced
most loudly at the meeting
was that foreign home-own-
ers, many of whom are
members of the protest
group, are themselves
investors who generate
income from the island.

But a home-owner told
The Tribune: “Very few of
us make money from Har-
bour Island. Most of those
who rent out their proper-
ties have a job breaking
even because of the high
maintenance costs.

“Island living is not cheap.
The weather takes its toll on
property. But the owners
make a contribution to the
local economy by employ-
ing island labour. They are
not here to earn money
from Harbour Island, they
are here to contribute.”

Some foreign residents
now fear that tensions build-
ing up on Harbour Island
will force a wedge between
the local and expatriate
communities.

. Monday night’s meeting

exposed undercurrents.

which long-term winter res-
idents found unsettling:












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“Some people here have
been linked with Harbour
Island for generations,” said
one foreigner.

“They love it here because
there is a real sense of com-
munity. There are incredi-
ble bonds and connections
and a tremendous amount
of financial commitment.

“It’s interesting that those
who came to disrupt the
meeting were criticising for-
eign home-owners because
the Romora Bay plan will

double the number...and the
new condo-owners will be
interested only in renting
their condos and earning big
money from the island.”

Ill-feeling could flare up
again today when a planning
meeting is held at the island
magistrate’s office. The
Romora Bay project is
expected to be on the agen-
da.

But, though the meeting
is open to the public, only
one representative of the

. care,”

protesters will be allowed to
speak, according to island
sources.

After Monday’s disrupted
meeting, protesters stayed
behind to discuss their strat-
egy.

They claim that islanders
are being denied a proper
hearing in planning matters
that affect everyone.

_ “Nassau doesn’t seem to
said one, “We

are being denied due
process.”






FROM page one

Beach Hotel, the Wyndham Nassau Resort and
Crystal Palace are currently located.

The development is aimed at transforming
the Cable Beach strip into a mega-resort,
and is projected to generate up to 9,000

-jobs in the first three years of operation.

“There is far too much that is wrong
about the recently announced Cable Beach
deal. It is the wrong deal, on the whole
island, in the wrong place, at. the wrong
time and is being done in the wrong man-
ner.”

Mr Bethel claimed that is unacceptable
for the government to “give away” Crown
land to foreign investors because it belongs
to the Bahamian people.

He said if the property sold in the Cable
Beach deal is Crown land then the Bahami-
an people should be given equity shares in
the project.

“The investors are paying a measly $45
million for a hotel which cost Bahamians
more than $125 million to build, and which,
as is, is worth more than $45 million.”

In addition to the hotel, he claimed the
investors will get large areas of prime land
and ownership of the Cable Beach Golf

Course.

Bethel: Cable Beach
project is the ‘wrong
deal for country’

‘glory for having secured the most perni-

* ject will cause enormous disruption to traf-






He asked how government could justify
effectively giving away what he claimed are
“hundreds of acres” to foreign investors
who will sell.it as condominiums for hun-
dreds of thousands of dollars, if not mil-
lions.

He asked that if the foreign investors are
so financially strong, why they needed-a
government hand-out of prime Bahamian
land. As !
“What happened to the FNM’s vision of
creating increased Bahamian ownership in
the Bahamas economy and tourism sector?

“What happened to the FNM’s pro-
grammes to empower small Bahamian busi-
ness? Has this been totally abandoned by a
PLP government that is prepared. to give
away anything to secure a few minutes of










cious give-away of the patrimony of every.
Bahamian in the history of the Bahamas?”
he asked. 3 va

Mr Bethel claimed that the proposed pro-







fic flow, and will be an inconvenience to
thousands of Bahamians who live in West-
ward Villas and the adjoining subdivisions.

He said the project will effectively
segregate Cable Beach from the rest of Nas-
sau. °







‘Tenders are to be hand-delive
April 2005 by 4:00 p.m. and a





WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005

SECTION



business@100jamz.com



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

Jain

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH








NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764




FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010





wipes WAI

analyst's Kerzner
SU ae ree

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business



Editor
A WALL STREET ana-| By YOLANDA
lyst has revealed that $7 DELEVEAUX

could be wiped off its target
share price for Kerzner
International, owner of Par-
adise Island’s Atlantis and
One&Only Ocean Club
resorts, after the UK Gam-
bling Bill was amended to
permit only one super-casino
in that nation.

CIBC World markets ana-
lysts, William Schmitt and
David Katz, in an update to
investors after the UK gov-

Senior Business Reporter

BRITISH Fidelity Assur-
ance will change its name to
Colonial Life Insurance
Company (CLICO),
Trinidadian-based parent, as
executives look to restructure
the company, implementing a
new focus and possibly devel-
oping new products and ini-
tiatives in a move to boost
profitability and encourage



its

these positive rating factors
is the company's geographic
concentration of business, its
relatively high expense struc-
ture, its real estate exposure
in Florida and the Bahamas,
and the challenges British
Fidelity faces to grow its
insurance business."

Ricardo Longchallon, the
A.M. Best analyst who rated
British Fidelity Assurance,
said Colina, with the acquisi-
tion of Imperial Life, will pre-
sent a number of challenges

for British Fidelity, which is a
small company with a
relatively high expense struc-
ture.

Synergies

The insurance company
might be able to realise some
synergies from its Trinidadian
parent, CLICO, that could
open up other opportunities
for it going forward, "maybe
outside the Bahamas, " he

said.

In his analysis, Mr
Longchallon wrote:
“Although premium income
has increased significantly in
recent years, driven mainly by
its group health and pension
and annuity segments, opera-
tions have. been modcatly.
profitable.

“As a small company,
British Fidelity has a rela-
tively high expense structure
due to its lack of critical mass,
and since more than 80 per
cent of the company's total

British Fidelity to
ake CLICO name

premium income is generat-
ed in the Bahamas, changes ©
in regulations, economic con-
ditions and consolidations in
the marketplace can poten-
tially have a significant impact
on British Fidelity’ $ Opera-
tions.

“A. M. Best believes
British Fidelity faces some
challenges to grow its life
insurance business as it com-

‘petes against larger and

stronger insurers in mature
markets."

ernment decided to amend
the Bill to permit only one
super-casino with 1250 slot
machines in a bid to get it
passed by Parliament before
the upcoming general elec-
tion, said the failure to win
regulatory approval would
impact Kerzner Internation-
al’s share price target.

The analysts said they had
assigned more value to
Kerzner International’s
stock price, based on its
three proposed UK casi-
no/hotel ventures, than any
other US gaming company
with similar plans.

Assigned

~ Mr Schmitt and Mr Katz
said: “We have previously
assigned $1 per share in esti-
mated value for Isle of
Capri, $2 in estimated value
for MGM Mirage, and $7 in
estimated value for Kerzn-
er. We will revisit these val-
uations........ when we have
a better sense of the out-
come of the Bill.”

Kerzner International had
been hoping to build three
US-style super-casinos ia the
UK, located in London’s
Millennium Dome, Man-
chester and Glasgow respec- .
tively. Now, only one will get
the go-ahead, and it is by no
means certain that will be
one of Kerzner Internation-
al’s planned projects.



SEE page five






@ By NEIL HARTNELL
.«, Tribune Business Editor

Bank’s e-banking
take-off ‘exceeds
expectations’

growth, The Tribune can
reveal.

When contacted by The Tri-
bune, executives at the com-
pany were reluctant to discuss
the new name and any plans
the company might have for
the short-term.

A senior executive, howev-

r, did confirm that the com-
pany would be changing its
name to CLICO, that of its
parent company.

Image

One insurance industry
source, who requested

. anonymity, told The Tribune

yesterday: “They want to
totally change their image and
have an upgrade. They’re
looking at this CLICO thing
as being an upgrade.”

A.M. Best Company earlier
this year reaffirmed British
Fidelity's B+ (Very Good)
financial strength rating with
a stable outlook, saying this
reflected the company's “con-
sistent premium growth and
modest profitability"

The major international
insurance credit rating agency
said, though, that it believes
British Fidelity Assurance
“faces some challenges" from
larger competitors in the
Bahamian life and health
insurance sector, with its high
cost structure ensuring it has
generated "modest prof-
itability" in recent years
despite growing premium
income.

A. M. Best said: “Offsetting









_SEE page three

~ BANK of the Bahamas International yesterday told The Tri-
bune that its Internet banking operation had “exceeded expec-
- tations” in the 15 months since it was launched, with the site
attracting an average of 4,500 customer visits per month.
Alexander Hanna, vice-president of Providence Technology
Group, the company that created the bank’s website and soft-
‘ware that runs it, said: “The site probably averages in the neigh-
bourhood of 4,500 customer visits per month, and that number
‘continues to increase every month. The word is definitely get-
ting out and the numbers are jumping.”

‘Vaughn Delaney, Bank of the Bahamas International’s
deputy managing director for information technology and
human resources, confirmed that the bank’s electronic banking












AES LNG project to grow
Bimini’s population 8%

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The AES Ocean Express liq-
uefied natural gas (LNG)
regasification terminal and
pipeline will create a 5-8 per
cent increase in Bimini’s popu-
lation to accomodate construc-
tion and permanent workers if
the project received govern-
ment approval, the company
believes.

In its heavily-dated Environ-
mental Impact Assessment
(EIA) produced in 2002, AES
Corporation pegs the total
investment in its LNG plan at

$550 million, and describes the

impact on Bimini’s population
and infrastructure as “minimal”.

However, this has been dis-
puted by environmental oppo-
nents of the project such as
reEarth, which have publicly
questioned the strain hiring 350-
400 workers to construct the
LNG terminal will place on
Bimini’s housing and utilities
infrastructure, such as garbage
collection and sewage.

In its EIA, AES said: “Pro-
ject construction is expected to
employ 450 people, who will be

SEE page five

Pieter See acs mee Pein
_ following IT contract signing

DOCTORS Hospital Health System
(DHHS) yesterday announced it will
invest about $3.5 million over the next
five years on information technology, after
signing a contract with Medical Informa-
tion Technology (MEDITECH) to pro-
vide its fully-integrated Health Care Infor-
mation system (HIS).

DHHS said the . selection of
MEDITECH completed the first phase of
a plan, begun almost a year ago, that
aimed to align the BISX-listed company’s
IT infrastructure with its business objec-
tives.

In a statement, DHHS said
MEDITECH was one of 10 prospéctive
vendors who submitted proposals for the
HIS contract. It was selected from a final
shortlist of two.

Software

The $3.5 million spent by DHHS will
go on software, implementation and train-
ing expenses.

DHHS described MEDITECH as “a
pacesetter” in the healthcare information
industry for the past 35 years, saying it
was selected because of its ability to devel-
op IT tools essential for delivering effi-
cient healthcare.

And DHHS added: “The new HIS will

significantly improve access to clinical
information, streamline workflows and

|

~

decrease repetitive paperwork, improve
communications between caregivers,
enable better co-ordination of care,
enhance medical safety and hasten reim-
bursements.

“Operational efficiency and customer
satisfaction are expected to be the most
immediate gains once the new HIS goes
live. Less paper will have to change hands,
thereby resulting in a substantial deduction
it delays in patient care.

«Doctors Hospital’s staff will be able to
instantly access all patient records and



@ ALL SMILES
AT CONTRACT
SIGNING - (Pictured
from L to R, front row:
Darron Cash, chief
financial officer; Barry
Rassin, chief execu-
tive; Joanne Lowe,
vice-president of cor-
porate finance; Back
row: Chadwick
Williamson, assistant
vice-president of MIS;
Harriet Lundy, assis-
tant co-ordinator of
Laboratory Services;
Jackie Negre, co-oor-
dinator Med/Surg; Dr
Charles Diggiss, chief —
medical officer.

make changes in real time that others using
the same record are able to see.

“Physicians will be able to go to a single
place to get all the information they
need, rather than having to await the
flow of paperwork from different depart-
ments.”

DHHS said: “This efficiency will trans-

_ late into better patient care.

“With medical records and results of
clinical tests available in a timelier manner,
physicians will be able to respond
faster.”




PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005 °

THE TRIBUNE



Attack is the board’
best form of defence

ECENTLY, the

entire board of direc-

tors at an organisa-

tion resigned en

masse, along with the executive
director. This was the result of
years of effort by a single member
who wished to change the direc-
tion of this popular organisation.
This member had, in fact, even-

tually been elected to the board,
but was forced to resign by pop-
ular vote of the general members

at an annual conference. The de-

frocked director subsequently ran
for office again, and was again
re-elected, giving them no doubt
as to his mandate. _

The director then began a
series of costly lawsuits against

COPE AUD

the organisation. Eventually, its
insurance company said it would
not cover any further costs for
lawsuits from this individual. The
board members, being no fools,
recognised they served in order to
help the company be more pro-
fessionally fruitful, rather than
for money or for anything else
central to their lives. Therefore,

Middle Income Home, Suffolk Unit 2, Block #51, Lot #3,
3 bed, 2.5 bath, central air, fully landscape, washer & dryer.

