Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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BAHAMAS EDITION

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005





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Girls died as result
of ‘accident with —
contribution of neglect’



@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Tribune"

THE DEATHS of the two
residents of the Williemae Pratt
Centre for Girls, who died in a
fire in 2003, were the result of
an “accident with contribution
of neglect”, the Coroner’s Court
ruled yesterday. |

Although satisfied with the
verdict, the mothers of the two
girls said they now hope to
explore other legal avenues to
bring justice to those they
believe to be responsible for the
deaths of their children.

_The seven-member jury

returned after a two-hour delib-
eration period to give their
unanimous verdict in the
inquest into the deaths of 16-
year-olds Anastacia Alexander
and Deshawn Ingraham, who
on October 24, 2003 were res-
cued from a blaze in the dorms
of the rehabilitative centre, but
later died as.a result of their
burns. .

A third girl, Shantia Minus,
was left seriously injured.

In the past year the court
heard testimony that suggested
that the fire was deliberately set
by a resident of dormitory as
part of an elaborate escape plot.

The Acting Assistant Super-
intendent at the facility also tes-
tified that there was a break-

down in safety at the Williemae ..

Pratt Centre.

The verdict handed down
yesterday expressed the jurors’
‘view that although the deaths
of the two girls were acciden-
;tal in nature, they were con-

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Ware House #4
1800 S.E. 19th Ave.

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SEUP BABAMIAN

tributed to by the failure to

-unlock the dorm room doors in

time to save the victims’ lives.

‘Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday after the ruling,
Anastacia’s mother, Phyllis
Bowe, said that although she is
satisfied with the outcome of
the inquest, she is convinced
that the fire was set deliberate-
ly by someone other than the
girls, =
_ “Two children were mur-
dered and J can only hope that
the demons who killed them
will suffer the same fate of
being locked up in a cell and
put fire to,” she said.

Deshawn’s step-mother,
Juanita Ingraham, agreed with
Mrs Bowe in her belief that the
fire was a deliberate act.

During the inquest, which
began in January 2004, the court
heard testimony from 38 wit-
nesses, including employees of
the rehabilitative facility and
residents who survived the fire.

A 15-year-old inmate of the
centre said that before the blaze
in the dorm, Anastacia had told
a fellow resident that she
planned to light a fire as part
of an escape plan.

A second girl, who escaped
from the Williemae Pratt Cen-
tre before the fatal blaze, admit-
ted to being part of a four-per-
son escape team.

Police fire investigators fur-
ther testified that their findings
showed that the fire was started
deliberately.

The court was also told that

SEE page 11



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SUVS SCTITIEOMHNLDITITEAT tas

are contributing to crime

By KILAH ROLLE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A CRUMBLING values
system in Bahamian society is
contributing to the breeding
of criminals, said community
relations expert and police
spokesman Hulan Hanna yes-
terday.

After serving for more than
20 years with the Royal
Bahamas Police Force and
counselling families as an
associate pastor of his church,
Supt Hanna said he has wit-
nessed a degeneration of the
values system, specifically in
Bahamian males.



"Creating or breeding
young boys who are prone to
violence does not happen in
isolation," said Mr Hanna,
"young boys are influenced
by persons who they live with
and mimic these behaviours
because they see no positive
alternative presented before
them."

Mr Hanna said that the
most positive influence a
young male could have is a
father, or father figure, who
has a strong sense of morals
and values.

The problem, he said, is

SEE page 11



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ING C

Teachers taught Creole
to help communicate
with Haitian students

TEACHERS and adminis-

trators at the Carmichael Pri-,

mary School are being taught
Creole to help them communi-
cate better with Haitian stu-
dents.

‘In an interview with The Tri-
bune yesterday, principal of the
school Albert Clarke, said the
teaching of the Creole language
to the staff will help to “catapult
our school from the academic
level that it now stands at into a
new educational paradigm.”

“When we take a holistic
view of this we recognise that as











N TOOLS
S BROOMS
ITER SYSTEMS

JAIN

teachers there was something
that needed to be done to assist
them, so that our teachers can
facilitate the needs of our Cre-
ole speaking population,” he
said.

Between 30 to 40 per cent of
the students at the school are
of Haitian decent, the principal
said.

Mr Clarke emphasised some
of the advantages of knowing
the Creole language within the
school’s context. ,

SEE page 11



PAGE 2, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005 THE TRIBUNE



Forum aims to create framework

for public/private collabor;

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

PRIME Minister Perry Christie
and Education Minister Alfred
Sears together with a number of
private sector representatives yes-
terday launched a forum called
“Optimism and Opportunity: A
presentation of Dialogue on Pub-
lic-Private Partnership.”

The forum is the inaugural
event of the Education and Train-
ing for Competitiveness (ETC)
programme and is:sponsored by
the Inter-American Development
Bank (IADB). It is hosted by IBM
Bahamas Ltd and the Ministry of
Education.

The one day intensive interac-
tive forum held at the British
Colonial Hilton allowed partici-

. pants an opportunity to create a

sustainable framework for: pub-
lic/private collaboration.

Mr Sears said: “The purpose of
the forum is to promote the part-
nering of the private sector and

the government in improving the

workforce development compo-
nent of secondary and post-sec-
ondary education in the Bahamas.

Skills
“We are challenged by the
forces of regional and global mar-
ket integration to improve basic
work skills among secondary

school graduates, to address skill
shortage in the industry and ser-

_ Vice sectors and to generate new

opportunities for innovative busi-
ness service... therefore today’s
activities are designed to bring us
to the table to explore ways in
which our partnership can work.”

In his key remarks, Mr Christie

- said the continuing challenge for

the country will be training of its
citizens. He noted that the




On

lm PRIME Minister Perry Christie

erated for the development of our
country means certain entitlement
of sharing. Therefore the empha-
sis we place on education, and the
‘emphasis on training must be
based on the foundation and
understanding of the develop-
mental needs of our country.”

Mr Christie said another chal-.

lenge involved is that although the
country brings in consultants from
aboard, there are no mechanisms
in place to determine whether the
country is implementing the rec-
ommendations in the way it should
and in a timely fashion.

“So as a result we even mea-
sure our success incorrectly.”

Mr Christie added that the best
way to measure the success is by
government creating partnerships
with the public and civil sectors.
He said that was why he was so

adamant at the beginning of his
administration in naming com-
mittees of persons from various
fields of life. He said unless gov-
ernment taps into the resources
of the private sector, there
becomes a culture of intellectual
lethargy which is unacceptable.

He said that the answer is “con-
stant sustainable application
training,” for both men and
women.

The Inter-American Develop- ©
ment Bank has provided the coun-
try with technical and financial
assistance, to facilitate the devel-
opment of the Education. and
Training for Competitiveness
which includes four areas of train-
ing: Early childhood, special edu-
cation, information management
and technical, and vocational edu-
cation training.



major developments, including the ,
Kerzner expansion, a project in e 6
Abaco, and the tedevelopment of
Cable Beach.- all of which will ¢ if
_ that as much as possible the labour e e (
force used i is Bahamian. ; ety? . ;

Sera cunts, TAA MOTORS LUCERO
also faces the challenge of being an
archipelagic nation.

) : ee )
cratic: MIOL AMOR RNIN ANTICOND
oping a more wholesome :

approach to societal development ;
must take into account the fact ' ,
Mf By RUPERT MISSICK Jr

Bahamas is poised for a number of sean ;
require a large labour force. He
said the challenge will be to ensure |
“Any strategy to do with
empowering people, educating
that we are an archipelagic nation.
The revenue of the country gen- Senior Staff Reporter

GOVERNMENT’S decision to grant national licences to
three radio stations was a part of its agenda to create increased
competition in one of the country’s growing industries, Tourism
Minister Obie Wilchcombe told The Tribune yesterday.

In 2004 the minister approved first time national licences to

TROPICAL
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Splash FM broadcasting out of Eleuthera, Carter Marketing’s
Island FM and Cool 96 in Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Government is also considering awarding the first non-com-
mercial FM broadcast licence to the College of the Bahamas.

In addition the governement will be considering granting
non-commercial broadcasting licences to other non-profit organ-
isations and educational institutions.

‘Interest has also been expressed by some entities for obtain-
ing commercial television licences. There are two applications
before government at this time.

Mr Wilchcombe told The Tribune yesterday that he is not
overly concerned about the private market damaging the busi-
ness of ZNS.

“We are thinking of restructuring the role of ZNS. When the
previous government opened up the market it did not consider
the role of ZNS in a private broadcasting era,” said Mr Wilch-
combe.

Currently ZNS is subsidised by the government and Mr
Wilchcombe said that it is necessary to mandate it with a more
national agenda.

“We are interested in ZNS becoming more involved in the
proliferation of national issues, culture and things like that,” said
Mr Wilchcombe.



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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005, PAGE 3



Bahamians

PION

prosecutors

SOUTH ET

A CARIBBEAN Pros-
ecutors Association could
soon be a reality follow-
ing a two-day seminar in
Barbados of regional
Directors of Public Prose-
cutions and senior prose-
cutors, at which the
Bahamas was represented
by Ms Cheryl Bethel and
Ms Valeria Pyfrom of the
Department of Public
Prosecutions.

This was the recom-
mendation of the nearly
thirty lawyers who repre-
sented thirteen
Caribbean countries. At
their final session they
unanimously agreed that
they would set up the
association, probably

| under the aegis of the
International Prosecu-
tors’ Association.

The seminar was con-
ducted by a team of facili-
tators headed by Anesta
Weekes QC, chair of the
UK Caribbean Jurists’
Group, and included Sir
David Calvert-Smith,
immediate past DPP of
England and Wales, '
Steve Gwilliam head of
the anti corruption divi-
sion at the Metropolitan
Police, Judge Michael
Lawson QC, Robert Dry-
brough-Smith, Crown
Prosecution Service, and
Deborah Mansfield Law
Society.

Appointed

Also addressing the
seminar were Barbados’
Chief Justice, Sir David
Simmons and Justice
Adrian Saunders, Acting
Chief Justice of the
Organisation of Eastern

Caribbean States. Justice |. |:

| Saunders was tecéntly
‘appointed as a Justice of.
the Caribbean Court of
Justice.

Matters discussed
included the indepen-
dence of the prosecutor,
handling of vulnerable
witnesses, investigation
and prosecution of cor-
ruption and sharing of
expertise within the
region as a whole. There
was also widespread
agreement that, despite
differences in size,
resources and proce-
dures, there is still com-
mon ground on judicial
matters among the
regional states as well as
with England and Wales.
Barbados’ Director of
Public Prosecutions,
Charles Leacock, brought
the Caribbean perspec-
tive in his address on
removing barriers to
prosecutions in the
region.

A particularly valuable
achievement was the invi-
tation by the facilitators
to the prosecutors to.be
more pro-active in attack-
ing corruption both in
police services and in ,
government service.

The seminar was organ-
ised by the UK

Caribbean Jurists’ Group .

in collaboration with the
British High Commission
in Barbados.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are

| making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Police officer claims murder accused
confessed to hitting driver with rock

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - Murder
accused Jonathan Nathan
Davis confessed to hitting taxi-
cab driver Robert Nelson Pratt
in the head twice with a large
rock, a police officer'told the
Supreme Court on Wednes-
day.

Set Robert Lloyd, who inter-
viewed the accused on Sep-
tember 2, 2000 at CID on Peel

Street, said Davis told him that.

he did not mean to kill the
taxicab driver and that he was
only trying to protect himself.

The body of Robert Pratt
was discovered on the road-
side at Illyria Road and Aerial
Place in the Arden Forest area
on September 1, 2000. Pratt’s
skull had been fractured and
there were other multiple
injuries to his body.

Davis, who allegedly caught

Trial continues
in Grand Bahama

a ride with the taxi driver on
September 1, is on trial in the
Supreme Court for his mur-
der. Lawyers Simeon Brown
and Sheandea Cooper are
defending him.

Jury

Justice Jon Isaacs presides |
over the trial, which is before

an eight-woman, four-man
jury. Prosecutor Joyann Fer-
guson-Pratt is appearing on
behalf of the Crown.

Sgt Lloyd told the court that.
Davis was cautioned before

the interview and signed the
caution, which was written on

the police interview form.

Prosecutor Ferguson sub-
mitted the written police inter-
view form as evidence to the
court.

According to the evidence,
Davis was employed as a bell-
man at the Country Club at

Bahamia (Royal Oasis Resort): i

from May 1992.

He went to work around
7pm on August 31, 2000. He
got off around 2.30am and
walked over to Ruby Swiss,
where he stayed for about two
hours.

Sgt Lloyd said Davis told

him that he drank quite afew...
Kalik (beers) but could not.’



unionisation’

@ By PACO NUNEZ
__ Tribune Staff Reporter

vote held yesterday.

SUPE iia workers have ten union
advances and decided to continue managing
their own affairs, according to the results of a

“Today they have decided to continue man-

aging | their own affairs without any outside

help," he said.

According to Union President Elgin Dou-
alas, workers have been intimidated by man-
agement in the past, including during the

period leading up to the vote.

The president of the Commercial Stores,
Supermarkets and Warehouse Workers

Union, alleged that employees were intimi-
dated and that ballots were tampered with,
however monitors say there was no evidence

of irregularities.

According to a ZNS report, the unofficial
final vote was 274 against unionisation and 50

in support of it.

The report said that around 90 per cent of
Super Value came out to vote.

the decision brought management and work-

-ers closer together.

“This will enable us to serve the public
even better. This year, the Super Value fam-
ily will be celebrating its 40th anniversary,
and the staff have managed their own affairs

all of this time.

Artet chk
hry abliets

de mand

he return

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

Rights

“Workers had to be intimidated, it might
have been a small amount, it might be a large

amount, but if you have to be intimidated to

said.

seek your rights if you’re in a democratic
country, that is my concern,” Mr Douglas

Mr Douglas said he would continue

his attempts to represent Super Value work-
_ Super Value President Rupert Roberts said ers.

Labour inspector Ernest Burrows, who

" oversaw the vote, said he found no evidence

of tampering by management.

“Both union and the employer was allowed
to oversee the polls, and at this time we have
no irregularities that I see happening at this
poll,” he said.





LA CASITA

The Art of Island Living

Off

Clothing

[BLOW OUT



Te Ata LTR em eam ALCL
© P.O. Box N-7771 © Tel: 242-356-7302
© email: ariana@batelnet.bs



went’
direction to some bushes. He _,



JONATHAN
NATHAN DAVIS

remember how many he had :
- had.

«Davis later caught a ride to

Les. Fountain, where he played =



hours before leaving.

He told Sgt Lloyd that he

met Robert Pratt standing out-

- side.‘He said he knew Pratt

Super Value staff :

because sometime ago he had
lived with the deceased and
his mother at Mayfield Park
for a period of six months
Davis said he got into the
front passenger seat of taxicab

- 112. He told Pratt to take him
hometg Windsor on the Mall.
; ld police that.Pratt

Istead in an easterly

said he was really drunk.

The'taxi driver, he said;

reached over and touched him

. on the shoulder and he

knocked his hand away. The

|. man reached over again and
â„¢ touched'his leg.

He knocked his hand away
again, he told the interview-
ing officer.

Sgt Lloyd said Davis then
told him that Pratt then said
“Jet’s get this over.”

Davis said he punched the

TeEMMY LEE JDRES

cab driver in the face and they
fought for about 10 minutes in
the van. Pratt, he said, then
started looking under the dri-
ver’s seat. He then got out of
the van and went to the other
side of the vehicle and pushed
Pratt away.

Davis told police that Pratt
fell to the ground. He kicked
him and then picked up a large
rock and hit him twice in the
head.

Davis told police that Pratt
begged him to stop hitting him.
He then dropped the rock and
walked away until he made his
way to Sunrise Highway and
caught a ride home.

Apartment

According to Sgt Lloyd,
Davis said he put the clothes
he was wearing, a pair of kha-

_kipants and red‘pullover shirt,

in a plastic bag, which he threw
in the garbage at the apart-

- ment complex where he lived.

He told police that the
deceased was wearing black
pants and a shirt.

Davis told Sgt Lloyd that he
had heard talk around the
hotel that the deceased was a
homosexual.

‘Sgt Lloyd said that during
an interview he asked Davis if .
he was a homosexual. He said
the accused. replied, “No, sir,

100 per cent man.”

“At some point during the
interview, Sgt Lloyd said they

“had stopped the interview to

allow Davis to speak with
his supervisor Tyrone

Thurston. -

He said Davis told Mr
Thurston that he hit the cab
driver in the head with a rock |
and they prayed.

After Sgt Lloyd’s testimo-
ny, the jury visited the murder
scene.

Simeon Brown and. the
accused, were also present.
The trial continues on Thurs-
day with the final witness by
the Progen:

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005

eee eee ee
EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published ee to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama ~

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352



Frustrations in dealing with government

MONTAGU MP Brent Symonette, des- —

perate to find an adequate word to describe his
frustration, looked as though he was going to
pull the last tuft of hair from the top of his
head in the House of Assembly on Wednes-
da

Mie Symonette, who was the Minister
responsible for Gaming during the FNM
administration, was debating a Bill for an Act
to amend the Casino Taxation Act.

Unable to find a word — or maybe it was a
parliamentary word he was looking for — to
adequately describe what dealing with the
Gaming Board was like — settled for the only
word that would get past the Speaker — “frus-
tration!”

“It was frustrating; frustrating is being
polite,” he informed the House.

Mr Symonette was describing how slow the
Board was to act on requests, leaving the casi-
nos in the Bahames lagging behind their com-
petitors overseas.

At the time, said Mr Symonette, “Caribbean
Stud was the hot new game. By the time we
were able to get that through the machina-
tions of the Gaming Board, Caribbean Stud
was as old as Henry the Eighth.”

At that time, he said, “even a man or
woman who came to fix the ATM — auto-
matic teller machine — on the casino floor
had to be approved by the Gaming Board.
They had to have a police certificate, a birth
certificate, and whatever other certificate, to
send it in just to go on the casino floor to fix
the machine that hands out the money the
tourists gamble with.”

'. He said he appreciated security issues, and ~

» the need for checks, but “we have to‘make cer-
~tain that our action is swift.”""

Swift action — these are the operative words
— ingredients lacking in most government

. departments.

Here we hasten to say that although the
snail’s pace is the general rule in the civil ser-
vice, slackness and slowness does not apply to

_all civil servants. There are those — the shin-
ing examples — who will take the time to
assist, will call back with information and do
their best to be “swift” and efficient. They
understand that time is important, not to be

_ wasted with humbug, while they spin people
around in circles and send them away tear-
ing their hair like Mr Symonette— in com-
plete frustration.

This was the state Mr Bruce Raine was left
in after dealing with a government vet at the
Ministry of Agriculture while trying to get a
neglected horse to a new home in the United
States this week. It was fortunate for the vet
that he came through at the last minute with
permission for the horse to travel, for, said
Mr Raine,“I would have delivered him (the

_ horse) first thing in the morning to the garden

DON STAINTON

of Agriculture Minister Alfred Gray, who lives
around the corner from me on Culbert’s Hill.”

Readers would have see the story of Flash,
the horse, in Wednesday’s Tribune and read of
the many hurdles Mr Raine had to jump to get
him on a plane already scheduled to take two
other horses to the US. Flash was catching a
ride. Flash, originally from Harbour Island,
had lived a “dog’s life”, and, until rescued,
was under nourished and badly treated. He
was rescued and brought to Nassau, but could
not get the medical care he needed. A home
was found for him in Virginia.

Although Flash had been abandoned, the

‘vet required that the owner be found. Some-
one flew to Harbour Island, found the owner
and purchased the horse. The bill of sale was
faxed to the Ministry of Agriculture on Sun-
day, and the vet informed.

However, the vet was taken with what he
described.in his best Jamaican accent as a
“terrible pain”. He was unable to go to his
office on Monday. The horse was to fly early
Tuesday morning..

The vet said there was no one else who
could certify Flash’s condition in his absence.
Mr Raine was then told that neither the vet,
nor the Ministry’s deputy director who was
also contacted, had any way to verify that the
bill of sale was genuine.

Mr Raine telephoned the island Adminis-
trator, asked him to contact the two signatories
to the bill of sale and verify its legality to the
Ministry. The Administrator acted swiftly, Mr
Raine rushed to the Ministry just before it
was about to close Monday afternoon, only to

"be told that oily atvet could give’a’ certification,
and ‘thé ‘Ministry’s ‘vet was: away with his °°"

: “pain”. PUMEEBES ber SLB

Another vet was called, who told Mr Raine
that Flash should have been put down long
ago. He declined to help.

By then it was too late to do anything. Mr
Raine returned home determined to deliver
Flash to Mr Gray, when a miracle cured the
Ministry’s vet, who phoned at 9 o’clock Mon-
day night to inform Mr Raine that:-the horse’s
documents could be collected from the
Humane Society at 8 o’clock the next morning,
just in time to catch the plane to Virginia.

Going through one of the late Sir Etienne
Dupuch’s files a few nights ago, we came
across a letter from the late Mrs Keith Gon-
salves, whose husband, with Wallace Groves

headed the Grand Bahama Port Authority.

Mrs Gonsalves spent’ most of her adult life in

Grand Bahama. In her note to Sir Etienne -
she quipped: “At last I have my residence sta-.

tus with the right to work — at the age of
82!”

This is the frustrating pace at which business
is done by government departments in the
Bahamas.

»does not matter h





THE TRIBUNE

‘Tt’s better in
the Bahamas - if
you're a foreigner’

EDITOR, The Tribune.

IN THE ideal world of a
Bahamian we are taught to be
patriotic; “love your country”
they say, buy Bahamian, and
support your own. After high
school it is expected that you
would attend college and/or uni-

versity, or its equivalent. After |

attaining your degree, you are
expected to return home, and
make a great contribution to

. the Bahamian society. To show

those who are younger, and
thought it impossible, that if you
did it, so can they. There is
always someone out there will-
ing to help you succeed. Now
you are back home, well quali-
fied in your area of study, jobs
you apply for you get, and you

- climb your way in a short time

to the top. You are great in your
area, ambitious, and successful;
making a huge salary, let’s say
$80,000 a year. Life is great, you
live comfortably, and you give
back to your community. Why?
Because you are Bahamian, you
love your country and your
country loves you.

As I said earlier, this is ideal.
Young people today are very
disheartened, disappointed, dis-
couraged, regret and hate that
they have returned home. Why
you may wonder? Simply
because The Bahamas does not
want you. You go to university,
better yourselves so that you
can improve your standard of
living; you give up job offers in

. the United States for large sums

of money, say, $90,000-$100,000
or maybe even more because
you want to come back home.
Home is-where the heart is.
What is happening is, it really
ow, gegpeater

how

ve
overseas, because’ in ie: end
your country does not appreci-
ate you or compensate you for
what you are worth. Why you




you. ibe, ome,.0



. may ask again?. I'll tell you

why, because “You are not a
foreigner.” Sad to say but it is
true. How many qualified
Bahamians do we have out
there still making $30,000 a
year, or less, and are qualified to
make so much more? To show

‘their appreciation for your

accomplishments and your
knowledge, here is what hap-
pens — foreigners are allowed
to come into The Bahamas, be
it for the government or the pri-
vate sector and are paid
$30,000/month, or ten times
what an equally qualified
Bahamian would be paid; and
exactly what are they being paid
to do? “Nothing”. Most of them
are not even qualified to do






OAM

letters@tribunemedia.net

their jobs, but the government
keeps them here anyway.

- What are the benefits of
being a foreigner? Let’s see. In
banking, for example, you are
given a car, a house to live in,
salary of approximately
$100,000 per annum, paid fam-
ily vacations, their children’s
education paid for at the top
private schools, and paid utili-

ties. What does the Bahamian.

qualified to do the same job get;
$40,000/annum, if that, a mort-
gage, car payments, and loans to
pay back for getting a degree
that in the end serves no pur-
pose since it will not be recog-
nised at home. Banking is just
one example in the private sec-
tor, however, we see this hap-
pening in the Government sec-
tor as well — Ministry of
Works, Ministry of Health, and
Ministry of Labour and Immi-

fix the roads, they give millions
of dollars away to foreign com-
panies who either go bankrupt,
or do a lousy job in the end, or
the jobs are left undone much
like the road at the traffic light
by Lake Cunningham; and
when these companies mess up,
Then the Bahamians are called
in to “finish up” and “fix” the
job, for chicken feed. When is it
going to end?

It is amazing that the govern-
ment always cries out that they
never have the money to do
anything, but they always seem
to find the monies to pay out
of the country. However, they
still expect us as Bahamians to
“shop at home” and “keep the
money at home’. How can they
expect us as a people to do so
when they never do it them-
selves? ’

So, actually the saying that
“Tt’s better in The Bahamas” is
indeed true but only if you area
foreigner, because if you are a
Bahamian you can forget it.

CONCERNED

CITIZEN

gration. The government con-
February 23, 2005.

tinuously recruits foreigners to -

Liberal immigration policy
needed in financial scene

EDITOR, The Tribune.

INCREDIBLY those who suggest they lead our Financial
Services sector who travel all over the globe are totally
blind to the global business they are practising in.

Visit any financial house in New York - London - Switzer-

_Jand Jersey Leichenstein - Bermuda - BVI - Cayman and

Turks.and Caicos youwill hear many foteign languages and.

' 18ee. various; nationalities working together in‘ the global’

financial markets no-one will argue, I hope, that’s the busi-"
ness.

‘It is naive that we suiepest that we need a restrictive Immi-
gration policy within the Financial sector or even within
the Legal sector as when it comes to global financial matters
we need a highly qualified group of experts working. with
locals to cause The Bahamas to be qualified as a global
leader.

No-one is negatively commenting on those Bahamians
who are qualified but are we qualified to give the
comfort the managers of substantial private holdings and
equity holdings who may wish to domicile global assets in
Nassau?

Disagreement and comments from politicians and some
private sector personalities simply are pure shortsighted
nationalism and I have still to find where in a single case of
nationalism put a dime in anyone’s hands.

If The Bahamas wants to be an accredited player in the
new global financial scene we must have.a liberal Immigra-
tion policy — not the door thrown wide open but a policy
that will cause The Bahamas to expand the potential harvest
that is there for us to take or lose.

A restrictive policy will simply cast a dark cloud over our
financial sector and job creation — is that what we wish?

H HUMES)
- Nassau
February 2, 2005.



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_ THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Minister suggests joint resolution
to decide on gambling referendum

@ By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter

GOVERNMENT and opposi-
tion MPs should work together
to decide whether a national ref-
erendum will be held on the ques-

‘tion of legalising gambling in the
Bahamas, according to Minister
of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe.

Mr Wilchcombe suggested a

joint resolution led by govern-
‘ment MPs and FNM whip Brent
‘Symonette, who raised the issue
of a referendum in the House of
‘Assembly on Wednesday.

‘Deliberation

“Maybe we ought to break new
ground in this place and consider
the function of a joint resolution
led by him of his side, and mem-
.bers of our side, and after delib-
eration, to move for what he sug-
gests: a referendum to determine
where we go so far as lotteries in
-the Bahamas,” Mr Wilchcombe
said.

Mr Wilchcombe’s suggestion
came after several MPs raised the
issue of gambling legalisation dur-
ing the debate on an amendment

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to the Casino Taxation Act.

Kennedy MP and Gaming
Board Chairman Kenyatta Gib-
son suggested that the govern-
ment look into the creation of a
national lottery, and Cat Island
MP Philip Davis pointed out that
if gambling was legal, a support
network for persons addicted to
gambling could be implemented.

Mr Symonette, who is the MP
for Montague, said a referendum
would remove the “political
whip” from the question of gam-
bling legalisation.

CEA
SIM LIATIIE

THE Port of Palm Beach
District and The World Trade.
Centre Palm Beach will
embark on its first Caribbean
Trade Mission with a fifteen-
member delegation visiting
the Bahamas over a two-day
period from March 2-3.

Port of Palm Beach District
Commissioner Mr Wayne M
Richards will lead the list of
prominent participants from
South Florida. Other elected
officials expected to partici-
pate include Palm Beach
County Commission Chair-
man Mr Tony. Masilotti and
Belle Glade Mayor, Mr Steve
Wilson.

On Wednesday, March 2,
the delegates will host a
breakfast reception in the
Governor’s A Room at the
British Colonial Hotel, down-
town Nassau beginning at
8am. The purpose of the
reception is to promote dia-
logue on ways to support and
increase trade and relations
between the Port of Palm
Beach, Florida and the
Bahamas.

The Deputy Chief of Mis-
sion.at the United States
Embassy, Mr Robert Wita-
jewski, along with represen-
tatives from the Bahamas
Ministry of Trade and Indus-
try, Ministry of Financial Ser-
vices and Investments and the

| Ministry of Tourism will
attend the breakfast and give
brief remarks.

The delegates will travel to
Grand Bahama on Thursday,
March 3, to meet with
Bahamian government offi-
cials as well as representatives
from the Grand Bahama Port
Authority, the Grand
Bahama Development Com-
pany and the Grand Bahama
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- than playing political football with

. said parliamentarians need to be

“Let us allow the voting public
to decide in a secret ballot rather

the question of gambling,” he
said.

According to Mr Symonette,
who pointed out that he himself
does not gamble, a referendum
on the issue is appropriate,
because of the great number of
Bahamians who already engage
in illegal gambling.

IHegal

Mr Symonette stressed that he —
was not attempting to offend the
Christian community or Christ-
ian Council by his comments, but

“realists” and acknowledge the
extent to which illegal gambling is
a part of Bahamian life.

“We are having a double stan-
dard, and it is this double stan-
dard which we must bring to an

end. Either regulate and legalise it
or enforce the law,” he said.
Mr Symonette said that in

“Maybe we ought to break _
new ground in this place and
consider the function of a joint
resolution led by him of his side,
and members of our side, and
after deliberation, to move for
what he suggests: a referendum
to determine where we go so far *:
as lotteries in the Bahamas.”

‘proposing a referendum on the
issue, he was not reflecting the
position of the FNM party, but

ions.





expressing his own personal opin-

According to Cat Island MP

Philip Davis the legalisation of
gambling would be a positive
step, as it would bring with itreg- said.

ulations to address the negative
effects associated with illegal

gaming.

“Mothers are losing the gro-
cery money for their children,
men are gambling and losing the
money for their rent for their

. apartments, or for their mortgage
money, and they’re doing this
under the cover of what I call the
informal gaming industry,” said
Mr Davis.

He said that if, however, gam-
bling were “formalised” and reg-
ulated, Bahamians would be
forced to be “more respansible
in their behaviour because there
is something they have to answer

or for example - that

help i is there for them, or coun-
seling.”

“As long as we have the
informal sector of gambling,
we will continue to have
these problems that tear a lot
of our social fabric,” Mr Davis

Call for private school security network

@ By KILAH ROLLE
Tribune Staff Reporter

INCREASING safety in Bahamian pub-

| lic schools will only come after the gov-

ernment relinquishes responsibility for

security and allows:room for a restruc-

tured private school security network, a

senior Grand Bahama security officer has
insisted.

Deputy Director of the Grand Bahama
Security Department Stephen Plakaris told
The Tribune yesterday that his depart-
ment has not been given the respect it
deserves, especially with the increased vio-
lence occurring in the public school system.

Surveillance

He noted that the Minister of Education

Alfred Sears recently endorsed the use of

metal detectors and electronic surveillance
technology in the Grand Bahama school
system, where practicable.

"Just ‘as a well-balanced school curricu-
lum addresses all of the various aspects
of an issue," stated Mr Plakaris, "a safe
school programme must take a compre-
hensive approach if it is to be considered a

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part of an effective school system."

He said this comprehensive approach
will only be possible with two significant
changes, the first is learning to view secu-
rity as a governing body; and secondly,
establishing minimum-security standards
for all public schools in the country.

“This change in attitude will not be easy
because education and security are not
natural partners," continued Mr Plakaris.
"Therefore it is significant that the Minis-
ter of Education and his advisors deem it
feasible that school security should no
longer come under the maintenance divi-
sion of the Ministry of Education."

The Security Department in Freeport,
Grand Bahama is made up of director
Garth Johnson who served 38 years on
the Royal Bahamas Police Force; Mr
Plakaris who served 24 years as a police

reservist and 18 years as a teacher; and.

assistant director Roderick Coakley, who
has more than 35 years of experience.
Mr Plakaris said that despite this wealth
of,experience;.and expertise, in order for
the security department to fulfill its envi-
sioned role in maintaining safe schools,
school security must be integrated into
the organisational culture of public schools.

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He added that it should also be struc-

tured, funded, supported, and accepted as

a professional support service in the same

manner as school psychological services,

finance, business and other related depart-
ments or professions.

Although Mr Plakaris said there is no |
single initiative or series of preventive
strategies that can be used to completely
eliminate violence from public schools, he
said a well-planned and trained security
network will minimise and contain the lev-
el of violence.

Violence

This violence, according to Mr Plakaris,
is posed mostly by the students themselves,
who have a constitutional right to De on
campus.

"Therefore monitoring student activi-
ties on campus and off campus is a vital
part of prevention techniques," Mr
Plakaris continued. "Additionally, the
emphasis is on training security officers
to.enforce.a code of ethics and increase the
safety and security of the government
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: PAGE 6, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005

Hurricane damaged complex reopened

@ By SIMON LEWIS
Bahamas Information
Services

EIGHT MILE ROCK -
Severely damaged by the passing
of Hurricanes Frances and

Jeanne back in September of last
of year, the Government’s
Administrative Complex in
Eight Mile Rock is again fully
functional, servicing the needs
of the people of West Grand
Bahama.

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The Administrative Complex
houses the Magistrate Court,
Administrator’s Office and the
Post Office. The building had
sustained thousands of dollars
in damages to its roof and the
interior.

Both the Administrator’s
Office and the Magistrate’s
Court suffered major setbacks
as water from the storm dam-
aged key equipments and docu-
ments.

Following the storm, the
Administrator’s Office relocated
to the West Grand Bahama Dis-
trict Council’s Office, while the
Magistrate and her staff braved
the poor conditions in their sec-
tor of the complex, ensuring that
court matters continue.

Thankful

During a special ceremony
marking the re-opening of the
complex last Thursday, Ms Deb-
bye L Ferguson, Stipendiary and
Circuit Magistrate at the Eight
Mile Rock Court was thankful
for the improved surrounding,
but expressed a desire for fur-
ther growth in servicing the
needs of the people in West
Grand Bahama.

