Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Inmate escapes
from Her
Majesty’s Prison

i By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

A CONVICTED rapist and
armed robber was on the run
in New Providence last night
after escaping from Her
Majesty’s Prison.

Police are searching for
escaped prison inmate Barry
Parcoi, 43, who is serving a life
sentence for rape and forcible
detention with intent, as well as
a 20-year sentence for armed
robbery.

He is described as armed and
extremely dangerous.

According to reports, some-
time between Wednesday night
and the early hours of yester-
day, Parcoi escaped from the
tnedium security housing block,
where he has been detained for
the past two years.

Prior to that, he had spent
19 years in maximum security.

Prison officials suspect that
Parcoi, who has a long list of
charges against him, including
possession of an unlicensed
firearm, possession of ammuni-
tion and escape from lawful cus-
tody, was able to break-out

, through the bathroom wall.

Speaking with the members
of the media at his offices yes-
terday morning, newly appoint-
ed Prison Superintendent Dr
Elliston Rahming said that to
determine the facts of the suc-

cessful escape, he has asked the »

police to conduct “a thorough
investigation of the inmates in
that section of the medium
security housing unit, as well as

the six officers who were on
duty within the confines of
medium security.”

Citing former US president
John F Kennedy, Dr Rahming
said: “Let the word go forth to
friend and foe alike, inmate or
officer, that we will make any
sacrifice, exert every effort,
remove every impediment,
reward any whistle blower and
apply the fullest measure of the
law to any wrong doer whom-
soever.’

Parcoi was first found miss-
ing yesterday at 6am when
prison guards coming on shift
conducted their routine head
count.

Dr Rahming said that one
theory is that during the day on
Wednesday, Parcoi was able to
puncture “the thin layer of con-
crete behind the toilet” in the
bathroom, and create.a hole in
the wall, through which he
escaped at a later point in time.

“We had roof repairs going
on here yesterday (Wednesday)
and we think he used the legit-
imate sound of the roof repairs
to make a sound in here which
created this kind of puncture in
the layer of concrete. He would
have taken the toilet top and
placed it back over that hole,
to camouflage what he had
done, and then under the cover
of darkness removed it and
made his escape,” he said.

Dr Rahming explained that
“no one had ever thought of

SEE page 16



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FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005





armed and dangerous.

(Above photo: Mario Duncanson)

@ CONVICTED rapist Barry Parcoi
is on the rum from Her Majesty’s Prison
after smashing a hole in a bathroom
wall and fleeing. He is considered











Mitchell: US report

shows the Bahamas

has nothing to hide

@ By PACO NUNEZ

Tribune Staff Reporter

THE US government’s
human rights report shows
that the Bahamas has “an
open and transparent govern-
ment” with nothing to hide,
according to Foreign Affairs
Minister Fred Mitchell.

Mr Mitchell pointed out
that the report, released by
the US State Department on
Monday, did not accuse the
Bahamas of having an official
policy sanctioning human
rights abuses of any kind.

“The fact of which we ought

’

to be proud in the Bahamas, is
that we have an open and
transparent government with
systems that respond to any
allegations of inhumane treat-
ment or conduct,” Mr
Mitchell said.

He emphasised that the
Bahamas is an “open society,’
where anyone is free to make
their comments and nndings
public.

Mr Mitchell was speaking

yesterday at a press confer-
ence on his return from a
series of meetings in Wash-

SEE page 16



Amendments

V ALFRED GRAY, minis-
ter responsible for local gov-
ernment, said yesterday that
government plans to implement
a number of amendments in the
House of Assembly which will
facilitate the smooth running of
the Family Islands.

Mr Gray held a press confer-
ence to announce that the
month of March has been des-
ignated local government
month, during which the min-
istry will try to increase aware-
ness of the role local govern-
ment plays in the development
of the Family Islands.

Mr Gray said the theme will
be “promoting local democracy

and development” which he

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planned
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@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

said is in keeping with the inter-
national local government
theme, “deepening local democ-
racy.”

He said that many Bahami-
ans are not aware of the vital
role Family Island administra-
tors play in the daily operations
and development of the Family
Islands.

While he would not elabo-
rate, Mr Gray said government
would be seeking amendments
to local government legislation
before local elections come up
in June. He did say that among
the proposed amendments
would be the introduction of
grades for administrations.

“In the main we are seeking
to call Family Island Adminis-

SEE page 16

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PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005

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PULTE we we RY ee ee

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g i me ee ey

Technical difficulties hit
Cable Bahamas service

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a TELEVISION screens are blank at the offices of Cable Bahamas.

@ By PAUL G.
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Repair



TECHNICAL difficulties
relating to control software
resulted in the disabling of
all “top box” service of
Cable Bahamas for the past
two days.

Dr Keith Wisdom, the
director of Public Affairs
at Cable Bahamas, said
that the problem disabled
approximately 15 per cent
of their subscribers’ ser-
vices.

Maintenance

“Through the wee hours
of Wednesday morning
Cable Bahamas carried out
necessary maintenance
procedures on the compa-

‘ny’s broadband network.

This operation was
designed to be seamless
and transparent to the cus-
tomer. This was due to be
completed before dawn
Wednesday morning,” Dr
Wisdom said.

However, “technical dif-

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ficulties” with the compa-
ny’s control software dur-
ing this maintenance
process, disabled the video
services to.all set top box
subscribers.

“The effects of the prob-
lem meant that the sub-
scribers whose services
were delivered through set
top boxes experienced loss
of all video services. By the
end of Wednesday’s busi-
ness, approximately 15 per
cent of those affected. were
restored, and the remiain-
ing customers should have
service resumed soon,” he
said.

Dr Wisdom mentioned
that they actually found the
problem and began
addressing it by early

Wednesday afternoon, and’:

will continue to address it,
to its end.

He assured his customers
that as the initial repairs
have already been done,

MAIN SECTION
Local News.
Editorial/Letters. Ean
Out There...
Weather.......

“Comics... h.a:

(Phot Mario Duncanson)

the process of actually
bringing the service back
up is now as simple as an
electrical signal being sent
to the set top box.

“If necessary, periodic
updates will be given of
our progress.

Calls

“As a result of our set

top black out, the Cable

Bahamas customer care
call centre has been inun-
dated with a large number
of calls.

“So-as a result, most of
our lines are busy with
your calls.

“Over the last 36 hours
Cable Bahamas customer
service representatives
have been diligently work-

ing‘with. our customers to

clarify the problem and
update them as to when
their service will be
restored,” he said.

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THE TRIBUNE





& By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

MEMBERS of the public
_should be opened-minded
towards individuals released
from prison and leave the
door open for the possibility
that the individual may be
deserving of a second chance,
said new Superintendent of
Her Majesty’s Prison Elliston
Rahming.

Dr Rahming was the guest
speaker at the Kiwanis Club
of Cable Beach’s weekly
meeting on Wednesday
evening. The same evening
convicted rapist Barry Parcoi,
who was serving a life sen-
tence, escaped from Her

}sMajesty’s Prison at Fox Hill.

He was unaware of the escape
before his speech to club
members.

He said: “Once a person
has been to prison, members
of the public ought to see him
not as an ex-offender full stop,
but to see him as-an ex-
offender possibly deserving of
a second chance. Some are
not deserving, but if you write
them all off those who are
deserving wouldn’t get that
second chance.”

He explained that 98 per
cent of people who go to
prison return to society. If
they return to a society that
has a built-in prejudice against
them, it is almost as if the pub-
lic is “enticing you, almost
inviting you to go back to your
natural instincts and re-
offend.”

“While rehabilitation begins
in prison, it must be tested in
the outside community.
Knowing that many of them
have low self-esteem, had a
series of failures in their life
and now having spent there
time in prison, to come back
and meet another series of
failures; there is the possibili-
ty of either giving up on trying
to do what is right and giving
into those things that you
know are wrong,” he said.

' Dr Rahming explained that
it is possible for criminal
records to be expunged.

If released from prison on
minor offences, it takes sev-
en year before that record can
be expunged.

If someone went to prison
for a more serious offences
like robbery the waiting peri-
od is fourteen years for a
clean police record. Howev-

Bahamas Baptist Union
Evangelist

az YO

Prison Uae

March 7 - March 1 4th, 2009
South Beach Union Baptist Church
: 7:00p.m. Nightly

Speakers:

SPECIAL MUSIC BY VARIOUS UN ION
CHURCH CHOIRS

er, he stated that there are
certain offences that current-
ly cannot be expunged, they
include armed robbery, drug
trafficking with the intent to
supply and murder.

In his presentation the four
primary functions of prisons
were outlined, which consist
of incarcerating, as punish-
ment, to deter, and rehabili-
tation.

In carrying out these func-
tions, he referred to what he
terms as the seven “P’s” of
penology, which consist of the
philosophy, policies, proce-
dures, personal, programmes,

premises, and planning of the

institution.

On the bases of planning
for the prison, Dr Rahming
noted that a juvenile unit and
a half-way house for inmates
who are about to be released
are needed.

Showcased

He mentioned that they are
looking at-having a facility in
one of the industrial parks, so
that when products are made
in prison they can be show-
cased. Additionally, it can
serve as a place for a job

-opportunity for an inmate

upon being released, he said.

Ten short term goals of her
Majesty’s Prison were con-
veyed to the Kiwanis’ Club
members.

He said that nothing super-
sedes the goal to protect the
public against escapes.

Other goals included to cre-
ate a climate wherein inmates
are treated humanely with a
view towards humanising, not
demonising them, attain and
maintain a high level of moti-
vation and enthusiasm among
staff and to move the institu-
tion towards greater financial
self-sufficiency.

Dr Rahming shared his
vision for Her Majesty’s
Prison: “I see a prison that has
an atmosphere conducive to
learning because there is a
strong relationship between
learning and re-offending. I
see it as being a clean and
pristine institution that fol-
lows the rules of proper
hygiene and sanitation at all
times.

“T also see it as being less of
a burden on central govern-
ment by using its resources to
engage in productive activi-
ties.”

|S SAVED IN Ar
GH ETTO

JOHN 4:29,...COME SEE A MAN

| Rev. Wilton A. McKenzie Rev. Dr. Victor Cooper

Bahamas Baptist Union
Assistant Evangelist




H

@ By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE cause of death for murder
victims Rosnell Newbold and her
grandson Kevin Wilson were
revealed in court yesterday.

Dr Govinda Raju, a forensic
pathologist with the Princess Mar-
paret Hospital told the Supreme

Court that Kevin Wilson died due .

to a collection of blood in the tho-

racic cavity, or the throat, after

being stabbed in the left lung.
While the doctor said it was the

immediate cause.of death, the
deceased, who was 26 at the time,
also suffered from other wounds.
The court, being presided over by
Justice Anita Allen, was told that
Mr Wilson suffered from ‘16
wounds, most of which occurred
to the back and neck.

His grandmother, who was 75,
died as a result of a stab injury to
the neck. She had three wounds,

' including a slice on the left hand.

Twenty-six year-old Basil

' Fitzgerald Gordon is accused of

breaking into their home on Spice
Street, Pinewood Gardens, and

FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005, PAGE 3

killing them on June 16, 2002.

The post-mortem examinations
for the deceased occurred on June
18, 2002.

Dr Raju told the court he could
not give the time of death because
their bodies had already been
placed in the freezer prior to his
examination.

Doctor —

Police reported to the doctor
that one victim died at around
6am, and the other a half-hour lat-
er.
He collected samples of blood
from the deceased, along with
urine and stomach fluids. They
were sent to the police forensics

Ist) Doctor reveals cause of
OLS death for murder victims

lish'a chain of command to explain
the order in which DNA samples
were collected and handed over

. from one expert to the other.

It is expected that the DNA
results will be revealed toda
establishing whether blood sam-

ples taken from the murder scene
. match samples taken from the sus-

pect.

Detective Constable 2341
Rochelle Deleveaux gave the.
blood samples to DC 2458 Ruth- «
mae Brown. She delivered the
sealed packages containing the
samples to Gladys Pena of the
Broward County Crime Lab.

Julie Schuerman of the Broward
Crime Lab testified that she
secured the items in a vault.










Former MP slams activist

FORMER FNM MP Lester Turnquest has hit out at Grand Bahama
activist and lawyer Fred Smith for his support of a US human rights report
that has found the Bahamas guilty of a number of violations.

Mr Turnquest, who was known for his tough stance against criminals
while in public office, has invited Mr Smith “to move to the United
States”.

Mr Smith, president of the Grand panes Human Rights Association,
said there was “nothing exaggerated” in the US State Department’s
annual report released earlier this week. It cited reports of police brutality,
claims of unlawful killings by officers, allegations of abuse at the
Carmichael Road Detention Centre and “harsh” prison conditions.

The report also pointed to cases of arbitrary arrest and detention; exces-
sive pre-trial incarceration for persons accused of crimes and a lack of legal
representation at trial for a large percentage of inmates. It said'that vio-
lence against women in the Bahamas “continued” to be a serious wide-
spread problem throughout 2004, and that social aiscomlzuda against
homosexuals “was evident”.

Mr Turnquest, who contacted The Tribune yesterday to fespout to Mr

Smith’s claims, said that he had a problem with the US condemning
| and making negative remarks about what they perceive to be human
rights violations in the Bahamas, given that its own record is not perfect.

“The Bahamas is literally under siege by criminals and it is inevitable,
from time to time, that you will hear complaints by (offenders) and
those who defend them,” he said.

“J absolutely condemn Fred Smith for j joining hands with an external.
entity to undermine the reputation and sovereignty of the Bahamas,
and he has consistently done this.”

In his response to the State Department’s report, Mr Smith said:
“The judicial situation is dysfunctional, there is very little respect for due
process or respect for the constitution, thete is arbitrary and unlawful
arrest and disrespect for the rule of law.”

Discrimination in the Bahamas, said Mr Smith, be it against women,
foreigners, Haitians or any member of society that thinks differently is the

“order of the day”.

Responding to the report’s charges of discrimination, Mr Turnquest
claimed that the US discriminates in any number of (ways), and pointed
out that it was not unusual for international college students to pay
higher tuition fees than “in-state” pupils.

“J don’t accept that the US cap presume to comment on’ ‘iolence
against women when in the US viglence against women is a fact. Just as

‘it is a fact in the Bahamas,” said Mr Turnquest.

“The report is condescending, patronising and I think it was not prop-
erly evaluated and considered before it was released.”

He said that if the US is so concerned about human rights’ they “would
treat all countries the same, including China, Cuba, Bahamas, Jamaica,
everybody”.

As a Bahamian, Mr Turnquest said that he is particularly aware of the
failings of his country, but believes that the Bahamas’ record on human
rights is no worse than the US’ record.

The Bahamas, he said, has limited resources and is doing its best.
“We don’t have the money to make it better. There's a lot to be¢ done, but
we don’t even have the money to pave our roads.”

¢ See page 1
























































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SEE page 16

lab, Dr Raju told the court. ;
During Thursday’s proceedings,
the prosecutors sought to estab-

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G,,

(Hon.) EL, DD: Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CABRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1 972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES .

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

How the Haitians slide by

In THURSDAY’S Tribune Dr Eugene
Newry asked a leading question and sug-
gested his own answer. He wondered why
the Bahamas was so attractive to Haitian
boat people.

“But the fundamental question,” said Dr
Newry, the Bahamas’ ambassador to Haiti,
“is why do these immigrants come to the
Bahamas? Someone must be hiring the
majority of these persons.”

Yes, someone is hiring these destitute peo-
ple. Just imagine what the crime rate would
have been if these Haitians, unable to find
jobs, were hiding in the bush and terrorising
the community for their sustenance?

Having spent their last penny buying their
way out of Haiti on a rickety boat with a dis-
honest boat captain, they had to support
themselves here because they had no money
to buy their way out. They were given work
because there were many areas of the econ-
omy in which they were needed — areas that
Bahamians turned their backs on. Someone
had to do the work — and there were the
Haitians, ready, willing and able.

As early as 1963 Sir Roland Symonette,
the first premier of the Bahamas, recognised
the Haitian influx as a “major problem”. It
wasn’t that Haitian labour was not needed,
the-problem was that it had to be regulated.
An enterprising Bahamian suggested a labour
exchange exclusively for Haitians. Sir Roland

_ sent the proposal to a House committee
appointed “to consider the Haitian prob-
lem”. That’s the last we heard of it.

By 1967 it was clear that the Haitian dias-
pora was in fact a major problem. But under
the new PLP government, whether they were
needed or not, permit applications for Hait-
ian labourers started to pile up.

Having failed to get a Bahamian willing
to work on a five-acre orchard that the late
Sir Etienne Dupuch had created, we unsuc-
cessfully applied to the Immigration Depart-
ment for a Haitian.

A friend of ours in the civil service tele-
phoned one day. He knew that our applica-
tion was not only genuine, but it was urgent.
He also knew that because of who we were, it
would not be considered. And so he had a
suggestion.

He told us that agricultural permits were
being allowed for farm labourers. But, of
course, again being who we were we could
not go the straight route, we had to sidle in by
the back door. There were certain people —
true PLP supporters — who had been given
farm permits. They had no farms, but like

the holders of taxi franchises without taxis,

- they had the permits — for a price. Of course,

if we were to hire the Haitian, we did not
pay the price, the poor Haitian did — a per-
centage of his weekly pay packet.

We declined the back-door racket and the
orchard returned to nature.

‘And so the underground network started
with the full knowledge of the government of
the day. Since then it has taken many twists
and turns until today it is a major racket— far
more sophisticated than the farm-pemit days.
The present Immigration crack down has
probably suspended it temporarily as those
involved duck for the nearest rabbit hole.

We know of the case of a young Haitian, -

who fled Haiti alone when he was in his ear-
ly teens. He learned the language, got a job
and melted into the community. His only
encounter with the law during his eight years

’ here was one evening returning home, he

was stopped by two policemen. They asked
him for his papers. He had none. They asked
him for $200 in return for not reporting him.
He produced the money. And so he was
allowed to slide for a price. This is just one of
hundreds of similar incidents that we have
heard over the years.

Because government had no system of con-
sidering work permits, employers took a
chance and hired Haitians when they were
needed. In answer to the cursory question:
“Do you have your papers?” If the answer
were “yes”, then the man, or woman was
hired. No one checked the papers.

We had an experience with this recently
when we asked to see “the papers”. Produced
was an Immigration receipt for $25 for an
application that had been sent to the depart-
ment more than a year ago from which there
had been no reply.

And so, Dr Newry, we are all to blame for
the Haitian problem. Those who have to car-
ry the most blame are the Bahamian people
themselves who have carved a niche for
Haitians in this country by refusing to do
menial labour — labour that they themselves,
despite their screams to get the Haitians out,
describe as “Haitian work”.

Government is also to blame for not pro-

cessing applications in a business;like fashion,
thus allowing the problem to get out of con-
trol.

Employers are also to blame, but less so

‘because their dilemma was created by

Bahamians who didn’t want to work, and a
government that ignored applications — forc-
ing everyone into a vicious circle of illegality.



Mistakes of the
PLP government

ie epwpan

EDITOR, The Tribune.

AFTER listening to a local talk
show and reading our newspaper
dailies, I have been prompted to
express my views in relation to how
the FNM stacks up against the PLP.
I’m amazed that persons believe that
the FNM is no better than the PLP.
It seems that there are persons who
suffer from amnesia or their judg-
ment is clouded by a political bias.

Some persons believe that the
FNM cannot criticise the PLP for
wrongdoing because they are no
better. Like any government, the
FNM was not perfect and made mis-
takes, mistakes that pale in com-
parison to that of the PLP. Howev-
er, one of those mistakes was not
the allegations levied against Mr
Tommy Turnquest. After more than
three years, persons are still calling
Mr Tommy Turnquest corrupt
despite a clear explanation being
given on the matter. Mr Turnquest
was accused of giving an air condi-

tion contract in exchange for a vic-
tory party. The matter I believe-was

further magnified due to the cost of

’ the party. This defamation of char-

acter must .stop. The decision to
grant the contract was not a unilat-

_ eral decision by Mr Turnquest, for it
. was made by Cabinet due to the val-

ue of the contract. In addition to
this, an independent engineering
firm approved the bid finding it to
be advantageous to the government.
In retrospect, Mr Turnquest has also
said that he may not have accepted
the party offer but hindsight is 20/20.
At the time the offer was made, Mr
Turnquest was busily involved in
the leadership election, he had no
idea the party would have been so
lavish costing more than $30,000,
for when it comes to political parties
you think chicken and fish, not lob-
ster and shrimp. Besides all of this,
no one was a fly on the wall to say
that the relationship was a quid pro
quo one. For those who know him
and those who have worked with
him they know Mr Turnquest is an
honest man with integrity and a

strong work ethic. Prior to frontline —

politics he led a very successful
career in the banking field where
many dishonest persons find them-

selves in trouble. He had not a blem- ‘

ish on his reputation. It is sad that
the reputation of such a good man is
being damaged.

Questionable decisions have been
a cloud that has hung over the PLP
from shortly after they were elected.
A book can be written on Sidney
Stubbs alone for the scandals that
surround him. Firstly, in an unpro-
fessional, untactful manner, Mr
Stubbs insulted and wrongfully ter-
minated persons at BAIC. Second-
ly, he had major involvement in the
Korean boat fiasco. In an affidavit
by Mr Mark Stubbs read in the
House of Assembly by Mr Whitney
Bastian MP, Sidney Stubbs was said
to have acted in a questionable man-
ner with a potential investor and Mr
Mark Stubbs, who felt that he had
been “swung” as stated in the affi-
davit. Thirdly, Mr Stubbs was found

to be a bankrupt and for almost 10.

months now has been unable to rep-
resent the people of Holy Cross.
Besides all this, Mr Stubbs was
accused of overspending and wast-



ing BAIC funds, a corporation that
is financially strapped. Mr Stubbs’
political colleague, Mr Leslie Miller,
made strong accusations against him
but they were swept under the car-
pet.

Another person in the PLP who
seems to have become best friends
with controversy is Mr Neville Wis-
dom. Shortly after being elected Mr
Wisdom proudly stood in the House
of Assembly and appeared to be

gloating as he gave a report on Mr.

Dion Foulkes. Ironically, a few
months later Mr Wisdom himself
came under fire for contracts he had
entered into. A large amount of
money was spent on bleachers to
lease them, some of which were nev-
er sat on and foreigners were

~brought in to assemble and disman-

tle the bleachers. Some persons have
said that they have found bleachers
on the internet for a much lesser
cost. Mr Wisdom had bragged that
he would make a $3 million profit
but instead he made a $1.2 million
loss which prompted him to ask:
“What price can we put on culture”.

Despite the fact that important
bills were in need of attention, the
PLP used a sitting of the House to
praise Mr Wisdom for a job that
was poorly done.

Conflict of interest seems to
plague the PLP. Mr Obie Wilch-
combe’s behaviour was questioned
when he appeared to have commit-
ted an act of conflict of interest dur-
ing Christmas 2003 when hams and
turkeys were delivered in Bimini
with a card attached that stated that
they were from Mr Wilchcombe and
Bimini Bay Resort and Casino. It
is my opinion that no Cabinet Min-
ister should have been connected
to a private company in that man-
ner.

Despite his criticisms and standing
up for right in the case of Mr Stubbs,
Mr Leslie Miller himself has had his
share of problems. Case in point,
Mr Miller has rented out space in his
building on Harrold Road to the
government. When the FNM went

on site to protest, they found that

government machinery was being

used to work on the building. Again '

in my opinion this was a blatant
conflict of interest. In addition to
this matter, there is an allegation
about Mr Miller and a female who
accused him of entering her home
and removing items that were gifts
from him. Again it’s my opinion that
that behaviour was befitting-.of a
juvenile delinquent and not one of a
Cabinet Minister.

Hurricanes Frances and Jeanne
came along and luckily for the PLP
took the public’s focus off the
Mohammed Harajchi matter. I
accept the fact that political parties
accept donations, however, I do not
accept being dishonest about it.
Another Bahamian resident by the
name of Mr Harald Fubrmann has
launched a nasty international cam-
paign against the Bahamas, but I
have not heard a call for a revoca-
tion of his residency permit as in the
case of Mr Harachi.

. There was also a scandal involv-
ing allegations levied against Mr
Bradley Roberts, albeit, the alleged
victim has dropped the charges, leav-
ing one to wonder what was the
nature of the relationship between
Mr Roberts and his alleged victim.
In my opinion Mr Roberts’ behav-
iour during the whole ordeal was
one typical of a PLP politician— he
was arrogant and threatening. Mr
Roberts threatened to sue the press
in an effort to muzzle them and as
usual did not want the opposition
to criticise him. I am also disap-
pointed how this matter was han-
died by the Police and the Attor-
ney General. I would hate to think
that if I were raped and reported it
to the police that they would take
three and half weeks to question my
attacker.

There has been much talk lately
on Mr Christie’s Code of Ethics
which the Prime Minister himself
has said does not deal with moral
issues. Does Mr Christie not know
the meaning of the word “ethics”?
The word ethics and morals can be
used interchangeably. This shows
me that Mr Christie’s Code of Ethics
was only a political ploy created to
manipulate the public into thinking
that this “New PLP” is comprised of
the most scrupulous politicians ever
to grace the House and we the pub-
lic should not take it seriously

‘because the PLP hasn’t. From my

perspective Mr Christie has totally
trivialised the mistakes of his col- .
leagues. He stated on the talk show
“Parliament Street” that his gov-
ernment has not made mistakes that
other governments haven’t. He
blamed his colleagues’ misconduct
on the fact that they are human. I
don’t know which governments Mr
Christie is using as comparisons, but
Thave never heard of a government
that has done so much in such
little time. The PLP would like to get
“off the hook” by saying that the
FNM had corrupt members. They
need to use the FNM as an

and remember that when Brent
Symonette was found to have com-
mitted an act of conflict of interest
he resigned. When matters of Gre-
gory Williams, former MP for Bain
Town’s marriage came out to the
public, he resigned as Parliamen-
tary Secretary, never mind this had
nothing to do with his job which he
was doing very well. The PLP has
accused Tommy Turnquest and
Dion Foulkes but when,the PLP
took over the government they did
nothing about it because they found
nothing.

Much shame and disgrace has
been brought to what should be the
Honourable House of Assembly. It
is sad that so much attention has to
be taken off running the country to
deal with government members’
misconduct. Too many press con-
ferences, too many cabinet meet-
ings and too many sittings of the
House had to deal with these mat-
ters. My advice to Mr Christie is to
reshuffle and revamp to form an
effective team so they can get on
with running this country.

TBULLARD
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January 18, 2005..

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005, PAGE 5



New Cuban restrictions prompt

concern

BAHAMIAN tourists were
left wondering today how new
restrictions by Castro’s govern-
ment will affect their leisure
trips to Havana.

For Cubans who work in the
tourism industry are now barred
from having personal contact
with foreigners under regula-
tions introduced by Cuba’s
Communist Party.

According to CNN, the move
is intended to centralise and
strengthen party control of
Cuban society. But, if strictly
_ enforced, it is bound to have an
impact on the growing number
of Bahamians taking long week-
ends in Havana and other
Cuban resorts.

Yesterday, a regular visitor
to Cuba said: “These new regu-
lations are bound to add to the
general discontent down there.
The Cubans are already fed up
over the new currency restric-
tions, which means tourists lose
ten per cent of their money if
they take US dollars.

“These latest rules will make
life even more difficult for them
and deepen the intrigue and
uncertainty that is part and par-
cel of Cuban society.”

Gifts

Resolution 10, issued by the
Cuban Tourism Ministry, for-
bids employees at all levels from
accepting gifts, tips and invita-
tions from foreigners.

And contact with non-
Cubans is restricted to “that
which is absolutely necessary.”

The new law also requires a
witness to be present during
business negotiations with for-
eigners.

Under the new edict, any
non-professional contact with a
foreigner, not just by an
employee but also any member
of his or her family, must be
reported to a superior within 72
hours.

Staff are now required to
report any foreigner whose

behaviour or comments are’
offensive to the Cuban govern-~

ment.

And they have been told to
be “vigilant at all times” to
deeds or attitudes harmful to
the state. The rules also apply to
tourism employees who work
abroad.

Personal friendships with for-
eigners are forbidden for the
“more than 100,000 Cubans who
work in tourism, Cuba’ s largest
industry.

Staff must also refuse all invi-
tations from diplomats, business
associates or even colleagues if

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11:00 Immediate Response

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12:03: Caribbean Today News

12:05 — Immediate Response

1:00 Caribbean Today News

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1:30 This Generation

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10:30 News Night 13

11:00 Baharnas Tonight

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10:00 Treasure Attic
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11:00 MBC Special: From the
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Hi CUBAN President Fidel Castro: The Cuban
government has implemented new restrictions

they are foreigners.

For hundreds of Bahamians -
especially the many men who
take weekend breaks in Cuba -
the new rules could have far-
reaching implications.

One told The Tribune: “It
really depends just how strictly
these rules are enforced. As
things stand, there is a lot of
contact between Cubans and
tourists, especially when it

- comes to the sex trade.

“Does this mean Big Brother
is going to be watching us? You

would have thought an impov- -

erished country like Cuba
would welcome every tourist
dollar it can get instead of mak-
ing life difficult. But that, I sup-
pose, is what communism is all
about.”

Resorts _

‘The. segregation méasures ~
went into efféct last month in’ '

most tourist resorts and will be
introduced into Havana shortly.

Bahamians are now an
important part of Cuba’s
tourism trade, with daily flights
from Nassau to Havana by
Cubana.

It is no secret that “contact”
with Cubans is very much part
of the appeal, with many
Bahamian men visiting Cuba
specifically for female compa-
ny.

Tourism was limited in Cuba
until the collapse of the Soviet
Union, when the country lost
its subsidies from Moscow.

Castro allowed tourism into
Cuba as a necessary evil,
regarding it as a useful source of
foreign exchange. But there
were always fears that it would
have a corrupting influence.

Billy Doadi, sales manager of
Havanatur, “the Cuba Special-
ist”, said at least 5,000 visitors
from the Bahamas travel to
Cuba each year.

Mr Doadi, who just returned
from Cuba a few days ago, said
there are no visible changes in

how Cubans interact with
tourists.

“They are still talking,” he
said, “and the personal relations
are not affected. Cubans are still
friendly and welcoming.
Bahamians shouldn’t worry
about it too much because as
far as I can see there is no dif-
ference.”

He said Cuban workers rely
heavily on tips and would be in
trouble if they had to stop being
as “friendly” to foreigners.

Management
clenies reports

“ THE, management of

_ Jones: Communications yes-
terday strongly denied
reports in a tabloid that
BEC is suing Love 97 radio
for $51,000 because of an
unpaid light bill.

In a statement released on
Thursday chief executive
officer Wendall Jones said:
“The story in substance is
simply not true in three
parts.”

Mr Jones acknowledged
that the radio station is ina
dispute with the corporation
over a balance of $5,401.57,
which BEC claims is the bal-
ance owed on the $25,000
bill for laying a cable to
upgrade the property’s elec-
trical supply. However, this
matter is being dealt with.

On reports that Jones
Communications was grant-
ed a government contract of
$250,000 to produce a book
on Parliament, Mr Jones
said that while the estimated
production of the book
exceeded $250,000 the pro-
duction and printing costs
together totalled $85,000.



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m Bahamian tourists

Mother reports son missing

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - The mother
of an 18-year-old special edu-
cation student reported her
son missing to police on
Wednesday after he failed to
return home on Sunday.

Emerald Bethel, a resident
of 70 Red Hill Close, Mayfield
Park, told police that her son
Tavaris Bethel, a student of
Beacon School, left home
around 8pm on February 27.
He has not been seen or heard
from since.

Mr Bethel, who said that
this is not the first time her
son has left home under these
circumstances, is requesting
the public’s assistance in find-
ing him.

He is described as being
about five feet six inches tall of
medium build. He has a dark
complexion and low hair cut
and was last seen wearing a
white shirt and short blue jean
pants.

H DRUG CHARGES

A 24-year-old Abaco man
was charged Thursday in the
Magistrate’s Court at Coop-
er’s Town with possession of

dangerous drugs with intent to
supply and assaulting a police.
Spring City resident Andrew
Jonuasse appeared before
Magistrate Crawford McKee.
He pleaded not guilty to
charges of possession of 21
small packets of marijuana and
assaulting a police officer dur-
ing his arrest on February 28
while at Spring City, Abaco.
Jonuasse, who was repre-
sented by Godfrey “Pro” Pin-
der, was remanded to Fox Hill
Prison until April 14 for trial.

‘@ FIRE AT EMR

DISPLACES FAMILY

A family of six was displaced
after a devastating fire
destroyed their five room
wooden home at Martin Town,
Eight Mile Rock.

According to Supt Basil

Rahming, Arthur Minnis, his
girlfriend, Cleo Moxey, and
their four children were at
home when the fire erupted
shortly after 10pm on Wednes-

day. They were able to escape -

unharmed.

Ms Moxey told fire officials
that she had got up and gone
into the kitchen to get some

water when she noticed the

fire in an unoccupied room.

“you shop © we ship # 9 seve”

Although firemen were able
to extinguish the flames, the
house was rendered uninhab-
itable as a result of extensive
damage.

Mr Rahmning said the build-
ing had been hooked up to a
neighbour’s electricity supply.
Firemen are still trying to
determine the cause of the fire,

: he said.

@ BOATING ACCIDENT

Two boaters escaped
serious injuries during a
boating accident off South
Bimini.

According to reports,
William Templeman, 76 of
Chicago, Illinois, told police at
Cat Cay that the incident
occurred around 1.50am Tues-
day while he was aboard his
54ft Hatteras vessel named
Empty Pockets.

He said his vessel was
anchored in “pitch blackness”
between Cat Cay and Gun Cay
off South Bimini when. anotb-
er vessel named ‘Tere J’, pilot-
ed by. Juan. Michelena, 65, of
Key. Biscayne, Florida, collided
into the right front section of
his boat, causing $2,000 in
damage.

No one was injured.

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St Andrew’s School, The International School of The Bahamas and authorized
International Baccalaureate World School offers the world-renowned,

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

to year 12 (grade 11) and year 13 (grade 12)

St Andrew’s School invites you to attend an information session on this programme: -

on Wednesday 9 March 2005, at 5:30pm

St Andrew's School, Yamacraw Road

’

In February 2003, St Andrew’s was authorized to teach the International
Baccalaureate Diploma from September 2003. For the first time in the history of The
Bahamas, students now have the opportunity to undertake an extended programme
based on The International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma and our first Diploma students
will graduate in the summer of 2005.

The IB Diploma programme has earned a reputation for rigorous assessment, giving IB
Diploma holders access to the world’s leading universities. The IB Diploma Programme's
grading system is criterion-referenced: each student's performance is measured against
well-defined levels of achievement consistent from one examination session to the next.
The IB Organization has shown, over the course of 30 years, that students are well

prepared for university work.

Contact:

Mrs Sally Varani-Jones
Director of Admissions
Telephone:
Fax:
E-mail:
Web site:

(242) 324 2621
(242) 324 0816

SVarani-Jones@st-andrews.com

www.st-andrews.com





PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Boxing Biminite recalls Hemingway

MORE than 40 years after
he shot himself, the American
novelist Ernest Hemingway
remains an object of fascination
among literary pilgrims to Bimi-
ni.

It was on the tiny island in
the northern Bahamas that
Hemingway, author of Farewell
to Arms and For Whom the Bell
Tolls, used to hold his own at
the bar of The Compleat
Angler Hotel.

Today, though his literary star
has waned, Hemingway is still
remembered by tourists for his
game fishing exploits and phe-
nomenal drinking, which have
all become part of the Heming-
way legend.

And they continue to trek to
the haunts where Hemingway
retains star status more than
four decades after his tragic
death in 1961.

One Biminite with a direct
family link with the writer is
former boxer Yama Bahama,
real name William Horatio But-





“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”



ler, whose brother Herman
once flattened Hemingway in a
Sparring session.

_ Yama, 72, who runs the Bimi-
ni Breeze Bar.and Restaurant in:

a



-—

Alice Town, said his late broth-
ers Herman and Lou were both
locally-known fighters when

’ Hemingway used to visit Bimi-
‘ni in search of marlin and sail-

fish in the 1940s.

“As everyone knows, Hem-
ingway liked to put on the
gloves and fight,” said Yama,
“My. brother Herman agreed to
spar with him one day and
knocked him down.”

The rough-and-tumble life
was nothing new to Heming-
way, whose love of action led
him into a succession of acci-
dents and mishaps which took
their toll on his body.

Survived

He was one of the few men
alive to have survived two plane
crashes in one week - both of
which occurred while he was on
safari in Africa.

Yama said: “People still come
here asking after him. I didn’t
know him personally, because I
was very young when he was
here, but I did know his
younger brother Leicester, who
looked just like him.

“Leicester was a down-to-
earth guy who I liked very
much, but he also killed him-
self, just like his brother.”

If Hemingway remains the
number one celebrity draw in

. Bimini, it’s almost certainly true

that Yama himself is number
two.

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MARCH 6th - 12th 2005
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HOST PASTOR: BISHOP DAVID DAWKINS D.D., J.P.

Location: Greater Bethel Cathedral
Blue Hill Rd South, Faith Way

Tel: (242) 326-7980



Although his brothers bored
strictly at local level, young
Yama made it into the big-time,
becoming the “TV Darling” of
Madison Square Garden dur-
ing an era of top middleweights.

From 1953 until 1968, Yama
put together a record of 103
professional fights - with 87

wins, 13 losses and two draws - -

at a time when the likes of Sug-
ar Ray Robinson, Emile Grif-
fith and Kid Gavilan were in

Title

Boxing first under trainer
Chris Dundee in Miami, then
in New York, Yama fought
most of the best of his day, but
lacked the connections to secure
a world title fight.

Gene Fulmer was reigning
champion at the time, and
Yama is convinced he could
have beaten him, but the oppor-
tunity never came. “Fulmer was
offered $100,000 to fight me, a
lot of money in those days, but
he always said I was too cute.

“Although I had 27 knock-

‘outs on my record, I was really
a scientific boxer, whereas Ful-.
mer was a brawler, and I don’t ©

think he would have got near
me.”

When he hung up his gloves,
Yama returned to Bimini, his
home island, where he took
over the bar which has been his
livelihood éver since.

“TI lost all my trophies and
souvenirs when my place
burned down in 1984,” he told
The Tribune, “but I still have

my memories, and they were |

good times.
“T was blessed because I man-
aged to finish my career with

my head and body in good.

shape. I don’t mumble and I
don’t shake. I wish I could do it
all over again.”

His links with boxing are ten-
uous nowadays. His old friend
Floyd Patterson, former world
heavyweight champion, called
to see him in Bimini some years
ago.

And Muhammad Ali, who
Yama trained with in Miami
shortly after “The Greatest”
won Olympic gold in Rome in
1960, kept in touch for a sons
time.

Now Yama’s fading recollec-
tions of a great boxing era are
going into a notebook which,
he hopes, will one day be trans-
formed into a published auto-
biography.

“T would. like to write my life
story,” he said, “I don’t know
how much longer the Lord will
give me, but I would like to get
it all down on paper before I
go. FF «9,

Of Hemingway, who remains

a hero in Havana, where he.

lived for 20 years, Yama said:

“Tourists still call in asking

about him. They want to know
what he did while he was here.

“But the sons of old fight fans
also call in to ask about me, too.
It’s all a long time ago, but they
still remember me.

“I suppose it was the name
‘Yama Bahama that did it. Many
people in the States didn’t know
where the Bahamas was, but I
used to get little kids in New
York asking me about the place
I came from.

“I guess I was a good adver-
tisement for the Bahamas i in
those days.”

Var



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FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005, PAGE 7





netted

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

A BAHAMIAN woman who
is the product of and a former
participant of extra-marital
affairs, commonly known in the
Bahamas as “sweethearting”,
has branded the type of behav-
iour as an “institutionalised
form of prostitution.”

Phillippa “Lady” Russell, was
a presenter at Tuesday
evening’s session of the
‘Bahamian Forum, which dis-
cussed “Sweethearting in the
Bahamas”. ,

She said that growing up in
Freeport, there were many oth-
er women who measured their
success by material gains, such
as lavish apartments designer
clothes, and top-paying jobs
obtained by having sexual rela-
tionships with powerful men,
who were often married.

“For the most part, sweet-
heart relationships are not
about love and not usually
about sex, although love can
become an end result. The sex is
really used to extract mortgage
payments, car payments, and a
job promotion. Sweethearting
is very economically based,” she
said.

Hedonistic

Ms Russell said that she was a
“a sexually permissive slave of
the hedonistic-culture of her
time” but by the grace of God
she is now totally transformed
in her thought process, she said.

It was not until her father
spoke to her, that she had no
idea that her lifestyle was

’ wrong. She said it was what |

everyone was doing. She accept-
ed that what she was doing was
wrong, when her-fatherchal-
lenged her with the word and
standards of God. Once she was
convinced that the standards of
God was the way to live, she
asked God to shape and remold
her thought processes, which
she said did not happen over-

night.

She strongly feels that the

survival of Bahamians depends
on the success in eliminating the
out-dated though process of
“sweethearting” and the
renewal of minds to a standard

_ LOC:

Hi PHILLIPA ‘LADY’ RUSSELL



earting
is slammed at

was a presenter at the Bahamian Forum.

of sexual fidelity in marriage.
She also feels that a single per-
sons should abstain from sex,

until he or she enters the

covenant of marriage.

She also stated that responsi-
bility for teaching the principles
which assure the successful liv-
ing out of God’s requirement
of marital fidelity rest largely

“On our churches:

“However, far too many
Bahamian churches are guilty
of holding gullible, spiritually
immature wives captive to an
impossibly hectic schedule of
week-night meetings which
result in the destruction of the
family unity, while encouraging
pastoral worship.” said Ms Rus-
sell.

She further explained that the
task of teaching values to our
young people, encouraging men
to love their wives and wives to

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make their homes a welcoming
haven, in which their husbands
look forward to returning, is not
easy, but neither is it impossible.

Marriage

“God who made us would
not have come up with a plan
that is impossible to live out.
Marriage is workable. If we
have the tools, if we have the
commitment to it, it can work.
We have people in this country
who have been happily married
for 50 years, so we have positive
role models,” said Ms
Russell.

It is her.deepest hope and fer-
vent prayer, from her own
authentic. experience, that the
Bahamas as a Christian nation

‘bring an end to the destructive

culturally accepted practice of
“sweethearting”.

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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



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The challenge
of education |
in the Bahamas

@ PART Ill
THE WAY FORWARD

By DION A. FOULKES

OUR country is currently faced
with a multitude of challenges
ranging from. changing interna-
tional trade and financial regimes
to internal social and economic
pressures.

In order to meet these chal- —

lenges we need constantly and
critically to monitor our educa-
tional system. We should ques-
tion whether it is relevant to our
national objectives and, above all,
whether it is effective.

At the-heart of our éducation-
al system is the curriculum. In our
public schools, the curriculum has
been upgraded several times over
the years, but is it accomplishing
the desired results? The curricu-
lum should provide both a well-

rounded educational experience

for the student, and should be
designed to meet the needs of the
nationasawhole.

The job market should largely
determine what is taught in our
classrooms and as that market

’ changes or evolves, we need to

review and, where necessary, alter
the objectives of curricula.

It makes little sense to teach
special fields of study which have
no relevance to the economy and
the overall social and cultural
development of the society. Cur-
ricula should be driven mainly by
the demands of tourism, finan-
cial services, light industry, tech-
nology, agriculture and fisheries.

