Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Volume: 101 No.82





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' The Tribune



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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005

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Human rights violations

Bahamas slammed

in annual US report



ll By PACO NUNEZ |
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas was guilty of a
number of human rights viola-
tions in 2004, according to the
United States government.

The US State Department
has released its annual human
rights report on the Bahamas

for 2004, in Which it listed ~

reports of police brutality,
claims of unlawful killings by
officers, allegations of abuse at
the Carmichael Road Deten-
tion Centre and “harsh” prison
conditions.

Government officials were

yesterday unavailable for com-
ment on the report, while a
local human rights group sup-
ported the State Department’s
findings, calling human rights
in the Bahamas “abysmal.”
- The State Department report
also pointed to cases of arbi-
trary arrest and detention,
excessive pre-trial incarceration
for persons accused of crimes
and a iack of legal representa-
tion at trial for a large percent-
age of inmates.

It said that violence against
women in the Bahamas “con-
tinued to be a serious wide-
spread problem” throughout
2004, and that social discrimi-
nation against homosexuals
“was evident.”

The report detailed a num-
ber of specific allegations into
which inquiries are continuing,
including the 2002 shooting of a
16-year-old girl by police and
claims that a Grand Bahama
man was. handcuffed to a tree
and beaten by officers with a






















wo

metal pipe until he confessed
to acrime.
It said that during the course

of 2004, no progress was report-.-

ed concerning the investigations
into these incidents.

The report comes on the

heels of several statements by

Amnesty International last year.

complaining of human rights
abuses-in the Bahamas..

Grand Bahama Human
Rights Association President
Fred Smith said that there is
“nothing exaggerated” in the
State Department’s report.

“The record, of the Bahamas
in human rights is abysmal,” he
said.

He said the Bahamas contin-
ues to decline in human rights
on many levels.

“The judicial situation is dys-
functional, there is very little
respect for due process or
respect for the constitution,
there is arbitrary and unlawful
arrest and disrespect for the rule
of law,” he said. ,

Mr Smith said that discrimi-
nation in the Bahamas, “be it
as against women, be it as
against foreigners, as against
Haitians or as against any mem-
ber of society that thinks dif-
ferently, is the order of the
day.”

He said that Bahamians have
come to accept that foreigners
can be mistreated, that women
can be abused and that persons
can be incarcerated for up to
seven years while awaiting trial.

Mr Smith called the condi-
tions at Fox Hill “some of the

SEE page 11 ~















SPIRIT

= By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune. Staff_Reporter

POLICE admit that something went
“drastically wrong in security” when two
prisoners were able to escape what should
have been a secure area at the Magistrate’s
Court on Monday.

himself in as police launched an intense
investigation to determine how the escapes
occurred.

The two prisoners, 32-year-old Jan
Reckley of Elizabeth Estates, and Jason
Flowers, aged 20, of Roseville Avenue
were taken to the Magistrate’s on Court,
Nassau Street, for a remand hearing fol-
lowing their previous arraignments for
armed robbery and stealing.

Yesterday Flowers, accompanied by an
intermediary, turned himself into police.
He appeared in court yesterday charged
with escaping from lawful custody and
was remanded back into custody.

Reckley remained on the run yesterday





a

RAR LIN ES

PRLIN ES

Prisoner charged with
escaping lawful custody

Bi JASON FLOWERS (red shirt) is escorted to court yesterday.



One of the two prisoners yesterday turned

_ Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)

and is considered to be armed and
extremely dangerous. He is described as
having dark brown eyes, black hair and a
brown complexion.

According to eye-witnesses the incident
happened at 1.30pm when the men were

_left unattended in the police bus.

The bus was parked at the compound
between the Nassau Street Police Station
and the Magistrate's Courts on Nassau
Street. The eye-witnesses claimed that the
men jumped out of the bus window and
made their escape.

Yesterday, Chief Supt Hulan Hanna,
said police are “bedeviled” at how the
incident happened. He said the area
around the courts is certainly supposed
to be a very secure area. He said there
were a number of factors leading to the
escape for which at the moment, they do
not have the answers. He said this includ-
ed why the men were not guarded or
shackled, which is often done when pris-

SEE page 11









Abaco.
The project, called Pa

ment’s

son said yesterday.

be completed by 2010.
It is expected that a

gramme.

training at the developer

SEE page 11

@ By RUPERT
MISSICK Jr

ceedings against the

signed yesterday bet

group’s lawyer Fred
Smith told The Tribun

SEE page 11

$400 million
development
deal signed

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Senior Staff Reporter

GOVERNMENT yesterday
signed the Heads of Agreement
for a $400 million development
project on Great Guana Cay,

sserine

of Abaco, is a part of govern-
commitment
strengthen the second-home
industry of the Bahamas, Finan-
cial Services and Investment
Minister Allyson Maynard-Gib-

to

The phased construction of
the project will employ some
200 people and is scheduled to

similar

number will be employed on a
full time basis when the resort is
finished, some of whom also will
be included in an on-the-job
training and apprenticeship pro-

The programme will involve

°s Over-

seas projects in the United

States, Hawaii and Mexico.
The development will com-

prise a 240-slip marina. with

TIA
residents group

MISMO Te
Celireontall

Senior Staff Reporter

THE Save Guana Cay
Reef lobby will bring pro-

gov-

ernment to declare the $400
million heads of agreement,

ween

government and the devel-
opers of the Passerine at
- Abaco project “void, illegal
and of no effect”,

the
erick
e yes-



Nassau)



hae heey

PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





Murder accused’s former

@ By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE former girlfriend of
the man accused of a double
murder in Pinewood Gardens
in 2002 took the stand in the
Supreme Court yesterday, tes-
tifying that the accused Basil
Fitzgerald Gordon had threat-
ened to kill her.

Rochelle Wilson told the
jury, being presided over by
Justice Anita Allen, that her
ex-boyfriend told her he
would kill her if she tried to
leave him or if he ever saw
her with another man.

When asked by the jury,
through Justice Allen, why

PRERS SAT REG

she did not tell anyone about
the threats, she said she did
not take them seriously.

Gordon’s trial went into day
two yesterday. He is charged
with the murders of Rochelle
Wilson’s grandmother, Ros-
nell Newbold, and her broth-
er, Kevin Wilson, who both
died on June 16, 2002.

Family

The house was full at the
time of their deaths, the court
heard. Ms Wilson’s father,
mother and other family
members were in their rooms

at the time. Her grandmother .

was found lying on the front
room floor, and her brother



‘was found on the kitchen |

floor.

She told the court that prior
to their deaths, there was little
interaction between the vic-
tims and the accused, but they
sometimes answered the tele-

phone when he called. Her

father, she added, had talked
with Gordon on several occa-
sions and there were never
any ill-feelings between them.

Rochelle Wilson said she

had tried to get away from |

him because “he had a terrible
temper on him”. She told the
court that the accused “would
always say what he was going

to do” whenever he saw her.

Police

She called the police and
had him escorted from her
home. However, he continued
to call. Through further ques-
tioning, it was discovered that
Rochelle Wilson continued to
talk to Basil Gordon by tele-

_ phone. When asked why she

continued to talk to him, she
answered: “Even if I did not
take the calls, the phone

, would be ringing off the

hook”.

Ms Wilson also told the
court that she had no need to
complain about the harass-
ment because “everyone knew
about it; every time the phone

. rang, it was him”.

Gordon’s former co-work-
er, Rodriguez Skippings, said

‘that on June 15, 2002, he had

given Gordon a ride home

from the job site at Bahamas ~

Waste Management.
“He looked normal after a
hard day’s work. I dropped

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he told the court.

Witness

The final witness during
Tuesday’s proceedings was the

. investigating officer, Kimroy

Ferguson.

He described the bloody
scene at the Wilson home on
1892 Spice Street.

said a struggle appeared

-to have happened in the

home.

He said there were several
footprints leading to and from
the bodies.

He said he had observed
droplets of blood in the area
in front of the kitchen door,
on the driveway, and the fence

* surrounding the home.

Both bodies, he said, were
taken to the accident and
emergency section of the

girlfriend testifies in court

where they were pronounced
dead on arrival.

On Tuesday, June 18, Gor-
don was questioned by officer
Ferguson.

The detective said he
noticed that Gordon had been
treated for an injury to his left
pinkie finger.

The suspect denied being at
the Wilson home that night.or
during the early morning
hours, and he.also denied any
knowledge of the killings. The
trial continues today.

Detective 2217 Ferguson



m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - A Supreme Court jury on
Monday evening found Jonathan Davis, the
father of two, not guilty of murder, but guilty of
manslaughter by provocation in the death of
taxicab driver Robert Nelson Pratt.

An eight-woman, four-man jury delivered
the verdict after deliberating for two hours.

Davis, who was charged with murder, was
accused of killing Pratt on September 1, 2000 at
| Illyria Road and Aerial Place in Arden For-
est.

It was alleged that he hit Pratt in the head
with a large stone fracturing his skull. Justice
+ Jon Isaacs presided over the trial.

Prosecutor Joyann Ferguson-Pratt appeared
on behalf of the Crown and Simeon Brown
- tepresented the accused.

The jury heard the testimonies of 15 to 16
prosecution witnesses and three witnesses balled
by the defence.

Defence

-’ Davis, who took the stand in his own defence,
told jurors that he did not mean to kill Pratt and
that he was only defending himself.

He testified that on the date in question he
was intoxicated when he engaged the services of
the deceased, who instead on taking him home,
took him to an area in the Arden Forest. |

attacked by Pratt, whom he knew to be a homo-
sexual. As they were fighting, he picked up a
stone and hit him twice in the head out of self

‘defence.
In her summation, Mrs Ferguson-Pratt urged

accused or prejudice against the deceased
because of his sexual preference.

. “Qne’s sexual preference does not give any-
one the right to take a life,” she said, explaining
that it is God who gives life and takes it away.

She said Davis, who was a professional box-

Jonathan Davis found guilty of
manslaughter by provocation

Davis said he was sexually assaulted and .

- the deceased due to provocation.

jurors not to be persuaded by sympathy for the .






er.and lived as a tenant at the home of the
deceased and his mother manly years ago, inten-
tionally caused the death of Pratt by using
unreasonable force when he hit the deceased in
the head with a stone as he pleaded on the
ground for his life.

“He could have walked away; he made a
poor choice and he must be accountable for
what he did,” she said.

Simeon Brown, however, told jurors that his
client was only acting out of self defence, which
is the right of every citizen under the law.

He then asked jurors if the situation would
have been any different if his client were a
woman.

“If this had happened to a woman wouldn’t
she be defending herself,” he said.

“He was fighting for his life; fighting for his
integrity as a man — a married man with two
children,” stressed Mr Brown.

In his summation to the jury, Justice Isaacs
advised jurors that if they believed the prose-
cution’s case that Davis intentionally caused
the death of Pratt by unlawful harm, they must
bring back a unanimous guilty verdict for mur-
der.

“The burden of proof rests on the Crown. If
you have reasonable doubt to any aspect of
the Crown’s case, doubt must be given to the
accused,” he said. -

“Additionally, he told them if they accept the
defence case of the self defence, they must also
acquit the accused of murder.

Justice Isaacs told jurors that they may also
find the accused guilty of manslaughter if they
believed that the accused caused the death of




























After deliberating for two hours, jurors found
Davis not guilty of murder, but guilty of
manslaughter.

Justice Isaacs thanked the jurors for their
service.

Simeon Brown requested that a_probationary
report be conducted on his client before sen-
téncing. Justice Isaac remanded Davis to cus-
tody until sentencing on March 21.











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@ PRIME Minister Perry Christie travelled to Jamaica on Sunday to celebrate ‘Bahamas Week’
with Bahamian students at the Mona Campus, University of the West Indies in Kingston.

The prime minister had promised the students, who had been airlifted home to safety from hur-
ricanes, that he would visit them this week. Bahamian students from other institutions in Jamaica
also attended the event. Mr Christie was accompanied by Foreign Minister Fred Mitchell,
Tourism Minister Obie Wilchcombe and Transport and Aviation Minister Glenys Hanma-Mar-
tin.

The prime minister returned to Nassau on Monday.

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Phone: (242) 322-1722 Buckle Up Now For

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THE TRIBUNE
















Apology for
publication of
photograph

THE Tribune pub-
lished this photograph
yesterday to illustrate
an article on adoles-
cent problems in
young girls.

The people in the
photograph were in no
way connected to the
contents of the article.

The photograph was
published as the result
of an editorial error.
The Tribune apologis-
es for any embarrass-
ment or inconvenience
caused to the families
involved.



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005, PAGE 3



@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter




FREEPORT - Grand Bahama
police are investigating the death of
a 42-year-old man who was force-
fully removed from the Isle of
Capri Casino by security officers
several weeks ago.

Simeon McIntosh, of Lewis
Yard, who was airlifted to Princess
Margaret Hospital with serious
neck injuries, died around 12.15am
on Tuesday.



about 2.40am on February 5, police
received a telephone call from the
Isle of Capri casino security office
reporting a disturbance at their
property.

Officers at the Port Lucaya
pdlice station immediately respond-


















Two hundred flock

to citizenship

@ By KILAH ROLLE
Tribune Staff Reporter

OPINIONS flared during a
debate on who ought to be a
Bahamian citizen during a town
meeting on Monday evening
after a large group of Bahami-
ans defended their right to citi-

‘zenship and cried out for a solu-

tion to illegal immigration.
About 200 people filled the
St Agnes schoolroom on Mar-
ket Street for the meeting,
which began with remarks from
three panelists known for their
research and expertise on the
issue of Bahamian citizenship.
Most of what was said, how-

“ever, came from the audience,,.

who after brief remarks from
the panelists, had the chance to
pose questions of their own.
People jumped from their seats
and formed a long line to await
an opportunity to ask questions.

Many of the questions were
not directed at any panelists,
but all seemed to share a sense
of urgency and helplessness,
reflected in the most popular
question of the night: "How do
we stop the illegal immigrants
from coming here?"

Influx

One man in the audience
compared the influx of immi-
grants, of various nationalities,
as a patient suffering from a
critical gunshot wound.

"In any emergency room, the
first thing a medical team would
do would be to stabilise the
patient," he said, "well our
country feels like it is being shot
and we need stabilisation."

Panelist Dr Gilbert Morris,
author and economist, argued
that stabilisation can only occur
in the Bahamas after Haiti itself
is stabilised.

He said in a proposal submit-
ted to the Bahamian govern-
ment that he suggested that it is
in the interest of the United
States to allow the Bahamas to
take a lead role in offering a
solution since the Bahamas is
so affected by Haitians attempt-
ing to escape their country.

He suggested the Bahamas
appeal to the United States for
financial backing to help apply
towards a number of pro-
grammes aimed at limiting
Haitian migration.

Elections

Dr Morris rejected the idea
of democratic elections in Haiti
and said it has proven to be a
process leading to further vio-
lence in the country.

Instead, he said the focus
should be put on basic medical
aid and education in Haiti.

Some Bahamians attending
the town meeting were not
moved by the suggestions. One
person told the panelists that
their "legal talk seems like a
bunch of pretty words to ordi-
nary Bahamians."

"What it seems like is after
all this talk is that the issue of
law enforcement seems to be
mercy first - law later," said one
concerned man.

A Haitian who has gained
Bahamian citizenship through
naturalisation expressed to The
Tribune the feelings he experi-
enced during the meeting.

"I can tell that Bahamians are
angry and want something
done, but nothing is going to

debate









SSNS



held in almost every inhabited
island over the past year as a
part of research for recommen-
‘dations to make to government
on constitutional changes,
specifically regarding citizen-
ship.

The four-man commission
responsible for the recommen-
dations is called the Constitu-
tional Review Committee, co-
chaired by Paul Adderley.

Mr Adderley said it is the
commission's hope "at the end

change unless men like me stop
risking their lives for freedom,"
said the young Haitian man.

"Believe me, men will not
stop doing that unless they can
have a chance to earn a living
like a man, and provide for their
family, that is our culture. Men
would rather face death than
live a life of no hope. If the sit-
uation was reversed, I guaran-
tee you Bahamian men would
be doing all they can to reach
Haitian shores."

devil worshippers; they are
uncontrollable breeders; and
they are changing Bahamian
culture.

"The Bahamas would not
exist were it not for the work
and labour of migrants, of all
nationalities," said Dr Strachan.
"T think Bahamians have a lot
to learn from the work ethics
of Haitian nationals. Just what is
a Bahamian work ethic anyway
and do we still believe in an
honest day's work and an hon-

Panelist Dr Ian Strachan, pro- est day's pay?" of the day" to draft a provi-
fessor at the College of the . sional recommendation to the Her Pores's
Bahamas, said he believed any- Questions ‘government but not before they Diary ofa Mad Black Woman
‘one born in the Bahamas publish constitutional changes

should be made a citizen and
that an injustice is being done to
the children whose parents
come here illegally.

He said he does not believe
the stories that are circulating in

The two-hour meeting end- for the Bahamian people
ed with many questions still informing them of the propos-
unasked by many frustrated © als.

Bahamians who shouted out "At the end of the day our
that there needs to be more | recommendations will be your
time committed to dialogue recommendations," Mr Adder-
the country about Haitiansand with increased media _ ley told the audience, "that is
many accusations are unfound- _exposure. why we are taking so long but
ed. The third panelist, former we believe that it is such an

He mentioned several myths Attorney General Paul Adder- important issue in the Bahamas
about Haitians, including the ley, said that the discussions and and hopefully at the end of the
claim they are violent and bring exchange of opinion is along day we will submit changes to
a criminal element to the and laborious process but essen- the government that the vast
Bahamas; they exploit and use tial for change in the future. majority of the country agrees
Bahamian resources; they are Town meetings have been with and understands."

FROM MY &

BECAUSE OF WINN-DIXIE



Death under investigation

Supt Basil Rahming said at



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ed and found a man who gave his
name as Simeon McIntosh lying
on the pavement. The man
appeared to be intoxicated.

Mr Rahming said the casino
supervisor told police that the man
was on the premises harassing
guests and was warned to leave.

After he refused to comply, they
had to forcefully remove him from
the casino as he resisted violently.

An ambulance was summoned
and McIntosh was transported to
Rand Memorial Hospital, where
he was detained.

It was discovered that he had
sustained serious neck injuries and
he was airlifted to New Providence,
where he died.

Supt Rahming said an autopsy
would be held to determine the
cause of death.





































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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt .

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

All children have right to education

A MEMO THAT has been sent from gov-
ernment’s Planning and Research Develop-
ment Unit to all public school principals
requiring them on registration of students to
find out their nationality is causing some con-
cern, and in the Haitian community a great
deal of fear.

The letter says that the Ministry of Educa-
tion has.“to collect information on the nation-
ality of students enrolled in our education
system.” This information, it says, “enables
the Ministry to plan and implement appro-
priate policies and programmes, which meet
the needs of all of our students”.

As a result the Ministry “has embarked
on a national data collection initiative to
gather information on student enrolment by
nationality”.

The school administrators were asked to
complete a Student Nationality Survey Form,
which was attached, with the request that
only students’ official nationality status be
reported.

The administrators were told that the pos-
session of a Bahamian passport was to be
the criterion used. It emphasised that a birth

certificate alone did not determine Bahami- .

an nationality.

. However, if a Bahamian student does not
have a passport, which many of them won’t
have, then the following criteria will deter-
mine Bahamian nationality:

e If both parents are Bahamians.

° Child of an unwed Bahamian mother,
even if the father is a foreigner.

e Child whose parents are married, but
mother is a foreigner (father must be Bahami-
an).

- We pause here to remind our readers that
children of an unwed Bahamian mother have
more rights than the children of a Bahamian
mother who is legally married. In Bahamian
law the child’s nationality follows the father,
not both parents, thereby eliminating the
Bahamian mother, and smiling on illegiti-
macy.

As the end of its second term of office
neared, the Ingraham government supervised
a referendum to remove this discrimination

against married Bahamian women. The —

Christie government in Opposition opposed
the proposal, and aggressively and success-
fully campaigned to defeat it.

Itis hoped that this government will even-
tually see the error of its ways, and move

swiftly to remove this disgraceful impedi-

ment to women’s rights.
But to return to the memo sent to the
schools. Nowhere does the memo say that
‘ only Bahamian students are to be enrolled, or

that children of foreign parents, legal or ille- :

gal, should be. denied entry.
However, already reports are coming in

that this document is the first step towards.

emptying the schools of foreign nationals

_ whose parents’ status might be in question.

And already some school administrators are
interpreting the survey to mean just that.

In discussing the decision to give his teach-
ers Creole instructions to help them better
assist their Creole-speaking students,
Carmichael Primary School principal Albert
Clarke said that once Haitian students are
in here ijegally it is his obligation to educate
them.

“Once they can produce the legal docu-
ment, like a birth certificate, or a travel doc-
ument, as an administrator, I am obligated to
register those students and see that they get
a proper education.”

Although we commend Mr Clarke on his
school’s initiative to have his teachers learn
Creole, he is completely wrong on his inter-
pretation of which students he is obliged to
educate.

Mr Clarke is probably unaware that the
Bahamas is one of 192 countries that ratified
the international Rights of the Child Con-
vention.

On November 20, 1989 governments rep-
resented at the UN General Assembly agreed
to adopt the Convention into international

law. It became legally binding in September

1990.

This was the first time that the rights of
every child were spelled out “regardless of
where born or to whom, regardless of sex,
religion, or social origin. The body of rights
enumerated.in the Convention are he rights
of ali children everywhere.”

That Convention permits of no dvcrink
nation against any child. Under this Con-
vention, the Bahamas is obligated to give
equal education to all children 18 years and

‘under who inhabit these islands. — legal or
illegal. And so Mr Clarke’s obligation is to
educate all children regardless of what pass-
port they carry or don’t carry. They have
only to present themselves at the school door,
and Mr Clarke has to take them in. Already
between 30 to 40 per cent of the students at
Carmichael Primary are of Haitian descent.

_. It is government’s duty to regularise the
status of their parents, a duty ignored for so
many years that the country is now in a chaot-
ic muddle.

Already the Bahamas is béing accused of
human rights breaches. No one wants the
denial of children’s rights to be yet another
black mark against this country’s name.



Public Utilities Commission

OF ue ee a
Senior Regulatory Economist

The rapid evolution of the telecommunications sector combined with novel approaches to
regulating the sector has made it mandatory for the Public Utilities Commission (PUC) to
strengthen its capacity in regulatory economic analyses.

The Job»?

The successful applicant for the position will provide specialist advice on the economic
and financial performance of regulated utilities. He will also work as an integral part of a
multi-disciplinary team of professionals to ensure effective oversight by the PUC of the
various providers of utility services in The Bahamas. The candidate will perform market
research and other economic studies relevant to the current and future development of
the telecommunications, electricity, and water and sewerage sectors in The Bahamas.

Training ??

The candidate will be trained to carry out economic and financial analyses involving
market research, and changes in price setting methodologies. This specialist training will
be offered principally via short courses and seminars in The Bahamas and overseas.

Qualifications»

fa) Bachelor's Degree in Economics or Economics and Accounting; and
{b) Master's Degree in Economics, or Finance; and
{c) Minimum of five (5) years relevant experience.

Remuneration?»

The PUC offers a very attractive benefits package and excellent opportunities for further
development. Starting salary will be commensurate with relevant experience. Further
information about the PUC could be obtained from our website

at: WWW. a Peraneamise soaks:

Applications should be received by if March, 2005.

The musical
genius of
Bob Marley

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THIS month of February
has been designated Black
History month and acknow!-
edgments of the heroes who

- contributed to better the lives

of those of African descent
are being observed. One such
hero who made a difference
in the struggle for justice is

- the legendary Jamaican-born

reggae superstar, Robert
“Nesta Marley”. On Febru-
ary 6, 2005, Bob Marley
would have celebrated his
60th birthday. However, this
year his birthday was
observed with much contro-
versy as there was the
announcement by his widow
Rita that the body. of Bob
Marley would be exhumed
and reburied in Ethiopia, his
spiritual home. This contro-
versy reflects the kind of life
that Bob Marley lived.

Yes, he was a Jamaican
national hero having received
the Order of Merit Award,
Jamaica’s highest civilian
honour, but the possibility of
a relocation demonstrates
that his accomplishments
extended far beyond the bor-
ders of Jamaica. Under-
standably, Jamaicans are jeal-
ously guarding their -native
son, but the fact is Bob Mar-
ley is a world hero. Bob Mar-
ley was a “Universal Man!”
When one looks at the
Caribbean, other than Fidel
Castro, Bob Marley is proba-
bly the best known. Twenty-
four years after his early
death, Bob Marley is as pop-
ular today, if not more so,
than he was wher he died.

Bob Marley had long
earned the reputation as a
musical genius. He was to
music what William Shake-
speare was to literature. In
his short time on this earth,
his music had gone to all four
corners of the earth. In 1979
while a student at George-
town University in Washing-
ton, DC, I met a fellow stu-
dent from North Yemen, an

isolated country on the Ara-

bian peninsula with a Marxist
dictatorship government.
When I inquired of this stu-
dent if he had ever heard of
Bob Marley, not only did he
reply in the affirmative, but
he also had in‘his possession
almost the entire collection
of Bob Marley’s music.
What separated Bob Mar-
ley from the rest wasn’t just

LETTERS

letters@trlbunemedia.net






the music, but the meaning
of the music. Bob Marley’s
music was the hope of the

downtrodden, the oppressed, -

the victims of injustice and a
system manipulated. by
crooked and corrupt individ-
uals whose only god and sal-
vation was the almighty dol-
lar. His music was the con-
science of man in the plight of
man’s inhumanity against
man. He told people to “get
up and stand up for their
rights!” Bob Marley, like Sis-
ter Teresa of Calcutta had a
caring concern of those dis-
placed by war or suffering
from hunger and were forced
to exodus in a world where
“only the fittest of the fittest
will survive!”

Then there were those who
would sell their talents to the
highest bidder without any
thought of human dignity.
These Judases or mercenaries
were justly condemned by
Bob Marley, Governments
that would sell out their coun-
try’s pride for “guns, spare
parts and money” were just
as evil as those who took
advantage and exploited the
misery of third world coun-
tries. The system of colonial-
ism so much a part of
Caribbean history was a great
tragedy. Unparalleled in the
history of mankind was the
slave trade and that one way
voyage aboard “pirate ships”
that uprooted and forcefully
transported millions of
Africans across the middle
passage to a life of a living
hell. These atrocities were
carried out with the full bless-
ing and blind approval of

“many churches, governments

and learned men. This “suck-
ing the blood of the suffer-
ers” is referred to as “Baby-
lon” and reminds us of the
way the people of Israel were
treated when they were taken
captive to the city of Baby-
lon in the book of Psalms.
Bob Martey’s music is
based on the philosophy of
life. It emphasis the princi-
ples of biblical teaching with

‘the expectation that on the

day when the final trumpet
sounds and everyone is sum-
moned to give account, that
good would triumph over evil

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. Nations,

as in the book of Revelations.

Unlike some of his prede-
cessors such as Malcolm X
and Marcus Garvey who were

- seeking justice for the black

man, Bob Marley like Dr
Martin Luther King believed
that ALL oppression must
end. Following in the -foot-
steps of Marcus Garvey who
prophesied the crowning of a
child African king to unite
Africa, Bob Marley’s praise
of wisdom for Haile Selassie
of Ethiopia, a direct descen-
dant of King Solomon was
the cry for freedom for the
black man.

Ironically, Ethiopia was the
victim of colonial genocide as
an unprovoked war with Italy
resulted in tens of thousands
of Ethiopians dying from
chemical weapons and other
weapons of mass destruction.
When addressing the world
body called the League of
Haile Selassie
reminded the world that
“until the philosophy which
holds one race superior and
another inferior is finally and
totally. abandoned and dis-
credited....we’ll have war!”

For Bob Marley, without
unity there can be no
progress to end conflicts.
With pre-election violence in
Jamaica in the 1970s, in an
effort to end the violence,
Bob Marley staged a “One
Love” concert where he
brought Edward Seaga and ,
Michael Manley, leaders of —
the two major political par-
ties to hold hands on stage.
For his efforts he was reward-
ed with a bullet to the chest in

n “ambush in the night” as
someone tried to assassinate
him.

Despite his well intended
motives, either out of igno-
rance or prejudice, Bob Mar-
ley was misunderstood by far
too many, many who voiced
disapproval of his ritual
smoking of “ganga” while
meditating and associated it
with the criminal element.
When questioned by a Cana-
dian reporter about this and
what people thought about it,
he coolly replied, “that these
are the same people who cru-
cified Jesus Christ!” In a later
interview, when reference
was made to the tens of mil-
lions of dollars’ he had
amassed due to the success
of his music if he was a rich
man, he rhetorically ask the
question “does money make
you rich?” The problem with
the world is that our priorities
are in the wrong place.

In 1977, Bob Marley under
much ignorant protest did a
performance in Nassau.
Nowhere else was the criti-
cism more bold than what
came from the Bahamas
Christian Council. They felt
that his performance would
lead to lawlessness, drug
abuse, lack of respect for oth-
ers, etc.

Indeed for those who knew
better, nothing could be fur-
ther from the truth.

In the 1984 Commission of
Inquiry investigating drug
smuggling, corruption, etc in
the Bahamas, Bob Marley’s
name was never called as hav-
ing contributed to this tragic
state of affairs in the
Bahamas. Only greedy,
uncaring and selfish persons,
some with high administra-
tive positions in the Bahamas
were blamed.

Undoubtedly, long after his
spirit flew away to Zion, the
legend of Bob Marley will
live on for a long time.
Recently, I had the opportu-
nity to attend a “Root, Rock,
Reggae” concert that fea-
tured Ziggy, Stephen and
Damien Marley. Clearly,
these dynamic Performers
inspired by their father con-
tinue to carry out Jah’s work
to the fullest.

DR LEATENDORE
PERCENTIE, DDS
Boston,
Massachusetts,
February 14, 2005.



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005, PAGE 5



Ore
youn} ie

Suv ODUE

BPMcrele

By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff
Reporter

A NEW luxury class
airline begins its Fort
Lauderdale/Nassau ser-
vice today, offering a
non-stop 45 minute flight
between the two destina-
tions.

Celebrating its inaugur-
al flight, the Fly First
Class airline will launch
its service with official
ceremonies this after-
noon at Nassau Interna-
tional Airport as well as
with a cocktail party in
Fort Lauderdale.

Fly First Class, a jet
service division of the
Florida-based Premier Jet
Corporation, flying Boe-
ing 737 Executive config-
ured aircraft outfitted
with 54-all-leather first-
class seats, will offer trav-
ellers such amenities as
champagne and a "three
free" baggage allowance.

Vacation

The Ministry of
Tourism stated that a ser-
vice such as the one Fly
First Class offers, will
meet the needs of the
more high-end visitor,
catering to tourists who
vacation on exclusive
properties on Paradise
‘sland and the Family
Islands.

"Not only do we have
upscale properties on
Paradise Island, like the
One and Only Ocean
club, we now also have
Four Seasons on Exuma.
Obviously they (Fly First
Class) are responding to
the demands of the mar-
ket," Deputy Director of
Tourism Vernice Walkine
told The Tribune.

Demand

Robert Masson, Presi-

dent of Fly First Class
said that he anticipates.a
great demand for the air-
line's service, "as we
offer the only first class
jet service from Fort —
Lauderdale into Nassau
at prices comparable to
coach fares."

"The Bahamas are a
hot destination for fish-
ing, diving, gaming and
business. Fly First Class is
perfect for the discerning
leisure and business trav-
eller," he said.

Together with the
recently introduced low-
cost carriers, such as Spir-
it Airlines, Song and Jet-
Blue, it is hoped that the
different airlines will be
able to access the various
sectors of the tourism
market.



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| for government act

US sonar testing in the Bahamas

@ By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas government
must act to protect marine
mammals in response to the
US administration’s rejection
of international attempts to
restrict sonar testing, environ-
mental group ReEarth said.

The use of active sonar in
US Navy manoeuvers is
thought by some scientists to
be responsible for marine
mammal strandings and deaths
in a number of countries
including the Bahamas.

Sam Duncombe, president
of ReEarth, told The Tribune
that it is important that the
Bahamas government recog-
nises the relevant “body of sci-
ence” and create appropriate
regulations for the use of sonar
in Bahamian waters.

Opposing

Mrs Duncombe was
responding to a Washington
Post report on Monday, which
announced that the US gov-
ernment is “strongly opposing
international efforts to restrict
the Navy's use of active sonar
anywhere in the world, putting
it at odds with European allies

_and several key ocean-protec-

tion organisations.”

Strandings near Navy sonar
manoeuvers in Hawaii, Wash-
ington state,
Islands, Greece and the
Bahamas have drawn the
attention of scientists, accord-
ing to the report.

It also pointed out that the
Navy admitted responsibility
for a mass stranding of whales
in the Bahamas in 2000.

The report said that
although some US officials and
non-governmental organisa-

the Canary

tions recognise the “link
between the mass strandings
of whales and nearby naval use
of sonar,” the US position on
the matter “puts national secu-
rity first.”

Sonar is used by the Navy
to locate potential enemy ves-
sels and to detect underwater
mines.

Military

According to the report, the
new policy states that the US
“strongly opposes any interna-
tional regulatory framework
addressing military use of
active sonar because of the
potential to restrict the ability
of individual states to balance
the relevant security and envi-
ronmental interests.” :

It said that US officials did
not confirm the contents of the
new policy, but that Defence
and State Department officials
as well as officials from the
National Oceanic and Atmos-
pheric Administration “did not
dispute its contents and con-
clusions.”

Mrs Duncombe said it is up
to members of the public in all
countries, including the
Bahamas “to tell all govern-
ments what we will put up with
and what we will not.”

She pointed out that now is

a critical time for the Bahami- _

an public in particular to make
themselves heard, as govern-
ment is currently in the process
of formulating a proposal for a
Marine Mammal Act for the
protection of whales and dol-
phins in the Bahamas.
According to the Washing-
ton Post report, as a result of
studies conducted by scientific
bodies including the Interna-
tional Whaling Commission,
which supported “the link



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between active sonar and
whale deaths last year, the
European Union began to
move toward a tightening of
restrictions on sonar use.”

It said that scientists have
put forward “several theories
about how the sonar might be
harming whales. Some believe
it ruptures their sensitive ears,
while others say it scares
them and causes ultimately
















Hi By DENISE MAYCOCK

States.

Robin Kobacker.

Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - The Bahamas Marine Mam-
mal Conservation Institute (BMMCT]) will com- °
mence a research programme to study the
integrity and bio-dynamics of the marine mam-
mal populations in the Bahamas.

The organisation, which officially initiated
the programme on Tuesday evening at the
Hawksbill Yacht Club in Freeport, has obtained
approval from the Bahamas government and is
applying for tax exempt status in the United

The objective of the programme is to imple-
ment effective conservation policies to ensure
the continuing viability of mammal populations.

The BMMCTI board of directors is comprised
of local veterinarian Dr Alan Bater, John Bad-
ham, Paul Mockler, Christopher Allison and

The Bahamas government is presently draft-
ing a Marine Mammal Protection Act, which

fatal beachings.

“Still others think it-causes
deep-diving whales in particu-
lar to swim to the surface too
quickly, causing a kind of
marine mammal version of the
bends,” the report said.

Sonar testing in Bahamian
waters is conducted by the US
Navy’s Atlantic Undersea
Testing and Evaluation Cen-
tre (AUTEC) located in

Research programme
to study the nation’s
marine mammals

inadequate and does nothing in terms of the
protection and conservation of dolphins in the
wild. Instead, she said, it gives “greedy” busi-
nessmen good graces to capture dolphins for

money.

entire group.

Ms Duncombe supports non-invasive
research methods that are observational, and
involves the use of swabs, collection of faeces

While Ms Duncombe supports mammal
research, she is opposed to invasive research
methods that may be harmful to mammals.

Teeth

Ms Duncombe said dolphins captured for
research are subjected to invasive research tnat
involves extraction of teeth to determine their
age, and skin scraping.

“When a dolphin is captured it is. six times
more likely to die in captivity,” she said.

Because dolphins and mammals swim in pods,
she'stressed that capturing one could disrupt the

Andros.

In a 2001 article in Science
magazine, researchers estab-
lished a link between marine
mammal strandings and the
testing of Low Frequency
Active Sonar (LFAS) con-
ducted by means of Surveil-
lance Towed Array Sensor
System (SURTASS).

This is one of the systems
used by AUTEC.





has been harshly criticised by local and inter-
national environmental groups.
Sam Duncombe of ReEarth said the Act i is

and photography for identity.
“As long as it is done respectfully it is good
thing,” she said.




P.O. Box N-1222, 22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

PT isa ee Te

MRS KITTY
LAWRENCE

of Nassau, The.
Bahamas, will be held
at St. Andrew’s
Presbyterian Kirk,
Princes’ Street,
Nassau, on Thursday,
3rd March, 2005 at


















goes out to

AND

6:00 p.m.




officiate.




- Lawrence.

Reverend Charles A. Sweeting will

She is survived by her husband, Howard;
two sons, Graham and Andrew; two
daughters-in-law, Christine and Sheelagh;
five grandchildren, Christopher, Kathryn,
Matthew, Jennifer and Stephanie; one
grand daughter-in-law, Carolina; two great-
grandchildren, Caitlin and Luke; two
sisters, Margaret and Winifred; one
brother-in-law, Dennis and numerous
nieces and nephews.

Instead of flowers the family request that
donations be sent to The Bahamas Heart
Association, P.O. Box N-8189, Nassau,
The Bahamas in memory of Mrs. Kitty




























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The regularly scheduled Plastic Surgery Clinic will be held in
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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BRENDALEE FORBES, N-7365,
SOUTH BEACH, PONCIANA BLVD., NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
2ND day of MARCH, 2005 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that HELLEN DAMARIS GARCIAS
DIAS, ALEXANDRA BLV #131, NASSAU VILLAGE,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible



























as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 23rd day of
FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ATASHA DAVILMAR OF P.O.
BOX F-046040, SEAGRAPE, EIGHT MILE ROCK, GRAND
BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 23RD day of
FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister responsible for. Nationality
and Citizenship, RO.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KELVIN JOHNSON, PEACH
STREET, ROACH AVENUE, HOUSE NUMBER 30, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that-any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send’
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 23RD day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, Ree Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that SHELIA TOUSSAINT, MACKEY
STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for. Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 2ND day of MARCH,

2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and wean:
P.O.Box N-.7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

‘NOTICE is hereby given that ANDREW PIERRE CAMPBELL,
#22 YOUNG STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 2ND day of MARCH,
2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




































MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization |

Industrial Tribunal ‘should
pay cost of case proceedings’

@ By PAUL G.
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

SUPREME Court Justice
Claire Hepburn ruled on
Monday that the Bahamas
Industrial Tribunal should pay
the cost of the case proceed-
ings “for not following the
law” in its handling of the
Morton Salt and Bahamas

Industrial Manufacturers and
Allied Workers Union con-
tracts.

Agreement

Justice Hepburn stated that
the Tribunal acted improperly
when. it de-registered an
agreement signed by Morton
Salt and the Bahamas Indus-

Workers Union on May 27,
2004.