EOL DL ee a











ITHE AMOURY.
| COMPANY LTD.

ERD steno cy

Chal Pat Te Se

£S Ne Ce ach (242) ELy! Phyo

Lal









Department;

consultants;

Sb Cle cy rey cio sy eley.)

Fax: (242)

¢ Planning, directing, and coordinating the human, financial
and physical resources of the Information Technology

¢ Overseeing and developing all technology related systems,
including telecommunications and security systems;
* Establishing key relationships with key IT suppliers and

¢ Application, selection, development and
implementation of new and existing corporate initiatives;

¢ Provide enabling technologies that make it easier for
customers and suppliers to do business with the Bank.



ha Ee

vee re Diels eee ate a Neen re aT ee

the risk of personal impoverish-
ment through legal fees was sim-

ply not worth it, and they

resigned.

We are not conseined here
about whether the member. was
right or wrong, or whether what
the directors did was good or bad,
whether fundamental changes
were or were not needed or desir-
able, or whether the organisation
will survive. .

We are only concerned with
how the board failed to deal with
this novel technique for using the
system as a tool of attack. As
always, when looking at any pol-
icy measures, what should be
done must be judged by the five
basic criteria:

1. What problem is the policy
or measure trying to solve?

2. How can it fail in practice?

3. Given the failure modes,
how well does it solve the prob-
lem? 7

4. What are the costs, both

’ financial and social, associated

with it, and flowing from its unin-
tended consequences?

5. Given the effectiveness and
costs, is the policy or measure
worth it?

In this case, the company sim-
ply did not recognise that it faced
a long term, well-organised and
ongoing threat. Because the mea-
sures they took did not address
the problem (as so often happens,

People rely on digital information, and need a productive
PULSER cle EM UE CE Pasa te ELL ce
Uae PN be eT RT UOT ttm) Ota Pine]

customer's Isjlnatealhelia

08, :

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~ INTERNATIONAL

JOB VACANCY
ee Manager, Information Technology eae

. MAIN RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE: KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS & ABILITIES

e Tertiary level qualifications in computer science,
information technology or related disciplines;

* Expert knowledge of systems analysis development and

planning methods;

¢ Demonstrated experience in managing a network:
environment including Windows server 2000/2003
services, Lotus Notes/Domino, hardware firewalls,
routers, AS400, Unix, Oracle and VPN appliances;

* Comprehensive knowledge of database management;

* Knowledge of web base technologies;

* Excellent communication skills, both written and ora

* Demonstrated team building and project management

skills;

* Five years of progressive experience in managing the
delivery of modem enterprise technology services;
¢ IT industry related certifications desirable.

The position also offers an attractive compensation package which includes comprehensive group insurance
coverage, participation in pension savings and other benefits enjoyed by staff.

Manager, Human Resources/Training
Bank of The Bahamas International
P.O. Box N-7118

‘Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for applications is April 25, 2005.

‘ ptice advantage, one that hela lat sacneds wa

tt

as



RoccnKc Measures





















Safe and Secure

nobody ever asked the first ques-
tion), they were simply inade-
quate in dealing with the threat.
Because there was no recogni-
tion that a threat was faced, the
board did not dignify the attacks
with. a meaningful public
response. Since, in the minds of
many, silence is taken as guilt,
this put them at a perception dis-
advantage. Additionally, and
again because the attack was not
taken seriously (largely because
the board members knew they
were not doing anything wrong,
nor acting for their own gain), the
board did not take measures to
either throw the member out or
put in a bylaw change to prevent

members who were expelled from ~

the organisation or forced to

resign from the board from future

participation.

‘When faced with legal action,
the board apparently (we have
had no contact with board mem-
bers, and can only make assump-
tions based on our experience and
what we observed) responded,
but did not counterattack. In fact,
our experience tells us that in cas-
es such as these, if there is no

~ counterattack there is no reason

for the attack to stop.

This last issue points out a final
problem. While not all attorneys
are bad (one attorney pointed out
that their firm was very good, but
that they were so overworked

any one of the following areas.

saries an advantage.

¢ Anti-economic espionage.

sulting

dering Directive of 2001.’

Mid- East and Southeast Asia.

¢ THE articles above




SOME of you have asked what j is the tia Onshis between
Lubrinco, Financial Examinations and Evaluations, and Preventa-
tive Measures. It is just as stated: We work together, and usually on.

° Operational Security (OPSEC): The identification and pro-
tection of information that would give your competitors and adver-

e Sarbanes-Oxley compliance.
e Protection of trade secrets and intellectual assets.
¢ Anti-competitive intelligence.

° International financial investigations and due diligence con-:

e Location and recovery of missing and hidden assets.

* Establishing business relationships and strategic partnerships in
Central and Eastern Europe, the offshore financial centres, Beijing
and Shanghai, Central Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean.

¢ Anti-money laundering and financial fraud requirements under
the International Money Laundering Abatement and Anti-Ter-
rorist Financing Act of 2001 and the EU Revised Money Laun-

¢. Protection of management, staff, and families.
* In the high-threat environments of Latin America, Africa, the

* When travelling and living overseas.
* When transporting items of substantial value.

they never had time to do an ade-
quate job), if you actually become
involved in litigation it is impor-
tant to have a good lawyer. Good
lawyers sometimes cost more per
hour than bad lawyers, but keep
in mind the truism that the only
thing more expensive than 4 good
lawyer is a bad lawyer.

Lawyers, however, don’t exist
in vacuuo. By this, we mean two
things. The first is that all lawyers
don’t know all the same stuff. The
body of law is so enormous that

’ lawyers specialise, and the more

specialised your problem, the
more specialised the lawyer you
should seek out. Thus a lawyer
who is a great collections attorney

“may not be a good attorney for a

libel action. !
The second issue is that you

_have to explain your problem to a

prospective lawyer, make sure
they understand your problem,
and that they can help you solve

‘your problem. You then have to
-work with your lawyer to make

sure they are doing what needs
to be done, and that what they
are doing makes sense. If it does-
n’t make sense, you need to havé
them explain to you why what
they are doing makes sense. IE it,
still doesn’t make sense, you need
to change lawyers.

NB: Gamal Newry is the pres-
ident of Preventative Measures, a

Jaw enforcement and security

consulting company. Comments
can be sent to PO Box N-3154

‘Nassau, Bahamas or. e-mail pre-

ventit@hotmail.com, or visit our
website rs
www.sunnyplace.net/prevent
vent>




























are taken from the case files of The

LUBRINCO Group and Financial Examinations and Evalua-
_tions. They are as seen in the April 2005 AEGIS e-journal. Pre-
ventative Measures represents these companies in the Bahamas.

FOR SALE OR RENT

Fully Furnished Executive Office Suites
plus Utilities Global Maritime Center
(Formerly Tanja)
2nd Floor, 2,500'sq ft
Internet Ready, Computer & Network Support
State Of The Art Phone & Voice Mail Systems
Dedicated Phone Lines
Conference Facilities
Professional Work Space

Office Space

- Unfurnished

1,250 sq ft

Global Maritime Centre
Queens Highway, Freeport, Bahamas

Contact 351-9026 or 351-1601 For Viewing
Or Additional Information.
Global United Formerly TANJA is
moving it’s operation to the
Former United Shipping Building at the Harbour


THE TRIBUNE

“WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005, PAGE 3B ~



Bahamian tourism and financial sector
held up as models by Japanese city

THE Bahamian tourism and
financial services sectors are
being touted as good examples
of a jurisdiction’s ability to draw
capital from around the world,
as financial experts urge offi-
cials in Okinawa, Japan, to

improve the area's investment __ ination.







climate by learning from the
success of a financial resort des-

“Leaders of hedge funds and
US investment banks often
travel to the Bahamas, Bermu-

PR enol
‘exceeds expectations’









FROM page one

operation had “exceeded expectations” since
its soft launch in January 2004.

He added that “everyone was surprised” at
the volume of transactions conducted by both
Bank of the Bahamas International’s retail and
corporate clients via its electronic banking plat-
form.

Mr Delaney said the numerous different
banking applications contained on the bank’s
electronic platform had distinguished. it from
competitors, as it provided an all-in-one solution







value and service.
He added: “We saw it as an opportunity to

sarily unique to the Bahamas, but rather met
customer needs as they pertained to the
Bahamas.

“We're not trying to be different, we’re trying
to be customer focused, and that drove us to be
different.”

Mr Delaney said that while he was not criti-
cising Bank of the Bahamas International’s
competitors, the bank had been “more progre-
sive” in the area of Internet and electronic
banking.

“We have easily had a year’s head start on
most other banks,” he added.

Bank of the Bahamas International’s e-bank-
ing platform provides its existing retail and cor-

porate account holders with services such as

cheque re-ordering, where they are able to
select on-line the branch it is most convenient to
picks We new cheque book up from.

Currency

Other services include foreign currency pick-
ups from the branch most convenient for the
customer to collect the funds from. Mr Delaney
said the Central Bank foreign exchange form
was also available on-line from the bank’s Inter-
net site, and clients could complete it via the
web, meaning that they only had to collect the
funds when they visited the branch.


























tions, Bank of the Bahamas International will
either send an e-mail to their computers or text
message to their cell phone via the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company’s (BTC) Short
Message System to confirm that it is ready or
been approved.

Mr Delaney said that while Bank of the
Bahamas International would probably look at
introducing telephone banking services in the
future, it was concentrating on its Internet oper-
ation because it could provide more functions
online.

He added: “We probably will do telephone
banking at some point, but it’s not a high pri-
ority for us because we think Internet banking
is more beneficial for our customers at the end

‘of the day.”

Bank of the Bahamas International customers
can also use the Internet banking platform for
ordering Bank Drafts, Foreign Exchange Drafts

and Travellers Cheques. Wire transfers and

NOTICE |











NOTICE i is hereby given that NIKOLAOS PANT SALPADIMOS
OF COLLINS AVENUE, NASSAU BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and |}
that any person who knows any reason why registration/ a
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 6TH day of APRIL, 2005 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.

Credit Suisse Wealth Management-Limited

requires an

OFFICE ASSISTANT

Temporary position for a young person to
perform filing and messenger duties

Please send resume to:

Credit Suisse Wealth Management Limited

P.O. Box N-4801
Nassau, Bahamas

Facsimile No. 302-6398

line: banking in the Bahamas.”

to clients’ e-banking needs, enhancing customer .

really do something we thought was not neces- ©.
y é E company’s presence here ensured it could also

So clients can check the status of transac-.

in a series of letters and numbers that appear on






money transfers, the latter through the bank’s
MoneyGram partnership, loan applications and
transfers between existing Bank of the Bahamas
International accounts could all be effected on-
line.

Mr Delaney described the potential for Inter-
net banking in the Bahamas as “really large”,
and added: “It’s about convenience; doing things
faster, easier. That’s what is going to drive it.” .

Mr Hanna said: “There is a big place for on-






Providence Technology Group’s role in devel-
oping the Bank of the Bahamas International e-
banking. platform, Mr Delaney added, meant
that it was.easier to develop‘a local solution, as
the firm was Bahamian-owned and based. The -

respond rapidly to its client’s needs.

Locally |

Mr Delaney said: “A significant point in my
mind is that it was developed locally. It shows
we have a capable technical resource capability
in this country. No one is saying this is an infe-
rior product; in fact, they would have to say it is
a superior product.

“We do have the capability in this country.
We said we’re a Bahamian bank, so we’ll give a
Bahamian company a chance. This really gives
[Providence Technology Group] a stage, as it
recognises what they:are capable of doing.

“We have these skills and people like Alex
don’t get a chance. often, because Bahamian

~~ don’t:have faith in themselves. He’s more than ale
_~ Shown he’s capable, os



Mr Delaney said Bank of the’ B
national intended to continue ‘déployin
technology to its advantage, in a bid to increase
customer value and save staff time and costs.

He added that the bank had been imaging
cheques for “a year and a half”, enabling bank
customers to monitor their cheque transactions
by seeing actual copies of the cashed cheques
online.

Other services offered by Bank of the
Bahamas International’s e-banking platform
include bill payments to the Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company (BTC) and Bahamas
Electricity Corporation (BEC), plus the ability
to stop payments. ,

Mr Hanna said he believed online banking
among Bahamians would increase once they
became more aware of the multiple functions
that could be performed electronically, and
when they became more comfortable with the
security functions.

