Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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. Pm lovin’ it..

HIGH
‘LOW






Volume: 101 No.83

70F
62F

“CLOUDS,
BREEZY

Bid to round-up illega
immigrants in Kemp
Road and Fox Hill areas

By PAUL G.
TURNQUEST
- Tribune Staff Reporter

THE latest operation by
police and immigration officials
to round-up illegal immigrants
in-the country led to the appre-
hension of 230 suspects yester-
day.

Officers carried out a series of
raids in the Kemp Road and
Fox Hill areas early in the
morning.

Among those arrested and
detained were 156 Haitian men,
35: Haitian women, 17 Haitian
children, 12 Jamaican men, and
10 Jamaican women. |

Labour and Immigration
Minister Vincent Peet said that
this latest raid is in keeping with
his government’s mandate of
removing all illegal immigrants
from within the country’s bor-
ders.

“As I told the nation before,
we will have sustained exercises
until all the immigrants, no mat-
ter where they are from, will be
picked up and repatriated. We
are in keeping with my govern-
ment’s commitment to do that,
d this exercise will continue in
a: sustained fashion until this
goal is reached,” he said.

“The Bahamian Ambassador
to Haiti, Dr Eugene Newry
echoed: Minister Peet’s remarks.

“Tf anyone is illegal in the
Bahamas they should be round-
éd up and sent home, because
there is a proper way of coming
into the country. But the fun-
damental question is why do





these immigrants come to the

Bahamas? Someone must be-

hiring the majority of these per-
sons,” he said.

Dr Newry sympathised with
the Department of Immigration

. and said that the job of protect-

ing the country’s borders is a
burden for all Bahamians to
uphold, and be actively a part
of.

“We have been the most wel-
coming, and integrating coun-
try on earth. Of 300,000 peo-
ple, if 50,000 are Haitians that’s
almost 17 percent of the popu-
lation. You have people who
feel that the Department of
Immigration may be coming
after the immigrants in a strong
fashion, and they will hide them.
You have Bahamian men liv-
ing with Haitian women, and
vice versa. So it’s not as simple
as saying illegal Haitian go
home. It’s not that easy.

“The. Department of Immi-
gration has to be seen as not
hunting down criminals, but
simply doing their mandated
job. Their service needs to be
looked at in a more construc-
tive light. They are not Nazis
out there, and if people have
that image of them then some-
thing is wrong.”

Haitian Ambassador Louis

Joseph said that his embassy is
doing all it can to help their
nationals by visiting the

‘Carmichael Road Detention
Centre to listen to the needs of.

SEE page 10

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To register, call (242) 325-2638.



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‘ B TWO-HUNDRED AND THIRTY suspects were apprehended yesterday i in.a series of raids
across Nassau. They were taken to the Carmichael Road Detention Centre for processing.

ETP mee Te

mn mrt RON NSW

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

A TWENTY-four-year-old
resident of Windsor Lane left
the Magistrate’s Court in tears

yesterday after being charged |

with murder and armed rob-
bery.

Court documents allege
that on February 25, Jeffrey
Trembley being concerned
with another, killed Bradley
Stevans during a robbery
which occurred at the Twilight
Club, a sports bar located off
Market Street.

It is alleged that while he
was armed with a shotgun,
Trembley robbed the owner
of the bar, Hubert Smith, of
$400 before shooting Mr Ste-
vans and fleeing the scene.

Yesterday Trembley was
escorted under heavy police
guard to Court One on Bank
Lane, with his left hand in a
cast.

-Magistrate Linda Virgill.

informed him that due to the

@ JEFFREY TREMBLEY
on his way to court yesterday.

(Photo: Mario Duncanson):

nature of the charges, he was
not required to enter a plea
and could not receive bail
unless he applied to the
Supreme Court. She said he
would be remanded to Her

SEE page 10



(Photo: Mario Pickoanion)

Developers of $76 million project

‘threaten to pull investment out

lm By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Senior Staff Reporter

THE developers of the pro-
posed $76 million Gold Rock
Creek Enterprises, a film pro-
duction and entertainment stu-
dio due to be built on Grand
Bahama, have threatened to

pull their investment out of the

country if they do not receive a
lease from government, High
Rock MP Kenneth Russell said
in the House of Assembly yes-
terday.

Mr Russell said that the
developers have*been waiting
for the lease to be signed for
more:than two years. This
would allow them to start con-

‘struction on the property which

once housed a US missile base
that closed in 1987.

Prime Minister Perry Christie
said that the main issue hold-
ing up the advancement of the
lease is the fact that government
and dévelopers cannot see eye
to eye on whether stipulations
on how the developers treat the
local environment should be

Nassau and Bahama Islands’ Leading Newspaper

included in the lease.

As for the threat of pulling
out of the country, Mr Christie
said that he was very frank with
the developers.

“T told (Paul) Quigley (a pro-
ducer who, with Hans Schutte
and Michael Collyer, is the. dri-
ving force behind the develop-
ment) from my mouth to his
ears, do not represent views
which can be seen as a threat
to a government. It is not right
nor is.it fair,” said Mr Christie.

The prime minister said that
he tried to ascertain from the
government’s legal advisers
whether or not mentioning the
heads of agreement, which has
outlined environmental regula-
tions, in the lease would bind
the company to a commitment
to the preservation of the envi-
ronment. Mr Christie said that
he was advised that it would
not.

He pointed out that Finan-
cial Services and Investment
Minister Allyson Maynard Gib-

SEE page 10



PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



Suspected double

@ By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE suspected murder
weapon used on 75-year-old
Rosnell Newbold and her

26- year-old grandson Kevin
Wilson was identified in the
Supreme Court on Wednes-
day.

The jagged-blade of a
kitchen knife, which was
broken off at the handle,















































was presented in Justice
Anita Allen’s court yester-
day by Corporal Rochelle

Deleveaux, a forensic
"expert.
Testimony

Corporal Deleveaux fit-
ted the blade back into the
handle during her testimo-
ny. She told the court that
she received a number of
items from the crime scene
from Corporal Phyllis
Smith.

They included numerous

swabs containing blood

samples, a multi-coloured
bed sheet, a black slip,

piece of paper, a piece of
bloody tissue, a pair of

‘white panties, a pair of

beige trousers, and two
glass tubes containing the
blood of the defendant Basil
Gordon.

He is accused of breaking
into a Spice . Street,
Pinewood Gardens home
and stabbing the two family
members to death on June
16, 2002.

Detective Corporal Olson
J Noel also testified for the
Crown, being represented

Ritchie...



514 or 393-7844

murder
weapon identified in court

by attorneys Gawaine’ Ward
and Antoinette Woodside
of the Attorney General’s
Office.

He brought a photo pack-
age containing nine images
taken at Gordon’s home on
June 16, 2002. He told the
court that at noon on June
16, 2002, he went to Gor-
don’s home at 21 Rock
Crusher Road.

Scene

He confiscated a pair of

Buffalino Boots to test them
in relation ‘to the shoe prints
found at the murder scene.

He also took a tissue
paper with suspected. blood

stains, and a pair of white’
“panties, also containing

blood stains...
After Gordon was arrest-



‘ed and cautioned for the’
crime, he was taken to the
accident and emergency
‘unit of the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital. ce

A hospital representative

read the report made by Drâ„¢

Mark Grant.
The report stated that

Gordon had a laceration to.
the base of his left pinkie ~

finger, as well as several
other lacerations and abra-
sions to that hand. There

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the.
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us.on 322-1986 °
and share your story.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

you are raising funds for a

were also documented abra-

sions on his back, according
tothe doctor. __
Officer 2458 Ruthmae

Brown also took the stand

yesterday, testifying that she
initialled all of the samples
and sent them to Gladys
Hanna. of the Broward
County crime laboratory.
Police witnesses are to be
recalled today to testify as
to the outcome of the DNA

tests.

The prosecution expects.
to close.its case today, leav-
ing . attorney Dorsey
McPhee to present his
defence.

‘Day. three of Gordon’s:
double murder trial in the.

‘Supreme Court included a’

new pechnolonical: advance:
ment.
Justice Allen was able to:

|
}





“read every word as it was
typed by the stenographer’

through the use of an IBM)
Thinkpad, which was con~
nected to the stenographer’s,

- machine. mes cf

Before proceedings got,
underway, the stenograph-
er told the jury that in time

to. come, this could be used

so that every jury member

-could glance at a screen if

they missed something said,
in court. 4

|
|







THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 3





24") i PRIME Minister Perry Christie

‘ ve speaks in the House yesterday.

(Photo: Mario Duncanson)

Tae STO vm killed

Jermaine Mackey testifies

1 By PACO NUNEZ

‘| Tribune Staff Reporter

f

+ THE police officer who
shot and killed Jermaine

Mackey told the Coroner’s -

Zourt yesterday that he fired
cause Mr Mackey was run-
fing at him pointing “a shiny
gbject. Z
‘ Officer Zhivago Earns tes-
tified that Mr Mackey’s
haviour
his s life “anc







that he drew

Searches

‘y His testimony follows that
Gf his partner, Constable
Ricardo Neely, who told the
gourt he was “certain” that
Wir Mackey had a gun. How-
gver police searches did not
discover a firearm from the
scene.

f Mackey died on December
1, 2002. His killing sparked a

fiot involving hundreds of res-

fdents of the Kemp Road
grea.

| According to Officer Earns,
fe and Constable Neely were
pn mobile patrol in the St
flames Road area on the night
pf the incident, when they



ut him in fear of

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Robinson Road location only.

observed a black Mercedes
Benz.

He said they followed the
vehicle as it turned into St
James Street, where it parked.

Officer Earns said that after
they pulled up next to the

‘vehicle, he exited the police |

car to conduct investigations
into the occupants of the Mer-
cedes.

rot. Véhicle’

observed a white Honda
Accord approaching the
police vehicle from the other ‘,
direction of St James Street. —

He said the car was unable
to pass, and attempted to
reverse but was blocked by
another car.

Officer Earns said that the
passenger of the Honda then
jumped out of the car and
began to run, and that he saw.
Constable Neely give chase.

He said that.afew seconds
later, he heard what sounded
like a gunshot and a voice that
seemed to belong to Consta-
ble Neely calling his name.

It was then, officer Earns
said, that he saw a man run-

SEE page 10

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@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Senior Staff Reporter

GOVERNMENT is expected
to spend $5 million on a pro-
ject which Prime Minister Perry
Christie promises will bring
reform to the administration of
land in the Bahamas.

Mr Christie advanced a reso-
lution in the House of Assembly
yesterday which would allow
government to borrow $3.5 mil-

. lion from the Inter-American

2 TM. BNSMISCDALEEA Len: ve euSaid.,.that,.be., shen.| aval:

Development Bank (IDB)
for the project, while govern-
ment directly advances $1.5 mil-
lion.

Expand

The prime minister said that
the project will among other
things improve and expand gov-
ernment’s land administration
services and improve the col-
lection and administration of

information on land in the

country.

These, said Mr Christie, will
engender the improved utilisa-
tion of land resources in the
Bahamas and will address the
inefficient process of land allo-
cation in the Bahamas.

“People apply for land on an

island for Crown Land either
by the way of grant or lease and
the process takes too long of a
time. Even though the decision
may be made quickly the
process of surveying and exe-
cuting the transfer of the prop-
erty just takes too long,” he
said.

Government, said Mr
Christie is also faced with the
problem of knowing how
Crown Land should be pre-
served for future generations oe
Bahamians.

“(The project will) bring sci-
ence and organisation to the
management of land in this
country,” he said.

The prime minister said that
this project is expected to be a

. Major intervention by the gov--

ernment in respect to land in
the Bahamas. -

“The government of the:

Bahamas is embarking on a
process which we hope will lead

. to comprehensive land reform.

Sa Hlt
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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt .

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

There cannot be discrimination

WE HAD A CALL yesterday from a
person who wanted clarification on our
Wednesday editorial. Were we saying that
under the UN Convention of the Rights
of the Child, to which the Bahamas is'a
signatory, government cannot take chil-
dren of illegal parents from school and
repatriate them?

This is not what we said. The point was

- that as long as these children are in our

country and a part of our society they have
to be treated equally and educated.

They cannot be removed from school to
sit at the Carmichael Detention Centre
until transportation can be arranged for
them to be returned to a homeland that
will be as foreign to them as it would be to
a Bahamian. :

We do not have to go as far as the UN
Convention to find clauses that protect
these children from unfair treatment. Near-
er home in our own Constitution they are
also shielded from discrimination.

Section 26 of the Constitution says that
no person can be discriminated against and
it defines discrimination as “affording dif-
ferent treatment to different persons attrib-
utable wholly or mainly to their respective
descriptions: by race, place of origin, polit-

ical opiniotis, colour or creed whereby ’per- ~

sons of one such description are subjected
to disabilities or restrictions to which per-
sons of another such description are. not
made subject. or are accorded privileges or
advantages which are not accorded to per-
sons of another such description”.

The caller wanted to know what gov-
ernment was expected to do in areas. in
which Bahamian children could not be
accommodated in the classroom because
they were squeezed out by Haitians.

This question recalled the answer that
GK Chesterton gave in a debate on Robert
Malthus’ theory on population control — a
theory based on a belief that more people
mean fewer goods for each person; thus, as
population grows, poverty inevitably

increases. This led to the movement to.

reduce population growth.

Said Chesterton: Suppose a man has
five sons, but only four hats to go on each
head. Is he going to cut off the head of the
fifth son because he cannot accommodate
him -with a hat, or is he going to work hard-

er to purchase a fifth hat?

And this was more or less the basis of
our answer to yesterday’s caller. Build
more schools — and until you have the
resources to build the needed schools
accommodate the overflow of students in
trailers. .

Of course, the next consideration is
where is the money coming from to do
even that. The answer to that one is to
economise on what we have. Don’t be
dashing around preening our feathers as
though we have the clout to influence and
change the world. Let’s face it — we don’t
and we never will.

For example, it is more important to
invest in our schools, than to underwrite an
Embassy in China. It’s not necessary for
government ministers to be flying all over
the world living in the best hotel suites to
attend every conference that comes up on
the agenda.

The next is to recognise that although we
now have more Haitians than we can
accommodate, the Bahamas’ economy
would collapse without most of them.
Those persons who have jobs, who have
been here for many years and who have
put down roots, should be regularised. The

‘payment of these permits alone would go a

long way in contributing to the construction
of a school.
The complaint is that the Haitians con-

. tribute nothing. The truth is that with their

superior work ethic, they contribute and
have contributed a great deal to this coun-
try.
They could contribute even more if they
had legal status and could, for example,

pay into National Insurance, open bank "

accounts, purchase property and invest
more than their labour into the country.

There are many businesses in the
Bahamas — the building trades and land-
scaping businesses to name just two — that
could-not operate without their Haitian
staff.

If processing is done carefully then those
who should not be here can be repatriated,
especially the recent arrivals, and those
who are making a contribution can be reg-
ularised and allowed to live as honest citi-
zens, no longer dodging their own shad-
ows from dusk to dawn.



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





Support for
Miller on the
Haitian situation |

EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE publish the follow-
ing letter written in 2002 when
Dr Earl Deveaux was minister
of Labour and Immigration,
and a letter written last month
to Minister of Trade and Indus-
try, Leslie Miller.

March 10, 2002

Hon. Dr Earl Deveaux
‘Minister of Immigration and
Labour —

Nassau, Bahamas

Re: Requirements for Citi-
zenship

Dear Minister:

After reading my copy of the
constitution, I am not satisfied
that it is clear how one may
obtain Bahamian citizenship
whether by birth or inheritance.
Iam of the strong opinion that
this is one of the matters that
should be up for constitutional
reform. Many countries have
specific requirements, which are
clearly laid out before one may
apply for citizenship. Some of

_ these include the following:

1. A period of residency.

2. Literacy - the ability to
read and write.

3. Knowledge of the history
and laws of the country.

4. A clean police record.

5. The applicant is in good
health.

I am not.sure that presently
our citizenship laws require all
the above. Therefore in the

interest of patriotism, I suggest’

the following:

1. All persons applying
should be proficient in the Eng-
lish language since it is neces-
sary for communicating with fel-
low citizens.

2. Since being functionally
illiterate is detrimental to a
democracy, the applicant should
possess a basic education.

3. The applicant should prove
that he or she is in good health
since widespread major diseases
in The Bahamas already chal-
lenge us. For example, TB,
hepatitis, HIV AIDS.

4. The applicant should be
acquainted with our system of
government, our laws, etc., since
he will be voting, obtaining a
driver’s licence and having to
function as a well-infornied cit-
izen.

I do not believe that citizen-
ship requirements should be
ambiguous or left exclusively in
a single government minister’s
hand, as this increases the
potential for gross abuse and




letters@tribunemedia.net



LETTERS



mishandling. I suggest therefore
that a independent group serve
as an advisory board.

It is also my belief that per-
sons born in The Bahamas of
illegal immigrant parents should
not qualify for citizenship, espe-
cially if they have spent most
of their early childhood out of
the country. Furthermore, they
should not be granted citizen-
ship if they are deficient.

February 22, 2005

Hon. Leslie O. Miller;
Minister of Trade and Indus-
try, ;

Manx Corporate Centre,
West Bay Street.

Dear Sir: -

I noted with great interest
your recent remarks in parlia-
ment regarding the. Haitian-
Bahamian situation in our coun-
try. Let me say that you have
my full support in this regard
and I admire the fact that you
had the courage to “call a spade
a spade”.

I am somewhat amazed that

_many of your cabinet colleagues
appear to have been fast asleep |

regarding this issue. This coun-
try has become a Haitian.colony
instead of a former British
colony. Does anyone truthfully
know how many Haitians are
residing in the Bahamas? Will
we ever find out or will we keep
coming up with a rough esti-
mate?

Many of our over-the-hill
areas such as Bain Town,

- Grant’s Town, Coconut Grove,

East Street, etc, are almost com-
pletely “Haitianized”. If you
were to check the student pop-
ulation of primary schools such
as Stephen Dillet, Mable Walk-
er, Naomi 'Blatch, Ridgeland,
Garvin Tynes, Carmichael and
Gerald Cash, this would give
you a good indication of the
number of Haitian families cur-
rently residing in our commu-
nity.

Iam of the opinion, sir, that
the Ministers of Education and
Immigration have failed utterly
in confronting this issue. I note

with great alarm the audacity”

and boldness now being dis-
played by the Haitian element
among us.

Do any of the Haitian women
that we constantly see walking
the streets with children in
hand, enter this country legally

and do they have work permits?

The time bomb that you
alluded to has a fuse that is
being consumed very quickly
and we are already too late to
turn this situation around.

We seem to have lost com-
plete control of our borders in
this country. As a matter of
security we need to realize that
prevention is better than cure.
Our past governments have
been notorious for foot-drag-

_ ging and are known for doing .

“too little, too late.” Bahami-
ans might be the next boat. peo-
ple seeking political refuge but
the question is “where do we
have to go to seek refuge”. For
a long time the Haitian agenda —
has been to overpopulate our
country with children born here,
in order to gain a foothold in
the country and to prevent
themselves from being repatri- °
ated. The next step in the agen-
da appears to be to gain voting
power and to use it to intimi-
date and silence outspoken
politicians like yourself.

May I suggest the following
as a partial remedy for the crisis
that we are now facing:

a. All persons applying for
citizenship must be able to
speak English. I am shocked by
the number of persons form
Haiti who apparently cannot

‘speak a word of English.

b. Children born in The
Bahamas to illegal immigrants .
should not be recognized as
Bahamians.

c. Children deported with
their parents to Haiti should not
be allowed to come back years
later and claim citizenship. This
is a dangerous. precedent
because who knows how many
such persons are returning and
claiming that they have rights
in this country.

d. We need to put a lid. on
the number of work permits
issued. It appears that someone
somewhere is selling this coun-
try out.

e. Homes built by squatters
on privately owned land should
be demolished after due notice
has been given. The same laws
that apply to Bahamians should
apply to illegal immigrants.

’ Unless something drastic is
done to curb the violation of
our borders, the saturation of
our country by illegal immi-
grants may become complete-

. ly out of control. Keep up the

good work and don’t allow
yourself to be deterred!

CHARLES T. MOXEY,
BA, JP,
Nassau,

February 22, 2005.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 5





New programme to aim |
for ‘Drug Free Schools’

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas National
Drug Council in its continu-
ing fight against drug abuse
in the Bahamas is expected
to shortly implement a drug
prevention programme called
“Drug Free Schools.”

At the council’s annual
church service on Tuesday,
Executive Director of the
council Marcia Munnings said
the programme will focus on
drug prevention education.

This initiative, which is
expected to be implemented
into 14 government schools
for a pilot project at the end
of March, has been made pos-
sible by a $21,000 grant from
‘the US Embassy.

Awareness

Ms Munnings also noted
that the programme will raise
drug awareness and promote
community participation in
communicating the drug pre-
vention message.

“Students involved in the
programme will be exposed
in a meaningful way. They
will propose solutions in an
integrated manner both in the
schools and communities
which they live. By doing so,
they will commit themselves
to sense the importance of a
drug free lifestyle,” said Ms
Munnings. :

The month of March has
been allocated as National
Drug Council’s Month under
the theme “Positive Vibes in
2005”.

The purpose of the month
is to highlight the challenges
and the achievements of
the council in drug preven-

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tion education.

Throughout the month of
March, on radio talk shows
there will be special features
with persons who were sub-
stance abusers and are now
in recovery.

Workshop

Also planned is a workshop
called “Profiling Youth Sub-
stance Abusers”.

At the church service Par-
liamentary Secretary in the
Ministry of Health Ron Pin-

der noted the negative effects

of repeated drug abuse.

sibility to keep our nation
sound both in mind and body
- that is drug free. The risks
of repeated drug abuse are
clear: Upper respiratory
infections, HIV/AIDS,
impaired memory, reduced
sex drive, lowered sperm
count, irregular menstrual
cycle, the risk of psychotic
behaviour, the list goes on
and on. Treatment is a costly
venture, both to the family
and the government. Let us
continue to work towards and
dream of a better Bahamas,”
he said .

Co-chairman of the coun-
cil William Weeks said that

the existing programmes for
persons with drug problems
have been doing a fantastic
job. However, he said that
more support needs to be giv-
en to them in order for them

to carry out the work to keep.

young men away from drugs.

“The drug addiction is clas-
sified as a disease because of
the way it affects the body,
mind and brain. People need
to understand that, so that
the way we deal with persons

who have a drug problem

should be caring and positive,
so that we can treat them like
we treat other people with
diseases,” said Mr Weeks.



“Tt is our collective respon-

Bahamas police force set

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Royal Bahamas Police force is set to cel-
ebrate 165 years of service in the Bahamas with a
month of special activities.

Police Commissioner Paul Farquharson
announced that the theme for the March anniver-
sary will be “Celebrating, 165 years of Progressive
transformation.”

He said the force was established to maintain the
law, order and peace in the country, and for the
prevention and detection of crime, the apprehen-
sion of offenders and the enforcement of all laws
with which it is charged.

Mr Farquharson said this mandate has placed
the force at the centre of virtually every significant
development throughout the country including:
social, economic, political and religious develop-
ment.

He said Bahamian policing has evolved from an
institution of watchmen to a multifaceted mod-
ern organisation comprised of police officers,
police civilians and police reservists.

Along the way, he said, there were many officers
who paid the ultimate price by laying down their
lives for the country.

“Those unsung heroes were ordinary individu-
als whose passion to serve remains unmatched.”

OWNER MmeO ONE LI ON

Mr Farquharson also thanked the public for
standing by the force all these years “through
good and bad times.”

He said: “Today we who serve, stand on the
shoulders of hundreds of great men and women -
Bahamians and other nationals. We are today
what they were yesterday.”

Pledged

Mr Farquharson pledged that the force will con-
tinue to go after every suspected law breaker in the

country and pursue those that leave this jurisdic- _

tion in order to seek safe haven from the long
and ever reaching arm of the law.

He invited all Bahamians to join them during
the month of celebration.

Superintendent Quinn McCartney, who co-
chairs the celebrations with Chief Superintendent
Hulan Hanna, outlined the special events of the
month which will include: A church service at St
Francis Xavier Cathedral at 2pm on Sunday, a
woman’s seminar to commemorate 40 years of
women in policing, a variety concert, medal pre-
sentation and anniversary ball.

Mr Hanna said all the events are geared to be
wholesome, safe and family orientated. He urged
the public to come out in large numbers to show
their support for the force.

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LOCAL NEWS




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HIGHLIGHTING the
efforts of officials from the
Ministry of Environmental
Health and officers from the

a

Royal Bahamas Police Force:

and Fire Brigade, parliamen-

tary secretary in the Ministry

of Health Ron Pinder «

announced on Wednesday
that 90 per cent of the smoke

pockets and "hot spots” at the |
Harrold Road dumpsite had

been extinguished.
Mr Pinder noted that a

small team of officers had :

- been assigned to combat the

fires at the dumpsite after the «

government had consulted
with environmental engineers

form a Bahamian company ’
and the US based company :
Barkerlamar. This effort.as.,
Mr Pinder noted began in ear-’?

ly January when new fires had
broken out.

Mr Pinder said however
that the challenge still

remained for the government,

+

of the Bahamas to find a way .
to eliminate the raw materi-',

als that continue to sponta-
neously combust.

Contracts »

He indicated that the gov: :

ernment is presently review-
ing two proposed contracts for

the overall management and.
treatment of solid waste at the -

dumpsite. Mr Pinder noted:

however that it was too early
to give out any more informa-
tion about the matter.

"The government of the
Bahamans is very serious
about this issue," Mr Pinder
said.

"What we are dealing with

here at the Harrold road dis-*

posal site did not happen
overnight , a remedy cannot
show up over night, it is a long
term process," he said.

“What we are doing is a

part of the government’s

attempt to not only remedy °

the situation but eliminate it
entirely," Mr Pinder added.
‘Mr Pinder could not esti-
mate how much money would
be needed in order to rectify
the dumpsite but he stated
that millions of dollars would:
be needed to establish a per-
manent and sustainable waste
management system.

Landfill

Mr Pinder noted that the
government must also review
the tipping fees charged to
individuals for disposing of
waste onto the landfill. He
predicted that these fees
would increase so as to accom-
modate the cost of imple-
menting a proper waste man-
agement system.

Roscoe Fergerson, the assis-
tant director of the solid waste
division at the Department of

- Environmental Health, noted

that residents in Jubilee. Gar-
dens had experienced relief in
the past several weeks from
the smoke and the odour
which emanated from the site.

He praised the dedication
of the small group of officers
who had worked to control
the fires and noted that his
department was embarking on
an initiative to separate the
waste that was being disposed.

"As persons come in now
they will be directed to the
various areas to deposit the
type of waste they are bring-
ing," he said.

u

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story. ©





THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS





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the 90th anniversary of the Cus-
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From left are Miss Natasha
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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





DIVIDEND NOTICE

Cc



COMMONWEALTH BANK

TO ALL SHAREHOLDERS

The Board of Directors of Commo:

nwealth Bank Limited has declared

a Quarterly Dividend for Ordinary, “A”, “B”, “D”, “E”, “F”, and
“G” Preference Shares to all shareholders of record at March 15th,

2005, as follows:-

Ordinary

“A” Preference (payable quarterly)
“B” Preference (payable quarterly)
“D” Preference (payable quarterly)
“E” Preference (payable quarterly)
“F” Preference (payable quarterly)
“G” Preference (payable quarterly)

' -8¢ each
-9% per annum
-8.5% per annum
-9% per annum
-9% per annum
-9% per annum
-9% per annum

The payment will be made on March 31, 2005, through Colina
Financial Advisors Limited, ee Registrar and Transfer Agent, in the

usual manner.

Charlene A. Pinder-Higgs
Corporate Secretary



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the International Bazaar, which
became the Princess Casino.

The Lonrho group operated
the. Princess. properties for
decades. However, in 1996 it
announced to ‘the world that it
was. selling this division of its
operations, which by then includ-
ed its ten luxury resort hotels in
the US/Caribbean/Mexico
regions, including the Princess
property in Freeport.

Lonrho was getting out of the

hotel business altogether. By the

time-it announced the sale, the

. Freeport hotel and resort was in

bad shape, and. needed renovat-
ing.

For years Lontho could not
find a-buyer for its. Freeport

property and determined to close
it.down, which would. have put

some 1, 600 Bahamians out of
work and would have badly

- affected Grand Bahama’ ‘Ss econ-
- omy:

To: ‘keep the. hotel Gperating

and. save.the jobs of its many

- workers; the-FNM administra-
tion granted: Lonrho certain casi-
no. tax.exemptions.. Under the

arrangement, -the Princess prop-

- erty remained open until a buyer
was: found. | ene

: Ts November: 1999, the
Driftwood group, headed
by. David Bottmyer, reached an

agreement with Lonrho-to pur-

chase the Princess property in

Freeport with financing from

Lehman Brothers, a global finan-
cial investment group operating
in New. York, where the Princess
Division of Lonrho also operat-
edesis lee

At the:time. of-the sale, Lon-
rho informed the government
that..Driftwood’s ‘offer was the
better of two it received. Drift-
wood was approved for the pur-
chase and in its Heads of Agree-
ment was signed on May 2, 2000,
which obligated it to maintain a
certain level of employment,
both after and during its planned
$45 million refurbishment. and

_ development of the hotel.

Driftwood completed the hotel
renovation in. May, 2001, and,

for the most part, maintained the

level of employment agreed.
In July, 2002, shortly after the

VARGO

“ = re

PLP came to office, the Princess
officially reopened the hotel
under the Crown Plaza flag. In
fact, the reopening of the reno-
vated hotel was one of the first, if
not the first, such official act by
newly sworn in Prime Minister,
Perry Christie.

W hen it presided over
the opening of the

hotel, the Christie administra-
tion indicated no concerns about
the Driftwood group as opera-
tors, though recently in the
House of Assembly, Obie Wilch-
combe, Minister of Tourism,
alluded to some coded concerns
he had in his speech on that
occasion.

This notwithstanding: the
Driftwood group operated the
hotel for almost three years with-
out the Christie administration
doing anything about any prob-
lems that developed. :

During that time, the Bahamas
Hotel Catering and Allied Work-
ers Union (BHCAWU), as well
as hotel workers on the. casino
and resort sides, claimed to have
brought concerns about Drift-
wood’s operations to the atten-
tion of the government:

Indeed, Princess casino.work-
ers raised the concerns as they
demonstrated to unionise some
time in 2004. However, the issues
received no attention from the
government and never really
came to a head until hurricanes
Jeanne and Frances landed in
Freeport in September last year,
damaging the Royal Oasis prop-
erty and forcing its closure.

-.For weeks following its clo-
sure, workers remained hopeful
that the hotel would reopen, as
announced by its operators and
the government, in April, 2005,

. following extensive renovations.

As the date’ for the hotel’s
reopening became more suspect

and a dispute between Drift-

wood and its insurers. caused
restoration work to stop, the
1,300 displaced hotel workers
became more and more agitat-
ed.

Their agitation increased.

because they heard little or noth-
ing from either,the, hotel opera-
tors or. the.government about



y
mas

what was happening with the
hotel.

For weeks they demonstrated
outside the property hoping to
hear some news about when they
would return to work or when
they would get their $8.4 million
severance pay. When the gov-
ernment did finally decide to
speak to workers about the situ-
ation they had few answers and
offered little help. In fact, the
government seemed almost as
helpless. as the demonstrating
workers who looked to them for
relief. Every government minis-
ter who spoke to the workers
sounded more like people out of
power than people in power. .

Embarrassed by 1,300 demon-
strating workers and severe crit-
icism from the opposition, the
government reacted in. knee-jerk
fashion. The government. spent
taxpayers’ limited funds ‘to fly
technocrats and a few displaced

- workers to New York to meét

with Driftwood principals rather
than requiring the Driftwoed
principals to fly to The Bahamas
to meet with them. :.

In the process the government
went-into further debt to collect
a debt owed to it instead of hav-
ing its wealthy debtors spend
some money to come to it to
explain how they would pay their
debt. PM Christie announced
all manner of promises to work-
ers, including finding them jobs
in other hotels around the coun-
try and persuading utility com-
panies to give them a’ break. The
top, however, was the promise
to pay workers the $8.4 niillion

owed to them in severance pay.

B y this time the govern-
ment. was criticised
heavily for being insensitive,
incompetent and irresponsible
in dealing with the Royal Oasis
matter, in particular the plight
of the workers. It was not.
blamed for the closure of the
hotel, which the hurricanes

‘brought about, but rather, it was

criticised for being too slow and
indecisive in moving to address
the plight of workers following
the closure. Perhaps it was this

‘severe criticism that led the gov-

ernment to agree to pay the $8.4
million severance that the Drift-
wood group owes workers. This
is an unprecedented move. Nev-

er before has a government of

The Bahamas undertaken to pay

SEE next page

- BACARDI & COMPANY LIMITED

- Bacardi & Company Limited is seeking candidates for the position of —
Cost Accountant. The Company has been based in Nassau for over 40
years with significant manufacturing operations in the areas of bulk rum

_ production and bottling of various spirits 1 and beverages, primarily. for ©

s export markets.

| Job Description

~ Under limited supervision, the Cost Accountant will be required to apply
i principles of cost accounting to analyze cost records and to distribute
~ costs for production on items such as labour, equipments, materials and’
‘overhead costs and to compute the unit cost of product or service.
- Continuously evaluate existing cost systems and records cost data for use
by management in controlling expenditures. The Cost Accountant will
further be expected to prepare the necessary reports in preparation for

operating budgets.

Qualifications

The successful candidate must hold a professional designation with five
(5) to ten (10) years experience. A CPA designation is preferred.
_ Furthermore, due to the nature of the work to be performed the individual

must possess the ability to work independently under pressure to
consistently meet deadlines. Must be a self starter and a team player.

Salary/Benefits

Commensurate with experience.

Interested candidates should forward copies of their curriculum vitae
directly to the Bacardi & Company Limited P.O. Box N-4880, Nassau,

N.P., The Bahamas.

Attention The Human Resources Manager

Information may also be forwarded via e-mail to dacartwright@bacardi.com

: Application Deadline: March 31, 2005

BACARDI AND THE BAT DEVICE ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF BACARD( & COMPANY LIMITED



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 9



fs

‘FROM previous page

!a debt owed to workers by a pri-
‘vate entity. Many have criticised
‘the move and for good reason.
‘One only imagines what other
‘workers will think about this
‘when they are displaced from
‘their jobs and their employers
fail to pay them their severance.
' Why should they not look to
‘the government to pay them and
‘collect from the employers later
‘also? What PM Christie agreed
to do is indeed a dangerous
precedent. One has to be happy
‘for the Royal Oasis workers, for
-God knows that they could use
the money.
-. However, the government’s
‘decision to pay them in this way
‘may result in the Driftwood
‘group getting away scot-free and
-the nation being burdened for a
‘long time to come. It is interest-
‘ing to note that Lehman Broth-
‘ers ‘are a preferred lender of
‘Royal’ Oasis, meaning that they
‘ate paid: before most other cred-
‘itors..
Perhaps it was the pressure of



the Royal Oasis situation that
led Minister Wilchcombe to talk
the nonsense he spoke in the
House of Assembly the other
day.

Pez: it was the severe
criticism of his govern-
ment’s clumsy, insensitive and
incompetent handling of the mat-
ter that made him attempt to
blame the former administration
for the situation. The pressure
of trying to recover from this
poor showing as well as the
numerous other blunders by his
government has driven the min-
ister to foolish ranting.

The fact is that the failure of
the Driftwood group to make
National Insurance payments, to
make employee payments to
creditors from salary deductions,
to make pension payments on
behalf of workers and to pay
local vendors had nothing to do
with the former administration
or any provision not placed in a
Heads of Agreement.

There are laws in place to deal

the Royal Oasis affair

with each of those situations. In

fact, Mr Wilchcombe’s govern-.

ment has presided over this situ-
ation for almost three years with-
out doing anything about it.

If his government knew about
the situation and did nothing, it
was simply negligent. If they did
not know about the situation,
they were simply incompetent.
Neither of these scenarios is far-
fetched, for there are far too
many examples in this country
today that point to the fact that
over the last three years Mr
Wilchcombe and his colleagues
have been both negligent and
incompetent.

They can try all they want to
lay their bungling at the feet of
the former administration, the
truth of the matter is that their
folly is all their own.

THOUGHT FOR
THE WEEK
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don’t want what I got.” The °

Overwhelmed. -

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005

Under the distinquished patronage of Her Excellency
Dame Ivy Dumont DCMG, Governor General & Mr Dumont

THE BAHAMAS —
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presents its

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March 16 - 19 Tel: 393-3728

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Tel:. 393-3226

and music from around the world!



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Officer who
shot Jermaine |
Mackey testifies

FROM page three

ning at him from behind a near-
by building.

“He said the man, who
appeared to be the passenger
of the white Honda, came run-
ning at him at a very fast pace
with his right hand inside his
jacket..

Officer Earns said that he
ordered the man to stop but
that the man instead removed
his hand from his jacket and
pointed a.“shiny object”.

“In fear I quickly drew my
pistol and discharged two
rounds,” he said. .

Officer Earns testified that
he conducted a search of Mr
Mackey, but found no firearm.
While he was doing so, he said,
he noticed a crowd running in
his direction.

He said that he then saw
‘Constable Neely re-appear.

-MONDAY | TUESDAY |WEDNESDAY| THURSDAY

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ADM 351
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Principles of
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Public
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ISA 401

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& Design

MONDAY TUESDAY |WEDNESDAY| THURSDAY FRIDAY |_

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Management
ADM 312
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BUS 300
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ENG 243

« iS
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ANT 100
Introduction to
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493 PDC Il

MAT 097 ISA 327
Basic Math II Data
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use, East Bay Street

LOCAL NEWS

Officer Earns said his partner
came towards the scene of the
shooting, and then went to the
patrol car to radio for an ambu-
lance and for back up units.

Officer Earns said that while
this was happening, the crowd
had surrounded him and tried
to attack him.

During his testimony, Con-
stable Neely told the court that
he chased Mr: Mackey around
two buildings and observed him
holding what he was “95 per
cent sure” was a handgun.

Fayne Thompson, who rep-

resents the Mackey family, sug-

gested'to Constable Neely that
his testimony was not truthful,
and that he never saw a gun in
Mr Mackey’s hand.



FROM page one

ties.

feet below sea level.

3,000,” said Mr Russell.

Charged with murder
and armed robbery

FROM page one

Majesty’s Prison until his pre-
liminary inquiry, which she set
for April 1. Trembley was rep-
resented by Tamara Taylor.
Inspector Ercil Dorsette prose-
cuted.

Trembley spoke once when
he told the judge that he under-
stand the charges read to him.

Outside the court a large
crowd of apparent supporters
of the accused lined the path-
way leading from the holding
cell to the courtroom.

As he passed, they shouted
at him to remain strong because
they knew that he was innocent.



FROM page one

the people there.

released,” he said.

ed from the country.

had seen a gun to furnish his
partner with justification for the *

this was the case, however '

Developers of $76
million project

son would be speaking with government’s legal advisers to
determine a way the lease could be written to satisfy both par-

Mr Christie said that the question is whether or not a devel-
oper ought to look at a government and say to a government |:
that it wants no mention in the lease, within the setting up of
obligations of the landlords, the obligations of the tenants,
anything to do with the environment. :

“The fact of the matter is, that is what separates the govern-
ment from the developers,” he said.

One of government’s concerns over the environmental impact
of the development seems to be stemming from a. “basin” or
“pool” being constructed by the developers. coming from the
beach which Mr Russell said is more than an acre in size and 25

“Obviously with this concern that the government has, I
encourage them to monitor this situation,” said Mr Russell.

He said that the residents of the east end communities are
looking forward to the development however.

“I understand that the project when completed will hire
some 1,200 regular employees and during movie time some

Raid nets 230 suspects

“What we are doing is going down at the detention centre to .
see the condition of the people, and to see how we can help !
them. Some people are saying that they don’t have the papers °
with them at the time of the arrest and we have helped in those -
cases to get word to their families or spouses to get them ;

Nearly 1,000 illegal immigrants have now been arrested living
in the country this year with the vast majority repatriated to .
Haiti. Last year more than 3,000 illegal immigrants were deport-

THE TRIBUNE

2

ae Pea et at area a of lM aaa? ate

Mr Thompson suggested that
Constable Neely only said he :

shooting.
Constable Neely denied that

Coroner William Campbell put i
it-to him that in his statement to :
police the officer has only said :
he saw “what appeared to be a:
handgun.” ‘

Constable Neely put this:
down to the language officers*
are trained to use when mak- :
ing statements, and said that he :
is “certain” that Mr Mackey was ;
armed. i

The Coroner’s inquest®
will continue on Friday;
March 4. i
























ST

OF

WF cara

Others shouted at police that:
they had arrested the wrong
man and threatened that the
family would sue the govern;
ment and the police. ;

His mother and sister were.
visibly distraught claiming that
police had targeted Trembley,
for no reason. They claimed he
was not a trouble maker and
had never had any trouble with
the law. :

As he was led away, his sister
began sobbing, “Look at how
they taking my brother to jail.
for something he ain’ do. Look
how they make my brother
cry,” she said as he was led

“away with tears in his eyes.

%
i
Â¥



+


















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THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 11

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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



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LOCAL NEWS



Casting call
for Pirates of
the Caribbean

FOR those who enjoyed see-
ing friends and family immor-
talised on the big screen in the
blockbuster high stakes action
comedy, “After the Sunset,” and
have kicked themselves for miss-
ing the opportunity presented by
the action thriller, “Into the
Blue” filmed last year, fate has
presented another opportunity.

The long awaited sequels to
“Pirates of The Caribbean: The
Curse of the Black Pearl” is
about to begin shooting on
Grand Bahama and casting
director, Thomas Gustafon has
sent out a call for extras from

New Providence, Abaco and
Grand Bahama.

“Pirates of The Caribbean II

and III,” which will also be
directed by Gore Verbinski, is
looking for men and women of
all ages to portray sailors, pirates
and Asian seamen. :

In these long awaited sequels
Johnny Depp, who will return as
Jack Sparrow in the 17th Cen-
tury epic adventure, is caught up
in yet another web of supernat-
ural intrigue. The filming of the
sequels will take place primarily
on Grand Bahama and the cast-
ing director is actively searching





for weathered, working-class,
“charactery” faces. They have
expressed no need for the mod-
ern day, clean-cut look.

Craig Woods, Bahamas Film
Commissioner, is ecstatic to have
yet another blockbuster film
being shot on location in the
Bahamas so soon after the suc-
cessful run of “After the Sun-
set”, expected out on DVD this
month.

“Having films such as Pirates
of The Caribbean‘shot in the
Bahamas presents tremendous
opportunities for the local econ-
omy,” Mr Woods said. “The esti-
mated $10 million left behind by
New Line Cinemas after the
wrap up of ‘After the Sunset’ in
2003 clearly demonstrates the
potential the film business holds
for the country.”

Benefits

In addition to the direct eco-
nomic benefits, Mr Woods
added: “The promotional value
of these blockbuster films show-
casing our country’s pristine
beauty and infectious culture will -
continue to pay off for years to
come.” :

The New Providence castin
call for “Pirates of The
Caribbean IJ and III” will be
held on Friday March 4 in Gov-
ernors Ballroom A at the British
Colonial Hilton between Spm
and 8pm. The casting call on
Abaco is set for Sunday, March 6
at the Abaco Beach Resort in
Marsh Harbour from 1pm to
4pm.

All applicants residing outside
Grand Bahama are required to
have housing options there in
order to be considered.

Additional information or
instructions for submissions via
email can be found at
www.piratescasting.com.

SENIOR EXECUTIVES,
DEPARTMENT HEADS:

Building a high performance
team is not optional!
It is a matter of survival!

LANTE

UNIVERSITY

is offering two one-day workshops to help you
design and motivate your team

and maximize performance:

Powering Tearn Performance March 3rd
Build team confidence in a world of global competition;
encourage open consistent and constructive communication.

Accelerating Individual Potential

March 17th & April 7th

Build and strengthen your relationship with and among team
members; measure performances for more productivity; achieve
goals through set performance parameters.

Cost per workshop: $285.00 per person
(includes breaks, lunch, and seminar materials)

For registration details

telephone (242) 363-2000 ext 64270/6495 |
or email: atlantis.uinversity@kerzner.com

ATLANTIS UNIVERSITY

“Leading organizational change through a shared vision

in the pursuit of excellence”





THE TRIBUNE | | __ THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 13 |





H. Wayne Huizenga School
of Business and Entrepreneurship
ges

its Denes Speaker Series

acre) ay A. Pohliman, Ph.D.



Randolph A. Pohiman, Ph.D.,
dean of the H. Wayne Huizenga
School of Business and
Entrepreneurship, will discuss _
his theory of value-driven —
management, a fully integrated
philosophical approach to
managing and leading. Discover |

how this dynamic approach can —
add value to yourself, your
career, and your organization.





Thursday, March 10, 2005.
6:00 p.m.

British Colonial Hilton Hotel
Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas

This Distinguished Speaker Series is offered FREE of charge as a public
service by the Huizenga School of Nova Poe University. Seating

is united and by RSVP only.
WY

Reserve your place today NSU
fee | SOUTHEASTERN
by calling Laquel Miller at UNIVERSITY

(242) 364-6766, ext. 0. Berona the Classroom

Nova Southeastern University admits students of any race, color, and national or ethnic origin. " Nova Southeastern University is accredited by the
Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097, Telephone number:
404-679-4501) to award associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s, educational specialist, and doctoral degrees. 02-026/05 ESJ



THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005












& PART Il
WHAT’S
HAPPENING NOW

By DION A. FOULKES

Summit Academy

invites you to apply for the
2005/6 academic year!
















I AM deeply concerned
about the current direction of
public education in The
Bahamas and fearful that the
tremendous progress made
under the FNM Government
from 1992 to 2002 is being
seriously undermined.

Over the past three years
the Ministry of Education has
adopted policies which are
diminishing the ability of
teachers and administrators to
provide a quality education
for our children.

After many years of devel-
opment, the Bahamas Gener-










We are proud to offer:

¢ Student-centered environment
* A progressive approach to teaching and learning
© Fully air conditioned facility
e Updated computer lab and computers in
every classroom





¢ Small class sizes
¢ Diverse student population
° A challenging hands-on, inquiry-based curriculum
¢ Highly qualified educators
« Emphasis on math, science and technology

Telephone: (242) 356-5625/6
Additional information available at www.summitacademybahamas.com

Annual tuition rates range from $1300.00 to $2400.00 per term









i T.G. Glover students are now being taught in trailer classrooms.

higher average. But this will May 2002 not in March 2005,



al Certificate of Secondary

' . Education was introduced in

not give us a true picture

of how all our students are

as it is likely that the benefit
from the IDB may not come

1992. The BGCSE is the final doing. to fruition for at least: tw;
examination for secondary So when the cutrent! Minis- years.
school students. It replaced ter of Education, the Hon. —
the former General Certifi- Alfred Sears, announced that
cate of Education (GCE) _ he wished to achieve a nation-
examination which primarily al B grade average by 2006, I
assessed a student’s academic _ believe he did not understand
ability. our current system of exami-

The BGCSE is a well- nations. Or hé intends to
thought-out diagnostic exam- __ revert to the former selective
ination which, unlike the system. That, in my view,
GCE, is intended to evaluate would be regressive.
the overall ability of a student. The truth is, that if we

' Tt tests a student’s ability to improve the national grade
learn a particular subject and average of D to a D+ ina
also the student’s ability to _ three-year period, that would
apply that knowledge. This be an excellent accomplish-

gi T. G. GLOVER
DEBACLE
The demolition of tikes
entire school campus at T. G::
Glover by the PLP Govern- '
ment was, in my view, a mis-
take because it destroyed bad-
ly needed classrooms. vi
In 2001 when I was’ the:
Minister for Education, as a::
result of some safety concerns,
we had the Ministry of Works:
examine the T. G. Glover:
School. It was recommended

practical side of the BGCSE ment under our current sys- by Works and a private engi- -

“was a new concept which tem. ‘ ‘neering firm that the centre
should produce a better analy- The effect of the Minister’s building of the school be con- x
sis of a student’s overall abili- pronouncement can set the demned.

