Citation
Two little pilgrims' progress

Material Information

Title:
Two little pilgrims' progress a story of the city beautiful
Alternate title:
Story of the city beautiful
Creator:
Burnett, Frances Hodgson, 1849-1924
Birch, Reginald Bathurst, 1856-1943 ( Illustrator )
Charles Scribner's Sons ( Publisher )
J.J. Little & Co ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Charles Scribner's Sons
Manufacturer:
J.J. Little & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[8], 191, [16] p. : ill. ; 22 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Aunts -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Altruism -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Consolation -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Orphans -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Farm life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Twins -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Runaway children -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1895 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1895
Genre:
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Illustrations by Reginald B. Birch.
General Note:
First edition. BAL 2088.
General Note:
Author's booklist on verso of half-title.
General Note:
Includes table of contents; list of illustrations.
General Note:
Frontispiece has guardsheet.
General Note:
Publisher's illustrated advertisements: [16] pages following text.
General Note:
Cf. Osborne Coll., p. 974.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Frances Hodgson Burnett.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
021391507 ( ALEPH )
ALG3287 ( NOTIS )
00249791 ( OCLC )
06017244 ( LCCN )

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Full Text
rwo-
her ue
Bh 7a ES





7 s “STORY. OF THE CITY BEAUTIFUL
ok oe by :
|-Frances ‘Hodgson Burnett



The Baldwin Library

RmB









TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



MRS. BURNETT'S FAMOUS JUVENILES.

Peon AND OTHER CHILD STORIES.



SQUARE 8vo, $1.50.



“ The history of Piccino’s ‘two days’ is as delicate as one of the anemones that spring in the rock walls

facing Piccino’s Mediterranean—a study rather than a story of child-life. « .

The other stories in

the book have the charm of their predecessor in material and manner. . . . A delightful volume, in fair
print, and furthermore embellished by Mr. Birch’s graceful and sympathetic drawings.”—Mrs. BURTON

Harrison,

| lee LORD FAUNTLEROY.



SQUARE 8vo, $2.00.



“In ‘Little Lord Fauntleroy’ we gain another
charming child to add to our gatlery of juvenile
heroes and heroines; one who teaches a great
lesson with such iruth and sweetness that we
part with him with real regret when the episode
zs over.’’—Louisa M. Atcorr.

IOVANNI AND THE OTHER.

CHILDREN Wuo Have Mabe Stories.



SQUARE 8vo, $1.50.



Four of these stories, sad, sweet and touched
with delicate humor,are about little Italian waifs
who crept into the author's heart. Two of the
stories are of incidents in the lives of Mrs. Bur-
nett’s own boys; and the others, while varied in
subject, have the same magic charm of disclosing
the beauty of child-life with a sympathy and
warmth of feeling the secret of which Mrs. Bur-
nett alone seems to possess.



Sy CREWE.



SQUARE 8vo, $1.00.



« Everybody was in love with ‘ Little Lord
Fauntleroy,’ and I think all the world and the
rest of mankind will be in love with ‘Sara Crewe.
The tale is so tender, so wise,so human, that 1
wish every girl in America could read it, for 1
think everyone would be made better by it.’—
LouisE CHANDLER MOULTON,

a SAINT ELIZABETH,

Anp OTHER STORIES.



SQUARE 8vo, $1.50.



“ The pretty tale has for its heroine a little
French girl brought up in an old chateau in Nor-
mandy by an aunt who is a recluse and a devote.
A child of this type transplanted suddenly to the
realistic atmosphere of New York must tnevitably
have much to suffer. The quaint little figure
blindly trying to guess the riddle of duty under
these unfamiliar conditions is pathetic,and Mrs.
Burnett touches it in with delicate strokes,’—

Susan Coo.ipGE.

Illustrated by REGINALD B. BIRCH.









ME TRUE,

M HAD CO

THEIR DREA



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS
A STORY OF THE CITY BEAUTIFUL

BY

FRANCES HODGSON BURNETT



NEW-YORK
CHARLES SCRIBNER’S SONS
1895



Copyright, 1895, by

CHARLES SCRIBNER’S SONS.

Press of J. J. Little & Co.
Astor Place. New York



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

FROM DRAWINGS BY REGINALD B&B. BIRCH

Their dream bad come true. . 2. 6 2 we ew we Frontispiece
“Everything in the world,’’ said Robin . ... . Page 13
«© Aunt Matilda,” she said, suddenly . . . . . . “ 3l
- Meg looked rather like a little witch. . . . . ss “ 61
“ls this the train to Chicago?” said Robin . . . . “ 73
“You like a cup coffee ?’’ ‘she asked. . ww wee “ 89
“Now we are in Venice” . . 1 6 6 ew we “ 101
“Well, Jem!” she exclaimed re “ III
He was looking at ber in an absent, miserable way . . “ 117
“* To—to—the Fair?’’ he said, tremulously . . . . “ 131
“Take me with yous’. 6 6 ww ee ee “ 143

“It’s a queer sight,’ she said to John Holt . . . . a 179






TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

1

HE sun had set, and the shadows were deepening in
‘| the big barn. The last red glow—the very last bit
which reached the corner the children called the
Straw Parlor—had died away, and Meg drew her knees up
higher, so as to bring the pages of her book nearer to her
eyes as the twilight deepened, and it became harder to read.
It was her bitterest grievance that this was what always
happened when she became most interested and excited—
the light began to fade away, and the shadows to fill all
the corners and close in about her.

She frowned as it happened now—a fierce little frown
which knitted her childish black brows as she pored over
her book, devouring the page, with the determination to
seize on as much as was possible. It was like running a
desperate race with the darkness.

She was a determined child, and no one would have



2 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

failed to guess as much who could have watched her for a
few moments as she sat on her curious perch, her cheeks
supported by her hands, her shock of straight black hair
tumbling over her forehead.

The Straw Parlor was the top of a straw stack in Aunt
Matilda’s barn. Robin had discovered it one day by climb-
ing a ladder which had been left leaning against the stack,
and when he had found himself on the top of it he had
been enchanted by the feeling it gave him of being so high
above the world, and had called Meg up to share it with
him.

She had been even more enchanted than he.

They both hated the world down below—Aunt Matilda’s
world—which seemed hideous and exasperating and sordid
to them in its contrast to the world they had lived in before
their father and mother had died, and they had been sent to
their sole relation, who did not want them, and only took
them in from respect to public opinion. Three years they
had been with Aunt Matilda, and each week had seemed
more unpleasant than the last. Mrs. Matilda Jennings was
a renowned female farmer of Illinois, and she was far too
energetic a manager and business woman to have time to
spend on children. She had an enormous farm, and man-
aged it herself with a success and ability which made her
celebrated in agricultural papers. If she had not given her
dead brother's children a home, they would have starved or
been sent to the poorhouse. Accordingly, she gave them



,

TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 3



food to eat and beds to sleep in, but she scarcely ever had
time to notice them. If she had had time to talk to them,
she had nothing to say. She cared for nothing but crops
and new threshing-machines and fertilizers, and they knew
nothing about such things.

“She never says anything but ‘Go to bed,’ ‘Keep out of
‘the way.’ She’s not like a woman at all,” Meg commented
once, “she’s like a man in woman’s clothes.”

Their father had been rather like a woman in man’s
clothes. He was a gentle little, slender man, with a large
head. He had always been poor, and Mrs. Matilda Jen-
nings had regarded him as a contemptible failure. He had
had no faculty for business or farming. He had taught
school, and married a school teacher. They had had a
small house, but somehow it had been as cosey as it was tiny.
They had managed to surround themselves with an atmos-
phere of books, by buying the cheap ones they could afford
and borrowing the expensive ones from friends and circu-
lating libraries. The twins—Meg and Robin—had heard
stories and read books all the first years of their lives, as
they sat in their little seats by the small, warm fireside. In
Aunt Matilda’s bare, cold house there was not a book to
be seen. A few agricultural papers were scattered about.
Meals were hurried over as necessary evils. The few people
who appeared on the scene were farmers, who talked about
agricultural implements and the wheat market.

“Tt’s such a bare place,” Robin used to say, and he



4 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

would drive his hands into the depths of his pockets and
set his square little jaw, and stare before him.

Both the twins had that square little jaw. Neither of
them looked like their father and mother, except that from
their mother they inherited black hair. Robin’s eyes were
black, but Meg’s were gray, with thick black lashes. They
were handsome little creatures, but their shocks of straight
black hair, their straight black brows and square little jaws,
made them look curiously unlike other children. They
both remembered one winter evening, when, as they sat on
their seat by the fire, their father, after looking at them
with a half smile for a moment or so, began to laugh.

“Margaret,” he said to their mother, “do you know
who those two are like? You have heard me speak of
Matilda often enough.”

“Oh, Robert!” she exclaimed, ‘‘surely they are not like
Matilda ?”

‘Well, perhaps it is too much to say they are like her,”
he answered, “but there is something in their faces that
reminds me of her strongly. I don’t know what it is
exactly, but it is there. It is a good thing, perhaps,” with
a queer tone in his voice. ‘ Matilda always did what she
made up her mind to do. Matilda was a success. I was
always a failure.”

-“ Ah, no, Bob,” she said, “not a failure !”

She had put her hand on his shoulder, and he lifted it .

and pressed it against his thin cheek.



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 5



“Wasn't I, Maggie?” he said, gently, “wasn’t I?
Well, I think these two will be like Matilda in making up
their minds and getting what they want.”

Before the winter was over Robin and Meg were
orphans, and were with Aunt Matilda, and there they had
been ever since.

Until the day they found the Straw Parlor it had seemed
as if no corner in the earth belonged to them. Meg slept
on a cot in a woman servant’s room, Robin shared a room
with some one else. Nobody took any notice of them.

“When any one meets us anywhere,” Meg said, “they
always look surprised. Dogs who are not allowed in the
house are like us. The only difference is that they don’t
drive us out. But we are just as much in the way.”

“T know,” said Robin; “if it wasn’t for you, Meg, I
should run away.”

“Where?” said Meg.

“Somewhere,” said Robin, setting his jaw; “I’d find a
place.”

“Tf it wasn’t for you,’
that I should walk into the river. I wouldn’t stand it.” It

‘said Meg, “I should be so lonely

is worth noticing that she did not say “I cow/d¢ not stand it.”

But after the day they found the Straw Parlor they had
an abiding-place. It was Meg who preémpted it before
she had been on the top of the stack five minutes. After
she had stumbled around, looking about her, she stopped
short, and looked down into the barn.



6 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

“Robin,” she said, ‘this is another world. We are
miles and miles away from Aunt Matilda. Let us make
this into our home—just yours and mine—and live here.”

“We are in nobody’s way—nobody will even know
where we are,” said Robin. ‘‘ Nobody ever asks, you know.
Meg, it will be just like our own. We will live here.” And
so they did. On fine days, when they were tired of playing,
they climbed the ladder to rest on the heap of yellow straw ;
on wet days they lay and told each other stories, or built
caves, or read their old favorite books over again. The
stack was a very high one, and the roof seemed like a sort
of big tent above their heads, and the barn floor a wonder-
ful, exaggeratedly long, distance below. The birds who had
nests in the rafters became accustomed to them, and one of
the children’s chief entertainments was to lie and watch the
mothers and fathers carry on their domestic arrangements,
feeding their young ones, and quarrelling a little sometimes
about the way to bring them up. The twins invented a
weird little cry, with which they called each other, if one
was in the Straw Parlor and the other one entered the barn,
to find out whether it was occupied or not. They never
mounted to the Straw Parlor, or descended from it, if any
one was within sight. This was their secret. They wanted
to feel that it was very high, and far away from Aunt
Matilda’s world, and if any one had known where they were,,
or had spoken to them from below, the charm would have
been broken. :



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 7

This afternoon, as Meg pored over her book, she was
waiting for Robin. He had been away all day. At twelve
years old Robin was not of a light mind. When he had
been only six years old he had had serious plans. He had
decided that he would be a great inventor. He had also
decided—a little later—that he would not be poor, like
his father, but would be very rich. He had begun by
having a savings bank, into which he put rigorously every
penny that was given to him. He had been so quaintly
systematic about it that people were amused, and gave
him pennies instead of candy and toys. He kept a little
banking book of his own. If he had been stingy he would
have been a very unpleasant little boy, but he was only
strict with himself. He was capable of taking from his
capital to do the gentlemanly thing by Meg at Christmas.
“He has the spirit of the financier, that is all,” said his
father. .

Since he had been with Aunt Matilda he had found
opportunities to earn a trifle rather frequently. On the
big place there were small, troublesome duties the farm
hands found he could be relied on to do, which they were
willing to pay for. They found out that he never failed
them. | :

“Smart little chap,” they said; ‘always up to time when
he undertakes a thing.”

To-day he had been steadily at work under the head
man. Aunt Matilda had no objection to his odd jobs.



8 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

“He has his living to earn, and he may as well begin,”
she said.

So Meg had been alone since morning. She had only
one duty to perform, and then she was free. The first
spring they had been with Aunt Matilda Robin had in-
vested in a few chickens, and their rigorous care of them
had resulted in such success that the chickens had become
a sort of centre of existence to them. They could always
have any dreams of the future upon the fortune to be gained
by chickens. You could calculate on bits of paper about
chickens and eggs until your head whirled at the magnitude
of your prospects. Meg’s duty was to feed them, and show
them scrupulous attentions when Robin was away.

After she had attended to them she went to the barn,
and, finding it empty, climbed up to the Straw Parlor with

”

an old “ Pilgrim’s Progress,” to spend the day.

This afternoon, when the light began to redden and then
to die away, she and Christian were very near the gates.
She longed so to go in with him, and was yearning towards
them with breathless eagerness, when she heard Robin’s cry
below, coming up from the barn floor.

She sprang up with a start, feeling bewildered a second,
before she answered. The City Beautiful was such millions
—such millions of miles away from Aunt Matilda’s barn..
She found herself breathing quickly and rubbing her eyes,
as she heard Robin hurrying up the ladder.



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 9





Somehow she felt as if he was rather in a hurry, and
when his small, black shock head and wide-awake black
eyes appeared above the straw she had a vague feeling that
he was excited, and that he had come from another world.
He clambered on to the stack and made his way to her, and
threw himself full length on the straw at her side.

“Meg!” he said—‘ Hallo, you look as if you were in a
dream! Wake up!—Jones and Jerry are coming to the
barn—I hurried to get here before them; they’re talking
about something I want you to hear—something new!
Wake up!”

“Oh, Robin!” said Meg, clutching her book and com-
ing back to earth with a sigh, “I don’t want to hear Jones
and Jerry. I don’t want to hear any of the people down
there. I’ve been reading the ‘ Pilgrim’s Progress,’ and I do
wish—I do so wsh there was a City Beautiful.”

Robin gave a queer little laugh. He really was excited.

“There is going to be one,” he said. “ Jones and Jerry
don’t really know it, but it is something like that they are
talking about; a City Beautiful—a real one—on this earth,
and not a hundred miles away. Let’s get near the edge
and listen.”



10 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



I]

HEY drew as near to the edge as they could without
| being seen. They did not understand in the least.
Robin was not given to practical jokes, but what he
had said sounded rather as if there was a joke somewhere.
But she saw Jones and Jerry enter the barn, and saw,
before they entered, that they were deep in talk. It was
Jones who was speaking. Jones was Aunt Matilda’s head
man, and was an authority on many things.

“ There’s been exhibitions and fairs all over the world,”
he was saying, “but there’s been nothing like what this will
be. It will be a city, that’s what it will be, and all the
world is going to be in it. They are going to build it front-
ing on the water, and bank the water up into lakes and
canals, and build places like white palaces beside them, and
decorate the grounds with statues and palms and flowers
and fountains, and there’s not a country on earth that won't
send things to fill the buildings. And there won't be any-
thing a man can’t see by going through ’em. It'll be as
good as a college course to spend a week there.”

Meg drew a little closer to Robin in the straw.

‘What are they talking about?” she whispered.

“Listen,” said Bob.



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS II



Jerry, who was moving about at some work below, gave
a chuckling laugh.

“Trust "em to do the biggest thing yet, or bust, them
Chicago people,” he said. “It’s got to be the biggest thing
—a Chicago Fair.”

“It’s not goin’ to be the Chicago Fain” Jones said.
. They re not goin’ to put up with no such idea as that ;
its the World’s Fair. They're going to ring in the
universe.”

“That’s Chicago out an’ out,” said Jerry. ‘ Buildin’s:
twenty stories high, an’ the thermometer twenty-five degrees
below zero, an’ a World’s Fair. Christopher Columbus!
I'd like to see it!”

‘““T bet Christopher Columbus would like to see it,” said
Jones. “It’s out of compliment to him they’re getting it
up—for discovering Chicago.”

“Well, I didn’t know he made his name that way par-
ticlar,” said Jerry. ‘Thought what he prided hisself on
was discoverin’ America.”

”

“Same thing,” said Jones, “same thing! Wouldn’t have
had much to blow about, and have statues set up, and comic
operas written about him, if it had only been America he’d
discovered. Chicago does him full credit, and she’s goin’
to give him a send-off that'll be a credit to her.”

Robin smothered a little laugh in his coat-sleeve. He
was quite used to hearing jokes about Chicago. The peo-

ple in the country round it were enormously proud of it,



12 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



and its great schemes and great buildings and multi-million-
naires, but those who were given to jokes had the habit of
being jocular about it, just as they had the habit of pro-
claiming and dwelling upon its rush and wealth and enter-
prise. But Meg was not a jocular person. She was too
intense and easily excited. She gave Robin an impatient
nudge with her elbow, not in reproof, but as a sort of irre-
pressible ejaculation.

“T wish they wouldn’t be funny,” she exclaimed. “I
want them to tell more about it. I wish they'd go on.”

But they did not go on; at least, not in any way that
was satisfactory. They only remained in the barn a short
time longer, and they were busy with the work they had
come to do. Meg craned her neck and listened, but they
did not tell more, and she was glad when they went away,
so that she could turn to Robin.

“Don’t you know more than that?” she said. “Is it
true? What have you heard? Tell me yourself.”

“Tye heard a lot to-day,” said Robin. ‘They were
all talking about it all the time, and I meant to tell you
myself, only I saw Jones and Jerry coming, and thought,
perhaps, we should hear something more if we listened.”

They clambered over to their corner and made them-
selves comfortable. Robin lay on his back, but Meg leaned
on her elbows, as usual, with her cheeks resting on her
hands. Her black elf-locks hung over her forehead, and
her big eyes shone.





”

‘* EVERYTHING IN THE WORLD,” SAID ROBIN,






TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 15.

‘“Rob,” she said, ‘go on. What’s-the rest ?”

“The rest!” he said. “It would take a week to tell it
all, I should think. But it’s going to be the most wonder-
ful thing in the world. They are going to build a place
that will be like a white, beautiful city, on the borders of
the lake—that was why I called it the City Beautiful. It

”

won't be on the top of a hill, of course



“But if it is on the edge of the lake, and the sun shines
and the big water is blue and there are shining white palaces,
it will be better, I believe,” said Meg. “What is going to
be in the city?”

“Everything in the world,” said Robin. “Things from
everywhere—from every country.”

‘There are a great many countries,” said Meg. “You
know how it is in the geography. Europe, Asia, and Africa,
as well as America. Spain and Portugal and France and
England—and Sweden and Norway and Russia and Lap-
land—and India—and Italy—and Switzerland, and all the
others.”

“There will be things—and_ people—brought from them
all. I heard them say so. They say there will be villages,
with people walking about in them.”

“Do they walk about when they are at home?” ex-
claimed Meg.

‘Yes, in the queer clothes they wear in their own coun-
tries. There’s going to be an Esquimaux village.”

“With dogs and sledges?” cried Meg, lifting her head.



16 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS





- “Yes; and you know that place in Italy where the streets

+s



are made of water
“Tt’s Venice,” said Meg. ‘And they go about in boats
called gondolas.”
“And the men who take them about are called gondo-

’

liers,” interrupted Robin. ‘And they have scarfs and red
caps, and push their boats along with poles. There will be
gondolas at the Fair, and people can get into them and
go about the canals.”

“Just as they do in Venice?” Meg gasped.

“Just as they do in Venice. And it will be the same
with all the other countries. It will be as if they were all
brought there—Spanish places and Egyptian places and
German places—and French and Italian and Irish and
Scotch and English—and all the others.”

“To go there would be like travelling all over the
world,” cried Meg.

“Yes,” said Rob, excitedly. ‘And all the trades will be
there, and all the machines—and inventions—and pictures—
and books—and statues—and scientific things—and won-
derful things—and everything any one wants to learn about
in all the world!”

In his excitement, his words had become so rapid that
they almost tumbled over each other, and he said the last
sentence in a rush. There were red spots on his cheeks,
and a queer look in his black eyes. He had been listening
to descriptions of this thing all day. A new hand, hot from



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 17



the excitement in Chicago, had been among the workers.
Apparently he had heard of nothing else, thought of noth-
ing else, talked of nothing else, and dreamed of nothing
else but the World’s Fair for weeks. Finding himself
among people who had only bucolic and vague ideas about
it, he had poured forth all he knew, and being a rather good
talker, had aroused great excitement. Robin had listened
with eyes and ears wide open. He was a young human
being, born so full of energy and enterprise that the dull,
prosaic emptiness of his life in Aunt Matilda’s world had
been more horrible than he had been old enough to realize.
He could not have explained why it had seemed so madden-
ing to him, but the truth was that in his small, boyish body
was imprisoned the force and ability which in manhood build
great schemes, and not only build, but carry them out. In
him was imprisoned one of the great business men, invent-
ors, or political powers of the newcentury. | But of this he
knew nothing, and so ate his young heart out in Aunt
Matilda’s world, sought refuge with Meg in the Straw
Parlor, and was bitterly miserable and at a loss.

How he had drunk in every word the man from Chicago
had uttered! How he had edged near to him and tried not
to lose him fora moment! How he had longed for Meg to
listen with him, and had hoarded up every sentence! If he
had not been a man in embryo, and a strong and clear-
headed creature; he would have done his work badly. But
he never did his work badly. He held on like a little bull-

2



18 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



dog, and thought of what Meg would say when they sat in
the straw together. Small wonder that he looked excited
when his black head appeared above the edge of the straw.
He was wrought up to the highest pitch. Small wonder that
there were deep red spots on his cheeks, and that there was
a queer, intense look in his eyes, and about his obstinate
little mouth.

He threw up his arms with a desperate gesture.

“Everything,” he said again, staring straight before him,
“that any one could want to learn about—everything in
all the world.”

“Oh, Robin!” said Meg, in quite a fierce little voice,
“and we—we shall never see it!”

She saw Robin clinch his hands, though he said nothing,
and it made her clinch her own hands. Robin’s were tough
little, square-fingered fists, brown and muscular; Meg’s
hands were long-fingered, flexible, and slender, but they
made good little fists when they doubled themselves up.

“Rob,” she said, ‘we never see anything! We never
hear anything! We never learn anything! If something
doesn’t happen we shall be Nothings—that’s what we shall
be—Nothings!” And she struck her fist upon the straw.

Rob's jaw began to look very square, but he did not
speak.

‘“We are twelve years old,” Meg went on. ‘ We've been
here three years, and we don’t know one thing we didn’t
know when we came here. If we had been with father and



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 19

mother we should have been learning things all the time.
We haven't one thing of our own, Rob, but the chickens
and the Straw Parlor—and the Straw Parlor might be taken
away from us.”

Rob’s square jaw relaxed just sufficiently to allow of a
grim little grin.

“We've got the Treasure, Meg,” he said.

Meg’s laugh had rather a hysterical sound. That she
should not have mentioned the Treasure among their
belongings was queer. They talked so much about the
Treasure. At this moment it-was buried in an iron bank,
deep in the straw, about four feet from where they sat. It
was the very bank Robin had hoarded his savings in when
he had begun at six years old with pennies, and a ten-cent
blank-book to keep his accounts in. Everything they had
owned since then had béen pushed and dropped into it—
all the chicken and egg money, and all Robin had earned
by doing odd jobs for any one who would give him one.
Nobody knew about the old iron bank any more than they
knew about the Straw Parlor, and the children, having
buried it in the straw, called it the Treasure. Meg's stories
about it were numerous and wonderful. Sometimes magi-
cians came, and multiplied it a hundred-fold. Sometimes
robbers stole it, and they themselves gave chase, and sought
it with wild adventure; but perhaps the most satisfactory
thing was to invent ways to spend it when it had grown
to enormous proportions, Sometimes they bought a house



20 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



in New York, and lived there together. Sometimes they
traded in foreign lands with it. Sometimes they bought
land, which increased in value to such an extent that they
were millionnaires in a month. Ah! it was a treasure
indeed.

After the little, low, over-strained laugh, Meg folded her
arms on the straw and hid her face in them. Robin looked
at her with a troubled air for about a minute. Then he
spoke to her.

“It’s no use doing that,” he said.

“It’s no use doing anything,” Meg answered, her voice
muffled in her arms. ‘I don’t want to do this any more
than you do. We're so lonely!”

“Yes, we're lonely,” said Robin, ‘that’s a fact.” And
he stared up at the dark rafters above him, and at some
birds who were clinging to them and twittering about a
nest.

“T said I wished there was a City Beautiful,” Meg said,
‘but it seems to make it worse that there is going to be
something like it so near, and that we should never get any
nearer to it than a hundred miles.”

Rob sat up, and locked his hands together round his
knees.

‘How do you know ?” he said.

‘How do I know?” cried Meg, desperately, and she
lifted her head, turning her wet face sideways to look at
him. He unlocked his hands to give his forehead a hard



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 21



rub, as if he were trying either to rub some thought out of
or into it.

“Just because we are lonely there zs use in doing
things,” he said. ‘“ There’s nobody to do them for us. At
any rate, we've got as far on the way to the City as the
bottom of the Hill of Difficulty.”

And he gave his forehead another rub and looked
straight before him, and Meg drew a little closer to him
on the straw, and the family of birds filled the silence with

domestic twitters.



22 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



Ill

URING the weeks that followed they spent more
1) time than ever in their hiding-place. They had an
absorbing topic of conversation, a new and won-
derful thing, better than their old books, even better than
the stories Meg made when she lay on the straw, her el-
bows supporting her, her cheeks on her hands, and her
black-lashed gray eyes staring into space. Hers were
always good stories, full of palaces and knights and robber
chiefs and fairies. But this new thing had the thrill of
being a fairy story which was real—so real that one could
read about it in the newspapers, and everybody was talking
about it, even Aunt Matilda, her neighbors, and the work-
hands on the farm. To the two lonely children, in their
high nest in the straw-stack, it seemed a curious thing to
hear these people in the world below talk about it in their
ordinary, everyday way, without excitement or awe, as if it
was a new kind of big ploughing or winnowing machine.
To them it was a thing so beautiful that they could scarcely
find the words to express their thoughts and dreams about
it, and yet they were never alone together without trying to
do so.
On wet, cheerless days, in which they huddled close to-



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 23

gether in their nest to keep from being chilled, it was their
‘comfort to try toimagine and paint pictures of the various
wonders until, in their interest, they forgot the dampness of
the air, and felt the unending patter of the rain-drops on
the barn roof merely a pleasant.sort of accompaniment to
the stories of their fancies.

Since the day when they had listened to Jones and Jerry
joking, down below them in the barn, Rob had formed the
habit of collecting every scrap of newspaper relating to the
wonder. He cut paragraphs out of Aunt Matilda’s cast-
aside newspapers; he begged them from the farm-hands
and from the country store-keepers. Anything in the form
of an illustration he held as a treasure beyond price, and
hoarded it to bring to Meg with exultant joy.

How they pored over these things, reading the para-
graphs again and again, until they knew them almost by
heart. How they studied the pictures, trying to gather the
proportions and color of every column and dome and arch!
What enthusiast, living in Chicago itself, knew the marvel
as they did, and so dwelt on and revelled in its beauties!
No one knew of their pleasure ; like the Straw Parlor, it was
their secret. The strangeness of their lives lay in the fact
that absolutely no one knew anything about them at all, or
asked anything, thinking it quite sufficient that their friend-
lessness was supplied with enough animal heat and nour-
ishment to keep their bodies alive.

Of that other part of them—their restless, growing



24 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



young brains and naturally craving hearts, which in their
own poor enough but still human little home had at least
been recognized and cared for—Aunt Matilda knew noth-
ing, and, indeed, had never given a thought to it. She had
not undertaken the care of intelligences and affections ; her
own were not of an order to require supervision. She was
too much occupied with her thousand-acre farm, and the
amazing things she was doing with it. That the children
could read and write and understood some arithmetic she
knew. She had learned no more herself, and had found it
enough to build her fortune upon. She had never known
what it was to feel lonely and neglected, because she was a
person quite free from affections and quite enough for
herself. She never suspected that others could suffer from
a weakness of which she knew nothing, because it had
never touched her.

If any one had told her that these two children, who ate
her plentiful, rough meals at her table, among field-hands
and servants, were neglected and lonely, and that their dim
knowledge of it burned in their childish minds, she would
have thought the announcement a piece of idle, sentimental
folly; but that no solid detail of her farming was a fact
more real than this one was the grievous truth.

“When we were at home,” was Meg’s summing-up of
the situation, ‘(at least we belonged to somebody. We
were poor, and wore our clothes a long time, and had
shabby shoes, and couldn’t go on excursions, but we had



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 25



our little bench by the fire, and father and mother used to
talk to us and let us read their books and papers, and try
to teach us things. I don’t know what we were going to
be when we grew up, but we were going to do some sort of
work, and know as much as father and mother did. I don’t
know whether that was a great deal or not, but it was
something.”

“It was enough to teach school,” said Robin. ‘If we
were not so far out in the country now, I believe Aunt
Matilda would let us go to school if we asked her. It
wouldn't cost her anything if we went to the public school.”

‘She wouldn’t if we didn’t ask her,” said Meg. ‘She
would never think of it herself. Do you know what I was
thinking yesterday. I was looking at the pigs in their sty.
Some of them were eating, and one was full, and was lying
down going to sleep. And I said to myself, ‘Robin and I
are just like you. We live just like you. We eat our food
and go to bed, and get up again and eat some more food.
We don’t learn anything more than you do, and we are not
worth as much to anybody. We are not even worth killing
at Christmas.’”

If they had never known any other life, or if nature had
not given them the big, questioning eyes and square little
- jaws and strong, nervous little fists, they might have been
content to sink into careless idleness and apathy. No one
was actively unkind to them; they had their Straw Parlor,
and were free to amuse themselves as they chose. But they



26 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



had been made of the material of which the world’s workers
are built, and their young hearts were full of a restlessness
and longing whose full significance they themselves did not
comprehend.

And this wonder working in the world beyond them—
this huge, beautiful marvel, planned by the human brain and
carried out by mere human hands; this great thing with
which all the world seemed to them to be throbbing, and
which seemed to set no limit to itself and prove that there
was no limit to the power of human wills and minds—this
filled them with a passion of restlessness and yearning
greater than they had ever known before.

“Tt is an enchanted thing, you know, Robin—it’s an
enchanted thing,” Meg said one day, looking up from her
study of some mewspaper clippings and a magazine with
some pictures in it.

“Tt seems like it,” said Robin.

“Tm sure it’s enchanted,” Meg went on. ‘It seems so
tremendous that people should think they could do such
huge things. As if they felt as if they could do anything
or bring anything from anywhere in the world. It almost
frightens me sometimes, because it reminds me of the Tower
of Babel. Don’t you remember how the people got so
proud that they thought they could do anything, and they
began to build the tower that was to reach to heaven; and
then they all woke up one morning and found they were all
speaking different languages and could not understand each



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 27



other. Suppose everybody was suddenly struck like that
some morning now—I mean the Fair people !” widening her
eyes with a little shiver.

“They won't be,” said Rob. ‘Those things have
stopped happening.”

“Ves, they have,” said Meg. ‘Sometimes I wish they
hadn’t. If they hadn’t, perhaps—perhaps if we made burnt
offerings, we might be taken by a miracle to see the World's
Fair.”

“We haven’t anything to burn,” said Rob, rather
gloomily. — :

“We've got the chickens,” Meg answered as gloomily,
“but it wouldn’t do any good. Miracles are over.”

“The world is all different,” said Robin. ‘‘ You have to
do your miracle yourself.”

“Tt will be a miracle,” Meg said, “if we ever get away
from Aunt Matilda’s world, and live like people instead of
like pigs who are comfortable—and we shall have to perform
it ourselves.”

“There is no one else,” said Robin. ‘You see, there is
no one else in the world.”

He threw out his hand and it clutched Meg’s, which was
lying in the straw near him. He did not know why he
clutched it—he did not in the least know why; nor did she
know why a queer sound in his voice suddenly made her feel
their unfriendedness in a way that overwhelmed her. She
found herself looking at him, with a hard lump rising in her



28 - TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



throat. It was one of the rainy days, and the hollow drum-
ming and patter of the big drops on the roof seemed some-
how to shut them in with their loneliness away from all the
world. :

“Tt’s a strange thing,” she said, almost under her breath,
“to be two children, only just twelve years old, and to be
quite by ourselves in such a big world, where there are such
millions and millions of people all busy doing things and
making great plans, and none of them knowing about us, or
caring what we are going to do.”

“Tf we work our miracle ourselves,” said Rob, holding
her hand quite tight, “it will be better than having it
worked for us. Meg!”—as if he were beginning a new sub-
ject—“ Meg !”

“What?” she answered, still feeling the hard lump in
her throat.

“Do you think we are going to stay here always?”

“Toh, Robin, I don’t know.”

“Well, I do, then. We are zo¢—and that’s the first step
up the Hill of Difficulty.”



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 29

IV

LL their lives the children had acted in unison.
When they had been tiny creatures they had played
the same games and used the same toys. It had

seemed of little importance that their belongings were
those of a boy and girl. When Robin had played with
tops and marbles, Meg had played with them too. When
Meg had been in a domestic and maternal mood, and had
turned to dolls and dolls’ housekeeping, Robin had assumed
some masculine rdle connected with the amusement. It
had entertained him as much at times to be the dolls’ doc-
tor, or the carpenter who repaired the dolls’ furniture or
made plans for the enlargement of the dolls’ house, as it
had entertained Meg to sew the flags and dress the sailors
who manned his miniature ships, and assist him with the
tails of his kites. They had had few playmates, and
had pleased each other far better than outsiders could
have done.
~“Tt’s because we are twins,” Meg said. ‘Twins are
made alike, and so they like the same things. I’m glad
I’m a twin. If I had to be born again and be an wz-twin
I’m sure I should be lonely.”
“T don’t think it matters whether you are a boy or a



30 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS —



girl, if you are a twin,” said Robin. ‘ You are part of the
other one, and so it’s as if you were both.”

They had never had secrets from each other. They
had read the same books as they grew older, been thrilled
by the same stories, and shared in each other's plans and
imaginings or depressions. So it was a curious thing that
at this special time, when they were drawn nearest to one
another by an unusual interest and sympathy, there should
have arrived a morning when each rose with a thought
unshared by the other.

Aunt Matilda was very busy that day. She was always
busy, but this morning seemed more actively occupied than
usual. She never appeared to sit down, unless to dispose
of a hurried meal or go over some accounts. She was a
wonderful woman, and the twins knew that the most ob-
jectionable thing they could do was not to remove them-
selves after a repast was over; but this morning Meg
walked over to a chair and firmly sat down in it, and
watched her as she vigorously moved things about, rubbed
dust off them, and put them in their right places.

Meg’s eyes were fixed on her very steadily. She won-
dered if it was true that she and Robin were like her, and
if they would be more like her when they had reached her
age, and what would have happened to them before that
time came. It was true that Aunt Matilda had a square
jaw also. It was not an encouraging thing to contemplate ;
in fact, as she looked at her, Meg felt her heart begin a



by #



















































_‘* AUNT MATILDA,” SHE SAID, SUDDENLY.






TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 33



slow and steady thumping. But, as it thumped, she was
getting herself in hand with such determination that when
she at last spoke her chin looked very square indeed, and
her black-lashed eyes were as nearly stern as a child’s eyes
can look.

“Aunt Matilda,” she said, suddenly.

“Well?” and a tablecloth was whisked off and shaken.

“T want to talk to you.”

“Talk in.a hurry, then. I’ve no time to waste in talk.”

“How old were you when you began to work and
make money?”

Aunt Matilda smiled grimly.

“T worked out for my board when I was ten years old,”
she said. ‘‘Me and your father were left orphans, and we
had to work, or starve. When I was twelve I got a place
to wash dishes and look after children and run errands, and
-I got a dollar a week because it was out in the country, and
girls wouldn't stay there.”

“Do you know how old / am?” asked» Meg.

“ve forgotten.”

“I’m twelve years old.” She got up from her chair and
walked across the room, and stood looking up at Aunt
Matilda. ‘I’m an orphan too, and so is Robin,” she said,
“and we have to work. You give us a place to stay in;
but—there are other things. We have no one, and we
have to do things ourselves; and we are twelve, and
twelve is a good age for people who have to do things for



34 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

themselves. Is there anything in this house or in the
dairy or on the farm that would be worth wages, that I
could do? I don’t care how hard it is if I can do it.”

If Aunt Matilda had been a woman of sentiment she
might have been moved by the odd, unchildish tenseness and
sternness of the little figure, and the straight-gazing eyes,
which looked up at her from under the thick black hair
tumbling in short locks over the forehead. Twelve years
old was very young to stand and stare the world in the face
with such eyes. But she was not a woman of sentiment,
and her life had been spent among people who knew their
right to live could only be won by hard work, and who
began the fight early. So she looked at the child without
any emotion whatever.

‘Do you suppose you could more than earn your bread
if I put you in the dairy and let you help there?” she said.

“Yes,” answered Meg, unflinchingly, “I know I could.
I’m strang for my age, and I’ve watched them doing things
there. I can wash pans and bowls and cloths, and carry
things about, and go anywhere I’m told. I know how clean
things have to be kept.”

“Well,” said Aunt Matilda, looking her over sharply,
‘they've been complaining about the work being too much
for them, lately. You go in there this morning and see
what you can do. You shall have a dollar a week if you’re
worth it. You're right about its being time that you should
begin earning something.”



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 35



“Thank you, ma’am,” said Meg, and she turned round
and walked away in the direction of the dairy, with two deep
red spots on her cheeks and her heart thumping again—
though this time it thumped quickly.

She reached the scene of action in the midst of a rush of
work, and after their first rather exasperated surprise at so
immature and inexperienced a creature being supposed to be
able to help them, the women found plenty for her to do.
She said so few words and looked so little afraid that she
made a sort of impression on them.

“ See,” she said to the head woman, ‘‘Aunt Matilda
didn’t send me to do things that need teaching. Just tell
me the little things, it does not matter what, and I'll do
them. I can.”

-How she worked that morning—how she ran on errands
—how she carried this and that—how she washed and°
scrubbed milk-pans—and how all her tasks were menial
and apparently trivial, though entirely necessary, and how
the activity and rapidity and unceasingness of them tried
her unaccustomed young body, and finally made her limbs
ache and her back feel as if it might break at some unex-
pected moment, Meg never forgot. But such was the des-
peration of her indomitable little spirit and the unconquer-
able will she had been born with, that when it was over she
was no more in the mood for giving up than she had been
when she walked in among the workers after her interview
with Aunt Matilda.



36 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



When dinner-time came she walked up to Mrs. Macart-
ney, the manager of the dairy work, and asked her a
question.

“Have I helped you?” she said.

“Yes, you have,” said the woman, who was by no means
an ill-natured creature for a hard-driven woman. ‘ You've
done first-rate.”

“Will you tell Aunt Matilda that ?” said Meg.

“Ves,” was the answer.

Meg was standing with her-hands clasped tightly behind
her back, and she looked at Mrs. Macartney very straight
and hard from under her black brows.

‘Mrs. Macartney,” she said, “if I’m worth it, Aunt
Matilda will give me a dollar a week ; and it’s time I began
to work for my living. Am I worth that much?”

“Yes, you are,” said Mrs. Macartney, ‘‘if you go on as
you've begun.”

“T shall go on as I’ve begun,” said Meg. ‘Thank you,
ma’am,” and she walked back to the house.

After dinner she waited to speak to Aunt Matilda again.

‘“T went to the dairy,” she said.

“I know you did,” Aunt Matilda answered. “Mrs.
Macartney told me about it. You can goon. I'll give you
the dollar a week.”

She looked the child over again, as she had done in the
morning, but with a shade of expression which might have

meant a touch of added interest. Perhaps her mind paused



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 37



just long enough to bring back to her the time when she
had been a worker at twelve years old, and also had
belonged to no one.

‘She'll make her living,” she said, as she watched Meg
out of the room. ‘She’s more like me than she is like her
father. Robert wasn’t worthless, but he had no push.”

Having made quite sure that she was not wanted in the
dairy for the time being, Meg made her way to the barn.
She was glad to find it empty, so that she could climb the
ladder without waiting. When she reached the top and
clambered over the straw the scent of it seemed delightful
to her. It was like something welcoming her home. She
threw herself down full length in the Straw Parlor. Robin
had not been at dinner. He had gone out early and had
not returned. As she lay, stretching her tired limbs, and
staring up at the nest in the dark, tent-like roof above her,
she hoped he would come. And he did. In about ten
minutes she heard the signal from the barn floor, and
answered it. Robin came up the ladder rather slowly.
When he made his way over the straw to her corner, and
threw himself down beside her, she saw that he was tired
too. They talked a few minutes about ordinary things, and
then Meg thought she would tell him about the dairy. But
it appeared that he had something to tell himself, and he
began first. :

‘“T’ve, been making a plan, Meg,” he said.

“Have you?” said Meg. “What is it?”



38 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

“T’ve been thinking about it for two or three days,” he
went on, “but I thought I wouldn't say anything about it
until—till I tried how it would work.”

Meg raised herself on her elbow and looked at him
curiously. It seemed so queer that he should have hada
plan too.

‘“Have you—tried?” she said.

“Yes,” he answered, “I have been working for Jones
this morning, and I did quite a lot. I worked hard. I
wanted him to see ‘what I could do. And then, Meg, I
asked him if he would take me on—like the rest of the
hands—and pay me what I was worth.”

‘“And what did he say?” breathlessly.

‘““He looked at me a minute—all over—and_ half
laughed, and I thought he was going to say I wasn’t worth
anything. It wouldn’t have been true, but I thought he
might, because I’m only twelve years old. It’s pretty
hard to be only twelve when you want to get work.
But he didn’t, he said, ‘Well, I’m darned if I won't
give you a show;’ and I’m to have a dollar a week.”

“Robin,” Meg cried, with a little gasp of excitement,
“so am I!”

“So are you!” cried Robin, and sat bolt upright.
“ Yous” /

“Tt’s—it’s because we are twins,” said Meg, her eyes
shining like lamps. “I told you twins did things alike
because they couldn’t help it. We have both thought of



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 39



the same thing. I went to Aunt Matilda, asked her to let
me work somewhere and pay me, and she let me go into the
dairy and try, and Mrs. Macartney said I was a help, and
I am to have a dollar a week, if I go on as I’ve begun.”

Robin’s hand gave hers a clutch, just as it had done
before, that day when he had not known why.

“Meg, I believe,” he said, ‘I believe that we two will
always go on as we begin. I believe we were born that
way. We have to, we can't help it. And two dollars a
week, if they keep us, and we save it all—we could go
almost anywhere—sometime.”

Meg’s eyes were fixed on him with a searching, but half
frightened, expression.

“ Almost anywhere,” she said, quite in a whisper.
‘“Anywhere not more than a hundred miles away.” -



40 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

V

HEY did not tell each other of the strange and bold
‘| thought which had leaped up in their minds that day.
Each felt an unwonted shyness about it, perhaps
because it had been so bold; but it had been in each
mind, and hidden though it was, it remained furtively in
both.

They went on exactly as they had begun. Each morn-
ing Meg went to her drudgery in the dairy and Robin
followed Jones whithersoever duty led. If the elder people
had imagined they would get tired and give up they found
out their mistake. That they were often tired was true, but
that in either there arose once the thought of giving up,
never! And they worked hard. The things they did to
earn their weekly stipend would have touched the heart of
a mother of cared-for children, but on Mrs. Jennings’s model
farm people knew how much work a human being could do
when necessity drove. They were all driven by necessity,
and it was nothing new to know that muscles ached and feet
swelled and burned. In fact, they knew no one who did not
suffer, as a rule, from these small inconveniences. And
these children, with their set little faces and mature intelli-
gence, were somehow so unsuggestive of the weakness and



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 41



limitations of childhood that they were often given work
which was usually intrusted only to elder people. Mrs.
Macartney found that Meg never slighted anything, never
failed in a task, and never forgot one, so she gave her
plenty to do. Scrubbing and scouring that others were
glad to shirk fell to her share. She lifted and dragged
things about that grown-up girls grumbled over. What
she lacked in muscle and size she made up in indomitable
will power that made her small face set itself and her small
body become rigid as iron. Her work ended by not con-
fining itself to the dairy, but extended to the house, the



kitchen—anywhere there were tiresome things to be done.

With Robin it was the same story. Jones was not afraid
to give him any order. He was of use in all quarters—in
the huge fields, in the barn, in the stables, and as a messen-
ger to be trusted to trudge any distance when transport was
not available.

They both grew thin but sinewy looking, and their faces
had a rather strained look. Their always large black eyes
seemed to grow bigger, and their little square jaws looked
more square every day; but on Saturday nights they each
were paid their dollar, and climbed to the Straw Parlor and
unburied the Treasure and added to it.

Those Saturday nights were wonderful things. To the
end of life they would never forget them. Through all the
tired hours of labor they were looked forward to. Then
they lay in their nest of straw and talked things over—

e



42 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS





there it seemed that they could relax and rest their limbs as
they could do it nowhere else. Mrs. Jennings was not given
to sofas and easy-chairs, and it is not safe to change position
often when one has a grown-up bedfellow. But in the straw
they could roll at full length, curl up or stretch out just as
they pleased, and there they could enlarge upon the one
subject that filled their minds, and fascinated and enraptured
them. :

Who could wonder that it was so! The City Beautiful
was growing day by day, and the development of its glories
was the one thing they heard talked of. Robin had estab-
lished the habit of collecting every scrap of newspaper
referring to it. He cut them out of Aunt Matilda’s old
papers, he begged them from every one, neighbors, store-
keepers, work hands. When he was sent on errands he
cast an all-embracing glance round every place his orders
took him to. The postmaster of the nearest village dis-
covered his weakness and saved paragraphs and whole
papers for him. Before very long there was buried near the
Treasure a treasure even more valuable of newspaper cut-
tings, and on the wonderful Saturday nights they gave them-
selves up to revelling in them.

How they watched it and followed it and lived with it—
this great human scheme which somehow seemed to their
young minds more like the scheme of giants and genii!
How they seized upon every new story of its wonders and
felt that there could be no limit to them! They knew



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 43



every purpose and plan connected with it—every arch and
tower and hall and stone they pleased themselves by fancy-
ing. Newspapers were liberal with information, people
talked of it, they heard of it on every side. To them it
seemed that the whole world must be thinking of nothing
else,

“While we are lying here,” Meg said—‘ while you are
doing chores, and I am scouring pans and scrubbing things,
it is all going on. People in France and in England and in
Italy are doing work to send to it—artists are painting pict-
ures, and machinery is whirring and making things, and
everything is pouring into that one wonderful place. And
men and women planned it, you know—just men and
women. And if we live a few years we shall be men and
women, and they were once children like us—only, if they
had been quite like us they would never have known enough
to do anything.”

‘But when they were children like us,” said Robin,
“they did not know what they would have learned by this
time—and they never dreamed about this.”

“That shows how wonderful men and women are,” said
Meg. “TI believe they can do anything if they set their
minds to it.” And she said it stubbornly.

‘Perhaps they can,” said Robin, slowly. ‘“ Perhaps we
could do anything we set our minds to.”

There was the suggestive tone in his voice which Meg
had been thrilled by more than once before. She had been



44 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



thrilled by it most strongly when he had said that if they
saved their two dollars a week they might be able to go
almost anywhere. Unconsciously she responded to it now,

“Tf I could do anything I set my mind to,” she said,
‘do you know what I would set my mind to first ?”

“What?”

“T would set my mind to going to that wonderful place.
I would set it to seeing everything there, and remembering
all I could hold, and learning all there was to be learned—
and I would se¢ zt hard.”

“So would I,” said Robin.

It was a more suggestive voice than before that he said
the words in; and suddenly he got up, and went and tore
away the straw from the burying-place of the Treasure. He
took out the old iron bank, and brought it back to their
corner.

He did it so suddenly, and with such a determined air,
that Meg rather lost her breath.

“What are you going to do with the Treasure?” she
asked,

“T am going to count it.”

“Why?” |

He was opening the box, using the blade of a stout
pocket-knife as a screwdriver.

‘A return ticket to Chicago costs fourteen dollars,” he
said. “I asked at the dépdt. That would be twenty-
eight dollars for two people. Any one who is careful can



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 45



live on a very little for a while. I want to see if we shall
have money enough to go.”

“To go/” Meg cried out. ‘To the Fair, Robin?”

She could not believe the evidence of her ears—it
sounded so daring.

“Nobody would take us!” she said. ‘Even if we
had money enough to pay for ourselves, nobody would
take us.”

“Take!” answered Robin, working at his screws. ‘“ No,

nobody would. What's the matter with taking ourselves ?”

Meg sat up in the straw, conscious of a sort of shock.

“To go by ourselves, like grown-up people! To buy
our tickets ourselves, and get on the train, and go all the
way—alone! And walk about the Fair alone, Robin?”

‘“Who takes care of us here?” answered Robin. ‘Who
has looked after us ever since father and mother died ?
Ourselves! Just ourselves!) Whose business are we but
our own? Who thinks of us, or asks if we are happy or
unhappy ?”

‘“ Nobody,” said Meg. And she hid her face in her
arms on her knees.

- Robin went on stubbornly.

‘“Nobody is ever going to do it,” he said, “if we live to
be hundreds of years old. I’ve thought of it when I’ve
been working in the fields with Jones, and I’ve thought of it
when I’ve been lying awake at night. It’s kept me awake
many and many a time.”



40 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS.





“So it has me,” said Meg.

“And since this thing began to be talked about every-
where, I’ve thought of it more and more,” said Rob. “It
means more to people like us than it does to any one else.
It’s the people who never see things, and who have no
chances, it means the most to. And the more I think of it,
the more I—I won't let it go by me!” And all at once he
threw himself face downward on the straw, and hid his face
in his arms.

Meg lifted hers. There’ was something in the woful
desperation of his movement that struck her to the heart.
She had never known him do such a thing in their lives
before. That was not his way. Whatsoever hard thing
had happened—howsoever lonely and desolate they had felt
—he had never shown his feeling in this way. She put out
her hand_and touched his shoulder.

“Robin!” she said. ‘Oh, Robin!”

“T don’t care,” he said, from the refuge of his sleeves.
“We are little when we are compared with grown-up
people. They would call us children; and children usually
have some one to help them and tell them what to do. I’m
only like this because I’ve been thinking so much and
working so hard—and it does seem like an Enchanted City
—but no one ever thinks we could care about anything
more than if we were cats and dogs. It was not like that
at home, even if we were poor.” .

Then he sat up with as little warning as he had thrown



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 4]



himself down, and gave his eyes a fierce rub. He returned
to the Treasure again.

“ve been making up my mind to it for days,” he said.
“Tf we have the money we can buy our tickets and go some
night without saying anything to any one. We can leave a
note for Aunt Matilda, and tell her we are all right and we
are coming back. She'll be too busy to mind.”

“Do you remember that book of father’s we read?” said
Meg. “That one called ‘David Copperfield. David ran
away from the bottle place when he was younger than we
are, and he had to walk all the way to Dover.”

“We shall not have to walk; and we won't let any one
take our money away from us,” said Robin.

“Are we going, really?” said Meg. ‘You speak as if
we were truly going; and it can’t be.”

“Do you know what you said just now about believing
human beings could do axythzng, if they set their minds
to it? Let’s set our minds to it.” .

“Well,” Meg answered, rather slowly, as if weighing the
matter, “let’s !”

And she fell to helping to count the Treasure.



48 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



VI

FTERWARDS, when they looked back upon that
A day, they knew that the thing had decided itself
then, though neither of them had said so.

“The truth was,” Robin used to say, ‘‘we had both been
thinking the same thing, as we always do, but we had been
thinking it in the back part of our minds. We were afraid
to let it come to the front at first, because it seemed such a
big thing. But it went on thinking by itself. That time,
when you said ‘ We shall zever see it,’ and I said, ‘How do
you know?’ we were both thinking about it in one way;
and I know I was thinking about it when I said, ‘We are
not going to stay here always. That is the first step up
the Hill of Difficulty.’”

“And that day when you said you would not let it go
by you,” Meg would answer, “that was the day we reached
the Wicket Gate.”

It seemed very like it, for from that day their strange,
unchildish purpose grew and ripened, and never for an hour
was absent from the mind of either. If they had been like
other children, living happy lives, full of young interests and
pleasures, it might have been crossed out by other and



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 49



newer things; if they had been of a slighter mental build,
and less strong, they might have forgotten it; but they
never did. When they had counted the Treasure, and had
realized how small it was after all, they had sat and gazed
at each other for a while with grave eyes, but they had only
been grave, and not despairing.

“Twenty-five dollars,” said Robin. ‘Well, that’s not
much after nearly six years; but we saved it nearly all by
cents, you know, Meg.”

“And it takes a hundred cents to make a dollar,” said
Meg; ‘‘and we were poor people’s children.”

“And we bought the chickens,” said Robin.

“And you have always given me a present at Christ-
mas, Robin, even if it was only a little one. That’s six
Christmases.” |

‘““We have eight months to work in,” said Robin, calcu-
lating. “If you get four dollars a month, and I get four,
that will be sixty-four dollars by next June. Twenty-five
dollars and sixty-four dollars make eighty-nine. Eighty-
nine dollars for us to live on and go to see all the things ;
because we must see them all, if we go. And I suppose we
shall have to come back”—with a long breath.

“Oh, dear!” cried Meg, “how cazx we come back ?”

“T don’t know,” said Robin. ‘We shall hate it, but we-
have nowhere else to go.” .

‘Perhaps we are going to seek our fortunes, and per-
haps we shall find them,” said Meg; “or perhaps Aunt



50 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



Matilda won’t let us come back. Rob,” with some awe,
‘do you think she will be angry?” .

‘“T’ve thought about that,” Robin answered contempla-
tively, ‘and I don’t think she will. She would be too busy
to care much even if we ran away and said nothing. But I
shall leave a letter, and tell her we have saved our money
and gone somewhere for a holiday, and we're all right, and
she need not bother.”

”

‘““She won't bother even if she is angry,” Meg said, with
mournful eyes. ‘She doesn’t.care about us enough.”

“Tf she loved us,” Rob said, ‘‘and was too poor to take
us herself, we couldn't go at all. We couldn’t run away,
because it would worry her so. You can’t do a thing, how-
ever much you want to do it, if it is going to hurt some-
body who is good to you, and cares.”

“ Well, then, we needn't stay here because of Aunt Ma-
tilda,” said Meggy. “That’s one sure thing. It wouldn't
interfere with her ploughing if we were both to die at
once.” oo
‘“No,” said Rob, deliberately, “that’s just what it would
not.” And he threw himself back on the straw and clasped
his hands under his head, gazing up into the dark roof
above him with very reflective eyes.

But they had reached the Wicket Gate, and from ‘the
hour they passed it there was no looking back. That in
their utter friendlessness and loneliness they should take
their twelve-year-old fates in their own strong little hands



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 51



was, perhaps, a pathetic thing; that once having done so
they moved towards their object as steadily as if they had
been of the maturest years was remarkable, but no one
ever knew or even suspected the first until the last.

The days went by, full of work, which left them little
time to lie and talk in the Straw Parlor. They could only
see each other in the leisure hours, which were so few, and
only came when the day was waning. Finding them faith-
ful and ready, those about them fell into the natural, easy,
human unworthiness of imposing by no means infrequently
on their inexperienced willingness and youth. So they
were hard enough worked, but each felt that every day that
passed brought them nearer to the end in view; and there
was always something to think of, some detail to be worked
out mentally, or to be discussed, in the valuable moments
when they were together.

“It’s a great deal better than it used to be,” Meg said,
“at all events. It’s better to feel tired by working than to
be tired of doing nothing but think and think dreary
things.”

As the weather grew colder it was hard enough to keep
warm in their hiding-place. They used to sit and talk,
huddled close together, bundled in their heaviest clothing,
and with the straw heaped close around them and over
them.

There were so many things to be thought of and talked
over! Robin collected facts more sedulously than ever—



52 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

facts about entrance fees, facts about prices of things to
eat, facts about places to sleep.

“Going to the Fair yourself, sonny?” Jones said to
him one day. Jones was fond of his joke. ‘You're right
to be inquirin’ round. Them hotel-keepers is given to
tot up bills several stories higher than their hotels is
themselves.”

““But I suppose a person needn’t go to a hotel,” said
Robin. .‘‘There must be plenty of poor people who can’t
go to hotels, and they'll have to sleep somewhere.”

“Ah, there’s. plenty of poor people,” responded Jones,
cheerfully, “plenty of ’em. Always is. But they won't go
to Chicago while the Fair's on. They'll sleep at home—
that’s where they'll sleep.”

“That's the worst of it,” Rob said to Meg afterwards ;
“you see, we have to sleep somewhere. We could live on
bread and> milk or crackers and cheese—or oatmeal—but
we have to sleep somewhere.”

“It will be warm weather,” Meg said, reflectively.
“Perhaps we could sleep out of doors. Beggars do. We
don’t mind.”

“T don’t think the police would let us,” Robin answered.
“If they would—perhaps we might have to, some night;
but we are going to that place, Meg—we are gorng.”

Yes, they believed they were going, and lived on the
belief. This being decided, howsoever difficult to attain, it
was like them both that they should dwell upon the dream,



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS' PROGRESS 53



and revel in it ina way peculiarly their own. It was Meg
whose imagination was the stronger, and it is true that it
was always she who made pictures in words and told stories.
But Robin was always as ready to enter into the spirit of
her imaginings as she was to talk about them. There was
a word he had once heard his father use which had caught
his fancy, in fact, it had attracted them both, and they ap-
plied it to this favorite pleasure of theirs of romancing with
everyday things. The word was “ philander.”

‘“Now we have finished adding up and making plans,”
he would say, putting his ten-cent account-book into his
pocket, “let us philander about it.”

And then Meg would begin to talk about the City Beau-
tiful—a City Beautiful which was a wonderful and curious
mixture of the enchanted one the whole world was pouring
its treasures into, one hundred miles away, and that City
Beautiful of her own which she had founded upon the one
towards which Christian had toiled through the Slough of
Despond and up the Hill of Difficulty and past Doubting
Castle. Somehow one could scarcely tell where one ended
and the others began, they were so much alike, these three
cities—Christian’s, Meg’s, and the fair, ephemeral one the
ending of the nineteenth century had built upon the blue
lake’s side.

“They must look alike,” said Meg, “I am sure they
must. See what it says in the ‘Pilgrim’s Progress.’ ‘Now
just as the gates were opened to let in the men, I looked in



54 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS





after them, and behold, the City shone like the sun’—and
then it says, ‘The talk they had with the Shining Ones was
about the glory of the place; who told them that the beauty
and glory of it were inexpressible.’ I always think of it,
Robin, when I read about those places like white palaces
and temples and towers that are being built. I am so glad
they are white. Think how the City will ‘shine like the
sun’ when it stands under the blue sky and by the blue
water, on a sunshiny day.”

They had never read the.dear old worn “ Pilgrim’s Prog-
ress” as they did in those days. They kept it in the straw
near the Treasure, and always had it at hand to refer to.
In it they seemed to find parallels for everything.

“Aunt Matilda’s world is the City of Destruction,” they
would say. “And our loneliness and poorness are like
Christian’s ‘burden.’ We-have to carry it like a heavy
weight, and it holds us back.”

“What was it that Goodwill said to Christian about it ?”
Robin asked.

Meg turned over the pages. She knew all the places by
heart. It was easy enough to find and read how “At last
there came a grave person to the gate, named Goodwill,”
and in the end he said, “As to thy burden, be content to
bear it until thou comest to the place of deliverance; for
there it will fall from thy back itself.” -

“But out of the ‘ Pilgrim’s Progress,’” Robin said, with
his reflecting air, ‘burdens don’t fall off by themselves. If



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 55



you are content with them they stick on and get bigger.
Ours would, I know. You have to do something yourself
to get them off. But—” with a little pause for thought, “I
like that part, Meg. And I like Goodwill, because he told
itto him. [It encouraged him, you know. You see it says
next, ‘Then Christian began to gird up his loins and address
himself to his journey.’”

“Robin,” said Meg, suddenly shutting the book and
giving it a little thump on the back, “it’s not only Chris-
tian’s City that is like our City. We are like Christian. We
are pilgrims, and our way to that place is our Pilgrims’

”
Progress.



56 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



VII

ND the cold days of hard work kept going by, and the
A City Beautiful grew, and, huddled close together in
the straw, the children planned and dreamed, and
read and re-read the ‘“ Pilgrim’s Progress,” following Chris-
tian step by step. And Aunt Matilda became busier every
day, it seemed, and did not remember that they were alive
except when she saw them. And nobody guessed and no-
body knew.

Days so quickly grow to weeks, and weeks slip by so
easily until they are months, and at last there came a time
when Meg, going out in the morning, felt a softer air, and
stopped a moment by a bare tree to breathe it in and feel
its lovely touch upon her cheek. She turned her face up-
ward with a half-involuntary movement, and found herself
looking at such a limitless vault of tender blueness that
her heart gave a quick throb, seemed to spring up to it, and
carry her with it. For a moment it seemed as if she had
left the earth far below, and was soaring in the soft depths
of blueness themselves. And suddenly, even as she felt it,
she heard on the topmost branch of the bare tree a brief
little rapturous trill, and her heart gave a leap again, and
she felt her cheeks grow warm.



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 57



“Tt is a bluebird,” she said; “it is a bluebird. And it is
the spring, and that means that the time is quite near.”

She had a queer little smile on her face all day as she
worked. She did not know it was there herself, but Mrs.
Macartney saw it.

‘What's pleasing you so, Meggy, my girl?” she asked.

Meg wakened up with a sort of start.

“T don’t know—exactly,” she said.

“You don’t know,” said the woman, good-naturedly.
“You look as if you were thinking over a secret, and it was
a pleasant one.”

That evening it was not cold when they sat in the Straw
Parlor, and Meg told Robin about the bluebird.

“Tt gave me a strange feeling to hear it,” she said. “It
seemed as if it was speaking to me. It said, ‘You must get
ready. It is quite near.’”

They had made up their minds that they would go in
June, before the weather became so hot that they might
suffer from it.

‘Because we have to consider everything,” was Robin's
idea. ‘‘We shall be walking about all the time, and we
have no cool clothes, and we shall have no money to buy
cool things; and if we should be ill, it would be worse for
us than for children who have some one with them.”

In the little account-book they had calculated all they
should own on the day their pilgrimage began. They had
apportioned it all out: so much for the price of the railroad



55 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



tickets, so much for entrance fees, and—not so much, but
so little—oh, so little !—for their food and lodging.