Apart from entering an in-line identification
and password, the Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national website also. requires clients to type

a strip. :

Explaining that the websits used “the highest
security”. measures, Mr Hanna said the strip
could not be optically read by hackers, thus
discouraging. them from attempting to break
into the site. Accounts were also disabled after
three invalid attempts to open them.

(BIS

Pricing Information As Of:

SEER SES SSRIS
52wk-HI | S2wk-Low

Famguard
Finco

Focol

52wk-Low

28.00 ABDAB

1.0320

Change -

Colina Bond ee





da and the Cayman Islands to
discuss business strategies with
clients," said Naoki Togashi,
chairman of the Private Bank-
ing Working Group of the Oki-
nawa Special Financial Business
Zone.

Promotion

“These Caribbean islands
became successful as financial
districts because they combined
their resort features with finan-

- cial know-how and business

promotion measures," Mr
Togashi told a seminar in
Ginowan, Okinawa, on Asia-
Latin America relations.
"These efforts will eventually

property.

247 to 261.



: previous Close

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Doctor's Hospital

FirstCaribbean
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson
Kerzner International BDRs

12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets

1.2164 1.1609 Colina Money Market Fund 1.216402"
2.2268 1.9423 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.2268 ***
10.3112 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.3112*****
2.2214 2.0941 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.221401**
1.0931 1 :093141"**"

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-HI - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change In closing price from day to day
pes Dally Vol. ’- Number of total shares traded today
- =. DIV $ - Dividends per share pald in the last 12.months: __
“PEs ‘Closing price ‘divided by the last 12 month eamings
** “AS AT MAR. 31, 2005/ **** - AS AT FEB. 28, 2005
. 34, 2005/ ***** AS AT

'

Colina

Financial Advisors Ltd.

Xi CLOSE 408.630




bring in a greater flow of capi-
tal, giving a boost to the local
economy.”

According to an online
report, the experts said Oki-
nawa's use of tourism assets
must be expanded to people in
other Asian economies.

They also suggested that busi-
ness incentives, such as tempo-
rary, local
tax exemptions, under special
financial business zone initia-
tives launched in 2002, be
expanded.

A total of 260 foreign banks
from 27 countries are operat-
ing in the Bahamas, compared
with zero in Okinawa, according
to the report. The financial ser-

NOTICE

FOR SALE BY PUBLIC TENDER

PARADISE ISLAND COLONY SUBDIVISION - Lot 4, Block 6, ‘
Section C. Property Size: 21,562 Sq. Ft.

There are presently two partly built Apartment Buildings on the
The buildings were constructed without proper
permission and in breach of the covenants and restrictions.
Paradise Island limited who are responsible for all the Covenants
and Restrictions applicable to the said lot have advised that they.
require the buildings to be demolished and the site cleared
within 3 months. The costs of demolition would be an expense
for the purchaser _

The seoes property is being sold under. a Power of Sale contained
in a Supplemental Mortgage dated November 3, 1993 to Gulf
Union Bank (Bahamas) Limited. Recorded in book 6216, at pages

Interested parties should submit written offers with telephone
contacts and postal : ‘addresses to the Joint Official Liquidators,
P. O. Box N-3748, Nassau, Bahamas.

‘Tolophone enquiries: 302-4862

Fax: 302-4870

Terms: 10% deposit upon acceptance of offer; balance upon

completion.

All Offers must be received by 19 April, 2005






THE LIQUIDATORS RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT AND/OR REFUSE ANY

OFFER.

Today's Close






landholding |

Okinawa officials urged to learn success of a financial resort destination



vices sector accounts for 15 to
20 per cent of gross domestic
product (GDP) in the Bahamas,
compared with 5 per cent in
Okinawa.

Okinawa officials were told
the Bahamas charges no corpo-
rate and personal income tax
for foreign investors, and also
charges no consumption tax or
capital gains tax, excluding
domestic transactions.

The event preceded a three-:

day annual meeting of the Inter-
American Development Bank,
which brought together
financial leaders from the
IDB's 47 member countries
including Japan and the United
States.



















































































































2st

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

ay SELEY 3 SEE IOe PPE: BSS

OO OE Ot Pe et wee wr at wt ne wt we nk oh er wn oe ht ne ne ee


PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005

Grant Thornton &

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT AUDITORS

To the Directors of
CROMWELL TRUST COMPANY LIMITED

We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of Cromwell Trust Company Limited (“the Company”) as of
December 31, 2004 and the related statements of operations and accumulated deficit and cash flows for the year
then ended. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility
is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with Intemational Standards on Auditing. Those standards require that
we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of
material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and
disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and
significant estimates made by management as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation.
We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our-opinion.

In our opinion, these financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the
Company as of December 31, 2004 and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the year then ended in
accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards.

9 ae :
Vim We VW
February 11, 2005 CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS

Nassau, The Bahamas

CROMWELL TRUST COMPANY LIMITED
Balance Sheet ;
(Expressed in United States dollars)

December 31, 2004







THE TRIBUNE



-| DHHS appoints

assistant MIS
vice-president

DOCTORS Hospital Health
System (DHHS) has appointed
Chadwick Williamson as its
assistant vice-president for
medical information systems
(MIS).

He brings eight years’ expe-
rience in information technol-
ogy (IT) to DHHS, having cre-
ated and managed the IT
Department at Commonwealth
Brewery, with responsibility for
all Heineken-managed compa-
nies.

In his new role with DHHS,
Mr Williamson’s responsibili-
ties will include the day-to-day
operations and ongoing sup-
port for the hospital’s systems,
plus accountability for Project
Management over the installa-
tion of the hospital’s new HIS
system, including vendor, user
and consultant’s time.





ASSETS 2004 - 2008 _ Mr Williamson will also han-
dle all liaisons between internal
CURRENT ASSETS users and external vendors
Cash at banks (Note 3) $ 6390 $ 25,968 onsib i f
Tem deposit (Note 4) 100,317 100,002 wise aad hea @ CHADWICK WILLIAMSON
Accounts receivable - 1,166 He hold ee
Other assets 1,050 800 __. He holds a degree in infor- *
107,757 127,936 mation system management network certifications, includ- _ Engineer (MSCE), Cisco Cer-
FIXED ASSETS Seay and a specialisation in project ing Microsoft Certify Network. _ tify Network Administrator
urns a Sane aie : ee -Inanagement. Mr Williamson Administrator (MSCA), (CCNA) and Cisco Certify
TAC eer roi 31.530 29,515 has obtained several advanced Microsoft Certify Network Network Profession (CCNP).
Less accumulated depreciation ( 11,155) (| 3,625) : : : fs : 2 z :
a 20,375 25,890
$ 128,132 $ 153,826
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
LIABILITIES
Accounts payable (Note 5) $ 2,500 $ 21,110
‘SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
ein des css Gs ca 100,000 doko The following persons or their nearest relatives are kindly asked to visit the
Conrbnted surplus BS SIO See a PENSION DEPARTMENT of the National Insurance Board located in the
——e en ie Board’s Jumbey Village complex on Baillou Road. For further information,
ene you may contact the Department at telephone number 502-1500.

N.I. NUMBER
12713368
11754354
12904368
13588581
14385716
12521485
15712729
14024446
21205639
11571306

See accompanying notes. Report of Independent Auditors page 1.
Signed half of the Directors

CROMWELL TRUST COMPANY LIMITED
Notes to Financial Statements

BODIE, Joe

DUROZIN, Gue

MILLER, Franklyn
NEWBOLD, Portia

RECKLEY, John
RODRIQUE-MEDRAND, Juan
ROLLE, Thomas

TONEY, Wendy

VALCIN, Fred

December 31, 2004 ae

1. GENERAL
Cromwell Tiust Company Limited (“the Company”) was incorporated on August 28, 2000 under the
provisions of the Companies Act, 1992, of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. The primary business
of the Company is to provide trustee services under a restricted trust license granted to the Company on
November 13, 2000. . K spe :

2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES _.

These financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting
Standards and are expressed in United States dollars. The significant accounting policies are as follows:

Tnvestments

GN 193

C MINISTRY OF TRANSPORT & AVIATION
N . . DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL AVIATION |.

Investments are recorded at the lower of cost or quoted market values.
Foreign currency transactions

The Company's functional currency is the United States ("U.S.") dollar, however, it transacts business in

currencies other than U.S. dollars. Assets and liabilities denominated in currencies other than U.S.

dollars are translated into U.S. dollars at rates in effect at the balance sheet date. Income and expenses

denominated in currencies other than U.S. dollars are translated into U.S. dollars at the rates in effect on
" the transaction dates.

PUBLICATION BY THE MINISTRY OF TRANSPORT & AVIATION
-.., DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL AVIATION
PARTICULARS OF AN APPLICATION TO OPERATE SCHEDULED AIR SERVICES

Fixed assets

Fixed assets are recorded at cost and are depreciated on the straight line basis at the following annual
Tates:

Fumiture and equipment — 20% i ' ante é ace rey : :
In accordance with the provisions of Regulation 9 of the Civil Aviation (Licensing

of Air Services) Regulations 1976, the Minister responsible for Aviation hereby
publishes the following particulars of the under-mentioned application to operate
scheduled air service to and from The Bahamas.

Leasehold improvements — 33 1/3%
Income and expenses

_ Income and.expenses are recorded on the accrual basis of accounting.

PARTICULARS OF APPLICATION
_ 1. Application: CHAUTAUQUA AIRLINES, INC. d/b/a DELTA CONNECTION

CROMWELL TRUST COMPANY LIMITED
Notes to Financial Statements

2. Date of first Publication: 6th April, 2005

3. Routes: BETWEEN TAMPA ON THE ONE HAND AND NASSAU ON THE
OTHER.

December 31, 2004

3. CASH AT BANKS

Cash at banks of $6,390 as at December 31, 2004 is comprised of current accounts with SG Hambros
Bank ‘and Trust (Bahamas) Limited (US$) and with First Caribbean Intemational Bank (Bahamas)
Limited (BS).

4. Purpose of services: Passenger, mail and freight.

oo nee 5. Provisional time table:



The term deposit of US$100,317 as of December 31, 2004 is held at SG Hambros Bank and Trust L 1 Times
(Bahamas) Limited and earns interest at the rate of 1.325% per annum. T. PAINASSA U 0040/11 00
: S: RECCOUNTS EAE ARLE NASSAU/TAMPA 1125/1250
Accounts payable as at December 31, 2004 are comprised of the following:
and a5 TAMPA/NASSAU 1630/1750
NASSAU/TAMPA 1825/1950
Professional fees $ 2,500 $ 3,250
SG Hambros administration fees - 10,000 f
Pension contributions _ ; 7,250 6. Frequency of flights: See above time-table.
_ National insurance : 610
$ 2,500 $21,110

7. Type of Aircraft: Embraer ERJ 135 & 145
6. LEASE COMMITMENT
Any representation regarding or objection thereto in accordance with Regulation
10 must be received by the Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Transport & Aviation
& the Department of Civil Aviation within fourteen (14) days after the date of first
publication of this Notice.

The Company rents office space under a three year operating lease which expires on June 30, 2006 and
the annual rental for which is $16,960. There is an option to extend the lease for an additional period of
three years.

ARCHIE NAIRN
PERMANENT SECRETARY

Report of Independent Auditors page 1.


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005, PAGE 5B





FROM page one

Kerzner International’s
share price on the New York
Stock Exchange (NYSE) ral-
lied slightly yesterday, clos-

ing up 0.57 per cent at $60.19..

It has been in a steady
decline since developments
in the UK first became pub-
lic.

However, the CIBC World
Markets analysts said “most
investors have already
reduced expectations” for
Kerzner International and
other gaming‘stocks due to
“the uncertainty and opposi-
tion to the Gambling Bill
over the past few months”.

As a result, Mr Schmitt and

7 could be wiped
off target share price

Mr Katz said: “As such, we
do not expect shares of those
US companies involved to be
significantly affected.”

The pair added that the UK
Bill did contain a provision
allowing for a future govern-
ment to raise the number of
super-casinos back up to
eight, provided the move was

‘ratified by both Houses of

Parliament.

UK developments are
unlikely to have come as a
total shock to. informed
investors, as analysts warned
earlier this year that “biggest
near term” risk facing Kerzn-
er International’s global
expansion plans was the pas-
sage‘of legislation in that.

AES LNG project to grow
Bimini’s population 8%
FROM page one

housed in temporary quarters, barges or cruise ships anchored
at Ocean Cay.