“We have suffered a lot and in
fact we lost everything. This is
indeed a time to say thank you
and to praise God. Because of
Him, we are a little bit better.

“And again, I am not going to
hold back and say that I am
completely satisfied, but I am
satisfied and I am thankful

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@ BLESSING - Fr Norman Lightbourne, Rector of Church of
The Good Shepherd in Lewis Yard, is pictured here blessing the
newly renovated Government Complex in Eight Mile Rock on
Thursday past. The building suffered damages to its interior and
exterior during the 2004 hurricanes, Also pictured looking on are
Administrator, Mr Charles King, and Stipendiary and Circuit Mag-
istrate for West Grand Bahama, Ms Debbie Ferguson.

been made to bring us to this
point,” she stated.

Admitting that she is difficult
to get along with at times, Mag-
istrate Ferguson noted that
Administrator, Mr Charles King
and his staff had always given
her a listening ear when request-
ing repairs to be done.

She further told the gathering
attending the re-opening cere-
mony that “my primary objec-
tive is to get the Eight Mile
Rock Court as well as this par-
ticular administrative office in
the twenty-first century. That
sounds a little bit unbelievable,
probably to some impossible,
but it will happen.

Customers

“We need to do it, because we
cater to a lot of people, from
Hepburn Town to West End>
and stretching to Pinder’s Point.
So we have a lot of customers
and we have to be in tune with
what we need to do and not talk
about getting it done, but have it
done, so that we can be better ©
able to be public servants to our
customers,” she said.

Continuing, Magistrate Fer-
guson said “we need to get rid of
this new thing concept of — all
we doing is working for pay
day...who put you here? Your
MP! fe N .

“We want to get rid of that!
We want to be able to perform

(BIS photo: Vandyke Hepinims)

and perform well. Again I want
to say that Iam appreciative of
what has happened, what has
been accomplished so far and I
hope that your prayers will
include that more will be done in
the future to bring this court to
a particular standard,” she stat-
ed.

The re-opening ceremonies
was held in the Magistrate’s
Court and attracted members of
the various Local Government
Townships and other specially
invited guests including the
Member of Parliament for the
Eight Mile Rock Constituency,
Mr Lindy Russell, and Mr
Carnard Bethel, Undersecretary
in the Office of the Prime Min-
ister, Freeport.

Mr Bethel told government
workers that “to have repaired
the building and not being able
to recover the files that you lost

' must be a very devastating blow

for you.

“But I can also say that the
spirit of camaraderie and deter-
mination that is displayed down
here under the leadership of Mr
King and the Magistrate is
unmatched anywhere else on
Grand Bahama and perhaps
anywhere else in The Bahamas,”
he said, while also applauding
the Administrator and Local

Government officials for their.

mmunities, :
over the past! four months,” ue he

assistance to the
during and aftert




torms.: ‘

Mr Bethel, who has local

Climate mw

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THE TRIBUNE



responsibilities for (NEMA) the

‘National Emergency Manage-

ment Agency, said the passing
of the two storms “was'an expe-
rience I never thought I would
have, having had forty-two years
in the Public Service.

“And I believe that as much
as Administrator King has
weathered several storms before,
he did not think that storms can
bring that kind of distress, frus-
tration and anxiety to a people,”
he stated.

He encouraged all to continue
in their rebuilding process and to,
buildup the communities in
which they live. Likewise he -
assured residents that they have
gotten additional funding to con-
tinue with the cleanup process
in the West Grand Bahama Dis- ~
trict.

Mr Bethel encouraged those
in attendance to “continue to
motivate others. Do not think
about what we have had. Think
about where we can go, think
about the lessons that we have

learnt.
Water

“T saw a rich man in the Span-
ish Main area going down to the
sea, bringing back water in a
bucket to flush his toilet. That
day, that Sunday after Frances,
we were all equal on Grand
Bahama. Nobody was above the
other, no matter how much
money you had in the bank.

“We were all equal and I
think it has taught us a lesson
that we must carry forth and use
that lesson as a foundation to
rebuild Grand Bahama and
rebuild our spirit,” he said.

Administrator Mr Charles
King used the occasion to thanks
all those who assisted in the
restoration of the complex.

He informed that Ministry of
Local Government will be send-
ing down additional funds to
complete the office.

“We still have a little distance
to go, we still have some bills to
pay, but I thank God that we are
here today and that I am able
to sit comfortably in my office
and the staff are able to sit com---
fortably in their office. They can
answer the telephone, deal with
customers and they can get on
with the ordinary daily routine
that was taken away from us

said. .

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THE TRIBUNE

Annual Heart Ball enj

LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005, PAGE 7




‘a special kind of love’

PATRONS attending the
Annual Heart Ball on Febru-
ary 19 showed their “heart”
by supporting the black-tie
fundraiser for the Sir Victor
Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart
Foundation to assist Bahami-
an children with heart disease.

“Tonight, “said organisers
of the ball, “we gather again to
enjoy a special type of love -
the love that comes from car-
ing for children. Our theme
this year, “Every child
deserves a healthy heart.
Make it possible!” calls on all
to support the Sir Victor Sas-
soon (Bahamas) Heart Foun-
dation in making that a reality.

Goal

“Your presence at tonight’s
gala ball will aid the Founda-
tion in meeting its goal of
being able to assist children
who call on the Foundation
for help. We must never turn
any child away.

“Have fun, dance and enjoy
the festivities, and when you
leave here tonight, know that
you have also helped the chil-
dren of the Bahamas who are
counting on you. You have
helped to make a difference
for their futures.”

The premier fundraising
event for the Foundation, the
ball attracted more than 500
persons headed by Deputy
Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt.
Other special invited guests

Kae Hows



Event attended

by more than 500_



included the British High
Commissioner Mr Roderick
Gemmell and Mrs Gemmell,
US Ambassador Mr John
Rood and Mrs Rood, and the
Chinese Ambassador Yuan-
ming Liand Madame Li.
Organisers had promised a
wonderful evening in the
name of charity and did they
deliver. Entering the Crown
Ballroom under two heart-
shaped arches, guests were
visually stimulated by the
rose-hued elegance created by
Mrs Pat Mortimer of “A
Social Affair” who had trans-
formed the Crown Ballroom
into a romantic setting, com-
plete with red and white icicle
lights, flowing reams of red
and white silk, and cascading
centrepieces of red roses.
Music for the evening was
provided by the SG band (for-

'merly known as Soulful

Groovers); the Police Pop
Band and the Ed Brice
Orchestra, which all had ball
attendees flocking to the floor.

Following the announce-.

ment of the winner of the
Lady Sassoon Golden Heart
Award by Chairman Mr RE



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‘he Pomslinlnios.”

Christ Church Cathedral
Schedule of Services for
Sunday February 27th, 2005

8:00 a.m.
Holy Eucharist & Annual Genral Meeting
Note: There will be one combined morning

service due to the

Parish Annual General Meeting.

Solemn Evensong, Sermon e& Benediction



Barnes, patrons enjoyed a
lovely evening of music and
fine dining. The Burns House
Group of Companies donat-

ed wine and also table minia- -

tures, along with Bacardi and
Company.

Elderly

The Golden Heart winner
was Mrs Orinthia Nesbeth
who was lauded for her work
with the PACE programme
for teen mothers, the Cancer
Society, the AIDS Foundation
and the elderly in the com-

" munity.

Ball organisers raised more
than $12,000 in a Silent Auc-
tion which once again featured

Accredited * Reg ‘ ie

a week-long stay at Echo Val-
ley Ranch Resort in Vancou-
ver, Canada, donated by own-
ers Norm and Nan Dove, in
what is described as “a little
bit of heaven.” Dr Mark
Weech was the lucky bidder.
Walking away with the top
Room Raffle prize was Keith
Rolle. He won two round-trip
World Traveller tickets from
Nassau to London; a Celestial
double room for two nights
with breakfast at Hotel Bal-
moral, Monte Carlo, Monaco;
lunch or dinner for two at
Harry’s Bar, a private club in
London; a 14-karat white gold
and amethyst ring, pendant,
and earrings from Colombian
Emeralds International, and
a gift certificate from La Rose
Boutique.
Second prize winner was
Inez Johnson who won an 18-
karat gold and enamel dolphin
bracelet from Coin of the
Realm; two nights stay for two
at British Colonial Hilton, a
Raymond Weil Ladies stain-

Room |
5:30

Room 2
5:30.

Room 3
5:30

Room 4
5:30

Room 5
5:30

Room 6
5:30

Room 7
5:30

Computer
Lab 5:30

Intro to
‘omp

Room 1
8:05 '

Room 3
8:05

Room 4
8:05

Room 5
8:05

Room 6
8:05

Room 7
8:05

Computer
Lal

CHS ag
information and registration

SPCH 100
undamentals of
Speech
PSY 101
Introduction to
Psychology

ENG 241
English Comp
il
MASTERS
CLASS

ENG 131
English Comp
I
PUB 318
Government ~
Budgeting
PHI 115
Intro to
Philosophy
ISA 305

Micro
catiol

-[Roommtime [MONDAY

BUS 400
Financial
Management

PSY 312
R 2
G8 Psychology of the
: Black Family

PSY 317
Abnormal
Psychology

MASTERS
CLASS

; ENG 105
Vocabulary
Development
ENG 121
English
Composition I
SSC 281
Co-op Education
Prep
491 PDC |

less steel 18k gold watch,
donated by Solomon’s Mines,
and a premier one year mem-
bership at Bally Total Fitness.

Debbie Outten was the
third prize winner. She
received a comprehensive car-
diac evaluation at the Lyford
Cay Hospital, donated by Dr
Dean Tseretopoulos; dinner
for two at ‘the Humidor
Restaurant donated by Gray-
cliff Hotel and Restaurant,
and an original Quartz and
Tourmaline double strand
necklace and earrings on ster-
ling silver, donated by Nadia
Campbell. -

Winners

Other prize winners includ-
ed Lamaque Lockhart,
Pamela Gibson, Pat Mortimer,
Bruce LaFleur, Darren Bast-
ian, Betsy Payne and Denise
Turnquest who were the
fourth to tenth winners
respectively.

Valued at more than

$20,000, the raffle prizes
included jewellery, trips, hotel
accommodations, and a pri-
vate dinner prepared by a
gourmet chef.

Guests attending the heart
ball also received Perry Ellis
“F” and “M” fragrances from
John Bull, which also pre-
sented fragrance baskets to
the wives of the dignitaries in
attendance. Solomon’s Mines
also provided Lalique fra-
grance table favours.

In commemoration of the
41st Ball, patrons with “num-
ber 4” under their bread plate
won a table prize and those
with “number 1” received the

floral centrepiece.

The Committee for the
Heart Ball was co-chaired
once again by Lady Butler and
Mrs Rosemarie Thompson,
who along with their hard-
working committee of volun-
teers saw to it that children.
with heart disease needing
assistance would be assured
of a better future.





ACC 420
Government
Accounting

SSC 101

Education

‘Seminar
BUS 227
Introduction to
Business

MASTERS
CLASS

PSY 313
Issues of Adolescents
Psychology
ECE 355
Curriculum .

Planning
BUS 383

Marketing Financial
Services

ECE 101
Early childhood
Education
SPCH 101

Interpersonal
Communication Skills

BUS 370
Labor Relations
MASTERS
CLASS

Sci
Anatomy of
Physiology

ENG 097
Communication
Skills II

- ECE 320
Diagnosis of
Reading Problems
ISA 210
Intro to
Microcomputers

ISA 326
Adv’d Computer
Appl’ns

ECO 215.
Economics I
ADM 351
Quantitative
Analysis
ACC 300
Principles of.
Accounting I
ACC 303
Principles of
Accounting II
ECE 109
Art
Appreciation
PUB 309
Public
Bureaucracy

ISA 401

| Systems Analysis

& Design

8:05PM CLASSES

PUB 311 “MAT 121
Introduction to Public College Math I
Administration

ACC 350 BUS 331
Intermediate Business Law I
Accounting II

MAT 124 PUB 325
College Algebra | Introduction to
Public Relations
MASTERS || SSC383.
CLASS rere of Wor
SSC 103 PSY 324
Career Planning | Psychology of
Racism

BUS 414 CRE 120
Offshore Trust & | Conversational
Co Management Creole I

SWK 300 ECE 293DD

Counseling Methods of

Theories Teaching Science

MAT 097
Basic Math II



TUESDAY |WEDNESDAY;| THURSDAY FRIDAY

ADM 321

Administration &

Management
ADM 312
Elements of
Supervision

BU

Business Ethics

MAT 204
Elements of
Statistics
ENG 243

Library Research

Skills
ANT 100

Introduction to

Anthropology

493 PDC Il

ISA 327
Data
Management

or TASS Peeing Or Fax: 394-8623
ROTA GUTH TeAn Maa Sse =1e 1]
or at Gold Circle House



PAGE 8, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005 THE TRIBUNE,

CR Walker students addressed





On success in today’s world —

@ By KRYSTAL KNOWLES
Bahamas Information
Services

MR GREGORY BETHEL,
vice-president of British
Fidelity Bank and Trust Com-

pany, told business students at
C-R Walker High School on
Thursday, February 17, that
knowledge, friends and sexu-
ality will determine an indi-
vidual’s level of success in
today’s world.

Senior Construction Estimator

required by major land developer

Applicants should have extensive background in residential and
site work estimating along with professional degrees and

certifications. The position requires high proficiency in quantity
take-offs, project planning, tracking software and regional unit

pricing.

Please reply in writing to:







| Early registrati





Name:

Date of Birth /

Quality Auto Sales Ltd
PARTS DEPARTMENT

Will be CLOSED for
STOCKTAKING

FEBRUARY 25 to 28
(Friday, Saturday, Monday)

We will reopen for business as usual on Tuesday, March 1.
We apologise to our valued customers and regret any
inconvenience this may cause. All other departments

will be open‘for business as usual.

QUALITY:

East Shirley Street 323-3529/323-3709 |



Proceeds will be donate aha

ophies and

P.O. Box N-3207
DA-03084



on & applications cat
_ Harbour Bay Shopping C iy Febru



Age (on race day)

Address:

E-mail Address: Telephone:
Check Appropriate Category —

Runners Walkers



Under 15
Under 20







[Male]
[Male] |










‘off at Subway® restau

Under 15
Under 20

Mr Gregory Bethel was
addressing the school’s. busi-
ness academic seminar on
“Achieving Success in the era
of Globalisation” “Managers
in the service industries like
banking, tourism, retail and
whole sale and government
ministries hire employees
depending on age, marital
status and sex,” Mr Bethel
said.

Preference

He added: “The preference
is mainly married males over
40, single females over 30
(with no children), single
males over 40, married males
under 40 and married females
over 40. The discrimination
against persons under 40
relates primarily to individuals
sex life. Who you choose to
have sex with and when,
will impact your life and
finances.”

Mr Bethel warned the stu-
dents that rearing children is
an expensive undertaking,
therefore they should practice
safe sex or abstinence.

“Your being wealthy
depends on whether you
spend your money.on pleasure
or on purpose,” he said. “Seek
opportunities to invest in a
business or shares of well-run
companies.”

Mr Bethel also told the stu-
dents that knowledge will also



@ MR GREGORY BETHEL,
vice-president of British Fidelity

Bank and Trust Company, address-

es business students of C R Walker
High School on “Achieving Success
in the Era of Globalisation’ at the
school’s business academic seminar

on Thursday, February 17.

(BIS Photo: Raymond Bethel)

bring individual success.

He added: “An associate or
bachelors of arts degree from
the College of The Bahamas

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning

4 for improvements in the ©
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us.on 322-1986
and share your story,.








rant in the |








Sex: M__F




[Jed UOeWIOJU! Bow 104








with a grade point average of

. 3.00 or from creditable uni-

versities in the United States,
Canada and England is
good,”

“Six Bahamas General Cer-
tificates of Secondary Educa-

tion, including math, English ©

and a foreign language make
you more marketable. Some
accounting knowledge and
personal computer knowledge
including micro word, excel,
power point.”

Mr Bethel warned students
to be careful about who they
select as companions.

“Companions are like but-.,
tons on an elevator. They will
either take you.up or:‘they will.

take you down.’



“Your friends and parents
influence you in areas like
peer pressure, greed for mon-
ey and things, selfish and
stingy attitudes, sexual choic-
es,” he said.

Mr Bethel encouraged stu-
dents subscribe to various
papers such as the Financial
Times, Economist and Wall
Street Journal to keep them;
selves informed of develop-
ments in North America,
South America, Europe and
Asia. ee

“We need to think global as
we seek an education, knowl+
edge, skills, a job. and business
partners-and look to Europe
‘and the Americas,” Mr Bethel
said.



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PARENTS SIGNITURE (if under 18):
Sige

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weather, inctuding, extreme heat, extreme caid, and/or humidity, trattic and.the conditions of the read, ‘all such risks’ being known and appreciated
by me: Having read this:waiver and knowing these facts and in consideration:of accepting my application, |, for myself and anyone entitied to act

Dependable, Reliable Quality Standard Shift Model







on oy betti peive esi he seonepenun and all sponsors, thelr leprosentatves and successors fram all claims and fiabilities of any kind arksing

out of my pation in the Subway ‘un: RunAWalk even though that liad: ay arse Out of negligence, or carelessness on the part of the . . 2 . . . . .

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005, PAGE 9 .





HE following is a

two part article
Presented by Amnesty
International Bahamas
that looks at the princi-
ples outlined in The Con-
vention on the Rights of
Children, which is an
international treaty that
recognizes the human
rights of children. The
Convention on the Rights
of the Child was carefully
drafted over the course of
ten years (1979-1989)
with the input of represen-
tatives from all societies,
all religions and all cul-
tures. A working group
inade up on members of
the United Nations Com-
mission on Human Rights,
independent experts and
observer delegations of
hon-member governments,
non-governmental organi-
zations (NGOs) and UN
agencies was charged with
the drafting. The Conven-
tion was adopted into
International Law by the
United Nations General
Assembly in November 20,
1989.

- Amnesty International is
a worldwide movement of
people from different cul-

tures and backgrounds who -



have access to services such
as education and health
care; can develop their per-
sonalities, abilities and tal-
ents to the fullest poten-
tial; grow up in an envi-
ronment of happiness, love
and understanding; and are

‘informed about and partic-

ipate in, achieving their
rights in an accessible and
active manner.

@ WHY IS A °
DOCUMENT
DESCRIBING
CHILDREN’S RIGHTS
NECESSARY?
Although many nations

have laws relating to chil-

dren’s welfare an rights,



“Non-discrimination means
that no child should be
injured, privileged or
punished by, or deprived of,
any right on the grounds of his

_or her race, color or gender;
on the basis of his or her

language or religion, or.
national, social or ethnic:
origin; on the grounds of any
political or other opinion; on
the basis of caste, property or
birth status; or on the basis of

disability.”



campaign on behalf of
human rights across the
‘globe.

DO CHILDREN
‘ HAVE RIGHTS?

Yes they do! According.

to THE CONVENTION
‘ON THE RIGHTS OF
‘CHILDREN that as stat-
ed, is an International
‘Treaty that recognizes the
shuman rights of children,
‘who are defined as persons
‘up to the age of eighteen
It establishes in
international law that State
‘Parties (the government)
‘must ensure that all chil-
«dren — without discrimina-
‘tion in any form - benefit
from special protection
‘measures and assistance;



MN
PW OXOC) ALK AWR LICLEY CL



the reality is that too many
nations. do not live up to
their own minimum stan-
dards in these areas. Chil-
dren suffer from poverty,
homelessness, abuse,
neglect, preventable dis-
eases, unequal access to
education and justice. sys-
tems that do not recognize
their special needs; chil-
dren of minority groups are
often particularly affected.
These are the problems
that occur in both industri-
alized and developing
countries.

The Convention of the
Rights of the Child and its
acceptance by so many
countries has heightened
recognition of the funda-

Cemple Baptist Church
134 Farrington Road
P.O.Box N-9426, Phone 326- 5581.

A Service of Praise
and Thanksgiving

for

Pastor A. Geoffrey Wood

who celebrates

20 Years in the Pastorate

and

46 Years in Ministry
on Sunday 27th February 2005 at 3:30pm at

The Church

Dr. Earle Francis, Guest Neca

The convention on —
the rights of children

mental human dignity of all
children and the urgency
of ensuring their well-being
and development. The
Convention makes clear
the idea that a basic quali-
ty of life should be the
right of all children, rather
than a privilege enjoyed by
a few.

@ WHAT ARE THE
UNDERLYING
VALUES IN THE
CONVENTION?

The Convention on the
Rights of the Child incor-
porates the full range of
human rights — civil and
political rights as well as
economic, social and cul-
tural rights — of all chil-

dren. The underlying val- .

ues — or “guiding princi-
ples” — of the Convention
guide the way each right is
fulfilled and respected and

serve as a constant refer- .

ence for the implementa-
tion and monitoring of chil-
dren’s rights. The Conven-
tion has four guiding prin-
ciples and today we shall

address two of these prin-

ciples.
# 1, NON-DESCRIMINATION

Non-discrimination
means that no child should
be injured, privileged or:
punished by, or deprived
of, any right on the
grounds of his or her race,
color or gender; on the
basis of his or her language
or religion, or national,
social or ethnic origin; on
the grounds of any political
or other opinion; on the
basis of caste, property or
birth status; or on the basis
of disability. This principle
implies. therefore that,all
children = girls and: boys,
rich or poor, living in
urban and rural areas,
belonging to minority or
indigenous groups — should
be given the opportunity to
enjoy the rights recognized
by the Convention.

& 2. SURVIVAL AND
DEVELOPMENT

The Convention on the
Rights of the Child
addresses the right to life,
survival and development.
The State must recognize
this right as inherent to
every child and commit to
acting in a way that will
ensure and respect this
right. In doing so, the State
must adopt appropriate
measures that safeguard
life and refrain from any
actions that intentionally
take life away. These
include measures ‘to
increase life expectancy
and to lower infant and
child mortality, as well as
prohibitions on the death
penalty; extralegal, arbi-
trary or Summary execu-
tions; and situations of
enforced disappearance.









~ Dr. Earle Francis
Guest Speaker










_ able to develop talents and



“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

States’ actions should pro-
mote a life of human digni-
ty that fully ensure the
right to. adequate standard
of living, including the
right to housing, nutrition
and the highest attainable
standards of healthy.

The “survival and devel-

opment” principle is in no
p

way limited to physical per-
spective; rather, it further
emphasizes the need to
ensure full and harmonious
development of the child,
including the spiritual,
moral and social levels,
where education will play
a key role.. They must
ensure that children will be

GRAND OPENING

Sida s
Meeps a erie

East Street North in front of
East Street Gospel Chapel

abilities to their fullest
potential; that children will
be prepared for a responsi-
ble life in a free society
and they will feel solidarity
with the world they live in.

Largest
selection .
of Hat’s
’

The State should under- you've
take strategies to assist the ever seen!!
most disadvantaged chil-
dren, such as children liv-
ing below a minimum
poverty level.



Store Hours: 9am - 6 pm * Phone: 325--

Next Week: A look at
the remaining two guiding
principles of the Conven-
tion and information on
what can be done to sup- -
port the implementation of
these values.

“NOTICE”

To the class of 1995 from Government High School,
the reunion is here! Meetings are held at Government High
School 5:00 pm every Saturday. Plans are in the process
for great events! Please show your support.

Contact persons:

Damien Sweetin
Damien_sweeting@hotmail.com
525-7867 /426-8221

Amnesty International
has in excess of 1.5 million
members, supporters and
subscribers in more than
150 countries, including the
Bahamas. For more infor-
mation about this volunteer
organization, please call
327-0807 or visit
www.amnesty.org.

Denzil Deveaux
, densil2hot@yahoo. com
326-6124



he LD Wy 4

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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005



Parties, Nightclubs
& Restaurants



The Love of Music concert featuring interna-
tional award-winning artist ta.da with Aydee,
Mizpah Bethel and Dreddy on Saturday, February
25 @ the Blue Note in the British Colonial Hilton.
Admission $35 (drinks inclusive). Tickets available
at the Juke Box, Mall at Marathon and Blue Note,
322-NOTE, blue.note@coralwave.com.

Have a Heart concert featuring the Bahamas’
hottest performers, Xtra, Visage and KB on Sat-
urday, February 26 @ at the Wyndham Crystal
Palace Ballroom. The theme of the concert is
“Bringing Hope and Awareness Through Music”
and is aimed at raising awareness of heart dis-
ease among young people. The box office opens
at 8.30pm. Showtime is 9pm. Tickets are $15 in
advance and $20 at the door, and all proceeds
will go to the Bahamas Heart Association. For
more information call 356-7326 or 324-1714.

Raye Saturdays @ The All New Club Eclipse.
DJ Scoobz spinning the best in Old Skool. Admis-
sion $35, all inclusive food and drink.

Fever @ Bahama Boom, Elizabeth St, down-

town, Fridays. The hottest party in the Bahamas .

every Friday night: Admission $10 before mid-
night. First 50 women get free champagne. First 50
men get a free Greycliff cigar. Dress to impress.
For VIP reservations call 356-4612.

Cool Runnings is back with a Conscious Party
@ Hard Rock Cafe, Charlotte St North every Fri-
on Classic reggae style music. Admission $10...

“Mellow M Mags evi
_and Nightclu i
“'terday — old school reggae and rocke
stairs, and:golden oldies upstairs. A
Free. Doors open Spm.

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshdtiers Sports
Bar. Drink aoe all night long, Dee



“Ratsoké Nights @ @ Fluid Louie and Night-
club.. Begins 10pm.every Tuesday. Weekly winners
selected as Vocalist of the Week — $250 cash prize.
Winner selected at end of month from finalists —




cash prize. $1,000. Admission $10 with one frees:



drink.

Reggae Tieaitays @ Bahama-Boom.:'Cov
charge includes a free Guinness and there should
be lots of prizes and surprises. Admission: Ladies
$10 and Men $15.

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports
Bar evéry Wednesday Spm-8pm. Free appetiz-
ers and numerous drink specials.

Flash Nights @ Club Fluid every Thursday. The
ultimate Ladies Night. Join Nassau’s and Miami
Beach’s finest men. Ladies only before 11.30pm
with free champagne. Guys allowed after 11.30pm
with $20 cover.

The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday.
Doors open at 9pm, showtime 11.30pm. Cover
charge $15. $10 with flyer.

Twisted Boodah Bar & Lounge every Friday @
Cafe Segafredo, Charlotte St North, featuring
world music, chillin’ jazz and soulful club beats.
Starting at 6pm. Beers $3, longdrinks $4.50.

Fantasy Fridays @ Fluid Lounge, featuring late
‘80s music in the VIP Lounge, Top of the Charts
in the Main Lounge, neon lights and Go Go
dancers. Glow sticks for all in before midnight.
Admission: Ladies free before 11pm, $15 after;
Guys $20 all night.

College Night @ Bahama Boom every Friday.
Admission: $10 with college ID, $15 without.





Artists to perform |

for love

of music





ee,

" - #’s for the love of music that artists tada, Mizpah Bethel, Aydee and Dreddy, will
take to the stage on Saturday in a concert that will introduce a soon-to-be-
released compilation album by Bahamian and Canadian artists. Headliner of the
event, ta.da (Terneille Burrows) of Sanctigrooye Promo, is.a recording artist,
songwriter and producer. Her style:is‘a: unique blend of soul, reggae and hip-hop.

She has independently released CDs and has music videos that air on Much Music. ta.da
is an honours graduate from the Harris Institute for the Arts in Toronto, Canada, and has
won multiple Marlin Awards and John Lennon Songwriting contest awards.

~ “Some of the freshest and most original young:a
_ is a must-see évent for music lovers, featuring-2

according to the concert press release.





; will be showcased. This
oster of Young Bahamian talent,”

“The Love of Music” begins at 9pm. Admission: $35 @ ink inclusive). Tickets can be
purely at the J uke Boxi in the Mail at Marathon.

HEAT a pe

Dicky Mo’ s Fridays ¢ @ ‘Cable Bench, aig

Hole. 3 for $10 mixed drinks and $1 shots. °



Grek Saturdays @ Bahama Boon: Elizabeth
Ave. Every Saturday the Phi Beta Sigma Frat
welcomes greeks, college grads and smooth oper-
ators. Admission $15 all night, $10 for greeks in

-letters. Music by DJ Palmer, security strictly

enforced.

Chill Out Sundays @ The Beach Hut, West
Bay Street with fresh served BBQ and other spe-
cials starting from 4pm-10pm, playing deep, funky
chill moods with world beats. Cover $2.

Sweet Sunday Chill Out Soiree Lounge, every
Sunday, 4pm-midnight @ Patio Grille, British
Colonial Hotel.

Wet Sundays, every Sunday, noon-midnight @
Crystal Cay Beach. Admission $10, ladies free.

Carib Scene @ Club Fluid every Sunday. A
night of Caribbean, Latin and Reggae flavours
for all audiences. Latin Flair in the VIP Lounge;
Old School Reggae and Soca in the Main Lounge.
Ladies in free before 11pm. $10 after 11pm. Men,
$15 cover charge.

Jay Mitchell and Hot KC @ Palm Court
Lounge, British Colonial Hilton, Wednesday-
Thursday 8pm-12am.

Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley’s Restaurant
& Lounge, Eneas St off Poinciana Drive. Fea-
turing Frankie Victory at the key board in the







After Dark Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to mid-
night. Fine food and drinks.

Paul Hanna performs at Traveller’s Rest, West
Bay St, every Sunday, 6.30pm-9.30pm.

The Arts
Island Girls Sandi George and Kimberly

Sturrup-Roberts are exhibiting fabric paint-
ings, quilts and drawings at the Central Bank of

the Bahamas. The show runs through Friday, '

February 25.

Alton Lowe will exhibit a group of recent
paintings at the Nassau Beach Hotel in the
Commonwealth Room, starting Saturday, Feb-
ruary 27 through March 2, 10am to 7pm daily.

Ian Strachan’s Diary of Souls, the critically

acclaimed play examining the Haitian experi- -

ence in the Bahamas, will open at.the Dundas
Centre for the Performing Arts on Friday,
March 4 and continue through March 6, 8pm.
And again on Friday, March 11 and Saturday,
March 12, 8pm. Call the box office at 393-3728
for ticket info. Tickets for Friday’s performance
are $25, remaining shows are $20.

The National Collection @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, an exhibition that
takes the viewer on a journey through the his-
tory of fine art in the Bahamas. It features sig-
nature pieces from the national collection,
including recent acquisitions by Blue Curry,
Antonius Roberts and Dionne Benjamin-Smith.
Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 1lam-4pm.
Call 328-5800 to book tours.

AROUND







‘second, fourth and fifth Wednesday at the J Whit-

THE TRIBUNE

NASSAU












































Past, Present and Personal: The Dawn Davies _,
Collection: @ the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, Villa Doyle, West and West Hill Streets.
The exhibition is part of the NAGB’s Collector’s
Series. Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday, llam- .
4pm. Call 328-5800 to book tours.

The Awakening Landscape: The Nassau
Watercolours of Gaspard Le Marchand Tupper,
from the collection of Orjan and Amanda Lin-
droth @ the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas. The mid-nineteenth century paintings
that make up the exhibition are part of one of
the earliest suites of paintings of Nassau and its

‘environs. Tupper was a British military officer

stationed at Fort Charlotte in the 1850s. The
works show a pre-modern Bahamas through
the decidely British medium of watercolour.
Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 1lam-4pm.
Call 328-5800 to book tours.



Health

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5.30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at
their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville.
Call 323-4482 for more info.

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the
third Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors Hos-
pital conference room.

The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2.30pm (except August and
December) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor
Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital, the official training centre’
of the; American: Heart Association offers:CPR
classes certified’ by the AHA. The course defines
the warning signs of respiratory arrest and gives
prevention strategies to avoid sudden death syn- |
drome and the most common serious injuries and |
choking that can occur in adults, infants and chil- |
dren. CPR and First Aid classes are offered every
third Saturday of the month from 9am-1pm. Con-
tact a Doctors Hospital Community Training Rep-
resentative at 302-4732 for more information and
learn to save a life today.

REACH - Resources & Education for :
Autism and related Challenges meets from :
7pm — 9pm the second Thursday of each month |
in the cafeteria of the BEC building, Blue Hill !
Road



Civic Clubs

Toastmasters Club 1905 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm. ;
@ BEC Cafe, Tucker Rd. Club 9477 meets Friday,
7pm @ Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm
A19, Jean St. Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pm
@ British Colonial Hilton. Club 1600 meets Thurs-
day, 8.30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes. Club 7178
meets Tuesday, 6pm @ The J Whitney Pinder
Building, Collins Ave. Club 2437 meets every

ney Pinder Building, Collins Ave at 6pm. Club
612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau
Resort, Cable Beach.

_ Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @
the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau
Resort; Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first
Tuesday, 7pm @ Gaylord’s Restaurant,
Dowdeswell St. Please call 502-4842/377-4589 for
more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second
Tuesday, 6.30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office,
4th floor meeting room.

The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council '
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month
in the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, Bay St.



Send all your civic and social events to The
Tribune via fax: 328-2398 or e-mail: outthere@tri-
bunemedia.net









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there are not enough of those
taales to go around, or they are
hiding behind " incredibly strong
Bahamian female personali-
ties."

« He explained that the idea of
a - family has changed drastically
in the Bahamas over the years
and it is not uncommon to find
that single women lead many
of the households.

> "Even if in some of those
Bomes there is a father," Mr
Hanna continued, "his authori-
ty has usually been trampled."
> Ensuring that his comments
are not misinterpreted, Mr Han-
fia added: "I don't want to
offend the women who I love
Bnd respect. But if the man is
not willing to command respect,
Hot coerce, but to command a
form of respect by the way he







FROM page one



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‘Teachers being
taught Creole at
primary school

behaves. himself, conducts his
affairs — if he doesn't do that
— the strong Bahamian female
personality emerges, and in a
dominant form."

In many households, Mr
Hanna has observed that many
Bahamian women are in rela-
tionships with men who may
not be the father of their chil-
dren, and many men do not
wish to adopt the disciplinary
responsibilities.

"So he sits back and allows °

things to run without him," con-
tinued Mr Hanna, "and some
men are not even offended by
that, and in many instances it is
because of weaknesses in their
own character, they have this
'Why should I care’ attitude."

But Mr Hanna said this lack-
adaisical attitude causes many
young males to grow up without
a values system to be instilled in
them.




“To be able to be competent and to be empowered
with this language to assist the students, so that they can
have better grades and speak the English Language
better. They will also be able to interact with the par-
ents on a more verbal bases.”