On November 7, 2002 the
union:and Morton Salt exe-
cuted an agreement that set
out the terms and conditions
by which both parties would
be governed. They concurred
that both the agreement of
November 7, 2002 and the
Supplemental Agreement of
June 5, 2003 must be regis-



‘ll By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

NORTH American Anglican Churches
have been asked to voluntarily withdraw their
members from the Anglican Consultative
Council for the period leading up to the next
Lambeth Conference.

This request was made at The Anglican

Northern Ireland which Anglican Archbish-
op Drexel Gomez attended along with: Arch-

nion. .

This request allows the Episcopal Church in
America and the Anglican Church of Cana-
da an opportunity to respond to the
questions that have been put to them by
the Windsor Report, noted Archbishop
Gomez.

Lifestyle

The Windsor Report asked that the Amer-
ican church express its regrets for ordaining
an openly gay Anglican priest to bishop; to
acknowledge that their action was a breech of
communion; to declare a moratorium on con-
secration of persons living a homosexual
lifestyle; a moratorium on same sex
blessings and. to provide a theological
rational to the ordination of an openly gay
priest.

On the other hand, the Canadian church
was asked to express regret over legitimizing
same sex blessings and to declare a morato-
rium on same sex blessings.

Archbishop Gomez said that this is not a



SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATION LOAN DIVISION

PUBLIC NOTICE

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE BAHAMAS

EDUCATIONAL GUARANTEE LOAN PROGRAM
Please be advised that new application forms for the Education Guarantee

Loan Program are now available. Application forms can be obtained from the
following locations between normal business hours. Application forms may

also be obtained from The Bahamas Ministry of Education website at

www.bahamaseducation.com

Nassau

Scholarship & Education Loan Division

Ministry of Education
Ground Floor
Thompson Boulevard

Grand Bahama
Scholarship Section
Ministry of Education
Kipling Building

Family Islands
ffice of the District Superintendent

Ministry of Education

trial Manufacturers and Allied

Archbishop Gomez:
no split within the
Anglican communion

Communion Primates' Meeting last week in.

bishops of the world-wide Anglican commu-






split within the Anglican communion.

“There is no split. What is happening, we
have a state of affairs in the communion in
which one area is teaching and doing some-
thing that the rest does not agree with. We are
simply, out of Christian charity, providing a
space and time for them to examine their
position and to report back. Relationships
have become strained, but we have not split
and there will be not split certainly before
the next Lambeth Conference in 2008,” he
said.












Supported




Archbishop Gomez added: “I supported it




very strongly because these two churches
have taken action that is contrary to opin-
ion of the vast majority within the world-
wide church. It is only fitting that they make
some token of expression: of paying the price
for.what they have done.”

The Anglican Communion Primates’ Meet-
ing Communiqué reads : “Within the ambit of
the issues discussed in the Windsor Report
and in order to recognise the integrity of all
parties, we request that the Episcopal Church
(USA) and the Anglican Church of Canada |
voluntarily withdraw their members from the
Anglican Consultative Council for the
period leading up to the next Lambeth Con-
ference.”

It added: “During that same period we
request that both churches respond through
their relevant constitutional bodies to the
questions specifically addressed to them in the
Windsor Report as they consider their place
within the Anglican communion.”




















BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

NOTICE

www.bahamasengineers.org

THE BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

_ CORDIALLY INVITES YOU TO ATTEND

THE MONTHLY LUNCHEON

ON

WEDNESDAY, March 02, 2005

TOPIC:

“SEASHELLS AT COTTON BAY

DEVELOPMENT - TECHNICAL
OPPORTUNITIES & CHALLNGES”

GUEST SPEAKERS:

Mr. Wim Steen bakkers Operations
Manager Eleuthera Properties Limited

All interested persons, including previous applicants who wish to be reconsidered,
will be required to complete an application form.

Completed application forms must be received by the Scholarship & Education
Loan Division no later than

3pm. April 29, 2005.

LATE AND/ OR INCOMPLETE APPLICATION FORMS WILL NOT BE

ACCEPTED

PLACE:

GRAYCLIFF RESTAURANT
(West Hill Street)

TIME: 12:00 noon

cost: $25

IF POSSIBLE PLEASE CONFIRM YOUR ATTENDANCE BY E-

MAIL

maria_lamaha@hotmail.com or wccgibson@wsc.com.bs

or by Tel: 328-1858 or jamielms @batelnet.bs



tered for either of them to be

effective.
On May 25, 2004 the Tri-
bunal registered the Bahamas

‘Industrial Manufacturers and

Allied Workers Union and
Morton (Bahamas) Limited
Industrial Agreement. How-
ever, on May 27 the Tribunal
withdrew the registration of
May 25, 2004 based on a
“hearsay” that the document —
was not properly executed.

The president of the Trade
Union Congress and attorney
for the Bahamas Industrial
Manufacturers and Allied
Workers Union, Obie Fergu-
son arguing against the Tri-.
bunal and Morton Salt, said
that he was pleased with Jus- |
tice Hepburn’s ruling of the
case.

Stance

Mr Ferguson stated that his
basic stance on the issue was
that the Tribunal did not fol-
low the fundamental rules that
govern it.

“Our position was that the
Tribunal did not follow the
rules. The rules must be
adhered to, and the judge ably
identified that in the ruling.
That is in fact our position. |
The Tribunal is a.creature of
statue, it must follow the law,”
he said.

According to Mr Ferguson,
the crux of the matter
revolved around an industrial
relations consultant for Mor-
ton Salt, CH Turnquest, mak-
ing a representation to the Tri-

- bunal to deny the already reg-

istered industrial agreement
with the Union.

“The industrial relations
consultant, made a represen-
tation to the Tribunal to deny
the executed industrial agree-
ment on information from
Morton Salt alone. °

“Signed”

“Mr Turnquest said that the
agreement that they had is not
the one that was signed by his
company and that it should
not be executed. Period.

“The Tribunal then went on
that information and de-reg-
istered the agreement that had
already been registered legal-
ly. In doing so the Tribunal
only relied on what he said
solely, without consulting with
the Union, and on that rec-
ommendation only they
denied the agreement. That is
wrong, and the judge said so
herself.”

Mr Ferguson said this is a
clear case where parties sim-
ply wanted to confuse what
they had previously agreed to,
but said that the Tribunal
being made to pay the fees of
the case was a sufficient level
of punishment.

your

news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005, PAGE 7



Challenge of education in the Bahamas

@ PARTI
WHAT THE FNM DID

By DION A. FOULKES

THE Bahamian public is
concemed about the direc-
tion of education and the
state of our public schools.
In the course of the debate
much misinformation has
been circulated. So I am
writing a series of three
articles to put in perspec-
tive what the FNM Gov-
ernment did in education,
where we are now and
where we should go from
here.

ducation under the

FNM Government was
in progressive and competent
hands. For a decade, from 1992
to 2002, we made tremendous
progress in improving the quality
of education in The Bahamas.
The Free National Movement's
record in education is outstand-
ing, especially when compared to
what the party inherited in 1992.

We met the government-oper-
ated school system in disarray at
that time. School buildings were
in disrepair, classrooms were
overcrowded and materials were
in short supply. There was also a
shortage of teachers and those
who were there were underpaid
and their morale was at an all
time low.

The Ministry of Education,
led by FNM Ministers C. A.
Smith, Dame Ivy Dumont and
myself, supported strongly by
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
and the entire Cabinet, was able
to reverse the downward trend
that education was on.

Our schools were made more
competitive, comfortable and
safe. Teachers and, administra-
tors were paid the salaries befit-
ting their noble profession and
morale among them was high.

We dramatically improved the
quality of education while at the
same time making it more acces-
sible to all students whether they
lived at Grand Cay, Abaco, or at
Cabbage Hill, Crooked Island.

A cost-of-living stipend of
$4,000 per annum was made
available for Family Island stu-
dents from the southeastern
islands and isolated cays in the
central and northern Bahamas to



* # DION FOULKES

enable them to pursue a high
school education in Nassau,and
Grand Bahama where special-
ized courses and programmes
were available. This initiative
helped to make the same quality
of education available to every
student in The Bahamas.

B INNOVATIONS

Magnet schools were estab-
lished for the first time in The
Bahamas. These institutions gave.
students the option to begin spe-
cialized courses of study while

still in high school. The magnet:

schools are: C. R. Walker (Sci-
ence and Business), C. I. Gibson
(Arts and Crafts), R. M. Bailey
(Construction), C. V. Bethel
(Electrical), C. C. Sweeting (Hos-
pitality Studies) and the Gov-
ernment High School (Perform-
ing Arts).

‘We added over 40 pre-schools
to our primary schools. This
enabled parents who could not
afford a private pre-school, access
to pre-schooling free of charge. It
is now established that those stu-
dents who attend pre-school do
better in primary school than
those who do not.

We reintroduced academic
competition at the national level.
The Bahamas National Spelling
Bee (BNSB) was established
after extensive collaborative
planning by The Nassau
Guardian, International Business
Machines (IBM) and the Min-
istry of Education. This competi-
tion is now a fixture on the
national calendar and has been
a great tool. for education in The
Bahamas.

Classroom sizes were reduced
at the primary level to a ratio of
25 students to one teacher at
grades 1 to 3 and a ratio of 30
students to one teacher from
grades 4 to 6. At the junior and
senior high school levels, class-
room sizes averaged 35 students
to one teacher.

This student to teacher ratio
surpassed the international stan-
dard for maximum classroom
sizes and is seldom attained even
in some developed countries.
This drastic reduction in class size
was due to the creation of 13,000
new places for students as a con-
sequence of our aggressive phys-
ical plant expansion.

This enabled teachers, espe-
cially in the primary schools, to
spend more one-on-one time
with students, consequently
improving the quality of educa-
tion at the most important stage
of a student’s life: the primary
level. Additionally, we instituted
a policy where our best teachers
were placed at grade levels 1 and
Qi

These measures led to solid
improvement by establishing a
sound educational foundation for
our children, the results of which
were manifested in the national

. tests for primary students, name-

dy the Grade Level Assessment
Test (GLAT).

The FNM introduced Spanish
as a second language at the pri-
mary school level. Spanish teach-
ers were recruited from Latin
America to augment the number
of Bahamian Spanish teachers.
This initiative is already showing
good results in our schools.

We introduced a comprehen-
sive computerization programme
for our primary schools at a cost
of over 12 million dollars. Public
school students are no longer at a
disadvantage because of a lack
of access to computers. .

Many of our primary schools
are now on par with private
schools and the results of the
GLAT for primary school stu-
dents support this conclusion.

‘HE CAREER PATH

An essential component for a
good education system is a well-
trained and well-paid teaching
complement. The FNM
enhanced the Teacher Training
Programme at the College of The
Bahamas and made significant
funds available for teachers to
pursue further training at C.O.B.
and other:colleges. The entry-

GERACE RESEARCH CENTRE SCHOLARSHIPS
(FORMERLY) BAHAMAS FIELD STATION/ MINISTRY

OF EDUCATION

SCHOLARSHIPS 2005

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for eight (8) scholarships
tenable at accredited institutions in the United States of America under the
Bahamas Field Station/ Ministry of Education Agreement (1971), eominenelg

September 2005.

Under the Agreement, participating Colleges and Universities will offer full
tuition scholarships and the Ministry of Education will pay board and lodging

charges.

Applicants should have gained admission into one of the following institutions
where the number of awards available is indicated in bracket:

level pay for teachers was
increased by 90 per cent.

A Career Path for teachers
was developed and implement-
ed for the first time. Our best
teachers no longer needed to pur-
sue an administrative post in
order to earn a higher salary.
Senior Teachers and Master
Teachers can now earn as much
as administrators and are there-
fore encouraged to remain in the
classrooms.

The Bahamas Teachers
Career Path was developed in
conjunction with The Bahamas
Union of Teachers.

It was adopted by several
Caribbean countries and remains
a model for many others in the
region. :

We introduced elected school
boards in New Providence and
Grand Bahama for the first time
inthe history of The Bahamas.

Parents and guardians were
able to have a direct say over the
management of their children’s
schools and were empowered
with a reasonable budget to
effect minor repairs and acquire
certain items for the schools.

This innovation was to be fur-
ther developed and expanded.

The most ambitious and com-
prehensive plan was embarked
upon to upgrade, renovate, refur-
bish and construct schools. Thir-
teen new schools were built in
New Providence, Grand Bahama
and the Family Islands. Several
schools were refurbished and
expanded making them, in fact,
new schools.

In addition to the 20. new
schools, 30 schools had additions

© and expansions — 12 in New Proy-.



idence and 18 in the Family

Islands. :
The FNM built the first Early

Childhood Education Centre in

New Providence, which at the
time was funded from the reduc-
tion of salaries for the Prime
Minister, Cabinet Ministers and
Members of Parliament.

m LIBRARY SYSTEM

The FNM expanded and
strengthened the public library
system in The Bahamas. There

had not been a purpose-built.

library in over 30 years so the
FNM converted the. Ministry’s
Testing and Evaluation unit next
to the Stephen Dillett Primary
School into a public library. That
had been the original purpose of
the building.

Reading and homework cen-

tres were established i in densely-

@ THESE were the appalling
conditions that existed in some
Nassau schools during the
1980s. Pupils are seen studying
outdoors (left) at C C Sweet-

ing High School in 1983 because
of a shortage of classroom
space. At Mabel Walker Pri-
mary School in 1984 (below),
there were scenes of devasta-
tion when two demolished class-
rooms had still not been
replaced after 12 months.

populated areas such as Kemp
Road and in new housing devel-
opments, including Elizabeth
Estates, Flamingo Gardens and
Jubilee Gardens.

Provision was also made for
public libraries in three new
Town Centres constructed at
Carmichael: Road, Elizabeth
Estates and South Beach.

In Grand Bahama a new Com-
munity: Library System was



established on the Mall and at
the Syntex Teen Centre.
- All-the new neighbourhood

libraries were equipped for inter-

net access...
~The FNM commenced an

- Education Loan Programme to

assist students with much-needed
funding for tertiary education at
home and abroad. Over 2,500
Bahamian ‘students were given
the opportunity to attend college
which they might otherwise not

‘have had.

Naturally it was our hope that
we could do more. But the fact is
that the FNM Government’s
record in education is very good

and all Bahamians can be justly

proud of it, as Iam.

LeMOYNE COLLEGE, New York (1)
DICKINSON COLLEGE, Pennsylvania (1)

MIAMI UNIVERSITY, Florida (1)(PARTIAL)
(FOR ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES ONLY)

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA AT AIKEN, (1)

South Carolina

HARTWICK COLLEGE, New York 1)
MOLLOY COLLEGE, New York 1
WITTENBERG UNIVERSITY, Ohio

)
(2)(PARTIAL)

Applications will be accepted only for the Colleges/Universities specified.

Applicants should have successfully completed high school education and be
in possession of at least 5 G.C.E./B.G.C.S.E. subjects, including English and
Mathematics at grade A, B, C.

Persons presently pursuing studies at one of the named institutions should
submit an up-to-date transcript along with the completed application form.

Applicants should note that the area of study must be one deemed acceptable
for the further development of the country.

Further detailes and application forms may be obtained from the Scholarship
and Education Loan Division of The Ministry of Education or from the Ministry
of Education website at www.bahamaseducation.com

Completed application forms should be returned to The Scholarship and
Education Loan Division Ministry of Education P.O.Box N-3913





PAGE 8, WEDNESvAY, MARCH 2, 2005 THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY EVENING MARCH 2, 2005

|| | 7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005, PAGE 9



Public-private partnership
in education reform initiative

W ITHOUT much
fanfare, business

and government leaders
launched an ambitious educa-
tion reform initiative last week
during an invitation-only meet-
ing at the British Colonial
Hilton.

The initiative is backed bya
$50 million credit facility from
the Inter-American Develop-
ment Bank and has the poten-
tial to radically change our fail-
ing education system. There is
a growing consensus that we
are unprepared to compete in
the modern world, and that our
young people lack the skills to
benefit from economic, growth.

As any manager will tell
you, technicians of all kinds are
in short supply here. But the
world economy relies more and
more on technology skills to
drive growth and prosperity.
Training workers to be more
productive and competitive is
critical to our survival as a
modern state, experts say.

The private sector needs
technology skills and the gov-
ernment wants to limit the
political fallout from import-
ing foreign labour. There are

by PPPs.

The goal is to exploit the
business community’s man-
agement and financial skills to
create better value for money
for taxpayers. And govern-
ments get to provide new hos-
pitals, roads, schools and pris-
ons without raising taxes.

From the private sector’s
point of view, there is an
understandable fear of gov-
ernment inefficiency coupled
with a deep reluctance to com-
mit funds and energy to waste-
ful public enterprises that are
easily manipulated for politi-
cal gain.

B ut in Britain and
Canada, for example,
the PPP concept has been able
to get private contractors to

foot the bill for major con-
struction projects such as roads,



“Public-private partnerships
are big news on the reform
front these days. Britain’s
Labour government uses them
to upgrade state services. And
in Canada, between 10 and 20
per cent of infrastructural
projects in some provinces
are being managed by PPPs.”



also moves afoot to open up
our restricted economy to West

Indian competitors with uncer- -

tain results. And everyone is
worried about what our unem-
ployable youth will turn to if
we do not do something soon.

So there is a confluence of
interests among the public and
private sectors that may finally
lead to some serious action on
the education front. It’s some-
thing that teachers and employ-
ers have been crying for ever
since the last major curriculum
revision some 30 years ago.

A. key — and perhaps crucial
- feature of the reform effort
is the creation of a public-pri-
vate partnership to guide the
restructuring process. A work-
ing group of business leaders,
government officials and edu-
cation experts is expected to
be set up soon to oversee the
project.

In fact, public-private part-
nerships are big news on the
.teform front these days.
Britain’s Labour government
uses them to upgrade state ser-
vices. And in Canada, between
10 and 20 per cent of infra-
structural projects in some
provinces are being managed

schools, prisons and hospitals,

“which used to be bankrolled

by tax dollars. Now, contrac-
tors pay for the construction
costs and then rent the finished
project back to the public sec-
tor.

And public-private partner-
ships are also recommended by
the Inter-American Develop-
ment Bank. Its strategy paper
for developing countries in the
region calls for joint efforts to
improve the business environ-
ment and workforce skills to
drive more competitive
economies.:

In our case, the bank seeks
to address “significant social

- problems” that are producing

rising crime and violence and
putting our youth at risk. High
on the agenda is fixing the edu-
cation system to make it more
relevant to modern needs, and

the bank is prepared to put its

money where its mouth 1s.
“The co-existence of acute
skills shortages, notably in
trades, and unemployment
rates consistently above 7 per
cent raise questions about the
relevance of education, partic-
ularly for males,” the bank

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says. “Although core curricular
subjects have been revised at
the primary and secondary ley-
els, the delivery and content of
vocational education Temains
outdated.”

The Bahamas Technical &
Vocational Institute currently
offers entry-level courses in the
building and automotive
trades, but is unable to deliver
more advanced training. Nor
does it have the resources to
develop custom programmes
in response to business
demand.

Our proposed public-private

partnership will oversee the

immediate restructuring of
BTVI along the lines of a new
international technology edu-
cation programme known as
XL (www.xlinitiative.org).

The XL Education Initia-
tive is the brainchild of a US-
based reinsurance company
that developed the programme
as a philanthropic exercise in
conjunction with California’s
Stanford University. It was first
implemented in Bermuda in
the late 1990s and by all
accounts has had tremendous
success there.

The goal was to graduate all
Bermuda public school stu-
dents with a high level of com-
puter and technological litera-
cy so they would be prepared
to use computers and technol-
ogy in their jobs and be
equipped to compete in a glob-
al market.

A non-profit organisation
called the International Edu-
cation Collaborative Founda-
tion (www. iecf.us) was set up to
evangelise the programme.

This group is led by Diane :

Miller, a public affairs advo-
cate from California who is
helping to implement the pub-
lic-private partnership in the
Bahamas.

Cjerernmens officials
acknowledge that for

Bahamians to benefit from the
economic development creat-
ed by global integration and
foreign investment flows, they
must upgrade basic work skills
and become more technically
competent. One big concern is
that male underachievement
has resulted in about 40 per

cent of all boys dropping out -

of the public school. system
prior to graduation.

“The XL initiative will bring
21st century learning to the
Bahamas,” Ms Miller told
Tough Call recently. “A new
educational product is needed
for the information age, one
that is more relevant to the
economy and that is both col-
laborative and exciting. This
programme actually turns on
students as well as teachers,
and it will produce a paradigm
shift in education.”

As Bermuda’s Tourism Min-
ister Renee Webb said: “Tech-
nology is changing business and
business is changing education.
Education is changing the
world.”

Of course, Bermuda is small
potatoes compared to the
Bahamas. The total population
there is only 60,000 with 25
public schools that are in better
shape than ours. The 161
Bahamian public schools (and
45 private ones) are scattered
over several islands with a stu-
dent population of more than
50,000.

And there are other factors
that make education reform
here a more daunting task.
Over half of all births in The

Bahamas are illegitimate. More :

than two thirds of young
Bahamians are from single par-
ent homes, and in most of these
cases the single parent is a
teenage woman. An increasing
number of boys are growing up
without a male role model and

dropping out of school to join |

gangs, use drugs, and commit

’ crimes.

According to its strategic
plan for the Bahamas, the
IADB is prepared to finance
education reform in three
areas: expansion of pre-school
education; modernization of
career technical education at
the secondary and post-sec-
ondary levels; and strengthen-
ing of the Ministry of Educa-
tion’s capacity to use technol-
ogy.
It remains to be seen
whether a genuine public-pri-
vate partnership can be formed
that will be able to dramatical-
ly impact our education deliv-
ery system. The biggest chal-
lenge is whether we can agree
to jointly apply our limited
financial and intellectual

resources wisely and with full
accountability.

MORE ON THE EFFIE
KNOWLES SAGA

ast week we explored

the life and times of
Effie Knowles, a Florida lawyer
of Bahamian descent who died
in 1984 at the age of 92. Effie
was renowned for settling a cel-
ebrated land claim against the
US government on behalf of
the Seminole Indian tribe.

When she died, her estate
was said to include more than
15,000 acres of land on several
Bahamian islands, including
more than 2000 acres on Rum
Cay. It is a subject of much dis-
pute:-today among attorneys,
realtors and developers.

Effie was born in: Florida,
but her mother, Julia, was born
in Nassau in 1865 and went to
Key West as a child. There she
married an American named
William E. Knowles — who was
probably of Bahamian descent.

Since that story was written

we located Julia’s death cer-
tificate, which lists her parents
as Joseph B. Dorsett and Lau-
ra Nairn of Nassau.

Julia’s father was a salt rak-
er at Rum Cay and magistrate
for San Salvador. Her grand-
father — Joseph L Dorsett — was
born in Charleston, South Car-
olina and moved to Rum Cay
when he inherited land from
his father - Captain George
Dorsett, a privateer. The
Dorsetts were some of the first
English settlers of Virginia.

Faith Temple Christian
Academy

wishes to announce that The
General Entrance Examination

will be held on Friday, March 4th,
2005 at 9:00 AM at the Academy
of Prince Charles Drive. 4

The Academy: has limited
space in grades | through 10, and

persons wanting to enter the
Academy in September 2005,
must sit the Examination.

For More Information

Contact:
The Admittance Office at

324-2269

So Register Now!

TOWER ESTATES SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 31

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Tower Estates Dr.
APPRAISED VALUE: $229,000

We have been unable to
learn more of Effie’s father’s
background, but there are -
many Bahamian Knowles’ who -
are connected with Key West.

Florida did not become a .
US territory until 1821. .

A few years later, Key West
was designated a US port of -
entry, which meant that sal- .
vaged cargoes from wrecked °
ships could be entered at Key |
West instead of further up the
coast at St. Augustine.

This prompted’ many:
Bahamians to move to Key:
West.

For years, Bahamians out- ;
numbered Americans in the .
Keys. They had been coming :
there to fish, turtle, cut lum- |
ber, and salvage wrecks for a:
long time. In fact, there is a
1790 letter asking the Spanish ::
Crown to set up military sta-.
tions in the Keys to keep:
Bahamians out.

The first official census in}
Monroe County in 1830:
recorded a total population of:
517.
Many of those early settlers:
were from the Bahamas. By:

_1870 Key West had 5,657:

inhabitants and the Upper:
Keys had 134, of which 124:
were of Bahamian origin. Mia- |
mi was not even a town at that:
time; it was Fort, Dallas.

We would appreciate hear-. :
‘ing from anyone with more:
information on Effie Knowles:
and her family. z

larry@tribunemedia.net.

7e8s 985 2005

Committed to Providing a Christ-Centred
Education, in an environment that is

Conducive for learning:

Ww

Fatlh Yemple Christian ee
“The School of First Choice”

aot make ¢

, chotce. ooe

A subsidiary of: Faith Temple Ministries International J.



GOLDEN GATES SUBDIVISION No. 1

LOT NO. 314
PROPERTY SIZE: Singlc

2
g
s
oD
c
@o
2
o
s
S
0
5

ramily Residence (5,000 sq. ft.)

LOCATION: Malcolm Rd. West of Reef Ln.
APPRAISED VALUE: $115,000

INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS TO PURCHASE (WITH TELEPHONE CONTACT AND POSTAL
ADDRESS) TO CHERRY MISSICK, THE PLAZA, MACKEY STREET, OR CALL 502-6200 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION.
*WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS. :





PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005 THE TRIBUNE










A Bright Start



startin ng Monday, March 17, ‘and printing



and sharing experience—with schoolmates .
family. —

fine literature, read in convenient stale
top daily newspaper.

A Breakfast Serials story is just like a bes
at a time every day, It's great writing and
ists, and readers can't wait for the next day



Breakfast Serials chapters ate short, ‘soit
keeps coming back for more.










written by Avi
illustrated by Brian Floca

The Secret School is a story
about kids by award-winning
American children’s author,

Avi. It’s about the kind of

one-room schoolhouses that














used to exist in American
communities, as well as many

Bahamian settlements.

The story is set in the 1920s.
When the regular teacher of a
rural schoolhouse must leave, bringing an early school clos-
ing, the children decide to take over, secretly. But they

encounter many problems along the way.

The suggested reading level is grade 4-8, and the Secret |

School is a great read aloud for all ages.

Avi—a name given to him by his twin sister—was born in
Brooklyn, New York, in 1937. Though he struggled with English
in high school, by the time he left, Avi had decided to become a
writer. In 1970, his first book was published and since then he
has published more than 50 acclaimed books for young people.







in conjunction with —
2 ‘The Tribune’s
Newspaper’ in Education Literac Pro



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2U0U5, PAGE 11





~ FROM page one

terday. .

The Save Guana Cay Reef
(SGCR), a group of concerned
Bahamian and foreign resi-
dents of Guana Cay, fear,
despite government assurances
of a project which will mini-
mize the impact on the island’s
environment, that the planned
600-acre Passerine develop-
ment will destroy “the envi-
ronment, natural beauty and
ambiance of Guana Cay.”

Responding to these con-
cerns at a press conference yes-
terday morning to announce
the signing of the heads of
agreement, Prime Minister
Perry Christie said that his
government is not prepared to
compromise on protecting the
environment of the Bahamas.

Nevertheless, the SGCR said
they are not willing to sit idly
by and let central government
dictate what happens in their
small community.

“Central government must
respect the aspirations, the
views and the essence of com-
munities in the Out Islands.
The Family Islands are not
pawns in a chess game played
by the prime minister and his
Cabinet,” said Mr Smith.

However, Financial Services
and Investment Minister
Allyson Maynard-Gibson said
yesterday that a lot of atten-
tion has been paid to the envi-
ronmental sensitivity of the

FROM page one

onets go to and from court.



culpable.

other road users.



“For these persons to have jumped out of
the window required substantial effort. It was
obviously not just one kick,” he said.

Supt Hanna said obviously something went |
drastically wrong. He said police will launch
an intense investigation to. determine exactly ®
how the men were able to walk away from the
court without weapons, or a physical struggle.
He said that if they find that it was caused by
negligence, the guilty persons will be held

Supt Hanna said that there is active con-
sideration as to what can be done to prevent
similar incidents from taking place again.

He said it is a challenge for police to have to
transport prisoners from the prison to Bank
Lane or Nassau Street courts because they
have to get them off the street as quickly as
possible, but at the same time do so in an
efficient manner which will not jeopardise‘

He explained that the prisoners must .be
accompanied by senior officers at the rank of

island.

“The developers are persons
who have developed similar
upscale second home develop-
ments in places like Scottsdale
in Arizona, Hawaii, Texas and
California and the unique
thing about this developer is
that they have always been in
places where there is eco-sen-
sitivity and they are bringing
this eco-sensitivity emphasis to
this development in Abaco,”
she said.

Prime Minister. Perry
Christie said that the concerns
being expressed by the resi-
dents of the Cay are not
unusual and that the conser-
vation of the environment
which has made the Bahamas
well know worldwide is of first
priority to him.

“In the country that I govern
we take into consideration all
such views giving a degree of
weight to those views that we
deem. appropriate. Doubtless
there are Abaconians or peo-
ple who live on Guana Cay
who are Bahamian citizens
who have expressed their con-
cern. The reason I begin with
that position is that we are not
prepared to compromise on
protecting the pristine envi-
ronment of the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas,” said
Mr Christie.

The SGCR, however, plan

force.



- of Foreign Iny

Prisoner
Inspector or higher. He said they are taught to
drive defensively. ;

However, he said it’,
problems. Supt Hanna echoed Police Com- |
missioner Farquharson’s wish for a court to be
located at the prison which would eliminate
the need for so many prisoners to have to be
taken to the courts. :

However, until a feasible solution can be
found, he asked the public'to bear with the

Supt Hanna said that a full and intensive
manhunt was launched immediately after the
escape which included law officials in the
Family Islands and Florida. Ma

He reminded the public that it is an offence
to not only harbour escaped prisoners but to
do anything which would assist them to
remain at large, including giving them cloth-
ing, food water or money. In addition, he
said, when persons have information on
escaped prisoners they should immediately
‘report it to the police. oe

LOCAL NEWS

Residents group

to challenge the government
as a whole and question its
authority to sign off a heads
of agreement.

Mr Smith asserts that there
is no law which entitles the
prime minister’s office or any
of his Cabinet ministers to
enter into heads of agree-
ments.

“The misconceived notion .

which has permeated in poli-
tics and public policy over the
last 13 years is that a prime
minister can dictate what does
or doesn’t happen anywhere.
That is simply illegal,” he said.

The attorney called this a
perfect.opportunity for a local
community to challenge what
he describes as “abusive exec-
utive authority”.

“The people of Guana Cay
have spoken out loudly and
clearly. I have written last
week to the prime minister’s
office? to the investment’s
board, the Minister of Works
Bradley Roberts, the Minister
ayestment, the
Ambassador to the Environ-
ment and all of these people
have a responsibility to take
into account the views of the
majority of the local popula-
tion,” Mr Smith said.

But Mr Christie said that he
was encouraged by the devel-
oper’s own commitment and
ability to employ the best prac-

















oes pose significant




















tices for the environment.

“It is these practices which
we expect the developers to.
employ at Guana Cay. We will
also work with the developers
to ensure that the environ-

FROM page one

Mrs Maynard-Gibson.

FROM page one

worst in the world,” and said
that his association has been
complaining about them “for
decades.”

He said the association is
pleased with the appoint-
ment of Criminologist Dr
Elliston Rahming as the new
Superintendent of Prisons,
‘and would assist him in any
way possible.

According to’ Mr Smith,
disrespect for the law in gen-
eral in the Bahamas begins
with the attitude of politi-
cians.

ethics and for the law, par-
ticularly by some cabinet
ministers “seems to have dis-



moorings for mega-yachts, a 75-room luxury
villa style hotel, an 18-hole championship golf
course and 350 residential lots.
“This development is the type of Family
Island: development which promotes the sec-
ond home mandate of the government,” said

Prime Minister Perry Christie said that this
was an unusual development in so far as the
process leading to the decision was concerned.

“As the prime minister J made it a point, a
fundamental part of the process of negotiations,
that the opposition be involved, that those rep-
resentatives of Abaco (MP for North Abaco)
the former prime minister Hubert Ingraham,
and (South Abaco MP) Robert Sweeting, that

‘He said that respect for.

mental implications of the
development are minimised.
We know the concern of the
golf course and the use of
insecticides and pesticides and
the runoffs from golf courses,

$400m development
on Great Guana Cay

they be specifically consulted by the developers

with a view to either disagreeing or signing off

on the proposal,” he said.

_ Mr Christie said that it was particularly impor-

tant for him not to have division on the matter .
‘on a political level. He said that it was admirable

that the developers were willing to effect some

changes to their initial proposal based on sug-

gestions and recommendations made by both

representatives.

- Abaco. ©

Bahamas slammed in
human rights report

_ appeared completely.”

This, Mr Smith said, has an
especially significant effect ‘
on human rights practices
because of the concentration
of executive authority in the

: office of the Prime Minister.

He. said that. when
“absolute power is deposed
in one person then the col-
lapse of society is inevitable.”

Mr Smith said that his
association “fully endorses
and corroborates the findings
of the State Department and
continues to condemn our -
government for its lack of
political will.”

Prime Minister Perry
Christie did not return calls
made to his office yesterday ©
afternoon.

CARD OF THANKS |

Perhaps you sang a lovely song, or brought a dish or two;
Prehaps you sent a floral plant, or a bouquet to set the mood;

Perhaps you sent a beautiful card, or lent assistance in your own way;
Perhaps you sent a funeral spray, or said a silent prayer;

Perhaps you sat quietly ina pew, if so we saw you there;

Perhaps you spoke the kindest words, as nay friends can say;
Perhaps you were not there at all, just thought of us that day;
Whatever you did to console our hearts,we thank you very much

“This development process took a long peri-
od of time. I am happy to say that hopefully as -
we move forward both the government and
those of the opposite party will be able to ensure
that our people will be able to see the tangible
benefits of this investment,” he said.

Mr Christie said that government is commit-
ted to major. public infrastructural works on

‘rity Minister has responsibil-
‘ ity for the police and the



but this is not a matter the
developer or the government
takes lightly and very clearly
we are going to be seen to
engage the best environmen-
tal practices,” said Mr Christie.



















1




Foreign Affairs Minister
Fred Mitchell was in Wash-
ington, DC, yesterday and
was unavailable for comment
on the report, however offi- |
cials from his ministry said
they have received the report
but have not had a chance to
review it in any detail, and
cannot yet comment on its
contents.

The Tribune was also
unable to reach Deputy
Prime Minister Cynthia
Pratt, who as National Secu-











prison.

Immigration Minster Vin-
cent Peet, who oversees the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre, was also unavailable.















The Transition from this earthly life of our wife, mother grandmother, friend and neighbor was
easy to bear, because you were there for us, and with us. We extend appreciation and gratitude to
you for your visits, telephone calls, floral tributes, cards, culinary dishes and all acts kindness
bestowed upon us.








Special Thanks to; Rey. Timothy Stewart, Associate Ministers, Deacon Board and Senior Saints
Choir of Bethel Baptist Church, management and staff, Bethel Brothers Morticians, his Grace,
Archbishop Patrick Pinder, Parishioners. of St. Francis Xavier Cathedral and St. Joseph’s Roman
Catholic Church, sisters of St. Martin de Porres Priory, Mrs. Patricia Vouch & family, Patricia
Jervis, Deloris Sherman, Eleanor Elliot, Roslyn Johnson, Anita Cooper, Gurth Knowles, Lydiabelle
Adderley & Family, Beverly Campbell - Deveaux & family, Ministry of Tourisum especially Social
Development Committee, Hotel Licensing Department & Film Commission, management & Staff,
Bank of the Bahamas International, Management & staff, Landscaping Department, Paradise
Utilities, Coral/ Beach Towers Landscaping (Atlantis), Royal Bahamas Police Fire Services, Mary
Wilkinson, Police Aces and Ocean Club Softball Teams, Sabrina & Jamie Davis, Jenny, Jeff &
Javarie, The Miller Brothers-Roston, Howard, Cecil & Marcus, Minister Almetta & Delano Culmer,
Gail Strachan & Family, Nathalie Hutcheson & family, Dora Culmer & Family, Monique, Allie,
Roland, Frank & Keith, Executive Members, Free National Movement Women’s Association,
Patricia Johnson, Keith Delancy, James Mackey, Denise Carew, A.S.P. Sidney Deveaux, Bradley
T. Cash, Virdell Williams, Anna Colebrooke, Telzena Coakley & family Anna Marche, Cynthia
Elliot, Bernard & Olive Lundy, Edna Russell & Val Johnson, Harveston McKinney & family, Mark
“Pete” Brown, Derek & Lil Greg, Deveaux family, Meldora Scott & Barbara Rigby, Vernetta
Amnbrister & Family, Lyndia Hanna, Stephanie Wallace, Brenda Cargill, The Bain’s Town Community
as a Whole, Especially Eneas Lane & Meadow Street Residents And Former Residents, Last, but
not least many others too numerous to mention.



















Whatever Role You Participated In, Know That We Are Thankful To You.




Uae ra Tea,






O/B ARS omens aE Ue ee a CEN VOCAL Te er





PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005 : THE TRIBUNE

ii

Pie



afraid of employing unconventional met

get the job done.

We say we're going on a trip, but we all know
: | they're actually expeditions. Returning home to
our family and friends brings a sense of

accomplishment. Celebrating our triumphant return

with a few friends over a couple of Kaliks... that’s

the icing on the cake.



SECTION



business@100jamz.com

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005





Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Stree









2) had



HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE

Tel: (242) 356-7764

- FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010



Grand Bahama

Tourism Board
buys Driftwood

‘ |
booking system
Setting up call centre to serve island that
should be up and running by mid-summer

to take winter bookings, with plans to
make service available to whole Bahamas

By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter

he Grand Bahama

Tourism Board

(GBTB) has

acquired Grand

Bahama Vaca-
tions (GBV), a Florida-based
reservations system, and is cre-
ating a satellite call centre in
Grand Bahama to support that
operation and expand its port-
folio to include as many hotels
in Grand Bahama as possible. It
is hoped that the system will
eventually service the entire
Bahamas.

In an interview with The Tri-
bune, tourism director David
Johnson said Board officials
were actively working to create
a satellite centre in Grand
Bahama, aiming to provide a
full service centre to help other
businesses.

He said they believed they
were on track to accept 2005
winter bookings, which means
that by mid-summer the satellite
centre will be up and running.

Mr Johnson said the satellite
centre was initially looking to
employ between six to eight
agents, based on current work-
load, but growth could could
quickly double that figure.

Board officials are also look-
ing to negotiate the long dis-

Call for more

tance fees on the call lines. “We
know what they are elsewhere
and we need to get them lower
than they are,” Mr Johnson
said. Apart from staff and the
long distance call charges, costs
are expected to be minimal.

Mr Johnson said: “The more
business we do, the lower costs
become. We hope to attract
business for other resorts in
Grand Bahama, and in the
entire Bahamas, and they need
not be part of the Grand
Bahama Tourism Board. We
can still fulfill requests for pack-
ages or land-only accommoda-
tions, for only transaction costs.
Those hotels that need reserva-
tion services will come to us and
this will build jobs and services
in the Bahamas."