“During operations, approximately 25-35 people will be
employed by the project on a full-time basis, and new permanent
housing to accommodate this increase in jobs will be con-
structed on South Bimini.

“The new housing represents a potential 5-8 per cent increase
in the population of South Bimini, and will increase the need for
municipal services. Increases in demand for potable water and
energy are anticipated to be offset by new supplies of water. and
natural gas to the Biminis from Ocean Cay.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FRITZ ALEXIS, MARSH HARBOUR,
ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
‘Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a

. | written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 13TH day of APRIL, 2005 to’the Minister responsible for
Nationality and eHesnslieey P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama,
Bahamas. Sak ka.

NOTICE

NOTICE: is hereby given that ODILIA KELLY OF WILTON
STREET OFF MOUNT ROYAL AVENUE, NASSAU
| BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister “responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization. should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 6TH day of APRIL,
2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


















LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE.
EQUITABLE HOLDINGS INC,

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 11th
day of April, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., of

P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
BRAGG CREEK LAKE INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, the dissolution of BRAGG CREEK LAKE
INC., has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator

BUS ass

country.

Analyst Joseph Greff, who
covers Kerzner Internation- ©
al for Wall Street investment
bank Bear Stearns, said in a
report released in January:
“We believe each of Kerzner
International’s three poten-
tial UK casino projects is less .
likely to be successful.

“Additionally, our UK con-
tacts have indicated that the
recent trend — towards
increased government over-
sight of the gaming industry
makes it impossible to gauge
where and subject to what
concessions casino’ licences
will be granted.

“Furthermore, Kerns:
International’s Millennium
Dome project in. London -
the company’s most-likely-to- _
succeed UK development - is
believed to have a lower
chance of implementation
than Caesars Entertainmen-

bebe ove of of

’ t’s Wembley project.”

NOTICE

‘The Aiinnal Meeting of
The Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association
_.. Willbe held atthe .
- National Tennis Centre on
Wednesday 27th, 2005 at 7:00 p.m.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SHARLENE BROWN, GOLDEN
GATES, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 6TH day of APRIL, 2005 to the Minister responsible
| for.Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOREL SATINE, EIGHT MILE ROCK,
PINEDALE, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
_registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written.and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13TH day of APRIL,
2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama; Bahamas.



LEGAL NOTICE
2 NOTICE
_PEACHLAND INVESTMENTS CORP.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

137(8) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000, the

~ dissolution of PEACHLAND INVESTMENTS CORP., has
_ been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
_ Liquidator

. LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

VERNON LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000,
the dissolution of VERNON LIMITED, has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator



Ll. chief to stay silent



“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”






PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that 1, MILDRED DAVIS, of
187 Hawkins Court, Hudson Estate; Grand Bahama,
.Bahamas, intend to change my child’s name from
QUINTON HENCIL WALKES to QUINTON HENCIL
DAVIS. If there are any objections to this change of name
by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no Jater
than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEAN CLAUDE PIERRE, OF
ALLAN DRIVE, P.O. BOX CR-56817, NASSAU BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 5TH day of APRIL, 2005 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas. coe ices

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WILSON ALTIDOR, P.O. BOX N-
4891, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed |
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13TH
day of APRIL, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

















LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
ZUGSPITZE LIMITED

. Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000,
the dissolution of ZUGSPITZE LIMITED, has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.
ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Secretary



LEGAL NOTICE

| NOTICE
STEIERMARK LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 22nd
day of March, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., of
P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator
PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Volleyball federation hoping for
gym time ahead of championships

# By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THE Bahamas Volleyball
Federation is preparing to send
its boys and girls teams off to
the Junior Caribbean Volley-
ball Championships in Aruba
this summer.

But Jason Saunders, one of
the coaches selected, said it’s
going to be important that they
have adequate use of the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium for
training.

The national team assistant
trainer and head coach for the
junior girls team noted that
every year around this time,
they are hampered by not hav-
ing sufficient time to practise in
the gym, but he’s hoping that
will all change.

Concrete

“Our sport calls for us to hit
the floor and roll over and we
can’t do that on the concrete
outdoors,” Saunders stressed.
“They will be intimated by their
surface.

“So we need a floor that is
padded. So we’re hoping that
the government will ensure us
that we will have the use of the
gym to train in.”

At present, Saunders said
they’ve had some problems get-
ting into the Kendal Isaacs Gym
at the appropriate time. But
they’re currently working fever-
ishly with the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture offi-

cials to get in the gym.
However, he said they are not

allowed to use the DW Davis

Gym, the home of the New

‘Sea Wolf’ honoured
at the Stars Rega

THE Nassau Yacht Club honoured legendary Bahamian sailor Sir Durward
Knowles at the Star Western Hemisphere Spring Championships that were
held at the Club last week. :

Sir Durward, a longstanding member of the Nassau Yacht Club, once mem-
orably earned the nickname “Sea Wolf” from the local press during a regat-
ta in Spain for his seemingly uncanny ability to read the wind and seas.

- In honouring Sir Durward, the club chose to retire the name of the Santa
Maria Trophy that since the 1940s has been presented to the winner of the Star
Spring Championships when held in Nassau.

The award was renamed the Sir Durward Knowles Trophy, a name that it
will now carry. In receiving the award, international sailing champion Paul
Cayard, a longtime friend and admirer of Sir Durward, expressed his delight
at being the first winner of the newly renamed trophy.

In his Star “Gem,” Sir Durward has himself been a past world champion
in 1947, in addition to winning a bronze medal in the 1956 Melbourne
Olympics, and the Bahamas first ever Olympic gold medal at the Tokyo
Olympics in 1964, with crew. Cecil Cooke. Astonishingly, Sir Durward’s
Olympic career spanned 40 years, from 1948 to 1988.

Twenty five Star boats manned by world renowned sailors from five.

countries, many of them with Olympic and Americas Cup campaigns to
their credit, competed during the four day regatta. The breezy conditions off
the eastern end of New Providence brought out the best in the competitors.

The world class event has been hosted by the Nassau Yacht Club more
times than any other venue worldwide.

In the three race Harry Knowles series sailed on April 4, fierce competi-
tion saw Canadian skipper Ross MacDonald and crew Mike Wolfs win the
day, with Paul Cayard and Brian Sharp in ‘second place, and John Mac-
Donald and Brian Faith in third.

Not to be outdone, however, veteran campaigner Paul Cayard from the
USA, with crew Brian Sharp, turned the tables on the rest of the fleet in the
three day, six race Spring Championship series with consistent results across
the board. Second place overall went to John Dane III and Austin Sperry who
also distinguished themselves by being the top placed Masters competitor for
those aged over 50. Rick Merriman and Steve Mitchel placed third.

Top Bahamian finisher was Steven Kelly with crew Billy Holowesko,
who placed a highly creditable 14th amongst the 25 entries.

aS

Providence Volleyball Associa-
tion.

In addition, Saunders said
they’ve had to travel to Blake

Road to use a community cen-
tre there, but they are being
charged a fee of $5 per player

_and, in most cases, the cost has







to be absorbed by the coaches
because the players don’t
always have the funds.

“For a national team where
we are just volunteering our ser-
vice and we don’t have any
sponsorship, it could be costly,”
Saunders declared.

Unless the gyms are more
readily available for the nation-
al teams to practise, Saunders
said they could be hard pressed
to perform at their best.

At the last championships in
the Netherlands Antilles two
years ago, the Bahamas came
in second in. the: boys division,
while the girls were fifth place
finishers.

This year, when they travel
to the championships in Aruba
from July 8-18, Saunders said
it’s going to be difficult to
improve on their positions
because the standard of the oth-

er countries has risen so high. -

“Some of those juniors are
actually members of their senior
national volleyball teams,”
Saunders revealed. “So the lev-
el of competition is that much
more intense. :

“At the last junior CVC,
there is a girl who played for
Trinidad and Tobago and she
will be back to play for them;
She won best hitter and most
valuable player at the Senior
CVC last year.” ;

Saunders said the Bahamas’
girls should be in a much better
position to compete with their
peers because they have been
there before. we

But he noted that the boys
may have a more difficult time
because they are going through
a rebuilding stage from the last
championships. ‘

Players :

At present, there are at least
25 players coming out to prac-
tise for both teams. However;
the federation is expected to cut’
the team down to 18 within a.
month’s time. SS

The final selection won’t be.
made until at least a month:
before the team gets set to trav-.
el.

Saunders said they have some:
of the top junior players in the
country trying out for the team:
and he’s confident that they will
select two squads that will rep-
resent the Bahamas well at the
championships. "

But he said that in order for
them to perform at their best,
the national teams will have to:
access to the gym at least four.
days a week. :

Practice is held daily from:
6pm. i

If granted, Saunders said they.
will workout from 8-10 am for'
the junior girls and from 10am-
noon for the junior boys.

While Saunders serves as the
assistant trainer and head coach
of the junior girls, he is expect- ©
ed to be assisted by Laverne
Symonette.

The head trainer is Raymond
Wiison, who also serves as the
head coach for the junior boys’
team: His assistant is expected
to be Mario Dean.

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@ SIR DURWARD is shown with Brian Sharp (left, crew)and Paul Cayard (right, skipper),



winners of the Star Western Hemisphere Spring Championships held at The Nassau Yacht Club.
TRIBUNE SPORTS EDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005, PAGE 7B
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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

WITH her work not yet com-
pletely done, Mary Shelley said
she will be offering herself for re-
election as president of the
Bahamas Lawn Tennis Associa-
tion.

The BLTA, which has seen a
transformation over the last few
years from the heated clashes in
the media, will hold its election of
officers at the annual general meet-
ing on Wednesday, April 27 at
7pm at the National Tennis Cen-
tre.

Members are being advised to
renew their membership by 6pm
on Wednesday, April 20 in order
to be eligible to vote.

“J didn’t finish all the work that
I started out to do,” said Shelley,
who took over from Harold Wat-
son last year. “I got most of it
done, but I still have a lot more to
do.
Shelley served the past year with
Dyphany Mortier as her first vice
president; Cylde Rolle as second
vice president; Caroline Moncur
as treasurer and Kevin Major as
secretary.

She noted that she’s not sure
who will be seeking another term
in office, but she will be willing to
work with whoever decides to run.

Looking back at her tenure in
office, Shelley said they had to take
one step backward over the first
four months in order to move for-
ward.

“We finally got our website up,
which was important, and we
immediately got a newsletter out,”
she pointed out. “So we tried very
hard to sort out our communica-
tion level with the executives and
the memberships.

“We were able to sort all of that
out and we were able to get our
junior programme up to a higher
level, which we had to do by com-
municating with the parents.”

Improve

Additionally, Shelley said they
were also able to improve the com-
munication between the BLTA
and the Ministry of Youth, Sports
and Culture.

“T think what we tried to do was
close the gaps where they exist-
ed,” she stated. “We also worked
very hard with our national team
and I think we did a good job with
that.”

She was referring to the Davis
Cup team, which had to utilise the
services of the junior players after
both Mark Knowles and Mark
Merklein opted not to compete.

The BLTA sent the team of
Devin Mullings, Marvin Rolle,
Ryan Sweeting and H’Cone
Thompson to Curacao, Nether-
lands Antilles for the first round of
the American Zone II Davis Cup
tie in February.

The team, captained by John
Farrington, eventually lost 4-1 and
will now have to prepare to play
Colombia in Colombia over the
weekend of July 15-17 in a bid to
stay in Zone II for next year.

“The executives have realised
that there is a lot of work and we
could get worn out, so we need to
have more help,” said Shelley, who
' noted that they are now leaning
| towards rehiring a full-time admin-
| istrator.

In a bid to improve the coaching
level in the sport, Shelley said they

former Davis Cup team captain
John Antonas to run a course very
soon.

“We hope to do a lot of
improvement in that area so we
can bring all of our coaches up to
the modern day techniques of
coaching,” she said.





intend to engage the services of.

f f Lei



i By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



DAVIS Cupper Ryan Sweeting
has been afforded the opportuni-
ty to travel with the International
Tennis Federation’s 18-and-under
International Junior team to
Europe this summer.

Over the course of a three-
month period, Sweeting will get to
compete in a total of ten tourna-
ments that will start at the 27th
Tomeo Internazionale ‘Citta Di
Santa Croce’ in Santa Croce, Italy
from May 9-15 and end with the
Junior Championships at Wim-
bledon in England from June 25-
July 3.

Bahamas Lawn Tennis Associ-
ation’s president Mary Shelley
said it’s a major accomplishment
for the Bahamas to have Sweeting
travelling as a part of the tour.

Sweeting is in Florida training

MIAMI HER



with his Davis Cup team-mate,
Marvin Rolle, who also serves as
his hitting coach.

