Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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WOOD-You

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Che Miami Herald

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BAHAMAS EDITION

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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005







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Families stand

firm in Bozine

Town battle

By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

ADILINE BURROWS has
lived in the Bozine Town area
since 1967 when she moved in
with her husband as a young
bride. Two months ago she
buried her husband and now she
faces the threat of losing her
home to the Harrold Road Land
Development Company (Land-
co).
Residents like Mrs Burrows
been have battling the developers
since last year when they received
letters from the company request-
ing them to either purchase the
land or vacate the premises.

The company claims that it is
the rightful owner of the land.

However, Mrs Burrows and
the-other 300 residents claim that
the land is theirs. Since Landco
sent shockwaves through the
community with their request,
they have organised a steering
committee, raised funds, obtained
legal counsel and took their pleas
to Cabinet in protest earlier this
week, '

OPTION

“When we moved here, we
leased the house with the option
to buy,” Mrs Burrows explained.

She said every month, a Mr
McKenzie would come around
and collect the lease money until
he died in 1975. Since then, she
explained her family has made
additions to the home, “piece by
piece” without ever going to the
bank for additional mortgages.

She said that ever since she
lived on the property, no-one has
ever come forward to claim that
the property was theirs.

_ Mrs Burrows said she feels ter-
rible about the situation. She said
that if the company did own the
land, they should have claimed it

years ago, before people moved |

in and made the community
home. She remains adamant that
she and her six children will
remain in their home.

“They will have to move the
house with me and my children in
it,” she said.

Mrs Burrows’ story is just one
of many in the quiet rustic com-
munity where the style of living
resembles that of the Family
Islands years ago.

Yesterday, area MP Leslie
Miller toured the area with the
media, so that Bahamians could
see the human side of the land
dispute which has made headlines
for the past few months.

“I wanted everyone to see
Bozine so everyone could see
what it is the lawyers are talking
about when they talk about dis-
placing Bahamians and the con-
ditions they live under,” he said.

Down one street, in an area
less than half an acre in size, is a
group of 10 homes. The 50 or so
occupants, including a number of
small children, share a three hole
out-house which sits in the middle

of the compound. In addition the
residents all share electricity by
feeding off extension cords.

“These are the conditions that
Bahamians are living in 2005,” he
said.

Mr Miller said the residgnts,
the majority of whom are
Bahamians, live in abject poverty.
Pointing to the rural surround-
ings and tiny homes, some of
which can house up to ten per-
sons, Mr Miller said: “This is the
little that they have and what they
are trying to take away from
them.

“I do not want to get into a
row with the developers. I think
they are working very closely with
the government and I think at the
end of the day we will resolve in
an amicable way where everyone
will be satisfied. Most important,
the residents of Bozine will never
ever be displaced.”

He said Prime Minister
Christie has given the govern-
ment the mandate to replace out-
door toilets in the Bahamas and
that very soon the government
will begin this effort in Bozine

Town, by replacing the out-house’

with proper bathroom facilities
with running water.

Mr Miller said next week, a
group of government surveyors

‘ will be coming in and surveying

the land because Landco itself is
not sure of the exact occupied
areas it claims to own.

“The size of the property is
very small, because on any prop-
erty here on Bozine, if it is 100 by
60 square feet you are looking at
least four structures in that yard.
So you are not talking about a
lot of land that these people are
talking about, and a lot of the
land is unoccupied.

“You are probably talking
about less than ten acres of occu-
pied land and of course the price
of land up here one would think

cannot be more $10-15,000 an ~

acre,” Mr Miller said.

Although the residents had
been given up until February
28 by attorneys for Landco, Mr
Miller said that deadline has
been extended by 30 days to
ensure that the government can
work with all the parties.

He said government has a
number of options, either an
outright acquisition of the land
or a trade-off where Landco
would be given the equivalent
of the land they own some-
where else. He said there was
also the possibility of the courts
overturning the ruling which
Landco says entitles them to the
land.

“We are exploring all the
options. At the end of the day,
each resident will have a clear
title deed to the property on
which they reside. That is the
key to give them comfort and
hope,” he said.

SEE also story
on Page 11








TRADE and Industry Minister Leslie Miller is shown an out-house that is used by children and
adults in the Bozine Town area. The minister was on a tour of the area where residents are fac-
ing the threat of eviction. Photos: Mario Duncanson

‘

House faces another vote
on Stubbs bankruptcy

By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Senior Staff Reporter

GOVERNMENT may have
to advance another resolution

in the House of Assembly soon’

to allow embattled Holy Cross
MP Sydney Stubbs an addition-
al six-month extension to get
his bankruptcy ruling over-
turned.

The deadline for Mr Stubbs’
first extension runs out on
March 25.

Before the first resolution
was passed last September,
Speaker of the House Oswald
Ingraham granted Mr Stubbs
several extensions, on April 27,
May 28, June 28, July 28 and
August 27 of last year.

Mr Stubbs has exhausted the
extensions which could be
granted by the Speaker under
the Constitution and requires a
further extension in the form of
a resoultion to complete any
hearing of the matter.

This extension cannot be giv-
en without a resolution of the
House.

Without any further exten-
sions Mr Stubbs, under the
Constitution, would have to
vacate his seat in the House.

Chief Clerk at the House of
Assembly Maurice Tynes said
that another resolution would
have to be passed by next
month. However the Constitu-
tion does not stipulate a limit

SEE Page 11

Tourist
drowns
off —
Exuma
beach

By NATARIO McKENZIE

A 55-year-old Canadian

| tourist drowned while swim-

ming in the sea off Exuma
on Thursday.

According to police press
liaison officer Walter Evans,
Thomas Torokvel, from
Toronto, along with his
brother, son and a dive
instructor from the Peace
and Plenty hotel in George
Town were swimming

towards the blue holes off

Exuma.

It is reported that at
some point, the victim indi-.
cated he could no longer
continue the swim and left
for shore. According to
police reports, sometime lat-
er the other men returned
to shore and discovered Mr
Torokvel’s body. He was
taken to George Town clin-
ic where he was pronounced
dead. Police are continuing
their investigations into the
incident.

© Police are also investi-
gating an attempted bur-
glary of a shop which
occurred shortly before 4am
on Friday morning. Accord-
ing to Inspector Evans offi-
cers were dispatched to the
Down Home Food Store on
Fox Hill Road. At the scene
police discovered a white
1997 Nissan Sentra and a
gold 1994 Nissan Sentra
which were suspected to be
stolen.

According to reports, as
the officers were in the
process of inspecting the
vehicles, a blue Chevy
Lumina approached the
scene. Officers immediately
became suspicious and
approached the vehicle. The
occupant of the vehicle then
opened fire on the officers
who returned fire. The
occupant of the vehicle
drove off during the
exchange, police said.

Police have also indicated
that shortly before 5am on
Friday morning a man was
admitted to the Princess
Margaret Hospital with
severe gunshot wounds to
the lower right leg.

A 19-year-old resident of
Cox Street, Fox Hill is
presently in police custody
in connection with this mat-
ter.

Murder accused
CREME

sey allack



~ Pace Two





PAGE 2, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





Murder accused describes

‘sex attack’ by taxi-driver









he new face of | Kalik

COMMONWEALTH

Leroy Archer said that the Kalik has been brewed
Brewery launched the new new look is meant not only to _ exclusively in the Bahamas by
label designs for its award-win- enhance the attractiveness of _ Commonwealth Brewery since
ning beer products: Kalik Reg- the products, but also reflect 1988. (Photo: Mario Duncan-

the brand’s connection with
all “things Bahamian.”

ular, Kalik Light and Kalik
Gold. Managing director

| PRE- INVENTORY/
CUSTOMER APPRECIATION SALE

oo" Se

Regular
; On Everything in the Store tous.
(Except Appliances - 10% Discount)

son / Tribune Staff) —

















Additional Discounted
Prices 3
(Excludes All Sale Item)

2

Bedroom Suites « Living Room Suites * Dining Room Suites * Appliances ¢ Linens ¢
Patio Furniture * Baby Furniture ¢ Wall Units * Lamps ¢ Tables etc. etc.

FURNITURE AND APPLIANCES

INGES BY FRIGIDAIRE = >
ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS
UML all reals U unico ete

EVERYBODY
KNOWS WE
HAVE THE
OWEST PRICE!
IN NASSAU

» mbo
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
British American Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson ;
Kerzner International BORa

13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.40 RND H

28.00 ABDAB
13,00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.36 RND Holdings

a

1.8944

Olina Money Market Fund

2.1105 """

Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
10,0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10,2602"*"""
2.0824 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2,186020""



1.0276 Colina Bond Fund 1.08937 1""""






| BISK ALL, BHARE INDEX - 19 Deo 02 = 1,000,00
B2wh-Hil - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks

f SAwh-Low - Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks
i Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume
A Von's Close - Current day's welghted price for dally volume

| Ghainge - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

= AS AT JAN. 31, 2008/ ***" - AS AT DEC, 31, 2004

*- AS AT FEB. 11, 2005/ *** - AS AT JAN 31, 2005/ *"""" AS AT
BS es

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful



- ing on

BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - In his sworn
testimony before the Supreme
Court, murder accused
Jonathan Nathan Davis told
jurors that cabdriver Robert

elson Pratt sexually assaulted
and attacked him in his taxicab
during the early morning hours
of September 1, 2000.

Davis, who is on trial for mur-
der, took the stand on Thurs-
day in his own defence. He said
that since the ordeal some four
to five years ago his life has

- been an “eternal hell.”

Justice Jon Isaacs is presid-
ing over the trial, which is
before a jury of eight women
and four men. Prosecutor Joy-
ann Ferguson-Pratt is appear-

Sehalf of the Crown,
and Simeon Brown is repre-
senting the accused, who is on
bail. “ :

Davis, a former bellman at
the Country Club at Bahamia, is
accused of killing Pratt, whose
body was discovered along the
roadside at Illyria Road and
Aerial Place in Arden Forest
on September 1.

It is alleged that he took a
large stone and struck the
deceased in the head fracturing
his skull.

Davis, who is claiming self
defence, told the court his
account of what transpired on

‘ September 1 before and after

he got into the taxicab with
Pratt, whom he knew to be a
homosexual.
After. getting off from. work
around 2am, Davis said he went
to Ruby Swiss Restaurant,
where he had several beers. He
left around closing around 4am,
catching a ride to Les Fountain
Restaurant. He played domi-
noes and drank a few more

beers and Tequila shots with ©

several friends for another two
hours before leaving.’ ~ »

-Davis said he was very intox-
icated and had to be assisted by
a female employee into Pratt's
taxi van. He told the cab driver
to take him home to Windsor
on the Mall and then fell asleep
in the front passenger seat.

When he awoke, he said they
were in a bushy area and Pratt's
hand was pushed down inside
his trousers.

Davis, who was a trained box-
er since the age of 18, and who
had fought professionally for
several years and won a cue
of titles before retiring in 1987,
said Pratt continued to make
homosexual advances on him
after he pushed his hands away.

_He said they fought in the
van for about 10 minutes when
he observed Pratt reach under
the driver’s seat for an object.
He said he came out of the van
and Pratt struck him on the
elbow and leg.

At some point, they were
wrestling on the ground and he
reached for a rock. .

He struck Pratt twice in the
head and left the scene on foot.

Davis said he walked to East

Sunrise Highway, where he ©

flagged down a man in a truck
who gave him a ride home.
During cross-examination by
Prosecutor Ferguson-Pratt,
Davis admitted that he knew
the victim for a long time prior
to the incident. He lived as a
tenant at Pratt’s mother’s home




VIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidality

Ask §$ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded ovar-the-counter price

Weokly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior weak

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mthe

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100





at Esher Court in Mayfield
Park, where Pratt had also lived.

During his'six-month tenancy,
he said Pratt exhibited “girlish”
tendencies but never made any
sexual advances toward him.

“He was more on the femi-
nine side, a soft man,” he
added.

“Was he an aggressive man?”
Asked Mrs Ferguson-Pratt.
“No, not to me,” Davis replied.

Prior to the incident on Sep-
tember 1, he recalled engaging
Pratt’s service on a few occa-
sions and felt safe with him.

“Based on your prior and
present relationship with Pratt
can you think of any reason why
on September 1 he would
change?” Ferguson-Pratt asked.

Davis, who said he was very
intoxicated on the date in ques-
tion, suggested that Pratt saw
an opportunity to do what he

id.

Mrs Pratt ‘suggested 'to: the

’ accused that he was not telling

the court everything about his
relationship with Pratt and
that he vane went on the
journey with Pratt.

She also Suggerlee that his
testimony was fabricated and
inconsistent with what he told
police during a police inter-
view on September 2 at CID.

She pointed out that
nowhere in the police inter-
view form was there any men-
tion of Pratt’s hands in his
trousers or about having an
object in his hand. .

avis, however, insisted that
he told police about it and did-
n’t know why it was not writ-
ten down on the interview
form.

Prosecutor Ferguson-Pratt
asked Davis why he threw his
clothing in the garbage after
he got home around 10 or
11am that morning: -

“They were bloodied and
torn and I had no need for them
anymore,” he answered.

'S*Ferguson-Pratt then sug-
pested that given his extensive
oxing experience, he could
easily have disarmed Pratt,
whom he said was girlish.

“Everything happened so
fast,” said Davis. “I was intoxi-
cated and trying to protect
myself. I feel that is my God
given right.”

“T didn’t want this thing to
happen. For four to five years
I have been going through
eternal hell. I think about this
almost everyday,” he said.

“You had an opportuni to

leave the scene? “ asked
guson-Pratt.

“I was intoxicated and try-
ing to protect myself. He kid-
napped me and tried to molest
me. All. I was doing was pro-
tecting my life. I am so sorry
that this happened,” said
Davis, who insisted that he
was only defending himself.

Davis said that he did not
know what condition Pratt

er-

_ was in after he hit him with

the rock before he left the
scene.

“Having hit him in the head
you did not try to see what
State he was in?” asked the
prosecutor.

“T was intoxicated and just
wanted to get home,” he
replied. I never thought about
him being dead. It wasn’t in
my ound that I killed him.”

he accused said he did not
think to report the matter to
police when he got home
around 10am or 11am that
morning because he was
frightened.

e also denied suggestions
by Mrs Pratt that he drove the
taxi from the scene to Pros-
peria Way, where he scattered
papers outside to cover up
what he had done.

The trial was adjourned to
Monday when the prosecution

‘and defence are expected to

give their summations.



MAIN SECTION
Local News
Editorial/Letters.
AGVt oa secee
Out There
‘SPORTS SECTIO





holistic approach to making

MP launches
ambitious |
jobs campaign








By A FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

WITH the unemployment
rate at around 10.8 per cent,
one MP has decided to take
on the challenge of trying to
provide jobs for his con-
stituents. .

Carmichael MP John
Carey is hosting a second job
registration on Monday, Feb-
ruary 28 at 7pm at the Ger-
ald Cash Primary School.
The opportunity is open to
Carmichael constituents only.

On Monday 125 people
registered, raising alarms for
Mr Carey about the unem-
ployment level in his con-
stituency.

“One of the biggest prob-
lems I believe I face is being
able to place many con-
stituents who are unem-
ployed,” said Mr Carey.

“The main reason I am
doing the programme is
because when constituents
are in a position where they
are not able to take care of
their basic physical needs,
that represents a real prob-
lem for our community.

“I am deeply concerned
about people who are not able
to work; particularly young
people, because in the
absence. of having gainful
employment there is a ten-
dency to engage in anti-social
behaviour which include and
are not limited to drug traf-
ficking, armed robberies and
home invasions.” -

Mr Carey represents
11,671 people in the area,
according to the last census
count. There are well over
4,000 registered voters there.

Mr Carey said his officers
are busy daily seeking jobs
in the private sector for these
unemployed persons, because
there is a moratorium on gov-
ernment hiring.

He said he looks in the
newspapers daily looking for
new opportunities for his con-
stituents; considering it an.


























































































the community better.

After job registration exer-
cises are complete and place-
ment begins, the MP’s next
step is to hold entrepreneurial
seminars to help those who
are unable to find a job to.
find ways to make their own
money. ;

“No matter how much
money people are able to
amass, if it does not filter
down to every level of soci-
ety, you run the risk of creat-
ing a sub-society of have-nots,
who want the same things as
the haves,” said Mr Carey.

‘“‘When we lock our doors
and we are acquiring wealth
and are successful, there are
families who want to enjoy
the same things.

‘J cannot realistically sleep
at night, because the reason
the people of Carmichael put
me here is to represent their
views and their needs. When
I cannot do that, I feel like a
failure.”

He said he is concerned
especially about young men,
fathers, who have “ given up
on government and given up
on the system” and resort to
crimes that affect other con-
stituents. He said not until a
person is held up and robbed
or even raped that the prob-
lem hits home.

Occupying idle hands may
result in a decrease in crime
in the.area, this MP believes.

“In this particular case,
their need is very simple -
employment. If I am unable
to assist them in this regard, I
would have failed them,” he
said.





_an police makes a

THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005, PAGE 3





pring

breakers

receive

US crime
arning

By PAUL G. TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE US Department of
State has issued an advisory
to its citizens who are trav-
elling to the Bahamas to
spend their Spring Break
holiday in the country.

Those visiting the country
have been warned of the
laws and penalties for
those who wished to
partake of any illegal
activity.

The advisory stated
that while the Bahami-

"special effort" to
increase patrols and expand
surveillance during the

: Spring: Break period, its cit-
“izens should still however

exercise caution and good
judgment to ensure that
their stay in the Bahamas is
a pleasant and safe one.
New Providence in partic-

ular sees a dramatic influx .

of visitors during this period,
from the last week in Feb-
ruary to the first week in
April. The advisory howev-

er warned that most crimi-
nal incidents take place in a
part of the city that is not
usually frequented by
tourists. It however men-
tioned that crime and vio-
lence are increasingly mov-
ing into the more "upscale"
tourist and residential areas.

Travellers were cautioned
not to walk alone after dark



‘Stay away from
drug traffickers’



Or in isolated areas, and that
they should avoid*being
‘alone with a group of
strangers.

"Be particularly cautious
on secluded beaches; crimi-
nals target such tourist
areas. Visitors found alone
or incapacitated have been

victims of rape, robbery, and

assault.

"Intoxicated young
women have been sexually
assaulted after reportedly

being drugged: Know your
drinking companions and
stay in a group with friends
when in clubs, bars, out
walking in deserted areas,
or in a taxi at night," the
advisory warned.

The report included ref-
erences to penalties for the
possession or use of illegal
drugs in the
Bahamas, and
warned its Ameri-
can citizens that the
infringement of
those laws will carry

fines, or
imprisonment.
"American citizens..yisit-
ing the Bahamas are. subject
to Bahamian law: Drug vio-
lators can and will be arrést-
ed, even for small quanti-
ties. All persons 16 years of
age or older are tried as
adults. Stay away from drug
traffickers, who are often
armed and violent; and do
not accept packages from
people you meet during
your stay," the advisory said.

even

Shipping firm

denies claims

By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter

PIONEER Shipping has
denied allegations that ship-
ments have been delayed in
Miami because cargo may have
included illegal drugs or
because vessels were not sea-
worthy.

According to Pioneer, the
increased powers granted to the
US Coast Guard under the
Patriot Act means that vessels
can be inspected and held up at
any time.

Pioneer executive Ray
Thompson said that only one
shipment has recently been
delayed by the US Coast
Guard. He said this occurred
about two weeks ago and was
the result of a documentation
irregularity.

“When the boat went into
Miami the Coast Guard went
on for inspection. One docu-
ment was out of order, and that
document was corrected imme-
diately.”

He said that the shipment had
since arrived in the Bahamas,
just over a week late.

Mr Thompson was respond-
ing to an anonymous complaint

ee (tot ae
Ua Mit

Tats
PHONE: 822-2157



over delay

which claimed that Pioneer has
been experiencing “significant
problems to the point that it has
not been able to deliver ship-
ments for the past week plus
(10 business. days) to the
Bahamas.”

According to the complaint,
which was sent to The Tribune
and the Miami Herald, the ship-
ment may have been held up
because Pioneer is suffering
from “security issues with its
crew, drugs, and/or has ships
that are not safe and seaworthy
as determined by the US Coast
Guard.”

Mr Thompson said that this
was definitely not the case:

“T can say categorically that it
had nothing to do with drugs,
or the fact that the boat was not
seaworthy. Because if the boat
was un-seaworthy it would have
been sent to dry dock and that
did not happen,” he said.

The complaint further alleged
that Pioneer has been telling
customers “whatever is conve-
nient for the moment to keep
the heat off,” and has failed to
allow competitors to move ship-
ments that have been held up.

“If they cannot deliver on
what it was contracted to do,

TWYNAM HEIGHTS
Bank Approved Financing

$330,000

3 Bed, 2 Bath;

then the competition should be
allowed to accommodate ship-
ments on behalf of others,” it
said.

According to Mr Thompson,
however, he has personally spo-
ken to several customers whose
cargo was delayed, and
explained the situation to them.

“Everybody was told up front
that the boat was being held by
the Coast Guard,” he said.

Mr Thompson said that cus-
tomers who wanted to have
their cargo brought into Nas-
sau by another carrier were
made aware that this could be
arranged through the Seaboard
Marine shipping service.

“Every customer I spoke tc I
explained the situation to, and
they understood that they could
have always had their cargo
switched over to another carri-
er,” he said.

Mr Thompson said that
delays which occur as a result of
Coast Guard inspections are
beyond the control of Bahami-
an shipping companies.

“With the advent of United
States homeland security pro-
cedures, they can do this any
time. You are at their discre-
tion,” he said.

Mr Thompson explained that
under the Patriot Act, the US
Coast Guard has been granted
“a lot of leeway” in terms of
their ability to board and
inspect ships that use ports in
the United States.

stiff penalties, heavy -

Minister
says a big
thank you

MINISTER of Youth
Sport and Culture
Neville Wisdom gives his
word of thanks to the

owners of the newly-

opened outlet of Mail
Boxes. Etc on Cable
Beach on Thursday. The
outlet offers additional
mail services to cus-
tomers in western New
providence,

peste eo

‘Photo:
Mario Duncanson













oa jw

a

Q




aio

6 | 8:25 | 10:25 |

THIDEANDSEEK CNW

MILLION DOLLAR BABY Lt




ARE WE-THERE YET | 6:10 | 8:20 | 10:30
COACH CARTER “Pan [as0-[wa [20 [wa [000
ELEKTRA | 1:30 | WA | 340 | 6:15 | WA | WA




Passau ONPREONOTIS oT Wawa Twa Twa Lao [0as




ANTHONY
See,

REGISTER TO WIN
2 FREE Cruises
Drawing on Monday, February 28th
6 p.m. Mackey St.
MALL AT MARATHON HOURS
Monday - Friday 8pm ¢ Saturday 9pm

MACKEY STREET LOCATION
Open until 6pm Friday, Saturday & Monday

LAYAWAYS ACCEPTED DURING SALE





PAGE 4, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR






@ @ @
The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master



Quality leadership
is the key to
nation’s future



LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914



SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.




Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991





EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-





Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O: F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama



TELEPHONES

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau. Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”





~ NOTICE

EDITOR, The Tribune.

AS the French say, the more
things change the more they
remain the same!

The political cartoon accom-
panying this brief observation
was published in 1980, and

- depicts Mr Franklyn Wilson and

Dr Elwood Donaldson finding
it difficult to accept that I, a
white politician, was being
enthusiastically received “Over
the Hill” by a fairly large audi-
ence of young black Bahamian
men, who obviously liked what
they heard! ..

Your January 18 report was
headlined “Political Giants
Have Their Say.” I quite under-
stand that comparatively speak-
ing I am a humble Political
Pygmy, but I nonetheless have
been there and done that, side
by. side with the Giants.

If the FNM does, in fact, deny
leadership to a capable white
person for no reason other than
the colour of his skin, they will
be making one of their biggest
mistakes ever. Seaga, a white

Royal
up to1

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THE PLP government has
finally shown their hand. The
unfortunate situation the for-
mer employees of the Royal
Oasis find themselves, and the
pressure applied on the Perry
Christie government has
forced the government to
“crack” under the pressure.

First of all every Bahamian
sympathises with the bad turn
of events that did not just hap-
pen overnight. The Royal
Oasis had been giving strange

signals for a long time. Long

before the hurricane, the man-

“agement of Royal Oasis had
- been taking advantage of its

employees and apparently had

been usurping monies that the

employees were entitled to.
So this is no surprise how
everything turned out. So



Sauna.

letters@tribunemedia.net





Jamaican of Lebanese extrac-
tion did it successfully. And, it
was Dr Martin Luther King
who proclaimed that he wanted

~ his children to be judged not by

the colour of their skin but by
the content of their character.
He was right on, and the same
should apply to white children,
and, yes, white politicians.
What this country has always
needed and continues to require
is quality leadership, regardless
of skin tone. Both political par-
ties (and there are only two that
are now viable) should seek
people of ability and integrity
thus ensuring us of a stable and
prosperous future. It will also
behove both parties to deliber-
ately seek out white political
aspirants, if they meet the
requirements in other ways,
simply because in a country
where some 10-20 per cent of
the population is white it is rea-

sonable that 10-20 per cent of
Parliament be white. Both par-
ties should bea mirror reflec-
tion of the population if at all

. possible.

Dr Donaldson (a friend of
mine) says that while the coun-
try may be ready for a white
leader he is not. Ellie, you have’
been out of step with reality
before! As for your remark that
there has not. been one black
investor since Independence,
that observation must have giv-
en Tiger a chuckle. I’m hoping
for an invitation to cruise on his
$30 million, 150-foot yacht with.

. eight staterooms when it fetch _

from New Zealand!
And if I need to borrow for
spending money on the cruise,

.. Pm sure that black Bahamian

investor, Frankie Wilson (he of
the second paragraph above)
would okay a loan.

As Smoky Joe used ‘to
say...Eh, Bulla! ~

NORMAN S SOLOMON
Nassau,
February 9, 2005.

Oasis must live

s responsibility

everything ‘niust bé done by

government to make sure that
Royal Oasis lives up to their
full responsibility.

Royal Oasis knows how
weak the Bahamas govern-
ment is so they took advan-
tage of it. They packed their

“Georgie bundle” and left,.

knowing full well that only
“hot. air” was expected from
the Prime Minister.

The government can cause
the principals of Royal Oasis
to pay. But they took the short
cut home and found a perfect
situation to use the public

purse, in a constituency that.

is obviously disgruntled with
the PLP and would therefore
not vote for them. .

It begs the question, “Is the
PLP buying votes?” Why is
the public treasury so liberal in
this situation, when there were
supposed to be a tightening of
the public’s purse? Who else
will benefit from this manoeu-
vre?

suspicious about:this exercise:

' People who have been laid‘sff -
’ from other properties, should °

expect the government to do
the same for them, or they
should force the government
to explain why the employees
of Royal Oasis are different
from them.

The extremely poor gesture
by the government will —

undoubtedly set a precedent

that will cause unrest in this
country. The government can-
not use our money as. they
wish. They cannot wake up
one morning and say, let’s give
this group or the other group
the Bahamian people’s money
without their permission.
Something is definitely wrong
with anyone who does that
with money that does not
belong to them.

~ IVOINE W
INGRAHAM
Nassau,
February 23, 2005.

B07 Nou acs-Vs40)

SECURITY DOORS

Serving The Bahamian Community
Since 1978

DON STAINTON

(PROTECTION) LTD.

HILLSIDE PLAZA - THOMPSON BLVD.
PHONE: 322-8160 OR 322-8219





NOTICE is hereby given that IZLAINE STERLIN, SHERLEY
STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 26th day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.

DIVIDEND NOTICE

PREMIER COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE
INVESTMENT CORPORATION LIMITED

TAKE NOTICE that the Board of Directors of
PREMIER COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE:
INVESTMENT CORPORATION LIMITED has
resolved to declare a Quarterly dividend in the
amount of Nineteen and one-half cent ($0.195) per
share for all shareholders of record as of the close
of business on the 21st day of February, 2005, the
same to be payable on the 28th day of February,
2005.