The classes were started about a month ago on Mon-
day’s and Friday’s. He said that a teacher, whose par-
ents are of Haitian descent, is also assisting in the

‘Member of Parliament for Carmichael John Carey \
told the principal that he will also attend the next class.

Mr Clarke told The Tribune that having the number
of Haitians at the school is not currently a serious con-
cern. He said that once the Haitian students are here
legally it is his obligation to educate them.

“Once they can produce the legal document, like a
birth certificate, or a travel document, as an adminis-
trator I am obligated to register those students and
see that they get a proper education,” he said.

Mr Clarke assured the public that there is no segre-
gation between Haitian and Bahamian children. He
said that teachers treat each child. with the same basic

He said that what he finds a problem is that the
majority of Haitian children at the school deny their

He noted that they do not want to be known as
Haitians, they want to be known as Bahamians.

He added that the Bahamian children at the school
treat their Haitian counterparts as one of them. He
said that there is love among the Bahamian and

“When some of the Creole students come into school
for the first time they do have a language barrier. I
am hoping that my teachers by being able to speak the
Creole language, they will be better able to assist these
students. In assisting these students, I am looking for-
ward to a greater degree of performance from them
academically. Also I expect through the language to
develop a more amicable relationship with the students
and the teachers. They would see now that the teacher
can speak my language and that would mean some-

Leanora Archer, deputy director with responsibility
for curriculum, said that the initiative taken at the
Carmichael Primary School is an excellent one.

“T thought that it was an excellent initiative. A num-
ber of our Haitian students may not be slow learners,
but there is a language barrier that is hindering them.
We do not want to encourage the students to use Cre-
ole. We want the teachers to understand it, so that
they can teach them English.” she said.

Ms Archer said she was not aware of the programme
of removal of illegal immigrants out of the school sys-
tem as was reported this week.

“From what I understand we have not gone i in that
direction of taking the Haitian students out of the
schools. That is not to say that we haven’t, just that
from my'knowledge, I’m not aware of it.







"That is a tragedy," he con-
tinued, "and that is why we see
so many men on the 'slow walk'
to court or to be incarcerated.
This vision diminishes the ideals
of what a man should be in this
country in the eyes of the pub-
lic. So who is going to be
missed? Male teachers, hus-
bands, pastors, that is who —
it’s a serious problem, is it an
epidemic? Of course it is."

Mr Hanna said his experience
as a policeman has led him to
the opinion that many of these
young males, who do not learn
how to work hard and prosper,

feel they must claw their way -

to the top as they see in the
behaviour of adults surround-
ing them.

Adding to this lack of guid-
ance, Mr Hanna said is the inap-

propriate manner in which.

Bahamians communicate. |
"We are very forceful and

aggressive in what we say to our’: |
young people," he said. "We

speak to them in violent lan-
guage and they go out and repli-

cate the very same behaviour —

in the wider community."
In the community, Mr Hanna

said he has also observed a°

common trait that he finds dis-
appointing.

"There are still a significant
number of hypocrites in our
society," he said, "where
Bahamians at large are not con-
sistent all the way through with
what they preach and what they
demonstrate. Young people see
this glaring inconsistency and a
big gaping hole at the top and
behave in similar fashion, but
their behaviour however is

‘more primitive than the adults
who can behave.in a more
sophisticated way."

The solution, he said is to
rehabilitate the young people,
"but fundamentally we need to
get with these others who have
created a very sordid situation
in our country."



Eta ea



Available on
Sesame Seed
Bun Only — x

_ "It’s rehabilitation across the
board," Mr Hanna continued,
"not just the areas that are
under economic distress, but it
comes down to a values sys-
tem."

According to Mr Hanna,
crime does not have any bor-
ders, and he said in the
past it had been wrongfully
labelled to people of lesser

_ means.

"Today, more and more peo-
ple from affluent areas of soci-

most heinous ways, including

murder, armed robbery, rape,
violence, and overall hostility,"
he added.

"What I have discovered over
the years is that things are good,
perks are good, but young peo-
ple need to connect with other
human beings, essentially

they need to connect with

adults."

He said good intentions are a
good start to instilling good val-
ues in the youth, but unless
more Bahamian men are willing

Supt Hanna: crumbling values
are contributing to crime

to fully commit themselves to
being a positive role model, the
country can expect an onslaught
of criminal behaviour.

"You can show things to
young people but if they are
hollow on the inside, and you
lack the values to help develop
their character, make them feel
good about themselves, and

respect. themselves or the

female down the road, why
would they respect the laws of -
the country in which they
reside?"

Providenciales te Nassau
Flight # RU401 departs 10:00am
Arrives in Nassau 11:30am —



ety are offending in some of the

Vensict on



FROM page one

firemen cut through the padlocks of Dorm 3,
where the girls were trapped, .after being told by

they were too hot to insert the keys.
been cut, the keys still worked in them.

Superintendent Cheryl Carol that the spare:
keys to the dorm were locked in the adminis-
trator’s office.

She said she was called to unlock the admin-
istrator’s office to retrieve the keys, because
the matrons were having difficulty unlocking
and opening Dorm 3. However she did not

and freed the girls.

Giving his opinion on the events that took
place on the morning of the fire, Coroner
William Campbell told the jury that using the
“common sense approach,” he could not see
how the fire could have been hot enough to
melt the padlocks or the keys.

He explained that in his view the fire could.
not have been “raging” because in the 10-25
minutes it took to open the dorm doors, the

FLIGHT SCHEDULE:
DAYS: Sunday, Monday, Wednesday & Friday

Nassau to Providenciales

/- day advance purchase return tickets as low as
Call Destinations at 393-6900 or Premier Travel at 328-0264 for reservations and ticketing

i'm lovin’ it

- Pratt fire deat 1S

one of the centre’s matrons, Ms Bowe, that:
It was shown that although the locks had S

The jury then heard from Acting Assistant

_ and Deshawn were accidents, accidents con-

arrive until after the firemen had cut the locks .





Williemae



‘girls had: not been burnt to death, as s they





essary temperature to. cause: ‘damage to the
locks.

The coroner, therefore; concluded that the
keys the matrons were trying to open the locks
with, were the wrong ones.

In his. directions to ‘the jury; Mr Campbell
said that three possible: verdicts arose from
the case.

He told the seven jurois’ that they must
determine whether the deaths of Anastacia













tributed to by neglects or solely the result of
neglect.

He defined neglect as s the failure of the indi-
viduals, on whom the two girls were depen-
dent, to provide the basic care and attention.

In this case the basic care would have
included the access to the. dorm keys at all
times, he added.

Mr ‘Campbell further reminded the jury that
the Coroner’s Court does not decide or attach
blame.

Inspector Bradley Neely prosecuted i in the
inquest.

Edward B Turner represented the families
of the three victims.


















Flight # RU400 departs 12:30pm
Arrives in Providenciales 2:00pm

$299

departure taxes included

The way to fly in the TCI and evey ond





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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005

SECTION



business@100jamz.com



BUSINESS



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

Telephone 242-393-1023 |







4

‘

‘Optimism’ exchange will
oon be at self-sufficiency,
with $1m loss in 2003

falling to $100,000 last year

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Bahamas Inter-
national Securities
- Exchange (BISX)
is “closer than
. ever” to being in
a break even position where it
will not have to rely on external
financial support for its survival,
its chief executive told The Tri-
bune last night, having seen its
annual losses reduced to around
$100,000 in fiscal 2004.

Keith Davies said BISX’s bal-
ance sheet was “moving in the
right direction”, even though
the income statement still
required work. He pointed out,
though, that the loss for last

year still represented a major
improvement on 2003’s $1 mil-
lion loss.

Mr Davies, speaking after
yesterday’s BISX annual gen-
eral meeting (AGM), said: “The

company has been able to ©

improve and gain market share
and new customers, and move
closer to the day when we will
be self-sufficient and able to
cover our expenses that we gen-
erate on a yearly basis entirely,

without any external support. .

We are closer than ever to
that.”

The BISX chief executive
said the exchange realised it
needed “to pay for ourselves,
and once we can do that we can
stop worrying about our exis-

BFSB to urge
Forum to hear
sector workers



By NEIL HARTNELL

“Tribune Business Editor

. The Bahamas Financial Ser- |

. vices Board (BFSB) will “rec-
- ommend” to the Financial Ser-

vices Consultative Forum

(FCSF) that it should take into
account the views of Bahami-
ans working in the industry

. when it advises the Government

on ‘Bahamianisation’ and immi-
«gration issues relating to the sec-
tor.

4. In its report on the “high-
erligh ” from last month’s Finan-

£3,
e wae
“oft

‘cial Services Retreat at Exu-
ha’ s Emerald Bay resort, the
“BFSB said it would “recom-
mend to the FSCF that consid-

-‘eration be given to the views of

aN

“&

: ;

ar.

f

‘Bahamians employed in the sec-
‘tor as it advises the government
‘on the impact of the Bahami-
‘anisation immigration policy on

_athe financial services industry”.

The Forum sub-committee’s
controversial Immigration
report sparked a public back-
lash from several quarters in the

$4
a4

on Immigration

financial services industry when
it was released late last year,
with some perceiving it as advo-
cating the “abandonment of
‘Bahamianisation”” as it relat-
ed to the sector and paving the
way for an influx of expatriate
labour.

Opinion on the report’s con-
clusions was sharply divided,
although Brian Moree, the
Forum’s chairman, denied it
was advocating an ‘Open
Sesame’ on immigration poli-
cies.

Nevertheless, the BFSB’ S
entrance into the debate is like-
ly to be an attempt to reassure
Bahamian workers in the indus-
try that their voices will be giv-
en a hearing on Immigration
policies and dampen the row.

In addition, the BFSB said it
would “continue to emphasise
the need for the establishment
of - and adherence to time lines
for - the delivery of public ser-
vices, including those provided

See REPORT, Page 2B

; “Undersea resort’s
Viability set to be

‘decided i in 90 days

By YOLANDA

- DELEVEAUX
.. Tribune Business Reporter

The developer behind a five-
‘star luxury underwater hotel,
situated just off the coast of
‘Eleuthera, said another 90 days

‘were needed before engineers .

can determine whether the
physical qualities of the site
meet with building standards.
In an interview with The Tri-
bune, Bruce Jones, head of the
$40 million Poseidon project,
said the group had identified a
piece of land near Eleuthera. If

'. the preliminary ground work
~’ bears out that it can contain an
“underwater structure, they will
purchase the beachfront prop- *

erty, and a formal application
will be made to the Govern-

‘ ment seeking approval to build

a 20-suite luxury resort, with

if
a

restaurant and bar, on the ocean
floor.

In an online news report, the
Florida-based entrepreneur said
he was currently signing on the
last of the investors, most them
institutional, who will put up
the $40 million.

_Mr Jones said: “People who

. are interested in experiencing

something they can't find any-
where else in the world will find
it a real bargain. By doing this
we can entertain people, but

. also educate people and pro-

mote environmental steward-
ship. Only in really experiencing
what it's like underwater can
you really motivate somebody
to protect the natural resources
of the sea." ,

The project has been in the
developmental stage for several

See HOTEL, Page 2B

tence and look forward to grow- —

ing the business”.

Mr Davies said BISX’s 45 pri- |
vate shareholders “understood
the circumstances” the
exchange found itself in, but
had been “upbeat” during the
AGM about its future
prospects.

“We had a very positive
meeting with ours sharehold-

rs,” Mr Davies said. “They are
very focused on our ultimate
goal.”

Sources close to BISX last

night said there was a “feeling

the worst is over” among the
exchange’s shareholders. —
One observer added:
“There’s a general optimism
about the future of BISX at the
moment. It’s cash flow has
largely been sorted out. This
year there’s almost the expec-
tation that it will break even.”
Achieving this, though, is
likely to be dependent on
whether the exchange can
attract new mutual fund listings,
plus gain debt and preference
share listings. BISX listings in

Exchange looking for alternative accommodation due to Cardinal situation

ISX is ‘closer than
ever’ to break-even



Keith Davies

themselves generate about
$1,000 per listing.

Among forthcoming listings
is likely to be a Bahamian
Depository Receipt (BDR)
offering by Consolidated Water,
which has just won the contract
to build, own and operate the
Blue Hills reverse osmosis
plant. Caribbean Crossings, the
Cable Bahamas subsidiary, is
also understood to be planning
a $25 million preference share
issue to fund the construction
of a fibre optic telecommunica-
tions cable between the
Bahamas and Jamaica, a move
still awaiting regulatory
approval.

Another source said: “Things
are happening in the securities
market that will help BISX

. move forward with or without

the .Government.” The
exchange “expects the next
three to five years to be fairly
positive”, having pared its cost
structure down to align this with
projected income.

See BISX, Page 2B

IndiGo spends iin
on network roll-out

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

IndiGO Networks, the first:
legal competitor to the

Bahamas Telecommunications
-Company (BTC) in the fixed-
line voice market, yesterday
said it had so far invested $4
million in rolling out its net-
work “with a lot more to

come”.

IndiGo’s president Paul
Hutton- -Ashkenny, told the
Rotary Club of West Nassau
that the company planned to

launch services on Abaco.

around “May-time” this year,
and it was hopeful it would
eventually receive regulatory
permission to operate outside
the three islands to which its







licence currently confines it.
’ Under the terms of the

‘licence issued by the Public

Utilities Commission (PUC),
IndiGo can only provide voice
telecommunications services to
customers in New Providence,
Grand Bahama and Abaco.

But Mr Hutton-Ashkenny ©

said yesterday: “We would like
to think we will be able to



Through 40 years

financial solutions





expand outside those three
islands we're licensed to be in
today. Clearly, we'd like to do
a good job there.”

The IndiGO president.
added that it was also “fairly
advanced” in plans to install
its own telephones in high den-
sity tourist areas. The company

See PHONE, Page 2B



of growth and transformation,
one thing has never changed:
our commitment to helping you
achieve your financial goals.

Thank you for making us
your choice for providing

to secure your future.

= FAMILY
GUARDIAN

INSURANCE
COMPANY

EEPORT, ABACO & ELEUTHERA CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O. BOX SS 6232



PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005 THE TRIBUNE





B | SX (From page 1B)

It was suggested last night that the report on implementing the.
16 recommendations for reviving BISX which was being developed
by a committee headed by Central Bank governor Julian Francis,
had been delivered to James Smith, minister of state for finance,
earlier this week. However, The Tribune was unable to contact the
minister to confirm this.

BISX would be able to take “a major step forward” if the Goy-
ernment enacted recommendations such as greater participation in
its listed equities by the National Insurance Board (NIB), which has
$1.23 billion in its reserve fund, and the listing of government
paper - registered stock and Treasury Bills. The listings alone
could add a six-figure sum to BISX’s listing revenues.

Meanwhile, Mr Davies last night confirmed that BISX was “cur-

‘rently seeking alternative arrangements” for the exchange’s
accommodation.

BISX is currently based in the British Colonial Hilton’s Centre
of Commerce in downtown Nassau, but is subletting its premises
from Cardinal International, the fund administrator that is in the
process of winding up its business.

Mr Davies said the need: foe BISX to find alternative accom-
modation was “a year advanced” from where the exchange had
planned to be.

It is understood that BISX would like to remain where it is for the
moment and negotiate another sub-lease with the tenant that
replaces Cardinal International. Among the possible alternatives is
a relocation to the Central Bank of the Bahamas,

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays







Julian Francis, Governor of the Central Bank of the Bahamas, is ee H i
of the BISX implementation committee ote (From page 1B) :

years, and iand surveys and resort desons are still being complet-
ed to determine its viability.

If built, with initial projections looking at a start date of 2006, the
resort is expected to be situated in some 50 feet of water and will
be connected to the Eleuthera mainland through two tunnels and
an escalator. -

The suites will have transparent acrylic. walls facing coral gardens

. that can be lit up at night. And Mr J ones said guests.can expect to
see a large variety of tropical fish, tuna and turtles - even sharks -
from the comfort of their rooms or from a private Jacuzzis.

President of US Submarines Inc, a company that designs, refits:
and sells submarines, Mr Jones said his group is also looking into
a number of other tourism projects around the world. .

The idea of an underwater hotel is not new and a similar project,
the Hydropolis resort, is planned for the waters off Dubai. Investors
in the Hydropolis say resort rooms will go for $500.a night, but Mr
Jones said guests at the Poseidon should expect to pay up.to three
times that. - .

He said: “It's an economic reality. We couldn't do it and make a
profit for less."

Repo rt (From page 1B)

by the Ministry of Immigration and Labour”.
But the industry body also appeared to agree with much of the
Forum’s report, saying: “The jurisdiction needs to ensure that is has
. an adequate cadre of highly skilled individuals or persons with a
wide network of relationships * who are able to. add value to the
financial.services sector. ~~
“In-this regard, the country’s immigration policy should seek to

eine rest Rate & attract individuals who can fill necessary skill gaps to complement
existing professional talent in the Bahamas. The immigration pol-

wie icy should also facilitate the appropriate employment of interna-
> tional staff in global organisations for the long-term benefit of the
industry and Bahamians.”

Other key talking points at the Retreat were the need to build the
Bahamas “brand” through a process involving all stakeholders,
plus the requirement for “greater emphasis” on managing the

. nation’s foreign relations with respect to financial.services.

The BFSB said that to achieve the latter aim it would increase
contacts with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and consulates and
‘high commissions abroad.

Research projects were also needed to identify tax ‘compliant
applications for Bahamian financial services products in the mar-
kets it targeted. The Bahamas also needed to “proactively” grow the
number of institutions based in this nation at a time when industry
consolidation was increasing through mergers and acquisitions.



Phone (From page 1B) eee

was also in discussions with BTC about setting up a toll payment
system so that IndiGo’s Bahamian and tourist pre-paid card cus-
tomers would not have to put coins in to use a BTC telephone. _

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said IndiGo’s next generation broadband ©
wireless network covered 54 per cent of the population of the
three islands it served.

The company was. launching its Grand Bahama services on
March 1, and was making postpaid services to residential cus-
tomers on New Providence available “as of now”. ..

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said postpaid services will enable cus-
tomers to exploit IndiGo’s low long-distance tariff rates even if they
do not have one.of the company’s phones. They would instead be
able to dial a PIN or access code number that would enable them
to access the IndiGo network, paying for calls from an account ey,
would have with the company.

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said IndiGo’s business model was built on
four key characteristics. They were the complete use of next gen-
eration technology throughout the network; network reliability
and built-in redundancy, as “any time off air is not acceptable”;
superior customer service; and “very cost effective” tariff rates.

However, IndiGo had discovered i in launching services to the
S ti b k? : F ‘ & F t' M rt C ; _ business Comunity that HESTON renabilitys rather than lower

; ' } : calling costs, was the main consideration for many companies.
couabank 5 0 rg we Oo rg e 0 9g age am pa Ig n “To have the phone system off the air is simply Teaccspeabile” for
businesses, Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said, adding that the co-exis-
tence of IndiGo’s network alongside that of BTC meant that firms

i mins 1 : : uld have “full redundancy”, sin e would be working if
We're giving away Big Bucks! . : thier ane dda: yee eee $

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said the competition IndiGo was provid-

ing to BTC in the fixed-line,voice market had already driven tariffs

Yes, you can own for as little as 5% down



( i down, with the lower prices already benefiting both commercial and

Have $10,000 or $7,500 of your mortgage balance Forgiven vesadegrtiil (elecorninianicalluns tisees throws sockiced Calling coety
. 66 ith i ion” 2

Or be one of 20 lucky customers to have $250 of a mortgage payment Forgotten He described as." compention in, action. BTC: s four-month

long-distance tariff promotion, which had a structure that “mirrored
IndiGo’s across the board and pitched prices just,lower than ours”.
BTC’s promotion was launched in October last year, the month
after IndiGo’s “soft launch” with a much simplified tariff structure
that divided calls into four regions.

Down-payment as low as 5% (with Mortgage Indemnity Insurance)
Campaign runs until May 13, 2005

\ Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said: “We don’t mind. I think we were
ote bef is : . \ ' actually quite flattered to be copied in that way, and to think we
Call or visit us today and let Scotiabank help you to ‘Forgive & Forget . became so powerful against an incumbent monopoly in just a few

weeks was quite a comforting thought.”

The IndiGo president added that BTC’s previous long-distance
tariffs had been “unwieldy and cumbersome”, featuring standard,
discount and super-saver hours, and different rates for each coun-

Vl i t try and between the first call minute and other minutes.
Rolie oLo lal He said “cynics” might take the view that BTC’s four-month pro-
motion was an attempt to “squeeze IndiGo’s margins” and put the
company out of business before hiking its long-distance rates again.
¢ This was predatory pricing or a prancar at ve its dominant
i " market position to kill off a new entrant, utton-Ashken-
Lite, Money. Balance both. ny said this was why BTC had to apply to the PUC for permission
to lower its prices to prevent it from manipulating the market.

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said: “It’s just been a few short months

since IndiGo was launched. We believe we’ve come a long way.”
‘ ne i \¥



* Trademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia, Trademarks used under authorization and contol of The Bank of Nova Scotia.

Sng ahaa





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005, PAGE 3B



Education reform Is Key to
Bahamas’ competitiveness

By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Tribune Business Reporter

THE re-engineering of the
Bahamian education system is
crucial to developing a work-
force able to compete in a
trade-liberalised global econo-
my, Philip Simon, executive
director of the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce, said yester-
day. He added that there
remained a greater need for co-
operation between all stake-
holders to improve the
Bahamas’ competitiveness.

“Public-private partnerships

can make a significant contri-°

bution to the delivery. of
advanced quality public ser-

vices,” Mr Simon said. “We see ©

regionally and globally that we
operate in a very competitive
environment and have to

improve our education system
to be successful. It is essential
that there is a broad consensus
in relation to the scope of our
partnership and the benefits we
expect to realise in both the
public, private and civil sectors."
As the Bahamas: considers
any number of trade agree-
ments and membership pro-
posals, including the CARI-
COM Single Market & Econo-
my (CSME), World Trade
Organisation (WTO) and the
Free Trade Area of the Ameri-
cans (FTAA), employers con-

tinued to find it challenging to-

recruit, develop and retain a

‘qualified workforce. .

Mr Simon pointed out that it
could be said that. qualified
workers are, on the other hand,
having trouble finding quality
work. While there is some dis-
connect in this area, many

Legal Notice

NOTICE

FOREST HILLS MANAGEMENT
LIMITED

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section
92 (4) of the International Business Companies Act No.
2 of 1990 FOREST HILLS MANAGEMENT
LIMITED is in Dissolution. The date of commencement
of dissolution was the 23rd day of February, 2005. Anita
M. Bain, of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of
FOREST HILLS MANAGEMENT LIMITED.

Anita Bain
Liquidator

Leg al Notice

NOTICE

NAVIGATION SERVICES LIMITED

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section

92 (4) of the International Business Companies Act No. |

2 of 1990 NAVIGATION SERVICES LIMITED i is
in Dissolution. The date of commencement of dissolution
was the 23rd day of February, 2005. Anita M. Bain, of
Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of NAVIGATION

SERVICES LIMITED.

Anita Bain
Liquidator



POSITION AVAILABLE
COMMUNITY LIAISON

OFFICER

The Caribbean Regional Environment
Programme (CREP) is seekin
Community Liaison Officer (CLO).

CLO will engage Andros conamisnilies
and other stakeholders in the CREP

employers would agree that
there is room for improvement
in what they want and what
they see or get.

Another sticking point for the
advancement of the Bahamas
is that career pathways in tech-

nical, vocational and hospitality ...

industries are not actively
encouraged. Students and oth- .
er potential hires are unable to
see the breadth of career
options available to them in
these industries, and therefore
shy away from-entering what
seems to them to.be limited or
"dead end" careers. :

- The most frequently.repeatéed
complaint or desire from -

employers, however, was for an.
improvement in the core com-

> petencies of many in the avail-
able workforce. The level of lit-

eracy, numeracy, basic comput-
er skills, written and verbal

communications, critical think-
ing and customer service orien-
tation were a few of the areas
seen to be lacking in the gener-
al community.

“All of these points speak to
a deficiency in the learning
process and upbringing of our

- youth. And this is not a Gov-

ernment problem, it’s a nation-
al issue. It's the responsibility
of the country,” Mr Simon said.

Addressing the National Pub-
lic-Private Partnership Forum
on Education Re-Engineering

for Economic Competitiveness,

jointly sponsored by the Cham-
ber of Commerce and the pub-
lic sector, Mr Simon said in
looking to re-engineer the edu-
cation system, there was a need

to develop. a post-secondary .

education system that can adapt
quickly and readily to changing
market trends.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

‘VICCOS LIMITED |

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the
undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or
before 11th April A.D., 2005. In default thereof they will be |
excluded from the benefit of any distribution made by the

Liquidator.

Dated the 21st day of February A.D., 2005.

‘Sarah M. Lobosky
LIQUIDATOR
. Harry B. Sands, Lobosky Management Co. Ltd.
Shirley House
50 Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas

~ DIVIDEND NOTICE

PREMIER COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE
INVESTMENT CORPORATION LIMITED

TAKE NOTICE that the Board of Directors of
PREMIER COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE
-INVESTMENT CORPORATION LIMITED has
resolved to declare a Quarterly dividend in the
~ amount of Nineteen and one-half cent ($0.195) per
share for all shareholders of record as of the close
of business on the 21st day of February, 2005, the
same to be payable on the 28th day of February,

2005.

All payments shall be made through SG Hambros
Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited, the Registrar &
Transfer Agent, pursuant to the instructions of the
relevant shareholders on the files of SG Hambros -
Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited as at the 21st day



of February, 2005.

Gregory K. Moss
Secretary



Colina

He said it was also important
to reframe and change the
mindset and marketing of hos-
pitality, tourism and occupa-
tional careers, and create a
more efficient and cost-effec-
tive process that would develop
a higher quality of graduate.

Prime Minister Perry Christie
and Alfred Sears, minister of

education, were also in atten- ©

dance at the launch of Opti-
mism and Opportunity: A Pre-
sentation and Dialogue on Pub-
lic-Private Partnership, which
was held at the British Colonial
Hilton.

The intensive interactive’.
forum was said to begin the cre-
ation of a sustainable frame- ~.

, work for public-private collab-"
oration in improving educa- -
tion's response to workforce “.

development for economic
competitiveness.

The forum was the inaugural
event of the Education and
Training for Competitiveness
(ETC) programme, funded by a
Government loan from the
Inter-American Development
Bank (IDB). The event was
hosted by IBM Bahamas and
the Ministry of Education, and

‘was designed and produced by

the Chamber and its consultants
to foster the evolution of an
education and training system
that meets the demands of the
business community for skilled
human resources. |

Two recently-released stud-

ies; one commissioned by the’

Chamber, A strategic Frame-
work for Optimizing Benefits
from Trade Liberalization in the

employ a

Responsibilities inolude:





experience in sales.






A growing Technology Solutions Provider i is seeking to
Client Account Manager |

The successful candidate should be self-motivated with
strong communication and networking skills. Experience
with technical products is not necessary as training will
be provided. However, the successful candidate should
have a proven track peo in sales and an ipernetng:

Managing axiating' élient accounts
Developing new clients - Sorin
Selling and marketing. products:
Managing the Marketing Budget’.
Reporting to the Board of Directors

The successful candidate should:have a Bachelors
Degree in business or science with.a minimum of 2 years

Remuneration and Benefits will include a competitive
salary, monthly bonus for meeting sales targets, car
‘ allowance, group health and pension.

Please submit a resume to:-
Ms. J Forsythe, PO Box EE17034, Nassau, Bahamas
Or apply online at http:/Avww.emagine.bs/cam

Closing date for applications is March 18th

Bahamas and a Report on Trade
Liberalisation by the Tourism
Task Force, both concluded that
the business sector needs to
increase its level of efficiency
and productivity while decreas-
ing the cost of inputs and raising
the quality of its human .
resource stock. Mr Simon said it
still remained that the business
community, along with the pub-
lic sector, must continue to
invest in people "because peo-
ple make the difference".

While the country was found

to be adequately prepared for .
“trade liberalisation in only three

out. of :28- ‘areas-- as a net

exporter of services, solid infra-
structure a and the level of trans-
. parency. - it fell-short in areas
that were: critical factors for suc-

cess . Areas such as skilled
labour, continuing training,
investment in learning and test-
ing, human development and
co-operation between stake-
holders, will require the imme-

- diate attention of both the pub-

lic and private sector if the
country is to move forward, he
said.

















TWYNAM HEIGHTS

Bank Approved Financing
$330,000
3 Bed. 2 Bath:
4 bed 3 1:2 bath
3,000 sq.
up to BS25,000.00 Gift

823-4365 * 557-1996

ne ee ce



































“TDELULY



Financial Advisors Ltd.



Poet activities and provide support for

nore Manager. The position is based
with CREP Project, in Fresh Creek,
Andros.

Pricing Information As Of:
24 Febru: 2005

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

British American Bank
Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Kerzner International BDRs
Premior Real Soe

Skills Required

* Team player able to work with

communities throughout Andros

e Excellent oral and written
communication skills

© Willingness to travel and to work
outside normal hours when
necessary

e Awareness of environmental issues

would be an asset

Qualifications

¢ Familiar with the communities of
Andros
° Strong facilitation skills for
meetings and workshops

¢ Computer literate
* Ability to plan/ conduct
community meetings and

! workshops

SoR aw
13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.40 RND Holding
cmnmenminss ee
28.00 ABDAB
13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.35 RND Holdings

52wk-Hi
1 is ;

none



0.810
0.000

1.105
-0.103 _









If you are interested in this exciting oo

S2wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Divs... Yield %
opportunity please send resume, cover 1.2095 1.1529 Colina Money Market Fund 1.209527" s Si o
letter & other supporting documentation 2.11914 1.8944: Fidelity Bahamas G &|Fund =—.2.1105 ***
to: 10.2648 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.2602*****
2.1746 2.0524 . ‘Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.166020"

1.0894

1.0276 Colina Bond Fund



CREP Position OR:
PO. N-4105 P.O. Box 23338
Nassau, Bahamas Fresh Creek, Andros

Material wet, also be delivered
CREP/ANCAT office, Fresh Cree
by e-mail to: exancat@batelnet.bs

CREP Position __1.089371***

YIELD - last 12 month dividandé divided by. doting keke

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity :..

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity °°

Lest Price - Last traded overdue onan ; ,

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported eamings per share for the last 12 mthe
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 19904 = 100

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX.- 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00. -
S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

i Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Dalty Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

hand to the
Andros or

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings
** - AS AT JAN. 31, 2005/ **** - AS AT DEC. 31, 2004
* 9 : siete

All app! lications must be received by
riday 11th March 2005





PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS

Economic growth depends

on the educational system

By YOLANDA
- DELEVEAUX
Tribune Business Reporter

Education minister Alfred
Sears said yesterday that the
economic growth and develop-
ment of the Bahamas depends
largely on the capacity of the
education system to upgrade
the skills and competencies of
| the existing workforce, as well

NOTICE TO

- labour market.

-market integration to improve

as trainirig new entrants to the -

“The Bahamas remained chal-
lenged by regional and global

basic work skills among sec-
ondary school graduates, to
address skill shortages in the
industry and service sectors, and
to generate new opportunities

See BOOST, Page 6B.

SHAREHOLDERS

The Board of Directors of Finance
Corporation of Bahamas Limited hereby




PUBLIC NOTICE _
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, MACKENSON LUTUS, -

of Minnis Subdivision, off Golden: ‘Isles; P.O. Box N-1000,
Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name to KENNY










MACKENSON LUTUS. If there are any objections to s to this
change of name by Deéd Poll, you may write such ©
objections to the Chief: Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) ans after the
date of publication of this notice.

notifies all of its Shareholders that the Bank’s
actual net profit, based on unaudited results
for the quarter ended 31st January 2005 was
$4,563,383. As aresult, an interim dividend
of twelve cents (12 cents) per Ordinary Share
will be paid on 10th March 2005, to all
shareholders of record as of 4th March 2005.






LINUX SYSTEM ADMINISTRATOR / TECH SUPPORT
JOB DESCRIPTION: ;

The Bank’s total assets stood at
$553,745,481 for the quarter ended 31st
January 2005.

Support Linux server infrastructure and provide technical support
and pre-sales assistance. :

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES en oe

* College or university degree.

° 2+ years experience with Linux in a server environment
° Strong ability to communicate effectively

¢ Strong organizational skills |;

You must posses experience offering tech support in ‘multiple
mediums, such as telephone, email, support tickets, etc: Must
have experience offering shared and dedicated server support
for. software, configuration and hardware issues.

KEVA L. BAIN

Cee SECRETARY Scie Rime

Based on experience level.
PLEASE FAX YOUR RESUME TO:

502-8723.
(Bahamian citizens only need apply)

| Dated this 25th February, 2005



Alfred Sears

Mignon (Nassau) Limited|

<.
| ~ |
A newly registered Securities Investment Advisory firm A N S B AC H E R
| _. The Ansbacher group, specialists in private banking, fiduciary services
and wealth management, has an opening in the Bahamas for a

| SENIOR SECURITIES, FOREIGN EXCHANGE
_ AND MONEY MARKET TRADER

Redonting directly to the Head of Banking, Securities ad
Operations, the jobholder will be the primary trader for the bank.
The individual will be responsible for all securities and foreign
exchange trading for the bank. To place deposits and manage
liquidity with correspondent banks on a daily basis to maximize
use of the banks assets. To ensure at all times, the bank operates
within bank placement limits as set by the Group.

Is seeking candidates for the position of

Fund Accounting Supervisor/Compliance officer

Candidates should possess the following qualifications: ;

¢ Certified Public Accountant or equivalent accounting -
qualifications

e Series 7 Examination

e 3-4 years experience in fund accounting, possibly for a fund
administrator

e Fluency in French would be an asset To ap ply, candidates must:

Have a minimum of 3 years active trading experience with a

Personal qualities: _ recognized financial institution, preferably at a managerial level.

Have a thorough understanding of the global financial landscape
and be able to understand and execute transactions in securities,
treasury, futures and options, structured products and foreign
exchange.

¢ Ability to work independently
¢ Excellent organizational skills
¢ Commitment to quality and excellence

¢ Self motivated.
Be ntoficient in the use of spreadsheets and database software
including Bloomberg.
Responsibilities: Holding a relevant degree, professional qualification such as Series
mh A 7 or equivalent work experience (minimum of 5 years)
¢ Fund Administration control and supervision
¢ Compliance Officer

¢ Office manager

Be a self starter who is detail oriented and able to work/think and
communicate effectively under pressure within a team environment.

