Citation
Mother Goose rhymes, jingles and fairy tales

Material Information

Title:
Mother Goose rhymes, jingles and fairy tales compiled from authoritative sources
Series Title:
Altemus' young people's library
Uniform Title:
Mother Goose
Children in the wood (Ballad)
Cinderella
Jack and the beanstalk
Little Red Riding Hood
Tom Thumb
Jack the Giant-Killer
Beauty and the beast
Puss in Boots
Sleeping Beauty
Whittington and his cat
Cover title:
Mother Goose's rhymes, jingles and fairy tales
Creator:
Altemus, Henry ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Philadelphia
Publisher:
Henry Altemus
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
254, [4] p. : ill. (some col.) ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Nursery rhymes ( lcsh )
Fairy tales ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1896 ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1896 ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1896 ( rbgenr )
Fairy tales -- 1896 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre:
Children's stories
Children's poetry
Nursery rhymes ( rbgenr )
Fairy tales ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Frontispiece printed in colors.
Statement of Responsibility:
with two hundred and thirty-four illustrations.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026446637 ( ALEPH )
ALH5067 ( NOTIS )
08910042 ( OCLC )

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ALTEMUS’ YOUNG PEOPLE’S LIBRARY

MOTHER
GOOSE

RHYMES
SINGLES
wo FAIRY TALES

COMPILED FROM AUTHORITATIVE SOURCES
With Two Hundred and Thirty-Four Illustrations

PHILADELPHIA
HENRY ALTEMUS





IN UNIFORM STYLE

Copiously Illustrated

THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS

ALICE’S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND

THROUGH THE LOOKING-GLASS & WHAT ALICE FOUND THEKE
ROBINSON CRUSOE
THE CHILD’S STORY OF THE BIBLE |
THE CHILD’S LIFE OF CHRIST |
LIVES OF THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES |

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON

THE FABLES OF SOP

CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS AND THE DISCOVERY OF AMERICA
MOTHER GOOSE’S RHYMES, JINGLES AND TALES
EXPLORATION AND ADVENTURE IN THE FROZEN SEAS
THE STORY OF DISCOVERY AND EXPLORATION IN AFRICA
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

ARABIAN NIGHTS’ ENTERTAINMENTS

WOOD’S NATURAL HISTORY

A CHILD’S HISTORY OF ENGLAND, by CHARLES DICKENS
BLACK BEAUTY, by ANNA SEWELL

Price 50 Cents Each

Henry ALTEMUS, PHILADELPHIA



Copyright 1896 by Henry Altemus





CONTENTS.

BE De

RHYMES AND JINGLES

CURLY Locks

LirtLE Bo-PEEP

Jack SPRAT

SIMPLE SIMON

A Suip A-SAILING

BABES IN THE WOOD

House THAT JACK BUILF

A Froc Hg Woutp A-Woorne Go
Fire! Frre! Burn Stick!

Cock ROBIN : : 5 3 5
(5)

PAGE



6 Contents.

CAT AND THE MOUSE .
CINDERELLA

JACK AND THE BEAN-STALK
LITTLE RED RIDING Hoop
Tom THuMB

JACK THE GIANT-KILLER .
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
BLUE BEARD

Puss 1n Boots

SLEEPING BEAUTY

WHITTINGTON AND His con



PAGE

62

65

86
109
116
142
167
193
207
221

235



Rhymes and Jingles.







AFFY-DOWN-DILLY has come up to town,

In a yellow petticoat and a green gown.



Rhymes and Jingles,





Rhymes and Jingles.



RODE a cock-horse to Banbury Cross,
To see a fine lady ride on a white horse !
Rings on her fingers and bells on her toes,

And so she makes music wherever she goes.





10 Rhymes and Jingles.



Vie. MARY, quite contrary,
How does your garden grow?
With cockle shells, and silver bells,

And columbines all in a row.



Rhymes and Jingles.



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Rhymes and Jingles.



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Rhymes and Jingles. 13



AY diddle, dinkety, poppety, pet,
The merchants of London they wear scarlet ;
Silk in the collar, and gold in the hem,

So merrily march the merchant men.





14 Rhymes and Jingles.





Rhymes and Jingles. &)



ae Boy Blue, come blow up your horn,
The sheep’s in the meadow, the cow’s in the
corn ;
But where is the boy that looks after the sheep ?
He’s under a haycock, fast asleep.
Will you awake him? No, notI;
For if I do, he’ll be sure to cry.





16

Rhymes and Jingles.



ARK, hark,
The dogs do bark,

Beggars are coming to town ;

Some in rags,

Some in jags,

And some in velvet gown.





Rhymes and Jingles.





18 Rhymes and Jingles.



EE Willie Winkie runs through the town,
Upstairs and downstairs in his nightgown,
Rapping at the window, crying through the lock,
“Are the children in their beds, for now it’s eight

o clock ?””





IQ

Rhymes and Jingles.





40 Rhymes and Jingles.



HREE wise men of Gotham
Went to sea in a bowl ;
If the bowl had been stronger,

My song would have been longer.





Rhymes and Jingles.





22 Rhymes and Jingles.



MAS is coming, the geese are getting fat,
Please to put a penny in the old man’s hat ;

If you havn’t got a penny, a ha’penny will do,

If you haven’t got a ha’ penny, God bless you.





Rhymes and Jingtes.





24 Rhymes and Jingles.

ico



URLY locks, curly locks,
Wilt thou be mine?
Thou shalt not wash dishes,
Nor yet feed the swine,

But sit on a cushion
And sew a fine seam,

And feed upon strawberries,

Sugar and cream. -





Rhymes and Jingles.



25



Rhymes and Jingles.

26







[tte Bo-peep has lost her sheep,
And can't tell where to find them ;
Leave them alone and they’ll come home,
And carry their tails behind them.

Little Bo-peep fell fast asleep,
And dreamt she heard them bleating ;
But when she awoke, she found it a joke,
For they still all were fleeting.

Then up she took her little crook,
Determined for to find them ;

She found them indeed, but it made her heart bleed,
For they'd left their tails behind them.





28 Rhymes and Jingles.



It happened one day, as Bo-peep did stray
Under a meadow hard by:

There she espied their tails side by side,
All hung on a tree to dry,



Rhymes and Jingles. 29



ACK SPRAT could eat no fat,

His wife could eat no lean,

So it came to pass between them both
‘They licked the platter clean.

Jack ate all the lean,
Joan ate all the fat,
The bone they picked it clean,

Then gave it to the cat.





30 Rhymes and Jingles.



Jack Sprat was wheeling
His wife by the ditch,
The barrow turned over,
And in she did pitch ;

Says Jack, she’ll be drowned,
But Joan did reply,

I don’t think I shall,
For the ditch is quite dry.

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Rhymes and Jingles.





32

Rhymes and Jingles.

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Rhymes and Jingles. 33



Joan Sprat went to brewing
A barrel of ale,
She put in some hops,

That it might not turn stale ;

But as for the malt,

She forgot to put that ;

This is brave sober liquor,
Said little Jack Sprat. -





34 Rhymes and Jingles.

IMPLE SIMON met a pieman, '
Going to the fair ;
Says Simple Sinton to the pieman,

“‘Tet me taste: your ware.’’

Says the pieraan to Simple Simon,
‘« Show ine first your penny ;”
Says Siriple ‘Simon to the pieman,

‘“Indzed, { have not any.” —

Simple Simon went a-fishing’
For to catch a whale ;
All the water he had got

Was in his mother’s pail.

‘Simple Simon went to look |

TE plums grew on a thistle <

. He pricked his fingers very much,
Which made poor Simon whistle.



Rhymes and Jingles.

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36

Rhymes and Jingles.

SAW a ship a-sailing,
A-sailing on the sea ;
And, oh! it was all laden
With pretty things for thee.

There were comfits in the cabin,
And apples in the hold :

The-sails were made of silk,

And the masts were made of gold.

The four-and-twenty sailors
‘That stood between the decks
Were four-and twenty white mice,
With chains about their necks.

The captain was a duck,
With a jacket on his back ;
When the ship began to move,
The captain said, “Quack! quack!”



Rhymes and Jingles.





Babes in the Woods.

Y dear, do you know
How, a long time ago,
-. Two poor litile children, .
Whose names I don’t know,
Were stolen away.
On a fine summer’s day,
And left in a wood,

As I’ve heard people say?

And when it was night,
So sad was their plight,

The sun, it went down,
And the moon gave no light !
‘They sobbed and they sigh’d,
Aud they bitterly cried,

And the poor. little things --~-

They laid down and died.

(38)



Rhymes ani Jingles.



39



40 Rhymes and Jingles.



And when they were dead,
The robins so red
Brought strawberry leaves
And over them spread ;
And all the day long
They sang them this song,
Poor babes in the wood !
Poor babes in the wood !
And don’t you remember
The babes in the wood ?





Rhymes and Jingles.





42 The House that Jack Built.





The House that Jack Built.









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THs is the house that Jack built.

This is the malt

That lay in the house that Jack built.



43



44 The House that Jack Built.

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This is the rat
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the cat,

That killed the rat,

That ate the malt

That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the dog,

That worried the cat,

That killed the rat,

That ate the malt

That lay in the house that Jack built.



The House that Jack Built. 45

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This is the cow with the crumpled horn, ©
That tossed the dog ; that worried the cat ;
That killed the rat ; that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

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46 The House that Jack Built.



This is the maiden all forlorn,

That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog, that worried the cat,
That killed the rat, that ate the malt

That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the man all tattered and torn,

That kissed the maiden all forlorn,

That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog, that worried the cat,
That killed the rat, that ate the malt

That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the priest all shaven and shorn,

That married the man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,

That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog, that worried the cat,
That killed the rat, that ate the malt

That lay in the house that Jack built.



The House that Jack Built. 47





48 The House that Jack Built.



‘This is the cock that crowed in the morn,
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the:man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,

That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog, that worried the cat,
That killed the rat, that ate the malt

‘That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the farmer sowing his corn,

That kept the cock that crowed in the morn,
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn,
‘That married the man all tattered and torn,
‘That kissed the maiden all forlorn,

That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog, that worried the cat,
That killed the rat, that ate the malt

That lay in the house that Jack built.



A Frog He Would A-Wooing Go. 49

A FROG he would a-wooing go,
Heigho, says Rowley,

Whether his mother would let him or no.
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach, .
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

So off he set with his opera hat,
Heigho, says Rowley,

And on the road he met with a rat.
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

‘Pray, Mr. Rat, will you go with me,
Heigho, says Rowley,

Kind Mrs. Mousey for to see ?”’
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

When they came to the door of Mousey’s hall,
Heigho, says Rowley,
They gave a loud knock and they gave a loud call.
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

‘Pray, Mrs. Mouse, are you within?”
Heigho, says Rowley,



50 A Frog He Would A-Wooing Go.

(Oh, yes, kind sirs, I’m sitting to spin.”
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinacn,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

‘‘Pray, Mrs. Mouse, will you give us some beer ?
Heigho, says Rowley,

For Froggy and I are fond of good cheer.”
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

‘*Pray, Mr Frog, will you give us a song ?
Heigho, says Rowley, .

But let it be something that’s not very long.”
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

‘Indeed, Mrs. Mouse,” replied the frog,
Heigho, says Rowley,

‘“A cold has made me as hoarse as a dog.”’
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

“Since you have caught cold, Mr. Frog,” Mousey
' said,
Heigho, says Rowley, .
“Pll sing you a song that I have just made.”
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !



. 5!

A Frog He Would A-Wooing Go.



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52
But while they were all a merry-making,
Heigho, says Rowley,

A cat and her kittens came tumbling in.
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

The cat she seized the rat by the crown;
Heigho, says Rowley,

The kittens they pulled the little mouse down.
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

This put Mr. Frog in a terrible fright,

Heigho, says Rowley,

He took up his hat, and he wished them good-night.
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

But as Froggy was crossing over a brook,
Heigho, says Rowley,

A lily-white duck came and gobbled him up. .
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

So there was an end of one, two, and three,
Heigho, says Rowley.

The Rat, the Mouse, and the little Frog-gee !
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !



Fire! Fire! Burn Stick! 53

a old woman was sweeping her house, and she
found a little crooked sixpence. ‘‘What,”’ said
she, ‘‘shall I do with this little sixpence? I will go
to market and buy a little pig.” As she was coming
home she came toa stile; the piggy would not go
over the stile. s
She went a little farther, and she metadog. So
she said to the — :
dog, ‘‘ Dog! bite
pig; piggy
won’t go over
the stile, and I
shan’t get home
to-night.” But |
the dog would fe
not.

She went a
little farther,
and she met a stick. So she said, ‘‘Stick! stick!
beat dog ; dog won’t bite pig ; piggy won’t get over
the stile, and I shan’t get home to-night.” But the
stick would not.

She went a little farther, and she meta fire. So
she said, ‘‘ Fire! fire! burn stick ; stick won’t beat
dog ; dog won’t bite pig ; piggy won’t get over the
stile, and I shan’t get home to-night.’ But the fire
would not.







ie Fire! Fire! Burn Stick!

She went a little farther, and she met some water.
So she said, ‘“‘ Water! water! quench fire ; fire won’t
burn stick ; stick won’t beat dog; dog won’t bite pig;
piggy won’t get over the stile, and I shan’t get home
to-night.’’ But the water would not.

She went a little farther, and she metan ox. Soshe
said, ‘Ox! ox!
drink water ;
water won’t
quench fire;
fire won’t burn
stick; stick
won't beat dog ;
dog won’t bite
pig; piggy
Â¥ won't get over
| the stile, and I
shan’t gethome
to-night.’ But



the ox would not.

She went a little farther, and she met a butcher.
So she said, “ Butcher! butcher! kill ox ; ox won’t
drink water; water won’t quench fire; fire won’t
burn stick ; stick won’t beat dog; dog won't bite pig;
piggy won’t get over the stile, and I shan’t get home
to-night.’’ But the butcher would not.

She went a little farther, and she met arope. So



Fire! Fire! Burn Stick!



55



56 Fire! Fire! Burn Stick!

she said, ‘‘ Rope! rope! hang butcher; butcher won’t
kill ox ; ox won’t drink water; water won’t quench
fire; fire won’t burn stick; stick won’t beat dog;
dog won’t bite pig; piggy won’t get over the stile,
and I shan’t get home to-night.’ But the rope would
not.

So she went a little farther, and she met arat. So

savy she said, ‘‘Rat!
rat! gnaw rope ;
rope won’t hang
any q butcher; butcher
i - won't kill OX}
N ox won't drink
water : water
oN AS v won’t quench
=, qj fire; fire won’t
oe RK zd, nee stick; stick
won’t beat dog ; dog won’t bite pig ; piggy won’t get
over the stile, and I shan’t get home to-night.’’? But
the rat would not.

So she went a little farther, and she meta cat. So
she said, ‘‘Cat! cat! kill rat; rat won’t gnaw rope;
rope won’t hang butcher ; butcher won’t kill ox ; ox
‘won't drink water; water won’t quench fire; fire
won’t burn stick ; stick won’t beat dog ; dog won’t
' bite pig; piggy won’t get over the stile, and I shan’t
get home to-night.’”’ But the cat said to her, ‘‘If








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58 Fire! Fire! Burn Stick!

you will go to yonder cow and fetch me a saucer of
milk, I will kill the rat.’ So away went the old
woman to the cow.

But the cow said to her, ‘‘If you will go to yonder
haystack and fetch me a handful of hay, I'll give
you the milk.’ So away went the old woman to the
haystack ; and she brought the hay to the cow.

ee a Assoonasthe

wes
eA cow had eaten
the hay she

gave the old
woman the
milk, and away
she went with
it in a saucer to
the cat.

Assoonas the
cat had lapped
up the milk,
began to gnaw
the rope; the rope began to hang the butcher ; the
butcher began to kill the ox; the ox began to drink
the water ; the water began to quench the fire; the
fire began to burn the stick ; the stick began to beat
the dog; the dog began to bite the pig; the little
pig in a fright jumped over the stile ; and so the old
woman got home that night.





Poor Cock Robin. 59



HO killed Cock Robin? I, said the Sparrow,
With my bow and arrow, I killed Cock Robin.

Who saw him die? I, said the Magpie,
With my little eye, I saw him die.

Who caught his blood? I, said the Fish,
With my little dish, I caught his blood.

Who made his shroud? I, said the Eagle,
With my thread and needle, I made his shroud.

Who'll dig his grave? The Owl, with aid,
But mattock and spade, will dig Robin’s grave.



60 Poor Cock Robin.



Who’ll be the parson? I, said the Rook,
- With my little book, I’ll be the parson.

Who'll be the clerk? I, said the Lark,
If not in the dark, I'll be the clerk.

Who'll carry him to the grave? I, said the Kite,
If not in the night, I'll carry him to the grave.

Who'll be chief mourner? I, said the Swan,

I’m sorry he’s gone, I'll be chief mourner.

Who'll bear his pall? We, said the Wren,
Both the cock and the hen, we’ll bear the pall.



Poor Cock Robin. 61
Who'll toll the bell? I, said the Bull,
Because I can pull, and I'll pull the bell.

Who'll lead the way? I, said the Martin,
When ready for starting, and I'll lead the way.



All the birds in the air began sighing and sobbing,
When they heard the bell toll for poor Cock Robin.

To all it concerns, this notice apprises,

The Sparrow’s for trial at next bird assizes,





62 The Cat and the Mouse.



HE cat and the mouse
Played in the malt-house :

The cat bit the mouse’s tail off. ‘‘Pray, puss, give
me my tail.” ‘‘No,” says the cat, ‘‘T’ll not give you
your tail, till you go to the cow and fetch me some
milk.”

First she leapt, and then she ran,
Till she came to the cow, and thus began,—

“Pray, cow, give me milk, that I may give cat
milk, that cat may give me my own tail again.”
‘“No,” said the cow, ‘‘I will give you no milk, till
you go to the farmer and get me some hay.”

First she leapt, and then she ran,
Till she came to the farmer, and thus began, —



‘The Cat and the Mouse. 63



‘“Pray, farmer, give me hay, that I may give cow
hay, that cow may give me milk, that I may give cat
milk, that cat may give me my own tail again.”
“No,” says the farmer, ‘‘I’ll give you no hay, till
you go to the butcher and fetch me some meat.”’

First she leapt, and then she ran,
Till she came to the butcher, and thus began, —

“Pray, butcher, give me meat, that I may give
farmer meat, that farmer may give me hay, that I may
give cow hay, that cow may give me milk, that I may
give cat milk, that cat may give me my own tail again.”
‘‘No,” says the butcher, “TIl give you no meat till
you go to the baker and fetch me some bread.”



64 The Cat and the Mouse.



First she leapt, and then she ran,
Till she came to the baker, and thus began, —

‘‘Pray, baker, give me bread, that I may give
butcher bread, that butcher may give me meat, that I
may give farmer meat, that farmer may give me hay,
that I may give cow hay, that cow may give me milk,
that I may give cat milk, that cat may give me my
own tail again.”’

“Yes,” says the baker, “I'll give you some bread,
But if you eat my meal, Pll cut off your head.”

Then the baker gave mouse bread, and mouse gave
butcher bread, and butcher gave mouse meat, and
mouse gave farmer meat, and farmer gave mouse hay,
and mouse gave cow hay, and cow gave mouse milk,
and mouse gave cat milk, and cat gave mouse her
own tail again! |



THE HISTORY OF CINDERELLA ;
OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER.

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THE PROUDEST WOMAN EVER SEEN.



Little Glass Slipper. 67



ae lived once a Ame who married for
his second wife the proudest woman ever seen.
She had two daughters of the same spirit, who were
indeed like her in all things. On his side, her hus-
band had a young daughter, who was of great good-
ness and sweetness of temper; in this she was like
her mother, who was the best woman in the world.
No sooner was the wedding over than the step- .
mother began to show her ill-humor; she could not
bear her young step-daughter’s gentle ways, because
they made those of her own daughters appear a thou-
sand times more odious and disagreeable. So she
employed her in the meanest work of the house; she
it was who must wash the dishes and rub the tables
and chairs, and it was her place to clean madam’s



68 Cinderella; or the



chamber and that of the misses, her daughters. She
herself slept up in a sorry garret, upon a wretched
straw bed, while her sisters’ rooms had shining floors
and curtained beds, and looking-glasses so long and
broad that they could see themselves from head to
foct in them.

The poor girl bore everything with patience, not
_daring to complain to her father. When she had
finished her work she used to sit down in the chimney
corner among the cinders; so that in the house she
went by the name of Cinderwench. ‘The youngest of
the two sisters, however, being rather more civil than
the eldest, called her Cinderella. But Cinderella,
ragged as she was, looked a hundred times more
charming than her sisters, decked out in all their
- splendor.



Little Glass Slipper.

a3 nail “ait



CINDERELLA DRESSES THEIR HAIR.

69



70 Cinderella; or the



It happened that the king’s son gave a ball, to which
he invited all the persons of fashion for miles around;
our two misses were among the number, for they made
a great figure in the country. ‘They were delighted
with this invitation, and were wonderfully busy choos-
ing such dresses as might become them. ‘This was a
new trouble for Cinderella, for it was she who ironed
her sisters’ linen, and plaited their ruffles. There
was little then talked of but what dresses should be
worn at the ball. ‘‘I,” said the eldest, “will wear
my crimson velvet gown.” ‘‘I,” said the youngest,
“will wear a dress all flowered with gold and a brooch
of diamonds in my hair.’ Yet they sent for Cinder-
ella to ask her advice, for she had excellent taste.
She helped them as much as she could, and even
offered to dress their hair, which was exactly what
they wanted.



‘Little Glass Slipper. TE



While she was busy over this, her sisters said to
her, “Cinderella, should not you be glad to go to the
ball?” ‘‘Ah,” said she, ‘‘you but mock me; it is
not for such as I am to go thither.’ ‘You are in the
right of it,” replied they, ‘‘it would make the folk
laugh to see a Cinderwench at the ball”? Any other
than Cinderella would have dressed their hair awry,
but she was good and did nothing but her best.

At last the happy moment arrived: they all set off,
and Cinderella looked after them till they passed from
her sight, when she sat down and began to cry.



72 Cinderella; or the



Her godmother came in, and seeing her in tears,
asked what ailed her. ‘‘I want—oh, I want—”
sobbed poor Cinderella, without being able to say
another word.

Her godmother, who indeed was a fairy, said to
cher, ‘‘ You want to go to the ball, isn’t itso??? ‘Oh,
yes!’? said Cinderella, sighing. ‘Well then,” said
her godmother, ‘‘be but a gcod girl, and I will con-
trive that you shall go.”

Then taking her kindly by the hand, she said,
“Run now into the garden, and bring me a pumpkin.”
Cinderella flew at her bidding, and brought back the
finest she could get. Her godmother scooped out the
inside, leaving nothing but the rind; this done, she



_ Little Glass Slipper.



Cox

PDECKED out FOR THE BALL,

73



74 Cinderella; or the

struck it with her wand, and the pumpkin was in-
stantly changed into a fine coach, gilded all over with
gold. She then went to look into the mouse-trap,
where she found six mice, all alive; she told Cinder-
ella to raise the door of the mouse-trap, and as each
mouse came out, at one tap of her wand they changed
into splendid horses ; so that now Cinderella had a
coach and six horses of a fine dappled mouse-color.
“Here, my child, are your coach and horses,’’ said
the godmother ; ‘‘but what shall we do for a coach-
man? run and see if there be not a rat in the trap ;””
Cinderella brought the trap, and in it were three
huge rats. The fairy made choice of the biggest of
the three, and having touched him, he was turned
into a fat jolly coachman, who mounted the hammer-
cloth in a trice.

She next said to Cinderella—“ Go again into the
garden, and you will find six lizards behind the water-
ing-pot ; bring them hither.’ She had no sooner done
so, than her godmother turned them into smart foot-
men; who at once skipped up behind the coach.

Then said the fairy, ‘‘ Now, then, here is something
that will take you to the ball; are you pleased with
it?” ‘Oh, yes,” cried she, ‘‘but must I go in these
dirty clothes ?”

Her godmother only touched her with her wand,
and her clothes were turned into cloth of gold and



Little Glass Slipper. 75

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THE PRINCE GAZING ON CINDERELLA.



76 Cinderella; or the

silver, all beset with jewels. This done she gave her
a pair of glass slippers, the prettiest in the world.

Being thus decked out, she got into her coach ; but
her godmother bade her, above all things, not to stay
past midnight, telling her that if she stayed a single
moment longer, all her fine things would return to
what they had been before.

She promised her godmother she would not fail to
leave the ball before midnight, and then away she
drove.

The king’s son, being told that a great princess
had come, ran out to receive her; he gave her his
hand as she stepped from her coach, and led her
among all the company.

Cinderella no sooner appeared than everyone was
silent; both the dancing and the music stopped, and
then all the guests might be heard whispering, “ Ah,
how handsome she is.” All the ladies were busied in
gazing at her clothes and head-dress, that they might
have some made after the same pattern. ‘The king’s
son took her to dance with him: she danced so grace-
fully that they all more and more admired her.