All payments shall be made through SG Hambros
Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited, the Registrar &
Transfer Agent, pursuant to the instructions of the
relevant shareholders on the files of SG Hambros
Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited as at the 21st day
of February, 2005.

Gregory K. Moss
Secretary




The Bahamian people. are

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ROSEMENE PIERRE,
MAYCOCK ALLEY, FOX HILL, P.O. BOX N - 10461,
‘NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 19th day of
FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANGELINA LACROIX OTHELLO,
#43 ETHEL STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26TH day of
FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GERTHA PEPE OF TREASURE
CAY, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 26TH day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.





THE TRIBUNE



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005, PAGE 5

as Reyer (MS a

Canker
groves
ripped
apart

By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

MORE than 900 acres of cit-
rus groves have been uproot-
ed in Abaco so far in the
effort to eliminate the Citrus
canker disease.

Meanwhile officials from the
Department of Agriculture
are preparing for the more
difficult task of going door-
to-door to identify infected
trees on the properties of res-
idents.

Director of Agriculture Sime-
on Pinder told The Tribune
yesterday that his department
is confident that all citrus
plants on the 3,700-acre
Bahama Star Farm at Trea-
sure Cay as well as those
growing in smaller commer-
cial groves in northern Abaco,
will be uprooted within the
next three months.

“We also just received new
equipment which will increase
the speed of the uprooting
and will help us complete the
process in three months,” he
said.

Mr Pinder further explained
that the uprooted trees have
not been burnt yet, as the
plants first have to dry out.

“However now that they

- have been uprooted it reduces
the chances of the canker
spreading, significantly,” he
added.

The agriculture director said
his department has so far
uprooted the largest of the
Bahama Star Farms groves,
and will now be moving on to
the smaller ones.

He said that security is still in
place in the area and that at
this point he is satisfied with
all the measures that have be
taken to rid the island of the
highly contagious disease.
Mr Pinder pointed out, how-
ever, that the “difficult part
is still ahead.”

He explained that the depart-

ment.will begin with their,

idpor-yard": survey in two
weeks, to determine which
‘residents have infected citrus
trees on their private proper-
ties.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control
Tropical Exterminators
BY 2 ae a) fae

BREET:
SATURDAY

| FEBRUARY 26 |

12:30 Lisa Knight & The Round
Table
Gillette World Sports
Sports Lifestyles
In This Corner: Carlos
Palomino Pt. 2
Sports Desk
Ballroom Boxing
Gospel Video Countdown
One Cubed
3’D Funk Studio
Eye On Health
Bahamas Tonight
Native Stew
Bahamian Things
Island Life Destination
The Darold Miller Show
Tropical Beat
Bahamas Tonight
The Lounge
Community Pg. 1540AM

SUNDAY
FEBRUARY 27

Community Pg. 1540AM
E.M.PA.C.T.
Voice That Makes The
Difference
Effective Living
Morning Joy
Contact Magazine
Fast Forward
Toyota World of Wildlife
Sports Desk
Gillette World Sports
This Is The Life
Gospel Video Countdown
World Impact
Ernest Angley Ministries
Morning Joy
Walking In Victory
One Cubed
The Bible Study Hour
Bahamas Tonight
Kemp Road Ministries
Living Abundantly
Ecclesia Gospel
Turning Point
Spiritual Impact: Leroy
Campbell
Bahamas Tonight

: Gospel Video Countdown

12:30amComm. Pg. 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV bia g--1-1 a5)
the right to make last minute
% programme changes!





By PAUL G. TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

WHY YOU VEX?

"I vex with this trend I see they have where
Bahamians are bending to accommodate all these
illegal immigrants in this town. Now they have us
teachers learning Creole so we can teach them
English. What happen to teaching us Spanish or
French? Why they never offer that programme?
Well, I could tell them one thing, I won't learn it.
We need to think a little bit. Why do we have to
build new schools every year? Who fillin them up
so much? It ain't Bahamian children, I can tell
you that for sure."

Teacher in Public school system

"I vex with this government and the past ones,
who have sold out this country to the highest bid-
der. Over the years these crooks have sold off
every piece of beachfront property or Out Island
to these big foreign investors. And for what? A

I tell you one thing...I
ain’t learning Creole!

. couple of dollars? Now they turnin around and

killin us with the price to buy back a piece of our
own country. Man, if you drive out west you can't
even see the beach, and you have no idea who
lives in these homes. But I can tell you one thing,
they ain't look like you an me."

Brent,
Courier Service

"T vex that ain't no more karaoke at the Hilton.
I used to love to go there and watch people make
complete fools of themselves. These new ones
they have now are too much about people coming
on trying to get record deals and stuff. That isn't
what karaoke is suppose to be about. You should
just be up there to have fun, not trying to make a
living."

Chester,

Village Road

"TI vex with my bush mechanic. I ask him how
much it would cost to fix my car engine and he
gave me a price almost double that of the licensed



Silver celebration for



car repair shop. You think his head straight?"

Dari,
Danottage Estates

WHY YOU HAPPY?

"I happy that the Pope is still making it. Lord I
was so scared when I heard he had gotten the flu.
I thought that was it for him, but thank the Lord he
pulled through. I'm not Catholic, but I could appre-
ciate all the good work this holy man has been
doing, and I wish him all the best."

Marvelle,
PMH

"I am very happy that the weekend has finally
come. I had one of those weeks that would cause
you to drink." ‘

Koyo,
Elizabeth Estates



region’s ‘best little navy’

Now
Defence
Force
strikes

for gold _

OFFICIALS of the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force yes-
terday announced plans to com-
memorate the organisation’s
25th year as a military entity

under the theme “Celebrating

Silver Reaching for Gold”.

Commander of the Defence
Force Commodore Davy Rolle,
at a press conference at the
Defence Force’s Coral Harbour
base, said that the establishment
of the Force grew out of the
necessity for the government of
the Bahamas to respond to the
many offences being perpetrat-
ed against the nation by drug
smugglers, poachers, illegal
immigrants and others who
sought to illegitimately operate
within the Bahamas’ maritime
borders.

Commodore Rolle, who is
only the second Bahamian to
hold the organisation’s top post,
since its inauguration on March
31, 1980, said the service is
widely recognised as “the best
little navy in the Caribbean”
and that he was “extremely
proud to have been associated
with the organisation since its
beginning years to this point”.

Co-chairperson of the 25th
Anniversary Celebrations Com-

mittee Lieutenant Commander |

Gaye Major stated that the
planned events and activities
have been deliberately designed
as much as possible to include
past members, friends, well
wishes:and the Bahamian pub-
lic. Planned events include a

Christ Church Cathedral
Schedule of Services for
Sunday February 27th, 2005

8:00 a.m.
Holy Eucharist & Annual Genral Meeting
Note: There will be one combined morning

service due to the

Parish Annual General Meeting.

Solemn Evensong, Sermon ex Benediction



fun/run/walk and a fun day at’

the base for the force’s family
members and friends, the
force’s annual church service,
an awards and medals presen-
tation ceremony at Government
House, an exhibition at the
main post office on East Hill
Street a grand military ball and
the second annual Commander
Defence Force Challenge Cup
‘C’ class and Sunfish Regatta
on Montague Beach,
Commodore Rolle also took
the opportunity to thank the
Bahamian public for its support
over the past quarter of a cen-

tury.



ee ee ee ee

A Service of Praise
and Thanksgiving









aU Og
A. Geoffrey Wood






Cemple Baptist Church

134 Farrington Road

Pastor A. Geoffrey Wood
who celebrates
20 Years in the Pastorate




A ee ee

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”







for

Dr. Earle Francis
Guest Speaker

and



46 Years in Ministry

on Sunday 27th February 2005 at 3:30pm at
The Church





PAGE 6, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005

_THE TRIBUNE





Black History Month’s
relevance to Bahamas

N a few days’ time, this
year’s celebration of
Black History Month by
our American neighbours
would come to an end.

The depictions of Black
achievements that have been
projected in the news media
during this period have, as
always, been both extremely
enlightening and inspiring. We
suppose this resulting experi-
ence has always been the pri-
mary purpose of the exercise.

In every civilisation the pio-
neering experiences of a gallant
few have always served as the
motivating catalyst for the
many, as the vast majority of
any people are followers, and
thus the importance of our
heroes.

Who are they? They are
those from among us whose
ground-breaking achievements
inspire countless others to like-
wise aspire to greatness.

When viewed in the above
context, the importance of com-
memorating their accomplish-
ments in various formats is then
brought into clearer focus. This
is absolutely necessary in order
that future generations might
come to the realisation that just
as others like them succeeded in
their chosen pursuits, so too can
they do likewise.

For quite some time, we have
been of the view that the cele-
bration of Black History Month
in the United States of America
had something to do with the
inception of the Dr Martin
Luther King, Jr holiday. That
holiday is celebrated on the
third Monday in January, a day
that falls on or near King’s
birthday of January 15.

The holiday was inaugurated ~

a little over two decades ago

and, like Black History Month, .

emphasises educational obser-
vances, such as lectures and
exhibits about King’s life and
philosophy.

However, we were wrong in
our opinion as expressed above,
as a recent scan of the Internet
has revealed the following:
“February marks the beginning
of Black History Month —- an
annual celebration that has
existed since 1926. But what are
the origins of Black History
Month?

“Much of the credit can go
to Harvard scholar Dr Carter
G Woodson, who was deter-
mined to bring Black History
into the mainstream public are-
na. Woodson devoted his life
to making ‘the world see the
Negro as a participant rather
than a lay figure in history.’

“In 1926 Woodson organised
the first annual Negro History
Week, which took place during
the second week of February.
Woodson chose this date to
coincide with the birthdays of
Frederick Douglass and Abra-
ham Lincoln — two men who
had greatly impacted the black
population — as well as the
anniversary of the founding of
the National Association for the
Advancement of Coloured Peo-
ple (NAACP).

“Renamed Black History
Week in 1972, the observance
was extended to become Black

History Month, a four-week-—

long celebration of African
American History, in 1976.
During February, lectures, exhi-
bitions, banquets, cultural
events, and television and radio
programming celebrate the
achievements of African Amer-
icans. Since 1978, the US Postal
Service has participated in
Black History Month by issu-
ing commemorative stamps
honouring notable African
Americans.”

Continuing our surfing of the
Internet, we were delighted to
find the following additional
information on Black History:
African Americans (American

Blacks or Black Americans) are |

defined as a racial group in the
United States whose dominant

ancestry is from sub-Saharan .

West Africa. Many African
Americans also claim Euro-
pean, Native American or
Asian ancestors.

A variety of names have been ,

used for African Americans’at
various points in history.
African Americans have been
referred to as Negroes,
coloured, blacks, and Afro-
Americans, as well as lesser-
known terms, such as the 19th
century designation Anglo-
African. The terms Negro and
coloured are now rarely used.
African American, black, and
to a lesser extent Afro-Ameri-

can, are used interchangeably
today.

Recent black immigrants
from Africa and the islands of
the Caribbean are sometimes
classified as African Americans.
However, these groups, espe-
cially first and second genera-
tion immigrants, often have cul-
tural practices, histories and lan-
guages that are distinct from
those of African Americans
born in the United States.

Examples of the above are
borne gut in the following facts:
Caribbean natives may speak
French, British English, or
Spanish as their first language.

-Emigrants from Africa may

speak a European other than
English or any of a number of
African languages as their first
language.

Caribbean and African immi-
grants often have little knowl-
edge or experience of the dis-
tinctive history of race relations
in the United States. Thus,
Caribbean and African immi-
grants may or may not choose
to identify with the African
American community.

Concerning the African
American experience, the fol-
lowing is revealed: African
American history is intertwined
with that of blacks in Latin
America and the Caribbean.
Like other blacks in the western
hemisphere the overwhelming

majority of African Americans ©

were brought to North America
the early 1800s.

As slaves, they were ‘édnsid-
ered the property of their own-
ers and had no rights. African
slaves could be found in al] 13 of
the British colonies, as well as
the Spanish colony of Florida
and the French colony of
Louisiana.

After the American Revolu-
tion (1775-1776), changing eco-
nomic conditions resulted in the
decline of slavery in the North.

as slavés between the 1700s and



However, the spread of cotton

cultivation encouraged the
growth of slavery in the South.

By 1860, four million slaves
accounted for one-third of the
total population of the south-
ern states. About 500,000 free
blacks lived throughout the
United States, slightly more
than half residing in the south-
ern states. In the North, many
free blacks became abolition-
ists, activists dedicated to ending
slavery and bringing about
black equality.

In 1863, during the American
Civil War (1861-1865), US Pres-
ident Abraham Lincoln issued
the Emancipation Proclama-
tion, freeing slaves in the south-

‘ ern states at war with the North.

The 13th amendment to the
Constitution of the US, ratified
in 1865, outlawed slavery in the
US...In 1868 the 14th amend-
ment granted full US citizen-
ship to African Americans. The
15th amendment, ratified in
1870, extended the right to vote
to black males.

In the South, such rights were
enforced only by the presence
of Union troops, who occupied
the region during the period
known as reconstruction. Wnen
Union troops withdrew from
the south in 1877, white South-
erners quickly reversed these
advances.

Racist groups, such as the Ku
Klux Klan, used terrorism to
keep blacks from voting, hold-
ing office, and enforcing labour
contracts. sha a

Whites also began establish-
ing a thorough system of seg-
regation in the US. Laws limit-
ing blacks’ access to trans-
portation, schools, restaurants,
and other public facilities,
sprang up throughout the
South. Although legal systems
of segregation were not estab-
lished in the North or West,
informal segregation was
enforced in both of these

regions.

Blacks responded to these
setbacks by forming the Nation-
al Association for the Advance-
ment of Coloured People
(NAACP) in 1910. The
NAACP mounted legal chal-
lenges to segregation and lob-
bied legislatures on behalf of
black Americans. African
Americans also created an inde-
pendent community and insti-
tutional life. They established
schools, banks, newspapers, and
small businesses to serve the
needs of their community.

Between 1910 and 1950, in
the largest internal migration in

US history, over five million

African Americans moved from
southern plantations to north-
ern cities in hopes of finding
better jobs and greater equality.
In the 1920s, the concentration
of blacks in urban areas led to
the cultural movement known
as the Harlem renaissance,
which used art, music and liter-
ature to demonstrate the cre-
ative abilities of African Amer-
icans.

A new generation of African
American political leaders, such
as Black Nationalist Marcus
Garvey and union organiser A
Philip Randolph, also found
support among urban African
Americans. In 1954, the US
Supreme Court handed down a

landmark decision in the case
of Brown v. Board of Educa-
tion of Topeka. This decision
led to the dismantling of legal
segregation in all areas of south-
ern life, from schools to restau-
rants to public restrooms.
Energised by such leaders as
Martin Luther King Jr, the civ-
il rights movement in the US,.
which coincided with our own
Bahamian struggle for majority
at that time, gained new
momentum in the mid-1950s.
Civil rights groups organised
non-violent protests, such as_.
marches and sit-ins, to rally the
black community. Many of the -
US civil rights leaders, including
Dr Martin L King Jr, A Philip
Randolph, Congressman Adam
Clayton Powell, Andrew
Young, Ralph Abernathy,
Mahalia Jackson and others,
came to The Bahamas during
this period to lend their moral
support to our local struggle.
Think on these things.

(George W Mackey’s book
“Millennium Perspectives”, a
compilation of Viewpoints and

. other interesting topics, is avail-

able at all leading bookstores
locally. E-mail: georgewmack-
ey@hotmail.com)

Gay issue splits Church

“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

‘CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS « Tel: 325-2921
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 27TH, 2005
11:30a.m. Speaker: Pastor Michael Johnson
7:00p.m. Evening Service

“Sunday School-6:45am The Lore’

___ -41:80am * Radio Broadcast ZNS {1 - 1:30
© Prayer & Bible Study Wed, - 7:30p

THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE
OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

pemegem l“Uillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, off Mackey Street
| P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax: 393-8135

Be CHURCH SERVICES

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2005
THIRD SUNDAY IN LENT



ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH, Prince Charles Drive
11:00 a.m. Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH, Bernard Road
11:00 a.m. Pastor Sharon Loyley



Worship time: 11am & 7pm

CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH, Zion Boulevard
Sunday School: 9:45am

10:00 a.m. Mr. George Knowles
7:00 p.m. No Service




' Special Service - Andrew Lord’s Day
Sunday February 27 at Ilam —/
Guest Speaker: Bro, Bill Davis - (



EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH, East Shirley Street
11:00 a.m. Pastor Martin Loyley
7:00 p.m. Pastor Martin Loyley

Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL
Preachering 11am & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm





GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH, Queen's College
Campus
9:30 a.m. Rev. James Neilly

Pastor:H. Mills




. Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive



ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue
8:00 a.m. Connections - Rev. Philip Stubbs

AT 6 is . - 3) | ces
S804 Rev ohllp-SLIbbS Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are

Pastor: H. Mills © Phone: 393-0563 ¢ Box N-3622

Rev. Henley Perry



TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
11:00 a.m. Youth Service - Mr. Robert d’ Albenas
7:00 p.m. Rev. William Higgs




PO. Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE



7 RADIO PROGRAMMES
“RENEWAL” on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Your Host: Mr. Henry Knowles
“METHODIST MOMENTS?” on each weekday at 6:55 a.m.
Your Host: Mr. Henry Knowles /
SCOSHHSOHSNDOHHOHOSOSOHSOHOHSHOOSOHSOOOHOOEOOOOESOCOOCDECCS
THE CONFERENCE BOARD OF CHILDREN, YOUTH AND YOUNG
ADULTS in conjunction with Wesley Methodist Church, Matthew Town,
Inagua ill be hosting a Young Adults Conference on February 25-27, 2005
under the theme: “Rekindling The Fire.”



COME





LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future
Worship time: Llam & 7pm
| Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:
The Madeira Shopping
Center






Collins Avenue at 4th Terrace Centreville
Telephone: 322-8304 or 325-1689 « P.O. Box N-1566
Fax No. 322-4793

OPPORTUNITIES FOR
PALO ctl ete

TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH will be hosting a HomeBuilders
Marriage Seminar - “Improving Communication in your Marriage”
on Friday, February 25, 2005 - 6:00 - 10:00p.m. ahd Saturday,
February 26, 2005 - 8:30a.m - 4:30p.m.Presenters: Drew and Kit
Coons of FamilyLife International. Registration: $20.00per person
includes: Seminar Materials. Supper on Friday an d Breakfast and
lunch on Saturday. Childcare available Friday and Saturday. Trin-
ity Place & Frederick Street (Next to Central Bank) Ample Parking
- Security Provided.







SUNDAY 8:30am ZNS-1 Temple Time Broadcast
‘6 i 8:30am Early Morning Worship Next door to CIBC ;
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427 aan at oe ieee ARE sie c eos tae
00am orship Service ALL LCOM ATT.
' SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 27th, 2005




7:00pm Evening Celebration





Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles



WEDNESDAY 7:30PM Selective Bible Teaching Royal
Rangers (Boys Club) Ages 4-17 Years

Missionettes (Girls Club) Ages 4-17.

7:00A.M. L. Lockhart/ Bro. E. Miller
11:00A.M. C. Archer/ Bro. J. Forde
7:00P.M. Sis. N. Thompson/ Bro. A. Paul

Theme: Rise up ye people of God.
Press towards the Prize Philippians 3:14 - 1




P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@batelnet.bs





VISIT OUR PREMISE BOOKSTORE, TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY





THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005, PAGE 7



Education key to re
claims new prison c

NEWLY-APPOINTED Super-
intendent of Prisons Dr Ellis-
ton Rahming says that a more
comprehensive educational,
technical and vocational train-
ing programme will be a key
component of prison reform at
Her Majesty’s Fox Hill Prison.

Dr Rahming, whose appoint-
ment took effect this month,
says the programme should
result in more inmates leaving
the facility better equipped aca-
demically and vocationally for
re-entry into society and should
also help reduce the high rate of
recidivism that is currently
pegged at 70 per cent.

A survey conducted amongst
inmates at Her Majesty’s Prison
by the National Prison Reform
Committee reveals that almost
60 per cent of inmates incarcer-
ated at the prison said more
educational, technical and voca-
tional programmes would help
reduce the rate of recidivism.

Dr Rahming says the pro-
gramme will include a distance-
learning component where
inmates - using an interactive
computer module - will be able
to learn a variety of technical
trades, including electronics,
small engine repair, motorcycle
repair and business manage-
ment skills at their own pace.

Inmates will also be. able to
benefit from hands-on instruc-
tion through a practical compo-
nent, in which they will work
side-by-side with professionals
in the various fields.

“One of the key aspects of
the long distance course is that
the inmates will be able to sit at
the computer and learn at his
or her pace, and so it will avoid
the embarrassment that often
serves as an, inhibitor to partic-
ipation.in classroom activities
for sgme inmates, who may not
want their cellmates to know
that they may have difficulty
conceptualising things,” says Dr
Rahming.

The long-distance course will
be combined with a number of
classroom activities designed to
enhance the educational well-
being of inmates at the institu-
tion.

Dr Rahming says prison offi-
cials envision the Ministry of
Education playing a key role in
the process by providing the
academic instruction for the
establishment of an adult learn-
ing facility on the prison com-
pound.

He says prison programmes
will also utilise, as much as pos-
sible, the expertise of external
educational and training agen-
cies such as the College of The
Bahamas, Bahamas Technical
and Vocational Institute, the
National Literary Services and
the National Library Services.

“It is our belief that the Min-
istry of Education should view
Her Majesty’s Prison as a school
site, the same way it now man-
ages a programme at the hospi-
tal for children who are hospi-
talised for long periods of times,
and in.the same light as it views

the Simpson Penn Centre for
Boys and the Williemae Pratt
Centre for Girls,” says Dr Rah-
ming.

“We have a new facility that
is about to be opened in short
order and the ideal thing would
be for the Ministry to provide
the teaching component, so that
an adult learning facility could
be launched right here that
would afford low-risk inmates
the opportunity to attend cours-
es in pursuance of their High
School Diploma, in addition to
BJC and BGCSE Certification.

“Security is always the num-
ber one priority in a prison envi-
ronment as it should be,” Dr
Rahming adds, “however,
inmate programming such as

academic/vocational training’

presents no threat to security,
but rather compliments security
in that inmates are accounted
for, they are fully occupied and
their chances of not becoming a
recidivist are enhanced.”

Dr Rahming, who chaired the
National Prison Reform Com-
mission established by Prime
Minister Perry G Christie in
October, 2002, to undertake a

strategic view of Her Majesty’s ©

Prison, says correctional edu-
cational programmes must be
of equal quality and require-
ments to equivalent pro-
grammes in the community, to
ensure that the student credits,
certificates and diplomas are
accepted by employers and are
transferable to schools and col-
leges after release.

The Report, made public in
February, 2003, just four
months after the Commission
was appointed, also recom-
mends that written policy, pro-
cedure and practice should pro-

vide that at least some Foe
ered |

tional programmes, are of
at a time when the majority of
inmates can take advantage of
those opportunities.

It further states that educa-

tional programmes should not

have to compete with work
assignments, visitation and
counseling, etc., and that pro-
grammes should be offered in
off-peak hours, the evenings
and on weekends.

Dr Rahming says the
enhanced focus on education-
al, technical and vocational
training at the Fox Hill Prison,
is part of a plan to “humanise”
the facility.

He says while the facility’ s
main priority remains setting
the standard for excellence in
public safety by protecting
members of the general public
against prisoner escapes, the
rehabilitation of inmates for re-
entry into society once they
have served their prison sen-
tences, is also a priority.

“If we don’t protect the pub-
lic from prisoner escapes, then
everything else falls away, and
so in pursuance of that we are
going to fortify the institution
to the point where no one even
thinks about escaping,” he says.

“We are going to fortify the
facility to the point where no

ows

unauthorised outsiders can get
in and no unauthorised insid-
ers can get out.

“By humanising the prison,
we are talking about a certain
philosophy of corrections,
where despite the wrong that
this person may have done, this
is a human being and he or she
ought to be treated as such. The
fact that a person is institution-
alised does not mean that they
are not entitled to the same
basic needs as persons on the
outside.

“They need proper shelter,
food, lighting, bedding and edu-
cational and technical and voca-
tional opportunities as part of
the rehabilitative process for
when they are released from
prison.’

Dr Rahming says the reality
is that 95 per cent of the per-
sons incarcerated at Her
Majesty’s Fox Hill Prison “will
hit the streets again” and that
society must be willing to give
them a second chance at life.

- He says that the educational

" programmes, along with a pre-

release programme that is being
worked into the prison curricu-
lum, will help make that transi-
tion easier for inmates upon
their release.

“The pre-release programme
will prepare them for life on the
outside and as they get closer
to theif day of exit, contact with
families, with church commu-
nities, with potential employers
will be increased, so that once
the individual hits the streets,
they will have a support net-
work already established that
can make the transition to being.
productive members of society
that much smoother,” says Dr
Rahming.

“In The Bahamas, we have a

very unforgiving society, (but).
’ members of the general ‘public’ '

are going to have to realise the
cold; hard facts that 95 per cent
of the persons incarcerated will
hit the streets again. They can
hit those streets continuously
being demonised and hated by
society or they can hit the
streets with society prepared to
give them a second chance,” he
adds.

Dr Rahming says failure to
be forgiving and to provide ex-
offenders with a second chance
will result in those persons
“becoming creative and surviv-
ing as best as they can”.

“Which means that many of
them will revert to crime,” Dr
Rahming says.

“That’s just the reality of it
and so a big part of the re-inte-
gration process has to do with
the wider society and the extent
to which they are prepared to
take a second look at these per-
sons”.

Dr Rahming says the institu-
tion will implement a Discharge
Certificate Programme under
which a certificate will be
awarded to each ex-offender.
The certificate will detail levels
of achievement in a number of
areas including educational,
technical and vocational train-

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ing, attitude and deportment,
initiative and responsibility and
involvement in positive activi-
ties, among others.

“Potentially, the purpose of
this certificate is to offset the
negative outflow associated with
a stained Police Certificate,” he
says. “The certificate will indi-
cate to a prospective employer
or loan officer, the institutional
assessment of the inmate’s
readiness to shoulder responsi-
bilities’.

A specialist in criminology,
Dr Rahming obtained a Doc-
tor of Philosophy Degree from
Washington State University
with a concentration in Crimi-
nology and has served as a con-
sultant/advisor on crime in the
Ministry of National Security.
His thesis at Washington State
focused on “Participation in 4
Prison Technical/Vocation-
al/Educational Programme and
Recidivism among Parolees in
Missouri”.

He says prison reform will
require a partnership between
prison officials, inmates and
members of the general public,
who must all buy into the new
vision and mission of the facili-
ty.

“Just as Rome was not
built in a day, reform does
not take place in a day and
similarly, or correspondingly,
does not relate to any one
person. It relates to the
extent to which the execu-
tive team at the prison could
have the rank and file at the
prison and the inmates buy
into the vision and move
together on the same page,
singing the same tune,” Dr
Rahming says.

“This is a very big job and
it is going to.take time, for it

to manifest itself, but it’s a.

questign of setting goals, sys-
tematically going after those
goals and being accountable

along the way. “We are an
instant coffee society,” Dr
Rahming says, “we want
things to happen right away.
You cannot judge progress
with regards to rehabilitation
and recidivism by the persons
who are being released today,
tomorrow or next month. You





will have to begin judging the
effectiveness of the pro-
grammes one year from now,
when persons who will be
released would have been
exposed to some new stimuli
and the programmes that will
be implemented in the very

near future”. .












Nassau, Bahamas.





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JENNIFER ELAINE TURNQUEST
WRIGHT OF DEADMANS CAY, LONG ISLAND, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 26TH day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and oreroenis P.O.Box N- 7147,



PARTS DEPARTMENT |

Will be CLOSED for
STOCKTAKING

FEBRUARY 25 to 2
(Friday, Saturday, Monday)

We will reopen for business as usual on Tuesday, March 1. }
We apologise to our valued customers and regret any |
inconvenience this may cause. All other departments

will be open for business as usual.