“T have listened when Jones and the others were talk-
ing,” said Robin; “and they say that everybody who has
room to spare, and wants to make money, is going to let
every corner they have. So you see there will be sure to
be people who have quite poor places that they would be
obliged to rent cheap to people who are poor, like them-
selves. We will go through the small side streets and look.”

The first bluebird came again, day after day, and others
came with it, until the swift dart of blue wings through the
air and the delicious ripple of joyous sound were no longer
rare things. The days grew warmer, and the men threw off
their coats, and began to draw their shirt-sleeves across
their foreheads when they were at work.

One evening when Robin came up into the Straw Parlor
he brought something with him. It was a battered old tin
coffee-pot.

‘What is that for?” asked Meg; for he seemed to carry
it as if it was of some value.

“It’s old and rusty, but there are no holes in it,” Robin
answered. ‘I saw it lying in a fence corner, where some
one had thrown it—perhaps a tramp. And it put a new
thought into my head. It will do to boil eggs in.”

“Eggs!” said Meg.

‘There's nothing much nicer than hard-boiled eggs,”
said Robin, ‘‘and you can carry them about with you. It



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 59



just came into my mind that we could take some of our
eggs, and go somewhere where no one would be likely to
see us, and build a fire of sticks, and boil some eggs, and
carry them with us to eat.”

“Robin,” cried Meg, with admiring ecstasy, “I wish I
had thought of that!”

“Tt doesn’t matter which of us thought of it,” said Rob,
“it’s all the same.”

So it was decided that when the time came they should
boil their supply of eggs very hard, and roll them up in
pieces of paper and tuck them away carefully in the one
small bag which was to carry all their necessary belongings.
These belongings would be very few—just enough to keep
them decent and clean, and a brush and comb between
them. They used to lie in bed at night, with beating hearts,
thinking it all over, sometimes awakening in a cold perspira-
tion from a dreadful dream, in which Aunt Matilda or Jones
or some of the hands had discovered their secret and con-
fronted them with it in all its daring. They were so full of
it night and day that Meg used to wonder that the people
about them did not see it in their faces.

“They are not thinking of us,” said Robin. ‘ They are
thinking about crops. I dare say Aunt Matilda would like
to see the Agricultural Building, but she couldn’t waste the
time to go through the others.”

Oh, what a day it was, what a thrilling, exciting, almost
unbearably joyful day, when Robin gathered sticks and



60 TIVO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



dried bits of branches, and piled them in a corner of a field
far enough from the house and outbuildings to be quite
safe! He did it one noon hour, and as he passed Meg on
his way back to his work, he whispered:

“T have got the sticks for the fire all ready.”

And after supper they crept out to the place, with
matches, and the battered old coffee-pot, and the eggs.

As they made their preparations, they found themselves
talking in whispers, though there was not the least chance of
any one’s hearing them. Meg looked rather like a little
witch as she stood over the bubbling old pot, with her
strange, little dark face and shining eyes and black elf
locks,

“Tt’s like making a kind of sacrifice on an altar,” she
said.

“You always think queer things about everything, don’t
you?” said Robin. ‘But they’re all right; I don’t think of
them myself, but I like them.”

When the eggs were boiled hard enough they carried
them to the barn and hid them in the Straw Parlor, near
the Treasure. Then they sat and talked, in whispers still,
almost trembling with joy.

‘Somehow, do you know,” Meg said, “it feels as if we
were going to do something more than just go to the Fair.
When people in stories go to seek their fortunes, I’m sure
they feel like this. Does it give you a kind of creeping in
your stomach whenever you think of it, Rob?”











MEG LOOKED RATHER LIKE A LITTLE WITCH,






TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 63



“Yes, it does,” Robin whispered back; ‘and when it
comes into my mind suddenly something gives a queer
jump inside me.”

‘That's your heart,” said Meg. “ Robin, if anything
should stop us, I believe I should drop dead.”

‘“No, you wouldn't,” was Rob's answer, “ but it’s better
not to let ourselves think about it. And I don’t believe any-
thing as bad as that cow/d happen. We've worked so hard,
and we have nobody but ourselves, and it can’t do any one
any harm—and we don’t want to do any one any harm. No,
there must be something that wouldn't let it be.”

‘“T believe that too,” said Meg, and this time it was she
who clutched at Robin’s hand; but he seemed glad she did,
and held as close as she.

And then, after the bluebirds had sung a few times
more, there came a night when Meg crept out of her cot
after she was sure that the woman in the other bed was
sleeping heavily enough. Every one went to bed early, and
every one slept through the night in heavy, tired sleep.
Too much work was done on the place to allow people to
waste time in sleeplessness. Meg knew no one would
waken as she crept down stairs to the lower part of the
house and softly opened the back door.

Robin was standing outside, with the little leather
satchel in his hand. It was a soft, warm night, and the
dark blue sky was full of the glitter of stars.

Both he and Meg stood still a moment, and looked up.



64 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



“T’m glad it’s like this,” Meg said; ‘‘it doesn’t seem so
lonely. Is your heart thumping, Robin?”

“Yes, rather,” whispered Robin. ‘I left the letter in a
place where Aunt Matilda will be likely to find it some time
to-morrow.”

“What did you say?” Meg whispered back.

“What I told you I was going to. There wasn’t much
to say. Just told her we had saved our money, and gone
away for a few days; and we were all right, and she needn't
worry.”

Everything was very still about them. There was no
moon, and, but for the stars, it would have been very dark.
As it was, the stillness of night and sleep, and the sombre-
ness of the hour, might have made less strong little
creatures feel timid and alone.

“Let us take hold of each other’s hands as we walk
along,” said Meg. ‘It will make us feel nearer, and—and
twenner.”

And so, hand in hand, they went out on the road
together.



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 65



VIII

T was four miles to the dépét, but they were good
| walkers. Robin hung the satchel on a stick over his
shoulder ; they kept in the middle of the road and
walked smartly. There were not many trees, but there were
a few, occasionally, and it was pleasanter to walk where the
way before them was quite clear. And somehow they found
themselves still talking in whispers, though there was cer-
tainly no one to overhear them.

“Let us talk about Christian,” said Meg. “It will not
seem so lonely if we are talking. I wish we could meet
Evangelist.”

“Tf we knew he was Evangelist when we met him,” said
Robin. “If we didn’t know him, we should think he was
some one who would stop us. And after all, you see, he
only showed Christian the shining light, and told him to go
to it. And we are farther on than that. We have passed
the Wicket Gate.”

“The thing we want,” said Meg, ‘is the Roll to read as
we go on, and find out what we are to do.”

And then they talked of what was before them. They
wondered who would be at the little dépot and if they would



66 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

be noticed, and of what the ticket-agent would think when
Robin bought the tickets.

“Perhaps he won't notice me at all,” said Rob. “And
he does not know me. Somebody might be sending us
alone, you know. We are not &¢¢/e children.”

“That's true,” responded Meg, courageously. “If we
were six years old it would be different. But we are
twelve !”

It did make it seem less lonely to be talking, and so they
did not stop. And there was.so much to say.

“ Robin,” broke forth Meg once, giving his hand a sud-
den clutch, “we are on the way



we are going. Soon we
shall be in the train and it will be carrying us nearer
and nearer. Suppose it was a dream, and we should

wake up!”
“Tt isn't a dream!” said Rob, stoutly. ‘It’s real—it’s
as real as Aunt Matilda!” He was always more practical-

minded than Meg.

“We needn't philander any more,” Meg said.

“It isn’t philandering to talk about a real thing.”

“Oh, Rob, just think of it—waiting for us under the
stars, this very moment—the City Beautiful !”

And then, walking close to each other in the dimness,
they told each other how they saw it in imagination, and
what its wonders would be to them, and which they would
see first, and how they would remember it all their lives
afterwards, and have things to talk of and think of. Very



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 67



few people would see it as they would, but they did not
know that. It was not a gigantic enterprise to them, a great
scheme fought for and struggled over for the divers reasons
poor humanity makes for itself ; that it would either make or
lose money was not a side of the question that reached
them. They only dwelt on the beauty and wonder of it,
which made it seem like an enchanted thing.

“I keep thinking of the white palaces, and that it is like

”

a fairy story,” Meg said, ‘and that it will melt away like
those cities travellers sometimes see in the desert. And I
wish it wouldn’t. But it will have been real for a while, and
everybody will remember it. I am so glad it is beautiful—
and white. I am so glad it is white, Robin!”

“And I keep thinking,” said Robin, “of all the people
who have made the things to go in it, and how they have
worked and invented. There have been some people,
perhaps, who have worked months and months making one
single thing—just as we have worked to go to see it. And
perhaps, at first they were afraid they couldn’t do it, and
they set their minds to it as we did, and tried and tried, and
then did it at last. I like to think of those men and women,
Meg, because, when the City has melted away, the things
won't melt. They will last after the people. And we are
feople too. I’m a man, and you are a woman, you know,
though we are only twelve, and it gives me a strong feel-
ing to think of those others.”

“It makes you think that perhaps men and women can



68 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



do anything if they set their minds to it,” said Meg, quite
solemnly. ‘Oh, I do like that!”

“T like it better than anything else in the world,” said
Rob. “Stop a minute, Meg. Come here in the shade.”

He said the last words quickly, and pulled her to the
roadside, where a big tree grew which threw a deep shadow.
He stood listening.

“It’s wheels!” he whispered. ‘There is a buggy com-
ing. We mustn’t let any one see us.”

It was a buggy, they could tell that by the lightness of
the wheels, and it was coming rapidly. They could hear
voices—men’s voices—and they drew back and stood very
close to each other. ‘

“Do you think they have found out, and sent some one
after us?” whispered Meg, breathlessly.

‘““No,” answered Robin, though his heart beat like a
triphammer. ‘No, no, no.”

The wheels drew nearer, and they heard one of the men
speaking.

“Chicago by sunrise,” he was saying, “and what I
don’t see of it won't be worth seeing.”

The next minute the fast-trotting horse spun swiftly
down the road, and carried the voices out of hearing. Meg
and Robin drew twin sighs of relief. Robin spoke first.

“Tt is some one who is going to the Fair,” he said.

‘Perhaps we shall see him in the train,” said Meg.

‘““T dare say we shall,” said Robin. ‘It was nobody who



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 69

knows us. I didn’t know his voice. Meg, let’s take hands
again, and walk quickly; we might lose the train.”

They did not talk much more, but walked briskly.
They had done a good day’s work before they set out, and
were rather tired, but they did not lag on that account.
Sometimes Meg took a turn at carrying the satchel, so
that Robin might rest his arm. It was not heavy, and
she was as strong for a girl as he was for a boy.

At last they reached the dépot. There were a number
of people waiting on the platform to catch the train to
Chicago, and there were several vehicles outside. They
passed one which was a buggy, and Meg gave Robin a
nudge with her elbow.

‘Perhaps that belongs to our man,” she said.

There were people enough before the office to give
the ticket-agent plenty to do. Robin’s heart quickened a
little as he passed by with the group of maturer people,
but no one seemed to observe him particularly, and he re-
turned to Meg with the precious bits of pasteboard held
very tight in his hand.

Meg had waited alone in-an unlighted corner, and when
she saw him coming she came forward to meet him.

‘Have you got them?” she said. ‘ Did any one look at
you or say anything ?”

“Yes, I got them,” Robin answered. ‘And, I'll tell you
what, Meg, these people are nearly all going just where
we are going, and they are so busy thinking about it, and



70 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



attending to themselves, that they haven’t any time to
watch any one else. That’s one good thing.”

“And the nearer we get to Chicago,” Meg said, “the
more people there will be, and the more they will have to
think of. And at that beautiful place, where there is so
much to see, who will look at two children? I don’t believe
we shall have any trouble at all.”

It really did not seem likely that they would, but it
happened, by a curious coincidence, that within a very few
minutes they saw somebody -looking at them.

The train was not due for ten minutes, and there were a
few people who, being too restless to sit in the waiting-
rooms, walked up and down on the platform. Most of
these were men, and there were two men who walked
farther than the others did, and so neared the place where
Robin and Meg stood in the shadow. One was a young
man, and seemed to be listening to instructions his com-
panion, who was older, was giving him, in a rapid, abrupt
sort of voice. This companion, who might have been his
employer, was a man of middle age. He was robust of
figure and had a clean-cut face, with a certain effect of
strong good looks. It was, perhaps, rather a hard face, but
it was a face one would look at more than once; and he
too, oddly enough, had a square jaw and straight black
brows. But it was his voice which first attracted Robin and
Meg as he neared them, talking.

“It's the man in the buggy,” whispered Robin. ‘“ Don’t



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 71



you know his voice again?” and they watched him with
deep interest.

He passed them once, without seeming to see them at
all. He was explaining something to his companion. The
second time he drew near he chanced to look up, and his
eye fell on them. It did not rest on them more than a
second, and he went on speaking. The next time he neared
their part of the platform he turned his glance towards
them, as they stood close together. It was as if involun-
tarily he glanced to see if they were still where they had
been before.

‘““A pair of children,” they heard him say, as if the
fleeting impression of their presence arrested his train of
thought for a second. ‘Look as if no one was with
them.”

He merely made the comment in passing, and returned
to his subject the next second; but Meg and Robin heard
him, and drew farther back into the shadow.

But it was not necessary to stand there much longer..
They heard a familiar sound in the distance, the shrill cry
of the incoming train—the beloved giant who was to carry
them to fairy-land; the people began to flock out of the
waiting-rooms with packages and valises and umbrellas in
hand; the porters suddenly became alert, and hurried about
attending to their duties; the delightful roar drew nearer
and louder, and began to shake the earth; it grew louder
still, a bell began to make a cheerful tolling, people were



72 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



rushing to and fro; Meg and Robin rushed with them,
and the train was panting in the dépdt.

It was even more thrilling than the children had
- thought it would be. They had travelled so very little,
and did not know exactly where to go. It might not be the
right train even. They did not know how long it would
wait. It might rush away again before they could get on.
People seemed in such a hurry and so excited. As they
hurried along they found themselves being pushed and
jostled. Before the steps of.one of the cars a conductor
stood, whom people kept showing tickets to. There were
several persons round him when Robin and Meg reached
the place where he stood. People kept asking him things,
and sometimes he passed them on, and sometimes let them
go into his car.

“Is this the train to Chicago?” said Robin, breath-
lessly. :

But he was so much less than the other people, and
the man was so busy, he did not hear him.

Robin tried to get nearer.

“Is this the Chicago train, sir?” he said, a little louder.

He had had to press by a man whom he had been too
excited to see, and the man looked down, and spoke to
him.

“Chicago train?” he said, in a voice which was abrupt,
without being ill-natured. ‘Yes, you're all right. Got
your sleeping tickets?”



QEESSSS SSE 4)
Wks YS AG



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: = = rN: SEs Sm SS = =
SSL SS SS ates EN\\\
N oa 75/4 FRAN: DIRS nae FS SSS a
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“Is THIS THE TRAIN 'TO CHICAGO?” SAID ROBIN,






TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 75



Robin looked up at him quickly. He knew the voice,
and was vaguely glad to hear it. He and Meg had never
been in a sleeping-car in their lives, and he did not quite
understand. He held out his tickets.

‘“We are going to sleep on the train,” he said; “but we
have nothing but these.”

‘““Next car but two, then,” he said; “and you'd better
hurry.”

And when both voices thanked him at once, and the
two caught each other’s hands and ran towards their car,
he looked after them and laughed.

“I’m blessed if they’re not by themselves,” he said,
watching them as they scrambled up the steps. ‘And
they're going to the Fair, I’ll bet a dollar. That's Young
America, and no mistake!”



76 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

IX

HE car was quite crowded. There were more people
| than themselves who were going to the Fair and
were obliged to economize. When the children
entered, and looked about them in the dim light, they
thought at first that all the seats were full. People seemed
to be huddled up asleep or sitting up awake in all of them.
Everybody had been trying to get to sleep, at least, and the
twins found themselves making their whispers even lower
than before.

“T think there is a seat empty just behind that very fat
lady,” Meg whispered.

It was at the end of the car, and they went to it, and
found she was right. They took possession of it quietly,
putting their satchel under the seat.

“It seems so still,” said Meg, “I feel as if I was in
somebody’s bedroom. The sound of the wheels makes it
seem ell the quieter. It’s as if we were shut in by the
noise.”

“We mustn't talk,” said Rabin, “or we shall waken the
people. Can you go to sleep, Meg?”

“T can if I can stop thinking,” she answered, with a joy-
ful sigh, ‘I’m very tired; but the wheels keep saying,



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 77



over and over again, ‘We're going—we're going—we’re
going.’ It’s just as if they were talking. Don’t you hear
them ?”

“Yes, I do. Do they say that to you, too? But we
mustn’t listen,” Robin whispered back. ‘If we do we shall
not go to sleep, and then we shall be too tired to walk.
about. Let’s put our heads down, and shut our eyes,
Meg.”

“Well, let’s,” said Meg.

She curled herself up on the seat, and put her head into
the corner.

“If you lean against me, Rob,” she said, “it will be
softer. We can take turns.”

They changed position a little two or three times,
but they were worn out with the day’s work, and their
walk, and the excitement, and the motion of the train
seemed like a sort of-rocking which lulled them. Gradually
their muscles relaxed and they settled down, though, after
they had done so, Meg spoke once, drowsily.

“Rob,” she said, “did you see that was our man?”

“Yes,” answered Rob, very sleepily indeed, ‘‘and he
looked as if he knew us.”

* * * * *

If they had been less young, or if they had been less
tired, they might have found themselves awake a good
many times during the night. But they were such children,
and, now that the great step was taken, were so happy,



78 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

that the soft, deep sleepiness of youth descended upon and
overpowered them. Once or twice during the night they
stirred, wakened for a dreamy, blissful moment by some
sound of a door shutting, or a conductor passing through.
But they were only conscious of a delicious sense of
strangeness, of the stillness of the car full of sleepers, of
the half-realized delight of feeling themselves carried along
through the unknown ‘country, and of the rattle of the
wheels, which never ceased saying rhythmically, ‘We're
going—we're going—we’re going!”

Ah! what a night of dreams and new, vague sensations,
to be remembered always! Ah! that heavenly sense of joy
to come, and adventure, and young hopefulness and imagin-
ing! Were there many others carried towards the City
Beautiful that night who bore with them the same rapture
of longing and belief; who saw with such innocent clear-
ness only the fair and splendid thought which had created
it, and were so innocently blind to any shadow of sordid-
ness or mere worldly interest touching its white walls?
And after the passing of this wonderful night, what a
wakening in the morning, at the first rosiness of dawn,
when all the other occupants of the car were still asleep, or
restlessly trying to be at ease!

It was as if they both wakened at almost the same
moment. The first shaft of early sunlight streaming in the
window touched Meg’s eyelids, and she slowly, opened them.
Then something joyous and exultant rushed in upon her



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 79



heart, and she sat upright. And Robin sat up too, and
they looked at each other.

“It's the Day, Meg!” said Robin. “It’s the Day!”
Meg caught her breath.

‘“And nothing has stopped us,” she said. ‘And we are
getting nearer and nearer. Rob, let us look out of the
window.”

For a while they looked out, pressed close together, and
full of such ecstasy of delight in the strangeness of every-
thing that at first they did not exchange even their
whispers.

It is rather a good thing to see—rather well worth while
even for a man or woman—the day waking, and waking the
world, as one is borne swiftly through the morning light,
and one looks out of a car window. What it was to these
two children only those who remember the children who
were themselves long ago can realize at all. The country
went hurrying past them, making curious sudden revela-
tions and giving half-hints in its haste; prairie and field,
farmhouse and wood and village all wore a strange, excit-
ing, vanishing aspect.

“Tt seems,” Meg said, “as if it was all going some-
where—in a great hurry—as if it couldn’t wait to let us
see it.” |

‘But we are the ones that are going,” said Rob. “ Lis-
ten to the wheels—and we shall soon be there.”

After a while the people who were asleep began to stir



80 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



and stretch themselves. Some of them looked cross, and
some looked tired. The very fat lady in the seat before
them had a coal smut on her nose.

“Robin,” said Meg, after looking at her seriously a
moment, “let’s get our towel out of the bag and wet it and
wash our faces.”

They had taken the liberty of borrowing a towel from
Aunt Matilda. It was Meg who had thought of it, and it
had, indeed, been an inspiration. Robin wetted two cor-
ners of it, and they made a rigorous if limited toilet. At
least they had no smuts on their noses, and after a little
touching up with the mutual comb and brush, they looked
none the worse for wear. Their plain and substantial gar-
ments were not of the order which has any special charm
to lose.

“And it’s not our clothes that are going to the Fair,”
said Meg, ‘it’s ws /”

And by the time they were in good order, the farms and
villages they were flying past had grown nearer together.
The platforms at the dépdts were full of people who wore a
less provincial look; the houses grew larger and so did the
towns; they found themselves flashing past advertisements
of all sorts of things, and especially of things connected
with the Fair. .

“You know how we used to play ‘hunt the thimble,’”
said Robin, “and how, when any one came near the place
where it was hidden, we said, ‘ Warm—warmer—warmer



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 81



~

still—hot!’ It’s like that now. We have been getting
warmer and warmer every minute, and now we are

getting
‘“We shall be in in a minute,” said a big man at the end

”



of the car, and he stood up and began to take down his
things.

‘“ Hot,” said Robin, with an excited little laugh. “ Meg,
we're not going—going—going any more. Look out of the
window.”

“We are steaming into the big dépét,” cried Meg.
“ How big it is! What crowds of people ! Robin, we are
there !” oo

Robin bent down to pick up their satchel; the people all
rose in their seats and began to move in a mass down the
aisle toward the door. Everybody seemed suddenly to
become eager and in a hurry, as if they thought the train
would begin to move again and carry them away. Some
were expecting friends to meet them, some were anxious
about finding accommodations. Those who knew each
other talked, asked questions over people’s shoulders, and
there was a general anxiety about valises, parcels, and
umbrellas. Robin and Meg were pressed back into their
section by the crowd, against which they were too young to
make headway.

‘We shall have to wait until the grown-up people have
passed by,” Rob said.

But the crowd in the aisle soon lost its compactness,



82 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



and they were able to get out. The porter, who stood on
the platform near the steps, looked at them curiously, and
glanced behind them to see who was with them, but he said
nothing.

It seemed to the two as if all the world must have
poured itself into the big dépét or be passing through it.
People were rushing about; friends were searching for one
another, pushing their way through the surging crowd; some
were greeting each other with exclamations and hand-shak-
ing, and stopping up the way.; there was a Babel of voices,
a clamor of shouts within the covered place, and from out-
side came a roar of sound rising from the city.

For a few moments Robin and Meg were overwhelmed.
They did not quite know what to do; everybody pushed past
and jostled them. No one was ill-natured, but no one had
time to be polite. They were so young and so strange to
all such worlds of excitement and rush, involuntarily they
clutched each other’s hands after their time-honored fashion,
when they were near each other and overpowered. The
human vortex caught them up and carried them along, not
knowing where they were going.

‘“We seem so little!” gasped Meg. ‘ There—there are
so many people! Rob, Rob, where are we going?”

Robin had lost his breath too. Suddenly the world
seemed so huge—so huge! Just for a moment he felt him-
self turn pale, and he looked at Meg and saw that she was
pale too.



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 83





‘“ Everybody is going out of the dépét,” he said.‘ Hold
on to me tight, Meg. It will be all right. We shall get
out.”

And so they did. The crowd surged and swayed and
struggled, and before long they saw that it was surging
towards the entrance gate, and it took them with it. Just
as they thrust through they found themselves pushed against
aman, who good-naturedly drew a little back to save Meg
from striking against his valise, which was a very substantial
one. She looked up to thank him, and gave a little start.
It was the man she had called “our man” the night before,
when she spoke of him to Robin. And he gave them a
sharp but friendly nod.

“Hallo!” he exclaimed, ‘it’s you two again. You ave
going to the Fair!”

Robin looked up at his shrewd face with a civil little
grin.

“Ves, sir; we are,” he answered.

“Hope you'll enjoy it,” said the man. “Big thing.”
And he was pushed past them and soon lost in the crowd.

'



84 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



X

HE crowd in the dépét surged into the streets, and
‘| melted into and became an addition to the world of
people there. The pavements were moving masses
of human beings, the centres of the streets were pandemo-
niums of wagons and vans, street cars, hotel omnibuses, and
carriages. The brilliant morning sunlight dazzled the chil-
dren’s eyes; the roar of wheels and the clamor of car bells,
of clattering horses’ feet, of cries and shouts and passing
voices, mingled in a volume of sound that deafened them.
The great. tidal wave of human life and work and pleasure
almost took them off their feet.

They knew too little of cities to have had beforehand
any idea of what the overwhelming rush and roar would be,
and what slight straws they would feel themselves upon
the current. If they had been quite ordinary children, they
might well have been frightened. But they were not ordi-
nary children, little as they were aware of that important
factor in their young lives. They were awed for this first
moment, but, somehow, they were fascinated as much as
they were awed, while they stood for a brief breathing-
space looking on. They did not know—no child of their



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 85





ages can possibly know such things of him or herself—that
Nature had made them of the metal out of which she
moulds strong things and great ones. As they had not
comprehended the restless sense of wrong and misery the
careless, unlearning, and ungrowing life in Aunt Matilda’s
world filled them with, so they did not understand that,
because they had been born creatures who belong to the
great moving, working, venturing world, they were not
afraid of it, and felt their first young face-to-face encounter
with it a thing which thrilled them with an exultant emo-
tion they could not have explained.

“This is not Aunt Matilda’s world,’ said Rob. ‘“It—lI
believe it is ours, Meg. Don’t you?”

Meg was staring with entranced eyes at the passing
multitude.

“ «More pilgrims are come to town,’” she said, quoting
the “ Pilgrim’s Progress” with a far-off look in her intense
little black-browed face. ‘You remember what it said,
Rob, ‘Here also all the noise of them that walked in the
streets was, More pilgrims are come to town.’ Oh, isn’t
it like it!”

It was. And the exaltation and thrill of it got into
their young blood and made them feel as if they walked
on air, and that every passing human thing meant, some-
how, life and strength to them.

Their appetites were sharpened by the morning air, and
they consulted as to what their breakfast should be. They



86 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



had no money to spend at restaurants, and every penny
must be weighed and calculated.

“Let's walk on,” said Meg, “until we see a bakery that
looks as if it was kept by poor people. Then we can buy
some bread, and eat it with our eggs somewhere.”

‘All right,” said Robin.

They marched boldly on. The crowd jostled them, and _
there was so much noise that they could hardly hear each
other speak ; but ah! how the sun shone, and how the pen-
nons fluttered and streamed on every side, and how excited
and full of living the people’s faces looked! It seemed
splendid, only to be alive in such a world on such a morn-
ing. The sense of the practical which had suggested that
they should go to a small place led them into the side
streets. They passed all the big shops without a glance,
but at last Meg: stopped before a small one.

‘There's a woman in there,” she said; “I just saw her
fora minute. She has a nice face. She looked as if she
might be good-natured. Let’s go in there, Robin. It’s
quite a small place.” .

They went in. It was a small place but a clean one,
and .the woman had a good-natured face. She was a
German, and was broad and _ placid and comfortable.
They bought some fresh rolls from her, and as she served
them, and was making the change, Meg watched her
anxiously. She was thinking that she did look very peace-
able, indeed. So, instead of turning away from the counter,



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 87



she planted herself directly before her and asked her a
question.

“Tf you please,” she said, ‘““we have some hard-boiled
eggs to eat with our bread, and we are not going home.
If we are very careful, would you mind if we ate our break-
fast in here, instead of outside? We won't let any of the
crumbs or shells drop on the floor.”

“You not going home?” said the woman. ‘You from
out town?”

“Yes,” answered Meg.

“You look like you wass goun to der Fair,” said the
woman, with a good-tempered smile. ‘Who wass with
you?”

‘““No one,” said Robin. ‘We are going alone. But
we're all right.”

‘““My crayshious!” said the woman. ‘ But you wass
young for that. But your ’Merican childrens is queer ones.
Yes! You can sit down an’ eat your bregfast. That
make no matter to me if you is careful. You can sit
down.”

There were two chairs near a little table, where, per-
haps, occasional customers ate buns, and they sat down to
their rolls and eggs and salt, as to a feast.

“T was hungry,” said Rob, cracking his fourth egg.

“So was I!” said Meg, feeling that her fresh roll was
very delicious. :

It was a delightful breakfast. The German woman



88 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS





watched them with placid curiosity as they ate it. She
had been a peasant in her own country, and had lived in a
village among rosy, stout, and bucolic little Peters and
Gretchens, who were not given to enterprise, and the
American child was a revelation to her. And somehow,
also, these two had an attraction all American children had
not. They looked so well able to take care of themselves,
and yet had such good manners and no air of self-impor-
tance at all. They ate their rolls and hard-boiled eggs
with all the gusto of very young appetite, but they evi-
dently meant to keep their part of the bargain, and leave
her no crumbs and shells to sweep up. The truth was that
they were perfectly honorable little souls, and had a sense
of justice. They were in the midst of their breakfast,
when they were rather startled by hearing her voice from
the end of the counter where she had been standing, lean-
ing against the wall, her arms folded.

“You like a cup coffee?” she asked.

They both looked round, uncertain what to say, not
knowing whether or not that she meant that she sold coffee.
They exchanged rather disturbed glances, and then Robin
answered,

“We can’t afford it, thank you, ma’am,” he said, ‘‘we’ve
got so little money.”

‘“Never mind,” she astonished them by answering, “that
cost me nothing. There some coffee left on the back of
the stove from my man’s bregfast. I give you each a cup.”



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7 s “STORY. OF THE CITY BEAUTIFUL
ok oe by :
|-Frances ‘Hodgson Burnett
The Baldwin Library

RmB



TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS
MRS. BURNETT'S FAMOUS JUVENILES.

Peon AND OTHER CHILD STORIES.



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The other stories in

the book have the charm of their predecessor in material and manner. . . . A delightful volume, in fair
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| lee LORD FAUNTLEROY.



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IOVANNI AND THE OTHER.

CHILDREN Wuo Have Mabe Stories.



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Sy CREWE.



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« Everybody was in love with ‘ Little Lord
Fauntleroy,’ and I think all the world and the
rest of mankind will be in love with ‘Sara Crewe.
The tale is so tender, so wise,so human, that 1
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LouisE CHANDLER MOULTON,

a SAINT ELIZABETH,

Anp OTHER STORIES.



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“ The pretty tale has for its heroine a little
French girl brought up in an old chateau in Nor-
mandy by an aunt who is a recluse and a devote.
A child of this type transplanted suddenly to the
realistic atmosphere of New York must tnevitably
have much to suffer. The quaint little figure
blindly trying to guess the riddle of duty under
these unfamiliar conditions is pathetic,and Mrs.
Burnett touches it in with delicate strokes,’—

Susan Coo.ipGE.

Illustrated by REGINALD B. BIRCH.






ME TRUE,

M HAD CO

THEIR DREA
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS
A STORY OF THE CITY BEAUTIFUL

BY

FRANCES HODGSON BURNETT



NEW-YORK
CHARLES SCRIBNER’S SONS
1895
Copyright, 1895, by

CHARLES SCRIBNER’S SONS.

Press of J. J. Little & Co.
Astor Place. New York
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

FROM DRAWINGS BY REGINALD B&B. BIRCH

Their dream bad come true. . 2. 6 2 we ew we Frontispiece
“Everything in the world,’’ said Robin . ... . Page 13
«© Aunt Matilda,” she said, suddenly . . . . . . “ 3l
- Meg looked rather like a little witch. . . . . ss “ 61
“ls this the train to Chicago?” said Robin . . . . “ 73
“You like a cup coffee ?’’ ‘she asked. . ww wee “ 89
“Now we are in Venice” . . 1 6 6 ew we “ 101
“Well, Jem!” she exclaimed re “ III
He was looking at ber in an absent, miserable way . . “ 117
“* To—to—the Fair?’’ he said, tremulously . . . . “ 131
“Take me with yous’. 6 6 ww ee ee “ 143

“It’s a queer sight,’ she said to John Holt . . . . a 179
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

1

HE sun had set, and the shadows were deepening in
‘| the big barn. The last red glow—the very last bit
which reached the corner the children called the
Straw Parlor—had died away, and Meg drew her knees up
higher, so as to bring the pages of her book nearer to her
eyes as the twilight deepened, and it became harder to read.
It was her bitterest grievance that this was what always
happened when she became most interested and excited—
the light began to fade away, and the shadows to fill all
the corners and close in about her.

She frowned as it happened now—a fierce little frown
which knitted her childish black brows as she pored over
her book, devouring the page, with the determination to
seize on as much as was possible. It was like running a
desperate race with the darkness.

She was a determined child, and no one would have
2 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

failed to guess as much who could have watched her for a
few moments as she sat on her curious perch, her cheeks
supported by her hands, her shock of straight black hair
tumbling over her forehead.

The Straw Parlor was the top of a straw stack in Aunt
Matilda’s barn. Robin had discovered it one day by climb-
ing a ladder which had been left leaning against the stack,
and when he had found himself on the top of it he had
been enchanted by the feeling it gave him of being so high
above the world, and had called Meg up to share it with
him.

She had been even more enchanted than he.

They both hated the world down below—Aunt Matilda’s
world—which seemed hideous and exasperating and sordid
to them in its contrast to the world they had lived in before
their father and mother had died, and they had been sent to
their sole relation, who did not want them, and only took
them in from respect to public opinion. Three years they
had been with Aunt Matilda, and each week had seemed
more unpleasant than the last. Mrs. Matilda Jennings was
a renowned female farmer of Illinois, and she was far too
energetic a manager and business woman to have time to
spend on children. She had an enormous farm, and man-
aged it herself with a success and ability which made her
celebrated in agricultural papers. If she had not given her
dead brother's children a home, they would have starved or
been sent to the poorhouse. Accordingly, she gave them
,

TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 3



food to eat and beds to sleep in, but she scarcely ever had
time to notice them. If she had had time to talk to them,
she had nothing to say. She cared for nothing but crops
and new threshing-machines and fertilizers, and they knew
nothing about such things.

“She never says anything but ‘Go to bed,’ ‘Keep out of
‘the way.’ She’s not like a woman at all,” Meg commented
once, “she’s like a man in woman’s clothes.”

Their father had been rather like a woman in man’s
clothes. He was a gentle little, slender man, with a large
head. He had always been poor, and Mrs. Matilda Jen-
nings had regarded him as a contemptible failure. He had
had no faculty for business or farming. He had taught
school, and married a school teacher. They had had a
small house, but somehow it had been as cosey as it was tiny.
They had managed to surround themselves with an atmos-
phere of books, by buying the cheap ones they could afford
and borrowing the expensive ones from friends and circu-
lating libraries. The twins—Meg and Robin—had heard
stories and read books all the first years of their lives, as
they sat in their little seats by the small, warm fireside. In
Aunt Matilda’s bare, cold house there was not a book to
be seen. A few agricultural papers were scattered about.
Meals were hurried over as necessary evils. The few people
who appeared on the scene were farmers, who talked about
agricultural implements and the wheat market.

“Tt’s such a bare place,” Robin used to say, and he
4 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

would drive his hands into the depths of his pockets and
set his square little jaw, and stare before him.

Both the twins had that square little jaw. Neither of
them looked like their father and mother, except that from
their mother they inherited black hair. Robin’s eyes were
black, but Meg’s were gray, with thick black lashes. They
were handsome little creatures, but their shocks of straight
black hair, their straight black brows and square little jaws,
made them look curiously unlike other children. They
both remembered one winter evening, when, as they sat on
their seat by the fire, their father, after looking at them
with a half smile for a moment or so, began to laugh.

“Margaret,” he said to their mother, “do you know
who those two are like? You have heard me speak of
Matilda often enough.”

“Oh, Robert!” she exclaimed, ‘‘surely they are not like
Matilda ?”

‘Well, perhaps it is too much to say they are like her,”
he answered, “but there is something in their faces that
reminds me of her strongly. I don’t know what it is
exactly, but it is there. It is a good thing, perhaps,” with
a queer tone in his voice. ‘ Matilda always did what she
made up her mind to do. Matilda was a success. I was
always a failure.”

-“ Ah, no, Bob,” she said, “not a failure !”

She had put her hand on his shoulder, and he lifted it .

and pressed it against his thin cheek.
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 5



“Wasn't I, Maggie?” he said, gently, “wasn’t I?
Well, I think these two will be like Matilda in making up
their minds and getting what they want.”

Before the winter was over Robin and Meg were
orphans, and were with Aunt Matilda, and there they had
been ever since.

Until the day they found the Straw Parlor it had seemed
as if no corner in the earth belonged to them. Meg slept
on a cot in a woman servant’s room, Robin shared a room
with some one else. Nobody took any notice of them.

“When any one meets us anywhere,” Meg said, “they
always look surprised. Dogs who are not allowed in the
house are like us. The only difference is that they don’t
drive us out. But we are just as much in the way.”

“T know,” said Robin; “if it wasn’t for you, Meg, I
should run away.”

“Where?” said Meg.

“Somewhere,” said Robin, setting his jaw; “I’d find a
place.”

“Tf it wasn’t for you,’
that I should walk into the river. I wouldn’t stand it.” It

‘said Meg, “I should be so lonely

is worth noticing that she did not say “I cow/d¢ not stand it.”

But after the day they found the Straw Parlor they had
an abiding-place. It was Meg who preémpted it before
she had been on the top of the stack five minutes. After
she had stumbled around, looking about her, she stopped
short, and looked down into the barn.
6 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

“Robin,” she said, ‘this is another world. We are
miles and miles away from Aunt Matilda. Let us make
this into our home—just yours and mine—and live here.”

“We are in nobody’s way—nobody will even know
where we are,” said Robin. ‘‘ Nobody ever asks, you know.
Meg, it will be just like our own. We will live here.” And
so they did. On fine days, when they were tired of playing,
they climbed the ladder to rest on the heap of yellow straw ;
on wet days they lay and told each other stories, or built
caves, or read their old favorite books over again. The
stack was a very high one, and the roof seemed like a sort
of big tent above their heads, and the barn floor a wonder-
ful, exaggeratedly long, distance below. The birds who had
nests in the rafters became accustomed to them, and one of
the children’s chief entertainments was to lie and watch the
mothers and fathers carry on their domestic arrangements,
feeding their young ones, and quarrelling a little sometimes
about the way to bring them up. The twins invented a
weird little cry, with which they called each other, if one
was in the Straw Parlor and the other one entered the barn,
to find out whether it was occupied or not. They never
mounted to the Straw Parlor, or descended from it, if any
one was within sight. This was their secret. They wanted
to feel that it was very high, and far away from Aunt
Matilda’s world, and if any one had known where they were,,
or had spoken to them from below, the charm would have
been broken. :
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 7

This afternoon, as Meg pored over her book, she was
waiting for Robin. He had been away all day. At twelve
years old Robin was not of a light mind. When he had
been only six years old he had had serious plans. He had
decided that he would be a great inventor. He had also
decided—a little later—that he would not be poor, like
his father, but would be very rich. He had begun by
having a savings bank, into which he put rigorously every
penny that was given to him. He had been so quaintly
systematic about it that people were amused, and gave
him pennies instead of candy and toys. He kept a little
banking book of his own. If he had been stingy he would
have been a very unpleasant little boy, but he was only
strict with himself. He was capable of taking from his
capital to do the gentlemanly thing by Meg at Christmas.
“He has the spirit of the financier, that is all,” said his
father. .

Since he had been with Aunt Matilda he had found
opportunities to earn a trifle rather frequently. On the
big place there were small, troublesome duties the farm
hands found he could be relied on to do, which they were
willing to pay for. They found out that he never failed
them. | :

“Smart little chap,” they said; ‘always up to time when
he undertakes a thing.”

To-day he had been steadily at work under the head
man. Aunt Matilda had no objection to his odd jobs.
8 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

“He has his living to earn, and he may as well begin,”
she said.

So Meg had been alone since morning. She had only
one duty to perform, and then she was free. The first
spring they had been with Aunt Matilda Robin had in-
vested in a few chickens, and their rigorous care of them
had resulted in such success that the chickens had become
a sort of centre of existence to them. They could always
have any dreams of the future upon the fortune to be gained
by chickens. You could calculate on bits of paper about
chickens and eggs until your head whirled at the magnitude
of your prospects. Meg’s duty was to feed them, and show
them scrupulous attentions when Robin was away.

After she had attended to them she went to the barn,
and, finding it empty, climbed up to the Straw Parlor with

”

an old “ Pilgrim’s Progress,” to spend the day.

This afternoon, when the light began to redden and then
to die away, she and Christian were very near the gates.
She longed so to go in with him, and was yearning towards
them with breathless eagerness, when she heard Robin’s cry
below, coming up from the barn floor.

She sprang up with a start, feeling bewildered a second,
before she answered. The City Beautiful was such millions
—such millions of miles away from Aunt Matilda’s barn..
She found herself breathing quickly and rubbing her eyes,
as she heard Robin hurrying up the ladder.
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 9





Somehow she felt as if he was rather in a hurry, and
when his small, black shock head and wide-awake black
eyes appeared above the straw she had a vague feeling that
he was excited, and that he had come from another world.
He clambered on to the stack and made his way to her, and
threw himself full length on the straw at her side.

“Meg!” he said—‘ Hallo, you look as if you were in a
dream! Wake up!—Jones and Jerry are coming to the
barn—I hurried to get here before them; they’re talking
about something I want you to hear—something new!
Wake up!”

“Oh, Robin!” said Meg, clutching her book and com-
ing back to earth with a sigh, “I don’t want to hear Jones
and Jerry. I don’t want to hear any of the people down
there. I’ve been reading the ‘ Pilgrim’s Progress,’ and I do
wish—I do so wsh there was a City Beautiful.”

Robin gave a queer little laugh. He really was excited.

“There is going to be one,” he said. “ Jones and Jerry
don’t really know it, but it is something like that they are
talking about; a City Beautiful—a real one—on this earth,
and not a hundred miles away. Let’s get near the edge
and listen.”
10 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



I]

HEY drew as near to the edge as they could without
| being seen. They did not understand in the least.
Robin was not given to practical jokes, but what he
had said sounded rather as if there was a joke somewhere.
But she saw Jones and Jerry enter the barn, and saw,
before they entered, that they were deep in talk. It was
Jones who was speaking. Jones was Aunt Matilda’s head
man, and was an authority on many things.

“ There’s been exhibitions and fairs all over the world,”
he was saying, “but there’s been nothing like what this will
be. It will be a city, that’s what it will be, and all the
world is going to be in it. They are going to build it front-
ing on the water, and bank the water up into lakes and
canals, and build places like white palaces beside them, and
decorate the grounds with statues and palms and flowers
and fountains, and there’s not a country on earth that won't
send things to fill the buildings. And there won't be any-
thing a man can’t see by going through ’em. It'll be as
good as a college course to spend a week there.”

Meg drew a little closer to Robin in the straw.

‘What are they talking about?” she whispered.

“Listen,” said Bob.
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS II



Jerry, who was moving about at some work below, gave
a chuckling laugh.

“Trust "em to do the biggest thing yet, or bust, them
Chicago people,” he said. “It’s got to be the biggest thing
—a Chicago Fair.”

“It’s not goin’ to be the Chicago Fain” Jones said.
. They re not goin’ to put up with no such idea as that ;
its the World’s Fair. They're going to ring in the
universe.”

“That’s Chicago out an’ out,” said Jerry. ‘ Buildin’s:
twenty stories high, an’ the thermometer twenty-five degrees
below zero, an’ a World’s Fair. Christopher Columbus!
I'd like to see it!”

‘““T bet Christopher Columbus would like to see it,” said
Jones. “It’s out of compliment to him they’re getting it
up—for discovering Chicago.”

“Well, I didn’t know he made his name that way par-
ticlar,” said Jerry. ‘Thought what he prided hisself on
was discoverin’ America.”

”

“Same thing,” said Jones, “same thing! Wouldn’t have
had much to blow about, and have statues set up, and comic
operas written about him, if it had only been America he’d
discovered. Chicago does him full credit, and she’s goin’
to give him a send-off that'll be a credit to her.”

Robin smothered a little laugh in his coat-sleeve. He
was quite used to hearing jokes about Chicago. The peo-

ple in the country round it were enormously proud of it,
12 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



and its great schemes and great buildings and multi-million-
naires, but those who were given to jokes had the habit of
being jocular about it, just as they had the habit of pro-
claiming and dwelling upon its rush and wealth and enter-
prise. But Meg was not a jocular person. She was too
intense and easily excited. She gave Robin an impatient
nudge with her elbow, not in reproof, but as a sort of irre-
pressible ejaculation.

“T wish they wouldn’t be funny,” she exclaimed. “I
want them to tell more about it. I wish they'd go on.”

But they did not go on; at least, not in any way that
was satisfactory. They only remained in the barn a short
time longer, and they were busy with the work they had
come to do. Meg craned her neck and listened, but they
did not tell more, and she was glad when they went away,
so that she could turn to Robin.

“Don’t you know more than that?” she said. “Is it
true? What have you heard? Tell me yourself.”

“Tye heard a lot to-day,” said Robin. ‘They were
all talking about it all the time, and I meant to tell you
myself, only I saw Jones and Jerry coming, and thought,
perhaps, we should hear something more if we listened.”

They clambered over to their corner and made them-
selves comfortable. Robin lay on his back, but Meg leaned
on her elbows, as usual, with her cheeks resting on her
hands. Her black elf-locks hung over her forehead, and
her big eyes shone.


”

‘* EVERYTHING IN THE WORLD,” SAID ROBIN,
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 15.

‘“Rob,” she said, ‘go on. What’s-the rest ?”

“The rest!” he said. “It would take a week to tell it
all, I should think. But it’s going to be the most wonder-
ful thing in the world. They are going to build a place
that will be like a white, beautiful city, on the borders of
the lake—that was why I called it the City Beautiful. It

”

won't be on the top of a hill, of course



“But if it is on the edge of the lake, and the sun shines
and the big water is blue and there are shining white palaces,
it will be better, I believe,” said Meg. “What is going to
be in the city?”

“Everything in the world,” said Robin. “Things from
everywhere—from every country.”

‘There are a great many countries,” said Meg. “You
know how it is in the geography. Europe, Asia, and Africa,
as well as America. Spain and Portugal and France and
England—and Sweden and Norway and Russia and Lap-
land—and India—and Italy—and Switzerland, and all the
others.”

“There will be things—and_ people—brought from them
all. I heard them say so. They say there will be villages,
with people walking about in them.”

“Do they walk about when they are at home?” ex-
claimed Meg.

‘Yes, in the queer clothes they wear in their own coun-
tries. There’s going to be an Esquimaux village.”

“With dogs and sledges?” cried Meg, lifting her head.
16 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS





- “Yes; and you know that place in Italy where the streets

+s



are made of water
“Tt’s Venice,” said Meg. ‘And they go about in boats
called gondolas.”
“And the men who take them about are called gondo-

’

liers,” interrupted Robin. ‘And they have scarfs and red
caps, and push their boats along with poles. There will be
gondolas at the Fair, and people can get into them and
go about the canals.”

“Just as they do in Venice?” Meg gasped.

“Just as they do in Venice. And it will be the same
with all the other countries. It will be as if they were all
brought there—Spanish places and Egyptian places and
German places—and French and Italian and Irish and
Scotch and English—and all the others.”

“To go there would be like travelling all over the
world,” cried Meg.

“Yes,” said Rob, excitedly. ‘And all the trades will be
there, and all the machines—and inventions—and pictures—
and books—and statues—and scientific things—and won-
derful things—and everything any one wants to learn about
in all the world!”

In his excitement, his words had become so rapid that
they almost tumbled over each other, and he said the last
sentence in a rush. There were red spots on his cheeks,
and a queer look in his black eyes. He had been listening
to descriptions of this thing all day. A new hand, hot from
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 17



the excitement in Chicago, had been among the workers.
Apparently he had heard of nothing else, thought of noth-
ing else, talked of nothing else, and dreamed of nothing
else but the World’s Fair for weeks. Finding himself
among people who had only bucolic and vague ideas about
it, he had poured forth all he knew, and being a rather good
talker, had aroused great excitement. Robin had listened
with eyes and ears wide open. He was a young human
being, born so full of energy and enterprise that the dull,
prosaic emptiness of his life in Aunt Matilda’s world had
been more horrible than he had been old enough to realize.
He could not have explained why it had seemed so madden-
ing to him, but the truth was that in his small, boyish body
was imprisoned the force and ability which in manhood build
great schemes, and not only build, but carry them out. In
him was imprisoned one of the great business men, invent-
ors, or political powers of the newcentury. | But of this he
knew nothing, and so ate his young heart out in Aunt
Matilda’s world, sought refuge with Meg in the Straw
Parlor, and was bitterly miserable and at a loss.

How he had drunk in every word the man from Chicago
had uttered! How he had edged near to him and tried not
to lose him fora moment! How he had longed for Meg to
listen with him, and had hoarded up every sentence! If he
had not been a man in embryo, and a strong and clear-
headed creature; he would have done his work badly. But
he never did his work badly. He held on like a little bull-

2
18 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



dog, and thought of what Meg would say when they sat in
the straw together. Small wonder that he looked excited
when his black head appeared above the edge of the straw.
He was wrought up to the highest pitch. Small wonder that
there were deep red spots on his cheeks, and that there was
a queer, intense look in his eyes, and about his obstinate
little mouth.

He threw up his arms with a desperate gesture.

“Everything,” he said again, staring straight before him,
“that any one could want to learn about—everything in
all the world.”

“Oh, Robin!” said Meg, in quite a fierce little voice,
“and we—we shall never see it!”

She saw Robin clinch his hands, though he said nothing,
and it made her clinch her own hands. Robin’s were tough
little, square-fingered fists, brown and muscular; Meg’s
hands were long-fingered, flexible, and slender, but they
made good little fists when they doubled themselves up.

“Rob,” she said, ‘we never see anything! We never
hear anything! We never learn anything! If something
doesn’t happen we shall be Nothings—that’s what we shall
be—Nothings!” And she struck her fist upon the straw.

Rob's jaw began to look very square, but he did not
speak.

‘“We are twelve years old,” Meg went on. ‘ We've been
here three years, and we don’t know one thing we didn’t
know when we came here. If we had been with father and
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 19

mother we should have been learning things all the time.
We haven't one thing of our own, Rob, but the chickens
and the Straw Parlor—and the Straw Parlor might be taken
away from us.”

Rob’s square jaw relaxed just sufficiently to allow of a
grim little grin.

“We've got the Treasure, Meg,” he said.

Meg’s laugh had rather a hysterical sound. That she
should not have mentioned the Treasure among their
belongings was queer. They talked so much about the
Treasure. At this moment it-was buried in an iron bank,
deep in the straw, about four feet from where they sat. It
was the very bank Robin had hoarded his savings in when
he had begun at six years old with pennies, and a ten-cent
blank-book to keep his accounts in. Everything they had
owned since then had béen pushed and dropped into it—
all the chicken and egg money, and all Robin had earned
by doing odd jobs for any one who would give him one.
Nobody knew about the old iron bank any more than they
knew about the Straw Parlor, and the children, having
buried it in the straw, called it the Treasure. Meg's stories
about it were numerous and wonderful. Sometimes magi-
cians came, and multiplied it a hundred-fold. Sometimes
robbers stole it, and they themselves gave chase, and sought
it with wild adventure; but perhaps the most satisfactory
thing was to invent ways to spend it when it had grown
to enormous proportions, Sometimes they bought a house
20 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



in New York, and lived there together. Sometimes they
traded in foreign lands with it. Sometimes they bought
land, which increased in value to such an extent that they
were millionnaires in a month. Ah! it was a treasure
indeed.

After the little, low, over-strained laugh, Meg folded her
arms on the straw and hid her face in them. Robin looked
at her with a troubled air for about a minute. Then he
spoke to her.

“It’s no use doing that,” he said.

“It’s no use doing anything,” Meg answered, her voice
muffled in her arms. ‘I don’t want to do this any more
than you do. We're so lonely!”

“Yes, we're lonely,” said Robin, ‘that’s a fact.” And
he stared up at the dark rafters above him, and at some
birds who were clinging to them and twittering about a
nest.

“T said I wished there was a City Beautiful,” Meg said,
‘but it seems to make it worse that there is going to be
something like it so near, and that we should never get any
nearer to it than a hundred miles.”

Rob sat up, and locked his hands together round his
knees.

‘How do you know ?” he said.

‘How do I know?” cried Meg, desperately, and she
lifted her head, turning her wet face sideways to look at
him. He unlocked his hands to give his forehead a hard
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 21



rub, as if he were trying either to rub some thought out of
or into it.

“Just because we are lonely there zs use in doing
things,” he said. ‘“ There’s nobody to do them for us. At
any rate, we've got as far on the way to the City as the
bottom of the Hill of Difficulty.”

And he gave his forehead another rub and looked
straight before him, and Meg drew a little closer to him
on the straw, and the family of birds filled the silence with

domestic twitters.
22 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



Ill

URING the weeks that followed they spent more
1) time than ever in their hiding-place. They had an
absorbing topic of conversation, a new and won-
derful thing, better than their old books, even better than
the stories Meg made when she lay on the straw, her el-
bows supporting her, her cheeks on her hands, and her
black-lashed gray eyes staring into space. Hers were
always good stories, full of palaces and knights and robber
chiefs and fairies. But this new thing had the thrill of
being a fairy story which was real—so real that one could
read about it in the newspapers, and everybody was talking
about it, even Aunt Matilda, her neighbors, and the work-
hands on the farm. To the two lonely children, in their
high nest in the straw-stack, it seemed a curious thing to
hear these people in the world below talk about it in their
ordinary, everyday way, without excitement or awe, as if it
was a new kind of big ploughing or winnowing machine.
To them it was a thing so beautiful that they could scarcely
find the words to express their thoughts and dreams about
it, and yet they were never alone together without trying to
do so.
On wet, cheerless days, in which they huddled close to-
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 23

gether in their nest to keep from being chilled, it was their
‘comfort to try toimagine and paint pictures of the various
wonders until, in their interest, they forgot the dampness of
the air, and felt the unending patter of the rain-drops on
the barn roof merely a pleasant.sort of accompaniment to
the stories of their fancies.

Since the day when they had listened to Jones and Jerry
joking, down below them in the barn, Rob had formed the
habit of collecting every scrap of newspaper relating to the
wonder. He cut paragraphs out of Aunt Matilda’s cast-
aside newspapers; he begged them from the farm-hands
and from the country store-keepers. Anything in the form
of an illustration he held as a treasure beyond price, and
hoarded it to bring to Meg with exultant joy.

How they pored over these things, reading the para-
graphs again and again, until they knew them almost by
heart. How they studied the pictures, trying to gather the
proportions and color of every column and dome and arch!
What enthusiast, living in Chicago itself, knew the marvel
as they did, and so dwelt on and revelled in its beauties!
No one knew of their pleasure ; like the Straw Parlor, it was
their secret. The strangeness of their lives lay in the fact
that absolutely no one knew anything about them at all, or
asked anything, thinking it quite sufficient that their friend-
lessness was supplied with enough animal heat and nour-
ishment to keep their bodies alive.

Of that other part of them—their restless, growing
24 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



young brains and naturally craving hearts, which in their
own poor enough but still human little home had at least
been recognized and cared for—Aunt Matilda knew noth-
ing, and, indeed, had never given a thought to it. She had
not undertaken the care of intelligences and affections ; her
own were not of an order to require supervision. She was
too much occupied with her thousand-acre farm, and the
amazing things she was doing with it. That the children
could read and write and understood some arithmetic she
knew. She had learned no more herself, and had found it
enough to build her fortune upon. She had never known
what it was to feel lonely and neglected, because she was a
person quite free from affections and quite enough for
herself. She never suspected that others could suffer from
a weakness of which she knew nothing, because it had
never touched her.

If any one had told her that these two children, who ate
her plentiful, rough meals at her table, among field-hands
and servants, were neglected and lonely, and that their dim
knowledge of it burned in their childish minds, she would
have thought the announcement a piece of idle, sentimental
folly; but that no solid detail of her farming was a fact
more real than this one was the grievous truth.

“When we were at home,” was Meg’s summing-up of
the situation, ‘(at least we belonged to somebody. We
were poor, and wore our clothes a long time, and had
shabby shoes, and couldn’t go on excursions, but we had
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 25



our little bench by the fire, and father and mother used to
talk to us and let us read their books and papers, and try
to teach us things. I don’t know what we were going to
be when we grew up, but we were going to do some sort of
work, and know as much as father and mother did. I don’t
know whether that was a great deal or not, but it was
something.”

“It was enough to teach school,” said Robin. ‘If we
were not so far out in the country now, I believe Aunt
Matilda would let us go to school if we asked her. It
wouldn't cost her anything if we went to the public school.”

‘She wouldn’t if we didn’t ask her,” said Meg. ‘She
would never think of it herself. Do you know what I was
thinking yesterday. I was looking at the pigs in their sty.
Some of them were eating, and one was full, and was lying
down going to sleep. And I said to myself, ‘Robin and I
are just like you. We live just like you. We eat our food
and go to bed, and get up again and eat some more food.
We don’t learn anything more than you do, and we are not
worth as much to anybody. We are not even worth killing
at Christmas.’”

If they had never known any other life, or if nature had
not given them the big, questioning eyes and square little
- jaws and strong, nervous little fists, they might have been
content to sink into careless idleness and apathy. No one
was actively unkind to them; they had their Straw Parlor,
and were free to amuse themselves as they chose. But they
26 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



had been made of the material of which the world’s workers
are built, and their young hearts were full of a restlessness
and longing whose full significance they themselves did not
comprehend.

And this wonder working in the world beyond them—
this huge, beautiful marvel, planned by the human brain and
carried out by mere human hands; this great thing with
which all the world seemed to them to be throbbing, and
which seemed to set no limit to itself and prove that there
was no limit to the power of human wills and minds—this
filled them with a passion of restlessness and yearning
greater than they had ever known before.

“Tt is an enchanted thing, you know, Robin—it’s an
enchanted thing,” Meg said one day, looking up from her
study of some mewspaper clippings and a magazine with
some pictures in it.

“Tt seems like it,” said Robin.

“Tm sure it’s enchanted,” Meg went on. ‘It seems so
tremendous that people should think they could do such
huge things. As if they felt as if they could do anything
or bring anything from anywhere in the world. It almost
frightens me sometimes, because it reminds me of the Tower
of Babel. Don’t you remember how the people got so
proud that they thought they could do anything, and they
began to build the tower that was to reach to heaven; and
then they all woke up one morning and found they were all
speaking different languages and could not understand each
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 27



other. Suppose everybody was suddenly struck like that
some morning now—I mean the Fair people !” widening her
eyes with a little shiver.

“They won't be,” said Rob. ‘Those things have
stopped happening.”

“Ves, they have,” said Meg. ‘Sometimes I wish they
hadn’t. If they hadn’t, perhaps—perhaps if we made burnt
offerings, we might be taken by a miracle to see the World's
Fair.”

“We haven’t anything to burn,” said Rob, rather
gloomily. — :

“We've got the chickens,” Meg answered as gloomily,
“but it wouldn’t do any good. Miracles are over.”

“The world is all different,” said Robin. ‘‘ You have to
do your miracle yourself.”

“Tt will be a miracle,” Meg said, “if we ever get away
from Aunt Matilda’s world, and live like people instead of
like pigs who are comfortable—and we shall have to perform
it ourselves.”

“There is no one else,” said Robin. ‘You see, there is
no one else in the world.”

He threw out his hand and it clutched Meg’s, which was
lying in the straw near him. He did not know why he
clutched it—he did not in the least know why; nor did she
know why a queer sound in his voice suddenly made her feel
their unfriendedness in a way that overwhelmed her. She
found herself looking at him, with a hard lump rising in her
28 - TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



throat. It was one of the rainy days, and the hollow drum-
ming and patter of the big drops on the roof seemed some-
how to shut them in with their loneliness away from all the
world. :

“Tt’s a strange thing,” she said, almost under her breath,
“to be two children, only just twelve years old, and to be
quite by ourselves in such a big world, where there are such
millions and millions of people all busy doing things and
making great plans, and none of them knowing about us, or
caring what we are going to do.”

“Tf we work our miracle ourselves,” said Rob, holding
her hand quite tight, “it will be better than having it
worked for us. Meg!”—as if he were beginning a new sub-
ject—“ Meg !”

“What?” she answered, still feeling the hard lump in
her throat.

“Do you think we are going to stay here always?”

“Toh, Robin, I don’t know.”

“Well, I do, then. We are zo¢—and that’s the first step
up the Hill of Difficulty.”
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 29

IV

LL their lives the children had acted in unison.
When they had been tiny creatures they had played
the same games and used the same toys. It had

seemed of little importance that their belongings were
those of a boy and girl. When Robin had played with
tops and marbles, Meg had played with them too. When
Meg had been in a domestic and maternal mood, and had
turned to dolls and dolls’ housekeeping, Robin had assumed
some masculine rdle connected with the amusement. It
had entertained him as much at times to be the dolls’ doc-
tor, or the carpenter who repaired the dolls’ furniture or
made plans for the enlargement of the dolls’ house, as it
had entertained Meg to sew the flags and dress the sailors
who manned his miniature ships, and assist him with the
tails of his kites. They had had few playmates, and
had pleased each other far better than outsiders could
have done.
~“Tt’s because we are twins,” Meg said. ‘Twins are
made alike, and so they like the same things. I’m glad
I’m a twin. If I had to be born again and be an wz-twin
I’m sure I should be lonely.”
“T don’t think it matters whether you are a boy or a
30 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS —



girl, if you are a twin,” said Robin. ‘ You are part of the
other one, and so it’s as if you were both.”

They had never had secrets from each other. They
had read the same books as they grew older, been thrilled
by the same stories, and shared in each other's plans and
imaginings or depressions. So it was a curious thing that
at this special time, when they were drawn nearest to one
another by an unusual interest and sympathy, there should
have arrived a morning when each rose with a thought
unshared by the other.

Aunt Matilda was very busy that day. She was always
busy, but this morning seemed more actively occupied than
usual. She never appeared to sit down, unless to dispose
of a hurried meal or go over some accounts. She was a
wonderful woman, and the twins knew that the most ob-
jectionable thing they could do was not to remove them-
selves after a repast was over; but this morning Meg
walked over to a chair and firmly sat down in it, and
watched her as she vigorously moved things about, rubbed
dust off them, and put them in their right places.

Meg’s eyes were fixed on her very steadily. She won-
dered if it was true that she and Robin were like her, and
if they would be more like her when they had reached her
age, and what would have happened to them before that
time came. It was true that Aunt Matilda had a square
jaw also. It was not an encouraging thing to contemplate ;
in fact, as she looked at her, Meg felt her heart begin a
by #



















































_‘* AUNT MATILDA,” SHE SAID, SUDDENLY.
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 33



slow and steady thumping. But, as it thumped, she was
getting herself in hand with such determination that when
she at last spoke her chin looked very square indeed, and
her black-lashed eyes were as nearly stern as a child’s eyes
can look.

“Aunt Matilda,” she said, suddenly.

“Well?” and a tablecloth was whisked off and shaken.

“T want to talk to you.”

“Talk in.a hurry, then. I’ve no time to waste in talk.”

“How old were you when you began to work and
make money?”

Aunt Matilda smiled grimly.

“T worked out for my board when I was ten years old,”
she said. ‘‘Me and your father were left orphans, and we
had to work, or starve. When I was twelve I got a place
to wash dishes and look after children and run errands, and
-I got a dollar a week because it was out in the country, and
girls wouldn't stay there.”

