Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
Pata mete

" The Tribune



Pm fovirr’ it.

HIGH
‘LOW



Volume: 101 No.85



76F
62F

PARTLY
SUNNY







Police team
heads to Berry
Islands to probe
snorkel tragedy

By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter

A team of police officers trav-
elled to the Berry Islands to
investigate the drowning of two
American tourists.

David George Steinbeck, 61,
and his wife Charlotte Marie
Steinbeck, 60, from Pennsylva-
nia, were snorkelling off tiny
Chubb Cay when they got into
difficulties and drowned.

Friends on holiday with the
married couple attempted to
rescue them by hauling them
from the sea onto a dinghy but
both died before reaching
shore.

Supt Hulan Hanna said foul
play was not suspected but offi-
cers from the Central Detective
Unit would investigate the cir-
cumstances surrounding the

\tragedy, which occurred on
Thursday afternoon.

He said autopsies would be
performed on the bodies at
Princess Margaret Hospital in
Nassau.

According to officers at the
Chubb Cay police station, the

. Steinbecks were snorkelling

with another American couple
at the time of the incident.

- Both couples were staying on
-a 37-foot catamaran “Bob’s
-Cat” as the guests of a third
couple, Pennsylvania attorney
‘Robert White and his wife, Bar-
-bara.

» Officers say it is possible that
‘while snorkelling, the current
overwhelmed the Steinbecks,
“pulling them under the water.

Mr White, who remained on
the boat while his guests went

.snorkelling, told police he

realised the Steinbecks were in
distress and attempted to radio
for help, but received no
response.

He then launched a Zodiac
dinghy from the catamaran to
help the pair.

He is reported to have told
police that by the time he found
Mr Steinbeck, he appeared to
be already dead. Mr White
managed to pull Mrs Steinbeck
from the water, but was unable
to resuscitate her.

Both bodies were eventually

recovered from the sea and then ©

taken ashore at Chubb Cay.

The Steinbecks had arrived
in the Bahamas on February 28
and were due to leave the coun-
try this weekend.

Mike Taylor, a spokesman
for the US Embassy in Nassau,
said yesterday that they had
been. in contact with relatives
of the couple in America, but
was unable to offer more infor-
mation.

He said: “Whenever an
American citizen dies in the
Bahamas the embassy works
with both the police and the
Bahamian government to facil-
itate the return of the body to

the US. The coroner has to_

establish a cause of death and
police have to conduct their
investigations.

“We then work with the fam-
ily and local funeral homes to
facilitate a return of the body
back to the US.”

Bishop Eldon
falls into coma

By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

‘' ASSISTANT Bishop of the
Anglican Diocese Michael
Eldon has suffered respiratory
failure and is in a comatose
state, a press release stated yes-
terday.

Bishop Eldon was admitted
to Doctors Hospital on Janu-
ary 31 with pneumonia and,
after complications from this ill-
ness, he suffered respiratory
failure and went into a

“comatose state.

His physician, Dr Kevin
~Moss, in a medical update, said
_yesterday that although Bishop

Eldon is slowly improving, his
prognosis remains guarded.

Bishop Eldon's sister Dr
Keva Bethel told The Tribune

‘yesterday that the family is

Bishop Eldon (File Photo)

grateful to have a team of tal-
ented physicians caring for her
brother and, although they are
not overly optimistic, they
remain hopeful for a good out-

See BISHOP, Page 11



Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005







WOOD-YoOU

PIa Wen ele MaUa Nua ee ars:

46 Madeira Street

PRICE — 50¢



Prime Minister Perry Christie and Allyson Maynard Gibson, the Minister of Financial Services and Investments, met with Paul Quigley to sign the
lease for a movie studio in Freeport yesterday at the Prime Minister's office on Cable Beach.

$76m fi
investment given
new ‘lease of life’

plan that aims to meet the May 23rd dead-
line for the beginning of. the filming of
Pirates of the Caribbean, part two ‘and

By KILAH ROLLE
Tribune Staff Reporter

DEVELOPERS of the $76 million pro-
duction studio and movie-based theme
park in Grand Bahama were given the
official stamp of approval from the

Guana Cay opponents plan to

Bahamas government yesterday to start
construction after two years of debate over
environmental issues.

The project was originally approved in
principle in May, 2001, under the former
FNM administration, and will be divided
into a complex three-phase development



three.

studio

The first phase of the 3,500-acre facili-

(Photo: Mario Duncanson)



See FILM, Page 11

file court action in two weeks

By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Senior Staff Reporter

THE Save Guana Cay Lobby
is identifying plaintiffs who will
be prepared to bring proceed-
ings in the Supreme Court
against Prime Minister Perry
Christie and his Cabinet before
the filing of their court action in
two weeks, the group’s lawyer
Fred Smith told The Tribune
yesterday.

Mr Smith cautioned develop-
ers of the $400 million Passerine
of Abaco project not to “feel
too comfortable”.

“We are hoping to file an |

action no later than the week
of March 21 to 25 because of
government having signed this

agreement with the developer,”
he said.

The litigation against the
heads of agreement will chal-
lenge the authority of the Cab-
inet entering into the deal with-
out having any statutory author-
ity.

“In the Bahamas the prime
minister is not a law unto him-
self. A prime minister or gover-
nor general can only act when
authorised to do so by parlia-
ment,” Mr Smith said.

The concept that Cabinet can
enter into a heads of agreement
and not disclose to the public
the terms of it is wrong and mis-
conceived, he said.

“In this day and age the
Bahamian people, and particu-

larly the citizens in Guana Cay
who are most affected by this
transaction, should have full dis-
closure,” said Mr Smith.

He said there should have
been a debate in the House of
Assembly on the terms of
agreement and then consulta-
tion with the communities on
Guana Cay.

During the signing of the
heads of agreement between
the developers and government
earlier this week Mr Christie
said concerns being expressed
by the residents of the cay are
not unusual and that the con-
servation of the environment
which has made the Bahamas
well-known worldwide is of first
priority to him.



He said the developers and
government have made a com-
mitment to protect the envi-
ronment of the island.

The Save Guana Cay Lobby
is raising funds and will be
engaging in public meetings to
promote their cause.

These funds are to be used
for a public marketing cam-
paign internationally and
nationally and also for legal
funds. The money raised will
also be used to employ envi-
ronmental experts to critique
and advise on the environmen-
tal impact assessment provided
by the developers.

Mr Smith said residents fear

See LAW, Page 11



Nassau and Bahama Islands’ Leading Newspaper



PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





DNA samples
‘link accused’ to
double murder

By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

A DNA expert yesterday
revealed that the results of sam-
ples taken from murder suspect
Basil Fitzgerald Gordon linked
him to the scene where two per-
sons were stabbed to death in
2002.

Julie Schuerman of the
Broward County crime labora-
tory told the Supreme Court
that she tested seven samples
given to her by Bahamian police
in September 2002.

The first two were whole
blood stains taken from mur-
der victims Rosnell Newbold
and Kevin Wilson, who were
stabbed to death in their
Pinewood home on June 16,
2002.

The third was taken from
murder suspect Gordon, who
was in a relationship with
Rochelle Wilson, granddaugh-
ter and sister of the two

deceased, the court heard.

The fourth was a bloodstain
taken from the outside part of
the Spice Street home and the
fifth from the kitchen door.

The sixth and seventh sam-
ples handed over to the DNA
expert were taken from the
knife blade and handle, which
were found broken apart not
far from the bodies.

Her findings were that the
DNA profile taken from the
fourth sample, outside the Wil-
son home, matched the refer-
ence sample of Gordon.

The DNA from the kitchen
door matched that of Kevin

Wilson, Ms Schuerman testi- -

fied.

She said the blood found on
the knife handle contained a
mixture of DNA, however, the
major part belonged to Kevin
Wilson. The blood on the blade
also. matched Kevin Wilson’s,
she said.

During cross examination,
defence attorney Dorsey

McPhee wanted to know
whether the DNA could be re-
tested. In the case of the fifth
sample, such a small amount of
blood was presented on the cot-
ton swab that it was unable to
be retested.

While Ms Schuerman said her
findings are checked by another
analyst as well as her supervisor,
she said she alone was respon:
sible for the testing.

Mr McPhee questioned her
about improvements in meth-
ods of testing DNA. It was dis-
covered in court that the
method used in this case is to
test from nine locations, or
aspects of the genetic make-up.

While nine locations can be
uploaded into the FBI database
on an inter-state level, it is now
necessary to have attempted to
ascertain 13 locations for the
national database.

The FBI, she said, created the
database and set the guidelines
for DNA testing.

Ms Schuerman explained to

the court that having only nine
locations to determine from

does not change the result of a.

match or mismatch.

She said the chances of the
samples not being a match
between the DNA taken from

outside the Wilson home ‘and.

that of the suspect on trial was
one in 3.4 trillion.

“One would likely have to be
an identical twin or triplet for
that to happen,” she said.

Mr McPhee pointed out that

_ while her report said that sam- .

ple five was taken from inside
the kitchen door, her notes said
it was taken from outside the
door.

She said she could not explain '

how that happened, but that
sample five is just that nonethe-
less. Justice Allen. adjourned
court Friday, stating that the
court expected to recall Detec-
tive Kimroy Ferguson for fur-
ther cross examination on Mon-
day before the prosecution clos-
es its case.

Officer’s evidence ‘exposes
the lie’ on deceased having

firearm, claims attorne

the officer that he: had not ttised . A

By By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

COUNSEL Fayne Thomp-
son suggested to the Coroner’s
Court yesterday that the evi-
dence givén by the officer who
shot Jermaine Mackey, “expos-
es the lie” that the deceased had
a gun in his hand at the time of
the shooting.

Representing the family of
Mr Mackey, 27, who was shot
and killed on December 6, 2002
following a confrontation with
police officers, Mr Thompson
made the suggestion that Offi-
cer Zhivago Earns used lethal
force on the night of the shoot-

. ing, because he had lost control
of the situation.

As the cross-examination of
Officer Earns continued during
yesterday's inquest into the
death of Mr Mackey, the wit-
ness told the court that after his
partner, Officer Ricardo Neely,
chased the deceased around the
corner of a building on St James
Street, he‘heard gun shots ring
out, which immediately put him
in a state of alarm, causing him

to place, his hand on his hol-:

stered weapon.
Officer Earns then testified

Pricing Information As Of:
4 March 2005

that a man appeared‘from the
rear of the building in question,
and that a few seconds later he
recognised the man as the per-
son his partner had been pur-
suing.

He said that at this time he
was still standing by the police
patrol vehicle parked close to
the Corner Pocket bar on the
opposite side of the street.

The witness told the seven-
member jury that the man was
running at a high speed towards
the bar and that he moved "in
an angle" to intercept him in an
effort to physically detain him.

Officer Earns said that when
he was "four-five feet" away
from the deceased, he and the
other man were face to face,
and that both were still in
motion.

At this time he saw the man
reach and take out a "shiny
object from his waist under the
jacket, which appeared to be a
firearm," the witness testified.

Responding to this action,
Officer Earns in turn reached
for his police issued gun and
fired two shots.

Mr Earns said he was in fear -

for his life and that he fired the
shots at the same time as he was

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moving‘out’of the man's path,
and that the two men brushed
up against each other.

The witness told the court
that after he had discharged his

. weapon, the man continued

running until he was several feet
away from the officer, before
"turning around, stumbling
back and falling down."

Officer Earns conceded that
it was dark that night, and that
he was not carrying a flashlight.

He said, however, that the
man never left his field of
vision, and that he never saw
that a gun was disposed of after
the shooting took place.

The’ officer added that
although he still perceived the
man to be a threat after he had
run past him, he did not fire
again.

After the deceased had fallen
into a sitting position close to
him, Mr Earns said that he then
patted the man down, but did
not find a gun.

The officer added that at the
time of the direct confrontation
with Mr Mackey he believed
that the "shiny object" he saw
was a gun, but said that he was
not "100 per cent sure."

Mr Thompson pointed out to



the word "firearm" in his origi-
nal report to the police in 2002,
and that the term had in fact
been used for the first time
before the Coroner's Court yes-
terday.

Officer Earns conceded that
some details were missing
from his statement because he
was "under stress at that time
and my mind) was not togeth-
er. u

The lawyer then suggested
to the witness that the word
"firearm" had not been used

before, because it was part of

"recently made up evidence."
He further suggested that
the physical evidence given by
a forensic expert and the bul-
let wounds found on the body
of Mr Mackey "are not con-
sistent with you shooting him
when he was passing by."

Mr Thompson suggested
that the chain of events as pre-
sented by Officer Earns are
"bogus, bold-faced lies," and
that Mr Mackey is.dead today
because the witness "lost it."

The inquest was adjourned

- yesterday and will continue

next.week.

=) FIDELITY

Basil Fitzgerald Gordon



(Tribune file photo)

OKteon eres
over safety of
rer HPLe Mom CLO ebb h

By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter _

ENVIRONMENTALISTS
and Grand Bahama residents
have raised concerns about
the safety of 15 captive dol-
phins because of a dredging
operation being conducted in
their holding pen.

Sam Duncombe, president
of the environmental group
ReEarth, has called for the
dredging to “stop immediate-
ly,” and for the dolphins to
be removed before it recom-
mences.

The Underwater Explorer’s
Society (Unexso) did not deny

-that the operation is being

conducted with the dolphins
still inside the pen, but said it
poses absolutely no danger to
them.

“We have more concern for
the dolphins than anyone; its
our business,” Unexso repre-
sentative Don Churchill said.

Unexso conducts super-

-vised swims with captive dol-
phins at their facility in Grand
Bahama.

Mr Churchill said that the
dredging operation was being
conducted on a very small
scale and that US experts,
including a veterinarian, had
been consulted during the
planning of the operation and
were continuing to monitor
its progress.

According to Mr Churchill,
the operation consists of the
insertion of an eight inch pipe
which sucks silt out in a small
corner of the nine-acre size
pen.

He explained that over the
years, silt and refuse washing
in from the sea has accumu-

lated at the bottom of the pen.

Mr Churchill denied sug-
gestions by residents ‘of the
nearby Tamarind Subdivision
that Unexso lacks a permit for
the operation.

Deputy Director of Fish-
eries Eddison Deleveaux told
The Tribune that his depart-
ment had not issued such a
permit to Unexso.

He said that he has
instructed the Environmental
Health office in Grand
Bahama to conduct an
“urgent” investigation into
the operation.

Mr Churchill said however
that the relevant permit had

‘been granted by the Grand

Bahama Port Authority.

' The issue first arose when
residents became concerned
about the operation, both in
terms of the safety of dolphins
and its effect on the sur-
rounding area.

They told The Tribune they
were particularly concerned
about the possibility of an
unpleasant odour arising from
any dolphin faeces.that might
be dredged up.

They said that the opera-
tion is turning the water white
in the pen and a nearby canal.

Mr Churchill acknowledged
that there was a small area of
unsettled silt around the pipe.

This, he said, was
inevitable, and will have no
effect on the dolphins in such
a large pen.

He said the operation was
actually beneficial for the dol-
phins as it is clearing outa
layer of thin silt and refuse
that is easily stirred up and
often makes the water cloudy
in the pen.



Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Kerzner International BDRs
Premier Real Estate



Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

28.00 ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
.35 in



1.1529 Colina Money Market Fund 1.209527"
1.9423 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.1105 ***
10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.2602*****
2.0524 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.166020**



Colina Bond Fund 1.089371****



BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

**- AS AT JAN. 31, 2005/ **** - AS AT DEC. 31, 2004

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price -

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100







THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, M

ARCH 5, 2005, PAGE 3





Robbery
victim is
shot in
the back



By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter

A ROBBERY victim was
beaten and shot in the back
as he lay helpless on the
ground, police said.

George Simmons, 32, is in a
critical condition in the
Princess Margaret Hospital
following the attack near Fort
Fincastle.

Another man, Dillet Rolle,
37, was pistol-whipped and
robbed by two men at around
10 o’clock Thursday night dur-
ing the same incident.

According to Police Super-
intendent Hulan Hanna Mr
Rolle was at the fort with oth-
er persons, engaged in a
“Junkanoo activity,” when he
was approached by two men,
one holding a handgun.

Mr Hanna said the other
persons fled, but Mr Rolle was
struck with the weapon and
ordered to hand over cash.

He reportedly gave his
assailants $75 and was then
told to give up his jewellery
and get on the ground.

The men then beat him
about the body.

At this point, Mr Simmons
happened to be passing and
was also accosted by the men,
according to police.

Mr Simmons was also
struck with a gun and ordered
onto the ground before being
beaten about the body and
shot.

Mr Hanna said that no
arrests have been made, but
police are following some
leads in connection with the

‘incident.



Missing youth

reported safe

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter



FREEPORT - The mother
of a missing 18-year-old youth is
relieved that he is back at home
safe and well after reporting
him missing to police on
Wednesday.

Emerald Bethel, of 70 Red

Hill Close, told police that her.

son, Tavaris Bethel, a special
education student at the Bea-
con School, arrived home
around 3.10pm Thursday.

Bethel, who left home on
February 27, was reported miss-
ing by his mother after he failed
to return home over the past
four days.

Tavaris told his mother that
he was staying at a friend’s
house since Sunday. He said he
was okay and looking for work.

Bethel directed officers to an
apartment complex at 139 Mag-
ellin Crest, where officers spoke
with Kevanlyn Wallace,
Lenward Bullard and Felix
Wallace.

They confirmed that Bethel
had slept at their house since
Sunday and every day he would
leave to visit his mother’s house
and return.

They told police they were
under the impression that he
was in contact with his family
and was not aware that he was
reported missing.

Appeal Court
backs ruling
by Tribunal in
union dispute

THE Court of Appeal upheld
on Tuesday an earlier decision
by the Industrial Tribunal that
the Tribunal has no jurisdiction
to entertain disputes if the prin-
cipal allegation by the union is
that the employer has failed to
negotiate in good faith.

President of the Trade
Union Congress-Obie Ferguson
brought an action before the
Tribunal on behalf of Bahamas
Hotel Managerial Association
claiming damages against High
Point Development Company,
the owners of Comfort Suites
on Paradise Island.

Mr Ferguson had claimed
that the company was refusing
to negotiate in good faith with
the union.

Tribunal President Harrison
Lockhart in a comprehensive
ruling said that the allegation
by the union did not constitute

a dispute over which the Tri-

bunal had jurisdiction.

He further said and recom-
mended that the union take the
matter up with the criminal
courts, because if its allegation
was sustained it constituted a
criminal offence.

The union appealed against
the decision of the Tribunal
president but in an oral judg-
ment given by Justice
Emmanuel Osadebay, the
Court of Appeal ruled that:
“After reviewing the facts and
the submissions we have come
to the conclusion that the
appeal has no merit. The appeal
is therefore dismissed.”

The Industrial Tribunal said
that quite a number of cases
with similar facts before it are
affected by this decision.

The president of the Tribunal
in many public addresses has
called for amendments to the
law which will allow the Tri-
bunal to deal with such matters.

In a similar vein Chief Jus-
tice Sir Burton Hall in October
2002 called for a reorganisation
of the Supreme Court to include
an industrial side effectively
extinguishing the Industrial Tri-
bunal and giving rise to an arm
of the Supreme Court which
can effectively deal with such
matters.

To date no decision has been
forthcoming on this matter.

INS ela a

lyaicwa cla cee citi!
the news, read Insight
on Mondays



LOCAL NEWS














& CONVICTED rapist Barry Parcoi is on the run from Her Majesty’s Prison after smashing a hole in a bathroom wall and
fleeing. He is considered armed and dangerous.

By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter .

SIX prison officers who were
on duty the night Barry Parcoi
escaped Her Majesty’s Prison
earlier this week have been
charged with dereliction of duty,
it was announced yesterday.

Meanwhile law enforcement
officials were continuing their
massive manhunt for the con-
victed criminal yesterday. They
say he is considered armed and
dangerous.

Parcoi, 43, who was serving
a life sentence for rape and
forcible detention with intent,
as well as a 20-year sentence for
armed robbery escaped the
prison sometime on Wednes-
day evening.

Parcoi had been moved to the
Medium Security wing of the
prison two years ago after serv-
ing 19 years in Maximum Secu-
rity.

Prison officials suspect that
Parcoi, who has a long list of
charges against him, including
possession of an unlicensed fire

fg pes gi
‘sg
fi wakeee :

Dr Elliston Rahming

arm, possession of ammunition
and escape from lawful custody,
was able to break-out through
the bathroom wall.

According to prison superin-

tendent Dr Elliston Rahming’

the six officers on duty at the
Medium Security unit that night
have been placed on charge.

Dr Rahming said they will
have to appear before a special
Prison Tribunal headed by
Deputy Superintendent Charles
Rolle who has primary respon-
sibility for security matters at
the prison.

Another prison officer will
face similar charges in connec-
tion with the escape of Lequient
Mckenzie on February 16. He
was recaptured and returned to
prison on the same day he
escaped.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
VARA TA ROYA

Tropical Exterminators
Ea



“We are determined to

ensure that escapes must be
kept at an irreducible minimum

(Above photo: Mario Duncanson) }

Officers face
charges over



(Photo: Mario Duncanson)

and that vigilance and due dili-
gence would be the order of the
day,” said Dr Rahming.

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fmemoren ew [ao J san [wn fo os [ss

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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
i oneaD ure Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DupUCH CARRON, C.M. G., MS. B.A., LL. B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassaii: Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

. TELEPHONES ;

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
-/ Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398.

Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1- (242)-352- 6608

a3 , pieeport fax: Ge); 352- 9348.

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

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‘Open our
eyes’ on the
Haitian issue

EDITOR, The Tribune. ©

The following is an open let-
ter to the government and
Bahamian people:

I HAVE a problem with you.
You have left your first love,
and because of this lawless deed
most people are affected and
their love has become cold and
bitter towards their brothers
and sisters in Haiti.

How far have we diittea

away from our upbringing? The
Haitian Crisis. The big debate,
the big set back, the big tragedy,
the chaos, the mess, the vio-
lence, etc. Whatever you want
to call it? When you treat your
brothers and sisters the way you
have been doing lately, you’re
bound to fail as a country. One
of the reasons why we’re
blessed is because we have been
supporting Haitian migrants
over the past few decades. Yes,
control needs to be placed. on
the flow of illegal immigrants
entering our country, but not
on the person themselves who
has already made, this beautiful
country their home. Yes, a strict
measure has to be taken to curb

the crisis, but not the way you

guys are doing it. When you
need your yard clean, whom do
you call? When you need cheap
farm workers, whom do you
call? When you need minimum
wage workers, who do you call?
Do you see them complaining
like everybody else? Don’t you
think they have the rights to
complain too? Do you consider
them less equal than yourself?
Of course you do; that is why
they get treated the way they
do. Have: you ever heard the
story of the man who went
down to Jerusalem to Jericho
and fell among thieves? Who

went by? The priest (church | |
leader), The Levité:(professing:

Christian) did they. help him?
No. They turned their faces and
walked away. The Church
knows that it is their responsi-
bility to feed and clothe the
hungry and naked. The Church
knows that it is responsible to
build hospitals and homes for
the unfortunate, yet they sit
back and allow their brothers
and sisters in Haiti to starve, go
naked and without preparing
shelter for them. How unfortu-
nate is that? The church in this

Say ‘no’
EDITOR, The Tribune.

ARE we naive here in the
Bahamas? How can we accept
the operation of a LNG Terminal
in Grand Bahama?

It will cost millions of dollars to

lay the pipeline from our beauti-
ful, pristine Bahamas to Florida



* Baby items
* Drapery

* Bedding

* Rugs

_* Dinnerware
Drinkware
& lots more...

URAL AUER
(242) 356 3205

LETTERS

lotters@tribunemedia.net




country is building their own
dynasty and kingdom, yet they
do not even see it fitting to
speak out on the issues and the
roles one plays in the society.
“You make me sad, you bunch

of thieves and robbers,” Jesus
said.