A fine supper was served up, whereof the young
prince ate not a morsel, so intently was he busied in
gazing on her. Shesat down by her sisters, giving
them part of the fruit which the prince had presented
her with ; which very much surprised them. While



Little Glass Slipper.



DROPPING HER GLASS SLIPPER.

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78 Cinderella; or the

Cinderella was thus talking with her sisters, she heard
the clock strike eleven and three-quarters, whereupon
she immediately made a curtsey to the company and
then hastened away. Being got home, she thanked
her godmother, and said she could not but wish she
might go next day to the ball, because the king’s son
had desired her.

While she was telling her godmother all that had
passed, her two sisters knocked at the door, and Cin-
derella opened. ‘‘ How long you have stayed !” cried
she, pretending to yawn. ‘‘If you had been at the
ball,’ said one of them, “let me tell you, sleepiness
would not have fallen on you. ‘There came thither
the very handsomest princess ever seen with eyes;
she showed us a thousand kindnesses, and gave us
oranges and citrons.’’ Cinderella asked the name of
the princess, but they told her they did not know it,
and that the king’s son was uneasy, and would give
all the world to know who she was.

At this, Cinderella, smiling, replied, ‘‘She must be
very beautiful: could I not see her? Ah! dear Miss
Charlotte, do lend me your yellow suit of clothes that
you wear every day?”—‘Oh, indeed!” cried Miss
Charlotte, ‘‘lend my clothes to such a dirty Cinder-
wench as thou art !”’

The next day the two sisters went to the ball and
so did Cinderella, dressed still more magnificently
than she had been on the first night.



Little Glass Slipper. 79



The king’s son was always with her, and said the
kindest things to her imaginable. She was so far
from feeling wearied by this, that she forgot the
charge her godmother had given her; so she at last
counted the clock striking twelve when she took it
to be no more than eleven : she then fled as nimble as
adeer. The prince followed, but could not overtake
her; she dropped one of her glass slippers, which the
prince carefully took up. She got home all out of
breath, without coach or footmen, and in her old
clothes, having nothing left of all her finery but one
of the little slippers. The guards of the gate were
asked if they had seen a princess go out, but they
said they had seen nobody except a young girl very.
meanly dressed.

“When ‘the two sisters returned, Cinderella asked
them if they had been as much amused as the night



80 Cinderella; or: the



before, and if the beautiful princess had been there?
They told her, yes, but that she hurried away at twelve
o’clock, so fast that she dropped one of her glass slip-
pers, which the king’s son had taken up; and that
he was surely.in love with the person to whom the
slipper belonged.

What they said was perfectly true, for the king’s
son caused it to be given out that he would marry
her whose foot this slipper would exactly fit. So
they began by trying it on the princesses, then on ~
the duchesses, and all the court, but in vain; they
then brought it to the two sisters, who both tried all
_ they could to force their feet into the slipper, but
without success.

Cinderella, who was looking at them all the while,
could not help smiling, and said, “‘ Let me see what I



Little Glass Slipper. 81

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IT FITS CINDERELLA.



82 Cinderella; or the







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can do with the slipper,’ which made her sisters
laugh heartily. ‘‘ Very likely,” said they, “that it
would fit your clumsy foot!”” ‘The gentleman who
was sent to try the slipper saw that she was very
handsome, and said he had been ordered to try it on
everyone that pleased. ‘Then, putting the slipper to
her foot, he found that it went on very easily, and
- fitted her as though it had been made of wax.

The astonishment of the two sisters was great, but
still greater when Cinderella drew out of her pocket
the other slipper, and put it on! At that very mo-
ment in came her godmother, and with one touch of
her wand, made Cinderella appear more magnificent
than ever.

The sisters knew her again at once, and throwing
themselves at her feet, begged pardon for the ill-
treatment they had made her undergo. Cinderella










Little Glass Slipper.




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ASTONISHMENT OF THE SISTERS.

83



84 Cinderella; or the

forgave them with all her heart, and begged that
they would always love her.

She was then led to the palace where the young
prince received her with great joy and in a few days
they were married. Cinderella, who was as good as
she was beautiful, took her sisters to live in the palace,
and shortly afterwards matched them to two great
lords of the Court, and they all lived happily ever
afterwards.





Little Glass Slipper.



85



86 Jack and the Bean-Stalk.

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ieee once lived a .pocr widow, in a cottage
which stood in a country village, a long distance
from London, for many years.

The widow had only a child named Jack, whom
she gratified in everything ; the end of her foolish
kindness was, that Jack paid little attention to any-
thing she said; and he was heedless and naughty.
His follies were not owing to bad nature, but to his
mother never having chided him. As she was not
rich, and he would not work, she was obliged to sup-
port herself and him by selling everything she had.
At last nothing remained, only a cow.

The widow, with tears in her eyes, could not help



Jack and the Bean-Stalk. 87

scolding Jack. ‘‘Oh! you wicked boy,” said she,
‘“by your naughty course of life you have now brought
us both to fall! Heedless, heedless boy! I have not
money enough to buy a bit of bread for another day :
nothing remains but my poor cow, and that must be
sold, or we must starve!”



Jack was in a degree of tenderness for a few min-
utes, but it soon passed over; and then becoming very
hungry for want of food, he teased his poor mother to
let him sell the cow ; which at last she sadly allowed
him to do.

As he went on his journey he met a butcher, who
asked why he was driving the cow from home?



88 Jack and the Bean-Stalk.

Jack replied he was going to sell it. The butcher
had some wonderful beans, of different colors,in his
bag, which caught Jack’s fancy. This the butcher
saw, who, knowing Jack’s easy temper, made up his
mind to take advantage of it, and offered all the beans
‘for the cow. The foolish boy thought it a great offer.
The bargain was momently struck, and. the cow ex-
changed for a few paltry beans. When Jack hastened
home with the beans and told his mother, and showed
them to her, she kicked the beans away in a great
passion. ‘They flew in all directions, and fell as far as
the garden.

Early in the morning Jack arose from his bed, and
seeing something strange from the window, he hast-
ened down-stairs into the garden, where he soon
found that some of the beans had taken root, and
sprung up wonderfully : the stalks grew of an im-
mense thickness, and had so entwined, that they
formed a ladder like a chain in view.

Looking upwards, he could not descry the top, it
seemed to be lost in the clouds. He tried it, found it

' firm, and not to beshaken. A new idea immediately
struck him : he would climb the bean stalk, and see
whither it wouldlead. Full of this plan, which made
him forget even his hunger, Jack hastened to tell it
to his mother.

He at once set out, and after climbing for some



Jack and the Bean-Stalk. 89

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90 Jack and the Bean-Stalk.

hours, reached the top of the bean-stalk, tired and
almost exhausted. Looking round, he was surprised
to find himself in a strange country ; it seemed to be
quite a barren desert; not a tree, shrub, house, or
living creature was to be seen.

Jack sat himself pensively upon a block of stone,
and thought of his mother ; his hunger attacked him,
and now he felt sorrowful for his disobedience in climb-
ing the bean-stalk against her will; and made up his
mind that he must now die for want of food.

However, he walked on, hoping to see a house
where he might beg something to eat. Suddenly he
saw a beautiful young woman at some distance. She
was dressed in an elegant manner, and had a small
white wand in her hand, on the top of which was a pea-
cock of pure gold. Shecame near and said: ‘‘I will
tell to you astory your mother darenot. But before I
begin, I require a solemn promise on your part to do
what I command. I ama fairy, and unless you per-
form exactly what I direct you to do, you will take
from me the power to assist you; and there is little
doubt but that you will die in the attempt.” Jack
was rather frightened at this caution, but promised to
follow her directions.

“Your father was a rich man, with a greatly gen-
erous nature. It was his practice never to refuse help
to the poor people about him ; but, on the contrary,



Jack and the Bean-Stalk. QI

to seek out the helpless and distressed. Not many
miles from your father’s house lived a huge giant,
who was the dread of the country around for cruelty
and wickedness. ‘his creature was moreover of a



very envious spirit, and disliked to hear others talked
of for their goodness and humanity, and he vowed to
do him a mischief, so that he might no longer hear
his good actions made the subject of every one’s talk.



92 Jack and the Bean-Stalk.

Your father was too good a man to fear evil from
others ; so that it was not long before the cruel giant
found a chance to put his wicked threats into prac-
tice ; for hearing that your parents were about passing
a few days with a friend at some distance from home,
he caused your father to be waylaid and murdered,
and your mother to be seized on their way homeward.

‘At the time this happened, you were but a few
months old. Your poor mother, almost dead with
affright and horror, was borne away by the cruel
giant’s servants, to a dungeon under his house, in
which she and her poor babe were both long kept
prisoners. Distracted at the absence of your parents,
the servants went in |search of them ; but no tidings
of either could be got. Meantime he caused a will to
be found making over all your father’s property to
him as your guardian, and as such he took open pos-
session.

‘‘ After your mother had been some months in
prison, the giant offered to restore her to liberty, on
condition that she would solemnly swear that she
would never tell the story of her wrongs to any one.
To put it out of her power to do him any harm, should
she break her oath, the giant had her put on ship-
board, and taken to a distant country ; where she
was left with no more money for her support than
what she got by selling a few jewels she had hidden
in her dress.



Jack and the Bean-Stalk. 93

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94 Jack and the Bean-Stalk.

‘‘T was appointed your father’s guardian at his
birth; but fairies have laws to which they are subject
as well as mortals. A short time before the giant
killed your father, I transgressed; my punishment
was the loss of my power for a certain time, which,
alas, entirely prevented my helping your father, even
when I most wished todo so. ‘The day on which you
met the butcher, as you went to sell your mother’s
cow, my power was restored. It was I who secretly
prompted you to take the beans in exchange for the
cow. By my power the bean-stalk grew to so great
a height, and formed a ladder. The giant lives in
this country; you are the person who must punish
him for all his wickedness. You will meet with
dangers and difficulties, but you must persevere in
avenging the death of your father, or you will not
prosper in any of your doings.

‘“Asto the giant’s goods, everything he has is yours,
‘though you are deprived of it; you may take, there-
fore, what part of it you can. You must, however,
be careful, for such is his love for gold, that the first
loss he discovers will make him outrageous and very
watchful for the future. But you must still pursue
him; for it is only by cunning that you can ever hope
to get the better of him, and become possessed of your
rightful property, and the means of justice overtaking
him for his barbarous murder. One thing I desire is,



Jack and the Bean-Stalk. 95





96 Jack and the Bean-Stalk.

do not let your mother know you are aware of your
father’s history till you see me again.

“Go along the direct road ; you will soon see the ©
house where your cruel enemy lives. While you do
as I order you, I will protect and guard you; but
remember, if you disobey my commands, a dreadful ~
punishment awaits you.”

As soon as she had made an end she disappeared,
leaving Jack to follow his journey. He walked on
till after sunset, when, to his great joy, he espied a
large mansion. ‘This pleasant sight revived his droop-
ing spirits; he redoubled his speed, and reached it
shortly. A good-looking woman stood at the door ;
he spoke to her, begging she would give him a morsel
of bread and a night’s lodging. She expressed the
greatest surprise at seeing him ; and said it was quite
uncommon to see any strange creature near their *
house, for it was mostly known that her husband was
a very cruel and powerful giant, and one that would
eat human flesh, if he could possibly get it.

This account terrified Jack greatly, but still, not
forgetting the fairy’s protection, he hoped to elude
the giant, and therefore he begged the woman to take
him in for one night only, and hide him where she
thought proper. ‘The good woman at last suffered
herself to be persuaded, for she had a kind heart, and
at last led him into the house.





Jack and the Bean-Stalk. 97

U



First they passed an elegant hall, finely furnished;
they then went through several spacious rooms, all in
the same style of grandeur, but they seemed to be
quite forsaken and desolate. A long gallery came
next ; it was very dark, just large enough to show
that, instead of a wall each side, there was a grating
of iron, which parted off a dismal’ dungeon, from
whence issued the groans of several poor victims whom
the cruel giant kept shut up in readiness for his very
large appetite. Poor Jack was in a dreadful fright at
witnessing sucha horrible scene, which caused him
to fear that he would never see his mother, but be
captured lastly for the giant’s meal; but still he
. recollected the fairy, and a gleam of hope forced itself
into his heart.



- 98 Jack and the Bean-Stalk.

The good woman then took Jack to a large kitchen, ~
where a great fire was kept; she bade him sit down, -
and gave him plenty to eat and drink. When he had
done his meal and enjoyed himself, he was disturbed _
by a hard knocking at the gate, so loud as to cause



the house to shake. Jack was hidden in the oven,
and the giant’s wife ran to let in her husband.

_ Jack heard him accost her in a voice like thunder,
saying: ‘‘ Wife! wife! I smell fresh meat!” ‘Oh,
my dear,’’ replied she, “it is nothing but the people
in the dungeon.’”’? ‘The giant seemed to believe her,









Jack and the Bean-Stalk. 99



wife prepared supper.

By degrees Jack managed to look at the monster
through asmall crevice. He was much surprised to see
what an amazing quantity he devoured, and supposed
he would never have done eating and drinking. After
his supper was ended, a very curious hen was brought
and placed on the table before him. Jack’s curiosity
was great to see what would happen. He saw that it
stood quiet before him, and every time the giant said:
“Tay!” the hen laid an egg of solid gold. The giant
amused himself a long time with his hen; meanwhile
his wife went to bed. At length he fell asleep, and
snored like the roaring of a cannon. Jack, finding
him still asleep at daybreak, crept softly from his



Full Text





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ALTEMUS’ YOUNG PEOPLE’S LIBRARY

MOTHER
GOOSE

RHYMES
SINGLES
wo FAIRY TALES

COMPILED FROM AUTHORITATIVE SOURCES
With Two Hundred and Thirty-Four Illustrations

PHILADELPHIA
HENRY ALTEMUS


IN UNIFORM STYLE

Copiously Illustrated

THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS

ALICE’S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND

THROUGH THE LOOKING-GLASS & WHAT ALICE FOUND THEKE
ROBINSON CRUSOE
THE CHILD’S STORY OF THE BIBLE |
THE CHILD’S LIFE OF CHRIST |
LIVES OF THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES |

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON

THE FABLES OF SOP

CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS AND THE DISCOVERY OF AMERICA
MOTHER GOOSE’S RHYMES, JINGLES AND TALES
EXPLORATION AND ADVENTURE IN THE FROZEN SEAS
THE STORY OF DISCOVERY AND EXPLORATION IN AFRICA
GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

ARABIAN NIGHTS’ ENTERTAINMENTS

WOOD’S NATURAL HISTORY

A CHILD’S HISTORY OF ENGLAND, by CHARLES DICKENS
BLACK BEAUTY, by ANNA SEWELL

Price 50 Cents Each

Henry ALTEMUS, PHILADELPHIA



Copyright 1896 by Henry Altemus


CONTENTS.

BE De

RHYMES AND JINGLES

CURLY Locks

LirtLE Bo-PEEP

Jack SPRAT

SIMPLE SIMON

A Suip A-SAILING

BABES IN THE WOOD

House THAT JACK BUILF

A Froc Hg Woutp A-Woorne Go
Fire! Frre! Burn Stick!

Cock ROBIN : : 5 3 5
(5)

PAGE
6 Contents.

CAT AND THE MOUSE .
CINDERELLA

JACK AND THE BEAN-STALK
LITTLE RED RIDING Hoop
Tom THuMB

JACK THE GIANT-KILLER .
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
BLUE BEARD

Puss 1n Boots

SLEEPING BEAUTY

WHITTINGTON AND His con



PAGE

62

65

86
109
116
142
167
193
207
221

235
Rhymes and Jingles.







AFFY-DOWN-DILLY has come up to town,

In a yellow petticoat and a green gown.
Rhymes and Jingles,


Rhymes and Jingles.



RODE a cock-horse to Banbury Cross,
To see a fine lady ride on a white horse !
Rings on her fingers and bells on her toes,

And so she makes music wherever she goes.


10 Rhymes and Jingles.



Vie. MARY, quite contrary,
How does your garden grow?
With cockle shells, and silver bells,

And columbines all in a row.
Rhymes and Jingles.



IT
Rhymes and Jingles.



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Rhymes and Jingles. 13



AY diddle, dinkety, poppety, pet,
The merchants of London they wear scarlet ;
Silk in the collar, and gold in the hem,

So merrily march the merchant men.


14 Rhymes and Jingles.


Rhymes and Jingles. &)



ae Boy Blue, come blow up your horn,
The sheep’s in the meadow, the cow’s in the
corn ;
But where is the boy that looks after the sheep ?
He’s under a haycock, fast asleep.
Will you awake him? No, notI;
For if I do, he’ll be sure to cry.


16

Rhymes and Jingles.



ARK, hark,
The dogs do bark,

Beggars are coming to town ;

Some in rags,

Some in jags,

And some in velvet gown.


Rhymes and Jingles.


18 Rhymes and Jingles.



EE Willie Winkie runs through the town,
Upstairs and downstairs in his nightgown,
Rapping at the window, crying through the lock,
“Are the children in their beds, for now it’s eight

o clock ?””


IQ

Rhymes and Jingles.


40 Rhymes and Jingles.



HREE wise men of Gotham
Went to sea in a bowl ;
If the bowl had been stronger,

My song would have been longer.


Rhymes and Jingles.


22 Rhymes and Jingles.



MAS is coming, the geese are getting fat,
Please to put a penny in the old man’s hat ;

If you havn’t got a penny, a ha’penny will do,

If you haven’t got a ha’ penny, God bless you.


Rhymes and Jingtes.


24 Rhymes and Jingles.

ico



URLY locks, curly locks,
Wilt thou be mine?
Thou shalt not wash dishes,
Nor yet feed the swine,

But sit on a cushion
And sew a fine seam,

And feed upon strawberries,

Sugar and cream. -


Rhymes and Jingles.



25
Rhymes and Jingles.

26




[tte Bo-peep has lost her sheep,
And can't tell where to find them ;
Leave them alone and they’ll come home,
And carry their tails behind them.

Little Bo-peep fell fast asleep,
And dreamt she heard them bleating ;
But when she awoke, she found it a joke,
For they still all were fleeting.

Then up she took her little crook,
Determined for to find them ;

She found them indeed, but it made her heart bleed,
For they'd left their tails behind them.


28 Rhymes and Jingles.



It happened one day, as Bo-peep did stray
Under a meadow hard by:

There she espied their tails side by side,
All hung on a tree to dry,
Rhymes and Jingles. 29



ACK SPRAT could eat no fat,

His wife could eat no lean,

So it came to pass between them both
‘They licked the platter clean.

Jack ate all the lean,
Joan ate all the fat,
The bone they picked it clean,

Then gave it to the cat.


30 Rhymes and Jingles.



Jack Sprat was wheeling
His wife by the ditch,
The barrow turned over,
And in she did pitch ;

Says Jack, she’ll be drowned,
But Joan did reply,

I don’t think I shall,
For the ditch is quite dry.

DUI

Wess
oN





Rhymes and Jingles.


32

Rhymes and Jingles.

Le
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LS

Ni PSSA

1x GES IED
oa

or
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a Re)
EY


Rhymes and Jingles. 33



Joan Sprat went to brewing
A barrel of ale,
She put in some hops,

That it might not turn stale ;

But as for the malt,

She forgot to put that ;

This is brave sober liquor,
Said little Jack Sprat. -


34 Rhymes and Jingles.

IMPLE SIMON met a pieman, '
Going to the fair ;
Says Simple Sinton to the pieman,

“‘Tet me taste: your ware.’’

Says the pieraan to Simple Simon,
‘« Show ine first your penny ;”
Says Siriple ‘Simon to the pieman,

‘“Indzed, { have not any.” —

Simple Simon went a-fishing’
For to catch a whale ;
All the water he had got

Was in his mother’s pail.

‘Simple Simon went to look |

TE plums grew on a thistle <

. He pricked his fingers very much,
Which made poor Simon whistle.
Rhymes and Jingles.

(heigl

OER D2
ed Cs
KPa I AY
ta Up
“9
a



35
36

Rhymes and Jingles.

SAW a ship a-sailing,
A-sailing on the sea ;
And, oh! it was all laden
With pretty things for thee.

There were comfits in the cabin,
And apples in the hold :

The-sails were made of silk,

And the masts were made of gold.

The four-and-twenty sailors
‘That stood between the decks
Were four-and twenty white mice,
With chains about their necks.

The captain was a duck,
With a jacket on his back ;
When the ship began to move,
The captain said, “Quack! quack!”
Rhymes and Jingles.


Babes in the Woods.

Y dear, do you know
How, a long time ago,
-. Two poor litile children, .
Whose names I don’t know,
Were stolen away.
On a fine summer’s day,
And left in a wood,

As I’ve heard people say?

And when it was night,
So sad was their plight,

The sun, it went down,
And the moon gave no light !
‘They sobbed and they sigh’d,
Aud they bitterly cried,

And the poor. little things --~-

They laid down and died.

(38)
Rhymes ani Jingles.



39
40 Rhymes and Jingles.



And when they were dead,
The robins so red
Brought strawberry leaves
And over them spread ;
And all the day long
They sang them this song,
Poor babes in the wood !
Poor babes in the wood !
And don’t you remember
The babes in the wood ?


Rhymes and Jingles.


42 The House that Jack Built.


The House that Jack Built.









9,






aS SF
: Sir ESI AL. A

THs is the house that Jack built.

This is the malt

That lay in the house that Jack built.



43
44 The House that Jack Built.

bly
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This is the rat
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the cat,

That killed the rat,

That ate the malt

That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the dog,

That worried the cat,

That killed the rat,

That ate the malt

That lay in the house that Jack built.
The House that Jack Built. 45

Die OY, ay
ey 8
ae 20S $5 F









This is the cow with the crumpled horn, ©
That tossed the dog ; that worried the cat ;
That killed the rat ; that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

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46 The House that Jack Built.



This is the maiden all forlorn,

That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog, that worried the cat,
That killed the rat, that ate the malt

That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the man all tattered and torn,

That kissed the maiden all forlorn,

That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog, that worried the cat,
That killed the rat, that ate the malt

That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the priest all shaven and shorn,

That married the man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,

That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog, that worried the cat,
That killed the rat, that ate the malt

That lay in the house that Jack built.
The House that Jack Built. 47


48 The House that Jack Built.



‘This is the cock that crowed in the morn,
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the:man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,

That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog, that worried the cat,
That killed the rat, that ate the malt

‘That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the farmer sowing his corn,

That kept the cock that crowed in the morn,
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn,
‘That married the man all tattered and torn,
‘That kissed the maiden all forlorn,

That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog, that worried the cat,
That killed the rat, that ate the malt

That lay in the house that Jack built.
A Frog He Would A-Wooing Go. 49

A FROG he would a-wooing go,
Heigho, says Rowley,

Whether his mother would let him or no.
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach, .
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

So off he set with his opera hat,
Heigho, says Rowley,

And on the road he met with a rat.
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

‘Pray, Mr. Rat, will you go with me,
Heigho, says Rowley,

Kind Mrs. Mousey for to see ?”’
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

When they came to the door of Mousey’s hall,
Heigho, says Rowley,
They gave a loud knock and they gave a loud call.
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

‘Pray, Mrs. Mouse, are you within?”
Heigho, says Rowley,
50 A Frog He Would A-Wooing Go.

(Oh, yes, kind sirs, I’m sitting to spin.”
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinacn,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

‘‘Pray, Mrs. Mouse, will you give us some beer ?
Heigho, says Rowley,

For Froggy and I are fond of good cheer.”
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

‘*Pray, Mr Frog, will you give us a song ?
Heigho, says Rowley, .

But let it be something that’s not very long.”
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

‘Indeed, Mrs. Mouse,” replied the frog,
Heigho, says Rowley,

‘“A cold has made me as hoarse as a dog.”’
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

“Since you have caught cold, Mr. Frog,” Mousey
' said,
Heigho, says Rowley, .
“Pll sing you a song that I have just made.”
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !
. 5!

A Frog He Would A-Wooing Go.



OS ee ie ae I

Yi }
i ts SE onl
— iW oD Ory
en ABEL a

<
oe oe
Fa ete



M Rr Boas SSS
t



es

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i
52
But while they were all a merry-making,
Heigho, says Rowley,

A cat and her kittens came tumbling in.
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

The cat she seized the rat by the crown;
Heigho, says Rowley,

The kittens they pulled the little mouse down.
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

This put Mr. Frog in a terrible fright,

Heigho, says Rowley,

He took up his hat, and he wished them good-night.
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

But as Froggy was crossing over a brook,
Heigho, says Rowley,

A lily-white duck came and gobbled him up. .
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

So there was an end of one, two, and three,
Heigho, says Rowley.