“Do you know how old / am?” asked» Meg.

“ve forgotten.”

“I’m twelve years old.” She got up from her chair and
walked across the room, and stood looking up at Aunt
Matilda. ‘I’m an orphan too, and so is Robin,” she said,
“and we have to work. You give us a place to stay in;
but—there are other things. We have no one, and we
have to do things ourselves; and we are twelve, and
twelve is a good age for people who have to do things for
34 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

themselves. Is there anything in this house or in the
dairy or on the farm that would be worth wages, that I
could do? I don’t care how hard it is if I can do it.”

If Aunt Matilda had been a woman of sentiment she
might have been moved by the odd, unchildish tenseness and
sternness of the little figure, and the straight-gazing eyes,
which looked up at her from under the thick black hair
tumbling in short locks over the forehead. Twelve years
old was very young to stand and stare the world in the face
with such eyes. But she was not a woman of sentiment,
and her life had been spent among people who knew their
right to live could only be won by hard work, and who
began the fight early. So she looked at the child without
any emotion whatever.

‘Do you suppose you could more than earn your bread
if I put you in the dairy and let you help there?” she said.

“Yes,” answered Meg, unflinchingly, “I know I could.
I’m strang for my age, and I’ve watched them doing things
there. I can wash pans and bowls and cloths, and carry
things about, and go anywhere I’m told. I know how clean
things have to be kept.”

“Well,” said Aunt Matilda, looking her over sharply,
‘they've been complaining about the work being too much
for them, lately. You go in there this morning and see
what you can do. You shall have a dollar a week if you’re
worth it. You're right about its being time that you should
begin earning something.”
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 35



“Thank you, ma’am,” said Meg, and she turned round
and walked away in the direction of the dairy, with two deep
red spots on her cheeks and her heart thumping again—
though this time it thumped quickly.

She reached the scene of action in the midst of a rush of
work, and after their first rather exasperated surprise at so
immature and inexperienced a creature being supposed to be
able to help them, the women found plenty for her to do.
She said so few words and looked so little afraid that she
made a sort of impression on them.

“ See,” she said to the head woman, ‘‘Aunt Matilda
didn’t send me to do things that need teaching. Just tell
me the little things, it does not matter what, and I'll do
them. I can.”

-How she worked that morning—how she ran on errands
—how she carried this and that—how she washed and°
scrubbed milk-pans—and how all her tasks were menial
and apparently trivial, though entirely necessary, and how
the activity and rapidity and unceasingness of them tried
her unaccustomed young body, and finally made her limbs
ache and her back feel as if it might break at some unex-
pected moment, Meg never forgot. But such was the des-
peration of her indomitable little spirit and the unconquer-
able will she had been born with, that when it was over she
was no more in the mood for giving up than she had been
when she walked in among the workers after her interview
with Aunt Matilda.
36 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



When dinner-time came she walked up to Mrs. Macart-
ney, the manager of the dairy work, and asked her a
question.

“Have I helped you?” she said.

“Yes, you have,” said the woman, who was by no means
an ill-natured creature for a hard-driven woman. ‘ You've
done first-rate.”

“Will you tell Aunt Matilda that ?” said Meg.

“Ves,” was the answer.

Meg was standing with her-hands clasped tightly behind
her back, and she looked at Mrs. Macartney very straight
and hard from under her black brows.

‘Mrs. Macartney,” she said, “if I’m worth it, Aunt
Matilda will give me a dollar a week ; and it’s time I began
to work for my living. Am I worth that much?”

“Yes, you are,” said Mrs. Macartney, ‘‘if you go on as
you've begun.”

“T shall go on as I’ve begun,” said Meg. ‘Thank you,
ma’am,” and she walked back to the house.

After dinner she waited to speak to Aunt Matilda again.

‘“T went to the dairy,” she said.

“I know you did,” Aunt Matilda answered. “Mrs.
Macartney told me about it. You can goon. I'll give you
the dollar a week.”

She looked the child over again, as she had done in the
morning, but with a shade of expression which might have

meant a touch of added interest. Perhaps her mind paused
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 37



just long enough to bring back to her the time when she
had been a worker at twelve years old, and also had
belonged to no one.

‘She'll make her living,” she said, as she watched Meg
out of the room. ‘She’s more like me than she is like her
father. Robert wasn’t worthless, but he had no push.”

Having made quite sure that she was not wanted in the
dairy for the time being, Meg made her way to the barn.
She was glad to find it empty, so that she could climb the
ladder without waiting. When she reached the top and
clambered over the straw the scent of it seemed delightful
to her. It was like something welcoming her home. She
threw herself down full length in the Straw Parlor. Robin
had not been at dinner. He had gone out early and had
not returned. As she lay, stretching her tired limbs, and
staring up at the nest in the dark, tent-like roof above her,
she hoped he would come. And he did. In about ten
minutes she heard the signal from the barn floor, and
answered it. Robin came up the ladder rather slowly.
When he made his way over the straw to her corner, and
threw himself down beside her, she saw that he was tired
too. They talked a few minutes about ordinary things, and
then Meg thought she would tell him about the dairy. But
it appeared that he had something to tell himself, and he
began first. :

‘“T’ve, been making a plan, Meg,” he said.

“Have you?” said Meg. “What is it?”
38 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

“T’ve been thinking about it for two or three days,” he
went on, “but I thought I wouldn't say anything about it
until—till I tried how it would work.”

Meg raised herself on her elbow and looked at him
curiously. It seemed so queer that he should have hada
plan too.

‘“Have you—tried?” she said.

“Yes,” he answered, “I have been working for Jones
this morning, and I did quite a lot. I worked hard. I
wanted him to see ‘what I could do. And then, Meg, I
asked him if he would take me on—like the rest of the
hands—and pay me what I was worth.”

‘“And what did he say?” breathlessly.

‘““He looked at me a minute—all over—and_ half
laughed, and I thought he was going to say I wasn’t worth
anything. It wouldn’t have been true, but I thought he
might, because I’m only twelve years old. It’s pretty
hard to be only twelve when you want to get work.
But he didn’t, he said, ‘Well, I’m darned if I won't
give you a show;’ and I’m to have a dollar a week.”

“Robin,” Meg cried, with a little gasp of excitement,
“so am I!”

“So are you!” cried Robin, and sat bolt upright.
“ Yous” /

“Tt’s—it’s because we are twins,” said Meg, her eyes
shining like lamps. “I told you twins did things alike
because they couldn’t help it. We have both thought of
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 39



the same thing. I went to Aunt Matilda, asked her to let
me work somewhere and pay me, and she let me go into the
dairy and try, and Mrs. Macartney said I was a help, and
I am to have a dollar a week, if I go on as I’ve begun.”

Robin’s hand gave hers a clutch, just as it had done
before, that day when he had not known why.

“Meg, I believe,” he said, ‘I believe that we two will
always go on as we begin. I believe we were born that
way. We have to, we can't help it. And two dollars a
week, if they keep us, and we save it all—we could go
almost anywhere—sometime.”

Meg’s eyes were fixed on him with a searching, but half
frightened, expression.

“ Almost anywhere,” she said, quite in a whisper.
‘“Anywhere not more than a hundred miles away.” -
40 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

V

HEY did not tell each other of the strange and bold
‘| thought which had leaped up in their minds that day.
Each felt an unwonted shyness about it, perhaps
because it had been so bold; but it had been in each
mind, and hidden though it was, it remained furtively in
both.

They went on exactly as they had begun. Each morn-
ing Meg went to her drudgery in the dairy and Robin
followed Jones whithersoever duty led. If the elder people
had imagined they would get tired and give up they found
out their mistake. That they were often tired was true, but
that in either there arose once the thought of giving up,
never! And they worked hard. The things they did to
earn their weekly stipend would have touched the heart of
a mother of cared-for children, but on Mrs. Jennings’s model
farm people knew how much work a human being could do
when necessity drove. They were all driven by necessity,
and it was nothing new to know that muscles ached and feet
swelled and burned. In fact, they knew no one who did not
suffer, as a rule, from these small inconveniences. And
these children, with their set little faces and mature intelli-
gence, were somehow so unsuggestive of the weakness and
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 41



limitations of childhood that they were often given work
which was usually intrusted only to elder people. Mrs.
Macartney found that Meg never slighted anything, never
failed in a task, and never forgot one, so she gave her
plenty to do. Scrubbing and scouring that others were
glad to shirk fell to her share. She lifted and dragged
things about that grown-up girls grumbled over. What
she lacked in muscle and size she made up in indomitable
will power that made her small face set itself and her small
body become rigid as iron. Her work ended by not con-
fining itself to the dairy, but extended to the house, the



kitchen—anywhere there were tiresome things to be done.

With Robin it was the same story. Jones was not afraid
to give him any order. He was of use in all quarters—in
the huge fields, in the barn, in the stables, and as a messen-
ger to be trusted to trudge any distance when transport was
not available.

They both grew thin but sinewy looking, and their faces
had a rather strained look. Their always large black eyes
seemed to grow bigger, and their little square jaws looked
more square every day; but on Saturday nights they each
were paid their dollar, and climbed to the Straw Parlor and
unburied the Treasure and added to it.

Those Saturday nights were wonderful things. To the
end of life they would never forget them. Through all the
tired hours of labor they were looked forward to. Then
they lay in their nest of straw and talked things over—

e
42 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS





there it seemed that they could relax and rest their limbs as
they could do it nowhere else. Mrs. Jennings was not given
to sofas and easy-chairs, and it is not safe to change position
often when one has a grown-up bedfellow. But in the straw
they could roll at full length, curl up or stretch out just as
they pleased, and there they could enlarge upon the one
subject that filled their minds, and fascinated and enraptured
them. :

Who could wonder that it was so! The City Beautiful
was growing day by day, and the development of its glories
was the one thing they heard talked of. Robin had estab-
lished the habit of collecting every scrap of newspaper
referring to it. He cut them out of Aunt Matilda’s old
papers, he begged them from every one, neighbors, store-
keepers, work hands. When he was sent on errands he
cast an all-embracing glance round every place his orders
took him to. The postmaster of the nearest village dis-
covered his weakness and saved paragraphs and whole
papers for him. Before very long there was buried near the
Treasure a treasure even more valuable of newspaper cut-
tings, and on the wonderful Saturday nights they gave them-
selves up to revelling in them.

How they watched it and followed it and lived with it—
this great human scheme which somehow seemed to their
young minds more like the scheme of giants and genii!
How they seized upon every new story of its wonders and
felt that there could be no limit to them! They knew
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 43



every purpose and plan connected with it—every arch and
tower and hall and stone they pleased themselves by fancy-
ing. Newspapers were liberal with information, people
talked of it, they heard of it on every side. To them it
seemed that the whole world must be thinking of nothing
else,

“While we are lying here,” Meg said—‘ while you are
doing chores, and I am scouring pans and scrubbing things,
it is all going on. People in France and in England and in
Italy are doing work to send to it—artists are painting pict-
ures, and machinery is whirring and making things, and
everything is pouring into that one wonderful place. And
men and women planned it, you know—just men and
women. And if we live a few years we shall be men and
women, and they were once children like us—only, if they
had been quite like us they would never have known enough
to do anything.”

‘But when they were children like us,” said Robin,
“they did not know what they would have learned by this
time—and they never dreamed about this.”

“That shows how wonderful men and women are,” said
Meg. “TI believe they can do anything if they set their
minds to it.” And she said it stubbornly.

‘Perhaps they can,” said Robin, slowly. ‘“ Perhaps we
could do anything we set our minds to.”

There was the suggestive tone in his voice which Meg
had been thrilled by more than once before. She had been
44 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



thrilled by it most strongly when he had said that if they
saved their two dollars a week they might be able to go
almost anywhere. Unconsciously she responded to it now,

“Tf I could do anything I set my mind to,” she said,
‘do you know what I would set my mind to first ?”

“What?”

“T would set my mind to going to that wonderful place.
I would set it to seeing everything there, and remembering
all I could hold, and learning all there was to be learned—
and I would se¢ zt hard.”

“So would I,” said Robin.

It was a more suggestive voice than before that he said
the words in; and suddenly he got up, and went and tore
away the straw from the burying-place of the Treasure. He
took out the old iron bank, and brought it back to their
corner.

He did it so suddenly, and with such a determined air,
that Meg rather lost her breath.

“What are you going to do with the Treasure?” she
asked,

“T am going to count it.”

“Why?” |

He was opening the box, using the blade of a stout
pocket-knife as a screwdriver.

‘A return ticket to Chicago costs fourteen dollars,” he
said. “I asked at the dépdt. That would be twenty-
eight dollars for two people. Any one who is careful can
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 45



live on a very little for a while. I want to see if we shall
have money enough to go.”

“To go/” Meg cried out. ‘To the Fair, Robin?”

She could not believe the evidence of her ears—it
sounded so daring.

“Nobody would take us!” she said. ‘Even if we
had money enough to pay for ourselves, nobody would
take us.”

“Take!” answered Robin, working at his screws. ‘“ No,

nobody would. What's the matter with taking ourselves ?”

Meg sat up in the straw, conscious of a sort of shock.

“To go by ourselves, like grown-up people! To buy
our tickets ourselves, and get on the train, and go all the
way—alone! And walk about the Fair alone, Robin?”

‘“Who takes care of us here?” answered Robin. ‘Who
has looked after us ever since father and mother died ?
Ourselves! Just ourselves!) Whose business are we but
our own? Who thinks of us, or asks if we are happy or
unhappy ?”

‘“ Nobody,” said Meg. And she hid her face in her
arms on her knees.

- Robin went on stubbornly.

‘“Nobody is ever going to do it,” he said, “if we live to
be hundreds of years old. I’ve thought of it when I’ve
been working in the fields with Jones, and I’ve thought of it
when I’ve been lying awake at night. It’s kept me awake
many and many a time.”
40 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS.





“So it has me,” said Meg.

“And since this thing began to be talked about every-
where, I’ve thought of it more and more,” said Rob. “It
means more to people like us than it does to any one else.
It’s the people who never see things, and who have no
chances, it means the most to. And the more I think of it,
the more I—I won't let it go by me!” And all at once he
threw himself face downward on the straw, and hid his face
in his arms.

Meg lifted hers. There’ was something in the woful
desperation of his movement that struck her to the heart.
She had never known him do such a thing in their lives
before. That was not his way. Whatsoever hard thing
had happened—howsoever lonely and desolate they had felt
—he had never shown his feeling in this way. She put out
her hand_and touched his shoulder.

“Robin!” she said. ‘Oh, Robin!”

“T don’t care,” he said, from the refuge of his sleeves.
“We are little when we are compared with grown-up
people. They would call us children; and children usually
have some one to help them and tell them what to do. I’m
only like this because I’ve been thinking so much and
working so hard—and it does seem like an Enchanted City
—but no one ever thinks we could care about anything
more than if we were cats and dogs. It was not like that
at home, even if we were poor.” .

Then he sat up with as little warning as he had thrown
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 4]



himself down, and gave his eyes a fierce rub. He returned
to the Treasure again.

“ve been making up my mind to it for days,” he said.
“Tf we have the money we can buy our tickets and go some
night without saying anything to any one. We can leave a
note for Aunt Matilda, and tell her we are all right and we
are coming back. She'll be too busy to mind.”

“Do you remember that book of father’s we read?” said
Meg. “That one called ‘David Copperfield. David ran
away from the bottle place when he was younger than we
are, and he had to walk all the way to Dover.”

“We shall not have to walk; and we won't let any one
take our money away from us,” said Robin.

“Are we going, really?” said Meg. ‘You speak as if
we were truly going; and it can’t be.”

“Do you know what you said just now about believing
human beings could do axythzng, if they set their minds
to it? Let’s set our minds to it.” .

“Well,” Meg answered, rather slowly, as if weighing the
matter, “let’s !”

And she fell to helping to count the Treasure.
48 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



VI

FTERWARDS, when they looked back upon that
A day, they knew that the thing had decided itself
then, though neither of them had said so.

“The truth was,” Robin used to say, ‘‘we had both been
thinking the same thing, as we always do, but we had been
thinking it in the back part of our minds. We were afraid
to let it come to the front at first, because it seemed such a
big thing. But it went on thinking by itself. That time,
when you said ‘ We shall zever see it,’ and I said, ‘How do
you know?’ we were both thinking about it in one way;
and I know I was thinking about it when I said, ‘We are
not going to stay here always. That is the first step up
the Hill of Difficulty.’”

“And that day when you said you would not let it go
by you,” Meg would answer, “that was the day we reached
the Wicket Gate.”

It seemed very like it, for from that day their strange,
unchildish purpose grew and ripened, and never for an hour
was absent from the mind of either. If they had been like
other children, living happy lives, full of young interests and
pleasures, it might have been crossed out by other and
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 49



newer things; if they had been of a slighter mental build,
and less strong, they might have forgotten it; but they
never did. When they had counted the Treasure, and had
realized how small it was after all, they had sat and gazed
at each other for a while with grave eyes, but they had only
been grave, and not despairing.

“Twenty-five dollars,” said Robin. ‘Well, that’s not
much after nearly six years; but we saved it nearly all by
cents, you know, Meg.”

“And it takes a hundred cents to make a dollar,” said
Meg; ‘‘and we were poor people’s children.”

“And we bought the chickens,” said Robin.

“And you have always given me a present at Christ-
mas, Robin, even if it was only a little one. That’s six
Christmases.” |

‘““We have eight months to work in,” said Robin, calcu-
lating. “If you get four dollars a month, and I get four,
that will be sixty-four dollars by next June. Twenty-five
dollars and sixty-four dollars make eighty-nine. Eighty-
nine dollars for us to live on and go to see all the things ;
because we must see them all, if we go. And I suppose we
shall have to come back”—with a long breath.

“Oh, dear!” cried Meg, “how cazx we come back ?”

“T don’t know,” said Robin. ‘We shall hate it, but we-
have nowhere else to go.” .

‘Perhaps we are going to seek our fortunes, and per-
haps we shall find them,” said Meg; “or perhaps Aunt
50 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



Matilda won’t let us come back. Rob,” with some awe,
‘do you think she will be angry?” .

‘“T’ve thought about that,” Robin answered contempla-
tively, ‘and I don’t think she will. She would be too busy
to care much even if we ran away and said nothing. But I
shall leave a letter, and tell her we have saved our money
and gone somewhere for a holiday, and we're all right, and
she need not bother.”

”

‘““She won't bother even if she is angry,” Meg said, with
mournful eyes. ‘She doesn’t.care about us enough.”

“Tf she loved us,” Rob said, ‘‘and was too poor to take
us herself, we couldn't go at all. We couldn’t run away,
because it would worry her so. You can’t do a thing, how-
ever much you want to do it, if it is going to hurt some-
body who is good to you, and cares.”

“ Well, then, we needn't stay here because of Aunt Ma-
tilda,” said Meggy. “That’s one sure thing. It wouldn't
interfere with her ploughing if we were both to die at
once.” oo
‘“No,” said Rob, deliberately, “that’s just what it would
not.” And he threw himself back on the straw and clasped
his hands under his head, gazing up into the dark roof
above him with very reflective eyes.

But they had reached the Wicket Gate, and from ‘the
hour they passed it there was no looking back. That in
their utter friendlessness and loneliness they should take
their twelve-year-old fates in their own strong little hands
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 51



was, perhaps, a pathetic thing; that once having done so
they moved towards their object as steadily as if they had
been of the maturest years was remarkable, but no one
ever knew or even suspected the first until the last.

The days went by, full of work, which left them little
time to lie and talk in the Straw Parlor. They could only
see each other in the leisure hours, which were so few, and
only came when the day was waning. Finding them faith-
ful and ready, those about them fell into the natural, easy,
human unworthiness of imposing by no means infrequently
on their inexperienced willingness and youth. So they
were hard enough worked, but each felt that every day that
passed brought them nearer to the end in view; and there
was always something to think of, some detail to be worked
out mentally, or to be discussed, in the valuable moments
when they were together.

“It’s a great deal better than it used to be,” Meg said,
“at all events. It’s better to feel tired by working than to
be tired of doing nothing but think and think dreary
things.”

As the weather grew colder it was hard enough to keep
warm in their hiding-place. They used to sit and talk,
huddled close together, bundled in their heaviest clothing,
and with the straw heaped close around them and over
them.

There were so many things to be thought of and talked
over! Robin collected facts more sedulously than ever—
52 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

facts about entrance fees, facts about prices of things to
eat, facts about places to sleep.

“Going to the Fair yourself, sonny?” Jones said to
him one day. Jones was fond of his joke. ‘You're right
to be inquirin’ round. Them hotel-keepers is given to
tot up bills several stories higher than their hotels is
themselves.”

““But I suppose a person needn’t go to a hotel,” said
Robin. .‘‘There must be plenty of poor people who can’t
go to hotels, and they'll have to sleep somewhere.”

“Ah, there’s. plenty of poor people,” responded Jones,
cheerfully, “plenty of ’em. Always is. But they won't go
to Chicago while the Fair's on. They'll sleep at home—
that’s where they'll sleep.”

“That's the worst of it,” Rob said to Meg afterwards ;
“you see, we have to sleep somewhere. We could live on
bread and> milk or crackers and cheese—or oatmeal—but
we have to sleep somewhere.”

“It will be warm weather,” Meg said, reflectively.
“Perhaps we could sleep out of doors. Beggars do. We
don’t mind.”

“T don’t think the police would let us,” Robin answered.
“If they would—perhaps we might have to, some night;
but we are going to that place, Meg—we are gorng.”

Yes, they believed they were going, and lived on the
belief. This being decided, howsoever difficult to attain, it
was like them both that they should dwell upon the dream,
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS' PROGRESS 53



and revel in it ina way peculiarly their own. It was Meg
whose imagination was the stronger, and it is true that it
was always she who made pictures in words and told stories.
But Robin was always as ready to enter into the spirit of
her imaginings as she was to talk about them. There was
a word he had once heard his father use which had caught
his fancy, in fact, it had attracted them both, and they ap-
plied it to this favorite pleasure of theirs of romancing with
everyday things. The word was “ philander.”

‘“Now we have finished adding up and making plans,”
he would say, putting his ten-cent account-book into his
pocket, “let us philander about it.”

And then Meg would begin to talk about the City Beau-
tiful—a City Beautiful which was a wonderful and curious
mixture of the enchanted one the whole world was pouring
its treasures into, one hundred miles away, and that City
Beautiful of her own which she had founded upon the one
towards which Christian had toiled through the Slough of
Despond and up the Hill of Difficulty and past Doubting
Castle. Somehow one could scarcely tell where one ended
and the others began, they were so much alike, these three
cities—Christian’s, Meg’s, and the fair, ephemeral one the
ending of the nineteenth century had built upon the blue
lake’s side.

“They must look alike,” said Meg, “I am sure they
must. See what it says in the ‘Pilgrim’s Progress.’ ‘Now
just as the gates were opened to let in the men, I looked in
54 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS





after them, and behold, the City shone like the sun’—and
then it says, ‘The talk they had with the Shining Ones was
about the glory of the place; who told them that the beauty
and glory of it were inexpressible.’ I always think of it,
Robin, when I read about those places like white palaces
and temples and towers that are being built. I am so glad
they are white. Think how the City will ‘shine like the
sun’ when it stands under the blue sky and by the blue
water, on a sunshiny day.”

They had never read the.dear old worn “ Pilgrim’s Prog-
ress” as they did in those days. They kept it in the straw
near the Treasure, and always had it at hand to refer to.
In it they seemed to find parallels for everything.

“Aunt Matilda’s world is the City of Destruction,” they
would say. “And our loneliness and poorness are like
Christian’s ‘burden.’ We-have to carry it like a heavy
weight, and it holds us back.”

“What was it that Goodwill said to Christian about it ?”
Robin asked.

Meg turned over the pages. She knew all the places by
heart. It was easy enough to find and read how “At last
there came a grave person to the gate, named Goodwill,”
and in the end he said, “As to thy burden, be content to
bear it until thou comest to the place of deliverance; for
there it will fall from thy back itself.” -

“But out of the ‘ Pilgrim’s Progress,’” Robin said, with
his reflecting air, ‘burdens don’t fall off by themselves. If
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 55



you are content with them they stick on and get bigger.
Ours would, I know. You have to do something yourself
to get them off. But—” with a little pause for thought, “I
like that part, Meg. And I like Goodwill, because he told
itto him. [It encouraged him, you know. You see it says
next, ‘Then Christian began to gird up his loins and address
himself to his journey.’”

“Robin,” said Meg, suddenly shutting the book and
giving it a little thump on the back, “it’s not only Chris-
tian’s City that is like our City. We are like Christian. We
are pilgrims, and our way to that place is our Pilgrims’

”
Progress.
56 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



VII

ND the cold days of hard work kept going by, and the
A City Beautiful grew, and, huddled close together in
the straw, the children planned and dreamed, and
read and re-read the ‘“ Pilgrim’s Progress,” following Chris-
tian step by step. And Aunt Matilda became busier every
day, it seemed, and did not remember that they were alive
except when she saw them. And nobody guessed and no-
body knew.

Days so quickly grow to weeks, and weeks slip by so
easily until they are months, and at last there came a time
when Meg, going out in the morning, felt a softer air, and
stopped a moment by a bare tree to breathe it in and feel
its lovely touch upon her cheek. She turned her face up-
ward with a half-involuntary movement, and found herself
looking at such a limitless vault of tender blueness that
her heart gave a quick throb, seemed to spring up to it, and
carry her with it. For a moment it seemed as if she had
left the earth far below, and was soaring in the soft depths
of blueness themselves. And suddenly, even as she felt it,
she heard on the topmost branch of the bare tree a brief
little rapturous trill, and her heart gave a leap again, and
she felt her cheeks grow warm.
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 57



“Tt is a bluebird,” she said; “it is a bluebird. And it is
the spring, and that means that the time is quite near.”

She had a queer little smile on her face all day as she
worked. She did not know it was there herself, but Mrs.
Macartney saw it.

‘What's pleasing you so, Meggy, my girl?” she asked.

Meg wakened up with a sort of start.

“T don’t know—exactly,” she said.

“You don’t know,” said the woman, good-naturedly.
“You look as if you were thinking over a secret, and it was
a pleasant one.”

That evening it was not cold when they sat in the Straw
Parlor, and Meg told Robin about the bluebird.

“Tt gave me a strange feeling to hear it,” she said. “It
seemed as if it was speaking to me. It said, ‘You must get
ready. It is quite near.’”

They had made up their minds that they would go in
June, before the weather became so hot that they might
suffer from it.

‘Because we have to consider everything,” was Robin's
idea. ‘‘We shall be walking about all the time, and we
have no cool clothes, and we shall have no money to buy
cool things; and if we should be ill, it would be worse for
us than for children who have some one with them.”

In the little account-book they had calculated all they
should own on the day their pilgrimage began. They had
apportioned it all out: so much for the price of the railroad
55 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



tickets, so much for entrance fees, and—not so much, but
so little—oh, so little !—for their food and lodging.

“T have listened when Jones and the others were talk-
ing,” said Robin; “and they say that everybody who has
room to spare, and wants to make money, is going to let
every corner they have. So you see there will be sure to
be people who have quite poor places that they would be
obliged to rent cheap to people who are poor, like them-
selves. We will go through the small side streets and look.”

The first bluebird came again, day after day, and others
came with it, until the swift dart of blue wings through the
air and the delicious ripple of joyous sound were no longer
rare things. The days grew warmer, and the men threw off
their coats, and began to draw their shirt-sleeves across
their foreheads when they were at work.

One evening when Robin came up into the Straw Parlor
he brought something with him. It was a battered old tin
coffee-pot.

‘What is that for?” asked Meg; for he seemed to carry
it as if it was of some value.

“It’s old and rusty, but there are no holes in it,” Robin
answered. ‘I saw it lying in a fence corner, where some
one had thrown it—perhaps a tramp. And it put a new
thought into my head. It will do to boil eggs in.”

“Eggs!” said Meg.

‘There's nothing much nicer than hard-boiled eggs,”
said Robin, ‘‘and you can carry them about with you. It
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 59



just came into my mind that we could take some of our
eggs, and go somewhere where no one would be likely to
see us, and build a fire of sticks, and boil some eggs, and
carry them with us to eat.”

“Robin,” cried Meg, with admiring ecstasy, “I wish I
had thought of that!”

“Tt doesn’t matter which of us thought of it,” said Rob,
“it’s all the same.”

So it was decided that when the time came they should
boil their supply of eggs very hard, and roll them up in
pieces of paper and tuck them away carefully in the one
small bag which was to carry all their necessary belongings.
These belongings would be very few—just enough to keep
them decent and clean, and a brush and comb between
them. They used to lie in bed at night, with beating hearts,
thinking it all over, sometimes awakening in a cold perspira-
tion from a dreadful dream, in which Aunt Matilda or Jones
or some of the hands had discovered their secret and con-
fronted them with it in all its daring. They were so full of
it night and day that Meg used to wonder that the people
about them did not see it in their faces.

“They are not thinking of us,” said Robin. ‘ They are
thinking about crops. I dare say Aunt Matilda would like
to see the Agricultural Building, but she couldn’t waste the
time to go through the others.”

Oh, what a day it was, what a thrilling, exciting, almost
unbearably joyful day, when Robin gathered sticks and
60 TIVO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



dried bits of branches, and piled them in a corner of a field
far enough from the house and outbuildings to be quite
safe! He did it one noon hour, and as he passed Meg on
his way back to his work, he whispered:

“T have got the sticks for the fire all ready.”

And after supper they crept out to the place, with
matches, and the battered old coffee-pot, and the eggs.

As they made their preparations, they found themselves
talking in whispers, though there was not the least chance of
any one’s hearing them. Meg looked rather like a little
witch as she stood over the bubbling old pot, with her
strange, little dark face and shining eyes and black elf
locks,

“Tt’s like making a kind of sacrifice on an altar,” she
said.

“You always think queer things about everything, don’t
you?” said Robin. ‘But they’re all right; I don’t think of
them myself, but I like them.”

When the eggs were boiled hard enough they carried
them to the barn and hid them in the Straw Parlor, near
the Treasure. Then they sat and talked, in whispers still,
almost trembling with joy.

‘Somehow, do you know,” Meg said, “it feels as if we
were going to do something more than just go to the Fair.
When people in stories go to seek their fortunes, I’m sure
they feel like this. Does it give you a kind of creeping in
your stomach whenever you think of it, Rob?”








MEG LOOKED RATHER LIKE A LITTLE WITCH,
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 63



“Yes, it does,” Robin whispered back; ‘and when it
comes into my mind suddenly something gives a queer
jump inside me.”

‘That's your heart,” said Meg. “ Robin, if anything
should stop us, I believe I should drop dead.”

‘“No, you wouldn't,” was Rob's answer, “ but it’s better
not to let ourselves think about it. And I don’t believe any-
thing as bad as that cow/d happen. We've worked so hard,
and we have nobody but ourselves, and it can’t do any one
any harm—and we don’t want to do any one any harm. No,
there must be something that wouldn't let it be.”

‘“T believe that too,” said Meg, and this time it was she
who clutched at Robin’s hand; but he seemed glad she did,
and held as close as she.

And then, after the bluebirds had sung a few times
more, there came a night when Meg crept out of her cot
after she was sure that the woman in the other bed was
sleeping heavily enough. Every one went to bed early, and
every one slept through the night in heavy, tired sleep.
Too much work was done on the place to allow people to
waste time in sleeplessness. Meg knew no one would
waken as she crept down stairs to the lower part of the
house and softly opened the back door.

Robin was standing outside, with the little leather
satchel in his hand. It was a soft, warm night, and the
dark blue sky was full of the glitter of stars.

Both he and Meg stood still a moment, and looked up.
64 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



“T’m glad it’s like this,” Meg said; ‘‘it doesn’t seem so
lonely. Is your heart thumping, Robin?”

“Yes, rather,” whispered Robin. ‘I left the letter in a
place where Aunt Matilda will be likely to find it some time
to-morrow.”

“What did you say?” Meg whispered back.

“What I told you I was going to. There wasn’t much
to say. Just told her we had saved our money, and gone
away for a few days; and we were all right, and she needn't
worry.”

Everything was very still about them. There was no
moon, and, but for the stars, it would have been very dark.
As it was, the stillness of night and sleep, and the sombre-
ness of the hour, might have made less strong little
creatures feel timid and alone.

“Let us take hold of each other’s hands as we walk
along,” said Meg. ‘It will make us feel nearer, and—and
twenner.”

And so, hand in hand, they went out on the road
together.
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 65



VIII

T was four miles to the dépét, but they were good
| walkers. Robin hung the satchel on a stick over his
shoulder ; they kept in the middle of the road and
walked smartly. There were not many trees, but there were
a few, occasionally, and it was pleasanter to walk where the
way before them was quite clear. And somehow they found
themselves still talking in whispers, though there was cer-
tainly no one to overhear them.

“Let us talk about Christian,” said Meg. “It will not
seem so lonely if we are talking. I wish we could meet
Evangelist.”

“Tf we knew he was Evangelist when we met him,” said
Robin. “If we didn’t know him, we should think he was
some one who would stop us. And after all, you see, he
only showed Christian the shining light, and told him to go
to it. And we are farther on than that. We have passed
the Wicket Gate.”

“The thing we want,” said Meg, ‘is the Roll to read as
we go on, and find out what we are to do.”

And then they talked of what was before them. They
wondered who would be at the little dépot and if they would
66 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

be noticed, and of what the ticket-agent would think when
Robin bought the tickets.

“Perhaps he won't notice me at all,” said Rob. “And
he does not know me. Somebody might be sending us
alone, you know. We are not &¢¢/e children.”

“That's true,” responded Meg, courageously. “If we
were six years old it would be different. But we are
twelve !”

It did make it seem less lonely to be talking, and so they
did not stop. And there was.so much to say.

“ Robin,” broke forth Meg once, giving his hand a sud-
den clutch, “we are on the way



we are going. Soon we
shall be in the train and it will be carrying us nearer
and nearer. Suppose it was a dream, and we should

wake up!”
“Tt isn't a dream!” said Rob, stoutly. ‘It’s real—it’s
as real as Aunt Matilda!” He was always more practical-

minded than Meg.

“We needn't philander any more,” Meg said.

“It isn’t philandering to talk about a real thing.”

“Oh, Rob, just think of it—waiting for us under the
stars, this very moment—the City Beautiful !”

And then, walking close to each other in the dimness,
they told each other how they saw it in imagination, and
what its wonders would be to them, and which they would
see first, and how they would remember it all their lives
afterwards, and have things to talk of and think of. Very
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 67



few people would see it as they would, but they did not
know that. It was not a gigantic enterprise to them, a great
scheme fought for and struggled over for the divers reasons
poor humanity makes for itself ; that it would either make or
lose money was not a side of the question that reached
them. They only dwelt on the beauty and wonder of it,
which made it seem like an enchanted thing.

“I keep thinking of the white palaces, and that it is like

”

a fairy story,” Meg said, ‘and that it will melt away like
those cities travellers sometimes see in the desert. And I
wish it wouldn’t. But it will have been real for a while, and
everybody will remember it. I am so glad it is beautiful—
and white. I am so glad it is white, Robin!”

“And I keep thinking,” said Robin, “of all the people
who have made the things to go in it, and how they have
worked and invented. There have been some people,
perhaps, who have worked months and months making one
single thing—just as we have worked to go to see it. And
perhaps, at first they were afraid they couldn’t do it, and
they set their minds to it as we did, and tried and tried, and
then did it at last. I like to think of those men and women,
Meg, because, when the City has melted away, the things
won't melt. They will last after the people. And we are
feople too. I’m a man, and you are a woman, you know,
though we are only twelve, and it gives me a strong feel-
ing to think of those others.”

“It makes you think that perhaps men and women can
68 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



do anything if they set their minds to it,” said Meg, quite
solemnly. ‘Oh, I do like that!”

“T like it better than anything else in the world,” said
Rob. “Stop a minute, Meg. Come here in the shade.”

He said the last words quickly, and pulled her to the
roadside, where a big tree grew which threw a deep shadow.
He stood listening.

“It’s wheels!” he whispered. ‘There is a buggy com-
ing. We mustn’t let any one see us.”

It was a buggy, they could tell that by the lightness of
the wheels, and it was coming rapidly. They could hear
voices—men’s voices—and they drew back and stood very
close to each other. ‘

“Do you think they have found out, and sent some one
after us?” whispered Meg, breathlessly.

‘““No,” answered Robin, though his heart beat like a
triphammer. ‘No, no, no.”

The wheels drew nearer, and they heard one of the men
speaking.

“Chicago by sunrise,” he was saying, “and what I
don’t see of it won't be worth seeing.”

The next minute the fast-trotting horse spun swiftly
down the road, and carried the voices out of hearing. Meg
and Robin drew twin sighs of relief. Robin spoke first.

“Tt is some one who is going to the Fair,” he said.

‘Perhaps we shall see him in the train,” said Meg.

‘““T dare say we shall,” said Robin. ‘It was nobody who
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 69

knows us. I didn’t know his voice. Meg, let’s take hands
again, and walk quickly; we might lose the train.”

They did not talk much more, but walked briskly.
They had done a good day’s work before they set out, and
were rather tired, but they did not lag on that account.
Sometimes Meg took a turn at carrying the satchel, so
that Robin might rest his arm. It was not heavy, and
she was as strong for a girl as he was for a boy.

At last they reached the dépot. There were a number
of people waiting on the platform to catch the train to
Chicago, and there were several vehicles outside. They
passed one which was a buggy, and Meg gave Robin a
nudge with her elbow.

‘Perhaps that belongs to our man,” she said.

There were people enough before the office to give
the ticket-agent plenty to do. Robin’s heart quickened a
little as he passed by with the group of maturer people,
but no one seemed to observe him particularly, and he re-
turned to Meg with the precious bits of pasteboard held
very tight in his hand.

Meg had waited alone in-an unlighted corner, and when
she saw him coming she came forward to meet him.

‘Have you got them?” she said. ‘ Did any one look at
you or say anything ?”

“Yes, I got them,” Robin answered. ‘And, I'll tell you
what, Meg, these people are nearly all going just where
we are going, and they are so busy thinking about it, and
70 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



attending to themselves, that they haven’t any time to
watch any one else. That’s one good thing.”

“And the nearer we get to Chicago,” Meg said, “the
more people there will be, and the more they will have to
think of. And at that beautiful place, where there is so
much to see, who will look at two children? I don’t believe
we shall have any trouble at all.”

It really did not seem likely that they would, but it
happened, by a curious coincidence, that within a very few
minutes they saw somebody -looking at them.

The train was not due for ten minutes, and there were a
few people who, being too restless to sit in the waiting-
rooms, walked up and down on the platform. Most of
these were men, and there were two men who walked
farther than the others did, and so neared the place where
Robin and Meg stood in the shadow. One was a young
man, and seemed to be listening to instructions his com-
panion, who was older, was giving him, in a rapid, abrupt
sort of voice. This companion, who might have been his
employer, was a man of middle age. He was robust of
figure and had a clean-cut face, with a certain effect of
strong good looks. It was, perhaps, rather a hard face, but
it was a face one would look at more than once; and he
too, oddly enough, had a square jaw and straight black
brows. But it was his voice which first attracted Robin and
Meg as he neared them, talking.

“It's the man in the buggy,” whispered Robin. ‘“ Don’t
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 71



you know his voice again?” and they watched him with
deep interest.

He passed them once, without seeming to see them at
all. He was explaining something to his companion. The
second time he drew near he chanced to look up, and his
eye fell on them. It did not rest on them more than a
second, and he went on speaking. The next time he neared
their part of the platform he turned his glance towards
them, as they stood close together. It was as if involun-
tarily he glanced to see if they were still where they had
been before.

‘““A pair of children,” they heard him say, as if the
fleeting impression of their presence arrested his train of
thought for a second. ‘Look as if no one was with
them.”

He merely made the comment in passing, and returned
to his subject the next second; but Meg and Robin heard
him, and drew farther back into the shadow.

But it was not necessary to stand there much longer..
They heard a familiar sound in the distance, the shrill cry
of the incoming train—the beloved giant who was to carry
them to fairy-land; the people began to flock out of the
waiting-rooms with packages and valises and umbrellas in
hand; the porters suddenly became alert, and hurried about
attending to their duties; the delightful roar drew nearer
and louder, and began to shake the earth; it grew louder
still, a bell began to make a cheerful tolling, people were
72 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



rushing to and fro; Meg and Robin rushed with them,
and the train was panting in the dépdt.

It was even more thrilling than the children had
- thought it would be. They had travelled so very little,
and did not know exactly where to go. It might not be the
right train even. They did not know how long it would
wait. It might rush away again before they could get on.
People seemed in such a hurry and so excited. As they
hurried along they found themselves being pushed and
jostled. Before the steps of.one of the cars a conductor
stood, whom people kept showing tickets to. There were
several persons round him when Robin and Meg reached
the place where he stood. People kept asking him things,
and sometimes he passed them on, and sometimes let them
go into his car.

“Is this the train to Chicago?” said Robin, breath-
lessly. :

But he was so much less than the other people, and
the man was so busy, he did not hear him.

Robin tried to get nearer.

“Is this the Chicago train, sir?” he said, a little louder.

He had had to press by a man whom he had been too
excited to see, and the man looked down, and spoke to
him.

“Chicago train?” he said, in a voice which was abrupt,
without being ill-natured. ‘Yes, you're all right. Got
your sleeping tickets?”
QEESSSS SSE 4)
Wks YS AG



\

: = = rN: SEs Sm SS = =
SSL SS SS ates EN\\\
N oa 75/4 FRAN: DIRS nae FS SSS a
i





“Is THIS THE TRAIN 'TO CHICAGO?” SAID ROBIN,
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 75



Robin looked up at him quickly. He knew the voice,
and was vaguely glad to hear it. He and Meg had never
been in a sleeping-car in their lives, and he did not quite
understand. He held out his tickets.

‘“We are going to sleep on the train,” he said; “but we
have nothing but these.”

‘““Next car but two, then,” he said; “and you'd better
hurry.”

And when both voices thanked him at once, and the
two caught each other’s hands and ran towards their car,
he looked after them and laughed.

“I’m blessed if they’re not by themselves,” he said,
watching them as they scrambled up the steps. ‘And
they're going to the Fair, I’ll bet a dollar. That's Young
America, and no mistake!”
76 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

IX

HE car was quite crowded. There were more people
| than themselves who were going to the Fair and
were obliged to economize. When the children
entered, and looked about them in the dim light, they
thought at first that all the seats were full. People seemed
to be huddled up asleep or sitting up awake in all of them.
Everybody had been trying to get to sleep, at least, and the
twins found themselves making their whispers even lower
than before.

“T think there is a seat empty just behind that very fat
lady,” Meg whispered.

It was at the end of the car, and they went to it, and
found she was right. They took possession of it quietly,
putting their satchel under the seat.

“It seems so still,” said Meg, “I feel as if I was in
somebody’s bedroom. The sound of the wheels makes it
seem ell the quieter. It’s as if we were shut in by the
noise.”

“We mustn't talk,” said Rabin, “or we shall waken the
people. Can you go to sleep, Meg?”

“T can if I can stop thinking,” she answered, with a joy-
ful sigh, ‘I’m very tired; but the wheels keep saying,
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 77



over and over again, ‘We're going—we're going—we’re
going.’ It’s just as if they were talking. Don’t you hear
them ?”

“Yes, I do. Do they say that to you, too? But we
mustn’t listen,” Robin whispered back. ‘If we do we shall
not go to sleep, and then we shall be too tired to walk.
about. Let’s put our heads down, and shut our eyes,
Meg.”

“Well, let’s,” said Meg.

She curled herself up on the seat, and put her head into
the corner.

“If you lean against me, Rob,” she said, “it will be
softer. We can take turns.”

They changed position a little two or three times,
but they were worn out with the day’s work, and their
walk, and the excitement, and the motion of the train
seemed like a sort of-rocking which lulled them. Gradually
their muscles relaxed and they settled down, though, after
they had done so, Meg spoke once, drowsily.

“Rob,” she said, “did you see that was our man?”

“Yes,” answered Rob, very sleepily indeed, ‘‘and he
looked as if he knew us.”

* * * * *

If they had been less young, or if they had been less
tired, they might have found themselves awake a good
many times during the night. But they were such children,
and, now that the great step was taken, were so happy,
78 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

that the soft, deep sleepiness of youth descended upon and
overpowered them. Once or twice during the night they
stirred, wakened for a dreamy, blissful moment by some
sound of a door shutting, or a conductor passing through.
But they were only conscious of a delicious sense of
strangeness, of the stillness of the car full of sleepers, of
the half-realized delight of feeling themselves carried along
through the unknown ‘country, and of the rattle of the
wheels, which never ceased saying rhythmically, ‘We're
going—we're going—we’re going!”

Ah! what a night of dreams and new, vague sensations,
to be remembered always! Ah! that heavenly sense of joy
to come, and adventure, and young hopefulness and imagin-
ing! Were there many others carried towards the City
Beautiful that night who bore with them the same rapture
of longing and belief; who saw with such innocent clear-
ness only the fair and splendid thought which had created
it, and were so innocently blind to any shadow of sordid-
ness or mere worldly interest touching its white walls?
And after the passing of this wonderful night, what a
wakening in the morning, at the first rosiness of dawn,
when all the other occupants of the car were still asleep, or
restlessly trying to be at ease!

It was as if they both wakened at almost the same
moment. The first shaft of early sunlight streaming in the
window touched Meg’s eyelids, and she slowly, opened them.
Then something joyous and exultant rushed in upon her
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 79



heart, and she sat upright. And Robin sat up too, and
they looked at each other.

“It's the Day, Meg!” said Robin. “It’s the Day!”
Meg caught her breath.

‘“And nothing has stopped us,” she said. ‘And we are
getting nearer and nearer. Rob, let us look out of the
window.”

For a while they looked out, pressed close together, and
full of such ecstasy of delight in the strangeness of every-
thing that at first they did not exchange even their
whispers.

It is rather a good thing to see—rather well worth while
even for a man or woman—the day waking, and waking the
world, as one is borne swiftly through the morning light,
and one looks out of a car window. What it was to these
two children only those who remember the children who
were themselves long ago can realize at all. The country
went hurrying past them, making curious sudden revela-
tions and giving half-hints in its haste; prairie and field,
farmhouse and wood and village all wore a strange, excit-
ing, vanishing aspect.

“Tt seems,” Meg said, “as if it was all going some-
where—in a great hurry—as if it couldn’t wait to let us
see it.” |

‘But we are the ones that are going,” said Rob. “ Lis-
ten to the wheels—and we shall soon be there.”

After a while the people who were asleep began to stir
80 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



and stretch themselves. Some of them looked cross, and
some looked tired. The very fat lady in the seat before
them had a coal smut on her nose.

“Robin,” said Meg, after looking at her seriously a
moment, “let’s get our towel out of the bag and wet it and
wash our faces.”

They had taken the liberty of borrowing a towel from
Aunt Matilda. It was Meg who had thought of it, and it
had, indeed, been an inspiration. Robin wetted two cor-
ners of it, and they made a rigorous if limited toilet. At
least they had no smuts on their noses, and after a little
touching up with the mutual comb and brush, they looked
none the worse for wear. Their plain and substantial gar-
ments were not of the order which has any special charm
to lose.

“And it’s not our clothes that are going to the Fair,”
said Meg, ‘it’s ws /”

And by the time they were in good order, the farms and
villages they were flying past had grown nearer together.
The platforms at the dépdts were full of people who wore a
less provincial look; the houses grew larger and so did the
towns; they found themselves flashing past advertisements
of all sorts of things, and especially of things connected
with the Fair. .

“You know how we used to play ‘hunt the thimble,’”
said Robin, “and how, when any one came near the place
where it was hidden, we said, ‘ Warm—warmer—warmer
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 81



~

still—hot!’ It’s like that now. We have been getting
warmer and warmer every minute, and now we are

getting
‘“We shall be in in a minute,” said a big man at the end

”



of the car, and he stood up and began to take down his
things.

‘“ Hot,” said Robin, with an excited little laugh. “ Meg,
we're not going—going—going any more. Look out of the
window.”

“We are steaming into the big dépét,” cried Meg.
“ How big it is! What crowds of people ! Robin, we are
there !” oo

Robin bent down to pick up their satchel; the people all
rose in their seats and began to move in a mass down the
aisle toward the door. Everybody seemed suddenly to
become eager and in a hurry, as if they thought the train
would begin to move again and carry them away. Some
were expecting friends to meet them, some were anxious
about finding accommodations. Those who knew each
other talked, asked questions over people’s shoulders, and
there was a general anxiety about valises, parcels, and
umbrellas. Robin and Meg were pressed back into their
section by the crowd, against which they were too young to
make headway.

‘We shall have to wait until the grown-up people have
passed by,” Rob said.

But the crowd in the aisle soon lost its compactness,
82 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



and they were able to get out. The porter, who stood on
the platform near the steps, looked at them curiously, and
glanced behind them to see who was with them, but he said
nothing.

It seemed to the two as if all the world must have
poured itself into the big dépét or be passing through it.
People were rushing about; friends were searching for one
another, pushing their way through the surging crowd; some
were greeting each other with exclamations and hand-shak-
ing, and stopping up the way.; there was a Babel of voices,
a clamor of shouts within the covered place, and from out-
side came a roar of sound rising from the city.

For a few moments Robin and Meg were overwhelmed.
They did not quite know what to do; everybody pushed past
and jostled them. No one was ill-natured, but no one had
time to be polite. They were so young and so strange to
all such worlds of excitement and rush, involuntarily they
clutched each other’s hands after their time-honored fashion,
when they were near each other and overpowered. The
human vortex caught them up and carried them along, not
knowing where they were going.

‘“We seem so little!” gasped Meg. ‘ There—there are
so many people! Rob, Rob, where are we going?”

Robin had lost his breath too. Suddenly the world
seemed so huge—so huge! Just for a moment he felt him-
self turn pale, and he looked at Meg and saw that she was
pale too.
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 83





‘“ Everybody is going out of the dépét,” he said.‘ Hold
on to me tight, Meg. It will be all right. We shall get
out.”

And so they did. The crowd surged and swayed and
struggled, and before long they saw that it was surging
towards the entrance gate, and it took them with it. Just
as they thrust through they found themselves pushed against
aman, who good-naturedly drew a little back to save Meg
from striking against his valise, which was a very substantial
one. She looked up to thank him, and gave a little start.
It was the man she had called “our man” the night before,
when she spoke of him to Robin. And he gave them a
sharp but friendly nod.

“Hallo!” he exclaimed, ‘it’s you two again. You ave
going to the Fair!”

Robin looked up at his shrewd face with a civil little
grin.

“Ves, sir; we are,” he answered.

“Hope you'll enjoy it,” said the man. “Big thing.”
And he was pushed past them and soon lost in the crowd.

'
84 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



X

HE crowd in the dépét surged into the streets, and
‘| melted into and became an addition to the world of
people there. The pavements were moving masses
of human beings, the centres of the streets were pandemo-
niums of wagons and vans, street cars, hotel omnibuses, and
carriages. The brilliant morning sunlight dazzled the chil-
dren’s eyes; the roar of wheels and the clamor of car bells,
of clattering horses’ feet, of cries and shouts and passing
voices, mingled in a volume of sound that deafened them.
The great. tidal wave of human life and work and pleasure
almost took them off their feet.

They knew too little of cities to have had beforehand
any idea of what the overwhelming rush and roar would be,
and what slight straws they would feel themselves upon
the current. If they had been quite ordinary children, they
might well have been frightened. But they were not ordi-
nary children, little as they were aware of that important
factor in their young lives. They were awed for this first
moment, but, somehow, they were fascinated as much as
they were awed, while they stood for a brief breathing-
space looking on. They did not know—no child of their
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 85





ages can possibly know such things of him or herself—that
Nature had made them of the metal out of which she
moulds strong things and great ones. As they had not
comprehended the restless sense of wrong and misery the
careless, unlearning, and ungrowing life in Aunt Matilda’s
world filled them with, so they did not understand that,
because they had been born creatures who belong to the
great moving, working, venturing world, they were not
afraid of it, and felt their first young face-to-face encounter
with it a thing which thrilled them with an exultant emo-
tion they could not have explained.

“This is not Aunt Matilda’s world,’ said Rob. ‘“It—lI
believe it is ours, Meg. Don’t you?”

Meg was staring with entranced eyes at the passing
multitude.

“ «More pilgrims are come to town,’” she said, quoting
the “ Pilgrim’s Progress” with a far-off look in her intense
little black-browed face. ‘You remember what it said,
Rob, ‘Here also all the noise of them that walked in the
streets was, More pilgrims are come to town.’ Oh, isn’t
it like it!”

It was. And the exaltation and thrill of it got into
their young blood and made them feel as if they walked
on air, and that every passing human thing meant, some-
how, life and strength to them.

Their appetites were sharpened by the morning air, and
they consulted as to what their breakfast should be. They
86 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



had no money to spend at restaurants, and every penny
must be weighed and calculated.

“Let's walk on,” said Meg, “until we see a bakery that
looks as if it was kept by poor people. Then we can buy
some bread, and eat it with our eggs somewhere.”

‘All right,” said Robin.

They marched boldly on. The crowd jostled them, and _
there was so much noise that they could hardly hear each
other speak ; but ah! how the sun shone, and how the pen-
nons fluttered and streamed on every side, and how excited
and full of living the people’s faces looked! It seemed
splendid, only to be alive in such a world on such a morn-
ing. The sense of the practical which had suggested that
they should go to a small place led them into the side
streets. They passed all the big shops without a glance,
but at last Meg: stopped before a small one.

‘There's a woman in there,” she said; “I just saw her
fora minute. She has a nice face. She looked as if she
might be good-natured. Let’s go in there, Robin. It’s
quite a small place.” .

They went in. It was a small place but a clean one,
and .the woman had a good-natured face. She was a
German, and was broad and _ placid and comfortable.
They bought some fresh rolls from her, and as she served
them, and was making the change, Meg watched her
anxiously. She was thinking that she did look very peace-
able, indeed. So, instead of turning away from the counter,
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 87



she planted herself directly before her and asked her a
question.

“Tf you please,” she said, ‘““we have some hard-boiled
eggs to eat with our bread, and we are not going home.
If we are very careful, would you mind if we ate our break-
fast in here, instead of outside? We won't let any of the
crumbs or shells drop on the floor.”

“You not going home?” said the woman. ‘You from
out town?”

“Yes,” answered Meg.

“You look like you wass goun to der Fair,” said the
woman, with a good-tempered smile. ‘Who wass with
you?”

‘““No one,” said Robin. ‘We are going alone. But
we're all right.”

‘““My crayshious!” said the woman. ‘ But you wass
young for that. But your ’Merican childrens is queer ones.
Yes! You can sit down an’ eat your bregfast. That
make no matter to me if you is careful. You can sit
down.”

There were two chairs near a little table, where, per-
haps, occasional customers ate buns, and they sat down to
their rolls and eggs and salt, as to a feast.

“T was hungry,” said Rob, cracking his fourth egg.

“So was I!” said Meg, feeling that her fresh roll was
very delicious. :

It was a delightful breakfast. The German woman
88 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS





watched them with placid curiosity as they ate it. She
had been a peasant in her own country, and had lived in a
village among rosy, stout, and bucolic little Peters and
Gretchens, who were not given to enterprise, and the
American child was a revelation to her. And somehow,
also, these two had an attraction all American children had
not. They looked so well able to take care of themselves,
and yet had such good manners and no air of self-impor-
tance at all. They ate their rolls and hard-boiled eggs
with all the gusto of very young appetite, but they evi-
dently meant to keep their part of the bargain, and leave
her no crumbs and shells to sweep up. The truth was that
they were perfectly honorable little souls, and had a sense
of justice. They were in the midst of their breakfast,
when they were rather startled by hearing her voice from
the end of the counter where she had been standing, lean-
ing against the wall, her arms folded.

“You like a cup coffee?” she asked.

They both looked round, uncertain what to say, not
knowing whether or not that she meant that she sold coffee.
They exchanged rather disturbed glances, and then Robin
answered,

“We can’t afford it, thank you, ma’am,” he said, ‘‘we’ve
got so little money.”

‘“Never mind,” she astonished them by answering, “that
cost me nothing. There some coffee left on the back of
the stove from my man’s bregfast. I give you each a cup.”
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TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS gi



And she actually went into the little back room, and pres-
ently brought back two good cups of hot coffee.

“There, you drink that,” she said, setting them down
on the little table. ‘If you children goun to der Fair in
that crowd by yourselves, you want something in your
stomachs.”

It was so good—it was so unexpected—it seemed such
luck! They looked at each other with beaming eyes, and
at her with quite disproportionate gratitude. It was much
more than two cups of coffee to them.

“Oh, thank you,” they both exclaimed. ‘“ We're so
much obliged to you, ma’am!”

Their feast seemed to become quite a royal thing.
They never had felt so splendidly fed in their lives. It
seemed as if they had never tasted such coffee.

When the meal was finished, they rose refreshed enough
to feel ready for anything. They went up to the counter
and thanked the German woman again. It was Meg who
spoke to her.

“We want to say thank you again,” she said. “We
are very much obliged to you for letting us eat our break-
fast in here. It was so nice to sit down, and the coffee
was so splendid. I dare say we do seem rather young to be
by ourselves, but that makes us all the more thankful.”

“That’s all right,” said the woman. ‘I hope you don’t
get lost by der Fair—and have good time!” _

And then they went forth on their pilgrimage, into the
g2 TIVO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

glorious morning, into the rushing world that seemed so



splendid and so gay—into the fairy-land that only them-
selves and those like them could see.

“Tsn’t it nice when some one’s kind to you, Rob?”
Meg exclaimed joyfully, when they got into the sunshine.
‘Doesn’t it make you feel happy, somehow, not because
they've done something, but just because they've been
kind ?”

“Yes, it does,” answered Rob, stepping out bravely.
“And T’ll tell you what I believe—I believe there are a
lot of kind people in the world.”

“So do I,” said Meg. “I believe they’re in it even
when we don’t see them.”

And all the more, with springing steps and brave young
faces, they walked on their way to fairy-land.

They had talked it all over—how they would enter their
City Beautiful. It would be no light thing to them, their
entrance into it. They were innocently epicurean about it,
and wanted to see it at the very first in all its loveliness.
They knew that there were gates of entrance here and there,
through which thousands poured each day; but Meg had a
fancy of her own, founded, of course, upon that other prog-
ress of the Pilgrim’s.

“Robin,” she said, “‘oh, we must go in by the water,
just like those other pilgrims who came to town. You
know that part at the last where it says, ‘And so many
went over the water and were let in at the golden gates
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 93

to-day.’ Let us go over the water and be let in at the
golden gates. But the water we shall go over won't be
dark and bitter; it will be blue and splendid, and the sun
will be shining everywhere. Ah, Rob, how caz it be true
that we are here!”

They knew all about the great arch of entrance and
stately peristyle. They had read in the newspapers all
about its height and the height of the statues adorning it;
they knew how many columns formed the peristyle, but it
was not height or breadth or depth or width they remem-
bered. The picture which remained with them and haunted
them like a fair dream was of a white and splendid archway,
crowned with one of the great stories of the world in marble
—the triumph of the man in whom the god was so strong
that his dreams, the working of his mind, his strength, his
courage, his suffering, wrested from the silence of the Un-
known a new and splendid world. It was this great white
arch they always thought of, with this precious marble story
crowning it, the blue, blue water spread before the stately
columns at its side, and the City Beautiful within the cotirts
it guarded. And it was to this they were going when they
found their way to the boat which would take them to it.

It was such a heavenly day of June! The water was so
amethystine, the sky such a vault of rapture! What did it
matter to them that they were jostled and crowded, and
counted for nothing among those about them? What did
it matter that there were often near them common faces,
94 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



speaking of nothing but common, stupid pleasure or com-
mon sharpness and greed? What did it matter that scarcely
any one saw what they saw, or, seeing it, realized its splen-
did, hopeful meaning? Little recked they of anything but
the entrancement of blue sky and water, and the City Beau-
tiful they were drawing near to.

When first out of the blueness there rose the fair
shadow of the whiteness, they sprang from their seats, and,
hand in hand, made their way to the side, and there stood
watching, as silent as if they did not dare to speak lest it
should melt away; and from a fair white spirit it grew to a
real thing—more white, more fair, more stately, and more
an enchanted thing than even they had believed or hoped.

And the crowd surged about them, and women ex-
claimed and men talked, and there was a rushing to and fro,
and the ringing of a bell, and movement and action and ex-
citement were on every side. But somehow these two chil-
dren stood hand in hand and only looked.

And their dream had come true, though it had been a
child’s dream of an enchanted thing.
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 95



X]

HEY passed beneath the snow-white stateliness of the
great arch, still hand in hand, and silent. They
walked softly, almost as if they felt themselves tread-

ing upon holy ground. To their youth and unworn souls it
was like holy ground, they had so dreamed of it, they had
so longed for it, it had been so mingled in their minds with
the story of a city not of this world.

And they stood within the court beyond the archway,
the fair and noble colonnade, its sweep of columns, statue-
crowned, behind them, the wonder of the City Beautiful
spread before. The water of blue lagoons lapped the bases
of white palaces, as if with a caress of homage to their
beauty. On every side these marvels stood ; everywhere
there was the green of sward and broad-leaved plants, the
sapphire of water, the flood of color and human life passing
by, and above it all and inclosing it, the warm, deep, splen-
did blueness of the summer sky.

It was so white—it was so full of the marvel of color—
it was so strange—it was so radiant and unearthly in its
beauty.

The two children only stood still and gazed and gazed,
with widening eyes and parted lips. They could not have
96 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS





moved about at first; they only stood and lost themselves
as in a dream.

Meg was still for so long that Robin, turning slowly to
look at her at last, was rather awed.

“Meg!” he said; “Meg!”

“Yes,” she answered, in a voice only half awake.

“Meg! Meg! We are there /” :

“T know,” said Meg. “Only it is so like—that other

”



City—that it seems as if She gave a queer little laugh,
and turned to look at him. ‘‘ Rob,” she said, ‘ perhaps we
are dead, and have just wakened up.”

That brought them back to earth. They laughed to-
gether. No, they were not dead. They were breathless
and uplifted by an ecstasy, but they had never been so fully
alive before. It seemed as if they were in the centre of the
world, and the world was such a bright and radiant and
beautiful place as they had never dreamed of.

“Where shall we go first?” said Meg. “What shall
we do?”

But it was so difficult to decide that. It did not seem
possible to make a plan and follow it. It was not possible
for them, at least. They were too happy and too young.
Surely visitors to fairy-land could not make plans! They
gave themselves up to the spell, and went where fancy led
them. And it led them far, and through strange beauties,
which seemed like dreams come true. They wandered
down broad pathways, past green sward, waving palms,
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 97



glowing masses of flowers, white balustrades bordering
lagoons lightly ruffed by a moment’s wind. Wonderful
statues stood on silent guard, sometimes in groups, some-
times majestic colossal figures.

‘They look as if they were all watching the thousands
and thousands go by,” said Robin.

“It seems as if they must be thinking something about
it all,” Meg answered. “It could not be that they could
stand there and look like that and not know.”

It was she who soon after built up for them the only
scheme they made during those enchanted days. It could
scarcely be called a plan of action, it was so much an
outcome of imagination and part of a vision, but it was
a great joy to them through every hour of their pil-
grimage.