The System, which includes _

acall centre and online website
that allows visitors to either
book a vacation package or the
land portion of the trip only,
will be restructured and
rebranded, Mr Johnson said.
Currently, half of all book-
ings made through Grand
Bahama Vacations are made
via the Internet. Within a year,
that percentage is expected to
increase to about 60 per cent or
more. The call centre, while

not a first choice for many >

potential visitors, did receive a
significant amount of traffic, Mr
Johnson said, adding that one

trade union

transparency

Chamber chief says this
should be assessed along
ILO Convention 87 talks

By YOLANDA. -.
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter

The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce president said yes-
terday that transparency in
trade union financial and
accounting records, and the
establishment of appropriate
corporate governance, had to
be discussed alongside any
review of whether the Bahamas
should ratify the International
Labour Organisation's (ILO)
Convention 87.

In an interview with The Tri-
bune, Winston Rolle said the
Government needed to go back
and look at one of the Bills
removed from the table during
the 2001 revision of the labour
laws, carried out under the for-
mer FNM administration. It
dealt with the level of trans-
parency that unions operate
under, and the need for those
bodies to have proper financial
reporting procedures in place.

"While unions want to look at
financial and accounting records
of businesses, I think it's only
fair and appropriate that the
same, be expected of unions,”

Mr Rolle said.

“We're now talking about
unions being large institutions,
and they should have the same
level of corporate governance.
We've seen some degree of
amalgamation between unions
and now we're talking about
large organisations responsible
for a significant portion of the
work force and sizeable funds
that can be invested in a num-
ber of ways".

Along with the issues of

‘transparency and corporate

governance, Mr Rolle said there
were also concerns about what
will happen to the Bahamas’
various unions.

Convention 87 is endorsed by
the ILO and allows for freedom
of association and protection of
the right to organise. If persons
had the option of selecting
which union they wanted to be
represented by, and were not
restricted to those formed for
their profession, from a busi-
ness perspective it might mean
that companies in one industry
could be impacted by industrial
action occurring in another,

See UNION, Page 4B

reservation format backs up the
other. —

He added: “This is just a start
up operation, acquiring Grand
Bahama Vacations, which was
previously owned by Driftwood
[operator of the Royal Oasis].
We want to maintain the high-
est quality operation we can, so
we don't want to make any pre-
mature steps that will cause us
to lose momentum.

“We have to move carefully
to maintain its reputation and
maintain the quality of service.
We're training staff, setting up a
new operation, building a new
website and also changing the
logo, changing the namecas it
appears in the logo to present a
new image.”

The current call centre in

_Florida.also-has satellite. call

centres in Jamaica, and Board
officials want a comparable sys-
tem in place for visitors. Mr
Johnson added that by having a
Bahamas-based call centre, per-
sons booking a vacation will be
able to speak to people who
have a more in-depth and wide-
spread knowledge of the prod-
uct in Grand Bahama.

During a speech to the Grand
Bahama Chamber of Com-
merce, Prime Minister Perry
Christie said that for far too
long, the country's tourism

See CALL, Page 2B



LEADING THE WAY - Kerzner International’s Atlantis resort

S&P increases
Kerzner’s EPS
for ‘05 to $2.71

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

STANDARD & POOR’S
(S&P), the international cred-
it rating agency, has fallen into
line with Wall Street’s invest-

ment banks on Kerzner Inter- —

national, forecasting that the
company’s revenues will grow
by 9 per cent in 2005 and rais-
ing its full-year earnings per
share (EPS) target to $2.71.
S&P analyst Markos
Kaminis upgraded Kerzner
International’s shares to a
‘Hold’ from ‘Sell’ recommen-
dation, based on improving
economic trends that had
resulted in higher occupancies
and revenue per available
room (RevPAR) figures at the
company’s properties, espe-
cially Paradise Island-based
Atlantis and the One & Only

Ocean Club. -

Mr Kaminis, in a report
obtained by The Tribune, fore-
cast that improved occupan-
cies would drive Kerzner Inter-
national’s 2005 gross margins
ahead of their year-before lev-
els.

He wrote: “We see net mar-

“ gins widening further, as high-

er interest rates and continuing
sales, general and administra-
tive and corporate spending
are outweighed by revenue
leverage.

“After taxes estimated at 1
per cent, due to Kerzner Inter-

_ national’s Bahamas domicile,

and with share dilution, we
forecast earnings per share
(EPS) of $2.71, versus 2004
EPS of $2.33, excluding
charges and insurance recov-
ery, but including pre-opening
costs.

_ “We expect 8 per cent
rowth [in EPS] in 2006 to
2.93.” The S&P analyst said

Kerzner International’s stock

should hit the $69 per share

level on the New York Stock

Exchange (NYSE) in one

year’s time, giving Bahamian

investors a value of $6.9 per -

Bahamian Depository Receipt

(BDR).

Mr Kaminis’s verdict also
followed an upgrade by Wall

‘Street investment bank Gold-

man Sachs, which raised its rat-
ing on Kerzner International’s
shares to ‘In-Line’ from
‘Underperform’, also bringing
it into accordance with the
New York consensus.
Goldman Sachs raised its
rating due to Kerzner Interna-
tional’s “strong results, the

See RATE, Page 4B





LPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

rote finance | mutual funds 1 CSSD

1 retail banking 1 insurance brokeray



PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





Understanding the

a

criminal’s thinking

ecurity industry
research on how the
environment impacts
crime trends has
resulted in new, use-
ful conclusions. Although dif-
ferent crimes are affected in dif-
ferent ways by the environment
in which they occur, almost
every type of ‘street crime’
(crimes against persons or
against property in FBI termi-
nology) is influenced in some
way by:
¢ Physical Design
e Layout
° Situational Factors

Theories of crime, such as
environmental criminology,
focus specifically on analysing
the environmental factors that
provide opportunities for crime




to occur. Based on this, it is fair
to say that most theories of
crime can also be classified as
opportunity theories.

Environmental criminology,
rational choice, situational
crime prevention, routine activ-
ity, opportunity model, geogra-
phy of crime and hot spots of
crime, just to name a few, all
explain factors that provide
criminal opportunities. In
essence, if we are able to reduce
opportunities then it is reason-
able to conclude that crime will
also be reduced.

Between the 1970s and 1990s,
studies were conducted (pri-
marily by the National Institute

of Justice in the US) to demon- —

strate that certain environments
tend to encourage informal
social gatherings and contacts,
thus raising the fear of crime.



These environments include
poorly-lighted areas, high-rise
buildings with an inappropriate
tenant mix, apartment buildings
with large numbers of units that

O EASY TO
IVE & FORGET’

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share one primary entrance, and

- heavily-trafficked streets.

Conversely, researchers
found that the presence of com-
munity centres and well-main-



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Life. Money. Balance both:



tained public parks helped
reduce crime. Ever wonder why
so much emphasis was placed
on building a basketball or
parks? These features increased
social interaction, natural sur-
veillance and other informal
social controls, thereby reducing
both crime and the fear of
crime.

The failure, however, was
that the Government and
church failed to capitalise on
these informal controls to create
formal controls; thus giving
meaning and direction to them.
Adolescents were left to: their
own decisions and thinking,
which resulted in their demise in

some cases.

Rational or Irrational

As mentioned, some took the.

good path while others took the
wrong one. According to the
rational choice approach, crim-
inal behaviour occurs when an
offender decides to risk break-
ing the law after considering the
following:

e Personal factors (the need
for money, cheap thrills, enter-
tainment, revenge) and situa-
tional factors (potential police
response, availability of target,
lighting, surveillance, access to
target, skill and tools needed to
commit the crime).

¢ Before committing a crime,
most criminals (excluding drug-
stupid impulse crimes, acts of
terrorism and psychopathic
criminals) will evaluate the fol-
lowing:

’ 1. Risks of apeeelionsion -
where are the police; are they
familiar with my tactics?

2. The seriousness of expect-
ed punishment - will I be
remanded to Fox Hill or will I

_..be put on. bail to await trial? ..
.. 3. The potential value of gain:

from the crime - $100 versus
$1,000. Is there a market for the

item I am going to steal, and
what is the profit margin?

Call (From page 1B)

4. The need for immediate
criminal gain. If yes to the.
above, how quickly can we get
the item sold or how badly is it
needed (money).

The decision to commit a spe-
cific type of crime is thus a mat-
ter of personal decision-mak-
ing, based upon an evaluation of
numerous variables and the
information available for the
decision-making process.

Burglary studies have shown
that burglars forego a break-in
if they perceive that the home is
too great a security challenge,
meaning the value or rewards
of the potential goods are not
worth the effort. The target
might be protected by guards,
police or capable guardians
(housekeepers, large dogs, etc.).
Evidence suggests that the deci-
sion to commit crime regard-
less of substance, is structed
by the choice of:

1) Where the crime occurs.

2) The characteristics of the
target.

3) The means and techniques
available for the completion of
the crime.

In addition to crime-preven-

. tion theory, security profes-

sionals should also understand
contemporary criminological
views on how criminals pick
their targets, and how their
choice is influenced by the per-
ception of vulnerability that the
target projects.

How targets are selected and
other factors that contribute to
crime will be discussed next
week.

NB: Gamal Newry is presi-
dent of Preventative Measures,

. asecurity and law enforcement

training and consulting compa-
ny.-Comments'can-be sent to

-PO..Box. N-3154 Nassau,

Bahamas or e-mail: preven-
tit@hotmail.com



industry had to employ people from outside the Bahamas to
answer calls and answer questions about the Bahamas..

He said that he is convinced that once a prospective visitor hears
a Bahamian, with that "mellifluous Bahamian voice" at the other
end of the telephone, the questions will switch from, Swbesher to

come” to “when to come”

Mr Christie said further ‘that even though the call centre begins
with properties and attractions on Grand Bahama, the intent is to
have the call centre service the entire Bahamas, including private

sector partners.

To advertise i in
The Tribune _
call 322-1986

NOTICE

Nassau Plastics
The Sign Post

&

The Trophy Case
on Parkgate Road

Will be closed
Thursday, March 3.

We apologize for any inconvenience.
We will open for business as usual
on Friday, March 4.

c

ar ar
A Memorial Service

ce oe olan
NVirs. Kitty Lawrence

Will be held at St. Andrew's Kirk
on Thursday, March 3 at 6 pm





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005, PAGE 3B



Contractors seek
more movement
on competition

espite receiving
increased work
from invest-
ment-related
projects over
the past 12-18 months, the
Bahamian Contractors Associ-
ation (BCA) said yesterday it
still warted to level the playing
field between its members and
foreign competitors who held a
cost advantage over them.
Terrence Knowles, the
BCA’s chairman, said talks
between the Association and
Ministry of Financial Services
and Investments had already
yielded positive results, with the
latter encouraging foreign
investors and developers to
view Bahamian companies
more favourably.

Mr Knowles added that this
had resulted in Bahamian con-
tractors getting more work on
development projects, but a
number of issues were still open
for discussion between the BCA
and Allyson Maynard-Gibson,
minister of financial services
and investments.

The BCA is continuing to
press for a Local Preference Act
that it believes would enhance
the prospects of Bahamian con-
tractors successfully: securing

determined, to account for the
higher overheads and other
costs that Bahamian contrac-
tors face compared to their
overseas competitors.

Mr Knowles said foreign con-
tractors had access to lower
financing costs internationally,
and were able to borrow at
interest rates between 3-5 per
cent, compared to 9 per cent for
Bahamian companies.

In addition, Mr Knowles said
that unlike their foreign coun-
terparts who were able to lease
equipment, Bahamian contrac-
tors could not do so and often
had to outlay large sums of cap-
ital to purchase the necessary
equipment.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said a
technical subcommittee head-
ed by Dr Tyrone McKenzie,
acting deputy director of invest-
ment, would be established to
look into this and other issues
relating to the construction
industry.

The Government and BCA.

are also discussing the question
of open tendering to determine
contractors for new projects,
particularly whether a new pro-
ject should go to open tender
or if the developer should con-
tinue working with a proven

LORS) Tots)

ding in those cases would be in
the “public purse’s” best inter-
ests.

While foreign contractors
now had to obtain a new busi-
ness licence for every addition-
al project they worked on, val-
ued at 1 per cent of the con-
tract’s value, Mrs Maynard-Gib-
son said the BCA had to
respond quickly when requests
were made for contractors and
workers who can and will
“deliver”.



Pictured above in a recent meeting are (from left): Godfrey Forbes, Vice Chairman, BCA; Dr. Tyrone
McKenzie, Acting Deputy Director of Investment; Sheila Carey, Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Financial
Services and Investment; Allyson Maynard-Gibson, Minister of Financial Services and Investment; Steven
Wrinkle, BCA member; Terrance Knowles, Chairman, BCA; Robyn Ogilvie, Sectalaly, BCA; and Johnny

Outten, Councilman, Combined Trades, BCA.

FirstCaribbean International Bank is the combination of CIBC and Barclays Bank in the Bahamas, Belize
and the Caribbean. We are the region's largest publicly traded bank, with over 3,000 staff serving over 5.3
million people in 16 territories. We manage over 500,000 active accounts through more than 80 branches

and centres.

As FirstCaribbean Capital Markets continues to grow, we are seeking persons with the requisite
skills, knowledge and expertise to fill the positions below.

ESSSole Ni DIRECTOR -

Responsibilities:

cea MARKETS

Prerequisites:
* Sound technical skills in financial modelling and

e Support FirstCaribbean Capital Markets in the
management of client relationships and execution of
client transactions

e Lead individual deal-team and guide analysts in
preparation of credit applications, and the
processing and maintenance, including analysis and
supporting documentation, of all risk aspects of
customer operations and the industries in which
they compete

contractor, especially if they
were Bahamian.

- Mrs Maynard-Gibson said it
was difficult to break ‘fixed’
relationships, and questioned
whether the cost of open bid-

projects.

The Association is proposing
that the Act make an allowance,
_ Which could be upwards of 10
per cent, although this has yet to

analysis for both Corporate and Sovereign clients

e Significant experience in investment banking and/or
strong knowledge of capital intensive industries and
sovereign financing needs

¢ Demonstrated track record in client management,
developing mutually beneficial solutions, and
creating lasting mutually beneficial client
relationships

¢ Bachelor's degree in business, finance and/or
equivalent experience

NOTICE

SUVEL HOLDINGS LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT an Extraordinary
General Meeting of the Shareholders of Jovéel Holdings Limited is hereby
called, to be held at the Registered Office of the Company, UBS House,
East Bay Street, P.O.Box N- 7151, Nassau Bahamas, on the Ist day of
April 2005 at 10:00a.m.

The object and purpose of said Meeting is to have liad before
the Shareholders of the Company the accounts of the Liquidators, Cordelia
Fernander and Ingrid Davis, showing the manner in which the winding
up of the Company has been conducted, the property of the Company
distributed, and the debts and obligations of the Company disharged and
also to hear any explanation that may be given by the said Liquidators.



BUSINESS ANALYST - CAPITAL MARKETS |

Prerequisites:

¢ Superior analytical/financial modelling skills,
including knowledge of the preparation of financial
forecasts

e Working knowledge of accounting for business
combinations and experience in consolidations and
multi- “currency group analysis would be an asset

e 2-3 years' experience in corporate finance/ capital
markets organisation, ideally within research
function

© Bachelor's degree in business, finance and/or
equivalent experience

Responsibilities:

© Support the Capital Markets team in
sales/marketing/origination/due diligence activities,
including substantial involvement in the conduct of
detailed due diligence and subsequent preparation
of comprehensive credit applications, for Large
Corporate and Sovereign target clients

¢ Support, when required, deal analysis reporting to
the Deals Committee, and the Capital Markets
Board

Dated this Ist day of March 2005.

Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)

Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)



We offer attractively structured compensation and reward
packages as well as performance bonuses.

NOTICE

STEVEL HOLDINGS LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT an Extraordinary
General Meeting of the Shareholders of Jovel Holdings Limited is hereby
called, to be held at the Registered Office of the Company, UBS House,
East Bay Street, P.O.Box N-7757, Nassau, Bahamas, on the Ist day of
April 2005 at 10:00a.m.

The object and purpose of said Meeting is to have liad before
the Shareholders of the Company the accounts of the Liquidators, Cordelia
Fernander and Ingrid Davis, showing the manner in which the winding
up of the Company has been conducted, the property of the Company
distributed, and the debts and obligations of the Company discharged and
also to hear any explanation that may be given by the said Liquidators.

Applications with detailed résumé should be submitted no
later than 11 March 2005 to:

lan Chinapoo

Investment Banker

FirstCaribbean International Bank

Capital Markets

Rendezvous

Barbados

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

Caribbean Pride. International Strength. Your Financial Partner.

E-mail: ian.chinapoo@firstcaribbeanbank.com
FirstCaribbean International Bank is an Associated Company of Barclays Bank PLC and CIBC.

Only applicants who are short-listed will be contacted.



Dated this Ist day of March 2005.

Financial A dvisors L.td.
Pricing Information As Of:

Cordelia Fernander 28 February 2005

(Liquidator)

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste
British American Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

JOVEL HOLDINGS LIMITED | 3 Bh. petite

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Kerzner International BDRs



Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)





NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT an Extraordinary
General Meeting of the Shareholders of Jovel Holdings Limited is hereby
called, to be held at the Registered Office of the Company, UBS House,
East Bay Street, P.O.Box N-7757, Nassau Bahamas, on the Ist day of
April 2005 at 10:00a.m.

The object and purpose of said Meeting is to have liad before
the Shareholders of the Company the accounts of the Liquidators, Cordelia
Fernander and Ingrid Davis, showing the manner in which the winding

Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $
Bahamas Supermarkets

Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets



up of the Company has been conducted, the property of the Company ree ee Seece ey pers one
= 8 jonths iv
distributed, and the debts and obligations of the Company disharged and Gola Money Market Fund 7 D0osa7*
also to hear any explanation that may be given by the said Liquidators. Fidelity Bahamas G&I Fund =—_2.1105 ***
10.2648 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.2602*****
‘ J 2.1746 2.0524 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.166020**
Dated this Ist day of March 2005. 1 Jip OOO a aes
“CRINDEX: CLOSE 496.680 °75 Ree
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
s 52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Cordelia Fernander 52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
(Liquidator) Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value

“f DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
** - AS AT JAN. 31, 2005/ **** - AS AT DEC. 31, 2004
& SA JAN 31, 2005) | beheheis "AS AT JAN. 31, 2005



“Tngrid Davis

(Liquidator) vag





PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



mi ss ie
Water shortage was corporation’s
worst crisis in its 28-year history

dents, due in part to the addition of the MV Clipper Legend, and



WAREHOUSE SPACE
TO SUBLEASE

* 2320 sq. ft. located on
Mt. Pleasant Avenue off Carib Road.

Please call Alice at 393-7020
for further information






LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

THE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
COMPANIES ACT, 2000

LIQUIDATOR’S STATEMENT
PURSUANT TO SECTION 137(8) OF THE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000

We, Pine Limited, Liquidator of CONSORT INVESTMENTS
LIMITED hereby certify that the winding up and dissolution of

CONSORT INVESTMENTS LIMITED has been completed in ’ |

accordance with the Articles of Dissolution and that CONSORT
INVESTMENTS LIMITED has been dissolved as of 23rd day of
February, 2005.

Dated this 28th day of February, 2005.

Pine Limited
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

EARNING LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that at an Extraordinary
General Meeting of the Shareholders of the above-named Company
was duly convened and held on the 25th day February, 2005 and
the following resolutions were passed: - —

RESOLVED that EARNING LIMITED be wound up
voluntarily.

RESOLVED that LYNDEN MAYCOCK be appointed
the Liquidator for the purpose of such winding up.

Dated the 28th day of February, 2005.

H&J CORPORAT E SERVICES a

Resisteredl Office
for the above-named Company



By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX

Senior Business Reporter

WATER AND SEWERAGE CORPORATION officials yes-
terday admitted that the water crisis experienced several weeks ago
was the worst in the corporation’s 28 year history, but were now
beginning to see some consistency returning to the water supply,
with the addition of a third barge and other remedial efforts.

After several weeks of severe water shortages in Nassau, the Cor-
poration was acutely aware of the fact that the public remains

sceptical about the continued reliability of water.

Corporation officials said they were beginning to see some con-
sistency return to the supply of water to New Providence resi-

Rate (From page 1B)

outlook for its existing proper-
ties and a heightened level of
new development”.

With S&P and the New York

. investment banks all setting

price targets in the high $60s to
low $70s range for Kerzner
International, it is becoming
clear that Bahamian institu-
tional and retail investors who
did not buy into last June’s
BDR offering missed a signifi-
cant opportunity to benefit from
capital appreciation.

The BDRs were priced at
$4.71 during the initial public
offering, but last night’s Wall
Street closing price of $63.53

for Kerzner International’s ordi-
U NION (From page 1B)

strike vote. can be taken. The

unrelated sector.

That could be good or bad,
Mr Rolle said, with the outside
influence possibly helping to
avert a strike vote, or it. could

_ spill over into the unrelated sec-.

tor and have the negative effect
of an even broader strike action.

Brian Nutt, president of the
Bahamas Employers Confeder-
ation (BECon), said the Trade
Union and Labour Relations
Bill, shelved during the 2001
review of the labour legislation,
would have provided a number
of safeguards that do not exist
in current legislation. The Bill
would have replaced. the Indus-
trial Relations Act

Mr Nutt said that in consid-
ering Convention 87, stake-
holders needed to look at also
implementing those safeguards.

He added that one example
of how the safeguards would

operate is to address how a °

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

Atlantic Medical Insurance (AMI), a subsidiary of Colonial Group
International Limited (CGIL) headquartered in Bermuda, is seeking a ~
Director of Operations for the medical claims and eligibility Gepcrimens

of AMI in the Bahamas.

CGIL, with offices in Bermuda, the Bahamas, the Oia Islands, and
the British Virgin Islands, offers a complete range of premier financial
and insurance services to both local and international clients. This is
an opportunity to be part of a rapidly growing innovative company,
focusing on providing clients with first class service and access to

- competitive products.

The Director of Operations will be responsible for the overall day-to-
day management of the medical claims, customer service,

administration and eligibility departments with a primary focus on the
claims area. These responsibilities will include monitoring and evaluating
all activities and procedures and introducing and monitoring structured
audits as well as productivity standards. This position will also be
responsible for developing and training staff in areas that are essential
to efficient company operations. It is essential that applicants possess

the following qualifications:

° 58 years experience managing claims and eligibility departments
within the health insurance industry, including the development

and

implementation of procedures and audits.

Experience of working within the US healthcare system and
experience of US claims processing, provider and network
discounts and negotiating contracts with Independent service

providers.

Minimum 5 years’ supervisory experience with the ability to train

staff.

Thorough understanding of group employee health benefits
including medical, dental, life, and disability.
Superior communication and organisational skills as well as a

service-oriented approach.

Proven ability to negotiate with external and internal clients and

work under pressure.

Compensation for the successful candidate will be attractive and
linked to performance. CGIL offers an attractive benefits package
that includes comprehensive medical | insurance, contributory pension

plan, and life insurance.

If you have a keen commitment to quality results and want to contribute
your talents to a dynamic company, contact us about this opportunity.
Applications will be treated in the strictest confidence and should be

made in writing to:

Atlantic Medical Insurance

P Box SS-5915
Nassau, Bahamas

or

email address for electronic submission of -
applications hr_manager_obm@colonial.om_)

Closing date for applications is March 29, 2005



nary shares means each BDR
is now worth $6.353 - generating
a capital appreciation gain for
BDR holders of 34.9.per cent.

However, the $63.53 price
means that much of the gains
Kerzner International is expect-
ed to received from its $1 billion
Phase III expansion on Par-
adise Island, plus. investment
projects in Dubai and Morocco,
has already been priced into the
stock: This means that Bahami-
an investors now. buying into
the BDRs are likely to experi-
ence a slower rate of capital
appreciation, given Wall Street’s
expectations.

_ Inhis report, Mr Kaminis said.

former Bill also looked to
implement a cooling-off period
and would have outlawed gen-
eral strikes.

One of the major fears that
employers have about Conven-
tion 87 is that it allows unions to
become... general workers
‘unions, which means that there
could be one mega union that

‘represents all workers in all

areas. “That union would be
very powerful and that's why
we need to look at safeguards in
legislation to prevent general
strikes and no sympathy strikes
in non-related areas,” Mr Nutt
said,

"There are a lot of different
views on Convention 87. With
respect to that, however, one
thing that has to be recognised

is that along with the right to’

associate, is also-to ‘have the

right to not associate. The free-:

other remedial efforts.

The MV Clipper Legend transports 1.2 million gallons of water,
and along with the MV Titas, at 3.3 million gallons and the MV Dol-
phin at 1.7 million gallons, provides a total transshipment of water
from North Andros at 6.2 million gallons daily.

The addition of the third barge is, however, a short-term con-
tingency measure as the corporation’s long-term strategy is to dis-
continue the barging of water from North Andros and build two
reverse osmosis plants in New Providence.

In a recent press statement, Bradley Roberts, minister of Works
& Utilities, revealed that the long-term plan is to construct a
reverse osmosis plant at Blue Hills.

the Phase III development on
Paradise Island and expansion
of the One & Only brand would
grow Kerzner International’s
revenues by9 per cent in 2005.

S&P had also raised its three-
year EPS growth outlook from
12 per cent to 16 per cent, “as
we expect improved air traffic
to the Bahamas and expansion
projects to boost occupancy and
revenues”. The 2005 EPS esti-
mate was raised to $2.71 from
$2.58, putting it in the middle
of the Wall Street consensus
range, which ranges from a high
of $3 to a low of $2.6.

For 2006, EPS estimates for

Kerzner International range

dom to associate incorporates
the freedom to not associate.
There is that consensus that
there is an unfair push for peo-
ple to join unions when they
really don't want to."

Mr Nutt said stakeholders
should also look at the possi-
bility of upsetting the status quo
of currently established unions.
While certain unions have cer-



from $3.12 to $2.83, with S&P’s
estimate of $2.93 close to the
Wall Street average of $2.95.

Mr Kaminis wrote that the
12-month price target was
increased to $69 from $55, given
that Kerzner International’s
stock had recently traded at 24x
its 2005 EPS estimates, in line
with the hotel, resort and cruise
industry average of 24x.

Mr Kaminis said: “Based on
an average price/earnings
growth ratio of 1.48x for our
two peer groups, applied to our
three-year EPS growth estimate
of 16 per cent and our 2006 EPS
estimates, we would value the
shares at $69 one year forw



tain crafts specified within their —
regulations, Convention 87
could provide a ‘free for all’,,
meaning that the current make-
up of union officials could
change drastically.

The Government has signed
up to Convention 87 but has yet
to ratify it in statute. It would
allow workers to join a union
of their choice.

NOTICE is hereby given that FRANK O. PREMPEH OF P.O.

BOX N-8940, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for. Nationality and Citizenship, for

registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed.statement of the facts within twenty-eight days

from the 23RD day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister}:

responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-'7147, |

Nassau, Bahamas.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Enterprise Risk Services - Control Assurance Senior Consultant/Manager



Well established firm seeks an IT Auditor panagetsersol consultant for its Enterprise Risk

Services Practice.

RESPONSIBILITIES

Identify and evaluate business and technology risks, internal controls which mitigate risks,
and related opportunities for internal control improvement

~ Assist in selecting and tailoring approaches, methods and tools to support services
Actively participate in training efforts

Actively participate in decision making with engagement management and seek to understand
the broader.impact of current decisions

Generate innovative ideas and challenge the status quo
Facilitate use of technology-based tools or methodologies to review, design and/or implement

products and services

Build and nurture positive working relationships with clients with the intention to exceed

client expectations

Understand clients' business environment and basic risk management approaches
Play substantive/lead role in engagement planning, economics, and billing
Participate in proposal development and sales efforts

- QUALIFICATIONS

3+ years experience in the areas of public accounting, internal auditing or consulting

Bachelors degree in Business Administration, Accounting, Computer Science, Information
Systems Administration or related field. MBA or dual-degree is an asset

CISA, CPA, CIA designation or desire and dedication to pursue
Advanced understanding of business processes, internal control risk management, IT controls

and related standards

Proven analytical skills with ability to tackle problems systematically to determine causes
and produce effective solutions

Experience with accounting control related issues

Demonstrated ability to plan and manage engagements along with ensuring deliverables
meet work plan specifications and deadlines ,

Ability to thrive in an environment of pressing deadlines and constantly changing conditions
Successful experience identifying controls, developing and executing test plans
Ability to synthesize information and produce concise synopses/summaries

Excellent written and oral communication skills including both technical and business writing,
documentation and presentation skills

Open to travel requirements

Experience with ACL is an asset

Experience with COSO and/or Sarbanes-Oxley an asset
Technical and/or management background in technical systems/environments an asset

COMPENSATION

¢ Compensation is negotiable based on combination of years experience and qualification.

Interested persons should submit their resumes before March 18, 2005.
HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT

P. O. BOX N-7120
NASSAU, BAHAMAS





WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005, PAGE 5B

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



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FROM page one

son was able to formulate a
plan which knocked the
Knights out of the final four
in the Hugh Campbell tour-
nament.

During the Christmas
break, they hosted their annu-
al invitational, adding to the
international tournaments
which they also attend. John-
son also holds a summer pro-
gramme that teaches young-
sters discipline, good moral
values and the fundamentals
of basketball.

And his basketball pro-
gramme extends from the
junior high level to the senior
level.

He said: “I have a pro-
gramme that never stops, the
programme runs all year
round and it isn’t just based
on basketball.

“What we try to do is estab-
lish a sound programme that
will help the athlete as a
whole. We do a lot of things
together as a team, this also
helps the programme.

“We work hard, and this
has helped the boys to stay
focussed. Our main goal is not
basketball, there is life after
basketball, I would love to see
the athletes move on to col-
lege and secure a good pay-
ing job.”

Johnson and his team work-
out out everyday at the
school’s gymnasium for more
than five hours.

One of the youngest coach-
es in the league, Johnson said
he is feeling no pressure and is
enjoying each minute he
spends with the team and
coaching his classes.

Johnson is one of three
physical education instructors
at the school, he coaches the
basketball, volleyball and
helps out with the track and
field teams.

“We’ve been working
extremely hard and it hope-
fully it will all pay off in the
end.

Pressure

“I am one of the younger
coaches in the league but that
doesn’t deter me at all. I don’t
feel any pressure when it
comes to coaching, coaching is
something I enjoy very much,
that’s why I didn’t choose to
go into the classroom.

“IT use to play basketball,
actually basketball was the
reason why I went off to col-
lege. While in college I played
and that give me a chance to
experience a lot, explore in a
way.

“Going of to college and
graduating makes things easi-
er when I am explaining to the
kids. Most players listen to
their coaches, but some of the
coaches can’t relate because
they’ve never been through
the situations.

“With me it is easy because
ican relate to the problems
of most of the athletes, since
I've been through it in a way.”

Becoming the student assis-
tant to the Arkansas State
basketball team really helped
Johnson with his coaching as
he became familiarised with
controlling a team.

Three years ago Johnson
retired from playing with the
Explorers to take on the head
coaching position.

Since leading the team, he
was able to take the Explorers
from being, what other teams
considered as, an average
team in the New Providence
Basketball Association
(NPBA) to contenders for the
championship title.

Johnson coaches both
teams in the NPBA, division I
and II and, for him, the
transition was not hard at
all.

“It wasn’t an adjustment
phase for me, i don’t think I
ever had to make any adjust-
ments, because coaching on
the night league level and

high school is basically the
same.”

Most of his players from the
high school division play
under the Explorers, but
Johnson says this is only used
to make them seasoned play-
ers.

“If you look at the amount
games an average high school
player plays over here it will
never compare to the games
the high school player has in
the States.

‘This is why I try to keep
the guys from my school more
active, I am about getting the
athletes off to school and
many of them have gone off
to school to further their edu-
cation.”

So far, more than eight high
school athletes coming from
Johnson’s programme have
gone onto college.

This year Johnson is expect-
ing to send at least three ath-
letes.







& By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

WITH his three-year stint at
the Westburg Christian Wild-
cats completed, Bahamian
Jeremy Barr has to decide on
whether to accept one of the 30-
plus college scholarship offers
he has received or to lean
towards the National Basketball
Association.

The 6-foot, 9-inches, 260
pound native from Mastic Point,
Andros, who wears size 22
shoes, helped the Wildcats win
their third straight District 4-5A
State Tournament last week.

“J think we played well
together. It was all about our
defence,” said Barr, who
declined to accept the individual
glory sharing the success with
his teammates instead.

Defence

“Sometimes the teams were
close to us, but we were able to
play together really well on
defence and that was what was
able to pull us through.”

Barr, 18, ended up-with 21
points, including hitting 7-of-9
from the free throw line, in the
Wildcats’ 61-53 over SA Christ-
ian in the championship game
on Saturday night.

The night before in the semi-



Hard work pays off
for Bahamas’ Jeremy

final game against Fortworth
Christian, Barr produced 18
points with 11 rebounds as they
won'59-46.

“He did an excellent job,”
said Westburg Christian’s head
coach Greg Glenn. “He ended

special player is his improve-
ment with his skills,” Glenn
reflected. “He made a play in
the championship game as he
was running hard in transition.

“Normally he’s running
towards the basket to catch the



“Because of the way I was
able to improve, everybody on
the team started to look at me
for the scoring. I just thank
God that I was able to deliver

for our team.”



up making the All-Tournament
team. But in the last two games,
he was really dominant.

“He did all the things you
expect him to do trom the very
beginning. He showed why he
was such a force for us.”

From the time he joined the
Wildcats three years ago, Glenn
admitted that Barr got better
and better with every game he
played in.

“Except for his physical attrib-
utes, what made Jeremy such a

Jeremy Barr

ball and score. But there was a
player running ahead of him.
He was able to catch the ball
and he just tapped it over to the
player for a great pass.”

Barr credits his success to his
work ethic.

“Frank (Rutherford) and I
were really working out.

“He got a lot of people to
help me develop my skills. Once
I started working on it, I just
continued to get better,” Barr
admitted.

“And because of the way I
was able to improve, everybody
on the team started to look at
me for the scoring. I just thank
God that I was able to deliver
for our team.”

Having helped to mature him
over the past three years
since he moved from Andros to
Houston, Texas, Glenn said
his only concern is that Barr
ends up in a program where
he can further develop his
skills.

“He has a great base to start
putting everything together. It
kind of like building a house. It
doesn’t matter how well you
build the house, if you don’t
have a solid foundation, you
won't have a good house,”
Glenn pointed out.

“Now he has a good founda-
tion to put a good house on it.
Because he has the potential, he
can build a good house on that
foundation.”

Despite the level of success
he has achieved, Glenn said
Barr is still a bit “green” and so
he needs to get into the right
program where he can reach his
full potential.

“Where that happens is not
so much important as it is get-
ting with the right people,”
Glenn declared.

This weekend, Barr will make
his first official visit to Texas

TRIBUNE SPORTS

Tech. But he has his sights set
more on the University of South
Carolina where he intend to vis-
it after the Spring Break.

Frank Rutherford, who has
been instrumental in getting
Barr developed from a “project”
to a “bonafide” collegiate and
NBA player, said, every
other weekend, Barr will be
making official visits to various
schools.

Decision

But Rutherford said they will
also be looking at making a few
unofficial visits as they sort out
every possible avenue before a
final decision is made as to
where he will end up later this
year.

Based on what he’s done in
high school, Barr said he’s con-
fident that he has the potential
to make it in college and even
enter the NBA.

“Most people feel like I
should go to college for a year or
two so that I can get some expe-
rience and eventually go high in
the draft,” Barr stressed. “So I
think I’m going to go that
route.”

Over the last three years, Barr
said he’s been able to prove to
everybody that if you put in the
hard work, it will pay off in the
long run.



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Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



behind the
CI Gibson
meio

@ By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports
Reporter






KEVIN ‘KJ’ JOHNSON
has established a basketball
dynasty at the CI Gibson
school (Rattlers) and has
become the most decorated
coach at both high school
and night league level.

Johnson, head coach of
the Rattlers’ senior boys and.
girl’s basketball squads, is
also the assistant coach of
the junior boy’s national
team and the head coach of
the Coca-Cola Explorers.

On Monday night, John-
son and the Rattlers
achieved the impossible,
trouncing the number one
team from Grand Bahama,
Tabernacle Falcons, for
their third Hugh Campbell
title in five years.

The 58-52 win over the
Falcons was an historic one,
not only for Johnson and his
squad, but all of New Prov-
idence base schools.

For the seventh time in
the tournament, the trophy
will remain in the capital. .

Dedication

Thanks to Johnson’s hard
work and dedication to the
team, the Rattlers will now
‘go down in the tournament’s
history books as the second
New Providence base school
to repeat as champions.

And they’ve attained a
goal no other school has,
their school’s name will be
the only one from New
Providence to be inscribed
on the floating trophy three
times.

Rattlers won their first
title in 2002, made it to the_|_
final four in 2003, and
returned as champions in
2004.

The only other school to
be listed twice was the AF
Adderley Tigers, in 1987
and 1988. ,

Rattlers have become the
most feared school compet-
ing under the Government
Secondary School Sporting
Association (GSSSA)
umbrella.

They’ve dominated the
basketball arena, softball,
and are catching up in track
and field and soccer.

Johnson, who started out
as a student assistant at the
Arkansas State University,
had a passion for the game,
despite obtaining a Bache--
lors degree in Biology.

Job

His love for the sport was
seen in his play and grew as
time went on. He applied to
the Ministry of Education
for a job at CI Gibson in
December of 1995.

Upon receiving the posi-
tion, Johnson was given the
junior boys’ team for two
years. While heading this
programme he helped coach
them to a playoff appear-
ance.

Since the separation in the
school system, junior and
senior, Johnson remained at
the Rattlers to coach at the
senior level.

“There is no difference in
coaching the junior boys and
senior boys at the school lev-
el,” said a confident John-
son.

“I love working with the
kids, they’ve become a big
part of my life, they are like
family. When you look at it,
Ispend a lot of my time with
them, so the relationship we
have built is beneficial for
all,”

Rattlers basketball teams:
have become the force to
reckoned with, winning four
straight GSSSA tiles.

The four-peat was~
stopped by the CR Walker
Knights last year, but John-

SEE page 6B






































































































@ ABOVE: Shakara Brown of D.W Davies broke the junior girls
high jump record by jumping 1.60 metres yesterday at the GSSSA
junior school track meet while Raquel Williams (left) of C H
Reeves won the Junior Girls shot put with a record-breaking
throw at the same event.





(Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)
t





Sol

Ae EE NR

@ By ERICA WELLS

R Ian Stra-

chan, activist,

playwright and

author, is not

afraid to speak

his mind. What some fear to

say outside.of the-privacy of

their own homes, he says loud
and clear for all to hear.

While Dr Strachan has most
recently been in the news
because of his controversial
declaration that “Junkanoo is
the death of cultural develop-
ment”, this weekend his equal-
ly strong opinions on the Hait-
ian experience in the Bahamas
will take centre stage in his crit-
ically-acclaimed play Diary. of
Souls.

On the surface, the play is
based on the 1990 tragedy at
sea involving a Royal Bahamas
Defence Force boat and a
Haitian sloop. During that
incident hundreds of Haitians
died and were buried in a mass
grave on Bitter Guana Cay, an
uninhabited island in the Exu-

To $7000 Paid For Beatles



tr

I





EXHIBITIONS ® MUSIC ®© ENTERTAINMENT





WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005

@ DR Ian Strachan, whose play Diary
of Souls opens Friday at the Dundas
Centre for the Performing Arts, took
this photograph while in Haiti. His play
addresses the Haitian experience in
the Bahamas.



aitian tragedy

Dr Ian Strachan’s critically-acclaimed play to take centre stage

mas.
But what it really speaks to is
what Dr Strachan perceives as

the Bahamas’ general insensi-~
‘tivity towards Haitians living

here.