The Rat, the Mouse, and the little Frog-gee !
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !
Fire! Fire! Burn Stick! 53

a old woman was sweeping her house, and she
found a little crooked sixpence. ‘‘What,”’ said
she, ‘‘shall I do with this little sixpence? I will go
to market and buy a little pig.” As she was coming
home she came toa stile; the piggy would not go
over the stile. s
She went a little farther, and she metadog. So
she said to the — :
dog, ‘‘ Dog! bite
pig; piggy
won’t go over
the stile, and I
shan’t get home
to-night.” But |
the dog would fe
not.

She went a
little farther,
and she met a stick. So she said, ‘‘Stick! stick!
beat dog ; dog won’t bite pig ; piggy won’t get over
the stile, and I shan’t get home to-night.” But the
stick would not.

She went a little farther, and she meta fire. So
she said, ‘‘ Fire! fire! burn stick ; stick won’t beat
dog ; dog won’t bite pig ; piggy won’t get over the
stile, and I shan’t get home to-night.’ But the fire
would not.




ie Fire! Fire! Burn Stick!

She went a little farther, and she met some water.
So she said, ‘“‘ Water! water! quench fire ; fire won’t
burn stick ; stick won’t beat dog; dog won’t bite pig;
piggy won’t get over the stile, and I shan’t get home
to-night.’’ But the water would not.

She went a little farther, and she metan ox. Soshe
said, ‘Ox! ox!
drink water ;
water won’t
quench fire;
fire won’t burn
stick; stick
won't beat dog ;
dog won’t bite
pig; piggy
Â¥ won't get over
| the stile, and I
shan’t gethome
to-night.’ But



the ox would not.

She went a little farther, and she met a butcher.
So she said, “ Butcher! butcher! kill ox ; ox won’t
drink water; water won’t quench fire; fire won’t
burn stick ; stick won’t beat dog; dog won't bite pig;
piggy won’t get over the stile, and I shan’t get home
to-night.’’ But the butcher would not.

She went a little farther, and she met arope. So
Fire! Fire! Burn Stick!



55
56 Fire! Fire! Burn Stick!

she said, ‘‘ Rope! rope! hang butcher; butcher won’t
kill ox ; ox won’t drink water; water won’t quench
fire; fire won’t burn stick; stick won’t beat dog;
dog won’t bite pig; piggy won’t get over the stile,
and I shan’t get home to-night.’ But the rope would
not.

So she went a little farther, and she met arat. So

savy she said, ‘‘Rat!
rat! gnaw rope ;
rope won’t hang
any q butcher; butcher
i - won't kill OX}
N ox won't drink
water : water
oN AS v won’t quench
=, qj fire; fire won’t
oe RK zd, nee stick; stick
won’t beat dog ; dog won’t bite pig ; piggy won’t get
over the stile, and I shan’t get home to-night.’’? But
the rat would not.

So she went a little farther, and she meta cat. So
she said, ‘‘Cat! cat! kill rat; rat won’t gnaw rope;
rope won’t hang butcher ; butcher won’t kill ox ; ox
‘won't drink water; water won’t quench fire; fire
won’t burn stick ; stick won’t beat dog ; dog won’t
' bite pig; piggy won’t get over the stile, and I shan’t
get home to-night.’”’ But the cat said to her, ‘‘If








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i




2







Fire! Fire! Burn Stick!

£ 2 fe
TITEL eT mn

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re

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58 Fire! Fire! Burn Stick!

you will go to yonder cow and fetch me a saucer of
milk, I will kill the rat.’ So away went the old
woman to the cow.

But the cow said to her, ‘‘If you will go to yonder
haystack and fetch me a handful of hay, I'll give
you the milk.’ So away went the old woman to the
haystack ; and she brought the hay to the cow.

ee a Assoonasthe

wes
eA cow had eaten
the hay she

gave the old
woman the
milk, and away
she went with
it in a saucer to
the cat.

Assoonas the
cat had lapped
up the milk,
began to gnaw
the rope; the rope began to hang the butcher ; the
butcher began to kill the ox; the ox began to drink
the water ; the water began to quench the fire; the
fire began to burn the stick ; the stick began to beat
the dog; the dog began to bite the pig; the little
pig in a fright jumped over the stile ; and so the old
woman got home that night.


Poor Cock Robin. 59



HO killed Cock Robin? I, said the Sparrow,
With my bow and arrow, I killed Cock Robin.

Who saw him die? I, said the Magpie,
With my little eye, I saw him die.

Who caught his blood? I, said the Fish,
With my little dish, I caught his blood.

Who made his shroud? I, said the Eagle,
With my thread and needle, I made his shroud.

Who'll dig his grave? The Owl, with aid,
But mattock and spade, will dig Robin’s grave.
60 Poor Cock Robin.



Who’ll be the parson? I, said the Rook,
- With my little book, I’ll be the parson.

Who'll be the clerk? I, said the Lark,
If not in the dark, I'll be the clerk.

Who'll carry him to the grave? I, said the Kite,
If not in the night, I'll carry him to the grave.

Who'll be chief mourner? I, said the Swan,

I’m sorry he’s gone, I'll be chief mourner.

Who'll bear his pall? We, said the Wren,
Both the cock and the hen, we’ll bear the pall.
Poor Cock Robin. 61
Who'll toll the bell? I, said the Bull,
Because I can pull, and I'll pull the bell.

Who'll lead the way? I, said the Martin,
When ready for starting, and I'll lead the way.



All the birds in the air began sighing and sobbing,
When they heard the bell toll for poor Cock Robin.

To all it concerns, this notice apprises,

The Sparrow’s for trial at next bird assizes,


62 The Cat and the Mouse.



HE cat and the mouse
Played in the malt-house :

The cat bit the mouse’s tail off. ‘‘Pray, puss, give
me my tail.” ‘‘No,” says the cat, ‘‘T’ll not give you
your tail, till you go to the cow and fetch me some
milk.”

First she leapt, and then she ran,
Till she came to the cow, and thus began,—

“Pray, cow, give me milk, that I may give cat
milk, that cat may give me my own tail again.”
‘“No,” said the cow, ‘‘I will give you no milk, till
you go to the farmer and get me some hay.”

First she leapt, and then she ran,
Till she came to the farmer, and thus began, —
‘The Cat and the Mouse. 63



‘“Pray, farmer, give me hay, that I may give cow
hay, that cow may give me milk, that I may give cat
milk, that cat may give me my own tail again.”
“No,” says the farmer, ‘‘I’ll give you no hay, till
you go to the butcher and fetch me some meat.”’

First she leapt, and then she ran,
Till she came to the butcher, and thus began, —

“Pray, butcher, give me meat, that I may give
farmer meat, that farmer may give me hay, that I may
give cow hay, that cow may give me milk, that I may
give cat milk, that cat may give me my own tail again.”
‘‘No,” says the butcher, “TIl give you no meat till
you go to the baker and fetch me some bread.”
64 The Cat and the Mouse.



First she leapt, and then she ran,
Till she came to the baker, and thus began, —

‘‘Pray, baker, give me bread, that I may give
butcher bread, that butcher may give me meat, that I
may give farmer meat, that farmer may give me hay,
that I may give cow hay, that cow may give me milk,
that I may give cat milk, that cat may give me my
own tail again.”’

“Yes,” says the baker, “I'll give you some bread,
But if you eat my meal, Pll cut off your head.”

Then the baker gave mouse bread, and mouse gave
butcher bread, and butcher gave mouse meat, and
mouse gave farmer meat, and farmer gave mouse hay,
and mouse gave cow hay, and cow gave mouse milk,
and mouse gave cat milk, and cat gave mouse her
own tail again! |
THE HISTORY OF CINDERELLA ;
OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER.

ent
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ay y
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: : SNe,
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<65)
66 Cinderella; or the

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i =
Me WY ic
\(

= a WS Q

RAN



THE PROUDEST WOMAN EVER SEEN.
Little Glass Slipper. 67



ae lived once a Ame who married for
his second wife the proudest woman ever seen.
She had two daughters of the same spirit, who were
indeed like her in all things. On his side, her hus-
band had a young daughter, who was of great good-
ness and sweetness of temper; in this she was like
her mother, who was the best woman in the world.
No sooner was the wedding over than the step- .
mother began to show her ill-humor; she could not
bear her young step-daughter’s gentle ways, because
they made those of her own daughters appear a thou-
sand times more odious and disagreeable. So she
employed her in the meanest work of the house; she
it was who must wash the dishes and rub the tables
and chairs, and it was her place to clean madam’s
68 Cinderella; or the



chamber and that of the misses, her daughters. She
herself slept up in a sorry garret, upon a wretched
straw bed, while her sisters’ rooms had shining floors
and curtained beds, and looking-glasses so long and
broad that they could see themselves from head to
foct in them.

The poor girl bore everything with patience, not
_daring to complain to her father. When she had
finished her work she used to sit down in the chimney
corner among the cinders; so that in the house she
went by the name of Cinderwench. ‘The youngest of
the two sisters, however, being rather more civil than
the eldest, called her Cinderella. But Cinderella,
ragged as she was, looked a hundred times more
charming than her sisters, decked out in all their
- splendor.
Little Glass Slipper.

a3 nail “ait



CINDERELLA DRESSES THEIR HAIR.

69
70 Cinderella; or the



It happened that the king’s son gave a ball, to which
he invited all the persons of fashion for miles around;
our two misses were among the number, for they made
a great figure in the country. ‘They were delighted
with this invitation, and were wonderfully busy choos-
ing such dresses as might become them. ‘This was a
new trouble for Cinderella, for it was she who ironed
her sisters’ linen, and plaited their ruffles. There
was little then talked of but what dresses should be
worn at the ball. ‘‘I,” said the eldest, “will wear
my crimson velvet gown.” ‘‘I,” said the youngest,
“will wear a dress all flowered with gold and a brooch
of diamonds in my hair.’ Yet they sent for Cinder-
ella to ask her advice, for she had excellent taste.
She helped them as much as she could, and even
offered to dress their hair, which was exactly what
they wanted.
‘Little Glass Slipper. TE



While she was busy over this, her sisters said to
her, “Cinderella, should not you be glad to go to the
ball?” ‘‘Ah,” said she, ‘‘you but mock me; it is
not for such as I am to go thither.’ ‘You are in the
right of it,” replied they, ‘‘it would make the folk
laugh to see a Cinderwench at the ball”? Any other
than Cinderella would have dressed their hair awry,
but she was good and did nothing but her best.

At last the happy moment arrived: they all set off,
and Cinderella looked after them till they passed from
her sight, when she sat down and began to cry.
72 Cinderella; or the



Her godmother came in, and seeing her in tears,
asked what ailed her. ‘‘I want—oh, I want—”
sobbed poor Cinderella, without being able to say
another word.

Her godmother, who indeed was a fairy, said to
cher, ‘‘ You want to go to the ball, isn’t itso??? ‘Oh,
yes!’? said Cinderella, sighing. ‘Well then,” said
her godmother, ‘‘be but a gcod girl, and I will con-
trive that you shall go.”

Then taking her kindly by the hand, she said,
“Run now into the garden, and bring me a pumpkin.”
Cinderella flew at her bidding, and brought back the
finest she could get. Her godmother scooped out the
inside, leaving nothing but the rind; this done, she
_ Little Glass Slipper.



Cox

PDECKED out FOR THE BALL,

73
74 Cinderella; or the

struck it with her wand, and the pumpkin was in-
stantly changed into a fine coach, gilded all over with
gold. She then went to look into the mouse-trap,
where she found six mice, all alive; she told Cinder-
ella to raise the door of the mouse-trap, and as each
mouse came out, at one tap of her wand they changed
into splendid horses ; so that now Cinderella had a
coach and six horses of a fine dappled mouse-color.
“Here, my child, are your coach and horses,’’ said
the godmother ; ‘‘but what shall we do for a coach-
man? run and see if there be not a rat in the trap ;””
Cinderella brought the trap, and in it were three
huge rats. The fairy made choice of the biggest of
the three, and having touched him, he was turned
into a fat jolly coachman, who mounted the hammer-
cloth in a trice.

She next said to Cinderella—“ Go again into the
garden, and you will find six lizards behind the water-
ing-pot ; bring them hither.’ She had no sooner done
so, than her godmother turned them into smart foot-
men; who at once skipped up behind the coach.

Then said the fairy, ‘‘ Now, then, here is something
that will take you to the ball; are you pleased with
it?” ‘Oh, yes,” cried she, ‘‘but must I go in these
dirty clothes ?”

Her godmother only touched her with her wand,
and her clothes were turned into cloth of gold and
Little Glass Slipper. 75

mys

D
ESS

go

Pr | ea
Bi Sn PEW
SS SS

,



THE PRINCE GAZING ON CINDERELLA.
76 Cinderella; or the

silver, all beset with jewels. This done she gave her
a pair of glass slippers, the prettiest in the world.

Being thus decked out, she got into her coach ; but
her godmother bade her, above all things, not to stay
past midnight, telling her that if she stayed a single
moment longer, all her fine things would return to
what they had been before.

She promised her godmother she would not fail to
leave the ball before midnight, and then away she
drove.

The king’s son, being told that a great princess
had come, ran out to receive her; he gave her his
hand as she stepped from her coach, and led her
among all the company.

Cinderella no sooner appeared than everyone was
silent; both the dancing and the music stopped, and
then all the guests might be heard whispering, “ Ah,
how handsome she is.” All the ladies were busied in
gazing at her clothes and head-dress, that they might
have some made after the same pattern. ‘The king’s
son took her to dance with him: she danced so grace-
fully that they all more and more admired her.

A fine supper was served up, whereof the young
prince ate not a morsel, so intently was he busied in
gazing on her. Shesat down by her sisters, giving
them part of the fruit which the prince had presented
her with ; which very much surprised them. While
Little Glass Slipper.



DROPPING HER GLASS SLIPPER.

(

. )

Tele
78 Cinderella; or the

Cinderella was thus talking with her sisters, she heard
the clock strike eleven and three-quarters, whereupon
she immediately made a curtsey to the company and
then hastened away. Being got home, she thanked
her godmother, and said she could not but wish she
might go next day to the ball, because the king’s son
had desired her.

While she was telling her godmother all that had
passed, her two sisters knocked at the door, and Cin-
derella opened. ‘‘ How long you have stayed !” cried
she, pretending to yawn. ‘‘If you had been at the
ball,’ said one of them, “let me tell you, sleepiness
would not have fallen on you. ‘There came thither
the very handsomest princess ever seen with eyes;
she showed us a thousand kindnesses, and gave us
oranges and citrons.’’ Cinderella asked the name of
the princess, but they told her they did not know it,
and that the king’s son was uneasy, and would give
all the world to know who she was.

At this, Cinderella, smiling, replied, ‘‘She must be
very beautiful: could I not see her? Ah! dear Miss
Charlotte, do lend me your yellow suit of clothes that
you wear every day?”—‘Oh, indeed!” cried Miss
Charlotte, ‘‘lend my clothes to such a dirty Cinder-
wench as thou art !”’

The next day the two sisters went to the ball and
so did Cinderella, dressed still more magnificently
than she had been on the first night.
Little Glass Slipper. 79



The king’s son was always with her, and said the
kindest things to her imaginable. She was so far
from feeling wearied by this, that she forgot the
charge her godmother had given her; so she at last
counted the clock striking twelve when she took it
to be no more than eleven : she then fled as nimble as
adeer. The prince followed, but could not overtake
her; she dropped one of her glass slippers, which the
prince carefully took up. She got home all out of
breath, without coach or footmen, and in her old
clothes, having nothing left of all her finery but one
of the little slippers. The guards of the gate were
asked if they had seen a princess go out, but they
said they had seen nobody except a young girl very.
meanly dressed.

“When ‘the two sisters returned, Cinderella asked
them if they had been as much amused as the night
80 Cinderella; or: the



before, and if the beautiful princess had been there?
They told her, yes, but that she hurried away at twelve
o’clock, so fast that she dropped one of her glass slip-
pers, which the king’s son had taken up; and that
he was surely.in love with the person to whom the
slipper belonged.

What they said was perfectly true, for the king’s
son caused it to be given out that he would marry
her whose foot this slipper would exactly fit. So
they began by trying it on the princesses, then on ~
the duchesses, and all the court, but in vain; they
then brought it to the two sisters, who both tried all
_ they could to force their feet into the slipper, but
without success.

Cinderella, who was looking at them all the while,
could not help smiling, and said, “‘ Let me see what I
Little Glass Slipper. 81

i

lise mee



IT FITS CINDERELLA.
82 Cinderella; or the







We t} af
LLL

YY

can do with the slipper,’ which made her sisters
laugh heartily. ‘‘ Very likely,” said they, “that it
would fit your clumsy foot!”” ‘The gentleman who
was sent to try the slipper saw that she was very
handsome, and said he had been ordered to try it on
everyone that pleased. ‘Then, putting the slipper to
her foot, he found that it went on very easily, and
- fitted her as though it had been made of wax.

The astonishment of the two sisters was great, but
still greater when Cinderella drew out of her pocket
the other slipper, and put it on! At that very mo-
ment in came her godmother, and with one touch of
her wand, made Cinderella appear more magnificent
than ever.

The sisters knew her again at once, and throwing
themselves at her feet, begged pardon for the ill-
treatment they had made her undergo. Cinderella







Little Glass Slipper.




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ASTONISHMENT OF THE SISTERS.

83
84 Cinderella; or the

forgave them with all her heart, and begged that
they would always love her.

She was then led to the palace where the young
prince received her with great joy and in a few days
they were married. Cinderella, who was as good as
she was beautiful, took her sisters to live in the palace,
and shortly afterwards matched them to two great
lords of the Court, and they all lived happily ever
afterwards.


Little Glass Slipper.



85
86 Jack and the Bean-Stalk.

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ieee once lived a .pocr widow, in a cottage
which stood in a country village, a long distance
from London, for many years.

The widow had only a child named Jack, whom
she gratified in everything ; the end of her foolish
kindness was, that Jack paid little attention to any-
thing she said; and he was heedless and naughty.
His follies were not owing to bad nature, but to his
mother never having chided him. As she was not
rich, and he would not work, she was obliged to sup-
port herself and him by selling everything she had.
At last nothing remained, only a cow.

The widow, with tears in her eyes, could not help
Jack and the Bean-Stalk. 87

scolding Jack. ‘‘Oh! you wicked boy,” said she,
‘“by your naughty course of life you have now brought
us both to fall! Heedless, heedless boy! I have not
money enough to buy a bit of bread for another day :
nothing remains but my poor cow, and that must be
sold, or we must starve!”



Jack was in a degree of tenderness for a few min-
utes, but it soon passed over; and then becoming very
hungry for want of food, he teased his poor mother to
let him sell the cow ; which at last she sadly allowed
him to do.

As he went on his journey he met a butcher, who
asked why he was driving the cow from home?
88 Jack and the Bean-Stalk.

Jack replied he was going to sell it. The butcher
had some wonderful beans, of different colors,in his
bag, which caught Jack’s fancy. This the butcher
saw, who, knowing Jack’s easy temper, made up his
mind to take advantage of it, and offered all the beans
‘for the cow. The foolish boy thought it a great offer.
The bargain was momently struck, and. the cow ex-
changed for a few paltry beans. When Jack hastened
home with the beans and told his mother, and showed
them to her, she kicked the beans away in a great
passion. ‘They flew in all directions, and fell as far as
the garden.

Early in the morning Jack arose from his bed, and
seeing something strange from the window, he hast-
ened down-stairs into the garden, where he soon
found that some of the beans had taken root, and
sprung up wonderfully : the stalks grew of an im-
mense thickness, and had so entwined, that they
formed a ladder like a chain in view.

Looking upwards, he could not descry the top, it
seemed to be lost in the clouds. He tried it, found it

' firm, and not to beshaken. A new idea immediately
struck him : he would climb the bean stalk, and see
whither it wouldlead. Full of this plan, which made
him forget even his hunger, Jack hastened to tell it
to his mother.

He at once set out, and after climbing for some
Jack and the Bean-Stalk. 89

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90 Jack and the Bean-Stalk.

hours, reached the top of the bean-stalk, tired and
almost exhausted. Looking round, he was surprised
to find himself in a strange country ; it seemed to be
quite a barren desert; not a tree, shrub, house, or
living creature was to be seen.

Jack sat himself pensively upon a block of stone,
and thought of his mother ; his hunger attacked him,
and now he felt sorrowful for his disobedience in climb-
ing the bean-stalk against her will; and made up his
mind that he must now die for want of food.

However, he walked on, hoping to see a house
where he might beg something to eat. Suddenly he
saw a beautiful young woman at some distance. She
was dressed in an elegant manner, and had a small
white wand in her hand, on the top of which was a pea-
cock of pure gold. Shecame near and said: ‘‘I will
tell to you astory your mother darenot. But before I
begin, I require a solemn promise on your part to do
what I command. I ama fairy, and unless you per-
form exactly what I direct you to do, you will take
from me the power to assist you; and there is little
doubt but that you will die in the attempt.” Jack
was rather frightened at this caution, but promised to
follow her directions.

“Your father was a rich man, with a greatly gen-
erous nature. It was his practice never to refuse help
to the poor people about him ; but, on the contrary,
Jack and the Bean-Stalk. QI

to seek out the helpless and distressed. Not many
miles from your father’s house lived a huge giant,
who was the dread of the country around for cruelty
and wickedness. ‘his creature was moreover of a



very envious spirit, and disliked to hear others talked
of for their goodness and humanity, and he vowed to
do him a mischief, so that he might no longer hear
his good actions made the subject of every one’s talk.
92 Jack and the Bean-Stalk.

Your father was too good a man to fear evil from
others ; so that it was not long before the cruel giant
found a chance to put his wicked threats into prac-
tice ; for hearing that your parents were about passing
a few days with a friend at some distance from home,
he caused your father to be waylaid and murdered,
and your mother to be seized on their way homeward.

‘At the time this happened, you were but a few
months old. Your poor mother, almost dead with
affright and horror, was borne away by the cruel
giant’s servants, to a dungeon under his house, in
which she and her poor babe were both long kept
prisoners. Distracted at the absence of your parents,
the servants went in |search of them ; but no tidings
of either could be got. Meantime he caused a will to
be found making over all your father’s property to
him as your guardian, and as such he took open pos-
session.

‘‘ After your mother had been some months in
prison, the giant offered to restore her to liberty, on
condition that she would solemnly swear that she
would never tell the story of her wrongs to any one.
To put it out of her power to do him any harm, should
she break her oath, the giant had her put on ship-
board, and taken to a distant country ; where she
was left with no more money for her support than
what she got by selling a few jewels she had hidden
in her dress.
Jack and the Bean-Stalk. 93

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94 Jack and the Bean-Stalk.

‘‘T was appointed your father’s guardian at his
birth; but fairies have laws to which they are subject
as well as mortals. A short time before the giant
killed your father, I transgressed; my punishment
was the loss of my power for a certain time, which,
alas, entirely prevented my helping your father, even
when I most wished todo so. ‘The day on which you
met the butcher, as you went to sell your mother’s
cow, my power was restored. It was I who secretly
prompted you to take the beans in exchange for the
cow. By my power the bean-stalk grew to so great
a height, and formed a ladder. The giant lives in
this country; you are the person who must punish
him for all his wickedness. You will meet with
dangers and difficulties, but you must persevere in
avenging the death of your father, or you will not
prosper in any of your doings.

‘“Asto the giant’s goods, everything he has is yours,
‘though you are deprived of it; you may take, there-
fore, what part of it you can. You must, however,
be careful, for such is his love for gold, that the first
loss he discovers will make him outrageous and very
watchful for the future. But you must still pursue
him; for it is only by cunning that you can ever hope
to get the better of him, and become possessed of your
rightful property, and the means of justice overtaking
him for his barbarous murder. One thing I desire is,
Jack and the Bean-Stalk. 95


96 Jack and the Bean-Stalk.

do not let your mother know you are aware of your
father’s history till you see me again.

“Go along the direct road ; you will soon see the ©
house where your cruel enemy lives. While you do
as I order you, I will protect and guard you; but
remember, if you disobey my commands, a dreadful ~
punishment awaits you.”

As soon as she had made an end she disappeared,
leaving Jack to follow his journey. He walked on
till after sunset, when, to his great joy, he espied a
large mansion. ‘This pleasant sight revived his droop-
ing spirits; he redoubled his speed, and reached it
shortly. A good-looking woman stood at the door ;
he spoke to her, begging she would give him a morsel
of bread and a night’s lodging. She expressed the
greatest surprise at seeing him ; and said it was quite
uncommon to see any strange creature near their *
house, for it was mostly known that her husband was
a very cruel and powerful giant, and one that would
eat human flesh, if he could possibly get it.

This account terrified Jack greatly, but still, not
forgetting the fairy’s protection, he hoped to elude
the giant, and therefore he begged the woman to take
him in for one night only, and hide him where she
thought proper. ‘The good woman at last suffered
herself to be persuaded, for she had a kind heart, and
at last led him into the house.


