Citation
Merry little playmates  pictures and stories for little folks

Material Information

Title:
Merry little playmates pictures and stories for little folks
Creator:
Griset, Ernest Henry, 1844-1907 ( Illustrator )
Cox, Palmer, 1840-1924 ( Illustrator )
Taylor, William Ladd, 1854-1926 ( Illustrator )
International Publishing Co. (Philadelphia, Pa.) ( Publisher )
Chicago Engraving Company ( Engraver )
Place of Publication:
Chicago
Philadelphia
Publisher:
International Publishing Company
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 26 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1895 ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1895 ( lcsh )
Baldwin -- 1895
Genre:
Children's stories
Children's poetry
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Frontispiece printed in colors; text and illustrations printed in blue.
General Note:
Some illustrations engraved by Ernest Griset and the Chicago Eng. Co. after W. L. Taylor and Palmer Cox.
Statement of Responsibility:
beautifully illustrated.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026641044 ( ALEPH )
ALG4497 ( NOTIS )
231833466 ( OCLC )

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Full Text














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Merry Littie Playmates.

Sines ele
eas,

(/) ren de Ste for
Cl Gitte Folks



BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED.

Copyrighted 1895, by Robert O. Law.

INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING COMPANY,

Consolidated with and Successors to
>



MAMMOTH PUBLISHING CO. AND Ww. W. HOUSTON & CO,
CHICAGO, ILL. ayo PHILADELPHIA, PA.



A GREAT READER.






lads-and- kassies- come - listen -a A-Look- JG,
Nerves, +e or an bine: oe w aoe ayee the: book Se
Vent sai S25 *




aw a ap
oe oe ater ors wat
etter OS) ey
“\a oe to “tyath - j
TeDMEN G- net at. our Alli ae hy,
Cate ed eee, eS oe oe ie
2 +5
oe Reel oh 1) oem oo.

o. ose bf
s ae CON ow + Ae, fot oral b
Aye %




a C.-2%..4 Vin WE Sine



g
gonecenecsees



M = turns the leaves and knows the
e words tell stories. She looks at the

pictures and pretends she can read.

She says: “This is ‘bout a girl:
prob’ly she tore her dress. This is "bout
a rabbit ; prob’ly he stepped on a trap.
This is bout an ant and a bee; prob’ly



they fought for the biggest honex y-drop. ”



THE NANNY GOAT.





Now we'll dance, TAKING A RIDE. With whip in hand,
And Nan can prance, an ee At my command,
For ’tis a sump er day; THE Our goat will dash away;

When ’tis cold, You'll ride behind,
Then she'll be old, Na 1) DY Goat. And you will find,

And then she’ll draw our sleigh. } V'll be a driver gay.

(ile, z
1 a)





Tee
aon NZ
iis 2.
Pee pcs

NFU nue oT

elf.
read -All-the

elk:

bac et ae C

«Wace .

tud oe and Apples»

between "POU -
and-méeé- |





THE CAT AND THE SPARROWS.





‘ls: For Bob- one- of Ali t :

ane op. aa 5 ee ‘9: Brcthos ers
d-tied.a* Bi d

Pwi-tie ea Ae i exrneath

Ll > How Ale ee taugh” ep. aber chayood: ta: co aN















4



i
i
i
\

WI is very algicult to
teach a cat that ‘the
must not catch the
sparrows. But even
this can be done, with care and
patience. In Barnum’s Happy
Family there used to be cats, dogs,
rabbits, birds and mice, all in the
| same cage, and not one of them
would harm any of the others. It
was not an unusual thing to see
a canary bird perched on a cat’s
back, while pretty little mice ran
about her and over her paws.





KITTIE’S TEA,







Hill 5
| : | a thi
| rams 4 {ie = H @
éf 5 Le Hi M
Seal) S ; “4 , i" m
Fp ‘i Se f z - A
j ne} 24,

















































































i Bue YA ee Saar ey
ae Wy oe a
py FS 7/7 Sg
———_ . ee
Kittie’s Tea.
IVE little pussies, Five little pussies,
( Sitting down to tea; Dressed all in silk,
*\ Pretty little pussies, Waiting for the sugar,
-Happy as can be! Waiting for the milk
Three little pussies, Dear little pussies,
All in a row, If you would thrive,
Ranged on the table, Breakfast at nine o’clock,
Two down below. Take tea at five.

\

raga —— FH

SS |
? . Ni si q
-Yorrthe «Gream + and-tho-nfce-
a se ne
PX’ ee, Cat When , she -Criods
Â¥ But tho naught Cat- Cli ae
B. Wang upres Cal: Chopped to

Hig

Hen. No: dn&* was: looking’ ands ~
WwW) just Nyorseleee

nhl on

we Orn a an
5
Ae ora









GENIE’S ALMANAC.















AP

f|'s- ron- Dor.-Dora-
WHO - RIGHT +
WAVE - BEEN: DROWNED
oh | Bvr. SWE -cAvaNT -
BY “WER: DRESS - NOT: A: YARD:
< FROM:THE «GROUND:
Han poon- Denk AeA:
CALLED: AND: CRIED-
TILL: | - WEARD: Ww

IBUT- BELIEVE: ME-
out: DERA : SAID -WE
dex

é WV AGA » ‘i
ase ba 5 es as i, us A! te
sti on



















a

et
ionehls Si
we ol Ii ~ is ~
linen hn ee GE




Genie’s Almanae.

MONDAY to wash all my doily’s clothes;
Lots to be done, as you may suppose,
Tuesday to iron and put away,

That takes a body the livelong day.
Wednesday to darn, to fix, and to mend,:
Plenty of sewing, you may depend.
Thursday, if shining, we visiting go,
Then we are dressed in our best, you know
Friday, oh then we go out to shop,

@uee on get started, ’tis hard to stop.
Saturday, polish, scrub and bake,

Tired out, hardly can keep awake.
Sunday, oh, that day of all is the best,

Gilad it is here; now we can rest.



MY SHIP.



My Ship.

Now, little ship, go out te














sea,

And bring good fortune back
to me;

But don’t, like papa’ s‘‘ship,””
I pray,

Be gone forever and a day.

He’s always saying what
hell do,

When zs ship comes to
land;

But somehow it has never

come,

Why, 1 don’t understand.



THE FATHER’S CARE.



SS

SS

SS

| pea EE ios
ne ek

a8); ep Yoo-Joo : a. Reree-little “man-
a-t

o -liVed-on-a-Funny old -Japaneye- yf

he-e¢ ‘ld@en Fig saw hin i. gave- ; '
: <7 play With ooo -Jrom-
ey. nen play SAE 4

mM orm ine : “Ad
5) mee Rei dee a ak

effi i i
iG "i SS Fd
Boyt Wek Je
a, é

The Father's Gare

(Babyland.) ”



The darling birds are warm.
Yes, feather on feather
All close together,





The darling birds are warm! ” a.
They care not whether Na
"Tis stormy weather, |

For they are safe from harm.

With feather on feather,
_ Tho’ it’s stormy weather :
The darling birds are warm.






Z

/
g

ae

it
)







THE GOLDEN RULE.

The Golden Rule.

(Babyland.)





"Tis a kind little dog,

‘Tis 2 kind little cat:

When the dog has a treat,
Why, the cat shares that;
When the cat makes a feast,
Then the dog she invites;
And the cat does not scratch,





















And the dog never bites. ZB LE

I know two little boys, i
They are named Nedand Nat; ee

— But I much rather write I have good reasons why;
Of the dog and the cat, But never will tell

And the eee how mo 1O. Noll

ott Ru
ees GAIN .Cfary-
NO-HELD: UP: HER: DRESS:
oe *SHOUUDN 'T
ai se Nea
Pa TRE: GEESE A: RAN
“AFTER:
1 AND: MADE: A:@REAT -
DiI No
aa oe
y OATS S:‘@ERTY «
UE 39» de j

ce NY Bee a
= oy gil I. ee oti ar

ae
nue
a Seren,

eM





BABY’S WANTS.

/ s s Cre
LS\ WS ae * SS
~ the: Hey angst Heaped. High
sit g-ebjidren: work. Meppily a a
Oy - aa
d. Ube: vase yigveus. balby- Melps- ~ 3" 2

ly- Hid. by. pis. oe Whe rly young, -POVEr =



Baby’s Wants.



I want that long sunbeam,
—I wish I couldwwalk!
I want the canary,
I wish I could talk!
I want to roll over, |.
—TI think I will try!

I want my dear mamma,





t wisi I neh TALK ene Pm glad | can cry!





MABEL’S TREASURES.









[N\abel’s Jreasures.

[Ao ABEL, has had many treasures
64 inhertime. Dolls of all sorts.
Dolls that would wink, and
dolls that would go to sleep, and
dolls that would cry ‘‘Ma”’ and
‘‘Pa’ and dolls that were dressed in
garments fit for a queen. But these
three little kittens are dearer to her
than all her treasures besides, and for
this estimate of them, she gives a very
sensible and sufficient reason. ‘‘ Dolls
can’t know you and love you,’’ she says;
“but kittens can, and my little kittens
just love me with all their little hearts.
They purr and never scratch. And
when they have had their breakfast they just snuggle down in my arms as if I was their
own real, sure-enough mother.’’ Mabel is quite a little philosopher in her way, though she
don’t know it. Our real treasures, after all, are those we love, and those who love us. And
it’s better for little girls to love a little kitten than to grow selfish and not love anything.






















































|. vor-lhal'- Annocenl - smoolth-
oy ¥ Hon rg -Jce- 9
hat looked to- poor. Bob-
go Inviting and. nice:
Orwpo- L-will® stidet”
@* lmprudemtly - evied
Avot: ys -wisled s pretty - soon. |
ns 6- NeVer- LA 22 :

oh

3 tried z





THE STOLEN CUSTARD.





















THE STOLEN CUSTARD. I.





















Pll
cana un i me

am: Alice -

aljelx -
30 5”

kK; but- se
OF DEE: ae iv:

os ed-

| 9





ie For dainties was sick,

e So he slyly stole into the kitchen,
Snatched a cup from the pantry,
And darted out quick,

Unnoticed by mother or Gretchen.

Whispered he, ‘‘ There’s no cake,
For to-morrow they bake,
But this custard looks rich and delicious ,
How they’ll scold at the rats,
Or the mice or the cats; ; |
For of me, I don’t think they’re suspicious,



THE STOLEN CUSTARD.



“They might have filled up
Such a mean little cup!
And for want of a spoon, I must drink it.
But ’tis easy to pour—
Hark! who’s that at the door?”
And the custard went down ere you’d
think it.

With a shriek he sprang up,
To the floor dashed the cup;
Then he howled and tumbled and blus-
tered,
Till the terrible din
Brought the household in—
He had swallowed a cupful of mustard!



<=





OM ¢
if ce
Hal \ Oz

a
Hl 9

} : TO a ite - puch ete 8
he- string:



: Kind Momiia. tied tH

Qur thes want blew Taed Und . the:
: Wale -ylew - awa -
he boys: wonder,

°

ones to- this as whe h ie
\

£\ edt



LP 2,



A LITTLE DANCE.

ov-the- Lad, land

Whe Laasséy Ww Deen
% : A Pe itees.

| i ek

Maar gé: OWEY: dvd: g
nel-ouvt- own: 1&ittle- "Lady §
he - Laagt - oF - —



Oh, it is fun! Oh, it is fun!

To dress ourselves up, as Grandma



has done.
See how we go! See how we go! -

Forward and back, heel and toe.

Lighter than down, our fee. come

down.





Mind all your steps and hold out
your gown;

Faster than that, whatever may hap,

Cherry red waist aud blue speckled



cap. |

/ IN PARCY DRERS



A LITTLE



_ Hi! Master John! Ho! Master John!

Don’t go to sleep while the music
goes On;

| Faster than that!

Hold up your head and flourish

Faster than that |








your hat 1

How she trips it along, that bright
little maid,

With her dainty: blue skirt and
spotted brocade;

And that one in yellow, who wears
the red rose—

How she keep her mouth a

and turns out her toes!



[
[iv avis ae ui Ao




eee

rn \ ac

DANCE.



How they do spin! when they truly
begin ;

Each dancer as airy and bright as
a doll;

While the music complete keeps
time to their feet,

With its fiddle-dee-diddle and tol:

de-rol-ol !
Oh, it is fun! Oh, it is funl
To dance, when every duty is
. done;

Forward and back, or all in a ring,

A auick little dance is a very gay.

thing.

a.

GQervy >
WEE: Maidén-

ATA dl : tell:

you [al

= 6) a

ee














ale










lets (jvm



THE DOLL’S MISSION.

young - Bueg ae
Rered. Red

he Never.
Fired -

ov dice
a ee



y-
\ A
bei a af





. Ghe Doll S NIETO:

ZES, Fido ate Anna-
bel’s head off;

I really suppose she
is dead;

And Dora has swallowed
| her eyeballs;

And Claire has a crack

in her head.



DOLL’S MISSION,



THE DOLL’S MISSION.



But Eva has gone on a mission,
A regular mission, not fun;
She lives at the hospital yonder,
And wears a gray dress, like a nun

As soon as I heard of the children,

The poor little sick ones, you know,
With nothing at all to amuse them,

I knew ‘twas her duty to go.

I loved her the best of my dollies,
Her eyes were the loveliest blue;

But doing your duty, ’most always,
Means something you'd rather not do.

t » 4
moe es 2 I,
oo we d-b

eat Out. :

Pr ek Over -.











THE BABY AND THE BEE:

Spey

® 1 Ke « IP =C@ a
Iker Pies Bie Vlaiy cod pS Myc
| for: Paragoly - rellSsx > : 2
vor: Plea vre- and: Play (7
° fOr: a:PicwIe » i

w

els have “ Oné« to-day! A

CE
A

AE



Ghe Baby and the Bee.



Said the baby to







|
the bee:





S6 THE BABY AND THE BEE.

“Good morning,
Mister Bee,

I am but a little
baby,

And you'll please

to Jet me be.”



[Our Little Ones.]



THE BABY AND THE BEE.



To the baby said the bee,
«Tf I am to let you be,
I will let you be a baby,
For you cannot be a bee.”

Said the baby to the bee,

“If you let me be a baby, |
You must let me be a bee;

For B-a-bee is baby,
And that is what I be.”

KHAM.
[Our Little Ones.]