The emotional and powerful
account switches frequently
between the beach on Bitter
Guana Cay, where three
Haitians are stranded as
“undead” between feeling nei-
ther life nor death, and a psy-
chiatrist’s office where a
Bahamas Defence Force
marine is being treated for psy-
chological trauma.

“What struck me most about
the story was the nature of the
burial,” Dr Strachan told The
Arts in an interview at his
office at the College of the
Bahamas, where he is the chair
of English Studies.

“TI thought it was an insensi-
tive way to bury them, the pho-
tographs, the handling of it, the

tragedy of it. It happening at
our independence weekend.
These people seeking freedom
and a better way of life, meet-
ing their deaths in this way.
The incident is symbolic of our
insensitivity.

“I wondered if any effort had
been made to record the names
of the dead, to find out the
names of those who died, if
they had been interviewed to
record their version of events.”

According to official records,
after the RBDF boat inter-
cepted the sloop it was trying to
tow the vessel to safer waters

when it capsized. It was report-

ed that the Haitians panicked
and moved to one side of the
ship, causing it to overturn.
Another source said that the
boat simply broke apart when

.they tried to pull it.

In any event, many Haitians
died and were buried in a com-
mon grave.

| Signed On The Front

Ip To $2 10 Paid For Beatles.
oa One Page

Not long after the tragedy,
rumours began to surface

_ about that incident, about what
really happened, about-its_.
effect on some of the officers. -

involved, said Dr Strachan.

Some were suffering from |

symptoms of what profession-
als would call post traumatic
stress disorder and some had
to be treated for drinking prob-
lems. In one particular case, an

officer was said to be halluci- ©

nating. He tried to save phan-
tom migrants from drowning
in waters at the Coral Harbour
Base.

It was at this point that Dr
Strachan began thinking about
how to write about this inci-
dent, and kept the idea in his
head for almost a decade
before he finally put it down
on paper.

“I was in Washington DC
and I saw (Samuel) Beckett’s
‘Waiting for Godot’ and a light

came on. I figured out how I
could tell the story,” recalled
Dr Strachan.

_“I_wanted it to be the spirits
of these people,” he said. “Just
as men are waiting for God in
‘Waiting for Godot’, these spir-
its are waiting for man, wait-
ing for Bahamians to acknowl-
edge them, and see them, and
they’re waiting indefinitely.”

More than that, though, Dr
Strachan said that he wanted
to tell both sides of the story —
not only the tragedy of the
Haitians but the tragedy of the
Bahamian men who did their
duty and are suffering.

Ultimately, Dr Strachan is
hoping that Diary of Souls will
give a human face to what is
commonly referred to as the
“Haitian problem”.

“There is such irrationality,
fear, anger, and so little knowl-
edge of the history of the coun-
try Haiti, the reason people

come and the Bahamas’ cen-
turies-old relationship with that
country,” said Dr Strachan.

“I wanted to find a way to
force Bahamians to forget
where these people come from
and see them as fellow human
beings who have suffered
tragedy, and if they could
achieve that and arrive at some
degree of empathy then they
would hopefully be capable of
re-examining their pre-historic
ideas and their preconceived
notions and their learned prej-
udices.”

Dr Strachan describes the
play as a “fictional imaginative
interpretation of the aftermath
of a true event’

None of the people who died
that day can speak. None of
the people who survived can
speak, because they can’t be

See PLAY, Page 2C

The Bristish Colonial Hilton Hotel (Rum Kay Room)

1 Bay Street, Nassau. TEL: 242 322 3301

Sat Sth & Sun 6th March-10amto 5pm —s|



y

‘ed in



wen e ee enn ewe ee



PAGE 2C, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005

‘When Worlds Collide’

ith the publication

and impending

launch of his

debut novel,

“When Worlds
Collide”, Bahamian banker and attor-
ney Shawn A Forbes has added
another achievement to his resumé —
published author.

Set principally in England, the
Bahamas and the United States, the
work of fiction follows the lives of
three friends, Stephen Taylor, a
Bahamian man; Suresh Patel, a
British man of Indian parentage and
Tanya Collings, a Canadian woman.

Though from vastly different back-
grounds, the three form a lasting
friendship that helps them overcome
a number of issues including physi-

Bahamian author to launch debut novel

cal, sexual and emotional abuse, men-
tal breakdowns and HIV/AIDS.
Among other explosive topics, the
book addresses head-on the taboo
subjects of homosexuality in black
and Indian societies, incest and child
abuse.

Religion

According to the author, “When
Worlds Collide” examines the influ-
ence of religion and culture on soci-
ety’s approach to a number of social
issues and the often calamitous results
of the imposition of contrived moral
















-values on flawed human beings. How-

ever, “above all else,” says Mr Forbes,
“the book examines how the power of
love often acts as a catalyst to help
people to heal their damaged lives.”

Degree

Mr Forbes received a bachelor’s
degree, with honours, from the Uni-
versity of Manchester in 1991. He was
called to the Bar of England and
Wales in July, 1992, and was called
to the Bahamas Bar in 1 August of that

. same year.

THE TRIBUNE





ney, Trust officer and served as an
Assistant Registrar of Bahamian ships
with the Bahamas Maritime Author-
ity in London.

Currently, he is a Senior Vice Pres-
ident of the Nassau subsidiary of a
Geneva-based private bank, with
responsibility for the bank’s Legal
and Corporate Department.

“When Worlds Collide” will be for-
mally launched in Nassau on April
29 with a gala cocktail reception.
However, the books are already avail-
able for purchase through the pub-
lisher’s website at www.trafford.com.
For further information, Mr Forbes
can be contacted by e-mail at
thewriter@coralwave.com.








ing shows are $20.

328-5800/1 to register.

tours.

Ian Strachan’s Diary of Souls, the critically
acclaimed play examining the Haitian experience
in the Bahamas, will open at the Dundas Centre
for the Performing Arts on Friday, March 4 and
continues through March 6, 8pm. And again on
Friday, March 11 and Saturday, March 12, 8pm.
Call the box office at 393-3728 for ticket info.
. Tickets for Friday’s performance are $25, remain-

A Fabric Printing workshop will be held on
Saturday, March 5 and March 12, from 10am -
1pm at the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas.
‘The workshop is part of the NAGB’s Youth
Workshop series and is for children between the
ages of 12 and 18. J oie Lamare of Bahama Hand-
prints will be conducting the workshop. Cost: $10
members/$16 non-members. Call the gallery at

The National Collection @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, an exhibition that takes
the viewer on a journey through the history of fine
art in the Bahamas. It features signature pigces
from the national collection, including recent —
acquisitions by Blue Curry, Antonius Roberts
and Dionne Benjamin-Smith. Gallery hours, Tues-
day- Saturday, llam-4pm. Call 328-5800 to book

Past, Present and Personal: The Dawn Davies
Collection @.the National, Art Gallery.of the
Bahamas, Villa Doyle, West and West Hill
Streets. This exhibition is made up of key selec-
tions from Ms Davies’ extensive collection of

_ Bahamian art and is part of the NAGB’s Collec-
’ tor’s Series. Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday,
1lam-4pm. Call 328-5800 to book tours.

The Awakening Landscape: The Nassau Water-
colours of Gaspard Le Marchand Tupper, from
the collection of Orjan and Amanda Lindroth @

_ the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas. The
mid-nineteenth century paintings that make up the
exhibition are part of one of the earliest suites of

_ paintings of Nassau and its environs. Tupper was
a British military officer stationed at Fort Char-
lotte in the 1850s. The works show a pre-modern
Bahamas through the decidedly British medium of
watercolour. Gallery hours; Tuesday-Saturday,

11am-4pm. Call 328-5800 to book tours.









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Me 9

e707 ately
Cea Eee






He has worked as a litigation attor-

Play (From page 1C)

found — and Dr Strachan has
tried.

The main characters in
Diary of Souls are three peo-
ple (souls) — two men and one
woman — based on people who
were probably on that fateful
voyage; and a defence force
officer who is living the hor-
rific aftermath of the experi-
ence.

Through hia characters, Dr
Strachan examines the source

of Haitian distress — “Was it’

the series of despots following
Toussaint .|’Ouverture that

‘impoverished the beautiful

country? Was it the brutality
of “Papa Doc” Duvalier and
his private militia, the Tons-
Tons Macoute that broke the
spirit of a nation? Why do
Bahamians shun and despise
Haitians, treating them like
dirt?”

The play was first staged in
1999 at-C W Sawyer School
and the Dundas Centre for the
Performing Arts in New Prov-
idence. After each production
the floor was opened for dis-
cussion on issues addressed in
the play, and some say it has
helped change local attitudes
toward Haitian immigrants for

the better.

Now six years later, Dr Stra-
chan and his Track Road The-
atre are bringing Diary of
Souls back to the local stage.

Last year the play travelled
to Barbados and New Orleans
as part of a commemoration
of the 200th anniversary of
Haitian independence, and it
received rave reviews.

It would seem as if the re-
staging of the play couldn’t

‘have come at a better time, as

the immigration situation in
the Bahamas has recently
resurfaced in the headlines of
the media.

“Any year that you would
put this on, people would say

. that it is topical, ” said Dr Stra-
chan “This doesn’t go away. ©

It has its peaks. It becomes
urgent and then less urgent
and then urgent again. Inci-
dents like this one have hap-
pened before and since.”

But what is of major con-

- cern to Dr Strachan is the

“alarmists” in society who feed
on people’s fears, “rather than
bringing any real reason or
information to the discussion
they just bring more igno-

He thinks that now more

" than ever there needs to be a

different type of discussion on
the issue.

_ “The nature of the (current)
discourse is so reminiscent of
the language that precedes
genocidal acts,” said Dr Stra-
chan, who is this semester
teaching a course which deals
with the theme of cruelty.

“When you hear talk about

‘them’ and ‘they are filthy’,

‘they are bad’, morally, ‘they
are a threat to our institutions
and our way of life’, ‘they are
using us’, ‘they are carriers of
disease’, ‘they are breeders
who are going to spawn and
swarm’, you are setting the
groundwork for the complete
dehumanisation of a people
and their elimination.

“All that’s missing is the
right charismatic, fascist bigot
to execute and put into action
these racist, classist, xenopho-
bic, irrational, hateful ideas.”

While Dr Strachan believes
that this is an issue that divides
the country, he suspects that
the majority of Bahamians are
tolerant. “It’s the loud people
who frighten and intimidate



the others.”

‘Not only is Dr Strachan try-
ing to foster a “different kind
of discussion” through his
play, he has spoken publicly
about these issues on a local
talk-show, and on Monday
night he was part of a panel
that addressed the question,

‘Who should be a Bahamian

citizen?”

“Our hope is in truth and in
information. We have to com-
bat irrationally with reason
and information and base our
decisions on reason rather
than emotion,” he said.

“Those of us who have con-
victions that are contrary to
the loud people must show
more courage and we have to |
stand up and be counted.”

Despite his concerns, Dr
Strachan does see signs that
Haitians in the community are
being accepted — through Cre-
ole radio programmes and lan-
guage lessons for school teach-
ers, among others. “Their cul-
ture is not being completely
marginalised and they are
being given a place.”

Dr Strachan believes that
the onus is on the artists and

the media to provide the pub-

lic with accurate information
to help them make informed
decisions. —

To address the very real
problems that accompany the
influx of immigrants into a
country of this size, Dr Stra-
chan suggests better border
control, more money for
health and education, the pros-
ecution of businesses and citi-
zens who continue to hire ille-
gal immigrants and aid pro-
grammes to help improve
conditions in Haiti, in an
attempt to stem the flow into

' the Bahamas.

“If we help Haiti improve
we will benefit,” said Dr Stra-
chan. “There needs to be a
multi-pronged approach.”

Dr Strachan would also like
education on these issues to
begin at an early age, as early
as elementary school. He has
just received a grant to have
Track Road Theatre’s plays
published, including Diary of
Souls, and is hoping that they
will make their way into
schools across the country.

“In elementary school there
are books to tell students how
to be nice to tourists, so why

' can’t there be books explain-

ing where all the different —
kinds of Bahamians come
from and why?” he asked.

High School students are
encouraged to see the play,
which runs at the Dundas Cen-
tre for the Performing Arts .
this weekend, and again the
following weekend. And the
play’s poster mimics a reggae
concert promotion in an
attempt to attract a younger -
audience. ;

Dr Strachan said that he is
fully prepared for those who
may take offence to his play
that shows Bahamian attitudes
towards Haitians in a harsh
but real light.

“Some may come and be
close minded or offended and
walk out,” he said. “Track
Road Theatre is used to that.
There hasn’t been a perfor-
mance where at least one per-
son hasn’t walked out, and I
don’t think it will be the last.”

¢ Diary of Souls opens at
the Dundas Centre for the
Performing Arts on Friday,
March 4 and continues .
through March 6, 8pm. And
again on March 11 and 12.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005, PAGE 3C



Girls flock to Roberta Flack concert

rom the far left balcony,
a lady shouted “it’s get-
ting hot in here!” One of
the background vocalists
— the older one with the
deeper voice — sang “it’s getting hot in
here. . . so take off all your clothes . .

In turn, Roberta jokingly requested
“someone call security!”

Three to six decades old on aver-
age, there was a good mix of Bahami-
ans and tourists in attendance as the
Wyndham Crystal Palace Casino host-
ed Roberta Flack in concert this past
Saturday night.

In the crowd one could identify
many young professionals and moth-
ers with daughters. Surprisingly, there
were not a lot of couples, as husbands
seemed to have stayed at home while
their wives had a girls’ night out with
friends. With no teenagers looking to
create mischief, it was a good night for
a crowd with more mature tastes.
Even the Prime Minister, Perry G.

Christie and his party, and Allyson
Maynard Gibson, came out to enjoy.

To see the legendary soul artist per-
form her timeless love ballads, fans
streamed in when doors opened at
8.15pm. It was a capacity crowd, and
late arrivals did not find two seats
together. Tickets were sold out a day
before the event.

No cameras allowed and mobiles
turned off, approximately five min-
utes after 9pm, Ms Flack appeared
on stage. She went straight into her
performance, accompanied by a band
and two, vocalists with whom she per-
formed duets once sung with Donny
Hathaway and Peabo Bryson.

As only a star like Roberta could
get away with, she wore a deep purple
sequins, rather snug top and a light
blue satin, fish-tailed and gathered
skirt, with what appeared to be
blonde-coloured hair extensions.

Notwithstanding the quirkiness of
her attire, Ms Flack still exuded a cer-
tain sex appeal to her male fans.



@ ROBERTA FLACK

(Source:
www.soulwalking.co.uk)

The show opened with the lively
Oasis, and all-time favourites like The
Closer I Get to You, and Tonight, I
Celebrate My Love were performed.
The audience requested Jesse, a
touching song with real ‘conscious’

lyrics that moved many to little tears.
Even though her last record was cut
13 years ago, her songs still evoked
deep sentiment. Ms Flack obviously
felt her music as she performed.

A very interactive performance, she
had the crowd sing along with her,
Killing Me Softly, during which she
walked into the audience and took a
seat on the lap of a very cooperative
guest.

So comfortable on the piano,
Roberta Flack seemed to especially
enjoy performing her blues songs.

Trained in classical piano and voice, -

she is a former music student who, at
the age of 15, won a full scholarship to
Howard University to study music.

All night long, there were com-
ments throughout the crowd. One
attractive older lady with graying hair
screamed straight through the entire
concert. The older of the crowd def-
initely ensured that the older songs
were sung.

Folks in the very front of VIP seat-

ing could have been more animated,
though, and not appeared to have
comped their tickets just looking for
something to do; persons in general
admission would have gladly switched
places with them.

Although the fans were hoping and
waiting for the number one hit of her
debut album, The First Time Ever I
Saw Your Face —- Grammy award-
winning record of the year, 1972 —
they were disappointed when it wasn’t
a part of the agenda for the night.

At about 10.30pm, the audience
requested an encore and Roberta
sang Tradewinds, ending the concert
at a quarter to eleven.

Next to perform at the same venue
will be Connie Francis, known for
Where the Boys Are, Don’t Cry on’
My Shoulder and And I Love Him.

For those who missed Roberta this
time around, she will be in concert
with Earl Klugh, famous jazz musi-
cian, at the Broadmoor, Colorado in
early April.



Bring your Beatles memorabilia along

TO celebrate the 40th
anniversary of The Beatles visit
to the Bahamas to film scenes
for their second feature film
HELP! Beatles and rare music
memorabilia are holding valu-

’ ation days at The British Colo-

nial Hilton Hotel this weekend.

Members of the public are
invited to bring along any Beat-
les and music memorabilia (sig-
natures, personal possessions,
negatives, lyrics, film props,
magazines, concert posters, fly-
ers, programs, tickets, etc) for
a free valuation.

Onlookers

“We will be purchasing select-
ed items on the day. We have
been holding these valuation
days in all the major cities and
towns in the UK and Europe
over the last 10 years. They are
basically an opportunity for peo-
ple to bring in music memora-
bilia that they own and have it
appraised. Sometimes people
want to know the history of the
items, they have had. stored in

their attics for the last 30 or 40
years. What is it? Where was it
made? How many were made?
Is it real or fake? And most
important of all...what is it
worth? These are some of the
most commonly asked questions
at our valuation days,” accord-
ing to a statement released by
the dealers and valuers of Beat-
les and rare music memorabilia,
Tracks. During their time in the
Bahamas, between February
and March 1965, The Beatles
were very accessible to the gen-
eral public and would often chat
with the onlookers, sign auto-
graphs and be photographed
between takes.

Many of these items are still
believed to be in the area.

“So, if you took some pic-
tures, obtained the autographs
or got any other memorabilia at
the time bring it along for a free
valuation, you never know what
it might be worth,” according to
the statement. :

Bésides the Beatles, many
other artists have visited the

Bahamas, these include Paul

McCartney & Wings, The
Rolling Stones, Bob Marley,
AC/DC, Pink Floyd, Eric Clap-
ton and Robert Palmer and they
have all recorded albums on the
island.

Onlookers

All of the bands and artists
left behind a plethora of superb
mementos from their time in the
Bahamas, most of this material
has risen steadily in value over
the last 20 years. The last five
years has seen a significant
increase in the price of Beatles
memorabilia, in particular.
There has been a substantial
increase in the value of specific
types of Beatles ephemera,
mostly notably signatures, hand-
written song lyrics, concert
memorabilia, some novelty
products and unique one-off
items or those items that are
very personal to The Beatles
such as stage clothing. Most of
the items in these categories
have doubled in value in the
past five years.

Natural disasters can’t be prevented, but the effects can be more |
manageable with YOUR HELP.

Friends of Sri Lanka invite individuals and institutions wishing to
contribute towards the tsunami relief efforts in Sri Lanka to help in
one of the following ways:

1. Deposit your contribution into the special account opened at
Bank of The Bahamas -






At A Glance — The Value Of
Music Memorabilia

Beatles

Signatures — A set of ‘auto-
graphs on one page are valued
at up to $2500, ‘photographs
signed by The Beatles on the
image or on.a concert pro-
gramme are valued around

“$7000. Autographed Beatles

record sleeves are priced
between $10000 and $15000.

Handwritten Song Lyrics -
$40000+ ;

Concert Posters — Up to
$7000

Film Props — Depending on
the item the price could be up to
four figures.

Negatives with copyright —
Around $100 each

Concert Handbills — $500 to
$900°

Concert Programmes — $45 to
$60 :

Concert Tickets — Around $40

Wings
Signatures — Up to $250

EQUIPMENT

2.6 litre diesel engine, standard
transmission, power steering,
dual rear wheels, radio/cassette,
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Concert Programmes -
Around $20

Rolling Stones

Signatures — Up to $350 per
set, more on a record, pro-
gramme or photograph.

Concert Posters — A 1960’s
Stones concert poster is worth
around $3500 whereas a 1970’s
poster is worth around $350.

Concert Handbills — Up to
$700

Concert Programmes — Up to

$70
Concert Tickets — Up to $45

Bob Marley

Signatures — Up To $500

Concert Posters — Up To $500

Concert Handbills - Up To
$200

Pink Floyd

Signatures — Up to $350

Concert Posters —- Up to $900

Concert Handbills — Up to
$350

J imi Hendrix

‘FEATURING GREAT






An ADVANCED front
BURCH IT eesti a
Eee eRe ra
TLRS MT Lat Ce
RUGGED and demandii

Signatures — Around $550

Concert Posters — Around
$3000

Concert Handbills — $250 to
$550

Concert Programmes —-
Around $75

Concert Tickets — Up to $100

Led Zeppelin

Signatures — Up to $900

Concert Posters —- Up to
$1350

Concert Handbills —- Up to
$150

Concert Programmes — Up to
$250

Concert Tickets — Up to $30

The Who

Signatures — Up to $350

Concert Posters — 1960’s
posters are valued at around
$1500 whereas 1970’s examples
are valued up to $180.

Concert Handbills — Between
$30 and $50 vera

Concert Programmes —
Around $25












Tsunami Relief for Sri Lanka

Account Number: 5265970

Bank of The Bahamas

Main Branch :
The deposit can be made at any branch of the bank.

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If you are paying by cheque, you can take your contribution
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Mail your cheque to Tsunami Relief for Sri Lanka.
P. O. Box CB 11665, Nassau, Bahamas. Cheques should be
made payable to “Tsunami Relief for Sri Lanka”.







Simply call us at 502-7094 — and we will arrange to
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Contributions will be forwarded. to the Sri Lanka Red Cross
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PAGE 4C, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





ARO UN D

i)



Parties, Nightclubs
& Restaurants



Rave Saturdays @ The All New Club Eclipse.
DJ Scoobz spinning the best in Old Skool. Admis-
sion $35, all inclusive food and drink.

Fever @ Bahama Boom, Elizabeth St, down-
town, Fridays. The hottest party in the Bahamas
every Friday night. Admission $10 before mid-
night. First 50 women get free champagne. First 50
men get a free Greycliff cigar. Dress to impress.
For VIP reservations call 356-4612.

Cool Runnings is back with a Conscious Party

@ Hard Rock Cafe, Charlotte St North every Fri- ,

day. Classic reggae style music. Admission $10.

Mellow Moods every Sunday @ Fluid Lounge
and Nightclub, Bay St, featuring hits from yes-
terday — old school reggae. and rockers down-
stairs, and golden oldies upstairs. Admission:
Free. Doors open 9pm.

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters Sports
Bar. Drink specials all night long, including
karaoke warm-up drink to get you started. Party,
8pm-until.

Karaoke Nights @ Fluid Lounge and Night-
club. Begins 10pm every Tuesday. Weekly winners
selected as Vocalist of the Week — $250 cash prize.
Winner selected at end of month from finalists —

cash prize $1,000. Admission $10 with one free |

drink.

Reggae Tuesdays @ Bahama Boom. Cover
charge includes-a free Guinness and there should
be lots of prizes and surprises. Admission: Ladies
$10 and Men $15.

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports
Bar every Wednesday S5pm-8pm. Free appetiz-
ers and numerous drink specials.

* Flash Nights @ Club Fluid every Thursday. The
ultimate Ladies Night. Join Nassau’s and Miami
Beach’s finest men. Ladies only before 11.30pm
with free champagne. Guys allowed after 11.30pm
with $20 cover.

The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday.
Doors open at 9pm, showtime 11.30pm. Cover
charge $15. $10 with flyer.

Twisted Boodah Bar & Lounge every Friday @
Cafe Segafredo, Charlotte St North, featuring
world music, chillin’ jazz and soulful club beats.
Starting at 6pm. Beers $3, longdrinks $4.50.

Fantasy Fridays @ Fluid Lounge, featuring late
‘80s music in the VIP Lounge, Top of the Charts
in the Main Lounge, neon lights and Go Go
dancers. Glow sticks for all in before midnight.
Admission: Ladies free before 11pm, $15 after;
Guys $20 all night.

f

College Night @ Bahama Boom every Friday.

Admission: $10 with college ID, $15 without.

Dicky Mo’s Fridays @ Cable Beach. Happy
Hour - 3 for $10 mixed drinks and $1 shots.

Greek Saturdayz @ Bahama Boom, Elizabeth
Ave. Every Saturday the Phi Beta Sigma Frat
welcomes greeks, college grads and smooth oper-
ators. Admission $15 all night, $10 for greeks in
letters. Music by DJ Palmer, security strictly
enforced.

Chill Out Sundays @ The Beach Hut, West
Bay Street with fresh served BBQ and other spe-
cials starting from 4pm-10pm, playing deep, funky
chill moods with world beats. Cover $2.

Sweet Sunday Chill Out Soiree Lounge, every
Sunday, 4pm-midnight @ Patio Grille, British
Colonial Hotel.

Wet Sundays, every Sunday, noon-midnight @
Crystal Cay Beach. Admission $10, ladies free.

Carib Scene @ Club Fluid every Sunday. A














common grave on Bitter Guana Cay.



being treated for psychological trauma.

despise Haitians, treating them like dirt?

_ upplies.

night of Caribbean, Latin and Reggae flavours

‘for all audiences. Latin Flair in the VIP Lounge;

Old School Reggae and Soca in the Main Lounge.
Ladies in free before 11pm. $10 after 11pm. Men,
$15 cover charge.

Jay Mitchell and Hot KC @ Palm Court
Lounge, British Colonial Hilton, Wednesday-
Thursday 8pm-12am.

Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley’s Restaurant
& Lounge, Eneas St off Poinciana Drive. Fea-
turing Frankie Victory at the key board in the
After Dark Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to mid-
night. Fine food and drinks.

Paul Hanna performs at Traveller’s Rest, West
Bay St, every Sunday, 6.30pm-9.30pm.

The Arts

Alton Lowe will exhibit a group of recent
paintings at the Nassau Beach Hotel in the
Commonwealth Room, starting Saturday, Feb-
ruary 27 through March 2, 10am to 7pm daily.

Ian Strachan’s Diary of Souls, the critically

.acclaimed play examining the Haitian experi-

ence in the Bahamas, will open at the Dundas
Centre for the Performing Arts on Friday,
March 4 and continue through March 6, 8pm.
And again on Friday, March 11 and Saturday,
March 12, 8pm. Call the box office at 393-3728
for ticket info. Tickets for Friday’s performance
are $25, remaining shows are $20.

Indigo, a film about gifted children on earth,



‘Diary of Souls’

DIARY of Souls, a drama written and directed by Dr Ian Strachan, playwright and chair
of COB’s School of English Studies, opens this Friday.

It is a fictional interpretation of tragic events that took place in Exuma in July 1990, and
is considered by some to be Strachan’s best play yet. When intercepted by the Defence
Force, a Haitian vessel allegedly capsizes. The 39 Haitians who drowned were buried in a

.Strachan’s Track Road Theatre will bring this story to the stage in an emotionally
powerful account, says an online review. The play switches. frequently between the beach
on Bitter Guana Cay, where three Haitians are stranded as “undead” between feeling nei-
ther life nor death, and a psychiatrist’s office where a Bahamas Defence Force marine is

Strachan also lets his characters investigate the heart of the matter, the source of Hait-
ian distress — Was it the series of despots following Toussaint Ouverture that impoverished
the beautiful country? Was it the brutality of “Papa Doc” Duvalier and his private mili-
tia, the Tons-Tons Macoute that broke the spirit of a nation? Why do Bahamians shun and

Diary of Souls opens at the Dundas Centre for the Performing Arts on Friday night @
8pm. Tickets are $25 (opening night only). Showtimes continue on Saturday and Sunday,
+hen continues on March 11 and 12 at a cost of $20 (same time). Tickets can be purchased

't the Dundas box office from 10am till 4pm, Heaven Sent Ppermacy and Tony’s Cabinet





| HEAVEN SENT PHARMACY -
TONY'S CABINETS
DUNDAS BOX OFFICE

/ PH: 393-3728

|
TRACK ROAD THEATRE

PRG PU CYFi ON

their purpose and work of healing, peace and
love, will be shown @ Unity Centre of Light,
East Ave, Centreville (directly behind Centre-

ville Food Store).on Friday, March 4, starting at .

6.30pm. Admission $10 adults, $7 children. For
more information call 328-1325.

A Fabric Printing workshop will be held on
Saturday, March 5 and March 12, from 10am -
Ipm at the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas. The workshop is part of the NAGB’s
Youth Workshop series and is for children
between the ages of 12 and 18. Joie Lamare

of Bahama Handprints will be conducting the .

workshop. Cost: $10 members/$16 non-mem-
bers. Call the gallery at 328-5800/1 to register.

The National Collection @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, an exhibition that
takes the viewer on a journey through the his-
tory of fine art in the Bahamas. It features sig-
nature pieces from the national collection,
including recent acquisitions by Blue Curry,
Antonius Roberts and Dionne Benjamin-Smith.
Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 1lam-4pm.
Call 328-5800 to book tours.

Past, Present and Personal: The Dawn Davies
Collection @ the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, Villa Doyle, West and West Hill Streets.
The exhibition is part of the NAGB’s Collector’s
Series. Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 1lam-
4pm. Call 328-5800 to book tours.

The Awakening Landscape: The Nassau
Watercolours of Gaspard Le Marchand Tupper,
from the collection of Orjan and Amanda Lin-
droth @ the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas. The mid-nineteenth century paintings































NASSAU





that make up the exhibition are part of one of
the earliest suites of paintings of Nassau and its
environs. Tupper was a British military officer
stationed at Fort Charlotte in the 1850s. The
works show a pre-modern Bahamas through
the decidely British medium of watercolour.
Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 1lam-4pm.
Call 328-5800 to book tours. .



Health

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5.30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at
their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville.

‘Call 323-4482 for more info.

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the
third Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors Hos-
pital conference room.

The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2.30pm (except August and
December) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor
Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital, the. official training centre
of the American Heart Association offers CPR
classes certified by the AHA. The course defines ff
the warning signs of respiratory arrest and gives
prevention strategies to avoid sudden death syn-
drome and the most common serious injuries and
choking that can occur in adults, infants and chil-
dren. CPR and First Aid classes are offered every
third Saturday of the month from 9am-1pm. Con-
tact a Doctors Hospital Community Training Rep-
resentative at 302-4732 for more information and

" Jearn to save a life today.

REACH - Resources & Education for
Autism -and related Challenges meets from
7pm — 9pm the second Thursday of each month
in the cafeteria of the BEC building, Blue Hill
Road.

Civic Clubs



The Bahamas Historical Society’s monthly
meeting is scheduled for 6pm on March 17 at
the Museum on Shirley Street and Elizabeth
Avenue. Dr Donald Hopkins of the Carter
Presidental Center, a descendent of Long
Island, Harbour Island and Abaco, will give a
presentation entitled “Posing Questions, Pon-
dering Records and Probing the Genes:
Researching Family Histories in the Bahamas.”
The public is invited to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1905 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm
@ BEC Cafe, Tucker Rd. Club 9477 meets Friday,
7pm @ Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm
A19, Jean St. Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pm
@ British Colonial Hilton. Club 1600 meets Thurs-
day, 8.30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes. Club 7178
meets Tuesday, 6pm @ The J Whitney Pinder
Building, Collins Ave. Club 2437 meets every
second, fourth and fifth Wednesday at the J Whit-
ney Pinder Building, Collins Ave at 6pm. Club
612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau
Resort, Cable Beach.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @
the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau
Resort, Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first
Tuesday, 7pm @ Gaylord’s Restaurant,
Dowdeswell St. Please call 502-4842/377-4589 for

more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second
Tuesday, 6.30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office,
Ath floor meeting room.

The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month
in the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, Bay St.

Send all your civic and social events to The
Tribune via fax: 328-2398 or e-mail: outthere@tri-
bunemedia.net



THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005, PAGE 5C

The Tribune & Solomon’s Mines



FIRST PRIZE SECOND PRIZE _ THIRD PRIZE
$150.00 GIFT BASKET | $100.00 GIFT BASKET $75.00 GIFT BASKET
In Each Age Group : In Each Age Group ee eC poled) 3









CONTEST RULES
1. Children ages 4-5, 6-8, and 9-10. Staff members and relatives are not eligible to enter. Og
2. Coloring may be done with crayons. Adults or older child may assist the child in filling out the entry form, BUT NOT IN COLORING THE ENTRY
5. Enter as much times as you wish. All entries must be in The Tribune by 4pm on Monday, March 21st, 2005. Winners will be announced Wednesday,
March 23, ZOO. Look for your names in The Tribune or listen to 1OOJAMZ / JOY FM to hear your name.

4. There will be one firet-prize winner, one second-prize winner and one third-prize winner in each age groups.
5. All entries become the property of The Tribune and may be used for any purpose including, but not limited to, publication in a future issue.

Recs Ota oe leek nee

Child’s Name: Parent/Guardian Signature

Address: Tel: Age:

eta nce a ttnt
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Available At All Solomon’s Mines Locations.





a eT Ak NRE el oo we we et ee te



PAGE 6C, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





‘We must protect those



By PETURA BURROWS
_ Tribune Feature Writer

here is a tendency to get
involved in much late-
night entertainment at
Spring Break. Some-
times it gets out of hand,
then violent, and the safety of the
partygoer becomes an issue.

With thousands of students from
various parts of the US and other
countries expected to spend their
Spring Break in the Bahamas, police
are calling for Bahamians to protect
this segment of the tourist popula-
tion, and for spring breakers to pay
close attention to their safety.

New Providence in particular sees a
dramatic influx of visitors during this
period — from the last week in Febru-
ary to the first week in April.

According to press liaison officer,
Chief Supt Hulan Hanna, the police
are “obviously” concerned with the
students’ safety when they come to
the Bahamas for Spring Break.

Tourist

They are a part of the “tourist prod-
uct”, he says, and have come here
with the anticipation of having a good
time free of incident.

From the police’s standpoint, Supt
Hanna says that they are doing every-
thing they can to ensure that locals
who may be “inclined” to interfere
with and frustrate visitors are unable
to do so.

“We have invited these people to
our country by way of our marketing
system, by way of the Ministry of
Tourism’s promotional programmes,
and it would be a shame — a tremen-
dous shame — if they come here and
they are frustrated in their attempts to
enjoy themselves,” he told Tribune
Entertainment.

While their safety is a concern, their
behaviour, which Supt Hanna says
may become “rowdy” if they
overindulge in alcoholic beverages,
is also a concern for the police.

Senior officers have been instructed
to deal with these persons in a “firm
way”, but also in a way that will
“guarantee” that they continue having
fun.

“But if we see them getting into
mischief then it’s our mandate to dis-
courage that and to let them know
that there are laws,” he adds.

Damage

According to Supt Hanna, there
have also been cases in the past where
property owners have been concerned
about damage — to property, bed-
ding, infrastructure, and the inordi-
nate use and abuse of portable fire
extinguishers. However, he feels that
this type of behaviour has been
“scaled back”.

He attributes this to the “vigilance”
of the industry stake holders.

It may also be that various enter-
tainment groups and travel agents
have attracted more reserved spring
breakers.

“They have sought to steer us
towards a different market, down to
the kind of visitor that the country
can feel comfortable having during
Spring Break,” says Supt Hanna.

The US Department of State
Bureau’s Consular Affairs highlights

on its website (http://travel.state.gov)
, “Spring Break in the Bahamas”. It
points to various issues that prospec-
tive spring breakers should know
before coming to this country.

The advisory warns that most crim-
inal incidents take place in a part of
the city that is not usually frequented *
by tourists. However, it states that
crime and violence are increasingly

moving into the more “upscale”
tourist and residential areas.
Though the police in the Bahamas
make a “special effort” to increase
patrols and expand surveillance dur-
ing Spring Break, Consular Affairs
says that exercising caution and “good
judgement” will ultimately help to

ensure that the student’s stay in the
- Bahamas is a pleasant and safe one.

The vast majority of arrests, acci-
dents and violent crimes suffered by
US citizens in the Bahamas involve
alcohol, according to that organisa-
tion.

“Visitors found alone or incapaci-
tated have been victims of rape, rob-
bery and assault. Intoxicated young
women have been sexually assaulted
after reportedly being drugged,” it



4 NEW Providence in particular sees a dramatic influx of visitors during this period — from the last week in February to the first week in April.

tudents on Spring Break’

@ THOUSANDS of students
(pictured) from various parts of
the United States and other
countries are expected to
spend their Spring Break in the
=F: lar are oe

‘(The Tribune archive photo)



claims.

Consular Affairs advises US stu-
dents to know their “drinking com-
panions”, and stay in a group of
friends when in clubs, bars, out walk-
ing in deserted areas, or in a taxi at
night, which is good advice for any
spring breaker.

Supt Hanna says that the Bahamas
welcomes “the hundreds, the thou-
sands” of spring breakers to come
and spend their moneys, and to know
that the Bahamas is still a “very, very,
very” safe place.

Traditionally, alcohol consumption
is a major part of the Spring Break
holiday.

Supt Hanna says that if alcohol is
not the “key” contributor to many of
the problems that arise around this
time of year, it is “certainly a signifi-
cant contribution”.

Drinking

“These people would have been
studying for weeks, perhaps months,
and when you get out of school you
let your hair down and you want to
have a good time. Some people may
be binge drinking, others may just be
partying and frolicking. They feel
good while they are downing the sub-
stance, and later on, when it really
reacts they may find that they are
challenged in many ways,” says Supt
Hanna.

His advice to spring breakers: “We
encourage them if they are coming
to the Bahamas to be responsible.
And if they are in the company of
others who seem to be behaving in a
way that is going to be harmful to -
themselves, then to discourage that
kind of behaviour. They should enjoy
themselves, but in the same token do
not create a situation that will cause
harm to them and perhaps even
embarrassment.”

The Consular Affairs website also
notes that a number of Americans
have been killed or very seriously
injured in jet ski, and scooter acci-
dents — both popular activities for
spring breakers.





-THE TRIBUNE WEUNESVAY, MANUN 2, cuuvs, FAUE 1 U

ENTERTAINMENT

Usher and Keys dominate

2005 Soul Train Awards



Jury selection starting

in Lil’ Kim's trial eo
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' The Tribune



The Miami Herald

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005

YOUR WORLD-CLASS
BUSINESS DIRECTORY

IN PRINT AND ON-LINE

(www.bahamasgp.com

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Human rights violations

Bahamas slammed

in annual US report



ll By PACO NUNEZ |
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas was guilty of a
number of human rights viola-
tions in 2004, according to the
United States government.

The US State Department
has released its annual human
rights report on the Bahamas

for 2004, in Which it listed ~

reports of police brutality,
claims of unlawful killings by
officers, allegations of abuse at
the Carmichael Road Deten-
tion Centre and “harsh” prison
conditions.

Government officials were

yesterday unavailable for com-
ment on the report, while a
local human rights group sup-
ported the State Department’s
findings, calling human rights
in the Bahamas “abysmal.”
- The State Department report
also pointed to cases of arbi-
trary arrest and detention,
excessive pre-trial incarceration
for persons accused of crimes
and a iack of legal representa-
tion at trial for a large percent-
age of inmates.

It said that violence against
women in the Bahamas “con-
tinued to be a serious wide-
spread problem” throughout
2004, and that social discrimi-
nation against homosexuals
“was evident.”