Jack and the Bean-Stalk. 97

U



First they passed an elegant hall, finely furnished;
they then went through several spacious rooms, all in
the same style of grandeur, but they seemed to be
quite forsaken and desolate. A long gallery came
next ; it was very dark, just large enough to show
that, instead of a wall each side, there was a grating
of iron, which parted off a dismal’ dungeon, from
whence issued the groans of several poor victims whom
the cruel giant kept shut up in readiness for his very
large appetite. Poor Jack was in a dreadful fright at
witnessing sucha horrible scene, which caused him
to fear that he would never see his mother, but be
captured lastly for the giant’s meal; but still he
. recollected the fairy, and a gleam of hope forced itself
into his heart.
- 98 Jack and the Bean-Stalk.

The good woman then took Jack to a large kitchen, ~
where a great fire was kept; she bade him sit down, -
and gave him plenty to eat and drink. When he had
done his meal and enjoyed himself, he was disturbed _
by a hard knocking at the gate, so loud as to cause



the house to shake. Jack was hidden in the oven,
and the giant’s wife ran to let in her husband.

_ Jack heard him accost her in a voice like thunder,
saying: ‘‘ Wife! wife! I smell fresh meat!” ‘Oh,
my dear,’’ replied she, “it is nothing but the people
in the dungeon.’”’? ‘The giant seemed to believe her,






Jack and the Bean-Stalk. 99



wife prepared supper.

By degrees Jack managed to look at the monster
through asmall crevice. He was much surprised to see
what an amazing quantity he devoured, and supposed
he would never have done eating and drinking. After
his supper was ended, a very curious hen was brought
and placed on the table before him. Jack’s curiosity
was great to see what would happen. He saw that it
stood quiet before him, and every time the giant said:
“Tay!” the hen laid an egg of solid gold. The giant
amused himself a long time with his hen; meanwhile
his wife went to bed. At length he fell asleep, and
snored like the roaring of a cannon. Jack, finding
him still asleep at daybreak, crept softly from his
100 Jack and the Bean-Stalk. .

hiding-place, seized the hen, and ran off with her as
fast as his legs could possibly carry him.

Jack easily found his way to the bean-stalk, and
came down better and quicker than he expected.
His mother was overjoyed to see him. “Now,
mother,” said Jack, ‘‘I have brought you home that
which will make you rich.”” The hen laid as many
golden eggs as they desired ;
they sold them, and soon had as
much riches as they wanted.

For a few months Jack and’
his mother lived very happy,
but he longed to pay the giant
another visit. Early one morn-
ing he again climbed the bean-
stalk, and reached the giant’s
mansion late in the evening;
the woman was at the door as —
before. Jack told her a pitiful
tale, and prayed for a night’s shelter. She told him
that she had admitted a poor hungry boy once be-
fore, and the little ingrate had stolen one of the
giant’s treasures, and ever since that she had been
cruelly used. She, however, led him to the kitchen,
gave him a supper, and put him ina lumber closet.
Soon after, the giant came in, took his supper, and
ordered his wife to bring down his bags of gold and

a

H


Jack and the Bean-Stalk. 101

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ANF



silver. Jack peeped out of his hiding-place, and ob-
served the giant counting over his treasures, and
after which he carefully put them in bags again, fell
asleep, and snored as before. Jack crept quietly from
: his hiding-place, and approached the giant, when a
little dog under the chair barked furiously. Much
to his surprise, the giant slept on soundly, and the
dog ceased. Jack seized the bags, reached the door
in safety, and soon arrived at the bottom of the bean-
stalk. When he reached his mother’s cottage, he
found it quite deserted. Full of astonishment he ran
into the village, and an old woman directed him toa
house, where he found his mother apparently dying.
On being told of our hero’s safe return, his mother
102 Jack and the Bean-Stalk.

revived and soon recovered. Jack then presented two
bags of gold and silver to her.

His mother saw that something preyed upon his
mind heavily, and tried to find out the cause; but
Jack knew too well what the consequence would be
should he discover the cause of his melancholy to her.
He did his utmost therefore to conquer the great desire



which now forced itself upon him in spite of himself
for another journey up the bean-stalk, butin vain.
On the longest day Jack arose as soon as it was
light, climbed the bean-stalk, and reached the top
with some little trouble. He found the road, journey,
etc., the same as before. He arrived at the giant’s
house in the evening, and found his wife standing as
Jack and the Bean-Stalk. 103



usual at the door. Jack now appeared a different
character, and had di8guised himself so completely
that she did notappear to remember him. However,
when he begged admittance, he found it very difficult
to: persuade her. At last he prevailed, was allowed
to go in, and was hidden in the copper.

When the giant returned, he said, as usual : ‘Wife !
wife ! I smell fresh meat!” But Jack felt quite com-
posed, as he had said so before, and had soon been
104 Jack and the Bean-Stalk.

satisfied. However, the giant started up suddenly,
and notwithstanding all his wife could say he searched
all round the room. Whilst this was going forward,
Jack was much terrified, and ready to die with fear,
wishing himself at home a thousand times; but when
the giant approached the copper, and put his hand
upon the lid, Jack thought his death was certain.
Fortunately the giant ended his search there, with-
out moving the lid, and seated himself quietly by the
fireside.

When the giant’s supper was over, he commanded
his wife to fetch down his harp. Jack peeped under
the copper-lid, and soon saw the most beautiful one
that could be imagined. It was put by the giant on
the table, who said: ‘‘ Play,” and it instantly played
of its own accord. ‘The music was uncommonly fine.
Jack was delighted, and felt more anxious to get the
harp into his possession than either of the former
treasures.

The giant’s soul was not attuned to harmony, and
the music soon lulled him into a sound sleep. Now,
therefore, was the time to carry off the harp, as the
giant appeared to be in a more profound sleep than
usual. Jack soon made up his mind, got out of the
copper, and seized the harp; which, however, being
enchanted by a fairy, called out loudly: ‘‘ Master,
master |”
Jack and the Bean-Stalk.



THE GIANT PURSUES JACK.
106 Jack and the Bean-Stalk.



The giant awoke, stood up, and tried to pursue
Jack; but he had drank so much that he could not
stand. Jack ran as quick as he could. In a little
time the giant was well enough to walk slowly, or
tather to reel after him. Had he been sober, he must
have overtaken Jack instantly; but as he then was,
Jack contrived to be first at the top of the bean-stalk.
The giant called to him all the way along the road
in a voice like thunder, and was sometimes very near
to him.

The moment Jack got down the bean-stalk he:
called out for a hatchet: one was brought him di-
rectly. Just at that instant the giant began to de-
scend, but Jack with his hatchet cut the bean-stalk
close off at the root, and the giant fell headlong into
the garden. The fall instantly killed him.
Jack and the Bean-Stalk.



JACK ESCAPES WITH THE HARP,

107
108 Jack and the Bean-Stalk.

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Jack heartily begged his mother’s pardon for all .
the sorrow and affliction he had caused her, promis-
ing most faithfully to be dutiful and obedient to her
in future. He proved as good as his word, and be-
came a pattern of affectionate behavior and attention
tohis parent.
Little Red Riding Hood. 109



GOING TO GRANDMAMMA,
110 Little Red Riding Hood.



(NCE upon a time there was a little village-girl,

the prettiest ever seen: her mother doted upon
her, and so did her grandmother. She, good woman,
made for her a little red hood, which suited her so
well that everyone called her Little Red Riding
Hood.

One day her mother, who had just made some
cakes, said to her: ‘‘My dear, you shall go and see .
how your grandmother is, for I have heard she is ail-
ing; take her this cake and this little pot of butter.”’

Little Red Riding Hood started off at once for her
grandmother’s cottage, which was in another village.

While passing through a wood she met a wolf, who
would have liked well to have eaten her; but he
dared not, because of some wood-cutters who were
Little Red Riding Hood. III

hard by in the forest. So he asked her where she was
going.

The poor child, who did not know it was dangerous
to listen to a wolf, answered, ‘‘I am going to see my
grandmother, to take her a cake and a little pot of
butter that my mother sends her.’’—“ Does she live a
great way off?” said the wolf—‘ Oh yes !” said Little
Red Riding Hood, “‘she lives beyond the mill you see



right down there, in the first house in the village:”—

‘‘Well,” said the wolf, ‘I shall go and see her too.
I shall take this road, and do you take that one, and
let us see who will get there first !”

- The wolf set off at a gallop along the shortest road;
but the little girl took the longest way and amused
herself by gathering nuts, running after butterflies,
and plucking daisies and buttercups.

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The wolf soon reached her grandmother’s cottage ;
fe knocks at the door, rap, rap. ‘‘Who’s there ?’’—
‘Ors your grand-daughter, Little Red Riding Hood,”
said the wolf in a shrill voice, ‘‘and I have brought
you a cake and a little pot of butter that my mother
sends you.’ ‘The good old grandmother, who was ill
in bed, called out, ‘‘ Pull the bobbin and the latch
willgoup!’? The wolf pulled the bobbin, and the
door opened. He leaped on the old woman and gob-
bled her up in a minute; for he had had no dinner
for three days past.

' Then he shut the door and rolled himself up in
the grandmother’s bed, to wait for Little Red Riding
Hood.

In a while she came knocking at the door, rap, rap.


Little Red Riding Hood. 113



‘Who's there?’’? Little Red Riding Hood, who
heard the gruff voice of the wolf, was frightened at
first, but thinking that her grandmother had a cold,
a Little Red Riding Hood.

she answered, ‘‘’ Tis your grand-daughter, Little Red
Riding Hood, and I have brought you acake anda
little pot of butter that my mother sends you.” ‘Then
the wolf called to her in as soft a voice as he could,
‘Pull the bobbin and the latch will go up.” Little
Red Riding Hood pulled the bobbin and the door
opened.

When the wolf saw her come in, he covered himself
up with the clothes, and said, ‘‘ Put the cake and the
little pot of butter on the chest, and come and lie
down beside me.” Little Red Riding Hood took off
her cloak and went over to the bed; she was full of
surprise to see how strange her grandmother looked
in her night-cap. She said to her then, “Oh, grand-
mamma, grandmamma, what great arms you have
got!”

‘‘ All the better to hug you with, my dear !””

“‘Oh, grandmamma, grandmamma, what great legs
you have got!”

“All the better to run with, my dear !”’

“Oh, grandmamma, grandmamma, what great ears
you have got!”

‘“All the better to hear with, my dear!”

“Oh, grandmamma, grandmamma, what great. eyes
you have got !”

‘All the better to see with, my dear!”

‘Oh, grandmamma, grandmamuina, what great /eeth
you have got !”
Little Red Riding Hood. 115



“ All the better to gobble you up !””
So saying, the wicked wolf leaped on Little Red
Riding Hood and gobbled her up.
116 The History of Tom Thumb.

2 is said that in the days of the famed Prince Ar-

thur, who was king of Britain, in the year 516,
there lived a great magician, called Merlin, the most
learned and skilful enchanter in the world at that
time.

This great magician, who could assume any form
he pleased, was travelling in the disguise of a poor
beggar, and being very much fatigued, he stopped at
the cottage of an honest ploughman to rest himself,
and asked for some refreshment.

The countryman gave hima hearty welcome, and
his wife, who was a very good-hearted, hospitable
woman, soon brought him some milk in a wooden
bowl, and some coarse brown bread on.a platter.

Merlin was much pleased with this homely repast
and the kindness of the ploughman and his wife; but
he could not help seeing that though everything was
neat and comfortable in the cottage, they seemed both
to be sad and much cast down. He therefore ques-
tioned them on the cause of their sadness, and learned
they were miserable because they had no children.

The poor woman declared, with tears in her eyes,
that she should be the happiest creature in the world
if she had a son; and although he was no bigger than
her husband’s thumb, she would be satisfied.

Merlin was so much amused with the idea of a boy
no bigger than a man’s thumb, that he made up his
The History of Tom Thumb. 117

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Merlin questions them on the cause
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118. The History of Tom Thumb.

mind to pay a visit to the queen of the fairies, and ask
her to grant the poor woman’s wish. ‘The droll fancy
of such a little person among the human race pleased
the fairy queen too, greatly, and she promised Merlin
that the wish should be granted. Accordingly, a
short time after, the ploughman’s wife had a son,
who, wonderful to relate! was not a bit bigger than
his father’s thumb.

The fairy queen, wishing to see the little fellow
thus born into the world, came in at the window
while the mother was sitting up in bed admiring him.
The queen kissed the child, and, giving it the name
of Tom Thumb, sent for some of the fairies, who
dressed her little favorite as she bade them.

“An oak-leaf hat he had for his crown;
His shirt of web by spiders spun;
With jacket wove of thistle’s down;
His trowsers were of feathers done.

His stockings, of apple-rind they tie
With eyelash from his mother’s eye:
His shoes were made of mouse’s skin,
Tann’d with the downy hair within.”

It is remarkable that Tom never grew any larger
than his father’s thumb, which was only of an ordi-
nary size; but as he got older he became very cun-
ning and full of tricks. When he was old enough to
The History of Tom Thumb. I19



play with the boys, and had lost all his own cherry-
stones, he used to creep into the bags of his playfel-
lows, fill his pockets, and, getting out unseen, would
again join in the game.

One day, however, as he was coming out of a bag
of cherrystones, where he had been pilfering as usual,
the boy to whom it belonged chanced to see him.
‘‘Ah, ha! my little Tommy,” said the boy, “so I
have caught you stealing my cherrystones at last, and
you shall be rewarded for your thievish tricks.” On
saying this, he drew the string tight around his neck,
and gave the bag such a hearty shake, that poor little
Tom’s legs, thighs, and body were sadly bruised. He
roared out with pain, and begged to be let out, prom-
ising never to be guilty of such bad practices again.

A short time afterwards his mother was making a
120 The History of Tom Thumb.

batter-pudding, and Tom being very anxious to see
how it was made, climbed up to the edge of the bowl;
but unfortunately his foot slipped and he plumped
over head and ears into the batter, unseen by his
mother, who stirred him into the pudding-bag, and
put him in the pot to boil.



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The batter had filled Tom’s mouth, and prevented
him from crying; but, on feeling the hot water, he
-kicked and struggled so much in the pot, that his
mother thought that the pudding was bewitched, and,
instantly pulling it out of the pot, she threw it to the
I21

The History of Tom Thumb.

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THROWN OUT OF DOORS.
122 The History of Tom Thumb.



door. A poor tinker, who was passing by, lifted up
the pudding, and, putting it into his budget, he then
walked off. As ‘Tom had now got his mouth cleared
of the batter, he then began to cry aloud, which so
frightened the tinker that he flung down the pud-
ding and ran away. The pudding being broke to
pieces by the fall, Tom crept out covered over with
the batter, and with difficulty walked home. His
mother, who was very sorry to see her darling in such
a woful state, put him into a tea-cup, and soon washed
off the batter; after which she kissed him, and laid
him in bed.

Soon after the adventure of the pudding, Tom’s
mother went to milk her cow in the meadow; and she
took him along with her. As the wind was very
high, fearing lest he should be blown away, she tied
him to a thistle with a piece of fine thread. The cow
The History of Tom Thumb. 123

soon saw the oak-leaf hat, and, liking the look of it,
took poor Tom and the thistle at one mouthful.
While the cow was chewing the thistle Tom was
afraid of her great teeth, which threatened to crush
him in pieces, and he roared out as loud as he could:
“Mother, mother !”’

‘‘Where are you, Tommy, my dear Tommy?” said
his mother.

‘‘Here, mother,” replied he, “in the red cow’s
mouth.”’

His mother began to cry and wring her hands ; but
the cow, surprised at the odd noise in her throat,
opened her mouth and let Tom drop out. Fortun-
ately his mother caught him in her apron as he was
falling to the ground, or he would have been dread-
fully hurt. She then put Tom in her bosom and ran
home with him. ;

Tom’s father made him a whip of a barley straw to
drive the cattle with, and having one day gone into the
fields, he slipped a foot and rolled into the furrow.
A raven, which was flying over, picked him up and
flew with him to the top of a giant’s castle that was
near the seaside, and there left him.

Tom was in a dreadful state, and did not know what
to do; but he was soon more dreadfully frightened ;
for old Grumbo, the giant, came up to walk on the
terrace, and seeing Tom, he took him up and swal-
lowed him like a pill.
124 The History of Tom Thumb.



The giant had no sooner swallowed Tom than he
began to repent what he had done; for Tom began to
kick and jump about so much that he felt very un-
comfortable, and at last threw him up again into the
sea. A large fish swallowed Tom the moment he fell
into the sea, which was soon after caught, and bought
for the table of King Arthur. When they opened the
fish in order to cook it, every one was astonished at
finding such a little boy, and Tom was quite delighted
to be out again. They carried him to the king, who
made Tom his dwarf, and he soon grew a great favor-
ite at court: for by his tricks and gambols he not
only amused the king and queen, but also all the
knights of the Round Table.

It is said that when the king rode out on horse-
back he often took:’Tom along with him, and if a
The History of Tom Thumb. - 125

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ENON BRASS re tad

LT hh
AVA Ot ae Eee My
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al



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“tr Ay pg it: coe aay ah oy as

IN THE RED COW’S MOUTH.
126 The History of Tom Thumb.

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OXY

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shower came on he used tO creep into his majesty’s
waistcoat pocket, where he siept till the rain was
over.

King Arthur one day asked Tom about his parents,
wishing to know if they were as small as he was, and
whether rich or poor. ‘Tor: told the king that his father
and mother were as taht as any of the persons about
court, but rather poor. Ouhearing this the king carried
Tfom to his treasury, the place where he kept all his
money, and told him to take as much money as he
The History of Tom Thumb. 127



could carry home to his parents, which made the poor
little fellow caper with joy. Tom went immediately
to fetch a purse, which was made of a water-bubble,
and then returned to the treasury, where he got a
silver three-penny-piece to put into it.
228 The History of Tom Thumb.

: anf 7
a) y
Our little hero had some trouble in lifting the bur-
den upon his back; but he at last succeeded in get-
ting it placed to his mind, and. set forward on his
journey.. However, without meeting with any acci-
dent, and after resting himself more than a hundred
times by the way, in two days and two nights he
reached his father’s house in safety.
Tom had travelled forty-eight hours with a huge

silver-piece on his back, and was almost tired to

SS

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LB
The History of ‘Tom Thumb, —129

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WITH A HUGE SILVER PIECE ON HIS SHOULDER.
130 The History of Tom Thumb.



death, when his mother ran out to meet him, and
carried him into the house.

Tom’s parents were both happy to see him, and the
more so as he had brought such an amazing sum of
money with him; but the poor little fellow was ex-
cessively wearied, having travelled half a mile in forty-
eight hours, with a hugesilver three-penny-piece on
his back. His mother, in order to recover him, placed
him in a walnut shell by the fireside, and feasted him
for three days on a hazel nut, which made him very
sick ; for a whole nut used to serve him a month.

Tom was soon well again; but as there had been a
fall of rain, and the ground was very wet, he could
not travel back to King Arthur’s court; therefore his
mother, one day when the wind was blowing in that
direction, made a little parasol of cambric paper, and
tying Tom to it, she gave him a puff into the air with
her mouth, which soon carried him to the king’s
palace.
The History of Tom Thumb. 131
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rn

;



my
Progr)
ah,

ST



Just at the time when Tom came flying across the
courtyard, the cook happened to be passing with the
king’s great bowl of furmenty, which was a dish his
majesty was very fond of; but unfortunately the poor
little fellow fell plump into the middle of it, and
splashed the hot furmenty about the cook’s face.

The cook, who was an ill-natured fellow, being in a
terrible rage at Tom for frightening and scalding him
with the furmenty, went straight to the king, and
said that Tom had jumped into the royal furmenty,
and thrown it down out of mere mischief. The king
was so enraged when he heard this, that he ordered
Tom to be seized and tried for high treason; and
there being no person who dared to plead for him, he
was condemned to be beheaded immediately.

On hearing this dreadful sentence pronounced, poor
Tom fell a-trembling with fear, but, seeing no means
132 The History of Tom Thumb.

of escape, and observing a miller close to him gaping
with his great mouth, as country boobies do at a fair,
he took a leap, and fairly jumped down his throat.
This exploit was done with such activity that not one
person present saw it, and even the miller did not
know the trick which Tom had played upon him.
Now, as Tom had disappeared, the court broke up,
and the miller went home to his mill.

When Tom heard the mill at work he knew he was
clear of the court, and therefore he began to tumble
and roll about, so that the poor miller could get no
rest, thinking he was bewitched; so he sent for a
doctor. When the doctor came, Tom began to dance
and sing; and the doctor, being as much frightened
as the miller, sent in haste for five other doctors and
twenty feared men.

When they were debating about this extraordinary
case, the miller happened to yawn, when Tom, seiz-
ing the chance, made another jump, and ali oticed
safely upon his feet on the middle of the table.

The miller, who was very much provoked at being
tormented by such a little pigmy creature, fell into a
terrible rage, and, laying hold of Tom, ran to the
king with him; but his majesty, being engaged with
state affairs, ordered him to be taken away and kept
in custody till he sent for him.

The cook was determined that Tom should not slip
The History of Tom Thumb. 133

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134 The History of Tom Thumb.










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out of his hands this time, so he put him into a
mouse-trap, and left him to peep through the wires.
Tom had remained in the-trap a whole week, when
he was sent for by King Arthur, who pardoned him
for throwing down the furmenty, and took him again
into favor. On account of his wonderful feats of ac-
tivity, Tom was knighted by the king, and went un-
der the name of the renowned Sir Thomas ‘Thumb.
As Tom’s clothes had suffered much in the batter-
pudding, the furmenty, and the insides of the giant,
miller, and fishes, his majesty ordered him a new suit
of clothes, and to be mounted as a knight.

“Of Butterfly’s wings his shirt was made,
His boots of chicken's hide ;
And by a nimble fairy blade,
Well learned in the tailoring trade,
The History of Tom Thumb. 135

DD.

(



His clothing was supplied.—
A needle dangled by his side ;
A dapper mouse he used to ride,
Thus strutted Tom in stately pride!”’

It was certainly very diverting tosee Tom in this
dress, and mounted on the mouse, as he rode out
a-hunting with the king and nobility, who were all
ready to expire with laughter at Tom and his fine
prancing charger.

One day, as they were riding by a farmhouse, a
large cat, which was lurking about the door, made a
136 The History of Tom Thumb.



spring, and seized both om and his mouse. She
then ran up a tree with them, and was beginning to
devour the mouse; but Tom boldly drew his sword,
and attacked the cat so fiercely that she let them both
fall, when one of the nobles caught him in his hat,
and laid him on a bed of down, in a little ivory
cabinet. re

The queen of the fairies came soon after to pay Tom
a visit, and carried him back to Fairy-land, where he
lived several years. During his residence there, King
Arthur, and all the persons who knew Tom, had died;
and as he was desirous of being again at court, the
fairy queen, after dressing him in a suit of clothes,
137

The History of Tom Thumb.



THER CAT UP THE TREE,
138 The History of Tom Thumb.



sent him flying through the air to the palace, in the
days of King Thunstone, the successor of Arthur.
Every one flocked round to see him, and being carried
to the king, he was asked who he was—whence he
came—and where he lived? ‘Tom answered:
“My name is Tom Thumb,
From the fairies ve come.
When King Arthur shone,
His court was my home.
In me he delighted,
By him I was knighted ;
Did you never hear of Sir Thomas Thumb?”

The king was so charmed with this address that he
ordered a little chair to be made, in order that Tom -
might sit upon his table, and also a palace of gold, a
span high, with a door an inch wide, tolive in. He
also gave him a coach, drawn by six small mice.
The History of Tom Thumb. . 139



The queen was so enraged at the honor paid to Sir
Thomas that she resolved to ruin him, and told the
king that the little knight had been saucy to her.

The king sent for Tom in great haste, but being
fully aware of the danger of royal anger, he crept into
an empty snail-shell, where he lay for a long time,
until he was almost starved with hunger ; but at last

‘he ventured to peep out, and seeing a fine large but
terfly on the ground, near his hiding-place, he ap-
proached very cautiously, and getting himself placed
astride on it,was immediately carried up into the air.
The butterfly flew with him from tree to tree and from
field to field, and at last returned to the court, where
the king and nobility all strove to catch him; but at
140 The History of Tom Thumb.



last poor Tom fell from his seat into a watering-pot,
in which he was almost drowned.

When the queen saw him she was in a rage, and
said he should be beheaded; and he was again put
into a mouse-trap until the time of his execution.

However, a cat, observing something alive in the
trap, patted it about till the wires broke, and set
Thomas at liberty.

The king received Tom again into favor, which
he did not live to enjoy, fora large spider one day
attacked him; and although he drew his sword and
fought well, yet the spider’s poisonous breath at last
overcame. him ;

“He fell dead on the ground where he stood, ec
And the spider suck’d every drop of his blood.”