Lad UE CY Hoek n
S rea Qusee: x G.
Or sodmet a. 5° Quaint
ZF ahs have : met -
Vis: Quarte ed - al Aa oVer +

‘i {EAN et. ay a
arty ul - Stes , Qui Bie \ and.
Le :6 danced: o aucun le ckly:

: ert ch





A SONG FOR BABY,





odé ie
eSy-

ed clover. peel
NES Paani we eTRIN

nd-awav Ye Gent “itn




"Relicd ML eee |
Over-aned-OveEer> “Vt , af 2

a
wee foe
.



fi Song for Baby.

A song for the baby, sweet
little Bopeep ;
Come, wee Willie Winkie.

and sing her to sleep.

Come, toss her high up,
and trot her low down.

This is the road to Brinkle-

peeptown.









A SONG FOR BABY.



Gome press down her eyelids, and sing in her ear

The wonderful songs that in Dreamland we hear,

The chime of the waters, the drone of the bees,

The tales that the blossoms are telling the breeze.

For, spite of her crowing and cooing, I see

The baby is sleepy as sleepy can be.

Down flutter the eyelids, dear little Bopeep, |
Now whist! Willie Winkie, she’s gone fast asleep.

NWA

Se Gomsbod y

CKYEQMING:

‘





MOTHER AND CHICKS.










ad -APale
little - Woddlers .

eee ee ery ully swail -
Wot. a ay aN hy:

eo Fo: count Po -HpPwenty -
es aS Gyo!
















* ‘ =



















Cluck-a-cluck! clack-clack!

Every horny yellow toe

A he ec A OS

ashen fp

Posed with graceful erudition

Wcthai iter mani:
a0 me

In the proper fifth position,
Very dignified and slow,

Chickens trooping at her back



Cluck-a-cluck! clack-clack !
See the lady-mother go'
Cluck-a-cluck! clack-claciz ;

Chickens chirrup at her back





MOTHER



i
- |
How they waver to ‘and fro,

In a long and struggling tether,

Light as thistle down doth blow,

In the harvest weather !
Oh, enchanted balls of feather ;

Chickens, chickens, keep together ;

Walk in decent two and two,

As Miss Crabb’s ‘young ladies do.
Pray preserve a proper row—
Nobody can count you so.
Clack-a-clack, and cluck-a-cluck !
What is this her mind has struck ?

Every moment louder, prouder,

While the chickens jolt and crowd her,

AND _ CHICKS.






Sharper, quicker,

Shorter, thicker,
Comes her clack-a-cluck-a-cluck.
See, her gnarly toe she points,
Till one trembles for her joints.
Lady hen—to put it thus—

_ Why and wherefore all this fuss?

, gl “Ree ll



ill

Si





i)









ty”

Ws
Se

al ae

peace 1 AT SNe
We-



pl € agant-

RR





BOBBY SHAFTO.



Bobby Shafto.

BY M. E. B. ©

Cap upon his curling crown,
_ Trying on his papa’s frown,
~ Cunning Bobby Shafto.
Boots upon his tiny toes,
Glasses on his little nose,
Funny Bobby Shaito!
And a meerschaum in his hand!
~ Doesn't he look gay and grand?
Jolly Bobby Shafto!



THE MUSICAL GRASSHOPPER.
















A CONSTITUTIONAL. |



AL Gonstitutional.

‘The sky is clear, the day
too fine .
To stay in doors abed,
A short brisk balk will do
us good,”’
Miss Dolly Doppel said.
‘You'd best each give an
arin to me,
For fear you'd have a fall;
To shade us from the sun
‘so bright,
I'll take a parasol.”’

©
Busey to a

ae eee






GENERAL HARRISON’S LETTER TO

St ai,
iis a Sar na zi

Poe we-de- 4p eit) Lid y . Se

li

N3; ee? Pte ae mi dy
saad ~UGa - cUre- peel OM Ty
ns te vest? Ae AR 4
Zo nit
aia-aad-aqagin:
@-eloeh. io G have.

een: ile ‘
Cig: gor. —



‘President aaa S Letter to the [ittl é Boys

WHO SENT HIM A JACK-RABBIT.
INDIANAPOLIS, {ND., Nov. 3, 80.
Masters Guy, Roy anp MarLEy RecTor, WASHINGTON, Kas.:
My Dear Little Friends.—VYour letter of October 31, telling me that you intended
to send me a jack-rabbit for luck, has been received. If there is any luck in a rabbit’s









THE LITTLE BOYS.



foot, as many of the colored people in the South are said to believe, then I think your
argument that there must be more luck in a whole rabbit is not a ‘non sequitur.”
You can ask your father to explain what that means. The rabbit came yesterday,
and furnished a good deal of amusement to my little grandson. In the last number of

Judge there is an illustration of what happened to a little boy who. had a jack-rabbit :
presented: to him, which will amuse you, I think. With kind regards for you all, 2
am truly yours,

B. HARRISON.











Believing that these funny
pictures will amuse many of our
young readers, the publishers have
had them copied for ‘ Little Bright
Eyes.’’? Some of the boys—and
girls too—will have a good laugh

over them.




S he -
awned-
and-he- nodded.
Diecound
yellow - head. ;
t Aare eds
and. orezd > Ie
©: CON ZEGG-=
fae: ell sound.

h 3
oes














ae hve

S+

A Pek C

Fese



‘ iM j i i"
I
tt





apt



Ot » the > 4nre
4 blew sor nt "Ot .

1s coiseâ„¢ little maiden:
“eel ors pov-school- .

So FOV » DoW.
ve.

: he J

omy lo.

d-
a ct
A,

|





BWW Www r"—_EACUWwSSK ‘ casa
DICK AND HIS FRIEND.





DICK AND HIS FRIEND.











together they will sometimes become ven fond of each other. When
the writer was a little boy he had a dog whose namie was “Dick.” Dick
was a few months old when a stray kitten came along, of which he soon
OD became very fond. Dick would not eat unless Kitty was with him. If
Dick was given something to eat, and the kitten was not with him, he would
hunt her up, take her in his mouth, and carry her to his plate. ‘There Dick
would watch her eat, and would bark, as if to say, “‘ That is real good, isn’t it,
Kitty ?”

If a strange cat or dog came around, Dick would try to drive it away. Dick
would not sleep alone in his little house, but when night came he would find the
kitten and carry her to his bed.

, Sometimes Dick would take tne kitten in his mouth and run around the
yard. At first the kitty seemed afraid Dick would hurt her, but after a time.she
got used to his play, and seemed to like it as well as Dick did.

Sometimes the kitty did not like to be caught, and then it was great fun to
see Dick chase her. The kitten could rin faster than Dick could, but Dick
would not give up until he had caught her.



ce on i aay

° ie
ther

oS emma 9 cn = =
t ‘
ae ie “fal ee ee ay? lithhe-
al - Seats 10: oS -you-all-

under €° aun
“books - fo. be - fee.
ezjons
Ge mew - bi
oy One:
b Peas Your:

em: aus a
Wi: eS ages an ca geye

Seer: ‘children Geo od-ls%







JACK AND JILL. ;









































































































































































































































‘THESE ae Jack and al Do you not see
their pail? They fill it with salt wacter.



“Wat a sweet little lamb!” said May.
* No: it ts awolf. I must run: he will eat me.”





ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.



One wee little woman, Sister brings her playthings‘
Only one year old; Brother brings her books;
Blue eyes bright and merry, Mother saves to please her
Curly locks of gold. All her sweetest looks.
Everybody’s princess, Love and hugs and kisses
Everybody's. pet; ' More than can be told
For a throne so cosey Has this littlhe woman

On a pillow set. Only one year old.

eT





ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.

o
9



SG
Oo ac
Bon ~
are iS
S 72 =
Gane Se = are
aoe 8s
HSER 4 § ~
o
3 eo 8 eo
= © 8 22 eS
= ce °
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a of = ©
SI Og o
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2.0 22 <2
See > es
So 2 Bo 2 vi
ae fo Yo 2
Se fe Gos :
= ee ‘ES
Soe os 2 2 Cy
oo ee ve
22 27 28 =O
ae fF © «=





ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.





Three thirsty thistles
Beside the stone wall,
So tired of waiting
For showers to fall.
Dear little Dicky
Was passing the spot,
And brought, in a hurry,
His watering-pot.



Though it was heavy,
Little cared he;
sc] am a shower!”

He shouted in glee.
hree thirsty thistles,
They feel the cool rain;
“Thanks to you, Dicky,
We are happy again!”

Zao!

4 iS
steer ssa HV

ta ; og 4) lp
1 1\\er 7%
ee li'y/ a

fy ;

isa)
ne Ben? Al

7. ut

iy



ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.





Four funny fans
Had Maud and May |
To cool the air
One summer day:
A palm-leaf broad,
A. feather fan,
And one that came >
From far Japan;

And for the fourth

May took her hat
And made a fine

Big fan of that.
And then so strong

A breeze had _ they,
They played it was

A winter day !





ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.





Five fairy fingers, Five fairy fingers
All dimpled and white, Work very fast,

Busily plying — And hold up the treasure
The needle so bright. Finished at last.

One wears a thimble, No matter how crooked
AO cap) tor \nis head, The small stitches are,

While gayly the others She knows the pincushion!
Pull out the long thread. Will please dear papa.





Gis

ALL AROUND THE CLO



The silver spoons.

ilver spoons

&

Six

Make many trips

ht and _ nice:

18

All br
Six saucers full

From heaping plates

lips.

To rosy
And when they

ice.

Of orange

Sic |

le napk

’

ins

itt

re empty

As _ before,

White as snow;

ds are ready

ix mal

w

S

ids

ix merry mal

S

For some more!

in a row.

All





ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.





even shining shells

Ne gathered on the shore,
\nd if we could have staid

Ne might have got some more.
Ne’d played and played all day
\s happy as could be,

\nd when the sun went down

hey called us in to tea.

We made a mound of sand
And put the shells inside ;
«Don’t touch our pretty things

You little waves !”’ we cried.

O naughty, naughty waves !
We hurried back next day,

And mound and shells and all
Had vanished quite away !







ALL AROUND. THE CLOCK.





Eight eager elves But long before

Flew high and far They reached the sky,
To catch the sparkle A. thunder-cloud

Of a ctar Came sailing by.
On. butterflies And blown with wind,

They rode, or bees, And wet with rain,
Or floated softly Fight eager elves

On the breeze. Flew down again.





ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.



_ Nine nodding nosegays,
| Fresh and fine;
« Which shall I choose,”

:

He looked at roses,
Red and white;
At lilies: fair ;
At pansies bright.

Said Tom, “for mine?”’



At last he chose
A fine bouquet,
And proudly bore
His flowers away.
But I have heard—
I guess it is true—

He gave them all
To little Prue!





ALL AROUND THE CLOc«.







There were ten tin trumpets,
There were ten small boys,
And the ten still houses
Then were full of noise.
How they roused the mothers—
_ Grandmas, too, perhaps—
From. their books and sewing,
From their peaceful naps!

How they 4 eda pot

How they scared the cats
Howthey shrieked and whistl

Tunes in sharps and flat
But at last the racket

Stopped at set of sun;

For the trumpets ten werel

Broken, every one!





pm oe

ERT

oa Ro








leven elastic eels,

This fisher-boy has caught ;
. splendid basketful

‘To carry home, he thought.
is sister, standing by,

‘Thinks Johnny very wise,

nd watches all he does

o he ie he
AND hie

ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.

With round, admiring eyes.



But when he starts for home
He finds, too late, alas!
That not a single eel
Lies in the long wet grass ©
The naughty, squirming things
—The truth is very plain—
Have wriggled to the edge,
And tumbled in again!



. ) A in ; a.
iia ph 7 fi









Twelve twirling tops
As. light as air:
Two children gay

With streaming hair.
So many times

The tops they’ve spun,
To spin themselves

They have begun.

Round go the tops,
A. dizzy whirl!
Round go the flying
Boy and girl!

Till who can see

Boy, girl or top?

I wonder if
They'll ever stop!









THE ANGIENT LEGEND OF THE LITTLE PIGS.

HE First pig went to market, the Second pig stayed at home.
The Third pig ate up all the pie, and left the Fourth pig none,
And the Fifth little pig said, © ou

“ Quee! quee! quee! |



Vl tell my mother when she comes home.”







wo brown eyes,

S| bread little nose;
Ten little fingers,
Ten little toes;
| Sips like a cherry,
Cheeks like a rose;
That’s little baby
“Wherever he goes.

=



Vi

|

hg

Be ee :

a) Fd, you noisy éllow I
ey Ili : Stop that. mee ts

S$ are all

wo!

ir Oo
ag





1)

——

—>

: My! oe We
iy) L

uy, ie e
\ G : ,

4 —
oe

i

SSS

—~

luis len my boy, T i : “ior
or you,
his is the word: Bet Irue! ne
wor oe play, it My ahh or light,

true, be rue, and stand forthengh

a ile girl lve a Word fay ou
"isthe very same word. Se iuuel Bette!
Bor truth tsihe sun,and falsehood the night: 7 iS
Be true lille mais, and ae for the right. Se
: i Hl
ane @ ic
ae SAL - % de
SSN ESS
coe SS (Ss —
SS) << €

































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































————

: THE ARTFUL ANGLER. *
An Irish Jadsangling one dayin the Liffy,
= That runs down by.Dublins qreateily so fine,

A.smart shower of rain falling, Pat, in a.Jiffy,
Creat under the arch of a bridge with his line,

Z == "That's not the place to accomplish your wishes?
=== Cried Dermol, for nivera bite will you get,”
"Och, bather!’says Pat, dont you-know That the fishes
Will come under here to keep out of the wet?”



LNT TT







“sn





ANA Tattle Willie at my knee,

A Blowing bubbled sala TO me.

\ \ Papa, dear, if I should blow
way One big bubble full of love,

hk Would if go

Up to angel land above ?

NV. And would darling sistér know
That it came from brother dear,
Waiting, oh,s0 lonesome here 2”

Climbing to the sill, he blew,
And the bubble slowly grew,
Till, at last, with love made light,

Rising o'ey the roof, it sped.

Out of sight —

Then my little Willie said,
@azing up with slrange delight,

" Yes, dear papa, there it goes—
God will see that sister Knows”

ha \
eX h
YO

4















ee SR SORT TIAA KG
XS Ny 2G Q | |
WRT Ak MESSAGE OF LOVE,






































Yh
HY



ROBERT AS GRANDFATHER,





Zi NS? aH Us Pas 3

Ns ban at of Tatters and Tags —~

Gallers and Tags of curly heir;
Ghe sli gilest” reese ob Seq i he might be,
“Polows the crinkled Pleece fle dog"Reas

Niher and thither aponthear, = Hyngas he is. with
Heavetnut brown, ant ike and while, —_‘Fagsvand sfiegs,
Gired wih hues of real sunligil” —“Gaangled and ringed
rom head ‘to_heel :
Ghe vagabond shows
Jn-his very Toes, Muffled until they scarce
reveal. “Whether “fis but one fodtor four?

