Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text






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HIGH
LOW



Volume: 101 No.81



74F
64F

~ PART SUNNY
and WARN |

Witnesses see.
pair flee bus
outside court

. By Kilah Rolle
Tribune Staff Reporter

TWO prisoners on remand

for armed robbery escaped
from a prison bus yesterday
afternoon after breaking the
iron mesh at the rear of the
vehicle and fleeing on foot
onto the nearby street. —
The bus was parked at the
compound between the Nas-
sau Street Police Station and
the Magistrate's Courts on
Nassau Street. 7
A small crowd of people

outside the courts observed |
the escape, which happened °

around 1.30pm.

One eye-witness said: "Well
the first thing we noticed was
this loud banging coming

_ from the bus. Every once in
a while they would start

- making noise and bang at °
the same time. Then all ofa

sudden I saw a pair of feet
break through the wire and
this guy managed to jump
down out of the bus. About
30 seconds later I saw anoth-
er guy jump out. The first
. guy ran up the hill, and the
other one watched to see
- which way the guy ran and
‘instead of following him

went across through the cor-
ner."

A female eyewitness agreed
with his account of the
events and added: "That bus
was unattended for the
longest, they always left
there unattended."

Police at the Nassau Street
Police Station, who are
assisting the prison officers

. With their search, identified

the two prisoners as 32-year-
old Ian Reckley of Elizabeth
Estates or Seabreeze Lane,
and Jason Flowers, age
unknown, from Roseville
Avenue.
While at the police station,
The Tribune learned that a
concerned citizen called the
Nassau Street police station
around 3pm to report that
two men had run across her
Wilkinson Street yard.
Although the eyewitness
reported that the men ran in
separate directions, one
police officer reported that
the men had been hand-
cuffed and there would have

-been no way for them to
’ escape those shackles.

"They would have probably
run together," said the offi-
cer, "and when they get

SEE Page Three


















The Trib



The Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005

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BASIL FITZGERALD GORDON, who is accused of murdering two people, is shown here on his way to the

Supreme Court yesterday for the start of his trial.

By FELICITY INGRAHAM
and PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporters

A DOUBLE murder trial
began in the Supreme Court
yesterday with Basil Fitzgerald
Gordon being accused of killing
a 26-year-old man and his
grandmother on Father's Day
two years ago. .

Rosnell Newbold, who was

75 at the time, and her grandson
Kevin Wilson were stabbed

numerous times about the body:

on June 16, 2002, after an
intruder jumped through a win-
dow in the early morning hours.

Prosecutors Gawaine Ward
and Antoinette Woodside
opened their case against Gor-
don on Monday morning, bring-
ing the charges of housebreak-
ing and double murder against

une







Photo: Mario Duncanson

Double death charge

him.

The accused is represented
by attorney Dorsey McPhee.

The first witness to take the
stand in Justice Anita Allen's
court was police photographer
DC Basil Evans, who brought
photographs of the murder
scene.

DC Evans pointed out to the

SEE Page 10 —

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probe

By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Senior Staff Reporter

OBSERVERS of the Syd-
ney Stubbs bankruptcy case
are waiting for the Registrar
of the Supreme Court to
advertise for Mr Stubbs’ cred-
| itors and start the process of
determining to whom and
how much Mr Stubbs may be
in debt.

‘Mr Stubbs’ hearing was
adjourned in January until his
creditors could be
approached to sign an agree-
ment allowing the ruling to
be struck off. ;

Queen’s Counsel Thomas
Evans, the attorney repre-
senting Mr Stubbs, would not
comment on how far the MP
has advanced in this process
because of attorney client
privilege but said that a date
has not yet been set for Mr
Stubbs to reappear in court.

‘The debt which caused Mr
Stubbs to be declared bank-
rupt was owed to Gina Gon-
zalez, the woman who
instructed her attorneys to
collect more than $70,000
from Mr Stubbs. The amount
stemmed from a $55,000 loan
made to Mr Stubbs and
another man on the basis of a
promissory note.

Mr Stubbs has since satis-
fied that debt, but Mrs Gon-
zalez’s lawyer Wayne
Munroe said that the MP
owes in excess of $20,000 in
legal fees ordered against him
in his bankruptcy appeal.

When Mr Stubbs was last
in court, the court confirmed
the registrar of the Supreme
Court as his trustee and gave
her permission to advertise
for Mr Stubbs’ creditors. That
has not yet happened.

“How it works is that the
registrar must advertise for
anyone who is a creditor and
people put in their claims and
she holds a meeting to see
who is owed and draws up a
list of creditors according to
the value owed to them.

“Either MrjStubbs will
have the financial where-

SEE Page 10



PURINA





debt |



PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005

LOCAL NEWS

.

THE TRIBUNE





Bahamas has a right to
compete in global trade

RIBUNE columnist Larry

Smith is trying to sell the

idea that Bahamian

involvement with the rest

- Of the world is inimical to

our relationship with the United

States, and also the perception that

the Bahamian political directorate

goes out of its way to antagonise the
Americans.

Mr Smith asks, «Why do we
always rub the Americans the wrong
way?” One example of rubbing the
Americans the wrong way, according
to Mr Smith in his column Tough Call,
February 2, goes like this:

“In 1992...The Bahamas signed a
mutual legal assistance treatyewith the
US, and then for the next eight years

failed to respond to hundreds of treaty

requests.”

Mr Smith says that according to

“some analysts” this led the US to

support the OECD attack on our’

financial services sector.

I have no doubt that thére were
problems involved in administering
the MLAT but I believe it is a mis-
chievous exaggeration to suggest that
the Bahamas government ignored its
treaty obligations for eight years.

A former member of the FNM gov-
ernment says that the MLAT was

. brought into force in 1990. Subsequent
. to that, hundreds of requests for legal
assistance in criminal matters were
processed with the direct assistance
of the Office of the Attorney General.

Says former Attorney Gen eral Carl
Bethel:

“The problem which arose was
where the ‘criminal matter’ was really
based upon alleged crimes against the

.. tax laws of other. countries.” .

‘“Until the mid-1990s it was acceptéd
- as gospel by the common law. system

that no country was obligated or could.
be required to enforce the tax laws of

another country. The Bahamas did
not decide this principle. It was decid-
ed by English judges at the very high-
est levels for hundreds of years.
“The Bahamas was well within its
rights to refuse to collect taxes, or to

- help foreign governments to collect.

taxes. The offshore industry through-
‘out the world was structured on that
basis.

“Tt was during this period that those,
comparatively few, requests which
involved enforcing income tax laws,
were refused either by the courts or
the competent authority.

“In the mid-1990s the world’s think-

ing changed and pressure grew to.

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erode strict bank secrecy laws through
the use of international treaties and
conventions. These treaties and con-
ventions then obliged sovereign gov-
ernments to pass laws which eroded, if
not eliminated, the old common law
protection.

“The blacklisting crisis brought the

reality of the world’s new ideas home >

very forcefully. Acting in the best
interests of The Bahamas, the gov-
ernment enacted the financial sector
reform laws of 2000. The present gov-
ernment has gone so far as to bring the
Tax Information Exchange Agree-
ment into force, both for criminal tax
matters and civil tax matters.

-“The Bahamas vigorously and effec-

tively implemented those aspects of
the new laws which called for inter-
national co-operation. If we had not

done so we would still be blacklist-

ed.”

If it were left to Mr Smith The
Bahamas would have relations with

nobody but the Americans: Not with .

the Caribbean (he is sick of reading
about the Caribbean Single Market
and Economy). Certainly not with
China.

In fact, Mr Smith comes right out
and says as much: “For a real geopo-
litical ally, look no further than Mia-
mi”!

It is interesting that Mr Smith should
choose to relate us not to the US cap-
ital Washington but to Miami, partic-
ularly at a time when some arrogant
people i in the Cuban émigré commu-

‘nity in that city are trying to make life

difficult.for us.

But never mind, Bahamians: should
not indulge in the joys of foreign trav-
el to such places as China and seek
trade opportunities there. We should
be content to let the Miami Cubans
buy Chinese goods and then sell to us
with their mark-up. They so need the
money!

Mr Smith accuses me of echoing the
Foreign Ministry’s line that there are
no undue concerns about our rela-
tions with China and Cuba.

My comments about China and
Cuba are my own. Mr Smith should
know by now that I am not reluctant



POINT
Arthur Foulkes

to express my views regardless of who
agrees or disagrees. And I do not
resort to peddling my own opinions

behind unnamed “sources” or “ana-_

lysts” or “observers”.

Under ordinary circumstances I.

would credit any opponent in a public
debate with expressing his own views:
But I think I am now entitled to ask
Mr Smith whose opinions is he echo-

‘ing and for what particular American

interests is he speaking.

Our politicos seem “strangely infat-
uated” with China, according to Mr
Smith. Well, no. He attributes that to
“diplomatic sources” who think it is
because China is “so exotic and so far
away”.

What condescending rubbish! Mr :

Smith ought to know, again, that
Bahamians, not just our politicians,
have always been interested in the big
wide world beyond Miami. On a per
capita basis we rate quite high among
the peoples of the world i in the love of

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travel, and we travel afar. Miami is
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Mr Smith asks, “...How can we con-
vince our political elites to focus on
the things that really matter and
eschew the glamour of foreign travel
and the excitement of geopolitical

. games.”

Many things matter, of course,
including the geopolitical games
played by others around the world,
and we will not be able to escape the

' effect of those.games. We need at least

to know what is happening and, with
_ our friends, maybe even influence an
outcome or two.

But that statement reminded me of
a similarly supercilious comment quot-
ed in The Tribune and referred to in
this column February 10, 2004:

“Haiti’s problems are an interna-
tional issue. If it is to be sorted out
by outsiders, those outsiders need to
be people of very high calibre who |
are used to the subtleties and nuances
of international diplomacy. Caribbean —
politicians are local politicians. They
don’t have the expertise for this kind
of work.”

The truth is that all paliticians are
local politicians but those who acquire
an understanding for the subtleties
and nuances of international diplo-
macy are not restricted to the devel-
oped countries.

The Caribbean has demonstrated
time and again that because a country
or a region is small does not mean it
cannot produce “high calibre” intel-
lects, intellects big enough to under-
stand the ways of the world.

* ok

The Bahamas and the United States
will continue to be the best of friends —
and our destinies will always be tied
together.

-But that does not mean The -
Bahamas should have no other
friends, no other investors and trading

partners, should stay out of the glob-
alization process, and should content
itself with being a “protectorate” of
Miami.

We should all put aside the rhetoric
and attitudes of the Cold War and
work for a new world comity with ~
globalised trade based on freedom
and fair play, nueie nespect and just
laws.

re here gemg set er®

“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”





THE TRIBUNE





Officials
set fo
probe
racial
abuse

claims

by weiner
Staff Writer











A TEAM from the
Bahamian Consulate im
Miami will leave for
Georgia today to imves-
tigate claims that
Bahamian prisomers
incarcerated at the
McRae Correctional
Facility are the victims
of racial abuse.

The Ministry of For-
eign Affairs said yester-
day that it was im pos-
session of a letter from
inmates purporting to
represent the views of
Bahamians incarcerated
at the prison.

The letter writer
claims that Hispamic
inmates at the prison are
preying on the Bahami-
ans and that while the
Miami Consulate office
has been made aware of
the situation nothing las
been dome.

The ministry said that
a report will be issued to
the country as soon as
‘the facts are known.

Meanwhile, the
Bahamas is participating
in the first in a series of
joint initiatives by Min-
ister of Foreign Affairs
Fred Mitchell and US
Ambassador to the
Bahamas John Rood to
ensure that the two

































| need and importance of
working together im the
fight against drugs,
smuggling and economic
crimes.

Mr Mitchell is expect-
ed to travel to Washing-
ton today, for a series of
meetings with United
States semators and to
‘attend a jumch with the
Florida Congressional
Delegation, hosted by
Mr Rood.

The minister will be
joined at the lunch by
Ambassador Sidmey
Poitier, the Bahamas’
Ambassador to Japan,
members from the Unit-
ed Nations Educational,
Scientific and Cultural
Organisation
(UNESCO).

Minister Mitchell will
also attend meetings
with officials of the US
State Department.






























ii
i





Telephone: 341-6593 for more details






“countries and their lead- |
fers are aware,of the.








SPLRCLA CE RAE OOO ROONEY

| Dail

at Nassa









LOCAL NEWS



MR STEVENS - innocent bystander







suspects

jail bus

FROM Page One

around the East Street area,
they can find anyone to cut
them free."

There were about 20 pris-
oners on the bus, which left
the compound shortly after
2pm on its way to Her
Majesty's Prison in Fox Hill.

According to police
sources, a prisoner escort
officer was on the bus at the
time, and the vehicle had not
been left unattended.

The source explained that
the door had probably been

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locked, and the officer might
have been distracted by the
noise the other detainees had
been making.

According to police, once a
prisoner is charged with
escape they can face up to
an additional two years on
their sentence, but the sever-
ity of the sentencing is at the
discretion of the magistrate.
Police are appealing to
members of the public to
contact them if they spot the
escapees.







By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE widow of the man shot
for apparently no reason on
Friday has urged government
to resume hangings to make
examples of murderers.

Sandra Stevens, the wife of
murder victim Shepherd
Bradley Stevens, said that are
just too many murders taking
place in the country. “I am
angry everyone has a gun, I
am furious,” she said yester-
day.

Mr Stevens, 43, became the
country’s 11th murder victim
this year after being shot in
the head following a robbery
at the Twilight Club, a sports
bar located just off Market
Street.

According to police, after
the two armed men received
“an undetermined amount” of
cash they started to flee on
foot when one of the men
turned around and fired
directly at Mr Stevens, hitting
him in the head and killing
him.

In an interview with The
Tribune she said that her hus-
band’s death feels like a piece
of her has been chopped off.

She said her husband of 20
years was an excellent
provider and father to their
three children - Jamaal, 22,
LeByron, 18, and Leticha,14.
She said it is not easy on any
of them, but they are coping.

According to the club’s pro-
prietor, Hubert Smith Jr, there
was no reason for the shoot-
ing.

Mr Stevens was an elections
supply officer at the Parlia-
mentary Registration Depart-
ment at the time of his death.

Yesterday, his colleagues
and friends at the department
met with counsellors as they
tried to come to terms with
their grief.

Ricardo Higgs, an officer in
the department, told The Tri-
bune that the employees were

extremely saddened’ and’ "

shocked by what happened.

“Anytime, something hap-
pens so sudden like this, it
makes people wonder.”

Mr Higgs said that as a col-
league Mr Stevens had a good
work ethic and always per-
formed his duties. He said that
while he did not know him
outside of the office ‘he

appeared to be a nice guy and.

would be missed.

Mr Stevens had served as a
marine in the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force from August
17, 1980 to April 30, 1999
reaching the rank of Leading
Seaman. He was then dis-
charged and transferred to the
Parliamentary Registration
Department.

TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005, PAGE 3



ring back hanging ,

Widow of shooting

victim says: “I
amangry that
everyone has a gun” |

Upon hearing of his death,

Lt Darren Henfield, the pub-

lic relations .officer at the.

force said, “ Commodore
Davey Rolle, the officers,
senior rates and marines of
the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force are extremely sad-

dened by the apparent sense- .

less slaying of Bradley
Stevens, a former member
and assure the family that

_ they are in our prayers.”

Police have confirmed that
they have arrested one man
who is in custody for ques-
tioning. They said investiga-
tions were continuing.

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
: Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

t

“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”













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College doing
country great
disservice

EDITOR, The Tribune.

IN preparation for my
upcoming graduation from the
College of the Bahamas I went
to the Technology block to get
my graduation form signed. I
noticed a note posted on the
door as J entered stating that
the Technology office had been
permanently closed and all mat-
ters of concern should be
addressed to the chair of the
Natural Sciences Department.
To say I was upset was an
understatement; livid would be
more accurate. This was the first
notice the administration had
given to students alerting them
to any action being taken. There
was no meeting, no public
announcement, no prior com-
munication to the students stat-
ing the college’s wish to. close
the school of technology only
that plain computer typed note,
size 8x11.

Did the College’s failure to
communicate to the students
surprise me? No, sadly, as a
technology student I have

_ become used to this lack of con-

sideration from the College.
Last semester, two of my class-
es were threatened to be can-

‘celled even though I needed

both classes in order to gradu-
ate. And was I surprised that
they were closing the School of
Technology? No, this appears
to have been in works for some-
time. Current and new enrolling
students wishing to get into the
pre-engineering programme are

‘being told by advisers that the

College has communicated with

. them not to sign up anymore

students for the programme and
are:being placed in Physics and

- Math, -without-the courtesy of a

fair explanation.

Why is the College slowly
phasing out the Technology
programme of the Bahamas? Is



LETTERS.

letters@tribunemedia.net
it because from The College’s
viewpoint, the programme, to




put it bluntly, isn’t making...

enough money? Yes, The
School of Technology does not

have large student numbers as’

in for example the School of
Business but then that does not
seem unusual for many schools
I have visited online in my
attempt to transfer. The Col-
lege seems to look at education
in terms of immediate dollars
and cents and not as social
investment for long term bene-
fit to society. By their apparent
action is the College saying this
nation does not have a need for
people with engineering and
technology education, training
and skills? Would they prefer
that we pay heavily for foreign
engineers to be those who
design and construct our roads,
seaports, and manage our water
supply and environmental con-
cerns when it is possible to have
Bahamians do it? The person-
nel on current Harrold Road
projects are all young Bahami-
ans most of whom passed

through the technology pro- _

grammes in the recent past.
Alumni of the College of the
Bahamas, School of Technology

presently work in the Ministry

of Works, BEC and other such
departments. If the college then
had closed the technology pro-
gramme because of small num-
bers in Technology, what would
have become of these alumni?

Instead of trying to close the
Technology department, the
College needs to make an effort
to recruit more students to the
programme. Not many high
school students have the requi-
site subjects such as physics,
mathematics and chemistry. I
know of a few high school grad-

uates who wanted to enter the
technology programme but
when told they may have to do
up to a year of college prep, —
they no longer wished to join
and decided to do something
else. This was because they took
options such as commerce and
accounts in high school or these
classes were not taught at their
schools. Most students from our
high schools lack a real under-
standing of engineering/tech-
nology; this is because they are
poorly informed about the
nature of technology education.
I was one of them and that is
why I spent three instead of the
expected two years for comple-
tion of my associate’s degree.

' This is where the College and

the Ministry of Education need
to create dialogue on trying to
stimulate the interest of stu-
dents in technology and ensure
that the students wishing to
enter into the school of tech-
nology are properly informed
about the programme. They
could offer incentives such as
giving scholarships to students
interested in technology.

The Bahamas is always crying
about the lack of trained
Bahamians in the technical
areas and having to hire for-
eigners to do the technical jobs,
and yet its premiere tertiary
institution is quietly smother-
ing the technology programme.
The College of the Bahamas is
doing this country a great dis-
service. The college’s adminis-
tration needs to realise that the
College of.the Bahamas’ pri-
mary purpose is to ensure that it
provides The Bahamas with
persons with the skills neces-
sary to make contributions that
will advance The Bahamas,‘and
not to line its pockets. -

MAEGAN CARTWRIGHT
Nassau,
- February 14, 2005.

No use blaming PLP
for school neglect

_EDITOR, The Tribune.

‘I READ with interest the
response rendered by Mr Dion
A Foulkes, JP, and former
FNM Minister of Education,
Youth and Sports with regard to

. the closure of the A F Adderley

Junior High School. I should
like to take this opportunity to
publicly thank Mr Foulkes for




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reminding the nation that the
record of the FNM during its
10-year period as the govern-
ment of the country speaks for
itself and in some cases is wor-
thy of praise.

I should also like to empha-
sise that one would have to be
maliciously motivated not to
acknowledge the fact that 13
new schools were constructed,
six schools were totally refur-
bished, 30 schools received
major additions and over 40
new pre-schools were created.
For this Mr Foulkes and his col-
leagues deserve to be congratu-
lated. However, the degree of
deterioration at the A F Adder-
ley Junior High School in New
Providence and the Eight Mile
Rock High’ School in Grand

Bahama along with several oth- .

er schools indicate that such
schools were not blessed with
the level of care and attention
that they deserved during the
tenure of the FNMiin order to
correct their deteriorating struc-
tural integrity.

Therefore, to blame the pre-

_ sent Minister of Education or

the PLP government for the
lack of maintenance to schools
that were in an advanced state
of decay when the Christie led
government came to power in
AD 2002 appears to be intel-
lectually and morally dishonest.



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Further, the records show that
during the 10 years of the FNM
government the national Grade
Point Average in our govern-
ment schools consistently lin-
gered in the lower “D” catego-
ry. I should like to believe that
the ultimate goal of any effec-
tive educational system is not
only to produce beautiful build-
ings but to cultivate the brain
in order to produce beautiful
minds.

Because every citizen has a
stake in the educational process,
it is incumbent upon all persons
of goodwill to recognise that
those schools that were neglect-
ed are now receiving the atten-
tion that they deserve. Hence
instead of attempting to place
the burden of fault on any one
person or group, it may be more
advantageous to formulate and
promote an effective plan for
the maintenance of the physi-
cal structures under the care of
the Ministry of Education as
well as formulating a more
effective system of mining the
intellectual treasures buried in
the minds of our children.

STEPHEN E
PLAKARIS

Freeport, Grand Bahama,
February 21, 2005.


















- YOUR LOCAL MEMBER OF THE-

PROHEM SYSTEM (sm)












THE TRIBUNE

Shooting victim ‘had gun’

By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

JERMAINE Mackey was in posses-
sion of a gun while he was being chased
by police, before being shot to death,
an Officer testified before the Coroner’s
Court yesterday.

Constable Ricardo Neely of the
mobile patrol division told the seven-
member jury that at one point in the
chase of Mr Mackey, he saw a “silver
hand gun” in the hand of the deceased.

The inquest. into the death of Mr
Mackey, 27, resumed yesterday for the
first time since the start of the new year.
The deceased was shot and killed on
December 6, 2002, following a con-
frontation with police officers.

His killing subsequently sparked a
riot involving hundreds of residents of
the Kemp Road area, in which several
police officers were injured, and several
vehicles were damaged during the inci-
dent.

Taking to the witness stand yester-
day, Officer Neely recounted the events
that led up to the death of Mr Mackey.

The officer said that at 10.10pm on
the night of the shooting, he was on,
patrol in the Kemp Road area ina
marked police vehicle together with his
partner Officer Zhivago Earns.

He said that he observed a black Mer-
cedes Benz on St James Road, with two
male occupants, who were “acting sus-
picious,” and pulled along side them,
when they came to.a stop near the Cor-
ner Pocket bar on St James Street.

Mr Neely said the two men left their
vehicle just as a white Honda Accord,
also carrying two male occupants and
travelling West on St James Street, came
to a stop outside of the small bar.

The officer said the front seat pas-
senger of the Honda Accord “was acting
suspicious,” looking to and fro from the
police car and slouching in his seat.

“He started to sit low, started to
slump,” he noted.

Officer Neely then told the jury that
the Honda began reversing backwards,
but was stopped in its attempt by other
vehicles that had come behind.

The officer said he left his car and
shone a flashlight towards the Honda.

He saw a “dark short male, wearing
khaki pants and a brown and blue jack-
et,” exiting the Honda and “taking off
running.”

“At that time he was holding some-
thing to his waist with his right hand,”
the witness added.

Officer Neely said he gave chase, run-
ning after the man around several small
wooden houses. The man he was chasing
gained in speed and when he turned a
corner, the officer lost sight of him. Mr
Neely said that he too then turned the
same corner and saw that the man had
stopped and was standing behind one
of the houses.

The witness testified that as he shone
his flashlight on the man, he saw him
pulling a silver handgun from his waist-
band.

Officer Neely said he then unhol-
stered his gun and ordered-the man “to

drop it,” also firing his gun once into
the air as a warning shot. “But he took
off running again,” he said.

Mr Neely told the court that he was
standing about ten feet away from the
man when he observed the gun in his
hand.

After he had again lost sight of the
man, he called out to his partner Officer
Earns, warning him that the man was
coming his way.“I shouted ‘Earns, watch
out, he coming to the front, he has a
gun’,” Mr Neely recalled. The witness
recounted that several seconds later he
heard “what appeared to be two shots
fired.”

Officer Neely said that when he came
around the building, in the rear of the
Corner Pocket bar, he saw the man sit-
ting on the ground “slouched over and
bleeding from his mouth.”

“He was saying ‘I got hit, I got hit’,”
Mr Neely recalled.

He said he saw Officer Earns standing
nearby and told his partner to search
the man for a weapon, while he himself
made his way to the police car to call for
an ambulance. ;

When he returned from making the
request for medical assistance about
three minutes later, he saw that a group
of about 50 people had gathered at the
scene of the shooting, and that his part-
ner was being pinned to a wall by some
residents, Mr Neely said.

He said the slumped-over man now
appeared to be “lifeless.”

Mr Neely said as the people crowding
around him and his partner became

TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005, PAGE 5

more hostile, jeering and shouting, he
was unable to check the man for a
weapon, but merely for a pulse. He con-
firmed that a plastic bag containing silver
tinfoil and a substance suspected to be
marijuana was found next to the victim.

The officer said that following these
events, he and Officer Earns were taken
to the Criminal Investigation Depart-
ment (CID), where they gave their state-
ments on the morning of December 7.
Before leaving the scene, however, Mr
Neely said he ejected the live round left
in the chamber of his gun onto the
ground.

Investigations did not turn up the vic-
tim’s alleged gun, he added.

Coroner William Campbell advised
the witness that some of the critical evi-
dence he had given the court had not
been included in his original statement
to the police in 2002.

The coroner highlighted the fact that
in his initial report, Mr Neely had made
no mention of using a flashlight, shout-
ing to his partner that Mr Mackey was in
possession of a gun, ejecting a live round
at the scene, or hearing the deceased
speak before he died.

’ Mr Campbell also said that Mr
Neely’s written statement of the
deceased “holding a silver object which
appeared to be a handgun,” seemed
vague and did not carry the same weight
as the statement that Mr Mackey had a
silver handgun in his hand. Responding
to the coroner’s comments and ques-
tions, the officer said that at the time
that he made his statement, he was







under stress and not “in the right state of
mind.”

He said that senior officers at CID
had pressured him to give his statement
the morning after the shooting, and that
he would have preferred to be on the
record when he was more collected.
Officer Neely, however, conceded that
there were omissions to his original
statement and that these omissions were
critical.

He further confirmed for Coroner
Campbell that had he not been carrying
a flashlight that night, he would not have
been able to clearly identify the silver
object Mr Mackey was holding in his
hand. Mr Neely said that he handed in
his police issued gun to CID, but not
his flashlight.

Also testifying yesterday was Sergeant
Cedric Bullard, the investigating officer
of the 2002 shooting death.

He told the court that the crime scene
was contaminated due the riot which
had broken out after the shooting, and
that police were not able to recover any
evidence.

Sergeant Bullard said that the only
evidence of a shooting that police have
in their possession, is a 9mm bullet cas-
ing which was handed in by a civilian.

Following the two testimonies, the
inquest was adjourned until Wednes-
day at 10am, when counsel for the police
department, Kenneth Toppin and
Michael Faulkes, and counsel for the
victim’s family, Fayne Thompson, will be
able to ask their questions of Officer
Neely.




Crew snatched from zi

A UNITED STATES Coast
Guard crew on board a Jay-
hawk helicopter rescued 14
Bahamian fishermen from a
burning vessel over the week-
end.

The burning 72-foot vessel
was located 50 miles northwest
of Nassau.

Coast Guard District Seven’s
command centre in Miami
received notification of the ves-
sel in distress at about 9.30am.
The vessel was spotted by civil-
ian aircraft flying overhead. The
pilot notified the Air Force Res-
cue Centre in Langley, Virginia,
who then called the Coast
Guard.

The Jayhawk Helicopter
deployed. with Operation
Bahamas Turks and Caicos
(OPBAT) was immediately
launched to the scene. While
en route, the passengers of the
vessel abandoned the ship and
sought refuge aboard the ves-
sel’s dinghy.

Upon the helicopter’s arrival,
a rescue swimmer was lowered
to the water to ensure the fish-
ermen were safe and accounted
for. The helicopter crew began
safely hoisting the passengers
on board. ©

The survivors were trans-

' ported to Nicholls Town in
Andros. No injuries were.

_ reported. and the cause of the
incident is not yet known.



A HUGE plume of black smoke rises from the stricken vessel as US Coast Guard rescuers move in. Fishermen had abandoned ship in a dinghy as flames
engulfed the vessel, which caught fire 50 miles north-west of Nassau.

Body found near a
bridge identified



AY

We aN

: By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter gata | ie
- _ THE body found floating near : SUN)

He a

Potter’s Cay on Sunday has been

identified'as that of 51-year-old ©

Raddison Clarke.

ete
ere eat



The Sea Breeze Lane resident
was found floating fully-clothed
under the Nassau to Paradise
Island bridge around 8am on Sun-
day.

Police yesterday gave no
update on their investigation into
the matter.

REE

TUESDAY
MARCH 1




















On Sunday Inspector Walter ae Sena
Evans said police are looking into 12noon ZNS News Update - Live
the possibility of a link between 12:03 Caribbean Today News
Mr Clarke’s death and a body 12:30 Immediate Response
found in the same area a few 1:00 Caribbean Today News
weeks ago. Oe A 1:02 Cybernet 1995 - 2005
that of 26yenrold Detoy Prat, | 201 Cabana es ott Mona vas
at of 26-year-old Delroy Pratt, 4 aribbean Today News .
was also found floating fully- a Gospe! ee Countdown DAYS: Sunday, Monday, Wednesday & Friday
clothed near Potter’s Cay. reasure Attic
Inspector Evans said there | 980 _ This Generation Providenciales to N N Providencial
were no signs of physical abuse to a ae Round ae enciaies to iINassau aseau to Providenciales
the body of Mr Clarke atthe time | 4.49 Kids On The Move Flight # RU401 departs 10:00am __ Flight ## RU400 departs 12:30pm



he was found.

4:58/30 _ZNS News Update - Live Arrives in Nassau | 1:30am Arrives in Providenciales 2:00pm








In other crime news, a 28-year- 5:00 Caribbean Newsline
old man is recovering after being 5:30 Holy Hip Hop
shot in the buttocks while asleep 6:00 Bahamian Things
at his home. The victim is report- 6:30 News Night 13 ‘
ed to have been in bed at his] 700 Bahamas Tonight 7-day advance purchase return tickets as low as
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McKinney Avenue residence
when he was awoken by the
sound of several gunshots.




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Police say the man became | !0:00 Spoken
aware of a burning sensation, and is Soe art
realised that he had been shot in 11:30 Immediate Response



the right buttock. Inspector Evans
said that police are following
some leads in connection with the
matter, and that investigations
are continuing.



1:30 Community Pg. 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves.
the right to: make last minute
programme changes!



PPPI>>A KCK OLE














PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



Beye



New home
owners
receive
keys from

- Christie

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PRIME MINISTER Perry
Christie, together with the -
Minister responsible for Hous-
ing Shane Gibson, presented
keys to four new home owners
during a ceremony in Grand
_ Cay on Friday.

Ada Cephas and Urial Rus-
sell, both senior citizens, and
Freddie Miller and Peter Gar-

diner, disabled residents,

received their keys in a cere-

mony at Shiloh Baptist -

Church. -

Also on hand for the cere-
mony were the Minister of
Social Development and
Community Development
Melanie Griffin, and the Min-
ister for Financial Service

Allyson Maynard Gibson,
along with other government
officials. ;
Pictured above are the recip-
ients of the homes together
with the Prime Minister and
Cabinet Ministers and other
government officials.
BIS photo



by NATARIO McKENZIE

IN an effort to get first-hand
experience of the day-to-day
duties of some of the workers in
his ministry, Ron Pinder parlia-
mentary secretary in the Min-
istry of Health, took to Bay

. Street yesterday in a mini clean-
up effort.

Mr Pinder, along with Ann-
Marie Sears from Environmen-
tal Health's city maintenance
unit assigned to Bay Street,
took to the streets on Monday
with brooms and garbage bags.

"This is my attempt to get a
general assessment of the day
to day experience of a worker at
the Department of Environ-
mental Health," Mr Pinder said.

"I think it’s important. that
our workers know that the per-
sons who are responsible for .
making decisions care about
them as well,” he said.

Mrs Sears said: "It was a sur-
prise when I saw him come onto
Bay Street, now he can experi-
ence what we go through on
Bay Street and the task that we
have in keeping Bay Street

clean."


















Mr Pinder noted that his min-
istry had received numerous
complaints about the debris in

_ the "downtown" area. Mr Pin-

der praised the work of the city
maintenance unit calling them
"humans behind the effort" to
beautify Bay Street.

Mr Pinder called for proper

_ planning in the beautificatio

efforts. :

Pinder gets
insight into —
ers’ lo



"There are too many govern-
ment agencies who have
responsibility for some aspect
of the environment," he said.

Mr Pinder noted that in meet-
ings with other government
agencies later this week he
would attempt to gather all of
their resources under one
agency in an effort to "better

organise" their work.

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

Established 1950
P.O. Box N-1222, 22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

We OVS Sa ead 173
















MRS KITTY
LAWRENCE

of Nassau, The].
Bahamas, will be held
at St. Andrew’s
Presbyterian Kirk,
Princes Street,
Nassau, on Thursday,
3rd March, 2005 at
6:00 p.m.

Reverend Charles A. Sweeting will
officiate. -















She is survived by her husband, Howard;
two sons, Graham and Andrew; two
daughters-in-law, Christine and Sheelagh;
five grandchildren, Christopher, Kathryn,
Matthew, Jennifer and Stephanie; two
great-grandchildren, Kaitlyn and Luke;
two sisters, Margaret and Winifred; one
brother-in-law, Dennis and numerous
nieces and nephews.




Instead of flowers the family request that
donations be sent to The Baharnas Heart
Association, PO. Box N-8189, Nassau,
The Bahamas in memory of Mrs. Kitty
Lawrence.’

eee ge



THE TRIBUNE



Ur

hopes on
‘freedom’
convention

By CARA BRENNEN,

said the government wanted to
Tribune Staff Reporter

allow the unions the opportu-
nity to make their concerns
known.

“This is for all members of
the trade movement across the
board. It is important that we
understand that labour is across
the board.

He said he is aware that there
are some unions who stand ful-
ly behind the convention as is
and there are some who need
clarification and satisfaction of
the full implication of the issues.

He warned the unionists that
adopting the convention was
not something to be going into
blindly.

“Tt calls for education, it calls
for input, it calls for discussion
and it calls for us to benchmark
what happens in other
Caribbean countries who are
just as worker friendly as the
Bahamas.”

He noted that the convention
was ratified in Jamaica and Bar-
bados, there were laws and pro-
visions which were not affect-
ed. He said they had to discuss
why that was.

THE Bahamas could see
across the board unionisation if
a convention permitting the
freedom of choice in organis-
ing labour is implemented.

Convention C87 is a conven-
tion endorsed by the Interna-
tional Labour Organisation and
it allows for freedom of associ-
ation and protection of the right
to organise.

If it is passed in the Bahamas
it would allow for greater flexi-
bility and freedom in organised
labour, one union leader
claimed.

Yesterday, the Ministry of
Labour hosted a one day work-
shop to discuss the: possibility
of enacting the convention in
the Bahamas and to allow union
leaders to weigh in on the
issues.

Pat Bain, president of the
Bahamas Hotel Catering and
Allied Workers Union, said the
workshop was a “watershed”
moment for organised labour.
He said that adopting the con-
vention would rest aside fears
that smaller unions would be
walked over. He said that just as
businesses are trying to protect
and prepare themselves for the
effects of globalisation and
trade agreements such as the
Caribbean Single Market, Free
Trade Agreement of the Amer-
icas and the World Trade
Organisation, so too must orga-
nized labour in the country.

Mr Bain said that presently
the country has a workforce of
just over 167,000 persons. How-
ever he said that only 23,000 of
those workers have union rep-
resentation. :

“They say we are the voice
of labour, but who do we speak
for,” he asked.

Labour Minister Vincent Peet

bados, where he said they

_ adopted the convention for pri-
vate sector unions to have gen-
eral unions, but in the public
sector they cannot.

“Therefore, we have to dis-
cuss and see why it is that cer-
tain progressive Caribbean
countries whom we benchmark
our laws after have not gone as
far as some would want us to
go at this point.”

He said it was important for
the government to hear the con-
cerns of the unions to ensure
that all the players were on the
same page and determine which
of the aspects should be enacted
or whether it should be done in
phases.

Mr Peet said the government

Management
duo up for
the challenge

SUPERCLUBS Breezes
Bahamas, Nassau’s first and
only Super-Inclusive resort, has
announced two new appoint-
ments to its management team.

Warren Glinton has been
promoted to chief engineer and
Marcus Laing to assistant chief
‘engineer.

Glinton previously held the
position of assistant chief engi-
neer during his 18 months with
the company. He has previous-
ly worked as an electrician for
Sun International - now Kerzn-
er International - as the main-
tenance manager with John Bull °
Limited, maintenance manag-
er with Aquapure Water Ltd,
maintenance and plant manag-
er with Gladstone Farms, and as
operations engineer with Flori-
da Aquastore. |

Laing has been with the com-
pany for three years working as
the air-conditioning and refrig-
eration specialist. He was for-
merly employed at Westwind
II as the air-conditioning and
refrigeration technician, and at
. Hill York Ltd and Freezing
Point as an air-conditioning and
refrigeration technician.

Glinton brings with him a
wealth of knowledge and over
23 years of experience. He is a
licensed single-phase electrician
and holds certificates from The
College of the Bahamas in gen-
eral maintenance, plumbing,
electrical engineering and air-
conditioning. He is the father
of two daughters, Lashan and

Cemone Glinton, and the proud
grandfather of one grandson,
Darius Glinton.

“T love the challenge of a new
position! I rise to the occasion
when I am faced with a chal-
lenge,” said Glinton. “It is what
keeps me driven...challenges.
That is the best part of my job.
I can’t be in a stale or boring
job. I need to have challenges
every day because it keeps me
motivated and brings out the
best in me.”

Laing is a graduate of
Atlantic Technical Institute with
a degree in air-conditioning and
refrigeration. He also holds cer-
tificates from The Copeland
Company in Ft Lauderdale,
Florida, and the Training Ser-
vice and Diagnostics course
offered in Orlando, Florida. He
is married to Kenji Laing. They
have two daughters, Khassidi
and Dejah Laing, and one son,
Khamran Laing.

“I am very excited about this
new position. I feel that I can
bring to the table new ideas and
new energy,” said Laing. “I am
definitely up to the challenge
and I will do my absolute best
to make sure that our depart-
ment is running the way that it
should be run, that we get
things done in a timely fashion
and that we are one-hundred
percent professional at all
times.”

Together they will head the
engineering department for the
400-room resort.

.

He gave as an example Bar-.

would be guided by the con-
sensus of the unionists since

they are affected along with the-

workers of the Bahamas.

He also said: “This is not a
dictatorship, it is a consultation
and a way of getting your views
across. It is a discussion to dis-
sect and analyse the. best way
forward.”

TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005, PAGE 7





Mum ke



‘garit Cla

New Master's

Room 1
5:30

Room 2
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6



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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Urban renewal scheme
brings surprise rewards

By Bahamas
Information
Services

WHEN the Urban Renewal.

Programme was launched in
May, 2002, with the establish-
ment of the Farm Road Pilot
Project Office, government, law
enforcement, community, civic
and social leaders all anticipat-
ed that the programme would
have a dramatic and positive
impact on the community.
Almost three years later, the
project is bringing some unex-
pected rewards - not for the
persons benefiting from the
many programmes established
over the years, but for one of
the key stakeholders of urban
renewal, the Ministry of Social

Development.

“The impact the Urban
Renewal Programme has had
on the various communities has

’ been remarkable in some cases,

but I think we, as a ministry,
have benefited tremendously
from the programme as well,”
says Kim Sawyer, an assistant
director with the Ministry of
Social Services and Community
Development and head of the
ministry’s Urban Renewal Unit.

“By forming a unit of the
Department of Social Services
responsible for urban renewal,
we have: been able to bring
relief more quickly to some of
the needy persons in the com-

munity, and it has further

allowed us to form comprehen-
sive alliances within and out-
side of our ministry that have
benefited not only those depart-
ments, but individuals seeking
our assistance”.

Those alliances include part-

nerships with government enti-
ties such as the Royal Bahamas
Police Force, Department of
Labour, Ministry of Housing

and National Insurance, and the

Department of Environmental
Health Services.

Alliances have also been
formed with church, business,
community and social partners.

Miss Sawyer says the unit acts
as the “eyes and ears” for all
sectors of the ministry. She says
being “on the ground” through
the Urban Renewal Pro-
gramme, has resulted in the
ministry becoming not only
more “proactive” in its
approach to delivering services
to the various communities, but
also “more interactive”.

“We are all here for the bet-
terment of the community and
if you wait for persons to come
to you, by the time they reach to
you the problems are so insur-
mountable that it takes years

Services and Community

PROPERTIES FOR SALE

LISTED PROPERTIES - RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL | NASSAU

GLENISTON GARDENS

LOT NO. 0 Block 7

PROPERTY SIZE: 3 Bed, 2 Bath (10,875 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: East Side of Jean St. off

Prince Charles Dr. :
APPRAISED VALUE: $189,000

SOUTH BEACH ESTATES

LOT NO. 12 BLOCK No. 5 (Commercial)
PROPERTY SIZE: Restaurant (6,364 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: East St. South

APPRAISED VALUE: $270,000

TOWER ESTATES SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 31 is
PROPERTY SIZE: 10,800 sq.ft.
LOCATION: Tower Estates Dr.
APPRAISED VALUE: $229,000

TOWER ESTATES SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 47

PROPERTY SIZE: 10,908 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Tower Estates Dr.
APPRAISED VALUE: $195,000

WESTERN CLOSE SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 9

PROPERTY SIZE: Triplex (10,325 sq. ft.)

LOCATION: Bellot Rd. off Gladstone Rd.
' APPRAISED VALUE: $244,000

SHIRLEA HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 5 Block 14 Bidg.12

PROPERTY SIZE: Single Storey (5,000 sq. ft.):
LOCATION: Maderia St.

APPRAISED VALUE: $205,000

YAMACRAW BEACH ESTATES

LOT NO. 247

PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Under
Construction (6,935 sq. ft.)

LOCATION: West Side of Acklins Circle
APPRAISED VALUE: $100,000

GOLDEN GATES SUBDIVISION No. 1
LOT NO. 314

PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence
(5,000 sq. ft.)

LOCATION: Maicolm Rd. West of Reef Ln.
APPRAISED VALUE: $115,000

GOLDEN GATES SECTION No. 2

LOT NO. 579

PROPERTY SIZE: 3 Bed, 2 Bath Single Family
Residence (60x100 sq. ft.)

LOCATION: St. Vincent Rd.

APPRAISED VALUE: $233,000

GOLDEN GATES No. 2

LOT NO. 1440

PROPERTY SIZE: Residence/ praia Unit
(6,000 sq. ft.)

SITE AREA: 1,902 sq. ft:

LOCATION: Tangerine St. & Cedar Way
APPRAISED VALUE: $221,120

GLADSTONE ROAD ALLOTMENT

LOT NO. Crown Allotment No. 53 Lot #D
PROPERTY SIZE: 3 Bed, 2 Bath (5,995 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Bellot Rd. West of Faith Ave.
APPRAISED VALUE: $124,000

MONTROSE AVENUE
PROPERTY SIZE: Incomplete 4 Plex Apt.
Building (5,000 sq. ft.) - Residentavsen
Commercial
LOCATION: Rolle Ave. & Apple St. West
of Wulff Rd.
APPRAISED VALUE: $50,000

JEROME AVENUE

PROPERTY SIZE: 2 Bed, 1 Bath Duplex
(7,200 sq. ft.)