UALITY:

gales

LIMITED. .



East Shirley Street 323-3529/323- 3709 |



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and your reality were one?

The Incredible Drea
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for your dream home. Low interest rates and closing costs.

More than 30 exhibitors: Realtors, developers, furniture, awnings,
patio furniture, attorneys, architects, appraisers & insurance companies

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Approved applicants eligible for

10 Cash Prizes $1,000 Each

An Outstanding Banking Experience
Bank of The Bahamas

~-INTERNATIONAL

Proud winner of the 2004-2005 IAAP Award for Corporate Excellence.





PAGE 8, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005 THE TRIBUNE

NATIONAL BANK OF CANADA (INTERNATIONAL) LIMITED 3. LOANS
_NON-CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET Maturity analysis of loans is as follows:

AS OF OCTOBER 31, 2004 2004 :
(Expressed in United States dollars) 2003





. 3 months and under $ 25,477,637 $ 28,403,126
2004 2003 4 to 6 months 59,147 1,131
7 to 12 months 34,941 18,385
ASSETS ee a dr al
Cash and due from banks $ 308,483,195 $ 452,624,087 : $ 25,571,725 $ 28,422,642
Loans (Note 3) 25,571,725 28,422,642 : ee) eer
Investments in subsidiaries (Note 4) 128,512 150,052 4. INVESTMENTS IN SUBSIDIARIES
i iti 1,391,670 27,578,965 oes ;
ee assets , 901.807 741.077 Movement on investments in subsidiaries during the year is as follows:
Fixed assets (Note 5) 1,035,591 1,136,552 : ; 2004 2003
ivati i 1,900,678 73,514,865 poate
Derivative related items (Note 9) jnvestinents at equity: Vepinnifie OF yest $ 150,052 § 168,542
TOTAL $_339,413,178 $ 584,168,240 84,168,240 Bank's share of net profit for the year - 25
ILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY pe ee
Hine = oe ° , Write-down in value of investment in subsidiary (21,540) (18,515)
LIABILITIES: Investments at equity, end of
, fi year « $ 128,512 $ 150,052
Deposits - related parties $ 54,791,560 $ 37,798,870 . ee Somme
- customer (Note 6) 92,104,627 126,807,181
Interest free demand loan - related party 28,089,121 - 94,070,059
Bank overdraft - related party 4,308,417 12,376,701
Accrued interest and other liabilities 2,070,801 1,470,296 5. FIXED ASSETS
iabiliti 23,10
pene 181304026. 2S The movement of fixed assets during the year is as follows:
SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY:
Share capital (Note 7) 20,000,000 20,000,000 se 2004 :
Retained earnings 138,048,652 291,645,133 Beginning Ending
Total shareholders’ equity 158,048,652 311,645,133 Balance __ Additions __Disposals__ Balance
COST: :
413,178 584,168,240 ‘ .
TOTAL $ 339,413,178 $ 584,168,240 Leasehold improvements $ 888,503 $ - $§ (4,027) $ 884,476
. 7 Office equipment oe
See notes to non-consolidated balance sheet. ‘eral ee 338,134 2,929 (14,322) 326,741
This non-consolidated balance sheet was approved by the Board of Directors on January 25, Motor vehicle 38,128 62,216 (38,128) 62,216
2005, and is signed on its behalf by: Computer equipment :
and software 436,210 67,961 (23,843) 480,328
$ 1,700,975 $ 133,106 . $ (80,320) $ 1,753,761
2004
or Beginning Depreciation Ending i
Balance Expense Disposats Balance
ACCUMULATED : ee ,
- DEPRECIATION
NATIONAL BANK OF CANADA (INTERNATIONAL) LIMITED AND AMORTIZATION:
Leasehold improvements $ 178,029 $ 63,177 .$ - $ 241,206
NOTES TO NON-CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Office equipment
YEAR ENDED OCTOBER 31, 2004 and furniture 103,320 52,441 . (1,865) 153,896
(Expressed in United States dollars) . Motor vehicle 33,171 10,142 (38,128) 5,185
: Computer equipment
1. GENERAL and software 249,903 __-_ 75,470 7,490) ___317,883
4 $ 564,423 $ 201,230 $ (47,483) $ 718,170
National Bank of Canada (Intemational) Limited (the “Bank”) was incorporated during } 3 S04 023 5 201,230 3 (47,483) ——
October 1977, in The Commonwealth of The Bahamas and is licensed under The Banks 2004 $8 Movement $ 1,136,552 $ (68,124) $ (32,837) $ 1,035,591
and Trust Companies Regulations Act of 1965. The Bank is wholly owned by Natcan ; oo : —o
Holdings International Limited which was incorporated in The Commonwealth of The : one 31,164,563 $ 28,011) $ $_1,136,552

Bahamas during October 1995. National Bank of Canada, Montreal is the ultimate parent
company. The primary activities of the Bank are private banking, fud management, trust

: ae : Maturity analysis of customers’ deposits is as follows:
services and securities trading. ty analys ep

The Bank owns 100% of the ordinary shares of Mondial Trading (Bahamas) Limited. 2004 2003
Mondial Trading (Bahamas) Limited in turn owns 100% of the ordinary shares of Mondial 3 months and under $ 76,515,986 $ 58,009,242
Trading (Bahamas) Y Compania Limitada, a company incorporatell in Ghile: The primary, 8 4 to 6 months a _.*.7,747,180. 35,722,007
activity of Mondial: Trading (Bahamas) Limited -is.the holding of the investment in its ‘ 2 : “to 12 months “ ee 7,841,461 33,075,932
bsidi wi a : A
Pere a $ 92,104,627 $ 126,807,181
The average number of employees for the year was 31 (2003: 32). :
. Deposits from related parties are payable on demand.
The address of the registered office of the Bank is Goodman’s Bay Corporate Centre, West : ; :
Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.
7. SHARE CAPITAL
2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES Authorized, issued and fully paid:
The Bank’s non-consolidated balance sheet has been prepared in accordance with ‘ 2004 ~~ 2003
International Financial Reporting Standards. The preparation of non-consolidated financial ; BES wn) _
statements, in conformity with International Financial Reporting Standards, requires 175,000 5% fei panne kes abe
management to make certain estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of zo redeemable convertible preference
assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the shares of $100 each $ 17,500,000 $ 17,500,000
non-consolidated financial statements, and the reported amounts of income and expenses 20,000 Non-voting non-participating preference
during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates. shares of $100 each with no
- dividend rights "2,000,000 2,000,000 ,
The following is a summary of the significant accounting policies: 5,000 Ordinary shares of $100 each 500,000 500,000
a. _ Basis of presentation - This balance sheet has been prepared on the non-consolidated \ $___20,000,000 $ 20,000,000
basis as the financial position of the Bank and its subsidiaries are consolidated into 8. ANALYSIS OF ASSETS AND.LIABILITIES

the financial statements of the ultimate parent company. Results of the subsidiaries

are recorded on the equity basis using the internally prepared, unaudited financial _Assets_____Liabilities__

statements. Management is satisfied that the amounts carried at equity for the , 2004 2003 2004 . 2003
subsidiaries are fully recoverable. North America ; 33% 18% ; 20% 25%
Western Europe and other _67% _ 82% 80% 75%

oo% 100% 190% 100%
b. Translation of foreign currencies - Assets and liabilities denominated or accounted

for in currencies other than United States dollars have been translated into United. Maturity Analysis: ae
States dollars at the applicable exchange rates ruling at the non-consolidated balance a ee
sheet date. 2004 2003 2004 2003
BAe . tie Up to 1 "99% 879 54% 479
c. Investment in securities - Investment securities are recorded on a trade date basis and fo 9 : - . .
are classified as available-for-sale oe cit hee —
oe Over 5 years ‘ — 0% 0% 46% _53%
Investment in securities are initially recognised at cost (which includes transaction : , 100% 100% 100% 100%
costs). Available-for-sale securities are subsequently re-measured at fair value based : Doyo TROT ug ee
on quoted bid prices or amounts derived from cash flow models. Fair values for Currency Analysis: :
unquoted equity instruments are estimated using applicable price/earnings or ; : Assets Liabilities
ice/ ; ,
Poe 2004 2003 2004 2003 -
d. Loans - Loans are recorded at their principal amounts less provisions for loan losses. United States dollars 96% 94% 79% 82%
Provisions for loan losses are maintained at a level considered by management to be Canadian dollars 4% 4% 21% 16%
atlequate to absorb any losses given the risk characteristics of the loan portfolio. Euros _ 0% _ 2% __ 0% _, 2%

A loan is classified as non-performing when payment of interest is contractually past 100% 100% 100% 100%

due for 90 days or more. As of the non-consolidated balance sheet date there were Average Interest Rates:
no non-performing loans.

Loans Deposits

e. Assets held or liabilities incurred as nominee - The Bank is engaged in significant 2004 2003 2004 2003
trust activities. No account is taken in these non-consolidated financial statements Average interest rate 4.59% 5.00% 1.46% 1.875%

for assets held or liabilities incurred by the Bank as trustee or nominee.

f. Related parties - Related parties include entities directly and indirectly controlled by 9. DERIVATIVE FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS
the ultimate parent company.

a.,. The Bank uses derivative instruments for trading purposes.

g. Fixed assets - Fixed assets are recorded at cost less accumulated depreciation and

amortization. Assets are depreciated or amortized on a straight-line basis over their The notional principal amounts upon which payments are based are not indicative of
estimated useful lives which are as follows: the credit risk associated with derivative financial instruments.
Leasehold improvements over the term of the lease Credit risk arising from derivative transactions is the financial loss that may occur as
Office equipment and furniture 20% a result of a counterparty defaulting on its obligations to the Bank. Credit risk is
Motor vehicles ; 25% managed by setting credit exposure and duration limits for counterparties and dealing
Computer equipment and software 20% - 33 4% . primarily with G7 based dealers and financial institutions with high credit ratings.
h. Derivative financial instruments - The Bank uses various types of derivatives for The maturity analysis for open derivative instruments as of October 31, 2004 is as
asset/liability management and for trading purposes. The derivative instruments used follows: ‘
most frequentl. i i
quently are foreign exchange forward contracts, currency and interest rate Remaining term to maturi
swaps and equity swaps.
Greater
These derivatives are recorded at market values and the resulting gains or losses are ual ae ee ad Lae: sis
recorded as income. Market values are determined using pricing models that oe toon mong te mons 2
incorporate current market and contractual prices of the underlying instruments, time ; ;
value of money, yield curve and volatility factors. Equity and commodity swaps 7 ae “3 -S -S ~ $61,650,520
Forward contracts 60,690,145 150,000 : - 60,840,145 116,723,171
: : oe Interest rate swaps - - 5 : - 28,000,000
Unrealized gains and losses are reported on the balance sheet as derivative related aus : . . : = __(6527,500)

amounts under assets and liabilities. Where there is both a legal right and intent to ; : : Soe ye
settle these amounts simultaneously, they are presented on a net basis. S_ 60,690,145 $_ 150,000 $ _ 3 = $60,840,145 S$ 200,846,191 -
4



FF FF Ta Fa aE Fa I SR a? RP a ST

=

10.

11.

12.

YOO,

Deloitte.

Forward contracts are commitments to purchase or sell foreign currencies for
delivery at a specified date in the future at a fixed rate. Future contracts are similar
in nature.

Equity and commodity swaps are contracts involving one party paying on specified
settlement dates, an amount based on a specified floating interest rate and notional
amount while the other party pays, on specified settlement dates, an amount based on

the movement in the values of some equity, equity index, commodity index, or
basket of equities and the same notional amount as the floating rate component.

Interest rate swaps are transactions that generally involve the contractual exchange of
fixed and floating rate interest payment obligations on a specified amount of notional
principal for a specified period of time.

All foreign exchange forward contracts: and interest rate swaps and the majority of
equity swaps have been made with related parties.

Derivative related items represent the. net present value of the future cash flows in
relation to open derivative instruments as at the year end.

FAIR VALUE OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

Fair value of financial instruments included in assets and liabilities, except for the loan due

to related party, are assumed to"approximate their carrying values due to their short-term

maturity.

Loan due to related party is not considered to be materially different from its fair value as it
is payable on demand. ‘

The estimated fair value represents values which financial instruments could be exchanged
for in a current transaction between willing parties. Where there is no available trading
market, fair values are estimated using appropriate valuation methods.

RISK MANAGEMENT.
Credit Risk:
Credit risk arises from the failure of a counter party to perform ‘according to’ the terms of

the contract. From this perspective, the Bank’s significant exposure to credit risk is
primarily concentrated in cash and current accounts with banks, investments. and loans.

, The deposits and investment transactions are predominantly in Unites States dollars and

have been placed with high quality international institutions and corporations. The loans
are short term and are fully secured by assets managed by the Bank on behalf of the
customers. :

Price Risk:

Price risk is comprised of currency risk, interest rate risk and market risk. Currency risk
emanates from the possibility that the value of a financial instrument will fluctyate due to
changes in foreign exchange rates. The Bank minimizes its risk by monitoring levels of
foreign currency particularly those susceptible to foreign exchange rates volatility.

Interest rate risk is the risk that the value of a financial instrument.may fluctuate
significantly as a result of changes in market interest rates. The Bank’s exposure to this is
minimal as the relevant financial instruments are usually short term with fixed interest rates
and are therefore repriced on maturity. :

Market risk is the risk that there will be a change in the value of a financial instrument due

to changes in the market conditions. The Bank may from time to time enter into certain
contracts on behalf of its customers in order to reduce the level of risk. The Bank tends to
minimize this risk through various control policies, monitoring procedures and hedging
strategies.

COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES
Lease Commitments: <

Woe le ay 4 bh . wu boy
¢ future minimum rental payments ‘required under a non-cancelable operating lease are

“as follows:

Due within 1-year $ 354,374
Due between 2-5 years $ 1,868,027

Due over'5 years $ 1,696,116 ~
Commitments to Extend Credit:

In the normal course of its business, the bank enters into commitments to extend credit in
order to meet the financial needs of its customers. As of October 31, 2004, the total
amount of guarantees outstanding by the Bank was $6,915,599 (2003: $4,079,500).

Contingencies:

The Bank has overdraft facilities up to an amount of $100,000 and credit card facilities for
its customers up to an aggregate limit of $3,000,000. from FirstCaribbean International
Bank. era

13. NET FOREIGN CURRENCY EXPOSURE

Assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies at the balance sheet date are as
follows: :

2004 2003

: US$ USS
CAD EUR Equivalent CAD EUR Equivalent

’ Assets $ 510,420,356 $ 22,667,068 $ 447,995,778 $ 560,536,621 $ 18,485,259 $ 446,513,623

Liabilities (510,446,263) (22,535,845) (447,849,158) (560,536,257) _ (18,624,042) _ (446,674,117)

$ (25,907) $131,223 S$ 146,620 $ 364 $138,783) $ (160,494)



The asset and liabilities disclosed on the balance sheet in certain instances are presented
net. This is mainly in relation to derivative items which creates both assets and liabilities
and which can legally be settled on a net basis. The above balances are presented gross to
give a clearer picture of the overall exposure of the Bank.

Deloitte & Touche

Chartered Accountants
and Management Consultants
2nd Terrace, Centreville

P.O. Box N-7120
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: + 1 (242) 302-4800
Fax: +1 (242) 322-3101
http://www.deloitte.com 2s

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT



Empty buildings
‘in use by end of
year’ - minister

2001.

By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Senior Staff Reporter

GOVERNMENT expects
to have three multi-million
dollar buildings inhabited by
the end of the year, Works
and Utilities Minister Bradley

Roberts has told The Tribune.

_ Opposition members in the
House of Assembly on
“Wednesday expressed concern
that three buildings purchased
by the former administration
and the current government
have not been used as yet and
appear to be in a state of
“inactivity”.

- However, Mr Roberts said
that government has every
intention to get those build-
ings up and running hopefully
by the end of the year.

The buildings in question
are the old City Market build-
ing on Market Street, which
was expected to be used for
the offices of the Registrar
General, the Lloyds Bank and
Trust building, which will be
used for the offices of the
Ministry of Tourism, and a
building on Blake Road which
will be used to house a num-
ber of other government
offices.

Mr Roberts said that gov-
ernment is looking at not only
using the City Market building
for the Registrar’s office but
also for a number of other

_ offices.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005, PAGE 9 .

LOCAL NEWS).

“Government is looking to
convert this into a multi-use
building. That is approved and

so we are just faced with the -

matter of refurbishing it. From
what I understand the archi-
tect is just about ready to hand
in his plans for approval,” Mr
Roberts said.

Expanding the building’s
usefulness, a process which
has delayed its completion,
was an idea from Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie, Mr
Roberts confirmed.

“Mr Christie had said why

- just use it for one department,

go a‘couple of more storeys -

and put the building at better
- use and have a greater utili-
sation of the land. So we sus-

pended the work and after

going through the design
process we will resume if not
by the end of March then by
the end of April,” he said.

The Lloyds Bank and Trust
building on the corner of King
and George Street has been
earmarked by the government
as the new Ministry of
Tourism headquarters. Its
main problem is a lack of
parking.

The ministry, which had

been renting offices at the |

British Colonial Hilton, was
expecting to move into the
building in June of 2003. The
former ministry offices were
burned down in the Straw

{ Market fire in September



SMM wR TA FFA,

Mr Roberts said that the
building had gone through a:
valuation process and a Cabi-; _
net paper was being put:
together to start the process:
of evaluating contracts for its’
refurbishment.

The Blake Road building:
had been purchased by the;
National Insurance Board to.

- rent out to government. In this

respect Mr Roberts said that
government is also looking at:
contracts for its refurbishment.:

However, Opposition
Leader Alvin Smith told The
Tribune yesterday that he is
concerned about the govern- '
ment’s seeming infability to
move ahead with putting these
buildings to use.

“Why are the buildings not
occupied, because government
has spent money on these
buildings which could have
‘gone to something else if it
was not intended for them to
be put to.use.right away,” he
said.

Mr Smith criticised govern-.

ment for not prioritising.

“Lloyds Bank was pur-
chased for $5 million, Blake
Road for $9 million and the
FNM left behind plans for the
registrar to be moved to Mar-
ket Street. Our country’s
schools are in a mess and we
need to hire more teachers,
that money could be used for
that,” said Mr Smith.

Pop group stalwart dies at 66

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

JNAMI RELIEF
FOR SRI LANKA

Natural disasters can’t be prevented, but the effects can be more
manageable with YOUR HELP.

Friends of Sri Lanka invite individuals and institutions wishing to
contribute towards the tsunami relief efforts in Sri Lanka to help in
one of the following ways:

UT EAS UT a a ae eo

To the Shareholders of
National Bank of Canada (International) Limited:

We have audited the accompanying non-consolidated balance sheet of National Bank of Canada
(International) Limited (the “Bank”) as of October 31, 2004. This non-consolidated balance
sheet is the responsibility of the Bank’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion
on this non-consolidated balance sheet based on our audit. :

We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those
Standards’ require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about
whether the non-consolidated balance sheet is free of material misstatement. An audit includes
examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting: the amounts and disclosures in the non-
consolidated balance sheet. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and
significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall non-consolidated
balance sheet presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis "for our
opinion.

In our opinion, the non-consolidated balance sheet presents fairly, in all material respects the

non-consolidated financial position of the Bank as of October 31, 2004; in accordance with’
International Financial Reporting Standards.

Lh ble ¢ Tock

January 25, 2005

1. Deposit your contribution into the special account opened at
Bank of The Bahamas —
Tsunami Relief for Sri Lanka -
Account Number: 5265970
Bank of The Bahamas
Main Branch
The deposit can be made at any branch of the bank.

If you are paying by cheque, you can take your contribution
to A. I. D. at any of their locations in New Providence, Grand
Bahamas, Abaco, Eleuthera, Andros and Exuma.

Mail: your cheque to Tsunami Relief for Sri Lanka.
P..O. Box CB 11665, Nassau, Bahamas. Cheques should be
made payable to “Tsunami Relief for Sri Lanka”.

Simply call us at 502-7094 — and we will arrange to
collect it from you.

LITT

Contributions will be forwarded to the Sri Lanka Red Cross
Society for effective deployment. ,



cd



PAGE 10, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005









Parties, Nightclubs
& Restaurants





The Love of Music concert featuring internation-
al award-winning artist ta.da with Aydee, Mizpah
Bethel and Dreddy on Saturday, February 26 @ the
Blue Note in the British Colonial Hilton. Admis-

_ sion $35 (drinks inclusive). Tickets available at the
Juke Box, Mall at Marathon and Blue Note, 322-
NOTE, blue.note@coralwave.com.

Have a Heart concert featuring the Bahamas’
hottest performers, Xtra, Visage and KB on Satur-
day, February 26 @ at the Wyndham Crystal Palace
Ballroom. The theme of the concert is “Bringing
Hope and Awareness Through Music” and is aimed
at raising awareness of heart disease among young
people. The box office opens at 8.30pm. Show-
time is 9pm. Tickets are $15 in advance and $20 at
the door, and all proceeds will go to the Bahamas
Heart Association. For more information call 356-
7326 or 324-1714.

Rave Saturdays @ The All New Club Eclipse. DJ
Scoobz spinning the best in Old Skool. Admission
$35, all inclusive food and drink. ,

Fever @ Bahama Boom, Elizabeth St, downtown,
Fridays. The hottest party in the Bahamas every
Friday night. Admission $10 before midnight. First 50
women get free champagne. First 50 men get a free
Greycliff cigar. Dress to impress. For VIP reserva-
tions call 356-4612.

Cool Runnings is back with a Conscious Party @
Hard Rock Cafe, Charlotte St North every Friday.
; Pldssie Teggae style music. Admission $10.

Mellow Moods every Sunday @ Fluid Lounge
and Nightclub, Bay St, featuring hits from yesterday
— old school reggae and rockers downstairs, and
golden oldies upstairs. Admission: Free. Doors open
9pm.

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters Sports
Bar. Drink specials all night long, including karaoke
warm-up drink to get you started. Party, 8pm-until.

Karaoke Nights @ Fluid Lounge and Nightclub.
Begins 10pm every Tuesday. Weekly winners select-
ed as Vocalist of the Week — $250 cash prize. Winner
selected at end of month from finalists — cash prize
$1,000. Admission $10 with one free drink.

Reggae Tuesdays @ Bahama Boom. Cover charge
includes a free Guinness and there should be lots of
prizes and surprises. Admission: Ladies $10 and
’ Men $15.

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports:
Bar every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers
and numerous drink specials.

Flash Nights @ Club Fluid every Thursday. The
ultimate Ladies Night. Join Nassau’s and Miami
Beach’s finest men. Ladies only before 11.30pm with
free champagne. Guys allowed after 11.30pm with
$20 cover.

The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday. Doors
open at 9pm, showtime 11.30pm. Cover charge $15.
$10 with flyer. ,

Twisted Boodah Bar & Lounge every Friday @
Cafe Segafredo, Charlotte St North, featuring world
music, chillin’ jazz and soulful club beats. Starting at
6pm. Beers $3, longdrinks $4.50.

Fantasy Fridays @ Fluid Lounge, featuring late
‘80s music in the VIP Lounge, Top of the Charts in
the Main Lounge, neon lights and Go Go dancers.
Glow sticks for all in before midnight. Admission:
Ladies free before 11pm, $15 after; Guys $20 all
night.

College Night @ Bahama Boom every Friday.
Admission: $10 with college ID, $15 without.

Dicky Mo’s Fridays @ Cable Beach. Happy Hour
- 3 for $10 mixed drinks and $1 shots.

LoNGon

melee

t’s for the love of music that artists ta.da, Mizpah Bethel, ‘Avice and Dreddy, will

take to the stage on Saturday ina concert that will introduce a soon-to-be-

released compilation album by Bahamian and Canadian artists. Headliner of the

event, ta.da (Terneille Burrows) of Sanctigroove Promo, is.a recording artist,

songwriter and producer. Her style is a unique ‘blend of soul, reggae and hip-hop.

She has independently released CDs and has music videos that air on Much Music. ta.da

is an honours graduate from the Harris Institute for the Arts in Toronto, Canada, and has
won multiple Marlin Awards and John Lennon Songwriting contest awards. _

“Some of the freshest and most original young artists/songwriters will be showcased. This

is a must-see event for music lovers, featuring an all-star roster of young Bahamian talent,”

according to the concert press release.

“The Love of Music” begins at 9pm. Adinission: $35 (drinks inclusive). Tickets can be
_purchased at the Juke Box in the Mall at Marathon. ~

Greek Saturdayz @ Bahama Boom, Elizabeth
Ave. Every Saturday the Phi Beta Sigma Frat wel-
comes greeks, college grads and smooth operators.
Admission $15 all night, $10 for greeks in letters.
Music by DJ Palmer, security strictly enforced.

Chill Out Sundays @ The Beach Hut, West Bay
Street with fresh served BBQ and other specials
starting from 4pm-10pm, playing deep, funky chill
moods with world beats. Cover $2.

Sweet Sunday Chill Out Soiree Lounge, every
Sunday, 4pm-midnight @ Patio Grille, British Colo-
nial Hotel.

' Wet Sundays, every Sunday, noon-midnight @
Crystal Cay Beach. Admission $10, ladies free.

Carib Scene @ Club Fluid every Sunday. A night
of Caribbean, Latin and Reggae flavours for all
audiences. Latin Flair in the VIP Lounge; Old School
Reggae and Soca in the Main Lounge. Ladies in
free before 11pm. $10 after 11pm. Men, $15 cover
charge.

Jay Mitchell and Hot KC @ Palm Court Lounge,
British Colonial Hilton, Wednesday-Thursday 8pm-
12am.

Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley’s Restaurant &
Lounge, Eneas St off Poinciana Drive. Featuring
Frankie Victory at the key board in the After Dark
Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to midnight. Fine food
and drinks.

Paul Hanna performs at Traveller’s Rest, West
Bay St, every Sunday, 6.30pm-9.30pm.







The Arts

Alton Lowe will exhibit a group of recent paint-
ings at the Nassau Beach Hotel in the Common-
wealth Room, starting Saturday, February 27
through March 2, 10am to 7pm daily.

Ian Strachan’s Diary of Souls, the critically
acclaimed play examining the Haitian experience
in the Bahamas, will open at the Dundas Centre
for the Performing Arts on Friday, March 4 and

continue through March 6, 8pm. And again on |

Friday, March 11 and Saturday, March 12, 8pm.
Call the box office at 393-3728 for ticket info.
Tickets for Friday’s performance are $25, remain-
ing shows are $20.

Indigo, a film about gifted children on earth,
their purpose and work of healing, peace and
love, will be shown @ Unity Centre of Light, East
Ave, Centreville (directly behind Centreville Food
Store) on Friday, March 4, starting at 6.30pm.
Admission $10 adults, $7 children. For more infor-
mation call 328-1325.

The National Collection @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, an exhibition that takes
the viewer on a journey through the history of
fine art in the Bahamas. It features signature
pieces from the national collection, including
recent acquisitions by Blue Curry, Antonius
Roberts and Dionne Benjamin-Smith. Gallery
hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 1lam-4pm. Call 328-
5800 to book tours.

Past, Present and Personal: The Dawn Davies
Collection @ the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, Villa Doyle, West and West Hill Streets.
The exhibition is part of the NAGB’s Collector’s
Series. Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 11am-4pm.

A ROUN D









THE TRIBUNE



NASSAU



Call 328-5800 to book tours.

The Awakening Landscape: The Nassau Water-
colours of Gaspard Le Marchand Tupper, from
the collection of Orjan and Amanda Lindroth @
the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas. The
mid-nineteenth century paintings that make up the
exhibition are part of one of the earliest suites of
paintings of Nassau and its environs. Tupper was
a British military officer stationed at Fort Char-
lotte in the 1850s. The works show a pre-mod-
ern Bahamas through the decidely British medium
of watercolour: Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday,
1lam-4pm. Call 328-5800 to book tours.