He was unavailable for com-
ments.

Sweeting, 17, will also get to
compete in the following tourna-
ments:

° 46th Italian Junior Open in
Milan, Italy from May 16-22.

e 41st Astrid Bowl in Belgium
from May 23-28.

e International Junior Cham-
pionships of France in Paris from
May 29-June 5,

© Queens Club Invitational in
London from June 7-12.

¢ Training Camp in London

‘from June 13-18.

e LTA International Junior
Tennis Championships in Roe-
hampton, London from June 19-
24,

The Wimbledon tournament at

ALD SPORTS







the end. of the tour, will be his
second Grand Slam for the year.
In January, Sweeting played in
the Australian Open in Mel-

‘bourne where he advanced to the

quarter-final round in the junior
boys singles before he lost in
straight sets to number six seed
Sergei Bubka.

Team

He also played doubles with
Miquel Angel Reyes-Varela from
Mexico. They went to the second
round before losing in three sets
to the American team of Jesse
Levine and Michael Shabaz.

Shelley, who got an opportuni-
ty to watch Sweeting play in the
first round of the American Zone
One Davis Cup tie in Curacao in
February against the Netherlands
Antilles, was thrilled when asked
to comment on this major



VOLLEYBALL
toy aeY Vol
HOPING FOR

GYM ACCESS
giclee

@ RYAN SWEETING in
action during a Davis Cup match
in Netherlands Antilles. Sweeting —
will get to compete in ten tourna- —

ments in Europe this summer.

Davis Cup star set to

European tour

achievement by Sweeting.

“J cannot tell you, I’m just
jumping up and down because
this is a wonderful opportunity
for Ryan,” Shelley explained. “To
be selected to go on this tour, this
will really give him the experi-
ence that he wouldn’t have expe-
rienced anywhere else.”

Shelley, who will be seeking her .
second consecutive one-year term
in office when the BLTA holds
its annual general meeting and
election of officers on April 27,
said that to have the entire tour
fully paid for by the ITA makes it
even more encouraging for
Sweeting.

At the end of the tour, Sweeting
should be heading back home to
travel with the BLTA’s team to.
Colombia to compete in the sec-
ond round of the American
Zone IT Davis Cup tie from July
15-17.




WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005



Ground-breaking legislation
to address Bahamian heritage

Proposed Act to
establish first National
Arts, Culture, Science
and Technology Council



@ By ERICA WELLS

THE question of national iden-
tity is a complex one, with many
possible answers, depending on
who’s asking the question and
who’s trying to answer it.

For Bahamians, that question is
especially difficult, given the per-
ception that the Bahamas is far
behind its regional neighbours
when it comes to heritage aware-
ness and cultural development.

But The National Cultural
Development Commission is try-
ing to make that question easier
to answer-through a ground-
breaking piece of legislation that
will address the all important but
often ignored issue of heritage
and artistic development.

. “The commission is interested
in gathering heritage, which
shores up, makes you stronger
and gives you your identity,”
Winston Saunders, co-chairman
of the National Cultural Devel-
opment Commission, told The
Arts in an interview at the com-
mission’s offices in Victoria Gar-
dens.

What Mr Saunders is referring
to is a proposed Act that will
establish the country’s first
National Arts, Culture, Science
and Technology Council.

A draft copy is now before
Cabinet and the commission is
hoping that government will bring
it to Parliament sooner than later.

The Council, along with invest-
ing in talented people and
ground-breaking ideas, will act as
an umbrella organisation for all
areas of the arts, fostering music,

literature, drama, dance and fine:

arts, and bringing some order to
the separate art events now tak-
ing place in sporadic periods.

Activities

“Too many things are happen-
ing in this country, that just spring
up. (The council) will act like an
umbrella for all of these activi-
ties that go-on harem scarem,”
says Mr Saunders, a noted play-
wright.

The council will also have the
power to establish a creative arts
centre and a national theatre, and
produce shows and festivals. And
it will provide an important outlet
for existing artists, related organ-
isations and performing groups.

This comprehensive piece of
legislation will hopefully help
bring the Bahamas more in line
with what has been going on in
other Caribbean countries for
years, in terms of cultural devel-
opment and its value.

Of all of the recommendations
made by the almost three-year-
old commission so far, this one,
says Mr Saunders, is considered
the most pressing.

One of the first projects on the
council’s agenda has to do with
compiling and properly docu-
menting the Bahamas’ music,
dances and stories.

Ethnomusicologist, Dr Nina
Wood, a Bahamian who lives in
Florida, will travel the Family
Islands with director of the
Bahamas National Youth Choir
Cleophas Adderley to study local
music and record the oral tradi-
tions that are in danger of being
lost forever.

One of the purposes behind the
project is to create a proper data

base that will go a long way in-

helping to form in a stronger idea
of Bahamian national identity.
Along the same lines, a repre-

Se

sentative from Britain’s NESTA
(National Endowment for Sci-
ence, Technology and the Arts),
will visit some of the local schools
for a project that will require stu-
dents to interview their elders,
which will be recorded for
research purposes.

It is projects like these that Mr
Saunders and commission mem-
bers believe will help define for
the Bahamas a national identity,
and educate that element in soci-
ety that does not place value on
local arts.

Mr Saunders believes that the
country’s delayed cultural devel-



“The

commission
is interested
in gathering

heritage,

which
shores up,
makes you
stronger
and gives
you your
identity.”

Winston Saunders,
co-chairman of the
National Cultural
Development

‘ Commission.



opment has something to do with
the Bahamas’ rapid development
of its tourism and finance prod-
ucts.

~ “Over the years of develop-
ment, little time was given, ona
wide scale, for scholarship or aes-
thetic,” he says.

“We just went by leaps and
bounds and never really thought
of aesthetics as that serious, much
less as economically viable.
(Some) saw artists, dancers,
actors, as just having fun.” —

The single-minded focus on
that tourist product, although
important for the country’s eco-
nomic sustainability, has con-
tributed to the neglect of heritage
awareness, Mr Saunders believes.

“When the country’s vision and
leadership is poised only on the
$400 million, the $500 million
investment, you tend to sell out a
little bit,” he says, adding that he
does not know of any Heads of
Agreement or contract with a for-

eign hotel investor that encour-

ages a display of local arts.

The economic viability will also
be an issue addressed by the
council.

In terms of living off of one’s
art, the most success has been
seen locally by the country’s fine
artists, who have had relative suc-
cess at home, when compared to
actors, dancers or writers.

The commission has recom-

mended that funding for the
council be drawn from a national
lottery, an idea that the religious
community is vehemently
opposed to. Funding for the coun-
cil is very important if it is to car-
ry out its grand goals, and help
ease the burden already placed
on the Endowment for the Per-
forming Arts, the Lyford Cay
Foundation and Cable Bahamas
Cares Foundation, which provide
much-needed funding for the
country’s many talented local
artists.

Heritage

When the commission was
appointed in 2002, it was given a
specific mandate, along with its
focus on heritage and artistic
development, it was also made
responsible for:

e Establishing a heroes park
and the appropriate location for
the park;

e Appropriate recognition of
Bahamians throughout “our

@ WINSTON Saunders, co-chairman

time” and the manner in which
they are recognised and;

* The specific examination of
the nature in which the country
goes about establishing an hon-
ours system. ,

The commission, which has
already made numerous reports
to government, has started a pro-
gramme of Family Island Heroes
Parks and is in the process of hon-
ouring deserving Bahamians via
naming ceremonies and the rec-
ommendation of an honours sys-
tem that will replace the existing
Queen’s Honours.

A street in The Grove has
already been named after
Bahamian folk artist Amos Fer-
guson; and plans have also been
made to name a road near the
Broadcasting Corporation of the
Bahamas after the much-loved
broadcaster Rusty Bethel.

The local honours system will
comprise various categories, from
the most special category of
National Hero, to an Order of
Distinction, which will encompass
a vast category of people who



have contributed to the country’s
development.

Mr Saunders pointed out that
Jamaica established its national
honours system in 1985, and since
then has named only seven
national heroes.

Though the commission is
expecting a backlash from its rec-
ommendation to do away with
the Queen’s Honours, its research
shows that most of those ques-
tioned on the idea are very
accepting of the concept.

There is also the suggestion
that the National Honours will
run alongside the Queen’s Hon-
ours, which Mr Saunders feel is
bad idea. It is feared that the
Bahamian honours system will
seem inferior next to the British
system, given the psyche of some
Bahamians. Under the proposed
national honours system, a spe-
cial panel will select nominees
from recommendation forms.

“All of this is to try and ele-
vate us as a people. I think that
for too long we have sort of
knocked down and not built our-



of the National Cultural Development Commission and noted playwright is pictured at a
street naming ceremony for renowned Bahamian artist Amos Ferguson. The ceremony is one of numerous ways the commission has rec-
ommended to celebrate Bahamian artists and cultural heroes.

(Photo: Peter Ramsay)

_ Selves up,” says Mr Saunders.

The commission has been
working quietly since it was estab-
lished almost three years ago and
while its regular numbers have
dwindled its determination to ful-
fill its mandate has not weakened.

It continues to address con-
cerns related to the “migratory
aspects of our land” and how that
will impact the Bahamas’ cultur-
al development; the influence of
American culture on young
Bahamians; and the expansion of
local culture beyond Junkanoo.

More than anything, Mr Saun-
ders hopes that the recommen-
dations of the council will help
usher in a renaissance of the arts
that will be sustained for genera-
tions to come.

“What has happened is that we
have bent ourselves to entertain
the tourists, and we don’t enter-
tain ourselves,” says Mr Saun-
ders. “And to me, that is one of
the things that the (council) can
help bring about, teach us to cel-
ebrate us first, to entertain our-
selves first.”
PAGE 2C, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005

Questions of gender and



The following is the third
and final installment of a
lecture delivered as part of
the Sir Lynden Pindling
Memorial Lecture Series on
March 22 at the Dundas Cen-
tre for the Performing Arts.

@ PART THREE
By PATRICIA
GLINTON-MEICHOLAS

OWING to the unfortunate
fact that we have adopted
Junkanoo as a paradigm for the
development of society, culture
and economy, we have failed to
put sufficient emphasis on how
gender identity is constructed in
the Bahamas. While we bemoan
the rise in domestic and public

psychological and physical abuse —

of women and children, the pub-
lic violence among men, we pay
scant attention to the fact that all
too many Bahamian men build
their manhood and self-conse-
quence on domination of their
peers and of women and, in the
words of Martin Duberman, on
an “unmodulated resort to vio-
lence as the preferred means for
resolving conflict”.

The question needs to be asked
and answered as to what extent
gender identity construction and
notions of female and male pow-
er are bound up in the rush to
early sexual relationships and ear-
ly maternity and paternity. Might
this not aid us in formulating
more effective strategies for stem-
ming the floodtide of teen preg-
nancies, HIV/AIDS transmission
and the ‘upward spiral of domestic
violence in this country?

We need to examine more
closely how Bahamian youth
define achievement. For many, it

is “thug life”, exemplified by gold-.

plated American “gangsta” rap-
pers with no high school educa-




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LUBE We honor

« T itears axiditional

tion and their East Coast-West
_ Coast gun battles; for others, it is
the local drug dealer, who has
managed to parlay as little edu-
cation into an expensive lifestyle
and the slavish worship of many
in their community. For some
young girls, the preferred mod-
els are often the women on the
receiving end of the sexual atten-
tions and largesse of the afore-
mentioned thugs. Surrounded as
they are by so many celebrated
models of easy gain, how, then,
do we expect our youth, espe-
cially the young men, to endure
the slow and painful process of
success that is achieved through
education and other forms of self-
discipline and education?

Patriotism

What is even scarier is that all

too many Bahamians do not have _

a concept of patriotism in and of

itself. Bahamian identity tends ©

only to emerge and be claimed
in opposition and der 3 tion of
some other ethnicity .. identi-
ty—as with “coolie” and “Hait-
ian

Where there is a well-defined

allegiance, it tends not to be to |
the collective but to individual °

achievement and gain. For a seg-

ment of the population allegiance’

tends to be to trends, factions and
the current music stars. A grow-
ing sentiment across sectors is
what your country can do for you
rather than what you can do for
your country, personified as “the
Government dem”, the ultimate
godfather.

We need to be concerned at to
the extent to which political
patronage, cronyism, nepotism
and the consequent failure to
establish a meritocracy in The
Bahamas influence young

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Bahamians’ perception of their
chances of social and economic
mobility under the present sys-
tem?