LOCATION: Bar 20 Corner & Jerome Ave.
APPRAISED VALUE: $156,500

EMERALD GARDENS

LOT NO. 60

PROPERTY SIZE: (5,525 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Opal Dr.
APPRAISED VALUE: $110,000

CULMERSVILLE SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 25

PROPERTY SIZE: Triplex Apartment (4,800 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Orchid Ln.

APPRAISED VALUE: $160,000

UNION VILLAGE

LOT NO. 57

PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence
(1,295 sq. ft.)

SITE AREA: 6,820 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Peach St. off Montrose Ave.
APPRAISED VALUE: $50,528

STAPLEDON GARDENS

LOT NO. 544

PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence (9,600 sq. ft.)
SITE AREA: 2,457 sq. ft.

LOCATION: 130 ft. North of Spitfire Rd.

APPRAISED VALUE: $224,000

SEA BREEZE ESTATES

LOT NO. 4 Block 21

PROPERTY SIZE: Split Level Residence (10,500 sq. ft.)
SITE AREA: 4,140 sq. ft.

LOCATION: 350 South of Seafan Dr.

APPRAISED VALUE: $366,000

JOHN TERRACE

LOT NO. 3

PROPERTY SIZE: Single Storey Residence/
Two Storey Apartment (3,483 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: 200 ft. from Lincoln Blvd./Wulff Rd.
Intersection

APPRAISED VALUE: $135,000

TWYNAM HEIGHTS ESTATES

LOT NO. 61

PROPERTY SIZE: 2 Storey Residence 9, 100 sq. ft.)
SITE AREA: 1,173 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Victoria St. & Coronation Rd.
APPRAISED VALUE: $203,000

SEVEN HILLS ESTATES

LOT NO. 15

PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence (5,000 St ft.)
SITE AREA: 1,693 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Blue Hill Rd. South

APPRAISED VALUE: $145,000

OAKES FIELD AIRPORT SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 45 Block 14

PROPERTY SIZE: 2 Single ey Apartment Units
(6,400 sq. ft.)

SITE AREA: 635 sq. ft. :
LOCATION: 75 ft. North of Davis St.

APPRAISED VALUE: $108,000

SANDILANDS VILLAGE ROAD

PROPERTY SIZE: Residence/ Apartment Complex
(11,600 sq. ft.)

SITE AREA: 5N North Side of Sandilands Village
APPRAISED VALUE: $386,000

SHIRLEY STREET

LOT NO. 1&3 *

PROPERTY SIZE: Commercial (13,000 o ft.)
SITE AREA: 3,236 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Southern Side of Shirley St.
APPRAISED VALUE: $775,000

LISTED PROPERTIES - VACANT LOTS | NASSAU

COWPEN ROAD-HOLLYWOOD SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. Crown Grant A-66

PROPERTY SIZE: (10,875 sq. ft.)

LOCATION: 350 West of Refuge Court
APPRAISED VALUE: $71,000

WEST BAY STREET

PARCEL OF LAND. Eastern Side of South
Ocean Blvd.

PROPERTY SIZE: 1,020 acres
LOCATION: 1,780 ft. South of West Bay St.
APPRAISED VALUE: $150,000

INTERESTED Nae) (eV

HIGHLAND ESTATES SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 6

PROPERTY SIZE: (9,761 sq. ft.)

LOGATION: 1,100 ft. East of West Bay St. & Sea
View Dr.

‘APPRAISED VALUE: $100,000

©2005 Creative Relations

OFFERS TO PURCHASE (WITH TELEPHONE |

. CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS) TO CHERRY MISSICK, THE PLAZA, MACKEY STREET, OR

CALL 502-6200 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION.
ALL OFFERS.

* WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR



and years to deal with them and
the clients become frustrated,”
says Miss Sawyer.

“By being more proactive
and interactive within the com-
munity, we have been able to
get to some of the problems fac-
ing persons in the communities
before they reach an advanced
stage. For example, if we dis-
cover a family who can benefit
from the School Lunch Pro-
gramme, they are referred to
the appropriate department
within our ministry.

“Tf we find disabled persons
in the community during our
walkabouts, we get the particu-
lars on those persons and send
all of that information to our
Disability Affairs Division,
which keeps a registry of all dis-
abled persons in the Bahamas.
The division would then assist in
getting those persons access to
whichever of our services they
may need.

“We have found persons who
qualified for invalidity assis-
tance but did not apply for that
assistance and senior citizens
who qualified for Old Age Pen-
sion but weren’t receiving their
benefits, and were able to refer
them to the appropriate agen-
cies and now they are getting
the benefits due to them,” Miss
Sawyer adds.

The unit also works in con-
junction with the Department
of Labour to identify unem-
ployed persons within the com-
munity with a view to finding
employment for those persons.

Case Aides, under the super-
vision of trained social work-
ers, gather information on the
levels of unemployment. The
information is assessed by the
social worker and interviews are
conducted to determine quali-
fications and interests of the
unemployed. The information
is then shared with the Depart-
ment of Labour’s Employment
Exchange.

The unit also assists persons
with securing all of the neces-

‘sary documentation they would

need to provide to prospective

employers.

“We also try to match job
opportunities with applications
we have, because not all
employers register with the
Department of Labour,” Miss
Sawyer says. “That sometimes
includes reaching out to busi-
nesses within the community”.

The ministry has implement-
ed a number of programmes
within the various communities
in which urban renewal project
offices are located, designed to
bring further relief to needy res-
idents. (Project offices are cur-
rently located in Bain and
Grant’s Town, Fort Charlotte,
St Cecilia, Englerston and just
recently Nassau Village).

These include programmes
for senior citizens, single and
married parents - through a par-
enting skills programme - chil-
dren, families, teen mothers and
single, unemployed mothers.

An Urban Renewal Senior
Citizens Division was estab-
lished by the ministry to work
closely with senior citizens and
the senior citizens. associations
in the various communities.

“What we found in canvass-
ing the various areas was that
there were a number of seniors
who were still active and mobile
but were just sitting at home
with very little to do in terms
of interacting with other per-
sons of their age grouping,” says

Miss Sawyer.

“There were others who did
not want to go to the Day Care
Centres and yet others who
were not really interested in
participating in activities out-
side of their areas,” adds Miss
sawyer, “and so we thought that
it would be interesting to form
senior citizen associations in the
various areas and that pro-
gramme has been quite suc-
cessful.”

The associations, with the
ministry’s assistance and
through some fundraising and
partnerships of their own, have
been able to arrange beach pic-
nics, island tours, movie treats,
comedy shows and special lun-

. cheon events for their members.

Miss Sawyer says there are
many more components to the
ministry’s programmes. She
notes that- while project offices
operate under a “blueprint,”
individual offices have the lee-
way to tailor programmes to
meet the individual needs of the
communities they serve.

“Each project office is headed
by a Task Force that has the
ability to develop programmes
and activities that target the spe-
cific needs of their communi-
ties. What we then do is develop
programmes to enhance that
work;” she says.

“For example, the Task Force
in Bain and Grant’s Town iden-
tified teenage pregnancy as one
of the major social concerns of

‘that particular community, and

so they developed a life enrich-

. ment programme that lasted for

12 weeks and focused on pro-
viding teenage girls with the
skills and self-esteem needed to
help reverse this trend. .

“The Task Force in St Cecil-
ia’s developed a girls club and a
dance group for teenage girls
and those programmes are
doing very well.

Social Services developed
empowerment workshops for
unemployed single mothers to
try and facilitate getting those
mothers into the job market.

“There are a number of com-
ponents to the programmes
because we are interested in
finding the best ways to help
people improve the quality of
their lives throughout our com-
munities,” Miss Sawyer says.

“I think Urban Renewal has
the capability to have an even
greater impact on building bet-
ter communities throughout
New Providence and indeed the
Commonwealth of — the
Bahamas, if all of the stake-
holders - citizens, community
leaders and associations, the
church and business communi-
ties and government ministries
and departments - continue to
work hand-in-hand,” adds Miss
Sawyer.





iHe& TRIBUNE



PVE GUA, Wi Ts

$y ans

Young chefs sign up

6,000 hours at hotel

SEVENTEEN apprentice
chefs at The College of the
Bahamas inked their names to
contracts pledging to work 6,000
‘hours at hotel properties over
the next three years.

The 12 first-year and five sec-
ond year apprentices made this
commitment before family,
friends and industry leaders
during the 29th annual contract
ceremony signing for appren-
tice chefs at Choices Restau-
rant, COB’s School of Hospi-
tality and Tourism Studies.

' The hours are a part of the
requirement necessary to com-
plete the students study toward
their degree in culinary arts at
The College of the Bahamas.
Sponsoring hotel and resort
properties include Atlantis Par-
adise, Radisson Cable Beach
Resort, Wyndham Nassau
Resort and Crystal Palace Casi-
no and British Colonial Hilton.

Mr Earl Bethell, president of
Bahamas Hotel Association and
deputy general manager at
Radisson Cable Beach, reas-

sured The College of the.

Bahamas of the industry’s com-
mitment to the programme.

“We at the Bahamas Hotel
Association and the Bahamas
Hotel Employers Association
are committed to the develop-
ment of our young chefs and
the development of our nation’s
greatest resource, our people,”
noted Betheil. “This will ensure
that tourism in the Bahamas is
the best it can be.”

Encouraging the young chefs
to strive to be the very best in
their profession, Mr Bethell
offered the young chefs some
advice: “Be committed to your
craft, wear your uniform with
honour and read cook books
and note the different styles of
cooking.”

COB president Dr Rodney
Smith, in his welcome remarks,
forecast the college’s plan to
create a culinary institute,
encompassing the widest range
of opportunities within the
industry.

“In fact, our goal is nothing
less than to become the centre
for culinary and hospitality pro-
grammes, training and research
in the region,” said Dr Smith.
“It is our aim to create a matrix
in which skilled and appropri-
ately certified professionals can
develop at all points on the con-
tinuum of culinary arts and
across the gamut of the hospi-
tality industry.”

In congratulating the appren-
tice chefs for the honourable
profession chosen, Dr Smith
reminded them that their roles
are bigger than that of fame and
fortune.

“You have the grand oppor-
tunity to put your country’s pri-
mary revenue source on a
firmer footing. You have the
opportunity to.contribute to
preserving an important aspect
of your culture and bringing it
to the attention of the world.”

The National. Apprentice
Chefs Programme began almost
three decades ago at the
Bahamas Hotel Training Col-
lege, which amalgamated with
The College of the Bahamas in
2000. The programme is of
three years’ duration and fol-
iows guidelines set up by the
American Culinary Federation
of which the Bahamas Culinary
Association is an affiliate.

The aim of COB’s culinary
curriculum is to continue to con-
tribute to the development of
the culinary arts and the hospi-
tality industry in the Bahamas
by assisting in the formation of
aspiring chefs. The Apprentice
Programme is designed to pro-
vide a theoretical foundation
and industry training in the food
and pastry preparation. Profes-
sional training is enhanced
through the partnership of
many of the members of The
Bahamas Hotel Association in
Nassau and Freeport, who facil-
itate apprenticeships at their
properties.

-Each year there is a contract
signing ceremony where the
representatives of the proper-
ties and students formalise the
terms of apprenticeship. Over
years, the programme has grad-
uated a fine cadre of culinary
professionals, who have con-
tributed to enhancing the
Bahamian character of cuisine
and food service in the local
hospitality industry. Graduates
include chefs Christopher Chea,







Edwin Johnson, Jasmin Young,
Tracey Sweeting, Wayne Mon-
cur, Jason McBride, Carolyn
Bowe and three professionals
who have since joined the fac-
ulty of The College of The
Bahamas — chefs Eldred Saun-
ders, Mario Adderley and
Vanessa Riley, who co-ordinate
the Apprentice Programme.

It has become increasingly
important for the college and
the hospitality industry to con-
centrate efforts to extend the
capacity and reach of this
important industry training ini-
tiative for the benefit of hospi-
tality and Bahamas tourism as a
whole.

PICTURES:

°¢ SECOND year apprentice
Rancourt Nixon signed a con-
tract withr Atlantis Paradise
Island for the apprentice chef
programme. Charles will be

expected to work 6,000 hours

to complete the practical aspect
of the culinary arts programme.

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Also signing the contract was
Atlantis chef Yasmin Young,
Atlantis; COB’s vice-president
of academic affairs, Dr Linda
Davis and Michael Humes, sec-
retary of the Apprenticeship
Board

° TWELVE first-year and
five second year apprentices
signed contracts to work at var-
ious hotel properties over the
next three years . The appren-
tices (standing) were congratu-
lated by family, friends, industry
jeaders and COB faculty and —
administrators. Seated from left:
Peter Daniels, Dean, Faculty of
Business, Hospitality and:
Tourism Studies, Dr Linda
Davis, VP academic affairs, Dr
Rodney Smith, COB president;
Mr Franklyn Wilson, council
chairman and Mr Earl Bethell,
guest speaker. Standing is
Michael Humes, secretary of
the Apprenticeship Board and
Vanessa Riley, apprentice co-
ordinator, School of Hospitality
and Tourism Studies.

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005

THE TRIBUNE:



LOCAL NEWS .



A year after Aristide

Haiti's misery goes on

as two die in protes

Man faces double
murder charge

FROM Page One

jury suspected bloody shoe
prints inside the house, a sus-
pected bloody palm print at the
entrance to a bedroom door,
what appeared to be a blood-
soaked newspaper down the
street and suspected blood
stains on the road.

, The suspected murder
weapon, a long, jagged kitchen
knife broken off at the handle,
was found in the kitchen in
addition to a human tooth.
Another tooth was found on the
outside porch, according to
police officers who testified.

Mrs Newbold’s body. was
found lying on the front room
floor.

DC Evans told the court that
from that room, a trail of blood
went down the hallway and into
a room where Mr Wilson's body
was found. His intestines were
hanging from his side, according
to prosecution witnesses.

- Crime scene officers also tes-
tified-that-they- collected sam-

ples of what they.suspected.to.. .

be blood from several areas
around the house.

The stains on the road were
found in front of a house on
Avocado Street, where the

- detectives continued their inter-

views. ;

Members of the Wilson fam-
ily, including victim Kevin
Wilson's sister and father Row-
land Wilson, also testified




ae

Butler's Funeral Homes
& Crematorium

Tel: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

MRS. ANNIS LOUISE
MA SAWYER, 88

of Retirement Road who died .
at her residence on Thursday,
February 24th, 2005 will be
held on Tuesday, March 1st,
2005 at 4:30pm at the
Graveside of the Eastern
Cemetery, Shirley and
Dowdeswell

before the court yésterday.

Mr Wilson said that in the
evening hours of June 15, he
was with his wife, Christina, in
their bedroom with their son
Kevin watching TV and talk-

Mr Wilson said that between
11 and 11.30pm, Kevin left the
room and went into the kitchen.
He said that victim Rosnell
Newbold was in another bed-
room at the time.

Mr Wilson testified that he
went to sleep and heard no
sounds during the night. He told
the court that his bedroom door
was locked and that the air-con-
ditioning was turned on.

Mr Wilson said that when he
got out of bed at around 6am
the next day, he was the only
person awake in the house. He
testified that he left his bed-
room and entered the laundry

room to find Kevin lying on the |
nergy PEL pO

floor.

Mr Wilson said..that he ran
back into his bedroom to alert
his wife, and then ran outside
screaming.

Mr Wilson said that when he
returned, he discovered Mrs
Newbold lying in the front room
of the house. According to Mr
Wilson, the kitchen of his house
was covered with blood.

Testimony from prosecution
witnesses is set to continue at
10 o’clock this morning.











Streets.

Officiating will be Pastor Matthew Sweeting.

























Ma Sawyer was pre-deceased by her husband,
Conrad “Pa Sawyer”; and she is survived by her
daughter, Louise Pinder; one grandson, Jerry Pinder;
one grand daughter, Portia Carey; one grand
| daughter-in-law, Ilene Pinder; one grandson-in-law,
Fred Carey; three great grandchildren, Colby and
Mariah Pinder and Zachary Carey; adopted
grandchildren, John and Mandy Benson, Adam,
Matthew and David Russell, Elizabeth and Ted
Turner and Adam Sweeting; one sister-in-law, Nellie
Lowe; nieces, Ruth Cleare, Ella Pinder, Adrella,
Rose and Darlene Sawyer; nephews, Bobby, Pat
and Elliott Sawyer, Everett Pinder, Gary, Ira and
Billy Lowe; cousins, Mr and Mrs Archie Lowe;
godchildren, Linda Pinder and Georgina Rolle and
a host of other relatives and friends, including Ruth
| Sawyer, Merlene and Myrtle Albury, Chris and
Angela Benson, Herbert and FrankieMae Thompson
and family, Elsie Weech, Mike and Harriet Russell,

George and Donnell Rolle and family, Matthew and

Allyson Sweeting, Ena Braynen, Claudine and

| Crystal Underwood and all her co-workers from
stop-in-shop.

Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers’ Funeral
Homes and Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets
on Tuesday from 10am until 3pm.

Edward and Loretta Turner, Linda Sawyer and family, -





WILLARD JESS KNOWLES

1920 - 2004

_ Reflections of a Faithful Life

With Gods help to strengthen us
We will take each day and try to be
A Light in the life of others
As you were a light to us.

You will live on inside our hearts
And with Gods grace we’ll do our part
To carry on faithfully...

We’ll be a reflection of heavenly love
For others, in your memory.

Sadly missed and cherished by his wife, children,
brother, grandchildren, great-grandchildren,
other relatives and friends.

~ MAY HIS SOUL REST IN PEACE ~



Stubbs debt
investigation

FROM Page One

withal to pay all of them or if he
does not then he will have to
seek to arrive at an agreement
which means if he can convince
the creditors to accept less than
100 per cent of his debt,” Mr
Munroe explained.

This’ process, said Mr
Munroe, can last up to 28 days.

Meanwhile attorney Michael
Scott, who with lawyer Wayne
Munroe, has prepared a peti-
tion on behalf of the FNM to
question whether Mr Stubbs is
qualified to represent the Holy
Cross constituency, told The
Tribune yesterday that an
annulment would not prevent
the petition from being filed.

The petition under the Par-
liamentary Elections Act and
the purpose of it will be to
inquire into the qualifications
of Mr Stubbs to remain in the
House of Assembly and to be
able to perform the function as
a member.

“T think that if it is annulled it
is not annulled retrospectively
so the position is as far as we
are concerned has not
changed,” he said.

The FNM’s position is that
when he sought the nomination
for the Holy Cross constituency
Mr Stubbs may have given inac-
curate information in his dec-
laration forms which would
mean that his documentation

of qualification was similarly
tainted making him election
invalid.

“The other thing is that he
became a bankrupt and the
constitution in the ordinary
course of events would kick in,”
said Mr Scott said.

Mr Stubbs was declared.
bankrupt in March of last year
by Justice Jeanne Thompson.”
His application for leave to
appeal the order on July 14 was”
rejected on September 16 by
President of the Court of*
Appeal Dame Joan Sawyer.
However, Mr Stubbs asked the
original ruling to be revisited
on grounds of new evidence.

The House of Assembly
passed a resolution in Septem-
ber allowing Mr Stubbs a six”
month extension to attempt to
have the ruling overturned and”
thereby retain his seat in par- ,
liament. The resolution was |
proposed after the original 150-"
day extension granted by the:
Speaker of the House had end- ‘

ed.
' The Holy Cross seat has"
become a subject of controver-:,
sy since Mr Stubbs was declared ’
bankrupt. The FNM has made '
repeated calls for a by-election,
which have been countered by |
PLP chairman Raynard Rigby:
who urged both parties to await '
the result of Tuesday’s hearing.-

islanders lone

protected status

“Copyrighted Material ***">

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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005 THE TRIBUNE !_

‘ oan ———$










SECTION



business@100jamz.com

TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

The Tribune






Janina

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH —







NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764







FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010





RND’s main [eReiwsiter:
shareholders

in falling-out

Former president proposes
Extraordinary General Meeting
on corporate governance issues

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The bitter dispute between
RND Holdings’ two largest
shareholders burst into public
view at yesterday’s annual gen-
eral meeting (AGM), as former
president Brent Dean requested
an extraordinary general meet-
ing (EGM) for April 7 to deal
with a variety of corporate gov-
ernance issues.

Mr Dean, who holds 31.2 per
cent of RND Holdings’ issued
ordinary shares, requested the
EGM of all shareholders “due
to the lack of transparency and
timely information to share-
holders prior to the AGM”.

His move potentially sets the
stage for a first proxy battle
involving a publicly-quoted
Bahamian company, putting Mr
Dean at odds with Jerome
Fitzgerald, RND Holdings
chairman, and fellow director
Mark Finlayson, son of well-
known businessman Garet
‘Tiger’ Finlayson.

Mr Fitzgerald is RND Hold-
ings’ second largest shareholder
behind Mr Dean, holding a
30.96 per cent stake. Between
them, the pair owned 62.5 per
cent of the company at January
14, 2005, and the fact neither of
them holds a controlling stake
could set the stage for a fierce
and drawn-out battle.

However, Mr Dean’s motives
are currently unknown, as it
could be that he just wants the
company to disclose more infor-
mation rather than engage in a
full-scale battle for control.

Among the issues Mr Dean
wants debated at the EGM are
a resolution to adopt many of
the corporate governance prac-
tices made mandatory in the US
following the Enron and World-
Com scandals.

The practices he wants to

debate include giving share-
holders “prompt access to criti-
cal information”; having RND
Holdings’ chief executive vouch
for timely disclosure and the
accuracy of the financial state-
ments released to its share-
holders; and for company direc-
tors who have a direct or indi-
rect benefit in contracts entered
into by RND Holdings to

See DISPUTE, Page 5B

Minimum wage does

mitt ay ROD

(ieee

(eC

i(esita

standard of living’

By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Tribune Business Reporter

A US State Department
report yesterday said the
Bahamian minimum wage of $4
per hour “did not provide a
decent standard of living’’, and
said the Grand Bahama Port
Authority had allowed Hutchi-

. son-Whampoa to discourage
unions from forming.

In its Country Report on
Human Rights Practices, the
Bureau of Democracy, Human
Rights and Labour said: "The
minimum wage for government
employees, set in 2000, was $4.5
per hour. A minimum wage for
the private sector was estab-
lished in 2002 at $4 per hour.
In view of the high cost of liv-
ing, these minimum wages did
not provide a decent standard
of living for a worker and fam-
ily. "

Brian Nutt, president of the
Bahamas Employers Confeder-

_ ation (BECon), dismissed the
concerns of the report. He said
the statement was made without











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any basis in fact, and that
Bureau officials could not point
to any study or research done to
support their findings.

While there was talk of a
study to determine what the
poverty level in the Bahamas
was, none was ever completed.
Mr Nutt said further that
increasing the minimum wage
was not the answer in the fight
against poverty in the Bahamas.

He added: "I'd like to know
what factual information they
are basing this statement on,
although most employers pay
well above minimum wage. I
think at the time that Bill
become law, I think it was
determined that some 6 per cent
of workers were paid at below
minimum wage.

“ It's unfortunate that the
world we live in does not pro-
vide fair amounts of material
wealth for everyone. Our soci-
ety, Bahamian society, has
adjusted itself for people to
make a living and survive. It's
unfortunate that businesses
can't pay a minimum wage of
$10 or $15 an hour, but society

Unique two level

Pd an

Danian












has adapted by people pooling
their resources to find a place to
stay..."

The US report also looked at
the rights of workers to organise
and bargain collectively, and
found that workers freely exer-
cised their right to organise and
participate in collective bar-

See WAGE, Page 2B



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE fiscal deficit for the first half of the
Government’s 2004-2005 financial year
increased by 58 per cent to $83.9 million due to
“the revenue and expenditure strains” imposed.
by the September 2004 hurricanes, the Cen-
tral Bank of the Bahamas reported yesterday.

In its bulletin on financial and economic
developments for January 2005, the Central
Bank’s generally bullish outlook on the
Bahamian: economy’s prospects for the year
again illustrated how the Government’s
finances were lagging behind the credit. and
monetary upturn.

_ While government revenues for the period
July to December 2004 were slightly ahead of
the previous year’s comparative, up 3.63 per
cent to $465 million from $448.7 million, import
duties remained down while recurrent expen-
diture - the Government’s fixed costs -
increased.

The 16.7 per cent decline in collected import
duties, which fell to $158.6 million from $190.4

- million the previous year, is likely to be at least
partially explained by the hurricanes’ impact

See FISCAL, Page 2B



Julian Francis, Central Bank
of the Bahamas governor

Tractebel may move Grand
Bahama LNG plant offshore ~

By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX:

’ Tribune Business Reporter:

Tractebel's construction of a deepwater lique-
fied natural gas (LNG)-port off.the coast of New
England has provided the company with the tech-
nology needed to build a water-based terminal off
the Florida coast, potentially ending its interest in
constructing a regasification plant in Grand
Bahama.

In an interview with The Tribune, Jim Ebeling,
Tractebel's vice-president of business ‘develop-
ment and project manager for its proposed Calyp-
so LNG pipeline. and terminal in Freeport Har-

bour, said the Neptune LNG project is an adjunct.

to its Boston operations and has nothing to do
with plans for the Florida market.

He said, however, that the technology being
developed for Neptune LNG would be applicable

if a similar project was proposed for Florida's
warm waters. i

Mr Ebeling admitted that the company was
engaging in preliminary investigations to review
the economics of such an alternative, but said
Tractebel, which is part of a consortium seeking
approval for an LNG terminal,on Grand Bahama,
remains: committed to its initial Bahamas pro-
ject for the time being.

Tractebel LNG North America announced ear- |
lier this month that a subsidiary, Neptune LNG
LLC, is pursuing the development of a deepwater |
port for LNG deliveries in federal waters off the
coast of Massachusetts.

In a statement to the press, Neptune LNG said
it proposes to locate its deepwater port about 10
miles south of the city of Gloucester and 22 miles

See LNG, Page 2B



Be ice eet

+ ne er ee apace Meee

Rul

RNG Holdings ‘right
now at break-even’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

RND Holdings yesterday
said revenues earned in fiscal
2005 would be “basically
unchanged” from the $1.515
million gained the previous
year, with its chairman saying:
“Right now, the company, to
all intents and purposes, is at
break even.”

Jerome Fitzgerald told the

company’s annual general .

meeting (AGM) that while
there would be some revenue
increase, it would-not bes“sig-
nificant”.

He added that some “fluctu-
ations” in rental income might
be experienced by RND Hold-

Fiscal (From ae 1B)

recurrent expenditure to $504.6 .

and the subsequent concessions

- granted for reconstruction.

Yet the 9.1 per cent rise in

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT

ings, as a number of five-year
leases on its commercial prop-
erty were becoming due for
renewal.

However, Ken Donathan,
RND Holdings’ managing
director, said the company did
expect to see an improvement
upon the $1.602 million oper-
ating expenses incurred in fiscal
2004, due to a “marked
improvement” in real estate
depreciation and the absence
of one-off write-offs, such as
goodwill and franchise rights.

Mr Donathan said he expect-
ed that RND Holdings’ Tick-
etXpress subsidiary, which for-
mally launches this month, will
only become a “significant con-
tributor” to the company’s bot-

million indicates the Govern-
ment is still failing to hold down

2004
CLE/QUI/01613

NOTICE

The Petition of GARY TYREL YOUNG is in respect of

the following parcel of land:-

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of
land containing 41,892 Square Feet

_ situate immediately West of Woodlawn
Gardens Cemetery and East of Village
Estates Sub-division in the Eastern
District of the Island of New - Providence.

Copies of the filed Plan my be inspected during normal

office hours at:-

(a)

The Registry of the Supreme

Court, Ansbacher House, East
Street North, Nassau, Bahamas, and;

The Chambers of James M. Thompson,
Terrace House, First Terrace and Collins

Avenue.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person, having Dower
or right of Dower or any Adverse Claim not recognized in
the Petition shall before the 28th day of April, 2005, file in
the Registry of the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner

’ or the undersigned a Statement of such claim. Failure of
any such person to file and serve a Statement of such claim,
_and requisite documents on or before the 28th day of April,
2005, will operate as a bar to such claim.



























1.20 0.95 Abaco Markets

8.40. 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund

6.25 5.55 Bank of Bahamas ~

0.85 0.75 Benchmark

1.95 1.45 Bahamas Waste

1.00 0.87 British American Bank

7.99 6.76 Cable Bahamas

2.20 1.40 Colina Holdings

7.90 6.75 Commonwealth Bank

1.50 0.35 Doctor's Hospital .

4.02 3.13 Famguard

10.25 8.21 Finco

7.67 6.45 FirstCaribbean

8.60 8.31 Focol

1.99 1.40 Freeport Concrete .

10.38. 9.50 ICD Utilities :
J. S. Johnson





28. 00 ABDAB




Kerzner International BDRs

12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0. 40 RND Holdings

13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets

Andrew J. Thompson
Attorney for the
Petitioner



1.2095 1.1529 Colina Money Market Fund 1.209527*
2.1191 1.9423 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.1105 ***
10.2648 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.2602*****

2.1746 2.0524




Colina Bo

Colina MSI Preferred Fund
F



2.166020**












BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-HI - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day’s weighted price for dally volume
Today's Close - Current day‘s weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings
** - AS AT JAN. 31, 2005/ **** - AS AT DEC. 31, 2004
*- AS AT FEB. 11, 2005/ *** - AS AT JAN 31, 2008/ *****

w= Colina

Financial Advisors Ltd,





tom line in 24 months, putting
this date at March 2007.
TicketXpress, which is a
“universal distribution high-
way”, will act as an on-line
reservation system to enable

Bahamians and residents to’

purchase pre-paid cards for
QuikCell and GSM phones;
tickets to concerts and major
events, and tickets for charter
operators Western Air and Sky
Unlimited.

Mr Fitzgerald said TicketX-

press would earn 50 per cent.

of its revenues from the air
charter tickets, 35 per cent
from pre-paid phone cards. and
15 per cent from events. .

He added that with Western

Air and Sky Unlimited on-

wages, salaries and rent costs in
the public sector.

But the Central Bank said:
“Nevertheless, the comparative
gap [between this year’s deficit
and last year’s] is expected to
narrow, as highlighted by the
improved revenue intake dur-
ing October-December, which
resulted in a second quarter

‘shortfall that was unchanged

from the previous year.
Away from the fiscal situa-

Wage (From page 1B)

gaining. .

It added that unions and
employers negotiated wage
rates without government inter-
ference.

However, the report also not-

ed that human rights advocates
had claimed that the Grand
Bahama Port Authority has
allowed Hutchison-Whampoa,

which owns the harbour and air- __

port i in Freeport, to discourage
unions.
The US-based agency' s

report also noted that some

LNG (From page 1B)

northeast of Boston.

The Neptune LNG deepwa-
ter port operation will be
designed to provide an average

. of 400 million cubic feet of nat-

ural gas per day to the New
England market, enough to
heat about 1.5 million homes.

Meanwhile, Mr Ebeling said
Tractebel continues to be in dia-
logue with the Government to
resolve any concerns or address
any questions they might have
on the Calypso project.

He added: “We have had
meetings and the Government
has expressed concern over cer-
tain things. I think there. was

- some concern.and confusion

created by the Sandia Report,

but we are trying to work our -

way through some of those
things and we're in active dis-
cussions to resolve these issues.

We're working on getting a bet- _
ter understanding of what their

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Janina

board, TicketXpress would
provide ticketing and reserva-
tions for 60 per cent of the air
charter market.

RND Holdings was in talks

with a further three medium- .

sized charter operators, and if
successful the company would
provide services for 80 per cent
of the market.

Mr Fitzgerald said the.com-
mission rate TicketXpress
would earn on sales would ‘be
between 3-7 per cent, depend-

- ing on the contracts it-had

entered into and the method
of purchase.

TicketXpress customers can
currently only reserve tickets
on-line and not pay for them, a
situation that disappointed

tion, the Bahamian economy’s
prospects look brighter, with
the Central Bank saying it
expanded at “a strengthening
pace” during January. Foreign
currency inflows were much

higher than. in January 2004,
resulting in a major build-up in

banking sector liquidity and for-
eign reserves.

The external reserves stood
at $718.11 million at month’s
end, having grown by me! 9 mil-

employers complained that the
industrial tribunal was biased
unfairly in favour of employ-
ees.

As part of its findings, it also »

reported that. the Ministry of
Labour, which has a team of
inspectors that conduct on-site
visits to enforce occupational

health and safety standards’and
investigate employee concerns.
and complaints, conducted

those inspections infrequently.
The report also said Bahami-
an law does not provide a right

concerns are to see how we can
address them within the para-
meters of the project."

The Sandia Report, a US-
based private sector document,
looked at potential risks to
LNG facilities, both from an
operational standpoint and acts
that were considered intention-
al, such as terrorism.

A supporter of Tractebel’s
application, the Grand Bahama
Port Authority, remains a
strong commercial partner that
has worked actively alongside

_Tractebel-to help address all
- regulatory issues and push the
- project forward.

Tractebel's Neptune LNG

deepwater port will be capable’
_of mooring specially-designed

LNG ships equipped to store,
transport and vaporise LNG in
natural gas that can be sent to
customers using the existing
HubLine subsea pipeline.



Yield
0.197 0.000 N/M 0.00%
1/328 0.320 6.0. 4.00%
0.152 0.330 11.0 5.50%
-0.057 0.000 N/M 0.00%
0.101 0.000 14.2 0.00%
0.007 0.040 12.8 4.21%
0.510 0.240 15.7 3.00%
0.259 0.060 8.5 2.73%
0.632 0.390 12.2 4.94%} -
0.228 0.000 . 6.6 0.00%|
0.406 0.230 9.9 5.72%}
0.662 0.480 15.5 4.68%
0.513 0.330 15.0 4.30%
0.710 0.500 11.1 6.29%
0.084 0.000 16.7 0.00%
0.818 0.405 11.6 4.26%|
0.785 0.550 10.5 6.81%












YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by Ssesing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask §$ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol.

- Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

‘FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



many shareholders, as mem-
bers of the public will only be
able to pay for them at distrib- |
ution outlets located at Galleria
Cinemas.

The company is in negotia-
tions with other businesses to
establish more distribution
points.

Advertising to promote Tick-
etXpress will begin, this week,

-using five different ads, with

Mr Fitzgerald acknowledged

.that RND Holdings had previ-

ously set October as the roll- ©
out date for TicketXpress but
this was delayed to allow the
company to enhance the pro-
gramme and add new modules,
enabling it to be seamlessly
rolled out to different compa-



lion in January 2005 compared
to the previous year’s growth
of $17.9 million. Excess liquidi-
ty in the banking system
increased by $67.8 million,

' growing it to $292.2 million

compared to the previous year’s
$138.27 million.

- Both developments are likely
to have contributed to the Cen-
tral Bank’s decision to reduce
the discount rate by 0.5 per cent
this month.

for workers to remove them-
selves from dangerous work sit-
uations without jeopardy to
continued employment.

In response, Mr Nutt said if
jobs were inherently dangerous
but that is the only job that
existed in the company, it will
be difficult to enforce such leg-
islation! °°" ~

In-regard-to ‘other alleeations .
contained in the report; Mr Nutt
said in regard to Hutchison-
Whampoa, there had never
been a situation where the com-

The LNG carriers will moor

- at the proposed deepwater port

by means of a submerged
unloading buoy system. Two
unloading buoys will moor the
LNG carriers throughout the
unloading cycle. An LNG ship
will typically moor at the deep-
water port for four to eight



THE TRIBUNE

nies and integrated with their ,
networks.

As a result, financial projec-
tions that showed TicketXpress
adding to RND Holdings’ per-
formance in 2004 were no
longer valid.

Mr Fitzgerald said the talks it
was having with the current
potential purchaser were “the
most serious” it had entered
into in its search for a buyer
for its Gold’s Gym franchise.

He added ‘that without an
anchor tenant, RND Holdings’
proposed Charles W Saunders

- Highway shopping centre was

too risky a venture, and the
project was essentially on hold
until one could be found.

The Central Bank said the
economy’s 2005 growth
prospects had been enhanced
by tourism and foreign invest-
ment inflows. The weak US$
and other conditions in the US
were supportive of tourism, and
this would be joined by future
increases in hotel sector capac-
ity.

Further gains are expected in
the external reserves during
2005, the Central Bank said,
although the rate of growth
would be lower due to expan-
sionary credit conditions.



pany was found to be anti-union
and that it was the workers that
carried on an illegal strike,

' being subsequently terminated

fi



for leaving their jobs.

Mr Nutt also noted that its
references to the Fair Labour
Standards Act, which it said
requires employers to find suit-

‘ able alternative employment for

-employees injured on the job,
but who are still able to work,
was erroneous, because the Act
was repealed when the Employ-
ment Act became law. .



and a formal project applica-

~ tion review, to take about 15 to

days, depending on the size of .

the ship.

The two separate buoys will
ensure that natural gas can be
delivered in a continuous flow
by having a brief overlap
between arriving and departing
LNG. carriers. The estimated
cost for the project, including
specially built LNG ships, a
buoy system and a connection
to the HubLine pipeline is
about $900 million.

Neptune LNG anticipates the
project's development phase,
including regulatory and pub-
lic consultation and evaluation,

18 months. Neptune LNG
anticipates construction of the
deepwater port components to
take an additional three years.
For its Grand Bahama pro-
ject, Tractebel has linked with a
Florida Power & Light (FPL)
subsidiary and El Paso Corpo-
ration to combine their devel-
opment resources, minimising
risk and financing costs for all. |
Ultimately, only one of the

’ Calypso and El Paso Seafarer

projects will be constructed
depending on government
approval, with Tractebel and El
Paso affiliates being the equity
owners of the pipeline, and
Tractebel and FPL owning the
LNG receiving terminals.

The $700 million Seafarer
pipeline and gas terminal, if
chosen,.would be funded from a
70/30 debt/equity mix.

APPOINTMENT

Paul

(Andy) Gomez,

Managing Partner at Grant

Thornton,
Accountants

Chartered
and
Management Consultants,

is pleased to confirm the
appointment of Patrick E

Smith, CPA, CIA as a partner.

Mr Smith joined the firm in
July 2004 and brings with him
a wealth of experience in
accounting and internal audit. At Grant Thornton-he will be
primarily responsible for management consulting and
accounting engagements, and will serve as the Firm’s
Administrative Partner. Mr Smith is a member of Rhodes _
Memorial Methodist Church and is married to the former

Regina Rigby.

Prior to joining Grant Thornton, Mr Smith was employed as
Financial Controller by a leading law firm based in Nassau
with offices in London, England where he was a key player
in implementing significant internal controls, specifically
time and billing systems, that are adaptable to a broad range
of professional organizations.

Grant Thornton (Bahamas) is a member firm of Grant
Thornton International, whose experience and quality
commitment is delivered through 21,500 staff in 585 offices
located in 110 countries worldwide.





THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS

TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005, PAGE 3B



The US PATRIOT
Act: is it all bad?

By Hubert Edwards

nrecent times there has
been much discussion
on the impact that the
US Patriot Act (the
Act) could have on
Caribbean jurisdictions, espe-
cially those ‘vith offshore finan-
cial centres. This topic also
seems to generate a significant
amount of emotion. At a semi-
nar in 2002, the presenter, a US
lawyer, in his response to ques-
tions stated that relative to the
Act, it is the geo-political pow-
er of the US at work.To para-
phrase his statement: the US is
large enough and has the polit-
ical influence to make demands
on countries such as the
Bahamas. This response led to
a few participants walking out.
Unfortunately, he could have
not been any more accurate.
Fast forward to a Bahamas
Association of Compliance
Officers (BACO) conference
held in 2004. The discussion
centred on the implications of
the PATRIOT Act for the
financial services industry. Sit-
ting at that panel were some
very distinguished profession-
als. The general conclusion was
that the Act should essentially
be rejected on the basis of its
apparent implications for sov-
ereignty and because it appears
to, along with other interna-
tional initiatives, impose a mov-
ing target for compliance on
jurisdictions within the region.
The argument was also made
that a coordinated and consid-
ered effort has to be made to
“lobby” strategic individuals
within the US who could then
represent our interest or, at the
very least, explain how the exis-
tence of offshore financial cen-
tres in the Caribbean impacts

the US capital markets and’
financial-services industry. This, :--

we assume, would temper any
negative consequences for the
region.

Considering the two scenar-
ios, it is clear that the Act con-
jures up certain fears and is gen-
erally not thought of as having
too many benefits for the
Caribbean. But is the Act all
bad, or are there aspects of its
objectives and its application
which are not fully considered
during these discussions? Our
intent is not to sway the reader
one way or the other. We will
therefore present some infor-

mation relevant to section 311 .

of the Act and leave the reader
to take their own position. Ina
future article we will analyse
some other sections of the Act

and their potential implications.

The information is presented
with one important caveat. We
are not lawyers and this, there-

fore, is not intended to be a
legal analysis.

Generally, it is title ITI of the
Act which is usually under the
spotlight when discussions arise
relative to financial services.
Title III contains many pro-
nouncements which have impli-
cations for every jurisdiction
outside the US, not just those
within the Caribbean.

Under section 311 of the Act,

ent Geoege W. Bush

p
brought in the PATRIOT Act.
(AP Photo)

the Secretary of the Treasury

has the power to require US
domestic banks to impose spe-
cial requirements where “a
jurisdiction outside of the Unit-
ed States, financial institution
operating outside of the United

. States, class. of transaction with-

in, or involving, a jurisdiction
outside of the United States, or
one or more types of accounts
has been declared as a primary
money laundering concern”.
These special requirements may
include prohibiting domestic
banks from providing, for exam-
ple, correspondent or payable
through accounts.

This power conferred upon
the secretary has the potential
to significantly disrupt a coun-
try’s economy, especially in
instances where the provision

of financial services forms a.

large portion of national
income. In our opinion, it is this
combination which unearths the
most dreaded aspect of the Act.
There is the ability to put some
countries out of business, at

least as it relates to the provi-
sion of financial services. It
should be noted that several
other international initiatives
could potentially have the same
effect.

Consider these two eine

situations (but different in terms...

of impact) which. play out’ dur-
ing the practical application of
the Act. The US authorities
imposed special measures under
section 311 against Myanmar

(Burma). This restricted US -

financial institutions from enter-

ing into direct.as well as indirect,

transactions with Burmese
banking organisations. With

NOTICE is hereby given that STEPHANIE ANITA NEWLAND,

CLARIDGE ROAD, P.O. BOX N-3859, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and

Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The |

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of.the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 22nd day of FEBRUARY, 2005
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



Faith pe CH Acad

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wishes to announce that The
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will be held on Friday, March 4th,
2005 at 9:00 AM at the Academy
of Prince Charles Drive.

The Academy: has limited
space in grades | through 10, and
persons wanting to enter the

Academy in September 2005,
must sit the Examination.

For More Information

Contact:
The Admittance Office at

324-2269

So Register Now!

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regard to indirect transactions,
US financial institutions are
required, for example, to ensure
that the correspondent or
payable-through accounts they
maintain in the US for any for-
eign bank are not used by the

foreign bank to provide banking |

services to Burmese banking
organisations.

This gives a fair idea of the
wide ranging implications such a
ruling can have on a jurisdic-
tion. In addition to the country
as a whole, two institutions were
singled out as being a threat for



money laundering. As a result,
the “special measures against
these two banking organisations
were more restrictive”.

The release from the author-
ities declared: “Without excep-

_tion, US financial institutions

are broadly prohibited from

‘establishing, maintaining or’

administering correspondent
accounts or payable-through
accounts -with Myanmar
Mayflower Bank and Asia
Wealth Bank”.

Being familiar with the oper-
ations of an offshore financial
institution, it would [be] recog-
nise that this action would have
dealt a significant blow to their
operations. The inability to cre-
ate correspondent accounts,
even on an indirect basis, will
significantly restrict the level of
service a bank is able to pro-
vide its clients, especially where
they are desirous of participat-
ing in the US capital markets. In
Burma’s case, the impact was
largely limited to the financial
sectors, given other “viable”



of publication of this notice.