The FNM Government began
an aggressive consultative process
with the business community to
ensure relevance in our curricula
and I am pleased to note that the
current administration is actively
continuing this initiative.


globalization will continue to chip
away at the concept of national

\



@ DION A. FOULKES

borders. So it is imperative that
we begin to prepare our children
for it. We need to be competitive
not only nationally, but also inter-
nationally. oe
This is one of the reasons why
we should now seek to expand
the Spanish programme in our

schools. It is envisaged that Cuba, -

the Dominican Republic and
Latin America will become more

' significant players in our trading

bloc.

Our ability to attract business
and tourists to the Bahamas from
these neighbouring countries will,
to a large extent, depend on how
competitive we are. Key to that
will be our proficiency in their
language.

I believe that the time has.
come for Spanish instructions to
be expanded to additional grade
levels. This will be a costly exer-
cise, but if we plan for it and
introduce it incrementally, it

- would be less burdensome and

the long-term results would be
beneficial to the country.

LITERACY RATE, ,.,..., - .
‘The levél ‘of literacy’ in ‘our
country is clearly unacceptable



and needs urgent upgrading in
order to improve our competi-
tiveness in the. world.

While I was Minister for Edu-
cation, a survey was conducted
at a particular school regarding
its reading level and was anony-
mously forwarded to the Ministry.
I was shocked at its content and
even more horrified at the
thought that if this was an accu-
rate survey, then our literacy rate
was in deep trouble.

Consequently, we requested
that a general survey of all the
schools be conducted. The results
of this survey should now be
available at the Ministry.

I suspect that this may have
provided.some impetus for the
introduction of the current Edu-
cation Minister’s book club, which
is a commendable effort.

The FNM Government
focused on enhancing the library
systems in schools and in the local
communities, and also introduced
several literacy programmes. One
of the more notable ones was the
“Let’s Read Bahamas” pro-
gramme. We established a read-
ing centre for students and adults
and we strengthened the remedi-
al reading programmes at each .
school. But we need to do much
more. ;

Primary school students should
be required to meet a minimum
reading standard at each grade .
level. Also, all students with defi-
ciencies need to be identified ear-
ly and given attention at the pri-
mary school level.. f

Those students who are now
deficient in reading, whether.at
the primary or secondary level,

‘ ought to be required to take spe-

cial remedial classes while in the
system. This will require that all
language teachers are trained and
retrained to improve their skills.

“4 If,we,want.our children to be

SEE page 10 ©

PUBLIC CONSULTATION
FURTHER PROPOSED MODIFICATION
LICENCE ISSUED 70 CARIBBEAN CROSSINGS LIMITED FOR THE PROVISION OF
- TELECOMMUNICATIONS TRANSMISSION CAPACITY

The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) is pleased to invite comments fram members of

the public and interested parties on its consultation document on the Proposed Modifica-
| tion to Caribbean Crossings Limited's (CCL) Licence for the provision of telecommunica-

tions transmission capacity.

| in aceordance with section 12 of the Telecommunications Act, 1999 (Tel Act) and Condi-
tion 25 of Its Licence, CCL has applied for a modification to its existing Licance to extend |
its existing fibre optic facilities described in its current Licence as Bahamas internet
| Cable System (BICS) to include eight (8) additional segments which will be part of the
| Jamaica Bahamas Cable System (JBCS). JBCS will facilitate the carriage of voice and
| data traffic from Jamaica, through The Baharnas to the USA and beyond, and vice versa.
_ The consultation document contains the PUC’s proposal on issues relating to CCL
| extending its network to become part of the JBCS.

| The main objective of this consultation is to:

oa inform the public and interested parties of CCL’s application for a modification to its
existing licence to extend its Licensed System which will become a part of the JBCS;

(b} suggest the likely benefits of the modification, to consumers; and

(c) obtain information from the public on the advantages and disadvantages of the

requested modification,

Section 6(4} of the Tel Act requires the PUC to process CCL's application in an objective

and nor-diseriminatory manner and consistent with the objectives of the Tel Act and the

| Telecommunications Sector Policy. At the conclusion of this public consultation, the PUC
will issue a Statement on the Results of the Public Consultation.

The public consultation document can be obtained from the PUC’s office located in the:

Agape House at 4th Terrace East, Collins Avenue or downloaded from the PUC's
website at www.PUCBahamas.gov.bs. Written comments should be submitted by Aprit
4th, 2005 via post, hand delivery, facsimile or e-mail to: :

Interested applicants may deliver resumes to:
Executive Director, Public Utilities Commission

4th Terrace East, Collins Avenue
Facsimile: (242) 323-7288
E-mail: PUC@pucbahamas.gov.bs

Applications should be received by 7 December, 2004,





ric TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005, PAGE 9

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has published more than 50 acclaimed books for young people.









PAGE 10, FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005





i PART (2)

HE following is the
second article present-
ed by Amnesty International
Bahamas to examine the prin-

ciples outlined in The Conven- —
tion on the Rights of Children |

that is an international treaty
that recognises the human
rights of children, It establish-
es an international law that
governments must ensure that
all children - without discrim-
ination - benefit from special
protection measures and assis-
tance; have access to services
such as education and health
care; can develop their person-
alities, abilities and talents to
the fullest potential; grow up
in an environment of happi-
ness, love and understanding;
and are informed about and
participate in, achieving their
rights in an accessible and
active manner. The Convention
was adopted into International
Law by the United Nation’s
General Assembly on Novem-



The Convention provides
a universal set of standards

. to be adhered to by all coun-

tries. It reflects a new vision
of the child. Children are
neither the property of their
parents nor are they help-
less object of charity. They
are human beings and are
the subject of their own
rights. The Convention
offers a vision of the child

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CALEB CONARD ROSE, 15

of Macket Street, will be held on
Saturday, 5th March, 2005 at 2pm
at Church of God of Prophecy, East
Street. Officiating will be Bishop
Anthony T. Roker, assisted by
Pastor Gersham Pratt and Minister
Branson Gibson. Interment will
follow at Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road.



Caleb was preceded in death by
his grandparents, Cecil Rose,
Clarissa Rose and Harry Smith. Left
to cherish Caleb's precious
memories are his parents, Ednal
Rose and Connie Smith; sisters, Georgette, Kaygele, Clarissa;
brother, Vardo; step brother, Lemarco; nephews, Vashaan; nieces,
Lavaranique, Petrel; grandmothers, Paula Darville and Louise Rose;
uncles, Jacob, Cecil Jr., Maxwell, Paul, Lynden, Dwight, Phillip,
Brian, Eric, Clement, Kenron, Jerry, Wendell, Walter, Calvin, Bishop
Steve Smith, Reed, Chord, Wrescott, Alexander, Rudolph, Terrance,
Hank, Hector, Sidney, Harry Smith Jr; aunts, Phylis Ruthmae, Dianne,
Edna, Debra, Sharon, Lilymae, Priscilla, Deidre, Alana, Sonia, Marilyn,
Vanria, Flora, Schvonne, Mushima, Rachel, Alfreda, Sherryann,
Eunice, Mildred, Nellie, Thelma, Lana, Hazel, Deborah, Hariette,
Charlene, Hilda, Janet; grand uncles, Rev. Bertram "Gaston"
Armbrister, Elisha Armbrister, Lionel Rose, Kendal Rose, Robert
Rose, George Gardiner, Maurice Mortimer, Franklyn Pratt, Junior
Morley, Bertram Bowe and Rev. Randolph Dorsette; grand aunts,
Curlene A. Dorsett, Alma Kaplan, Alicia Armbrister, Eleanor Armbrister,
Cynthia Mortimer, Gloria Rose Culmer, Patricia Johnson, Pandora
Pratt, Carmelita Williams, Thelma Rose, Cleomi Rose, Ophelia Rose,
Betty Rose; great grand uncles, Leroy Glass, Randolph Dorsett,
Bertram Bowe; great grand aunts, Coralee Sturrup, Keva Farquharson,
Florabell Penn, Myrtis Moncur, Ignes Glass; god parents, Robert
Rolle, Jennifer Wilkinson, Sharon Rose, Jacqueline Clarke McPhee;
cousins, Cyshae, Bjournae, Archie, Cecil Rose Ill, Miaeda, Kellen,
Phylicia,, Bianca, Kara, Chrissy, Phillips, Keisha, Lamar, Matthew
Rose Il, Eric, Darion, Terrell, Madelyn, Lynden Rose Jr., Lynnard,
Nikki, Dimeiko, Jacobi, Shake, Bake, Drexel, Tyrese, Bambadukla,
Rasheeda, Jamal, Isaac and Louise Lightbourne, Cindy, Angela,
Beth, Shanti, Paula, Shakera, Shareed, Virginia, Uti, Virginia, Shantera,
Mira, Empress, Valentera, Ananya, Jennifer, Solomon, Omeka,
Okeisha, Tyrek, Charles Ill, Calvin I, Calvin Ill, Demetrus, Stefano
and Deanglo; a host of relatives and friends that include Bishop and
Mrs Anthony Roker, Pastor and Mrs Pratt, congregation of Coconut
Grove Church of God of Prophecy Tent Ministry, Dr and Mrs Reuben
E. Cooper ur., Mission Baptist Church family, Mr and Mrs Glen
Bowe, Dr. Cyprian Strachan, Dr. Joyous Pickstock, Dr. Robert
Gibson, Bishop Albert Hepburn, Rev. Gladstone Patton, the
community of Holiness Church family, family of Martha "Beneth"
Bain, familly of Margaret Johnson, family of Constance Bowe, Pastor
and Mrs Michael Hinsey,, Mrs Mavis Dean and family, the Dames
family, Jesse Darville and family, the Cox family, the Coleby family,
Mr and Mrs Glen Bowe, Mrs Cynthia Pratt, Deputy Prime Minister
and family, the Pickstock family, Minister Anthony Sands, Mr and

rs Norwood Rolle, Chan Abney, Beverly Taylor and family, Suzimae
Dorsette and family, Karen Butler, the Adderley family, the Rose
family, Cynthia Dean and family, the Armbrister, Josey, Saunders,
King, Ramsey, Deveaux, Lightbourn, Hepburn, McKenzie, Simmons,
Bet el, Butterfield, Sturrup, Mulphy, Romer, Bain, Coakley and
Marshall families of Coconut Grove Community.

will be held at Evergreen Mortuary, Harrold Road on Friday
ion 1 to 6pm and on Saturday from 9am to 12noon and at the
church from 1pm until service time.


















































rtuary.

















eC CO?Nnlve

as an individual and a mem-
ber of a family and a com-
munity, with rights and
responsibilities appropriate
to his or her age and stage of
development. Recognising
children’s rights in this way
firmly sets a focus of the
whole child. Previously seen
as negotiable, the child’s
needs have become legally
binding rights. No longer the
passive recipient of benefits,
the child has become the
subject or holder of rights.

This week will address the
two remaining “guiding prin-
ciples” of the Convention
and they are as follows:

@ 1. BEST INTEREST OF
THE CHILD

The Convention on the
Rights of the Child states
that the best interest of the
child shall be a primary con-
sideration in all actions con-
cerning children, whether
undertaken by public or pri-
vate social welfare institu-
tions, courts of law, admin-
istrative authorities or leg-
islative bodies. In each and
every circumstance and deci-
sion affecting the child, the
various possible solutions
must give due weight to the
child’s best interests. This
approach must be taken in
all cases — even in the cases
where State intervenes
directly in the private con-
text of family life — to ensure
and protect children’s rights.
Legislative bodies must con-

Sider whether laws being

adopted or amended will
benefit children in the best
possible way. In the alloca-
tion of budgets, special
attention should be given to
children’s policies and to the
impact the policies have on
children’s lives. Resources
should be allocated to the

maximum extend possible.
2. PARTICIPATION -

' Participation is one of the ~

guiding principles of the

Convention, as well as one
of its basic challenges. The
principle affirms that chil-
dren are full-fledged persons
who have the right to
express their views in all
matters affecting them and
requires that those views be
heard and given due weight
in accordance with the
child’s age and maturity. It
recognises the potential of
children to enrich decision-
making processes, to share
perspectives and to partici-
pate as citizens and change
agents.

The Convention envisages
a changed relationship
between adults and children.
Parents, teachers, caregivers
and others interacting with
children are seen no longer
as mere providers, protec-
tors or advocates, but also
as negotiators and facilita-
tors. Adults are therefore
expected to create spaces
and promote processes
designed to enable and
empower children to express
views, to be consulted and
to influence decisions.

Bl WHAT STEPS ARE
GOVERNMENTS
‘ ENCOURAGED
TAKING IN REGARDS
TO THE CONVEN-
TION ON THE RIGHTS
FO THE CHILD?

e Develop a comprehen-
sive national agenda for chil-
dren.

e Develop permanent bod-
ies or mechanisms to pro-
mote coordination, monitor-
ing and evaluation of activi-
ties throughout all sectors of
government.

e Ensure that all legisla-
tion is fully compatible with
the Convention.

e Make children visible in
policy development process-
es throughout government

by introducing child inayat

assessments..i)y)

e Carry out ndoanate bud-

get analysis to determine the
portion of public funds spent

Notitication a amore eae

MISS. PAULA

SAMANTHA MURPHY, 35

ontion on
rights of the child

on children and to ensure
that these resources are
being used effectively.

e Ensure that sufficient
data are collected and used
to improve the plight of all
children in the country

e Raise awareness and dis-
seminate information on the
Convention by providing
training to all those involved
in government policy-mak-
ing and working with or for
children.

° Involve civil society —

including children them-
selves — in the process of
implementing and raising
awareness of child rights.

e Set up independent
statutory offices -

THE TRIBUNE.

“}
‘i

e

RP aud ot 2

ed

WEP CR

Sat

hs
ca ade,

ombudspersons, commis=,
sions and other institutions a
to promote children’s rights.”

Although this may seem tos
be a considerable challenges
for our society, to promote;
the rights of children in ours
country will ensure a pros--
perous and stable future for,
all of us. a

Amnesty International hag
in excess of 1.5 million mem--
bers, supporters and sub-
scribers in more than 150;
countries, including the;
Bahamas.

For more information’
about this volunteer group,
please call:'the local chapter
at 327-0807 or visit,
www.amnesty-org. ~ 7

4

Py

8
4
a
i

Challenge of education |

FROM page eight





of Long Bay Cays Andros and
formerly of Eight Mile Rock,
Grand Bahama, will be held on
Saturday, March 05, 2005 at 2pm
at Epiphany Anglican Church,
Prince Charles Drive East. Fr.
Ormond Wright will officiate.

The Radiance of this “Amethyst
of a Gem” will always glow in
the hearts of her:

daughter: Pacara Rahming;

three sons: Sacano and Devontae Rahming and Calvano |

Burrows;
father: Daniel Murphy of Mayguana;

four brothers: Cornell Stuart of Freeport, Blair Glinton, Tyrone |

and Jayon Newbold Sr. of Bradenton Florida;

two aunts: Shirley Newbold and Edna Burns of Freeport:

uncle: Wellington Newbold of Freeport;

nieces and nephews: Nazzma, Naddia, Naamah and Nazeem |

Sturat, Gaynell, Michael, Sanchez, Michaela, Jayon Jr., Mia,
Faheem, Jahseema, Naseem, Jahiem and Nyeema Newbold:
Three Grand Aunts: Augusta Hepburn, Isadora Kelly of Long
Bay Cays Andros and Coralee Longley;

grand niece: Niajnay Glinton;

cousins: Barbara Nixon, Jerome Small, Staff Nurse Karen
Burrows, Leading Seaman Clayton Delaney of the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force, Yontalay, Kim and Walter Hanna,
Laverne, Troy, Judy and Rod Newbold, Francoise Barr, B. J.
and B. K. Burns, Tadnisha, Franquesta, Tamara, Douglas Jr.,
Yves, Yurie, Azurie, Peres, Ryshanda and Roy Burrows Jr.,
Claytino, Okoye and Waltario;

other relatives and friends including: Reverend Roy Sr.,

Mildred and Arlington Burrows, Mr. and Mrs. Kendal Taylor |

of Long Bay Cays, Jane Rolle, Jermaine Glinton, Shevon,

Dion, Jefferey and Prescola Stubbs, Calvin, Olga and Oscar |

Graves, Rose Hanna, Douglas Nixon Sr., Conrad Saunters,

Jean and Geneva Stuart, Rosinell Forbes, Burnell Rolle, Jane :
Sweeting, Brudinell Kelly, Asquit nd Albertha Davis and Vernell |

Lynes.

Arrangements Uniquely Emerald Ridge Mortuary & Monument
Company Ltd.



fully developed, our goal should to be to ensure that all are read- |
ing at their grade level, although they ought to be cneouraped to
read above it.

@ INTEGRATED SYSTEM :
As our national education objectives develop, there should be

increased integration between the primary, secondary and tertiary

schools in the country.

The College of the Bahamas and other tertiary institutions should “};

gear their curricula to the current needs of the society, and these »
should be reflected at the secondary and primary levels.

Under the FNM the College of the Bahamas was transformed into ‘|
a four-year academic institution offering bachelor degrees. Addi-

tionally, the Eugene Dupuch Law School was established. Also, plans /

were well underway to advance COB to university status, offering 1;

both master and doctorate degrees.

# SPORTS DEVELOPMENT

I believe that a closer relationship should be developed between ; :

ture.

laboration with the Ministry of Sports and the sporting federations. :
Our success in sports is to a large degree attributed to the unselfish ;
dedication and commitment of these federations, as well as that of the ‘
coaches and parents.

We should now begin the process of institutionalizing a compre- 1

hensive sports programme in the school system. ;
Given our limited financial resources, we should examine the ben-

the Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Cul- +

Physical education curricula should be developed in close col- F

efits of a “rotation system” apptoadt to physical education and ;}:

sports development.
_. We should identify core sports such as swimming, tennis, volley-

school.

The facilities should be developed in districts in New Providence
and Grand Bahama and, where possible in the Family Islands. These +
should be used by each school on a rotating schedule. :

For example, there are four education districts in New Providence. *
But we need not build a swimming pool for each school to introduce
a swimming programme. Pools should be built in each of these dis- :
tricts and then used by the relevant schools on a rotating basis.

There are already two existing pool facilities in South Beach

| and at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre which can probably

accommodate students in the southwestern and northwestern dis- *
tricts respectively. Therefore, only two additional districts might -
need to be addressed. y

This concept can be applied to the other core sports, and where *

" ball, basketball, softball, baseball and track and field, and then set af
minimum requirement for the ‘children’s participation while ‘in ‘}

there are no existing facilities then obviously they should be con- #
structed to take into account the anticipated expansion of the school ;}

system.

The Blue Hill Road sporting complex was a good example of inno- : :
vation in the development of sports, and is a model that should be re- *
introduced and expanded. This complex offered extracurricular -}}

sporting activities such as tennis, golf and racquetball to public
school students who might not ordinarily have had access to them.

Also, it undoubtedly provided social outlet for these children that pos- 4

itively influenced their overall development.

Space does not permit an extensive discussion but cultural devel- ’
opment needs the same dedicated focus and, again, it must be -.

addressed in a comprehensive manner. It should focus on the per- ‘|:

forming arts, music, junkanoo, and arts and crafts.
Apart from its economic potential, cultural development is nec-

essary to provide a better quality of life for our citizens and partic- ;f

ularly wholesome pursuits for our youth.

fi CHURCH SCHOOLS

Church-operated schools have played a major role in the delivery F |

of education in the Bahamas for many years. The financial grants i
awarded by the past and present governments have been given to‘
assist these schools in defraying the cost of their teachers’ salaries. The +
extended benefit is that it effectively results in more affordable fees ,}

being charged by the private schools.

The FNM Government focused on increasing funding to these +f

schools very early in its term and as a result, many individuals, par-°;}
ticularly single parents benefited. Grants to church operated schools ‘f

were increased from $2.9 million in 1992 to $7.4 million in 2001.

I am told that consideration is being given to reducing grants to }

some church schools. If this is true I would urge the government not *}
to pursue this course because it would adversely impact the delivery \}

and the cost of education in our country.

The government should continue the FNM’s policy of incre-
mental grants to church schools and they should certainly revisit any ,}

decision to revoke completely the funding of any school.

UPKEEP OF SCHOOLS

In order to ensure the continued safety and comfort of the stu- é

dents, teachers, administrators and support staff, an aggressive main-
tenance programme should be continued. The FNM Government on

an average spent $3 million a year for the maintenance of schools. As *
our schools get older and new ones are added, this number will -}

necessarily increase.

@ FULL TIME MINISTER

I do not subscribe to the view that Education needs to be a stand ‘

Â¥

alone ministry; however, I do believe that if it is not a separate min-
istry, it ought to be combined with departments that are compatible -
with it, and include areas that would permit a complete integration '}

of its functions, such as Youth, Sports and Culture.
The current combination of the Ministry

of Education, and Attor- ;

ney General and Minister of Justice being assigned to one individual *
is just not working. Clearly, the Ministry of Education is being ‘
neglected based on the observations previously made, and as I said ::

earlier, education deserves better.

In this three part series I have attempted briefly to present the «'
FNM Government’s accomplishments in education, take a critical ;
look at the PLP Government’s performance in education to date, and ‘

to present some of my ideas for education in the future.

Education is a process through which an individual can achieve his

or her life’s goals and it ought to continue throughout life. If we :

neglect it at any stage, it would be to our detriment as individuals and

would also retard national development.





JHE TRIBUNE



The College of the Bahamas is now taking definite and well-considered steps towards
becoming a university. An important part of the process is the revision of The
College’s Strategic Plan. To guide the review and recommendations, the President
has established the nine task forces, with requisite charges, that are listed below.
If you are interested in giving input, write us a brief letter indicating the task force
on which you wish to serve and what skills you would bring to the exercise. Please
attach a current resume. Kindly note that for many practical reasons, including
efficiency, task force memberships must be limited, so if you wish to be considered,
please send in your request NOW.

Deadline for Response March 11, 2005

For further information or delivery of letters and resumes: ~
Office of Research, Planning & Development

Rm 117, Administration Building

' Oakes Field Campus

- Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone: 302-4308

Fax: 323-7803

1. Task Force for Educational Technology

_ Charges: (a) identify and assess present conditions in the area of technological
support for the enhancement and expansion of instructional and other academic
programmes, as well as administrative and support units, (i.e. computer technology
in offices, classrooms, laboratories, campus connectivity, and internal capability and
usage); (b) determining criteria to be used to access, implement, expand or enhance
technological support for all assessed areas; (c) analyze and assess maintenance and
personnel needs relative to maintaining a premier status of technology; and (d) review
the status of the College Technology plan and provide direction for developing the
_ scope and breadth of a University Technology Plan with components necessary for
its expansion and completion. Concrete plans should be developed for strengthening
.the link between the University and all satellite and residential campuses.

2. Task Force for Imaging for International Culture and Global Outreach

Charges: Examine the College’s current position in the international community;
and develop a plan to move the perception of The College to that of nationally and
internationally recognized prestigious university.

The group will analyze all College procedures and practices relative to its charges
as they relate to recruitment and admission of students; recruitment and appointment
of administrators, faculty and staff in order to advance the University’s diverse
complexion. Additionally, the task force should present plans for identifying
scholarship, talent, athletic competitions and civic and social opportunities for students
- designed to.market and promote the College/University as an institution that is
receptive and responsive.to serving a multicultural and multicultural and multiracial

student population.

3. Task Force for Administrative Efficiency and Effectiveness

‘Charges: Present and assess the executive and managerial operations in various
areas such financial aid and ‘scholarships; the registration and graduation processes
with specific focus on the freshman; transfer and continuing student registration
procedures; student accounts procedures; administrative computing services; requisition
and purchases; processes for decision-making; the development of plans designed
to engage The College in total quality control; and organizational and staff development
so structure that it ensures that administrative efficiency and effectiveness permeate
the College/University community. Additionally, this group is charged with analyzing
_and assessing the delivery of services to students and potential students in the areas
of financial aid, recruitment and admissions and student accounts procedures. The
Task Force report should clearly delineate criteria recommended for updating,
upgrading and expanding programmes and services including technology, training
and organizational design.

4. Task Force for Facilities

Charge: a) Present and assess current conditions of physical facilities such as office

and classroom buildings, residential halls (dormitories); classroom and office space :
allocation and utilization, renovations; and athletic and extramural structures; b) :
examine and develop capabilities of the physical facilities affected by such variables }
as the expanded role of technology, the design trends of office equipment, the :
implementation of interactive and virtual classrooms, and designs and desired ;
: plans of the College/University from the apexcen S units should be received and

ambience; and c) projecting future needs in facilities.

Capital construction and renovations for programmes, in light of enrollment }
management, changing foci of scholarship-service-teaching, continuing professional
development, and creating an optimum educational environment for students, faculty ;

9. Task Force for The Bahamas Higher Education Act

and staff are key areas which will impact the development, expansion and enhancement
for future facilities.

Criteria should be developed for assessing and evaluating optimum use of facilities
and the need for future construction and renovation. The task force report should
reflect comments from the College/University community relative to plans for }
: Body for final review and approval of all newly proposed academic programmes;
: and to establish a self-governing University of The Bahamas under a duly appointed
: Board of Trustees. The government, control, conduct, management and administration
: of the University shall be vested in the Board of Trustees. All current and future

facilities.

‘5. Task Force for Research

opportunities in the institution b) recommend structures for the organisation and |
conduct of research in the University of The Bahamas c) draft policies for i) the :
conduct of research in the University of The Bahamas ii) the establishment and :
implementation of an Institutional Review Board ii) Consulting iii) Awards iv) }

Training and the Use of Resources v) Animal and Human Welfare vi) the Environment }

FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005, PAGE 11

University

vii) Collaboration with Government and International Researchers/Agencies d)Review
the relationship among the several entities, including the Field Stations, engaged in
research activities and recommend the relationship and policies i in the University of
The Bahamas e) Recommend the role of the university in coordinating research
activities within the country. .

6. Task Force for Student Body

Charges: Examine current conditions of student life as they relate to recruitment
and admissions procedures, scholarship opportunities, student retention, student
organisations and on-campus activities, career placement, and graduate and professional

schools preparation. Additionally, I would like for you to analyze the academic
support programmes available to students and advance, through your Task Force
report, any recommended revisions and Suggestions,

7. Task Force for Academic Programmes

Charges: Conduct a programme review of current seadennic offerings and to ranké
an assessment with recommendations of maintaining or strengthening those that
contiriue to be mission-wise appropriate and developing or creating those that reflect -
the vocational needs of an ever changing society. The University of The Bahamas
cannot and should not try to be all things to all people. The University will offer
graduate and professional degrees up to the doctorate level, but it cannot afford to
be a large research institution offering doctoral degrees in multiple fields. Likewise,
the University of The Bahamas cannot and should not try to offer every undergraduate
degree imaginable. What the University of The Bahamas will do, however, is to
determine what role and influence it wants to exert in the 21st century and identify
those programmes and Centres of Excellence (Institutes) that meet the goals of the
University and the nation and in which the University can excel; i.e. the Marine and
Environmental Studies Institute, and International Languages Institute, a Culinary
and Hospitality Management Institute, and a Bahamas Technical and Vocational
Institute. It is my judgment that every one of our academic offerings should be
outstanding, good or phased out.
Capital construction and renovations for programmes, in light of enrollment
management, changing foci of scholarship-service-teaching, continuing professional
development, and creating an optimum educational environment for students, faculty,
and staff are key illustrations of areas which will impact the development, expansion
and enhancement for future facilities.

Specifically, the Task Force should determine whether programmes/departments and
curricular offerings (undergraduate, graduate and continuing education) one outstanding,
good, targeted for elevation to bachelors or masters levels, or targeted for phase-out
in light of multiple criteria. These criteria include adequate student enrollment, the
relationship to projected trends and occupational demands for the 21st. Century,
unquestionable scholarship, and service contributions of programmes and curriculum,
along with current and future projections for grants and contracts.
Deliberations should also include an analysis of the current structure of departments,
schools and/or colleges. If modifications, restructuring, or consolidations seem
warranted, the appropriate recommendations should be advanced through the task
forces report.

Additionally, this Task Force should present a student/faculty ratio report for each
academic unit and/or department and recommend revisions deemed appropriate.
These revisions should also take into consideration the current state of affairs in
higher education and projected trends for the 21st century. Finally, this task force
is expected to make recommendations regarding: goals for the percentage of earned
doctorates that each unit should aspire to and methods of achieving those goals.

:. The Task Force may also present innovative recommendations for any other aspect

of academic affairs that it deems appropriate. All recommendations should be
immediately followed by a realistic proposal as to where the resources my be secured
to implement the recommendations.

8. Task for Finance

Charges: (a) examining all current fiscal resources and allocations in the respective

' budget units; (b) assessing current and future financial practices with the overall goal

of using the best policies and procedures to enhance fiscal effectiveness; (c) identifying
new or alternate fiscal resources such as corporate and individual gifts, grants,

: contracts, scholarships and fellowships, tuition, fees, and endowments in light of

plans articulated by the task forces on Academic Programmes, Facilities and Student
Body. Specific plans should be developed to ensure that the fiscal infrastructure and
logistical procedures and operations are understood and implemented by all respective
budget unit heads and appropriate staff. Criteria should also be enumerated for
periodic assessments of fiscal resources. Funding plans and unit program development

included in the task force’s report.

Charges: Examine the current state of affairs pertaining to higher education throughout
The Commonwealth of The Bahamas and to design the mission, goals and objectives
of a national higher education coordinating board; to bring into existence a Accrediting

properties used by the University shall be vested under control of the Board of
Charges: a) Identify and assess the current and future research capabilities and :

Trustees.

The draft act shall stipulate in clear language that the Act is meant to establish the
University and that the Board is obligated to establish Bye-laws designed for the
governing of the University though its respective administrative officers.



Visit our website at www.cob.edu.

—_
D





PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005 THE TRIBUNE



FRIDAY EVENING MARCH 4, 2005

| 7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30 |

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USA lonk Gets Stuck |An actress is suspected of having Detectives hunt for the sadist who json Finale) (N) (CC)
in Traffic” an affair with a teen. (CC) tortured an old woman.

* & & SOUL FOOD (1997, Comedy-Drama) Vanessa |VH1 Special 0,
VH1 L. Williams, Vivica A. Oe Nia Long. 1 ,

Home Improve- | * *% ROCKY V (1990, Drama) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire, Burt _ /WGN News at Nine © (CC)
WGN ment “Oh, Broth- | Young. The former champ agrees to train a rising young fighter. O (CC)

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Everybody /WhatiLike |WhatI Like |Reba Reba ques-/Blue Collar TV |WB11 News at Ten With Kai
WPIX [Loves Raymond|About You |About You 1 tions her deci- [Sports 1 (CC) Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
“Ray's Ring” —_—|(CC) (CC) sion. (CC) 1& Mr. G (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) {America’s Next Top Model Contes-/ America’s Next Top Model Contes-|Dr. Phil
WSBK (cc) tants = how the show has __|tants arrive in Los Angeles to meet
. changed their lives. 1 (CC) supermodel Tyra Banks.

PREMIUM CHANNELS

ee x % MAL-| * &4 THE DEVIL'S ADVOCATE ( 997, Horror) Keanu Reeves, Al Pacino, Charlize Theron.|Unscripted

HBO-E |(BU'SMOST —_|Anattorney goes to work at a law firm run by Satan, 0 'R’ (CC) Bryan retums to
WANTED (2003) Los Angeles. 1
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HBO-P |THEGOOD — |Camp” Bullock returns to camp a dren” Riders arrive with a vaccine. |Daughters” A meeting is called to
THIEF (2002) © |changed man. O (CC) N (CC) set up an informal govemment.

% MILLENNIUM (1989, Science Fiction) Kris Kristofferson, Cheryl | * * MALIBU'S MOST WANTED (2003, Comedy)
HBO-W |Lada, Daniel J. Travanti. An unusual device is found in the wreckage of a |Jamie Kennedy. A white politician hires black actors to
downed jet. © ‘PG-13' (CC) kidnap his son. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC)

:00) & %&% FRENCH KISS (1995, Comedy) Meg |Sex and the City/Sex and the City) * * 50 FIRST DATES (2004, Ro-
HBO-S f “A Vogue Idea” |Mr. Big is leaving |mance-Comedy) Adam St
0 (CC) town. Drew Barrymore. ( ‘PG-13' (CC)
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yan, Kevin Kline, An American woman crosses paths
ern THE) (:15) % % %& THE RUNDOWN (2003, Adventure) The Rock, Seann tok MEN IN BLACK (1997, Sci-
MAX-E [HEIST (1989) | Wiliam Scott, Rosario Dawson. A bounty hunter must find his boss's son jence Fiction) Tommy Lee Jones,
(CC) in the Amazon. 11 ‘PG-13' (CC) Will Smith. ‘PG-13' (CC)

with a smamy French thief. ‘PG-13' (CC)

(:00) % %% S.W.ALT. (2003, Action) Samuel L. Jack- )% % NEVER DIE ALONE (2004, Suspense) DMX, — |HOT LINE: SUL-
MOMAX son, Colin Farrell. ALos Angeles SWAT team must [David Arquette, Michael Ealy. An aspiring writer leams |TRY NIGHTS

protect a criminal. ‘PG-13' (CC) about a drug dealer. 1 ‘R’ (CC) (1995) ‘NR’ (CC)

00) #9» IT RUNS IN THE FAMILY (2003) Michael | % x JEEPERS CREEPERS 2 (2003, Horror) Ray Wise, Jonathan Breck,

Available at




















°325.WOOD

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The Tribune & Solomon’s Mines

FIRST Tir : |
$150.00 GIFT BAS a ry ar ate - BASKET
In Each Age Group bee ou Lhd Gees holhidalg

eso oe

1. Children ages 4-5, 6-8, and 9-10. Staff iebets ahd see are not eligible to eaten

2. Coloring may be done with crayons. Adults or older child may assistthe child in filling out the entry form, BUT NOT IN COLORING THE ENTRY.

3. Enter as.much times as you wish. All entries must be in The Tribune by 4pm on Monday, March 21st, 2005. Winners will be announced Wednesday,
March 23, ZOOD5. Look for your names in The Tribune or listen to 1OOJAMZ / JOY FM to hear your name.

4, There will be one first- -prize winner, one second-prize winner and one third-prize winner in each age groups.

5. All enlace: become the property of The Tribune and may be used for any purpose nebang but not limited to, pevicanent in a future issue.

Ne PHOTOCOPIES. iS NEWSPAPER AD ONLY"

Child’s Name: ; Parent/Guardian Signature



Address:





PAGE 14, FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005



















1 tions call 3564






AR OUND





Parties, Nightclubs
& Restaurants



Official Kalik Relaunch Party on Saturday, March
5 @ Arawak Cay. Come and celebrate with a huge
FREE party featuring 3 for $5 Kalik. Performances
by Ira Storr, Nita, Funky D, Spice, Terez Hepburn,
Visage, the Extra Band and KB. '

Annual DJs Boat Cruise on Friday, March 4 on
the Island Link, 8pm. Tickets $15 advance, $20 at the
boat. Special appearances by Platinum and Renais-
sance Models.

Miriam & Remix Birthday Bash on Friday, March
4 on board the Calypso I. Boarding 7.30pm, boat
leaves at 8.30pm. Tickets $20 advance, $25 at the
boat. Price includes food and drinks.

Exotic Saturdays @ Fridays Soon Come starts this
weekend with 3 for $10 drink specials. Admission:
$10 before 12 and $15 after. Ladies free before 11pm.

Da Greasy Pit (Omega Psi Phi Steak-out) on Sat-
urday, March 5 @ West Bay St and Perpall Tract, 12-
6pm. Proceeds in aid of the Bahamas Red Cross
Society and the Omega Psi Phi (Pi Xi Chapter)
Community Centre Building Fund.

Rave Saturdays @ The All New Club Eclipse. DJ
Scoobz spinning the best in Old Skool. Admission
$35, all inclusive food and drink.

Fever @ Bahama Boom, Elizabeth St, downtown,
Fridays. The hottest party in the Bahamas every
Friday night. Admission $10 before midnight. First 50
women get free champagne. First 50 men get a free
Greycliff cigar. Dress to impress. For VIP reserva-





gs is back with a Conscious Party @
e, Charlotte St North every Friday.

‘Classic reggae style music. Admission $10.

Mellow Moods every Sunday @ Fluid Lounge
and Nightclub, Bay St, featuring hits from yesterday
— old school reggae and rockers downstairs, and
golden oldies upstairs. Admission: Free. Doors open
9pm.

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters Sports
Bar. Drink specials ail night long, including karaoke
warm-up drink to get you started. Party, 8pm-until.

Karaoke Nights @ Fluid Lounge and Nightclub.
Begins 10pm every:Tuesday. Weekly winners select-
ed as Vocalist of the Week — $250 cash prize. Winner
selected at end of month from finalists — cash prize
$1,000. Admission $10 with one free drink.

_ Reggae Tuesdays @ Bahama Boom. Cover charge
includes a free Guinness and there should be lots of
prizes and surprises. Admission: Ladies $10 and
Men $15.

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports
Bar every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers
and numerous drink specials.

Flash Nights @ Club Fluid every Thursday. The
ultimate Ladies Night. Join Nassau’s and Miami
Beach’s finest men. Ladies only before 11.30pm with
free champagne. Guys allowed after 11.30pm with
$20 cover.

The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday. Doors
open at 9pm, showtime 11.30pm. Cover charge $15.
$10 with flyer.

Twisted Boodah Bar & Lounge every Friday @
Cafe Segafredo, Charlotte St North, featuring world
music, chillin’ jazz and soulful club beats. Starting at
6pm. Beers $3, longdrinks $4.50.

Fantasy Fridays @ Fluid Lounge, featuring late
‘80s music in the VIP Lounge, Top of the Charts in
the Main Lounge, neon lights and Go Go dancers.
Glow sticks for all in before midnight. Admission:
Ladies free before 11pm, $15 after; Guys $20 all

night.

College Night @ Bahama Boom every Friday.
Admission: $10 with college ID, $15 without.

‘event





the
main

‘Diarn









of Souls’



RATED: B



TICKETS,
HEAVEN SENT PHARMACY
TONY'S CABINETS
BUNDAS BOX OFFICE

PH: 393-3728

A
TRACK ROAD THEATRE
PROP UOCTEON

PONSOREDR BY: —





DIARY of Souls, a deama written and directed by Dr Ian Strachan, playwright and chair of
COB’s School of English Studies, opens this Friday.

It is a fictional interpretation of tragic events that took place in Exuma in J uly 1990, and is
considered by some to be Strachan’s best play yet. When intercepted by the Defence Force,
a Haitian vessel allegedly capsizes. The 39 Haitians who drowned were buried in a common

grave on Bitter Guana Cay.

Strachan’s Track Road Theatre will bring this story to the stage in an emotionally powerful
account, says an online review. The play switches frequently between the beach on Bitter Gua-
na Cay, where three Haitians are stranded as “undead” between feeling neither life nor
death, and a psychiatrist’s office where a Bahamas Defence Force marine is being treated for

psychological trauma.

Strachan also lets his characters investigate the heart of the matter, the source of Haitian dis-
tress — Was it the series of despots following Toussaint Ouverture that impoverished the beanu--

| tiful country? Was it the brutality of “Papa Doc” Duvalier and his private militia,'the Tons-

‘Tons Macoute that broke the spit of a nation? Why do Bahamians shun and degpisé Baas

| treating them like.dirt?.. |...



Diary of Souls opens at the Dundas Conive for the Performing Aris on Friday night @ 8pm.
Tickets are $25 (opening night only). Showtimes continue on Saturday and Sunday, then
continues on March 11 and 12 at a cost of $20 (same time). Tickets can be purchased at the Dun-
das box office from 10am till 4pm, Heaven Sent Pharmacy and Tony’s Cabinet Supplies.

Dicky Mo’s Fridays @ Cable Beach. Happy Hour
- 3 for $10 mixed drinks and $1 shots.

Greek Saturdayz @ Bahama Boom, Elizabeth



‘Ave. Every Saturday the Phi Beta Sigma Frat wel-

comes greeks, college grads and smooth operators.
Admission $15 all night, $10 for greeks in letters.
Music by DJ Palmer, security strictly enforced.

Chill Out Sundays @ The Beach Hut, West Bay

Street with fresh served BBQ and other specials...

starting from 4pm-10pm, playing deep, ee chill
moods with world beats. Cover $2.

Sweet Sunday Chill Out Soiree Lounge, every
Sunday, 4pm-midnight @ Patio Grille, British Colo-
nial Hotel.

Wet Sundays, every Sunday, noon-midnight @
Crystal Cay Beach. Admission $10, ladies free.

Carib Scene @ Club Fluid every Sunday. A night
of Caribbean, Latin and Reggae flavours for all
audiences. Latin Flair in the VIP Lounge; Old School
Reggae and Soca in the Main Lounge. Ladies in
free before 11pm. $10 after 11pm. Men, $15 cover

' charge.

Jay Mitchell and Hot KC @ Palm Court Lounge,
British Colonial Hilton, MAS 8pm-
12am.

Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley’s Restaurant &
Lounge, Eneas St off Poinciana Drive. Featuring
Frankie Victory at the key board in the After Dark
Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to midnight. Fine food
and drinks.

Paul Hanna performs at Traveller’s Rest, West
Bay St, every Sunday, 6.30pm-9.30pm.

‘The Arts
Ian Strachan’s Diary of Souls, the critically

acclaimed play examining the Haitian experience
in the Bahamas, will open at the Dundas Centre







for the paiienine Arts on Friday, March 4 and
continue through March 6, 8pm. And again on
Friday, March 11 and Saturday, March 12, 8pm.
Call the box office at 393-3728 for ticket info.
Tickets for Friday’s performance are $25, remain-
ing shows are $20.

Indigo, a film about gifted children on earth,
their purpose and work of healing, peace and
love, will be shown @ Unity Centre of Light, East
Ave, Centreville (directly behind Centreville Food
Store) on Friday, March 4, starting at 6.30pm.
Admission $10 adults, $7 children. For more infor-
mation call 328-1325.

A Fabric Printing workshop will be held on
Saturday, March 5 and March 12, from 10am -
1pm at the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas.
The workshop is part of the NAGB’s Youth
Workshop series and is for children between the
ages of 12 and 18. Joie Lamare of Bahama Hand-
prints will be conducting the workshop. Cost: $10
members/$16 non-members. Call the gallery at
328-5800/1 to register.

Reading and Lecture by Dr Joanne Hyppolite,
award-winning author of children’s literature, will
deliver a lecture and reading on Monday, March
7, 6pm @ Choices Dining Room, College of the
Bahamas School of Hospitality and Tourism Stud-
ies.

The National Collection @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, an exhibition that takes
the viewer on a journey through the history of

. fine art in the Bahamas. It features signature.

pieces from the national collection, including
recent acquisitions by Blue Curry, Antonius
Roberts and Dionne Benjamin-Smith. Gallery
hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 1lam-4pm. Call 328-
5800 to book tours.

Past, Present and Personal: The Dawn Davies
Collection @ the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, Villa Doyle, West and West Hill Streets.
The exhibition is part of the NAGB’s Collector’s
Series. Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 1lam-4pm.
Call 328-5800 to book tours.





THE TRIBUNE

NASSAU



The Awakening Landscape: ‘The Nassau Water: :
colours of Gaspard Le Marchand Tupper, from. §
the collection of Orjan and Amanda Lindroth @°

the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas. The

mid-nineteenth century paintings that make up the &

exhibition are part of one of the earliest suites of

paintings of Nassau-and its environs. Tupper was. :
a British military officer stationed at Fort Char-: 8
lotte in the 1850s. The works show a pre-mod- §

erm Bahamas through the decidely British medium

of watercolour. Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday,

11am-4pm. Call 328-5800 to book tours.



Health

_ The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at i

5.30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at ‘f

+ their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville. Call’
323-4482 for more inte:

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third

Monday every month, 6pm 2 Doctors Hospital con-
ference room.