Standing upon a fairy bridge, looking over shining
canals crossed by these fairy bridges again and again, the
gold sun lighting snow-white columns, archways, towers, and
minarets, statues and rushing fountains, flowers and palms,
her child eyes filled with a deep, strange glow of joy and
dreaming.

She leaned upon the balustrade in her favorite fashion,
her chin upon her hands.

“We need not pretend it is a fairy story, Robin,” she
said. ‘It zs a fairy story, but it is real. Who ever thought
a fairy story could come true? I’ve made up how it came
to be like this.”
98 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



‘Tell us how,” said Robin, looking over the jewelled
water almost as-she did.

“Tt was like this,” she said. ‘ There was a great Magi-
cian who was the ruler of all the Genii in all the world.
They were all powerful and rich and wonderful magicians,
but he could make them obey him, and give him what they
stored away. And he said: ‘I will build a splendid City,
that all the world shall flock to and wonder at and remem-
ber forever. And in it some of all the things in the world
shall be seen, so that the people who see it shall learn what
the world is like—how huge it is, and what wisdom it has
in it, and what wonders! And it will make them know
what ¢hey are like themselves, because the wonders will be
made by hands and feet and brains just like their own.
And so they will understand how strong they are—if they
only knew it—and it will give them courage and fill them
with thoughts.”

She stopped a moment, and Rob pushed her gently with
his elbow.

‘Go on,” he said, “I like it. It sounds quite true.
What else?”

“And he called all the Genii together and called them
by their names. There was one who was the king of all
the pictures and statues, and the people who worked at
making them. They did not know they had a Genius, but
they had, and he put visions into their heads, and made
them feel restless until they had worked them out into
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 99





statues and paintings. And the Great Genius said to him:
‘You must build a palace for your people, and make them
pour their finest work into it; and all-the people who are
made to be your workers, whether they know it or not, will
look at your palace and see what other ones have done,
and wonder if they cannot do it themselves.’ And there
was a huge, huge Genius who was made of steel and iron
and gold and silver and wheels, and the Magician said to
him: ‘Build a great palace, and make your workers fill it
with all the machines and marvels they have made, and all
who see will know what wonders can be done, and feel that
there is no wonder that isn’t done that is too great for
human beings to plan.’ And there was a Genius of the
strange countries, and one who knew all the plants and
flowers and trees that grew, and one who lived at the
bottom of the sea and knew the fishes by name and strode
about among them. And each one was commanded to
build a palace or to make his people work, and they grew
so interested that in the end each one wanted his palace
and his people to be the most wonderful of all. And so
the City was built, and we are in it, Robin, though we are
only twelve years old, and nobody cares about us.”

“Yes,” said Robin, ‘and the City is as much ours as if
we were the Magician himself. Meg, who was the Magi-
cian? What was he?”

“T don’t know,” said Meg. ‘Nobody knows. He is
that—that



" She gave a sudden, queer little touch to her
100 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



forehead and one to her side. ‘ 7ha¢é, you know, Rob!
The thing that ¢herks
be things. Don’t you suppose so, Rob?”



and makes us want to do things and

“The thing that made us want so to come here that we
could not bear zo¢ to come?” said Robin. ‘‘ The thing that
makes you make up stories about everything, and always
have queer thoughts ?”

“Yes—that!” said Meg. ‘And every one has some of
it; and there are such millions of people, and so there is
enough to make the Great Magician. Robin, come along ;
let us go to the palace the picture Genius built, and
see what his people put in it. Let us be part of the
fairy story when we go anywhere. It will make it beau-
tiful.”

They took their fairy story with them and went their
way. They made it as much the way of a fairy story as
possible. They found a gondola with a rich-hued, gay-
‘scarfed gondolier, and took their places.

“Now we are in Venice,” Meg said, as they shot
smoothly out upon the lagoon. ‘We can be in any
country we like. Now we are in Venice.”

Their gondola stopped, and lay rocking on the lagoon
before the palace’s broad white steps. They mounted them,
and entered into a rich, glowing world, all unknown.

They knew little of pictures, they knew nothing of
statuary, but they went from room to room, throbbing
with enjoyment. They stopped before beautiful faces and
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‘“NOW WE ARE IN VENICE,”
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 103



happy scenes, and vaguely smiled, though they did not
know they were smiling; they lingered before faces and
figures that were sad, and their own dark little faces
grew soft and grave. They could not afford to buy a
catalogue, so they could only look and pity and delight
or wonder.

“We must make up the stories and thoughts of them
ourselves,” Robin said. ‘‘Let’s take it in turns, Meg.
Yours will be the best ones, of course.”

And this was what they did. As they passed from pict-
ure to picture, each took turns at building up explanations.
Some of them might have been at once surprising and
instructive to the artist concerned, but some were very
vivid, and all were full of young directness and clear sight,
and the fresh imagining and coloring of the unworn mind.
They were so interested that it became like a sort of excit-
ing game. They forgot all about the people around them ;
they did not know that their two small, unchaperoned fig-
ures attracted more glances than one. They were so accus-
tomed to being alone, that they never exactly counted
themselves in with other people. And now, it was as if
they were at a banquet, feasting upon strange viands, and
the new flavors were like wine to them. They went from
side to side of the rooms, drawn sometimes by a glow of
color, sometimes by a hinted story.

“We don’t know anything about pictures, I suppose,”
said Meg, “but we can see everything is in them. There
104 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

are the poor, working in the fields and the mills, being glad
or sorry; and there are the rich ones, dancing at balls and
standing in splendid places.”

“And there are the good ones and the bad ones. You
can see it in their faces,” Rob went on, for her.

“Yes,” said Meg; ‘richness and poorness and good-
ness and badness and happiness and gladness. The Genius
who made this palace was a very proud one, and he said
he would put all the world in it, even if his workers could
only make pictures and statues.”

“Was he the strongest of all?” asked Robin, taking
up the story again with interest.

— “T don't know,” Meg answered; ‘sometimes I think he
was. He was strong—he was very strong.”

They had been too deeply plunged into their mood to
notice a man who stood near them, looking at a large pict-
ure. In fact, the man himself had not at first noticed them,
but when Meg began to speak her voice attracted him.
He turned his head, and looked at her odd little reflecting
face, and, after having looked at it, he stood listening to
her. An expression of recognition came into his strong,
clean-shaven face.

“You two again!” he said, when she had _ finished.
“And you have got here.” It was their man again.

“Yes,” answered Meg, her gray eyes revealing, as she
lifted them to his face, that she came back to earth with
some difficulty.
~LWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 105



‘How do you like it, as far as you've gone?” he asked.

‘We are making believe that it is a fairy story,” Meg
answered ; “‘and it’s very easy.”

And then a group of people came between and separated
them.
106 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



XII

OW tired they were when they came out from the

H world of pictures into the world of thronging people!

How their limbs ached and they were brought back

to the realization that they were creatures with human
bodies, which somehow they seemed to have forgotten!

When they stood in the sunshine again Robin drew
a long breath.

“It is like coming out of one dream into another,” he
said. ‘We must have been there a long time. I didn’t
know I was tired and I didn’t know I was hungry, but I am
both. Are you?”

She was as tired and hungry as he was.

“Dare we buy a sandwich to eat with our eggs?” she
said.

“Yes, I think we dare,” Robin answered. ‘Where
shall we go and eat them ?”

There was no difficulty in deciding. She had planned
it all out, and they so knew the place by heart that they did
not need to ask their way. It was over one of the fairy
bridges which led to a fairy island. It was softly wooded,
and among the trees were winding paths and flowers and
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 107



rustic seats, and quaint roofs peering above the greenness
of branches. And it was full of the warm scent of roses,
growing together in sumptuous thousands, their heavy,
sweet heads uplifted to the sun, or nodding and leaning
towards their neighbors’ clusters.

The fairy bridge linked it to the wonderful world
beyond, but by comparison its bowers were almost quiet.
The crowd did not jostle there.

“And we shall be eating our lunch near thousands and
thousands of roses. It will be like the ‘Arabian Nights.’
Let us pretend that the rose who is queen of them all
invited us, because we belong to nobody,” Meg said.

They bought the modest addition to their meal, and
carried the necessary, ever-present satchel to their bower.
They were tired of dragging the satchel about, but they
were afraid to lose sight of it.

“Tt’s very well that it is such a small one, and that we
have so little in it,” Robin said. They chose the most
secluded corner they could find, as near to the rose garden
as possible, and sat down and fell upon their scant lunch as
they had fallen upon their breakfast.

It was very scant for two ravenously hungry children,
and they tried to make it last as long as possible. But
scant as it was, and tired as they were, their spirits did not
fail them.

“Perhaps, if we eat it slowly, it will seem more,” said.
Meg, peeling an egg with deliberation, but with a very
108 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



undeliberate feeling in her small stomach. ‘“ Robin, ‘did
you notice our man?”

~“T saw him, of course,” answered Robin; ‘he’s too
big not to see.”

“T nxoteced him,” continued Meg.“ Robin, there’s some-
thing the matter with that man. He’s a gloomy man.”

“Well, you noticed him quickly,” Robin responded,
with a shade of fraternal incredulity. ‘ What's happened
to him ?”

Meg’s eyes fixed themselves on a glimpse of blue water
she saw through the trees. She looked as if she were
thinking the matter over.

“How do I know?” she said; “I couldn't. But, some-
how, he has a dreary face, as if he had been thinking of
dreary things. I don’t know why I thought that all in a
minute, but I did, and I believe it’s true.”

“Well, if we should see him again,” Robin said, “I'll
look and see.”

“I believe we shall see him again,” said Meg. ‘How
many eggs have we left, Robin?”

“We only brought three dozen,” he answered, looking
into the satchel; “and we ate seven this morning.”

“When you have nothing but eggs, you eat a good
many,” said Meg, reflectively. ‘They won't last very long.
But we couldn't have carried a thousand eggs, even if we
had had them ”—which was a sage remark.

‘We shall have to buy some cheap things,” was Robin's
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 109



calculation. ‘ They’ll have to be very cheap, though. We
have to pay a dollar, you know, every day, to come in; and
if we have no money we can't go into the places that are
not free; and we want to go into everything.”

“Td rather go in hungry than stay outside and have real
dinners, wouldn’t you?” Meg put it to him.

“Yes, I would,” he answered, “though it’s pretty hard
to be hungry.”

They had chosen a secluded corner to sit in, but it was
not so secluded that they had it entirely to themselves.
At a short distance from them, in the nearest bowery nook,
a young man and woman were eating something out of a
basket. They looked like a young country pair, plain and
awkward, and enjoying themselves immensely. Their
clothes were common and their faces were tanned, as if
from working out of doors. But their basket evidently
contained good, home-made things to eat. Meg caught
glimpses of ham and chicken, and something that looked
like cake. Just at that moment they looked so desperately
good that she turned away her eyes, because she did not
want to stare at. them rudely. And as she averted them,
she saw that Robin had seen, too.

“Those people have plenty to eat,” he said, with a
short, awkward laugh.

“Yes,” she answered. “Don’t let us look. We are
here, Robin, anyway, and we knew we couldn’t come as

other people do.”
¢

110 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



“Ves,” he said, ‘we are here.”

The man and his wife finished their lunch, and began
putting things in order in their basket. As they did it,
they talked together in a low voice, and seemed to be dis-
cussing something. Somehow, in spite of her averted eyes,
Meg suddenly felt as if they were discussing Robin and
herself, and she wondered if they had caught her involun-
tary look. “

“T think, Robin,” said Meg—‘I think that woman is
going to speak to us.’

It was evident that she was. She got up and came
towards them, her husband following her rather awk-
wardly.

She stopped before them, and the two pairs of dark
eyes lifted themselves to her face.

“T’ve just been talking to my man about you two,” she
said. ‘“Wecouldn’t help looking at you. Have you lost
your friends ?”

“No, ma’am,” said Robin, “we haven't got any; I
mean, we're not with any one.”

The woman turned and looked at her husband.

“Well, Jem!” she exclaimed.

The man drew near and looked them over.

He was a raw-boned, big young man, with a countrified,
good-natured face.

“You haven’t come here alone?” he said.

“Yes,” said Robin. ‘We couldn’t have come, if we


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TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 113



hadn’t come alone. We're not afraid, thank you. We're
getting along very well.”

“Well, Jem!” said the woman again.

She seemed quite stirred. There was something in her
ordinary, good-natured face that was quite like a sort of
rough emotion.

‘Have you plenty of money?” she asked.

“No,” said Robin, “not plenty, but we have a little.”

She put her basket down and opened it. She took out
some pieces of brown fried chicken; then she took out
some big slices of cake, with raisins in it. She even added
some biscuits and slices of ham. Then she put them in a
coarse, clean napkin.

“Now, look here,” she said, “don’t you go filling up
with candy and peanuts, just because you are by your-
selves. You put this in your bag, and eat it when you're
ready. "I any rate, it’s good, home-made victuals, and
won't harm you.” .

And in the midst of their shy thanks, she shut the bas-
ket again and went off with her husband, and they heard
her say again, before she disappeared,

“Well, Jem!”
114 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS





XIll

ES, there were plenty of kind people in the world,
Y and one of the best proofs of it was that, in that busy,
wonderful place through which all the world seemed
passing, and where, on every side, were a thousand things to
attract attention, and so fill eyes and mind that forgetful-
ness and carelessness of small things might not have been
quite unnatural, these two small things, utterly insignificant
and unknown to the crowds they threaded, met many a
passing friend of the moment, and found themselves made
happier by many a kindly and helpful word or look. Off-
cials were good-natured to them, guides were good-humored,
motherly women and fatherly men protected them in awk-
ward crowds. They always saw that those who noticed
them glanced about for their chaperons, and again and
again they were asked who was taking care of them;
but Robin’s straightforward, civil little answer, ‘We're
taking care of ourselves,” never failed to waken as much
friendly interest as surprise.
They kept up their fairy story of. the Great Genius, and
called things by fairy-story names, and talked to each
other of their fairy-story fancies about them. It was so
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 115



much more delightful to say: ‘Let us go to the Palace of
the Genius of the Sea,” than to say, “ Let us go to the Fish-
eries’ building.” And once in the palace, standing among
great rocks and pools and fountains, with water splashing
and tumbling over strange sea-plants, and strange sea-mon-
sters swimming beneath their eyes in green sea-water, it
was easy to believe in the Genius who had brought them all
together.

“He was very huge,” Meg said, making a picture of
him. ‘He had monstrous eyes, that looked like the sea
when it is blue; he had great, white coral teeth, and he had
silver, scaly fish-skin wound round him, and his hair was
long sea-grass and green and brown weeds.”

They stood in grottoes and looked down into clear
pools, at swift-darting things of gold and silver and strange
prismatic colors. Meg made up stories of tropical rivers,
with palms and jungle cane fringing them, and tigers and
lions coming to lap at the brink. She invented rushing
mountain streams and lakes, with speckled trout leaping ;
and deep, deep seas, where whales lay rocking far below,
and porpoises rolled, and devil-fish spread hideous, far-reach-
ing tentacles for prey. .

Oh, what a day it was! What wonders they saw and
hung over, and dwelt on with passions of young delight!
The great sea gave up its deep to them; great forests and
trackless jungles their wonderful growths; kings’ palaces
and queens’ coffers their rarest treasures; the ages of long
116 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS





ago their relics and strange legends, in stone and wood and
brass and gold.

They did not know how often people turned and stopped
to look at their two little, close-leaning figures and vivid,
dark, ecstatic-eyed faces. They certainly never chanced to
see that one figure was often behind them at a safe distance,
and seemed rather to have fallen into the habit of going
where they went and listening to what they said. It was
their man, curiously enough, and it was true that he was
rather a gloomy-looking man, when one observed him well.
His keen, business-like, well-cut face had a cloud resting
upon it; he looked listless and unsmiling, even in the
palaces that most stirred the children’s souls; and, in fact, it
seemed to be their odd enthusiasm which had attracted him
a little, because he was in the mood to feel none himself.
He had been within hearing distance when Meg had been
telling her stories of the Genius of the Palace of the Sea, and
a faint smile had played about his mouth for a moment.
Then he had drawn a trifle nearer, still keeping out of sight,
and when they had moved he had followed them. He had
been a hard, ambitious, wealth-gaining man all his life. A
few years before he had found a new happiness, which soft-
ened him for a while, and made his world seem a brighter
thing. Then a black sorrow had come upon him, and every-
thing had changed. He had come to the Enchanted City,
not as the children had come, because it shone before them,
a radiant joy, but because he wondered if it would distract
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HE WAS LOOKING AT HER IN AN ABSENT, MISERABLE WAY.

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TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 119



him at all. All other things had failed; his old habits of
work and scheme, his successes, his ever-growing fortune,
they were all as nothing. The world was empty to him, and
he walked about it feeling like a ghost. The little dark,
vivid faces had attracted him, he did not know why, and
when he heard the story of the Palace of the Sea he was
led on by a vague interest.

He was near them often during the day, but it was not
until late in the afternoon that they saw him themselves,
when he did not see them. They came upon him in a quiet
spot where he was sitting alone. On a seat near him sat a
young woman, resting, with a baby asleep in her arms. The
young woman was absorbed in her child, and was appar-
ently unconscious of him. His arms were folded and his
head bent, but he was looking at her in an absent, miser-
able way. It was as if she made him think of something
bitter and sad.

Meg and Robin passed him quietly.

‘‘T see what you meant, Meg,” Robin said. ‘He does
look as if something was the matter with him. I wonder
what it is?”

When they passed out of the gates at dusk, it was with
worn-out bodies, but enraptured souls. In the street-car,
which they indulged in the extravagance of taking, the
tired people, sitting exhaustedly in the seats and hanging
on to straps, looked with a sort of wonder at them, their
faces shone so like stars. They did not know where they
120 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



were going to sleep, and they were more than ready for
lying down, but they were happy beyond words.

They went with the car until it reached the city’s heart,
and then they got out and walked. The streets were
lighted, and the thoroughfares were a riot of life and
sound. People were going to theatres, restaurants, and
hotels, which were a blaze of electric radiance. They found
themselves limping a little, but they kept stoutly on, hold-
ing firmly to the satchel.

“We needn’t be afraid of going anywhere, however
poor it looks,” Robin said, with a grave little elderly air.
He was curiously grave for his years, sometimes. ‘“ Any-
body can see we have nothing to steal. I think any one
would know that we only want to go to bed.”

It was a queer place they finally hit upon. It was up a
side street, which was poorly lighted, and where the houses
were all shabby and small. On the steps of one of them a
tired-looking woman was sitting, with a pale, old-faced boy
beside her. Robin stopped before her.

‘Have you a room where my sister could sleep, and I
could have a mattress on the floor, or lie down on any-
thing?” he said. ‘ We can’t afford to go anywhere where
it will cost more than fifty cents each.” :

The woman looked at them indifferently. She was evi-
dently very much worn out with her day’s work, and dis-
couraged by things generally.

“T haven't. anything worth more than fifty cents, good-
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 121



ness knows,” she answered. ‘You must be short of money
to come here. I’ve never thought of having roomers.”

‘“We’re poor,” said Robin, ‘and we know we can’t have
anything but a poor room. If we can lie down, we are so
tired we shall go to sleep anywhere. We've been at the
Fair all day.”

The pale little old-faced boy leaned forward, resting
his arm on his mother’s knee. They saw that he was a very
poor little fellow, indeed, with a hunch back.

“Mother,” he said, “let ’em stay ; I’ll sleep on the floor.”

The woman gave a dreary half laugh, and got up from
the step. ‘He’s crazy about the Fair,” she said: “We
hain’t no money to spend on Fairs, and he’s most wild about
it. You can stay here to-night, if you want to.”

She made a sign to them to follow her. The hunch-
back boy rose too, and went into the dark passage after
them. He seemed to regard them with a kind of hunger
in his look.

They went up the narrow, steep staircase. It was only
lighted by a dim gleam from a room below, whose. door was
open. The balustrades were rickety, and some of them
were broken out. It was a forlorn enough place. The
hunchback boy came up the steps, awkwardly, behind them.
It was as if he wanted to see what would happen.

They went up two flights of the crooked, crazy stairs,
and at the top of the second flight the woman opened a
door.
122 | TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



“That's all the place there is,” she said. ‘It isn’t any-
thing more than a place to lie down in, you see. I can put
a mattress on the floor for you, and your sister can sleep
in the cot.”

“That’s all we want,” replied Robin.

But it was a poor place. A room, both small and bare,
and with broken windows. There was nothing in it but the
cot and a chair.

‘Ben sleeps here,” the woman said. “If I couldn't
make him a place on the floor, near me, I couldn't let it to
you.” Meg turned and looked at Ben. He was gazing
at her with a nervous interest.

‘“We're much obliged to you,” she said.

“Tt’s all right,” he said, with eager shyness. ‘Do you
want some water to wash yourselves with? I can bring
you up atin basin and a jug. You can set it on the
chair.”

“Thank you,” they both said at once. And Robin
added, ‘‘ We want washing pretty badly.”

Ben turned about and went down-stairs for the water as
if he felt a sort of excitement in doing the service. These
two children, who looked as poor as himself, set stirring
strange thoughts in his small, unnourished brain.

He brought back the tin basin and water, a piece
of yellow soap, and even a coarse, rather dingy, towel.
He had been so eager that he was out of breath when
he returned, but he put the basin on the chair and the tin
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 123



jug beside it, with a sort of exultant look in his poor
face.

“Thank you,” said Meg again; “thank you, Ben.”

She could not help watching him as his mother prepared
the rather wretched mattress for Robin. Once he caught
the look of her big, childish, gray eyes as it rested upon
him with questioning sympathy, and he flushed up so that
even by the light of the little smoky lamp she saw it.
When the woman had finished she and the boy went away |
and left them, and they stood a moment looking at each
other. They were both thinking of the same thing, but
somehow they did not put it into words.

“We'll wash off the dust first,” said Robin, “and then
we'll eat some of the things we have left from what the
woman gave us. And then we'll go to bed, and we shall
drop just like logs.”

And this they did, and it was certainly a very short time
before the smoky little lamp was out, and each had
dropped like a log and lay stretched in the darkness, with a
sense of actual ecstasy in limbs laid down to rest and mus-
cles relaxed for sleeping.

“Robin,” said Meg, drowsily, through the dark that
divided them, “everybody in the world has something to
give to somebody else.”

‘“T’m thinking that, too,” Robin answered, just as sleep-
ily; “nobody is so poor—that—he—hasn’t anything. That

”



—boy
124 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

‘He let us have his hard bed,” Meg murmured, “and he

”



—hasn’t seen
But her voice died away, and Robin would not have
heard her if she had said more. And they were both fast.

fast asleep.
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 125



XIV

T would have been a loud sound which would have awak-
ened them during those deep sleeping hours of the
night. They did not even stir on their poor pillows when,
long after midnight, there was the noise of heavy drunken
footsteps and heavy drunken stumbling in the passage
below, and then the raising of a man’s rough voice, and
the upsetting of chairs and the slamming of doors, mingled
with the expostulations of the woman, whose husband had
come home in something worse than his frequent ill-fashion.
They slept sweetly through it all, but when the morning
came, and hours of unbroken rest had made their slumbers
lighter, and the sunshine streamed in through the broken
windows, they were called back to the world by loud and
angry sounds.

“What is it?” said Meg, sitting bolt upright and rubbing
her eyes; “somebody’s shouting.”

”

‘And somebody’s crying,” said Robin, sitting up too,
but more slowly.

It was quite clear to them, as soon as they were fully
awake, that both these things were happening. A man
seemed to be quarrelling below. They could hear him

stamping about and swearing savagely. And they could
126 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

hear the woman’s voice, which sounded as if she were trying
to persuade him to do or leave undone something. They
could not hear her words, but she was crying, and somebody
else was crying, too, and they knew it was the boy with the
little old face and the hump back.

‘““T suppose it’s the woman’s husband,” said Meg. ‘I’m
glad he wasn’t here last night.”

“T wonder if he knows we are here,” said Robin, listen-
ing anxiously.

It was plain that he did know. They heard him
stumbling up the staircase, grumbling and swearing as he
came, and he was coming up to their room, it was evident.

“What shall we do?” exclaimed Meg, in a whisper.

“Wait,” Robin answered, breathlessly. ‘We can’t do
anything.”

The heavy feet blundered up the short second flight and
blundered to their door. It seemed that the man had not
slept off his drunken fit. He struck the door with his fist.

“Hand out that dollar,” he shouted. ‘When my wife
takes roomers I’m going to be paid. Hand it out.”

They heard the woman hurrying up the stairs after him.
She was out of breath with crying, and there was a chok-
ing sound in her voice when she spoke to them through
the door.

“You'd better let him have it,” she said.

“I guess they'd better,” said the man, roughly. ‘“ Who
d’ they suppose owns the house ?”
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 127





Robin got up and took a dollar from their very small
store, which was hidden in the lining of his trousers. He
went to the door and opened it a little, and held the money
out.

“ Here it is,” he said.

The man snatched it out of his hand and turned away,
and went stumbling down stairs, still growling. The
woman stood a minute on the landing, and they heard her
make a pitiful sort of sound, half sob, half sniff.

Meg sat up in bed, with her chin on her hands, and
glared like a little lioness.

“What do you think of ¢at?” she said.

“ He’s a devil!” said Robin, with terseness. And he was
conscious of no impropriety. ‘I wanted that boy to have
it, and go.” It was not necessary to say where.

“So did I,” answered Meg. ‘And 1 believe his mother
would have given it to him, too.”

They heard the man leave the house a few minutes
later, and then it did not take them long to dress and go
down the narrow, broken-balustraded stairs again. As they
descended the first flight they saw the woman cooking
something over the stove in her kitchen, and as she moved
about they saw her brush her apron across her eyes.

The squalid street was golden with the early morning
sunshine, which is such a joyful thing, and, in the full,
happy flood of it, a miserable little figure sat crouched on
the steps. It was the boy Ben, and they saw that he
128 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

looked paler than he had looked the night before, and his
little face looked older. His elbow was on his knee and
his cheek on his hand, and there were wet marks on his
cheeks.

A large lump rose up in Meg’s throat.

““T know what’s the matter,” she whispered to Robin.

‘““So—so do I,” Robin answered, rather unsteadily. ‘“ And
he’s poorer than anybody else. It ought not to go by
him.”

“No, no,” said Meg.“ It-oughtn’t.”

She walked straight to the threshold and sat down on
the step beside him. She was a straightforward child, and
she was too much moved to stand on ceremony. She sat
down quite close by the poor little fellow, and put her hand
on his arm.

“Never you mind,” she said. ‘Never you mind.”
And her throat felt so full that for a few seconds she could
say nothing more.

Robin stood against the door post. The effect of this
was to make his small jaw square itself.

“ Don’t mind us at all,” he said. ‘ We—we know.”

The little fellow looked at Meg and then up at him. In
that look he saw that they did know.

‘Mother was going to give that dollar to me,” he said,
brokenly. “I was going to the Fair on it. Fverybody is
going, everybody is talking about it, and thinking about it!
Nobody’s been talking of nothing else for months and
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 129



‘months! The streets are full of people on their way!
And they all pass me by.”

He rubbed his sleeve across his forlorn face and swal-
lowed hard.

‘There's pictures in the shops,” he went on, “and flags
flying. And everything’s going that way, and me staying
behind !”

Two of the large, splendid drops, which had sometimes
gathered on Meg’s eyelashes and fallen on the straw, when
she had been telling stories in the barn, fell now upon her
lap.

“Robin!” she said.

Robin stood and stared very straight before him for a
minute, and then his eyes turned and met hers.

‘We're very poor,” he said to her, “but cverybody has
—has something.”

“We couldn’t leave him behind,” Meg said, “we couldn't /
Let’s think.” And she put her head down, resting her
elbows on her knee and clutching her forehead with her
supple, strong little hands.

“What can we do without?” said Robin. ‘“ Let’s do
without something.”
Meg lifted her head. -

“We will eat nothing but the eggs for breakfast,” she
said, ‘and go without lunch—if we can. Perhaps we can’t
—but we'll try. And we will not go into some of the places
we have to pay to go into. I will make up stories about
130 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



them for you. And, Robin, it zs true—everybody has some-
thing to give. That's what | have—the stories I make up.
It’s something—just a little.”

“Tt isn’t so little,” Robin answered ; “ it fills in the empty
place, Meg?” with a question in his voice.

She answered with a little nod, and then put her hand on
Ben’s arm again. During their rapid interchange of words
he had been gazing at them in a dazed, uncomprehending
way. To his poor little starved nature they seemed so
strong and different from himself that there was something
wonderful about them. Meg’s glowing, dark little face
quite made his weak heart beat as she turned it upon him.

“We are not much better off than you are,” she said,
“but we think we’ve got enough to take you into the
grounds. You let us have your bed. Come along with us.”

““To—to—the Fair?” he said, tremulously.

“Yes,” she answered, ‘and when we get in I'll try and
think up things to tell you and Robin, about the places we
can’t afford to go into. We can go into the Palaces for
nothing.”

“Palaces!” he gasped, his wide eyes on her face.

She laughed.

‘“That’s what we call them,” she said; “that’s what they
are. It’s part of a story. I'll tell it to you as we go.”

“Oh!” he breathed out, with a sort of gasp, again.

He evidently did not know how to express himself. His
hands trembled, and he looked half frightened.
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“ TO—TO—THE FAIR?” HE SAID, TREMULOUSLY,
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 133



“Tf you'll do it,” he said, “ ’ll remember you all my life!
T11—I’ll—if it wasn’t for father I know mother would let
you sleep here every night for nothing. And I'd give you
my bed and be glad to do it, I would. I'll be so thankful to
you. I hain’t got nothin-—nothin’—but I'll be that thankful
—JI”—there was a kind of hysterical break in his voice—
“Jet me go and tell mother,” he said, and he got up stum-
blingly and rushed into the house.

Meg and Robin followed him to the kitchen, as excited
as he was. The woman had just put a cracked bowl of
something hot on the table, and as he came in she spoke to
him.

“Your mush is ready,” she said. ‘‘Come and eat while
it's: Wot.

‘‘Mother,” he cried out, ‘they are going to take me in.
I'm going! They're going to take me!”

The woman stopped short and looked at the twins, who
stood in the doorway. It seemed as if her chin rather
trembled.

“You're going—” she began, and broke off. ‘You're
as. poor as. he iis, she. ended. -="“You musty be or you
wouldn’t have come here to room.”

“We're as poor in one way,” said Meg, “ but we worked,
and saved money to come. It isn’t much, but we can do
without something that would cost fifty cents, and that will
pay for his ticket.”

The woman’s chin trembled more still.
134 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



“Well,” she said, ““I—I—O Lord!” And she threw
her apron over her head and sat down suddenly.

Meg went over to her, not exactly knowing why.

“We could not bear to go ourselves,” she said. ‘And
he is like us.”

She was thinking, as she spoke, that this woman and her
boy were very fond of each other. The hands holding the
apron were trembling as his had done. They dropped as
suddenly as they had been thrown up. The woman lifted
her face eagerly.

“What were you thinking of going without?” she asked.
“Was it things to eat?”

“We—we've got some hard- boiled eggs,” faltered Meg,
a little guiltily.

“There's hot mush in the pan,” said the woman.
“There’s nothing to eat with it, a it’s healthier than cold
eggs. Sit down and eat some.’

And they did, and in half an hour they left the poor
house, feeling full-fed and fresh. With them went Ben—
his mother standing on the steps looking after him—his
pale old face almost flushed and young, as it set itself
toward the City Beautiful.
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 135



XV

EFORE they entered the Court of Honor Meg
B stopped them both. She was palpitating with excite-
ment.

“Robin,” she said, “let us make him shut his eyes.
Then you can take one of his hands and I can take the
other, and we will lead him. And when we have taken him
to the most heavenly place, he shall look—suddenly !”

“T should like that,” said Ben, tremulous with antici-
pation.

‘All right,” said Robin.

By this time it was as if they had been friends all their
lives. They knew each other. They had not ceased talk-
ing a moment since they set out, but it had not been
about the Fair. Meg had decided that nothing should be
described beforehand; that all the entrancement of beauty
should burst upon Ben’s hungry soul, as Paradise bursts
upon translated spirits.

“T don’t want it to be gradual,” she said, anxiously. “I
want it to be sudden / It can be gradual after.”

She was an artist and an epicure in embryo, this child.
She tasted her joys with a delicate palate, and lost no
flavor of them. The rapture of yesterday was intensified
136 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



tenfold to-day, because she felt it throbbing anew in this
frail body beside her, in which Nature had imprisoned a
soul as full of longings as her own, but not so full of power.

They took Ben by either hand, and led him with the
greatest care. He shut his eyes tight, and walked between
them. People who glanced at them smiled, recognizing
the time-honored and familiar child trick. They did not
know that this time it was something more than that.

“The trouble is,” Meg said in a low voice to Robin, “I
don’t know which is the most heavenly place to stand.
Sometimes I think it is at one end, and sometimes at the
other, and sometimes at the side.”

They led their charge for some mniinutes indefinitely.
Sometimes they paused and looked about them, speaking
in undertones. Ben was rigidly faithful, and kept his eyes
shut. As they hesitated for a moment near one of the
buildings, a man who was descending the steps looked in
their direction, and his look was one of recognition. It
was the man who had watched them the day before, and
he paused upon the steps, interested again, and conscious
of being curious.

“What are they going to do?” he said to himself.
“They are going to do something. Where did they pick
up the other one—poor little chap!”

Meg had been looking very thoughtful during that
moment of hesitancy. She spoke, and he was near enough
to hear her.
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 137



‘He shall open them where he can hear the water
splashing in the fountain,” she said. “I think that’s the
best.”

It seemed that Robin thought so, too. They turned
and took their way to the end of the Court, where the dome
lifted itself, wonderful, against the sky, and a splendor of
rushing water, from which magnificent sea-monsters rose,
stood grand before.

Their man followed them. He had had a bad night,
and had come out into a dark world. The streams of pleas-
ure-seekers, the gayly fluttering flags, the exhilaration in
the very air seemed to make his world blacker and more
empty. A year before he had planned to see this wonder,
with the one soul on earth who would have been most
thrilled, and who would have made him most thrill, to its
deepest and highest meaning. Green grass and summer
roses were waving over the earth that had shut in all
dreams like these, for him. As he wandered about, he
had told himself that he had been mad to come and see it
all,so alone. Sometimes he turned away from the crowd,
and sat in some quiet corner of palace or fairy garden;
and it was because he was forced to do it, for it was at
times when he was in no condition to be looked at by care-
less passers-by.

He had never been particularly fond of children; but
somehow these two waifs, with their alert faces and odd
independence, had wakened his interest. He was con-
138 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



scious of rather wanting to know where they had come
from and what they would do next. The bit of the story
of the Genius of the Palace of the Sea had attracted him.
He had learned to love stories from the one who should
have seen with him the Enchanted City. She had been a
story lover, and full of fancies.

He followed the trio to the end of the great Court.
When they reached there, three pairs of cheeks were
flushed, and the eyes that were open were glowing. Meg
and Robin chose a spot of ground, and stopped.

“Now,” said Meg, ‘open them—suddenly !”

The boy opened them. The man saw the look that
flashed into his face. It was a strange, quivering look.
Palaces, which seemed of pure marble, surrounded him.
He had never even dreamed of palaces. White stairways
rose from the lagoon, leading to fair, open portals the won-
dering world passed through to splendors held within. A
great statue of gold towered noble and marvellous, with
uplifted arms holding high the emblems of its spirit and
power, and at the end of this vista, through the archway,
and between the line of columns, bearing statues poised
against the background of sky, he caught glimpses of the
lake’s scintillating blue.

He uttered a weird little sound. It was part exclama-
tion, and a bit of a laugh, cut short by something like a
nervous sob, which did not know what to do with itself.

“Oh!” he said. And then, “Oh!” again. And then
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 139



“J—I don’t know—what it’s—like!” And he cleared his
throat and stared, and Meg saw his narrow chest heave up
and down.

“Tt isn’t “Zeke anything, but—but something we've
dreamed of, perhaps,” said Meg, gazing in ecstasy with
him. .

“No—no!” answered Ben. “But I've never dreamed
like it.”

Meg put her hand on his shoulder.

“But you will now,” she said. “ You will now.”

And their man had been near enough to hear, and he
came to them.

‘Good morning,” he said. ‘You're having another
day of it, I see.”

Meg and Robin looked up at him, radiant. They were
both in good enough mood to make friends. They felt
friends with everybody.

“Good morning,” they answered; and Robin added,
“We're going to come every day as long as we can make
our money last.”

“That’s a good enough idea,” said their man. ‘‘ Where
are your father and mother ?”

Meg lifted her solemn, black-lashed eyes to his. She
was noticing again about the dreary look in his face.

“They died nearly four years ago,” she answered, for
Robin.

“Who is with you?” asked the man, meeting her
140 TIVO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS
questioning gaze with a feeling that her great eyes were
oddly thoughtful for a child’s, and that there was a look in
them he had seen before in a pair of eyes closed a year ago.
It gave him an almost startled feeling.

‘“ Nobody is with us,” Meg said, ‘except Ben.”

“You came alone?” said the man.

“Yes.”

He looked at her for a moment in silence, and then
turned away and looked across the Court to where the lake
gleamed through the colonnade.

“So did I,” he said, reflectively. ‘So did I. Quite
alone.”

Meg and Robin glanced at each other.

“Yesterday Rob and I came by ourselves,” said Meg
next, and she said it gently. ‘But we were not lonely;
and to-day we have Ben.”

The man turned his eyes on the boy.

“You're Ben, are you?” he said.

“Yes,” Ben answered. ‘And but for them I couldn’t
never have seen it—never!”

“Why?” the man asked. ‘Almost everybody can
see it.”
“But not me,” said Ben. ‘And I wanted to more than

any one—seemed like to me. And when they roomed at
our house last night, mother was going to give me the fifty
cents, but—but father—father, he took it away from us.
And they brought me.”
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 141



Then the man turned on Robin.
“Have you plenty of money?” he asked, unceremoni-
ously.
“ No,” said Rob.
‘They're as poor as Iam,” put in Ben. ‘They couldn't
afford to room anywhere but with poor people.”

”

“But everybody—’” Meg began impulsively, and then
stopped, remembering that it was not Robin she was talk-
ing to.

“But everybody—what ?” said the man.

It was Robin who answered for her this time.

‘“She said that last night,” he explained, with a half shy
laugh, “that everybody had something they could give to
somebody else.”

“Oh, well, it isn’t always money, of course, or anything
big,” said Meg, hurriedly. ‘It might be something that is
ever so little.”

The man laughed, but his eyes seemed to be remember-
ing something as he looked over the lagoon again.

“That's a pretty good thing to think,” he said.
“Now,” turning on Meg rather suddenly, “I wonder
what you have to give to me.”

“T don’t know,” she answered, perhaps a trifle wistfully.
“The thing I give to Rob and Ben is a very little one.”

“She makes up things to tell us about the places we
can’t pay to go into, or don’t understand,” said Robin.

”

“Tt’s not as little as she thinks it is.
142 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS
.

“Well,” said the man, “look here! Perhaps that’s what
you have to give tome. You came to this place alone and
so did I. I believe you’re enjoying yourselves more than I
am. You're going to take Ben about and tell him stories.
Suppose you take me !”

“You!” Meg exclaimed. ‘But you’re a man, and you
know all about it, | dare say; and I only tell things I make
up—fairy stories, and other things. A man wouldn’t care
for them. He—he knows.”

‘“He knows too much, perhaps—that’s the trouble,” said
the man. “A fairy or so might do me good. I’m not
acquainted enough with them. And if I know things you
don’t—perhaps that’s what I have to give to you.”

“Why,” said Meg, her eyes growing as she looked up at
his odd, clever face, ‘‘do you want to go about with us?”

“Yes,” said the man, with a quick, decided nod, “I be-
lieve that’s just what I want todo. I’m lonelier than you
two. At least, you are together. Come on, children,” but it
was to Meg he held out his hand. ‘Take me with you.”

And, bewildered as she was, Meg found herself giving
her hand to him and being led away, Robin and Ben close
beside them.
i}

Hl i}

ey
ae



“TAKE ME WITH YOU.”
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 145



XVI

T was such a strange thing—so unlike the things of every
| day, and so totally an unexpected thing, that for a little
while they all three had a sense of scarcely knowing
what to do with themselves. If Robin and Meg had not
somehow rather liked the man, and vaguely felt him friendly,
and if there had not been in their impressionable minds that
fancy about his being far from as happy as the other people
of the crowds looked, it is more than probable that they
would not have liked their position, and would have felt
that it might spoil their pleasure.

But they were sympathetic children, and they had been
lonely and sad enough themselves to be moved by a sadness
in others, even if it was an uncomprehended one.

As she walked by the man’s side, still letting her hand
remain in his, Meg kept giving him scrutinizing looks aside,
and trying in her way to read him. He was a man just past
middle life, he was powerful and well-built, and had keen,
and at the same time rather unhappy-looking, blue eyes, with
brows and lashes as black’ as Rob’s and her own. There
was something strong in his fine-looking, clean-shaven face,
and the hand which held hers had a good, firm grasp, and
felt like a hand which had worked in its time.
146 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

As for the man himself, he was trying an experiment.
He had been suddenly seized with a desire to try it, and see
how it would result. He was not sure that it would be a
success, but if it proved one it might help to rid him of
gloom he would be glad to be relieved of. He felt it rather
promising when Meg went at once to the point and asked
him a practical question.

“You don’t know our names?” she said.

“You don’t know mine,” he answered. ‘It’s John Holt.
You can call me that.”

“John Holt,” said Meg. “Mr. John Holt.”

The man laughed. Her grave, practical little air pleased
him.

“Say John Holt, without the handle to it,” he said. “It
. sounds well.”

Meg looked at him inquiringly. Though he had
laughed, he seemed to mean what he said. .

“It’s queer, of course,” she said, ‘because we don’t
know each other well; but I can do it, if you like.”

“T do like,” he said, and he laughed again.

“Very well,” said Meg. ‘* My name’s Margaret Macleod,
I’m called Meg for short. My brother’s name is Robin, and
Ben’s is Ben Nowell. Where shall we go first ?”

“You are the leader of the party,” he answered, his face
beginning to brighten a little. ‘ Where shall it be?”

“The Palace of the Genius of the Flowers,” she said.

“Ts that what it is called?” he asked.
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 147

“That's what we call it,” she explained. ‘ That’s part of
the fairy story. Weare part of a fairy story, and-all these
are palaces that the Genii built for the Great Magician.”

‘That's first-rate,” he said. “ Just tell us about it. Ben
and I have not heard.”

At first she had wondered if she could tell her stories to
a grown-up person, but there was something in his voice and
face that gave her the feeling that she could. She laughed
a littlke when she began; but he listened with enjoyment
that was so plain, and Ben, walking by her side, looked up
with such eager, enraptured, and wondering eyes, that she
went on bravely. It grew, as stories will, in being told,
and it was better than it had been the day before. Robin
himself saw that, and leaned: towards her as eagerly
as Ben.

By the time they entered the Palace of the Flowers and
stood among the flame of colors, and beneath the great palm
fronds swaying under the crystal globe that was its dome,
she had warmed until she was all aglow, and as full of
fancies as the pavilions were of blossoms.

As she dived into the story of the Genius who strode
through tropical forests and deep jungles, over purple
moors and up mountain sides, where strange-hued pale
or vivid things grew in tangles, or stood in the sun alone,
John Holt became of the opinion that his experiment would
be a success. It was here that he began to find he had gifts
to give. She asked him questions; Robin and Ben asked
148 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



him questions; the three drew close to him, and hung on
his every word.

‘You know the things and the places where they grow,”
Meg said. ‘ We have never seen anything. We can only
try to imagine. You can tell us.” And he did tell them;
and as they went from court to pavilion, surrounded by
sumptuous bloom and sumptuous leafage and sumptuous
fragrance, the three beginning to cling to him, to turn to
him with every new discovery, and to forget he was a
stranger, he knew that he was less gloomy than he had been
before, and that somehow this thing seemed worth doing.

And in this way they went from place to place. As
they had seen beauties and wonders the day before, they
saw wonders and beauties to-day, but to-day their pleasure
had a flavor new to them. For the first time in years, since
they had left their little seat at their own fireside, they were
not alone, and some one seemed to mean to look after
them. John Holt was an eminently practical person, and
when they left the Palace of the Flowers they began
vaguely to realize that, stranger or not, he had taken charge
of them. It was evident that he was in the habit of taking
charge of people and things. He took charge of the
satchel. It appeared that he knew where it was safe to
leave it.

‘Can we get it at lunch time?” Robin asked, with some
anxiety.

“You can get it when you want it,” said John Holt.
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 149

A little later he looked at Ben’s pale, small face scruti-
nizingly. .

‘Look here,” he said, “you're tired.” And without
any further question he called up a rolling-chair.

“Get into that,” he said.

“Me?” said Ben, a little alarmed.

7 Yes,

And, almost a shade paler at the thought of such
grandeur, Ben got in, and fell back with a luxurious sigh.

And at midday, when they were beginning to feel
ravenous, though no one mentioned the subject, he asked
Meg a blunt question.

‘Where did you eat your lunch yesterday?” he asked.

Meg flushed a little, feeling that hospitality demanded
that they should share the remaining eggs with such a com-
panion, and she was afraid there would be very few to
offer, when Ben was taken into consideration.

‘““We went to a quiet place on the Wooded Island,”
she said, ‘and ate it with the roses. We pretended
they invited us. We had only hard-boiled eggs and a
sandwich each; but a kind woman gave us something of
her own.”

“We brought the eggs from home,” explained Rob.
‘“We have some chickens of our own, who laid them. We
thought that would be cheaper than buying things.”

“Oh!” said John Holt. “So you've been living on hard-
boiled eggs. Got any left ?”
150 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



‘“A few,” Meg answered. ‘They're in the satchel. We
shall have to go and get it.”

“Come along, then,” said John Holt. ‘ Pretty hungry
by this time, aren’t you?”

“Yes,” said Meg, with heartfelt frankness, ‘we are!”

It was astonishing how much John Holt had found out
about them during this one morning. They did not know
themselves how much their answers to his occasional ques-
tions had told him. He had not known himself, when he
‘asked the questions, how much their straightforward, prac-
tical replies would reveal. They had not sentimentalized
over their friendless loneliness, but he had found himself
realizing what desolate, unnoticed, and uncared-for things
their lives were. They had not told him how they had
tired their young bodies with work too heavy for them, but
he had realized it. In his mind there had risen a picture
of the Straw Parlor, under the tent-like roof of the barn,
with these two huddled together in the cold, buried in the
straw, while they talked over their desperate plans. They
had never thought of calling themselves strong and deter-_
mined, and clear of wit, but he knew how strong and firm
of purpose and endurance two creatures so young and
unfriended, and so poor, must have been to form a plan so
bold, and carry it out in the face of the obstacles of youth
and inexperience, and empty pockets and hands. He had
laughed at the story of the Treasure saved in pennies, and
hidden deep in the straw; but as he had laughed he had
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 151

thought, with a quick, soft throb of his heart, that the
woman he had loved and lost would have laughed with
him, with tears in the eyes which Meg’s reminded him of.
He somehow felt as if she might be wandering about with
them in their City Beautiful this morning, they were so
entirely creatures she would have been drawn to, and longed
to make happier.

He liked their fancy of making their poor little feast
within scent of the roses. It was just such a fancy as She
might have had herself. And he wanted to see what they
had to depend on. He knew it must be little, and it
touched him to know that, little as they had, they meant
to share it with their poorer friend.

They went for the satchel, and when they did so they
began to calculate as to what they could add to its contents.
They were few things, and poor ones.

He did not sit down, but stood by and watched them
for a moment, when, having reached their sequestered nook,
they began to spread out their banquet. It was composed
of the remnant eggs, some bread, and a slice of cheese. It
looked painfully scant, and Meg had an anxious eye.

“Ts that all?” asked John Holt, abruptly.

“Yes,” said Meg. ‘We shall have to make it do.”

“My Lord!” ejaculated John Holt, suddenly, in his
blunt fashion. And he turned round and walked away.

‘“Where’s he gone?” exclaimed Ben, timidly.

But they none of them could guess. Nice as he had
152 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

been, he had a brusque way, and, perhaps, he meant to
leave them.

But by the time they had divided the eggs, and the
bread and cheese, and had fairly begun, he came marching
back. He had a basket on his arm, and two bottles stuck
out of one coat pocket, while a parcel protruded from the
other. He came and threw himself down on the grass
beside them, and opened the basket. It was full of good
things.

“I’m going to have lunch with you,” he said, “and I
have a pretty big appetite, so I’ve brought you something
to eat. You can’t tramp about on that sort of thing.”

The basket they had seen the day before had been a
poor thing compared to this. The contents of this would
have been a feast for much more fastidious creatures than
three ravenous children. There were chickens and sand-
wiches and fruit; the bottles held lemonade, and the package
in the coat pocket was a box of candy.

‘““We—never had such good things in our lives,” Meg
gasped, amazed.

“Hadn’t you?” said John Holt, with a kind, and even a
happy, grin. ‘Well, pitch in.”
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 153



XVII

HAT a feast it was—what a feast! They were

\ V/ so hungry, they were so happy, they were so

rejoiced! And John Holt watched them as if he

had never enjoyed himself so much before. He laughed,

he made jokes, he handed out good things, he poured out
lemonade.

‘“Let’s drink to the Great Magician!” he said, filling the
little glasses he had brought; and he made them drink it
standing, asa toast. In all the grounds that day there was
no such a party, it was so exhilarated and amazed at itself.
Little Ben looked and ate and laughed as if the lemonade
had gone to his head.

“Oh, my!” he said, ‘if mother could see me!”

“We'll bring her to-morrow,” said John Holt.

“Are you—” faltered Meg, looking at him with wide
eyes, ‘are you coming again to-morrow ?”

“Yes,” John Holt answered, “and you are coming with
me; and we'll come every day until you've seen it all—if
you three will pilot me around.”

“You must be very rich, John Holt,” said Meg. She
had found out that it was his whim to want her to call

him so.
154 TIVO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



“T have plenty of money,” he said, ‘if that’s being rich,
Oh, yes, I’ve got money enough! I’ve more land than
Aunt Matilda.”

And then it was that suddenly Robin remembered some-
thing.

“T believe,” he said, ‘that I’ve heard Aunt Matilda
speak about you to Jones. I seem to remember your name.
You have the biggest farm in Illinois, and you have houses
and houses in town. Meg, don’t you remember—when he
got married, and everybody talked about how rich he was?”

And Meg did remember. She looked at him softly,
and thought she knew why he had seemed gloomy, for she
remembered that this rich and envied man’s wife had had
a little child and died suddenly. And she had even heard
once that it had almost driven him mad, because he had
been fond of her.

“Are you-—that one?” she said.

“Yes,” he answered, “I’m the one who got married.”
And the cloud fell on his face again, and for a minute or
so rested there. For he thought this thing which had hap-
pened to him was cruel and hideous, and he had never
ceased to rebel against it bitterly.

Meg drew a little closer to him, but she said no more
about what she knew he was thinking of. She was a clever
little thing, and knew this was not the time.

And after they had eaten of the good things, until
hunger seemed a thing of the past, the afternoon began as
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 155



a fairy story, indeed. Little by little they began to realize
that John Holt was their good and powerful giant, for it
seemed that he was not only ready to do everything for
them, but was rich enough.

‘“Have you been to the Midway Plaisance?” he asked
them. He felt very sure, however, that they had not, or
that, if they had, with that scant purse, they had not seen
what they longed to see.

“No, we haven't,” said Meg. ‘We thought we would
save it until we had seen so many other things that we
should not mind so very much only seeing the outsides of
places. We knew we should have to make up stories all
the time.”

“We won't save it,” said John Holt. “We'll go now.
We will hobnob with Bedouins and Japanese and Turks,
and shake hands with Amazons and Indians; we'll ride on
camels and go to the Chinese Theatre. Come along.”

And to this Arabian Nights’ Entertainment he took
them all. They felt as if he were a prince. And oh, the
exciting strangeness of it! To be in such a place and amid
such marvels, with a man who seemed to set no limit to the
resources of his purse. They never had been even near a
person who spent money as if it were made for spending,
and the good things of life were made to be bought by it.
What John Holt spent was only what other people with
full purses spent in the Midway Plaisance, but to Meg and.
Robin and Ben it seemed that he poured forth money in
156 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



torrents. They looked at him with timorous wonder and
marvelling gratitude. It seemed that he meant them to
see everything and to do everything. They rode on camels
down a street in Cairo, they talked to chiefs of the desert,
they listened to strange music, they heard strange tongues,
and tasted strange confections. Robin and Ben went about
like creatures in a delightful dream. Every few minutes
during the first hour Robin would sidle close to Meg, and
clutch her dress or her hand with a gasp of rapture.

“Oh, Meg!” he would say, ‘and yesterday we were so
poor! And now we are seeing everything /”

And when John Holt heard him, he would laugh half to
himself; a laugh with a touch of pleasant exultation in it,
and no gloom at all. He had found something to distract
him at last.

He liked to watch Meg’s face, as they went from one
weirdly foreign place to another. Her eyes were immense
with delight, and her face had the flush of an Indian peach.
Once she stopped suddenly, in such a glow of strange
delight that her eyes were full of other brightness than the
shining of her pleasure. ;

“Fairy stories do happen!” she said. ‘‘ You have made
one! It was a fairy story yesterday—but zow—oh ! just
think how like a fairy king you are, and what you are
giving to us! It will be enough to make stories of
forever!”

He laughed again. She found out in time that le often
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 157



laughed that short half-laugh when he was moved by
something. He had had a rough sort of life, successful as
it had been, and it was not easy for him to express all he
felt.

“That's all right,” he said, “that’s just as it should
be. But you are giving something to me, too—you
three.”

And so they were, and it was not a little thing.

Their afternoon was a thing of which they could never
have dreamed and for which they could never have hoped.
Before it was half over they began to feel that not only
John Holt was a prince, but that by some magic meta-
morphosis they had become princes themselves. It seemed
that nothing in that City Beautiful was to be closed to
them. It was John Holt’s habit to do things in a thorough,
business-like way, and he did this thing ina manner which
was a credit to his wit and good sense.

Ben, who had never been taken care of in his life, was
taken about in a chair, and looked after in a way that made
him wonder if he were not dreaming, and if he should not
be wakened presently by the sound of his father’s drunken
voice.

Robin found himself more than once rubbing his fore-
head in a puzzled fashion.

Meg felt rather as if she had become a princess. Some-
how, she and John Holt seemed to have known each other
along time. He seemed to like to keep her near him, and
158 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

always kept his eye on her, to see if she was enjoying her-
self, and was comfortable, or tired. She found herself being
wheeled by Ben, when John Holt decided it was time for.
her to rest. He walked by her and talked to her, answer-
ing all her questions. More than once it flashed into her
mind that it would be very awful when all this joy was over,
and they parted, as they would. But they were going to see
him to-morrow, he had said.

It seemed as if they marched from one climax of new
experience to another.

“You're going to dine with me,” he announced.
“You've had enough hard-boiled eggs. | And we'll see the
illuminations afterwards.”

He took them to what seemed to them a dining-place for
creatures of another world, it was so brilliant with light, so
decorated, so gorgeous. Servants moved to and fro, electric
globes gleamed, palms and flowers added to the splendor of
color and brightness. John Holt gave them an excellent
dinner; they thought it was a banquet. Ben kept his eyes
on John Holt’s face at every mouthful—he felt as if he
might vanish away. He looked as if he had done this every
day of his life. He called the waiters as if he knew no awe
of any human being, and the waiters flew to obey him.

In the evening he took them to see the City Beautiful
as it looked at night. It was set, it seemed to them, with
myriads of diamonds, all alight. Endless chains of jewels
seemed strung and wound about it. The Palace of the
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 159



Flowers held up a great crystal of light glowing against the
dark blue of the sky, towers and domes were crowned and
diademed, thousands of jewels hung among the masses of
leaves, or reflected themselves, sparkling, in the darkness of
the lagoons, fountains of molten jewels sprung up, and
flamed and changed. The City Beautiful stood out whiter
and more spirit-like than ever, in the pure radiance of these
garlands of clearest flame.

When first they came out upon it Robin involuntarily
pressed close to Meg, and their twin hands clasped each
other.

“Oh, Meg!” cried Robin.

“Oh, Robin!” breathed Meg, and she turned to John
Holt and caught his hand too.

“Oh, John Holt!” she said; “John Holt!”

Very primitive and brief exclamations of joy, but some-
how human beings have uttered them just as simply in all
great moments through centuries.

John Holt knew just the degree of rapturous feeling
they expressed, and he held Meg’s hand close and with a
warm grasp.

They saw the marvellous fairy spectacle from all points
and from all sides. Led by John Holt, they lost no view
and no beauty. They feasted full of all the delight of it;
and at last he took them to a quiet corner, where, through
the trees, sparkled lights and dancing water, and let them
talk it out.
160 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



The day had been such an incredible one, with its succes-
sion of excitements and almost unreal pleasures, that they
had actually forgotten that the night must come. They
were young enough for that indiscretion, and when they sat
down and began to realize how tired they were, they also
began to realize a number of other things.

A little silence fell upon them. Ben’s head began to
droop slightly upon his shoulder, and John Holt’s quick eye
saw it. :

‘“Have you had a good day?” he asked.

“Rob,” said Meg, “when we sat in the Straw Parlor and
talked about the City Beautiful, and the people who would
come to it—when we thought we could never see it our-
selves—did we ever dream that anybody—even if they were
kings and queens—could have such a day?”

“Never,” answered Robin; “never! We didn’t know
such a day was in the world.”

“That's right,” said John Holt. “I’m glad it’s seemed
as good as that. Now, where did you think of spending the
night 2?”

Meg and Rob looked at each other. Since Rob had
suggested to her in the morning a bold thought, they had
had no time to discuss the matter, but now each one remem-
bered the bold idea. Rob got up and came close to John
Holt.

“This morning I thought of something,” he said, ‘and
once again this afternoon I thought of it. I don’t know
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 161

whether we could do it, but you could tell us. Do you
think—this is such a big place and there are so many cor-
ners we could creep into, and it’s such a fine night—do you
think we could wait until all the people are gone and then
find a place to sleep without going out of the grounds? It
would save us buying the tickets in the morning, and Ben
could stay with us—I told his mother that perhaps he might
not come home—and he could have another day.”

John Holt laughed his short laugh.

“Were you thinking of doing that?” he said. ‘“ Well,
you have plenty of sand, anyway.”

‘Do you think we could do it?” asked Meg. ‘Would
they find us and drive us out ?”

John Holt laughed again.

“Great Cesar!” he said, “no; I don’t think they'd
find you two. Luck would be with you. But I knowa
plan worth two of that. I’m going to take you all three
to my hotel.”

“A hotel?” said Meg. '

Ben lifted his sleepy head from his shoulder.

“Yes,” said John Holt. “I can make them find cor-
ners for you, though they’re pretty crowded. I’m not
going to lose sight of you. This has begun to be my
tea-party.”

Meg looked at him with large and solemn eyes.

“Well,” she said, “it’s a fairy story, and it’s getting
fairyer and fairyer every minute.”
162 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



She leaned forward, with her heart quite throbbing.
Because it was he who did this splendid thing—he to whom
all things seemed possible—it actually seemed a thing to be
accepted as if a magician had done it.

‘“Oh, how good you are to us!” she said.‘ How good,
and how good! And what is the use of saying only
‘Thank you’? I should not be surprised,” with a touch of
awe, “if you took us to a hotel built of gold.”

How heartily John Holt laughed then.

‘Well, some of them ought to be, by the time this
thing’s over,” he said. ‘“ But the lights will soon be out;
the people are going, and Ben’s nearly dead. Let’s go and
find a carriage.”
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 163



XVIII

ES, they went home in a carriage! John Holt put
Y them into it, and settled back into it himself, as if
comfortable cushions were only what belonged to
tired people. And he took them to one of the hotels whose
brilliantly lighted fronts they had trudged wearily by the
night before. And they had a good supper and warm
baths and delicious beds, and Meg went to sleep with
actual tears of wonder and gratitude on her lashes, and they
all three slept the sleep of Eden and dreamed the dreams
of Paradise. And in the morning they had breakfast with
John Holt, in the hotel dining-room, and a breakfast as
good as the princely dinner he had given them; and after it
they all went back with him to the City Beautiful, and the
fairy story began again. For near the entrance where they
went in they actually found Ben’s mother, in a state of
wonder beyond words; for, by the use of some magic mes-
senger, that wonderful John Holt had sent word to her that
Ben was in safe hands, and that she must come and join
him, and the money to make this possible had been in the
letter.
Poor, tired, discouraged, down-trodden woman, how she
_ lost her breath when Ben threw himself upon her and poured
164 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS





forth his story! And what a face she wore through all that
followed! How Ben led her from triumph to triumph, with
the exultant air of one to whom the City Beautiful almost
belonged, and who, consequently, had it to bestow as a rich
gift on those who did not know it as he did. What wonder-
ing glances his mother kept casting on his face, which had
grown younger with each hour! She had never seen him
look like this before. And what glances she cast aside at
John Holt! This was one of the rich men poor people
heard of. She had never been near one of them. She had,
often, rather hated them.

Before the day was over Robin and Meg realized that
this wonder was to go on as long as there was anything of
the City Beautiful they had not seen. They were to drink
deep draughts of delight as long as they were thirsty for
more. John Holt made this plain to them in his blunt,
humorous way. He was going to show them everything
and share all their pleasures, and they were to stay at the
golden hotel every night.

And John Holt was getting almost as much out of it as
they were. He wandered about alone no more; he did not
feel as if he were only a ghost, with nothing in common
with the human beings passing by. In the interest and
excitement of generalship and management, and the amuse-
ment of seeing this unspoiled freshness of his charges’
delight in all things, the gloomy look faded out of his
face, and he looked like a different man. Once they came
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 165



upon two men who seemed to know him, and the first
one who spoke to him glanced at the children in some
surprise.

“ Hallo, John!” he said, “set up a family?”

“Just what I’ve done,” answered John Holt. “Set upa
family. A man’s no right to be going around a place
like this without one.”

“How do you get on with it?” asked the other.
“Find it pay?”

“Pay!” said John Holt, with a big laugh. ‘Great
Scott! I should say so! It’s worth twice the price of
admission !”

“Glad of it,” said his friend, giving him a curious
look.

And as he went away Meg heard him say to his
companion,

“Tt was time he found something that paid— John



Holt. He was in a pretty bad way—a fretty bad way.”

As they became more and more intimate, and spoke
more to each other, Meg understood how bad a ‘“‘ way” he
had been in. She was an observing, old-fashioned child,
and she saw many things a less sympathetic creature might
have passed by; and when John Holt discovered this—
which he was quite shrewd enough to do rather soon—he
gradually began to say things to her he would not have
said to other people. She understood, somehow, that,

though the black look passed “away from his face, and

\
166 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



he laughed and made them laugh, there was a thing that
was never quite out of his mind. She saw that pictures
brought it back to him, that strains -of music did, that
pretty mothers with children hurt him when they passed,
and that every now and then he would cast a broad glance
over all the whiteness and blueness and beauty and grace,
and draw a long, quick sigh—as if he were homesick for
something.