King Thunstone and his whole court were so sorry
at the loss of their little favorite, that they went into
mourning, and raised a fine white marble monument
over his grave, with the following epitaph:
The History of Tom Thumb. I4i



“Here lyes Tom Thumb, King Arthur’s knight,
Who died by a spider’s cruel bite.
He was well known in Arthur’s court,
Where he afforded gallant sport ;
He rode at tilt and tournament,
And on a mouse a-hunting went.
Alive he filled the court with mirth ;
His death to sorrow soon gave birth.
Wipe, wipe your eyes, and shake your head
And cry,—Alas! Tom Thumb is dead !”’

ian
Te
RN


Jack the Giant-Killer. |

1 the reign of
King Arthur,
there lived in the
county of Cornwall,
near the Land’s End
of England, a
| wealthy farmer who
had one only son
called Jack. He was
brisk and of a ready
lively wit, so that
whatever he could
not perform by force
and strength, he did
by his quick wit and
cleverness. Never
J] was. any person
} heard of that could
} worst him, and he
very often baffled
wise men by his
sharp and ready in-
vention.
In those days the
= Mount of Cornwall
was kept by a huge and monstrous giant of eighteen
feet in height, and about three yards in girth, of a
(142)


Jack the Giant-Killer. 143

~ fierce and grim < meg)
face, the terror
of all the towns
and villages
near. He lived
in a cave in the
midst of the
Mount, and
would not suffer
any one else to
live near him.
His food was
other men’s cat-
tle, which often
became his prey,
for whensoever he wanted food he would wade over
to the mainland, where he would furnish himself
with whatever came in his way. The good folk, at
his approach, forsook their homes, while he seized on
their cattle, making nothing of carrying half-a-dozen
oxen on his back at atime; and as for their sheep
and hogs, he would tie them round his waist like a
bunch of bandeliers, This course he had followed for
many years, so that all Cornwall had become poor
through his robberies.

One day Jack, happening to be present at the town
hall when the magistrates were sitting in council


I44 Jack the Giant-Killer.

about the giant, asked what reward would be given
to the person who destroyed him. ‘The giant’s treas-
ure, they said, was the reward. Quoth Jack, ‘' Then
let me undertake it.”

So he took a horn, shovel, and pickaxe, and went
over to the Mount in the beginning of a dark winter’s
evening, when he fell to work, and before morning had
dug a pit twenty-two feet deep, and nearly as broad,
covering it over with long sticks and straw. ‘Then
strewing a little mould upon it, it appeared like plain
ground. This done, Jack placed himself on the con-
trary side of the pit, fartherest from the giant’s lodg-
ing, and, just at the break of the day, he put the horn
to his mouth, and blew, Tantivy, Tantivy. The un-
expected noise aroused the giant, who rushed from
his cave, crying: ‘‘You bold villain, are you come
here to disturb my rest? You shall pay dearly for
this. Satisfaction I will have, and this it shall be, I
will take you whole and broil you for breakfast,”
which he had no sooner uttered, than tumbling into

-the pit, he made the very foundations of the Mount
to shake. “Oh, giant,” quoth Jack, ‘‘ where are you
now? Oh faith, you are gotten now into Lob’s Pound,
where I will surely plague you foryour wicked words:
what do you think now of broiling me for your break-
fast? Will no other diet serve you but poor Jack?”
Thus having teased the giant for a while, he gave him
Jack the Giant-Killer. 145

a most weighty knock with his pickaxe on the very
crown of his head, and killed him on the spot.

This done, Jack filled up the pit with earth, and went
to search the cave, which he found contained much
treasure. When the magistrates heard of this, they
said he should henceforth be called Jack the Giant-
Killer, and gave him a sword and an embroidered belt,
on which were
written these pr
words in letters pa
of gold—

“Here’s the right
valiant Cornish
man, ;

Who slew the giant
Cormelian.”’

The news of
Jack’s victory
soon spread over
all the West of England, so that another giant, named
Blunderbore, hearing of it, vowed to be revenged on
the little hero, if ever it was his fortune to light on him.
This giant was the lord of an enchanted castle stand-
ing in the midst ofalonesome wood. NowJack, about
_four months afterwards, walking near this wood in his
journey to Wales, being weary, seated himself near'a
pleasant fountain and fell fast asleep. While he was


146 Jack the Giant-Killer.

enjoying his repose, the giant, coming for water, there
found him and knew him to be the far-famed Jack, by
the lines written on the belt. Without ado, he took
Jack on his shoulders and carried him towards his en-
chanted castle. Now, as they passed through a thicket,
the rustling of the boughs awakened Jack, who was
strangely surprised to find himself in the clutches of
the giant. His terror was not ‘yet begun, for, on en-
tering the castle, he saw the ground strewed with
human bones, the giant telling him his own would
ere long increase them. After this the giant locked
poor Jack in an immense chamber, leaving him there
while he went to fetch another giant living in the
same wood to help him to put an end to Jack. While
he was gone, dreadful shrieks and cries affrighted Jack,
especially a voice which said many times—
“Do what you can to get away,

Or you'll become the giant’s prey ;

He’s gone to fetch his brother, who

Will kill, likewise devour you too.”

This’ dreadful noise had almost distracted Jack,
who, going*to the window, beheld afar off the two
giants coming’ towards the castle. ‘‘Now,’’ quoth
‘Jack to himself, “my death or my escape is at hand.”
‘Now,*there were strong cords in a corner of the room
in which Jack was, and two of these he took, and
made a'strong noose at the end; and while the giants
Jack the Giant-Killer. 147 |

were unlocking
the iron gate of
the castle, he
threw the ropes
over each of
their heads.
Then drawing
the other ends
across a beam,
and pulling
with all his
might, hethrot-
‘tled them.
Then, seeing
they were black
in the face, and
sliding down
the rope, he
came to their
heads, when |
they could not |
defend them -
selves, and,
drawing his
sword, slew
them both. ‘Then, taking the giant’s keys, and un-
locking the rooms, he found three fair ladies tied by the


148 Jack the Giant-Killer.

hair of their heads, almost starved to death. ‘‘Sweet
ladies,” quoth Jack, ‘‘I have killed this monster and
his brutish brother, and so set you free.” ‘This said,
he gave them the keys, and so went on his journey to
Wales. Having but little money, Jack found it well
to make the best of his way by travelling as fast as
he could ; but losing his road, he was benighted, and
could not get a place to rest in until, coming into a
narrow valley, he found a large house, and by reason
of his present needs took courage to knock at the gate.
But what was his surprise when there came forth a
monstrous giant with two heads; yet he did not ap-
pear so fiery as the others were, for he was a Welsh
giant, and what he did was by private and secret
malice under the false show of friendship. Jack, hav-
ing told his state to the giant, was shown into a bed-
room, where, in the dead of night, he heard his host
in another room, muttering these words—
‘‘ Though here you lodge with me this night,
You shall not see the morning light ;
My club shall dash your brains outright!”

‘*Say’st thou so,” quoth Jack ; ‘‘that is like one of
your Welsh tricks, yet I hope to be cunning enough
for you.” ‘Then, getting out of bed, he laid a billet
of wood in the bed in his stead, and hid himself in
a corner of the room. At the dead time of the night,
in came the Welsh giant, who struck several heavy
Jack the Giant-Killer. 149

blows on the bed with his club, thinking he had
broken every bone in Jack’s skin. The next morning
Jack, laughing in his sleeve, gave him hearty thanks
for his night’s lodging. “How have you rested?”
quoth the giant; ‘did you not feel anything in the
night?” ‘No,’ quoth Jack, “nothing but a rat,
which gave me two or three slaps with her tail.”
With that, greatly wondering, the giant led Jack to
breakfast, bringing him a bowl containing four gal-
lons of hasty pudding. Being loath to let the giant
think it too much for him, Jack put a large leather
bag under his loose coat, in such a way that he could
convey the pudding into it without its being seen.
Then, telling the giant he would show him a trick,
taking a knife, Jack ripped open the bag, and out
came all the hasty pudding. Whereupon, saying,
‘*Odds splut-
ters, hur can
do that trick
hurself,”’
the monster
took the
knife,.and,
ripping open —
his body, fell
down dead.
Now, it


150 Jack the Giant-Killer.

fell in these days that King Arthur’s only son begged
his father to give him a large sum of money, in
order that he might go and seek his fortune in the
country of Wales, where lived a beautiful lady pos-
sessed with seven evil spirits. The king did his best
to persuade his son from it, but in vain; so at last
granted the request, and the prince set out with two
horses, one loaded with money, the other for himself
to ride upon. Now, after several days’ travel, he
came to a market-town in Wales, where he beheld a
vast crowd of people gathered together. ‘T’he prince
asked the reason of it, and was told that they had
arrested a corpse for several large sums of money
which the dead man owed when hedied. ‘The prince
replied that it was a pity creditors should be so cruel,
and said, ‘‘Go bury the dead, and let his creditors
come to my lodging, and there their debts shall be
paid.” So they came, but in such great numbers that
before night he had almost left himself moneyless.

* Now Jack the Giant-Killer, coming that way, was so
taken with the generosity of ae prince, that he wished
to be his servant. This being agreed upon, the next
morning they set forward on their journey together,
when, as they were riding out of the town, an old
woman called after the prince, saying, ‘‘ He has owed
me two-pence these seven years; pray pay me as well
as the rest.’’ Putting his hand to his pocket, the

s
Jack the Giant-Killer. 151

prince gave the woman all he had left, so that after
their day’s refreshment, which cost what small spell
Jack had by him, they were without a penny between
them. When thesun began to grow low, the king’s son
said, ‘‘Jack, since we have no money, where can we
lodge this night?” But Jack replied, ‘‘ Master, we'll
do well enough, for I have an uncle lives within two
miles of this place; he is a huge and monstrous giant
with three heads; he’ll fight five hundred men in



armor, and make them to fly before him.” ‘Alas!’
quoth the prince, “what shall we do there? He'll
certainly chop us up at a mouthful. Nay, we are
scarce enough to fill one of his hollow teeth!’ ‘‘It
is no matter for that,’ quoth Jack, ‘‘I myself will go
before and prepare the way for you; therefore tarry
and wait till I return.’? Jack then rode away full
speed, and coming to the gate of the castle, he
knocked so loud that he made the hills around to
echo, ‘The giant roared out at this like thunder,
152 Jack the Giant-Killer.

‘Who's there?’? He was answered, ‘‘None but
your poor Cousin Jack.” Quoth he, ‘‘What news
with my poor Cousin Jack?” He replied, ‘‘ Dear
Uncle, heavy news, God wot!”’ ‘‘ Prithee,” quoth the
giant, ‘‘what heavy news can come to me? Iam a
giant with three heads, and besides thou knowest I
can fight five hundred men in armor, and make them
fly like chaff before the wind.’ ‘‘Oh, but,’’ quoth
Jack, “‘here’s the king’s son a-coming with a thou-
sand men in armor to kill youand destroy all that you
have!’ ‘‘Oh, Cousin Jack,” said the giant, “this is
heavy news indeed! I will immediately run and hide
myself, and thou shalt lock, bolt, and bar me in, and
keep the keys until the prince is gone.’? Having
secured the giant, Jack fetched his master, when they
made themselves heartily merry whilst the poor giant
lay trembling in a vault under the ground.
Early in the morning Jack furnished his maste1
eae with a fresh
Sis supply of gold
and silver, and
then sent him
three miles for-
ward on his
journey, at
which time the
prince was


Jack the Giant-Killer. 153

pretty well out of =
the smell of the ;
giant. Jack then
returned, and let
the giant out of
the vault, who
asked what he
should give him
for keeping the
castle safe.
“Why, quoth
Jack, “I desire |
nothing but the
old coat and cap,
together with the
old rusty sword
and slippers
which are at your
bed’s head.’’
Quoth the giant,
“Thou shalt have
them; and pray
keep them for my
sake, for they are
things of excel-
lent use. ‘The coat will keep you invisible, the cap
will furnish you with knowledge, the sword cuts


15h Jack the Giant-Killer.

asunder whatever you strike, and the shoes are of
extraordinary swiftness. These may be useful to
you, therefore take them with all my heart.” ‘Tak-
ing them, Jack thanked his uncle, and then having
overtaken his master, they quickly arrived at the
house of the lady the prince sought, who, finding the
prince to be a suitor, prepared a splendid banquet for
him. After the feasting was done, she wiped his
mouth with a handkerchief, saying, ‘‘ You must show
me that handkerchief to-morrow morning, or else you
will lose your head.’’? With that she put it in her
bosom. ‘The prince went to bed in great sorrow, but
Jack’s cap of knowledge taught him how it was to be
got. In the middle of the night she called upon her
familiar spirit to carry her to Lucifer. But Jack put
on his coat of darkness and his shoes of swiftness, and
was there as soon as she. When she entered the place
of the evil one, she gave the handkerchief to old Lu-
cifer, who laid it upon a shelf, whence Jack took it
and brought it to his master, who showed it to the
lady the next day, and so saved his life. On that
day she saluted the prince, telling him he must show
her the lips to-morrow morning that she kissed last
night or lose his head. ‘‘Ah,” he replied, ‘Gf you
kiss none but mine, I will.’ ‘That is neither here
nor there,’’ said she ; ‘‘if you do not, death’s your por-
tion !?? At midnight she went as before, and was
Jack the Giant-Killer. 155

angry with old
Lucifer for let-

ting the hand-'
kerchief go.

‘*But now,”’

quoth she, ‘I

will be too hard |
for the king’s
son, for I will
kiss thee, and
he is to show
me thy lips.”
Which she did,
and Jack, who
was standing
by, cut off the
devil’s head
and brought it
under his in-
visible coat to §
his master, who
the next morn- |
ing pulled it 4
out by the horns
before the lady. —

The enchantment thus broken, the evil spirit left her
and she appeared in all her beauty. ‘They were mar-


156 Jack the Giant-Killer.

ried the next morning, and soon after went to the
court of King Arthur, where Jack, for his many great
deeds, was made one of the Knights of the Round.
Table.

Having been successful in all he did, Jack resolved
not to remain idle, but to do what he could for the
honor of his king and country, and begged King
Arthur to fit him out with a horse and money to help
him to travel in search of strange and new adventures.
“For,” said he, ‘there are many giants yet living
in the farthest part of Wales, to the great damage of
your majesty’s liege subjects; wherefore, may it
please you to encourage me, I do not doubt but ina
short time to cut them off root and branch, and so rid
all the realm of those giants and monsters of nature.”
When the king had heard this noble request, he fur-
nished Jack with all he had need of, and Jack started
on his pursuit, taking with him the cap of knowledge,
sword of sharpness, shoes of swiftness, and invisible
coat, the better to succeed in the dangerous adven-
tures which now lay before him.

Jack travelled over vast hills and wonderful moun-
tains, and on the third day came to a large wood,
which he had no sooner entered than he heard dread-
ful shrieks and cries. Casting his eyes round, he be-
held with terror a huge giant dragging along a fair
lady and a knight by the hair of their heads, with as
much ease as
if they had
been a pair of
gloves. At this
sight Jack shed
tears of pity,
and then, get-
ting off from
his. horse, he
put.on his in-
visible coat,
and taking
with him his
sword of sharp-
ness, at length
with a swing-
ing stroke cut
off both the
giant’s legs be-
low the knee,
so that his fall
made the trees
totremble. At
this the courteous knight and his fair lady, after re-
turning Jack their hearty thanks, invited him home,
there to refresh his strength after the battle, and re-
ceive some ample reward for his good services. But


158 Jack the Giant-Killer.

i] Jack vowed he
: would not rest
until he had
found out the
ij giant’s den.
F The knight,
hearing this,
was very sor-
rowful,: and
replied, ‘‘Noble stranger, it is too much to run a
second risk; this monster lived in a den under yonder
mountain, with a brother more fierce and fiery than
himself. ‘Therefore, if you should go thither, and
perish in the attempt, it would be a heart-breaking
to me and my lady. Let me persuade you to go with
us, and desist from any further pursuit.’ ‘ Nay,”
quoth Jack, “were there twenty, not one should
escape my fury. But when I have finished my task,
_ I will come and pay my respects to you.”’

Jack had not ridden more than a mile and a half,
when the cave mentioned by the knight appeared to
view, near the entrance of which he beheld the giant
sitting upon a block of timber, with a knotted iron
club by his side, waiting, as he supposed, for his
brother’s return with his prey. His goggle eyes were
like flames of fire, his face grim and ugly, and his
cheeks like a couple of large flitches of bacon, while


Jack the Giant-Killer. 159

the bristles
of his beard
-resembled
rods of iron
wire, and
the locks
that hung
‘down upon
his brawny
shoulders
were like
curled snakes or hissing adders. Jack alighted from
his horse, and, putting on the coat of darkness, ap-
proached near the giant, and’ said softly, ‘‘Oh! are
you there? It will not be long ere I shall take you
fast by the beard.’ The giant all this while could
not see him, on account of his invisible coat, so that
Jack, coming up close to the monster, struck a blow
with his sword at his head, but, missing his aim, he
cut off the nose instead. At this, the giant roared
like claps of thunder, and began to lay about him
with his iron club like one stark mad. But Jack,
running behind, drove his sword up to the hilt in the
giant’s back, which caused him to fall down dead.
This done, Jack cut off the giant’s head, and sent it, .
with his brother’s head also, to King Arthur, by a

waggoner he hired for that purpose.


160 Jack the Giant-Killer,

_ Jack now resolved toenter the giants’ cave in search
of his treasure, and, passing along through a great
many windings and turnings, he came at length toa
large room paved with freestone, at the upper end of
which was a boiling caldron, and on the right hand a
large table, at which the giants used to dine. Then
he came to a window, barred with iron, through which
he looked and beheld a vast crowd of unhappy cap-
tives, who, seeing him, cried out, “Alas! young man,
art thou come to be one amongst us in this miserable
den?” “Ay,” quoth Jack, “but pray tell me why it
is you are so imprisoned?”” ‘We are kept here,”
said one, ‘‘till such time as the giants have a wish to
feast, and then the fattest among us is killed! And
many are the times they have dined upon murdered
men!” ‘Say you so,” quoth Jack, and straightway
unlocked the gate and let them free, who al rejoiced
like condemned men at sight of a reprieve. ‘Then
searching the giants’ coffers, he shared the gold and
silver amongst them.

It was about sunrise the next day when Jack, after
seeing the captives on their way to their homes,
mounted his horse to go on his journey, and, by the
help of his directions, reached the knight’s house
about noon. He was received here with all signs of
joy by the knight and his lady, who in respect to Jack
prepared a feast which lasted many days, all the gentry
Jack the Giant-Killer. 161

in the neighborhood being of the company. ‘The
worthy knight was likewise pleased to present him
with a beautiful ring, on which was engraved a picture
of the giant dragging the distressed knight and his
lady, with this motto—
“We are in sad distress you see,
Under a giant’s fierce command,
_But gain our lives and liberty
By valiant Jack’s victorious hand.”

But in the
midst of all
this mirth a

messenger
brought the
dismal tidings

that one

- Thunderdell,

a giant with
two heads,
having heard
of the death of his two kinsmen, came from the
northern dales to be revenged on Jack, and was within
a mile of the knight’s seat, the country people flying
before him like chaff. But Jack was no whit daunted,
and said, ‘“‘Let him come! I have a tool to pick his
teeth ; and you, ladies and gentlemen, walk but forth
into the garden, and you shall witness this giant
Thunderdell’s death and destruction.”


162 Jack the Giant-Killer.

The house of this knight was in the midst of a small
island with a moat thirty feet deep and twenty feet
wide around it, over which lay adrawbridge. Where-
fore Jack employed men to cut through this bridge on
both sides, nearly to the middle; and then, dressing
himself in his invisible coat, he marched against the
giant with his sword of sharpness. Although the
giant could not see Jack he smelt his approach, and
cried out in these words—

. Fee, fi, fo, fum ! :
I smell the blood of an Englishman !

Be he alive or be he dead,
T’ll grind his bones to make me bread!”

“‘Say’st thou so,’? said Jack; ‘“‘then thou art a
monstrous miller indeed.” At which the giant cried
out again, ‘‘Art thou that villain who killed my
kinsmen? ‘Then I will tear thee with my teeth, suck
thy blood, and grind thy bones to powder.”? ‘‘ You
will catch me first,” quoth Jack, and throwing off his
invisible coat, so that the giant might see him, and
putting on his shoes of swiftness, he ran from the
giant, who followed like a walking castle, so that the
very earth seemed to shake at every step. Jack led
him a long dance, in order that the knights and ladies
might see ; and at last, to end the matter, ran lightly
over the drawbridge, the giant, in full speed, pursuing ~
him with his club. ‘Then, coming to the middle of
Jack the Giant-Killer. 163

the bridge, the giant’s great weight broke it down,
and he tunbled headlong into the water, where he
rolled and wallowed like a whale. Jack, standing by
the moat, laughed at him all the while; but though
the giant foamed to hear him scoff, and plunged from
place to place in the moat, yet he could not get out to
be revenged. Jack at length got a cart-rope and cast
it over the two heads of the giant, and drew. him
ashore by a team of horses, and then cut off both his
heads with his sword of sharpness, and sent them to
King Arthur.

After some time spent in mirth and pastime, Jack,
taking leave of the knights and ladies, set out for new
adventures. [Through many woods he passed, and
came at length to the foot of a high mountain. Here,
late ‘at night, he found a lonesome house, and knocked
at the door, which was opened by.an ancient man
with a head as white as snow. ‘‘ Father,” said Jack,
“have you any place where a traveller may rest that
has lost his way?” ‘ Yes,” said the old man; “you
are right welcome to my poor cottage.’? Whereupon
Jack entered, and down they sat together, and the old
man began to speak as follows: ‘‘Son, I know you
are the great conqueror of giants, and behold, my son,
on the top of this mountain is an enchanted castle, kept
by a giant named Galligantus, who, by the help of
an old conjuror, betrays knights and ladies into his
castle, where, by magic art, they are transformed into
164 Jack the Giant-Killer.

many shapes and forms; but, above all, I weep for
the fate of a duke’s daughter, whom they fetched
from her father’s garden, carrying her through the
air in a burning chariot drawn by fiery dragons, when
they shut her up within the castle, and transformed
her into the shape of a white hind. And though
many knights have tried to break the enchantment,
and set her free, yet no one could do it, on account of
two dreadful griffins which are placed at the castle
gate, and which destroy every one who comes near.
But you, my son, having an invisible coat, may pass
by them unseen, where, on the gates of the castle, you
will find written in large letters by what means the
enchantment may be broken.” ‘The old man having
ended, Jack gave him his hand, and promised that in
the morning he would venture his life to free the lady.

In the morning Jack arose and put on his invisible
coat and magic cap and shoes, and prepared himself
for the task. Now, when he had reached the top of
the mountain, he soon saw the two fiery griffins, but
passed them without fear, because of his invisible coat.
When he had got beyond them, he found upon the
gates of the castle a golden trumpet hung by a silver
chain, under which these lines were written—

‘Whosoever this trumpet shall blow,
Shall soon the giant overthrow,
And break the black enchantment straight ;
So all shall be in happy state.””
Jack the Giant-Killer. 165

Jack had no
sooner read this
but he blew the
trumpet, at
which thecastle pSyhy ¢
trembled to its ,- Zirh:
vast founda-
tions, and the
giant and con-
juror were in
horrid fear,
biting their |]
thumbs and |}
tearing their |
hair, knowing
their wicked
reign was at an
end. ‘Then the
giant, stooping
to take up his
club, Jack atone
blow cut off his
head; where- {
upon the con- }§
juror, mounting IWS
up into the air, ~ 3
was carried away ina whirlwind. ‘T’hus was the en-



166 Jack the Giant-Killer.

chantment
broken, and
all the lords
and ladies who
had so long
been trans-
formed into
birds and
beasts return-
ed to their
proper shapes,
and the castle
vanished away
in a cloud of
smoke. As a
reward for his
services, the
king gaveJack
the duke’s
daughter in
matriage, and
the whole
kingdom was
filled with joy at the wedding; and he and his lady
lived in great joy and happiness all the rest of their
days.

EE

he RL NN 6]


Beauty and the Beast.



ONS upon a time there was a very rich merchant

who had six children—three boys and three girls.
As he was a kind father, he spared no pains in bring-
ing them. up, and had them taught everything that
was good. His daughters were very pretty, but the
youngest was prettiest of all; while she was little,
she was always called Beauty, and when she grew up
she still kept the name, so that her sisters were full of

(167)
168 Beauty and the Beast.

EUUH(72EaE8
te
ah



jealousy. But Beauty was not only lovelier than her
_Sisters, she was also more virtuous than they ; for
they were proud of their riches, and, aping the doings
of the great, they would only know people of better
condition than themselves... Every day they went to
balls and theatres, and laughed at Beauty, who spent
a great part of her time in study. As it was well
known that these sisters were very rich, many great
merchants wished to marry them ; but the two eldest
always said that they would never marry any one but
a duke, or at least anearl. Beauty, however, thanked
those who wished to marry her, saying that she was
too young to leave her father, whose companion she
hoped to be for some years longer.
All at once the merchant lost his whole fortune,
and nothing
was left him
but a little
house in the
country, a
great way
from town.
Weeping, he
told his chil-
dren that
they must go
and livethere
and work for
their living.
The two eld-
est daught-
ers answered
that they
would not
leave town,
and thatthey
had _ several
lovers who
would be
gladto marry
them,though
they had no

Beauty and the Beast.