The government doesn’t
have a vision for Haiti and nei-
ther do you, how sad. How
many churches today, all they
could think of is their building
projects, their seminars, their

- crusades, their projects, their

this, their that, etc? The church
of the 21st century ought to be
the first one to help to allevi-
ate the Haitian crisis. Who are

you waiting on? The govern- °

ment? The businessmen? The
investors? Unless the church
changed their perspectives and
outlook on life itself things will
only get worse as seen in the
world today. Judgment starts
from the pulpit. A Haitian per-
son needs our help locally and
abroad. The same people you
treat as slaves today,may very
well be your “Boss” tomorrow.
Be careful and be warned how
you treat the people of Haiti.
Father, I confess the sins of our
nation’s leaders who don’t
understand the roles they play
in times of crisis. Help them not
to see the Haitian people as a
problem, but instead see them-
selves as the answer to the prob-
lems in Haiti. Open our eyes
Lord, give us vision, and show
us how to comfort our brothers
and sisters in Haiti in their time
of great need, in Jesus’ name I
pray amen.

cr isis

1. Recruit Christian workers _

and volunteers for Missions to
Haiti.

2. Train and equip these
workers for the mission field to
Haiti in various outreach pro-
grammes.

3. After completion of the
training programme, give those
trainees the basic necessary
resources and set them up
(camp style) in various commu-
nities throughout Haiti to do

.- The solution to the Haitian...” themselves. Take one Idok, they

missions and outreaches.

4. Create a safe haven and a
place of refuge that caters to
the direct needs of the Haitian
people in these camps.

5. Afterwards, feed the peo-
ple; clothe the people, shelter
the people, the destitute and
poverty-stricken ones of Haiti,
one family at a time.

6. Work alongside the Haitian
government to help seek and
root out all the reasons why
Haitians flee their country.

7. Help in doing our part in
ridding the country from war,
poverty, oppression, antagonists
groups, etc.

8. Teach and train the peo-
ple of Haiti on the basics of
love, compassion and faith.
Teach them the truth about the
love of Christ.

The Haitian problem is a ‘sin’
(spiritual) problem, and if we
do not open our eyes and
realise it, we'can find ourselves
sinning by the way we treat
them. If we do our part then we
can enforce stricter punishments
to curb the Haitian crisis. If we
as a nation commit ourselves to
these solutions, what will we
accomplish?

1. Haitian ieaders will -
become awakened to the reali-
ty and truths that causes the
chaos in their country.

2. Peace in hostile situations
through reconciling differences.

3. Higher standards and
morals in the hearts of the Hait-
ian people.

4. Progress, prosperity,
growth development within the
Haitian community.

5. Transformation of individ-
ual lives from a poverty stricken
mindset. ;

Haiti is simply in an impov-
erished, disorganised state
where a people live isolated to

carry the same bondage men-
tality when they migrate here
in this country. Lack of vision
destroys a nation. We can play a
major role in the success of
Haiti, it’s just the way we look
at it from a righteous viewpoint.

MINISTER RODNEY
E ADDERLEY
Nassau,

March, 2005.

to LNG terminal

and now Tractebel is willing to
add $40'million more to relocate

Freeport harbour’s cruise ship - °

terminal to another location.
The people of the Bahamas
should be told why these people
want to spend these millions of
dollars here when. they could
build the facility in Florida with-
out the expense of laying an
underground pipeline and with-
out having to relocate the cruise
ship terminal. It seems to me that
the answer to this question is that
Florida does not want the termi-



NOTICE

nal there! Why should we?

With all the possible ramifica-
tions of the location here, are we
so money hungry that we would
risk our future for a few dollars
now?

As the saying goes, “Think on
these things”.

“A GRANDPARENT
CONCERNED FOR THE
FUTURE OF HER
GRANDCHILDREN”
Nassau,

February 9, 2005.





NOTICE is hereby given that ANGELINA LACROIX OTHELLO,
#43 ETHEL STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26TH day of
FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that IZLAINE STERLIN, SHERLEY
STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 26th day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JENNIFER ELAINE TURNQUEST
WRIGHT, DEADMANS CAY, LONG ISLAND, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
5TH day of MARCH, 2005 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.






















THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2U0U5, PAGE 5





WHY YOU VEX?

By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

WHY YOU VEX?

“Tam tired of the conditions our students
have to endure when they are in school. My
husband and I do not make a lot of money
and so we have to send our daughter to a pub-
lic school. However the conditions at the
school leave much to be desired.

Why should my daughter have o>

to worry about the building

falling on her head or suf- cs
fer from the lack of basic
equipment. ,

The government says “
that the children are the
future, but the message
they are sending is that
substandard buildings CO
are all they deserve. s
Look at the stories we
keep hearing in the
news, about all these
schools and the prob-
lems they have. It is a
disgrace. And you know
what it is insulting to ask
young talented Bahami-
ans to return home to
teach in a holey broke up
school. There are poor
people all over this coun-
try struggling to make a
living, and just because we
send our child to a gov-
ernment school does not
mean that we are inattentive
parents. We attend every PTA
meeting and meet with her teachers and
support school functions. There are excellent
professionals at her school who do the very
best they-can with the little they have and it is
a slap in their face to expect them to educate in
such conditions.

Maybe the minister will read this and make
more of an effort to repair our schools. And
please you know what else makes me vex, how
this government blames everything on the hur-
ricanes. Please it is almost hurricane time again
and no progress has been made. My daughter’s
school was broke up long before the hurri-
canes.

I am seriously thinking of borrowing money
for September to put my daughter in a pri-
vate school.

- “A frustrated parent,” 38

wi




“You know what makes me vex. I was at a
fast food restaurant yesterday and there was
this man who left his little son playing while he
went down the road to smoke.

This little boy was chasing his toy car in the
parking lot without being attended. Thank-
fully, no car came along or there might have
been an accident.

I wanted to slap that man right across his
head.”

- Mario Brown
34, The Grove.

“TI work in a medium
size office and I am vex
and sickened at how
nasty my female co-
workers keep our
restroom. To see these
ladies dressed up in
their suits with nails
and hair done, you
wouldn’t believe they
would be capable of
being so nasty.
- TS, 45
Pinewood.

“T am vex with the way
businesses are allowed to
open up in residential .
areas. J know everyone
needs to make a living but
I feel that commercial
should be kept separate
from residential. I feel when
one comes home, they
should feel that they are in
their haven to relax and let
go from the hustle and bustle
of everyday life, However, if there
are numerous restaurants around your area, it
doesn’t feel like ‘Home Sweet Home’
- Concerned in the West.

“T am vex with Batelco because J opened up
a DSL account when I lived in Abaco.

Now that I have moved back to Nassau,
they tell me I have to make any inquires on the
Abaco account in Abaco which makes no
sense.

- A. Miller

Golden Gates.

WHY YOU HAPPY

I am blessed to have wonderful family and
friends and J recently turned 45!

Yellow Elder.

- Tamara Smith

Scouts unveil road
safety campaign

ia ee
AP US)

aay mai ika Ss
Serer]



BURR eae

SATURDAY
MARCH 5

12:30 Cinema, Cinema

1:00 Inside Hollywood

1:30 Sports Lifestyles

In This Corner: Kevin Kelly
Sports Desk

Ballroom Boxing

Gospel Video Countdown


















































5:00 One Cubed
5:30 3’D Funk Studio
6:00 Prescription For Health:
Prostate Cancer
17:00 Bahamas Tonight

7:30 Native Stew

8:00 Bahamian Things

Island Life Destination
The Darold Miller Show
Tropical Beat

Bahamas Tonight

The Lounge

Community Pg. 1540AM

SUNDAY
MARCH 6

Community Pg. 1540AM



2:00

9:00 E.M.PA.C.T.

9:30 Voice That Makes The
Difference

10:00 Effective Living

10:30 Listen Up :

11:00° Zion Baptist Church

1:00 — Gillette World Sports
1:30 This Is The Life
2:00 Gospel Video Countdown

3:00 World Impact

3:30 Ernest Angley Ministries

4:30 Morning Joy

5:00 — Walking In Victory

6:00 One Cubed

6:30 The Bible Study Hour

7:00 Bahamas Tonight

7:30 New Covenant Baptist
Church

8:30 The Jackson's America’s
First Family of Music

9:00 — Ecclesia Gospel

10:00 Turning Point

10:30 Spiritual Impact: Isaac
Hayes

# 11:00 Bahamas Tonight

11:30 Gospel Video Countdown
12:30amComm. Pg. 1540AM




NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves
the right:to make last minute
programme changes!



Seat Belts Save Lives BUCKLE UP! These are the words of the
bumper sticker that little Branee Major displays with her father Drexel
Major. (Photo: Mario Duncanson)

BY NATARIO McKENZIE

In an effort to sensitise
motorists on the importance of
road safety, the Scout Associa-

' tion of the Bahamas officially

launched its “Driver Safety
Awareness” campaign at the
Scout headquarters on Dolphin
Drive yesterday.

Celebrating 92-years of com-
munity service and develop-
ment in the Bahamas, officials
of the organisation noted that
this latest initiative was one of
many contributions the associ-
ation had launched over recent
years.

“We feel like one life lost on
our streets is one too many,”
Brian Christie, the chief com-
missioner of the Scout Associa-
tion of the Bahamas, said at the
launch of the campaign.

In conjunction with several
corporate and community part-
ners as well as the road traffic
division of the Royal Bahamas
Police Force, the organisation
is poised to begin the distribu-
tion of its bumper stickers which
will read, “Seat belts save lives -
Buckle up”.

Officials at the Scout Asso-
ciation noted that these would
be available to the general pub-
lic at a cost of $3.

In his address, President of
the Scout Association of the

Bahamas Winston Newton
thanked the many community
partners who were committed
to the campaign and would aid
in the distribution of the
bumper stickers.

“We are looking for a suc-
cessful launch and the proceeds
will be used to assist our pro-
grammes in the scout organisa-
tion,” he said.

Arthur Taylor, the training
commissioner in the Scout
Association, noted that the pro-
ceeds would also help to fur-
ther expand the organisation
into the Family Islands. |

He added that it would also
support their newest initiative
for training leaders which would
encourage scouts to stay in the
organisation and pursue lead-
ership roles as well as the
Beaver programme designed
for younger children.

Although scout officials esti-
mate that there are currently
some 3,000 members in the
organisation throughout the
Bahamas they admit that the
organisation has seen a decline
in membership over recent
years.

They hope that this latest
campaign will make the
Bahamian public more aware
of the organisation’s efforts in
community development and
encourage greater membership.

Saxons



victories are
made official

BY NATARIO McKENZIE

HE preliminary

Junkanoo results .

have been made

official and the

Saxons remain the
winners of both parades, it was
announced yesterday.

According to the Ministry of
Youth Sports and Culture, the
results will stand despite
protests by Boxing Day parade
runners up One Family, who
cited judging irregularities.

In a press release yesterday,
the ministry announced the
decision of the Junkanoo Inde-
pendent Review Committee on
both the 2004/05 Boxing Day
and New Year’s Day Junkanoo
parades.

It stated that the unofficial
results had been forwarded to
the independent committee on
February 28 at the request of
the Junkanoo Corporation of
the Bahamas.

The result of that review has
deemed the unofficial results of
both parades as official, it said.

As a result, the Shell Saxon
Superstars are now the official
overall winners of the 2004/05
Sammy Thompson Boxing Day

- parade with a total of 2,176

points, One Family remains in
second place with 2,166, The
Prodigal Sons remain in third
place with 1,977, in fourth posi-
tion The Valley Boys with 1,939
points, Roots in fifth place with
1,798 points and the Music
Makers in sixth position with
1,330 points.

The results of the New Year’s
Day Junkanoo parade in hon-
our of Maureen Duvalier
remain as follows; the winner,
the Shell Saxon Superstars with
3,052 total points.

The Roots remain in, ‘second

place with 3,024 points, in thitd

Prodigal, Sons in fifth.



A MEMBER of the Shell Saxons Superstars shows off her costume dur-
ing the 2004 Sammy Thompson Boxing Day Parade.

position, the Valley Boys with
3,013 points, in fourth position
One Family with 2,872 points,




wit ae 672 points an
Mak cers ean 6th plac



eT Tete dl eeu)

osition :

(Tribune file eee

points.
The funkanos awards pre-
sentations are scheduled to be

held today at the. Wyndham
- ‘Nassau. Resort and Crystal
*. “palace Casino. °."





&j Scotiabank



oS

Z
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2
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PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005 s

THE TRIBUNE

a

(CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS * Tel: 325 2921)
SUNDAY, MARCH 6TH, 2005
11:30a.m. Speaker: Elder Sidney Burrows
'7:00p.m. Evening Service
Sunday School-9:45am The Lord's Supper- -10:45am » Community Bible Hole

a 30am * Radio Broadcast ZNS Il - 1:30pm » Evening Services- 7:00pm.
Prayer & Bible Study Wed, - 7:30pm ¢ Ladies Prayer Thurs.- 10:00am










THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE
OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

semen Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, off Mackey Street
wampeme =°.0. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas

fmm Phone: 393-3726/303-2355/Fax: 393-6135
i iy CHURCH SERVICES

SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2005
FOURTH SUNDAY IN LENT

ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH, Prince Charles Drive
11.00 a.m. Mr. Philip Clarke

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH, Bernard Road
11:00 a.m. Pastor Sharon Loyley/ HC

CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH, Zion Boulevard
10:00 a.m. Rev. Manette Poitier! HC
7:00 p.m. No Service

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH, East Shirley Street
11:00 a.m. Pastor Martin Loyley/ HC
7:00 p.m. Rev. Ed Lacy

GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH, Queen's College
Campus
9:30 a.m. Rev. James Neilly/ HC

ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue
: $4 8:00 a.m. Connections - Rev. Philip Stubbs
i wy 9:30 a.m. Rev. Philip Stubbs/ HC

TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
11:00 a.m. Mrs. Kenris Carey/ HC

7:00 p.m. Mr. Livingston Parks
0000000000000000060000000006000000000000000000000000000000
RADIO PROGRAMMES
“RENEWAL” on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Your Host: Rev. Charles Sweeting
“METHODIST MOMENTS” on each weekday at 6:55 a.m.
Your Host: Rev. Charles Sweeting
00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH, Harbour Island, will be celebrating its
200th Anniversary during the week of March 6-13, 2005 under the theme
“To God Be The Glory! Living With Purpose: The Rest of Your Life Can Be
The Best of Your Life”. This week promises to be spiritually, emotionally
and socially fulfilling as there will be programs for each day.








The Holy Ghost Pray ee Line TURE 326- 7427,
SUNDAY, MARCH 6th, 2005

7:00A.M. Rev. Dr. Colin Archer/ Sis. Tezel Anderson
11:00A.M. Rev. Dr. Colin Archer/ Sis. Nathalie Thompson

7:00P.M. Sis. Tezel Anderson/ Sis. Marilyn Tinker

Theme: Rise up ye people of God.
Press towards the Prize Philippians 3:14 - 15








By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter



A local food store has come
to the aid of a Fox Hill family
who lost: everything they
owned in a fire that also killed
their pet dog.

_Foxlair Convenience Store
in co-operation with Blanco
Bleach recently announced
that they will hold a drive to
collect food, clothing, and cash

’ for the Nixon family.

_The family of seven was left
homeless after a Valentine’s
Day fire which also destroyed
all of their personal property










SPEAKER of the Bahamian
House of Assembly Oswald
Ingraham (right) receiving a
gift, on March 3, from. Speaker
of the Canadian House of Com-
mons Peter Milliken during a
luncheon, hosted by Speaker
Ingraham in his counterpart’s
honour, at. the British Colonial
Hilton.

(BIS photo: Eric Rose)



Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL
Preachering 11am & 7:30pm: EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

Pastor:H. Mills

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills e Phone: 393-0563 * Box N-3622



_ (WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND E



Worship time: llam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Rev. Henley Perry

PO. Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

Collins Avenue at 4th Terrace Centreville
Telephone: 322-8304 or 325-1689 ¢ P.O. Box N-1566
Fax No. 322-4793 —

OPPORTUNITIES FOR _
WORSHIP AND MINISTRY

SUNDAY 8:30am ZNS-1 Temple Time Broadcast
8:30am Early Morning Worship
9:45am Sunday School For All Ages
11:00am Worship Service

7:00pm Evening Celebration
WEDNESDAY 7:30PM Selective Bible Teaching Royal
Rangers (Boys Club) Ages 4-17 Years
Missionettes (Girls Club) Ages 4-17.

VISIT OUR PREMISE BOOKSTORE, TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY



Food store aids

family who lost

all possessions
in major fire

including their car.

The family dog Skipper was
trapped in the home and per-
ished.

Sidney Strachan, the Gen-
eral Manager of Foxlair,
speaking on behalf of owner
Cecil Smith said: “We are in
the service business. Some-
times, ‘service’ means provid-
ing an excellent product and
quality staff. Sometimes it
means seeing to it that no one
in our uelgnbduciood suf-
fers.”

The sentiment was echoed
by Blanco Bleach manage-
ment who have also pledged



3241876 or

their co-operation and sup-
port.

In addition to the company
making its own donation to
the family ,Foxlair has opened
its doors to serve as a collec-
tion and distribution point for

. donations by other members

of the community and the
public.

Persons who wish to help
are invited to bring their dona-
tions to the store any day of
the week between 7am and 10
am. For further information
please call 324-1874, fax,
e-mail .
foxlair@coralwave.com

House Speaker receives gift
from Canadian counterpart

LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

Worship time: Ilam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm

Place:
The Madeira Shopping

Center

(Next door to CIBC)

Rey. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807 _
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@batelnet.bs



pero Ae
GHETTO

JOHN 4:29....COME SEE A MAN

March 7 - March 131h, 2005
South Beach Union Baptist Church
7:00p.m. Nightly

Speakers:

Rev. Wilton A. McKenzie Rev. Dr. Victor Cooper

Bahamas Baptist Union

Evangelist

Bahamas Baptist Union
Assistant Evangelist

SPECIAL MUSIC BY VARIOUS UNION
CHURCH CHOIRS

SNS E!





THE TRIBUNE

gos eee

ATTORNEY-GENERAL and Minister of Education Alfred Sears (centre) with Swiss Ambassador Anton
Thalmann (left) and Honorary Consul Bert Wernli during a courtesy call, on March 2, at the Office of the



LOCAL NEWS







Attorney General, Post Office Building. (BIS photo: Derek Smith)

Swiss Ambassador

calls on ministers



DEPUTY Prime Minister and Minister of National Security Cynthia Pratt and Swiss,Ambassador Anton
Thalmann exchanging gifts during a courtesy call, on March 2, at the Office of the Deputy Prime e Minis-

ter, Churchill Building. (BIS photo: Derek Smith)









&

BACARDI & COMPANY LIMITED

Bacardi & Company Limited is seeking candidates for the position of
Cost Accountant. The Company has been based in Nassau for over 40
years with significant manufacturing operations in the areas of bulk rum
production and bottling of various spirits and beverages, primarily for

export markets. /

Job Description

Under limited supervision, the Cost Accountant will be required to apply
principles of cost accounting to analyze cost records and to distribute

costs for production on items such as labour, equipments, materials and

overhead costs and to compute the unit cost of product or service.

Continuously evaluate existing cost systems and records cost data for use
by management in controlling expenditures. The Cost Accountant will
further be expected to prepare the necessary reports in preparation for

operating budgets.

Qualifications

The successful candidate must hold a professional designation with five
(5) to ten (10) years experience. A CPA designation is preferred.
Furthermore, due to the nature of the work to be performed the individual
must possess the ability to work independently under pressure to
consistently meet deadlines. Must be a self starter and a team player.

Salary/Benefits

Commensurate with experience.

Interested candidates should forward copies of their curriculum vitae
directly to the Bacardi & Company Limited P.O. Box N-4880, Nassau,

N.P., The Bahamas.
Attention The Human Resources Manager

Information may also be forwarded via e-mail to dacartwright@bacardi.com

Application Deadline: March 31, 2005

BACARDLAND THE BAT DEVICE ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF BACARDI & COMPANY LIMITED






tragedy of the Tsunami in
the ol decided of Tambe



iebruary 24, 2005, at the ais of Foreign Affairs Head-
cheil ‘is pictured steepting, Resdest emesis Espinola’s

pocket money and also to earn
money. . doing a wide variety



PAGE 8, SATU.

AY, MARCH 5, 2005

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS



Coastal areas
‘critical’ to
development
of Bahamas

@ By BAHAMAS
INFORMATION SERVICES

AN EXPERT committee
comprising environmentalists,
business, civic and government
leaders from throughout the
Bahamas says the preservation
of the country’s coastal areas is
critical to the future socio-eco-
nomic development of the
Bahamas.

So critical, that the committee
and the government, will
observe April 2005 as “Coastal
Awareness Month” throughout
the Bahamas.

The month’s activities will
seek to educate all members of
the public about the various
threats to coastal environment;
encourage discussions on the
solutions to those threats and
address the importance of
changing negative behaviours
that could continue to destroy
coastal areas.

“It is very important for us
to preserve our coastal areas
because our social and eco-
nomic future lies in the healthy
development of those areas,”
says Earlston McPhee, General
Manager of Sustainable
Tourism Development at the
Ministry of Tourism and chair-
man of the Planning Commit-
tee for Coastal Awareness
Month. :

“Unlike a number of other
countries, the entire Bahamas
is a coastal area and most of us
either reside on the coast or in
close proximity thereof. Our
beaches, oceans, wetlands, man-
groves, dunes and blue holes
are all an integral part of our
coastal resources and therefore
we must all do our best to pre-

serve these areas,” Mr McPhee’:

adds... ew “
Forei n

Mr McPhee says the coastal
region is a “major” reason why
millions of visitors journey to
the country’s shores annually,
spending hundreds of millions
of dollars in foreign currency
that creates a “number of lucra-
tive jobs for Bahamians and res-
idents alike”.

He says it makes good “busi-
ness and environmental sense
from an economic and social
standpoint”
and residents to properly man-
age these resources.

for all Bahamians

“A number of visitors have
indicated through the Ministry
of Tourism’s exit surveys that
they selected the Bahamas over
other destinations due to our
white, sandy beaches and clear,
crystal water,” says Mr McPhee.
“As a matter of information, we
get our beautiful, white, sandy
beaches as a result of a healthy
coral reef system, but if we pol-
lute our waters, there is a good
chance that we will destroy this
reef system and there goes our
beaches along with future eco-
nomic opportunities which it
supports.

“The aim of the planning
committee is through education,
to demonstrate the importance
of these resources to the socio-
economic development of our
islands while at the same time
show the economic and social
consequences if we continue to
degrade these assets,” he added.

Mr McPhee says pollution is:

one of the greatest challenges
the Bahamas faces with regards

.to maintaining its coastal envi-

ronment and will be one of five
areas of concern that will be
addressed during the month of
April and beyond.

“Seventy per cent of all
marine pollution is land-based.
Our entire islands are littered
with abandoned automobiles
and other consumer goods such
as refrigerators and stoves,
among others, that have been,
and are still being indiscrimi-
nately dumped by persons living
in our country and that pollu-
tion reaches our oceans,” says
Mr McPhee.

Filtering

“The, preservation of our

mangrove system jis. also. very, . ;

very important as the man-
groves act as a filtering system
for our marine ecosystem and
serves as a habitat for juvenile
fish.

“The filling in of wetland
areas is another major challenge
we face in the Bahamas, which

ultimately will result in more

flooding and increased insur-
ance rates,” Mr McPhee adds.

Mr McPhee says other areas
of concern to be addressed dur-
ing the month are: over-har-
vesting of fish resources, climate
change, invasive species and
habitat destruction.

He says figures provided by

Legal Notice

NOTICE

EXXON EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION TARAIJA
LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) EXXON EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION TARIJA
LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 2nd
day of March, 2005 when its Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is G.R. Huff of 16945
Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A. °

the National Ocean and Atmos-
pheric Administration (NOAA)
reveal that sustainable devel-
opment within the Caribbean
region - the Bahamas being no
exception - cannot occur with-
out healthy watershed and
marine ecosystems.

The NOAA report further
revealed that coastal popula-
tions worldwide are on the
increase with those figures
expected to reach to 75 per cent
within the next 10 to 15 years.

Already, 50 per cent of the
world’s population lives in
coastal areas.

Mr McPhee says the over-
harvesting of fish resources is a
major concern due to the fact
that fish accounts for up to 60
per cent of the animal protein
consumed by persons living in
developing economies such as
the Bahamas.

“However, some 70 per cent

of the world’s fish stock is fully -

fished or over-fished,” he adds.

Mr McPhee says improper
building techniques, adverse
weather conditions such as hur-
ricanes, the presence of inva-
sive species and littering are

other factors that can all con-

tribute to accelerated coastal

- erosion.

He says the objective of
“Coastal Awareness Month” is
to educate the general public of
the socio-economic importance
of preserving the country’s
coastal environment.