“ You know,” he said once, when he did this and looked
round, and found Meg’s .eyes resting yearningly upon him,
“you know She was coming with me! We planned it all.
Lord! how She liked to talk of it! She said it would be
an Enchanted City—just as you did, Meg. That was one

of the first things that made me stop. to listen—when |



heard you say that. An Enchanted City!” he repeated,
pondering. ‘Lord, Lord!”

“Well,” said Meg, with a little catch in her breath,
“well, you know, John Holt, she’s got to an Enchanted
City that won't vanish away, hasn’t she?”

She did not say it with any sanctified little air. Out
of their own loneliness, and the ‘“ Pilgrim’s Progress,” and
ber ardent fancies, the place she and Robin had built to
take refuge in was a very real thing. It had many modern
improvements upon the vagueness of harps and crowns.
There were good souls who might have been astounded
and rather shocked by it, but the children believed in it
very implicitly, and found. great comfort in their confidence
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 167



in its joyfulness. They thought of themselves as walking
about its streets exactly as rapturously as they walked
about this earthly City Beautiful. And because it was so
real there was a note in Meg’s voice which gave John
Holt a sudden touch of new feeling, as he looked back
at her.

“To you suppose she is?” he said. ‘ You believe in
that, don’t you—you believe in it?”

Meg looked a little troubled for a moment.

“Why,” she said, “Rob and I talk to each other and
invent things about it, just as we talked about this. We
just have to, you see. Perhaps we say things that would
seem very funny to religious people—I don’t think we're
religious—but—but we do “ke it.”

“Do you?” said John Holt. ‘Perhaps I should, too.
You shall tell me some stories about it, and you shall put
Her there. If I could feel as if she were somewhere!”

“Oh,” said Meg, “she must be somewhere, you know.
She couldn’t go ot, John Holt.”

He cast his broad glance all around, and caught his
breath, as if remembering,

“Lord, Lord!” he said. ‘No! Ske couldn't go out!”

Meg knew afterwards why he said this with such force.
“She” had been a creature who was so full of life, and of
the joy of living. She had been gay, and full of laughter
and humor. She had had a wonderful, vivid mind, which
found color and feeling and story in the commonest things.
168 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

She had been so clever and so witty, and such a bright
and warm thing in her house. When she had gone away
from earth so suddenly, people had said, with wonder, “ But
it seemed as if she cov/d not die!” But she had died, and
her child had died too, scarcely an hour after it was born,
and John Holt had been left stunned and aghast, and
almost stricken into gloomy madness. And in some way
Meg was like her, with her vivid little face and her black-
lashed eyes, her City Beautiful and her dreams and stories,
which made the realities of her life. It was a strange
chance, a marvellously kind chance, which had thrown them
together; these two, who were of such different worlds,
and yet, who needed each other so much.

~During the afternoon, seeing that Meg looked a little
tired, and also realizing, in his practical fashion, that Ben’s
mother would be more at ease in the society she was used
to, John Holt sent her to ramble about with her boy, and
Robin went with them; and Meg and John went to rest
with the thousands of roses among the bowers of the fairy
island, and there they said a good deal to each other.
John Holt seemed to get a kind of comfort in finding
words for some of the thoughts he had been silent about
in the past.

‘It’s a queer thing,” he said, “but when I talk to you
about her I feel as if she were somewhere near.”

‘Perhaps she is,” said Meg, in her matter-of-fact little
way. “We don’t know what they are doing. But if you
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 109

had gone into another world, and she had stayed here, you
know you would have come to take care of her.”
“That’s true,” said John Holt. “I took care of her
when she was here, the Lord knows. There wasn’t any-
thing on earth she liked that I wouldn’t have broken my
neck to get at. When I built that house for her—I built
a big house to take her to when we were married—she said
I hadn’t left out a thing she cared for. And she £vew what
things ought to be. She wasn’t like me, Meg. [d spent
my life trying to make a fortune. I began when I was a
boy, and I worked hard. She belonged to people with
money, and she’d read books and travelled and seen things.
She knew it all. I didn’t, when first I knew her, but I
learned fast enough afterwards. I couldn't help it while I
was with her. We planned the house together. It was
one of the best in the country—architecture, furniture,
pictures, and all the rest. The first evening we spent
there |
silent a few seconds. Then he added, ina rather unsteady

’



He stopped and cleared his throat, and was

voice, “We were pretty happy people that evening.”

Later he showed Meg her miniature. He carried it in
an oval case in his inside pocket. It was the picture of a
young woman with a brilliant face, lovely laughing eyes, and
a bright, curving red mouth.

“No,” he said, as he looked at it, “ She couldn't go out.
She’s somewhere.”

Then he told Meg about the rooms they had made ready
170 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS





for “John Holt, Junior,” as they had called the little child
who died so quickly.

“Tt was her idea,” he said. ‘‘ There was a nursery, with.
picture paper on the walls. There was a bathroom, with
tiles that told stories about little mermen and mermaids,
that she had made up herself. There was a bedroom, with a
swinging cot, frilled with lace and tied with ribbons. And
there were picture-books and toys. The doors never were
opened. John Holt, Junior, never slept in his cot. He
slept with his mother.”

There he broke off a moment again.

“She used to be sorry he wouldn’t be old enough to
appreciate all this,” he said next. ‘She used to laugh about
him, and say, he was going to be cheated out of it. But she
said he should come with us, so that he could say he had
been. She said he had to see it, if he only stared at it and
said ‘goo.’”

‘Perhaps he does see it,” said Meg. “I should think
those who have got away from here, and know more what
being alive really means, would want to see what earth
people are ¢ryzng to do—though they know so little.”

“That sounds pretty good,” said John Holt; “I like
that.”

They had been seated long enough to feel rested, and
they rose and went on their way, to begin their pilgrimage
again. Just as they were crossing the bridge they saw
Robin coming tearing towards them. He evidently had left
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 171



Ben and his mother somewhere. He was alone. His hat
was on the back of his head, and he was hot with running.
“Something has happened,” said Meg, ‘and I believe
I know
But Robin had reached them.
“Meg,” he said, panting for breath, “Aunt Matilda’s



here! She didn’t see me, but I saw her. She’s in the Agri-
cultural Building, standing before a new steam plough, and
she’s chewing a sample of wheat.”
172 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



XIX

HE two children did not know exactly whether they

‘| were frightened or not. If it had not seemed impos-

sible that anything should go entirely wrong while

John Holt was near them, they would have felt rather queer.
But John Holt was evidently not the least alarmed.

“Look here,” he said, “I’m glad of it. I want to see
that woman.”

‘Do you 2?” exclaimed Robin and Meg together.

“Yes, I do,” he said. ‘Come along, and let’s go and
find her.” And he strode out towards the Agricultural
Building as if he were going towards something interesting.

It is true that the Agricultural Building had been too
nearly connected with Aunt Matilda’s world to hold the
greatest attractions for the little Pilgrims. It had, indeed,
gone rather hard with them to find a name for it with a
beautiful sound.

‘But it zs something,” Meg had said, “and it’s a great,
huge thing, whether we care for it or not. That it isn’t the
thing we care for doesn’t make it any less. We should be
fools if we thought that, of course. And you know we're
not fools, Rob.”

“No,” Rob had said, standing gazing at rakes and
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 173



harrows with his brows knit and his legs pretty wide apart.
“And if there’s one thing that shows human beings caz
do what they set their minds to, it’s this place. Why, they
used to thresh wheat with flails—two pieces of wood
hooked together. They banged the wheat on the barn
floor with things like that! I'll tell you what, as soon
as a man gets any sense, he begins to make machines. He
bangs at things with his brain, instead of with his arms
and legs.”

And in the end they had called it the Palace of the
Genius of the Earth, and the Seasons, and the Sun. They
walked manfully by John Holt through the place, Robin
leading the way, until they came to the particular exhibit
where he had caught sight of Aunt Matilda. Being a busi-
ness-like and thorough person, she was still there, though
she had left the steam plough and directed her attention
to a side-delivery hay rake, which she seemed to find
very well worth study.

If the children and John Holt had not walked up and
planted themselves immediately in her path, she would not
have seen them. It gave Meg a little shudder to see how
like her world she looked, with her hard, strong-featured
face, her straight skirt, and her square shoulders. They
waited until she moved, and then she looked up and saw
them. She did not start or look nervous in the least. She
stared at them.

“Well,” she said. ‘So this was the place you came to.”
174 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



“Ves, Aunt Matilda,” said Robin. ‘We couldn't let
it go by us—and we took our own money.”

“And we knew you wouldn't be anxious about us,” said
Meg, looking up at her with a shade of curiosity.

Aunt Matilda gave a dry laugh.

“No,” she said, “I’ve no time to be anxious about
children. I took care of myself when I was your age; and
I had a sort of notion you’d come here. Who are you
with ?”

John Holt lifted his hat, but without too much cere-
mony. He knew Mrs. Matilda Jennings’s principles were
opposed to the ceremonious.

“Tm a sort of neighbor of yours, Mrs. Jennings,” he
explained. ‘I have some land near your farm, though I
don’t live on the place. My name is John Holt.”

Aunt Matilda glanced from him to Robin.

She knew all about John Holt, and was quite sufficiently
business-like to realize that it would be considered good
luck to have him for a friend.

“Well,” she said to them, “you've got into good
hands.”

John Holt laughed.

‘By this time we all three think we’ve got into good
hands,” he said; “and we're going to see this thing
through.”

“They haven’t money enough to see much of it,” said

Mrs. Jennings.
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 175





“No,” said John Holt, “but I have, and it’s to be my
treat.”

“Well,” said Aunt Matilda, “I suppose you can afford
it. I couldn't. I’ve come here on business.”

“You'd better let us help you to combine a little pleas-
ure with it,” said John Holt. ‘“ This won’t happen twice in
your life or mine.” :

‘““There’s been a lot of money wasted in decorations,”
said Mrs. Jennings. ‘I don’t believe it will pay them.”

“Oh, yes; it will pay them,” said John Holt. “It
would pay them if they didn’t make a cent out of it. It
would have paid me, if I’d done it, and lost money.” .

“Now, see here,” said Mrs. Matilda Jennings, with a
shrewd air, ‘the people that built this didn’t do it for
their health—they did it for what they'd make out of it.”

‘Perhaps they did,” said John Holt, “and perhaps all of
them didn’t. And even those that did have made a bigger
thing than they knew, by Jupiter!”

They were all sauntering along together, as they spoke.
Meg and Robin wondered what John Holt was going to do.
It looked rather as if he wanted to see more of Aunt
Matilda. And it proved that he did. He had a reason of
his own, and, combined with this, a‘certain keen sense of
humor made her entertaining to him. He wanted to see
how the place affected her, as he had wanted to look on at its
effect on Meg and Robin. But he knew that Aunt Matilda
had come to accumulate new ideas on agriculture, and that
176 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



she must be first allowed to satisfy herself on that point ;
and he knew the children were not specially happy in the
society of ploughs and threshing-machines, and he did not
think Aunt Matilda’s presence would add to their pleasure
in the Palace of the Earth, the Seasons, and the Sun.
Besides, he wanted to talk to Mrs. Jennings a little alone.

“You know where Ben and his mother are?” he said to
Robin, after a few minutes.

“Yes,” Robin answered.

“Then take Meg and go to them for a while. Mrs.
Jennings wants to stay here about an hour more, and I
want to walk round with her. In an hour come back to the
entrance here and [| will meet you.”

Meg and Robin went away as he told them. It was in
one sense rather a relief.

‘“T wonder what she'll say to him,” said Meg.

“There’s no knowing,” Robin answered. ‘“ But what-
ever it is, he will make it all right. He’s one of those who
have found out human beings can do things if they try hard
enough. He was as lonely and poor as we are when he was
twelve. He told me so.”

What Aunt Matilda said was very matter-of-fact.

“T must say,” she said, as the children walked off, “ you
seem to have been pretty good to them.”

“They've been pretty good to me,” said John Holt.
‘““They’ve been pretty good for me, though they’re not old
enough to know it.”
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 177



“They're older than their age,” said Aunt Matilda. “If
they'd been like other children the Lord knows what I
should have done with them. They’ve been no trouble in
particular.”

‘“T should imagine not,” said John Holt.

“It was pretty business-like of them,” said Mrs. Jennings,
with another dry laugh, “to make up their minds without
saying a word to any one, and just hustle around and make
their money to come here. They both worked pretty
steady, I can tell you, and it wasn’t easy work, either. Most
young ones would have given in. But they were bound to
get here.”

“They'll be bound to get pretty much where they make
up their minds to, as life goes on,” remarked John Holt.
“That's their build.”

“Thank goodness, they're not like their father,” Mrs.
Jennings commented. ‘Robert hadn't any particular fault,
but he never made anything.”

“He and his wife seem to have made a home that was a
pretty good start for these children,” was what John Holt said.

“Well,” said Mrs. Jennings, “they've got to do the rest
themselves. He left them nothing.”

‘No other relations but you?” John Holt asked.

“Not asoul. I shall keep them and let them work on
the farm, I suppose.”

“Tt would pay to educate them well and let them see
the world,” said John Holt.
178 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



‘““T dare say it would pay them,” replied Aunt Matilda,
‘but I’ve got all I can do, and my husband’s family have a
sort of claim on me. Half the farm belonged to him.”

They spent their remaining hours in the Agricultural
Building very profitably. Mrs. Jennings found John Holt
an excellent companion. He knew things very thoroughly,
and had far-seeing ideas of how far things would work,
and how much they would pay. He did not expect Mrs.
Jennings to tell him fairy stories, and he told her none, but
before they left the place they had talked a good deal.
John Holt had found out all he wanted to know about the
two children, and he had made a proposition which cer-
tainly gave Aunt Matilda something new to think of.

She was giving some thought to it when they went out
to meet the party of four at the entrance. She looked as
if she had been rather surprised by some occurrence, but
she did not look displeased, and the glances she gave to
Meg and Robin expressed a new sense of appreciation of
their practical value.

“Tve promised Mr. Holt that I'll let him take me
through the Midway Plaisance,” she said. ‘I’ve seen the
things I came to see, and I may as well get my ticket’s
worth.”

Meg and Robin regarded her with interest. Aunt
Matilda and the Midway Plaisance, taken together, would
be such a startling contrast that they must be interesting.
And as she looked at John Holt’s face, as they went on












































“11's A QUEER SIGHT,” SHE SAID ‘tO JOHN HOLT,

4
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 181





their way, Meg knew he was thinking the same thing.
And it was a strange experience. Mrs. Jennings strode
through the curious places rather as if she were following
a plough down a furrow. She looked at Samoan beauties,
Arab chiefs, and Persian Jersey Lilies with unmovedly
scrutinizing eyes. She did not waste time anywhere, but
she took all in as if it were a matter of business. Camel
drivers and donkey boys seemed to strike her merely as
samples of slow travelling; she ascended, as it were into
mid-heaven, on the Ferris Wheel, with a grim air of deter-
mination. Being so lifted from earth and poised above in
the clear air, Meg had thrilled with a strange, exultant
feeling of being a bird, and it had seemed to her that, with
a moment's flutter of wings, she could soar higher and
higher, and lose herself in the pure sea of blue above.
Aunt Matilda looked down with cool interest.

“Pretty big power this,” she said to John Holt. “I
guess it’s made one man’s fortune.”

John Holt was a generous host. He took her from
place to place—to Lapland villages, Cannibal huts, and
Moorish palaces. She tramped about, and inspected them
all with a sharp, unenthusiastic eye. She looked at the men
and women, and their strange costumes, plainly thinking
them rather mad.

“It’s a queer sight,” she said to John Holt; “but I
don’t see what good all this is going to do any one.”

“Tt saves travelling expenses,” answered John Holt,
182 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



laughing. His shrewd, humorous face was very full of
expression all the time they were walking about together.
She had only come for the day, and she was going back by
a night train. When she left them, she gave them both
one of those newly appreciative looks.

“Well,” she said, “Mr. Holt’s going to look after you,
he says. He's got something to tell you when I’m gone.
We've talked it over, and it’s all right. There's one thing
sure, you’re two of the luckiest young ones /’ve heard
of.” And she marched away briskly.

Meg and Robin looked at each other and at John Holt.
What was he going to tell them? But he told them
nothing until they had all dined, and Ben and his mother
had gone home, prepared to come again the next day.

By that time the City Beautiful was wreathed with its
enchanted jewels of light again, and in the lagoon’s depths
they trembled and blazed. John Holt called a gondola
with a brilliant gondolier, and they got into it and shot out
into the radiant night.

The sight was so unearthly in its beauty that for a few
moments they were quite still. Meg sat in her Straw
Parlor-attitude, with her elbows on her knees, and her chin
on her hands. Her eyes looked very big, and as lustrous
as the jewels in the lagoon.

‘“T’m going to ask you something,” said John Holt, in-a
quiet sort of voice, at last. :

“Yes,” said Meg, dreamily.
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 183



“Would you two like to belong to me?”

Meg’s hands dropped, and she turned her shining eyes.

“T’ve been talking to yeur Aunt Matilda about that
big house of mine,” he went on. “It’s empty. There’s
too much room in it. I want to take you two, and see if
you can fill it up. Will you come?”

Meg and Robin turned their eyes upon each other in a
dazed way.

“Will we come?” they stammered.

“Mrs. Jennings is willing,” said John Holt. “You two
have things to do in the world. I'll help you to learn to
do them. You,” with the short laugh—‘ you shall tell me
fairy stories.” :

Fairy stories! What was this? Their hearts beat in
their breasts like little hammers. The gondola moved
smoothly over the scintillating water, and the jewel-strung
towers and domes rose white against the lovely night.
Meg looked around her, and uttered a little cry.

“Oh, Rob!” she said. “Oh, dear John Holt. We
have got zzéo the City Beautiful, and you are going to let
us live there always.”

And John Holt knew that the big house would seem
empty no more. .
184 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



XX

T would have seemed that this was the climax of wonders
| and delights—to know that they had escaped forever
from Aunt Matilda’s world, that they were not to be
parted from John Holt, that they were to be like his chil —
dren, living with him, sharing his great house, and learning
all they could want to learn. All this, even when it was
spoken of as possible, seemed more than could be believed,
but it seemed almost more unbelievable day by day, as the
truth began to realize itself in detail. What a marvellous
thing it was to find out that they were not lonely, uncared-
for creatures any more, but that they belonged to a man
who seemed to hold all power in his hands! When John
Holt took them to the big stores and bought them all they
needed, new clothes and new trunks and new comforts, and
‘luxuries such as they had never thought of as belonging to
them, they felt almost aghast. He was so practical, and
seemed to know so well how to do everything, that each”
hour convinced them more and more that everything was
possible to him. And he seemed to like so much to be with
them. Day after day he took them to their City Beautiful,
and enjoyed with them every treasure in it. And they had
so much time before them, they could see it all at rapturous
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 185



leisure and ease. No more hungry hours, no more straining
of tired bodies and spurring of weary. feet, because there
was so much to see and so little time to see it in, because
there was so little money to be spent. There was time to
loiter through palaces and linger before pictures and mar-
vellous things. And John Holt could explain them all.
No more limited and-vague imaginings. There was time to
hear everything, and Meg could tell fairy stories by the hour
if she was in the mood. She told them in tropical bowers;
she told them as they floated on the lagoon; she read them
in strange, savage, or oriental faces.

“T shall have enough to last all my life, John Holt,”
she would say. ‘I see a new one every half-hour. If you
like, I will tell them all to you and Robin when you have
nothing else to do.”

“Tt will be like the ‘Arabian Nights,” said Robin.
‘“Meg, do you remember that old book we had, where all
the leaves we wanted most were torn out, and we had to
make the rest up ourselves ?”

There was one story Meg found John Holt liked better
than all the rest. It was the one about the City Beautiful,
into which she used to follow Christian in the days when
she and Robin lay in the Straw Parlor. It had grown so
real to her that she made it very real and near in the telling.
John Holt liked the way she had of filling it with people
and things she knew quite well. Meg was very simple
about it all, but she told that story well and often, when
186 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



they were resting in some beautiful place alone. John Holt
would lead her back to it, and sit beside her, listening, with
a singular expression in his eyes. Ah, those were wonder-
ful days!

Ben and his mother shared them, though they were not
always with John Holt and Robin and Meg. John Holt
made comfortable plans for them, and let them wander about
and look their fill.

“Tt’s a great thing for Azm, Mr. Holt,” said the poor
woman once, with a side glance at Ben. ‘Seems like he’s
been born over again. The way he talks, when we go home
at night, is as if he’d never be tired again as long as he lives.
And a month ago I used to think he’d wear himself out,
fretting. Seemed like I could see him getting thinner and
peakeder every day. My, it’s a wonderful thing!”

And John Holt’s kindness did not end there, though it
was some time before Meg and Robin heard all he had
done. One day, when they had left the grounds earlier
than usual, because they were tired, he spent the evening in
searching out Ben’s disreputable father, and giving him what
he called ‘‘a straight talk.”

“Look here,” he said, “I’m going to keep my eye on
that boy of yours and your wife. I intend to make the
house decent, and see that the boy has a chance to learn
something, and take care they’re not too hard run. But I’m
going to keep my eye on you too—at least, I shall see that
some one else does—and if you make things uncomfortable
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 187



youll be made pretty uncomfortable yourself, that’s all. I’d
advise you to try the new recreation of going to work. It'll
be good for your health. Sort of athletics.”

And he kept his word.

It was a marvel of a holiday. It is not possible that
among all the holiday-makers there were two others who
were nearer the rapture of Paradise than these two little
Pilgrims.

When it was at an end they went home with John Holt.
It was a wonderful home-going. The house was a wonder-
ful house. It was one of the remarkable places that some
self-made western men have built and furnished, with the
aid of unlimited fortunes and the unlimited shrewd good
sense which has taught most of those of them whose lives
have been spent in work and bold ventures that it is more
practical to buy taste and experience than to spend money
without it. John Holt had also had the aid and taste of a
wonderful litthke woman, whose life had been easier and
whose world had been broader than his own. Together
they had built a beautiful and lovable home to live in.
It contained things from many countries, and its charm
and luxury might well have been the result of a far older
civilization. '

“Don’t you think, Robin,” said Meg, in a low voice, the
first evening, as they sat in a deep-cushioned window-seat
in the library together, “don’t you think you know what
She was like ?”
188 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



They had spoken together of her often, and somehow
it was always in a rather low voice, and they always called
her ‘“ She.”

Robin looked up from the book he held on his knee.
It was a beautiful volume She had been fond of.

“T know why you say that,” he said. ‘ You mean that
somehow the house is like her. Yes, I’m sure it is, just
as Aunt Matilda’s house is like her. People’s houses are
always like them.”

“This one is full of her,” said Meg. “I should think
John Holt would feel as if she must be in it, and she
might speak to him any moment. I feel as if she might
speak to me. And it isn’t only the pictures of her every-
where, with her eyes laughing at you from the wall and
the tables and the mantels. It’s herself Perhaps it is
because she helped John Holt to. choose things, and was
so happy here.”

‘Perhaps it is,” said Robin; and he added, softly,
“this was her book.”

They went once more to Aunt Matilda’s world. They
did it because John Holt wanted to see the Straw Parlor,
and they wanted to show it to him and bid it good-by.

Aunt Matilda treated them with curious. consideration.
It almost seemed as if she had begun to regard them with
respect. It seemed to her that any business-like person
would respect two penniless children who had made them-
selves attractive toa man with the biggest farm in Illinois,
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 189



and other resources still larger. They went out to the
barn in their old way, when no one knew where they
were going, and when no one was about to see them place
their ladder against the stack, and climb up to the top.
The roof séemed more like a dark tent than ever, and
they saw the old birds’ nests, which by this time were
empty.

“Meg,” said Robin, “do you remember the day we
lay in the straw and told each other we had got work?
And do you remember the afternoon I climbed up with
the old coffee-pot, to boil the eggs in?”

“And when we counted the Treasure?” said Meg.

“And when we talked about miracles?” said Robin.

“And when it made me think human beings could
do anything if they tried hard enough?” said Meg.

“And when you read the ‘Pilgrim’s Progress’ ?” said
John Holt.

“And the first afternoon when we listened to Jones
and Jerry, and you said there was a City Beautiful?” said
Meg.

“And there was,” said Robin, “and we've been there.”

“It was just this time in the afternoon,” said Meg,
looking about her; “the red light was dying away, for I
could not see to read any more.”

And for a little while they sat in the Straw Parlor,
while the red light waned; and afterwards, when they spoke
of it, they found they were all thinking of the same thing,
190 TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS



and it was of the last day they had spent at the Enchanted
City, when they had gone about together in a strange,
tender, half-sad mood, loitering through the white palaces,
lingering about the clear pools of green sea water, where
strange creatures swam lazily or darted to and fro, look-
ing their last at pictures and stories in marble, and listen-
ing to the tinkle of water plashing under great tropical
leaves and over strange mosses, strolling through temples
and past savage huts, and gazing in final questioning at
mysterious, barbarous faces; and at last passing through
the stately archway and being borne away on the waters
of the great lake.

As they had been carried away farther and farther, and
the white wonder had begun to lose itself and fade into
a white spirit of a strange and lovely thing, Meg had felt
the familiar throb at her heart and the familiar lump in
her throat. And she had broken into a piteous little
cry. .

“Oh, John Holt,” she said, “it is going, it is going,
and we shall never see it again! For it will vanish away,
it will vanish away!” And the tears rushed down her
cheeks, and she hid her face on his arm.

But though he had laughed his short. laugh, John
Holt had made her lift up her head.

“No,” he said, “it won’t vanish away. It’s not one of |
the things that vanish. Things don’t vanish away that
a million or so of people have seen as they've seen this.
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS 191



They stay where they're not forgotten, and time doesn’t
change them. They're put where they can be passed on,
and passed on again. And thoughts that grow out of
them bring other ones. And what things may grow out
of it that never would have been, and where the end is,
the Lord only knows, for no human being can tell. It

won't vanish away.”

Perhaps, as Meg said often to John Holt, theirs was
a fairy story—and why not? There are beautiful things
in the world, there are men and women and children with
brave and gentle hearts; there are those who work well
and give to others the thing they have to give, and are
glad in the giving. There are birds in the sky and
flowers in the woods, and Spring comes every year. And

these are the fairy stories.
CHARLES SCRIBNER’S SONS’

New and Standard Books for Young Readers
for 1895-96.



A New Book by Mrs. Burnett.

TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS :

A Story of the City Beautiful. By Mrs. FRaNces
Hopcson Burnett. Illustrated by R. B. Bircu.
Uniform with ‘‘ Fauntleroy,” etc. Sq. 8vo, $1.50.

The largest and most notable children’s book that Mrs.
Burnett has written since ‘‘ Fauntleroy.” It is a charming story
of a little boy and girl, who, taking their small savings, leave
home to visit the World’s Fair. This is their Pilgrims’ Progress;
and their interesting adventures and the happy ending of it all
Mrs. Burnett tells as no one else can. It is in the author’s best
vein and will take place in the hearts of her readers close beside
“Fauntleroy.”



Mrs. Burnett’s Five Famous Juveniles.

LITTLE LORD FAUNTLEROY.
Beautifully illustrated by RecinaLp B. Bircu. Square 8vo, $2.00.

“In ‘Little Lord Fauntleroy’ we gain another charming child to add to our gallery of juvenile heroes and heroines ; one
who teaches a great lesson with such truth and sweetness that we part from him with real regret."—Louisa M. Atcotr.

SARA CREWE;

Or, What happened at Miss Minchin’s. Richly and fully illus-
trated by R. B. Bircu. Square 8vo, $1.00.

“It is.astory to linger over in the reading, it is so brightly, frankly, sweetly, and tenderly
written, and to remember and return to. In creating her little gentlewoman, ‘Sara Crewe,’ so fresh,
so simple, so natural, so genuine, and so indomitable, Mrs. Burnett has added another child to
English Fiction.”"—R. H. Stopparp.

LITTLE SAINT ELIZABETH
And Other Stories. With twelve full-page drawings by
RecINALD B. BircH. Square 8vo, $1.50.

‘‘ Four stories different in kind, but alike in grace and spirit.’’—Susan Coottpce.
“One of the most winning and pathetic of Mrs. Burnett's child heroines. The tales which follov’
are quite charming.”"—THe ATHENUM.

GIOVANNI AND THE OTHER:

Children who have made stories. With nine full-page illustra-
tions by RecInNaLpD B. BircH. Square 8vo, $1.50.

‘Stories beautiful in tone, and style, and color."—KaTe Doucias Wicct.
‘There isa tender pathos in these tales and a gentle, loving spirit that gives the book a peculiar

charm."’—PHILADELPHIA TIMES.
PICCINO

And Other Child Stories. Fully illustrated by R. B. Bircu.
Square 8vo, $1.50.

“ The history of Pitcino’s ‘two days’ is as delicate as one of the anemones that springin the

rock walls facing Piccino’s Mediterranean. . . The other stories in the book have the charm of
their predecessor in material and matter.”—Mrs. Burton Harrison.




Charles Scribner’s Sons’ ‘Books for Young Readers.

' Written and Illustrated by Howard Pyle.
eA NEW BGOK JUST PUBLISHED.

| BEHIND THE GARDEN OF THE MOON.

A Real Story of the Moon Angel. Written and illustra-
ted by Howard Pyir. Square 12mo, $2.00.



Underneath the charm of this original and delightful fairy tale of
Mr. Pyle’s is a mystical moral significance which gives it the dignity of
true literature in addition to its interest of adventure. Out of the truth
that great deeds are achieved and high character moulded by entire
spiritual consecration, rather than by direct and interested effort, the
author has evolved a winning and delightful piece of fanciful fiction, and
has illustrated it copiously in his happiest and most characteristically

Â¥
OTHER ‘BOOKS BY MR. PYLE.

THE MERRY ADVENTURES OF
ROBIN HOOD

of Great Renown in Nottinghamshire. With many illustra
tions. Royal 8vo, $3.00.

poetical vein.



‘“ This superb book is unquestionably the most original and elaborate ever produced by any
American artist. Mr. Pyle has told, with pencil and pen, the complete and consecutive story of
Robin Hood and his merry men their haunts
in Sherwood Forest, gathered from the old bal-
lads and legends. Mr. Pyle’s admirable illustra-
tions are strewn profusely through the book.” —
Boston Transcript.



OTTO, OF; THE. SILVER “HAND,

With many illustrations. Royal 8vo, haif leather,
$2.00.

‘*The scene of the story is medieval Germany in the time of the feuds



and robber barons and romance. The kidnapping of Otto, his adventures
among rough soldiers, and his daring rescue, make up a spirited arid thrilling
story. The drawings are in keeping with the text, and in mechanical and artistic

| qualities as well as in literary execution the book must be greeted as one of the



very best juveniles of the year, quite worthy to succeed to the remarkable

: : _ FROM ‘‘ OTTO OF THE SILVER-HAND.”
popularity of Mr. Pyle’s ‘ Robin Hood.’”—Curistian Union. Reduced.


Charles Scribner’s Sons’ ‘Books for Young Readers.

The Kanter Girls. ee
By Mary L. B. Brancu. Illustrated by Helen M. Armstrong. § | afte

eftet 77
1

The !
anter oust
’ i

1
'
Square 12mo, $1.50. Wes
Pres} Ie
The adventures of Janet and Prue, two small sisters, among different peoples }} |
of the imaginative world—dryads, snow-children, Kobolds, &c.—aided by |
their invisible rings, their magic boat, and their wonderful birds, are described by
the author with great naturalness and a true gift for story-telling. The nu- f |
merous illustrations are very attractive and in thorough sympathy with the

text.



A New Book by Gordon Stables.

FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.

A Story of Battle by Land and Sea. By Gorbon Srases. With 8 full-page illus-
trations. 1I2mo, $1.50.
The story of an English boy who runs from home and joins the southern army in the late civil

war. He is accompanied by his chum, who enters the navy, and their various adventures in the great
conflict are set forth with great vigor and are unfailing in interest.

OTHER ‘BOOKS BY MR. STABLES.

TO GREENLAND AND THE; WESTWARD WITH
POLE. | COLUMBUS.

A Story of Adventure in the Arctic | Illustrated. 12mo, 1.50.
Regions. With 8 full-page illustra- |

‘““The whole story of Columbus’ career is embraced, but

tlons. I2mo, $ 1.50. the main interest is focused on the westward voyage and the
‘* More than ordinarily entertaining and it imparts agreeably | romantic incidents of the discovery. The book is admirably
a great deal of valuable knowledge.’’—ConGREGATIONALIST. written and is well illustrated.""-Boston Beacon.

"TWIXT SCHOOL AND COLLEGE.

A Tale of Self-Reliance. With 8 illustrations. Crown 8vo, $1.50.

Joseph The Dreamer.
By the Author of Jesus the Carpenter. 12mo, in press.

The story of Joseph, told in the same popular, interesting, and realistic manner as that of Jesus
in the author’s former book; not only setting forth truthfully and graphically the life of Joseph, but
picturing as well the marvellous state of Egypt in which he lived.

JESUS THE CARPENTER. By A. Layman. 12mo, $1.50.

“1 think the idea of this book—the aim and the intention—excellent, and the execution beautiful.""—Pror. A. B. Brucg.
a

Charles Scribner's Sons’ ‘Books for Young Readers.

A New Book by Kirk Munroe.

AT WAR WITH PONTIAC;

Or, The Totem of the Bear. A Tale of Redcoat and Redskin.
By Kirk Munroe. With 8 full-page illustrations by J. —
FINNEMORE. I2M0, $1.25.

A story of old days in America when Detroit was a frontier town and fii q

the shores of Lake Erie were held by hostile Indians under Pontiac. The
hero, Donald Hester, goes in search of his sister Edith, who has been cap-
tured by the Indians. Strange and terrible are his experiences : for he is
wounded, taken prisoner, condemned to be burned, and contrives to escape.
In the end there is peace between Pontiac and the English, and all things
terminate happily for the hero. One dares not skip a page of this enthralling

ee -THE WHITE CONQUEROR.

A Tale of Toltec and Aztec. By Kirk Munroe. With 8
full-page illustrations by W. S. Stacey. 12mo, $1.25.

‘The story is replete with scenes of vivid power; it is full of action and rapid movement; and he must be deficient in recep-
tive faculty who fails to gain valuable historical instruction, along with the pleasure of reading a tale graphically told.’’—Puita-
DELPHIA BULLETIN.

Stories of Literature, Science, and History.

By HENRIETTA CHRISTIAN WRIGHT.
A NEW VOLUME JUST ISSUED.



CHILDREN’S STORIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE—166c-1860. 12mo, $1.25.

Miss Wright here continues her attractive presentation of literary history begun in her ‘‘ Chil-
dren’s Stories in English Literature.” Elliot, the translator of the Bible into the English language,
Irving, Cooper, Prescott, Holmes, Longfellow, Hawthorne, Mrs. Stowe, Whittier, Poe, and Emer-
son are here considered, bringing the history of the subject down to the period of the civil war, and
treated with constant reference to that side of their works and personalities which most nearly ap-
peals to children. :

CHILDREN’S STORIES IN ENGLISH LITERATURE. Two volumes :
TALIESIN TO SHAKESPEARE—SHAKESPEARE TO TENNYSON. 12mo, each, $1.25.

“It is indeed a vivid history of the people as well asa story of their literature; and, brief as it is,
the author has so deftly seized on all the salient points, that the child who has read this book will be
more thoroughly acquainted than many a student of history with the life and thought of the cen-
turies over which the work reaches.”—Tue EvaNceLIsT.

CHILDREN’S STORIES OF THE GRFAT SCIENTISTS. With portraits.
12mo, $1.25.

“The author has succeeded in making her pen-pictures of the great scientists as graphic as the
excellent portraits that illustrate the work. Around each name she has picturesquely grouped the
essential features of scientific achievement.’’— BRookLyn Times.

CHILDREN’S STORIES IN AMERICAN HISTORY. Illustrated. 12mo,
$1.25. :

“A most delightful and instructive collection of historical events, told in a simple and pleasan
manner. Almost every occurrence in the gradual development of our country is woven into an
attractive story.”—SAan Francisco Eveninc Post.

CHILDREN’S STORIES OF AMERICAN PROGRESS. Illustrated. 12mo, $1.25.

“ Miss Wright is favorably known by her volume of well-told ‘Stories in American History;’ and her ‘ Stories of American
Progress’ is equally worthy of commendation. Taken together they present a series of pictures of great graphic interest.
The illustrations are excellent.”—Tue Nation,


Charles Scribner’s Sons’ “Books for Young Readers.

G. A. Henty’s Popular Stories for Boys.
NEW VOLUMES FOR 1895-96.

Each, Crown 8vo. Handsomely Illustrated. $1.50.

Mr. Henty, the most popular writer of Books of Adventure in England, adds three new volumes
to his list this fall—books that will delight the thousands of boys who are his ardent admirers.

**Mr. Henty’s books never fail to interest boy readers. Among writers of stories of adventure he stands in the very first
rank.""—Acapemy (London). -

‘No country nor epoch of history is there which Mr. Henty does not know, and what is really remarkable is that he always
writes well and interestingly. Boys like stirring adventures, and Mr. Henty is a master of this method of composition.”—New
York Times.

A KNIGHT OF THE WHITE CROSS.

A Tale of the Siege of Rhodes. With 12 full-page illustrations.

Gervaise Tresham, the hero of this story, joins the Order of the Knights of St. John,
and leaving England he proceeds to the stronghold of Rhodes. Subsequently, Gervaise
is made a Knight of the White Cross for valor, while soon after he is appointed com-
mander of a war-galley, and in his first voyage destroys a fleet cf Moorish corsairs.
During one of his cruises the young knight is attacked on shore, captured after a desperate
struggle, and sold into slavery in Tripoli. He succeeds in escaping, however, and returns
to Rhodes in time to take part in the splendid defence of that fortress. Altogether a
fine chivalrous tale, of varied interest and full of noble daring.

THE TIGER OF MYSORE.

A Story of the War with Tippoo Saib. With 12 full-page illustrations.

Dick Holland, whose father is supposed to be a captive of Tippoo Saib, goes to India
to help him to escape. He joins the army under Lord Cornwallis, and takes part in
the campaign against Tippoo. Afterwards, he assumes a disguise, enters Seringapatam,
the capital of Mysore, rescues Tippoo's harem from a tiger, and is appointed to high G. A. HENTY.
office by the tyrant. In this capacity Dick visits the hill fortresses, still in search of his
father; and at last he discovers him in the great stronghold of Savandroog. The hazardous rescue through the enemy’s country

is at length accomplished, and the young fellow’s dangerous mission is done.



THROUGH RUSSIAN SNOWS.

A Story of Napoleon’s Retreat from Moscow. With 8 full-page illustra-
tions and a map.

The hero, Julian Wyatt, after several ad ventures with smugglers, by whom he is handed
over a prisoner to the French, regains his freedom and joins Napoleon’s army in the
Russian campaign, and reaches Moscow with the victorious Emperor. Then, when the
terrible retreat begins, Julian finds himself in the rear guard of the French army, fighting
desperately, league by league, against famine, snow-storms, wolves, and Russians. Ultimately
he escapes out of the general disaster. after rescuing the daughter of a Russian Count; makes
his way to St. Petersburg, and then returns to England. A story with an excellent plot, ex-
AKNIGHT OF THE WHITE CRoss. citing adventures, and splendid historical interests,


Charles Scribner’s Sons’ ‘Books for Young Readers.

G. A. HENTY’S POPULAR STORIES FOR BOYS. |

Each, Crown 8vo, handsomely illustrated, $1.50.

IN THE HEART OF THE ROCKIES. A Story of ADVENTURE IN CoLoRADO.

‘One of the most interesting and attractive stories for boys. It is a tale of adventure thrilling enough for the most
daring readers."—Boston JourNaL,

WULF THE SAXON. A Story oF THE NorMAN ConQuest.

**An unusually realistic picture of the times. The scenes and incidents which Mr, Henty introduces are calculated to
awaken fresh interest in the influence of tre battle of Hastings upon the destiny of mankind."—Boston HERALD.

WHEN LONDON BURNED, A Srory oF REstorATION TIMES AND THE GREAT Fire,

‘An exciting story of adventure, at the same time dealing with historic truths deftly and interestingly.”—-Detroit
Free Press.

ST. BARTHOLOMEW’S EVE. A Tate oF THE HuGuENoT Wars.

‘Exciting enough to interest even the dullest of readers.”’—Boston Transcript.

THROUGH THE SIKH WAR. A Tate oF THE CONQUEST OF THE PUNJAUB,

‘*Not only interesting but instructive. It is related with great spirit and animation.’’—Boston HeEratp.

A JACOBITE EXILE. Betnc tHE ADVENTURES OF A YOUNG ENGLISHMAN IN THE SERVICE OF CHARLES
XII. oF SwepEN,

‘*Remarkable for its thrilling adventures and its interesting historical pictures.””—Heratp AND PresByTER.

BERIC THE BRITON. A Story oF THE Roman Invasion.

“It is a powerful and fascinating romance.’’—Boston Post.

IN GREEK WATERS. A Story oF THE Grecian War oF INDEPENDENCE—1821I-1827.

“It is a stirring narrative, wholesome and stimulating.’’—ConcREGATIONALIST.

CONDEMNED AS A NIHILIST. A Story or Escape FROM SIBERIA.

‘A narrative absorbing and thrilling. The scenes of Siberian prison-life give the book a peculiar value.’’—CurisTIAN
ADVOCATE.

REDSKIN AND COWBOY. A TALE OF ‘THE WESTERN PLains,.

“Though it is full of hairbreadth escapes, none of the incidents are improbable. It is needless to say that the adven-
tures are well told.’”’—San Francisco CHRonicte.

HELD FAST FOR ENGLAND. A Tate oF THE SteGE OF GIBRALTAR.

“Tt is an historical novel, the siege of Gibraltar, in the latter part of the eighteenth century, being the foundation on which
Mr. Henty’s clever action rests.” —Newark ADVERTISER.

*,* The above are Mr, Henty’s latest books. A full descriptive list containing all of Mr.
Henty’s books—now 47 in number—will be sent to any address on application, They are all
attractively illustrated and handsomely bound,
Charles Scribner's Sons’ ‘Books for Young Readers.

Czar and Sultan.

The adventures of a British Lad in the Russo-Turkish War of
1877-78. By ARcHIBALD ForBes. Illustrated. 12mo, ¢2. 00.

‘Very fascinating and graphic. Mr. Forbes is a forcible writer, and the present work has the
vigor and intensity associated with his name. It is sure to be popular with youthful readers.”’—Bos-
Ton Beacon.



‘A brilliant and exciting narrative, and the drawings add to its interest and value.”"—N. Y.
OpsERVER.

Books of Adventure by Robert Leighton.

OLAF THE GLORIOUS.

A Story of Olaf Triggvison, King of Norway, A. D.
995-1000. Crown 8vo, with numerous full-page illustra-
tions, $1.50.

THE WRECK OF THE GOLDEN FLEECE.

The Story of a North Sea Fisher Boy. Illustrated.
Crown 8vo, $1.50.

THE THIRSTY SWORD.
A Story of the Norse Invasion of Scotland, 1262-65.

With 8 illustrations and a map. Crown 8vo, $1.50.
THE PILOTS OF POMONA.

A Story of the Orkney Islands. With 8 illustrations
anda map. Crown 8vo, $1.50.



‘*Mr. Leighton as a writer for boys needs no praise, as his books
place him in the front rank."—New York Osserver.

Things Will Take a Turn.

By Beatrice Harrabden, author of ‘Ships that Pass in the Night.” Illustrated.
12m0, $1,00. 2

The charm of this tale is its delicate, wistful sympathy. It is the story of a sunny-hearted

child, Rosebud, who assists her grandfather in his dusty, second-hand book-

shop. One cannot help being fascinated by the sweet little heroine, she is

so engaging, so natural; and to love Rosebud is to love all her friends and
enter sympathetically into the good fortune she brought them.

Among the Lawmakers.
By Epmunp ALTON. Illustrated. Sq. 8vo, $1,50.

‘* The book is a diverting as well as an instructive one. Mr. Aiton was in his early days a
page in the Senate, and he relates the doings of Congress from the point of view he then obtained.
His narrative is easy and piquant, and abounds in personal anecdotes about the great men whom
the pages waited on.”—CuristiAN Union.


Charles Scribner’s Sons’ ‘Books for Young Readers.

Samuel Adams Drake’s Historical Books.

THE MAKING OF THE OHIO VALLEY STATES. 1660-1837.
Illustrated. 12mo, $1.50. Q@M]H]HA

mh 7 KW
THE MAKING OF VIRGINIA AND THE MIDDLE COLONIES. — Fiberalinalfs 1 a >

1578-1701. Illustrated. 12mo, $1.50.

THE MAKING OF NEW ENGLAND. 1580-1643. With 148
illustrations and with maps. I2mo, $1.50.

THE MAKING OF THE GREAT WEST. 1812-1853. With
145 illustrations and with maps. 1I2mo, $1.50.

“The author's aim in these books is that they shall occupy a place between the
larger and lesser histories of the lands and of the periods of which they treat, and
that each topic therein shall be treated as a unit and worked out to a clear understand-
ing of its objects and results before passing to another topic. In the furtherance of this
method each subject has its own descriptive notes, maps, plans and illustrations,
the whole contributing to a thorough, though condensed, knowledge of the sub-
ject in hand.”"—New York Malt anp Express.














tL
i

The Butterfly Hunters in the Caribbees.



i

OTL








By Dr. Eucene Murray-Aaron. With 8 full-page illustrations. Square 12mo, $2.00.

“The book is written in a very interesting style. The author is a recognized authority on the subjects of which he writes.
He takes a company of young explorers over ground with which he is thoroughly familiar."—Tue INDEPENDENT.

“Our author only reproduces the incidents and scenes of his own life as an exploring naturalist ina way to capture the
attention of younger readers. The incidents are told entertainingly, and his descriptions of country and the methods of capture of

butterflies and bugs of rare varieties are full of interest.",—Cuicaco InTER-OCEAN.

A New Mexico David.

AND OTHER STORIES AND SKETCHES OF THE SOUTH West. By Cuarces F, Lummis. Illustrated. 12mo,
$1.25.

‘“Mr. Lummis has lived for years in the land of the Pueblos ; has traversed it in every direction, both on foot and on horse-
back ;, and it is an enthralling treat set before youthful readers by him in this series of lively chronicles."—Boston Beacon.



Poems of Childhood by Eugene Field.
LOVE SONGS OF CHILDHOOD. 16mo, $1.00.

WITH TRUMPET AND DRUM. By Eucene Fietp. 16mo, $1.25.

‘His poems of childhood have gone home, not only to the hearts of children, but to
the heart of the country as well, and he is one of the few contributors to that genuine
EUGENE FIELD. literature of childhood which expresses ideas from the standpoint of a child.”"—Tue OuTLoox.


Charles Scribner’s Sons’ ‘Books for Young Readers.

The Wagner Story Book.

Firelight Tales of the Great Music Dramas. By Wutttam Henry Frosr.
Illustrated by Sipvey R. BurteicH. I2mo, $1.50.
“A successful attempt to make the romantic themes of the music dramas intelligible to

young readers. The author has full command of his subject, and the style is easy, graceful and
simple."—Boston Beacon.



RICHARD WAGNER.

Robert Grant’s Two Books for Boys.

JACK HALL: Or, THE ScHoot Days oF AN AMERI- JACK IN THE BUSH: Or, a Summer on a SaL~
|
J

mon River. _ Illustrated’ by F. T. Merritt,
12mo, $1.25.

A aever book for boys. It is the story of the camp
life of a lot of boys, and is destined to please every boy reader.
It is attractively illustrated.’’—Detroit Free Press.

‘* An ideal story of out-door life and genuine experiences.”
—-Boston TRAVELLER.

can Boy. Illustrated by F. G. Attwoop.
12mo, $1.25.
“A better book for boys has never been written. It is

pure, clean and healthy, and has throughout a vigorous action
that holds the reader breathlessly.’’—Boston Heratp.

“ A capital story for boys, wholesome and interesting. It
‘chi one of Tom Brown."’—Boston Transcript.

Illustrated “iD Ibeaey: of Travel.
By BAYARD TAYLOR.

Per set, six volumes, 12mo, $6.00. Each with many illustrations. Sold sep-
arately, per volume, $1.25.

JAPAN IN OUR DAY.

TRAVELS IN ARABIA.

TRAVELS IN SOUTH AFRICA.

CENTRAL ASIA.

THE LAKE REGION OF CENTRAL
AFRICA.

SIAM, THE LAND OF THE WHITE
ELEPHANT.

Each volume is complete in itself, and contains,
first, a brief preliminary sketch of the country to
which it is devoted; next, such an outline of pre-
vious explorations as may be necessary to explain what has been achieved by later ones; and finally,
a condensation of one or more of the most important narratives of recent travel, accompanied with
illustrations of the scenery, architecture, and life of the races, drawn only from the most authentic
sources.



‘ Authenticated accounts of countries, peoples, modes of living and being, curiosities in natural history, and personal adven-
ture in travels and explorations, suggest a rich fund of solid instruction combined with delightful entertainment. The editorship,
by one of the most observant and well-traveled men of modern times, at once secures the high character of the ‘ Library’ in every
particular.”— Tug Sunpay Schoot Times.
Charles Scribner’s Sons’ Books for Young Readers.



The Norseland Series.
BY H. H. BOYESEN.

NORSELAND TALES. Illustrated. 12mo, $1.25.
BOYHOOD IN NORWAY : Nive Stories of Deeps oF THE Sons
oF THE Vikincs. With 8 illustrations. 12mo, $1.25

AGAINST HEAVY ODDS, anp A Feartess Trio. With 13 full-
page illustrations by W. L. Taytor. 12mo, $1.25.

THE MODERN VIKINGS: Stories oF Lire AND Sport IN THE
Norse.and. With many full-page illustrations. I2mo, $1.25.
The four above volumes in a box, $5.00.

“ Charmingly told stories of boy-life in the Land of the Midnight Sun, illustrated
with pictures giving a capital idea of the incidents and scenes described. The tales
have a delight all their own, as they tell of scenes and sports and circumstances so
different from those of our American life.”"—N. Y. Opserver.



Two Books by Rossiter Johnson.

THE END OF A RAINBOW. Aw American Story. Illustrated. 12mo,
$1.50.

“It will be read with breathless interest. It is interesting and full of boyish experiences.”"—-
N. Y. INDEPENDENT.

PHAETON ROGERS. A Nove oF Boy Lire. Illustrated. 12mo, $1.50.

“Mr. Johnson has shown in this book capabilities of a really high quality, for his story
abounds with humor, and there are endless bits ot quiet fun in it, which bring out the
hearty laugh, even when it is read by older people. It is a capital book for boys."—New
York Times.



Mrs. Burton Harrison’s Tales.
BRIC-A-BRAC STORIES.

With 24 illustrations by WaLTER CRANE. I2mo, $1.50.

“When the little boy, for whose benefit the various articles of bric-a-brac in his
father’s drawing-room relate stories appropriate to their several native countries,
exclaims at the conclusion of one of them: ‘I almost think there can’t be a better
one than that!’ the reader, of whatever age, will probably feel inclined to agree
withhim. Upon the whole, it isto be wished that every boy and girl might become
acquainted with the contents of this book.”—Jutian HAwTHorne.

THE OLD FASHIONED FAIRY BOOK.
Illustrated by Rosina Emmet. 16mo, $1.25.

“The little ones, who so willingly go back with us to ‘Jack the Giant Killer,’
‘Bluebeard,’ and the kindred stories of our childhood, will gladly welcome Mrs.
Burton Harrison’s ‘ Old-Fashioned Fairy Tales.’ The graceful pencil of Miss Ro-
sina. Emmet has given a pictorial. interest to the book.”—Frank R. Stockton.



__ FROM ‘! BRIC-A-BRAC STORIES.’?
uced.
Charles Scribner’s Sons’ Books for Young Readers.

Frank R. Stockton’s Books for the Young.

“His books for boys and girls are classics.”"—NEWARK ADVERTISER.

THE CLOCKS OF RONDAINE, ano Otner Stories. With 24 illustrations
by BiashrieLD, Rocers, Bearp, and others. Square 8vo, $1.50.

PERSONALLY CONDUCTED. _ Illustrated by
PENNELL, Parsons, and others. Sq. 8vo, $2.00.

THE STORY OF VITEAU. Illustrated by R.
B. BircH. 12mo, $1.50.

A JOLLY FELLOWSHIP. With 20 illustrations.
12mo, $1.50.

THE FLOATING PRINCE AND OTHER FAIRY
TALES. Illustrated. Square 8vo, $1.50.

THE TING-A-LING TALES. Illustrated.
$1.00.

ROUNDABOUT RAMBLES IN LANDS OF FACT AND FICTION.
Illustrated. Square 8vo, $1.50.

TALES OUT OF SCHOOL. With nearly 200 illustrations.
8vo, $1.50.

‘*The volumes are profusely illustrated and contain the most entertaining sketches in
Mr. Stockton’s most entertaining manner.’’—Curistian Union.



I2mo, FRANK R. STOCKTON.

Square



Edward Eggleston’s Two Popular Books.

THE HOOSIER SCHOOL-BOY.

Illustrated. 12mo, $1.00.

‘** The Hoosier School-Boy’ depicts some of the charac-
teristics of boy-life years ago on the Ohio ; characteristics,
however, that were not peculiar to that section. The story
presents a vivid and interesting picture of the difficulties which
in those days beset the path of the youth aspiring for an edu-
cation.”’—Cuicaco InTEeR-OcEAN.

QUEER STORIES FOR BOYS AND
GIRLS. 12m, $1.00.

‘SA very bright and attractive little volume for young
readers. The stories are fresh, breezy, and healthy, with a
good point to them and a good, sound American view of life
and the road to success. The book abounds in good feeling
and good sense, and is written in a style of homely art.”’—In-
DEPENDENT.

Evening Tales.

Done into English from the French of Frederic Ortoli, by JoeL CHANDLER
Harris. 12mo, $1.00.
“It is a veritable French ‘ Uncle Remus’ that Mr. Harris has discovered in Frederic Ortoli. The

book has the genuine piquancy of Galiic wit, and will be sure to charm American children. Mr. Har-
ris’s version is delightfully written.’’—Boston Beacon.

7

KERR
ba
Ree
ie

Hans Brinker:

ene

ij

Or, The Silver Skates. A Story of Life in Holland. By Mary
Mapes Dodge. With 60 illustrations. 12mo, $1.50.

“The author has shown, in her former works for the young, a very rare ability to meet their
wants; but she has produced ‘nothing better than this charming tale—alive with incident and action,
adorned rather than freighted with useful facts, and moral without moralization.”"—Tue Nation.


Charles Scribner’s Sons’ ‘Books for Young Readers.
Thomas Nelson Page’s Two Books.

“AMONG THE CAMPS: Or, Younc Peopte’s Stories oF THE WAR,
With 8 full-page illustrations. Square, 8vo, $1.50.

“ They are five in number, each having reference to some incident of the Civil
War. A vein of mingled pathos and humor runs through them all, and greatly
heightens the charm of them. It is the early experience of the author himself,
doubtless, which makes his pictures of life in a’ Southern home during the great
struggle so vivid and truthful.”—Tue Nation.

TWO LITTLE CONFEDERATES. With 8 full-page illustrations
by Kemate and Repwoop. Square, 8vo, $1.50.

‘“Mr. Page was ‘raised’ in Virginia, and he knows the ‘darkey' of the South
better than any one who writes about them. And he knows ‘ white folks,’ too,
and his stories, whether for old or young people, have the charm of sincerity and
beauty and reality.",—Harrer’s Younc Peorte.



-W. 0. Stoddard’s Books for Boys.

DAB KINZER. A Story of A Growina Boy. THE QUARTET. A Sequet to Das Kinzer.
SALTILLO BOYS. AMONG THE LAKES. WINTER FUN.
Five volumes, 12mo, in a box, $5.00. Sold separately, each, $1.00.
‘William O. Stoddard has written capital books for boys. His ‘Dab Kinzer’ and ‘ The Quartet’ are among the best speci-
mens of ‘Juveniles’ produced anywhere. In his latest volume, ‘ Winter Fun,’ Mr. Stoddard gives free rein to his remarkable

gift of story-tellling for boys. Healthful works of this kind cannot be too freely distributed among the little men of America.”
—New York JOURNAL OF COMMERCE.

Little People

And their Homes in Meadows, Woods, and Waters. By SteLta Louise Hook.
Illustrated by Dan Bearp and Harry Bearb. One volume, square 8vo, $1.50.
‘*A delightful excursion for the little ones into the fairy-land of nature, tell'ng all about the little oe and all in such

leasant language and_such pretty illustrations that the little readers will be charmed as much as they will be instructed by the
ok.”’—New York EvanceList.

Two Books by Robert Louis Stevenson.

THE BLACK ARROW:

A Tale of the Two Roses. By R. L. Stevenson. With
12 full-page illustrations by Witt H. Low and ALFRED
BRENNAN. 12mo, $1.00.

“The story is one of the strongest pieces of romantic writing ever done by Mr. Stevenson.”

—Tue Boston Times.
KIDNAPPED: :

Being Memoirs of the Adventures of David Balfour in the
Year 1751. By R. L. STEVENSON. 12mo, with 16 full-page
illustrations, $1.00.



: “Mr. Stevenson has never appeared to greater advantage than in ‘ Kidnapped.’’—Tue
R. L. STEVENSON. Nation.
Charles Scribner's Sons’ ‘Books for Young Readers.

Kent Hampden.

A Story of a Boy. By Resecca Harpinc Davis. _ Illus-
trated by Rurus F. ZocBaum. 12mo, $1.00.

Mrs, Davis's story of the heroic lad, who by his courage, faith, and
persistency freed his father’s good name from suspicion and overcame his
enemies, is a valuable and entertaining study of life in West Virginia
seventy years ago,

“Sharply drawn incidents and a crisp narrative make the book interesting.’’—Boston
Y S,
OURNAL.’?”



Fg

Two Books of Sports and Games.

THE AMERICAN BOY’S HANDY BOOK;

Or, What to Do and How to Do It. By DanieL C,
BearD. With 360 illustrations by the author.
Square 8vo, $2.00.

__ The book has this great advantage over its predecessors, that most of the games,
tricks, and other amuseinents described in it, are new. It treats of sports adapted to
all seasons of the year; it is practical, and it is well illustrated...—New York
TRIBUNE.

THE AMERICAN GIRL’S HANDY BOOK.

By Lena and Apewia B. Bearp. With over 500
illustrations by the authors. Square 8vo, $2.00.

Louisa M. Atcotr: ‘‘I have put it in my list of good and useful books for
young people, as | have many requests for advice from my little friends and their
anxious mothers. I am most happy to commend your very ingenious and enter-
taining book.”





The Boys’ Library of Pluck and Action.

Illustrated. Four volumes, 12mo, in a box, $5.00. Sold separately, per volume,
$1.50. zo





The purpose of ‘The Boy’s Library of Pluck
and Action” was to bring together the representative
and most popular books of four of the best known
writers for young people. Each of these books is
fully described elsewhere in this catalogue. The
volumes are beautifully illustrated and are uniformly
bound.

THE BOY EMIGRANTS. By Noan Brooks.
PHAETON ROGERS. By Rossiter Jounson.
A JOLLY FELLOWSHIP. By F. R. Stockton.
HANS BRINKER. By Mrs. Mary M. Dopce.

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Charles Scribner’s Sons’ ‘Books for Young Readers.

Stories for Boys.

By RicuarpD HarpinG Davis. With 6 full-page illustra-
tions. 1I2mo, $1.00

Contents: The Reporter who made himself King—Midsummer Pi-
rates—Richard ‘Carr’s Baby, a Football Story—The Great Tri-Club
Tennis Tournament—The Jump at Corey’s Slip—The Van Bibber
Baseball Club—The Story of a Jockey.

“Tt will be astonishing indeed if youths of all ages are not fascinated with these

‘Stories for Boys.’ Mr. Davis knows infallibly what wil! interest his young readers.””
—Boston Beacon.



RICHARD HARDING DAVIS,

Marvels of Animal Life Series.

By Cuar_es F. Hotper. Three volumes, 8vo,
each profusely illustrated. Singly, $1.75;
the Set, $5.00.

THE IVORY KING. A Poputar History oF THE ELE~
PHANT AND ITS ALLIES.

“The author talks in a lively and pleasant way about white
elephants, rogue elephants, baby elephants, trick elephants, of the
elephant in war, pageantry, sports and games. A charming accession
to books for young people.’’—Cuicaco INTERIOR.

MARVELS OF ANIMAL LIFE.

‘“Mr. Holder combines his description of these odd creatures with
stories of his own adventures in pursuit of them in many parts of the
world. These are told with much spirit, and add greatly to the fasci-
nation of the book.”-—Wonrcester Sry.

LIVING LIGHTS. A Poputar Account oF PHospHorR-
ESCENT ANIMALS AND VEGETABLES.

‘A very curious branch of natural history is expounded in most
agreeable style by this delightful book. He has revealed a world of
new wonders.’’—PHILADELPHIA BULLETIN.



FROM *} THE IVORY KING.”

nee White Cockades.

An Incident of the “Forty-five.” By Epwarp I. STEVENSON. 12mo, $1.00.

‘‘A bright historical tale. The scene is Scotland ; the time that of Prince Charles’ rebellion. The hero is a certain gallant
young nobleman devoted to the last of the Stuarts and his cause. The action turns mainly upon the hiding, the hunting, and the
narrow escapes of Lord Geofirey Armitage from the spies and soldiers of the King.’’—New York Mai anp Express.

Prince Peerless.

A Fairy-Folk Story Book. By Marcaret CoLtier (Madam Gelletti Di Cadilhac).
Illustrated by John Collier. 12mo, $1.25.

“More admirable and fascinating a fairy-story book we have not lately set eyes upon. The stories are most airily conceived
and gracefully executed.’’—Hartrorp Post,
Charles Scribner's Sons’ “Books for Young Readers.

Heroes of the Olden Time.

By James BaLpwin. Three volumes, 12mo, each
beautifully illustrated. Singly, $1.50;
the set, $4.00.

A STORY OF THE GOLDEN AGE. | Illustrated
by Howarb PYLE.

‘“Mr. Baldwin's book is redolent with the spirit of the Odyssey, that glo-
rious primitive epic, fresh with the dew of the morning of time. It is an unal-
loyed pleasure to read his recital of the adventures of the wily Odysseus. How-
ard Pyle’s illustrations render the spirit of the Homeric age with admirakie
felicity."—Pror. H. H. Boyvesen.



THE STORY OF SIEGFRIED. _ Illustrated by Howarp Pye.

‘The story of ‘Siegfried’ is charmingly told. The author makes up the str, frm the various myths ina fascinating
way which cannot fail to interest the reader. It is as enjoyable as any fairy tale.”.—Hartrorp Courant.

THE STORY OF ROLAND. | Illustrated by R. B. Eircu.

‘“Mr. Baldwin has culled from a wide range of epics, French, Italian, and German, and has once more proved his aptitude
as a story-teller for the young.’?—Tue Nation.

The Boy’s Library of Legend and Chivalry.

Edited by Sipvey Lanier, and richly illustrated by PREDERICKs, BENSELL, and
Kappes. Four volumes, cloth, uaiform binding, price per set, $7.00. Sold
separately, price per volume, $2.00.