The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2.30pm (except August and Decem-
ber) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley
Street.

Doctors Hospital, the official training centre of the
American Heart Association offers CPR classes cer-
tified by the AHA. The course defines the warning
signs of respiratory arrest and gives prevention strate-
gies to avoid sudden death syndrome and the most

common serious injuries and choking that can occur

in adults, infants and children. CPR and First Aid

’ classes are offered every third Saturday of the month

from 9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Com-
munity Training Representative at 302-4732 for
more. paforyiats nd learn to save a life today.



- REACH Résourtes & Education for Autism
and related Challenges meets from 7pm — 9pm the
second Thursday of each month in the cafeteria of
the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.



Civic Clubs

The Bahamas Historical Society’s monthly
meeting is scheduled for 6pm on March 17 at the
Museum on Shirley Street and Elizabeth Avenue.
Dr Donald Hopkins of the Carter Presidental
Center, a descendent of Long Island, Harbour
Island and Abaco, will give a presentation entitled
“Posing Questions, Pondering Records and Prob-
ing the Genes: Researching Family Histories in the
Bahamas.” The public is invited to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1905 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm @
BEC Cafe, Tucker Rd. Club 9477 meets Friday,
7pm @ Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm

A19, Jean St. Club 3956 meets. Thursday, 7.30pm @ 3 1
British Colonial Hilton. Club 1600 meets Thursday,

8.30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes. Club 7178 meets

Tuesday, 6pm @ The J Whitney Pinder Building, ff

Collins Ave. Club 2437 meets every second, fourth
and fifth Wednesday at the J Whitney Pinder Build-

ing, Collins Ave at 6pm. Club 612315 meets Monday:

6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega

chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ the
Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first

Tuesday, 7pm @ Gaylord’s Restaurant, Dowdeswell §

St. Please call 502-4842/377-4589 for more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second
Tuesday, 6.30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office, °§

4th floor meeting Toom.

The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council

(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month in
the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, Bay St.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets
the second and fourth Wednesday of the month,
8pm @ St Augustine’s Monestary.



Send all your civic and social events to The Tri-
bune via fax: 328-2398 or e-mail: outthere@tribune-
media.net

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PAGE 16, FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005

LOCAL NEWS

Pith 6b tie



FROM page one

ington, DC.

Although he met with rep-
resentatives of the US State
Department, Mr Mitchell said
that there had been no need
to discuss the report, which he
said simply “recites facts in the
public domain with regard to
the prison, the judiciary and
the conduct of our national
institutions.”

Mitchell

Under the headline:
“Human Rights Violations”
The Tribune reported on
Wednesday that according to
the State Department’s annu-
al report, the Bahamas is
guilty of human rights
infringements.

The report said that in 2004
there were reports of beatings

and unlawful killings by police
officers, allegations of abuse
of migrants, and “harsh”
prison conditions.

It also said that violence
against women continued to
be “a serious widespread
problem,” and that discrimi-
nation against homosexuals
“was evident” in the Bahamas.

The minister spoke out
against the comments made by

human rights activist attorney



’

BUSINESS DIRECTORY IN PRINT AND ONLINE

BAHAMAS GOLDEN PAGES DIRECTORY DELAY

Bahamas Golden Pages would like to apologise to its customers —
for the delay in the distribution of its much anticipated 2005
Directory. Technical . difficulties beyond the control of the
company have resulted in this unforeseen delay.

The 2005 edition is now expected to arrive in Nassau at the end
of this month at which time commercial and residential distribu-
tion will commence immediately. This edition will again excel in
quality, innovation and unprecedented value for advertisers.

As always, however, our 2005 edition is published and avail-
able on our standard setting website, www.bahamasgp.com
giving worldwide, year-round exposure to all of our advertisers.

To lend further value to our advertisers we are the only Bahamian
Directory accessible through the well-known North American por-
tal, www.yellowpagecity.com, opening up: even more avenues to

our advertiser base.

Our Sales & Marketing Consultants are
available at 242-394-7988 for assistance
with your advertising needs.

Again we would like to thank you, our valued customers, for your
patience and understanding during this time.





FLIGHT SCHEDULE:
DAYS: Sunday, Monday, Wednesday & Friday

Providenciales to Nassau
Flight # RU401 departs 10:00am
Arrives in Nassau 11:30am

7-day advance purchase return tickets as low as
Call Destinations at 393-6900 or Premier Travel at 328-0264 for reservations and ticketing

KYKING





Nassau to Providenciales
Flight # RU400 departs 12:30pm
Arrives in Providenciales 2:00pm

The way to fly in the TC! and beyond

Fred Smith who is quoted in
the story as calling the human
rights record of the Bahamas
“abysmal.”

He said it seemed that the
story “conveniently forgot to
point out that nowhere is there
an attack on the institutions
of government in the sense
that they are accused of being
ineffective or corrupt.”

Mr Mitchell acknowledged
that the Bahamas is challenged
by a number of issues, includ-
ing problems at the prison.

“Who has tried to hide
them?” he asked, pointing out
that steps are being taken to
address these issues.

Mr Mitchell said that a sim-
ilar human rights report could
be made on any country with-
out leading to the conclusion
that such behaviour is official-
ly sanctioned by that country’s
government.

He pointed out that
although a group of Bahami-
ans are currently alleging mis-
treatment at a correctional
facility in the US, no one is
claiming that it is the policy
of the US government.

Mr Mitchell said that in
open and transparent societies
like the Bahamas and the US,
such claims can be investigated
and addressed if found to be
true.

The minister said that while
in the US capital, his delega-
tion held meetings with vari-
ous parts of the legislative
branch of the US government.

These included a meeting
with Idaho Senator Tom
Harking, who has been visiting
the Bahamas frequently since
1969 and is the owner of a res-

. idence in Abaco.

The minister said the dele-
gation also met with Florida
Senator Bill Nelson to discuss
matters-of mutual interest,
including the situation in Haiti
and the-fight against drug traf-

. ficking:

Mr Mitchell said these issues
were also discussed at a lunch

’ with 16 members of Florida’s

congressional delegation.

He said that joint efforts for
natural disaster relief were
also raised at the lunch.

Mr Mitchell thanked US
Ambassador to.the Bahamas
John Rood for organising the
meetings, and Bahamas
Ambassador to Japan and to
UNESCO, Sir Sidney Poitier,
who accompanied him on the
Visit.

°299

departure taxes included





Available on
Sesame Seed
Bun Only

oon

Pm lovin’ it

FROM page one

trators with grades 1-4.”

At the moment Family
Island Administrator, senior
deputy administrator, deputy
administrator and assistant
administrator are the titles
used.

“We feel that does not
make real good sense, because
they do not deputise or assist
anyone, and they all have
their own districts and I feel to
call a man who is in charge an
assistant administrator does
not make practical sense.”

In addition, he said, gov-
ernment hopes to change the
local government legislation
so that officers can be
removed from office before
the end of their term if neces-
sary.

“We feel that if a selected
official does not behave in
accordance with the expecta-
tions of the majority of the
council who selected him, they
should be able to remove him
by a majority vote and in the
law today, that is not
allowed.”

He said another crucial
amendment would be the re-
establishment of the Depart-
ment of Local Government.
He said at the moment, the
department does not have a
director or deputy director as
it must have if it is to move
forward.

Mr Gray explained that the
month of events will begin
with a special appreciation
luncheon and award ceremo-
ny for retired family adminis-
trators to be held in Grand
Bahama today.

“This will be our ministry’s
way of saying thanks to those
worthy ladies and gentlemen



FROM page one



Inmate on the run

Amendments

who have given unselfish ser-
vices in the various Family
Island communities in which
they served.”

Alexander Williams, presi-
dent of the Association of
Local Government Adminis-
trators, said he hopes that
more people will become
aware of just how important
local government is and how it
affects the Family Islands.

He also hoped that the
event would encourage local
leaders in the community to
offer themselves for office in
the June election to serve in
the three-year local govern-
ment term.

He said a number of events
are being planned for Grand
Bahama, including a mock
council meeting for students.

A number of former admin-
istrators were also at the press
conference and noted their
appreciation to the minister
and his office, for highlight-
ing local government.

Former administrator Karl
Spencer said: “Family island
commissioners and adminis-
trators have played a tremen-
dous part in touching people,
not only at the local level, but
at the national level.”

He said administrators have
given years of dedicated ser-
vice.and local government has
been the breeding ground for
producing top civil servants,
including Minister Gray, who
himself was a Family Island
administrator, FNM MP
Lindy Russell and a number
of permanent and under sec-
retaries in various government
ministries.





this method of escape.” He said that in response to Parcoi’s
escape, the walls of the bathroom had immediately been forti-
fied and that other areas within the prison compound were
also being looked at.

“Wherever there is a vulnerability of this nature, that vul-
nerability is being addressed today,” he said.

Parcoi is the fifth prisoner to escape in 2005.

The first inmate to break-out from HMP this year, made his
escape on January 31, 2005. On February 16, 2005 another:
inmate escaped from prison.

Two prisoners on remand for armed robbery also escaped
from a prison bus parked on the compound next to the Nassau
Street police station last Tuesday.

One of the prisoners, 32-year-old Jan Reckley of Elizabeth
Estates, turned himself in on. Tuesday and was charged with
escaping from lawful custody. The other, Jason Flowers, aged 20,
of Roseville Avenue, remains on the run and is considered
extremely dangerous.

Dr Rahming noted that in the more than six years that the
inmate escapes have been under review, there have been 37
escapes, 19 or 51 per cent from HMP; 10 or 25 per cent from
police custody; six or 16 per cent from the Extra Mural Day
Release Work Scheme; and three or eight per cent from Princess
Margaret Hospital.

“J should point out that of these 37 escapes over the past six
and a half years, 32 of the escapes were returned to the safe cus-
tody of Her Majesty’s Prison, many of whom were recaptured
within hours by search parties from her Majesty’s Prison,” he
said. ;
The Prison Superintendent further said that the recapture rate
by the prison in co-operation with the police, “is enviable.”

“As the new Prison Superintendent, I have said publicly that
our top priority is to protect the public against escapes. And
while we do not have a perfect record, the record is not anything
to be ashamed of.

“The fact is close to 1,500 men and women slept here last
night. One escaped, and that is one too many,” he reiterated.

Dr Rahming said that although there can be no such thing as
an escape-proof prison, that must be the ultimate goal.

To this end, he announced that the re-deployment of the
Canine Unit has been ordered and that for the first time, HMP
now has an Internal Affairs Unit in place “to target suspicious
activities and other matters that may compromise security.”

“We are now in search of the most cutting edge methodolo-
gy for further fortifying the perimeter boundaries of the insti-
tution,” he said, also noting that “indolence and indifference are
as poisonous as culpability and complicity.”



















































FROM page three

September 25, 2002 until they were handed over from Ms Pena to
Officer Deleveaux on September 26, 2003.

During cross examination of witnesses, defence attorney Dorsey
McPhee questioned why pictures were not taken of places where
police said they used distilled water and a cotton swab applicator to
collect samples.

It was said in court that the samples included those taken from a
flowerpot outside the kitchen door and from the picket fence sur-
rounding the home.

However, there were no images of where the samples were taken
amongst a 50-picture package presented to court by the detectives.

The trial continues today.










SECTION



business@100jamz.com

FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005

_ The Tribune

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street





Nassau/Paradise Island properties
expecting occupancies and room
rates to exceed 2004 performance

By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter

*
nd

assau/Paradise
Island hotels are
reporting strong
2005 first quar-
ters, with several
expecting 100. per cent occu-
pancies over the Easter holiday
period despite new policies cur-
tailing the number of Spring
Breakers.

‘Robert Sands, general man-
ager of the Nassau Beach Hotel,
said the Cable Beach property
will post an average occupancy
level for February, March and
April of 90 per cent, some 10
percentage points higher than
the same period last year. He
also anticipates a 5 per cent
growth in room rates for the
period.

"This is our winter season,



when there is the most demand
for the Bahamian product,” Mr
Sands said. “We're maximising
our pricing strategy'so there are
no specials. The demand for the
Bahamas remains strong and
we're confident that we will see
growth in business over last
year. Heading forward, provid-
ing there are no setbacks from
hurricanes, 2005 will be an even
stronger year than 2004, which
was stronger than 2003."
Crediting the increased air-
lift for the positive growth in

_ hotel occupancy, Mr Sands said

the Nassau Beach eas experi-
encing a more level rate of
occupancy throughout the
week, with arrivals and depar-
tures on Sunday through to
Thursday not as challenging as
it was before. Business is now
more spread through the work-
ing week.

Mr Sands said further that

Freeport’s

Bazaar saw [Etvaramcenote ‘fast-tracked’

‘lifeline cut
off by road
diversion

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

‘The diversion of Sunrise
Highway to bypass Freeport’s
International Bazaar has “cut
off a lifeline” for business own-
ers in that area, a senior
Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation (BAIC)
official said, exacerbating the
problems caused by the Royal
Oasis closure.

-Rudy Sawyer told the Grand
Bahama Business Outlook con-
ference that the diversion of
Sunrise Highway had taken
4 ia consumer traffic away

from the International Bazaar’s
retail section when it “needed
every chance at getting cus-
tomers”.

Mr Sawyer said: “As a result,
they were forced into a depen-
dency relationship on the occu-
pancy of the [Royal Oasis]
hotels and casino with which
they were now hemmed in, and
now they suffer more than they
needed to.

“Business people realise the
importance of ‘traffic flow’, par-
ticularly for retailers. Sunrise
Highway bypassing the Inter-

See ROAD, Page 2B

Bahamas urged
to target Japan,
Germany for
more tourists

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

“A tourism consultant has
urged the Bahamas to launch
aggressive marketing campaigns
in prosperous ‘Americanised’
countries such as Japan and
Germany, as the cost of living in
these nations was comparable
to that on Grand Bahama.

“As an expensive destination
we ought to be proud, and we
should identify countries with
high costs of living, as tourists
from those countries would not
be deterred by our relatively
high prices," Subir Das Gupta
told the Bahamas Business Out-
look conference at the Westin
at Our Lucaya Resort.

Speaking on the topic
Restructuring the Grand
Bahama Tourism Industry', Mr
Das Gupta, managing consul-
tant at Warrior Consulting in
Freeport, outlined several new
trends and strategies that should
be considered.

In addition to the traditional
US markets, he said that mar-
keting in American-influenced
countries would serve as lever-
age to attract more high spend-
ing visitors to the island.

As an expert in serving the
US tourists, Mr Das Gupta said
Grand Bahama should now
focus that expertise on other
large-economy countries.

See MARKET, Page 2B

more airline seats means more’
rooms are filled, and it augered
well for the Bahamas. As it con-
tinues to grow its room inven-
tory, it will need additional lift

.to support those rooms.

Meanwhile, Mr Sands said a
decision had been made to
reduce the Nassau Beach's
dependency-on Spring Break
rooms by limiting the amount
available for students to 20-25
per cent this year.

“We did not want to inundate
other customers with Spring
Breakers, so we allocated not
more than 20 per cent of rooms
to students. It's a clash of cul-
tures and we're trying to find
the right balance so both groups
can coexist,” he added..

Stephen Kappeler, regional
director of operations for the
Holiday Inns in the Bahamas,
said the properties were also
looking to reduce the number of
Spring Breakers compared to
last year.

He said management at the
Holiday Inn All-Inclusive Sun-
spree Resort on Paradise Island
was no longer motivated to do
as much Spring Break business



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

WHILE a Delta Connection
airline’s addition of two daily
round-trip flights between Nas-
sau and Fort Lauderdale was

“terrific news”, the Bahamas
Hotel Association’s executive
vice-president told The Tribune
that this nation was moving to
“fast-track” further improve-
ments to all its airports to meet



Robert Sands, general manager of the Nassau Beach Hotel

‘Terrific news’ on daily
Delta Connection flights

another internationally-man-
dated security deadline.
Frank Comito said that
Delta Airlines plan to add two
non-stop daily flights to its Fort
Lauderdale-Nassau route from
May 1 was “incredibly wel-

otels 100% full
or Easter holiday

because of the impact on regu-
lar guests.

The property is sold out from
March 19 to the end of the
month, and is also expected to
post a rate increase of some $10
to $11 over 2004.

The now-independent Nas-
sau Palm Resort, formerly the
Nassau Holiday Inn at
Junkanoo Beach, is expected to
be full for the entire month, and
is also expected to post positive
growth in occupancy trends,
with rate increase of $4 to $5 ,
over last year.

Meanwhile, Mr Kappeler said
the opening of the Spanish-
based property RIU Paradise
Island was helping the Holiday
Inn Sunspree because the for- .
mer’s price point was higher
than what the former Sheraton
offered, giving the Holiday Inn
the opportunity to improve on
its prices.

In terms of the Paradise
Island market, Mr Kappeler
said that prreviously Atlantis
had the highest prices, followed
by Comfort Suites, the Sheraton

See OUTLOOK, Page 2B

the latest flights, which will be
operated by Delta Connection
carrier Chautauqua Airlines,
using Embraer Regional Jet
aircraft, added to the arrival of
JetBlue, Song and Spirit into
this market, “underscored the
urgency” of “getting Nassau

come news” as it would add to
the increased airlift into the

Bahamas, making this destina-

tion more accessible to tourists

and hopefully increasing hotel

International Airport up to a
whole different level quickly”
so it could handle the expected

occupancies and revenues.
However, Mr Comito said

See FLY, Page 2B













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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



Mar ket (From page 1B)

He suggested that tourism
representatives should be
appointed to cities in Japan and
Germany, which are the second
and third-largest economies in
the world.

“A typical Japanese family
are the only people who found
London cheap compared to
Tokyo prices," said Mr Das
Gupta.

The consultant said Grand
Bahama could be marketed as a
golfing vacation destination to
Japanese executives, as many
cannot afford to play in Japan
because the scarcity of land
makes golf club membership
open only to a select few. He
suggested that perhaps charter
flights could be started to major
Japanese cities such as Tokyo,
Nagoya and Osaka.

In an effort to embrace this
new influx of visitors, Mr Das
Gupta said language training in
Japanese would have to be pro-
vided for tourism industry per-
sonnel. He added that Grand
Bahamians would have to be
prepared and sensitised to the
appearances of large number of
oriental visitors.

“We don't want immigration
phones ringing off the hook,
saying there are a lot of illegal
Chinese immigrants here when
there are actual, legal Japanese
tourists," Mr Das Gupta said.

Outlook (From page 1B)

and then the Holiday Inn. Now,
the RIU was offering guests an
‘all-inclusive ocean front expe-
rience comparable, in terms of
price, to Atlantis’ Beach Tow-
ers, although Atlantis’ other
towers still remained the top
price for the destination.

The Holiday Inn now com-
petes primarily with Comfort
Suites which, while not an all-
inclusive, offers its guest all the
amenities provided at Atlantis.

"We're offering all-inclusive
on the harbour side at about
the same price of Comfort
Suites. The RIU’s prices are the
same as the Beach Tower and
it’s an all- suite hotel on the
ocean front,” Mr Kappeler said.

“ In essence you're getting
four distinct market niches,
which is good for everybody.
Also, the Sunspree, with the
Holiday Inn Nassau going out
of brand, is now the only Holi-
day Inn in the country right now
and it’s driving business to us."

General manager of the new-

ly-named Nassau Palm Resort,

He stressed that a similar

approach can also be consid-.

ered for German visitors, who
are fluent in English and love
beach vacation destinations.

“We can contact the German
charter airline to start flights
from Frankfurt and Berlin, as
Germans are good prospects for
the condominium market," he
said.

Mr Das Gupta indicated that
another trend that must be con-
sidered to develop a more
vibrant tourism industry is the
encouragement of specific niche
developments outside
Freeport's bonded area. He
exnlained that an eco-tourism
niche could be developed in the
east, while a heritage niche be
developed in the west.

Mr Das Gupta said the
Bahamas National Trust can
take the lead in establishing east
Grand Bahama as an eco-
tourism haven, promoting plant,
animal and human ecology, and
business developments in solar
energy, bonefishing lodges and
organic farms.

Similarly, he noted that the
Bahamas Agricultural Industri-
al Corporation (BAIC) could
establish a heritage niche for
west Grand Bahama that would
encourage a rich tapestry of
native Grand Bahamians, Turks
Islanders and Haitian immi-

Larry Williams, concurred with
Mr Kappeler's assessment of
the property's performance,
saying that over the Easter peri-
od the hotel will be completely
sold out. It was working not to
get overbooked.

The Nassau Palm was exceed-
ing occupancy levels, revenue
and average room rates for Jan-
uary and February, when com-
pared to the same period last
year.

Looking at summer, which is
usually slow, Mr Williams said
he was anticipating about the
same level of business. But with
the name change and the addi-
tion of more travel agents, he
was hopeful the resort can

‘attract more people, putting

occupancies some 6 per cent
above last year, with initial
bookings already showing a
positive trend.

One of the few properties to

fully embrace the Spring Break

crowd, Mr Williams said while
students have arrived already,

most are expected to begin |

NOTICE

‘

ARGUS GLOBAL EQUITIES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in
dissolution, commencing on the 25th day of February, 2005.
Articles of Dissolution have been duly registered by the Registrar.
The Liquidator is Contance L. Godet, P.O.Box N-8303, Nassau,

Bahamas.

All persons having Claims against the named Company are
required on or before the 4th day of April, 2005 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to
the Liquidator of the Company or, in default thereof, may be
excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before such

debts are proved.

Dated this 25th day of February, 2005.

CONSTANCE L. GODET
Liquidator

BISk

Pricing Information As Of:
3 March 2005



‘Colina

Financial Advisors Ltd.

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste
British American Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Doctor's Hospital

Famguard
Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Kerzner International BDRs
Premier Real Estate

12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets

_ 0.35 RND Holdings

Colina Money Market Fund

1.209527*

2.1191 1.9423 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.1105 ***
10.2648 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.2602*****
2.1746 2.0524 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.166020**

grant culture.

“BAIC could set up schemat-
ic inns, ethnic restaurants and
handicrafts, and a West End
Fishing Festival could be start-
ed," he added.

The consultant said that the
island must also move away
from the trend of promoting
sun, sea and sand to become a
secure destination, where visi-
tors could feel safe and secure.

Stressing that September 11
drastically altered the travel
industry, Mr Das Gupta said
Grand Bahama must be alert
to the risk posed by interna-
tional terrorists.

The fact that the Bahamas
immigration at Freeport Har-
bour turn away two of the Sep-
tember 11 hijackers should not
give rise to complacency, he
said.

“We should not think it can-
not happen here. They did not
expect a hit on New York City
either," he said, warning that
possible alliance between drug
traffickers and terrorists must
be scrutinised.

“We have been very luke-
warm about tackling the prob-
lems of drugs. The existence of
the large pool of unemployable
males is cause for concern, as
these persons may be unwit-
tingly drawn into collusion with

terrorists," Mr Das Gupta said. .

arriving on Monday. He added:
“The entire month of March,
the hotel will be filled with
Spring Breakers. This is the
busiest month of the year for
hotels".

Mr Williams said further that
the hotel was working to imple-
ment a number of changes from
last year to help all guests enjoy
their stay.

They will be adding extra
security, putting in a curfew and
efforts are also being made to
work with the Ministry of
Tourism to clean up Junkanoo
beach.

Mr Williams said a letter is
being sent to students before
their arrival to let them know
what the property's rules are.

As for how successful the
Nassau Palm will be following
the renaming, he said that it had
already positively impacted the
company's bottom line because
they no longer have to pay a
franchise fee. The real test of



He said slippage in border
control, as evidenced by the
large number of illegal immi-
grants, could showcase entry
routes that terrorists can use
without fear of being detected.

Mr Das Gupta said hotels in
Grand Bahama must bring for-
mer police and defense officers
into their core workforce.

“Such skills are invaluable in
today's high risk environment
and should not be limited to
confines of traditional roles of
security officers. Instead, they
should be deployed in all facets
of tourism industry - so we
would then be able to project
ourselves a secure destination,”
he added.

Mr Das Gupta said the
Tourism Board must expand
beyond it current role of
tourism promoter to that of
property developer and invest-
ment banker. °

He also encouraged more .
hospitality training and afford-

able customised programmes
for the different categories of
visitors, without compromising
standard and quality.-

“A holistic approach to visi-
tor satisfaction is required.
When tourists leave these
shores they must leave ener-
gised, refreshed, and wanting
to. come back to’ Grand

Bahama," Mr Das Gupta said.



whether it was a good decision
or not, however, will be deter-
mined if they can meet their
budget without the Holiday Inn
name.

Najam Khan, general manag-
er of the Wyndham Nassau
Resort, said the hotel was
expected to be full for Easter,
posting a $20 to $25 rate
increase over the average daily
rate seen last year. Occupancy
levels are expected to go up by
about 2 points.

For March, the occupancy
level will hit 89 per cent, with
average daily room rates stand-
ing at $20 over last year, thanks
in large part to all the new airlift
coming into the destination.

February improved by 4 to 5
points in occupancy, with the

room rate up by. almost $10... .
Looking ahead, Mi Khan said: .

“Right now we are aggressive
about the trends we have and I
think it will continue into the
summer."



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JIMMY LAURENT, MARSH
HARBOUR, GENERAL DELIVERY, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas; and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
4TH day of MARCH, 2005 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PRO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.







Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KENOL GUE, MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that .any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25th day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147,












libs



BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day’s weighted price for daily volume
Today’s Close - Current day's welghted price for dally volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months
Pe - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
** - AS AT JAN. 31, 2008/ **** - AS AT DEC. 31, 2004
- AS AT FEB. 11, 2005/ *** - AS AT JAN 31, 2005/ ***** oes rin JAN. 31, aoa



EE ee Aa



YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bld $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

ELI



Fly (From page 1B)



Road (From page 1B)

national Bazaar was a major artery, a lifeline for business that
was cut off.”

Mr Sawyer argued that any potential purchaser ‘of the Royal
Oasis should follow Kerzner International’s lead and establish a
business model where the hotel was secondary to the attractions
around it. It was these attractions that would draw guests to the
hotel.

The BAIC executive also floated the idea of establishing a ‘Fes-
tival Park’ on the vacant property next to Goombay Park, which lies
adjacent to the Royal Oasis and is home to independent craft ven-
dors.

The Festival Park could give tourists a taste of Junkanoo by
allowing them to participate in it, and spin-offs could include the
sale of Junkanoo-related costumes and craft items.

Apart from a lack of creativity, Mr Sawyer reiterated that small
business development and entrepreneurial growth were still being
held back by lack of access to capital, contending that the funding
system for such start-ups was “retarded and deformed”.

While acknowledging that commercial banks were not in business
to make high-risk loans to start-ups, Mr Sawyer said providing
loans to small businesses “could be profitable with the proper
interest rate regime and follow-up and delinquency control pro-
gramme in place”.

Adding that the “very successful commercial banking club in the
Bahamas can decide to set aside a small percentage of their lend-
ing portfolio for on-lending to good new business projects every
year”, Mr Sawyer called for reduced documentation requirements
for business loans up to a certain amount, suggesting $200,000.

He also called for better administrative support and a “restruc-
tured Government Small Business Guarantee Scheme’’, with real
funds set aside in a reserve fund to back the total amount guaran-
teed by the Government “up to five to.10 times the amount of the
reserve amount”.

On the issue of taxation, Mr Sawyer suggested that the Gov-
ernment could reduce import duties - which it is under pressure to
do anyway - and replace impose new taxes “on certain services
where the users can comfortably bear the taxes imposed”, such as
a service tax.

He also advocated the introduction of transfer fees on financial
transactions, given the high volume that took place on a daily
basis. Revenues could also be gained from taxing just a small por-
tion of local gambling.

- And Mr Sawyer suggested: “For those businesses that estab-
lish enterprises that are using the country to transfer high vol-
ume, high value commodities because of the cost advantages from
operating in a no to low-tax jurisdictions, [get them] to pay trans-
fer/user or throughput fees to the Government through government
corporations rather than direct taxation.”



increase in passenger volumes.

Meanwhile, research by The Tribune has found that the Bahamas
will have to ensure all its airports have implemented further secu-
rity measures for international flights by January 1, 2006.

The International Civil Aviation Association is requiring 100 per
cent screeing and checking of all baggage going on international
flights, which will impose further cost burdens on the Bahamas.

Mr Comito said the Government was already moving on the
issue, and at some airports might receive financial assistance from
the private sector on a process that had to be “fast-tracked”.

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If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DAVID GABRIELE BANGELLI,
BUCCANEER ROAD, LITTLE BLAIR, P.O. BOX SS-19531,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 25TH day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.














UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. a leading international wealth manager,
has an opening for the position of a

| IT BUSINESS ENGINEER

In this challenging position you will be responsible for:

¢ Develop and program our banking applications and systems;
¢ Implement IT solutions;

e Lead IT projects and ensure compliance with milestones
and delivery requests;

e Manage the user testing existing, upgraded and new
systems and provide troubleshooting;

¢ Analyze and reengineer the existing systems and workflows;

¢ Support international business process reengineering

projects;
© User Training.

We are searching for a personality with expensive experience

in IT, Business Engineering and Project management who
meets the following mandatory requirements:

¢ University degree in Computer Science, Mathematics or
Physics;

e At least six years of experience in a comparable position
with a proven track record;

¢ Extensive experience in IT business analysis, data modeling,
database development, programming and testing;

* Excellent knowledge of applications such as Sybase, SQL,

. Windows XP, MS Office and Smartsizing;

“e Solid knowledge of products and services of a global offshore

bank;

¢ International experience is an advantage.

Applications in writing, enclosing a full resume,
by Bahamian nationals only to:

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources

P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas





THE TRIBUNE

=) UES) | tots)

FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005, PAGE 3B



Lack of data hurting
economic planning

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

he absence of

“hard core” statis-

tics and data on

the Grand

Bahama econo-
my’s performance has prevent-
ed the development of “long
range, forward-looking policies
that would get us to where we
want to go”, a Central Bank of
the Bahamas researcher and
economist said.

Adressing the Grand Bahama
Business Outlook Conference,
Kevin Demeritte said the Cen-
tral Bank was working with the
Grand Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) to help alleviate this
problem through “developing
a comprehensive economic fea-
sibility study” of the island. Sim-
ilar studies would be performed
on other Family Islands, but
Grand Bahama and Freeport
would be a particular focus.

Mr Demeritte added that the
Central Bank and the GBPA
were working with the Inter-
American Development Bank
(IDB).to develop another study
that would analyse the “net fis-
cal resources cost benefit
impact”.

This would assess the benefits
Freeport and Grand Bahama
received from the national gov-
‘ernment compared to the taxes
they paid.

Mr Demeritte said: “It is nice
to say that Freeport is the sec-
ond City... , but the fact of
the matter is we have absolute-
ly no idea just how much Grand
Bahama and Freeport specifi-
cally contributes to our overall
GDP: We have a fair feel, but
quite frankly the numbers are
not there.

“We can see over the course
of the years since 1955, the
changes in the overall picture
of Grand Bahama. We can see -
and we sincerely believe going



‘What we need is hardcore

numbers of we are going to
_ plan development for
Grand Bahama over the

\

next 20-30 years. ’



forward - that the agreement
between the Government and
the Port Authority, that is the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement,
extending it another 20 or 30
years was the right thing to do.

“Rut, at the end of the day -

we still need the kind of num-
bers that not only the Port
Authority, as the local govern-
ment entity, [requires] but the

_ national government in Nassau

and the Central Bank need
those numbers to be able to
plan where our economy is
going to be going forward,” Mr
Demeritte added.

“We don't know, for exam-
ple, the net contribution that
Grand Bahama - and Freeport
specifically - make to the
National Budget. We don't
know how much taxes you pay
compared to how much in ben-
efits you received from the
national government.

“Clearly, you can see why it is
important to Grand Bahama.
You would really like to know if
your getting more back than
you’re giving.”

The Central Bank, Mr
Demeritte said, had already
issued a survey asking compa-
nies in Grand Bahama how the
economy was. doing from their

business’s perspective and their
assessment of its prospects

going forward.

Adding that it was “very dif-
ficult to make policy based on
anecdotal evidence”; Mr
Demeritte said: “What we need

More FUN N to eG

is hardcore numbers if we are
going to plan development for
Grand Bahama over the next
20-30 years. As has been
acknowledged, the Grand
Bahama economy went on this
roller coaster ride.

“T strongly believe that one
of the difficulties in smoothing
out the growth trend in Grand
Bahama has been that we don't
have hard core numbers that
we need to make the kind long
range forward looking policies
that would get us to where we
want to go.

“We need the kind of
detailed statistics, not just from
the Port Authority, but we need
to know locally and a national
level to precisely quantify the
benefits of the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement to the Grand
Bahamian economy in general
and the Bahamian economy
specifically.

“We do need to know exact-
ly where we would have been if
we did not have a Hawksbill
Creek Agreement and we need
to know numbers quantifiable
how that agreement has bene-

‘fited this community and our

economy. If we know what hap-
pened in the past, we can begin
to make some plans about what
might be happening in the
future. We know it has been a
net benefit we can see that in

our community. We need to’

know how much of a benefit.”

Mr Demeritte’ said the Cen-

tral Bank did not know how

ry yi4 7 NE

y ndai Accent comes with a surprising number of
sophisticated standard features, including...

much the Grand Bahama and
Freeport contributed to the
Bahamas’ net foreign exchange
earnings, nor how much the
island contributed to economic
diversification or developing the
workforce’s skills base.

The Department of Statistics

_ had ceased producing national

accounts since 1995 because
most of the numbers were esti-
mates, and there were statistical
issues related to these.

Mr Demeritte said: “Nation-
al accounts data regarding
industrial and sectoral statistics,
prices and inflation, agriculture
production - fisheries, livestock,
construction. Those are pre-
cisely the numbers we don't
really have a good handle on
when it comes to Grand
Bahama.”

There was no comprehensive
real esate data, such as infor-
mation on real estate inflation,
inflation.in leases, lease pay-

ments, lease costs and rental

inflation.

There was no information on
inflation in business square
footage prices.

Mr Demeritte said: “And that
is just real estate. Agricultural
production, yield, acreage, cost,
revenue - good hard core sta-
tistics that we don't have for
Grand Bahama.

“T am sure that Grand
Bahama farmers, probably indi-
viduals in the Chamber of Com-
merce and Port Authority, have
some idea or numbers. We
would certainly like to be able
to create a comprehensive data
set because it then allows us to
make plans moving forward.
Fisheries, large production,
same deal.”

Mr Demeritte said it was crit-
ical to develop expectations for
Grand Bahama’s gross domestic

‘production (GDP).

He added: “The question
only remains; where cai we go
from here? Do we have the



vision, plan and hardcore data
that is going to allow us to push
this project forward?...........
“You can lead the way, but
what you do need is a proper

26 UBS

road map,. You certainly have a
real good captain, and you need
the kind of data that is going to
allow you to make those kind of
plans. “

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd. a leading trust company manager,
has an opening for the position of a

TEAM HEAD PRODUCTS,
PROCESSES & TRAINING

In this challenging position you will be responsible for:

° Analysis and re-engineering of existing and new business

processes;

* Documentation of all processes within the trust company;

e Review of existing and new product offering;

° Product and Process Training for all staff,

* Coordination with head office in Switzerland for all product,
process and training activities;

® Special Projects on behalf of CEO. of trust company.

We are searching for a personality with expensive experience
in international trust work, Project Management and Training;

¢ University degree in law;

e Extensive practical experience as a lawyer for a law company,

incl. court experience;

° Several years of experience as a Trust Officer at an international

offshore trust company;

* Good knowledge of the finance industry in general especially

fiduciary products;

¢ Proven management skills, tract record as a Trainer;

© Good interpersonal skills;

e International experience is a plus;
e Fluency in English is essential, fluency in German is a plus;

© Computer literacy.

Applications in writing, enclosing a full resume,
by Bahamian nationals only to:

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757
. Nassau, Bahamas .

RUE Rene ae La Eee eee acre ee



ee aes

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

CAREER OPPORT UNITY

fora

PROPERTY MANAGER

Reporting to the Property Director in Barbados, you will enjoy a high level of
autonomy and responsibility for managing, through a small property team,

a varied but demanding caseload of premises matters reiaing to the Bahamas
& TCl occupational porfolio.

QUALIFICATIONS:



¢ Member of professional body or Certification in recognized property

field

e 5+ years in Property management, especially in complex buildings
or multiple sites across the islands, with proven track record

© Comprehensive knowledge of property and construction management

e Detailed knowledge of building A/C systems, electrical systems,
building, codes, occupational health and labour regulation, and
hurricane building codes

e Motivated, strong on delivery, able to handle multiple tasks, and a
good logistical planner

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS / RESPONSIBILITIES:

-“e Proactively manage the premises, including all repairs and disaster
management, ensuring that Health & Safety and Security issues are

delivered.

e Develop and apply strategic solutions to maximize asset value and

the P&L

* automatic transmission
* air conditioning
° stereo radio/cassette

© digital clock

HYUNDAI

° 1.5 litre engine

° power steering

¢ central locking & alarm system ~
¢ keyless entry

e Project manage the construction / renovation of new branches,
' properties as required
e Manage relationships with the businesses, service providers, suppliers
and landlords
e uanege and motivate a small team through excellent leadership
skills

IF YOU ARE INTERESTED:

Submit your resume private & confidential in WRITING ONLY before March
18, 2005 to:

Jamise Sturrup - Human Resources Assistant
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-8329, Nassau, Bahamas

Or email: jamise.sturrup@firstcaribbeanbank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
thanks all applicants for their interest, however only those ©
under consideration will be contacted.

Vacancies are open to Bahamian residents only.

ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING

Price includes rustproofing, licensing and inspection to birthday,
full tank of fuel and 12,000-mile/12-month wal

QUALITY 2:

LIMITED
#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET ° 322-3775 ° 325-3079

Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals, Queens Hwy, 352-6122
or Abaco Motor Mall, Don Mackay Blvd, 367-2916



PERSE TMI eee ne NE





PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



i SS a
FIU analyst is fourth
Bahamian to pass anti-
money laundering exam

A Financial Intelligence Unit (FIU) analyst has become the
fourth person in the Bahamas to attain the Certified Anti-Money
Laundering Specialist (CAMS) designation after successfully pass-
ing the relevant exam.

Michelle Miller joined the FIU as an analyst in June 2001, and has
been a Professional Member of the Association of Certified Anti-
Money Laundering Specialists since 2002.

icated to the detection and prevention of international money
laundering. It also promotes the development and implementation
of sound anti-money laundering practices.

The certification programme aims to set the standard for the anti-
money laundering professional. Eligibility to sit the exam requires
a minimum scoring based upon a combination of education and
experience. To maintain the CAMS certification, persons must
conform to a programme of earned credits through continuing

The Association is an organisation whose mission is to advance

the professional knowledge, skills and experience of persons ded- _ professional education (re-certification).




POSITION AVAILABLE







Caribbean Regtonai
Environment
Programme

SUBS

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. a leading international wealth
manager, has an opening for the position of a

‘Head of Credit Risk Management &
Transaction Control




COMMUNITY LIAISON
OFFICER

The Caribbean Regional Environment
Programme (CREP) is cen a
Community Liaison Officer (CLO). The
_ CLO will engage Andros communities
and other stakeholders in the CREP
Project activities and provide support for
the project Manager. The position is based
with CREP Project, in Fresh Creek,
Andros.













Financed by the
European Union





In this challenging position you will be responsible for:













Bahamas
Focal Point
Organizations

| Skills Required e Maintaining credit facilities

¢ Analysis of counter party risks including settlement,
trading and crossborder risk .

® Collateral assessment and monitoring

® Transaction Investigation

¢ Team player able to work with

communities throughout Andros

e Excellent oral and written
communication skills -

e Willingness to travel and to work
outside normal hours when °
necessary

e Awareness of environmental issues

would be an asset









Michelle Miller

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight.
fe) a] Mondays

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WILLIS DOCTEUR OF MARSH






We are searching for a personality with extensive
experience in credit risk management who meets
the following mandatory requirements:






Qualifications

| © Familiar with the communities of
Andros 3

e Strong facilitation skills for
meetings and workshops

¢ Computer literate

° Ability to plan/ conduct

community meetings and

workshops



e Proven tract record and familiarity with service oriented
global offshore bank
e Experience in Credit Services to international High
Net Worth Clients
¢ Analytic approach to Credit Risk Management and
Transaction Control
¢ Fluency in English is essential, German is an advantage










BEST Commission



If you are interested in this exciting
opportunity please send resume, cover
letter & other supporting documentation
to:












‘Applications in writing, enclosing a full resume, by
Bahamian nationals only to:




CARIFORUM











Authorized by the
Cabbean Forum of ACP CREP Position OR: CREP Position HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
SENS PO. N-4105 PO. Box 23338 responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,. for
Nassau, Bahamas Fresh Creek, Andros registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
e UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. that any person who knows any reason why registration/
Material may also be delivered by hand to the Human Resources naturalization:should not be granted, should send a written |
CREP/ANCAT office, Fresh Creek, Andros or and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
Mercunie by exmatl fo; crancat@bateinet.bs P.O, Box. N7157 from the 25TH day: of: FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister |.
arbbean Conservation Nassau, Bahamas responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147, |:



All applications must be received by

Friday 11th March 2005 Nassau, Bahamas.

Association









Deloitte
& Touche
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Enterprise Risk Services - Control Assurance Senior Consultant/Manager

THE AIRPORT AUTHORITY

Well established firm seeks an IT Auditor manager/senior consultant for its Enterprise Risk
Services Practice.

RESPONSIBILITIES

Identify and evaluate business and technology risks, internal controls which mitigate risks,
and related opportunities for internal control improvement

Assist in selecting and tailoring approaches, methods and tools to support services
Actively participate in training efforts

Actively participate in decision making with engagement management and seek to understand
the broader impact of current decisions

Generate innovative ideas and challenge the status quo

Facilitate use of technology-based tools or methodologies to review, design and/or implement
products and services

Build and nurture positive working relationships with clients with the intention to exceed
. Client expectations

Understand clients' business environment and basic risk management approaches
Play substantive/lead role in engagement planning, economics, and billing
Participate in proposal development and sales efforts

QUALIFICATIONS

3+ years experience in the areas of public accounting, internal auditing or consulting

Bachelors degree in Business Administration, Accounting, Computer Science, Information
Systems Administration or related field. MBA or dual-degree is an asset

CISA, CPA, CIA designation or desire and dedication to pursue

_ Advanced understanding of business processes, internal control risk management, IT controls
and related standards 5 ey

Proven analytical skills with ability to tackle problems systematically to determine causes
and produce effective solutions

Experience with accounting control related issues

Demonstrated ability to plan and manage engagements along with ensuring deliverables
meet work plan specifications and deadlines

Ability to thrive in an environment of pressing deadlines and constantly changing conditions
Successful experience identifying controls, developing and executing test plans
Ability to synthesize information and produce concise synopses/summaries

Excellent written and oral communication skills including both technical and business writing,
documentation and presentation skills

Open to travel requirements

Experience with ACL is an asset

Experience with COSO and/or Sarbanes-Oxley an asset

Technical and/or management background in technical systems/environments an asset

P.O. Box AP-59222
Nassau International Airport
Nassau, Bahamas

Proposal for Group Life & Medical Insurance

The Airport Authority invites proposals from eligible.
insurance companies and/or brokers on a Group Life and
Medical Insurance Plan for employees of The Airport
Authority. oe |

. The policy will be for a period of one year following the
selection of a successful tender. Parties interested in
submitting a proposal may collect an information package
from the Executive Office of The Airport Authority at the

- Nassau International Airport on Monday 7th, March, 2005.