“This is a national initiative
and all hands are on deck,” says
Mr McPhee. “The composition

_ of the committee represents a

cross-sectoral approach which
is, critical for an integrated
coastal zone management pro-
gramme.

“Our tourist offices in the
respective islands are involved
in planning and executing activ-
ities in the islands and we also
have as an integral partner, the
Department of Local Govern-
ment, who will have responsi-
bility for islands without tourist
offices”.

Some of the major activities
scheduled for the month include
school competitions, beach
restoration projects, exhibitions,
media workshops and youth
fora.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

EXXON EXPLORATION AND
PRODUCTION TARIJA LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the
undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or
before 29th day of March, A.D., 2005. In default thereof
they will be excluded from the benefit of any distribution

made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 3rd day of March, A.D., 2005.

















PRIME MINISTER, Perry G Christie is pictured centre with a group of happy new home owners at
East Grand Bahama. The Government of the Bahamas constructed eleven new homes for residents
in East Grand Bahama, who lost their home during the passing of Hurricanes Frances and Jeanne
back in September of last year year. The Government is also constructing additional homes for
residents who were displaced by the storm. Likewise the Government has spent thousands of dol-
lars in helping to repair homes and in purchasing material for residents to secure their dwellings.
Also pictured centre with Prime Minister Christie is new home owner, 93 year old Mrs Olive Pin-
der; Health Minister Sen Marcus Bethel and Housing and National Insurance Minister Shane Gibson.
Also Pictured third left is High Rock Member of Parliament Kenneth Russell, left is Mrs Ann Per-
centie, MP for Pineridge, and far right is Ms Pleasant Bridgewater, MP for Marco City.

PM brings ‘home’ good
news for Grand Bahama





HAPPY Home Owners - Prime Minister Perry G Christie is pictured centre as he presented sey-
enteen residents of West Grand Bahama with the keys to their new homes on Monday afternoon.

' The Prime Minister flew direct to Grand Bahama from‘an engagement in Jamaica for the ‘spe-
cial presentation to residents who had lost their homes during the recent hurricanes.

This was the first installment of key to residents as the government continues to help residents
re-settle.

The presentation took place at the Eight Mile Rock High School Gym. Also pictured is the Min-
ister for Housing and National Insurance Shane Gibson (seventh left) and EMR MP Mr Lindy
Russell is seen to the left of the Prime Minister. (BIS photos: Vandyke Hepburn)

US AG eourevunitoiis
foreign minister

US Assistant Secretary of
State for Western Hemisphere
Affairs Roger. Noriega and
Ambassador John Rood wel-
comed Bahamian Foreign Min-
ister Fred Mitchell to Washing-
ton on March 2 to discuss a
range of important bilateral and
regional issues.

Assistant Secretary Noriega
underscored the close partner-
ship shared by the US and the
Bahamas in the fight against
narcotics trafficking in the
Caribbean region. Minister
Mitchell emphasised the impor-
tance of Operation Bahamas
Turks and Caicos (OPBAT) in
our shared counter-narcotics
efforts and encouraged Mr Nor-
iega to do all he could to ensure








John Rood, US Ambassauv,

Dated the 3rd day of March, 2005.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY
MANAGEMENT CO. LTD
Attorney for the above-named Company

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION MDD BOLIVIA LIMITED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION MDD BOLIVIA
LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 2nd
day of March, 2005 when its Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is G.R. Huff of 16945
Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

Dated the 3rd day of March, 2005.
HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY

MANAGEMENT CO. LTD
Attorney for the above-named Company

G. R. Huff
LIQUIDATOR
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION MDD
BOLIVIA LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the
undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or
before 29th day of March, A.D., 2005. In default thereof
they will be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 3rd day of March, A.D., 2005.

G. R. Huff
LIQUIDATOR
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.



that OPBAT funding is contin-
ued at adequate levels.

Both parties agreed that the
US and the Bahamas have
much to gain by working
together to promote stability
and development in Haiti. Min-
ister Mitchell stressed the
importance of maintaining good
communication as the situation
in Haiti evolves this year. He
provided a summary of the
Caribbean _Community’s
(CARICOM) Heads of Gov-
ernment meeting held in mid-
February, including CARI-
COM’s plan to provide techni-
cal assistance for Haiti’s elec-
toral process. Minister Mitchell
indicated that the Bahamian

to the Bahamas

embassy in Port-au-Prince was
operational and would be pro-
viding office space to represen-
tatives from CARICOM. Both
sides expressed concern over
the continued detention of for-
mer Prime Minister Yvon Nep-
tune and hoped for a speedy
resolution to the issue.

In addition to meeting with
Assistant Secretary Noriega,
Minister Mitchell and Ambas-
sador Rood met with Senator
Bill Nelson, Senator Tom
Harkin, and Senator Mel Mar-
tinez, as well as members of the
Florida Congressional delega-
tion.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
me) amu Celate fie





THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005, PAGE 9





Another Bahamian
unsung hero passes

E grew up in

an era when

many of the

privileges

and oppor-
tunities enjoyed by today’s gen-
eration were not only non-exis-
tent, but their absence also dic-
tated the extent of the aspira-
tions of the vast majority of
Bahamians. Yet, out of that cru-
el and unfair environment
emerged some pacesetters,
many of them ordinary people,
who dared to dream of a better
way of life and were brave
enough to attempt to change
the status quo.

Today, we refer to them as
our unsung heroes. We do’so
because, possibly due to their
initial lowly status in life —
notwithstanding their brave
defiance in the midst of tremen-
dous odds — they have never-
theless been denied proper
recognition for the great sacri-
fices they made in securing the
vastly improved way of life we
presently enjoy, and, we might
add, far too many of us seem-
ingly take for granted.

We refer to a period some six
decades ago when racial dis-
crimination and segregation
were in vogue in The Bahamas,

and the suppression of sec-'

ondary education to the masses
was one of the key strategies
employed by the ruling oli-
garchy in its attempt to perpet-
uate minority rule in this then
British colony.

Those were the days when
most Bahamian children were
obliged to leave the public
school system at the legal age of
fourteen years, as there were
only two secondary schools in
operation locally at that time.
They were the Government
High School, with an annual
intake of less than 24 new stu-
dents, and Queen’s College, a
similar but segregated institu-
tion operated by the Methodist
Church, and to which black chil-
dren were not generally admit-
ted.

We refer to the above condi-
tions that obtained at the time,

not to rekindle old negative

social embers, but rather to give
some insight into the adverse
conditions prevailing during
that period. This we deem nec-
essary in order for today’s gen-
eration to better appreciate the
contributions made by many
ordinary people, along with oth-
ers, in bringing about change
locally. We also do so in order
that we all might have a better
way of measuring and appreci-
ating the tremendous progress
we as a people have made in



GEORGE MACKEY

our race relations in this coun-
try.

Thus, it is against the above
backdrop that we pay tribute
today to one such unsung hero,
who blazed the trail of progres-
sive advancement by countless
Bahamians in the hospitality
industry — an industry that today
represents the backbone of our

local economy. We refer to the .

late Mr Alvin Thomas (Tom-
my) Thompson, whose funeral
service and burial were con-
ducted at St Matthew’s Church
a week ago.

Affectionately known as
Tommy, he was born to the
marital union of Gerald and
Marion Thompson in Deep
Creek, Eleuthera, on October
11, 1939. After receiving his ear-
ly education in Eleuthera, Tom-
my moved to New Providence
and began his working career
as an apprentice tailor. An
industrious young man, who
loved meeting and entertaining
people, he soon found his pro-
fessional niche in the hotel
industry.

‘ It was in the hospitality field
that Tommy would make his
mark as a pacesetter, rising
eventually to the top echelons
of management therein. He
achieved many firsts during his
distinguished career in the
industry, including becoming
the first Bahamian general man-
ager of the old Ambassador
Beach Hotel on Cable Beach,
and later holding a similar posi-
tion at the Emerald Beach, Har-

bour. Bay and-the Lucayan:

Beach (in Freeport, Grand
Bahama) hotels, respectively.
Being among the first
Bahamians to be entrusted with
such great responsibility, his
conscientious application to the
challenge thereby paved the
way for others to likewise
advance in the local tourist
industry. In the process, he
received invaluable training via
being seconded to various
hotels in the United States to
broaden his scope and gain
greater exposure in the industry.
Among his other pioneering
accomplishments was his selec-
tion, along with his faithful sec-
retary Ms Gloria Brown, of
being named Boss and Secre-
tary of the Year in 1986, the

P.O. Box N-7127, Nassau, Bahamas

Tel# (242) 293-1666, 393-2153, 393-2646 |,

Faxe {242} 393-3248

EVENING

® Begirmars Micresoft

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first such occurrence in the his-
tory of The Bahamas Secre-
taries Association. He was also
the recipient of the Paul Harris
Award, the Rotary Club’s high-
est honour, in 2000.

Despite having had open-
heart surgery in 1992, Tommy
continued his active involve-
ment in St Matthew’s Church,
where he served on the Vestry,
in the singing choir, the Social
Outreach Ministry and the
Anglican Church Men’s Organ-
isation. Active in politics, he
was a faithful member of the
Progressive Liberal Party,
served in its Delaporte branch,
also a member of its National
General Council, and was made
a.Stalwart Councillor, the par-
ty’s highest award.

_A community activist, Tom-
my was involved with the Skal
Club, the Deep Creek Associa-
tion and the Delaporte Com-
munity Association. The mea-
sure of this heroic - yet humble
- Bahamian was vividly borne
out in the tributes that were
paid him at his funeral service.

These accolades were given
by the following: Prime Minister
Perry Christie, Bishop Neil Ellis
(his former neighbour), Dela-
porte MP Neville Wisdom, Ms
Gloria Brown, and Mr Mervyn
Sweeting of the Deep Creek
Association. These tributes
were climaxed by a moving
eulogy delivered by the Rev Fr
James Moultrie, rector, of St
Matthew’s Church. Following
the service, Tommy’s mortal
remains. were. interred in the
church’s cemetery. May his soul
rest in peace and rise in glory.

Tommy died while celebrat-
ing with family and friends on
the evening of February 14,
Valentine’s Day. The following
day, his dear. friend Winston T
Marshall gave us a copy of a
tribute he had just written about
Tommy to commemorate the
sad occasion. Entitled “A Fall-
en Comrade”, it follows thus:

“All of that does not matter
anymore.”

“The philosophers, great and
minor, throughout the ages,
grappled with weighty subjects

-such as life and death and the

soul and good and evil and jus-
tice and righteousness, and truth

> ih
of



Alvin Thomas (Tommy) Thompson

and honour...to which we add
good health, wealth and family
and friends.

“We are continuously chal-

lenged to do the best we.

can...when we can...for as many
as we can...and in so doing, it
really does not matter what
people say about us while we
are here or when we are
gone...for...no matter
what...some will say this and
some will say that...and now in
Tommy’s case...it does not real-
ly matter anymore.

“In the case of our departed
friend, brother, Rotarian and
comrade...and walking...and boil
fish discussion partner...Tom-
my Thompson...we have had
multiple opportunities to dis-
cuss with him some matters that
were dear and important to

_ him. Those of us who really

knew Tommy, would have
known how he loved is family
so much...and showed it in his
own proud way...especially
when it came to his kids, and
grandkids...‘his boys’.

“Those of us who really knew
and understood him, know of
his deep and. abiding
faith...which sustained him
through the many ups and
downs that he faced...health,
unemployment, family, busi-
ness, and yes politically...but it
does not really matter anymore.

“Those of us who really knew
him...know of his great joy of
singing in the choir, working
with the Social Outreach Pro-
gramme and serving as a vestry-
member at his beloved St
Matthew’s Anglican
Church...and his pride when he

“represented his Parish ‘at the

Diocesan Synod...and engaged
in church politics.

“Those of us who really knew
him...know that he was a nation-
alist... who saw The Bahamas
progress to become world-class
in tourism...and saw himself
move up the ranks to become
one of the first Bahamian. gen-
eral managers of a major hotel
property...but that does not
really. matter anymore.

“Those of us who really knew
him, know of the challenges that
he faced as he tried his hands at
entrepreneurship...his constant
travelling...back and forth...his
visits with “The Group’ to Neva-
da, Columbia (where he
became ill...but rallied and con-
tinued), Cuba and just as

.recently as February 2 through

5, 2005, to the Chinese trade
fair in Kingston, Jamaica, to
explore business opportunities.

“And those of us who really -
knew him...would know of his
committed support of the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party...and how
proud he was of having been
named a stalwart councilor...and
his disappointment of his party’s
wilderness years...and the. joy
of returning to power...but all
of that does not matter any-
more.

“What does ‘matter is the fact
that there is a certain democ-
racy about death...it comes to
us all...and our living would not
have been in vain...if we
attempted to help somebody as
we passed along.

“Sleep on comrade...you did
your best...you will remember
the pleasant and the not so
pleasant times...we will all miss
you.”

(George W Mackey’s book
“Millennium Perspectives”, a
compilation of Viewpoints and
other interesting topics, is avail-
able at leading bookstores local-

y. E-mail:
georgewmackey@hotmail. eo

THE AIRPORT AUTHORITY

P.O. Box AP-59222

Nassau International Airport

Nassau, Bahamas

Proposal for Group Life & Medical Insurance

The Airport Authority invites proposals from eligible
insurance companies and/or brokers on a Group Life and
Medical Insurance Plan for employees of The Airport

Authority.

The policy will be for a period of one year following the
selection of a successful tender. Parties interested in
submitting a proposal may collect an information package
from the Executive Office of The Airport Authority at the
Nassau International Airport on Monday 7th, March, 2005.

All proposals should be sealed, and delivered to:

Acting General Manager,

Course are six {6} weeks fong

The Airport Authority,
P.O. Box, AP - 59222

Nassau International Airport



ginners MS PowerPoint | Saturday 12

And should be marked:

SSSENTIALS OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP

PO peer,

PROPOSALS FOR GROUP LIFE AND MEDICAL
INSURANCE |

Smail Business’
on your soind this
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Ne

Queen's College
Introduces the

All tenders must be received no later than 4:30 pm on
Monday 21st March, 2005.

AL aUseek Cartiin
tn Starting and Manag ir Ovin Serial Buziness Veriture
START OATE Weak beginning Monday Mar. 07, 2005 G08 pm.

Contact CFE ADMINISTRATOR or ernail cfe@gchenceforth. core waww.qchentcefortts.com

TERM DATE: March 07 — May 14, 2005

The Airport Authority reserves the ienetg to reject any or
all tenders.





PAGE 10, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005











Parties, Nightclubs
& Restaurants



Official Kalik Relaunch Party on Saturday, March
5 @ Arawak Cay. Come and celebrate with a huge
FREE party featuring 3 for $5 Kalik. Performances
by Ira Storr, Nita, Funky D, Spice, Terez Hepburn,
Visage, the Extra Band and KB.

Annual DJs Boat Cruise on Friday, March 4 on
the Island Link, 8pm. Tickets $15 advance, $20.at the
boat. Special appearances by Platinum and Renais-
sance Models.

Miriam & Remix Birthday Bash on Friday, March
4 on board the Calypso I. Boarding 7.30pm, boat
leaves at 8.30pm. Tickets $20 advance, $25 at the
boat. Price includes food and drinks.

Exotic Saturdays @ Fridays Soon Come starts this
weekend with 3 for $10 drink specials. Admission:
$10 before 12 and $15 after. Ladies free before 11pm.

Da Greasy Pit (Omega Psi Phi Steak-out) on Sat-
urday, March 5 @ West Bay St and Perpall Tract, 12-
6pm. Proceeds in aid of the Bahamas Red Cross
Society and the Omega Psi Phi (Pi Xi Chapter)
Community Centre Building Fund.

Rave Saturdays @ The All New Club Eclipse. DJ
Scoobz spinning the best in Old Skool. Admission
$35, all inclusive food and drink.

Fever @ Bahama Boom, Elizabeth St, downtown,
Fridays. The hottest party in the Bahamas every
Friday night. Admission $10 before midnight. First 50
women get free champagne. First 50 men get a free
Greycliff cigar. Dress to impress. For VIP reserva-
tions call 356-4612.

Cool Runnings is back with a Conscious Party @
' Haid Rock Cafe, Charlotte St North every Friday.
Classic reggae style music. Admission $10.

Mellow Moods every Sunday @ Fluid Lounge
and Nightclub, Bay St, featuring hits from yesterday
— old school reggae and rockers downstairs, and
golden oldies upstairs. Admission: Free. Doors open
9pm.

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters Sports
Bar. Drink specials all night long, including karaoke
warm-up drink to get you started. Party, 8pm-until.

Karaoke Nights @ Fluid Lounge and Nightclub.
Begins 10pm every Tuesday. Weekly winners select-
ed as Vocalist of the Week — $250 cash prize. Winner

selected at end of month from finalists — cash prize
$1,000. Admission $10 with one free drink.

Reggae Tuesdays @ Bahama Boom. Cover charge
includes a free Guinness and there should be lots of
prizes and surprises. Admission: Ladies $10 and
Men $15.

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports
Bar every Wednesday S5pm-8pm. Free appetizers
and numerous drink specials.

Flash Nights @ Club Fluid every Thursday. The
ultimate Ladies Night. Join Nassau’s and Miami
Beach’s finest men. Ladies only before 11.30pm with
free champagne. Guys allowed after 11.30pm with
$20 cover.

_ The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday. Doors
open at 9pm, showtime 11.30pm. Cover charge $15.
$10 with flyer. ,

Twisted Boodah Bar & Lounge every Friday @

Cafe Segafredo, CharlotteSt North, featuring world .

music, chillin’ jazz and soulful club beats. Starting at
6pm. Beers $3, longdrinks $4.50.

Fantasy Fridays @ Fluid Lounge, featuring late
‘80s music in the VIP Lounge, Top of the Charts in
the Main Lounge, neon lights and.Go Go dancers.
Glow sticks for all in before midnight. Admission:
Ladies free before 11pm, $15 after; Guys $20 all
night. %

College Night @ Bahama Boom every Friday.
Admission: $10 with college ID, $15 without.





AROUN D

THE TRIBUNE

Ni A-S SAU












ter Guana Cay.

psychological trauma.

Haitians, treating them like dirt?

Pharmacy and Tony’s Cabinet Supplies.

Dicky Mo’s Fridays @ Cable Beach. Happy Hour
- 3 for $10 mixed drinks and $1 shots.

Greek Saturdayz @ Bahama Boom, Elizabeth
Ave. Every Saturday the Phi Beta Sigma Frat wel-
comés greeks, college grads and smooth operators.
Admission $15 all night, $10 for greeks in letters.
Music by DJ Palmer, security strictly enforced.

Chill Out Sundays @ The Beach Hut, West Bay
Street with fresh served BBQ and other specials
starting from 4pm-10pm, playing deep, funky chill
moods with world beats. Cover $2.

Sweet Sunday Chill Out Soiree Lounge, every
Sunday, 4pm-midnight @ Patio Grille, British Colo-
nial Hotel.

Wet Sundays, every Sunday, noon-midnight @
Crystal Cay Beach. Admission $10, ladies free.

Carib Scene @ Club Fluid every Sunday. A night
of Caribbean, Latin and Reggae flavours for all
audiences, Latin Flair in the VIP Lounge; Old School
Reggae and'Soca in the Main Lounge. Ladies in
free before 11pm. $10 after 11pm. Men, $15 cover

charge.

Jay Mitchell and Hot KC @ Palm Court Lounge,
British Colonial Hilton, Wednesday-Thursday 8pm-
12am. , oes

Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley’s Restaurant &
Lounge, Eneas St off Poinciana Drive. Featuring

_ Frankie Victory atthe key board in the After Dark

Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to midnight. Fine food
and drinks.

Paul Hanna performs at Traveller’s Rest, West
Bay St, every Sunday, 6.30pm-9.30pm.

The Arts
Ian Strachan’s Diary of Souls, the critically

acclaimed play examining the Haitian experience
in the Bahamas, will open at the Dundas Centre



‘Diary of Souls’
%, iary of Souls, a drama written and directed by Dr Ian Strachan, playwright and
chair of COB’s School of English Studies is a fictional interpretation of tragic

events that took place in Exwma in July 1990, and is considered by some to be

Strachan’s best play yet. When intercepted by the Defence Force, a Haitian ves-
sel allegedly capsizes. The 39 Haitians who drowned were buried in a common grave on Bit-

Strachan’s Track Road Theatre will bring this story to the stage in an emotionally powerful
account, says an online review. The play switches frequently between the beach on Bitter Gua-
na Cay, where three Haitians are stranded as “undead” between feeling neither life nor death,
and a psychiatrist’s office where a Bahamas Defence Force marine is being treated for

Strachan also lets his characters investigate the heart of the matter, the source of Haitian
distress — Was it the series of despots following Toussaint Ouverture that impoverished the
beautiful country? Was it the brutality of “Papa Doc” Duvalier and his private militia, the
Tons-Tons Macoute that broke the spirit of a nation? Why do Bahamians shun and despise

Diary of Souls runs this weekend through Sunday at the Dundas Centre for the Performing
Arts @ 8pm. Tickets are $20. The show continues on March 11 and 12 at a cost of $20 (same -
time). Tickets can be purchased at the Dundas box office from 10am-4pm, Heaven Sent







TICKETS:

HEAVEN SENT PHARMACY

TONY'S CABINETS
DUNDAS BOX OFFICE

: PH: 392-3728

A.
TRACK ROAD THEATRE
PRODUCTION

SPONSORED BY:









- for the Performing Arts on Friday, March 4 and

continue through March 6, 8pm. And again on

: Friday, March 11 and Saturday, March 12, 8pm.

Call the box office at 393-3728 for ticket info.

’ Tickets for Friday’s performance are $25, remain-

ing shows are $20.

Indigo, a film about gifted children on earth,
their purpose and work of healing, peace and
love, will be shown @ Unity Centre of Light, East
Ave, Centreville (directly behind Centreville Food
Store) on Friday, March 4, starting at 6.30pm.

. Admission $10 adults, $7 children. For more infor-

mation call 328-1325.

A Fabric Printing workshop will be held on
Saturday, March 5 and March 12, from:10am -
1pm at the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas.
The workshop is part of the NAGB’s Youth
Workshop series and is for children between the
ages of 12 and 18. Joie Lamare of Bahama Hand-
prints will be conducting the workshop. Cost: $10
members/$16 non-members. Call the gallery at
328-5800/1 to register.

Reading and Lecture by Dr Joanne Hyppolite,
award-winning author of children’s literature, will
deliver a lecture and reading on Monday, March
7, 6pm @ Choices Dining Room, College of the
Bahamas School of Hospitality and Tourism Stud-
ies.

The National Collection @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, an exhibition that takes
the viewer on a journey through the history of
fine art in the Bahamas. It features signature
pieces from the national collection, including
recent acquisitions by Blue Curry, Antonius
Roberts and Dionne Benjamin-Smith. Gallery
hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 1lam-4pm. Call 328-
5800 to book tours.

Past, Present and Personal: The Dawn Davies
Collection @ the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, Villa Doyle, West and West Hill Streets.
The exhibition is part of the NAGB’s Collector’s
Series. Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 11am-4pm.
Call 328-5800 to book tours.





















The Awakening Landscape: The Nassau Water-
colours of Gaspard Le Marchand Tupper, from
the collection of Orjan and Amanda Lindroth @
the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas. The
mid-nineteenth century paintings that make up the
exhibition are part of one of the earliest suites of
paintings of Nassau and its environs. Tupper was
a British military officer stationed at Fort Char-
lotte in the 1850s. The works show a pre-mod-
ern Bahamas through the decidely British medium
of watercolour. Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday,
1lam-4pm. Call 328-5800 to book tours.



Health

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5.30pm on the second Tuesday. of each month at
their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville. Call
323-4482 for more info.

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third
Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors Hospital con-
ference room.

The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2.30pm (except August and Decem-
ber) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley

_ street.

Doctors Hospital, the official training centre of the
American Heart Association offers CPR classes cer-
tified by the AHA. The course defines the warning
signs of respiratory arrest and gives prevention strate-
gies to avoid sudden death syndrome and the most
common serious injuries and choking that can occur
in adults, infants and children. CPR and First Aid
classes are offered every third Saturday of the month
from 9am-ipm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Com-
munity Training Representative at 302-4732: for
more information and learn to'save a life today.