‘Pater soflly ¢ long the {loor®





Sil

berhabs he

This, this Sifle dog" Regs,
Gis a better Tail

than one that dogs.





am has ays nol 1G

Jo show delight’ ~
he Shaniel eyes

So a Le Ghe

coaxing bas So clean and ae
Che on pear, and winsome Jone.
“Tehen he teases for a cake
ar bone.





Rey git De, ie be conrcal fedture
a

iste dot) g Rags. “has il dog Regs.
.
Hutlring somany = © Pind thitis atal thet never








Rings. Lesh all his
drapery, here is a lack,
9 realy Gis of the sort
el al Gigf foo shoft:~ J
S eR ati dl the end of his

My ay hier fo wish 0: pas :

bennons and. flags ;

ie indeed. in - : é



SS urlybek Th
dtnigil~ } foe if the sofa, his uhmast frac and ws ies
or chair or bed, glee “eS, uinkle is

Chere wil dl thal py
he lay ‘you can wins



his ou ul head 566.







































iy
i) \y Ne
Mr

I



A SURLY NEIGHBOR,





THREE LITTLE FRIENDS.

Unprr the tree, under the tree,

Contented and happy sit little friends three.
The sunbeams so gay make a beautiful day
For our little girlies to frolic away.

Up in the tree, up in the tree,
The birdies are hiding as snug as can be;
The little black cat is too lazy and fat

And too busy purring to care about that.
M. D. BRINE,



































‘DRAWING PICTURES,







uy

ec Dollie’s Party.

po I’s dot a party;
<¥Y- De table’s set for free,
And Kitty’s ’vited to it,
And only you and me.

Kittie ain’t used to eating
On such a little plate,

And ’fore I got her bib on
She ’fought she couldn’t wait.



And when I wasn’t seeing —
Before you’d hardly fink

She put her paw on table,
And took a little drink.

I didn’t like to fp her — So I said, “ Kitty, don’t do ’at "—
She’s only free months old; She didn’t seem to care,
I fought she’d be’ave herself better But got her fiskers in the cream,

If she was only told. And the cream went on the chair.

"Fore I had time to stop her
She took the piece of meat;
And now the party’s over,

‘Cause there ain’f no more to eat.

JENNIE PATTERSON.











What Teddy Did.

‘You ought to go to the barber ”’
Said Edith, ‘“‘that is plain;
For you look like a Shetland pony, Ted,
With all that bristling mane.”’

“Or more like a shaggy terrier,
Whose eyes are hid in hair.”’
Ted only laughed at being teased,

And said he didn’t care,

So, snipping, snipping, snipping,
The cold, keen scissors sped,

Till one whole side of his little pate
Was bald as the baby’s head.

Just then the tea bell, ringing
Its cheery call, he heard; f
And he glanced at the uncut side and said
“IT can do that afterward.”’

et

Yi 7,
nV, |
WW |









SSS
SS

SS
Ss











_ WHAT TEDDY DID.

But to himself he wondered
If indeed he looked like that;

And down in front of a looking glass
‘Reflectively he sat.

A pair of his mother’s scissors
- Lay on the mantel shelf,
And hethought, ‘‘I hate a barber’s chair,
I can cut it off myself.”’

“X83

Think what a funny topknot
For company to see—

Brown elf-locks covering half, and half
As bare as bare could be!

As he seated himself at table,
Merrily laughed each one;

- And mamma cried in dull dismay,

“My boy, what have you done?’
Mrs. Ciara Doty Bates



KITE FLYERS’ ADVENTURES. -

























KITE FLYERS’ ADVENTURES.



THE TRAINED PIGS.

“What shall we do with them this evening?” asked
aunt Mary. “Them” were the children, thirteen in
number, from Marjory, aged five, up to Walter, aged
fourteen. They were spending Thanksgiving with
grandma at Kingsbridge.

“We'll all go to see the trained pigs,” said uncle George.
So there they were, the whole thirteen, in a row on the



front seats of the front balcony, uncle George in the centre, and
aunt Mary and aunt Louise at either end of the row.
The man on the stage cracked his whip, apd




out ran a little pig from one side, and jumped through
a paper hoop as lightly and
swiftly as a bird, and then
through another and another,
until he had jumped through
six hoops.

There were twelve of them.
One queer little piggie sat on a
stool ; he wore his coat
buttoned behind. Little
Miss Mudget wore a
gown with a ruff, and she balanced things on her nose.
There was another. that crept around on his hands and knees
likea baby. But the jolliest of all was when La Petite came
out and danced. She wore a white silk frock trimmed with rosebuds,.

and she danced and skipped about on her toes in the most graceful
LP 5,





THE TRAINED PIGS.

manner. When the people applauded, she bored and
smiled a sweet pig smile.

“QO,” said roguish Dick to his cousin Nelly, “I should
like to throw an apple on the stage. Wouldn’t it be
fun! pigs like apples, you know,” and he drew one of grandma’s
big red baldwins from his pocket. But aunt Louise saw him, and
shook hér head at him, though she could not. _help smiling a
little, for aunt Louise likes fun as- well as her small nephew.

So Dick dropped the apple back into his pocket,
and tossed his button hole bouquet at La Petite’s feet
instead. A very stout pig Nn st came forward and picked
up the bouquet in his â„¢ mouth, then both La Pe-
tite and the stout pig bowed, and walked off the
stage in a very stately manner, amusing alike to all.

“O, it is awful funny!” said Nelly, gigeling outright. The
French have a name for the pig, which means “ dressed-in-silk,”
a very good name for these dainty pigs, who are washed and
brushed and combed every day, so that their bristles look like silk.

“They are just the pinkest and sweetest of darlings,” said little
Louise.

After he had led La Petite off the stage, the stout pig came
back with a pair of dumb bells in his mouth.

He wore a watch, and strutted about the stage,
and felt very grand indeed.

“What do you think would have happened,
aunt Louise, if Dick had thrown that apple
on the stage?” asked Nelly, after they had {
gone home.







ce I don’t dare to think,” said aunt Louise. “ Very likely there

would have been a fine scramble.”
x2





Two Little Runaways. |

WO little runaways,

T Faces round as moons,
Up to their waists in
Red clover blooms.



Two little Spitz doggies, Vy oy
; : : V
Noses in the air,
Locking for the two rogues
Here and everywhere.

Wagging their little tails; _

Searching in vain,
Througt. the big farm-house

own the long lane.



Two little, tired boys,

Losing their way,
Fall fast asleep upon

Sweet clover hay,








Two anxious mammas,





Hunting the house, : Any i aath HT b I
Look in every corner | Me ut ul |
That can hide a mouse. i eae 4
ALUN |}
li ‘|





One shaggy big dog,
On the right track,
Brings the stray little ones
Home on his back.



Two little bath-tubs— .
Soap not amiss,—

Make both the runaways

~ Clean enough to kiss.


















Hy

A “
| aN SES
Phy MG) p :
gy WS







ly iv wo a oe One pretty cot-bed,
Smooth as your hand,
Carries both the darlings

Off to sleep land.
—M. J. T.







framloe

7ORA went to the show last summer and saw the big elephant,
Jumbo. When she got home she talked so much about it that
her big brother, Tom, bought her a toy elephant and called it
Jumbo. You see that she has put Jumbo in her dolly’s bed
while she has gone to grandma’s room to hear a true story about
the real Jumbo. ‘his is the story her grandma told her:
At Barnum’s, in Oswego, a large crowd was standing in front of the
huge “Jumbo,” feeding him with bits of crackers, nuts and candy. A





A Toy JUMBo.

rather elderly-looking woman was seen pushing her way through the
throng, trying to get near enough to give the beast something. Jumbo
stood swaying his trunk in front of the crowd, but suddenly stopped. and
looked intently at the ‘lady pushing her way towards him. ‘Then he
. seemed to recognize her, and leaned as far forward as his chain would
allow him, and stretched his trunk out toward the woman, regardless of
the many other choice bits that were held out to him. ‘The lady reached





the rope stretched across in front of the elephant, and began to feed him
with some nuts. He would take none from any other person and. seemed
delighted to see her.

“Madam,” said the keeper, ‘‘Jumbo has seen you somewhere before
and remembers you.”

On, yes,” replied the lady, “many is the time I have stood for an
hour or more, and fed him with candy and nuts at the Zoo, in London; but
do you suppose that he really remembers me?”

‘“Of course he does,” said the keeper. ‘‘Don’t you see he will not
notice anybody else? I knew the minute I saw him stop eating and look
at the crowd that he saw some one that he knew.”

The lady petted the monster a few moments, said “ Good-bye,
Jumbo,” and started for the circus tent. Jumbo looked after her and would
have followed her if he could; but his chains held him fast, so he held
out his trunk for a loaf of bread that had been waiting for him some

s

moments.

BIN i YouNG FouKs’ STORIES oF FOREIGN LANDS.
f . \

i

‘,

































































































































































































































































































































































































I will tell you about them all, _
ra For I want you to feel well acquainied
"If ever you happen to call.

Ce DOLLIES are just six in number,

Let me see, I'll begin with the oldest:
Her name is plain Dorothy Sue,

Her complexion is not of the fairest,
And she’s not very handsome, ’tis true,

She’s a comfort to me, I can tell you,
She watches the rest while they play ;
Why, sometimes I leave my whole family,

With Sue for their mother, all day.

The next is my dear, charming Bessie,
With eyes a most beautiful blue,

With a mouth that’s so’ tiny and pretty
She always seems smiling at you.



My third doll is Ethelwyn Stoddard,
She’s named for Aunt Winnie, you see,

For, when auntie came home from Paris,
She brought the dear dolly to me.

Her eyes are as dark as Aunt Winnie’s,
Her hair is a rich, glossy brown,

Her cheeks are as pink as the roses—
She’s the handsomest doll in our town.

Little Lu is my fair German dolly ;
She traveled here ’way from the Rhine—
She talks to the others in German, I think,
But I guess she’ll learn English, in time.

My other two dollies—the darlings—
Are babies, like dear little May,

And when the nurse takes mamma’s baby
Out-doors for a ride, ew’ry day,

I put Pearl and Flo in their carriage,
And we have the most beautiful fun;
Sometimes, when old Carlo goes with us,

I really feel tempted to run.

But then I remember my babies,
And try to stop wanting to go,
Till Pearlie and Flossie are sleeping,

For it wouldn’t be proper, you know.
ANNIE H. STREATER.





Qn STILTS,











465\W hich One W as Kept?@x.



Ww HERE were twe little kittens, a black and a gray,
And grandmamma said, with a frown:
“Tt will never do to keep them both;
The black one we'd better drown.



Ze “Don’t cry, my dear,” to tiny Bess,
“One kitten’s enough to keep;
Now run to nurse, for it’s growing late
And time you were fast asleep.”

The morrow dawned, and rosy and sweet
Came little Bess from her nap;

The nurse said, “Go into mamma’s room
And look in onda Sala.

“Come here,” said grandma, with a smile,
From the rocking-chair where she sat,

“God has sent you two little sisters;
Now, what do you think of that?”

Bess looked at the babies a moment,
With their wee heads yellow and brown,
And then to grandma soberly said:
‘Which one are you going to drown?”























































































































































































































































































































































EHO

ETE





7]

.

_ ;



































a

BRAVE DONALD.



BRAVE DONALD.
A braver man than Donald McPherson

was not to be found in all the Island of
Skye. Many a life has he saved from the
angry, stormy sea. Eighteen years ago a
ship was wrecked, and the only one saved
was a little girl. The child’s parents were
both drowned. Donald succeeded in res-
cuing the little girl The name of her pa-
rents was never known. Donald kept her as
his own, and called her Catherine Mc Pher-
son. She is now eighteen years old, and
there is not a fairer woman all along that
weather-beaten coast. The sailor-folk call her
“Donald’s prize;” and Donald thanks the
sea for such a darling treasure.

WHAT THE SUN SAYS.

“Ibook ab me cried the sun, meine in
unclouded splendor over the eastern hills.
“Do I not come back to you after the dark-
ness of the night? So will He, whose light
I reflect, shine away your sorrow, and He has
sent me to comfort you.”



















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































i THE WOODS,



LULLABY.

The maple strews the embers of its leaves

O’er the laggard swallows nestled ’neath the eav es;

And the moody cricket falters in his cry—
Baby-bye!

And the lid of night is falling o’er the sky—

Baby-bye!—

The lid of night is falling o’er the sky.



The rose is lying pallid, and the cup

Of the frosted calla lily folded up; °

And the breezes through the garden sob and sigh—
Baby-bye!

O’er the sleeping blooms of summer where they lie—
Baby-bye!

O’er the sleeping blooms of summer where they lie,

















THE KITTEN WAS DRESSED IN A PEA-GREEN SILE,
AND A MOST ASTOUNDING HAT. i f .

A PICNIC.

A dog, a cat and a kitten,
They all went out to see

A bug that danced, and a frog that sang,
And a mouse that climbed a tree.

The dog had an umbrella,
A fan adorned the cat,

The kitten was dressed in a pea-green silk,
And a most astounding hat.



A PICNIC.

Ah, it was picnic weather,
All on a summer day;

And they had some bread and meat for lunch,
And cake to give away.

~The bug then danced superbly,
The mouse sped up. a tree,
The frog sang sweet of a ship that sailed

Across the sunlit sea:





THE BUG THEN DANCED SUPERBLY,

And swift the hours went fleeting
Along the day’s bright course,

Till the bug and mouse were weary grown,
The frog was getting hoarse ;

So arm in arm together,
When low the sun sank down,
They took their way through the gloaming gray,

Back to their home in town.
LP 6













i
fi















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































WILLIE AND PUSSY.

WILLIE PARRISH went to have his picture taken. His
mother did not know how she was to keep him still long
enough. Willie was very fond of pussy, and the cat was
taken to the photograph room. a

Pussy did not feel at home in the room. It was as hard te

' keep her still as it was the baby. Pussy did not care about
having her picture taken, but she liked to play with Willie.

Mrs. Parrish placed Pussy in Willie’s lap, and both of
them were happy then. The artist was going to put Willie



WILLIE AND PUSSY.

as he wanted him in the picture; but baby thought the man
meant to take pussy away from him. He put his arms
' around the cat, and held her as tight as he could.