As a result, this portion of
the school was cordoned off.
However there were other
buildings on the. school
grounds deemed safe and
sound that were not closed.
These buildings were used to
accommodate Grades 4, 5 and
6, and we accommodated
grades 1, 2 and 3 at the Albury
Sayles Primary School in
proper classrooms.

At the time, there was a big
public outcry ‘from the oppo-
sition, especially from Mr.”

ty. Nilay: education system back many

5 years and it is my hope that
Policy

he will further analyze the
import of what he is attempt-

The following point needs
to be emphasized because it

ing to do.

Without any policy change,
is something that is often mis- it appears that teachers are
understood or not recognized. now reverting to the former
The BGCSE is a pluralistic or _ practice of selecting only the
open examination and isnon- brighter students to take the
selective. As a matter of poli- +. national exams.
cy, all students are encouraged = There was a 20 per cent
to take the maximum number reduction in the total number
of exams wherever possible.

This new policy drastically

of students taking the exam

last year and it is easy to imag-
_ changed the average national
grade for the examinations.

ine that this, in great part, is Sears, regarding unsafe and
attributed to the Minister’s
“iach ator (ahh gctlseionraminrdnmmemisicinnned GEE the old system, the Pest.
“students were selected to ta

unhealthy conditions.
oronouncement, This will pro- In contrast, the PLP. Gov-
“duce only a cosmetic improve- ernment ae oished the”
the GCE examinations. . ment, not an accurate overall entire school, including the
The previous selective poli-
cy resulted in a higher nation-
al grade average. However,

assessment. parts which were deemed safe.
this practice did not give a

and sound and. which were,
Purpose
realistic and accurate indica-°

accommodating half of the,
students. _ ‘
If the BGCSE is to serve They then took these same
tion of the ability of all the the purpose for which it was’ students from a safe environ-|
students. The BGCSE exami- created, then Minister Sears ment and proceeded to house
nation gives amore accurate andhisteamshouldadhereto them in trailer classrooms,
assessment of the abilities of | the parameters previously set. which is clearly a less safe and
our total student population. Otherwise, they should restate . a less healthy environment.

It would not be difficult to the policy on education that Currently, the. students at
produce a national B grade. his government intends to TT. G. Glover are crammed. in ©
average. All youhavetodois advance. trailer classrooms at Albury
select the top 10 percent of His current goal to attain Sayles School which is an
students in each grade to take a natiorial B average in three
the’ national exams, which years is clearly unrealistic
would automatically ensure a



that we are now accepting applications for 2005 - 2006

' academic year, tenable at:

® The College of The Bahamas |

e All accredited Tertiary level IInstitutions fechitarshis

alt does not include college prep)

“|e A limited number of scholarships are also available for
deserving students attenalng instiutions outside the

pceramaee sna i





Application forms can be collected from the offices of
Burns House Limited,
John F. Kennedy Drive.

Deadline for applications is May 15, 2005.

Sin LYNDEN PINDLING i
ARCHDEACON WILLIAM THOMPSON

QS

undesirable situation at. best.
unless it is achieved by revert-

Their playing area is small and
ing to the selective system. He

@CH GkLAR & HE littered with boulders and
. has not indicated that he

RIENDLY

TEL: 356-7100 ° FAX: 328-6094 ¢ friendlymotors@hotmail.com

2004 FORD EXPLORER

dangerous sharp-edged steel
debris. Our students. deserve

intends to do so this. In my better.
view a more realistic goal
would be to aim fora Caver- HLOW.MORALE

ALL indications are point-
ing to a breakdown in the
leadership and command
structure at the Ministry of
Education which is having a
debilitating effect on the oper-
ation of the schools and is also
negatively affecting the per-
formance of teachers. :

There seems to be a lack
of co-ordination between the
Ministry itself and the Depart-
ment of Education, which has

any significant additions to direct responsibility for the
schools nor constructed any management of the school sys-
new schools in their nearly tem. )
three years of governance, and This disconnect is sending:
there does not appear to be mixed signals to administra-
_ any movement in that direc-’ tors and teachers. Transfers
tion. and appointments of admin-
Generally speaking, the _istrators and teachers are not
construction of a new school now being effected through
. from inception to completion, the proper channels, resulting
takes approximately one year in long delays and untimely
to 18 months barring unfore- - notification to the individuals
seen events. affected. This is disruptive to
Therefore, if the govern- the system.

ment commenced construc- In order to have effective
tion of a new school now, in delivery of education in The
all probability it would notbe Bahamas there must be a
completed until the latter part mature and professional rela-
of 2006. This would mean that _ tionship between the key play-
for almost four and a half ersin the Ministry. Anything
years, there would be no _ short of this will result in our
‘meaningtul expansion in our children being deprived of an
school system, hence the over- _ effective system of education
crowding problem, which that all governments have an
seems unmanageable now, _ obligation to provide.

would be exacerbated.

The Ministry of Education STUDENT LOANS
announced just recently it was After winning the general
about to commence negotia- elections in 2002, the PLP

increased the burden of pay-

tions to obtain funding from
the Inter-American Develop- ment under the Government's |
Guaranteed Loan Scheme

age within six years.

@ OVERCROWDING

Overcrowding is becoming
a serious problem again. Iam
advised that in some primary
schools the classroom sizes are
near to 40 students, and at the
high school level nearing 45
in some schools.

This state of affairs is total-
ly unacceptable. The PLP
Government has not made





2004 FORD EXPLORER XLS LOADED 2004 FORD EXPLORER XLT LOADED
32,99 50 Special Price 36,99 500
LIMITED SUPPLIES, SO COME IN AND GET YOURS TODAY!

price includes lic & inspection to your birthday, first 5 services to
12000 miles, 24 roadside assistance, floor mats, full tank of gas,
. = 5 ment Bank (IDB) to fund the
2 year 30,000 mile warranty, rust protection & undercoating. construction of new schools. _ instituted by the FNM. With-,
out reasonable notice they |

' ; This is clearly an initiative
pte st co pera antec ems ng # which should have started in changed the polley to require ©

Special Price









THE TRIBUNE

IHUHRSDAY, MAHUN 3, cu, FAVE 15





parents to pay the entire 8 per
cent interest due on the loan
as opposed to the previous
equal 4 per cent split between
government and parent. This
has increased by 100 per cent
the cost of borrowing under
the scheme. fer

This change in the agrée-

ment by the PLP Government
has put a heavy burden on a
lot of parents, which in many
instances cannot be borne
solely by them.

Their finances simply will
not permit it. Consequently,
the loan payment default rate
this year has exceeded 60 per
cent which is worse than in
previous years.

Scheme

There has been some criti-
cism of the administration of.
the scheme. However, it is a
new and remarkable oppor-
tunity for many students to
get financial assistance for ter-

tiary education. The PLP gov- »

ernment awarded 1,354 schol-
arships between 1982 and
1991. ;

The FNM government
awarded 3,249 scholarships
between the corresponding
period of 1991-2001.

. .. Many progressive countries
are trying to make
tertiary education available
to all of their qualified stu-
dents. ,

We are not able to afford
this so the least we can do is to
make it easier for the parents
and students who are pre-
pared to pay for their ow
education.

I would urge the govern-
ment to review their decision
and revert to the previous split
interest system under the orig-
inal programme which could
help to reduce further delin-
auener cee rea Swe coe

I believe that public edu-
cation is heading in the wrong
direction. _

This trend must be reversed
in order to move our country

forward and to remain com-:

petitive in the world. .



@ THE closed gates of
T.G. Glover after the gov-
ernment had demolished
the school.

Currently, the students at
T. G. Glover are crammed
in trailer classrooms at
Albury Sayles School.













The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. Ney

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.












BOT aU

BE

aS UH td.)

i me TLL

tC ay eas

EL

CHICKEN
Sr ey

NASSAU

Nobody does it better!

<=
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OU
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get more for less: _
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& more!

Lio

ATER TEST AIEEE

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CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED : GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE





BIA STI OS

AB AR EME ED II

DT TE a se eee oe



PAGE 16, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005 ho . THE TRIBUNE.








Butler & Sands
Company Limited

+08

:

ae
Te
a faa

Dr Cane of 3 Boies Baskets Per Store



lace on Monday March 7, 2005
h, 2005
| Best Choices, Best Deals!
NASSAU | |

Caves Village, Shirley Street, Independence Highway, JFK Drive, Cable Beach Roundabout,

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WHILE SUPPLIES LAST..NO FURTHER DISCOUNT APPLICABLE ON THESE ITEMS.
PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY. |



“
t
of

THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY; MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 17

iy ~ ii
~







vehicle from point A to point B would be the

ed Baha



smart thing to do. Inde mians have been

taking advantage of this concept long before - (oe

“car pooling” was an internationally accepted

hae Se

practice.

Doing the smart thing and using common sense







‘ R {
“3 are two Bahamian traits that we must always |
2 ‘exercise when it comes fo drinking and driving. |
; ° \

Kalik reminds you to think before you drink...

cheers!







PAGE 18, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005 | THE TRIBUNE
L N Coakley ded | 7
students visit [77°
Dame Ivy

STUDENTS from the LN
Coakley High School, in
Exuma, posing, on February
25, in front of Government
House during a courtesy call
on Governor-General Dame
Ivy Dumont.























(BIS photo: Eric Rose)

share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.















Jacqueline is
the write stuff

MRS Jacqueline Myckle-
whyte, author, presenting
Dame Ivy Dumont Governor-

RE-BATH BAHAMAS General with a copy of her
“Bahamas Only One-day Bath Remodeler” book entitled, “The boy
Telephone (242) 393-8501 and his bottle” during a

courtesy call on Tuesday, Feb-
ruary 22, at Government
House.

The book, which is avail-



We can professionally install:

The Hu

Custom made tub and shower door enclosures.




Toilets, sinks and Acrylic Bathtub Liners. able in bookstores, is geared
toward youths. But Mrs Myck-
Quality “washerless” solid brass plumbing fixtures. _ lewhyte says “adults can
Solid Surface vanity tops and all wood vanity bases. rete ae ne ponies being
ge Bathtub drains and over flow assembly. _ She says the book is the first
es a in a series.
Le :
a (BIS photo: Lorenzo
oa * Lockhart)
i
Cea NAL Ce De ay ene O70 oF re FC nec eesssssssssssshessnnnsnnnnsnnnnnnsnenennnnnennnnenensees
‘l4atthe =| 2
‘Botanical =| §
Gardens :



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_ Havea Filet-O-Fish Extra Value Meal
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’m lovin’ it



Saees GONE THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 19’

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Home Fabrics, Godetts Jewelry.
FREEPORT: Dolly Madison Home Centre, GNC, Epic Battery, Play Time Sports

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PAGE 20, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005 “6 THE TRIBUNE. ?



=
THURSDAY EVENING MARCH 3, 2005

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(CC) : 3 (CC day Programming
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KTLA _ {ccc Teenage Witch |Prince of Bel-Air| Loves Raymond |"Ben? Her?” (CC) offers Frank Jr. a |Loves Raymond
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LIFE CAPTURE OF ANDREW LUSTER (2003, Crime Dra- |Heather Matarazzo. Townspeople rally behind teenage athletes accused
ma) Jason Gedrick, Marla Sokoloff. (CC) of rape. (CC)
tee Hardball {Countdown With Keith Olber- /MSNBC Investigates: To Love and| Scarborough Country
CC. mann ' to Kill
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Parents (CC) |SquarePants 1 - (CC) (cc) Bel-Air Bel-Air
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Stinct Beretta Tred Barta Journal
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ation (N) cle Car (N) Australia -- Practice. ‘Live
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Chandler go for a} Comedy) Mike Myers; Elizabeth Hurley, Michael York. A swinging spy
(CC) delivery girl. from the ’60s is thawed out in the ’90s. (CC)
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USA vestigation ©. |Benson and Stabler are put on the |Epps, Eva Mendes. A bounty hunter and his prey get mixed up in a dia- .
(CC) trail of a pedophile. (CC) ~ |mond scam. (CC) ,

VH1 Celebrity Obses-|VH1 Goes Inside “America’s Next) % % % SOUL FOOD (1997) Vanessa L. Williams, Vivica A. Fox, Nia

sion-Thin Top Model” 1 Long. Domestic troubles and illness threaten a close-knit family.

Home Improve- | * * ROCKY IV Seal aes ba Stallone, Talia Shire, Dolph + |WGN News at Nine 4 (CC) oS

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Loves Raymond and all reconsider their respective |take control of her life, she starts by |Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano

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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 21

The Tribune & Solomon's Mines

- FIRST PRIZE SECOND PRIZE THIRD PRIZE
$150.00 GIFT BASKET $100.00 GIFT BASKET $75.00 GIFT BASKET
In Each Age Group In Each Age Group Ta} ahaha Age Group -



ope) eS aS

1. Children ages 4-5, 6-8, and 9-10. Staff members and relatives are not eligible to enter.

2. Coloring may be done with crayons. Adults or older child may assist the child in filling out the entry form, BUT NOT IN COLORING THE ENTRY

3. Enter as much times as you wish. All entries must be in The Tribune by 4pm on Monday, March 21st, 2005. Winners will be announced Wednesday,
March 23, 2005. Look for your names in The Tribune or listen to IOOJAMZ / JOY FM to hear your name.

4. There will be one first-prize winner, one second-prize winner and one third- -prize winner in €ach age groups.

5. All entries become the property of The Tribune and may be used for any purpose including, but not limited to, publication in a future issue.

“NO PHOTOCOPIES. USE NEWSPAPER AD ONLY”



Child’s Name: Parent/Guardian Signature

Address: | toes Tel: ___Age:

Sovouon’s Mie

ata oor EW 3
Available At All Solomon’ s wines Locations.



os



PAGE 22, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005 THE TRIBUNE |





~~ COMICS PAGE



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gllogy?

A Bright Start

BR

Great Books for










promos

will launch an innovative new ser
our Newspaper in Education Literac
the reading habits of our children





2 HSA wer Ea

Breakfast Serials chapters are short, engaj
keeps coming back for more.
























written by Avi
illustrated by Brian Floca

The Secret School is a story
about kids by award-winning
American children’s author,
Avi. It’s about the kind of
one-room schoolhouses that
used to exist in American ‘
communities, as well as many

Bahamian settlements.














The story is set in the 1920s.
When the regular teacher of a
rural schoolhouse must leave, bringing an early school clos-
ing, the children decide to take over, secretly. But they

Sat oP Cah eres er et at

encounter many problems along the way.

The suggested reading level is grade 4-8, and the Secret

atsteren

School is a great read aloud for all ages.

tat at ete

Avi—a name given to him by his twin sister—was born in
Brooklyn, New York, in 1937. Though he struggled with English
in high school, by the time he left, Avi had decided to become a

writer. In 1970, his first book was published and since then he
has published more than 50 acclaimed books for young people.

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PAGE 24, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL NEWS

‘oncerns over Haitian
police ahead of elections



Ambassador pays courtesy call

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”



Politicians stop for
a morning chat

THESE well-known political opponents took off their gloves for a quick and friendly chat ear-
ly-one morning last week. Prime Minister Perry Christie (left) is pictured with opposition leader
Alvin Smith (second left), former FNM MP Dion Foulkes (second right) and former prime min-
ister Hubert Ingraham (right). The men were exercising on the Cable Beach median when they
ran into each other and stopped-for an impromptu chat. Veteran photographer Peter Ramsay,
whose camera is never far, caught this curious meeting on camera.

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Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street









But investors and Disney hopeful problems will be solved for movies that promise $30m economic injection



Pirates of the Caribbean
films placed in jeopardy |

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he filming sched-

ule for Disney’s

$400. million-bud-

get Pirates of the

Caribbean II and
III movies has been placed in
potential jeopardy by the failure
of Grand Bahama-based Gold
Rock Creek Enterprises to
secure a lease from the Gov-
ernment for the site upon which
they will build their $76 million
film studio complex.

‘A substantial portion of the
films is due to be shot at Gold
Rock Creek’s shooting tanks in
Grand Bahama, particularly the

’ water-based and underwater
scenes. .

But Ken Russell, the FNM
MP for High Rock, yesterday
told the House of Assembly

Minister [TPRVMECE mots

o.¢usetme Isle of Capri

that the investors behind the
development had been unable

‘to start full construction at the

site because they had been wait-
ing to agree a lease with the
Government for the past two
years.

As a result, the trio behind

the film studios - Hans Schutte, ©

Paul Quigley and Michael
Quigley - were said by Mr Rus-
sell to be considering whether to

‘pull out of their Bahamian

investment, which would force
Disney to film Pirates of the
Caribbean I and IIT elsewhere.

The delay over signing the
lease - and the subsequent con-
struction hold-up - has imposed
immense pressure on Disney’s
already-tight schedule, with
filming set to begin in the
Bahamas this May and be com-
pleted by January 2006. Mr
Russell yesterday expressed

report
on BISX

by Friday

By NEIL 4ARTNELL
Tribune © ..siness Editor

JAMES SMITH, minister of
_ state for finance, yesterday told
;The Tribune he expected to
‘receive the report on how to
implement recommendations
for revitalising the Bahamas
International Securities
Exchange (BISX) this Friday.
"Mr Smith said Julian Francis,
the Central Bank of the
Bahamas governor who is head-
ing the Implementation Com-
‘mittee, had promised him earli-
‘er this week that the report
“would be delivered by that date.
The fact that the minister has
yet to receive the report is like-
ly to surprise both the BISX
‘board and the exchange’s 45
-private shareholders who, it is
‘understood, were under the
impression that it had already
been completed.
Mr Smith yesterday told The

Tribune that once the report
was received, it would be
analysed internally at the Min-
istry of Finance before being
presented to the Cabinet.

He explained that he and his

' team would look at. the recom-

mendations and the timelines
for implementing them, seeing
whether any ideas had been
omitted, if some were not pos-
sible and if the implementation
of some might have to be

‘delayed.

After this process had been
completed, Mr Smith said the
report would taken “to Cabi-
net and see what they say”.
However, he was unable to give
a timeframe for when the BISX
report might make it on to the
Cabinet agenda.

Mr Smith said the report had
involved a “two track” process
to some extent, with the Central

See REPORT, Page 6B

Credit unions
are advised to

reduce rates —

. By YOLANDA
_ DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter

Bahamas-registered credit
-unions and cooperatives that
_ engage in lending and deposit

taking have been advised to

reduce interest rates immedi-
, ately, Nathaniel Adderley,
_ director of Cooperative Devel-

opment, said yesterday.

Notified of the Central Bank

of the Bahamas’ reduction in

_ the Discount rate by 50 basis
points to 5.25 per cent, which
' has influenced a reduction in

deposit and lending rates with-
in the financial services industry,
Mr Adderley said all credit
unions were expected to fully
comply in reducing their inter-
est rates. They were expected
to implement a reduction in
deposits and lending rates
where applicable.

The reduction is also expect-
ed to include reduced rates on
all new deposits and credit facil-
ities, on existing fixed deposits
as they are renewed, and on
existing savings accounts as

See RATES, Page 2B

MP says investors behind Grand Bahama

multi-million film studio where movies _

to be shot threatening to pull out due
to lease problems with government

hope that the Gold Rock pro-
ject would proceed “so the con-
tract with Disney can be ful-.
filled”.

Disney is understood to have
become increasingly agitated
with what it perceives as. gov-
ernment foot-dragging on its
project. However, The Tribune

understands that both the Gold —

Rock Creek investors and the
film company are still confident
that the lease issue will be
resolved speedily and the

By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX .
Senior Business Report

Paul Major, Baham:

managing director, yesterday

told The Tribune that the ¢
rier was about to sign a b
seat agreement with Isl

Capri for its Our Licaya casino
on Grand Bahama, dismissing

concerns that a Delta Connec-

tion airline’s addition of two

daily round-trip flights between
Nassau and Fort Lauderdale
would further add to competi-
tive pressures.

Mr Major said he embraced

Pirates of the Caribbean II and
II will proceed as planned.

It seems inconceivable that
the Gold Rock Creek project
will fail, given that its Heads of
Agreement was the first invest-
ment deal signed by the PLP
administration after it took
office in summer 2002.

The Pirates of the Caribbean
II and III project was also per-
sonally touted by Prime Minis-
ter Perry Christie during his
speech to the Grand Bahama

Chamber of Commerce last
month, which described the
agreement between the Gov-
ernment and Disney. The films
would provide a major boost
for Grand Bahama’s economy,
which is treading water in the
wake of the hurricanes and
Royal Oasis saga, injecting at

least $30 million into it.

Mr Christie said then: “The
Minister of Tourism has advised
me that so far, to date, Disney is
committed to 16,000 room



HERE’S THE LOW-COST DIGITAL

|) Paul Major

nights as a part of this produc-
tion. It is anticipated that the
room nights could exceed

* 30,000 room nights as addition-

al technical people are brought
in for these productions..

“From our estimates, these
two motion pictures will cause
some $30 million to be spent on
Grand Bahama Island.” Mr
Russell yesterday said that 1200
workers would be employed at
Gold Rock Creek on a full-time
basis when it was completed,
with a total of 3,000 hired dur-
ing filming times.

Mr Christie added that Mr
Quigley and his partners had
set the stage for attracting more
motion pictures to film in the
Bahamas. ee

The Prime Minister said, yes-
terday, though that the delays

See FILM, Page 2B




competition, adding that

Bahamasair was attracting an
additional 20-30,000 tourist
passengers per year. He. said
that to date, Bahamasair was
matching or beating every oth-
er carrier - legacy or low-cost -
in the Florida market in terms
of price.

"I believe in competition,
free enterprise. Bahamasair,
like any other business, must
be able to effectively com-
pete,” Mr Major said.

“We are doing all that we
can do to position us to do just .

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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





Well-executed website

can raise capital return
Making IT Work

well-imple-
mented website
.- can extend the

“reach of your
business. and
yield an excellent return on



Investment.

In my last articlé; the various
types of websites were discussed
and how they apply to your

Sets

Ene ue en EL}

$330,000
3 Bed, 2 Bath;
4 bed 3 1/2 bath
3,000 sq. ft. Home (4)
up to B$25,000.00 Gift

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ae

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business. In today’s article, I
will outline the process required
to provide your customers with
access to key business functions
and services.

Identify Your Objectives
’ The first step to taking your

‘business online is to determine

what it is you want your website
to achieve. J recommend that
you form a small team to brain-
storm ideas for your website.
The focus should not be on
technology, but rather on the
business functions that are a pri-
ority to take online.

These functions could include

online ordering, customer

access to account information,
delivery of statements and

‘ online payments.

The key is to identify which

functions, if placed online, have

the potential to yield better cus-

_tomer service, thereby deliver-

ing a return on investment in

increased revenue and/or in
reduced costs.

Documenting your require-

ments is essential. This‘ docu-
ment will serve several purpos-
es, including ensuring that all
your requirements are met dur-
ing the development process.

Identify Your Audience

Determine who will be visit-
ing your website. Will the audi-
ence be local, international or
both? Consider the language;
you may require that your web
site support both English and
Spanish. The audience of your
website will have a direct bear-
ing on how it is marketed, and
therefore the cost.

Realign Your Business
Processes

Any-website that provides
services online will almost
always require changes in your
existing business processes.

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These changes can be simple or
more involved.

A good example of this is
Bank of the Bahamas Interna-
tional. This organisation created
a new counter at all of their
branches for online banking

customers to pick up their

online requests. This ensures
their customers receive the
quick and efficient service
intended by the implementa-
tion of their website.

Develop Website
When selecting a provider to
assist you with developing your
website, my advice is to review
their work and speak with their
clients. Take a look at the qual-
ity and professionalism of the
websites they have developed.
Additionally, you should exam-
ine the complexity of the work
that they have performed to
ensure they have the required
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Providence
Technology Group

effective website is one where
the company is constantly think-
ing about ways in which it can
provide a return on investment.
To provide feedback on this
column, please e-mail makin-
el Twork@providencetg.com

tives.

Just because your website is
up and running does not mean
your work is done. As visitors
begin to use your website, they
will come to expect and demand
more from your website. You
should always endeavour to
enhance your website to retain
your competitive advantage.

About the Author: Alexan-
der J. Hanna is vice-president of
Software Solutions at Provi-
dence Technology Group, one
of the leading IT firms in the
Bahamas. Providence Technol-
ogy Group specialises im Net-
working Solutions, Consulting
and Advisory Services and Soft-
ware Solutions.

Conclusion

For many companies, a web- -
site is seen as an expense. How- -
ever, websites are an invest-
ment. The foundation of an



Film (From pagé 1B)

over the lease related to.the fact that the Government and Gold -
Rock Creek principals could not agree on whether the contract -
should contain stipulations on how the investors treated the envi-
ronment.

_ Mr Christie added that the Government’s legal advisers had
told him that including the Heads of Agreement, which contains
environmental conditions, in the lease terms did not bind Gold

- Rock Creek to preserving the environment.

The lease negotiations are being handled by the Ministry of _
Financial Services and Investments. The original Heads of Agree-
ment signed between the Government and the investors only said
that a lease for the former US missile base site “will” be signed.

The Tribune revealed on October 28 last year that Disney had
committed to shoot “more than 50 per cent” of the two sequels to
the original Pirates of the Caribbean blockbuster in the Bahamas,
paving the way for this nation to establish itself as a major pro-
duction location.

Apart from the Gold Rock Creek water tank, Disney will also
film Pirates of the Caribbean II and IIT scenes on an island off
Little Exuma.

Mr Quigley said then that the water tank would have to be
ready for May, giving the company just two months now to com-
plete it.

He said: “We’re trying to have as much of the studio infrastruc-
ture in place for when Disney arrives for the first day of principal
photography.”

In addition to the shooting tank, Gold Rock Creek will also
provide production office space, production support areas and at
least one of the main sound stages.

Some 400-600 persons will be needed to shoot the movies, and Mr
Quigley said: “I think it’s going to really open the floodgates in
terms of the Bahamas as a production location. Now, with the

' infrastructure coming on side, it will be even more helpful and

bring about the whole training aspect of what we’re doing.

“It’s terribly important that you train as many Bahamians as
you can, as the costs of bringing in labour are not economically
viable. We’re looking to build an indigenous film industry like
Ireland.”

Mr Quigley also told The Tribune last year: “It’s really wonder-
ful creating an indigenous film industry and creating a new indus-
try for the Bahamas, and not be so reliant on tourism. There will be
another industry bringing i in significant dollars. It’s a win-win situ-
ation for everyone.’

Rates (From page 1B)

soon as possible, Mr Adderley said.

He added that where existing loans, including mortgages, qual-
ified for interest rate adjustments, these were also expected to be
made as soon as the contractual terms or applicable arrangement
permitted.

Mr Adderley said further that in view of fixed operating expens-
es, credit unions should adjust deposit rates in a carefully bal-
anced fashion to minimise short-term shrinkage in net interest
income.

He urged institutions to also follow the general direction of
movement in interest rates in the banking and financial services sec-
tor, to gain strategic advantage in attracting new business.

Mr Adderley said: “Credit unions are encouraged to adopt and
adhere to sound and balanced growth strategies. To do otherwise
could have destabilising consequences on the operating perfor-
mances of the cooperative sector."

Credit union officials have been advised to communicate with
their membership and customers regarding both the timing of,
and the methodology, of the interest rate adjustments. They were
told that they should: also indicate which existing facilities will be
affected.

Mr Adderley said he expects uniformity throughout the credit
union sub-sector, and that greater regulatory monitoring could be
expected going forward.



To advertise in
The Tribune

call 322-1986





THE TRIBUNE





Borrowers told
to keep mortgage
payments at thel

urrent levels

Morigage broker says this will
lead to early retirement of loan,
rather than take advantage of
interest rate reduction

By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter

leading mort-
gage analyst
yesterday
praised the

Central Bank
’ of the Bahamas for reducing its
Discount Rate, saying the econ-
omy would see significant
growth in the short to mid-term
due to the decrease in the cost
of borrowing money.

In an interview with The Tri-
bune, Troy Sampson, a principal
with Approved Lending Ser-
vices, said that from a macro-
economic perspective, the Cen-
tral Bank's decision to reduce
the Discount rate by 0.5 per
cent to 5.25 per cent was likely
to stimulate economic activity
in the construction, banking and
other ancillary markets in the
next 18 to 30 months.

Driven by what officials
describe as excess liquidity in



the Bahamian banking system -
and the "buoyant" outlook...

forthe economy, including
Bahamian foreign reserves
being at an all time high, the
effect of reduced interest rates
will also mean an upswing in
the activity in new mortgages, as
persons look to take advantage
of the new lending rates.

A spillover effect from an
upsurge in construction will also
mean greater demand for build-
ing supplies, increased imports
and a demand for workers in
the construction industry, Mr
Sampsc) said.

He aaded: “Our outlook is
that in -ddition to the foreign
investments - from the Atlantis
Phase III project to the one in
Guana Cay, Abaco, Bimini and
the Exumas, and the other
tourisn.-related projects, the

reduction in the prime rate will
bolster not just developments
in the tourism sector. Prior to
that, the country will get the
benefits of increased construc-

-tion projects, and other auxil-

iary developments such as
entrepreneurial endeavours and
start-up ventures, which tend to
drive economic growth at the
local level."

In the US, a leading econom-
ic indicator is the number of
construction starts during any
given period. For the Bahamas,
Mr Sampson said, to the extent
that lower interest rates allow
more people to qualify for
mortgage loans and homes are
built, this also indicates the
economy is heading in the right
direction.

“What our finding is, is that
this reduction in the cost of bor-
rowed monies should be a tem-

porary stop-gap measure

impacting the rising cost of real
estate, and that is not necessar-
ily stopping prices from rising,
but allowing people to qualify

. for a purchase because the mon-

ey needed to purchase the land
is easier to get,” he added.

- From a social perspective, Mr
Sampson said, one of the bene-
fits of increased home owner-
ship among Bahamians is the
creation of a stable family envi-
ronment and stable communi-
ties. It also increases the level
of commitment employees have
to their jobs, creating a sense
of responsibility and support-
ing long-term planning.

Any number of mortgage
brokerage campaigns have been
launched since the Central
Bank's rate reduction. And one
of the immediate things the rate
change means for Bahamian
consumers is that borrowing
money has become cheaper
because the interest rate is the

AGENT ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

| Security & General
Insurance Company Ltd.

is seeking to emmploy a

SR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

to assist in the proceduarl maintenance of

angency accounts. Salary will

commensurate with experience.

Candidates should have:

e 5 years or more experience in
underwriting General Insurance

¢ Strong project management, leadership

real cost of borrowing money.

Mr Sampson explained that
banks get the funds they lend
to consumers from two sources;
as a result of savings deposits
and through the Central Bank.

Savings deposits, or the mon-
ey that is deposited into the
bank by depositors for a not
substantial return in interest,
does not always supply the
amount of money needed by -
clearing banks to conduct their
business. The Central Bank fills
the gap by agreeing to lend
money to the banks at the Dis-
count rate and, while it is not
legislated, banks in turn have
historically pegged the cost of
lending money to that rate,
which was 5.75 per cent.

The lending policy of most
members of the Clearing Banks

Association and other lending .

institutions involved adding
about 3 percentage points on to
monies being lent to residential
mortgage clients, giving the con-
sumer an average interest rate
of around 9 per cent.

The recent decision by the
Central Bank to reduce the Dis-
count rate by 50 basis points,
or 0.5 per cent, was followed by
the clearing banks adjusting the
Bahamian prime rate by 0.5 per
cent to 5.5 per cent.

"Now that the Central Bank's
rate has dropped, people who
marginally were unable to qual-
ify for a loan, all things being
equal, should be able to qualify.
If they ‘were under-qualified by
$200 to $300, then the interest’
rate reduction should help them
because the cost of borrowing
has been reduced,” Mr Samp-
son said.

He added that the lower rates
now being seen at Family
Guardian and Bank of the
Bahamas International, at 7.25
and 7.5 respectively, are cam-
paigns done so banks can see a
spike in their business. These
especially low rates, however,
will not be sustained for a long
period of time.

The decline in interest ratse
will also impact those who
would have qualified for a loan
under the pre-reduction rate.
These consumers will likely be
able to qualify for an even
greater amount. Mr Sampson
cautioned, however, that this
does not mean persons should
borrow more, but ‘it did allow
the consumer to upgrade

aspects of his project if he

wished to do so.

For persons who are in the
middle of a mortgage, the rates
are also expected to have a pos-

See LOAN, Page 7B

Bis

Pricing Information As Of: :
2 March 2005



Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund

Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

' Bahamas Waste

British American Bank

Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Doctor's Hospital

Famguard
Finco.

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson
Kerzner International BDRs

A leading banking institution is seeking to fill the position of

THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 3B













J OB VACANCY

MANAGER

NOTICE

Would the owner of Lot
Nos. 28,29,30,31 & 32
in Mount Airy Subdivision

off Hawkins Hill Directly in

Back of
Pat Strachan Realty Sales,
Dr. Joseph Evans and Dr.
| Minnus PLEASE
contact Patrick § trachan at
_ Telephone: 323-1983

| Information Technology Services

Responsibilities.

The Manager, Information Technology Services, will be responsible for:

e planning, directing and cootdinating the human, financial and physical resources
of the information fechiolozy department, to ensure the quality of service

provided. |

overseeing and developing all scehnalogy related systems, to include but not
limited to telecommunications and security systems.

determining, planning and controlling the use of current and emerging technologies

to improve existing business practices, institutional effectiveness and
internal/external customer satisfaction

Qualifications, Knowledge and Experience Requirements

* . overseeing and developing. all technology related systems, to include but not
limited to telecommunications and security systems.

Qualifications, Knowledge and Experience Requirements

Master’s degree i in Computer Science, Information Technology or related

discipline.

IT industry related certifications desisable.

Expert knowledge and understanding of: systems analysis, development and

planning methods.

Demonstrated experience in managing a network environment that includes
Windows Server2003 services, Microsoft Exchange2003, Lotus Notes/Domino,

Windows XP, hardware firewalls and VPN appliances.

Proficiency in the use of programming languages (e.g.. Visual Basic, C++, Java)
Proficiency in developing, Haplem ening: integrating and managing expert

systems. ©

Experience inn iSeries/OS400 platform desirable.

Comprehensive knowledge of database management’ preferred.
Knowledge ofthe application of Web based technologies desirable.
Excellent and demonstrated team building and project management skills.

Excellent communication skills, both written and oral.

Seven (7)-years of progressive experience in managing the delivery of modern

‘enter prs technology services.

Terms and Conditions

The position is being offered ona contractual basis for a period of five years, with

standard benefits. °

How to apply

Qualified candidates should submit their curriculum vitae and references to:

The Manager, Human Resources

c/o Box... -
The Nassau Guardian

The deadline for applications is 11 March, 2005.

‘Colina

Financial A duteors Ltd.

Previous Close



Jlinaaa

CE
Weekly Vol.

and verbal skills

Cast | Price
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00
D Holdi 0.00 * -O
ani hk) LE
13.00
0.35



e Fundamental computer proficiency

Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings
oS



Resumes should be submitted by March

Last 12 Months Yield %

Div $

Fund Name



' 1.1529 Colina Money Market Fund 1.209527*

15, 2005, and addressed 1.9423 ‘Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.1105 ***
10.2648 10.0000 Fidelity Prime income Fund 10.2602***"* _.

2.1746 2.0524 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.166020**



Colina Bond Fund

....

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share pald in the last 12 months

PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

- AS AT JAN. 31, 2005/ **** - AS AT DEC. 31, 2004

AS AT FEB. 11, 2005/ - AS AT JAN 31, 2005/ ***** AS AT JAN. 31, 2005




Attn:

HR - Account Executive Position
P.O. Box N-3540
Nassau, Bahamas



YIELD - tast 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningfal
FINDEX< - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1904 = 100










PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





Government to ‘limit’
Hotels Incentive Act |







QUEEN’S COLLEGE

Centre for Further Education

ooerees,
ae ee

a + p> (







P.O. Box N-7127, Nassau. Bahamas
Tel (242) 393-1666, 393-2153, 393-2646
Fax# {242} 393-3248



/ENING







COMPUTER ghee
CLASSES a |
Pric






"Beginners Package i S264




_ Executive Package

| : Individual





Course are six {6} weeks long



Beginners Word



$180

ESSENTIALS OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Small Business

on your mind this
New Year?





Queen's College

introduces the

Essentials of entrepre:

An Beek Certificate Course





Own Sriall Business Vertue ‘
ang Monday Mar 07, S005 GOS p.m.
Contact CFE ADMINISTRATOR or email cfe@qchenceforth.com wavww.qchenceforth, cont



TERM DATE: March 07 — May 14, 2005 -













EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
_ FINANCIAL INTELLIGENCE UNIT



career with the Financial Intelligence



Director and the Financial Intelligence
Intelligence Unit Act 2000.

POSITION: LEGAL COUNSEL
RESPONSIBLE TO: DIRECTOR
QUALIFICATIONS: The successful applicant must:





Unit Act 2000.



¢ Be a Counsel & Attorney-at-Law in the
Commonwealth of The
of 5 years Call.



KEY RESPONSIBILITIES




of legislative developments relative to its functions.



legal issues affecting the Financial Intelligence Unit.




- Office of the Attorney General relative to legal issues affecting the
Financial Intelligence Unit.




4. Responsible for the provision of assistance in the training of industry
participants in the Financial Service Sector in accordance with the
provisions of the Financial Intelligence Unit Act 2000.




5. Responsible for drafting of legal documents for Memoranda of
Understanding between the Financial Intelligence Unit and foreign
Financial Intelligence Units.





of the Financial Intelligence Unit as required by the Director.

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS & EXPERIENCE:




¢ Five years call to the Bahamas Bar

e Experience in Compliance, Civil, Criminal & Corporate Law, Assets
Tracing & Forfeiture.

¢ Excellent attitude, punctuality and attendance.

REMUNERATION PACKAGE








¢ Competitive salary commensurate with experience
¢ 15% gratuity upon successful completion of contract



the relevant certificates to:



The Director,
Financial Intelligence Unit
Third Floor, Norfolk House

Frederick Street
Nassau, The Bahamas















Secretary Package | S34e $320
ae arrennnernareennsanaernntantannnAteneelb POA PCOCCC ARRAN Cerererece staan
P $320













This position provides an excellent opporianity for an individual seeking a meaningful

The successful candidate would be responsible for the provision of legal advice to the
nit relative to its functions under the Financial

* Be appointed in writing by the Minister responsible
for the administration of the Financial Intelligence









ahamas with a minimum

1. Responsible for ensuring that the Financial Intelligence Unit is kept abreast
2. Responsible for making recommendations to the Director relative to the

3. Responsible for liaison between the Financial Intelligence Unit and the

6. Repos for assisting with other duties relative to the proper functioning





Interested persons should submit their application and resume in writing along with

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Prime Minister
yesterday said the
Government was
looking at placing
a “limit” on how
many investment projects qual-

ified for the Hotels Encourage- ~

ment Act, describing many
resort developments in the
Family Islands as “mixed
resorts” that involed small
hotels alongside a major real
estate component. .

Mr Christie told The House
of Assembly: “We. must limit
the application of the Hotels
Encouragement Act to. these
mixed resort developments.”

The Hotels Encouragement
Act provides a number of cus-
toms duty and tax exemptions
for investors constructing new
hotels, plus existing resorts
seeking to renovate or upgrade
their properties.

However, a number of
recently-approved Family
Island resort developments
have a relatively small number
of hotel rooms, instead being
heavily reliant on dividing land
up into residential lots and then
selling it - principally to foreign
second home owners - to gen-
erate cash flow that will fund
the construction of the hotel, a
marina, spa and other facilities.
As a result, observers have
argued that many investments
are really engaged in land spec-
ulation, acquiringCrown land
cheaply.

Meanwhile, Discovery Land
Company, the San Francisco-
based real estate development
company that is the lead
investor behind the $400 mil-
lion Great Guana Cay project in

Abaco; was yesterday described’
as “the real deal” by observers. |:
The company has teamed up"

Deloitte
& Touche

with a consortium of Abaco-
based businessmen calling
themselves the Passerine Part-
ners.

The group is understood to
be headed by John Head, own-

er of the Abaco Inn, and also ~

includes Fred Gottlieb, the
attorney, former FNM parlia-
mentarian and ex-Bahamasair
chairman.

Also involved in the devel-
opment is Abaco businessman
Gary Sawyer and Bahamas
Realty executive, Larry
Roberts.

One source said of Discov-
ery Land: “They lokk like the
real deal. But they’re going to
get no end of trouble” from the
Save Guana Cay Reek envi-
ronmental lobby.

On its website, Discovery
Land names its Great Guana
Cay project as Baker’s Bay Golf
and Ocean-Club, featuring six
mils of beachfront, a private

‘marina (240 slips), beach club

and spa, and. an 18-hole Tom
Fazio designed golf course. It

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Enterprise Risk Services - Control Assurance Senior Consultant/Manager



adds that there will also be a
Caribbean seaport village resort
component, a reference to the
75-room luxury villa style hotel

' the developers announced yes-

terday.

Discovery Land’s Great Gua-
na Cay development appears to
follow the model it has estab-
lished in the US, where a top

class golf course - usually Tom.

Fazio designed - is linked to a
private, gated residential com-
munity targeted chiefly at high
net worth individuals and their
families.

Among the projects that Dis-

covery Land has completed are

CordeValle Golf Club and
Lodge in California; Gozzer
Ranch Golk and Lake Club in
Idaho; Mountaintop Golf and
Lake Club in North Carolina;
Tron Horse Golf Club in Mon-
tana; and Kukio Golf and
Beach Club in Hawaii. The
company is also engaged in
developing El Dorado Golf and
Beach Club in Los Cabos, Mex-
ico. es

Well established firm ‘seeks an IT Auditor manager/senior consultant for its Enterprise Risk

Services Practice.

RESPONSIBILITIES }

Identify and evaluate business and technology risks, internal controls which mitigate risks,
and related opportunities for internal control improvement

Assist in selecting and tailoring approaches, methods and tools to support services
Actively participate in training efforts

Actively participate in decision making with engagement management and seek to understand
the broader impact of current decisions

Generate innovative ideas and challenge the status quo
Facilitate use of technology-based tools or methodologies to review, design and/or implemen

products and services

Build and nurture positive workin

client expectations

g relationships with clients with the intention to exceed

Understand clients' business environment and basic risk management approaches
Play substantive/lead role in engagement planning, economics, and billing
Participate in proposal development and sales efforts

QUALIFICATIONS

3+ years experience in the areas of public accounting, internal auditing or consulting

Bachelors degree in Business Administration, Accounting, Computer Science, Information
Systems Administration or related field. MBA or dual-degree is an asset

CISA, CPA, CIA designation or desire and dedication to pursue

Advanced understanding of business processes, internal control risk management, IT controls

and related standards

Proven analytical skills with ability to tackle problems systematically to determine causes
and produce effective solutions

Experience with accounting control related issues

Demonstrated ability to plan and manage engagements along with ensuring deliverables
meet work plan specifications and deadlines

Ability to thrive in an environment of pressing deadlines and constantly changing conditions
Successful experience identifying controls, developing and executing test plans
Ability to synthesize information and produce concise synopses/summaries

Excellent written and oral communication skills including both technical and business writing,
documentation and presentation skills

Open to travel requirements
Experience with ACL is an asset

_ Experience with COSO and/or Sarbanes-Oxley an asset
Technical and/or management background in technical systems/environments an asset

COMPENSATION

e¢ Compensation is negotiable based on combination of years experience and qualification.
’

Interested persons should submit their resumes before March 18, 2005.
HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT
P. O. BOX N-7120
NASSAU, BAHAMAS



oF



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

THURSDAY, MARCH 3,



The College of the Bahamas is now taking definite and well-considered steps towards
becoming a university. An important part of the process is the revision of The :
College’s Strategic Plan. To guide the review and recommendations, the President :
has established the nine task forces, with requisite charges, that are listed below.
If you are interested in giving input, write us a brief letter indicating the task force :
on which you wish to serve and what skills you would bring to the exercise. Please :
attach a current resume. Kindly note that for many practical reasons, including :
efficiency, task force memberships must be limited, so if you wish to be considered, :

please send in your request NOW.

De-dline for Response March 11, 2005

For further information or delivery of letters and resumes:
Office of Research, Planning & Development

Rm 117, Administration Building

Oakes Field Campus

Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone: 302-4308

Fax: 323-7803

1. Task Force for Educational Technology

the link between the University and all satellite and residential campuses.

2. Task Force for Imaging for International Culture and Global Outreach

internationally recognized prestigious university.

The group will analyze all College procedures and practices relative to its charges
as they relate to recruitment and admission of students; recruitment and appointment
of administrators, faculty and staff in order to advance the University’s diverse }
complexion. Additionally, the task force should present plans for identifying ;
scholarship, talent, athletic competitions and civic and social opportunities for students i
designed to market and promote the College/University as an institution’ that’is
receptive and responsive to serving a multicultural and multicultural and multiracial
: Deliberations should also include an analysis of the current structure of departments,

i schools and/or colleges. If modifications, restructuring, or consolidations seem
| warranted, the appropriate recommendations should be advanced through the task
_£ forces report.
: . | Additionally, this Task Force should nheseut a student/faculty ratio report for each ©
Charges: Present and assess the executive and managerial operations in various
areas such financial-aid and scholarships; the registration and graduation processes :
with specific focus on the freshman; transfer and continuing student registration :
procedures; student accounts procedures; administrative computing services; requisition :
and purchases; processes for decision-making; the development of plans designed }
to engage The College in total quality control; and organizational and staff development :
s¢ structure that it ensures that administrative efficiency and effectiveness permeate }
the College/University community. Additionally, this group is charged with analyzing ;
and assessing the delivery of services to students and potential students in the areas }
of financial aid, recruitment and admissions and student accounts procedures. The :
Task Force report should clearly delineate criteria recommended for updating, :
upgrading and expanding programmes and services including technology, training }

student population.

3. Task Force for Administrative Efficiency and Effectiveness

and organizational design.

4, Task Force for Facilities

ambience; and c) projecting future needs in facilities.

Capital construction and renovations for programmes, in light of enrollment
management, changing foci of scholarship-service-teaching, continuing professional :
development, and creating an optimum educational environment for students, faculty :

9. Task Force for The Bahamas Higher Education Act

and staff are key areas which will impact the development, expansion and enhancement
for future facilities.

Criteria should be developed for assessing and evaluating épamnum use of facilities
and the need for future construction and renovation. The task force report should :
| reflect comments from the College/University community relative to plans for :

facilities.

5. Task Force for Research



#
B ae
By —_ a
a iy ey
enthilbeamat eohlbus bbe wblonwel



Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

vii) Collaboration with Government and International Researchers/Agencies d)Review .
the relationship among the several entities, including the Field Stations, engaged in
research activities and recommend the relationship and policies 1 in the University of
The Bahamas e) Recommend the role of the university in coordinating research
activities within the country.