4

Health



The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at |
5.30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at
their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville. Call
323-4482 for more info.

_MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third
Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors Hospital con-
ference room.

The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2.30pm (except August and Decem-
ber) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley
Street.

Doctors Hospital, the official training centre of the
American Heart Association offers CPR classes cer-
tified by the AHA. The course defines the warning
signs of réspiratory arrest and gives prévention strate-

\giés:to: avoid sudden death syndrome and the most |

common serious injuries and-choking that'can occu}
in adults, infants and children. CPR and First Aid
classes are offered every third Saturday of the month
from 9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Com-
munity Training Representative at 302-4732 for
more information and learn to save a life today.

REACH - Resources & Education for Autism

‘and related Challenges meets from 7pm — 9pm the

second Thursday of each month in the cafeteria of
the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.

Civic Clubs



The Bahamas Historical Society’s monthly
meeting is scheduled for 6pm on March 17 at the”
Museum on Shirley Street and Elizabeth Avenue.
Dr Donald Hopkins of the Carter Presidental
Center, a descendent of Long Island, Harbour
Island and Abaco, will give a presentation entitled
“Posing Questions, Pondering Records and:Prob-
ing the Genes: Researching Family Histories in the

Bahamas.” The public is invited to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1905 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm @
BEC Cafe, Tucker Rd. Club 9477 meets Friday,
7pm @ Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm
A19, Jean St. Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pm @
British Colonial Hilton. Club 1600 meets Thursday,
8.30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes. Club 7178 meets
Tuesday, 6pm @ The J Whitney Pinder Building,
Collins Ave. Club 2437 meets every second, fourth
and fifth Wednesday at the J Whitney Pinder Build-
ing, Collins Ave at 6pm. Club 612315 meets Monday
6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ the
Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first
Tuesday, 7pm @ Gaylord’s Restaurant, Dowdeswell
St. Please call 502-4842/377-4589 for more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second
Tuesday, 6.30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office,
4th floor meeting room.

The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month in
the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, Bay St.

Send all your civic and social events to The Tri-
bune via fax: 328-2398 or e-mail: outthere@tribune-
media.net

Se 6):

PIRITS



THE TRIBUNE ~

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005, PAGE 11



Government faces 57 requests

for commercial broadcasting

By ERIC ROSE
Bahamas Information Services

MINISTER of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe said that the govern-
ment is considering 57 requests. for
commercial broadcast licences for
FM stations, as well as requests for
commercial television licences.

“We are reviewing these requests
and, shortly, there will be an
announcement of our decisions,” said
Minister Wilchcombe, who has min-
isterial responsibility for broadcast-

ing.
Mr Wilchcombe was speaking at

FNM. calls for ‘Students - told of

the renewal of Bahamian commercial
broadcast licences during a ceremo-
ny at the British Colonial Hilton.

Attending were representatives of
radio stations from New Providence,
Grand Bahama, Abaco and
Eleuthera, as well as government
officials and broadcasting stake-
holders.

Mr Wilchcombe told the broad-
casters that it is the government’s
policy that all radio stations pro-
mote Bahamian heritage and cul-
ture and reinforce positive
Bahamian values.

“In this regard, licence holders
are encouraged to increase pro-

grammes that reflect our rich and
diverse culture and our heritage,”
he said.

Mr Wilchcombe said that the
government is also considering
amending the broadcasting rules
to impose fines for breaches of Sec-
tion 10 of the rules, which outlines
matters which are not permitted to
be broadcast. He asked that they
ensure that their stations fully com-
ply with the rules.

Mr Wilchcombe encouraged
licensees to submit suggestions and
written recommendations for the
improvement of the broadcasting

industry in The Bahamas. He said

solution to
Bozine row

- By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Free National Move--

ment has called on the gov-

House faces
new Stubbs
resolution —

FROM Page One

on how many extensions a per-
son can be given.

Leader of government busi-
ness in the House, Immigration
and Labour Minister Vincent
Peet said that government is still
monitoring the matter.

“The issue is before the
courts which is hearing his mat-
ter and we would certainly wait
for the court to do what it needs

to do. We are clearly watching

how things develop but we have
no control over'the court,” he
said.

However, Mr Peet said that
government has not made a
decision yet as to whether it will
forward another resolution giv-
ing Mr Stubbs another exten-
sion.

Leader of Opposition Busi-
ness, Montagu MP Brent
Symonette told The Tribune
that enough time has been giv-
en to Mr Stubbs.

“I feel that certainly enough
time has been given to sort this
matter out and it is time for the

ernment to resolve the land

dispute between land devel-
opers and the residents of
Bozine Town.as soon as pos-
sible.

The residents face being dis-
placed by the Harrold Road
Land Development Compa-
ny (Landco) which claims they
have the clear title deed tRihe

property. on. which the resi-'.

dents have lived for many
years.

In a press statement yester-
day, former area MP Dion
Foulkes, said the FNM held
an extraordinary meeting on
Wednesday night where the

FNM Blue Hills Constituen- -

cy Association unanimously
passed a resolution calling on
the government to bring
immediate resolution to the
crisis in Bozine Town and
Knowles Drive.

Mr Foulkes said that the gov-
ernment must move with

. haste to ensure that the resi-

dents of Bozine Town and

‘Knowles Drive obtain good

and marketable title to their
land.

"The good people of Bozine
Town and Knowles Drive

have experienced a lot of pain |

and anxiety as a result of the

land dispute.. Families are in —

an uproar, financial commit-
ments are in. jeopardy and

societal pressures are build-

ing."
He said as a matter of public

policy, the government has an’

obligation to bring swift and
effective help to the good peo-
ple of Bozine Town.

He said he called on the
Prime Minister, the Attorney
General and area MP Leslie
Miller to address this matter
as one of national urgency so
that residents could revert to

_ their former lives of peace and

tranquility.

The Bahamas Democratic
Party has also taken up the
call for the government to
assist the residents.

TEACHING VACANCY




ly towards sex.

C I GIBSON HIGH SCHOOL held a
workshop on HIV/AIDS and other social
issues at the school on Marathon Road.

Presentations were made by Mr Ranard
Henfield on HIV/AIDS from a Caribbean
perspective, Mr Keith Kemp on education
and the value of abstinence, and Mr Hank
Williams on drug abuse:

Mr Henfield, attorney and founder of the
Caribbean AIDS Awareness Festival, told
the students that HIV/AIDS is a world-wide
problem, and that most persons infected with
HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean are between
the ages of 15 and 25 years.

“The leading cause of death among young
people in the Bahamas.teday & HIV/AIDS,”
Mr Henfield said. “Youngsters are taking
part in'sexual intercourse at an alarming ear-
ly age. “The strange thing about AIDS is it
does not matter who you are. It has no face.
It has no cure.”

Mr Henfield noted that a new strain of
AIDS has being detected recently, and that a
Trinidadian man contracted HIV some six
months ago and has since died.

Mr Keith Kemp, chairman of Youth:
Awareness Programme, said that young peo-
ple’s attention. is being directed almost entire-

Said Mr Kemp: “The national prade point

that since 2003, such input was

requested from them.

“I must confess that I was rather
disappointed with the lack of
response and interest shown to date,”
he said. “I had hoped that, at this
forum, we would have begun mean-
ingful discussions of your written rec-
ommendations to improve broad-
casting.

“Tt would be better, for example, not

-to wait for the 2007 General Election

to consider amendments to the rules
governing General Elections.”
Minister Wilchcombe also
addressed questions and comments
from broadcasters on various topics,

new AIDS strain

By Krystal Knowles
Bahamas Information Services

done.

dead.”

average for 2004 stood at a D level. Main-
taining a low grade point average affects your
future. Employers are looking for employees
who are intellectually u inclined to get the job

“When it comes to sex, your body and your
future, you need to develop a serious atti-
tude. Young women need to have moral and
respect. Do not allow your boyfriend to intim-
idate you into having sex. Say no and mean
no Mr Kemp said.

“Young men need to wise up if you intend
to be the future leaders of this country. Stop
procrastinating and focus on your education
and cease allowing our women to lead us in
every aspect of society. Time wasted can nev-
er be regained.”

Mr Williams, a former drug dealer and
abuser, recounted his life’s story in an effort
to deter young men and women from becom-
ing.drug dealers or.abusers.

“Marijuana destroys your brain cells. Your
attitude and judgement about life is distorted
when you are under the influence drugs,” he
said. “Satan shows us all the glamour of this
world but does not show us the end results of
being locked in Fox Hill, having aS or |

Mr Williams said the love of money causes
young women to sell their bodies or men to
kill for it.

“Be sure of yourself. Focus on your edu-
cation and give your life to the Lord, ” Mr
Williams said.

including the possibility of dividing
The Bahamas into regional broad-
cast markets, competition with ZNS
for advertisers, satellite radio, music
subscription services, the need to
promote Bahamian performing
artists and the importance of com-
petition. Minister Wilchcombe said
such dialogue is important and is nec-

“essary for the growth of Bahamian

broadcasting.
“We are ina developing industry,

-as far as the Bahamas is concerned,

and our job must always be to look at

it, to assess where we are and then |

make new decisions and move on,”
Minister Wilchcombe said.























Get behind the news every ae |
..read INSIGHT, only in The Tribune





BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF
EXTERNAL AUDITING SERVICES

TENDER No. 578/05

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites
applications from qualified Teachers for ‘positions
available at St John’s College, St Anne’s School,
Freeport Anglican High School/Discovery Primary
School and St Andrew’s Anglican School, Exuma.

‘parties concerned to fully dis-
close what actions have been
taken prior to brining any reso-
lution to the House of Assem-
bly,” said Mr Symonette.

If a by-election is called to fill
a seat vacated by Mr Stubbs,
Chairman of the FNM Carl.
Bethel is expected to run for
the Holy Cross seat which he
lost to Mr Stubbs three years
ago.

“The executive of the party
and council have a definitive
strategy in place and we are
waiting to see what will happen
by the end of March and based
on what the government does






PRIMARY:
Upper Primary
Lower Primary
Kindergarten
Computer Studies

SECONDARY
Spanish .
English Language/Literature
Biology
Mathematic
’ Religious Studies
Physical Education
Special Education
Librarian

The Bahamas Flectrcity Corporation invites tenders fron eligible bidders for
the provision of external auditing services.












Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office, Blue
Hill & Tucker Roads ey contacting:-

we will have a response,” Mr Mrs Delmeta Seymour

Bethel said. plome BeguoMucs: Administrative Officer
Mr Stubbs was declared Nurse é :

bankrupt in March of 2004 by Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

J He ipsicdonte peal Only qualified Teachers, Nurse, with Bachelor or Nassau, Bahamas

was rejected by the Court of Master Degrees from an accredited University or Phone No. 302-1158

Appeal and he has expended Fax No. 323-6852
the entire 150 day extension
allowed by parliament to have
the matter resolved.

The House then passed a res-

olution allowing Mr Stubbs an

College and Teaching Certificate need apply.

For further details and application forms, please contact .
the Anglican Central Education Authority on Sands
Road at telephone (242) 322-3015/6/7.

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 11 March 2005 by 4:00pm and
addressed as follows:

additional six months to get his The General Manager

affairs in order. If he fails he ae et pe Bahamas Electricity Corporation
forfeits his parliament t. Letters of application and/or completed application , a

orfeits his parliamentary sea PP. p Pp Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Since first being declared a
bankrupt Mr Stubbs has come
under fire by the FNM which
made repeated calls for a by-
election in Holy Cross.

Lawyers for the FNM also
announced that they would file
" a petition questioning whether
Mr Stubbs is qualified to con-
tinue representing the con-
stituency if the bankruptcy rul-
ing is upheld.

forms with copies of required documents must be sent
by Friday, March 11, 2005 to the Anglican Education
~ Department addressed to:-

Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs Delmeta Seymour
Marked: Tender No. 578/05

The Director of Education ‘RXTERNAL AUDITING SERVICES”

Anglican Central Education Authority
P.O. Box N-656

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.
Nassau, Bahamas f :



|



PAGE 12, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005 [HE | HIBUNE



isaac

Naa See eh EWEN TS CAPTURED ON CAMERA

Golden Heart Awards



@ A DASHING COUPLE: The debonair Joseph B Pratt, retired
GIVING TO CHARITY: from left, Kit Spencer; J. Barrie Farrington, supervisor of underground construction with the Bahamas Electrical
Kerzner International senior vice-president of administration and = Corporation (BEC), together with his wife Cynthia, Deputy Prime
his wife Susan; Dr Bernard Nottage, leader of the Coalition for Minister and Minister of National Security, dressed in a stunning red
Democratic Reform (CDR); attorney Thomas Evans QC. satin gown.





DANCING THE NIGHT AWAY: Insurance
executive and Zonta living legend, Orinthia
Nesbitt, winner of the 41st Annual Golden

Heart Award with her husband Lloyd, own-
ers of General Brokers Insurance Ltd.

‘







i LOOKING SMART: Joseph Gibson, marketing consultant, with his wife
Linda, executive vice-president and general manager of Atlantic Medical
Company.

Hi SEEING CLEARLY: Optometrist Randall ‘Randy’ Hall and
his wife Annie of the Optique Shoppe.



Pe

LADIES OF GLAMOUR: Kayla Johnson
and Shawnell Bain of the Commonwealth
Bank.



@ FOREIGN AFFAIRS: US Ambassador to the Bahamas John Rood and his
wife Jamie with British High Commissioner Rod Gemmell and his wife Jan.





M@ KEEPING THE FAITH: Rev James Moul-
trie, former educator, politician and diplo-

mat, with his wife Bernadette.
Va by es @ DIVAS OF THE NIGHT: Flora Strachan, CEO of the Reg-
4 aj, peep ees Rens ie | i ONE HEART: Rev Kendal Nottage, attorney-at-law, with his wife Ruby, istrar Department; Michailla Strachan, chief radiologic
FE BN hela chancellor of the Anglican Diocese of Bahamas including Turks and technologist of the Fourth Terrace Diagnostic Centre; Zen-

: tt ah ' Caicos. — er Beckford, lease manager at the Airport Authority.























SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005 Gece es a ture

a __ of sailing at
SECTION Rotary Club of
; _ East Nassau —

Fax: (242) 328-2398 ;
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com MIAMI HERALD Ss PORTS

@ By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
TWO minutes had elapsed off the clock |

before any team decided to put ascore onthe |

board, and with the defensive pressure being |;

applied it seems as though the first quarter |, ; :

would have gone without a score.
It was a crucial game between the Catholic
High Crusaders and the Prince William Fal-

cons, who were forced to head south for the

spring. The final score was 32-31.
With time ticking, and pressure.starting to |

climb, Falcons’ Rashad Williams drove base- |

line, hitting the first point in the game off the |
ass. i

© Williams went cold afterwards jut histeam- |

| mate Benjamin Rolle took o, “where he left
| off. a yo

Pressure was moundng for the Crusaders,

ee eee a | ORaAlCG ns ‘head south for si ring

lafelo (2x1 =}



9

son. Nelson scored all six of the Crusaders'
| points in the first quarter.

! The game, which would have sent the loser
packing, was all the fans expected, especially
; after the Crusaders fell short in their first battle.

Forcing the Falcons to take the long route
were the CV Bethel Stingrays. The two teams
were on the tournament’s hook, dangling.

i With just two points separating the two
| schools in the first three quarters, the Falcons
| applied their full court press and winded up
| stealing three inbound passes by the Crusaders.
However, the Falcons were only able to convert
one of the steals.
Williams said: “It was a tough game for us ...
+ J believe we could have played better in the
/ final minutes, but I lost control of several pass-
; - es which cost us in the end. But overall it was a
| good game which we shouldn’t have lost, but I
| guess they wanted it more than us.” ;
1 The Falcons were a brand new team in the
| fourth quarter and didn't allow the Crusaders to
{ send them packing in their own hometown.
They started the fourth period with a big three
pointer by Devard Martin, and two steals, one of
} which they capitalised on.
| By this time the falcons had the Crusaders
: down by four points, with things just starting to
| heat up. But this wasn’t just an ordinary game
for the Crusaders, who are known for doing
well in.tournaments like the Hugh Campbell
Invitational. he tee nn Lah
i When the Crusaders thought they were get-
i: ting back into the game the Falcons took flight.
i A swift Williams led his team on a 7-2 run
: and, with the Falcons' pride in his heart, he
| pounded the ball over the Crusaders' defence.
i With two minutes left in the game, the Cru-
saders battled their way back into the game and
forced the Falcons' defence to work hard, mak-
ing them tired.

Using fresh legs to their advantage and real-
ising that they had now tied the score, the Cru-
saders went to work. The Falcons passed the
out-of-zone defence set-up by the crusaders but
they weren’t able to convert easy lay-ups.

While the lay-ups haunted the Falcons, the
Crusaders’ biggest nightmare became free
throws. Up by one point with less than 30 sec-
onds remaining in the game, Nelson fouled
i Devard Martin.

i With the Falcons not being in foul bonus,
they had to inbound the ball and with time as
their worst enemy, the only thing they could
do was force a shot, which rattled around the
; rim and bounced on the back part of the cylin-
| der as all eyes stared to see exactly what the ball
+ would do. The ball fell off the left side of the rim
and into the hands of one of the Crusaders.

j Ashton King was the leading scorer for the
' Crusaders. He finished with 12 points, while
; Nelson chipped in with 11.

i Said the coach of the Crusaders: “I saw the
; Falcons play CV Bethel so that helped me to
prepare for them in this game. One of things we
trained for was the full court press, but they
surprised us and applied the half court press
to. We were definitely ready for the full court
and all we did against the half court was sit in a
zone.

“We are not that explosive team and we are
just taking what we get. The key was that the
team played great defence and with that you will
always win. I know we have a pretty young
team and they are just elated to be here. Know
; One is expecting us to be in the big dance but I
don’t advise them to count us out. We might not
be among the top teams in the tournament but
we are coming up," he said.

q

|











i
i
i



@ STEPHAN Burrows takes a jump shot
for the Catholic High Crusaders.

(Photo: Felipé Major/
Trubune Staff)



_ Subwaye
thanks all the participants of the
2005 Subwa
Fun Run/Wal
February, 26th 2005





PAGE 2B, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005



TRIBUNE SPORTS

Hugh Campbell action

The Wildcats
roar against
the Hawks

SIR JACK Hayward Wildcats took
on the Old Bight Hawks from Cat
Island this week in the Hugh Camp-
bell Invitational. The Wildcats started
quickly and went on to win the game
55-23.

(Photos: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)



~~







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TRIBUNE SPORTS

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005, PAGE 3B





What does the future hold for
Olympic sailing in Bahamas?

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

MINISTER of Youth,
Sports and.Culture Neville
Wisdom got a first-hand
glimpse of what is expected in
the future for Olympic sailing
in the Bahamas.

Yesterday at the Nassau
Yacht Club, where he spoke
on sailing in front of Rotary
Club of East Nassau members,
Minister Wisdom introduced
25 new Optimus sailing sloops
which are to be used by the
Bahamas Sailing Association -
headed by Sir Durward "Sea
Wolf" Knowles - for the Asso-
ciation's junior development
programme.

Jimmy Lowe, who heads the
organising committee of the
pilot programme that will be
launched by the BSA after the
Easter holiday, said they are
excited about the new form of
sailing for youngsters between
the agesof8-14 years. —_.

“Eighty per cent of the
medal winners in Athens start-
ed in the Opti sailing,” said
Lowe, who attempted to rep-
resent the Bahamas at the
2004 Olympics in Athens,
Greece, but fell short.

“This is the ultimate begin-
ners boat and we wanted to
broaden the horizon for sailing
and get everybody involved
and make it fun for every-
body," he added.

Once the programme is
launched, Lowe said they will
be looking at holding a six- to-
eight week training session
before they go into a more
defined programme in the
summer.

“It’s my goal to see at least
40-50 boats out here and have
a junior Optimus champi-
onship for the Bahamas,”
Lowe said.

Eventually, Lowe said, their
goal is to get a vehicle that can
be used on the Family Islands
to promote the sport as they
begin to lay the foundation‘

Government has allowed
the BSA to import the boats -
delivered by Seaboard Marine
- duty-free, according to Mr



Minister Wisc ayn PTT
a first-hand glimpse

Wisdom.

Francisco Decardenas,
another member of the organ-
ising- committee, thanked
B&M Custom Brokerage for

‘clearing the boats and Four

Seasons Maintenance for
transporting the vessels to the

“This -
is the
ultimate
beginners
boat and
we wanted
to broaden
the horizon
for sailing
and get
everybody
involved
and make
it fun for
everybody.

— Minister of Youth,
Sports and Culture
Neville Wisdom

Nassau Yacht Club.

In his address to the Rotary
Club, Minister Wisdom told
members about how he was
able to bring harmony and
unity on the waters of native
sloop sailing.

“There is peace in sailing.



Native sloop sailing is trying
to address some different chal-
lenges,” said Minister Wis-
dom, referring to the lack of a
vibrant youth movement on
the crew of the various boats.

“They have spent so much
time arguing among them-
selves that they forget that
some of these people partici-
pating in the sport are getting
old. So you have to train the
younger ones so there is a
replenishment of youth and
youth thinking and youthful
activities in this sport," he said.

Minister Wisdom said the
introduction of a youth sum-
mer programme has helped to
address latter concerns in the
sport.

-. “Our native sloop sailing

programme is on _ the
rebound,” he said, adding that
his present focus is on
Olympic sailing.

The BSA, said Minister
Wisdom, will be given the task
of getting the Optimus sailing
in the water and preparing the
future generation for the
Olympics.

He congratulated Sir Dur-
ward Knowles for his contri-
bution to the sport of sailing
and encouraged him to con-
tinue to make his contribu-
tions, especially financial ones,
to sports in the Bahamas.

Minister Wisdom noted that
the organising committee
responsible for Optimus sail-
ing should be commended for
their hard work to date.

“In order for it to be suc-
cessful, they told me that it
was necessary for them to go
into the public schools, to go
into the schools over the hill,
to go into areas where young
people would not think about
having an opportunity, to par-
ticipate in what is generally
considered a rich man’s sport,"
he said.

Minister Wisdom said the
sport of sailing is in good
hands and has a bright future.

Sir Durward Knowles
thanked Minister Wisdom for
the role he played in bringing
peace and harmony to native
sloop sailing.

}



@ PICTURED (I-r): Sailor Jimmy Lowe,
Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture
Neville Wisdom, Rev Harrison Thompson,
permanent secretary in the Ministry of
Youth Sports and Culture, and Mrs
Bernadette Smith, Ministry of Youth
Sports and Culture administrator. Minister
Wisdom and his team inspected a trailer of
25 Opti sailing sloops at Nassau Yacht
Club, East Bay Street, on Friday..

(Photo by Brent Stubbs/
Senior Sports Reporter)



BAHAMAS RUGBY FOOTBALL UNION

BAILLOU RECOVERY COMPLETE —
WITH VICTORY IN RUGBY FINAL

AMAS iN being held close by League Champions Cuckoos for 75 minutes,
Baillou pulled away as the dying embers of a fiery game flickered to
prove that they s hould never be underestimated. After their worst start to

the season in over a decade (0 -3), Baillou came back to win all their
remaining league games and went into the play —_- offs in a position of
strength with two key players (Nicky Stubbs & Tim Thompson) backto.
match fitness. This confidence was underlined in the quarter finals as they held Freeport pointless-at home, the

only time that’s happened all season.

‘Lead- from - the--back’ captain Nicky Stubbs was in no doubt about his team’s preparations for the final
and when Ryan ‘Chilly’ Knowles crossed the line for the winning try in the dying minutes of the game, the
celebrations began in earnest. “I knew we'd win,” exclaimed Stubbs after the game “we're Baillou!”

Not to be outdone, the youth match was —_ played with every bit as much commitment. An end to end
game which saw the lead change hands 4 times resulted in another ‘dying minutes’ try to give Cuckoos a 25-
20 victory over perennial rivals Buccaneers. Cuckoos Youth coach Edrico Hanchell was jubilant © “The boys
worked hard for this, there’s no question they deserve the win. Buccaneers came out to strong and were
excellent, but we stayed the course. A great game. — ” he said. A crowd of several hundred enjoyed a fantastic end
to arecord season. Now Bahamas Rugby will focus on the Rugby World Cup Qualifications in June.

FULL 15-A-SIDE SEASON STATISTICS



Stella Artois Score Premier Importers Score
League Pid W DL F A Pts. . Youth League PdWDkL EF. A Pts.
1 Cuckoos 6 5 0 1 108 53 15 1 Cuckoos 6 4 1 1 100 4 13
2 Baillou 6 3 0 3 126 86 9 2 Buccaneers 6 2 1 3 105 120 7
3: Freeport! &@ 2 004 79 132 6 3 Baillou 6 2 0 4 100-115 6
4 Buccaneers* 6 2 0 4 94 133 6
-*Freeport finish ahead of Buccaneers due to a better score difference in head-to-head games
Stella Artois League Premier Importers Youth League
Baillou Buccaneers Cuckoos Freeport Cuckoos. Buccaneers Baillou
Baillou X 20-21 10-20 35-5 Baillou 5-15 0-30 "ee
Buccaneers 13-41 X 11-13 22-31 Buccaneers 20-20 X 30-25
Cuckoos 10-15 14-3 X 26-0 Cuckoos X 25-5 20-10
Freeport 17-5 17-24 7-27 X Baillou 25-5 35-10
Buccaneers 10-15
PLAY- OFF RESULTS ;
Stella Artois Men's League Freeport O22 Baillou
Cuckoos 22-8 Buccaneers
Premier Importers Youth League Baillou 0-15 Buccaneers
FINALS RE®LTS
Stella Artois Championship Cup Cuckoos 5-15 Baillou
Premier Importers Youth Cup Cuckoos 25-20 Buccaneers

There will be NO GAMES on February 26". International games begin in March
NEXT GAMES: MARCH 5° 3pm - Baillou vs. LeHigh Valley RFC (Pennsylvania)
MARCH 6" 3pm - Buccaneers vs. Yale University





‘



TRIBUNE SPORTS
SPORTS

Surprises in second legs
as UEFA Cup heats





han

“Copyrighted! Material
Syndicated ’Content

oe
Available from Commercial | News ALON ICIETS af





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This title basically hits the Caribbean
Style of Architecture and Cuisine





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>

PAGE 6B,SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005

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LIFE ana Nicollette Sheridan. A woman discovers her new ce Lauria. Parents face abuse at the Nae of their troubled daughter.
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TRIBUNE SPORTS



SUNDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 27, 2005

[7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

TSA eLearn Se

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a factory worker. 0 (CC) who killed his family. O (CC) (DVS)

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feud within the Mafia. (CC) is suspected of murder.

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wei = Walters {down 2005 (Live) )/nize excellence in motion pictures; host Chris Rock. (Live) (CC)
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deadly strain of alien DNA.







TRIBUNE SPORTS . SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005, PAGE 7B .
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Families stand

firm in Bozine

Town battle

By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

ADILINE BURROWS has
lived in the Bozine Town area
since 1967 when she moved in
with her husband as a young
bride. Two months ago she
buried her husband and now she
faces the threat of losing her
home to the Harrold Road Land
Development Company (Land-
co).
Residents like Mrs Burrows
been have battling the developers
since last year when they received
letters from the company request-
ing them to either purchase the
land or vacate the premises.

The company claims that it is
the rightful owner of the land.

However, Mrs Burrows and
the-other 300 residents claim that
the land is theirs. Since Landco
sent shockwaves through the
community with their request,
they have organised a steering
committee, raised funds, obtained
legal counsel and took their pleas
to Cabinet in protest earlier this
week, '

OPTION

“When we moved here, we
leased the house with the option
to buy,” Mrs Burrows explained.

She said every month, a Mr
McKenzie would come around
and collect the lease money until
he died in 1975. Since then, she
explained her family has made
additions to the home, “piece by
piece” without ever going to the
bank for additional mortgages.

She said that ever since she
lived on the property, no-one has
ever come forward to claim that
the property was theirs.