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, DWAYNE HARVEY
LOCKHART, of Foxdale Subdivision, c/o P.O. Box N-8199,
Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name to DWAYNE
HARVEY LOCKHART-GAILLARD. If there are any objections .
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date

means of national income.
Nauru provides us with the
second but more dramatic piece
of evidence of the impact the
Act can have on a country.
Based on information gleaned
from the US Federal Reserve’s
website, Nauru is a small island,
ten square miles in size with a
population about 12,000. It had
developed a reputation for the

establishment of offshore shell |

banks without a physical pres-
ence. To raise income, having
seen its previously impressive
wealth from the mining of phos-
phates depleted, the country
resorted to the selling of pass-
ports (or ‘economic citizen-

See ACT, Page 4B










NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FITZROY DEWAR JR., P.O.BOX
40401, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 22ND day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box F-41085,

Grand Bahama, Bahamas.



America On Sale

FT. LAUDERDALE ..............ss0scese0000$ 88,00
MIAMI.........cccsscsscsscsscsscssesseee$ 99,00
NEWYORK.........ccsccssccsceee cosseees $198.00
ORLANDO. ........00ccccccceseeeescseene es $199.00.
ATLANTA...........ececececscecsceeees+ $235.00
BOSTON. ......ccccssssessesceeseeee1+ $267.00
CHARLOTTE ...........ssseeccccccceeee ++ $285.00
PHILADELPHIA. ..........0sc0sseese00+0 $285.00

BALTIMORE.........scecsscscececeees ves $296.00
WASHINGTON .........cccsececccccecceees 9296.00

AND) MORESCIMIES

BOOK NOW & SAVE

For more details call our office at:
Phone: 328-0264, 328-0257
Fax: 325-6878
Website: premiertravelbahamas.com
37 Collins Avenue, P.O. Box N-9670
Nassau, Bahamas

* Fares based on Mid-week Travel

* tickets must be purchased by March 2nd 2005.

* Taxes & Service Fees not included
* Travel completed by June 15th 2005



nv Me ;
Credit Cards
Acepted



PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005

ee ee eae ee eee ee ee

Act ferota oaes 3B)

ships’) to non-resident for-
eigners and offshore banking
licences.

Nauru’s banking licenses are
only subject to cursory super-
vision, and maintain no banking
records that would facilitate
review by a bank regulator. It
was noted in the report that
“the limited information avail-
able indicates that there is a
strong likelihood that they
[were] shell banks that [were]
not subject to effective banking
supervision”. The country was
declared a money laundering
threat. —

Subsequent to the declara-
tion and discussions between
the US and Nauru, the latter’s
offshore sector essentially fold-
ed or - as was reported - the
leadership agreed to “terminate
certain types of business”. The
country is currently on the
doorsteps of total bankruptcy.
The big question now is how
Nauru, struggling for survival,
will ever be able to find viable,
legitimate replacement for the

income lost as a result of the

significant erosion of its “off-
shore” activities.

Naurw has clearly shown that
the application of the Act can
and does create significant eco-
nomic hardship for a country.
We would not wish, given the
facts involved, for one to con-
clude that the Act was applied
unjustifiably or with prejudice.

THE TRIBUNE



There are, however, different
perspectives on what constitute

‘proper supervision or the level

of risk posed by certain types
of institutions and financial ser-
vices products. Consequently,
some may draw such a conclu-
sion.

Considering the facts in the
case of Nauru, there were
aspects of the operations of
their “offshore sector” that
were obviously flawed. The lack
of supervision and regulation
would cause any objective
observer to be concerned. The
absence of physical presence,
together with inadequate paper
trails (or paper support), defi-
nitely had negative implications
for the financial systems of oth-
er countries. In this case, there-
fore, one would have to con-
clude that, prima facie, the Act
was beneficial not only to the
US but to other jurisdictions,
given that there was the poten-
tial for unwelcome activities to
be carried out through these
non-domiciled, unregulated
institutions. Here, in our opin-
ion, is the manifestation of the

geo-political clout of the US..

Consider whether any other
major financial center, “singu-
larly” imposing a similar “sanc-
tion”, would have had the same
effect.

The right to create a means
that ensures survival and pros-
perity is an explicit right of

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

- STAYNER SECURITIES S.A.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act
No. 45 of 2000, STAYNER SECURITIES S.A. has
been dissolved and struck of the Register according
to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 17th of February, 2005.

GEORGY ULUKHANOV
of 1, Dgebuadze Str., app. 259,
PO 380002, Tbilisi, Georgia
Liquidator




POSITION:
RESPONSIBLE TO:

O





This position provides an excellent op
career with the Financial Intelligence

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
FINANCIAL INTELLIGENCE UNIT

poruinity for an individual seeking a meaningful -
nit ; ;

The successful candidate would be responsible for the provision of legal advice to the
Director and the Financial Intelligence Unit relative to its functions under the Financial
Intelligence Unit Act 2000.

LEGAL COUNSEL
DIRECTOR

QUALIFICATIONS: The successful applicant must:
~ ¢Be apponied in writing by the Minister responsible
e administration of the Financial Intelligence

for
‘Unit Act 2000.

¢ Be a Counsel & Attorney-at-Law in the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas with a minimum

of 5 years Call.

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES

1. Responsible for ensuring that the Financial Intelligence Unit is kept abreast |
of legislative developments relative to its functions.

2. Responsible for making recommendations to the Director relative to the
legal issues affecting the Financial Intelligence Unit.

3. eek for liaison between the Financial Intelligence Unit and the
ice of the Attorney General relative to legal issues affecting the
Financial Intelligence Unit.

4. Responsible for the provision of assistance in the training of industry
participants in the Financial Service Sector in accordance with the
provisions of the Financial Intelligence Unit Act 2000.

5: Responsible for drafting of legal documents for Memoranda of
Understanding between the Financial Intelligence Unit and foreign
Financial Intelligence Units. .

6. Responsible for assisting with other duties relative to the proper functioning |
of the Financial Intelligence Unit as required by the Director.

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS & EXPERIENCE:

e Five years call to the Bahamas Bar

° Experience in Compliance, Civil, Criminal & Corporate Law, Assets
Tracing & Forfeiture.

¢ Excellent attitude, punctuality and attendance.

REMUNERATION PACKAGE

¢ Competitive salary commensurate with experience
¢ 15% gratuity upon successful completion of contract’

Interested persons should submit their application and resume in writing along with
the relevant certificates to:

The Director,

Financial Intelligence Unit
Third Floor, Norfolk House

Frederick Street
Nassau, The Bahamas

every country. Against this

background isn’t it very curious -

that a sovereign could take cer-
tain actions against another,
unilaterally, which places it at a
significant disadvantage. Care-
ful analysis of the procedures
for application of section 311 of
the Act shows that the US may
not, in fact, necessarily be acting
singularly or as unilaterally as it
first appears, but is instead rely-
ing on signals from other juris-
dictions and institutions.
Institutions such as the
FATF, FSF and the IMF play a
significant role in this regard.

This is why there needs to be

careful consideration of other
international initiatives and
their impact in any discussion
on the implications and effects
of the Patriot Act. This is also
why the actions. and pro-
nouncements of these multilat-
eral bodies should never be dis-
regarded, especially where they
have. negative connotations
towards the region.

The PATRIOT Act, in our
opinion, has been carefully
crafted to ensure that sufficient
and careful consideration is giv-
en before an entity, country or
class of accounts is declared as a
primary money laundering con-

cern. Section 311 requires con-.

sultation with, among others,
the Board of Governors of the
Federal Reserve system, the
Securities and Exchange Com-
mission and the Secretary of
State. Consideration must be
given to whether similar actions

are being taken by other coun- °

tries or multilateral groups. This
is where the importance of

groups such as the FATF and ©
‘FSF becomes pronounced. The

impact on competitiveness and
the compliance burden on US
financial institutions is also con-
sidered, together with whether

the timing of the action would .
have any adverse systemic.

impact on the global financial
system and the effect of the
action on US national security.
and foreign policy.
Essentially, the process is
designed to carefully consider
and protect US interests. There-

fore, all things being equal, with —

these checks and balances, there
should be very little anxiety that
undue and undeserved sanc-
tions would be imposed on any

entity or country. Given the col-

lective financial importance of

Caribbean financial centres and _

the obvious impact the imposi-




































tion of “special measures” could
have on the US financial sys-
tem, together with the poten-
tial impact on the competitive-
ness of US financial institutions,
it is difficult to envision any type
of ill-considered declaration
directed at the Caribbean.

An examination of the con-
clusions drawn in the case of
Nauru is useful in gauging how
Caribbean jurisdictions would

' be assessed in the unlikely event

of any coming up for such con-

- sideration. The following delin-

eates the thought process lead-
ing to the decision to declare
Nauru a money laundering con-
cern. The authorities considered
the following:

e Whether similar actions

have been or are being taken
by other nations or multilateral
groups. The FATF had called
on its member countries for the
imposition of counter-measures
against Nauru.

¢ Whether the imposition of
any particular special measure
would create a significant com-
petitive disadvantage, including
any undue cost or burden asso-
ciated with compliance, for
financial institutions organised
or licensed in the United States.

It was concluded that the

imposition of sanctions against .

Nauru would not.create sucha
situation. This was taken
against the background that
FATF members and G-—7 coun-
tries had already responded to

- the FATF’s call for the imposi-

tion of counter-measure,s and
that there was already a restric-

.. tion on the provision of certain

services to Nauru financial insti-
tutions by institutions in the US.

~ e The extent to which the
action or the timing of the
action would have a significant,

. adverse, systemic impact on the

international payment, clear-
ance and settlement system, or
on legitimate business activities

~ involving the particular juris-

diction, institution or class of
transactions.
The conclusion was that
action against Nauru should
have no significant adverse sys-
temic impact on the interna-
tional payment system or on
legitimate business activities,
due to the small size of the
economy and the absence of

any meaningful, legitimate

international business.

e Finally, the effect of the

Deloitte
& Touche



‘tured to ensure the “ri:

action on US national security
and foreign policy. It was con-
cluded that the action is expect-
ed to have virtually no effect
on US national security or for-
eign policy.

Based on the foregoing, the
declaration was made. The
reader can determine for him-
self how Caribbean jurisdictions
or any specific jurisdiction
would fare in a similar circum-
stance, taking into account the
points enumerated above.

It is clear that while the fac-
tors considered mainly focus on
the US’s position, there is also
allowance for assessing the
impact within the targeted
country. One other element
that is interesting is the extent
to which the “importance” of a
jurisdiction to US national secu-
rity and foreign policy would
influence the decision.

It appears that the process for

implementing the force of the
Act is very deliberate and struc-

sion is made. Further, it would
appear that by including factors
such as competitiveness and
foreign policy, there is unlikely

_ to be any overwhelming adverse

action against the Caribbean
given its relatively good rela-
tionships with the US and the
extent to which a few, for exam-
ple, the Bahamas, have serious
implications for the US nation-
al security. The competitiveness
aspect, while an important fac-
tor that would play to the
advantage of the Caribbean,
does raise the possibility of
actions from other countries,
regions or multilateral institu-
tions being used to influence
sanctions under the Act, given
that such actions would reduce
the adverse impact on US inter-
ests by eroding the competi-
tiveness argument. In this
regard, it therefore appears that
there lies more veiled danger
in other quarters, which could

. render the region susceptible to

the might of the Patriot Act
One point that can be raised,
especially in-the aftermath of
certain Caribbean jurisdictions
being blacklisted, is that there is
a need to correct what appears
not only to be a clear misun-
derstanding, on the part of US
policy makers, of the products
and what is done in Caribbean

offshore jurisdictions,;but:also ;
the clear underestimation.on.. .
how much these activities con- ~~

tribute to the US capital mar-

| EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY |

Enterprise Risk Services - Control Assurance Senior Consultant/Manager

t” deci- '

kets and financial services
industry. -

From this perspective the call
for a lobbyist approach, as not-
ed above, certainly has signifi-
cant value. Clearly, without
educating those with ability to
“hurt” our economies that there
is an intrinsic connection in the
viability of the offshore institu-
tions, subject to proper man-
agement of money laundering
issues, the misunderstandings
will continue and the implica-
tion for us is not favourable. If
the Caribbean can show that
actions against it by the US,
through the Patriot Act or oth-
er measures for that matter,

would hurt the US financial ser- |
vices industry in a noticeable ;

way, then'the region would be
well on the way to ensuring
these factors, when considered,
are skewed in its favour.
Finally, we must again ask the
question - should the Patriot
Act be summarily rejected?
Analysis of the facts, some of
which are discussed above, sug-
gests that at this point in time,
that approach does not appear
to represent a viable solution.

- Obviously there are others who

are able to argue otherwise and
we welcome such discussions.
A useful approach, however, is

not to agonise over the geo- “

a

ea

teh hd feb hg ee as

ee He

political clout of the US (or any -

other region), nor seek to dis-

regard the Act but to consis- '

tently guard against the need

for the provisions of the Act to ©
be even considered, much less '
applied, with regards to the:

Caribbean.

About the author: Hubert
Edwards is as a bank examiner
with the Central Bank of the
Bahamas. He is also a mem-
ber of Lignum! Lignum!, a
newly formed group of profes-
sionals that reviews, analyses
and provides feedback on
national, regional and global
issues impacting private and
public sector organisations with-
in the Caribbean region. The
opinions expressed in this article
do not necessarily reflect those
of the Central Bank of the
Bahamas, any of its officers or
employees. This article contains
researched information,
excerpts or paraphrases from
‘any document cited in its body.

For, comments on this article

please email — bertz@coral-
wave.com. :

Well established firm seeks an IT Auditor manager/senior consultant for its Enterprise Risk

Services Practice.

RESPONSIBILITIES

Identify and evaluate business and technology risks, internal controls which mitigate risks,
and related opportunities for internal control improvement

Assist in selecting and tailoring approaches, methods and tools to support services
Actively participate in training efforts

Actively participate in decision making with engagement management and seek to understand
the broader impact.of current decisions

Generate innovative ideas and challenge the status quo
Facilitate use of technology-based tools or methodologies to review, design and/or implement

. products and services

Build and nurture positive working relationships with clients with the intention to exceed

client expectations

Understand clients' business environment and basic risk management approaches
Play substantive/lead role in engagement planning, economics, and billing
Participate in proposal development and sales efforts

QUALIFICATIONS

3+.years experience in the areas of public accounting, internal auditing or consulting

Bachelors degree in Business Administration, Accounting, Computer Science, Information
Systems Administration or related field. MBA or dual-degree is an asset

CISA, CPA, CIA designation or desire and dedication to pursue

Advanced understanding of business processes, internal control risk management, IT controls

and related standards

Proven analytical skills with ability to tackle problems systematically to determine causes
and produce effective solutions

Experience with accounting control related issues

Demonstrated ability to plan and manage engagements along with ensuring deliverables
meet work plan specifications and deadlines

Ability to thrive in an environment of pressing deadlines and constantly changing conditions
Successful experience identifying controls, developing and executing test plans
Ability to synthesize information and produce concise synopses/summaries

Excellent written and oral communication skills including both technical and business writing,
documentation and presentation skills

Open to travel requirements

Experience with ACL is an asset

Experience with COSO and/or Sarbanes-Oxley an asset
Technical and/or management background in technical systems/environments an asset

COMPENSATION

¢ Compensation is negotiable based on combination of years experience and qualification.

Interested persons should submit their resumes before March 18, 2005.

HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT

P. O. BOX N-7120
NASSAU, BAHAMAS





THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS

TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005, PAGE 5B



IndiGo to cover

0% of Grand
Bahama within
30 months

By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Tribune Business Reporter

IndiGo Networks yesterday
announced. the launch of its
voice telephony services in
Grand Bahama, promising a
progressive expansion of the
network over the next 30
months to cover 90 per cent of
the island's population.

To mark the launch, IndiGO
is unveiling a Caribbean pro-
motion that allow its pre-paid
card customers in New Provi-
dence and Grand Bahama to
call all nations apart from Cuba
at a rate of $0.49 per minute.

“In New Providence we have
found that calls within the
region formed a large part of
our traffic, and we wanted to
find a way of both thanking

those customers for their busi-
ness, and marking the exciting
launch of IndiGO into Grand
Bahama”, said Paul Hutton-
Ashkenny, the company’s pres-
ident.

“We believe that our
Caribbean prepaid promotion
is the perfect means of doing
just that, and we have even
managed to also provide a spe-
cial affordable rate for calling
Cuba.”

The company’s Grand
Bahama wireless network will
initially cover the main com-

‘mercial areas, allowing busi-

nesses to use IndiGo’s rates for
international and inter-island
calls.

"We are very excited to be
able to launch voice services in
Grand Bahama and offer the

' Agrowing Technology Solutions Provider is seeking to

employ a

Client Account Manager

The successful candidate should be self-motivated with
strong communication and networking skills. Experience
with technical products is not necessary as training will
be provided. However, the successful candidate should
have a proven track record in sales and marketing.

Responsibilities include:

Managing existing client accounts

same services and low rates that
residents of New Providence
already enjoy. Our entry into
the market as the first legal
competition to the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
(BTC) has already driven down
the cost of long distance phone
calls to an all-time low and Indi-
Go is committed to continuing
that trend," said Mr Hutton-
Ashkenny.

Beginning March 1, con-
sumers and businesses through-
out Grand Bahama will be able
to take advantage of the lower
long distance rates. The new
service comes on the heels of
IndiGo's introduction into the
New Providence telecommuni-
cations market as the only pri-
vate, licensed telecommunica-
tions operator.

Dispute (From page 1B)

recuse themselves from debates on such deals.

Mr Dean also said the EGM would debate a
proposal to elect to RND Holdings’ board per-
sons nominated by financial institutions. They
wouild review all proposals for the company’s
future growth; review the financial statements
for its fiscal 2005 year; and review how the firm
planned to finance its future development.

The separation of the board from RND Hold-
ings’ management was also on the former presi-
dent’s agenda.

Mr Dean no longer holds a board seat him-
self, and his EGM motion was opposed by Mr
Finlayson, who said: “J must register a complaint.
He was president and chief executive of the com-
pany until recently. Unless he has a problem with
himself, I don’t see why we should waste share-
holders’ time.”

However, Mr Fitzgerald said that since Mr
Dean had tabled his EGM request to the com-
pany secretary, the firm would have to seek legal
advice on the correct procedure for dealing with
the motion and how it should proceed.

He indicated that the April 7 date proposed by
Mr Dean may not be feasible, due to the need to
send information and invitations to all share-
holders, adding that the AGM for fiscal 2005 was
expected to be held “some time in June”.

Jim Graham, vice-president of Fidelity Capital
Markets, also used the AGM to note the unhap-
piness of shareholders represented by his com-
pany over RND Holdings’ failure to produce
timely financial reports “for three years in a row”.

The Tribune revealed last month how RND
Holdings’ annual report for its fiscal year ended
on February 29, 2004, had been posted to share-
holders almost a year after the period had ended,
with yesterday’s AGM taking place on the same
day that fiscal 2005 ended, Taising major question

marks about the company’s disclosure and trans-

parency. -

Mr Fitzgerald yesterday said RND Holdings
“acknowledged and accepted” it had failed to
provide investors with timely information about
the company’s performance and what it was doing

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE |

SUVEL HOLDINGS LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that at an Extraordinary General
’ Meeting of the Shareholders of the above-named Company duly convened -
and held on the 22nd day of February 2005, the following Resolutions

were passed:-

RESOLVED THAT Suvel Holdings Limited be wound up

voluntarily -

’ RESOLVED THAT Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid Davis be
appointed the Liquidators for the purpose of such winding up.

were passed:-



with their money.

He added: “As responsible management, direc-
tors we should be publishing timely results.” RND
Holdings, he admitted, had not issued interim
financial statements to shareholders for the past
three years, although the Securities Industry Act
did not require it to do so.

Mr Fitzgerald blamed the lateness of RND
Holdings’ 2004 annual report on the fact that it
took longer than expected to complete the $4.7
million sale of its cinema operations to Galleria,
which produced a knock-on effect for the recon-
ciliation and conciliation of its accounts.

The accounting department had also been
downsized during that period, which “exacerbat-
ed” the problem.

Mr Finlayson yesterday appeared to blame Mr
Dean for the disclosure failures, saying: “We
have made a change. The person in charge is no
longer in charge.

“We have made a move. The new person [man-
aging director Ken Donathan] is here. We will
give him a chance.”



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

JOVEL HOLDINGS LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that at an Extraordinary General
Meeting of the Shareholders of the above-named Company duly convened
and held on the 22nd day of February 2005, the following Resolutions

RESOLVED THAT Jovel Holdings Limited be wound up

voluntarily

’ RESOLVED THAT Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid Davis be
appointed the Liquidators for the purpose of such winding up.

Since ec ait aa ak

Developing new clients Dated the 22nd day of February 2005.

Selling and marketing products
Managing the Marketing Budget’ "
..,. Reporting to the Board of Directors

’ Dated the 22nd day of February 2005.

-+ +4 (Liquidator) : .

Cod ak Vue

(Liquidator)

~ (Liquidator) “(Liquidator)

The successful candidate should have a Bachelors
Degree i in business or science with a minimum of 2 years
experience in sales.



Remuneration and Benefits will include a competitive
salary, monthly bonus for meeting sales targets, car
allowance, group health and pension.

FirstCaribbean International Bank is the combination of CIBC and Barclays Bank in the Bahamas,
Belize and the Caribbean. We are the region's largest publicly traded bank, with over 3,000 staff
serving over 5.3 million people in 16 territories. We menage over 500,000 active accounts through
more than 80 branches and centres.

Please submit a resume to:-
Ms. J Forsythe, PO Box EE17034, Nassau, Bahamas
Or apply online at http:/Awww.emagine.bs/cam

Closing date for applications is March 18th ‘ : * 4 : , ‘ ra a
; As we continue to grow, FirstCaribbean is seeking dynamic candidates for two senior-level positions,

both of which report directly to the Chief Operating Officer.

LEGAL NOTICE

NGiRER HEAD, OPERATIONS & TECHNOLOGY

: aa PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION
STEVEL HOLDINGS LIMITED i |

‘NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that at an Extraordinary General
Meeting of the Shareholders of the above-named Company duly convened
and held.on the 22nd day of February 2005, the following Resolutions
were eee -

Responsibilities: Prerequisites:

e Lead, motivate and develop a team responsible for © Demonstrated results leading, managing and
Business Planning, Financials, Expense - motivating large, distributed teams
Management, General Services, Process Previous experience in a large regional, multi-

_ Reengineering, Procedures and Documentation and — country operations environment, within the
Business Consulting financial services industry

e Achieve sector goals/targets and maintain Exceptional communication skills, with ability to
exceptionally high quality of delivery to internal interpret and effectively explain complex
and external customers challenges and proposals and to influence the full

e Ensure successful achievement of significant support of subordinates and Executive teams
business change by identifying, planning, and Extensive knowledge of Service Delivery within the
implementing operational business requirements in Retail, Corporate and Offshore Banking markets
line with the evolving needs of the business University degree with a minimum of 10 years’

experience in the business/financial world

RESOLVED THAT Stevel Holdings Limited be wound up
voluntarily

RESOLVED THAT Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid Davis be
appointed the Liquidators for the purpose of such winding up.

Dated the 22nd day of February 2005.

(Liquidator)

(Liquidator)



HEAD OF INTERNAL CONTROLS

Responsibilities: :
Lead and direct a programme of internal control
reviews of business areas within the various
centres, ensuring a level of management control
over operational risk through appropriate
processes and procedures
Manage Operational Risk, Compliance &
Information Security matters to minimise all
potential losses/reputational damage
Achieve sector goals/targets, maintaining
exceptionally high quality of delivery to internal
and external customers



Prerequisites:

¢ Proven ability to manage, lead and motivate large,
distributed teams :

¢ Previous experience in a large regional, multi-
country operations environment, within the
financial services industry

¢ Solid track record of results implementing
significant business change across multiple
geographic locations

e Awareness of financial services issues including
regulatory requirements .

e University degree with a minimum of 10 years'
experience in the business/financial world

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
SHL INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000,



the dissolution of SHL INC., has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore
been struck off the Register.

We offer attractively structured compensation and
reward packages as well as performance bonuses.

Applications with detailed résumé should be
submitted no later than March 11th, 2005 to:
Ms. Rosemary Jones

Executive Administrative Assistant
FirstCaribbean International Bank

Head Office, Warrens, St. Michael
Barbados.

Elvira Lowe

(Liquidator) FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK



"E-mail: rosemary.jones@firstcaribbeanbank.com Caribbean Pride. International Strength. Your Financial Partner,

aa nts who are short-listed will be FirstCaribbean International Bank is an Associated Company of Barclays Bank PLC and CIBC.

Cheryl Rolle
(Liquidator)









PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



‘Reno’ first Bahamian
to beat Russian boxer

Promoter
looking
forward

to next
boxing
show _

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter

PROMOTER Michelle
Minus was so pleased with
the turnout on Saturday
night that she’s looking for-
ward to First Class Promo-
tions’ next professional
boxing show. :

“We had over 1,000 per-
sons in the house. I think it
was an excellent show. It’s
a good start for 2005,” said
Minus at the Wyndam Nas-
sau Resort and Crystal
Palace Casino.

“We’re looking forward
to some bigger and better
shows in the coming
months.”

Already plans are in the
works for a Friday, April
29, show at the same venue
when “Marvelous” Marvin
Smith will put his Bahamas
super-middleweight title on
the line against Jermaine
*“Chu-Chu”’ Mackey.

On Saturday, Mackey

went the distance, pulling _|.

off a four-round unani-
mous decision over
Jamaican Ricardo “Ever
Ready” Planter in a tune-
up to the championship
bout. oe

“The guy realiy worked
me hard,” Mackey stressed.
“But I was glad that I got
the workout. It allowed me
to get ready for Marvin.

“J just want him to know
that it will be a different
story when we meet.”

That championship bout,
according to Minus, will
have to be sanctioned by
the Bahamas Boxing Com-
mission.

The BSC sanctioned the
showdown on Saturday
night between Wilson “Kid
Wonder” Theophile and
Jerome “Bahamian Bronze
Bomber” Ellis for the

vacant Bahamas junior ©

middleweight title.

The title was last held by
Elisha Obed in the 1970s.
First Class Promotions paid
special recognition to Obed
when they presented him
with a replica of his World
Boxing Council’s title.

In the championship
fight, which was scheduled
for 12 rounds, Theophile
was unable to answer the
bell to start the seventh.

Doctors Rickey Davis
and Munir Rashad were

called into the ring by ref- |
eree Matthew Rolle to |

check out Theophile after it
was discovered that he had
a problem with his jaw.

He was diagnosed with a
fractured jaw. He was
rushed to the hospital by
ambulance for treatment.

Minus, who was con-
cerned about Theophile’s
condition, said despite this
incident, the show was a
really exciting one from
start to finish.

“The entire card was
really good, but I think
Wilson will be okay
because he’s in good hands
with Dr Rashad, who is a

dental specialist,” Minus

noted.

“We haven’t seen this
type of crowd in a long
time. I think it’s because of
the mew venue. So we’re
going to make Wyndam
our home for the rest of:
our fights throughout the
year.”

However, Minus said

See SHOW, 7B







Hi TAUREANO “Reno” Johnson (third from left) shows off
the bronze medal that he won in the welterweight division
at the Independence Cup Tournament in Santo Domingo,
Dominican Republic, last week. He is pictured (!-r) with
head coach Andre Seymour, his father, middleweight Da
Dorsett and assistant coach Leonard “Boston Blackie

Miller.

& By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

AMATEUR Boxing Association of
the Bahamas’ president Wellington
Miller said Taureano “Reno” John-
son’s historic bronze medal at the Inde-
pendence Cup was just an indication
of what to expect from our local boxers
this year.

, Johnson made history last week
when he became the first Bahamian to
beat a Russian boxer, winning 3-2 over
Alexander Zodkov.

The victory in Santo Domingo,
Dominican Republic, advanced him to
the semi-final where he lost to a
Dominican and had to settle for the
bronze.

“Going there for the first event for
the year was really a good event for











Miller says Johnson’s historic bronze |

medal was just an indication of what :

’

to expect from local boxers this year -

the federation,” Miller stressed. “It was
a milestone for us.

“TI like us know that we are on the
right course and once we continue to do
what we have to do, we will be able to
do a lot of things this year.”

Miller revealed that Johnson’s per-
formance was so spectacular that the
Russian federation have agreed to
come to the Bahamas to participate in

@ IT was certainly a night to remember as
Jerome “Bahamian Bronze Bomber” Ellis
(far left) snapped Wilson “Kid Wonder”
Theophile’s perfect record to win the
vacant Bahamas Junior Middleweight

Title.

(Photo by Felipé Major/Tribune Staff) |

an exchange programme.

Miller said they will be working
feverishly on putting all the details
together before they announce how
they intend to entertain the visitors.

In the meantime, he said they are
just going to celebrate with Johnson
over his stunning victory over the Russ-
ian and his bronze medal at the end of
the tournament.

Paes

i

Q

fy

4

BF

i
o
3

- Still sore from the gruelling match, -

Johnson said he didn’t have to go all the .

way to win the medal round.

“It happens to the best of us,” he
admitted. “But it would disappoint any- -
body knowing that you not only have’
the gold medal in your hand or the box-

See BOXERS, 7B

fae





TRIBUNE SPORTS







Joshua Knights knock of
_ Jets for





mpio

PUWLLOLIPALy tvir var twrne

ee

By mew 8 tee we



@ MEMBERS of the Joshua Knights softball team pose
after sweeping the William Construction Jets in three
straight games Sunday at the Churchill Tener Knowles
National Softball Stadium to repeat as Masters Softball

League champions.







ship

& By BRENT STUBBS
‘Senior Sports Reporter

THE Joshua Knights were like a

“lighting bolt” as they knocked off.

the pennant winning William Con-
struction Jets for the second consec-
utive year to repeat as the Masters
Softball League’s champions.

In a repeat scenario from last year,
the Knights lost the pennant to the
Jets, but bounced back to beat them
when it counted the most - in the
finals - sweeping the best-of-five
series over the weekend at the
Churchill Tener Knowles National
Softball Stadium.

The Knights blew out the Jets 25-9
in game one, came back from a 21-20
deficit to pull off a 23-21 decision and
then secured the title in game three,
29-22.

“We’re always happy when we win
a championship, but this team played
together all year and we were victo-
rious. We deserve to be the champi-
ons,” said right-fielder Lenny White.

“ For the second straight year, White
was named the Most Outstanding
Player (MVP) after he banged out

‘is always sweeter,”

11 hits in 17 at bats, scoring 13 times
with nine runs batted in (RBI) for a
hefty .647 batting average.

“It’s a good feéling, but it’s even
greater to do it with a team like this,”
said White, who celebrated his 18th

wedding anniversary with his wife,

Eileen, on the same day they won
and was a couple days off their Feb-
ruary 22 marriage date this year.

For manager Anthony ‘Poker’
Huyler, there’s nothing like dupli-
cating the championship feat all over
again.

“Last year was sweet, but ehig'y year
was sweeter. The second time around
Huyler quipped.
“We should have won the pennant
this year, but only the championship

was left for us to salvage, so we went _

out and did it.”

Sponsor Ricardo Miller said this is
just an indication of what to expect
from the Knights next year.

“Right now, there’s no team out
there that can beat us. We will be
back next year bigger and better,”
he stressed. “We just wish they can
put an all-star team together to try
and beat us.” -



SOFTBALL



Coach Harry Dean, who assisted
manager Akel Clarke, said the Jets
fell victim to poor defence.

“We didn’t make the plays on the
field. We could score runs, but we
just needed to buckle up on our
defence,” Dean stressed.

As for Miller’s challenge, Dean
admitted that they are a “good” team,

but he insisted that they are listed as —

the youngest team of the players 50-
years and older in the league.

“They might win a game against a
so-called All-Star, but I don’t think
they can go through a series and beat
an All-Star team.”

Here’s a summary of the three
games played:

Knights 29, Jets 22: In a keenly
contested battle that went right down
to the wire, Michael Carroll had a
perfect 6-for-6 day, driving as many
runs and scoring three times to lead
Joshua’s in the clincher.

Greg Thompson came in relief for

starter Bertie Murray Sr and was able
to hold off Williams Construction
down the stretch.

Abe Johnson helped out with a 4-

for-7 day with 6 RBIs, scoring 3 '

times; Lenny White was 3-for-7 with
2 RBIs and 3 runs; Lester Dean was
4-for-6 with a RBi and 3 runs; Max
Moncur was 5-for-6 with 4 RBIs and
4 runs and Lorenzo Lockhart con-
tributed a hit with 2 RBIs and 2 runs
scored.

Anthony ‘Hot Dog’ Pierce was 3-
for-5 with 2 RBIs and 3 runs to lead
the Jets. Lee Rahming was 2-for-3
with 3 RBIs and 2 runs; Anthony
Weech 2-for-5 with 4 RBIs and 4
tuns; Cliff Jones 2-for-4 with a RBI
and 3 runs and Jeff Cooper was 2-
for-4 with 2 RBIs and 4 runs. |

Harold White suffered the loss.

Knights 23, Jets 21: Trailing 21-20
at the end of the sixth when the game
was called on Saturday night, Abe
Johnson laid down a neat bunt that

‘enabled Lenny White to score the

last of three runs in the seventh to
seal game two.

White finished with a 4-for-5 day
with three RBIs and 6 runs; Abe

Johnson was 4-for-6 with four RBIs |
and a run; Lester Dean was 3-for-5
with 4 RBIs and a run; Lorenzo
Lockhart 2-for-4 with two RBIs and a
run and Max Moncur 2-for-5 with 2
RBIs and 2 runs.

Bertie Murray Sr picked up the
win, while Harold White was tagged
with the loss.

Mike Major was 3-for-4 with five
RBIs and 4 runs; Anthony Weech 2-
for-5 with 4 RBIs and 3 runs and
Gary ‘Super’ Johnson 2-for-4 with 2
RBIs and 3 runs. .

Knights 25, Jets 9: Lenny White
went 4-for-5 with 4 RBIs and 5 runs;
Lorenzo Lockhart 3-for-3.with a RBI
and 3 runs; Lester Dean 3-for-5 with
3 RBIs and 3 runs and Lignel Neely |
3-for-4 with 3 RBIs and 3 runs and
Max Moncur 2-for-5 with 2 RBIs and
2 runs to lead Joshua’s in one game.

Bertie Murray Sr got the win over
Mike Dillette.

Sonny ‘Jiggy’ Haven was 2-for-4
with 3 RBIs and two runs; Jeff Coop-
er 3-for-3 with 3 runs; Mike Major
2-for-3 with 3 RBIs and Anthony
Pierce 2-for-4 with 2 RBIs and a run
in the loss.



bon

Bear

Boxers

4 of the tournament or the
MVP of the tournament, but
history in your hand.

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:(From page 8B)

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Bahamian to beat a Russian,
but I wanted to be the first to
beat a Cuban and win the gold
medal at the same time. So it
was disappointing to me that it
all slipped right between my
fingers.”

Johnson, who will take a
couple days off to recuperate
at home, said he’s looking for-
ward to going back to Cuba on
the scholarship he secured
from the Bahamas Olympic
Association.

“We have to learn from our
mistakes and we have to.learn
from what we learn,” he stated.
“That’s what I’m going to do
when I go back to Cuba.”

Coaches

Johnson, 21, thanked God,
the BOA, the International
Olympic Committee, his
coaches Andre Seymour and
Leonard ‘Boston Blackie’
Miller and his family and
friends, especially Ms Sawyer
from Old Nassau Liquor Store,
for their support.

Two other boxers also rep-
resented the Bahamas, but did-
n’t fare as well.

Middleweight Daryl Dorsett
lost his opening match to a
Russian, losing in the first
round, while heavyweight
James McKenzie went the dis-
tance with a Dominican before
he lost 3-2 in his opener.

“It was kind of disappoint-
ing, but I have to look at it asa
learning experience,” he said.
“The whole experience in San-
to Domingo was out of this
world.

“I never went to any com-
petition of that calibre before
so I went there with some false
expectations. But coming back,
I realised what it takes to be on
that level.”

Dorsett, a 20-year-old full-
time student at the College of
the Bahamas, said he was told
that he needed to bulk up, but
he felt that he had to improve
on his speed to complement
his size.

As for Johnson, Dorsett said
he was thrilled just being there
to watch it all unfold after he
failed in his bid to become the
first Bahamian to achieve the
feat.

“T felt even though the Russ-
ian was using his body to move

caround Reno, I felt Reno

fought well. It was all-out
excitement,” Dorsett stressed.
“Congratulations to Reno for a
job well done.”

Coach Seymour said the
team performed exceptional-

ly well competing against the

talented teams from Russia
and Cuba.

“The Bahamas has gained

the respect that we deserve,”
he stated.

“These are the type of tour-
naments that we need to go to
in order to improve our devel-
opment.

Country

“Whenever you beat a coun-
try like Russia, it shows the tal-
ent that we have in the
Bahamas. In the future, I think
the Bahamas will be the coun-
try to reckon with in the Latin
American region.”

Coach Miller, however, said
that if the Bahamas is going to
attain the level of success that
it should, the training sessions
have to be totally different.

“Government needs to pro-
vide us with a facility that we

could train in together,” Miller.

noted. “Everybody is doing it.
They are all in the camp. We
were in the camp with them
when we got there.

“Even if we have people
working or going to school, if
they get a camp, we can train
them before they go to school
or work and then we can train
together again when they fin-
ish.”

Miller said he and Seymour



are on target with their training
programme and they are
encouraging the amateur box-
ers to come out now and start
training if they want to com-
pete on any national team this
year.

Wellington Miller said they
intend to send a team off to
Nicaragua to compete in the
Senior Central American and
Caribbean Championships i in
the next two months.





TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005

SECTION



SPORTS

Fax: (242) 328-2398 |
MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



set to play Bainst the ti team of Jean-Julien ojer, Raoul Behr, David Josepa and Rasid
Winkie this weekend in the first round of the American Zone Il Davis ¢

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

BAHAMAS Lawn Tennis
Association’s president Mary
Shelley said she’s confident
that the Bahamas will prevail
over the Netherlands Antilles
this weekend in the first round
of the American Zone II

.Davis Cup tie.

The youthful team of Devin
Mullings,
H’Cone Thompson and Ryan
Sweeting, along with team cap-
tain, John Farrington, has
already arrived in Curacao.

They are scheduled to play
against the team of Jean-Julien
Rojer, Raoul Behr, David
Josepa and Rasid Winklaar
from Friday to Sunday.

The Netherlands Antilles
will be captained by Pranees
Hoyer.

“I expect them to do
extremely well,” said Shelley,
who will be joining the team in
Curacao on Wednesday. “I
think we are a stronger team

’ than the Netherlands Antilles.
“So if we can get past Jean--

Julien Rojer, we will be okay.”
Rojer, 24; has the highest
world ranking of all the players
from both teams. He is cur-
rently pegged at number 285 in
singles and 241 in doubles.

He is also the most seasoned
player in the tie, having par-
ticipated since 1998 when the
Netherlands Antilles first
played Davis Cup in Greup
IV.

Rojer has posted an impres-
sive 30-8 win-loss record for
the Netherlands Antilles, who
played in Zone II from 2001-
2003 before they dropped back
to Zone III last year, only to

_ return to Zone II in the finals.

Behr, the veteran of the
team at 28, also played with
the Netherlands Antilles from
1998. Winklaar made his debut
last year. He is the youngest
member of the team at 17.

As for the Bahamas, none
of the players has posted a vic-
tory yet in Davis Cup play.

Southpaw Mullings, 19,
appeared in 2002 and 2003
when the Bahamas played in
Zone One. He lost all four
matches he played in. He is
currently ranked at 1,470 in
singles and is a member of the
Ohio State Buckeyes’ tennis
team.

Rolle, 21, is a right-hander |

who played in Zone One in
2001 and 2003 for the
Bahamas. He lost both match-
es played. Thompson, 24,
made his debut last year, los-
ing in the two ties he played in.
Sweeting, 17, is making his
debut in Curacao.

“T think we have a good
team,” Shelley stated. “I am
looking for some good things
from there this weekend.”

The official dinner for the
team is set for Wednesday
night. The draw will take place
on Thursday at llam. The
opening singles will be played
on Friday at 10 am.

The doubles will be contest-
ed on Saturday at 10am and
the reserve singles will be
played on Sunday at 10am.

The winner of the tie will
automatically secure a berth
in Zone II next year, but they
will go on to play the winner
between Colombia and Brazil
over the weekend of July 15-17
in a bid to advance to zone
one.

The loser, however, will play
the loser between Colombia
and Brazil in a play-off from
July 15-17.

Marvin Rolle,.






















































Ce







Nee aT eee eae




Sn ee ee




















































TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005

ASD theta,

“David: Allensaggressive traits usually

seen in young men are now becenie mio Cenc méfe“eommon in young women
coming through the project’s commun centres. :-Pictured.fere are a group of young

Adolescent girls ‘among newest

Vrodeg



emerging problem groups’

& By ERICA WELLS

dolescent girls are among

the newest emerging

problem groups in

Bahamian society, a

prominent local psychia-
trist has warned.

Chairman of the Urban Renewal Pro--

ject Dr David Allen, who played a key
role in the war against cocaine as a former
National Drug Council chair, said that
aggressive traits usually seen in young
men are now becoming more and more
common in young women coming through
the project’s community centres.

“This newest group coming down the
line is very difficult,” he said.

“We have to ask ourselves if we are
prepared for this.”

Dr Allen believes that this disturbing
trend may have something to do with the
growing number of young women engag-
ing in sexual activity at an earlier age.

“It’s almost like early sexuality expo-
sure brings them into the physical devel-
opment of womanhood without the emo-
tional and intellectual ability,” Dr Allen
told Tribune Woman and Health in an
interview at his Sandyport office.

Girls are having sex earlier, between
the ages of 11 and 14, and some of them
are having sex with older men, he said.

This, said Dr Allen, could lead to prob-
lems in the home, where the mother is

usually alone because the man has left.
“When (the mother tells the daughter)
to do something the response is usually,
‘Look there’s nothing you could do that I
can’t do, and more than that T got man

“This newest
group coming.
down the
line is very
difficult ... We
have to ask
ourselves if we
are prepared

. for this.”

—Dr David Allen

and he’ll give me money, so if you make
noise I'll go with him’,” said Dr Allen.
According to the latest statistics avail-
able from the Ministry of Health, more
than 40 per cent of Bahamian adolescents

Fs

are sexually active, and 20 per cent of
them had their first sexual experience
before the age of 10.

The young girls in particular who claim
to get very little attention at home, are
1.5 times more likely to have sex, accord-
ing to a Bahamas Youth Health Survey.
taken in 1997.

Forty-five per cent of the females sur-
veyed for the 1997 study were almost
twice as likely to have felt pressure or
were forced into having sex. A total of
2,007 young people between the ages of
11 and 19 were surveyed in New Provi-
dence, Grand Bahama, Abaco, Exuma,
Eleuthera and Long Island for the analy-
sis.

. This troublesome development among
young girls is only part of a much larger
problem that is taking its toll on commu-
nities throughout the country.

Dr Allen believes that it’s a problem
that, in part, stems from a precarious self-
esteem or self-image, which could lead to
feelings of shame and eventually violent
behaviour.

He explained: “When someone dresses
better than me I am jealous, if someone
doesn’t notice me or looks at my girlfriend
in a seductive way I feel shame. So I have
to compensate by becoming invincible
and I must show them that I am ‘king of

See GIRLS, Page 2C

“1859 email: bwabahamas@coralwave.com
* fax: 242-351-2215

Harbour Bay Shopping Centre
Town Centre Mall









PAGE 2C, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005





Baby signing - the new

THE TRIBUNE

communication trend

@ By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

aby signing. It’s

the new trend of

communication

that allows

babies to “talk”
to their parents without mak-
ing a sound.