The successful candidate will enjoy a competitive salary, bonus

Pies eo endlenmil our ee and benefit package, commensurate with skill and experience.

Mignon (Nassau) Limited
PO Box AP 59223#365
Nassau, The Bahamas
sp@mignon.bs

Qualified individuals are invited to apply in writing, with a full
resume to:

The Human Resource Manager,
Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited,
P.O. Box N-7768,
-Nassau, Bahamas
Fax 242-326-5020





THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005, PAGE 5B




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PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005 THE TRIBUNE

[FREEPORT concreTE | © ONCern rises
| COMPANY LIMITED theft



‘Yo. Gross. profit: :

Dear Shareholders,

We present our first quarter unaudited financial statements ending November 2004 and
once again we are pleased to announce another profitable quarter. First quarter sales
have increased a modest 3.8% over the same quarter last year despite a sales decline in
our concrete operations due to the effects of Hurricanes Frances and Jeanne. The Home _
Centre also sustained significant damage to its leased premises that rendered a portion of
the building unusable. Our gross profit margin was also positively impacted increasing to
30.70% this quarter versus 26.5% in 2004. Despite the serious setbacks, Freeport i.
Concrete Company Limited was able to maintain sales momentum and operating
profitability as evidence by our EBITDA (earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and
amortization), dramatically improving to $436,464 in 1° quarter 2005 versus $205,805 in
2004 fiscal year. After all hurricane related activity FCC recorded improved profitability
of 336% or $279,700 over last year. It should be noted that FCC is expected to record
additional hurricane related income or losses in the second quarter of 2005 pending the
complete settlement of insurance related negotiations.

Additionally, accounts receivables have increased by $223.8K over fiscal year end 2004
driven primarily by an increase in a key account as a result of Hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne. We do not believe it is.a cause for concer as the payment history with this -
customer has been excellent. We however continue to remain vigilant in our collection
efforts and closely monitor our accounts receivable to manage the impact on cash flow.
Our accounts payable also increased over year-end due to our suppliers agreeing to more
extended terms because of the challenges faced post hurricanes. We fully expect that our
accounts payables will be reduced to normal levels by the end of the second quarter of
fiscal year 2005. The most significant improvement however occurred in our cash
position as we experienced an improvement of $1.1M over fiscal year end 2004 due
primarily to the settlement of our hurricane related insurance claims.

We continue to be focused on increasing sales, improving the gross profit margin and

controlling costs and as the company continues to enjoy sales growth and profitability,
. this will be reflected in the value of your shares.

Darvin L. Russell

Ray Simpson
Chief Executive Officer Chief Financial Officer
February 3 2005

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

_ Consolidated Statement of Operations
Three months ended November 30, 2004 with comparative information for 2003

_ (Expressed in Bahamian dollars) : i

; 3 months ended 3 months ended
: November 30, 2004 November 30, 2003
Sales . 5,201,572

5,009,146




Cost of sales



Payroll costs - hiv 639,958
Other operating costs 303,248 221,976
Rent expense _ (99,247. - 125,573
Advertising expense : 42,745 60,061
Utilities expense 59,543 73,889
Other income 2,655 402
1,160,295 1,121,859

income/(loss) before interest, taxes

depreciation and amortisation 436,464 205,805
Depn. and amort. expense (58,668) _- * (94,670)
Net financing income/(expense’ 21,463) _ (26,242
Profit/(Loss) before minority interest 356,334 84,893
Minority interest in gain . 6,515 (1,744)
Net income/(loss 362,849 ; 83,149

\

Eamings per share

Basic and diluted eamings/ (loss) per share $ 0.077 0.018



Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Consolidated Balance Sheet
As at November 30, 2004

. ‘ November 30, 2004 August 31,2004
Unaudited (Audited)

Cash 486,305 58,895
Time deposits 80,043 79,740
Accounts receivable, net 1,941,874 1,718,031
Inventories ; 2,881,434 3,431,533
inventories of spare parts and supplies 147,873 93,246
Deposits and prepaid expenses 341,486 94,980
Total current assets 5,879,015 5,476,425

3,048,274 3,197,387

Fined assets 197,

Total nesgis 8,927,289 8,673,812



LIABILITIES
Bank overdraft $ - 750,341
Accounts payable and accrued

expenses 3,719,113 3,050,784
Warranty Provision 35,267 35,267
Oue to Shareholder 429,022 440,272

Current portion of long term debt 35,022 39,810
Total current Kabilities 4,218,425 4,316,474

Long term fatbility 191,605 196,412
Minority interest (6,515) -
SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

Share Capital 47,083 47,083
Contributed surplus 5,774,868 5,774,868
Appransal excess 1,433,867 1,433,867
Retained eamings (3,094,892) (3,094,892)

Current 362,849

aT TT a
Total equity z 4,523,775 4,160,926

Total liabilities and

shareholders’ $ 8,927,289 8,673,812



on identity

- —— lc

= — - -

-_
-

-_
—
——— ~

——_

~~ “Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

= = -

Boost (From page 4B)

NOTICE —

NOTICE is hereby given that KENOL GUE, MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality ‘and Citizenship, for
| registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
| that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25th day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


















NQTICE,



'

dow op tea yy"

i ‘s *” NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
; (No. 45 of 2000)

ZENITH CAPITAL INVESTMENTS LIMITED
- In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137(4) of the
International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), ZENITH’
CAPITAL INVESTMENTS LIMITED is in Dissolution.

The date of commencement of dissolution is 2nd day of December,
2004.

Marlborough Trust Company Limited
P.O. Box 19, Farnley House,
La Charroterie, St Peter Port,
Guernsey GY1 3AG
Liquidator



POSITION AVAILABLE

Caribbean Regional
Environment
Programme

Financed by the
European Union

Administrative
Assistant

The Caribbean Regional Environment
Programme (CREP) is seeking an
; Administrative Assistant to provide
administrative support for the Andros
Conservancy and Trust and the CREP
ee The position is based with ANCAT,
in Fresh Creek, Andros.
Bahamas
Focal Point
Organizations

Skills/Qualifications

© Computer literate, especially Microsoft
Office Suite

¢ Minimum of 2-3 years experience in office
procedures, including performing basic
accounting tasks, operating office
equipment, and receptionist skills

e Excellent oral and written
communication skills

¢ Positive attitude and self motivated

¢ Excellent organisational skills and ability
to multitask

¢ Detail oriented and able to meet
deadlines

° rinse to maintain confidentiality of
records and information

If you are interested in this exciting
opportunity please send resume, cover
letter & other supporting documentation
to:

OR: CREP Position
P.O. Box 23338
Fresh Creek, Andros

CREP Position
P.O. N4105
Authorized by the Nassau, Bahamas
Caribbean Forum of ACP
States
Material may also be delivered by hand to
the CREP/ANCAT office, Fresh Creek, Andros
or by e-mail to: exancat@batelnet.bs

All oy one must be received by
riday 11th March 2005.







for innovative business services
in the Bahamas.

“We need a well-trained, flex-
ible and adaptable workforce
in which graduates from public
schools are technologically flu-
ent and prepared to compete
globally. And we believe that «
the educational theory and
practice of public-private part-
nerships in development repre-

’ sents the best approach to

achieve this outcome,” Mr Sears
said. , .
Addressing the National Pub-

’ lic-Private Partnership Forum

on Education Re-Engineering
for'Economic:'Competitiveness,
dy sponsored by the Cham-



~ ‘ber of Commerce and the pub-

lic sector, Mr Sears said that in |
the past, the public sector has
involved the private sector after
it had already designed its pro-

. jects and is at the point where it

required financial assistance.

This time, he noted, the pub-
lic sector is advocating the
involvement of the private sec-
tor at the outset in the reform of
the Bahamian workforce. Mr
Sears said public sector officials
are interested in the expertise
made available by private sector
involvement at all stages of dis-
cussion.

The Bahamas Government,
with the assistance of the Inter-
American Development Bank
(IDB), has engaged the services
of the International Education
and Collaborative Foundation
(IECF) to establish a public-
private partnership to develop
an education system flexible
enough to respond to labour
market demands in a timely
manner.

IECF will also seek to
strengthen the ability of the
Ministry of Education and tech-
nical career training institutions
to monitor labour market data,
in order to update their training
programmes.

IECF brings to the table:
extensive experience in the
design and implementation of
successful models of public-pri-
vate collaboration in the edu-
cation sector.

Diane Miller, IECF Director
of Global Operations, said the
demand for public private part-
nerships around the world is
increasing. “It's too big a job
for any one government to do
alone. Our mission is to create
a partnership with the right
composition and membership
to ensure success."

The collaborative structure
is expected to include the cre-
ation of a foundation estab-
lished in accordance with the
Foundations Act 2004. ;

"We are pleased to announce
the endowment of the founda-
‘tion by the Fidelity Group of
Companies. McKinney Ban-
croft & Hughes will create the
legal structure; and Ernst &
Young will provide their exper-
tise to structure the operation
and joint implementation from
public, private and civil sectors.
We will, from the beginning,
institutionalise our partnership
to ensure’ transparency,
accountability and responsibili-
ty, borrowing best practices
from the private sector," she

* said.



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2UUd, FAGE /6





OVC auditions
for new products

“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News

NOTICE.

NOTICE is hereby given that DAVID GABRIELE BANGELLI,
BUCCANEER ROAD, LITTLE BLAIR, P.O. BOX SS-19531,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible






:

TEACHING VACANCY

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites
applications from qualified Teachers for positions
available at St John’s College, St Anne’s School,
Freeport Anglican High School/Discovery Primary
School and St Andrew’s Anglican School, Exuma.

SECONDARY

_ Spanish
English Language/Literature
Biology
Mathematic
Religious Studies
Physical Education
Special Education
Librarian
Home Economics

- Nurse

PRIMARY

Upper Primary
Lower Primary
Kindergarten
Computer Studies .

Only qualified Teachers, Nurse, with Bachelor or

Master Degrees from an accredited University or

r 49 College and Teaching Certificate need apply.

Providers ; ee

For further details and application forms, please contact

the Anglican Central Education Authority on Sands
Road at telephone (242) 322-3015/6/7.

Letters of application and/or completed application
forms with copies of required documents must be sent
by Friday, March 11, 2005 to the Anglican Education
Department addressed to:-

The Director of Education
Anglican Central Education Authority
P.O. Box N-656
Nassau, Bahamas








LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE |
CARUPANO INVESTMENTS LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)








~~ Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is -
siedissolution, which commenced on the 14th day of February, | ,
2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid Davis of
P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau, Bahamas.








for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
‘| twenty-eight days from the 25TH day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas. .










BKG/410.03

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS |
GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS

Sealed tenders for B$59,100,000.00 of 91-Day
Treasury Bills will be received by the banking
manager, The Central Bank of The Bahamas,
Frederick Street, Nassau up to 3:00p.m. on Friday,
March 4, 2005. Successful Tenderers, who will be
advised should take up their bills against payment
on Tuesday, March 8, 2005. These bills will be in
minimum multiples of B$100.00. Tenders are to be
on special forms obtainable from The Central Bank
of. The. Bahamas or commercial banks.
















. Tenders must state the net price percent (in multiples
of one cent) and should be marked “Tender for
Bahamas Government Treasury Bills”. The Central
Bank of the Bahamas reserves the right to reject any
or all tenders.







CECILE M. SHERMAN
MANAGER, BANKING DEPARTMENT
THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS




LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
THE SPARTENBURY CO. LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the 14th day of February,
2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid Davis of
P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)

(Liquidator)



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WILLIS DOCTEUR OF MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality: and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/

naturalization should not be granted, should send a written,

and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25TH day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.





LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
PANTERAINC. ~

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000, the
dissolution of PANTERA INC., has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.

Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)

Cordelia Fernander_
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

FLANDER VALLEY INVESTMENTS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in
dissolution, which commenced on the 3rd day of February,
2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid Davis
of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)

Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)







Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)





Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)





LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

REEZE VIEW INVESTMENTS LTD. ©
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the 27th day of January,
2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid
Davis of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

‘Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)

Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

MAGNETRON INVESTMENTS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the 3rd day of February,
2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid
Davis of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)

Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)



PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005 THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS










Volume 25 ® Auturen 2004

Men’s|
WHAT RE
TURNS T

SHE Caribbean reflects the faces and the spirit We are fun - yet, very serious.
. of all Caribbean women.

esesensenesss

SHE Caribbean is the only magazine with a

- SHE Caribbean celebrates women’s direct line to the region’s women, a growing

achievements while highlighting their struggles, and increasingly powerful, affluent section of
their suffering, and prejudices we face. our region.

SHE Caribbean is a beautifully designed SHE Caribbean truly is in syne with the
magazine that insists on the highest standards Caribbean woman. We invite you to be a part
of photography, hard hitting editorials on of this magazine. Or visit us on-line on:

fashion, beauty, health and inspiration. shecaribbean.com .



HARM MT a CMM TeN Nr Selita yr!.





eo

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2005, PAGE 9B

RND HOLDINGS LIMITED FINANCIAL REPORT



Dear Shareholder, Benes \

A
This year has beén a year of change for the company, led primarily by the decision taken In terms of normal operations in 2004, the company demonstrated substantive improvement
by the Board of Directors to sell our cinema assets to our competitors for approximately in its performance as evidenced by the reduction in loss from operations from ($634,010)
$4.7 Million, with $3.1 Million having been paid at the close of the transaction and the in 2003 to $(270,872) in 2004.

remaining balance of $1.6 Million scheduled to be paid in equal monthly installments over
We expect this trend to continue as the company has been restructured to improve operating

the forthcoming five years.
efficiencies, and several managerial positions have become redundant.

The rationale for this decision was based upon three factors —
In conjunction with operating and cost efficiencies, the company will continue to improve

Firstly we were being paid a fair market value for the asset, secondly the sale allowed the its revenue stream by focusing and aggressively building its ticketing business, which will
company to immediately strengthen its balance sheet and overall financial position, and _, be modest initially, but is expected to have a greater impact on our net earnings in the near
thirdly it gave the company the flexibility to move ahead with other initiatives which prior future.

to the sale, we were not in a financial position to pursue.
On behalf of the Board of Directors and our employees, we would like to thank you for your

The sale proceeds allowed the company to realize a gain of $2,622,205 on the book continued support.
value of the assets. This gain provided an opportunity for the company to write-off the
remaining balance of goodwill and franchise fee rights of $606,070 associated with the
purchase of the Golds Gym franchise for the Bahamas and seven (7) other territories in the

Caribbean.
Notwithstanding the write off of the goodwill and franchise rights the company was able

to record a net profit of $1,257,286 for the 12-month financial period ending February





29th, 2004. Jerome K. Fitzgerald
Chairman
RND HOLDINGS LIMITED ses RND HOLDINGS LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET : ; CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY
AS AT FEBRUARY 29, 2004 YEAR ENDED FEBRUARY 29, 2004
{Expressed in Bahamian dollars) : "(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)
2004 2003 ae
Aecel> canning: Total
CURRENT ASSETS: te : Share Share Contributed Revaluation (Accumulated Shareholders’
Cash - : $ 1,851,480 $. 17,463 Capital Premium’ Capital Surplus Deficit) "Equity
Accounts receivable 288,676 214,436 i
Current portion of note receivable 240,000 - Balance Gt
4 : : February 28, 2001 $ 88,562 $5,934,987 $3,175,087 $4,443,229 $ 740,605 $14,382,470
Prepayments and deposits 48,970 62,508
irvantony 34,515 59,499 Net loss for the year - - : - - (963,425) . (963,425) .
Other receivables 229,459 183,196
Total current assets 2,693,100 537,102 Balanes.ot ke
PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT 11,107,304 13,181,985 February 28, 2002 88,562 5,934,987 3,175,087 4,443,229 ( 222,820) 13,419,045
NOTE RECEIVABLE 960,000 : 5 Revaluation decrease
INVESTMENT IN ASSOCIATE, AT EQUITY - 111,658 186,658 ony land ond buildings : : 7 LAAs 2291 = (4449229)
~ OTHER ASSETS ie 222,335 172,708 Net loss for the year of - - _ + (2,452,066) (2,452,066)
FRANCHISE RIGHTS : ; . : - 191,176
~ GOODWILL 414,894 Balance at ‘ :
TOTAL ASSETS “$ 15,094,397. $ 14,684,523 _ February 28, 2003 88,562 Sean 3,175,087 ‘ - (2,674,886) | 6,523,750: ©
, fh emcee Net income for the year - RES : - | 1,257,286 1,257,286
UABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY palanes ot eee ae
CURRENT LIABILITIES: February 29,2004 $ 88,562 $5,934,987 $3,175,087 $. - $ (1,417,600): $ 7,781,036
Bank overdrafts $ 256,538 $ 451,633
Accounts payable and accrued expenses 1,990,420 . 1,761,623
Current portion of long-term debt BS “ *- 281,708 263,559
Other liabilities pee 59,627 136,757
Total current liabilities 2,588,293 2,613,572
LONG-TERM DEBT 4,617,657 4,867,059 RND HOLDINGS LIMITED
DUE TO DIRECTORS ee a 107,411 680,142 ToAW CHBES feenGlay Doe
Total liabilities 3 ! 7,313,361 8,160,773 a (Expressed in Bahamian dollars)
SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY: ea el id es a
Share capital 88,562 88,562 CAR : 2004 2003
Share premium 5,934,987 5,934,987 — ;
Contributed capital 3 : 3,175,087 3,175,087 CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
Accumulated deficit : (1,417,600) ( 2,674,886) Net income (loss) $ 1,257,286 $ (2,452,066)
Total shareholders’ equity 7,781,036 6,523,750 "Adjustments for: eee
TOTAL $ 15,094,397 $ 14,684,523 Loss from associate i - 75,000 44,054
We eee a RCE RI: ae REE Se STNG Depreciation 721,078 882,691
Loss on revaluation - 1,232,535
Write-off and amortisation of goodwill 414,894 232,259
Write-off of and amortisation of franchise rights 191,176 29,412
RND HOLDINGS LIMITED Gain on disposal of cinema assets (2,622,205) girdle
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME Operating cash flows before movements in working capital 37,229 (31,115)
YEAR ENDED FEBRUARY 29, 2004 Increase in accounts receivable (74,240) ( 167,366)
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars) Decrease (increase) in prepayments and deposits 13,538 (10,533 )
ee 2004 a me i Ge obs ne ce
CONTINUING OPERATIONS: se Ss : : ; : : : : eg . : f f :
Bee a a ae ee | erate ee
coe pe TBS 0 ASO Net cash flows from operating activities a 106,91 5 286,777
Gross margin 1,331,875 1,280,427 —————
OPERATING EXPENSES: CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING acl IVITIES: .
“Adi ainiciikve 972,730 1,042,572 Purchase of property, plant and equipment (124,192) (276,725) ;
eal Proceeds on disposal of cinema assets 3,100,000 -
pena ea? staat Payment of transaction costs on disposal of cinema assets. (200,000) -
Other operating 269,862 352,009 : i ;
Marketing 8,676 28,409 Investment in other assets (49,627) ( 172,708 }
Tord operiing axeeies 1,602,747 1,914,437 Net cash from (used in} investing activities 2,726,181 (449,433 )
LOSS FROM OPERATIONS (270,872) ( 634,010] CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
Repayment of borrowings (231,253) (216,487 )
OTHER INCOME (EXPENSES): Advances (repayments to) from directors (572,731) 482,998
Glee ete : + 136,228 Net cash (used in) from financing activities ( 803,984) 266,511
Franchise fees - (11,870) iene op ERR Rog cP 2 ig RR cea
Lace Warcecencinis (75,000) (44,054) NET INCREASE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS 2,029,112 (103,855
Finance costs ( 477,998 } ( 471,677}
Goodwill written-off or amortized (414,894) ( 232,259} CASHAND GASH EQUATES:
Franchise rights written-off or amortized (191,176) (29,412) BEGINNING OF YEAR (434,170) (538,025)
Loss on revaluation : (1,232,535) ' :
Loss from continuing operations ( 1,429,940) (2,519,589) END ‘OF YEAR $1,594,942 $ (434,170)
DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS:
Gain on sale of cinema assets 2,622,205 - eee
; Cash $ 1,851,480 $ 17,463
Income from cinema assets 65,021 67,523 :
Gain from discontinued operations Ee 2,687,226 67,523 bank everdrat ogo 256,598) sh A093)

$ 1,594,942 $ (434,170)
NET INCOME (LOSS) $ 1,257,286 $ (2,452,066)



ta











This title basically hits the Caribbean





Style of Architecture and Cuisine



NASSAU:

City Markets Lyford Cay
City Markets Harbour Bay
Super Value Cable Beach

=

we

i

rg

Super Saver Stores
Lowes Pharmacy
United Book Stores
Istand Merchant Stores
News Cafe









Special Price:







FREEPORT:

Winn Dixie Lucaya
Oasis Drugs
L.M.R. Drug







THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

t
t
:

5
sane aa

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FRIDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 25, 2005

[7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

NETWORK CHANNELS

| Week|McLaughli Journal EditorialNOW (N) — [Tucker Carlson:

The Insider (N) [Joan of Arcadia Joan and Will try [JAG Macis sent to negotiatea — [NUMB3RS Don and Charlie investi
a WFOR |n (cc) to help Stevie get something she | hostage release involving naval off- |gate a series of railroad accidents
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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2005, PAGE 11B

Let Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and
his sidekick Derek put.

some smiles on your

kids’s faces.

Bring your children to the
McHappy tlour at McDonald's in
Oaks Field every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the »
month of February 9005.

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun

i'm lovin’ it

"Mi GHTPC UA

Time: Second Floor of ‘
Doors open 11pm

Admission:
$7? w/ Movie Tickets
$15 without

Movie Pass Giveaways!



PAGE 12B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005 THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS
COMICS PAGE



-#

© “copyrighted Material
*.\¢ _ {Syndicated Content

-
» Available from Commercial News Providers”




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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005, PAGE 13B

- TRIBUNE SPORTS

Saints alive!

CLINTON BROWN of Kingsway Academy Saints
dunks against the Crusaders in yesterday’s.action at
the Hugh Campbell Invitational. Saints inflicted the
Crusaders’ second defeat of the tournament.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)





PAGE 14B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005

Knowles




and Nestor

Moirctetn
quarters

& By BRENT
STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter

AFTER two months
and five tournaments,
Mark Knowles and his
Canadian doubles part-
ner Daniel Nestor are
still looking for their first
taste of victory in 2005.

Yesterday at the Dubai
Open, Knowles and
Nestor were ousted in
the quarter-finals, losing
6-4, 6-4 to Martin Damm
and Radek Stepanek.

The duo were the top
seeded team. They easily
won their first round
match, 6-2, 6-2 over
Omar Bahrouzyan and
Younes Elaynaoui.

But they couldn't get it
together in the quarters.

Going into the tourna-
ment, Knowles said he
was still recuperating
from a groin pull he suf-
fered at the Open 13 in
Marseille, France where
they reached their first
final for the year.

Advanced

However, he said he
was feeling okay, despite
the fact that they
advanced to the semifi-
nals at the ABN Amro
World Tennis Tourna-
ment in Rotterdam, the
Netherlands.

But they lost to Suk
and Vizner.

Knowles could not be
reached for comments
yesterday at his hotel
room in ‘Dubai.



| ‘the year in Australia,

‘including the Australian
Open, the first Grand
Slam Tournament.

Knowles and Nestor

are expected to travel to :
«4: the United States this

“week where they will

_ take a break before they ~
|. return to action.

Event

Their neéxtscheduled
events expected to be:
the Pacific Life Open in
Indian Wells, California,
starting on March 7.

_ After that, they will

| move closer to home

where they are scheduled

| to compete in the NAS-

DAQ-100 Open in Mia-
mi, Florida, starting on
March 21.

Knowles and Nestor

' are then expected to take

another break, hopefully
this time to stop over in.
the Bahamas before they
return to the tour and a
run that will lead to the
second Grand slam at the
French Open in Roland
Garros, Paris, France
starting on May 23.

The French Open and
Wimbledon, which fol-
lows in London, England
on June 20, are the only
two Grand Slam titles
that Knowles and Nestor
have not won as a team.

i The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
‘good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. —

t If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

FORMER world heavy-
weight champion Michael ‘Dou-
ble M’ Moorer is excited about
being in the Bahamas for the
first Class Promotion’s Night to
Remember professional boxing
show.

He’s even more ecstatic
about being in the corner of
Bahamian lightweight Meach-
er ‘Pain’ Major tonight when
he takes on a Canadian oppo-
nent at the Radisson Cable
Beach Resort & Casino.

“Meacher has a style of box-
ing. He has a lot of finesse and
skills and speed and talent,”
said Moorer, who along with
trainer Anthony ‘Chills’ Wilson
will be working in his corner in
the co-main event of the
Bahamas light middleweight
title bout between Jerome
‘Bahamian Bronze Bomber’
Elis and Wilson ‘Kid Wonder’
Theophile.

Gym

The trio all train together at
the Warriors Boxing Club in
Fort Lauderdale..And, based
on what he’s saw in the gym,
Moorer said if they can just get
Major to sit down on his punch-
es, his speed and power will

4 enable him to fight a lot better

than he’s doins now.

“I’m sure it’s going to be an
exciting show,” Moorer noted.
“This is their first one for the
year, but they’ve had many in
the past, so they should progress
with every show.”

The 37-year-old 6-foot-2
southpaw, who was born in
Brooklyn, New York, is work-
ing on rebuilding his own career
after he held the WBA and IBF
world titles before losing to
George Foreman in 1994 when
he was knocked out in the 19th la
round. ig

He regained the IBF. title in
1996 over Axel Schulz in Dort-
mund, Germany and defended
it twice before he lost to Evan-
der Holyfield for the second

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Former boxing champion
Moorer in Major’s corner



@ FORMER undisputed world heavyweight champion Michael Moorer (left) shares a moment with Tabernacle coach Norris
Bain; Moorer’s trainer Anthony ‘Chills’ Wilson and Olympic bronze medallist Frank Rutherford. Moorer and Wilson are here
to support Meacher ‘Pain’ Major tonight at the Radisson Cable Beach Resort & Casino.

“I was.bored with the sport. I
was tired of boxing and I just
wanted to take some time off,”
said Moorer, who would go into
a three-year hiatus.

In 2000, he returned to the
sport and has been on a 8-2-1
win-loss-draw stint since. His
latest fight was an eight-round
knockout victory in December.

“A lot of people were
shocked by it. They didn’t
believe that I could do it,” said
Moorer, who is gearing up to
return to the ring in May.

z= Wheil asked if he fees he can
- regain that lofty: position asa
world champion again, Moorer
declared that he’s working on
it, but there’s no timeframe to
accomplish the feat.

“You have to be put in the
right position,” he stressed. “As

long as I keep winning and keep
my name out there, people will
want to see me and demand
that I get a title shot.”

Although he’s even fought in
seven fights, Moorer feels that,
in time, Major will get a shot at
a world title.

Guided

“He has the talent, but he has
to have the will, which I think
he does,” Moorer declared. “It’s




possible. He has to be guided -

right and put in the right
tion.

“So if I can work wit
as far as letting him settle down,
and put more power in his’
punches, he will definitely be a
world champion.”

Wilson, who has worked with

time in 1997.



aureno makes

Bahamian history i



Dominican Republic

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

BAHAMIAN Taureno ‘Reno’ Johnson put
on an historic show Wednesday night at the
Independence Cup Amateur Boxing Tourna-
ment as he upset a Russian opponent.

Johnson’s stunning 3-2 victory in the welter-
weight division was the first by any Bahamian
over a Russian at any international competition.

“First of all, I want to thank God. It was
through him that I was able to accomplish this,”
said Johnson yesterday from his hotel room in
Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.

“To fight the Russian and move on to the
semifinal was a big accomplishment for me. I
fought a Dominican Republican in my first match
and I have another one to go through to get to
the final to fight for the gold medal.”

The 21-year-old seasoned amateur boxer who
has fought in numerous international competi-
tions is the only member of the Bahamas three-
member team still left in the week-long ens
tition.

. pos : e,°e
Competition

Middleweight Daryl Dorsett, 20, was stopped
in the first round of his bout on the first day of
competition by a Russian, while heavyweight
James McKenzie, 28, went the distance before he
lost a close, 3-2 decision to a fighter from the
Dominican Republic.

Johnson, according to team manager George
Turner, was the only boxer to defeat any of the
Russians at the tournament. He said that the
Russians have dominated the match ups with
the Cubans.

Prior to travelling with the team, Johnson had
just returned from Cuba where he spent the past
month and a half training. He credited the expe-
rience to his performance against the Russian.

“He was a very sound, strong, technical and
swift guy,” Johnson reflected. “But for me to
out-fight him, I had to use a lot of wit and tech-
nical manoeuvres. I had to fight a lot with my
heart.

“I had to fight and push a lot. Those were

some of the things that I learned in Cuba.

“He was strong,.but I realised that it wasn’t

about his power.

“But who endured to the end. That was how I
beat him.”

Before he left town with the three-member
Bahamian team last week, a confident Johnson
said he was going after the most improved fight-
er award and it didn’t matter who he had to go
through to achieve the feat.

“It’s not a coincidence, but it is my aim and
goal to win the award and I’m sitting good for the
best boxer of the tournament, so I’m not going to
allow anything to deter me from that goal,” John-
son insisted.

Action

“T’m going to go out there and fight my hard-
est. I’m sure that, if I put everything that I learndd
into action, I will be successful.”

The way he’s fought so far in the tournament,
Turner said he’s just as convinced that Johnson
have the ability to come out as the champion. *

And he couldn’t stop singing the praises of:
Johnson’s triumph. ¢

“I think it’s a great accomplishment. I think ;'
that it’s a positive step forward for us towards the +
2008 Olympics,” Turner stressed. 3

“I think Reno is very, very focussed. The oth-’
er boxers are also very focussed, but against the’
Russians, we have never seen a performance
like this. I think it was only because it was Reno,
Only Reno could have performed the way he’.
did.” ®
Turner, the federation’s secretary, said’the:
training sessions in Cuba ‘have certainly paid off
and they hope that the Ministry of Youth, Sport§
and Culture will see the need to further facilitate
the programme when Johnson returns from the
Dominican Republic. *

Also accompanying the team are federatida
president Wellington Miller, head coach Andre
Seymour, assistant coach Leonard ‘Boston Black:
ie’ Miller, team doctor Francis Saunders and ref:
eree/judge Alvin Sergeant. ;

Sergeant, who was also impressed with John-::
son, said he’s been just as busy as the boxers, hav-'+
ing to both judge and referee a number of match-:
es from day one.



Moorer since they were ama-
teurs, said he’s also looking for
some great things from Major in
the. future.

But, for now, he’s just con-
cerned about watching him take
care of his opponent tonight.

“T want him to dedicate the
fight because he’s working up
to fight six rounds now,” Wilson
stressed. “He just have to take
his time, see what the man
brings to him and then he can

- go to work.

“He’s a good fighter. He can
put his combinations togeth Sf,
So if he takes control ei the:
fight, he will come out on’ top.”
He just has to stay active.”

. While this is all about busi-
ness, he’s brought along his
fiancé, Debbie Haskell, and his
daughter, Morgan Moorer, to
help him enjoy his trip here.

Moorer was greeted and wel-
comed to the Bahamas by
Olympic bronze medallist Frank
Rutherford and Tabernacle
Baptist Falcons’ coach Norris
Bain.



“It’s a testament to how won-
derful the Bahamas is,” said
Rutherford, who is here along
with Baltimore Raven’s wide
receiver Devard Darling to
watch the prestigious Hugh
Campbell Basketball Classic.

“We attract a lot of people
like Michael Moorer and his
trainer. So it’s good to see this
calibre of people who come to
our country. Hopefully we can
see more of these current or ex-
champions come to endorse the
programme by Ray and
Michelle Minus.”

Atid Bain, who will attempt
to become the most successful
coach in the Hugh Campbell
Tournament, couldn’t agree’
more.

“It’s a great experience to
meet someone who has been on
top of the world in Michael
Moorer,” Bain stated. “This
says alot about our country.
We just have to make sure that
we can treat them with the kind
of hospitality that this great
country is known for.”

7) | Roger Federer

advances in
Dubai Open

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com MIAMI HERALD SPORTS







& By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

FIVE teams were sent packing ‘early
Thursday morning, with questions sur-
rounding two top teams from Freeport,
Grand Bahama.

Temple Christian Suns, Galilee Mira-
cles, CC Sweeting Cobras, Nassau Chris-
tian Academy and Alpha and Omega
were all eliminated from the Hugh Camp-
bell tournament yesterday, with the Sun-
land Baptist Stingers and Eight Mile Re
BlueJays struggling.

The Suns, Miracles, Cobras and Cru
saders all collected their second loss of
the tournament, after turning in some of
the lowest scores in the Invitational so:
far.

Forcing these teams to watch from the:
stands were CI Gibson, RM Bailey,
Kingsway Saints and Doris J ohnson Mar.

Verge

The Omegas were the first Freeport
team to pack it up and head back Grand. |
Bahama, with Freeport Anglican High
lying on the verge of elimination. ~

However, the game between the Mar:
lins and the Cobras was a real dog figh
with the.Cobras trying to stay alive.

Cobras had a steaming first quarter ‘and
kept the Marlins in sight.

This was the same case in the. see
and third quarters, but in the final -four
minutes of the game the Cobras seemed -
to have lost the push they had earlier. =-:-

More teams are expected to. leave the
tournament today.

The question of ineligibility has beak.
lurking around the tournament from
before the opening tip.

Players

Teams will be penalised for allowing
players who weren’t cleared from the Invi-
tational’s committee to play. :

On the opening day, defending cham- :
pions CI Gibson Rattlers defeated the St
Annes Bluewaves, but lost the game after
they allowed Terrance Brown to play. |.

This was the same case for the Marlins,
who played on the second day of the tour-
nament.

Marlins defeated the Faith Temple’
Warriors and were expecting to move on
to play the Aquinas Aces.

However, the Warriors advanced to the
play the Aces, where they tasted defeat

Both the Rattlers and Marlins wi
forced to the left side of the tournameit
chart, having to fight their way out of an.
intense battle.