_ Mrs Burrows said she feels ter-
rible about the situation. She said
that if the company did own the
land, they should have claimed it

years ago, before people moved |

in and made the community
home. She remains adamant that
she and her six children will
remain in their home.

“They will have to move the
house with me and my children in
it,” she said.

Mrs Burrows’ story is just one
of many in the quiet rustic com-
munity where the style of living
resembles that of the Family
Islands years ago.

Yesterday, area MP Leslie
Miller toured the area with the
media, so that Bahamians could
see the human side of the land
dispute which has made headlines
for the past few months.

“I wanted everyone to see
Bozine so everyone could see
what it is the lawyers are talking
about when they talk about dis-
placing Bahamians and the con-
ditions they live under,” he said.

Down one street, in an area
less than half an acre in size, is a
group of 10 homes. The 50 or so
occupants, including a number of
small children, share a three hole
out-house which sits in the middle

of the compound. In addition the
residents all share electricity by
feeding off extension cords.

“These are the conditions that
Bahamians are living in 2005,” he
said.

Mr Miller said the residgnts,
the majority of whom are
Bahamians, live in abject poverty.
Pointing to the rural surround-
ings and tiny homes, some of
which can house up to ten per-
sons, Mr Miller said: “This is the
little that they have and what they
are trying to take away from
them.

“I do not want to get into a
row with the developers. I think
they are working very closely with
the government and I think at the
end of the day we will resolve in
an amicable way where everyone
will be satisfied. Most important,
the residents of Bozine will never
ever be displaced.”

He said Prime Minister
Christie has given the govern-
ment the mandate to replace out-
door toilets in the Bahamas and
that very soon the government
will begin this effort in Bozine

Town, by replacing the out-house’

with proper bathroom facilities
with running water.

Mr Miller said next week, a
group of government surveyors

‘ will be coming in and surveying

the land because Landco itself is
not sure of the exact occupied
areas it claims to own.

“The size of the property is
very small, because on any prop-
erty here on Bozine, if it is 100 by
60 square feet you are looking at
least four structures in that yard.
So you are not talking about a
lot of land that these people are
talking about, and a lot of the
land is unoccupied.

“You are probably talking
about less than ten acres of occu-
pied land and of course the price
of land up here one would think

cannot be more $10-15,000 an ~

acre,” Mr Miller said.

Although the residents had
been given up until February
28 by attorneys for Landco, Mr
Miller said that deadline has
been extended by 30 days to
ensure that the government can
work with all the parties.

He said government has a
number of options, either an
outright acquisition of the land
or a trade-off where Landco
would be given the equivalent
of the land they own some-
where else. He said there was
also the possibility of the courts
overturning the ruling which
Landco says entitles them to the
land.

“We are exploring all the
options. At the end of the day,
each resident will have a clear
title deed to the property on
which they reside. That is the
key to give them comfort and
hope,” he said.

SEE also story
on Page 11








TRADE and Industry Minister Leslie Miller is shown an out-house that is used by children and
adults in the Bozine Town area. The minister was on a tour of the area where residents are fac-
ing the threat of eviction. Photos: Mario Duncanson

‘

House faces another vote
on Stubbs bankruptcy

By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Senior Staff Reporter

GOVERNMENT may have
to advance another resolution

in the House of Assembly soon’

to allow embattled Holy Cross
MP Sydney Stubbs an addition-
al six-month extension to get
his bankruptcy ruling over-
turned.

The deadline for Mr Stubbs’
first extension runs out on
March 25.

Before the first resolution
was passed last September,
Speaker of the House Oswald
Ingraham granted Mr Stubbs
several extensions, on April 27,
May 28, June 28, July 28 and
August 27 of last year.

Mr Stubbs has exhausted the
extensions which could be
granted by the Speaker under
the Constitution and requires a
further extension in the form of
a resoultion to complete any
hearing of the matter.

This extension cannot be giv-
en without a resolution of the
House.

Without any further exten-
sions Mr Stubbs, under the
Constitution, would have to
vacate his seat in the House.

Chief Clerk at the House of
Assembly Maurice Tynes said
that another resolution would
have to be passed by next
month. However the Constitu-
tion does not stipulate a limit

SEE Page 11

Tourist
drowns
off —
Exuma
beach

By NATARIO McKENZIE

A 55-year-old Canadian

| tourist drowned while swim-

ming in the sea off Exuma
on Thursday.

According to police press
liaison officer Walter Evans,
Thomas Torokvel, from
Toronto, along with his
brother, son and a dive
instructor from the Peace
and Plenty hotel in George
Town were swimming

towards the blue holes off

Exuma.

It is reported that at
some point, the victim indi-.
cated he could no longer
continue the swim and left
for shore. According to
police reports, sometime lat-
er the other men returned
to shore and discovered Mr
Torokvel’s body. He was
taken to George Town clin-
ic where he was pronounced
dead. Police are continuing
their investigations into the
incident.

© Police are also investi-
gating an attempted bur-
glary of a shop which
occurred shortly before 4am
on Friday morning. Accord-
ing to Inspector Evans offi-
cers were dispatched to the
Down Home Food Store on
Fox Hill Road. At the scene
police discovered a white
1997 Nissan Sentra and a
gold 1994 Nissan Sentra
which were suspected to be
stolen.

According to reports, as
the officers were in the
process of inspecting the
vehicles, a blue Chevy
Lumina approached the
scene. Officers immediately
became suspicious and
approached the vehicle. The
occupant of the vehicle then
opened fire on the officers
who returned fire. The
occupant of the vehicle
drove off during the
exchange, police said.

Police have also indicated
that shortly before 5am on
Friday morning a man was
admitted to the Princess
Margaret Hospital with
severe gunshot wounds to
the lower right leg.

A 19-year-old resident of
Cox Street, Fox Hill is
presently in police custody
in connection with this mat-
ter.

Murder accused
CREME

sey allack



~ Pace Two


PAGE 2, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005

THE TRIBUNE





Murder accused describes

‘sex attack’ by taxi-driver









he new face of | Kalik

COMMONWEALTH

Leroy Archer said that the Kalik has been brewed
Brewery launched the new new look is meant not only to _ exclusively in the Bahamas by
label designs for its award-win- enhance the attractiveness of _ Commonwealth Brewery since
ning beer products: Kalik Reg- the products, but also reflect 1988. (Photo: Mario Duncan-

the brand’s connection with
all “things Bahamian.”

ular, Kalik Light and Kalik
Gold. Managing director

| PRE- INVENTORY/
CUSTOMER APPRECIATION SALE

oo" Se

Regular
; On Everything in the Store tous.
(Except Appliances - 10% Discount)

son / Tribune Staff) —

















Additional Discounted
Prices 3
(Excludes All Sale Item)

2

Bedroom Suites « Living Room Suites * Dining Room Suites * Appliances ¢ Linens ¢
Patio Furniture * Baby Furniture ¢ Wall Units * Lamps ¢ Tables etc. etc.

FURNITURE AND APPLIANCES

INGES BY FRIGIDAIRE = >
ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS
UML all reals U unico ete

EVERYBODY
KNOWS WE
HAVE THE
OWEST PRICE!
IN NASSAU

» mbo
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
British American Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson ;
Kerzner International BORa

13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.40 RND H

28.00 ABDAB
13,00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.36 RND Holdings

a

1.8944

Olina Money Market Fund

2.1105 """

Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
10,0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10,2602"*"""
2.0824 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2,186020""



1.0276 Colina Bond Fund 1.08937 1""""






| BISK ALL, BHARE INDEX - 19 Deo 02 = 1,000,00
B2wh-Hil - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks

f SAwh-Low - Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks
i Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume
A Von's Close - Current day's welghted price for dally volume

| Ghainge - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

= AS AT JAN. 31, 2008/ ***" - AS AT DEC, 31, 2004

*- AS AT FEB. 11, 2005/ *** - AS AT JAN 31, 2005/ *"""" AS AT
BS es

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful



- ing on

BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - In his sworn
testimony before the Supreme
Court, murder accused
Jonathan Nathan Davis told
jurors that cabdriver Robert

elson Pratt sexually assaulted
and attacked him in his taxicab
during the early morning hours
of September 1, 2000.

Davis, who is on trial for mur-
der, took the stand on Thurs-
day in his own defence. He said
that since the ordeal some four
to five years ago his life has

- been an “eternal hell.”

Justice Jon Isaacs is presid-
ing over the trial, which is
before a jury of eight women
and four men. Prosecutor Joy-
ann Ferguson-Pratt is appear-

Sehalf of the Crown,
and Simeon Brown is repre-
senting the accused, who is on
bail. “ :

Davis, a former bellman at
the Country Club at Bahamia, is
accused of killing Pratt, whose
body was discovered along the
roadside at Illyria Road and
Aerial Place in Arden Forest
on September 1.

It is alleged that he took a
large stone and struck the
deceased in the head fracturing
his skull.

Davis, who is claiming self
defence, told the court his
account of what transpired on

‘ September 1 before and after

he got into the taxicab with
Pratt, whom he knew to be a
homosexual.
After. getting off from. work
around 2am, Davis said he went
to Ruby Swiss Restaurant,
where he had several beers. He
left around closing around 4am,
catching a ride to Les Fountain
Restaurant. He played domi-
noes and drank a few more

beers and Tequila shots with ©

several friends for another two
hours before leaving.’ ~ »

-Davis said he was very intox-
icated and had to be assisted by
a female employee into Pratt's
taxi van. He told the cab driver
to take him home to Windsor
on the Mall and then fell asleep
in the front passenger seat.

When he awoke, he said they
were in a bushy area and Pratt's
hand was pushed down inside
his trousers.

Davis, who was a trained box-
er since the age of 18, and who
had fought professionally for
several years and won a cue
of titles before retiring in 1987,
said Pratt continued to make
homosexual advances on him
after he pushed his hands away.

_He said they fought in the
van for about 10 minutes when
he observed Pratt reach under
the driver’s seat for an object.
He said he came out of the van
and Pratt struck him on the
elbow and leg.

At some point, they were
wrestling on the ground and he
reached for a rock. .

He struck Pratt twice in the
head and left the scene on foot.

Davis said he walked to East

Sunrise Highway, where he ©

flagged down a man in a truck
who gave him a ride home.
During cross-examination by
Prosecutor Ferguson-Pratt,
Davis admitted that he knew
the victim for a long time prior
to the incident. He lived as a
tenant at Pratt’s mother’s home




VIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidality

Ask §$ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded ovar-the-counter price

Weokly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior weak

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mthe

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100





at Esher Court in Mayfield
Park, where Pratt had also lived.

During his'six-month tenancy,
he said Pratt exhibited “girlish”
tendencies but never made any
sexual advances toward him.

“He was more on the femi-
nine side, a soft man,” he
added.

“Was he an aggressive man?”
Asked Mrs Ferguson-Pratt.
“No, not to me,” Davis replied.

Prior to the incident on Sep-
tember 1, he recalled engaging
Pratt’s service on a few occa-
sions and felt safe with him.

“Based on your prior and
present relationship with Pratt
can you think of any reason why
on September 1 he would
change?” Ferguson-Pratt asked.

Davis, who said he was very
intoxicated on the date in ques-
tion, suggested that Pratt saw
an opportunity to do what he

id.

Mrs Pratt ‘suggested 'to: the

’ accused that he was not telling

the court everything about his
relationship with Pratt and
that he vane went on the
journey with Pratt.

She also Suggerlee that his
testimony was fabricated and
inconsistent with what he told
police during a police inter-
view on September 2 at CID.

She pointed out that
nowhere in the police inter-
view form was there any men-
tion of Pratt’s hands in his
trousers or about having an
object in his hand. .

avis, however, insisted that
he told police about it and did-
n’t know why it was not writ-
ten down on the interview
form.

Prosecutor Ferguson-Pratt
asked Davis why he threw his
clothing in the garbage after
he got home around 10 or
11am that morning: -

“They were bloodied and
torn and I had no need for them
anymore,” he answered.

'S*Ferguson-Pratt then sug-
pested that given his extensive
oxing experience, he could
easily have disarmed Pratt,
whom he said was girlish.

“Everything happened so
fast,” said Davis. “I was intoxi-
cated and trying to protect
myself. I feel that is my God
given right.”

“T didn’t want this thing to
happen. For four to five years
I have been going through
eternal hell. I think about this
almost everyday,” he said.

“You had an opportuni to

leave the scene? “ asked
guson-Pratt.

“I was intoxicated and try-
ing to protect myself. He kid-
napped me and tried to molest
me. All. I was doing was pro-
tecting my life. I am so sorry
that this happened,” said
Davis, who insisted that he
was only defending himself.

Davis said that he did not
know what condition Pratt

er-

_ was in after he hit him with

the rock before he left the
scene.

“Having hit him in the head
you did not try to see what
State he was in?” asked the
prosecutor.

“T was intoxicated and just
wanted to get home,” he
replied. I never thought about
him being dead. It wasn’t in
my ound that I killed him.”

he accused said he did not
think to report the matter to
police when he got home
around 10am or 11am that
morning because he was
frightened.

e also denied suggestions
by Mrs Pratt that he drove the
taxi from the scene to Pros-
peria Way, where he scattered
papers outside to cover up
what he had done.

The trial was adjourned to
Monday when the prosecution

‘and defence are expected to

give their summations.



MAIN SECTION
Local News
Editorial/Letters.
AGVt oa secee
Out There
‘SPORTS SECTIO





holistic approach to making

MP launches
ambitious |
jobs campaign








By A FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter

WITH the unemployment
rate at around 10.8 per cent,
one MP has decided to take
on the challenge of trying to
provide jobs for his con-
stituents. .

Carmichael MP John
Carey is hosting a second job
registration on Monday, Feb-
ruary 28 at 7pm at the Ger-
ald Cash Primary School.
The opportunity is open to
Carmichael constituents only.

On Monday 125 people
registered, raising alarms for
Mr Carey about the unem-
ployment level in his con-
stituency.

“One of the biggest prob-
lems I believe I face is being
able to place many con-
stituents who are unem-
ployed,” said Mr Carey.

“The main reason I am
doing the programme is
because when constituents
are in a position where they
are not able to take care of
their basic physical needs,
that represents a real prob-
lem for our community.

“I am deeply concerned
about people who are not able
to work; particularly young
people, because in the
absence. of having gainful
employment there is a ten-
dency to engage in anti-social
behaviour which include and
are not limited to drug traf-
ficking, armed robberies and
home invasions.” -

Mr Carey represents
11,671 people in the area,
according to the last census
count. There are well over
4,000 registered voters there.

Mr Carey said his officers
are busy daily seeking jobs
in the private sector for these
unemployed persons, because
there is a moratorium on gov-
ernment hiring.

He said he looks in the
newspapers daily looking for
new opportunities for his con-
stituents; considering it an.


























































































the community better.

After job registration exer-
cises are complete and place-
ment begins, the MP’s next
step is to hold entrepreneurial
seminars to help those who
are unable to find a job to.
find ways to make their own
money. ;

“No matter how much
money people are able to
amass, if it does not filter
down to every level of soci-
ety, you run the risk of creat-
ing a sub-society of have-nots,
who want the same things as
the haves,” said Mr Carey.

‘“‘When we lock our doors
and we are acquiring wealth
and are successful, there are
families who want to enjoy
the same things.

‘J cannot realistically sleep
at night, because the reason
the people of Carmichael put
me here is to represent their
views and their needs. When
I cannot do that, I feel like a
failure.”

He said he is concerned
especially about young men,
fathers, who have “ given up
on government and given up
on the system” and resort to
crimes that affect other con-
stituents. He said not until a
person is held up and robbed
or even raped that the prob-
lem hits home.

Occupying idle hands may
result in a decrease in crime
in the.area, this MP believes.

“In this particular case,
their need is very simple -
employment. If I am unable
to assist them in this regard, I
would have failed them,” he
said.


_an police makes a

THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005, PAGE 3





pring

breakers

receive

US crime
arning

By PAUL G. TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE US Department of
State has issued an advisory
to its citizens who are trav-
elling to the Bahamas to
spend their Spring Break
holiday in the country.

Those visiting the country
have been warned of the
laws and penalties for
those who wished to
partake of any illegal
activity.

The advisory stated
that while the Bahami-

"special effort" to
increase patrols and expand
surveillance during the

: Spring: Break period, its cit-
“izens should still however

exercise caution and good
judgment to ensure that
their stay in the Bahamas is
a pleasant and safe one.
New Providence in partic-

ular sees a dramatic influx .

of visitors during this period,
from the last week in Feb-
ruary to the first week in
April. The advisory howev-

er warned that most crimi-
nal incidents take place in a
part of the city that is not
usually frequented by
tourists. It however men-
tioned that crime and vio-
lence are increasingly mov-
ing into the more "upscale"
tourist and residential areas.

Travellers were cautioned
not to walk alone after dark



‘Stay away from
drug traffickers’



Or in isolated areas, and that
they should avoid*being
‘alone with a group of
strangers.

"Be particularly cautious
on secluded beaches; crimi-
nals target such tourist
areas. Visitors found alone
or incapacitated have been

victims of rape, robbery, and

assault.

"Intoxicated young
women have been sexually
assaulted after reportedly

being drugged: Know your
drinking companions and
stay in a group with friends
when in clubs, bars, out
walking in deserted areas,
or in a taxi at night," the
advisory warned.

The report included ref-
erences to penalties for the
possession or use of illegal
drugs in the
Bahamas, and
warned its Ameri-
can citizens that the
infringement of
those laws will carry

fines, or
imprisonment.
"American citizens..yisit-
ing the Bahamas are. subject
to Bahamian law: Drug vio-
lators can and will be arrést-
ed, even for small quanti-
ties. All persons 16 years of
age or older are tried as
adults. Stay away from drug
traffickers, who are often
armed and violent; and do
not accept packages from
people you meet during
your stay," the advisory said.

even

Shipping firm

denies claims

By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter

PIONEER Shipping has
denied allegations that ship-
ments have been delayed in
Miami because cargo may have
included illegal drugs or
because vessels were not sea-
worthy.

According to Pioneer, the
increased powers granted to the
US Coast Guard under the
Patriot Act means that vessels
can be inspected and held up at
any time.

Pioneer executive Ray
Thompson said that only one
shipment has recently been
delayed by the US Coast
Guard. He said this occurred
about two weeks ago and was
the result of a documentation
irregularity.

“When the boat went into
Miami the Coast Guard went
on for inspection. One docu-
ment was out of order, and that
document was corrected imme-
diately.”

He said that the shipment had
since arrived in the Bahamas,
just over a week late.

Mr Thompson was respond-
ing to an anonymous complaint

ee (tot ae
Ua Mit

Tats
PHONE: 822-2157



over delay

which claimed that Pioneer has
been experiencing “significant
problems to the point that it has
not been able to deliver ship-
ments for the past week plus
(10 business. days) to the
Bahamas.”

According to the complaint,
which was sent to The Tribune
and the Miami Herald, the ship-
ment may have been held up
because Pioneer is suffering
from “security issues with its
crew, drugs, and/or has ships
that are not safe and seaworthy
as determined by the US Coast
Guard.”

Mr Thompson said that this
was definitely not the case:

“T can say categorically that it
had nothing to do with drugs,
or the fact that the boat was not
seaworthy. Because if the boat
was un-seaworthy it would have
been sent to dry dock and that
did not happen,” he said.

The complaint further alleged
that Pioneer has been telling
customers “whatever is conve-
nient for the moment to keep
the heat off,” and has failed to
allow competitors to move ship-
ments that have been held up.

“If they cannot deliver on
what it was contracted to do,

TWYNAM HEIGHTS
Bank Approved Financing

$330,000

3 Bed, 2 Bath;

then the competition should be
allowed to accommodate ship-
ments on behalf of others,” it
said.

According to Mr Thompson,
however, he has personally spo-
ken to several customers whose
cargo was delayed, and
explained the situation to them.

“Everybody was told up front
that the boat was being held by
the Coast Guard,” he said.

Mr Thompson said that cus-
tomers who wanted to have
their cargo brought into Nas-
sau by another carrier were
made aware that this could be
arranged through the Seaboard
Marine shipping service.

“Every customer I spoke tc I
explained the situation to, and
they understood that they could
have always had their cargo
switched over to another carri-
er,” he said.

Mr Thompson said that
delays which occur as a result of
Coast Guard inspections are
beyond the control of Bahami-
an shipping companies.

“With the advent of United
States homeland security pro-
cedures, they can do this any
time. You are at their discre-
tion,” he said.

Mr Thompson explained that
under the Patriot Act, the US
Coast Guard has been granted
“a lot of leeway” in terms of
their ability to board and
inspect ships that use ports in
the United States.

stiff penalties, heavy -

Minister
says a big
thank you

MINISTER of Youth
Sport and Culture
Neville Wisdom gives his
word of thanks to the

owners of the newly-

opened outlet of Mail
Boxes. Etc on Cable
Beach on Thursday. The
outlet offers additional
mail services to cus-
tomers in western New
providence,

peste eo

‘Photo:
Mario Duncanson













oa jw

a

Q




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Passau ONPREONOTIS oT Wawa Twa Twa Lao [0as




ANTHONY
See,

REGISTER TO WIN
2 FREE Cruises
Drawing on Monday, February 28th
6 p.m. Mackey St.
MALL AT MARATHON HOURS
Monday - Friday 8pm ¢ Saturday 9pm

MACKEY STREET LOCATION
Open until 6pm Friday, Saturday & Monday

LAYAWAYS ACCEPTED DURING SALE


PAGE 4, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR






@ @ @
The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master



Quality leadership
is the key to
nation’s future



LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914



SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.




Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991





EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-





Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O: F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama



TELEPHONES

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau. Fax: - (242) 328-2398
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Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”





~ NOTICE

EDITOR, The Tribune.

AS the French say, the more
things change the more they
remain the same!

The political cartoon accom-
panying this brief observation
was published in 1980, and

- depicts Mr Franklyn Wilson and

Dr Elwood Donaldson finding
it difficult to accept that I, a
white politician, was being
enthusiastically received “Over
the Hill” by a fairly large audi-
ence of young black Bahamian
men, who obviously liked what
they heard! ..

Your January 18 report was
headlined “Political Giants
Have Their Say.” I quite under-
stand that comparatively speak-
ing I am a humble Political
Pygmy, but I nonetheless have
been there and done that, side
by. side with the Giants.

If the FNM does, in fact, deny
leadership to a capable white
person for no reason other than
the colour of his skin, they will
be making one of their biggest
mistakes ever. Seaga, a white

Royal
up to1

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THE PLP government has
finally shown their hand. The
unfortunate situation the for-
mer employees of the Royal
Oasis find themselves, and the
pressure applied on the Perry
Christie government has
forced the government to
“crack” under the pressure.

First of all every Bahamian
sympathises with the bad turn
of events that did not just hap-
pen overnight. The Royal
Oasis had been giving strange

signals for a long time. Long

before the hurricane, the man-

“agement of Royal Oasis had
- been taking advantage of its

employees and apparently had

been usurping monies that the

employees were entitled to.
So this is no surprise how
everything turned out. So



Sauna.

letters@tribunemedia.net





Jamaican of Lebanese extrac-
tion did it successfully. And, it
was Dr Martin Luther King
who proclaimed that he wanted

~ his children to be judged not by

the colour of their skin but by
the content of their character.
He was right on, and the same
should apply to white children,
and, yes, white politicians.
What this country has always
needed and continues to require
is quality leadership, regardless
of skin tone. Both political par-
ties (and there are only two that
are now viable) should seek
people of ability and integrity
thus ensuring us of a stable and
prosperous future. It will also
behove both parties to deliber-
ately seek out white political
aspirants, if they meet the
requirements in other ways,
simply because in a country
where some 10-20 per cent of
the population is white it is rea-

sonable that 10-20 per cent of
Parliament be white. Both par-
ties should bea mirror reflec-
tion of the population if at all

. possible.

Dr Donaldson (a friend of
mine) says that while the coun-
try may be ready for a white
leader he is not. Ellie, you have’
been out of step with reality
before! As for your remark that
there has not. been one black
investor since Independence,
that observation must have giv-
en Tiger a chuckle. I’m hoping
for an invitation to cruise on his
$30 million, 150-foot yacht with.

. eight staterooms when it fetch _

from New Zealand!
And if I need to borrow for
spending money on the cruise,

.. Pm sure that black Bahamian

investor, Frankie Wilson (he of
the second paragraph above)
would okay a loan.

As Smoky Joe used ‘to
say...Eh, Bulla! ~

NORMAN S SOLOMON
Nassau,
February 9, 2005.

Oasis must live

s responsibility

everything ‘niust bé done by

government to make sure that
Royal Oasis lives up to their
full responsibility.

Royal Oasis knows how
weak the Bahamas govern-
ment is so they took advan-
tage of it. They packed their

“Georgie bundle” and left,.

knowing full well that only
“hot. air” was expected from
the Prime Minister.

The government can cause
the principals of Royal Oasis
to pay. But they took the short
cut home and found a perfect
situation to use the public

purse, in a constituency that.

is obviously disgruntled with
the PLP and would therefore
not vote for them. .

It begs the question, “Is the
PLP buying votes?” Why is
the public treasury so liberal in
this situation, when there were
supposed to be a tightening of
the public’s purse? Who else
will benefit from this manoeu-
vre?

suspicious about:this exercise:

' People who have been laid‘sff -
’ from other properties, should °

expect the government to do
the same for them, or they
should force the government
to explain why the employees
of Royal Oasis are different
from them.

The extremely poor gesture
by the government will —

undoubtedly set a precedent

that will cause unrest in this
country. The government can-
not use our money as. they
wish. They cannot wake up
one morning and say, let’s give
this group or the other group
the Bahamian people’s money
without their permission.
Something is definitely wrong
with anyone who does that
with money that does not
belong to them.

~ IVOINE W
INGRAHAM
Nassau,
February 23, 2005.

B07 Nou acs-Vs40)

SECURITY DOORS

Serving The Bahamian Community
Since 1978

DON STAINTON

(PROTECTION) LTD.

HILLSIDE PLAZA - THOMPSON BLVD.
PHONE: 322-8160 OR 322-8219





NOTICE is hereby given that IZLAINE STERLIN, SHERLEY
STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 26th day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.

DIVIDEND NOTICE

PREMIER COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE
INVESTMENT CORPORATION LIMITED

TAKE NOTICE that the Board of Directors of
PREMIER COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE:
INVESTMENT CORPORATION LIMITED has
resolved to declare a Quarterly dividend in the
amount of Nineteen and one-half cent ($0.195) per
share for all shareholders of record as of the close
of business on the 21st day of February, 2005, the
same to be payable on the 28th day of February,
2005.

All payments shall be made through SG Hambros
Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited, the Registrar &
Transfer Agent, pursuant to the instructions of the
relevant shareholders on the files of SG Hambros
Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited as at the 21st day
of February, 2005.

Gregory K. Moss
Secretary




The Bahamian people. are

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ROSEMENE PIERRE,
MAYCOCK ALLEY, FOX HILL, P.O. BOX N - 10461,
‘NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 19th day of
FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANGELINA LACROIX OTHELLO,
#43 ETHEL STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26TH day of
FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GERTHA PEPE OF TREASURE
CAY, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 26TH day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


THE TRIBUNE



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005, PAGE 5

as Reyer (MS a

Canker
groves
ripped
apart

By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

MORE than 900 acres of cit-
rus groves have been uproot-
ed in Abaco so far in the
effort to eliminate the Citrus
canker disease.

Meanwhile officials from the
Department of Agriculture
are preparing for the more
difficult task of going door-
to-door to identify infected
trees on the properties of res-
idents.

Director of Agriculture Sime-
on Pinder told The Tribune
yesterday that his department
is confident that all citrus
plants on the 3,700-acre
Bahama Star Farm at Trea-
sure Cay as well as those
growing in smaller commer-
cial groves in northern Abaco,
will be uprooted within the
next three months.

“We also just received new
equipment which will increase
the speed of the uprooting
and will help us complete the
process in three months,” he
said.