169
170 Beauty and the Beast.

fortune; but in
this they were
mistaken, for
their lovers
slighted and
forsook them in
their poverty.
As they were
not beloved, on
account of their



pride, everybody said—
“They do not deserve to be pitied ; we are glad to
see their pride humbled ; let them go and give them-
selves quality airs in milking the cows and minding
their dairy. But,” added they, ‘we are very sorry
for Beauty, she was such a good girl, she spoke so
softly to poor folk, and was gentle and kind.” Nay;
several gentlemen would have married her, although
they knew she had not a penny; but she told them
she could not think of leaving her poor father in his
trouble, but was determined to go with him into the
country, to comfort him'and give what help she could.
Poor Beauty at first was sadly grieved at the loss of
her fortune. ‘‘ But,” said she to herself, ‘‘ were I to
cry ever so much it would make things no better, so I
must try to make myself happy without a fortune.”
«When they came to their cottage the merchant
Beauty and the Beast. 171

and his sons
spent their time
in tilling the
ground. Beau-
ty rose at four
in the morning

and made haste ‘ % ,
to have the /iiyse J ty
house clean and i 2 ice (( f
dinner ready for
them all. At first she found it very difficult, for she
had not been used to work hard ; but in less than two
months she grew stronger and healthier than ever.
After she had done her work, she read, played on the
harpsichord, or else sang whilst she spun. Her two
sisters, on the contrary, were wretched ; they got up
at ten o’clock, and did nothing but saunter about the
whole day, and complain of the loss of their fine
clothes and acquaintance.

‘‘Do but see our youngest sister,’’ said one to the
other, ‘‘what a poor, stupid, mean-spirited creature
she is, to be contented with such a miserable lot.”
The good merchant, however, thought quite differ-
ently : he knew very well that Beauty was as much
fairer than her sisters as she was wiser, and admired
her humility, her industry, and, above all, her pa-
tience ; for her sisters not only left her all the work
of the house to do, but insulted her every minute.


172 Beauty and the Beast.

For about

a year they
lived together
in this loneli-
| ness) when
the merchant
received a let-
: oN ter with an
yl account of

A | how a ship,
AMZN on board of
which he had
some goods, was safely arrived. This news had like
to have turned the heads of the two eldest daughters,
who thought that here was a chance of their leaving
the country where they were so wretched ; and, when
they saw their father ready to set out, they begged of
him .to buy them new gowns, caps, rings, and all
manner of trifles ; but Beauty asked for nothing, for
she thought to herself, that all the money her father
was going to receive would scarce be enough to buy
every thing that her sisters wanted. ‘‘ What will you
have, Beauty?” said her father. ‘‘ Since you are so
good as to think of me,” answered she, ‘‘ pray bring
me.a rose, for we have none in our garden.” The good —
man went on his journey ; but when he reached town,
they went to law with him about his goods, and after


Beauty and the Beast. 173

a great deal of
trouble and
pains to no
purpose, he
came back as f
poor as before.

He was with-
in thirty miles
of his own
house, think-
ing on the
pleasure he
should have in seeing his children again, when, going
through a great forest, he lost his way. It was snow-
ing hard, and besides the wind was so high it blew
him twice off his horse; and night coming on he be-
gan to fear of being starved to death with cold and
hunger, or else eaten by the wolves whom he heard
howling all around him. Suddenly, looking down a
long avenue of trees, he saw a bright light some way
off, and going a little farther found that it came from
a palace which was lit up from top to bottom. The
merchant thanked God for the help-he had sent, and
made haste to reach the castle, but was greatly sur-
prised not to meet anyone in the courtyards.

His horse followed him, and seeing a large stable
open went in, and finding both hay and oats the poor


174 Beauty and the Beast.

beast, who was almost famished, fell to eating very
heartily. The merchant tied him up to the manger
and walked toward the house, where he saw no one;
but entering into a large hall he found a good fire,
and a table plentifully set out with but one cover laid.
As he was wet quite through with the rain and snow,
he drew near the fire to dry himself. ‘‘I hope,” said
he, “the master of the house or his servants will ex-
cuse the liberty I take; I suppose it will not be long
before some of them appear.”

He waited a considerable time, till it struck eleven,
and still nobody came; at last he was so hungry that
he could stay no longer, but took a chicken and ate it
in two mouthfuls, trembling all. the while. After
this he drank a few glasses of wine, and, growing
more courageous, he went out of the hall and crossed
through several grand apartments with magnificent
furniture, till
he came intoa
chamber which
had an exceed-
ing good bed
in it, and, as
he was very
much fatigued,
and it was past
, midnight, he


Beauty and the Beast. 75

concluded it
_was best to
shut the door
‘and go to bed.
It was ten
thenextmorn-
ing before the
merchant
waked, and as
he was going
to rise, he was
astonished to
see a good suit
of clothes in
the room of
his own, which
were quite
spoiled. ‘‘Cer-
tainly,’ said
he, ‘“‘this pal-
ace belongs to
some kind
fairy, who has
seen and pit-
ied my dis-
tresses.’? He
looked through a window, but, instead of snow, saw


176 Beauty and the Beast.

the most delightful arbors, interwoven with the most
beautiful flowers that-ever were beheld. He then re-
“turned to the great ‘hall, where he had supped thé
-night before, and found some chocolate ready made
ona little table. ‘“Thank you, good Madam Fairy,”
said he aloud, “for being so kind as to think of my
. breakfast.”

‘The good man drank his chocolate, and then went
to look for his horse; but passing through an arbor of
roses, he remembered Beauty’s request, and gathered
a branch on which were several; immediately he
heard a great noise and saw such a frightful beast
coming towards him that he was ready to faint away.
““Ungrateful man,’’ said the Beast to him in a terri-
ble voice, ‘‘I have saved your life by receiving you
‘into my castle, and in return you steal my roses
-which I love better than anything in the world; but
‘you shall die for it, I give you but a quarter of an
‘hour to prepare yourself and to say your prayers.”’
The merchant fell on his knees and lifted up both
“his hands: ‘‘My Lord,” said he, ‘‘I beseech you to
forgive me, indéed I had no intention to offend in
gathering a rose for one of my daughters, who had
asked me to bring her one.’? ‘‘My name is not My
Lord,” replied the monster, ‘‘ but Beast. I don’t like
compliments, not I; I like people to speak as they
think; and so do not expect to move me by. any of
Beauty and the Beast. 177

your flatteries.
However, -you
say you have
got daughters ;
I will forgive
you on condi-
tion that one of
them comes
willingly and
suffers for you.
‘Let me have no
words, but go
about your busi-
ness, and swear
that if your
daughters re-
fuse to die in
your stead you
will return
within three
months.” ‘The
merchant had
no mind to
sacrifice his
daughters to
the ugly monster, but he thought that at least he
smight have the pleasure of seeing them once more.


178 Beauty and the Beast.

So he prom-
ised to return,
and the Beast
told him he
_mnight set out
when he pleas-
ed; “but,” add-
ed he, ‘‘you
shall not depart
empty handed.
—_ - Go back to the
room where you lay, and you will see a great empty
chest ; fill it with whatever you like best, and I will
send it to your home,’’ and with that the Beast went
away.

“Well,’’ said the good man to himself, “if I must
die I shall have the comfort, at least, of leaving some-
thing to my poor children.”

He returned to the bedchamber, and finding a quan-
tity of. broad pieces of gold he filled the great chest
the Beast had told him of, locked it, and then took
his horse out of the stable, leaving the palace with as
much grief as he had ertered it with joy.

The horse, of his own accord, took one of the roads
of the forest, and in a few hours the good merchant
was at home. His children came around him, but
instead of receiving their caresses with pleasure, he


Beauty and the Beast. 179

stood weeping,
and looked at
them. Then
holding out the
rose-branch he
carried to
Beauty, he said
to her, “Take
these roses,
Beauty ; little
do you think how dear they will cost your poor
father ;” and so he told them all the sad adventure
he had fallen in with. Immediately the two eldest
set up a most dolorous outcry, and spoke unkindly to
Beauty, who, however, did not cry at all. ‘See what
comes of the little wretch’s pride,” said they, ‘‘she
would not ask for fine clothes, as we did; no indeed,
miss wished to be uncommon; and now that she is
going to be the death of our poor father, she will not
shed a tear.’? ‘‘Why should I?” answered Beauty,
‘it would be very needless, for my father shall not
suffer on my account. Since the monster will accept
one of his daughters, I will go and give myself up to
him, and happy am I to think that my death will
save my father’s life and be proof of my love for
him.” ‘No, sister,’ said her three brothers, ‘that
shall not be; we will go and find the monster, and


180 Beauty and the Beast.

either kill him or die ourselves.” ‘‘Do not imagine
any such thing, my sons,’’ said the merchant, ‘‘ Beast’s
power is so great that I have no hopes of your getting
the better of him. I am touched by Beauty’s kind-
ness of heart, but I cannot do as she would have me;
I am old and have but little longer to live; so at most
I lose a few years, which I regret for your sakes, my
dear children.’ “Indeed, father, you shall not go to
the palace without me,’ said Beauty, ‘you cannot
hinder me from following you.” In spite of all they
could say, Beauty still insisted on setting out for the
palace, and her sisters were not sorry, for her good-
ness had filled them with jealousy.

The merchant, however, was so grieved at the
thought of losing his daughter that he had quite for-
got the chest fullof gold. But at night, as soon as he
had shut his chamber door, what was his astonishment
to find it by his bedside; he determined, however,
not to tell his children that he had grown rich, as
his two elder daughters would have wanted to re-
turn to town, and he was resolved not to leave the
country; but he trusted Beauty with the secret, who
then told him that two gentlemen came in his ab-
sence, and courted her sisters ; she begged her father
to consent to their marriage and give them fortunes ;
for she was so good that she loved them, and forgave
them heartily for all their ill usage. These wicked
Beauty and the Beast. 181

creatures rubbed their eyes with an onion to force
some tears when they parted with their sister, but her
brothers were really concerned. Beauty was the only
- one who did not shed tears at parting, for she would
not increase their grief.

The horse took the direct road to the palace, and
towards evening they saw it all lit up as at first: the
horse went of himself into the stable, and the good
man and his eee came into the oa hall where



they found a table ai spread, with two
covers laid. ‘Ihe merchant had no heart to eat, but
Beauty, trying to appear cheerful, sat down to table
and helped him. Afterwards, thought she to herself,
“Beast surely has a mind to fatten me Deer he eats
me, since he provides such a good supper.” When
they had supped they heard a great noise, and the
merchant, in tears, bid his poor child farewell, for he
thought Beast was coming. Beauty was sadly terri-
182 Beauty and the Beast.

fied at his horrid form, but she took courage as well
as she could, and the monster having asked her if she
came willingly, ‘‘ Y-e-s,” said she, trembling. “ You
are very good, and I am grateful to you. Honest
man, go your ways to-morrow morning, but never
think of returning here again. Farewell, Beauty.”
‘‘ Parewell, Beast,’ answered she, sighing, and imme-
diately the monster turned to go away. ‘‘Oh, daugh-
ter,” said the merchant, embracing Beauty, “I am
almost frightened to death ; believe me, you had bet-
ter go back and let me stay here.” “No, father,”
said Beauty, firmly, “do you go and leave me to the
care and protection of Providence.” ‘They went to
bed and thought they should not close their eyes all
night; but scarce had they lain down than they fell
fast asleep ; and Beauty dreamed a fair lady came and
said to her, ‘‘I am pleased with your brave heart,
Beauty ; this good action of yours in giving up your
own life to save your father’s shall not go unre-
warded.” Beauty waked and told her father her
dream, and though it helped to comfort him a little,
yet he could not help crying bitterly when he took
‘leave of his dear child, as he feared he uta never
see her again.

As soon as he was gone, Beauty sat down in the
great hall and fell a-crying likewise; but as she was
mistress of a great deal of spirit, she recommended
Beauty and the Beast. 183

herself to God, and resolved not to be uneasy the little
time she had to live; for she firmly believed Beast
would eat her up that night. She made up her mind
then to walk about and see this great castle, which
she could not help admiring. It was a delightful,
pleasant place, and she was extremely surprised to
find a door, over which was written, ‘‘ Beauty’s
Room.” She quickly opened the door, and was daz-
zled by the splendor that she saw within. ‘There,
among other things, was a great library, a harpsi-
chord and many books of music. “Ah,” thought
Beauty, ‘‘had they thought of eating me at once they -
would surely not have made such provision for my
amusement.’ So, taking heart, she opened the li-
brary and there saw written in gold letters, “Wish
or command, you are queen and mistress here.”
“Alas,” said she, sighing, ‘‘I want nothing but to
see my poor father again, and to know what he is
now doing.’? Scarce had she thought it, when, what
was her surprise on looking at a great mirror near by,
to see there her own home, where her father was just
arriving with a most sad face; her sisters came out
to meet him, and in spite of the grimaces which they
made so as to seem in grief, the joy they felt at their
sister’s loss was plain to see. One moment after, al!
had vanished, and Beauty could not but think it had
been a proof of the Beast’s kindness, and that she had
nothing to fear from him.
184 Beauty and the Beast.

Towards evening she returned to the great hall,
where she found dinner ready prepared. The most
delightful music played during the whole of dinner.
When Beauty had finished, the table was cleared and
the choicest wines and most delicious fruits were then
laid. At the same hour as on the day before she
heard the noise of Beast’s coming, and he entered and
advancing towards Beauty, who dared not look up, he
said : ‘‘ Will you permit me to sit with you?” ‘That
is as you please,” replied she, ‘‘ Not so,” said Beast,
“for you are mistress here; and if my company is
disagreeable I will be gone; but tell me, Beauty, do
you think me very ugly?” ‘‘I do, indeed,” said
she, “‘to speak the truth; but I think you are very
good.” ‘You are right,” said the monster; ‘but
that is not all, for I am stupid as well as ugly; I
know well that Iam nothing but a beast.” “ Noone
is really stupid who thinks that he has little wit,”
answered Beauty; ‘‘ no fool ever thought that.” “Ah,
well,” said the Beast, ‘‘try to make yourself happy
here, Beauty; I should be sorty if you were un-
happy.” ‘‘You are very kind, Beast,” said she;
‘indeed, when I think of your good heart you no
longer seem to me so ugly.’? ‘‘Dear me, yes,’’ said
he, ‘‘my heart is good, but for all that Iam a mon-
ster.” ‘There are many who are really more of mon-
sters than you,” answered Beauty, ‘‘and I like you
Beauty and the Beast. 185

better with that
face than many
who under an
appearance of
beauty hide a
cruel heart.”
“Ah,” said
Beast, “if I
were not so
stupid I would know how to thank you.” So Beauty
talked to him, gaining courage the while; but she
had liked to have fainted with fright, when, taking
hold of her hand, Beast said in a gentle voice:
“Beauty, will you marry me?’’ She hastily with-
drew her hand, but made no reply ; at which the
Beast sighed deeply and withdrew. On his next visit
he appeared sorrowful and dejected, but said nothing.
Some weeks after, he repeated the question, when
Beauty replied: ‘‘No, Beast, I cannot marry you,
but I will do all in my power to make you happy.”
“This you cannot do,” replied he, ‘‘for unless you
marry me I shall die.” ‘‘Oh, say not so,’’ said Beauty,
“for it is impossible that I can ever marry you.”
The Beast then went away more unhappy than ever.
Then Beauty was seized with compassion. ‘‘ Alas,”
sighed she, ‘’tis a thousand pities anything so good-
natured should be so ugly.”


186 Beauty and the Beast.

Amidst all this, Beauty did not forget her father.
One day she felt a strong desire to know how he was,
and what he was doing; at that instant she cast her
eyes on a mirror and saw her father had pined him-
self ill and lay in his bed, whilst her sisters were try-
ing on some fine dresses in another room. At this
sad sight poor Beauty wept bitterly.

When Beast came as usual he saw her grief and
asked the cause. She told him what she had seen
and how much she wished to go and nurse her father.
He asked her if she would promise to return at the
end of a week if she went. Beauty gave him her
promise. ‘‘Well, then,” said Beast, ‘‘you will find
yourself there to-morrow; but ah! do not forget to
return; you will only have to place your ring ona
table when you go to bed if you wish to come back.
Farewell, Beauty.” Beast sighed as he spoke and
Beauty went to bed very sad because she must give
him pain.

When she waked in the morning she found herself
in her father’s cottage, and on ringing a little bell
she found by her bed, the servant entered and cried
out on seeing her. The good man hastened to her on
hearing ‘the noise, and had almost died of joy when
he saw his dear daughter, and for more than a quar-
ter of an hour they forgot all else. Then Beauty re-
membered that she had no gown to put on, but the
Beauty and the Beast. 187

servant told her that she had just found in the next
room a great chest full of golden gowns sewn with
diamonds. Beauty thanked the good Beast in her
heart, and choosing the simplest dress she told the
maid to lock away the others, as she would give them
to her sisters. But hardly had she said so when the
chest disappeared. Her father told her that Beast
wished her to keep them for herself; when immedi-
ately the dresses and the chest came back to the same
place.

Then Beauty put on her gown, and when she had
done so, her sisters, who had been sent for, came with
their husbands.

They were both very unhappy. The eldest had
married a young gentleman as handsome as the day ;
but he was so much in love with his own face that he
thought of nothing else from morning till night, and
never noticed the beauty of his wife. ‘The second had
married a man who had very pretty wit, but he only
used it to annoy everyone, beginning with his wife.

The two sisters were very much annoyed at Beau-
ty’s return, for they had hoped that the Beast would
have destroyed her. ‘They were greatly annoyed to
see her dressed like a queen and as lovely as a flower.
In vain did Beauty caress them, nothing could check
their jealousy, which only increased when Beauty told
them of her happiness.
188 Beauty and the Beast.

So these two went down to the garden where they
could talk as they pleased. ‘The eldest said to the
other, ‘‘ Why should this minx be better off than we.
are? Let us try to keep her here beyond the time;
the monster will then be so enraged with her for
breaking her promise that he will destroy her at once
when she returns.”’ “That is well thought of,’ re-
plied the sister. ‘‘We will keep her.”

In order to succeed, they treated Beauty with the
greatest affection, so that she almost wept for joy.
When the week had past the two sisters tore their
hair and made as though they would die of grief if
Beauty were to go, so that she easily promised to
remain another week.

Nevertheless, Beauty fretted at the grief she must
be causing to her poor Beast, whom she loved with all
her heart and longed to see again. The tenth night
that she spent at her father’s house she dreamed that
she was in the palace garden, and that she saw the
Beast lying on the grass and like to die, and that he
reproached her for her ingratitude. Beauty awoke
weeping. ‘Ah! said she, ‘‘Am I not ungrateful to
grieve a Beast who is so kind tome? What fault is
it of his that he is ugly and stupid? He is good, and
that is better than all the rest. Why did I not marry
him? I should at any rate be happier than my sisters,
who are no better off for the beauty and wit of their
Beauty and the Beast.

husbands. No,
I will not make
Beast unhap-
py; all my life
long I should
have to re-
proach myself
for such ingra-
titude.”’

So Beauty
got up, and
placing her
ring on the ta-
ble, fell again
into a sound
sleep, from
which she
woke to find

herself in the ©

palace. Every-
thing was just
as she had left
it; but the
sweet sounds of

a
So
eS Y ;
A SS)



i
2)

XG

music which used to greet her were now hushed, and
there was an air of apparent gloom hanging over
everything. She herself felt very sad, but she knew

not why.
190 Beauty and the Beast.

At the usual time she expected a visit from Beast,
but no Beast appeared. Beauty, wondering what all
this could mean, now reproached herself for her in-
gratitude in not having returned as she promised.
She feared the poor Beast had died of grief, and she
resolved to seek him in every part of the palace, and
ran through every apartment, but no Beast could be
seen. ‘Then remembering her dream, with a sorrow-
ful heart she hastened into the garden, going towards
the little canal, beside which she had seen him in her
sleep.

At that moment she arrived at a plotof grass where |
the poor Beast lay as if dead. Beauty ran towards
him, and knelt by his side, and finding that he still
lived, she flung some water from the canal over his
head.

He opened his eyes and said: “ Beauty, you forgot
your promise, and therefore I must die.”’

‘“No, dear Beast,” exclaimed Beauty, weeping, “ 0,
you shall not die, you will live to be my aetna I
thought, indeed, ‘that I had only friendship for you
but now I new that I love you with my whole
heart.”?

No sooner had these words passed her lips than the
beast disappeared, and she saw at her feet a handsome
prince, who thanked her for having broken his en-
chantment, At the same moment the whole castle
Beauty and the Beast. I9I

was lit up, the
sweetest mu- Jj Bee, , ol

= Hts — SEAR Sey Hae HTH
sic was heard, |ifirie “evs Pa HILAR ae

| MN YZ N
Be

i
ey
f —]

x |

and bells rang a
oN

in all their

cheering mel- |B7*Wikge be~ RY

ody. Beauty, \ 5 NY al ns
however, Ga 3

could think of
nothing but

her dear Beast,

and asked the

prince where

she could find

him. ‘*You

see him at

your feet,” an-
swered he;

and then he

told her that

a wicked ma-

gician had

condemned

lim to wear

the form of a

beast, until a

beautiful maiden should consent to marry him.

4 a
a
ne

w=


192 Beauty and the Beast.

“But,” added
he, “‘you were
the only one
in the world
good enough
to be touched
by my kind
heart and un-
happy state,
so that this
palace and all that belongs to me is but a poor return
for your sweet goodness.” ‘So saying, he led Beauty to
the great hall of the palace, which was now thronged,
for at the same instant that the beast was changed the
whole palace became full of courtiers, all of whom
had been rendered invisible when the prince was en-
chanted. But what was Beauty’s joy to find there
her father and sisters, transported there by the kind
fairy who had appeared to her inher sleep. “Beauty,”
said she, “here is the reward of your wise choice; you
have chosen goodness, and you shall have beauty and
wisdom as well.” ‘Then turning to the frowning sis-
ters, she punished them by turning them into two
statues, to stand by the door of their sister’s palace,
until their hard hearts should change and become soft.
So the prince married Beauty, and they lived happily
together for many, many years.


Ore upona
time there &
lived a man,
who had beauti-
ful houses in
town and in the
country, dishes
of gold and sil-
ver, chairs and
sofas covered § 7)
with flowered fat
satin, and car-
riages gilt all
over with gold.

But alas! this
man was so un-
lucky-as to have
a blue beard,
which made
him so ugly and
frightful that
there was not |
any one who did
not flee from
him.

One of his neighbors, a lady of quality, had two
beautiful daughters. Blue Beard asked her to give

(193)


194 Blue Beard.

one of them to him as his wife, leaving to herself the
choice which of the two it should be. Both the
daughters, however, refused to have him, and each in
turn gave him up to the other, and so he went back-
wards and forwards from one to another, neither be-
ing able to make up their minds to marry a man
whose beard was blue. But what disgusted them
still more, was that he had already had several wives
and no one ever
knew what had
become of them.

Then Blue
Beard, so that
he might come
to know these
sisters, invited
them with their
mother and
some young friends, to spend a whole week at one of
his country houses. Nothing was thought of but
parties for hunting and fishing, feasting, dancing and
music. ‘There was but little sleep to be got, and at
night they played each other all manner of practical
jokes. Indeed, everything was so agreeable that the
youngest girl began to think her host’s beard was no
longer so very blue, and that he was a mighty pleas-
ant person. So as soon as they came back to town
they were married. -


Blue Beard. 19 5

At the end of BS
the month, Blue §&
Beard said to
his wife that he
must go upon a
journey which
would take him
six weeks at
least, as his
business was
one of much :
weight; that he hoped she would amuse herself finely
while he was gone; that she should invite her good
friends ; that she should take them into the country
if she wished, and that everywhere she should make
merry cheer.











= y) ns 5 Ea!
aS LEP

= ae Id 4 we
aed





LZ)
aa






‘‘Here,”’ said
DT ae Be ees

A

pea NRE SEL keys of the two
G great store-
Pee ZSOC eee §=rooms, wherein
| IT have my best
furniture; these
are the keys to
lock up the gold
and silver
dishes which


196 Blue Beard.

we only use on feast days; those open the caskets
where my jewels are kept; and here is the master-key
that opens all the rooms. But look well at this
smallest one, it is the key of the closet at the end of
the long gallery down-stairs ; open everything, go
everywhere, but, as for this little closet, I forbid you
to enter it. And I forbid you strictly, that if you
should chance to open it, there is nothing you may
not expect from
my just anger.”