“You sha’n’t have my pussy!” said he, looking at the
man. Willie was just right then. The artist drew the slide,
and took the picture as you see it.





evenks-AW OLD
AND *PALAGE « 2)
eau 2 os fe






IN: MISCHIEF: : ?
AND «IN MALICE!
4, JWatar: ARE + You « )
ie READING MAIDIE:-

LUNDER-THE- “ARBOR
ee, Sir:

ONDER THE: : MoRMIN Ge By
GLORIES? |
Tel ME Aer: TRESTORIES |











| “G@he Oul,

| Dh he has a Roman nose,

1 a awe.
| Sitile Glhoo!
Sind he’ sof with silky down.
Nod he’s Tiny and he’s byw.
dnd the oddest lite thing
Â¥ ever knew





Jf he could Task in. words
MHFall, J think
Jnstead of silling there Ay
“Witha silent Solemn. ais? Wy ;
Doing noining all day long
Saat blink, blink §










Pp @o the kitten he would ach.

eal friend! Claus

Co cy i
Say “Hike Je Cousins ~ aé nT ous eyes

SESe

dust alike, so Slasing Twise ?
CN ae :
Gyiie, Sve WINGS and You have none, yt

hake a paw j









F “For J live on. mice-and bitls
dust like you’
Nd loam and oy J night
Nnd J Sleep in. byoad daylighty
Ghough for putin this ss zauhal”
A say ~Ti-whoo §”





aerarrmre vo *







EAGLES.

AGLES are magnificent birds, and are spread over

a large portion of the world, being found in the
British Islands and in various parts of Europe, Asia,
Africa and America. The Eagle is a truly magnificent
bird in point of size, for an adult female measures about
three feet six inches in length, and the expanse of her
wings is nine feet. The male is less by nearly six
inches. In hunting for their prey the Eagle and his»
mate mutually assist each other. As the rabbits and—
hares are generally under cover during the day the Eagle |
is forced to drive them.from their place of concealment, —
and manage the matter in a very clever and sportsman-
like manner. One of the Eagles conceals itself near the
_eover which is to be beaten, and its companion then
dashes among the bushes, screaming and making such
a disturbance that the terrified inmates rush out in hopes
ef escape, and are immediately pounced upon by. the |
watchful confederate.

I

THE DOGS AND- THE FOX,

OME Dogs, finding the skin of a lion, began to tear
it in pieces with their teeth. A Fox, seeing them,
said, “If this: Lion were alive, you would soon find out
that his claws were stronger than your teeth.”
It is easy to kick a man who is down.



RIDING CALF-BACK.

Wuewn Stella was about ten years old her health was not as good
as her mamma would have wished; so it was decided to send her
to spend a summer with an auntie who lived upon a large farm. _

There were on the farm three barns, into the largest of which the

























































































































































cattle were driven every
night. On one side were the
cows, all a fastened by their heads, and quietly wait- .
ing their turn to be milked. _

Such a long row of horns! Stella was quite timid about walking
past them. On the other side were the yearling calves, and the
little girl’s uncle said she might have one for her very own. She
was delighted, and chose a light tan-colored little bossy, with large
brown eyes. At first the calf was rather wild, and shrank from the |
little girl’s advances; but finally it became tame enough to come to

ber when she called.
ISP 2,



RIDING CALF-BACK.

~

One day Stella was standing on the fence, feeding salt to her pet
Then the idea came into her head to try a ride on Bossy.

She coaxed the calf up close to the fence, and suddenly Jumped on,
man-fashion. Bossy was too much astonished at first to stir... Stella
shouted “Get up!” Sess

Away the calf started. Uncle Will was standing in the barn-dooyr.















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































The first thing he knew they
came flying towards him. The little girl <=
pluckily retained her seat, and held on with both
arms around the calf’s neck. Her uncle very politely helped her

down. And now, though she is a woman grown, he often teases
her about her ride on the calf’s back.

















AUNT ESTELLE,































Ho! ho! there, —all aboard Sor “Shut-Eye-Town!”

The brakes are all up, the signals pulled down;

How silvery and soft the conductor’s last note, wo

As over the ear the sweet syllables float: \
Bye-lo, bye-lo to “Shut-Eye-Town.”

Oh! a wonderful city is “Shut-Eye-Town!”

Then haste in your dainty white travelling gown;

‘No baskets of luncheon or wraps will you need,

Hor this train’s going through with lightning-like speed. ©
‘Bye-lo, bye-lo to “ Shut-Eye-Town.”

fairies and brownies are waiting us there,
Jewels and rainbows, and blossoms so rare,
Soft summer breezes, and bright singing-birds,

eginssi TUTE a



=e





ALL ABOARD FOR “SHUT-EYE TOWN.”

Oh! never was city so sunny as this;
Be quick, or its pleasures you surely will misa,
And never, I know, was conductor go fair

As the one who is waiting to usher us there,

Bye-lo, bye-lo to “Shut-Hye-Town.”











ie Suk ie Was S| ae by
Ard ng he had a fur ca
Ae came to the muda ne : 13 jove choad,





aN
\



ag

© i


























































































































































Se e Was hee
99 7
jie was a |



i a

i



































































































































































































































































































































































































THE AFFLICTED DOLL,



Tie AVELIC LED DOLL

Elsie Johnson had a beautiful doll, with blue °
eyes that opened and shut, and the loveliest polka-
dot dress you ever saw. Well, dolls will get sick
the same as people will, and something was the
matter with Dolly’s eyes —they wouldn’t open.
Elsie was in great distress, and sent for her cousin
Bertie, whose Pa was a doctor. He put on his Pa’s
coat and hat, and came with physic, ahd _pow-
ders, and pills. He felt Dolly’s pulse, and told
Elsie she must keep her very quiet, and put her
in a dark room. oe

HANDS AND LIPS.



Oh, what can little hands do
To please the King of Heaven?
The little hands some work may try,
To help the poor in misery,

Such grace to mine be given!

Oh, what can little lips do

To praise the King of Heaven?

The little lips can praise and pray,

And gentle words of kindness say,
Such grace to mine be given!





A TROUBLESOME VISITOR,





A TROUBLESOME VISITOR.

* That good old dog Floss, has a happy lit.
tle family—-Gyp, and Fan, and Pug, and Ro-
ver—but she cannot make them understand
that they are safe and happy in their kennel,
and that if they wander they will be sure to
get into trouble. One day a hedgehog came
along, and out bounced Gyp and Pug to bark.
defiance at the stranger. Gyp, not satisfied
with barking, made straight for the hedge-
hog; but one taste of his prickles was enough.
Back went Gyp, barking and yelling. Pug
was more cautious, and was satished with be
ing. Good old Floss takes little heed, she is
old. enough to know that some puppies and
most men can only be taught by experience.



ae

THE MAN IN THE MOON.

The man in the moon who sails through the sky,
Is the most courageous skipper;
But he mad: a mistake when he tried to take
A drink of milk from the “dipper.”
He dipped it into the “milky way,”
And slowly cautiously filled it;
But the “Great Bear” growled ot the “ “Little Bear” howled,

And scared him so that he spilled it.
wy,



THE MOON-CLOTH.





















THE winter night fell all too soon ;
There was no moon,

Save just a crescent that seemed to be
A silver C,

Written against the frosty sky,
So far and high.





































































































Teddy was called, against his will,
From the coasting-hill.

The track was icy along the drift,
And his sled was swift ;

So he the summons to hear or heed
Was loath indeed.

























Even when the fire-lit house was wained
His frown remained ;
And he murmured ’twas hard for him
to see
Why the moon ould be
Sometimes so round, like a great white
ball, |

Sometimes so small.

























































Up spoke sweet Edith, sitting there
All Saxon fair :
“They hadn’t enough of the moon-cloth spun
For a larger one,
And they wanted to use this up ielore
They made any more.”

This satisfied dear little Ted, ea ae
And he went to bed;

But hé thought of his precious penny hoard
So snugly stored.

And he wondered how much of a supply
His dollar would buy.





THE MOON-CLOTH.





































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































And he asked of Edith afterward,

How: much the moen-cleth cost a yard.

MRS. CLARA DOTY BATES



MAY DAY.

One day, all
in the sweet
spring weath
er,

Two little folk
went out to-
geth-er.

Oh the bright
May-day!

Sum was shin

ing, birds



were sing-ing,
Howes blooms -ing, May-bells ring-ing!

Oh the glad May-day!

So they two went forth a May-ing,

Laugh-ing, dan-cing, sing-ing, say-ing
“Oh the bright May-day!

What care we for moth-er’s warn-ing ?

Who would bide at home this morn-ing ? :
Oh the glad May-day!” ;



Full Text







t
}


Merry Littie Playmates.

Sines ele
eas,

(/) ren de Ste for
Cl Gitte Folks



BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED.

Copyrighted 1895, by Robert O. Law.

INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING COMPANY,

Consolidated with and Successors to
>



MAMMOTH PUBLISHING CO. AND Ww. W. HOUSTON & CO,
CHICAGO, ILL. ayo PHILADELPHIA, PA.
A GREAT READER.






lads-and- kassies- come - listen -a A-Look- JG,
Nerves, +e or an bine: oe w aoe ayee the: book Se
Vent sai S25 *




aw a ap
oe oe ater ors wat
etter OS) ey
“\a oe to “tyath - j
TeDMEN G- net at. our Alli ae hy,
Cate ed eee, eS oe oe ie
2 +5
oe Reel oh 1) oem oo.

o. ose bf
s ae CON ow + Ae, fot oral b
Aye %




a C.-2%..4 Vin WE Sine



g
gonecenecsees



M = turns the leaves and knows the
e words tell stories. She looks at the

pictures and pretends she can read.

She says: “This is ‘bout a girl:
prob’ly she tore her dress. This is "bout
a rabbit ; prob’ly he stepped on a trap.
This is bout an ant and a bee; prob’ly



they fought for the biggest honex y-drop. ”
THE NANNY GOAT.





Now we'll dance, TAKING A RIDE. With whip in hand,
And Nan can prance, an ee At my command,
For ’tis a sump er day; THE Our goat will dash away;

When ’tis cold, You'll ride behind,
Then she'll be old, Na 1) DY Goat. And you will find,

And then she’ll draw our sleigh. } V'll be a driver gay.

(ile, z
1 a)





Tee
aon NZ
iis 2.
Pee pcs

NFU nue oT

elf.
read -All-the

elk:

bac et ae C

«Wace .

tud oe and Apples»

between "POU -
and-méeé- |


THE CAT AND THE SPARROWS.





‘ls: For Bob- one- of Ali t :

ane op. aa 5 ee ‘9: Brcthos ers
d-tied.a* Bi d

Pwi-tie ea Ae i exrneath

Ll > How Ale ee taugh” ep. aber chayood: ta: co aN















4



i
i
i
\

WI is very algicult to
teach a cat that ‘the
must not catch the
sparrows. But even
this can be done, with care and
patience. In Barnum’s Happy
Family there used to be cats, dogs,
rabbits, birds and mice, all in the
| same cage, and not one of them
would harm any of the others. It
was not an unusual thing to see
a canary bird perched on a cat’s
back, while pretty little mice ran
about her and over her paws.


KITTIE’S TEA,







Hill 5
| : | a thi
| rams 4 {ie = H @
éf 5 Le Hi M
Seal) S ; “4 , i" m
Fp ‘i Se f z - A
j ne} 24,

















































































i Bue YA ee Saar ey
ae Wy oe a
py FS 7/7 Sg
———_ . ee
Kittie’s Tea.
IVE little pussies, Five little pussies,
( Sitting down to tea; Dressed all in silk,
*\ Pretty little pussies, Waiting for the sugar,
-Happy as can be! Waiting for the milk
Three little pussies, Dear little pussies,
All in a row, If you would thrive,
Ranged on the table, Breakfast at nine o’clock,
Two down below. Take tea at five.

\

raga —— FH

SS |
? . Ni si q
-Yorrthe «Gream + and-tho-nfce-
a se ne
PX’ ee, Cat When , she -Criods
Â¥ But tho naught Cat- Cli ae
B. Wang upres Cal: Chopped to

Hig

Hen. No: dn&* was: looking’ ands ~
WwW) just Nyorseleee

nhl on

we Orn a an
5
Ae ora






GENIE’S ALMANAC.















AP

f|'s- ron- Dor.-Dora-
WHO - RIGHT +
WAVE - BEEN: DROWNED
oh | Bvr. SWE -cAvaNT -
BY “WER: DRESS - NOT: A: YARD:
< FROM:THE «GROUND:
Han poon- Denk AeA:
CALLED: AND: CRIED-
TILL: | - WEARD: Ww

IBUT- BELIEVE: ME-
out: DERA : SAID -WE
dex

é WV AGA » ‘i
ase ba 5 es as i, us A! te
sti on



















a

et
ionehls Si
we ol Ii ~ is ~
linen hn ee GE




Genie’s Almanae.

MONDAY to wash all my doily’s clothes;
Lots to be done, as you may suppose,
Tuesday to iron and put away,

That takes a body the livelong day.
Wednesday to darn, to fix, and to mend,:
Plenty of sewing, you may depend.
Thursday, if shining, we visiting go,
Then we are dressed in our best, you know
Friday, oh then we go out to shop,

@uee on get started, ’tis hard to stop.
Saturday, polish, scrub and bake,

Tired out, hardly can keep awake.
Sunday, oh, that day of all is the best,

Gilad it is here; now we can rest.
MY SHIP.



My Ship.

Now, little ship, go out te














sea,

And bring good fortune back
to me;

But don’t, like papa’ s‘‘ship,””
I pray,

Be gone forever and a day.

He’s always saying what
hell do,

When zs ship comes to
land;

But somehow it has never

come,

Why, 1 don’t understand.
THE FATHER’S CARE.



SS

SS

SS

| pea EE ios
ne ek

a8); ep Yoo-Joo : a. Reree-little “man-
a-t

o -liVed-on-a-Funny old -Japaneye- yf

he-e¢ ‘ld@en Fig saw hin i. gave- ; '
: <7 play With ooo -Jrom-
ey. nen play SAE 4

mM orm ine : “Ad
5) mee Rei dee a ak

effi i i
iG "i SS Fd
Boyt Wek Je
a, é

The Father's Gare

(Babyland.) ”



The darling birds are warm.
Yes, feather on feather
All close together,





The darling birds are warm! ” a.
They care not whether Na
"Tis stormy weather, |

For they are safe from harm.

With feather on feather,
_ Tho’ it’s stormy weather :
The darling birds are warm.