REACH — Resources & Education for Autism
and related Challenges meets from 7pm — 9pm‘the:
second Thursday of each month in the cafeteria of:
the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.



Civic Clubs

The Bahamas Historical Society’s monthly
meeting is scheduled for 6pm on March 17 at the
Museum on Shirley Street and Elizabeth Avenue.
Dr Donald Hopkins of the Carter Presidental
Center, a descendent of Long Island, Harbour
Island and Abaco, will give a presentation entitled

“Posing Questions, Pondering Records and Prob- §

ing the Genes: Researching Family Histories in the
Bahamas.” The public is invited to attend. ©

Toastmasters Club 1905 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm @
BEC Cafe, Tucker Rd. Club 9477 meets Friday,
7pm @ Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm
A19, Jean St. Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pm @
British Colonial Hilton. Club 1600 meets Thursday,
8.30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes. Club 7178 meets
Tuesday, 6pm @ The J Whitney Pinder Building,
Collins Ave. Club 2437 meets every second, fourth
and fifth Wednesday at the J Whitney Pinder Build-
ing, Collins Ave at 6pm. Club 612315 meets Monday
6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ the
Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first
Tuesday, 7pm @ Gaylord’s Restaurant, Dowdeswell

’ St. Please call 502-4842/377-4589 for more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second
Tuesday, 6.30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office,
4th floor meeting room.

The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month in
the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, Bay St.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets
the second and fourth Wednesday of the month,
8pm @ St Augustine’s Monestary.



Send all your civic and social events to The Tri-
bune via fax: 328-2398 or e-mail: outthere@tribune-
media.net

POE eMere

WINES & SPIRITS









THE TRIBUNE ; . SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005, PAGE 11
{ \ | i i ie t ae Demonstrators calling for the return of ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide marched through Bel Air, a
slum in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on Friday, March 4,2005. Demonstrators chanted "too much blood" and








accused police of human rights abuses five days after two people were shot dead in another protest. (AP
Photo/Ariana Cubillos)







Demonstrators calling for the return of ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide reach out to UN Brazilian
— peacekeepers during.a march through of Bel Air, a.slum in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on Friday, March 4, 2005.

_ Demonstrators chanted “too much blood” and accused police of human rights abuses five days after two
people were shot dead in another protest. (AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)

Film (From page 1)

ty is a massive environmental
clean-up, landscaping and build-
ing restructuring that will turn
several of the old buildings of
the former US missile base into
offices..

The next phase will include
the first of three sound stages
and necessary infrastructure,
according to Paul Quigley,
CEO of Toronto-based Gold
Rock Film Studio and Theme
Park.

This third stage of develop-
ment, for which preparations

have already begun, includes:

excavation for the world’s
largest tank, 100-by-80 feet and
12 feet deep. ‘

This excavation into rock
caused some delay after ques-
tions about environmental safe-
ty came from The Bahamas
Environment Science and Tech-
nology (BEST) Commission,
the government’s watchdog for
environmental issues in relation
to international developments.

Mr Quigley said that with
the signed lease, excavation for
the tank, which helps maintain a
controlled environment on the
open seas, will now be able to
go below sea level.

Prime Minister Perry
Christie and Minister of Finan-

cial Services and Investments .

Allyson Maynard-Gibson, were

Law (From page 1)

the development will destroy the sanctity of their

quaint island community.

“The Save Guana Cay Lobby are there to save
the island. They don’t want an entire third of the



both present for yesterday’s

_ signing and thanked Mr Quigley

for his hard work and commit-
ment.

Mr Christie praised the sig-
nificant contribution the pro-
ject will bring to Grand Bahama
and the Bahamas on the whole.

“T have found both govern-
ment and developers have a
commitment to protecting the
environment,” Mr Christie said,
“and without any difficulty we
have overcome all setbacks and
are happily moving forward.”

Minister Maynard-Gibson
added: “We believe that the
heads of agreement which pro-
vides the facilities and ability
for Bahamians to fully express
themselves creatively in a myr-
iad of ways they’re involved in
the film industry, can now be
fulfilled diligently.”

The investment is expected
to create about 1,200 jobs and
pay out $8 million annually in
salaries after investing $6.5 mil-
lion on wages for about 300
construction workers. -

The developer is also com-
mitted to securing $250 million
in production funding, and forg-
ing a partnership with Bahamas
Technical Vocational Institute
in Grand Bahama. '

“It’s been a bit of a long road
and a complex deal,” said Mr

Quigley, “and I am happy that
we have finally signed the deal.
I am very excited about the
potential of what we are doing.

We are very committed to.

developing an indigenous film
industry in the Bahamas.”

Mr Quigley, who has spent
more than 35 years in the film
industry, said a very important
part of the project is the training
of Bahamians as opposed to
bringing professionals in from
abroad. Soy

“In the long term,” he added,
“the project would not be suc-
cessful if reliant on foreigners.
There is a huge opportunity for
Bahamians in so many differ-
ent fields in the film industry,
and it is a wonderful calling card
for us to have the largest Disney
franchise of all time being our
first production.”

The studios will produce
commercials, feature films, TV
series, music, in-house produc-
tions, and offer a Bahamian vil-
lage theme park — including
actors, and a market square
with Bahamian crafts and hand-
iwork. The studios will have
viewing galleries so visitors can
watch commercials or shows
being filmed. In the future the
firm plans to offer a 3D Imax
theatre and an endangered
species area.



and we should be preserving these places as

national treasures,” the lawyer said.

island to be sliced off from the rest of Guana Bahamas.

Cay and to become a preserve for the rich foreign

investor.

“Our land resources are very small in the
Bahamas. Although we cover thousands of miles
of water, we have a very small availability of land

Bishop (From page 1)

come. Dr Bethel said Bishop
Eldon has limited movement of
his limbs and seems to recog-
nise voices.

"He opens his eyes and
seems to be aware of who he is
talking to," said Dr Bethel, "but
we know that it is a wait and
see type of situation."

She added: "We put our-
selves in God's hands and what-
ever is the Lord's will we shall
accept. We keep praying and
we appreciate the love and sup-
port shown to us from the
Anglican community and the

Mr Smith said a $400 million investment in
Guana Cay is not going to be felt across the

“However, if $400 million was pumped into

Freeport where there are thousands of unem-

community at large."

Father Laish Boyd, rector of
Holy Cross Anglican Church,
said he is very concerned about
Bishop Eldon's condition.

"Iam very concerned. Obvi-
ously he has been in intensive
care for a while. Bishop Eldon
made great contributions to the
church in so many ways and he
is extremely dear to many peo-
ple and to me personally," said
Fr Boyd.

Fr Boyd told The Tribune
that Bishop Eldon ordained him
as both a deacon and priest.

ployed people, where the infrastructure is, where
there are people who can directly benefit from
this, that would benefit us more,” he said.



"When I offered myself as a
candidate for the testing of my
vocation, he was the bishop and
took a personal interest in all
of us who were interested in the
priesthood," he said.

Archbishop Drexel Gomez,
in a memo to all Anglican cler-
gy, has asked that special
prayers be said during all ser-
vices for Bishop Eldon.

The Anglican Diocese is ask-
ing all Anglicans and the entire
Bahamian community to con-
tinue to keep Bishop Eldon in
their prayers. |

LogisticsS





ckage or multiple —

nt and cost effective







PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005



Artist celebrates 35

@ By Franklyn G Ferguson

rtist Alton
Lowe cele-
brated 35
years as a
s o 1 o
exhibitor when he staged an
impressive show at the Nas-

sau Beach Hotel on Febru-.

ary 25.

For 32 years, Mr Lowe has
been at the Nassau Beach,
where he says he has been
given excellent services over
the years.

Lowe’s name has become
synonymous with Bahamian
art. His success and
renowned paintings of
Bahamian scenes in oil over
the past three decades is
matched by his zest for pro-
moting the people, history
and culture of his homeland.

Born at New Plymouth,
Green Turtle Cay, in 1945,
Lowe showed an interest in
painting at an early age. An
American couple painting in
Abaco recognised his poten-
tial and began tutoring him
after school.

After several months they
convinced Lowe’s parents to
permit them to further his
training in the United States.

At age 16, Lowe left his
island home to apprentice in
galleries on Miami Beach and
Gatlinburg, Tennessee, for
two years before spending
three years at the prestigious
Frank Reilly School in New
York City.

The young artist staged his
first one-man exhibition in
1969 at the British Colonial
Hotel. His nervousness
quickly disappeared when 22
paintings were sold on open-
ing night and the remaining
two the next day.

Every spring since then,
Lowe has held successful
one-man exhibitions in the
capital. This annual event has
drawn an ever-widening cir-
cle of admirers from the
Bahamas and abroad.

Many of his works hang in
collections far from the
Bahamian shores. In addi-
tion, Lowe takes on commis-
sions and has been featured
several times on Bahamian
postage stamps, with series
on rare orchids, roses, Loyal-
ist settlers and Lucayans.

' Lowe’s works captures the
brilliant colours and peace-
ful people of the Bahamas.

He has used his success to
promote the preservation of
Bahamian history and cul-
ture, especially in his native
Abaco.

He founded the Albert
Lowe Museum, named after

his father, at Green Turtle .

Cay in 1976 in a restored
Loyalist-style home.

He was also a moving force
behind the Memorial Sculp-
ture Garden, New Plymouth
Historical Society and Island
Roots Festival in Key West.

Lowe’s art is distinctly
Bahamian, so is he. Always
preserving and promoting the
islands he calls home.

THE TRIBUNE



NASSAU ON CAMERA

years







TV hava tebe rey reo

tra.



@ FROM left are Dr Gail Saunders, director of archives,
pianist Peggy Hail and historian Dr Sanra Riley.
te

lH FIRST TIME — From left are artist Alton Lowe, journalist Karin Herig and Dr Harold
Munnings Jr. .



iy Sis thi

ATTORNEY Anthony Klonaris (centre), consultant to the
law firm Michael Klonaris and Co., with his wife, Kathryn,

and daughter, Christina.



@ BAHAMIAN subject matter has been the theme of many of James Mastin’s works.
This sculpture, The Seagull in Flight, cast in polished bronze, was on.display at the exhi-
bition. Shown above, from left, are Hane Banister and Karin Meulengracht while long-time
friend and client Rodger Banister chats with Mr Mastin about the art of sculpture.



@ Dr Michael Gerassimos (left), who has been serving as a
GP for about half a century, with artist/engineer Harold
Munnings, co-chairman of the Bahamas Independence
celebration.



@ PICTURED from left are Luisa Black, Martin Ratcliffe, Tom Black, Cynthia Ratcliffe
and Andrew Aitken.

















ae

@ ATTORNEYS A Rosemary Christie, of Higgs and Johnson

law firm, and E Dawson Roberts, of E Dawson Roberts:
and Co. Mr Roberts is the oldest practising lawyer in Nas-

sau.

eH wa ipa iH ; i fe

@ PRESIDENT of Bethell Estates, John Bethell (second from left) and his wife Beth, are
shown with artist Kim Smith and Keren Ramsay, office manager at Southworth Consultants
Limited.





VN ON
A a







SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398



E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com








| BDA IO LO) OIC eer ENE

(Photo: Lucien LS) |

CONN Tre Tem nee wb

the heat up

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

WILLESMSTAD, Curacao
— Top seed Devin Mullings
adjusted very well to the change
in climate as he pulled off the
opening match of the American
Zone II Davis Cup tie against
the Netherlands Antilles.

The 19-year-old Grand
Bahamian, who arrived here on
Wednesday night - three days
after the rest of the Bahamas
team - enjoyed a 6-1, 6-3, 6-2
win yesterday at the Sta Catha-
rina Sports & Country Club to
Win iis first Davis Cup match
in five outings.

“Today, I wasn’t. really 100
per cent. I just came from
indoors and it was snowing over
there,” said Mullings, who came
from directly from school at
Ohio State where he’s in his
sophomore year.

“[’m just getting accustomed
to the heat. I felt kind of slug-
gish out there, but I think the
Jonger I stay out there, the bet-
ter it’s going to be for me.
Hopefully by Sunday, I will be
much more prepared than I was
today.”

Mullings, the southpaw with
the big serve, was referring to
the reverse singles in which he
will play Netherlands Antilles’
top seed Jean-Julien Rojer in
what could be the clincher for
the tie.

It will all depend on what
happens in the doubles today
when Marvin Rolle and Ryan
Sweeting take on Royer and
Raoul Behr.

Rolle lost 6-2, 6-2, 7. 5 to
Rojer-in the second opening
singles that lasted one hour and
50 minutes.

Although there was some
concern about how well
Mullings would make the
adjustment to the change in
weather, he didn’t show any
signs of problems throughout
the match.

In fact, he broke Winklaar in
the first game and although he

was broken in the second game,.

Mullings went on to take control
of the set, easily winning the
next five games.

Mullings would keep the
momentum going in the second
set, holding serve in the first
game. He came from a 40-15
deficit to take advantage, but
Winklaar was able to rally back
to/hold for a 1-1 tie.

Winklaar, a 17-year-old col-
legiate player in Curacao, would
break and hold serve for a 3-1
lead.

But Mullings rallied back to
break at 3-3 and he was able to
go on to win the second set.

Both players would hold
serve through the first four
games of the third set. However,
Mullings again took control as
he broke Winklaar and went on
to seal the game, set and match.

Nervous

“He was playing well. He
kept the ball in play,” said a dis-
appointed Winklaar. “It was my
first Davis Cup, so I was kind

~ of nervous. I know I could play

better than I did.”

Winklaar did manage to get
in a couple of passing shots that
kept the small Netherlands
Antilles players cheering. But
they had even more to cheer
from Mullings as he forced Win-
klaar to make mistake after mis-
take and give the Bahamas the
upper hand.

Mullings, the shorter of the
two, basically stayed back at the
line. But he was able to work
inside to get in a couple of shots
at the net to counter Winklaar’s
baseline game.

“T thought he played very
well,” said Bahamas team cap-
tain John Farrington. “Devin
played an intelligent match. He
controlled the match from the
start to the end.

“He moved the ball around
and kept it in play. He mixed
up his serves and he out-thought
the guy and just blew him off
the court.”

“He played a very intelligent

- match.” *



Bi By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

CR WALKER Knights edged out the CC
Sweeting Cobras for their fourth straight
Government Secondary School Sporting
Association (GSSSA) track and field title.

Three more records fell on the second
day of competition, with more than 20 ath-
letes qualifying for the national high school
championships.

Knights, who established a first day lead
and never looked back, defeated their clos-
est competitors, the Cobras, by 40 points.

Pacers came in third with 455, CI Gibson
Rattlers fourth with 313 and Doris Johnson
Marlins fifth with 275.50 points.

Knights claimed the under 17 division with
a combined score of 334 points, and were
second in the senior division with 310 points.
Winning the division were the Cobras with
316 points, they were second in the inter-
mediate division with 288 points.

Effort

ceordirig to Knights' head coach Floyd
Armbrister, the fourth straight win was a
combined effort, which came because the
coaches allowed the athletes to compete,

He said: "It is great to win four straight
titles, but when you take a closer look at it,
the situation is saddening.

"You have a power school like RM Bailey
who were denied a chance of winning a
championship title because club coaches
decided to interfere.

"We don't interfere with their meets, so I
don't understand why they would want to
tell the athletes not to compete in certain
races, which is for the betterment of their
‘school and athletes."

For the Knights, spectacular performances
came from LeSean Pickstock, Ashley Han-
na, Lesley Dorceval and Mary Miller.

Miller and Dorceval cleaned house in
the distance events, winning each race
entered.

‘Miller said: "It feels great knowing that
the hard work paid off, but I am disap-
pointed that I wasn't able to run a faster
time. /

“For me today was harder than Thurs-
day. It was cold and every time I tried to
push forward the wind coming around the
200m curve made it impossible."

Competition

There were only four records breakers
during the two day competition, two of
which belonged to strong woman Tracey
Morrison.

Morrison came off day two on a high,
annihilating a record which she set five years
ago, in the javelin.

Yesterday was no different for Morrison,
being the first to place her name again in the
record books, this time in the shot putt.

Morrison’s throw of 13.28m was more
than enough to erase the old record of
11.90m, but was just shy of the Carifta gual:
ifying standards of 14.15m.

She said: “I don’t like the shot as much.as
I like javelin, but the record is always pleas-
ing.

“T have to thank God and -my coaches,
this record belongs to them because they
are the ones who helped me obtain it.”

The other two records were set by Pacers’
under 17 girl’ s squad.

The team of Wendy Derosin, Teniel Poiti-
er, Rennise McKenzie and Christina Badmus
ran a time of 4:11.64 seconds — the old
record time, set back in 1993 by the Cobras,
was 4:13.39 ‘seconds.

Dorceval was the other record breaker,
winning the under 17 boys’ 800m run in a
time ®f 2:05.29 seconds. The old time was
2:05.52 seconds.





SPORTS

MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

SSNS

S

ESS





A.I.D., Supporting
THE ,_BAHAMAS DAVIS CUP TEAM

Wulff Road, Nassau, The Bahamas |



a

\ ty

NK
Fax: 393-4258 i & 2
www.aidbahamaislands.com A

A.I.D. — Automotive & Industrial Distributors
Phone: 393-7481 |



, 7 TRIBUNE SPORTS

PAGE 2B, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005



week of wi



a

& C CSWEETING’S Elbin
: Sn Carey jumps 6.04 to win the inter-
’ , mediate boys long jump yesterday

during the first day of the GSSSA
‘ senior high schools track meet.
; “ , (Photo: Felipé Major/

Tribune staff)





- 3 ay oe & GOVERNMENT High
‘ 8 School’s Michealla McPhee
throws 26.73 to win the inter-
mediate girls javelin.

(Photo; Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)









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7
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4,
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‘



TRIBUNE SPORTS SAIUHDAY, VIARUH 5, ZUU9, FAUE op

SPORTS



LW YOUNG’S
Lynden Bethel pass-
es S C McPherson’s

Ronico Thompson to
win the intermediate
boys 100 metre hur-

dles








(Photo: Felipé
Major/Tribune staff)







—



,

@ CH REEVES’ Lexi Wilson runs
home to win the 1500 metres yesterday at

the track meet.
(Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

@ JARAN HINSEY of SC McPherson
wins the 200 hundred metres to break
the bantam boys record time.
(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)





PAGE 4B, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Marvin Rolle stumbles as
Netherlands Antilles pull even



@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

WILLEMSTAD, Curacao
— By the time Marvin Rolle
found a way to get around
Netherlands Antilles’ top seed
Jean-Julien Rojer’s serve and
volley game, it was a too late.

Rolle, the Bahamas’ num-
ber two seed, suffered a 6-2, 6-
2, 7-5 to Rojer as the Nether-
lands Antilles pulled even in
the first round of the Ameri-
can Zone II Davis Cup tie yes-
terday.

It now makes it an even ©

more interesting showdown in
the doubles today at the Sta
Catharina Sports & Country
Club when Rolle and Ryan
Sweeting will carry the flag for

the Bahamas against the ©

Netherlands Antilles’ duo of
Rojer and Raoul Behr.

“T went out there and did
my best, but Julian is a good
player. He’s not 250 for noth-
ing,” said Rolle about Rojer,
who is ranked at No. 285 on
the ATP computer list.

“He went out there and he
played a smart game. I just
made a lot of errors. But in
the third set, I made a little
ru. coming from 5-2 down,
but I wasn’t able to keep my
concentration level up. But I
gave it a good run. | didn’t
give up until the end.”

Rojer, who improved his





Av






Davis Cup record to 31-8,
played a real solid serve and
volley game in the first two
sets as he delighted the crowd
and frustrated Rolle.

Rolle, however, turned
things around in the third set
as returned some big shots
and served just as well. He
was close to avoiding the
three-set sweep when he
broke Rojer and held for a 5-
4 lead.

Volley

Serving tied at 15-15, Rojer
slid at the net as he went for a
volley. Rolle won the point
and eventually took a 15-40
lead. Rolle went on to break
at 30-40 for a 5-S tie.

With the crowd cheering
him on, Rojer went back to
his flashy serve and volley
game and blanked Rolle to
snatch a 6-5 lead. He then
blanked Rolle again on the
break to win the game, set and
match in one hour and 50
minutes.

“It was a good match. I
think Marvin started to find
his rhythm a little too late in
the match,” said Rojer, who
didn’t want to disappoint the
fans at the end of the match.

“Overall it was okay. I was

pleased with the match. I felt

okay. I felt fit. There was a lot
of windy conditions, but it was

eg ee

Syn



H MARVIN ROLLE in action for the Bahamas yesterday.
(Photo: Lucien LS)

a good match overall. I just
had to keep concentrating on
playing my own game.”

Despite the win, Rojer felt
Rolle played well and he real-
ly made him work down the
stretch.

The Bahainas took a 1-0
lead as top seed Devin



ri

Mullings disposed of Nether-
lands Antilles’ No. 2 seed
Rasid Winklaar 6-1, 6-3, 6-2
in a match that lasted one
hour and 35 minutes to get the
best-of-five tie underway.

Team captain John Farring- -

ton said he was hoping that
the Bahamas would have been

ighted Material

dicated Content
ailable from '( Commercial News Providers”

- — => -~ © —

_—_ - - -

in the driver’s seat after
Rolle’s match. But he admit-
ted that Rolle wasn’t as con-
sistent as he should have been
in the first two sets.
“Marvin played'a good
match, but I think the differ-
ence in the match was his con-

sistency,” Farrington noted.

“He just came up a little short.
So now we have to get pre-
pared for the doubles and try

‘to go up 2-1 going into Sun-

day.”
Sunday is when the reverse

singles will be played. Regard- -

less of the outcome of the
doubles today, the draw could
be decided in the first reverse
singles when Mullings takes
on Rojer in the marquee bat-
tle of the top seeds.

The fifth and final match is
scheduled to be played
between Rolle and Winklaar.
But if the tie is secured by any
team, the players could

change, with possibly H’Cone -

Thompson seeing some action
in the rubber match that could
be reduced to a best-of-three
sets.

Today, however, the
momentum for the tie could
go in either country’s favour
when the doubles is played.
But Rolle said he’s confident
that he and Sweeting can get
the job done.

“Ryan has a good serve and

that is what you need in dou- »

bles. With my net game, I

‘think we have a solid team,”

Rolle reflected. “I think we
should have a solid team that
can win the doubles.”

Farrington couldn’t

agree more.

“Both guys are playing very
well, so I feel we should be
able to take the doubles,” he

- projected. “We just have to

try to stay together as a team.
I know I will be-doing my. best
to make sure that they do.”

Netherlands Antilles’ cap-
tain Frances Hoyer said
Rojer’s victory has certainly
given the Netherlands Antilles
the momentum that they need
going into the remainder of
the tie.

“The doubles is definitely
going to be the key,” Hoyer
stated. “So if we can go out
there and win it, I’m sure that
we will end up winning the
tie.”

Bahamas Lawn Tennis
Association’s president Mary
Shelley said they are right
where they want to be, tied at
1-1 going into the doubles.

Solid |

“Hopefully this will give
Ryan a chance to show his
skills,” Shelley quipped.
“Jean-Julian is a solid player
and I think the Netherlands
Antilles is expecting him to
carry them through.

“But we’re going to go out
there and try to pull it off.”

If there’s any concern going
into the doubles, Rojer said
it’s the Bahamas’ reputation
as a good doubles team.

“You guys have a good his-
tory of doubles players.

“We will try not to let
that history continue,” he
quipped.




Practice makes pericct
for India and Pakistan

ell
—<—- @e- «ss
—





TRIBUNE SPORTS SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005, PAGE 5B









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PAGE 6B, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005 TRIBUNE SPORTS —

The Tribune & Solomon’s Mines



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2. Coloring may be done with crayons. Adults or older child may assist the child in filling out the entry form, BUT NOT IN COLORING THE ENTRY
3, Enter as much times as you wish. All entries must be in The Tribune by 4pm on Monday, March 21st, 2005. Winners will be announced Wednesday,
March 23, 2005. Look for your names in The Tribune or listen to IOOJAMZ / JOY FM to hear your name.
4. There will be one firet-prize winner, one second-prize winner and one thira-prize winner in each age groups.
5. All entries become the property of The Tribune and may be used for any purpose including, but not limited to, publication in a future issue.

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Full Text
Pata mete

" The Tribune



Pm fovirr’ it.