Never mind the goo-goo’s
and gaa-gaa’s of baby talk.
These days children are learn-
ing how to sign in order to
articulate their needs, and par-
ents are teaching them.

Baby signing was featured
in the recent Hollywood hit,
Meet the Fockers, which shows
Little Jack communicating
with his hands.

And though it may not be a
trend in the Bahamas, Dr Nel-
son Clarke, consultant psychi-
atrist and Medical Chief of
Staff at Sandilands Rehabili-
tation Centre says that we have
always taught children to use
signs to communicate.

For example, how to wave

“bye bye” or beckon “come
here”, or fingers on the lips to

Nowadays, children are learning how to
sign in order to articulate their needs

signify “quiet, no noise”. Or
the itsy-bitsy spider nursery
rhyme, where children learn
to use their hands to tell a com-
plete story, even though they
can’t sing the words.

Baby signing seems to be a

natural extension of the every-—
day gestures we all use to com- -
-Municate, such as waving and

pointing. Those simple ges-
tures give you a window into
your child’s mind, in the same
way that baby signing experts

say will help your children with -

communication skills later on
in life.

How many times have you
looked at your crying, frus-
trated baby and just wished the
poor thing could talk to tell
you what’s wrong, what hurts
or what’s needed?

A local child psychiatrist,

STORAGE |
SOLUTIONS

Small Spaces

who did not want to be identi-
fied in this article, says that
some parents can already inter-
pret their child’s needs based
upon the tone of their-cries.

But for the many parents
who can’t, baby signing may
be a solution to the problem.

Parents can start teaching
their baby signs as early as six
months. Remember, though,
that babies can take weeks or
even months before making
their first sign.

Luckily, this is not really a.

structured language, so
although it seems over the top
and difficult, it isn’t.

No prior knowledge of sign’
language is required, and most

parents learn right along with
their children through the aid
of a sign language dictionary;
baby signing book; or website —



Available on
Sesame Seed
Bun Only



@ NEVER mind the goo-
goo’s and gaa-gaa’s of
‘baby talk.

(Posed by model)

of which there are many choic-
es.
Simply choose a sign (or sev-

‘eral signs) to begin with and

use it when you have your

. baby’s complete attention.

For example, use the sign for
“milk” before nursing or giving
a bottle. The key is to use it

. consistently, and soon your

baby will begin to imitate you.

Parents are also advised to
encourage others to join in.
Make it a family affair, and at

‘times when it is overwhelming,

make it a game, rather than a
burden.

While it seems contrary to
earlier opinion, babies do
recognise that a word or a sign
can represent or symbolise
something else...

And for those who Worry
that baby signing could inter-
fere with verbal communica-
tion, the experts assure us that
it has no such effect. They have

found that signing children |

usually learn to speak earlier,
and by the age of two have
learned on average 50 more
words than non-signing babies.

However, there is no need

G i rl S (From page

the roost’, and the best way to
show that is to carry a knife
or gun...and then they end up
in prison.”

And the vicious cycle con-
tinues.

A key to addressing this
problem is anger management,
said Dr Allen, who has seen
first-hand numerous examples
of how it can negatively impact
the community.

For instance, while talking _

to a group of suspended public
school students — between the
ages of 11 and 15 — he posed
the question, “How do you
deal with a situation when
someone makes you angry?”

Every one of the students,
boys and girls, answered: “T'll
jook ’em”, said Dr Allen.
“One girl said, ‘I done jook
three people for the year’.”

This behaviour continues
into adulthood and its effects
are seen in the crime and
domestic abuse rates, and the
fragmentation of communities,
especially those in New Prov-
idence.

It is this fragmentation that
programmes like the Urban
Renewal Project are trying to
heal. One of the goals of the
project is to establish Com-
munity Transformation Units
in areas to address myriad
issues, including teenage preg-

i’m lovin’ it

1C)

to continue with signs after a
child has mastered saying the
word. The signs will have
served their purpose, to open a
channel of communication —a

channel that will continue as

your child grows.

Dr Clarke says that in his
personal opinion (and he
admits that he is not well-
versed on the topic), signing
combined with speech from
the parents or caregivers

should not affect the baby’s -

“Janguage acquisition”.

There is also an argument .

that babies who sign will be
more intelligent later on in life.

One study in California
found a spread of 12 IQ points
in second grade between chil-
dren who had learned to sign
as babies and those who had-
n't.

However, some psychiatrists
question the control group that
was used for this test. In other

‘words, -how do you measure

the verbal and performance
levels of children who are all

developing at different rates?

Whatever the argument,
baby signing seems to be catch-
ing on.

It was developed by an
American researcher Joseph
Garcia, based on his own
observations of deaf children

. communicating with their par-
-ents. :
Baby signing has now caught
_the imagination of both par-

ents and child development
experts in the. US. When doing
online research for this article,
there were thousands of hits
on the topic. And as Linda
Acredolo and Susan Goodwyn
point out in their book “Baby
Signs”, it is popular universal-
ly because baby signing isn’t a
system bound to either Amer-

ican of British Sign Language. .

In fact, parents can choose to
create their own signs or adapt

nancy, drug awareness, legal
aid, environmental health, job

. training and domestic violence.

Dr Allen believes that if
churches’ become more
involved many more commu-
nities, including those in the

' Family Islands, can be reached

and a vast improvement can
be made within three years.
Some churches are already
responding. The Mt Tabor
Full Gospel Baptist Church
has already started a unit, and

Abundant Life Bible Church is _

looking at starting one.

The newest urban renewal
office is soon to open in Fox
Hill, where Dr Allen has pre-
dicted a “blow up” much like
the one that occurred in Nas-
sau Village last month.

“Tf I could sell this to the -

churches, what I believe is that
Ican move quicker than in the
political situation,” he said.

_ “I think it’s possible to make
a vast improvement in three
years, if the churches get
involved on a national level,
and take responsibility for
their surrounding communi-
ties.”

Dr Allen, who has set up a
number of successful drug
rehab programmes in the
Bahamas and Washington,
DC, would also like to set up a
rehabilitation centre for

those suggested.

Experts say that the impor-
tant thing to remember when
introducing your child to this
new world of signs is to do
what feels right for your baby.
So take the lead from the child:
start when he or she shows an
interest in communicating
about the things he or she sees.

Finding gestures that act out
the object or concept in an
obvious way is usually easier. It
means that the sign for “hat”
could be patting the top of

-your head with your hand

open and palm down, while
“bird” could be expressed by

‘flapping one or both arms out

to the side. |

Baby signing works on the
principle that children learn by
repetition. And if you have a
baby you are probably already
signing. The secret is to sign
as many chances as you get.

If you use a sign for “drink”,
say the word, do the sign and
then give your baby a drink.

The main benefit of baby
signing is improved communi-
cation between you and your
baby. This advantage, say.
experts, cannot be overesti-
mated: it sets a good founda-
tion for your child’s self-
expression and will put him in
good stead for the rest of his or
her life.

Baby signing also empowers |

your child to tell you what is
wrong instead of screaming,

~ whining or crying — all of which

may add to the frustration of
you and the child.

It can even enable babies to
play a part in problem-solving.
For example, one of the par-
ents in Garcia’s “Sign with

_ Your Baby” training video tells

the story of her 11-month-old
son Sebastian, who warned her
that.a wasp was trapped with
him inside the car. His mother,
who hadn’t seen the wasp, .

_.could then remove it without i,

incident.

-It appears that the majority
of child psychiatrists in the
Bahamas are not too familiar
with this new trend, but some
say that parents have come to

- their offices asking about it.



women drug addicts.
Right now there is no place

‘for female addicts in the

Bahamas, he noted.

- The Sandilands Rehabilita-
tion Centre is filled, and while
there is Teen Challenge and
The Haven for male addicts,
there is no place for female
drug users.

Dr Allen said that his work
with addicts over the years has
brought with it a lot of insight.
“When you work with these
people they tell you a lot, and
they’ll tell you that a murder
never just happens.”

He believes that nothing
happens without provocation,
and that the community needs
to do more to act before some-
thing happens, and not after a
shot has been fired.

He is urging Bahamians to
pay attention to the signs. “No
one reacts until a shot has
been fired or someone has
been stabbed. So basically the
police are being used as under-
takers.

“T firmly believe that every
murder, people see the fights
going on before, but somehow
they do not call the police,”
said Dr Allen.

“All of us have to do this
work. This can’t be done by
government or the police, all
of us have to get involved.”





!

THE TRIBUNE

‘
ft
4

~ Mushrooms could
be good for heart

@ By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

ushrooms

could pro-

vide a new

dietary route

to a healthi-
er heart, according to scientists
who conducted an unprece-
dented examination of their
chemical make-up.

According to dietician Julia
Lee of Doctors Hospital, sci-
entists never knew exactly
what components were in
mushrooms, though they knew

FOOD AND HEALTH

I heard someone talking
about HPV and the risks of
cancer associated with it.
What exactly is HPV? Is it
contagious? And is it a risk
factor for getting cancer?

HPV stands for Human
Papilloma Virus. This is a
very common sexually trans-
mitted virus. It is estimated
that 75 per cent of the repro-
ductive-age population has
been infected with sexually
transmitted HPV. Most
infected people suffer no ill
effects. A small fraction
develop genital warts and
another smaller fraction

TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005, PAGE 3C







# Dr Reginald Carey
Obstetrician/
Gynaecologist |

cologist to identify areas of
infection.

A biopsy is taken from the
infected areas. The abnor-
malities range from minor to
major,-the latter being cervi-
cal cancer. Pre-cancerous
lesions can be treated by a
freezing technique
(cryosurgery), heat treatment
(coagulation), electrical burn-
ing (diathermy) or excision. .

There is no corresponding
test for males. If a female
partner of a male is diag-
nosed with HPV then it is
likely that the male is also
infected.

It is therefore very impor-

they had nutritional benefits.

A new analytical study con-
ducted by Illinois University
scientists now lets health pro-
‘fessionals know “more specif-
ically” what advantages the
mushroom holds, Mrs Lee told

Tribune Woman and Health.

While fungi are already
known to contain high-quali-
ty protein and fibre, only now
have “modern analytic tools”
been able to break down their
complicated carbohydrate pro-
files, says a report in the Jour-
nal of Agricultural and Food

Chemistry.

The research involved the
use of high-performance liq-
uid chromatography, which
was adapted by Laura L
Bauer, a research specialist in
animal sciences and a co-

“. mks

rtm wT) ww
resi

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”



s

DIETICIAN Julia Lee says scientists never knew exact-
ly what components were in a mushroom ipictured),
though they knew it had nutritional benefits.

author of the paper, to quanti-
fy chitin (a type of fibre) con-
centrations in each mushroom.
A spectrophotometer was used
to analyse beta-glucan (a type
of fibre) levels and sort out
uronic acids that are associated
with total dietary fibres.

The team of scientists dis-
covered that mushrooms such

- as portabellas, shiitakes and

enokis are rich in the com-
pounds chitin and beta-glutan,
which have both been found
in clinical studies to signifi-
cantly reduce levels of harmful
cholesterols. Chitin is specifi-
cally found to lower choles-
terol levels, and beta-glutan is
known to be ideal for healthy
hearts.

In the university’s study, SIX
mushroom varieties were test-
ed in their raw and cooked

- forms, and at various harvest

tiniés and thatutity levels. The
findings of this study. appeared
online in’ advance of publica-
tion by the Journal of Agricul-
tural and Food Chemistry, and
have become part of the US
Department of Agriculture’s
National Nutrient Database.
White button; crimini and
portabella, all of which repre-
sent different maturity levels
of Agaricus bisporus, maitake
(Grifola frondosa), shiitake
(Lentinus edodes) and.enoki
(Flammulina velutipes) vari-
eties were the mushrooms

’ studied. Shiitake and Enoki

varieties were analysed only in
their “consumed cooked
form”.

Cheryl L Dickman, lead
author of the paper, said that
the maitakes and shiitakes

tended to be very similar in.

their nutrient concentrations,

(The Tribune archive photo)

and quite a bit different than
the others. The portabellas
however, were “off on their
own” in terms of their contents
of oligosaccharides, beta-glu-
cans and chitin.

Chitin concentrations were
eight per cent in raw, mature
portabellas and six per cent in

the raw, immature ones. When .

cooked, chitin content fell to
2.7 per cent in both forms, but
their levels of total dietary
fibres went up significantly,

according to the research. Also "

showing the same pattern were
the raw enokis, with 7.7 per
cent chitin content; while cook-
ing also lowered it to 2.7 per
cent, but total dietary fibres
jumped from 29.3 per cent in
raw to 41.6 per cent in cooked.
The raw, mature white buttons
and cooked, mature shiitakes
boasted chitin levels of three
per cent and 3.6 per cent,
respectively.

The ra maturé portabel-
las also had the highest level
of beta-glucan (which was 0.2
per cent), while most of the
other mushrooms had 0.1 per
cent. Enokis and maitakes had
none. Relatively small amounts
are required to provide car-
diovascular benefits, said the
researchers.

But what does all this mean



- to the lay person?

Mrs Lee says that while she
does not know much about the
bio-chemistry of how chitin
and beta-glutan actually work
in the body, from what she
understands, it has to do with
controlling bacteria.

“Chitin and beta-glutan,”
she explained, “changes the
number and activity of bacteria

‘in the colon, and that helps to

develop cervical changes
which can lead to cancer.

This latter group may be
susceptible because of an
immune defect.

Transmission occurs via
genital skin to genital skin
contact with or without sex-
ual intercourse, therefore
condom use is not totally
protective.

Presently there is no cure
for the virus but the good
news is that 70-90 per cent
of infected persons may nat-

. urally clear the virus from
the body within two years of
infection. Reinfection is pos-
sible. Women who smoke do

control the blood fat (lipids)
that contribute to heart dis-
ease.

“Chitin and bets: -glutan are
types of fibre, but there is no
recommendation that exist for
fibre intake in various disease
states. There is just a general
recominendation to increase
fibre, but nobody knows by
how much we should,” she
said.

ESRC TC
case), bacteria in
the colon would

treat cooked |

mushrooms in
_a different way,
- with different
benefits than raw
- mushrooms.”



-— Dietician Julia Lee

What was interesting in this
study, is that cooking tended
to increase starch, total dietary
fibres and fat contents, and
decrease chitin concentrations
in all of the mushrooms.
“Some nutrients went up after
cooking, while some went
down,” according to the study.
“Part of that you’d expect to



not clear the virus as quickly
as non-smokers.

There are more than 100
different genetic types or
strains of HPV. Genital warts
are a result of infection with
type 6 of 11. Abnormal
changes in the cervix which
can lead to cancer is caused
by types 16,18,31 or 33.
These types can be identified
by lab DNA testing.

The first indication of HPV
may be an abnormal cervical
smear also known as the pap
smear or pap test. Your doc-

tor may recommend a col-.

poscopy which is special
microscope used by a gynae-

happen as water is cooked
out.”

Mrs Lee said that cooking
mushrooms can indeed affect
the concentration of nutrients.
“The energy of the heat has a
chemical decomposition reac-
tion. For example, if you fry
an egg you can’t turn it into an
egg white again. It has a dif-
ferent chemical structure at
that level. So (in this case),
bacteria in the colon would
treat cooked mushrooms in a
different way, with different
benefits than raw mushrooms.”

The. study also measured the -

oligosaccharide (sugar mole-
cules that are only partially
digestible) levels in the six vari-
eties. Raw, immature porta-
bellas had a total oligosaccha-
ride concentration of 5,272
micrograms per gram. Also
found to have more than 1,000
milograms per gram were raw,
mature portabellas and
cooked, immature crimini.
None were detected in enokis,
maitakes or shiitakes.

The undigested components
are called “prebiotics”, as they
encourage the growth of
“healthful” bacteria in the
colon, ©,

“Oligosaccharides are not
defined as dietary fibres,”
explained Mrs Lee. “But they
act in a similar way to produce
the same heart healthy benefits

tant that women have regular
pap smears, usually yearly.
A possible vaccine may
become available in the
future.

© This informative weekly
column provided by Doctors
Hospital is intended to edu-
cate-women about important

‘issues regarding their health

and is not intended as a sub-
stitute for consultation with
an obstetrician/gynaecologist.
Please send questions via e-
mail to tribune@tribuneme-
dia.net or mrassin@doctorsh-
soptial.com. For more infor-
mation call 302-4707.



of fibres like chitin and beta-
glutan. They boost the good
bacteria, but it is not medicine,
or else it would be an anti-biot-
ic. It’s a pre-biotic, which
means that it is a non-diges-
tive food substance that
improves health by stimulat-
ing growth or the action of
good bacteria in the colon or
the lower digestive tract — not
decreasing bad bacteria.”
In other findings:
e White buttons had the
highest levels of ash;
.° Starch was highest in -

i, maitakes and shiitakes; and

e Crude protein and acid- -
hydrolyzed fats were highest -
in crimini, white buttons and
maitakes.

According to Mrs: Lee,
though mushrooms do have
heart health qualities, it doesn’t
mean that increasing intake
will eliminate your chances of
developing heart disease.

Intake should be considered
on an individual basis, she
added. Mushrooms are high in
potassium, for example, so
increasing intake would not be
the best choice for a person
who needs to be ona potassi-
um-low diet.

She suggested that persons
with pre-existing health condi-
tions consult with a qualified
nutrition specialist before mak- *
ing a changes.

Is cutting carbs really the
magic weight loss formula?

BAHAMIANS from all walks of life
have been infatuated with the low-car-

bohydrate dieting concept. In the quest to

lose weight and improve their health,
men, women and even adolescents are
joining the “low-carb” craze, often with
little understanding of the benefits or
drawbacks of this diet approach.

You probably know somebody, if not
yourself, who is on the low-carb diet or
has been on the low-carb diet. And to
every dieter’s dream, this one seems to
work.

But is cutting carbs really the magic
weight loss formula?

This diet claims many wonderful health

benefits but there is limited scientific evi-
dence to back them up.

The low-carb diet is based on the con-
cept that carbohydrate-rich foods are the
cause of weight gain and if you elimi-
nate carbohydrates calories would not
matter. However, sciéntists are not con-
vinced.

Practicing a low-carb diet means leav-
ing out a major food group, for the most
part.

According to Dr Gary Foster, clinical
director of the Weight and Eating Dis-
order Program at the University of Penn-
sylvania, weight loss from a low-carb diet
results from eating fewer calories.

In other words, if you eliminate any
one food group and don’t increase your
intake of other food groups, you will lose
weight.

Though this diet gets some people to
eat fewer calories, there still remains a



LIGHTEN UP & LIVE HEALTHY



lack of solid evidence supporting the
long-term safety and effectiveness of low-
carb dieting.

Carbohydrates in perspective

Much of the confusion over. low-carb:

diets has to do with the lack of under-
standing of what carbohydrates are and
their role in the diet.

Carbohydrate is one of the three major
macronutrients (carbohydrate, protein
and fat) found in food and provides calo-
ries or energy for the body. Many car-
bohydrate-rich foods such as whole grain,
fruits and vegetables also contain essen-
tial vitamins and minerals, plus fibre and
phytonutrients important for health and

. disease prevention.

Carbohydrate comes in two types, sim-
ple and complex. Both types supply the
same amount of calories. Fibre is also a
form of carbohydrate but it cannot be
digested, so it does not supply calories.
Simple carbohydrates are found natu-
rally in fruits, dairy products and some
vegetables and they make up the refined
sugars, such as table sugar used in sweet
foods. Complex carbohydrates such as
starch are the primary nutrient in grains
(pasta rice and bread), potatoes, beans
and vegetables.

The low-carb diet suggests that in the
first phase dieters should eat no more
than 20 to 30 grams of carbohydrates a
day. This equates to about one slice of

bread or a half-cup of cooked rice, leav-
ing little room for fruits and vegetables.

It is recommended that adults and chil-
dren over the age of one year consume at
least 130 grams of carbohydrates a day.
This minimum requirement is based on
the brain’s use of carbohydrates as its
primary source of fuel by the central ner-
vous system.

The brain can only function on carbo-
hydrates, as no other nutrient reaches
the brain. On a regular diet however,
most people easily meet this require-
ment.

The Bottom Line

‘Reducing carbohydrates may make
sense as a calorie cutting measure for
people whose diets are largely made up
of foods such as sweets, sweetened bev-
erages and baked goods. It makes little
sense however to eliminate wholesome,
nutrient dense foods such as starchy veg-
etables (sweet potato, cassava, pumpkin,
squash) whole grains, fruits and vegeta-
bles in favour of protein and fat rich
foods.

The American Heart Association does
not recommend the low-carb diet, object-
ing that it encourages people to eat foods
high in saturated fat and cholesterol.

Plenty of evidence points to an
increased risk of heart disease and some
forms of cancer from a diet consistently
high in fat and saturated fat.

- Lately, the natket has been saturated
with low-carb labeling products. Whether
it’s carb-smart, carb-wise, carb-fit or just
plain low-carb, in the USA, no federal
regulation defines these marketing terms
used to sell this flood of new reduced-car-
bohydrate food products. In the absence
of an official definition, low carb can be
interpreted in many ways. It may mean.
that the product has fewer carbohydrates
than a comparable product or it may
mean that it contains a specific amount of
carbohydrates per serving. Even the
labels of some foods that are naturally
low in carbohydrates may be using the
low-carb label terms to attract “carb”
conscious consumers.

To confuse matters further, some food
labels refer to “net carbs” or “effective
carbs”. There is no official definition
for this terminology either, but it is typi-
cally used as the result when fibre and
certain sweeteners, such as sugar alco-
hols and glycerin, are subtracted from
the total carbohydrate content.

Bottom line, calories still count. The
solution to the problem of overweight,
remains the same, maintaining energy
balance by a combination of eating few-
er calories and increasing physical activ-
ity. The key however is to include all
essential nutrients in the right propor-
tion for your needs.

© This article is provided by Adelma
Penn and Camelta Barnes, nutritionists
from the Department of Public Health/
Ministry of Health.










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THE TRIBUNE | rr. TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005, PAGE 5C


















A Bright Start

Starting Monday, March 7, and print
will launch an innovative new servic
our Newspaper in Education Litera
the reading habits of our children.

Remember when community ente
and sharing books? Breakfast Seria
and sharing experience—with s
family. © |

Breakfast Serials provides yout g
fine literature, read in convenien
top daily newspaper.

A Breakfast Serials story is ju:
at a time every day. It's great v
ists, and readers: can't wait for t

Breakfast Serials iste a
keeps coming back for more. _










written by Avi.
illustrated by Brian Floca

The Secret School is a story
about kids by award-winning
American children’s author,

Avi. It’s about the kind of

one-room schoolhouses that


















used to exist in American
communities, as well as many

Bahamian settlements.

The story is set in the 1920s.
When the regular teacher of a
rural schoolhouse must leave, bringing an early school clos-
ing, the children decide to take over, secretly. But they |

encounter many problems along the way.

The suggested reading level is grade 4-8, and the Secret
School is a great read aloud for all ages.

Avi—a name given to him by his twin sister—was born in
Brooklyn, New York, in 1937. Though he struggled with English
in high school, by the time he left, Avi had decided to become a
writer. In 1970, his first book was published and since then he
has published more than 50 acclaimed books for young people.

; Jewspaper in Education Lit





as ba
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PAGE 6C, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005 . so _ THE TRIBUNEâ„¢

SECOND PRIZE | THIRD PRIZE
$100.00 GIFT BASKET ___. $75.00 GIFT BASKET.
In Each Age Group In Each Age Group

Cy Res

1. Children ages 4-5, 6-8, and 9-10. Staff members and relatives are not eligible to enter.

2. Coloring may be done with crayons. Adults or older child may assist the child in filling out the’ entry form, BUT NOT IN COLORING THE ENTRY

3. Enter as much times as you wish. All entries must be in The Tribune by 4pm on Monday, March 21st, 2005. Winners will be announce Wednesday,
March 23, 2004. Look for your names in The Tribune or listen to 1(OOJAMZ / JOY FM to hear your name.

4, There will be one first-prize winner, one second-prize winner and one third-prize winner in each age groups.

5. All entries become the propecty of The Tribune and may be used for any purpose including, but not limited to, publication in a future issue.

“NO PHOTOCOPIES. USE Mayas AD ONLY”



Child’s Name: Parent/Guardian Signature



Address: Tel: Age:



Available At All Solomon’ s Mines Locations.





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005, PAGE 7C





The Tribune

ea





ith

‘Heart healthy cooking requires

‘
as

att

rae

By PETURA BURROWS
Pena Feature Writer

yeaa ss

eart month is
over but that
. doesn’t mean
; you should
i stop thinking
about how to keep your heart
healthy, especially when it
comes to your diet.

* When considering recipes
that are heart healthy, the gen-
eral recommendation may be
low sodium and low fat. But
there’s alot more toit. —

* Dr Idamae Hanna, dietician
and health educator at Better
Living Health Center & Deli,

says that heart healthy cooking

Fequires several substitutions,
and cutbacks.

* First, you should know that
foods low in saturated fats,
cholesterol and high in fibre
are good for your heart’s
health. So for recipes that con-
tain low saturated fat and low
cholesterol.

* A heart healthy recipe will
also contain other essential
nutrients such as vitamins and
minerals. These nutrients can
be found in vegetables, grains

and fruits. Fruits, vegetables,

grains and legumes tend to be
low in fat and have no choles-
_ terol. Most are also good
sources of dietary fibre, com-
plex carbohydrates and vita-
mins.
: If possible, substitute low-
fat products for a healthy heart
dr tweak a recipe to your
advantage.
« “If the recipe requires eggs,
use only the egg whites. Most
pastries require eggs, but you
don’t really need the entire
egg. The egg white is a binder
in itself, so you wouldn’t notice
the difference, ” Dr Hanna
notes.
* She suggests that persons
watch their saturated fat
intake, which means avoiding
coconut oils, for example. “Use

6

olive oil or canola oil instead.
Then make the recipe low-fat
by cutting back on fat, even

though it’s a good fat you are

using. Don’t deep fry — bake,
boil or barbecue,” she adds.

Choosing poultry and fish:

over red meat and shellfish,
which are very high in choles-
terol is also ideal for heart
health, says Dr Hanna.

The American Heart Asso-
ciation suggests that you eat
foods high in complex carbo-
hydrates and fibre (some kinds
of soluble fibre, such as pectin
and oat bran, when eaten in
large amounts in a diet low in
saturated fat, may reduce total
cholestero] and LDL choles-
terol). It also suggests eating
approximately 25-30 grams of
dietary fibre per day.

Here are some guidelines for
healthy eating from its web-
site:

® Coconut is high in saturat-
ed fat; olives and avocados are
high in monounsaturated fat
and calories. Use these items
sparingly to avoid getting too
many calories from fat.

e When vegetable grains or
legumes are cooked or
processed into foods, saturated
fats or cholesterol are often
added. For instance, egg yolks
may be added to breads or pas-
tas.

¢ Canned, processed and
preserved vegetables also may
contain added sodium. And in
some people, too much sodi-
um (salt) can lead to high
blood pressure. Some food
companies are canning veg-
etables with less salt. “No salt

added” varieties are also avail- .

able. Look for these in the
market or choose fresh or
frozen vegetables.

e Nuts and seeds tend to be
very high in fat and calories,
but most of the fat is polyun-
saturated or monounsaturated
(eg, walnuts, almonds, pecans).
Some varieties, such as

rv these
recipes

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

LP ea Pi alert core]| ef
will also contain other ©
essential’ nutrients such
as vitamins and minerals.
These nutrients can be

| found in fruits and veg-
etables (pictured).

OAc Bale eee
archive photo)’

macadamia nuts, are also high

in saturated fat, so check the.
label. Nuts and seeds don’t -
have cholesterol and are good
sources of protein. :
According to Dr Hanna,
heart health also has to do with
achieving a balance between:

_ potassium intake and sodium.

She explains: “Eat .a lot of
fruits and vegetables as ‘well
because again, potassium
intake helps against heart dis-
ease. A lot of persons who.
have heart disease and high:
blood pressure have high sodi-
um intakes, but they don’t eat
many fruits and vegetables, but
the body needs a balance.

“You should consume four
times more potassium than
sodium, but the way we (in the
Bahamas) do it, (we) eat four
times more sodium than potas-
sium. If you do it the right way,
then you will balance this
mechanism.”

Using herbal seasonings with ~

a “dash” of salt, if any; eating a
balanced diet — which Dr Han-
na equates to half of your food
intake being fruits and vegeta-
bles, with one quarter being
starch and the other quarter
meats — will help you to lose
weight, which in turn reduces
the risk of heart disease, she
says.

Chad Bowe, general manag-
er at GNC in the Mall at
Marathon, says that when he
thinks about heart-healthy -
cooking, various ingredients
come to mind — garlic, Atlantic
salmon, organic raw vegeta-
bles, organic whole grains,
among others.

If the organic products are
too expensive, Mr Bowe says
to reach for strictly whole
wheat products.

He agrees with Dr Hanna
that frying foods should be
avoided, and says that home-
cooking your meals rather than
purchasing fast food is the best
way to ensure a healthy heart.

He told Tribune Health that
many persons come into his
establishment requesting prod-
ucts to balance their choles-
terol levels. Some of these per-
sons, he adds, have been sent
by their doctors.

Mr Bowe says that while
there are an abundance of
products on the market which .
are effective and “easy on the
body”, he suggests that per-
sons consult with their physi-
cians — especially if they have a
“serious” medical condition.

several substitutions, cutbacks’





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PAGE 8C, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





‘The best plan for
a healthy mouth’

lm By DR SPARKMAN FERGUSON

f you are an adult who has

never visited a dentist, or one’

who seldom visits, or one

who hopes never to make a

visit, this article is written
especially for you.

The contents of this article are
meant only to educate, inform, create.
introspection and motivate the read-
er.

The best plan for a healthy mouth is
regular maintenance...the best plan
for a diseased mouth is immediate
treatment.

There are two main reasons why
we have mouth problems.

1. Failure in seeking professional
maintenance; and

2. Failure in- having timely: treat-
ment performed.

Failure in Professional

Maintenance:

Most people know that they should
see a dentist every year but avoid
dental visits for a variety of reasons.
With each passing year of “dodging”
the dentist, the general health of one’s
mouth deteriorates.

It still surprises people to hear that
adults and children should see.a den-
tist at least once a year for a general
check up.

Many unfortunate circumstances
are born when these visits are ignored
and missed. The end result is never
good, because diseases of the teeth; or
a disease of the gums.develop in all
who avoid professional maintenance.

Professional maintenance involves
dental prophylaxis (professional
cleaning of the mouth). Every mouth
should be professionally cleaned at
least once each year. However, it is
recommended that a normal healthy
individual have two cleanings. per-
formed each year.:‘Some dentists rec-
ommend as many as three or four vis-

A HEALTHY environment |

promotes a balance and a har-
monious symphony :between

man, animal and nature. How- -

ever, an unhealthy environ-
ment results in diseases such
as dengue fever, malaria, West
Nile virus, leptosperosis, gastro
enteritis and acute respiratory
infections caused or, transmit-
ted (carried) by vectors. Mos-
quitoes, rats, flies and roaches

are all vectors that carry these ©

diseases to man.

A clean environment differs
from a healthy environment.
A clean environment reduces
the chances of disease forma-
tion; however, it does not pro-
mote the natural growth and
balance between man, animal
and nature. The presence of
trees produges more oxygen
into the environment, homes
for the birds, shade and shelter

for all. Flowers and trees are
also considered very relaxing
for many. When the environ-
ment is healthy, residents have

less stress or concerns about

their health. The health of res-
idents can be affected by
unsanitary factors such as
garbage generation, mosqui-
toes, flies and rodents breeding
within their environment.
Therefore, it is important to
maintain both a clean and
healthy environment.
Everyone in the community
has a responsibility to main-
tain a clean and healthy envi-
ronment in which they live.
However, some residents make
greater contributions than oth-
ers. Therefore, we encourage
those environmentally-con-
scious leaders within our com-
munities to assist the depart-

ment by teaching and showing

The Cancer Society of the
Bahamas meets at 5.30pm
on the second Tuesday of
each month at their Head-
quarters at East Terrace,
Centreville, Call 323-4482
for more info: ;

REACH — Resources & -
Education ‘for Autism and

related Challenges meets

from 7pm — 9pm the second
Thursday of each month in
the cafeteria of the BEC-
building, Blue Hill Road.

MS (Multiple Sclerosis).
Bahamas meets the third
Monday every month, 6pm
@ Doctors Hospital confer-
ence room.

The Bahamas Diabetic
Association meets every
third Saturday, 2.30pm
(except August and Decem-
ber) @ the Nursing School,
Grosvenor Close, Shirley
Street.

Doctors Hospital, the offi-



cial training centre of the

American Heart Associa-
tion offers CPR classes cer-

tified by the AHA. The

course defines the warning
signs of respiratory arrest
and gives prevention strate-
gies to avoid sudden death
syndrome and the most
common serious injuries and
choking that can occur in
adults, infants and children.
CPR and First Aid classes
are offered every third Sat-
urday of the month from

9am-1pm. Contact a Doc-

tors Hospital Community
Training Representative at
302-4732 for more informa-
tion and learn to save a life
today.

Alcoholics Anonymous
meets @ 16 Rosetta St,
Monday-Friday and Sunday,
6pm-7pm & 8.30pm-9.30pm,
and on Saturday, 10am-
llam & 6pm-7pm &
8.30pm-9.30pm;.@ Sacred
Heart Catholic Church,
Shirley St, on Friday at 6pm.

\

others the importance of hav-
ing a clean environment and
saving it for generations to
come.

Refuse is unwanted, used
items comménly known as

waste that is discarded from .

residential and commercial
premises. Items such as paper,
cans, bottles and kitchen refuse
are all classified as household
garbage.

The plastic 32-gallon
garbage containers with a
secure lid have been identified
by Ministry of Health officials
as the most appropriate stor-
age container to be used for
garbage storage and collection.
The 55-gallon metal drum,
most widely used by residents,
is being discouraged for many
reasons. They collect water
when it rains if they are not

covered and holes are not.

placed at the bottom of them.
They breed mosquitoes
because of the settled water,
creating the potential for the
transmission of malaria and
dengue fever.

Residents are asked to place
all household garbage in
garbage containers that are
lined with plastic garbage bags.
When waste material is dis-
posed of properly, the envi-
ronment within our communi-
ties is healthier and cleaner.
Tightly secured garbage con-
tainers trap smell and controls
the odor of garbage, prevents
the spillage of garbage by stray
dogs, reduces insect and rodent
breeding within the communi-
ty, all resulting in a healthier
environment.

It is very important to care
for your garbage containers.
Residents are encouraged to
properly clean and secure their
garbage bins, and store them in
fastened garbage storage
booths. The garbage booth
prevents scavengers such as
















































MWe Srse

9

Sia Of

vee

1

its per year for individuals with special
circumstances.

Here is the list of possible happen-
ings when the professional propii:
laxis is not performed.

¢ The mouth smells bad;

e The gums bleed because of sank
inflammation or infection;and .° 4

e Dental plaque (bacteria), tartars
(plaque that is starting to get hard),.
and dental calculus (hard crusty stuff
that causes gum disease) accumulate,
around the teeth and gums. =

oo

o! Pes WO

\\c3

Le

Failure in having timely treatment.
We live in a time where early diag=

‘ nosis and prompt treatment are the,

only sensible health goals. The body is
wise and often sends early warnings to
us all. Even the mouth sends an early=
signal when something is wrong. s
Early signals from the mouth ares:
usually mild and remind us for a long?
time. Some of the more common sig
nals are bleeding gums, sensations to
cold or hot drinks and pressure whiles

_ chewing. If we manage to ignore these*

varying degrees of mouth signals, dis+3
comforts and PAIN begin. These
pains definitely get our attention. But..
by that time drastic steps have to be
taken, like tooth extractions, root
canal therapies and gum surgeries toz
correct our neglect.

It is a known fact that timely treatg
ments are simple, inexpensive and.
painless.

Finally, dentists are aware that a>
vast number of people are afraid to
visit a dental office. However, we
encourage all persons to seek profes-
sional care because the mouth is an
area which requires close attention:
because of its “high maintenance”
requirement.

@ THE best plan for a healthy mouth (pictured) is regular maintenance ...






(The Tribune archive photo)





JOINING HANDS FOR HEALTH



dogs from overthrowing the
garbage bins.

Old furniture from homes
and business places, electrical
appliances, are all labeled as
‘bulk items’. Residents unable

to afford proper disposa]_of.

such waste are encouraged to
request the assistance of the
Department of Environmen-
tal Health Services. Owners of
vacant properties are encour-

_aged to keep them free of

overgrown bush, litter and
accumulation of bulk items and

Everyone in the
community has a
responsibility to
maintain a clean

and healthy
environment in

which they live

abandoned cars. Residents are
also discouraged from dump-
ing such items on other per-
son’s properties and to prop-
erly dispose of them. It should
be understood that refrigera-
tors and similar items are dis-
posed of at the solid waste site
and derelict vehicles~are dis-
posed of at the designated
derelict site at Marshall Road.

The issue of indiscriminate
dumping is posing a serious
problem in the community, as
an increasing number of per-
sons are dumping garbage in

-isolated areas, ietead of at the

designated site. This is con-
tributing to the deterioration
of a healthy environment.

. Whenever these persons are

identified, they will be prose-
cuted in the Environmental
Health Court. It is important
for people to understand the
importance of keeping the
environment clean and healthy
for the protection of them-
selves and the community. Any
possible disease outbreak
would affect our health and
tourism, which is our main
industry.

Health education is an ongo-
ing strategy applied by health

- inspectors of the Department

of Environmental Health Ser-
vices, Ministry of Health to

encourage residents to main- -

tain a healthy home environ-
ment.

Most residents guilty of envi-
ronmental infractions do not
take verbal warnings seriously.
In cases where residents do not
comply to the needed changes
within their properties, the
health inspectors serve them
notices and they are required
to appear to court. Residents
sometimes comply with the
wishes of the health inspector
and make the necessary
changes before the Environ-
mental Court date. However,
some residents do not comply
with the wishes of ,the health
inspector and are required to
appear to court, pay fines and
even possibly spend time in
prison:-After all of this, resi-
dents will still be required to
correct the problems within
their residence to prevent or
stop the public health threat
their yard may have posed.

Although court dates seem
far away, all residents who vio-

_ late the Environmental Health —



Act eventually get their day in =
court and justice is served. ,,
Officials of the Department of
Environmental Health Ser- 2
vices, Ministry of Health,=
would prefer the judicial ©
process to be more immediate;
and they patiently partner with © =
the court systems to ensure ~
due process of all cases. ce
Residents should be aware =,
that it is in our nation’s best *
interest that all residents com- 5
ply as it would make the need *
to serve orders by the Depart- 2 :
ment of Environmental Health = =
Services, Ministry of Health a e
last resort. i
The court rooms remain ;:
backed up with environmen- ‘s
tal health cases because of the
large numbers of our residents ;.:
who have been served orders bo
Simply keeping your own yard)
clean and free of containers}:
such as old cars, boats, refrig-}.
erators, buckets or basically}.”
any container that would col- “i
lect water and breed mosqui-i.
toes that can spread diseases he
would present an order to}:
attend court. fa)
Residents are encouraged tor
cooperate with officials of thet:
Department of Environmen-i i
tal Health Services, Ministry}: :
of Health, all neighbourhood!:
and national clean up pro-'.:
grammes to keep the Bahamasi: 4
“Clean, Green and Pristine”. }*:
Residents, remember, it starts}.
with you! ; %



¢ For more information ony.
maintaining a healthy environ-}:
ment please call the Department!
of Environmental Health ati:
telephone 323-2296 or 322-4 me
8037. This column was pre-}
pared in collaboration with}s.
deputy chief health inspectors\..
Dwight Allen and Timothy.
Munroe of the Department of\::
Environment Health Services. }:







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PAGE 10C, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005



ust a few more weeks
of winter and it will
officially be spring.
Our Bahamian
spring weather is
more like summer in other
areas so we need to plant seeds
in our vegetable gardens that
are designed for tropical use.

Seed companies like Yates
produce tropical varieties of
tomatoes, cauliflower, cucum-
bers and. others.

Italian paste tomatoes like
Roma will thrive in spring
‘weather, as will hot peppers.
Bell peppers can be scalded by
the sun so it is a good idea to
move them into partial shade if
you grow them in pots. If-you
are sowing new peppers, try
Cubanelles. They are long and
flattish and very sweet — par-
ticularly when sweated in a
skillet with low heat. Tall vari-
eties of snap beans and Lima
beans do far better in spring
than bush varieties.

Although hot peppers do
well in warm weather they like
to grow in soil that drains
quickly. This means, unless it
rains, you will have to water
your peppers virtually every
day as March is traditionally a
dry month.

Spring is the time to start
completely new crops that
enjoy warmer weather.

Instead of leaf spinach we
can grow New Zealand spinach
or Malabar spinach.

Neither of these are true
spinaches but when cooked
they taste identical.

Red beans, black beans and
blackeye peas are closely relat-
ed and are good warm weather
crops. Where to buy the seeds?
Try the food store. Those
packages of dried beans are,
of course, packets of seeds.
These beans are climbers so
you can grow them on trellises
or along wire fences. You can
grow them on the ground but if
you do it would be a good idea
to place milk crates under the
mass of foliage in order to
keep the beans off the ground.

Okras also enjoy heat and
come in tall and bush versions.
The tall okras are far more
productive than bush though
they take a little longer to start
bearing. Pick your okras when
they are a day old and they will

he ‘se

be tender. If you don’t like the
mucilaginous texture of okras,
slice them and sauté them gen-
tly until they dry out slightly.
Sweet potatoes make good

- ground cover and are produc-,

tive in poor, sandy soil as they
do not like nitrogen. Again,
you can get your starts from
the food store. Select a fine
quality sweet potato like Boni-

ato and let it age somewhat. |

Cut off the tail end and place
the potato in water, leaving the
top dry. Sprouts will form here
and when they are eight to ten
inches long you can cut and
plant them. Keep the soil well
watered until the slips are
established, then ignore them
until harvesting time.

Our fruit and citrus tree are
best fertilized three times a
year: in spring, summer and
autumn. Fertilizer is best
applied when the ground is
very wet after heavy rains.

Trees

Large trees can have fertil-
izer spread around the trunk
and along the drip line. Small-

er trees can have the fertilizer .

broadcast from the trunk to
the drip line. The trees will also
benefit from a Sequestrene 128
chelated iron drench applied
to the area around the trunk.
‘While feeding your fruit and
citrus trees with the major ele-
ments, it is a good idea to also
apply minor nutrients in liquid
form. This is sprayed onto the
foliage of the trees after being
mixed with a little
sticker/spreader that will make
the spray more effective. A
drop or two of soft soap will
substitute for the
sticker/spreader.

It will be May or June before
the seasonal rains begin and
your flowering shrubs will
burst into activity. Any pruning
should be done in March as
pruning takes away material
that contains the next couple of
month’s flowering. Pruning
done now will allow .your
shrubs to recover in time for
the rainy season. Do not prune
any more than one-third of any
plant or it may never recover.

Spring will see the end of
our Impatiens and other winter
jewels. Kalanchoe will lose its

4
¢



GARDENING

THE TRIBUNE

@ SHRUBS like hibiscus can
be pruned during March and
will take off with vigorous new
growth when the summer
rains begin.



eds’ of March

Green Scene by Gardener Jack



Hi KALANCHOE will soon drop its flowers and become a foliage plant until late autumn when it blooms again.

flowers until November but the
plant will remain green and
healthy through the summer
and fall. Warm weather flow-
ers include vincas, zinnias and
cosmos. If you sow them from

seed you will have to have to
put down snail bait as well for
snails and slugs love tiny
seedlings. It’s a salad bar for
them. If you buy young plants
from your favourite nursery

you will skip the snail danger
stage.