Mr Pinder further explained
that the uprooted trees have
not been burnt yet, as the
plants first have to dry out.

“However now that they

- have been uprooted it reduces
the chances of the canker
spreading, significantly,” he
added.

The agriculture director said
his department has so far
uprooted the largest of the
Bahama Star Farms groves,
and will now be moving on to
the smaller ones.

He said that security is still in
place in the area and that at
this point he is satisfied with
all the measures that have be
taken to rid the island of the
highly contagious disease.
Mr Pinder pointed out, how-
ever, that the “difficult part
is still ahead.”

He explained that the depart-

ment.will begin with their,

idpor-yard": survey in two
weeks, to determine which
‘residents have infected citrus
trees on their private proper-
ties.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control
Tropical Exterminators
BY 2 ae a) fae

BREET:
SATURDAY

| FEBRUARY 26 |

12:30 Lisa Knight & The Round
Table
Gillette World Sports
Sports Lifestyles
In This Corner: Carlos
Palomino Pt. 2
Sports Desk
Ballroom Boxing
Gospel Video Countdown
One Cubed
3’D Funk Studio
Eye On Health
Bahamas Tonight
Native Stew
Bahamian Things
Island Life Destination
The Darold Miller Show
Tropical Beat
Bahamas Tonight
The Lounge
Community Pg. 1540AM

SUNDAY
FEBRUARY 27

Community Pg. 1540AM
E.M.PA.C.T.
Voice That Makes The
Difference
Effective Living
Morning Joy
Contact Magazine
Fast Forward
Toyota World of Wildlife
Sports Desk
Gillette World Sports
This Is The Life
Gospel Video Countdown
World Impact
Ernest Angley Ministries
Morning Joy
Walking In Victory
One Cubed
The Bible Study Hour
Bahamas Tonight
Kemp Road Ministries
Living Abundantly
Ecclesia Gospel
Turning Point
Spiritual Impact: Leroy
Campbell
Bahamas Tonight

: Gospel Video Countdown

12:30amComm. Pg. 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV bia g--1-1 a5)
the right to make last minute
% programme changes!





By PAUL G. TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

WHY YOU VEX?

"I vex with this trend I see they have where
Bahamians are bending to accommodate all these
illegal immigrants in this town. Now they have us
teachers learning Creole so we can teach them
English. What happen to teaching us Spanish or
French? Why they never offer that programme?
Well, I could tell them one thing, I won't learn it.
We need to think a little bit. Why do we have to
build new schools every year? Who fillin them up
so much? It ain't Bahamian children, I can tell
you that for sure."

Teacher in Public school system

"I vex with this government and the past ones,
who have sold out this country to the highest bid-
der. Over the years these crooks have sold off
every piece of beachfront property or Out Island
to these big foreign investors. And for what? A

I tell you one thing...I
ain’t learning Creole!

. couple of dollars? Now they turnin around and

killin us with the price to buy back a piece of our
own country. Man, if you drive out west you can't
even see the beach, and you have no idea who
lives in these homes. But I can tell you one thing,
they ain't look like you an me."

Brent,
Courier Service

"T vex that ain't no more karaoke at the Hilton.
I used to love to go there and watch people make
complete fools of themselves. These new ones
they have now are too much about people coming
on trying to get record deals and stuff. That isn't
what karaoke is suppose to be about. You should
just be up there to have fun, not trying to make a
living."

Chester,

Village Road

"TI vex with my bush mechanic. I ask him how
much it would cost to fix my car engine and he
gave me a price almost double that of the licensed



Silver celebration for



car repair shop. You think his head straight?"

Dari,
Danottage Estates

WHY YOU HAPPY?

"I happy that the Pope is still making it. Lord I
was so scared when I heard he had gotten the flu.
I thought that was it for him, but thank the Lord he
pulled through. I'm not Catholic, but I could appre-
ciate all the good work this holy man has been
doing, and I wish him all the best."

Marvelle,
PMH

"I am very happy that the weekend has finally
come. I had one of those weeks that would cause
you to drink." ‘

Koyo,
Elizabeth Estates



region’s ‘best little navy’

Now
Defence
Force
strikes

for gold _

OFFICIALS of the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force yes-
terday announced plans to com-
memorate the organisation’s
25th year as a military entity

under the theme “Celebrating

Silver Reaching for Gold”.

Commander of the Defence
Force Commodore Davy Rolle,
at a press conference at the
Defence Force’s Coral Harbour
base, said that the establishment
of the Force grew out of the
necessity for the government of
the Bahamas to respond to the
many offences being perpetrat-
ed against the nation by drug
smugglers, poachers, illegal
immigrants and others who
sought to illegitimately operate
within the Bahamas’ maritime
borders.

Commodore Rolle, who is
only the second Bahamian to
hold the organisation’s top post,
since its inauguration on March
31, 1980, said the service is
widely recognised as “the best
little navy in the Caribbean”
and that he was “extremely
proud to have been associated
with the organisation since its
beginning years to this point”.

Co-chairperson of the 25th
Anniversary Celebrations Com-

mittee Lieutenant Commander |

Gaye Major stated that the
planned events and activities
have been deliberately designed
as much as possible to include
past members, friends, well
wishes:and the Bahamian pub-
lic. Planned events include a

Christ Church Cathedral
Schedule of Services for
Sunday February 27th, 2005

8:00 a.m.
Holy Eucharist & Annual Genral Meeting
Note: There will be one combined morning

service due to the

Parish Annual General Meeting.

Solemn Evensong, Sermon ex Benediction



fun/run/walk and a fun day at’

the base for the force’s family
members and friends, the
force’s annual church service,
an awards and medals presen-
tation ceremony at Government
House, an exhibition at the
main post office on East Hill
Street a grand military ball and
the second annual Commander
Defence Force Challenge Cup
‘C’ class and Sunfish Regatta
on Montague Beach,
Commodore Rolle also took
the opportunity to thank the
Bahamian public for its support
over the past quarter of a cen-

tury.



ee ee ee ee

A Service of Praise
and Thanksgiving









aU Og
A. Geoffrey Wood






Cemple Baptist Church

134 Farrington Road

Pastor A. Geoffrey Wood
who celebrates
20 Years in the Pastorate




A ee ee

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”







for

Dr. Earle Francis
Guest Speaker

and



46 Years in Ministry

on Sunday 27th February 2005 at 3:30pm at
The Church


PAGE 6, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005

_THE TRIBUNE





Black History Month’s
relevance to Bahamas

N a few days’ time, this
year’s celebration of
Black History Month by
our American neighbours
would come to an end.

The depictions of Black
achievements that have been
projected in the news media
during this period have, as
always, been both extremely
enlightening and inspiring. We
suppose this resulting experi-
ence has always been the pri-
mary purpose of the exercise.

In every civilisation the pio-
neering experiences of a gallant
few have always served as the
motivating catalyst for the
many, as the vast majority of
any people are followers, and
thus the importance of our
heroes.

Who are they? They are
those from among us whose
ground-breaking achievements
inspire countless others to like-
wise aspire to greatness.

When viewed in the above
context, the importance of com-
memorating their accomplish-
ments in various formats is then
brought into clearer focus. This
is absolutely necessary in order
that future generations might
come to the realisation that just
as others like them succeeded in
their chosen pursuits, so too can
they do likewise.

For quite some time, we have
been of the view that the cele-
bration of Black History Month
in the United States of America
had something to do with the
inception of the Dr Martin
Luther King, Jr holiday. That
holiday is celebrated on the
third Monday in January, a day
that falls on or near King’s
birthday of January 15.

The holiday was inaugurated ~

a little over two decades ago

and, like Black History Month, .

emphasises educational obser-
vances, such as lectures and
exhibits about King’s life and
philosophy.

However, we were wrong in
our opinion as expressed above,
as a recent scan of the Internet
has revealed the following:
“February marks the beginning
of Black History Month —- an
annual celebration that has
existed since 1926. But what are
the origins of Black History
Month?

“Much of the credit can go
to Harvard scholar Dr Carter
G Woodson, who was deter-
mined to bring Black History
into the mainstream public are-
na. Woodson devoted his life
to making ‘the world see the
Negro as a participant rather
than a lay figure in history.’

“In 1926 Woodson organised
the first annual Negro History
Week, which took place during
the second week of February.
Woodson chose this date to
coincide with the birthdays of
Frederick Douglass and Abra-
ham Lincoln — two men who
had greatly impacted the black
population — as well as the
anniversary of the founding of
the National Association for the
Advancement of Coloured Peo-
ple (NAACP).

“Renamed Black History
Week in 1972, the observance
was extended to become Black

History Month, a four-week-—

long celebration of African
American History, in 1976.
During February, lectures, exhi-
bitions, banquets, cultural
events, and television and radio
programming celebrate the
achievements of African Amer-
icans. Since 1978, the US Postal
Service has participated in
Black History Month by issu-
ing commemorative stamps
honouring notable African
Americans.”

Continuing our surfing of the
Internet, we were delighted to
find the following additional
information on Black History:
African Americans (American

Blacks or Black Americans) are |

defined as a racial group in the
United States whose dominant

ancestry is from sub-Saharan .

West Africa. Many African
Americans also claim Euro-
pean, Native American or
Asian ancestors.

A variety of names have been ,

used for African Americans’at
various points in history.
African Americans have been
referred to as Negroes,
coloured, blacks, and Afro-
Americans, as well as lesser-
known terms, such as the 19th
century designation Anglo-
African. The terms Negro and
coloured are now rarely used.
African American, black, and
to a lesser extent Afro-Ameri-

can, are used interchangeably
today.

Recent black immigrants
from Africa and the islands of
the Caribbean are sometimes
classified as African Americans.
However, these groups, espe-
cially first and second genera-
tion immigrants, often have cul-
tural practices, histories and lan-
guages that are distinct from
those of African Americans
born in the United States.

Examples of the above are
borne gut in the following facts:
Caribbean natives may speak
French, British English, or
Spanish as their first language.

-Emigrants from Africa may

speak a European other than
English or any of a number of
African languages as their first
language.

Caribbean and African immi-
grants often have little knowl-
edge or experience of the dis-
tinctive history of race relations
in the United States. Thus,
Caribbean and African immi-
grants may or may not choose
to identify with the African
American community.

Concerning the African
American experience, the fol-
lowing is revealed: African
American history is intertwined
with that of blacks in Latin
America and the Caribbean.
Like other blacks in the western
hemisphere the overwhelming

majority of African Americans ©

were brought to North America
the early 1800s.

As slaves, they were ‘édnsid-
ered the property of their own-
ers and had no rights. African
slaves could be found in al] 13 of
the British colonies, as well as
the Spanish colony of Florida
and the French colony of
Louisiana.

After the American Revolu-
tion (1775-1776), changing eco-
nomic conditions resulted in the
decline of slavery in the North.

as slavés between the 1700s and



However, the spread of cotton

cultivation encouraged the
growth of slavery in the South.

By 1860, four million slaves
accounted for one-third of the
total population of the south-
ern states. About 500,000 free
blacks lived throughout the
United States, slightly more
than half residing in the south-
ern states. In the North, many
free blacks became abolition-
ists, activists dedicated to ending
slavery and bringing about
black equality.

In 1863, during the American
Civil War (1861-1865), US Pres-
ident Abraham Lincoln issued
the Emancipation Proclama-
tion, freeing slaves in the south-

‘ ern states at war with the North.

The 13th amendment to the
Constitution of the US, ratified
in 1865, outlawed slavery in the
US...In 1868 the 14th amend-
ment granted full US citizen-
ship to African Americans. The
15th amendment, ratified in
1870, extended the right to vote
to black males.

In the South, such rights were
enforced only by the presence
of Union troops, who occupied
the region during the period
known as reconstruction. Wnen
Union troops withdrew from
the south in 1877, white South-
erners quickly reversed these
advances.

Racist groups, such as the Ku
Klux Klan, used terrorism to
keep blacks from voting, hold-
ing office, and enforcing labour
contracts. sha a

Whites also began establish-
ing a thorough system of seg-
regation in the US. Laws limit-
ing blacks’ access to trans-
portation, schools, restaurants,
and other public facilities,
sprang up throughout the
South. Although legal systems
of segregation were not estab-
lished in the North or West,
informal segregation was
enforced in both of these

regions.

Blacks responded to these
setbacks by forming the Nation-
al Association for the Advance-
ment of Coloured People
(NAACP) in 1910. The
NAACP mounted legal chal-
lenges to segregation and lob-
bied legislatures on behalf of
black Americans. African
Americans also created an inde-
pendent community and insti-
tutional life. They established
schools, banks, newspapers, and
small businesses to serve the
needs of their community.

Between 1910 and 1950, in
the largest internal migration in

US history, over five million

African Americans moved from
southern plantations to north-
ern cities in hopes of finding
better jobs and greater equality.
In the 1920s, the concentration
of blacks in urban areas led to
the cultural movement known
as the Harlem renaissance,
which used art, music and liter-
ature to demonstrate the cre-
ative abilities of African Amer-
icans.

A new generation of African
American political leaders, such
as Black Nationalist Marcus
Garvey and union organiser A
Philip Randolph, also found
support among urban African
Americans. In 1954, the US
Supreme Court handed down a

landmark decision in the case
of Brown v. Board of Educa-
tion of Topeka. This decision
led to the dismantling of legal
segregation in all areas of south-
ern life, from schools to restau-
rants to public restrooms.
Energised by such leaders as
Martin Luther King Jr, the civ-
il rights movement in the US,.
which coincided with our own
Bahamian struggle for majority
at that time, gained new
momentum in the mid-1950s.
Civil rights groups organised
non-violent protests, such as_.
marches and sit-ins, to rally the
black community. Many of the -
US civil rights leaders, including
Dr Martin L King Jr, A Philip
Randolph, Congressman Adam
Clayton Powell, Andrew
Young, Ralph Abernathy,
Mahalia Jackson and others,
came to The Bahamas during
this period to lend their moral
support to our local struggle.
Think on these things.

(George W Mackey’s book
“Millennium Perspectives”, a
compilation of Viewpoints and

. other interesting topics, is avail-

able at all leading bookstores
locally. E-mail: georgewmack-
ey@hotmail.com)

Gay issue splits Church

“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

‘CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS « Tel: 325-2921
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 27TH, 2005
11:30a.m. Speaker: Pastor Michael Johnson
7:00p.m. Evening Service

“Sunday School-6:45am The Lore’

___ -41:80am * Radio Broadcast ZNS {1 - 1:30
© Prayer & Bible Study Wed, - 7:30p

THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE
OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

pemegem l“Uillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, off Mackey Street
| P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax: 393-8135

Be CHURCH SERVICES

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2005
THIRD SUNDAY IN LENT



ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH, Prince Charles Drive
11:00 a.m. Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH, Bernard Road
11:00 a.m. Pastor Sharon Loyley



Worship time: 11am & 7pm

CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH, Zion Boulevard
Sunday School: 9:45am

10:00 a.m. Mr. George Knowles
7:00 p.m. No Service




' Special Service - Andrew Lord’s Day
Sunday February 27 at Ilam —/
Guest Speaker: Bro, Bill Davis - (



EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH, East Shirley Street
11:00 a.m. Pastor Martin Loyley
7:00 p.m. Pastor Martin Loyley

Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL
Preachering 11am & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm





GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH, Queen's College
Campus
9:30 a.m. Rev. James Neilly

Pastor:H. Mills




. Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive



ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue
8:00 a.m. Connections - Rev. Philip Stubbs

AT 6 is . - 3) | ces
S804 Rev ohllp-SLIbbS Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are

Pastor: H. Mills © Phone: 393-0563 ¢ Box N-3622

Rev. Henley Perry



TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
11:00 a.m. Youth Service - Mr. Robert d’ Albenas
7:00 p.m. Rev. William Higgs




PO. Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE



7 RADIO PROGRAMMES
“RENEWAL” on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Your Host: Mr. Henry Knowles
“METHODIST MOMENTS?” on each weekday at 6:55 a.m.
Your Host: Mr. Henry Knowles /
SCOSHHSOHSNDOHHOHOSOSOHSOHOHSHOOSOHSOOOHOOEOOOOESOCOOCDECCS
THE CONFERENCE BOARD OF CHILDREN, YOUTH AND YOUNG
ADULTS in conjunction with Wesley Methodist Church, Matthew Town,
Inagua ill be hosting a Young Adults Conference on February 25-27, 2005
under the theme: “Rekindling The Fire.”



COME





LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future
Worship time: Llam & 7pm
| Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:
The Madeira Shopping
Center






Collins Avenue at 4th Terrace Centreville
Telephone: 322-8304 or 325-1689 « P.O. Box N-1566
Fax No. 322-4793

OPPORTUNITIES FOR
PALO ctl ete

TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH will be hosting a HomeBuilders
Marriage Seminar - “Improving Communication in your Marriage”
on Friday, February 25, 2005 - 6:00 - 10:00p.m. ahd Saturday,
February 26, 2005 - 8:30a.m - 4:30p.m.Presenters: Drew and Kit
Coons of FamilyLife International. Registration: $20.00per person
includes: Seminar Materials. Supper on Friday an d Breakfast and
lunch on Saturday. Childcare available Friday and Saturday. Trin-
ity Place & Frederick Street (Next to Central Bank) Ample Parking
- Security Provided.







SUNDAY 8:30am ZNS-1 Temple Time Broadcast
‘6 i 8:30am Early Morning Worship Next door to CIBC ;
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427 aan at oe ieee ARE sie c eos tae
00am orship Service ALL LCOM ATT.
' SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 27th, 2005




7:00pm Evening Celebration





Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles



WEDNESDAY 7:30PM Selective Bible Teaching Royal
Rangers (Boys Club) Ages 4-17 Years

Missionettes (Girls Club) Ages 4-17.

7:00A.M. L. Lockhart/ Bro. E. Miller
11:00A.M. C. Archer/ Bro. J. Forde
7:00P.M. Sis. N. Thompson/ Bro. A. Paul

Theme: Rise up ye people of God.
Press towards the Prize Philippians 3:14 - 1




P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@batelnet.bs





VISIT OUR PREMISE BOOKSTORE, TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY


THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005, PAGE 7



Education key to re
claims new prison c

NEWLY-APPOINTED Super-
intendent of Prisons Dr Ellis-
ton Rahming says that a more
comprehensive educational,
technical and vocational train-
ing programme will be a key
component of prison reform at
Her Majesty’s Fox Hill Prison.

Dr Rahming, whose appoint-
ment took effect this month,
says the programme should
result in more inmates leaving
the facility better equipped aca-
demically and vocationally for
re-entry into society and should
also help reduce the high rate of
recidivism that is currently
pegged at 70 per cent.

A survey conducted amongst
inmates at Her Majesty’s Prison
by the National Prison Reform
Committee reveals that almost
60 per cent of inmates incarcer-
ated at the prison said more
educational, technical and voca-
tional programmes would help
reduce the rate of recidivism.

Dr Rahming says the pro-
gramme will include a distance-
learning component where
inmates - using an interactive
computer module - will be able
to learn a variety of technical
trades, including electronics,
small engine repair, motorcycle
repair and business manage-
ment skills at their own pace.

Inmates will also be. able to
benefit from hands-on instruc-
tion through a practical compo-
nent, in which they will work
side-by-side with professionals
in the various fields.

“One of the key aspects of
the long distance course is that
the inmates will be able to sit at
the computer and learn at his
or her pace, and so it will avoid
the embarrassment that often
serves as an, inhibitor to partic-
ipation.in classroom activities
for sgme inmates, who may not
want their cellmates to know
that they may have difficulty
conceptualising things,” says Dr
Rahming.

The long-distance course will
be combined with a number of
classroom activities designed to
enhance the educational well-
being of inmates at the institu-
tion.

Dr Rahming says prison offi-
cials envision the Ministry of
Education playing a key role in
the process by providing the
academic instruction for the
establishment of an adult learn-
ing facility on the prison com-
pound.

He says prison programmes
will also utilise, as much as pos-
sible, the expertise of external
educational and training agen-
cies such as the College of The
Bahamas, Bahamas Technical
and Vocational Institute, the
National Literary Services and
the National Library Services.

“It is our belief that the Min-
istry of Education should view
Her Majesty’s Prison as a school
site, the same way it now man-
ages a programme at the hospi-
tal for children who are hospi-
talised for long periods of times,
and in.the same light as it views

the Simpson Penn Centre for
Boys and the Williemae Pratt
Centre for Girls,” says Dr Rah-
ming.

“We have a new facility that
is about to be opened in short
order and the ideal thing would
be for the Ministry to provide
the teaching component, so that
an adult learning facility could
be launched right here that
would afford low-risk inmates
the opportunity to attend cours-
es in pursuance of their High
School Diploma, in addition to
BJC and BGCSE Certification.

“Security is always the num-
ber one priority in a prison envi-
ronment as it should be,” Dr
Rahming adds, “however,
inmate programming such as

academic/vocational training’

presents no threat to security,
but rather compliments security
in that inmates are accounted
for, they are fully occupied and
their chances of not becoming a
recidivist are enhanced.”

Dr Rahming, who chaired the
National Prison Reform Com-
mission established by Prime
Minister Perry G Christie in
October, 2002, to undertake a

strategic view of Her Majesty’s ©

Prison, says correctional edu-
cational programmes must be
of equal quality and require-
ments to equivalent pro-
grammes in the community, to
ensure that the student credits,
certificates and diplomas are
accepted by employers and are
transferable to schools and col-
leges after release.

The Report, made public in
February, 2003, just four
months after the Commission
was appointed, also recom-
mends that written policy, pro-
cedure and practice should pro-

vide that at least some Foe
ered |

tional programmes, are of
at a time when the majority of
inmates can take advantage of
those opportunities.

It further states that educa-

tional programmes should not

have to compete with work
assignments, visitation and
counseling, etc., and that pro-
grammes should be offered in
off-peak hours, the evenings
and on weekends.

Dr Rahming says the
enhanced focus on education-
al, technical and vocational
training at the Fox Hill Prison,
is part of a plan to “humanise”
the facility.

He says while the facility’ s
main priority remains setting
the standard for excellence in
public safety by protecting
members of the general public
against prisoner escapes, the
rehabilitation of inmates for re-
entry into society once they
have served their prison sen-
tences, is also a priority.

“If we don’t protect the pub-
lic from prisoner escapes, then
everything else falls away, and
so in pursuance of that we are
going to fortify the institution
to the point where no one even
thinks about escaping,” he says.

“We are going to fortify the
facility to the point where no

ows

unauthorised outsiders can get
in and no unauthorised insid-
ers can get out.

“By humanising the prison,
we are talking about a certain
philosophy of corrections,
where despite the wrong that
this person may have done, this
is a human being and he or she
ought to be treated as such. The
fact that a person is institution-
alised does not mean that they
are not entitled to the same
basic needs as persons on the
outside.

“They need proper shelter,
food, lighting, bedding and edu-
cational and technical and voca-
tional opportunities as part of
the rehabilitative process for
when they are released from
prison.’

Dr Rahming says the reality
is that 95 per cent of the per-
sons incarcerated at Her
Majesty’s Fox Hill Prison “will
hit the streets again” and that
society must be willing to give
them a second chance at life.

- He says that the educational

" programmes, along with a pre-

release programme that is being
worked into the prison curricu-
lum, will help make that transi-
tion easier for inmates upon
their release.

“The pre-release programme
will prepare them for life on the
outside and as they get closer
to theif day of exit, contact with
families, with church commu-
nities, with potential employers
will be increased, so that once
the individual hits the streets,
they will have a support net-
work already established that
can make the transition to being.
productive members of society
that much smoother,” says Dr
Rahming.

“In The Bahamas, we have a

very unforgiving society, (but).
’ members of the general ‘public’ '

are going to have to realise the
cold; hard facts that 95 per cent
of the persons incarcerated will
hit the streets again. They can
hit those streets continuously
being demonised and hated by
society or they can hit the
streets with society prepared to
give them a second chance,” he
adds.

Dr Rahming says failure to
be forgiving and to provide ex-
offenders with a second chance
will result in those persons
“becoming creative and surviv-
ing as best as they can”.

“Which means that many of
them will revert to crime,” Dr
Rahming says.

“That’s just the reality of it
and so a big part of the re-inte-
gration process has to do with
the wider society and the extent
to which they are prepared to
take a second look at these per-
sons”.

Dr Rahming says the institu-
tion will implement a Discharge
Certificate Programme under
which a certificate will be
awarded to each ex-offender.
The certificate will detail levels
of achievement in a number of
areas including educational,
technical and vocational train-

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ing, attitude and deportment,
initiative and responsibility and
involvement in positive activi-
ties, among others.

“Potentially, the purpose of
this certificate is to offset the
negative outflow associated with
a stained Police Certificate,” he
says. “The certificate will indi-
cate to a prospective employer
or loan officer, the institutional
assessment of the inmate’s
readiness to shoulder responsi-
bilities’.

A specialist in criminology,
Dr Rahming obtained a Doc-
tor of Philosophy Degree from
Washington State University
with a concentration in Crimi-
nology and has served as a con-
sultant/advisor on crime in the
Ministry of National Security.
His thesis at Washington State
focused on “Participation in 4
Prison Technical/Vocation-
al/Educational Programme and
Recidivism among Parolees in
Missouri”.

He says prison reform will
require a partnership between
prison officials, inmates and
members of the general public,
who must all buy into the new
vision and mission of the facili-
ty.

“Just as Rome was not
built in a day, reform does
not take place in a day and
similarly, or correspondingly,
does not relate to any one
person. It relates to the
extent to which the execu-
tive team at the prison could
have the rank and file at the
prison and the inmates buy
into the vision and move
together on the same page,
singing the same tune,” Dr
Rahming says.

“This is a very big job and
it is going to.take time, for it

to manifest itself, but it’s a.

questign of setting goals, sys-
tematically going after those
goals and being accountable

along the way. “We are an
instant coffee society,” Dr
Rahming says, “we want
things to happen right away.
You cannot judge progress
with regards to rehabilitation
and recidivism by the persons
who are being released today,
tomorrow or next month. You





will have to begin judging the
effectiveness of the pro-
grammes one year from now,
when persons who will be
released would have been
exposed to some new stimuli
and the programmes that will
be implemented in the very

near future”. .












Nassau, Bahamas.





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JENNIFER ELAINE TURNQUEST
WRIGHT OF DEADMANS CAY, LONG ISLAND, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 26TH day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and oreroenis P.O.Box N- 7147,



PARTS DEPARTMENT |

Will be CLOSED for
STOCKTAKING

FEBRUARY 25 to 2
(Friday, Saturday, Monday)

We will reopen for business as usual on Tuesday, March 1. }
We apologise to our valued customers and regret any |
inconvenience this may cause. All other departments

will be open for business as usual.

UALITY:

gales

LIMITED. .



East Shirley Street 323-3529/323- 3709 |



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~-INTERNATIONAL

Proud winner of the 2004-2005 IAAP Award for Corporate Excellence.