What is likely to occasion even
more universal damage is policy-
makers’ neglect of the environ-
ment and failure to examine in
depth the links between the

. degradation of the marine envi-

ronment and the failure of a great
many Bahamians to extend their
radius of responsibility beyond
home and Junkanoo group.

Casuarina McKinney, director of
Bahamas Reef Environment
Educational Foundation
(BREEF) offers the following
insight into local beliefs and cus-

‘toms that endanger the marine.

environment:

“There is a general mindset that
the ocean is infinite- an infinite
place to harvest resources (conch,
fish etc) and an infinite place to

‘dump waste. I frequently
encounter fishermen who tell me
that the ocean will never run out

despite the fact that we have so.

much evidence to the contrary.
One mindset is that God put the
fish on the earth and that humans
cannot damage a Godly creation.
I prefer to look at it the other way,
we are stewards of God’s earth
and so we should look after it. It is
rare to hear preachers speaking
this message, and I would like to
hear it more often.”

Not the least of the problems
politics have created is a retarda-
tion in the development of social
capital, which refers to the ability

.of distinct groups in society to
extend their radius of trust and
loyalty beyond the confines of the
group to which they are bound
to a horizon that aligns with the
boundary of nation or the nation-
al collective. Francis Fukuyama,
Hirst Professor of Public Policy at






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George Mason University, has
noted that when people examine
a culture, they pay too much
attention to consumer behaviour,
which he brands “the most super-
ficial aspects of culture”. What
he says we should be more con-
cerned about are the deeper
moral norms that affect how peo-
ple link together and define eco-
nomic activity.

In brief, political patronage, .

patently self-serving interpreta-
tions of holy writ, tourism and a
variety of ill-considered cultural
policies and practices have creat-
ed a new plantation, with new
dependencies and a new elite,
posited not on colour but on
political affiliation, opportunism
and wealth. It is a plantation on
which many Bahamians are
enslaved and robbed of personal
motivation by promises of a
chicken in every pot, a Lexus in
every garage, with minimal effort
on the part of the consumer of
these benefices, and all liberally
seasoned with a healthy dose of
deliberately promoted i ignorance
and intractable prejudices.

Leadership

All too many of our primary
political and civic institutions are
conspiring to perpetuate an
authoritarian system in which the
people are entirely dependent on
their leaders for direction and sus-
tenance. We are dependent on
the Member of Parliament for
our constituency to give us a job
or coerce someone else into giv-
ing us a job. We are count on that
same MP to keep us on that job,
again by coercion, even when we
prove unproductive or dishonest.
We are dependent on our church
leaders to tell us how to vote on
the issues of a referendum, and
many of them, in turn, are guided

by their political affiliations in
directing their congregations in
the most basic obligations of citi-
zenship.

Ultimately, the greatest con-
cern, as relates to the quality of
future national development is
the indication that, beyond the
well-worn “The Bahamas is a
Christian nation”, statements of
identity reflecting values, espe-
cially values of social, economic,
scientific and technological striv-
ing, progress and achievement are
rare. There are few, if any, popu-
lar expressions that speak of
philosophies to guide a balanced
intersection of ecological, social
and economic imperatives in cul-
tural development. Nor are there
allusions to aspirations or ideals
such as integrity, freedom,
democracy and brotherhood.
And while there has been much
to indicate the existence of col-
lective intent at the level of fac-
tion, there. is little evidence that
there are collective ideals for the
nation, except for such worthy
concepts as may: be enshrined in
The Bahamas Constitution.

While Bahamians bitterly
bemoan the fate of our youth,

witness how little investment has -

gone into the sociocultural devel-
opment of Bahamian children
beyond the classroom. Where are
the child- or teen-oriented super-
vised community cultural and
recreational centres that promote

an appreciation for our heritage

and culture and foster the growth
of positive values? To what extent
are citizenship and ethical training

~ incorporated in the national cur-

riculum? How many of us have’

been taught the provisions of the
Bahamas Constitution, especially
with regard to our rights and

- responsibilities?

Perhaps the very worst of it is
that political factions, unions and
other groups have fostered what

THE TRIBUNE.

has been called a “limited aegis
of identification and trust,’

impeding the development of a,
national perspective and the:
social capital needed for eco-:
nomic and social progress. It.
seems that there is sufficient indi-.
cation in all this to make an asser-.,
tion that the work of nation build-.
ing is far from complete in The
Bahamas. Moreover, through:
malfeasance, neglect, indifference,
and ignorance we are creating
values, attitudes and behaviour;
inimical to an equitable partici-,
pation in the global economy and,
the maintenance of the relative.
peace we have come to enjoy in
our land. At

r

Progress |

If one accepts the foregoing as
realistic assessment of the nation-
al profile, obviously the need for
change is indicated. At the Sec-
ond Global Knowledge Confer-
ence of 2000, the fourth Prime
Minister of Malaysia, Dr
Mahathir Mohamad, offered
advice as to how developing
states wishing to make progress in
the newest globalisation revolu-.
tion can help themselves:

“We must be prepared to exam-.
ine every sacred cow, to give up:
every pre-conceived notion. In the,
pursuit of information, knowledge
and wisdom, we must be prepared.
to face reality. We must embrace,
change, pursue novelty, crave.
innovation. We must learn. Even
harder still, we must unlearn.”

This statement encompasses
the fundamentals of change, but is
worth noting a few specifics for.
the Bahamian context. For this,
country, moving into global com-
petition and creating a more just-
society requires creating a true

meritocracy. While political



@ ARTIST, writer and curator Christopher Cozier.

Trinidadian artist
Ozier to give a
visual presentation

TRINIDADIAN artist, writer and curator Christopher Cozi-
er will be the first guest of the National Art Gallery’s Artist and

Critic Programme.

Cozier will give a visual presentation at the gallery on Thurs-
day, April 21, starting at 6pm. And visit local artists in-studio to
discuss their work in relation to regional and international

movements in art.

He is an artist who makes mixed media work, including video,
sound and live performances, and installations with drawings,
constructions and appropriated objects.

Awards

Cozier has had solo exhibitions in Trinidad and Barbados, par-
ticipated in biennials in Cuba and the Dominican Republic,
published works in Small Axe (editor), The Massachusetts
Review (critic) and Art Journal, and has received numerous
awards and grants including the 2004 Pollock-Krasner Grant.

This NAGB programme seeks to bring in regional and inter-
national artists to the Bahamas to present and discuss their

work with Bahamian audiences.

The guest artist and or critic first gives a visual presentation
at the National Art Gallery where they pay particular attention
to shifts in media, subject, content, philosophies etc. in their body
of work, and then visit with local artists in-studio to discuss
their work in relation to regional and international movements

in art.

This event is free and open to the public. Call the gallery at

328-5800 for more information.
M7

THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005, PAGE 3C





identity in the Bahamas

patronage, cronyism and nepo-
tism will always be with us, we
need not allow them to prevail to
the point where excellence dis-
appears from the community, and
the emperor parades naked, while
the whole community blindly
applauds the quality of his cou-
ture. In short, these negative
influences cannot be allowed to
compromise the chances for this
country, its people and products
to find respect and acceptance in
the international community. It
is time to make use of indepen-
dent juries and task forces to pre-
serve some degree of objectivity

- in judging national competitions,

distributing national awards, iden-
tifying national heroes and insti-
tutional leaders, in the design and
construction of public buildings,
in the formulation of educational
curricula, and in the development

- and appointment of national insti-

tutions.

Harmony

For us, moving forward means
promoting a more harmonious
society, the national curriculum
cannot dichotomize culture and
history. There should be neither
Loyalist history nor Black history
taught in our schools, or promot-
ed in the media, but Bahamian
history. We need to understand
that Black History Month is an
imperative for African Ameri-
cans, who represent a minority
group in the United States still
struggling for an equal voice in
the life of their country. If the
history of Africans was neglected
under colonialism and white
minority rule in The Bahamas, as
indeed it was, it takes only a few
strokes of the official planning
and legislative pens in this major-
ity-black, majority-governed
nation to give it an honoured and
rightful place in the national cur-
riculum.

‘By the same token, white
Bahamians must teach their chil-
dren to be fierce in celebrating
their black brethren and fierce in
protecting that aspect of their
country’s heritage that is now
being foolishly isolated as “black

._ history and heritage”,.Further-

more, the men, women and chil-
dren who live in the plush sub-

urbs, who have never pasted a '

Junkanoo costume or beat a
drum, must be recognised and
celebrated as Bahamians as true
as the Junkanoo purist who lives
in Mason’s Addition in the heart
of the inner city, whose swaddling
clothes were made of goatskin
and whose first rattle was a cow-
bell.

A better, stronger Bahamas in
the future means increasing and
maintaining democracy, and for
this our country needs engaged
citizens. Civic education cannot
simply be adjuncts to the content
syllabi. The curricula of our
schools must include substantive
programmes and courses to teach



@ Revel in the Arts —
the event of the season,
The Lyford Cay Schol-
ars Association fund-
raiser is set for Satur-
day April 16 at Mount-
batten House and Gar-
dens, beginning at 7pm.
Tickets cost $75, which
entitles you to a
gourmet selection of
food, wine, the oppor-
tunity to bid on art by
the country’s best artists
and much more.

All proceeds go to the
Harry C Moore Memor-
ial Scholarship in the
Arts.

For tickets contact
dionne@coralwave.com
or call 323-8962.

@ Talking Canvases,
a solo exhibition by artist
Marlon Hunt @ the Cen-
tral Bank Art Gallery
through April 28.

@ Dr Rosalyn W Floyd,
a prominent African-
American pianist, will per-
form at Government
House on Friday, April 22,
8pm. For more informa-
tion contact Artists Guild
International at 326-3608 or
558-7570.

@ The National Collection
@ the National Art Gallery of
the Bahamas, an exhibition
that takes the viewer on a
journey through the history of
fine art in the Bahamas.

It features signature pieces
from the national collection,
including recent acquisitions
by Blue Curry, Antonius
Roberts and Dionne Ben-

4

{

civic knowledge, skills and virtues.
In his essay “Global Trends for
Civic Education”, John J Patrick
notes that “effective civic educa-
tion is an indispensable means to
the establishment and mainte-
nance of democratic ideals and
institutions.” Patrick says in
another essay “Political and civic
engagement, the constructive
interactions of citizens with their
civil society and government,
requires intellectual capital —
knowledge of democratic princi-
ples and practices and cognitive
capacity to apply it to public
affairs.”

In light of increasing globaliza-
tion of trade and The Bahamas’
inevitable participation in region-
al trade combines, education must
serve to create and deepen bene-
ficial respect and reciprocity
between Bahamians and racial
and ethnic groups in partner and
other nations. In other words, we
should not allow the heat from
our navels, in our insular con-
templation thereof, to cloud our
world view or our vision of the
future.

The Ministry of Education has
imported native speakers to teach
Spanish in the primary schools,
so one can assume there is an
understanding of the importance
of being able to communicate
with trade partners. However,
the education paradigm for the
global age must be constructed
on the understanding that

satisfactory communication
requires more than mutual lin-
guistic intelligibility.

Manuel Guilherme argues that
the foreign language curriculum
must “assume a much more
prominent role, if not centre
stage, in the general school cur-
riculum when it comes to dis-
cussing and improving racial and
social relations and helping all
students to acquire the knowl-
edge, attitudes and critical social
skills indispensable to successful-
ly interact in inter-cultural situa-
tions and to take personal, social,
and political action that will help
make the world more democratic
and just.”

But while developing “human

capital” to propel-the national -: .

economy into equitable partici-
pation in global trade‘is of great
importance, development of per-
sons must be central to the edu-
cation paradigm. As Michael W
Apple says:

“The ‘practical’, could never be
divorced from historical, ethical,
and political understanding with-
out losing something in the
process. Schooling should never
be seen as simply training for
industries’ needs.”

There is much to indicate that
economic progress and orderly
social development will, almost
certainly, depend on the extent
to which we develop social capi-
tal, which Francis Fukuyama
defines as “cooperative social

ey ated |



@ Bond, an exhibition of
recent works by mother
and son artists Sue Ben-
nett-Williams and Jason
Bennett will run this month
at Popopstudios Gallery in
Chippingham. The exhibi-
tion features paintings,
mixed media and ceramics.

jamin-Smith. Gallery hours,
Tuesday-Saturday,
llam—4pm. Call 328-5800 to
book tours.

@ Past, Present and Per-
sonal: The Dawn Davies Col-
lection @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, Villa
Doyle, West and West Hill
Streets. The exhibition is part
of the NAGB’s Collector’s
Series. Gallery hours, Tues-
day-Saturday, 1lam—4pm. Call
328-5800 to book tours.

relationships based on norms of
honesty and reciprocity.”