6. Task Force for Student Body

: Charges: Examine current conditions of student life as they relate to recruitment
: and admissions procedures, scholarship opportunities, student retention, student

_} organisations and on-campus activities, career placement, and graduate and professional
: schools preparation. Additionally, I would like for you to analyze the academic
i support programmes available to students and advance, through your Task Force
i report, any recommended revisions and suggestions.

7. Task Force for Academic Programmes

i Charges: Conduct a programme review of current academic offerings and to make
i an assessment with recommendations of maintaining or strengthening those that
. z _ £ continue to be mission-wise appropriate and developing or creating those that reflect
Charges: (a) identify and assess present conditions in the area of technological
support for the enhancement and expansion of instructional and other academic :
programmes, as well as administrative and support units, (i.e. computer technology :
in offices, classrooms, laboratories, campus connectivity, and internal capability and :
usage); (b) determining criteria to be used to access, implement, expand or enhance:
- technological support for all assessed areas; (c) analyze and assess maintenance and }
personnel needs relative to maintaining a premier status of technology; and (d) review :
the status of the College Technology plan and provide direction for developing the :
scope and breadth of a University Technology Plan with components necessary for
its expansion and completion. Concrete plans should be developed for strengthening :
i and Hospitality Management Institute, and a Bahamas Technical and Vocational

: Institute. It is my judgment that every one of our academic offerings should be

: outstanding, good or phased out. _

: Capital construction and renovations for programmes, in light of enrollment

: management, changing foci of scholarship-service-teaching, continuing professional ©
Charges: Examine the College’s current position in the international community; }
and develop a plan to move the perception of The College to that. of neHonaly. and :
i and enhancement for future facilities.

the vocational needs of an ever changing society. The University of The Bahamas
cannot and should not try to be all things to all people. The University will offer
graduate and professional degrees up to the doctorate level, but it cannot afford to

be a large research institution offering doctoral degrees in multiple fields. Likewise,

the University of The Bahamas cannot and should not try to offer every undergraduate ;
degree imaginable. What the University of The Bahamas will do, however, is to
determine what role and influence it wants to exert in the 21st century and identify
those programmes and Centres of Excellence (Institutes) that meet the goals of the
University and the nation and in which the University can excel; i.e. the Marine and
Environmental Studies Institute, and International Languages Institute, a Culinary

development, and creating an optimum educational environment for students, faculty,
and staff are key illustrations of areas which will impact the development, expansion

Specifically, the Task Force should determine whether programmes/departments and
curricular offerings (undergraduate, graduate and continuing education) one outstanding,
good, targeted for elevation to bachelors or masters levels, or targeted for phase-out
in light of multiple criteria. These criteria include adequate student enrollment, the
relationship to projected trends and occupational demands for the 21st. Century,
unquestionable scholarship, and service contributions of programmes and curriculum,
along with current and future projections for grants and contracts,

academic unit and/or department and recommend revisions deemed appropriate.
These revisions should also take into consideration the current state of affairs in
higher education and projected trends for the 21st century. Finally, this task force.
is expected to make recommendations regarding goals for the percentage of earned
doctorates that each unit should aspire to and methods of achieving those goals.
The Task Force may also present innovative recommendations for any other aspect
of academic affairs that it deems appropriate. All recommendations should be
immediately followed by a realistic proposal as to where the resources may be secured
to implement the recommendations.

-8. Task for Finance

: Charges: (a) examining all current fiscal resources and allocations in the respective
: budget units; (b) assessing current and future financial practices with the overall goal
: of using the best policies and procedures to enhance fiscal effectiveness; (c) identifying
: new or alternate fiscal resources such as corporate and individual gifts, grants,
Charge: a) Present and assess current conditions of physical facilities such as office
and classroom buildings, residential halls (dormitories); classroom and office space }
allocation and utilization, renovations; and athletic and extramural structures; b) }
examine and develop capabilities of the physical facilities affected by such variables }
as the expanded role of technology, the design trends of office equipment, the :
implementation of interactive and virtual classrooms, and designs and desired
: plans of the College/University from the appropriate units should be received and

contracts, scholarships and fellowships, tuition, fees, and endowments in light of
plans articulated by the task forces on Academic Programmes, Facilities and Student
Body. Specific plans should be developed to ensure that the fiscal infrastructure and
logistical procedures and operations are understood and implemented by all respective
budget unit heads and appropriate staff. Criteria should also be enumerated for
periodic assessments of fiscal resources. Funding plans and unit program development

included in the task force’s report.

Charges: Examine the current state of affairs pertaining to higher education throughout
The Commonwealth of The Bahamas and to design the mission, goals and objectives
of a national higher education coordinating board; to bring into existence a Accrediting

: Body for final review and approval of all newly proposed academic programmes;
: and to establish a self-governing University of The Bahamas under a duly appointed
: Board of Trustees. The government, control, conduct, management and administration
: of the University shall be vested in the Board of Trustees. All current and future
:. properties used by the University shall be vested under control of the Board of
Charges: a) Identify and assess the current and future research capabilities and }
opportunities in the institution b) recommend structures for the organisation and
conduct of research in the University of The Bahamas c) draft policies for i) the :
conduct of research in the University of The Bahamas ii) the establishment and :
implementation of an Institutional Review Board ii) Consulting iii) Awards iv)
Training and the Use of Resources v) Animal and Human Welfare vi) the Environment :

Trustees.

The draft act shall stipulate in clear language that the Act is meant to establish the
University and that the Board is obligated to establish Bye-laws designed for the
governing of the University though its respective administrative officers.



2UUd, PAGE 5b



PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005

THE TRIBUNE.



,

. Report (From page 1B) |

Bank governor looking at the
relaxation of certain capital con-
trols in the Bahamas’ foreign
exchange guidelines, and the
Ministry of Finance looking at
other issues.

Implementing the recom-
mendations put forward in 2004
is seen as vital to BISX’s future
growth and development. The
exchange’s current board and
management have already tak-
en stapes in this direction, dras-

tically cutting costs to reduce -

BISX’s annual loss in fiscal 2004

to around $100,000, compared
to the previous year’s $1 mil-
lion.

Any move by the Govern-
ment to support BISX is likely
to involve the former making
some sort of capital markets
policy statement, giving "some
kind of endorsement to say they
are in agreement and working
to implement some of the rec-
ommendations where possible".

Among the recommendations
most likely to be enacted are
greater participation in BISX-

POSITION AVAILABLE

Adinthisteative:

Assistant

-ernment’s support,

Bahamas
Focal Point
Organizations

BEST Commission

The Caribbean. Regional Erivitoninent

Programme (CREP) is seeking an.
Administrative Assistant to. provide.

administrative support. for the Andros
Conservancy and Trust and the CREP
Project. The position is based with ANCAT,
i in Fresh Creek, Andros.

Skills/Qualifications

° Computer literate, eopetially Microsoft
Office Suite:
® Minimum of 2-3 years experience in office

procedures, including performing basic

accounting tasks, operating office
ment, and receptionist skills
° oaenre oral and written ‘”
communication skills
¢ Positive attitude and self motivated

* Excellent. organisational skills and ity

to multitask:
e poe papnted and able to meet

° ‘Atlity * maintain confidentiality of ©
records and information

If you are interested in. this exciting
opportunity please send resume, cover
letter & other supporting documentation
to:

CREP Position
P.O. N4105 .
Nassau, Bahamas

P.O. Box 23338

Material m may also be delivered by hand to-

the CREP/ANCAT office, Fresh Creek, Andros
or by ea to: exancat@batelnet. bs.

All rae must be received by
nda. 11th March 2005:



OR: CREP Position
Fresh cel apn

listed stocks and the wider cap-
ital markets by the National
Insurance Board (NIB), whose
reserve fund amounts to more
than $1.23 billion.

Other recommendations
being considered by the Imple-
mentation Committee, which is
working out how these propos-
als will be followed through and

who will be responsible for |...

them, are the listing of govern-
ment paper - registered stock
and Treasury Bills - on the

exchange, regional cross-border -

listings, the creation: of a
Caribbean credit rating facility
and the. underwriting of gov-
ernment securities by private
sector brokers.

But even without the Gov-
BISX
appears to be moving towards a
position where it might not be
reliant upon it for financial.sup-

port.
Keith Davies, BISX’s chief
executive, told The Tribune last
week that the exchange was
“closer than ever” to being in a
break. even position, where it
will not have to rely upon exter-

nal financial support for its sur-

vival.

Mr Davies said: “The com-
pany has been able to improve °-
and gain market share and new.

customers, and move closer to

the day when we will be self- —
sufficient and able to cover our
expenses that we generate on a_
“cyearly basis entirely, without .-
any external support. We are.
~ closer than ever to that." ;
The BISX chief executive .
said the exchange realised it. -
_ needed “to pay for ourselves, :
and once we can do that we can -
stop worrying about our exis- .,
tence and look forward to grow-. 4
_ ing the business".

Sources close to BISX. said

. there was a “feeling the worst is.
over" among the exchange's

shareholders.

Al rl ift (From page 4B) -

that, against any low-cost or
legacy carrier and. we're

approaching it on two fronts..
_ First, service, and secondly we

_are certainly matching or beat-
ing everybody i in the Florida:

market in price on routes that
we compete in." ~

-. + Delta: Airlines gentSedaly a
- announced it intended to add:

two non-stop daily flights to its

: Fort Lauderdale-Nassau route

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

fora

PROPERTY MANAGER

Reporting to the Property Director in Barbados, you will enjoy a high level of
autonomy and responsibility for managing, through a small property team,

a varied but demanding caseload of premises matters relating to the Bahamas
& TCI occupational porfollo.

QUALIFICATIONS:
¢ Member of professional body or Certification i in recognized property

field

¢ 5+ years in Property management, especially i in complex buildings
or multiple sites across the islands, with proven track record

¢ Comprehensive knowledge of property and construction management

¢ Detailed knowledge of building A/C systems, electrical systems,
building, codes, occupational health and labour regulation, and
hurricane building codes .

¢ Motivated, strong on delivery, able to handle multiple tasks, anda
good logistical planner

_ GENERAL REQUIREMENTS / RESPONSIBILITIES:

¢ Proactively manage the premises, including all repairs and disaster
Meee ensuring that Health & Safety and Security issues are
elivered

from May 1. The flights will be
operated by Delta Connection
carrier Chautauqua Airlines,
using Embraer Regional Jet air-
craft.

‘"All the service Delta is
announcing today represents
new non-stop markets, chosen

because of customer demand.
Our. point-to-point flights
» between Fort Lauderdale and

Nassau will service growing

. demand between these two sun- .

ny destinations," said Doug
Blissit, Delta’s vice-president of
network analysis.

But Mr Major said this would
have little effect on Bahama-
sair's ability to: meet the

demands of its customers, par-
‘ticularly as it had a number of

special rate agreements with
brokers in the Florida market,

‘who were directing business to
-: the carrier.

Bahamasair also had an

arrangement with the Ruffin |
_ Group of Companies to service
-its Cable Beach hotel proper-
ties, while the airline was about .

to: sign a bulk-seat agreement
with Grand Bahama casino
operators, the Isle of Capri. The
agreement will be similar to the
arrangement signed with Drift-
wood. ‘

ee baggage, with, customers. la
~ paying only $70 for.excess bags. to get
We also have an express line

Mr Major said: “We've done
a lot to retain customers - from
the Freeport specials of $118,
and the Florida travel at $90
pre-tax on flights to anywhere
Bahamasair flies, and the
70/70/70 campaign that has
changed the way we take on



for passengers with two or less

bags at all Florida airports."

Mr Major told The Tribune
that there had been an increase.
in the number of tourists using

Bahamasair. Traditionally,

about 12 per cent of Bahama-

_ Sair’s passenger volumes had

been non-Bahamian travellers,
versus 80 per cent of Bahami-
ans.

The non-Bahamian propor-
tion is now approaching 14 to 15
per cent, with every percentage
point representing 10,000 per-
sons. Based on these calcula-
tions, Mr Major said Bahama-
sair was now attracting an addi-
tional 20-30,000 tourists. With a
million passengers flying
Bahamasair per year, the num-
ber of tourists flying with the
carrier is approaching 150,000
on an annual. basis.

Mr Major also credited the

Faith Temple Christian





» : ay. James Smith, minister of state for finance



airline's various code share
agreements with pulling i in more
tourists. can
Meanwhile, Bahamasair’ s.
chairman, Basil Sands, has offi- .
cially launched the first of seven’
customer service seminars for

~ staff in the Nassau, Freeport
: _and Fort. Lauderdak arkets,



_ service quality, grooming and

deportment. =
Mr Major said, however, that
based on preliminary observa-..
‘tions, customer comments on
service quality and on-time per-:
formance have been improving.
And Mckinsey & Company,
‘the world's largest management

consultancy, which was selected

by the Government to design a.
business plan that will trans-
form the national flag carrier
into a sustainable business with
long-term viability, issued its
first interim report on Febru-
ary 9.

Calling it "encouraging", Mr.
Major declined to go into detail:
about the contents of the report,
but said it was very preli
and was meant to say what the
initial findings have been to that
point. Additional reports are.

- expected on March 9 and aert

11.

le = 2005

° eee and apply strategic solutions to maximize asset value and
the

¢ Project manage the construction / renovation of new branches,
properties as required

¢ Manage relationships with the businesses, service providers, suppliers
and landlords

° wenege and motivate a small team through excellent leadership
skills

"IF YOU ARE INTERESTED:

~ Submit your resume private & confidential in WRITING ONLY before March :
18, 2005 to: :

Academy
wishes to announce that The
General Entrance Examination
will be held on Friday, March 4th,
2005 at 9:00 AM at the Academy
of Prince Charles Drive.

The Academy: has limited
space in grades 1 through 10, and
persons wanting to enter the
Academy in September 2005,
must sit the Examination.

Committed to Providing a Christ-Centred
Education, in an environment that is
Conducive for learning:

Fatth Temple Christiam Academy
“The School of First Choice”

Why uot make tt your chatets..

Jamise Sturrup - Human Resources Assistant
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-8329, Nassau, Bahamas

Or email: jamise.sturrup@firstcaribbeanbank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
thanks all applicants for their interest, however only those
under consideration will be contacted.

Vacancies are open to Bahamian residents only.

For More Information

Contact:
The Admittance Office at
324-2269

So Register Now!

A subsidiary of: Faith Temple Ministries International





THE TRIBUNE

SIU ES) NT Sess

| HURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 7B



Oil price rises
cancel out Fe

chairman’s
bullish U:

“Copyrighted Material
#¥tSyndicated Content’y &

Available from Commercial News Providers”

. -_ - .

| WAREHOUSE SPACE
TO SUBLEASE

_ * 2320 sq. ft. located on
Mt. Pleasant Avenue off Carib Road.

Please call Alice at 393-7020
for further information

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, ANNETTE LOUISE
MCPHEE-MADDEN, of #801 Pinewood Gardens
Subdivision, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name
to ANNIS LOUISE SMITH. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (80) days after the
date of publication of this notice. —

NOTICE is hereby given that RODLINE DIEUVILLE OF
CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization. should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 24TH day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.













NOTICE
FINCO INVITES TENDERS

Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders for the
purchase of the following:

| “ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #176, Yamacraw
Beach Estates situated in the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting of (3)
Bedrooms, (2) Bathrooms. ,

This property is being sold under our Power Of Sale contained ina
Mortgage FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

Property size: 7,417.50 sq. ft.
Building size: 2,217 sq. ft.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery Centre, Finance
Corporation Of Bahamas Limited, Main Branch, PO. Box N-3038,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked “tender 9712”. All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 4th March, 2005.










PUBLIC NOTICE |
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY:DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that the parents of, JESINDA
TENNESIA ROWE of Blue Berry Hill, Fox Hill, Nassau,
Bahamas, intend to change her name to JESINDA TENNESIA



WHYLEY. If there are any objections to this change of name
by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, PO.Box N-7421, Nassau, Bahamas, no later
than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE
FINCO INVITES TENDERS

Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders for the
purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #84, Block #2, South
Beach Estates situated on one of the islands of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas Situated thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting
of (4) four bedrooms and (2) two bathrooms.

Property size: 10,609 sq. ft.
Building size: 2,160 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under our Power Of Sale contained in a_

Mortgage FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

§ All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed

to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery Centre, Finance
Corporation Of Bahamas Limited, Main Branch, PO. Box N-3038,
Nassau; Bahamas and marked “tender 2966”. All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 4th March, 2005.



NOTICE
FINCO INVITES TENDERS

Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders for th
purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #212 Yamacraw

Beach Estate situated in the Eastern Discrict of the Island of New E

Providence on one of the islands-of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Situate thereon is Vacant Land.

Property size: 7,200 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under our Power Of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery Centre, Finance
Corporation Of Bahamas Limited, Main Branch, PO. Box N-3038,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked “tender 5674”. All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 4th March, 2005.



Loan (From page 3B)

itive impact. Under the Indenture of Mortgage clause on most
residential mortgage contracts, the bank states that any reduction
in the prime rate would be reflected in the loan payment within a
three-month period. ;

Conversely, if the Central Bank had raised the Discount rate, then
banks would have notified borrowers of an expected increase in the
prime and interest rates over the next three months.

There are three factors which can impact a monthly mortgage
payment - the interest rate, the amount borrowed and the length of
the loan. For example, if a client takes out a $150,000 loan at 9 per
cent over 25 years with monthly payments of $1250, a change’in any
one of those variables will impact the monthly payment. ,

’ According to Mr Sampson, most mortgage brokers, Approved
Lending included, are advising mortgage holders that instead of tak-
ing the option to reduce their payment, they continue with current
payments. The net effect of the reduction in the interest rate cou-
pled with maintained payments is the early retirement of the mort-
gage, knocking up to five years, and in some cases more, off the
loan. Maintaining the original payment also reduces fhe amount of
interest paid to the lending institution over the life of the loan.

Mr Sampson acknowledged, however, that because of personal
situations, some mortgage holders might prefer to get the immediate
benefit of the.extra cash and opt for a reduced payment while still
maintaining the payment schedule.



POSITION AVAILABLE

COMMUNITY LIAISON .
~~ OFFICER

The Caribbean Regional Environment .
Programme (CREP) is peeing 3
Community Liaison Officer (CLO). The
CLO will engage Andros communities
and other stakeholders in the CREP
Project activities and pede support for
the project Manager. The position is based
with CREP Project, in Fresh Creek,
Andros.

Senanee Skills Required

Focal Point

Srearatore ‘© Team player able to work with

communities throughout Andros _

e Excellent oral and written
communication skills

¢ Willingness to travel and to work
outside normal hours when
necessary

¢ Awareness of environmental issues

would be an asset

Qualifications °

¢ Familiar with the communities of
Andros

¢ Strong facilitation skills for

_ meetings and workshops

° Computer literate __

¢ Ability to plan/ conduct
community meetings and -
workshops

BEST Commission

If you are interested inthis exciting

opportunity please send resume, cover

letter & other supporting documentation |
ARIFORUM | o:, SE oa



Authorized by the enn - et A
ee ‘CREP Position OR: CREP Position =
moma oe eee PORN ADIB oe neseiion cone PLO. BOx.23338...5,
Y Nassau, Bahamas Fresh Creek, Andros
*

Material may also be delivered by hand to the
CREP/ANCAT office, Fresh Creek, Andros or
by e-mail to: exancat@batelnet.bs
Implemented by the A
Caribbean Conservation
Association

All applications must be received by
Friday 11th March 2005

NOTICE
FINCO INVITES TENDERS

Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders for the
purchase of the foliowing:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #4, Coral Meadows
situated in the Western District of the Island of New Providence one
of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon
is a Single family residence consisting of (3) Bedrooms, (2) Bathrooms.

Property size: 7,500 sq. ft.
Building size: 1,448 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under our Power Of Sale contained ina
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery Centre, Finance
Corporation Of Bahamas Limited, Main Branch, PO. Box N-3038,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked “tender 0607”. All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 4th March, 2005.



NOTICE
FINCO INVITES TENDERS

Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders for the
purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #362, in Pinewood
Gardens situated in the Southern District of the Island of New
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas
situated thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting of (3)
Bedrooms (2) Bathrooms.

This property is being sold under our Power Of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

Property size: 5,000 sq. ft.
Building size: 1,076 sq. ft.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery Centre, Finance
Corporation Of Bahamas Limited, Main Branch, P.O. Box N-3038,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked “tender 0891”. All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 4th March, 2005.





PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005 ane TRIBUNE nee

Provisions

Provisions are recognised when the Bank has a present legal or constructive obligation as a
- result of past events, it is probable that an outflow of resources emBodying economic benefits
will be required to settle the obligation, and a reliable estimate of the amount.of the obligation

FIRSTCARIBBEAN INTERNATIONAL FINANCE CORPORATION (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BALANCE SHEET AT 31 OCTOBER 2004
(expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

can be made.
Interest income and expense
: 103 : ‘ . . A
Notes ve - $ Interest income and expense are recognised in the income statement for all interést. bearing
3 instruments on an accrual basis using the effective yield method based on the actual purchase
price. Interest income includes coupons eamed, on fixed income investment and trading
Assets securities and-accrued discount and premium on treasury bills and other discounted instruments.
Interest income is suspended when loans become doubtful of collection, such as when overdue
Due from other banks 2 acco aa aps ‘by more than 90 days, or when the borrower or securities’ issuer defaults, if earlier than 90
Loans and advances ; 2 518 2518 days. Such income is excluded from interest income until received. Interest income on loans in
ee é 578 "178 arrears greater than 90 days is taken into income to the extent that it is deemed recoverable.
Property, plant and equipment 7 too Fee and commission income
Total assets 148,332 148,512 Fees and commissions are Tecognised on.an accrual basis.
' Foreign exchange income
Foreign exchange income relates to income earned from exchanging foreign currencies and is
Deposits : 8 122,962 126,278 recognised on the accrual basis.
Dividends payable 9 5,000 ot
Other liabilities 10 2,589 __2,629
3. Due from other banks
Total liabilities 130,551 __128,907
2004 2003
Shareholders’ equity $ $
Share capital and reserves u 1,000 oe Cash and cash equivalents , 22,961 14,343
Retained earnings 16,781 __ 18,605 _ Mandatory reserve deposits with Central Bank 3,375 4,157
17,781 ____19,605 :
etree Eanes . 26,336 18,500
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity ___ 48,332 ____148,512 a
Approved by the Board of Directors The Bank is required to maintain a percentage of deposit liabilities as cash or deposits with The
Central Bank of The Bahamas. These funds are not available to finance the Bank’s day-to-day
opérations.
TEREN SHARON BROWN. :
RENCE ETS Director The effective yield on cash resources during the year was 0.6% (2003 — 0.6 %) per annum.
9 February 2005
Date 4. ° Loans and Advances
2004 2003
$ S.
NOTES
3 Mortgages 124,691 132,020
Less: — provisions for impairment :
1. General Information specific provisions for credit risk "(5,667)" (4,473)
. st BS dh eneral provisions for inherent risk (231) (242)°
FirstCaribbean International Finance Corporation (Bahamas) Limited formerly Barclays Finance 8 Pr

Corporation (Bahamas) Limited (the “Bank”) is incorporated in the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas and is a wholly-owned subsidiary of FirstCaribbean Intemational Bank (Bahamas)
Limited. .

: 118,793 127,305

Mortgage loan balances are represented by residential loans of $111,277 (2003: $118,110) and
The Bank’s principal activities are the acceptance of deposits and granting of mortgage loans commercial loans of $7,516 (2003: $9,195).
within The Commonwealth of The Bahamas. a The average interest rate earned during the year on loans and advances. was 7.94% (2003 ~
: ee 7.77%).
The Bank changed its name to FirstCaribbean International Finance Corporation (Bahamas) °
Limited on 11 October 2002, following the combination of the retail, corporate and offshore
ing operations of Barclays Bank PLC in The Bahamas and the Turks & Caicos Islands

Movement in provisions for impaitment are as follows:
banking :
(“Barclays Bahamas”) and CIBC Bahamas Limited.

; Specific Inherent

: credit risk risk

The ultimate parent companies of the Bank are Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, a provision provision

company incorporated in Canada, and Barclays Bank PLC, a company incorporated in England. $

. The registered office of the Bank is located at Charlotte House, Charlotte Street, Nassau, The Balance, 31 October 2002 2,017 287
Bahamas. At 31 October 2004, the Bank had 10 (2003: 9) employees. Doubful debts « sac . 45)

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies Balance, 31 October 2003 4,473 242
Basis of presentation Doubtful debts expense 1,194 (11):

Balance, 31 October 2004 5,667 231

The Bank’s balance sheet has been prepared in accordance with International Financial ————
Reporting Standards, under the historical cost convention as modified by the revaluation to fair

value of available-for-sale securities. The aggregate amount of non-performing loans on which interest was not being accrued

amounted to $23,397 as at 31 October 2004 (2003 — $27,530). :

Estimates
Preparation of the balance sheet in conformity with International Financial Reporting Standards 5. Investment Securities
Tequires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect amounts teported in the 2004 - 2003
balance sheet and accompanying notes. Actual results could differ from these estimates. $ $
Cash and cash equivalents Securities held to maturity

: Debt securities _ 2,518 2,518
For the purposes of the cash flow statement, cash and cash equivalents comprise balances with
less than 90 days maturity from the date of acquisition including cash balances, deposits with 2,518 2,518

Central Banks, and amounts due from other banks. ‘

The market values of these securities approximate cost.
Investment securities . : :
. a . , All debt securities held by the Bank were issued by The Bahamas Government and related
Investment securities with fixed maturity where management has both the intent and the ability agencies. ,
to hold to maturity are classified as held-to-maturity. Investment securities and purchased loans
and receivables intended to be held for an indefinite period of time, which may be sold in
response to needs for liquidity or changes in interest rates, exchange rates or equity prices are
classified as available-for-sale. Management determines the appropriate classification of its

investments at the time of the purchase.

The average interest rate earned during the year on debt securities was 7.05% (2003 — 7.05%).

6... _. Other Assets



nS ee wpe an 7 ee ae be

IT EE NE

Bank will not be able to collect all amounts due. The amount of the provision is the difference
between the carrying amount and the recoverable amount, being the estimated present value of
expected future cash flows, including amounts recoverable from guarantees and collateral,
discounted based on the interest rate at inception of the loan. :

The loan loss provision also covers losses where there is objective evidence that probable losses
are present in components of the loan portfolio at the balance sheet date. These have been
estimated based upcn historical patterns of losses in each component, the credit ratings allocated
to the borrowers and reflecting the current economic climate in which the borrowers operate and

semen

: 2004 2083
Investment securities and purchased loans and receivables are initially recognised at cost’ __§ s
(which includes transaction costs). Available-for-sale financial assets are subsequently re- Accrued interest & other accounts receivable 678 —___!8
measured at fair value based on quoted bid prices or amounts derived from cash flow models. ,
Fair values for unquoted equity instruments are estimated to be cost except for a permanent ~ meee 9 8 178
diminution : a Unrealised gains and losses arising from changes in the fair value of
securities classified as available-for-sale are recognised in equity. When the securities are
disposed of or impaired, the related accumulated fair alison are’ included in the 7 Property: }isat abe Eauipenet
income Statement as gains and losses from investment securities. : : Equipment,
: . furniture ‘
Held-to-maturity investments are carried at amortised cost using the effective yield method, less and vehicles Total
any provision for impairment. s s
‘ Cost
A financial asset is impaired if its carrying amount is greater than its estimated recoverable Balance, beginning of year 232 232
amount. The amount of the impairment loss for assets carried at amortised cost is calculated as Purchases ~ we 2 ee
the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of expected future :
cash flows discounted at the financial instrument’s original effective interest rate. By Balance, end of year 234 —____234
comparison, the recoverable amount of an instrument measured at fair value is the present value
of expected future cash flows discounted at the current market rate of interest for a similar Accumulated depreciation : ; :
financial asset. Balance, beginning of year 221 221 _
Depreciation 6 wo
Interest earned whilst holding investment securities is reported as interest income. Dividends
received aré included separately in interest income. - ; : Balance, end of year 227 27
All regular way purchases and sales of investment securities are recognised at trade date, which Net book values ;
is the date that the Bank.commits to purchase or sell the asset. All other purchases and sales are End of year scoeececmeeenneree ED eee
recognised as derivative forward transactions until settlement.
Originated loans and provisions for {oan impairment Beginning of year etl eee
Loans and advances originated by the Bank by providing money directly to the borrower are 8... Deposits
categorized as originated loans and are carried at amortised cost. Third party expenses, such as
-legal fees, incurred in securing a loan are expensed as incurred. Interest income is accounted 2004 2003
for on the accrual basis for all loans and advances other than those that are impaired. $ $
Loan fees are recognized in income at the inception of the loan. Individuals 45,698 46,954
aes i Business and Government 31,172 - 33,350
A credit risk provision for loan impairment is established if there is objective evidence that the Affiliated banks __— 46,092 4574

122,962 126,278

The effective rate of interest on deposits was 4.7% (2003 — 4.9%) during the year.

All deposits in 2004 were payable at a fixed date.

is classified as a provision for inherent risk. When a loan is uncollectible, it is written off against 9. Dividends Payable
the related provision for impairments; subsequent recoveries are credited to the bad and doubtful ; : :
debt expense in the income statement. At its meeting of 31 March 2004, the Board of Directors declared a dividend of $25 per share in
: respect of the 2003 fiscal year amounting to a total dividend of $5,000 (2003: Nil).
If the amount of the impairment subsequently decreases due to an event occurring after the
write-down, the release of the provision is credited to the bad and doubtful debt expense. 10. Other Liabilities
Property, plant and equipment ar oe
All property, plant and equipment are stated at historical cost less accumulated depreciation.
Accounts payable and accruals 101 372

Depreciation is computed on the straight line method at rates considered adequate to write-off Accrued interest 2,488 2,257
the cost of depreciable assets, less salvage, over their useful lives. :

. . 2,589 2,629
The annual rates used are: 7

11. Share Capital

Frechold buildings 2%% ;
Leasehold improvements ; 10% or the term of the lease, whichever is less The Bank has authorised, issued and fully paid 200,000 ordinary shares with a par value of $5
Equipment, vehicles and furniture 20% each amounting to $1,000.
‘Where the carrying amount of an asset is greater than its estimated recoverable amount, it is 12, Related Party Tramsactions

written down immediately to its recoverable amount. Gains and losses on disposal of property
and equipment are determined by reference to its recoverable amount and are taken into account
in determining operating income.



At 31 October 2004, deposits maintained with and for other FirstCaribbean entities arnounted to ©

$22,961 (2003 - $14,343) and $46,092 (2003 - $45,974).



THE TR

Hs Fs RR Fe Mis Fis EMP Fa ha Saga Fa Tia a a a ae ana A a BE aw

e

es

13.

14.

IBUNE BUSINESS

aH Tere ae ee Oe eee a

Contingent Liabilities and Commitments

At the balance sheet date the following contingent liabilities exist.

"2004 2003

$ $

Loan commitments 3,991 ______7,180
3,991 7,180

Use of Financial Instruments

Strategy in using financial instruments

By its nature the Bank’s actiyities are principally related to the use of financial
instruments. The Bank accepts deposits from customers at both fixed and floating rates
and for various periods and seeks to earn above average interest margins by investing
these funds in high quality assets. The Bank seeks to increase these margins by
consolidating short-term funds and lending for longer periods at higher rates whilst
maintaining sufficient liquidity to meet all claims that mi ght fall due.

The Bank also seeks to raise its interest margins by obtaining above average margins, net
of provisions, through lending to commercial and retail borrowers with a range of credit
standing. Such exposures involve not just on-balance sheet loans and advances but the
group also enters into guarantees and other commitments such as letter of credit and
performance, and other bonds.

Credit risk

The Bank takes on exposure to credit risk, which is the risk that a counterparty will be
unable to pay amounts in full when due. The Bank structures the levels of credit risk it
undertakes by placing limits on the amount of risk accepted in relation to one borrower,
or groups of borrowers, arid to geographical and industry segments. Such risks are
monitored on a revolving basis and subject to an annual or more frequent review.

The exposure to any one borrower including banks and brokers is further restricted by
sub-limits covering on and off-balance sheet exposures and daily delivery risk limits in
relation to trading items such as forward foreign exchange contracts. Actual exposures
against limits are monitored daily.

Exposure to credit risk is managed through regular analysis of the ability of borrowers
and potential borrowers to meet interest and capital repayment obligations and by
changing these lending limits where appropriate. Exposure to credit risk is also managed
in part by obtaining collateral and corporate and personal guarantees, but a significant .
portion is personal lending where no such facilities can be obtained.

Credit related commitments

The primary purpose of these instruments is to ensure that funds are available toa
customer as required. Guarantees and standby letters of credit, which represent
irrevocable assurances that the Bank will make payments in the event that a customer
cannot meet ‘its obligations to third parties, carry the same credit risk as loans.
Documentary and commercial letters of credit, which are written undertakings by the
Bank on behalf of a customer authorising a third party to draw drafts on the Bark up to a’
stipulated amount under specific terms and conditions, are collateralised by the
underlying shipments of goods to which they relate and therefore carry less risk than a
direct borrowing.

Commitments to extend credit represent unused portions of authorisations to extend
credit in the form of loans, guarantees or letters of credit. With respect to credit risk on
commitments to extend credit, the Bank is potentially exposed to loss in an amount equal
to the total unused commitments. However, the likely amount of loss is less than the total .
unused commitments since most commitments to extend credit are contingent upon
customers maintaining specific credit standards. The Bank monitors the term of maturity
of credit commitments because longer-term commitments generally have a greater degree
of credit risk than shorter-term commitments. :

Interest rate risk

Interest sensitivity of assets, Habilities and off balance sheet items — repricing
analysis

The Bank takes on exposure to the effects of fluctuations in the prevailing levels of
market interest rates on its financial position and cash flows. Interest margins may
increase as a result of such changes but may reduce or create losses in the event that
unexpected movements arise. The Board of Directors sets limits on the level of mismatch
of interest rate repricing that may be undertaken, which is monitored daily.

Expected repricing and maturity dates do not differ significantly from the contract dates,
except for the maturity of deposits up to 1 month, which represent balances on current
accounts considered by the Bank asa relatively stable core source of funding of its
operations.

Liquidity risk

The Bank is exposed to daily calls on its available cash resources from overnight
deposits, current accounts, maturing deposits, loan draw downs, guarantees and from
margin and other calls on cash settled derivatives. The Bank does not maintain cash
resources to meet all of these needs as experience shows that a minimum level of
reinvestment of maturing funds can be predicted with a high level of certainty. The Board
sets limits on the minimum proportion of maturing funds available to meet such calls and
on the minimum level of interbank and other borrowing facilities that should be in place
to cover withdrawals at unexpected levels of demand.

The table below analyses assets and liabilities of the Bank into relevant maturity
groupings based on the remaining period at balance sheet date to the contractual maturity
date.

Maturities of assets and liabilities

1-3 3-12 1-5 Over 5 :

; months months years years Total
As at 31 October 2904 $ $ s : $ $
Assets
Due from banks 26,336 S 2 - 26,336
Loans and advances to customers (5,413) 5,037 26,550 92,619 118,793
Tnvestiients scouzitics , 78 = 300 2,140 2,518
Property and equipment - - - 7 7
Other assets : 678 - a - : = 678
Total assets ___21,679 5,037 26,850 94,766 148,332



“THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 9B

Liabilities

Deposits _ 76,688 > 46,270 *4 122,962
Other liabilities 7,589 >! = - 7,589
Total liabilities 84,277 : 46,270 4 - 130,551
Net on balance sheet position (62,598) (41,233) 26,846 94,766 17,781
Credit commitments 3,991 . - - - 3,991
As at 31 December 2003

Total assets 17,506 L716 4874 124,416 148,512
Total liabilities 70,768 58,139 - i - 128,907
Net on balance sheet position . (53,262) (56,423) 4,874 124,416 19,605
Credit commitments 7,180 2 : - - 7,180

The matching and controlled mismatching of the maturities and interest rates of assets
and liabilities is fundamental to the management of the Bank. It is unusual for banks ever
to be completely matched since business transacted is often of uncertain term and
different types. An unmatched position potentially enhances profitability, but also
increases the risk of Josses.

The maturities of assets and liabilities and the ability to replace, at an acceptable cost,
interest-bearing liabilities as they mature, are important factors in assessing the liquidity
of the Bank and its exposure to changes in interest rates and exchange rates.

Liquidity requirements to support calls under guarantees and standby letters of credit are

considerably less than the amount of the commitment because the Bank does not
generally expect the third party to draw funds under the agreement. The total outstanding

contractual amount of commitments to extend credit does not necessarily represent future

cash requirements, since many of these commitments will expire or terminate without

being fi -ded. :

E. Fair values of financial assets and liabilities
Due from other banks

Due from other banks includes inter-bank placements and items in the course of
-collection. :

" The fair value of floating rate placements and overnight deposits is their carrying amount.
The estimated fair value of fixed interest bearing deposits is based on discounted cash
flows using prevailing money market interest rates for debts with similar credit risk and
remaining maturity. .

Loans and advances to customers

Loans and advances are net of specific and other provisions for impairment. The
estimated fair value of loans and advances represents the discounted amount of estimated
future cash flows expected to be received. Expected cash flows are discounted at current
market rates to determine fair value

Iavestment securities _

Investment securities include .only interest-bearing assets held to maturity, as assets
available-for-sale are now measured at fair value. Fair value for held to maturity assets
are based on market prices or broker/dealer price quotations. Where this information is
not available, fair value has been estimated using quoted prices for securities with similar
credit, maturity and yield characteristics, or in some cases by reference to the net tangible
asset backing of the investee.

Deposits and borrowings

The estimated fair value of deposits with no stated maturity, which includes non-interest-
bearing deposits, is the amount repayable on demand.

The estimated fair value of fixed interest bearing deposits and other borrowings without

quoted market price is based on discounted cash flows using interest rates for new debts
with similar remaining maturitv : .

PRICEWATERHOUSE(COPERS @



” Providence Hi
East Hill Street
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, The Bahamas
Telephone (242) 302-5300
Facsimile (242) 302-5350

Independent Auditors’ Report

To the Directors of
FirstCaribbean International Finance Corporation (Bahamac) Limited

We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of FirstCaribbean International Finance Corporation
(Bahamas) Limited (the “Bank”) as of 31 October 2004. This balance sheet is the responsibility of the ”
Bank’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on this balance sheet based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those Standards require
that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the balance sheet is free
of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts
and disclosures in the balance sheet. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and
significant estimates made by management, as well as ‘evaluating the overall balance sheet presentation.
We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for.our opinion. : :

In our opinion, the balance sheet presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Bank
as of 31 October 2004 in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards.

PricewaterhouseCoopers

Chartered Accountants
9 February 2005



OBR:

Balance Sheets & Legal Notices

in

BU twin

Or) ie ae

502-2356





PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005

CALVARY Bible have
emerged as the leader of the
pack in one half of the men’s
draw in the Baptist Sports
Council’s 2005 basketball
league.

Pilgrim Baptist have
surged out front in the other
half.

On Saturday at the Charles
W Saunders High School,

| Calvary Bible pushed their
unblemished record to 2-0
with a 45-38 victory over
Golden Gates.

Pilgrim Baptist stayed even
in the vice president’s divi-
sion with a close 34-33 vic-
tory over the rookie Fellow-
ship Church of God.

In other men’s games
played, New Mount Zion
made their debut with a 44-
40 victory over hapless Mace-
donia; New Bethlehem also
opened with a 42-29 rout
over BIBA and Faith United
knocked off Christ the King
39-30.

In the 19-and-under divi-
sion, Jubilee won 51-46 over
Faith United; First Baptist
hammered Golden Gates 43-
31 and Pilgrim got by Temple
Christian 34-30.

And in the 15-and-under
division, Calvary Deliverance
clobbered BIBA 47-25;
Macedonia held off New
Bethlehem 22-20 and Trans-
figuration devoured Mount
Tabor 29-14.

Here’s a summary of the
games played:

& Calvary Bible 45, Gold-
en Gates 38: Craig 'Magic'
Wakine produced 13 points
and Robin Shepherd added
12 as Calvary Bible pulled
off the men's victory. Edward
Carey scored a game high 18
in the loss.

i Jubilee 46, Faith United
‘46: Tario Brooks scored 17
points to lead Jubilee to vic-
tory in the 19-and-under divi-
sion. Theo Woods scored a

game high 19 points to lead
Faith United in the loss.

fi Calvary Deliverance 47,
BIBA 25: Rashad Williams
exploded for a game high 17,
Deshiko Henfield had 11 and
Antonio Bosfield added 10
to lead Calvary Deliverance's
15-and-under team. Sterling
Woods had nine in a losing
effort.

@ First Baptist 43, Golden
Gates 31: Gibson Alcidor
scored nine and both Charles
Williams and Charles Fergu-
son contributed eight as First
Baptist won this men's game.
Michael Munnings had a
game high 10 in the loss.

& Faith United 39, Christ
the King 30: Carrington
Dean pumped in a game high
17 and Oscar Clarke had 14
as Faith United won their
second straight men's game.
Corrie Miller had 15 in a los-
ing effort.

H New Bethlehem 42,
BIBA 29: Philip Rolle's
game high 17 led New Beth-
lehem men's to their season
opener. Burlington Moss had
11 in a losing effort.

Hi New Mount Zion 44,
Macedonia 40: Ricardo Rolle
canned a game high 15 and
Luke Hutchinson added 11
in their men's season opener
for New Mount Zion. Ricar-
do. Stubbs had nine in the
loss.

BH Macedonia 22, New
Bethlehem 20: Mario Mead-
ows led the way with nine
and Anthony Porter added
eight, including the game
winning two points, to seal
the second straight 15-and-
under win for Macedonia.
Justin Rodgers had six in the
loss.

@ Pilgrim v Fellowship
Church of God: Julius Smith
and Leonardo Burrows came
through with 11 and 10

SPORTS

respectively to give Pilgrim
this men's victory. Deidrick
Johnson had a game high 13
in the loss.

@ Macedonia 29, New
Bethlehem 15: Leon Rah-
ming and Keno Brice pro-
vided a 1-2 punch for Mace-
donia as their 19-and-under
team stayed undefeated.
Fritzroy George led the way
for the losers.

H Pilgrim 34, Temple
Christian 30: Brenville Saun-
ders scored 12 and Denaldo
Kemp and Edward Rodgers
both had eight in the win for
the undefeated 19-and-under
Pilgrim. Noel Lamm had
nine in the loss.

@ Transfiguration 29,
Mount Tabor 14: Demetrius
Ferguson came up with 10
and Donovan Moss had eight
as Transfiguration won this
15-and-under game.
Jonathan Davis had six in the
loss.

Here's how they will play this
weekend:

mf COURT ONE

10 am Faith United vs
Jubilee (15); 11 am Fellow-
ship Church of God vs BIBA
(M); Noon Mount Tabor vs
Christ the King (M(); 1 pm
Transfiguration vs Golden
Gates (15); 2 pm Transfigu-
ration vs Golden Gates (19);
3 pm First Baptist vs Golden
Gates (M); 4 pm New Beth-
lehem vs New Mount Zion
(M).

@ COURT TWO

10 am Temple Christian vs
Ebenezer (15); 11 am Tem-
ple Christian vs Calvary
Deliverance (19); Noon Cal-
vary Deliverance vs New
Bethlehem (15); 1 pm Evan-
gelistic Centre vs Pilgrim
(M); 2 pm Faith United vs
First Baptist (15); 3 pm Cal-
vary Bible vs Faith United
(M).



TRIBUNE SPORTS



pe of punch

'VE had the opportunity

to cover many profession-
al boxing shows and First Class
Boxing Promotion's Night to
Remember on Saturday night
at. the Wyndham Nassau Resort
& Crystal Palace Casino ranks
as one of the best.

If that wasn't enough, the
prestigious Hugh Campbell
Basketball Classic turned out
to be just as exhilarating.

I don't know which one I
enjoyed the most.

They both had their share of
dramatic moments..:

By the time you read this, I
should be in Curacao getting
ready to watch our young guns
go to work in the first round of
the American Zone II Davis

_ Cup tie against.the Netherlands.

Antilles.

With so much expectation on
those young rising stars, this
weekend might just top what
occurred here at home this past
weekend.

Let's start with boxing.

It was good to see the fans
show up in such large numbers.
It reminded me of the days
when boxing was at its height
with Ray Minus Jr going after
one of the many titles-in per-
haps the most illustrious cateer
of our local boxers.

The title bout between
Jerome 'Bahamian Bronze
Boomer' Ellis and Wilson 'Kid
Wonder' Theophile lived up to
its advanced billing as an excit-
ing fight to watch. But my main
concern, which was evident in
the early rounds, was whether
or not any of the fighters would
have lasted if they had to go the
full 12 rounds.

Ne of them had ever
fought a match past
the sixth round. So, as Ellis
started in his post-fight cele-
brations, the fight'was way
beyond both of them. -

It showed up in Theophile,
who obviously wasn't as condi-

. tioned as Ellis to go the dis-

tance, not withstanding the frac-
tured jaw he suffered, and he
wasn't able to answer the bell at
the start of the seventh.

There's no doubt that we will
see Theophile again. Whether
it's against Ellis is a different
story.

I believe that Ellis will go on
to fight a lot more on the inter-
national scene where he will get

STUBBS



OPINION



ble trouble for Theophile in a
rematch.

This, however, could become
the next big rivalry since Minus



ing champion 'Marvellous' Mar-
vin Smith for his super mid-
dleweight title at the end of
April, the fans will be looking
for a First Class show.

I don't want to dwell on this
too much, but it seems that
every year the Hugh Campbell
title stays in New Providence,

the teams from Grand Bahama ,

complain that they were cheat-
ed by the referees.

But, despite all the bickering
before and during the week-
long double elimination tour-

nament, Tabernacle Falcons':

coach Norris Bain gave credit
where it was due.

H: admitted that the
CI Gibson Rattlers

were the better team Monday
night and they deserved the vic-
tory, although his complaint was
centred around the moist floor
at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um after the air-conditioned
system malfunctioned.

There is, however, talk

among the Grand Bahama.
_teams of a possible boycott of
the tournament next year

because of how they claim they
were treated.
Let's just hope that calmer



“The title bout between
Jerome 'Bahamian Bronze
Boomer' Ellis and Wilson 'Kid
Wonder' Theophile lived up to
its advanced billing as an
exciting fight to watch.” —



Jr went head-to-head with
Quincy 'Thrill-A-Minute' Pratt,
not just once or twice, but three
times.

First Class Promotions should
line up Meacher 'Pain' Major,
who was just as brilliant as ever
in his co-main event bout -
stopping American Jeff 'the
Executioner’ at the end of the
second. But the problem might
be finding a worthy opponent.

With Duran 'Hands of Stone’
Miller back in action after a
two-year hiatus, he might just
be the legitimate choice. He
looked good against

Dencil 'Death' Miller. But he
has to be tested before he can
step in the ring with Major.

Whatever happens, especial-

heads prevail and the Grand

‘Bahama teams decline to carry

out their threat.

The tournament just wouldn’t
be the same without them.

This weekend, the Bahamas
Lawn Tennis Association's
four-man team won't be the
same either.

Team captain John Farring-
ton has a young team withlittle
experience that includes Devin
Mullings, Marvin Rolle, :1'Cone
Thompson and Ryan Sweeting.

So without Merkle.n and
Mark Knowles providing the
dramatic victories, we will just
have to rely on these athletes
to get the job done.