HIGH
‘LOW



Volume: 101 No.85



76F
62F

PARTLY
SUNNY







Police team
heads to Berry
Islands to probe
snorkel tragedy

By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter

A team of police officers trav-
elled to the Berry Islands to
investigate the drowning of two
American tourists.

David George Steinbeck, 61,
and his wife Charlotte Marie
Steinbeck, 60, from Pennsylva-
nia, were snorkelling off tiny
Chubb Cay when they got into
difficulties and drowned.

Friends on holiday with the
married couple attempted to
rescue them by hauling them
from the sea onto a dinghy but
both died before reaching
shore.

Supt Hulan Hanna said foul
play was not suspected but offi-
cers from the Central Detective
Unit would investigate the cir-
cumstances surrounding the

\tragedy, which occurred on
Thursday afternoon.

He said autopsies would be
performed on the bodies at
Princess Margaret Hospital in
Nassau.

According to officers at the
Chubb Cay police station, the

. Steinbecks were snorkelling

with another American couple
at the time of the incident.

- Both couples were staying on
-a 37-foot catamaran “Bob’s
-Cat” as the guests of a third
couple, Pennsylvania attorney
‘Robert White and his wife, Bar-
-bara.

» Officers say it is possible that
‘while snorkelling, the current
overwhelmed the Steinbecks,
“pulling them under the water.

Mr White, who remained on
the boat while his guests went

.snorkelling, told police he

realised the Steinbecks were in
distress and attempted to radio
for help, but received no
response.

He then launched a Zodiac
dinghy from the catamaran to
help the pair.

He is reported to have told
police that by the time he found
Mr Steinbeck, he appeared to
be already dead. Mr White
managed to pull Mrs Steinbeck
from the water, but was unable
to resuscitate her.

Both bodies were eventually

recovered from the sea and then ©

taken ashore at Chubb Cay.

The Steinbecks had arrived
in the Bahamas on February 28
and were due to leave the coun-
try this weekend.

Mike Taylor, a spokesman
for the US Embassy in Nassau,
said yesterday that they had
been. in contact with relatives
of the couple in America, but
was unable to offer more infor-
mation.

He said: “Whenever an
American citizen dies in the
Bahamas the embassy works
with both the police and the
Bahamian government to facil-
itate the return of the body to

the US. The coroner has to_

establish a cause of death and
police have to conduct their
investigations.

“We then work with the fam-
ily and local funeral homes to
facilitate a return of the body
back to the US.”

Bishop Eldon
falls into coma

By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

‘' ASSISTANT Bishop of the
Anglican Diocese Michael
Eldon has suffered respiratory
failure and is in a comatose
state, a press release stated yes-
terday.

Bishop Eldon was admitted
to Doctors Hospital on Janu-
ary 31 with pneumonia and,
after complications from this ill-
ness, he suffered respiratory
failure and went into a

“comatose state.

His physician, Dr Kevin
~Moss, in a medical update, said
_yesterday that although Bishop

Eldon is slowly improving, his
prognosis remains guarded.

Bishop Eldon's sister Dr
Keva Bethel told The Tribune

‘yesterday that the family is

Bishop Eldon (File Photo)

grateful to have a team of tal-
ented physicians caring for her
brother and, although they are
not overly optimistic, they
remain hopeful for a good out-

See BISHOP, Page 11



Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005







WOOD-YoOU

PIa Wen ele MaUa Nua ee ars:

46 Madeira Street

PRICE — 50¢



Prime Minister Perry Christie and Allyson Maynard Gibson, the Minister of Financial Services and Investments, met with Paul Quigley to sign the
lease for a movie studio in Freeport yesterday at the Prime Minister's office on Cable Beach.

$76m fi
investment given
new ‘lease of life’

plan that aims to meet the May 23rd dead-
line for the beginning of. the filming of
Pirates of the Caribbean, part two ‘and

By KILAH ROLLE
Tribune Staff Reporter

DEVELOPERS of the $76 million pro-
duction studio and movie-based theme
park in Grand Bahama were given the
official stamp of approval from the

Guana Cay opponents plan to

Bahamas government yesterday to start
construction after two years of debate over
environmental issues.

The project was originally approved in
principle in May, 2001, under the former
FNM administration, and will be divided
into a complex three-phase development



three.

studio

The first phase of the 3,500-acre facili-

(Photo: Mario Duncanson)



See FILM, Page 11

file court action in two weeks

By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Senior Staff Reporter

THE Save Guana Cay Lobby
is identifying plaintiffs who will
be prepared to bring proceed-
ings in the Supreme Court
against Prime Minister Perry
Christie and his Cabinet before
the filing of their court action in
two weeks, the group’s lawyer
Fred Smith told The Tribune
yesterday.

Mr Smith cautioned develop-
ers of the $400 million Passerine
of Abaco project not to “feel
too comfortable”.

“We are hoping to file an |

action no later than the week
of March 21 to 25 because of
government having signed this

agreement with the developer,”
he said.

The litigation against the
heads of agreement will chal-
lenge the authority of the Cab-
inet entering into the deal with-
out having any statutory author-
ity.

“In the Bahamas the prime
minister is not a law unto him-
self. A prime minister or gover-
nor general can only act when
authorised to do so by parlia-
ment,” Mr Smith said.

The concept that Cabinet can
enter into a heads of agreement
and not disclose to the public
the terms of it is wrong and mis-
conceived, he said.

“In this day and age the
Bahamian people, and particu-

larly the citizens in Guana Cay
who are most affected by this
transaction, should have full dis-
closure,” said Mr Smith.

He said there should have
been a debate in the House of
Assembly on the terms of
agreement and then consulta-
tion with the communities on
Guana Cay.

During the signing of the
heads of agreement between
the developers and government
earlier this week Mr Christie
said concerns being expressed
by the residents of the cay are
not unusual and that the con-
servation of the environment
which has made the Bahamas
well-known worldwide is of first
priority to him.



He said the developers and
government have made a com-
mitment to protect the envi-
ronment of the island.

The Save Guana Cay Lobby
is raising funds and will be
engaging in public meetings to
promote their cause.

These funds are to be used
for a public marketing cam-
paign internationally and
nationally and also for legal
funds. The money raised will
also be used to employ envi-
ronmental experts to critique
and advise on the environmen-
tal impact assessment provided
by the developers.

Mr Smith said residents fear

See LAW, Page 11



Nassau and Bahama Islands’ Leading Newspaper
PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





DNA samples
‘link accused’ to
double murder

By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

A DNA expert yesterday
revealed that the results of sam-
ples taken from murder suspect
Basil Fitzgerald Gordon linked
him to the scene where two per-
sons were stabbed to death in
2002.

Julie Schuerman of the
Broward County crime labora-
tory told the Supreme Court
that she tested seven samples
given to her by Bahamian police
in September 2002.

The first two were whole
blood stains taken from mur-
der victims Rosnell Newbold
and Kevin Wilson, who were
stabbed to death in their
Pinewood home on June 16,
2002.

The third was taken from
murder suspect Gordon, who
was in a relationship with
Rochelle Wilson, granddaugh-
ter and sister of the two

deceased, the court heard.

The fourth was a bloodstain
taken from the outside part of
the Spice Street home and the
fifth from the kitchen door.

The sixth and seventh sam-
ples handed over to the DNA
expert were taken from the
knife blade and handle, which
were found broken apart not
far from the bodies.

Her findings were that the
DNA profile taken from the
fourth sample, outside the Wil-
son home, matched the refer-
ence sample of Gordon.

The DNA from the kitchen
door matched that of Kevin

Wilson, Ms Schuerman testi- -

fied.

She said the blood found on
the knife handle contained a
mixture of DNA, however, the
major part belonged to Kevin
Wilson. The blood on the blade
also. matched Kevin Wilson’s,
she said.

During cross examination,
defence attorney Dorsey

McPhee wanted to know
whether the DNA could be re-
tested. In the case of the fifth
sample, such a small amount of
blood was presented on the cot-
ton swab that it was unable to
be retested.

While Ms Schuerman said her
findings are checked by another
analyst as well as her supervisor,
she said she alone was respon:
sible for the testing.

Mr McPhee questioned her
about improvements in meth-
ods of testing DNA. It was dis-
covered in court that the
method used in this case is to
test from nine locations, or
aspects of the genetic make-up.

While nine locations can be
uploaded into the FBI database
on an inter-state level, it is now
necessary to have attempted to
ascertain 13 locations for the
national database.

The FBI, she said, created the
database and set the guidelines
for DNA testing.

Ms Schuerman explained to

the court that having only nine
locations to determine from

does not change the result of a.

match or mismatch.

She said the chances of the
samples not being a match
between the DNA taken from

outside the Wilson home ‘and.

that of the suspect on trial was
one in 3.4 trillion.

“One would likely have to be
an identical twin or triplet for
that to happen,” she said.

Mr McPhee pointed out that

_ while her report said that sam- .

ple five was taken from inside
the kitchen door, her notes said
it was taken from outside the
door.

She said she could not explain '

how that happened, but that
sample five is just that nonethe-
less. Justice Allen. adjourned
court Friday, stating that the
court expected to recall Detec-
tive Kimroy Ferguson for fur-
ther cross examination on Mon-
day before the prosecution clos-
es its case.

Officer’s evidence ‘exposes
the lie’ on deceased having

firearm, claims attorne

the officer that he: had not ttised . A

By By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

COUNSEL Fayne Thomp-
son suggested to the Coroner’s
Court yesterday that the evi-
dence givén by the officer who
shot Jermaine Mackey, “expos-
es the lie” that the deceased had
a gun in his hand at the time of
the shooting.

Representing the family of
Mr Mackey, 27, who was shot
and killed on December 6, 2002
following a confrontation with
police officers, Mr Thompson
made the suggestion that Offi-
cer Zhivago Earns used lethal
force on the night of the shoot-

. ing, because he had lost control
of the situation.

As the cross-examination of
Officer Earns continued during
yesterday's inquest into the
death of Mr Mackey, the wit-
ness told the court that after his
partner, Officer Ricardo Neely,
chased the deceased around the
corner of a building on St James
Street, he‘heard gun shots ring
out, which immediately put him
in a state of alarm, causing him

to place, his hand on his hol-:

stered weapon.
Officer Earns then testified

Pricing Information As Of:
4 March 2005

that a man appeared‘from the
rear of the building in question,
and that a few seconds later he
recognised the man as the per-
son his partner had been pur-
suing.

He said that at this time he
was still standing by the police
patrol vehicle parked close to
the Corner Pocket bar on the
opposite side of the street.

The witness told the seven-
member jury that the man was
running at a high speed towards
the bar and that he moved "in
an angle" to intercept him in an
effort to physically detain him.

Officer Earns said that when
he was "four-five feet" away
from the deceased, he and the
other man were face to face,
and that both were still in
motion.

At this time he saw the man
reach and take out a "shiny
object from his waist under the
jacket, which appeared to be a
firearm," the witness testified.

Responding to this action,
Officer Earns in turn reached
for his police issued gun and
fired two shots.

Mr Earns said he was in fear -

for his life and that he fired the
shots at the same time as he was

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moving‘out’of the man's path,
and that the two men brushed
up against each other.

The witness told the court
that after he had discharged his

. weapon, the man continued

running until he was several feet
away from the officer, before
"turning around, stumbling
back and falling down."

Officer Earns conceded that
it was dark that night, and that
he was not carrying a flashlight.

He said, however, that the
man never left his field of
vision, and that he never saw
that a gun was disposed of after
the shooting took place.

The’ officer added that
although he still perceived the
man to be a threat after he had
run past him, he did not fire
again.

After the deceased had fallen
into a sitting position close to
him, Mr Earns said that he then
patted the man down, but did
not find a gun.

The officer added that at the
time of the direct confrontation
with Mr Mackey he believed
that the "shiny object" he saw
was a gun, but said that he was
not "100 per cent sure."

Mr Thompson pointed out to



the word "firearm" in his origi-
nal report to the police in 2002,
and that the term had in fact
been used for the first time
before the Coroner's Court yes-
terday.

Officer Earns conceded that
some details were missing
from his statement because he
was "under stress at that time
and my mind) was not togeth-
er. u

The lawyer then suggested
to the witness that the word
"firearm" had not been used

before, because it was part of

"recently made up evidence."
He further suggested that
the physical evidence given by
a forensic expert and the bul-
let wounds found on the body
of Mr Mackey "are not con-
sistent with you shooting him
when he was passing by."

Mr Thompson suggested
that the chain of events as pre-
sented by Officer Earns are
"bogus, bold-faced lies," and
that Mr Mackey is.dead today
because the witness "lost it."

The inquest was adjourned

- yesterday and will continue

next.week.

=) FIDELITY

Basil Fitzgerald Gordon



(Tribune file photo)

OKteon eres
over safety of
rer HPLe Mom CLO ebb h

By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter _

ENVIRONMENTALISTS
and Grand Bahama residents
have raised concerns about
the safety of 15 captive dol-
phins because of a dredging
operation being conducted in
their holding pen.

Sam Duncombe, president
of the environmental group
ReEarth, has called for the
dredging to “stop immediate-
ly,” and for the dolphins to
be removed before it recom-
mences.

The Underwater Explorer’s
Society (Unexso) did not deny

-that the operation is being

conducted with the dolphins
still inside the pen, but said it
poses absolutely no danger to
them.

“We have more concern for
the dolphins than anyone; its
our business,” Unexso repre-
sentative Don Churchill said.

Unexso conducts super-

-vised swims with captive dol-
phins at their facility in Grand
Bahama.

Mr Churchill said that the
dredging operation was being
conducted on a very small
scale and that US experts,
including a veterinarian, had
been consulted during the
planning of the operation and
were continuing to monitor
its progress.

According to Mr Churchill,
the operation consists of the
insertion of an eight inch pipe
which sucks silt out in a small
corner of the nine-acre size
pen.

He explained that over the
years, silt and refuse washing
in from the sea has accumu-

lated at the bottom of the pen.

Mr Churchill denied sug-
gestions by residents ‘of the
nearby Tamarind Subdivision
that Unexso lacks a permit for
the operation.

Deputy Director of Fish-
eries Eddison Deleveaux told
The Tribune that his depart-
ment had not issued such a
permit to Unexso.

He said that he has
instructed the Environmental
Health office in Grand
Bahama to conduct an
“urgent” investigation into
the operation.

Mr Churchill said however
that the relevant permit had

‘been granted by the Grand

Bahama Port Authority.

' The issue first arose when
residents became concerned
about the operation, both in
terms of the safety of dolphins
and its effect on the sur-
rounding area.

They told The Tribune they
were particularly concerned
about the possibility of an
unpleasant odour arising from
any dolphin faeces.that might
be dredged up.

They said that the opera-
tion is turning the water white
in the pen and a nearby canal.

Mr Churchill acknowledged
that there was a small area of
unsettled silt around the pipe.

This, he said, was
inevitable, and will have no
effect on the dolphins in such
a large pen.

He said the operation was
actually beneficial for the dol-
phins as it is clearing outa
layer of thin silt and refuse
that is easily stirred up and
often makes the water cloudy
in the pen.



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1.1529 Colina Money Market Fund 1.209527"
1.9423 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.1105 ***
10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.2602*****
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Colina Bond Fund 1.089371****



BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks

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Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume
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P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

**- AS AT JAN. 31, 2005/ **** - AS AT DEC. 31, 2004

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price -

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100




THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, M

ARCH 5, 2005, PAGE 3





Robbery
victim is
shot in
the back



By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter

A ROBBERY victim was
beaten and shot in the back
as he lay helpless on the
ground, police said.

George Simmons, 32, is in a
critical condition in the
Princess Margaret Hospital
following the attack near Fort
Fincastle.

Another man, Dillet Rolle,
37, was pistol-whipped and
robbed by two men at around
10 o’clock Thursday night dur-
ing the same incident.

According to Police Super-
intendent Hulan Hanna Mr
Rolle was at the fort with oth-
er persons, engaged in a
“Junkanoo activity,” when he
was approached by two men,
one holding a handgun.

Mr Hanna said the other
persons fled, but Mr Rolle was
struck with the weapon and
ordered to hand over cash.

He reportedly gave his
assailants $75 and was then
told to give up his jewellery
and get on the ground.

The men then beat him
about the body.

At this point, Mr Simmons
happened to be passing and
was also accosted by the men,
according to police.

Mr Simmons was also
struck with a gun and ordered
onto the ground before being
beaten about the body and
shot.

Mr Hanna said that no
arrests have been made, but
police are following some
leads in connection with the

‘incident.



Missing youth

reported safe

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter



FREEPORT - The mother
of a missing 18-year-old youth is
relieved that he is back at home
safe and well after reporting
him missing to police on
Wednesday.

Emerald Bethel, of 70 Red

Hill Close, told police that her.

son, Tavaris Bethel, a special
education student at the Bea-
con School, arrived home
around 3.10pm Thursday.

Bethel, who left home on
February 27, was reported miss-
ing by his mother after he failed
to return home over the past
four days.

Tavaris told his mother that
he was staying at a friend’s
house since Sunday. He said he
was okay and looking for work.

Bethel directed officers to an
apartment complex at 139 Mag-
ellin Crest, where officers spoke
with Kevanlyn Wallace,
Lenward Bullard and Felix
Wallace.

They confirmed that Bethel
had slept at their house since
Sunday and every day he would
leave to visit his mother’s house
and return.

They told police they were
under the impression that he
was in contact with his family
and was not aware that he was
reported missing.

Appeal Court
backs ruling
by Tribunal in
union dispute

THE Court of Appeal upheld
on Tuesday an earlier decision
by the Industrial Tribunal that
the Tribunal has no jurisdiction
to entertain disputes if the prin-
cipal allegation by the union is
that the employer has failed to
negotiate in good faith.

President of the Trade
Union Congress-Obie Ferguson
brought an action before the
Tribunal on behalf of Bahamas
Hotel Managerial Association
claiming damages against High
Point Development Company,
the owners of Comfort Suites
on Paradise Island.

Mr Ferguson had claimed
that the company was refusing
to negotiate in good faith with
the union.

Tribunal President Harrison
Lockhart in a comprehensive
ruling said that the allegation
by the union did not constitute

a dispute over which the Tri-

bunal had jurisdiction.

He further said and recom-
mended that the union take the
matter up with the criminal
courts, because if its allegation
was sustained it constituted a
criminal offence.

The union appealed against
the decision of the Tribunal
president but in an oral judg-
ment given by Justice
Emmanuel Osadebay, the
Court of Appeal ruled that:
“After reviewing the facts and
the submissions we have come
to the conclusion that the
appeal has no merit. The appeal
is therefore dismissed.”

The Industrial Tribunal said
that quite a number of cases
with similar facts before it are
affected by this decision.

The president of the Tribunal
in many public addresses has
called for amendments to the
law which will allow the Tri-
bunal to deal with such matters.

In a similar vein Chief Jus-
tice Sir Burton Hall in October
2002 called for a reorganisation
of the Supreme Court to include
an industrial side effectively
extinguishing the Industrial Tri-
bunal and giving rise to an arm
of the Supreme Court which
can effectively deal with such
matters.

To date no decision has been
forthcoming on this matter.

INS ela a

lyaicwa cla cee citi!
the news, read Insight
on Mondays



LOCAL NEWS














& CONVICTED rapist Barry Parcoi is on the run from Her Majesty’s Prison after smashing a hole in a bathroom wall and
fleeing. He is considered armed and dangerous.

By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter .

SIX prison officers who were
on duty the night Barry Parcoi
escaped Her Majesty’s Prison
earlier this week have been
charged with dereliction of duty,
it was announced yesterday.

Meanwhile law enforcement
officials were continuing their
massive manhunt for the con-
victed criminal yesterday. They
say he is considered armed and
dangerous.

Parcoi, 43, who was serving
a life sentence for rape and
forcible detention with intent,
as well as a 20-year sentence for
armed robbery escaped the
prison sometime on Wednes-
day evening.

Parcoi had been moved to the
Medium Security wing of the
prison two years ago after serv-
ing 19 years in Maximum Secu-
rity.

Prison officials suspect that
Parcoi, who has a long list of
charges against him, including
possession of an unlicensed fire

fg pes gi
‘sg
fi wakeee :

Dr Elliston Rahming

arm, possession of ammunition
and escape from lawful custody,
was able to break-out through
the bathroom wall.

According to prison superin-

tendent Dr Elliston Rahming’

the six officers on duty at the
Medium Security unit that night
have been placed on charge.

Dr Rahming said they will
have to appear before a special
Prison Tribunal headed by
Deputy Superintendent Charles
Rolle who has primary respon-
sibility for security matters at
the prison.

Another prison officer will
face similar charges in connec-
tion with the escape of Lequient
Mckenzie on February 16. He
was recaptured and returned to
prison on the same day he
escaped.

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“We are determined to

ensure that escapes must be
kept at an irreducible minimum

(Above photo: Mario Duncanson) }

Officers face
charges over



(Photo: Mario Duncanson)

and that vigilance and due dili-
gence would be the order of the
day,” said Dr Rahming.

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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
i oneaD ure Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DupUCH CARRON, C.M. G., MS. B.A., LL. B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassaii: Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

. TELEPHONES ;

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
-/ Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398.

Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1- (242)-352- 6608

a3 , pieeport fax: Ge); 352- 9348.

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

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‘Open our
eyes’ on the
Haitian issue

EDITOR, The Tribune. ©

The following is an open let-
ter to the government and
Bahamian people:

I HAVE a problem with you.
You have left your first love,
and because of this lawless deed
most people are affected and
their love has become cold and
bitter towards their brothers
and sisters in Haiti.

How far have we diittea

away from our upbringing? The
Haitian Crisis. The big debate,
the big set back, the big tragedy,
the chaos, the mess, the vio-
lence, etc. Whatever you want
to call it? When you treat your
brothers and sisters the way you
have been doing lately, you’re
bound to fail as a country. One
of the reasons why we’re
blessed is because we have been
supporting Haitian migrants
over the past few decades. Yes,
control needs to be placed. on
the flow of illegal immigrants
entering our country, but not
on the person themselves who
has already made, this beautiful
country their home. Yes, a strict
measure has to be taken to curb

the crisis, but not the way you

guys are doing it. When you
need your yard clean, whom do
you call? When you need cheap
farm workers, whom do you
call? When you need minimum
wage workers, who do you call?
Do you see them complaining
like everybody else? Don’t you
think they have the rights to
complain too? Do you consider
them less equal than yourself?
Of course you do; that is why
they get treated the way they
do. Have: you ever heard the
story of the man who went
down to Jerusalem to Jericho
and fell among thieves? Who

went by? The priest (church | |
leader), The Levité:(professing:

Christian) did they. help him?
No. They turned their faces and
walked away. The Church
knows that it is their responsi-
bility to feed and clothe the
hungry and naked. The Church
knows that it is responsible to
build hospitals and homes for
the unfortunate, yet they sit
back and allow their brothers
and sisters in Haiti to starve, go
naked and without preparing
shelter for them. How unfortu-
nate is that? The church in this

Say ‘no’
EDITOR, The Tribune.

ARE we naive here in the
Bahamas? How can we accept
the operation of a LNG Terminal
in Grand Bahama?

It will cost millions of dollars to

lay the pipeline from our beauti-
ful, pristine Bahamas to Florida



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LETTERS

lotters@tribunemedia.net




country is building their own
dynasty and kingdom, yet they
do not even see it fitting to
speak out on the issues and the
roles one plays in the society.
“You make me sad, you bunch

of thieves and robbers,” Jesus
said.

The government doesn’t
have a vision for Haiti and nei-
ther do you, how sad. How
many churches today, all they
could think of is their building
projects, their seminars, their

- crusades, their projects, their

this, their that, etc? The church
of the 21st century ought to be
the first one to help to allevi-
ate the Haitian crisis. Who are

you waiting on? The govern- °

ment? The businessmen? The
investors? Unless the church
changed their perspectives and
outlook on life itself things will
only get worse as seen in the
world today. Judgment starts
from the pulpit. A Haitian per-
son needs our help locally and
abroad. The same people you
treat as slaves today,may very
well be your “Boss” tomorrow.
Be careful and be warned how
you treat the people of Haiti.
Father, I confess the sins of our
nation’s leaders who don’t
understand the roles they play
in times of crisis. Help them not
to see the Haitian people as a
problem, but instead see them-
selves as the answer to the prob-
lems in Haiti. Open our eyes
Lord, give us vision, and show
us how to comfort our brothers
and sisters in Haiti in their time
of great need, in Jesus’ name I
pray amen.

cr isis

1. Recruit Christian workers _

and volunteers for Missions to
Haiti.