In this country, a variety of
biases still hold subtle but pow-
erful sway. We must work to rid
ourselves of them or, more real-
istically, mitigate their influence
through education and legislation.
There is an urgent need to
address the fact that many
Bahamians are still discriminat-
ed against on the basis of sexual
orientation and the national ori-
gin of their parents. There is need
to recognise and address those
prejudices that have installed
glass ceilings or solid core doors
as immovable barriers to oppor-
tunity for far too many. What is
even more tragic is that, in second

Cultures

millennium since our Lord
walked among us and even after
the terrifying lessons from Bosnia,
Rwanda, the Ivory Coast and the
Sudan in recent times, we are
allowing the seeds of ethnic
cleansing to sown in our own little
Bahamaland, while we insou-
ciantly consume our morning
newspaper, doughnut and coffee
and agree to “Send ‘em back”.

The way forward for develop-

ment in The Bahamas must entail
recognition and respect for the
multiplicity of cultures that make
up the Bahamian culture com-
plex, and an increase in self-
esteem among young black men
and women that does not depend
for its existence on some short-
lived and often dangerous route
to power. To this end, we must
learn and write more of our own
history, more about the many
facets, of our heritage. We must
demonstrate that better and more
enduring sources of power exist
within the individual that cannot
be alienated. The necessary con-
comitant is a far greater commit-

ment to research, writing and.

publication, with funding assis-
tance from the national budget
and agreements with foreign
investors. Our primary school stu-
dents must not he forced to

acquire their knowledge of
Bahamian history, environment
tourist >

and culture from
brochures, posters and postage
stamps, especially those celebrat-
ing pirates.

The way forward must include
if only a modicum of account-
ability on the part cf religious
ministries, in light of their influ-
ence on socioeconomic develop-
ment in The Bahamas. Govern-
ment policy, for instance, might
require churches to be licensed,
and show evidence of supporting
non-exclusionary social pro-
grammes of quality in order to
qualify for rebates on Customs
duties and other forms of taxa-
tion. In the same vein, the church-

Environment

es can become a primary vehicle
for much-needed civic, family

planning and parenting educa-

tion. No doubt this would be too
hot a political potato for govern-
ment administrations to take hold
of, especially for those politicians
who put the “out to lunch” signs
on their doors when any critical
issue arises. The best way to deal
with this situation is, perhaps, to
cultivate a more discerning pop-
ulace that will be more careful in
their choice of shepherds.

The lack of a culture of con-
servation and appreciation of the
environment is evident in the
insouciant boating and fishing
practices of locals, the blind eyes
turned to the harm done to the
marine environment by yacht
tourism, the pollution of our
verges, beaches and waters and

the callous destruction of hills,

forests and wetlands in uncaring
pursuit of maximum concrete
expansion. There is so close an
identification between geograph-
ical territory and nation, the firm-
ness of our grip on tomorrow will
depend heavily upon protective
national policies. It will require

. fostering the proper bonds and
protective attitudes between the -

people and their territorial space,
beyond the visceral repudiation

of Haitians and, to a lesser

degree, other foreign nationals?
Can we not teach.our people. to

love our land and waters as much

as Junkanoo?

As the media are a powerful.
force inthe process of accultura- <
tion and cultural development,. ”-
more attention must be paid, not:
to attempts at suppressing for-.

eign or local media,:but.to coun-
tervailing, productive measures.

It would be far better to institute.
a code of ethics for media pro-
duction, publishing and broad- .-

casting, accompanied by.the.cul-

tivation of standards of excellence .
in research, writing, publishing...
and production technology, radio.’

Enterprise

and television programming
through better training and recog-
nition systems..For how long will

politics pit the minor utterances:

of a parliamentary backbencher

at the ribbon cutting for-the ©
launch of a less than spectacular.
project against the country’s:need _

of the broadcast media to edu-
cate Bahamians about citizenship,
history and culture?

In Bahamian culture resides

another potential economic .

strength — the ease with which
Bahamians conceive of and set in
motion informal entrepreneurial

ventures — witness the peanut

man and other the regular road-

‘side vendors, the “hackers” (unli-

censed public transportation), and
the seasonal roadside enterprises
such as holiday gift baskets and
the selling of land crabs and
guineps. If this spirit and
dynamism could be harnessed
and regulated, it could have the

power to reduce unemployment.

and poverty. Fukuyama points
out that it is at this level that the
real entrepreneurial energy lies,
and even the World Bank recog-
nises this and has adjusted its poli-

cies to advocate micro lending.
In the new world order, we
would be wise to discard our
largely unfounded antipathies and
strengthen our ties with the peo-
ples of the region, with whom we
share mutual intelligibility in his-
tory, geography, culture, eco-
nomics and, in many cases, lan-
guage. Together, we are approx-
imately 34 million strong, which
would permit us, in many areas,
to at least develop highly benefi-
cial economies of scale. Bahamas
Director General of Tourism Vin-
cent Vanderpool Wallace appears

-to be like-minded as quoted in
- Basil Springer’s column of Mon-
~ day, March 10, 2003 in the Bar-

bados Advocate:

“If we could create the United
States. of the Caribbean tomor-
row, we would become overnight
one of the blocs with which the
rest of the world had to reckon.
As it stands, we exist in such small
insular and isolated pockets that

‘the forces and talent that we have
. collectively can never be
unleashed.” °

The~.. general Bahamian
response to the Caribbean Single
Market Economy is nowhere

‘near ‘as warm: Thus far, The
‘Bahamas has refused to. accede

to the free movement of skilled

persons within the Caribbean
Community, although one of the '
well-acknowledged characteris-
‘tics of ‘global: trade is rivalry for

-Conclusion

prifesionils with the most com-

petitive-skills, no matter what
their nationality. Were this coun-

‘try to agree to. some flexibility in

this area, immigration policies

- could become an element of strat-

egy in ¢conomic development,
rather than an agent of ancient
and often ill-founded prejudices

~ with a focus on repatriation of
aliens.

Recently; I have had the good

* fortune to read much of Catholic
‘social-thought and have it eluci-

~ dated by an honest and thought-
- fully intellectual friend. I have

been: particularly struck by the

‘tenets outlined by the Jesuit

Father William Byron in his arti-
cle entitled“Ten Principles-of

people desirous of building a
strong and enlightened society,
we would do well-to learn and

hold fast to them:

@ Human Dignity: “Every per-
son—regardless of race, sex, age,
national origin, religion, sexual
orientation, employment or
employnient status, health, intel-
ligence, achievement or any oth-
er differentiating characteristic—
is worthy of respect. The human
person. «-is never a means, always
an end.”

@ Respect for Human Life:
“Human life at every stage of
development and decline is pre-

cious and therefore worthy of

protection and respect.”
. @ Association: “The center-
piece.of society is the family; fam-

». ily .stability must always be pro-

ey
Catholic Social Thought”.:An' °

tected and never undermined. By
association with others—in fami-
lies and in other social institu-
tions that foster growth, protect

‘dignity and promote the common

good—human persons achieve
their fulfillment.

@ Participation: “...Everyoné
has a part to play in the making of
a good society. Each person has
the right not to be shut out from
participating in those institutions
that are necessary for human ful-
fillment. Nor should anyone be
excluded from participation in the
decisions and the formation of
policies that directly affect his or
her personal human develop-
ment.”

@ Preferential Protection for
the Poor and Vulnerable: “If the

good of all, the common good, is .

to prevail, preferential protection
must move toward those affected
adversely by the absence of pow-
er and the presence of privation.”

@ Solidarity: “Learning to
practice the virtue of solidarity
means learning that ‘loving our
neighbour’ has global dimensions
in an interdependent world.”

@ Stewardship: The concept of:

stewardship calls us not only to a
moral responsibility for protecting
our natural inheritance, but also
to good citizenship and the use
of our personal talents for the
common good. ‘

® Subsidiarity: “The principle
of subsidiarity puts a proper lim-
it on government by insjsting that
no higher level of organisation
should perform any function that
can be handled efficiently and
effectively at a lower level of
organisation by human perspns
who, individually or in groups,
are closer to the problems and
closer to the ground.”

@® Human Equality: “Equality
of all persons comes from their
essential dignity... While differ-
ences in talents are a: part of

God’s plan, social and cultural *

discrimination in fundamental
rights...are not compatible with
God’s design.”

‘© The Common Good: results
from the intersection of all the
foregoing virtues, resulting in

social conditions that allow peo-:

ple to reach their full potential
and to realise their human digni-



I alone with wofds drawn from
President .John,, Kennedy’s
address to the Irish Parliament
on-June 20, 1963, when he spoke
encouragingly about the poten-
tial of small states:

“All the Werle owes much to
the little ‘five feet high’ nations.
The greatest art of the world was
the work of little nations. The most

enduring literature of the world’

came from little nations. The hero-
ic deeds that thrill humanity
through generations were the
deeds of little nations fighting for
their freedom ... the humblest
nation of all the world, when clad
in the armour ofa righteous cause
is str onger.than all.’

© Mrs Glinton-Meicholas is
the president of the Bahamas
Association for Cultural Studies.

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PAGE 4C, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



Old-school reggae

fans get an ‘earful’ |
Concepts holds ‘A Natural
Mystic (Reggae Flashback)’

& By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

ans of old-school reggae
got an earful on Saturday
night at Concepts’ “A
Natural Mystic (Reggae
Flashback)”.

The company, which started just a
year ago and enjoyed success with its
inaugural event, (last year’s Heavens
Angels benefit party at Mountbatten
House in aid of the Cancer Society),
decided to hold its second function
with reggae music fans in mind.

“This is the first event I am doing
on my own. We have culture music
right now, and the dancehall thing.
Every other week there is .a dance-
hall instruction party, but I know that
there are a lot of diehard reggae fans
out there. So we wanted to do some-
thing especially for them,” said Leah
Davis, head of Concepts.

“You know, take it back, take it
way back a couple years, and focus on
the music,” she added.

The courtyard of Pirates of Nassau
was the spot on Saturday night, and
into Sunday morning as reggae fans
started to trickle in very slowly when
doors opened at 9pm. But the true
late-night Nassau party goers didn’t
make their entrance until about
11.30pm.

“Naturally, Bahamians party late,
so I expected it to be later crowd,” Ms
Davis told Tribune Entertainment.

But as the crowd thickened Alpha
Sounds continued to play slow paced
music from artists like Barrington
Levy, Freddy McGregor, Dennis
Brown, Everton Blender, Junior
Reid, Half Pint, UB40, Garnet Silk,
Ninja Man, Super Cat, Cobra, Court-
ney Melody, Shabba Ranks, Yellow-
man and Michael Rose, to name a
few.

“We had a cross section of people
that turned out. Everybody was well
behaved, it was just a nice mellow
vibe and everybody seemed to really
be having a good time,” said Ms
Davis, commenting on the success of
the event.

Though the dress code: ‘of irie
colours was not heeded by all, the
mood was energetic. Each person was
fitted with an irie coloured wristband

- and given a stick of incense, in keep-
ing with the natural mystic reggae
theme, which according to Concepts
was chosen to pay homage to Bob
Marley who would have celebrated
his 60th birthday this year.

“He (Marley) was, in my opinion,
the one who started the whole reg-
gae music off,” Ms Davis added.

Anku of Thought Katcher, who
came to enjoy the music, told Tribune
Entertainment that he “totally
enjoyed” the occasion.

“It was nice. The people who came
out really appreciated the music. We
would consider it to be old school
reggae because this is the music that
was around in our teenage years:and
early 20s. Everything was just really
tight and no hassle, ya know. You
had the incense burning...and the
music was lickin’,” he recalls.

As one who loves reggae music,
Natural Mystic was the ideal place
for him to be on Saturday night. “I
also love other music, but roots reg-
gae is where I am rooted. It has a
message alone with the music.”

Along with playing what he con-

siders to be roots reggae, Anku notes
that the event also featured dance-
hall songs. But very different from
the dancing instruction and vulgar
dancehall songs that are in regular
rotation today.

“Dancehall back in the day had
more soul. They were speaking about
something, about somebody’s strug-
gle, like Barrignton Levy’s ‘Work’,”
he explains.

According to Ms Davis, the mystic
vibes didn’t get wrapped up until
around 3am, but apparently nobody
seemed to mind.

Thirty-five year old Michael Pratt,
who went to the event. with a friend,
told Tribune Entertainment that he
loved the combination of old school
reggae and a more mature crowd.
“Usually, you don’t get that any
more.”

The event was advertised for guys
who were 21 years old and older.

“Tt was all right, at least the music
and the atmosphere. There was no
violence, and you had people who
know how to conduct themselves,”
he noted.