She prom-.
ised faithfully
to obey him,
and he, when
he had kissed
her, got into
his carriage and
1 set off on his
* journey.

Her neighbors and good friends did not wait to be
sent for before visiting her, so impatient were they to
see all the splendor of her house; they had not dared
to venture while her husband was there, because of
the blue beard, which frightened them. Behold them
now running to see the rooms, closets, wardrobes,
each one more splendid and magnificent than the last.
From thence they went up to the galleries, where


Blue Beard. 197

cease admir-
ing the num-
ber and the
beauty of the
tapestries,
beds, sofas,
cabinets, side-
boards and ta-
bles, and of the
mirrors where
they could see
themselves
from head to
foot, and
whose frames,
some of glass,
and others of
silver and of
red gold, were
the most beau-
tiful that were
ever seen.
With one con-
sent they
praised and
envied the fortune of their friend, who, indeed, was

they could not FF SSS SEES
SS


198 Blue Beard.

all the time far
from being
amused by the
fine compli-
ments they paid
| her, so full of
impatience was
Hi she to go and
? 1 open the secret
closet below.
She was so eagerly curious that, without thinking
of her rudeness in leaving her guests, she ran down a
concealed staircase, and that so hurriedly that two
or three times she came near to breaking her neck.
Having found the closet door, she stopped a moment
or two, thinking of the charge her husband had
given her, and reflecting that some misfortune might
chance to fall ‘iat a
on her should
she be disobe- |
dient ; but the fig
temptation was
too strong for
her to get the
better of, and

a eee ae aN | 5)
taking the little . i
key, she opened /\ i S




Blue Beard.

the closet door
trembling.

At first she
could see noth-
ing because the
window - shut-
ters were clos-
ed. After a few
minutes, she
began to dis-
cover that the
floor was cover-
ed with blood-
stains, in which
trailed the feet
of many dead
ladies, whose
bodies were sus-
pended round
the walls; these
were all the
wives whom
Blue Beard hed married, and whose throats he had
cut, one after another. She was ready to sink with
fear, and the key of the closet, which she had drawn
from the lock, fell from her hand.

Coming to herself, she picked up the key, locked


200 Blue Beard.

the door again,
and went up to
| her own room
4 to recover her-
self; but this
was not possi-
ble, she was so
much fright-
| ened.

Seeing that
the key of the
closet was stain-
ed with blood,
4] she wiped it

i two or three
times, but the
blood still remained: in vain she washed it, and even
scrubbed it with sand and brick-dust, the blooc still
remained, for the key was enchanted and could never
be made wholly clean, As soon as ever the stains
were washed away from one side, they appeared again
on the other.

Blue Beard came back from his journey that
very evening, saying that he had received letters on
the road, putting a fortunate end to his business. His
wife, though in secret she was much afraid, did all
she could to prove to. him that she was delighted at .
his quick return.


Next morn-

ing he asked |

her for the keys,
and she gave
them upto him,

y,
but with such a

trembling hand
that he easily
guessed what
had happened.
“How comes
it,’ said he,
“that the key
of my closet is
not with the
rest???’ —‘‘J
must,’ an-
swered she,
“have left it
on my table up-
stairs.’ ‘Be
sure you give it
me by-and-by,”
said Blue Beard.

After several



Blue Beard. 201

goings backwards and forwards she was forced to
bring him the key. Blue Beard, having very atten-
202 Blue Beard.

"| tively examin-
‘| ed it, said to his
| wife: ‘‘How
I came this blood
4) upon the key?”
47 —‘‘ Indeed Ido
j not know!’?
i cried she, and
her face was
white with fear. ‘You don’t know!” answered Blue
Beard; ‘‘but I do, right well. You have been into
my. closet. Vastly well, Madam, then you shall go
in again, and take your place among the ladies you
saw there.”

She threw herself at her husband’s feet, weeping
and praying his pardon for her disobedience with
every mark of
sorrow for her §
fault. She
would have
softened a
stone, so pretty :
was she, and so [aes
distressed ; but
Blue Beard’s
heart was hard-
er than stone.




“You must die,
Madam,” said
he, ‘Sand that
at once.’’?—
“Since I must
die,” said she,
looking up at
him with eyes
all bathed in
tears,a) Leave
me some little
time to say my
prayers.” — ‘‘T
give you ten
minutes,’? an-
swered Blue
Beard, ‘“‘and
not onemoment
more.”?

When she

found herself
alone, she call-
ed her sister,
and said, ‘‘Sis-
ter Anne” (for

that was her name),



Blue Beard. 203

“go up, pray, to the top of the

tower, and see if my brothers are coming ; they had
204 Blue Beard.

promised to come and see me to-day, and if they
should be in sight, beckon them to come quickly.”
Sister Anne went up to the tower; and from time to
time her wretched sister called to her from below:
“Anne, Sister Anne, do you see any one coming?”
And Sister Anne answered, “‘I only see the sun that
shines, and the grass that grows green.”’

In the meantime, Blue Beard, holding a mighty
sabre in his
hand, cried out
as loud as he
could bawl. to
his wife: “Come
down at once, .
or I shall go up
for you!?’?—
‘Vet one little
moment, I pray
you!’ answer-
ed his wife. And then she called up softly, ‘Anne,
Sister Anne, do you see any one coming?’ And
Sister Anne answered, ‘‘I only see the sun poet shines,
and the grass that grows green.”’

“Come down quickly,” shouted Blue Beard, or I
shall have to fetch you!’?—“I am coming,’’ an-
swered his wife. And then she cried, ‘‘ Anne, Sister
Anne, do you see any one coming?”—‘‘I see,’ an-

oN


Blue Beard. 205

swered Sister Anne, ‘‘a great cloud of dust coming *
this way.” . . . ‘‘Is it my. brothers ?’’—“ Alas,
no, sister; it is only a flock of sheep.”—‘‘ Come down,
come down !’’ shouted Blue Beard. ‘‘ Yet one little
moment!’ answered his wife. And then she called:
‘““Anne, Sister Anne, do you see any one coming?”’
—‘T see two horsemen riding towards me, but they
are still a great way off. . . . Heaven be praised,”’
she joyfully cried a moment after, ‘‘they are my
brothers; Iam beckoning with might and main for
them to hasten.”

Blue Beard began to shout so loud, that the whole
house shook. The poor lady went down and fell on
her knees before him, her face all soiled with tears and
her hair flying loose. ‘‘No use, Madam,” roared Blue
Beard, “‘you shall die!” ‘Then taking hold of her
hair with one hand, and raising his scimitar into the
air with the other, he made ready to cut off her head.
The poor lady, turning towards him and looking up
with eyes of terror, begged for one little moment to
prepare herself. ‘No, no,” said he, “this is your
last moment...’ Then, raising hisarm. . . . Sud-
denly, such a loud knocking was heard at the gates
that Blue Beard stopped at once. ‘The door was
opened and in came two knights who, sword in hand,
rushed towards him...

He saw at once that they were his wife’s brothers,
206 Blue Beard.

one a captain of foot and the other of horse, so he
turned and fled; but the two brothers were hard upon
luim and cut him off before he could reach the steps.
They passed their swords through his body, and left
him for dead. His poor wife was in little better case,
and had no strength left to rise and greet her brothers.

Soon, however, she was well again, and as it hap-
pened, Blue Beard had no heirs, so his wife became
mistress of all that he had. Part of her riches she
bestowed on her sister Anne, who married a youth by
whom she had long been beloved ; another part she
made use of to aid her two brothers; and with the
rest she herself married a very worthy gentleman,
whose kind treatment soon helped her to forget her
unlucky adventure with Blue Beard.


Puss in Boots.

lee NG ago

there died
[| a miller whose
i} whole property
E} was a mill, an
H| ass and a cat.
#1 All this had to
be divided be-
tween his three
sons; and it was
quickly done
without the
help of either
lawyer or clerk.
The eldest took
the mill, the second took the ass, and the youngest
had nothing but
the cat.

He, indeed,
was greatly cast
down at his poor
lot: ‘‘My broth-
ers,” said he,
‘(will be able to
earn their liv-
ing honestly by
working to-




208



Puss in Boots.

gether; but as for me, when I have
eaten my cat and made a muff of
his skin, I shall have to die of
hunger.”

The cat, who heard all this, but
made believe that he did not, said
to his master, ‘‘Don’t be down-
hearted, master; all you have to do
is to give me a bag, and have a pair
of boots made for me, because of
the brambles which scratch my
legs, and then you will see that

your share is not such a poor one as you think.”

Although his master put no great faith in this, yet
he had seen his cat do so many cunning tricks to
catch rats and mice, when he hung himself up by his
feet and lay like dead in the flour, that he did not
despair of getting help in his difficulty.

When the cat
had all that he
wanted, he boot-
ed himself

bravely, and

hung the bag
about his neck;
then, holdinig

the strings in Lo



Yr
Mh,

Hes \\ “ os aa
7S aN |
Puss in Boots. 209

his two front paws,
he set off for a rab-
bit warren, where
lived great numbers
of rabbits. He put
some bran and sow-
thistles into his bag,
and stretched him-
self out as though
he were dead, wait-
ing until some
young rabbitshould
be innocent and .
‘confiding enough
to put his nose into
the bag and eat its
contents. :
Hardly had he f., Sas

Ae
; ad

lain down when all ys x
fell out as he wish- NER i =

ed; a giddy young
rabbit skipped into vf fr
his bag and our
friend the cat, when
he had pulled the strings, took him and killed him
without pity.

In high delight with his booty, he went off to the


210 Puss in Boots.



king’s palace and asked to see him. He was shown
up to his Majesty’s chamber, and when he had en-
tered he made a deep bow and said, ‘‘ Here, Sire, is a
rabbit that my lord the Marquis of Carabas (for this
was the name he had invented for his master) has
desired me to present to you.”—‘' Tell your master,”’
said the king, “that I thank him for his gift.”

‘Another day the cat went and hid himself in a


Puss in Boots. . ie 211

wheat-field: with’ §
his bag gaping
open, and when. B
two partridges had
walked in, he pull-
ed the strings and
caught them both.
Then he went and
presented them. to
the king, just as
he had done. with
the rabbit. The
king. again gra--
ciously: received
the two partridges,
and bade. his serv-
ants offer food and
drink to the cat.
For two or three
months the cat
went on carrying
game from his mas-
ter to the king
Then one day,
when he knew that the king was to take the air along
the riverside with his daughter; who was the most
beautiful princess in the world, he said to his master


212 Puss in Boots.

‘If you will but do as I bid you, your fortune is
made: you have only to go and bathe in the river at
the spot which I shall show you, and leave the rest
to me.”

The Marquis of Carabas did all that his cat advised,
_ without knowing why or wherefore. So it fell out

that while he was bathing the king passed by and the
cat began to cry out as loud as he could,

‘‘Help, help! my Lord Marquis of Carabas is
drowning !””

At this noise the king put his head out of the
coach, and seeing it was the cat which had so often
brought him game, he ordered his guards to run im-
mediately to the help of his lordship the Marquis of
Carabas.

While they were pulling the poor Marquis out of
the river, the cat came up to the coach, and told the
king that, while his master was bathing, there came
by some rogues who had gone off with his clothes,
though he had cried “Stop, thief!’ at the top of ie
voice, the rogues had hidden them under a great
stone. The king at once ordered the officers of his
wardrobe to run and fetch one of his best suits for the
Lord Marquis of Carabas.

The king paid him a thousand compliments, and
as the fine clothes they had brought him set off his

good air (for he was a comely lad), the king’s daugh-
: &
ter fell in love
with him on the
spot,and the king
would have him
come into his
coach.

The cat, who
was overjoyed to
see his plan had
begun to succeed,
went on in front;
and meeting with
some country-
people who were
mowing a mead-
ow, he said to
them, ‘‘Good
mowers, if you
do not tell the
king that the
meadow you mow
belongs to the
Marquis of Cara-
bas, you shall be



ee

Puss in Boots. 213

chopped as small as mincemeat.”
Sure enough the king asked the mowers to whom
the meadow they were mowing belonged.
214 Puss in Boots.

‘To my Lord
Marquis of
Carabas,”’-an-
swered they all |
together—for
i the cat had
frightened
them well.

“That is a

ae a fine property: of

yours,’’said the king to the Marquis of Carabas.

VAs you see, your Majesty,” answered he; “it isa
meadow that never fails to yield a plentiful harvest
every year.”

The cat, who still went on before, met with some
reapers, and said -to them, “Good reapers, if you do
not. tell the king that all this corn belongs to the
Marquis of Carabas, you shall be chopped as small as
‘mincemeat.’?

~The king, who passed by a moment after, must
needs know to
whom all the
corn belonged.

“To my Lord
Marquis of Cara-
bas,” replied the: |
reapers; and. the




king was very
well pleased,

and so was the |
Marquis, whom |
he congratu- |

lated.

The cat went
always before,
saying the saine
words to all he
met; and the
king was.aston-
ished at the vast
estates of ny

Lord Marquis

of Carabas.

Master Puss }

came at last to
a stately castle,
the lord of
which was. an
ogre, the richest
that had ever
been known, for
all the country

Puss in Boots.

215



through which the king had passed was his property.
The cat who had taken good care to find out who this
216 Puss in Boots.

Po

;

Y)

:

he ik
ill

Se GIF oi ii

hy, Hh hy, whan

OVERS
= i 7, Wy



ogre was and what he could do, asked leave to speak
to him, saying, ‘‘He could not pass so near his castle,
without having the honor of paying his tespects to
him.” =

The ogre received him as civilly as an ogre could
do, and bade him sit down.

““T have been told,” said the cat, “that you have
the gift of being able to change yourself into any
creature you have a mind to. You can, for ex-


ample, turn your-
self into a lion
or elephant, and
the like?”
‘“Thatis true,”
answered the
_ ogre, very brisk-
ly; ‘“‘and to con-
vince you, you
shall see me now
become a lion.”
Puss was so
sadly terrified to
see a lion so near
him, that he im-
mediately climb-

Puss in Boots.

ed into the gut- FY

ter, not without

greattroubleand |

danger because
of his boots,
which were of

no use at all to #

him in walking
upon the tiles.



A little while after, when Puss saw

that the ogre had again taken his natural form, he
came down, and owned that he had been very much

frightened.
218 Puss in Boots.

“T have been
told, too,’’ said
the.cat, “but: I
can scarce ‘be-
lieve it, that
}:you can also
turn yourself
into. one of the
smallest ani-
mals—for example, a rat or a mouse; but I must own
to you I believe this to be impossible.”’

‘‘Tmpossible !”’ cried the ogre; ‘‘you shall:see !””
—and at once he changed himself into a mouse; and
began to run about the floor. Puss no sooner saw
this than he pounced upon him and ate him up. .

Meanwhile the king, who saw as he passed this fine
castle of the ogre’s, had a: mind to go into it... Puss,
who heard the noise of his Majesty’s coach wheeling
over the drawbridge, ran out, and said to the king:
‘“VYour Majesty is welcome to this castle of the Mar-
quis of Cara- |
bas.”?

“How! my
Lord Marquis,”
said the king,
‘‘and does this
castle belong to -



( WA“



Puss in Boots. 219

you? I have seen nothing finer than this courtyard
with all the great buildings round it; let us go in, if
you please!” Z

The king went up first, the Marquis following,
handing the Princess. .’They went into a great hall,
where they found a splendid feast the ogre had pre-
pared for his friends, who dared not enter, knowing
the king was there. His Majesty was delighted with
the pleasant behavior of the Marquis, and so was his
daughter ; so much so, that after having taken a glass
or two of wine, he said to him, “ My Lord Marquis,
you only will be to blame if you are not my son-in-
law.” ;

The Marquis, making many low bows, accepted the
honor the king offered him, and forthwith married
the Priricess the very same day.

Puss became a great lord, and never ran after mice
any more except for his own amusement.





The Sleeping Beauty.

HERE was
formerly,

in a distant
’ country, a king
and a queen, the
most beautiful
and happy in
the world; hav-
ing nothing to
cloud their de-
light, but the
want of chil-
dren to share in
their happiness.
This was their
whole concern:
physicians, wa-
ters, vows and
offerings were
tried, but all to
no purpose. At
last, however,
after long wait-
ing, a daughter
was born. At
the christening the princess had seven fairies for her
godmothers, who were all they could find in the whole

221


222 The Sleeping Beauty. °

kingdom, that
every one
q might give her
a gift.

The chris- |
tening being
over, a grand
feast was pre-
pared to enter-

. tain and thank
the fairies: be-
fore each of
them was placed a magnificent cover, with a spoon,
a knife,and a fork, of pure gold and exquisite work-
manship, set with divers precious stones; but as they
were all sitting down at the table, they saw come into
the hall a very old fairy, whom they had not invited,
because it was near fifty years since she had been out
of a certain tower, and was thought to have been
either dead or enchanted. Sees

The king ordered her a cover, but could not furnish
her with such a case of gold as the others had, because
he had only seven made for the seven fairies. The
old fairy, thinking she was slighted by not being
treated in the same manner as the rest, murmured
out some threats between her teeth.

One of the young fairies who sat by her, overheard


The Sleeping Beauty. 223

-how she grum-
bled, and judg-
ing that she
might give the
little princess
some. unlucky
gift, she went,
as‘soon as she
rose from the MSS
table, and hid &
herself behind
the hangings, F
that she might
speak last, and
repair, as much
as she possibly
could, the evil
which the old gm
fairy might in- B
tend.

In the mean- §
time-all the |
fairies began to’ §
give their gifts
to the princess in the following manner :—

The youngest gave her a gift that she should be
the most beautiful person in the world.


224 The Sleeping Beauty.

The sec-.
ond, that she
should have
witlikean

angel.
The third,
that she

should have
a wonder-
ful grace in



everything
that she did.
The fourth, that she should sing like a nightin-
gale. .

The fifth, that she should dance like a flower in
the wind.

And the sixth, that she would play on all kinds of
musical instruments to the utmost degree of pester
tion.

The old fairy’s turn coming next, she advanced
forward, and, with a shaking head, that seemed to
show more spite than age, she said,—That the prin-
cess, when she was fifteen years old, would have her
hand pierced with a spindle, and die of the wound.

This terrible gift made the whole company trem-
ble, and every one of them fell a-crying.

At this very instant the young fairy came out from
The Sleeping Beauty. 225

behind the cur-
tains and spoke
these words
aloud: “Assure
yourselves,
O King and
Queen, that
your daughter
shall not die of
this disaster. It
is true, I have
not the power to undo what my elder has done. The
princess shall indeed pierce her hand with a spindle;
but instead of dying, she shall only fall into a pro-
found sleep, which shall last a hundred years, at the
end of which time a king’s son shall come, and awake
her from it.”’
The king, to avoid this misfortune told by the old
_, malicious fairy,
caused at once
his royal com-
mand to be
issued forth,
whereby every
4 person was for-
bidden, upon
pain of death, to




226 The Sleeping Beauty.

spin with a distaff or spindle; nay, even so much as
to have a spindle in any of their houses.

About fifteen or sixteen years after, the king and
queen being gone to one of their houses of pleasure,
the young princess happened one day to divert herself
by wandering up and down the palace, when, going
up from one apartment to another, she at length came
into a little room at the top of the tower, where an
old woman, all alone, was spinning with her spindle.
- Now either she had not heard of the king’s com-
mand issued forth against spindles, or else it was the
wicked fairy who had taken this disguise.

_ “What are you doing there, Goody ?” said the prin-
cess. .I am spinning, my pretty child,” said the
old'woman. ‘‘Ha!” said the princess, “that is very
amusing: low do you do it? -give it to me that I
may see if I can do so too.”” ‘ The old woman gave it
her, She-had no sooner taken it into her hand than,
whether being very hasty at it, and somewhat awk-
ward, or that the decree of the spiteful fairy had
caused it, is not to be certainly known; but, however,
sure it is that the spindle immediately ran into her
hand, and she directly fell down upon the groundina
swoon. ‘Thereupon the old woman cried out for help,
and people came in from every quarter in great num-
bers: some threw water upon the princess’s face, un-
laced her, struck her on the palm of her hands, and
“The Sleeping Beauty. "2a

rubbed her
temples with
Hungary wa-
ter; but all
they could do §
did not bring §
her to herself.
The good
fairy who had
saved her life
by condemn- ;
ing her tosleep one hundred years, was in the king-
dom of Matakin, twelve thousand leagues off, when
this accident befell the princess ; but she was instantly
informed of it by a little dwarf, who had boots of seven
leagues, that is, boots with which he could tread over
seven leagues of ground at one stride. The fairy left
the kingdom
_immediately,
and arrived at
the palace
about an hour
after, in afairy
chariot drawn
by dragons.
The king
handed her




228 The Sleeping Beauty.

out of the chariot and she approved of everything he
had done; but as she had a very great foresight, she
thought that when the princess should awake, she
might not know what to do with herself, being all
alone in the old palace; therefore she touched with
her wand everything in the palace, except the king
and the queen—governesses, maids of honor, ladies of
the bed-chamber, gentlemen, officers, stewards, cooks,
under-cooks, scullions, guards, with their beef-eaters,
pages, and footmen; she likewise touched all the
horses that were in the stables, pads as well as others,
the great dog in the outer court, and the little spaniel
that lay by her on the bed.

Immediately on her touching them they all fell
asleep, that they might not wake before their mis-
tress, and that they might be ready to wait upon her
when she wanted them, ‘he very spits at the fire,
as full as they could be of partridges and pheasants.
and everything in the place, whether alive or not, fell
asleep also.

All this was done in a moment, for fairies are not
long in doing their business.

And now the king and queen, having kissed their
child without waking her, went very sorrowfully
forth from the palace, and issued a command that
no one should come near it. ‘This, however, was
not needed; for, in less than a quarter of an
The Sleeping Beauty. 229

hour, there got
ip all around the
park such a vast
number of trees, |
great and small
bushes, and bram- }W
bles, twined one
within the other, [LI]
that neither man
nor beast could
pass through, so
that nothing
could be seen but FF
the very tops of.
the towers, and |
not that even, un- [
less it were a good
way off. Nobody
doubted but that &
here was an extra- [W
ordinary example
of the fairies’ art,
that the princess,
while she remain-
ed sleeping, might a
have nothing to fear from any curious people.

When a hundred years were gone and past, the son


230 The Sleeping Beauty.

of a king then reigning, who was of another family
from that of the sleeping princess, being out a-hunt-
ing on that side of the country, asked what these
towers were which he saw in the midst of a great
thick wood. Every one answered according as they
had heard; some said it was an old ruinous castle
haunted by spirits; others, that all the sorcerers and
witches kept their eabpanh or weekly cee in ila
place.

The most common opinion was, that. an ogre lived
there, and that he’carried thither all the little chil-
dren he could catch, that he might eat. them up at
his leisure, without anybody being able to ‘follow
him, as having himself only power to Bees through
the wood:

‘The prince was at a stand, not knowing what to
believe, when an aged man spoke to him thus:

“May it please your highness, it is about fifty years
since I heard from my father, who heard my grand-
father say, that there was then in that castle a prin-
cess, the most beautiful that was ever seen; that she
must sleep there fora hundred years, and would be
wakened by a king’s son, whom she was a-waiting.”

~The young prince was all on fire at these words,

believing without considering the matter, that he
could put an end to this rare adventure ; and pushed
on by love and ambition, resolved that moment to
attempt it.
The Sleeping Beauty. 931

Scarce had ~
he advanced
towards the
wood, when all
the great trees,
the bushes, the
brambles, gave
way of their
own accord, and let him pass through. He went
up to the castle, which he saw at the end of a large
avenue, and entered ‘into: it; what not @ little sur-
prised him was, he saw none of his people.could fol-
low him, because the trees closed again, as soon as he
passed through them. a

However,:he did’ not cease from valiantly pursuing
his way. He came into a spacious outward court,
where everything he saw might have frozen up the
most hardy
person with
horror. There
reigned all over
a most fright-
ful silence, the
image of death
everywhere
shewing itself,
and there was




232 The Sleeping Beauty

nothing to
be seen but
stretched out
bodies of men
and animals,
seeming to be
Way dead. He, how-
ever, very well
knew by the
rosy faces and
red noses of the beef-eaters that they were only asleep;
and their goblets, wherein still remained some few
drops of wine, plainly showed that they. had fallen
asleep while drinking.

He then, crossing a court paved with marble, went
up stairs, and came into the guard-chamber, where
the guards were standing in their ranks, with their
halberds on
their shoulders,
and snoring as
loud as they
could. After
that he went
through several
rooms full of
gentlemen and
ladies all asleep,




The Sleeping Beauty. pe283

some sitting
and some stand-
ing.

At last he
came into a
chamber all gilt
with gold; here
he saw, upon a
bed, the curtains
of which were
all open, the
fairest sight that
ever he beheld—
a princess who
appeared to be
about fifteen or
sixteen years of
age, and whose
resplendent
beauty had in it something divine. He approached
with trembling and admiration, and fell down before
her on his knees. And now the enchantment was
at an end; the princess awaked, and looking at him
kindly, said, “Is it you, my prince? I have waited
for you a long time !’’