Stingers, who are playing out of Beak
IV, faced off with Abaco Marlins, finally
defeating them 46-25, while the BlueJays
took on the number one team from
Freeport, Tabernacle Falcons. = 2s

Falcons destroyed the BlueJays, defeat-
ing them 43-25.



ee ! / a 7 Tages |
@ MYSTIC MARLINS on their. way: oe Bsrotpesaisinans
to eliminating the CC Sweeting: a 7 a a ae —./

Cobras yesterday. .

(Photo: Felipé Majar/

Tribune staffy





Section
Missing
or
Unavailable



Full Text
“mn Lhe Tribune



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Volume: 101 No.79



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MOSTLY
CLOUDY

Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005





.



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vO Weim Csi LaKe Mana







Girls died as result
of ‘accident with —
contribution of neglect’



@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Tribune"

THE DEATHS of the two
residents of the Williemae Pratt
Centre for Girls, who died in a
fire in 2003, were the result of
an “accident with contribution
of neglect”, the Coroner’s Court
ruled yesterday. |

Although satisfied with the
verdict, the mothers of the two
girls said they now hope to
explore other legal avenues to
bring justice to those they
believe to be responsible for the
deaths of their children.

_The seven-member jury

returned after a two-hour delib-
eration period to give their
unanimous verdict in the
inquest into the deaths of 16-
year-olds Anastacia Alexander
and Deshawn Ingraham, who
on October 24, 2003 were res-
cued from a blaze in the dorms
of the rehabilitative centre, but
later died as.a result of their
burns. .

A third girl, Shantia Minus,
was left seriously injured.

In the past year the court
heard testimony that suggested
that the fire was deliberately set
by a resident of dormitory as
part of an elaborate escape plot.

The Acting Assistant Super-
intendent at the facility also tes-
tified that there was a break-

down in safety at the Williemae ..

Pratt Centre.

The verdict handed down
yesterday expressed the jurors’
‘view that although the deaths
of the two girls were acciden-
;tal in nature, they were con-

{
|
!
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Betsy Rodriquez
St. Johns Shipping
Ware House #4
1800 S.E. 19th Ave.

Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316
Phone: 1 (954) 527-0034
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SEUP BABAMIAN

tributed to by the failure to

-unlock the dorm room doors in

time to save the victims’ lives.

‘Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday after the ruling,
Anastacia’s mother, Phyllis
Bowe, said that although she is
satisfied with the outcome of
the inquest, she is convinced
that the fire was set deliberate-
ly by someone other than the
girls, =
_ “Two children were mur-
dered and J can only hope that
the demons who killed them
will suffer the same fate of
being locked up in a cell and
put fire to,” she said.

Deshawn’s step-mother,
Juanita Ingraham, agreed with
Mrs Bowe in her belief that the
fire was a deliberate act.

During the inquest, which
began in January 2004, the court
heard testimony from 38 wit-
nesses, including employees of
the rehabilitative facility and
residents who survived the fire.

A 15-year-old inmate of the
centre said that before the blaze
in the dorm, Anastacia had told
a fellow resident that she
planned to light a fire as part
of an escape plan.

A second girl, who escaped
from the Williemae Pratt Cen-
tre before the fatal blaze, admit-
ted to being part of a four-per-
son escape team.

Police fire investigators fur-
ther testified that their findings
showed that the fire was started
deliberately.

The court was also told that

SEE page 11



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Fax: (242) 328-0847

Tel: (242) 351-1501















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SUVS SCTITIEOMHNLDITITEAT tas

are contributing to crime

By KILAH ROLLE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A CRUMBLING values
system in Bahamian society is
contributing to the breeding
of criminals, said community
relations expert and police
spokesman Hulan Hanna yes-
terday.

After serving for more than
20 years with the Royal
Bahamas Police Force and
counselling families as an
associate pastor of his church,
Supt Hanna said he has wit-
nessed a degeneration of the
values system, specifically in
Bahamian males.



"Creating or breeding
young boys who are prone to
violence does not happen in
isolation," said Mr Hanna,
"young boys are influenced
by persons who they live with
and mimic these behaviours
because they see no positive
alternative presented before
them."

Mr Hanna said that the
most positive influence a
young male could have is a
father, or father figure, who
has a strong sense of morals
and values.

The problem, he said, is

SEE page 11



— re

Th A f=



ie aay, - ey
= GOT




ING C

Teachers taught Creole
to help communicate
with Haitian students

TEACHERS and adminis-

trators at the Carmichael Pri-,

mary School are being taught
Creole to help them communi-
cate better with Haitian stu-
dents.

‘In an interview with The Tri-
bune yesterday, principal of the
school Albert Clarke, said the
teaching of the Creole language
to the staff will help to “catapult
our school from the academic
level that it now stands at into a
new educational paradigm.”

“When we take a holistic
view of this we recognise that as











N TOOLS
S BROOMS
ITER SYSTEMS

JAIN

teachers there was something
that needed to be done to assist
them, so that our teachers can
facilitate the needs of our Cre-
ole speaking population,” he
said.

Between 30 to 40 per cent of
the students at the school are
of Haitian decent, the principal
said.

Mr Clarke emphasised some
of the advantages of knowing
the Creole language within the
school’s context. ,

SEE page 11
PAGE 2, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005 THE TRIBUNE



Forum aims to create framework

for public/private collabor;

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

PRIME Minister Perry Christie
and Education Minister Alfred
Sears together with a number of
private sector representatives yes-
terday launched a forum called
“Optimism and Opportunity: A
presentation of Dialogue on Pub-
lic-Private Partnership.”

The forum is the inaugural
event of the Education and Train-
ing for Competitiveness (ETC)
programme and is:sponsored by
the Inter-American Development
Bank (IADB). It is hosted by IBM
Bahamas Ltd and the Ministry of
Education.

The one day intensive interac-
tive forum held at the British
Colonial Hilton allowed partici-

. pants an opportunity to create a

sustainable framework for: pub-
lic/private collaboration.

Mr Sears said: “The purpose of
the forum is to promote the part-
nering of the private sector and

the government in improving the

workforce development compo-
nent of secondary and post-sec-
ondary education in the Bahamas.

Skills
“We are challenged by the
forces of regional and global mar-
ket integration to improve basic
work skills among secondary

school graduates, to address skill
shortage in the industry and ser-

_ Vice sectors and to generate new

opportunities for innovative busi-
ness service... therefore today’s
activities are designed to bring us
to the table to explore ways in
which our partnership can work.”

In his key remarks, Mr Christie

- said the continuing challenge for

the country will be training of its
citizens. He noted that the




On

lm PRIME Minister Perry Christie

erated for the development of our
country means certain entitlement
of sharing. Therefore the empha-
sis we place on education, and the
‘emphasis on training must be
based on the foundation and
understanding of the develop-
mental needs of our country.”

Mr Christie said another chal-.

lenge involved is that although the
country brings in consultants from
aboard, there are no mechanisms
in place to determine whether the
country is implementing the rec-
ommendations in the way it should
and in a timely fashion.

“So as a result we even mea-
sure our success incorrectly.”

Mr Christie added that the best
way to measure the success is by
government creating partnerships
with the public and civil sectors.
He said that was why he was so

adamant at the beginning of his
administration in naming com-
mittees of persons from various
fields of life. He said unless gov-
ernment taps into the resources
of the private sector, there
becomes a culture of intellectual
lethargy which is unacceptable.

He said that the answer is “con-
stant sustainable application
training,” for both men and
women.

The Inter-American Develop- ©
ment Bank has provided the coun-
try with technical and financial
assistance, to facilitate the devel-
opment of the Education. and
Training for Competitiveness
which includes four areas of train-
ing: Early childhood, special edu-
cation, information management
and technical, and vocational edu-
cation training.



major developments, including the ,
Kerzner expansion, a project in e 6
Abaco, and the tedevelopment of
Cable Beach.- all of which will ¢ if
_ that as much as possible the labour e e (
force used i is Bahamian. ; ety? . ;

Sera cunts, TAA MOTORS LUCERO
also faces the challenge of being an
archipelagic nation.

) : ee )
cratic: MIOL AMOR RNIN ANTICOND
oping a more wholesome :

approach to societal development ;
must take into account the fact ' ,
Mf By RUPERT MISSICK Jr

Bahamas is poised for a number of sean ;
require a large labour force. He
said the challenge will be to ensure |
“Any strategy to do with
empowering people, educating
that we are an archipelagic nation.
The revenue of the country gen- Senior Staff Reporter

GOVERNMENT’S decision to grant national licences to
three radio stations was a part of its agenda to create increased
competition in one of the country’s growing industries, Tourism
Minister Obie Wilchcombe told The Tribune yesterday.

In 2004 the minister approved first time national licences to

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PHONE: 322-2157

Splash FM broadcasting out of Eleuthera, Carter Marketing’s
Island FM and Cool 96 in Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Government is also considering awarding the first non-com-
mercial FM broadcast licence to the College of the Bahamas.

In addition the governement will be considering granting
non-commercial broadcasting licences to other non-profit organ-
isations and educational institutions.

‘Interest has also been expressed by some entities for obtain-
ing commercial television licences. There are two applications
before government at this time.

Mr Wilchcombe told The Tribune yesterday that he is not
overly concerned about the private market damaging the busi-
ness of ZNS.

“We are thinking of restructuring the role of ZNS. When the
previous government opened up the market it did not consider
the role of ZNS in a private broadcasting era,” said Mr Wilch-
combe.

Currently ZNS is subsidised by the government and Mr
Wilchcombe said that it is necessary to mandate it with a more
national agenda.

“We are interested in ZNS becoming more involved in the
proliferation of national issues, culture and things like that,” said
Mr Wilchcombe.



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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005, PAGE 3



Bahamians

PION

prosecutors

SOUTH ET

A CARIBBEAN Pros-
ecutors Association could
soon be a reality follow-
ing a two-day seminar in
Barbados of regional
Directors of Public Prose-
cutions and senior prose-
cutors, at which the
Bahamas was represented
by Ms Cheryl Bethel and
Ms Valeria Pyfrom of the
Department of Public
Prosecutions.

This was the recom-
mendation of the nearly
thirty lawyers who repre-
sented thirteen
Caribbean countries. At
their final session they
unanimously agreed that
they would set up the
association, probably

| under the aegis of the
International Prosecu-
tors’ Association.

The seminar was con-
ducted by a team of facili-
tators headed by Anesta
Weekes QC, chair of the
UK Caribbean Jurists’
Group, and included Sir
David Calvert-Smith,
immediate past DPP of
England and Wales, '
Steve Gwilliam head of
the anti corruption divi-
sion at the Metropolitan
Police, Judge Michael
Lawson QC, Robert Dry-
brough-Smith, Crown
Prosecution Service, and
Deborah Mansfield Law
Society.

Appointed

Also addressing the
seminar were Barbados’
Chief Justice, Sir David
Simmons and Justice
Adrian Saunders, Acting
Chief Justice of the
Organisation of Eastern

Caribbean States. Justice |. |:

| Saunders was tecéntly
‘appointed as a Justice of.
the Caribbean Court of
Justice.

Matters discussed
included the indepen-
dence of the prosecutor,
handling of vulnerable
witnesses, investigation
and prosecution of cor-
ruption and sharing of
expertise within the
region as a whole. There
was also widespread
agreement that, despite
differences in size,
resources and proce-
dures, there is still com-
mon ground on judicial
matters among the
regional states as well as
with England and Wales.
Barbados’ Director of
Public Prosecutions,
Charles Leacock, brought
the Caribbean perspec-
tive in his address on
removing barriers to
prosecutions in the
region.

A particularly valuable
achievement was the invi-
tation by the facilitators
to the prosecutors to.be
more pro-active in attack-
ing corruption both in
police services and in ,
government service.

The seminar was organ-
ised by the UK

Caribbean Jurists’ Group .

in collaboration with the
British High Commission
in Barbados.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are

| making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Police officer claims murder accused
confessed to hitting driver with rock

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - Murder
accused Jonathan Nathan
Davis confessed to hitting taxi-
cab driver Robert Nelson Pratt
in the head twice with a large
rock, a police officer'told the
Supreme Court on Wednes-
day.

Set Robert Lloyd, who inter-
viewed the accused on Sep-
tember 2, 2000 at CID on Peel

Street, said Davis told him that.

he did not mean to kill the
taxicab driver and that he was
only trying to protect himself.

The body of Robert Pratt
was discovered on the road-
side at Illyria Road and Aerial
Place in the Arden Forest area
on September 1, 2000. Pratt’s
skull had been fractured and
there were other multiple
injuries to his body.

Davis, who allegedly caught

Trial continues
in Grand Bahama

a ride with the taxi driver on
September 1, is on trial in the
Supreme Court for his mur-
der. Lawyers Simeon Brown
and Sheandea Cooper are
defending him.

Jury

Justice Jon Isaacs presides |
over the trial, which is before

an eight-woman, four-man
jury. Prosecutor Joyann Fer-
guson-Pratt is appearing on
behalf of the Crown.

Sgt Lloyd told the court that.
Davis was cautioned before

the interview and signed the
caution, which was written on

the police interview form.

Prosecutor Ferguson sub-
mitted the written police inter-
view form as evidence to the
court.

According to the evidence,
Davis was employed as a bell-
man at the Country Club at

Bahamia (Royal Oasis Resort): i

from May 1992.

He went to work around
7pm on August 31, 2000. He
got off around 2.30am and
walked over to Ruby Swiss,
where he stayed for about two
hours.

Sgt Lloyd said Davis told

him that he drank quite afew...
Kalik (beers) but could not.’



unionisation’

@ By PACO NUNEZ
__ Tribune Staff Reporter

vote held yesterday.

SUPE iia workers have ten union
advances and decided to continue managing
their own affairs, according to the results of a

“Today they have decided to continue man-

aging | their own affairs without any outside

help," he said.

According to Union President Elgin Dou-
alas, workers have been intimidated by man-
agement in the past, including during the

period leading up to the vote.

The president of the Commercial Stores,
Supermarkets and Warehouse Workers

Union, alleged that employees were intimi-
dated and that ballots were tampered with,
however monitors say there was no evidence

of irregularities.

According to a ZNS report, the unofficial
final vote was 274 against unionisation and 50

in support of it.

The report said that around 90 per cent of
Super Value came out to vote.

the decision brought management and work-

-ers closer together.

“This will enable us to serve the public
even better. This year, the Super Value fam-
ily will be celebrating its 40th anniversary,
and the staff have managed their own affairs

all of this time.

Artet chk
hry abliets

de mand

he return

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

Rights

“Workers had to be intimidated, it might
have been a small amount, it might be a large

amount, but if you have to be intimidated to

said.

seek your rights if you’re in a democratic
country, that is my concern,” Mr Douglas

Mr Douglas said he would continue

his attempts to represent Super Value work-
_ Super Value President Rupert Roberts said ers.

Labour inspector Ernest Burrows, who

" oversaw the vote, said he found no evidence

of tampering by management.

“Both union and the employer was allowed
to oversee the polls, and at this time we have
no irregularities that I see happening at this
poll,” he said.





LA CASITA

The Art of Island Living

Off

Clothing

[BLOW OUT



Te Ata LTR em eam ALCL
© P.O. Box N-7771 © Tel: 242-356-7302
© email: ariana@batelnet.bs



went’
direction to some bushes. He _,



JONATHAN
NATHAN DAVIS

remember how many he had :
- had.

«Davis later caught a ride to

Les. Fountain, where he played =



hours before leaving.

He told Sgt Lloyd that he

met Robert Pratt standing out-

- side.‘He said he knew Pratt

Super Value staff :

because sometime ago he had
lived with the deceased and
his mother at Mayfield Park
for a period of six months
Davis said he got into the
front passenger seat of taxicab

- 112. He told Pratt to take him
hometg Windsor on the Mall.
; ld police that.Pratt

Istead in an easterly

said he was really drunk.

The'taxi driver, he said;

reached over and touched him

. on the shoulder and he

knocked his hand away. The

|. man reached over again and
â„¢ touched'his leg.

He knocked his hand away
again, he told the interview-
ing officer.

Sgt Lloyd said Davis then
told him that Pratt then said
“Jet’s get this over.”

Davis said he punched the

TeEMMY LEE JDRES

cab driver in the face and they
fought for about 10 minutes in
the van. Pratt, he said, then
started looking under the dri-
ver’s seat. He then got out of
the van and went to the other
side of the vehicle and pushed
Pratt away.

Davis told police that Pratt
fell to the ground. He kicked
him and then picked up a large
rock and hit him twice in the
head.

Davis told police that Pratt
begged him to stop hitting him.
He then dropped the rock and
walked away until he made his
way to Sunrise Highway and
caught a ride home.

Apartment

According to Sgt Lloyd,
Davis said he put the clothes
he was wearing, a pair of kha-

_kipants and red‘pullover shirt,

in a plastic bag, which he threw
in the garbage at the apart-

- ment complex where he lived.

He told police that the
deceased was wearing black
pants and a shirt.

Davis told Sgt Lloyd that he
had heard talk around the
hotel that the deceased was a
homosexual.

‘Sgt Lloyd said that during
an interview he asked Davis if .
he was a homosexual. He said
the accused. replied, “No, sir,

100 per cent man.”

“At some point during the
interview, Sgt Lloyd said they

“had stopped the interview to

allow Davis to speak with
his supervisor Tyrone

Thurston. -

He said Davis told Mr
Thurston that he hit the cab
driver in the head with a rock |
and they prayed.

After Sgt Lloyd’s testimo-
ny, the jury visited the murder
scene.

Simeon Brown and. the
accused, were also present.
The trial continues on Thurs-
day with the final witness by
the Progen:

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005

eee eee ee
EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published ee to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama ~

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352



Frustrations in dealing with government

MONTAGU MP Brent Symonette, des- —

perate to find an adequate word to describe his
frustration, looked as though he was going to
pull the last tuft of hair from the top of his
head in the House of Assembly on Wednes-
da

Mie Symonette, who was the Minister
responsible for Gaming during the FNM
administration, was debating a Bill for an Act
to amend the Casino Taxation Act.

Unable to find a word — or maybe it was a
parliamentary word he was looking for — to
adequately describe what dealing with the
Gaming Board was like — settled for the only
word that would get past the Speaker — “frus-
tration!”

“It was frustrating; frustrating is being
polite,” he informed the House.

Mr Symonette was describing how slow the
Board was to act on requests, leaving the casi-
nos in the Bahames lagging behind their com-
petitors overseas.

At the time, said Mr Symonette, “Caribbean
Stud was the hot new game. By the time we
were able to get that through the machina-
tions of the Gaming Board, Caribbean Stud
was as old as Henry the Eighth.”

At that time, he said, “even a man or
woman who came to fix the ATM — auto-
matic teller machine — on the casino floor
had to be approved by the Gaming Board.
They had to have a police certificate, a birth
certificate, and whatever other certificate, to
send it in just to go on the casino floor to fix
the machine that hands out the money the
tourists gamble with.”

'. He said he appreciated security issues, and ~

» the need for checks, but “we have to‘make cer-
~tain that our action is swift.”""

Swift action — these are the operative words
— ingredients lacking in most government

. departments.

Here we hasten to say that although the
snail’s pace is the general rule in the civil ser-
vice, slackness and slowness does not apply to

_all civil servants. There are those — the shin-
ing examples — who will take the time to
assist, will call back with information and do
their best to be “swift” and efficient. They
understand that time is important, not to be

_ wasted with humbug, while they spin people
around in circles and send them away tear-
ing their hair like Mr Symonette— in com-
plete frustration.

This was the state Mr Bruce Raine was left
in after dealing with a government vet at the
Ministry of Agriculture while trying to get a
neglected horse to a new home in the United
States this week. It was fortunate for the vet
that he came through at the last minute with
permission for the horse to travel, for, said
Mr Raine,“I would have delivered him (the

_ horse) first thing in the morning to the garden

DON STAINTON

of Agriculture Minister Alfred Gray, who lives
around the corner from me on Culbert’s Hill.”

Readers would have see the story of Flash,
the horse, in Wednesday’s Tribune and read of
the many hurdles Mr Raine had to jump to get
him on a plane already scheduled to take two
other horses to the US. Flash was catching a
ride. Flash, originally from Harbour Island,
had lived a “dog’s life”, and, until rescued,
was under nourished and badly treated. He
was rescued and brought to Nassau, but could
not get the medical care he needed. A home
was found for him in Virginia.

Although Flash had been abandoned, the

‘vet required that the owner be found. Some-
one flew to Harbour Island, found the owner
and purchased the horse. The bill of sale was
faxed to the Ministry of Agriculture on Sun-
day, and the vet informed.

However, the vet was taken with what he
described.in his best Jamaican accent as a
“terrible pain”. He was unable to go to his
office on Monday. The horse was to fly early
Tuesday morning..

The vet said there was no one else who
could certify Flash’s condition in his absence.
Mr Raine was then told that neither the vet,
nor the Ministry’s deputy director who was
also contacted, had any way to verify that the
bill of sale was genuine.

Mr Raine telephoned the island Adminis-
trator, asked him to contact the two signatories
to the bill of sale and verify its legality to the
Ministry. The Administrator acted swiftly, Mr
Raine rushed to the Ministry just before it
was about to close Monday afternoon, only to

"be told that oily atvet could give’a’ certification,
and ‘thé ‘Ministry’s ‘vet was: away with his °°"

: “pain”. PUMEEBES ber SLB

Another vet was called, who told Mr Raine
that Flash should have been put down long
ago. He declined to help.

By then it was too late to do anything. Mr
Raine returned home determined to deliver
Flash to Mr Gray, when a miracle cured the
Ministry’s vet, who phoned at 9 o’clock Mon-
day night to inform Mr Raine that:-the horse’s
documents could be collected from the
Humane Society at 8 o’clock the next morning,
just in time to catch the plane to Virginia.

Going through one of the late Sir Etienne
Dupuch’s files a few nights ago, we came
across a letter from the late Mrs Keith Gon-
salves, whose husband, with Wallace Groves

headed the Grand Bahama Port Authority.

Mrs Gonsalves spent’ most of her adult life in

Grand Bahama. In her note to Sir Etienne -
she quipped: “At last I have my residence sta-.

tus with the right to work — at the age of
82!”

This is the frustrating pace at which business
is done by government departments in the
Bahamas.

»does not matter h





THE TRIBUNE

‘Tt’s better in
the Bahamas - if
you're a foreigner’

EDITOR, The Tribune.

IN THE ideal world of a
Bahamian we are taught to be
patriotic; “love your country”
they say, buy Bahamian, and
support your own. After high
school it is expected that you
would attend college and/or uni-

versity, or its equivalent. After |

attaining your degree, you are
expected to return home, and
make a great contribution to

. the Bahamian society. To show

those who are younger, and
thought it impossible, that if you
did it, so can they. There is
always someone out there will-
ing to help you succeed. Now
you are back home, well quali-
fied in your area of study, jobs
you apply for you get, and you

- climb your way in a short time

to the top. You are great in your
area, ambitious, and successful;
making a huge salary, let’s say
$80,000 a year. Life is great, you
live comfortably, and you give
back to your community. Why?
Because you are Bahamian, you
love your country and your
country loves you.

As I said earlier, this is ideal.
Young people today are very
disheartened, disappointed, dis-
couraged, regret and hate that
they have returned home. Why
you may wonder? Simply
because The Bahamas does not
want you. You go to university,
better yourselves so that you
can improve your standard of
living; you give up job offers in

. the United States for large sums

of money, say, $90,000-$100,000
or maybe even more because
you want to come back home.
Home is-where the heart is.
What is happening is, it really
ow, gegpeater

how

ve
overseas, because’ in ie: end
your country does not appreci-
ate you or compensate you for
what you are worth. Why you




you. ibe, ome,.0



. may ask again?. I'll tell you

why, because “You are not a
foreigner.” Sad to say but it is
true. How many qualified
Bahamians do we have out
there still making $30,000 a
year, or less, and are qualified to
make so much more? To show

‘their appreciation for your

accomplishments and your
knowledge, here is what hap-
pens — foreigners are allowed
to come into The Bahamas, be
it for the government or the pri-
vate sector and are paid
$30,000/month, or ten times
what an equally qualified
Bahamian would be paid; and
exactly what are they being paid
to do? “Nothing”. Most of them
are not even qualified to do






OAM

letters@tribunemedia.net

their jobs, but the government
keeps them here anyway.

- What are the benefits of
being a foreigner? Let’s see. In
banking, for example, you are
given a car, a house to live in,
salary of approximately
$100,000 per annum, paid fam-
ily vacations, their children’s
education paid for at the top
private schools, and paid utili-

ties. What does the Bahamian.

qualified to do the same job get;
$40,000/annum, if that, a mort-
gage, car payments, and loans to
pay back for getting a degree
that in the end serves no pur-
pose since it will not be recog-
nised at home. Banking is just
one example in the private sec-
tor, however, we see this hap-
pening in the Government sec-
tor as well — Ministry of
Works, Ministry of Health, and
Ministry of Labour and Immi-

fix the roads, they give millions
of dollars away to foreign com-
panies who either go bankrupt,
or do a lousy job in the end, or
the jobs are left undone much
like the road at the traffic light
by Lake Cunningham; and
when these companies mess up,
Then the Bahamians are called
in to “finish up” and “fix” the
job, for chicken feed. When is it
going to end?

It is amazing that the govern-
ment always cries out that they
never have the money to do
anything, but they always seem
to find the monies to pay out
of the country. However, they
still expect us as Bahamians to
“shop at home” and “keep the
money at home’. How can they
expect us as a people to do so
when they never do it them-
selves? ’

So, actually the saying that
“Tt’s better in The Bahamas” is
indeed true but only if you area
foreigner, because if you are a
Bahamian you can forget it.

CONCERNED

CITIZEN

gration. The government con-
February 23, 2005.

tinuously recruits foreigners to -

Liberal immigration policy
needed in financial scene

EDITOR, The Tribune.

INCREDIBLY those who suggest they lead our Financial
Services sector who travel all over the globe are totally
blind to the global business they are practising in.

Visit any financial house in New York - London - Switzer-

_Jand Jersey Leichenstein - Bermuda - BVI - Cayman and

Turks.and Caicos youwill hear many foteign languages and.

' 18ee. various; nationalities working together in‘ the global’

financial markets no-one will argue, I hope, that’s the busi-"
ness.

‘It is naive that we suiepest that we need a restrictive Immi-
gration policy within the Financial sector or even within
the Legal sector as when it comes to global financial matters
we need a highly qualified group of experts working. with
locals to cause The Bahamas to be qualified as a global
leader.

No-one is negatively commenting on those Bahamians
who are qualified but are we qualified to give the
comfort the managers of substantial private holdings and
equity holdings who may wish to domicile global assets in
Nassau?

Disagreement and comments from politicians and some
private sector personalities simply are pure shortsighted
nationalism and I have still to find where in a single case of
nationalism put a dime in anyone’s hands.

If The Bahamas wants to be an accredited player in the
new global financial scene we must have.a liberal Immigra-
tion policy — not the door thrown wide open but a policy
that will cause The Bahamas to expand the potential harvest
that is there for us to take or lose.

A restrictive policy will simply cast a dark cloud over our
financial sector and job creation — is that what we wish?

H HUMES)
- Nassau
February 2, 2005.



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_ THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Minister suggests joint resolution
to decide on gambling referendum

@ By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter

GOVERNMENT and opposi-
tion MPs should work together
to decide whether a national ref-
erendum will be held on the ques-

‘tion of legalising gambling in the
Bahamas, according to Minister
of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe.

Mr Wilchcombe suggested a

joint resolution led by govern-
‘ment MPs and FNM whip Brent
‘Symonette, who raised the issue
of a referendum in the House of
‘Assembly on Wednesday.

‘Deliberation

“Maybe we ought to break new
ground in this place and consider
the function of a joint resolution
led by him of his side, and mem-
.bers of our side, and after delib-
eration, to move for what he sug-
gests: a referendum to determine
where we go so far as lotteries in
-the Bahamas,” Mr Wilchcombe
said.

Mr Wilchcombe’s suggestion
came after several MPs raised the
issue of gambling legalisation dur-
ing the debate on an amendment

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SG are

to the Casino Taxation Act.

Kennedy MP and Gaming
Board Chairman Kenyatta Gib-
son suggested that the govern-
ment look into the creation of a
national lottery, and Cat Island
MP Philip Davis pointed out that
if gambling was legal, a support
network for persons addicted to
gambling could be implemented.

Mr Symonette, who is the MP
for Montague, said a referendum
would remove the “political
whip” from the question of gam-
bling legalisation.

CEA
SIM LIATIIE

THE Port of Palm Beach
District and The World Trade.
Centre Palm Beach will
embark on its first Caribbean
Trade Mission with a fifteen-
member delegation visiting
the Bahamas over a two-day
period from March 2-3.

Port of Palm Beach District
Commissioner Mr Wayne M
Richards will lead the list of
prominent participants from
South Florida. Other elected
officials expected to partici-
pate include Palm Beach
County Commission Chair-
man Mr Tony. Masilotti and
Belle Glade Mayor, Mr Steve
Wilson.

On Wednesday, March 2,
the delegates will host a
breakfast reception in the
Governor’s A Room at the
British Colonial Hotel, down-
town Nassau beginning at
8am. The purpose of the
reception is to promote dia-
logue on ways to support and
increase trade and relations
between the Port of Palm
Beach, Florida and the
Bahamas.

The Deputy Chief of Mis-
sion.at the United States
Embassy, Mr Robert Wita-
jewski, along with represen-
tatives from the Bahamas
Ministry of Trade and Indus-
try, Ministry of Financial Ser-
vices and Investments and the

| Ministry of Tourism will
attend the breakfast and give
brief remarks.

The delegates will travel to
Grand Bahama on Thursday,
March 3, to meet with
Bahamian government offi-
cials as well as representatives
from the Grand Bahama Port
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- than playing political football with

. said parliamentarians need to be

“Let us allow the voting public
to decide in a secret ballot rather

the question of gambling,” he
said.

According to Mr Symonette,
who pointed out that he himself
does not gamble, a referendum
on the issue is appropriate,
because of the great number of
Bahamians who already engage
in illegal gambling.

IHegal

Mr Symonette stressed that he —
was not attempting to offend the
Christian community or Christ-
ian Council by his comments, but

“realists” and acknowledge the
extent to which illegal gambling is
a part of Bahamian life.

“We are having a double stan-
dard, and it is this double stan-
dard which we must bring to an

end. Either regulate and legalise it
or enforce the law,” he said.
Mr Symonette said that in

“Maybe we ought to break _
new ground in this place and
consider the function of a joint
resolution led by him of his side,
and members of our side, and
after deliberation, to move for
what he suggests: a referendum
to determine where we go so far *:
as lotteries in the Bahamas.”

‘proposing a referendum on the
issue, he was not reflecting the
position of the FNM party, but

ions.





expressing his own personal opin-

According to Cat Island MP

Philip Davis the legalisation of
gambling would be a positive
step, as it would bring with itreg- said.

ulations to address the negative
effects associated with illegal

gaming.

“Mothers are losing the gro-
cery money for their children,
men are gambling and losing the
money for their rent for their

. apartments, or for their mortgage
money, and they’re doing this
under the cover of what I call the
informal gaming industry,” said
Mr Davis.

He said that if, however, gam-
bling were “formalised” and reg-
ulated, Bahamians would be
forced to be “more respansible
in their behaviour because there
is something they have to answer

or for example - that

help i is there for them, or coun-
seling.”

“As long as we have the
informal sector of gambling,
we will continue to have
these problems that tear a lot
of our social fabric,” Mr Davis

Call for private school security network

@ By KILAH ROLLE
Tribune Staff Reporter

INCREASING safety in Bahamian pub-

| lic schools will only come after the gov-

ernment relinquishes responsibility for

security and allows:room for a restruc-

tured private school security network, a

senior Grand Bahama security officer has
insisted.

Deputy Director of the Grand Bahama
Security Department Stephen Plakaris told
The Tribune yesterday that his depart-
ment has not been given the respect it
deserves, especially with the increased vio-
lence occurring in the public school system.

Surveillance

He noted that the Minister of Education

Alfred Sears recently endorsed the use of

metal detectors and electronic surveillance
technology in the Grand Bahama school
system, where practicable.

"Just ‘as a well-balanced school curricu-
lum addresses all of the various aspects
of an issue," stated Mr Plakaris, "a safe
school programme must take a compre-
hensive approach if it is to be considered a

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part of an effective school system."

He said this comprehensive approach
will only be possible with two significant
changes, the first is learning to view secu-
rity as a governing body; and secondly,
establishing minimum-security standards
for all public schools in the country.

“This change in attitude will not be easy
because education and security are not
natural partners," continued Mr Plakaris.
"Therefore it is significant that the Minis-
ter of Education and his advisors deem it
feasible that school security should no
longer come under the maintenance divi-
sion of the Ministry of Education."

The Security Department in Freeport,
Grand Bahama is made up of director
Garth Johnson who served 38 years on
the Royal Bahamas Police Force; Mr
Plakaris who served 24 years as a police

reservist and 18 years as a teacher; and.

assistant director Roderick Coakley, who
has more than 35 years of experience.
Mr Plakaris said that despite this wealth
of,experience;.and expertise, in order for
the security department to fulfill its envi-
sioned role in maintaining safe schools,
school security must be integrated into
the organisational culture of public schools.

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He added that it should also be struc-

tured, funded, supported, and accepted as

a professional support service in the same

manner as school psychological services,

finance, business and other related depart-
ments or professions.

Although Mr Plakaris said there is no |
single initiative or series of preventive
strategies that can be used to completely
eliminate violence from public schools, he
said a well-planned and trained security
network will minimise and contain the lev-
el of violence.

Violence

This violence, according to Mr Plakaris,
is posed mostly by the students themselves,
who have a constitutional right to De on
campus.

"Therefore monitoring student activi-
ties on campus and off campus is a vital
part of prevention techniques," Mr
Plakaris continued. "Additionally, the
emphasis is on training security officers
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safety and security of the government
school system throughout the common-
wealth of the Bahamas," he said.

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: PAGE 6, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005

Hurricane damaged complex reopened

@ By SIMON LEWIS
Bahamas Information
Services

EIGHT MILE ROCK -
Severely damaged by the passing
of Hurricanes Frances and

Jeanne back in September of last
of year, the Government’s
Administrative Complex in
Eight Mile Rock is again fully
functional, servicing the needs
of the people of West Grand
Bahama.

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The Administrative Complex
houses the Magistrate Court,
Administrator’s Office and the
Post Office. The building had
sustained thousands of dollars
in damages to its roof and the
interior.