2. Train and equip these
workers for the mission field to
Haiti in various outreach pro-
grammes.

3. After completion of the
training programme, give those
trainees the basic necessary
resources and set them up
(camp style) in various commu-
nities throughout Haiti to do

.- The solution to the Haitian...” themselves. Take one Idok, they

missions and outreaches.

4. Create a safe haven and a
place of refuge that caters to
the direct needs of the Haitian
people in these camps.

5. Afterwards, feed the peo-
ple; clothe the people, shelter
the people, the destitute and
poverty-stricken ones of Haiti,
one family at a time.

6. Work alongside the Haitian
government to help seek and
root out all the reasons why
Haitians flee their country.

7. Help in doing our part in
ridding the country from war,
poverty, oppression, antagonists
groups, etc.

8. Teach and train the peo-
ple of Haiti on the basics of
love, compassion and faith.
Teach them the truth about the
love of Christ.

The Haitian problem is a ‘sin’
(spiritual) problem, and if we
do not open our eyes and
realise it, we'can find ourselves
sinning by the way we treat
them. If we do our part then we
can enforce stricter punishments
to curb the Haitian crisis. If we
as a nation commit ourselves to
these solutions, what will we
accomplish?

1. Haitian ieaders will -
become awakened to the reali-
ty and truths that causes the
chaos in their country.

2. Peace in hostile situations
through reconciling differences.

3. Higher standards and
morals in the hearts of the Hait-
ian people.

4. Progress, prosperity,
growth development within the
Haitian community.

5. Transformation of individ-
ual lives from a poverty stricken
mindset. ;

Haiti is simply in an impov-
erished, disorganised state
where a people live isolated to

carry the same bondage men-
tality when they migrate here
in this country. Lack of vision
destroys a nation. We can play a
major role in the success of
Haiti, it’s just the way we look
at it from a righteous viewpoint.

MINISTER RODNEY
E ADDERLEY
Nassau,

March, 2005.

to LNG terminal

and now Tractebel is willing to
add $40'million more to relocate

Freeport harbour’s cruise ship - °

terminal to another location.
The people of the Bahamas
should be told why these people
want to spend these millions of
dollars here when. they could
build the facility in Florida with-
out the expense of laying an
underground pipeline and with-
out having to relocate the cruise
ship terminal. It seems to me that
the answer to this question is that
Florida does not want the termi-



NOTICE

nal there! Why should we?

With all the possible ramifica-
tions of the location here, are we
so money hungry that we would
risk our future for a few dollars
now?

As the saying goes, “Think on
these things”.

“A GRANDPARENT
CONCERNED FOR THE
FUTURE OF HER
GRANDCHILDREN”
Nassau,

February 9, 2005.





NOTICE is hereby given that ANGELINA LACROIX OTHELLO,
#43 ETHEL STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26TH day of
FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that IZLAINE STERLIN, SHERLEY
STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 26th day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JENNIFER ELAINE TURNQUEST
WRIGHT, DEADMANS CAY, LONG ISLAND, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
5TH day of MARCH, 2005 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



















THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2U0U5, PAGE 5





WHY YOU VEX?

By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

WHY YOU VEX?

“Tam tired of the conditions our students
have to endure when they are in school. My
husband and I do not make a lot of money
and so we have to send our daughter to a pub-
lic school. However the conditions at the
school leave much to be desired.

Why should my daughter have o>

to worry about the building

falling on her head or suf- cs
fer from the lack of basic
equipment. ,

The government says “
that the children are the
future, but the message
they are sending is that
substandard buildings CO
are all they deserve. s
Look at the stories we
keep hearing in the
news, about all these
schools and the prob-
lems they have. It is a
disgrace. And you know
what it is insulting to ask
young talented Bahami-
ans to return home to
teach in a holey broke up
school. There are poor
people all over this coun-
try struggling to make a
living, and just because we
send our child to a gov-
ernment school does not
mean that we are inattentive
parents. We attend every PTA
meeting and meet with her teachers and
support school functions. There are excellent
professionals at her school who do the very
best they-can with the little they have and it is
a slap in their face to expect them to educate in
such conditions.

Maybe the minister will read this and make
more of an effort to repair our schools. And
please you know what else makes me vex, how
this government blames everything on the hur-
ricanes. Please it is almost hurricane time again
and no progress has been made. My daughter’s
school was broke up long before the hurri-
canes.

I am seriously thinking of borrowing money
for September to put my daughter in a pri-
vate school.

- “A frustrated parent,” 38

wi




“You know what makes me vex. I was at a
fast food restaurant yesterday and there was
this man who left his little son playing while he
went down the road to smoke.

This little boy was chasing his toy car in the
parking lot without being attended. Thank-
fully, no car came along or there might have
been an accident.

I wanted to slap that man right across his
head.”

- Mario Brown
34, The Grove.

“TI work in a medium
size office and I am vex
and sickened at how
nasty my female co-
workers keep our
restroom. To see these
ladies dressed up in
their suits with nails
and hair done, you
wouldn’t believe they
would be capable of
being so nasty.
- TS, 45
Pinewood.

“T am vex with the way
businesses are allowed to
open up in residential .
areas. J know everyone
needs to make a living but
I feel that commercial
should be kept separate
from residential. I feel when
one comes home, they
should feel that they are in
their haven to relax and let
go from the hustle and bustle
of everyday life, However, if there
are numerous restaurants around your area, it
doesn’t feel like ‘Home Sweet Home’
- Concerned in the West.

“T am vex with Batelco because J opened up
a DSL account when I lived in Abaco.

Now that I have moved back to Nassau,
they tell me I have to make any inquires on the
Abaco account in Abaco which makes no
sense.

- A. Miller

Golden Gates.

WHY YOU HAPPY

I am blessed to have wonderful family and
friends and J recently turned 45!

Yellow Elder.

- Tamara Smith

Scouts unveil road
safety campaign

ia ee
AP US)

aay mai ika Ss
Serer]



BURR eae

SATURDAY
MARCH 5

12:30 Cinema, Cinema

1:00 Inside Hollywood

1:30 Sports Lifestyles

In This Corner: Kevin Kelly
Sports Desk

Ballroom Boxing

Gospel Video Countdown


















































5:00 One Cubed
5:30 3’D Funk Studio
6:00 Prescription For Health:
Prostate Cancer
17:00 Bahamas Tonight

7:30 Native Stew

8:00 Bahamian Things

Island Life Destination
The Darold Miller Show
Tropical Beat

Bahamas Tonight

The Lounge

Community Pg. 1540AM

SUNDAY
MARCH 6

Community Pg. 1540AM



2:00

9:00 E.M.PA.C.T.

9:30 Voice That Makes The
Difference

10:00 Effective Living

10:30 Listen Up :

11:00° Zion Baptist Church

1:00 — Gillette World Sports
1:30 This Is The Life
2:00 Gospel Video Countdown

3:00 World Impact

3:30 Ernest Angley Ministries

4:30 Morning Joy

5:00 — Walking In Victory

6:00 One Cubed

6:30 The Bible Study Hour

7:00 Bahamas Tonight

7:30 New Covenant Baptist
Church

8:30 The Jackson's America’s
First Family of Music

9:00 — Ecclesia Gospel

10:00 Turning Point

10:30 Spiritual Impact: Isaac
Hayes

# 11:00 Bahamas Tonight

11:30 Gospel Video Countdown
12:30amComm. Pg. 1540AM




NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves
the right:to make last minute
programme changes!



Seat Belts Save Lives BUCKLE UP! These are the words of the
bumper sticker that little Branee Major displays with her father Drexel
Major. (Photo: Mario Duncanson)

BY NATARIO McKENZIE

In an effort to sensitise
motorists on the importance of
road safety, the Scout Associa-

' tion of the Bahamas officially

launched its “Driver Safety
Awareness” campaign at the
Scout headquarters on Dolphin
Drive yesterday.

Celebrating 92-years of com-
munity service and develop-
ment in the Bahamas, officials
of the organisation noted that
this latest initiative was one of
many contributions the associ-
ation had launched over recent
years.

“We feel like one life lost on
our streets is one too many,”
Brian Christie, the chief com-
missioner of the Scout Associa-
tion of the Bahamas, said at the
launch of the campaign.

In conjunction with several
corporate and community part-
ners as well as the road traffic
division of the Royal Bahamas
Police Force, the organisation
is poised to begin the distribu-
tion of its bumper stickers which
will read, “Seat belts save lives -
Buckle up”.

Officials at the Scout Asso-
ciation noted that these would
be available to the general pub-
lic at a cost of $3.

In his address, President of
the Scout Association of the

Bahamas Winston Newton
thanked the many community
partners who were committed
to the campaign and would aid
in the distribution of the
bumper stickers.

“We are looking for a suc-
cessful launch and the proceeds
will be used to assist our pro-
grammes in the scout organisa-
tion,” he said.

Arthur Taylor, the training
commissioner in the Scout
Association, noted that the pro-
ceeds would also help to fur-
ther expand the organisation
into the Family Islands. |

He added that it would also
support their newest initiative
for training leaders which would
encourage scouts to stay in the
organisation and pursue lead-
ership roles as well as the
Beaver programme designed
for younger children.

Although scout officials esti-
mate that there are currently
some 3,000 members in the
organisation throughout the
Bahamas they admit that the
organisation has seen a decline
in membership over recent
years.

They hope that this latest
campaign will make the
Bahamian public more aware
of the organisation’s efforts in
community development and
encourage greater membership.

Saxons



victories are
made official

BY NATARIO McKENZIE

HE preliminary

Junkanoo results .

have been made

official and the

Saxons remain the
winners of both parades, it was
announced yesterday.

According to the Ministry of
Youth Sports and Culture, the
results will stand despite
protests by Boxing Day parade
runners up One Family, who
cited judging irregularities.

In a press release yesterday,
the ministry announced the
decision of the Junkanoo Inde-
pendent Review Committee on
both the 2004/05 Boxing Day
and New Year’s Day Junkanoo
parades.

It stated that the unofficial
results had been forwarded to
the independent committee on
February 28 at the request of
the Junkanoo Corporation of
the Bahamas.

The result of that review has
deemed the unofficial results of
both parades as official, it said.

As a result, the Shell Saxon
Superstars are now the official
overall winners of the 2004/05
Sammy Thompson Boxing Day

- parade with a total of 2,176

points, One Family remains in
second place with 2,166, The
Prodigal Sons remain in third
place with 1,977, in fourth posi-
tion The Valley Boys with 1,939
points, Roots in fifth place with
1,798 points and the Music
Makers in sixth position with
1,330 points.

The results of the New Year’s
Day Junkanoo parade in hon-
our of Maureen Duvalier
remain as follows; the winner,
the Shell Saxon Superstars with
3,052 total points.

The Roots remain in, ‘second

place with 3,024 points, in thitd

Prodigal, Sons in fifth.



A MEMBER of the Shell Saxons Superstars shows off her costume dur-
ing the 2004 Sammy Thompson Boxing Day Parade.

position, the Valley Boys with
3,013 points, in fourth position
One Family with 2,872 points,




wit ae 672 points an
Mak cers ean 6th plac



eT Tete dl eeu)

osition :

(Tribune file eee

points.
The funkanos awards pre-
sentations are scheduled to be

held today at the. Wyndham
- ‘Nassau. Resort and Crystal
*. “palace Casino. °."





&j Scotiabank
oS

Z
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2
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PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005 s

THE TRIBUNE

a

(CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS * Tel: 325 2921)
SUNDAY, MARCH 6TH, 2005
11:30a.m. Speaker: Elder Sidney Burrows
'7:00p.m. Evening Service
Sunday School-9:45am The Lord's Supper- -10:45am » Community Bible Hole

a 30am * Radio Broadcast ZNS Il - 1:30pm » Evening Services- 7:00pm.
Prayer & Bible Study Wed, - 7:30pm ¢ Ladies Prayer Thurs.- 10:00am










THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE
OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

semen Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, off Mackey Street
wampeme =°.0. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas

fmm Phone: 393-3726/303-2355/Fax: 393-6135
i iy CHURCH SERVICES

SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2005
FOURTH SUNDAY IN LENT

ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH, Prince Charles Drive
11.00 a.m. Mr. Philip Clarke

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH, Bernard Road
11:00 a.m. Pastor Sharon Loyley/ HC

CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH, Zion Boulevard
10:00 a.m. Rev. Manette Poitier! HC
7:00 p.m. No Service

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH, East Shirley Street
11:00 a.m. Pastor Martin Loyley/ HC
7:00 p.m. Rev. Ed Lacy

GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH, Queen's College
Campus
9:30 a.m. Rev. James Neilly/ HC

ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue
: $4 8:00 a.m. Connections - Rev. Philip Stubbs
i wy 9:30 a.m. Rev. Philip Stubbs/ HC

TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
11:00 a.m. Mrs. Kenris Carey/ HC

7:00 p.m. Mr. Livingston Parks
0000000000000000060000000006000000000000000000000000000000
RADIO PROGRAMMES
“RENEWAL” on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Your Host: Rev. Charles Sweeting
“METHODIST MOMENTS” on each weekday at 6:55 a.m.
Your Host: Rev. Charles Sweeting
00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH, Harbour Island, will be celebrating its
200th Anniversary during the week of March 6-13, 2005 under the theme
“To God Be The Glory! Living With Purpose: The Rest of Your Life Can Be
The Best of Your Life”. This week promises to be spiritually, emotionally
and socially fulfilling as there will be programs for each day.








The Holy Ghost Pray ee Line TURE 326- 7427,
SUNDAY, MARCH 6th, 2005

7:00A.M. Rev. Dr. Colin Archer/ Sis. Tezel Anderson
11:00A.M. Rev. Dr. Colin Archer/ Sis. Nathalie Thompson

7:00P.M. Sis. Tezel Anderson/ Sis. Marilyn Tinker

Theme: Rise up ye people of God.
Press towards the Prize Philippians 3:14 - 15








By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter



A local food store has come
to the aid of a Fox Hill family
who lost: everything they
owned in a fire that also killed
their pet dog.

_Foxlair Convenience Store
in co-operation with Blanco
Bleach recently announced
that they will hold a drive to
collect food, clothing, and cash

’ for the Nixon family.

_The family of seven was left
homeless after a Valentine’s
Day fire which also destroyed
all of their personal property










SPEAKER of the Bahamian
House of Assembly Oswald
Ingraham (right) receiving a
gift, on March 3, from. Speaker
of the Canadian House of Com-
mons Peter Milliken during a
luncheon, hosted by Speaker
Ingraham in his counterpart’s
honour, at. the British Colonial
Hilton.

(BIS photo: Eric Rose)



Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL
Preachering 11am & 7:30pm: EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

Pastor:H. Mills

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills e Phone: 393-0563 * Box N-3622



_ (WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND E



Worship time: llam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Rev. Henley Perry

PO. Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

Collins Avenue at 4th Terrace Centreville
Telephone: 322-8304 or 325-1689 ¢ P.O. Box N-1566
Fax No. 322-4793 —

OPPORTUNITIES FOR _
WORSHIP AND MINISTRY

SUNDAY 8:30am ZNS-1 Temple Time Broadcast
8:30am Early Morning Worship
9:45am Sunday School For All Ages
11:00am Worship Service

7:00pm Evening Celebration
WEDNESDAY 7:30PM Selective Bible Teaching Royal
Rangers (Boys Club) Ages 4-17 Years
Missionettes (Girls Club) Ages 4-17.

VISIT OUR PREMISE BOOKSTORE, TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY



Food store aids

family who lost

all possessions
in major fire

including their car.

The family dog Skipper was
trapped in the home and per-
ished.

Sidney Strachan, the Gen-
eral Manager of Foxlair,
speaking on behalf of owner
Cecil Smith said: “We are in
the service business. Some-
times, ‘service’ means provid-
ing an excellent product and
quality staff. Sometimes it
means seeing to it that no one
in our uelgnbduciood suf-
fers.”

The sentiment was echoed
by Blanco Bleach manage-
ment who have also pledged



3241876 or

their co-operation and sup-
port.

In addition to the company
making its own donation to
the family ,Foxlair has opened
its doors to serve as a collec-
tion and distribution point for

. donations by other members

of the community and the
public.

Persons who wish to help
are invited to bring their dona-
tions to the store any day of
the week between 7am and 10
am. For further information
please call 324-1874, fax,
e-mail .
foxlair@coralwave.com

House Speaker receives gift
from Canadian counterpart

LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

Worship time: Ilam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm

Place:
The Madeira Shopping

Center

(Next door to CIBC)

Rey. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807 _
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@batelnet.bs



pero Ae
GHETTO

JOHN 4:29....COME SEE A MAN

March 7 - March 131h, 2005
South Beach Union Baptist Church
7:00p.m. Nightly

Speakers:

Rev. Wilton A. McKenzie Rev. Dr. Victor Cooper

Bahamas Baptist Union

Evangelist

Bahamas Baptist Union
Assistant Evangelist

SPECIAL MUSIC BY VARIOUS UNION
CHURCH CHOIRS

SNS E!


THE TRIBUNE

gos eee

ATTORNEY-GENERAL and Minister of Education Alfred Sears (centre) with Swiss Ambassador Anton
Thalmann (left) and Honorary Consul Bert Wernli during a courtesy call, on March 2, at the Office of the



LOCAL NEWS







Attorney General, Post Office Building. (BIS photo: Derek Smith)

Swiss Ambassador

calls on ministers



DEPUTY Prime Minister and Minister of National Security Cynthia Pratt and Swiss,Ambassador Anton
Thalmann exchanging gifts during a courtesy call, on March 2, at the Office of the Deputy Prime e Minis-

ter, Churchill Building. (BIS photo: Derek Smith)









&

BACARDI & COMPANY LIMITED

Bacardi & Company Limited is seeking candidates for the position of
Cost Accountant. The Company has been based in Nassau for over 40
years with significant manufacturing operations in the areas of bulk rum
production and bottling of various spirits and beverages, primarily for

export markets. /

Job Description

Under limited supervision, the Cost Accountant will be required to apply
principles of cost accounting to analyze cost records and to distribute

costs for production on items such as labour, equipments, materials and

overhead costs and to compute the unit cost of product or service.

Continuously evaluate existing cost systems and records cost data for use
by management in controlling expenditures. The Cost Accountant will
further be expected to prepare the necessary reports in preparation for

operating budgets.

Qualifications

The successful candidate must hold a professional designation with five
(5) to ten (10) years experience. A CPA designation is preferred.
Furthermore, due to the nature of the work to be performed the individual
must possess the ability to work independently under pressure to
consistently meet deadlines. Must be a self starter and a team player.

Salary/Benefits

Commensurate with experience.

Interested candidates should forward copies of their curriculum vitae
directly to the Bacardi & Company Limited P.O. Box N-4880, Nassau,

N.P., The Bahamas.
Attention The Human Resources Manager

Information may also be forwarded via e-mail to dacartwright@bacardi.com

Application Deadline: March 31, 2005

BACARDLAND THE BAT DEVICE ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF BACARDI & COMPANY LIMITED






tragedy of the Tsunami in
the ol decided of Tambe



iebruary 24, 2005, at the ais of Foreign Affairs Head-
cheil ‘is pictured steepting, Resdest emesis Espinola’s

pocket money and also to earn
money. . doing a wide variety
PAGE 8, SATU.

AY, MARCH 5, 2005

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS



Coastal areas
‘critical’ to
development
of Bahamas

@ By BAHAMAS
INFORMATION SERVICES

AN EXPERT committee
comprising environmentalists,
business, civic and government
leaders from throughout the
Bahamas says the preservation
of the country’s coastal areas is
critical to the future socio-eco-
nomic development of the
Bahamas.

So critical, that the committee
and the government, will
observe April 2005 as “Coastal
Awareness Month” throughout
the Bahamas.

The month’s activities will
seek to educate all members of
the public about the various
threats to coastal environment;
encourage discussions on the
solutions to those threats and
address the importance of
changing negative behaviours
that could continue to destroy
coastal areas.

“It is very important for us
to preserve our coastal areas
because our social and eco-
nomic future lies in the healthy
development of those areas,”
says Earlston McPhee, General
Manager of Sustainable
Tourism Development at the
Ministry of Tourism and chair-
man of the Planning Commit-
tee for Coastal Awareness
Month. :

“Unlike a number of other
countries, the entire Bahamas
is a coastal area and most of us
either reside on the coast or in
close proximity thereof. Our
beaches, oceans, wetlands, man-
groves, dunes and blue holes
are all an integral part of our
coastal resources and therefore
we must all do our best to pre-

serve these areas,” Mr McPhee’:

adds... ew “
Forei n

Mr McPhee says the coastal
region is a “major” reason why
millions of visitors journey to
the country’s shores annually,
spending hundreds of millions
of dollars in foreign currency
that creates a “number of lucra-
tive jobs for Bahamians and res-
idents alike”.

He says it makes good “busi-
ness and environmental sense
from an economic and social
standpoint”
and residents to properly man-
age these resources.

for all Bahamians

“A number of visitors have
indicated through the Ministry
of Tourism’s exit surveys that
they selected the Bahamas over
other destinations due to our
white, sandy beaches and clear,
crystal water,” says Mr McPhee.
“As a matter of information, we
get our beautiful, white, sandy
beaches as a result of a healthy
coral reef system, but if we pol-
lute our waters, there is a good
chance that we will destroy this
reef system and there goes our
beaches along with future eco-
nomic opportunities which it
supports.

“The aim of the planning
committee is through education,
to demonstrate the importance
of these resources to the socio-
economic development of our
islands while at the same time
show the economic and social
consequences if we continue to
degrade these assets,” he added.

Mr McPhee says pollution is:

one of the greatest challenges
the Bahamas faces with regards

.to maintaining its coastal envi-

ronment and will be one of five
areas of concern that will be
addressed during the month of
April and beyond.

“Seventy per cent of all
marine pollution is land-based.
Our entire islands are littered
with abandoned automobiles
and other consumer goods such
as refrigerators and stoves,
among others, that have been,
and are still being indiscrimi-
nately dumped by persons living
in our country and that pollu-
tion reaches our oceans,” says
Mr McPhee.

Filtering

“The, preservation of our

mangrove system jis. also. very, . ;

very important as the man-
groves act as a filtering system
for our marine ecosystem and
serves as a habitat for juvenile
fish.

“The filling in of wetland
areas is another major challenge
we face in the Bahamas, which

ultimately will result in more

flooding and increased insur-
ance rates,” Mr McPhee adds.

Mr McPhee says other areas
of concern to be addressed dur-
ing the month are: over-har-
vesting of fish resources, climate
change, invasive species and
habitat destruction.

He says figures provided by

Legal Notice

NOTICE

EXXON EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION TARAIJA
LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) EXXON EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION TARIJA
LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 2nd
day of March, 2005 when its Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is G.R. Huff of 16945
Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A. °

the National Ocean and Atmos-
pheric Administration (NOAA)
reveal that sustainable devel-
opment within the Caribbean
region - the Bahamas being no
exception - cannot occur with-
out healthy watershed and
marine ecosystems.

The NOAA report further
revealed that coastal popula-
tions worldwide are on the
increase with those figures
expected to reach to 75 per cent
within the next 10 to 15 years.

Already, 50 per cent of the
world’s population lives in
coastal areas.

Mr McPhee says the over-
harvesting of fish resources is a
major concern due to the fact
that fish accounts for up to 60
per cent of the animal protein
consumed by persons living in
developing economies such as
the Bahamas.

“However, some 70 per cent

of the world’s fish stock is fully -

fished or over-fished,” he adds.

Mr McPhee says improper
building techniques, adverse
weather conditions such as hur-
ricanes, the presence of inva-
sive species and littering are

other factors that can all con-

tribute to accelerated coastal

- erosion.

He says the objective of
“Coastal Awareness Month” is
to educate the general public of
the socio-economic importance
of preserving the country’s
coastal environment.

“This is a national initiative
and all hands are on deck,” says
Mr McPhee. “The composition

_ of the committee represents a

cross-sectoral approach which
is, critical for an integrated
coastal zone management pro-
gramme.

“Our tourist offices in the
respective islands are involved
in planning and executing activ-
ities in the islands and we also
have as an integral partner, the
Department of Local Govern-
ment, who will have responsi-
bility for islands without tourist
offices”.