Z

/
g

ae

it
)




THE GOLDEN RULE.

The Golden Rule.

(Babyland.)





"Tis a kind little dog,

‘Tis 2 kind little cat:

When the dog has a treat,
Why, the cat shares that;
When the cat makes a feast,
Then the dog she invites;
And the cat does not scratch,





















And the dog never bites. ZB LE

I know two little boys, i
They are named Nedand Nat; ee

— But I much rather write I have good reasons why;
Of the dog and the cat, But never will tell

And the eee how mo 1O. Noll

ott Ru
ees GAIN .Cfary-
NO-HELD: UP: HER: DRESS:
oe *SHOUUDN 'T
ai se Nea
Pa TRE: GEESE A: RAN
“AFTER:
1 AND: MADE: A:@REAT -
DiI No
aa oe
y OATS S:‘@ERTY «
UE 39» de j

ce NY Bee a
= oy gil I. ee oti ar

ae
nue
a Seren,

eM


BABY’S WANTS.

/ s s Cre
LS\ WS ae * SS
~ the: Hey angst Heaped. High
sit g-ebjidren: work. Meppily a a
Oy - aa
d. Ube: vase yigveus. balby- Melps- ~ 3" 2

ly- Hid. by. pis. oe Whe rly young, -POVEr =



Baby’s Wants.



I want that long sunbeam,
—I wish I couldwwalk!
I want the canary,
I wish I could talk!
I want to roll over, |.
—TI think I will try!

I want my dear mamma,





t wisi I neh TALK ene Pm glad | can cry!


MABEL’S TREASURES.









[N\abel’s Jreasures.

[Ao ABEL, has had many treasures
64 inhertime. Dolls of all sorts.
Dolls that would wink, and
dolls that would go to sleep, and
dolls that would cry ‘‘Ma”’ and
‘‘Pa’ and dolls that were dressed in
garments fit for a queen. But these
three little kittens are dearer to her
than all her treasures besides, and for
this estimate of them, she gives a very
sensible and sufficient reason. ‘‘ Dolls
can’t know you and love you,’’ she says;
“but kittens can, and my little kittens
just love me with all their little hearts.
They purr and never scratch. And
when they have had their breakfast they just snuggle down in my arms as if I was their
own real, sure-enough mother.’’ Mabel is quite a little philosopher in her way, though she
don’t know it. Our real treasures, after all, are those we love, and those who love us. And
it’s better for little girls to love a little kitten than to grow selfish and not love anything.






















































|. vor-lhal'- Annocenl - smoolth-
oy ¥ Hon rg -Jce- 9
hat looked to- poor. Bob-
go Inviting and. nice:
Orwpo- L-will® stidet”
@* lmprudemtly - evied
Avot: ys -wisled s pretty - soon. |
ns 6- NeVer- LA 22 :

oh

3 tried z


THE STOLEN CUSTARD.





















THE STOLEN CUSTARD. I.





















Pll
cana un i me

am: Alice -

aljelx -
30 5”

kK; but- se
OF DEE: ae iv:

os ed-

| 9





ie For dainties was sick,

e So he slyly stole into the kitchen,
Snatched a cup from the pantry,
And darted out quick,

Unnoticed by mother or Gretchen.

Whispered he, ‘‘ There’s no cake,
For to-morrow they bake,
But this custard looks rich and delicious ,
How they’ll scold at the rats,
Or the mice or the cats; ; |
For of me, I don’t think they’re suspicious,
THE STOLEN CUSTARD.



“They might have filled up
Such a mean little cup!
And for want of a spoon, I must drink it.
But ’tis easy to pour—
Hark! who’s that at the door?”
And the custard went down ere you’d
think it.

With a shriek he sprang up,
To the floor dashed the cup;
Then he howled and tumbled and blus-
tered,
Till the terrible din
Brought the household in—
He had swallowed a cupful of mustard!



<=





OM ¢
if ce
Hal \ Oz

a
Hl 9

} : TO a ite - puch ete 8
he- string:



: Kind Momiia. tied tH

Qur thes want blew Taed Und . the:
: Wale -ylew - awa -
he boys: wonder,

°

ones to- this as whe h ie
\

£\ edt



LP 2,
A LITTLE DANCE.

ov-the- Lad, land

Whe Laasséy Ww Deen
% : A Pe itees.

| i ek

Maar gé: OWEY: dvd: g
nel-ouvt- own: 1&ittle- "Lady §
he - Laagt - oF - —



Oh, it is fun! Oh, it is fun!

To dress ourselves up, as Grandma



has done.
See how we go! See how we go! -

Forward and back, heel and toe.

Lighter than down, our fee. come

down.





Mind all your steps and hold out
your gown;

Faster than that, whatever may hap,

Cherry red waist aud blue speckled



cap. |

/ IN PARCY DRERS
A LITTLE



_ Hi! Master John! Ho! Master John!

Don’t go to sleep while the music
goes On;

| Faster than that!

Hold up your head and flourish

Faster than that |








your hat 1

How she trips it along, that bright
little maid,

With her dainty: blue skirt and
spotted brocade;

And that one in yellow, who wears
the red rose—

How she keep her mouth a

and turns out her toes!



[
[iv avis ae ui Ao




eee

rn \ ac

DANCE.



How they do spin! when they truly
begin ;

Each dancer as airy and bright as
a doll;

While the music complete keeps
time to their feet,

With its fiddle-dee-diddle and tol:

de-rol-ol !
Oh, it is fun! Oh, it is funl
To dance, when every duty is
. done;

Forward and back, or all in a ring,

A auick little dance is a very gay.

thing.

a.

GQervy >
WEE: Maidén-

ATA dl : tell:

you [al

= 6) a

ee














ale










lets (jvm
THE DOLL’S MISSION.

young - Bueg ae
Rered. Red

he Never.
Fired -

ov dice
a ee



y-
\ A
bei a af





. Ghe Doll S NIETO:

ZES, Fido ate Anna-
bel’s head off;

I really suppose she
is dead;

And Dora has swallowed
| her eyeballs;

And Claire has a crack

in her head.



DOLL’S MISSION,
THE DOLL’S MISSION.



But Eva has gone on a mission,
A regular mission, not fun;
She lives at the hospital yonder,
And wears a gray dress, like a nun

As soon as I heard of the children,

The poor little sick ones, you know,
With nothing at all to amuse them,

I knew ‘twas her duty to go.

I loved her the best of my dollies,
Her eyes were the loveliest blue;

But doing your duty, ’most always,
Means something you'd rather not do.

t » 4
moe es 2 I,
oo we d-b

eat Out. :

Pr ek Over -.








THE BABY AND THE BEE:

Spey

® 1 Ke « IP =C@ a
Iker Pies Bie Vlaiy cod pS Myc
| for: Paragoly - rellSsx > : 2
vor: Plea vre- and: Play (7
° fOr: a:PicwIe » i

w

els have “ Oné« to-day! A

CE
A

AE



Ghe Baby and the Bee.



Said the baby to







|
the bee:





S6 THE BABY AND THE BEE.

“Good morning,
Mister Bee,

I am but a little
baby,

And you'll please

to Jet me be.”



[Our Little Ones.]
THE BABY AND THE BEE.



To the baby said the bee,
«Tf I am to let you be,
I will let you be a baby,
For you cannot be a bee.”

Said the baby to the bee,

“If you let me be a baby, |
You must let me be a bee;

For B-a-bee is baby,
And that is what I be.”

KHAM.
[Our Little Ones.]

Lad UE CY Hoek n
S rea Qusee: x G.
Or sodmet a. 5° Quaint
ZF ahs have : met -
Vis: Quarte ed - al Aa oVer +

‘i {EAN et. ay a
arty ul - Stes , Qui Bie \ and.
Le :6 danced: o aucun le ckly:

: ert ch


A SONG FOR BABY,





odé ie
eSy-

ed clover. peel
NES Paani we eTRIN

nd-awav Ye Gent “itn




"Relicd ML eee |
Over-aned-OveEer> “Vt , af 2

a
wee foe
.



fi Song for Baby.

A song for the baby, sweet
little Bopeep ;
Come, wee Willie Winkie.

and sing her to sleep.

Come, toss her high up,
and trot her low down.

This is the road to Brinkle-

peeptown.






A SONG FOR BABY.



Gome press down her eyelids, and sing in her ear

The wonderful songs that in Dreamland we hear,

The chime of the waters, the drone of the bees,

The tales that the blossoms are telling the breeze.

For, spite of her crowing and cooing, I see

The baby is sleepy as sleepy can be.

Down flutter the eyelids, dear little Bopeep, |
Now whist! Willie Winkie, she’s gone fast asleep.

NWA

Se Gomsbod y

CKYEQMING:

‘


MOTHER AND CHICKS.










ad -APale
little - Woddlers .

eee ee ery ully swail -
Wot. a ay aN hy:

eo Fo: count Po -HpPwenty -
es aS Gyo!
















* ‘ =



















Cluck-a-cluck! clack-clack!

Every horny yellow toe

A he ec A OS

ashen fp

Posed with graceful erudition

Wcthai iter mani:
a0 me

In the proper fifth position,
Very dignified and slow,

Chickens trooping at her back



Cluck-a-cluck! clack-clack !
See the lady-mother go'
Cluck-a-cluck! clack-claciz ;

Chickens chirrup at her back


MOTHER



i
- |
How they waver to ‘and fro,

In a long and struggling tether,

Light as thistle down doth blow,

In the harvest weather !
Oh, enchanted balls of feather ;

Chickens, chickens, keep together ;

Walk in decent two and two,

As Miss Crabb’s ‘young ladies do.
Pray preserve a proper row—
Nobody can count you so.
Clack-a-clack, and cluck-a-cluck !
What is this her mind has struck ?

Every moment louder, prouder,

While the chickens jolt and crowd her,

AND _ CHICKS.






Sharper, quicker,

Shorter, thicker,
Comes her clack-a-cluck-a-cluck.
See, her gnarly toe she points,
Till one trembles for her joints.
Lady hen—to put it thus—

_ Why and wherefore all this fuss?

, gl “Ree ll



ill

Si





i)









ty”

Ws
Se

al ae

peace 1 AT SNe
We-



pl € agant-

RR


BOBBY SHAFTO.



Bobby Shafto.

BY M. E. B. ©

Cap upon his curling crown,
_ Trying on his papa’s frown,
~ Cunning Bobby Shafto.
Boots upon his tiny toes,
Glasses on his little nose,
Funny Bobby Shaito!
And a meerschaum in his hand!
~ Doesn't he look gay and grand?
Jolly Bobby Shafto!



THE MUSICAL GRASSHOPPER.













A CONSTITUTIONAL. |



AL Gonstitutional.

‘The sky is clear, the day
too fine .
To stay in doors abed,
A short brisk balk will do
us good,”’
Miss Dolly Doppel said.
‘You'd best each give an
arin to me,
For fear you'd have a fall;
To shade us from the sun
‘so bright,
I'll take a parasol.”’

©
Busey to a

ae eee



GENERAL HARRISON’S LETTER TO

St ai,
iis a Sar na zi

Poe we-de- 4p eit) Lid y . Se

li

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een: ile ‘
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‘President aaa S Letter to the [ittl é Boys

WHO SENT HIM A JACK-RABBIT.
INDIANAPOLIS, {ND., Nov. 3, 80.
Masters Guy, Roy anp MarLEy RecTor, WASHINGTON, Kas.:
My Dear Little Friends.—VYour letter of October 31, telling me that you intended
to send me a jack-rabbit for luck, has been received. If there is any luck in a rabbit’s






THE LITTLE BOYS.



foot, as many of the colored people in the South are said to believe, then I think your
argument that there must be more luck in a whole rabbit is not a ‘non sequitur.”
You can ask your father to explain what that means. The rabbit came yesterday,
and furnished a good deal of amusement to my little grandson. In the last number of

Judge there is an illustration of what happened to a little boy who. had a jack-rabbit :
presented: to him, which will amuse you, I think. With kind regards for you all, 2
am truly yours,

B. HARRISON.











Believing that these funny
pictures will amuse many of our
young readers, the publishers have
had them copied for ‘ Little Bright
Eyes.’’? Some of the boys—and
girls too—will have a good laugh

over them.




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DICK AND HIS FRIEND.


DICK AND HIS FRIEND.











together they will sometimes become ven fond of each other. When
the writer was a little boy he had a dog whose namie was “Dick.” Dick
was a few months old when a stray kitten came along, of which he soon
OD became very fond. Dick would not eat unless Kitty was with him. If
Dick was given something to eat, and the kitten was not with him, he would
hunt her up, take her in his mouth, and carry her to his plate. ‘There Dick
would watch her eat, and would bark, as if to say, “‘ That is real good, isn’t it,
Kitty ?”

If a strange cat or dog came around, Dick would try to drive it away. Dick
would not sleep alone in his little house, but when night came he would find the
kitten and carry her to his bed.

, Sometimes Dick would take tne kitten in his mouth and run around the
yard. At first the kitty seemed afraid Dick would hurt her, but after a time.she
got used to his play, and seemed to like it as well as Dick did.

Sometimes the kitty did not like to be caught, and then it was great fun to
see Dick chase her. The kitten could rin faster than Dick could, but Dick
would not give up until he had caught her.



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JACK AND JILL. ;









































































































































































































































‘THESE ae Jack and al Do you not see
their pail? They fill it with salt wacter.



“Wat a sweet little lamb!” said May.
* No: it ts awolf. I must run: he will eat me.”


ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.



One wee little woman, Sister brings her playthings‘
Only one year old; Brother brings her books;
Blue eyes bright and merry, Mother saves to please her
Curly locks of gold. All her sweetest looks.
Everybody’s princess, Love and hugs and kisses
Everybody's. pet; ' More than can be told
For a throne so cosey Has this littlhe woman

On a pillow set. Only one year old.

eT


ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.

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ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.





Three thirsty thistles
Beside the stone wall,
So tired of waiting
For showers to fall.
Dear little Dicky
Was passing the spot,
And brought, in a hurry,
His watering-pot.



Though it was heavy,
Little cared he;
sc] am a shower!”

He shouted in glee.
hree thirsty thistles,
They feel the cool rain;
“Thanks to you, Dicky,
We are happy again!”

Zao!

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steer ssa HV

ta ; og 4) lp
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7. ut

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ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.





Four funny fans
Had Maud and May |
To cool the air
One summer day:
A palm-leaf broad,
A. feather fan,
And one that came >
From far Japan;

And for the fourth

May took her hat
And made a fine

Big fan of that.
And then so strong

A breeze had _ they,
They played it was

A winter day !


ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.





Five fairy fingers, Five fairy fingers
All dimpled and white, Work very fast,

Busily plying — And hold up the treasure
The needle so bright. Finished at last.

One wears a thimble, No matter how crooked
AO cap) tor \nis head, The small stitches are,

While gayly the others She knows the pincushion!
Pull out the long thread. Will please dear papa.


Gis

ALL AROUND THE CLO



The silver spoons.

ilver spoons

&

Six

Make many trips

ht and _ nice:

18

All br
Six saucers full

From heaping plates

lips.

To rosy
And when they

ice.

Of orange

Sic |

le napk

’

ins

itt

re empty

As _ before,

White as snow;

ds are ready

ix mal

w

S

ids

ix merry mal

S

For some more!

in a row.

All


ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.





even shining shells

Ne gathered on the shore,
\nd if we could have staid

Ne might have got some more.
Ne’d played and played all day
\s happy as could be,

\nd when the sun went down

hey called us in to tea.

We made a mound of sand
And put the shells inside ;
«Don’t touch our pretty things

You little waves !”’ we cried.

O naughty, naughty waves !
We hurried back next day,

And mound and shells and all
Had vanished quite away !




ALL AROUND. THE CLOCK.





Eight eager elves But long before

Flew high and far They reached the sky,
To catch the sparkle A. thunder-cloud

Of a ctar Came sailing by.
On. butterflies And blown with wind,

They rode, or bees, And wet with rain,
Or floated softly Fight eager elves

On the breeze. Flew down again.


ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.



_ Nine nodding nosegays,
| Fresh and fine;
« Which shall I choose,”

:

He looked at roses,
Red and white;
At lilies: fair ;
At pansies bright.

Said Tom, “for mine?”’



At last he chose
A fine bouquet,
And proudly bore
His flowers away.
But I have heard—
I guess it is true—

He gave them all
To little Prue!


ALL AROUND THE CLOc«.







There were ten tin trumpets,
There were ten small boys,
And the ten still houses
Then were full of noise.
How they roused the mothers—
_ Grandmas, too, perhaps—
From. their books and sewing,
From their peaceful naps!

How they 4 eda pot

How they scared the cats
Howthey shrieked and whistl

Tunes in sharps and flat
But at last the racket

Stopped at set of sun;

For the trumpets ten werel

Broken, every one!





pm oe

ERT

oa Ro





leven elastic eels,

This fisher-boy has caught ;
. splendid basketful

‘To carry home, he thought.
is sister, standing by,

‘Thinks Johnny very wise,

nd watches all he does

o he ie he
AND hie

ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.

With round, admiring eyes.



But when he starts for home
He finds, too late, alas!
That not a single eel
Lies in the long wet grass ©
The naughty, squirming things
—The truth is very plain—
Have wriggled to the edge,
And tumbled in again!



. ) A in ; a.
iia ph 7 fi






Twelve twirling tops
As. light as air:
Two children gay

With streaming hair.
So many times

The tops they’ve spun,
To spin themselves

They have begun.

Round go the tops,
A. dizzy whirl!
Round go the flying
Boy and girl!

Till who can see

Boy, girl or top?

I wonder if
They'll ever stop!






THE ANGIENT LEGEND OF THE LITTLE PIGS.

HE First pig went to market, the Second pig stayed at home.
The Third pig ate up all the pie, and left the Fourth pig none,
And the Fifth little pig said, © ou

“ Quee! quee! quee! |



Vl tell my mother when she comes home.”




wo brown eyes,

S| bread little nose;
Ten little fingers,
Ten little toes;
| Sips like a cherry,
Cheeks like a rose;
That’s little baby
“Wherever he goes.

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true, be rue, and stand forthengh

a ile girl lve a Word fay ou
"isthe very same word. Se iuuel Bette!
Bor truth tsihe sun,and falsehood the night: 7 iS
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————

: THE ARTFUL ANGLER. *
An Irish Jadsangling one dayin the Liffy,
= That runs down by.Dublins qreateily so fine,

A.smart shower of rain falling, Pat, in a.Jiffy,
Creat under the arch of a bridge with his line,

Z == "That's not the place to accomplish your wishes?
=== Cried Dermol, for nivera bite will you get,”
"Och, bather!’says Pat, dont you-know That the fishes
Will come under here to keep out of the wet?”



LNT TT







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ANA Tattle Willie at my knee,

A Blowing bubbled sala TO me.

\ \ Papa, dear, if I should blow
way One big bubble full of love,

hk Would if go

Up to angel land above ?

NV. And would darling sistér know
That it came from brother dear,
Waiting, oh,s0 lonesome here 2”

Climbing to the sill, he blew,
And the bubble slowly grew,
Till, at last, with love made light,

Rising o'ey the roof, it sped.

Out of sight —

Then my little Willie said,
@azing up with slrange delight,

" Yes, dear papa, there it goes—
God will see that sister Knows”

ha \
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YO

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WRT Ak MESSAGE OF LOVE,
































Yh
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ROBERT AS GRANDFATHER,


Zi NS? aH Us Pas 3

Ns ban at of Tatters and Tags —~

Gallers and Tags of curly heir;
Ghe sli gilest” reese ob Seq i he might be,
“Polows the crinkled Pleece fle dog"Reas

Niher and thither aponthear, = Hyngas he is. with
Heavetnut brown, ant ike and while, —_‘Fagsvand sfiegs,
Gired wih hues of real sunligil” —“Gaangled and ringed
rom head ‘to_heel :
Ghe vagabond shows
Jn-his very Toes, Muffled until they scarce
reveal. “Whether “fis but one fodtor four?

‘Pater soflly ¢ long the {loor®


Sil

berhabs he

This, this Sifle dog" Regs,
Gis a better Tail

than one that dogs.





am has ays nol 1G

Jo show delight’ ~
he Shaniel eyes

So a Le Ghe

coaxing bas So clean and ae
Che on pear, and winsome Jone.
“Tehen he teases for a cake
ar bone.


Rey git De, ie be conrcal fedture
a

iste dot) g Rags. “has il dog Regs.
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Rings. Lesh all his
drapery, here is a lack,
9 realy Gis of the sort
el al Gigf foo shoft:~ J
S eR ati dl the end of his

My ay hier fo wish 0: pas :

bennons and. flags ;

ie indeed. in - : é



SS urlybek Th
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or chair or bed, glee “eS, uinkle is

Chere wil dl thal py
he lay ‘you can wins



his ou ul head 566.




































iy
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Mr

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A SURLY NEIGHBOR,


THREE LITTLE FRIENDS.

Unprr the tree, under the tree,

Contented and happy sit little friends three.
The sunbeams so gay make a beautiful day
For our little girlies to frolic away.

Up in the tree, up in the tree,
The birdies are hiding as snug as can be;
The little black cat is too lazy and fat

And too busy purring to care about that.
M. D. BRINE,
































‘DRAWING PICTURES,




uy

ec Dollie’s Party.

po I’s dot a party;
<¥Y- De table’s set for free,
And Kitty’s ’vited to it,
And only you and me.

Kittie ain’t used to eating
On such a little plate,

And ’fore I got her bib on
She ’fought she couldn’t wait.



And when I wasn’t seeing —
Before you’d hardly fink

She put her paw on table,
And took a little drink.

I didn’t like to fp her — So I said, “ Kitty, don’t do ’at "—
She’s only free months old; She didn’t seem to care,
I fought she’d be’ave herself better But got her fiskers in the cream,

If she was only told. And the cream went on the chair.

"Fore I had time to stop her
She took the piece of meat;
And now the party’s over,

‘Cause there ain’f no more to eat.

JENNIE PATTERSON.





What Teddy Did.

‘You ought to go to the barber ”’
Said Edith, ‘“‘that is plain;
For you look like a Shetland pony, Ted,
With all that bristling mane.”’

“Or more like a shaggy terrier,
Whose eyes are hid in hair.”’
Ted only laughed at being teased,

And said he didn’t care,

So, snipping, snipping, snipping,
The cold, keen scissors sped,

Till one whole side of his little pate
Was bald as the baby’s head.

Just then the tea bell, ringing
Its cheery call, he heard; f
And he glanced at the uncut side and said
“IT can do that afterward.”’

et

Yi 7,
nV, |
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SSS
SS

SS
Ss











_ WHAT TEDDY DID.

But to himself he wondered
If indeed he looked like that;

And down in front of a looking glass
‘Reflectively he sat.

A pair of his mother’s scissors
- Lay on the mantel shelf,
And hethought, ‘‘I hate a barber’s chair,
I can cut it off myself.”’

“X83

Think what a funny topknot
For company to see—

Brown elf-locks covering half, and half
As bare as bare could be!

As he seated himself at table,
Merrily laughed each one;

- And mamma cried in dull dismay,

“My boy, what have you done?’
Mrs. Ciara Doty Bates
KITE FLYERS’ ADVENTURES. -

























KITE FLYERS’ ADVENTURES.
THE TRAINED PIGS.

“What shall we do with them this evening?” asked
aunt Mary. “Them” were the children, thirteen in
number, from Marjory, aged five, up to Walter, aged
fourteen. They were spending Thanksgiving with
grandma at Kingsbridge.

“We'll all go to see the trained pigs,” said uncle George.
So there they were, the whole thirteen, in a row on the



front seats of the front balcony, uncle George in the centre, and
aunt Mary and aunt Louise at either end of the row.
The man on the stage cracked his whip, apd




out ran a little pig from one side, and jumped through
a paper hoop as lightly and
swiftly as a bird, and then
through another and another,
until he had jumped through
six hoops.

There were twelve of them.
One queer little piggie sat on a
stool ; he wore his coat
buttoned behind. Little
Miss Mudget wore a
gown with a ruff, and she balanced things on her nose.
There was another. that crept around on his hands and knees
likea baby. But the jolliest of all was when La Petite came
out and danced. She wore a white silk frock trimmed with rosebuds,.

and she danced and skipped about on her toes in the most graceful
LP 5,


THE TRAINED PIGS.

manner. When the people applauded, she bored and
smiled a sweet pig smile.

“QO,” said roguish Dick to his cousin Nelly, “I should
like to throw an apple on the stage. Wouldn’t it be
fun! pigs like apples, you know,” and he drew one of grandma’s
big red baldwins from his pocket. But aunt Louise saw him, and
shook hér head at him, though she could not. _help smiling a
little, for aunt Louise likes fun as- well as her small nephew.

So Dick dropped the apple back into his pocket,
and tossed his button hole bouquet at La Petite’s feet
instead. A very stout pig Nn st came forward and picked
up the bouquet in his â„¢ mouth, then both La Pe-
tite and the stout pig bowed, and walked off the
stage in a very stately manner, amusing alike to all.

“O, it is awful funny!” said Nelly, gigeling outright. The
French have a name for the pig, which means “ dressed-in-silk,”
a very good name for these dainty pigs, who are washed and
brushed and combed every day, so that their bristles look like silk.

“They are just the pinkest and sweetest of darlings,” said little
Louise.

After he had led La Petite off the stage, the stout pig came
back with a pair of dumb bells in his mouth.

He wore a watch, and strutted about the stage,
and felt very grand indeed.

“What do you think would have happened,
aunt Louise, if Dick had thrown that apple
on the stage?” asked Nelly, after they had {
gone home.







ce I don’t dare to think,” said aunt Louise. “ Very likely there

would have been a fine scramble.”
x2


Two Little Runaways. |

WO little runaways,

T Faces round as moons,
Up to their waists in
Red clover blooms.



Two little Spitz doggies, Vy oy
; : : V
Noses in the air,
Locking for the two rogues
Here and everywhere.

Wagging their little tails; _

Searching in vain,
Througt. the big farm-house

own the long lane.



Two little, tired boys,

Losing their way,
Fall fast asleep upon

Sweet clover hay,





Two anxious mammas,





Hunting the house, : Any i aath HT b I
Look in every corner | Me ut ul |
That can hide a mouse. i eae 4
ALUN |}
li ‘|





One shaggy big dog,
On the right track,
Brings the stray little ones
Home on his back.



Two little bath-tubs— .
Soap not amiss,—

Make both the runaways

~ Clean enough to kiss.


















Hy

A “
| aN SES
Phy MG) p :
gy WS







ly iv wo a oe One pretty cot-bed,
Smooth as your hand,
Carries both the darlings

Off to sleep land.
—M. J. T.




framloe

7ORA went to the show last summer and saw the big elephant,
Jumbo. When she got home she talked so much about it that
her big brother, Tom, bought her a toy elephant and called it
Jumbo. You see that she has put Jumbo in her dolly’s bed
while she has gone to grandma’s room to hear a true story about
the real Jumbo. ‘his is the story her grandma told her:
At Barnum’s, in Oswego, a large crowd was standing in front of the
huge “Jumbo,” feeding him with bits of crackers, nuts and candy. A





A Toy JUMBo.

rather elderly-looking woman was seen pushing her way through the
throng, trying to get near enough to give the beast something. Jumbo
stood swaying his trunk in front of the crowd, but suddenly stopped. and
looked intently at the ‘lady pushing her way towards him. ‘Then he
. seemed to recognize her, and leaned as far forward as his chain would
allow him, and stretched his trunk out toward the woman, regardless of
the many other choice bits that were held out to him. ‘The lady reached


the rope stretched across in front of the elephant, and began to feed him
with some nuts. He would take none from any other person and. seemed
delighted to see her.

“Madam,” said the keeper, ‘‘Jumbo has seen you somewhere before
and remembers you.”

On, yes,” replied the lady, “many is the time I have stood for an
hour or more, and fed him with candy and nuts at the Zoo, in London; but
do you suppose that he really remembers me?”

‘“Of course he does,” said the keeper. ‘‘Don’t you see he will not
notice anybody else? I knew the minute I saw him stop eating and look
at the crowd that he saw some one that he knew.”

The lady petted the monster a few moments, said “ Good-bye,
Jumbo,” and started for the circus tent. Jumbo looked after her and would
have followed her if he could; but his chains held him fast, so he held
out his trunk for a loaf of bread that had been waiting for him some

s

moments.

BIN i YouNG FouKs’ STORIES oF FOREIGN LANDS.
f . \

i

‘,



























































































































































































































































































































































































I will tell you about them all, _
ra For I want you to feel well acquainied
"If ever you happen to call.

Ce DOLLIES are just six in number,

Let me see, I'll begin with the oldest:
Her name is plain Dorothy Sue,

Her complexion is not of the fairest,
And she’s not very handsome, ’tis true,

She’s a comfort to me, I can tell you,
She watches the rest while they play ;
Why, sometimes I leave my whole family,

With Sue for their mother, all day.