Both the Administrator’s
Office and the Magistrate’s
Court suffered major setbacks
as water from the storm dam-
aged key equipments and docu-
ments.

Following the storm, the
Administrator’s Office relocated
to the West Grand Bahama Dis-
trict Council’s Office, while the
Magistrate and her staff braved
the poor conditions in their sec-
tor of the complex, ensuring that
court matters continue.

Thankful

During a special ceremony
marking the re-opening of the
complex last Thursday, Ms Deb-
bye L Ferguson, Stipendiary and
Circuit Magistrate at the Eight
Mile Rock Court was thankful
for the improved surrounding,
but expressed a desire for fur-
ther growth in servicing the
needs of the people in West
Grand Bahama.

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fact we lost everything. This is
indeed a time to say thank you
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Him, we are a little bit better.

“And again, I am not going to
hold back and say that I am
completely satisfied, but I am
satisfied and I am thankful

indeed for all the efforts that has

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@ BLESSING - Fr Norman Lightbourne, Rector of Church of
The Good Shepherd in Lewis Yard, is pictured here blessing the
newly renovated Government Complex in Eight Mile Rock on
Thursday past. The building suffered damages to its interior and
exterior during the 2004 hurricanes, Also pictured looking on are
Administrator, Mr Charles King, and Stipendiary and Circuit Mag-
istrate for West Grand Bahama, Ms Debbie Ferguson.

been made to bring us to this
point,” she stated.

Admitting that she is difficult
to get along with at times, Mag-
istrate Ferguson noted that
Administrator, Mr Charles King
and his staff had always given
her a listening ear when request-
ing repairs to be done.

She further told the gathering
attending the re-opening cere-
mony that “my primary objec-
tive is to get the Eight Mile
Rock Court as well as this par-
ticular administrative office in
the twenty-first century. That
sounds a little bit unbelievable,
probably to some impossible,
but it will happen.

Customers

“We need to do it, because we
cater to a lot of people, from
Hepburn Town to West End>
and stretching to Pinder’s Point.
So we have a lot of customers
and we have to be in tune with
what we need to do and not talk
about getting it done, but have it
done, so that we can be better ©
able to be public servants to our
customers,” she said.

Continuing, Magistrate Fer-
guson said “we need to get rid of
this new thing concept of — all
we doing is working for pay
day...who put you here? Your
MP! fe N .

“We want to get rid of that!
We want to be able to perform

(BIS photo: Vandyke Hepinims)

and perform well. Again I want
to say that Iam appreciative of
what has happened, what has
been accomplished so far and I
hope that your prayers will
include that more will be done in
the future to bring this court to
a particular standard,” she stat-
ed.

The re-opening ceremonies
was held in the Magistrate’s
Court and attracted members of
the various Local Government
Townships and other specially
invited guests including the
Member of Parliament for the
Eight Mile Rock Constituency,
Mr Lindy Russell, and Mr
Carnard Bethel, Undersecretary
in the Office of the Prime Min-
ister, Freeport.

Mr Bethel told government
workers that “to have repaired
the building and not being able
to recover the files that you lost

' must be a very devastating blow

for you.

“But I can also say that the
spirit of camaraderie and deter-
mination that is displayed down
here under the leadership of Mr
King and the Magistrate is
unmatched anywhere else on
Grand Bahama and perhaps
anywhere else in The Bahamas,”
he said, while also applauding
the Administrator and Local

Government officials for their.

mmunities, :
over the past! four months,” ue he

assistance to the
during and aftert




torms.: ‘

Mr Bethel, who has local

Climate mw

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THE TRIBUNE



responsibilities for (NEMA) the

‘National Emergency Manage-

ment Agency, said the passing
of the two storms “was'an expe-
rience I never thought I would
have, having had forty-two years
in the Public Service.

“And I believe that as much
as Administrator King has
weathered several storms before,
he did not think that storms can
bring that kind of distress, frus-
tration and anxiety to a people,”
he stated.

He encouraged all to continue
in their rebuilding process and to,
buildup the communities in
which they live. Likewise he -
assured residents that they have
gotten additional funding to con-
tinue with the cleanup process
in the West Grand Bahama Dis- ~
trict.

Mr Bethel encouraged those
in attendance to “continue to
motivate others. Do not think
about what we have had. Think
about where we can go, think
about the lessons that we have

learnt.
Water

“T saw a rich man in the Span-
ish Main area going down to the
sea, bringing back water in a
bucket to flush his toilet. That
day, that Sunday after Frances,
we were all equal on Grand
Bahama. Nobody was above the
other, no matter how much
money you had in the bank.

“We were all equal and I
think it has taught us a lesson
that we must carry forth and use
that lesson as a foundation to
rebuild Grand Bahama and
rebuild our spirit,” he said.

Administrator Mr Charles
King used the occasion to thanks
all those who assisted in the
restoration of the complex.

He informed that Ministry of
Local Government will be send-
ing down additional funds to
complete the office.

“We still have a little distance
to go, we still have some bills to
pay, but I thank God that we are
here today and that I am able
to sit comfortably in my office
and the staff are able to sit com---
fortably in their office. They can
answer the telephone, deal with
customers and they can get on
with the ordinary daily routine
that was taken away from us

said. .

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THE TRIBUNE

Annual Heart Ball enj

LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005, PAGE 7




‘a special kind of love’

PATRONS attending the
Annual Heart Ball on Febru-
ary 19 showed their “heart”
by supporting the black-tie
fundraiser for the Sir Victor
Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart
Foundation to assist Bahami-
an children with heart disease.

“Tonight, “said organisers
of the ball, “we gather again to
enjoy a special type of love -
the love that comes from car-
ing for children. Our theme
this year, “Every child
deserves a healthy heart.
Make it possible!” calls on all
to support the Sir Victor Sas-
soon (Bahamas) Heart Foun-
dation in making that a reality.

Goal

“Your presence at tonight’s
gala ball will aid the Founda-
tion in meeting its goal of
being able to assist children
who call on the Foundation
for help. We must never turn
any child away.

“Have fun, dance and enjoy
the festivities, and when you
leave here tonight, know that
you have also helped the chil-
dren of the Bahamas who are
counting on you. You have
helped to make a difference
for their futures.”

The premier fundraising
event for the Foundation, the
ball attracted more than 500
persons headed by Deputy
Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt.
Other special invited guests

Kae Hows



Event attended

by more than 500_



included the British High
Commissioner Mr Roderick
Gemmell and Mrs Gemmell,
US Ambassador Mr John
Rood and Mrs Rood, and the
Chinese Ambassador Yuan-
ming Liand Madame Li.
Organisers had promised a
wonderful evening in the
name of charity and did they
deliver. Entering the Crown
Ballroom under two heart-
shaped arches, guests were
visually stimulated by the
rose-hued elegance created by
Mrs Pat Mortimer of “A
Social Affair” who had trans-
formed the Crown Ballroom
into a romantic setting, com-
plete with red and white icicle
lights, flowing reams of red
and white silk, and cascading
centrepieces of red roses.
Music for the evening was
provided by the SG band (for-

'merly known as Soulful

Groovers); the Police Pop
Band and the Ed Brice
Orchestra, which all had ball
attendees flocking to the floor.

Following the announce-.

ment of the winner of the
Lady Sassoon Golden Heart
Award by Chairman Mr RE



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‘he Pomslinlnios.”

Christ Church Cathedral
Schedule of Services for
Sunday February 27th, 2005

8:00 a.m.
Holy Eucharist & Annual Genral Meeting
Note: There will be one combined morning

service due to the

Parish Annual General Meeting.

Solemn Evensong, Sermon e& Benediction



Barnes, patrons enjoyed a
lovely evening of music and
fine dining. The Burns House
Group of Companies donat-

ed wine and also table minia- -

tures, along with Bacardi and
Company.

Elderly

The Golden Heart winner
was Mrs Orinthia Nesbeth
who was lauded for her work
with the PACE programme
for teen mothers, the Cancer
Society, the AIDS Foundation
and the elderly in the com-

" munity.

Ball organisers raised more
than $12,000 in a Silent Auc-
tion which once again featured

Accredited * Reg ‘ ie

a week-long stay at Echo Val-
ley Ranch Resort in Vancou-
ver, Canada, donated by own-
ers Norm and Nan Dove, in
what is described as “a little
bit of heaven.” Dr Mark
Weech was the lucky bidder.
Walking away with the top
Room Raffle prize was Keith
Rolle. He won two round-trip
World Traveller tickets from
Nassau to London; a Celestial
double room for two nights
with breakfast at Hotel Bal-
moral, Monte Carlo, Monaco;
lunch or dinner for two at
Harry’s Bar, a private club in
London; a 14-karat white gold
and amethyst ring, pendant,
and earrings from Colombian
Emeralds International, and
a gift certificate from La Rose
Boutique.
Second prize winner was
Inez Johnson who won an 18-
karat gold and enamel dolphin
bracelet from Coin of the
Realm; two nights stay for two
at British Colonial Hilton, a
Raymond Weil Ladies stain-

Room |
5:30

Room 2
5:30.

Room 3
5:30

Room 4
5:30

Room 5
5:30

Room 6
5:30

Room 7
5:30

Computer
Lab 5:30

Intro to
‘omp

Room 1
8:05 '

Room 3
8:05

Room 4
8:05

Room 5
8:05

Room 6
8:05

Room 7
8:05

Computer
Lal

CHS ag
information and registration

SPCH 100
undamentals of
Speech
PSY 101
Introduction to
Psychology

ENG 241
English Comp
il
MASTERS
CLASS

ENG 131
English Comp
I
PUB 318
Government ~
Budgeting
PHI 115
Intro to
Philosophy
ISA 305

Micro
catiol

-[Roommtime [MONDAY

BUS 400
Financial
Management

PSY 312
R 2
G8 Psychology of the
: Black Family

PSY 317
Abnormal
Psychology

MASTERS
CLASS

; ENG 105
Vocabulary
Development
ENG 121
English
Composition I
SSC 281
Co-op Education
Prep
491 PDC |

less steel 18k gold watch,
donated by Solomon’s Mines,
and a premier one year mem-
bership at Bally Total Fitness.

Debbie Outten was the
third prize winner. She
received a comprehensive car-
diac evaluation at the Lyford
Cay Hospital, donated by Dr
Dean Tseretopoulos; dinner
for two at ‘the Humidor
Restaurant donated by Gray-
cliff Hotel and Restaurant,
and an original Quartz and
Tourmaline double strand
necklace and earrings on ster-
ling silver, donated by Nadia
Campbell. -

Winners

Other prize winners includ-
ed Lamaque Lockhart,
Pamela Gibson, Pat Mortimer,
Bruce LaFleur, Darren Bast-
ian, Betsy Payne and Denise
Turnquest who were the
fourth to tenth winners
respectively.

Valued at more than

$20,000, the raffle prizes
included jewellery, trips, hotel
accommodations, and a pri-
vate dinner prepared by a
gourmet chef.

Guests attending the heart
ball also received Perry Ellis
“F” and “M” fragrances from
John Bull, which also pre-
sented fragrance baskets to
the wives of the dignitaries in
attendance. Solomon’s Mines
also provided Lalique fra-
grance table favours.

In commemoration of the
41st Ball, patrons with “num-
ber 4” under their bread plate
won a table prize and those
with “number 1” received the

floral centrepiece.

The Committee for the
Heart Ball was co-chaired
once again by Lady Butler and
Mrs Rosemarie Thompson,
who along with their hard-
working committee of volun-
teers saw to it that children.
with heart disease needing
assistance would be assured
of a better future.





ACC 420
Government
Accounting

SSC 101

Education

‘Seminar
BUS 227
Introduction to
Business

MASTERS
CLASS

PSY 313
Issues of Adolescents
Psychology
ECE 355
Curriculum .

Planning
BUS 383

Marketing Financial
Services

ECE 101
Early childhood
Education
SPCH 101

Interpersonal
Communication Skills

BUS 370
Labor Relations
MASTERS
CLASS

Sci
Anatomy of
Physiology

ENG 097
Communication
Skills II

- ECE 320
Diagnosis of
Reading Problems
ISA 210
Intro to
Microcomputers

ISA 326
Adv’d Computer
Appl’ns

ECO 215.
Economics I
ADM 351
Quantitative
Analysis
ACC 300
Principles of.
Accounting I
ACC 303
Principles of
Accounting II
ECE 109
Art
Appreciation
PUB 309
Public
Bureaucracy

ISA 401

| Systems Analysis

& Design

8:05PM CLASSES

PUB 311 “MAT 121
Introduction to Public College Math I
Administration

ACC 350 BUS 331
Intermediate Business Law I
Accounting II

MAT 124 PUB 325
College Algebra | Introduction to
Public Relations
MASTERS || SSC383.
CLASS rere of Wor
SSC 103 PSY 324
Career Planning | Psychology of
Racism

BUS 414 CRE 120
Offshore Trust & | Conversational
Co Management Creole I

SWK 300 ECE 293DD

Counseling Methods of

Theories Teaching Science

MAT 097
Basic Math II



TUESDAY |WEDNESDAY;| THURSDAY FRIDAY

ADM 321

Administration &

Management
ADM 312
Elements of
Supervision

BU

Business Ethics

MAT 204
Elements of
Statistics
ENG 243

Library Research

Skills
ANT 100

Introduction to

Anthropology

493 PDC Il

ISA 327
Data
Management

or TASS Peeing Or Fax: 394-8623
ROTA GUTH TeAn Maa Sse =1e 1]
or at Gold Circle House
PAGE 8, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005 THE TRIBUNE,

CR Walker students addressed





On success in today’s world —

@ By KRYSTAL KNOWLES
Bahamas Information
Services

MR GREGORY BETHEL,
vice-president of British
Fidelity Bank and Trust Com-

pany, told business students at
C-R Walker High School on
Thursday, February 17, that
knowledge, friends and sexu-
ality will determine an indi-
vidual’s level of success in
today’s world.

Senior Construction Estimator

required by major land developer

Applicants should have extensive background in residential and
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certifications. The position requires high proficiency in quantity
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pricing.

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Name:

Date of Birth /

Quality Auto Sales Ltd
PARTS DEPARTMENT

Will be CLOSED for
STOCKTAKING

FEBRUARY 25 to 28
(Friday, Saturday, Monday)

We will reopen for business as usual on Tuesday, March 1.
We apologise to our valued customers and regret any
inconvenience this may cause. All other departments

will be open‘for business as usual.

QUALITY:

East Shirley Street 323-3529/323-3709 |



Proceeds will be donate aha

ophies and

P.O. Box N-3207
DA-03084



on & applications cat
_ Harbour Bay Shopping C iy Febru



Age (on race day)

Address:

E-mail Address: Telephone:
Check Appropriate Category —

Runners Walkers



Under 15
Under 20







[Male]
[Male] |










‘off at Subway® restau

Under 15
Under 20

Mr Gregory Bethel was
addressing the school’s. busi-
ness academic seminar on
“Achieving Success in the era
of Globalisation” “Managers
in the service industries like
banking, tourism, retail and
whole sale and government
ministries hire employees
depending on age, marital
status and sex,” Mr Bethel
said.

Preference

He added: “The preference
is mainly married males over
40, single females over 30
(with no children), single
males over 40, married males
under 40 and married females
over 40. The discrimination
against persons under 40
relates primarily to individuals
sex life. Who you choose to
have sex with and when,
will impact your life and
finances.”

Mr Bethel warned the stu-
dents that rearing children is
an expensive undertaking,
therefore they should practice
safe sex or abstinence.

“Your being wealthy
depends on whether you
spend your money.on pleasure
or on purpose,” he said. “Seek
opportunities to invest in a
business or shares of well-run
companies.”

Mr Bethel also told the stu-
dents that knowledge will also



@ MR GREGORY BETHEL,
vice-president of British Fidelity

Bank and Trust Company, address-

es business students of C R Walker
High School on “Achieving Success
in the Era of Globalisation’ at the
school’s business academic seminar

on Thursday, February 17.

(BIS Photo: Raymond Bethel)

bring individual success.

He added: “An associate or
bachelors of arts degree from
the College of The Bahamas

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning

4 for improvements in the ©
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us.on 322-1986
and share your story,.








rant in the |








Sex: M__F




[Jed UOeWIOJU! Bow 104








with a grade point average of

. 3.00 or from creditable uni-

versities in the United States,
Canada and England is
good,”

“Six Bahamas General Cer-
tificates of Secondary Educa-

tion, including math, English ©

and a foreign language make
you more marketable. Some
accounting knowledge and
personal computer knowledge
including micro word, excel,
power point.”

Mr Bethel warned students
to be careful about who they
select as companions.

“Companions are like but-.,
tons on an elevator. They will
either take you.up or:‘they will.

take you down.’



“Your friends and parents
influence you in areas like
peer pressure, greed for mon-
ey and things, selfish and
stingy attitudes, sexual choic-
es,” he said.

Mr Bethel encouraged stu-
dents subscribe to various
papers such as the Financial
Times, Economist and Wall
Street Journal to keep them;
selves informed of develop-
ments in North America,
South America, Europe and
Asia. ee

“We need to think global as
we seek an education, knowl+
edge, skills, a job. and business
partners-and look to Europe
‘and the Americas,” Mr Bethel
said.



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weather, inctuding, extreme heat, extreme caid, and/or humidity, trattic and.the conditions of the read, ‘all such risks’ being known and appreciated
by me: Having read this:waiver and knowing these facts and in consideration:of accepting my application, |, for myself and anyone entitied to act

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005, PAGE 9 .





HE following is a

two part article
Presented by Amnesty
International Bahamas
that looks at the princi-
ples outlined in The Con-
vention on the Rights of
Children, which is an
international treaty that
recognizes the human
rights of children. The
Convention on the Rights
of the Child was carefully
drafted over the course of
ten years (1979-1989)
with the input of represen-
tatives from all societies,
all religions and all cul-
tures. A working group
inade up on members of
the United Nations Com-
mission on Human Rights,
independent experts and
observer delegations of
hon-member governments,
non-governmental organi-
zations (NGOs) and UN
agencies was charged with
the drafting. The Conven-
tion was adopted into
International Law by the
United Nations General
Assembly in November 20,
1989.

- Amnesty International is
a worldwide movement of
people from different cul-

tures and backgrounds who -



have access to services such
as education and health
care; can develop their per-
sonalities, abilities and tal-
ents to the fullest poten-
tial; grow up in an envi-
ronment of happiness, love
and understanding; and are

‘informed about and partic-

ipate in, achieving their
rights in an accessible and
active manner.

@ WHY IS A °
DOCUMENT
DESCRIBING
CHILDREN’S RIGHTS
NECESSARY?
Although many nations

have laws relating to chil-

dren’s welfare an rights,



“Non-discrimination means
that no child should be
injured, privileged or
punished by, or deprived of,
any right on the grounds of his

_or her race, color or gender;
on the basis of his or her

language or religion, or.
national, social or ethnic:
origin; on the grounds of any
political or other opinion; on
the basis of caste, property or
birth status; or on the basis of

disability.”



campaign on behalf of
human rights across the
‘globe.

DO CHILDREN
‘ HAVE RIGHTS?

Yes they do! According.

to THE CONVENTION
‘ON THE RIGHTS OF
‘CHILDREN that as stat-
ed, is an International
‘Treaty that recognizes the
shuman rights of children,
‘who are defined as persons
‘up to the age of eighteen
It establishes in
international law that State
‘Parties (the government)
‘must ensure that all chil-
«dren — without discrimina-
‘tion in any form - benefit
from special protection
‘measures and assistance;



MN
PW OXOC) ALK AWR LICLEY CL



the reality is that too many
nations. do not live up to
their own minimum stan-
dards in these areas. Chil-
dren suffer from poverty,
homelessness, abuse,
neglect, preventable dis-
eases, unequal access to
education and justice. sys-
tems that do not recognize
their special needs; chil-
dren of minority groups are
often particularly affected.
These are the problems
that occur in both industri-
alized and developing
countries.

The Convention of the
Rights of the Child and its
acceptance by so many
countries has heightened
recognition of the funda-

Cemple Baptist Church
134 Farrington Road
P.O.Box N-9426, Phone 326- 5581.

A Service of Praise
and Thanksgiving

for

Pastor A. Geoffrey Wood

who celebrates

20 Years in the Pastorate

and

46 Years in Ministry
on Sunday 27th February 2005 at 3:30pm at

The Church

Dr. Earle Francis, Guest Neca

The convention on —
the rights of children

mental human dignity of all
children and the urgency
of ensuring their well-being
and development. The
Convention makes clear
the idea that a basic quali-
ty of life should be the
right of all children, rather
than a privilege enjoyed by
a few.

@ WHAT ARE THE
UNDERLYING
VALUES IN THE
CONVENTION?

The Convention on the
Rights of the Child incor-
porates the full range of
human rights — civil and
political rights as well as
economic, social and cul-
tural rights — of all chil-

dren. The underlying val- .

ues — or “guiding princi-
ples” — of the Convention
guide the way each right is
fulfilled and respected and

serve as a constant refer- .

ence for the implementa-
tion and monitoring of chil-
dren’s rights. The Conven-
tion has four guiding prin-
ciples and today we shall

address two of these prin-

ciples.
# 1, NON-DESCRIMINATION

Non-discrimination
means that no child should
be injured, privileged or:
punished by, or deprived
of, any right on the
grounds of his or her race,
color or gender; on the
basis of his or her language
or religion, or national,
social or ethnic origin; on
the grounds of any political
or other opinion; on the
basis of caste, property or
birth status; or on the basis
of disability. This principle
implies. therefore that,all
children = girls and: boys,
rich or poor, living in
urban and rural areas,
belonging to minority or
indigenous groups — should
be given the opportunity to
enjoy the rights recognized
by the Convention.

& 2. SURVIVAL AND
DEVELOPMENT

The Convention on the
Rights of the Child
addresses the right to life,
survival and development.
The State must recognize
this right as inherent to
every child and commit to
acting in a way that will
ensure and respect this
right. In doing so, the State
must adopt appropriate
measures that safeguard
life and refrain from any
actions that intentionally
take life away. These
include measures ‘to
increase life expectancy
and to lower infant and
child mortality, as well as
prohibitions on the death
penalty; extralegal, arbi-
trary or Summary execu-
tions; and situations of
enforced disappearance.









~ Dr. Earle Francis
Guest Speaker










_ able to develop talents and



“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

States’ actions should pro-
mote a life of human digni-
ty that fully ensure the
right to. adequate standard
of living, including the
right to housing, nutrition
and the highest attainable
standards of healthy.

The “survival and devel-

opment” principle is in no
p

way limited to physical per-
spective; rather, it further
emphasizes the need to
ensure full and harmonious
development of the child,
including the spiritual,
moral and social levels,
where education will play
a key role.. They must
ensure that children will be

GRAND OPENING

Sida s
Meeps a erie

East Street North in front of
East Street Gospel Chapel

abilities to their fullest
potential; that children will
be prepared for a responsi-
ble life in a free society
and they will feel solidarity
with the world they live in.

Largest
selection .
of Hat’s
’

The State should under- you've
take strategies to assist the ever seen!!
most disadvantaged chil-
dren, such as children liv-
ing below a minimum
poverty level.



Store Hours: 9am - 6 pm * Phone: 325--

Next Week: A look at
the remaining two guiding
principles of the Conven-
tion and information on
what can be done to sup- -
port the implementation of
these values.

“NOTICE”

To the class of 1995 from Government High School,
the reunion is here! Meetings are held at Government High
School 5:00 pm every Saturday. Plans are in the process
for great events! Please show your support.

Contact persons:

Damien Sweetin
Damien_sweeting@hotmail.com
525-7867 /426-8221

Amnesty International
has in excess of 1.5 million
members, supporters and
subscribers in more than
150 countries, including the
Bahamas. For more infor-
mation about this volunteer
organization, please call
327-0807 or visit
www.amnesty.org.

Denzil Deveaux
, densil2hot@yahoo. com
326-6124



he LD Wy 4

“a fe

paneer re

Hahamae Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.
MONTROSE AVENUE

PHONE: 322-1722 FAX: 326-7452

MITSUBISHI
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Parts and Service Assured

&

PRICE INCLUDES: FIRST SERVICE




PAGE 10, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005



Parties, Nightclubs
& Restaurants



The Love of Music concert featuring interna-
tional award-winning artist ta.da with Aydee,
Mizpah Bethel and Dreddy on Saturday, February
25 @ the Blue Note in the British Colonial Hilton.
Admission $35 (drinks inclusive). Tickets available
at the Juke Box, Mall at Marathon and Blue Note,
322-NOTE, blue.note@coralwave.com.

Have a Heart concert featuring the Bahamas’
hottest performers, Xtra, Visage and KB on Sat-
urday, February 26 @ at the Wyndham Crystal
Palace Ballroom. The theme of the concert is
“Bringing Hope and Awareness Through Music”
and is aimed at raising awareness of heart dis-
ease among young people. The box office opens
at 8.30pm. Showtime is 9pm. Tickets are $15 in
advance and $20 at the door, and all proceeds
will go to the Bahamas Heart Association. For
more information call 356-7326 or 324-1714.

Raye Saturdays @ The All New Club Eclipse.
DJ Scoobz spinning the best in Old Skool. Admis-
sion $35, all inclusive food and drink.

Fever @ Bahama Boom, Elizabeth St, down-

town, Fridays. The hottest party in the Bahamas .

every Friday night: Admission $10 before mid-
night. First 50 women get free champagne. First 50
men get a free Greycliff cigar. Dress to impress.
For VIP reservations call 356-4612.

Cool Runnings is back with a Conscious Party
@ Hard Rock Cafe, Charlotte St North every Fri-
on Classic reggae style music. Admission $10...

“Mellow M Mags evi
_and Nightclu i
“'terday — old school reggae and rocke
stairs, and:golden oldies upstairs. A
Free. Doors open Spm.

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshdtiers Sports
Bar. Drink aoe all night long, Dee



“Ratsoké Nights @ @ Fluid Louie and Night-
club.. Begins 10pm.every Tuesday. Weekly winners
selected as Vocalist of the Week — $250 cash prize.
Winner selected at end of month from finalists —




cash prize. $1,000. Admission $10 with one frees:



drink.

Reggae Tieaitays @ Bahama-Boom.:'Cov
charge includes a free Guinness and there should
be lots of prizes and surprises. Admission: Ladies
$10 and Men $15.

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports
Bar evéry Wednesday Spm-8pm. Free appetiz-
ers and numerous drink specials.

Flash Nights @ Club Fluid every Thursday. The
ultimate Ladies Night. Join Nassau’s and Miami
Beach’s finest men. Ladies only before 11.30pm
with free champagne. Guys allowed after 11.30pm
with $20 cover.

The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday.
Doors open at 9pm, showtime 11.30pm. Cover
charge $15. $10 with flyer.

Twisted Boodah Bar & Lounge every Friday @
Cafe Segafredo, Charlotte St North, featuring
world music, chillin’ jazz and soulful club beats.
Starting at 6pm. Beers $3, longdrinks $4.50.

Fantasy Fridays @ Fluid Lounge, featuring late
‘80s music in the VIP Lounge, Top of the Charts
in the Main Lounge, neon lights and Go Go
dancers. Glow sticks for all in before midnight.
Admission: Ladies free before 11pm, $15 after;
Guys $20 all night.

College Night @ Bahama Boom every Friday.
Admission: $10 with college ID, $15 without.





Artists to perform |

for love

of music





ee,

" - #’s for the love of music that artists tada, Mizpah Bethel, Aydee and Dreddy, will
take to the stage on Saturday in a concert that will introduce a soon-to-be-
released compilation album by Bahamian and Canadian artists. Headliner of the
event, ta.da (Terneille Burrows) of Sanctigrooye Promo, is.a recording artist,
songwriter and producer. Her style:is‘a: unique blend of soul, reggae and hip-hop.

She has independently released CDs and has music videos that air on Much Music. ta.da
is an honours graduate from the Harris Institute for the Arts in Toronto, Canada, and has
won multiple Marlin Awards and John Lennon Songwriting contest awards.

~ “Some of the freshest and most original young:a
_ is a must-see évent for music lovers, featuring-2

according to the concert press release.





; will be showcased. This
oster of Young Bahamian talent,”

“The Love of Music” begins at 9pm. Admission: $35 @ ink inclusive). Tickets can be
purely at the J uke Boxi in the Mail at Marathon.

HEAT a pe

Dicky Mo’ s Fridays ¢ @ ‘Cable Bench, aig

Hole. 3 for $10 mixed drinks and $1 shots. °



Grek Saturdays @ Bahama Boon: Elizabeth
Ave. Every Saturday the Phi Beta Sigma Frat
welcomes greeks, college grads and smooth oper-
ators. Admission $15 all night, $10 for greeks in

-letters. Music by DJ Palmer, security strictly

enforced.

Chill Out Sundays @ The Beach Hut, West
Bay Street with fresh served BBQ and other spe-
cials starting from 4pm-10pm, playing deep, funky
chill moods with world beats. Cover $2.

Sweet Sunday Chill Out Soiree Lounge, every
Sunday, 4pm-midnight @ Patio Grille, British
Colonial Hotel.

Wet Sundays, every Sunday, noon-midnight @
Crystal Cay Beach. Admission $10, ladies free.

Carib Scene @ Club Fluid every Sunday. A
night of Caribbean, Latin and Reggae flavours
for all audiences. Latin Flair in the VIP Lounge;
Old School Reggae and Soca in the Main Lounge.
Ladies in free before 11pm. $10 after 11pm. Men,
$15 cover charge.

Jay Mitchell and Hot KC @ Palm Court
Lounge, British Colonial Hilton, Wednesday-
Thursday 8pm-12am.

Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley’s Restaurant
& Lounge, Eneas St off Poinciana Drive. Fea-
turing Frankie Victory at the key board in the







After Dark Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to mid-
night. Fine food and drinks.

Paul Hanna performs at Traveller’s Rest, West
Bay St, every Sunday, 6.30pm-9.30pm.

The Arts
Island Girls Sandi George and Kimberly

Sturrup-Roberts are exhibiting fabric paint-
ings, quilts and drawings at the Central Bank of

the Bahamas. The show runs through Friday, '

February 25.

Alton Lowe will exhibit a group of recent
paintings at the Nassau Beach Hotel in the
Commonwealth Room, starting Saturday, Feb-
ruary 27 through March 2, 10am to 7pm daily.

Ian Strachan’s Diary of Souls, the critically

acclaimed play examining the Haitian experi- -

ence in the Bahamas, will open at.the Dundas
Centre for the Performing Arts on Friday,
March 4 and continue through March 6, 8pm.
And again on Friday, March 11 and Saturday,
March 12, 8pm. Call the box office at 393-3728
for ticket info. Tickets for Friday’s performance
are $25, remaining shows are $20.

The National Collection @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, an exhibition that
takes the viewer on a journey through the his-
tory of fine art in the Bahamas. It features sig-
nature pieces from the national collection,
including recent acquisitions by Blue Curry,
Antonius Roberts and Dionne Benjamin-Smith.
Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 1lam-4pm.
Call 328-5800 to book tours.

AROUND







‘second, fourth and fifth Wednesday at the J Whit-

THE TRIBUNE

NASSAU












































Past, Present and Personal: The Dawn Davies _,
Collection: @ the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, Villa Doyle, West and West Hill Streets.
The exhibition is part of the NAGB’s Collector’s
Series. Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday, llam- .
4pm. Call 328-5800 to book tours.

The Awakening Landscape: The Nassau
Watercolours of Gaspard Le Marchand Tupper,
from the collection of Orjan and Amanda Lin-
droth @ the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas. The mid-nineteenth century paintings
that make up the exhibition are part of one of
the earliest suites of paintings of Nassau and its

‘environs. Tupper was a British military officer

stationed at Fort Charlotte in the 1850s. The
works show a pre-modern Bahamas through
the decidely British medium of watercolour.
Gallery hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 1lam-4pm.
Call 328-5800 to book tours.



Health

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5.30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at
their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville.
Call 323-4482 for more info.

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the
third Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors Hos-
pital conference room.

The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2.30pm (except August and
December) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor
Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital, the official training centre’
of the; American: Heart Association offers:CPR
classes certified’ by the AHA. The course defines
the warning signs of respiratory arrest and gives
prevention strategies to avoid sudden death syn- |
drome and the most common serious injuries and |
choking that can occur in adults, infants and chil- |
dren. CPR and First Aid classes are offered every
third Saturday of the month from 9am-1pm. Con-
tact a Doctors Hospital Community Training Rep-
resentative at 302-4732 for more information and
learn to save a life today.

REACH - Resources & Education for :
Autism and related Challenges meets from :
7pm — 9pm the second Thursday of each month |
in the cafeteria of the BEC building, Blue Hill !
Road



Civic Clubs

Toastmasters Club 1905 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm. ;
@ BEC Cafe, Tucker Rd. Club 9477 meets Friday,
7pm @ Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm
A19, Jean St. Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pm
@ British Colonial Hilton. Club 1600 meets Thurs-
day, 8.30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes. Club 7178
meets Tuesday, 6pm @ The J Whitney Pinder
Building, Collins Ave. Club 2437 meets every

ney Pinder Building, Collins Ave at 6pm. Club
612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau
Resort, Cable Beach.

_ Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @
the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau
Resort; Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first
Tuesday, 7pm @ Gaylord’s Restaurant,
Dowdeswell St. Please call 502-4842/377-4589 for
more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second
Tuesday, 6.30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office,
4th floor meeting room.

The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council '
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month
in the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, Bay St.



Send all your civic and social events to The
Tribune via fax: 328-2398 or e-mail: outthere@tri-
bunemedia.net






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there are not enough of those
taales to go around, or they are
hiding behind " incredibly strong
Bahamian female personali-
ties."

« He explained that the idea of
a - family has changed drastically
in the Bahamas over the years
and it is not uncommon to find
that single women lead many
of the households.

> "Even if in some of those
Bomes there is a father," Mr
Hanna continued, "his authori-
ty has usually been trampled."
> Ensuring that his comments
are not misinterpreted, Mr Han-
fia added: "I don't want to
offend the women who I love
Bnd respect. But if the man is
not willing to command respect,
Hot coerce, but to command a
form of respect by the way he







FROM page one



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‘Teachers being
taught Creole at
primary school

behaves. himself, conducts his
affairs — if he doesn't do that
— the strong Bahamian female
personality emerges, and in a
dominant form."

In many households, Mr
Hanna has observed that many
Bahamian women are in rela-
tionships with men who may
not be the father of their chil-
dren, and many men do not
wish to adopt the disciplinary
responsibilities.