Some of the major activities
scheduled for the month include
school competitions, beach
restoration projects, exhibitions,
media workshops and youth
fora.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

EXXON EXPLORATION AND
PRODUCTION TARIJA LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the
undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or
before 29th day of March, A.D., 2005. In default thereof
they will be excluded from the benefit of any distribution

made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 3rd day of March, A.D., 2005.

















PRIME MINISTER, Perry G Christie is pictured centre with a group of happy new home owners at
East Grand Bahama. The Government of the Bahamas constructed eleven new homes for residents
in East Grand Bahama, who lost their home during the passing of Hurricanes Frances and Jeanne
back in September of last year year. The Government is also constructing additional homes for
residents who were displaced by the storm. Likewise the Government has spent thousands of dol-
lars in helping to repair homes and in purchasing material for residents to secure their dwellings.
Also pictured centre with Prime Minister Christie is new home owner, 93 year old Mrs Olive Pin-
der; Health Minister Sen Marcus Bethel and Housing and National Insurance Minister Shane Gibson.
Also Pictured third left is High Rock Member of Parliament Kenneth Russell, left is Mrs Ann Per-
centie, MP for Pineridge, and far right is Ms Pleasant Bridgewater, MP for Marco City.

PM brings ‘home’ good
news for Grand Bahama





HAPPY Home Owners - Prime Minister Perry G Christie is pictured centre as he presented sey-
enteen residents of West Grand Bahama with the keys to their new homes on Monday afternoon.

' The Prime Minister flew direct to Grand Bahama from‘an engagement in Jamaica for the ‘spe-
cial presentation to residents who had lost their homes during the recent hurricanes.

This was the first installment of key to residents as the government continues to help residents
re-settle.

The presentation took place at the Eight Mile Rock High School Gym. Also pictured is the Min-
ister for Housing and National Insurance Shane Gibson (seventh left) and EMR MP Mr Lindy
Russell is seen to the left of the Prime Minister. (BIS photos: Vandyke Hepburn)

US AG eourevunitoiis
foreign minister

US Assistant Secretary of
State for Western Hemisphere
Affairs Roger. Noriega and
Ambassador John Rood wel-
comed Bahamian Foreign Min-
ister Fred Mitchell to Washing-
ton on March 2 to discuss a
range of important bilateral and
regional issues.

Assistant Secretary Noriega
underscored the close partner-
ship shared by the US and the
Bahamas in the fight against
narcotics trafficking in the
Caribbean region. Minister
Mitchell emphasised the impor-
tance of Operation Bahamas
Turks and Caicos (OPBAT) in
our shared counter-narcotics
efforts and encouraged Mr Nor-
iega to do all he could to ensure








John Rood, US Ambassauv,

Dated the 3rd day of March, 2005.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY
MANAGEMENT CO. LTD
Attorney for the above-named Company

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION MDD BOLIVIA LIMITED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION MDD BOLIVIA
LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 2nd
day of March, 2005 when its Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is G.R. Huff of 16945
Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

Dated the 3rd day of March, 2005.
HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY

MANAGEMENT CO. LTD
Attorney for the above-named Company

G. R. Huff
LIQUIDATOR
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION MDD
BOLIVIA LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the
undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or
before 29th day of March, A.D., 2005. In default thereof
they will be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 3rd day of March, A.D., 2005.

G. R. Huff
LIQUIDATOR
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.



that OPBAT funding is contin-
ued at adequate levels.

Both parties agreed that the
US and the Bahamas have
much to gain by working
together to promote stability
and development in Haiti. Min-
ister Mitchell stressed the
importance of maintaining good
communication as the situation
in Haiti evolves this year. He
provided a summary of the
Caribbean _Community’s
(CARICOM) Heads of Gov-
ernment meeting held in mid-
February, including CARI-
COM’s plan to provide techni-
cal assistance for Haiti’s elec-
toral process. Minister Mitchell
indicated that the Bahamian

to the Bahamas

embassy in Port-au-Prince was
operational and would be pro-
viding office space to represen-
tatives from CARICOM. Both
sides expressed concern over
the continued detention of for-
mer Prime Minister Yvon Nep-
tune and hoped for a speedy
resolution to the issue.

In addition to meeting with
Assistant Secretary Noriega,
Minister Mitchell and Ambas-
sador Rood met with Senator
Bill Nelson, Senator Tom
Harkin, and Senator Mel Mar-
tinez, as well as members of the
Florida Congressional delega-
tion.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
me) amu Celate fie


THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005, PAGE 9





Another Bahamian
unsung hero passes

E grew up in

an era when

many of the

privileges

and oppor-
tunities enjoyed by today’s gen-
eration were not only non-exis-
tent, but their absence also dic-
tated the extent of the aspira-
tions of the vast majority of
Bahamians. Yet, out of that cru-
el and unfair environment
emerged some pacesetters,
many of them ordinary people,
who dared to dream of a better
way of life and were brave
enough to attempt to change
the status quo.

Today, we refer to them as
our unsung heroes. We do’so
because, possibly due to their
initial lowly status in life —
notwithstanding their brave
defiance in the midst of tremen-
dous odds — they have never-
theless been denied proper
recognition for the great sacri-
fices they made in securing the
vastly improved way of life we
presently enjoy, and, we might
add, far too many of us seem-
ingly take for granted.

We refer to a period some six
decades ago when racial dis-
crimination and segregation
were in vogue in The Bahamas,

and the suppression of sec-'

ondary education to the masses
was one of the key strategies
employed by the ruling oli-
garchy in its attempt to perpet-
uate minority rule in this then
British colony.

Those were the days when
most Bahamian children were
obliged to leave the public
school system at the legal age of
fourteen years, as there were
only two secondary schools in
operation locally at that time.
They were the Government
High School, with an annual
intake of less than 24 new stu-
dents, and Queen’s College, a
similar but segregated institu-
tion operated by the Methodist
Church, and to which black chil-
dren were not generally admit-
ted.

We refer to the above condi-
tions that obtained at the time,

not to rekindle old negative

social embers, but rather to give
some insight into the adverse
conditions prevailing during
that period. This we deem nec-
essary in order for today’s gen-
eration to better appreciate the
contributions made by many
ordinary people, along with oth-
ers, in bringing about change
locally. We also do so in order
that we all might have a better
way of measuring and appreci-
ating the tremendous progress
we as a people have made in



GEORGE MACKEY

our race relations in this coun-
try.

Thus, it is against the above
backdrop that we pay tribute
today to one such unsung hero,
who blazed the trail of progres-
sive advancement by countless
Bahamians in the hospitality
industry — an industry that today
represents the backbone of our

local economy. We refer to the .

late Mr Alvin Thomas (Tom-
my) Thompson, whose funeral
service and burial were con-
ducted at St Matthew’s Church
a week ago.

Affectionately known as
Tommy, he was born to the
marital union of Gerald and
Marion Thompson in Deep
Creek, Eleuthera, on October
11, 1939. After receiving his ear-
ly education in Eleuthera, Tom-
my moved to New Providence
and began his working career
as an apprentice tailor. An
industrious young man, who
loved meeting and entertaining
people, he soon found his pro-
fessional niche in the hotel
industry.

‘ It was in the hospitality field
that Tommy would make his
mark as a pacesetter, rising
eventually to the top echelons
of management therein. He
achieved many firsts during his
distinguished career in the
industry, including becoming
the first Bahamian general man-
ager of the old Ambassador
Beach Hotel on Cable Beach,
and later holding a similar posi-
tion at the Emerald Beach, Har-

bour. Bay and-the Lucayan:

Beach (in Freeport, Grand
Bahama) hotels, respectively.
Being among the first
Bahamians to be entrusted with
such great responsibility, his
conscientious application to the
challenge thereby paved the
way for others to likewise
advance in the local tourist
industry. In the process, he
received invaluable training via
being seconded to various
hotels in the United States to
broaden his scope and gain
greater exposure in the industry.
Among his other pioneering
accomplishments was his selec-
tion, along with his faithful sec-
retary Ms Gloria Brown, of
being named Boss and Secre-
tary of the Year in 1986, the

P.O. Box N-7127, Nassau, Bahamas

Tel# (242) 293-1666, 393-2153, 393-2646 |,

Faxe {242} 393-3248

EVENING

® Begirmars Micresoft

® Reainners Microsoft,
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i HE

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first such occurrence in the his-
tory of The Bahamas Secre-
taries Association. He was also
the recipient of the Paul Harris
Award, the Rotary Club’s high-
est honour, in 2000.

Despite having had open-
heart surgery in 1992, Tommy
continued his active involve-
ment in St Matthew’s Church,
where he served on the Vestry,
in the singing choir, the Social
Outreach Ministry and the
Anglican Church Men’s Organ-
isation. Active in politics, he
was a faithful member of the
Progressive Liberal Party,
served in its Delaporte branch,
also a member of its National
General Council, and was made
a.Stalwart Councillor, the par-
ty’s highest award.

_A community activist, Tom-
my was involved with the Skal
Club, the Deep Creek Associa-
tion and the Delaporte Com-
munity Association. The mea-
sure of this heroic - yet humble
- Bahamian was vividly borne
out in the tributes that were
paid him at his funeral service.

These accolades were given
by the following: Prime Minister
Perry Christie, Bishop Neil Ellis
(his former neighbour), Dela-
porte MP Neville Wisdom, Ms
Gloria Brown, and Mr Mervyn
Sweeting of the Deep Creek
Association. These tributes
were climaxed by a moving
eulogy delivered by the Rev Fr
James Moultrie, rector, of St
Matthew’s Church. Following
the service, Tommy’s mortal
remains. were. interred in the
church’s cemetery. May his soul
rest in peace and rise in glory.

Tommy died while celebrat-
ing with family and friends on
the evening of February 14,
Valentine’s Day. The following
day, his dear. friend Winston T
Marshall gave us a copy of a
tribute he had just written about
Tommy to commemorate the
sad occasion. Entitled “A Fall-
en Comrade”, it follows thus:

“All of that does not matter
anymore.”

“The philosophers, great and
minor, throughout the ages,
grappled with weighty subjects

-such as life and death and the

soul and good and evil and jus-
tice and righteousness, and truth

> ih
of



Alvin Thomas (Tommy) Thompson

and honour...to which we add
good health, wealth and family
and friends.

“We are continuously chal-

lenged to do the best we.

can...when we can...for as many
as we can...and in so doing, it
really does not matter what
people say about us while we
are here or when we are
gone...for...no matter
what...some will say this and
some will say that...and now in
Tommy’s case...it does not real-
ly matter anymore.

“In the case of our departed
friend, brother, Rotarian and
comrade...and walking...and boil
fish discussion partner...Tom-
my Thompson...we have had
multiple opportunities to dis-
cuss with him some matters that
were dear and important to

_ him. Those of us who really

knew Tommy, would have
known how he loved is family
so much...and showed it in his
own proud way...especially
when it came to his kids, and
grandkids...‘his boys’.

“Those of us who really knew
and understood him, know of
his deep and. abiding
faith...which sustained him
through the many ups and
downs that he faced...health,
unemployment, family, busi-
ness, and yes politically...but it
does not really matter anymore.

“Those of us who really knew
him...know of his great joy of
singing in the choir, working
with the Social Outreach Pro-
gramme and serving as a vestry-
member at his beloved St
Matthew’s Anglican
Church...and his pride when he

“represented his Parish ‘at the

Diocesan Synod...and engaged
in church politics.

“Those of us who really knew
him...know that he was a nation-
alist... who saw The Bahamas
progress to become world-class
in tourism...and saw himself
move up the ranks to become
one of the first Bahamian. gen-
eral managers of a major hotel
property...but that does not
really. matter anymore.

“Those of us who really knew
him, know of the challenges that
he faced as he tried his hands at
entrepreneurship...his constant
travelling...back and forth...his
visits with “The Group’ to Neva-
da, Columbia (where he
became ill...but rallied and con-
tinued), Cuba and just as

.recently as February 2 through

5, 2005, to the Chinese trade
fair in Kingston, Jamaica, to
explore business opportunities.

“And those of us who really -
knew him...would know of his
committed support of the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party...and how
proud he was of having been
named a stalwart councilor...and
his disappointment of his party’s
wilderness years...and the. joy
of returning to power...but all
of that does not matter any-
more.

“What does ‘matter is the fact
that there is a certain democ-
racy about death...it comes to
us all...and our living would not
have been in vain...if we
attempted to help somebody as
we passed along.

“Sleep on comrade...you did
your best...you will remember
the pleasant and the not so
pleasant times...we will all miss
you.”

(George W Mackey’s book
“Millennium Perspectives”, a
compilation of Viewpoints and
other interesting topics, is avail-
able at leading bookstores local-

y. E-mail:
georgewmackey@hotmail. eo

THE AIRPORT AUTHORITY

P.O. Box AP-59222

Nassau International Airport

Nassau, Bahamas

Proposal for Group Life & Medical Insurance

The Airport Authority invites proposals from eligible
insurance companies and/or brokers on a Group Life and
Medical Insurance Plan for employees of The Airport

Authority.

The policy will be for a period of one year following the
selection of a successful tender. Parties interested in
submitting a proposal may collect an information package
from the Executive Office of The Airport Authority at the
Nassau International Airport on Monday 7th, March, 2005.

All proposals should be sealed, and delivered to:

Acting General Manager,

Course are six {6} weeks fong

The Airport Authority,
P.O. Box, AP - 59222

Nassau International Airport



ginners MS PowerPoint | Saturday 12

And should be marked:

SSSENTIALS OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP

PO peer,

PROPOSALS FOR GROUP LIFE AND MEDICAL
INSURANCE |

Smail Business’
on your soind this
New Year?

Ne

Queen's College
Introduces the

All tenders must be received no later than 4:30 pm on
Monday 21st March, 2005.

AL aUseek Cartiin
tn Starting and Manag ir Ovin Serial Buziness Veriture
START OATE Weak beginning Monday Mar. 07, 2005 G08 pm.

Contact CFE ADMINISTRATOR or ernail cfe@gchenceforth. core waww.qchentcefortts.com

TERM DATE: March 07 — May 14, 2005

The Airport Authority reserves the ienetg to reject any or
all tenders.


PAGE 10, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005











Parties, Nightclubs
& Restaurants



Official Kalik Relaunch Party on Saturday, March
5 @ Arawak Cay. Come and celebrate with a huge
FREE party featuring 3 for $5 Kalik. Performances
by Ira Storr, Nita, Funky D, Spice, Terez Hepburn,
Visage, the Extra Band and KB.

Annual DJs Boat Cruise on Friday, March 4 on
the Island Link, 8pm. Tickets $15 advance, $20.at the
boat. Special appearances by Platinum and Renais-
sance Models.

Miriam & Remix Birthday Bash on Friday, March
4 on board the Calypso I. Boarding 7.30pm, boat
leaves at 8.30pm. Tickets $20 advance, $25 at the
boat. Price includes food and drinks.

Exotic Saturdays @ Fridays Soon Come starts this
weekend with 3 for $10 drink specials. Admission:
$10 before 12 and $15 after. Ladies free before 11pm.

Da Greasy Pit (Omega Psi Phi Steak-out) on Sat-
urday, March 5 @ West Bay St and Perpall Tract, 12-
6pm. Proceeds in aid of the Bahamas Red Cross
Society and the Omega Psi Phi (Pi Xi Chapter)
Community Centre Building Fund.

Rave Saturdays @ The All New Club Eclipse. DJ
Scoobz spinning the best in Old Skool. Admission
$35, all inclusive food and drink.

Fever @ Bahama Boom, Elizabeth St, downtown,
Fridays. The hottest party in the Bahamas every
Friday night. Admission $10 before midnight. First 50
women get free champagne. First 50 men get a free
Greycliff cigar. Dress to impress. For VIP reserva-
tions call 356-4612.

Cool Runnings is back with a Conscious Party @
' Haid Rock Cafe, Charlotte St North every Friday.
Classic reggae style music. Admission $10.

Mellow Moods every Sunday @ Fluid Lounge
and Nightclub, Bay St, featuring hits from yesterday
— old school reggae and rockers downstairs, and
golden oldies upstairs. Admission: Free. Doors open
9pm.

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters Sports
Bar. Drink specials all night long, including karaoke
warm-up drink to get you started. Party, 8pm-until.

Karaoke Nights @ Fluid Lounge and Nightclub.
Begins 10pm every Tuesday. Weekly winners select-
ed as Vocalist of the Week — $250 cash prize. Winner

selected at end of month from finalists — cash prize
$1,000. Admission $10 with one free drink.

Reggae Tuesdays @ Bahama Boom. Cover charge
includes a free Guinness and there should be lots of
prizes and surprises. Admission: Ladies $10 and
Men $15.

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports
Bar every Wednesday S5pm-8pm. Free appetizers
and numerous drink specials.

Flash Nights @ Club Fluid every Thursday. The
ultimate Ladies Night. Join Nassau’s and Miami
Beach’s finest men. Ladies only before 11.30pm with
free champagne. Guys allowed after 11.30pm with
$20 cover.

_ The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday. Doors
open at 9pm, showtime 11.30pm. Cover charge $15.
$10 with flyer. ,

Twisted Boodah Bar & Lounge every Friday @

Cafe Segafredo, CharlotteSt North, featuring world .

music, chillin’ jazz and soulful club beats. Starting at
6pm. Beers $3, longdrinks $4.50.

Fantasy Fridays @ Fluid Lounge, featuring late
‘80s music in the VIP Lounge, Top of the Charts in
the Main Lounge, neon lights and.Go Go dancers.
Glow sticks for all in before midnight. Admission:
Ladies free before 11pm, $15 after; Guys $20 all
night. %

College Night @ Bahama Boom every Friday.
Admission: $10 with college ID, $15 without.





AROUN D

THE TRIBUNE

Ni A-S SAU












ter Guana Cay.

psychological trauma.

Haitians, treating them like dirt?

Pharmacy and Tony’s Cabinet Supplies.

Dicky Mo’s Fridays @ Cable Beach. Happy Hour
- 3 for $10 mixed drinks and $1 shots.

Greek Saturdayz @ Bahama Boom, Elizabeth
Ave. Every Saturday the Phi Beta Sigma Frat wel-
comés greeks, college grads and smooth operators.
Admission $15 all night, $10 for greeks in letters.
Music by DJ Palmer, security strictly enforced.

Chill Out Sundays @ The Beach Hut, West Bay
Street with fresh served BBQ and other specials
starting from 4pm-10pm, playing deep, funky chill
moods with world beats. Cover $2.

Sweet Sunday Chill Out Soiree Lounge, every
Sunday, 4pm-midnight @ Patio Grille, British Colo-
nial Hotel.

Wet Sundays, every Sunday, noon-midnight @
Crystal Cay Beach. Admission $10, ladies free.

Carib Scene @ Club Fluid every Sunday. A night
of Caribbean, Latin and Reggae flavours for all
audiences, Latin Flair in the VIP Lounge; Old School
Reggae and'Soca in the Main Lounge. Ladies in
free before 11pm. $10 after 11pm. Men, $15 cover

charge.

Jay Mitchell and Hot KC @ Palm Court Lounge,
British Colonial Hilton, Wednesday-Thursday 8pm-
12am. , oes

Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley’s Restaurant &
Lounge, Eneas St off Poinciana Drive. Featuring

_ Frankie Victory atthe key board in the After Dark

Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to midnight. Fine food
and drinks.

Paul Hanna performs at Traveller’s Rest, West
Bay St, every Sunday, 6.30pm-9.30pm.

The Arts
Ian Strachan’s Diary of Souls, the critically

acclaimed play examining the Haitian experience
in the Bahamas, will open at the Dundas Centre



‘Diary of Souls’
%, iary of Souls, a drama written and directed by Dr Ian Strachan, playwright and
chair of COB’s School of English Studies is a fictional interpretation of tragic

events that took place in Exwma in July 1990, and is considered by some to be

Strachan’s best play yet. When intercepted by the Defence Force, a Haitian ves-
sel allegedly capsizes. The 39 Haitians who drowned were buried in a common grave on Bit-

Strachan’s Track Road Theatre will bring this story to the stage in an emotionally powerful
account, says an online review. The play switches frequently between the beach on Bitter Gua-
na Cay, where three Haitians are stranded as “undead” between feeling neither life nor death,
and a psychiatrist’s office where a Bahamas Defence Force marine is being treated for

Strachan also lets his characters investigate the heart of the matter, the source of Haitian
distress — Was it the series of despots following Toussaint Ouverture that impoverished the
beautiful country? Was it the brutality of “Papa Doc” Duvalier and his private militia, the
Tons-Tons Macoute that broke the spirit of a nation? Why do Bahamians shun and despise

Diary of Souls runs this weekend through Sunday at the Dundas Centre for the Performing
Arts @ 8pm. Tickets are $20. The show continues on March 11 and 12 at a cost of $20 (same -
time). Tickets can be purchased at the Dundas box office from 10am-4pm, Heaven Sent







TICKETS:

HEAVEN SENT PHARMACY

TONY'S CABINETS
DUNDAS BOX OFFICE

: PH: 392-3728

A.
TRACK ROAD THEATRE
PRODUCTION

SPONSORED BY:









- for the Performing Arts on Friday, March 4 and

continue through March 6, 8pm. And again on

: Friday, March 11 and Saturday, March 12, 8pm.

Call the box office at 393-3728 for ticket info.

’ Tickets for Friday’s performance are $25, remain-

ing shows are $20.

Indigo, a film about gifted children on earth,
their purpose and work of healing, peace and
love, will be shown @ Unity Centre of Light, East
Ave, Centreville (directly behind Centreville Food
Store) on Friday, March 4, starting at 6.30pm.

. Admission $10 adults, $7 children. For more infor-

mation call 328-1325.

A Fabric Printing workshop will be held on
Saturday, March 5 and March 12, from:10am -
1pm at the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas.
The workshop is part of the NAGB’s Youth
Workshop series and is for children between the
ages of 12 and 18. Joie Lamare of Bahama Hand-
prints will be conducting the workshop. Cost: $10
members/$16 non-members. Call the gallery at
328-5800/1 to register.

Reading and Lecture by Dr Joanne Hyppolite,
award-winning author of children’s literature, will
deliver a lecture and reading on Monday, March
7, 6pm @ Choices Dining Room, College of the
Bahamas School of Hospitality and Tourism Stud-
ies.

The National Collection @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, an exhibition that takes
the viewer on a journey through the history of
fine art in the Bahamas. It features signature
pieces from the national collection, including
recent acquisitions by Blue Curry, Antonius
Roberts and Dionne Benjamin-Smith. Gallery
hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 1lam-4pm. Call 328-
5800 to book tours.

Past, Present and Personal: The Dawn Davies
Collection @ the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, Villa Doyle, West and West Hill Streets.
The exhibition is part of the NAGB’s Collector’s
Series. Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 11am-4pm.
Call 328-5800 to book tours.





















The Awakening Landscape: The Nassau Water-
colours of Gaspard Le Marchand Tupper, from
the collection of Orjan and Amanda Lindroth @
the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas. The
mid-nineteenth century paintings that make up the
exhibition are part of one of the earliest suites of
paintings of Nassau and its environs. Tupper was
a British military officer stationed at Fort Char-
lotte in the 1850s. The works show a pre-mod-
ern Bahamas through the decidely British medium
of watercolour. Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday,
1lam-4pm. Call 328-5800 to book tours.



Health

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5.30pm on the second Tuesday. of each month at
their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville. Call
323-4482 for more info.

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third
Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors Hospital con-
ference room.

The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2.30pm (except August and Decem-
ber) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley

_ street.

Doctors Hospital, the official training centre of the
American Heart Association offers CPR classes cer-
tified by the AHA. The course defines the warning
signs of respiratory arrest and gives prevention strate-
gies to avoid sudden death syndrome and the most
common serious injuries and choking that can occur
in adults, infants and children. CPR and First Aid
classes are offered every third Saturday of the month
from 9am-ipm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Com-
munity Training Representative at 302-4732: for
more information and learn to'save a life today.

REACH — Resources & Education for Autism
and related Challenges meets from 7pm — 9pm‘the:
second Thursday of each month in the cafeteria of:
the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.