Mr. Lanier’s books present to boy readers the old
English classics of history and legend in an attract-
ive form. While they are stories of action and
stirring incident, they teach those lessons which
manly, honest boys ought to learn,

THE BOY’S KING ARTHUR.

THE BOY’S FROISSART.

THE BOY’S PERCY.

THE KNIGHTLY LEGENDS OF
WALES. :

‘ Amid all the strange and fanciful scenery of these stories,
character and ideals of character remain at the simplest and
purest. The romantic history transpires in the healthy atmos-
phere of the open air on the green earth beneath the open sky.”
--Tue INDEPENDENT.


Charles Scribner’s Sous’ Books for Young Readers.

Two Books by Henry M. Stanley.

MY DARK COMPANIONS
And Their Strange Stories. With 64 illustrations. 8vo, $2.00

“The following legends,’’ says Mr. Stanley in his introduction, ‘‘ are the choicest and most
curious of those that were related to me during seventeen years, and which have not been hith-
erto published in any of my books of travel.” There are in all nineteen stories, new and striking
in motive and quaint in language.

MY KALULU.
Prince, King, and Slave. A Story of Central Africa. By



Henry M. STaNntey. One volume, 12mo, new edition, \enry M. STANLEY.
with many illustrations, $1.50.

‘“ A fresh, breezy, stirring story for youths, interesting in itself and full of information regarding life in the interior of the
continent in which its scenes are laid.*,—New York Times.

“Tf the young reader is fond of strange adventures, he will find enough in this volume to delight him all winter, and he will
be hard to please who is‘not charmed by its graphic pages.’’—Boston JourNAL.

Jules Verne’s Greatest Work.
‘*THE EXPLORATION OF THE WORLD.”

‘°M. Verne’s scheme in this work is to tell fully how man has made
acquaintance with the world in which he lives, to combine into a single work ‘in °
three volumes the wonderful stories of all the great explorers, navigators, and .
travelers who have sought out, one after another, the once uttermost parts of
the earth.”—THe New York Eveninc Post.



The three volumes in a set, $7.50; singly, $2.50.

FAMOUS TRAVELS AND TRAVELLERS.

With over too full-page illustrations, maps, etc., 8vo, $2.50.

THE GREAT NAVIGATORS OF THE XVIIITH
CENTURY.
With 96 full-page illustrations and 19 maps, 8vo, $2.50.
THE GREAT EXPLORERS OF THE XIXTH
CENTURY.

With over too full-page illustrations, fac-similes, etc., 8vo, $2.50.





Jules Verne’s Stories. Uniform Illustrated Edition.

Nine volumes, 8vo, extra cloth, with over 750 full-page illustrations. Price, per set, in a box,
$17.50. Sold also in separate volumes.

Micuaet StrocorF; or, The Courier of the Czar, $2.00. A FLoatinc City AND THE BLOCKADE
Runners, $2.00. Hector Servapac, $2.00. A JOURNEY TO THE CENTRE OF THE EarTH, $2.00. FROM
tHE EarTH TO THE Moon Direct 1n NineTy-sEVEN Hours, Twenty Minutes; AND A JOURNEY AROUND IT,
$2.00. Dick Sanps, $2.00. THE STEAM House, $2.00. THE Giant Raft, $2.00. THE MysTERIous

[SLAND, $2.50.