The next is my dear, charming Bessie,
With eyes a most beautiful blue,

With a mouth that’s so’ tiny and pretty
She always seems smiling at you.
My third doll is Ethelwyn Stoddard,
She’s named for Aunt Winnie, you see,

For, when auntie came home from Paris,
She brought the dear dolly to me.

Her eyes are as dark as Aunt Winnie’s,
Her hair is a rich, glossy brown,

Her cheeks are as pink as the roses—
She’s the handsomest doll in our town.

Little Lu is my fair German dolly ;
She traveled here ’way from the Rhine—
She talks to the others in German, I think,
But I guess she’ll learn English, in time.

My other two dollies—the darlings—
Are babies, like dear little May,

And when the nurse takes mamma’s baby
Out-doors for a ride, ew’ry day,

I put Pearl and Flo in their carriage,
And we have the most beautiful fun;
Sometimes, when old Carlo goes with us,

I really feel tempted to run.

But then I remember my babies,
And try to stop wanting to go,
Till Pearlie and Flossie are sleeping,

For it wouldn’t be proper, you know.
ANNIE H. STREATER.





Qn STILTS,





465\W hich One W as Kept?@x.



Ww HERE were twe little kittens, a black and a gray,
And grandmamma said, with a frown:
“Tt will never do to keep them both;
The black one we'd better drown.



Ze “Don’t cry, my dear,” to tiny Bess,
“One kitten’s enough to keep;
Now run to nurse, for it’s growing late
And time you were fast asleep.”

The morrow dawned, and rosy and sweet
Came little Bess from her nap;

The nurse said, “Go into mamma’s room
And look in onda Sala.

“Come here,” said grandma, with a smile,
From the rocking-chair where she sat,

“God has sent you two little sisters;
Now, what do you think of that?”

Bess looked at the babies a moment,
With their wee heads yellow and brown,
And then to grandma soberly said:
‘Which one are you going to drown?”























































































































































































































































































































































EHO

ETE


7]

.

_ ;



































a

BRAVE DONALD.
BRAVE DONALD.
A braver man than Donald McPherson

was not to be found in all the Island of
Skye. Many a life has he saved from the
angry, stormy sea. Eighteen years ago a
ship was wrecked, and the only one saved
was a little girl. The child’s parents were
both drowned. Donald succeeded in res-
cuing the little girl The name of her pa-
rents was never known. Donald kept her as
his own, and called her Catherine Mc Pher-
son. She is now eighteen years old, and
there is not a fairer woman all along that
weather-beaten coast. The sailor-folk call her
“Donald’s prize;” and Donald thanks the
sea for such a darling treasure.

WHAT THE SUN SAYS.

“Ibook ab me cried the sun, meine in
unclouded splendor over the eastern hills.
“Do I not come back to you after the dark-
ness of the night? So will He, whose light
I reflect, shine away your sorrow, and He has
sent me to comfort you.”
















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































i THE WOODS,
LULLABY.

The maple strews the embers of its leaves

O’er the laggard swallows nestled ’neath the eav es;

And the moody cricket falters in his cry—
Baby-bye!

And the lid of night is falling o’er the sky—

Baby-bye!—

The lid of night is falling o’er the sky.



The rose is lying pallid, and the cup

Of the frosted calla lily folded up; °

And the breezes through the garden sob and sigh—
Baby-bye!

O’er the sleeping blooms of summer where they lie—
Baby-bye!

O’er the sleeping blooms of summer where they lie,














THE KITTEN WAS DRESSED IN A PEA-GREEN SILE,
AND A MOST ASTOUNDING HAT. i f .

A PICNIC.

A dog, a cat and a kitten,
They all went out to see

A bug that danced, and a frog that sang,
And a mouse that climbed a tree.

The dog had an umbrella,
A fan adorned the cat,

The kitten was dressed in a pea-green silk,
And a most astounding hat.
A PICNIC.

Ah, it was picnic weather,
All on a summer day;

And they had some bread and meat for lunch,
And cake to give away.

~The bug then danced superbly,
The mouse sped up. a tree,
The frog sang sweet of a ship that sailed

Across the sunlit sea:





THE BUG THEN DANCED SUPERBLY,

And swift the hours went fleeting
Along the day’s bright course,

Till the bug and mouse were weary grown,
The frog was getting hoarse ;

So arm in arm together,
When low the sun sank down,
They took their way through the gloaming gray,

Back to their home in town.
LP 6










i
fi















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































WILLIE AND PUSSY.

WILLIE PARRISH went to have his picture taken. His
mother did not know how she was to keep him still long
enough. Willie was very fond of pussy, and the cat was
taken to the photograph room. a

Pussy did not feel at home in the room. It was as hard te

' keep her still as it was the baby. Pussy did not care about
having her picture taken, but she liked to play with Willie.

Mrs. Parrish placed Pussy in Willie’s lap, and both of
them were happy then. The artist was going to put Willie
WILLIE AND PUSSY.

as he wanted him in the picture; but baby thought the man
meant to take pussy away from him. He put his arms
' around the cat, and held her as tight as he could.

“You sha’n’t have my pussy!” said he, looking at the
man. Willie was just right then. The artist drew the slide,
and took the picture as you see it.





evenks-AW OLD
AND *PALAGE « 2)
eau 2 os fe






IN: MISCHIEF: : ?
AND «IN MALICE!
4, JWatar: ARE + You « )
ie READING MAIDIE:-

LUNDER-THE- “ARBOR
ee, Sir:

ONDER THE: : MoRMIN Ge By
GLORIES? |
Tel ME Aer: TRESTORIES |








| “G@he Oul,

| Dh he has a Roman nose,

1 a awe.
| Sitile Glhoo!
Sind he’ sof with silky down.
Nod he’s Tiny and he’s byw.
dnd the oddest lite thing
Â¥ ever knew





Jf he could Task in. words
MHFall, J think
Jnstead of silling there Ay
“Witha silent Solemn. ais? Wy ;
Doing noining all day long
Saat blink, blink §







Pp @o the kitten he would ach.

eal friend! Claus

Co cy i
Say “Hike Je Cousins ~ aé nT ous eyes

SESe

dust alike, so Slasing Twise ?
CN ae :
Gyiie, Sve WINGS and You have none, yt

hake a paw j






F “For J live on. mice-and bitls
dust like you’
Nd loam and oy J night
Nnd J Sleep in. byoad daylighty
Ghough for putin this ss zauhal”
A say ~Ti-whoo §”


aerarrmre vo *




EAGLES.

AGLES are magnificent birds, and are spread over

a large portion of the world, being found in the
British Islands and in various parts of Europe, Asia,
Africa and America. The Eagle is a truly magnificent
bird in point of size, for an adult female measures about
three feet six inches in length, and the expanse of her
wings is nine feet. The male is less by nearly six
inches. In hunting for their prey the Eagle and his»
mate mutually assist each other. As the rabbits and—
hares are generally under cover during the day the Eagle |
is forced to drive them.from their place of concealment, —
and manage the matter in a very clever and sportsman-
like manner. One of the Eagles conceals itself near the
_eover which is to be beaten, and its companion then
dashes among the bushes, screaming and making such
a disturbance that the terrified inmates rush out in hopes
ef escape, and are immediately pounced upon by. the |
watchful confederate.

I

THE DOGS AND- THE FOX,

OME Dogs, finding the skin of a lion, began to tear
it in pieces with their teeth. A Fox, seeing them,
said, “If this: Lion were alive, you would soon find out
that his claws were stronger than your teeth.”
It is easy to kick a man who is down.
RIDING CALF-BACK.

Wuewn Stella was about ten years old her health was not as good
as her mamma would have wished; so it was decided to send her
to spend a summer with an auntie who lived upon a large farm. _

There were on the farm three barns, into the largest of which the

























































































































































cattle were driven every
night. On one side were the
cows, all a fastened by their heads, and quietly wait- .
ing their turn to be milked. _

Such a long row of horns! Stella was quite timid about walking
past them. On the other side were the yearling calves, and the
little girl’s uncle said she might have one for her very own. She
was delighted, and chose a light tan-colored little bossy, with large
brown eyes. At first the calf was rather wild, and shrank from the |
little girl’s advances; but finally it became tame enough to come to

ber when she called.
ISP 2,
RIDING CALF-BACK.

~

One day Stella was standing on the fence, feeding salt to her pet
Then the idea came into her head to try a ride on Bossy.

She coaxed the calf up close to the fence, and suddenly Jumped on,
man-fashion. Bossy was too much astonished at first to stir... Stella
shouted “Get up!” Sess

Away the calf started. Uncle Will was standing in the barn-dooyr.















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































The first thing he knew they
came flying towards him. The little girl <=
pluckily retained her seat, and held on with both
arms around the calf’s neck. Her uncle very politely helped her

down. And now, though she is a woman grown, he often teases
her about her ride on the calf’s back.

















AUNT ESTELLE,




























Ho! ho! there, —all aboard Sor “Shut-Eye-Town!”

The brakes are all up, the signals pulled down;

How silvery and soft the conductor’s last note, wo

As over the ear the sweet syllables float: \
Bye-lo, bye-lo to “Shut-Eye-Town.”

Oh! a wonderful city is “Shut-Eye-Town!”

Then haste in your dainty white travelling gown;

‘No baskets of luncheon or wraps will you need,

Hor this train’s going through with lightning-like speed. ©
‘Bye-lo, bye-lo to “ Shut-Eye-Town.”

fairies and brownies are waiting us there,
Jewels and rainbows, and blossoms so rare,
Soft summer breezes, and bright singing-birds,

eginssi TUTE a



=e


ALL ABOARD FOR “SHUT-EYE TOWN.”

Oh! never was city so sunny as this;
Be quick, or its pleasures you surely will misa,
And never, I know, was conductor go fair

As the one who is waiting to usher us there,

Bye-lo, bye-lo to “Shut-Hye-Town.”








ie Suk ie Was S| ae by
Ard ng he had a fur ca
Ae came to the muda ne : 13 jove choad,





aN
\



ag

© i


























































































































































Se e Was hee
99 7
jie was a |
i a

i



































































































































































































































































































































































































THE AFFLICTED DOLL,
Tie AVELIC LED DOLL

Elsie Johnson had a beautiful doll, with blue °
eyes that opened and shut, and the loveliest polka-
dot dress you ever saw. Well, dolls will get sick
the same as people will, and something was the
matter with Dolly’s eyes —they wouldn’t open.
Elsie was in great distress, and sent for her cousin
Bertie, whose Pa was a doctor. He put on his Pa’s
coat and hat, and came with physic, ahd _pow-
ders, and pills. He felt Dolly’s pulse, and told
Elsie she must keep her very quiet, and put her
in a dark room. oe

HANDS AND LIPS.



Oh, what can little hands do
To please the King of Heaven?
The little hands some work may try,
To help the poor in misery,

Such grace to mine be given!

Oh, what can little lips do

To praise the King of Heaven?

The little lips can praise and pray,

And gentle words of kindness say,
Such grace to mine be given!


A TROUBLESOME VISITOR,


A TROUBLESOME VISITOR.

* That good old dog Floss, has a happy lit.
tle family—-Gyp, and Fan, and Pug, and Ro-
ver—but she cannot make them understand
that they are safe and happy in their kennel,
and that if they wander they will be sure to
get into trouble. One day a hedgehog came
along, and out bounced Gyp and Pug to bark.
defiance at the stranger. Gyp, not satisfied
with barking, made straight for the hedge-
hog; but one taste of his prickles was enough.
Back went Gyp, barking and yelling. Pug
was more cautious, and was satished with be
ing. Good old Floss takes little heed, she is
old. enough to know that some puppies and
most men can only be taught by experience.



ae

THE MAN IN THE MOON.

The man in the moon who sails through the sky,
Is the most courageous skipper;
But he mad: a mistake when he tried to take
A drink of milk from the “dipper.”
He dipped it into the “milky way,”
And slowly cautiously filled it;
But the “Great Bear” growled ot the “ “Little Bear” howled,

And scared him so that he spilled it.
wy,
THE MOON-CLOTH.





















THE winter night fell all too soon ;
There was no moon,

Save just a crescent that seemed to be
A silver C,

Written against the frosty sky,
So far and high.





































































































Teddy was called, against his will,
From the coasting-hill.

The track was icy along the drift,
And his sled was swift ;

So he the summons to hear or heed
Was loath indeed.

























Even when the fire-lit house was wained
His frown remained ;
And he murmured ’twas hard for him
to see
Why the moon ould be
Sometimes so round, like a great white
ball, |

Sometimes so small.

























































Up spoke sweet Edith, sitting there
All Saxon fair :
“They hadn’t enough of the moon-cloth spun
For a larger one,
And they wanted to use this up ielore
They made any more.”

This satisfied dear little Ted, ea ae
And he went to bed;

But hé thought of his precious penny hoard
So snugly stored.

And he wondered how much of a supply
His dollar would buy.


THE MOON-CLOTH.





































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































And he asked of Edith afterward,

How: much the moen-cleth cost a yard.

MRS. CLARA DOTY BATES
MAY DAY.

One day, all
in the sweet
spring weath
er,

Two little folk
went out to-
geth-er.

Oh the bright
May-day!

Sum was shin

ing, birds



were sing-ing,
Howes blooms -ing, May-bells ring-ing!

Oh the glad May-day!

So they two went forth a May-ing,

Laugh-ing, dan-cing, sing-ing, say-ing
“Oh the bright May-day!

What care we for moth-er’s warn-ing ?

Who would bide at home this morn-ing ? :
Oh the glad May-day!” ;
DOLL AND I:

“On, dear! Oh, dear!
"Tis al-most nine.
The birds all sing,
The sun does shine.
~ Poor Doll and I
To school must go:
I don’t see why,
We hate it so.
I hate those let-ters. They twist and turn.
There's no use try-ing: ITI nev-er learn.



Hur-rah! hur-rah!
At last it's two!

I am so glad!

What shall we do ?
Come, Doll, let’s run.
I'll nev-er go,

- When I get big,

To school, I know; :
‘But ev-er-y minute of the day

[ll spend just as I like, in play.”


MAY AND HER PA-PA.