All proposals should be sealed, and delivered to:

Acting General Manager,
The Airport Authority,
P.O. Box, AP - 59222
Nassau International Airport

And should be marked:

PROPOSALS FOR GROUP LIFE AND MEDICAL
INSURANCE

All tenders must be received no later than 4:30 pm on

Monday 21st March, 2005. COMPENSATION

e Compensation is negotiable based on combination of years experience and qualification.

Interested persons should submit their resumes before March 18, 2005.

HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT
P. O. BOX N-7120
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The Airport Authority reserves the right to reject any or
all tenders.





THE TRIBUNE



UT Sok

FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005, PAGE 5B



Competition created by

onvention 87 to weed —
out poorly-run unions

By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter

leading union

official yester-

day urged the

Government to

ratify and enact
the International Labour
Organisation's (ILO) Conven-
tion 87, saying the administra-
tion had a golden opportunity
to complete what its predeces-
. sor started.

"This convention is extreme-
ly fundamental and basic. So
basic that major political par-
ties like the Free National
Movement (FNM) in 1991 saw
the need to include this con-
vention in its 1992 Manifesto,
which should have resulted in
this convention being ratified
and legislated during the FNM
Government's term in office,”
said Bahamas Utilities, Services
and Allied Workers Union
(BUSAW) president, Huedley
Moss.

“This did not occur. What did
occur was the ratification of

ILO Convention 87 in Geneva:

Switzerland in 2001. And so the
promise that was made to work-
ers was never fulfilled."

Convention 87 gives stake-
holders, namely employees,
employers and governments,
the right to organise and join
the union or association of their
choice, Mr Moss said.

Under Convention 87, unions
face the same threats and weak-
nesses to other organisations,
he said, adding that this is what
competition and market forces
are all about.

Mr Moss added further that
since competition was the order
of the day for capitalist democ-
racies such as the Bahamas, it
was absolutely taboo to deny
unions and workers Convention
87.

"It must be remembered that
every segment of our society is
faced with some degree of com-
petition, but not so with the
trade union movement. Who
suffers when the playing field
is not level and protectionism
from competition becomes the
order of the day? Workers,
employers and the government
pay heavily for the absence of

Legal Notice

_ NOTICE

Convention 87," he said.
According to Mr Moss, who
also serves as chief advisor and
negotiator for the Bahamas
Beverage and Water Distribu-
tors Union (BBWDU), which
represents PepsiCo and Aqua-
pure workers, workers suffer
immeasurably when they are
compelled to tolerate a badly-

_run union, with no recourse to

replace it or its leaders.
Convention 87 will address
this concern, he added, because
unions and their executives will
know that if they do not doa
reasonable job they will be ter-
minated. The competition
enabled under this convention,
Mr Moss said, is likely to force

union officers to be just as.

enlightened as employers coun-
terpart. It will also force unions
to hold elections in a timely
manner and in accordance with
their constitution.

Mr Moss said that an enacted
convention 87 would ensure
unions provide more monetary
benefits for their members, in
addition to other strategic and
professional advice, particular-
ly in regard to financial affairs.

The newly-introduced com-
petition unions will face will
also result in members receiving
all or most of their union dues
in a lump sum payment. upon
retirement or death, Mr Moss
said.

"Everybody will benefit from

competition, including unionid-.

ed workers. To exempt unions
from competition by denying
the Convention 87 is absolutely
‘taboo’and contradicts the con-
cept of democratic competi-
tion," he added.

The union president also not-
ed that employers would bene-
fit from Convention 87, as this
would give new levels of flexi-
bility and alternatives in
addressing their concerns, a
move that should fit perfectly
with the concept of merit
increases.

Mr Moss said adding it was a
"no brainer" for unions to con-
tinue to lobby for compulsory
salary increases, mandatory
increases and across the board
increases.

He gave the example of
workers in Eastern Europe and
America having priced them-
selves out of the market: Those
workers were now enthusiasti-
cally giving up benefits to save
their industry and jobs. ‘Those
who did not understand this
were witnessing for.themselves
that employers such as Wal-
Mart in Canada weere closing
their businesses before they
subject themselves to inflexible
negotiations.

“Workers are looking for effi-
ciency and results, and if unions
are doing a satisfactory job they
will be around for a long time. If
not, they have no right to be

around to give the trade union
movement a bad name if they
are not doing a satisfactory job,”
Mr Moss said.

“Competition and Conven-

tion 87 will address this expedi-
tiously. Furthermore, whether
a union is small or large it ought
not be the minister’s concern
because competition and mar-

ket forces will address this con-.

cern to the satisfaction of all
and sundry."

During earlier discussions
with the union about Conven-

tion 87, Vincent Peet, minister .

of labour and immigration, dis-
cussed the importance of bench-
marking the Bahamian version
of Convention 87 with

Jamaica's and those versions

existing in Caribbean commu-

nities similar to the Bahamas.
Mr Moss said, however, that

such a move would have



The Tribune wants to
hear from people who are
making news in their
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you are raising funds for a
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for improvements in the
area or have won an
‘award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

absolutely no relevance for the
Bahamas because Bahamians
are capable of standing on their
own two feet, independent of
any unions in the Caribbean.

When unions in the Bahamas
are contrasted with unions else-
where, Mr Moss said Bahamas-
based organisations are micro-
scopic in size when compared
to unions with memberships in
the hundreds of thousands ae
even millions. .














MIDATT COMPANY LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named Company
are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned at
Sandringham House,-83 Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas, as sole
Liquidator on or before the 18th day of March, 2005. In default
thereof they will be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 1st day of March, 2005
Lynden Maycock
LIQUIDATOR

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
NEW DAWSON LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the Ist day of March,
2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid
Davis of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)

Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

MIDATT COMPANY LIMITED
| NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) MIDATT COMPANY LIMITED is in dissolution under
. the provisions of the International Business Companies
Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the
1st March, 2005 when its Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said Company is Mr. Lynden
Maycock of Sandringham House, 83 Shirley Street, Nassau,
Bahamas as sole Liquidator.
Dated the 1st day of March, 2005.

H & J Corporate Services Ltd.

Registered Agent
for the above-named Company



LEGAL NOTICE ©

NOTICE
LEXINE FINE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the Ist day of March,

2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid

‘Davis of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)

Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)

6 UBS

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd. a leading international
trust company has an opening for the position of a

MIS Specialist

in this challenging position you will be responsible for:

¢ Develop our system to provide consistent and
coherent management information;

e Enhance and redesign the existing database and
workflow models to meet the business requirements;

¢ Develop and implement solutions in MS Access;

¢ Support the testing of the developed system and
provide solutions to any defects that are detected;

¢ Take ownership for the analysis and design phases
of one or more of the projects deliveries;

¢ Collaborate on project to build an intranet site to
support business processes;

* Provide training and second level support to users.

We are searching for a personality with a broad
experience of relational database modeling and process
modeling with sound knowledge in software development
lifecycle. A successful tract record as Project Manager
MIS and strong analytical skills are key requirements to
succeed in this senior position. Good knowledge of SAP
systems and experience as a trainer are essential. In
addition the ideal candidate must be fluent in English
(German is an advantage in order to coordinate with our
head office in Switzerland.

Applications in writing, enclosing a full resume, by
Bahamian nationals only to:

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas

“NOTICE.
RICHPLUS HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the 11th day of February,
2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid
Davis of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)

Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)

POSITION AVAILABLE

Caribbean Regional
Environment
Programme

Administrative
Assistant

: The Sete ional Environment

| Programme (CREP) is seeking an

hat inter ve Assistant to provide

administrative support for the Andros

Conservancy and Frust and the CREP

| Project. The position is based with ANCAT,
in Eresh Creek, Andros.

Financed by the
European Union

Bahamas
Focal Point —
Organizations

| Skills/Qualifications

| * Computer literate, especially Microsoft
| Office Suite
¢ Minimum of 2-3 years experience in office
procedures, including performing basic
accounting tasks, operating office
equipment, and receptionist skills
e Excellent oral and written
f communication skills
© Positive attitude and self motivated
e Excellent organisational skills and ability §
to multitask
e Detail oriented and able to meet
deadlines
¢ Ability to maintain confidentiality of
records and information

If you are interested in this exciting
opportunity please send resume, cover |
letter & other eee documentation
to:

CREP Position OR: CREP Position
P.O. N4105 P.O. Box 23338
Authorized by the Nassau, Bahamas Fresh Creek, Andros
Caribbean Forum of ACP
States

Q
implemented by the

Caribbean Conservation
Association

’

Material ma my also be delivered by hand to .
the CREP/ANCAT office, Fresh Creek, Andros
or by e-mail to: exancat@batelnet.bs

All app lications must be roves by
riday 11th March 2005.





PAGE 6B,FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005 | _ THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS
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THE TRIBUNE



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FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005; PAGE 7B

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PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005









Saree ie









MO

Telephone 242 393 2007

PO Box N 123 Fax 242 393 1772
Montague Sterling Centre Internet www.kpmg.com.bs
East Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas

AUDITORS' REPORT TO THE SHAREHOLDER

We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of Banco de Bogota (Nassau) Limited (‘the
Bank’) as of December 31, 2004, and the related statements of income, changes in shareholder's
equity and cash flows for the year then ended. These financial statements are the responsibility of
the Bank's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements

based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing as promulgated
by the International Federation of Accountants. Those standards require that we plan and
perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance as to whether the financial statements are free
of material misstatement: An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the
amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the
accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating
the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable

basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position
of the Bank as of December 31, 2004, and the results of its operations, changes in shareholder's
equity and its cash flows for the year then ended in accordance with International Financial
Reporting Standards as promulgated by the International Accounting Standards Board.

Chartered Accountants

Nassau, Bahamas
January 21, 2005

KPMG, a Bahemian partnership, is the Bahamas
member firm of KPMG Intemational, a Swiss cooperative.

BANCO DE BOGOTA (NASSAU) LIMITED
Balance Sheet

December 31, 2004, with corresponding figures for 2003

(Expressed in United States dollars)



2004 2003
ASSETS
Due from banks (note 4)
Demand - affiliates 243,378 334,093
-others 4 : 1,659,208 ~ 1,726,255
Time - others ; 65,600,000 62,000,000
: 67,602,586 64,060,348
Loans, net (note 5) 65,492,466 45,859,903
Securities available-for-sale (note 6) 59,003,911 75,946,667
Securities held-to-maturity (note 7) 20,364,747 20,667,473
investment in related party (note 8) 166,068 * 166,068
Accrued interest receivable 2,115,377 2,755,662 ,
Accounts receivable and prepayments 51,897 91,000
” Fixed assets, net 3,400 -
Total Assets , 2 ; 214,700,452 209,547,121
ee
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDER'S EQUITY i
Liabilities: : ¢
Demand deposits ;
- affiliates : - 164,834 154,635 —
~ others ; ; 4,103,741 4,852,101
Saving deposits a DRE TY nti 612,302 -
Time deposits (note 9) ‘ 181,150,725 184,135,424
ga 186,021,602 169,142,360
Borrowed funds under repurchase agreements (note 10) 15,000,000 10,000,000
Accrued interest payable 690,290 730,762
Accounts payable 860,062 1,007,571
Total Liabilities ; : 172,571,954, 170,880,693
Shareholder's Equity:
Share capital:

Authorised - 5,000,000 (2003: 5,000,000) ordinary shares of
$10 each. Issued and fully paid - 3,954,344 shares

(2003: 3,592,458) : : 39,543,440 0,924,580
Unrealised gain on securities available-for-sale (note 6) 677,208 1,389,548
Retained earnings 1,907,850 1,352,300 _
Total Shareholder's Equity ¥ 42,128,498 38,666,428
Total Liabilities and Sharsholder's Equity 214,700,452 209,547,121

See accompanying notes to balance sheet
The balance sheet was approved on behalf of the Board of Directors on January 21, 2005 by the following:

Ei io Rishio s Di

Notes to Balance Sheet

December 31, 2004

(Expressed in United States dollars)



~~
.

»

General information

Banco de Bogota (Nassau) Limited (the "Bank") is incorporated under the laws of
the Commonwealth of- the Bahamas and is licensed by the Ministry of Finance of The
Bahamas to.carry on banking business. The Bank is a wholly owned subsidiary of Banco
de Bogota S. A. ("parent company") a Panamanian company, which is in turn wholly owned
by Banco de Bogota, S.A. (“the ultimate parent company") incorporated in Colombia. The
Bank's registered office is located in Goodman's Bay Corporate Center, 2 Floor, P.O: Box
N-10700, West Bay Street, Nassau - Bahamas. As of December 31, 2004, the Bank has
one (1) direct employee. A related company provides administrative services to the Bank.

Summary of significant accounting policies

(a) Statements of compliance

This balance sheet has been prepared in accordance with International Financial

Reporting Standards ("IFRS") and its interpretations adopted. by the International
Accounting Standards Board. :

(b) Basis of preparation

The balance sheet is prepared on a fair value basis for available-for-sale: assets.
Other financial assets and liabilities and non-financial assets and liabilities are stated
at amortized cost or historical cost. The accounting policies have been consistently
applied.

(Cc) Financial instruments
() . Classification

Loans and receivables are classified as originated loans and receivables as
these were created by the Bank providing money to a debtor other than those
created with the intention of short-term profit taking.

Held-to-maturity assets are financial assets with fixed or determinable
payments and fixed maturity that the Bank has the intent and ability to hold to
maturity.

Available-for-sale assets are financial assets that are not held for trading
Purposes, originated by the Bank or held to maturity. Available-for-sale
instruments include certain debt securities, and an equity investment in a

(ii) Recognition
The Bank recognizes available-for-sale assets on the date it commits to
purchase the assets. From this date any gains and losses from changes in fair
value of the assets are recognised in equity.

Held-to-maturity assets and loans and receivable originated by the Bank are
recognised on the setttement date, being the date they are transferred to the
Bank.

(ii) Measurements
Financial instruments are measured initially at cost, including transaction costs.

Subsequent to initial recognition all available-for-sale assets are measured at
fair value, except that any investment that does not have a quoted market price
in an active market and whose fair value cannot be reliably measured is stated
at cost including transaction costs, less impairment losses.



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

Originated loans and receivables and held-to-maturity investments are
_measured at amortized cost less impairment losses. Borrowed funds under
repurchase agreements and non-trading liabilities are measured at amortized
cost. Premiums and discounts’ are included in the canying amount of the
related instrument and amortized to interest income/expense.

(iv) Fair value measurement principles

The fair value of financial instruments is based on their quoted market price at
the balance sheet date without any deduction for transaction costs.

(v) Gains and losses on subsequent measurement :

Gains and josses from a change in the fair value of available-for-sale assets
are recognised directly in equity, unt# an investment is considered to be
impaired, at which time the loss is charged to income. - When the financial
assets are sold, collected or otherwise disposed of, the accumulated gain or .
loss recognised in equity is transferred to earnings. :

(vi) Derecognition

A financial asset is derecognized when the Bank losses control over the
contractual rights that comprises that asset. This occurs when the rights are
realized, expire or are surrendered. A financial liability is derecognized when it
is extinguished.

(vii) Specific instruments
Cash and cash equivalents

The Bank considers due from banks with original maturities of three months or
less to be cash equivalents.

Securities

Securities that the Bank holds for the purpose of short-term profit taking are.
classified as trading instruments. Securities that the Bank has the intent to
hold to maturity are classified as held-to-maturity assets. Other investments
are classified as available-for-sale assets. :

Loans

Loans and advances originated by the Bank are classified as loans, which are
reported net of allowances to reflect estimated recoverable amounts. ©

Investment in related party
Investment in related party is classified as an available-for-sale financial asset.
Fixed assets

Fixed assets, which comprise furniture and fixtures, are carried at cost less
accumulated depreciation. Major renewals and betterments to the fixed assets
are capitalized while minor replacements that donot improve or extend the
remaining useful life of the assets are charged to‘expense when incurred.
Fixed assets are depreciated using the straight-line method over the estimated.
service lives of the depreciable assets which for furniture and fixtures is 4 — 10
years.

Liabilities

Liabilities evidenced by paper including demand and time deposits are, -
classified as non-trading liabilities. :

Borrowed funds under repurchase agreements

Borrowed funds under repurchase agreements represent collateralized
financing transactions. The underlying assets which serve as ‘collateral for
these transactions continue to be recognized in the balance sheet and
" measured in accordance with the accounting policy in note 2. (c) (iii).

(ad) Use of estimates

Management of the Bank has made a.number of estimates and assumptions relating
to the reporting of assets and liabilities and the disclosure of contingencies at the date
of the balance sheet to prepare this balance sheet in conformity with IFRS. Actual
results could differ from.those estimates.

(e) Fair value estimates

Fair value estimates are made at specific point in time, based on relevant market
information and information about the financial instrument. ‘These estimates do not
reflect any premium or discount that could result from offering for sale at one time the
Bank’s entire holdings of a particular financial instrument. These estimates are
subjective in nature and involve uncertainties and matters of significant judgment and,
therefore, cannot be determined with precision. Changes in assumptions could
significantly affect the estimates. : tl

Except for securities held-to-maturity, the carrying amounts of the Bank's significant
financial instruments approximate fair values because of one or more of the following
reasons:

(i) Immediate or short-term maturity.

(ii) Carrying value approximates market value.
(iii) Interest rates approximate current’ market rates.

() Impairment
Financial assets are reviewed at each balance sheet date to determine whether there
is objective evidence of impairment. tf any such identification exists, the asset's
recoverable amount is estimated. An impairment loss is recognised to the extent the
asset's carrying value exceeds the recoverable amount.

Transactions with affiliates

The parent company and other companies owned by the ultimate parent company,
represent related parties and are referred to in this balance sheet is as “affiliates".

During the years ended December 31, 2004 and 2008, an affiliate provided certain
administrative services to the Bank.amounting to $60,000 per annum. Another affiliate
provided office space for an annual fee of $126,000 for the year ended December 31, 2004
(2003: $124,500). ae

Due from banks

The geographical distribution of due from banks by country of the head office bank is as
follows: . - nee s \

2004 2003
Latin America and the Caribbean no 15,243,378 1,767,351

United States of America and Canada 52,259 208 62,292 997
LL RL tr tt gd ae pene VIL

67,502,586 64,060,348
Due from banks-time earn interest at rates varying. from 2.10% to 2.35% (2003: 0.75% to
1.056%) per annum. a, ae :
Loans, net

Loans outstanding by country of borrower are as follows:

ess SPSS

2004 2003

rere rt earn er laa fe eee a

Percentage - Percentage

Amount __ of total loans Amount |_ of total loans
Colombia 66,411,925 99% 44,217,230 89%
Panama 6,664 |. 0% 90,318 0%
Other 384,000 1% 5,346,554 11%
: 66,802,589 © 100% 49,654,102 100%

Less: allowance for possible i : :
loan losses (1,310,123) (3,600,000)

‘_unearned income (194,199)

65,492,466 45,859,903 :

RS A aps

The movement of the allowance for possible loan losses for the year is shown below:

ey



2004 2003
Balance at the beginning of year 3,600,000 2,700,000
Provision charged to expense 415,500 900,000

Loans charged off 2,705,377

loans charged off 7 2705 877)
Balance at the end of year 1,310,123 3,600,000

’

Loans outstanding by type of industry are as follows: oe



2004 2003
Government 60,236,725 37,710,175
Commercial and industrial 6,565,864 11,943,927

66,802,589 49,654 102

rece tS NN ea enter ee

Loans earn interest at rates varying from 2.7025% to 11.00% (2003: 2.17% to 10.50%) per
annum.

Securities available-tor-saie

At December 31, 2004, securities available-for-sale comprised the following: .

Fair Amortized Unrealised
Value Cost

Republic of Colombia with various maturities

to 2011 and interest ranging from 7.625% to ‘

10.50% per annum. 35,895,692 35,780,237 115,455

Petroleos Mexicanos, maturing in Feb/1 2005

with interest at 6.50% per annum. 3,498,709 3,486,519 12,190
Daimler Chrysler USA maturing on Jan/20,
2005 with interast at 7.40% per annum. 1,553,348 1,551,387 ives
Republica de Chile, maturing on July 23,
2007 with interest at 5.6250% per annum 5,138,360 Sleser8 ape
Union de Estados Mexicanos, maturing on
April 6, 2005 with interest at 9.75% per 4,020,600 1,010,534 10,068

annum.

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THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005, PAGE 9B

Py
fa!
f ; 11. Maturity of significant assets and Ilabilities
3 Ministerio de Hacienda y Credito Publico, with oH et
4 various maturities to April 20, 2006 and The contractual maturities of significant categories of assets and liabilities are summarised
3 interest ranging from 1.1599% to 2.1694% 1,494,651 1,494,651 _ below: : :
: per annum. :
2 LSE
L Freddie Mac with, various maturities to 2009 Maturity (days 2004 2003
i sic ineiees ranging from 2.00% to 3.00% per 4,999,450 ‘ 5,000,000 (550)
Assets:
Hepublica de Brazil, maturing on January 11, 2,133,200 2,102,144 31,056 Due from banks:
2006 with interest at 10.25% per annum Demand deposits On demand 1,902,586 2,060,348
4 Transgas de Occidente, S. A. E.S.P.: ;
‘ i 3,833,569 common shares at a nominal value Time deposits * 1-30 65,600,000 62,000,000
of $500 Colombian pesos each share, which 5.269.901 . 4,777,873 492,028 67,502,586 64,060,348
i represent 2.80% ownership. tea ae!
59,003,911 58,326,703 677,208 Loans 1-90 2,414,826 80,000
181-360 537,570 890,625
rf Republic of Colombia with various 1 to 5 years 61,613,262 44,752,347
maturities to 2011 and interest ranging Over 5 years 2,236,931 936,931
, from 7.625% to 10.50% per annum. 46,919,103 46,116,037 801,006 Past due — 2,800,000
| E ie 66,802,589 49,459,903
: Banco ABN Amro Real, S. A. maturing on Securities:
July/28, 2004 with interest at 5.00% per Available -for- sale 1 to 5 years 51,142,283 64,541,041
annum. 3,519,789 3,490,938 28,851 : Over 5 years 7,861,628 11,405,626
: 59,003,911 75,946,667
Petroleos Mexicanos, maturing in Feb/1 ;
2005 with interest at 6.50% per annum. 3,643,985 3,515,324 128,661 Held- to -maturity 1 to 5 years 20,364,747 20,687,473
Daimler Chrysler USA maturing on Investment in related party Not applicable 166,068 166,068 .
Jan/20, 2005 with interest at 7.40% per
annum. 1,633,498 1,576,768 56,730
Liabilities:
Banco Itau, S. A., maturing on Nov/29, Demand deposits On demand _ 4,870,877 ~ 5,006,936
2004 with interest at 5% per annum. 3,586,345 3,533,273 53,072 :
Time deposits 1-90 115,834,879 123,498,225
Banco Bradesco, S. A., maturing on July 91-180 33,422,733 27,858,788
2, 2004 with interest at 5.000% per 181-360 1,893,113 2,778,411
annum. d 3,556,210 3,525,433 30,777 151,150,725 154,135,424
Union de Estados Mexicanos, maturing Borrowed funds under repurchase
on April 6,:2005 with interest at 9.75% agreements ‘ 181-360" 15,000,000 10,000,000
per annum. 1,107,000 1,050,697 56,303 ee PAQTE CETUS a EEE
Republica de Chile, maturing on July 23, ;
2007 with interest at 5.6300% per annum 5,357,100. 5,286,940 70,160
Ministerio de Hacienda y Crédito Publico 12. Managing Agen
with various maturities to April 20, 2006 ; Since March 13, 2002, the Bank entered into a management contract with Deloitte &
and interest ranging from 1.1599% to s : is to permit the
2.1700% per annum. 1,336,975 1,368,648 (31,673) Touche Corporate Services Ltd. The purpose of the agency arrangement is to pe
; Bank to comply with physical presence requirements of The Central Bank of the Bahamas.
; Transgas de Occidente, S. A. E.S.P.: . . because the Bank has
4 3,833,569 common shares at a nominal This agreement was duly canceled in the second semester of 2004
: value of $600 Colombian pesos each now established a physical presence in The Bahamas.
i share, which represent 2.80% ownership. _. 5,286,662 5,091,001 195,661
§ 75,946,667 74,557,119 1,389,548
t f
4 13. Risk Management
4 ; : ; The most important types of financial.risk to which the Bank is exposed are credit risk,
: Fair values of securities, other than the Transgas de Occidente investment, were obtained liquidity risk and price risk. Price risk includes. currency risk, interest rate risk and market
5 from an investment banking firm. The fair value of the Transgas de Occidente investment risk. :
‘ was determined by management using a discounted cash flow analysis. The Bank maintains positions in the bond market for investment purposes, as described in
« At December 31, 2004, Bonds of the Republic of Colombia amounting to $19,590,880 notes 6 and 7. Since the Bank’s investments have been issued by well recognised debtors,
dq (2003: $13,150,126) were pledged as a collateral guarantee of borrowed funds under it is management's belief that the Bank is not exposed to significant credit risk on these
iS repurchase agreements described in note 10. investments. . These instruments are subject to market risk, the risk that future changes in
al , market conditions may make an instrument less valuable.
7. Securities held-to-maturity In the case of non-trading financial instruments, the Bank is subject to credit risk, liquidity
a Securities held-to-maturity comprise the following: risk and interest rate risk. Credit risk is the risk that the counterparty to the loan might
wd default on their obligation and interest rate risk is'the risk of interest rate fluctuations to the
2004 2003 extent that future market interest rates become significantly different to the rates set by the
4 U. S Treasury Notes maturing on Feb/15, 2006, with : Bank. To manage the level of credit risk, the Bank only deals with counterparties of good
a interest at 5.625% per annum (2002: 5.625%). $ 20,364,747 20,667,473 credit standing, and where appropriate, obtains collateral.
rq $ 20,364,747 20,667,473 Liquidity risk arises in the general funding of the Bank's activities and in the management of
“ay age : ‘ . : see
"4 Fair Value $ 20,524,000 21,556,200 positions. It includes both the tisk of being unable to fund assets at appropriate maturities
q and rates and the risk of being unable to liquidate an asset at a reasonable price and in an
3 Fair value has been determined from quotations provided by investment banking firms. - appropriate time frame. The Bank has access to a diverse funding base. Funds are raised
#4 substantially by accepting deposits from customers. This enhances funding flexibility and
a limits dependence on any one source of funds. Overall liquidity risk is monitored on a global
a level by the ultimate parent company.
A 8. Investment in related party :
aa Investment in related party comprises the following:
ry The Bank's operations are subjec* to the risk of interest rate fluctuations to the extend that
ts 2004 2003 interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities mature or re-price at different times or
fi Almaviva, SA.- Colombia, 30,486 common shares in differing amounts. Contractual maturity profiles are disclosed in note 11. _Deposits with
ia at a nominal value of 100 Colombian pesos | : . and from banks, loans and customers’ deposits are generally at fixed interest rates and are
(US$0.10) each share, which represents 0.88% therefore re-priced at maturity or on interest revision dates. ; cafe
eB ownership. #: ses $0 seni. bie ets $..: _166,068 166,068 ee One alas heat eile ook oS le! Saou
= Almaviva, S. A. is related party by way of common ownership and control. ,
‘l 5 14. Recently Revised and Issued Accounting Standard
“1 2 : . ‘ Z t -
Py Sy, * Tine: Sepeeite During 2003, the International Accounting Standards Board revised fifteen International -
A At December 31, 2004 time deposits include $45,713,147 (2003: $49,085,892) representing Accounting Standards (IASs) and withdrew one JAS, with effect from January 1, 2005. In
“ deposits pledged by customers to the order of the Bank and affiliates as security for OBns addition, during 2004 six new International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRSs) were
rs and other facilities. The customers are primarily concentrated in South America. issued, with effect primarily form January 1, 2005, except for IFRS 3 that applies to the
") Customers’ time deposits earn interest at rates varying from 1.00% to 9.50% (2003: 1.00% accounting for business combinations for which the agreement date is on or after March 31,
y ’ to 7.00%) per annum. 2004, and: to any goodwill arising from such business combinations. When these
we amendments and new standards are adopted by an entity, it will be necessary to re-state.

“#4



Ba

£0 FO G8 RR RLY,

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10. Borrowed funds under repurchase agreements

At December 31, 2004 the Bank maintained short-term financing under repurchase
agreements with banks of $15,000,000 (2003: $10,000,000) at interest rates adjustable
quarterly which at December 31, 2004 was 3.28% (2003: 1.5%) per.annum. Borrowed
funds are secured by securities available-for-sale of $19,590,880 as described in note 6

(2003: $13,150,126).

aU asl

The Tribune

OP ET Get

Bl PIAL



Your Balance Sheets & Legal Notices HH



certain figures for the previous period presented that may have an impact on the financial
position, results of operations, movements in equity, and disclosures in notes to the balance
sheet.

As of the date of issuance of these balance sheet, management of the Bank has not
reasonably determined the effect that the adoption of the revised and new accounting
standards will have on this balance sheet and notes thereto.





PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Late arrival Mullings
is ready for early start



i By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

STA CATHARINA, Cura-
cao: Devin Mullings arrived in
town on Wednesday night, two
days after the rest of the
Bahamian team had already set-
tled in to play the Netherlands
Antilles in the first round of the
American Zone II Davis Cup
tie.

But 19-year-old Mullings,
who came directly from Ohio
State where he played to play a
couple of matches for the Buck-
eyes, Said he’s looking forward
to playing the opening match
today at the Sta Catharina

As the Bahamas’ top seed,
the southpaw was drawn yes-
terday to play against the
Netherlands Antilles’ number
two player Rasid Winklaar,
another left-hander, who was
granted permission to go to
school to sit an exam, rather
than attend the draw.

“I’m doing fine, I’m hitting

the ball, so I’m ready to go,”
said the Grand Bahama native.
“T just want to go out there and
get the first point on the board
for the Bahamas.

“If we play our cards right,
we will be alright.”

Although he’s had some
experience with a couple of the

Sports & Country Club.

Mbycvant enon
Davis Cup clash

FROM page one

about Rojer’s match up with Rolle. “I feel confident that our
team will prevail in the end.

“We're looking forward to Marvin having a good
match. He’s in shape. He worked extremely hard with
the rest of the team all this mec I think he’s ready to
play.”

Farrington, who began Stave Davis Cup for the
Bahamas since 1989 and is now in his fifth consecutive
year as captain, said the cohesiveness he’s experi-
enced since they arrived here on Sunday is certainly
going to help this squad as they go through the tie.

Impressed

“With the team we have travelling with us repre-
senting the Bahamas, I’m impressed with their work
ethic, attitude and team unity,” Farrington stressed.

“T think we have a good group of young players, so
I am looking forward to some good things happening
for the Bahamas, not just this weekend, but in the
future.”

Depending on the outcome of the first two singles,
Farrington is expected to send the team’s youngest
player, Ryan Sweeting, out on Saturday to play the
pivotal doubles with Rolle.

They are scheduled to play the team of Rojer and
Raoul Behr, the two most experienced members of
the Netherlands Antilles’ team.

However, both teams will have at least one hour
before the match starts at 10.30am to make an adjust-
ment to their line-up.

On Sunday, the reverse singles will be held with
Rolle facing Rojer in the much anticipated showdown
between the two top teams. If necessary, the second
reverse single will feature Rolle and Winklaar.

_ But those match-ups could also change depending on
‘the outcome of the tie after the doubles.



Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association’s president Mary |

‘Shelley had anticipated seeing the reverse in the open-
‘ing singles with Rolle playing second so he can get a
‘little more acclimatised.

Concerned

“But the draw is the draw, so he will have to play the

‘first match,” she noted. “I’m just concerned about
‘how quickly he can adjust in the time period that he
‘has.
: “However, looking at it today when they were doing
, the draw, I think the pressure is going to be on Marvin.
‘But if Devin can put the points on the Deard for us
‘right away, we will be okay.”

Netherlands Antilles’ captain Francis Haver said
they are excited about the tie and the team from the
. Bahamas they have to face.

. “I know Devin and Ryan from when they played on
‘the junior circuit,” said Hoyer, who travelled with
: Mullings as a coach on the junior circuit. “Ryan, also,
: | know him from the circuit. So I think it’s going to be
, an interesting tie.’

Having seen their capabilities before, Hoyer said
he has some idea as to how they both play but, as
‘ that was over a year ago,.he expects that they would
: have improved.

Pressure

r “JT know how they play and I feel that we have a

: team that can win the first two matches. That would
really put the pressure on the Bahamas.”

__Rojer likes the idea that the tie is being played on

' their soil.

“It’s always an advantage playing at home before the
crowd,” he insisted. “But the Bahamas is a young,

: pretty strong team. They should be eager to fight.

“I think we are also a lot younger than we were in
the past, so I think we should give it a good battle.”
Not having a chance to see Rolle play, Rojer said he
| expects that he will provide a stiff challenge. But he

indicated that he’s hoping that he and Rolle can real-
| ly play against each other on Sunday.

Hopefully, it would come down to deciding the out-

‘come of the tie.
| The winner of the tie will automatically stay in Zone

II and have a chance to move back into Zone One

next year. The loser will have to avoid being relegat-

ed to zone IV.

After playing in Zone One from 1989, the Bahamas
were relegated to Zone II in September, 2003 at home
against Chile.

The Netherlands Antilles were promoted to Zone II

| last year when they beat Honduras.

MRM 22 ENR AUER UN REBAR RAER He k NOINE AOA SEO SEN RFU Ah PRL AML MR Pate

|



Netherlands Antilles’ players,
including their captain, Frances
Hoyer, Mullings said he’s not
taking their team lightly.
“Every match is important. I
just want to go out there and
play my best,’ he declared. “The
best is a best-of-five, so I have
plenty of time to work my
rhythm. I think I will be fine.”

Better

Despite his late arrival,
Mullings said, the more he
plays, the more he anticipates
getting better. So he’s glad that
he’s going to get to swing the
racket first.

Marvin Rolle, the No.2 seed,
who will face Netherlands
Antilles’ top seed Jean-Julien
Rojer in the second singles
today, said he’s had some good
workouts with Ryan Sweeting
and H’Cone Thompson. . -

So he’s confident that he will



@ By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

be ready to play.
“The sun is pretty hot, but

‘John has been running us

around,” said Rolle, who admit-
ted that he. felt the heat the first
day, but was able to quickly
adjust to the climate.

As for the slow hard courts,
Rolle said it plays similar to the
environment at.home at the
National Tennis Centre, so he
doesn’t expect any problems,
not even against the top seed,
who has the best rankings of all
the players in the tie.

“Tm just going to go out
there and give it my all,” Rolle

stressed. “I’m playing for my

country and with the guys
cheering me on and John coach-
ing me, I’m just ready to go out
and give it my all.” .

Rolle, 22, is currently playing
on the professional circuit. He
previously played at Nick Bol-
letteri Tennis Academy and for
Texas A&M University. -

Players in the regional programme will
be assessed at a national level, and will



opmental programmes.

centres this weekend.

every July.

THE Bahamas Football Association
(BFA) opened up its regional soccer cen-
tres over the weekend, centres which it
believes will help with their national devel-

Having kicked off the boy’s programme,
the BFA is gearing up to host their girls’

The centres cater for soccer players aged
9-15 for boys and 10-15 for girls.

The regional centres will also be used as
a forerunner for the BFA’s National Cen-
tre for Excellence programme which runs

gramme.

ing field.

School.

then be invited out to the National Pro-

Semunar

On Wednesday past,.BFA’s technical
department conducted an inset seminar
on sports psychology.

' The seminar, which was designed to help
prepare coaches, players and officials
was held at the Kingsway Academy.

B& THE BAHAMAS team watches eagerly as the draw takes place.

Ryan Sweeting, who is sched-
uled to team up with Rolle to
play the pivotal doubles on Sat-
urday, he’s just excited to be
able to go out and wet his feet
in his first match in his second
straight tie.

Important

“I’m just glad to be on the
team to represent my country

again,” said Sweeting, who trav-

elled to Venezuela last year, but
didn’t play. “Now I have a

_chance to play a match. The
_ doubles is a pretty important
match, so I hope to do my best.”

Sweeting, the youngest mem-
ber of the team at age 17, said

since they arrived here on Sun-.
' day, Farrington has taken them

through tough training sessions
and he feels the hard work will
pay off this weekend.

- Although he’s not listed to
play, H’Cone Thompson, the

Soccer centres put boys and girls on the ball

Centres are held every Friday and Sat-
urday at the College of the Bahamas play- »

Maine.

petition.

- Copyrighted Material
[Syndicated | Content

It covered vital topics. as goal setting,
mental preparation and exercises for the
match, and exercises which.should be
utilised during competition.

Instructed

Fifty-one people participated‘in'the sem-
inar, which was directed by Nitidnal Soc-
cer Coaches Association of Americas .
(NSCAA) staff instructor George Purgavi,
the men’s soccer coach at Bates College in

BFA is expecting to host at least one
clinic and seminar each month, which will
help them prepare for international com-

(Photo: Lucien LS)

fourth member of the team,
feels that they have bonded

- very well and for him, it doesn’t

matter whether or not he gets to
play.

“Everybody finished ahead
of me at the trials. I feel I can go
out there and compete and'even
win, but I give credit to the guys
and it is John’s decision,” stated
Thompson, who is back on the ©
team for the second straight
year.

“T know the guys have all
been working hard, so I think
we have a good chance to win 3-
0. So hopefully they can do that
and I could get a chance to play
on Sunday.”

But whether or not he plays,

"the 24-year-old Lafayette Col-

lege graduate said he under-
stand that Davis Cup is bigger
than any one player, so he’s
just willing to do.whatever
is necessary to help the team
win.

























Available from Commercial News Providers”

v





Ob Re Kr Rt hi

SPORTS



*

Senior high schools hit the
reach for championships

SON



i i ae
AN oF NN



’



FROM page one

schools.
“We are looking forward to day two, and if the athletes con-

tinue to perform the way they are doing then we will be able to
walk away with the title.

“As a coach I must say that we are happy with all the per-
formances, we had at least two persons in each of the finals,
persons who weren’t able to make it to the finals tried their
hardest, so we are still in good shape.

“All we need the athletes to do is show up on time, like they
did today and go all out. My thing is I want as many of them
qualify for the nationals, with the nationals being held in Grand
Bahama will give them an opportunity to get in some more com-

petition.”
After 66 events, the Knights lead all schools with 346 points;

CC Sweeting Cobras 324; Pacers, 241; Rattlers, 152; Marlins,
147.50; Stingrays, 138.50; and GHS Magics, 93 points.

‘
a
i

| Up To $7000 Paid For Beatles | 3. | _ | . . : EMEA Ts UT aaa ea mL Ma
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FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com





@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter

STA CATHARINA,
Curacao — Top seed Devin
Mullings will be the first out
of the blocks to compete for
the Bahamas when the
American Zone One Davis
Cup tie against the Nether-
lands Antilles gets under-
way today.

Netherlands Antilles’
number two seed Rasid
Winklaart was the first
name pulled from the cup
in yesterday’s draw at the
St Catharina Sports &
Country Club. 2

As a result of the way the
draw is set, he automatical-
ly gets to play Mullings in
the opening singles at 10am
(11am Curacao time) in the
best-of-five sets.

Singles ©

In the second singles
match that follows, No. 2
seed Marvin Rolle will face
Netherlands Antilles’ top
seed Jean-Julien Rojer.

“Devin is just coming off
a couple of college wins, so
he’s been playing well,” said
team captain John Farring-
ton, about Mullings, a play-
er with the Ohio State
Buckeyes.

“So I’m looking forward
to him playing well and
coming out with a win.”

Farrington, however, was
a little concerned about the
adjustment that the Grand
Bahamian would have to
make in a 24-hour period,
having just arrived here
Wednesday night from
Ohio.

Switch

However, Farrington said
he’s confident that Mullings
will be able to make the
switch from the indoor
courts to the slow hard
court they will have to play
on in the humidity in Cura-
cao.

While that may not be
much of a transition to deal
with, Farrington feels the
biggest problem they will
have to contend with is
Rojer, the only player in the
tie with a solid ATP rank-
ing.

Rojer, who at age 23 is
30-8 in Davis Cup play, is
currently pegged at 285 in
singles and 241 in doubles,
while Mullings, the only
other player with a ranking,
is 1470.

“In Davis Cup, anything
can happen. Anything is
possible,” said Farrington,

SEE page 10B






























































@ By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

A FIVE-year-old record
came crashing down yester-
day with one pitch by Tracey
Morrison in the GSSSA
Championships.

Morrison’s throw of 39.78
meters in the javelin — equiv-
alent to 130 feet five inches —
erased the old marking of
38.75m, which she set in
2000.

Next in the event was
Shavette Taylor with
31.85m; Samantha Pratt,
29.96 and Thela Johnson
who rounded off the top
four spots with 28.42.

The top four competitors —

in the event were able to
qualify for the national high
school championships, which

are set for April in Grand
‘Bahama.

Just before stepping over
to the javelin’s runway, Mor-
rison had to cool off from a
victory in the discus. Her
best throw of 31.72m was
enough for her to take top
honours, edging out team-
mate Roselyn Benjamin who
threw 31.27m and CI Gib-
son Rattlers’ Saberina Walk-
er’s 29.59.

Medallist

Morrison, a former Carif-
ta medalist, fell short of
qualification marks for this
year’s Carifta games, but
says she is optimistic about
making it.

“J don’t see why I can’t
qualify, I still have the shot

putt to do so I am still opti-
mistic about that,” said Mor-
rison.

“T didn’t even know I did
break the record until I
heard them announce it over
the speakers. It feels great,
even though I set the record.
It shows improvement and
gives me hope as I continue
on this season.”

Morrison, who has a nag-
ging shoulder injury, will
compete in the shot putt
during the evening session
of the meet. She will need
to throw 14.15m to qualify.

In the other two events,
Morrison needed a best
throw of 40.95m in the discus
and 43.70m in the javelin, to
qualify.

Cara Bowleg expressed
her disappointment about

A day of drama at senior high school championships



not qualifying in her
favourite event — the high
jump — after winning.

Bowleg, who wanted to
surpass the mark of 1.80m
in the senior girls jumping
event, was only able to clear
1.60m.

Jumps

Entering the event at
1.52m, Bowleg took three
jumps to finally win at
1.60m, her personal best
record is 1.68m.

She said: “I am very dis-
appointed with my perfor-
mance, I am capable of
jumping better, but I guess it
won’t happen today.

“J don’t know if I will
make it on the team, but if I
am given the opportunity I

A.l.D., Supporting








CR WALKER’S
Devando Gibson crosses —
the line aheadof RM

o: Felipé Major!
Tribune Staff)



will be grateful. I know I am
able to jump way better than
I did.”

A photo-finish had to be
used to determine the win-
ner in the senior boy’s
4x100m event.

Edging out the RM Bai-
ley Pacers were the CR
Walker Knights, in a time of
43.96 seconds to the Pacers’
43.97 seconds. Rounding out
the field was CV Bethel
Stingrays with 44.08, CC
Sweeting Cobras at 44.23
and Doris Johnson Marlins
with 44.31 seconds.

Knights’ head coach Floyd
Armbrister said: “The ath-
letes are very disciplined,
and this is what is giving us
the edge over the other

SEE page 11B



THE BAHAMAS DAVIS CUP TEAM.

Wulff Road, Nassau, The Bahamas |

A.I.D. — Automotive & Industrial Distributors

Phone: 393-7481 |

Fax: 393-4258

www.aidbahamaislands.com



Section
Missing
or
Unavailable



Full Text








itt laste ik...





74F
62F

Brn eet et



Inmate escapes
from Her
Majesty’s Prison

i By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

A CONVICTED rapist and
armed robber was on the run
in New Providence last night
after escaping from Her
Majesty’s Prison.