es

ra








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'124' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABARU' 'sip-files00003.txt'
c7067ae7edcc8e757c95ead287eb65b6
5e773d0b992c43b86f56dc9e5763c0d040d34e0f
'2011-11-14T17:03:12-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'5318' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABARV' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
989dc9ce34de8a8764e59816f0971fd9
17f2c986c8814b980073a313e3c1a46184712f77
'2011-11-14T17:04:32-05:00'
describe
'52796' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABARW' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
7633b0164559801c0b1d6721c3d7fcc3
d795e4e06a24ec0834ae674c3817e58cdc702a4d
'2011-11-14T17:02:13-05:00'
describe
'10993' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABARX' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
2820f6e1a4864fb60a9ff91a4cb61395
09d62987ce277b64e16c1fa5a6099f17bede6560
'2011-11-14T17:05:16-05:00'
describe
'1017' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABARY' 'sip-files00005.pro'
8ca10bfd2cc39c6caae25745373e027f
7ba509ab50af41cd730f7be2507a242570149828
'2011-11-14T17:00:37-05:00'
describe
'3570' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABARZ' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
f9c1442ea5504fb14308d47cb17dab08
a37a069bba6a57f18a25727ab8543ab1cbe58e88
'2011-11-14T17:06:06-05:00'
describe
'4066536' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABASA' 'sip-files00005.tif'
a617607448d2e10c90a36840be335a1a
3be72db21932c92a7f416cdbf358271cbc0540d0
describe
'62' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABASB' 'sip-files00005.txt'
7faff27d110565db30abf0fb00a2d291
d3f5c0ef5f9f18541c90b7d8242de9d90973a914
describe
'1363' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABASC' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
36e8ca12eccc145aa1aef5f4982495ee
5dab1e3ad7559b3c7438ba2581807e7026501413
'2011-11-14T17:02:24-05:00'
describe
'499404' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABASD' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
1b33c38754bef2fca7400b6701e62243
6aee360bc9e19fc464cea3a27d609ee1f8c9945d
'2011-11-14T17:06:28-05:00'
describe
'74896' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABASE' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
4eec0da3c65fc3f163b442881ce8faac
ed982237655d537c4e2d0760e8adb74d4f67f7fe
'2011-11-14T17:02:17-05:00'
describe
'56381' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABASF' 'sip-files00006.pro'
375d100ff58185b6266ee2e0c4d644e1
39654f16e7dace08365d847379605fd3a61a8401
'2011-11-14T17:05:17-05:00'
describe
'20782' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABASG' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
a479db9782e1b59d8d46e95461d77180
9fa19cd0f257003ba10bec0221df2d84033dc501
'2011-11-14T17:06:12-05:00'
describe
'4007668' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABASH' 'sip-files00006.tif'
ba4172f57b95980fb14446d5ff6f5b20
dba301fdde7a051ac0e8dfb70754766a60889007
'2011-11-14T17:06:25-05:00'
describe
'2484' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABASI' 'sip-files00006.txt'
e0d91690c71e21d30613f1b15b1b4a2a
cadaf01a4e9ad327d2cef86118ddc64739120d14
'2011-11-14T17:03:54-05:00'
describe
'5429' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABASJ' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
3369b8256b1fd9bc220fcc4ce29579bf
54412bba2e436141f2cee3981624c14921e8ca3c
'2011-11-14T17:03:53-05:00'
describe
'531187' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABASK' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
181ce58a6c092cb34ac61dbded8f36c6
6437d13f4f71431a3f6cbf27d5c133e8ae8b9b61
'2011-11-14T17:01:26-05:00'
describe
'105102' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABASL' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
ea343a736d548c42cfe8770e233a9840
c02d0b74c4b5f6914936a7bfa10805aab088c309
'2011-11-14T17:02:27-05:00'
describe
'2899' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABASM' 'sip-files00008.pro'
1af2d9e0454e35c4c7278d786e28ca7d
af1a7e91653accc5614de036177891619e1c6955
'2011-11-14T17:04:56-05:00'
describe
'27039' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABASN' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
5ebe27d388d6f282cea2d59603131c17
d09a2e7e9ef74b808e22c12ace1b47d263263b06
'2011-11-14T17:03:45-05:00'
describe
'4263436' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABASO' 'sip-files00008.tif'
be648b8641d1235640e008fd31041a2d
4752e4db1e6a4f4e9a8a5dc28f33fb9c9ab4040a
'2011-11-14T17:01:07-05:00'
describe
'229' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABASP' 'sip-files00008.txt'
b0b91150db046203160f066e3aa3517e
dbab5d02faa445dd2e7343ebf70bf9fbc9bef716
'2011-11-14T17:05:56-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6651' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABASQ' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
d6e557835898630414ea7cf978f10810
9e1dc0b83628abc63c905cbd5d8721ca3cb3f531
'2011-11-14T17:04:10-05:00'
describe
'396931' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABASR' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
1efe4e0684ed9dd2a1bd06218e29d6f1
fcc54cde4eb59437edeb9a65bebdb75ae4c2ba58
'2011-11-14T17:03:44-05:00'
describe
'44725' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABASS' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
1c0416908e48ff427d131de0e86e9060
9f053efd5397ce2b6215da980b3140fb9386b30b
'2011-11-14T17:00:35-05:00'
describe
'3717' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAST' 'sip-files00011.pro'
cdcbb3ca0cf006ce101a09267f7b80ab
360b76280b471d699aa96026e6abeed2fdd0ad94
'2011-11-14T17:04:09-05:00'
describe
'13269' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABASU' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
2486224e186e301d75e1a5bbbed78e6b
73b6f6b30e866f5440de80f4118ed4d941e6a86c
'2011-11-14T17:04:50-05:00'
describe
'3944484' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABASV' 'sip-files00011.tif'
2243d17909fda5665903a36a7493f634
c48c5d7fd2fa3b2f31de99d48ea023d90f071128
'2011-11-14T17:06:04-05:00'
describe
'170' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABASW' 'sip-files00011.txt'
5d40b024570f4d0d3f8630855f63c6d4
caf954e10df5ce8e2c86da5dc5b39e4e0e98118b
'2011-11-14T17:02:41-05:00'
describe
'3457' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABASX' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
4a95459d3d58f6b375c54408e74f3e7a
45599b4c75cd55cd52f936bd95df413dee6d7cab
describe
'44176' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABASY' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
6e6e23b67ffb7c4b897f4bb19b1f3927
5ca6a42d01089008550bc282c0a915543863aac6
'2011-11-14T17:03:05-05:00'
describe
'9720' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABASZ' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
4c12dbabdd49df3e30f9458b7ada9712
7db76a9ef2a22f61d192fcfce5272b85dee9503a
'2011-11-14T17:00:39-05:00'
describe
'2712' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATA' 'sip-files00012.pro'
ed12ccb6e461ff2150a6a73ff7f8857e
6b965b46655e10d68d57181ccf65456da71fa364
'2011-11-14T17:02:02-05:00'
describe
'2999' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATB' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
24f8b3170e81bc931ef0bf757129ff27
5e30ad300d43290a23393a5d2b263196f8610f8e
'2011-11-14T17:03:48-05:00'
describe
'4231480' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATC' 'sip-files00012.tif'
b04f40c7472408e4a417c1fcdb73617b
f06b85b80ad37ff54d68825dd350a65186500d8a
'2011-11-14T17:04:48-05:00'
describe
'238' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATD' 'sip-files00012.txt'
d772d0debdd9f2c9c2b03adab0b88557
536e4e1d7a6374c011a6f3b4d779de3c4191c902
'2011-11-14T17:05:34-05:00'
describe
'957' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATE' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
d6210dd5e98c18da7b6fb5a905841c0a
7e0e245058e2010cb4eb2168bb8be9e73a1d6817
'2011-11-14T17:01:27-05:00'
describe
'294035' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATF' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
61b1bc97189f90a62f4cdc34932bfecf
ee1314dae79823f005a917c8114c947d6ec94fb1
'2011-11-14T17:01:14-05:00'
describe
'37037' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATG' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
49f977a734f4ababd505a49f9241083d
08eaefe6ea3bb0b1ca47e08882986f494fad38c0
'2011-11-14T17:07:24-05:00'
describe
'21371' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATH' 'sip-files00013.pro'
59a9c3f43f0120e9b9b51553d54dc9b8
ec809d8ba2311fd212347b49881c47c5e7075eda
'2011-11-14T17:01:10-05:00'
describe
'13288' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATI' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
8142fb80a4c41b0680bf08a5cb8373f6
c482ef510622edb932f2dad83465e53e0348591e
'2011-11-14T17:01:06-05:00'
describe
'4051752' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATJ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
5635598fb10f765c6233ac0f3ff2fbd5
24a42c435091dfe476aaf83d398bfd8983c3cac7
'2011-11-14T17:03:52-05:00'
describe
'900' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATK' 'sip-files00013.txt'
2b348440f9b41e0162d39e05f394af89
1242a5172a336c23b3e3ce159c813f2b20025b99
'2011-11-14T17:01:03-05:00'
describe
'4009' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATL' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
9ad8a9f072eebd1b7b6900a9aac9aa01
b6dac5f79e343575353fad45ec1d27bdad9ff665
'2011-11-14T17:03:42-05:00'
describe
'16768' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATM' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
c6a8d5ed4ebb9e31f002f7355f835a6f
455cee546db25dd7e9b86ecff45958aa1a05b457
'2011-11-14T17:02:00-05:00'
describe
'7003' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATN' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
8f4a9e042ceb700a0d50ee8c01fbaf20
df2d37829049b119da41d39a0822b58abd61cf98
'2011-11-14T17:01:11-05:00'
describe
'2140' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATO' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
91468481fb1a49900fb1343fa2ae5502
2bf61b0e8bc2f1cbfc8fb2b3571354e2d4706e10
describe
'4080048' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATP' 'sip-files00014.tif'
47cc545c27796d5d6cdc90ea02b07b27
4057cb9c1e34843010a4244fd4eae64ba208f9a4
'2011-11-14T17:05:06-05:00'
describe
'805' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATQ' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
33d6b51159b6d8934026ee0eec288f3e
4b974cb959fbbf88cface5f78a2737fad7dfc02d
'2011-11-14T17:06:13-05:00'
describe
'476664' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATR' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
6fc497e1952e626c9d1f9a4ef0a72abe
d9944c833890191161258959d06b1d4a92fa2e0a
'2011-11-14T17:04:51-05:00'
describe
'57792' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATS' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
da7a1f8093cc5274f65d06ec84ede894
b3875237554842af24d46eebc9d33255051122e5
'2011-11-14T17:05:50-05:00'
describe
'23040' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATT' 'sip-files00015.pro'
60efd31b76be458b6ddb571b13086b3a
dd83bd80d83798233d2305d3fedec58b36142380
'2011-11-14T17:01:04-05:00'
describe
'18201' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATU' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
fb7dde3098107f03e38befdfb6ec5dba
26be7c48b4375a12fd0e64b5677c1c15d4fd9f64
describe
'4125140' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATV' 'sip-files00015.tif'
fdefff05f4c1649bc9df4adb04db212c
572d0e575239d60bebbb9e00485c948bf8c99bcf
'2011-11-14T17:04:16-05:00'
describe
'951' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATW' 'sip-files00015.txt'
be8e5db1b1c6429c9b6ede8f094d04ee
ab4c0faf1e8f723db6c56f555c3f42104f08d035
'2011-11-14T17:05:38-05:00'
describe
'4830' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATX' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
c8ca5c4f1c72c3ed768facaec418bab4
480823f92c45d32da38e655b5481b752c438a649
'2011-11-14T17:06:57-05:00'
describe
'515079' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATY' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
fa653777241a8c6b4f1e453a93635e49
70af58cb5a8b23b2f00a6688fd5be2dbb30b3071
'2011-11-14T17:00:53-05:00'
describe
'92832' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABATZ' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
cd124752d9364fe5ac4bdd887b8f6cdd
655b75da54da40c78b5cf8f661089e557251001e
'2011-11-14T17:01:23-05:00'
describe
'38846' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUA' 'sip-files00016.pro'
9cb09f24e010802b66e1a6a3f19c4719
a27c794b9a9e19170cd95ccd9fd8112061d78af8
'2011-11-14T17:04:37-05:00'
describe
'29037' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUB' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
2ea13e7eb3249d22aafe34b652aff7cd
b6d2a8d8a4f15c88e68487a8b5c58f110cf7ac84
describe
'4132992' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUC' 'sip-files00016.tif'
cb21371eef473d553d6195f0aa469406
538def788bc647710cda3ad2960f97cc7243dfd9
'2011-11-14T17:06:37-05:00'
describe
'1527' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUD' 'sip-files00016.txt'
cece893781e4fbf41e1567111432157f
9543dbf63d11621f21b9c701264c143ca88fe0f7
describe
'6722' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUE' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
413ce635dd1bb54cf42cd5c807aa295f
8f63d52142a85010535d967c91b632ecaa1918da
describe
'518613' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUF' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
bc7627accfd6441e50e469453a62c459
76230800def3b1153ee0a20527304b3ecdb34062
describe
'100757' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUG' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
98a6519da9ff51b55284c7146476aafe
9dbdc225e807b11bb1e0ba3deb0c9a9f8f8391e3
'2011-11-14T17:00:59-05:00'
describe
'39966' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUH' 'sip-files00017.pro'
2adabec9bb59a0d9878ab747d70325b6
e65ad631670b0aad2a746fc3a0833eb2bd5716d1
'2011-11-14T17:06:05-05:00'
describe
'30485' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUI' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
b3ef554971a3e6c426b3035ca915a053
c68c86c9c77af24d62205687da6f9f0b5f9d1e7f
'2011-11-14T17:05:24-05:00'
describe
'4161676' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUJ' 'sip-files00017.tif'
57a4c84a517b3ca2f5fee703d2dcfb80
b500788cfe819fe966b32adca874ea9e968d2773
'2011-11-14T17:06:03-05:00'
describe
'1586' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUK' 'sip-files00017.txt'
26508787f9a280e958d7faa1418f5e97
7a046ee9bf774c965808d5bf85176a722e674c99
'2011-11-14T17:02:18-05:00'
describe
'7110' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUL' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
f9272c88792b89807142329ce77723e7
0e219752a165eefcab6312803118c8f5f2168fb4
'2011-11-14T17:06:11-05:00'
describe
'524025' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUM' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
83d7350fa694b948d97fa8fc83032165
e4a8887c4468ef1709855a6c6dd13304a2b4b501
'2011-11-14T17:05:02-05:00'
describe
'93253' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUN' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
96ccbc0f7403a260ddc5ed198c69ccea
9945d33a599058eae090d2ce2ce47c5a456e235c
'2011-11-14T17:02:43-05:00'
describe
'37068' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUO' 'sip-files00018.pro'
a57bc20d69a5bc935b55be6e42bb51e3
93a324ee50cf963919d861b9559b4855b1547e26
describe
'29144' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUP' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
d3cabd11a1ea8a7bfa2fde7528c2f44b
c4e9663b531e10aaa2d76734b76e9eeeef8dd403
'2011-11-14T17:05:30-05:00'
describe
'4204532' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUQ' 'sip-files00018.tif'
95fe59eca0767d54ef23373ff983c27f
1cec34b0b852eb11d6462716d6343aef94d22332
'2011-11-14T17:03:43-05:00'
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUR' 'sip-files00018.txt'
dabf75547ff411006ecefa9558406379
99179d3cb1068cee1ede9f5697ad2bb43fe84e80
'2011-11-14T17:03:50-05:00'
describe
'6863' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUS' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
b515f632b219d20a0b11bd617fab3862
6adc80afd65bb66f55644930e13a24d1aee66df6
'2011-11-14T17:04:33-05:00'
describe
'513470' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUT' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
52d10dfdc1f3eac0945be126137efd44
008c596744a87ac61076d16ea2a22f6e272b7be9
'2011-11-14T17:01:17-05:00'
describe
'87001' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUU' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
aac41320782d64b5eb3276790e55c0f7
08387a15fb94342224a0f182b3fb8c6a41696ff4
describe
'35263' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUV' 'sip-files00019.pro'
8f343b88e32d41d668439f363232467c
d3eaadab5a612aecefadf8723d12934efa553670
'2011-11-14T17:01:35-05:00'
describe
'28720' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUW' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
2b1f0d86a5d14dbfabe8843e4f4ea934
3b619e1b9e47baa72115252c3f7e1740a4fa4c8a
'2011-11-14T17:02:40-05:00'
describe
'4120516' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUX' 'sip-files00019.tif'
fea0d9008c4665bffe4cd8ffae8442d9
2d098e42a80d1c89fc694db61d6e6a048609f437
'2011-11-14T17:05:33-05:00'
describe
'1420' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUY' 'sip-files00019.txt'
19c7a72cf8c1947d4ccb4d776836612b
2783ac292f2823a811a02dab95d7b737f9981c34
'2011-11-14T17:03:57-05:00'
describe
'6989' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAUZ' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
0a5e42382cd9dcd60aef7230d6568949
d815052aabc2191a939e3d20429cd858818e1055
'2011-11-14T17:04:00-05:00'
describe
'469544' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVA' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
d1f715f1449231d204772fd93a95769e
0dfb21056f4ac604d1022a7152484dbd5ed6db5a
'2011-11-14T17:04:44-05:00'
describe
'103042' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVB' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
58244dc7745f05566ed78d8d63e57ec3
fbea730d9ef2e2066d8d34e224d6bf95062841f7
'2011-11-14T17:06:01-05:00'
describe
'40188' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVC' 'sip-files00020.pro'
f184dbdf9f1d104b9c25a9367e2ae124
f56973f98af0518aeeebeb0b4a8c24ee75dd1731
describe
'34444' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVD' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
29627c0695bb730234378fd12cca2518
1a8339b8574638a2c1471a19e9fb3b76d9479c03
'2011-11-14T17:04:22-05:00'
describe
'3769304' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVE' 'sip-files00020.tif'
4b0f281ec3aa1a4601f922867736f91f
0335eb7c1632a6ca6fa48faa32ecd7dcf6a027f7
'2011-11-14T17:04:26-05:00'
describe
'1577' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVF' 'sip-files00020.txt'
e17d1802dd390d33d98cd933efa39d76
e7b338dcac145f87f1f35b0246b8d2a1ae5cb950
'2011-11-14T17:03:01-05:00'
describe
'7969' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVG' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
8602d5d6750b8c52b1c086ff57648bb2
b63a28390d7dba82b2cea2d9a29c46c8d7a48b4b
'2011-11-14T17:00:44-05:00'
describe
'515198' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVH' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
ebf0a3e6e71f4fe18c104884bb8d9c62
75eadf24b617aec29234ea834833e64c231e735c
'2011-11-14T17:04:11-05:00'
describe
'74639' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVI' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
c36952aeb5d1c09b568515634bf808aa
13a47625e2a730ab819ad3750791517fc0cc6de0
'2011-11-14T17:01:20-05:00'
describe
'36689' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVJ' 'sip-files00021.pro'
06502fd383107df995912f4339fd4599
edd57126dfeed0dc1c4e66098b07434ae35be0e7
'2011-11-14T17:06:26-05:00'
describe
'26590' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVK' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
cd4387ee7d426ccae187691f24999895
283efee2b9c87adce9d268618743522ea58e7582
describe
'4133956' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVL' 'sip-files00021.tif'
2447e4a5299bf7bff32b773783bbb08b
a91df5a95c6634f49136c1ed3d2ec3d3935e573d
'2011-11-14T17:03:11-05:00'
describe
'1448' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVM' 'sip-files00021.txt'
19971e95aafd249dc56247fc1fad4557
e348ed7e33b2216a343bca00c8b180e6bb383240
'2011-11-14T17:04:38-05:00'
describe
'6872' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVN' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
f3803b10330776a305d7a6e8cc66497a
b9b0767f01e4c4f6656c7bb4939405ca0333853d
'2011-11-14T17:07:02-05:00'
describe
'505920' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVO' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
a26b2a70cde4711a0bab22e5ab842aca
e21e29726d31e1290ebf38e129841607a675669c
'2011-11-14T17:03:49-05:00'
describe
'87402' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVP' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
6290fe067965febfccf95aa1e59ec936
957c15c7f4678d55d01e1644b6d60e93dbc7d2c5
'2011-11-14T17:07:29-05:00'
describe
'37253' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVQ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
3e3a10b5f8918dbbaec897990a4ea9d4
d72f0c8fc1556f2e261c8efef39abaa0a43ac01b
'2011-11-14T17:00:54-05:00'
describe
'28832' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVR' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
861dd97d2675d0be0f5490b14813b872
0021d642decf5d59c7d2fd8411d69337943c79ff
'2011-11-14T17:03:16-05:00'
describe
'4060072' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVS' 'sip-files00022.tif'
91222e718b9512522a1a610cc8166e75
90bd88c9812a5875170f96c2177f8b47f808cbac
'2011-11-14T17:05:35-05:00'
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVT' 'sip-files00022.txt'
08c93e3793fc6f0bb19a92d235b2fa5f
dd58527e6471cfd24a0056e43fac62ed1ded8906
'2011-11-14T17:03:30-05:00'
describe
'6853' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVU' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
f81d6be87a58580c0b8a02dd57b33d45
b4ba5f18af01a8b179e371052c9d1c2a9e6f8569
'2011-11-14T17:06:56-05:00'
describe
'475046' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVV' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
f18d7ab6154d2db92cf39c58710b698c
eecf52c38430be27d6c1380a8bd556085056bd9b
'2011-11-14T17:03:17-05:00'
describe
'76166' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVW' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
b51b98c85905f8468b2d697e7af8c7b5
064730757948e036a83c024e7585cbfd47eb7139
'2011-11-14T17:03:39-05:00'
describe
'30630' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVX' 'sip-files00023.pro'
aa8da7dadf93a336150d50311c4c1dfb
67525159df3396d8e65d0c543408d9635a16d96c
describe
'25185' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVY' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
461402df272252457d349ec232aa9f5a
eb58446d00df5c15d07a2edf7f55e18655210af7
'2011-11-14T17:03:47-05:00'
describe
'3812140' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAVZ' 'sip-files00023.tif'
7340c1c83c287f128320a95cb24eb53a
ea7df26cb0f6cec03e9c6e028c02c8de89c7edca
'2011-11-14T17:06:14-05:00'
describe
'1228' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWA' 'sip-files00023.txt'
5c17e6b04c7739908663ec66ab10f0a8
9e4258e04aeebc6bc552ac5419f14d080463ace9
describe
'6137' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWB' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
36b5a04e6a5d1bf2086d3a808985022a
e657438522bf61d7ec7d0bc6ba51ccffdb314bfe
'2011-11-14T17:03:25-05:00'
describe
'483939' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWC' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
9cc77909662e5ac64dba2a0153e702e0
8afc3e621f821ec0e3e8c1c26383c6ef46bd931e
'2011-11-14T17:01:18-05:00'
describe
'78286' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWD' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
144fd4ecdfdb59a76910cb4ff2fc3c46
fc48b1b3dfb9616dc5a87256dc7666868f7b6714
'2011-11-14T17:02:57-05:00'
describe
'31877' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWE' 'sip-files00024.pro'
06cff512dee87ae5d1009ef316e82aad
694ff504aa9b137732fb7b48324964c3c6435a00
'2011-11-14T17:04:45-05:00'
describe
'25884' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWF' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
b3b8705f0a0020ef5501f41c4ba70c47
400c5b7aea0b5dabd223b40f8745c040b22120e1
'2011-11-14T17:04:28-05:00'
describe
'3883508' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWG' 'sip-files00024.tif'
22ed37d542e836b798c200d7e0c2f36b
0a0f34526f2f23b4d7e49d52af1601690b6699e5
'2011-11-14T17:04:17-05:00'
describe
'1305' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWH' 'sip-files00024.txt'
27bdebe2255db095e790d1d731e8bf34
5feac92005d9f602bf7e231ec8eb3d0a41ba7c2a
'2011-11-14T17:02:58-05:00'
describe
'6241' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWI' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
e7464a26bef2c3f1b53f1c1ed413c1d5
ebe4a24678619cb3a1ad8caa8053b09452a0ad60
describe
'502455' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWJ' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
9292c207648a9bf1bc2408fbf24780bc
51e003975276061df53f436a5d22ac26fd3e6fe4
'2011-11-14T17:05:20-05:00'
describe
'90231' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWK' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
42f53152258fb5454ef29d37a9d69647
ffee07cdd402d402722337b282b23b1b2eac08ad
'2011-11-14T17:00:56-05:00'
describe
'35061' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWL' 'sip-files00025.pro'
cc80e05b4f33be4fcf1e2bbcb441b313
afcda6d6ea3914aca73246bf35e0ebbdfedce2b8
'2011-11-14T17:03:35-05:00'
describe
'29559' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWM' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
7e4428656934ec9d83934e28ebe207ec
f3e77089e16d2bb809852b2d0c28dc11e3972f9c
describe
'4032116' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWN' 'sip-files00025.tif'
57424911b153c9e75725ddb824556a47
ed174319c0a3ab4ebacebda469c56f029b71330a
'2011-11-14T17:04:13-05:00'
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWO' 'sip-files00025.txt'
b6bcc5080627b18457c8f67db674432b
cc7110de7855356c4bdef5ecdbd82ccddeb59073
'2011-11-14T17:02:47-05:00'
describe
'7650' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWP' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
ea4af0acaddbb3ee59de8b04fe078a05
3e562b0e58c569e47541a5714887ebc654697fbf
'2011-11-14T17:01:42-05:00'
describe
'496833' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWQ' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
4bfe07d0f39f7235eb24bd529694f71b
e0e5f6309aa9c5a69a2ca60177e42431720e994c
'2011-11-14T17:05:53-05:00'
describe
'90403' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWR' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
4c6c2af7a947c8f25aef028641a934ff
a3ec4cf8b120766dbf3464c719e31c469887c139
'2011-11-14T17:03:40-05:00'
describe
'37918' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWS' 'sip-files00026.pro'
22cc441838818683ffb5ae28e00c8a36
3ff45d64357068946bf3c4c8226a37eceb055bb8
describe
'30227' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWT' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
4dd0ee690dc11f38e6bfa2c47dace360
a7649f8fa391240e8600e8b8841661677c776c5e
'2011-11-14T17:07:15-05:00'
describe
'3987136' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWU' 'sip-files00026.tif'
4cc9370ed9bc9244613d4f7418e59c13
dd9e18ee0ee94b1698ff7119c7cbb73c54528c31
'2011-11-14T17:03:33-05:00'
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWV' 'sip-files00026.txt'
dfa1faa968a29a57fd8bcbcac014a2df
57701d5ff3f1af5b2f1af8b84a5692fdcf21880c
describe
'7171' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWW' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
3a67022f8e7dc27e452ffc9f734d00e4
4ceada77a5b199796cdd7d7bc443d91249d84e07
'2011-11-14T17:06:51-05:00'
describe
'573199' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWX' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
1f1868c7acb6fb522562b18050dfb2c8
79992a17a6f594866901d53d28a8490d5a96d4be
'2011-11-14T17:04:52-05:00'
describe
'136820' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWY' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
3c663c51b4ee64902ec5038482faf150
c3f7433da75cea485fe64331824d4e109c45834d
'2011-11-14T17:05:12-05:00'
describe
'2078' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAWZ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
c50054bcc4b7ee4c7ed47e10928db176
17c4ff73797335c381693613631ecb10350bbfcc
describe
'32651' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXA' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
376c29910b82ef3002aa08ddfacbc136
6d273a9fbdbf9bc1da4eef7c0b22547216527c84
'2011-11-14T17:02:19-05:00'
describe
'4600552' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXB' 'sip-files00027.tif'
1f5d4d64608ee674057ebac5d247bac1
b68babf300fd8783675ffed3a49aaaaf398d6777
'2011-11-14T17:00:57-05:00'
describe
'129' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXC' 'sip-files00027.txt'
abc68735f3db06c02a50b6908dfd14b9
f04811c5b62ceec57c4bf8ed682c3b984fe68bc3
describe
'7728' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXD' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
6ffb95d4c7d37ea8462c0bc2f1e97d0a
55bc175a2f684ba3401fce0b17131476ed3d3d41
'2011-11-14T17:07:17-05:00'
describe
'11985' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXE' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
4dbef6bc60ef62e3f6718e08ad1529fa
d78d073b6c38daec07ca7959ebb744a4c7174127
'2011-11-14T17:07:28-05:00'
describe
'6855' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXF' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
5f5fae55679de6f3e6741797c713b1a8
f1d5d3be4d45764f3ff1fc682273094519a49bf5
describe
'2030' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXG' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
f6769a8c2b558f629de65c81fa730579
080e80842af76bb33144f49a27c3c1136d08ab77
'2011-11-14T17:01:22-05:00'
describe
'3770928' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXH' 'sip-files00028.tif'
2c9bd12141cc7ce8b815c2cb790b9399
c70f68a1ac1f5fca136974f6ae4771360b91eceb
'2011-11-14T17:07:00-05:00'
describe
'770' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXI' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
f579c7a6369d8722c177ab0b2f0422a6
e926e97dbd06465a945bc62cd966e079a02436e9
'2011-11-14T17:07:21-05:00'
describe
'525672' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXJ' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
be62b95dccc22cf30f396bc392e26116
777f0f9ce184a2d56f34a0eda25075ace54f8929
describe
'82211' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXK' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
e98ba457a6f0bae3652f2db33696fa88
ebcf097439f800cf4bbbf1295fd1a55d940eb6d9
'2011-11-14T17:01:30-05:00'
describe
'35397' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXL' 'sip-files00029.pro'
03e6ead066dd9c167902def3271207d9
4b324c246434c898285a0f74bdbc3edbfb2ebef0
describe
'25895' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXM' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
c8e4a5e09c5ea3eaaa1fb97fbe67b925
dcb9d69f8aeb67b8ab08556afcc9b8a527be60ea
'2011-11-14T17:04:42-05:00'
describe
'4217756' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXN' 'sip-files00029.tif'
56f044caef4c9b786668223009827c2a
ce99eb25832e1324dc88b6673825205ca37ea416
'2011-11-14T17:03:37-05:00'
describe
'1412' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXO' 'sip-files00029.txt'
9e48e93579b6310c5f7a15e6a7efcd6f
4e924c8ceb9b879dd2fdcd30d1f0af1badc64420
'2011-11-14T17:01:39-05:00'
describe
'6377' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXP' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
8798e8f1edc570070680ff7f8b33a9ed
ed5c2fcffdd63b86396ad76d5d948b172b567bbd
describe
'495039' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXQ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
c8a10b51ee87550b0509b7c4dfed02ad
c2f329713c04ff5df71ad64b338aef479c8537bb
describe
'85597' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXR' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
2e5c85c082ade12c51e31404a3d3bfc6
8fc75a70dfcf6c68910d5589f5d759af2dc00fe1
'2011-11-14T17:00:51-05:00'
describe
'34963' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXS' 'sip-files00030.pro'
4246965dde5ac5f9a52fe89da16c56a5
be8ef05578ef6bad8dc36345b775e7c09c31885d
describe
'28258' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXT' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
44303b3855ebc11b9a56c9cb90420c72
fc71de1defb88690543f7d870e4de3b6fae2b397
'2011-11-14T17:04:23-05:00'
describe
'3972572' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXU' 'sip-files00030.tif'
a1b7cef8d7c49185fd55a519cb4cd205
8f93f5475c7dab4f3bb5f487d755af496f5c20e7
'2011-11-14T17:01:40-05:00'
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXV' 'sip-files00030.txt'
c61b85cc76d4351fd77cc257f06878de
045602ee7a2ec3a647ec2ec912fc6cd5ac4aa44d
'2011-11-14T17:02:28-05:00'
describe
'6944' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXW' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
67fc26d4ae0c4cb089a50293c10f694a
3febfbb30eb842b946a5cfffa0098651a5ecee55
'2011-11-14T17:03:09-05:00'
describe
'474668' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXX' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
d981728b21571345990e548764edc09d
e4e39cd26bc007a62ccaf85ec9ba6fdac879fe10
'2011-11-14T17:00:48-05:00'
describe
'110585' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXY' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
a1dd44c8ceec597065000b2659f24998
8b1e4fd75652d0eafa25ae2384c666244d280d80
'2011-11-14T17:04:07-05:00'
describe
'41032' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAXZ' 'sip-files00031.pro'
efcde784e5a7c7d7da40044a4c9252f1
e191f89e032b35b011913afbc657ca74246e9bd8
describe
'36884' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYA' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
2c1f10c852d3779d204a7670b329a52c
46a99fe0d26eec157b3bae4bee5963f38f7baf7f
describe
'3810132' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYB' 'sip-files00031.tif'
66327971ff9b411dfab127520073fcd7
22dcd4d2acd6f6d6ab9ff374bb8fd9fc91659ffe
describe
'1639' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYC' 'sip-files00031.txt'
909af69ed6db141027cf5ba856a3ee4b
a10f216cc255b9e8d74d2b9594246ceeffd290d1
'2011-11-14T17:03:41-05:00'
describe
'8867' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYD' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
04231adb845c0118e14b7c0a462ceac8
4307647975c233e15a59c42ccf0360d88daa582f
'2011-11-14T17:07:12-05:00'
describe
'534587' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYE' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
7167fdd86bc7c07eb3ed7e79c0753852
3c09a61aa64760efc7092b4e696a475d3e3c0690
'2011-11-14T17:02:06-05:00'
describe
'82092' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYF' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
5ac4488a35b6edf451ce7144318ab57d
ad85918484cb457a80ef0401deebe1d6e7bd020c
'2011-11-14T17:06:00-05:00'
describe
'36492' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYG' 'sip-files00032.pro'
770154d6deb31f1d2b6836e925f99003
d9238bf86c0c420cf14f7a80b7de678cbd64d7ad
'2011-11-14T17:00:47-05:00'
describe
'26757' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYH' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
7632b087e6ea377bff1fa76b1b4f80f0
202e59de5ae345a67a8f24f4f17ea5d0b0e952d1
describe
'4289296' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYI' 'sip-files00032.tif'
193f22642a5e2b9b200548a68507e93a
bbd9f98990ca873517aa14db7f705fccd0b6e3a6
describe
'1449' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYJ' 'sip-files00032.txt'
94e428e4ac24616dc98c89463977c4e7
eedb2260a5d25c08ed58db567847b7e9cc251f57
'2011-11-14T17:03:14-05:00'
describe
'6330' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYK' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
f1a24f68cf817f77d4e66805cec09d0f
345ff9d79fcdf2d67461f249b2c0af3f73bd6e80
describe
'512814' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYL' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
661a236f4027fe2b9925a70ffcad2f03
ced84f0582420b66757042feedfeda130a19e1d4
describe
'95176' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYM' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
ecad45f73f599ccdb5cc8e5b7048403d
0f575235667920a4622486b563e13a7939adbb86
describe
'37977' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYN' 'sip-files00033.pro'
54a9a174e30ee400fd5c13f16b627d7c
37d761d4e30f2ccccd66d4eadbe5909b153d9f33
describe
'30942' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYO' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
5fdf718b28f9341e54a49e63d2f40a26
4937b96d28711d39b2fdcc3cae99d3124a216897
'2011-11-14T17:00:36-05:00'
describe
'4115068' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYP' 'sip-files00033.tif'
94480f7983a7f8ab1c1a72056594831a
7a071eb41263b4d3dae7db2b6969371951bd787d
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYQ' 'sip-files00033.txt'
927afb2aae68602d9c6d8d8b2ea0129f
59392a2ad4db0c9d09e4232e2e5840dcc9da3f0c
describe
'7822' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYR' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
0805ee8542fa45600afa8bb945c20225
4f3238a70d1303579675fe2ce179885e3958b697
describe
'516922' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYS' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
1c45acf29fffe3a99db78ec49e99e646
686251d743ae7849f386f8cd4ce9eef482a9e454
'2011-11-14T17:04:59-05:00'
describe
'79388' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYT' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
8316d092b0ce28b9e0d0c7be99ff51b2
eb193e2d29b3f706f71503454229b678e4526d06
describe
'33219' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYU' 'sip-files00034.pro'
cd780956d7cc9dec5bde1d420dff19f4
15fe7b13b2435d5fbee56039ce7c55363f285689
describe
'26535' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYV' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
7ad5440f61b8ab34c61e2463b65f73fe
c471409027c2746aab9ef5d3e21859798e5cc531
'2011-11-14T17:04:27-05:00'
describe
'4147608' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYW' 'sip-files00034.tif'
54fd393bffa99d41cb780b8c58ef17ee
53e71c751d257893eb71965b90f02ba09ca54350
'2011-11-14T17:04:49-05:00'
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYX' 'sip-files00034.txt'
4bf25dcbcfacf7c21a97a742bb803906
bca9787b283abd0e13c03b1a98425a46147fc392
'2011-11-14T17:00:55-05:00'
describe
'6586' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYY' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
78839b0a3648c50158272f0234da5b87
6348b5fabbb561abc6d53ca7414003fa92836f0d
'2011-11-14T17:04:29-05:00'
describe
'276011' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAYZ' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
fe98d0a73dd232f4c148eb05b9a3e28a
34b743fd0e97992f48c22bf998f573d1eae69e02
'2011-11-14T17:02:20-05:00'
describe
'38276' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZA' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
2eafdfc499d2a29b38d013b95c365659
5c2732e0e09f37f2dfa865426ad47827af90aecc
'2011-11-14T17:06:55-05:00'
describe
'13115' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZB' 'sip-files00035.pro'
97d98279efe0c8ea2c42f23cad2702ad
3b2c4c22e1778c5d8fd694226070530f48179b00
describe
'12288' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZC' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
c54b4513266576db7a86e1b796b165d1
ae67b5acda20f9190572633cd4c5d6381aed197d
'2011-11-14T17:03:10-05:00'
describe
'4017464' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZD' 'sip-files00035.tif'
37acee1af1bdec372d850440aa54ab15
abd1d987a1db1e96461b523f250a4d1557b774fe
describe
'546' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZE' 'sip-files00035.txt'
5a9c7726601853524a64661e43665ba0
862bedcb2dff6570bc6a304af87165bea2cab032
'2011-11-14T17:02:10-05:00'
describe
'3496' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZF' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
58ab5fc7d20b153837f249284eb60be0
2e4d206510cd805d68a4d42fdcfde8dbc0ff118c
'2011-11-14T17:02:09-05:00'
describe
'510349' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZG' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
59843875ed422dba45123800b5bd1093
5b600457794438fe4c93ae501cfa3c59901b7a13
describe
'78603' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZH' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
e6ecb6baad1c78848f3bb327ef43a922
3e9b45eab4e9f9dabd7f15af01cf98e2764a8325
'2011-11-14T17:04:31-05:00'
describe
'32635' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZI' 'sip-files00036.pro'
2a48a3903585ddfdce0280aabe008292
b95f11aa06b008c87ab8d9130239045b7a71c0a5
'2011-11-14T17:07:06-05:00'
describe
'26198' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZJ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
e8d6ca176dbaefd6c76307ee53d2d75f
bdb5cd8d59e204eea7916cd8199c815f976b0640
'2011-11-14T17:01:00-05:00'
describe
'4094984' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZK' 'sip-files00036.tif'
1d4e43a3be650cc900e412b6f5d54e83
a502566f122604b7d04e4ee6c6f7a04c511170e3
'2011-11-14T17:02:31-05:00'
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZL' 'sip-files00036.txt'
f43e5d80c8380c8169e7fa1041ea2fda
dc5c6b215530d251181328e3586e6aab054cce5a
'2011-11-14T17:02:54-05:00'
describe
'6215' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZM' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
76b3e9769e27aa6b94814948a5f61d2e
f1dca2332de3484bd677f3ad63c14cd382528d9c
'2011-11-14T17:01:21-05:00'
describe
'505462' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZN' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
ba8dddc28ae28b6e312a58b41d4c75ba
6a1e5eea048763be382dccfe2c7482625ecc168f
describe
'100597' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZO' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
2e97609753e8584fc26475ee2a4c2519
deb6bd21a2410a5dc180e6a4c914bee3c8c8d9a7
'2011-11-14T17:02:36-05:00'
describe
'40307' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZP' 'sip-files00037.pro'
7e6c46a6aa560ebb8e9591d6b081544e
eb540dbb2c59b1efe733c3f4a104c27ee775dc2d
describe
'32952' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZQ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
91b6bcf5df7c587045ff635f831b683b
d6d3d8e56ec7e5fa43ec8742610608d0b4ee9586
'2011-11-14T17:03:08-05:00'
describe
'4055924' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZR' 'sip-files00037.tif'
855bd342a5cd63930d2552806ac8c28c
6539f1c4da4e1ec492fe571700e0efe8893a13f8
'2011-11-14T17:02:23-05:00'
describe
'1588' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZS' 'sip-files00037.txt'
03bb60c9a472524220142452787b5f21
b288d43a60bd2e4ac3d051654e6d4ad88a5a0c60
describe
'7985' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZT' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
1641094623fb8c75ab27b1bddf1c265a
635bb871d1297c84c559205ea230412aef18c684
'2011-11-14T17:07:25-05:00'
describe
'512996' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZU' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
abe5619a56ce619e4ea06e2c96f4d69e
c70c08839dfe3733cc51fa7ee2dafa7cefe65088
describe
'95409' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZV' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
f519d9595569e5de1fe1e8b673561ff8
0b7ddb4d97ca378473fa655c09a0c3f45bc13ebc
'2011-11-14T17:07:23-05:00'
describe
'39846' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZW' 'sip-files00038.pro'
895485d2018d194598fbf07a9da69a59
41d7e895225df18cde1554a20b21006f43e42f08
describe
'30920' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZX' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
71d40fa2f01c1f26da95c8906fefcccf
96255cec2077bf28ab79cbbbfb7990f33aa68d42
describe
'4116352' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZY' 'sip-files00038.tif'
975dc503576a096d8d9da100b9114889
899385bd05d2fda87c2e5d4fac18b42e84d29c31
'2011-11-14T17:00:42-05:00'
describe
'1569' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABAZZ' 'sip-files00038.txt'
30fbe615b8a9c0ef6a8489fd8bcfb8cb
b112b669b5d8113c1da2ab560f69a050063e7f4e
describe
'7382' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAA' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
bdbaafee718139eb57b03d4f37c6cfb5
4eb99d95d81e7330adc7ad6022e2fcb782b06a1a
'2011-11-14T17:05:15-05:00'
describe
'499862' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAB' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
5dd7b044356800469cc7a778a6444b8a
b8e8bf701fd800433c73846afbb004ffd3b0b5c1
describe
'94418' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAC' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
37ff694ecb043ba1e649cef3824864a8
277c6a73a9c3474cea324284089dd9c77c3dc390
'2011-11-14T17:05:21-05:00'
describe
'39156' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAD' 'sip-files00039.pro'
9380ab3fcd0daf238c3d87bdc87a005a
844347e04994788450676ecbccf0f25d550153ca
describe
'31661' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAE' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
80054529d6701ae528f9fd35df741edb
dfc0002dbee6d81d6cc61cc81be59b1b6ab4ec99
'2011-11-14T17:02:33-05:00'
describe
'4011440' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAF' 'sip-files00039.tif'
83c4615fa7000e762675d3579ef13d8a
a1aebd76ba0c6841a4ba798a67c209f1f512e6b7
'2011-11-14T17:02:03-05:00'
describe
'1558' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAG' 'sip-files00039.txt'
926da686f63f4d031c30f82db11b7eb8
d777f92a997e72950b625dce418e4bba6b354b4c
'2011-11-14T17:02:26-05:00'
describe
'7552' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAH' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
c71d9cb10b64deb179d41921ae39a1b9
5b9941972e3e0c49005de5a8c9b45b01bc890d68
'2011-11-14T17:05:41-05:00'
describe
'543690' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAI' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
606c938406b3076ef837bbec63b6ec0f
2f567c5bbff7f98c80d32a831723affdd3b08216
describe
'85151' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAJ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
facec4257e26af0abfe893c9467e7d50
31b5ea1a3b85a063fef79acbfa7968f4125f3611
describe
'38041' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAK' 'sip-files00040.pro'
1161db7ec6972cb9287735c893ea4acd
e09dd8c15ac7366c3883f180243c5b77de3689ca
describe
'26585' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAL' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
90696b42a1dfab6644745b1187e1980d
0b8085b7d50cddf5dffd6ec1ef665b9269fba05c
'2011-11-14T17:01:02-05:00'
describe
'4361720' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAM' 'sip-files00040.tif'
a2a9d5dd563b57e89bcd1cb60109cb94
dbd2abad3a57aa72366b1144b16afa4a6a0772bb
'2011-11-14T17:05:59-05:00'
describe
'1497' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAN' 'sip-files00040.txt'
dc3844020c184bac54b07f741637c069
cb5727d7f36e0842d1aa3f3dd0b2c362887f087b
describe
'6159' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAO' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
cdea592c11c219471066998c21f4e6aa
0e218b8b60bfe3d2a44fc867387dddadda948d77
describe
'524985' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAP' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
fd4f0b798c7a0b58cfa0b6abecab0d93
94a7462b749449950fb6d26aea8ff6b68b6bd428
describe
'74626' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAQ' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
1ed62bac6cf3f670c25cc053f67942b6
e65be4754172d366aa4c80f486e4f8c266505f3e
'2011-11-14T17:03:29-05:00'
describe
'33645' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAR' 'sip-files00041.pro'
e510b691224b6f43c38295557ae6b86c
98164a1bbb2d5c4d10a7cf5032f6570bdb846930
describe
'26171' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAS' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
7a9516d9dcbcc41c4f11c31a2e085e19
f04b5cf96b3bc7f226e94ff418a374dcc28e3b50
describe
'4211816' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAT' 'sip-files00041.tif'
1ef13bfbdd5eaaf115d3df8c3ce091d0
818f4679963b9527eca511eb32986bacfc1e775b
'2011-11-14T17:05:19-05:00'
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAU' 'sip-files00041.txt'
86a1656d5015be674906189ec8b16ba7
b525ec91307b487636ea943c1ef7e598eb058363
describe
'6557' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAV' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
db6af3ebf37d49b9a7d06517954b4c49
fbf8217ac053151988bc98c34258a9c7c71f935e
'2011-11-14T17:02:15-05:00'
describe
'503349' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAW' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
bc19d738b5574b5d9f73ba1dbd18c12a
64fc3bd6f879738e48ffdcd1f775e3ab25c6ab90
'2011-11-14T17:02:50-05:00'
describe
'61413' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAX' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
5ab05f2f5f493c15e2daf0a5b1481473
75e183697fbd330a09f0f855d359d7821d8bd2b0
describe
'25472' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAY' 'sip-files00042.pro'
22eeb042666ba4ba4c8cc45a2711e4c8
689df83a7f02e263a21f53de8f3da8ec71e3d9be
describe
'19180' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBAZ' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
3d7e37d325c7609ef16a9ae88ee9f6e2
33440cca34d22c6eeef52cd35130dbee5e133065
'2011-11-14T17:02:42-05:00'
describe
'4303356' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBA' 'sip-files00042.tif'
d60f3ea65ddfe4b90d4b7b5d758e7978
f815e0638702bafcffaaa9b592fb90acd63d2025
'2011-11-14T17:04:41-05:00'
describe
'1022' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBB' 'sip-files00042.txt'
3b1657a79a388afb633c029b1be323eb
e1b70c6f5c2cbf6d70d964802a2d07a51578c6d2
'2011-11-14T17:02:04-05:00'
describe
'4890' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBC' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
f38c76da06a4aa509b82fe25872b1a83
f18223ec7e72222977496dac3e688b9e0470f420
'2011-11-14T17:06:58-05:00'
describe
'500589' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBD' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
a2c3a32d72f1a76334348073f9c989e8
f803cf9592a71c72d042ed2aabe307b8eec60d22
'2011-11-14T17:01:41-05:00'
describe
'80783' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBE' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
a31e65e7fd9ff7d3924e481cbf054c5d
c9ec45816f45939ed3fc4a17adbefc48910dc863
'2011-11-14T17:02:08-05:00'
describe
'30741' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBF' 'sip-files00043.pro'
088d437fcf505c33b35a6e4d8570dc4b
f1cea7a1bd828a05f619b2f4aaff3269ab3a8acc
describe
'25447' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBG' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
9c12d1f44bc4cf860dc228ff0ad47ad9
c570c64107681a9fefb2fb88b58bd03324a55c85
'2011-11-14T17:02:35-05:00'
describe
'4016584' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBH' 'sip-files00043.tif'
705ec29f5a4374a5f1c7d595c1f2bd6a
e7552536fb90eefc8ad9ece4d9c4762bbb6b8f21
'2011-11-14T17:05:05-05:00'
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBI' 'sip-files00043.txt'
ff3c5a7742304e7b317c80282bd4abcb
da60aeda31da5c2acbf6632497bb4b05ba833020
'2011-11-14T17:04:57-05:00'
describe
'6280' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBJ' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
fb44f608f7c08fc3fd648d1a03fc0be0
f8a650cdec4a4deae8c61fd619758e90737bc886
'2011-11-14T17:05:46-05:00'
describe
'532693' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBK' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
4bd446271a6b87fbacf70c5def8500c5
5660c2992635a1677e5ee691e39832fdac18ef97
'2011-11-14T17:04:40-05:00'
describe
'87004' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBL' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
2b1f9b6943556647d05d37fd4c02821b
4074875edfb2e8b21ef4a0416b05f3c101a62211
describe
'39380' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBM' 'sip-files00044.pro'
7c0693ca7eee75c7ff7f5dcba024d06e
0a7546378e9efe86154cc6e6280801d0159b4362
describe
'28396' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBN' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
8d70f0aa93428a52a67f2aa9262dcd41
0b1d19b8bcf6e6eba26e77f60ab559c7488735d2
describe
'4273656' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBO' 'sip-files00044.tif'
fc049ef886697b3446f4a806b12b66c9
23dc770929286f944fd2b8d94cb022c25ec5a816
'2011-11-14T17:01:34-05:00'
describe
'1547' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBP' 'sip-files00044.txt'
799f174253c82076c9241c08149553f5
6b6113adc52cfac9755a0f966ad5d9ec69406a0c
'2011-11-14T17:06:50-05:00'
describe
'6581' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBQ' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
43908234c87733f3c7b51123318893cd
cbe571fdca157b19546ee08acf888fd22e6c2f59
describe
'551905' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBR' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
8f96eb00ed71d85ab8fe4208f0735eee
69936eb2c67053d43766c7627515b86ccc0cc9b9
describe
'144960' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBS' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
b9088b265655ba30fc6ea84dac1e4fe5
303ed46b650b0bf8c07d8b05172aa24d4d3fc539
'2011-11-14T17:04:43-05:00'
describe
'4972' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBT' 'sip-files00045.pro'
319a7f0345b5da29497e12250abe807b
029c8dd6a4ef11df4dd3791bb2eace1f196190f9
describe
'35242' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBU' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
351b135b5cd34ef5f336321a401c8141
49522d41e72a07a2f1b0ea8eccb2ebc716318fb0
describe
'4428760' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBV' 'sip-files00045.tif'
4446ea344a4a1f994627bc9d6cef830b
f0864687154bf4d2c9cf472e807d64144d876ba0
'2011-11-14T17:02:11-05:00'
describe
'269' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBW' 'sip-files00045.txt'
d4a075c6fd561e348d51b0553ef86fcb
aef76c3cbf8d91b82b131d70c4be37df6989a850
describe
Invalid character
'8208' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBX' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
138337f214a9addf50267c38db2ed8ae
7e64db73d9c892df673076ed615925822a698fda
'2011-11-14T17:03:04-05:00'
describe
'17081' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBY' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
442f497cbf2017c2b899fe9bac393be6
0c6889891c928b3b97e3d7fabe6cebfcfcd40533
describe
'6914' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBBZ' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
b241c01e25d943d55af51511f8bc1e2a
4f60b37efd69e19b2e320f5a631973dae0b7d101
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCA' 'sip-files00046.pro'
256afd55f4cb5996f7a8b85287501666
cd83dfe6bb0ae04201205466714d54d8dc36bbda
describe
'2071' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCB' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
7a9c5c6d1cb05dd95974b59346f28de0
3a63eb591b7b396d4aa44457907e4378221aa23f
'2011-11-14T17:07:05-05:00'
describe
'4170448' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCC' 'sip-files00046.tif'
c1378cb180d7aad6f051512fb0133ec7
fb50264b4b582f0243b1103185863f673badc013
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCD' 'sip-files00046.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'773' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCE' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
ec735316d36f568523cd1c31dd53f045
c10e3e51e4b5e54d331aa9e8a3e2c06e7e905cbc
describe
'548324' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCF' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
79fef0560beeba1bb86838ca693f01a1
54541f59d8457f7536c26fbc1a0167a0c4a5c12b
'2011-11-14T17:03:18-05:00'
describe
'75814' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCG' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
dd00829e209fd8bd19b193f98f33d93a
fa89d0078f7242aacc042364273717b57758f89a
'2011-11-14T17:06:46-05:00'
describe
'34009' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCH' 'sip-files00047.pro'
e6085c10b87e2766ec685e9a0488322e
b5cc3bee1c13536eaa3a7e076ba54e9f63764560
describe
'25058' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCI' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
88ee547e4677fdd7076492c99252212c
ab2a9fe2957d74808b4a55a6ef7b6aa5c38648d3
'2011-11-14T17:02:07-05:00'
describe
'4398792' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCJ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
4a7430af53337e8ea4152ee0c41183b5
dd5fc52000e55122f9aeea3339311583afc59c0a
'2011-11-14T17:00:45-05:00'
describe
'1360' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCK' 'sip-files00047.txt'
459673904d86bec37a2f330a72b54d0d
7f289456321372c2d25878baf591ae7a1109452e
'2011-11-14T17:00:38-05:00'
describe
'5877' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCL' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
02f6285e73d9453a635290c277f28eed
a8d7441206e1a35103df7608dd8bd95bccf78f4b
describe
'521921' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCM' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
83786742e2f74b8acd89fd636d5315d0
f561cda9f8fb0108021987a5cd4a26ea7987b9d8
describe
'85765' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCN' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
e8d82729eb2d280ea567eab2eb95cbf9
f5ff3e882cddff0d5380f95a949c4ead9d6af84c
describe
'38356' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCO' 'sip-files00048.pro'
034818cd42c818c40dded99f6c979a88
cf2e33dba80610508124a61cc72b08edbaa2e4a9
describe
'27684' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCP' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
b55aea1f9fced1bf3de39750303c533a
d3936eab8e06037682b8dbb976cede45bd26bfb2
describe
'4188276' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCQ' 'sip-files00048.tif'
05c94a380336162656bc95e22612c9d8
2b6ec5e9d14d377c75a2a4dfc6c558194d424f8a
describe
'1507' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCR' 'sip-files00048.txt'
025d9f4d4fb4a7b86e7e818ae336a4d4
4c5f376ff333dbe7fb07bacc44a083b9f0d53916
'2011-11-14T17:05:23-05:00'
describe
'6655' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCS' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
98940cf7bff820254625c49ba76844f9
38ebdf1335d6e904e968bffa380689d05ed34d6b
describe
'535688' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCT' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
a8d1409adda3cffc8323da9ebfad18f2
1544c7c6f188c0fb96dd8c10e59203d1a57b3490
'2011-11-14T17:05:40-05:00'
describe
'88050' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCU' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
40df60a1efbae27ba541cbe50f2db244
ccf69b12b9090580617d01f64600b144f2bce746
'2011-11-14T17:02:16-05:00'
describe
'37984' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCV' 'sip-files00049.pro'
5df511c6193b0445f770413b09c6c1a5
e63422c5f64e677c7dc23d41b54719b95f035648
'2011-11-14T17:04:47-05:00'
describe
'28698' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCW' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
35c79b21fbf1ecdb64932441a9dd7fb9
70f9c8c4ccb1a28d9bd4dcde5f285884b35e1940
'2011-11-14T17:05:55-05:00'
describe
'4297300' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCX' 'sip-files00049.tif'
3a11a6555c3c4a97214c00fbce87b218
e4236b424883155b39f6271a3152e94b4c4743a1
'2011-11-14T17:02:22-05:00'
describe
'1494' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCY' 'sip-files00049.txt'
e67ca093e1d6eaf07a4880ae112d61a0
d020abc8851a324131a69e15234108bb1d0e8417
describe
'6700' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBCZ' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
b299684c7ef85fd511e2491942b81475
90c2273739c182dfb5986c16400eb49601b43c42
'2011-11-14T17:04:30-05:00'
describe
'564581' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDA' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
254bd71991b4228122467bfbbe20327b
9094e355d1771d665614a0cd678b9314a25661c1
describe
'75043' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDB' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
b2b1a09e5a1f6c7321d99905101a25e8
d55f4b3c4d1f050243488644fa7900d9b4a5ff86
describe
'32855' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDC' 'sip-files00050.pro'
35b0f2569ed832dff3e989ada3110331
67cda20d16e25d2f4f55c383db2f7977c52f4609
'2011-11-14T17:05:43-05:00'
describe
'23452' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDD' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
ab62931f43fd3a9b6b8601bb57ede815
14f2140d500eeff436c14a990e28d74d19ca854e
'2011-11-14T17:00:58-05:00'
describe
'4528284' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDE' 'sip-files00050.tif'
fd5ae12b9d6c789d11bf07954f75ed63
ce6d5cf9fa7feb0fdf97ec72cf5a837aa9509f83
'2011-11-14T17:04:24-05:00'
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDF' 'sip-files00050.txt'
eaa22452a32d2f60ee809a557cd57897
68a18fd1dd47a8f70ffbbf5f8474d4abe65ecc42
describe
'5911' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDG' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
2ea20160ef2d23340a3abcd07a1735b2
20ac48595bffe08e7ef2eb7e077f98ea0a8eac9e
describe
'494680' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDH' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
fbde12ed1c30c92c865cbe98963544a7
ed132c5688cbc85b0d4f076d74264d8354879fc6
describe
'94210' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDI' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
9bfc237c176acf5d899740f4cc6b1703
d4076b4a7b944ca46a5d06ac13d4f53f920f1ac2
'2011-11-14T17:06:52-05:00'
describe
'37622' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDJ' 'sip-files00051.pro'
610f6176458cb53bdef1f9b5cb567313
8ecdaa8fdf76874bf68f66b3186ef4f7840de394
describe
'30203' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDK' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
d005df64cdab61ede26c522f7c4ec7a3
1327b068dbc9abe03eaf017682b9251baa8725d5
'2011-11-14T17:06:24-05:00'
describe
'3970160' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDL' 'sip-files00051.tif'
87d3d08266fcafa7ceedceb53d30c823
90839bc137360756b3d03f77ce6251affcc84c66
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDM' 'sip-files00051.txt'
a26dff7db96c2b1f3093ea7804729479
06d8011299869f2d81d122fa6518eeaf7516208b
describe
'7384' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDN' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
376fcd57ed0ef7ecafd7d512049be64e
4ada38dd74b19c19b1a68122d7a2239072190404
describe
'495392' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDO' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
c5ff0adad120d614ddbbd57854e8f09c
4e07a37a010bb8a1055e3d7a28fa15c409232806
describe
'83642' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDP' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
090d9772ce4411f60d4769a71a656eb9
d529bb63d5ee29347cc3f9fcc8acd7cce43a2029
describe
'33650' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDQ' 'sip-files00052.pro'
462e18a6aa104adb8862d58d6d6f5aef
bd8d8fd51c8d81074a608b6bca9e60c77bfccac5
'2011-11-14T17:01:31-05:00'
describe
'28499' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDR' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
7d4071612dcd971c2ca33c6153a7a36a
8872ed36063465a5b42ba05c7f19cf89c91facbb
describe
'3975656' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDS' 'sip-files00052.tif'
fe39d4bce80100275571d698edd73918
6ec4b50032c671d4e40aa145761934ea2a2c275c
'2011-11-14T17:01:36-05:00'
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDT' 'sip-files00052.txt'
f140fe857ec555eae45434c99eb0d625
84c453fdbf044147930ccba1bd1e8ec0838691c0
describe
'7245' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDU' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
6d9262911bfd7788e5543bf81fe6c7bb
4ab175d440b6937484a6dbd809907ad9b505f5fd
'2011-11-14T17:05:27-05:00'
describe
'410196' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDV' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
7c02248dca0434326307612be360db9c
5250ca4a86cff209deea18174b9ff1aa73b43261
'2011-11-14T17:05:07-05:00'
describe
'53390' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDW' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
195cdd44ebb9c7ffbf622a2d467379eb
ae37515b176c00f437a6ea53863d72005d9b1bff
'2011-11-14T17:04:03-05:00'
describe
'20593' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDX' 'sip-files00053.pro'
7bafa2397cac3479120961acf322e7a4
6558672480d9162f98a220af8646b56c760e4bb6
describe
'18069' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDY' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
ed703c777d66d8b3657e820d43209c3a
d9160acc23fb02b622713fd6384cdc6f0dff2da7
'2011-11-14T17:06:53-05:00'
describe
'3752508' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBDZ' 'sip-files00053.tif'
fe631f921d13c91ce5ac849bddcd411e
06e4a08ce86fc5af226e7ee144fe2b0fd542d234
'2011-11-14T17:06:36-05:00'
describe
'822' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBEA' 'sip-files00053.txt'
3c72a52af71ee1607f575580d6810156
d616760c2cc2eface27e7287c18a4156e2b48feb
describe
'4538' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBEB' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
256d661b3023f5ba473eb65b1e700f3b
0ada020f6843c24ca53878413905fbb284a9e8d8
describe
'510140' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBEC' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
6e6cc8d2e169f08aa56f7c157bb8effa
886e7c3eab8fbf3add67d126ed966bd9dda8d4e0
describe
'80122' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBED' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
84d7e9f90914e3755e692d1cf0446316
f6382305a0c2306b06fbb59207f64eb87f6a63cf
describe
'32151' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBEE' 'sip-files00054.pro'
6acb1596d1508e0aba76956d8dde20bb
bf2f5da172a454bb7fc7dcfb5a791175af67a2a2
describe
'25556' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBEF' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
6bf9297368c00276721de0d00fa70e57
c32a1d2b0392c688fb2c633388f09cd5ee213689
describe
'4092796' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBEG' 'sip-files00054.tif'
6221e5d47ff1d918c0728324670f2da1
f3dc938efa96f9838833e99d7d1646cae799ee45
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBEH' 'sip-files00054.txt'
8b9e2e73b8a0bbae9a5cebb54d1308f9
28a74b03f93d77fba1564341008188a8bb5226a5
describe
'6339' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBEI' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
f59cc9a615ab2e9ca79866a0b062f0f4
4a76615f8dc435ba65298493fa2de84c8e6610da
describe
'519641' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBEJ' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
6e3e63503d0e9fd68a118f27f95be69c
dd4efe1aec8b73d2c45b5add124e8b4ecd5c0f94
describe
'94756' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBEK' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
f57e4bd6aaa6a3f2692166552d9a453b
5c144ed0449b995118542b22c3decb7b9ca5d09d
'2011-11-14T17:02:25-05:00'
describe
'39617' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBEL' 'sip-files00055.pro'
225a40ac98493792b1c116c44815da32
7857e30ec1517dfa9731c7376802b2c305547ac1
'2011-11-14T17:05:26-05:00'
describe
'29639' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBEM' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
889c208f79d2918d4ff32e28cc05d9a4
88925ea324d399d2ab5e3377eff157d42f66dac7
describe
'4169152' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBEN' 'sip-files00055.tif'
5c2b45db6012b0587e1e0fd86693ce68
d26e533a82b04c28604e21cbe9ce5957cbc549c2
describe
'1555' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBEO' 'sip-files00055.txt'
c06a5ac80b07216efa1d7788e86a799f
ffeaa666598eef906abcba21fbe6457c31d6268f
'2011-11-14T17:07:16-05:00'
describe
'7028' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBEP' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
c8ac7b5a6e47f55a6d515cad9d72c5da
ffccd2558f4b00f599fd953222073dcc0ed8dc4d
describe
'519549' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBEQ' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
a4d72b203a1e3a6b5d1e5081abd88011
2d113c752d2a4f23ca4c3f16547672b38946b768
'2011-11-14T17:02:05-05:00'
describe
'94029' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBER' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
f95b4caaf200a19e2bf3067ec1c0f6fc
08c5fe6d36e336e034ccf2dfd04ef39ff312ce40
'2011-11-14T17:02:55-05:00'
describe
'39449' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBES' 'sip-files00056.pro'
a08d16f6f19f6c27500a19e88de5c343
78c17db7fe06daf586b198297210fcc80eb5291d
'2011-11-14T17:01:15-05:00'
describe
'28458' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBET' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
e26be0790853f03f5a5343f83ac1bc4e
6424d3ea88af8c27b6e94744bb1aa91972132cfe
describe
'4168744' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBEU' 'sip-files00056.tif'
5bafef11bf42f97d10cec3690a3c6d6e
9625d3b0797cbd2aebbfa72659b5c1b98b518720
describe
'1546' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBEV' 'sip-files00056.txt'
e929556a9255b28f184dd41226218aed
20025ee8eb5f4f075a1efa7628ccada43b8b5db4
describe
'6658' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBEW' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
9cb92c6887db3740165003bda23b3e76
55281d9cc24f931b4a117371253358bd595753bf
describe
'531164' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBEX' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
7ecdbb3e8e6ba0a4193a84504dbf003c
5ff56edf80b5b1c10a6645708f7c4cdcc7fafc9b
'2011-11-14T17:01:12-05:00'
describe
'80347' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBEY' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
9cfa765e47f35c0c30c768d0a2ce7c04
98468afb3939c7fdf76cd4ccf33e20859b37592f
describe
'37082' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBEZ' 'sip-files00057.pro'
531c445d60a1c12ac1206955df5c33a6
6ab8615e5651c6888b017daf2f1c7f2cd1b1a4d6
describe
'27163' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFA' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
2c861cdd11f3396d31f26dd8a81905ee
f2dd12dc77ee0d95342e74857db5de3af8de43fa
describe
'4261408' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFB' 'sip-files00057.tif'
3546dbb4ced59c353bf8b556625fb60e
2b6dd6c87c1d6fcba10e6ec07a7c48b579115ff4
describe
'1499' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFC' 'sip-files00057.txt'
4f9f52d18d2bc8471911ee7c886bf101
49498d6af13b31f817ba3fcdaa716c476d216ca5
describe
'6899' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFD' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
55fc3212d9462bce1f385c03cc495d29
98fbba5b4320f2504b61e879321d736eb78591a7
describe
'491289' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFE' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
803b80f6ed2e7f0a7c7a0ddd51f4f7f5
cdea1504de460750920467782a0e1675c5b4ad24
'2011-11-14T17:07:26-05:00'
describe
'75374' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFF' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
5710c937ca5a2906ef5015c23d065a1b
1df2da74c2cc89593fd8e4409364b009c455c65a
'2011-11-14T17:05:51-05:00'
describe
'31717' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFG' 'sip-files00058.pro'
cc2fd40195f5a971f0437fa4d85663c2
68e6c30cb57b77be67cffa7995ce84de0e154863
'2011-11-14T17:04:12-05:00'
describe
'25956' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFH' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
693e797a92177d017bd49e1016553a2b
ceff06b2957ec6dd3617296d1cf8d64ac8bd12f7
'2011-11-14T17:02:51-05:00'
describe
'3942692' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFI' 'sip-files00058.tif'
f5a43c191037b8c30142f741c3bf3a78
e605e4acd958f0c51f5d0cd785e0b6f5f2235345
'2011-11-14T17:07:10-05:00'
describe
'1272' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFJ' 'sip-files00058.txt'
ce6e3f7a747e7d2b0c4e7590abbd6787
ac8f98a3470c834e23c366b9842a06af0fdb0250
'2011-11-14T17:02:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFK' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
56d7f76b7778c7359e75796e411ecd5c
f4360ec9e5bd5f0658703aa6d554d31b7fc80239
'2011-11-14T17:01:32-05:00'
describe
'495450' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFL' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
b441d797f351f2165cc3fe755452580f
de670f62ff75f46355497e4b84978732133cae36
'2011-11-14T17:04:18-05:00'
describe
'81019' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFM' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
24d5fbdb0081b7c34067bd39c8c11f00
365c0aa94cbf5965ca0bd0c61aba43bec833f837
describe
'32993' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFN' 'sip-files00059.pro'
29121820197ac26649306e2cc16fa044
75bda7cb6b413dd77f0ee24ddcfe7c08f9eec13d
describe
'27323' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFO' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
78b4acf7d3cebbcc051fd28a99929adf
c9b7a13b1ba8e81e485fdb0e75cbd5bc774d062e
describe
'3975880' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFP' 'sip-files00059.tif'
63d7452f28e91aa1922b939f3331286d
2846eedb8737a4c176863e63918b8c2fe8837f01
'2011-11-14T17:01:24-05:00'
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFQ' 'sip-files00059.txt'
428644b49766db185bd53d2537c465ca
f0eec79c1554cafe02990bd9abe1517b64890a4e
'2011-11-14T17:02:01-05:00'
describe
'7014' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFR' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
d54d229edaec27840c511911c57479e1
c76203dddc4bfbdd6c4e269c3a0130a76d380255
describe
'511110' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFS' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
f66f0c678aaa6fbe0a330dc4c268bccc
7e695bf539b1e6258a0b39d5e6293ed3ca56c83e
'2011-11-14T17:03:22-05:00'
describe
'88230' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFT' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
e34cd27478970325fdec0722e20a681d
688ce29e89e26b7b1ccefa924d0db8f6b314d1ed
describe
'36991' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFU' 'sip-files00060.pro'
bed0d17e54223ecbffccbd38c8c3f106
367396a2346422d8776efdbc811ef64f7a3dbe58
describe
'28739' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFV' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
01b3863b2c26f4d0838a7ee97cbacd1e
2eccc2efaaaac57848eefc959ca4538cce4273f5
describe
'4101136' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFW' 'sip-files00060.tif'
0ab434896b09304b612485e36a08a37f
b7e15254a708bf611e947651357f015db4852226
'2011-11-14T17:06:27-05:00'
describe
'1469' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFX' 'sip-files00060.txt'
5b3756f9f31702b0703fdb7547988604
a9869cc215df5247de34152d8dd51e849b50db40
'2011-11-14T17:04:01-05:00'
describe
'7143' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFY' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
f44ac3f31fda4016d36e2e4624ea0dd4
b507cf719fd480aed4b7255dddf79e55b207c666
describe
'500781' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBFZ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
c5362bb22f36ddd9fd80e76843c8e182
eba3e602a11286ef5ec4f8680d0bce86a637e3eb
'2011-11-14T17:07:20-05:00'
describe
'69404' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGA' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
49be6d2a7bab134ac49a2a39e4928732
10cac2a57724dbb81511a6851fd701507a4acf45
describe
'27912' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGB' 'sip-files00061.pro'
dedaf9bc5910e0c43dbed815af054a8e
3a4977b048d2ea3aa7760c3fe2ba6ad75884d49b
'2011-11-14T17:00:49-05:00'
describe
'23378' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGC' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
b6249fbc8739e44ebc298798c7c3f229
ce33422f1648c2e5ba91a60e28beb3b04c3f0a88
'2011-11-14T17:07:08-05:00'
describe
'4017868' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGD' 'sip-files00061.tif'
6148d096fc8b851cf78a01a9e5d36529
85f44c618a8cd4df53d44bc8bdc703c85bf04adc
'2011-11-14T17:01:29-05:00'
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGE' 'sip-files00061.txt'
9c170f634ec407f17db9bfab1980df0b
be7b3401ade9deb8f6a82fcb421b3528be8a8c8e
describe
'5746' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGF' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
6384549a6e324f7ebceb95581d6f53f9
e3f23a695b23a55bf715a24e4a58bc1022c65f92
describe
'554374' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGG' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
2eca6c7fcecba353a896ec3940eff007
50e9d51f96179f3ea94dc5513335b94e45408b48
describe
'66478' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGH' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
ed57727ce2278a186b47efdfe8e1751d
6c876f1eb6947e3cd8aec3322c753f80c220db04
'2011-11-14T17:01:59-05:00'
describe
'30158' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGI' 'sip-files00062.pro'
8243f084d90b75fedd5dbcdc42bd6728
db12208291eff18962ae72ca314d22ca84dd8f1d
describe
'21360' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGJ' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
b3fca70d51f10fe741e2c94d0c00526b
064a569a1f0baa4bba36702bdcc5f4f3137beff6
'2011-11-14T17:06:45-05:00'
describe
'4446216' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGK' 'sip-files00062.tif'
81cb7b9685950417855d080fb9bc9fbd
2e4f64cd6e6aa9435fc1ab10d52b89dad5ed5623
'2011-11-14T17:02:59-05:00'
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGL' 'sip-files00062.txt'
8061e61d2791f83c4e8539269aab41ab
36bacf94356744172ff6a7eeddfb7f093becd38a
'2011-11-14T17:06:08-05:00'
describe
'5392' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGM' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
9a429543f6a4fd4d3056620ece188d80
afc696fc63e5c3edee86d1641729f0faee50c77a
describe
'505637' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGN' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
c14e6b6624c5b5acd3a6bf5633a09764
824a3d9d0a5d28e544f5e5f2a239b8164b168301
describe
'88151' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGO' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
75a61fc787dd307927b548a77d6dc8b5
33f3ec8ee3b627e9fe39b4321240d3ef2c2ed20d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGP' 'sip-files00063.pro'
4704b0d2fd3c57ec8775dfb25ac422e2
c860fb00f0169bf28859a4a0eed6036ce0726e5c
'2011-11-14T17:04:05-05:00'
describe
'29430' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGQ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
b6989b8a0b85642dcb861ac1b52896cb
87b1fd7484f2fd2854e2245a3c90f20818001ab7
'2011-11-14T17:03:34-05:00'
describe
'4057292' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGR' 'sip-files00063.tif'
5724063b01a740ad83b605d3d416d52e
3c0037c6c80593c5d314dee41166ffada6d0b162
describe
'1468' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGS' 'sip-files00063.txt'
f071aa6c88c73f3b21a450f3032120af
bf8becb37c3af37b2cd01efcb3120fee589ab450
describe
'7066' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGT' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
a74f01825ab75676d7e8194793e3cad8
2237af14b6de3e2b16c8f4f16d52f7a797e30b1b
describe
'520554' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGU' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
13f5e509d4258ba99aa362d590ebdaef
16da5fe92b9d12868af7aa0d9897f7c44a2bdf9a
describe
'92023' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGV' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
3ff8952d3f60fc965982776f23a7ba82
031540ece0c9b7bca8c89ea60bc3a85e87157b64
describe
'37338' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGW' 'sip-files00064.pro'
3e8d3112b9d4ad7f774f263c138fe1b3
4fbef2f9648d081685e216da8e16221416fcfa3f
'2011-11-14T17:04:53-05:00'
describe
'28535' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGX' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
c6f678f8d9fd199750beac2a9c333489
ea78b0f336287d70ac03a7c59045d67c300284bf
describe
'4177308' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGY' 'sip-files00064.tif'
10169fae93ae2ef80b00b4afbaca58fd
e7d791013dba125a81739651f956c10a10330e4b
describe
'1482' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBGZ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
8d94c242d86968dbaac8a3fd207387b7
39c8dbf647b9948c5499d1c22def8067828b00b6
describe
'7011' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHA' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
10a33e1411703b130a0d34ae80da46cc
cb358c1d5a42c660e6e3623fb6cc714001852180
'2011-11-14T17:01:25-05:00'
describe
'496545' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHB' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
c351f1d3fa78f1a597e6536140a56976
48550d49e2e4d790d7f9702e3e02b5da15b19fae
'2011-11-14T17:02:34-05:00'
describe
'92889' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHC' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
f607cb3ef0fb009a75fb5cc70e76e775
598cca5ccbdcd474c58809be378b616a098a66f6
'2011-11-14T17:06:44-05:00'
describe
'37795' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHD' 'sip-files00065.pro'
566486d748f8635988c68f0dfe7029d7
f8258e825ab038fa6934cbc0396e86a6c32950d7
describe
'31066' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHE' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
65f20030a67c8a28bd29bfa64ee6829f
c7df91038aee21697f9c7c61ddc8678833acde1c
describe
'3984444' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHF' 'sip-files00065.tif'
c67996738f51f6d889ff7479b7e0bd3e
459134b615dec384acb20a413a9d873975dcdbbb
describe
'1510' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHG' 'sip-files00065.txt'
f75fc90976b3cc44c1be62ca1a4e4948
5e872f6f9f96951734504a129ce27368ad8c855d
describe
'7455' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHH' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
8d4a6515625b57f7841012fed8584a1a
13331a1ecb7a73882b191e2de6bd491292644be1
'2011-11-14T17:01:19-05:00'
describe
'529894' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHI' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
181b9fe84dca5eb529a88a201f5468c1
e98640ebc429894774bc1ad5f51e0a239bec1dc5
describe
'82880' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHJ' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
2ca08dd1a6cc20a6065cb60b09ab5ea9
53ef2c4274e1f60a8e9cda5ec49559cdc1d127ce
describe
'35929' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHK' 'sip-files00066.pro'
d60dbcd9faf88ba2dd80bacf74bb4901
68f9642c1740e3c37551311cf1dec860364baa96
describe
'26495' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHL' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
8af3c3b738aa3f8c56080856e5f88a40
059ee7ba6a52a6883b7bc5aeeda2c8acb351df6c
'2011-11-14T17:03:19-05:00'
describe
'4251720' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHM' 'sip-files00066.tif'
c12bb4d9972bac756389d2f592afba07
06e0f6317fae3373811141e232812344a6e07e9a
describe
'1445' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHN' 'sip-files00066.txt'
634d398cb3890aa8a4d321c683b1b1e6
9c5f444e32f7bf76886fda4854cfa76eb12fa9b2
'2011-11-14T17:06:47-05:00'
describe
'6673' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHO' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
b53c24c41b2d79e022ae623b27fb4a56
bf10dca2a4aceea00371e46c69e2f644f05ca0bb
describe
'512039' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHP' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
1f93e4619703a3934f34d0f3a4c08bca
574d650fe3e9ccc16f28283e8ec111465f2e87b9
describe
'93712' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHQ' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
ec3f2744203f97911a8cc1fcb0018d5a
a46d9a5b42f35bb279c84a5f098de6f01bba0c82
'2011-11-14T17:01:28-05:00'
describe
'39622' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHR' 'sip-files00067.pro'
2fbd3f66bc7da5bd36ae5de40e1eb9f4
c6ee22bdc1b05e0a9dd70c9ff2efc044d3af79a8
describe
'30020' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHS' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
0958f91312b8c433fc541a8b5070fbb1
d8941ab34fd960234f4ad4d1295104fa4ba46ef2
'2011-11-14T17:07:01-05:00'
describe
'4108924' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHT' 'sip-files00067.tif'
344e613c6a3d5a5ba322c479ddcbd41d
546aed7d36201b599790a9e4319f0722f4d3263d
'2011-11-14T17:04:02-05:00'
describe
'1575' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHU' 'sip-files00067.txt'
6ece7846d9c11ec1a77d07113ed6635a
964e16dfba5386db976e785f84b2bfe804388b3a
describe
'7114' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHV' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
6278dcdd817d1070e499199c332e6098
a45f407924add5d844bcb8fffff050f456219efa
describe
'517761' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHW' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
ca127e9449d41eed856c5d130917be88
0901b3f5e9295d48631f98668fd1595f2c3508a2
describe
'91757' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHX' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
1376717c997f8b3a1a5b981c2a45d3a3
4e0cbc230e123acb99443f0bda835c29deb0bf38
describe
'38613' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHY' 'sip-files00068.pro'
b488b250449fbc93e29c5a20a1975518
9f1064fb94338e2fd9af40f500de3f8eef098f26
describe
'30111' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBHZ' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
24905d170b12ba0a83fc77b36849d7c7
df2f9ab0a3d0a5123a4818e13e2ff654d29550c7
describe
'4154276' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBIA' 'sip-files00068.tif'
da6d331aa13f1d66cd29024d4d21d3e4
1d61f024bc7fde2c73b9b42f98188e3a086ff223
describe
'1524' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBIB' 'sip-files00068.txt'
d5a80697e19c9d375795c6582f0a283e
ba2883c8a956fda89339333ff32d513af972383a
describe
'7082' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBIC' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
e3762aec3746f7af9c2085720b8eae41
e12e7275f3dcb256265b5dd35c19e20ef5d63da8
'2011-11-14T17:00:52-05:00'
describe
'346405' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBID' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
7ae33135ba0e2daba25823e8063ec19f
c4dbba5abbaccb8d460d2a9ec66dcba2ef2c3708
'2011-11-14T17:06:38-05:00'
describe
'42532' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBIE' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
feaf449b9e3e5e8b304c73e37c465f31
6b4c1249962b9a606792f45cc36049464975de3b
describe
'17126' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBIF' 'sip-files00069.pro'
a0a0dfd3520579af6086eec441a508db
620b22139d8b4dfed86895dff124b385150e699c
describe
'13911' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBIG' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
d8c545e0820bc68a439b6d7965d519c2
485efda68768598ba96cf7696a0dac0f8a87e484
'2011-11-14T17:03:03-05:00'
describe
'4156340' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBIH' 'sip-files00069.tif'
8d394d8e5d4e00d9d076e24a212d5d2d
8d38d10c56d4c268252669be1fce69d2fb156f0d
describe
'697' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBII' 'sip-files00069.txt'
5709fe5cf9d55bc9de343519f778034c
0353afc060b80956e1c7711f34096b8c441a9e33
'2011-11-14T17:04:55-05:00'
describe
'3550' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBIJ' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
40b3af3c25521e8aab3d256d07c754b5
9c59bbd3b83e1c706f96b0aa058fcf8d490b130c
'2011-11-14T17:02:53-05:00'
describe
'495498' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBIK' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
4901303655f77be979912b49e27b90de
6a280f1ce8b8e1068ef19bc1ced6041e9adb71d7
describe
'79142' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBIL' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
d5d5940cc5b0df873f7fa671a9e82822
d3fb4e3db3e3533fa68319079ef9c8639e6e646a
describe
'32202' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBIM' 'sip-files00070.pro'
298fe587a6c7616fb675a7998384f36b
881988a3d751b899e9e522d9ca93ba40361b7d82
'2011-11-14T17:07:09-05:00'
describe
'26347' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBIN' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
b63c55d750ab239064a54ce8a48eba3a
8c3c95e8c1c7edc79e2cc2e2679216b30a5d5cea
describe
'3975820' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBIO' 'sip-files00070.tif'
d96342260956bdcf7bc77768af34e30a
69fe5ba9748fbdd5121dd12a4323100a511462a0
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBIP' 'sip-files00070.txt'
51a098ac9e9c123469ce4f5d6fd7080d
819073b772b2f2a074691d83369bd7b6de49edc9
describe
'6368' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBIQ' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
64f2993440952a3d6a1e01a5e61883c4
45ddf6bd23556b66088ac00f5cdc321ed283151a
describe
'504778' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBIR' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
58beff1785ec7c6630b9baad1c3a8449
b27bc14f57d31e72341d6ca43e60d8c410c3a160
describe
'84395' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBIS' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
b413e3b8c02399aff100b4eda31ca5c5
71bdeb78eaf44a827f69c40b0fbc9af992a7bece
'2011-11-14T17:04:14-05:00'
describe
'35841' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBIT' 'sip-files00071.pro'
78f945122075f22af31140e18c952afe
458f144de22b7556dfcaa069ad3e39eb097ca6e3
describe
'27858' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBIU' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
56fbf043714c921a7ab3971edb138ac5
36cd97c3f4fbe14cecf2781d71b98750c3c5c784
describe
'4050100' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBIV' 'sip-files00071.tif'
68120fac779ddbe494e3343643733e43
ee8ce669fff67c2b72bda4500bad7e05dd4471b5
describe
'1465' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBIW' 'sip-files00071.txt'
3eb51eea86b2b3525e3174b6d3ae8056
431a712853785fc57700c18890aa4f7dba65466f
describe
'6737' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBIX' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
63f81417098322cba161ec43c28eb4ff
c3ad6ae1cf98a4c55bf4602ab3718b421d7cc5f1
'2011-11-14T17:02:46-05:00'
describe
'510854' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBIY' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
df6d6f4ed4866f7132d945431e853f06
a96c2d461660c401bd3542476387ce82bcbe5a48
describe
'91720' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBIZ' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
bc89ef1e3d01510aaff376e13c958fe6
add8b3947af56afebd799cd3cf007985d7944cd9
describe
'37713' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJA' 'sip-files00072.pro'
fcbbcabc922c13f72e7b2fa92d8314c8
3c384089837665b23dad0687cd63d1ea0b3a4122
describe
'29240' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJB' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
48b3cde924d7a80aa247cd88d8462df7
fab3a85e2102f6369bd758a751d9abefed4fbf2a
'2011-11-14T17:04:34-05:00'
describe
'4098932' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJC' 'sip-files00072.tif'
347221a77d7c3124c2325d7813d24954
6689cf5295e4f8c28f3edd6fa4f252b918c73483
'2011-11-14T17:05:45-05:00'
describe
'1493' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJD' 'sip-files00072.txt'
63782e88c70c9a4320edb085ea2af346
fbd0ab3dbed48657922a3b9d37eff900188e3467
describe
'6980' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJE' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
57cf0ce02915b0d328d58f4dcc45c720
1ecdab608168ed40c5b6ebb0eed9030a6b883e21
describe
'524053' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJF' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
5815219a6cac773de1b74a72f7819828
aeb2a7b708c4fb1069235b9e9ca02783fbf1b94c
describe
'87833' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJG' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
7e27d212ecebf04da53ff15197419a70
76ba912b783964f9b9e53736be0645179272fa26
describe
'37893' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJH' 'sip-files00073.pro'
935cfaf626c976dbfb629e2445897088
5e9d8e671be4fcfeea9ccce7ae172c7e9d5dfcff
describe
'29137' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJI' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
28a727e80f87e3dcab83412f16b2ddc8
4d7b30ddc6480ac00b6e1773f974bfdb11e03306
describe
'4204760' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJJ' 'sip-files00073.tif'
42fffbaa6cf32f73eb5817596611b498
93da7687d63a8d22bca2f0299f5c97ca940701f7
'2011-11-14T17:05:25-05:00'
describe
'1514' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJK' 'sip-files00073.txt'
86352c88e5bb042f7fa6c46da306d7c0
79f6994d3f428ecef9bea4c7c2f8371fb9b1aa96
'2011-11-14T17:06:42-05:00'
describe
'7052' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJL' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
6bf6cf283ca181f92d7c983f45682f03
0bb2efa05e679c75879df8443f069f266c3af474
describe
'519906' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJM' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
0521e6742ac35a9edf05f490b6fb98ba
77ebcf5ae0b3a71a9cdcc15f9a2a750dfca7684d
describe
'83871' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJN' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
ee7c851d9f07596d4962d76e97ac81b0
a58b57c7d88f507139d3041e960d759d60ee9d63
describe
'36287' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJO' 'sip-files00074.pro'
ada09a0f2b61c53f64b5f67f74b087aa
63fc55bcc4a2579af1a610a74ec0cd5bb57b6d99
describe
'26751' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJP' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
1b2569ec2b37cdfe8fca9a4cd7140c39
e04c51bdbdd6be2d2ef74bbd3ba5d9da875755f2
'2011-11-14T17:03:31-05:00'
describe
'4171428' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJQ' 'sip-files00074.tif'
e7b673a2d97cb964e9f89bd8af8c6947
50b8be5bc03374e1949523cdcccb6054f6e511fc
'2011-11-14T17:04:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJR' 'sip-files00074.txt'
a54cc126a3a42b732270687a62dadf0d
704dc40cfe0c3cf5205ad6da21b910d81621e4ba
describe
'6452' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJS' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
1fcdbf75b1fd8d89c375eb570dc839ea
4f2b4fe87e44f0e2d560369d85d0892c9ab41f6b
describe
'535939' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJT' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
1330493ff3f2f294c4df2507b386e010
0097d5ffe6e1350b7892e2f2a3966bba67bac227
describe
'166020' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJU' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
1925392858c7cf66ec213dcec7651ba0
3381f02f3b3145762813c3b70b6fc856e2c702de
'2011-11-14T17:02:49-05:00'
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJV' 'sip-files00075.pro'
3d80a866dadd17f482d3dbcac3c2266c
c06441c0b57160a0faeabfd953aba0ee1831cce2
describe
'39253' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJW' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
4cf0578ec82fdc1ba95c0b76775deed1
65a4df0a5a6b17956ae895afee037e830d07d55f
describe
'4302416' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJX' 'sip-files00075.tif'
9ee1125512475f5c6d90b36f99349987
ddda5301388c76a5c34f821fa7c2768ff53f16d8
describe
'205' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJY' 'sip-files00075.txt'
e2be9538d1abafd2bfb0ade85a98acf4
dd7b95724664e36144f1504a4121b93457b2c74e
describe
'8949' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBJZ' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
d7e2dc59daebd637ceae474e5a481595
1a3f12d34326f01d26d18143a87d0a3da18b7138
describe
'13081' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKA' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
3c7ad5c9abc305285202c5d23d8a8961
d8e78d27c6addf3c04efad4a684052d67761702a
describe
'6862' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKB' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
e71c6f2790096959716a0d3e839fb5f0
5ea574d31498e7c0ba4a2a19849de970ca14a468
describe
'2062' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKC' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
3e09e34e0fa8a9933d2dc970fa41df07
c7fa4e45d15c7dc6e6506c802c0b6ae2080f0407
'2011-11-14T17:05:37-05:00'
describe
'3330984' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKD' 'sip-files00076.tif'
4319f8b1b935083cb92c01d1d49d29c4
bdfa4675242700cdb899b7d9485b3aa11ef658a2
describe
'767' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKE' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
c735b9e82ea63c4a05e9d9e3b66bb0d6
ca5b0f002240355f8c00ddcd4e406be5d43cff35
describe
'539725' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKF' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
e01e95d5a2669f5a09e6b6912dffece2
1db5635093a41f31546ba6da741a5f763ca440e6
describe
'88286' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKG' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
f9e902a30dc30d34d73f9bd47e8dc59a
b728db8ee181bbba4a8f01d0a1264968785a4cb7
describe
'37633' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKH' 'sip-files00077.pro'
9c32ccf373ac0884a98ed5c04a80682b
a912c71db2d7a4b2f457be9df98f9371008283f4
'2011-11-14T17:03:58-05:00'
describe
'28320' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKI' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
f28f49daaff350f79549886f02f99c06
b6e5eb0e8f907b328926d2fc7bb2bc8db021a6bc
describe
'4329696' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKJ' 'sip-files00077.tif'
f1b1c4ec964d6b89f6e004874610c54e
0765d614b08faedf5e9050afc77c825262dae367
describe
'1519' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKK' 'sip-files00077.txt'
0dd06c4d08ba0cfc091d7bdfe69c3ad7
634c1315696dd84172d97c0022f4a987d8b7593e
describe
'6745' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKL' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
840dd028ccc0aa5a98063aa7b1d08f71
8cfe7c224c8e42cde9af0efeaeedf9739c119915
describe
'471282' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKM' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
e812c05fa9882952d07bcb0d5f13df9d
d6f528000bc1a6b7c614971d4a6c7ce199508c8e
describe
'59937' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKN' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
95d0217d29b932e3d0bba9d1f3c7c96d
e85ab8553cc15b533d398e33894e2e801cca523f
describe
'24009' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKO' 'sip-files00078.pro'
2572024ed150d5edee87d7a6287f2237
02e7c3ec292554378e964f73eb5806ec1dc337d9
describe
'20148' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKP' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
21989e0a102ae434e14af152634b2273
1a7e1d226dda2bc6c63e0d409ebdca2618a886cf
describe
'4118788' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKQ' 'sip-files00078.tif'
889318d95786669fe942d559b04a1d32
19e51d3a65d1bad07df18c2fbd3c1b21a2f6d614
describe
'961' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKR' 'sip-files00078.txt'
c1a24ac6ef817389d9900655d1f7b4d0
3aa4d18c44a7dfc1b7b2457827ba4b45dbe1a566
'2011-11-14T17:03:20-05:00'
describe
'5090' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKS' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
3f560263376983df25e341072071e932
a3640adfb5df47228a3ec1e940eaf8ce5ff0499e
'2011-11-14T17:06:02-05:00'
describe
'527965' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKT' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
7eeff213d8c5ba0268257def8d34a1a1
a26079157f24e901ce706cddebdd5be11a095599
'2011-11-14T17:00:43-05:00'
describe
'65335' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKU' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
6bfc3233fba304e90223916933f14886
9e77ac513c98437bb2a3a6ce5def995785dc97b2
describe
'28865' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKV' 'sip-files00079.pro'
faaef033b15e1a14738119b101ed0705
4b80f98257a538840db6742052ed1f418c70c437
describe
'21479' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKW' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
74f8c08774c298d979289bcb27700d52
491cca079e4025f6be49de082ebd2e3b10342bb3
describe
'4235272' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKX' 'sip-files00079.tif'
4cf44f2ed8628b1bf8267b7c5847d0d4
0f533625897fa2d0aacbd7aca10cf24986d03945
'2011-11-14T17:01:08-05:00'
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKY' 'sip-files00079.txt'
fefd0c67e5a59d0c4b40c80646689515
3d35087f2b0a63e2cd62268f11b0205bf00bbb1f
describe
'5460' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBKZ' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
3fd59d826b21e8a5b78b660282ccceda
3d9a9b03f343a9b92827e7f6f85b3eea13eab5ea
describe
'531203' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLA' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
7f3312e034b0f0ec391ac2f430ff5a39
c9c3dea80948ec5bc70b36d305f8915cfb999876
describe
'83225' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLB' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
21f87b9730734129e6ae514ad1f495da
26d095e9be776f23e65cc083422f5d62548d07b4
describe
'34850' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLC' 'sip-files00080.pro'
f7fe02c7a92be3ee1ab619b7503d1d2a
e8d494993540db8f844c3058be77dff8063f574d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLD' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
88e6d7dd72cd650ecdb76fd2c32c39c2
1b4444f148f41dfcc933ce52d9d16fdaa8407749
'2011-11-14T17:04:54-05:00'
describe
'4261540' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLE' 'sip-files00080.tif'
f0600b3e806aa59ccf0486d6f4842ea3
b96d1133769fd3a52a7e45f503b3cc2d528ac288
'2011-11-14T17:04:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLF' 'sip-files00080.txt'
4aa5a6e1f9f44bad3ec7a1d46bd84c3f
1179732877b9a3d40c3503e00027ec95b72da8df
describe
'6656' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLG' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
c5e3bcaeb438af9e9ded689c20bd40d9
2f8fbc831a2a0751972968808f66c7757a469183
describe
'528369' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLH' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
9463b0491401b4fb0023782ca56b4534
67cdf81635b76286740d15a40c55b84730e57827
describe
'91386' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLI' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
c28e3873815097f88fe25d220cadf15f
18017c20bdcfa404a0c2b1a1fcb315af5ced9d04
describe
'40498' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLJ' 'sip-files00081.pro'
7adbc4d0b257c23dd998f1ae7941b988
4722a90287b0369856362919986d76ef3c5319dc
describe
'28622' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLK' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
37dd8fc84a1bbd2777e3bf94f983640e
afa6a630293e12b3348c923aaa65a9b513724f8f
describe
'4239356' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLL' 'sip-files00081.tif'