The prince, charmed with these words, and much
more with the manner in which they were spoken,


234 | The Sleeping Beauty.

answered that he lov-
ed her better than the
whole world. Then
they talked for four
hours together and yet
said not half of what
they had got to say.”

In the meantime
all the- palace awak-
ed, every one think-
ing on his particular business. The ‘chief lady of
honor, being ready to die of hunger, grew very im-
patient, and told the princess aloud, ‘that: supper
was served up. The prince then gave her his hand;
though her attire was very magnificent, his royal
highness did not forget to tell her that she was-dressed
like his great-grandmother; but, however, she looked
not the less beautiful and charming for all that. ‘They
went into the great hall of looking-glasses, where they
held the wedding supper, and were served by the offi-
cers of the princess; the violins and hautboys played
all old tunes, but very excellent, though it was now
about a hundred years since they had any practice.
After supper the lord almoner married them in the
Chapel of the castle, and they lived happily ever after-
wards.


Whittington and His Cat.

es the reign
of the fa-
mous King Ed-
ward III, there
was alittle boy
called Dick Rt
Whittington, i
whose father
and mother

died when he

was very

young; so that

he remem-

bered nothing

at all about-
them; and was

left a ragged

little fellow,

running about ~
a country vil- ! ca : cao
lage. As poor Dick was not old enough to work,
he was very badly off; he got but little for his
dinner, and sometimes nothing at all for his break-
fast; for the’ people who lived in the village were
very poor indeed, and could not spare him much
more than the parings of potatoes, and now and then
a hard crust of bread.

N

SS
J

wi

Ce
NX
AS

SS
PY),

RS rf
NSS



235
236 Whittington and His Cat.

For all this Dick Whittington was a very sharp
boy, and was always listening to what everybody
talked about. On Sunday he was sure to get near the
farmers, as they sat talking on the tombstones in the
churchyard, before the parson was come; and once
a week you might see little Dick leaning against
the sign-post of the village alehouse, where people
stopped to drink as they came from the next market
town; and when the barber’s shop door was open,
Dick listened to all the news that his customers told
one another.

In this manner Dick heard a great many very
strange things about the great city called London;
for the foolish country people at that time thought
that folks in London were all fine gentlemen and
ladies ; and that there was singing and music there -
all day long; and that the streets were all paved
with gold.

One day a large waggon and eight horses, all with
bells at their heads, drove through the village while
Dick was standing by the sign-post: He thought that
this waggon must be going to the fine town of Lon-
don ; so he took courage, and asked the waggoner to
let him walk with him by the side of the waggon.
As soon as the waggoner heard that poor Dick had
no father or mother, and saw by his ragged clothes
that he could not be worse off than he was, he told
Whittington and His Cat. 237

him he might
goif he would, fm
so they set off §
together.
Icouldnever
find out how &
little Dick con-
trived to get
meat and drink
ontheroad;nor +
how he could walk so far, for it was a long way; nor
what he did at night for a place to lie down to sleep
in. Perhaps some good-natured people in the towns
that he passed through, when they saw he was a poor
little ragged boy, gave him something to eat; and
perhaps the waggoner let him get into the waggon at
night, and take a nap upon one of the boxes or large
parcels in the waggon.



Dick, how-
ever, got safe
to London,and
4 was in such a
hurry to see
the fine streets
paved all over
with gold, that
I am afraid he


238 = Whittington: and -His’ Cat.

in Aix Ree “did not eveu
| ae a = stay to thank



HIS ¥-the kind wag-

goner. but ran
Wa offas fast as
“his legs would
‘carry him,
through ee
of ie. streets, thinking every moment to. come to
those that were paved with gold; for Dick had seen
.a. guinea three times in his own little village, and
remembered what a deal of money it. brought in
change; so he thought he had nothing to. do but to
take up some little bits of the pavement, and should
then have.as much money as he could wish for: --

Poor Dick ran till he was tired, and had ‘quite for-
got his friend the waggoner ; but at last, finding it
grow dark, and that every way he turned he saw
nothing fae dirt instead of gold, he sat down in a
dark corner and cried himself to sleep.

Little Dick was all night in the streets; and next
morning, being very hungry, he got up and walked
about, and asked everybody he met to give him a
halfpenny to keep him from starving; but nobody
stayed to answer him, and only two or three gave him
a halfpenny ; so that the poor boy was soon quite
weak and faint for the want of victuals.
Whittington and His Cat. 239

At last a good-natured. looking gentleman saw how
hungry he looked. ‘‘ Why don’t you go to work, my
lad?” said he to Dick. ‘That I would, but I do not
know how to get any,’’ answered Dick. “ If you are
willing, come along with me,” said the gentleman,
and took him to a hay-field, where Dick worked
briskly, and lived merrily till the hay was made.

After this he found himself as badly off as before ;
and being almost starved again, he laid himself down
at the door of Mr. Fitzwarren, a rich merchant. Here
he was soon seen by the cook-maid, who was an ill-
tempered creature, and happened just then to be very

busy dressing dinner STN
for her master and mis-- - - SN\ },

tress ; so she called out
to poor Dick: ‘* What:
business have you
there, you lazy rogue?
there is nothing else
but beggars; if you
do not take yourself
away, we will see how
you will like a sousing
of some dish-water ;
I have some here hot
enough to make you
jump.”


240 Whittington and His Cat.

Just at that
time Mr. Fitz-
a warren himself
fm came home to
# dinner; and
Mee when he saw

the dirty rag-
) ged boy lying
at the door, he
said to him:
“Why do you lie there, my boy? You seem old
enough to work; Iam afraid you are inclined to be
lazy.” —

“No, indeed, sir,” said Dick to him, ‘‘that is not
the case, for I would work with all my heart, but I
do not know anybody, and I believe I am very sick
for the want of food.” . “‘ Poor fellow, get up; let me
see what ails you.”

Dick now tried to rise, but was obliged to lie down
again, being too weak to stand, for he had not eaten
any food for three days, and was no longer able to
run about and beg a halfpenny of people in the street.
So the kind merchant ordered him to be taken into
the house, and have a good dinner given him, and be
kept to do what dirty work he was able for the cook.

Little Dick would have lived very happy in this
good family if it had not been for the ill-natured


Whittington and His Cat. 241

cook, who was find-
ing fault and scold-
ing him from morn-
ing to night, and
besides, she was so
fond of basting,
that when she had
no meat to baste,
she would baste
poor Dick’s head
and shoulders with
a broom, or any-
thing else that hap-
pened tofallin her §
way. At last her &
ill-usage of him
was told to Alice,
Mr. Fitzwarren’s
daughter, who told
the cook she should
be turned away if [
she did not treat
him kinder.
The ill-humor of Bs YA

the cook was now ZF

a little amended; â„¢ = si Li
but besides this Dick had another hardship to get


24a Whittington and His Cat.

over. His bed stood in a garret, where there were so
many holes in the floor and the walls that every night
he was tormented with rats and mice. A gentleman
having given Dick a penny for cleaning his shoes, he
thought he would buy a cat with it. The next day
he saw a girl with a cat, and asked her if she would
let him have itfora penny. ‘The girl said she would,
and at the same time told him the cat was an excel-
lent mouser.

Dick hid his cat in the garret, and always took
‘care to carry a part of his dinner to her; and in a
short time he had no more trouble with the rats and
mice, but slept quite sound every night.

Soon after this, his master had a ship ready to sail;
and as he thought it right that all his servants should
have some chance for good fortune as well as himself,
he called them all into the parlor and asked them
what they would send out.

They all had something that they were willing to
venture except poor Dick, who had neither money
‘nor goods, and therefore could send nothing.

For. this reason he did not come into the parlor

with the rest; but Miss Alice guessed what was the
matter, and Mestad him to be called in. She then
said she would lay down some money for him, .from
her own purse; but the father told her this would not
do, for it must be something of his own,
Whittington and His Cat. P2243

When poor
Dick. heard this,
he said he had
nothing but a cat
which he bought
for a penny some
time since of a
little girl.

‘Fetch your
cat then, my good
boy,’? said Mr.
Fitzwarren, “and.
let her go.”

Dick went up-
stairs and
brought down
poor puss, with
tears in his eyes,
and gave her to
the captain; for
he said he should
now be kept
awake again all
night by the rats
and mice.

All the com-
pany laughed at Diek’s odd venture; and Miss Alice,


244 Whittington and His Cat.

who felt pity for the poor boy, gave him some money
to buy another cat.

This, and many other marks of kindness shown
him by Miss Alice, made the ill-tempered cook jeal-
ous of poor Dick, and she began to use him more
cruelly than ever, and always made game of him for
sending his cat to sea. She asked him if he thought
his cat would sell for as much money as would buy a
stick to beat him.

At last poor Dick could not bear this usage any
longer, and he thought he would run away from his
place ; so he packed up his few things, and started
very early in the morning, on All-hallows’ Day, which
is the first of November. He walked as far as Hollo-
way; and there sat down ona stone, which to this
day is called Whittington’s stone, and began to think
to himself which road he should take as he went
onwards.

While he was thinking what he should do, the
Bells of Bow Church, which at that time had only
six, began to ring, and he fancied their sound seemed
to say to him :

“Turn again Whittington,
Lord Mayor of London.”’

‘‘Lord Mayor of London!” said he to himself.
““Why, to be sure, I would put up with almost any-
thing now, to be Lord Mayor of London, and ride in
Whittington and His Cat. = = 245

a fine coach,
when I grow
to be a man! Ff
Well, I will go
back, and
think nothing
of the cufing
and scolding
of the old cook,
if I am to be
Lord Mayor of London at last.”

Dick went back, and was lucky enough to get into
the house, and set about his work, before the old
cook came down stairs.

The ship, with the cat on board, was a long time
at sea; and was at last driven by the winds on a
part of the coast of Barbary, where the only people
were the Moors, that the English had never known
before..

The people then came in great numbers to see the”
sailors, who were of different color to themselves, and
treated them very civilly; and, when they became
better acquainted, were very eager to buy the fine
things that the ship was loaded with.

When the captain saw this, he sent patterns of the
best things he had to the king of the country ; who
was so much pleased with them, that he sent for the


\

\

246. Whittington and His Cat.

captain to the palace. Here
they were placed, as it is
the custom of the country,
on rich carpets marked with
gold and silver flowers. The
king and queen were seated
at the upper end of the
4 room; and a number of
\ dishes were brought in for
dinner. -’They had not sat
long, when a vast number of rats and mice rushed in,
helping themselves from almost every dish. The cap-
tain wondered at this, and asked if these vermin were
not very unpleasant.

““Oh yes,” said they, “very Aerie: the king
would give half his treasure to be freed of them, for
they not only destroy his dinner, as you see, but they
assault him in his chamber, and even in bed) so that
he is obliged
to be watched
while he is
sleeping for |
fear of them.”

The captain
jumped for joy;
he remembered {&
poor Whitting-




Whittington and His Cat. 247

ton and his cat, TT )
and told the a &
king he had a
creature on
board the ship [fj
that would de- |

spatch all these
vermin immedi- .
ately. The
king’s heart
heaved so high
at the joy which
this news gave
him that his tur-
ban dropped off §
his head. “Bring §
this creature to
me,’’? said he;
“vermin are
dreadful in a
court, and if she
will perform
what you say, I
will load your ,
ship with gold ,.
and jewels, in
exchange for her.”’


248 Whittington and His Cat.

The captain who knew his business, took this op-
portunity to set forth the merits of Mrs. Puss. He
told his majesty that it would be inconvenient to part
with her, as, when she was gone, the rats and mice
might destroy the goods in the ship—but to oblige
his majesty he would fetch her. ‘Run, run!” said
the queen; ‘‘I am impatient to see the dear crea-
ture.”

Away went the captain to the ship, while another
dinner was got ready. He put puss under his arm,
and arrived at the place soon enough to see the table
full of rats.

When the cat saw them, she did not wait for bid-
ding, but jumped out of the captain’s arms, and in a
few minutes laid almost all the rats and mice dead at
her feét. The rest of them in their fright scampered
away to their holes.

The king and queen were quite charmed to get so
easily rid of such plagues, and desired that the crea-
ture who had done them so greata kindness might
be brought to them for inspection. Upon which the
captain called: ‘Pussy, pussy, pussy!” and she
came to him. He then presented her to the queen,
who started back, and was afraid to touch a creature
who had made such a havoc among the rats and mice.
However, when the captain stroked the cat and called:
‘‘ Pussy, pussy,’’ the queen also touched her and cried:
Whittington and His Cat. 249

“Putty, putty,”
for she had not
learned Eng- &
lish, He then }
put her down
on the queen’s
lap, where she,
purring, played
with her majesty’s hand, and then sung herself to
sleep.

The king, having seen the exploits of Mrs. Puss,
and being informed that her kittens would stock the
whole country, bargained with the captain for the
whole ship’s cargo, and then gave him ten times as
much for the cat as all the rest amounted to.

The captain then took leave of the royal party, and
set sail with a fair wind for England, and after a
happy voyage arrived safe in London.

One morning Mr. Fitzwarren had just come to his
counting-house and seated himself at the desk, when
somebody came tap, tap, at the door. “Who's there?”
said Mr. Fitzwarren. ‘‘A friend,” answered the
other; ‘‘I come to bring you good news of your ship
Unicorn.’ ‘The merchant, bustling up instantly,
opened the door, and who should be seen waiting but
the captain and factor, with a cabinet of jewels, and
a bill of lading, for which the merchant lifted up his


250 Whittington and His Cat.

eyes and thanked heaven for sending him such a
prosperous voyage.

They then told the story of the cat, and showed the
rich present that the king and queen had sent for -her
to poor Dick. As soon as the merchant heard this,
he called out to his servants:

“Go fetch him—we will tell him of the aS p
Pray call him Mr. Whittington by name.”

Mr. Fitzwarren now showed himself to be a good
man ; for when some of his servants said so great a
treasure was too much for Dick, he answered: “God
forbid - should deprive him of the value of a single
penny.’

He ae sent for Dick, who at that time was scour-
ing pots for the cook, and was quite dirty.

Mr. Fitzwarren ordered a chair to be set for him,
andso he began to think they were making game of
him, at the same time begging them not to play
tricks with a poor simple boy, but to let him go down
again, if they pleased, to his work.

“Indeed, Mr. Whittington,” said the merchant,
“we are all quite in earnest with you, and I most
heartily rejoice in the news these gentlemen have
brought you ; for the captain has sold your cat to the
King of Barbary, and brought you in return for her
more riches than I possess in the whole world; and I

wish you may long enjoy them !”’
Whittington and His Cat. 251

Mr. Fitzwar-
ren then told
the men to }
open the great
treasure they
had _ brought
with them; and
said: “Mr.
Whittington
has nothing to
do but to’put it
in some place
of safety.”

; Poor Dick

hardly knew
how to behave
himself for joy.
He begged his
master to take
what part of it
he pleased,
since he owed
it all to his
kindness. ‘‘No,
no,’? answered
Mr. Fitzwat-
ren, ‘‘this is all your own; and I have no doubt but
you will use it well.”


252 Whittington and His Cat.

RB] Y
Va



Dick next asked his mistress, and then Miss Alice,
to accept a part of his good fortune; but they would
not, and at the same time told him they felt great
joy at his good success. But this poor fellow was too
kind-hearted to keep it all to himself; so he madea
present to the captain, the mate, and the rest of Mr.
Fitzwarren’s servants; and even to the ill-natured old
cook.

After this Mr. Fitzwarren advised him to send for
a proper tradesman and get himself dressed like a
gentleman ; and told him he was welcome to live in
his house till he could provide himself with a better.

When Whittington’s face was washed, his hair
curled, his hat cocked, and he was dressed in a nice
suit of clothes, he was as handsome and genteel as
any young man who visited at Mr. Fitzwarren’s; so
that Miss Alice, who had once been so kind to him,
Whittington and His Cat. 253

and thought of him
with pity, now look-
ed upon him as fit
to be her sweet-
heart; and the more
so, no doubt, be-
cause Whittington
was now always
thinking what he
could do to oblige
her, and making
her the prettiest
presents that could
be.

Mr. Fitzwarren
soon saw their love
for each other, and
proposed to join
them in marriage;
and to this they
both readily agreed.
A day for the wed- |
ding was soon fixed;
‘and they were at-
tended to church by
the Lord Mayor, the court of aldermen, the sheriffs,
and a great number of the richest merchants in Lon-


254 Whittington and His Cat.

don, whom they afterwards treated with a very rich
forse

History tells us that Mr. Whittington and his lady
lived in great splendor, and were very happy. ‘They
had several children. He was Sheriff of London,
also Mayor, and received the honor of knighthood by
Heury V.

The figure of Sir Richard Whittington with his
cat in his arms, carved in stone, was to be seen till
the year 1780 over the archway ee the old prison of
Newgate, that stood across Newgate Street.


ALTEMUS’ YOUNG PEOPLE’S LIBRARY.

ROBINSON CRUSOE: His Life and Strange, Sur-
prising Adventures, With 70 beautiful illustrations

by WALTER PaGET.
‘Was there ever anything written that the reader wished longer ox-
cept Roprnson Crusor and PILGRIM’s PROGRESS? ’—Samuel Johnson.
“There exists no work, either of instruction or entertainment, which
aas been more generally read, and universally admired.” — Walter Scott.

ALICE'S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND.
With 42 illustrations by Joun TENNIEL.
«Lewis Carroll’s immortal story.’ —Atheneum.

“The most delightful of children’s stories. Elegant and delicious
nonsense.’”’—Saturday Review.

THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS AND WHAT
ALICE FOUND THERE. (A companion to ALIcE
IN WoNDERLAND.) With 50 illustrations by JoHN

TENNIEL.

‘Will fairly rank with the tale of her previous experience.”’—Daily
Telegraph. . . . “Many of Tenniel’s designs are masterpieces of wise
absurdity.’—Atheneum. . ... ‘Not a whit inferior to its predecessor
in grand extravagance of imagination, and delicious allegorical non-
sense.”—Quarterly Review.

BUNYAN’S PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. With 50 full-

page and text illustrations.

Pinerm’s Progress is the most popular story book in the world.
With the exception of the Bible it has keen translated into more lan-
guages than any other book ever printed. :

A CHILD’S STORY OF THE BIBLE. With 72 full-

page illustrations.

Tells in simple language attd in a form fitted for the hands of the
younger members of the Christian flock, the tale of God’s dealings with
his Chosen People under the Old Dispensation, with its roreenecow lige
of the coming of that Messiah who was to make all mankind one fold
ander one Shepherd.

A CHILD’S LIFE OF CHRIST. With 48 illustrations.

God has implanted in the infant heart a desire to hear of Jesus, and
children are carly attracted and sweetly riveted by the wonderful] Story
of the Master from the Manger to the Throne.

Tn this little book we have brought together from Scripture every in-
cident, expression and description, within the verge of their comprehen-
sion in the effort to weave them into a memorial garland of their Saviour.
CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS AND THE DISCOV-
ERY OF AMERICA. With 70 illustrations.

It is the duty of every American lad to know the story of Christopher
Culumbus. In this book is depieted the story of his life ard struggles;
of his persistent solicitations at the Courts of Europe, and his contempiz-
ous receptions by the learned Geographical Councils, until his final em-
ployment by Queen Isabella. Records the day-by-day journeyings while

e was pursuing his aim and perilous way over the shoreless Ocean, until
he “gave to Spain a New World.” Shows his progress through Spain on
the occasion of his first return, when he was received with rapturous
demonstrations and more than regal homage. His displacement by the
Odjeas, Ovandos and Bobadilas; his last return in chains, and the story
of his death in poverty and neglect.

One distinguishing feature of this edition is, that many of the illus-
trations are copies from DeBry’s and Herrara’s histories, which were com-
pled by authority of the King of Spain, showing the Indians, in their

ife and customs, as they appeared to the early discoverers.

LIVES OF THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED
STATES, Compiled from authoritative sources. With
portraits of the Presidents; and also of the unsuccessful
candidates for the office; as well as the ablest of the

Cabinet officers.

This book should be in every home and school library. It tells, in an
impartial way, the story of the political history of the United States, from
the first Constitutional convention till the last Presidential nominations.
st is just the book for intelligent boys, and it will help to make them
intelligent and patriotic citizens, .

GULLIVER’S TRAVELS INTO SOME REMOTE
REGIONS OF THE WORLD. With *9 iliustra-

tions. é

In description, even of the most common-place things, his power is
often perfectly marvellous. Macaulay says of Swirr: “ Under a plain
garb and ungainly deportment were concealed some of the choicest gifts
that ever have been bestowed on any of the children of men,—rare
powers of observation, brilliant art, grotesque invention, humor of the
most austere flavor, yet exquisitely delicious, eloquence singularly pure,
manly, and perspicuous.”’

MOTHER GOOSE’S RHYMES, JINGLES, AND
FAIRY TALES. With 300 illustrations.

‘Tn this edition an excellent choice has been made from the standard
fiction of the little ones. The abundant pictures are well drawn and
graceful, the effect frequently striking and always decorative.’’—Critic.

. . “Only to see the book is to wish to give it to every child one
knows.’’—Queen.

THE FABLES OF AESOP. Compiled from the best
accepted sources. With 62 illustrations.

The fables of ASsop are among the very earliest compositions of this

kind, and probably have never been surpassed for point and brevity, aa
well as for we practical good sense they display. In their grovesque
grace, in their quaint humor, in their trust in the simpler virtues,
in their insight into the cruder vices, in their innocence of the fact
of sex, AEsop’s Fapurs are as little children—and for that reason
they will ever find a home in the heaven of little children’s souls,

THE STORY OF ADVENTURE IN THE FROZEN

SEAS. With 70 illustrations. Compiled from author-
ized sources.

We have here brought together the records of the attempts to reacu.
the North Pole. Our object being to recall the stories of the early voy-
agers, and ‘to narrate the recent efforts of gallant adventurers of various
nationalities to cross the “unknown and inaccessible” threshold ; and
to show how much can be accomplished by indomitable pluck and steady
perseverance. Portraits and numerous illustrations help the narration.

The North Polar region is the largest, as it is the most important field
of discovery that remains for this generation to work out. As Frobisher
declared nearly three hundred and fifty years ago, it is ‘‘the only great
thing left undone in the world.” Every year diminishes the extent of
the unknown ; and there is a bare likelihy ‘d that Dr. Nansen has already
explored the hitherto unexplorable.

THE STORY OF EXPLORATION AND DIS-
COVERY IN AFRICA. With 80 illustrations.

Records the experiences of adventures, privations, sufferings, trials,
dangers, and discoveries in developing the “ Dark Continent,’’ from the
early days of Bruce and Mungo Park down to Livin gstone and Stanley
and the heroes of our own times.

The reader becomes carried away by conflicting emotious of wonder
and sympathy, and feels compelled to pursue the story, whica he cannot
lay down. No present can be more acgeptable than such a volume as this,
where courage, intrepidity, resource and devotion are so pleasantly
mingled. It is very fully illustrated with pictures worthy of the book.

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON, or the Adven-
tures of a Shipwrecked Family on an Uninhab-

ited Island. With 50 illustrations.

A rems.ckable tale of adventure that will interest the boys and girls,
The father of the family tells the tale and the vicissitudes through
which he and his wife and children pass, the wonderful discoveries they
make, and the dangers they encounter. It is a standard work of adven-
turs that has the favor of all who have read it.

THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.
With 50 illustrations. Contains the most favorably

known of the stories.

The text is somewhat abridged and edited for the young. It forms an
excellent introduction to those immortal tales which have helped se

long to keep the weary world young.
ILLUSTRATED NATURAL HISTORY. By the Rev.
J.G. Woop. With 80 illustrations.

Woov’s Naturat History needs no commendation. Its author has
done morethan any other writer to popularizethe study. His work is
known and admired over all the civilized world. The sales of his works
in England and America have been enormous. The illustrations in this
edition are entirely new, striking, and life-like.

A CHILD’S HISTORY OF ENGLAND. By Cuarrzs

DickEens. With 50 illustrations.

Dickens grew tired of listening to his children memorizing the old-
fashioned twaddle that went under the name of English history. He
thereupon wrote a book, in his own peculiarly happy style, primarily
for the educational advantage of his own children, but was prevailed upon
to publish the work, and make its use general. Its success was instanta-
neous and abiding.

‘ BLACK BEAUTY: The Autobiography of a
Horse. By AnnA SEWELL. With 50 illustrations.

This NEW ILLUSTRATED EDITION is sure to command attention. Wher-
ever children are, whether boys or girls, there this Autobiography should
be. It inculcates habits of kindness to all members of the animal crea-
tion. The literary merit of the book is excellent.

Other volumes in preparation.



HENRY ALTEMUS, Publisher, Philadelphia.