Police are searching for
escaped prison inmate Barry
Parcoi, 43, who is serving a life
sentence for rape and forcible
detention with intent, as well as
a 20-year sentence for armed
robbery.

He is described as armed and
extremely dangerous.

According to reports, some-
time between Wednesday night
and the early hours of yester-
day, Parcoi escaped from the
tnedium security housing block,
where he has been detained for
the past two years.

Prior to that, he had spent
19 years in maximum security.

Prison officials suspect that
Parcoi, who has a long list of
charges against him, including
possession of an unlicensed
firearm, possession of ammuni-
tion and escape from lawful cus-
tody, was able to break-out

, through the bathroom wall.

Speaking with the members
of the media at his offices yes-
terday morning, newly appoint-
ed Prison Superintendent Dr
Elliston Rahming said that to
determine the facts of the suc-

cessful escape, he has asked the »

police to conduct “a thorough
investigation of the inmates in
that section of the medium
security housing unit, as well as

the six officers who were on
duty within the confines of
medium security.”

Citing former US president
John F Kennedy, Dr Rahming
said: “Let the word go forth to
friend and foe alike, inmate or
officer, that we will make any
sacrifice, exert every effort,
remove every impediment,
reward any whistle blower and
apply the fullest measure of the
law to any wrong doer whom-
soever.’

Parcoi was first found miss-
ing yesterday at 6am when
prison guards coming on shift
conducted their routine head
count.

Dr Rahming said that one
theory is that during the day on
Wednesday, Parcoi was able to
puncture “the thin layer of con-
crete behind the toilet” in the
bathroom, and create.a hole in
the wall, through which he
escaped at a later point in time.

“We had roof repairs going
on here yesterday (Wednesday)
and we think he used the legit-
imate sound of the roof repairs
to make a sound in here which
created this kind of puncture in
the layer of concrete. He would
have taken the toilet top and
placed it back over that hole,
to camouflage what he had
done, and then under the cover
of darkness removed it and
made his escape,” he said.

Dr Rahming explained that
“no one had ever thought of

SEE page 16



Betsy Rodriquez
St. Johns Shipping
Ware House #4
1800 S.E. 19th Ave.
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316
Phone: 1 (954) 527-0034
Fax: 1 (954) 522-4828





Tel: (242) 328-0832
Fax: (242) 328-0847

Tel: (242) 351-1501





Laser Freight International










Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005





armed and dangerous.

(Above photo: Mario Duncanson)

@ CONVICTED rapist Barry Parcoi
is on the rum from Her Majesty’s Prison
after smashing a hole in a bathroom
wall and fleeing. He is considered











Mitchell: US report

shows the Bahamas

has nothing to hide

@ By PACO NUNEZ

Tribune Staff Reporter

THE US government’s
human rights report shows
that the Bahamas has “an
open and transparent govern-
ment” with nothing to hide,
according to Foreign Affairs
Minister Fred Mitchell.

Mr Mitchell pointed out
that the report, released by
the US State Department on
Monday, did not accuse the
Bahamas of having an official
policy sanctioning human
rights abuses of any kind.

“The fact of which we ought

’

to be proud in the Bahamas, is
that we have an open and
transparent government with
systems that respond to any
allegations of inhumane treat-
ment or conduct,” Mr
Mitchell said.

He emphasised that the
Bahamas is an “open society,’
where anyone is free to make
their comments and nndings
public.

Mr Mitchell was speaking

yesterday at a press confer-
ence on his return from a
series of meetings in Wash-

SEE page 16



Amendments

V ALFRED GRAY, minis-
ter responsible for local gov-
ernment, said yesterday that
government plans to implement
a number of amendments in the
House of Assembly which will
facilitate the smooth running of
the Family Islands.

Mr Gray held a press confer-
ence to announce that the
month of March has been des-
ignated local government
month, during which the min-
istry will try to increase aware-
ness of the role local govern-
ment plays in the development
of the Family Islands.

Mr Gray said the theme will
be “promoting local democracy

and development” which he

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said is in keeping with the inter-
national local government
theme, “deepening local democ-
racy.”

He said that many Bahami-
ans are not aware of the vital
role Family Island administra-
tors play in the daily operations
and development of the Family
Islands.

While he would not elabo-
rate, Mr Gray said government
would be seeking amendments
to local government legislation
before local elections come up
in June. He did say that among
the proposed amendments
would be the introduction of
grades for administrations.

“In the main we are seeking
to call Family Island Adminis-

SEE page 16

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PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005

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PULTE we we RY ee ee

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Technical difficulties hit
Cable Bahamas service

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a TELEVISION screens are blank at the offices of Cable Bahamas.

@ By PAUL G.
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Repair



TECHNICAL difficulties
relating to control software
resulted in the disabling of
all “top box” service of
Cable Bahamas for the past
two days.

Dr Keith Wisdom, the
director of Public Affairs
at Cable Bahamas, said
that the problem disabled
approximately 15 per cent
of their subscribers’ ser-
vices.

Maintenance

“Through the wee hours
of Wednesday morning
Cable Bahamas carried out
necessary maintenance
procedures on the compa-

‘ny’s broadband network.

This operation was
designed to be seamless
and transparent to the cus-
tomer. This was due to be
completed before dawn
Wednesday morning,” Dr
Wisdom said.

However, “technical dif-

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ficulties” with the compa-
ny’s control software dur-
ing this maintenance
process, disabled the video
services to.all set top box
subscribers.

“The effects of the prob-
lem meant that the sub-
scribers whose services
were delivered through set
top boxes experienced loss
of all video services. By the
end of Wednesday’s busi-
ness, approximately 15 per
cent of those affected. were
restored, and the remiain-
ing customers should have
service resumed soon,” he
said.

Dr Wisdom mentioned
that they actually found the
problem and began
addressing it by early

Wednesday afternoon, and’:

will continue to address it,
to its end.

He assured his customers
that as the initial repairs
have already been done,

MAIN SECTION
Local News.
Editorial/Letters. Ean
Out There...
Weather.......

“Comics... h.a:

(Phot Mario Duncanson)

the process of actually
bringing the service back
up is now as simple as an
electrical signal being sent
to the set top box.

“If necessary, periodic
updates will be given of
our progress.

Calls

“As a result of our set

top black out, the Cable

Bahamas customer care
call centre has been inun-
dated with a large number
of calls.

“So-as a result, most of
our lines are busy with
your calls.

“Over the last 36 hours
Cable Bahamas customer
service representatives
have been diligently work-

ing‘with. our customers to

clarify the problem and
update them as to when
their service will be
restored,” he said.

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THE TRIBUNE





& By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

MEMBERS of the public
_should be opened-minded
towards individuals released
from prison and leave the
door open for the possibility
that the individual may be
deserving of a second chance,
said new Superintendent of
Her Majesty’s Prison Elliston
Rahming.

Dr Rahming was the guest
speaker at the Kiwanis Club
of Cable Beach’s weekly
meeting on Wednesday
evening. The same evening
convicted rapist Barry Parcoi,
who was serving a life sen-
tence, escaped from Her

}sMajesty’s Prison at Fox Hill.

He was unaware of the escape
before his speech to club
members.

He said: “Once a person
has been to prison, members
of the public ought to see him
not as an ex-offender full stop,
but to see him as-an ex-
offender possibly deserving of
a second chance. Some are
not deserving, but if you write
them all off those who are
deserving wouldn’t get that
second chance.”

He explained that 98 per
cent of people who go to
prison return to society. If
they return to a society that
has a built-in prejudice against
them, it is almost as if the pub-
lic is “enticing you, almost
inviting you to go back to your
natural instincts and re-
offend.”

“While rehabilitation begins
in prison, it must be tested in
the outside community.
Knowing that many of them
have low self-esteem, had a
series of failures in their life
and now having spent there
time in prison, to come back
and meet another series of
failures; there is the possibili-
ty of either giving up on trying
to do what is right and giving
into those things that you
know are wrong,” he said.

' Dr Rahming explained that
it is possible for criminal
records to be expunged.

If released from prison on
minor offences, it takes sev-
en year before that record can
be expunged.

If someone went to prison
for a more serious offences
like robbery the waiting peri-
od is fourteen years for a
clean police record. Howev-

Bahamas Baptist Union
Evangelist

az YO

Prison Uae

March 7 - March 1 4th, 2009
South Beach Union Baptist Church
: 7:00p.m. Nightly

Speakers:

SPECIAL MUSIC BY VARIOUS UN ION
CHURCH CHOIRS

er, he stated that there are
certain offences that current-
ly cannot be expunged, they
include armed robbery, drug
trafficking with the intent to
supply and murder.

In his presentation the four
primary functions of prisons
were outlined, which consist
of incarcerating, as punish-
ment, to deter, and rehabili-
tation.

In carrying out these func-
tions, he referred to what he
terms as the seven “P’s” of
penology, which consist of the
philosophy, policies, proce-
dures, personal, programmes,

premises, and planning of the

institution.

On the bases of planning
for the prison, Dr Rahming
noted that a juvenile unit and
a half-way house for inmates
who are about to be released
are needed.

Showcased

He mentioned that they are
looking at-having a facility in
one of the industrial parks, so
that when products are made
in prison they can be show-
cased. Additionally, it can
serve as a place for a job

-opportunity for an inmate

upon being released, he said.

Ten short term goals of her
Majesty’s Prison were con-
veyed to the Kiwanis’ Club
members.

He said that nothing super-
sedes the goal to protect the
public against escapes.

Other goals included to cre-
ate a climate wherein inmates
are treated humanely with a
view towards humanising, not
demonising them, attain and
maintain a high level of moti-
vation and enthusiasm among
staff and to move the institu-
tion towards greater financial
self-sufficiency.

Dr Rahming shared his
vision for Her Majesty’s
Prison: “I see a prison that has
an atmosphere conducive to
learning because there is a
strong relationship between
learning and re-offending. I
see it as being a clean and
pristine institution that fol-
lows the rules of proper
hygiene and sanitation at all
times.

“T also see it as being less of
a burden on central govern-
ment by using its resources to
engage in productive activi-
ties.”

|S SAVED IN Ar
GH ETTO

JOHN 4:29,...COME SEE A MAN

| Rev. Wilton A. McKenzie Rev. Dr. Victor Cooper

Bahamas Baptist Union
Assistant Evangelist




H

@ By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE cause of death for murder
victims Rosnell Newbold and her
grandson Kevin Wilson were
revealed in court yesterday.

Dr Govinda Raju, a forensic
pathologist with the Princess Mar-
paret Hospital told the Supreme

Court that Kevin Wilson died due .

to a collection of blood in the tho-

racic cavity, or the throat, after

being stabbed in the left lung.
While the doctor said it was the

immediate cause.of death, the
deceased, who was 26 at the time,
also suffered from other wounds.
The court, being presided over by
Justice Anita Allen, was told that
Mr Wilson suffered from ‘16
wounds, most of which occurred
to the back and neck.

His grandmother, who was 75,
died as a result of a stab injury to
the neck. She had three wounds,

' including a slice on the left hand.

Twenty-six year-old Basil

' Fitzgerald Gordon is accused of

breaking into their home on Spice
Street, Pinewood Gardens, and

FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005, PAGE 3

killing them on June 16, 2002.

The post-mortem examinations
for the deceased occurred on June
18, 2002.

Dr Raju told the court he could
not give the time of death because
their bodies had already been
placed in the freezer prior to his
examination.

Doctor —

Police reported to the doctor
that one victim died at around
6am, and the other a half-hour lat-
er.
He collected samples of blood
from the deceased, along with
urine and stomach fluids. They
were sent to the police forensics

Ist) Doctor reveals cause of
OLS death for murder victims

lish'a chain of command to explain
the order in which DNA samples
were collected and handed over

. from one expert to the other.

It is expected that the DNA
results will be revealed toda
establishing whether blood sam-

ples taken from the murder scene
. match samples taken from the sus-

pect.

Detective Constable 2341
Rochelle Deleveaux gave the.
blood samples to DC 2458 Ruth- «
mae Brown. She delivered the
sealed packages containing the
samples to Gladys Pena of the
Broward County Crime Lab.

Julie Schuerman of the Broward
Crime Lab testified that she
secured the items in a vault.










Former MP slams activist

FORMER FNM MP Lester Turnquest has hit out at Grand Bahama
activist and lawyer Fred Smith for his support of a US human rights report
that has found the Bahamas guilty of a number of violations.

Mr Turnquest, who was known for his tough stance against criminals
while in public office, has invited Mr Smith “to move to the United
States”.

Mr Smith, president of the Grand panes Human Rights Association,
said there was “nothing exaggerated” in the US State Department’s
annual report released earlier this week. It cited reports of police brutality,
claims of unlawful killings by officers, allegations of abuse at the
Carmichael Road Detention Centre and “harsh” prison conditions.

The report also pointed to cases of arbitrary arrest and detention; exces-
sive pre-trial incarceration for persons accused of crimes and a lack of legal
representation at trial for a large percentage of inmates. It said'that vio-
lence against women in the Bahamas “continued” to be a serious wide-
spread problem throughout 2004, and that social aiscomlzuda against
homosexuals “was evident”.

Mr Turnquest, who contacted The Tribune yesterday to fespout to Mr

Smith’s claims, said that he had a problem with the US condemning
| and making negative remarks about what they perceive to be human
rights violations in the Bahamas, given that its own record is not perfect.

“The Bahamas is literally under siege by criminals and it is inevitable,
from time to time, that you will hear complaints by (offenders) and
those who defend them,” he said.

“J absolutely condemn Fred Smith for j joining hands with an external.
entity to undermine the reputation and sovereignty of the Bahamas,
and he has consistently done this.”

In his response to the State Department’s report, Mr Smith said:
“The judicial situation is dysfunctional, there is very little respect for due
process or respect for the constitution, thete is arbitrary and unlawful
arrest and disrespect for the rule of law.”

Discrimination in the Bahamas, said Mr Smith, be it against women,
foreigners, Haitians or any member of society that thinks differently is the

“order of the day”.

Responding to the report’s charges of discrimination, Mr Turnquest
claimed that the US discriminates in any number of (ways), and pointed
out that it was not unusual for international college students to pay
higher tuition fees than “in-state” pupils.

“J don’t accept that the US cap presume to comment on’ ‘iolence
against women when in the US viglence against women is a fact. Just as

‘it is a fact in the Bahamas,” said Mr Turnquest.

“The report is condescending, patronising and I think it was not prop-
erly evaluated and considered before it was released.”

He said that if the US is so concerned about human rights’ they “would
treat all countries the same, including China, Cuba, Bahamas, Jamaica,
everybody”.

As a Bahamian, Mr Turnquest said that he is particularly aware of the
failings of his country, but believes that the Bahamas’ record on human
rights is no worse than the US’ record.

The Bahamas, he said, has limited resources and is doing its best.
“We don’t have the money to make it better. There's a lot to be¢ done, but
we don’t even have the money to pave our roads.”

¢ See page 1
























































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lab, Dr Raju told the court. ;
During Thursday’s proceedings,
the prosecutors sought to estab-

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G,,

(Hon.) EL, DD: Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CABRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1 972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES .

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

How the Haitians slide by

In THURSDAY’S Tribune Dr Eugene
Newry asked a leading question and sug-
gested his own answer. He wondered why
the Bahamas was so attractive to Haitian
boat people.

“But the fundamental question,” said Dr
Newry, the Bahamas’ ambassador to Haiti,
“is why do these immigrants come to the
Bahamas? Someone must be hiring the
majority of these persons.”

Yes, someone is hiring these destitute peo-
ple. Just imagine what the crime rate would
have been if these Haitians, unable to find
jobs, were hiding in the bush and terrorising
the community for their sustenance?

Having spent their last penny buying their
way out of Haiti on a rickety boat with a dis-
honest boat captain, they had to support
themselves here because they had no money
to buy their way out. They were given work
because there were many areas of the econ-
omy in which they were needed — areas that
Bahamians turned their backs on. Someone
had to do the work — and there were the
Haitians, ready, willing and able.

As early as 1963 Sir Roland Symonette,
the first premier of the Bahamas, recognised
the Haitian influx as a “major problem”. It
wasn’t that Haitian labour was not needed,
the-problem was that it had to be regulated.
An enterprising Bahamian suggested a labour
exchange exclusively for Haitians. Sir Roland

_ sent the proposal to a House committee
appointed “to consider the Haitian prob-
lem”. That’s the last we heard of it.

By 1967 it was clear that the Haitian dias-
pora was in fact a major problem. But under
the new PLP government, whether they were
needed or not, permit applications for Hait-
ian labourers started to pile up.

Having failed to get a Bahamian willing
to work on a five-acre orchard that the late
Sir Etienne Dupuch had created, we unsuc-
cessfully applied to the Immigration Depart-
ment for a Haitian.

A friend of ours in the civil service tele-
phoned one day. He knew that our applica-
tion was not only genuine, but it was urgent.
He also knew that because of who we were, it
would not be considered. And so he had a
suggestion.

He told us that agricultural permits were
being allowed for farm labourers. But, of
course, again being who we were we could
not go the straight route, we had to sidle in by
the back door. There were certain people —
true PLP supporters — who had been given
farm permits. They had no farms, but like

the holders of taxi franchises without taxis,

- they had the permits — for a price. Of course,

if we were to hire the Haitian, we did not
pay the price, the poor Haitian did — a per-
centage of his weekly pay packet.

We declined the back-door racket and the
orchard returned to nature.

‘And so the underground network started
with the full knowledge of the government of
the day. Since then it has taken many twists
and turns until today it is a major racket— far
more sophisticated than the farm-pemit days.
The present Immigration crack down has
probably suspended it temporarily as those
involved duck for the nearest rabbit hole.

We know of the case of a young Haitian, -

who fled Haiti alone when he was in his ear-
ly teens. He learned the language, got a job
and melted into the community. His only
encounter with the law during his eight years

’ here was one evening returning home, he

was stopped by two policemen. They asked
him for his papers. He had none. They asked
him for $200 in return for not reporting him.
He produced the money. And so he was
allowed to slide for a price. This is just one of
hundreds of similar incidents that we have
heard over the years.

Because government had no system of con-
sidering work permits, employers took a
chance and hired Haitians when they were
needed. In answer to the cursory question:
“Do you have your papers?” If the answer
were “yes”, then the man, or woman was
hired. No one checked the papers.

We had an experience with this recently
when we asked to see “the papers”. Produced
was an Immigration receipt for $25 for an
application that had been sent to the depart-
ment more than a year ago from which there
had been no reply.

And so, Dr Newry, we are all to blame for
the Haitian problem. Those who have to car-
ry the most blame are the Bahamian people
themselves who have carved a niche for
Haitians in this country by refusing to do
menial labour — labour that they themselves,
despite their screams to get the Haitians out,
describe as “Haitian work”.

Government is also to blame for not pro-

cessing applications in a business;like fashion,
thus allowing the problem to get out of con-
trol.

Employers are also to blame, but less so

‘because their dilemma was created by

Bahamians who didn’t want to work, and a
government that ignored applications — forc-
ing everyone into a vicious circle of illegality.



Mistakes of the
PLP government

ie epwpan

EDITOR, The Tribune.

AFTER listening to a local talk
show and reading our newspaper
dailies, I have been prompted to
express my views in relation to how
the FNM stacks up against the PLP.
I’m amazed that persons believe that
the FNM is no better than the PLP.
It seems that there are persons who
suffer from amnesia or their judg-
ment is clouded by a political bias.

Some persons believe that the
FNM cannot criticise the PLP for
wrongdoing because they are no
better. Like any government, the
FNM was not perfect and made mis-
takes, mistakes that pale in com-
parison to that of the PLP. Howev-
er, one of those mistakes was not
the allegations levied against Mr
Tommy Turnquest. After more than
three years, persons are still calling
Mr Tommy Turnquest corrupt
despite a clear explanation being
given on the matter. Mr Turnquest
was accused of giving an air condi-

tion contract in exchange for a vic-
tory party. The matter I believe-was

further magnified due to the cost of

’ the party. This defamation of char-

acter must .stop. The decision to
grant the contract was not a unilat-

_ eral decision by Mr Turnquest, for it
. was made by Cabinet due to the val-

ue of the contract. In addition to
this, an independent engineering
firm approved the bid finding it to
be advantageous to the government.
In retrospect, Mr Turnquest has also
said that he may not have accepted
the party offer but hindsight is 20/20.
At the time the offer was made, Mr
Turnquest was busily involved in
the leadership election, he had no
idea the party would have been so
lavish costing more than $30,000,
for when it comes to political parties
you think chicken and fish, not lob-
ster and shrimp. Besides all of this,
no one was a fly on the wall to say
that the relationship was a quid pro
quo one. For those who know him
and those who have worked with
him they know Mr Turnquest is an
honest man with integrity and a

strong work ethic. Prior to frontline —

politics he led a very successful
career in the banking field where
many dishonest persons find them-

selves in trouble. He had not a blem- ‘

ish on his reputation. It is sad that
the reputation of such a good man is
being damaged.

Questionable decisions have been
a cloud that has hung over the PLP
from shortly after they were elected.
A book can be written on Sidney
Stubbs alone for the scandals that
surround him. Firstly, in an unpro-
fessional, untactful manner, Mr
Stubbs insulted and wrongfully ter-
minated persons at BAIC. Second-
ly, he had major involvement in the
Korean boat fiasco. In an affidavit
by Mr Mark Stubbs read in the
House of Assembly by Mr Whitney
Bastian MP, Sidney Stubbs was said
to have acted in a questionable man-
ner with a potential investor and Mr
Mark Stubbs, who felt that he had
been “swung” as stated in the affi-
davit. Thirdly, Mr Stubbs was found

to be a bankrupt and for almost 10.

months now has been unable to rep-
resent the people of Holy Cross.
Besides all this, Mr Stubbs was
accused of overspending and wast-



ing BAIC funds, a corporation that
is financially strapped. Mr Stubbs’
political colleague, Mr Leslie Miller,
made strong accusations against him
but they were swept under the car-
pet.

Another person in the PLP who
seems to have become best friends
with controversy is Mr Neville Wis-
dom. Shortly after being elected Mr
Wisdom proudly stood in the House
of Assembly and appeared to be

gloating as he gave a report on Mr.

Dion Foulkes. Ironically, a few
months later Mr Wisdom himself
came under fire for contracts he had
entered into. A large amount of
money was spent on bleachers to
lease them, some of which were nev-
er sat on and foreigners were

~brought in to assemble and disman-

tle the bleachers. Some persons have
said that they have found bleachers
on the internet for a much lesser
cost. Mr Wisdom had bragged that
he would make a $3 million profit
but instead he made a $1.2 million
loss which prompted him to ask:
“What price can we put on culture”.

Despite the fact that important
bills were in need of attention, the
PLP used a sitting of the House to
praise Mr Wisdom for a job that
was poorly done.

Conflict of interest seems to
plague the PLP. Mr Obie Wilch-
combe’s behaviour was questioned
when he appeared to have commit-
ted an act of conflict of interest dur-
ing Christmas 2003 when hams and
turkeys were delivered in Bimini
with a card attached that stated that
they were from Mr Wilchcombe and
Bimini Bay Resort and Casino. It
is my opinion that no Cabinet Min-
ister should have been connected
to a private company in that man-
ner.

Despite his criticisms and standing
up for right in the case of Mr Stubbs,
Mr Leslie Miller himself has had his
share of problems. Case in point,
Mr Miller has rented out space in his
building on Harrold Road to the
government. When the FNM went

on site to protest, they found that

government machinery was being

used to work on the building. Again '

in my opinion this was a blatant
conflict of interest. In addition to
this matter, there is an allegation
about Mr Miller and a female who
accused him of entering her home
and removing items that were gifts
from him. Again it’s my opinion that
that behaviour was befitting-.of a
juvenile delinquent and not one of a
Cabinet Minister.

Hurricanes Frances and Jeanne
came along and luckily for the PLP
took the public’s focus off the
Mohammed Harajchi matter. I
accept the fact that political parties
accept donations, however, I do not
accept being dishonest about it.
Another Bahamian resident by the
name of Mr Harald Fubrmann has
launched a nasty international cam-
paign against the Bahamas, but I
have not heard a call for a revoca-
tion of his residency permit as in the
case of Mr Harachi.

. There was also a scandal involv-
ing allegations levied against Mr
Bradley Roberts, albeit, the alleged
victim has dropped the charges, leav-
ing one to wonder what was the
nature of the relationship between
Mr Roberts and his alleged victim.
In my opinion Mr Roberts’ behav-
iour during the whole ordeal was
one typical of a PLP politician— he
was arrogant and threatening. Mr
Roberts threatened to sue the press
in an effort to muzzle them and as
usual did not want the opposition
to criticise him. I am also disap-
pointed how this matter was han-
died by the Police and the Attor-
ney General. I would hate to think
that if I were raped and reported it
to the police that they would take
three and half weeks to question my
attacker.

There has been much talk lately
on Mr Christie’s Code of Ethics
which the Prime Minister himself
has said does not deal with moral
issues. Does Mr Christie not know
the meaning of the word “ethics”?
The word ethics and morals can be
used interchangeably. This shows
me that Mr Christie’s Code of Ethics
was only a political ploy created to
manipulate the public into thinking
that this “New PLP” is comprised of
the most scrupulous politicians ever
to grace the House and we the pub-
lic should not take it seriously

‘because the PLP hasn’t. From my

perspective Mr Christie has totally
trivialised the mistakes of his col- .
leagues. He stated on the talk show
“Parliament Street” that his gov-
ernment has not made mistakes that
other governments haven’t. He
blamed his colleagues’ misconduct
on the fact that they are human. I
don’t know which governments Mr
Christie is using as comparisons, but
Thave never heard of a government
that has done so much in such
little time. The PLP would like to get
“off the hook” by saying that the
FNM had corrupt members. They
need to use the FNM as an

and remember that when Brent
Symonette was found to have com-
mitted an act of conflict of interest
he resigned. When matters of Gre-
gory Williams, former MP for Bain
Town’s marriage came out to the
public, he resigned as Parliamen-
tary Secretary, never mind this had
nothing to do with his job which he
was doing very well. The PLP has
accused Tommy Turnquest and
Dion Foulkes but when,the PLP
took over the government they did
nothing about it because they found
nothing.

Much shame and disgrace has
been brought to what should be the
Honourable House of Assembly. It
is sad that so much attention has to
be taken off running the country to
deal with government members’
misconduct. Too many press con-
ferences, too many cabinet meet-
ings and too many sittings of the
House had to deal with these mat-
ters. My advice to Mr Christie is to
reshuffle and revamp to form an
effective team so they can get on
with running this country.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005, PAGE 5



New Cuban restrictions prompt

concern

BAHAMIAN tourists were
left wondering today how new
restrictions by Castro’s govern-
ment will affect their leisure
trips to Havana.

For Cubans who work in the
tourism industry are now barred
from having personal contact
with foreigners under regula-
tions introduced by Cuba’s
Communist Party.

According to CNN, the move
is intended to centralise and
strengthen party control of
Cuban society. But, if strictly
_ enforced, it is bound to have an
impact on the growing number
of Bahamians taking long week-
ends in Havana and other
Cuban resorts.

Yesterday, a regular visitor
to Cuba said: “These new regu-
lations are bound to add to the
general discontent down there.
The Cubans are already fed up
over the new currency restric-
tions, which means tourists lose
ten per cent of their money if
they take US dollars.

“These latest rules will make
life even more difficult for them
and deepen the intrigue and
uncertainty that is part and par-
cel of Cuban society.”

Gifts

Resolution 10, issued by the
Cuban Tourism Ministry, for-
bids employees at all levels from
accepting gifts, tips and invita-
tions from foreigners.

And contact with non-
Cubans is restricted to “that
which is absolutely necessary.”

The new law also requires a
witness to be present during
business negotiations with for-
eigners.

Under the new edict, any
non-professional contact with a
foreigner, not just by an
employee but also any member
of his or her family, must be
reported to a superior within 72
hours.

Staff are now required to
report any foreigner whose

behaviour or comments are’
offensive to the Cuban govern-~

ment.

And they have been told to
be “vigilant at all times” to
deeds or attitudes harmful to
the state. The rules also apply to
tourism employees who work
abroad.

Personal friendships with for-
eigners are forbidden for the
“more than 100,000 Cubans who
work in tourism, Cuba’ s largest
industry.

Staff must also refuse all invi-
tations from diplomats, business
associates or even colleagues if

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Hi CUBAN President Fidel Castro: The Cuban
government has implemented new restrictions

they are foreigners.

For hundreds of Bahamians -
especially the many men who
take weekend breaks in Cuba -
the new rules could have far-
reaching implications.

One told The Tribune: “It
really depends just how strictly
these rules are enforced. As
things stand, there is a lot of
contact between Cubans and
tourists, especially when it

- comes to the sex trade.

“Does this mean Big Brother
is going to be watching us? You

would have thought an impov- -

erished country like Cuba
would welcome every tourist
dollar it can get instead of mak-
ing life difficult. But that, I sup-
pose, is what communism is all
about.”

Resorts _

‘The. segregation méasures ~
went into efféct last month in’ '

most tourist resorts and will be
introduced into Havana shortly.

Bahamians are now an
important part of Cuba’s
tourism trade, with daily flights
from Nassau to Havana by
Cubana.

It is no secret that “contact”
with Cubans is very much part
of the appeal, with many
Bahamian men visiting Cuba
specifically for female compa-
ny.

Tourism was limited in Cuba
until the collapse of the Soviet
Union, when the country lost
its subsidies from Moscow.

Castro allowed tourism into
Cuba as a necessary evil,
regarding it as a useful source of
foreign exchange. But there
were always fears that it would
have a corrupting influence.

Billy Doadi, sales manager of
Havanatur, “the Cuba Special-
ist”, said at least 5,000 visitors
from the Bahamas travel to
Cuba each year.

Mr Doadi, who just returned
from Cuba a few days ago, said
there are no visible changes in

how Cubans interact with
tourists.

“They are still talking,” he
said, “and the personal relations
are not affected. Cubans are still
friendly and welcoming.
Bahamians shouldn’t worry
about it too much because as
far as I can see there is no dif-
ference.”

He said Cuban workers rely
heavily on tips and would be in
trouble if they had to stop being
as “friendly” to foreigners.

Management
clenies reports

“ THE, management of

_ Jones: Communications yes-
terday strongly denied
reports in a tabloid that
BEC is suing Love 97 radio
for $51,000 because of an
unpaid light bill.

In a statement released on
Thursday chief executive
officer Wendall Jones said:
“The story in substance is
simply not true in three
parts.”

Mr Jones acknowledged
that the radio station is ina
dispute with the corporation
over a balance of $5,401.57,
which BEC claims is the bal-
ance owed on the $25,000
bill for laying a cable to
upgrade the property’s elec-
trical supply. However, this
matter is being dealt with.

On reports that Jones
Communications was grant-
ed a government contract of
$250,000 to produce a book
on Parliament, Mr Jones
said that while the estimated
production of the book
exceeded $250,000 the pro-
duction and printing costs
together totalled $85,000.



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m Bahamian tourists

Mother reports son missing

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - The mother
of an 18-year-old special edu-
cation student reported her
son missing to police on
Wednesday after he failed to
return home on Sunday.

Emerald Bethel, a resident
of 70 Red Hill Close, Mayfield
Park, told police that her son
Tavaris Bethel, a student of
Beacon School, left home
around 8pm on February 27.
He has not been seen or heard
from since.

Mr Bethel, who said that
this is not the first time her
son has left home under these
circumstances, is requesting
the public’s assistance in find-
ing him.

He is described as being
about five feet six inches tall of
medium build. He has a dark
complexion and low hair cut
and was last seen wearing a
white shirt and short blue jean
pants.

H DRUG CHARGES

A 24-year-old Abaco man
was charged Thursday in the
Magistrate’s Court at Coop-
er’s Town with possession of

dangerous drugs with intent to
supply and assaulting a police.
Spring City resident Andrew
Jonuasse appeared before
Magistrate Crawford McKee.
He pleaded not guilty to
charges of possession of 21
small packets of marijuana and
assaulting a police officer dur-
ing his arrest on February 28
while at Spring City, Abaco.
Jonuasse, who was repre-
sented by Godfrey “Pro” Pin-
der, was remanded to Fox Hill
Prison until April 14 for trial.

‘@ FIRE AT EMR

DISPLACES FAMILY

A family of six was displaced
after a devastating fire
destroyed their five room
wooden home at Martin Town,
Eight Mile Rock.

According to Supt Basil

Rahming, Arthur Minnis, his
girlfriend, Cleo Moxey, and
their four children were at
home when the fire erupted
shortly after 10pm on Wednes-

day. They were able to escape -

unharmed.

Ms Moxey told fire officials
that she had got up and gone
into the kitchen to get some

water when she noticed the

fire in an unoccupied room.

“you shop © we ship # 9 seve”

Although firemen were able
to extinguish the flames, the
house was rendered uninhab-
itable as a result of extensive
damage.

Mr Rahmning said the build-
ing had been hooked up to a
neighbour’s electricity supply.
Firemen are still trying to
determine the cause of the fire,

: he said.

@ BOATING ACCIDENT

Two boaters escaped
serious injuries during a
boating accident off South
Bimini.

According to reports,
William Templeman, 76 of
Chicago, Illinois, told police at
Cat Cay that the incident
occurred around 1.50am Tues-
day while he was aboard his
54ft Hatteras vessel named
Empty Pockets.

He said his vessel was
anchored in “pitch blackness”
between Cat Cay and Gun Cay
off South Bimini when. anotb-
er vessel named ‘Tere J’, pilot-
ed by. Juan. Michelena, 65, of
Key. Biscayne, Florida, collided
into the right front section of
his boat, causing $2,000 in
damage.

No one was injured.

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St Andrew’s School, The International School of The Bahamas and authorized
International Baccalaureate World School offers the world-renowned,

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

to year 12 (grade 11) and year 13 (grade 12)

St Andrew’s School invites you to attend an information session on this programme: -

on Wednesday 9 March 2005, at 5:30pm

St Andrew's School, Yamacraw Road

’

In February 2003, St Andrew’s was authorized to teach the International
Baccalaureate Diploma from September 2003. For the first time in the history of The
Bahamas, students now have the opportunity to undertake an extended programme
based on The International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma and our first Diploma students
will graduate in the summer of 2005.

The IB Diploma programme has earned a reputation for rigorous assessment, giving IB
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Contact:

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Director of Admissions
Telephone:
Fax:
E-mail:
Web site:

(242) 324 2621
(242) 324 0816

SVarani-Jones@st-andrews.com

www.st-andrews.com


PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Boxing Biminite recalls Hemingway

MORE than 40 years after
he shot himself, the American
novelist Ernest Hemingway
remains an object of fascination
among literary pilgrims to Bimi-
ni.

It was on the tiny island in
the northern Bahamas that
Hemingway, author of Farewell
to Arms and For Whom the Bell
Tolls, used to hold his own at
the bar of The Compleat
Angler Hotel.

Today, though his literary star
has waned, Hemingway is still
remembered by tourists for his
game fishing exploits and phe-
nomenal drinking, which have
all become part of the Heming-
way legend.

And they continue to trek to
the haunts where Hemingway
retains star status more than
four decades after his tragic
death in 1961.

One Biminite with a direct
family link with the writer is
former boxer Yama Bahama,
real name William Horatio But-





“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”



ler, whose brother Herman
once flattened Hemingway in a
Sparring session.

_ Yama, 72, who runs the Bimi-
ni Breeze Bar.and Restaurant in:

a



-—

Alice Town, said his late broth-
ers Herman and Lou were both
locally-known fighters when

’ Hemingway used to visit Bimi-
‘ni in search of marlin and sail-

fish in the 1940s.

“As everyone knows, Hem-
ingway liked to put on the
gloves and fight,” said Yama,
“My. brother Herman agreed to
spar with him one day and
knocked him down.”

The rough-and-tumble life
was nothing new to Heming-
way, whose love of action led
him into a succession of acci-
dents and mishaps which took
their toll on his body.

Survived

He was one of the few men
alive to have survived two plane
crashes in one week - both of
which occurred while he was on
safari in Africa.

Yama said: “People still come
here asking after him. I didn’t
know him personally, because I
was very young when he was
here, but I did know his
younger brother Leicester, who
looked just like him.

“Leicester was a down-to-
earth guy who I liked very
much, but he also killed him-
self, just like his brother.”

If Hemingway remains the
number one celebrity draw in

. Bimini, it’s almost certainly true

that Yama himself is number
two.

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Although his brothers bored
strictly at local level, young
Yama made it into the big-time,
becoming the “TV Darling” of
Madison Square Garden dur-
ing an era of top middleweights.

From 1953 until 1968, Yama
put together a record of 103
professional fights - with 87

wins, 13 losses and two draws - -

at a time when the likes of Sug-
ar Ray Robinson, Emile Grif-
fith and Kid Gavilan were in

Title

Boxing first under trainer
Chris Dundee in Miami, then
in New York, Yama fought
most of the best of his day, but
lacked the connections to secure
a world title fight.

Gene Fulmer was reigning
champion at the time, and
Yama is convinced he could
have beaten him, but the oppor-
tunity never came. “Fulmer was
offered $100,000 to fight me, a
lot of money in those days, but
he always said I was too cute.

“Although I had 27 knock-

‘outs on my record, I was really
a scientific boxer, whereas Ful-.
mer was a brawler, and I don’t ©

think he would have got near
me.”

When he hung up his gloves,
Yama returned to Bimini, his
home island, where he took
over the bar which has been his
livelihood éver since.

“TI lost all my trophies and
souvenirs when my place
burned down in 1984,” he told
The Tribune, “but I still have

my memories, and they were |

good times.
“T was blessed because I man-
aged to finish my career with

my head and body in good.

shape. I don’t mumble and I
don’t shake. I wish I could do it
all over again.”

His links with boxing are ten-
uous nowadays. His old friend
Floyd Patterson, former world
heavyweight champion, called
to see him in Bimini some years
ago.

And Muhammad Ali, who
Yama trained with in Miami
shortly after “The Greatest”
won Olympic gold in Rome in
1960, kept in touch for a sons
time.

Now Yama’s fading recollec-
tions of a great boxing era are
going into a notebook which,
he hopes, will one day be trans-
formed into a published auto-
biography.

“T would. like to write my life
story,” he said, “I don’t know
how much longer the Lord will
give me, but I would like to get
it all down on paper before I
go. FF «9,

Of Hemingway, who remains

a hero in Havana, where he.

lived for 20 years, Yama said:

“Tourists still call in asking

about him. They want to know
what he did while he was here.

“But the sons of old fight fans
also call in to ask about me, too.
It’s all a long time ago, but they
still remember me.

“I suppose it was the name
‘Yama Bahama that did it. Many
people in the States didn’t know
where the Bahamas was, but I
used to get little kids in New
York asking me about the place
I came from.

“I guess I was a good adver-
tisement for the Bahamas i in
those days.”

Var



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-THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005, PAGE 7





netted

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

A BAHAMIAN woman who
is the product of and a former
participant of extra-marital
affairs, commonly known in the
Bahamas as “sweethearting”,
has branded the type of behav-
iour as an “institutionalised
form of prostitution.”

Phillippa “Lady” Russell, was
a presenter at Tuesday
evening’s session of the
‘Bahamian Forum, which dis-
cussed “Sweethearting in the
Bahamas”. ,

She said that growing up in
Freeport, there were many oth-
er women who measured their
success by material gains, such
as lavish apartments designer
clothes, and top-paying jobs
obtained by having sexual rela-
tionships with powerful men,
who were often married.

“For the most part, sweet-
heart relationships are not
about love and not usually
about sex, although love can
become an end result. The sex is
really used to extract mortgage
payments, car payments, and a
job promotion. Sweethearting
is very economically based,” she
said.

Hedonistic

Ms Russell said that she was a
“a sexually permissive slave of
the hedonistic-culture of her
time” but by the grace of God
she is now totally transformed
in her thought process, she said.

It was not until her father
spoke to her, that she had no
idea that her lifestyle was

’ wrong. She said it was what |

everyone was doing. She accept-
ed that what she was doing was
wrong, when her-fatherchal-
lenged her with the word and
standards of God. Once she was
convinced that the standards of
God was the way to live, she
asked God to shape and remold
her thought processes, which
she said did not happen over-

night.

She strongly feels that the

survival of Bahamians depends
on the success in eliminating the
out-dated though process of
“sweethearting” and the
renewal of minds to a standard

_ LOC:

Hi PHILLIPA ‘LADY’ RUSSELL



earting
is slammed at

was a presenter at the Bahamian Forum.

of sexual fidelity in marriage.
She also feels that a single per-
sons should abstain from sex,

until he or she enters the

covenant of marriage.

She also stated that responsi-
bility for teaching the principles
which assure the successful liv-
ing out of God’s requirement
of marital fidelity rest largely

“On our churches:

“However, far too many
Bahamian churches are guilty
of holding gullible, spiritually
immature wives captive to an
impossibly hectic schedule of
week-night meetings which
result in the destruction of the
family unity, while encouraging
pastoral worship.” said Ms Rus-
sell.

She further explained that the
task of teaching values to our
young people, encouraging men
to love their wives and wives to

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make their homes a welcoming
haven, in which their husbands
look forward to returning, is not
easy, but neither is it impossible.

Marriage

“God who made us would
not have come up with a plan
that is impossible to live out.
Marriage is workable. If we
have the tools, if we have the
commitment to it, it can work.
We have people in this country
who have been happily married
for 50 years, so we have positive
role models,” said Ms
Russell.

It is her.deepest hope and fer-
vent prayer, from her own
authentic. experience, that the
Bahamas as a Christian nation

‘bring an end to the destructive

culturally accepted practice of
“sweethearting”.

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THE TRIBUNE



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The challenge
of education |
in the Bahamas

@ PART Ill
THE WAY FORWARD

By DION A. FOULKES

OUR country is currently faced
with a multitude of challenges
ranging from. changing interna-
tional trade and financial regimes
to internal social and economic
pressures.

In order to meet these chal- —

lenges we need constantly and
critically to monitor our educa-
tional system. We should ques-
tion whether it is relevant to our
national objectives and, above all,
whether it is effective.

At the-heart of our éducation-
al system is the curriculum. In our
public schools, the curriculum has
been upgraded several times over
the years, but is it accomplishing
the desired results? The curricu-
lum should provide both a well-

rounded educational experience

for the student, and should be
designed to meet the needs of the
nationasawhole.

The job market should largely
determine what is taught in our
classrooms and as that market

’ changes or evolves, we need to

review and, where necessary, alter
the objectives of curricula.

It makes little sense to teach
special fields of study which have
no relevance to the economy and
the overall social and cultural
development of the society. Cur-
ricula should be driven mainly by
the demands of tourism, finan-
cial services, light industry, tech-
nology, agriculture and fisheries.

The FNM Government began
an aggressive consultative process
with the business community to
ensure relevance in our curricula
and I am pleased to note that the
current administration is actively
continuing this initiative.


globalization will continue to chip
away at the concept of national

\



@ DION A. FOULKES

borders. So it is imperative that
we begin to prepare our children
for it. We need to be competitive
not only nationally, but also inter-
nationally. oe
This is one of the reasons why
we should now seek to expand
the Spanish programme in our

schools. It is envisaged that Cuba, -

the Dominican Republic and
Latin America will become more

' significant players in our trading

bloc.

Our ability to attract business
and tourists to the Bahamas from
these neighbouring countries will,
to a large extent, depend on how
competitive we are. Key to that
will be our proficiency in their
language.

I believe that the time has.
come for Spanish instructions to
be expanded to additional grade
levels. This will be a costly exer-
cise, but if we plan for it and
introduce it incrementally, it

- would be less burdensome and

the long-term results would be
beneficial to the country.