There are many bulbs and
tubers that can be planted in
March. Use Caladiums tubers
to brighten up shaded areas of

your garden and hippeastrum
bulbs for full sun glory.

e Contact Jack Hardy at:
gardenerjack@
coconuttelegraph.net



Section
Missing
or
Unavailable



Section
Missing
or
Unavailable



Full Text






itm lovin? i. “i

HIGH
LOW



Volume: 101 No.81



74F
64F

~ PART SUNNY
and WARN |

Witnesses see.
pair flee bus
outside court

. By Kilah Rolle
Tribune Staff Reporter

TWO prisoners on remand

for armed robbery escaped
from a prison bus yesterday
afternoon after breaking the
iron mesh at the rear of the
vehicle and fleeing on foot
onto the nearby street. —
The bus was parked at the
compound between the Nas-
sau Street Police Station and
the Magistrate's Courts on
Nassau Street. 7
A small crowd of people

outside the courts observed |
the escape, which happened °

around 1.30pm.

One eye-witness said: "Well
the first thing we noticed was
this loud banging coming

_ from the bus. Every once in
a while they would start

- making noise and bang at °
the same time. Then all ofa

sudden I saw a pair of feet
break through the wire and
this guy managed to jump
down out of the bus. About
30 seconds later I saw anoth-
er guy jump out. The first
. guy ran up the hill, and the
other one watched to see
- which way the guy ran and
‘instead of following him

went across through the cor-
ner."

A female eyewitness agreed
with his account of the
events and added: "That bus
was unattended for the
longest, they always left
there unattended."

Police at the Nassau Street
Police Station, who are
assisting the prison officers

. With their search, identified

the two prisoners as 32-year-
old Ian Reckley of Elizabeth
Estates or Seabreeze Lane,
and Jason Flowers, age
unknown, from Roseville
Avenue.
While at the police station,
The Tribune learned that a
concerned citizen called the
Nassau Street police station
around 3pm to report that
two men had run across her
Wilkinson Street yard.
Although the eyewitness
reported that the men ran in
separate directions, one
police officer reported that
the men had been hand-
cuffed and there would have

-been no way for them to
’ escape those shackles.

"They would have probably
run together," said the offi-
cer, "and when they get

SEE Page Three


















The Trib



The Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005

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BASIL FITZGERALD GORDON, who is accused of murdering two people, is shown here on his way to the

Supreme Court yesterday for the start of his trial.

By FELICITY INGRAHAM
and PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporters

A DOUBLE murder trial
began in the Supreme Court
yesterday with Basil Fitzgerald
Gordon being accused of killing
a 26-year-old man and his
grandmother on Father's Day
two years ago. .

Rosnell Newbold, who was

75 at the time, and her grandson
Kevin Wilson were stabbed

numerous times about the body:

on June 16, 2002, after an
intruder jumped through a win-
dow in the early morning hours.

Prosecutors Gawaine Ward
and Antoinette Woodside
opened their case against Gor-
don on Monday morning, bring-
ing the charges of housebreak-
ing and double murder against

une







Photo: Mario Duncanson

Double death charge

him.

The accused is represented
by attorney Dorsey McPhee.

The first witness to take the
stand in Justice Anita Allen's
court was police photographer
DC Basil Evans, who brought
photographs of the murder
scene.

DC Evans pointed out to the

SEE Page 10 —

ean Ret

Residential Mortgages...

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tel:242-394-1759 © fax: 242-394-1859 * email: bwabahamas@coralwave.com
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Stubbs




























































probe

By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Senior Staff Reporter

OBSERVERS of the Syd-
ney Stubbs bankruptcy case
are waiting for the Registrar
of the Supreme Court to
advertise for Mr Stubbs’ cred-
| itors and start the process of
determining to whom and
how much Mr Stubbs may be
in debt.

‘Mr Stubbs’ hearing was
adjourned in January until his
creditors could be
approached to sign an agree-
ment allowing the ruling to
be struck off. ;

Queen’s Counsel Thomas
Evans, the attorney repre-
senting Mr Stubbs, would not
comment on how far the MP
has advanced in this process
because of attorney client
privilege but said that a date
has not yet been set for Mr
Stubbs to reappear in court.

‘The debt which caused Mr
Stubbs to be declared bank-
rupt was owed to Gina Gon-
zalez, the woman who
instructed her attorneys to
collect more than $70,000
from Mr Stubbs. The amount
stemmed from a $55,000 loan
made to Mr Stubbs and
another man on the basis of a
promissory note.

Mr Stubbs has since satis-
fied that debt, but Mrs Gon-
zalez’s lawyer Wayne
Munroe said that the MP
owes in excess of $20,000 in
legal fees ordered against him
in his bankruptcy appeal.

When Mr Stubbs was last
in court, the court confirmed
the registrar of the Supreme
Court as his trustee and gave
her permission to advertise
for Mr Stubbs’ creditors. That
has not yet happened.

“How it works is that the
registrar must advertise for
anyone who is a creditor and
people put in their claims and
she holds a meeting to see
who is owed and draws up a
list of creditors according to
the value owed to them.

“Either MrjStubbs will
have the financial where-

SEE Page 10



PURINA





debt |
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005

LOCAL NEWS

.

THE TRIBUNE





Bahamas has a right to
compete in global trade

RIBUNE columnist Larry

Smith is trying to sell the

idea that Bahamian

involvement with the rest

- Of the world is inimical to

our relationship with the United

States, and also the perception that

the Bahamian political directorate

goes out of its way to antagonise the
Americans.

Mr Smith asks, «Why do we
always rub the Americans the wrong
way?” One example of rubbing the
Americans the wrong way, according
to Mr Smith in his column Tough Call,
February 2, goes like this:

“In 1992...The Bahamas signed a
mutual legal assistance treatyewith the
US, and then for the next eight years

failed to respond to hundreds of treaty

requests.”

Mr Smith says that according to

“some analysts” this led the US to

support the OECD attack on our’

financial services sector.

I have no doubt that thére were
problems involved in administering
the MLAT but I believe it is a mis-
chievous exaggeration to suggest that
the Bahamas government ignored its
treaty obligations for eight years.

A former member of the FNM gov-
ernment says that the MLAT was

. brought into force in 1990. Subsequent
. to that, hundreds of requests for legal
assistance in criminal matters were
processed with the direct assistance
of the Office of the Attorney General.

Says former Attorney Gen eral Carl
Bethel:

“The problem which arose was
where the ‘criminal matter’ was really
based upon alleged crimes against the

.. tax laws of other. countries.” .

‘“Until the mid-1990s it was acceptéd
- as gospel by the common law. system

that no country was obligated or could.
be required to enforce the tax laws of

another country. The Bahamas did
not decide this principle. It was decid-
ed by English judges at the very high-
est levels for hundreds of years.
“The Bahamas was well within its
rights to refuse to collect taxes, or to

- help foreign governments to collect.

taxes. The offshore industry through-
‘out the world was structured on that
basis.

“Tt was during this period that those,
comparatively few, requests which
involved enforcing income tax laws,
were refused either by the courts or
the competent authority.

“In the mid-1990s the world’s think-

ing changed and pressure grew to.

Donald's Furniture

STORE HOURS —

MONDAY - THURSDAY - 8:30AM - 5:30PM. -
FRIDAY - SATURDAY - 8:30AM - 6PM

erode strict bank secrecy laws through
the use of international treaties and
conventions. These treaties and con-
ventions then obliged sovereign gov-
ernments to pass laws which eroded, if
not eliminated, the old common law
protection.

“The blacklisting crisis brought the

reality of the world’s new ideas home >

very forcefully. Acting in the best
interests of The Bahamas, the gov-
ernment enacted the financial sector
reform laws of 2000. The present gov-
ernment has gone so far as to bring the
Tax Information Exchange Agree-
ment into force, both for criminal tax
matters and civil tax matters.

-“The Bahamas vigorously and effec-

tively implemented those aspects of
the new laws which called for inter-
national co-operation. If we had not

done so we would still be blacklist-

ed.”

If it were left to Mr Smith The
Bahamas would have relations with

nobody but the Americans: Not with .

the Caribbean (he is sick of reading
about the Caribbean Single Market
and Economy). Certainly not with
China.

In fact, Mr Smith comes right out
and says as much: “For a real geopo-
litical ally, look no further than Mia-
mi”!

It is interesting that Mr Smith should
choose to relate us not to the US cap-
ital Washington but to Miami, partic-
ularly at a time when some arrogant
people i in the Cuban émigré commu-

‘nity in that city are trying to make life

difficult.for us.

But never mind, Bahamians: should
not indulge in the joys of foreign trav-
el to such places as China and seek
trade opportunities there. We should
be content to let the Miami Cubans
buy Chinese goods and then sell to us
with their mark-up. They so need the
money!

Mr Smith accuses me of echoing the
Foreign Ministry’s line that there are
no undue concerns about our rela-
tions with China and Cuba.

My comments about China and
Cuba are my own. Mr Smith should
know by now that I am not reluctant



POINT
Arthur Foulkes

to express my views regardless of who
agrees or disagrees. And I do not
resort to peddling my own opinions

behind unnamed “sources” or “ana-_

lysts” or “observers”.

Under ordinary circumstances I.

would credit any opponent in a public
debate with expressing his own views:
But I think I am now entitled to ask
Mr Smith whose opinions is he echo-

‘ing and for what particular American

interests is he speaking.

Our politicos seem “strangely infat-
uated” with China, according to Mr
Smith. Well, no. He attributes that to
“diplomatic sources” who think it is
because China is “so exotic and so far
away”.

What condescending rubbish! Mr :

Smith ought to know, again, that
Bahamians, not just our politicians,
have always been interested in the big
wide world beyond Miami. On a per
capita basis we rate quite high among
the peoples of the world i in the love of

Pr wom

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travel, and we travel afar. Miami is
where we go to shop.

* K

Mr Smith asks, “...How can we con-
vince our political elites to focus on
the things that really matter and
eschew the glamour of foreign travel
and the excitement of geopolitical

. games.”

Many things matter, of course,
including the geopolitical games
played by others around the world,
and we will not be able to escape the

' effect of those.games. We need at least

to know what is happening and, with
_ our friends, maybe even influence an
outcome or two.

But that statement reminded me of
a similarly supercilious comment quot-
ed in The Tribune and referred to in
this column February 10, 2004:

“Haiti’s problems are an interna-
tional issue. If it is to be sorted out
by outsiders, those outsiders need to
be people of very high calibre who |
are used to the subtleties and nuances
of international diplomacy. Caribbean —
politicians are local politicians. They
don’t have the expertise for this kind
of work.”

The truth is that all paliticians are
local politicians but those who acquire
an understanding for the subtleties
and nuances of international diplo-
macy are not restricted to the devel-
oped countries.

The Caribbean has demonstrated
time and again that because a country
or a region is small does not mean it
cannot produce “high calibre” intel-
lects, intellects big enough to under-
stand the ways of the world.

* ok

The Bahamas and the United States
will continue to be the best of friends —
and our destinies will always be tied
together.

-But that does not mean The -
Bahamas should have no other
friends, no other investors and trading

partners, should stay out of the glob-
alization process, and should content
itself with being a “protectorate” of
Miami.

We should all put aside the rhetoric
and attitudes of the Cold War and
work for a new world comity with ~
globalised trade based on freedom
and fair play, nueie nespect and just
laws.

re here gemg set er®

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Syndicated Content
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THE TRIBUNE





Officials
set fo
probe
racial
abuse

claims

by weiner
Staff Writer











A TEAM from the
Bahamian Consulate im
Miami will leave for
Georgia today to imves-
tigate claims that
Bahamian prisomers
incarcerated at the
McRae Correctional
Facility are the victims
of racial abuse.

The Ministry of For-
eign Affairs said yester-
day that it was im pos-
session of a letter from
inmates purporting to
represent the views of
Bahamians incarcerated
at the prison.

The letter writer
claims that Hispamic
inmates at the prison are
preying on the Bahami-
ans and that while the
Miami Consulate office
has been made aware of
the situation nothing las
been dome.

The ministry said that
a report will be issued to
the country as soon as
‘the facts are known.

Meanwhile, the
Bahamas is participating
in the first in a series of
joint initiatives by Min-
ister of Foreign Affairs
Fred Mitchell and US
Ambassador to the
Bahamas John Rood to
ensure that the two

































| need and importance of
working together im the
fight against drugs,
smuggling and economic
crimes.

Mr Mitchell is expect-
ed to travel to Washing-
ton today, for a series of
meetings with United
States semators and to
‘attend a jumch with the
Florida Congressional
Delegation, hosted by
Mr Rood.

The minister will be
joined at the lunch by
Ambassador Sidmey
Poitier, the Bahamas’
Ambassador to Japan,
members from the Unit-
ed Nations Educational,
Scientific and Cultural
Organisation
(UNESCO).

Minister Mitchell will
also attend meetings
with officials of the US
State Department.






























ii
i





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“countries and their lead- |
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LOCAL NEWS



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around the East Street area,
they can find anyone to cut
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There were about 20 pris-
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the compound shortly after
2pm on its way to Her
Majesty's Prison in Fox Hill.

According to police
sources, a prisoner escort
officer was on the bus at the
time, and the vehicle had not
been left unattended.

The source explained that
the door had probably been

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locked, and the officer might
have been distracted by the
noise the other detainees had
been making.

According to police, once a
prisoner is charged with
escape they can face up to
an additional two years on
their sentence, but the sever-
ity of the sentencing is at the
discretion of the magistrate.
Police are appealing to
members of the public to
contact them if they spot the
escapees.







By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE widow of the man shot
for apparently no reason on
Friday has urged government
to resume hangings to make
examples of murderers.

Sandra Stevens, the wife of
murder victim Shepherd
Bradley Stevens, said that are
just too many murders taking
place in the country. “I am
angry everyone has a gun, I
am furious,” she said yester-
day.

Mr Stevens, 43, became the
country’s 11th murder victim
this year after being shot in
the head following a robbery
at the Twilight Club, a sports
bar located just off Market
Street.

According to police, after
the two armed men received
“an undetermined amount” of
cash they started to flee on
foot when one of the men
turned around and fired
directly at Mr Stevens, hitting
him in the head and killing
him.

In an interview with The
Tribune she said that her hus-
band’s death feels like a piece
of her has been chopped off.

She said her husband of 20
years was an excellent
provider and father to their
three children - Jamaal, 22,
LeByron, 18, and Leticha,14.
She said it is not easy on any
of them, but they are coping.

According to the club’s pro-
prietor, Hubert Smith Jr, there
was no reason for the shoot-
ing.

Mr Stevens was an elections
supply officer at the Parlia-
mentary Registration Depart-
ment at the time of his death.

Yesterday, his colleagues
and friends at the department
met with counsellors as they
tried to come to terms with
their grief.

Ricardo Higgs, an officer in
the department, told The Tri-
bune that the employees were

extremely saddened’ and’ "

shocked by what happened.

“Anytime, something hap-
pens so sudden like this, it
makes people wonder.”

Mr Higgs said that as a col-
league Mr Stevens had a good
work ethic and always per-
formed his duties. He said that
while he did not know him
outside of the office ‘he

appeared to be a nice guy and.

would be missed.

Mr Stevens had served as a
marine in the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force from August
17, 1980 to April 30, 1999
reaching the rank of Leading
Seaman. He was then dis-
charged and transferred to the
Parliamentary Registration
Department.

TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005, PAGE 3



ring back hanging ,

Widow of shooting

victim says: “I
amangry that
everyone has a gun” |

Upon hearing of his death,

Lt Darren Henfield, the pub-

lic relations .officer at the.

force said, “ Commodore
Davey Rolle, the officers,
senior rates and marines of
the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force are extremely sad-

dened by the apparent sense- .

less slaying of Bradley
Stevens, a former member
and assure the family that

_ they are in our prayers.”

Police have confirmed that
they have arrested one man
who is in custody for ques-
tioning. They said investiga-
tions were continuing.

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
: Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

t

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College doing
country great
disservice

EDITOR, The Tribune.

IN preparation for my
upcoming graduation from the
College of the Bahamas I went
to the Technology block to get
my graduation form signed. I
noticed a note posted on the
door as J entered stating that
the Technology office had been
permanently closed and all mat-
ters of concern should be
addressed to the chair of the
Natural Sciences Department.
To say I was upset was an
understatement; livid would be
more accurate. This was the first
notice the administration had
given to students alerting them
to any action being taken. There
was no meeting, no public
announcement, no prior com-
munication to the students stat-
ing the college’s wish to. close
the school of technology only
that plain computer typed note,
size 8x11.

Did the College’s failure to
communicate to the students
surprise me? No, sadly, as a
technology student I have

_ become used to this lack of con-

sideration from the College.
Last semester, two of my class-
es were threatened to be can-

‘celled even though I needed

both classes in order to gradu-
ate. And was I surprised that
they were closing the School of
Technology? No, this appears
to have been in works for some-
time. Current and new enrolling
students wishing to get into the
pre-engineering programme are

‘being told by advisers that the

College has communicated with

. them not to sign up anymore

students for the programme and
are:being placed in Physics and

- Math, -without-the courtesy of a

fair explanation.

Why is the College slowly
phasing out the Technology
programme of the Bahamas? Is



LETTERS.

letters@tribunemedia.net
it because from The College’s
viewpoint, the programme, to




put it bluntly, isn’t making...

enough money? Yes, The
School of Technology does not

have large student numbers as’

in for example the School of
Business but then that does not
seem unusual for many schools
I have visited online in my
attempt to transfer. The Col-
lege seems to look at education
in terms of immediate dollars
and cents and not as social
investment for long term bene-
fit to society. By their apparent
action is the College saying this
nation does not have a need for
people with engineering and
technology education, training
and skills? Would they prefer
that we pay heavily for foreign
engineers to be those who
design and construct our roads,
seaports, and manage our water
supply and environmental con-
cerns when it is possible to have
Bahamians do it? The person-
nel on current Harrold Road
projects are all young Bahami-
ans most of whom passed

through the technology pro- _

grammes in the recent past.
Alumni of the College of the
Bahamas, School of Technology

presently work in the Ministry

of Works, BEC and other such
departments. If the college then
had closed the technology pro-
gramme because of small num-
bers in Technology, what would
have become of these alumni?

Instead of trying to close the
Technology department, the
College needs to make an effort
to recruit more students to the
programme. Not many high
school students have the requi-
site subjects such as physics,
mathematics and chemistry. I
know of a few high school grad-

uates who wanted to enter the
technology programme but
when told they may have to do
up to a year of college prep, —
they no longer wished to join
and decided to do something
else. This was because they took
options such as commerce and
accounts in high school or these
classes were not taught at their
schools. Most students from our
high schools lack a real under-
standing of engineering/tech-
nology; this is because they are
poorly informed about the
nature of technology education.
I was one of them and that is
why I spent three instead of the
expected two years for comple-
tion of my associate’s degree.

' This is where the College and

the Ministry of Education need
to create dialogue on trying to
stimulate the interest of stu-
dents in technology and ensure
that the students wishing to
enter into the school of tech-
nology are properly informed
about the programme. They
could offer incentives such as
giving scholarships to students
interested in technology.

The Bahamas is always crying
about the lack of trained
Bahamians in the technical
areas and having to hire for-
eigners to do the technical jobs,
and yet its premiere tertiary
institution is quietly smother-
ing the technology programme.
The College of the Bahamas is
doing this country a great dis-
service. The college’s adminis-
tration needs to realise that the
College of.the Bahamas’ pri-
mary purpose is to ensure that it
provides The Bahamas with
persons with the skills neces-
sary to make contributions that
will advance The Bahamas,‘and
not to line its pockets. -

MAEGAN CARTWRIGHT
Nassau,
- February 14, 2005.

No use blaming PLP
for school neglect

_EDITOR, The Tribune.

‘I READ with interest the
response rendered by Mr Dion
A Foulkes, JP, and former
FNM Minister of Education,
Youth and Sports with regard to

. the closure of the A F Adderley

Junior High School. I should
like to take this opportunity to
publicly thank Mr Foulkes for




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reminding the nation that the
record of the FNM during its
10-year period as the govern-
ment of the country speaks for
itself and in some cases is wor-
thy of praise.

I should also like to empha-
sise that one would have to be
maliciously motivated not to
acknowledge the fact that 13
new schools were constructed,
six schools were totally refur-
bished, 30 schools received
major additions and over 40
new pre-schools were created.
For this Mr Foulkes and his col-
leagues deserve to be congratu-
lated. However, the degree of
deterioration at the A F Adder-
ley Junior High School in New
Providence and the Eight Mile
Rock High’ School in Grand

Bahama along with several oth- .

er schools indicate that such
schools were not blessed with
the level of care and attention
that they deserved during the
tenure of the FNMiin order to
correct their deteriorating struc-
tural integrity.

Therefore, to blame the pre-

_ sent Minister of Education or

the PLP government for the
lack of maintenance to schools
that were in an advanced state
of decay when the Christie led
government came to power in
AD 2002 appears to be intel-
lectually and morally dishonest.



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Further, the records show that
during the 10 years of the FNM
government the national Grade
Point Average in our govern-
ment schools consistently lin-
gered in the lower “D” catego-
ry. I should like to believe that
the ultimate goal of any effec-
tive educational system is not
only to produce beautiful build-
ings but to cultivate the brain
in order to produce beautiful
minds.

Because every citizen has a
stake in the educational process,
it is incumbent upon all persons
of goodwill to recognise that
those schools that were neglect-
ed are now receiving the atten-
tion that they deserve. Hence
instead of attempting to place
the burden of fault on any one
person or group, it may be more
advantageous to formulate and
promote an effective plan for
the maintenance of the physi-
cal structures under the care of
the Ministry of Education as
well as formulating a more
effective system of mining the
intellectual treasures buried in
the minds of our children.

STEPHEN E
PLAKARIS

Freeport, Grand Bahama,
February 21, 2005.


















- YOUR LOCAL MEMBER OF THE-

PROHEM SYSTEM (sm)









THE TRIBUNE

Shooting victim ‘had gun’

By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

JERMAINE Mackey was in posses-
sion of a gun while he was being chased
by police, before being shot to death,
an Officer testified before the Coroner’s
Court yesterday.

Constable Ricardo Neely of the
mobile patrol division told the seven-
member jury that at one point in the
chase of Mr Mackey, he saw a “silver
hand gun” in the hand of the deceased.

The inquest. into the death of Mr
Mackey, 27, resumed yesterday for the
first time since the start of the new year.
The deceased was shot and killed on
December 6, 2002, following a con-
frontation with police officers.

His killing subsequently sparked a
riot involving hundreds of residents of
the Kemp Road area, in which several
police officers were injured, and several
vehicles were damaged during the inci-
dent.

Taking to the witness stand yester-
day, Officer Neely recounted the events
that led up to the death of Mr Mackey.

The officer said that at 10.10pm on
the night of the shooting, he was on,
patrol in the Kemp Road area ina
marked police vehicle together with his
partner Officer Zhivago Earns.

He said that he observed a black Mer-
cedes Benz on St James Road, with two
male occupants, who were “acting sus-
picious,” and pulled along side them,
when they came to.a stop near the Cor-
ner Pocket bar on St James Street.

Mr Neely said the two men left their
vehicle just as a white Honda Accord,
also carrying two male occupants and
travelling West on St James Street, came
to a stop outside of the small bar.

The officer said the front seat pas-
senger of the Honda Accord “was acting
suspicious,” looking to and fro from the
police car and slouching in his seat.

“He started to sit low, started to
slump,” he noted.

Officer Neely then told the jury that
the Honda began reversing backwards,
but was stopped in its attempt by other
vehicles that had come behind.

The officer said he left his car and
shone a flashlight towards the Honda.

He saw a “dark short male, wearing
khaki pants and a brown and blue jack-
et,” exiting the Honda and “taking off
running.”

“At that time he was holding some-
thing to his waist with his right hand,”
the witness added.

Officer Neely said he gave chase, run-
ning after the man around several small
wooden houses. The man he was chasing
gained in speed and when he turned a
corner, the officer lost sight of him. Mr
Neely said that he too then turned the
same corner and saw that the man had
stopped and was standing behind one
of the houses.

The witness testified that as he shone
his flashlight on the man, he saw him
pulling a silver handgun from his waist-
band.

Officer Neely said he then unhol-
stered his gun and ordered-the man “to

drop it,” also firing his gun once into
the air as a warning shot. “But he took
off running again,” he said.

Mr Neely told the court that he was
standing about ten feet away from the
man when he observed the gun in his
hand.

After he had again lost sight of the
man, he called out to his partner Officer
Earns, warning him that the man was
coming his way.“I shouted ‘Earns, watch
out, he coming to the front, he has a
gun’,” Mr Neely recalled. The witness
recounted that several seconds later he
heard “what appeared to be two shots
fired.”

Officer Neely said that when he came
around the building, in the rear of the
Corner Pocket bar, he saw the man sit-
ting on the ground “slouched over and
bleeding from his mouth.”

“He was saying ‘I got hit, I got hit’,”
Mr Neely recalled.

He said he saw Officer Earns standing
nearby and told his partner to search
the man for a weapon, while he himself
made his way to the police car to call for
an ambulance. ;

When he returned from making the
request for medical assistance about
three minutes later, he saw that a group
of about 50 people had gathered at the
scene of the shooting, and that his part-
ner was being pinned to a wall by some
residents, Mr Neely said.

He said the slumped-over man now
appeared to be “lifeless.”

Mr Neely said as the people crowding
around him and his partner became

TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005, PAGE 5

more hostile, jeering and shouting, he
was unable to check the man for a
weapon, but merely for a pulse. He con-
firmed that a plastic bag containing silver
tinfoil and a substance suspected to be
marijuana was found next to the victim.

The officer said that following these
events, he and Officer Earns were taken
to the Criminal Investigation Depart-
ment (CID), where they gave their state-
ments on the morning of December 7.
Before leaving the scene, however, Mr
Neely said he ejected the live round left
in the chamber of his gun onto the
ground.

Investigations did not turn up the vic-
tim’s alleged gun, he added.

Coroner William Campbell advised
the witness that some of the critical evi-
dence he had given the court had not
been included in his original statement
to the police in 2002.

The coroner highlighted the fact that
in his initial report, Mr Neely had made
no mention of using a flashlight, shout-
ing to his partner that Mr Mackey was in
possession of a gun, ejecting a live round
at the scene, or hearing the deceased
speak before he died.

’ Mr Campbell also said that Mr
Neely’s written statement of the
deceased “holding a silver object which
appeared to be a handgun,” seemed
vague and did not carry the same weight
as the statement that Mr Mackey had a
silver handgun in his hand. Responding
to the coroner’s comments and ques-
tions, the officer said that at the time
that he made his statement, he was







under stress and not “in the right state of
mind.”

He said that senior officers at CID
had pressured him to give his statement
the morning after the shooting, and that
he would have preferred to be on the
record when he was more collected.
Officer Neely, however, conceded that
there were omissions to his original
statement and that these omissions were
critical.

He further confirmed for Coroner
Campbell that had he not been carrying
a flashlight that night, he would not have
been able to clearly identify the silver
object Mr Mackey was holding in his
hand. Mr Neely said that he handed in
his police issued gun to CID, but not
his flashlight.

Also testifying yesterday was Sergeant
Cedric Bullard, the investigating officer
of the 2002 shooting death.

He told the court that the crime scene
was contaminated due the riot which
had broken out after the shooting, and
that police were not able to recover any
evidence.

Sergeant Bullard said that the only
evidence of a shooting that police have
in their possession, is a 9mm bullet cas-
ing which was handed in by a civilian.

Following the two testimonies, the
inquest was adjourned until Wednes-
day at 10am, when counsel for the police
department, Kenneth Toppin and
Michael Faulkes, and counsel for the
victim’s family, Fayne Thompson, will be
able to ask their questions of Officer
Neely.




Crew snatched from zi

A UNITED STATES Coast
Guard crew on board a Jay-
hawk helicopter rescued 14
Bahamian fishermen from a
burning vessel over the week-
end.

The burning 72-foot vessel
was located 50 miles northwest
of Nassau.

Coast Guard District Seven’s
command centre in Miami
received notification of the ves-
sel in distress at about 9.30am.
The vessel was spotted by civil-
ian aircraft flying overhead. The
pilot notified the Air Force Res-
cue Centre in Langley, Virginia,
who then called the Coast
Guard.

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en route, the passengers of the
vessel abandoned the ship and
sought refuge aboard the ves-
sel’s dinghy.

Upon the helicopter’s arrival,
a rescue swimmer was lowered
to the water to ensure the fish-
ermen were safe and accounted
for. The helicopter crew began
safely hoisting the passengers
on board. ©

The survivors were trans-

' ported to Nicholls Town in
Andros. No injuries were.

_ reported. and the cause of the
incident is not yet known.



A HUGE plume of black smoke rises from the stricken vessel as US Coast Guard rescuers move in. Fishermen had abandoned ship in a dinghy as flames
engulfed the vessel, which caught fire 50 miles north-west of Nassau.

Body found near a
bridge identified



AY

We aN

: By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter gata | ie
- _ THE body found floating near : SUN)

He a

Potter’s Cay on Sunday has been

identified'as that of 51-year-old ©

Raddison Clarke.

ete
ere eat



The Sea Breeze Lane resident
was found floating fully-clothed
under the Nassau to Paradise
Island bridge around 8am on Sun-
day.

Police yesterday gave no
update on their investigation into
the matter.

REE

TUESDAY
MARCH 1




















On Sunday Inspector Walter ae Sena
Evans said police are looking into 12noon ZNS News Update - Live
the possibility of a link between 12:03 Caribbean Today News
Mr Clarke’s death and a body 12:30 Immediate Response
found in the same area a few 1:00 Caribbean Today News
weeks ago. Oe A 1:02 Cybernet 1995 - 2005
that of 26yenrold Detoy Prat, | 201 Cabana es ott Mona vas
at of 26-year-old Delroy Pratt, 4 aribbean Today News .
was also found floating fully- a Gospe! ee Countdown DAYS: Sunday, Monday, Wednesday & Friday
clothed near Potter’s Cay. reasure Attic
Inspector Evans said there | 980 _ This Generation Providenciales to N N Providencial
were no signs of physical abuse to a ae Round ae enciaies to iINassau aseau to Providenciales
the body of Mr Clarke atthe time | 4.49 Kids On The Move Flight # RU401 departs 10:00am __ Flight ## RU400 departs 12:30pm



he was found.

4:58/30 _ZNS News Update - Live Arrives in Nassau | 1:30am Arrives in Providenciales 2:00pm








In other crime news, a 28-year- 5:00 Caribbean Newsline
old man is recovering after being 5:30 Holy Hip Hop
shot in the buttocks while asleep 6:00 Bahamian Things
at his home. The victim is report- 6:30 News Night 13 ‘
ed to have been in bed at his] 700 Bahamas Tonight 7-day advance purchase return tickets as low as
8:00 Ethics & Excellence . departure taxes included

McKinney Avenue residence
when he was awoken by the
sound of several gunshots.




8:30
# 9:00

Urban Renewal Update
Da’ Down Home Show



Call Destinations at 393-6900 or Premier Travel at 328-0264 for reservations and ticketing







Police say the man became | !0:00 Spoken
aware of a burning sensation, and is Soe art
realised that he had been shot in 11:30 Immediate Response



the right buttock. Inspector Evans
said that police are following
some leads in connection with the
matter, and that investigations
are continuing.



1:30 Community Pg. 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves.
the right to: make last minute
programme changes!



PPPI>>A KCK OLE











PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



Beye



New home
owners
receive
keys from

- Christie

The introduction of the all new Ford F-150 introduces a long series of first and best in class series, the new F-
150 is the-first pickup with 4 doors in regular, supercab and supercrew models, the new F-150 also sports best,
_ in class available payload, -box size, low end torque, available towing capacity interior room, and the widest
variety of Body, trim, and pick up box configurations no wonder its been the best selling full size pick up for
26 years straight, undoubtedly, 27 years is guaranteed.

WHO SAID A TRUCK CAN'T BE STYLISH

The F-150 STX is a vehicle that makes a bold fashicin statement, its available as regular Cab
or supercab, with a styleside or flareside box, it also comes with a standard 4.6 |. Triton V8
that produces 231 HP, body colored bumpers and a long list of standard features, as you
can see, this Pick-Up is as unique as you are.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE:
friendlymotorsbahamas.com

Wits ruc rr Ts

a

THOMPSON BOULEVARD © TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094










rvicsares thasara purest

Reatall

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a) Tel; 327-POST

Ph, 356 - POST (767





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Freiericht St.
Vol; F36-PORT



Sores -
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Hinlsrmnat Bots: Rankal
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+ Fon Garvieon

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Village Ad. Shopping

The Morfolh Hoaae

PRIME MINISTER Perry
Christie, together with the -
Minister responsible for Hous-
ing Shane Gibson, presented
keys to four new home owners
during a ceremony in Grand
_ Cay on Friday.

Ada Cephas and Urial Rus-
sell, both senior citizens, and
Freddie Miller and Peter Gar-

diner, disabled residents,

received their keys in a cere-

mony at Shiloh Baptist -

Church. -

Also on hand for the cere-
mony were the Minister of
Social Development and
Community Development
Melanie Griffin, and the Min-
ister for Financial Service

Allyson Maynard Gibson,
along with other government
officials. ;
Pictured above are the recip-
ients of the homes together
with the Prime Minister and
Cabinet Ministers and other
government officials.
BIS photo



by NATARIO McKENZIE

IN an effort to get first-hand
experience of the day-to-day
duties of some of the workers in
his ministry, Ron Pinder parlia-
mentary secretary in the Min-
istry of Health, took to Bay

. Street yesterday in a mini clean-
up effort.

Mr Pinder, along with Ann-
Marie Sears from Environmen-
tal Health's city maintenance
unit assigned to Bay Street,
took to the streets on Monday
with brooms and garbage bags.

"This is my attempt to get a
general assessment of the day
to day experience of a worker at
the Department of Environ-
mental Health," Mr Pinder said.

"I think it’s important. that
our workers know that the per-
sons who are responsible for .
making decisions care about
them as well,” he said.

Mrs Sears said: "It was a sur-
prise when I saw him come onto
Bay Street, now he can experi-
ence what we go through on
Bay Street and the task that we
have in keeping Bay Street

clean."


















Mr Pinder noted that his min-
istry had received numerous
complaints about the debris in

_ the "downtown" area. Mr Pin-

der praised the work of the city
maintenance unit calling them
"humans behind the effort" to
beautify Bay Street.

Mr Pinder called for proper

_ planning in the beautificatio

efforts. :

Pinder gets
insight into —
ers’ lo



"There are too many govern-
ment agencies who have
responsibility for some aspect
of the environment," he said.

Mr Pinder noted that in meet-
ings with other government
agencies later this week he
would attempt to gather all of
their resources under one
agency in an effort to "better

organise" their work.

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

Established 1950
P.O. Box N-1222, 22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

We OVS Sa ead 173
















MRS KITTY
LAWRENCE

of Nassau, The].
Bahamas, will be held
at St. Andrew’s
Presbyterian Kirk,
Princes Street,
Nassau, on Thursday,
3rd March, 2005 at
6:00 p.m.

Reverend Charles A. Sweeting will
officiate. -















She is survived by her husband, Howard;
two sons, Graham and Andrew; two
daughters-in-law, Christine and Sheelagh;
five grandchildren, Christopher, Kathryn,
Matthew, Jennifer and Stephanie; two
great-grandchildren, Kaitlyn and Luke;
two sisters, Margaret and Winifred; one
brother-in-law, Dennis and numerous
nieces and nephews.




Instead of flowers the family request that
donations be sent to The Baharnas Heart
Association, PO. Box N-8189, Nassau,
The Bahamas in memory of Mrs. Kitty
Lawrence.’

eee ge
THE TRIBUNE



Ur

hopes on
‘freedom’
convention

By CARA BRENNEN,

said the government wanted to
Tribune Staff Reporter

allow the unions the opportu-
nity to make their concerns
known.

“This is for all members of
the trade movement across the
board. It is important that we
understand that labour is across
the board.

He said he is aware that there
are some unions who stand ful-
ly behind the convention as is
and there are some who need
clarification and satisfaction of
the full implication of the issues.

He warned the unionists that
adopting the convention was
not something to be going into
blindly.

“Tt calls for education, it calls
for input, it calls for discussion
and it calls for us to benchmark
what happens in other
Caribbean countries who are
just as worker friendly as the
Bahamas.”

He noted that the convention
was ratified in Jamaica and Bar-
bados, there were laws and pro-
visions which were not affect-
ed. He said they had to discuss
why that was.

THE Bahamas could see
across the board unionisation if
a convention permitting the
freedom of choice in organis-
ing labour is implemented.

Convention C87 is a conven-
tion endorsed by the Interna-
tional Labour Organisation and
it allows for freedom of associ-
ation and protection of the right
to organise.

If it is passed in the Bahamas
it would allow for greater flexi-
bility and freedom in organised
labour, one union leader
claimed.

Yesterday, the Ministry of
Labour hosted a one day work-
shop to discuss the: possibility
of enacting the convention in
the Bahamas and to allow union
leaders to weigh in on the
issues.

Pat Bain, president of the
Bahamas Hotel Catering and
Allied Workers Union, said the
workshop was a “watershed”
moment for organised labour.
He said that adopting the con-
vention would rest aside fears
that smaller unions would be
walked over. He said that just as
businesses are trying to protect
and prepare themselves for the
effects of globalisation and
trade agreements such as the
Caribbean Single Market, Free
Trade Agreement of the Amer-
icas and the World Trade
Organisation, so too must orga-
nized labour in the country.

Mr Bain said that presently
the country has a workforce of
just over 167,000 persons. How-
ever he said that only 23,000 of
those workers have union rep-
resentation. :

“They say we are the voice
of labour, but who do we speak
for,” he asked.

Labour Minister Vincent Peet

bados, where he said they

_ adopted the convention for pri-
vate sector unions to have gen-
eral unions, but in the public
sector they cannot.

“Therefore, we have to dis-
cuss and see why it is that cer-
tain progressive Caribbean
countries whom we benchmark
our laws after have not gone as
far as some would want us to
go at this point.”

He said it was important for
the government to hear the con-
cerns of the unions to ensure
that all the players were on the
same page and determine which
of the aspects should be enacted
or whether it should be done in
phases.

Mr Peet said the government

Management
duo up for
the challenge

SUPERCLUBS Breezes
Bahamas, Nassau’s first and
only Super-Inclusive resort, has
announced two new appoint-
ments to its management team.

Warren Glinton has been
promoted to chief engineer and
Marcus Laing to assistant chief
‘engineer.

Glinton previously held the
position of assistant chief engi-
neer during his 18 months with
the company. He has previous-
ly worked as an electrician for
Sun International - now Kerzn-
er International - as the main-
tenance manager with John Bull °
Limited, maintenance manag-
er with Aquapure Water Ltd,
maintenance and plant manag-
er with Gladstone Farms, and as
operations engineer with Flori-
da Aquastore. |

Laing has been with the com-
pany for three years working as
the air-conditioning and refrig-
eration specialist. He was for-
merly employed at Westwind
II as the air-conditioning and
refrigeration technician, and at
. Hill York Ltd and Freezing
Point as an air-conditioning and
refrigeration technician.

Glinton brings with him a
wealth of knowledge and over
23 years of experience. He is a
licensed single-phase electrician
and holds certificates from The
College of the Bahamas in gen-
eral maintenance, plumbing,
electrical engineering and air-
conditioning. He is the father
of two daughters, Lashan and

Cemone Glinton, and the proud
grandfather of one grandson,
Darius Glinton.

“T love the challenge of a new
position! I rise to the occasion
when I am faced with a chal-
lenge,” said Glinton. “It is what
keeps me driven...challenges.
That is the best part of my job.
I can’t be in a stale or boring
job. I need to have challenges
every day because it keeps me
motivated and brings out the
best in me.”

Laing is a graduate of
Atlantic Technical Institute with
a degree in air-conditioning and
refrigeration. He also holds cer-
tificates from The Copeland
Company in Ft Lauderdale,
Florida, and the Training Ser-
vice and Diagnostics course
offered in Orlando, Florida. He
is married to Kenji Laing. They
have two daughters, Khassidi
and Dejah Laing, and one son,
Khamran Laing.

“I am very excited about this
new position. I feel that I can
bring to the table new ideas and
new energy,” said Laing. “I am
definitely up to the challenge
and I will do my absolute best
to make sure that our depart-
ment is running the way that it
should be run, that we get
things done in a timely fashion
and that we are one-hundred
percent professional at all
times.”

Together they will head the
engineering department for the
400-room resort.

.

He gave as an example Bar-.

would be guided by the con-
sensus of the unionists since

they are affected along with the-

workers of the Bahamas.

He also said: “This is not a
dictatorship, it is a consultation
and a way of getting your views
across. It is a discussion to dis-
sect and analyse the. best way
forward.”

TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005, PAGE 7





Mum ke



‘garit Cla

New Master's

Room 1
5:30

Room 2
5:30

‘ Room 3
5:30

Room 5
5:30

Room 6
5:30

Room 7
5:30

Computer
Lab 5:30

Room |
s 8:05

THERE’S a rare sight at the Circle B Ranch farm on Cow Pen Road in Nassau as these two calves were born f
to the same mother at the same time just over a week ago. Owner Basil Cumberbatch said the birth of twin |
calves was “extremely rare”. :

Room4 | MASTERS
5:30 CLASS



eps watch over beefy babes




Photo: Mario Duncanson





6



tudants: tn “Public: Administrat
= gramme ‘meet for advisement at the Nas
Ferguson; Hon. ‘Theresa: Moxey-
Leon Mars and Errol Johns





DISCUSSING THE FINER POINT:
Degree. ‘students ts

ECO 215

Economics I

ECE 101
Early childhood
Education

SPCH 100
undamentals of
"Speech
PSY

Introduction to

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Education

Seminar
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Business

ADM 351
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Analysis
ACC 300
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ACC 303
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Accounting IT
ECE 109
Art
Appreciation
PUB 309

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Bureaucracy

BUS 370

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MASTERS

MASTERS.
CLASS. CLASS
PSY 313 SCcl
Adolescents} — Anatomy of
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ENG 097
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ENG 241
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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Urban renewal scheme
brings surprise rewards

By Bahamas
Information
Services

WHEN the Urban Renewal.

Programme was launched in
May, 2002, with the establish-
ment of the Farm Road Pilot
Project Office, government, law
enforcement, community, civic
and social leaders all anticipat-
ed that the programme would
have a dramatic and positive
impact on the community.
Almost three years later, the
project is bringing some unex-
pected rewards - not for the
persons benefiting from the
many programmes established
over the years, but for one of
the key stakeholders of urban
renewal, the Ministry of Social

Development.

“The impact the Urban
Renewal Programme has had
on the various communities has

’ been remarkable in some cases,

but I think we, as a ministry,
have benefited tremendously
from the programme as well,”
says Kim Sawyer, an assistant
director with the Ministry of
Social Services and Community
Development and head of the
ministry’s Urban Renewal Unit.

“By forming a unit of the
Department of Social Services
responsible for urban renewal,
we have: been able to bring
relief more quickly to some of
the needy persons in the com-

munity, and it has further

allowed us to form comprehen-
sive alliances within and out-
side of our ministry that have
benefited not only those depart-
ments, but individuals seeking
our assistance”.

Those alliances include part-

nerships with government enti-
ties such as the Royal Bahamas
Police Force, Department of
Labour, Ministry of Housing

and National Insurance, and the

Department of Environmental
Health Services.

Alliances have also been
formed with church, business,
community and social partners.

Miss Sawyer says the unit acts
as the “eyes and ears” for all
sectors of the ministry. She says
being “on the ground” through
the Urban Renewal Pro-
gramme, has resulted in the
ministry becoming not only
more “proactive” in its
approach to delivering services
to the various communities, but
also “more interactive”.