The report detailed a num-
ber of specific allegations into
which inquiries are continuing,
including the 2002 shooting of a
16-year-old girl by police and
claims that a Grand Bahama
man was. handcuffed to a tree
and beaten by officers with a






















wo

metal pipe until he confessed
to acrime.
It said that during the course

of 2004, no progress was report-.-

ed concerning the investigations
into these incidents.

The report comes on the

heels of several statements by

Amnesty International last year.

complaining of human rights
abuses-in the Bahamas..

Grand Bahama Human
Rights Association President
Fred Smith said that there is
“nothing exaggerated” in the
State Department’s report.

“The record, of the Bahamas
in human rights is abysmal,” he
said.

He said the Bahamas contin-
ues to decline in human rights
on many levels.

“The judicial situation is dys-
functional, there is very little
respect for due process or
respect for the constitution,
there is arbitrary and unlawful
arrest and disrespect for the rule
of law,” he said. ,

Mr Smith said that discrimi-
nation in the Bahamas, “be it
as against women, be it as
against foreigners, as against
Haitians or as against any mem-
ber of society that thinks dif-
ferently, is the order of the
day.”

He said that Bahamians have
come to accept that foreigners
can be mistreated, that women
can be abused and that persons
can be incarcerated for up to
seven years while awaiting trial.

Mr Smith called the condi-
tions at Fox Hill “some of the

SEE page 11 ~















SPIRIT

= By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune. Staff_Reporter

POLICE admit that something went
“drastically wrong in security” when two
prisoners were able to escape what should
have been a secure area at the Magistrate’s
Court on Monday.

himself in as police launched an intense
investigation to determine how the escapes
occurred.

The two prisoners, 32-year-old Jan
Reckley of Elizabeth Estates, and Jason
Flowers, aged 20, of Roseville Avenue
were taken to the Magistrate’s on Court,
Nassau Street, for a remand hearing fol-
lowing their previous arraignments for
armed robbery and stealing.

Yesterday Flowers, accompanied by an
intermediary, turned himself into police.
He appeared in court yesterday charged
with escaping from lawful custody and
was remanded back into custody.

Reckley remained on the run yesterday





a

RAR LIN ES

PRLIN ES

Prisoner charged with
escaping lawful custody

Bi JASON FLOWERS (red shirt) is escorted to court yesterday.



One of the two prisoners yesterday turned

_ Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)

and is considered to be armed and
extremely dangerous. He is described as
having dark brown eyes, black hair and a
brown complexion.

According to eye-witnesses the incident
happened at 1.30pm when the men were

_left unattended in the police bus.

The bus was parked at the compound
between the Nassau Street Police Station
and the Magistrate's Courts on Nassau
Street. The eye-witnesses claimed that the
men jumped out of the bus window and
made their escape.

Yesterday, Chief Supt Hulan Hanna,
said police are “bedeviled” at how the
incident happened. He said the area
around the courts is certainly supposed
to be a very secure area. He said there
were a number of factors leading to the
escape for which at the moment, they do
not have the answers. He said this includ-
ed why the men were not guarded or
shackled, which is often done when pris-

SEE page 11









Abaco.
The project, called Pa

ment’s

son said yesterday.

be completed by 2010.
It is expected that a

gramme.

training at the developer

SEE page 11

@ By RUPERT
MISSICK Jr

ceedings against the

signed yesterday bet

group’s lawyer Fred
Smith told The Tribun

SEE page 11

$400 million
development
deal signed

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Senior Staff Reporter

GOVERNMENT yesterday
signed the Heads of Agreement
for a $400 million development
project on Great Guana Cay,

sserine

of Abaco, is a part of govern-
commitment
strengthen the second-home
industry of the Bahamas, Finan-
cial Services and Investment
Minister Allyson Maynard-Gib-

to

The phased construction of
the project will employ some
200 people and is scheduled to

similar

number will be employed on a
full time basis when the resort is
finished, some of whom also will
be included in an on-the-job
training and apprenticeship pro-

The programme will involve

°s Over-

seas projects in the United

States, Hawaii and Mexico.
The development will com-

prise a 240-slip marina. with

TIA
residents group

MISMO Te
Celireontall

Senior Staff Reporter

THE Save Guana Cay
Reef lobby will bring pro-

gov-

ernment to declare the $400
million heads of agreement,

ween

government and the devel-
opers of the Passerine at
- Abaco project “void, illegal
and of no effect”,

the
erick
e yes-



Nassau)
hae heey

PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





Murder accused’s former

@ By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE former girlfriend of
the man accused of a double
murder in Pinewood Gardens
in 2002 took the stand in the
Supreme Court yesterday, tes-
tifying that the accused Basil
Fitzgerald Gordon had threat-
ened to kill her.

Rochelle Wilson told the
jury, being presided over by
Justice Anita Allen, that her
ex-boyfriend told her he
would kill her if she tried to
leave him or if he ever saw
her with another man.

When asked by the jury,
through Justice Allen, why

PRERS SAT REG

she did not tell anyone about
the threats, she said she did
not take them seriously.

Gordon’s trial went into day
two yesterday. He is charged
with the murders of Rochelle
Wilson’s grandmother, Ros-
nell Newbold, and her broth-
er, Kevin Wilson, who both
died on June 16, 2002.

Family

The house was full at the
time of their deaths, the court
heard. Ms Wilson’s father,
mother and other family
members were in their rooms

at the time. Her grandmother .

was found lying on the front
room floor, and her brother



‘was found on the kitchen |

floor.

She told the court that prior
to their deaths, there was little
interaction between the vic-
tims and the accused, but they
sometimes answered the tele-

phone when he called. Her

father, she added, had talked
with Gordon on several occa-
sions and there were never
any ill-feelings between them.

Rochelle Wilson said she

had tried to get away from |

him because “he had a terrible
temper on him”. She told the
court that the accused “would
always say what he was going

to do” whenever he saw her.

Police

She called the police and
had him escorted from her
home. However, he continued
to call. Through further ques-
tioning, it was discovered that
Rochelle Wilson continued to
talk to Basil Gordon by tele-

_ phone. When asked why she

continued to talk to him, she
answered: “Even if I did not
take the calls, the phone

, would be ringing off the

hook”.

Ms Wilson also told the
court that she had no need to
complain about the harass-
ment because “everyone knew
about it; every time the phone

. rang, it was him”.

Gordon’s former co-work-
er, Rodriguez Skippings, said

‘that on June 15, 2002, he had

given Gordon a ride home

from the job site at Bahamas ~

Waste Management.
“He looked normal after a
hard day’s work. I dropped

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him off at the corner. (to his
home) and he took his belong-
ings off the back of the truck,”
he told the court.

Witness

The final witness during
Tuesday’s proceedings was the

. investigating officer, Kimroy

Ferguson.

He described the bloody
scene at the Wilson home on
1892 Spice Street.

said a struggle appeared

-to have happened in the

home.

He said there were several
footprints leading to and from
the bodies.

He said he had observed
droplets of blood in the area
in front of the kitchen door,
on the driveway, and the fence

* surrounding the home.

Both bodies, he said, were
taken to the accident and
emergency section of the

girlfriend testifies in court

where they were pronounced
dead on arrival.

On Tuesday, June 18, Gor-
don was questioned by officer
Ferguson.

The detective said he
noticed that Gordon had been
treated for an injury to his left
pinkie finger.

The suspect denied being at
the Wilson home that night.or
during the early morning
hours, and he.also denied any
knowledge of the killings. The
trial continues today.

Detective 2217 Ferguson



m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - A Supreme Court jury on
Monday evening found Jonathan Davis, the
father of two, not guilty of murder, but guilty of
manslaughter by provocation in the death of
taxicab driver Robert Nelson Pratt.

An eight-woman, four-man jury delivered
the verdict after deliberating for two hours.

Davis, who was charged with murder, was
accused of killing Pratt on September 1, 2000 at
| Illyria Road and Aerial Place in Arden For-
est.

It was alleged that he hit Pratt in the head
with a large stone fracturing his skull. Justice
+ Jon Isaacs presided over the trial.

Prosecutor Joyann Ferguson-Pratt appeared
on behalf of the Crown and Simeon Brown
- tepresented the accused.

The jury heard the testimonies of 15 to 16
prosecution witnesses and three witnesses balled
by the defence.

Defence

-’ Davis, who took the stand in his own defence,
told jurors that he did not mean to kill Pratt and
that he was only defending himself.

He testified that on the date in question he
was intoxicated when he engaged the services of
the deceased, who instead on taking him home,
took him to an area in the Arden Forest. |

attacked by Pratt, whom he knew to be a homo-
sexual. As they were fighting, he picked up a
stone and hit him twice in the head out of self

‘defence.
In her summation, Mrs Ferguson-Pratt urged

accused or prejudice against the deceased
because of his sexual preference.

. “Qne’s sexual preference does not give any-
one the right to take a life,” she said, explaining
that it is God who gives life and takes it away.

She said Davis, who was a professional box-

Jonathan Davis found guilty of
manslaughter by provocation

Davis said he was sexually assaulted and .

- the deceased due to provocation.

jurors not to be persuaded by sympathy for the .






er.and lived as a tenant at the home of the
deceased and his mother manly years ago, inten-
tionally caused the death of Pratt by using
unreasonable force when he hit the deceased in
the head with a stone as he pleaded on the
ground for his life.

“He could have walked away; he made a
poor choice and he must be accountable for
what he did,” she said.

Simeon Brown, however, told jurors that his
client was only acting out of self defence, which
is the right of every citizen under the law.

He then asked jurors if the situation would
have been any different if his client were a
woman.

“If this had happened to a woman wouldn’t
she be defending herself,” he said.

“He was fighting for his life; fighting for his
integrity as a man — a married man with two
children,” stressed Mr Brown.

In his summation to the jury, Justice Isaacs
advised jurors that if they believed the prose-
cution’s case that Davis intentionally caused
the death of Pratt by unlawful harm, they must
bring back a unanimous guilty verdict for mur-
der.

“The burden of proof rests on the Crown. If
you have reasonable doubt to any aspect of
the Crown’s case, doubt must be given to the
accused,” he said. -

“Additionally, he told them if they accept the
defence case of the self defence, they must also
acquit the accused of murder.

Justice Isaacs told jurors that they may also
find the accused guilty of manslaughter if they
believed that the accused caused the death of




























After deliberating for two hours, jurors found
Davis not guilty of murder, but guilty of
manslaughter.

Justice Isaacs thanked the jurors for their
service.

Simeon Brown requested that a_probationary
report be conducted on his client before sen-
téncing. Justice Isaac remanded Davis to cus-
tody until sentencing on March 21.











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@ PRIME Minister Perry Christie travelled to Jamaica on Sunday to celebrate ‘Bahamas Week’
with Bahamian students at the Mona Campus, University of the West Indies in Kingston.

The prime minister had promised the students, who had been airlifted home to safety from hur-
ricanes, that he would visit them this week. Bahamian students from other institutions in Jamaica
also attended the event. Mr Christie was accompanied by Foreign Minister Fred Mitchell,
Tourism Minister Obie Wilchcombe and Transport and Aviation Minister Glenys Hanma-Mar-
tin.

The prime minister returned to Nassau on Monday.

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THE TRIBUNE
















Apology for
publication of
photograph

THE Tribune pub-
lished this photograph
yesterday to illustrate
an article on adoles-
cent problems in
young girls.

The people in the
photograph were in no
way connected to the
contents of the article.

The photograph was
published as the result
of an editorial error.
The Tribune apologis-
es for any embarrass-
ment or inconvenience
caused to the families
involved.



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005, PAGE 3



@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter




FREEPORT - Grand Bahama
police are investigating the death of
a 42-year-old man who was force-
fully removed from the Isle of
Capri Casino by security officers
several weeks ago.

Simeon McIntosh, of Lewis
Yard, who was airlifted to Princess
Margaret Hospital with serious
neck injuries, died around 12.15am
on Tuesday.



about 2.40am on February 5, police
received a telephone call from the
Isle of Capri casino security office
reporting a disturbance at their
property.

Officers at the Port Lucaya
pdlice station immediately respond-


















Two hundred flock

to citizenship

@ By KILAH ROLLE
Tribune Staff Reporter

OPINIONS flared during a
debate on who ought to be a
Bahamian citizen during a town
meeting on Monday evening
after a large group of Bahami-
ans defended their right to citi-

‘zenship and cried out for a solu-

tion to illegal immigration.
About 200 people filled the
St Agnes schoolroom on Mar-
ket Street for the meeting,
which began with remarks from
three panelists known for their
research and expertise on the
issue of Bahamian citizenship.
Most of what was said, how-

“ever, came from the audience,,.

who after brief remarks from
the panelists, had the chance to
pose questions of their own.
People jumped from their seats
and formed a long line to await
an opportunity to ask questions.

Many of the questions were
not directed at any panelists,
but all seemed to share a sense
of urgency and helplessness,
reflected in the most popular
question of the night: "How do
we stop the illegal immigrants
from coming here?"

Influx

One man in the audience
compared the influx of immi-
grants, of various nationalities,
as a patient suffering from a
critical gunshot wound.

"In any emergency room, the
first thing a medical team would
do would be to stabilise the
patient," he said, "well our
country feels like it is being shot
and we need stabilisation."

Panelist Dr Gilbert Morris,
author and economist, argued
that stabilisation can only occur
in the Bahamas after Haiti itself
is stabilised.

He said in a proposal submit-
ted to the Bahamian govern-
ment that he suggested that it is
in the interest of the United
States to allow the Bahamas to
take a lead role in offering a
solution since the Bahamas is
so affected by Haitians attempt-
ing to escape their country.

He suggested the Bahamas
appeal to the United States for
financial backing to help apply
towards a number of pro-
grammes aimed at limiting
Haitian migration.

Elections

Dr Morris rejected the idea
of democratic elections in Haiti
and said it has proven to be a
process leading to further vio-
lence in the country.

Instead, he said the focus
should be put on basic medical
aid and education in Haiti.

Some Bahamians attending
the town meeting were not
moved by the suggestions. One
person told the panelists that
their "legal talk seems like a
bunch of pretty words to ordi-
nary Bahamians."

"What it seems like is after
all this talk is that the issue of
law enforcement seems to be
mercy first - law later," said one
concerned man.

A Haitian who has gained
Bahamian citizenship through
naturalisation expressed to The
Tribune the feelings he experi-
enced during the meeting.

"I can tell that Bahamians are
angry and want something
done, but nothing is going to

debate









SSNS



held in almost every inhabited
island over the past year as a
part of research for recommen-
‘dations to make to government
on constitutional changes,
specifically regarding citizen-
ship.

The four-man commission
responsible for the recommen-
dations is called the Constitu-
tional Review Committee, co-
chaired by Paul Adderley.

Mr Adderley said it is the
commission's hope "at the end

change unless men like me stop
risking their lives for freedom,"
said the young Haitian man.

"Believe me, men will not
stop doing that unless they can
have a chance to earn a living
like a man, and provide for their
family, that is our culture. Men
would rather face death than
live a life of no hope. If the sit-
uation was reversed, I guaran-
tee you Bahamian men would
be doing all they can to reach
Haitian shores."

devil worshippers; they are
uncontrollable breeders; and
they are changing Bahamian
culture.

"The Bahamas would not
exist were it not for the work
and labour of migrants, of all
nationalities," said Dr Strachan.
"T think Bahamians have a lot
to learn from the work ethics
of Haitian nationals. Just what is
a Bahamian work ethic anyway
and do we still believe in an
honest day's work and an hon-

Panelist Dr Ian Strachan, pro- est day's pay?" of the day" to draft a provi-
fessor at the College of the . sional recommendation to the Her Pores's
Bahamas, said he believed any- Questions ‘government but not before they Diary ofa Mad Black Woman
‘one born in the Bahamas publish constitutional changes

should be made a citizen and
that an injustice is being done to
the children whose parents
come here illegally.

He said he does not believe
the stories that are circulating in

The two-hour meeting end- for the Bahamian people
ed with many questions still informing them of the propos-
unasked by many frustrated © als.

Bahamians who shouted out "At the end of the day our
that there needs to be more | recommendations will be your
time committed to dialogue recommendations," Mr Adder-
the country about Haitiansand with increased media _ ley told the audience, "that is
many accusations are unfound- _exposure. why we are taking so long but
ed. The third panelist, former we believe that it is such an

He mentioned several myths Attorney General Paul Adder- important issue in the Bahamas
about Haitians, including the ley, said that the discussions and and hopefully at the end of the
claim they are violent and bring exchange of opinion is along day we will submit changes to
a criminal element to the and laborious process but essen- the government that the vast
Bahamas; they exploit and use tial for change in the future. majority of the country agrees
Bahamian resources; they are Town meetings have been with and understands."

FROM MY &

BECAUSE OF WINN-DIXIE



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ed and found a man who gave his
name as Simeon McIntosh lying
on the pavement. The man
appeared to be intoxicated.

Mr Rahming said the casino
supervisor told police that the man
was on the premises harassing
guests and was warned to leave.

After he refused to comply, they
had to forcefully remove him from
the casino as he resisted violently.

An ambulance was summoned
and McIntosh was transported to
Rand Memorial Hospital, where
he was detained.

It was discovered that he had
sustained serious neck injuries and
he was airlifted to New Providence,
where he died.

Supt Rahming said an autopsy
would be held to determine the
cause of death.





































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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt .

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

All children have right to education

A MEMO THAT has been sent from gov-
ernment’s Planning and Research Develop-
ment Unit to all public school principals
requiring them on registration of students to
find out their nationality is causing some con-
cern, and in the Haitian community a great
deal of fear.

The letter says that the Ministry of Educa-
tion has.“to collect information on the nation-
ality of students enrolled in our education
system.” This information, it says, “enables
the Ministry to plan and implement appro-
priate policies and programmes, which meet
the needs of all of our students”.

As a result the Ministry “has embarked
on a national data collection initiative to
gather information on student enrolment by
nationality”.

The school administrators were asked to
complete a Student Nationality Survey Form,
which was attached, with the request that
only students’ official nationality status be
reported.

The administrators were told that the pos-
session of a Bahamian passport was to be
the criterion used. It emphasised that a birth

certificate alone did not determine Bahami- .

an nationality.

. However, if a Bahamian student does not
have a passport, which many of them won’t
have, then the following criteria will deter-
mine Bahamian nationality:

e If both parents are Bahamians.

° Child of an unwed Bahamian mother,
even if the father is a foreigner.

e Child whose parents are married, but
mother is a foreigner (father must be Bahami-
an).

- We pause here to remind our readers that
children of an unwed Bahamian mother have
more rights than the children of a Bahamian
mother who is legally married. In Bahamian
law the child’s nationality follows the father,
not both parents, thereby eliminating the
Bahamian mother, and smiling on illegiti-
macy.

As the end of its second term of office
neared, the Ingraham government supervised
a referendum to remove this discrimination

against married Bahamian women. The —

Christie government in Opposition opposed
the proposal, and aggressively and success-
fully campaigned to defeat it.

Itis hoped that this government will even-
tually see the error of its ways, and move

swiftly to remove this disgraceful impedi-

ment to women’s rights.
But to return to the memo sent to the
schools. Nowhere does the memo say that
‘ only Bahamian students are to be enrolled, or

that children of foreign parents, legal or ille- :

gal, should be. denied entry.
However, already reports are coming in

that this document is the first step towards.

emptying the schools of foreign nationals

_ whose parents’ status might be in question.

And already some school administrators are
interpreting the survey to mean just that.

In discussing the decision to give his teach-
ers Creole instructions to help them better
assist their Creole-speaking students,
Carmichael Primary School principal Albert
Clarke said that once Haitian students are
in here ijegally it is his obligation to educate
them.

“Once they can produce the legal docu-
ment, like a birth certificate, or a travel doc-
ument, as an administrator, I am obligated to
register those students and see that they get
a proper education.”

Although we commend Mr Clarke on his
school’s initiative to have his teachers learn
Creole, he is completely wrong on his inter-
pretation of which students he is obliged to
educate.

Mr Clarke is probably unaware that the
Bahamas is one of 192 countries that ratified
the international Rights of the Child Con-
vention.

On November 20, 1989 governments rep-
resented at the UN General Assembly agreed
to adopt the Convention into international

law. It became legally binding in September

1990.

This was the first time that the rights of
every child were spelled out “regardless of
where born or to whom, regardless of sex,
religion, or social origin. The body of rights
enumerated.in the Convention are he rights
of ali children everywhere.”

That Convention permits of no dvcrink
nation against any child. Under this Con-
vention, the Bahamas is obligated to give
equal education to all children 18 years and

‘under who inhabit these islands. — legal or
illegal. And so Mr Clarke’s obligation is to
educate all children regardless of what pass-
port they carry or don’t carry. They have
only to present themselves at the school door,
and Mr Clarke has to take them in. Already
between 30 to 40 per cent of the students at
Carmichael Primary are of Haitian descent.

_. It is government’s duty to regularise the
status of their parents, a duty ignored for so
many years that the country is now in a chaot-
ic muddle.

Already the Bahamas is béing accused of
human rights breaches. No one wants the
denial of children’s rights to be yet another
black mark against this country’s name.



Public Utilities Commission

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The rapid evolution of the telecommunications sector combined with novel approaches to
regulating the sector has made it mandatory for the Public Utilities Commission (PUC) to
strengthen its capacity in regulatory economic analyses.

The Job»?

The successful applicant for the position will provide specialist advice on the economic
and financial performance of regulated utilities. He will also work as an integral part of a
multi-disciplinary team of professionals to ensure effective oversight by the PUC of the
various providers of utility services in The Bahamas. The candidate will perform market
research and other economic studies relevant to the current and future development of
the telecommunications, electricity, and water and sewerage sectors in The Bahamas.

Training ??

The candidate will be trained to carry out economic and financial analyses involving
market research, and changes in price setting methodologies. This specialist training will
be offered principally via short courses and seminars in The Bahamas and overseas.

Qualifications»

fa) Bachelor's Degree in Economics or Economics and Accounting; and
{b) Master's Degree in Economics, or Finance; and
{c) Minimum of five (5) years relevant experience.

Remuneration?»

The PUC offers a very attractive benefits package and excellent opportunities for further
development. Starting salary will be commensurate with relevant experience. Further
information about the PUC could be obtained from our website

at: WWW. a Peraneamise soaks:

Applications should be received by if March, 2005.

The musical
genius of
Bob Marley

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THIS month of February
has been designated Black
History month and acknow!-
edgments of the heroes who

- contributed to better the lives

of those of African descent
are being observed. One such
hero who made a difference
in the struggle for justice is

- the legendary Jamaican-born

reggae superstar, Robert
“Nesta Marley”. On Febru-
ary 6, 2005, Bob Marley
would have celebrated his
60th birthday. However, this
year his birthday was
observed with much contro-
versy as there was the
announcement by his widow
Rita that the body. of Bob
Marley would be exhumed
and reburied in Ethiopia, his
spiritual home. This contro-
versy reflects the kind of life
that Bob Marley lived.

Yes, he was a Jamaican
national hero having received
the Order of Merit Award,
Jamaica’s highest civilian
honour, but the possibility of
a relocation demonstrates
that his accomplishments
extended far beyond the bor-
ders of Jamaica. Under-
standably, Jamaicans are jeal-
ously guarding their -native
son, but the fact is Bob Mar-
ley is a world hero. Bob Mar-
ley was a “Universal Man!”
When one looks at the
Caribbean, other than Fidel
Castro, Bob Marley is proba-
bly the best known. Twenty-
four years after his early
death, Bob Marley is as pop-
ular today, if not more so,
than he was wher he died.

Bob Marley had long
earned the reputation as a
musical genius. He was to
music what William Shake-
speare was to literature. In
his short time on this earth,
his music had gone to all four
corners of the earth. In 1979
while a student at George-
town University in Washing-
ton, DC, I met a fellow stu-
dent from North Yemen, an

isolated country on the Ara-

bian peninsula with a Marxist
dictatorship government.
When I inquired of this stu-
dent if he had ever heard of
Bob Marley, not only did he
reply in the affirmative, but
he also had in‘his possession
almost the entire collection
of Bob Marley’s music.
What separated Bob Mar-
ley from the rest wasn’t just

LETTERS

letters@trlbunemedia.net






the music, but the meaning
of the music. Bob Marley’s
music was the hope of the

downtrodden, the oppressed, -

the victims of injustice and a
system manipulated. by
crooked and corrupt individ-
uals whose only god and sal-
vation was the almighty dol-
lar. His music was the con-
science of man in the plight of
man’s inhumanity against
man. He told people to “get
up and stand up for their
rights!” Bob Marley, like Sis-
ter Teresa of Calcutta had a
caring concern of those dis-
placed by war or suffering
from hunger and were forced
to exodus in a world where
“only the fittest of the fittest
will survive!”

Then there were those who
would sell their talents to the
highest bidder without any
thought of human dignity.
These Judases or mercenaries
were justly condemned by
Bob Marley, Governments
that would sell out their coun-
try’s pride for “guns, spare
parts and money” were just
as evil as those who took
advantage and exploited the
misery of third world coun-
tries. The system of colonial-
ism so much a part of
Caribbean history was a great
tragedy. Unparalleled in the
history of mankind was the
slave trade and that one way
voyage aboard “pirate ships”
that uprooted and forcefully
transported millions of
Africans across the middle
passage to a life of a living
hell. These atrocities were
carried out with the full bless-
ing and blind approval of

“many churches, governments

and learned men. This “suck-
ing the blood of the suffer-
ers” is referred to as “Baby-
lon” and reminds us of the
way the people of Israel were
treated when they were taken
captive to the city of Baby-
lon in the book of Psalms.
Bob Martey’s music is
based on the philosophy of
life. It emphasis the princi-
ples of biblical teaching with

‘the expectation that on the

day when the final trumpet
sounds and everyone is sum-
moned to give account, that
good would triumph over evil

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. Nations,

as in the book of Revelations.

Unlike some of his prede-
cessors such as Malcolm X
and Marcus Garvey who were

- seeking justice for the black

man, Bob Marley like Dr
Martin Luther King believed
that ALL oppression must
end. Following in the -foot-
steps of Marcus Garvey who
prophesied the crowning of a
child African king to unite
Africa, Bob Marley’s praise
of wisdom for Haile Selassie
of Ethiopia, a direct descen-
dant of King Solomon was
the cry for freedom for the
black man.

Ironically, Ethiopia was the
victim of colonial genocide as
an unprovoked war with Italy
resulted in tens of thousands
of Ethiopians dying from
chemical weapons and other
weapons of mass destruction.
When addressing the world
body called the League of
Haile Selassie
reminded the world that
“until the philosophy which
holds one race superior and
another inferior is finally and
totally. abandoned and dis-
credited....we’ll have war!”

For Bob Marley, without
unity there can be no
progress to end conflicts.
With pre-election violence in
Jamaica in the 1970s, in an
effort to end the violence,
Bob Marley staged a “One
Love” concert where he
brought Edward Seaga and ,
Michael Manley, leaders of —
the two major political par-
ties to hold hands on stage.
For his efforts he was reward-
ed with a bullet to the chest in

n “ambush in the night” as
someone tried to assassinate
him.

Despite his well intended
motives, either out of igno-
rance or prejudice, Bob Mar-
ley was misunderstood by far
too many, many who voiced
disapproval of his ritual
smoking of “ganga” while
meditating and associated it
with the criminal element.
When questioned by a Cana-
dian reporter about this and
what people thought about it,
he coolly replied, “that these
are the same people who cru-
cified Jesus Christ!” In a later
interview, when reference
was made to the tens of mil-
lions of dollars’ he had
amassed due to the success
of his music if he was a rich
man, he rhetorically ask the
question “does money make
you rich?” The problem with
the world is that our priorities
are in the wrong place.

In 1977, Bob Marley under
much ignorant protest did a
performance in Nassau.
Nowhere else was the criti-
cism more bold than what
came from the Bahamas
Christian Council. They felt
that his performance would
lead to lawlessness, drug
abuse, lack of respect for oth-
ers, etc.

Indeed for those who knew
better, nothing could be fur-
ther from the truth.

In the 1984 Commission of
Inquiry investigating drug
smuggling, corruption, etc in
the Bahamas, Bob Marley’s
name was never called as hav-
ing contributed to this tragic
state of affairs in the
Bahamas. Only greedy,
uncaring and selfish persons,
some with high administra-
tive positions in the Bahamas
were blamed.

Undoubtedly, long after his
spirit flew away to Zion, the
legend of Bob Marley will
live on for a long time.
Recently, I had the opportu-
nity to attend a “Root, Rock,
Reggae” concert that fea-
tured Ziggy, Stephen and
Damien Marley. Clearly,
these dynamic Performers
inspired by their father con-
tinue to carry out Jah’s work
to the fullest.

DR LEATENDORE
PERCENTIE, DDS
Boston,
Massachusetts,
February 14, 2005.
THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005, PAGE 5



Ore
youn} ie

Suv ODUE

BPMcrele

By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff
Reporter

A NEW luxury class
airline begins its Fort
Lauderdale/Nassau ser-
vice today, offering a
non-stop 45 minute flight
between the two destina-
tions.

Celebrating its inaugur-
al flight, the Fly First
Class airline will launch
its service with official
ceremonies this after-
noon at Nassau Interna-
tional Airport as well as
with a cocktail party in
Fort Lauderdale.

Fly First Class, a jet
service division of the
Florida-based Premier Jet
Corporation, flying Boe-
ing 737 Executive config-
ured aircraft outfitted
with 54-all-leather first-
class seats, will offer trav-
ellers such amenities as
champagne and a "three
free" baggage allowance.

Vacation

The Ministry of
Tourism stated that a ser-
vice such as the one Fly
First Class offers, will
meet the needs of the
more high-end visitor,
catering to tourists who
vacation on exclusive
properties on Paradise
‘sland and the Family
Islands.

"Not only do we have
upscale properties on
Paradise Island, like the
One and Only Ocean
club, we now also have
Four Seasons on Exuma.
Obviously they (Fly First
Class) are responding to
the demands of the mar-
ket," Deputy Director of
Tourism Vernice Walkine
told The Tribune.

Demand

Robert Masson, Presi-

dent of Fly First Class
said that he anticipates.a
great demand for the air-
line's service, "as we
offer the only first class
jet service from Fort —
Lauderdale into Nassau
at prices comparable to
coach fares."

"The Bahamas are a
hot destination for fish-
ing, diving, gaming and
business. Fly First Class is
perfect for the discerning
leisure and business trav-
eller," he said.

Together with the
recently introduced low-
cost carriers, such as Spir-
it Airlines, Song and Jet-
Blue, it is hoped that the
different airlines will be
able to access the various
sectors of the tourism
market.



Ry 3 rm f WT Sa
iiare TAAL

ot Pe Cue U eae
- 822. 257



Sean

“WEDNESDAY |

MARCH 2
2:00am Community Pg 1540AM
8:00 Bahamas@Sunrise

Cybernet

Treasure Attic

This Generation

Kids On The Move
Immediate Response
ZNS News Update - Live
Caribbean News Update
Immediate Response
Caribbean News Update
Ethnic Health America
This Generation
Caribbean News Update
Gospel Video Countdown
Treasure Attic

CMJ Club Zone
Thousand Dollar Bee
Kids On The Move

ZNS News Update - Live
Caribbean Newsline
Inside Hollywood

One Cubed -

News Night 13

Bahamas Tonight

‘ Arawak Homes
Prescription For Health:
Prostate Cancer
Westwood Park

News Night 13

Bahamas Tonight
Immediate Response
Community Pg. 1540AM -



| for government act

US sonar testing in the Bahamas

@ By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas government
must act to protect marine
mammals in response to the
US administration’s rejection
of international attempts to
restrict sonar testing, environ-
mental group ReEarth said.

The use of active sonar in
US Navy manoeuvers is
thought by some scientists to
be responsible for marine
mammal strandings and deaths
in a number of countries
including the Bahamas.

Sam Duncombe, president
of ReEarth, told The Tribune
that it is important that the
Bahamas government recog-
nises the relevant “body of sci-
ence” and create appropriate
regulations for the use of sonar
in Bahamian waters.

Opposing

Mrs Duncombe was
responding to a Washington
Post report on Monday, which
announced that the US gov-
ernment is “strongly opposing
international efforts to restrict
the Navy's use of active sonar
anywhere in the world, putting
it at odds with European allies

_and several key ocean-protec-

tion organisations.”

Strandings near Navy sonar
manoeuvers in Hawaii, Wash-
ington state,
Islands, Greece and the
Bahamas have drawn the
attention of scientists, accord-
ing to the report.

It also pointed out that the
Navy admitted responsibility
for a mass stranding of whales
in the Bahamas in 2000.

The report said that
although some US officials and
non-governmental organisa-

the Canary

tions recognise the “link
between the mass strandings
of whales and nearby naval use
of sonar,” the US position on
the matter “puts national secu-
rity first.”

Sonar is used by the Navy
to locate potential enemy ves-
sels and to detect underwater
mines.

Military

According to the report, the
new policy states that the US
“strongly opposes any interna-
tional regulatory framework
addressing military use of
active sonar because of the
potential to restrict the ability
of individual states to balance
the relevant security and envi-
ronmental interests.” :

It said that US officials did
not confirm the contents of the
new policy, but that Defence
and State Department officials
as well as officials from the
National Oceanic and Atmos-
pheric Administration “did not
dispute its contents and con-
clusions.”

Mrs Duncombe said it is up
to members of the public in all
countries, including the
Bahamas “to tell all govern-
ments what we will put up with
and what we will not.”

She pointed out that now is

a critical time for the Bahami- _

an public in particular to make
themselves heard, as govern-
ment is currently in the process
of formulating a proposal for a
Marine Mammal Act for the
protection of whales and dol-
phins in the Bahamas.
According to the Washing-
ton Post report, as a result of
studies conducted by scientific
bodies including the Interna-
tional Whaling Commission,
which supported “the link



KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED )

Established 1950



between active sonar and
whale deaths last year, the
European Union began to
move toward a tightening of
restrictions on sonar use.”

It said that scientists have
put forward “several theories
about how the sonar might be
harming whales. Some believe
it ruptures their sensitive ears,
while others say it scares
them and causes ultimately
















Hi By DENISE MAYCOCK

States.

Robin Kobacker.

Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - The Bahamas Marine Mam-
mal Conservation Institute (BMMCT]) will com- °
mence a research programme to study the
integrity and bio-dynamics of the marine mam-
mal populations in the Bahamas.

The organisation, which officially initiated
the programme on Tuesday evening at the
Hawksbill Yacht Club in Freeport, has obtained
approval from the Bahamas government and is
applying for tax exempt status in the United

The objective of the programme is to imple-
ment effective conservation policies to ensure
the continuing viability of mammal populations.

The BMMCTI board of directors is comprised
of local veterinarian Dr Alan Bater, John Bad-
ham, Paul Mockler, Christopher Allison and

The Bahamas government is presently draft-
ing a Marine Mammal Protection Act, which

fatal beachings.

“Still others think it-causes
deep-diving whales in particu-
lar to swim to the surface too
quickly, causing a kind of
marine mammal version of the
bends,” the report said.

Sonar testing in Bahamian
waters is conducted by the US
Navy’s Atlantic Undersea
Testing and Evaluation Cen-
tre (AUTEC) located in

Research programme
to study the nation’s
marine mammals

inadequate and does nothing in terms of the
protection and conservation of dolphins in the
wild. Instead, she said, it gives “greedy” busi-
nessmen good graces to capture dolphins for

money.

entire group.

Ms Duncombe supports non-invasive
research methods that are observational, and
involves the use of swabs, collection of faeces

While Ms Duncombe supports mammal
research, she is opposed to invasive research
methods that may be harmful to mammals.

Teeth

Ms Duncombe said dolphins captured for
research are subjected to invasive research tnat
involves extraction of teeth to determine their
age, and skin scraping.

“When a dolphin is captured it is. six times
more likely to die in captivity,” she said.

Because dolphins and mammals swim in pods,
she'stressed that capturing one could disrupt the

Andros.

In a 2001 article in Science
magazine, researchers estab-
lished a link between marine
mammal strandings and the
testing of Low Frequency
Active Sonar (LFAS) con-
ducted by means of Surveil-
lance Towed Array Sensor
System (SURTASS).

This is one of the systems
used by AUTEC.





has been harshly criticised by local and inter-
national environmental groups.
Sam Duncombe of ReEarth said the Act i is

and photography for identity.
“As long as it is done respectfully it is good
thing,” she said.




P.O. Box N-1222, 22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

PT isa ee Te

MRS KITTY
LAWRENCE

of Nassau, The.
Bahamas, will be held
at St. Andrew’s
Presbyterian Kirk,
Princes’ Street,
Nassau, on Thursday,
3rd March, 2005 at


















goes out to

AND

6:00 p.m.




officiate.




- Lawrence.

Reverend Charles A. Sweeting will

She is survived by her husband, Howard;
two sons, Graham and Andrew; two
daughters-in-law, Christine and Sheelagh;
five grandchildren, Christopher, Kathryn,
Matthew, Jennifer and Stephanie; one
grand daughter-in-law, Carolina; two great-
grandchildren, Caitlin and Luke; two
sisters, Margaret and Winifred; one
brother-in-law, Dennis and numerous
nieces and nephews.

Instead of flowers the family request that
donations be sent to The Bahamas Heart
Association, P.O. Box N-8189, Nassau,
The Bahamas in memory of Mrs. Kitty




























“ANNOUNCEMENT

BAHAMAS PLASTIC SURGERY
Gregory C. Neil, M.D.
Board certified
Plastic & Reconstructive Surgeon
Surgery of the Hand

The regularly scheduled Plastic Surgery Clinic will be held in
FREEPORT
on Saturday March Sth, 2005 at Lucayan Medical Center West
from 9:00am - 11:00am &
Sunrise Medical Center
from 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Please call (242) 356-3189 or the preferred clinic to schedule
or confirm appointments.




BASTIAN

Prom ui
VE Ua

Greetings coming from
Jamal; daughter Edneisha; family and friends.

shi x #88 BAsRe

aye eher ewe

° Daily éxcess Baggage cick
from Miami te Nassau
e Upto 50% cheaper than the Airlines

e Convenient drop-off minutes from
| Miami Airport, (next to Budget Rent-A-Car)
4005 NW 28th St

© Collect your bags in the customs hall
at Nassau International Airport

Telephone: 341-6593 for more details
we Brought to you by


PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BRENDALEE FORBES, N-7365,
SOUTH BEACH, PONCIANA BLVD., NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
2ND day of MARCH, 2005 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that HELLEN DAMARIS GARCIAS
DIAS, ALEXANDRA BLV #131, NASSAU VILLAGE,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible



























as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 23rd day of
FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ATASHA DAVILMAR OF P.O.
BOX F-046040, SEAGRAPE, EIGHT MILE ROCK, GRAND
BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 23RD day of
FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister responsible for. Nationality
and Citizenship, RO.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KELVIN JOHNSON, PEACH
STREET, ROACH AVENUE, HOUSE NUMBER 30, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that-any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send’
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 23RD day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, Ree Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that SHELIA TOUSSAINT, MACKEY
STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for. Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 2ND day of MARCH,

2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and wean:
P.O.Box N-.7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

‘NOTICE is hereby given that ANDREW PIERRE CAMPBELL,
#22 YOUNG STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 2ND day of MARCH,
2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




































MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization |

Industrial Tribunal ‘should
pay cost of case proceedings’

@ By PAUL G.
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

SUPREME Court Justice
Claire Hepburn ruled on
Monday that the Bahamas
Industrial Tribunal should pay
the cost of the case proceed-
ings “for not following the
law” in its handling of the
Morton Salt and Bahamas

Industrial Manufacturers and
Allied Workers Union con-
tracts.