LITERACY RATE, ,.,..., - .
‘The levél ‘of literacy’ in ‘our
country is clearly unacceptable



and needs urgent upgrading in
order to improve our competi-
tiveness in the. world.

While I was Minister for Edu-
cation, a survey was conducted
at a particular school regarding
its reading level and was anony-
mously forwarded to the Ministry.
I was shocked at its content and
even more horrified at the
thought that if this was an accu-
rate survey, then our literacy rate
was in deep trouble.

Consequently, we requested
that a general survey of all the
schools be conducted. The results
of this survey should now be
available at the Ministry.

I suspect that this may have
provided.some impetus for the
introduction of the current Edu-
cation Minister’s book club, which
is a commendable effort.

The FNM Government
focused on enhancing the library
systems in schools and in the local
communities, and also introduced
several literacy programmes. One
of the more notable ones was the
“Let’s Read Bahamas” pro-
gramme. We established a read-
ing centre for students and adults
and we strengthened the remedi-
al reading programmes at each .
school. But we need to do much
more. ;

Primary school students should
be required to meet a minimum
reading standard at each grade .
level. Also, all students with defi-
ciencies need to be identified ear-
ly and given attention at the pri-
mary school level.. f

Those students who are now
deficient in reading, whether.at
the primary or secondary level,

‘ ought to be required to take spe-

cial remedial classes while in the
system. This will require that all
language teachers are trained and
retrained to improve their skills.

“4 If,we,want.our children to be

SEE page 10 ©

PUBLIC CONSULTATION
FURTHER PROPOSED MODIFICATION
LICENCE ISSUED 70 CARIBBEAN CROSSINGS LIMITED FOR THE PROVISION OF
- TELECOMMUNICATIONS TRANSMISSION CAPACITY

The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) is pleased to invite comments fram members of

the public and interested parties on its consultation document on the Proposed Modifica-
| tion to Caribbean Crossings Limited's (CCL) Licence for the provision of telecommunica-

tions transmission capacity.

| in aceordance with section 12 of the Telecommunications Act, 1999 (Tel Act) and Condi-
tion 25 of Its Licence, CCL has applied for a modification to its existing Licance to extend |
its existing fibre optic facilities described in its current Licence as Bahamas internet
| Cable System (BICS) to include eight (8) additional segments which will be part of the
| Jamaica Bahamas Cable System (JBCS). JBCS will facilitate the carriage of voice and
| data traffic from Jamaica, through The Baharnas to the USA and beyond, and vice versa.
_ The consultation document contains the PUC’s proposal on issues relating to CCL
| extending its network to become part of the JBCS.

| The main objective of this consultation is to:

oa inform the public and interested parties of CCL’s application for a modification to its
existing licence to extend its Licensed System which will become a part of the JBCS;

(b} suggest the likely benefits of the modification, to consumers; and

(c) obtain information from the public on the advantages and disadvantages of the

requested modification,

Section 6(4} of the Tel Act requires the PUC to process CCL's application in an objective

and nor-diseriminatory manner and consistent with the objectives of the Tel Act and the

| Telecommunications Sector Policy. At the conclusion of this public consultation, the PUC
will issue a Statement on the Results of the Public Consultation.

The public consultation document can be obtained from the PUC’s office located in the:

Agape House at 4th Terrace East, Collins Avenue or downloaded from the PUC's
website at www.PUCBahamas.gov.bs. Written comments should be submitted by Aprit
4th, 2005 via post, hand delivery, facsimile or e-mail to: :

Interested applicants may deliver resumes to:
Executive Director, Public Utilities Commission

4th Terrace East, Collins Avenue
Facsimile: (242) 323-7288
E-mail: PUC@pucbahamas.gov.bs

Applications should be received by 7 December, 2004,


ric TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005, PAGE 9

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has published more than 50 acclaimed books for young people.






PAGE 10, FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005





i PART (2)

HE following is the
second article present-
ed by Amnesty International
Bahamas to examine the prin-

ciples outlined in The Conven- —
tion on the Rights of Children |

that is an international treaty
that recognises the human
rights of children, It establish-
es an international law that
governments must ensure that
all children - without discrim-
ination - benefit from special
protection measures and assis-
tance; have access to services
such as education and health
care; can develop their person-
alities, abilities and talents to
the fullest potential; grow up
in an environment of happi-
ness, love and understanding;
and are informed about and
participate in, achieving their
rights in an accessible and
active manner. The Convention
was adopted into International
Law by the United Nation’s
General Assembly on Novem-



The Convention provides
a universal set of standards

. to be adhered to by all coun-

tries. It reflects a new vision
of the child. Children are
neither the property of their
parents nor are they help-
less object of charity. They
are human beings and are
the subject of their own
rights. The Convention
offers a vision of the child

ber 20, 1989.

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Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 242-341-6451 ° Nights 242-322-3242
24 Hour Cell: 242-427-5414





CALEB CONARD ROSE, 15

of Macket Street, will be held on
Saturday, 5th March, 2005 at 2pm
at Church of God of Prophecy, East
Street. Officiating will be Bishop
Anthony T. Roker, assisted by
Pastor Gersham Pratt and Minister
Branson Gibson. Interment will
follow at Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road.



Caleb was preceded in death by
his grandparents, Cecil Rose,
Clarissa Rose and Harry Smith. Left
to cherish Caleb's precious
memories are his parents, Ednal
Rose and Connie Smith; sisters, Georgette, Kaygele, Clarissa;
brother, Vardo; step brother, Lemarco; nephews, Vashaan; nieces,
Lavaranique, Petrel; grandmothers, Paula Darville and Louise Rose;
uncles, Jacob, Cecil Jr., Maxwell, Paul, Lynden, Dwight, Phillip,
Brian, Eric, Clement, Kenron, Jerry, Wendell, Walter, Calvin, Bishop
Steve Smith, Reed, Chord, Wrescott, Alexander, Rudolph, Terrance,
Hank, Hector, Sidney, Harry Smith Jr; aunts, Phylis Ruthmae, Dianne,
Edna, Debra, Sharon, Lilymae, Priscilla, Deidre, Alana, Sonia, Marilyn,
Vanria, Flora, Schvonne, Mushima, Rachel, Alfreda, Sherryann,
Eunice, Mildred, Nellie, Thelma, Lana, Hazel, Deborah, Hariette,
Charlene, Hilda, Janet; grand uncles, Rev. Bertram "Gaston"
Armbrister, Elisha Armbrister, Lionel Rose, Kendal Rose, Robert
Rose, George Gardiner, Maurice Mortimer, Franklyn Pratt, Junior
Morley, Bertram Bowe and Rev. Randolph Dorsette; grand aunts,
Curlene A. Dorsett, Alma Kaplan, Alicia Armbrister, Eleanor Armbrister,
Cynthia Mortimer, Gloria Rose Culmer, Patricia Johnson, Pandora
Pratt, Carmelita Williams, Thelma Rose, Cleomi Rose, Ophelia Rose,
Betty Rose; great grand uncles, Leroy Glass, Randolph Dorsett,
Bertram Bowe; great grand aunts, Coralee Sturrup, Keva Farquharson,
Florabell Penn, Myrtis Moncur, Ignes Glass; god parents, Robert
Rolle, Jennifer Wilkinson, Sharon Rose, Jacqueline Clarke McPhee;
cousins, Cyshae, Bjournae, Archie, Cecil Rose Ill, Miaeda, Kellen,
Phylicia,, Bianca, Kara, Chrissy, Phillips, Keisha, Lamar, Matthew
Rose Il, Eric, Darion, Terrell, Madelyn, Lynden Rose Jr., Lynnard,
Nikki, Dimeiko, Jacobi, Shake, Bake, Drexel, Tyrese, Bambadukla,
Rasheeda, Jamal, Isaac and Louise Lightbourne, Cindy, Angela,
Beth, Shanti, Paula, Shakera, Shareed, Virginia, Uti, Virginia, Shantera,
Mira, Empress, Valentera, Ananya, Jennifer, Solomon, Omeka,
Okeisha, Tyrek, Charles Ill, Calvin I, Calvin Ill, Demetrus, Stefano
and Deanglo; a host of relatives and friends that include Bishop and
Mrs Anthony Roker, Pastor and Mrs Pratt, congregation of Coconut
Grove Church of God of Prophecy Tent Ministry, Dr and Mrs Reuben
E. Cooper ur., Mission Baptist Church family, Mr and Mrs Glen
Bowe, Dr. Cyprian Strachan, Dr. Joyous Pickstock, Dr. Robert
Gibson, Bishop Albert Hepburn, Rev. Gladstone Patton, the
community of Holiness Church family, family of Martha "Beneth"
Bain, familly of Margaret Johnson, family of Constance Bowe, Pastor
and Mrs Michael Hinsey,, Mrs Mavis Dean and family, the Dames
family, Jesse Darville and family, the Cox family, the Coleby family,
Mr and Mrs Glen Bowe, Mrs Cynthia Pratt, Deputy Prime Minister
and family, the Pickstock family, Minister Anthony Sands, Mr and

rs Norwood Rolle, Chan Abney, Beverly Taylor and family, Suzimae
Dorsette and family, Karen Butler, the Adderley family, the Rose
family, Cynthia Dean and family, the Armbrister, Josey, Saunders,
King, Ramsey, Deveaux, Lightbourn, Hepburn, McKenzie, Simmons,
Bet el, Butterfield, Sturrup, Mulphy, Romer, Bain, Coakley and
Marshall families of Coconut Grove Community.

will be held at Evergreen Mortuary, Harrold Road on Friday
ion 1 to 6pm and on Saturday from 9am to 12noon and at the
church from 1pm until service time.


















































rtuary.

















eC CO?Nnlve

as an individual and a mem-
ber of a family and a com-
munity, with rights and
responsibilities appropriate
to his or her age and stage of
development. Recognising
children’s rights in this way
firmly sets a focus of the
whole child. Previously seen
as negotiable, the child’s
needs have become legally
binding rights. No longer the
passive recipient of benefits,
the child has become the
subject or holder of rights.

This week will address the
two remaining “guiding prin-
ciples” of the Convention
and they are as follows:

@ 1. BEST INTEREST OF
THE CHILD

The Convention on the
Rights of the Child states
that the best interest of the
child shall be a primary con-
sideration in all actions con-
cerning children, whether
undertaken by public or pri-
vate social welfare institu-
tions, courts of law, admin-
istrative authorities or leg-
islative bodies. In each and
every circumstance and deci-
sion affecting the child, the
various possible solutions
must give due weight to the
child’s best interests. This
approach must be taken in
all cases — even in the cases
where State intervenes
directly in the private con-
text of family life — to ensure
and protect children’s rights.
Legislative bodies must con-

Sider whether laws being

adopted or amended will
benefit children in the best
possible way. In the alloca-
tion of budgets, special
attention should be given to
children’s policies and to the
impact the policies have on
children’s lives. Resources
should be allocated to the

maximum extend possible.
2. PARTICIPATION -

' Participation is one of the ~

guiding principles of the

Convention, as well as one
of its basic challenges. The
principle affirms that chil-
dren are full-fledged persons
who have the right to
express their views in all
matters affecting them and
requires that those views be
heard and given due weight
in accordance with the
child’s age and maturity. It
recognises the potential of
children to enrich decision-
making processes, to share
perspectives and to partici-
pate as citizens and change
agents.

The Convention envisages
a changed relationship
between adults and children.
Parents, teachers, caregivers
and others interacting with
children are seen no longer
as mere providers, protec-
tors or advocates, but also
as negotiators and facilita-
tors. Adults are therefore
expected to create spaces
and promote processes
designed to enable and
empower children to express
views, to be consulted and
to influence decisions.

Bl WHAT STEPS ARE
GOVERNMENTS
‘ ENCOURAGED
TAKING IN REGARDS
TO THE CONVEN-
TION ON THE RIGHTS
FO THE CHILD?

e Develop a comprehen-
sive national agenda for chil-
dren.

e Develop permanent bod-
ies or mechanisms to pro-
mote coordination, monitor-
ing and evaluation of activi-
ties throughout all sectors of
government.

e Ensure that all legisla-
tion is fully compatible with
the Convention.

e Make children visible in
policy development process-
es throughout government

by introducing child inayat

assessments..i)y)

e Carry out ndoanate bud-

get analysis to determine the
portion of public funds spent

Notitication a amore eae

MISS. PAULA

SAMANTHA MURPHY, 35

ontion on
rights of the child

on children and to ensure
that these resources are
being used effectively.

e Ensure that sufficient
data are collected and used
to improve the plight of all
children in the country

e Raise awareness and dis-
seminate information on the
Convention by providing
training to all those involved
in government policy-mak-
ing and working with or for
children.

° Involve civil society —

including children them-
selves — in the process of
implementing and raising
awareness of child rights.

e Set up independent
statutory offices -

THE TRIBUNE.

“}
‘i

e

RP aud ot 2

ed

WEP CR

Sat

hs
ca ade,

ombudspersons, commis=,
sions and other institutions a
to promote children’s rights.”

Although this may seem tos
be a considerable challenges
for our society, to promote;
the rights of children in ours
country will ensure a pros--
perous and stable future for,
all of us. a

Amnesty International hag
in excess of 1.5 million mem--
bers, supporters and sub-
scribers in more than 150;
countries, including the;
Bahamas.

For more information’
about this volunteer group,
please call:'the local chapter
at 327-0807 or visit,
www.amnesty-org. ~ 7

4

Py

8
4
a
i

Challenge of education |

FROM page eight





of Long Bay Cays Andros and
formerly of Eight Mile Rock,
Grand Bahama, will be held on
Saturday, March 05, 2005 at 2pm
at Epiphany Anglican Church,
Prince Charles Drive East. Fr.
Ormond Wright will officiate.

The Radiance of this “Amethyst
of a Gem” will always glow in
the hearts of her:

daughter: Pacara Rahming;

three sons: Sacano and Devontae Rahming and Calvano |

Burrows;
father: Daniel Murphy of Mayguana;

four brothers: Cornell Stuart of Freeport, Blair Glinton, Tyrone |

and Jayon Newbold Sr. of Bradenton Florida;

two aunts: Shirley Newbold and Edna Burns of Freeport:

uncle: Wellington Newbold of Freeport;

nieces and nephews: Nazzma, Naddia, Naamah and Nazeem |

Sturat, Gaynell, Michael, Sanchez, Michaela, Jayon Jr., Mia,
Faheem, Jahseema, Naseem, Jahiem and Nyeema Newbold:
Three Grand Aunts: Augusta Hepburn, Isadora Kelly of Long
Bay Cays Andros and Coralee Longley;

grand niece: Niajnay Glinton;

cousins: Barbara Nixon, Jerome Small, Staff Nurse Karen
Burrows, Leading Seaman Clayton Delaney of the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force, Yontalay, Kim and Walter Hanna,
Laverne, Troy, Judy and Rod Newbold, Francoise Barr, B. J.
and B. K. Burns, Tadnisha, Franquesta, Tamara, Douglas Jr.,
Yves, Yurie, Azurie, Peres, Ryshanda and Roy Burrows Jr.,
Claytino, Okoye and Waltario;

other relatives and friends including: Reverend Roy Sr.,

Mildred and Arlington Burrows, Mr. and Mrs. Kendal Taylor |

of Long Bay Cays, Jane Rolle, Jermaine Glinton, Shevon,

Dion, Jefferey and Prescola Stubbs, Calvin, Olga and Oscar |

Graves, Rose Hanna, Douglas Nixon Sr., Conrad Saunters,

Jean and Geneva Stuart, Rosinell Forbes, Burnell Rolle, Jane :
Sweeting, Brudinell Kelly, Asquit nd Albertha Davis and Vernell |

Lynes.

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fully developed, our goal should to be to ensure that all are read- |
ing at their grade level, although they ought to be cneouraped to
read above it.

@ INTEGRATED SYSTEM :
As our national education objectives develop, there should be

increased integration between the primary, secondary and tertiary

schools in the country.

The College of the Bahamas and other tertiary institutions should “};

gear their curricula to the current needs of the society, and these »
should be reflected at the secondary and primary levels.

Under the FNM the College of the Bahamas was transformed into ‘|
a four-year academic institution offering bachelor degrees. Addi-

tionally, the Eugene Dupuch Law School was established. Also, plans /

were well underway to advance COB to university status, offering 1;

both master and doctorate degrees.

# SPORTS DEVELOPMENT

I believe that a closer relationship should be developed between ; :

ture.

laboration with the Ministry of Sports and the sporting federations. :
Our success in sports is to a large degree attributed to the unselfish ;
dedication and commitment of these federations, as well as that of the ‘
coaches and parents.

We should now begin the process of institutionalizing a compre- 1

hensive sports programme in the school system. ;
Given our limited financial resources, we should examine the ben-

the Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Cul- +

Physical education curricula should be developed in close col- F

efits of a “rotation system” apptoadt to physical education and ;}:

sports development.
_. We should identify core sports such as swimming, tennis, volley-

school.

The facilities should be developed in districts in New Providence
and Grand Bahama and, where possible in the Family Islands. These +
should be used by each school on a rotating schedule. :

For example, there are four education districts in New Providence. *
But we need not build a swimming pool for each school to introduce
a swimming programme. Pools should be built in each of these dis- :
tricts and then used by the relevant schools on a rotating basis.

There are already two existing pool facilities in South Beach

| and at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre which can probably

accommodate students in the southwestern and northwestern dis- *
tricts respectively. Therefore, only two additional districts might -
need to be addressed. y

This concept can be applied to the other core sports, and where *

" ball, basketball, softball, baseball and track and field, and then set af
minimum requirement for the ‘children’s participation while ‘in ‘}

there are no existing facilities then obviously they should be con- #
structed to take into account the anticipated expansion of the school ;}

system.

The Blue Hill Road sporting complex was a good example of inno- : :
vation in the development of sports, and is a model that should be re- *
introduced and expanded. This complex offered extracurricular -}}

sporting activities such as tennis, golf and racquetball to public
school students who might not ordinarily have had access to them.

Also, it undoubtedly provided social outlet for these children that pos- 4

itively influenced their overall development.

Space does not permit an extensive discussion but cultural devel- ’
opment needs the same dedicated focus and, again, it must be -.

addressed in a comprehensive manner. It should focus on the per- ‘|:

forming arts, music, junkanoo, and arts and crafts.
Apart from its economic potential, cultural development is nec-

essary to provide a better quality of life for our citizens and partic- ;f

ularly wholesome pursuits for our youth.

fi CHURCH SCHOOLS

Church-operated schools have played a major role in the delivery F |

of education in the Bahamas for many years. The financial grants i
awarded by the past and present governments have been given to‘
assist these schools in defraying the cost of their teachers’ salaries. The +
extended benefit is that it effectively results in more affordable fees ,}

being charged by the private schools.

The FNM Government focused on increasing funding to these +f

schools very early in its term and as a result, many individuals, par-°;}
ticularly single parents benefited. Grants to church operated schools ‘f

were increased from $2.9 million in 1992 to $7.4 million in 2001.

I am told that consideration is being given to reducing grants to }

some church schools. If this is true I would urge the government not *}
to pursue this course because it would adversely impact the delivery \}

and the cost of education in our country.

The government should continue the FNM’s policy of incre-
mental grants to church schools and they should certainly revisit any ,}

decision to revoke completely the funding of any school.

UPKEEP OF SCHOOLS

In order to ensure the continued safety and comfort of the stu- é

dents, teachers, administrators and support staff, an aggressive main-
tenance programme should be continued. The FNM Government on

an average spent $3 million a year for the maintenance of schools. As *
our schools get older and new ones are added, this number will -}

necessarily increase.

@ FULL TIME MINISTER

I do not subscribe to the view that Education needs to be a stand ‘

Â¥

alone ministry; however, I do believe that if it is not a separate min-
istry, it ought to be combined with departments that are compatible -
with it, and include areas that would permit a complete integration '}

of its functions, such as Youth, Sports and Culture.
The current combination of the Ministry

of Education, and Attor- ;

ney General and Minister of Justice being assigned to one individual *
is just not working. Clearly, the Ministry of Education is being ‘
neglected based on the observations previously made, and as I said ::

earlier, education deserves better.

In this three part series I have attempted briefly to present the «'
FNM Government’s accomplishments in education, take a critical ;
look at the PLP Government’s performance in education to date, and ‘

to present some of my ideas for education in the future.

Education is a process through which an individual can achieve his

or her life’s goals and it ought to continue throughout life. If we :

neglect it at any stage, it would be to our detriment as individuals and

would also retard national development.


JHE TRIBUNE



The College of the Bahamas is now taking definite and well-considered steps towards
becoming a university. An important part of the process is the revision of The
College’s Strategic Plan. To guide the review and recommendations, the President
has established the nine task forces, with requisite charges, that are listed below.
If you are interested in giving input, write us a brief letter indicating the task force
on which you wish to serve and what skills you would bring to the exercise. Please
attach a current resume. Kindly note that for many practical reasons, including
efficiency, task force memberships must be limited, so if you wish to be considered,
please send in your request NOW.

Deadline for Response March 11, 2005

For further information or delivery of letters and resumes: ~
Office of Research, Planning & Development

Rm 117, Administration Building

' Oakes Field Campus

- Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone: 302-4308

Fax: 323-7803

1. Task Force for Educational Technology

_ Charges: (a) identify and assess present conditions in the area of technological
support for the enhancement and expansion of instructional and other academic
programmes, as well as administrative and support units, (i.e. computer technology
in offices, classrooms, laboratories, campus connectivity, and internal capability and
usage); (b) determining criteria to be used to access, implement, expand or enhance
technological support for all assessed areas; (c) analyze and assess maintenance and
personnel needs relative to maintaining a premier status of technology; and (d) review
the status of the College Technology plan and provide direction for developing the
_ scope and breadth of a University Technology Plan with components necessary for
its expansion and completion. Concrete plans should be developed for strengthening
.the link between the University and all satellite and residential campuses.

2. Task Force for Imaging for International Culture and Global Outreach

Charges: Examine the College’s current position in the international community;
and develop a plan to move the perception of The College to that of nationally and
internationally recognized prestigious university.

The group will analyze all College procedures and practices relative to its charges
as they relate to recruitment and admission of students; recruitment and appointment
of administrators, faculty and staff in order to advance the University’s diverse
complexion. Additionally, the task force should present plans for identifying
scholarship, talent, athletic competitions and civic and social opportunities for students
- designed to.market and promote the College/University as an institution that is
receptive and responsive.to serving a multicultural and multicultural and multiracial

student population.

3. Task Force for Administrative Efficiency and Effectiveness

‘Charges: Present and assess the executive and managerial operations in various
areas such financial aid and ‘scholarships; the registration and graduation processes
with specific focus on the freshman; transfer and continuing student registration
procedures; student accounts procedures; administrative computing services; requisition
and purchases; processes for decision-making; the development of plans designed
to engage The College in total quality control; and organizational and staff development
so structure that it ensures that administrative efficiency and effectiveness permeate
the College/University community. Additionally, this group is charged with analyzing
_and assessing the delivery of services to students and potential students in the areas
of financial aid, recruitment and admissions and student accounts procedures. The
Task Force report should clearly delineate criteria recommended for updating,
upgrading and expanding programmes and services including technology, training
and organizational design.

4. Task Force for Facilities

Charge: a) Present and assess current conditions of physical facilities such as office

and classroom buildings, residential halls (dormitories); classroom and office space :
allocation and utilization, renovations; and athletic and extramural structures; b) :
examine and develop capabilities of the physical facilities affected by such variables }
as the expanded role of technology, the design trends of office equipment, the :
implementation of interactive and virtual classrooms, and designs and desired ;
: plans of the College/University from the apexcen S units should be received and

ambience; and c) projecting future needs in facilities.

Capital construction and renovations for programmes, in light of enrollment }
management, changing foci of scholarship-service-teaching, continuing professional
development, and creating an optimum educational environment for students, faculty ;

9. Task Force for The Bahamas Higher Education Act

and staff are key areas which will impact the development, expansion and enhancement
for future facilities.

Criteria should be developed for assessing and evaluating optimum use of facilities
and the need for future construction and renovation. The task force report should
reflect comments from the College/University community relative to plans for }
: Body for final review and approval of all newly proposed academic programmes;
: and to establish a self-governing University of The Bahamas under a duly appointed
: Board of Trustees. The government, control, conduct, management and administration
: of the University shall be vested in the Board of Trustees. All current and future

facilities.

‘5. Task Force for Research

opportunities in the institution b) recommend structures for the organisation and |
conduct of research in the University of The Bahamas c) draft policies for i) the :
conduct of research in the University of The Bahamas ii) the establishment and :
implementation of an Institutional Review Board ii) Consulting iii) Awards iv) }

Training and the Use of Resources v) Animal and Human Welfare vi) the Environment }

FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005, PAGE 11

University

vii) Collaboration with Government and International Researchers/Agencies d)Review
the relationship among the several entities, including the Field Stations, engaged in
research activities and recommend the relationship and policies i in the University of
The Bahamas e) Recommend the role of the university in coordinating research
activities within the country. .

6. Task Force for Student Body

Charges: Examine current conditions of student life as they relate to recruitment
and admissions procedures, scholarship opportunities, student retention, student
organisations and on-campus activities, career placement, and graduate and professional

schools preparation. Additionally, I would like for you to analyze the academic
support programmes available to students and advance, through your Task Force
report, any recommended revisions and Suggestions,

7. Task Force for Academic Programmes

Charges: Conduct a programme review of current seadennic offerings and to ranké
an assessment with recommendations of maintaining or strengthening those that
contiriue to be mission-wise appropriate and developing or creating those that reflect -
the vocational needs of an ever changing society. The University of The Bahamas
cannot and should not try to be all things to all people. The University will offer
graduate and professional degrees up to the doctorate level, but it cannot afford to
be a large research institution offering doctoral degrees in multiple fields. Likewise,
the University of The Bahamas cannot and should not try to offer every undergraduate
degree imaginable. What the University of The Bahamas will do, however, is to
determine what role and influence it wants to exert in the 21st century and identify
those programmes and Centres of Excellence (Institutes) that meet the goals of the
University and the nation and in which the University can excel; i.e. the Marine and
Environmental Studies Institute, and International Languages Institute, a Culinary
and Hospitality Management Institute, and a Bahamas Technical and Vocational
Institute. It is my judgment that every one of our academic offerings should be
outstanding, good or phased out.
Capital construction and renovations for programmes, in light of enrollment
management, changing foci of scholarship-service-teaching, continuing professional
development, and creating an optimum educational environment for students, faculty,
and staff are key illustrations of areas which will impact the development, expansion
and enhancement for future facilities.

Specifically, the Task Force should determine whether programmes/departments and
curricular offerings (undergraduate, graduate and continuing education) one outstanding,
good, targeted for elevation to bachelors or masters levels, or targeted for phase-out
in light of multiple criteria. These criteria include adequate student enrollment, the
relationship to projected trends and occupational demands for the 21st. Century,
unquestionable scholarship, and service contributions of programmes and curriculum,
along with current and future projections for grants and contracts.
Deliberations should also include an analysis of the current structure of departments,
schools and/or colleges. If modifications, restructuring, or consolidations seem
warranted, the appropriate recommendations should be advanced through the task
forces report.

Additionally, this Task Force should present a student/faculty ratio report for each
academic unit and/or department and recommend revisions deemed appropriate.
These revisions should also take into consideration the current state of affairs in
higher education and projected trends for the 21st century. Finally, this task force
is expected to make recommendations regarding: goals for the percentage of earned
doctorates that each unit should aspire to and methods of achieving those goals.

:. The Task Force may also present innovative recommendations for any other aspect

of academic affairs that it deems appropriate. All recommendations should be
immediately followed by a realistic proposal as to where the resources my be secured
to implement the recommendations.

8. Task for Finance

Charges: (a) examining all current fiscal resources and allocations in the respective

' budget units; (b) assessing current and future financial practices with the overall goal

of using the best policies and procedures to enhance fiscal effectiveness; (c) identifying
new or alternate fiscal resources such as corporate and individual gifts, grants,

: contracts, scholarships and fellowships, tuition, fees, and endowments in light of

plans articulated by the task forces on Academic Programmes, Facilities and Student
Body. Specific plans should be developed to ensure that the fiscal infrastructure and
logistical procedures and operations are understood and implemented by all respective
budget unit heads and appropriate staff. Criteria should also be enumerated for
periodic assessments of fiscal resources. Funding plans and unit program development

included in the task force’s report.

Charges: Examine the current state of affairs pertaining to higher education throughout
The Commonwealth of The Bahamas and to design the mission, goals and objectives
of a national higher education coordinating board; to bring into existence a Accrediting

properties used by the University shall be vested under control of the Board of
Charges: a) Identify and assess the current and future research capabilities and :

Trustees.

The draft act shall stipulate in clear language that the Act is meant to establish the
University and that the Board is obligated to establish Bye-laws designed for the
governing of the University though its respective administrative officers.



Visit our website at www.cob.edu.

—_
D


PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005 THE TRIBUNE



FRIDAY EVENING MARCH 4, 2005

| 7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30 |

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Available at




















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The Tribune & Solomon’s Mines

FIRST Tir : |
$150.00 GIFT BAS a ry ar ate - BASKET
In Each Age Group bee ou Lhd Gees holhidalg

eso oe

1. Children ages 4-5, 6-8, and 9-10. Staff iebets ahd see are not eligible to eaten

2. Coloring may be done with crayons. Adults or older child may assistthe child in filling out the entry form, BUT NOT IN COLORING THE ENTRY.

3. Enter as.much times as you wish. All entries must be in The Tribune by 4pm on Monday, March 21st, 2005. Winners will be announced Wednesday,
March 23, ZOOD5. Look for your names in The Tribune or listen to 1OOJAMZ / JOY FM to hear your name.

4, There will be one first- -prize winner, one second-prize winner and one third-prize winner in each age groups.

5. All enlace: become the property of The Tribune and may be used for any purpose nebang but not limited to, pevicanent in a future issue.

Ne PHOTOCOPIES. iS NEWSPAPER AD ONLY"

Child’s Name: ; Parent/Guardian Signature



Address:


PAGE 14, FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005



















1 tions call 3564






AR OUND





Parties, Nightclubs
& Restaurants



Official Kalik Relaunch Party on Saturday, March
5 @ Arawak Cay. Come and celebrate with a huge
FREE party featuring 3 for $5 Kalik. Performances
by Ira Storr, Nita, Funky D, Spice, Terez Hepburn,
Visage, the Extra Band and KB. '

Annual DJs Boat Cruise on Friday, March 4 on
the Island Link, 8pm. Tickets $15 advance, $20 at the
boat. Special appearances by Platinum and Renais-
sance Models.

Miriam & Remix Birthday Bash on Friday, March
4 on board the Calypso I. Boarding 7.30pm, boat
leaves at 8.30pm. Tickets $20 advance, $25 at the
boat. Price includes food and drinks.

Exotic Saturdays @ Fridays Soon Come starts this
weekend with 3 for $10 drink specials. Admission:
$10 before 12 and $15 after. Ladies free before 11pm.

Da Greasy Pit (Omega Psi Phi Steak-out) on Sat-
urday, March 5 @ West Bay St and Perpall Tract, 12-
6pm. Proceeds in aid of the Bahamas Red Cross
Society and the Omega Psi Phi (Pi Xi Chapter)
Community Centre Building Fund.

Rave Saturdays @ The All New Club Eclipse. DJ
Scoobz spinning the best in Old Skool. Admission
$35, all inclusive food and drink.

Fever @ Bahama Boom, Elizabeth St, downtown,
Fridays. The hottest party in the Bahamas every
Friday night. Admission $10 before midnight. First 50
women get free champagne. First 50 men get a free
Greycliff cigar. Dress to impress. For VIP reserva-





gs is back with a Conscious Party @
e, Charlotte St North every Friday.

‘Classic reggae style music. Admission $10.

Mellow Moods every Sunday @ Fluid Lounge
and Nightclub, Bay St, featuring hits from yesterday
— old school reggae and rockers downstairs, and
golden oldies upstairs. Admission: Free. Doors open
9pm.

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters Sports
Bar. Drink specials ail night long, including karaoke
warm-up drink to get you started. Party, 8pm-until.

Karaoke Nights @ Fluid Lounge and Nightclub.
Begins 10pm every:Tuesday. Weekly winners select-
ed as Vocalist of the Week — $250 cash prize. Winner
selected at end of month from finalists — cash prize
$1,000. Admission $10 with one free drink.

_ Reggae Tuesdays @ Bahama Boom. Cover charge
includes a free Guinness and there should be lots of
prizes and surprises. Admission: Ladies $10 and
Men $15.

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports
Bar every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers
and numerous drink specials.

Flash Nights @ Club Fluid every Thursday. The
ultimate Ladies Night. Join Nassau’s and Miami
Beach’s finest men. Ladies only before 11.30pm with
free champagne. Guys allowed after 11.30pm with
$20 cover.

The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday. Doors
open at 9pm, showtime 11.30pm. Cover charge $15.
$10 with flyer.

Twisted Boodah Bar & Lounge every Friday @
Cafe Segafredo, Charlotte St North, featuring world
music, chillin’ jazz and soulful club beats. Starting at
6pm. Beers $3, longdrinks $4.50.

Fantasy Fridays @ Fluid Lounge, featuring late
‘80s music in the VIP Lounge, Top of the Charts in
the Main Lounge, neon lights and Go Go dancers.
Glow sticks for all in before midnight. Admission:
Ladies free before 11pm, $15 after; Guys $20 all

night.

College Night @ Bahama Boom every Friday.
Admission: $10 with college ID, $15 without.

‘event





the
main

‘Diarn









of Souls’



RATED: B



TICKETS,
HEAVEN SENT PHARMACY
TONY'S CABINETS
BUNDAS BOX OFFICE

PH: 393-3728

A
TRACK ROAD THEATRE
PROP UOCTEON

PONSOREDR BY: —





DIARY of Souls, a deama written and directed by Dr Ian Strachan, playwright and chair of
COB’s School of English Studies, opens this Friday.

It is a fictional interpretation of tragic events that took place in Exuma in J uly 1990, and is
considered by some to be Strachan’s best play yet. When intercepted by the Defence Force,
a Haitian vessel allegedly capsizes. The 39 Haitians who drowned were buried in a common

grave on Bitter Guana Cay.

Strachan’s Track Road Theatre will bring this story to the stage in an emotionally powerful
account, says an online review. The play switches frequently between the beach on Bitter Gua-
na Cay, where three Haitians are stranded as “undead” between feeling neither life nor
death, and a psychiatrist’s office where a Bahamas Defence Force marine is being treated for

psychological trauma.

Strachan also lets his characters investigate the heart of the matter, the source of Haitian dis-
tress — Was it the series of despots following Toussaint Ouverture that impoverished the beanu--

| tiful country? Was it the brutality of “Papa Doc” Duvalier and his private militia,'the Tons-

‘Tons Macoute that broke the spit of a nation? Why do Bahamians shun and degpisé Baas

| treating them like.dirt?.. |...



Diary of Souls opens at the Dundas Conive for the Performing Aris on Friday night @ 8pm.
Tickets are $25 (opening night only). Showtimes continue on Saturday and Sunday, then
continues on March 11 and 12 at a cost of $20 (same time). Tickets can be purchased at the Dun-
das box office from 10am till 4pm, Heaven Sent Pharmacy and Tony’s Cabinet Supplies.

Dicky Mo’s Fridays @ Cable Beach. Happy Hour
- 3 for $10 mixed drinks and $1 shots.

Greek Saturdayz @ Bahama Boom, Elizabeth



‘Ave. Every Saturday the Phi Beta Sigma Frat wel-

comes greeks, college grads and smooth operators.
Admission $15 all night, $10 for greeks in letters.
Music by DJ Palmer, security strictly enforced.

Chill Out Sundays @ The Beach Hut, West Bay

Street with fresh served BBQ and other specials...

starting from 4pm-10pm, playing deep, ee chill
moods with world beats. Cover $2.

Sweet Sunday Chill Out Soiree Lounge, every
Sunday, 4pm-midnight @ Patio Grille, British Colo-
nial Hotel.

Wet Sundays, every Sunday, noon-midnight @
Crystal Cay Beach. Admission $10, ladies free.

Carib Scene @ Club Fluid every Sunday. A night
of Caribbean, Latin and Reggae flavours for all
audiences. Latin Flair in the VIP Lounge; Old School
Reggae and Soca in the Main Lounge. Ladies in
free before 11pm. $10 after 11pm. Men, $15 cover

' charge.

Jay Mitchell and Hot KC @ Palm Court Lounge,
British Colonial Hilton, MAS 8pm-
12am.

Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley’s Restaurant &
Lounge, Eneas St off Poinciana Drive. Featuring
Frankie Victory at the key board in the After Dark
Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to midnight. Fine food
and drinks.

Paul Hanna performs at Traveller’s Rest, West
Bay St, every Sunday, 6.30pm-9.30pm.

‘The Arts
Ian Strachan’s Diary of Souls, the critically

acclaimed play examining the Haitian experience
in the Bahamas, will open at the Dundas Centre







for the paiienine Arts on Friday, March 4 and
continue through March 6, 8pm. And again on
Friday, March 11 and Saturday, March 12, 8pm.
Call the box office at 393-3728 for ticket info.
Tickets for Friday’s performance are $25, remain-
ing shows are $20.

Indigo, a film about gifted children on earth,
their purpose and work of healing, peace and
love, will be shown @ Unity Centre of Light, East
Ave, Centreville (directly behind Centreville Food
Store) on Friday, March 4, starting at 6.30pm.
Admission $10 adults, $7 children. For more infor-
mation call 328-1325.

A Fabric Printing workshop will be held on
Saturday, March 5 and March 12, from 10am -
1pm at the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas.
The workshop is part of the NAGB’s Youth
Workshop series and is for children between the
ages of 12 and 18. Joie Lamare of Bahama Hand-
prints will be conducting the workshop. Cost: $10
members/$16 non-members. Call the gallery at
328-5800/1 to register.

Reading and Lecture by Dr Joanne Hyppolite,
award-winning author of children’s literature, will
deliver a lecture and reading on Monday, March
7, 6pm @ Choices Dining Room, College of the
Bahamas School of Hospitality and Tourism Stud-
ies.

The National Collection @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, an exhibition that takes
the viewer on a journey through the history of

. fine art in the Bahamas. It features signature.

pieces from the national collection, including
recent acquisitions by Blue Curry, Antonius
Roberts and Dionne Benjamin-Smith. Gallery
hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 1lam-4pm. Call 328-
5800 to book tours.

Past, Present and Personal: The Dawn Davies
Collection @ the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, Villa Doyle, West and West Hill Streets.
The exhibition is part of the NAGB’s Collector’s
Series. Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 1lam-4pm.
Call 328-5800 to book tours.





THE TRIBUNE

NASSAU



The Awakening Landscape: ‘The Nassau Water: :
colours of Gaspard Le Marchand Tupper, from. §
the collection of Orjan and Amanda Lindroth @°

the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas. The

mid-nineteenth century paintings that make up the &

exhibition are part of one of the earliest suites of

paintings of Nassau-and its environs. Tupper was. :
a British military officer stationed at Fort Char-: 8
lotte in the 1850s. The works show a pre-mod- §

erm Bahamas through the decidely British medium

of watercolour. Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday,

11am-4pm. Call 328-5800 to book tours.



Health

_ The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at i

5.30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at ‘f

+ their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville. Call’
323-4482 for more inte:

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third

Monday every month, 6pm 2 Doctors Hospital con-
ference room.

The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2.30pm (except August and Decem-
ber) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley
Street.

Doctors Hospital, the official training centre of the
American Heart Association offers CPR classes cer-
tified by the AHA. The course defines the warning
signs of respiratory arrest and gives prevention strate-
gies to avoid sudden death syndrome and the most

common serious injuries and choking that can occur

in adults, infants and children. CPR and First Aid

’ classes are offered every third Saturday of the month

from 9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Com-
munity Training Representative at 302-4732 for
more. paforyiats nd learn to save a life today.



- REACH Résourtes & Education for Autism
and related Challenges meets from 7pm — 9pm the
second Thursday of each month in the cafeteria of
the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.



Civic Clubs

The Bahamas Historical Society’s monthly
meeting is scheduled for 6pm on March 17 at the
Museum on Shirley Street and Elizabeth Avenue.
Dr Donald Hopkins of the Carter Presidental
Center, a descendent of Long Island, Harbour
Island and Abaco, will give a presentation entitled
“Posing Questions, Pondering Records and Prob-
ing the Genes: Researching Family Histories in the
Bahamas.” The public is invited to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1905 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm @
BEC Cafe, Tucker Rd. Club 9477 meets Friday,
7pm @ Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm

A19, Jean St. Club 3956 meets. Thursday, 7.30pm @ 3 1
British Colonial Hilton. Club 1600 meets Thursday,

8.30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes. Club 7178 meets

Tuesday, 6pm @ The J Whitney Pinder Building, ff

Collins Ave. Club 2437 meets every second, fourth
and fifth Wednesday at the J Whitney Pinder Build-

ing, Collins Ave at 6pm. Club 612315 meets Monday:

6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega

chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ the
Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first

Tuesday, 7pm @ Gaylord’s Restaurant, Dowdeswell §

St. Please call 502-4842/377-4589 for more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second
Tuesday, 6.30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office, °§

4th floor meeting Toom.

The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council

(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month in
the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, Bay St.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets
the second and fourth Wednesday of the month,
8pm @ St Augustine’s Monestary.



Send all your civic and social events to The Tri-
bune via fax: 328-2398 or e-mail: outthere@tribune-
media.net

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PAGE 16, FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005

LOCAL NEWS

Pith 6b tie



FROM page one

ington, DC.

Although he met with rep-
resentatives of the US State
Department, Mr Mitchell said
that there had been no need
to discuss the report, which he
said simply “recites facts in the
public domain with regard to
the prison, the judiciary and
the conduct of our national
institutions.”

Mitchell

Under the headline:
“Human Rights Violations”
The Tribune reported on
Wednesday that according to
the State Department’s annu-
al report, the Bahamas is
guilty of human rights
infringements.

The report said that in 2004
there were reports of beatings

and unlawful killings by police
officers, allegations of abuse
of migrants, and “harsh”
prison conditions.

It also said that violence
against women continued to
be “a serious widespread
problem,” and that discrimi-
nation against homosexuals
“was evident” in the Bahamas.

The minister spoke out
against the comments made by

human rights activist attorney



’

BUSINESS DIRECTORY IN PRINT AND ONLINE

BAHAMAS GOLDEN PAGES DIRECTORY DELAY

Bahamas Golden Pages would like to apologise to its customers —
for the delay in the distribution of its much anticipated 2005
Directory. Technical . difficulties beyond the control of the
company have resulted in this unforeseen delay.

The 2005 edition is now expected to arrive in Nassau at the end
of this month at which time commercial and residential distribu-
tion will commence immediately. This edition will again excel in
quality, innovation and unprecedented value for advertisers.

As always, however, our 2005 edition is published and avail-
able on our standard setting website, www.bahamasgp.com
giving worldwide, year-round exposure to all of our advertisers.

To lend further value to our advertisers we are the only Bahamian
Directory accessible through the well-known North American por-
tal, www.yellowpagecity.com, opening up: even more avenues to

our advertiser base.

Our Sales & Marketing Consultants are
available at 242-394-7988 for assistance
with your advertising needs.

Again we would like to thank you, our valued customers, for your
patience and understanding during this time.