Civic Clubs

The Bahamas Historical Society’s monthly
meeting is scheduled for 6pm on March 17 at the
Museum on Shirley Street and Elizabeth Avenue.
Dr Donald Hopkins of the Carter Presidental
Center, a descendent of Long Island, Harbour
Island and Abaco, will give a presentation entitled

“Posing Questions, Pondering Records and Prob- §

ing the Genes: Researching Family Histories in the
Bahamas.” The public is invited to attend. ©

Toastmasters Club 1905 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm @
BEC Cafe, Tucker Rd. Club 9477 meets Friday,
7pm @ Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm
A19, Jean St. Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pm @
British Colonial Hilton. Club 1600 meets Thursday,
8.30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes. Club 7178 meets
Tuesday, 6pm @ The J Whitney Pinder Building,
Collins Ave. Club 2437 meets every second, fourth
and fifth Wednesday at the J Whitney Pinder Build-
ing, Collins Ave at 6pm. Club 612315 meets Monday
6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ the
Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first
Tuesday, 7pm @ Gaylord’s Restaurant, Dowdeswell

’ St. Please call 502-4842/377-4589 for more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second
Tuesday, 6.30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office,
4th floor meeting room.

The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month in
the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, Bay St.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets
the second and fourth Wednesday of the month,
8pm @ St Augustine’s Monestary.



Send all your civic and social events to The Tri-
bune via fax: 328-2398 or e-mail: outthere@tribune-
media.net

POE eMere

WINES & SPIRITS






THE TRIBUNE ; . SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005, PAGE 11
{ \ | i i ie t ae Demonstrators calling for the return of ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide marched through Bel Air, a
slum in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on Friday, March 4,2005. Demonstrators chanted "too much blood" and








accused police of human rights abuses five days after two people were shot dead in another protest. (AP
Photo/Ariana Cubillos)







Demonstrators calling for the return of ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide reach out to UN Brazilian
— peacekeepers during.a march through of Bel Air, a.slum in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on Friday, March 4, 2005.

_ Demonstrators chanted “too much blood” and accused police of human rights abuses five days after two
people were shot dead in another protest. (AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)

Film (From page 1)

ty is a massive environmental
clean-up, landscaping and build-
ing restructuring that will turn
several of the old buildings of
the former US missile base into
offices..

The next phase will include
the first of three sound stages
and necessary infrastructure,
according to Paul Quigley,
CEO of Toronto-based Gold
Rock Film Studio and Theme
Park.

This third stage of develop-
ment, for which preparations

have already begun, includes:

excavation for the world’s
largest tank, 100-by-80 feet and
12 feet deep. ‘

This excavation into rock
caused some delay after ques-
tions about environmental safe-
ty came from The Bahamas
Environment Science and Tech-
nology (BEST) Commission,
the government’s watchdog for
environmental issues in relation
to international developments.

Mr Quigley said that with
the signed lease, excavation for
the tank, which helps maintain a
controlled environment on the
open seas, will now be able to
go below sea level.

Prime Minister Perry
Christie and Minister of Finan-

cial Services and Investments .

Allyson Maynard-Gibson, were

Law (From page 1)

the development will destroy the sanctity of their

quaint island community.

“The Save Guana Cay Lobby are there to save
the island. They don’t want an entire third of the



both present for yesterday’s

_ signing and thanked Mr Quigley

for his hard work and commit-
ment.

Mr Christie praised the sig-
nificant contribution the pro-
ject will bring to Grand Bahama
and the Bahamas on the whole.

“T have found both govern-
ment and developers have a
commitment to protecting the
environment,” Mr Christie said,
“and without any difficulty we
have overcome all setbacks and
are happily moving forward.”

Minister Maynard-Gibson
added: “We believe that the
heads of agreement which pro-
vides the facilities and ability
for Bahamians to fully express
themselves creatively in a myr-
iad of ways they’re involved in
the film industry, can now be
fulfilled diligently.”

The investment is expected
to create about 1,200 jobs and
pay out $8 million annually in
salaries after investing $6.5 mil-
lion on wages for about 300
construction workers. -

The developer is also com-
mitted to securing $250 million
in production funding, and forg-
ing a partnership with Bahamas
Technical Vocational Institute
in Grand Bahama. '

“It’s been a bit of a long road
and a complex deal,” said Mr

Quigley, “and I am happy that
we have finally signed the deal.
I am very excited about the
potential of what we are doing.

We are very committed to.

developing an indigenous film
industry in the Bahamas.”

Mr Quigley, who has spent
more than 35 years in the film
industry, said a very important
part of the project is the training
of Bahamians as opposed to
bringing professionals in from
abroad. Soy

“In the long term,” he added,
“the project would not be suc-
cessful if reliant on foreigners.
There is a huge opportunity for
Bahamians in so many differ-
ent fields in the film industry,
and it is a wonderful calling card
for us to have the largest Disney
franchise of all time being our
first production.”

The studios will produce
commercials, feature films, TV
series, music, in-house produc-
tions, and offer a Bahamian vil-
lage theme park — including
actors, and a market square
with Bahamian crafts and hand-
iwork. The studios will have
viewing galleries so visitors can
watch commercials or shows
being filmed. In the future the
firm plans to offer a 3D Imax
theatre and an endangered
species area.



and we should be preserving these places as

national treasures,” the lawyer said.

island to be sliced off from the rest of Guana Bahamas.

Cay and to become a preserve for the rich foreign

investor.

“Our land resources are very small in the
Bahamas. Although we cover thousands of miles
of water, we have a very small availability of land

Bishop (From page 1)

come. Dr Bethel said Bishop
Eldon has limited movement of
his limbs and seems to recog-
nise voices.

"He opens his eyes and
seems to be aware of who he is
talking to," said Dr Bethel, "but
we know that it is a wait and
see type of situation."

She added: "We put our-
selves in God's hands and what-
ever is the Lord's will we shall
accept. We keep praying and
we appreciate the love and sup-
port shown to us from the
Anglican community and the

Mr Smith said a $400 million investment in
Guana Cay is not going to be felt across the

“However, if $400 million was pumped into

Freeport where there are thousands of unem-

community at large."

Father Laish Boyd, rector of
Holy Cross Anglican Church,
said he is very concerned about
Bishop Eldon's condition.

"Iam very concerned. Obvi-
ously he has been in intensive
care for a while. Bishop Eldon
made great contributions to the
church in so many ways and he
is extremely dear to many peo-
ple and to me personally," said
Fr Boyd.

Fr Boyd told The Tribune
that Bishop Eldon ordained him
as both a deacon and priest.

ployed people, where the infrastructure is, where
there are people who can directly benefit from
this, that would benefit us more,” he said.



"When I offered myself as a
candidate for the testing of my
vocation, he was the bishop and
took a personal interest in all
of us who were interested in the
priesthood," he said.

Archbishop Drexel Gomez,
in a memo to all Anglican cler-
gy, has asked that special
prayers be said during all ser-
vices for Bishop Eldon.

The Anglican Diocese is ask-
ing all Anglicans and the entire
Bahamian community to con-
tinue to keep Bishop Eldon in
their prayers. |

LogisticsS





ckage or multiple —

nt and cost effective




PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005



Artist celebrates 35

@ By Franklyn G Ferguson

rtist Alton
Lowe cele-
brated 35
years as a
s o 1 o
exhibitor when he staged an
impressive show at the Nas-

sau Beach Hotel on Febru-.

ary 25.

For 32 years, Mr Lowe has
been at the Nassau Beach,
where he says he has been
given excellent services over
the years.

Lowe’s name has become
synonymous with Bahamian
art. His success and
renowned paintings of
Bahamian scenes in oil over
the past three decades is
matched by his zest for pro-
moting the people, history
and culture of his homeland.

Born at New Plymouth,
Green Turtle Cay, in 1945,
Lowe showed an interest in
painting at an early age. An
American couple painting in
Abaco recognised his poten-
tial and began tutoring him
after school.

After several months they
convinced Lowe’s parents to
permit them to further his
training in the United States.

At age 16, Lowe left his
island home to apprentice in
galleries on Miami Beach and
Gatlinburg, Tennessee, for
two years before spending
three years at the prestigious
Frank Reilly School in New
York City.

The young artist staged his
first one-man exhibition in
1969 at the British Colonial
Hotel. His nervousness
quickly disappeared when 22
paintings were sold on open-
ing night and the remaining
two the next day.

Every spring since then,
Lowe has held successful
one-man exhibitions in the
capital. This annual event has
drawn an ever-widening cir-
cle of admirers from the
Bahamas and abroad.

Many of his works hang in
collections far from the
Bahamian shores. In addi-
tion, Lowe takes on commis-
sions and has been featured
several times on Bahamian
postage stamps, with series
on rare orchids, roses, Loyal-
ist settlers and Lucayans.

' Lowe’s works captures the
brilliant colours and peace-
ful people of the Bahamas.

He has used his success to
promote the preservation of
Bahamian history and cul-
ture, especially in his native
Abaco.

He founded the Albert
Lowe Museum, named after

his father, at Green Turtle .

Cay in 1976 in a restored
Loyalist-style home.

He was also a moving force
behind the Memorial Sculp-
ture Garden, New Plymouth
Historical Society and Island
Roots Festival in Key West.

Lowe’s art is distinctly
Bahamian, so is he. Always
preserving and promoting the
islands he calls home.

THE TRIBUNE



NASSAU ON CAMERA

years







TV hava tebe rey reo

tra.



@ FROM left are Dr Gail Saunders, director of archives,
pianist Peggy Hail and historian Dr Sanra Riley.
te

lH FIRST TIME — From left are artist Alton Lowe, journalist Karin Herig and Dr Harold
Munnings Jr. .



iy Sis thi

ATTORNEY Anthony Klonaris (centre), consultant to the
law firm Michael Klonaris and Co., with his wife, Kathryn,

and daughter, Christina.



@ BAHAMIAN subject matter has been the theme of many of James Mastin’s works.
This sculpture, The Seagull in Flight, cast in polished bronze, was on.display at the exhi-
bition. Shown above, from left, are Hane Banister and Karin Meulengracht while long-time
friend and client Rodger Banister chats with Mr Mastin about the art of sculpture.



@ Dr Michael Gerassimos (left), who has been serving as a
GP for about half a century, with artist/engineer Harold
Munnings, co-chairman of the Bahamas Independence
celebration.



@ PICTURED from left are Luisa Black, Martin Ratcliffe, Tom Black, Cynthia Ratcliffe
and Andrew Aitken.

















ae

@ ATTORNEYS A Rosemary Christie, of Higgs and Johnson

law firm, and E Dawson Roberts, of E Dawson Roberts:
and Co. Mr Roberts is the oldest practising lawyer in Nas-

sau.

eH wa ipa iH ; i fe

@ PRESIDENT of Bethell Estates, John Bethell (second from left) and his wife Beth, are
shown with artist Kim Smith and Keren Ramsay, office manager at Southworth Consultants
Limited.





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A a




SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398



E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com








| BDA IO LO) OIC eer ENE

(Photo: Lucien LS) |

CONN Tre Tem nee wb

the heat up

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

WILLESMSTAD, Curacao
— Top seed Devin Mullings
adjusted very well to the change
in climate as he pulled off the
opening match of the American
Zone II Davis Cup tie against
the Netherlands Antilles.

The 19-year-old Grand
Bahamian, who arrived here on
Wednesday night - three days
after the rest of the Bahamas
team - enjoyed a 6-1, 6-3, 6-2
win yesterday at the Sta Catha-
rina Sports & Country Club to
Win iis first Davis Cup match
in five outings.

“Today, I wasn’t. really 100
per cent. I just came from
indoors and it was snowing over
there,” said Mullings, who came
from directly from school at
Ohio State where he’s in his
sophomore year.

“[’m just getting accustomed
to the heat. I felt kind of slug-
gish out there, but I think the
Jonger I stay out there, the bet-
ter it’s going to be for me.
Hopefully by Sunday, I will be
much more prepared than I was
today.”

Mullings, the southpaw with
the big serve, was referring to
the reverse singles in which he
will play Netherlands Antilles’
top seed Jean-Julien Rojer in
what could be the clincher for
the tie.

It will all depend on what
happens in the doubles today
when Marvin Rolle and Ryan
Sweeting take on Royer and
Raoul Behr.

Rolle lost 6-2, 6-2, 7. 5 to
Rojer-in the second opening
singles that lasted one hour and
50 minutes.

Although there was some
concern about how well
Mullings would make the
adjustment to the change in
weather, he didn’t show any
signs of problems throughout
the match.

In fact, he broke Winklaar in
the first game and although he

was broken in the second game,.

Mullings went on to take control
of the set, easily winning the
next five games.

Mullings would keep the
momentum going in the second
set, holding serve in the first
game. He came from a 40-15
deficit to take advantage, but
Winklaar was able to rally back
to/hold for a 1-1 tie.

Winklaar, a 17-year-old col-
legiate player in Curacao, would
break and hold serve for a 3-1
lead.

But Mullings rallied back to
break at 3-3 and he was able to
go on to win the second set.

Both players would hold
serve through the first four
games of the third set. However,
Mullings again took control as
he broke Winklaar and went on
to seal the game, set and match.

Nervous

“He was playing well. He
kept the ball in play,” said a dis-
appointed Winklaar. “It was my
first Davis Cup, so I was kind

~ of nervous. I know I could play

better than I did.”

Winklaar did manage to get
in a couple of passing shots that
kept the small Netherlands
Antilles players cheering. But
they had even more to cheer
from Mullings as he forced Win-
klaar to make mistake after mis-
take and give the Bahamas the
upper hand.

Mullings, the shorter of the
two, basically stayed back at the
line. But he was able to work
inside to get in a couple of shots
at the net to counter Winklaar’s
baseline game.

“T thought he played very
well,” said Bahamas team cap-
tain John Farrington. “Devin
played an intelligent match. He
controlled the match from the
start to the end.

“He moved the ball around
and kept it in play. He mixed
up his serves and he out-thought
the guy and just blew him off
the court.”

“He played a very intelligent

- match.” *



Bi By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

CR WALKER Knights edged out the CC
Sweeting Cobras for their fourth straight
Government Secondary School Sporting
Association (GSSSA) track and field title.

Three more records fell on the second
day of competition, with more than 20 ath-
letes qualifying for the national high school
championships.

Knights, who established a first day lead
and never looked back, defeated their clos-
est competitors, the Cobras, by 40 points.

Pacers came in third with 455, CI Gibson
Rattlers fourth with 313 and Doris Johnson
Marlins fifth with 275.50 points.

Knights claimed the under 17 division with
a combined score of 334 points, and were
second in the senior division with 310 points.
Winning the division were the Cobras with
316 points, they were second in the inter-
mediate division with 288 points.

Effort

ceordirig to Knights' head coach Floyd
Armbrister, the fourth straight win was a
combined effort, which came because the
coaches allowed the athletes to compete,

He said: "It is great to win four straight
titles, but when you take a closer look at it,
the situation is saddening.

"You have a power school like RM Bailey
who were denied a chance of winning a
championship title because club coaches
decided to interfere.

"We don't interfere with their meets, so I
don't understand why they would want to
tell the athletes not to compete in certain
races, which is for the betterment of their
‘school and athletes."

For the Knights, spectacular performances
came from LeSean Pickstock, Ashley Han-
na, Lesley Dorceval and Mary Miller.

Miller and Dorceval cleaned house in
the distance events, winning each race
entered.

‘Miller said: "It feels great knowing that
the hard work paid off, but I am disap-
pointed that I wasn't able to run a faster
time. /

“For me today was harder than Thurs-
day. It was cold and every time I tried to
push forward the wind coming around the
200m curve made it impossible."

Competition

There were only four records breakers
during the two day competition, two of
which belonged to strong woman Tracey
Morrison.

Morrison came off day two on a high,
annihilating a record which she set five years
ago, in the javelin.

Yesterday was no different for Morrison,
being the first to place her name again in the
record books, this time in the shot putt.

Morrison’s throw of 13.28m was more
than enough to erase the old record of
11.90m, but was just shy of the Carifta gual:
ifying standards of 14.15m.

She said: “I don’t like the shot as much.as
I like javelin, but the record is always pleas-
ing.

“T have to thank God and -my coaches,
this record belongs to them because they
are the ones who helped me obtain it.”

The other two records were set by Pacers’
under 17 girl’ s squad.

The team of Wendy Derosin, Teniel Poiti-
er, Rennise McKenzie and Christina Badmus
ran a time of 4:11.64 seconds — the old
record time, set back in 1993 by the Cobras,
was 4:13.39 ‘seconds.

Dorceval was the other record breaker,
winning the under 17 boys’ 800m run in a
time ®f 2:05.29 seconds. The old time was
2:05.52 seconds.





SPORTS

MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

SSNS

S

ESS





A.I.D., Supporting
THE ,_BAHAMAS DAVIS CUP TEAM

Wulff Road, Nassau, The Bahamas |



a

\ ty

NK
Fax: 393-4258 i & 2
www.aidbahamaislands.com A

A.I.D. — Automotive & Industrial Distributors
Phone: 393-7481 |
, 7 TRIBUNE SPORTS

PAGE 2B, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005



week of wi



a

& C CSWEETING’S Elbin
: Sn Carey jumps 6.04 to win the inter-
’ , mediate boys long jump yesterday

during the first day of the GSSSA
‘ senior high schools track meet.
; “ , (Photo: Felipé Major/

Tribune staff)





- 3 ay oe & GOVERNMENT High
‘ 8 School’s Michealla McPhee
throws 26.73 to win the inter-
mediate girls javelin.

(Photo; Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)









'
7
{
4,
«
4
‘
TRIBUNE SPORTS SAIUHDAY, VIARUH 5, ZUU9, FAUE op

SPORTS



LW YOUNG’S
Lynden Bethel pass-
es S C McPherson’s

Ronico Thompson to
win the intermediate
boys 100 metre hur-

dles








(Photo: Felipé
Major/Tribune staff)







—



,

@ CH REEVES’ Lexi Wilson runs
home to win the 1500 metres yesterday at

the track meet.
(Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

@ JARAN HINSEY of SC McPherson
wins the 200 hundred metres to break
the bantam boys record time.
(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)


PAGE 4B, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Marvin Rolle stumbles as
Netherlands Antilles pull even



@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

WILLEMSTAD, Curacao
— By the time Marvin Rolle
found a way to get around
Netherlands Antilles’ top seed
Jean-Julien Rojer’s serve and
volley game, it was a too late.

Rolle, the Bahamas’ num-
ber two seed, suffered a 6-2, 6-
2, 7-5 to Rojer as the Nether-
lands Antilles pulled even in
the first round of the Ameri-
can Zone II Davis Cup tie yes-
terday.

It now makes it an even ©

more interesting showdown in
the doubles today at the Sta
Catharina Sports & Country
Club when Rolle and Ryan
Sweeting will carry the flag for

the Bahamas against the ©

Netherlands Antilles’ duo of
Rojer and Raoul Behr.

“T went out there and did
my best, but Julian is a good
player. He’s not 250 for noth-
ing,” said Rolle about Rojer,
who is ranked at No. 285 on
the ATP computer list.

“He went out there and he
played a smart game. I just
made a lot of errors. But in
the third set, I made a little
ru. coming from 5-2 down,
but I wasn’t able to keep my
concentration level up. But I
gave it a good run. | didn’t
give up until the end.”

Rojer, who improved his





Av






Davis Cup record to 31-8,
played a real solid serve and
volley game in the first two
sets as he delighted the crowd
and frustrated Rolle.

Rolle, however, turned
things around in the third set
as returned some big shots
and served just as well. He
was close to avoiding the
three-set sweep when he
broke Rojer and held for a 5-
4 lead.

Volley

Serving tied at 15-15, Rojer
slid at the net as he went for a
volley. Rolle won the point
and eventually took a 15-40
lead. Rolle went on to break
at 30-40 for a 5-S tie.

With the crowd cheering
him on, Rojer went back to
his flashy serve and volley
game and blanked Rolle to
snatch a 6-5 lead. He then
blanked Rolle again on the
break to win the game, set and
match in one hour and 50
minutes.

“It was a good match. I
think Marvin started to find
his rhythm a little too late in
the match,” said Rojer, who
didn’t want to disappoint the
fans at the end of the match.

“Overall it was okay. I was

pleased with the match. I felt

okay. I felt fit. There was a lot
of windy conditions, but it was

eg ee

Syn



H MARVIN ROLLE in action for the Bahamas yesterday.
(Photo: Lucien LS)

a good match overall. I just
had to keep concentrating on
playing my own game.”

Despite the win, Rojer felt
Rolle played well and he real-
ly made him work down the
stretch.

The Bahainas took a 1-0
lead as top seed Devin



ri

Mullings disposed of Nether-
lands Antilles’ No. 2 seed
Rasid Winklaar 6-1, 6-3, 6-2
in a match that lasted one
hour and 35 minutes to get the
best-of-five tie underway.

Team captain John Farring- -

ton said he was hoping that
the Bahamas would have been

ighted Material

dicated Content
ailable from '( Commercial News Providers”

- — => -~ © —

_—_ - - -

in the driver’s seat after
Rolle’s match. But he admit-
ted that Rolle wasn’t as con-
sistent as he should have been
in the first two sets.
“Marvin played'a good
match, but I think the differ-
ence in the match was his con-

sistency,” Farrington noted.

“He just came up a little short.
So now we have to get pre-
pared for the doubles and try

‘to go up 2-1 going into Sun-

day.”
Sunday is when the reverse

singles will be played. Regard- -

less of the outcome of the
doubles today, the draw could
be decided in the first reverse
singles when Mullings takes
on Rojer in the marquee bat-
tle of the top seeds.

The fifth and final match is
scheduled to be played
between Rolle and Winklaar.
But if the tie is secured by any
team, the players could

change, with possibly H’Cone -

Thompson seeing some action
in the rubber match that could
be reduced to a best-of-three
sets.

Today, however, the
momentum for the tie could
go in either country’s favour
when the doubles is played.
But Rolle said he’s confident
that he and Sweeting can get
the job done.

“Ryan has a good serve and

that is what you need in dou- »

bles. With my net game, I

‘think we have a solid team,”

Rolle reflected. “I think we
should have a solid team that
can win the doubles.”

Farrington couldn’t

agree more.

“Both guys are playing very
well, so I feel we should be
able to take the doubles,” he

- projected. “We just have to

try to stay together as a team.
I know I will be-doing my. best
to make sure that they do.”

Netherlands Antilles’ cap-
tain Frances Hoyer said
Rojer’s victory has certainly
given the Netherlands Antilles
the momentum that they need
going into the remainder of
the tie.

“The doubles is definitely
going to be the key,” Hoyer
stated. “So if we can go out
there and win it, I’m sure that
we will end up winning the
tie.”

Bahamas Lawn Tennis
Association’s president Mary
Shelley said they are right
where they want to be, tied at
1-1 going into the doubles.

Solid |

“Hopefully this will give
Ryan a chance to show his
skills,” Shelley quipped.
“Jean-Julian is a solid player
and I think the Netherlands
Antilles is expecting him to
carry them through.

“But we’re going to go out
there and try to pull it off.”

If there’s any concern going
into the doubles, Rojer said
it’s the Bahamas’ reputation
as a good doubles team.

“You guys have a good his-
tory of doubles players.

“We will try not to let
that history continue,” he
quipped.




Practice makes pericct
for India and Pakistan

ell
—<—- @e- «ss
—


TRIBUNE SPORTS SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005, PAGE 5B









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PAGE 6B, SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005 TRIBUNE SPORTS —

The Tribune & Solomon’s Mines



FIRST PRIZE | SECOND PRIZE | snare





] | 50.00 GIFT BASKET $100.00 GIFT BASKET | $75.00 GIFT BASKET
3 In Each Age Group. o In Each Age Group oo Te Tod a) PNT Group |






CONTEST RULES
1. Children ages 4-5, 6-8, and 9-10, Staff members and relatives are not eligible to enter.
2. Coloring may be done with crayons. Adults or older child may assist the child in filling out the entry form, BUT NOT IN COLORING THE ENTRY
3, Enter as much times as you wish. All entries must be in The Tribune by 4pm on Monday, March 21st, 2005. Winners will be announced Wednesday,
March 23, 2005. Look for your names in The Tribune or listen to IOOJAMZ / JOY FM to hear your name.
4. There will be one firet-prize winner, one second-prize winner and one thira-prize winner in each age groups.
5. All entries become the property of The Tribune and may be used for any purpose including, but not limited to, publication in a future issue.

Ned ae elke’ Ose sem A ag aes

Child’s Name:

Parent/Guardian Signature

Address: Tel: Age:

Available At All Solomon's Mines Locations.


“TRIBUNE SPORTS a SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005, PAGE 7B



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