PAGE 8, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005 THE TRIBUNE

NATIONAL BANK OF CANADA (INTERNATIONAL) LIMITED 3. LOANS
_NON-CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET Maturity analysis of loans is as follows:

AS OF OCTOBER 31, 2004 2004 :
(Expressed in United States dollars) 2003





. 3 months and under $ 25,477,637 $ 28,403,126
2004 2003 4 to 6 months 59,147 1,131
7 to 12 months 34,941 18,385
ASSETS ee a dr al
Cash and due from banks $ 308,483,195 $ 452,624,087 : $ 25,571,725 $ 28,422,642
Loans (Note 3) 25,571,725 28,422,642 : ee) eer
Investments in subsidiaries (Note 4) 128,512 150,052 4. INVESTMENTS IN SUBSIDIARIES
i iti 1,391,670 27,578,965 oes ;
ee assets , 901.807 741.077 Movement on investments in subsidiaries during the year is as follows:
Fixed assets (Note 5) 1,035,591 1,136,552 : ; 2004 2003
ivati i 1,900,678 73,514,865 poate
Derivative related items (Note 9) jnvestinents at equity: Vepinnifie OF yest $ 150,052 § 168,542
TOTAL $_339,413,178 $ 584,168,240 84,168,240 Bank's share of net profit for the year - 25
ILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY pe ee
Hine = oe ° , Write-down in value of investment in subsidiary (21,540) (18,515)
LIABILITIES: Investments at equity, end of
, fi year « $ 128,512 $ 150,052
Deposits - related parties $ 54,791,560 $ 37,798,870 . ee Somme
- customer (Note 6) 92,104,627 126,807,181
Interest free demand loan - related party 28,089,121 - 94,070,059
Bank overdraft - related party 4,308,417 12,376,701
Accrued interest and other liabilities 2,070,801 1,470,296 5. FIXED ASSETS
iabiliti 23,10
pene 181304026. 2S The movement of fixed assets during the year is as follows:
SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY:
Share capital (Note 7) 20,000,000 20,000,000 se 2004 :
Retained earnings 138,048,652 291,645,133 Beginning Ending
Total shareholders’ equity 158,048,652 311,645,133 Balance __ Additions __Disposals__ Balance
COST: :
413,178 584,168,240 ‘ .
TOTAL $ 339,413,178 $ 584,168,240 Leasehold improvements $ 888,503 $ - $§ (4,027) $ 884,476
. 7 Office equipment oe
See notes to non-consolidated balance sheet. ‘eral ee 338,134 2,929 (14,322) 326,741
This non-consolidated balance sheet was approved by the Board of Directors on January 25, Motor vehicle 38,128 62,216 (38,128) 62,216
2005, and is signed on its behalf by: Computer equipment :
and software 436,210 67,961 (23,843) 480,328
$ 1,700,975 $ 133,106 . $ (80,320) $ 1,753,761
2004
or Beginning Depreciation Ending i
Balance Expense Disposats Balance
ACCUMULATED : ee ,
- DEPRECIATION
NATIONAL BANK OF CANADA (INTERNATIONAL) LIMITED AND AMORTIZATION:
Leasehold improvements $ 178,029 $ 63,177 .$ - $ 241,206
NOTES TO NON-CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Office equipment
YEAR ENDED OCTOBER 31, 2004 and furniture 103,320 52,441 . (1,865) 153,896
(Expressed in United States dollars) . Motor vehicle 33,171 10,142 (38,128) 5,185
: Computer equipment
1. GENERAL and software 249,903 __-_ 75,470 7,490) ___317,883
4 $ 564,423 $ 201,230 $ (47,483) $ 718,170
National Bank of Canada (Intemational) Limited (the “Bank”) was incorporated during } 3 S04 023 5 201,230 3 (47,483) ——
October 1977, in The Commonwealth of The Bahamas and is licensed under The Banks 2004 $8 Movement $ 1,136,552 $ (68,124) $ (32,837) $ 1,035,591
and Trust Companies Regulations Act of 1965. The Bank is wholly owned by Natcan ; oo : —o
Holdings International Limited which was incorporated in The Commonwealth of The : one 31,164,563 $ 28,011) $ $_1,136,552

Bahamas during October 1995. National Bank of Canada, Montreal is the ultimate parent
company. The primary activities of the Bank are private banking, fud management, trust

: ae : Maturity analysis of customers’ deposits is as follows:
services and securities trading. ty analys ep

The Bank owns 100% of the ordinary shares of Mondial Trading (Bahamas) Limited. 2004 2003
Mondial Trading (Bahamas) Limited in turn owns 100% of the ordinary shares of Mondial 3 months and under $ 76,515,986 $ 58,009,242
Trading (Bahamas) Y Compania Limitada, a company incorporatell in Ghile: The primary, 8 4 to 6 months a _.*.7,747,180. 35,722,007
activity of Mondial: Trading (Bahamas) Limited -is.the holding of the investment in its ‘ 2 : “to 12 months “ ee 7,841,461 33,075,932
bsidi wi a : A
Pere a $ 92,104,627 $ 126,807,181
The average number of employees for the year was 31 (2003: 32). :
. Deposits from related parties are payable on demand.
The address of the registered office of the Bank is Goodman’s Bay Corporate Centre, West : ; :
Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.
7. SHARE CAPITAL
2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES Authorized, issued and fully paid:
The Bank’s non-consolidated balance sheet has been prepared in accordance with ‘ 2004 ~~ 2003
International Financial Reporting Standards. The preparation of non-consolidated financial ; BES wn) _
statements, in conformity with International Financial Reporting Standards, requires 175,000 5% fei panne kes abe
management to make certain estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of zo redeemable convertible preference
assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the shares of $100 each $ 17,500,000 $ 17,500,000
non-consolidated financial statements, and the reported amounts of income and expenses 20,000 Non-voting non-participating preference
during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates. shares of $100 each with no
- dividend rights "2,000,000 2,000,000 ,
The following is a summary of the significant accounting policies: 5,000 Ordinary shares of $100 each 500,000 500,000
a. _ Basis of presentation - This balance sheet has been prepared on the non-consolidated \ $___20,000,000 $ 20,000,000
basis as the financial position of the Bank and its subsidiaries are consolidated into 8. ANALYSIS OF ASSETS AND.LIABILITIES

the financial statements of the ultimate parent company. Results of the subsidiaries

are recorded on the equity basis using the internally prepared, unaudited financial _Assets_____Liabilities__

statements. Management is satisfied that the amounts carried at equity for the , 2004 2003 2004 . 2003
subsidiaries are fully recoverable. North America ; 33% 18% ; 20% 25%
Western Europe and other _67% _ 82% 80% 75%

oo% 100% 190% 100%
b. Translation of foreign currencies - Assets and liabilities denominated or accounted

for in currencies other than United States dollars have been translated into United. Maturity Analysis: ae
States dollars at the applicable exchange rates ruling at the non-consolidated balance a ee
sheet date. 2004 2003 2004 2003
BAe . tie Up to 1 "99% 879 54% 479
c. Investment in securities - Investment securities are recorded on a trade date basis and fo 9 : - . .
are classified as available-for-sale oe cit hee —
oe Over 5 years ‘ — 0% 0% 46% _53%
Investment in securities are initially recognised at cost (which includes transaction : , 100% 100% 100% 100%
costs). Available-for-sale securities are subsequently re-measured at fair value based : Doyo TROT ug ee
on quoted bid prices or amounts derived from cash flow models. Fair values for Currency Analysis: :
unquoted equity instruments are estimated using applicable price/earnings or ; : Assets Liabilities
ice/ ; ,
Poe 2004 2003 2004 2003 -
d. Loans - Loans are recorded at their principal amounts less provisions for loan losses. United States dollars 96% 94% 79% 82%
Provisions for loan losses are maintained at a level considered by management to be Canadian dollars 4% 4% 21% 16%
atlequate to absorb any losses given the risk characteristics of the loan portfolio. Euros _ 0% _ 2% __ 0% _, 2%

A loan is classified as non-performing when payment of interest is contractually past 100% 100% 100% 100%

due for 90 days or more. As of the non-consolidated balance sheet date there were Average Interest Rates:
no non-performing loans.

Loans Deposits

e. Assets held or liabilities incurred as nominee - The Bank is engaged in significant 2004 2003 2004 2003
trust activities. No account is taken in these non-consolidated financial statements Average interest rate 4.59% 5.00% 1.46% 1.875%

for assets held or liabilities incurred by the Bank as trustee or nominee.

f. Related parties - Related parties include entities directly and indirectly controlled by 9. DERIVATIVE FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS
the ultimate parent company.

a.,. The Bank uses derivative instruments for trading purposes.

g. Fixed assets - Fixed assets are recorded at cost less accumulated depreciation and

amortization. Assets are depreciated or amortized on a straight-line basis over their The notional principal amounts upon which payments are based are not indicative of
estimated useful lives which are as follows: the credit risk associated with derivative financial instruments.
Leasehold improvements over the term of the lease Credit risk arising from derivative transactions is the financial loss that may occur as
Office equipment and furniture 20% a result of a counterparty defaulting on its obligations to the Bank. Credit risk is
Motor vehicles ; 25% managed by setting credit exposure and duration limits for counterparties and dealing
Computer equipment and software 20% - 33 4% . primarily with G7 based dealers and financial institutions with high credit ratings.
h. Derivative financial instruments - The Bank uses various types of derivatives for The maturity analysis for open derivative instruments as of October 31, 2004 is as
asset/liability management and for trading purposes. The derivative instruments used follows: ‘
most frequentl. i i
quently are foreign exchange forward contracts, currency and interest rate Remaining term to maturi
swaps and equity swaps.
Greater
These derivatives are recorded at market values and the resulting gains or losses are ual ae ee ad Lae: sis
recorded as income. Market values are determined using pricing models that oe toon mong te mons 2
incorporate current market and contractual prices of the underlying instruments, time ; ;
value of money, yield curve and volatility factors. Equity and commodity swaps 7 ae “3 -S -S ~ $61,650,520
Forward contracts 60,690,145 150,000 : - 60,840,145 116,723,171
: : oe Interest rate swaps - - 5 : - 28,000,000
Unrealized gains and losses are reported on the balance sheet as derivative related aus : . . : = __(6527,500)

amounts under assets and liabilities. Where there is both a legal right and intent to ; : : Soe ye
settle these amounts simultaneously, they are presented on a net basis. S_ 60,690,145 $_ 150,000 $ _ 3 = $60,840,145 S$ 200,846,191 -
4
FF FF Ta Fa aE Fa I SR a? RP a ST

=

10.

11.

12.

YOO,

Deloitte.

Forward contracts are commitments to purchase or sell foreign currencies for
delivery at a specified date in the future at a fixed rate. Future contracts are similar
in nature.

Equity and commodity swaps are contracts involving one party paying on specified
settlement dates, an amount based on a specified floating interest rate and notional
amount while the other party pays, on specified settlement dates, an amount based on

the movement in the values of some equity, equity index, commodity index, or
basket of equities and the same notional amount as the floating rate component.

Interest rate swaps are transactions that generally involve the contractual exchange of
fixed and floating rate interest payment obligations on a specified amount of notional
principal for a specified period of time.

All foreign exchange forward contracts: and interest rate swaps and the majority of
equity swaps have been made with related parties.

Derivative related items represent the. net present value of the future cash flows in
relation to open derivative instruments as at the year end.

FAIR VALUE OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

Fair value of financial instruments included in assets and liabilities, except for the loan due

to related party, are assumed to"approximate their carrying values due to their short-term

maturity.

Loan due to related party is not considered to be materially different from its fair value as it
is payable on demand. ‘

The estimated fair value represents values which financial instruments could be exchanged
for in a current transaction between willing parties. Where there is no available trading
market, fair values are estimated using appropriate valuation methods.

RISK MANAGEMENT.
Credit Risk:
Credit risk arises from the failure of a counter party to perform ‘according to’ the terms of

the contract. From this perspective, the Bank’s significant exposure to credit risk is
primarily concentrated in cash and current accounts with banks, investments. and loans.

, The deposits and investment transactions are predominantly in Unites States dollars and

have been placed with high quality international institutions and corporations. The loans
are short term and are fully secured by assets managed by the Bank on behalf of the
customers. :

Price Risk:

Price risk is comprised of currency risk, interest rate risk and market risk. Currency risk
emanates from the possibility that the value of a financial instrument will fluctyate due to
changes in foreign exchange rates. The Bank minimizes its risk by monitoring levels of
foreign currency particularly those susceptible to foreign exchange rates volatility.

Interest rate risk is the risk that the value of a financial instrument.may fluctuate
significantly as a result of changes in market interest rates. The Bank’s exposure to this is
minimal as the relevant financial instruments are usually short term with fixed interest rates
and are therefore repriced on maturity. :

Market risk is the risk that there will be a change in the value of a financial instrument due

to changes in the market conditions. The Bank may from time to time enter into certain
contracts on behalf of its customers in order to reduce the level of risk. The Bank tends to
minimize this risk through various control policies, monitoring procedures and hedging
strategies.

COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES
Lease Commitments: <

Woe le ay 4 bh . wu boy
¢ future minimum rental payments ‘required under a non-cancelable operating lease are

“as follows:

Due within 1-year $ 354,374
Due between 2-5 years $ 1,868,027

Due over'5 years $ 1,696,116 ~
Commitments to Extend Credit:

In the normal course of its business, the bank enters into commitments to extend credit in
order to meet the financial needs of its customers. As of October 31, 2004, the total
amount of guarantees outstanding by the Bank was $6,915,599 (2003: $4,079,500).

Contingencies:

The Bank has overdraft facilities up to an amount of $100,000 and credit card facilities for
its customers up to an aggregate limit of $3,000,000. from FirstCaribbean International
Bank. era

13. NET FOREIGN CURRENCY EXPOSURE

Assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies at the balance sheet date are as
follows: :

2004 2003

: US$ USS
CAD EUR Equivalent CAD EUR Equivalent

’ Assets $ 510,420,356 $ 22,667,068 $ 447,995,778 $ 560,536,621 $ 18,485,259 $ 446,513,623

Liabilities (510,446,263) (22,535,845) (447,849,158) (560,536,257) _ (18,624,042) _ (446,674,117)

$ (25,907) $131,223 S$ 146,620 $ 364 $138,783) $ (160,494)



The asset and liabilities disclosed on the balance sheet in certain instances are presented
net. This is mainly in relation to derivative items which creates both assets and liabilities
and which can legally be settled on a net basis. The above balances are presented gross to
give a clearer picture of the overall exposure of the Bank.

Deloitte & Touche

Chartered Accountants
and Management Consultants
2nd Terrace, Centreville

P.O. Box N-7120
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: + 1 (242) 302-4800
Fax: +1 (242) 322-3101
http://www.deloitte.com 2s

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT



Empty buildings
‘in use by end of
year’ - minister

2001.

By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Senior Staff Reporter

GOVERNMENT expects
to have three multi-million
dollar buildings inhabited by
the end of the year, Works
and Utilities Minister Bradley

Roberts has told The Tribune.

_ Opposition members in the
House of Assembly on
“Wednesday expressed concern
that three buildings purchased
by the former administration
and the current government
have not been used as yet and
appear to be in a state of
“inactivity”.

- However, Mr Roberts said
that government has every
intention to get those build-
ings up and running hopefully
by the end of the year.

The buildings in question
are the old City Market build-
ing on Market Street, which
was expected to be used for
the offices of the Registrar
General, the Lloyds Bank and
Trust building, which will be
used for the offices of the
Ministry of Tourism, and a
building on Blake Road which
will be used to house a num-
ber of other government
offices.

Mr Roberts said that gov-
ernment is looking at not only
using the City Market building
for the Registrar’s office but
also for a number of other

_ offices.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005, PAGE 9 .

LOCAL NEWS).

“Government is looking to
convert this into a multi-use
building. That is approved and

so we are just faced with the -

matter of refurbishing it. From
what I understand the archi-
tect is just about ready to hand
in his plans for approval,” Mr
Roberts said.

Expanding the building’s
usefulness, a process which
has delayed its completion,
was an idea from Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie, Mr
Roberts confirmed.

“Mr Christie had said why

- just use it for one department,

go a‘couple of more storeys -

and put the building at better
- use and have a greater utili-
sation of the land. So we sus-

pended the work and after

going through the design
process we will resume if not
by the end of March then by
the end of April,” he said.

The Lloyds Bank and Trust
building on the corner of King
and George Street has been
earmarked by the government
as the new Ministry of
Tourism headquarters. Its
main problem is a lack of
parking.

The ministry, which had

been renting offices at the |

British Colonial Hilton, was
expecting to move into the
building in June of 2003. The
former ministry offices were
burned down in the Straw

{ Market fire in September



SMM wR TA FFA,

Mr Roberts said that the
building had gone through a:
valuation process and a Cabi-; _
net paper was being put:
together to start the process:
of evaluating contracts for its’
refurbishment.

The Blake Road building:
had been purchased by the;
National Insurance Board to.

- rent out to government. In this

respect Mr Roberts said that
government is also looking at:
contracts for its refurbishment.:

However, Opposition
Leader Alvin Smith told The
Tribune yesterday that he is
concerned about the govern- '
ment’s seeming infability to
move ahead with putting these
buildings to use.

“Why are the buildings not
occupied, because government
has spent money on these
buildings which could have
‘gone to something else if it
was not intended for them to
be put to.use.right away,” he
said.

Mr Smith criticised govern-.

ment for not prioritising.

“Lloyds Bank was pur-
chased for $5 million, Blake
Road for $9 million and the
FNM left behind plans for the
registrar to be moved to Mar-
ket Street. Our country’s
schools are in a mess and we
need to hire more teachers,
that money could be used for
that,” said Mr Smith.

Pop group stalwart dies at 66

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

JNAMI RELIEF
FOR SRI LANKA

Natural disasters can’t be prevented, but the effects can be more
manageable with YOUR HELP.

Friends of Sri Lanka invite individuals and institutions wishing to
contribute towards the tsunami relief efforts in Sri Lanka to help in
one of the following ways:

UT EAS UT a a ae eo

To the Shareholders of
National Bank of Canada (International) Limited:

We have audited the accompanying non-consolidated balance sheet of National Bank of Canada
(International) Limited (the “Bank”) as of October 31, 2004. This non-consolidated balance
sheet is the responsibility of the Bank’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion
on this non-consolidated balance sheet based on our audit. :

We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those
Standards’ require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about
whether the non-consolidated balance sheet is free of material misstatement. An audit includes
examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting: the amounts and disclosures in the non-
consolidated balance sheet. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and
significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall non-consolidated
balance sheet presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis "for our
opinion.

In our opinion, the non-consolidated balance sheet presents fairly, in all material respects the

non-consolidated financial position of the Bank as of October 31, 2004; in accordance with’
International Financial Reporting Standards.

Lh ble ¢ Tock

January 25, 2005

1. Deposit your contribution into the special account opened at
Bank of The Bahamas —
Tsunami Relief for Sri Lanka -
Account Number: 5265970
Bank of The Bahamas
Main Branch
The deposit can be made at any branch of the bank.

If you are paying by cheque, you can take your contribution
to A. I. D. at any of their locations in New Providence, Grand
Bahamas, Abaco, Eleuthera, Andros and Exuma.

Mail: your cheque to Tsunami Relief for Sri Lanka.
P..O. Box CB 11665, Nassau, Bahamas. Cheques should be
made payable to “Tsunami Relief for Sri Lanka”.

Simply call us at 502-7094 — and we will arrange to
collect it from you.

LITT

Contributions will be forwarded to the Sri Lanka Red Cross
Society for effective deployment. ,



cd
PAGE 10, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005









Parties, Nightclubs
& Restaurants





The Love of Music concert featuring internation-
al award-winning artist ta.da with Aydee, Mizpah
Bethel and Dreddy on Saturday, February 26 @ the
Blue Note in the British Colonial Hilton. Admis-

_ sion $35 (drinks inclusive). Tickets available at the
Juke Box, Mall at Marathon and Blue Note, 322-
NOTE, blue.note@coralwave.com.

Have a Heart concert featuring the Bahamas’
hottest performers, Xtra, Visage and KB on Satur-
day, February 26 @ at the Wyndham Crystal Palace
Ballroom. The theme of the concert is “Bringing
Hope and Awareness Through Music” and is aimed
at raising awareness of heart disease among young
people. The box office opens at 8.30pm. Show-
time is 9pm. Tickets are $15 in advance and $20 at
the door, and all proceeds will go to the Bahamas
Heart Association. For more information call 356-
7326 or 324-1714.

Rave Saturdays @ The All New Club Eclipse. DJ
Scoobz spinning the best in Old Skool. Admission
$35, all inclusive food and drink. ,

Fever @ Bahama Boom, Elizabeth St, downtown,
Fridays. The hottest party in the Bahamas every
Friday night. Admission $10 before midnight. First 50
women get free champagne. First 50 men get a free
Greycliff cigar. Dress to impress. For VIP reserva-
tions call 356-4612.

Cool Runnings is back with a Conscious Party @
Hard Rock Cafe, Charlotte St North every Friday.
; Pldssie Teggae style music. Admission $10.

Mellow Moods every Sunday @ Fluid Lounge
and Nightclub, Bay St, featuring hits from yesterday
— old school reggae and rockers downstairs, and
golden oldies upstairs. Admission: Free. Doors open
9pm.

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters Sports
Bar. Drink specials all night long, including karaoke
warm-up drink to get you started. Party, 8pm-until.

Karaoke Nights @ Fluid Lounge and Nightclub.
Begins 10pm every Tuesday. Weekly winners select-
ed as Vocalist of the Week — $250 cash prize. Winner
selected at end of month from finalists — cash prize
$1,000. Admission $10 with one free drink.

Reggae Tuesdays @ Bahama Boom. Cover charge
includes a free Guinness and there should be lots of
prizes and surprises. Admission: Ladies $10 and
’ Men $15.

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports:
Bar every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers
and numerous drink specials.

Flash Nights @ Club Fluid every Thursday. The
ultimate Ladies Night. Join Nassau’s and Miami
Beach’s finest men. Ladies only before 11.30pm with
free champagne. Guys allowed after 11.30pm with
$20 cover.

The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday. Doors
open at 9pm, showtime 11.30pm. Cover charge $15.
$10 with flyer. ,

Twisted Boodah Bar & Lounge every Friday @
Cafe Segafredo, Charlotte St North, featuring world
music, chillin’ jazz and soulful club beats. Starting at
6pm. Beers $3, longdrinks $4.50.

Fantasy Fridays @ Fluid Lounge, featuring late
‘80s music in the VIP Lounge, Top of the Charts in
the Main Lounge, neon lights and Go Go dancers.
Glow sticks for all in before midnight. Admission:
Ladies free before 11pm, $15 after; Guys $20 all
night.

College Night @ Bahama Boom every Friday.
Admission: $10 with college ID, $15 without.

Dicky Mo’s Fridays @ Cable Beach. Happy Hour
- 3 for $10 mixed drinks and $1 shots.

LoNGon

melee

t’s for the love of music that artists ta.da, Mizpah Bethel, ‘Avice and Dreddy, will

take to the stage on Saturday ina concert that will introduce a soon-to-be-

released compilation album by Bahamian and Canadian artists. Headliner of the

event, ta.da (Terneille Burrows) of Sanctigroove Promo, is.a recording artist,

songwriter and producer. Her style is a unique ‘blend of soul, reggae and hip-hop.

She has independently released CDs and has music videos that air on Much Music. ta.da

is an honours graduate from the Harris Institute for the Arts in Toronto, Canada, and has
won multiple Marlin Awards and John Lennon Songwriting contest awards. _

“Some of the freshest and most original young artists/songwriters will be showcased. This

is a must-see event for music lovers, featuring an all-star roster of young Bahamian talent,”

according to the concert press release.

“The Love of Music” begins at 9pm. Adinission: $35 (drinks inclusive). Tickets can be
_purchased at the Juke Box in the Mall at Marathon. ~

Greek Saturdayz @ Bahama Boom, Elizabeth
Ave. Every Saturday the Phi Beta Sigma Frat wel-
comes greeks, college grads and smooth operators.
Admission $15 all night, $10 for greeks in letters.
Music by DJ Palmer, security strictly enforced.

Chill Out Sundays @ The Beach Hut, West Bay
Street with fresh served BBQ and other specials
starting from 4pm-10pm, playing deep, funky chill
moods with world beats. Cover $2.

Sweet Sunday Chill Out Soiree Lounge, every
Sunday, 4pm-midnight @ Patio Grille, British Colo-
nial Hotel.

' Wet Sundays, every Sunday, noon-midnight @
Crystal Cay Beach. Admission $10, ladies free.

Carib Scene @ Club Fluid every Sunday. A night
of Caribbean, Latin and Reggae flavours for all
audiences. Latin Flair in the VIP Lounge; Old School
Reggae and Soca in the Main Lounge. Ladies in
free before 11pm. $10 after 11pm. Men, $15 cover
charge.

Jay Mitchell and Hot KC @ Palm Court Lounge,
British Colonial Hilton, Wednesday-Thursday 8pm-
12am.

Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley’s Restaurant &
Lounge, Eneas St off Poinciana Drive. Featuring
Frankie Victory at the key board in the After Dark
Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to midnight. Fine food
and drinks.

Paul Hanna performs at Traveller’s Rest, West
Bay St, every Sunday, 6.30pm-9.30pm.







The Arts

Alton Lowe will exhibit a group of recent paint-
ings at the Nassau Beach Hotel in the Common-
wealth Room, starting Saturday, February 27
through March 2, 10am to 7pm daily.

Ian Strachan’s Diary of Souls, the critically
acclaimed play examining the Haitian experience
in the Bahamas, will open at the Dundas Centre
for the Performing Arts on Friday, March 4 and

continue through March 6, 8pm. And again on |

Friday, March 11 and Saturday, March 12, 8pm.
Call the box office at 393-3728 for ticket info.
Tickets for Friday’s performance are $25, remain-
ing shows are $20.

Indigo, a film about gifted children on earth,
their purpose and work of healing, peace and
love, will be shown @ Unity Centre of Light, East
Ave, Centreville (directly behind Centreville Food
Store) on Friday, March 4, starting at 6.30pm.
Admission $10 adults, $7 children. For more infor-
mation call 328-1325.

The National Collection @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, an exhibition that takes
the viewer on a journey through the history of
fine art in the Bahamas. It features signature
pieces from the national collection, including
recent acquisitions by Blue Curry, Antonius
Roberts and Dionne Benjamin-Smith. Gallery
hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 1lam-4pm. Call 328-
5800 to book tours.

Past, Present and Personal: The Dawn Davies
Collection @ the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, Villa Doyle, West and West Hill Streets.
The exhibition is part of the NAGB’s Collector’s
Series. Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 11am-4pm.

A ROUN D









THE TRIBUNE



NASSAU



Call 328-5800 to book tours.

The Awakening Landscape: The Nassau Water-
colours of Gaspard Le Marchand Tupper, from
the collection of Orjan and Amanda Lindroth @
the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas. The
mid-nineteenth century paintings that make up the
exhibition are part of one of the earliest suites of
paintings of Nassau and its environs. Tupper was
a British military officer stationed at Fort Char-
lotte in the 1850s. The works show a pre-mod-
ern Bahamas through the decidely British medium
of watercolour: Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday,
1lam-4pm. Call 328-5800 to book tours.

4

Health



The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at |
5.30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at
their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville. Call
323-4482 for more info.

_MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third
Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors Hospital con-
ference room.

The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2.30pm (except August and Decem-
ber) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley
Street.

Doctors Hospital, the official training centre of the
American Heart Association offers CPR classes cer-
tified by the AHA. The course defines the warning
signs of réspiratory arrest and gives prévention strate-

\giés:to: avoid sudden death syndrome and the most |

common serious injuries and-choking that'can occu}
in adults, infants and children. CPR and First Aid
classes are offered every third Saturday of the month
from 9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Com-
munity Training Representative at 302-4732 for
more information and learn to save a life today.

REACH - Resources & Education for Autism

‘and related Challenges meets from 7pm — 9pm the

second Thursday of each month in the cafeteria of
the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.

Civic Clubs



The Bahamas Historical Society’s monthly
meeting is scheduled for 6pm on March 17 at the”
Museum on Shirley Street and Elizabeth Avenue.
Dr Donald Hopkins of the Carter Presidental
Center, a descendent of Long Island, Harbour
Island and Abaco, will give a presentation entitled
“Posing Questions, Pondering Records and:Prob-
ing the Genes: Researching Family Histories in the

Bahamas.” The public is invited to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1905 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm @
BEC Cafe, Tucker Rd. Club 9477 meets Friday,
7pm @ Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm
A19, Jean St. Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pm @
British Colonial Hilton. Club 1600 meets Thursday,
8.30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes. Club 7178 meets
Tuesday, 6pm @ The J Whitney Pinder Building,
Collins Ave. Club 2437 meets every second, fourth
and fifth Wednesday at the J Whitney Pinder Build-
ing, Collins Ave at 6pm. Club 612315 meets Monday
6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ the
Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first
Tuesday, 7pm @ Gaylord’s Restaurant, Dowdeswell
St. Please call 502-4842/377-4589 for more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second
Tuesday, 6.30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office,
4th floor meeting room.