I know I'm looking forward
to seeing how they perform this

Mata 2 -

weekend and it could be one to

(. an opportunity to improve even émember
T .

ly with talk of Jermaine 'Chu-
more. And that could spell dou-

Chu' Mackey taking on defend-

BAHAMAS RUGBY
FOOTBALL UNION
COLLEGE WEEKEND
SCHEDULE

GAMES SCHEDULED FOR
SUNDAY, MARCH 6"

As most University teams travel on Saturdays, matches against









“Copyrighted Material
§ Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

college sides are being played on Sundays and during the week.
Throughout the month of March there will be 10 College teams in

Nassau (7men, 3 women). This Sunday, the schedule is as follows:



3pm - Buccaneers RFC vs. -

Yale University RFC |
(2005 NE Division 2 Champions)



4.30pm - U Penn

(2004 EPRU Division 1 Champions)
vs. Michigan State











z

ee ee a ed

@ ‘AKITA BROWN
of C.H Reeves on her
way to a record throw
to win the Junior Girls
Javelin.

(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)

B L.W. YOUNG’S
Lynden Bethel passes
S.C McPherson’s
Ronico Thompson to
win the intermediate
boys 100 metre hur-
dles.

: (Photo:
Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)

& LW YOUNG’S Ivanique Kemp
edges out A.F Adderley’s Kashara

dderley to win the juni

@ VINCENT
MCKENNEY placed
third during the interme-
diate boys long jump
yesterday at the GSSSA
junior high schools
championship track
meet.

(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)





THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

=e

cer

AN



@ By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

ELEVEN records fell in the 12th
annual Government Secondary Schools
Sporting Association (GSSSA) junior
high school championships. —

The event, which was held over a two
day period also saw 50.athletes qualify
for the national track and field meet.

Stealing the show was Vashti Cole-
brooke and Jaran Hinsey of DW Davis

~ and SC’McPherson schools.

Both competed in the bantam divi-
sions, set new meet records and quali-
fied for the national meet.

Colebrooke was crowned the sprint-
ing queen, winning the 100m and 200m,
in times of 13.40 seconds and 27.25 sec-
onds, respectively. ;

Despite falling short of a meet recor!
in the 100m, she managed a record in
the 200m. Z

Colebrooke was gunning for the old
record, 27.80 seconds, which was held by
Tamara Rigby in 1999, from the pre-
liminary rounds. In the preliminaries
she ran 27.87 seconds.

Hinsey helped to erase three meet
records as he competed in the 200m,
400m, 4x100m, 4x400m and high jump.

Heats

In the 200m heats, Hinsey ran 28.32
seconds, the second fastest time behind
teammate Tre Adderley’s 28.08 sec-
onds.

Hinsey also posted the second fastest
time in the 400m heats with 1:07.17 sec-
onds. The time of 1:06.04 seconds ran by
Neil Sands was listed.as the fastest. Both
times were record breakers.

Using the times and teammates as @
guide, Hinsey blasted to times of 27.04.
seconds and 1:05.14 seconds in the 200m
and 400m, respectively.

The old mark in the 200m was 28.78
seconds and 1:07.48 seconds in the
400m.

In the high jump event Hinsey leapt
to 1.43m, winning the event over Alon-
zo Cunningham, who also cleared
1.43m.

Hinsey won the event because he had
the fewest knock downs.

Dominating the junior girls division
was Lexi Wilson of CH Reeves.

Wilson set a new record in the 1500m,
uprooting a record that she set last year,
in a time of 5:30.22.

She said: “The meet was a good one,
I was able to run some fast times and
qualify for the national championships.

Great

“Training has been coming along
great and I am happy to see that it paid
off. I would like to thank my coach for
assisting me.

“T didn’t know that I was going to set
a new meet record, the record was mine
and to see I broke my own record
means that I am improving on a con-
stant basis.”

Annihilating a fourteen year old
record on the first day was Shakara
Brown.

Brown, who just missed qualifying
for this year’s Carifta games, destroyed
the old mark of 1.57m set by Debbie
Ferguson in 1990.

She jumped 1.60m — the Carifta qual-
ifying standard is 1.63. The jump is the
best marking posted by anyone who is
seeking to compete in this event.

With just six events remaining, the
CH Reeves Raptors were leading two
divisions, but were slotted amongst the
top three in the other divisions.

Head coach Fritz Grant said: “We
have an excellent programme which is
paying off for us. We set a few records
last year, but this year we are doing
extremely well.

“We were able to set several records,
and many of the athletes were able to
qualify for the nationals.”

The high school meet is set to begin
today at 9am.








SECTION



_ THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005



Sermons, Church Activities, Awards



Church Notes
Page 2C



Nassau Village pastors hoping

to re-build residents’

place various programmes and __

@ By PETURA BURROWS

Tribune Feature Writer

astors in Nassau

Village have

revived a pre-

existing organisa-

tion for communi-

ty development, with the hope

of re-building the spirit and

morale of residents following
January’s riot.

Tempers flared and the com-
munity came to the forefront
of the news in January as the
site of a social uprising that
some likened to scenes of vio-
lence in Haiti. A total of five
people, civilians and police
officers, were injured during
the incident that was said to
a sparked by an car accident

y the area.
3Now the pastors, who have
‘stablished churches in this
community, are putting aside
tHeir denominational differ-
ences in a bid to “penetrate”
the community with worth-
while activities, Christian
teaching and personal devel-
opment exercises — a combi-
nation which they hope will
safeguard Nassau Village from
future unrest.

zThe Nassau Village Pastors
fot Community Involvement
(NVPCI) was first organised



last August, after Bishop. --

Reuben J Deleveaux of The
New Holy Spirit Church of
God Inc met with other pas-
tors in the area to discuss ways
that they-could assist the com-
munity.

But the group didn’t
“mobilise” itself in the com-
munity until January, follow-
“ing the riot.

“We are just sorry that we
‘took so long to get it up off the
ground. But that (riot) has
stirred us up to go ahead with
our plans, Bishop Deleveaux
told Tribune Religion.

The group’s first objective is
to form a strong alliance of
spiritual fellowship for the ben-
efit of pastors and church
members in the community.

‘ The second objective is to

find a way to meet the needs of

troubled families in the com- _

munity; and the third goal is
to help provide the young peo-
ple in the area with skills that
will allow them to contribute to
society in meaningful way.

“These are only some of our
goals,” said the Bishop.

Residents of Nassau Village
believe that healing and hope
are needed following the “dev-
astating” riot.

Rochelle Mortimer, a 37-
year-old resident of Nassau
Village who has lived in the
area “from birth”, described
the riot as a “national disas-
ter”. id

Nassau Village, which she

feels is usually a peaceful com- ©

munity, has had its challenges
throughout the years but the
riot was the worst that she has
ever seen.

Community

“I came up in Nassau Vil-
lage and this was never a com-
munity for such things. We got
along. We lived together
peacefully. We cooperated
with the police. But we have

lost that now, sadly,” Mrs Mor-

timer told Tribune Religion.
Although the riot is weeks

gone, it is still a topic of con--
versation in the community,

she said.

“People say they can’t
believe that the police could
act like that. And a lot of per-
sons are saying that they feel
like Nassau Village will never
be able to come up from this.

“This community is hurting
obviously because everyone
was involved and was touched.
Even if you didn’t throw a rock
or shoot, or you may not have
been there, but you were
affected because it’s the atmos-
phere that has just changed.
Everyone is angry. Some of
them didn’t even know what
they were mad about. Maybe it

was something that the police—. .

or anybody — did to them, and
you see they just got angry.”
Mrs Mortimer is a devoted



B UPLIFTING — Rev Ishmael Martin, pastor of Last Days
Gospel Assembly on Forbes Street, Nassau Village, speaks
to the congregation during Tuesday night’s service. Rev
_ Martinis part.of-Nassau-Village Pastors for Community
Involvement (NVPC)) - a pre-existing ergeneay forcom-**
munity development.

(Photo by Mario Duncaidon/TAbene Staff)

Christian who worships out-
side of Nassau Village, and
feels that the “body of Christ”

“in the community is partially

responsible for the moral re-
building of the area.

Churches

She believes that dozens of
churches are not doing any-
thing but applauds the effort
of the “few” pastors who are.

The church, as “shepherds

- of-God’s children”, have to do ©

more than just “sit and have
service”, said Mrs Mortimer.
Rev Ishmael Martin of Last

Days Gospel Assembly in
Forbes Street is one of the 14
pastors who make up the
organisation seeking to bring
about community develop-
ment.

He has made “objective
three” — empowering the
young people in the commu-
nity — one of the main focuses
of his assembly.

-Rev Martin, who is also a
resident of Nassau Village,
believes that the young peo-

_ ple in the area have to be

reached if future unrest is to.
be avoided.
His church currently has in

‘Haitians are drain on society
is overall feeling of Bahamians’

i By CLEMENT JOHNSON

‘EVERYWHERE you go these days
there is talk about what should happen
with the Haitians in the Bahainas. In
restaurants, at bus stops, on talk shows.

Early in the morning you can even see
the police stopping the vehicles of per-
sons who they suspect of having Haitian
workers.

_ The opinion varies from lock them all
-up and send them home, they are just tak-
‘ing over this country, they having babies

like flies, they pay no taxes, we need them

here to work.

' However, the overall feeling of Bahami-

ans is that they are a drain on the society

and we can do without them.

One is taken aback by the many senti-
_ments expressed so freely and openly
about a group of fellow human beings.
The fear expressed by one old lady was
really what struck me.
~ “T hope,” she said, “we will not see a
tepeat of the Cay Lobos, where Haitians
“were stranded and the Sovernient io

people of the Bahamas did nothing to
help them.

The American Government had to
come to the aid of those innocent people
in 1980. For me this was a genuine sign
that when hysteria takes over we lose our
sense of Christian identity.”

“I hope we will not see
a repeat of the Cay Lobos,
where Haitians were strand-
ed and the Government and
people of the Bahamas did
nothing to help them.”

— Anonymous lady

As the old lady looked through eyes
filled with tears she reminisced about a
time when the church spoke up on matters
relating to the plight of Haitians.

It was after her remarks about the role
of the church in the 80’s that we did a lit-
tle research on our own.

This lady, who only wanted to be called

“Grammy”, said that both Anglican and
Catholic churches spoke out against the
manhandling of Haitians. She was now
convinced that no one seemed to care.

If police and immigration officers find
illegal immigrants on jobs sites, both the
employer and employee should be made
to answer.

In our limited research we found
excerpts from a speech made by Bishop
Michael Eldon when he addressed the
21st Anglican Synod on November 16,
1980. These remarks would have been,

made after it was reported in Nassau that”

a number of Haitians would have been
unduly beaten.

“The time has arrived,” said the Bishop, ~

“when we feel every effort should be
made to find some solution to the prob-
lem. We must seek help outside our bor-
ders to solve it.”

The former Anglican Bishop of the
Bahamas said that persons who lived in a

See HAITIANS, Page 2C

TD. JAKES

activities that are geared
towards the young people in a
certain part of Nassau Village.

His plan is to get the young
people into the church so that
he can “feel their heart beat” —
how they feel about the situa-
tions they face and the prob-
lems they have to deal with
regularly.

“Our plan for the future is to
see if we can house a lot of |

these young people....not just
to make them happy but we
want to have activities along
with some of the major pro-
grammes,” Rev. Martin
explains.

“One of the things we want
to do is to try to get a change a
mindset into the youth, that
you do not have to go on the
block, you do not have to be
involved with the law, you do
not have to be taking drugs...”

Mrs Mortimer, like many
women raising children in Nas-
sau Village, believes that the
young people in the area need
special attention.

Challenges

Her daughter who has just
started high school is already
facing various “challenges”,
_she noted...

“And Mr Mortimer is con-
cerned about the future of her
“young man”, who will begin
primary school in September.

“I know that there are bad
influences out there and so I
try to keep (my children) away
from bad company and I try
to.teach them how to do the
right thing and not follow the
crowd and what they. are
doing,” she adds.

Rev Martin says that while
preaching the gospel of Christ
to young people is important,
they must also be exposed to
ways that they can equip them-
selves to better their situation
and stay out of “trouble”.

At his church Rev Martin
shows movies that deal with
youth issues, teach young men
how. to be gentlemen and

orale

young women how to be
ladies. Cooking and sewing
lessons are available for young
women and masonry sessions
for young men.

These are only some of the
plans that have been put in
place to build the “character”
of young people in the com-
munity, he says.

Rev Martin also takes his

“message to the women and

men on the streets of Nassau
Village, where he says that he
is “respected highly” by many
of them, because of their rela-
tionship.

The church’s job, he said, is
not only to reach the saved but
to reach everybody. Church
services are good but the idea
that somebody must first
receive the Lord in order to
participate in any activity of
the church is against biblical
principles, said Rev Martin.

“T don’t want to have a pro-
gramme that says, well you
have to find the Lord for you
to participate. I believe that
there are decent folks who
might not be saved, who might
not be involved in church but
they can be a great asset and a
great help to the community.”

In addition, there are many
other activities that are needed

outside of the church service, ene

said the pastor.

“There are things to keep
that individual occupied so that _
he (or she) has no-need to
want to go-on the other side.
And if we can have some pro-
grammes to pregnate their
minds with these things, then
they have no need to go over
there.

“But right now, to my
understanding, the Bahamas
doesn’t have anything to enter-
tain our youth. Government is
not implementing anything,
MPs aren’t bringing in any-
thing for the youth....there is
so much that could be done in
the Bahamas at large, and
every community, to pull them

See PASTORS, 2C —

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© Fight for the Family





PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





ANGLICAN
CHURCH
MEN

THE organisation is sched-
uled to hold its 32nd Annual
Conference in Marsh Harbour,
Abaco, March 10-13. All men
in the Anglican Church are
invited to register at their
parish.

Conference speakers include
Archbishop Drexel Gomez,
Canon Basil Tynes, Troy Sands
and Archdeacon Corenell
Moss.

ST ANDREW’S
PRESBYTERIAN
KIRK

YOU are invited to worship
with the church family at 9:30
am or 11 am on Sunday. Sun-
day School meets during the
11 am service and the Youth
Group meets on Friday
evenings.

The Kirk is located at the

Church Notes

corner of Peck’s Slope and
Princes' Street, across from the
Central Bank. Parking is avail-
able immediately behind the
Kirk. Visit us also at:
www.standrewskirk.com

UNITED FAITH
MINISTRIES

INT.

THE church is scheduled to
hold the following services:

¢ Morning Glory Worship —
2nd & 4th Sunday @ 8am

¢ Morning Glory Prayer
Meeting - Wednesday & Sat-
urday @ Sam.

e Christian Education - 1st &
3rd Sunday @ 9.30am.

¢ Divine Worship — Sunday
@ 10.30am.

¢ Communion & Healing
Service - Ist Sunday @ 6pm.






director...

shop.

lunch and snacks.

CRUS,

St Martin Monastery
to sponsor Spiritual —
Direction Workshop

A SPIRITUAL Direction Workshop, sponsored by St
' Martin Monastery, will be held on Friday, March 11, and |
Saturday, March 12, at St Martin Monastery and will be con-
ducted by Sister Josue Behnen, OSB, a qualified spiritual

Topics will include the what and why of spiritual direction,
the theological foundations and practical aspects of spiritual
direction, and a demonstration of a spiritual direction session.

All pastors and administrators have been invited to send
representatives from their parish, especially those involved in
the formation ministries, to participate in the complete work-

There will be a $65 donation that will include materials,



ee aon INA
GHETTO
JOHN 4:29....COME SEE A MAN

March 7 - March 13th, 2005
South Beach Union Baptist Church
_ 7:00p.m. Nightly

Speakers:



Rey. Wilton A. McKenzie Rev. Dr. Victor Cooper

Bahamas Baptist Union
Evangelist

Bahamas Baptist Union
Assistant Evangelist

SPECIAL MUSIC BY VARIOUS UNION
CHURCH CHOIRS



let Cha rlie the

Bahamian Puppet and
his sidekick Derek put

some smiles on your

kids’s faces.

e Evening Worship — Ist &
3rd Sunday @ 6pm.

e Word Explosion - Every
Wednesday @ 7.30pm.

e Youth Meeting - Friday @

7.30pm.

¢ Women of Destiny Meet-
ing - 2nd Tuesday @ 7.30pm.

¢ Men of Honour Meeting -
4th Tuesday @ 7.30pm.

¢ Praise Choir Rehearsal -

_ 1st & 3rd Tuesday @ 7.30pm.

e Live broadcast every 2nd
and 4th Sunday at 11:00 am via
More 94.9FM.

e Faith Touch is aired 1st,
2nd and 3rd Sunday at 8:00 am
via More 94.9 FM.

e Faith Touch is also aired
every Thursday at 9.45am via
101.9 Joy FM.

United Faith Ministries
International is located in the
Summerwinds Plaza, Harrold

- Road.

The senior pastor is Apos-

tle Phalmon Ferguson. For fur- -

ther information, e-mail:
ufm@bahamas.net. bs or call
328-3737/328-6949





Haitians (Fret page 1C)

ZION
BAPTIST
CHURCH

THE church at East and
Shirley Streets is hosting The
Institute In Basic Life Princi-
ples Basic Seminar until March
5. (Thursday - 7 pm to 10 pm,
Friday and Saturday, 9 am to
6:30 pm.

For further information, call
341-3009. or 457-0827 or 328-
5776.

NEW
COVENANT

BAPTIST

CHURCH

THE Children’s Choir of the
church on East West Highway
is scheduled to hold a concert
under the theme, “Kidz ‘N’
Praise” 6 pm Sunday.

For further information, call
393-3946. The senio# pastor is

- Bishop Simeon B Hall.

Hundreds pack Cathedral
for gospel music, hip-hop

HUNDREDS packed the Church of God
Cathedral. to enjoy some good old fashion
Gospel music, and hip-hop.

The church of God Cathedral Praise Team
was led by Psalmist Eileen Johnson. And the
concert was organised by the Inner Circle group.
Emcees for the night were Brother Pascal Saun-
ders and Rev Sherell Saunders.

The atmosphere was upbeat from the moment
you entered the Church, which was decorated
with purple and white balloons.

The new Dimension Dance group led the ©
audience into a interpretive dance of prayer.

The Golden Gates Praise Team, under the
direction of Minister Dwight Armbrister,
brought the house down with their selection,

- but-the night belonged:to Landlord, who worked
the young people in the audience into a frenzy
of praise and dance. i
~ The concert was held on Sunday, Feeiary 2 20.





. A member of the Church of God Cathedral sings during the concert.
(Photo by Clement Johnson) *



EAST
STREET
GOSPEL
CHAPEL

THE church at 83 East
Street, “where Jesus Christ is
Lord, and everyone is special”,
is scheduled to hold the fol-

‘ lowing services:

Sunday, 9:45 am - Sunday
School & Adult Bible Class,
11 am - Morning Celebration,
7 pm - Communion Service, 8
pm - ‘Jesus, the Light of
World’ Radio Programme on

- ZNS 1

Tuesday, 8 pm - Chapel
Choir Practice

Wednesday, 8 pm - Mid-
week Prayer Meeting (Second
Wednesday) - Cell Group
Meeting

Thursday, 6 pm - Hand Bells
Choir Practice, 8 pm - Men’s
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday), 7:45 pm - Women’s
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday)

Friday, 6:30 pm - Con-

7

querors for Christ Club (Boys.
& Girls Club), 8 pm - East
a Youth Fellowship Meet-

Saturday, 6:30 am - Barly
Morning Prayer Meeting

PARISH
CHURCH
OF THE
MOST HOLY

_ TRINITY

THE church at 14 Trinity
Way, Stapledon Gardens, is
scheduled to hold the following
services:

‘Sunday, 7 am - The Holy
Eucharist, 9 am - The Family
Eucharist, Sunday School, 6:30
pm - Praise & Worship/Bible
Study, Evensong & Benedic-
tion

Tuesday, 7:30 pm - The
Church At Prayer

Wednesday, 5:30 am - Inter-
cessory Prayer, 6:30 am - The
Holy Eucharist, 7:30 pm _ :

For further information, call
(242)-328-8677 or visit our
website:

www. holytrinitybahamas.org























society for 20 years had become an impor-
tant part of the workforce of the coun-
try. He stressed that there is a definite
need for a controlled number of Haitians

' to:continued the development of the

Bahamas.

Bishop Eldon was prophetic i in his
remarks when he said: “The need to pur-
sue a just and constructive solution cannot
be over stressed, and in our opinion, the
time is running out. Efforts to procure
such a solution, we feel certain, will

receive the support of a well meaning °

Bahamians.”
Bishop

The bishop was adamant that the treat-
ment of anyone should be Christ-like.
“Our friendship with God is incomplete,
near impossible without a corresponding
friendship with our fellow human beings.
True evangelism demands that we are a
caring and loving people, demands that
we are a responsible family.

“Caring for those members of the fam-
ily who have lost touch with family. Caring
for those who have never had a relation-
ship with any community.

“In each of our churches, concern for

Pastors (From page 1¢)

away from these negative
things. That’s what we are try-
ing to do in Nassau Village,”
he said.

Nassau Village Pastors for
Community Involvement is in
the process of locating a build-
ing to serve as a community
office.

them must be evidence itself in a mean-
ingful pastoral programme, which will
assure them that we value each of them
and assure them the warm welcome and
involvement”.

Msgr. Preston Moss in a . “Pastoral
on the problem of illegal immigrants” o
the feast of the baptism of our Lord in
1981 said that Bahamians must, in justice
and charity, make every effort to alleviate
the sufferings of “our fellow brothers and
sisters”.

“We have to strive,” he said, “to protect
the rights and dignity as individuals and
make sure, to the best of our ability, that
they are not damaged emotionally, phys-
ically or otherwise by this unhappy expe-
rience”

Mser. Moss’ letter came after the Min-
istry of Home Affairs had set a deadline
for an amnesty.

Mercy

“Mercy becomes an indispensable ele-
ment for shaping mutual relationship
between people, in a spirit of mutual
brotherhood,” said the Monsignor in his
pastoral letter.

“It is impossible to established this bond

between people if they wish to regulate
this mutual relationship solely according to
the measure of justice. In every sphere of
interpersonal relationship, justice must
speak, be ‘corrected’ to a considerable
extent, by that love which Saint Paul pro-
claimed is patient and kind, or in other
words possesses the characteristics of that
merciful love which is so much of the
essence of the Gospel and Christianity.”
“Grammy” said it would be interesting
to see how the church will respond to the
round up and detainment of Haitians

today.
Workplace

“I would like to see all non-Bahamians
one day stay away from their workplace
for at least two days,” she said. .

“Tt will really teach us in this country the
importance of foreign workers in this
country. I am afraid what will happen to
those Haitians who were born in this
country and have no status and if sent to
Haiti what will they do.

“Well maybe one day our church lead-
ers will speak up again and along with
government leaders try and find some
solution.”



“We are just sorry that we took so
long to get it up off the ground. But
that (riot) has stirred us up to go

ahead with our plans.”

— Bishop Reuben J Deleveaux

Bring your children to the McHappy Hour at

McDonald's in Palmdale every Thursday
from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. during the
month of March 2005.

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.

One of the group’s pastors,
Bishop Bertrum Johnson of
Whosoever Will Church of
God, an electrician by trade,
has already pledged between
two and three hours each week
to teach his trade to young
men, once the building is
opened.





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 3C












\






















@ REV ANDREW STEWART

@ By REV ANGELA PALACIOUS

WHO we are is a developing phenomenon
that is changing all of the time. How authentic
we are at any given moment has to do with our
relationship with God, I believe.

In Romans 2: 28-29 NLT, St Paul writes:

“For you are not a true Jew just because you

were born of Jewish parents or because you
have gone through the Jewish ceremony of
circumcision. No, a true Jew is one whose
heart is right with God. And true circumci-
sion is not a cutting of the body but a change of
heart produced by God’s spirit. Whoever has
that kind of change seeks praise from God,
not from people.”

If we change the word Jew to Christian then
we can reflect on our birth into a Christian
family and our infant baptism as experiences
that predispose us to a particular faith and
choice of lifestyle.

These external situations have to become
internalised in order for us to live the reality,
and be true “through and through”.

Such change has to be inspired and created
by the Holy Spirit if it is to be permanent,
genuine and godly. Our culture, community
or family may impose a particular way of life
on us, but.our hearts have to embrace it as
truth if we are going to live this way when we
are away from home, or when we have options
to choose otherwise.

It is not a change that can be orchestrated as
a good idea. God has to do this for us so that

Paryerstoet trove

@ By CLEMENT JOHNSON

arishioners of the New Mount Zion
Missionary Baptist Church received a
lesson in stewardship on Sunday at
their 11am Divine Service.

The message was delivered by Rev Andrew
Stewart, assistant pastor, during the church’s
40th anniversary celebrations.

-Rev Stewart stressed to the congregation that
it was important to understand the following: 1.
“Forward in faith”; 2. “Forward in the faith”
and 3. “Unity in the Body of Christ”.

Quoting Genesis 12:1-3, he said: “Now the
Lord said unto Abraham, get thee out of thy
country, and from thy kindred, and from thy

father’s house unto a land that I will shew thee:.

and I will make of thee a great nation, and I will
bless them that bless thee, and curse him that
curse thee, and in thee shall all families of the

Reflecting on life



MEDITATION



" MLREV ANGELA PALAGIOUS,

pleasing God replaces the natural human ten-
dency to want to please ourselves or other
‘people. Our heart’s desire, our inner orienta-
tion, our focus, goal, objective, aim is totally
absorbed in what God desires to do in us and
through us, with us and for us.

As we settle into this love relationship with
God, we also want to please God in our life
work: In Acts 20:24 NLT, St Paul speaks of this
inner compulsion to please God in his assigned
role: “But my life is worth nothing unless I
use it for doing the work assigned me by the

Lord Jesus — the work of telling others the ~

Good News about God’s wonderful kindness

FOR SRI LANKA

Natural disasters can’t be prevented, but the effects can be more

manageable with YOUR HELP.

Friends of Sri Lanka invite individuals and institutions wishing to
contribute towards the tsunami relief efforts in Sri Lanka to help in

one of the following ways:

Deposit your contribution into the special account opened at

Bank of The Bahamas -

Tsunami Relief for Sri Lanka
Account Number: 5265970
Bank of The Bahamas

Main Branch

The deposit can be made at any branch of the bank.

If you are paying by cheque, you can take your contribution
to A. I. D. at any of their locations in New Providence, Grand
Bahamas, Abaco, Eleuthera, Andros and Exuma.

Mail your cheque to Tsunami Relief for Sri Lanka.
P. O. Box CB 11665, Nassau, Bahamas. Cheques should be
made payable to “Tsunami Relief for Sri Lanka”.

Simply call us at 502-7094 — and we will arrange to

collect it from you.

Contributions will be forwarded to the Sri Lanka Red Cross
Society for effective deployment.

earth be blessed.”

This passage, said Rev Stewart, shows the
two-fold promise of God. The faith of Abra-
ham was being tested. He left his country and in

“The worship spaces
are only instruments
to facilitate us. Abraham
looked for a city, and we
too must look for the

city of God.”

— Rev A Stewart

faith he journeyed to a land of promise. “For he
looked for a city which hath foundations, whose

builder and maker is God.”

Abraham went forward in faith because he

and love.”

The question that we each have to ask our-
selves is: “What is my work assignment from
God and is it what I am currently doing?”

If you are not pleasing God where you are
then you are in the wrong place, and you need
to allow the Holy Spirit to reveal to you where
you need to be and to help you to move to that

_place. There may be setbacks on the journey

but at least you will be under God’s direction
and you know that it will all work out for good
somehow.

When we are lost, confused, hurt or
attacked, our response should be to turn to
God and wait for God to show us how to cope,
how long to wait and what is to be our next
move. Then, our attitude will be like that of the
psalmist in Psalm 96: 13 NLT: “But I keep
right on praying to you Lord, hoping this is the
time you will show me favor.”

Perseverance, trust, commitment, devotion
and honest admission of our thoughts and feel-
ings all work together to build character,
strength, faith and sustain us throughout the
period of suffering or struggle.

I hope that these next weeks and months
will be a time for you to re-consider where
you are in terms of being an authentic per-

“son, engaged in purposeful work, depending

solely on God’s strength and wisdom to live a
life that is pleasing to God. Perhaps, it is time
for you to ask God to change your heart so that
you may live a life that will have fulfilled God’s
highest and best dreams and plans for you.

Sunday, April 3r



WT Ee eae Ley stewardship’

believed in a God who would deliver on his
promises, so he went forth with the intent also of
building a house of worship, said Rev Stewart.

“The worship spaces are only instruments to
facilitate us. Abraham looked for a city, and
we too must look for the city of God,” he said.

“Abraham did not know where he was going
but he depended totally on God for direction.

. He received direction from God on a daily basis.

We too must depend on God for our daily guid-
ance.”

He said that God’s instructions to Abraham
can be seen as a formula for Christians.

“We should follow the word of God and rely
on Him only, trusting him only,” said Rev Stew-
art.

The community of the New Mount Zion Mis-
sionary Baptist Church celebrated 40 years on
Sunday, February 27. The anniversary services
were attended by hundreds of its members and
guests.

The church community of Mt Zion began in
January of 1965, when the church was organised
by the late Pastor Henry Stewart.

_ According to the church’s archives, the orig- —
inal church was located on Kemp Road.

After the death of her husband, Rev Lavinia
Stewart assumed the pastorate of Mt Zion in
August, 1970.

Years later after the building on Kemp Road
became too small for the growing congrega-
tion, it was demolished and the wall of the sec-
ond church was built. As the church continued
to prosper, Rev Stewart who was Pastor and
chairperson of the building committee, called the

_ members together and reminded them of a

vision the Lord had given her about building
three churches.

It was agreed to by all of the members, and
the construction of the third church began. A
new place for worship was built on Baillou Road
South — the New Mt Zion Missionary Baptist
Church.

The current church was dedicated to the Lord
in February, 1995.

Rev Lavinia Stewart made history when she
was ordained pastor in 1970 as the first woman
Baptist pastor. She was seen as a pioneer in the
early Bahamian Baptist church for women min-
isters.

She was also the first woman minister to
preach at the National Baptist Convention USA
Inc.

She attended the College of the Bahamas,
Bahamas Baptist Bible Institute and Trinity
Theological College-Bahamas/Caribbean.

She is a retired librarian from the public ser-
vice school system.

Rev Lavinia Stewart holds a bachelor’s degree
in theology, and honorary doctorate degrees
from Trinity College and Tennessee School of

Reon

2005

4pm
Christ Community Church, Bellot Road

For tickets or further information, please contact the
church’s office at
361-8782 or cccbahamas@coralwave.com

This ad has been sponsored by:
Gentle Touch Spa, Martin’s Air Conditioning, Foreign Security and
Consultancy Bahamas Limited, & Overflow Enterprises Limited





PAGE 4C, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005 THE TRIB




MUELLERS
READY CUT

eT

16 - OZ







‘Your Bahamian Supermarkets"

| SUPER
VALUE

|_ QUALITY RIGHTS AND PRICES RESERVED _)




MASHING
_AVING),







CARNATION
EVAPORATED

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WHOLE KERNAL

3g CORN

Riau eel



LIBBY’S

VTE
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CHICKEN / 09





PINK












SHURFINE 64 - OZ SHURFIN OZ ie :
PLASTIC COMPLETE/BUTTERMILK 2 :
reset APPLE JUICE ... $2.79] PANCAKE MIX......:00:---- $2.29 N Ne
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$479 : DRINK MIX .....cssssssssee $2.89 on
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: Wage Seige PARTY PEANUTS ...... $2.69 -
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DISINFECTANT






MACARONI




WHOLE/STEWED/DICED _

TEAS








5% el) TOMATOES oo easssssess -99¢ SHURFINE 100 - CT
COFFEE FILTERS ....... .99¢ |
SHURFINE 16
SALTINES u.sscsesesseees. $1 .89 | SHURFINE 16-02
SQUEEZE MUSTARD .... .99¢
SHURFIN 18 - OZ |
CREAMY/ CRUNCHY SH —40-0z]
PEANUT BUTTER....... $2.69 FABRIC SOFTENER $1.69]
HEETS ...eeeeeeeeee
PILLSBURY SHURFINE -4-ROLL CAMPBELLS




BATH TISSUE ........ $1.89] SHURFINE QUARTZ 25 - CT CHUNKY/SELECT

: STORAGE BAGS. ....... $1.79 D.
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TOWELS o..sesseeees $1.39) SHUREINE WiTRIGGER 32-02 =

es WINDOW CLEANER..... $2.79 .
SHURFINE 80 - CT i.




CAKE MIXES
& eg
S$ BEE e AG eee SARERGL BAGS ..... $1 ‘99

q 79 18 - ae einpDEIEEGEME ‘$4. 59 SHURFINE 12 - ROLL

BATH TISSUE ............ $4.99

AQUAPURE










ROYALTY



| CRE AM CHUNK/SLICED/CRUSHED
CRACKERS |gii/:gu43)

Ey $142





FOIL Ln pctv CES |

25 - SQ FT

89°



6.4 ae OZ 149 a OZ

$379 $4999 aE



AUSTRALIAN

CHEDDAR
CHEESE

PER - LB

‘BEEF CHICKEN
Pas | i

$5 °° RE

TURKEY >

i

PER - LB





FRESH

GROUND

‘DANISH



MAR OR Oe wien

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GALAXY SLICED SANDWICH GREEN GIANT

{3 10-0z! ASST’D FLAVOURS 24-0Z
CHEESE ete tees $1.39 | PASTA ACCENTS ........ $5.19
SUNNY LAND | PILLSBURY ASSTD FLAVOURS
ae 5 - LB BOWL | 11.5 - OZ
SPREAD......0..000. $2.99 : TOASTER STRUDLES ..... $3.39
SUPER VALUE | PEPPERIDGE FARM

7 GAL jASST’D FLAVOUR 19 - 0z
DRINKS ......., ene $1.99 1 CAKES .............. $3 .59

oO *
OSCAR MAYER GWALTNEY LYKES SMOKED

CHICKEN

wl si] cs HAMS

_Starkist Tuna - 2/$1.25



THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 5C

DISCOUNT MART

HOME SALE

Flatware Sets 20% OFF

Dreemel ‘Standard Size

Nene 20% OFF Pillows 2/$9.99

“Comfoter 20% OFF Towel 20% OFF

Place Mats 20% OFF

Sheet Sets 20% OFF Table Cloths 20% OFF Flowers 20% OFF

Large Plastic Garbage
20% OFF

Genéric Bleach I Gallon - 2/$3.00' — Capri-Sun 10pk Juice - $3.35
Supervalue 4pk Tissue - $1.29 Rainbow Corned Beef 120z - 99¢
Sunchy Apple Juice - 2/99¢
Fresquito Deodorizers 320z - $1.59
Pine-Sol original 1.12gallon - $11.59
Evercane Sugar 4lbs - $1.35

Glass Sets 20% OFF Syroco Patio Chairs

Niagara Spray Starch 220z - $1.69
Carnation Evaporated Milk - 2/$1.19
Veryfine Fruit

Punch Juice 1280z -$4.39

SALE STARTS MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28TH - SATURDAY, MARCH 5TH, 2005

_Pay Less at Discount Mart_

: WE ACCEPT AMERICAN EXPRESS MASTER, VISA'‘AND SUNCARD, WE ALSO REDEEM QUALITY STAMP CARDS
: MACKEY STREET, TOP OF THE HILL (next to Super Value) PHONE: 393- 3411/393-5569

BED BATH & HOME

End of Month Sale



Rugs

Towels

Sheet Sets

Table Cloths
Throw Pillows
Comforter Sets
Bath Scales
Shower Curtains



= SWEET RED &
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Bathroom Accessories

Irons

Lamps
Blenders
Figurines
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Cookware Sets Picture Frames

Glassware Sets

Flatware Sets
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PER - LB



OFFERS en MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28TH - SATURDAY, MARCH 5TH. 2005

Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448



PAGE 6C, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005



a
four friends 5am



Bahamas Conference of

S

eventh-day Ad

ventists

ists

THE TRIBUNE





Lee Ad

Day of Prayer and Fasting

March 5, 2005

he Seventh-day Adventist Church in the West Indies has
declared Saturday, March 5, 2005, a day of Prayer and
Fasting for the Bahamas, Jamaica, the Cayman Islands and
Turks and Caicos Islands. The entire membership of these
islands which make up the territory of West

| Indies Union Conference are being called to

unite in praying to the Lord to bring about a

spiritual revolution and stem the rising tide

of crime and violence. This special appeal is

made to coincide with the worldwide obser-

| vance of the Annual International Women's

| Day of Prayer on the first Sabbath in March.

In an appeal to all members of the 724 con-

gregations in the territory, Pastor Patrick

Allen, President of West. Indies Union

Pastor ‘Patrick Allen, Conference said "We are deeply troubled
President of the West by the runaway state of crime and violence
indies Union Conference .44 we must address the matter with the

of Seventh-day Adventists, : :
Mandeville, Jamaica. weapon that is primary to our warfare -

PRAYER AND FASTING." Apart from the
appeal to its membership, Pastor Allen is also extending an open
invitation to all Government representatives, business and com-
munity leaders and friends to participate in the service in their
local communities. From the Pastor Patrick Allen, Presidnet of the
West Indies Union Confernece of Seventh-day Adventists

Join Us For A Day of ENG and Fasting

Saturday, March 5, 2005, 9:15 a.m. to sunset, at any of the 45
Adventist Churches in the Bahamas: Abaco, Grand Bahama,
Abaco, Andros, Cat Island, Eleuthera, Exuma, |nagua, Long
Island, New Providence, San Salvador

Hon. John Carey,
Parliamentary
Secretary for the
Ministry of Works, visits
booths at the Trade
Show on Sunday.

Visit www.bahamasconference.org/directory to see complete list of
Adventist businesses.

Haitian Gospe eect
Campaign. Ieemeiena
ve
KY N=]\\
Channel



1

SS eee eee ee oe ee ee eet



INUNROVAT, VIAN ¥, CUVY, ) NUL TY

THE TRIBUNE

3
i

i
?

RELIGION

MOUNT TABOR

FULL GOSPEL BAPTIST CHURCH
Willow Tree Ave., Pinewood Gardens « P.O. Box N-BTOS « Teh (242) 392-2322 + Faw: (242) 392-4343
Website: www snounttabor.org > www. nellellisministies.cam « Email: mttabor@baie net.
































ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATIONS!

On Sunday February 27th, Mount Tabor Full Gosp
Baptist Church celebrated 18 years of existence.
This dynamic Ministry which was organized i
February of 1987
has been defyin
the odds and bla
ing its own trai
from the ver
beginning. It wa
on Friday the 13t
known to man
Bahamians
Black Friday (
day of bad luck
that eleven perso
along with Neil and
Patrice Ellis
answered the call






Mission of The Church . oe
Eighteen years later, Mount Tabor has growaminding the older members and informing the ne

into the one of the largest most influential churches members of why they ought to give God praise for t
the country and has impacted thousands of livwerk and ministry of their church. Indeed, Mount Tab
throughout the length and breadth of this country ahas weathered many storms, but like their predecess
around the world via its international television broathe Israelites; éfction didn t make them bitter, it sim-
casts. This cutting edge Ministry has also blazed traily made them better.

and led the way in presenting a new, more relevant and__!n addition to the dance, praise and worship a
practical model of what church is; by venturing int@noir ministries; one of Bishop Ellis sons in ministr
areas which had previously been unheard of in relathéastor Frederick Hardy of Montgomery Alabam

to church activity. Over the years Mount Tabor haseached both t
7:00am and 9:30a

services. H
admonished Mou
Taborites to tak
advantage of th
blessed privileg
that is theirs, a
members of Mou
Tabor and peopl
who have th
‘opportunity to si
under the anoint
ministry of a Senio

Ministry. From it
inception, -Bisho
Ellis (then Rev oc
Ellis) purposed tha =
this Ministry would Bishop ELLIS RECAPS 18 YEARS OF
not be church a MINISTRY.

usual ; and even its

Friday the 13th Genesis underscored this fact, wh
would become more evident as the days, weeks, mo
and years rolled along.




















The first Divine
Worship Service }”
was held on Sunday}
February 22nd |
1987, in the Chapel
of the. Bahamas
National Baptist
Convention Pastor. like Bishoy.
Headquarters . on Neil G..Ellis. H
Baillou Hill Road. secured new homes for scores of its members by p¥e@ted that his Iliff
During the first viding them with the necessary closing costs and dow#d tens of tho
service, some fifty- payments, many other members have been blessed gattds of others |
three | persons new vehicles, others with full educational Selena arg
shared in the wor- and to ensure that members are not distressed as ragessed and hav
ship experience, of medical costs the church instituted a group medi&gien positively and powerfully transformed by Bishq
including the health plan with a leading insurer in the country. Adéllis ministry and that it would-be sad if Moun
Reverend Dr. these accomplishments to the continued numerical aradporites fell in the trap of not honoring a prophet
Phillip Rahming, fiscal growth of the Ministry to well over 6,000 and ovétis own home. He told the thousands of Mou
the then President3,000,000 (debt free) in assets, respectively; andl@porites gathered in both services that theirs is a
of the Bahamas becomes apparent that Mount Taborites had more to a8 awesome spiritual heritage as the anointing d]

ae, re re Christian Council, ebrate than just the chronological accomplishment ofigeed flow from the head down; and their spiritual he
PASTOR FREDERICK HARDY, FAITH who presided over years. and therefore the ministry to which they are connec
FOL, Gosrel BAPHST VHURCH,. the: service. The And celebrate they did! In each service Bishaye both MOST BLESSED! |
ONTEONERY 2 LREAMS Pastor-Elect, the Ellis, took time out to recount some of the experiences,
Reverend Neil C. Ellis preached a sermon entitled; Tét@uggles and blessings of the years past, as a means of - TO GOD BE THE GLORY!









MT. TABOR MAKES TOASTMASTERS HISTORY!

‘l'hey are appropriately called the Mount Tabor F
Gospel Baptist Church Trailblazers ; because they
indeed blazing a new trail in the Toastmaste
international Organization as the first church sponso
club in the area.

With the help and sponsorship of Toastmas
Ivan C. Thompson, CTM/CL; Toastmaster Pamela Ro
and other members of Toastmasters club 7178 and
Toastmasters Organization here in New Providence
group got started officially on Thursday February 103
2005, with the election of its officers. Elected 4
President was Toastmaster Ilsa Evans, Toastma




















AREA GOVERNOR ANDON EDWARDS ADDRESSES THE CLUB. Mr. TABOR’S TOASTMASTERS CLUB EXECUTIVE OFFICERS.

Toastmaster Janet Sands was elected Secreteembership.

Toastmaster Lynette Smith was elected Treasurer and _ All indications are that the Mount Tabor Fu
Toastmaster Cornell Rolle was elected Sergeant-Atespel Baptist Church Trailblazers Toastmasters C
Arms. Elections were conducted by Bahamas Divisiomlll mirror their church and rise to the top of th
Governor, Toastmaster Duquesa Dean; Area Goverrfmganization locally and internationally.

Andon Edwards and other area leaders within -
Toastmasters organization.

Already Mount Tabors club is distinguishin
itself;.as the interest in the club was so tremendous
it had to be limited to a starting membership of 50 p
sons with a waiting list of over 60 persons.
Banas Division I GOVERNOR DUQUESA DEAN CONDUCTS ~— and vee rei ee Ne Ne sehneD

ELECTION OF OFFICERS AS TOASTMASTER ROLLE AND Toastmasters club in the area and very excited ab

THOMPSON LOOK ON. what the Toastmasters program can do for the ov

enhancement of its members. She further stated that

Stacia Williams was elected as Vice President @fandate and mission of the Toastmasters organizatio
Education, Toastmaster Yvette Ferguson was eleoje@y complimentary to a primary objective of Mou

Vice President of Membership, Toastmaster Bob Browabor, which is to provide holistic ministry to its : sien.

was elected Vice President of Public Relations, Mr. TaBor’s TOASTMASTERS AT THE “I”,


















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HIGH
‘LOW






Volume: 101 No.83

70F
62F

“CLOUDS,
BREEZY

Bid to round-up illega
immigrants in Kemp
Road and Fox Hill areas

By PAUL G.
TURNQUEST
- Tribune Staff Reporter

THE latest operation by
police and immigration officials
to round-up illegal immigrants
in-the country led to the appre-
hension of 230 suspects yester-
day.

Officers carried out a series of
raids in the Kemp Road and
Fox Hill areas early in the
morning.

Among those arrested and
detained were 156 Haitian men,
35: Haitian women, 17 Haitian
children, 12 Jamaican men, and
10 Jamaican women. |

Labour and Immigration
Minister Vincent Peet said that
this latest raid is in keeping with
his government’s mandate of
removing all illegal immigrants
from within the country’s bor-
ders.

“As I told the nation before,
we will have sustained exercises
until all the immigrants, no mat-
ter where they are from, will be
picked up and repatriated. We
are in keeping with my govern-
ment’s commitment to do that,
d this exercise will continue in
a: sustained fashion until this
goal is reached,” he said.

“The Bahamian Ambassador
to Haiti, Dr Eugene Newry
echoed: Minister Peet’s remarks.

“Tf anyone is illegal in the
Bahamas they should be round-
éd up and sent home, because
there is a proper way of coming
into the country. But the fun-
damental question is why do





these immigrants come to the

Bahamas? Someone must be-

hiring the majority of these per-
sons,” he said.

Dr Newry sympathised with
the Department of Immigration

. and said that the job of protect-

ing the country’s borders is a
burden for all Bahamians to
uphold, and be actively a part
of.

“We have been the most wel-
coming, and integrating coun-
try on earth. Of 300,000 peo-
ple, if 50,000 are Haitians that’s
almost 17 percent of the popu-
lation. You have people who
feel that the Department of
Immigration may be coming
after the immigrants in a strong
fashion, and they will hide them.
You have Bahamian men liv-
ing with Haitian women, and
vice versa. So it’s not as simple
as saying illegal Haitian go
home. It’s not that easy.

“The. Department of Immi-
gration has to be seen as not
hunting down criminals, but
simply doing their mandated
job. Their service needs to be
looked at in a more construc-
tive light. They are not Nazis
out there, and if people have
that image of them then some-
thing is wrong.”

Haitian Ambassador Louis

Joseph said that his embassy is
doing all it can to help their
nationals by visiting the

‘Carmichael Road Detention
Centre to listen to the needs of.

SEE page 10

Courses scheduled for April 9th

to July 2nd 2005.

Registration deadline: April 1st.
To register, call (242) 325-2638.



ANDERSONPRICE

institute of Technology



m Lhe Iribune

Che Miami Herald



BAHAMAS EDITION

THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005




Has‘ lovely
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Dresses & Shorts:
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colors i Oe asia

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‘ B TWO-HUNDRED AND THIRTY suspects were apprehended yesterday i in.a series of raids
across Nassau. They were taken to the Carmichael Road Detention Centre for processing.

ETP mee Te

mn mrt RON NSW

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

A TWENTY-four-year-old
resident of Windsor Lane left
the Magistrate’s Court in tears

yesterday after being charged |

with murder and armed rob-
bery.

Court documents allege
that on February 25, Jeffrey
Trembley being concerned
with another, killed Bradley
Stevans during a robbery
which occurred at the Twilight
Club, a sports bar located off
Market Street.

It is alleged that while he
was armed with a shotgun,
Trembley robbed the owner
of the bar, Hubert Smith, of
$400 before shooting Mr Ste-
vans and fleeing the scene.

Yesterday Trembley was
escorted under heavy police
guard to Court One on Bank
Lane, with his left hand in a
cast.

-Magistrate Linda Virgill.

informed him that due to the

@ JEFFREY TREMBLEY
on his way to court yesterday.