FLIGHT SCHEDULE:
DAYS: Sunday, Monday, Wednesday & Friday

Providenciales to Nassau
Flight # RU401 departs 10:00am
Arrives in Nassau 11:30am

7-day advance purchase return tickets as low as
Call Destinations at 393-6900 or Premier Travel at 328-0264 for reservations and ticketing

KYKING





Nassau to Providenciales
Flight # RU400 departs 12:30pm
Arrives in Providenciales 2:00pm

The way to fly in the TC! and beyond

Fred Smith who is quoted in
the story as calling the human
rights record of the Bahamas
“abysmal.”

He said it seemed that the
story “conveniently forgot to
point out that nowhere is there
an attack on the institutions
of government in the sense
that they are accused of being
ineffective or corrupt.”

Mr Mitchell acknowledged
that the Bahamas is challenged
by a number of issues, includ-
ing problems at the prison.

“Who has tried to hide
them?” he asked, pointing out
that steps are being taken to
address these issues.

Mr Mitchell said that a sim-
ilar human rights report could
be made on any country with-
out leading to the conclusion
that such behaviour is official-
ly sanctioned by that country’s
government.

He pointed out that
although a group of Bahami-
ans are currently alleging mis-
treatment at a correctional
facility in the US, no one is
claiming that it is the policy
of the US government.

Mr Mitchell said that in
open and transparent societies
like the Bahamas and the US,
such claims can be investigated
and addressed if found to be
true.

The minister said that while
in the US capital, his delega-
tion held meetings with vari-
ous parts of the legislative
branch of the US government.

These included a meeting
with Idaho Senator Tom
Harking, who has been visiting
the Bahamas frequently since
1969 and is the owner of a res-

. idence in Abaco.

The minister said the dele-
gation also met with Florida
Senator Bill Nelson to discuss
matters-of mutual interest,
including the situation in Haiti
and the-fight against drug traf-

. ficking:

Mr Mitchell said these issues
were also discussed at a lunch

’ with 16 members of Florida’s

congressional delegation.

He said that joint efforts for
natural disaster relief were
also raised at the lunch.

Mr Mitchell thanked US
Ambassador to.the Bahamas
John Rood for organising the
meetings, and Bahamas
Ambassador to Japan and to
UNESCO, Sir Sidney Poitier,
who accompanied him on the
Visit.

°299

departure taxes included





Available on
Sesame Seed
Bun Only

oon

Pm lovin’ it

FROM page one

trators with grades 1-4.”

At the moment Family
Island Administrator, senior
deputy administrator, deputy
administrator and assistant
administrator are the titles
used.

“We feel that does not
make real good sense, because
they do not deputise or assist
anyone, and they all have
their own districts and I feel to
call a man who is in charge an
assistant administrator does
not make practical sense.”

In addition, he said, gov-
ernment hopes to change the
local government legislation
so that officers can be
removed from office before
the end of their term if neces-
sary.

“We feel that if a selected
official does not behave in
accordance with the expecta-
tions of the majority of the
council who selected him, they
should be able to remove him
by a majority vote and in the
law today, that is not
allowed.”

He said another crucial
amendment would be the re-
establishment of the Depart-
ment of Local Government.
He said at the moment, the
department does not have a
director or deputy director as
it must have if it is to move
forward.

Mr Gray explained that the
month of events will begin
with a special appreciation
luncheon and award ceremo-
ny for retired family adminis-
trators to be held in Grand
Bahama today.

“This will be our ministry’s
way of saying thanks to those
worthy ladies and gentlemen



FROM page one



Inmate on the run

Amendments

who have given unselfish ser-
vices in the various Family
Island communities in which
they served.”

Alexander Williams, presi-
dent of the Association of
Local Government Adminis-
trators, said he hopes that
more people will become
aware of just how important
local government is and how it
affects the Family Islands.

He also hoped that the
event would encourage local
leaders in the community to
offer themselves for office in
the June election to serve in
the three-year local govern-
ment term.

He said a number of events
are being planned for Grand
Bahama, including a mock
council meeting for students.

A number of former admin-
istrators were also at the press
conference and noted their
appreciation to the minister
and his office, for highlight-
ing local government.

Former administrator Karl
Spencer said: “Family island
commissioners and adminis-
trators have played a tremen-
dous part in touching people,
not only at the local level, but
at the national level.”

He said administrators have
given years of dedicated ser-
vice.and local government has
been the breeding ground for
producing top civil servants,
including Minister Gray, who
himself was a Family Island
administrator, FNM MP
Lindy Russell and a number
of permanent and under sec-
retaries in various government
ministries.





this method of escape.” He said that in response to Parcoi’s
escape, the walls of the bathroom had immediately been forti-
fied and that other areas within the prison compound were
also being looked at.

“Wherever there is a vulnerability of this nature, that vul-
nerability is being addressed today,” he said.

Parcoi is the fifth prisoner to escape in 2005.

The first inmate to break-out from HMP this year, made his
escape on January 31, 2005. On February 16, 2005 another:
inmate escaped from prison.

Two prisoners on remand for armed robbery also escaped
from a prison bus parked on the compound next to the Nassau
Street police station last Tuesday.

One of the prisoners, 32-year-old Jan Reckley of Elizabeth
Estates, turned himself in on. Tuesday and was charged with
escaping from lawful custody. The other, Jason Flowers, aged 20,
of Roseville Avenue, remains on the run and is considered
extremely dangerous.

Dr Rahming noted that in the more than six years that the
inmate escapes have been under review, there have been 37
escapes, 19 or 51 per cent from HMP; 10 or 25 per cent from
police custody; six or 16 per cent from the Extra Mural Day
Release Work Scheme; and three or eight per cent from Princess
Margaret Hospital.

“J should point out that of these 37 escapes over the past six
and a half years, 32 of the escapes were returned to the safe cus-
tody of Her Majesty’s Prison, many of whom were recaptured
within hours by search parties from her Majesty’s Prison,” he
said. ;
The Prison Superintendent further said that the recapture rate
by the prison in co-operation with the police, “is enviable.”

“As the new Prison Superintendent, I have said publicly that
our top priority is to protect the public against escapes. And
while we do not have a perfect record, the record is not anything
to be ashamed of.

“The fact is close to 1,500 men and women slept here last
night. One escaped, and that is one too many,” he reiterated.

Dr Rahming said that although there can be no such thing as
an escape-proof prison, that must be the ultimate goal.

To this end, he announced that the re-deployment of the
Canine Unit has been ordered and that for the first time, HMP
now has an Internal Affairs Unit in place “to target suspicious
activities and other matters that may compromise security.”

“We are now in search of the most cutting edge methodolo-
gy for further fortifying the perimeter boundaries of the insti-
tution,” he said, also noting that “indolence and indifference are
as poisonous as culpability and complicity.”



















































FROM page three

September 25, 2002 until they were handed over from Ms Pena to
Officer Deleveaux on September 26, 2003.

During cross examination of witnesses, defence attorney Dorsey
McPhee questioned why pictures were not taken of places where
police said they used distilled water and a cotton swab applicator to
collect samples.

It was said in court that the samples included those taken from a
flowerpot outside the kitchen door and from the picket fence sur-
rounding the home.

However, there were no images of where the samples were taken
amongst a 50-picture package presented to court by the detectives.

The trial continues today.







SECTION



business@100jamz.com

FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005

_ The Tribune

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street





Nassau/Paradise Island properties
expecting occupancies and room
rates to exceed 2004 performance

By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter

*
nd

assau/Paradise
Island hotels are
reporting strong
2005 first quar-
ters, with several
expecting 100. per cent occu-
pancies over the Easter holiday
period despite new policies cur-
tailing the number of Spring
Breakers.

‘Robert Sands, general man-
ager of the Nassau Beach Hotel,
said the Cable Beach property
will post an average occupancy
level for February, March and
April of 90 per cent, some 10
percentage points higher than
the same period last year. He
also anticipates a 5 per cent
growth in room rates for the
period.

"This is our winter season,



when there is the most demand
for the Bahamian product,” Mr
Sands said. “We're maximising
our pricing strategy'so there are
no specials. The demand for the
Bahamas remains strong and
we're confident that we will see
growth in business over last
year. Heading forward, provid-
ing there are no setbacks from
hurricanes, 2005 will be an even
stronger year than 2004, which
was stronger than 2003."
Crediting the increased air-
lift for the positive growth in

_ hotel occupancy, Mr Sands said

the Nassau Beach eas experi-
encing a more level rate of
occupancy throughout the
week, with arrivals and depar-
tures on Sunday through to
Thursday not as challenging as
it was before. Business is now
more spread through the work-
ing week.

Mr Sands said further that

Freeport’s

Bazaar saw [Etvaramcenote ‘fast-tracked’

‘lifeline cut
off by road
diversion

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

‘The diversion of Sunrise
Highway to bypass Freeport’s
International Bazaar has “cut
off a lifeline” for business own-
ers in that area, a senior
Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation (BAIC)
official said, exacerbating the
problems caused by the Royal
Oasis closure.

-Rudy Sawyer told the Grand
Bahama Business Outlook con-
ference that the diversion of
Sunrise Highway had taken
4 ia consumer traffic away

from the International Bazaar’s
retail section when it “needed
every chance at getting cus-
tomers”.

Mr Sawyer said: “As a result,
they were forced into a depen-
dency relationship on the occu-
pancy of the [Royal Oasis]
hotels and casino with which
they were now hemmed in, and
now they suffer more than they
needed to.

“Business people realise the
importance of ‘traffic flow’, par-
ticularly for retailers. Sunrise
Highway bypassing the Inter-

See ROAD, Page 2B

Bahamas urged
to target Japan,
Germany for
more tourists

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

“A tourism consultant has
urged the Bahamas to launch
aggressive marketing campaigns
in prosperous ‘Americanised’
countries such as Japan and
Germany, as the cost of living in
these nations was comparable
to that on Grand Bahama.

“As an expensive destination
we ought to be proud, and we
should identify countries with
high costs of living, as tourists
from those countries would not
be deterred by our relatively
high prices," Subir Das Gupta
told the Bahamas Business Out-
look conference at the Westin
at Our Lucaya Resort.

Speaking on the topic
Restructuring the Grand
Bahama Tourism Industry', Mr
Das Gupta, managing consul-
tant at Warrior Consulting in
Freeport, outlined several new
trends and strategies that should
be considered.

In addition to the traditional
US markets, he said that mar-
keting in American-influenced
countries would serve as lever-
age to attract more high spend-
ing visitors to the island.

As an expert in serving the
US tourists, Mr Das Gupta said
Grand Bahama should now
focus that expertise on other
large-economy countries.

See MARKET, Page 2B

more airline seats means more’
rooms are filled, and it augered
well for the Bahamas. As it con-
tinues to grow its room inven-
tory, it will need additional lift

.to support those rooms.

Meanwhile, Mr Sands said a
decision had been made to
reduce the Nassau Beach's
dependency-on Spring Break
rooms by limiting the amount
available for students to 20-25
per cent this year.

“We did not want to inundate
other customers with Spring
Breakers, so we allocated not
more than 20 per cent of rooms
to students. It's a clash of cul-
tures and we're trying to find
the right balance so both groups
can coexist,” he added..

Stephen Kappeler, regional
director of operations for the
Holiday Inns in the Bahamas,
said the properties were also
looking to reduce the number of
Spring Breakers compared to
last year.

He said management at the
Holiday Inn All-Inclusive Sun-
spree Resort on Paradise Island
was no longer motivated to do
as much Spring Break business



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

WHILE a Delta Connection
airline’s addition of two daily
round-trip flights between Nas-
sau and Fort Lauderdale was

“terrific news”, the Bahamas
Hotel Association’s executive
vice-president told The Tribune
that this nation was moving to
“fast-track” further improve-
ments to all its airports to meet



Robert Sands, general manager of the Nassau Beach Hotel

‘Terrific news’ on daily
Delta Connection flights

another internationally-man-
dated security deadline.
Frank Comito said that
Delta Airlines plan to add two
non-stop daily flights to its Fort
Lauderdale-Nassau route from
May 1 was “incredibly wel-

otels 100% full
or Easter holiday

because of the impact on regu-
lar guests.

The property is sold out from
March 19 to the end of the
month, and is also expected to
post a rate increase of some $10
to $11 over 2004.

The now-independent Nas-
sau Palm Resort, formerly the
Nassau Holiday Inn at
Junkanoo Beach, is expected to
be full for the entire month, and
is also expected to post positive
growth in occupancy trends,
with rate increase of $4 to $5 ,
over last year.

Meanwhile, Mr Kappeler said
the opening of the Spanish-
based property RIU Paradise
Island was helping the Holiday
Inn Sunspree because the for- .
mer’s price point was higher
than what the former Sheraton
offered, giving the Holiday Inn
the opportunity to improve on
its prices.

In terms of the Paradise
Island market, Mr Kappeler
said that prreviously Atlantis
had the highest prices, followed
by Comfort Suites, the Sheraton

See OUTLOOK, Page 2B

the latest flights, which will be
operated by Delta Connection
carrier Chautauqua Airlines,
using Embraer Regional Jet
aircraft, added to the arrival of
JetBlue, Song and Spirit into
this market, “underscored the
urgency” of “getting Nassau

come news” as it would add to
the increased airlift into the

Bahamas, making this destina-

tion more accessible to tourists

and hopefully increasing hotel

International Airport up to a
whole different level quickly”
so it could handle the expected

occupancies and revenues.
However, Mr Comito said

See FLY, Page 2B













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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



Mar ket (From page 1B)

He suggested that tourism
representatives should be
appointed to cities in Japan and
Germany, which are the second
and third-largest economies in
the world.

“A typical Japanese family
are the only people who found
London cheap compared to
Tokyo prices," said Mr Das
Gupta.

The consultant said Grand
Bahama could be marketed as a
golfing vacation destination to
Japanese executives, as many
cannot afford to play in Japan
because the scarcity of land
makes golf club membership
open only to a select few. He
suggested that perhaps charter
flights could be started to major
Japanese cities such as Tokyo,
Nagoya and Osaka.

In an effort to embrace this
new influx of visitors, Mr Das
Gupta said language training in
Japanese would have to be pro-
vided for tourism industry per-
sonnel. He added that Grand
Bahamians would have to be
prepared and sensitised to the
appearances of large number of
oriental visitors.

“We don't want immigration
phones ringing off the hook,
saying there are a lot of illegal
Chinese immigrants here when
there are actual, legal Japanese
tourists," Mr Das Gupta said.

Outlook (From page 1B)

and then the Holiday Inn. Now,
the RIU was offering guests an
‘all-inclusive ocean front expe-
rience comparable, in terms of
price, to Atlantis’ Beach Tow-
ers, although Atlantis’ other
towers still remained the top
price for the destination.

The Holiday Inn now com-
petes primarily with Comfort
Suites which, while not an all-
inclusive, offers its guest all the
amenities provided at Atlantis.

"We're offering all-inclusive
on the harbour side at about
the same price of Comfort
Suites. The RIU’s prices are the
same as the Beach Tower and
it’s an all- suite hotel on the
ocean front,” Mr Kappeler said.

“ In essence you're getting
four distinct market niches,
which is good for everybody.
Also, the Sunspree, with the
Holiday Inn Nassau going out
of brand, is now the only Holi-
day Inn in the country right now
and it’s driving business to us."

General manager of the new-

ly-named Nassau Palm Resort,

He stressed that a similar

approach can also be consid-.

ered for German visitors, who
are fluent in English and love
beach vacation destinations.

“We can contact the German
charter airline to start flights
from Frankfurt and Berlin, as
Germans are good prospects for
the condominium market," he
said.

Mr Das Gupta indicated that
another trend that must be con-
sidered to develop a more
vibrant tourism industry is the
encouragement of specific niche
developments outside
Freeport's bonded area. He
exnlained that an eco-tourism
niche could be developed in the
east, while a heritage niche be
developed in the west.

Mr Das Gupta said the
Bahamas National Trust can
take the lead in establishing east
Grand Bahama as an eco-
tourism haven, promoting plant,
animal and human ecology, and
business developments in solar
energy, bonefishing lodges and
organic farms.

Similarly, he noted that the
Bahamas Agricultural Industri-
al Corporation (BAIC) could
establish a heritage niche for
west Grand Bahama that would
encourage a rich tapestry of
native Grand Bahamians, Turks
Islanders and Haitian immi-

Larry Williams, concurred with
Mr Kappeler's assessment of
the property's performance,
saying that over the Easter peri-
od the hotel will be completely
sold out. It was working not to
get overbooked.

The Nassau Palm was exceed-
ing occupancy levels, revenue
and average room rates for Jan-
uary and February, when com-
pared to the same period last
year.

Looking at summer, which is
usually slow, Mr Williams said
he was anticipating about the
same level of business. But with
the name change and the addi-
tion of more travel agents, he
was hopeful the resort can

‘attract more people, putting

occupancies some 6 per cent
above last year, with initial
bookings already showing a
positive trend.

One of the few properties to

fully embrace the Spring Break

crowd, Mr Williams said while
students have arrived already,

most are expected to begin |

NOTICE

‘

ARGUS GLOBAL EQUITIES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in
dissolution, commencing on the 25th day of February, 2005.
Articles of Dissolution have been duly registered by the Registrar.
The Liquidator is Contance L. Godet, P.O.Box N-8303, Nassau,

Bahamas.

All persons having Claims against the named Company are
required on or before the 4th day of April, 2005 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to
the Liquidator of the Company or, in default thereof, may be
excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before such

debts are proved.

Dated this 25th day of February, 2005.

CONSTANCE L. GODET
Liquidator

BISk

Pricing Information As Of:
3 March 2005



‘Colina

Financial Advisors Ltd.

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste
British American Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Doctor's Hospital

Famguard
Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Kerzner International BDRs
Premier Real Estate

12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets

_ 0.35 RND Holdings

Colina Money Market Fund

1.209527*

2.1191 1.9423 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.1105 ***
10.2648 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.2602*****
2.1746 2.0524 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.166020**

grant culture.

“BAIC could set up schemat-
ic inns, ethnic restaurants and
handicrafts, and a West End
Fishing Festival could be start-
ed," he added.

The consultant said that the
island must also move away
from the trend of promoting
sun, sea and sand to become a
secure destination, where visi-
tors could feel safe and secure.

Stressing that September 11
drastically altered the travel
industry, Mr Das Gupta said
Grand Bahama must be alert
to the risk posed by interna-
tional terrorists.

The fact that the Bahamas
immigration at Freeport Har-
bour turn away two of the Sep-
tember 11 hijackers should not
give rise to complacency, he
said.

“We should not think it can-
not happen here. They did not
expect a hit on New York City
either," he said, warning that
possible alliance between drug
traffickers and terrorists must
be scrutinised.

“We have been very luke-
warm about tackling the prob-
lems of drugs. The existence of
the large pool of unemployable
males is cause for concern, as
these persons may be unwit-
tingly drawn into collusion with

terrorists," Mr Das Gupta said. .

arriving on Monday. He added:
“The entire month of March,
the hotel will be filled with
Spring Breakers. This is the
busiest month of the year for
hotels".

Mr Williams said further that
the hotel was working to imple-
ment a number of changes from
last year to help all guests enjoy
their stay.

They will be adding extra
security, putting in a curfew and
efforts are also being made to
work with the Ministry of
Tourism to clean up Junkanoo
beach.

Mr Williams said a letter is
being sent to students before
their arrival to let them know
what the property's rules are.

As for how successful the
Nassau Palm will be following
the renaming, he said that it had
already positively impacted the
company's bottom line because
they no longer have to pay a
franchise fee. The real test of



He said slippage in border
control, as evidenced by the
large number of illegal immi-
grants, could showcase entry
routes that terrorists can use
without fear of being detected.

Mr Das Gupta said hotels in
Grand Bahama must bring for-
mer police and defense officers
into their core workforce.

“Such skills are invaluable in
today's high risk environment
and should not be limited to
confines of traditional roles of
security officers. Instead, they
should be deployed in all facets
of tourism industry - so we
would then be able to project
ourselves a secure destination,”
he added.

Mr Das Gupta said the
Tourism Board must expand
beyond it current role of
tourism promoter to that of
property developer and invest-
ment banker. °

He also encouraged more .
hospitality training and afford-

able customised programmes
for the different categories of
visitors, without compromising
standard and quality.-

“A holistic approach to visi-
tor satisfaction is required.
When tourists leave these
shores they must leave ener-
gised, refreshed, and wanting
to. come back to’ Grand

Bahama," Mr Das Gupta said.



whether it was a good decision
or not, however, will be deter-
mined if they can meet their
budget without the Holiday Inn
name.

Najam Khan, general manag-
er of the Wyndham Nassau
Resort, said the hotel was
expected to be full for Easter,
posting a $20 to $25 rate
increase over the average daily
rate seen last year. Occupancy
levels are expected to go up by
about 2 points.

For March, the occupancy
level will hit 89 per cent, with
average daily room rates stand-
ing at $20 over last year, thanks
in large part to all the new airlift
coming into the destination.

February improved by 4 to 5
points in occupancy, with the

room rate up by. almost $10... .
Looking ahead, Mi Khan said: .

“Right now we are aggressive
about the trends we have and I
think it will continue into the
summer."



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JIMMY LAURENT, MARSH
HARBOUR, GENERAL DELIVERY, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas; and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
4TH day of MARCH, 2005 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PRO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.







Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KENOL GUE, MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that .any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25th day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147,












libs



BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day’s weighted price for daily volume
Today’s Close - Current day's welghted price for dally volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months
Pe - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
** - AS AT JAN. 31, 2008/ **** - AS AT DEC. 31, 2004
- AS AT FEB. 11, 2005/ *** - AS AT JAN 31, 2005/ ***** oes rin JAN. 31, aoa



EE ee Aa



YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bld $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

ELI



Fly (From page 1B)



Road (From page 1B)

national Bazaar was a major artery, a lifeline for business that
was cut off.”

Mr Sawyer argued that any potential purchaser ‘of the Royal
Oasis should follow Kerzner International’s lead and establish a
business model where the hotel was secondary to the attractions
around it. It was these attractions that would draw guests to the
hotel.

The BAIC executive also floated the idea of establishing a ‘Fes-
tival Park’ on the vacant property next to Goombay Park, which lies
adjacent to the Royal Oasis and is home to independent craft ven-
dors.

The Festival Park could give tourists a taste of Junkanoo by
allowing them to participate in it, and spin-offs could include the
sale of Junkanoo-related costumes and craft items.

Apart from a lack of creativity, Mr Sawyer reiterated that small
business development and entrepreneurial growth were still being
held back by lack of access to capital, contending that the funding
system for such start-ups was “retarded and deformed”.

While acknowledging that commercial banks were not in business
to make high-risk loans to start-ups, Mr Sawyer said providing
loans to small businesses “could be profitable with the proper
interest rate regime and follow-up and delinquency control pro-
gramme in place”.

Adding that the “very successful commercial banking club in the
Bahamas can decide to set aside a small percentage of their lend-
ing portfolio for on-lending to good new business projects every
year”, Mr Sawyer called for reduced documentation requirements
for business loans up to a certain amount, suggesting $200,000.

He also called for better administrative support and a “restruc-
tured Government Small Business Guarantee Scheme’’, with real
funds set aside in a reserve fund to back the total amount guaran-
teed by the Government “up to five to.10 times the amount of the
reserve amount”.

On the issue of taxation, Mr Sawyer suggested that the Gov-
ernment could reduce import duties - which it is under pressure to
do anyway - and replace impose new taxes “on certain services
where the users can comfortably bear the taxes imposed”, such as
a service tax.

He also advocated the introduction of transfer fees on financial
transactions, given the high volume that took place on a daily
basis. Revenues could also be gained from taxing just a small por-
tion of local gambling.

- And Mr Sawyer suggested: “For those businesses that estab-
lish enterprises that are using the country to transfer high vol-
ume, high value commodities because of the cost advantages from
operating in a no to low-tax jurisdictions, [get them] to pay trans-
fer/user or throughput fees to the Government through government
corporations rather than direct taxation.”



increase in passenger volumes.

Meanwhile, research by The Tribune has found that the Bahamas
will have to ensure all its airports have implemented further secu-
rity measures for international flights by January 1, 2006.

The International Civil Aviation Association is requiring 100 per
cent screeing and checking of all baggage going on international
flights, which will impose further cost burdens on the Bahamas.

Mr Comito said the Government was already moving on the
issue, and at some airports might receive financial assistance from
the private sector on a process that had to be “fast-tracked”.

share your news

The Tribune'wants to

hear from people who are .
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DAVID GABRIELE BANGELLI,
BUCCANEER ROAD, LITTLE BLAIR, P.O. BOX SS-19531,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 25TH day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.














UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. a leading international wealth manager,
has an opening for the position of a

| IT BUSINESS ENGINEER

In this challenging position you will be responsible for:

¢ Develop and program our banking applications and systems;
¢ Implement IT solutions;

e Lead IT projects and ensure compliance with milestones
and delivery requests;

e Manage the user testing existing, upgraded and new
systems and provide troubleshooting;

¢ Analyze and reengineer the existing systems and workflows;

¢ Support international business process reengineering

projects;
© User Training.

We are searching for a personality with expensive experience

in IT, Business Engineering and Project management who
meets the following mandatory requirements:

¢ University degree in Computer Science, Mathematics or
Physics;

e At least six years of experience in a comparable position
with a proven track record;

¢ Extensive experience in IT business analysis, data modeling,
database development, programming and testing;

* Excellent knowledge of applications such as Sybase, SQL,

. Windows XP, MS Office and Smartsizing;

“e Solid knowledge of products and services of a global offshore

bank;

¢ International experience is an advantage.

Applications in writing, enclosing a full resume,
by Bahamian nationals only to:

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources

P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas


THE TRIBUNE

=) UES) | tots)

FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005, PAGE 3B



Lack of data hurting
economic planning

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

he absence of

“hard core” statis-

tics and data on

the Grand

Bahama econo-
my’s performance has prevent-
ed the development of “long
range, forward-looking policies
that would get us to where we
want to go”, a Central Bank of
the Bahamas researcher and
economist said.

Adressing the Grand Bahama
Business Outlook Conference,
Kevin Demeritte said the Cen-
tral Bank was working with the
Grand Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) to help alleviate this
problem through “developing
a comprehensive economic fea-
sibility study” of the island. Sim-
ilar studies would be performed
on other Family Islands, but
Grand Bahama and Freeport
would be a particular focus.

Mr Demeritte added that the
Central Bank and the GBPA
were working with the Inter-
American Development Bank
(IDB).to develop another study
that would analyse the “net fis-
cal resources cost benefit
impact”.

This would assess the benefits
Freeport and Grand Bahama
received from the national gov-
‘ernment compared to the taxes
they paid.

Mr Demeritte said: “It is nice
to say that Freeport is the sec-
ond City... , but the fact of
the matter is we have absolute-
ly no idea just how much Grand
Bahama and Freeport specifi-
cally contributes to our overall
GDP: We have a fair feel, but
quite frankly the numbers are
not there.

“We can see over the course
of the years since 1955, the
changes in the overall picture
of Grand Bahama. We can see -
and we sincerely believe going



‘What we need is hardcore

numbers of we are going to
_ plan development for
Grand Bahama over the

\

next 20-30 years. ’



forward - that the agreement
between the Government and
the Port Authority, that is the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement,
extending it another 20 or 30
years was the right thing to do.

“Rut, at the end of the day -

we still need the kind of num-
bers that not only the Port
Authority, as the local govern-
ment entity, [requires] but the

_ national government in Nassau

and the Central Bank need
those numbers to be able to
plan where our economy is
going to be going forward,” Mr
Demeritte added.

“We don't know, for exam-
ple, the net contribution that
Grand Bahama - and Freeport
specifically - make to the
National Budget. We don't
know how much taxes you pay
compared to how much in ben-
efits you received from the
national government.

“Clearly, you can see why it is
important to Grand Bahama.
You would really like to know if
your getting more back than
you’re giving.”

The Central Bank, Mr
Demeritte said, had already
issued a survey asking compa-
nies in Grand Bahama how the
economy was. doing from their

business’s perspective and their
assessment of its prospects

going forward.

Adding that it was “very dif-
ficult to make policy based on
anecdotal evidence”; Mr
Demeritte said: “What we need

More FUN N to eG

is hardcore numbers if we are
going to plan development for
Grand Bahama over the next
20-30 years. As has been
acknowledged, the Grand
Bahama economy went on this
roller coaster ride.

“T strongly believe that one
of the difficulties in smoothing
out the growth trend in Grand
Bahama has been that we don't
have hard core numbers that
we need to make the kind long
range forward looking policies
that would get us to where we
want to go.

“We need the kind of
detailed statistics, not just from
the Port Authority, but we need
to know locally and a national
level to precisely quantify the
benefits of the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement to the Grand
Bahamian economy in general
and the Bahamian economy
specifically.

“We do need to know exact-
ly where we would have been if
we did not have a Hawksbill
Creek Agreement and we need
to know numbers quantifiable
how that agreement has bene-

‘fited this community and our

economy. If we know what hap-
pened in the past, we can begin
to make some plans about what
might be happening in the
future. We know it has been a
net benefit we can see that in

our community. We need to’

know how much of a benefit.”

Mr Demeritte’ said the Cen-

tral Bank did not know how

ry yi4 7 NE

y ndai Accent comes with a surprising number of
sophisticated standard features, including...

much the Grand Bahama and
Freeport contributed to the
Bahamas’ net foreign exchange
earnings, nor how much the
island contributed to economic
diversification or developing the
workforce’s skills base.

The Department of Statistics

_ had ceased producing national

accounts since 1995 because
most of the numbers were esti-
mates, and there were statistical
issues related to these.

Mr Demeritte said: “Nation-
al accounts data regarding
industrial and sectoral statistics,
prices and inflation, agriculture
production - fisheries, livestock,
construction. Those are pre-
cisely the numbers we don't
really have a good handle on
when it comes to Grand
Bahama.”

There was no comprehensive
real esate data, such as infor-
mation on real estate inflation,
inflation.in leases, lease pay-

ments, lease costs and rental

inflation.

There was no information on
inflation in business square
footage prices.

Mr Demeritte said: “And that
is just real estate. Agricultural
production, yield, acreage, cost,
revenue - good hard core sta-
tistics that we don't have for
Grand Bahama.

“T am sure that Grand
Bahama farmers, probably indi-
viduals in the Chamber of Com-
merce and Port Authority, have
some idea or numbers. We
would certainly like to be able
to create a comprehensive data
set because it then allows us to
make plans moving forward.
Fisheries, large production,
same deal.”

Mr Demeritte said it was crit-
ical to develop expectations for
Grand Bahama’s gross domestic

‘production (GDP).

He added: “The question
only remains; where cai we go
from here? Do we have the



vision, plan and hardcore data
that is going to allow us to push
this project forward?...........
“You can lead the way, but
what you do need is a proper

26 UBS

road map,. You certainly have a
real good captain, and you need
the kind of data that is going to
allow you to make those kind of
plans. “

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd. a leading trust company manager,
has an opening for the position of a

TEAM HEAD PRODUCTS,
PROCESSES & TRAINING

In this challenging position you will be responsible for:

° Analysis and re-engineering of existing and new business

processes;

* Documentation of all processes within the trust company;

e Review of existing and new product offering;

° Product and Process Training for all staff,

* Coordination with head office in Switzerland for all product,
process and training activities;

® Special Projects on behalf of CEO. of trust company.

We are searching for a personality with expensive experience
in international trust work, Project Management and Training;

¢ University degree in law;

e Extensive practical experience as a lawyer for a law company,

incl. court experience;

° Several years of experience as a Trust Officer at an international

offshore trust company;

* Good knowledge of the finance industry in general especially

fiduciary products;

¢ Proven management skills, tract record as a Trainer;

© Good interpersonal skills;

e International experience is a plus;
e Fluency in English is essential, fluency in German is a plus;

© Computer literacy.

Applications in writing, enclosing a full resume,
by Bahamian nationals only to:

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757
. Nassau, Bahamas .

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CAREER OPPORT UNITY

fora

PROPERTY MANAGER

Reporting to the Property Director in Barbados, you will enjoy a high level of
autonomy and responsibility for managing, through a small property team,

a varied but demanding caseload of premises matters reiaing to the Bahamas
& TCl occupational porfolio.

QUALIFICATIONS:



¢ Member of professional body or Certification in recognized property

field

e 5+ years in Property management, especially in complex buildings
or multiple sites across the islands, with proven track record

© Comprehensive knowledge of property and construction management

e Detailed knowledge of building A/C systems, electrical systems,
building, codes, occupational health and labour regulation, and
hurricane building codes

e Motivated, strong on delivery, able to handle multiple tasks, and a
good logistical planner

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS / RESPONSIBILITIES:

-“e Proactively manage the premises, including all repairs and disaster
management, ensuring that Health & Safety and Security issues are

delivered.

e Develop and apply strategic solutions to maximize asset value and

the P&L

* automatic transmission
* air conditioning
° stereo radio/cassette

© digital clock

HYUNDAI

° 1.5 litre engine

° power steering

¢ central locking & alarm system ~
¢ keyless entry

e Project manage the construction / renovation of new branches,
' properties as required
e Manage relationships with the businesses, service providers, suppliers
and landlords
e uanege and motivate a small team through excellent leadership
skills

IF YOU ARE INTERESTED:

Submit your resume private & confidential in WRITING ONLY before March
18, 2005 to:

Jamise Sturrup - Human Resources Assistant
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-8329, Nassau, Bahamas

Or email: jamise.sturrup@firstcaribbeanbank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
thanks all applicants for their interest, however only those ©
under consideration will be contacted.

Vacancies are open to Bahamian residents only.

ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING

Price includes rustproofing, licensing and inspection to birthday,
full tank of fuel and 12,000-mile/12-month wal

QUALITY 2:

LIMITED
#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET ° 322-3775 ° 325-3079

Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals, Queens Hwy, 352-6122
or Abaco Motor Mall, Don Mackay Blvd, 367-2916



PERSE TMI eee ne NE


PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



i SS a
FIU analyst is fourth
Bahamian to pass anti-
money laundering exam

A Financial Intelligence Unit (FIU) analyst has become the
fourth person in the Bahamas to attain the Certified Anti-Money
Laundering Specialist (CAMS) designation after successfully pass-
ing the relevant exam.

Michelle Miller joined the FIU as an analyst in June 2001, and has
been a Professional Member of the Association of Certified Anti-
Money Laundering Specialists since 2002.

icated to the detection and prevention of international money
laundering. It also promotes the development and implementation
of sound anti-money laundering practices.

The certification programme aims to set the standard for the anti-
money laundering professional. Eligibility to sit the exam requires
a minimum scoring based upon a combination of education and
experience. To maintain the CAMS certification, persons must
conform to a programme of earned credits through continuing

The Association is an organisation whose mission is to advance

the professional knowledge, skills and experience of persons ded- _ professional education (re-certification).




POSITION AVAILABLE







Caribbean Regtonai
Environment
Programme

SUBS

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. a leading international wealth
manager, has an opening for the position of a

‘Head of Credit Risk Management &
Transaction Control




COMMUNITY LIAISON
OFFICER

The Caribbean Regional Environment
Programme (CREP) is cen a
Community Liaison Officer (CLO). The
_ CLO will engage Andros communities
and other stakeholders in the CREP
Project activities and provide support for
the project Manager. The position is based
with CREP Project, in Fresh Creek,
Andros.













Financed by the
European Union





In this challenging position you will be responsible for:













Bahamas
Focal Point
Organizations

| Skills Required e Maintaining credit facilities

¢ Analysis of counter party risks including settlement,
trading and crossborder risk .

® Collateral assessment and monitoring

® Transaction Investigation

¢ Team player able to work with

communities throughout Andros

e Excellent oral and written
communication skills -

e Willingness to travel and to work
outside normal hours when °
necessary

e Awareness of environmental issues

would be an asset









Michelle Miller

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight.
fe) a] Mondays

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WILLIS DOCTEUR OF MARSH






We are searching for a personality with extensive
experience in credit risk management who meets
the following mandatory requirements:






Qualifications

| © Familiar with the communities of
Andros 3

e Strong facilitation skills for
meetings and workshops

¢ Computer literate

° Ability to plan/ conduct

community meetings and

workshops



e Proven tract record and familiarity with service oriented
global offshore bank
e Experience in Credit Services to international High
Net Worth Clients
¢ Analytic approach to Credit Risk Management and
Transaction Control
¢ Fluency in English is essential, German is an advantage










BEST Commission



If you are interested in this exciting
opportunity please send resume, cover
letter & other supporting documentation
to:












‘Applications in writing, enclosing a full resume, by
Bahamian nationals only to:




CARIFORUM











Authorized by the
Cabbean Forum of ACP CREP Position OR: CREP Position HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
SENS PO. N-4105 PO. Box 23338 responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,. for
Nassau, Bahamas Fresh Creek, Andros registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
e UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. that any person who knows any reason why registration/
Material may also be delivered by hand to the Human Resources naturalization:should not be granted, should send a written |
CREP/ANCAT office, Fresh Creek, Andros or and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
Mercunie by exmatl fo; crancat@bateinet.bs P.O, Box. N7157 from the 25TH day: of: FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister |.
arbbean Conservation Nassau, Bahamas responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147, |:



All applications must be received by

Friday 11th March 2005 Nassau, Bahamas.

Association









Deloitte
& Touche
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Enterprise Risk Services - Control Assurance Senior Consultant/Manager

THE AIRPORT AUTHORITY

Well established firm seeks an IT Auditor manager/senior consultant for its Enterprise Risk
Services Practice.

RESPONSIBILITIES

Identify and evaluate business and technology risks, internal controls which mitigate risks,
and related opportunities for internal control improvement

Assist in selecting and tailoring approaches, methods and tools to support services
Actively participate in training efforts

Actively participate in decision making with engagement management and seek to understand
the broader impact of current decisions

Generate innovative ideas and challenge the status quo

Facilitate use of technology-based tools or methodologies to review, design and/or implement
products and services

Build and nurture positive working relationships with clients with the intention to exceed
. Client expectations

Understand clients' business environment and basic risk management approaches
Play substantive/lead role in engagement planning, economics, and billing
Participate in proposal development and sales efforts

QUALIFICATIONS

3+ years experience in the areas of public accounting, internal auditing or consulting

Bachelors degree in Business Administration, Accounting, Computer Science, Information
Systems Administration or related field. MBA or dual-degree is an asset

CISA, CPA, CIA designation or desire and dedication to pursue

_ Advanced understanding of business processes, internal control risk management, IT controls
and related standards 5 ey

Proven analytical skills with ability to tackle problems systematically to determine causes
and produce effective solutions

Experience with accounting control related issues

Demonstrated ability to plan and manage engagements along with ensuring deliverables
meet work plan specifications and deadlines

Ability to thrive in an environment of pressing deadlines and constantly changing conditions
Successful experience identifying controls, developing and executing test plans
Ability to synthesize information and produce concise synopses/summaries

Excellent written and oral communication skills including both technical and business writing,
documentation and presentation skills

Open to travel requirements

Experience with ACL is an asset

Experience with COSO and/or Sarbanes-Oxley an asset

Technical and/or management background in technical systems/environments an asset

P.O. Box AP-59222
Nassau International Airport
Nassau, Bahamas

Proposal for Group Life & Medical Insurance

The Airport Authority invites proposals from eligible.
insurance companies and/or brokers on a Group Life and
Medical Insurance Plan for employees of The Airport
Authority. oe |

. The policy will be for a period of one year following the
selection of a successful tender. Parties interested in
submitting a proposal may collect an information package
from the Executive Office of The Airport Authority at the

- Nassau International Airport on Monday 7th, March, 2005.

All proposals should be sealed, and delivered to:

Acting General Manager,
The Airport Authority,
P.O. Box, AP - 59222
Nassau International Airport

And should be marked:

PROPOSALS FOR GROUP LIFE AND MEDICAL
INSURANCE

All tenders must be received no later than 4:30 pm on

Monday 21st March, 2005. COMPENSATION

e Compensation is negotiable based on combination of years experience and qualification.

Interested persons should submit their resumes before March 18, 2005.

HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT
P. O. BOX N-7120
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The Airport Authority reserves the right to reject any or
all tenders.


THE TRIBUNE



UT Sok

FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005, PAGE 5B



Competition created by

onvention 87 to weed —
out poorly-run unions

By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter

leading union

official yester-

day urged the

Government to

ratify and enact
the International Labour
Organisation's (ILO) Conven-
tion 87, saying the administra-
tion had a golden opportunity
to complete what its predeces-
. sor started.

"This convention is extreme-
ly fundamental and basic. So
basic that major political par-
ties like the Free National
Movement (FNM) in 1991 saw
the need to include this con-
vention in its 1992 Manifesto,
which should have resulted in
this convention being ratified
and legislated during the FNM
Government's term in office,”
said Bahamas Utilities, Services
and Allied Workers Union
(BUSAW) president, Huedley
Moss.

“This did not occur. What did
occur was the ratification of

ILO Convention 87 in Geneva:

Switzerland in 2001. And so the
promise that was made to work-
ers was never fulfilled."

Convention 87 gives stake-
holders, namely employees,
employers and governments,
the right to organise and join
the union or association of their
choice, Mr Moss said.

Under Convention 87, unions
face the same threats and weak-
nesses to other organisations,
he said, adding that this is what
competition and market forces
are all about.

Mr Moss added further that
since competition was the order
of the day for capitalist democ-
racies such as the Bahamas, it
was absolutely taboo to deny
unions and workers Convention
87.

"It must be remembered that
every segment of our society is
faced with some degree of com-
petition, but not so with the
trade union movement. Who
suffers when the playing field
is not level and protectionism
from competition becomes the
order of the day? Workers,
employers and the government
pay heavily for the absence of

Legal Notice

_ NOTICE

Convention 87," he said.
According to Mr Moss, who
also serves as chief advisor and
negotiator for the Bahamas
Beverage and Water Distribu-
tors Union (BBWDU), which
represents PepsiCo and Aqua-
pure workers, workers suffer
immeasurably when they are
compelled to tolerate a badly-

_run union, with no recourse to

replace it or its leaders.
Convention 87 will address
this concern, he added, because
unions and their executives will
know that if they do not doa
reasonable job they will be ter-
minated. The competition
enabled under this convention,
Mr Moss said, is likely to force

union officers to be just as.

enlightened as employers coun-
terpart. It will also force unions
to hold elections in a timely
manner and in accordance with
their constitution.

Mr Moss said that an enacted
convention 87 would ensure
unions provide more monetary
benefits for their members, in
addition to other strategic and
professional advice, particular-
ly in regard to financial affairs.

The newly-introduced com-
petition unions will face will
also result in members receiving
all or most of their union dues
in a lump sum payment. upon
retirement or death, Mr Moss
said.

"Everybody will benefit from

competition, including unionid-.

ed workers. To exempt unions
from competition by denying
the Convention 87 is absolutely
‘taboo’and contradicts the con-
cept of democratic competi-
tion," he added.

The union president also not-
ed that employers would bene-
fit from Convention 87, as this
would give new levels of flexi-
bility and alternatives in
addressing their concerns, a
move that should fit perfectly
with the concept of merit
increases.

Mr Moss said adding it was a
"no brainer" for unions to con-
tinue to lobby for compulsory
salary increases, mandatory
increases and across the board
increases.

He gave the example of
workers in Eastern Europe and
America having priced them-
selves out of the market: Those
workers were now enthusiasti-
cally giving up benefits to save
their industry and jobs. ‘Those
who did not understand this
were witnessing for.themselves
that employers such as Wal-
Mart in Canada weere closing
their businesses before they
subject themselves to inflexible
negotiations.

“Workers are looking for effi-
ciency and results, and if unions
are doing a satisfactory job they
will be around for a long time. If
not, they have no right to be

around to give the trade union
movement a bad name if they
are not doing a satisfactory job,”
Mr Moss said.