The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month in
the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, Bay St.

Send all your civic and social events to The Tri-
bune via fax: 328-2398 or e-mail: outthere@tribune-
media.net

Se 6):

PIRITS
THE TRIBUNE ~

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005, PAGE 11



Government faces 57 requests

for commercial broadcasting

By ERIC ROSE
Bahamas Information Services

MINISTER of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe said that the govern-
ment is considering 57 requests. for
commercial broadcast licences for
FM stations, as well as requests for
commercial television licences.

“We are reviewing these requests
and, shortly, there will be an
announcement of our decisions,” said
Minister Wilchcombe, who has min-
isterial responsibility for broadcast-

ing.
Mr Wilchcombe was speaking at

FNM. calls for ‘Students - told of

the renewal of Bahamian commercial
broadcast licences during a ceremo-
ny at the British Colonial Hilton.

Attending were representatives of
radio stations from New Providence,
Grand Bahama, Abaco and
Eleuthera, as well as government
officials and broadcasting stake-
holders.

Mr Wilchcombe told the broad-
casters that it is the government’s
policy that all radio stations pro-
mote Bahamian heritage and cul-
ture and reinforce positive
Bahamian values.

“In this regard, licence holders
are encouraged to increase pro-

grammes that reflect our rich and
diverse culture and our heritage,”
he said.

Mr Wilchcombe said that the
government is also considering
amending the broadcasting rules
to impose fines for breaches of Sec-
tion 10 of the rules, which outlines
matters which are not permitted to
be broadcast. He asked that they
ensure that their stations fully com-
ply with the rules.

Mr Wilchcombe encouraged
licensees to submit suggestions and
written recommendations for the
improvement of the broadcasting

industry in The Bahamas. He said

solution to
Bozine row

- By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Free National Move--

ment has called on the gov-

House faces
new Stubbs
resolution —

FROM Page One

on how many extensions a per-
son can be given.

Leader of government busi-
ness in the House, Immigration
and Labour Minister Vincent
Peet said that government is still
monitoring the matter.

“The issue is before the
courts which is hearing his mat-
ter and we would certainly wait
for the court to do what it needs

to do. We are clearly watching

how things develop but we have
no control over'the court,” he
said.

However, Mr Peet said that
government has not made a
decision yet as to whether it will
forward another resolution giv-
ing Mr Stubbs another exten-
sion.

Leader of Opposition Busi-
ness, Montagu MP Brent
Symonette told The Tribune
that enough time has been giv-
en to Mr Stubbs.

“I feel that certainly enough
time has been given to sort this
matter out and it is time for the

ernment to resolve the land

dispute between land devel-
opers and the residents of
Bozine Town.as soon as pos-
sible.

The residents face being dis-
placed by the Harrold Road
Land Development Compa-
ny (Landco) which claims they
have the clear title deed tRihe

property. on. which the resi-'.

dents have lived for many
years.

In a press statement yester-
day, former area MP Dion
Foulkes, said the FNM held
an extraordinary meeting on
Wednesday night where the

FNM Blue Hills Constituen- -

cy Association unanimously
passed a resolution calling on
the government to bring
immediate resolution to the
crisis in Bozine Town and
Knowles Drive.

Mr Foulkes said that the gov-
ernment must move with

. haste to ensure that the resi-

dents of Bozine Town and

‘Knowles Drive obtain good

and marketable title to their
land.

"The good people of Bozine
Town and Knowles Drive

have experienced a lot of pain |

and anxiety as a result of the

land dispute.. Families are in —

an uproar, financial commit-
ments are in. jeopardy and

societal pressures are build-

ing."
He said as a matter of public

policy, the government has an’

obligation to bring swift and
effective help to the good peo-
ple of Bozine Town.

He said he called on the
Prime Minister, the Attorney
General and area MP Leslie
Miller to address this matter
as one of national urgency so
that residents could revert to

_ their former lives of peace and

tranquility.

The Bahamas Democratic
Party has also taken up the
call for the government to
assist the residents.

TEACHING VACANCY




ly towards sex.

C I GIBSON HIGH SCHOOL held a
workshop on HIV/AIDS and other social
issues at the school on Marathon Road.

Presentations were made by Mr Ranard
Henfield on HIV/AIDS from a Caribbean
perspective, Mr Keith Kemp on education
and the value of abstinence, and Mr Hank
Williams on drug abuse:

Mr Henfield, attorney and founder of the
Caribbean AIDS Awareness Festival, told
the students that HIV/AIDS is a world-wide
problem, and that most persons infected with
HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean are between
the ages of 15 and 25 years.

“The leading cause of death among young
people in the Bahamas.teday & HIV/AIDS,”
Mr Henfield said. “Youngsters are taking
part in'sexual intercourse at an alarming ear-
ly age. “The strange thing about AIDS is it
does not matter who you are. It has no face.
It has no cure.”

Mr Henfield noted that a new strain of
AIDS has being detected recently, and that a
Trinidadian man contracted HIV some six
months ago and has since died.

Mr Keith Kemp, chairman of Youth:
Awareness Programme, said that young peo-
ple’s attention. is being directed almost entire-

Said Mr Kemp: “The national prade point

that since 2003, such input was

requested from them.

“I must confess that I was rather
disappointed with the lack of
response and interest shown to date,”
he said. “I had hoped that, at this
forum, we would have begun mean-
ingful discussions of your written rec-
ommendations to improve broad-
casting.

“Tt would be better, for example, not

-to wait for the 2007 General Election

to consider amendments to the rules
governing General Elections.”
Minister Wilchcombe also
addressed questions and comments
from broadcasters on various topics,

new AIDS strain

By Krystal Knowles
Bahamas Information Services

done.

dead.”

average for 2004 stood at a D level. Main-
taining a low grade point average affects your
future. Employers are looking for employees
who are intellectually u inclined to get the job

“When it comes to sex, your body and your
future, you need to develop a serious atti-
tude. Young women need to have moral and
respect. Do not allow your boyfriend to intim-
idate you into having sex. Say no and mean
no Mr Kemp said.

“Young men need to wise up if you intend
to be the future leaders of this country. Stop
procrastinating and focus on your education
and cease allowing our women to lead us in
every aspect of society. Time wasted can nev-
er be regained.”

Mr Williams, a former drug dealer and
abuser, recounted his life’s story in an effort
to deter young men and women from becom-
ing.drug dealers or.abusers.

“Marijuana destroys your brain cells. Your
attitude and judgement about life is distorted
when you are under the influence drugs,” he
said. “Satan shows us all the glamour of this
world but does not show us the end results of
being locked in Fox Hill, having aS or |

Mr Williams said the love of money causes
young women to sell their bodies or men to
kill for it.

“Be sure of yourself. Focus on your edu-
cation and give your life to the Lord, ” Mr
Williams said.

including the possibility of dividing
The Bahamas into regional broad-
cast markets, competition with ZNS
for advertisers, satellite radio, music
subscription services, the need to
promote Bahamian performing
artists and the importance of com-
petition. Minister Wilchcombe said
such dialogue is important and is nec-

“essary for the growth of Bahamian

broadcasting.
“We are ina developing industry,

-as far as the Bahamas is concerned,

and our job must always be to look at

it, to assess where we are and then |

make new decisions and move on,”
Minister Wilchcombe said.























Get behind the news every ae |
..read INSIGHT, only in The Tribune





BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF
EXTERNAL AUDITING SERVICES

TENDER No. 578/05

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites
applications from qualified Teachers for ‘positions
available at St John’s College, St Anne’s School,
Freeport Anglican High School/Discovery Primary
School and St Andrew’s Anglican School, Exuma.

‘parties concerned to fully dis-
close what actions have been
taken prior to brining any reso-
lution to the House of Assem-
bly,” said Mr Symonette.

If a by-election is called to fill
a seat vacated by Mr Stubbs,
Chairman of the FNM Carl.
Bethel is expected to run for
the Holy Cross seat which he
lost to Mr Stubbs three years
ago.

“The executive of the party
and council have a definitive
strategy in place and we are
waiting to see what will happen
by the end of March and based
on what the government does






PRIMARY:
Upper Primary
Lower Primary
Kindergarten
Computer Studies

SECONDARY
Spanish .
English Language/Literature
Biology
Mathematic
’ Religious Studies
Physical Education
Special Education
Librarian

The Bahamas Flectrcity Corporation invites tenders fron eligible bidders for
the provision of external auditing services.












Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office, Blue
Hill & Tucker Roads ey contacting:-

we will have a response,” Mr Mrs Delmeta Seymour

Bethel said. plome BeguoMucs: Administrative Officer
Mr Stubbs was declared Nurse é :

bankrupt in March of 2004 by Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

J He ipsicdonte peal Only qualified Teachers, Nurse, with Bachelor or Nassau, Bahamas

was rejected by the Court of Master Degrees from an accredited University or Phone No. 302-1158

Appeal and he has expended Fax No. 323-6852
the entire 150 day extension
allowed by parliament to have
the matter resolved.

The House then passed a res-

olution allowing Mr Stubbs an

College and Teaching Certificate need apply.

For further details and application forms, please contact .
the Anglican Central Education Authority on Sands
Road at telephone (242) 322-3015/6/7.

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 11 March 2005 by 4:00pm and
addressed as follows:

additional six months to get his The General Manager

affairs in order. If he fails he ae et pe Bahamas Electricity Corporation
forfeits his parliament t. Letters of application and/or completed application , a

orfeits his parliamentary sea PP. p Pp Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Since first being declared a
bankrupt Mr Stubbs has come
under fire by the FNM which
made repeated calls for a by-
election in Holy Cross.

Lawyers for the FNM also
announced that they would file
" a petition questioning whether
Mr Stubbs is qualified to con-
tinue representing the con-
stituency if the bankruptcy rul-
ing is upheld.

forms with copies of required documents must be sent
by Friday, March 11, 2005 to the Anglican Education
~ Department addressed to:-

Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs Delmeta Seymour
Marked: Tender No. 578/05

The Director of Education ‘RXTERNAL AUDITING SERVICES”

Anglican Central Education Authority
P.O. Box N-656

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.
Nassau, Bahamas f :



|
PAGE 12, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005 [HE | HIBUNE



isaac

Naa See eh EWEN TS CAPTURED ON CAMERA

Golden Heart Awards



@ A DASHING COUPLE: The debonair Joseph B Pratt, retired
GIVING TO CHARITY: from left, Kit Spencer; J. Barrie Farrington, supervisor of underground construction with the Bahamas Electrical
Kerzner International senior vice-president of administration and = Corporation (BEC), together with his wife Cynthia, Deputy Prime
his wife Susan; Dr Bernard Nottage, leader of the Coalition for Minister and Minister of National Security, dressed in a stunning red
Democratic Reform (CDR); attorney Thomas Evans QC. satin gown.





DANCING THE NIGHT AWAY: Insurance
executive and Zonta living legend, Orinthia
Nesbitt, winner of the 41st Annual Golden

Heart Award with her husband Lloyd, own-
ers of General Brokers Insurance Ltd.

‘







i LOOKING SMART: Joseph Gibson, marketing consultant, with his wife
Linda, executive vice-president and general manager of Atlantic Medical
Company.

Hi SEEING CLEARLY: Optometrist Randall ‘Randy’ Hall and
his wife Annie of the Optique Shoppe.



Pe

LADIES OF GLAMOUR: Kayla Johnson
and Shawnell Bain of the Commonwealth
Bank.



@ FOREIGN AFFAIRS: US Ambassador to the Bahamas John Rood and his
wife Jamie with British High Commissioner Rod Gemmell and his wife Jan.





M@ KEEPING THE FAITH: Rev James Moul-
trie, former educator, politician and diplo-

mat, with his wife Bernadette.
Va by es @ DIVAS OF THE NIGHT: Flora Strachan, CEO of the Reg-
4 aj, peep ees Rens ie | i ONE HEART: Rev Kendal Nottage, attorney-at-law, with his wife Ruby, istrar Department; Michailla Strachan, chief radiologic
FE BN hela chancellor of the Anglican Diocese of Bahamas including Turks and technologist of the Fourth Terrace Diagnostic Centre; Zen-

: tt ah ' Caicos. — er Beckford, lease manager at the Airport Authority.




















SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005 Gece es a ture

a __ of sailing at
SECTION Rotary Club of
; _ East Nassau —

Fax: (242) 328-2398 ;
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com MIAMI HERALD Ss PORTS

@ By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
TWO minutes had elapsed off the clock |

before any team decided to put ascore onthe |

board, and with the defensive pressure being |;

applied it seems as though the first quarter |, ; :

would have gone without a score.
It was a crucial game between the Catholic
High Crusaders and the Prince William Fal-

cons, who were forced to head south for the

spring. The final score was 32-31.
With time ticking, and pressure.starting to |

climb, Falcons’ Rashad Williams drove base- |

line, hitting the first point in the game off the |
ass. i

© Williams went cold afterwards jut histeam- |

| mate Benjamin Rolle took o, “where he left
| off. a yo

Pressure was moundng for the Crusaders,

ee eee a | ORaAlCG ns ‘head south for si ring

lafelo (2x1 =}



9

son. Nelson scored all six of the Crusaders'
| points in the first quarter.

! The game, which would have sent the loser
packing, was all the fans expected, especially
; after the Crusaders fell short in their first battle.

Forcing the Falcons to take the long route
were the CV Bethel Stingrays. The two teams
were on the tournament’s hook, dangling.

i With just two points separating the two
| schools in the first three quarters, the Falcons
| applied their full court press and winded up
| stealing three inbound passes by the Crusaders.
However, the Falcons were only able to convert
one of the steals.
Williams said: “It was a tough game for us ...
+ J believe we could have played better in the
/ final minutes, but I lost control of several pass-
; - es which cost us in the end. But overall it was a
| good game which we shouldn’t have lost, but I
| guess they wanted it more than us.” ;
1 The Falcons were a brand new team in the
| fourth quarter and didn't allow the Crusaders to
{ send them packing in their own hometown.
They started the fourth period with a big three
pointer by Devard Martin, and two steals, one of
} which they capitalised on.
| By this time the falcons had the Crusaders
: down by four points, with things just starting to
| heat up. But this wasn’t just an ordinary game
for the Crusaders, who are known for doing
well in.tournaments like the Hugh Campbell
Invitational. he tee nn Lah
i When the Crusaders thought they were get-
i: ting back into the game the Falcons took flight.
i A swift Williams led his team on a 7-2 run
: and, with the Falcons' pride in his heart, he
| pounded the ball over the Crusaders' defence.
i With two minutes left in the game, the Cru-
saders battled their way back into the game and
forced the Falcons' defence to work hard, mak-
ing them tired.

Using fresh legs to their advantage and real-
ising that they had now tied the score, the Cru-
saders went to work. The Falcons passed the
out-of-zone defence set-up by the crusaders but
they weren’t able to convert easy lay-ups.

While the lay-ups haunted the Falcons, the
Crusaders’ biggest nightmare became free
throws. Up by one point with less than 30 sec-
onds remaining in the game, Nelson fouled
i Devard Martin.

i With the Falcons not being in foul bonus,
they had to inbound the ball and with time as
their worst enemy, the only thing they could
do was force a shot, which rattled around the
; rim and bounced on the back part of the cylin-
| der as all eyes stared to see exactly what the ball
+ would do. The ball fell off the left side of the rim
and into the hands of one of the Crusaders.

j Ashton King was the leading scorer for the
' Crusaders. He finished with 12 points, while
; Nelson chipped in with 11.

i Said the coach of the Crusaders: “I saw the
; Falcons play CV Bethel so that helped me to
prepare for them in this game. One of things we
trained for was the full court press, but they
surprised us and applied the half court press
to. We were definitely ready for the full court
and all we did against the half court was sit in a
zone.

“We are not that explosive team and we are
just taking what we get. The key was that the
team played great defence and with that you will
always win. I know we have a pretty young
team and they are just elated to be here. Know
; One is expecting us to be in the big dance but I
don’t advise them to count us out. We might not
be among the top teams in the tournament but
we are coming up," he said.

q

|











i
i
i



@ STEPHAN Burrows takes a jump shot
for the Catholic High Crusaders.

(Photo: Felipé Major/
Trubune Staff)



_ Subwaye
thanks all the participants of the
2005 Subwa
Fun Run/Wal
February, 26th 2005


PAGE 2B, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005



TRIBUNE SPORTS

Hugh Campbell action

The Wildcats
roar against
the Hawks

SIR JACK Hayward Wildcats took
on the Old Bight Hawks from Cat
Island this week in the Hugh Camp-
bell Invitational. The Wildcats started
quickly and went on to win the game
55-23.

(Photos: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)



~~




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TRIBUNE SPORTS

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005, PAGE 3B





What does the future hold for
Olympic sailing in Bahamas?

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

MINISTER of Youth,
Sports and.Culture Neville
Wisdom got a first-hand
glimpse of what is expected in
the future for Olympic sailing
in the Bahamas.

Yesterday at the Nassau
Yacht Club, where he spoke
on sailing in front of Rotary
Club of East Nassau members,
Minister Wisdom introduced
25 new Optimus sailing sloops
which are to be used by the
Bahamas Sailing Association -
headed by Sir Durward "Sea
Wolf" Knowles - for the Asso-
ciation's junior development
programme.

Jimmy Lowe, who heads the
organising committee of the
pilot programme that will be
launched by the BSA after the
Easter holiday, said they are
excited about the new form of
sailing for youngsters between
the agesof8-14 years. —_.

“Eighty per cent of the
medal winners in Athens start-
ed in the Opti sailing,” said
Lowe, who attempted to rep-
resent the Bahamas at the
2004 Olympics in Athens,
Greece, but fell short.

“This is the ultimate begin-
ners boat and we wanted to
broaden the horizon for sailing
and get everybody involved
and make it fun for every-
body," he added.

Once the programme is
launched, Lowe said they will
be looking at holding a six- to-
eight week training session
before they go into a more
defined programme in the
summer.

“It’s my goal to see at least
40-50 boats out here and have
a junior Optimus champi-
onship for the Bahamas,”
Lowe said.

Eventually, Lowe said, their
goal is to get a vehicle that can
be used on the Family Islands
to promote the sport as they
begin to lay the foundation‘

Government has allowed
the BSA to import the boats -
delivered by Seaboard Marine
- duty-free, according to Mr



Minister Wisc ayn PTT
a first-hand glimpse

Wisdom.

Francisco Decardenas,
another member of the organ-
ising- committee, thanked
B&M Custom Brokerage for

‘clearing the boats and Four

Seasons Maintenance for
transporting the vessels to the

“This -
is the
ultimate
beginners
boat and
we wanted
to broaden
the horizon
for sailing
and get
everybody
involved
and make
it fun for
everybody.

— Minister of Youth,
Sports and Culture
Neville Wisdom

Nassau Yacht Club.

In his address to the Rotary
Club, Minister Wisdom told
members about how he was
able to bring harmony and
unity on the waters of native
sloop sailing.

“There is peace in sailing.



Native sloop sailing is trying
to address some different chal-
lenges,” said Minister Wis-
dom, referring to the lack of a
vibrant youth movement on
the crew of the various boats.

“They have spent so much
time arguing among them-
selves that they forget that
some of these people partici-
pating in the sport are getting
old. So you have to train the
younger ones so there is a
replenishment of youth and
youth thinking and youthful
activities in this sport," he said.

Minister Wisdom said the
introduction of a youth sum-
mer programme has helped to
address latter concerns in the
sport.

-. “Our native sloop sailing

programme is on _ the
rebound,” he said, adding that
his present focus is on
Olympic sailing.

The BSA, said Minister
Wisdom, will be given the task
of getting the Optimus sailing
in the water and preparing the
future generation for the
Olympics.

He congratulated Sir Dur-
ward Knowles for his contri-
bution to the sport of sailing
and encouraged him to con-
tinue to make his contribu-
tions, especially financial ones,
to sports in the Bahamas.

Minister Wisdom noted that
the organising committee
responsible for Optimus sail-
ing should be commended for
their hard work to date.

“In order for it to be suc-
cessful, they told me that it
was necessary for them to go
into the public schools, to go
into the schools over the hill,
to go into areas where young
people would not think about
having an opportunity, to par-
ticipate in what is generally
considered a rich man’s sport,"
he said.

Minister Wisdom said the
sport of sailing is in good
hands and has a bright future.

Sir Durward Knowles
thanked Minister Wisdom for
the role he played in bringing
peace and harmony to native
sloop sailing.

}



@ PICTURED (I-r): Sailor Jimmy Lowe,
Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture
Neville Wisdom, Rev Harrison Thompson,
permanent secretary in the Ministry of
Youth Sports and Culture, and Mrs
Bernadette Smith, Ministry of Youth
Sports and Culture administrator. Minister
Wisdom and his team inspected a trailer of
25 Opti sailing sloops at Nassau Yacht
Club, East Bay Street, on Friday..

(Photo by Brent Stubbs/
Senior Sports Reporter)



BAHAMAS RUGBY FOOTBALL UNION

BAILLOU RECOVERY COMPLETE —
WITH VICTORY IN RUGBY FINAL

AMAS iN being held close by League Champions Cuckoos for 75 minutes,
Baillou pulled away as the dying embers of a fiery game flickered to
prove that they s hould never be underestimated. After their worst start to

the season in over a decade (0 -3), Baillou came back to win all their
remaining league games and went into the play —_- offs in a position of
strength with two key players (Nicky Stubbs & Tim Thompson) backto.
match fitness. This confidence was underlined in the quarter finals as they held Freeport pointless-at home, the

only time that’s happened all season.

‘Lead- from - the--back’ captain Nicky Stubbs was in no doubt about his team’s preparations for the final
and when Ryan ‘Chilly’ Knowles crossed the line for the winning try in the dying minutes of the game, the
celebrations began in earnest. “I knew we'd win,” exclaimed Stubbs after the game “we're Baillou!”

Not to be outdone, the youth match was —_ played with every bit as much commitment. An end to end
game which saw the lead change hands 4 times resulted in another ‘dying minutes’ try to give Cuckoos a 25-
20 victory over perennial rivals Buccaneers. Cuckoos Youth coach Edrico Hanchell was jubilant © “The boys
worked hard for this, there’s no question they deserve the win. Buccaneers came out to strong and were
excellent, but we stayed the course. A great game. — ” he said. A crowd of several hundred enjoyed a fantastic end
to arecord season. Now Bahamas Rugby will focus on the Rugby World Cup Qualifications in June.

FULL 15-A-SIDE SEASON STATISTICS



Stella Artois Score Premier Importers Score
League Pid W DL F A Pts. . Youth League PdWDkL EF. A Pts.
1 Cuckoos 6 5 0 1 108 53 15 1 Cuckoos 6 4 1 1 100 4 13
2 Baillou 6 3 0 3 126 86 9 2 Buccaneers 6 2 1 3 105 120 7
3: Freeport! &@ 2 004 79 132 6 3 Baillou 6 2 0 4 100-115 6
4 Buccaneers* 6 2 0 4 94 133 6
-*Freeport finish ahead of Buccaneers due to a better score difference in head-to-head games
Stella Artois League Premier Importers Youth League
Baillou Buccaneers Cuckoos Freeport Cuckoos. Buccaneers Baillou
Baillou X 20-21 10-20 35-5 Baillou 5-15 0-30 "ee
Buccaneers 13-41 X 11-13 22-31 Buccaneers 20-20 X 30-25
Cuckoos 10-15 14-3 X 26-0 Cuckoos X 25-5 20-10
Freeport 17-5 17-24 7-27 X Baillou 25-5 35-10
Buccaneers 10-15
PLAY- OFF RESULTS ;
Stella Artois Men's League Freeport O22 Baillou
Cuckoos 22-8 Buccaneers
Premier Importers Youth League Baillou 0-15 Buccaneers
FINALS RE®LTS
Stella Artois Championship Cup Cuckoos 5-15 Baillou
Premier Importers Youth Cup Cuckoos 25-20 Buccaneers

There will be NO GAMES on February 26". International games begin in March
NEXT GAMES: MARCH 5° 3pm - Baillou vs. LeHigh Valley RFC (Pennsylvania)
MARCH 6" 3pm - Buccaneers vs. Yale University





‘
TRIBUNE SPORTS
SPORTS

Surprises in second legs
as UEFA Cup heats





han

“Copyrighted! Material
Syndicated ’Content

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Available from Commercial | News ALON ICIETS af


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This title basically hits the Caribbean
Style of Architecture and Cuisine





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PAGE 6B,SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005

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‘MOMAX, a big insurance company. (1 ‘PG-13 er of his young girlfriend. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC)
4 30) %% JURY | & x % TREKKIES (1997, Documentary) iTV. The im- |% %% TREKKIES 2 (2004, Documentary) iTV. Euro-
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ie oes [ck THE ITALIAN JOB (2003, Suspense) Mark ‘ittey Charlize | * & GOLDENEYE { 995, Adven-
TMC TARGATE — | Theron, Edward Norton. A thief and his crew plan to steal back their gold. Wi Pierce Brosnan, Sean Bean,
(1994) 'PG-13' | ‘PG-13' (CC) G-13' (CC



ak aH DIE ALONE en Suspense) DMX, : % AMERICAN WEDDING (2003, Comedy) Jason Sau ey
MOMAX JDavid Arquette, Michael Fa Premiere, An “ng Bigs, , Alyson Hannigan, January Jones. Jim and tre een
writer learns about a drug dealer. 1 ‘R’ (CC) Michelle prepare to get married. 1 ‘NR’ (CC) fairs’ 0 (00)



TRIBUNE SPORTS



SUNDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 27, 2005

[7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

TSA eLearn Se

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@ wrorlly N) © (CC) asked to probe the 1943 murder of ‘| Elias Koteas, Francesca Neri. Premiere. Aone goes after the terrorist
a factory worker. 0 (CC) who killed his family. O (CC) (DVS)

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feud within the Mafia. (CC) is suspected of murder.

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“News (CC)
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| CBC family secret in Rutherford Hall. Stars Joan Hickson. (CC) days of the election. (00)

CNBC ce Chris Matt- |The Age of Wal-Mart: Inside America’s Most Powerful Company The |Cover to Cover Host Liz Claman.
hews Show _history and future plans of the retail giant.
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ean Central |George Lopez: Why You Crying? The comic ape Jamie Foxx’s Latfapalooza (CC
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and Spa in Carlsbad, Calif. (Same-day Tine) tion (Live) '



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(sy is % HEAD OF STATE eas , Comedy) Chris
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a difficult book, 'R’ (CC)

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man, Mos Def, Mary Stuart Masterson. A lab technician helps a doctor
with surgical techniques. 1 ‘NR’ (CC)

4 ANGELS IN AMERICA (2003, pe (Part 2 of 2) Al Pacino,
Meryl Streep, Emma Tepe ony Kushner's plays about the AIDS
crisis in 1980s America. 1 (CC)




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M AX-E TOKER’S ||, Corbin Bemsen, David Alan Grier. A mortician plays host to four sto- Ben Stiller. Two detectives investi-
CULA'R’ .. {ries of twisted terror. 'R(CC) gate a cocaine dealer. (CC)



( 15) * & DAN-| * * LARA CROFT TOMB RAIDER: THE CRADLE OF LIFE (2003, Ac- a vi “Lap Dance” (iTV) (N)
SHOW GR US MINDS |tion) Angelina Jolie, Gerard Butler, Ciaran Hinds. iTV, The globe-trotter
(1995) battles a scientist for Pandora's box. (\ 'PG-13" (CC)

re %% BARB] % % SPECIES (1995, Science Fiction) Ben Kingsley, Natasha Hen- % SPECIES Il (1998) Michael Mad-
TMC Cy (1996) 'R’ ede, Mi Michael a ae A genetically engineered creature may destroy |sen. An astronaut is infected with a



deadly strain of alien DNA.




TRIBUNE SPORTS . SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2005, PAGE 7B .
COMICS PAGE



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