(Photo: Mario Duncanson):

nature of the charges, he was
not required to enter a plea
and could not receive bail
unless he applied to the
Supreme Court. She said he
would be remanded to Her

SEE page 10



(Photo: Mario Pickoanion)

Developers of $76 million project

‘threaten to pull investment out

lm By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Senior Staff Reporter

THE developers of the pro-
posed $76 million Gold Rock
Creek Enterprises, a film pro-
duction and entertainment stu-
dio due to be built on Grand
Bahama, have threatened to

pull their investment out of the

country if they do not receive a
lease from government, High
Rock MP Kenneth Russell said
in the House of Assembly yes-
terday.

Mr Russell said that the
developers have*been waiting
for the lease to be signed for
more:than two years. This
would allow them to start con-

‘struction on the property which

once housed a US missile base
that closed in 1987.

Prime Minister Perry Christie
said that the main issue hold-
ing up the advancement of the
lease is the fact that government
and dévelopers cannot see eye
to eye on whether stipulations
on how the developers treat the
local environment should be

Nassau and Bahama Islands’ Leading Newspaper

included in the lease.

As for the threat of pulling
out of the country, Mr Christie
said that he was very frank with
the developers.

“T told (Paul) Quigley (a pro-
ducer who, with Hans Schutte
and Michael Collyer, is the. dri-
ving force behind the develop-
ment) from my mouth to his
ears, do not represent views
which can be seen as a threat
to a government. It is not right
nor is.it fair,” said Mr Christie.

The prime minister said that
he tried to ascertain from the
government’s legal advisers
whether or not mentioning the
heads of agreement, which has
outlined environmental regula-
tions, in the lease would bind
the company to a commitment
to the preservation of the envi-
ronment. Mr Christie said that
he was advised that it would
not.

He pointed out that Finan-
cial Services and Investment
Minister Allyson Maynard Gib-

SEE page 10
PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



Suspected double

@ By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE suspected murder
weapon used on 75-year-old
Rosnell Newbold and her

26- year-old grandson Kevin
Wilson was identified in the
Supreme Court on Wednes-
day.

The jagged-blade of a
kitchen knife, which was
broken off at the handle,















































was presented in Justice
Anita Allen’s court yester-
day by Corporal Rochelle

Deleveaux, a forensic
"expert.
Testimony

Corporal Deleveaux fit-
ted the blade back into the
handle during her testimo-
ny. She told the court that
she received a number of
items from the crime scene
from Corporal Phyllis
Smith.

They included numerous

swabs containing blood

samples, a multi-coloured
bed sheet, a black slip,

piece of paper, a piece of
bloody tissue, a pair of

‘white panties, a pair of

beige trousers, and two
glass tubes containing the
blood of the defendant Basil
Gordon.

He is accused of breaking
into a Spice . Street,
Pinewood Gardens home
and stabbing the two family
members to death on June
16, 2002.

Detective Corporal Olson
J Noel also testified for the
Crown, being represented

Ritchie...



514 or 393-7844

murder
weapon identified in court

by attorneys Gawaine’ Ward
and Antoinette Woodside
of the Attorney General’s
Office.

He brought a photo pack-
age containing nine images
taken at Gordon’s home on
June 16, 2002. He told the
court that at noon on June
16, 2002, he went to Gor-
don’s home at 21 Rock
Crusher Road.

Scene

He confiscated a pair of

Buffalino Boots to test them
in relation ‘to the shoe prints
found at the murder scene.

He also took a tissue
paper with suspected. blood

stains, and a pair of white’
“panties, also containing

blood stains...
After Gordon was arrest-



‘ed and cautioned for the’
crime, he was taken to the
accident and emergency
‘unit of the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital. ce

A hospital representative

read the report made by Drâ„¢

Mark Grant.
The report stated that

Gordon had a laceration to.
the base of his left pinkie ~

finger, as well as several
other lacerations and abra-
sions to that hand. There

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the.
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us.on 322-1986 °
and share your story.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

you are raising funds for a

were also documented abra-

sions on his back, according
tothe doctor. __
Officer 2458 Ruthmae

Brown also took the stand

yesterday, testifying that she
initialled all of the samples
and sent them to Gladys
Hanna. of the Broward
County crime laboratory.
Police witnesses are to be
recalled today to testify as
to the outcome of the DNA

tests.

The prosecution expects.
to close.its case today, leav-
ing . attorney Dorsey
McPhee to present his
defence.

‘Day. three of Gordon’s:
double murder trial in the.

‘Supreme Court included a’

new pechnolonical: advance:
ment.
Justice Allen was able to:

|
}





“read every word as it was
typed by the stenographer’

through the use of an IBM)
Thinkpad, which was con~
nected to the stenographer’s,

- machine. mes cf

Before proceedings got,
underway, the stenograph-
er told the jury that in time

to. come, this could be used

so that every jury member

-could glance at a screen if

they missed something said,
in court. 4

|
|




THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 3





24") i PRIME Minister Perry Christie

‘ ve speaks in the House yesterday.

(Photo: Mario Duncanson)

Tae STO vm killed

Jermaine Mackey testifies

1 By PACO NUNEZ

‘| Tribune Staff Reporter

f

+ THE police officer who
shot and killed Jermaine

Mackey told the Coroner’s -

Zourt yesterday that he fired
cause Mr Mackey was run-
fing at him pointing “a shiny
gbject. Z
‘ Officer Zhivago Earns tes-
tified that Mr Mackey’s
haviour
his s life “anc







that he drew

Searches

‘y His testimony follows that
Gf his partner, Constable
Ricardo Neely, who told the
gourt he was “certain” that
Wir Mackey had a gun. How-
gver police searches did not
discover a firearm from the
scene.

f Mackey died on December
1, 2002. His killing sparked a

fiot involving hundreds of res-

fdents of the Kemp Road
grea.

| According to Officer Earns,
fe and Constable Neely were
pn mobile patrol in the St
flames Road area on the night
pf the incident, when they



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observed a black Mercedes
Benz.

He said they followed the
vehicle as it turned into St
James Street, where it parked.

Officer Earns said that after
they pulled up next to the

‘vehicle, he exited the police |

car to conduct investigations
into the occupants of the Mer-
cedes.

rot. Véhicle’

observed a white Honda
Accord approaching the
police vehicle from the other ‘,
direction of St James Street. —

He said the car was unable
to pass, and attempted to
reverse but was blocked by
another car.

Officer Earns said that the
passenger of the Honda then
jumped out of the car and
began to run, and that he saw.
Constable Neely give chase.

He said that.afew seconds
later, he heard what sounded
like a gunshot and a voice that
seemed to belong to Consta-
ble Neely calling his name.

It was then, officer Earns
said, that he saw a man run-

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@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Senior Staff Reporter

GOVERNMENT is expected
to spend $5 million on a pro-
ject which Prime Minister Perry
Christie promises will bring
reform to the administration of
land in the Bahamas.

Mr Christie advanced a reso-
lution in the House of Assembly
yesterday which would allow
government to borrow $3.5 mil-

. lion from the Inter-American

2 TM. BNSMISCDALEEA Len: ve euSaid.,.that,.be., shen.| aval:

Development Bank (IDB)
for the project, while govern-
ment directly advances $1.5 mil-
lion.

Expand

The prime minister said that
the project will among other
things improve and expand gov-
ernment’s land administration
services and improve the col-
lection and administration of

information on land in the

country.

These, said Mr Christie, will
engender the improved utilisa-
tion of land resources in the
Bahamas and will address the
inefficient process of land allo-
cation in the Bahamas.

“People apply for land on an

island for Crown Land either
by the way of grant or lease and
the process takes too long of a
time. Even though the decision
may be made quickly the
process of surveying and exe-
cuting the transfer of the prop-
erty just takes too long,” he
said.

Government, said Mr
Christie is also faced with the
problem of knowing how
Crown Land should be pre-
served for future generations oe
Bahamians.

“(The project will) bring sci-
ence and organisation to the
management of land in this
country,” he said.

The prime minister said that
this project is expected to be a

. Major intervention by the gov--

ernment in respect to land in
the Bahamas. -

“The government of the:

Bahamas is embarking on a
process which we hope will lead

. to comprehensive land reform.

Sa Hlt
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rR
PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt .

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

There cannot be discrimination

WE HAD A CALL yesterday from a
person who wanted clarification on our
Wednesday editorial. Were we saying that
under the UN Convention of the Rights
of the Child, to which the Bahamas is'a
signatory, government cannot take chil-
dren of illegal parents from school and
repatriate them?

This is not what we said. The point was

- that as long as these children are in our

country and a part of our society they have
to be treated equally and educated.

They cannot be removed from school to
sit at the Carmichael Detention Centre
until transportation can be arranged for
them to be returned to a homeland that
will be as foreign to them as it would be to
a Bahamian. :

We do not have to go as far as the UN
Convention to find clauses that protect
these children from unfair treatment. Near-
er home in our own Constitution they are
also shielded from discrimination.

Section 26 of the Constitution says that
no person can be discriminated against and
it defines discrimination as “affording dif-
ferent treatment to different persons attrib-
utable wholly or mainly to their respective
descriptions: by race, place of origin, polit-

ical opiniotis, colour or creed whereby ’per- ~

sons of one such description are subjected
to disabilities or restrictions to which per-
sons of another such description are. not
made subject. or are accorded privileges or
advantages which are not accorded to per-
sons of another such description”.

The caller wanted to know what gov-
ernment was expected to do in areas. in
which Bahamian children could not be
accommodated in the classroom because
they were squeezed out by Haitians.

This question recalled the answer that
GK Chesterton gave in a debate on Robert
Malthus’ theory on population control — a
theory based on a belief that more people
mean fewer goods for each person; thus, as
population grows, poverty inevitably

increases. This led to the movement to.

reduce population growth.

Said Chesterton: Suppose a man has
five sons, but only four hats to go on each
head. Is he going to cut off the head of the
fifth son because he cannot accommodate
him -with a hat, or is he going to work hard-

er to purchase a fifth hat?

And this was more or less the basis of
our answer to yesterday’s caller. Build
more schools — and until you have the
resources to build the needed schools
accommodate the overflow of students in
trailers. .

Of course, the next consideration is
where is the money coming from to do
even that. The answer to that one is to
economise on what we have. Don’t be
dashing around preening our feathers as
though we have the clout to influence and
change the world. Let’s face it — we don’t
and we never will.

For example, it is more important to
invest in our schools, than to underwrite an
Embassy in China. It’s not necessary for
government ministers to be flying all over
the world living in the best hotel suites to
attend every conference that comes up on
the agenda.

The next is to recognise that although we
now have more Haitians than we can
accommodate, the Bahamas’ economy
would collapse without most of them.
Those persons who have jobs, who have
been here for many years and who have
put down roots, should be regularised. The

‘payment of these permits alone would go a

long way in contributing to the construction
of a school.
The complaint is that the Haitians con-

. tribute nothing. The truth is that with their

superior work ethic, they contribute and
have contributed a great deal to this coun-
try.
They could contribute even more if they
had legal status and could, for example,

pay into National Insurance, open bank "

accounts, purchase property and invest
more than their labour into the country.

There are many businesses in the
Bahamas — the building trades and land-
scaping businesses to name just two — that
could-not operate without their Haitian
staff.

If processing is done carefully then those
who should not be here can be repatriated,
especially the recent arrivals, and those
who are making a contribution can be reg-
ularised and allowed to live as honest citi-
zens, no longer dodging their own shad-
ows from dusk to dawn.



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





Support for
Miller on the
Haitian situation |

EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE publish the follow-
ing letter written in 2002 when
Dr Earl Deveaux was minister
of Labour and Immigration,
and a letter written last month
to Minister of Trade and Indus-
try, Leslie Miller.

March 10, 2002

Hon. Dr Earl Deveaux
‘Minister of Immigration and
Labour —

Nassau, Bahamas

Re: Requirements for Citi-
zenship

Dear Minister:

After reading my copy of the
constitution, I am not satisfied
that it is clear how one may
obtain Bahamian citizenship
whether by birth or inheritance.
Iam of the strong opinion that
this is one of the matters that
should be up for constitutional
reform. Many countries have
specific requirements, which are
clearly laid out before one may
apply for citizenship. Some of

_ these include the following:

1. A period of residency.

2. Literacy - the ability to
read and write.

3. Knowledge of the history
and laws of the country.

4. A clean police record.

5. The applicant is in good
health.

I am not.sure that presently
our citizenship laws require all
the above. Therefore in the

interest of patriotism, I suggest’

the following:

1. All persons applying
should be proficient in the Eng-
lish language since it is neces-
sary for communicating with fel-
low citizens.

2. Since being functionally
illiterate is detrimental to a
democracy, the applicant should
possess a basic education.

3. The applicant should prove
that he or she is in good health
since widespread major diseases
in The Bahamas already chal-
lenge us. For example, TB,
hepatitis, HIV AIDS.

4. The applicant should be
acquainted with our system of
government, our laws, etc., since
he will be voting, obtaining a
driver’s licence and having to
function as a well-infornied cit-
izen.

I do not believe that citizen-
ship requirements should be
ambiguous or left exclusively in
a single government minister’s
hand, as this increases the
potential for gross abuse and




letters@tribunemedia.net



LETTERS



mishandling. I suggest therefore
that a independent group serve
as an advisory board.

It is also my belief that per-
sons born in The Bahamas of
illegal immigrant parents should
not qualify for citizenship, espe-
cially if they have spent most
of their early childhood out of
the country. Furthermore, they
should not be granted citizen-
ship if they are deficient.

February 22, 2005

Hon. Leslie O. Miller;
Minister of Trade and Indus-
try, ;

Manx Corporate Centre,
West Bay Street.

Dear Sir: -

I noted with great interest
your recent remarks in parlia-
ment regarding the. Haitian-
Bahamian situation in our coun-
try. Let me say that you have
my full support in this regard
and I admire the fact that you
had the courage to “call a spade
a spade”.

I am somewhat amazed that

_many of your cabinet colleagues
appear to have been fast asleep |

regarding this issue. This coun-
try has become a Haitian.colony
instead of a former British
colony. Does anyone truthfully
know how many Haitians are
residing in the Bahamas? Will
we ever find out or will we keep
coming up with a rough esti-
mate?

Many of our over-the-hill
areas such as Bain Town,

- Grant’s Town, Coconut Grove,

East Street, etc, are almost com-
pletely “Haitianized”. If you
were to check the student pop-
ulation of primary schools such
as Stephen Dillet, Mable Walk-
er, Naomi 'Blatch, Ridgeland,
Garvin Tynes, Carmichael and
Gerald Cash, this would give
you a good indication of the
number of Haitian families cur-
rently residing in our commu-
nity.

Iam of the opinion, sir, that
the Ministers of Education and
Immigration have failed utterly
in confronting this issue. I note

with great alarm the audacity”

and boldness now being dis-
played by the Haitian element
among us.

Do any of the Haitian women
that we constantly see walking
the streets with children in
hand, enter this country legally

and do they have work permits?

The time bomb that you
alluded to has a fuse that is
being consumed very quickly
and we are already too late to
turn this situation around.

We seem to have lost com-
plete control of our borders in
this country. As a matter of
security we need to realize that
prevention is better than cure.
Our past governments have
been notorious for foot-drag-

_ ging and are known for doing .

“too little, too late.” Bahami-
ans might be the next boat. peo-
ple seeking political refuge but
the question is “where do we
have to go to seek refuge”. For
a long time the Haitian agenda —
has been to overpopulate our
country with children born here,
in order to gain a foothold in
the country and to prevent
themselves from being repatri- °
ated. The next step in the agen-
da appears to be to gain voting
power and to use it to intimi-
date and silence outspoken
politicians like yourself.

May I suggest the following
as a partial remedy for the crisis
that we are now facing:

a. All persons applying for
citizenship must be able to
speak English. I am shocked by
the number of persons form
Haiti who apparently cannot

‘speak a word of English.

b. Children born in The
Bahamas to illegal immigrants .
should not be recognized as
Bahamians.

c. Children deported with
their parents to Haiti should not
be allowed to come back years
later and claim citizenship. This
is a dangerous. precedent
because who knows how many
such persons are returning and
claiming that they have rights
in this country.

d. We need to put a lid. on
the number of work permits
issued. It appears that someone
somewhere is selling this coun-
try out.

e. Homes built by squatters
on privately owned land should
be demolished after due notice
has been given. The same laws
that apply to Bahamians should
apply to illegal immigrants.

’ Unless something drastic is
done to curb the violation of
our borders, the saturation of
our country by illegal immi-
grants may become complete-

. ly out of control. Keep up the

good work and don’t allow
yourself to be deterred!

CHARLES T. MOXEY,
BA, JP,
Nassau,

February 22, 2005.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 5





New programme to aim |
for ‘Drug Free Schools’

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas National
Drug Council in its continu-
ing fight against drug abuse
in the Bahamas is expected
to shortly implement a drug
prevention programme called
“Drug Free Schools.”

At the council’s annual
church service on Tuesday,
Executive Director of the
council Marcia Munnings said
the programme will focus on
drug prevention education.

This initiative, which is
expected to be implemented
into 14 government schools
for a pilot project at the end
of March, has been made pos-
sible by a $21,000 grant from
‘the US Embassy.

Awareness

Ms Munnings also noted
that the programme will raise
drug awareness and promote
community participation in
communicating the drug pre-
vention message.

“Students involved in the
programme will be exposed
in a meaningful way. They
will propose solutions in an
integrated manner both in the
schools and communities
which they live. By doing so,
they will commit themselves
to sense the importance of a
drug free lifestyle,” said Ms
Munnings. :

The month of March has
been allocated as National
Drug Council’s Month under
the theme “Positive Vibes in
2005”.

The purpose of the month
is to highlight the challenges
and the achievements of
the council in drug preven-

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MARCH 3

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12:08 Caribbean News Update

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10:30 News Night 13

11:00 The Bahamas Tonight

11:30 Immediate Response

1:30am Community Pg./1540

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves
the right to make last minute
programme changes!

tion education.

Throughout the month of
March, on radio talk shows
there will be special features
with persons who were sub-
stance abusers and are now
in recovery.

Workshop

Also planned is a workshop
called “Profiling Youth Sub-
stance Abusers”.

At the church service Par-
liamentary Secretary in the
Ministry of Health Ron Pin-

der noted the negative effects

of repeated drug abuse.

sibility to keep our nation
sound both in mind and body
- that is drug free. The risks
of repeated drug abuse are
clear: Upper respiratory
infections, HIV/AIDS,
impaired memory, reduced
sex drive, lowered sperm
count, irregular menstrual
cycle, the risk of psychotic
behaviour, the list goes on
and on. Treatment is a costly
venture, both to the family
and the government. Let us
continue to work towards and
dream of a better Bahamas,”
he said .

Co-chairman of the coun-
cil William Weeks said that

the existing programmes for
persons with drug problems
have been doing a fantastic
job. However, he said that
more support needs to be giv-
en to them in order for them

to carry out the work to keep.

young men away from drugs.

“The drug addiction is clas-
sified as a disease because of
the way it affects the body,
mind and brain. People need
to understand that, so that
the way we deal with persons

who have a drug problem

should be caring and positive,
so that we can treat them like
we treat other people with
diseases,” said Mr Weeks.



“Tt is our collective respon-

Bahamas police force set

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Royal Bahamas Police force is set to cel-
ebrate 165 years of service in the Bahamas with a
month of special activities.

Police Commissioner Paul Farquharson
announced that the theme for the March anniver-
sary will be “Celebrating, 165 years of Progressive
transformation.”

He said the force was established to maintain the
law, order and peace in the country, and for the
prevention and detection of crime, the apprehen-
sion of offenders and the enforcement of all laws
with which it is charged.

Mr Farquharson said this mandate has placed
the force at the centre of virtually every significant
development throughout the country including:
social, economic, political and religious develop-
ment.

He said Bahamian policing has evolved from an
institution of watchmen to a multifaceted mod-
ern organisation comprised of police officers,
police civilians and police reservists.

Along the way, he said, there were many officers
who paid the ultimate price by laying down their
lives for the country.

“Those unsung heroes were ordinary individu-
als whose passion to serve remains unmatched.”

OWNER MmeO ONE LI ON

Mr Farquharson also thanked the public for
standing by the force all these years “through
good and bad times.”

He said: “Today we who serve, stand on the
shoulders of hundreds of great men and women -
Bahamians and other nationals. We are today
what they were yesterday.”

Pledged

Mr Farquharson pledged that the force will con-
tinue to go after every suspected law breaker in the

country and pursue those that leave this jurisdic- _

tion in order to seek safe haven from the long
and ever reaching arm of the law.

He invited all Bahamians to join them during
the month of celebration.

Superintendent Quinn McCartney, who co-
chairs the celebrations with Chief Superintendent
Hulan Hanna, outlined the special events of the
month which will include: A church service at St
Francis Xavier Cathedral at 2pm on Sunday, a
woman’s seminar to commemorate 40 years of
women in policing, a variety concert, medal pre-
sentation and anniversary ball.

Mr Hanna said all the events are geared to be
wholesome, safe and family orientated. He urged
the public to come out in large numbers to show
their support for the force.

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LOCAL NEWS




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THE TRIBUN.”

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& By NATARIO
McKENZIE

HIGHLIGHTING the
efforts of officials from the
Ministry of Environmental
Health and officers from the

a

Royal Bahamas Police Force:

and Fire Brigade, parliamen-

tary secretary in the Ministry

of Health Ron Pinder «

announced on Wednesday
that 90 per cent of the smoke

pockets and "hot spots” at the |
Harrold Road dumpsite had

been extinguished.
Mr Pinder noted that a

small team of officers had :

- been assigned to combat the

fires at the dumpsite after the «

government had consulted
with environmental engineers

form a Bahamian company ’
and the US based company :
Barkerlamar. This effort.as.,
Mr Pinder noted began in ear-’?

ly January when new fires had
broken out.

Mr Pinder said however
that the challenge still

remained for the government,

+

of the Bahamas to find a way .
to eliminate the raw materi-',

als that continue to sponta-
neously combust.

Contracts »

He indicated that the gov: :

ernment is presently review-
ing two proposed contracts for

the overall management and.
treatment of solid waste at the -

dumpsite. Mr Pinder noted:

however that it was too early
to give out any more informa-
tion about the matter.

"The government of the
Bahamans is very serious
about this issue," Mr Pinder
said.

"What we are dealing with

here at the Harrold road dis-*

posal site did not happen
overnight , a remedy cannot
show up over night, it is a long
term process," he said.

“What we are doing is a

part of the government’s

attempt to not only remedy °

the situation but eliminate it
entirely," Mr Pinder added.
‘Mr Pinder could not esti-
mate how much money would
be needed in order to rectify
the dumpsite but he stated
that millions of dollars would:
be needed to establish a per-
manent and sustainable waste
management system.

Landfill

Mr Pinder noted that the
government must also review
the tipping fees charged to
individuals for disposing of
waste onto the landfill. He
predicted that these fees
would increase so as to accom-
modate the cost of imple-
menting a proper waste man-
agement system.

Roscoe Fergerson, the assis-
tant director of the solid waste
division at the Department of

- Environmental Health, noted

that residents in Jubilee. Gar-
dens had experienced relief in
the past several weeks from
the smoke and the odour
which emanated from the site.

He praised the dedication
of the small group of officers
who had worked to control
the fires and noted that his
department was embarking on
an initiative to separate the
waste that was being disposed.

"As persons come in now
they will be directed to the
various areas to deposit the
type of waste they are bring-
ing," he said.

u

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story. ©


THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS





Customs
Department BEAUTY GUARD

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Gardens.

The event was part of activi-
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toms Department’s 17th annual
International Customs Day and
the 90th anniversary of the Cus-
toms Department. Staff of the
Customs Department through-
out the Bahamas sponsored the
event. Friends of the Nazareth ©
Centre also showed their sup-
port at the event.

From left are Miss Natasha
Strachan, accounts section,

’ Bahamas Customs and member
of Friends of Nazareth; Mr
Baldwin Seymour, Friends of
Nazareth; Melanie Griffin, Min-
ister of Social Services and
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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





DIVIDEND NOTICE

Cc



COMMONWEALTH BANK

TO ALL SHAREHOLDERS

The Board of Directors of Commo:

nwealth Bank Limited has declared

a Quarterly Dividend for Ordinary, “A”, “B”, “D”, “E”, “F”, and
“G” Preference Shares to all shareholders of record at March 15th,

2005, as follows:-

Ordinary

“A” Preference (payable quarterly)
“B” Preference (payable quarterly)
“D” Preference (payable quarterly)
“E” Preference (payable quarterly)
“F” Preference (payable quarterly)
“G” Preference (payable quarterly)

' -8¢ each
-9% per annum
-8.5% per annum
-9% per annum
-9% per annum
-9% per annum
-9% per annum

The payment will be made on March 31, 2005, through Colina
Financial Advisors Limited, ee Registrar and Transfer Agent, in the

usual manner.

Charlene A. Pinder-Higgs
Corporate Secretary



Minister Wilchcombe off on

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the Princess Towers and the
King’s Inn Hotel, which became
the Bahamas Princess Resort.
Lonrho’s 50 per cent shares in
the Princess properties was part
of its plans to expand its activities
in North and Central America

and the Princess property in’

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the Princess Properties and in

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the International Bazaar, which
became the Princess Casino.

The Lonrho group operated
the. Princess. properties for
decades. However, in 1996 it
announced to ‘the world that it
was. selling this division of its
operations, which by then includ-
ed its ten luxury resort hotels in
the US/Caribbean/Mexico
regions, including the Princess
property in Freeport.

Lonrho was getting out of the

hotel business altogether. By the

time-it announced the sale, the

. Freeport hotel and resort was in

bad shape, and. needed renovat-
ing.

For years Lontho could not
find a-buyer for its. Freeport

property and determined to close
it.down, which would. have put

some 1, 600 Bahamians out of
work and would have badly

- affected Grand Bahama’ ‘Ss econ-
- omy:

To: ‘keep the. hotel Gperating

and. save.the jobs of its many

- workers; the-FNM administra-
tion granted: Lonrho certain casi-
no. tax.exemptions.. Under the

arrangement, -the Princess prop-

- erty remained open until a buyer
was: found. | ene

: Ts November: 1999, the
Driftwood group, headed
by. David Bottmyer, reached an

agreement with Lonrho-to pur-

chase the Princess property in

Freeport with financing from

Lehman Brothers, a global finan-
cial investment group operating
in New. York, where the Princess
Division of Lonrho also operat-
edesis lee

At the:time. of-the sale, Lon-
rho informed the government
that..Driftwood’s ‘offer was the
better of two it received. Drift-
wood was approved for the pur-
chase and in its Heads of Agree-
ment was signed on May 2, 2000,
which obligated it to maintain a
certain level of employment,
both after and during its planned
$45 million refurbishment. and

_ development of the hotel.

Driftwood completed the hotel
renovation in. May, 2001, and,

for the most part, maintained the

level of employment agreed.
In July, 2002, shortly after the

VARGO

“ = re

PLP came to office, the Princess
officially reopened the hotel
under the Crown Plaza flag. In
fact, the reopening of the reno-
vated hotel was one of the first, if
not the first, such official act by
newly sworn in Prime Minister,
Perry Christie.

W hen it presided over
the opening of the

hotel, the Christie administra-
tion indicated no concerns about
the Driftwood group as opera-
tors, though recently in the
House of Assembly, Obie Wilch-
combe, Minister of Tourism,
alluded to some coded concerns
he had in his speech on that
occasion.

This notwithstanding: the
Driftwood group operated the
hotel for almost three years with-
out the Christie administration
doing anything about any prob-
lems that developed. :

During that time, the Bahamas
Hotel Catering and Allied Work-
ers Union (BHCAWU), as well
as hotel workers on the. casino
and resort sides, claimed to have
brought concerns about Drift-
wood’s operations to the atten-
tion of the government:

Indeed, Princess casino.work-
ers raised the concerns as they
demonstrated to unionise some
time in 2004. However, the issues
received no attention from the
government and never really
came to a head until hurricanes
Jeanne and Frances landed in
Freeport in September last year,
damaging the Royal Oasis prop-
erty and forcing its closure.

-.For weeks following its clo-
sure, workers remained hopeful
that the hotel would reopen, as
announced by its operators and
the government, in April, 2005,

. following extensive renovations.

As the date’ for the hotel’s
reopening became more suspect

and a dispute between Drift-

wood and its insurers. caused
restoration work to stop, the
1,300 displaced hotel workers
became more and more agitat-
ed.

Their agitation increased.

because they heard little or noth-
ing from either,the, hotel opera-
tors or. the.government about



y
mas

what was happening with the
hotel.

For weeks they demonstrated
outside the property hoping to
hear some news about when they
would return to work or when
they would get their $8.4 million
severance pay. When the gov-
ernment did finally decide to
speak to workers about the situ-
ation they had few answers and
offered little help. In fact, the
government seemed almost as
helpless. as the demonstrating
workers who looked to them for
relief. Every government minis-
ter who spoke to the workers
sounded more like people out of
power than people in power. .

Embarrassed by 1,300 demon-
strating workers and severe crit-
icism from the opposition, the
government reacted in. knee-jerk
fashion. The government. spent
taxpayers’ limited funds ‘to fly
technocrats and a few displaced

- workers to New York to meét

with Driftwood principals rather
than requiring the Driftwoed
principals to fly to The Bahamas
to meet with them. :.

In the process the government
went-into further debt to collect
a debt owed to it instead of hav-
ing its wealthy debtors spend
some money to come to it to
explain how they would pay their
debt. PM Christie announced
all manner of promises to work-
ers, including finding them jobs
in other hotels around the coun-
try and persuading utility com-
panies to give them a’ break. The
top, however, was the promise
to pay workers the $8.4 niillion

owed to them in severance pay.

B y this time the govern-
ment. was criticised
heavily for being insensitive,
incompetent and irresponsible
in dealing with the Royal Oasis
matter, in particular the plight
of the workers. It was not.
blamed for the closure of the
hotel, which the hurricanes

‘brought about, but rather, it was

criticised for being too slow and
indecisive in moving to address
the plight of workers following
the closure. Perhaps it was this

‘severe criticism that led the gov-

ernment to agree to pay the $8.4
million severance that the Drift-
wood group owes workers. This
is an unprecedented move. Nev-

er before has a government of

The Bahamas undertaken to pay

SEE next page

- BACARDI & COMPANY LIMITED

- Bacardi & Company Limited is seeking candidates for the position of —
Cost Accountant. The Company has been based in Nassau for over 40
years with significant manufacturing operations in the areas of bulk rum

_ production and bottling of various spirits 1 and beverages, primarily. for ©

s export markets.

| Job Description

~ Under limited supervision, the Cost Accountant will be required to apply
i principles of cost accounting to analyze cost records and to distribute
~ costs for production on items such as labour, equipments, materials and’
‘overhead costs and to compute the unit cost of product or service.
- Continuously evaluate existing cost systems and records cost data for use
by management in controlling expenditures. The Cost Accountant will
further be expected to prepare the necessary reports in preparation for

operating budgets.

Qualifications

The successful candidate must hold a professional designation with five
(5) to ten (10) years experience. A CPA designation is preferred.
_ Furthermore, due to the nature of the work to be performed the individual

must possess the ability to work independently under pressure to
consistently meet deadlines. Must be a self starter and a team player.

Salary/Benefits

Commensurate with experience.

Interested candidates should forward copies of their curriculum vitae
directly to the Bacardi & Company Limited P.O. Box N-4880, Nassau,

N.P., The Bahamas.

Attention The Human Resources Manager

Information may also be forwarded via e-mail to dacartwright@bacardi.com

: Application Deadline: March 31, 2005

BACARDI AND THE BAT DEVICE ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF BACARD( & COMPANY LIMITED
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 9



fs

‘FROM previous page

!a debt owed to workers by a pri-
‘vate entity. Many have criticised
‘the move and for good reason.
‘One only imagines what other
‘workers will think about this
‘when they are displaced from
‘their jobs and their employers
fail to pay them their severance.
' Why should they not look to
‘the government to pay them and
‘collect from the employers later
‘also? What PM Christie agreed
to do is indeed a dangerous
precedent. One has to be happy
‘for the Royal Oasis workers, for
-God knows that they could use
the money.
-. However, the government’s
‘decision to pay them in this way
‘may result in the Driftwood
‘group getting away scot-free and
-the nation being burdened for a
‘long time to come. It is interest-
‘ing to note that Lehman Broth-
‘ers ‘are a preferred lender of
‘Royal’ Oasis, meaning that they
‘ate paid: before most other cred-
‘itors..
Perhaps it was the pressure of



the Royal Oasis situation that
led Minister Wilchcombe to talk
the nonsense he spoke in the
House of Assembly the other
day.

Pez: it was the severe
criticism of his govern-
ment’s clumsy, insensitive and
incompetent handling of the mat-
ter that made him attempt to
blame the former administration
for the situation. The pressure
of trying to recover from this
poor showing as well as the
numerous other blunders by his
government has driven the min-
ister to foolish ranting.

The fact is that the failure of
the Driftwood group to make
National Insurance payments, to
make employee payments to
creditors from salary deductions,
to make pension payments on
behalf of workers and to pay
local vendors had nothing to do
with the former administration
or any provision not placed in a
Heads of Agreement.

There are laws in place to deal

the Royal Oasis affair

with each of those situations. In

fact, Mr Wilchcombe’s govern-.

ment has presided over this situ-
ation for almost three years with-
out doing anything about it.

If his government knew about
the situation and did nothing, it
was simply negligent. If they did
not know about the situation,
they were simply incompetent.
Neither of these scenarios is far-
fetched, for there are far too
many examples in this country
today that point to the fact that
over the last three years Mr
Wilchcombe and his colleagues
have been both negligent and
incompetent.

They can try all they want to
lay their bungling at the feet of
the former administration, the
truth of the matter is that their
folly is all their own.

THOUGHT FOR
THE WEEK
“I got what I wanted; now I

don’t want what I got.” The °

Overwhelmed. -

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005

Under the distinquished patronage of Her Excellency
Dame Ivy Dumont DCMG, Governor General & Mr Dumont

THE BAHAMAS —
NATIONAL YOUTH CHOIR

presents its

Ree UE ee vi et UN)

presse eae: soeossege gs

March 15 to 19, 2005 at

The Dundas Centre For The Performing Arts at
8:30pm nightly

Gala Performance

Tickets $15.00
March 15 Tickets $50.00

March 16 - 19 Tel: 393-3728

(Includes drinks and hors d’ouvres)

A programme of Bahamian music and dances
Tel:. 393-3226

and music from around the world!



Room/Time

Room 1
5:30

SPCH 100 ACC 420 ECE 101
Fundamentals of | Government Early childhood
: Accounting Education

SPCH 101

Interpersonal

Education
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BUS 227

Zommunic
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Budgeting Planning Skills IT.
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College Math I

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Financial
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PSY 312
Psychology of the
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PSY 317

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Introduction to Public
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College Algebra | Introduction to
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Gold Circle





Officer who
shot Jermaine |
Mackey testifies

FROM page three

ning at him from behind a near-
by building.

“He said the man, who
appeared to be the passenger
of the white Honda, came run-
ning at him at a very fast pace
with his right hand inside his
jacket..

Officer Earns said that he
ordered the man to stop but
that the man instead removed
his hand from his jacket and
pointed a.“shiny object”.

“In fear I quickly drew my
pistol and discharged two
rounds,” he said. .

Officer Earns testified that
he conducted a search of Mr
Mackey, but found no firearm.
While he was doing so, he said,
he noticed a crowd running in
his direction.

He said that he then saw
‘Constable Neely re-appear.

-MONDAY | TUESDAY |WEDNESDAY| THURSDAY

ECO 215

Economics I

ADM 351
Quantitative
Analysis
ACC 300
Principles of
Accounting I
ACC 303
Principles of
Accounting II
ECE 109

Art
Appreciation
PUB 309
Public
Bureaucracy

ISA 401

Systems Analysis

& Design

MONDAY TUESDAY |WEDNESDAY| THURSDAY FRIDAY |_

ADM 321

Administration &

Management
ADM 312
Elements of
Supervision
BUS 300
Business Ethics
MAT 204
Elements of
Statistics
ENG 243

« iS
Library Research oT

Skills
ANT 100
Introduction to
Anthropology
493 PDC Il

MAT 097 ISA 327
Basic Math II Data
t

use, East Bay Street

LOCAL NEWS

Officer Earns said his partner
came towards the scene of the
shooting, and then went to the
patrol car to radio for an ambu-
lance and for back up units.

Officer Earns said that while
this was happening, the crowd
had surrounded him and tried
to attack him.

During his testimony, Con-
stable Neely told the court that
he chased Mr: Mackey around
two buildings and observed him
holding what he was “95 per
cent sure” was a handgun.

Fayne Thompson, who rep-

resents the Mackey family, sug-

gested'to Constable Neely that
his testimony was not truthful,
and that he never saw a gun in
Mr Mackey’s hand.



FROM page one

ties.

feet below sea level.

3,000,” said Mr Russell.

Charged with murder
and armed robbery

FROM page one

Majesty’s Prison until his pre-
liminary inquiry, which she set
for April 1. Trembley was rep-
resented by Tamara Taylor.
Inspector Ercil Dorsette prose-
cuted.

Trembley spoke once when
he told the judge that he under-
stand the charges read to him.

Outside the court a large
crowd of apparent supporters
of the accused lined the path-
way leading from the holding
cell to the courtroom.

As he passed, they shouted
at him to remain strong because
they knew that he was innocent.



FROM page one

the people there.

released,” he said.

ed from the country.

had seen a gun to furnish his
partner with justification for the *

this was the case, however '

Developers of $76
million project

son would be speaking with government’s legal advisers to
determine a way the lease could be written to satisfy both par-

Mr Christie said that the question is whether or not a devel-
oper ought to look at a government and say to a government |:
that it wants no mention in the lease, within the setting up of
obligations of the landlords, the obligations of the tenants,
anything to do with the environment. :

“The fact of the matter is, that is what separates the govern-
ment from the developers,” he said.

One of government’s concerns over the environmental impact
of the development seems to be stemming from a. “basin” or
“pool” being constructed by the developers. coming from the
beach which Mr Russell said is more than an acre in size and 25

“Obviously with this concern that the government has, I
encourage them to monitor this situation,” said Mr Russell.

He said that the residents of the east end communities are
looking forward to the development however.

“I understand that the project when completed will hire
some 1,200 regular employees and during movie time some

Raid nets 230 suspects

“What we are doing is going down at the detention centre to .
see the condition of the people, and to see how we can help !
them. Some people are saying that they don’t have the papers °
with them at the time of the arrest and we have helped in those -
cases to get word to their families or spouses to get them ;

Nearly 1,000 illegal immigrants have now been arrested living
in the country this year with the vast majority repatriated to .
Haiti. Last year more than 3,000 illegal immigrants were deport-

THE TRIBUNE

2

ae Pea et at area a of lM aaa? ate

Mr Thompson suggested that
Constable Neely only said he :

shooting.
Constable Neely denied that

Coroner William Campbell put i
it-to him that in his statement to :
police the officer has only said :
he saw “what appeared to be a:
handgun.” ‘

Constable Neely put this:
down to the language officers*
are trained to use when mak- :
ing statements, and said that he :
is “certain” that Mr Mackey was ;
armed. i

The Coroner’s inquest®
will continue on Friday;
March 4. i
























ST

OF

WF cara

Others shouted at police that:
they had arrested the wrong
man and threatened that the
family would sue the govern;
ment and the police. ;

His mother and sister were.
visibly distraught claiming that
police had targeted Trembley,
for no reason. They claimed he
was not a trouble maker and
had never had any trouble with
the law. :

As he was led away, his sister
began sobbing, “Look at how
they taking my brother to jail.
for something he ain’ do. Look
how they make my brother
cry,” she said as he was led

“away with tears in his eyes.

%
i
Â¥



+


















,



ANNOUNCEMENT ,
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Gregory C. Neil, M.D.
Board certified
Plastic & Reconstructive Surgeon
Surgery of the Hand

The regularly scheduled Plastic Surgery Clinic will be held in
FREEPORT
on Saturday March Sth, 2005 at Lucayan Medical Center West
from 9:00am - 11:00am &
Sunrise Medical Center

from 12:00p

m - 2:00pm

Please call (242) 356-3189 or the preferred clinic to schedule
or confirm appointments.


THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 11

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THE TRIBUNE



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ccs ceo

LOCAL NEWS



Casting call
for Pirates of
the Caribbean

FOR those who enjoyed see-
ing friends and family immor-
talised on the big screen in the
blockbuster high stakes action
comedy, “After the Sunset,” and
have kicked themselves for miss-
ing the opportunity presented by
the action thriller, “Into the
Blue” filmed last year, fate has
presented another opportunity.

The long awaited sequels to
“Pirates of The Caribbean: The
Curse of the Black Pearl” is
about to begin shooting on
Grand Bahama and casting
director, Thomas Gustafon has
sent out a call for extras from

New Providence, Abaco and
Grand Bahama.

“Pirates of The Caribbean II

and III,” which will also be
directed by Gore Verbinski, is
looking for men and women of
all ages to portray sailors, pirates
and Asian seamen. :

In these long awaited sequels
Johnny Depp, who will return as
Jack Sparrow in the 17th Cen-
tury epic adventure, is caught up
in yet another web of supernat-
ural intrigue. The filming of the
sequels will take place primarily
on Grand Bahama and the cast-
ing director is actively searching





for weathered, working-class,
“charactery” faces. They have
expressed no need for the mod-
ern day, clean-cut look.

Craig Woods, Bahamas Film
Commissioner, is ecstatic to have
yet another blockbuster film
being shot on location in the
Bahamas so soon after the suc-
cessful run of “After the Sun-
set”, expected out on DVD this
month.

“Having films such as Pirates
of The Caribbean‘shot in the
Bahamas presents tremendous
opportunities for the local econ-
omy,” Mr Woods said. “The esti-
mated $10 million left behind by
New Line Cinemas after the
wrap up of ‘After the Sunset’ in
2003 clearly demonstrates the
potential the film business holds
for the country.”

Benefits

In addition to the direct eco-
nomic benefits, Mr Woods
added: “The promotional value
of these blockbuster films show-
casing our country’s pristine
beauty and infectious culture will -
continue to pay off for years to
come.” :

The New Providence castin
call for “Pirates of The
Caribbean IJ and III” will be
held on Friday March 4 in Gov-
ernors Ballroom A at the British
Colonial Hilton between Spm
and 8pm. The casting call on
Abaco is set for Sunday, March 6
at the Abaco Beach Resort in
Marsh Harbour from 1pm to
4pm.

All applicants residing outside
Grand Bahama are required to
have housing options there in
order to be considered.

Additional information or
instructions for submissions via
email can be found at
www.piratescasting.com.

SENIOR EXECUTIVES,
DEPARTMENT HEADS:

Building a high performance
team is not optional!
It is a matter of survival!

LANTE

UNIVERSITY

is offering two one-day workshops to help you
design and motivate your team

and maximize performance:

Powering Tearn Performance March 3rd
Build team confidence in a world of global competition;
encourage open consistent and constructive communication.

Accelerating Individual Potential

March 17th & April 7th

Build and strengthen your relationship with and among team
members; measure performances for more productivity; achieve
goals through set performance parameters.

Cost per workshop: $285.00 per person
(includes breaks, lunch, and seminar materials)

For registration details

telephone (242) 363-2000 ext 64270/6495 |
or email: atlantis.uinversity@kerzner.com

ATLANTIS UNIVERSITY

“Leading organizational change through a shared vision

in the pursuit of excellence”


THE TRIBUNE | | __ THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 13 |





H. Wayne Huizenga School
of Business and Entrepreneurship
ges

its Denes Speaker Series

acre) ay A. Pohliman, Ph.D.



Randolph A. Pohiman, Ph.D.,
dean of the H. Wayne Huizenga
School of Business and
Entrepreneurship, will discuss _
his theory of value-driven —
management, a fully integrated
philosophical approach to
managing and leading. Discover |

how this dynamic approach can —
add value to yourself, your
career, and your organization.





Thursday, March 10, 2005.
6:00 p.m.

British Colonial Hilton Hotel
Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas

This Distinguished Speaker Series is offered FREE of charge as a public
service by the Huizenga School of Nova Poe University. Seating

is united and by RSVP only.
WY

Reserve your place today NSU
fee | SOUTHEASTERN
by calling Laquel Miller at UNIVERSITY

(242) 364-6766, ext. 0. Berona the Classroom

Nova Southeastern University admits students of any race, color, and national or ethnic origin. " Nova Southeastern University is accredited by the
Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097, Telephone number:
404-679-4501) to award associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s, educational specialist, and doctoral degrees. 02-026/05 ESJ
THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005












& PART Il
WHAT’S
HAPPENING NOW

By DION A. FOULKES

Summit Academy

invites you to apply for the
2005/6 academic year!
















I AM deeply concerned
about the current direction of
public education in The
Bahamas and fearful that the
tremendous progress made
under the FNM Government
from 1992 to 2002 is being
seriously undermined.

Over the past three years
the Ministry of Education has
adopted policies which are
diminishing the ability of
teachers and administrators to
provide a quality education
for our children.

After many years of devel-
opment, the Bahamas Gener-










We are proud to offer:

¢ Student-centered environment
* A progressive approach to teaching and learning
© Fully air conditioned facility
e Updated computer lab and computers in
every classroom





¢ Small class sizes
¢ Diverse student population
° A challenging hands-on, inquiry-based curriculum
¢ Highly qualified educators
« Emphasis on math, science and technology

Telephone: (242) 356-5625/6
Additional information available at www.summitacademybahamas.com

Annual tuition rates range from $1300.00 to $2400.00 per term









i T.G. Glover students are now being taught in trailer classrooms.

higher average. But this will May 2002 not in March 2005,



al Certificate of Secondary

' . Education was introduced in

not give us a true picture

of how all our students are

as it is likely that the benefit
from the IDB may not come

1992. The BGCSE is the final doing. to fruition for at least: tw;
examination for secondary So when the cutrent! Minis- years.
school students. It replaced ter of Education, the Hon. —
the former General Certifi- Alfred Sears, announced that
cate of Education (GCE) _ he wished to achieve a nation-
examination which primarily al B grade average by 2006, I
assessed a student’s academic _ believe he did not understand
ability. our current system of exami-

The BGCSE is a well- nations. Or hé intends to
thought-out diagnostic exam- __ revert to the former selective
ination which, unlike the system. That, in my view,
GCE, is intended to evaluate would be regressive.
the overall ability of a student. The truth is, that if we

' Tt tests a student’s ability to improve the national grade
learn a particular subject and average of D to a D+ ina
also the student’s ability to _ three-year period, that would
apply that knowledge. This be an excellent accomplish-

gi T. G. GLOVER
DEBACLE
The demolition of tikes
entire school campus at T. G::
Glover by the PLP Govern- '
ment was, in my view, a mis-
take because it destroyed bad-
ly needed classrooms. vi
In 2001 when I was’ the:
Minister for Education, as a::
result of some safety concerns,
we had the Ministry of Works:
examine the T. G. Glover:
School. It was recommended

practical side of the BGCSE ment under our current sys- by Works and a private engi- -

“was a new concept which tem. ‘ ‘neering firm that the centre
should produce a better analy- The effect of the Minister’s building of the school be con- x
sis of a student’s overall abili- pronouncement can set the demned.

As a result, this portion of
the school was cordoned off.
However there were other
buildings on the. school
grounds deemed safe and
sound that were not closed.
These buildings were used to
accommodate Grades 4, 5 and
6, and we accommodated
grades 1, 2 and 3 at the Albury
Sayles Primary School in
proper classrooms.