“We are all here for the bet-
terment of the community and
if you wait for persons to come
to you, by the time they reach to
you the problems are so insur-
mountable that it takes years

Services and Community

PROPERTIES FOR SALE

LISTED PROPERTIES - RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL | NASSAU

GLENISTON GARDENS

LOT NO. 0 Block 7

PROPERTY SIZE: 3 Bed, 2 Bath (10,875 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: East Side of Jean St. off

Prince Charles Dr. :
APPRAISED VALUE: $189,000

SOUTH BEACH ESTATES

LOT NO. 12 BLOCK No. 5 (Commercial)
PROPERTY SIZE: Restaurant (6,364 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: East St. South

APPRAISED VALUE: $270,000

TOWER ESTATES SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 31 is
PROPERTY SIZE: 10,800 sq.ft.
LOCATION: Tower Estates Dr.
APPRAISED VALUE: $229,000

TOWER ESTATES SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 47

PROPERTY SIZE: 10,908 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Tower Estates Dr.
APPRAISED VALUE: $195,000

WESTERN CLOSE SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 9

PROPERTY SIZE: Triplex (10,325 sq. ft.)

LOCATION: Bellot Rd. off Gladstone Rd.
' APPRAISED VALUE: $244,000

SHIRLEA HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 5 Block 14 Bidg.12

PROPERTY SIZE: Single Storey (5,000 sq. ft.):
LOCATION: Maderia St.

APPRAISED VALUE: $205,000

YAMACRAW BEACH ESTATES

LOT NO. 247

PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Under
Construction (6,935 sq. ft.)

LOCATION: West Side of Acklins Circle
APPRAISED VALUE: $100,000

GOLDEN GATES SUBDIVISION No. 1
LOT NO. 314

PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence
(5,000 sq. ft.)

LOCATION: Maicolm Rd. West of Reef Ln.
APPRAISED VALUE: $115,000

GOLDEN GATES SECTION No. 2

LOT NO. 579

PROPERTY SIZE: 3 Bed, 2 Bath Single Family
Residence (60x100 sq. ft.)

LOCATION: St. Vincent Rd.

APPRAISED VALUE: $233,000

GOLDEN GATES No. 2

LOT NO. 1440

PROPERTY SIZE: Residence/ praia Unit
(6,000 sq. ft.)

SITE AREA: 1,902 sq. ft:

LOCATION: Tangerine St. & Cedar Way
APPRAISED VALUE: $221,120

GLADSTONE ROAD ALLOTMENT

LOT NO. Crown Allotment No. 53 Lot #D
PROPERTY SIZE: 3 Bed, 2 Bath (5,995 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Bellot Rd. West of Faith Ave.
APPRAISED VALUE: $124,000

MONTROSE AVENUE
PROPERTY SIZE: Incomplete 4 Plex Apt.
Building (5,000 sq. ft.) - Residentavsen
Commercial
LOCATION: Rolle Ave. & Apple St. West
of Wulff Rd.
APPRAISED VALUE: $50,000

JEROME AVENUE

PROPERTY SIZE: 2 Bed, 1 Bath Duplex
(7,200 sq. ft.)

LOCATION: Bar 20 Corner & Jerome Ave.
APPRAISED VALUE: $156,500

EMERALD GARDENS

LOT NO. 60

PROPERTY SIZE: (5,525 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Opal Dr.
APPRAISED VALUE: $110,000

CULMERSVILLE SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 25

PROPERTY SIZE: Triplex Apartment (4,800 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Orchid Ln.

APPRAISED VALUE: $160,000

UNION VILLAGE

LOT NO. 57

PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence
(1,295 sq. ft.)

SITE AREA: 6,820 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Peach St. off Montrose Ave.
APPRAISED VALUE: $50,528

STAPLEDON GARDENS

LOT NO. 544

PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence (9,600 sq. ft.)
SITE AREA: 2,457 sq. ft.

LOCATION: 130 ft. North of Spitfire Rd.

APPRAISED VALUE: $224,000

SEA BREEZE ESTATES

LOT NO. 4 Block 21

PROPERTY SIZE: Split Level Residence (10,500 sq. ft.)
SITE AREA: 4,140 sq. ft.

LOCATION: 350 South of Seafan Dr.

APPRAISED VALUE: $366,000

JOHN TERRACE

LOT NO. 3

PROPERTY SIZE: Single Storey Residence/
Two Storey Apartment (3,483 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: 200 ft. from Lincoln Blvd./Wulff Rd.
Intersection

APPRAISED VALUE: $135,000

TWYNAM HEIGHTS ESTATES

LOT NO. 61

PROPERTY SIZE: 2 Storey Residence 9, 100 sq. ft.)
SITE AREA: 1,173 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Victoria St. & Coronation Rd.
APPRAISED VALUE: $203,000

SEVEN HILLS ESTATES

LOT NO. 15

PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence (5,000 St ft.)
SITE AREA: 1,693 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Blue Hill Rd. South

APPRAISED VALUE: $145,000

OAKES FIELD AIRPORT SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 45 Block 14

PROPERTY SIZE: 2 Single ey Apartment Units
(6,400 sq. ft.)

SITE AREA: 635 sq. ft. :
LOCATION: 75 ft. North of Davis St.

APPRAISED VALUE: $108,000

SANDILANDS VILLAGE ROAD

PROPERTY SIZE: Residence/ Apartment Complex
(11,600 sq. ft.)

SITE AREA: 5N North Side of Sandilands Village
APPRAISED VALUE: $386,000

SHIRLEY STREET

LOT NO. 1&3 *

PROPERTY SIZE: Commercial (13,000 o ft.)
SITE AREA: 3,236 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Southern Side of Shirley St.
APPRAISED VALUE: $775,000

LISTED PROPERTIES - VACANT LOTS | NASSAU

COWPEN ROAD-HOLLYWOOD SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. Crown Grant A-66

PROPERTY SIZE: (10,875 sq. ft.)

LOCATION: 350 West of Refuge Court
APPRAISED VALUE: $71,000

WEST BAY STREET

PARCEL OF LAND. Eastern Side of South
Ocean Blvd.

PROPERTY SIZE: 1,020 acres
LOCATION: 1,780 ft. South of West Bay St.
APPRAISED VALUE: $150,000

INTERESTED Nae) (eV

HIGHLAND ESTATES SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 6

PROPERTY SIZE: (9,761 sq. ft.)

LOGATION: 1,100 ft. East of West Bay St. & Sea
View Dr.

‘APPRAISED VALUE: $100,000

©2005 Creative Relations

OFFERS TO PURCHASE (WITH TELEPHONE |

. CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS) TO CHERRY MISSICK, THE PLAZA, MACKEY STREET, OR

CALL 502-6200 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION.
ALL OFFERS.

* WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR



and years to deal with them and
the clients become frustrated,”
says Miss Sawyer.

“By being more proactive
and interactive within the com-
munity, we have been able to
get to some of the problems fac-
ing persons in the communities
before they reach an advanced
stage. For example, if we dis-
cover a family who can benefit
from the School Lunch Pro-
gramme, they are referred to
the appropriate department
within our ministry.

“Tf we find disabled persons
in the community during our
walkabouts, we get the particu-
lars on those persons and send
all of that information to our
Disability Affairs Division,
which keeps a registry of all dis-
abled persons in the Bahamas.
The division would then assist in
getting those persons access to
whichever of our services they
may need.

“We have found persons who
qualified for invalidity assis-
tance but did not apply for that
assistance and senior citizens
who qualified for Old Age Pen-
sion but weren’t receiving their
benefits, and were able to refer
them to the appropriate agen-
cies and now they are getting
the benefits due to them,” Miss
Sawyer adds.

The unit also works in con-
junction with the Department
of Labour to identify unem-
ployed persons within the com-
munity with a view to finding
employment for those persons.

Case Aides, under the super-
vision of trained social work-
ers, gather information on the
levels of unemployment. The
information is assessed by the
social worker and interviews are
conducted to determine quali-
fications and interests of the
unemployed. The information
is then shared with the Depart-
ment of Labour’s Employment
Exchange.

The unit also assists persons
with securing all of the neces-

‘sary documentation they would

need to provide to prospective

employers.

“We also try to match job
opportunities with applications
we have, because not all
employers register with the
Department of Labour,” Miss
Sawyer says. “That sometimes
includes reaching out to busi-
nesses within the community”.

The ministry has implement-
ed a number of programmes
within the various communities
in which urban renewal project
offices are located, designed to
bring further relief to needy res-
idents. (Project offices are cur-
rently located in Bain and
Grant’s Town, Fort Charlotte,
St Cecilia, Englerston and just
recently Nassau Village).

These include programmes
for senior citizens, single and
married parents - through a par-
enting skills programme - chil-
dren, families, teen mothers and
single, unemployed mothers.

An Urban Renewal Senior
Citizens Division was estab-
lished by the ministry to work
closely with senior citizens and
the senior citizens. associations
in the various communities.

“What we found in canvass-
ing the various areas was that
there were a number of seniors
who were still active and mobile
but were just sitting at home
with very little to do in terms
of interacting with other per-
sons of their age grouping,” says

Miss Sawyer.

“There were others who did
not want to go to the Day Care
Centres and yet others who
were not really interested in
participating in activities out-
side of their areas,” adds Miss
sawyer, “and so we thought that
it would be interesting to form
senior citizen associations in the
various areas and that pro-
gramme has been quite suc-
cessful.”

The associations, with the
ministry’s assistance and
through some fundraising and
partnerships of their own, have
been able to arrange beach pic-
nics, island tours, movie treats,
comedy shows and special lun-

. cheon events for their members.

Miss Sawyer says there are
many more components to the
ministry’s programmes. She
notes that- while project offices
operate under a “blueprint,”
individual offices have the lee-
way to tailor programmes to
meet the individual needs of the
communities they serve.

“Each project office is headed
by a Task Force that has the
ability to develop programmes
and activities that target the spe-
cific needs of their communi-
ties. What we then do is develop
programmes to enhance that
work;” she says.

“For example, the Task Force
in Bain and Grant’s Town iden-
tified teenage pregnancy as one
of the major social concerns of

‘that particular community, and

so they developed a life enrich-

. ment programme that lasted for

12 weeks and focused on pro-
viding teenage girls with the
skills and self-esteem needed to
help reverse this trend. .

“The Task Force in St Cecil-
ia’s developed a girls club and a
dance group for teenage girls
and those programmes are
doing very well.

Social Services developed
empowerment workshops for
unemployed single mothers to
try and facilitate getting those
mothers into the job market.

“There are a number of com-
ponents to the programmes
because we are interested in
finding the best ways to help
people improve the quality of
their lives throughout our com-
munities,” Miss Sawyer says.

“I think Urban Renewal has
the capability to have an even
greater impact on building bet-
ter communities throughout
New Providence and indeed the
Commonwealth of — the
Bahamas, if all of the stake-
holders - citizens, community
leaders and associations, the
church and business communi-
ties and government ministries
and departments - continue to
work hand-in-hand,” adds Miss
Sawyer.


iHe& TRIBUNE



PVE GUA, Wi Ts

$y ans

Young chefs sign up

6,000 hours at hotel

SEVENTEEN apprentice
chefs at The College of the
Bahamas inked their names to
contracts pledging to work 6,000
‘hours at hotel properties over
the next three years.

The 12 first-year and five sec-
ond year apprentices made this
commitment before family,
friends and industry leaders
during the 29th annual contract
ceremony signing for appren-
tice chefs at Choices Restau-
rant, COB’s School of Hospi-
tality and Tourism Studies.

' The hours are a part of the
requirement necessary to com-
plete the students study toward
their degree in culinary arts at
The College of the Bahamas.
Sponsoring hotel and resort
properties include Atlantis Par-
adise, Radisson Cable Beach
Resort, Wyndham Nassau
Resort and Crystal Palace Casi-
no and British Colonial Hilton.

Mr Earl Bethell, president of
Bahamas Hotel Association and
deputy general manager at
Radisson Cable Beach, reas-

sured The College of the.

Bahamas of the industry’s com-
mitment to the programme.

“We at the Bahamas Hotel
Association and the Bahamas
Hotel Employers Association
are committed to the develop-
ment of our young chefs and
the development of our nation’s
greatest resource, our people,”
noted Betheil. “This will ensure
that tourism in the Bahamas is
the best it can be.”

Encouraging the young chefs
to strive to be the very best in
their profession, Mr Bethell
offered the young chefs some
advice: “Be committed to your
craft, wear your uniform with
honour and read cook books
and note the different styles of
cooking.”

COB president Dr Rodney
Smith, in his welcome remarks,
forecast the college’s plan to
create a culinary institute,
encompassing the widest range
of opportunities within the
industry.

“In fact, our goal is nothing
less than to become the centre
for culinary and hospitality pro-
grammes, training and research
in the region,” said Dr Smith.
“It is our aim to create a matrix
in which skilled and appropri-
ately certified professionals can
develop at all points on the con-
tinuum of culinary arts and
across the gamut of the hospi-
tality industry.”

In congratulating the appren-
tice chefs for the honourable
profession chosen, Dr Smith
reminded them that their roles
are bigger than that of fame and
fortune.

“You have the grand oppor-
tunity to put your country’s pri-
mary revenue source on a
firmer footing. You have the
opportunity to.contribute to
preserving an important aspect
of your culture and bringing it
to the attention of the world.”

The National. Apprentice
Chefs Programme began almost
three decades ago at the
Bahamas Hotel Training Col-
lege, which amalgamated with
The College of the Bahamas in
2000. The programme is of
three years’ duration and fol-
iows guidelines set up by the
American Culinary Federation
of which the Bahamas Culinary
Association is an affiliate.

The aim of COB’s culinary
curriculum is to continue to con-
tribute to the development of
the culinary arts and the hospi-
tality industry in the Bahamas
by assisting in the formation of
aspiring chefs. The Apprentice
Programme is designed to pro-
vide a theoretical foundation
and industry training in the food
and pastry preparation. Profes-
sional training is enhanced
through the partnership of
many of the members of The
Bahamas Hotel Association in
Nassau and Freeport, who facil-
itate apprenticeships at their
properties.

-Each year there is a contract
signing ceremony where the
representatives of the proper-
ties and students formalise the
terms of apprenticeship. Over
years, the programme has grad-
uated a fine cadre of culinary
professionals, who have con-
tributed to enhancing the
Bahamian character of cuisine
and food service in the local
hospitality industry. Graduates
include chefs Christopher Chea,







Edwin Johnson, Jasmin Young,
Tracey Sweeting, Wayne Mon-
cur, Jason McBride, Carolyn
Bowe and three professionals
who have since joined the fac-
ulty of The College of The
Bahamas — chefs Eldred Saun-
ders, Mario Adderley and
Vanessa Riley, who co-ordinate
the Apprentice Programme.

It has become increasingly
important for the college and
the hospitality industry to con-
centrate efforts to extend the
capacity and reach of this
important industry training ini-
tiative for the benefit of hospi-
tality and Bahamas tourism as a
whole.

PICTURES:

°¢ SECOND year apprentice
Rancourt Nixon signed a con-
tract withr Atlantis Paradise
Island for the apprentice chef
programme. Charles will be

expected to work 6,000 hours

to complete the practical aspect
of the culinary arts programme.

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Also signing the contract was
Atlantis chef Yasmin Young,
Atlantis; COB’s vice-president
of academic affairs, Dr Linda
Davis and Michael Humes, sec-
retary of the Apprenticeship
Board

° TWELVE first-year and
five second year apprentices
signed contracts to work at var-
ious hotel properties over the
next three years . The appren-
tices (standing) were congratu-
lated by family, friends, industry
jeaders and COB faculty and —
administrators. Seated from left:
Peter Daniels, Dean, Faculty of
Business, Hospitality and:
Tourism Studies, Dr Linda
Davis, VP academic affairs, Dr
Rodney Smith, COB president;
Mr Franklyn Wilson, council
chairman and Mr Earl Bethell,
guest speaker. Standing is
Michael Humes, secretary of
the Apprenticeship Board and
Vanessa Riley, apprentice co-
ordinator, School of Hospitality
and Tourism Studies.

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005

THE TRIBUNE:



LOCAL NEWS .



A year after Aristide

Haiti's misery goes on

as two die in protes

Man faces double
murder charge

FROM Page One

jury suspected bloody shoe
prints inside the house, a sus-
pected bloody palm print at the
entrance to a bedroom door,
what appeared to be a blood-
soaked newspaper down the
street and suspected blood
stains on the road.

, The suspected murder
weapon, a long, jagged kitchen
knife broken off at the handle,
was found in the kitchen in
addition to a human tooth.
Another tooth was found on the
outside porch, according to
police officers who testified.

Mrs Newbold’s body. was
found lying on the front room
floor.

DC Evans told the court that
from that room, a trail of blood
went down the hallway and into
a room where Mr Wilson's body
was found. His intestines were
hanging from his side, according
to prosecution witnesses.

- Crime scene officers also tes-
tified-that-they- collected sam-

ples of what they.suspected.to.. .

be blood from several areas
around the house.

The stains on the road were
found in front of a house on
Avocado Street, where the

- detectives continued their inter-

views. ;

Members of the Wilson fam-
ily, including victim Kevin
Wilson's sister and father Row-
land Wilson, also testified




ae

Butler's Funeral Homes
& Crematorium

Tel: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

MRS. ANNIS LOUISE
MA SAWYER, 88

of Retirement Road who died .
at her residence on Thursday,
February 24th, 2005 will be
held on Tuesday, March 1st,
2005 at 4:30pm at the
Graveside of the Eastern
Cemetery, Shirley and
Dowdeswell

before the court yésterday.

Mr Wilson said that in the
evening hours of June 15, he
was with his wife, Christina, in
their bedroom with their son
Kevin watching TV and talk-

Mr Wilson said that between
11 and 11.30pm, Kevin left the
room and went into the kitchen.
He said that victim Rosnell
Newbold was in another bed-
room at the time.

Mr Wilson testified that he
went to sleep and heard no
sounds during the night. He told
the court that his bedroom door
was locked and that the air-con-
ditioning was turned on.

Mr Wilson said that when he
got out of bed at around 6am
the next day, he was the only
person awake in the house. He
testified that he left his bed-
room and entered the laundry

room to find Kevin lying on the |
nergy PEL pO

floor.

Mr Wilson said..that he ran
back into his bedroom to alert
his wife, and then ran outside
screaming.

Mr Wilson said that when he
returned, he discovered Mrs
Newbold lying in the front room
of the house. According to Mr
Wilson, the kitchen of his house
was covered with blood.

Testimony from prosecution
witnesses is set to continue at
10 o’clock this morning.











Streets.

Officiating will be Pastor Matthew Sweeting.

























Ma Sawyer was pre-deceased by her husband,
Conrad “Pa Sawyer”; and she is survived by her
daughter, Louise Pinder; one grandson, Jerry Pinder;
one grand daughter, Portia Carey; one grand
| daughter-in-law, Ilene Pinder; one grandson-in-law,
Fred Carey; three great grandchildren, Colby and
Mariah Pinder and Zachary Carey; adopted
grandchildren, John and Mandy Benson, Adam,
Matthew and David Russell, Elizabeth and Ted
Turner and Adam Sweeting; one sister-in-law, Nellie
Lowe; nieces, Ruth Cleare, Ella Pinder, Adrella,
Rose and Darlene Sawyer; nephews, Bobby, Pat
and Elliott Sawyer, Everett Pinder, Gary, Ira and
Billy Lowe; cousins, Mr and Mrs Archie Lowe;
godchildren, Linda Pinder and Georgina Rolle and
a host of other relatives and friends, including Ruth
| Sawyer, Merlene and Myrtle Albury, Chris and
Angela Benson, Herbert and FrankieMae Thompson
and family, Elsie Weech, Mike and Harriet Russell,

George and Donnell Rolle and family, Matthew and

Allyson Sweeting, Ena Braynen, Claudine and

| Crystal Underwood and all her co-workers from
stop-in-shop.

Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers’ Funeral
Homes and Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets
on Tuesday from 10am until 3pm.

Edward and Loretta Turner, Linda Sawyer and family, -





WILLARD JESS KNOWLES

1920 - 2004

_ Reflections of a Faithful Life

With Gods help to strengthen us
We will take each day and try to be
A Light in the life of others
As you were a light to us.

You will live on inside our hearts
And with Gods grace we’ll do our part
To carry on faithfully...

We’ll be a reflection of heavenly love
For others, in your memory.

Sadly missed and cherished by his wife, children,
brother, grandchildren, great-grandchildren,
other relatives and friends.

~ MAY HIS SOUL REST IN PEACE ~



Stubbs debt
investigation

FROM Page One

withal to pay all of them or if he
does not then he will have to
seek to arrive at an agreement
which means if he can convince
the creditors to accept less than
100 per cent of his debt,” Mr
Munroe explained.

This’ process, said Mr
Munroe, can last up to 28 days.

Meanwhile attorney Michael
Scott, who with lawyer Wayne
Munroe, has prepared a peti-
tion on behalf of the FNM to
question whether Mr Stubbs is
qualified to represent the Holy
Cross constituency, told The
Tribune yesterday that an
annulment would not prevent
the petition from being filed.

The petition under the Par-
liamentary Elections Act and
the purpose of it will be to
inquire into the qualifications
of Mr Stubbs to remain in the
House of Assembly and to be
able to perform the function as
a member.

“T think that if it is annulled it
is not annulled retrospectively
so the position is as far as we
are concerned has not
changed,” he said.

The FNM’s position is that
when he sought the nomination
for the Holy Cross constituency
Mr Stubbs may have given inac-
curate information in his dec-
laration forms which would
mean that his documentation

of qualification was similarly
tainted making him election
invalid.

“The other thing is that he
became a bankrupt and the
constitution in the ordinary
course of events would kick in,”
said Mr Scott said.

Mr Stubbs was declared.
bankrupt in March of last year
by Justice Jeanne Thompson.”
His application for leave to
appeal the order on July 14 was”
rejected on September 16 by
President of the Court of*
Appeal Dame Joan Sawyer.
However, Mr Stubbs asked the
original ruling to be revisited
on grounds of new evidence.

The House of Assembly
passed a resolution in Septem-
ber allowing Mr Stubbs a six”
month extension to attempt to
have the ruling overturned and”
thereby retain his seat in par- ,
liament. The resolution was |
proposed after the original 150-"
day extension granted by the:
Speaker of the House had end- ‘

ed.
' The Holy Cross seat has"
become a subject of controver-:,
sy since Mr Stubbs was declared ’
bankrupt. The FNM has made '
repeated calls for a by-election,
which have been countered by |
PLP chairman Raynard Rigby:
who urged both parties to await '
the result of Tuesday’s hearing.-

islanders lone

protected status

“Copyrighted Material ***">

Syndicated Content ==="
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THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY EVENING MARCH 1, 2005

8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005 THE TRIBUNE !_

‘ oan ———$







SECTION



business@100jamz.com

TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

The Tribune






Janina

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH —







NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764







FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010





RND’s main [eReiwsiter:
shareholders

in falling-out

Former president proposes
Extraordinary General Meeting
on corporate governance issues

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The bitter dispute between
RND Holdings’ two largest
shareholders burst into public
view at yesterday’s annual gen-
eral meeting (AGM), as former
president Brent Dean requested
an extraordinary general meet-
ing (EGM) for April 7 to deal
with a variety of corporate gov-
ernance issues.

Mr Dean, who holds 31.2 per
cent of RND Holdings’ issued
ordinary shares, requested the
EGM of all shareholders “due
to the lack of transparency and
timely information to share-
holders prior to the AGM”.

His move potentially sets the
stage for a first proxy battle
involving a publicly-quoted
Bahamian company, putting Mr
Dean at odds with Jerome
Fitzgerald, RND Holdings
chairman, and fellow director
Mark Finlayson, son of well-
known businessman Garet
‘Tiger’ Finlayson.

Mr Fitzgerald is RND Hold-
ings’ second largest shareholder
behind Mr Dean, holding a
30.96 per cent stake. Between
them, the pair owned 62.5 per
cent of the company at January
14, 2005, and the fact neither of
them holds a controlling stake
could set the stage for a fierce
and drawn-out battle.

However, Mr Dean’s motives
are currently unknown, as it
could be that he just wants the
company to disclose more infor-
mation rather than engage in a
full-scale battle for control.

Among the issues Mr Dean
wants debated at the EGM are
a resolution to adopt many of
the corporate governance prac-
tices made mandatory in the US
following the Enron and World-
Com scandals.

The practices he wants to

debate include giving share-
holders “prompt access to criti-
cal information”; having RND
Holdings’ chief executive vouch
for timely disclosure and the
accuracy of the financial state-
ments released to its share-
holders; and for company direc-
tors who have a direct or indi-
rect benefit in contracts entered
into by RND Holdings to

See DISPUTE, Page 5B

Minimum wage does

mitt ay ROD

(ieee

(eC

i(esita

standard of living’

By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Tribune Business Reporter

A US State Department
report yesterday said the
Bahamian minimum wage of $4
per hour “did not provide a
decent standard of living’’, and
said the Grand Bahama Port
Authority had allowed Hutchi-

. son-Whampoa to discourage
unions from forming.

In its Country Report on
Human Rights Practices, the
Bureau of Democracy, Human
Rights and Labour said: "The
minimum wage for government
employees, set in 2000, was $4.5
per hour. A minimum wage for
the private sector was estab-
lished in 2002 at $4 per hour.
In view of the high cost of liv-
ing, these minimum wages did
not provide a decent standard
of living for a worker and fam-
ily. "

Brian Nutt, president of the
Bahamas Employers Confeder-

_ ation (BECon), dismissed the
concerns of the report. He said
the statement was made without











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i quarters including games room, bar and gym. This island is large enough to be
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any basis in fact, and that
Bureau officials could not point
to any study or research done to
support their findings.

While there was talk of a
study to determine what the
poverty level in the Bahamas
was, none was ever completed.
Mr Nutt said further that
increasing the minimum wage
was not the answer in the fight
against poverty in the Bahamas.

He added: "I'd like to know
what factual information they
are basing this statement on,
although most employers pay
well above minimum wage. I
think at the time that Bill
become law, I think it was
determined that some 6 per cent
of workers were paid at below
minimum wage.

“ It's unfortunate that the
world we live in does not pro-
vide fair amounts of material
wealth for everyone. Our soci-
ety, Bahamian society, has
adjusted itself for people to
make a living and survive. It's
unfortunate that businesses
can't pay a minimum wage of
$10 or $15 an hour, but society

Unique two level

Pd an

Danian












has adapted by people pooling
their resources to find a place to
stay..."

The US report also looked at
the rights of workers to organise
and bargain collectively, and
found that workers freely exer-
cised their right to organise and
participate in collective bar-

See WAGE, Page 2B



By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE fiscal deficit for the first half of the
Government’s 2004-2005 financial year
increased by 58 per cent to $83.9 million due to
“the revenue and expenditure strains” imposed.
by the September 2004 hurricanes, the Cen-
tral Bank of the Bahamas reported yesterday.

In its bulletin on financial and economic
developments for January 2005, the Central
Bank’s generally bullish outlook on the
Bahamian: economy’s prospects for the year
again illustrated how the Government’s
finances were lagging behind the credit. and
monetary upturn.

_ While government revenues for the period
July to December 2004 were slightly ahead of
the previous year’s comparative, up 3.63 per
cent to $465 million from $448.7 million, import
duties remained down while recurrent expen-
diture - the Government’s fixed costs -
increased.

The 16.7 per cent decline in collected import
duties, which fell to $158.6 million from $190.4

- million the previous year, is likely to be at least
partially explained by the hurricanes’ impact

See FISCAL, Page 2B



Julian Francis, Central Bank
of the Bahamas governor

Tractebel may move Grand
Bahama LNG plant offshore ~

By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX:

’ Tribune Business Reporter:

Tractebel's construction of a deepwater lique-
fied natural gas (LNG)-port off.the coast of New
England has provided the company with the tech-
nology needed to build a water-based terminal off
the Florida coast, potentially ending its interest in
constructing a regasification plant in Grand
Bahama.

In an interview with The Tribune, Jim Ebeling,
Tractebel's vice-president of business ‘develop-
ment and project manager for its proposed Calyp-
so LNG pipeline. and terminal in Freeport Har-

bour, said the Neptune LNG project is an adjunct.

to its Boston operations and has nothing to do
with plans for the Florida market.

He said, however, that the technology being
developed for Neptune LNG would be applicable

if a similar project was proposed for Florida's
warm waters. i

Mr Ebeling admitted that the company was
engaging in preliminary investigations to review
the economics of such an alternative, but said
Tractebel, which is part of a consortium seeking
approval for an LNG terminal,on Grand Bahama,
remains: committed to its initial Bahamas pro-
ject for the time being.

Tractebel LNG North America announced ear- |
lier this month that a subsidiary, Neptune LNG
LLC, is pursuing the development of a deepwater |
port for LNG deliveries in federal waters off the
coast of Massachusetts.

In a statement to the press, Neptune LNG said
it proposes to locate its deepwater port about 10
miles south of the city of Gloucester and 22 miles

See LNG, Page 2B
Be ice eet

+ ne er ee apace Meee

Rul

RNG Holdings ‘right
now at break-even’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

RND Holdings yesterday
said revenues earned in fiscal
2005 would be “basically
unchanged” from the $1.515
million gained the previous
year, with its chairman saying:
“Right now, the company, to
all intents and purposes, is at
break even.”

Jerome Fitzgerald told the

company’s annual general .

meeting (AGM) that while
there would be some revenue
increase, it would-not bes“sig-
nificant”.

He added that some “fluctu-
ations” in rental income might
be experienced by RND Hold-

Fiscal (From ae 1B)

recurrent expenditure to $504.6 .

and the subsequent concessions

- granted for reconstruction.

Yet the 9.1 per cent rise in

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT

ings, as a number of five-year
leases on its commercial prop-
erty were becoming due for
renewal.

However, Ken Donathan,
RND Holdings’ managing
director, said the company did
expect to see an improvement
upon the $1.602 million oper-
ating expenses incurred in fiscal
2004, due to a “marked
improvement” in real estate
depreciation and the absence
of one-off write-offs, such as
goodwill and franchise rights.

Mr Donathan said he expect-
ed that RND Holdings’ Tick-
etXpress subsidiary, which for-
mally launches this month, will
only become a “significant con-
tributor” to the company’s bot-

million indicates the Govern-
ment is still failing to hold down

2004
CLE/QUI/01613

NOTICE

The Petition of GARY TYREL YOUNG is in respect of

the following parcel of land:-

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of
land containing 41,892 Square Feet

_ situate immediately West of Woodlawn
Gardens Cemetery and East of Village
Estates Sub-division in the Eastern
District of the Island of New - Providence.

Copies of the filed Plan my be inspected during normal

office hours at:-

(a)

The Registry of the Supreme

Court, Ansbacher House, East
Street North, Nassau, Bahamas, and;

The Chambers of James M. Thompson,
Terrace House, First Terrace and Collins

Avenue.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person, having Dower
or right of Dower or any Adverse Claim not recognized in
the Petition shall before the 28th day of April, 2005, file in
the Registry of the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner

’ or the undersigned a Statement of such claim. Failure of
any such person to file and serve a Statement of such claim,
_and requisite documents on or before the 28th day of April,
2005, will operate as a bar to such claim.



























1.20 0.95 Abaco Markets

8.40. 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund

6.25 5.55 Bank of Bahamas ~

0.85 0.75 Benchmark

1.95 1.45 Bahamas Waste

1.00 0.87 British American Bank

7.99 6.76 Cable Bahamas

2.20 1.40 Colina Holdings

7.90 6.75 Commonwealth Bank

1.50 0.35 Doctor's Hospital .

4.02 3.13 Famguard

10.25 8.21 Finco

7.67 6.45 FirstCaribbean

8.60 8.31 Focol

1.99 1.40 Freeport Concrete .

10.38. 9.50 ICD Utilities :
J. S. Johnson





28. 00 ABDAB




Kerzner International BDRs

12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0. 40 RND Holdings

13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets

Andrew J. Thompson
Attorney for the
Petitioner



1.2095 1.1529 Colina Money Market Fund 1.209527*
2.1191 1.9423 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.1105 ***
10.2648 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.2602*****

2.1746 2.0524




Colina Bo

Colina MSI Preferred Fund
F



2.166020**












BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-HI - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day’s weighted price for dally volume
Today's Close - Current day‘s weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings
** - AS AT JAN. 31, 2005/ **** - AS AT DEC. 31, 2004
*- AS AT FEB. 11, 2005/ *** - AS AT JAN 31, 2008/ *****

w= Colina

Financial Advisors Ltd,





tom line in 24 months, putting
this date at March 2007.
TicketXpress, which is a
“universal distribution high-
way”, will act as an on-line
reservation system to enable

Bahamians and residents to’

purchase pre-paid cards for
QuikCell and GSM phones;
tickets to concerts and major
events, and tickets for charter
operators Western Air and Sky
Unlimited.

Mr Fitzgerald said TicketX-

press would earn 50 per cent.

of its revenues from the air
charter tickets, 35 per cent
from pre-paid phone cards. and
15 per cent from events. .

He added that with Western

Air and Sky Unlimited on-

wages, salaries and rent costs in
the public sector.

But the Central Bank said:
“Nevertheless, the comparative
gap [between this year’s deficit
and last year’s] is expected to
narrow, as highlighted by the
improved revenue intake dur-
ing October-December, which
resulted in a second quarter

‘shortfall that was unchanged

from the previous year.
Away from the fiscal situa-

Wage (From page 1B)

gaining. .

It added that unions and
employers negotiated wage
rates without government inter-
ference.

However, the report also not-

ed that human rights advocates
had claimed that the Grand
Bahama Port Authority has
allowed Hutchison-Whampoa,

which owns the harbour and air- __

port i in Freeport, to discourage
unions.
The US-based agency' s

report also noted that some

LNG (From page 1B)

northeast of Boston.

The Neptune LNG deepwa-
ter port operation will be
designed to provide an average

. of 400 million cubic feet of nat-

ural gas per day to the New
England market, enough to
heat about 1.5 million homes.

Meanwhile, Mr Ebeling said
Tractebel continues to be in dia-
logue with the Government to
resolve any concerns or address
any questions they might have
on the Calypso project.

He added: “We have had
meetings and the Government
has expressed concern over cer-
tain things. I think there. was

- some concern.and confusion

created by the Sandia Report,

but we are trying to work our -

way through some of those
things and we're in active dis-
cussions to resolve these issues.

We're working on getting a bet- _
ter understanding of what their

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Janina

board, TicketXpress would
provide ticketing and reserva-
tions for 60 per cent of the air
charter market.

RND Holdings was in talks

with a further three medium- .

sized charter operators, and if
successful the company would
provide services for 80 per cent
of the market.

Mr Fitzgerald said the.com-
mission rate TicketXpress
would earn on sales would ‘be
between 3-7 per cent, depend-

- ing on the contracts it-had

entered into and the method
of purchase.

TicketXpress customers can
currently only reserve tickets
on-line and not pay for them, a
situation that disappointed

tion, the Bahamian economy’s
prospects look brighter, with
the Central Bank saying it
expanded at “a strengthening
pace” during January. Foreign
currency inflows were much

higher than. in January 2004,
resulting in a major build-up in

banking sector liquidity and for-
eign reserves.

The external reserves stood
at $718.11 million at month’s
end, having grown by me! 9 mil-

employers complained that the
industrial tribunal was biased
unfairly in favour of employ-
ees.

As part of its findings, it also »

reported that. the Ministry of
Labour, which has a team of
inspectors that conduct on-site
visits to enforce occupational

health and safety standards’and
investigate employee concerns.
and complaints, conducted

those inspections infrequently.
The report also said Bahami-
an law does not provide a right

concerns are to see how we can
address them within the para-
meters of the project."

The Sandia Report, a US-
based private sector document,
looked at potential risks to
LNG facilities, both from an
operational standpoint and acts
that were considered intention-
al, such as terrorism.

A supporter of Tractebel’s
application, the Grand Bahama
Port Authority, remains a
strong commercial partner that
has worked actively alongside

_Tractebel-to help address all
- regulatory issues and push the
- project forward.

Tractebel's Neptune LNG

deepwater port will be capable’
_of mooring specially-designed

LNG ships equipped to store,
transport and vaporise LNG in
natural gas that can be sent to
customers using the existing
HubLine subsea pipeline.



Yield
0.197 0.000 N/M 0.00%
1/328 0.320 6.0. 4.00%
0.152 0.330 11.0 5.50%
-0.057 0.000 N/M 0.00%
0.101 0.000 14.2 0.00%
0.007 0.040 12.8 4.21%
0.510 0.240 15.7 3.00%
0.259 0.060 8.5 2.73%
0.632 0.390 12.2 4.94%} -
0.228 0.000 . 6.6 0.00%|
0.406 0.230 9.9 5.72%}
0.662 0.480 15.5 4.68%
0.513 0.330 15.0 4.30%
0.710 0.500 11.1 6.29%
0.084 0.000 16.7 0.00%
0.818 0.405 11.6 4.26%|
0.785 0.550 10.5 6.81%












YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by Ssesing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask §$ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol.

- Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

‘FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



many shareholders, as mem-
bers of the public will only be
able to pay for them at distrib- |
ution outlets located at Galleria
Cinemas.

The company is in negotia-
tions with other businesses to
establish more distribution
points.

Advertising to promote Tick-
etXpress will begin, this week,

-using five different ads, with

Mr Fitzgerald acknowledged

.that RND Holdings had previ-

ously set October as the roll- ©
out date for TicketXpress but
this was delayed to allow the
company to enhance the pro-
gramme and add new modules,
enabling it to be seamlessly
rolled out to different compa-



lion in January 2005 compared
to the previous year’s growth
of $17.9 million. Excess liquidi-
ty in the banking system
increased by $67.8 million,

' growing it to $292.2 million

compared to the previous year’s
$138.27 million.

- Both developments are likely
to have contributed to the Cen-
tral Bank’s decision to reduce
the discount rate by 0.5 per cent
this month.

for workers to remove them-
selves from dangerous work sit-
uations without jeopardy to
continued employment.

In response, Mr Nutt said if
jobs were inherently dangerous
but that is the only job that
existed in the company, it will
be difficult to enforce such leg-
islation! °°" ~

In-regard-to ‘other alleeations .
contained in the report; Mr Nutt
said in regard to Hutchison-
Whampoa, there had never
been a situation where the com-

The LNG carriers will moor

- at the proposed deepwater port

by means of a submerged
unloading buoy system. Two
unloading buoys will moor the
LNG carriers throughout the
unloading cycle. An LNG ship
will typically moor at the deep-
water port for four to eight



THE TRIBUNE

nies and integrated with their ,
networks.

As a result, financial projec-
tions that showed TicketXpress
adding to RND Holdings’ per-
formance in 2004 were no
longer valid.

Mr Fitzgerald said the talks it
was having with the current
potential purchaser were “the
most serious” it had entered
into in its search for a buyer
for its Gold’s Gym franchise.

He added ‘that without an
anchor tenant, RND Holdings’
proposed Charles W Saunders

- Highway shopping centre was

too risky a venture, and the
project was essentially on hold
until one could be found.

The Central Bank said the
economy’s 2005 growth
prospects had been enhanced
by tourism and foreign invest-
ment inflows. The weak US$
and other conditions in the US
were supportive of tourism, and
this would be joined by future
increases in hotel sector capac-
ity.

Further gains are expected in
the external reserves during
2005, the Central Bank said,
although the rate of growth
would be lower due to expan-
sionary credit conditions.



pany was found to be anti-union
and that it was the workers that
carried on an illegal strike,

' being subsequently terminated

fi



for leaving their jobs.

Mr Nutt also noted that its
references to the Fair Labour
Standards Act, which it said
requires employers to find suit-

‘ able alternative employment for

-employees injured on the job,
but who are still able to work,
was erroneous, because the Act
was repealed when the Employ-
ment Act became law. .



and a formal project applica-

~ tion review, to take about 15 to

days, depending on the size of .

the ship.

The two separate buoys will
ensure that natural gas can be
delivered in a continuous flow
by having a brief overlap
between arriving and departing
LNG. carriers. The estimated
cost for the project, including
specially built LNG ships, a
buoy system and a connection
to the HubLine pipeline is
about $900 million.

Neptune LNG anticipates the
project's development phase,
including regulatory and pub-
lic consultation and evaluation,

18 months. Neptune LNG
anticipates construction of the
deepwater port components to
take an additional three years.
For its Grand Bahama pro-
ject, Tractebel has linked with a
Florida Power & Light (FPL)
subsidiary and El Paso Corpo-
ration to combine their devel-
opment resources, minimising
risk and financing costs for all. |
Ultimately, only one of the

’ Calypso and El Paso Seafarer

projects will be constructed
depending on government
approval, with Tractebel and El
Paso affiliates being the equity
owners of the pipeline, and
Tractebel and FPL owning the
LNG receiving terminals.

The $700 million Seafarer
pipeline and gas terminal, if
chosen,.would be funded from a
70/30 debt/equity mix.

APPOINTMENT

Paul

(Andy) Gomez,

Managing Partner at Grant

Thornton,
Accountants

Chartered
and
Management Consultants,

is pleased to confirm the
appointment of Patrick E

Smith, CPA, CIA as a partner.

Mr Smith joined the firm in
July 2004 and brings with him
a wealth of experience in
accounting and internal audit. At Grant Thornton-he will be
primarily responsible for management consulting and
accounting engagements, and will serve as the Firm’s
Administrative Partner. Mr Smith is a member of Rhodes _
Memorial Methodist Church and is married to the former

Regina Rigby.

Prior to joining Grant Thornton, Mr Smith was employed as
Financial Controller by a leading law firm based in Nassau
with offices in London, England where he was a key player
in implementing significant internal controls, specifically
time and billing systems, that are adaptable to a broad range
of professional organizations.

Grant Thornton (Bahamas) is a member firm of Grant
Thornton International, whose experience and quality
commitment is delivered through 21,500 staff in 585 offices
located in 110 countries worldwide.


THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS

TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005, PAGE 3B



The US PATRIOT
Act: is it all bad?

By Hubert Edwards

nrecent times there has
been much discussion
on the impact that the
US Patriot Act (the
Act) could have on
Caribbean jurisdictions, espe-
cially those ‘vith offshore finan-
cial centres. This topic also
seems to generate a significant
amount of emotion. At a semi-
nar in 2002, the presenter, a US
lawyer, in his response to ques-
tions stated that relative to the
Act, it is the geo-political pow-
er of the US at work.To para-
phrase his statement: the US is
large enough and has the polit-
ical influence to make demands
on countries such as the
Bahamas. This response led to
a few participants walking out.
Unfortunately, he could have
not been any more accurate.
Fast forward to a Bahamas
Association of Compliance
Officers (BACO) conference
held in 2004. The discussion
centred on the implications of
the PATRIOT Act for the
financial services industry. Sit-
ting at that panel were some
very distinguished profession-
als. The general conclusion was
that the Act should essentially
be rejected on the basis of its
apparent implications for sov-
ereignty and because it appears
to, along with other interna-
tional initiatives, impose a mov-
ing target for compliance on
jurisdictions within the region.
The argument was also made
that a coordinated and consid-
ered effort has to be made to
“lobby” strategic individuals
within the US who could then
represent our interest or, at the
very least, explain how the exis-
tence of offshore financial cen-
tres in the Caribbean impacts

the US capital markets and’
financial-services industry. This, :--

we assume, would temper any
negative consequences for the
region.

Considering the two scenar-
ios, it is clear that the Act con-
jures up certain fears and is gen-
erally not thought of as having
too many benefits for the
Caribbean. But is the Act all
bad, or are there aspects of its
objectives and its application
which are not fully considered
during these discussions? Our
intent is not to sway the reader
one way or the other. We will
therefore present some infor-

mation relevant to section 311 .

of the Act and leave the reader
to take their own position. Ina
future article we will analyse
some other sections of the Act

and their potential implications.

The information is presented
with one important caveat. We
are not lawyers and this, there-

fore, is not intended to be a
legal analysis.

Generally, it is title ITI of the
Act which is usually under the
spotlight when discussions arise
relative to financial services.
Title III contains many pro-
nouncements which have impli-
cations for every jurisdiction
outside the US, not just those
within the Caribbean.