Agreement

Justice Hepburn stated that
the Tribunal acted improperly
when. it de-registered an
agreement signed by Morton
Salt and the Bahamas Indus-

Workers Union on May 27,
2004.

On November 7, 2002 the
union:and Morton Salt exe-
cuted an agreement that set
out the terms and conditions
by which both parties would
be governed. They concurred
that both the agreement of
November 7, 2002 and the
Supplemental Agreement of
June 5, 2003 must be regis-



‘ll By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

NORTH American Anglican Churches
have been asked to voluntarily withdraw their
members from the Anglican Consultative
Council for the period leading up to the next
Lambeth Conference.

This request was made at The Anglican

Northern Ireland which Anglican Archbish-
op Drexel Gomez attended along with: Arch-

nion. .

This request allows the Episcopal Church in
America and the Anglican Church of Cana-
da an opportunity to respond to the
questions that have been put to them by
the Windsor Report, noted Archbishop
Gomez.

Lifestyle

The Windsor Report asked that the Amer-
ican church express its regrets for ordaining
an openly gay Anglican priest to bishop; to
acknowledge that their action was a breech of
communion; to declare a moratorium on con-
secration of persons living a homosexual
lifestyle; a moratorium on same sex
blessings and. to provide a theological
rational to the ordination of an openly gay
priest.

On the other hand, the Canadian church
was asked to express regret over legitimizing
same sex blessings and to declare a morato-
rium on same sex blessings.

Archbishop Gomez said that this is not a



SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATION LOAN DIVISION

PUBLIC NOTICE

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE BAHAMAS

EDUCATIONAL GUARANTEE LOAN PROGRAM
Please be advised that new application forms for the Education Guarantee

Loan Program are now available. Application forms can be obtained from the
following locations between normal business hours. Application forms may

also be obtained from The Bahamas Ministry of Education website at

www.bahamaseducation.com

Nassau

Scholarship & Education Loan Division

Ministry of Education
Ground Floor
Thompson Boulevard

Grand Bahama
Scholarship Section
Ministry of Education
Kipling Building

Family Islands
ffice of the District Superintendent

Ministry of Education

trial Manufacturers and Allied

Archbishop Gomez:
no split within the
Anglican communion

Communion Primates' Meeting last week in.

bishops of the world-wide Anglican commu-






split within the Anglican communion.

“There is no split. What is happening, we
have a state of affairs in the communion in
which one area is teaching and doing some-
thing that the rest does not agree with. We are
simply, out of Christian charity, providing a
space and time for them to examine their
position and to report back. Relationships
have become strained, but we have not split
and there will be not split certainly before
the next Lambeth Conference in 2008,” he
said.












Supported




Archbishop Gomez added: “I supported it




very strongly because these two churches
have taken action that is contrary to opin-
ion of the vast majority within the world-
wide church. It is only fitting that they make
some token of expression: of paying the price
for.what they have done.”

The Anglican Communion Primates’ Meet-
ing Communiqué reads : “Within the ambit of
the issues discussed in the Windsor Report
and in order to recognise the integrity of all
parties, we request that the Episcopal Church
(USA) and the Anglican Church of Canada |
voluntarily withdraw their members from the
Anglican Consultative Council for the
period leading up to the next Lambeth Con-
ference.”

It added: “During that same period we
request that both churches respond through
their relevant constitutional bodies to the
questions specifically addressed to them in the
Windsor Report as they consider their place
within the Anglican communion.”




















BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

NOTICE

www.bahamasengineers.org

THE BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

_ CORDIALLY INVITES YOU TO ATTEND

THE MONTHLY LUNCHEON

ON

WEDNESDAY, March 02, 2005

TOPIC:

“SEASHELLS AT COTTON BAY

DEVELOPMENT - TECHNICAL
OPPORTUNITIES & CHALLNGES”

GUEST SPEAKERS:

Mr. Wim Steen bakkers Operations
Manager Eleuthera Properties Limited

All interested persons, including previous applicants who wish to be reconsidered,
will be required to complete an application form.

Completed application forms must be received by the Scholarship & Education
Loan Division no later than

3pm. April 29, 2005.

LATE AND/ OR INCOMPLETE APPLICATION FORMS WILL NOT BE

ACCEPTED

PLACE:

GRAYCLIFF RESTAURANT
(West Hill Street)

TIME: 12:00 noon

cost: $25

IF POSSIBLE PLEASE CONFIRM YOUR ATTENDANCE BY E-

MAIL

maria_lamaha@hotmail.com or wccgibson@wsc.com.bs

or by Tel: 328-1858 or jamielms @batelnet.bs



tered for either of them to be

effective.
On May 25, 2004 the Tri-
bunal registered the Bahamas

‘Industrial Manufacturers and

Allied Workers Union and
Morton (Bahamas) Limited
Industrial Agreement. How-
ever, on May 27 the Tribunal
withdrew the registration of
May 25, 2004 based on a
“hearsay” that the document —
was not properly executed.

The president of the Trade
Union Congress and attorney
for the Bahamas Industrial
Manufacturers and Allied
Workers Union, Obie Fergu-
son arguing against the Tri-.
bunal and Morton Salt, said
that he was pleased with Jus- |
tice Hepburn’s ruling of the
case.

Stance

Mr Ferguson stated that his
basic stance on the issue was
that the Tribunal did not fol-
low the fundamental rules that
govern it.

“Our position was that the
Tribunal did not follow the
rules. The rules must be
adhered to, and the judge ably
identified that in the ruling.
That is in fact our position. |
The Tribunal is a.creature of
statue, it must follow the law,”
he said.

According to Mr Ferguson,
the crux of the matter
revolved around an industrial
relations consultant for Mor-
ton Salt, CH Turnquest, mak-
ing a representation to the Tri-

- bunal to deny the already reg-

istered industrial agreement
with the Union.

“The industrial relations
consultant, made a represen-
tation to the Tribunal to deny
the executed industrial agree-
ment on information from
Morton Salt alone. °

“Signed”

“Mr Turnquest said that the
agreement that they had is not
the one that was signed by his
company and that it should
not be executed. Period.

“The Tribunal then went on
that information and de-reg-
istered the agreement that had
already been registered legal-
ly. In doing so the Tribunal
only relied on what he said
solely, without consulting with
the Union, and on that rec-
ommendation only they
denied the agreement. That is
wrong, and the judge said so
herself.”

Mr Ferguson said this is a
clear case where parties sim-
ply wanted to confuse what
they had previously agreed to,
but said that the Tribunal
being made to pay the fees of
the case was a sufficient level
of punishment.

your

news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005, PAGE 7



Challenge of education in the Bahamas

@ PARTI
WHAT THE FNM DID

By DION A. FOULKES

THE Bahamian public is
concemed about the direc-
tion of education and the
state of our public schools.
In the course of the debate
much misinformation has
been circulated. So I am
writing a series of three
articles to put in perspec-
tive what the FNM Gov-
ernment did in education,
where we are now and
where we should go from
here.

ducation under the

FNM Government was
in progressive and competent
hands. For a decade, from 1992
to 2002, we made tremendous
progress in improving the quality
of education in The Bahamas.
The Free National Movement's
record in education is outstand-
ing, especially when compared to
what the party inherited in 1992.

We met the government-oper-
ated school system in disarray at
that time. School buildings were
in disrepair, classrooms were
overcrowded and materials were
in short supply. There was also a
shortage of teachers and those
who were there were underpaid
and their morale was at an all
time low.

The Ministry of Education,
led by FNM Ministers C. A.
Smith, Dame Ivy Dumont and
myself, supported strongly by
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
and the entire Cabinet, was able
to reverse the downward trend
that education was on.

Our schools were made more
competitive, comfortable and
safe. Teachers and, administra-
tors were paid the salaries befit-
ting their noble profession and
morale among them was high.

We dramatically improved the
quality of education while at the
same time making it more acces-
sible to all students whether they
lived at Grand Cay, Abaco, or at
Cabbage Hill, Crooked Island.

A cost-of-living stipend of
$4,000 per annum was made
available for Family Island stu-
dents from the southeastern
islands and isolated cays in the
central and northern Bahamas to



* # DION FOULKES

enable them to pursue a high
school education in Nassau,and
Grand Bahama where special-
ized courses and programmes
were available. This initiative
helped to make the same quality
of education available to every
student in The Bahamas.

B INNOVATIONS

Magnet schools were estab-
lished for the first time in The
Bahamas. These institutions gave.
students the option to begin spe-
cialized courses of study while

still in high school. The magnet:

schools are: C. R. Walker (Sci-
ence and Business), C. I. Gibson
(Arts and Crafts), R. M. Bailey
(Construction), C. V. Bethel
(Electrical), C. C. Sweeting (Hos-
pitality Studies) and the Gov-
ernment High School (Perform-
ing Arts).

‘We added over 40 pre-schools
to our primary schools. This
enabled parents who could not
afford a private pre-school, access
to pre-schooling free of charge. It
is now established that those stu-
dents who attend pre-school do
better in primary school than
those who do not.

We reintroduced academic
competition at the national level.
The Bahamas National Spelling
Bee (BNSB) was established
after extensive collaborative
planning by The Nassau
Guardian, International Business
Machines (IBM) and the Min-
istry of Education. This competi-
tion is now a fixture on the
national calendar and has been
a great tool. for education in The
Bahamas.

Classroom sizes were reduced
at the primary level to a ratio of
25 students to one teacher at
grades 1 to 3 and a ratio of 30
students to one teacher from
grades 4 to 6. At the junior and
senior high school levels, class-
room sizes averaged 35 students
to one teacher.

This student to teacher ratio
surpassed the international stan-
dard for maximum classroom
sizes and is seldom attained even
in some developed countries.
This drastic reduction in class size
was due to the creation of 13,000
new places for students as a con-
sequence of our aggressive phys-
ical plant expansion.

This enabled teachers, espe-
cially in the primary schools, to
spend more one-on-one time
with students, consequently
improving the quality of educa-
tion at the most important stage
of a student’s life: the primary
level. Additionally, we instituted
a policy where our best teachers
were placed at grade levels 1 and
Qi

These measures led to solid
improvement by establishing a
sound educational foundation for
our children, the results of which
were manifested in the national

. tests for primary students, name-

dy the Grade Level Assessment
Test (GLAT).

The FNM introduced Spanish
as a second language at the pri-
mary school level. Spanish teach-
ers were recruited from Latin
America to augment the number
of Bahamian Spanish teachers.
This initiative is already showing
good results in our schools.

We introduced a comprehen-
sive computerization programme
for our primary schools at a cost
of over 12 million dollars. Public
school students are no longer at a
disadvantage because of a lack
of access to computers. .

Many of our primary schools
are now on par with private
schools and the results of the
GLAT for primary school stu-
dents support this conclusion.

‘HE CAREER PATH

An essential component for a
good education system is a well-
trained and well-paid teaching
complement. The FNM
enhanced the Teacher Training
Programme at the College of The
Bahamas and made significant
funds available for teachers to
pursue further training at C.O.B.
and other:colleges. The entry-

GERACE RESEARCH CENTRE SCHOLARSHIPS
(FORMERLY) BAHAMAS FIELD STATION/ MINISTRY

OF EDUCATION

SCHOLARSHIPS 2005

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for eight (8) scholarships
tenable at accredited institutions in the United States of America under the
Bahamas Field Station/ Ministry of Education Agreement (1971), eominenelg

September 2005.

Under the Agreement, participating Colleges and Universities will offer full
tuition scholarships and the Ministry of Education will pay board and lodging

charges.

Applicants should have gained admission into one of the following institutions
where the number of awards available is indicated in bracket:

level pay for teachers was
increased by 90 per cent.

A Career Path for teachers
was developed and implement-
ed for the first time. Our best
teachers no longer needed to pur-
sue an administrative post in
order to earn a higher salary.
Senior Teachers and Master
Teachers can now earn as much
as administrators and are there-
fore encouraged to remain in the
classrooms.

The Bahamas Teachers
Career Path was developed in
conjunction with The Bahamas
Union of Teachers.

It was adopted by several
Caribbean countries and remains
a model for many others in the
region. :

We introduced elected school
boards in New Providence and
Grand Bahama for the first time
inthe history of The Bahamas.

Parents and guardians were
able to have a direct say over the
management of their children’s
schools and were empowered
with a reasonable budget to
effect minor repairs and acquire
certain items for the schools.

This innovation was to be fur-
ther developed and expanded.

The most ambitious and com-
prehensive plan was embarked
upon to upgrade, renovate, refur-
bish and construct schools. Thir-
teen new schools were built in
New Providence, Grand Bahama
and the Family Islands. Several
schools were refurbished and
expanded making them, in fact,
new schools.

In addition to the 20. new
schools, 30 schools had additions

© and expansions — 12 in New Proy-.



idence and 18 in the Family

Islands. :
The FNM built the first Early

Childhood Education Centre in

New Providence, which at the
time was funded from the reduc-
tion of salaries for the Prime
Minister, Cabinet Ministers and
Members of Parliament.

m LIBRARY SYSTEM

The FNM expanded and
strengthened the public library
system in The Bahamas. There

had not been a purpose-built.

library in over 30 years so the
FNM converted the. Ministry’s
Testing and Evaluation unit next
to the Stephen Dillett Primary
School into a public library. That
had been the original purpose of
the building.

Reading and homework cen-

tres were established i in densely-

@ THESE were the appalling
conditions that existed in some
Nassau schools during the
1980s. Pupils are seen studying
outdoors (left) at C C Sweet-

ing High School in 1983 because
of a shortage of classroom
space. At Mabel Walker Pri-
mary School in 1984 (below),
there were scenes of devasta-
tion when two demolished class-
rooms had still not been
replaced after 12 months.

populated areas such as Kemp
Road and in new housing devel-
opments, including Elizabeth
Estates, Flamingo Gardens and
Jubilee Gardens.

Provision was also made for
public libraries in three new
Town Centres constructed at
Carmichael: Road, Elizabeth
Estates and South Beach.

In Grand Bahama a new Com-
munity: Library System was



established on the Mall and at
the Syntex Teen Centre.
- All-the new neighbourhood

libraries were equipped for inter-

net access...
~The FNM commenced an

- Education Loan Programme to

assist students with much-needed
funding for tertiary education at
home and abroad. Over 2,500
Bahamian ‘students were given
the opportunity to attend college
which they might otherwise not

‘have had.

Naturally it was our hope that
we could do more. But the fact is
that the FNM Government’s
record in education is very good

and all Bahamians can be justly

proud of it, as Iam.

LeMOYNE COLLEGE, New York (1)
DICKINSON COLLEGE, Pennsylvania (1)

MIAMI UNIVERSITY, Florida (1)(PARTIAL)
(FOR ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES ONLY)

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA AT AIKEN, (1)

South Carolina

HARTWICK COLLEGE, New York 1)
MOLLOY COLLEGE, New York 1
WITTENBERG UNIVERSITY, Ohio

)
(2)(PARTIAL)

Applications will be accepted only for the Colleges/Universities specified.

Applicants should have successfully completed high school education and be
in possession of at least 5 G.C.E./B.G.C.S.E. subjects, including English and
Mathematics at grade A, B, C.

Persons presently pursuing studies at one of the named institutions should
submit an up-to-date transcript along with the completed application form.

Applicants should note that the area of study must be one deemed acceptable
for the further development of the country.

Further detailes and application forms may be obtained from the Scholarship
and Education Loan Division of The Ministry of Education or from the Ministry
of Education website at www.bahamaseducation.com

Completed application forms should be returned to The Scholarship and
Education Loan Division Ministry of Education P.O.Box N-3913


PAGE 8, WEDNESvAY, MARCH 2, 2005 THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY EVENING MARCH 2, 2005

|| | 7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005, PAGE 9



Public-private partnership
in education reform initiative

W ITHOUT much
fanfare, business

and government leaders
launched an ambitious educa-
tion reform initiative last week
during an invitation-only meet-
ing at the British Colonial
Hilton.

The initiative is backed bya
$50 million credit facility from
the Inter-American Develop-
ment Bank and has the poten-
tial to radically change our fail-
ing education system. There is
a growing consensus that we
are unprepared to compete in
the modern world, and that our
young people lack the skills to
benefit from economic, growth.

As any manager will tell
you, technicians of all kinds are
in short supply here. But the
world economy relies more and
more on technology skills to
drive growth and prosperity.
Training workers to be more
productive and competitive is
critical to our survival as a
modern state, experts say.

The private sector needs
technology skills and the gov-
ernment wants to limit the
political fallout from import-
ing foreign labour. There are

by PPPs.

The goal is to exploit the
business community’s man-
agement and financial skills to
create better value for money
for taxpayers. And govern-
ments get to provide new hos-
pitals, roads, schools and pris-
ons without raising taxes.

From the private sector’s
point of view, there is an
understandable fear of gov-
ernment inefficiency coupled
with a deep reluctance to com-
mit funds and energy to waste-
ful public enterprises that are
easily manipulated for politi-
cal gain.

B ut in Britain and
Canada, for example,
the PPP concept has been able
to get private contractors to

foot the bill for major con-
struction projects such as roads,



“Public-private partnerships
are big news on the reform
front these days. Britain’s
Labour government uses them
to upgrade state services. And
in Canada, between 10 and 20
per cent of infrastructural
projects in some provinces
are being managed by PPPs.”



also moves afoot to open up
our restricted economy to West

Indian competitors with uncer- -

tain results. And everyone is
worried about what our unem-
ployable youth will turn to if
we do not do something soon.

So there is a confluence of
interests among the public and
private sectors that may finally
lead to some serious action on
the education front. It’s some-
thing that teachers and employ-
ers have been crying for ever
since the last major curriculum
revision some 30 years ago.

A. key — and perhaps crucial
- feature of the reform effort
is the creation of a public-pri-
vate partnership to guide the
restructuring process. A work-
ing group of business leaders,
government officials and edu-
cation experts is expected to
be set up soon to oversee the
project.

In fact, public-private part-
nerships are big news on the
.teform front these days.
Britain’s Labour government
uses them to upgrade state ser-
vices. And in Canada, between
10 and 20 per cent of infra-
structural projects in some
provinces are being managed

schools, prisons and hospitals,

“which used to be bankrolled

by tax dollars. Now, contrac-
tors pay for the construction
costs and then rent the finished
project back to the public sec-
tor.

And public-private partner-
ships are also recommended by
the Inter-American Develop-
ment Bank. Its strategy paper
for developing countries in the
region calls for joint efforts to
improve the business environ-
ment and workforce skills to
drive more competitive
economies.:

In our case, the bank seeks
to address “significant social

- problems” that are producing

rising crime and violence and
putting our youth at risk. High
on the agenda is fixing the edu-
cation system to make it more
relevant to modern needs, and

the bank is prepared to put its

money where its mouth 1s.
“The co-existence of acute
skills shortages, notably in
trades, and unemployment
rates consistently above 7 per
cent raise questions about the
relevance of education, partic-
ularly for males,” the bank

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says. “Although core curricular
subjects have been revised at
the primary and secondary ley-
els, the delivery and content of
vocational education Temains
outdated.”

The Bahamas Technical &
Vocational Institute currently
offers entry-level courses in the
building and automotive
trades, but is unable to deliver
more advanced training. Nor
does it have the resources to
develop custom programmes
in response to business
demand.

Our proposed public-private

partnership will oversee the

immediate restructuring of
BTVI along the lines of a new
international technology edu-
cation programme known as
XL (www.xlinitiative.org).

The XL Education Initia-
tive is the brainchild of a US-
based reinsurance company
that developed the programme
as a philanthropic exercise in
conjunction with California’s
Stanford University. It was first
implemented in Bermuda in
the late 1990s and by all
accounts has had tremendous
success there.

The goal was to graduate all
Bermuda public school stu-
dents with a high level of com-
puter and technological litera-
cy so they would be prepared
to use computers and technol-
ogy in their jobs and be
equipped to compete in a glob-
al market.

A non-profit organisation
called the International Edu-
cation Collaborative Founda-
tion (www. iecf.us) was set up to
evangelise the programme.

This group is led by Diane :

Miller, a public affairs advo-
cate from California who is
helping to implement the pub-
lic-private partnership in the
Bahamas.

Cjerernmens officials
acknowledge that for

Bahamians to benefit from the
economic development creat-
ed by global integration and
foreign investment flows, they
must upgrade basic work skills
and become more technically
competent. One big concern is
that male underachievement
has resulted in about 40 per

cent of all boys dropping out -

of the public school. system
prior to graduation.

“The XL initiative will bring
21st century learning to the
Bahamas,” Ms Miller told
Tough Call recently. “A new
educational product is needed
for the information age, one
that is more relevant to the
economy and that is both col-
laborative and exciting. This
programme actually turns on
students as well as teachers,
and it will produce a paradigm
shift in education.”

As Bermuda’s Tourism Min-
ister Renee Webb said: “Tech-
nology is changing business and
business is changing education.
Education is changing the
world.”

Of course, Bermuda is small
potatoes compared to the
Bahamas. The total population
there is only 60,000 with 25
public schools that are in better
shape than ours. The 161
Bahamian public schools (and
45 private ones) are scattered
over several islands with a stu-
dent population of more than
50,000.

And there are other factors
that make education reform
here a more daunting task.
Over half of all births in The

Bahamas are illegitimate. More :

than two thirds of young
Bahamians are from single par-
ent homes, and in most of these
cases the single parent is a
teenage woman. An increasing
number of boys are growing up
without a male role model and

dropping out of school to join |

gangs, use drugs, and commit

’ crimes.

According to its strategic
plan for the Bahamas, the
IADB is prepared to finance
education reform in three
areas: expansion of pre-school
education; modernization of
career technical education at
the secondary and post-sec-
ondary levels; and strengthen-
ing of the Ministry of Educa-
tion’s capacity to use technol-
ogy.
It remains to be seen
whether a genuine public-pri-
vate partnership can be formed
that will be able to dramatical-
ly impact our education deliv-
ery system. The biggest chal-
lenge is whether we can agree
to jointly apply our limited
financial and intellectual

resources wisely and with full
accountability.

MORE ON THE EFFIE
KNOWLES SAGA

ast week we explored

the life and times of
Effie Knowles, a Florida lawyer
of Bahamian descent who died
in 1984 at the age of 92. Effie
was renowned for settling a cel-
ebrated land claim against the
US government on behalf of
the Seminole Indian tribe.

When she died, her estate
was said to include more than
15,000 acres of land on several
Bahamian islands, including
more than 2000 acres on Rum
Cay. It is a subject of much dis-
pute:-today among attorneys,
realtors and developers.

Effie was born in: Florida,
but her mother, Julia, was born
in Nassau in 1865 and went to
Key West as a child. There she
married an American named
William E. Knowles — who was
probably of Bahamian descent.

Since that story was written

we located Julia’s death cer-
tificate, which lists her parents
as Joseph B. Dorsett and Lau-
ra Nairn of Nassau.

Julia’s father was a salt rak-
er at Rum Cay and magistrate
for San Salvador. Her grand-
father — Joseph L Dorsett — was
born in Charleston, South Car-
olina and moved to Rum Cay
when he inherited land from
his father - Captain George
Dorsett, a privateer. The
Dorsetts were some of the first
English settlers of Virginia.

Faith Temple Christian
Academy

wishes to announce that The
General Entrance Examination

will be held on Friday, March 4th,
2005 at 9:00 AM at the Academy
of Prince Charles Drive. 4

The Academy: has limited
space in grades | through 10, and

persons wanting to enter the
Academy in September 2005,
must sit the Examination.

For More Information

Contact:
The Admittance Office at

324-2269

So Register Now!

TOWER ESTATES SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 31

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Tower Estates Dr.
APPRAISED VALUE: $229,000

We have been unable to
learn more of Effie’s father’s
background, but there are -
many Bahamian Knowles’ who -
are connected with Key West.

Florida did not become a .
US territory until 1821. .

A few years later, Key West
was designated a US port of -
entry, which meant that sal- .
vaged cargoes from wrecked °
ships could be entered at Key |
West instead of further up the
coast at St. Augustine.

This prompted’ many:
Bahamians to move to Key:
West.

For years, Bahamians out- ;
numbered Americans in the .
Keys. They had been coming :
there to fish, turtle, cut lum- |
ber, and salvage wrecks for a:
long time. In fact, there is a
1790 letter asking the Spanish ::
Crown to set up military sta-.
tions in the Keys to keep:
Bahamians out.

The first official census in}
Monroe County in 1830:
recorded a total population of:
517.
Many of those early settlers:
were from the Bahamas. By:

_1870 Key West had 5,657:

inhabitants and the Upper:
Keys had 134, of which 124:
were of Bahamian origin. Mia- |
mi was not even a town at that:
time; it was Fort, Dallas.

We would appreciate hear-. :
‘ing from anyone with more:
information on Effie Knowles:
and her family. z

larry@tribunemedia.net.

7e8s 985 2005

Committed to Providing a Christ-Centred
Education, in an environment that is

Conducive for learning:

Ww

Fatlh Yemple Christian ee
“The School of First Choice”

aot make ¢

, chotce. ooe

A subsidiary of: Faith Temple Ministries International J.



GOLDEN GATES SUBDIVISION No. 1

LOT NO. 314
PROPERTY SIZE: Singlc

2
g
s
oD
c
@o
2
o
s
S
0
5

ramily Residence (5,000 sq. ft.)

LOCATION: Malcolm Rd. West of Reef Ln.
APPRAISED VALUE: $115,000

INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS TO PURCHASE (WITH TELEPHONE CONTACT AND POSTAL
ADDRESS) TO CHERRY MISSICK, THE PLAZA, MACKEY STREET, OR CALL 502-6200 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION.
*WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS. :


PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005 THE TRIBUNE










A Bright Start



startin ng Monday, March 17, ‘and printing



and sharing experience—with schoolmates .
family. —

fine literature, read in convenient stale
top daily newspaper.

A Breakfast Serials story is just like a bes
at a time every day, It's great writing and
ists, and readers can't wait for the next day



Breakfast Serials chapters ate short, ‘soit
keeps coming back for more.










written by Avi
illustrated by Brian Floca

The Secret School is a story
about kids by award-winning
American children’s author,

Avi. It’s about the kind of

one-room schoolhouses that














used to exist in American
communities, as well as many

Bahamian settlements.

The story is set in the 1920s.
When the regular teacher of a
rural schoolhouse must leave, bringing an early school clos-
ing, the children decide to take over, secretly. But they

encounter many problems along the way.

The suggested reading level is grade 4-8, and the Secret |

School is a great read aloud for all ages.

Avi—a name given to him by his twin sister—was born in
Brooklyn, New York, in 1937. Though he struggled with English
in high school, by the time he left, Avi had decided to become a
writer. In 1970, his first book was published and since then he
has published more than 50 acclaimed books for young people.







in conjunction with —
2 ‘The Tribune’s
Newspaper’ in Education Literac Pro
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2U0U5, PAGE 11





~ FROM page one

terday. .

The Save Guana Cay Reef
(SGCR), a group of concerned
Bahamian and foreign resi-
dents of Guana Cay, fear,
despite government assurances
of a project which will mini-
mize the impact on the island’s
environment, that the planned
600-acre Passerine develop-
ment will destroy “the envi-
ronment, natural beauty and
ambiance of Guana Cay.”

Responding to these con-
cerns at a press conference yes-
terday morning to announce
the signing of the heads of
agreement, Prime Minister
Perry Christie said that his
government is not prepared to
compromise on protecting the
environment of the Bahamas.

Nevertheless, the SGCR said
they are not willing to sit idly
by and let central government
dictate what happens in their
small community.

“Central government must
respect the aspirations, the
views and the essence of com-
munities in the Out Islands.
The Family Islands are not
pawns in a chess game played
by the prime minister and his
Cabinet,” said Mr Smith.

However, Financial Services
and Investment Minister
Allyson Maynard-Gibson said
yesterday that a lot of atten-
tion has been paid to the envi-
ronmental sensitivity of the

FROM page one

onets go to and from court.



culpable.

other road users.



“For these persons to have jumped out of
the window required substantial effort. It was
obviously not just one kick,” he said.

Supt Hanna said obviously something went |
drastically wrong. He said police will launch
an intense investigation to. determine exactly ®
how the men were able to walk away from the
court without weapons, or a physical struggle.
He said that if they find that it was caused by
negligence, the guilty persons will be held

Supt Hanna said that there is active con-
sideration as to what can be done to prevent
similar incidents from taking place again.

He said it is a challenge for police to have to
transport prisoners from the prison to Bank
Lane or Nassau Street courts because they
have to get them off the street as quickly as
possible, but at the same time do so in an
efficient manner which will not jeopardise‘

He explained that the prisoners must .be
accompanied by senior officers at the rank of

island.

“The developers are persons
who have developed similar
upscale second home develop-
ments in places like Scottsdale
in Arizona, Hawaii, Texas and
California and the unique
thing about this developer is
that they have always been in
places where there is eco-sen-
sitivity and they are bringing
this eco-sensitivity emphasis to
this development in Abaco,”
she said.

Prime Minister. Perry
Christie said that the concerns
being expressed by the resi-
dents of the Cay are not
unusual and that the conser-
vation of the environment
which has made the Bahamas
well know worldwide is of first
priority to him.

“In the country that I govern
we take into consideration all
such views giving a degree of
weight to those views that we
deem. appropriate. Doubtless
there are Abaconians or peo-
ple who live on Guana Cay
who are Bahamian citizens
who have expressed their con-
cern. The reason I begin with
that position is that we are not
prepared to compromise on
protecting the pristine envi-
ronment of the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas,” said
Mr Christie.

The SGCR, however, plan

force.



- of Foreign Iny

Prisoner
Inspector or higher. He said they are taught to
drive defensively. ;

However, he said it’,
problems. Supt Hanna echoed Police Com- |
missioner Farquharson’s wish for a court to be
located at the prison which would eliminate
the need for so many prisoners to have to be
taken to the courts. :

However, until a feasible solution can be
found, he asked the public'to bear with the

Supt Hanna said that a full and intensive
manhunt was launched immediately after the
escape which included law officials in the
Family Islands and Florida. Ma

He reminded the public that it is an offence
to not only harbour escaped prisoners but to
do anything which would assist them to
remain at large, including giving them cloth-
ing, food water or money. In addition, he
said, when persons have information on
escaped prisoners they should immediately
‘report it to the police. oe

LOCAL NEWS

Residents group

to challenge the government
as a whole and question its
authority to sign off a heads
of agreement.

Mr Smith asserts that there
is no law which entitles the
prime minister’s office or any
of his Cabinet ministers to
enter into heads of agree-
ments.

“The misconceived notion .

which has permeated in poli-
tics and public policy over the
last 13 years is that a prime
minister can dictate what does
or doesn’t happen anywhere.
That is simply illegal,” he said.

The attorney called this a
perfect.opportunity for a local
community to challenge what
he describes as “abusive exec-
utive authority”.

“The people of Guana Cay
have spoken out loudly and
clearly. I have written last
week to the prime minister’s
office? to the investment’s
board, the Minister of Works
Bradley Roberts, the Minister
ayestment, the
Ambassador to the Environ-
ment and all of these people
have a responsibility to take
into account the views of the
majority of the local popula-
tion,” Mr Smith said.

But Mr Christie said that he
was encouraged by the devel-
oper’s own commitment and
ability to employ the best prac-

















oes pose significant




















tices for the environment.

“It is these practices which
we expect the developers to.
employ at Guana Cay. We will
also work with the developers
to ensure that the environ-

FROM page one

Mrs Maynard-Gibson.

FROM page one

worst in the world,” and said
that his association has been
complaining about them “for
decades.”

He said the association is
pleased with the appoint-
ment of Criminologist Dr
Elliston Rahming as the new
Superintendent of Prisons,
‘and would assist him in any
way possible.

According to’ Mr Smith,
disrespect for the law in gen-
eral in the Bahamas begins
with the attitude of politi-
cians.

ethics and for the law, par-
ticularly by some cabinet
ministers “seems to have dis-



moorings for mega-yachts, a 75-room luxury
villa style hotel, an 18-hole championship golf
course and 350 residential lots.
“This development is the type of Family
Island: development which promotes the sec-
ond home mandate of the government,” said

Prime Minister Perry Christie said that this
was an unusual development in so far as the
process leading to the decision was concerned.

“As the prime minister J made it a point, a
fundamental part of the process of negotiations,
that the opposition be involved, that those rep-
resentatives of Abaco (MP for North Abaco)
the former prime minister Hubert Ingraham,
and (South Abaco MP) Robert Sweeting, that

‘He said that respect for.

mental implications of the
development are minimised.
We know the concern of the
golf course and the use of
insecticides and pesticides and
the runoffs from golf courses,

$400m development
on Great Guana Cay

they be specifically consulted by the developers

with a view to either disagreeing or signing off

on the proposal,” he said.

_ Mr Christie said that it was particularly impor-

tant for him not to have division on the matter .
‘on a political level. He said that it was admirable

that the developers were willing to effect some

changes to their initial proposal based on sug-

gestions and recommendations made by both

representatives.

- Abaco. ©

Bahamas slammed in
human rights report

_ appeared completely.”

This, Mr Smith said, has an
especially significant effect ‘
on human rights practices
because of the concentration
of executive authority in the

: office of the Prime Minister.

He. said that. when
“absolute power is deposed
in one person then the col-
lapse of society is inevitable.”

Mr Smith said that his
association “fully endorses
and corroborates the findings
of the State Department and
continues to condemn our -
government for its lack of
political will.”

Prime Minister Perry
Christie did not return calls
made to his office yesterday ©
afternoon.

CARD OF THANKS |

Perhaps you sang a lovely song, or brought a dish or two;
Prehaps you sent a floral plant, or a bouquet to set the mood;

Perhaps you sent a beautiful card, or lent assistance in your own way;
Perhaps you sent a funeral spray, or said a silent prayer;

Perhaps you sat quietly ina pew, if so we saw you there;

Perhaps you spoke the kindest words, as nay friends can say;
Perhaps you were not there at all, just thought of us that day;
Whatever you did to console our hearts,we thank you very much

“This development process took a long peri-
od of time. I am happy to say that hopefully as -
we move forward both the government and
those of the opposite party will be able to ensure
that our people will be able to see the tangible
benefits of this investment,” he said.

Mr Christie said that government is commit-
ted to major. public infrastructural works on

‘rity Minister has responsibil-
‘ ity for the police and the



but this is not a matter the
developer or the government
takes lightly and very clearly
we are going to be seen to
engage the best environmen-
tal practices,” said Mr Christie.



















1




Foreign Affairs Minister
Fred Mitchell was in Wash-
ington, DC, yesterday and
was unavailable for comment
on the report, however offi- |
cials from his ministry said
they have received the report
but have not had a chance to
review it in any detail, and
cannot yet comment on its
contents.

The Tribune was also
unable to reach Deputy
Prime Minister Cynthia
Pratt, who as National Secu-











prison.

Immigration Minster Vin-
cent Peet, who oversees the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre, was also unavailable.















The Transition from this earthly life of our wife, mother grandmother, friend and neighbor was
easy to bear, because you were there for us, and with us. We extend appreciation and gratitude to
you for your visits, telephone calls, floral tributes, cards, culinary dishes and all acts kindness
bestowed upon us.








Special Thanks to; Rey. Timothy Stewart, Associate Ministers, Deacon Board and Senior Saints
Choir of Bethel Baptist Church, management and staff, Bethel Brothers Morticians, his Grace,
Archbishop Patrick Pinder, Parishioners. of St. Francis Xavier Cathedral and St. Joseph’s Roman
Catholic Church, sisters of St. Martin de Porres Priory, Mrs. Patricia Vouch & family, Patricia
Jervis, Deloris Sherman, Eleanor Elliot, Roslyn Johnson, Anita Cooper, Gurth Knowles, Lydiabelle
Adderley & Family, Beverly Campbell - Deveaux & family, Ministry of Tourisum especially Social
Development Committee, Hotel Licensing Department & Film Commission, management & Staff,
Bank of the Bahamas International, Management & staff, Landscaping Department, Paradise
Utilities, Coral/ Beach Towers Landscaping (Atlantis), Royal Bahamas Police Fire Services, Mary
Wilkinson, Police Aces and Ocean Club Softball Teams, Sabrina & Jamie Davis, Jenny, Jeff &
Javarie, The Miller Brothers-Roston, Howard, Cecil & Marcus, Minister Almetta & Delano Culmer,
Gail Strachan & Family, Nathalie Hutcheson & family, Dora Culmer & Family, Monique, Allie,
Roland, Frank & Keith, Executive Members, Free National Movement Women’s Association,
Patricia Johnson, Keith Delancy, James Mackey, Denise Carew, A.S.P. Sidney Deveaux, Bradley
T. Cash, Virdell Williams, Anna Colebrooke, Telzena Coakley & family Anna Marche, Cynthia
Elliot, Bernard & Olive Lundy, Edna Russell & Val Johnson, Harveston McKinney & family, Mark
“Pete” Brown, Derek & Lil Greg, Deveaux family, Meldora Scott & Barbara Rigby, Vernetta
Amnbrister & Family, Lyndia Hanna, Stephanie Wallace, Brenda Cargill, The Bain’s Town Community
as a Whole, Especially Eneas Lane & Meadow Street Residents And Former Residents, Last, but
not least many others too numerous to mention.



















Whatever Role You Participated In, Know That We Are Thankful To You.




Uae ra Tea,






O/B ARS omens aE Ue ee a CEN VOCAL Te er


PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005 : THE TRIBUNE

ii

Pie



afraid of employing unconventional met

get the job done.

We say we're going on a trip, but we all know
: | they're actually expeditions. Returning home to
our family and friends brings a sense of

accomplishment. Celebrating our triumphant return

with a few friends over a couple of Kaliks... that’s

the icing on the cake.
SECTION



business@100jamz.com

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005





Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Stree









2) had



HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE

Tel: (242) 356-7764

- FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010



Grand Bahama

Tourism Board
buys Driftwood

‘ |
booking system
Setting up call centre to serve island that
should be up and running by mid-summer

to take winter bookings, with plans to
make service available to whole Bahamas

By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter

he Grand Bahama

Tourism Board

(GBTB) has

acquired Grand

Bahama Vaca-
tions (GBV), a Florida-based
reservations system, and is cre-
ating a satellite call centre in
Grand Bahama to support that
operation and expand its port-
folio to include as many hotels
in Grand Bahama as possible. It
is hoped that the system will
eventually service the entire
Bahamas.

In an interview with The Tri-
bune, tourism director David
Johnson said Board officials
were actively working to create
a satellite centre in Grand
Bahama, aiming to provide a
full service centre to help other
businesses.

He said they believed they
were on track to accept 2005
winter bookings, which means
that by mid-summer the satellite
centre will be up and running.

Mr Johnson said the satellite
centre was initially looking to
employ between six to eight
agents, based on current work-
load, but growth could could
quickly double that figure.

Board officials are also look-
ing to negotiate the long dis-

Call for more

tance fees on the call lines. “We
know what they are elsewhere
and we need to get them lower
than they are,” Mr Johnson
said. Apart from staff and the
long distance call charges, costs
are expected to be minimal.