At the time, there was a big
public outcry ‘from the oppo-
sition, especially from Mr.”

ty. Nilay: education system back many

5 years and it is my hope that
Policy

he will further analyze the
import of what he is attempt-

The following point needs
to be emphasized because it

ing to do.

Without any policy change,
is something that is often mis- it appears that teachers are
understood or not recognized. now reverting to the former
The BGCSE is a pluralistic or _ practice of selecting only the
open examination and isnon- brighter students to take the
selective. As a matter of poli- +. national exams.
cy, all students are encouraged = There was a 20 per cent
to take the maximum number reduction in the total number
of exams wherever possible.

This new policy drastically

of students taking the exam

last year and it is easy to imag-
_ changed the average national
grade for the examinations.

ine that this, in great part, is Sears, regarding unsafe and
attributed to the Minister’s
“iach ator (ahh gctlseionraminrdnmmemisicinnned GEE the old system, the Pest.
“students were selected to ta

unhealthy conditions.
oronouncement, This will pro- In contrast, the PLP. Gov-
“duce only a cosmetic improve- ernment ae oished the”
the GCE examinations. . ment, not an accurate overall entire school, including the
The previous selective poli-
cy resulted in a higher nation-
al grade average. However,

assessment. parts which were deemed safe.
this practice did not give a

and sound and. which were,
Purpose
realistic and accurate indica-°

accommodating half of the,
students. _ ‘
If the BGCSE is to serve They then took these same
tion of the ability of all the the purpose for which it was’ students from a safe environ-|
students. The BGCSE exami- created, then Minister Sears ment and proceeded to house
nation gives amore accurate andhisteamshouldadhereto them in trailer classrooms,
assessment of the abilities of | the parameters previously set. which is clearly a less safe and
our total student population. Otherwise, they should restate . a less healthy environment.

It would not be difficult to the policy on education that Currently, the. students at
produce a national B grade. his government intends to TT. G. Glover are crammed. in ©
average. All youhavetodois advance. trailer classrooms at Albury
select the top 10 percent of His current goal to attain Sayles School which is an
students in each grade to take a natiorial B average in three
the’ national exams, which years is clearly unrealistic
would automatically ensure a



that we are now accepting applications for 2005 - 2006

' academic year, tenable at:

® The College of The Bahamas |

e All accredited Tertiary level IInstitutions fechitarshis

alt does not include college prep)

“|e A limited number of scholarships are also available for
deserving students attenalng instiutions outside the

pceramaee sna i





Application forms can be collected from the offices of
Burns House Limited,
John F. Kennedy Drive.

Deadline for applications is May 15, 2005.

Sin LYNDEN PINDLING i
ARCHDEACON WILLIAM THOMPSON

QS

undesirable situation at. best.
unless it is achieved by revert-

Their playing area is small and
ing to the selective system. He

@CH GkLAR & HE littered with boulders and
. has not indicated that he

RIENDLY

TEL: 356-7100 ° FAX: 328-6094 ¢ friendlymotors@hotmail.com

2004 FORD EXPLORER

dangerous sharp-edged steel
debris. Our students. deserve

intends to do so this. In my better.
view a more realistic goal
would be to aim fora Caver- HLOW.MORALE

ALL indications are point-
ing to a breakdown in the
leadership and command
structure at the Ministry of
Education which is having a
debilitating effect on the oper-
ation of the schools and is also
negatively affecting the per-
formance of teachers. :

There seems to be a lack
of co-ordination between the
Ministry itself and the Depart-
ment of Education, which has

any significant additions to direct responsibility for the
schools nor constructed any management of the school sys-
new schools in their nearly tem. )
three years of governance, and This disconnect is sending:
there does not appear to be mixed signals to administra-
_ any movement in that direc-’ tors and teachers. Transfers
tion. and appointments of admin-
Generally speaking, the _istrators and teachers are not
construction of a new school now being effected through
. from inception to completion, the proper channels, resulting
takes approximately one year in long delays and untimely
to 18 months barring unfore- - notification to the individuals
seen events. affected. This is disruptive to
Therefore, if the govern- the system.

ment commenced construc- In order to have effective
tion of a new school now, in delivery of education in The
all probability it would notbe Bahamas there must be a
completed until the latter part mature and professional rela-
of 2006. This would mean that _ tionship between the key play-
for almost four and a half ersin the Ministry. Anything
years, there would be no _ short of this will result in our
‘meaningtul expansion in our children being deprived of an
school system, hence the over- _ effective system of education
crowding problem, which that all governments have an
seems unmanageable now, _ obligation to provide.

would be exacerbated.

The Ministry of Education STUDENT LOANS
announced just recently it was After winning the general
about to commence negotia- elections in 2002, the PLP

increased the burden of pay-

tions to obtain funding from
the Inter-American Develop- ment under the Government's |
Guaranteed Loan Scheme

age within six years.

@ OVERCROWDING

Overcrowding is becoming
a serious problem again. Iam
advised that in some primary
schools the classroom sizes are
near to 40 students, and at the
high school level nearing 45
in some schools.

This state of affairs is total-
ly unacceptable. The PLP
Government has not made





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2 year 30,000 mile warranty, rust protection & undercoating. construction of new schools. _ instituted by the FNM. With-,
out reasonable notice they |

' ; This is clearly an initiative
pte st co pera antec ems ng # which should have started in changed the polley to require ©

Special Price






THE TRIBUNE

IHUHRSDAY, MAHUN 3, cu, FAVE 15





parents to pay the entire 8 per
cent interest due on the loan
as opposed to the previous
equal 4 per cent split between
government and parent. This
has increased by 100 per cent
the cost of borrowing under
the scheme. fer

This change in the agrée-

ment by the PLP Government
has put a heavy burden on a
lot of parents, which in many
instances cannot be borne
solely by them.

Their finances simply will
not permit it. Consequently,
the loan payment default rate
this year has exceeded 60 per
cent which is worse than in
previous years.

Scheme

There has been some criti-
cism of the administration of.
the scheme. However, it is a
new and remarkable oppor-
tunity for many students to
get financial assistance for ter-

tiary education. The PLP gov- »

ernment awarded 1,354 schol-
arships between 1982 and
1991. ;

The FNM government
awarded 3,249 scholarships
between the corresponding
period of 1991-2001.

. .. Many progressive countries
are trying to make
tertiary education available
to all of their qualified stu-
dents. ,

We are not able to afford
this so the least we can do is to
make it easier for the parents
and students who are pre-
pared to pay for their ow
education.

I would urge the govern-
ment to review their decision
and revert to the previous split
interest system under the orig-
inal programme which could
help to reduce further delin-
auener cee rea Swe coe

I believe that public edu-
cation is heading in the wrong
direction. _

This trend must be reversed
in order to move our country

forward and to remain com-:

petitive in the world. .



@ THE closed gates of
T.G. Glover after the gov-
ernment had demolished
the school.

Currently, the students at
T. G. Glover are crammed
in trailer classrooms at
Albury Sayles School.













The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. Ney

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.












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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005 ho . THE TRIBUNE.








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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY; MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 17

iy ~ ii
~







vehicle from point A to point B would be the

ed Baha



smart thing to do. Inde mians have been

taking advantage of this concept long before - (oe

“car pooling” was an internationally accepted

hae Se

practice.

Doing the smart thing and using common sense







‘ R {
“3 are two Bahamian traits that we must always |
2 ‘exercise when it comes fo drinking and driving. |
; ° \

Kalik reminds you to think before you drink...

cheers!




PAGE 18, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005 | THE TRIBUNE
L N Coakley ded | 7
students visit [77°
Dame Ivy

STUDENTS from the LN
Coakley High School, in
Exuma, posing, on February
25, in front of Government
House during a courtesy call
on Governor-General Dame
Ivy Dumont.























(BIS photo: Eric Rose)

share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.















Jacqueline is
the write stuff

MRS Jacqueline Myckle-
whyte, author, presenting
Dame Ivy Dumont Governor-

RE-BATH BAHAMAS General with a copy of her
“Bahamas Only One-day Bath Remodeler” book entitled, “The boy
Telephone (242) 393-8501 and his bottle” during a

courtesy call on Tuesday, Feb-
ruary 22, at Government
House.

The book, which is avail-



We can professionally install:

The Hu

Custom made tub and shower door enclosures.




Toilets, sinks and Acrylic Bathtub Liners. able in bookstores, is geared
toward youths. But Mrs Myck-
Quality “washerless” solid brass plumbing fixtures. _ lewhyte says “adults can
Solid Surface vanity tops and all wood vanity bases. rete ae ne ponies being
ge Bathtub drains and over flow assembly. _ She says the book is the first
es a in a series.
Le :
a (BIS photo: Lorenzo
oa * Lockhart)
i
Cea NAL Ce De ay ene O70 oF re FC nec eesssssssssssshessnnnsnnnnsnnnnnnsnenennnnnennnnenensees
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PAGE 20, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005 “6 THE TRIBUNE. ?



=
THURSDAY EVENING MARCH 3, 2005

P| 7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

NETWORK CHANNELS

. Everyday Food |Visions of New York City Iconic ras of the city, in-| California Dreamin’: The Songs of the Mamas and
WPEBT |Com and water- |cluding St. Patrick’s Cathedral, Little aly and Central |the Papas © (CC)
cress salad. (Park.
The Insider (N) |Survivor: Palau ao Crea- |CSI: Crime Scene Investigation Without a Trace A nanny and her
WFOR|n (Cc) tures and Horrible Setbacks” (N) 0 |Grissom finds a clue on a piece of aay disappear hours after her
(CC) evidence during a murder trial. employers fired her. M (CC)
Access ory Joey Joey joins [Will &Grace |The Apprentice The candidates de-/Law & Order: Trial by Jury ‘The
WTV4J |wood (N) (CC) |Michael’s book |*Company’ sign and operate miniature golf [Abominable Showman” (Series Pre-
club, 1 (CC) (CC) courses. (N) (CC) miere) (N) © (CC)

Deco Drive The 0.C. ‘The L.A.” Sandy and Jim-|Point Pleasant “Pilot” A half-devil |News (CC)
@ wsvn

my, caught in a bind, get help from |woman’s search for her mortal
Jeopardy! (N) _|Extreme Makeover Singer/musi- _|Extreme Makeover Fritz and PrimeTime Live (CC)
@ WPLG (cc) cian; Beverly Hills High School ne get new looks. (N) 0.






an unlikely source. ( (CC) mother. (CC)
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levenge”





hurricane hits Miami. (N) (CC)









Hardtalk BBC World Talking Movies |BBC World Kill or Cure? | BBC World Asia Today
The Parkers 1 /Girlfriends Soul Food 4 (CC) Club Comic View
BET cc (cc





(00) Life & Opening Night “Cantata for the King”, “A Pairing of Swans’ starring Rex |The National (CC)
imes (N) (CC) |Harrington. (N) (CC)

Late Night With |CNBC on Assignment Martha Dennis Miller Malcolm Gladwell. |The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
Conan OBrien Stewart's release from prison: (N) _|(N)

Be Anderson |People in the News Martha Stew- |Larry King Live (CC) NewsNight With Aaron Brown
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Mad TV The violently heartwarming |Comedy Central (Ray Romano —_ | South Park Drawn Together |Shorties
film “Gump Fiction.” © (CC) Presents ‘Paul jComic.(CC) |‘Spontaneous |(CC). Watchin’ Short-
Gilmartin” Combustion” ies (CC)
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Raven goes to | Broderick, Rupert Everett. A scat Ae igtrans- — |Future Phil is left |The twins "0 to |Louis tries out for} ‘
the spa. formed into a cyborg crimefighter. ‘PG’ (CC) in charge. Chicago. (CC) — |mascot. (CC)
DIY This Old House | Weekend. Wood Works Be Your Own {DIY to the Res- |DIY to the Res-
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Journal: Europa Aktuell Journal: In Journal: Im Focus-(In
Tagestema Depth Tagestema German)

Michael Jackson|La Toya Jackson: The E! True | Janet Jackson: The E! True Holly-/Saturday Night Live Justin Timber-
Trial Hollywood Story 4 (CC} wood Story (CC) lake. 1 (cc
(:00) College Basketball Miami at Duke. (Live) (CC) Tilt (N) (CC) Tilt (CC)

2)
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Tenis Con Clerc |RPM Semanal {NBA Action (N) |Simplemente Futbol (N) SportsCenter - International Edi-

(N) (N) tion (Live)

Daily Mass: Our |Life on the Rock Back Stage |The Holy Rosary|Theology of the |The Church and : ae i

Lady - |Body the Poor :

Caribbean Work-|No Opportunity Wasted ‘Navy ‘|The Extremists |The Extremists |Secret World of Ballroom Dancing . ee Rs a

FIT TV outa cc) |Sealsieral Art 1 (CC) n n n | : NIGHT OCLUR

Fox Report- |The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) |Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van pa

Senaicats Time: Second Floor of
ny : ; MAL BAe

Susteren (Live) (CC)

The Sports List |The Sports List |Women’s College Basketball Texas Tech at Baylor. (Live) College Basket-
FSNF : ball et ae eee
Doors open 11pm

GOLF Post Game Show (Live) Rion PGA Golf Dubai Desert Classic ~ First Round. From Dubai, United Arab Emi-
rates.
(a) iG ica) Wants to Be a Millionaire © |Dog Eat Dog 1 (CC) Dog Eat Dog 1 (CC)
in
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aren Eee PS a “Ber eeOn
HALL (i Wales re by an ane “| Do” al scan AY be ie an ' sudan Any ee eae Epa ' wi OVvie | Chess
exas Ranger |fallsinto a coma on the eve of his custody battle involving a deaf boy Jence’ Vincent is shot while trying to sy et
- -|"Rookie” (CC) — |wedding. A (CC) who stops communicating. stop a robbery. M (CC) $15 without
Dream House /Holmes on Homes “Bar None” 1 |Real Renos “Day|Weekend War- /Mission: Organi-|Hot Property om Doane Civ ’
HGTV [Builders face in- (CC) inthe Lite’. irs (CC) |zation Cluttered |*Rochester’ 0 Movie Pass Giveaways!
spections. (CC) ) room. 1 (CC} -

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(CC ;
Morris Cerullo |Breakthrough |LoveaChild |This Is Your Day|Life Today (CC) |Inspiration To- |Inspirational
(CC) : 3 (CC day Programming
Yu-Gi-Oh! |Sabrina,the | The'Fresh Everybody Will & Grace —_|Friends Phoebe |Everybody
KTLA _ {ccc Teenage Witch |Prince of Bel-Air| Loves Raymond |"Ben? Her?” (CC) offers Frank Jr. a |Loves Raymond
N (CC) (CC) “| Love You’ massage. — Frank is jealous,
% * A DATE WITH DARKNESS: THE TRIAL AND =| * OUTRAGE IN-GLEN RIDGE (1999, Drama) Ally Sheedy, Eric Stoltz,
LIFE CAPTURE OF ANDREW LUSTER (2003, Crime Dra- |Heather Matarazzo. Townspeople rally behind teenage athletes accused
ma) Jason Gedrick, Marla Sokoloff. (CC) of rape. (CC)
tee Hardball {Countdown With Keith Olber- /MSNBC Investigates: To Love and| Scarborough Country
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Parents (CC) |SquarePants 1 - (CC) (cc) Bel-Air Bel-Air
Will & Grace Survivor: Palau “Dangerous Crea- |The Apprentice (N) 1 (CC) News © (CC) |News
“Company” ™ _ |tures and Horrible Setbacks” eee
OLN (:00) Killer In- Buckmasters |Buckmasters |The Worldof ‘|Best & Worst of |Elk Country
Stinct Beretta Tred Barta Journal
nt) NASCAR |American Mus- |Car Crazy Cars at Carlisle (N) Formula One Racing Grand Prix of
ation (N) cle Car (N) Australia -- Practice. ‘Live
Praise the Lord Michael Youssef|Bishop T.D. —_/This Is Your Day|Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN (CC) (CC) Jakes (CC) —_|(CC)

Friends Ross, | x *% AUSTIN POWERS: INTERNATIONAL MAN OF MYSTERY (1997,
Chandler go for a} Comedy) Mike Myers; Elizabeth Hurley, Michael York. A swinging spy
(CC) delivery girl. from the ’60s is thawed out in the ’90s. (CC)
itchen.

(:00) In a Fix The|Crop Circles: In Search of a Sign |Area 51: Fact or Fiction (CC Overhaulin’ “Dude, Where's M
cn installs a (ce) - Skylark?” :
chen,

(:00) Law & Or- |NBA Basketball Indiana Pacers at Denver Nuggets. From the Pepsi Center in Denver. NBA Basketball:

STORAGE SOLUTIONS |
for Small Spaces









TNT. fer ‘Act of God’ |(Live) (CC) Pistons at Suns
Ed, Edd n Eddy |Ozzy & Drix 1 Yu-Gi-Oh! % |Codename: Kids|Mucha Lucha _|Teen Titans Rave Master
TOON eee ae lo hander ee |e [Patty
TV5 Le Miroir de l’eau-(Partie 1 de 4) > (:10) Les Yeux |(:35) Restera, restera pas? Une . |TV5 Le Journal
dans l’écran —_jenseignante et des enfants inuits. |(En direct)

(6:00) PM Edi- Storm Stories Storm Stories [Evening Edition (CC:
Two fica lee) (CC) NT

(:00) La Mujer Amor Real Aqui y Ahora

(:00) Medical In- |Law & Order: Special Victims Unit] x * ALL ABOUT THE BENJAMINS (2002, Comedy) Ice Cube, Mike

USA vestigation ©. |Benson and Stabler are put on the |Epps, Eva Mendes. A bounty hunter and his prey get mixed up in a dia- .
(CC) trail of a pedophile. (CC) ~ |mond scam. (CC) ,

VH1 Celebrity Obses-|VH1 Goes Inside “America’s Next) % % % SOUL FOOD (1997) Vanessa L. Williams, Vivica A. Fox, Nia

sion-Thin Top Model” 1 Long. Domestic troubles and illness threaten a close-knit family.

Home Improve- | * * ROCKY IV Seal aes ba Stallone, Talia Shire, Dolph + |WGN News at Nine 4 (CC) oS

ment “Room Lundgren. Vengelul boxer Rocky Balboa faces a deadly Soviet fighter. :

Without a View’ |(CC) :

Everybod Summerland Summer nears its end] Summerland When Ava decides to |WB11 News at Ten With Kai ;

Loves Raymond and all reconsider their respective |take control of her life, she starts by |Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano

Frank is jealous. |relationships. (CC) proposing to Simon. & Mr. G (CC) :
wsBK |e" (N) |WWE SmackDown! (N) © (CC) Dr. Phil

PREMIUM CHANNELS

ee % %% CHEAPER BY THE =| * & & SOMETHING’S GOTTA GIVE (2003, Romance-Comedy) Jack —_|(:45) The Upside
DOZEN aye Comedy) Steve Mar-|Nicholson, Diane Keaton, Keanu Reeves. A music exec falls for the moth- |of Anger: HBO

tin. 1 ‘PG’ (CC) er of his young girlfriend. ‘PG-13' (CC) First Look

(:00) Carnivale |Deadwood “Here Was a Man’ Deadwood ‘The Trial of Jack Mc- |Deadwood “Plague” Bullock en-

HBO-P. Outskirts, Dam- |Swearengen directs Famum to buy |Call” Deadwood makes laws to try a|counters resistance. © (CC)

ascus, NE” the Garret claim. © (CC) murderer. ( (CC)

(:45) The ypeice %%% THREE MEN AND A LITTLE LADY (1990, Se * &% CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN (2003, Come-

of Anger: HBO |Comedy) Tom Selleck. Three bachelors may lose their |dy) Steve Martin. A man must handle the chaos sur-

First Look cherubic 5-year-old. 1 ‘PG’ (CC) rounding his 12 children. © ‘PG’ (CC)

("s) 3% THE SHAPE OF THINGS (2003, Drama) | * * ALONG CAME POLLY (2004, Romance-Come- | % * THE
retchen Mol, Paul Rudd. An art student clashes with “y) Ben Stiller. A jilted newlywed finds solace with an- |COMPANY

her lover's friends. 0 ‘R’ (CC) other woman. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC) (2003) ‘PG-13'

ee X2: X-MEN UNITED (2003, Science Fiction) Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman, | * * * THE MATRIX RELOADED
jan McKellen. A right-wing militarist pursues the mutants. © ‘PG-13'(CC) a Keanu Reeves. Freedom
ighters revolt against machines.
Es 4% CHARLIE'S ANGELS: FULL THROTTLE | x x LETHAL WEAPON 2 (1989, Action) Mel Gibson, Danny Glover, Certified Member
2003) Cameron Diaz. Private detectives try to retrieve |Joe Pesci. Riggs and Murtaugh battle drug-smuggling diplomats. 1 ‘R’ de deaaneateh ie
cryptic information. © ‘NR’ (CC) C)

‘SHOW, | (19) - : : THE| & x» CITY OF GHOSTS (2002, Crime Drama) Matt Dillon, James Caan,]*» BARB WIRE (1996, Adventure)
BEAUTY 'R’

Natascha McElhone. iTV Premiere. A businessman searches for his Pamela Anderson Lee, Temuera
5:30) THE % % BULLETPROOF MONK (2003, Action) Chow —_|(:45) % & 4 THE QUICK AND THE DEAD (1995,
Tâ„¢c 8 Sh



















crooked partner in Cambodia. © ‘R’ (CC) Morrison. iTV. 1 'R’ (CC)
SHANK | Yun-Fat. Premiere. A monk chooses a callow youth to |Westem) Sharon Stone. A female gunslinger enters a
REDEMPTION [protect a sacred scroll. M ‘PG-13' (CC) deadly quick-draw competition. O'R’ (CC) -






THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 21

The Tribune & Solomon's Mines

- FIRST PRIZE SECOND PRIZE THIRD PRIZE
$150.00 GIFT BASKET $100.00 GIFT BASKET $75.00 GIFT BASKET
In Each Age Group In Each Age Group Ta} ahaha Age Group -



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1. Children ages 4-5, 6-8, and 9-10. Staff members and relatives are not eligible to enter.

2. Coloring may be done with crayons. Adults or older child may assist the child in filling out the entry form, BUT NOT IN COLORING THE ENTRY

3. Enter as much times as you wish. All entries must be in The Tribune by 4pm on Monday, March 21st, 2005. Winners will be announced Wednesday,
March 23, 2005. Look for your names in The Tribune or listen to IOOJAMZ / JOY FM to hear your name.

4. There will be one first-prize winner, one second-prize winner and one third- -prize winner in €ach age groups.

5. All entries become the property of The Tribune and may be used for any purpose including, but not limited to, publication in a future issue.

“NO PHOTOCOPIES. USE NEWSPAPER AD ONLY”



Child’s Name: Parent/Guardian Signature

Address: | toes Tel: ___Age:

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ata oor EW 3
Available At All Solomon’ s wines Locations.



os
PAGE 22, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005 THE TRIBUNE |





~~ COMICS PAGE



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gllogy?

A Bright Start

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LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL NEWS

‘oncerns over Haitian
police ahead of elections



Ambassador pays courtesy call

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”



Politicians stop for
a morning chat

THESE well-known political opponents took off their gloves for a quick and friendly chat ear-
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Alvin Smith (second left), former FNM MP Dion Foulkes (second right) and former prime min-
ister Hubert Ingraham (right). The men were exercising on the Cable Beach median when they
ran into each other and stopped-for an impromptu chat. Veteran photographer Peter Ramsay,
whose camera is never far, caught this curious meeting on camera.

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But investors and Disney hopeful problems will be solved for movies that promise $30m economic injection



Pirates of the Caribbean
films placed in jeopardy |

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he filming sched-

ule for Disney’s

$400. million-bud-

get Pirates of the

Caribbean II and
III movies has been placed in
potential jeopardy by the failure
of Grand Bahama-based Gold
Rock Creek Enterprises to
secure a lease from the Gov-
ernment for the site upon which
they will build their $76 million
film studio complex.

‘A substantial portion of the
films is due to be shot at Gold
Rock Creek’s shooting tanks in
Grand Bahama, particularly the

’ water-based and underwater
scenes. .

But Ken Russell, the FNM
MP for High Rock, yesterday
told the House of Assembly

Minister [TPRVMECE mots

o.¢usetme Isle of Capri

that the investors behind the
development had been unable

‘to start full construction at the

site because they had been wait-
ing to agree a lease with the
Government for the past two
years.

As a result, the trio behind

the film studios - Hans Schutte, ©

Paul Quigley and Michael
Quigley - were said by Mr Rus-
sell to be considering whether to

‘pull out of their Bahamian

investment, which would force
Disney to film Pirates of the
Caribbean I and IIT elsewhere.

The delay over signing the
lease - and the subsequent con-
struction hold-up - has imposed
immense pressure on Disney’s
already-tight schedule, with
filming set to begin in the
Bahamas this May and be com-
pleted by January 2006. Mr
Russell yesterday expressed

report
on BISX

by Friday

By NEIL 4ARTNELL
Tribune © ..siness Editor

JAMES SMITH, minister of
_ state for finance, yesterday told
;The Tribune he expected to
‘receive the report on how to
implement recommendations
for revitalising the Bahamas
International Securities
Exchange (BISX) this Friday.
"Mr Smith said Julian Francis,
the Central Bank of the
Bahamas governor who is head-
ing the Implementation Com-
‘mittee, had promised him earli-
‘er this week that the report
“would be delivered by that date.
The fact that the minister has
yet to receive the report is like-
ly to surprise both the BISX
‘board and the exchange’s 45
-private shareholders who, it is
‘understood, were under the
impression that it had already
been completed.
Mr Smith yesterday told The

Tribune that once the report
was received, it would be
analysed internally at the Min-
istry of Finance before being
presented to the Cabinet.

He explained that he and his

' team would look at. the recom-

mendations and the timelines
for implementing them, seeing
whether any ideas had been
omitted, if some were not pos-
sible and if the implementation
of some might have to be

‘delayed.

After this process had been
completed, Mr Smith said the
report would taken “to Cabi-
net and see what they say”.
However, he was unable to give
a timeframe for when the BISX
report might make it on to the
Cabinet agenda.

Mr Smith said the report had
involved a “two track” process
to some extent, with the Central

See REPORT, Page 6B

Credit unions
are advised to

reduce rates —

. By YOLANDA
_ DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter

Bahamas-registered credit
-unions and cooperatives that
_ engage in lending and deposit

taking have been advised to

reduce interest rates immedi-
, ately, Nathaniel Adderley,
_ director of Cooperative Devel-

opment, said yesterday.

Notified of the Central Bank

of the Bahamas’ reduction in

_ the Discount rate by 50 basis
points to 5.25 per cent, which
' has influenced a reduction in

deposit and lending rates with-
in the financial services industry,
Mr Adderley said all credit
unions were expected to fully
comply in reducing their inter-
est rates. They were expected
to implement a reduction in
deposits and lending rates
where applicable.

The reduction is also expect-
ed to include reduced rates on
all new deposits and credit facil-
ities, on existing fixed deposits
as they are renewed, and on
existing savings accounts as

See RATES, Page 2B

MP says investors behind Grand Bahama

multi-million film studio where movies _

to be shot threatening to pull out due
to lease problems with government

hope that the Gold Rock pro-
ject would proceed “so the con-
tract with Disney can be ful-.
filled”.

Disney is understood to have
become increasingly agitated
with what it perceives as. gov-
ernment foot-dragging on its
project. However, The Tribune

understands that both the Gold —

Rock Creek investors and the
film company are still confident
that the lease issue will be
resolved speedily and the

By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX .
Senior Business Report

Paul Major, Baham:

managing director, yesterday

told The Tribune that the ¢
rier was about to sign a b
seat agreement with Isl

Capri for its Our Licaya casino
on Grand Bahama, dismissing

concerns that a Delta Connec-

tion airline’s addition of two

daily round-trip flights between
Nassau and Fort Lauderdale
would further add to competi-
tive pressures.

Mr Major said he embraced

Pirates of the Caribbean II and
II will proceed as planned.

It seems inconceivable that
the Gold Rock Creek project
will fail, given that its Heads of
Agreement was the first invest-
ment deal signed by the PLP
administration after it took
office in summer 2002.

The Pirates of the Caribbean
II and III project was also per-
sonally touted by Prime Minis-
ter Perry Christie during his
speech to the Grand Bahama

Chamber of Commerce last
month, which described the
agreement between the Gov-
ernment and Disney. The films
would provide a major boost
for Grand Bahama’s economy,
which is treading water in the
wake of the hurricanes and
Royal Oasis saga, injecting at

least $30 million into it.

Mr Christie said then: “The
Minister of Tourism has advised
me that so far, to date, Disney is
committed to 16,000 room



HERE’S THE LOW-COST DIGITAL

|) Paul Major

nights as a part of this produc-
tion. It is anticipated that the
room nights could exceed

* 30,000 room nights as addition-

al technical people are brought
in for these productions..

“From our estimates, these
two motion pictures will cause
some $30 million to be spent on
Grand Bahama Island.” Mr
Russell yesterday said that 1200
workers would be employed at
Gold Rock Creek on a full-time
basis when it was completed,
with a total of 3,000 hired dur-
ing filming times.

Mr Christie added that Mr
Quigley and his partners had
set the stage for attracting more
motion pictures to film in the
Bahamas. ee

The Prime Minister said, yes-
terday, though that the delays

See FILM, Page 2B




competition, adding that

Bahamasair was attracting an
additional 20-30,000 tourist
passengers per year. He. said
that to date, Bahamasair was
matching or beating every oth-
er carrier - legacy or low-cost -
in the Florida market in terms
of price.

"I believe in competition,
free enterprise. Bahamasair,
like any other business, must
be able to effectively com-
pete,” Mr Major said.

“We are doing all that we
can do to position us to do just .

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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





Well-executed website

can raise capital return
Making IT Work

well-imple-
mented website
.- can extend the

“reach of your
business. and
yield an excellent return on



Investment.

In my last articlé; the various
types of websites were discussed
and how they apply to your

Sets

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business. In today’s article, I
will outline the process required
to provide your customers with
access to key business functions
and services.

Identify Your Objectives
’ The first step to taking your

‘business online is to determine

what it is you want your website
to achieve. J recommend that
you form a small team to brain-
storm ideas for your website.
The focus should not be on
technology, but rather on the
business functions that are a pri-
ority to take online.

These functions could include

online ordering, customer

access to account information,
delivery of statements and

‘ online payments.

The key is to identify which

functions, if placed online, have

the potential to yield better cus-

_tomer service, thereby deliver-

ing a return on investment in

increased revenue and/or in
reduced costs.

Documenting your require-

ments is essential. This‘ docu-
ment will serve several purpos-
es, including ensuring that all
your requirements are met dur-
ing the development process.

Identify Your Audience

Determine who will be visit-
ing your website. Will the audi-
ence be local, international or
both? Consider the language;
you may require that your web
site support both English and
Spanish. The audience of your
website will have a direct bear-
ing on how it is marketed, and
therefore the cost.

Realign Your Business
Processes

Any-website that provides
services online will almost
always require changes in your
existing business processes.

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These changes can be simple or
more involved.

A good example of this is
Bank of the Bahamas Interna-
tional. This organisation created
a new counter at all of their
branches for online banking

customers to pick up their

online requests. This ensures
their customers receive the
quick and efficient service
intended by the implementa-
tion of their website.

Develop Website
When selecting a provider to
assist you with developing your
website, my advice is to review
their work and speak with their
clients. Take a look at the qual-
ity and professionalism of the
websites they have developed.
Additionally, you should exam-
ine the complexity of the work
that they have performed to
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| Alexander
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Providence
Technology Group

effective website is one where
the company is constantly think-
ing about ways in which it can
provide a return on investment.
To provide feedback on this
column, please e-mail makin-
el Twork@providencetg.com

tives.

Just because your website is
up and running does not mean
your work is done. As visitors
begin to use your website, they
will come to expect and demand
more from your website. You
should always endeavour to
enhance your website to retain
your competitive advantage.

About the Author: Alexan-
der J. Hanna is vice-president of
Software Solutions at Provi-
dence Technology Group, one
of the leading IT firms in the
Bahamas. Providence Technol-
ogy Group specialises im Net-
working Solutions, Consulting
and Advisory Services and Soft-
ware Solutions.

Conclusion

For many companies, a web- -
site is seen as an expense. How- -
ever, websites are an invest-
ment. The foundation of an



Film (From pagé 1B)

over the lease related to.the fact that the Government and Gold -
Rock Creek principals could not agree on whether the contract -
should contain stipulations on how the investors treated the envi-
ronment.

_ Mr Christie added that the Government’s legal advisers had
told him that including the Heads of Agreement, which contains
environmental conditions, in the lease terms did not bind Gold

- Rock Creek to preserving the environment.

The lease negotiations are being handled by the Ministry of _
Financial Services and Investments. The original Heads of Agree-
ment signed between the Government and the investors only said
that a lease for the former US missile base site “will” be signed.

The Tribune revealed on October 28 last year that Disney had
committed to shoot “more than 50 per cent” of the two sequels to
the original Pirates of the Caribbean blockbuster in the Bahamas,
paving the way for this nation to establish itself as a major pro-
duction location.

Apart from the Gold Rock Creek water tank, Disney will also
film Pirates of the Caribbean II and IIT scenes on an island off
Little Exuma.

Mr Quigley said then that the water tank would have to be
ready for May, giving the company just two months now to com-
plete it.

He said: “We’re trying to have as much of the studio infrastruc-
ture in place for when Disney arrives for the first day of principal
photography.”

In addition to the shooting tank, Gold Rock Creek will also
provide production office space, production support areas and at
least one of the main sound stages.

Some 400-600 persons will be needed to shoot the movies, and Mr
Quigley said: “I think it’s going to really open the floodgates in
terms of the Bahamas as a production location. Now, with the

' infrastructure coming on side, it will be even more helpful and

bring about the whole training aspect of what we’re doing.

“It’s terribly important that you train as many Bahamians as
you can, as the costs of bringing in labour are not economically
viable. We’re looking to build an indigenous film industry like
Ireland.”

Mr Quigley also told The Tribune last year: “It’s really wonder-
ful creating an indigenous film industry and creating a new indus-
try for the Bahamas, and not be so reliant on tourism. There will be
another industry bringing i in significant dollars. It’s a win-win situ-
ation for everyone.’

Rates (From page 1B)

soon as possible, Mr Adderley said.

He added that where existing loans, including mortgages, qual-
ified for interest rate adjustments, these were also expected to be
made as soon as the contractual terms or applicable arrangement
permitted.

Mr Adderley said further that in view of fixed operating expens-
es, credit unions should adjust deposit rates in a carefully bal-
anced fashion to minimise short-term shrinkage in net interest
income.

He urged institutions to also follow the general direction of
movement in interest rates in the banking and financial services sec-
tor, to gain strategic advantage in attracting new business.

Mr Adderley said: “Credit unions are encouraged to adopt and
adhere to sound and balanced growth strategies. To do otherwise
could have destabilising consequences on the operating perfor-
mances of the cooperative sector."

Credit union officials have been advised to communicate with
their membership and customers regarding both the timing of,
and the methodology, of the interest rate adjustments. They were
told that they should: also indicate which existing facilities will be
affected.

Mr Adderley said he expects uniformity throughout the credit
union sub-sector, and that greater regulatory monitoring could be
expected going forward.



To advertise in
The Tribune

call 322-1986


THE TRIBUNE





Borrowers told
to keep mortgage
payments at thel

urrent levels

Morigage broker says this will
lead to early retirement of loan,
rather than take advantage of
interest rate reduction

By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter

leading mort-
gage analyst
yesterday
praised the

Central Bank
’ of the Bahamas for reducing its
Discount Rate, saying the econ-
omy would see significant
growth in the short to mid-term
due to the decrease in the cost
of borrowing money.

In an interview with The Tri-
bune, Troy Sampson, a principal
with Approved Lending Ser-
vices, said that from a macro-
economic perspective, the Cen-
tral Bank's decision to reduce
the Discount rate by 0.5 per
cent to 5.25 per cent was likely
to stimulate economic activity
in the construction, banking and
other ancillary markets in the
next 18 to 30 months.

Driven by what officials
describe as excess liquidity in



the Bahamian banking system -
and the "buoyant" outlook...

forthe economy, including
Bahamian foreign reserves
being at an all time high, the
effect of reduced interest rates
will also mean an upswing in
the activity in new mortgages, as
persons look to take advantage
of the new lending rates.

A spillover effect from an
upsurge in construction will also
mean greater demand for build-
ing supplies, increased imports
and a demand for workers in
the construction industry, Mr
Sampsc) said.

He aaded: “Our outlook is
that in -ddition to the foreign
investments - from the Atlantis
Phase III project to the one in
Guana Cay, Abaco, Bimini and
the Exumas, and the other
tourisn.-related projects, the

reduction in the prime rate will
bolster not just developments
in the tourism sector. Prior to
that, the country will get the
benefits of increased construc-

-tion projects, and other auxil-

iary developments such as
entrepreneurial endeavours and
start-up ventures, which tend to
drive economic growth at the
local level."

In the US, a leading econom-
ic indicator is the number of
construction starts during any
given period. For the Bahamas,
Mr Sampson said, to the extent
that lower interest rates allow
more people to qualify for
mortgage loans and homes are
built, this also indicates the
economy is heading in the right
direction.

“What our finding is, is that
this reduction in the cost of bor-
rowed monies should be a tem-

porary stop-gap measure

impacting the rising cost of real
estate, and that is not necessar-
ily stopping prices from rising,
but allowing people to qualify

. for a purchase because the mon-

ey needed to purchase the land
is easier to get,” he added.

- From a social perspective, Mr
Sampson said, one of the bene-
fits of increased home owner-
ship among Bahamians is the
creation of a stable family envi-
ronment and stable communi-
ties. It also increases the level
of commitment employees have
to their jobs, creating a sense
of responsibility and support-
ing long-term planning.

Any number of mortgage
brokerage campaigns have been
launched since the Central
Bank's rate reduction. And one
of the immediate things the rate
change means for Bahamian
consumers is that borrowing
money has become cheaper
because the interest rate is the

AGENT ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

| Security & General
Insurance Company Ltd.

is seeking to emmploy a

SR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

to assist in the proceduarl maintenance of

angency accounts. Salary will

commensurate with experience.

Candidates should have:

e 5 years or more experience in
underwriting General Insurance

¢ Strong project management, leadership

real cost of borrowing money.

Mr Sampson explained that
banks get the funds they lend
to consumers from two sources;
as a result of savings deposits
and through the Central Bank.

Savings deposits, or the mon-
ey that is deposited into the
bank by depositors for a not
substantial return in interest,
does not always supply the
amount of money needed by -
clearing banks to conduct their
business. The Central Bank fills
the gap by agreeing to lend
money to the banks at the Dis-
count rate and, while it is not
legislated, banks in turn have
historically pegged the cost of
lending money to that rate,
which was 5.75 per cent.

The lending policy of most
members of the Clearing Banks

Association and other lending .

institutions involved adding
about 3 percentage points on to
monies being lent to residential
mortgage clients, giving the con-
sumer an average interest rate
of around 9 per cent.

The recent decision by the
Central Bank to reduce the Dis-
count rate by 50 basis points,
or 0.5 per cent, was followed by
the clearing banks adjusting the
Bahamian prime rate by 0.5 per
cent to 5.5 per cent.

"Now that the Central Bank's
rate has dropped, people who
marginally were unable to qual-
ify for a loan, all things being
equal, should be able to qualify.
If they ‘were under-qualified by
$200 to $300, then the interest’
rate reduction should help them
because the cost of borrowing
has been reduced,” Mr Samp-
son said.

He added that the lower rates
now being seen at Family
Guardian and Bank of the
Bahamas International, at 7.25
and 7.5 respectively, are cam-
paigns done so banks can see a
spike in their business. These
especially low rates, however,
will not be sustained for a long
period of time.

The decline in interest ratse
will also impact those who
would have qualified for a loan
under the pre-reduction rate.
These consumers will likely be
able to qualify for an even
greater amount. Mr Sampson
cautioned, however, that this
does not mean persons should
borrow more, but ‘it did allow
the consumer to upgrade

aspects of his project if he

wished to do so.

For persons who are in the
middle of a mortgage, the rates
are also expected to have a pos-

See LOAN, Page 7B

Bis

Pricing Information As Of: :
2 March 2005



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THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 3B













J OB VACANCY

MANAGER

NOTICE

Would the owner of Lot
Nos. 28,29,30,31 & 32
in Mount Airy Subdivision

off Hawkins Hill Directly in

Back of
Pat Strachan Realty Sales,
Dr. Joseph Evans and Dr.
| Minnus PLEASE
contact Patrick § trachan at
_ Telephone: 323-1983

| Information Technology Services

Responsibilities.

The Manager, Information Technology Services, will be responsible for:

e planning, directing and cootdinating the human, financial and physical resources
of the information fechiolozy department, to ensure the quality of service

provided. |

overseeing and developing all scehnalogy related systems, to include but not
limited to telecommunications and security systems.

determining, planning and controlling the use of current and emerging technologies

to improve existing business practices, institutional effectiveness and
internal/external customer satisfaction

Qualifications, Knowledge and Experience Requirements

* . overseeing and developing. all technology related systems, to include but not
limited to telecommunications and security systems.

Qualifications, Knowledge and Experience Requirements

Master’s degree i in Computer Science, Information Technology or related

discipline.

IT industry related certifications desisable.

Expert knowledge and understanding of: systems analysis, development and

planning methods.

Demonstrated experience in managing a network environment that includes
Windows Server2003 services, Microsoft Exchange2003, Lotus Notes/Domino,

Windows XP, hardware firewalls and VPN appliances.

Proficiency in the use of programming languages (e.g.. Visual Basic, C++, Java)
Proficiency in developing, Haplem ening: integrating and managing expert

systems. ©

Experience inn iSeries/OS400 platform desirable.

Comprehensive knowledge of database management’ preferred.
Knowledge ofthe application of Web based technologies desirable.
Excellent and demonstrated team building and project management skills.

Excellent communication skills, both written and oral.

Seven (7)-years of progressive experience in managing the delivery of modern

‘enter prs technology services.

Terms and Conditions

The position is being offered ona contractual basis for a period of five years, with

standard benefits. °

How to apply

Qualified candidates should submit their curriculum vitae and references to:

The Manager, Human Resources

c/o Box... -
The Nassau Guardian

The deadline for applications is 11 March, 2005.

‘Colina

Financial A duteors Ltd.

Previous Close



Jlinaaa

CE
Weekly Vol.

and verbal skills

Cast | Price
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00
D Holdi 0.00 * -O
ani hk) LE
13.00
0.35



e Fundamental computer proficiency

Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings
oS



Resumes should be submitted by March

Last 12 Months Yield %

Div $

Fund Name



' 1.1529 Colina Money Market Fund 1.209527*

15, 2005, and addressed 1.9423 ‘Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.1105 ***
10.2648 10.0000 Fidelity Prime income Fund 10.2602***"* _.

2.1746 2.0524 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.166020**



Colina Bond Fund

....

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share pald in the last 12 months

PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

- AS AT JAN. 31, 2005/ **** - AS AT DEC. 31, 2004

AS AT FEB. 11, 2005/ - AS AT JAN 31, 2005/ ***** AS AT JAN. 31, 2005




Attn:

HR - Account Executive Position
P.O. Box N-3540
Nassau, Bahamas



YIELD - tast 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningfal
FINDEX< - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1904 = 100







PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





Government to ‘limit’
Hotels Incentive Act |







QUEEN’S COLLEGE

Centre for Further Education

ooerees,
ae ee

a + p> (







P.O. Box N-7127, Nassau. Bahamas
Tel (242) 393-1666, 393-2153, 393-2646
Fax# {242} 393-3248



/ENING







COMPUTER ghee
CLASSES a |
Pric






"Beginners Package i S264




_ Executive Package

| : Individual





Course are six {6} weeks long



Beginners Word



$180

ESSENTIALS OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Small Business

on your mind this
New Year?





Queen's College

introduces the

Essentials of entrepre:

An Beek Certificate Course





Own Sriall Business Vertue ‘
ang Monday Mar 07, S005 GOS p.m.
Contact CFE ADMINISTRATOR or email cfe@qchenceforth.com wavww.qchenceforth, cont



TERM DATE: March 07 — May 14, 2005 -













EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
_ FINANCIAL INTELLIGENCE UNIT



career with the Financial Intelligence



Director and the Financial Intelligence
Intelligence Unit Act 2000.

POSITION: LEGAL COUNSEL
RESPONSIBLE TO: DIRECTOR
QUALIFICATIONS: The successful applicant must:





Unit Act 2000.



¢ Be a Counsel & Attorney-at-Law in the
Commonwealth of The
of 5 years Call.



KEY RESPONSIBILITIES




of legislative developments relative to its functions.



legal issues affecting the Financial Intelligence Unit.




- Office of the Attorney General relative to legal issues affecting the
Financial Intelligence Unit.




4. Responsible for the provision of assistance in the training of industry
participants in the Financial Service Sector in accordance with the
provisions of the Financial Intelligence Unit Act 2000.




5. Responsible for drafting of legal documents for Memoranda of
Understanding between the Financial Intelligence Unit and foreign
Financial Intelligence Units.





of the Financial Intelligence Unit as required by the Director.

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS & EXPERIENCE:




¢ Five years call to the Bahamas Bar

e Experience in Compliance, Civil, Criminal & Corporate Law, Assets
Tracing & Forfeiture.

¢ Excellent attitude, punctuality and attendance.

REMUNERATION PACKAGE








¢ Competitive salary commensurate with experience
¢ 15% gratuity upon successful completion of contract



the relevant certificates to:



The Director,
Financial Intelligence Unit
Third Floor, Norfolk House

Frederick Street
Nassau, The Bahamas















Secretary Package | S34e $320
ae arrennnernareennsanaernntantannnAteneelb POA PCOCCC ARRAN Cerererece staan
P $320













This position provides an excellent opporianity for an individual seeking a meaningful

The successful candidate would be responsible for the provision of legal advice to the
nit relative to its functions under the Financial

* Be appointed in writing by the Minister responsible
for the administration of the Financial Intelligence









ahamas with a minimum

1. Responsible for ensuring that the Financial Intelligence Unit is kept abreast
2. Responsible for making recommendations to the Director relative to the

3. Responsible for liaison between the Financial Intelligence Unit and the

6. Repos for assisting with other duties relative to the proper functioning





Interested persons should submit their application and resume in writing along with

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Prime Minister
yesterday said the
Government was
looking at placing
a “limit” on how
many investment projects qual-

ified for the Hotels Encourage- ~

ment Act, describing many
resort developments in the
Family Islands as “mixed
resorts” that involed small
hotels alongside a major real
estate component. .

Mr Christie told The House
of Assembly: “We. must limit
the application of the Hotels
Encouragement Act to. these
mixed resort developments.”

The Hotels Encouragement
Act provides a number of cus-
toms duty and tax exemptions
for investors constructing new
hotels, plus existing resorts
seeking to renovate or upgrade
their properties.

However, a number of
recently-approved Family
Island resort developments
have a relatively small number
of hotel rooms, instead being
heavily reliant on dividing land
up into residential lots and then
selling it - principally to foreign
second home owners - to gen-
erate cash flow that will fund
the construction of the hotel, a
marina, spa and other facilities.
As a result, observers have
argued that many investments
are really engaged in land spec-
ulation, acquiringCrown land
cheaply.

Meanwhile, Discovery Land
Company, the San Francisco-
based real estate development
company that is the lead
investor behind the $400 mil-
lion Great Guana Cay project in

Abaco; was yesterday described’
as “the real deal” by observers. |:
The company has teamed up"

Deloitte
& Touche

with a consortium of Abaco-
based businessmen calling
themselves the Passerine Part-
ners.