"So he sits back and allows °

things to run without him," con-
tinued Mr Hanna, "and some
men are not even offended by
that, and in many instances it is
because of weaknesses in their
own character, they have this
'Why should I care’ attitude."

But Mr Hanna said this lack-
adaisical attitude causes many
young males to grow up without
a values system to be instilled in
them.




“To be able to be competent and to be empowered
with this language to assist the students, so that they can
have better grades and speak the English Language
better. They will also be able to interact with the par-
ents on a more verbal bases.”

The classes were started about a month ago on Mon-
day’s and Friday’s. He said that a teacher, whose par-
ents are of Haitian descent, is also assisting in the

‘Member of Parliament for Carmichael John Carey \
told the principal that he will also attend the next class.

Mr Clarke told The Tribune that having the number
of Haitians at the school is not currently a serious con-
cern. He said that once the Haitian students are here
legally it is his obligation to educate them.

“Once they can produce the legal document, like a
birth certificate, or a travel document, as an adminis-
trator I am obligated to register those students and
see that they get a proper education,” he said.

Mr Clarke assured the public that there is no segre-
gation between Haitian and Bahamian children. He
said that teachers treat each child. with the same basic

He said that what he finds a problem is that the
majority of Haitian children at the school deny their

He noted that they do not want to be known as
Haitians, they want to be known as Bahamians.

He added that the Bahamian children at the school
treat their Haitian counterparts as one of them. He
said that there is love among the Bahamian and

“When some of the Creole students come into school
for the first time they do have a language barrier. I
am hoping that my teachers by being able to speak the
Creole language, they will be better able to assist these
students. In assisting these students, I am looking for-
ward to a greater degree of performance from them
academically. Also I expect through the language to
develop a more amicable relationship with the students
and the teachers. They would see now that the teacher
can speak my language and that would mean some-

Leanora Archer, deputy director with responsibility
for curriculum, said that the initiative taken at the
Carmichael Primary School is an excellent one.

“T thought that it was an excellent initiative. A num-
ber of our Haitian students may not be slow learners,
but there is a language barrier that is hindering them.
We do not want to encourage the students to use Cre-
ole. We want the teachers to understand it, so that
they can teach them English.” she said.

Ms Archer said she was not aware of the programme
of removal of illegal immigrants out of the school sys-
tem as was reported this week.

“From what I understand we have not gone i in that
direction of taking the Haitian students out of the
schools. That is not to say that we haven’t, just that
from my'knowledge, I’m not aware of it.







"That is a tragedy," he con-
tinued, "and that is why we see
so many men on the 'slow walk'
to court or to be incarcerated.
This vision diminishes the ideals
of what a man should be in this
country in the eyes of the pub-
lic. So who is going to be
missed? Male teachers, hus-
bands, pastors, that is who —
it’s a serious problem, is it an
epidemic? Of course it is."

Mr Hanna said his experience
as a policeman has led him to
the opinion that many of these
young males, who do not learn
how to work hard and prosper,

feel they must claw their way -

to the top as they see in the
behaviour of adults surround-
ing them.

Adding to this lack of guid-
ance, Mr Hanna said is the inap-

propriate manner in which.

Bahamians communicate. |
"We are very forceful and

aggressive in what we say to our’: |
young people," he said. "We

speak to them in violent lan-
guage and they go out and repli-

cate the very same behaviour —

in the wider community."
In the community, Mr Hanna

said he has also observed a°

common trait that he finds dis-
appointing.

"There are still a significant
number of hypocrites in our
society," he said, "where
Bahamians at large are not con-
sistent all the way through with
what they preach and what they
demonstrate. Young people see
this glaring inconsistency and a
big gaping hole at the top and
behave in similar fashion, but
their behaviour however is

‘more primitive than the adults
who can behave.in a more
sophisticated way."

The solution, he said is to
rehabilitate the young people,
"but fundamentally we need to
get with these others who have
created a very sordid situation
in our country."



Eta ea



Available on
Sesame Seed
Bun Only — x

_ "It’s rehabilitation across the
board," Mr Hanna continued,
"not just the areas that are
under economic distress, but it
comes down to a values sys-
tem."

According to Mr Hanna,
crime does not have any bor-
ders, and he said in the
past it had been wrongfully
labelled to people of lesser

_ means.

"Today, more and more peo-
ple from affluent areas of soci-

most heinous ways, including

murder, armed robbery, rape,
violence, and overall hostility,"
he added.

"What I have discovered over
the years is that things are good,
perks are good, but young peo-
ple need to connect with other
human beings, essentially

they need to connect with

adults."

He said good intentions are a
good start to instilling good val-
ues in the youth, but unless
more Bahamian men are willing

Supt Hanna: crumbling values
are contributing to crime

to fully commit themselves to
being a positive role model, the
country can expect an onslaught
of criminal behaviour.

"You can show things to
young people but if they are
hollow on the inside, and you
lack the values to help develop
their character, make them feel
good about themselves, and

respect. themselves or the

female down the road, why
would they respect the laws of -
the country in which they
reside?"

Providenciales te Nassau
Flight # RU401 departs 10:00am
Arrives in Nassau 11:30am —



ety are offending in some of the

Vensict on



FROM page one

firemen cut through the padlocks of Dorm 3,
where the girls were trapped, .after being told by

they were too hot to insert the keys.
been cut, the keys still worked in them.

Superintendent Cheryl Carol that the spare:
keys to the dorm were locked in the adminis-
trator’s office.

She said she was called to unlock the admin-
istrator’s office to retrieve the keys, because
the matrons were having difficulty unlocking
and opening Dorm 3. However she did not

and freed the girls.

Giving his opinion on the events that took
place on the morning of the fire, Coroner
William Campbell told the jury that using the
“common sense approach,” he could not see
how the fire could have been hot enough to
melt the padlocks or the keys.

He explained that in his view the fire could.
not have been “raging” because in the 10-25
minutes it took to open the dorm doors, the

FLIGHT SCHEDULE:
DAYS: Sunday, Monday, Wednesday & Friday

Nassau to Providenciales

/- day advance purchase return tickets as low as
Call Destinations at 393-6900 or Premier Travel at 328-0264 for reservations and ticketing

i'm lovin’ it

- Pratt fire deat 1S

one of the centre’s matrons, Ms Bowe, that:
It was shown that although the locks had S

The jury then heard from Acting Assistant

_ and Deshawn were accidents, accidents con-

arrive until after the firemen had cut the locks .





Williemae



‘girls had: not been burnt to death, as s they





essary temperature to. cause: ‘damage to the
locks.

The coroner, therefore; concluded that the
keys the matrons were trying to open the locks
with, were the wrong ones.

In his. directions to ‘the jury; Mr Campbell
said that three possible: verdicts arose from
the case.

He told the seven jurois’ that they must
determine whether the deaths of Anastacia













tributed to by neglects or solely the result of
neglect.

He defined neglect as s the failure of the indi-
viduals, on whom the two girls were depen-
dent, to provide the basic care and attention.

In this case the basic care would have
included the access to the. dorm keys at all
times, he added.

Mr ‘Campbell further reminded the jury that
the Coroner’s Court does not decide or attach
blame.

Inspector Bradley Neely prosecuted i in the
inquest.

Edward B Turner represented the families
of the three victims.


















Flight # RU400 departs 12:30pm
Arrives in Providenciales 2:00pm

$299

departure taxes included

The way to fly in the TCI and evey ond


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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005

SECTION



business@100jamz.com



BUSINESS



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

Telephone 242-393-1023 |







4

‘

‘Optimism’ exchange will
oon be at self-sufficiency,
with $1m loss in 2003

falling to $100,000 last year

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Bahamas Inter-
national Securities
- Exchange (BISX)
is “closer than
. ever” to being in
a break even position where it
will not have to rely on external
financial support for its survival,
its chief executive told The Tri-
bune last night, having seen its
annual losses reduced to around
$100,000 in fiscal 2004.

Keith Davies said BISX’s bal-
ance sheet was “moving in the
right direction”, even though
the income statement still
required work. He pointed out,
though, that the loss for last

year still represented a major
improvement on 2003’s $1 mil-
lion loss.

Mr Davies, speaking after
yesterday’s BISX annual gen-
eral meeting (AGM), said: “The

company has been able to ©

improve and gain market share
and new customers, and move
closer to the day when we will
be self-sufficient and able to
cover our expenses that we gen-
erate on a yearly basis entirely,

without any external support. .

We are closer than ever to
that.”

The BISX chief executive
said the exchange realised it
needed “to pay for ourselves,
and once we can do that we can
stop worrying about our exis-

BFSB to urge
Forum to hear
sector workers



By NEIL HARTNELL

“Tribune Business Editor

. The Bahamas Financial Ser- |

. vices Board (BFSB) will “rec-
- ommend” to the Financial Ser-

vices Consultative Forum

(FCSF) that it should take into
account the views of Bahami-
ans working in the industry

. when it advises the Government

on ‘Bahamianisation’ and immi-
«gration issues relating to the sec-
tor.

4. In its report on the “high-
erligh ” from last month’s Finan-

£3,
e wae
“oft

‘cial Services Retreat at Exu-
ha’ s Emerald Bay resort, the
“BFSB said it would “recom-
mend to the FSCF that consid-

-‘eration be given to the views of

aN

“&

: ;

ar.

f

‘Bahamians employed in the sec-
‘tor as it advises the government
‘on the impact of the Bahami-
‘anisation immigration policy on

_athe financial services industry”.

The Forum sub-committee’s
controversial Immigration
report sparked a public back-
lash from several quarters in the

$4
a4

on Immigration

financial services industry when
it was released late last year,
with some perceiving it as advo-
cating the “abandonment of
‘Bahamianisation”” as it relat-
ed to the sector and paving the
way for an influx of expatriate
labour.

Opinion on the report’s con-
clusions was sharply divided,
although Brian Moree, the
Forum’s chairman, denied it
was advocating an ‘Open
Sesame’ on immigration poli-
cies.

Nevertheless, the BFSB’ S
entrance into the debate is like-
ly to be an attempt to reassure
Bahamian workers in the indus-
try that their voices will be giv-
en a hearing on Immigration
policies and dampen the row.

In addition, the BFSB said it
would “continue to emphasise
the need for the establishment
of - and adherence to time lines
for - the delivery of public ser-
vices, including those provided

See REPORT, Page 2B

; “Undersea resort’s
Viability set to be

‘decided i in 90 days

By YOLANDA

- DELEVEAUX
.. Tribune Business Reporter

The developer behind a five-
‘star luxury underwater hotel,
situated just off the coast of
‘Eleuthera, said another 90 days

‘were needed before engineers .

can determine whether the
physical qualities of the site
meet with building standards.
In an interview with The Tri-
bune, Bruce Jones, head of the
$40 million Poseidon project,
said the group had identified a
piece of land near Eleuthera. If

'. the preliminary ground work
~’ bears out that it can contain an
“underwater structure, they will
purchase the beachfront prop- *

erty, and a formal application
will be made to the Govern-

‘ ment seeking approval to build

a 20-suite luxury resort, with

if
a

restaurant and bar, on the ocean
floor.

In an online news report, the
Florida-based entrepreneur said
he was currently signing on the
last of the investors, most them
institutional, who will put up
the $40 million.

_Mr Jones said: “People who

. are interested in experiencing

something they can't find any-
where else in the world will find
it a real bargain. By doing this
we can entertain people, but

. also educate people and pro-

mote environmental steward-
ship. Only in really experiencing
what it's like underwater can
you really motivate somebody
to protect the natural resources
of the sea." ,

The project has been in the
developmental stage for several

See HOTEL, Page 2B

tence and look forward to grow- —

ing the business”.

Mr Davies said BISX’s 45 pri- |
vate shareholders “understood
the circumstances” the
exchange found itself in, but
had been “upbeat” during the
AGM about its future
prospects.

“We had a very positive
meeting with ours sharehold-

rs,” Mr Davies said. “They are
very focused on our ultimate
goal.”

Sources close to BISX last

night said there was a “feeling

the worst is over” among the
exchange’s shareholders. —
One observer added:
“There’s a general optimism
about the future of BISX at the
moment. It’s cash flow has
largely been sorted out. This
year there’s almost the expec-
tation that it will break even.”
Achieving this, though, is
likely to be dependent on
whether the exchange can
attract new mutual fund listings,
plus gain debt and preference
share listings. BISX listings in

Exchange looking for alternative accommodation due to Cardinal situation

ISX is ‘closer than
ever’ to break-even



Keith Davies

themselves generate about
$1,000 per listing.

Among forthcoming listings
is likely to be a Bahamian
Depository Receipt (BDR)
offering by Consolidated Water,
which has just won the contract
to build, own and operate the
Blue Hills reverse osmosis
plant. Caribbean Crossings, the
Cable Bahamas subsidiary, is
also understood to be planning
a $25 million preference share
issue to fund the construction
of a fibre optic telecommunica-
tions cable between the
Bahamas and Jamaica, a move
still awaiting regulatory
approval.

Another source said: “Things
are happening in the securities
market that will help BISX

. move forward with or without

the .Government.” The
exchange “expects the next
three to five years to be fairly
positive”, having pared its cost
structure down to align this with
projected income.

See BISX, Page 2B

IndiGo spends iin
on network roll-out

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

IndiGO Networks, the first:
legal competitor to the

Bahamas Telecommunications
-Company (BTC) in the fixed-
line voice market, yesterday
said it had so far invested $4
million in rolling out its net-
work “with a lot more to

come”.

IndiGo’s president Paul
Hutton- -Ashkenny, told the
Rotary Club of West Nassau
that the company planned to

launch services on Abaco.

around “May-time” this year,
and it was hopeful it would
eventually receive regulatory
permission to operate outside
the three islands to which its







licence currently confines it.
’ Under the terms of the

‘licence issued by the Public

Utilities Commission (PUC),
IndiGo can only provide voice
telecommunications services to
customers in New Providence,
Grand Bahama and Abaco.

But Mr Hutton-Ashkenny ©

said yesterday: “We would like
to think we will be able to



Through 40 years

financial solutions





expand outside those three
islands we're licensed to be in
today. Clearly, we'd like to do
a good job there.”

The IndiGO president.
added that it was also “fairly
advanced” in plans to install
its own telephones in high den-
sity tourist areas. The company

See PHONE, Page 2B



of growth and transformation,
one thing has never changed:
our commitment to helping you
achieve your financial goals.

Thank you for making us
your choice for providing

to secure your future.

= FAMILY
GUARDIAN

INSURANCE
COMPANY

EEPORT, ABACO & ELEUTHERA CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O. BOX SS 6232
PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005 THE TRIBUNE





B | SX (From page 1B)

It was suggested last night that the report on implementing the.
16 recommendations for reviving BISX which was being developed
by a committee headed by Central Bank governor Julian Francis,
had been delivered to James Smith, minister of state for finance,
earlier this week. However, The Tribune was unable to contact the
minister to confirm this.

BISX would be able to take “a major step forward” if the Goy-
ernment enacted recommendations such as greater participation in
its listed equities by the National Insurance Board (NIB), which has
$1.23 billion in its reserve fund, and the listing of government
paper - registered stock and Treasury Bills. The listings alone
could add a six-figure sum to BISX’s listing revenues.

Meanwhile, Mr Davies last night confirmed that BISX was “cur-

‘rently seeking alternative arrangements” for the exchange’s
accommodation.

BISX is currently based in the British Colonial Hilton’s Centre
of Commerce in downtown Nassau, but is subletting its premises
from Cardinal International, the fund administrator that is in the
process of winding up its business.

Mr Davies said the need: foe BISX to find alternative accom-
modation was “a year advanced” from where the exchange had
planned to be.

It is understood that BISX would like to remain where it is for the
moment and negotiate another sub-lease with the tenant that
replaces Cardinal International. Among the possible alternatives is
a relocation to the Central Bank of the Bahamas,

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays







Julian Francis, Governor of the Central Bank of the Bahamas, is ee H i
of the BISX implementation committee ote (From page 1B) :

years, and iand surveys and resort desons are still being complet-
ed to determine its viability.

If built, with initial projections looking at a start date of 2006, the
resort is expected to be situated in some 50 feet of water and will
be connected to the Eleuthera mainland through two tunnels and
an escalator. -

The suites will have transparent acrylic. walls facing coral gardens

. that can be lit up at night. And Mr J ones said guests.can expect to
see a large variety of tropical fish, tuna and turtles - even sharks -
from the comfort of their rooms or from a private Jacuzzis.

President of US Submarines Inc, a company that designs, refits:
and sells submarines, Mr Jones said his group is also looking into
a number of other tourism projects around the world. .

The idea of an underwater hotel is not new and a similar project,
the Hydropolis resort, is planned for the waters off Dubai. Investors
in the Hydropolis say resort rooms will go for $500.a night, but Mr
Jones said guests at the Poseidon should expect to pay up.to three
times that. - .

He said: “It's an economic reality. We couldn't do it and make a
profit for less."

Repo rt (From page 1B)

by the Ministry of Immigration and Labour”.
But the industry body also appeared to agree with much of the
Forum’s report, saying: “The jurisdiction needs to ensure that is has
. an adequate cadre of highly skilled individuals or persons with a
wide network of relationships * who are able to. add value to the
financial.services sector. ~~
“In-this regard, the country’s immigration policy should seek to

eine rest Rate & attract individuals who can fill necessary skill gaps to complement
existing professional talent in the Bahamas. The immigration pol-

wie icy should also facilitate the appropriate employment of interna-
> tional staff in global organisations for the long-term benefit of the
industry and Bahamians.”

Other key talking points at the Retreat were the need to build the
Bahamas “brand” through a process involving all stakeholders,
plus the requirement for “greater emphasis” on managing the

. nation’s foreign relations with respect to financial.services.

The BFSB said that to achieve the latter aim it would increase
contacts with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and consulates and
‘high commissions abroad.

Research projects were also needed to identify tax ‘compliant
applications for Bahamian financial services products in the mar-
kets it targeted. The Bahamas also needed to “proactively” grow the
number of institutions based in this nation at a time when industry
consolidation was increasing through mergers and acquisitions.



Phone (From page 1B) eee

was also in discussions with BTC about setting up a toll payment
system so that IndiGo’s Bahamian and tourist pre-paid card cus-
tomers would not have to put coins in to use a BTC telephone. _

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said IndiGo’s next generation broadband ©
wireless network covered 54 per cent of the population of the
three islands it served.

The company was. launching its Grand Bahama services on
March 1, and was making postpaid services to residential cus-
tomers on New Providence available “as of now”. ..

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said postpaid services will enable cus-
tomers to exploit IndiGo’s low long-distance tariff rates even if they
do not have one.of the company’s phones. They would instead be
able to dial a PIN or access code number that would enable them
to access the IndiGo network, paying for calls from an account ey,
would have with the company.

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said IndiGo’s business model was built on
four key characteristics. They were the complete use of next gen-
eration technology throughout the network; network reliability
and built-in redundancy, as “any time off air is not acceptable”;
superior customer service; and “very cost effective” tariff rates.

However, IndiGo had discovered i in launching services to the
S ti b k? : F ‘ & F t' M rt C ; _ business Comunity that HESTON renabilitys rather than lower

; ' } : calling costs, was the main consideration for many companies.
couabank 5 0 rg we Oo rg e 0 9g age am pa Ig n “To have the phone system off the air is simply Teaccspeabile” for
businesses, Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said, adding that the co-exis-
tence of IndiGo’s network alongside that of BTC meant that firms

i mins 1 : : uld have “full redundancy”, sin e would be working if
We're giving away Big Bucks! . : thier ane dda: yee eee $

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said the competition IndiGo was provid-

ing to BTC in the fixed-line,voice market had already driven tariffs

Yes, you can own for as little as 5% down



( i down, with the lower prices already benefiting both commercial and

Have $10,000 or $7,500 of your mortgage balance Forgiven vesadegrtiil (elecorninianicalluns tisees throws sockiced Calling coety
. 66 ith i ion” 2

Or be one of 20 lucky customers to have $250 of a mortgage payment Forgotten He described as." compention in, action. BTC: s four-month

long-distance tariff promotion, which had a structure that “mirrored
IndiGo’s across the board and pitched prices just,lower than ours”.
BTC’s promotion was launched in October last year, the month
after IndiGo’s “soft launch” with a much simplified tariff structure
that divided calls into four regions.

Down-payment as low as 5% (with Mortgage Indemnity Insurance)
Campaign runs until May 13, 2005

\ Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said: “We don’t mind. I think we were
ote bef is : . \ ' actually quite flattered to be copied in that way, and to think we
Call or visit us today and let Scotiabank help you to ‘Forgive & Forget . became so powerful against an incumbent monopoly in just a few

weeks was quite a comforting thought.”

The IndiGo president added that BTC’s previous long-distance
tariffs had been “unwieldy and cumbersome”, featuring standard,
discount and super-saver hours, and different rates for each coun-

Vl i t try and between the first call minute and other minutes.
Rolie oLo lal He said “cynics” might take the view that BTC’s four-month pro-
motion was an attempt to “squeeze IndiGo’s margins” and put the
company out of business before hiking its long-distance rates again.
¢ This was predatory pricing or a prancar at ve its dominant
i " market position to kill off a new entrant, utton-Ashken-
Lite, Money. Balance both. ny said this was why BTC had to apply to the PUC for permission
to lower its prices to prevent it from manipulating the market.

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said: “It’s just been a few short months

since IndiGo was launched. We believe we’ve come a long way.”
‘ ne i \¥



* Trademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia, Trademarks used under authorization and contol of The Bank of Nova Scotia.

Sng ahaa


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005, PAGE 3B



Education reform Is Key to
Bahamas’ competitiveness

By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Tribune Business Reporter

THE re-engineering of the
Bahamian education system is
crucial to developing a work-
force able to compete in a
trade-liberalised global econo-
my, Philip Simon, executive
director of the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce, said yester-
day. He added that there
remained a greater need for co-
operation between all stake-
holders to improve the
Bahamas’ competitiveness.

“Public-private partnerships

can make a significant contri-°

bution to the delivery. of
advanced quality public ser-

vices,” Mr Simon said. “We see ©

regionally and globally that we
operate in a very competitive
environment and have to

improve our education system
to be successful. It is essential
that there is a broad consensus
in relation to the scope of our
partnership and the benefits we
expect to realise in both the
public, private and civil sectors."
As the Bahamas: considers
any number of trade agree-
ments and membership pro-
posals, including the CARI-
COM Single Market & Econo-
my (CSME), World Trade
Organisation (WTO) and the
Free Trade Area of the Ameri-
cans (FTAA), employers con-

tinued to find it challenging to-

recruit, develop and retain a

‘qualified workforce. .

Mr Simon pointed out that it
could be said that. qualified
workers are, on the other hand,
having trouble finding quality
work. While there is some dis-
connect in this area, many

Legal Notice

NOTICE

FOREST HILLS MANAGEMENT
LIMITED

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section
92 (4) of the International Business Companies Act No.
2 of 1990 FOREST HILLS MANAGEMENT
LIMITED is in Dissolution. The date of commencement
of dissolution was the 23rd day of February, 2005. Anita
M. Bain, of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of
FOREST HILLS MANAGEMENT LIMITED.

Anita Bain
Liquidator

Leg al Notice

NOTICE

NAVIGATION SERVICES LIMITED

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section

92 (4) of the International Business Companies Act No. |

2 of 1990 NAVIGATION SERVICES LIMITED i is
in Dissolution. The date of commencement of dissolution
was the 23rd day of February, 2005. Anita M. Bain, of
Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of NAVIGATION

SERVICES LIMITED.

Anita Bain
Liquidator



POSITION AVAILABLE
COMMUNITY LIAISON

OFFICER

The Caribbean Regional Environment
Programme (CREP) is seekin
Community Liaison Officer (CLO).

CLO will engage Andros conamisnilies
and other stakeholders in the CREP

employers would agree that
there is room for improvement
in what they want and what
they see or get.

Another sticking point for the
advancement of the Bahamas
is that career pathways in tech-

nical, vocational and hospitality ...

industries are not actively
encouraged. Students and oth- .
er potential hires are unable to
see the breadth of career
options available to them in
these industries, and therefore
shy away from-entering what
seems to them to.be limited or
"dead end" careers. :

- The most frequently.repeatéed
complaint or desire from -

employers, however, was for an.
improvement in the core com-

> petencies of many in the avail-
able workforce. The level of lit-

eracy, numeracy, basic comput-
er skills, written and verbal

communications, critical think-
ing and customer service orien-
tation were a few of the areas
seen to be lacking in the gener-
al community.

“All of these points speak to
a deficiency in the learning
process and upbringing of our

- youth. And this is not a Gov-

ernment problem, it’s a nation-
al issue. It's the responsibility
of the country,” Mr Simon said.

Addressing the National Pub-
lic-Private Partnership Forum
on Education Re-Engineering

for Economic Competitiveness,

jointly sponsored by the Cham-
ber of Commerce and the pub-
lic sector, Mr Simon said in
looking to re-engineer the edu-
cation system, there was a need

to develop. a post-secondary .

education system that can adapt
quickly and readily to changing
market trends.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

‘VICCOS LIMITED |

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the
undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or
before 11th April A.D., 2005. In default thereof they will be |
excluded from the benefit of any distribution made by the

Liquidator.

Dated the 21st day of February A.D., 2005.

‘Sarah M. Lobosky
LIQUIDATOR
. Harry B. Sands, Lobosky Management Co. Ltd.
Shirley House
50 Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas

~ DIVIDEND NOTICE

PREMIER COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE
INVESTMENT CORPORATION LIMITED

TAKE NOTICE that the Board of Directors of
PREMIER COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE
-INVESTMENT CORPORATION LIMITED has
resolved to declare a Quarterly dividend in the
~ amount of Nineteen and one-half cent ($0.195) per
share for all shareholders of record as of the close
of business on the 21st day of February, 2005, the
same to be payable on the 28th day of February,

2005.

All payments shall be made through SG Hambros
Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited, the Registrar &
Transfer Agent, pursuant to the instructions of the
relevant shareholders on the files of SG Hambros -
Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited as at the 21st day



of February, 2005.

Gregory K. Moss
Secretary



Colina

He said it was also important
to reframe and change the
mindset and marketing of hos-
pitality, tourism and occupa-
tional careers, and create a
more efficient and cost-effec-
tive process that would develop
a higher quality of graduate.

Prime Minister Perry Christie
and Alfred Sears, minister of

education, were also in atten- ©

dance at the launch of Opti-
mism and Opportunity: A Pre-
sentation and Dialogue on Pub-
lic-Private Partnership, which
was held at the British Colonial
Hilton.

The intensive interactive’.
forum was said to begin the cre-
ation of a sustainable frame- ~.

, work for public-private collab-"
oration in improving educa- -
tion's response to workforce “.

development for economic
competitiveness.

The forum was the inaugural
event of the Education and
Training for Competitiveness
(ETC) programme, funded by a
Government loan from the
Inter-American Development
Bank (IDB). The event was
hosted by IBM Bahamas and
the Ministry of Education, and

‘was designed and produced by

the Chamber and its consultants
to foster the evolution of an
education and training system
that meets the demands of the
business community for skilled
human resources. |

Two recently-released stud-

ies; one commissioned by the’

Chamber, A strategic Frame-
work for Optimizing Benefits
from Trade Liberalization in the

employ a

Responsibilities inolude:





experience in sales.






A growing Technology Solutions Provider i is seeking to
Client Account Manager |

The successful candidate should be self-motivated with
strong communication and networking skills. Experience
with technical products is not necessary as training will
be provided. However, the successful candidate should
have a proven track peo in sales and an ipernetng:

Managing axiating' élient accounts
Developing new clients - Sorin
Selling and marketing. products:
Managing the Marketing Budget’.
Reporting to the Board of Directors

The successful candidate should:have a Bachelors
Degree in business or science with.a minimum of 2 years

Remuneration and Benefits will include a competitive
salary, monthly bonus for meeting sales targets, car
‘ allowance, group health and pension.

Please submit a resume to:-
Ms. J Forsythe, PO Box EE17034, Nassau, Bahamas
Or apply online at http:/Avww.emagine.bs/cam

Closing date for applications is March 18th

Bahamas and a Report on Trade
Liberalisation by the Tourism
Task Force, both concluded that
the business sector needs to
increase its level of efficiency
and productivity while decreas-
ing the cost of inputs and raising
the quality of its human .
resource stock. Mr Simon said it
still remained that the business
community, along with the pub-
lic sector, must continue to
invest in people "because peo-
ple make the difference".

While the country was found

to be adequately prepared for .
“trade liberalisation in only three

out. of :28- ‘areas-- as a net

exporter of services, solid infra-
structure a and the level of trans-
. parency. - it fell-short in areas
that were: critical factors for suc-

cess . Areas such as skilled
labour, continuing training,
investment in learning and test-
ing, human development and
co-operation between stake-
holders, will require the imme-

- diate attention of both the pub-

lic and private sector if the
country is to move forward, he
said.

















TWYNAM HEIGHTS

Bank Approved Financing
$330,000
3 Bed. 2 Bath:
4 bed 3 1:2 bath
3,000 sq.
up to BS25,000.00 Gift

823-4365 * 557-1996

ne ee ce



































“TDELULY



Financial Advisors Ltd.



Poet activities and provide support for

nore Manager. The position is based
with CREP Project, in Fresh Creek,
Andros.

Pricing Information As Of:
24 Febru: 2005

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

British American Bank
Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Kerzner International BDRs
Premior Real Soe

Skills Required

* Team player able to work with

communities throughout Andros

e Excellent oral and written
communication skills

© Willingness to travel and to work
outside normal hours when
necessary

e Awareness of environmental issues

would be an asset

Qualifications

¢ Familiar with the communities of
Andros
° Strong facilitation skills for
meetings and workshops

¢ Computer literate
* Ability to plan/ conduct
community meetings and

! workshops

SoR aw
13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.40 RND Holding
cmnmenminss ee
28.00 ABDAB
13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.35 RND Holdings

52wk-Hi
1 is ;

none



0.810
0.000

1.105
-0.103 _









If you are interested in this exciting oo

S2wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Divs... Yield %
opportunity please send resume, cover 1.2095 1.1529 Colina Money Market Fund 1.209527" s Si o
letter & other supporting documentation 2.11914 1.8944: Fidelity Bahamas G &|Fund =—.2.1105 ***
to: 10.2648 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.2602*****
2.1746 2.0524 . ‘Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.166020"

1.0894

1.0276 Colina Bond Fund



CREP Position OR:
PO. N-4105 P.O. Box 23338
Nassau, Bahamas Fresh Creek, Andros

Material wet, also be delivered
CREP/ANCAT office, Fresh Cree
by e-mail to: exancat@batelnet.bs

CREP Position __1.089371***

YIELD - last 12 month dividandé divided by. doting keke

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity :..

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity °°

Lest Price - Last traded overdue onan ; ,

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported eamings per share for the last 12 mthe
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 19904 = 100

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX.- 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00. -
S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

i Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Dalty Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

hand to the
Andros or

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings
** - AS AT JAN. 31, 2005/ **** - AS AT DEC. 31, 2004
* 9 : siete

All app! lications must be received by
riday 11th March 2005


PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005

THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS

Economic growth depends

on the educational system

By YOLANDA
- DELEVEAUX
Tribune Business Reporter

Education minister Alfred
Sears said yesterday that the
economic growth and develop-
ment of the Bahamas depends
largely on the capacity of the
education system to upgrade
the skills and competencies of
| the existing workforce, as well

NOTICE TO

- labour market.

-market integration to improve

as trainirig new entrants to the -

“The Bahamas remained chal-
lenged by regional and global

basic work skills among sec-
ondary school graduates, to
address skill shortages in the
industry and service sectors, and
to generate new opportunities

See BOOST, Page 6B.

SHAREHOLDERS

The Board of Directors of Finance
Corporation of Bahamas Limited hereby




PUBLIC NOTICE _
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, MACKENSON LUTUS, -

of Minnis Subdivision, off Golden: ‘Isles; P.O. Box N-1000,
Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name to KENNY










MACKENSON LUTUS. If there are any objections to s to this
change of name by Deéd Poll, you may write such ©
objections to the Chief: Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) ans after the
date of publication of this notice.

notifies all of its Shareholders that the Bank’s
actual net profit, based on unaudited results
for the quarter ended 31st January 2005 was
$4,563,383. As aresult, an interim dividend
of twelve cents (12 cents) per Ordinary Share
will be paid on 10th March 2005, to all
shareholders of record as of 4th March 2005.






LINUX SYSTEM ADMINISTRATOR / TECH SUPPORT
JOB DESCRIPTION: ;

The Bank’s total assets stood at
$553,745,481 for the quarter ended 31st
January 2005.

Support Linux server infrastructure and provide technical support
and pre-sales assistance. :

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES en oe

* College or university degree.

° 2+ years experience with Linux in a server environment
° Strong ability to communicate effectively

¢ Strong organizational skills |;

You must posses experience offering tech support in ‘multiple
mediums, such as telephone, email, support tickets, etc: Must
have experience offering shared and dedicated server support
for. software, configuration and hardware issues.

KEVA L. BAIN

Cee SECRETARY Scie Rime

Based on experience level.
PLEASE FAX YOUR RESUME TO:

502-8723.
(Bahamian citizens only need apply)

| Dated this 25th February, 2005



Alfred Sears

Mignon (Nassau) Limited|

<.
| ~ |
A newly registered Securities Investment Advisory firm A N S B AC H E R
| _. The Ansbacher group, specialists in private banking, fiduciary services
and wealth management, has an opening in the Bahamas for a

| SENIOR SECURITIES, FOREIGN EXCHANGE
_ AND MONEY MARKET TRADER

Redonting directly to the Head of Banking, Securities ad
Operations, the jobholder will be the primary trader for the bank.
The individual will be responsible for all securities and foreign
exchange trading for the bank. To place deposits and manage
liquidity with correspondent banks on a daily basis to maximize
use of the banks assets. To ensure at all times, the bank operates
within bank placement limits as set by the Group.

Is seeking candidates for the position of

Fund Accounting Supervisor/Compliance officer

Candidates should possess the following qualifications: ;

¢ Certified Public Accountant or equivalent accounting -
qualifications

e Series 7 Examination

e 3-4 years experience in fund accounting, possibly for a fund
administrator

e Fluency in French would be an asset To ap ply, candidates must:

Have a minimum of 3 years active trading experience with a

Personal qualities: _ recognized financial institution, preferably at a managerial level.