Para and mam-ma will soon have sup-per;
for I see Jane bring-ing it in on a tray. But,
un-til they do, May is to ride a cock-horse on
her pa-pa’s knee. Pa-pa goes to town to busi-
ness ev-er-y day, and, when he comes back, May
and her sister Fan run to meet him. They
take his hat, and bring his ‘slip-pers, and put
him in the big chair in front of: the fire; and
then they climb up in-to his lap, and play with
him. He rath-er seems to like it.



peal

ul


















































































































GOING TO BED.

























oe fe Seer SEES

May and Kate and Lou and wee Tom-my
have been sit-ting by the fire in the nur-se-ry
for the last hour look-ing through their books.
But now the books have all been put on the
shelf and nurse has made them ready for bed.
Mam-ma has come up, as she al-ways does, to
hear their pray-ers and have a short chat with
them af-ter they are tuck-ed up in their cribs.
The chat has to be short, for these lit-tle peo-
ple fall a-sleep in no time,

REA











Lirtix children, don’t you hear
Some one knocking at your door?

Don’t you know the glad new year
Comes to you and me once more—

Comes with treasures ever new
Spread out at our waiting feet,
High resolves and
purpose true
Round our lives te
music sweet ?





3

wy
a
it i Hl
ih :

tt hs My
. PLAYING GYPSIES.

Uurs to choose the thorns or flowers.
If we but mind our duty,

Spend aright the priceless hours,
And life will glow with beauty.

Let us, then, the portals fling,
Heaping high the liberal cheer ;
Let us laugh, and shout, and sing, —
Welcome! Welcome, glad new year!
ELIZABETH A. DAVIS,



PLAYING GYPSIES.

Mase. and Fay thought it would be nice to play gypsies and
steal their baby brother away from mamma. Then they would

make her pay piles of money for bringing him back. So they —

dressed up, and were dreadful-looking gypsies, in slouched hats and
long coats. They hid little Georgie carefully on the front porch
behind some chairs and an open umbrella.
i
ay
NE
Balu
a



















Nt

NW
an
lis

ig

a
ON

iy
N

Ears

Ny
a
ANY i
vi
i

H

Mh



BABY RALPH’S LETTER,



â„¢,

eee) OLDEN-HAIRED, blue-eyed, sweet-
ex mouthed Baby Ralph lay, a cunning
little white heap, in his willow cradle. —

While he slept, papa and mamma
came softly into the room—dropped the
lightest and sweetest of kisses on the
dear baby face, then stole quietly out
and away to the big city. Did Baby Ralph like this?
You will hardly think so when you read his letter.
Ebene 11s:

“My own Papa AND Mamma,— Does you want to hear
*bout me? You thinked I didn’t know you runned way oft
and left your little baby boy all ’lone. But I did. And J
waked up and cried—and cried. And Auntie May looked
sober — and grandma looked sober — and grandpa whistled —
and I cried hard. Then Auntie May put something in my
bottle. ‘Iwas. good, and [ didn’t cry. But Auntie May
bringed water, and put some on my face, and I didn’t like it.
And I cried awful —so awful Auntie May stopped. Wish
you’s here, ’cause I don’t feel good. If my papa and my
mammia’s here I’d feel gooder — wouldn’t fuss any bit. Wish
you’s here, I do, to kiss your own | Basy Ravpu.”

Did this bring Baby Ralph’s papa and mamma?
Yes, indeed. And they took him and Auntie May
back to the big city. -

ne
i

ATH
TREE se

n

i

SS

E Ss


















_Trw’s CHRISTMAS DINNER.

21M was sick. He had been sick a long
time. His mother was poor. Not so
poor but that she could get Tim enough
tO Cat, SUCh as Ht was. But it was not
what poor, sick Tim wanted. :

She could only get him coarse bread
Little Tim wanted some nice white bread,
such as he had seen in the shop windows
sometimes. | Christmas was coming, too. And he
wished he could have a slice of nice bread to toast
for his Christmas dinner.

You see, Tim had thought it over and over. And
he knew just how he would like best to have it
fixed, and Tim’s mother prayed about it.

Christmas eve came. But no bread yet. Tim went
to bed looking very sober.. After he had gone to
sleep, however, a large basket was left at the door.

“Bor sick Tim,” it was marked. In it was as nice
a loaf of white bread as you ever saw. Was Tim
glad? You should have seen his hungry eyes shine,
as he saw the many good things. He was so glad to
get the bread, that he never once thought of roast ©
‘beef and plum pudding. —

Where did it come from? I think God put it into
the mind of some person, to send the bread to Tim, in
answer to his mother’s prayers.
















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































aunt a
ssl













































































HUNTING POLAR BEARS.
HUNTING POLAR BEARS.

I do not know which to pit-y more in this
pic-ture, the men or the bears. -I sup-pose.
that the men are sail-ors, and. that their ship
is fro-zen up in the ice. Ve-ry like-ly their
food is al-most gone, and they think that
bear-steak would taste ve-ry good for their
din-ner, and that the bears’ thick fur would
make warm coats to keep out the ter-ri-ble
cold. But I fan-cy that the poor bears would
pre-fer to keep their coats for them-selves, and
as to be-ing eat-en, why, who would like that :
After all, how-ev-er, ] am more sor-ry for the
men, as they must have ma-ny long, sad hours,
as, cold and hun-gry, they think of ‘their
homes and dear ones. 1 hope that the
spring will soon come, and that they can sail
out to the o-pen sea, and ar-rive at home with
e-nough whale-oil in their ship’s great tanks
to make them all rich. I should think that
they would nev-er want ‘o go back a-gain;
but I have no doubt that they will go back
W3



-MRS RAYS CHILDREN.
_ © mother, said Silky, ‘

“T saw in the shed
The funniest rat-house
Without any bed.”

“Dear Mother,” said Light-foot,
“TI saw in the shed

A great tub of snap-corn—
But two kernels red.”

“And, mother,” said Bob-tail,
_“T saw in the shed
A jug of molasses—
"Twas higher’n my head!”
MRS. RAT’S CHILDREN.



LP 8.

*

“Come, mother! Come help us
The rat-children cried ;

To make mother aid them
They eagerly tried.



“My darlings, just listen,”
Said wise Mrs. Rat.

“I know where there’s something
Much better than that.”

“Come out to the corn-bin;
There, safe as can be,
O’er meal-bags and meal- ‘bags
You'll Snes with me.’
Pes LORING.


THE SONG OF THE FIVE CHICKS.





Sang the first little chicken, Sang the fourth little chicken,
With a queer little squirm, With a small sigh of grief,
“JT wish I could find . “T wish I could find
A fat little worm.” A green little leaf.”
Sang the next little chicken, Sang the fifth little chicken,
With an odd little shrug, With a faint little moan,
“T wish I could find “T wish I could find
A fat little slug.” A wee gravel stone.”
Sang the third little chicken, “Now, see here,” said the mother,
With a'sharp little scueel, From the green garden patch,
*T wish I could find ra “Tf you want any breakfast,
Some nice yellow meal.” f Just come here and scratch.”
LO:

A STRONG PULL,

Three ssirls, Now we

With their curls, Can plainly see,

Three boys, : 4 That boys,,

With their noise, With their noise, \
Are pulling to see, Are losing the game,

Which the stroiger must be. And much of their fame.




saan MET AH



FIRST LESSONS IN WHISTLING.

Our boy is learning to whistle;

It’s always something new: |
He begins first thing in the morning,
And he stops last thing at bed-time,
And he keeps it up at intervals,

The day through.

And pray who is his teacher? | J
We haven’t decided quite l/

Whether it is the thrushes,

The bobolinks in the meadow,

oO the swallows round the barn eaves,

~~ Or Bob White.




HOW HERMY LOST FIVE DOLLARS.

What is the tune he likes best ?
Well, ’tis between a call
And the shriek of the wind in the chimney,
Or a gale in the tops of the pine-trees,
For, in fact (don’t tell) it is no
Tune at all!

Go ask his little playmates,
And ask the housemaid, too,
- If they like that sort of music,
- They ’ll sigh, “Oh, dear!’ “Good. gracious !”
‘Now ask me if I like it —

Yes, I do.
MRS. CLARA DOTY BATES.



HOW HERMY LOST FIVE DOLLARS.

A TRUE STORY.

Wuew Hermy Burns was four years old his father bought a plan-
tation in Florida and went there to live. Hermy and his mother did
not go with him. They went to Grandpa Hoff’s to pay a visit first;
for Mrs. Burns did not know when she would see her parents again.

Hermy was a very pretty little boy ; but his hair was the prettiest
thing about him. It curled in tiny rings all over his head.
HOW HERMY LOST FIVE DOLLARS. 5

His grandparents became very fond of him, and sometimes his
grandpa gave him a penny and let him go alone to the grocery near
by to spend it. Hermy always bought pink gum-drops.



At last the time came for Mrs. Burns and Hermy to go to Florida.
The old grandparents felt very sorry to have them leave, and grandpa
said he must have a photograph of Hermy to keep. aye
HOW HERMY LOST FIVE. DOLLARS.

So one day Mrs.
Burns dressed Her-
my up in-his black-
velvet suit to take
him to the photogra- -
pher’s. But company
came just as she was
about to start, and
she went into the
parlor, leaving Her- |



























i mi yy my playing wita the
\ | ee, rae EE en ~ dominos.
( PETIA EC AL
a WNisavae i a When she came back he was not to be
AAMAAY\) i SMe PS e. seen. She called him, but he did not
KY 2 Gem “1 answer. She was just about to go out in
SY 27 eS ek - "
\ NY leer the street to look for him, when he came
OH eo i . “i "7
WV 3 a sy, crawling out from under the bed. He
\ i Ee Reda lt had a pair of scissors in his hand, and he
WY, Here si iy Dp 2
bl q had clipped his hair in little bare spots all
Lp Fs : a ‘| .
Vs ae ie | over his head. His mamma almost cried
SZ Ze 4 sSwhen she saw what he had done.
Set | “You can’t have your picture taken

now,” she said. “You look too badly.”

Grandpa was very much vexed as
well as sorry.

«J would rather have given you five dollars than had you do that,
Hermy,”: he said.

About’ an hour later the cook found Hermy crying in the back
yard. ;
« Never mind, Hermy,” she said; “ your hair will grow out again
before long.” G

“Tm not crying about my hair,” sobbed Hermy. “ Tm crying
because I’ve lost five dollars. I could have bought so many gum-
drops with it.” He

How grandpa laughed when he heard that! He said it almost
paid him for losing Hermy’s photograph.

" : FLORENCE B. HALLOWELL.

Byuckeh
el

—=


AFTER THE RAIN.

Ir had rained all night and until breakfast-time.
Then, just as Millie went to the window to see if
there was any sign of its clearing off, the sun came
out bright and ‘clear. In a little while the clouds
were all gone.

“Just see the water in the paths!” said Ned,
as he, Winnie, and Millie looked out the window.

“Look at that dear little pond at the foot of the
garden!” cried Millie. :

“Wouldn't it be lovely to wade through 2”
added Winnie.

“We could make splendid mud pies and cakes
there,” said Millie,
AFTER THE RAIN.

“I wonder if mamma would let us,” began Ned.
“T think she would,” said their mother, who had
come in without their hearing her. “But you
must put on your old clothes, and come into the
house in time to be dressed before dinner.” :

“Yes, ’m; we will,” they all said at once.

It was not long before Millie and Winnie, in
their oldest calico dresses, and Ned, with his worn-
out pants rolled above his knees, were splashing in
the pond.

First they sailed chips for boats; then they
played the chips were whales, and caught them
with spears made of sticks. By the time the
whales were all disposed of, they were ready to
-make mud pies out of the nice soft mud on the
edge of the pond.

Mille made one pie in an old tin pan. She
even made “twinkles” around the edge, as Hannah,
the cook, did.

Winnie made one in a box-lid and filled it with
green currants. She put a top crust on, and cut
out half-moons in it so the fruit showed through. -

Ned would not make pies, for he said that was
girl's work; so he made a dam across the pond. .

They played until nurse rang the bell for them
to come in and be dressed. They all said they

had not had so much fun for a long time.
L. A. FRANCE.
MEG AND LITTLE BELL.

Mec and her lit-tle sis-ter Bell went for a
walk in the mea-dow. A cow came down to
the brook to drink. Bell was pick-ing some
flow-ers, and did not see her un-til she was close
up-on her. Then she gave a loud cry, and ran







































Sun s

Gs
TINS
eS
hs i WI
‘



‘to Meg, and eae tight hold of fe ae
Meg soon set her fears to rest; and the cow
looked on with wide o-pened eyes, as much
as to say, “ What a fool-ish child this is! I
give her milk ev-er-y day.” |
THE TWO STAGS.



















Here we are out in the wild woods. What
a pret-ty lit-tle glade it is, with a spring of fresh
wa-ter in it! But see, there are two stags here,
fight-ing as if they were bitter foes. Their
great wide-spread ant-lers are locked in-to each
oth-er's. It some-times hap-pens in these fights
that the antlers get so fast-ened to-geth-er that
the stags can-not get them apart. Then they
both die. This will show you how quar-rels
of-ten have ve-ry sad ends,


; i

The Six Doves” /

Bay t
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{HEN Jimmy was seven years old his father gave him

six pretty doves for a birthday gift. Jimmy put them

in a large box in the yard, and sent for all the boys
he knew to come and see them.

For a time the doves had very good care. Jimmy

fed them every day, and they would eat corn from his

hand. But he soon grew tired of caring for his pets.



Winter came on, and he did not like to go out in the
cold to give the doves food and water.
One day he did not go to feed them, because it snowed. The next day he
went. to a snowball fight, and did not get bome until dark. He ate his supper
and went to bed, thinking he would feed
his doves early the next morning. But
he forgot all about it till nearly noon.
Then the cook said she had no stale
bread to spare for the doves.
Jimmy went to his mother and asked

her for five cents to buy some corn for



them. His mother gave him the money, “%
and he ran off to buy the corn, But

on his way he passed a candy store, and

the candy looked so nice that he felt that he must have some of it. So he spent -

the five cents for gum-drops. A
' Then he went to play with another boy, and did not get home till dark. He
was afraid his mother would ask him if he had bought the corn. So he went to

bed as soon as he could. The next morning he got some bread from the cook,

i

J
and went to feed his doves. He opened the door of the box, but the doves did :
not come out. He looked in, and saw two of them lying dead on the floor of the |
box. ‘They had starved to death,

and were quite cold and stiff.

The other four. doves were too

weak to eat the bread, and they

all died that night.



Oh, how sorry Jimmy was











that he had spent the five cents
on candy for himself !

His mother sent him to bed



without any supper, that he might



know what it was to be hungry.
Jimmy cried until he fell asleep. But he learned a good lesson; for he never

neglected another pet. PrORENGE HO Bune

Dae
en AE


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