The group is understood to
be headed by John Head, own-

er of the Abaco Inn, and also ~

includes Fred Gottlieb, the
attorney, former FNM parlia-
mentarian and ex-Bahamasair
chairman.

Also involved in the devel-
opment is Abaco businessman
Gary Sawyer and Bahamas
Realty executive, Larry
Roberts.

One source said of Discov-
ery Land: “They lokk like the
real deal. But they’re going to
get no end of trouble” from the
Save Guana Cay Reek envi-
ronmental lobby.

On its website, Discovery
Land names its Great Guana
Cay project as Baker’s Bay Golf
and Ocean-Club, featuring six
mils of beachfront, a private

‘marina (240 slips), beach club

and spa, and. an 18-hole Tom
Fazio designed golf course. It

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Enterprise Risk Services - Control Assurance Senior Consultant/Manager



adds that there will also be a
Caribbean seaport village resort
component, a reference to the
75-room luxury villa style hotel

' the developers announced yes-

terday.

Discovery Land’s Great Gua-
na Cay development appears to
follow the model it has estab-
lished in the US, where a top

class golf course - usually Tom.

Fazio designed - is linked to a
private, gated residential com-
munity targeted chiefly at high
net worth individuals and their
families.

Among the projects that Dis-

covery Land has completed are

CordeValle Golf Club and
Lodge in California; Gozzer
Ranch Golk and Lake Club in
Idaho; Mountaintop Golf and
Lake Club in North Carolina;
Tron Horse Golf Club in Mon-
tana; and Kukio Golf and
Beach Club in Hawaii. The
company is also engaged in
developing El Dorado Golf and
Beach Club in Los Cabos, Mex-
ico. es

Well established firm ‘seeks an IT Auditor manager/senior consultant for its Enterprise Risk

Services Practice.

RESPONSIBILITIES }

Identify and evaluate business and technology risks, internal controls which mitigate risks,
and related opportunities for internal control improvement

Assist in selecting and tailoring approaches, methods and tools to support services
Actively participate in training efforts

Actively participate in decision making with engagement management and seek to understand
the broader impact of current decisions

Generate innovative ideas and challenge the status quo
Facilitate use of technology-based tools or methodologies to review, design and/or implemen

products and services

Build and nurture positive workin

client expectations

g relationships with clients with the intention to exceed

Understand clients' business environment and basic risk management approaches
Play substantive/lead role in engagement planning, economics, and billing
Participate in proposal development and sales efforts

QUALIFICATIONS

3+ years experience in the areas of public accounting, internal auditing or consulting

Bachelors degree in Business Administration, Accounting, Computer Science, Information
Systems Administration or related field. MBA or dual-degree is an asset

CISA, CPA, CIA designation or desire and dedication to pursue

Advanced understanding of business processes, internal control risk management, IT controls

and related standards

Proven analytical skills with ability to tackle problems systematically to determine causes
and produce effective solutions

Experience with accounting control related issues

Demonstrated ability to plan and manage engagements along with ensuring deliverables
meet work plan specifications and deadlines

Ability to thrive in an environment of pressing deadlines and constantly changing conditions
Successful experience identifying controls, developing and executing test plans
Ability to synthesize information and produce concise synopses/summaries

Excellent written and oral communication skills including both technical and business writing,
documentation and presentation skills

Open to travel requirements
Experience with ACL is an asset

_ Experience with COSO and/or Sarbanes-Oxley an asset
Technical and/or management background in technical systems/environments an asset

COMPENSATION

e¢ Compensation is negotiable based on combination of years experience and qualification.
’

Interested persons should submit their resumes before March 18, 2005.
HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT
P. O. BOX N-7120
NASSAU, BAHAMAS



oF
THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

THURSDAY, MARCH 3,



The College of the Bahamas is now taking definite and well-considered steps towards
becoming a university. An important part of the process is the revision of The :
College’s Strategic Plan. To guide the review and recommendations, the President :
has established the nine task forces, with requisite charges, that are listed below.
If you are interested in giving input, write us a brief letter indicating the task force :
on which you wish to serve and what skills you would bring to the exercise. Please :
attach a current resume. Kindly note that for many practical reasons, including :
efficiency, task force memberships must be limited, so if you wish to be considered, :

please send in your request NOW.

De-dline for Response March 11, 2005

For further information or delivery of letters and resumes:
Office of Research, Planning & Development

Rm 117, Administration Building

Oakes Field Campus

Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone: 302-4308

Fax: 323-7803

1. Task Force for Educational Technology

the link between the University and all satellite and residential campuses.

2. Task Force for Imaging for International Culture and Global Outreach

internationally recognized prestigious university.

The group will analyze all College procedures and practices relative to its charges
as they relate to recruitment and admission of students; recruitment and appointment
of administrators, faculty and staff in order to advance the University’s diverse }
complexion. Additionally, the task force should present plans for identifying ;
scholarship, talent, athletic competitions and civic and social opportunities for students i
designed to market and promote the College/University as an institution’ that’is
receptive and responsive to serving a multicultural and multicultural and multiracial
: Deliberations should also include an analysis of the current structure of departments,

i schools and/or colleges. If modifications, restructuring, or consolidations seem
| warranted, the appropriate recommendations should be advanced through the task
_£ forces report.
: . | Additionally, this Task Force should nheseut a student/faculty ratio report for each ©
Charges: Present and assess the executive and managerial operations in various
areas such financial-aid and scholarships; the registration and graduation processes :
with specific focus on the freshman; transfer and continuing student registration :
procedures; student accounts procedures; administrative computing services; requisition :
and purchases; processes for decision-making; the development of plans designed }
to engage The College in total quality control; and organizational and staff development :
s¢ structure that it ensures that administrative efficiency and effectiveness permeate }
the College/University community. Additionally, this group is charged with analyzing ;
and assessing the delivery of services to students and potential students in the areas }
of financial aid, recruitment and admissions and student accounts procedures. The :
Task Force report should clearly delineate criteria recommended for updating, :
upgrading and expanding programmes and services including technology, training }

student population.

3. Task Force for Administrative Efficiency and Effectiveness

and organizational design.

4, Task Force for Facilities

ambience; and c) projecting future needs in facilities.

Capital construction and renovations for programmes, in light of enrollment
management, changing foci of scholarship-service-teaching, continuing professional :
development, and creating an optimum educational environment for students, faculty :

9. Task Force for The Bahamas Higher Education Act

and staff are key areas which will impact the development, expansion and enhancement
for future facilities.

Criteria should be developed for assessing and evaluating épamnum use of facilities
and the need for future construction and renovation. The task force report should :
| reflect comments from the College/University community relative to plans for :

facilities.

5. Task Force for Research



#
B ae
By —_ a
a iy ey
enthilbeamat eohlbus bbe wblonwel



Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

vii) Collaboration with Government and International Researchers/Agencies d)Review .
the relationship among the several entities, including the Field Stations, engaged in
research activities and recommend the relationship and policies 1 in the University of
The Bahamas e) Recommend the role of the university in coordinating research
activities within the country.

6. Task Force for Student Body

: Charges: Examine current conditions of student life as they relate to recruitment
: and admissions procedures, scholarship opportunities, student retention, student

_} organisations and on-campus activities, career placement, and graduate and professional
: schools preparation. Additionally, I would like for you to analyze the academic
i support programmes available to students and advance, through your Task Force
i report, any recommended revisions and suggestions.

7. Task Force for Academic Programmes

i Charges: Conduct a programme review of current academic offerings and to make
i an assessment with recommendations of maintaining or strengthening those that
. z _ £ continue to be mission-wise appropriate and developing or creating those that reflect
Charges: (a) identify and assess present conditions in the area of technological
support for the enhancement and expansion of instructional and other academic :
programmes, as well as administrative and support units, (i.e. computer technology :
in offices, classrooms, laboratories, campus connectivity, and internal capability and :
usage); (b) determining criteria to be used to access, implement, expand or enhance:
- technological support for all assessed areas; (c) analyze and assess maintenance and }
personnel needs relative to maintaining a premier status of technology; and (d) review :
the status of the College Technology plan and provide direction for developing the :
scope and breadth of a University Technology Plan with components necessary for
its expansion and completion. Concrete plans should be developed for strengthening :
i and Hospitality Management Institute, and a Bahamas Technical and Vocational

: Institute. It is my judgment that every one of our academic offerings should be

: outstanding, good or phased out. _

: Capital construction and renovations for programmes, in light of enrollment

: management, changing foci of scholarship-service-teaching, continuing professional ©
Charges: Examine the College’s current position in the international community; }
and develop a plan to move the perception of The College to that. of neHonaly. and :
i and enhancement for future facilities.

the vocational needs of an ever changing society. The University of The Bahamas
cannot and should not try to be all things to all people. The University will offer
graduate and professional degrees up to the doctorate level, but it cannot afford to

be a large research institution offering doctoral degrees in multiple fields. Likewise,

the University of The Bahamas cannot and should not try to offer every undergraduate ;
degree imaginable. What the University of The Bahamas will do, however, is to
determine what role and influence it wants to exert in the 21st century and identify
those programmes and Centres of Excellence (Institutes) that meet the goals of the
University and the nation and in which the University can excel; i.e. the Marine and
Environmental Studies Institute, and International Languages Institute, a Culinary

development, and creating an optimum educational environment for students, faculty,
and staff are key illustrations of areas which will impact the development, expansion

Specifically, the Task Force should determine whether programmes/departments and
curricular offerings (undergraduate, graduate and continuing education) one outstanding,
good, targeted for elevation to bachelors or masters levels, or targeted for phase-out
in light of multiple criteria. These criteria include adequate student enrollment, the
relationship to projected trends and occupational demands for the 21st. Century,
unquestionable scholarship, and service contributions of programmes and curriculum,
along with current and future projections for grants and contracts,

academic unit and/or department and recommend revisions deemed appropriate.
These revisions should also take into consideration the current state of affairs in
higher education and projected trends for the 21st century. Finally, this task force.
is expected to make recommendations regarding goals for the percentage of earned
doctorates that each unit should aspire to and methods of achieving those goals.
The Task Force may also present innovative recommendations for any other aspect
of academic affairs that it deems appropriate. All recommendations should be
immediately followed by a realistic proposal as to where the resources may be secured
to implement the recommendations.

-8. Task for Finance

: Charges: (a) examining all current fiscal resources and allocations in the respective
: budget units; (b) assessing current and future financial practices with the overall goal
: of using the best policies and procedures to enhance fiscal effectiveness; (c) identifying
: new or alternate fiscal resources such as corporate and individual gifts, grants,
Charge: a) Present and assess current conditions of physical facilities such as office
and classroom buildings, residential halls (dormitories); classroom and office space }
allocation and utilization, renovations; and athletic and extramural structures; b) }
examine and develop capabilities of the physical facilities affected by such variables }
as the expanded role of technology, the design trends of office equipment, the :
implementation of interactive and virtual classrooms, and designs and desired
: plans of the College/University from the appropriate units should be received and

contracts, scholarships and fellowships, tuition, fees, and endowments in light of
plans articulated by the task forces on Academic Programmes, Facilities and Student
Body. Specific plans should be developed to ensure that the fiscal infrastructure and
logistical procedures and operations are understood and implemented by all respective
budget unit heads and appropriate staff. Criteria should also be enumerated for
periodic assessments of fiscal resources. Funding plans and unit program development

included in the task force’s report.

Charges: Examine the current state of affairs pertaining to higher education throughout
The Commonwealth of The Bahamas and to design the mission, goals and objectives
of a national higher education coordinating board; to bring into existence a Accrediting

: Body for final review and approval of all newly proposed academic programmes;
: and to establish a self-governing University of The Bahamas under a duly appointed
: Board of Trustees. The government, control, conduct, management and administration
: of the University shall be vested in the Board of Trustees. All current and future
:. properties used by the University shall be vested under control of the Board of
Charges: a) Identify and assess the current and future research capabilities and }
opportunities in the institution b) recommend structures for the organisation and
conduct of research in the University of The Bahamas c) draft policies for i) the :
conduct of research in the University of The Bahamas ii) the establishment and :
implementation of an Institutional Review Board ii) Consulting iii) Awards iv)
Training and the Use of Resources v) Animal and Human Welfare vi) the Environment :

Trustees.

The draft act shall stipulate in clear language that the Act is meant to establish the
University and that the Board is obligated to establish Bye-laws designed for the
governing of the University though its respective administrative officers.



2UUd, PAGE 5b
PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005

THE TRIBUNE.



,

. Report (From page 1B) |

Bank governor looking at the
relaxation of certain capital con-
trols in the Bahamas’ foreign
exchange guidelines, and the
Ministry of Finance looking at
other issues.

Implementing the recom-
mendations put forward in 2004
is seen as vital to BISX’s future
growth and development. The
exchange’s current board and
management have already tak-
en stapes in this direction, dras-

tically cutting costs to reduce -

BISX’s annual loss in fiscal 2004

to around $100,000, compared
to the previous year’s $1 mil-
lion.

Any move by the Govern-
ment to support BISX is likely
to involve the former making
some sort of capital markets
policy statement, giving "some
kind of endorsement to say they
are in agreement and working
to implement some of the rec-
ommendations where possible".

Among the recommendations
most likely to be enacted are
greater participation in BISX-

POSITION AVAILABLE

Adinthisteative:

Assistant

-ernment’s support,

Bahamas
Focal Point
Organizations

BEST Commission

The Caribbean. Regional Erivitoninent

Programme (CREP) is seeking an.
Administrative Assistant to. provide.

administrative support. for the Andros
Conservancy and Trust and the CREP
Project. The position is based with ANCAT,
i in Fresh Creek, Andros.

Skills/Qualifications

° Computer literate, eopetially Microsoft
Office Suite:
® Minimum of 2-3 years experience in office

procedures, including performing basic

accounting tasks, operating office
ment, and receptionist skills
° oaenre oral and written ‘”
communication skills
¢ Positive attitude and self motivated

* Excellent. organisational skills and ity

to multitask:
e poe papnted and able to meet

° ‘Atlity * maintain confidentiality of ©
records and information

If you are interested in. this exciting
opportunity please send resume, cover
letter & other supporting documentation
to:

CREP Position
P.O. N4105 .
Nassau, Bahamas

P.O. Box 23338

Material m may also be delivered by hand to-

the CREP/ANCAT office, Fresh Creek, Andros
or by ea to: exancat@batelnet. bs.

All rae must be received by
nda. 11th March 2005:



OR: CREP Position
Fresh cel apn

listed stocks and the wider cap-
ital markets by the National
Insurance Board (NIB), whose
reserve fund amounts to more
than $1.23 billion.

Other recommendations
being considered by the Imple-
mentation Committee, which is
working out how these propos-
als will be followed through and

who will be responsible for |...

them, are the listing of govern-
ment paper - registered stock
and Treasury Bills - on the

exchange, regional cross-border -

listings, the creation: of a
Caribbean credit rating facility
and the. underwriting of gov-
ernment securities by private
sector brokers.

But even without the Gov-
BISX
appears to be moving towards a
position where it might not be
reliant upon it for financial.sup-

port.
Keith Davies, BISX’s chief
executive, told The Tribune last
week that the exchange was
“closer than ever” to being in a
break. even position, where it
will not have to rely upon exter-

nal financial support for its sur-

vival.

Mr Davies said: “The com-
pany has been able to improve °-
and gain market share and new.

customers, and move closer to

the day when we will be self- —
sufficient and able to cover our
expenses that we generate on a_
“cyearly basis entirely, without .-
any external support. We are.
~ closer than ever to that." ;
The BISX chief executive .
said the exchange realised it. -
_ needed “to pay for ourselves, :
and once we can do that we can -
stop worrying about our exis- .,
tence and look forward to grow-. 4
_ ing the business".

Sources close to BISX. said

. there was a “feeling the worst is.
over" among the exchange's

shareholders.

Al rl ift (From page 4B) -

that, against any low-cost or
legacy carrier and. we're

approaching it on two fronts..
_ First, service, and secondly we

_are certainly matching or beat-
ing everybody i in the Florida:

market in price on routes that
we compete in." ~

-. + Delta: Airlines gentSedaly a
- announced it intended to add:

two non-stop daily flights to its

: Fort Lauderdale-Nassau route

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

fora

PROPERTY MANAGER

Reporting to the Property Director in Barbados, you will enjoy a high level of
autonomy and responsibility for managing, through a small property team,

a varied but demanding caseload of premises matters relating to the Bahamas
& TCI occupational porfollo.

QUALIFICATIONS:
¢ Member of professional body or Certification i in recognized property

field

¢ 5+ years in Property management, especially i in complex buildings
or multiple sites across the islands, with proven track record

¢ Comprehensive knowledge of property and construction management

¢ Detailed knowledge of building A/C systems, electrical systems,
building, codes, occupational health and labour regulation, and
hurricane building codes .

¢ Motivated, strong on delivery, able to handle multiple tasks, anda
good logistical planner

_ GENERAL REQUIREMENTS / RESPONSIBILITIES:

¢ Proactively manage the premises, including all repairs and disaster
Meee ensuring that Health & Safety and Security issues are
elivered

from May 1. The flights will be
operated by Delta Connection
carrier Chautauqua Airlines,
using Embraer Regional Jet air-
craft.

‘"All the service Delta is
announcing today represents
new non-stop markets, chosen

because of customer demand.
Our. point-to-point flights
» between Fort Lauderdale and

Nassau will service growing

. demand between these two sun- .

ny destinations," said Doug
Blissit, Delta’s vice-president of
network analysis.

But Mr Major said this would
have little effect on Bahama-
sair's ability to: meet the

demands of its customers, par-
‘ticularly as it had a number of

special rate agreements with
brokers in the Florida market,

‘who were directing business to
-: the carrier.

Bahamasair also had an

arrangement with the Ruffin |
_ Group of Companies to service
-its Cable Beach hotel proper-
ties, while the airline was about .

to: sign a bulk-seat agreement
with Grand Bahama casino
operators, the Isle of Capri. The
agreement will be similar to the
arrangement signed with Drift-
wood. ‘

ee baggage, with, customers. la
~ paying only $70 for.excess bags. to get
We also have an express line

Mr Major said: “We've done
a lot to retain customers - from
the Freeport specials of $118,
and the Florida travel at $90
pre-tax on flights to anywhere
Bahamasair flies, and the
70/70/70 campaign that has
changed the way we take on



for passengers with two or less

bags at all Florida airports."

Mr Major told The Tribune
that there had been an increase.
in the number of tourists using

Bahamasair. Traditionally,

about 12 per cent of Bahama-

_ Sair’s passenger volumes had

been non-Bahamian travellers,
versus 80 per cent of Bahami-
ans.

The non-Bahamian propor-
tion is now approaching 14 to 15
per cent, with every percentage
point representing 10,000 per-
sons. Based on these calcula-
tions, Mr Major said Bahama-
sair was now attracting an addi-
tional 20-30,000 tourists. With a
million passengers flying
Bahamasair per year, the num-
ber of tourists flying with the
carrier is approaching 150,000
on an annual. basis.

Mr Major also credited the

Faith Temple Christian





» : ay. James Smith, minister of state for finance



airline's various code share
agreements with pulling i in more
tourists. can
Meanwhile, Bahamasair’ s.
chairman, Basil Sands, has offi- .
cially launched the first of seven’
customer service seminars for

~ staff in the Nassau, Freeport
: _and Fort. Lauderdak arkets,



_ service quality, grooming and

deportment. =
Mr Major said, however, that
based on preliminary observa-..
‘tions, customer comments on
service quality and on-time per-:
formance have been improving.
And Mckinsey & Company,
‘the world's largest management

consultancy, which was selected

by the Government to design a.
business plan that will trans-
form the national flag carrier
into a sustainable business with
long-term viability, issued its
first interim report on Febru-
ary 9.

Calling it "encouraging", Mr.
Major declined to go into detail:
about the contents of the report,
but said it was very preli
and was meant to say what the
initial findings have been to that
point. Additional reports are.

- expected on March 9 and aert

11.

le = 2005

° eee and apply strategic solutions to maximize asset value and
the

¢ Project manage the construction / renovation of new branches,
properties as required

¢ Manage relationships with the businesses, service providers, suppliers
and landlords

° wenege and motivate a small team through excellent leadership
skills

"IF YOU ARE INTERESTED:

~ Submit your resume private & confidential in WRITING ONLY before March :
18, 2005 to: :

Academy
wishes to announce that The
General Entrance Examination
will be held on Friday, March 4th,
2005 at 9:00 AM at the Academy
of Prince Charles Drive.

The Academy: has limited
space in grades 1 through 10, and
persons wanting to enter the
Academy in September 2005,
must sit the Examination.

Committed to Providing a Christ-Centred
Education, in an environment that is
Conducive for learning:

Fatth Temple Christiam Academy
“The School of First Choice”

Why uot make tt your chatets..

Jamise Sturrup - Human Resources Assistant
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-8329, Nassau, Bahamas

Or email: jamise.sturrup@firstcaribbeanbank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
thanks all applicants for their interest, however only those
under consideration will be contacted.

Vacancies are open to Bahamian residents only.

For More Information

Contact:
The Admittance Office at
324-2269

So Register Now!

A subsidiary of: Faith Temple Ministries International


THE TRIBUNE

SIU ES) NT Sess

| HURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 7B



Oil price rises
cancel out Fe

chairman’s
bullish U:

“Copyrighted Material
#¥tSyndicated Content’y &

Available from Commercial News Providers”

. -_ - .

| WAREHOUSE SPACE
TO SUBLEASE

_ * 2320 sq. ft. located on
Mt. Pleasant Avenue off Carib Road.

Please call Alice at 393-7020
for further information

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, ANNETTE LOUISE
MCPHEE-MADDEN, of #801 Pinewood Gardens
Subdivision, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name
to ANNIS LOUISE SMITH. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (80) days after the
date of publication of this notice. —

NOTICE is hereby given that RODLINE DIEUVILLE OF
CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization. should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 24TH day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.













NOTICE
FINCO INVITES TENDERS

Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders for the
purchase of the following:

| “ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #176, Yamacraw
Beach Estates situated in the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting of (3)
Bedrooms, (2) Bathrooms. ,

This property is being sold under our Power Of Sale contained ina
Mortgage FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

Property size: 7,417.50 sq. ft.
Building size: 2,217 sq. ft.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery Centre, Finance
Corporation Of Bahamas Limited, Main Branch, PO. Box N-3038,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked “tender 9712”. All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 4th March, 2005.










PUBLIC NOTICE |
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY:DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that the parents of, JESINDA
TENNESIA ROWE of Blue Berry Hill, Fox Hill, Nassau,
Bahamas, intend to change her name to JESINDA TENNESIA



WHYLEY. If there are any objections to this change of name
by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, PO.Box N-7421, Nassau, Bahamas, no later
than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE
FINCO INVITES TENDERS

Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders for the
purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #84, Block #2, South
Beach Estates situated on one of the islands of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas Situated thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting
of (4) four bedrooms and (2) two bathrooms.

Property size: 10,609 sq. ft.
Building size: 2,160 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under our Power Of Sale contained in a_

Mortgage FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

§ All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed

to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery Centre, Finance
Corporation Of Bahamas Limited, Main Branch, PO. Box N-3038,
Nassau; Bahamas and marked “tender 2966”. All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 4th March, 2005.



NOTICE
FINCO INVITES TENDERS

Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders for th
purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #212 Yamacraw

Beach Estate situated in the Eastern Discrict of the Island of New E

Providence on one of the islands-of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Situate thereon is Vacant Land.

Property size: 7,200 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under our Power Of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery Centre, Finance
Corporation Of Bahamas Limited, Main Branch, PO. Box N-3038,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked “tender 5674”. All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 4th March, 2005.



Loan (From page 3B)

itive impact. Under the Indenture of Mortgage clause on most
residential mortgage contracts, the bank states that any reduction
in the prime rate would be reflected in the loan payment within a
three-month period. ;

Conversely, if the Central Bank had raised the Discount rate, then
banks would have notified borrowers of an expected increase in the
prime and interest rates over the next three months.

There are three factors which can impact a monthly mortgage
payment - the interest rate, the amount borrowed and the length of
the loan. For example, if a client takes out a $150,000 loan at 9 per
cent over 25 years with monthly payments of $1250, a change’in any
one of those variables will impact the monthly payment. ,

’ According to Mr Sampson, most mortgage brokers, Approved
Lending included, are advising mortgage holders that instead of tak-
ing the option to reduce their payment, they continue with current
payments. The net effect of the reduction in the interest rate cou-
pled with maintained payments is the early retirement of the mort-
gage, knocking up to five years, and in some cases more, off the
loan. Maintaining the original payment also reduces fhe amount of
interest paid to the lending institution over the life of the loan.

Mr Sampson acknowledged, however, that because of personal
situations, some mortgage holders might prefer to get the immediate
benefit of the.extra cash and opt for a reduced payment while still
maintaining the payment schedule.



POSITION AVAILABLE

COMMUNITY LIAISON .
~~ OFFICER

The Caribbean Regional Environment .
Programme (CREP) is peeing 3
Community Liaison Officer (CLO). The
CLO will engage Andros communities
and other stakeholders in the CREP
Project activities and pede support for
the project Manager. The position is based
with CREP Project, in Fresh Creek,
Andros.

Senanee Skills Required

Focal Point

Srearatore ‘© Team player able to work with

communities throughout Andros _

e Excellent oral and written
communication skills

¢ Willingness to travel and to work
outside normal hours when
necessary

¢ Awareness of environmental issues

would be an asset

Qualifications °

¢ Familiar with the communities of
Andros

¢ Strong facilitation skills for

_ meetings and workshops

° Computer literate __

¢ Ability to plan/ conduct
community meetings and -
workshops

BEST Commission

If you are interested inthis exciting

opportunity please send resume, cover

letter & other supporting documentation |
ARIFORUM | o:, SE oa



Authorized by the enn - et A
ee ‘CREP Position OR: CREP Position =
moma oe eee PORN ADIB oe neseiion cone PLO. BOx.23338...5,
Y Nassau, Bahamas Fresh Creek, Andros
*

Material may also be delivered by hand to the
CREP/ANCAT office, Fresh Creek, Andros or
by e-mail to: exancat@batelnet.bs
Implemented by the A
Caribbean Conservation
Association

All applications must be received by
Friday 11th March 2005

NOTICE
FINCO INVITES TENDERS

Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders for the
purchase of the foliowing:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #4, Coral Meadows
situated in the Western District of the Island of New Providence one
of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon
is a Single family residence consisting of (3) Bedrooms, (2) Bathrooms.

Property size: 7,500 sq. ft.
Building size: 1,448 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under our Power Of Sale contained ina
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery Centre, Finance
Corporation Of Bahamas Limited, Main Branch, PO. Box N-3038,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked “tender 0607”. All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 4th March, 2005.



NOTICE
FINCO INVITES TENDERS

Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders for the
purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #362, in Pinewood
Gardens situated in the Southern District of the Island of New
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas
situated thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting of (3)
Bedrooms (2) Bathrooms.

This property is being sold under our Power Of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

Property size: 5,000 sq. ft.
Building size: 1,076 sq. ft.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery Centre, Finance
Corporation Of Bahamas Limited, Main Branch, P.O. Box N-3038,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked “tender 0891”. All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 4th March, 2005.


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005 ane TRIBUNE nee

Provisions

Provisions are recognised when the Bank has a present legal or constructive obligation as a
- result of past events, it is probable that an outflow of resources emBodying economic benefits
will be required to settle the obligation, and a reliable estimate of the amount.of the obligation

FIRSTCARIBBEAN INTERNATIONAL FINANCE CORPORATION (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BALANCE SHEET AT 31 OCTOBER 2004
(expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

can be made.
Interest income and expense
: 103 : ‘ . . A
Notes ve - $ Interest income and expense are recognised in the income statement for all interést. bearing
3 instruments on an accrual basis using the effective yield method based on the actual purchase
price. Interest income includes coupons eamed, on fixed income investment and trading
Assets securities and-accrued discount and premium on treasury bills and other discounted instruments.
Interest income is suspended when loans become doubtful of collection, such as when overdue
Due from other banks 2 acco aa aps ‘by more than 90 days, or when the borrower or securities’ issuer defaults, if earlier than 90
Loans and advances ; 2 518 2518 days. Such income is excluded from interest income until received. Interest income on loans in
ee é 578 "178 arrears greater than 90 days is taken into income to the extent that it is deemed recoverable.
Property, plant and equipment 7 too Fee and commission income
Total assets 148,332 148,512 Fees and commissions are Tecognised on.an accrual basis.
' Foreign exchange income
Foreign exchange income relates to income earned from exchanging foreign currencies and is
Deposits : 8 122,962 126,278 recognised on the accrual basis.
Dividends payable 9 5,000 ot
Other liabilities 10 2,589 __2,629
3. Due from other banks
Total liabilities 130,551 __128,907
2004 2003
Shareholders’ equity $ $
Share capital and reserves u 1,000 oe Cash and cash equivalents , 22,961 14,343
Retained earnings 16,781 __ 18,605 _ Mandatory reserve deposits with Central Bank 3,375 4,157
17,781 ____19,605 :
etree Eanes . 26,336 18,500
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity ___ 48,332 ____148,512 a
Approved by the Board of Directors The Bank is required to maintain a percentage of deposit liabilities as cash or deposits with The
Central Bank of The Bahamas. These funds are not available to finance the Bank’s day-to-day
opérations.
TEREN SHARON BROWN. :
RENCE ETS Director The effective yield on cash resources during the year was 0.6% (2003 — 0.6 %) per annum.
9 February 2005
Date 4. ° Loans and Advances
2004 2003
$ S.
NOTES
3 Mortgages 124,691 132,020
Less: — provisions for impairment :
1. General Information specific provisions for credit risk "(5,667)" (4,473)
. st BS dh eneral provisions for inherent risk (231) (242)°
FirstCaribbean International Finance Corporation (Bahamas) Limited formerly Barclays Finance 8 Pr

Corporation (Bahamas) Limited (the “Bank”) is incorporated in the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas and is a wholly-owned subsidiary of FirstCaribbean Intemational Bank (Bahamas)
Limited. .

: 118,793 127,305

Mortgage loan balances are represented by residential loans of $111,277 (2003: $118,110) and
The Bank’s principal activities are the acceptance of deposits and granting of mortgage loans commercial loans of $7,516 (2003: $9,195).
within The Commonwealth of The Bahamas. a The average interest rate earned during the year on loans and advances. was 7.94% (2003 ~
: ee 7.77%).
The Bank changed its name to FirstCaribbean International Finance Corporation (Bahamas) °
Limited on 11 October 2002, following the combination of the retail, corporate and offshore
ing operations of Barclays Bank PLC in The Bahamas and the Turks & Caicos Islands

Movement in provisions for impaitment are as follows:
banking :
(“Barclays Bahamas”) and CIBC Bahamas Limited.

; Specific Inherent

: credit risk risk

The ultimate parent companies of the Bank are Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, a provision provision

company incorporated in Canada, and Barclays Bank PLC, a company incorporated in England. $

. The registered office of the Bank is located at Charlotte House, Charlotte Street, Nassau, The Balance, 31 October 2002 2,017 287
Bahamas. At 31 October 2004, the Bank had 10 (2003: 9) employees. Doubful debts « sac . 45)

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies Balance, 31 October 2003 4,473 242
Basis of presentation Doubtful debts expense 1,194 (11):

Balance, 31 October 2004 5,667 231

The Bank’s balance sheet has been prepared in accordance with International Financial ————
Reporting Standards, under the historical cost convention as modified by the revaluation to fair

value of available-for-sale securities. The aggregate amount of non-performing loans on which interest was not being accrued

amounted to $23,397 as at 31 October 2004 (2003 — $27,530). :

Estimates
Preparation of the balance sheet in conformity with International Financial Reporting Standards 5. Investment Securities
Tequires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect amounts teported in the 2004 - 2003
balance sheet and accompanying notes. Actual results could differ from these estimates. $ $
Cash and cash equivalents Securities held to maturity

: Debt securities _ 2,518 2,518
For the purposes of the cash flow statement, cash and cash equivalents comprise balances with
less than 90 days maturity from the date of acquisition including cash balances, deposits with 2,518 2,518

Central Banks, and amounts due from other banks. ‘

The market values of these securities approximate cost.
Investment securities . : :
. a . , All debt securities held by the Bank were issued by The Bahamas Government and related
Investment securities with fixed maturity where management has both the intent and the ability agencies. ,
to hold to maturity are classified as held-to-maturity. Investment securities and purchased loans
and receivables intended to be held for an indefinite period of time, which may be sold in
response to needs for liquidity or changes in interest rates, exchange rates or equity prices are
classified as available-for-sale. Management determines the appropriate classification of its

investments at the time of the purchase.

The average interest rate earned during the year on debt securities was 7.05% (2003 — 7.05%).

6... _. Other Assets



nS ee wpe an 7 ee ae be

IT EE NE

Bank will not be able to collect all amounts due. The amount of the provision is the difference
between the carrying amount and the recoverable amount, being the estimated present value of
expected future cash flows, including amounts recoverable from guarantees and collateral,
discounted based on the interest rate at inception of the loan. :

The loan loss provision also covers losses where there is objective evidence that probable losses
are present in components of the loan portfolio at the balance sheet date. These have been
estimated based upcn historical patterns of losses in each component, the credit ratings allocated
to the borrowers and reflecting the current economic climate in which the borrowers operate and

semen

: 2004 2083
Investment securities and purchased loans and receivables are initially recognised at cost’ __§ s
(which includes transaction costs). Available-for-sale financial assets are subsequently re- Accrued interest & other accounts receivable 678 —___!8
measured at fair value based on quoted bid prices or amounts derived from cash flow models. ,
Fair values for unquoted equity instruments are estimated to be cost except for a permanent ~ meee 9 8 178
diminution : a Unrealised gains and losses arising from changes in the fair value of
securities classified as available-for-sale are recognised in equity. When the securities are
disposed of or impaired, the related accumulated fair alison are’ included in the 7 Property: }isat abe Eauipenet
income Statement as gains and losses from investment securities. : : Equipment,
: . furniture ‘
Held-to-maturity investments are carried at amortised cost using the effective yield method, less and vehicles Total
any provision for impairment. s s
‘ Cost
A financial asset is impaired if its carrying amount is greater than its estimated recoverable Balance, beginning of year 232 232
amount. The amount of the impairment loss for assets carried at amortised cost is calculated as Purchases ~ we 2 ee
the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of expected future :
cash flows discounted at the financial instrument’s original effective interest rate. By Balance, end of year 234 —____234
comparison, the recoverable amount of an instrument measured at fair value is the present value
of expected future cash flows discounted at the current market rate of interest for a similar Accumulated depreciation : ; :
financial asset. Balance, beginning of year 221 221 _
Depreciation 6 wo
Interest earned whilst holding investment securities is reported as interest income. Dividends
received aré included separately in interest income. - ; : Balance, end of year 227 27
All regular way purchases and sales of investment securities are recognised at trade date, which Net book values ;
is the date that the Bank.commits to purchase or sell the asset. All other purchases and sales are End of year scoeececmeeenneree ED eee
recognised as derivative forward transactions until settlement.
Originated loans and provisions for {oan impairment Beginning of year etl eee
Loans and advances originated by the Bank by providing money directly to the borrower are 8... Deposits
categorized as originated loans and are carried at amortised cost. Third party expenses, such as
-legal fees, incurred in securing a loan are expensed as incurred. Interest income is accounted 2004 2003
for on the accrual basis for all loans and advances other than those that are impaired. $ $
Loan fees are recognized in income at the inception of the loan. Individuals 45,698 46,954
aes i Business and Government 31,172 - 33,350
A credit risk provision for loan impairment is established if there is objective evidence that the Affiliated banks __— 46,092 4574

122,962 126,278

The effective rate of interest on deposits was 4.7% (2003 — 4.9%) during the year.

All deposits in 2004 were payable at a fixed date.

is classified as a provision for inherent risk. When a loan is uncollectible, it is written off against 9. Dividends Payable
the related provision for impairments; subsequent recoveries are credited to the bad and doubtful ; : :
debt expense in the income statement. At its meeting of 31 March 2004, the Board of Directors declared a dividend of $25 per share in
: respect of the 2003 fiscal year amounting to a total dividend of $5,000 (2003: Nil).
If the amount of the impairment subsequently decreases due to an event occurring after the
write-down, the release of the provision is credited to the bad and doubtful debt expense. 10. Other Liabilities
Property, plant and equipment ar oe
All property, plant and equipment are stated at historical cost less accumulated depreciation.
Accounts payable and accruals 101 372

Depreciation is computed on the straight line method at rates considered adequate to write-off Accrued interest 2,488 2,257
the cost of depreciable assets, less salvage, over their useful lives. :

. . 2,589 2,629
The annual rates used are: 7

11. Share Capital

Frechold buildings 2%% ;
Leasehold improvements ; 10% or the term of the lease, whichever is less The Bank has authorised, issued and fully paid 200,000 ordinary shares with a par value of $5
Equipment, vehicles and furniture 20% each amounting to $1,000.
‘Where the carrying amount of an asset is greater than its estimated recoverable amount, it is 12, Related Party Tramsactions

written down immediately to its recoverable amount. Gains and losses on disposal of property
and equipment are determined by reference to its recoverable amount and are taken into account
in determining operating income.



At 31 October 2004, deposits maintained with and for other FirstCaribbean entities arnounted to ©

$22,961 (2003 - $14,343) and $46,092 (2003 - $45,974).
THE TR

Hs Fs RR Fe Mis Fis EMP Fa ha Saga Fa Tia a a a ae ana A a BE aw

e

es

13.

14.

IBUNE BUSINESS

aH Tere ae ee Oe eee a

Contingent Liabilities and Commitments

At the balance sheet date the following contingent liabilities exist.

"2004 2003

$ $

Loan commitments 3,991 ______7,180
3,991 7,180

Use of Financial Instruments

Strategy in using financial instruments

By its nature the Bank’s actiyities are principally related to the use of financial
instruments. The Bank accepts deposits from customers at both fixed and floating rates
and for various periods and seeks to earn above average interest margins by investing
these funds in high quality assets. The Bank seeks to increase these margins by
consolidating short-term funds and lending for longer periods at higher rates whilst
maintaining sufficient liquidity to meet all claims that mi ght fall due.

The Bank also seeks to raise its interest margins by obtaining above average margins, net
of provisions, through lending to commercial and retail borrowers with a range of credit
standing. Such exposures involve not just on-balance sheet loans and advances but the
group also enters into guarantees and other commitments such as letter of credit and
performance, and other bonds.

Credit risk

The Bank takes on exposure to credit risk, which is the risk that a counterparty will be
unable to pay amounts in full when due. The Bank structures the levels of credit risk it
undertakes by placing limits on the amount of risk accepted in relation to one borrower,
or groups of borrowers, arid to geographical and industry segments. Such risks are
monitored on a revolving basis and subject to an annual or more frequent review.

The exposure to any one borrower including banks and brokers is further restricted by
sub-limits covering on and off-balance sheet exposures and daily delivery risk limits in
relation to trading items such as forward foreign exchange contracts. Actual exposures
against limits are monitored daily.

Exposure to credit risk is managed through regular analysis of the ability of borrowers
and potential borrowers to meet interest and capital repayment obligations and by
changing these lending limits where appropriate. Exposure to credit risk is also managed
in part by obtaining collateral and corporate and personal guarantees, but a significant .
portion is personal lending where no such facilities can be obtained.

Credit related commitments

The primary purpose of these instruments is to ensure that funds are available toa
customer as required. Guarantees and standby letters of credit, which represent
irrevocable assurances that the Bank will make payments in the event that a customer
cannot meet ‘its obligations to third parties, carry the same credit risk as loans.
Documentary and commercial letters of credit, which are written undertakings by the
Bank on behalf of a customer authorising a third party to draw drafts on the Bark up to a’
stipulated amount under specific terms and conditions, are collateralised by the
underlying shipments of goods to which they relate and therefore carry less risk than a
direct borrowing.

Commitments to extend credit represent unused portions of authorisations to extend
credit in the form of loans, guarantees or letters of credit. With respect to credit risk on
commitments to extend credit, the Bank is potentially exposed to loss in an amount equal
to the total unused commitments. However, the likely amount of loss is less than the total .
unused commitments since most commitments to extend credit are contingent upon
customers maintaining specific credit standards. The Bank monitors the term of maturity
of credit commitments because longer-term commitments generally have a greater degree
of credit risk than shorter-term commitments. :

Interest rate risk

Interest sensitivity of assets, Habilities and off balance sheet items — repricing
analysis

The Bank takes on exposure to the effects of fluctuations in the prevailing levels of
market interest rates on its financial position and cash flows. Interest margins may
increase as a result of such changes but may reduce or create losses in the event that
unexpected movements arise. The Board of Directors sets limits on the level of mismatch
of interest rate repricing that may be undertaken, which is monitored daily.

Expected repricing and maturity dates do not differ significantly from the contract dates,
except for the maturity of deposits up to 1 month, which represent balances on current
accounts considered by the Bank asa relatively stable core source of funding of its
operations.

Liquidity risk

The Bank is exposed to daily calls on its available cash resources from overnight
deposits, current accounts, maturing deposits, loan draw downs, guarantees and from
margin and other calls on cash settled derivatives. The Bank does not maintain cash
resources to meet all of these needs as experience shows that a minimum level of
reinvestment of maturing funds can be predicted with a high level of certainty. The Board
sets limits on the minimum proportion of maturing funds available to meet such calls and
on the minimum level of interbank and other borrowing facilities that should be in place
to cover withdrawals at unexpected levels of demand.

The table below analyses assets and liabilities of the Bank into relevant maturity
groupings based on the remaining period at balance sheet date to the contractual maturity
date.

Maturities of assets and liabilities

1-3 3-12 1-5 Over 5 :

; months months years years Total
As at 31 October 2904 $ $ s : $ $
Assets
Due from banks 26,336 S 2 - 26,336
Loans and advances to customers (5,413) 5,037 26,550 92,619 118,793
Tnvestiients scouzitics , 78 = 300 2,140 2,518
Property and equipment - - - 7 7
Other assets : 678 - a - : = 678
Total assets ___21,679 5,037 26,850 94,766 148,332



“THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 9B

Liabilities

Deposits _ 76,688 > 46,270 *4 122,962
Other liabilities 7,589 >! = - 7,589
Total liabilities 84,277 : 46,270 4 - 130,551
Net on balance sheet position (62,598) (41,233) 26,846 94,766 17,781
Credit commitments 3,991 . - - - 3,991
As at 31 December 2003

Total assets 17,506 L716 4874 124,416 148,512
Total liabilities 70,768 58,139 - i - 128,907
Net on balance sheet position . (53,262) (56,423) 4,874 124,416 19,605
Credit commitments 7,180 2 : - - 7,180

The matching and controlled mismatching of the maturities and interest rates of assets
and liabilities is fundamental to the management of the Bank. It is unusual for banks ever
to be completely matched since business transacted is often of uncertain term and
different types. An unmatched position potentially enhances profitability, but also
increases the risk of Josses.

The maturities of assets and liabilities and the ability to replace, at an acceptable cost,
interest-bearing liabilities as they mature, are important factors in assessing the liquidity
of the Bank and its exposure to changes in interest rates and exchange rates.

Liquidity requirements to support calls under guarantees and standby letters of credit are

considerably less than the amount of the commitment because the Bank does not
generally expect the third party to draw funds under the agreement. The total outstanding

contractual amount of commitments to extend credit does not necessarily represent future

cash requirements, since many of these commitments will expire or terminate without

being fi -ded. :

E. Fair values of financial assets and liabilities
Due from other banks

Due from other banks includes inter-bank placements and items in the course of
-collection. :

" The fair value of floating rate placements and overnight deposits is their carrying amount.
The estimated fair value of fixed interest bearing deposits is based on discounted cash
flows using prevailing money market interest rates for debts with similar credit risk and
remaining maturity. .

Loans and advances to customers

Loans and advances are net of specific and other provisions for impairment. The
estimated fair value of loans and advances represents the discounted amount of estimated
future cash flows expected to be received. Expected cash flows are discounted at current
market rates to determine fair value

Iavestment securities _

Investment securities include .only interest-bearing assets held to maturity, as assets
available-for-sale are now measured at fair value. Fair value for held to maturity assets
are based on market prices or broker/dealer price quotations. Where this information is
not available, fair value has been estimated using quoted prices for securities with similar
credit, maturity and yield characteristics, or in some cases by reference to the net tangible
asset backing of the investee.

Deposits and borrowings

The estimated fair value of deposits with no stated maturity, which includes non-interest-
bearing deposits, is the amount repayable on demand.

The estimated fair value of fixed interest bearing deposits and other borrowings without

quoted market price is based on discounted cash flows using interest rates for new debts
with similar remaining maturitv : .

PRICEWATERHOUSE(COPERS @



” Providence Hi
East Hill Street
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, The Bahamas
Telephone (242) 302-5300
Facsimile (242) 302-5350

Independent Auditors’ Report

To the Directors of
FirstCaribbean International Finance Corporation (Bahamac) Limited

We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of FirstCaribbean International Finance Corporation
(Bahamas) Limited (the “Bank”) as of 31 October 2004. This balance sheet is the responsibility of the ”
Bank’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on this balance sheet based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those Standards require
that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the balance sheet is free
of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts
and disclosures in the balance sheet. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and
significant estimates made by management, as well as ‘evaluating the overall balance sheet presentation.
We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for.our opinion. : :

In our opinion, the balance sheet presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Bank
as of 31 October 2004 in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards.

PricewaterhouseCoopers

Chartered Accountants
9 February 2005



OBR:

Balance Sheets & Legal Notices

in

BU twin

Or) ie ae

502-2356


PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005

CALVARY Bible have
emerged as the leader of the
pack in one half of the men’s
draw in the Baptist Sports
Council’s 2005 basketball
league.

Pilgrim Baptist have
surged out front in the other
half.

On Saturday at the Charles
W Saunders High School,

| Calvary Bible pushed their
unblemished record to 2-0
with a 45-38 victory over
Golden Gates.

Pilgrim Baptist stayed even
in the vice president’s divi-
sion with a close 34-33 vic-
tory over the rookie Fellow-
ship Church of God.

In other men’s games
played, New Mount Zion
made their debut with a 44-
40 victory over hapless Mace-
donia; New Bethlehem also
opened with a 42-29 rout
over BIBA and Faith United
knocked off Christ the King
39-30.

In the 19-and-under divi-
sion, Jubilee won 51-46 over
Faith United; First Baptist
hammered Golden Gates 43-
31 and Pilgrim got by Temple
Christian 34-30.

And in the 15-and-under
division, Calvary Deliverance
clobbered BIBA 47-25;
Macedonia held off New
Bethlehem 22-20 and Trans-
figuration devoured Mount
Tabor 29-14.

Here’s a summary of the
games played:

& Calvary Bible 45, Gold-
en Gates 38: Craig 'Magic'
Wakine produced 13 points
and Robin Shepherd added
12 as Calvary Bible pulled
off the men's victory. Edward
Carey scored a game high 18
in the loss.

i Jubilee 46, Faith United
‘46: Tario Brooks scored 17
points to lead Jubilee to vic-
tory in the 19-and-under divi-
sion. Theo Woods scored a

game high 19 points to lead
Faith United in the loss.

fi Calvary Deliverance 47,
BIBA 25: Rashad Williams
exploded for a game high 17,
Deshiko Henfield had 11 and
Antonio Bosfield added 10
to lead Calvary Deliverance's
15-and-under team. Sterling
Woods had nine in a losing
effort.