Though Mr Pratt said that he was
one who came up on Bahamian music
and was not “exposed” to this type
of music, as he got older he devel-
oped a love for it.

On his appreciation for the music,
-he said: “It gives you a special feeling
because it’s what you call black man
music, African music. Most of the
singers send out positive vibes, and
they are singing about things that hap-
pened not only in Jamaica but all over
the world. And a lot of the things in
the music is out of the Bible.”

Because the event was received so
well, Ms Davis said that reggae lovers
can look forward to a Natural Mystic
2, or another party that will focus on
the reggae flashback aspect, which
will involve an even wider selection
from that genre of music.

“A lot of people have been asking
when the next one is coming up,” she
said. “In terms of the give-aways, we
were giving glow sticks and incense.
What people seem to like and to want
is just something different.”

@ LEAH Davis (left), head
of Concepts, and Maria
Marshall are all smiles
during Concepts’ “A
Natural Mystic (Reggae
Flashback)”.

(Photos courtesy of
Concepts)


























































’

@ FANS of old-school reggae music (pictured) had a blast during Saturday night’s event at Pirates of Nassau.



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Parties, Nightclubs
& Restaurants |



Pink and White Bashment @ BFM Diplomat Cen-
tre to launch the Kingdom Vibes TV Show Cable 12.
Friday, April 15 @ 7.30pm sharp. Appearing: Mr
Link, DJ Counsellor, Kristine, Solo and Chariots of
Fire. Admission: $12 (includes a free CD of your
choice). Tickets @ BFM, Faith Life, Oasis Music
Centre, The Jukebox, Bucks Gospel.

Girl Power, featuring Novie, Destra, Faye Ann
(Trini Road March Queen 2K3), Spice and Lady E.
@ Cable Beach Grounds. Saturday, April 16 @ Cable
Beach Grounds. Admission: $20 (advance), $25 (at
the gate). Ticket location: Alpha Sounds. Hosted
by JJ, backed by Visage.

Exotic Saturdays @ Fridays Soon Come starts
with 3 for $10 drink specials. Admission: $10 before
midnight and $15 after. Ladies free before 11pm.

Rave Saturdays @ Club Eclipse. DJ Scoobz spin-
ning the best in Old Skool. Admission $35, all inclu-
sive food and drink.

Fever @ Bahama Boom, Elizabeth St, downtown,
every Friday night. Admission $10 before midnight.
First 50 women get free champagne. First 50 men get
a free Greycliff cigar. Dress to impress. For VIP
reservations call 356-4612.

Cool Runnings is back with a Conscious Party @
Hard Rock Cafe, Charlotte St North every Friday.
Classic reggae style music. Admission $10.

Mellow Moods every Sunday @ Fluid Lounge
and Nightclub, Bay St, featuring hits from yesterday

old school reggae and rockers downstairs, and
golden oldies upstairs. Admission: Free. Doors epen
9pm.

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters Sports
Bar. Drink specials all night long, including karaoke
warm-up drink to get you started. Party from 8pm-
until.

Karaoke Nights @ Fluid Lounge and Nightclub. ,

Begins 10pm every Tuesday. Weekly winners select-
ed as Vocalist of the Week ~ $250 cash prize. Winner
selected at end of month from finalists - cash prize
$1,000. Admission $10 with one free drink.

Reggae Tuesdays @ Bahama Boom. Cover charge
includes a free Guinness and there should be lots of
prizes and surprises. Admission: Ladies $10 and
Men $15.

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports
Bar every Wednesday Spm-8pm. Free appetizers
and numerous drink specials.

Flash Nights @ Club Fluid every Thursday. The
ultimate Ladies Night. Join Nassau’s and Miami
Beach’s finest men. Ladies only before 11.30pm with
free champagne. Guys allowed after 11.30pm with
$20 cover. ,

The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday. Doors
open at 9pm, showtime 11.30pm. Cover charge $15.
$10 with flyer.

Fantasy Fridays @ Fluid Lounge, featuring late
“80s music in the VIP Lounge, Top of the Charts in
the Main Lounge, neon lights and Go Go dancers.
Glow sticks for all in before midnight. Admission:
Ladies free before 11pm, $15 after; Guys $20 all
night.

Dicky Mo’s Fridays @ Cable Beach. Happy Hour
- 3 for $10 mixed drinks and $1 shots.

Twisted Boodah Lounge @ Cafe Segafredo,
Charlotte St kicks off early this Friday at 6pm with
deep house to hard house music, featuring Craig-
BOO, Unkle Funky and Sworl’wide on the decks.

Chill Out Sundays @ Coco Loco, Sandyport, from
4pm-until, playing deep, funky chill moods with
world beats.

Sweet Sunday Chill Out Soiree Lounge, every
Sunday, 4pm-midnight @ Patio Grille, British Colo-
nial





ARO UN D

‘Revel in the Arts

REVEL in the Arts, a celebration of the
visual, musical and culinary arts, hosted by the
Lyford Cay Scholars’ Association (LCSA), will
_be held on Saturday, April 16 at 7pm at Mount-
batten House & Gardens, West Hill Street.

The gala‘cocktail benefits the Harry C Moore
Memorial Scholarship in the Arts, to fund the
education of Bahamian arts students. Thirty
well-known artists have donated artwork for a

- silent auction. Opening bids will begin at half

the value, providing the “rare” opportunity to
obtain your favourite artist’s work at very good
prices.

Hotel. é

Wet Sundays, every Sunday, noon-midnight @
Crystal Cay Beach. Admission $10, ladies free.

‘Carib Scene @ Club Fluid every Sunday. A night
of Caribbean, Latin and Reggae flavours for all
audiences. Latin Flair in the VIP Lounge; Old School
Reggae: and Soca in the Main Lounge. Ladies in
free before 11pm. $10 after 11pm. Men, $15 cover
charge.

Jay Mitchell and Hot KC @ Palm Court Lounge,
British Colonial Hilton, Wednesday-Thursday 8pm-
12am. :

Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley’s Restaurant &
Lounge, Eneas St off Poinciana Drive. Featuring
Frankie Victory at the key board in the After Dark
Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to midnight. Fine food
and drinks.

Paul Hanna, Tabatha and Gernie, and the
Caribbean Express perform at Traveller’s Rest, West
Bay St, every Sunday, 6.30pm-9.30pm.

The Arts

Revel in the Arts, a gala cocktial fundrais-
er celebrating the visual, musical and culi-
nary arts, will be held at Mountbatten House
& Gardens, West Hill Street on Saturday,
April 16. Featuring: an Art & Services auc-
tion; door prizes; live music; and Dine
Around, a culinary feast featuring the cuisine
of Nassau's most exclusive restaurants. Host-
ed by the Lyford Cay Scholars' Association
(LCSA). Dress: island elegance. Time: 7pm.
Proceeds in aid of the Lyford Cay Founda-
tion's Harry C Moore Memorial Scholarship
in the Arts. Tickets @ $75 can be purchased
by contacting Monique Hinsey, 362-4910; John
A C Benjamin, 394-9541; Mark A Jordan,
361-5220 ext 264; Erica James, oe 5800 ext
227.

Bond, an exhibition of recent works by
mother and son artists Sue Bennett-Williams
and Jason Bennett will run this month at
Popostudios Gallery in Chippingham. An all
day open house will be held on Saturday,
April 9, 12pm-7pm. The exhibition features
paintings, mixed media and ceramics.

Talking Canvases, a solo exhibition by artist



Revel in fine food, wine, live music, live food





demonstrations and much more.

The gala event will also introduce the much
anticipated “Dine Around”’, where cuisine from
the island’s finest restaurants will be available.
Guests will also have an opportunity to retain
the in-house services of some of the Bahamas’
top chefs, and the services of numerous pro-
fessionals in fields including graphic design,
personal care and assistance.

¢ For tickets @ $75, contact Monique Hinsey,
362-4910; John A C- Benjamin, 394-9541; Mark
A Jordan, 361-5220 ext 264; Erica James, 328-
5800 ext 227. Door prizes will also be avail-
able.



Marlon Hunt at the Central Bank Art

Gallery, Market St. The show runs through

April 28.

Henry Wallace, noted wood sculptor and
environmentalist of Red Bays, North Andros,

‘will be the featured artist in the National Art

Gallery’s Medium Specialist Series on Mon-
day April 11 and Tuesday, April 12, ‘6pm-9pm
in Room T-24 @ the College of the Bahamas.
Workshop participants will work with basic
tools, such as crosscut saw, the coping saw,
chisels and gouges. To register call 328-5800.

The workshop is for adults (age 18 and over).

Price: $35 members/$45 non-members.

The National Collection @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, an exhibition that takes
the viewer on a journey through the history of
fine art in the Bahamas. It features signature
pieces from the national collection, including
recent acquisitions by Blue Curry, Antonius
Roberts and Dionne Benjamin-Smith. Gallery
hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 1lam-4pm. Call 328-
5800 to book tours.

Past, Present and Personal: The Dawn Davies
Collection @ the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, Villa Doyle, West and West Hill Streets.
The exhibition is part of the NAGB’s Collector’s
Series. Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 1lam-4pm.
Call 328-5800 to book tours.

The Awakening Landscape: The Nassau Water-
colours of Gaspard Le Marchand Tupper, from
the collection of Orjan and Amanda Lindroth @
the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas. The
mid-nineteenth century paintings that make up the
exhibition are part of one of the earliest suites of
paintings of Nassau and its environs.

Tupper was a British military officer stationed
at Fort Charlotte in ine 1850s. The works show a
pre-modern Bahamas through the decidely British
medium of watercolour. Gallery hours, Tuesday-
Saturday, 1lam-4pm. Call 328-5800 to book tours.

Health

Doctors Hospital Distinguished Leciure Series:
High blood pressure affects one in four adults.
‘Distinguished physician Dr Judson Eneas will aa
cuss “Hypertension, the Silent Killer Exposed” o
Thursday, April 21 at 6pm in the Doctors Hospi
tal conference room. This lecture will increase
awareness and educate persons about how to pre-
vent, treat, and manage high blood pressure as
well as the related cardiovascular diseases. The lec-







THE TRIBUNE

NASSAU



ture is free to the general public. Free blood pres-
sure, cholesterol and glucose screenings will be
performed between 5pm and 6pm. To ensure
available seating RSVP 302-4603.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5.30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at,
their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville. Call
323-4482 for moré info.

" MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third
Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors Hospital con-
ference room.

The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2.30pm (except August and Decem-
ber) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley
Street.

‘Doctors Hospital, the official training centre of the
American Heart Association offers CPR classes cer-
tified by the AHA. The course defines the warning
signs of respiratory arrest and gives prevention strate-

- gies to avoid sudden death syndrome and the most

common serious injuries and choking that can occur
in adults, infants and children. CPR and First Aid
classes are offered every third Saturday of the month
from 9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Com-
munity Training Representative at 302-4732 for
more information and learn to save a life today.

REACH - Resources & Education for Autism
and related Challenges meets from 7pm — 9pm the
second Thursday of each month in the cafeteria of
the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.

“ Civic Clubs



Toastmasters Club 1905 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm @
BEC Cafe, Tucker Rd. Club 9477 meets Friday,
7pm @ Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm .
A19, Jean St. Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pm @
British Colonial Hilton. Club 1600 meets Thursday,
8.30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes. Club 7178 meets
Tuesday, 6pm @ The J Whitney Pinder Building,
Collins Ave. Club 2437 meets every second, fourth
and fifth Wednesday at the J Whitney Pinder Build-
ing, Collins Ave at 6pm. Club 612315 meets Monday
6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach. Club
753494 meets every Wednesday, 6pm-8pm in the
Solomon’s Building, East-West Highway. All are
welcome.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ the —
Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first
Tuesday, 7pm @ Gaylord’s Restaurant, Dowdeswell
St. Please call 502-4842/377-4589 for more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second
Tuesday, 6.30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office,
4th floor meeting room.

The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month in
the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, Bay St.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets
the second and fourth Wednesday of the month,
8pm @ St Augustine’s Monestary.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second
Friday of each month, 7.30pm at Emmaus Centre at
St Augustine’s Monestary. For more info call 325-
1947 after 4pm.

International Association of Administrative Pro-
fessionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third Thurs-
day of every month @ Superclubs Breezes, Cable
Beach, 6pm.

AMISTAD, a Spanish club meets the third Friday
of the month at COB’s Tourism Training Centre at
7pm in Room 144 during the academic year. The
group promotes the Spanish language and culture in
the community.

Send all your civic and social events to The Tri-
bune via fax: 328-2398 or e-mail: outthere@tri-
bunemedia.net

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or
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