Mr Johnson said: “The more
business we do, the lower costs
become. We hope to attract
business for other resorts in
Grand Bahama, and in the
entire Bahamas, and they need
not be part of the Grand
Bahama Tourism Board. We
can still fulfill requests for pack-
ages or land-only accommoda-
tions, for only transaction costs.
Those hotels that need reserva-
tion services will come to us and
this will build jobs and services
in the Bahamas."

The System, which includes _

acall centre and online website
that allows visitors to either
book a vacation package or the
land portion of the trip only,
will be restructured and
rebranded, Mr Johnson said.
Currently, half of all book-
ings made through Grand
Bahama Vacations are made
via the Internet. Within a year,
that percentage is expected to
increase to about 60 per cent or
more. The call centre, while

not a first choice for many >

potential visitors, did receive a
significant amount of traffic, Mr
Johnson said, adding that one

trade union

transparency

Chamber chief says this
should be assessed along
ILO Convention 87 talks

By YOLANDA. -.
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter

The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce president said yes-
terday that transparency in
trade union financial and
accounting records, and the
establishment of appropriate
corporate governance, had to
be discussed alongside any
review of whether the Bahamas
should ratify the International
Labour Organisation's (ILO)
Convention 87.

In an interview with The Tri-
bune, Winston Rolle said the
Government needed to go back
and look at one of the Bills
removed from the table during
the 2001 revision of the labour
laws, carried out under the for-
mer FNM administration. It
dealt with the level of trans-
parency that unions operate
under, and the need for those
bodies to have proper financial
reporting procedures in place.

"While unions want to look at
financial and accounting records
of businesses, I think it's only
fair and appropriate that the
same, be expected of unions,”

Mr Rolle said.

“We're now talking about
unions being large institutions,
and they should have the same
level of corporate governance.
We've seen some degree of
amalgamation between unions
and now we're talking about
large organisations responsible
for a significant portion of the
work force and sizeable funds
that can be invested in a num-
ber of ways".

Along with the issues of

‘transparency and corporate

governance, Mr Rolle said there
were also concerns about what
will happen to the Bahamas’
various unions.

Convention 87 is endorsed by
the ILO and allows for freedom
of association and protection of
the right to organise. If persons
had the option of selecting
which union they wanted to be
represented by, and were not
restricted to those formed for
their profession, from a busi-
ness perspective it might mean
that companies in one industry
could be impacted by industrial
action occurring in another,

See UNION, Page 4B

reservation format backs up the
other. —

He added: “This is just a start
up operation, acquiring Grand
Bahama Vacations, which was
previously owned by Driftwood
[operator of the Royal Oasis].
We want to maintain the high-
est quality operation we can, so
we don't want to make any pre-
mature steps that will cause us
to lose momentum.

“We have to move carefully
to maintain its reputation and
maintain the quality of service.
We're training staff, setting up a
new operation, building a new
website and also changing the
logo, changing the namecas it
appears in the logo to present a
new image.”

The current call centre in

_Florida.also-has satellite. call

centres in Jamaica, and Board
officials want a comparable sys-
tem in place for visitors. Mr
Johnson added that by having a
Bahamas-based call centre, per-
sons booking a vacation will be
able to speak to people who
have a more in-depth and wide-
spread knowledge of the prod-
uct in Grand Bahama.

During a speech to the Grand
Bahama Chamber of Com-
merce, Prime Minister Perry
Christie said that for far too
long, the country's tourism

See CALL, Page 2B



LEADING THE WAY - Kerzner International’s Atlantis resort

S&P increases
Kerzner’s EPS
for ‘05 to $2.71

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

STANDARD & POOR’S
(S&P), the international cred-
it rating agency, has fallen into
line with Wall Street’s invest-

ment banks on Kerzner Inter- —

national, forecasting that the
company’s revenues will grow
by 9 per cent in 2005 and rais-
ing its full-year earnings per
share (EPS) target to $2.71.
S&P analyst Markos
Kaminis upgraded Kerzner
International’s shares to a
‘Hold’ from ‘Sell’ recommen-
dation, based on improving
economic trends that had
resulted in higher occupancies
and revenue per available
room (RevPAR) figures at the
company’s properties, espe-
cially Paradise Island-based
Atlantis and the One & Only

Ocean Club. -

Mr Kaminis, in a report
obtained by The Tribune, fore-
cast that improved occupan-
cies would drive Kerzner Inter-
national’s 2005 gross margins
ahead of their year-before lev-
els.

He wrote: “We see net mar-

“ gins widening further, as high-

er interest rates and continuing
sales, general and administra-
tive and corporate spending
are outweighed by revenue
leverage.

“After taxes estimated at 1
per cent, due to Kerzner Inter-

_ national’s Bahamas domicile,

and with share dilution, we
forecast earnings per share
(EPS) of $2.71, versus 2004
EPS of $2.33, excluding
charges and insurance recov-
ery, but including pre-opening
costs.

_ “We expect 8 per cent
rowth [in EPS] in 2006 to
2.93.” The S&P analyst said

Kerzner International’s stock

should hit the $69 per share

level on the New York Stock

Exchange (NYSE) in one

year’s time, giving Bahamian

investors a value of $6.9 per -

Bahamian Depository Receipt

(BDR).

Mr Kaminis’s verdict also
followed an upgrade by Wall

‘Street investment bank Gold-

man Sachs, which raised its rat-
ing on Kerzner International’s
shares to ‘In-Line’ from
‘Underperform’, also bringing
it into accordance with the
New York consensus.
Goldman Sachs raised its
rating due to Kerzner Interna-
tional’s “strong results, the

See RATE, Page 4B





LPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

rote finance | mutual funds 1 CSSD

1 retail banking 1 insurance brokeray
PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





Understanding the

a

criminal’s thinking

ecurity industry
research on how the
environment impacts
crime trends has
resulted in new, use-
ful conclusions. Although dif-
ferent crimes are affected in dif-
ferent ways by the environment
in which they occur, almost
every type of ‘street crime’
(crimes against persons or
against property in FBI termi-
nology) is influenced in some
way by:
¢ Physical Design
e Layout
° Situational Factors

Theories of crime, such as
environmental criminology,
focus specifically on analysing
the environmental factors that
provide opportunities for crime




to occur. Based on this, it is fair
to say that most theories of
crime can also be classified as
opportunity theories.

Environmental criminology,
rational choice, situational
crime prevention, routine activ-
ity, opportunity model, geogra-
phy of crime and hot spots of
crime, just to name a few, all
explain factors that provide
criminal opportunities. In
essence, if we are able to reduce
opportunities then it is reason-
able to conclude that crime will
also be reduced.

Between the 1970s and 1990s,
studies were conducted (pri-
marily by the National Institute

of Justice in the US) to demon- —

strate that certain environments
tend to encourage informal
social gatherings and contacts,
thus raising the fear of crime.



These environments include
poorly-lighted areas, high-rise
buildings with an inappropriate
tenant mix, apartment buildings
with large numbers of units that

O EASY TO
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share one primary entrance, and

- heavily-trafficked streets.

Conversely, researchers
found that the presence of com-
munity centres and well-main-



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Life. Money. Balance both:



tained public parks helped
reduce crime. Ever wonder why
so much emphasis was placed
on building a basketball or
parks? These features increased
social interaction, natural sur-
veillance and other informal
social controls, thereby reducing
both crime and the fear of
crime.

The failure, however, was
that the Government and
church failed to capitalise on
these informal controls to create
formal controls; thus giving
meaning and direction to them.
Adolescents were left to: their
own decisions and thinking,
which resulted in their demise in

some cases.

Rational or Irrational

As mentioned, some took the.

good path while others took the
wrong one. According to the
rational choice approach, crim-
inal behaviour occurs when an
offender decides to risk break-
ing the law after considering the
following:

e Personal factors (the need
for money, cheap thrills, enter-
tainment, revenge) and situa-
tional factors (potential police
response, availability of target,
lighting, surveillance, access to
target, skill and tools needed to
commit the crime).

¢ Before committing a crime,
most criminals (excluding drug-
stupid impulse crimes, acts of
terrorism and psychopathic
criminals) will evaluate the fol-
lowing:

’ 1. Risks of apeeelionsion -
where are the police; are they
familiar with my tactics?

2. The seriousness of expect-
ed punishment - will I be
remanded to Fox Hill or will I

_..be put on. bail to await trial? ..
.. 3. The potential value of gain:

from the crime - $100 versus
$1,000. Is there a market for the

item I am going to steal, and
what is the profit margin?

Call (From page 1B)

4. The need for immediate
criminal gain. If yes to the.
above, how quickly can we get
the item sold or how badly is it
needed (money).

The decision to commit a spe-
cific type of crime is thus a mat-
ter of personal decision-mak-
ing, based upon an evaluation of
numerous variables and the
information available for the
decision-making process.

Burglary studies have shown
that burglars forego a break-in
if they perceive that the home is
too great a security challenge,
meaning the value or rewards
of the potential goods are not
worth the effort. The target
might be protected by guards,
police or capable guardians
(housekeepers, large dogs, etc.).
Evidence suggests that the deci-
sion to commit crime regard-
less of substance, is structed
by the choice of:

1) Where the crime occurs.

2) The characteristics of the
target.

3) The means and techniques
available for the completion of
the crime.

In addition to crime-preven-

. tion theory, security profes-

sionals should also understand
contemporary criminological
views on how criminals pick
their targets, and how their
choice is influenced by the per-
ception of vulnerability that the
target projects.

How targets are selected and
other factors that contribute to
crime will be discussed next
week.

NB: Gamal Newry is presi-
dent of Preventative Measures,

. asecurity and law enforcement

training and consulting compa-
ny.-Comments'can-be sent to

-PO..Box. N-3154 Nassau,

Bahamas or e-mail: preven-
tit@hotmail.com



industry had to employ people from outside the Bahamas to
answer calls and answer questions about the Bahamas..

He said that he is convinced that once a prospective visitor hears
a Bahamian, with that "mellifluous Bahamian voice" at the other
end of the telephone, the questions will switch from, Swbesher to

come” to “when to come”

Mr Christie said further ‘that even though the call centre begins
with properties and attractions on Grand Bahama, the intent is to
have the call centre service the entire Bahamas, including private

sector partners.

To advertise i in
The Tribune _
call 322-1986

NOTICE

Nassau Plastics
The Sign Post

&

The Trophy Case
on Parkgate Road

Will be closed
Thursday, March 3.

We apologize for any inconvenience.
We will open for business as usual
on Friday, March 4.

c

ar ar
A Memorial Service

ce oe olan
NVirs. Kitty Lawrence

Will be held at St. Andrew's Kirk
on Thursday, March 3 at 6 pm


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005, PAGE 3B



Contractors seek
more movement
on competition

espite receiving
increased work
from invest-
ment-related
projects over
the past 12-18 months, the
Bahamian Contractors Associ-
ation (BCA) said yesterday it
still warted to level the playing
field between its members and
foreign competitors who held a
cost advantage over them.
Terrence Knowles, the
BCA’s chairman, said talks
between the Association and
Ministry of Financial Services
and Investments had already
yielded positive results, with the
latter encouraging foreign
investors and developers to
view Bahamian companies
more favourably.

Mr Knowles added that this
had resulted in Bahamian con-
tractors getting more work on
development projects, but a
number of issues were still open
for discussion between the BCA
and Allyson Maynard-Gibson,
minister of financial services
and investments.

The BCA is continuing to
press for a Local Preference Act
that it believes would enhance
the prospects of Bahamian con-
tractors successfully: securing

determined, to account for the
higher overheads and other
costs that Bahamian contrac-
tors face compared to their
overseas competitors.

Mr Knowles said foreign con-
tractors had access to lower
financing costs internationally,
and were able to borrow at
interest rates between 3-5 per
cent, compared to 9 per cent for
Bahamian companies.

In addition, Mr Knowles said
that unlike their foreign coun-
terparts who were able to lease
equipment, Bahamian contrac-
tors could not do so and often
had to outlay large sums of cap-
ital to purchase the necessary
equipment.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said a
technical subcommittee head-
ed by Dr Tyrone McKenzie,
acting deputy director of invest-
ment, would be established to
look into this and other issues
relating to the construction
industry.

The Government and BCA.

are also discussing the question
of open tendering to determine
contractors for new projects,
particularly whether a new pro-
ject should go to open tender
or if the developer should con-
tinue working with a proven

LORS) Tots)

ding in those cases would be in
the “public purse’s” best inter-
ests.

While foreign contractors
now had to obtain a new busi-
ness licence for every addition-
al project they worked on, val-
ued at 1 per cent of the con-
tract’s value, Mrs Maynard-Gib-
son said the BCA had to
respond quickly when requests
were made for contractors and
workers who can and will
“deliver”.



Pictured above in a recent meeting are (from left): Godfrey Forbes, Vice Chairman, BCA; Dr. Tyrone
McKenzie, Acting Deputy Director of Investment; Sheila Carey, Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Financial
Services and Investment; Allyson Maynard-Gibson, Minister of Financial Services and Investment; Steven
Wrinkle, BCA member; Terrance Knowles, Chairman, BCA; Robyn Ogilvie, Sectalaly, BCA; and Johnny

Outten, Councilman, Combined Trades, BCA.

FirstCaribbean International Bank is the combination of CIBC and Barclays Bank in the Bahamas, Belize
and the Caribbean. We are the region's largest publicly traded bank, with over 3,000 staff serving over 5.3
million people in 16 territories. We manage over 500,000 active accounts through more than 80 branches

and centres.

As FirstCaribbean Capital Markets continues to grow, we are seeking persons with the requisite
skills, knowledge and expertise to fill the positions below.

ESSSole Ni DIRECTOR -

Responsibilities:

cea MARKETS

Prerequisites:
* Sound technical skills in financial modelling and

e Support FirstCaribbean Capital Markets in the
management of client relationships and execution of
client transactions

e Lead individual deal-team and guide analysts in
preparation of credit applications, and the
processing and maintenance, including analysis and
supporting documentation, of all risk aspects of
customer operations and the industries in which
they compete

contractor, especially if they
were Bahamian.

- Mrs Maynard-Gibson said it
was difficult to break ‘fixed’
relationships, and questioned
whether the cost of open bid-

projects.

The Association is proposing
that the Act make an allowance,
_ Which could be upwards of 10
per cent, although this has yet to

analysis for both Corporate and Sovereign clients

e Significant experience in investment banking and/or
strong knowledge of capital intensive industries and
sovereign financing needs

¢ Demonstrated track record in client management,
developing mutually beneficial solutions, and
creating lasting mutually beneficial client
relationships

¢ Bachelor's degree in business, finance and/or
equivalent experience

NOTICE

SUVEL HOLDINGS LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT an Extraordinary
General Meeting of the Shareholders of Jovéel Holdings Limited is hereby
called, to be held at the Registered Office of the Company, UBS House,
East Bay Street, P.O.Box N- 7151, Nassau Bahamas, on the Ist day of
April 2005 at 10:00a.m.

The object and purpose of said Meeting is to have liad before
the Shareholders of the Company the accounts of the Liquidators, Cordelia
Fernander and Ingrid Davis, showing the manner in which the winding
up of the Company has been conducted, the property of the Company
distributed, and the debts and obligations of the Company disharged and
also to hear any explanation that may be given by the said Liquidators.



BUSINESS ANALYST - CAPITAL MARKETS |

Prerequisites:

¢ Superior analytical/financial modelling skills,
including knowledge of the preparation of financial
forecasts

e Working knowledge of accounting for business
combinations and experience in consolidations and
multi- “currency group analysis would be an asset

e 2-3 years' experience in corporate finance/ capital
markets organisation, ideally within research
function

© Bachelor's degree in business, finance and/or
equivalent experience

Responsibilities:

© Support the Capital Markets team in
sales/marketing/origination/due diligence activities,
including substantial involvement in the conduct of
detailed due diligence and subsequent preparation
of comprehensive credit applications, for Large
Corporate and Sovereign target clients

¢ Support, when required, deal analysis reporting to
the Deals Committee, and the Capital Markets
Board

Dated this Ist day of March 2005.

Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)

Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)



We offer attractively structured compensation and reward
packages as well as performance bonuses.

NOTICE

STEVEL HOLDINGS LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT an Extraordinary
General Meeting of the Shareholders of Jovel Holdings Limited is hereby
called, to be held at the Registered Office of the Company, UBS House,
East Bay Street, P.O.Box N-7757, Nassau, Bahamas, on the Ist day of
April 2005 at 10:00a.m.

The object and purpose of said Meeting is to have liad before
the Shareholders of the Company the accounts of the Liquidators, Cordelia
Fernander and Ingrid Davis, showing the manner in which the winding
up of the Company has been conducted, the property of the Company
distributed, and the debts and obligations of the Company discharged and
also to hear any explanation that may be given by the said Liquidators.

Applications with detailed résumé should be submitted no
later than 11 March 2005 to:

lan Chinapoo

Investment Banker

FirstCaribbean International Bank

Capital Markets

Rendezvous

Barbados

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

Caribbean Pride. International Strength. Your Financial Partner.

E-mail: ian.chinapoo@firstcaribbeanbank.com
FirstCaribbean International Bank is an Associated Company of Barclays Bank PLC and CIBC.

Only applicants who are short-listed will be contacted.



Dated this Ist day of March 2005.

Financial A dvisors L.td.
Pricing Information As Of:

Cordelia Fernander 28 February 2005

(Liquidator)

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste
British American Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

JOVEL HOLDINGS LIMITED | 3 Bh. petite

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Kerzner International BDRs



Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)





NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT an Extraordinary
General Meeting of the Shareholders of Jovel Holdings Limited is hereby
called, to be held at the Registered Office of the Company, UBS House,
East Bay Street, P.O.Box N-7757, Nassau Bahamas, on the Ist day of
April 2005 at 10:00a.m.

The object and purpose of said Meeting is to have liad before
the Shareholders of the Company the accounts of the Liquidators, Cordelia
Fernander and Ingrid Davis, showing the manner in which the winding

Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $
Bahamas Supermarkets

Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets



up of the Company has been conducted, the property of the Company ree ee Seece ey pers one
= 8 jonths iv
distributed, and the debts and obligations of the Company disharged and Gola Money Market Fund 7 D0osa7*
also to hear any explanation that may be given by the said Liquidators. Fidelity Bahamas G&I Fund =—_2.1105 ***
10.2648 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.2602*****
‘ J 2.1746 2.0524 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.166020**
Dated this Ist day of March 2005. 1 Jip OOO a aes
“CRINDEX: CLOSE 496.680 °75 Ree
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
s 52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Cordelia Fernander 52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
(Liquidator) Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value

“f DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
** - AS AT JAN. 31, 2005/ **** - AS AT DEC. 31, 2004
& SA JAN 31, 2005) | beheheis "AS AT JAN. 31, 2005



“Tngrid Davis

(Liquidator) vag


PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



mi ss ie
Water shortage was corporation’s
worst crisis in its 28-year history

dents, due in part to the addition of the MV Clipper Legend, and



WAREHOUSE SPACE
TO SUBLEASE

* 2320 sq. ft. located on
Mt. Pleasant Avenue off Carib Road.

Please call Alice at 393-7020
for further information






LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

THE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
COMPANIES ACT, 2000

LIQUIDATOR’S STATEMENT
PURSUANT TO SECTION 137(8) OF THE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000

We, Pine Limited, Liquidator of CONSORT INVESTMENTS
LIMITED hereby certify that the winding up and dissolution of

CONSORT INVESTMENTS LIMITED has been completed in ’ |

accordance with the Articles of Dissolution and that CONSORT
INVESTMENTS LIMITED has been dissolved as of 23rd day of
February, 2005.

Dated this 28th day of February, 2005.

Pine Limited
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

EARNING LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that at an Extraordinary
General Meeting of the Shareholders of the above-named Company
was duly convened and held on the 25th day February, 2005 and
the following resolutions were passed: - —

RESOLVED that EARNING LIMITED be wound up
voluntarily.

RESOLVED that LYNDEN MAYCOCK be appointed
the Liquidator for the purpose of such winding up.

Dated the 28th day of February, 2005.

H&J CORPORAT E SERVICES a

Resisteredl Office
for the above-named Company



By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX

Senior Business Reporter

WATER AND SEWERAGE CORPORATION officials yes-
terday admitted that the water crisis experienced several weeks ago
was the worst in the corporation’s 28 year history, but were now
beginning to see some consistency returning to the water supply,
with the addition of a third barge and other remedial efforts.

After several weeks of severe water shortages in Nassau, the Cor-
poration was acutely aware of the fact that the public remains

sceptical about the continued reliability of water.

Corporation officials said they were beginning to see some con-
sistency return to the supply of water to New Providence resi-

Rate (From page 1B)

outlook for its existing proper-
ties and a heightened level of
new development”.

With S&P and the New York

. investment banks all setting

price targets in the high $60s to
low $70s range for Kerzner
International, it is becoming
clear that Bahamian institu-
tional and retail investors who
did not buy into last June’s
BDR offering missed a signifi-
cant opportunity to benefit from
capital appreciation.

The BDRs were priced at
$4.71 during the initial public
offering, but last night’s Wall
Street closing price of $63.53

for Kerzner International’s ordi-
U NION (From page 1B)

strike vote. can be taken. The

unrelated sector.

That could be good or bad,
Mr Rolle said, with the outside
influence possibly helping to
avert a strike vote, or it. could

_ spill over into the unrelated sec-.

tor and have the negative effect
of an even broader strike action.

Brian Nutt, president of the
Bahamas Employers Confeder-
ation (BECon), said the Trade
Union and Labour Relations
Bill, shelved during the 2001
review of the labour legislation,
would have provided a number
of safeguards that do not exist
in current legislation. The Bill
would have replaced. the Indus-
trial Relations Act

Mr Nutt said that in consid-
ering Convention 87, stake-
holders needed to look at also
implementing those safeguards.

He added that one example
of how the safeguards would

operate is to address how a °

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

Atlantic Medical Insurance (AMI), a subsidiary of Colonial Group
International Limited (CGIL) headquartered in Bermuda, is seeking a ~
Director of Operations for the medical claims and eligibility Gepcrimens

of AMI in the Bahamas.

CGIL, with offices in Bermuda, the Bahamas, the Oia Islands, and
the British Virgin Islands, offers a complete range of premier financial
and insurance services to both local and international clients. This is
an opportunity to be part of a rapidly growing innovative company,
focusing on providing clients with first class service and access to

- competitive products.

The Director of Operations will be responsible for the overall day-to-
day management of the medical claims, customer service,

administration and eligibility departments with a primary focus on the
claims area. These responsibilities will include monitoring and evaluating
all activities and procedures and introducing and monitoring structured
audits as well as productivity standards. This position will also be
responsible for developing and training staff in areas that are essential
to efficient company operations. It is essential that applicants possess

the following qualifications:

° 58 years experience managing claims and eligibility departments
within the health insurance industry, including the development

and

implementation of procedures and audits.

Experience of working within the US healthcare system and
experience of US claims processing, provider and network
discounts and negotiating contracts with Independent service

providers.

Minimum 5 years’ supervisory experience with the ability to train

staff.

Thorough understanding of group employee health benefits
including medical, dental, life, and disability.
Superior communication and organisational skills as well as a

service-oriented approach.

Proven ability to negotiate with external and internal clients and

work under pressure.

Compensation for the successful candidate will be attractive and
linked to performance. CGIL offers an attractive benefits package
that includes comprehensive medical | insurance, contributory pension

plan, and life insurance.

If you have a keen commitment to quality results and want to contribute
your talents to a dynamic company, contact us about this opportunity.
Applications will be treated in the strictest confidence and should be

made in writing to:

Atlantic Medical Insurance

P Box SS-5915
Nassau, Bahamas

or

email address for electronic submission of -
applications hr_manager_obm@colonial.om_)

Closing date for applications is March 29, 2005



nary shares means each BDR
is now worth $6.353 - generating
a capital appreciation gain for
BDR holders of 34.9.per cent.

However, the $63.53 price
means that much of the gains
Kerzner International is expect-
ed to received from its $1 billion
Phase III expansion on Par-
adise Island, plus. investment
projects in Dubai and Morocco,
has already been priced into the
stock: This means that Bahami-
an investors now. buying into
the BDRs are likely to experi-
ence a slower rate of capital
appreciation, given Wall Street’s
expectations.

_ Inhis report, Mr Kaminis said.

former Bill also looked to
implement a cooling-off period
and would have outlawed gen-
eral strikes.

One of the major fears that
employers have about Conven-
tion 87 is that it allows unions to
become... general workers
‘unions, which means that there
could be one mega union that

‘represents all workers in all

areas. “That union would be
very powerful and that's why
we need to look at safeguards in
legislation to prevent general
strikes and no sympathy strikes
in non-related areas,” Mr Nutt
said,

"There are a lot of different
views on Convention 87. With
respect to that, however, one
thing that has to be recognised

is that along with the right to’

associate, is also-to ‘have the

right to not associate. The free-:

other remedial efforts.

The MV Clipper Legend transports 1.2 million gallons of water,
and along with the MV Titas, at 3.3 million gallons and the MV Dol-
phin at 1.7 million gallons, provides a total transshipment of water
from North Andros at 6.2 million gallons daily.

The addition of the third barge is, however, a short-term con-
tingency measure as the corporation’s long-term strategy is to dis-
continue the barging of water from North Andros and build two
reverse osmosis plants in New Providence.

In a recent press statement, Bradley Roberts, minister of Works
& Utilities, revealed that the long-term plan is to construct a
reverse osmosis plant at Blue Hills.

the Phase III development on
Paradise Island and expansion
of the One & Only brand would
grow Kerzner International’s
revenues by9 per cent in 2005.

S&P had also raised its three-
year EPS growth outlook from
12 per cent to 16 per cent, “as
we expect improved air traffic
to the Bahamas and expansion
projects to boost occupancy and
revenues”. The 2005 EPS esti-
mate was raised to $2.71 from
$2.58, putting it in the middle
of the Wall Street consensus
range, which ranges from a high
of $3 to a low of $2.6.

For 2006, EPS estimates for

Kerzner International range

dom to associate incorporates
the freedom to not associate.
There is that consensus that
there is an unfair push for peo-
ple to join unions when they
really don't want to."

Mr Nutt said stakeholders
should also look at the possi-
bility of upsetting the status quo
of currently established unions.
While certain unions have cer-



from $3.12 to $2.83, with S&P’s
estimate of $2.93 close to the
Wall Street average of $2.95.

Mr Kaminis wrote that the
12-month price target was
increased to $69 from $55, given
that Kerzner International’s
stock had recently traded at 24x
its 2005 EPS estimates, in line
with the hotel, resort and cruise
industry average of 24x.

Mr Kaminis said: “Based on
an average price/earnings
growth ratio of 1.48x for our
two peer groups, applied to our
three-year EPS growth estimate
of 16 per cent and our 2006 EPS
estimates, we would value the
shares at $69 one year forw



tain crafts specified within their —
regulations, Convention 87
could provide a ‘free for all’,,
meaning that the current make-
up of union officials could
change drastically.

The Government has signed
up to Convention 87 but has yet
to ratify it in statute. It would
allow workers to join a union
of their choice.

NOTICE is hereby given that FRANK O. PREMPEH OF P.O.

BOX N-8940, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for. Nationality and Citizenship, for

registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed.statement of the facts within twenty-eight days

from the 23RD day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister}:

responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-'7147, |

Nassau, Bahamas.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Enterprise Risk Services - Control Assurance Senior Consultant/Manager



Well established firm seeks an IT Auditor panagetsersol consultant for its Enterprise Risk

Services Practice.

RESPONSIBILITIES

Identify and evaluate business and technology risks, internal controls which mitigate risks,
and related opportunities for internal control improvement

~ Assist in selecting and tailoring approaches, methods and tools to support services
Actively participate in training efforts

Actively participate in decision making with engagement management and seek to understand
the broader.impact of current decisions

Generate innovative ideas and challenge the status quo
Facilitate use of technology-based tools or methodologies to review, design and/or implement

products and services

Build and nurture positive working relationships with clients with the intention to exceed

client expectations

Understand clients' business environment and basic risk management approaches
Play substantive/lead role in engagement planning, economics, and billing
Participate in proposal development and sales efforts

- QUALIFICATIONS

3+ years experience in the areas of public accounting, internal auditing or consulting

Bachelors degree in Business Administration, Accounting, Computer Science, Information
Systems Administration or related field. MBA or dual-degree is an asset

CISA, CPA, CIA designation or desire and dedication to pursue
Advanced understanding of business processes, internal control risk management, IT controls

and related standards

Proven analytical skills with ability to tackle problems systematically to determine causes
and produce effective solutions

Experience with accounting control related issues

Demonstrated ability to plan and manage engagements along with ensuring deliverables
meet work plan specifications and deadlines ,

Ability to thrive in an environment of pressing deadlines and constantly changing conditions
Successful experience identifying controls, developing and executing test plans
Ability to synthesize information and produce concise synopses/summaries

Excellent written and oral communication skills including both technical and business writing,
documentation and presentation skills

Open to travel requirements

Experience with ACL is an asset

Experience with COSO and/or Sarbanes-Oxley an asset
Technical and/or management background in technical systems/environments an asset

COMPENSATION

¢ Compensation is negotiable based on combination of years experience and qualification.

Interested persons should submit their resumes before March 18, 2005.
HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT

P. O. BOX N-7120
NASSAU, BAHAMAS


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005, PAGE 5B

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



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FROM page one

son was able to formulate a
plan which knocked the
Knights out of the final four
in the Hugh Campbell tour-
nament.

During the Christmas
break, they hosted their annu-
al invitational, adding to the
international tournaments
which they also attend. John-
son also holds a summer pro-
gramme that teaches young-
sters discipline, good moral
values and the fundamentals
of basketball.

And his basketball pro-
gramme extends from the
junior high level to the senior
level.

He said: “I have a pro-
gramme that never stops, the
programme runs all year
round and it isn’t just based
on basketball.

“What we try to do is estab-
lish a sound programme that
will help the athlete as a
whole. We do a lot of things
together as a team, this also
helps the programme.

“We work hard, and this
has helped the boys to stay
focussed. Our main goal is not
basketball, there is life after
basketball, I would love to see
the athletes move on to col-
lege and secure a good pay-
ing job.”

Johnson and his team work-
out out everyday at the
school’s gymnasium for more
than five hours.

One of the youngest coach-
es in the league, Johnson said
he is feeling no pressure and is
enjoying each minute he
spends with the team and
coaching his classes.

Johnson is one of three
physical education instructors
at the school, he coaches the
basketball, volleyball and
helps out with the track and
field teams.

“We’ve been working
extremely hard and it hope-
fully it will all pay off in the
end.

Pressure

“I am one of the younger
coaches in the league but that
doesn’t deter me at all. I don’t
feel any pressure when it
comes to coaching, coaching is
something I enjoy very much,
that’s why I didn’t choose to
go into the classroom.

“IT use to play basketball,
actually basketball was the
reason why I went off to col-
lege. While in college I played
and that give me a chance to
experience a lot, explore in a
way.

“Going of to college and
graduating makes things easi-
er when I am explaining to the
kids. Most players listen to
their coaches, but some of the
coaches can’t relate because
they’ve never been through
the situations.

“With me it is easy because
ican relate to the problems
of most of the athletes, since
I've been through it in a way.”

Becoming the student assis-
tant to the Arkansas State
basketball team really helped
Johnson with his coaching as
he became familiarised with
controlling a team.

Three years ago Johnson
retired from playing with the
Explorers to take on the head
coaching position.

Since leading the team, he
was able to take the Explorers
from being, what other teams
considered as, an average
team in the New Providence
Basketball Association
(NPBA) to contenders for the
championship title.

Johnson coaches both
teams in the NPBA, division I
and II and, for him, the
transition was not hard at
all.

“It wasn’t an adjustment
phase for me, i don’t think I
ever had to make any adjust-
ments, because coaching on
the night league level and

high school is basically the
same.”

Most of his players from the
high school division play
under the Explorers, but
Johnson says this is only used
to make them seasoned play-
ers.

“If you look at the amount
games an average high school
player plays over here it will
never compare to the games
the high school player has in
the States.

‘This is why I try to keep
the guys from my school more
active, I am about getting the
athletes off to school and
many of them have gone off
to school to further their edu-
cation.”

So far, more than eight high
school athletes coming from
Johnson’s programme have
gone onto college.

This year Johnson is expect-
ing to send at least three ath-
letes.







& By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

WITH his three-year stint at
the Westburg Christian Wild-
cats completed, Bahamian
Jeremy Barr has to decide on
whether to accept one of the 30-
plus college scholarship offers
he has received or to lean
towards the National Basketball
Association.

The 6-foot, 9-inches, 260
pound native from Mastic Point,
Andros, who wears size 22
shoes, helped the Wildcats win
their third straight District 4-5A
State Tournament last week.

“J think we played well
together. It was all about our
defence,” said Barr, who
declined to accept the individual
glory sharing the success with
his teammates instead.

Defence

“Sometimes the teams were
close to us, but we were able to
play together really well on
defence and that was what was
able to pull us through.”

Barr, 18, ended up-with 21
points, including hitting 7-of-9
from the free throw line, in the
Wildcats’ 61-53 over SA Christ-
ian in the championship game
on Saturday night.

The night before in the semi-



Hard work pays off
for Bahamas’ Jeremy

final game against Fortworth
Christian, Barr produced 18
points with 11 rebounds as they
won'59-46.

“He did an excellent job,”
said Westburg Christian’s head
coach Greg Glenn. “He ended

special player is his improve-
ment with his skills,” Glenn
reflected. “He made a play in
the championship game as he
was running hard in transition.

“Normally he’s running
towards the basket to catch the



“Because of the way I was
able to improve, everybody on
the team started to look at me
for the scoring. I just thank
God that I was able to deliver

for our team.”



up making the All-Tournament
team. But in the last two games,
he was really dominant.

“He did all the things you
expect him to do trom the very
beginning. He showed why he
was such a force for us.”

From the time he joined the
Wildcats three years ago, Glenn
admitted that Barr got better
and better with every game he
played in.

“Except for his physical attrib-
utes, what made Jeremy such a

Jeremy Barr

ball and score. But there was a
player running ahead of him.
He was able to catch the ball
and he just tapped it over to the
player for a great pass.”

Barr credits his success to his
work ethic.

“Frank (Rutherford) and I
were really working out.

“He got a lot of people to
help me develop my skills. Once
I started working on it, I just
continued to get better,” Barr
admitted.

“And because of the way I
was able to improve, everybody
on the team started to look at
me for the scoring. I just thank
God that I was able to deliver
for our team.”

Having helped to mature him
over the past three years
since he moved from Andros to
Houston, Texas, Glenn said
his only concern is that Barr
ends up in a program where
he can further develop his
skills.

“He has a great base to start
putting everything together. It
kind of like building a house. It
doesn’t matter how well you
build the house, if you don’t
have a solid foundation, you
won't have a good house,”
Glenn pointed out.

“Now he has a good founda-
tion to put a good house on it.
Because he has the potential, he
can build a good house on that
foundation.”

Despite the level of success
he has achieved, Glenn said
Barr is still a bit “green” and so
he needs to get into the right
program where he can reach his
full potential.

“Where that happens is not
so much important as it is get-
ting with the right people,”
Glenn declared.

This weekend, Barr will make
his first official visit to Texas

TRIBUNE SPORTS

Tech. But he has his sights set
more on the University of South
Carolina where he intend to vis-
it after the Spring Break.

Frank Rutherford, who has
been instrumental in getting
Barr developed from a “project”
to a “bonafide” collegiate and
NBA player, said, every
other weekend, Barr will be
making official visits to various
schools.

Decision

But Rutherford said they will
also be looking at making a few
unofficial visits as they sort out
every possible avenue before a
final decision is made as to
where he will end up later this
year.

Based on what he’s done in
high school, Barr said he’s con-
fident that he has the potential
to make it in college and even
enter the NBA.

“Most people feel like I
should go to college for a year or
two so that I can get some expe-
rience and eventually go high in
the draft,” Barr stressed. “So I
think I’m going to go that
route.”

Over the last three years, Barr
said he’s been able to prove to
everybody that if you put in the
hard work, it will pay off in the
long run.
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Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



behind the
CI Gibson
meio

@ By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports
Reporter






KEVIN ‘KJ’ JOHNSON
has established a basketball
dynasty at the CI Gibson
school (Rattlers) and has
become the most decorated
coach at both high school
and night league level.

Johnson, head coach of
the Rattlers’ senior boys and.
girl’s basketball squads, is
also the assistant coach of
the junior boy’s national
team and the head coach of
the Coca-Cola Explorers.

On Monday night, John-
son and the Rattlers
achieved the impossible,
trouncing the number one
team from Grand Bahama,
Tabernacle Falcons, for
their third Hugh Campbell
title in five years.

The 58-52 win over the
Falcons was an historic one,
not only for Johnson and his
squad, but all of New Prov-
idence base schools.

For the seventh time in
the tournament, the trophy
will remain in the capital. .

Dedication

Thanks to Johnson’s hard
work and dedication to the
team, the Rattlers will now
‘go down in the tournament’s
history books as the second
New Providence base school
to repeat as champions.

And they’ve attained a
goal no other school has,
their school’s name will be
the only one from New
Providence to be inscribed
on the floating trophy three
times.

Rattlers won their first
title in 2002, made it to the_|_
final four in 2003, and
returned as champions in
2004.

The only other school to
be listed twice was the AF
Adderley Tigers, in 1987
and 1988. ,

Rattlers have become the
most feared school compet-
ing under the Government
Secondary School Sporting
Association (GSSSA)
umbrella.

They’ve dominated the
basketball arena, softball,
and are catching up in track
and field and soccer.

Johnson, who started out
as a student assistant at the
Arkansas State University,
had a passion for the game,
despite obtaining a Bache--
lors degree in Biology.

Job

His love for the sport was
seen in his play and grew as
time went on. He applied to
the Ministry of Education
for a job at CI Gibson in
December of 1995.

Upon receiving the posi-
tion, Johnson was given the
junior boys’ team for two
years. While heading this
programme he helped coach
them to a playoff appear-
ance.

Since the separation in the
school system, junior and
senior, Johnson remained at
the Rattlers to coach at the
senior level.

“There is no difference in
coaching the junior boys and
senior boys at the school lev-
el,” said a confident John-
son.

“I love working with the
kids, they’ve become a big
part of my life, they are like
family. When you look at it,
Ispend a lot of my time with
them, so the relationship we
have built is beneficial for
all,”

Rattlers basketball teams:
have become the force to
reckoned with, winning four
straight GSSSA tiles.

The four-peat was~
stopped by the CR Walker
Knights last year, but John-

SEE page 6B






































































































@ ABOVE: Shakara Brown of D.W Davies broke the junior girls
high jump record by jumping 1.60 metres yesterday at the GSSSA
junior school track meet while Raquel Williams (left) of C H
Reeves won the Junior Girls shot put with a record-breaking
throw at the same event.





(Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)
t


Sol

Ae EE NR

@ By ERICA WELLS

R Ian Stra-

chan, activist,

playwright and

author, is not

afraid to speak

his mind. What some fear to

say outside.of the-privacy of

their own homes, he says loud
and clear for all to hear.

While Dr Strachan has most
recently been in the news
because of his controversial
declaration that “Junkanoo is
the death of cultural develop-
ment”, this weekend his equal-
ly strong opinions on the Hait-
ian experience in the Bahamas
will take centre stage in his crit-
ically-acclaimed play Diary. of
Souls.