@ First Baptist 43, Golden
Gates 31: Gibson Alcidor
scored nine and both Charles
Williams and Charles Fergu-
son contributed eight as First
Baptist won this men's game.
Michael Munnings had a
game high 10 in the loss.

& Faith United 39, Christ
the King 30: Carrington
Dean pumped in a game high
17 and Oscar Clarke had 14
as Faith United won their
second straight men's game.
Corrie Miller had 15 in a los-
ing effort.

H New Bethlehem 42,
BIBA 29: Philip Rolle's
game high 17 led New Beth-
lehem men's to their season
opener. Burlington Moss had
11 in a losing effort.

Hi New Mount Zion 44,
Macedonia 40: Ricardo Rolle
canned a game high 15 and
Luke Hutchinson added 11
in their men's season opener
for New Mount Zion. Ricar-
do. Stubbs had nine in the
loss.

BH Macedonia 22, New
Bethlehem 20: Mario Mead-
ows led the way with nine
and Anthony Porter added
eight, including the game
winning two points, to seal
the second straight 15-and-
under win for Macedonia.
Justin Rodgers had six in the
loss.

@ Pilgrim v Fellowship
Church of God: Julius Smith
and Leonardo Burrows came
through with 11 and 10

SPORTS

respectively to give Pilgrim
this men's victory. Deidrick
Johnson had a game high 13
in the loss.

@ Macedonia 29, New
Bethlehem 15: Leon Rah-
ming and Keno Brice pro-
vided a 1-2 punch for Mace-
donia as their 19-and-under
team stayed undefeated.
Fritzroy George led the way
for the losers.

H Pilgrim 34, Temple
Christian 30: Brenville Saun-
ders scored 12 and Denaldo
Kemp and Edward Rodgers
both had eight in the win for
the undefeated 19-and-under
Pilgrim. Noel Lamm had
nine in the loss.

@ Transfiguration 29,
Mount Tabor 14: Demetrius
Ferguson came up with 10
and Donovan Moss had eight
as Transfiguration won this
15-and-under game.
Jonathan Davis had six in the
loss.

Here's how they will play this
weekend:

mf COURT ONE

10 am Faith United vs
Jubilee (15); 11 am Fellow-
ship Church of God vs BIBA
(M); Noon Mount Tabor vs
Christ the King (M(); 1 pm
Transfiguration vs Golden
Gates (15); 2 pm Transfigu-
ration vs Golden Gates (19);
3 pm First Baptist vs Golden
Gates (M); 4 pm New Beth-
lehem vs New Mount Zion
(M).

@ COURT TWO

10 am Temple Christian vs
Ebenezer (15); 11 am Tem-
ple Christian vs Calvary
Deliverance (19); Noon Cal-
vary Deliverance vs New
Bethlehem (15); 1 pm Evan-
gelistic Centre vs Pilgrim
(M); 2 pm Faith United vs
First Baptist (15); 3 pm Cal-
vary Bible vs Faith United
(M).



TRIBUNE SPORTS



pe of punch

'VE had the opportunity

to cover many profession-
al boxing shows and First Class
Boxing Promotion's Night to
Remember on Saturday night
at. the Wyndham Nassau Resort
& Crystal Palace Casino ranks
as one of the best.

If that wasn't enough, the
prestigious Hugh Campbell
Basketball Classic turned out
to be just as exhilarating.

I don't know which one I
enjoyed the most.

They both had their share of
dramatic moments..:

By the time you read this, I
should be in Curacao getting
ready to watch our young guns
go to work in the first round of
the American Zone II Davis

_ Cup tie against.the Netherlands.

Antilles.

With so much expectation on
those young rising stars, this
weekend might just top what
occurred here at home this past
weekend.

Let's start with boxing.

It was good to see the fans
show up in such large numbers.
It reminded me of the days
when boxing was at its height
with Ray Minus Jr going after
one of the many titles-in per-
haps the most illustrious cateer
of our local boxers.

The title bout between
Jerome 'Bahamian Bronze
Boomer' Ellis and Wilson 'Kid
Wonder' Theophile lived up to
its advanced billing as an excit-
ing fight to watch. But my main
concern, which was evident in
the early rounds, was whether
or not any of the fighters would
have lasted if they had to go the
full 12 rounds.

Ne of them had ever
fought a match past
the sixth round. So, as Ellis
started in his post-fight cele-
brations, the fight'was way
beyond both of them. -

It showed up in Theophile,
who obviously wasn't as condi-

. tioned as Ellis to go the dis-

tance, not withstanding the frac-
tured jaw he suffered, and he
wasn't able to answer the bell at
the start of the seventh.

There's no doubt that we will
see Theophile again. Whether
it's against Ellis is a different
story.

I believe that Ellis will go on
to fight a lot more on the inter-
national scene where he will get

STUBBS



OPINION



ble trouble for Theophile in a
rematch.

This, however, could become
the next big rivalry since Minus



ing champion 'Marvellous' Mar-
vin Smith for his super mid-
dleweight title at the end of
April, the fans will be looking
for a First Class show.

I don't want to dwell on this
too much, but it seems that
every year the Hugh Campbell
title stays in New Providence,

the teams from Grand Bahama ,

complain that they were cheat-
ed by the referees.

But, despite all the bickering
before and during the week-
long double elimination tour-

nament, Tabernacle Falcons':

coach Norris Bain gave credit
where it was due.

H: admitted that the
CI Gibson Rattlers

were the better team Monday
night and they deserved the vic-
tory, although his complaint was
centred around the moist floor
at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um after the air-conditioned
system malfunctioned.

There is, however, talk

among the Grand Bahama.
_teams of a possible boycott of
the tournament next year

because of how they claim they
were treated.
Let's just hope that calmer



“The title bout between
Jerome 'Bahamian Bronze
Boomer' Ellis and Wilson 'Kid
Wonder' Theophile lived up to
its advanced billing as an
exciting fight to watch.” —



Jr went head-to-head with
Quincy 'Thrill-A-Minute' Pratt,
not just once or twice, but three
times.

First Class Promotions should
line up Meacher 'Pain' Major,
who was just as brilliant as ever
in his co-main event bout -
stopping American Jeff 'the
Executioner’ at the end of the
second. But the problem might
be finding a worthy opponent.

With Duran 'Hands of Stone’
Miller back in action after a
two-year hiatus, he might just
be the legitimate choice. He
looked good against

Dencil 'Death' Miller. But he
has to be tested before he can
step in the ring with Major.

Whatever happens, especial-

heads prevail and the Grand

‘Bahama teams decline to carry

out their threat.

The tournament just wouldn’t
be the same without them.

This weekend, the Bahamas
Lawn Tennis Association's
four-man team won't be the
same either.

Team captain John Farring-
ton has a young team withlittle
experience that includes Devin
Mullings, Marvin Rolle, :1'Cone
Thompson and Ryan Sweeting.

So without Merkle.n and
Mark Knowles providing the
dramatic victories, we will just
have to rely on these athletes
to get the job done.

I know I'm looking forward
to seeing how they perform this

Mata 2 -

weekend and it could be one to

(. an opportunity to improve even émember
T .

ly with talk of Jermaine 'Chu-
more. And that could spell dou-

Chu' Mackey taking on defend-

BAHAMAS RUGBY
FOOTBALL UNION
COLLEGE WEEKEND
SCHEDULE

GAMES SCHEDULED FOR
SUNDAY, MARCH 6"

As most University teams travel on Saturdays, matches against









“Copyrighted Material
§ Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

college sides are being played on Sundays and during the week.
Throughout the month of March there will be 10 College teams in

Nassau (7men, 3 women). This Sunday, the schedule is as follows:



3pm - Buccaneers RFC vs. -

Yale University RFC |
(2005 NE Division 2 Champions)



4.30pm - U Penn

(2004 EPRU Division 1 Champions)
vs. Michigan State








z

ee ee a ed

@ ‘AKITA BROWN
of C.H Reeves on her
way to a record throw
to win the Junior Girls
Javelin.

(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)

B L.W. YOUNG’S
Lynden Bethel passes
S.C McPherson’s
Ronico Thompson to
win the intermediate
boys 100 metre hur-
dles.

: (Photo:
Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)

& LW YOUNG’S Ivanique Kemp
edges out A.F Adderley’s Kashara

dderley to win the juni

@ VINCENT
MCKENNEY placed
third during the interme-
diate boys long jump
yesterday at the GSSSA
junior high schools
championship track
meet.

(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)


THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

=e

cer

AN



@ By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

ELEVEN records fell in the 12th
annual Government Secondary Schools
Sporting Association (GSSSA) junior
high school championships. —

The event, which was held over a two
day period also saw 50.athletes qualify
for the national track and field meet.

Stealing the show was Vashti Cole-
brooke and Jaran Hinsey of DW Davis

~ and SC’McPherson schools.

Both competed in the bantam divi-
sions, set new meet records and quali-
fied for the national meet.

Colebrooke was crowned the sprint-
ing queen, winning the 100m and 200m,
in times of 13.40 seconds and 27.25 sec-
onds, respectively. ;

Despite falling short of a meet recor!
in the 100m, she managed a record in
the 200m. Z

Colebrooke was gunning for the old
record, 27.80 seconds, which was held by
Tamara Rigby in 1999, from the pre-
liminary rounds. In the preliminaries
she ran 27.87 seconds.

Hinsey helped to erase three meet
records as he competed in the 200m,
400m, 4x100m, 4x400m and high jump.

Heats

In the 200m heats, Hinsey ran 28.32
seconds, the second fastest time behind
teammate Tre Adderley’s 28.08 sec-
onds.

Hinsey also posted the second fastest
time in the 400m heats with 1:07.17 sec-
onds. The time of 1:06.04 seconds ran by
Neil Sands was listed.as the fastest. Both
times were record breakers.

Using the times and teammates as @
guide, Hinsey blasted to times of 27.04.
seconds and 1:05.14 seconds in the 200m
and 400m, respectively.

The old mark in the 200m was 28.78
seconds and 1:07.48 seconds in the
400m.

In the high jump event Hinsey leapt
to 1.43m, winning the event over Alon-
zo Cunningham, who also cleared
1.43m.

Hinsey won the event because he had
the fewest knock downs.

Dominating the junior girls division
was Lexi Wilson of CH Reeves.

Wilson set a new record in the 1500m,
uprooting a record that she set last year,
in a time of 5:30.22.

She said: “The meet was a good one,
I was able to run some fast times and
qualify for the national championships.

Great

“Training has been coming along
great and I am happy to see that it paid
off. I would like to thank my coach for
assisting me.

“T didn’t know that I was going to set
a new meet record, the record was mine
and to see I broke my own record
means that I am improving on a con-
stant basis.”

Annihilating a fourteen year old
record on the first day was Shakara
Brown.

Brown, who just missed qualifying
for this year’s Carifta games, destroyed
the old mark of 1.57m set by Debbie
Ferguson in 1990.

She jumped 1.60m — the Carifta qual-
ifying standard is 1.63. The jump is the
best marking posted by anyone who is
seeking to compete in this event.

With just six events remaining, the
CH Reeves Raptors were leading two
divisions, but were slotted amongst the
top three in the other divisions.

Head coach Fritz Grant said: “We
have an excellent programme which is
paying off for us. We set a few records
last year, but this year we are doing
extremely well.

“We were able to set several records,
and many of the athletes were able to
qualify for the nationals.”

The high school meet is set to begin
today at 9am.





SECTION



_ THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005



Sermons, Church Activities, Awards



Church Notes
Page 2C



Nassau Village pastors hoping

to re-build residents’

place various programmes and __

@ By PETURA BURROWS

Tribune Feature Writer

astors in Nassau

Village have

revived a pre-

existing organisa-

tion for communi-

ty development, with the hope

of re-building the spirit and

morale of residents following
January’s riot.

Tempers flared and the com-
munity came to the forefront
of the news in January as the
site of a social uprising that
some likened to scenes of vio-
lence in Haiti. A total of five
people, civilians and police
officers, were injured during
the incident that was said to
a sparked by an car accident

y the area.
3Now the pastors, who have
‘stablished churches in this
community, are putting aside
tHeir denominational differ-
ences in a bid to “penetrate”
the community with worth-
while activities, Christian
teaching and personal devel-
opment exercises — a combi-
nation which they hope will
safeguard Nassau Village from
future unrest.

zThe Nassau Village Pastors
fot Community Involvement
(NVPCI) was first organised



last August, after Bishop. --

Reuben J Deleveaux of The
New Holy Spirit Church of
God Inc met with other pas-
tors in the area to discuss ways
that they-could assist the com-
munity.

But the group didn’t
“mobilise” itself in the com-
munity until January, follow-
“ing the riot.

“We are just sorry that we
‘took so long to get it up off the
ground. But that (riot) has
stirred us up to go ahead with
our plans, Bishop Deleveaux
told Tribune Religion.

The group’s first objective is
to form a strong alliance of
spiritual fellowship for the ben-
efit of pastors and church
members in the community.

‘ The second objective is to

find a way to meet the needs of

troubled families in the com- _

munity; and the third goal is
to help provide the young peo-
ple in the area with skills that
will allow them to contribute to
society in meaningful way.

“These are only some of our
goals,” said the Bishop.

Residents of Nassau Village
believe that healing and hope
are needed following the “dev-
astating” riot.

Rochelle Mortimer, a 37-
year-old resident of Nassau
Village who has lived in the
area “from birth”, described
the riot as a “national disas-
ter”. id

Nassau Village, which she

feels is usually a peaceful com- ©

munity, has had its challenges
throughout the years but the
riot was the worst that she has
ever seen.

Community

“I came up in Nassau Vil-
lage and this was never a com-
munity for such things. We got
along. We lived together
peacefully. We cooperated
with the police. But we have

lost that now, sadly,” Mrs Mor-

timer told Tribune Religion.
Although the riot is weeks

gone, it is still a topic of con--
versation in the community,

she said.

“People say they can’t
believe that the police could
act like that. And a lot of per-
sons are saying that they feel
like Nassau Village will never
be able to come up from this.

“This community is hurting
obviously because everyone
was involved and was touched.
Even if you didn’t throw a rock
or shoot, or you may not have
been there, but you were
affected because it’s the atmos-
phere that has just changed.
Everyone is angry. Some of
them didn’t even know what
they were mad about. Maybe it

was something that the police—. .

or anybody — did to them, and
you see they just got angry.”
Mrs Mortimer is a devoted



B UPLIFTING — Rev Ishmael Martin, pastor of Last Days
Gospel Assembly on Forbes Street, Nassau Village, speaks
to the congregation during Tuesday night’s service. Rev
_ Martinis part.of-Nassau-Village Pastors for Community
Involvement (NVPC)) - a pre-existing ergeneay forcom-**
munity development.

(Photo by Mario Duncaidon/TAbene Staff)

Christian who worships out-
side of Nassau Village, and
feels that the “body of Christ”

“in the community is partially

responsible for the moral re-
building of the area.

Churches

She believes that dozens of
churches are not doing any-
thing but applauds the effort
of the “few” pastors who are.

The church, as “shepherds

- of-God’s children”, have to do ©

more than just “sit and have
service”, said Mrs Mortimer.
Rev Ishmael Martin of Last

Days Gospel Assembly in
Forbes Street is one of the 14
pastors who make up the
organisation seeking to bring
about community develop-
ment.

He has made “objective
three” — empowering the
young people in the commu-
nity — one of the main focuses
of his assembly.

-Rev Martin, who is also a
resident of Nassau Village,
believes that the young peo-

_ ple in the area have to be

reached if future unrest is to.
be avoided.
His church currently has in

‘Haitians are drain on society
is overall feeling of Bahamians’

i By CLEMENT JOHNSON

‘EVERYWHERE you go these days
there is talk about what should happen
with the Haitians in the Bahainas. In
restaurants, at bus stops, on talk shows.

Early in the morning you can even see
the police stopping the vehicles of per-
sons who they suspect of having Haitian
workers.

_ The opinion varies from lock them all
-up and send them home, they are just tak-
‘ing over this country, they having babies

like flies, they pay no taxes, we need them

here to work.

' However, the overall feeling of Bahami-

ans is that they are a drain on the society

and we can do without them.

One is taken aback by the many senti-
_ments expressed so freely and openly
about a group of fellow human beings.
The fear expressed by one old lady was
really what struck me.
~ “T hope,” she said, “we will not see a
tepeat of the Cay Lobos, where Haitians
“were stranded and the Sovernient io

people of the Bahamas did nothing to
help them.

The American Government had to
come to the aid of those innocent people
in 1980. For me this was a genuine sign
that when hysteria takes over we lose our
sense of Christian identity.”

“I hope we will not see
a repeat of the Cay Lobos,
where Haitians were strand-
ed and the Government and
people of the Bahamas did
nothing to help them.”

— Anonymous lady

As the old lady looked through eyes
filled with tears she reminisced about a
time when the church spoke up on matters
relating to the plight of Haitians.

It was after her remarks about the role
of the church in the 80’s that we did a lit-
tle research on our own.

This lady, who only wanted to be called

“Grammy”, said that both Anglican and
Catholic churches spoke out against the
manhandling of Haitians. She was now
convinced that no one seemed to care.

If police and immigration officers find
illegal immigrants on jobs sites, both the
employer and employee should be made
to answer.

In our limited research we found
excerpts from a speech made by Bishop
Michael Eldon when he addressed the
21st Anglican Synod on November 16,
1980. These remarks would have been,

made after it was reported in Nassau that”

a number of Haitians would have been
unduly beaten.

“The time has arrived,” said the Bishop, ~

“when we feel every effort should be
made to find some solution to the prob-
lem. We must seek help outside our bor-
ders to solve it.”

The former Anglican Bishop of the
Bahamas said that persons who lived in a

See HAITIANS, Page 2C

TD. JAKES

activities that are geared
towards the young people in a
certain part of Nassau Village.

His plan is to get the young
people into the church so that
he can “feel their heart beat” —
how they feel about the situa-
tions they face and the prob-
lems they have to deal with
regularly.

“Our plan for the future is to
see if we can house a lot of |

these young people....not just
to make them happy but we
want to have activities along
with some of the major pro-
grammes,” Rev. Martin
explains.

“One of the things we want
to do is to try to get a change a
mindset into the youth, that
you do not have to go on the
block, you do not have to be
involved with the law, you do
not have to be taking drugs...”

Mrs Mortimer, like many
women raising children in Nas-
sau Village, believes that the
young people in the area need
special attention.

Challenges

Her daughter who has just
started high school is already
facing various “challenges”,
_she noted...

“And Mr Mortimer is con-
cerned about the future of her
“young man”, who will begin
primary school in September.

“I know that there are bad
influences out there and so I
try to keep (my children) away
from bad company and I try
to.teach them how to do the
right thing and not follow the
crowd and what they. are
doing,” she adds.

Rev Martin says that while
preaching the gospel of Christ
to young people is important,
they must also be exposed to
ways that they can equip them-
selves to better their situation
and stay out of “trouble”.

At his church Rev Martin
shows movies that deal with
youth issues, teach young men
how. to be gentlemen and

orale

young women how to be
ladies. Cooking and sewing
lessons are available for young
women and masonry sessions
for young men.

These are only some of the
plans that have been put in
place to build the “character”
of young people in the com-
munity, he says.

Rev Martin also takes his

“message to the women and

men on the streets of Nassau
Village, where he says that he
is “respected highly” by many
of them, because of their rela-
tionship.

The church’s job, he said, is
not only to reach the saved but
to reach everybody. Church
services are good but the idea
that somebody must first
receive the Lord in order to
participate in any activity of
the church is against biblical
principles, said Rev Martin.

“T don’t want to have a pro-
gramme that says, well you
have to find the Lord for you
to participate. I believe that
there are decent folks who
might not be saved, who might
not be involved in church but
they can be a great asset and a
great help to the community.”

In addition, there are many
other activities that are needed

outside of the church service, ene

said the pastor.

“There are things to keep
that individual occupied so that _
he (or she) has no-need to
want to go-on the other side.
And if we can have some pro-
grammes to pregnate their
minds with these things, then
they have no need to go over
there.

“But right now, to my
understanding, the Bahamas
doesn’t have anything to enter-
tain our youth. Government is
not implementing anything,
MPs aren’t bringing in any-
thing for the youth....there is
so much that could be done in
the Bahamas at large, and
every community, to pull them

See PASTORS, 2C —

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e 7] he Bone Collector

© Fight for the Family


PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





ANGLICAN
CHURCH
MEN

THE organisation is sched-
uled to hold its 32nd Annual
Conference in Marsh Harbour,
Abaco, March 10-13. All men
in the Anglican Church are
invited to register at their
parish.

Conference speakers include
Archbishop Drexel Gomez,
Canon Basil Tynes, Troy Sands
and Archdeacon Corenell
Moss.

ST ANDREW’S
PRESBYTERIAN
KIRK

YOU are invited to worship
with the church family at 9:30
am or 11 am on Sunday. Sun-
day School meets during the
11 am service and the Youth
Group meets on Friday
evenings.

The Kirk is located at the

Church Notes

corner of Peck’s Slope and
Princes' Street, across from the
Central Bank. Parking is avail-
able immediately behind the
Kirk. Visit us also at:
www.standrewskirk.com

UNITED FAITH
MINISTRIES

INT.

THE church is scheduled to
hold the following services:

¢ Morning Glory Worship —
2nd & 4th Sunday @ 8am

¢ Morning Glory Prayer
Meeting - Wednesday & Sat-
urday @ Sam.

e Christian Education - 1st &
3rd Sunday @ 9.30am.

¢ Divine Worship — Sunday
@ 10.30am.

¢ Communion & Healing
Service - Ist Sunday @ 6pm.






director...

shop.

lunch and snacks.

CRUS,

St Martin Monastery
to sponsor Spiritual —
Direction Workshop

A SPIRITUAL Direction Workshop, sponsored by St
' Martin Monastery, will be held on Friday, March 11, and |
Saturday, March 12, at St Martin Monastery and will be con-
ducted by Sister Josue Behnen, OSB, a qualified spiritual

Topics will include the what and why of spiritual direction,
the theological foundations and practical aspects of spiritual
direction, and a demonstration of a spiritual direction session.

All pastors and administrators have been invited to send
representatives from their parish, especially those involved in
the formation ministries, to participate in the complete work-

There will be a $65 donation that will include materials,



ee aon INA
GHETTO
JOHN 4:29....COME SEE A MAN

March 7 - March 13th, 2005
South Beach Union Baptist Church
_ 7:00p.m. Nightly

Speakers:



Rey. Wilton A. McKenzie Rev. Dr. Victor Cooper

Bahamas Baptist Union
Evangelist

Bahamas Baptist Union
Assistant Evangelist

SPECIAL MUSIC BY VARIOUS UNION
CHURCH CHOIRS



let Cha rlie the

Bahamian Puppet and
his sidekick Derek put

some smiles on your

kids’s faces.

e Evening Worship — Ist &
3rd Sunday @ 6pm.

e Word Explosion - Every
Wednesday @ 7.30pm.

e Youth Meeting - Friday @

7.30pm.

¢ Women of Destiny Meet-
ing - 2nd Tuesday @ 7.30pm.

¢ Men of Honour Meeting -
4th Tuesday @ 7.30pm.

¢ Praise Choir Rehearsal -

_ 1st & 3rd Tuesday @ 7.30pm.

e Live broadcast every 2nd
and 4th Sunday at 11:00 am via
More 94.9FM.

e Faith Touch is aired 1st,
2nd and 3rd Sunday at 8:00 am
via More 94.9 FM.

e Faith Touch is also aired
every Thursday at 9.45am via
101.9 Joy FM.

United Faith Ministries
International is located in the
Summerwinds Plaza, Harrold

- Road.

The senior pastor is Apos-

tle Phalmon Ferguson. For fur- -

ther information, e-mail:
ufm@bahamas.net. bs or call
328-3737/328-6949





Haitians (Fret page 1C)

ZION
BAPTIST
CHURCH

THE church at East and
Shirley Streets is hosting The
Institute In Basic Life Princi-
ples Basic Seminar until March
5. (Thursday - 7 pm to 10 pm,
Friday and Saturday, 9 am to
6:30 pm.

For further information, call
341-3009. or 457-0827 or 328-
5776.

NEW
COVENANT

BAPTIST

CHURCH

THE Children’s Choir of the
church on East West Highway
is scheduled to hold a concert
under the theme, “Kidz ‘N’
Praise” 6 pm Sunday.

For further information, call
393-3946. The senio# pastor is

- Bishop Simeon B Hall.

Hundreds pack Cathedral
for gospel music, hip-hop

HUNDREDS packed the Church of God
Cathedral. to enjoy some good old fashion
Gospel music, and hip-hop.

The church of God Cathedral Praise Team
was led by Psalmist Eileen Johnson. And the
concert was organised by the Inner Circle group.
Emcees for the night were Brother Pascal Saun-
ders and Rev Sherell Saunders.

The atmosphere was upbeat from the moment
you entered the Church, which was decorated
with purple and white balloons.

The new Dimension Dance group led the ©
audience into a interpretive dance of prayer.

The Golden Gates Praise Team, under the
direction of Minister Dwight Armbrister,
brought the house down with their selection,

- but-the night belonged:to Landlord, who worked
the young people in the audience into a frenzy
of praise and dance. i
~ The concert was held on Sunday, Feeiary 2 20.





. A member of the Church of God Cathedral sings during the concert.
(Photo by Clement Johnson) *



EAST
STREET
GOSPEL
CHAPEL

THE church at 83 East
Street, “where Jesus Christ is
Lord, and everyone is special”,
is scheduled to hold the fol-

‘ lowing services:

Sunday, 9:45 am - Sunday
School & Adult Bible Class,
11 am - Morning Celebration,
7 pm - Communion Service, 8
pm - ‘Jesus, the Light of
World’ Radio Programme on

- ZNS 1

Tuesday, 8 pm - Chapel
Choir Practice

Wednesday, 8 pm - Mid-
week Prayer Meeting (Second
Wednesday) - Cell Group
Meeting

Thursday, 6 pm - Hand Bells
Choir Practice, 8 pm - Men’s
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday), 7:45 pm - Women’s
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday)

Friday, 6:30 pm - Con-

7

querors for Christ Club (Boys.
& Girls Club), 8 pm - East
a Youth Fellowship Meet-

Saturday, 6:30 am - Barly
Morning Prayer Meeting

PARISH
CHURCH
OF THE
MOST HOLY

_ TRINITY

THE church at 14 Trinity
Way, Stapledon Gardens, is
scheduled to hold the following
services:

‘Sunday, 7 am - The Holy
Eucharist, 9 am - The Family
Eucharist, Sunday School, 6:30
pm - Praise & Worship/Bible
Study, Evensong & Benedic-
tion

Tuesday, 7:30 pm - The
Church At Prayer

Wednesday, 5:30 am - Inter-
cessory Prayer, 6:30 am - The
Holy Eucharist, 7:30 pm _ :

For further information, call
(242)-328-8677 or visit our
website:

www. holytrinitybahamas.org























society for 20 years had become an impor-
tant part of the workforce of the coun-
try. He stressed that there is a definite
need for a controlled number of Haitians

' to:continued the development of the

Bahamas.

Bishop Eldon was prophetic i in his
remarks when he said: “The need to pur-
sue a just and constructive solution cannot
be over stressed, and in our opinion, the
time is running out. Efforts to procure
such a solution, we feel certain, will

receive the support of a well meaning °

Bahamians.”
Bishop

The bishop was adamant that the treat-
ment of anyone should be Christ-like.
“Our friendship with God is incomplete,
near impossible without a corresponding
friendship with our fellow human beings.
True evangelism demands that we are a
caring and loving people, demands that
we are a responsible family.

“Caring for those members of the fam-
ily who have lost touch with family. Caring
for those who have never had a relation-
ship with any community.

“In each of our churches, concern for

Pastors (From page 1¢)

away from these negative
things. That’s what we are try-
ing to do in Nassau Village,”
he said.

Nassau Village Pastors for
Community Involvement is in
the process of locating a build-
ing to serve as a community
office.

them must be evidence itself in a mean-
ingful pastoral programme, which will
assure them that we value each of them
and assure them the warm welcome and
involvement”.

Msgr. Preston Moss in a . “Pastoral
on the problem of illegal immigrants” o
the feast of the baptism of our Lord in
1981 said that Bahamians must, in justice
and charity, make every effort to alleviate
the sufferings of “our fellow brothers and
sisters”.

“We have to strive,” he said, “to protect
the rights and dignity as individuals and
make sure, to the best of our ability, that
they are not damaged emotionally, phys-
ically or otherwise by this unhappy expe-
rience”

Mser. Moss’ letter came after the Min-
istry of Home Affairs had set a deadline
for an amnesty.

Mercy

“Mercy becomes an indispensable ele-
ment for shaping mutual relationship
between people, in a spirit of mutual
brotherhood,” said the Monsignor in his
pastoral letter.

“It is impossible to established this bond

between people if they wish to regulate
this mutual relationship solely according to
the measure of justice. In every sphere of
interpersonal relationship, justice must
speak, be ‘corrected’ to a considerable
extent, by that love which Saint Paul pro-
claimed is patient and kind, or in other
words possesses the characteristics of that
merciful love which is so much of the
essence of the Gospel and Christianity.”
“Grammy” said it would be interesting
to see how the church will respond to the
round up and detainment of Haitians

today.
Workplace

“I would like to see all non-Bahamians
one day stay away from their workplace
for at least two days,” she said. .

“Tt will really teach us in this country the
importance of foreign workers in this
country. I am afraid what will happen to
those Haitians who were born in this
country and have no status and if sent to
Haiti what will they do.

“Well maybe one day our church lead-
ers will speak up again and along with
government leaders try and find some
solution.”



“We are just sorry that we took so
long to get it up off the ground. But
that (riot) has stirred us up to go

ahead with our plans.”

— Bishop Reuben J Deleveaux

Bring your children to the McHappy Hour at

McDonald's in Palmdale every Thursday
from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. during the
month of March 2005.

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.

One of the group’s pastors,
Bishop Bertrum Johnson of
Whosoever Will Church of
God, an electrician by trade,
has already pledged between
two and three hours each week
to teach his trade to young
men, once the building is
opened.


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 3C












\






















@ REV ANDREW STEWART

@ By REV ANGELA PALACIOUS

WHO we are is a developing phenomenon
that is changing all of the time. How authentic
we are at any given moment has to do with our
relationship with God, I believe.

In Romans 2: 28-29 NLT, St Paul writes:

“For you are not a true Jew just because you

were born of Jewish parents or because you
have gone through the Jewish ceremony of
circumcision. No, a true Jew is one whose
heart is right with God. And true circumci-
sion is not a cutting of the body but a change of
heart produced by God’s spirit. Whoever has
that kind of change seeks praise from God,
not from people.”

If we change the word Jew to Christian then
we can reflect on our birth into a Christian
family and our infant baptism as experiences
that predispose us to a particular faith and
choice of lifestyle.

These external situations have to become
internalised in order for us to live the reality,
and be true “through and through”.

Such change has to be inspired and created
by the Holy Spirit if it is to be permanent,
genuine and godly. Our culture, community
or family may impose a particular way of life
on us, but.our hearts have to embrace it as
truth if we are going to live this way when we
are away from home, or when we have options
to choose otherwise.

It is not a change that can be orchestrated as
a good idea. God has to do this for us so that

Paryerstoet trove

@ By CLEMENT JOHNSON

arishioners of the New Mount Zion
Missionary Baptist Church received a
lesson in stewardship on Sunday at
their 11am Divine Service.

The message was delivered by Rev Andrew
Stewart, assistant pastor, during the church’s
40th anniversary celebrations.

-Rev Stewart stressed to the congregation that
it was important to understand the following: 1.
“Forward in faith”; 2. “Forward in the faith”
and 3. “Unity in the Body of Christ”.

Quoting Genesis 12:1-3, he said: “Now the
Lord said unto Abraham, get thee out of thy
country, and from thy kindred, and from thy

father’s house unto a land that I will shew thee:.

and I will make of thee a great nation, and I will
bless them that bless thee, and curse him that
curse thee, and in thee shall all families of the

Reflecting on life



MEDITATION



" MLREV ANGELA PALAGIOUS,

pleasing God replaces the natural human ten-
dency to want to please ourselves or other
‘people. Our heart’s desire, our inner orienta-
tion, our focus, goal, objective, aim is totally
absorbed in what God desires to do in us and
through us, with us and for us.

As we settle into this love relationship with
God, we also want to please God in our life
work: In Acts 20:24 NLT, St Paul speaks of this
inner compulsion to please God in his assigned
role: “But my life is worth nothing unless I
use it for doing the work assigned me by the

Lord Jesus — the work of telling others the ~

Good News about God’s wonderful kindness

FOR SRI LANKA

Natural disasters can’t be prevented, but the effects can be more

manageable with YOUR HELP.

Friends of Sri Lanka invite individuals and institutions wishing to
contribute towards the tsunami relief efforts in Sri Lanka to help in

one of the following ways:

Deposit your contribution into the special account opened at

Bank of The Bahamas -

Tsunami Relief for Sri Lanka
Account Number: 5265970
Bank of The Bahamas

Main Branch

The deposit can be made at any branch of the bank.

If you are paying by cheque, you can take your contribution
to A. I. D. at any of their locations in New Providence, Grand
Bahamas, Abaco, Eleuthera, Andros and Exuma.

Mail your cheque to Tsunami Relief for Sri Lanka.
P. O. Box CB 11665, Nassau, Bahamas. Cheques should be
made payable to “Tsunami Relief for Sri Lanka”.

Simply call us at 502-7094 — and we will arrange to

collect it from you.

Contributions will be forwarded to the Sri Lanka Red Cross
Society for effective deployment.

earth be blessed.”

This passage, said Rev Stewart, shows the
two-fold promise of God. The faith of Abra-
ham was being tested. He left his country and in

“The worship spaces
are only instruments
to facilitate us. Abraham
looked for a city, and we
too must look for the

city of God.”

— Rev A Stewart

faith he journeyed to a land of promise. “For he
looked for a city which hath foundations, whose

builder and maker is God.”

Abraham went forward in faith because he

and love.”

The question that we each have to ask our-
selves is: “What is my work assignment from
God and is it what I am currently doing?”

If you are not pleasing God where you are
then you are in the wrong place, and you need
to allow the Holy Spirit to reveal to you where
you need to be and to help you to move to that

_place. There may be setbacks on the journey

but at least you will be under God’s direction
and you know that it will all work out for good
somehow.

When we are lost, confused, hurt or
attacked, our response should be to turn to
God and wait for God to show us how to cope,
how long to wait and what is to be our next
move. Then, our attitude will be like that of the
psalmist in Psalm 96: 13 NLT: “But I keep
right on praying to you Lord, hoping this is the
time you will show me favor.”

Perseverance, trust, commitment, devotion
and honest admission of our thoughts and feel-
ings all work together to build character,
strength, faith and sustain us throughout the
period of suffering or struggle.

I hope that these next weeks and months
will be a time for you to re-consider where
you are in terms of being an authentic per-

“son, engaged in purposeful work, depending

solely on God’s strength and wisdom to live a
life that is pleasing to God. Perhaps, it is time
for you to ask God to change your heart so that
you may live a life that will have fulfilled God’s
highest and best dreams and plans for you.

Sunday, April 3r



WT Ee eae Ley stewardship’

believed in a God who would deliver on his
promises, so he went forth with the intent also of
building a house of worship, said Rev Stewart.

“The worship spaces are only instruments to
facilitate us. Abraham looked for a city, and
we too must look for the city of God,” he said.

“Abraham did not know where he was going
but he depended totally on God for direction.

. He received direction from God on a daily basis.

We too must depend on God for our daily guid-
ance.”

He said that God’s instructions to Abraham
can be seen as a formula for Christians.

“We should follow the word of God and rely
on Him only, trusting him only,” said Rev Stew-
art.

The community of the New Mount Zion Mis-
sionary Baptist Church celebrated 40 years on
Sunday, February 27. The anniversary services
were attended by hundreds of its members and
guests.

The church community of Mt Zion began in
January of 1965, when the church was organised
by the late Pastor Henry Stewart.

_ According to the church’s archives, the orig- —
inal church was located on Kemp Road.

After the death of her husband, Rev Lavinia
Stewart assumed the pastorate of Mt Zion in
August, 1970.

Years later after the building on Kemp Road
became too small for the growing congrega-
tion, it was demolished and the wall of the sec-
ond church was built. As the church continued
to prosper, Rev Stewart who was Pastor and
chairperson of the building committee, called the

_ members together and reminded them of a

vision the Lord had given her about building
three churches.

It was agreed to by all of the members, and
the construction of the third church began. A
new place for worship was built on Baillou Road
South — the New Mt Zion Missionary Baptist
Church.

The current church was dedicated to the Lord
in February, 1995.

Rev Lavinia Stewart made history when she
was ordained pastor in 1970 as the first woman
Baptist pastor. She was seen as a pioneer in the
early Bahamian Baptist church for women min-
isters.

She was also the first woman minister to
preach at the National Baptist Convention USA
Inc.

She attended the College of the Bahamas,
Bahamas Baptist Bible Institute and Trinity
Theological College-Bahamas/Caribbean.

She is a retired librarian from the public ser-
vice school system.

Rev Lavinia Stewart holds a bachelor’s degree
in theology, and honorary doctorate degrees
from Trinity College and Tennessee School of

Reon

2005

4pm
Christ Community Church, Bellot Road

For tickets or further information, please contact the
church’s office at
361-8782 or cccbahamas@coralwave.com

This ad has been sponsored by:
Gentle Touch Spa, Martin’s Air Conditioning, Foreign Security and
Consultancy Bahamas Limited, & Overflow Enterprises Limited


PAGE 4C, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005 THE TRIB




MUELLERS
READY CUT

eT

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| SUPER
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|_ QUALITY RIGHTS AND PRICES RESERVED _)




MASHING
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SHURFINE 64 - OZ SHURFIN OZ ie :
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CREAMY/ CRUNCHY SH —40-0z]
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FRESH

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THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005, PAGE 5C

DISCOUNT MART

HOME SALE

Flatware Sets 20% OFF

Dreemel ‘Standard Size

Nene 20% OFF Pillows 2/$9.99

“Comfoter 20% OFF Towel 20% OFF

Place Mats 20% OFF

Sheet Sets 20% OFF Table Cloths 20% OFF Flowers 20% OFF

Large Plastic Garbage
20% OFF

Genéric Bleach I Gallon - 2/$3.00' — Capri-Sun 10pk Juice - $3.35
Supervalue 4pk Tissue - $1.29 Rainbow Corned Beef 120z - 99¢
Sunchy Apple Juice - 2/99¢
Fresquito Deodorizers 320z - $1.59
Pine-Sol original 1.12gallon - $11.59
Evercane Sugar 4lbs - $1.35

Glass Sets 20% OFF Syroco Patio Chairs

Niagara Spray Starch 220z - $1.69
Carnation Evaporated Milk - 2/$1.19
Veryfine Fruit

Punch Juice 1280z -$4.39

SALE STARTS MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28TH - SATURDAY, MARCH 5TH, 2005

_Pay Less at Discount Mart_

: WE ACCEPT AMERICAN EXPRESS MASTER, VISA'‘AND SUNCARD, WE ALSO REDEEM QUALITY STAMP CARDS
: MACKEY STREET, TOP OF THE HILL (next to Super Value) PHONE: 393- 3411/393-5569

BED BATH & HOME

End of Month Sale



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Towels

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Table Cloths
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Comforter Sets
Bath Scales
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Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448
PAGE 6C, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005



a
four friends 5am



Bahamas Conference of

S

eventh-day Ad

ventists

ists

THE TRIBUNE





Lee Ad

Day of Prayer and Fasting

March 5, 2005

he Seventh-day Adventist Church in the West Indies has
declared Saturday, March 5, 2005, a day of Prayer and
Fasting for the Bahamas, Jamaica, the Cayman Islands and
Turks and Caicos Islands. The entire membership of these
islands which make up the territory of West

| Indies Union Conference are being called to

unite in praying to the Lord to bring about a

spiritual revolution and stem the rising tide

of crime and violence. This special appeal is

made to coincide with the worldwide obser-

| vance of the Annual International Women's

| Day of Prayer on the first Sabbath in March.

In an appeal to all members of the 724 con-

gregations in the territory, Pastor Patrick

Allen, President of West. Indies Union

Pastor ‘Patrick Allen, Conference said "We are deeply troubled
President of the West by the runaway state of crime and violence
indies Union Conference .44 we must address the matter with the

of Seventh-day Adventists, : :
Mandeville, Jamaica. weapon that is primary to our warfare -

PRAYER AND FASTING." Apart from the
appeal to its membership, Pastor Allen is also extending an open
invitation to all Government representatives, business and com-
munity leaders and friends to participate in the service in their
local communities. From the Pastor Patrick Allen, Presidnet of the
West Indies Union Confernece of Seventh-day Adventists

Join Us For A Day of ENG and Fasting

Saturday, March 5, 2005, 9:15 a.m. to sunset, at any of the 45
Adventist Churches in the Bahamas: Abaco, Grand Bahama,
Abaco, Andros, Cat Island, Eleuthera, Exuma, |nagua, Long
Island, New Providence, San Salvador

Hon. John Carey,
Parliamentary
Secretary for the
Ministry of Works, visits
booths at the Trade
Show on Sunday.

Visit www.bahamasconference.org/directory to see complete list of
Adventist businesses.

Haitian Gospe eect
Campaign. Ieemeiena
ve
KY N=]\\
Channel



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INUNROVAT, VIAN ¥, CUVY, ) NUL TY

THE TRIBUNE

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RELIGION

MOUNT TABOR

FULL GOSPEL BAPTIST CHURCH
Willow Tree Ave., Pinewood Gardens « P.O. Box N-BTOS « Teh (242) 392-2322 + Faw: (242) 392-4343
Website: www snounttabor.org > www. nellellisministies.cam « Email: mttabor@baie net.
































ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATIONS!

On Sunday February 27th, Mount Tabor Full Gosp
Baptist Church celebrated 18 years of existence.
This dynamic Ministry which was organized i
February of 1987
has been defyin
the odds and bla
ing its own trai
from the ver
beginning. It wa
on Friday the 13t
known to man
Bahamians
Black Friday (
day of bad luck
that eleven perso
along with Neil and
Patrice Ellis
answered the call






Mission of The Church . oe
Eighteen years later, Mount Tabor has growaminding the older members and informing the ne

into the one of the largest most influential churches members of why they ought to give God praise for t
the country and has impacted thousands of livwerk and ministry of their church. Indeed, Mount Tab
throughout the length and breadth of this country ahas weathered many storms, but like their predecess
around the world via its international television broathe Israelites; éfction didn t make them bitter, it sim-
casts. This cutting edge Ministry has also blazed traily made them better.

and led the way in presenting a new, more relevant and__!n addition to the dance, praise and worship a
practical model of what church is; by venturing int@noir ministries; one of Bishop Ellis sons in ministr
areas which had previously been unheard of in relathéastor Frederick Hardy of Montgomery Alabam

to church activity. Over the years Mount Tabor haseached both t
7:00am and 9:30a

services. H
admonished Mou
Taborites to tak
advantage of th
blessed privileg
that is theirs, a
members of Mou
Tabor and peopl
who have th
‘opportunity to si
under the anoint
ministry of a Senio

Ministry. From it
inception, -Bisho
Ellis (then Rev oc
Ellis) purposed tha =
this Ministry would Bishop ELLIS RECAPS 18 YEARS OF
not be church a MINISTRY.

usual ; and even its

Friday the 13th Genesis underscored this fact, wh
would become more evident as the days, weeks, mo
and years rolled along.




















The first Divine
Worship Service }”
was held on Sunday}
February 22nd |
1987, in the Chapel
of the. Bahamas
National Baptist
Convention Pastor. like Bishoy.
Headquarters . on Neil G..Ellis. H
Baillou Hill Road. secured new homes for scores of its members by p¥e@ted that his Iliff
During the first viding them with the necessary closing costs and dow#d tens of tho
service, some fifty- payments, many other members have been blessed gattds of others |
three | persons new vehicles, others with full educational Selena arg
shared in the wor- and to ensure that members are not distressed as ragessed and hav
ship experience, of medical costs the church instituted a group medi&gien positively and powerfully transformed by Bishq
including the health plan with a leading insurer in the country. Adéllis ministry and that it would-be sad if Moun
Reverend Dr. these accomplishments to the continued numerical aradporites fell in the trap of not honoring a prophet
Phillip Rahming, fiscal growth of the Ministry to well over 6,000 and ovétis own home. He told the thousands of Mou
the then President3,000,000 (debt free) in assets, respectively; andl@porites gathered in both services that theirs is a
of the Bahamas becomes apparent that Mount Taborites had more to a8 awesome spiritual heritage as the anointing d]

ae, re re Christian Council, ebrate than just the chronological accomplishment ofigeed flow from the head down; and their spiritual he
PASTOR FREDERICK HARDY, FAITH who presided over years. and therefore the ministry to which they are connec
FOL, Gosrel BAPHST VHURCH,. the: service. The And celebrate they did! In each service Bishaye both MOST BLESSED! |
ONTEONERY 2 LREAMS Pastor-Elect, the Ellis, took time out to recount some of the experiences,
Reverend Neil C. Ellis preached a sermon entitled; Tét@uggles and blessings of the years past, as a means of - TO GOD BE THE GLORY!









MT. TABOR MAKES TOASTMASTERS HISTORY!

‘l'hey are appropriately called the Mount Tabor F
Gospel Baptist Church Trailblazers ; because they
indeed blazing a new trail in the Toastmaste
international Organization as the first church sponso
club in the area.

With the help and sponsorship of Toastmas
Ivan C. Thompson, CTM/CL; Toastmaster Pamela Ro
and other members of Toastmasters club 7178 and
Toastmasters Organization here in New Providence
group got started officially on Thursday February 103
2005, with the election of its officers. Elected 4
President was Toastmaster Ilsa Evans, Toastma




















AREA GOVERNOR ANDON EDWARDS ADDRESSES THE CLUB. Mr. TABOR’S TOASTMASTERS CLUB EXECUTIVE OFFICERS.

Toastmaster Janet Sands was elected Secreteembership.

Toastmaster Lynette Smith was elected Treasurer and _ All indications are that the Mount Tabor Fu
Toastmaster Cornell Rolle was elected Sergeant-Atespel Baptist Church Trailblazers Toastmasters C
Arms. Elections were conducted by Bahamas Divisiomlll mirror their church and rise to the top of th
Governor, Toastmaster Duquesa Dean; Area Goverrfmganization locally and internationally.

Andon Edwards and other area leaders within -
Toastmasters organization.

Already Mount Tabors club is distinguishin
itself;.as the interest in the club was so tremendous
it had to be limited to a starting membership of 50 p
sons with a waiting list of over 60 persons.
Banas Division I GOVERNOR DUQUESA DEAN CONDUCTS ~— and vee rei ee Ne Ne sehneD

ELECTION OF OFFICERS AS TOASTMASTER ROLLE AND Toastmasters club in the area and very excited ab

THOMPSON LOOK ON. what the Toastmasters program can do for the ov

enhancement of its members. She further stated that

Stacia Williams was elected as Vice President @fandate and mission of the Toastmasters organizatio
Education, Toastmaster Yvette Ferguson was eleoje@y complimentary to a primary objective of Mou

Vice President of Membership, Toastmaster Bob Browabor, which is to provide holistic ministry to its : sien.

was elected Vice President of Public Relations, Mr. TaBor’s TOASTMASTERS AT THE “I”,


















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