“Competition and Conven-

tion 87 will address this expedi-
tiously. Furthermore, whether
a union is small or large it ought
not be the minister’s concern
because competition and mar-

ket forces will address this con-.

cern to the satisfaction of all
and sundry."

During earlier discussions
with the union about Conven-

tion 87, Vincent Peet, minister .

of labour and immigration, dis-
cussed the importance of bench-
marking the Bahamian version
of Convention 87 with

Jamaica's and those versions

existing in Caribbean commu-

nities similar to the Bahamas.
Mr Moss said, however, that

such a move would have



The Tribune wants to
hear from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
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for improvements in the
area or have won an
‘award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

absolutely no relevance for the
Bahamas because Bahamians
are capable of standing on their
own two feet, independent of
any unions in the Caribbean.

When unions in the Bahamas
are contrasted with unions else-
where, Mr Moss said Bahamas-
based organisations are micro-
scopic in size when compared
to unions with memberships in
the hundreds of thousands ae
even millions. .














MIDATT COMPANY LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named Company
are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned at
Sandringham House,-83 Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas, as sole
Liquidator on or before the 18th day of March, 2005. In default
thereof they will be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 1st day of March, 2005
Lynden Maycock
LIQUIDATOR

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
NEW DAWSON LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the Ist day of March,
2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid
Davis of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)

Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

MIDATT COMPANY LIMITED
| NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) MIDATT COMPANY LIMITED is in dissolution under
. the provisions of the International Business Companies
Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the
1st March, 2005 when its Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said Company is Mr. Lynden
Maycock of Sandringham House, 83 Shirley Street, Nassau,
Bahamas as sole Liquidator.
Dated the 1st day of March, 2005.

H & J Corporate Services Ltd.

Registered Agent
for the above-named Company



LEGAL NOTICE ©

NOTICE
LEXINE FINE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the Ist day of March,

2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid

‘Davis of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)

Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)

6 UBS

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd. a leading international
trust company has an opening for the position of a

MIS Specialist

in this challenging position you will be responsible for:

¢ Develop our system to provide consistent and
coherent management information;

e Enhance and redesign the existing database and
workflow models to meet the business requirements;

¢ Develop and implement solutions in MS Access;

¢ Support the testing of the developed system and
provide solutions to any defects that are detected;

¢ Take ownership for the analysis and design phases
of one or more of the projects deliveries;

¢ Collaborate on project to build an intranet site to
support business processes;

* Provide training and second level support to users.

We are searching for a personality with a broad
experience of relational database modeling and process
modeling with sound knowledge in software development
lifecycle. A successful tract record as Project Manager
MIS and strong analytical skills are key requirements to
succeed in this senior position. Good knowledge of SAP
systems and experience as a trainer are essential. In
addition the ideal candidate must be fluent in English
(German is an advantage in order to coordinate with our
head office in Switzerland.

Applications in writing, enclosing a full resume, by
Bahamian nationals only to:

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas

“NOTICE.
RICHPLUS HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the 11th day of February,
2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid
Davis of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)

Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)

POSITION AVAILABLE

Caribbean Regional
Environment
Programme

Administrative
Assistant

: The Sete ional Environment

| Programme (CREP) is seeking an

hat inter ve Assistant to provide

administrative support for the Andros

Conservancy and Frust and the CREP

| Project. The position is based with ANCAT,
in Eresh Creek, Andros.

Financed by the
European Union

Bahamas
Focal Point —
Organizations

| Skills/Qualifications

| * Computer literate, especially Microsoft
| Office Suite
¢ Minimum of 2-3 years experience in office
procedures, including performing basic
accounting tasks, operating office
equipment, and receptionist skills
e Excellent oral and written
f communication skills
© Positive attitude and self motivated
e Excellent organisational skills and ability §
to multitask
e Detail oriented and able to meet
deadlines
¢ Ability to maintain confidentiality of
records and information

If you are interested in this exciting
opportunity please send resume, cover |
letter & other eee documentation
to:

CREP Position OR: CREP Position
P.O. N4105 P.O. Box 23338
Authorized by the Nassau, Bahamas Fresh Creek, Andros
Caribbean Forum of ACP
States

Q
implemented by the

Caribbean Conservation
Association

’

Material ma my also be delivered by hand to .
the CREP/ANCAT office, Fresh Creek, Andros
or by e-mail to: exancat@batelnet.bs

All app lications must be roves by
riday 11th March 2005.


PAGE 6B,FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005 | _ THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS
COMICS PAGE :







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THE TRIBUNE



<=, FIRST BAPTIST
5; CHURCH

Four Services Sundays
7AM, 9AM, 11AM & 7:30 PM.

PRAYERS FOR YOUR BABIES EVERY SUNDAY
WEDDINGS, FUNERALS
Just call the numbers listed, I’ll personally
handle your request.

(242) 393-5798, (242) 323-6452

“Come and pede lig

J.P. - Pastor

INTER SAND ‘PROCESS SERVICE &
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FOR DISCRETE & CONFIDENTIAL INFO CALL 426-6618
E-MAIL: private_74@msn.com

e@ ‘
Psychosocial Therapy
Promoting well-being through individual, couples,

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Identity: sexual & gender conflicts
Problem Child: acting out, hyperactive/unfocused
Depression « Anxiety * Stress * Psycho-somataforms

Call: Mon - Fri, 10am-4pm for appointments

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Rid you home or office of
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We utilize the latest
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President
Managing Director

Phoenix

PEST CONTROL LTD.
TEL:242-322-2088 ¢ Fax: 42-326-1153
P.O. Box GT-2000
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---- Telephone ----
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Visit our site: .
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NEED TO RENEW YOUR CAPTAIN LICENCE BUT
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1) MARITIME LAW

2) CAPTAIN’S COURSES

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4) IS PS SECURITY COURSES
P.O BOX CB-13328 TEL/FAX: (242)362-4305
NASSAU, BAHAMAS. CELL: (242)557-1617 .

Ivana Tenia ners ||

Advancing Today’s Minds Using Tomorrow’s Technologies

CREEN TVs AND DVD PLAYERS

Attention!! Just in time for Christmas.
We have Flat Screen CRT Colour TVs
In-House Financing Available for Government employees.
No Payments until January, February or March! You Choose!!
Portable DVD players -excellent quality. Only $399.99

co
TEL: 341-7575, 341-4293, 341-3670

DNA TESTING

when in doubt let MASTERSCAN check it out!
It could cost over 200,000.00 to rise a child

‘ews THINK ABOUT IT

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WE CAN COME TO YOU.
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LET THE FACTS SPEAK FOR IT SELF

Furniture Plus is proud to help with financing |

Earle Francis}:
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OCTAGON ENTERPRISES IS A PRESSURE MAINTENANCE SERVICE ‘

We sell Housewares, Appliances, Flowers, Antique

|Zacwel Shipping |

954-989-5432 * Fax: 954-989-5432
MASTERSCAN ||

I TEL: 380-4DNA, OR 380-8188 .
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Vocal Training, Vocal Coaching and
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We guarantee in a few sessions you will:
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Welcome to Nassau’s. Newest SousePlace
-@HAPPY HOURS: 5pm-7pm
“Enjoy Golden Oldies”
|] DAILY SPECIALS:
TUESDAY: MEAT LOAF & CURRY CHICKEN
WEDNESDAY: OKRA SOUP & LASAGNA
WE DELIVER FOR 4 OR MORE ORDERS!

| Tel: 393-2953, or 341-4778 |
ask aor Stephanie

‘Natural aaa Beauty Salon |

Now Hiring

e 2 Nail Technician
° 1 Natural Hair Care Beautician

Thomas Ferguson
President
Managing Director :

Tel: (242)324-8117
E-mail: leejoanncallender @ yahoo.com

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one Course, One Weekend per month

VISION INT’L UNIVERSITY || Tel: 393-2953, or 341-4778

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Details: 327-0667 / 424-3330 ask for Stephanie

-| © MORE THAN 120 VARIETY OF EXOTIC TROPICAL FISH Special of the Month
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Bucket Lift Services, Tree Trimming.
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Tel: (242) 557-4609
Email:d_r_wilson73@ yahoo.com

B “What can Do for you?”

Goldfish 50¢
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VANCING TODAY’S MINDS USING TOMORROW'S TECHNOLOGIES

USED COMPUTERS

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Fr ualt Colour Pe peneg ane

VG COOFEE SHOP
Call us for take-out orders
Tel: 325-4002 * P.O.Box SS-5926
#13 Bradley Street

Drinks and all your favourite Bahamian Dishes

pcan @ THE GARDEN
#94 DOWDESWELL ST

4 LOW & NO CHOLESTERO!

Vegetarian ¢ Fish * Chicken Dinner Snacks
Salads ¢ Sandwiches ¢ Soups ¢ Pizza & Desserts
Dine In / Take Out - Catering Available
Reserve Our Heritage Dining Room for Office,
School Reunion, Family Reunion & Club Meetings.

- We Accept Batelco’s Meal Vouchers -

OPEN SUNDAY : 8:30AM - 12 NOON (Boil & Stew Fish)
MON-FRI - 7:30AM to 2:30PM
TELEPHONE: 356-0907 * FAX: 356-09

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Saree ie









MO

Telephone 242 393 2007

PO Box N 123 Fax 242 393 1772
Montague Sterling Centre Internet www.kpmg.com.bs
East Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas

AUDITORS' REPORT TO THE SHAREHOLDER

We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of Banco de Bogota (Nassau) Limited (‘the
Bank’) as of December 31, 2004, and the related statements of income, changes in shareholder's
equity and cash flows for the year then ended. These financial statements are the responsibility of
the Bank's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements

based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing as promulgated
by the International Federation of Accountants. Those standards require that we plan and
perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance as to whether the financial statements are free
of material misstatement: An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the
amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the
accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating
the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable

basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position
of the Bank as of December 31, 2004, and the results of its operations, changes in shareholder's
equity and its cash flows for the year then ended in accordance with International Financial
Reporting Standards as promulgated by the International Accounting Standards Board.

Chartered Accountants

Nassau, Bahamas
January 21, 2005

KPMG, a Bahemian partnership, is the Bahamas
member firm of KPMG Intemational, a Swiss cooperative.

BANCO DE BOGOTA (NASSAU) LIMITED
Balance Sheet

December 31, 2004, with corresponding figures for 2003

(Expressed in United States dollars)



2004 2003
ASSETS
Due from banks (note 4)
Demand - affiliates 243,378 334,093
-others 4 : 1,659,208 ~ 1,726,255
Time - others ; 65,600,000 62,000,000
: 67,602,586 64,060,348
Loans, net (note 5) 65,492,466 45,859,903
Securities available-for-sale (note 6) 59,003,911 75,946,667
Securities held-to-maturity (note 7) 20,364,747 20,667,473
investment in related party (note 8) 166,068 * 166,068
Accrued interest receivable 2,115,377 2,755,662 ,
Accounts receivable and prepayments 51,897 91,000
” Fixed assets, net 3,400 -
Total Assets , 2 ; 214,700,452 209,547,121
ee
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDER'S EQUITY i
Liabilities: : ¢
Demand deposits ;
- affiliates : - 164,834 154,635 —
~ others ; ; 4,103,741 4,852,101
Saving deposits a DRE TY nti 612,302 -
Time deposits (note 9) ‘ 181,150,725 184,135,424
ga 186,021,602 169,142,360
Borrowed funds under repurchase agreements (note 10) 15,000,000 10,000,000
Accrued interest payable 690,290 730,762
Accounts payable 860,062 1,007,571
Total Liabilities ; : 172,571,954, 170,880,693
Shareholder's Equity:
Share capital:

Authorised - 5,000,000 (2003: 5,000,000) ordinary shares of
$10 each. Issued and fully paid - 3,954,344 shares

(2003: 3,592,458) : : 39,543,440 0,924,580
Unrealised gain on securities available-for-sale (note 6) 677,208 1,389,548
Retained earnings 1,907,850 1,352,300 _
Total Shareholder's Equity ¥ 42,128,498 38,666,428
Total Liabilities and Sharsholder's Equity 214,700,452 209,547,121

See accompanying notes to balance sheet
The balance sheet was approved on behalf of the Board of Directors on January 21, 2005 by the following:

Ei io Rishio s Di

Notes to Balance Sheet

December 31, 2004

(Expressed in United States dollars)



~~
.

»

General information

Banco de Bogota (Nassau) Limited (the "Bank") is incorporated under the laws of
the Commonwealth of- the Bahamas and is licensed by the Ministry of Finance of The
Bahamas to.carry on banking business. The Bank is a wholly owned subsidiary of Banco
de Bogota S. A. ("parent company") a Panamanian company, which is in turn wholly owned
by Banco de Bogota, S.A. (“the ultimate parent company") incorporated in Colombia. The
Bank's registered office is located in Goodman's Bay Corporate Center, 2 Floor, P.O: Box
N-10700, West Bay Street, Nassau - Bahamas. As of December 31, 2004, the Bank has
one (1) direct employee. A related company provides administrative services to the Bank.

Summary of significant accounting policies

(a) Statements of compliance

This balance sheet has been prepared in accordance with International Financial

Reporting Standards ("IFRS") and its interpretations adopted. by the International
Accounting Standards Board. :

(b) Basis of preparation

The balance sheet is prepared on a fair value basis for available-for-sale: assets.
Other financial assets and liabilities and non-financial assets and liabilities are stated
at amortized cost or historical cost. The accounting policies have been consistently
applied.

(Cc) Financial instruments
() . Classification

Loans and receivables are classified as originated loans and receivables as
these were created by the Bank providing money to a debtor other than those
created with the intention of short-term profit taking.

Held-to-maturity assets are financial assets with fixed or determinable
payments and fixed maturity that the Bank has the intent and ability to hold to
maturity.

Available-for-sale assets are financial assets that are not held for trading
Purposes, originated by the Bank or held to maturity. Available-for-sale
instruments include certain debt securities, and an equity investment in a

(ii) Recognition
The Bank recognizes available-for-sale assets on the date it commits to
purchase the assets. From this date any gains and losses from changes in fair
value of the assets are recognised in equity.

Held-to-maturity assets and loans and receivable originated by the Bank are
recognised on the setttement date, being the date they are transferred to the
Bank.

(ii) Measurements
Financial instruments are measured initially at cost, including transaction costs.

Subsequent to initial recognition all available-for-sale assets are measured at
fair value, except that any investment that does not have a quoted market price
in an active market and whose fair value cannot be reliably measured is stated
at cost including transaction costs, less impairment losses.



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

Originated loans and receivables and held-to-maturity investments are
_measured at amortized cost less impairment losses. Borrowed funds under
repurchase agreements and non-trading liabilities are measured at amortized
cost. Premiums and discounts’ are included in the canying amount of the
related instrument and amortized to interest income/expense.

(iv) Fair value measurement principles

The fair value of financial instruments is based on their quoted market price at
the balance sheet date without any deduction for transaction costs.

(v) Gains and losses on subsequent measurement :

Gains and josses from a change in the fair value of available-for-sale assets
are recognised directly in equity, unt# an investment is considered to be
impaired, at which time the loss is charged to income. - When the financial
assets are sold, collected or otherwise disposed of, the accumulated gain or .
loss recognised in equity is transferred to earnings. :

(vi) Derecognition

A financial asset is derecognized when the Bank losses control over the
contractual rights that comprises that asset. This occurs when the rights are
realized, expire or are surrendered. A financial liability is derecognized when it
is extinguished.

(vii) Specific instruments
Cash and cash equivalents

The Bank considers due from banks with original maturities of three months or
less to be cash equivalents.

Securities

Securities that the Bank holds for the purpose of short-term profit taking are.
classified as trading instruments. Securities that the Bank has the intent to
hold to maturity are classified as held-to-maturity assets. Other investments
are classified as available-for-sale assets. :

Loans

Loans and advances originated by the Bank are classified as loans, which are
reported net of allowances to reflect estimated recoverable amounts. ©

Investment in related party
Investment in related party is classified as an available-for-sale financial asset.
Fixed assets

Fixed assets, which comprise furniture and fixtures, are carried at cost less
accumulated depreciation. Major renewals and betterments to the fixed assets
are capitalized while minor replacements that donot improve or extend the
remaining useful life of the assets are charged to‘expense when incurred.
Fixed assets are depreciated using the straight-line method over the estimated.
service lives of the depreciable assets which for furniture and fixtures is 4 — 10
years.

Liabilities

Liabilities evidenced by paper including demand and time deposits are, -
classified as non-trading liabilities. :

Borrowed funds under repurchase agreements

Borrowed funds under repurchase agreements represent collateralized
financing transactions. The underlying assets which serve as ‘collateral for
these transactions continue to be recognized in the balance sheet and
" measured in accordance with the accounting policy in note 2. (c) (iii).

(ad) Use of estimates

Management of the Bank has made a.number of estimates and assumptions relating
to the reporting of assets and liabilities and the disclosure of contingencies at the date
of the balance sheet to prepare this balance sheet in conformity with IFRS. Actual
results could differ from.those estimates.

(e) Fair value estimates

Fair value estimates are made at specific point in time, based on relevant market
information and information about the financial instrument. ‘These estimates do not
reflect any premium or discount that could result from offering for sale at one time the
Bank’s entire holdings of a particular financial instrument. These estimates are
subjective in nature and involve uncertainties and matters of significant judgment and,
therefore, cannot be determined with precision. Changes in assumptions could
significantly affect the estimates. : tl

Except for securities held-to-maturity, the carrying amounts of the Bank's significant
financial instruments approximate fair values because of one or more of the following
reasons:

(i) Immediate or short-term maturity.

(ii) Carrying value approximates market value.
(iii) Interest rates approximate current’ market rates.

() Impairment
Financial assets are reviewed at each balance sheet date to determine whether there
is objective evidence of impairment. tf any such identification exists, the asset's
recoverable amount is estimated. An impairment loss is recognised to the extent the
asset's carrying value exceeds the recoverable amount.

Transactions with affiliates

The parent company and other companies owned by the ultimate parent company,
represent related parties and are referred to in this balance sheet is as “affiliates".

During the years ended December 31, 2004 and 2008, an affiliate provided certain
administrative services to the Bank.amounting to $60,000 per annum. Another affiliate
provided office space for an annual fee of $126,000 for the year ended December 31, 2004
(2003: $124,500). ae

Due from banks

The geographical distribution of due from banks by country of the head office bank is as
follows: . - nee s \

2004 2003
Latin America and the Caribbean no 15,243,378 1,767,351

United States of America and Canada 52,259 208 62,292 997
LL RL tr tt gd ae pene VIL

67,502,586 64,060,348
Due from banks-time earn interest at rates varying. from 2.10% to 2.35% (2003: 0.75% to
1.056%) per annum. a, ae :
Loans, net

Loans outstanding by country of borrower are as follows:

ess SPSS

2004 2003

rere rt earn er laa fe eee a

Percentage - Percentage

Amount __ of total loans Amount |_ of total loans
Colombia 66,411,925 99% 44,217,230 89%
Panama 6,664 |. 0% 90,318 0%
Other 384,000 1% 5,346,554 11%
: 66,802,589 © 100% 49,654,102 100%

Less: allowance for possible i : :
loan losses (1,310,123) (3,600,000)

‘_unearned income (194,199)

65,492,466 45,859,903 :

RS A aps

The movement of the allowance for possible loan losses for the year is shown below:

ey



2004 2003
Balance at the beginning of year 3,600,000 2,700,000
Provision charged to expense 415,500 900,000

Loans charged off 2,705,377

loans charged off 7 2705 877)
Balance at the end of year 1,310,123 3,600,000

’

Loans outstanding by type of industry are as follows: oe



2004 2003
Government 60,236,725 37,710,175
Commercial and industrial 6,565,864 11,943,927

66,802,589 49,654 102

rece tS NN ea enter ee

Loans earn interest at rates varying from 2.7025% to 11.00% (2003: 2.17% to 10.50%) per
annum.

Securities available-tor-saie

At December 31, 2004, securities available-for-sale comprised the following: .

Fair Amortized Unrealised
Value Cost

Republic of Colombia with various maturities

to 2011 and interest ranging from 7.625% to ‘

10.50% per annum. 35,895,692 35,780,237 115,455

Petroleos Mexicanos, maturing in Feb/1 2005

with interest at 6.50% per annum. 3,498,709 3,486,519 12,190
Daimler Chrysler USA maturing on Jan/20,
2005 with interast at 7.40% per annum. 1,553,348 1,551,387 ives
Republica de Chile, maturing on July 23,
2007 with interest at 5.6250% per annum 5,138,360 Sleser8 ape
Union de Estados Mexicanos, maturing on
April 6, 2005 with interest at 9.75% per 4,020,600 1,010,534 10,068

annum.

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THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005, PAGE 9B

Py
fa!
f ; 11. Maturity of significant assets and Ilabilities
3 Ministerio de Hacienda y Credito Publico, with oH et
4 various maturities to April 20, 2006 and The contractual maturities of significant categories of assets and liabilities are summarised
3 interest ranging from 1.1599% to 2.1694% 1,494,651 1,494,651 _ below: : :
: per annum. :
2 LSE
L Freddie Mac with, various maturities to 2009 Maturity (days 2004 2003
i sic ineiees ranging from 2.00% to 3.00% per 4,999,450 ‘ 5,000,000 (550)
Assets:
Hepublica de Brazil, maturing on January 11, 2,133,200 2,102,144 31,056 Due from banks:
2006 with interest at 10.25% per annum Demand deposits On demand 1,902,586 2,060,348
4 Transgas de Occidente, S. A. E.S.P.: ;
‘ i 3,833,569 common shares at a nominal value Time deposits * 1-30 65,600,000 62,000,000
of $500 Colombian pesos each share, which 5.269.901 . 4,777,873 492,028 67,502,586 64,060,348
i represent 2.80% ownership. tea ae!
59,003,911 58,326,703 677,208 Loans 1-90 2,414,826 80,000
181-360 537,570 890,625
rf Republic of Colombia with various 1 to 5 years 61,613,262 44,752,347
maturities to 2011 and interest ranging Over 5 years 2,236,931 936,931
, from 7.625% to 10.50% per annum. 46,919,103 46,116,037 801,006 Past due — 2,800,000
| E ie 66,802,589 49,459,903
: Banco ABN Amro Real, S. A. maturing on Securities:
July/28, 2004 with interest at 5.00% per Available -for- sale 1 to 5 years 51,142,283 64,541,041
annum. 3,519,789 3,490,938 28,851 : Over 5 years 7,861,628 11,405,626
: 59,003,911 75,946,667
Petroleos Mexicanos, maturing in Feb/1 ;
2005 with interest at 6.50% per annum. 3,643,985 3,515,324 128,661 Held- to -maturity 1 to 5 years 20,364,747 20,687,473
Daimler Chrysler USA maturing on Investment in related party Not applicable 166,068 166,068 .
Jan/20, 2005 with interest at 7.40% per
annum. 1,633,498 1,576,768 56,730
Liabilities:
Banco Itau, S. A., maturing on Nov/29, Demand deposits On demand _ 4,870,877 ~ 5,006,936
2004 with interest at 5% per annum. 3,586,345 3,533,273 53,072 :
Time deposits 1-90 115,834,879 123,498,225
Banco Bradesco, S. A., maturing on July 91-180 33,422,733 27,858,788
2, 2004 with interest at 5.000% per 181-360 1,893,113 2,778,411
annum. d 3,556,210 3,525,433 30,777 151,150,725 154,135,424
Union de Estados Mexicanos, maturing Borrowed funds under repurchase
on April 6,:2005 with interest at 9.75% agreements ‘ 181-360" 15,000,000 10,000,000
per annum. 1,107,000 1,050,697 56,303 ee PAQTE CETUS a EEE
Republica de Chile, maturing on July 23, ;
2007 with interest at 5.6300% per annum 5,357,100. 5,286,940 70,160
Ministerio de Hacienda y Crédito Publico 12. Managing Agen
with various maturities to April 20, 2006 ; Since March 13, 2002, the Bank entered into a management contract with Deloitte &
and interest ranging from 1.1599% to s : is to permit the
2.1700% per annum. 1,336,975 1,368,648 (31,673) Touche Corporate Services Ltd. The purpose of the agency arrangement is to pe
; Bank to comply with physical presence requirements of The Central Bank of the Bahamas.
; Transgas de Occidente, S. A. E.S.P.: . . because the Bank has
4 3,833,569 common shares at a nominal This agreement was duly canceled in the second semester of 2004
: value of $600 Colombian pesos each now established a physical presence in The Bahamas.
i share, which represent 2.80% ownership. _. 5,286,662 5,091,001 195,661
§ 75,946,667 74,557,119 1,389,548
t f
4 13. Risk Management
4 ; : ; The most important types of financial.risk to which the Bank is exposed are credit risk,
: Fair values of securities, other than the Transgas de Occidente investment, were obtained liquidity risk and price risk. Price risk includes. currency risk, interest rate risk and market
5 from an investment banking firm. The fair value of the Transgas de Occidente investment risk. :
‘ was determined by management using a discounted cash flow analysis. The Bank maintains positions in the bond market for investment purposes, as described in
« At December 31, 2004, Bonds of the Republic of Colombia amounting to $19,590,880 notes 6 and 7. Since the Bank’s investments have been issued by well recognised debtors,
dq (2003: $13,150,126) were pledged as a collateral guarantee of borrowed funds under it is management's belief that the Bank is not exposed to significant credit risk on these
iS repurchase agreements described in note 10. investments. . These instruments are subject to market risk, the risk that future changes in
al , market conditions may make an instrument less valuable.
7. Securities held-to-maturity In the case of non-trading financial instruments, the Bank is subject to credit risk, liquidity
a Securities held-to-maturity comprise the following: risk and interest rate risk. Credit risk is the risk that the counterparty to the loan might
wd default on their obligation and interest rate risk is'the risk of interest rate fluctuations to the
2004 2003 extent that future market interest rates become significantly different to the rates set by the
4 U. S Treasury Notes maturing on Feb/15, 2006, with : Bank. To manage the level of credit risk, the Bank only deals with counterparties of good
a interest at 5.625% per annum (2002: 5.625%). $ 20,364,747 20,667,473 credit standing, and where appropriate, obtains collateral.
rq $ 20,364,747 20,667,473 Liquidity risk arises in the general funding of the Bank's activities and in the management of
“ay age : ‘ . : see
"4 Fair Value $ 20,524,000 21,556,200 positions. It includes both the tisk of being unable to fund assets at appropriate maturities
q and rates and the risk of being unable to liquidate an asset at a reasonable price and in an
3 Fair value has been determined from quotations provided by investment banking firms. - appropriate time frame. The Bank has access to a diverse funding base. Funds are raised
#4 substantially by accepting deposits from customers. This enhances funding flexibility and
a limits dependence on any one source of funds. Overall liquidity risk is monitored on a global
a level by the ultimate parent company.
A 8. Investment in related party :
aa Investment in related party comprises the following:
ry The Bank's operations are subjec* to the risk of interest rate fluctuations to the extend that
ts 2004 2003 interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities mature or re-price at different times or
fi Almaviva, SA.- Colombia, 30,486 common shares in differing amounts. Contractual maturity profiles are disclosed in note 11. _Deposits with
ia at a nominal value of 100 Colombian pesos | : . and from banks, loans and customers’ deposits are generally at fixed interest rates and are
(US$0.10) each share, which represents 0.88% therefore re-priced at maturity or on interest revision dates. ; cafe
eB ownership. #: ses $0 seni. bie ets $..: _166,068 166,068 ee One alas heat eile ook oS le! Saou
= Almaviva, S. A. is related party by way of common ownership and control. ,
‘l 5 14. Recently Revised and Issued Accounting Standard
“1 2 : . ‘ Z t -
Py Sy, * Tine: Sepeeite During 2003, the International Accounting Standards Board revised fifteen International -
A At December 31, 2004 time deposits include $45,713,147 (2003: $49,085,892) representing Accounting Standards (IASs) and withdrew one JAS, with effect from January 1, 2005. In
“ deposits pledged by customers to the order of the Bank and affiliates as security for OBns addition, during 2004 six new International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRSs) were
rs and other facilities. The customers are primarily concentrated in South America. issued, with effect primarily form January 1, 2005, except for IFRS 3 that applies to the
") Customers’ time deposits earn interest at rates varying from 1.00% to 9.50% (2003: 1.00% accounting for business combinations for which the agreement date is on or after March 31,
y ’ to 7.00%) per annum. 2004, and: to any goodwill arising from such business combinations. When these
we amendments and new standards are adopted by an entity, it will be necessary to re-state.

“#4



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Woe eet ne ee eS a I

























10. Borrowed funds under repurchase agreements

At December 31, 2004 the Bank maintained short-term financing under repurchase
agreements with banks of $15,000,000 (2003: $10,000,000) at interest rates adjustable
quarterly which at December 31, 2004 was 3.28% (2003: 1.5%) per.annum. Borrowed
funds are secured by securities available-for-sale of $19,590,880 as described in note 6

(2003: $13,150,126).

aU asl

The Tribune

OP ET Get

Bl PIAL



Your Balance Sheets & Legal Notices HH



certain figures for the previous period presented that may have an impact on the financial
position, results of operations, movements in equity, and disclosures in notes to the balance
sheet.

As of the date of issuance of these balance sheet, management of the Bank has not
reasonably determined the effect that the adoption of the revised and new accounting
standards will have on this balance sheet and notes thereto.


PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2005

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Late arrival Mullings
is ready for early start



i By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

STA CATHARINA, Cura-
cao: Devin Mullings arrived in
town on Wednesday night, two
days after the rest of the
Bahamian team had already set-
tled in to play the Netherlands
Antilles in the first round of the
American Zone II Davis Cup
tie.

But 19-year-old Mullings,
who came directly from Ohio
State where he played to play a
couple of matches for the Buck-
eyes, Said he’s looking forward
to playing the opening match
today at the Sta Catharina

As the Bahamas’ top seed,
the southpaw was drawn yes-
terday to play against the
Netherlands Antilles’ number
two player Rasid Winklaar,
another left-hander, who was
granted permission to go to
school to sit an exam, rather
than attend the draw.

“I’m doing fine, I’m hitting

the ball, so I’m ready to go,”
said the Grand Bahama native.
“T just want to go out there and
get the first point on the board
for the Bahamas.

“If we play our cards right,
we will be alright.”

Although he’s had some
experience with a couple of the

Sports & Country Club.

Mbycvant enon
Davis Cup clash

FROM page one

about Rojer’s match up with Rolle. “I feel confident that our
team will prevail in the end.

“We're looking forward to Marvin having a good
match. He’s in shape. He worked extremely hard with
the rest of the team all this mec I think he’s ready to
play.”

Farrington, who began Stave Davis Cup for the
Bahamas since 1989 and is now in his fifth consecutive
year as captain, said the cohesiveness he’s experi-
enced since they arrived here on Sunday is certainly
going to help this squad as they go through the tie.

Impressed

“With the team we have travelling with us repre-
senting the Bahamas, I’m impressed with their work
ethic, attitude and team unity,” Farrington stressed.

“T think we have a good group of young players, so
I am looking forward to some good things happening
for the Bahamas, not just this weekend, but in the
future.”

Depending on the outcome of the first two singles,
Farrington is expected to send the team’s youngest
player, Ryan Sweeting, out on Saturday to play the
pivotal doubles with Rolle.

They are scheduled to play the team of Rojer and
Raoul Behr, the two most experienced members of
the Netherlands Antilles’ team.

However, both teams will have at least one hour
before the match starts at 10.30am to make an adjust-
ment to their line-up.

On Sunday, the reverse singles will be held with
Rolle facing Rojer in the much anticipated showdown
between the two top teams. If necessary, the second
reverse single will feature Rolle and Winklaar.

_ But those match-ups could also change depending on
‘the outcome of the tie after the doubles.



Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association’s president Mary |

‘Shelley had anticipated seeing the reverse in the open-
‘ing singles with Rolle playing second so he can get a
‘little more acclimatised.

Concerned

“But the draw is the draw, so he will have to play the

‘first match,” she noted. “I’m just concerned about
‘how quickly he can adjust in the time period that he
‘has.
: “However, looking at it today when they were doing
, the draw, I think the pressure is going to be on Marvin.
‘But if Devin can put the points on the Deard for us
‘right away, we will be okay.”

Netherlands Antilles’ captain Francis Haver said
they are excited about the tie and the team from the
. Bahamas they have to face.

. “I know Devin and Ryan from when they played on
‘the junior circuit,” said Hoyer, who travelled with
: Mullings as a coach on the junior circuit. “Ryan, also,
: | know him from the circuit. So I think it’s going to be
, an interesting tie.’

Having seen their capabilities before, Hoyer said
he has some idea as to how they both play but, as
‘ that was over a year ago,.he expects that they would
: have improved.

Pressure

r “JT know how they play and I feel that we have a

: team that can win the first two matches. That would
really put the pressure on the Bahamas.”

__Rojer likes the idea that the tie is being played on

' their soil.

“It’s always an advantage playing at home before the
crowd,” he insisted. “But the Bahamas is a young,

: pretty strong team. They should be eager to fight.

“I think we are also a lot younger than we were in
the past, so I think we should give it a good battle.”
Not having a chance to see Rolle play, Rojer said he
| expects that he will provide a stiff challenge. But he

indicated that he’s hoping that he and Rolle can real-
| ly play against each other on Sunday.

Hopefully, it would come down to deciding the out-

‘come of the tie.
| The winner of the tie will automatically stay in Zone

II and have a chance to move back into Zone One

next year. The loser will have to avoid being relegat-

ed to zone IV.

After playing in Zone One from 1989, the Bahamas
were relegated to Zone II in September, 2003 at home
against Chile.

The Netherlands Antilles were promoted to Zone II

| last year when they beat Honduras.

MRM 22 ENR AUER UN REBAR RAER He k NOINE AOA SEO SEN RFU Ah PRL AML MR Pate

|



Netherlands Antilles’ players,
including their captain, Frances
Hoyer, Mullings said he’s not
taking their team lightly.
“Every match is important. I
just want to go out there and
play my best,’ he declared. “The
best is a best-of-five, so I have
plenty of time to work my
rhythm. I think I will be fine.”

Better

Despite his late arrival,
Mullings said, the more he
plays, the more he anticipates
getting better. So he’s glad that
he’s going to get to swing the
racket first.

Marvin Rolle, the No.2 seed,
who will face Netherlands
Antilles’ top seed Jean-Julien
Rojer in the second singles
today, said he’s had some good
workouts with Ryan Sweeting
and H’Cone Thompson. . -

So he’s confident that he will



@ By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

be ready to play.
“The sun is pretty hot, but

‘John has been running us

around,” said Rolle, who admit-
ted that he. felt the heat the first
day, but was able to quickly
adjust to the climate.

As for the slow hard courts,
Rolle said it plays similar to the
environment at.home at the
National Tennis Centre, so he
doesn’t expect any problems,
not even against the top seed,
who has the best rankings of all
the players in the tie.

“Tm just going to go out
there and give it my all,” Rolle

stressed. “I’m playing for my

country and with the guys
cheering me on and John coach-
ing me, I’m just ready to go out
and give it my all.” .

Rolle, 22, is currently playing
on the professional circuit. He
previously played at Nick Bol-
letteri Tennis Academy and for
Texas A&M University. -

Players in the regional programme will
be assessed at a national level, and will



opmental programmes.

centres this weekend.

every July.

THE Bahamas Football Association
(BFA) opened up its regional soccer cen-
tres over the weekend, centres which it
believes will help with their national devel-

Having kicked off the boy’s programme,
the BFA is gearing up to host their girls’

The centres cater for soccer players aged
9-15 for boys and 10-15 for girls.

The regional centres will also be used as
a forerunner for the BFA’s National Cen-
tre for Excellence programme which runs

gramme.

ing field.

School.

then be invited out to the National Pro-

Semunar

On Wednesday past,.BFA’s technical
department conducted an inset seminar
on sports psychology.

' The seminar, which was designed to help
prepare coaches, players and officials
was held at the Kingsway Academy.

B& THE BAHAMAS team watches eagerly as the draw takes place.

Ryan Sweeting, who is sched-
uled to team up with Rolle to
play the pivotal doubles on Sat-
urday, he’s just excited to be
able to go out and wet his feet
in his first match in his second
straight tie.

Important

“I’m just glad to be on the
team to represent my country

again,” said Sweeting, who trav-

elled to Venezuela last year, but
didn’t play. “Now I have a

_chance to play a match. The
_ doubles is a pretty important
match, so I hope to do my best.”

Sweeting, the youngest mem-
ber of the team at age 17, said

since they arrived here on Sun-.
' day, Farrington has taken them

through tough training sessions
and he feels the hard work will
pay off this weekend.

- Although he’s not listed to
play, H’Cone Thompson, the

Soccer centres put boys and girls on the ball

Centres are held every Friday and Sat-
urday at the College of the Bahamas play- »

Maine.

petition.

- Copyrighted Material
[Syndicated | Content

It covered vital topics. as goal setting,
mental preparation and exercises for the
match, and exercises which.should be
utilised during competition.

Instructed

Fifty-one people participated‘in'the sem-
inar, which was directed by Nitidnal Soc-
cer Coaches Association of Americas .
(NSCAA) staff instructor George Purgavi,
the men’s soccer coach at Bates College in

BFA is expecting to host at least one
clinic and seminar each month, which will
help them prepare for international com-

(Photo: Lucien LS)

fourth member of the team,
feels that they have bonded

- very well and for him, it doesn’t

matter whether or not he gets to
play.

“Everybody finished ahead
of me at the trials. I feel I can go
out there and compete and'even
win, but I give credit to the guys
and it is John’s decision,” stated
Thompson, who is back on the ©
team for the second straight
year.

“T know the guys have all
been working hard, so I think
we have a good chance to win 3-
0. So hopefully they can do that
and I could get a chance to play
on Sunday.”

But whether or not he plays,

"the 24-year-old Lafayette Col-

lege graduate said he under-
stand that Davis Cup is bigger
than any one player, so he’s
just willing to do.whatever
is necessary to help the team
win.

























Available from Commercial News Providers”

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SPORTS



*

Senior high schools hit the
reach for championships

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FROM page one

schools.
“We are looking forward to day two, and if the athletes con-

tinue to perform the way they are doing then we will be able to
walk away with the title.

“As a coach I must say that we are happy with all the per-
formances, we had at least two persons in each of the finals,
persons who weren’t able to make it to the finals tried their
hardest, so we are still in good shape.

“All we need the athletes to do is show up on time, like they
did today and go all out. My thing is I want as many of them
qualify for the nationals, with the nationals being held in Grand
Bahama will give them an opportunity to get in some more com-

petition.”
After 66 events, the Knights lead all schools with 346 points;

CC Sweeting Cobras 324; Pacers, 241; Rattlers, 152; Marlins,
147.50; Stingrays, 138.50; and GHS Magics, 93 points.

‘
a
i

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SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com





@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter

STA CATHARINA,
Curacao — Top seed Devin
Mullings will be the first out
of the blocks to compete for
the Bahamas when the
American Zone One Davis
Cup tie against the Nether-
lands Antilles gets under-
way today.

Netherlands Antilles’
number two seed Rasid
Winklaart was the first
name pulled from the cup
in yesterday’s draw at the
St Catharina Sports &
Country Club. 2

As a result of the way the
draw is set, he automatical-
ly gets to play Mullings in
the opening singles at 10am
(11am Curacao time) in the
best-of-five sets.

Singles ©

In the second singles
match that follows, No. 2
seed Marvin Rolle will face
Netherlands Antilles’ top
seed Jean-Julien Rojer.

“Devin is just coming off
a couple of college wins, so
he’s been playing well,” said
team captain John Farring-
ton, about Mullings, a play-
er with the Ohio State
Buckeyes.

“So I’m looking forward
to him playing well and
coming out with a win.”

Farrington, however, was
a little concerned about the
adjustment that the Grand
Bahamian would have to
make in a 24-hour period,
having just arrived here
Wednesday night from
Ohio.

Switch

However, Farrington said
he’s confident that Mullings
will be able to make the
switch from the indoor
courts to the slow hard
court they will have to play
on in the humidity in Cura-
cao.

While that may not be
much of a transition to deal
with, Farrington feels the
biggest problem they will
have to contend with is
Rojer, the only player in the
tie with a solid ATP rank-
ing.

Rojer, who at age 23 is
30-8 in Davis Cup play, is
currently pegged at 285 in
singles and 241 in doubles,
while Mullings, the only
other player with a ranking,
is 1470.

“In Davis Cup, anything
can happen. Anything is
possible,” said Farrington,

SEE page 10B






























































@ By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

A FIVE-year-old record
came crashing down yester-
day with one pitch by Tracey
Morrison in the GSSSA
Championships.

Morrison’s throw of 39.78
meters in the javelin — equiv-
alent to 130 feet five inches —
erased the old marking of
38.75m, which she set in
2000.

Next in the event was
Shavette Taylor with
31.85m; Samantha Pratt,
29.96 and Thela Johnson
who rounded off the top
four spots with 28.42.

The top four competitors —

in the event were able to
qualify for the national high
school championships, which

are set for April in Grand
‘Bahama.

Just before stepping over
to the javelin’s runway, Mor-
rison had to cool off from a
victory in the discus. Her
best throw of 31.72m was
enough for her to take top
honours, edging out team-
mate Roselyn Benjamin who
threw 31.27m and CI Gib-
son Rattlers’ Saberina Walk-
er’s 29.59.

Medallist

Morrison, a former Carif-
ta medalist, fell short of
qualification marks for this
year’s Carifta games, but
says she is optimistic about
making it.

“J don’t see why I can’t
qualify, I still have the shot

putt to do so I am still opti-
mistic about that,” said Mor-
rison.

“T didn’t even know I did
break the record until I
heard them announce it over
the speakers. It feels great,
even though I set the record.
It shows improvement and
gives me hope as I continue
on this season.”

Morrison, who has a nag-
ging shoulder injury, will
compete in the shot putt
during the evening session
of the meet. She will need
to throw 14.15m to qualify.

In the other two events,
Morrison needed a best
throw of 40.95m in the discus
and 43.70m in the javelin, to
qualify.

Cara Bowleg expressed
her disappointment about

A day of drama at senior high school championships



not qualifying in her
favourite event — the high
jump — after winning.

Bowleg, who wanted to
surpass the mark of 1.80m
in the senior girls jumping
event, was only able to clear
1.60m.

Jumps

Entering the event at
1.52m, Bowleg took three
jumps to finally win at
1.60m, her personal best
record is 1.68m.

She said: “I am very dis-
appointed with my perfor-
mance, I am capable of
jumping better, but I guess it
won’t happen today.

“J don’t know if I will
make it on the team, but if I
am given the opportunity I

A.l.D., Supporting








CR WALKER’S
Devando Gibson crosses —
the line aheadof RM

o: Felipé Major!
Tribune Staff)



will be grateful. I know I am
able to jump way better than
I did.”

A photo-finish had to be
used to determine the win-
ner in the senior boy’s
4x100m event.

Edging out the RM Bai-
ley Pacers were the CR
Walker Knights, in a time of
43.96 seconds to the Pacers’
43.97 seconds. Rounding out
the field was CV Bethel
Stingrays with 44.08, CC
Sweeting Cobras at 44.23
and Doris Johnson Marlins
with 44.31 seconds.

Knights’ head coach Floyd
Armbrister said: “The ath-
letes are very disciplined,
and this is what is giving us
the edge over the other

SEE page 11B



THE BAHAMAS DAVIS CUP TEAM.

Wulff Road, Nassau, The Bahamas |

A.I.D. — Automotive & Industrial Distributors

Phone: 393-7481 |

Fax: 393-4258

www.aidbahamaislands.com
Section
Missing
or
Unavailable