On the surface, the play is
based on the 1990 tragedy at
sea involving a Royal Bahamas
Defence Force boat and a
Haitian sloop. During that
incident hundreds of Haitians
died and were buried in a mass
grave on Bitter Guana Cay, an
uninhabited island in the Exu-

To $7000 Paid For Beatles



tr

I





EXHIBITIONS ® MUSIC ®© ENTERTAINMENT





WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005

@ DR Ian Strachan, whose play Diary
of Souls opens Friday at the Dundas
Centre for the Performing Arts, took
this photograph while in Haiti. His play
addresses the Haitian experience in
the Bahamas.



aitian tragedy

Dr Ian Strachan’s critically-acclaimed play to take centre stage

mas.
But what it really speaks to is
what Dr Strachan perceives as

the Bahamas’ general insensi-~
‘tivity towards Haitians living

here.

The emotional and powerful
account switches frequently
between the beach on Bitter
Guana Cay, where three
Haitians are stranded as
“undead” between feeling nei-
ther life nor death, and a psy-
chiatrist’s office where a
Bahamas Defence Force
marine is being treated for psy-
chological trauma.

“What struck me most about
the story was the nature of the
burial,” Dr Strachan told The
Arts in an interview at his
office at the College of the
Bahamas, where he is the chair
of English Studies.

“TI thought it was an insensi-
tive way to bury them, the pho-
tographs, the handling of it, the

tragedy of it. It happening at
our independence weekend.
These people seeking freedom
and a better way of life, meet-
ing their deaths in this way.
The incident is symbolic of our
insensitivity.

“I wondered if any effort had
been made to record the names
of the dead, to find out the
names of those who died, if
they had been interviewed to
record their version of events.”

According to official records,
after the RBDF boat inter-
cepted the sloop it was trying to
tow the vessel to safer waters

when it capsized. It was report-

ed that the Haitians panicked
and moved to one side of the
ship, causing it to overturn.
Another source said that the
boat simply broke apart when

.they tried to pull it.

In any event, many Haitians
died and were buried in a com-
mon grave.

| Signed On The Front

Ip To $2 10 Paid For Beatles.
oa One Page

Not long after the tragedy,
rumours began to surface

_ about that incident, about what
really happened, about-its_.
effect on some of the officers. -

involved, said Dr Strachan.

Some were suffering from |

symptoms of what profession-
als would call post traumatic
stress disorder and some had
to be treated for drinking prob-
lems. In one particular case, an

officer was said to be halluci- ©

nating. He tried to save phan-
tom migrants from drowning
in waters at the Coral Harbour
Base.

It was at this point that Dr
Strachan began thinking about
how to write about this inci-
dent, and kept the idea in his
head for almost a decade
before he finally put it down
on paper.

“I was in Washington DC
and I saw (Samuel) Beckett’s
‘Waiting for Godot’ and a light

came on. I figured out how I
could tell the story,” recalled
Dr Strachan.

_“I_wanted it to be the spirits
of these people,” he said. “Just
as men are waiting for God in
‘Waiting for Godot’, these spir-
its are waiting for man, wait-
ing for Bahamians to acknowl-
edge them, and see them, and
they’re waiting indefinitely.”

More than that, though, Dr
Strachan said that he wanted
to tell both sides of the story —
not only the tragedy of the
Haitians but the tragedy of the
Bahamian men who did their
duty and are suffering.

Ultimately, Dr Strachan is
hoping that Diary of Souls will
give a human face to what is
commonly referred to as the
“Haitian problem”.

“There is such irrationality,
fear, anger, and so little knowl-
edge of the history of the coun-
try Haiti, the reason people

come and the Bahamas’ cen-
turies-old relationship with that
country,” said Dr Strachan.

“I wanted to find a way to
force Bahamians to forget
where these people come from
and see them as fellow human
beings who have suffered
tragedy, and if they could
achieve that and arrive at some
degree of empathy then they
would hopefully be capable of
re-examining their pre-historic
ideas and their preconceived
notions and their learned prej-
udices.”

Dr Strachan describes the
play as a “fictional imaginative
interpretation of the aftermath
of a true event’

None of the people who died
that day can speak. None of
the people who survived can
speak, because they can’t be

See PLAY, Page 2C

The Bristish Colonial Hilton Hotel (Rum Kay Room)

1 Bay Street, Nassau. TEL: 242 322 3301

Sat Sth & Sun 6th March-10amto 5pm —s|



y

‘ed in
wen e ee enn ewe ee



PAGE 2C, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005

‘When Worlds Collide’

ith the publication

and impending

launch of his

debut novel,

“When Worlds
Collide”, Bahamian banker and attor-
ney Shawn A Forbes has added
another achievement to his resumé —
published author.

Set principally in England, the
Bahamas and the United States, the
work of fiction follows the lives of
three friends, Stephen Taylor, a
Bahamian man; Suresh Patel, a
British man of Indian parentage and
Tanya Collings, a Canadian woman.

Though from vastly different back-
grounds, the three form a lasting
friendship that helps them overcome
a number of issues including physi-

Bahamian author to launch debut novel

cal, sexual and emotional abuse, men-
tal breakdowns and HIV/AIDS.
Among other explosive topics, the
book addresses head-on the taboo
subjects of homosexuality in black
and Indian societies, incest and child
abuse.

Religion

According to the author, “When
Worlds Collide” examines the influ-
ence of religion and culture on soci-
ety’s approach to a number of social
issues and the often calamitous results
of the imposition of contrived moral
















-values on flawed human beings. How-

ever, “above all else,” says Mr Forbes,
“the book examines how the power of
love often acts as a catalyst to help
people to heal their damaged lives.”

Degree

Mr Forbes received a bachelor’s
degree, with honours, from the Uni-
versity of Manchester in 1991. He was
called to the Bar of England and
Wales in July, 1992, and was called
to the Bahamas Bar in 1 August of that

. same year.

THE TRIBUNE





ney, Trust officer and served as an
Assistant Registrar of Bahamian ships
with the Bahamas Maritime Author-
ity in London.

Currently, he is a Senior Vice Pres-
ident of the Nassau subsidiary of a
Geneva-based private bank, with
responsibility for the bank’s Legal
and Corporate Department.

“When Worlds Collide” will be for-
mally launched in Nassau on April
29 with a gala cocktail reception.
However, the books are already avail-
able for purchase through the pub-
lisher’s website at www.trafford.com.
For further information, Mr Forbes
can be contacted by e-mail at
thewriter@coralwave.com.








ing shows are $20.

328-5800/1 to register.

tours.

Ian Strachan’s Diary of Souls, the critically
acclaimed play examining the Haitian experience
in the Bahamas, will open at the Dundas Centre
for the Performing Arts on Friday, March 4 and
continues through March 6, 8pm. And again on
Friday, March 11 and Saturday, March 12, 8pm.
Call the box office at 393-3728 for ticket info.
. Tickets for Friday’s performance are $25, remain-

A Fabric Printing workshop will be held on
Saturday, March 5 and March 12, from 10am -
1pm at the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas.
‘The workshop is part of the NAGB’s Youth
Workshop series and is for children between the
ages of 12 and 18. J oie Lamare of Bahama Hand-
prints will be conducting the workshop. Cost: $10
members/$16 non-members. Call the gallery at

The National Collection @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, an exhibition that takes
the viewer on a journey through the history of fine
art in the Bahamas. It features signature pigces
from the national collection, including recent —
acquisitions by Blue Curry, Antonius Roberts
and Dionne Benjamin-Smith. Gallery hours, Tues-
day- Saturday, llam-4pm. Call 328-5800 to book

Past, Present and Personal: The Dawn Davies
Collection @.the National, Art Gallery.of the
Bahamas, Villa Doyle, West and West Hill
Streets. This exhibition is made up of key selec-
tions from Ms Davies’ extensive collection of

_ Bahamian art and is part of the NAGB’s Collec-
’ tor’s Series. Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday,
1lam-4pm. Call 328-5800 to book tours.

The Awakening Landscape: The Nassau Water-
colours of Gaspard Le Marchand Tupper, from
the collection of Orjan and Amanda Lindroth @

_ the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas. The
mid-nineteenth century paintings that make up the
exhibition are part of one of the earliest suites of

_ paintings of Nassau and its environs. Tupper was
a British military officer stationed at Fort Char-
lotte in the 1850s. The works show a pre-modern
Bahamas through the decidedly British medium of
watercolour. Gallery hours; Tuesday-Saturday,

11am-4pm. Call 328-5800 to book tours.









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Me 9

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Cea Eee






He has worked as a litigation attor-

Play (From page 1C)

found — and Dr Strachan has
tried.

The main characters in
Diary of Souls are three peo-
ple (souls) — two men and one
woman — based on people who
were probably on that fateful
voyage; and a defence force
officer who is living the hor-
rific aftermath of the experi-
ence.

Through hia characters, Dr
Strachan examines the source

of Haitian distress — “Was it’

the series of despots following
Toussaint .|’Ouverture that

‘impoverished the beautiful

country? Was it the brutality
of “Papa Doc” Duvalier and
his private militia, the Tons-
Tons Macoute that broke the
spirit of a nation? Why do
Bahamians shun and despise
Haitians, treating them like
dirt?”

The play was first staged in
1999 at-C W Sawyer School
and the Dundas Centre for the
Performing Arts in New Prov-
idence. After each production
the floor was opened for dis-
cussion on issues addressed in
the play, and some say it has
helped change local attitudes
toward Haitian immigrants for

the better.

Now six years later, Dr Stra-
chan and his Track Road The-
atre are bringing Diary of
Souls back to the local stage.

Last year the play travelled
to Barbados and New Orleans
as part of a commemoration
of the 200th anniversary of
Haitian independence, and it
received rave reviews.

It would seem as if the re-
staging of the play couldn’t

‘have come at a better time, as

the immigration situation in
the Bahamas has recently
resurfaced in the headlines of
the media.

“Any year that you would
put this on, people would say

. that it is topical, ” said Dr Stra-
chan “This doesn’t go away. ©

It has its peaks. It becomes
urgent and then less urgent
and then urgent again. Inci-
dents like this one have hap-
pened before and since.”

But what is of major con-

- cern to Dr Strachan is the

“alarmists” in society who feed
on people’s fears, “rather than
bringing any real reason or
information to the discussion
they just bring more igno-

He thinks that now more

" than ever there needs to be a

different type of discussion on
the issue.

_ “The nature of the (current)
discourse is so reminiscent of
the language that precedes
genocidal acts,” said Dr Stra-
chan, who is this semester
teaching a course which deals
with the theme of cruelty.

“When you hear talk about

‘them’ and ‘they are filthy’,

‘they are bad’, morally, ‘they
are a threat to our institutions
and our way of life’, ‘they are
using us’, ‘they are carriers of
disease’, ‘they are breeders
who are going to spawn and
swarm’, you are setting the
groundwork for the complete
dehumanisation of a people
and their elimination.

“All that’s missing is the
right charismatic, fascist bigot
to execute and put into action
these racist, classist, xenopho-
bic, irrational, hateful ideas.”

While Dr Strachan believes
that this is an issue that divides
the country, he suspects that
the majority of Bahamians are
tolerant. “It’s the loud people
who frighten and intimidate



the others.”

‘Not only is Dr Strachan try-
ing to foster a “different kind
of discussion” through his
play, he has spoken publicly
about these issues on a local
talk-show, and on Monday
night he was part of a panel
that addressed the question,

‘Who should be a Bahamian

citizen?”

“Our hope is in truth and in
information. We have to com-
bat irrationally with reason
and information and base our
decisions on reason rather
than emotion,” he said.

“Those of us who have con-
victions that are contrary to
the loud people must show
more courage and we have to |
stand up and be counted.”

Despite his concerns, Dr
Strachan does see signs that
Haitians in the community are
being accepted — through Cre-
ole radio programmes and lan-
guage lessons for school teach-
ers, among others. “Their cul-
ture is not being completely
marginalised and they are
being given a place.”

Dr Strachan believes that
the onus is on the artists and

the media to provide the pub-

lic with accurate information
to help them make informed
decisions. —

To address the very real
problems that accompany the
influx of immigrants into a
country of this size, Dr Stra-
chan suggests better border
control, more money for
health and education, the pros-
ecution of businesses and citi-
zens who continue to hire ille-
gal immigrants and aid pro-
grammes to help improve
conditions in Haiti, in an
attempt to stem the flow into

' the Bahamas.

“If we help Haiti improve
we will benefit,” said Dr Stra-
chan. “There needs to be a
multi-pronged approach.”

Dr Strachan would also like
education on these issues to
begin at an early age, as early
as elementary school. He has
just received a grant to have
Track Road Theatre’s plays
published, including Diary of
Souls, and is hoping that they
will make their way into
schools across the country.

“In elementary school there
are books to tell students how
to be nice to tourists, so why

' can’t there be books explain-

ing where all the different —
kinds of Bahamians come
from and why?” he asked.

High School students are
encouraged to see the play,
which runs at the Dundas Cen-
tre for the Performing Arts .
this weekend, and again the
following weekend. And the
play’s poster mimics a reggae
concert promotion in an
attempt to attract a younger -
audience. ;

Dr Strachan said that he is
fully prepared for those who
may take offence to his play
that shows Bahamian attitudes
towards Haitians in a harsh
but real light.

“Some may come and be
close minded or offended and
walk out,” he said. “Track
Road Theatre is used to that.
There hasn’t been a perfor-
mance where at least one per-
son hasn’t walked out, and I
don’t think it will be the last.”

¢ Diary of Souls opens at
the Dundas Centre for the
Performing Arts on Friday,
March 4 and continues .
through March 6, 8pm. And
again on March 11 and 12.

e oropcnomn ace

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005, PAGE 3C



Girls flock to Roberta Flack concert

rom the far left balcony,
a lady shouted “it’s get-
ting hot in here!” One of
the background vocalists
— the older one with the
deeper voice — sang “it’s getting hot in
here. . . so take off all your clothes . .

In turn, Roberta jokingly requested
“someone call security!”

Three to six decades old on aver-
age, there was a good mix of Bahami-
ans and tourists in attendance as the
Wyndham Crystal Palace Casino host-
ed Roberta Flack in concert this past
Saturday night.

In the crowd one could identify
many young professionals and moth-
ers with daughters. Surprisingly, there
were not a lot of couples, as husbands
seemed to have stayed at home while
their wives had a girls’ night out with
friends. With no teenagers looking to
create mischief, it was a good night for
a crowd with more mature tastes.
Even the Prime Minister, Perry G.

Christie and his party, and Allyson
Maynard Gibson, came out to enjoy.

To see the legendary soul artist per-
form her timeless love ballads, fans
streamed in when doors opened at
8.15pm. It was a capacity crowd, and
late arrivals did not find two seats
together. Tickets were sold out a day
before the event.

No cameras allowed and mobiles
turned off, approximately five min-
utes after 9pm, Ms Flack appeared
on stage. She went straight into her
performance, accompanied by a band
and two, vocalists with whom she per-
formed duets once sung with Donny
Hathaway and Peabo Bryson.

As only a star like Roberta could
get away with, she wore a deep purple
sequins, rather snug top and a light
blue satin, fish-tailed and gathered
skirt, with what appeared to be
blonde-coloured hair extensions.

Notwithstanding the quirkiness of
her attire, Ms Flack still exuded a cer-
tain sex appeal to her male fans.



@ ROBERTA FLACK

(Source:
www.soulwalking.co.uk)

The show opened with the lively
Oasis, and all-time favourites like The
Closer I Get to You, and Tonight, I
Celebrate My Love were performed.
The audience requested Jesse, a
touching song with real ‘conscious’

lyrics that moved many to little tears.
Even though her last record was cut
13 years ago, her songs still evoked
deep sentiment. Ms Flack obviously
felt her music as she performed.

A very interactive performance, she
had the crowd sing along with her,
Killing Me Softly, during which she
walked into the audience and took a
seat on the lap of a very cooperative
guest.

So comfortable on the piano,
Roberta Flack seemed to especially
enjoy performing her blues songs.

Trained in classical piano and voice, -

she is a former music student who, at
the age of 15, won a full scholarship to
Howard University to study music.

All night long, there were com-
ments throughout the crowd. One
attractive older lady with graying hair
screamed straight through the entire
concert. The older of the crowd def-
initely ensured that the older songs
were sung.

Folks in the very front of VIP seat-

ing could have been more animated,
though, and not appeared to have
comped their tickets just looking for
something to do; persons in general
admission would have gladly switched
places with them.

Although the fans were hoping and
waiting for the number one hit of her
debut album, The First Time Ever I
Saw Your Face —- Grammy award-
winning record of the year, 1972 —
they were disappointed when it wasn’t
a part of the agenda for the night.

At about 10.30pm, the audience
requested an encore and Roberta
sang Tradewinds, ending the concert
at a quarter to eleven.

Next to perform at the same venue
will be Connie Francis, known for
Where the Boys Are, Don’t Cry on’
My Shoulder and And I Love Him.

For those who missed Roberta this
time around, she will be in concert
with Earl Klugh, famous jazz musi-
cian, at the Broadmoor, Colorado in
early April.



Bring your Beatles memorabilia along

TO celebrate the 40th
anniversary of The Beatles visit
to the Bahamas to film scenes
for their second feature film
HELP! Beatles and rare music
memorabilia are holding valu-

’ ation days at The British Colo-

nial Hilton Hotel this weekend.

Members of the public are
invited to bring along any Beat-
les and music memorabilia (sig-
natures, personal possessions,
negatives, lyrics, film props,
magazines, concert posters, fly-
ers, programs, tickets, etc) for
a free valuation.

Onlookers

“We will be purchasing select-
ed items on the day. We have
been holding these valuation
days in all the major cities and
towns in the UK and Europe
over the last 10 years. They are
basically an opportunity for peo-
ple to bring in music memora-
bilia that they own and have it
appraised. Sometimes people
want to know the history of the
items, they have had. stored in

their attics for the last 30 or 40
years. What is it? Where was it
made? How many were made?
Is it real or fake? And most
important of all...what is it
worth? These are some of the
most commonly asked questions
at our valuation days,” accord-
ing to a statement released by
the dealers and valuers of Beat-
les and rare music memorabilia,
Tracks. During their time in the
Bahamas, between February
and March 1965, The Beatles
were very accessible to the gen-
eral public and would often chat
with the onlookers, sign auto-
graphs and be photographed
between takes.

Many of these items are still
believed to be in the area.

“So, if you took some pic-
tures, obtained the autographs
or got any other memorabilia at
the time bring it along for a free
valuation, you never know what
it might be worth,” according to
the statement. :

Bésides the Beatles, many
other artists have visited the

Bahamas, these include Paul

McCartney & Wings, The
Rolling Stones, Bob Marley,
AC/DC, Pink Floyd, Eric Clap-
ton and Robert Palmer and they
have all recorded albums on the
island.

Onlookers

All of the bands and artists
left behind a plethora of superb
mementos from their time in the
Bahamas, most of this material
has risen steadily in value over
the last 20 years. The last five
years has seen a significant
increase in the price of Beatles
memorabilia, in particular.
There has been a substantial
increase in the value of specific
types of Beatles ephemera,
mostly notably signatures, hand-
written song lyrics, concert
memorabilia, some novelty
products and unique one-off
items or those items that are
very personal to The Beatles
such as stage clothing. Most of
the items in these categories
have doubled in value in the
past five years.

Natural disasters can’t be prevented, but the effects can be more |
manageable with YOUR HELP.

Friends of Sri Lanka invite individuals and institutions wishing to
contribute towards the tsunami relief efforts in Sri Lanka to help in
one of the following ways:

1. Deposit your contribution into the special account opened at
Bank of The Bahamas -






At A Glance — The Value Of
Music Memorabilia

Beatles

Signatures — A set of ‘auto-
graphs on one page are valued
at up to $2500, ‘photographs
signed by The Beatles on the
image or on.a concert pro-
gramme are valued around

“$7000. Autographed Beatles

record sleeves are priced
between $10000 and $15000.

Handwritten Song Lyrics -
$40000+ ;

Concert Posters — Up to
$7000

Film Props — Depending on
the item the price could be up to
four figures.

Negatives with copyright —
Around $100 each

Concert Handbills — $500 to
$900°

Concert Programmes — $45 to
$60 :

Concert Tickets — Around $40

Wings
Signatures — Up to $250

EQUIPMENT

2.6 litre diesel engine, standard
transmission, power steering,
dual rear wheels, radio/cassette,
air conditioning, 1-ton

Concert Programmes -
Around $20

Rolling Stones

Signatures — Up to $350 per
set, more on a record, pro-
gramme or photograph.

Concert Posters — A 1960’s
Stones concert poster is worth
around $3500 whereas a 1970’s
poster is worth around $350.

Concert Handbills — Up to
$700

Concert Programmes — Up to

$70
Concert Tickets — Up to $45

Bob Marley

Signatures — Up To $500

Concert Posters — Up To $500

Concert Handbills - Up To
$200

Pink Floyd

Signatures — Up to $350

Concert Posters —- Up to $900

Concert Handbills — Up to
$350

J imi Hendrix

‘FEATURING GREAT






An ADVANCED front
BURCH IT eesti a
Eee eRe ra
TLRS MT Lat Ce
RUGGED and demandii

Signatures — Around $550

Concert Posters — Around
$3000

Concert Handbills — $250 to
$550

Concert Programmes —-
Around $75

Concert Tickets — Up to $100

Led Zeppelin

Signatures — Up to $900

Concert Posters —- Up to
$1350

Concert Handbills —- Up to
$150

Concert Programmes — Up to
$250

Concert Tickets — Up to $30

The Who

Signatures — Up to $350

Concert Posters — 1960’s
posters are valued at around
$1500 whereas 1970’s examples
are valued up to $180.

Concert Handbills — Between
$30 and $50 vera

Concert Programmes —
Around $25












Tsunami Relief for Sri Lanka

Account Number: 5265970

Bank of The Bahamas

Main Branch :
The deposit can be made at any branch of the bank.

payload (long bed),
tachometer
and seatbelts





double-cab

If you are paying by cheque, you can take your contribution
to A. I. D. at any of their locations in New Providence, Grand
Bahamas, Abaco, Eleuthera, Andros and Exuma.

| On-the-spot financing

HYUNDAI

Price includes rustproofing, licensing and inspection to birthday,
full tank of fuel and 12,000-mile/12-month warranty.

QUALITY

sales
LIMITED
#] AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET ° 322-3775 ° 325-3079

Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals, Queens Hwy, 352-6122 |
or Abaco Motor Mall, Don Mackay Blvd, 367-2916



Mail your cheque to Tsunami Relief for Sri Lanka.
P. O. Box CB 11665, Nassau, Bahamas. Cheques should be
made payable to “Tsunami Relief for Sri Lanka”.







Simply call us at 502-7094 — and we will arrange to
collect it from you.



Contributions will be forwarded. to the Sri Lanka Red Cross
Society for effective deployment...


PAGE 4C, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





ARO UN D

i)



Parties, Nightclubs
& Restaurants



Rave Saturdays @ The All New Club Eclipse.
DJ Scoobz spinning the best in Old Skool. Admis-
sion $35, all inclusive food and drink.

Fever @ Bahama Boom, Elizabeth St, down-
town, Fridays. The hottest party in the Bahamas
every Friday night. Admission $10 before mid-
night. First 50 women get free champagne. First 50
men get a free Greycliff cigar. Dress to impress.
For VIP reservations call 356-4612.

Cool Runnings is back with a Conscious Party

@ Hard Rock Cafe, Charlotte St North every Fri- ,

day. Classic reggae style music. Admission $10.

Mellow Moods every Sunday @ Fluid Lounge
and Nightclub, Bay St, featuring hits from yes-
terday — old school reggae. and rockers down-
stairs, and golden oldies upstairs. Admission:
Free. Doors open 9pm.

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters Sports
Bar. Drink specials all night long, including
karaoke warm-up drink to get you started. Party,
8pm-until.

Karaoke Nights @ Fluid Lounge and Night-
club. Begins 10pm every Tuesday. Weekly winners
selected as Vocalist of the Week — $250 cash prize.
Winner selected at end of month from finalists —

cash prize $1,000. Admission $10 with one free |

drink.

Reggae Tuesdays @ Bahama Boom. Cover
charge includes-a free Guinness and there should
be lots of prizes and surprises. Admission: Ladies
$10 and Men $15.

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports
Bar every Wednesday S5pm-8pm. Free appetiz-
ers and numerous drink specials.

* Flash Nights @ Club Fluid every Thursday. The
ultimate Ladies Night. Join Nassau’s and Miami
Beach’s finest men. Ladies only before 11.30pm
with free champagne. Guys allowed after 11.30pm
with $20 cover.

The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday.
Doors open at 9pm, showtime 11.30pm. Cover
charge $15. $10 with flyer.

Twisted Boodah Bar & Lounge every Friday @
Cafe Segafredo, Charlotte St North, featuring
world music, chillin’ jazz and soulful club beats.
Starting at 6pm. Beers $3, longdrinks $4.50.

Fantasy Fridays @ Fluid Lounge, featuring late
‘80s music in the VIP Lounge, Top of the Charts
in the Main Lounge, neon lights and Go Go
dancers. Glow sticks for all in before midnight.
Admission: Ladies free before 11pm, $15 after;
Guys $20 all night.

f

College Night @ Bahama Boom every Friday.

Admission: $10 with college ID, $15 without.

Dicky Mo’s Fridays @ Cable Beach. Happy
Hour - 3 for $10 mixed drinks and $1 shots.

Greek Saturdayz @ Bahama Boom, Elizabeth
Ave. Every Saturday the Phi Beta Sigma Frat
welcomes greeks, college grads and smooth oper-
ators. Admission $15 all night, $10 for greeks in
letters. Music by DJ Palmer, security strictly
enforced.

Chill Out Sundays @ The Beach Hut, West
Bay Street with fresh served BBQ and other spe-
cials starting from 4pm-10pm, playing deep, funky
chill moods with world beats. Cover $2.

Sweet Sunday Chill Out Soiree Lounge, every
Sunday, 4pm-midnight @ Patio Grille, British
Colonial Hotel.

Wet Sundays, every Sunday, noon-midnight @
Crystal Cay Beach. Admission $10, ladies free.

Carib Scene @ Club Fluid every Sunday. A














common grave on Bitter Guana Cay.



being treated for psychological trauma.

despise Haitians, treating them like dirt?

_ upplies.

night of Caribbean, Latin and Reggae flavours

‘for all audiences. Latin Flair in the VIP Lounge;

Old School Reggae and Soca in the Main Lounge.
Ladies in free before 11pm. $10 after 11pm. Men,
$15 cover charge.

Jay Mitchell and Hot KC @ Palm Court
Lounge, British Colonial Hilton, Wednesday-
Thursday 8pm-12am.

Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley’s Restaurant
& Lounge, Eneas St off Poinciana Drive. Fea-
turing Frankie Victory at the key board in the
After Dark Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to mid-
night. Fine food and drinks.

Paul Hanna performs at Traveller’s Rest, West
Bay St, every Sunday, 6.30pm-9.30pm.

The Arts

Alton Lowe will exhibit a group of recent
paintings at the Nassau Beach Hotel in the
Commonwealth Room, starting Saturday, Feb-
ruary 27 through March 2, 10am to 7pm daily.

Ian Strachan’s Diary of Souls, the critically

.acclaimed play examining the Haitian experi-

ence in the Bahamas, will open at the Dundas
Centre for the Performing Arts on Friday,
March 4 and continue through March 6, 8pm.
And again on Friday, March 11 and Saturday,
March 12, 8pm. Call the box office at 393-3728
for ticket info. Tickets for Friday’s performance
are $25, remaining shows are $20.

Indigo, a film about gifted children on earth,



‘Diary of Souls’

DIARY of Souls, a drama written and directed by Dr Ian Strachan, playwright and chair
of COB’s School of English Studies, opens this Friday.

It is a fictional interpretation of tragic events that took place in Exuma in July 1990, and
is considered by some to be Strachan’s best play yet. When intercepted by the Defence
Force, a Haitian vessel allegedly capsizes. The 39 Haitians who drowned were buried in a

.Strachan’s Track Road Theatre will bring this story to the stage in an emotionally
powerful account, says an online review. The play switches. frequently between the beach
on Bitter Guana Cay, where three Haitians are stranded as “undead” between feeling nei-
ther life nor death, and a psychiatrist’s office where a Bahamas Defence Force marine is

Strachan also lets his characters investigate the heart of the matter, the source of Hait-
ian distress — Was it the series of despots following Toussaint Ouverture that impoverished
the beautiful country? Was it the brutality of “Papa Doc” Duvalier and his private mili-
tia, the Tons-Tons Macoute that broke the spirit of a nation? Why do Bahamians shun and

Diary of Souls opens at the Dundas Centre for the Performing Arts on Friday night @
8pm. Tickets are $25 (opening night only). Showtimes continue on Saturday and Sunday,
+hen continues on March 11 and 12 at a cost of $20 (same time). Tickets can be purchased

't the Dundas box office from 10am till 4pm, Heaven Sent Ppermacy and Tony’s Cabinet





| HEAVEN SENT PHARMACY -
TONY'S CABINETS
DUNDAS BOX OFFICE

/ PH: 393-3728

|
TRACK ROAD THEATRE

PRG PU CYFi ON

their purpose and work of healing, peace and
love, will be shown @ Unity Centre of Light,
East Ave, Centreville (directly behind Centre-

ville Food Store).on Friday, March 4, starting at .

6.30pm. Admission $10 adults, $7 children. For
more information call 328-1325.

A Fabric Printing workshop will be held on
Saturday, March 5 and March 12, from 10am -
Ipm at the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas. The workshop is part of the NAGB’s
Youth Workshop series and is for children
between the ages of 12 and 18. Joie Lamare

of Bahama Handprints will be conducting the .

workshop. Cost: $10 members/$16 non-mem-
bers. Call the gallery at 328-5800/1 to register.

The National Collection @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, an exhibition that
takes the viewer on a journey through the his-
tory of fine art in the Bahamas. It features sig-
nature pieces from the national collection,
including recent acquisitions by Blue Curry,
Antonius Roberts and Dionne Benjamin-Smith.
Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 1lam-4pm.
Call 328-5800 to book tours.

Past, Present and Personal: The Dawn Davies
Collection @ the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, Villa Doyle, West and West Hill Streets.
The exhibition is part of the NAGB’s Collector’s
Series. Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 1lam-
4pm. Call 328-5800 to book tours.

The Awakening Landscape: The Nassau
Watercolours of Gaspard Le Marchand Tupper,
from the collection of Orjan and Amanda Lin-
droth @ the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas. The mid-nineteenth century paintings































NASSAU





that make up the exhibition are part of one of
the earliest suites of paintings of Nassau and its
environs. Tupper was a British military officer
stationed at Fort Charlotte in the 1850s. The
works show a pre-modern Bahamas through
the decidely British medium of watercolour.
Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 1lam-4pm.
Call 328-5800 to book tours. .



Health

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5.30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at
their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville.

‘Call 323-4482 for more info.

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the
third Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors Hos-
pital conference room.

The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2.30pm (except August and
December) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor
Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital, the. official training centre
of the American Heart Association offers CPR
classes certified by the AHA. The course defines ff
the warning signs of respiratory arrest and gives
prevention strategies to avoid sudden death syn-
drome and the most common serious injuries and
choking that can occur in adults, infants and chil-
dren. CPR and First Aid classes are offered every
third Saturday of the month from 9am-1pm. Con-
tact a Doctors Hospital Community Training Rep-
resentative at 302-4732 for more information and

" Jearn to save a life today.

REACH - Resources & Education for
Autism -and related Challenges meets from
7pm — 9pm the second Thursday of each month
in the cafeteria of the BEC building, Blue Hill
Road.

Civic Clubs



The Bahamas Historical Society’s monthly
meeting is scheduled for 6pm on March 17 at
the Museum on Shirley Street and Elizabeth
Avenue. Dr Donald Hopkins of the Carter
Presidental Center, a descendent of Long
Island, Harbour Island and Abaco, will give a
presentation entitled “Posing Questions, Pon-
dering Records and Probing the Genes:
Researching Family Histories in the Bahamas.”
The public is invited to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1905 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm
@ BEC Cafe, Tucker Rd. Club 9477 meets Friday,
7pm @ Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm
A19, Jean St. Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pm
@ British Colonial Hilton. Club 1600 meets Thurs-
day, 8.30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes. Club 7178
meets Tuesday, 6pm @ The J Whitney Pinder
Building, Collins Ave. Club 2437 meets every
second, fourth and fifth Wednesday at the J Whit-
ney Pinder Building, Collins Ave at 6pm. Club
612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau
Resort, Cable Beach.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @
the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau
Resort, Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first
Tuesday, 7pm @ Gaylord’s Restaurant,
Dowdeswell St. Please call 502-4842/377-4589 for

more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second
Tuesday, 6.30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office,
Ath floor meeting room.

The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month
in the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, Bay St.

Send all your civic and social events to The
Tribune via fax: 328-2398 or e-mail: outthere@tri-
bunemedia.net
THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005, PAGE 5C

The Tribune & Solomon’s Mines



FIRST PRIZE SECOND PRIZE _ THIRD PRIZE
$150.00 GIFT BASKET | $100.00 GIFT BASKET $75.00 GIFT BASKET
In Each Age Group : In Each Age Group ee eC poled) 3









CONTEST RULES
1. Children ages 4-5, 6-8, and 9-10. Staff members and relatives are not eligible to enter. Og
2. Coloring may be done with crayons. Adults or older child may assist the child in filling out the entry form, BUT NOT IN COLORING THE ENTRY
5. Enter as much times as you wish. All entries must be in The Tribune by 4pm on Monday, March 21st, 2005. Winners will be announced Wednesday,
March 23, ZOO. Look for your names in The Tribune or listen to 1OOJAMZ / JOY FM to hear your name.

4. There will be one firet-prize winner, one second-prize winner and one third-prize winner in each age groups.
5. All entries become the property of The Tribune and may be used for any purpose including, but not limited to, publication in a future issue.

Recs Ota oe leek nee

Child’s Name: Parent/Guardian Signature

Address: Tel: Age:

eta nce a ttnt
Y
@
@

SOLOMON’s MINE

Available At All Solomon’s Mines Locations.





a eT Ak NRE el oo we we et ee te
PAGE 6C, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





‘We must protect those



By PETURA BURROWS
_ Tribune Feature Writer

here is a tendency to get
involved in much late-
night entertainment at
Spring Break. Some-
times it gets out of hand,
then violent, and the safety of the
partygoer becomes an issue.

With thousands of students from
various parts of the US and other
countries expected to spend their
Spring Break in the Bahamas, police
are calling for Bahamians to protect
this segment of the tourist popula-
tion, and for spring breakers to pay
close attention to their safety.

New Providence in particular sees a
dramatic influx of visitors during this
period — from the last week in Febru-
ary to the first week in April.

According to press liaison officer,
Chief Supt Hulan Hanna, the police
are “obviously” concerned with the
students’ safety when they come to
the Bahamas for Spring Break.

Tourist

They are a part of the “tourist prod-
uct”, he says, and have come here
with the anticipation of having a good
time free of incident.

From the police’s standpoint, Supt
Hanna says that they are doing every-
thing they can to ensure that locals
who may be “inclined” to interfere
with and frustrate visitors are unable
to do so.

“We have invited these people to
our country by way of our marketing
system, by way of the Ministry of
Tourism’s promotional programmes,
and it would be a shame — a tremen-
dous shame — if they come here and
they are frustrated in their attempts to
enjoy themselves,” he told Tribune
Entertainment.

While their safety is a concern, their
behaviour, which Supt Hanna says
may become “rowdy” if they
overindulge in alcoholic beverages,
is also a concern for the police.

Senior officers have been instructed
to deal with these persons in a “firm
way”, but also in a way that will
“guarantee” that they continue having
fun.

“But if we see them getting into
mischief then it’s our mandate to dis-
courage that and to let them know
that there are laws,” he adds.

Damage

According to Supt Hanna, there
have also been cases in the past where
property owners have been concerned
about damage — to property, bed-
ding, infrastructure, and the inordi-
nate use and abuse of portable fire
extinguishers. However, he feels that
this type of behaviour has been
“scaled back”.

He attributes this to the “vigilance”
of the industry stake holders.

It may also be that various enter-
tainment groups and travel agents
have attracted more reserved spring
breakers.

“They have sought to steer us
towards a different market, down to
the kind of visitor that the country
can feel comfortable having during
Spring Break,” says Supt Hanna.

The US Department of State
Bureau’s Consular Affairs highlights

on its website (http://travel.state.gov)
, “Spring Break in the Bahamas”. It
points to various issues that prospec-
tive spring breakers should know
before coming to this country.

The advisory warns that most crim-
inal incidents take place in a part of
the city that is not usually frequented *
by tourists. However, it states that
crime and violence are increasingly

moving into the more “upscale”
tourist and residential areas.
Though the police in the Bahamas
make a “special effort” to increase
patrols and expand surveillance dur-
ing Spring Break, Consular Affairs
says that exercising caution and “good
judgement” will ultimately help to

ensure that the student’s stay in the
- Bahamas is a pleasant and safe one.

The vast majority of arrests, acci-
dents and violent crimes suffered by
US citizens in the Bahamas involve
alcohol, according to that organisa-
tion.

“Visitors found alone or incapaci-
tated have been victims of rape, rob-
bery and assault. Intoxicated young
women have been sexually assaulted
after reportedly being drugged,” it



4 NEW Providence in particular sees a dramatic influx of visitors during this period — from the last week in February to the first week in April.

tudents on Spring Break’

@ THOUSANDS of students
(pictured) from various parts of
the United States and other
countries are expected to
spend their Spring Break in the
=F: lar are oe

‘(The Tribune archive photo)



claims.

Consular Affairs advises US stu-
dents to know their “drinking com-
panions”, and stay in a group of
friends when in clubs, bars, out walk-
ing in deserted areas, or in a taxi at
night, which is good advice for any
spring breaker.

Supt Hanna says that the Bahamas
welcomes “the hundreds, the thou-
sands” of spring breakers to come
and spend their moneys, and to know
that the Bahamas is still a “very, very,
very” safe place.

Traditionally, alcohol consumption
is a major part of the Spring Break
holiday.

Supt Hanna says that if alcohol is
not the “key” contributor to many of
the problems that arise around this
time of year, it is “certainly a signifi-
cant contribution”.

Drinking

“These people would have been
studying for weeks, perhaps months,
and when you get out of school you
let your hair down and you want to
have a good time. Some people may
be binge drinking, others may just be
partying and frolicking. They feel
good while they are downing the sub-
stance, and later on, when it really
reacts they may find that they are
challenged in many ways,” says Supt
Hanna.

His advice to spring breakers: “We
encourage them if they are coming
to the Bahamas to be responsible.
And if they are in the company of
others who seem to be behaving in a
way that is going to be harmful to -
themselves, then to discourage that
kind of behaviour. They should enjoy
themselves, but in the same token do
not create a situation that will cause
harm to them and perhaps even
embarrassment.”

The Consular Affairs website also
notes that a number of Americans
have been killed or very seriously
injured in jet ski, and scooter acci-
dents — both popular activities for
spring breakers.


-THE TRIBUNE WEUNESVAY, MANUN 2, cuuvs, FAUE 1 U

ENTERTAINMENT

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