Under section 311 of the Act,

ent Geoege W. Bush

p
brought in the PATRIOT Act.
(AP Photo)

the Secretary of the Treasury

has the power to require US
domestic banks to impose spe-
cial requirements where “a
jurisdiction outside of the Unit-
ed States, financial institution
operating outside of the United

. States, class. of transaction with-

in, or involving, a jurisdiction
outside of the United States, or
one or more types of accounts
has been declared as a primary
money laundering concern”.
These special requirements may
include prohibiting domestic
banks from providing, for exam-
ple, correspondent or payable
through accounts.

This power conferred upon
the secretary has the potential
to significantly disrupt a coun-
try’s economy, especially in
instances where the provision

of financial services forms a.

large portion of national
income. In our opinion, it is this
combination which unearths the
most dreaded aspect of the Act.
There is the ability to put some
countries out of business, at

least as it relates to the provi-
sion of financial services. It
should be noted that several
other international initiatives
could potentially have the same
effect.

Consider these two eine

situations (but different in terms...

of impact) which. play out’ dur-
ing the practical application of
the Act. The US authorities
imposed special measures under
section 311 against Myanmar

(Burma). This restricted US -

financial institutions from enter-

ing into direct.as well as indirect,

transactions with Burmese
banking organisations. With

NOTICE is hereby given that STEPHANIE ANITA NEWLAND,

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is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and

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Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of.the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 22nd day of FEBRUARY, 2005
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



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regard to indirect transactions,
US financial institutions are
required, for example, to ensure
that the correspondent or
payable-through accounts they
maintain in the US for any for-
eign bank are not used by the

foreign bank to provide banking |

services to Burmese banking
organisations.

This gives a fair idea of the
wide ranging implications such a
ruling can have on a jurisdic-
tion. In addition to the country
as a whole, two institutions were
singled out as being a threat for



money laundering. As a result,
the “special measures against
these two banking organisations
were more restrictive”.

The release from the author-
ities declared: “Without excep-

_tion, US financial institutions

are broadly prohibited from

‘establishing, maintaining or’

administering correspondent
accounts or payable-through
accounts -with Myanmar
Mayflower Bank and Asia
Wealth Bank”.

Being familiar with the oper-
ations of an offshore financial
institution, it would [be] recog-
nise that this action would have
dealt a significant blow to their
operations. The inability to cre-
ate correspondent accounts,
even on an indirect basis, will
significantly restrict the level of
service a bank is able to pro-
vide its clients, especially where
they are desirous of participat-
ing in the US capital markets. In
Burma’s case, the impact was
largely limited to the financial
sectors, given other “viable”



of publication of this notice.

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, DWAYNE HARVEY
LOCKHART, of Foxdale Subdivision, c/o P.O. Box N-8199,
Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name to DWAYNE
HARVEY LOCKHART-GAILLARD. If there are any objections .
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date

means of national income.
Nauru provides us with the
second but more dramatic piece
of evidence of the impact the
Act can have on a country.
Based on information gleaned
from the US Federal Reserve’s
website, Nauru is a small island,
ten square miles in size with a
population about 12,000. It had
developed a reputation for the

establishment of offshore shell |

banks without a physical pres-
ence. To raise income, having
seen its previously impressive
wealth from the mining of phos-
phates depleted, the country
resorted to the selling of pass-
ports (or ‘economic citizen-

See ACT, Page 4B










NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FITZROY DEWAR JR., P.O.BOX
40401, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 22ND day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box F-41085,

Grand Bahama, Bahamas.



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nv Me ;
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PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005

ee ee eae ee eee ee ee

Act ferota oaes 3B)

ships’) to non-resident for-
eigners and offshore banking
licences.

Nauru’s banking licenses are
only subject to cursory super-
vision, and maintain no banking
records that would facilitate
review by a bank regulator. It
was noted in the report that
“the limited information avail-
able indicates that there is a
strong likelihood that they
[were] shell banks that [were]
not subject to effective banking
supervision”. The country was
declared a money laundering
threat. —

Subsequent to the declara-
tion and discussions between
the US and Nauru, the latter’s
offshore sector essentially fold-
ed or - as was reported - the
leadership agreed to “terminate
certain types of business”. The
country is currently on the
doorsteps of total bankruptcy.
The big question now is how
Nauru, struggling for survival,
will ever be able to find viable,
legitimate replacement for the

income lost as a result of the

significant erosion of its “off-
shore” activities.

Naurw has clearly shown that
the application of the Act can
and does create significant eco-
nomic hardship for a country.
We would not wish, given the
facts involved, for one to con-
clude that the Act was applied
unjustifiably or with prejudice.

THE TRIBUNE



There are, however, different
perspectives on what constitute

‘proper supervision or the level

of risk posed by certain types
of institutions and financial ser-
vices products. Consequently,
some may draw such a conclu-
sion.

Considering the facts in the
case of Nauru, there were
aspects of the operations of
their “offshore sector” that
were obviously flawed. The lack
of supervision and regulation
would cause any objective
observer to be concerned. The
absence of physical presence,
together with inadequate paper
trails (or paper support), defi-
nitely had negative implications
for the financial systems of oth-
er countries. In this case, there-
fore, one would have to con-
clude that, prima facie, the Act
was beneficial not only to the
US but to other jurisdictions,
given that there was the poten-
tial for unwelcome activities to
be carried out through these
non-domiciled, unregulated
institutions. Here, in our opin-
ion, is the manifestation of the

geo-political clout of the US..

Consider whether any other
major financial center, “singu-
larly” imposing a similar “sanc-
tion”, would have had the same
effect.

The right to create a means
that ensures survival and pros-
perity is an explicit right of

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

- STAYNER SECURITIES S.A.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act
No. 45 of 2000, STAYNER SECURITIES S.A. has
been dissolved and struck of the Register according
to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 17th of February, 2005.

GEORGY ULUKHANOV
of 1, Dgebuadze Str., app. 259,
PO 380002, Tbilisi, Georgia
Liquidator




POSITION:
RESPONSIBLE TO:

O





This position provides an excellent op
career with the Financial Intelligence

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
FINANCIAL INTELLIGENCE UNIT

poruinity for an individual seeking a meaningful -
nit ; ;

The successful candidate would be responsible for the provision of legal advice to the
Director and the Financial Intelligence Unit relative to its functions under the Financial
Intelligence Unit Act 2000.

LEGAL COUNSEL
DIRECTOR

QUALIFICATIONS: The successful applicant must:
~ ¢Be apponied in writing by the Minister responsible
e administration of the Financial Intelligence

for
‘Unit Act 2000.

¢ Be a Counsel & Attorney-at-Law in the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas with a minimum

of 5 years Call.

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES

1. Responsible for ensuring that the Financial Intelligence Unit is kept abreast |
of legislative developments relative to its functions.

2. Responsible for making recommendations to the Director relative to the
legal issues affecting the Financial Intelligence Unit.

3. eek for liaison between the Financial Intelligence Unit and the
ice of the Attorney General relative to legal issues affecting the
Financial Intelligence Unit.

4. Responsible for the provision of assistance in the training of industry
participants in the Financial Service Sector in accordance with the
provisions of the Financial Intelligence Unit Act 2000.

5: Responsible for drafting of legal documents for Memoranda of
Understanding between the Financial Intelligence Unit and foreign
Financial Intelligence Units. .

6. Responsible for assisting with other duties relative to the proper functioning |
of the Financial Intelligence Unit as required by the Director.

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS & EXPERIENCE:

e Five years call to the Bahamas Bar

° Experience in Compliance, Civil, Criminal & Corporate Law, Assets
Tracing & Forfeiture.

¢ Excellent attitude, punctuality and attendance.

REMUNERATION PACKAGE

¢ Competitive salary commensurate with experience
¢ 15% gratuity upon successful completion of contract’

Interested persons should submit their application and resume in writing along with
the relevant certificates to:

The Director,

Financial Intelligence Unit
Third Floor, Norfolk House

Frederick Street
Nassau, The Bahamas

every country. Against this

background isn’t it very curious -

that a sovereign could take cer-
tain actions against another,
unilaterally, which places it at a
significant disadvantage. Care-
ful analysis of the procedures
for application of section 311 of
the Act shows that the US may
not, in fact, necessarily be acting
singularly or as unilaterally as it
first appears, but is instead rely-
ing on signals from other juris-
dictions and institutions.
Institutions such as the
FATF, FSF and the IMF play a
significant role in this regard.

This is why there needs to be

careful consideration of other
international initiatives and
their impact in any discussion
on the implications and effects
of the Patriot Act. This is also
why the actions. and pro-
nouncements of these multilat-
eral bodies should never be dis-
regarded, especially where they
have. negative connotations
towards the region.

The PATRIOT Act, in our
opinion, has been carefully
crafted to ensure that sufficient
and careful consideration is giv-
en before an entity, country or
class of accounts is declared as a
primary money laundering con-

cern. Section 311 requires con-.

sultation with, among others,
the Board of Governors of the
Federal Reserve system, the
Securities and Exchange Com-
mission and the Secretary of
State. Consideration must be
given to whether similar actions

are being taken by other coun- °

tries or multilateral groups. This
is where the importance of

groups such as the FATF and ©
‘FSF becomes pronounced. The

impact on competitiveness and
the compliance burden on US
financial institutions is also con-
sidered, together with whether

the timing of the action would .
have any adverse systemic.

impact on the global financial
system and the effect of the
action on US national security.
and foreign policy.
Essentially, the process is
designed to carefully consider
and protect US interests. There-

fore, all things being equal, with —

these checks and balances, there
should be very little anxiety that
undue and undeserved sanc-
tions would be imposed on any

entity or country. Given the col-

lective financial importance of

Caribbean financial centres and _

the obvious impact the imposi-




































tion of “special measures” could
have on the US financial sys-
tem, together with the poten-
tial impact on the competitive-
ness of US financial institutions,
it is difficult to envision any type
of ill-considered declaration
directed at the Caribbean.

An examination of the con-
clusions drawn in the case of
Nauru is useful in gauging how
Caribbean jurisdictions would

' be assessed in the unlikely event

of any coming up for such con-

- sideration. The following delin-

eates the thought process lead-
ing to the decision to declare
Nauru a money laundering con-
cern. The authorities considered
the following:

e Whether similar actions

have been or are being taken
by other nations or multilateral
groups. The FATF had called
on its member countries for the
imposition of counter-measures
against Nauru.

¢ Whether the imposition of
any particular special measure
would create a significant com-
petitive disadvantage, including
any undue cost or burden asso-
ciated with compliance, for
financial institutions organised
or licensed in the United States.

It was concluded that the

imposition of sanctions against .

Nauru would not.create sucha
situation. This was taken
against the background that
FATF members and G-—7 coun-
tries had already responded to

- the FATF’s call for the imposi-

tion of counter-measure,s and
that there was already a restric-

.. tion on the provision of certain

services to Nauru financial insti-
tutions by institutions in the US.

~ e The extent to which the
action or the timing of the
action would have a significant,

. adverse, systemic impact on the

international payment, clear-
ance and settlement system, or
on legitimate business activities

~ involving the particular juris-

diction, institution or class of
transactions.
The conclusion was that
action against Nauru should
have no significant adverse sys-
temic impact on the interna-
tional payment system or on
legitimate business activities,
due to the small size of the
economy and the absence of

any meaningful, legitimate

international business.

e Finally, the effect of the

Deloitte
& Touche



‘tured to ensure the “ri:

action on US national security
and foreign policy. It was con-
cluded that the action is expect-
ed to have virtually no effect
on US national security or for-
eign policy.

Based on the foregoing, the
declaration was made. The
reader can determine for him-
self how Caribbean jurisdictions
or any specific jurisdiction
would fare in a similar circum-
stance, taking into account the
points enumerated above.

It is clear that while the fac-
tors considered mainly focus on
the US’s position, there is also
allowance for assessing the
impact within the targeted
country. One other element
that is interesting is the extent
to which the “importance” of a
jurisdiction to US national secu-
rity and foreign policy would
influence the decision.

It appears that the process for

implementing the force of the
Act is very deliberate and struc-

sion is made. Further, it would
appear that by including factors
such as competitiveness and
foreign policy, there is unlikely

_ to be any overwhelming adverse

action against the Caribbean
given its relatively good rela-
tionships with the US and the
extent to which a few, for exam-
ple, the Bahamas, have serious
implications for the US nation-
al security. The competitiveness
aspect, while an important fac-
tor that would play to the
advantage of the Caribbean,
does raise the possibility of
actions from other countries,
regions or multilateral institu-
tions being used to influence
sanctions under the Act, given
that such actions would reduce
the adverse impact on US inter-
ests by eroding the competi-
tiveness argument. In this
regard, it therefore appears that
there lies more veiled danger
in other quarters, which could

. render the region susceptible to

the might of the Patriot Act
One point that can be raised,
especially in-the aftermath of
certain Caribbean jurisdictions
being blacklisted, is that there is
a need to correct what appears
not only to be a clear misun-
derstanding, on the part of US
policy makers, of the products
and what is done in Caribbean

offshore jurisdictions,;but:also ;
the clear underestimation.on.. .
how much these activities con- ~~

tribute to the US capital mar-

| EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY |

Enterprise Risk Services - Control Assurance Senior Consultant/Manager

t” deci- '

kets and financial services
industry. -

From this perspective the call
for a lobbyist approach, as not-
ed above, certainly has signifi-
cant value. Clearly, without
educating those with ability to
“hurt” our economies that there
is an intrinsic connection in the
viability of the offshore institu-
tions, subject to proper man-
agement of money laundering
issues, the misunderstandings
will continue and the implica-
tion for us is not favourable. If
the Caribbean can show that
actions against it by the US,
through the Patriot Act or oth-
er measures for that matter,

would hurt the US financial ser- |
vices industry in a noticeable ;

way, then'the region would be
well on the way to ensuring
these factors, when considered,
are skewed in its favour.
Finally, we must again ask the
question - should the Patriot
Act be summarily rejected?
Analysis of the facts, some of
which are discussed above, sug-
gests that at this point in time,
that approach does not appear
to represent a viable solution.

- Obviously there are others who

are able to argue otherwise and
we welcome such discussions.
A useful approach, however, is

not to agonise over the geo- “

a

ea

teh hd feb hg ee as

ee He

political clout of the US (or any -

other region), nor seek to dis-

regard the Act but to consis- '

tently guard against the need

for the provisions of the Act to ©
be even considered, much less '
applied, with regards to the:

Caribbean.

About the author: Hubert
Edwards is as a bank examiner
with the Central Bank of the
Bahamas. He is also a mem-
ber of Lignum! Lignum!, a
newly formed group of profes-
sionals that reviews, analyses
and provides feedback on
national, regional and global
issues impacting private and
public sector organisations with-
in the Caribbean region. The
opinions expressed in this article
do not necessarily reflect those
of the Central Bank of the
Bahamas, any of its officers or
employees. This article contains
researched information,
excerpts or paraphrases from
‘any document cited in its body.

For, comments on this article

please email — bertz@coral-
wave.com. :

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THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS

TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005, PAGE 5B



IndiGo to cover

0% of Grand
Bahama within
30 months

By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Tribune Business Reporter

IndiGo Networks yesterday
announced. the launch of its
voice telephony services in
Grand Bahama, promising a
progressive expansion of the
network over the next 30
months to cover 90 per cent of
the island's population.

To mark the launch, IndiGO
is unveiling a Caribbean pro-
motion that allow its pre-paid
card customers in New Provi-
dence and Grand Bahama to
call all nations apart from Cuba
at a rate of $0.49 per minute.

“In New Providence we have
found that calls within the
region formed a large part of
our traffic, and we wanted to
find a way of both thanking

those customers for their busi-
ness, and marking the exciting
launch of IndiGO into Grand
Bahama”, said Paul Hutton-
Ashkenny, the company’s pres-
ident.

“We believe that our
Caribbean prepaid promotion
is the perfect means of doing
just that, and we have even
managed to also provide a spe-
cial affordable rate for calling
Cuba.”

The company’s Grand
Bahama wireless network will
initially cover the main com-

‘mercial areas, allowing busi-

nesses to use IndiGo’s rates for
international and inter-island
calls.

"We are very excited to be
able to launch voice services in
Grand Bahama and offer the

' Agrowing Technology Solutions Provider is seeking to

employ a

Client Account Manager

The successful candidate should be self-motivated with
strong communication and networking skills. Experience
with technical products is not necessary as training will
be provided. However, the successful candidate should
have a proven track record in sales and marketing.

Responsibilities include:

Managing existing client accounts

same services and low rates that
residents of New Providence
already enjoy. Our entry into
the market as the first legal
competition to the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
(BTC) has already driven down
the cost of long distance phone
calls to an all-time low and Indi-
Go is committed to continuing
that trend," said Mr Hutton-
Ashkenny.

Beginning March 1, con-
sumers and businesses through-
out Grand Bahama will be able
to take advantage of the lower
long distance rates. The new
service comes on the heels of
IndiGo's introduction into the
New Providence telecommuni-
cations market as the only pri-
vate, licensed telecommunica-
tions operator.

Dispute (From page 1B)

recuse themselves from debates on such deals.

Mr Dean also said the EGM would debate a
proposal to elect to RND Holdings’ board per-
sons nominated by financial institutions. They
wouild review all proposals for the company’s
future growth; review the financial statements
for its fiscal 2005 year; and review how the firm
planned to finance its future development.

The separation of the board from RND Hold-
ings’ management was also on the former presi-
dent’s agenda.

Mr Dean no longer holds a board seat him-
self, and his EGM motion was opposed by Mr
Finlayson, who said: “J must register a complaint.
He was president and chief executive of the com-
pany until recently. Unless he has a problem with
himself, I don’t see why we should waste share-
holders’ time.”

However, Mr Fitzgerald said that since Mr
Dean had tabled his EGM request to the com-
pany secretary, the firm would have to seek legal
advice on the correct procedure for dealing with
the motion and how it should proceed.

He indicated that the April 7 date proposed by
Mr Dean may not be feasible, due to the need to
send information and invitations to all share-
holders, adding that the AGM for fiscal 2005 was
expected to be held “some time in June”.

Jim Graham, vice-president of Fidelity Capital
Markets, also used the AGM to note the unhap-
piness of shareholders represented by his com-
pany over RND Holdings’ failure to produce
timely financial reports “for three years in a row”.

The Tribune revealed last month how RND
Holdings’ annual report for its fiscal year ended
on February 29, 2004, had been posted to share-
holders almost a year after the period had ended,
with yesterday’s AGM taking place on the same
day that fiscal 2005 ended, Taising major question

marks about the company’s disclosure and trans-

parency. -

Mr Fitzgerald yesterday said RND Holdings
“acknowledged and accepted” it had failed to
provide investors with timely information about
the company’s performance and what it was doing

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE |

SUVEL HOLDINGS LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that at an Extraordinary General
’ Meeting of the Shareholders of the above-named Company duly convened -
and held on the 22nd day of February 2005, the following Resolutions

were passed:-

RESOLVED THAT Suvel Holdings Limited be wound up

voluntarily -

’ RESOLVED THAT Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid Davis be
appointed the Liquidators for the purpose of such winding up.

were passed:-



with their money.

He added: “As responsible management, direc-
tors we should be publishing timely results.” RND
Holdings, he admitted, had not issued interim
financial statements to shareholders for the past
three years, although the Securities Industry Act
did not require it to do so.

Mr Fitzgerald blamed the lateness of RND
Holdings’ 2004 annual report on the fact that it
took longer than expected to complete the $4.7
million sale of its cinema operations to Galleria,
which produced a knock-on effect for the recon-
ciliation and conciliation of its accounts.

The accounting department had also been
downsized during that period, which “exacerbat-
ed” the problem.

Mr Finlayson yesterday appeared to blame Mr
Dean for the disclosure failures, saying: “We
have made a change. The person in charge is no
longer in charge.

“We have made a move. The new person [man-
aging director Ken Donathan] is here. We will
give him a chance.”



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

JOVEL HOLDINGS LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that at an Extraordinary General
Meeting of the Shareholders of the above-named Company duly convened
and held on the 22nd day of February 2005, the following Resolutions

RESOLVED THAT Jovel Holdings Limited be wound up

voluntarily

’ RESOLVED THAT Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid Davis be
appointed the Liquidators for the purpose of such winding up.

Since ec ait aa ak

Developing new clients Dated the 22nd day of February 2005.

Selling and marketing products
Managing the Marketing Budget’ "
..,. Reporting to the Board of Directors

’ Dated the 22nd day of February 2005.

-+ +4 (Liquidator) : .

Cod ak Vue

(Liquidator)

~ (Liquidator) “(Liquidator)

The successful candidate should have a Bachelors
Degree i in business or science with a minimum of 2 years
experience in sales.



Remuneration and Benefits will include a competitive
salary, monthly bonus for meeting sales targets, car
allowance, group health and pension.

FirstCaribbean International Bank is the combination of CIBC and Barclays Bank in the Bahamas,
Belize and the Caribbean. We are the region's largest publicly traded bank, with over 3,000 staff
serving over 5.3 million people in 16 territories. We menage over 500,000 active accounts through
more than 80 branches and centres.

Please submit a resume to:-
Ms. J Forsythe, PO Box EE17034, Nassau, Bahamas
Or apply online at http:/Awww.emagine.bs/cam

Closing date for applications is March 18th ‘ : * 4 : , ‘ ra a
; As we continue to grow, FirstCaribbean is seeking dynamic candidates for two senior-level positions,

both of which report directly to the Chief Operating Officer.

LEGAL NOTICE

NGiRER HEAD, OPERATIONS & TECHNOLOGY

: aa PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION
STEVEL HOLDINGS LIMITED i |

‘NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that at an Extraordinary General
Meeting of the Shareholders of the above-named Company duly convened
and held.on the 22nd day of February 2005, the following Resolutions
were eee -

Responsibilities: Prerequisites:

e Lead, motivate and develop a team responsible for © Demonstrated results leading, managing and
Business Planning, Financials, Expense - motivating large, distributed teams
Management, General Services, Process Previous experience in a large regional, multi-

_ Reengineering, Procedures and Documentation and — country operations environment, within the
Business Consulting financial services industry

e Achieve sector goals/targets and maintain Exceptional communication skills, with ability to
exceptionally high quality of delivery to internal interpret and effectively explain complex
and external customers challenges and proposals and to influence the full

e Ensure successful achievement of significant support of subordinates and Executive teams
business change by identifying, planning, and Extensive knowledge of Service Delivery within the
implementing operational business requirements in Retail, Corporate and Offshore Banking markets
line with the evolving needs of the business University degree with a minimum of 10 years’

experience in the business/financial world

RESOLVED THAT Stevel Holdings Limited be wound up
voluntarily

RESOLVED THAT Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid Davis be
appointed the Liquidators for the purpose of such winding up.

Dated the 22nd day of February 2005.

(Liquidator)

(Liquidator)



HEAD OF INTERNAL CONTROLS

Responsibilities: :
Lead and direct a programme of internal control
reviews of business areas within the various
centres, ensuring a level of management control
over operational risk through appropriate
processes and procedures
Manage Operational Risk, Compliance &
Information Security matters to minimise all
potential losses/reputational damage
Achieve sector goals/targets, maintaining
exceptionally high quality of delivery to internal
and external customers



Prerequisites:

¢ Proven ability to manage, lead and motivate large,
distributed teams :

¢ Previous experience in a large regional, multi-
country operations environment, within the
financial services industry

¢ Solid track record of results implementing
significant business change across multiple
geographic locations

e Awareness of financial services issues including
regulatory requirements .

e University degree with a minimum of 10 years'
experience in the business/financial world

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
SHL INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000,



the dissolution of SHL INC., has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore
been struck off the Register.

We offer attractively structured compensation and
reward packages as well as performance bonuses.

Applications with detailed résumé should be
submitted no later than March 11th, 2005 to:
Ms. Rosemary Jones

Executive Administrative Assistant
FirstCaribbean International Bank

Head Office, Warrens, St. Michael
Barbados.

Elvira Lowe

(Liquidator) FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK



"E-mail: rosemary.jones@firstcaribbeanbank.com Caribbean Pride. International Strength. Your Financial Partner,

aa nts who are short-listed will be FirstCaribbean International Bank is an Associated Company of Barclays Bank PLC and CIBC.

Cheryl Rolle
(Liquidator)






PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



‘Reno’ first Bahamian
to beat Russian boxer

Promoter
looking
forward

to next
boxing
show _

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter

PROMOTER Michelle
Minus was so pleased with
the turnout on Saturday
night that she’s looking for-
ward to First Class Promo-
tions’ next professional
boxing show. :

“We had over 1,000 per-
sons in the house. I think it
was an excellent show. It’s
a good start for 2005,” said
Minus at the Wyndam Nas-
sau Resort and Crystal
Palace Casino.

“We’re looking forward
to some bigger and better
shows in the coming
months.”

Already plans are in the
works for a Friday, April
29, show at the same venue
when “Marvelous” Marvin
Smith will put his Bahamas
super-middleweight title on
the line against Jermaine
*“Chu-Chu”’ Mackey.

On Saturday, Mackey

went the distance, pulling _|.

off a four-round unani-
mous decision over
Jamaican Ricardo “Ever
Ready” Planter in a tune-
up to the championship
bout. oe

“The guy realiy worked
me hard,” Mackey stressed.
“But I was glad that I got
the workout. It allowed me
to get ready for Marvin.

“J just want him to know
that it will be a different
story when we meet.”

That championship bout,
according to Minus, will
have to be sanctioned by
the Bahamas Boxing Com-
mission.

The BSC sanctioned the
showdown on Saturday
night between Wilson “Kid
Wonder” Theophile and
Jerome “Bahamian Bronze
Bomber” Ellis for the

vacant Bahamas junior ©

middleweight title.

The title was last held by
Elisha Obed in the 1970s.
First Class Promotions paid
special recognition to Obed
when they presented him
with a replica of his World
Boxing Council’s title.

In the championship
fight, which was scheduled
for 12 rounds, Theophile
was unable to answer the
bell to start the seventh.

Doctors Rickey Davis
and Munir Rashad were

called into the ring by ref- |
eree Matthew Rolle to |

check out Theophile after it
was discovered that he had
a problem with his jaw.

He was diagnosed with a
fractured jaw. He was
rushed to the hospital by
ambulance for treatment.

Minus, who was con-
cerned about Theophile’s
condition, said despite this
incident, the show was a
really exciting one from
start to finish.

“The entire card was
really good, but I think
Wilson will be okay
because he’s in good hands
with Dr Rashad, who is a

dental specialist,” Minus

noted.

“We haven’t seen this
type of crowd in a long
time. I think it’s because of
the mew venue. So we’re
going to make Wyndam
our home for the rest of:
our fights throughout the
year.”

However, Minus said

See SHOW, 7B







Hi TAUREANO “Reno” Johnson (third from left) shows off
the bronze medal that he won in the welterweight division
at the Independence Cup Tournament in Santo Domingo,
Dominican Republic, last week. He is pictured (!-r) with
head coach Andre Seymour, his father, middleweight Da
Dorsett and assistant coach Leonard “Boston Blackie

Miller.

& By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

AMATEUR Boxing Association of
the Bahamas’ president Wellington
Miller said Taureano “Reno” John-
son’s historic bronze medal at the Inde-
pendence Cup was just an indication
of what to expect from our local boxers
this year.

, Johnson made history last week
when he became the first Bahamian to
beat a Russian boxer, winning 3-2 over
Alexander Zodkov.

The victory in Santo Domingo,
Dominican Republic, advanced him to
the semi-final where he lost to a
Dominican and had to settle for the
bronze.

“Going there for the first event for
the year was really a good event for











Miller says Johnson’s historic bronze |

medal was just an indication of what :

’

to expect from local boxers this year -

the federation,” Miller stressed. “It was
a milestone for us.

“TI like us know that we are on the
right course and once we continue to do
what we have to do, we will be able to
do a lot of things this year.”

Miller revealed that Johnson’s per-
formance was so spectacular that the
Russian federation have agreed to
come to the Bahamas to participate in

@ IT was certainly a night to remember as
Jerome “Bahamian Bronze Bomber” Ellis
(far left) snapped Wilson “Kid Wonder”
Theophile’s perfect record to win the
vacant Bahamas Junior Middleweight

Title.

(Photo by Felipé Major/Tribune Staff) |

an exchange programme.

Miller said they will be working
feverishly on putting all the details
together before they announce how
they intend to entertain the visitors.

In the meantime, he said they are
just going to celebrate with Johnson
over his stunning victory over the Russ-
ian and his bronze medal at the end of
the tournament.

Paes

i

Q

fy

4

BF

i
o
3

- Still sore from the gruelling match, -

Johnson said he didn’t have to go all the .

way to win the medal round.

“It happens to the best of us,” he
admitted. “But it would disappoint any- -
body knowing that you not only have’
the gold medal in your hand or the box-

See BOXERS, 7B

fae


TRIBUNE SPORTS







Joshua Knights knock of
_ Jets for





mpio

PUWLLOLIPALy tvir var twrne

ee

By mew 8 tee we



@ MEMBERS of the Joshua Knights softball team pose
after sweeping the William Construction Jets in three
straight games Sunday at the Churchill Tener Knowles
National Softball Stadium to repeat as Masters Softball

League champions.







ship

& By BRENT STUBBS
‘Senior Sports Reporter

THE Joshua Knights were like a

“lighting bolt” as they knocked off.

the pennant winning William Con-
struction Jets for the second consec-
utive year to repeat as the Masters
Softball League’s champions.

In a repeat scenario from last year,
the Knights lost the pennant to the
Jets, but bounced back to beat them
when it counted the most - in the
finals - sweeping the best-of-five
series over the weekend at the
Churchill Tener Knowles National
Softball Stadium.

The Knights blew out the Jets 25-9
in game one, came back from a 21-20
deficit to pull off a 23-21 decision and
then secured the title in game three,
29-22.

“We’re always happy when we win
a championship, but this team played
together all year and we were victo-
rious. We deserve to be the champi-
ons,” said right-fielder Lenny White.

“ For the second straight year, White
was named the Most Outstanding
Player (MVP) after he banged out

‘is always sweeter,”

11 hits in 17 at bats, scoring 13 times
with nine runs batted in (RBI) for a
hefty .647 batting average.

“It’s a good feéling, but it’s even
greater to do it with a team like this,”
said White, who celebrated his 18th

wedding anniversary with his wife,

Eileen, on the same day they won
and was a couple days off their Feb-
ruary 22 marriage date this year.

For manager Anthony ‘Poker’
Huyler, there’s nothing like dupli-
cating the championship feat all over
again.

“Last year was sweet, but ehig'y year
was sweeter. The second time around
Huyler quipped.
“We should have won the pennant
this year, but only the championship

was left for us to salvage, so we went _

out and did it.”

Sponsor Ricardo Miller said this is
just an indication of what to expect
from the Knights next year.

“Right now, there’s no team out
there that can beat us. We will be
back next year bigger and better,”
he stressed. “We just wish they can
put an all-star team together to try
and beat us.” -



SOFTBALL



Coach Harry Dean, who assisted
manager Akel Clarke, said the Jets
fell victim to poor defence.

“We didn’t make the plays on the
field. We could score runs, but we
just needed to buckle up on our
defence,” Dean stressed.

As for Miller’s challenge, Dean
admitted that they are a “good” team,

but he insisted that they are listed as —

the youngest team of the players 50-
years and older in the league.

“They might win a game against a
so-called All-Star, but I don’t think
they can go through a series and beat
an All-Star team.”

Here’s a summary of the three
games played:

Knights 29, Jets 22: In a keenly
contested battle that went right down
to the wire, Michael Carroll had a
perfect 6-for-6 day, driving as many
runs and scoring three times to lead
Joshua’s in the clincher.

Greg Thompson came in relief for

starter Bertie Murray Sr and was able
to hold off Williams Construction
down the stretch.

Abe Johnson helped out with a 4-

for-7 day with 6 RBIs, scoring 3 '

times; Lenny White was 3-for-7 with
2 RBIs and 3 runs; Lester Dean was
4-for-6 with a RBi and 3 runs; Max
Moncur was 5-for-6 with 4 RBIs and
4 runs and Lorenzo Lockhart con-
tributed a hit with 2 RBIs and 2 runs
scored.

Anthony ‘Hot Dog’ Pierce was 3-
for-5 with 2 RBIs and 3 runs to lead
the Jets. Lee Rahming was 2-for-3
with 3 RBIs and 2 runs; Anthony
Weech 2-for-5 with 4 RBIs and 4
tuns; Cliff Jones 2-for-4 with a RBI
and 3 runs and Jeff Cooper was 2-
for-4 with 2 RBIs and 4 runs. |

Harold White suffered the loss.

Knights 23, Jets 21: Trailing 21-20
at the end of the sixth when the game
was called on Saturday night, Abe
Johnson laid down a neat bunt that

‘enabled Lenny White to score the

last of three runs in the seventh to
seal game two.

White finished with a 4-for-5 day
with three RBIs and 6 runs; Abe

Johnson was 4-for-6 with four RBIs |
and a run; Lester Dean was 3-for-5
with 4 RBIs and a run; Lorenzo
Lockhart 2-for-4 with two RBIs and a
run and Max Moncur 2-for-5 with 2
RBIs and 2 runs.

Bertie Murray Sr picked up the
win, while Harold White was tagged
with the loss.

Mike Major was 3-for-4 with five
RBIs and 4 runs; Anthony Weech 2-
for-5 with 4 RBIs and 3 runs and
Gary ‘Super’ Johnson 2-for-4 with 2
RBIs and 3 runs. .

Knights 25, Jets 9: Lenny White
went 4-for-5 with 4 RBIs and 5 runs;
Lorenzo Lockhart 3-for-3.with a RBI
and 3 runs; Lester Dean 3-for-5 with
3 RBIs and 3 runs and Lignel Neely |
3-for-4 with 3 RBIs and 3 runs and
Max Moncur 2-for-5 with 2 RBIs and
2 runs to lead Joshua’s in one game.

Bertie Murray Sr got the win over
Mike Dillette.

Sonny ‘Jiggy’ Haven was 2-for-4
with 3 RBIs and two runs; Jeff Coop-
er 3-for-3 with 3 runs; Mike Major
2-for-3 with 3 RBIs and Anthony
Pierce 2-for-4 with 2 RBIs and a run
in the loss.



bon

Bear

Boxers

4 of the tournament or the
MVP of the tournament, but
history in your hand.

“It was good to be the first

%
*
*
“

“i nkTaSa A

4

:(From page 8B)

- they will also be travelling

‘ to various Family Island
EPCRA Ca RMI NALS
putting on mini-profes-
sional shows during the

mae

One of the champi-
OUI OC IRM UCN Mn LLP xt)
be looking at hosting is for
the lightweight. title.
Meacher “Pain” Major,
who stopped American
Jetf “the Executioner”
Skyler in the third round,
is the number one‘con-
onc ee ;
Minus said there's a pos-

sibility that First Class Pro-
TEL MOU SMA WR SCT
AOD OE Or
title fight before the year is
CO ULe '





Bahamian to beat a Russian,
but I wanted to be the first to
beat a Cuban and win the gold
medal at the same time. So it
was disappointing to me that it
all slipped right between my
fingers.”

Johnson, who will take a
couple days off to recuperate
at home, said he’s looking for-
ward to going back to Cuba on
the scholarship he secured
from the Bahamas Olympic
Association.

“We have to learn from our
mistakes and we have to.learn
from what we learn,” he stated.
“That’s what I’m going to do
when I go back to Cuba.”

Coaches

Johnson, 21, thanked God,
the BOA, the International
Olympic Committee, his
coaches Andre Seymour and
Leonard ‘Boston Blackie’
Miller and his family and
friends, especially Ms Sawyer
from Old Nassau Liquor Store,
for their support.

Two other boxers also rep-
resented the Bahamas, but did-
n’t fare as well.

Middleweight Daryl Dorsett
lost his opening match to a
Russian, losing in the first
round, while heavyweight
James McKenzie went the dis-
tance with a Dominican before
he lost 3-2 in his opener.

“It was kind of disappoint-
ing, but I have to look at it asa
learning experience,” he said.
“The whole experience in San-
to Domingo was out of this
world.

“I never went to any com-
petition of that calibre before
so I went there with some false
expectations. But coming back,
I realised what it takes to be on
that level.”

Dorsett, a 20-year-old full-
time student at the College of
the Bahamas, said he was told
that he needed to bulk up, but
he felt that he had to improve
on his speed to complement
his size.

As for Johnson, Dorsett said
he was thrilled just being there
to watch it all unfold after he
failed in his bid to become the
first Bahamian to achieve the
feat.

“T felt even though the Russ-
ian was using his body to move

caround Reno, I felt Reno

fought well. It was all-out
excitement,” Dorsett stressed.
“Congratulations to Reno for a
job well done.”

Coach Seymour said the
team performed exceptional-

ly well competing against the

talented teams from Russia
and Cuba.

“The Bahamas has gained

the respect that we deserve,”
he stated.

“These are the type of tour-
naments that we need to go to
in order to improve our devel-
opment.

Country

“Whenever you beat a coun-
try like Russia, it shows the tal-
ent that we have in the
Bahamas. In the future, I think
the Bahamas will be the coun-
try to reckon with in the Latin
American region.”

Coach Miller, however, said
that if the Bahamas is going to
attain the level of success that
it should, the training sessions
have to be totally different.

“Government needs to pro-
vide us with a facility that we

could train in together,” Miller.

noted. “Everybody is doing it.
They are all in the camp. We
were in the camp with them
when we got there.

“Even if we have people
working or going to school, if
they get a camp, we can train
them before they go to school
or work and then we can train
together again when they fin-
ish.”

Miller said he and Seymour



are on target with their training
programme and they are
encouraging the amateur box-
ers to come out now and start
training if they want to com-
pete on any national team this
year.

Wellington Miller said they
intend to send a team off to
Nicaragua to compete in the
Senior Central American and
Caribbean Championships i in
the next two months.


TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005

SECTION



SPORTS

Fax: (242) 328-2398 |
MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



set to play Bainst the ti team of Jean-Julien ojer, Raoul Behr, David Josepa and Rasid
Winkie this weekend in the first round of the American Zone Il Davis ¢

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

BAHAMAS Lawn Tennis
Association’s president Mary
Shelley said she’s confident
that the Bahamas will prevail
over the Netherlands Antilles
this weekend in the first round
of the American Zone II

.Davis Cup tie.

The youthful team of Devin
Mullings,
H’Cone Thompson and Ryan
Sweeting, along with team cap-
tain, John Farrington, has
already arrived in Curacao.

They are scheduled to play
against the team of Jean-Julien
Rojer, Raoul Behr, David
Josepa and Rasid Winklaar
from Friday to Sunday.

The Netherlands Antilles
will be captained by Pranees
Hoyer.

“I expect them to do
extremely well,” said Shelley,
who will be joining the team in
Curacao on Wednesday. “I
think we are a stronger team

’ than the Netherlands Antilles.
“So if we can get past Jean--

Julien Rojer, we will be okay.”
Rojer, 24; has the highest
world ranking of all the players
from both teams. He is cur-
rently pegged at number 285 in
singles and 241 in doubles.

He is also the most seasoned
player in the tie, having par-
ticipated since 1998 when the
Netherlands Antilles first
played Davis Cup in Greup
IV.

Rojer has posted an impres-
sive 30-8 win-loss record for
the Netherlands Antilles, who
played in Zone II from 2001-
2003 before they dropped back
to Zone III last year, only to

_ return to Zone II in the finals.

Behr, the veteran of the
team at 28, also played with
the Netherlands Antilles from
1998. Winklaar made his debut
last year. He is the youngest
member of the team at 17.

As for the Bahamas, none
of the players has posted a vic-
tory yet in Davis Cup play.

Southpaw Mullings, 19,
appeared in 2002 and 2003
when the Bahamas played in
Zone One. He lost all four
matches he played in. He is
currently ranked at 1,470 in
singles and is a member of the
Ohio State Buckeyes’ tennis
team.

Rolle, 21, is a right-hander |

who played in Zone One in
2001 and 2003 for the
Bahamas. He lost both match-
es played. Thompson, 24,
made his debut last year, los-
ing in the two ties he played in.
Sweeting, 17, is making his
debut in Curacao.

“T think we have a good
team,” Shelley stated. “I am
looking for some good things
from there this weekend.”

The official dinner for the
team is set for Wednesday
night. The draw will take place
on Thursday at llam. The
opening singles will be played
on Friday at 10 am.

The doubles will be contest-
ed on Saturday at 10am and
the reserve singles will be
played on Sunday at 10am.

The winner of the tie will
automatically secure a berth
in Zone II next year, but they
will go on to play the winner
between Colombia and Brazil
over the weekend of July 15-17
in a bid to advance to zone
one.

The loser, however, will play
the loser between Colombia
and Brazil in a play-off from
July 15-17.

Marvin Rolle,.






















































Ce







Nee aT eee eae




Sn ee ee

















































TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005

ASD theta,

“David: Allensaggressive traits usually

seen in young men are now becenie mio Cenc méfe“eommon in young women
coming through the project’s commun centres. :-Pictured.fere are a group of young

Adolescent girls ‘among newest

Vrodeg



emerging problem groups’

& By ERICA WELLS

dolescent girls are among

the newest emerging

problem groups in

Bahamian society, a

prominent local psychia-
trist has warned.

Chairman of the Urban Renewal Pro--

ject Dr David Allen, who played a key
role in the war against cocaine as a former
National Drug Council chair, said that
aggressive traits usually seen in young
men are now becoming more and more
common in young women coming through
the project’s community centres.

“This newest group coming down the
line is very difficult,” he said.

“We have to ask ourselves if we are
prepared for this.”

Dr Allen believes that this disturbing
trend may have something to do with the
growing number of young women engag-
ing in sexual activity at an earlier age.

“It’s almost like early sexuality expo-
sure brings them into the physical devel-
opment of womanhood without the emo-
tional and intellectual ability,” Dr Allen
told Tribune Woman and Health in an
interview at his Sandyport office.

Girls are having sex earlier, between
the ages of 11 and 14, and some of them
are having sex with older men, he said.

This, said Dr Allen, could lead to prob-
lems in the home, where the mother is

usually alone because the man has left.
“When (the mother tells the daughter)
to do something the response is usually,
‘Look there’s nothing you could do that I
can’t do, and more than that T got man

“This newest
group coming.
down the
line is very
difficult ... We
have to ask
ourselves if we
are prepared

. for this.”

—Dr David Allen

and he’ll give me money, so if you make
noise I'll go with him’,” said Dr Allen.
According to the latest statistics avail-
able from the Ministry of Health, more
than 40 per cent of Bahamian adolescents

Fs

are sexually active, and 20 per cent of
them had their first sexual experience
before the age of 10.

The young girls in particular who claim
to get very little attention at home, are
1.5 times more likely to have sex, accord-
ing to a Bahamas Youth Health Survey.
taken in 1997.

Forty-five per cent of the females sur-
veyed for the 1997 study were almost
twice as likely to have felt pressure or
were forced into having sex. A total of
2,007 young people between the ages of
11 and 19 were surveyed in New Provi-
dence, Grand Bahama, Abaco, Exuma,
Eleuthera and Long Island for the analy-
sis.

. This troublesome development among
young girls is only part of a much larger
problem that is taking its toll on commu-
nities throughout the country.

Dr Allen believes that it’s a problem
that, in part, stems from a precarious self-
esteem or self-image, which could lead to
feelings of shame and eventually violent
behaviour.

He explained: “When someone dresses
better than me I am jealous, if someone
doesn’t notice me or looks at my girlfriend
in a seductive way I feel shame. So I have
to compensate by becoming invincible
and I must show them that I am ‘king of

See GIRLS, Page 2C

“1859 email: bwabahamas@coralwave.com
* fax: 242-351-2215

Harbour Bay Shopping Centre
Town Centre Mall






PAGE 2C, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005





Baby signing - the new

THE TRIBUNE

communication trend

@ By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

aby signing. It’s

the new trend of

communication

that allows

babies to “talk”
to their parents without mak-
ing a sound.