Have a thorough understanding of the global financial landscape
and be able to understand and execute transactions in securities,
treasury, futures and options, structured products and foreign
exchange.

¢ Ability to work independently
¢ Excellent organizational skills
¢ Commitment to quality and excellence

¢ Self motivated.
Be ntoficient in the use of spreadsheets and database software
including Bloomberg.
Responsibilities: Holding a relevant degree, professional qualification such as Series
mh A 7 or equivalent work experience (minimum of 5 years)
¢ Fund Administration control and supervision
¢ Compliance Officer

¢ Office manager

Be a self starter who is detail oriented and able to work/think and
communicate effectively under pressure within a team environment.

The successful candidate will enjoy a competitive salary, bonus

Pies eo endlenmil our ee and benefit package, commensurate with skill and experience.

Mignon (Nassau) Limited
PO Box AP 59223#365
Nassau, The Bahamas
sp@mignon.bs

Qualified individuals are invited to apply in writing, with a full
resume to:

The Human Resource Manager,
Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited,
P.O. Box N-7768,
-Nassau, Bahamas
Fax 242-326-5020


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005, PAGE 5B




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PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005 THE TRIBUNE

[FREEPORT concreTE | © ONCern rises
| COMPANY LIMITED theft



‘Yo. Gross. profit: :

Dear Shareholders,

We present our first quarter unaudited financial statements ending November 2004 and
once again we are pleased to announce another profitable quarter. First quarter sales
have increased a modest 3.8% over the same quarter last year despite a sales decline in
our concrete operations due to the effects of Hurricanes Frances and Jeanne. The Home _
Centre also sustained significant damage to its leased premises that rendered a portion of
the building unusable. Our gross profit margin was also positively impacted increasing to
30.70% this quarter versus 26.5% in 2004. Despite the serious setbacks, Freeport i.
Concrete Company Limited was able to maintain sales momentum and operating
profitability as evidence by our EBITDA (earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and
amortization), dramatically improving to $436,464 in 1° quarter 2005 versus $205,805 in
2004 fiscal year. After all hurricane related activity FCC recorded improved profitability
of 336% or $279,700 over last year. It should be noted that FCC is expected to record
additional hurricane related income or losses in the second quarter of 2005 pending the
complete settlement of insurance related negotiations.

Additionally, accounts receivables have increased by $223.8K over fiscal year end 2004
driven primarily by an increase in a key account as a result of Hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne. We do not believe it is.a cause for concer as the payment history with this -
customer has been excellent. We however continue to remain vigilant in our collection
efforts and closely monitor our accounts receivable to manage the impact on cash flow.
Our accounts payable also increased over year-end due to our suppliers agreeing to more
extended terms because of the challenges faced post hurricanes. We fully expect that our
accounts payables will be reduced to normal levels by the end of the second quarter of
fiscal year 2005. The most significant improvement however occurred in our cash
position as we experienced an improvement of $1.1M over fiscal year end 2004 due
primarily to the settlement of our hurricane related insurance claims.

We continue to be focused on increasing sales, improving the gross profit margin and

controlling costs and as the company continues to enjoy sales growth and profitability,
. this will be reflected in the value of your shares.

Darvin L. Russell

Ray Simpson
Chief Executive Officer Chief Financial Officer
February 3 2005

Freeport Concrete Company Limited

_ Consolidated Statement of Operations
Three months ended November 30, 2004 with comparative information for 2003

_ (Expressed in Bahamian dollars) : i

; 3 months ended 3 months ended
: November 30, 2004 November 30, 2003
Sales . 5,201,572

5,009,146




Cost of sales



Payroll costs - hiv 639,958
Other operating costs 303,248 221,976
Rent expense _ (99,247. - 125,573
Advertising expense : 42,745 60,061
Utilities expense 59,543 73,889
Other income 2,655 402
1,160,295 1,121,859

income/(loss) before interest, taxes

depreciation and amortisation 436,464 205,805
Depn. and amort. expense (58,668) _- * (94,670)
Net financing income/(expense’ 21,463) _ (26,242
Profit/(Loss) before minority interest 356,334 84,893
Minority interest in gain . 6,515 (1,744)
Net income/(loss 362,849 ; 83,149

\

Eamings per share

Basic and diluted eamings/ (loss) per share $ 0.077 0.018



Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Consolidated Balance Sheet
As at November 30, 2004

. ‘ November 30, 2004 August 31,2004
Unaudited (Audited)

Cash 486,305 58,895
Time deposits 80,043 79,740
Accounts receivable, net 1,941,874 1,718,031
Inventories ; 2,881,434 3,431,533
inventories of spare parts and supplies 147,873 93,246
Deposits and prepaid expenses 341,486 94,980
Total current assets 5,879,015 5,476,425

3,048,274 3,197,387

Fined assets 197,

Total nesgis 8,927,289 8,673,812



LIABILITIES
Bank overdraft $ - 750,341
Accounts payable and accrued

expenses 3,719,113 3,050,784
Warranty Provision 35,267 35,267
Oue to Shareholder 429,022 440,272

Current portion of long term debt 35,022 39,810
Total current Kabilities 4,218,425 4,316,474

Long term fatbility 191,605 196,412
Minority interest (6,515) -
SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

Share Capital 47,083 47,083
Contributed surplus 5,774,868 5,774,868
Appransal excess 1,433,867 1,433,867
Retained eamings (3,094,892) (3,094,892)

Current 362,849

aT TT a
Total equity z 4,523,775 4,160,926

Total liabilities and

shareholders’ $ 8,927,289 8,673,812



on identity

- —— lc

= — - -

-_
-

-_
—
——— ~

——_

~~ “Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers”

= = -

Boost (From page 4B)

NOTICE —

NOTICE is hereby given that KENOL GUE, MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality ‘and Citizenship, for
| registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
| that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25th day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


















NQTICE,



'

dow op tea yy"

i ‘s *” NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
; (No. 45 of 2000)

ZENITH CAPITAL INVESTMENTS LIMITED
- In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137(4) of the
International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), ZENITH’
CAPITAL INVESTMENTS LIMITED is in Dissolution.

The date of commencement of dissolution is 2nd day of December,
2004.

Marlborough Trust Company Limited
P.O. Box 19, Farnley House,
La Charroterie, St Peter Port,
Guernsey GY1 3AG
Liquidator



POSITION AVAILABLE

Caribbean Regional
Environment
Programme

Financed by the
European Union

Administrative
Assistant

The Caribbean Regional Environment
Programme (CREP) is seeking an
; Administrative Assistant to provide
administrative support for the Andros
Conservancy and Trust and the CREP
ee The position is based with ANCAT,
in Fresh Creek, Andros.
Bahamas
Focal Point
Organizations

Skills/Qualifications

© Computer literate, especially Microsoft
Office Suite

¢ Minimum of 2-3 years experience in office
procedures, including performing basic
accounting tasks, operating office
equipment, and receptionist skills

e Excellent oral and written
communication skills

¢ Positive attitude and self motivated

¢ Excellent organisational skills and ability
to multitask

¢ Detail oriented and able to meet
deadlines

° rinse to maintain confidentiality of
records and information

If you are interested in this exciting
opportunity please send resume, cover
letter & other supporting documentation
to:

OR: CREP Position
P.O. Box 23338
Fresh Creek, Andros

CREP Position
P.O. N4105
Authorized by the Nassau, Bahamas
Caribbean Forum of ACP
States
Material may also be delivered by hand to
the CREP/ANCAT office, Fresh Creek, Andros
or by e-mail to: exancat@batelnet.bs

All oy one must be received by
riday 11th March 2005.







for innovative business services
in the Bahamas.

“We need a well-trained, flex-
ible and adaptable workforce
in which graduates from public
schools are technologically flu-
ent and prepared to compete
globally. And we believe that «
the educational theory and
practice of public-private part-
nerships in development repre-

’ sents the best approach to

achieve this outcome,” Mr Sears
said. , .
Addressing the National Pub-

’ lic-Private Partnership Forum

on Education Re-Engineering
for'Economic:'Competitiveness,
dy sponsored by the Cham-



~ ‘ber of Commerce and the pub-

lic sector, Mr Sears said that in |
the past, the public sector has
involved the private sector after
it had already designed its pro-

. jects and is at the point where it

required financial assistance.

This time, he noted, the pub-
lic sector is advocating the
involvement of the private sec-
tor at the outset in the reform of
the Bahamian workforce. Mr
Sears said public sector officials
are interested in the expertise
made available by private sector
involvement at all stages of dis-
cussion.

The Bahamas Government,
with the assistance of the Inter-
American Development Bank
(IDB), has engaged the services
of the International Education
and Collaborative Foundation
(IECF) to establish a public-
private partnership to develop
an education system flexible
enough to respond to labour
market demands in a timely
manner.

IECF will also seek to
strengthen the ability of the
Ministry of Education and tech-
nical career training institutions
to monitor labour market data,
in order to update their training
programmes.

IECF brings to the table:
extensive experience in the
design and implementation of
successful models of public-pri-
vate collaboration in the edu-
cation sector.

Diane Miller, IECF Director
of Global Operations, said the
demand for public private part-
nerships around the world is
increasing. “It's too big a job
for any one government to do
alone. Our mission is to create
a partnership with the right
composition and membership
to ensure success."

The collaborative structure
is expected to include the cre-
ation of a foundation estab-
lished in accordance with the
Foundations Act 2004. ;

"We are pleased to announce
the endowment of the founda-
‘tion by the Fidelity Group of
Companies. McKinney Ban-
croft & Hughes will create the
legal structure; and Ernst &
Young will provide their exper-
tise to structure the operation
and joint implementation from
public, private and civil sectors.
We will, from the beginning,
institutionalise our partnership
to ensure’ transparency,
accountability and responsibili-
ty, borrowing best practices
from the private sector," she

* said.
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2UUd, FAGE /6





OVC auditions
for new products

“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News

NOTICE.

NOTICE is hereby given that DAVID GABRIELE BANGELLI,
BUCCANEER ROAD, LITTLE BLAIR, P.O. BOX SS-19531,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible






:

TEACHING VACANCY

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites
applications from qualified Teachers for positions
available at St John’s College, St Anne’s School,
Freeport Anglican High School/Discovery Primary
School and St Andrew’s Anglican School, Exuma.

SECONDARY

_ Spanish
English Language/Literature
Biology
Mathematic
Religious Studies
Physical Education
Special Education
Librarian
Home Economics

- Nurse

PRIMARY

Upper Primary
Lower Primary
Kindergarten
Computer Studies .

Only qualified Teachers, Nurse, with Bachelor or

Master Degrees from an accredited University or

r 49 College and Teaching Certificate need apply.

Providers ; ee

For further details and application forms, please contact

the Anglican Central Education Authority on Sands
Road at telephone (242) 322-3015/6/7.

Letters of application and/or completed application
forms with copies of required documents must be sent
by Friday, March 11, 2005 to the Anglican Education
Department addressed to:-

The Director of Education
Anglican Central Education Authority
P.O. Box N-656
Nassau, Bahamas








LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE |
CARUPANO INVESTMENTS LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)








~~ Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is -
siedissolution, which commenced on the 14th day of February, | ,
2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid Davis of
P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau, Bahamas.








for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
‘| twenty-eight days from the 25TH day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas. .










BKG/410.03

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS |
GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS

Sealed tenders for B$59,100,000.00 of 91-Day
Treasury Bills will be received by the banking
manager, The Central Bank of The Bahamas,
Frederick Street, Nassau up to 3:00p.m. on Friday,
March 4, 2005. Successful Tenderers, who will be
advised should take up their bills against payment
on Tuesday, March 8, 2005. These bills will be in
minimum multiples of B$100.00. Tenders are to be
on special forms obtainable from The Central Bank
of. The. Bahamas or commercial banks.
















. Tenders must state the net price percent (in multiples
of one cent) and should be marked “Tender for
Bahamas Government Treasury Bills”. The Central
Bank of the Bahamas reserves the right to reject any
or all tenders.







CECILE M. SHERMAN
MANAGER, BANKING DEPARTMENT
THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS




LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
THE SPARTENBURY CO. LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the 14th day of February,
2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid Davis of
P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)

(Liquidator)



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WILLIS DOCTEUR OF MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality: and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/

naturalization should not be granted, should send a written,

and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25TH day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.





LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
PANTERAINC. ~

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000, the
dissolution of PANTERA INC., has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.

Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)

Cordelia Fernander_
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

FLANDER VALLEY INVESTMENTS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in
dissolution, which commenced on the 3rd day of February,
2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid Davis
of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)

Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)







Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)





Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)





LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

REEZE VIEW INVESTMENTS LTD. ©
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the 27th day of January,
2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid
Davis of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

‘Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)

Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

MAGNETRON INVESTMENTS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the 3rd day of February,
2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid
Davis of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)

Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)
PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005 THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS










Volume 25 ® Auturen 2004

Men’s|
WHAT RE
TURNS T

SHE Caribbean reflects the faces and the spirit We are fun - yet, very serious.
. of all Caribbean women.

esesensenesss

SHE Caribbean is the only magazine with a

- SHE Caribbean celebrates women’s direct line to the region’s women, a growing

achievements while highlighting their struggles, and increasingly powerful, affluent section of
their suffering, and prejudices we face. our region.

SHE Caribbean is a beautifully designed SHE Caribbean truly is in syne with the
magazine that insists on the highest standards Caribbean woman. We invite you to be a part
of photography, hard hitting editorials on of this magazine. Or visit us on-line on:

fashion, beauty, health and inspiration. shecaribbean.com .



HARM MT a CMM TeN Nr Selita yr!.


eo

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2005, PAGE 9B

RND HOLDINGS LIMITED FINANCIAL REPORT



Dear Shareholder, Benes \

A
This year has beén a year of change for the company, led primarily by the decision taken In terms of normal operations in 2004, the company demonstrated substantive improvement
by the Board of Directors to sell our cinema assets to our competitors for approximately in its performance as evidenced by the reduction in loss from operations from ($634,010)
$4.7 Million, with $3.1 Million having been paid at the close of the transaction and the in 2003 to $(270,872) in 2004.

remaining balance of $1.6 Million scheduled to be paid in equal monthly installments over
We expect this trend to continue as the company has been restructured to improve operating

the forthcoming five years.
efficiencies, and several managerial positions have become redundant.

The rationale for this decision was based upon three factors —
In conjunction with operating and cost efficiencies, the company will continue to improve

Firstly we were being paid a fair market value for the asset, secondly the sale allowed the its revenue stream by focusing and aggressively building its ticketing business, which will
company to immediately strengthen its balance sheet and overall financial position, and _, be modest initially, but is expected to have a greater impact on our net earnings in the near
thirdly it gave the company the flexibility to move ahead with other initiatives which prior future.

to the sale, we were not in a financial position to pursue.
On behalf of the Board of Directors and our employees, we would like to thank you for your

The sale proceeds allowed the company to realize a gain of $2,622,205 on the book continued support.
value of the assets. This gain provided an opportunity for the company to write-off the
remaining balance of goodwill and franchise fee rights of $606,070 associated with the
purchase of the Golds Gym franchise for the Bahamas and seven (7) other territories in the

Caribbean.
Notwithstanding the write off of the goodwill and franchise rights the company was able

to record a net profit of $1,257,286 for the 12-month financial period ending February





29th, 2004. Jerome K. Fitzgerald
Chairman
RND HOLDINGS LIMITED ses RND HOLDINGS LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET : ; CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY
AS AT FEBRUARY 29, 2004 YEAR ENDED FEBRUARY 29, 2004
{Expressed in Bahamian dollars) : "(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)
2004 2003 ae
Aecel> canning: Total
CURRENT ASSETS: te : Share Share Contributed Revaluation (Accumulated Shareholders’
Cash - : $ 1,851,480 $. 17,463 Capital Premium’ Capital Surplus Deficit) "Equity
Accounts receivable 288,676 214,436 i
Current portion of note receivable 240,000 - Balance Gt
4 : : February 28, 2001 $ 88,562 $5,934,987 $3,175,087 $4,443,229 $ 740,605 $14,382,470
Prepayments and deposits 48,970 62,508
irvantony 34,515 59,499 Net loss for the year - - : - - (963,425) . (963,425) .
Other receivables 229,459 183,196
Total current assets 2,693,100 537,102 Balanes.ot ke
PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT 11,107,304 13,181,985 February 28, 2002 88,562 5,934,987 3,175,087 4,443,229 ( 222,820) 13,419,045
NOTE RECEIVABLE 960,000 : 5 Revaluation decrease
INVESTMENT IN ASSOCIATE, AT EQUITY - 111,658 186,658 ony land ond buildings : : 7 LAAs 2291 = (4449229)
~ OTHER ASSETS ie 222,335 172,708 Net loss for the year of - - _ + (2,452,066) (2,452,066)
FRANCHISE RIGHTS : ; . : - 191,176
~ GOODWILL 414,894 Balance at ‘ :
TOTAL ASSETS “$ 15,094,397. $ 14,684,523 _ February 28, 2003 88,562 Sean 3,175,087 ‘ - (2,674,886) | 6,523,750: ©
, fh emcee Net income for the year - RES : - | 1,257,286 1,257,286
UABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY palanes ot eee ae
CURRENT LIABILITIES: February 29,2004 $ 88,562 $5,934,987 $3,175,087 $. - $ (1,417,600): $ 7,781,036
Bank overdrafts $ 256,538 $ 451,633
Accounts payable and accrued expenses 1,990,420 . 1,761,623
Current portion of long-term debt BS “ *- 281,708 263,559
Other liabilities pee 59,627 136,757
Total current liabilities 2,588,293 2,613,572
LONG-TERM DEBT 4,617,657 4,867,059 RND HOLDINGS LIMITED
DUE TO DIRECTORS ee a 107,411 680,142 ToAW CHBES feenGlay Doe
Total liabilities 3 ! 7,313,361 8,160,773 a (Expressed in Bahamian dollars)
SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY: ea el id es a
Share capital 88,562 88,562 CAR : 2004 2003
Share premium 5,934,987 5,934,987 — ;
Contributed capital 3 : 3,175,087 3,175,087 CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
Accumulated deficit : (1,417,600) ( 2,674,886) Net income (loss) $ 1,257,286 $ (2,452,066)
Total shareholders’ equity 7,781,036 6,523,750 "Adjustments for: eee
TOTAL $ 15,094,397 $ 14,684,523 Loss from associate i - 75,000 44,054
We eee a RCE RI: ae REE Se STNG Depreciation 721,078 882,691
Loss on revaluation - 1,232,535
Write-off and amortisation of goodwill 414,894 232,259
Write-off of and amortisation of franchise rights 191,176 29,412
RND HOLDINGS LIMITED Gain on disposal of cinema assets (2,622,205) girdle
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME Operating cash flows before movements in working capital 37,229 (31,115)
YEAR ENDED FEBRUARY 29, 2004 Increase in accounts receivable (74,240) ( 167,366)
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars) Decrease (increase) in prepayments and deposits 13,538 (10,533 )
ee 2004 a me i Ge obs ne ce
CONTINUING OPERATIONS: se Ss : : ; : : : : eg . : f f :
Bee a a ae ee | erate ee
coe pe TBS 0 ASO Net cash flows from operating activities a 106,91 5 286,777
Gross margin 1,331,875 1,280,427 —————
OPERATING EXPENSES: CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING acl IVITIES: .
“Adi ainiciikve 972,730 1,042,572 Purchase of property, plant and equipment (124,192) (276,725) ;
eal Proceeds on disposal of cinema assets 3,100,000 -
pena ea? staat Payment of transaction costs on disposal of cinema assets. (200,000) -
Other operating 269,862 352,009 : i ;
Marketing 8,676 28,409 Investment in other assets (49,627) ( 172,708 }
Tord operiing axeeies 1,602,747 1,914,437 Net cash from (used in} investing activities 2,726,181 (449,433 )
LOSS FROM OPERATIONS (270,872) ( 634,010] CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
Repayment of borrowings (231,253) (216,487 )
OTHER INCOME (EXPENSES): Advances (repayments to) from directors (572,731) 482,998
Glee ete : + 136,228 Net cash (used in) from financing activities ( 803,984) 266,511
Franchise fees - (11,870) iene op ERR Rog cP 2 ig RR cea
Lace Warcecencinis (75,000) (44,054) NET INCREASE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS 2,029,112 (103,855
Finance costs ( 477,998 } ( 471,677}
Goodwill written-off or amortized (414,894) ( 232,259} CASHAND GASH EQUATES:
Franchise rights written-off or amortized (191,176) (29,412) BEGINNING OF YEAR (434,170) (538,025)
Loss on revaluation : (1,232,535) ' :
Loss from continuing operations ( 1,429,940) (2,519,589) END ‘OF YEAR $1,594,942 $ (434,170)
DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS:
Gain on sale of cinema assets 2,622,205 - eee
; Cash $ 1,851,480 $ 17,463
Income from cinema assets 65,021 67,523 :
Gain from discontinued operations Ee 2,687,226 67,523 bank everdrat ogo 256,598) sh A093)

$ 1,594,942 $ (434,170)
NET INCOME (LOSS) $ 1,257,286 $ (2,452,066)



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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2005, PAGE 11B

Let Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and
his sidekick Derek put.

some smiles on your

kids’s faces.

Bring your children to the
McHappy tlour at McDonald's in
Oaks Field every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the »
month of February 9005.

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun

i'm lovin’ it

"Mi GHTPC UA

Time: Second Floor of ‘
Doors open 11pm

Admission:
$7? w/ Movie Tickets
$15 without

Movie Pass Giveaways!
PAGE 12B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005 THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS
COMICS PAGE



-#

© “copyrighted Material
*.\¢ _ {Syndicated Content

-
» Available from Commercial News Providers”




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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005, PAGE 13B

- TRIBUNE SPORTS

Saints alive!

CLINTON BROWN of Kingsway Academy Saints
dunks against the Crusaders in yesterday’s.action at
the Hugh Campbell Invitational. Saints inflicted the
Crusaders’ second defeat of the tournament.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)


PAGE 14B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005

Knowles




and Nestor

Moirctetn
quarters

& By BRENT
STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter

AFTER two months
and five tournaments,
Mark Knowles and his
Canadian doubles part-
ner Daniel Nestor are
still looking for their first
taste of victory in 2005.

Yesterday at the Dubai
Open, Knowles and
Nestor were ousted in
the quarter-finals, losing
6-4, 6-4 to Martin Damm
and Radek Stepanek.

The duo were the top
seeded team. They easily
won their first round
match, 6-2, 6-2 over
Omar Bahrouzyan and
Younes Elaynaoui.

But they couldn't get it
together in the quarters.

Going into the tourna-
ment, Knowles said he
was still recuperating
from a groin pull he suf-
fered at the Open 13 in
Marseille, France where
they reached their first
final for the year.

Advanced

However, he said he
was feeling okay, despite
the fact that they
advanced to the semifi-
nals at the ABN Amro
World Tennis Tourna-
ment in Rotterdam, the
Netherlands.

But they lost to Suk
and Vizner.

Knowles could not be
reached for comments
yesterday at his hotel
room in ‘Dubai.



| ‘the year in Australia,

‘including the Australian
Open, the first Grand
Slam Tournament.

Knowles and Nestor

are expected to travel to :
«4: the United States this

“week where they will

_ take a break before they ~
|. return to action.

Event

Their neéxtscheduled
events expected to be:
the Pacific Life Open in
Indian Wells, California,
starting on March 7.

_ After that, they will

| move closer to home

where they are scheduled

| to compete in the NAS-

DAQ-100 Open in Mia-
mi, Florida, starting on
March 21.

Knowles and Nestor

' are then expected to take

another break, hopefully
this time to stop over in.
the Bahamas before they
return to the tour and a
run that will lead to the
second Grand slam at the
French Open in Roland
Garros, Paris, France
starting on May 23.

The French Open and
Wimbledon, which fol-
lows in London, England
on June 20, are the only
two Grand Slam titles
that Knowles and Nestor
have not won as a team.

i The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
‘good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. —

t If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

FORMER world heavy-
weight champion Michael ‘Dou-
ble M’ Moorer is excited about
being in the Bahamas for the
first Class Promotion’s Night to
Remember professional boxing
show.

He’s even more ecstatic
about being in the corner of
Bahamian lightweight Meach-
er ‘Pain’ Major tonight when
he takes on a Canadian oppo-
nent at the Radisson Cable
Beach Resort & Casino.

“Meacher has a style of box-
ing. He has a lot of finesse and
skills and speed and talent,”
said Moorer, who along with
trainer Anthony ‘Chills’ Wilson
will be working in his corner in
the co-main event of the
Bahamas light middleweight
title bout between Jerome
‘Bahamian Bronze Bomber’
Elis and Wilson ‘Kid Wonder’
Theophile.

Gym

The trio all train together at
the Warriors Boxing Club in
Fort Lauderdale..And, based
on what he’s saw in the gym,
Moorer said if they can just get
Major to sit down on his punch-
es, his speed and power will

4 enable him to fight a lot better

than he’s doins now.

“I’m sure it’s going to be an
exciting show,” Moorer noted.
“This is their first one for the
year, but they’ve had many in
the past, so they should progress
with every show.”

The 37-year-old 6-foot-2
southpaw, who was born in
Brooklyn, New York, is work-
ing on rebuilding his own career
after he held the WBA and IBF
world titles before losing to
George Foreman in 1994 when
he was knocked out in the 19th la
round. ig

He regained the IBF. title in
1996 over Axel Schulz in Dort-
mund, Germany and defended
it twice before he lost to Evan-
der Holyfield for the second

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Former boxing champion
Moorer in Major’s corner



@ FORMER undisputed world heavyweight champion Michael Moorer (left) shares a moment with Tabernacle coach Norris
Bain; Moorer’s trainer Anthony ‘Chills’ Wilson and Olympic bronze medallist Frank Rutherford. Moorer and Wilson are here
to support Meacher ‘Pain’ Major tonight at the Radisson Cable Beach Resort & Casino.

“I was.bored with the sport. I
was tired of boxing and I just
wanted to take some time off,”
said Moorer, who would go into
a three-year hiatus.

In 2000, he returned to the
sport and has been on a 8-2-1
win-loss-draw stint since. His
latest fight was an eight-round
knockout victory in December.

“A lot of people were
shocked by it. They didn’t
believe that I could do it,” said
Moorer, who is gearing up to
return to the ring in May.

z= Wheil asked if he fees he can
- regain that lofty: position asa
world champion again, Moorer
declared that he’s working on
it, but there’s no timeframe to
accomplish the feat.

“You have to be put in the
right position,” he stressed. “As

long as I keep winning and keep
my name out there, people will
want to see me and demand
that I get a title shot.”

Although he’s even fought in
seven fights, Moorer feels that,
in time, Major will get a shot at
a world title.

Guided

“He has the talent, but he has
to have the will, which I think
he does,” Moorer declared. “It’s




possible. He has to be guided -

right and put in the right
tion.

“So if I can work wit
as far as letting him settle down,
and put more power in his’
punches, he will definitely be a
world champion.”

Wilson, who has worked with

time in 1997.



aureno makes

Bahamian history i



Dominican Republic

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

BAHAMIAN Taureno ‘Reno’ Johnson put
on an historic show Wednesday night at the
Independence Cup Amateur Boxing Tourna-
ment as he upset a Russian opponent.

Johnson’s stunning 3-2 victory in the welter-
weight division was the first by any Bahamian
over a Russian at any international competition.

“First of all, I want to thank God. It was
through him that I was able to accomplish this,”
said Johnson yesterday from his hotel room in
Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.

“To fight the Russian and move on to the
semifinal was a big accomplishment for me. I
fought a Dominican Republican in my first match
and I have another one to go through to get to
the final to fight for the gold medal.”

The 21-year-old seasoned amateur boxer who
has fought in numerous international competi-
tions is the only member of the Bahamas three-
member team still left in the week-long ens
tition.

. pos : e,°e
Competition

Middleweight Daryl Dorsett, 20, was stopped
in the first round of his bout on the first day of
competition by a Russian, while heavyweight
James McKenzie, 28, went the distance before he
lost a close, 3-2 decision to a fighter from the
Dominican Republic.

Johnson, according to team manager George
Turner, was the only boxer to defeat any of the
Russians at the tournament. He said that the
Russians have dominated the match ups with
the Cubans.

Prior to travelling with the team, Johnson had
just returned from Cuba where he spent the past
month and a half training. He credited the expe-
rience to his performance against the Russian.

“He was a very sound, strong, technical and
swift guy,” Johnson reflected. “But for me to
out-fight him, I had to use a lot of wit and tech-
nical manoeuvres. I had to fight a lot with my
heart.

“I had to fight and push a lot. Those were

some of the things that I learned in Cuba.

“He was strong,.but I realised that it wasn’t

about his power.

“But who endured to the end. That was how I
beat him.”

Before he left town with the three-member
Bahamian team last week, a confident Johnson
said he was going after the most improved fight-
er award and it didn’t matter who he had to go
through to achieve the feat.

“It’s not a coincidence, but it is my aim and
goal to win the award and I’m sitting good for the
best boxer of the tournament, so I’m not going to
allow anything to deter me from that goal,” John-
son insisted.

Action

“T’m going to go out there and fight my hard-
est. I’m sure that, if I put everything that I learndd
into action, I will be successful.”

The way he’s fought so far in the tournament,
Turner said he’s just as convinced that Johnson
have the ability to come out as the champion. *

And he couldn’t stop singing the praises of:
Johnson’s triumph. ¢

“I think it’s a great accomplishment. I think ;'
that it’s a positive step forward for us towards the +
2008 Olympics,” Turner stressed. 3

“I think Reno is very, very focussed. The oth-’
er boxers are also very focussed, but against the’
Russians, we have never seen a performance
like this. I think it was only because it was Reno,
Only Reno could have performed the way he’.
did.” ®
Turner, the federation’s secretary, said’the:
training sessions in Cuba ‘have certainly paid off
and they hope that the Ministry of Youth, Sport§
and Culture will see the need to further facilitate
the programme when Johnson returns from the
Dominican Republic. *

Also accompanying the team are federatida
president Wellington Miller, head coach Andre
Seymour, assistant coach Leonard ‘Boston Black:
ie’ Miller, team doctor Francis Saunders and ref:
eree/judge Alvin Sergeant. ;

Sergeant, who was also impressed with John-::
son, said he’s been just as busy as the boxers, hav-'+
ing to both judge and referee a number of match-:
es from day one.



Moorer since they were ama-
teurs, said he’s also looking for
some great things from Major in
the. future.

But, for now, he’s just con-
cerned about watching him take
care of his opponent tonight.

“T want him to dedicate the
fight because he’s working up
to fight six rounds now,” Wilson
stressed. “He just have to take
his time, see what the man
brings to him and then he can

- go to work.

“He’s a good fighter. He can
put his combinations togeth Sf,
So if he takes control ei the:
fight, he will come out on’ top.”
He just has to stay active.”

. While this is all about busi-
ness, he’s brought along his
fiancé, Debbie Haskell, and his
daughter, Morgan Moorer, to
help him enjoy his trip here.

Moorer was greeted and wel-
comed to the Bahamas by
Olympic bronze medallist Frank
Rutherford and Tabernacle
Baptist Falcons’ coach Norris
Bain.



“It’s a testament to how won-
derful the Bahamas is,” said
Rutherford, who is here along
with Baltimore Raven’s wide
receiver Devard Darling to
watch the prestigious Hugh
Campbell Basketball Classic.

“We attract a lot of people
like Michael Moorer and his
trainer. So it’s good to see this
calibre of people who come to
our country. Hopefully we can
see more of these current or ex-
champions come to endorse the
programme by Ray and
Michelle Minus.”

Atid Bain, who will attempt
to become the most successful
coach in the Hugh Campbell
Tournament, couldn’t agree’
more.

“It’s a great experience to
meet someone who has been on
top of the world in Michael
Moorer,” Bain stated. “This
says alot about our country.
We just have to make sure that
we can treat them with the kind
of hospitality that this great
country is known for.”

7) | Roger Federer

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com MIAMI HERALD SPORTS







& By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

FIVE teams were sent packing ‘early
Thursday morning, with questions sur-
rounding two top teams from Freeport,
Grand Bahama.

Temple Christian Suns, Galilee Mira-
cles, CC Sweeting Cobras, Nassau Chris-
tian Academy and Alpha and Omega
were all eliminated from the Hugh Camp-
bell tournament yesterday, with the Sun-
land Baptist Stingers and Eight Mile Re
BlueJays struggling.

The Suns, Miracles, Cobras and Cru
saders all collected their second loss of
the tournament, after turning in some of
the lowest scores in the Invitational so:
far.

Forcing these teams to watch from the:
stands were CI Gibson, RM Bailey,
Kingsway Saints and Doris J ohnson Mar.

Verge

The Omegas were the first Freeport
team to pack it up and head back Grand. |
Bahama, with Freeport Anglican High
lying on the verge of elimination. ~

However, the game between the Mar:
lins and the Cobras was a real dog figh
with the.Cobras trying to stay alive.

Cobras had a steaming first quarter ‘and
kept the Marlins in sight.

This was the same case in the. see
and third quarters, but in the final -four
minutes of the game the Cobras seemed -
to have lost the push they had earlier. =-:-

More teams are expected to. leave the
tournament today.

The question of ineligibility has beak.
lurking around the tournament from
before the opening tip.

Players

Teams will be penalised for allowing
players who weren’t cleared from the Invi-
tational’s committee to play. :

On the opening day, defending cham- :
pions CI Gibson Rattlers defeated the St
Annes Bluewaves, but lost the game after
they allowed Terrance Brown to play. |.

This was the same case for the Marlins,
who played on the second day of the tour-
nament.

Marlins defeated the Faith Temple’
Warriors and were expecting to move on
to play the Aquinas Aces.

However, the Warriors advanced to the
play the Aces, where they tasted defeat

Both the Rattlers and Marlins wi
forced to the left side of the tournameit
chart, having to fight their way out of an.
intense battle.

Stingers, who are playing out of Beak
IV, faced off with Abaco Marlins, finally
defeating them 46-25, while the BlueJays
took on the number one team from
Freeport, Tabernacle Falcons. = 2s

Falcons destroyed the BlueJays, defeat-
ing them 43-25.



ee ! / a 7 Tages |
@ MYSTIC MARLINS on their. way: oe Bsrotpesaisinans
to eliminating the CC Sweeting: a 7 a a ae —./

Cobras yesterday. .

(Photo: Felipé Majar/

Tribune staffy


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