Never mind the goo-goo’s
and gaa-gaa’s of baby talk.
These days children are learn-
ing how to sign in order to
articulate their needs, and par-
ents are teaching them.

Baby signing was featured
in the recent Hollywood hit,
Meet the Fockers, which shows
Little Jack communicating
with his hands.

And though it may not be a
trend in the Bahamas, Dr Nel-
son Clarke, consultant psychi-
atrist and Medical Chief of
Staff at Sandilands Rehabili-
tation Centre says that we have
always taught children to use
signs to communicate.

For example, how to wave

“bye bye” or beckon “come
here”, or fingers on the lips to

Nowadays, children are learning how to
sign in order to articulate their needs

signify “quiet, no noise”. Or
the itsy-bitsy spider nursery
rhyme, where children learn
to use their hands to tell a com-
plete story, even though they
can’t sing the words.

Baby signing seems to be a

natural extension of the every-—
day gestures we all use to com- -
-Municate, such as waving and

pointing. Those simple ges-
tures give you a window into
your child’s mind, in the same
way that baby signing experts

say will help your children with -

communication skills later on
in life.

How many times have you
looked at your crying, frus-
trated baby and just wished the
poor thing could talk to tell
you what’s wrong, what hurts
or what’s needed?

A local child psychiatrist,

STORAGE |
SOLUTIONS

Small Spaces

who did not want to be identi-
fied in this article, says that
some parents can already inter-
pret their child’s needs based
upon the tone of their-cries.

But for the many parents
who can’t, baby signing may
be a solution to the problem.

Parents can start teaching
their baby signs as early as six
months. Remember, though,
that babies can take weeks or
even months before making
their first sign.

Luckily, this is not really a.

structured language, so
although it seems over the top
and difficult, it isn’t.

No prior knowledge of sign’
language is required, and most

parents learn right along with
their children through the aid
of a sign language dictionary;
baby signing book; or website —



Available on
Sesame Seed
Bun Only



@ NEVER mind the goo-
goo’s and gaa-gaa’s of
‘baby talk.

(Posed by model)

of which there are many choic-
es.
Simply choose a sign (or sev-

‘eral signs) to begin with and

use it when you have your

. baby’s complete attention.

For example, use the sign for
“milk” before nursing or giving
a bottle. The key is to use it

. consistently, and soon your

baby will begin to imitate you.

Parents are also advised to
encourage others to join in.
Make it a family affair, and at

‘times when it is overwhelming,

make it a game, rather than a
burden.

While it seems contrary to
earlier opinion, babies do
recognise that a word or a sign
can represent or symbolise
something else...

And for those who Worry
that baby signing could inter-
fere with verbal communica-
tion, the experts assure us that
it has no such effect. They have

found that signing children |

usually learn to speak earlier,
and by the age of two have
learned on average 50 more
words than non-signing babies.

However, there is no need

G i rl S (From page

the roost’, and the best way to
show that is to carry a knife
or gun...and then they end up
in prison.”

And the vicious cycle con-
tinues.

A key to addressing this
problem is anger management,
said Dr Allen, who has seen
first-hand numerous examples
of how it can negatively impact
the community.

For instance, while talking _

to a group of suspended public
school students — between the
ages of 11 and 15 — he posed
the question, “How do you
deal with a situation when
someone makes you angry?”

Every one of the students,
boys and girls, answered: “T'll
jook ’em”, said Dr Allen.
“One girl said, ‘I done jook
three people for the year’.”

This behaviour continues
into adulthood and its effects
are seen in the crime and
domestic abuse rates, and the
fragmentation of communities,
especially those in New Prov-
idence.

It is this fragmentation that
programmes like the Urban
Renewal Project are trying to
heal. One of the goals of the
project is to establish Com-
munity Transformation Units
in areas to address myriad
issues, including teenage preg-

i’m lovin’ it

1C)

to continue with signs after a
child has mastered saying the
word. The signs will have
served their purpose, to open a
channel of communication —a

channel that will continue as

your child grows.

Dr Clarke says that in his
personal opinion (and he
admits that he is not well-
versed on the topic), signing
combined with speech from
the parents or caregivers

should not affect the baby’s -

“Janguage acquisition”.

There is also an argument .

that babies who sign will be
more intelligent later on in life.

One study in California
found a spread of 12 IQ points
in second grade between chil-
dren who had learned to sign
as babies and those who had-
n't.

However, some psychiatrists
question the control group that
was used for this test. In other

‘words, -how do you measure

the verbal and performance
levels of children who are all

developing at different rates?

Whatever the argument,
baby signing seems to be catch-
ing on.

It was developed by an
American researcher Joseph
Garcia, based on his own
observations of deaf children

. communicating with their par-
-ents. :
Baby signing has now caught
_the imagination of both par-

ents and child development
experts in the. US. When doing
online research for this article,
there were thousands of hits
on the topic. And as Linda
Acredolo and Susan Goodwyn
point out in their book “Baby
Signs”, it is popular universal-
ly because baby signing isn’t a
system bound to either Amer-

ican of British Sign Language. .

In fact, parents can choose to
create their own signs or adapt

nancy, drug awareness, legal
aid, environmental health, job

. training and domestic violence.

Dr Allen believes that if
churches’ become more
involved many more commu-
nities, including those in the

' Family Islands, can be reached

and a vast improvement can
be made within three years.
Some churches are already
responding. The Mt Tabor
Full Gospel Baptist Church
has already started a unit, and

Abundant Life Bible Church is _

looking at starting one.

The newest urban renewal
office is soon to open in Fox
Hill, where Dr Allen has pre-
dicted a “blow up” much like
the one that occurred in Nas-
sau Village last month.

“Tf I could sell this to the -

churches, what I believe is that
Ican move quicker than in the
political situation,” he said.

_ “I think it’s possible to make
a vast improvement in three
years, if the churches get
involved on a national level,
and take responsibility for
their surrounding communi-
ties.”

Dr Allen, who has set up a
number of successful drug
rehab programmes in the
Bahamas and Washington,
DC, would also like to set up a
rehabilitation centre for

those suggested.

Experts say that the impor-
tant thing to remember when
introducing your child to this
new world of signs is to do
what feels right for your baby.
So take the lead from the child:
start when he or she shows an
interest in communicating
about the things he or she sees.

Finding gestures that act out
the object or concept in an
obvious way is usually easier. It
means that the sign for “hat”
could be patting the top of

-your head with your hand

open and palm down, while
“bird” could be expressed by

‘flapping one or both arms out

to the side. |

Baby signing works on the
principle that children learn by
repetition. And if you have a
baby you are probably already
signing. The secret is to sign
as many chances as you get.

If you use a sign for “drink”,
say the word, do the sign and
then give your baby a drink.

The main benefit of baby
signing is improved communi-
cation between you and your
baby. This advantage, say.
experts, cannot be overesti-
mated: it sets a good founda-
tion for your child’s self-
expression and will put him in
good stead for the rest of his or
her life.

Baby signing also empowers |

your child to tell you what is
wrong instead of screaming,

~ whining or crying — all of which

may add to the frustration of
you and the child.

It can even enable babies to
play a part in problem-solving.
For example, one of the par-
ents in Garcia’s “Sign with

_ Your Baby” training video tells

the story of her 11-month-old
son Sebastian, who warned her
that.a wasp was trapped with
him inside the car. His mother,
who hadn’t seen the wasp, .

_.could then remove it without i,

incident.

-It appears that the majority
of child psychiatrists in the
Bahamas are not too familiar
with this new trend, but some
say that parents have come to

- their offices asking about it.



women drug addicts.
Right now there is no place

‘for female addicts in the

Bahamas, he noted.

- The Sandilands Rehabilita-
tion Centre is filled, and while
there is Teen Challenge and
The Haven for male addicts,
there is no place for female
drug users.

Dr Allen said that his work
with addicts over the years has
brought with it a lot of insight.
“When you work with these
people they tell you a lot, and
they’ll tell you that a murder
never just happens.”

He believes that nothing
happens without provocation,
and that the community needs
to do more to act before some-
thing happens, and not after a
shot has been fired.

He is urging Bahamians to
pay attention to the signs. “No
one reacts until a shot has
been fired or someone has
been stabbed. So basically the
police are being used as under-
takers.

“T firmly believe that every
murder, people see the fights
going on before, but somehow
they do not call the police,”
said Dr Allen.

“All of us have to do this
work. This can’t be done by
government or the police, all
of us have to get involved.”


!

THE TRIBUNE

‘
ft
4

~ Mushrooms could
be good for heart

@ By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

ushrooms

could pro-

vide a new

dietary route

to a healthi-
er heart, according to scientists
who conducted an unprece-
dented examination of their
chemical make-up.

According to dietician Julia
Lee of Doctors Hospital, sci-
entists never knew exactly
what components were in
mushrooms, though they knew

FOOD AND HEALTH

I heard someone talking
about HPV and the risks of
cancer associated with it.
What exactly is HPV? Is it
contagious? And is it a risk
factor for getting cancer?

HPV stands for Human
Papilloma Virus. This is a
very common sexually trans-
mitted virus. It is estimated
that 75 per cent of the repro-
ductive-age population has
been infected with sexually
transmitted HPV. Most
infected people suffer no ill
effects. A small fraction
develop genital warts and
another smaller fraction

TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005, PAGE 3C







# Dr Reginald Carey
Obstetrician/
Gynaecologist |

cologist to identify areas of
infection.

A biopsy is taken from the
infected areas. The abnor-
malities range from minor to
major,-the latter being cervi-
cal cancer. Pre-cancerous
lesions can be treated by a
freezing technique
(cryosurgery), heat treatment
(coagulation), electrical burn-
ing (diathermy) or excision. .

There is no corresponding
test for males. If a female
partner of a male is diag-
nosed with HPV then it is
likely that the male is also
infected.

It is therefore very impor-

they had nutritional benefits.

A new analytical study con-
ducted by Illinois University
scientists now lets health pro-
‘fessionals know “more specif-
ically” what advantages the
mushroom holds, Mrs Lee told

Tribune Woman and Health.

While fungi are already
known to contain high-quali-
ty protein and fibre, only now
have “modern analytic tools”
been able to break down their
complicated carbohydrate pro-
files, says a report in the Jour-
nal of Agricultural and Food

Chemistry.

The research involved the
use of high-performance liq-
uid chromatography, which
was adapted by Laura L
Bauer, a research specialist in
animal sciences and a co-

“. mks

rtm wT) ww
resi

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”



s

DIETICIAN Julia Lee says scientists never knew exact-
ly what components were in a mushroom ipictured),
though they knew it had nutritional benefits.

author of the paper, to quanti-
fy chitin (a type of fibre) con-
centrations in each mushroom.
A spectrophotometer was used
to analyse beta-glucan (a type
of fibre) levels and sort out
uronic acids that are associated
with total dietary fibres.

The team of scientists dis-
covered that mushrooms such

- as portabellas, shiitakes and

enokis are rich in the com-
pounds chitin and beta-glutan,
which have both been found
in clinical studies to signifi-
cantly reduce levels of harmful
cholesterols. Chitin is specifi-
cally found to lower choles-
terol levels, and beta-glutan is
known to be ideal for healthy
hearts.

In the university’s study, SIX
mushroom varieties were test-
ed in their raw and cooked

- forms, and at various harvest

tiniés and thatutity levels. The
findings of this study. appeared
online in’ advance of publica-
tion by the Journal of Agricul-
tural and Food Chemistry, and
have become part of the US
Department of Agriculture’s
National Nutrient Database.
White button; crimini and
portabella, all of which repre-
sent different maturity levels
of Agaricus bisporus, maitake
(Grifola frondosa), shiitake
(Lentinus edodes) and.enoki
(Flammulina velutipes) vari-
eties were the mushrooms

’ studied. Shiitake and Enoki

varieties were analysed only in
their “consumed cooked
form”.

Cheryl L Dickman, lead
author of the paper, said that
the maitakes and shiitakes

tended to be very similar in.

their nutrient concentrations,

(The Tribune archive photo)

and quite a bit different than
the others. The portabellas
however, were “off on their
own” in terms of their contents
of oligosaccharides, beta-glu-
cans and chitin.

Chitin concentrations were
eight per cent in raw, mature
portabellas and six per cent in

the raw, immature ones. When .

cooked, chitin content fell to
2.7 per cent in both forms, but
their levels of total dietary
fibres went up significantly,

according to the research. Also "

showing the same pattern were
the raw enokis, with 7.7 per
cent chitin content; while cook-
ing also lowered it to 2.7 per
cent, but total dietary fibres
jumped from 29.3 per cent in
raw to 41.6 per cent in cooked.
The raw, mature white buttons
and cooked, mature shiitakes
boasted chitin levels of three
per cent and 3.6 per cent,
respectively.

The ra maturé portabel-
las also had the highest level
of beta-glucan (which was 0.2
per cent), while most of the
other mushrooms had 0.1 per
cent. Enokis and maitakes had
none. Relatively small amounts
are required to provide car-
diovascular benefits, said the
researchers.

But what does all this mean



- to the lay person?

Mrs Lee says that while she
does not know much about the
bio-chemistry of how chitin
and beta-glutan actually work
in the body, from what she
understands, it has to do with
controlling bacteria.

“Chitin and beta-glutan,”
she explained, “changes the
number and activity of bacteria

‘in the colon, and that helps to

develop cervical changes
which can lead to cancer.

This latter group may be
susceptible because of an
immune defect.

Transmission occurs via
genital skin to genital skin
contact with or without sex-
ual intercourse, therefore
condom use is not totally
protective.

Presently there is no cure
for the virus but the good
news is that 70-90 per cent
of infected persons may nat-

. urally clear the virus from
the body within two years of
infection. Reinfection is pos-
sible. Women who smoke do

control the blood fat (lipids)
that contribute to heart dis-
ease.

“Chitin and bets: -glutan are
types of fibre, but there is no
recommendation that exist for
fibre intake in various disease
states. There is just a general
recominendation to increase
fibre, but nobody knows by
how much we should,” she
said.

ESRC TC
case), bacteria in
the colon would

treat cooked |

mushrooms in
_a different way,
- with different
benefits than raw
- mushrooms.”



-— Dietician Julia Lee

What was interesting in this
study, is that cooking tended
to increase starch, total dietary
fibres and fat contents, and
decrease chitin concentrations
in all of the mushrooms.
“Some nutrients went up after
cooking, while some went
down,” according to the study.
“Part of that you’d expect to



not clear the virus as quickly
as non-smokers.

There are more than 100
different genetic types or
strains of HPV. Genital warts
are a result of infection with
type 6 of 11. Abnormal
changes in the cervix which
can lead to cancer is caused
by types 16,18,31 or 33.
These types can be identified
by lab DNA testing.

The first indication of HPV
may be an abnormal cervical
smear also known as the pap
smear or pap test. Your doc-

tor may recommend a col-.

poscopy which is special
microscope used by a gynae-

happen as water is cooked
out.”

Mrs Lee said that cooking
mushrooms can indeed affect
the concentration of nutrients.
“The energy of the heat has a
chemical decomposition reac-
tion. For example, if you fry
an egg you can’t turn it into an
egg white again. It has a dif-
ferent chemical structure at
that level. So (in this case),
bacteria in the colon would
treat cooked mushrooms in a
different way, with different
benefits than raw mushrooms.”

The. study also measured the -

oligosaccharide (sugar mole-
cules that are only partially
digestible) levels in the six vari-
eties. Raw, immature porta-
bellas had a total oligosaccha-
ride concentration of 5,272
micrograms per gram. Also
found to have more than 1,000
milograms per gram were raw,
mature portabellas and
cooked, immature crimini.
None were detected in enokis,
maitakes or shiitakes.

The undigested components
are called “prebiotics”, as they
encourage the growth of
“healthful” bacteria in the
colon, ©,

“Oligosaccharides are not
defined as dietary fibres,”
explained Mrs Lee. “But they
act in a similar way to produce
the same heart healthy benefits

tant that women have regular
pap smears, usually yearly.
A possible vaccine may
become available in the
future.

© This informative weekly
column provided by Doctors
Hospital is intended to edu-
cate-women about important

‘issues regarding their health

and is not intended as a sub-
stitute for consultation with
an obstetrician/gynaecologist.
Please send questions via e-
mail to tribune@tribuneme-
dia.net or mrassin@doctorsh-
soptial.com. For more infor-
mation call 302-4707.



of fibres like chitin and beta-
glutan. They boost the good
bacteria, but it is not medicine,
or else it would be an anti-biot-
ic. It’s a pre-biotic, which
means that it is a non-diges-
tive food substance that
improves health by stimulat-
ing growth or the action of
good bacteria in the colon or
the lower digestive tract — not
decreasing bad bacteria.”
In other findings:
e White buttons had the
highest levels of ash;
.° Starch was highest in -

i, maitakes and shiitakes; and

e Crude protein and acid- -
hydrolyzed fats were highest -
in crimini, white buttons and
maitakes.

According to Mrs: Lee,
though mushrooms do have
heart health qualities, it doesn’t
mean that increasing intake
will eliminate your chances of
developing heart disease.

Intake should be considered
on an individual basis, she
added. Mushrooms are high in
potassium, for example, so
increasing intake would not be
the best choice for a person
who needs to be ona potassi-
um-low diet.

She suggested that persons
with pre-existing health condi-
tions consult with a qualified
nutrition specialist before mak- *
ing a changes.

Is cutting carbs really the
magic weight loss formula?

BAHAMIANS from all walks of life
have been infatuated with the low-car-

bohydrate dieting concept. In the quest to

lose weight and improve their health,
men, women and even adolescents are
joining the “low-carb” craze, often with
little understanding of the benefits or
drawbacks of this diet approach.

You probably know somebody, if not
yourself, who is on the low-carb diet or
has been on the low-carb diet. And to
every dieter’s dream, this one seems to
work.

But is cutting carbs really the magic
weight loss formula?

This diet claims many wonderful health

benefits but there is limited scientific evi-
dence to back them up.

The low-carb diet is based on the con-
cept that carbohydrate-rich foods are the
cause of weight gain and if you elimi-
nate carbohydrates calories would not
matter. However, sciéntists are not con-
vinced.

Practicing a low-carb diet means leav-
ing out a major food group, for the most
part.

According to Dr Gary Foster, clinical
director of the Weight and Eating Dis-
order Program at the University of Penn-
sylvania, weight loss from a low-carb diet
results from eating fewer calories.

In other words, if you eliminate any
one food group and don’t increase your
intake of other food groups, you will lose
weight.

Though this diet gets some people to
eat fewer calories, there still remains a



LIGHTEN UP & LIVE HEALTHY



lack of solid evidence supporting the
long-term safety and effectiveness of low-
carb dieting.

Carbohydrates in perspective

Much of the confusion over. low-carb:

diets has to do with the lack of under-
standing of what carbohydrates are and
their role in the diet.

Carbohydrate is one of the three major
macronutrients (carbohydrate, protein
and fat) found in food and provides calo-
ries or energy for the body. Many car-
bohydrate-rich foods such as whole grain,
fruits and vegetables also contain essen-
tial vitamins and minerals, plus fibre and
phytonutrients important for health and

. disease prevention.

Carbohydrate comes in two types, sim-
ple and complex. Both types supply the
same amount of calories. Fibre is also a
form of carbohydrate but it cannot be
digested, so it does not supply calories.
Simple carbohydrates are found natu-
rally in fruits, dairy products and some
vegetables and they make up the refined
sugars, such as table sugar used in sweet
foods. Complex carbohydrates such as
starch are the primary nutrient in grains
(pasta rice and bread), potatoes, beans
and vegetables.

The low-carb diet suggests that in the
first phase dieters should eat no more
than 20 to 30 grams of carbohydrates a
day. This equates to about one slice of

bread or a half-cup of cooked rice, leav-
ing little room for fruits and vegetables.

It is recommended that adults and chil-
dren over the age of one year consume at
least 130 grams of carbohydrates a day.
This minimum requirement is based on
the brain’s use of carbohydrates as its
primary source of fuel by the central ner-
vous system.

The brain can only function on carbo-
hydrates, as no other nutrient reaches
the brain. On a regular diet however,
most people easily meet this require-
ment.

The Bottom Line

‘Reducing carbohydrates may make
sense as a calorie cutting measure for
people whose diets are largely made up
of foods such as sweets, sweetened bev-
erages and baked goods. It makes little
sense however to eliminate wholesome,
nutrient dense foods such as starchy veg-
etables (sweet potato, cassava, pumpkin,
squash) whole grains, fruits and vegeta-
bles in favour of protein and fat rich
foods.

The American Heart Association does
not recommend the low-carb diet, object-
ing that it encourages people to eat foods
high in saturated fat and cholesterol.

Plenty of evidence points to an
increased risk of heart disease and some
forms of cancer from a diet consistently
high in fat and saturated fat.

- Lately, the natket has been saturated
with low-carb labeling products. Whether
it’s carb-smart, carb-wise, carb-fit or just
plain low-carb, in the USA, no federal
regulation defines these marketing terms
used to sell this flood of new reduced-car-
bohydrate food products. In the absence
of an official definition, low carb can be
interpreted in many ways. It may mean.
that the product has fewer carbohydrates
than a comparable product or it may
mean that it contains a specific amount of
carbohydrates per serving. Even the
labels of some foods that are naturally
low in carbohydrates may be using the
low-carb label terms to attract “carb”
conscious consumers.

To confuse matters further, some food
labels refer to “net carbs” or “effective
carbs”. There is no official definition
for this terminology either, but it is typi-
cally used as the result when fibre and
certain sweeteners, such as sugar alco-
hols and glycerin, are subtracted from
the total carbohydrate content.

Bottom line, calories still count. The
solution to the problem of overweight,
remains the same, maintaining energy
balance by a combination of eating few-
er calories and increasing physical activ-
ity. The key however is to include all
essential nutrients in the right propor-
tion for your needs.

© This article is provided by Adelma
Penn and Camelta Barnes, nutritionists
from the Department of Public Health/
Ministry of Health.







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THE TRIBUNE | rr. TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005, PAGE 5C


















A Bright Start

Starting Monday, March 7, and print
will launch an innovative new servic
our Newspaper in Education Litera
the reading habits of our children.

Remember when community ente
and sharing books? Breakfast Seria
and sharing experience—with s
family. © |

Breakfast Serials provides yout g
fine literature, read in convenien
top daily newspaper.

A Breakfast Serials story is ju:
at a time every day. It's great v
ists, and readers: can't wait for t

Breakfast Serials iste a
keeps coming back for more. _










written by Avi.
illustrated by Brian Floca

The Secret School is a story
about kids by award-winning
American children’s author,

Avi. It’s about the kind of

one-room schoolhouses that


















used to exist in American
communities, as well as many

Bahamian settlements.

The story is set in the 1920s.
When the regular teacher of a
rural schoolhouse must leave, bringing an early school clos-
ing, the children decide to take over, secretly. But they |

encounter many problems along the way.

The suggested reading level is grade 4-8, and the Secret
School is a great read aloud for all ages.

Avi—a name given to him by his twin sister—was born in
Brooklyn, New York, in 1937. Though he struggled with English
in high school, by the time he left, Avi had decided to become a
writer. In 1970, his first book was published and since then he
has published more than 50 acclaimed books for young people.

; Jewspaper in Education Lit


as ba
; ui

PAGE 6C, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005 . so _ THE TRIBUNEâ„¢

SECOND PRIZE | THIRD PRIZE
$100.00 GIFT BASKET ___. $75.00 GIFT BASKET.
In Each Age Group In Each Age Group

Cy Res

1. Children ages 4-5, 6-8, and 9-10. Staff members and relatives are not eligible to enter.

2. Coloring may be done with crayons. Adults or older child may assist the child in filling out the’ entry form, BUT NOT IN COLORING THE ENTRY

3. Enter as much times as you wish. All entries must be in The Tribune by 4pm on Monday, March 21st, 2005. Winners will be announce Wednesday,
March 23, 2004. Look for your names in The Tribune or listen to 1(OOJAMZ / JOY FM to hear your name.

4, There will be one first-prize winner, one second-prize winner and one third-prize winner in each age groups.

5. All entries become the propecty of The Tribune and may be used for any purpose including, but not limited to, publication in a future issue.

“NO PHOTOCOPIES. USE Mayas AD ONLY”



Child’s Name: Parent/Guardian Signature



Address: Tel: Age:



Available At All Solomon’ s Mines Locations.


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005, PAGE 7C





The Tribune

ea





ith

‘Heart healthy cooking requires

‘
as

att

rae

By PETURA BURROWS
Pena Feature Writer

yeaa ss

eart month is
over but that
. doesn’t mean
; you should
i stop thinking
about how to keep your heart
healthy, especially when it
comes to your diet.

* When considering recipes
that are heart healthy, the gen-
eral recommendation may be
low sodium and low fat. But
there’s alot more toit. —

* Dr Idamae Hanna, dietician
and health educator at Better
Living Health Center & Deli,

says that heart healthy cooking

Fequires several substitutions,
and cutbacks.

* First, you should know that
foods low in saturated fats,
cholesterol and high in fibre
are good for your heart’s
health. So for recipes that con-
tain low saturated fat and low
cholesterol.

* A heart healthy recipe will
also contain other essential
nutrients such as vitamins and
minerals. These nutrients can
be found in vegetables, grains

and fruits. Fruits, vegetables,

grains and legumes tend to be
low in fat and have no choles-
_ terol. Most are also good
sources of dietary fibre, com-
plex carbohydrates and vita-
mins.
: If possible, substitute low-
fat products for a healthy heart
dr tweak a recipe to your
advantage.
« “If the recipe requires eggs,
use only the egg whites. Most
pastries require eggs, but you
don’t really need the entire
egg. The egg white is a binder
in itself, so you wouldn’t notice
the difference, ” Dr Hanna
notes.
* She suggests that persons
watch their saturated fat
intake, which means avoiding
coconut oils, for example. “Use

6

olive oil or canola oil instead.
Then make the recipe low-fat
by cutting back on fat, even

though it’s a good fat you are

using. Don’t deep fry — bake,
boil or barbecue,” she adds.

Choosing poultry and fish:

over red meat and shellfish,
which are very high in choles-
terol is also ideal for heart
health, says Dr Hanna.

The American Heart Asso-
ciation suggests that you eat
foods high in complex carbo-
hydrates and fibre (some kinds
of soluble fibre, such as pectin
and oat bran, when eaten in
large amounts in a diet low in
saturated fat, may reduce total
cholestero] and LDL choles-
terol). It also suggests eating
approximately 25-30 grams of
dietary fibre per day.

Here are some guidelines for
healthy eating from its web-
site:

® Coconut is high in saturat-
ed fat; olives and avocados are
high in monounsaturated fat
and calories. Use these items
sparingly to avoid getting too
many calories from fat.

e When vegetable grains or
legumes are cooked or
processed into foods, saturated
fats or cholesterol are often
added. For instance, egg yolks
may be added to breads or pas-
tas.

¢ Canned, processed and
preserved vegetables also may
contain added sodium. And in
some people, too much sodi-
um (salt) can lead to high
blood pressure. Some food
companies are canning veg-
etables with less salt. “No salt

added” varieties are also avail- .

able. Look for these in the
market or choose fresh or
frozen vegetables.

e Nuts and seeds tend to be
very high in fat and calories,
but most of the fat is polyun-
saturated or monounsaturated
(eg, walnuts, almonds, pecans).
Some varieties, such as

rv these
recipes

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

LP ea Pi alert core]| ef
will also contain other ©
essential’ nutrients such
as vitamins and minerals.
These nutrients can be

| found in fruits and veg-
etables (pictured).

OAc Bale eee
archive photo)’

macadamia nuts, are also high

in saturated fat, so check the.
label. Nuts and seeds don’t -
have cholesterol and are good
sources of protein. :
According to Dr Hanna,
heart health also has to do with
achieving a balance between:

_ potassium intake and sodium.

She explains: “Eat .a lot of
fruits and vegetables as ‘well
because again, potassium
intake helps against heart dis-
ease. A lot of persons who.
have heart disease and high:
blood pressure have high sodi-
um intakes, but they don’t eat
many fruits and vegetables, but
the body needs a balance.

“You should consume four
times more potassium than
sodium, but the way we (in the
Bahamas) do it, (we) eat four
times more sodium than potas-
sium. If you do it the right way,
then you will balance this
mechanism.”

Using herbal seasonings with ~

a “dash” of salt, if any; eating a
balanced diet — which Dr Han-
na equates to half of your food
intake being fruits and vegeta-
bles, with one quarter being
starch and the other quarter
meats — will help you to lose
weight, which in turn reduces
the risk of heart disease, she
says.

Chad Bowe, general manag-
er at GNC in the Mall at
Marathon, says that when he
thinks about heart-healthy -
cooking, various ingredients
come to mind — garlic, Atlantic
salmon, organic raw vegeta-
bles, organic whole grains,
among others.

If the organic products are
too expensive, Mr Bowe says
to reach for strictly whole
wheat products.

He agrees with Dr Hanna
that frying foods should be
avoided, and says that home-
cooking your meals rather than
purchasing fast food is the best
way to ensure a healthy heart.

He told Tribune Health that
many persons come into his
establishment requesting prod-
ucts to balance their choles-
terol levels. Some of these per-
sons, he adds, have been sent
by their doctors.

Mr Bowe says that while
there are an abundance of
products on the market which .
are effective and “easy on the
body”, he suggests that per-
sons consult with their physi-
cians — especially if they have a
“serious” medical condition.

several substitutions, cutbacks’





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PAGE 8C, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





‘The best plan for
a healthy mouth’

lm By DR SPARKMAN FERGUSON

f you are an adult who has

never visited a dentist, or one’

who seldom visits, or one

who hopes never to make a

visit, this article is written
especially for you.

The contents of this article are
meant only to educate, inform, create.
introspection and motivate the read-
er.

The best plan for a healthy mouth is
regular maintenance...the best plan
for a diseased mouth is immediate
treatment.

There are two main reasons why
we have mouth problems.

1. Failure in seeking professional
maintenance; and

2. Failure in- having timely: treat-
ment performed.

Failure in Professional

Maintenance:

Most people know that they should
see a dentist every year but avoid
dental visits for a variety of reasons.
With each passing year of “dodging”
the dentist, the general health of one’s
mouth deteriorates.

It still surprises people to hear that
adults and children should see.a den-
tist at least once a year for a general
check up.

Many unfortunate circumstances
are born when these visits are ignored
and missed. The end result is never
good, because diseases of the teeth; or
a disease of the gums.develop in all
who avoid professional maintenance.

Professional maintenance involves
dental prophylaxis (professional
cleaning of the mouth). Every mouth
should be professionally cleaned at
least once each year. However, it is
recommended that a normal healthy
individual have two cleanings. per-
formed each year.:‘Some dentists rec-
ommend as many as three or four vis-

A HEALTHY environment |

promotes a balance and a har-
monious symphony :between

man, animal and nature. How- -

ever, an unhealthy environ-
ment results in diseases such
as dengue fever, malaria, West
Nile virus, leptosperosis, gastro
enteritis and acute respiratory
infections caused or, transmit-
ted (carried) by vectors. Mos-
quitoes, rats, flies and roaches

are all vectors that carry these ©

diseases to man.

A clean environment differs
from a healthy environment.
A clean environment reduces
the chances of disease forma-
tion; however, it does not pro-
mote the natural growth and
balance between man, animal
and nature. The presence of
trees produges more oxygen
into the environment, homes
for the birds, shade and shelter

for all. Flowers and trees are
also considered very relaxing
for many. When the environ-
ment is healthy, residents have

less stress or concerns about

their health. The health of res-
idents can be affected by
unsanitary factors such as
garbage generation, mosqui-
toes, flies and rodents breeding
within their environment.
Therefore, it is important to
maintain both a clean and
healthy environment.
Everyone in the community
has a responsibility to main-
tain a clean and healthy envi-
ronment in which they live.
However, some residents make
greater contributions than oth-
ers. Therefore, we encourage
those environmentally-con-
scious leaders within our com-
munities to assist the depart-

ment by teaching and showing

The Cancer Society of the
Bahamas meets at 5.30pm
on the second Tuesday of
each month at their Head-
quarters at East Terrace,
Centreville, Call 323-4482
for more info: ;

REACH — Resources & -
Education ‘for Autism and

related Challenges meets

from 7pm — 9pm the second
Thursday of each month in
the cafeteria of the BEC-
building, Blue Hill Road.

MS (Multiple Sclerosis).
Bahamas meets the third
Monday every month, 6pm
@ Doctors Hospital confer-
ence room.

The Bahamas Diabetic
Association meets every
third Saturday, 2.30pm
(except August and Decem-
ber) @ the Nursing School,
Grosvenor Close, Shirley
Street.

Doctors Hospital, the offi-



cial training centre of the

American Heart Associa-
tion offers CPR classes cer-

tified by the AHA. The

course defines the warning
signs of respiratory arrest
and gives prevention strate-
gies to avoid sudden death
syndrome and the most
common serious injuries and
choking that can occur in
adults, infants and children.
CPR and First Aid classes
are offered every third Sat-
urday of the month from

9am-1pm. Contact a Doc-

tors Hospital Community
Training Representative at
302-4732 for more informa-
tion and learn to save a life
today.

Alcoholics Anonymous
meets @ 16 Rosetta St,
Monday-Friday and Sunday,
6pm-7pm & 8.30pm-9.30pm,
and on Saturday, 10am-
llam & 6pm-7pm &
8.30pm-9.30pm;.@ Sacred
Heart Catholic Church,
Shirley St, on Friday at 6pm.

\

others the importance of hav-
ing a clean environment and
saving it for generations to
come.

Refuse is unwanted, used
items comménly known as

waste that is discarded from .

residential and commercial
premises. Items such as paper,
cans, bottles and kitchen refuse
are all classified as household
garbage.

The plastic 32-gallon
garbage containers with a
secure lid have been identified
by Ministry of Health officials
as the most appropriate stor-
age container to be used for
garbage storage and collection.
The 55-gallon metal drum,
most widely used by residents,
is being discouraged for many
reasons. They collect water
when it rains if they are not

covered and holes are not.

placed at the bottom of them.
They breed mosquitoes
because of the settled water,
creating the potential for the
transmission of malaria and
dengue fever.

Residents are asked to place
all household garbage in
garbage containers that are
lined with plastic garbage bags.
When waste material is dis-
posed of properly, the envi-
ronment within our communi-
ties is healthier and cleaner.
Tightly secured garbage con-
tainers trap smell and controls
the odor of garbage, prevents
the spillage of garbage by stray
dogs, reduces insect and rodent
breeding within the communi-
ty, all resulting in a healthier
environment.

It is very important to care
for your garbage containers.
Residents are encouraged to
properly clean and secure their
garbage bins, and store them in
fastened garbage storage
booths. The garbage booth
prevents scavengers such as
















































MWe Srse

9

Sia Of

vee

1

its per year for individuals with special
circumstances.

Here is the list of possible happen-
ings when the professional propii:
laxis is not performed.

¢ The mouth smells bad;

e The gums bleed because of sank
inflammation or infection;and .° 4

e Dental plaque (bacteria), tartars
(plaque that is starting to get hard),.
and dental calculus (hard crusty stuff
that causes gum disease) accumulate,
around the teeth and gums. =

oo

o! Pes WO

\\c3

Le

Failure in having timely treatment.
We live in a time where early diag=

‘ nosis and prompt treatment are the,

only sensible health goals. The body is
wise and often sends early warnings to
us all. Even the mouth sends an early=
signal when something is wrong. s
Early signals from the mouth ares:
usually mild and remind us for a long?
time. Some of the more common sig
nals are bleeding gums, sensations to
cold or hot drinks and pressure whiles

_ chewing. If we manage to ignore these*

varying degrees of mouth signals, dis+3
comforts and PAIN begin. These
pains definitely get our attention. But..
by that time drastic steps have to be
taken, like tooth extractions, root
canal therapies and gum surgeries toz
correct our neglect.

It is a known fact that timely treatg
ments are simple, inexpensive and.
painless.

Finally, dentists are aware that a>
vast number of people are afraid to
visit a dental office. However, we
encourage all persons to seek profes-
sional care because the mouth is an
area which requires close attention:
because of its “high maintenance”
requirement.

@ THE best plan for a healthy mouth (pictured) is regular maintenance ...






(The Tribune archive photo)





JOINING HANDS FOR HEALTH



dogs from overthrowing the
garbage bins.

Old furniture from homes
and business places, electrical
appliances, are all labeled as
‘bulk items’. Residents unable

to afford proper disposa]_of.

such waste are encouraged to
request the assistance of the
Department of Environmen-
tal Health Services. Owners of
vacant properties are encour-

_aged to keep them free of

overgrown bush, litter and
accumulation of bulk items and

Everyone in the
community has a
responsibility to
maintain a clean

and healthy
environment in

which they live

abandoned cars. Residents are
also discouraged from dump-
ing such items on other per-
son’s properties and to prop-
erly dispose of them. It should
be understood that refrigera-
tors and similar items are dis-
posed of at the solid waste site
and derelict vehicles~are dis-
posed of at the designated
derelict site at Marshall Road.

The issue of indiscriminate
dumping is posing a serious
problem in the community, as
an increasing number of per-
sons are dumping garbage in

-isolated areas, ietead of at the

designated site. This is con-
tributing to the deterioration
of a healthy environment.

. Whenever these persons are

identified, they will be prose-
cuted in the Environmental
Health Court. It is important
for people to understand the
importance of keeping the
environment clean and healthy
for the protection of them-
selves and the community. Any
possible disease outbreak
would affect our health and
tourism, which is our main
industry.

Health education is an ongo-
ing strategy applied by health

- inspectors of the Department

of Environmental Health Ser-
vices, Ministry of Health to

encourage residents to main- -

tain a healthy home environ-
ment.

Most residents guilty of envi-
ronmental infractions do not
take verbal warnings seriously.
In cases where residents do not
comply to the needed changes
within their properties, the
health inspectors serve them
notices and they are required
to appear to court. Residents
sometimes comply with the
wishes of the health inspector
and make the necessary
changes before the Environ-
mental Court date. However,
some residents do not comply
with the wishes of ,the health
inspector and are required to
appear to court, pay fines and
even possibly spend time in
prison:-After all of this, resi-
dents will still be required to
correct the problems within
their residence to prevent or
stop the public health threat
their yard may have posed.

Although court dates seem
far away, all residents who vio-

_ late the Environmental Health —



Act eventually get their day in =
court and justice is served. ,,
Officials of the Department of
Environmental Health Ser- 2
vices, Ministry of Health,=
would prefer the judicial ©
process to be more immediate;
and they patiently partner with © =
the court systems to ensure ~
due process of all cases. ce
Residents should be aware =,
that it is in our nation’s best *
interest that all residents com- 5
ply as it would make the need *
to serve orders by the Depart- 2 :
ment of Environmental Health = =
Services, Ministry of Health a e
last resort. i
The court rooms remain ;:
backed up with environmen- ‘s
tal health cases because of the
large numbers of our residents ;.:
who have been served orders bo
Simply keeping your own yard)
clean and free of containers}:
such as old cars, boats, refrig-}.
erators, buckets or basically}.”
any container that would col- “i
lect water and breed mosqui-i.
toes that can spread diseases he
would present an order to}:
attend court. fa)
Residents are encouraged tor
cooperate with officials of thet:
Department of Environmen-i i
tal Health Services, Ministry}: :
of Health, all neighbourhood!:
and national clean up pro-'.:
grammes to keep the Bahamasi: 4
“Clean, Green and Pristine”. }*:
Residents, remember, it starts}.
with you! ; %



¢ For more information ony.
maintaining a healthy environ-}:
ment please call the Department!
of Environmental Health ati:
telephone 323-2296 or 322-4 me
8037. This column was pre-}
pared in collaboration with}s.
deputy chief health inspectors\..
Dwight Allen and Timothy.
Munroe of the Department of\::
Environment Health Services. }:




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PAGE 10C, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005



ust a few more weeks
of winter and it will
officially be spring.
Our Bahamian
spring weather is
more like summer in other
areas so we need to plant seeds
in our vegetable gardens that
are designed for tropical use.

Seed companies like Yates
produce tropical varieties of
tomatoes, cauliflower, cucum-
bers and. others.

Italian paste tomatoes like
Roma will thrive in spring
‘weather, as will hot peppers.
Bell peppers can be scalded by
the sun so it is a good idea to
move them into partial shade if
you grow them in pots. If-you
are sowing new peppers, try
Cubanelles. They are long and
flattish and very sweet — par-
ticularly when sweated in a
skillet with low heat. Tall vari-
eties of snap beans and Lima
beans do far better in spring
than bush varieties.

Although hot peppers do
well in warm weather they like
to grow in soil that drains
quickly. This means, unless it
rains, you will have to water
your peppers virtually every
day as March is traditionally a
dry month.

Spring is the time to start
completely new crops that
enjoy warmer weather.

Instead of leaf spinach we
can grow New Zealand spinach
or Malabar spinach.

Neither of these are true
spinaches but when cooked
they taste identical.

Red beans, black beans and
blackeye peas are closely relat-
ed and are good warm weather
crops. Where to buy the seeds?
Try the food store. Those
packages of dried beans are,
of course, packets of seeds.
These beans are climbers so
you can grow them on trellises
or along wire fences. You can
grow them on the ground but if
you do it would be a good idea
to place milk crates under the
mass of foliage in order to
keep the beans off the ground.

Okras also enjoy heat and
come in tall and bush versions.
The tall okras are far more
productive than bush though
they take a little longer to start
bearing. Pick your okras when
they are a day old and they will

he ‘se

be tender. If you don’t like the
mucilaginous texture of okras,
slice them and sauté them gen-
tly until they dry out slightly.
Sweet potatoes make good

- ground cover and are produc-,

tive in poor, sandy soil as they
do not like nitrogen. Again,
you can get your starts from
the food store. Select a fine
quality sweet potato like Boni-

ato and let it age somewhat. |

Cut off the tail end and place
the potato in water, leaving the
top dry. Sprouts will form here
and when they are eight to ten
inches long you can cut and
plant them. Keep the soil well
watered until the slips are
established, then ignore them
until harvesting time.

Our fruit and citrus tree are
best fertilized three times a
year: in spring, summer and
autumn. Fertilizer is best
applied when the ground is
very wet after heavy rains.

Trees

Large trees can have fertil-
izer spread around the trunk
and along the drip line. Small-

er trees can have the fertilizer .

broadcast from the trunk to
the drip line. The trees will also
benefit from a Sequestrene 128
chelated iron drench applied
to the area around the trunk.
‘While feeding your fruit and
citrus trees with the major ele-
ments, it is a good idea to also
apply minor nutrients in liquid
form. This is sprayed onto the
foliage of the trees after being
mixed with a little
sticker/spreader that will make
the spray more effective. A
drop or two of soft soap will
substitute for the
sticker/spreader.

It will be May or June before
the seasonal rains begin and
your flowering shrubs will
burst into activity. Any pruning
should be done in March as
pruning takes away material
that contains the next couple of
month’s flowering. Pruning
done now will allow .your
shrubs to recover in time for
the rainy season. Do not prune
any more than one-third of any
plant or it may never recover.

Spring will see the end of
our Impatiens and other winter
jewels. Kalanchoe will lose its

4
¢



GARDENING

THE TRIBUNE

@ SHRUBS like hibiscus can
be pruned during March and
will take off with vigorous new
growth when the summer
rains begin.



eds’ of March

Green Scene by Gardener Jack



Hi KALANCHOE will soon drop its flowers and become a foliage plant until late autumn when it blooms again.

flowers until November but the
plant will remain green and
healthy through the summer
and fall. Warm weather flow-
ers include vincas, zinnias and
cosmos. If you sow them from

seed you will have to have to
put down snail bait as well for
snails and slugs love tiny
seedlings. It’s a salad bar for
them. If you buy young plants
from your favourite nursery

you will skip the snail danger
stage.

There are many bulbs and
tubers that can be planted in
March. Use Caladiums tubers
to brighten up shaded areas of

your garden and hippeastrum
bulbs for full sun glory.

e Contact Jack Hardy at:
gardenerjack@
coconuttelegraph.net
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