d105ff022fdcb9193173d11c4021e1e7
98022a27cdc3929523a3b5d09f0eaa5535e45699
describe
'1620' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLM' 'sip-files00081.txt'
b2eb516091fe6bb89a1480f20287b0e7
73d57ef7cd1a650746377400ea5d49575e690ce4
describe
'6877' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLN' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
4a7848f890afda81a416b3acafff53b9
680c35197e3f78740d80022eb5f579fef02a7b10
'2011-11-14T17:07:04-05:00'
describe
'508642' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLO' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
a3f9638426919a8956b31cbcdfb45745
5084ffb9016deef6c14ec7ff3a1e91f779ebca21
'2011-11-14T17:06:07-05:00'
describe
'78986' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLP' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
7bba5b1ee01002e5e59ce07bcf102da7
5cb48d9e4c93ee298e163088873d0068b9f5124a
describe
'34132' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLQ' 'sip-files00082.pro'
350d3e5d3304b278b5b76b4fa5f8b638
0f330b87518e8068f1d9243a8a87e3cb111003aa
describe
'27090' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLR' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
f8590852b690cf13a9ebfaf2fdd2bb22
23361bf034a9fb3030bc3d95f553bf929c5c0ce4
describe
'4081120' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLS' 'sip-files00082.tif'
ff52a5f606c3ed5c7ab6cd586da06156
adc07972f14c455bf2d174fa8ad770a36c481b47
'2011-11-14T17:06:41-05:00'
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLT' 'sip-files00082.txt'
644d3dbc065608075f9b148ab28fcc67
7fc19181fbcd50d54b478e468b14871d9458cfb2
describe
'6344' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLU' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
3dd98e7d5b19393a54f48266a9c75ba9
90eb728a76480efc2cff294513f381f7f5783c68
describe
'507744' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLV' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
91dff7bf3a6612e0cc655080216716af
ec0d80a149b510e947c77f98337d9daea5511bda
'2011-11-14T17:00:50-05:00'
describe
'90891' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLW' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
6d07c125a8efaaf85e9b523a9f99e080
e36023a29af6fd1a236bd7b7e33e319f6eec75d5
'2011-11-14T17:00:41-05:00'
describe
'36770' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLX' 'sip-files00083.pro'
6ed6674793a5012c37d79be9482c699e
8e3d9e9189f5d53686ae6bc695af61af79007c2b
'2011-11-14T17:01:16-05:00'
describe
'30314' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLY' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
008481d5a1309c0de5d0e490b562bb51
b6f2b2f3ffb11b737294a219974addb37a5dad82
describe
'4074636' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBLZ' 'sip-files00083.tif'
df129a552daebd36746e094a6cc70162
bda459d60fd665f9e8642c2175a1c72171787b5e
describe
'1458' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBMA' 'sip-files00083.txt'
458c6e1835efabefe79c0420919c4c25
964a1da910013c46eb50817db11e3fd1bc1535cc
'2011-11-14T17:06:54-05:00'
describe
'7035' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBMB' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
1639f9ae4e3889297473e01622b557ee
3909c2a1d3dcdf25a0b43f318e78eb1ffc61611b
describe
'528883' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBMC' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
1df20be45ed0b3c0ba7811446af8c5d8
3905a08919f7318647eca00df98adfc89f42d740
'2011-11-14T17:01:09-05:00'
describe
'88994' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBMD' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
e1e53666bfe20ddfb2279b16cc2e5494
3bfe48de38f9225d8711ea85fd1f2345e33f4376
describe
'38859' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBME' 'sip-files00084.pro'
7f8f606a18761289af6dae3d2dc1947c
f3aeb64f25c79c94253193a91c35c814d29c0225
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBMF' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
d3baeff43aa477089e2a761fbb3f3129
4dd42f499c1ea0060cb2cb31e609b6d43cb48ee7
describe
'4243380' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBMG' 'sip-files00084.tif'
2351accb50456ce64f4d08e164829ad0
266e66b48918091a213e11f41236fe1e78b4c549
describe
'1534' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBMH' 'sip-files00084.txt'
aebf23782ed738e3f63096b30baa4148
e7b79e3f4f1c6215fc77fcf4748028f617b725c4
describe
'6978' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBMI' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
3906b5cfa344375e1c3edbd1d0bfd66e
3b757d83c68f769a3c3117dec3fd7e95050f1c54
describe
'511027' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBMJ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
8bf7dd627133a7198b4b17bdcd4f8eee
320b833872e2af5e615eab5d8091b3f95c0ccbe6
describe
'95510' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBMK' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
cb484a3f6d5e356cc480cb9047fa3eb3
5c24811eaef68acf26555610218a644e4177b142
describe
'37078' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBML' 'sip-files00085.pro'
34a1a19a3de14a885d53ef2869a4bbd5
07b2a5be5cac1c32976762c9bfec7a306ab7ab0c
describe
'29723' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBMM' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
cafb5bbef3fb001f5a27412ab285a3d5
460282045ab3a272ab5512c104751d4d3066c115
describe
'4100692' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBMN' 'sip-files00085.tif'
81f1a24bb9e04d27287ea0d90465ac0a
baf2eef09c1a92304bed7ae292714a58e6a9d288
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBMO' 'sip-files00085.txt'
fd9da20e70c87e05b9961f19ebda16fb
ca7d5aa129bd5d2510fdc43ce315a11daf8bb9ef
'2011-11-14T17:03:38-05:00'
describe
'7345' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBMP' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
0f34b69c3482006a845a9e475a9a2885
bf7fb494620b1dc9301eeee01f7018a03de874ee
describe
'532995' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBMQ' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
580d87d57c7d7f2f61eb5c3d1575f7c1
607da555b08db5052e563665822f695c8eb7d25f
describe
'78112' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBMR' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
e58b143dc27309f86a92522219a25efc
f659898ad862f2db5a099335469359cc0b66d1dd
describe
'34072' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBMS' 'sip-files00086.pro'
ad46bf216ff7b74c6feb015042933c39
629b0fcf6ea0d5ba3f6fc2b6a31341bdf170b03a
describe
'25974' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBMT' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
11da45c1d944071ac2c8b654a389d1eb
ebfea34edb194fb7eed56b0c0f737123fca6c145
describe
'4275600' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBMU' 'sip-files00086.tif'
c569c2a81a2428953a864aa178dbc24c
e5605bae424ac147a446cb0e2e1df5d5eb575e9d
'2011-11-14T17:03:24-05:00'
describe
'1351' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBMV' 'sip-files00086.txt'
25613f6fd900d5ac56a1b02a0f0180fc
7f0f02e1dc9286ea20a2ae3153bd6239bbbd3e0e
describe
'6308' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBMW' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
d9524080238a7b9e65715eedc01b8393
c50c18924f32dc5953d638b7b6e1314e45d6199b
'2011-11-14T17:00:34-05:00'
describe
'570243' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBMX' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
84448629872f84c0551cef2231cf9bdf
d2cb2297d78bbe27b9a43ac7d2891d0f25d5a74e
describe
'140352' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBMY' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
4de0673b4dea08e1a3f9dcb5eed557ec
15d98b40b58aef18382166552e8ceb8fc63fe705
describe
'4818' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBMZ' 'sip-files00087.pro'
378e5ff75806223b169f18c3efe0fd8e
bd94cd0feaae5844c7cdaab21022ba857353ec44
describe
'34400' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBNA' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
67ec10dbd8e7fca77b5892b3cb2538bf
7fea550160621001ee358e6b832ec0ba7587161a
describe
'4576084' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBNB' 'sip-files00087.tif'
19d68bf42ffc5adec65fae3beed9e0e4
d1e915074bb8b002d548111619d62fe21ebe31e2
describe
'354' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBNC' 'sip-files00087.txt'
4042cbc2cecc885472080a50aa88207c
c4dd4e5a4de5df034a4b593d58de4290370c458f
'2011-11-14T17:07:07-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8038' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBND' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
fc4d5ebc45d99151556e42990dba2fb2
fbbf6ecb600bf5bc0b39d271dc577c53865d8e56
describe
'11468' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBNE' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
81f666be38fb0622d1dc2f762044ee75
7a6b883bd0467b791a59904336a00f01318522a0
describe
'7464' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBNF' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
126648be3a486aa42320a23ff5802bf9
7a8722f93eb9a328d2f82f30c31d9024985096ea
describe
'2193' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBNG' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
7a85cc2649408562e50a21b07c35195c
6ff19134240b62c61911253d1c8d9a5dd1c9e65d
describe
'3954184' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBNH' 'sip-files00088.tif'
776d4afabf3f5f096791d541a740b171
d7b0a8c51c449a1fd9ef59d49907bc71e6635479
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBNI' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
ef278bf0a59752e3ad4012a0730f0402
6f3d3e9a577d4e430c8f30daede9e4d4370f9ae3
'2011-11-14T17:05:32-05:00'
describe
'385890' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBNJ' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
74d94d0dad45e67cb338103f2b87a685
b0a6246441f173f5b4a0a1ae23ff8a51414677be
describe
'51064' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBNK' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
285b5b943769239f1633b3d01c00af7f
f119fd174ec47dddb368f775360a269eb7e7d817
describe
'18941' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBNL' 'sip-files00089.pro'
dbb087c9fd70b06e9e9b89c1e6c23c8f
9085d0e076ca43c7d41cb6425c4a320b27824e29
describe
'16941' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBNM' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
586dc413f6fdd33714924a40714c59b4
70569624f863ef19f0a516d32f0e8cb5d1baeb29
describe
'4126432' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBNN' 'sip-files00089.tif'
0473df58532ceaba95385ccec4b2c84f
6da112fde08e6d87944a55c3841e6f1960402913
describe
'768' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBNO' 'sip-files00089.txt'
74fbee9c6ef4c77fa951162d05bc4b30
6a2d3f296b12ad4d281e470fb38feab650c42fb9
describe
'4388' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBNP' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
5acb6ff38bbb4252b27e4049f2c2c81f
74806701416ae4fc0d0fcbdd2f117011a60d4e7a
describe
'533896' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBNQ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
06b0e1b901681f4677abfecbc88003bf
71994cb57a8c0c30193f879ef912a0672068fdf3
describe
'68918' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBNR' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
6eda29adf41323d6e18b7f5da200b44d
6b0a2ed042b91e8a15ce4abe8923a47b984773a9
describe
'28781' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBNS' 'sip-files00090.pro'
c065b36ffe73ea52c1a8f065d9ff1372
dac9bf31c503872be82cadbfdc7f2566cc4f23e3
describe
'22489' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBNT' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
80b1301b3abb5154040231051cea18af
55ce059914518b107fd29065afe7160e564983cb
describe
'4282368' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBNU' 'sip-files00090.tif'
23967cfe9bf3646f6b75db50c7de4d5c
b7a285d46f8ff5fba389eeef1509b0bc81181038
describe
'1186' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBNV' 'sip-files00090.txt'
b530e0e561d55f845b56a2ddcf728695
e04cb7dc79f79b79409862d2e08e43548de6ea31
describe
'5553' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBNW' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
493d0d52a671a3cf090d66f418a7f73b
a08750ff9d2a29496dde19d38ef7ec847cb2e772
describe
'516043' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBNX' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
45418138aab1734702f8a44fcb57e2a8
ec372d1244bc2084eb97959eef85085aefc01e8e
describe
'79269' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBNY' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
8a7eaee5900897acc6b4bfc1529c9499
ce7a45d91c1a327f2f88ca9bcdb01fa4857080bc
describe
'32966' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBNZ' 'sip-files00091.pro'
b2ba8c36dd75c6b5aa2d78615dec5299
1de8f5e1453a3ae332c18cb345a34cb58da32b43
describe
'25856' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBOA' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
58609211e9017e8b543cd79122d384e7
6a6e9ba74dfaae62e19cbb44bfe0c907257bfb02
describe
'4140356' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBOB' 'sip-files00091.tif'
6857985d0df8bda66bcfd649ae2d9173
14349803675902d8e4d9021b205568f04c020d91
describe
'1366' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBOC' 'sip-files00091.txt'
c3c53e8db837a0355eec37b3858c55cb
9089c904ec2f3ed424fa7fed9dc37a87643c45b1
describe
'6661' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBOD' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
ce221cddfe9ccb63453fa68bd85a2c66
f7e1829887e13a4ec52f83aace1dea66ba20a98d
describe
'532476' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBOE' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
5dc57cb114c13bd27efe76fc25f5bdad
6ea7aedbc053e5cb627090059643616f9e16cd33
'2011-11-14T17:05:10-05:00'
describe
'91803' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBOF' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
f241d7a03c04b6efc7f66fa6ace1f71a
90876ba5d11274a12c9ac884102746626abbd830
'2011-11-14T17:07:19-05:00'
describe
'39898' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBOG' 'sip-files00092.pro'
d4174f8c151d3d72e202fea7f3e68f9c
286386c8810c3b6e0d44194905d42a7f97f075d2
describe
'29139' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBOH' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
e943d0d3d22e68f7127cf952b99fab0a
1b603637546245438ed72edefe7313080a824427
describe
'4272280' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBOI' 'sip-files00092.tif'
9f2d04c171da9e83ee33f35311fe3b3a
c9a115f181c8322674de4e94eca28fd1cff5cc9d
describe
'1562' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBOJ' 'sip-files00092.txt'
98ab99baa4997d9dddac391186167314
44cc34d88e3929b401e92b469eecbfa68d66aa39
describe
'6900' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBOK' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
2c586054f3f06b6b0a005e5c445d3d2f
f09a8c4b30f02e436f8df3907641e2c7b36befdd
'2011-11-14T17:07:30-05:00'
describe
'506773' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBOL' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
a15a712afe48783127ea6181ebfc131a
d0c315ecf8c28f0c0637761ff080b625cc34711c
describe
'82922' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBOM' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
10e5e5a774c546f8300b749ab9e291ca
4ba07986262256607988a59237fdefa459eef241
describe
'34046' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBON' 'sip-files00093.pro'
aa18dc714430265666afada826ac7d86
8a9914f58fcc1e5a8b3bc449774e35b7a0153fab
describe
'26651' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBOO' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
d8d7b78fc7526c8b2fc603fe7fdb4e38
4c0917c1ec580c51c2b139be5dafaaa868049f87
describe
'4066236' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBOP' 'sip-files00093.tif'
7d72fe58aab7891c585363f2635af41e
7bd6a6027483921d583f74ad2d7f64a654c09550
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBOQ' 'sip-files00093.txt'
8ee7e437b70e1a51c701414b7611b8a4
5ae874768b3595e777dccc157ff892efa59a7146
describe
'6926' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBOR' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
db1f6934b059e0a6fcc4bc36ce4cbe29
668174d65271e75197ee842ee764efffa2d22951
describe
'518735' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBOS' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
0975cfa773c3a204ffbef089e3c0734e
54baba02c180dccb92d5f87b6a557b2a87ab3d3c
describe
'81086' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBOT' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
f6e3992f7f1a02baad849e6669deaa11
fc564b0ce460dffac9e739ca82ffa3fd66ca8abd
describe
'36062' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBOU' 'sip-files00094.pro'
f20473d0b37e03ef5554c75da17db6d5
23383c9ff7b1c95c24d387a98a1d47d8d3556ac1
describe
'26577' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBOV' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
11dee400e6052232fa391a87ba49fda5
5da777ec7ebe1ddba2ea6c11f535d97a470defaf
describe
'4161860' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBOW' 'sip-files00094.tif'
157745ada5796800418f0b383679f485
b85e16d94aead3b55a05db8d18d43dc869856eb4
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBOX' 'sip-files00094.txt'
ff21ccc183cd7885914eee4d29c37b68
b092d067242d6d6298e16e110159e74ffec805f2
describe
'6764' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBOY' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
93b1a124c2cb54d24fa3574f06ee2411
512c922dee339ef20b982f40afccfa739a79efd3
'2011-11-14T17:03:51-05:00'
describe
'508216' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBOZ' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
8e7481ed10d4a506af29e3552a0c9138
e483b69cb35fe32b33c2234a0fd60c2512ccb7db
describe
'77834' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPA' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
e8507b7338244ebd70712ec4a27e8cb3
1a0aced00342990dceb4ac8f360fa63a5ff817f5
describe
'32973' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPB' 'sip-files00095.pro'
511be0f63b977db025539ad60d9cc98a
f2c1a8d7c70a9a56759a5ed6b967dbd723f1a219
describe
'25215' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPC' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
6f57885f43d3006c6e07930d52d0c971
964bffb4dcdc5e03897f376341ce33a3d13338dd
describe
'4077872' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPD' 'sip-files00095.tif'
97bf7df78e56aeeefab8612c2f78188b
9f9da0413e653c00b43c084b1e8ac8bdb57fa689
describe
'1307' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPE' 'sip-files00095.txt'
ba9bb45e2c280225b68ad15157fc955a
45cee29fe0b789d80b5008aeb00b229c60ebfb01
'2011-11-14T17:01:37-05:00'
describe
'6463' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPF' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
45e584e6e5907ea267de88537bb2c5b1
55afcc5c5186a21c7c01e4eec060cec374db9d59
describe
'498855' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPG' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
37274fc8c3ba359e96deb4131698e67b
adbc42d8b000df8878de865a623ea6de9c5be1e3
describe
'89566' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPH' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
f1ad5c235f3512420bba5d3ab081786a
c651380d60a388674376800227f98569e1388a98
describe
'37584' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPI' 'sip-files00096.pro'
c05811057e2218516894d4bfd17e6d56
e9cfea3d1d62b0da302f5e06365f3d1f77e846f0
describe
'28033' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPJ' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
397f9a66e97b6fd1e503bc67987bb19c
4c3d974a230c82fe0e97547233641850aa801a41
describe
'4003056' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPK' 'sip-files00096.tif'
0bf2598a6a866d10916cf68f103aedc4
017c3daa53cddbe5666568292fe5d4832f0b0c1f
describe
'1483' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPL' 'sip-files00096.txt'
3cd99440b8ed8abe89c79bd0e7229bfb
22f715ad446b060c618fff6f8d97e88bbe9390c0
describe
'6903' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPM' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
0b8e3bfc1058738fdbbea4c08f33a78d
1149cf5e71f06e898732ea6c7062163c8ce6cb3a
describe
'496837' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPN' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
5b5072f658f0d666c7639cc36887f5a9
9c6e95650a4167660dd90aca47fdc791d0f199df
describe
'65358' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPO' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
c67d97ae7f781a23ff0ccf71cbbbb486
bf74c2ef8daaa8af4c8450b65a9aa10c05ef2460
describe
'25367' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPP' 'sip-files00097.pro'
ce6afa60fee676353d100e8f53a0f97e
0d91c0de2bd745794dfc4278710568ad3d87c586
describe
'20306' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPQ' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
75249a9a807764b9a7efcb48d88f2b38
3a596aa3800e5f82849ea6d1d9d81dd53685ad5f
describe
'3985628' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPR' 'sip-files00097.tif'
cfc384404eee44607992326c71064eb6
802e76c6c9357a7cb66a2b34f76ddbf3adc65129
describe
'1013' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPS' 'sip-files00097.txt'
51274f3a69a82f312b1b1336d801ce81
7d61954cd13292763e6ed58b2a60558c23131b78
'2011-11-14T17:05:42-05:00'
describe
'5054' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPT' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
e48b1f14b8171a7b0d956db7aa24d4df
758cd9f6aa9203d44420ea607c00871ee04c57b1
'2011-11-14T17:05:48-05:00'
describe
'491414' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPU' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
ef8f85075c1326f127f41622c5f91d2e
e21577a6d8e627be6d9e68386ccd086dcb48d051
describe
'78813' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPV' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
72dce80a513efabc5cdccde50ca99c0e
ac05e81e1dd9001ad6f4dedebdc2f9b2c43e4f73
describe
'31512' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPW' 'sip-files00098.pro'
3a74328a966822cf6206a6d2ae7cfc49
15eeaa2b600f6d91289c43c27116193c5ec25b13
describe
'26637' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPX' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
14ce517337f42ddba1487b0093cd74fc
edcb72958c92005478d6b6bc02529d527ca340c9
describe
'3942872' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPY' 'sip-files00098.tif'
10c5a23aef5ba276d20b27e85e93d76f
d981294d152f4dc73a5f0c590a6d300467afdee8
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBPZ' 'sip-files00098.txt'
baaea1bcac20604d11074be035b8622b
5ba828a4373fc12ee845f95465e4e5168206a8ce
describe
'6296' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQA' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
98b5820f9937c3b6de3b5c7c6ddd76ad
bab9da3740eb274689a703f398798d0912f485da
describe
'487585' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQB' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
d18e80529b9b0eac2a5c0ed69cd617bb
528c586c3c33d425ff82b57116b505b6133cbf1e
describe
'92462' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQC' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
b241f9234bfa4660151050f6bc3623ef
94854f7d80d8d775a8e87e7ddae8fc259e549473
describe
'36719' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQD' 'sip-files00099.pro'
bfa8f28095664c86119b5629d8dcf66c
5bd69ddd5b5d6bc25ea0036ac7dc91c37ddb9301
describe
'30661' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQE' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
604e637144ffcfc57ea0e68008b6ba7f
37efc54e912f7b4b1f8f724856c4857fcf977ca1
describe
'3913012' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQF' 'sip-files00099.tif'
c4784cb764bf7c47f07f5cbd2346bfab
11db4215ce5941d673f3f5ed35b99d695fc4f31c
describe
'1473' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQG' 'sip-files00099.txt'
d8928dab58cb76bd5a1abfb59d9736e1
4a9fb4d62efdddb4deb36f8c0a1ca26bd2ac79bf
describe
'7546' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQH' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
3144ed3453711c00002db58bc32500e3
cb611dc4530d53b80c9016a70f335bca88288888
describe
'498153' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQI' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
af5736fe86483dcce6520ec1b5370701
b80a37365f9e6141e5daff7a36df116305c1b5ba
describe
'91650' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQJ' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
f5ca9ac3dc63c3555c9877da288f75c9
046ae0e3219adc13a5014324308b870ef6c8c619
describe
'37668' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQK' 'sip-files00100.pro'
5ed71137a5e9de4a2c9b4829a2e3319c
5d801ee5fa2aa6b58ef7edf89d1180ae7e86c32d
describe
'30793' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQL' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
a19b869efc915e420411816c143242d5
2ad21451af1b32a8d75f1c7ed59c6584462e99de
describe
'3998172' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQM' 'sip-files00100.tif'
2974dff13274f26737d9a29e6b07c19a
c4df76a69da4d987cd225419b8ffd5a14ba2508e
describe
'1500' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQN' 'sip-files00100.txt'
f651e3a16535d877a8433f2acd761ecd
2ebf1993625adef15cfaaf8979d68d69c78dd7d8
describe
'7271' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQO' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
0c6ead868e51efbd4566a175b3d5afa0
ef5fa64d78906a15be372ab6fac46a392678c310
describe
'496722' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQP' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
46b3d570dbb2fae11b391e2a4886d786
24b2c0b549786a2bc46585b03b6cc7d3aa77100c
describe
'78678' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQQ' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
a1dbb026587545679e46daa8b0f0146a
64da80f01ec20d33618e91abd61365e9d46eaf10
describe
'30919' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQR' 'sip-files00101.pro'
5e09e90fe131320f4099ecc86e54c3f8
418c0bf92f0dc8aa0c4de27ff3c755c24cf0be49
describe
'25970' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQS' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
f32f10f5db76c46f1a0cab44e58a5d2d
ca53a706ee6cf0fd180c2aedc3dede744ad76d5e
'2011-11-14T17:05:09-05:00'
describe
'3986064' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQT' 'sip-files00101.tif'
9fb02bc85caf1a6a4c7f336e33f62ce3
b043977aec33ee4f8bd650b62c5808d4d5ebdf93
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQU' 'sip-files00101.txt'
67cbb1c496e9a623c7caa29076ec1e42
b54afd20fabbef605615ca21c758f826b960cdf0
describe
'6858' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQV' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
a510f67696540ecffe53bcb2f44423c5
68d4de61477ea154b5d2f33d826c9aacf6fad9e5
describe
'500756' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQW' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
24e4af70d4a324750d224e007417e81f
a108c6fe5746cc622e7db78c90c49f0ffb832fa4
describe
'88118' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQX' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
2352634d2bb10e67b0f32125e486c946
0d40f0f1bb005421ef3caf274a9b004e35aaab60
describe
'37993' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQY' 'sip-files00102.pro'
63b0e6eb15c6d1775e3f8d070233f6dc
fdee58ebb291ce0685cff5f9ee58757fdb092043
describe
'29067' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBQZ' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
af50b26345b108cb4ff67b5210460641
7dd0fa6acd9f74de7cf60b75a84ddb07bed9c65e
describe
'4018388' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRA' 'sip-files00102.tif'
eada7fa139c5c1baf67697cbf003275d
72f280e7c33c810eeb433ca34b41099e2b38bab1
describe
'1502' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRB' 'sip-files00102.txt'
d82284e3b3c124e3e74ce5dfe7f934a8
a92151ba5b9662e7fb4ab047b7a65bf0fa2f91ab
describe
'6828' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRC' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
0d7780c868253d1e3d744c560735df2c
8b1eb01a179c76bb61e1299edd6274384ac41b16
describe
'498663' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRD' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
e23ded3a8dfc05fe3f3a42fc0c717555
6550a9ebdf86a4611d5144c0875cbab12c2e2d6a
describe
'153711' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRE' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
f1b8364b8313c3b7af76f86a98b87230
4b965a08ccf6371e6f9691911a5463ccbbd140c2
describe
'2433' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRF' 'sip-files00103.pro'
4f11f14f126378392c995367b58338f7
a82e9bb569ea5b00e7709c86ae66c62d6211418b
describe
'37994' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRG' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
e2b40f85d937dfbaf5f0cbfd61dc7c3c
58580e00753b8e9c089505f0e776c6d957ff61b9
describe
'4003756' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRH' 'sip-files00103.tif'
7b7886794b8140b97e1ac14941afecbe
3a51fd2be2d917a6c9f8c02d4acc8287c12f5929
describe
'152' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRI' 'sip-files00103.txt'
a35608cce9a8812910b20b0f1155c4aa
d265ba9deffb06843ee6ba9e2b330a9546acc28a
'2011-11-14T17:02:44-05:00'
describe
'9010' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRJ' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
65f94c9c342af0d414a514ccf2e2ef0b
0436ee36c309ed23eb0769971a9f8de62db9c568
describe
'14851' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRK' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
a0a3b26dbce4d122697b62664fa0e61f
fdd47759e24747c3300411050fdc9ea73fc5c6dd
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRL' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
0b37ca831fe740ebcb41bea796f48052
5ac08da7ea01163c6d1b87de19dfde4f9d0bb40e
describe
'2175' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRM' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
5ff2b1ae20abe305842166aef269fedc
d99405d9a823ce5a7d8e63c6f21dd66281af60bc
describe
'3916696' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRN' 'sip-files00104.tif'
d019f8840f4c119a829c4156ae8bf7a5
26bda41284045964236d70f499c49acdcbcbc23c
describe
'787' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRO' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
9e95bd1337678cc93f55af479793350a
15523cc531b1672b8c3a6bc6260025e044a7c017
describe
'509053' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRP' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
633343983f5bb21e520cae47068de6d0
b2ed8d706b92006b12a661a7968f3683209299d1
describe
'87190' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRQ' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
6ba86340783e080f2cd09a47e233501c
f9761a7f28ff8807ba3ed9672689113ba62ab9f1
describe
'35777' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRR' 'sip-files00105.pro'
2cb3e8c6a2dc212c140341f7453ed607
1bbcb9cab2e89deaf654ec36a507c08134890cae
describe
'29574' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRS' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
3dd87f89a6f914ae864ca60616428faf
811d785380e2be762e2028e110b3de90f81527db
describe
'4084404' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRT' 'sip-files00105.tif'
313451b2d044bae9eaa5cf82c836de88
f59ea395f5f4cb153f98385ae43b7fa0461cfeb0
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRU' 'sip-files00105.txt'
35ecfe6f95a6e55ca14ba4646cefbac4
90e635414aff6212643f9ecea76376cc3875364a
describe
'6950' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRV' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
bf81eea545bcf5c80fe6aae2ce12729d
a33363e40be2512b752d72daadd7466ccb6852ad
describe
'506192' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRW' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
912b09e58d1b034cc71b0bf46adcd6e5
2a355c02b3c012b0e16e3d74af1856fdbdee1e86
describe
'82659' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRX' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
7464abe4c4be765d7916ea9e51c137b4
089635e8945fae7fc0239d0c8f3f3b9d611c056d
describe
'36463' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRY' 'sip-files00106.pro'
86495253766a87c530005808438abe53
a12c6cc964f98f26fef7aa839109b6bc3e03a7da
describe
'27206' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBRZ' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
153d4da6d3540330809360773d5107e7
91af2ff4f31ea2401aabfc5b3339b2a4f29dc552
describe
'4061776' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBSA' 'sip-files00106.tif'
c1e026be9f1ccd349132edfc4ddd3562
050f35fe61bbb848574df631d133dea53ea15372
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBSB' 'sip-files00106.txt'
46f7510375d214e62a0038225180584b
fb9b590c63e44747464ed9612a9ebfa2c346085d
'2011-11-14T17:02:52-05:00'
describe
'6890' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBSC' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
a12e4244aa12807b4c5121b0d3a971ff
de4628587621097df97483eeba4d96977ee569e5
'2011-11-14T17:06:59-05:00'
describe
'509093' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBSD' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
6f22966d3d71c5102b5b74f967992857
bb3c0abb80db640ede54b10102479600a65fb336
describe
'92692' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBSE' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
1a288d1187cfbca06b47ebe02fb954b0
79119792e1db9cdf715dcb64309d1e8b678ba220
describe
'40509' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBSF' 'sip-files00107.pro'
ab90fecda48dd910be97f7318de8522b
338f7e0733449cf857d3322c09f3901e2fcea33e
describe
'29897' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBSG' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
aaf781c09a1bd956ccd4140c72340064
3df6c4cf60ec83a51069abd7cdbe466faf134966
describe
'4085096' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBSH' 'sip-files00107.tif'
49a167d8c47e11ebc675911ce1bb427d
17ea439020b8802fd80f6a6fc1ca903d26e14d29
describe
'1626' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBSI' 'sip-files00107.txt'
b64dfe4226150b8ffc49370c89e8caf2
fa56365b6e9f5e7db3d6d4068bf587a861f8fbed
describe
'7137' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBSJ' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
bf7bd823e08f5450b31bcb3443a47671
19dc2e95e17ae45b3f15714488a61f63c76dff34
describe
'552302' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBSK' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
fdf4ff7f37d57004a0824c6052db6840
77392c90959311d565947ade6ee55c36ad91c860
describe
'66482' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBSL' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
9bc5c8f940fa36adb94550b50608a678
af2f86f902ed370e3f31ca345add6d0a9c10905e
describe
'29488' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBSM' 'sip-files00108.pro'
ae31a694bdcf207e118ca11ebf54e7ef
813aaab1eb5002697cd59836bb26802de2f4b26a
describe
'21425' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBSN' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
66e626f08894bec392ad036cb06b41ca
0c3e2b6271fae46c11fc3458196af02bc839a2f4
describe
'4429764' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBSO' 'sip-files00108.tif'
476165b022f42fb8ca48112620005d86
e76b7dad8a9d85bddb44c63865367f30917b6d55
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBSP' 'sip-files00108.txt'
841cae7df7996dcfcfc44dacf65671fc
4bcb7d9e11c77116af0e635e5b230c200b26aa47
describe
'4854' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBSQ' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
54e9a714006dddcd730334c37de171d0
3ac8836f0a37b84782d820391657ce90a4b98e25
describe
'504307' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBSR' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
5c03988e6841b948191f50869e2f0641
3e8e8132c13e39f5b1a96e91304986a4ad8228e5
describe
'71660' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBSS' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
5b634e0403a7fb65cc0ecebc9d5515ed
c50026c77bacac7275a6633c52a94e20d1bc021f
describe
'31422' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBST' 'sip-files00109.pro'
d9a6744cf27dcafb4b778dd5d5642c73
4ad328bab0afc521feef144608cc27f12ce1436f
describe
'23586' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBSU' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
fb67b18fe942b6793e891c7fc6a166cd
0276034ae808b0ad1eb85951cff89dbfd9d410ed
'2011-11-14T17:05:31-05:00'
describe
'4046320' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBSV' 'sip-files00109.tif'
c6f89d88824128ad7294f02174f5c384
a6186aed544b62e854cf0fbcb1a2c7a4427b76ea
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBSW' 'sip-files00109.txt'
5674ebd5f25761db799325123399baf1
04d941a1b134d235476e794a3bc97e90dc3276a5
'2011-11-14T17:03:55-05:00'
describe
'6176' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBSX' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
c01af63bace62fd270038f5f0c7dbea1
303f17c634f0cbd25eb523c6f1b2f8a464d1618f
describe
'520552' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBSY' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
dd7761ea382bf71ef55dd0383a5b2fe4
bd538496104e59e5842b11918cc63e467df25128
describe
'83540' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBSZ' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
8edd79a575465d54154135f5f3a72589
7faf8104fa82f64be8cdb88823797a4a7887cd04
describe
'35329' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTA' 'sip-files00110.pro'
b222c78bd4172bc64e812f0dd65fa91c
fd56ede8fe853ad5f5ed7da0f44bcacd7be8af66
describe
'26782' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTB' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
f0cddf19d611802d2cc310e6319c2a31
ef9d7f1cf5709466f4d1dfbf98b4d20f2456db6a
'2011-11-14T17:03:56-05:00'
describe
'4176244' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTC' 'sip-files00110.tif'
2f09f28fcf88930d08b557821a38aacc
0251e8888402f44e4ab5d3cf8c2e0c4845861bd2
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTD' 'sip-files00110.txt'
6613b470c57aadd0f1272791418e66a3
1c31feac50a423b2ad152896a46ad1e92e49ac1a
describe
'6500' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTE' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
93e5e7fe3d7d249a976b1b5e5acfd221
e9c0add25b9b8571982e4bc34a56b918638231e4
'2011-11-14T17:07:27-05:00'
describe
'554014' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTF' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
f6581b0234fdfc305ab13dd182e3b443
d147340752b07215b954ab01085dfe561ef2e408
'2011-11-14T17:02:14-05:00'
describe
'87818' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTG' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
2c1889ad6439b96c66a7e01d49636a0d
2f3f7f7af02543cf21df0d21e4abff8b5da5dfc8
describe
'35117' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTH' 'sip-files00111.pro'
2cc0777c3616947332aff06cf5277ca8
108e15ad1466657620dd3de05a11158f0484e4b4
describe
'28253' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTI' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
908ad01c44ceb6b130ded78adc72eb43
e759be3e585e2469e306345ee223226ead756825
describe
'4453904' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTJ' 'sip-files00111.tif'
72efa2b3cd9a865b3bad9ec8a9219fb4
650449c63a8e00cec67707778e6a836c354a1a4f
describe
'1393' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTK' 'sip-files00111.txt'
c92c859e9991495198dd3c7493eda917
9ff9685e986d7f444792d2e535119558c375ae0d
describe
'6937' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTL' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
e85dfcb2a03af76d211e88854052c6b7
0f7f5d9873b1c1831030f2d6f07ec8c52906f951
describe
'515934' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTM' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
f4279e31fee13cbbb8969057d68e2e76
ddae12cd23bb380b79e448661f1de0cb9d90f448
describe
'83171' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTN' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
3fec6bc50e0a07ce1097ed280035f0fc
d3f6a30a484300bdc4be5383e1c7844ac7fe3242
describe
'36684' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTO' 'sip-files00112.pro'
8e3494e75050846d46e27033ebb61b32
28cfb26f665b2d1f7e3cad38810bb9c877a98917
describe
'27303' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTP' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
500051a209695bd54d39c2e6218de9de
62eddef4969bf64cd107d3c5c9a13679d8027a4f
describe
'4140108' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTQ' 'sip-files00112.tif'
5ee7fdbcfa38fd0ec8a9bd019d8f33a8
f4acc1c5a451850e47ef29c84923cbf75a03890b
describe
'1452' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTR' 'sip-files00112.txt'
3df37876bea4dfa59edf0a11152cb74f
cbf045a0dfdba3ef5d8a6e5eca991ceaa06fabfa
describe
'6773' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTS' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
5702e64f03c85853670d15550015a371
7340557cf8f88504adb647868c36b3cbfdc716b1
describe
'501583' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTT' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
27c50449eea7ca9d15218dfc713c817f
6c44ac9fa8cbbe3d590dcafa45107f7de8412429
'2011-11-14T17:05:47-05:00'
describe
'94314' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTU' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
cb0e1e53ed5e810fac6d7f11715f7d89
71429a1bcc3050753e0b87c71b686c00e98f10e4
describe
'39460' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTV' 'sip-files00113.pro'
8ce2923c20e1eb5fa73102e435daeeac
7eabf09b390633ce728105601b827137b236e714
describe
'31162' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTW' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
44438463fe62209ac1fa8919ef0835f9
896408442d73738c0f44674fd98ae5c8f6a5e0c0
'2011-11-14T17:02:30-05:00'
describe
'4025376' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTX' 'sip-files00113.tif'
bb43a181c3dede7f93ba275187e5b1ee
9c0dac66f93f8878e00bf29da3dac0126e4b6bc8
describe
'1548' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTY' 'sip-files00113.txt'
16ca21a409ef327fc802d562d2e199b6
34a14b3323894dba9122ce321bf2f68a580ec5ac
describe
'7269' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBTZ' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
1dbda1f1497eb20b779bf6e45a167d5c
1a164fddea18ca462421397867681836ff59718f
describe
'525175' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUA' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
63dfc2d35a67cec23c5178a2983737e0
60d317c34f1b5c98059ce19c77d4d03ddb1d339f
describe
'87165' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUB' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
8975a4802541d8ce8f9f7af872dc4f31
6300a2056a84a180af00822f1dde7c0603e2954f
describe
'36233' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUC' 'sip-files00114.pro'
6da5f1a266290c069ba9f39be5199171
f12123d0b9ac74cc3fbaa2630eb3df907816536c
'2011-11-14T17:05:57-05:00'
describe
'28216' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUD' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
d1cc842f12bca0896b89ca19ee2e1e55
ae9a92b87aa4235c7e19adfa91b1fc40ee4e2cef
describe
'4213232' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUE' 'sip-files00114.tif'
3eb65301181a8cb7cea4eb9c97e4893b
bbc0609d34bc83e908afcd52071786cbd975d4b1
'2011-11-14T17:05:52-05:00'
describe
'1439' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUF' 'sip-files00114.txt'
41b097baa06b5c6f9478dad28f137954
8ddf2dc5c001f75dbf84abe455ae6b5a26a61135
describe
'6505' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUG' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
14c42586fe829f4ca976cdb244d69ef2
e466314f5db7794e166f653650430074cccb160a
describe
'550685' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUH' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
28c4c63322944f6f5c9bc33f212ab2e5
554d54374287f7888da1a0374b6761bc82e964fa
describe
'96236' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUI' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
63c2e3039917cb671aa0843e125aa1c7
dc094a522dc12d70e3ca5c5e4a8c0c0935d90ffa
describe
'5367' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUJ' 'sip-files00115.pro'
48955f49ed99aff8a6b16b7374100c91
d909021b1521e80a2f918ceeca58415833b8d3ac
describe
'23750' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUK' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
581df036a99b5db41527e16fec2f831e
519c03077eca04423147b61ed9639bd20f01d859
describe
'4418096' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUL' 'sip-files00115.tif'
f407843c89979f5e2a6901159281fb22
3a93092dc17b286ce45957592d5b0917817aca29
describe
'380' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUM' 'sip-files00115.txt'
1f9f84c23bbbf002e17f190f788e460d
846fe53f2185be4b684b11eba83558ec1e161dbd
describe
Invalid character
'5682' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUN' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
5393917fd41984efa6e9b4795d487204
2b08132bfa21608025b187efe96b09858181a431
describe
'12037' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUO' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
86238b5649f7413b00b6f02a616710d5
b776dbc2df1e7374a870427ed401d7721740cbf6
describe
'7287' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUP' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
b3b1d2846ee5729686609a3599c29b17
8c4140f7cde9234ed06cd260bc2167e139f08f8a
describe
'2173' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUQ' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
7b564fdc9b1c0c42c94ca620e5daa8b9
d299f17d30afa6c74d6fd90a7719c770b77ad4ff
describe
'3864756' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUR' 'sip-files00116.tif'
5c44797494690aa92ec2e8fd85d161b9
d9002f2e359522c721e20a06025314c1cc901a7e
describe
'808' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUS' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
b47d9dc1155ffb227a03e4155597528c
d1cc37a1548f6deb6c80ff41f8c83c7121868a59
describe
'497986' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUT' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
c9fc093938549452ad9e42ae689de2c6
6b26037f23c5f37fa78a9f9b0c22fd15a1559592
describe
'91505' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUU' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
4a0e6550c7c8282db799c64986bce7f7
7ef0f1ee9b20d39de96c36f29e1380109f1009e7
describe
'38315' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUV' 'sip-files00117.pro'
36b05872668e2a2a0348092193057aef
133d29bddbca3cb93c37156f548a702a3dee9189
describe
'30514' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUW' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
ceb72bdb7fd33b26138fec9647eb5b77
4202b81cb4d1c3cfacf204c8496886d2ec64609e
describe
'3996420' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUX' 'sip-files00117.tif'
8dbe121a4eca88305b96ae3520b83ebc
505f64659fce5424b45a2c3386d638d48d994078
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUY' 'sip-files00117.txt'
d43ee67d3d9991c87a582fec83ef11c2
5084e4ddafbc41687713247c273a8843a43270b3
describe
'7420' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBUZ' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
4a0d6ec108e032fcc597799b14851380
f254012388b240e515bce1fb7534a2cf7374f474
describe
'535596' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVA' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
b42cf0f889847120097da6f38a3e9e23
bcfe6e5e302a05259bc0c2f01f5a4eb32315b9f8
describe
'77951' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVB' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
945c1c9498efa0738700ff7517ca8903
64e328abe1153bb1280333c68ce71941b8ccd043
'2011-11-14T17:04:15-05:00'
describe
'36145' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVC' 'sip-files00118.pro'
851520fa32019cab2d0833c778fea3e4
fefdb007c82df479183ecf907f08b60a04a30e96
describe
'24469' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVD' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
e0c7e1dea6708866c375b61c88495db6
af231f70dfd3388f67c7ec95eb57c9a675c5bd47
describe
'4297148' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVE' 'sip-files00118.tif'
f47cbddb613947628be7fb89a387f460
42779e5df10549d0bb3419c8ec450e1e0f87d32c
describe
'1434' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVF' 'sip-files00118.txt'
28b33b9899b404bc52ec712a40102f32
d61aeffc7c1b46f83f8e1cbec143067c87997679
describe
'5928' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVG' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
38572b63f1f12374037f5a5ef38fbdf2
921f3b77e457df23c779c6111d34215f573aa897
describe
'146933' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVH' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
59e2f65021165e8ba00416eb5da7916b
91e25e677833dfe5eb6d648a2f5f63b1b67ba18b
describe
'22423' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVI' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
177f5135520217792b25249357282b8a
25b1eb2e119c4d38fc275552658c980464085a8c
describe
'6517' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVJ' 'sip-files00119.pro'
d4d6f3e4d24ec66294106b51e4a791ae
c141ba5ab30353909192941cc5351f5bb3218573
'2011-11-14T17:02:48-05:00'
describe
'7094' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVK' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
837231350a5dddb3c59737311101c2e9
1117119644b085fae4414a78e79af027c776f12c
describe
'4192476' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVL' 'sip-files00119.tif'
c37f1444c70771174985a57f9d2ec301
9136c886ca7929087eb6d14ae18f683057c8aa89
describe
'285' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVM' 'sip-files00119.txt'
e46b2fbd805040b0ade3c440a36e750b
fb74aa5fa4170cf585ac6af36a922deddc17784e
describe
'2055' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVN' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
7a2b5f82e9b0cca70afcaee4467e22f6
f217647c4a4409393c21d475781487d217845f46
describe
'522233' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVO' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
d0347d2ebc18c263c6e70e542477361e
6571840ff93bf3fb9dc00e2af43c12424be05d83
describe
'59875' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVP' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
9f61e211d60fff2d514b1c787ba20dba
81d5b1a9f28c08af17c280d2c52ccef30e0ff94c
describe
'26524' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVQ' 'sip-files00120.pro'
b0f6a1afec89ac76a1987df771c17367
684e5028014667edcbb4acec0bbd848eba3c8e75
describe
'20457' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVR' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
927522f282f9aef6a61a85fcf660de05
b8898017a9452d5ee7b0098879bacfd8db34c05e
'2011-11-14T17:00:46-05:00'
describe
'4189716' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVS' 'sip-files00120.tif'
22d4ce0e433e2b5da05f0054e38e4302
fdb3d7c894908c443b2d955fbefe6f36cfb7beee
'2011-11-14T17:05:29-05:00'
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVT' 'sip-files00120.txt'
33985a0ab93d9f801660531f6216bb8d
8222e247649800f55c54ec5fb495da862ed99675
'2011-11-14T17:02:29-05:00'
describe
'5566' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVU' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
a38ef15be35df56b13545f0e2482cf8c
dde4ba9690eda67ab5602f80374146f9e554bded
describe
'517448' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVV' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
e6ecb5835bc5acbc3541281353dbd4af
4b33f6a5ae96a6b761b169a598eb89279596915d
describe
'89456' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVW' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
41c4e3401ebd9f8863b3bada082d1591
86ebb45bb8c69b7bed97ff361107fbea74983256
describe
'37617' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVX' 'sip-files00121.pro'
921da79114bb2b9a42fa5bfca931cbbf
6ba315cfb3d399e80396f4b5e1557e818a196e4e
describe
'27689' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVY' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
04a4fb1365544c15f163c6a00690ff09
761e1256b62b1c88ea7959c1cdf2e9f0f1b3a2c6
describe
'4151592' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBVZ' 'sip-files00121.tif'
f0e8a684f28160cda04dfd81aa96b20d
35274cfe307c93071d39e2e6a646d5de03115e4e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWA' 'sip-files00121.txt'
5faf9d7482bd7837a015d949207612fe
601762d7f58588544c8d718cc84468d43f51750d
describe
'6783' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWB' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
086000bbca84eb68c5202690109ca3f7
f25bd870b31966f0bb8d2fb45fcbf6b8747da1ec
describe
'514818' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWC' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
84c02cdc14f6f4461ad8f94eefbdd261
e51c22932c6416999c403c21be272af3ba358fd3
describe
'74616' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWD' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
9b781b93eca68863da0d5ac85c92c1ea
081851100e1bf587c9b6808d8d9598572b495977
'2011-11-14T17:06:40-05:00'
describe
'33468' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWE' 'sip-files00122.pro'
b600c5b71a0c02781805e9542ee88679
9c404e72ea5daa85cdbbe0ed145b5c8f9d526ae9
describe
'24475' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWF' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
e7a914a45ef7d2f1b80df1d7af49a709
0d26452fe210ce490a61bfd5b0eceb4f5454f5f4
describe
'4130320' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWG' 'sip-files00122.tif'
a4e551387a27ef2e5e29505d09335e60
d988c9942c8bbf8641354ae9f52fa9ab9bd617b8
describe
'1350' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWH' 'sip-files00122.txt'
115efd85323dbfdc8e4bb1be448c96e4
bfe3d338aff268a103cd043da17d0d09c1ce0c02
describe
'6533' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWI' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
5c753d5fa11207139fd7fb5e506617d3
89b05934b411ae4ec90d0b6d50a64898e9a3128a
describe
'544036' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWJ' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
ac50ed2130f29cb3a99d00be9115ce4a
00a873ba3f6e9eb79dc09db92c7ad76d3b25c414
describe
'78941' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWK' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
c417e8de05c42d167db23e035ee1733a
ce85ebdb749200b704989b5e4303cfb1c7174589
describe
'36139' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWL' 'sip-files00123.pro'
75a760dc0a2eb5fb706394a34db1cc43
80e65c3f569d486ea1569ed74d10a1ea7dfa45d9
'2011-11-14T17:05:18-05:00'
describe
'24681' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWM' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
1c27956c9c0f9d7c270beea8440587d3
3bee251e45652ee4016c635cbccf16ba37bff84a
'2011-11-14T17:03:28-05:00'
describe
'4364608' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWN' 'sip-files00123.tif'
9790d1669f057b4e74ee7828d95e73a2
9e761ab8cc856a13c572dcce5b1f886e7bd3b69d
'2011-11-14T17:01:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWO' 'sip-files00123.txt'
e0a757bd7a806f36e30fef786a097fec
48ee38970eb8b3511177e3bf48b105ee22920d33
'2011-11-14T17:07:14-05:00'
describe
'6045' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWP' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
6482bf74ba39ba865e428d2d6ccd11a1
3f9abc0177565561cc70f66bb79435ac6201ecce
describe
'513359' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWQ' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
a98d6d22933fe2a45ec9baf328632878
9ef09003d1e9bce4ecf1bcb4d036a8894b0f06d6
describe
'72191' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWR' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
5ddc68863cb7b31983ec679340a3d4d3
a5e03e87db9bf8e1be4df35a0b99b3b427467774
describe
'30935' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWS' 'sip-files00124.pro'
20bc6020f6deefbf978f3b63b77c4f0c
b2ccb9072b8ec43fd3494e71c5ba49bfe7350404
describe
'23488' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWT' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
2994ad9ed713108068d37cd3bc41f1fc
95bbd51352005fb55b027b52a3d11d246662999e
describe
'4118868' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWU' 'sip-files00124.tif'
2cd76bd0eacacf60ddc20f94c5d0a34e
fd196318818e9b7929dafaae4cfa67d9ba47dcea
describe
'1254' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWV' 'sip-files00124.txt'
1f08225db5fc22444ef7c1a35211619b
566bf5f332328f717ce2298246755a3865d328ed
'2011-11-14T17:02:45-05:00'
describe
'6226' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWW' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
c484f2c05e64b86353334db621b1e531
b23c2d282360ed11ecb4a51272f8f9ecb5a2936a
describe
'551746' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWX' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
e747751859730113031277ca38336a8d
075631eae077e2958c673a1e09a3b674bc39fb55
describe
'158450' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWY' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
8ef55a081b000b3899bbf7586cd1db17
a7be0756498e1f36a69bb6be9a27705e2a178671
describe
'2703' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBWZ' 'sip-files00125.pro'
a2c2c3ceed224265c528cfe9ecba5203
bb94d614ab139d6e0daf315b0a9d7c5f84c8bb91
describe
'37793' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXA' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
d4b5f5464f8d63f7087abc7874cb7904
7d07d8f69a340f1ed1dc5384ec07b0afe2e7c9cb
describe
'4428480' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXB' 'sip-files00125.tif'
defa121eef6b7a52ca627b95717b05ff
8e0689061517a8739fceb61c08772f574841a213
describe
'126' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXC' 'sip-files00125.txt'
23b074f5ce35b109618727ef908c6968
1a156637464de53eaea9acfa9dbb4f9a609a2591
'2011-11-14T17:04:04-05:00'
describe
'8614' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXD' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
2ce67778c6f9c95b36df9866a7f41dba
6f160ecf059332a3ab98c20818f0ce5168d78628
describe
'11701' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXE' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
fe872d05f8bdac22c3716d952e25d18c
701436c9a89873ddb5a2c89fe0d651392ab6852b
describe
'7538' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXF' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
c0de465890bec494893835c62ac11ed1
d83c85f73500efa4b45f9de3fbec26f365450d78
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXG' 'sip-files00126.pro'
806d20bf112ebf3e079aeeb120512a18
3bbc3b9b68a01d2c111ce5d3243901f62843676a
describe
'2223' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXH' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
f25c5dc576b512b87f455763c8f16e08
94ef89c4c9d9ddda6450b3a3dc38923eb7819d6f
describe
'3766980' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXI' 'sip-files00126.tif'
687af8d11b4cc6fd346d2042e2e54c40
1aa94f9c9b3e8202b87500151ceb9b9597f71790
describe
'815' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXJ' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
2bb7ce97ff99ab5ee4ea3d587e6aad6b
c2da8acad83224285f0c35011027dcc46772b089
describe
'524285' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXK' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
7289ea91bb17b6bca07801b907e928d8
bca6b7a2cc232d3b061a33a2ac8ff171e3ee9a0b
describe
'62126' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXL' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
b929f8ed86cab7908b1f56b9df797e53
9faca43751c44731c08f482b383de3583864dca4
describe
'26804' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXM' 'sip-files00127.pro'
1cf9ff482c62ad42546b48d4bd7f781a
7d51ed1f19179fbed370ec949a19f52dea9d9af3
describe
'19967' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXN' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
d3c988eddd7746667ad03853a7d4f6a9
6254a7eec4231e11eba8ca8ce66c178254e23c28
'2011-11-14T17:06:09-05:00'
describe
'4205628' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXO' 'sip-files00127.tif'
8252417be4be27cdb7c6adefcc7138ad
ede5fe960b437ac10e9e0c8488df465b1d7398c5
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXP' 'sip-files00127.txt'
928ae655ea0605e62f49148e7d441d58
ce270f109282dee7f4ccaf05c3f175c2a3f51a82
describe
'5302' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXQ' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
5c4a785f380743ffdb286863c4b37b50
08075ef23fdded1008b8ae2ee324b283674ec315
describe
'565654' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXR' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
bd786c7b10ce950bc15d7d6fa9c2c55c
39187bb8db369b8927ccf714ed3f4e4aa55a5843
'2011-11-14T17:05:28-05:00'
describe
'66902' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXS' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
a278d7c5d37e8f05a8c0363e2fd546d9
5f54281078bdd84e40ae23db3d4f1b3d45689bfe
describe
'31606' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXT' 'sip-files00128.pro'
fc4fa8b0828d9e423fa4c7307ae8ea39
2fa6492c7562c8dbffe4b9fd7ea10b1be5f727fe
describe
'21177' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXU' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
9905e1a21c4b535a2606e6a66dd3787c
e469daa3c9c4555286c30d7342f17f4df101fb2d
describe
'4536672' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXV' 'sip-files00128.tif'
613706caf24495fe40c492ceb44121b5
e0ce9cf96f36551ad53c7c5754a5640a07fb8c6e
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXW' 'sip-files00128.txt'
659a3274701fc0cfa254b683a6c40e9d
829f91ad4651ac2de0546c01db670ddffa2ea844
describe
'4926' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXX' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
7e87081988db71e1d464f1615b74505d
685e49a658b515bd383f0d770a82923b75e6729b
describe
'554003' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXY' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
ac5bbc7d290b05ce8a37bbf56af0b2f2
fc9d012e721e79b26d75bd078028b452b23a8944
describe
'84783' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBXZ' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
7b6ce6e2b926db2827d28ba0a036bed9
b08786366de647428384b99597b3574c07fdb4f4
'2011-11-14T17:07:18-05:00'
describe
'39311' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYA' 'sip-files00129.pro'
ffe1177d40a3c78cec6e4b1e89c715e9
ba83a74dcfb996059e447df66073abe0a35bd658
describe
'26174' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYB' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
7351917cf3cb437bc882f4ec46b4f2fb
fb9369c85a4d6f1efbb8061bc4bc00107a39d35b
describe
'4443704' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYC' 'sip-files00129.tif'
22690a7738a3368a4c72d2a1efd19462
a9d2e4c5de2aa08dcae81f5471fbd4695e759fca
describe
'1541' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYD' 'sip-files00129.txt'
6a377f3599c3f7381b76a540173b260a
91b0f9822fbb2c39560cb9c0c884563e3b67a64c
describe
'6016' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYE' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
c8aa05771edc67a892bb8c51ed4cfcd6
f75024186f7a529dc6e3e32f6c183c9ab5393ae3
describe
'557151' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYF' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
40efbe34ad902877b3cb6fb8e6468f36
01412dfcf9749abe8b18f65ba317ed2b98b7d5aa
describe
'88392' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYG' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
436a1552f399dfa28970d4d7e549ed83
5d449ed1eeddf5e80db4cb0447fb81b950022408
describe
'41259' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYH' 'sip-files00130.pro'
2fb1419685fbf67130235b8ffd59de7a
426008e8eb526d94211f63c7744032439fe3dd4b
describe
'27845' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYI' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
8a5ef864ef15f92cd80ffa94a2cb112b
175745e00e3b82e1581e45810f7f73604727084e
describe
'4469404' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYJ' 'sip-files00130.tif'
68004d3c53c6e688931603804a886de1
16ae5a52e07d93dec6cfe1d301af564f9e32448e
describe
'1611' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYK' 'sip-files00130.txt'
6c485ec0791ea34557bac9f44e0fde3f
51879f4da796ff8e398b382fef6c754b2e71f300
'2011-11-14T17:03:32-05:00'
describe
'6216' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYL' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
add5518e3a36552016b5ed879a97de38
3ba0491a67c36f2c4650446408051bfe935916ef
describe
'547771' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYM' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
14b8df03d9124d2a0a93eb35eb9c4212
460c45f28a42e3505e793eb067d461ba98ea971d
'2011-11-14T17:03:07-05:00'
describe
'134568' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYN' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
0630452fa7f98d6fbd46d7d184253a26
d9e12ad2c384852ffff7af5e57d8fd6c57efee78
describe
'1737' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYO' 'sip-files00131.pro'
6f8fd61bd6c18af83b1d092d417db48a
58915fe39e672d7fac7832493f791db962c56ca9
describe
'32959' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYP' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
ef45903ce5a57496203ea3064268b235
c88fec35eabbdadf69a45f263c9a12e90612dbd5
describe
'4395800' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYQ' 'sip-files00131.tif'
d8d8cbb6e1341c32a412e0d9556fe1af
b2c93dc2966ac3cdd2b3fb762468edbb96d5ac29
describe
'90' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYR' 'sip-files00131.txt'
ee4a4acf316d9dcc8d600ebe7980121b
7aab07aaf780d1511dc6e33bf4edd7e4483aa668
describe
'7826' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYS' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
6e712a24bc1e2ff2414b6c08f7414e10
b81df0c1197c3e0d0184f5d05b02e3f1a8a285c8
describe
'14942' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYT' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
c4419751695ef7e0e1ae5a46ad2d5a02
1e1a039e23bdf15ce58137576c8228c29615c651
describe
'7005' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYU' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
998b8f6ff72f752babe102ccf4d8f4b4
77c11784eb235ad3ab8586258f9f32e960b6a073
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYV' 'sip-files00132.pro'
88367f4ab9ee8d6b4ff65fc87d7d7652
4f7a28d2452c78e41b347c35a553a9974b7f9331
describe
'2089' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYW' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
f29bc1f98131f13480dbf8247fc0fe22
ff8812f462fd9398f6315ff439f3f131fab77345
describe
'3685548' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYX' 'sip-files00132.tif'
c6c0ae8624e951429989fbab17d03350
9c6c31b2655fb405ceb4585fba1d27f12ddc0f29
'2011-11-14T17:04:25-05:00'
describe
'778' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYY' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
0a6ff0abc8edf5553056ddf86db02035
676dc64f9637a740447a925d4e419614b4ec1532
describe
'509544' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBYZ' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
85aacac7362138b2343c012cb5b4288f
24e3091fa5fbe94f49314901569d2993a379c166
describe
'86882' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZA' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
141fed81b04f33bcc3ef9361d7c69336
def8ed1bb53a23fc600d825a161bd5cdb7e11c53
describe
'37428' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZB' 'sip-files00133.pro'
636900feb026f0ce4c2bfe0f8f49231b
9d69f802fed628d2a0e5c04164fa52972d3e9103
describe
'28455' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZC' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
d187c8b101b1004fbe71745704d75118
82f8ab882a3e1d9f84a66e4a0c68efed16549f4c
describe
'4088656' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZD' 'sip-files00133.tif'
8f769fa65152cebcadd710b765b9525e
eabeb473b10ee9001ce1d7882195de6f1517b1d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZE' 'sip-files00133.txt'
4eb99502b09d3fdb97b644881ad9a89d
71311e924d3409db65e70a1c8c08002f1c30e608
describe
'7093' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZF' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
09de9c885bcd5e1eeda9a84200d88929
f7f293d226c9903b4a50d619c96420dfda55dd85
describe
'526667' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZG' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
88ea190eb6d8fe988d82a2711ee0051e
9af8b531aec9dec98c229d70c4fe065d2ff7cfb6
describe
'87432' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZH' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
0eadecadabe0c9823bd9c2a079a728b0
368f417f6b3b7f000668a53df7132d4a400e681b
describe
'38079' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZI' 'sip-files00134.pro'
89f47b6f6e2ebb70b785702fa6436ef1
b5f5142d6293125af54cdb251f9ce37e7f12b1c1
describe
'27933' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZJ' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
bb67e6e69f3da5c428c5ef392075ae54
1bf649fd3d6c332feee808495179bc6f008d5997
describe
'4225392' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZK' 'sip-files00134.tif'
61a607b71c4ff2a745a4bc54a68c868b
e6cfaf245d9411cbaa1bc1077d31efee442a4e85
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZL' 'sip-files00134.txt'
dcbd9d69c4b3a465ac50dd989d1bfe65
cac1c3d2c139e1919ce5bd95cc43577c6611e497
describe
'6674' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZM' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
e4428782ccbf76303c7b0439b9dda27b
4ff00919c363397b812891dfae36b36b07d32069
describe
'519093' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZN' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
e24ba5ce617c99250b56e58707da884d
d56bd5791ba4804732ac887d88fcfa7704cd1a3c
describe
'83040' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZO' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
87d262a17191c03b9620ddf634020d52
dbd271e40768c19e40eba88dca3a3c2eb285ef0c
describe
'36182' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZP' 'sip-files00135.pro'
93853ee4f63508759c0edcf42b7d2909
5613ab2c8c1e3373457a94bfe94aee1826eabeaa
'2011-11-14T17:07:13-05:00'
describe
'26829' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZQ' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
defb2cff77712454156cedfeba45d99f
bb7604806ae3562b27991d3ef23c2a5ff1b96301
describe
'4165184' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZR' 'sip-files00135.tif'
1b8c1a5de165667d1288b65f3873931b
4005e80cd13f0e571ec30b0bd68d220f7685a718
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZS' 'sip-files00135.txt'
439f3f1a9634a4ecae2e15ac1d756790
d8a9154e3ceb22f43f37b46e18e119ad6a3af04a
describe
'6305' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZT' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
b28a69130c72e0e944676912fe3eef76
1f063eb998707bf0d2449daef66e90ffd7ff832b
describe
'543466' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZU' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
0ff6936a3e90bea2e5eca91f1f243b91
f671a08a597847ed32aa9205e3a26bde383fec8e
describe
'76715' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZV' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
f0f0f9ac983c4738129ea0e39aefae02
f9026da93dfa48e9eb204e39af4179e318fafbaf
describe
'34925' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZW' 'sip-files00136.pro'
134a1f31ea5170e2319d307d808c16f1
46dfb79a93762dd389931e8a316fc1b0e008e856
describe
'24911' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZX' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
c009e8e92725cce113ed9d1585fd1fe6
80885803224bd8adfddb5830bdf8a218a3d8144e
describe
'4359772' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZY' 'sip-files00136.tif'
352d44c2e2abde0a169c7992f373de68
4db634157338e3c7caf6ddfc04277b00ae43b12f
'2011-11-14T17:03:13-05:00'
describe
'1396' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABBZZ' 'sip-files00136.txt'
e014e84d692d1a64cb0a92413c783a0b
11613a71fab6328108d3355dd4fa990cb2819ba8
describe
'6255' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAA' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
ebfef5afa5c65d6e3cc651ef652818bd
56b598fe8aed1c832032392ae209bd2050f930a7
describe
'573860' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAB' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
bfee3099e5a787d04bf0f8f70e6d9978
bd69585df61d8f06660791e761838f26e06a36b3
describe
'75237' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAC' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
93b9bce14982728df78626b5f212552c
1bdaf82743c1d08151a16bbc7cb9031d7860d57f
describe
'35092' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAD' 'sip-files00137.pro'
6b3170901b72027b092b2032d7e43271
6b69af458bcde429a95267b99c0f2093a6a77372
describe
'23885' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAE' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
0a7b82fde2968ffb6b7a520ff2b5e19e
3d3840b58d61517cf4fcced37b799b5fe0e13388
describe
'4603036' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAF' 'sip-files00137.tif'
04893e1a2b28aebd27090b5d4e9ff170
795e2202970b861c9692806dd646af6ad2d7853f
describe
'1406' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAG' 'sip-files00137.txt'
d1a873dd209f92c6763acddb048f138f
c9e67f7b996cad990400b27ae52bca38e87214a4
describe
'5422' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAH' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
e85632f1718e22ce73218085c6b3439e
556f5bbe78dc67475c05d87d36b7b371517359a9
describe
'154570' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAI' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
07ae0b59a7480343a73c06ac59cbe719
680d74442b04c9df594900a655dfffac1eb5886d
describe
'21015' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAJ' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
a248c01e3587ce194ca93e1217f4e77a
eb41aae775e742052dc795803f5ffd2b48856b3f
describe
'6158' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAK' 'sip-files00138.pro'
768090d54fc9b78952a1fb3f6fa9ee9c
5e24d5e39a5b3e5ac737bc046f2940d6147ad23c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAL' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
84cc7316ae69145d5c706b6a90e1b8d0
3a03493a302f26ace2dc4a2f74aaaadcd08a68c8
describe
'4474244' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAM' 'sip-files00138.tif'
7ba0533f2ede73c134f1c90131e5605f
8308bad55c1af55238c9572be477f83c56d24d1b
describe
'256' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAN' 'sip-files00138.txt'
279c0b4d63d006fd514e29f1a0a1508a
ac4bb72aaa6e2d16eff274c184af735688d18a40
describe
'1934' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAO' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
f37520a7cdeecd7ba6fc0fcad3609b31
42ca0492abd6f96a30530d87eae11d56c5bad482
describe
'534176' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAP' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
6f9566b5c540c478d3fee945d8c55e61
30bc12b8c9422ca9bf24ce30a3f5cbd8ed667cc6
describe
'73458' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAQ' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
ce4d8b0d0ede298d24170c6115f55229
3859a9726748a9227e06b8639e582af1975a20ed
describe
'30617' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAR' 'sip-files00139.pro'
55ae292eb29e0945cabb91037427bbad
1cadbdd92783111101e99fe05e1c772963cb996c
describe
'23838' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAS' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
54a81bd23270309f4ad869cb518267fd
b9cae0e9a8b8dcba5a92f5d5a312bf388cf1ef2a
describe
'4285500' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAT' 'sip-files00139.tif'
06578dc0d1f148698f128ef24e17439f
7e76c94e3937832abe70f50574e39547a864f62c
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAU' 'sip-files00139.txt'
de05cc0b7076cee87153562e8195e1b7
5dcc9b929a3d39f0648450b38c3e5d698ba5081c
describe
'5739' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAV' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
871777e9eda30b25e1b9db80dd0e56fe
0bc236acd468e64b8fce4b3a445b0930bd04ad3b
describe
'530341' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAW' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
ffda83012804ec02ff90a7e6a89fa6f9
14ccf5fc07f84733fb47026a5440eba1f020bcff
describe
'80860' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAX' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
dcde9e52eda188cd2ea07a742cc2937e
8b414e70849391ae9a57cd1e5f3d1586c1ea190c
describe
'34823' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAY' 'sip-files00140.pro'
4679c1315d360a259ff1e1c9a7c13ae3
24dd76a0baf3d46456fabd0bb7dc1f4396ab9d7f
describe
'26199' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCAZ' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
cf4aa0ddd0773f9976452583931742b1
b1af91d1db0a6905b13088fbca8c6c57c68ef32b
describe
'4255228' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBA' 'sip-files00140.tif'
c4323c32555f841f005b5687c3214226
9b75d3ef34ea26ab6ede0f7cc95a08232541f527
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBB' 'sip-files00140.txt'
20c73e66ae6555f5c1f28b6095e4d3d3
8a6592c5ef9117e827f7ec4db95c05ea979eee83
describe
'6620' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBC' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
46ed1f6fcdefe32c15490491bd861db2
66b5dc89c5031f1514eb3431e80db4b6e72fb6b8
describe
'536975' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBD' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
97017ac7030470c6467a6d4ae9226bfd
e5d7506d7a2db3116d6827c2a94a25caa952d725
describe
'81333' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBE' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
0d3cb3762ab184643e04b9ed7a1a24ea
77e510dce435b71bb2f7ab98f1bc6c90016b4cd2
describe
'36380' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBF' 'sip-files00141.pro'
9e60465defc545efe56709b985872d4b
73a725bc2c6a35a1316832bbbb6a5f2218a2e6a3
describe
'26188' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBG' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
72eaf728fe44d95dad29fa6ee8e313f2
c6273dbcdac3885d52c397887c7fdb0ec87d6b6d
describe
'4308160' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBH' 'sip-files00141.tif'
2d9211d74522c3c4f15af49d95b96e83
83238a98c83f4083a31adea298e3b7504bd34247
'2011-11-14T17:05:39-05:00'
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBI' 'sip-files00141.txt'
1c47bd151e6c311e506a2d3ba8428f8d
88cce6deeaa204be87b979acf053f363e95af55e
describe
'6262' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBJ' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
fb4aac17ce24e5e0db6abe975392ff59
3d387dadc2c43cfe705b53a99c4cd6a69d7742a5
describe
'540544' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBK' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
96831f80f9de95ed95b2ef355466d62d
c1be89d6ec9b4aca118f0f7662edb4adf55d231e
describe
'77177' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBL' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
3134cc66356141bab6b107f4b571a1cd
219fd1ab6a0f81c4c0f6947f487eaa3e1c8ca64d
describe
'33915' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBM' 'sip-files00142.pro'
289ccf05f2ed4ab7703fc451213c100f
3ac5d6de22dd6b3805a7cc7dd34edd4324d9e3ce
describe
'24366' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBN' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
c8ffdcb829aa7b91858690bdcb877494
8bb51b89a4c497bb04b7be26d1553a90e3a34c89
describe
'4336460' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBO' 'sip-files00142.tif'
b56179b029d15d0bcc84a090fe605df6
b50bd405acb87cad49198e385b72b2aadde59e80
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBP' 'sip-files00142.txt'
746bc05a11a586d308cd1106252dcd72
b13ebeecaeb29cbb963f1cdbc0c553432f3b2291
describe
'6041' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBQ' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
5b946458e94998e9b10d70a0246dca75
3018dc289bcfdc4b12b80f9735004031c1c7b74c
describe
'530280' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBR' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
39fbf422324b8d101876f4e199574897
44a7499393e1b3f04529f08ca6a69a64e914ecaf
'2011-11-14T17:03:36-05:00'
describe
'74969' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBS' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
71ab5268d2579df786ae48bdc8149fbd
eecf50480394735b2e484c1e7000b577a9ce1e0e
'2011-11-14T17:04:39-05:00'
describe
'31483' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBT' 'sip-files00143.pro'
05c4b460aeca9b57631394fa1b47c399
dd75b2985e2b33b3de1a2ba28fa0bdcad2d3d5d0
describe
'24047' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBU' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
eaad6383bd5ac675d1f5e02ebcc47f80
f5fd6db987367eac4f23e666c0e580f5c7aa678b
describe
'4254188' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBV' 'sip-files00143.tif'
ab61bb0cede0a77c707891cc75b7b233
55f392a8eb51dbdaeb18b92d4331a21a6c6f6681
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBW' 'sip-files00143.txt'
db87cf79d66608f2138b85bd1c0defec
61f4e28ab4014da9625a27a99df0a0b82f98f43f
describe
'6265' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBX' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
137e749bb92f45cc3ae2bc0e940f243d
d6b8a1715c8d430042520a713cf5122edb5d08c1
describe
'524898' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBY' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
907f6c2e1463344f61337435eee165f8
608d0ef29588991242df303361c1acddb5593540
describe
'85522' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCBZ' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
2b2c9a3ec97c643a15339af43e5c663d
b82b5d404e32692be604e32012c5d858ec1d0b4a
describe
'36729' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCA' 'sip-files00144.pro'
51b9808d5e3c5aff2d9f1b4b52a2676e
8772c0ad23534805b0cebc95b404983904917894
describe
'27675' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCB' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
8ddda509d99553d69522b633d0903fd6
e2a8b623a5c6ed02e6fb0a7c260f9c2ae8222e3c
describe
'4211436' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCC' 'sip-files00144.tif'
264558338ccd881a6625d4ea6c1aca32
091635dd1fe85c11a7a93786bc62a1ce711f3822
'2011-11-14T17:02:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCD' 'sip-files00144.txt'
3c4d7e4934c937fdbbba704f548b8099
4ea2093dcb2a966ec5b634d79a8a2f5b7cda7a7d
describe
'6687' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCE' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
50669a58de7b5b944129837bea3eeea2
d5165d2522443bc94c2f39bbeece3f375ba234d7
describe
'533691' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCF' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
7fc71bf01cc4536c2c21a0c9e8b8470d
fbfddd6ea849930bb44832b9b639a3149581dc3a
describe
'145323' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCG' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
1f9f235e09b1907f78088c3291df6d10
a7174f2173cb515067f3c1aaf4f5da5ad0423b26
describe
'4640' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCH' 'sip-files00145.pro'
06347cfd63e5a95ffce3aa54a6891e77
0509d8fad5616d4dbb020cce37b9e124f308aacc
describe
'36620' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCI' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
15514afa10c282e40cbd0b2dae288344
6be80633d5065a8ef71f24b96590b41205bfbb82
'2011-11-14T17:05:03-05:00'
describe
'4284256' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCJ' 'sip-files00145.tif'
a6c59021a33d656302d38029461ee1f5
e2b4a85ebdfeaabad32755e67cb966e3a0bbbdc9
describe
'313' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCK' 'sip-files00145.txt'
b6e2a2531a7d16df46b0c105e5acaffc
647aee9b6a9e76a88b457a3c88c2b2d3714dba57
describe
Invalid character
'9077' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCL' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
390e0e5c4379183718e96a10a1d57c15
26f407baadd42db744749484a62702e246354971
'2011-11-14T17:04:19-05:00'
describe
'13185' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCM' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
d392f3346df18c42451824aceec85707
f752e55b2097d0a582cc8714673aa3ee623078b7
describe
'7549' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCN' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
0fbbe03a081844e87c0ee0c4e0ebc9ba
5a7e202036d18869caf952a6e16cf27566aa6aaf
describe
'2221' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCO' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
9e6bf368674a921c2b9caea2b6096a93
493c3a2445ee56bb7fb0db9b4b8fa7537831e359
describe
'3464676' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCP' 'sip-files00146.tif'
57c5bfdbefda4bc81518d4775ad58db7
555a783221ffee113ff002dc8a71e55f2c8ae461
describe
'814' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCQ' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
03a3e5e45251b0a9f617d58711088af6
e82e29e43842a467c9d0bd37c9c52fa3dde27b42
describe
'570908' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCR' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
9a7984f2da0fe19174ef5a651a0bce32
8163eb2df6c87e5af2597ec3a2052d9e94c84038
describe
'86043' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCS' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
ce544d56bc75f56ec81c1adddeffd20c
d13f56aa05d1309fb65cb7f35175ae615dbbb517
describe
'34178' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCT' 'sip-files00147.pro'
7ce872507b3dcb16cf4c5c5273cd799a
735dc7275be6ae352249b63374285dbbbd8961ad
describe
'26497' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCU' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
9fb34972f3dd6184cd5192603c97f013
6c6f832f34ab92286f86f89eb427dbc382f4f6f2
describe
'4589052' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCV' 'sip-files00147.tif'
46e3b1586000d215b00f34bd92f4ed79
f605cf3ee0617b3d4bbdc9c3349b0afc19168511
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCW' 'sip-files00147.txt'
86c6168788bcc8ebffb67fb2b06d0319
b8e065bd679974f8d3029ee5478390e079e7a9d2
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCX' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
90acd1682503d5621661aa1bea6a5173
5975390b863eea79d93319e62bf4efabd3fdf7c2
describe
'525050' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCY' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
417ec240cea1bcf310045bb8c120bfe7
102be5dbb1408faaf025b4bc819beb598cf0afb4
describe
'65947' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCCZ' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
82aeae638a93f35a65d79723a5991984
543a3ad276c9d2716d393ecbed61151a3b647fd1
describe
'27078' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDA' 'sip-files00148.pro'
993941a6a18e04513f2bf9c66947e067
e10e47133a6ff6dc0fe7f684488dbea43e064136
describe
'21343' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDB' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
ba269374b2f626458657d3b28312f280
a1d4c54b482b9dc777fb04dbcc1f696779ccd451
describe
'4212076' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDC' 'sip-files00148.tif'
ba33b32dd98cdc18f3f8fcc74751730b
fbd99fd6ea68db7d97f744ced335e8bec5d4513d
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDD' 'sip-files00148.txt'
c58a085689f49d10e0cda2bbbb00a6a8
15dab710231a36cf83659a716201dea88d8eb9cf
describe
'5438' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDE' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
989cee8f2731e62aba450c9147609f7c
5aed0d8a57a8ff248f17f2c61258399b4ca54f05
describe
'545410' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDF' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
0e928c1f9c636a85ed5126dd18c129c0
1347493129f8c0023f5860c09d5ef5d31db9bc3f
describe
'64887' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDG' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
a757114afe65c96b9640a5af73e8711c
f3fe8127a9e773093adf640baf616cab181e1741
describe
'28674' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDH' 'sip-files00149.pro'
f6404e9386bac9b52bee25855e965d49
40e41d93b7efc8906746f8d396f97b70ceb15082
describe
'20448' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDI' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
0bdc427495faf40aaf8dfce1ea1ba0ef
330e6663daabba25707f6c63249dffd81f49f15f
describe
'4374496' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDJ' 'sip-files00149.tif'
e3cb7ebfab7c63b2c5195a2541097a89
18a97abeadc18fd67ed0c3166b2f43bfbf8ba79e
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDK' 'sip-files00149.txt'
519185ecd6db03a236c554493ec569b9
3bf83b8aad7a79cf4822c701fde746e5377a01c9
describe
'5032' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDL' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
06483a3ec5e32699e6c19d7751523402
0685d6ec3a694ef71832999679fdea83344d34ca
describe
'536359' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDM' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
30e9277eee30e0d98047c16d79a7dcdf
171071ba469a0c3e5c3a0a67183fdbc5b637836f
describe
'82758' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDN' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
460850299a6698e40102692a53925ed6
5c4246c2191248f96a97e4cf104228a89e1f669a
'2011-11-14T17:06:43-05:00'
describe
'37012' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDO' 'sip-files00150.pro'
2792f24bd45deaf9dde22687a549d8bb
93b1d8e923f330845260c6b8828f39bb358165c9
describe
'25837' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDP' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
d15b95a658f7692b55016f018f425b56
78afc7fb2c73baca7af9f7f3a2afdf44d63b6c36
describe
'4303368' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDQ' 'sip-files00150.tif'
86ff2d6c6db3dda2ec8c48f7fb820082
e87f049f346ae82e2593fbc833539879f8d0c733
describe
'1457' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDR' 'sip-files00150.txt'
2296dfd8ccd3b95bfd63ddb36dc21792
8a855e3895e210abac1412890f0d93a85fa0ded9
describe
'6315' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDS' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
f6a6ebdfd48b97a2658d90df57d78e7b
fb23a16bb122ef6806210ae125393ebe4f2c9994
describe
'576245' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDT' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
8351020ece780792a4f6f7366f6cc71d
d2a3ee09ee30f749cf471661b1f92e7775c0e70a
describe
'75401' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDU' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
8ee35703e567571555dec6b4b7ebfb3f
198d25541cce00e2c895498c38ff675f144d8402
describe
'37226' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDV' 'sip-files00151.pro'
43920f16e8dc9dbd99609510ea1b77cf
6572d1bed9043311dd42a9c79c920c4818f21109
'2011-11-14T17:05:44-05:00'
describe
'23798' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDW' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
e77c85697c82cf0a3f79964be364f805
e7c89ff431813e32c96fef7d0685581ec5139d97
describe
'4622664' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDX' 'sip-files00151.tif'
854f6df273e8195f078d687cf9017456
b2ce0504cf872e9d116da3926d4ce7313d5fb7ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDY' 'sip-files00151.txt'
396c682d3a92b788d83c201edd2b4e1b
a943dbbb1ab48e9d4888b7f12aaa43a9dca5210b
describe
'5747' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCDZ' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
a818c6d9d473128b910880efbd761f5d
4e1ede6b3f162f35cc0849eb96df73915ae8b2b1
describe
'555765' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCEA' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
44245c088442091b10c5351f1c6b6b8c
14313449eab44db17463bd851847ff37f10fa426
describe
'81777' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCEB' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
45dacba4f5a14d84a2d8b7b651139d77
dc04799ef7943729fe8d1ab1f26c0cae8978f09a
describe
'38086' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCEC' 'sip-files00152.pro'
5532769539f3af9bd8e88c39f9c7caf8
fc27202f80abd114def84eb488fc3a224f8b1f3b
describe
'25488' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCED' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
fafeacbe0bf19d017246ebf9af7e3385
e6a0d293fb42872be1e0093ffd9a56be77c05c79
describe
'4457824' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCEE' 'sip-files00152.tif'
3758d03e9ec9bf56d5213810bdd9a578
817ccfa535a52c949167d72cffb0ad67f4472272
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCEF' 'sip-files00152.txt'
ec1a8c86c40be32dd9dce342ad5d4a9b
cabe27d5e6e20b977c8c1a14eea1bc157d118de6
describe
'5975' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCEG' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
1ad2aef0e5376aea4f54a7a010fe7617
e75fb88b29614cd94069588bdca6e1b00f79d6b7
describe
'557615' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCEH' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
6bae267cd41f7e00097eb044fbf34798
670a464c2a4821209f7bbf67b8b3aabba7a724a4
describe
'62050' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCEI' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
e49125ac8f7c15fb565d8388bd818c00
50ec1dcef5e2315d7301c32dc4b78734b48e8821
describe
'28802' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCEJ' 'sip-files00153.pro'
3dafe0000eef7b1f6949bbd525a3d9dd
1a1350b82c7ba14c027bb3e8d408e0db65b7aff4
describe
'19935' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCEK' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
0bde4b7aae787624db86db6bfa33cbd8
2d3cba0fafce104a08884c1817b956e96ddf530b
describe
'4472852' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCEL' 'sip-files00153.tif'
513409b6fe89ebc699707b1ce9bb09f1
c1aa49f4f7c5dc7391e34fe6d15044a30a6d764e
describe
'1180' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCEM' 'sip-files00153.txt'
1028936c81fd67295039f7a2c56df2ea
aec3586335769861e8701dad2bf15e8091f87597
describe
'5458' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCEN' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
93f9f414e0ab467cedd2ef42443bd1cf
e9c5ef6dea230779c4ca7828bb21041ffe00f87e
describe
'524517' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCEO' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
fea44e6f0605a7cb2b64f4e2a853b9b5
198f404701e9fbbf8350e5a7b5369c754652d9bd
describe
'68869' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCEP' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
f2df072a31717b20a0058bf08b231cda
308c9f5bf1cf0715ec4164755806a7976b4610bd
'2011-11-14T17:06:39-05:00'
describe
'30483' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCEQ' 'sip-files00154.pro'
50dac7b1d8d23c709c98bb4b4ba4b7b3
0cb794e47acb43c2facf4434915d8cec66db9f3b
describe
'21887' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCER' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
a956af4b4c2c704aa4325195761674dc
e679c7e32e972beee7d5f01c8bf49d769cd2a83d
'2011-11-14T17:03:46-05:00'
describe
'4208184' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCES' 'sip-files00154.tif'
012461c971e07e8c5cc978b02b7e1ecb
ef3afe3236df1f23ab48441e3bdb216d20408012
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCET' 'sip-files00154.txt'
66c84907946309d70cb796a292db8720
fd8bf12d261c64b93386ca2a99be0099bb412747
describe
'5929' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCEU' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
6ad9c1ddd341e0fbc479cd06c10548b8
77064cf5d848ff7e9069de920940b66066249d0b
'2011-11-14T17:04:20-05:00'
describe
'476018' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCEV' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
19e12289e0ab728f8df7e68e715f8664
927e4c001b56d6d3090ff797fb119aa2de1253ee
'2011-11-14T17:03:06-05:00'
describe
'78528' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCEW' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
b944eb641e0cc0db40a91e66843b7cbf
6c190ea7be485ddf8fda7b04da01ed7fbb658f31
describe
'31666' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCEX' 'sip-files00155.pro'
9f6d9de157d6ce0495de4ca5c357e44d
cec1801ebb9d62d683f0042637d2c25c9189e2e4
describe
'25528' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCEY' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
2372d70c048080e204a8c1c2a6d3f479
f779eb77a73eae6a66c5e757227c909d0336c18b
describe
'3820572' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCEZ' 'sip-files00155.tif'
6f0048f885491a9a0061a81f1cefe9e5
0eea9a94f1899d1cf1a7eeaffa2975ccd5e7931d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFA' 'sip-files00155.txt'
1c4415bee22564536485b6ab99124b1e
5db7592f2d5908eced5e1a7448958c7edd1b5747
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFB' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
0d1bc8d2545a8ae6ded74172aadb816a
bad38809011e68037b5372d773fca505791653d8
describe
'533846' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFC' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
4ec82c2465b3866351485d59fd641313
600a3679d20bf3042d97ec6e870889a7b71e05e4
describe
'70986' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFD' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
fa81a554c1b5122e30bc9c0bc80a537f
1b4e9f40502a911c31914470cf495d706386ddb9
describe
'30511' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFE' 'sip-files00156.pro'
bc3d159161ffc3cb627dabb2e6b9e3f9
5a6aae7fb8d53a179efe1bf792430a96ead5a986
describe
'22147' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFF' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
5c9e0fbacb85574b8d3d3d1a964e2343
b1521b3eb755233afe7548b591c14759f9bd6801
describe
'4282548' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFG' 'sip-files00156.tif'
bff09aae1b25990a691408128696ce26
4146706dd0ca1cc2f0755fb8fbef0794d0d23e23
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFH' 'sip-files00156.txt'
f382fe94e06aaec79cbc29edf64ca16f
8fc00e9acc7aad5419bbd184f1777dd2576688cf
describe
'5329' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFI' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
83a6317a534ca7b620175859c39ec6ca
eaac4d325d16aba58d7814b65693e586e64a2022
describe
'548362' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFJ' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
8a3e4aed21a24368c346d10d134b59e8
24810503190c37275de9b8d8284167174e9cefbd
describe
'132491' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFK' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
c1852e86a09a0271cd8bd1b128d4ded5
d5b583730e3d59655656f8d7690dddbb296ba060
describe
'5376' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFL' 'sip-files00157.pro'
438fb2429aaaca14b36426dfb702f6f2
1b57cc85696bb82878d34ec8df91396f27a8a42a
describe
'32876' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFM' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
e493495dbeefbb858c1b1c49e15a2f5f
681dd4ef50c012665799ebce97644ee2cf7913bc
describe
'4400808' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFN' 'sip-files00157.tif'
4bf2afd8d9e2f9b91c35c0c80a2d8166
e83dcd26fcc07acaadcaf564eb4d3cbec50daf38
describe
'524' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFO' 'sip-files00157.txt'
c03b4d9a897ce25b5589e9b9d8f01f2d
fee08c7aba3bc4e211e41be9a4adc11c2d34aa57
describe
Invalid character
'7811' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFP' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
2ac766034edda61bb1a226a7fbdb1c66
40acb5f56fcd4337751bceeacb2b9a45f3960b9b
describe
'11423' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFQ' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
08f8315a521187fc0ac079847f72a949
4467f1063ce90cf5ac542cbd4313351c087374a6
describe
'6818' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFR' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
faa9eea3b8b83dd3af403794465c0745
9fc2e29a7b2acffd9eb91db2786a9682859ed004
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFS' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
1ab6d1500c632e04002a4070c03e3b10
30d6cc794aecb5d514ad85c0457a3b6c06a08e4c
describe
'4021776' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFT' 'sip-files00158.tif'
7cdfce3f87e601656e8391c3f2ca863a
b2bd30e7306393addd65cd8e7c8d0bd94a865c5b
describe
'798' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFU' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
73d4c8697c8e3a1234d785bd532bcece
596a965303d971ef97ae24614c1abe435f555b21
describe
'532947' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFV' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
d5804c545b3ab5b7ffc96ed6f231c95d
4d705e6a7165912601eafc08ccbcb448a7faea76
describe
'75444' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFW' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
28524de24dcabac87cd617310c196c6e
72e5c1a549faea9dbd77455036183a32d076f563
describe
'33426' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFX' 'sip-files00159.pro'
d8716ebd9915949025d0434223124863
b0ed0914c0a61f3fb63ff1dd21c39188a102b4a4
describe
'23968' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFY' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
dbd2b1cfee09a7ac2169dfcc448abaa6
14430592b6b99a31d70923cf784cd8c9c0947fb5
describe
'4275396' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCFZ' 'sip-files00159.tif'
1e8626f8ba0ea4de3fadf5d795d7b2a2
9bd6fa075aab31cd5d386b2a561fb2f3b7edcb86
'2011-11-14T17:05:49-05:00'
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGA' 'sip-files00159.txt'
83e1d313b3c4124860cfc139a0a8042a
f4250195a04c3136a78a6807bcd448908c05b256
describe
'5550' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGB' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
9f4bc2af632214aded039ca25e97f312
a67320284e0ac1a42ff4e7b4a7dfaf82f23350d8
describe
'506921' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGC' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
90c82a1b5bcc70abaaaeb8e8f5705816
e75fa8d35a2dd28927c5c4516f55efc1f520b50f
describe
'82634' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGD' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
bdd81a70da19112f5230df4311bdd2f2
45b8171b7a97c81319d7ea7b1e97b68f0a75b0f3
describe
'34129' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGE' 'sip-files00160.pro'
1fdf08fec4bb60083e8f7ee3f12467c4
e3d87055d8f16c8e7c1f5033515a478b19d2d307
describe
'27190' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGF' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
3bdbe7764d7f42c27084c6bd4bbe9ce3
e5a30a16c5e726a97f3692877967195b5da26d84
describe
'4067224' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGG' 'sip-files00160.tif'
3c47d4e2d744063c6a54d16389acf894
0f9423bc27a4efafd7abc011bbb7aecf8e836122
describe
'1373' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGH' 'sip-files00160.txt'
33e4a401fe7b001b75b454cd6d313405
cec93ab68d27b7c1d5a5356d148407e343e89c92
describe
'6625' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGI' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
ae26d98ee9077fe8ba02576fe086bff4
aaddbe402a584f85bf5e38a08cc553ecee2073fc
describe
'547717' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGJ' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
8ae1986728bc7ff68f999f63eafc1182
25b5ce39d50e534f6b5c9cc460d10224a140fe91
'2011-11-14T17:05:54-05:00'
describe
'83644' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGK' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
8235bbc76c7757cf728c77afbdb7ec26
97622ec14f15a0dca5a2869e806361c3fb91fb1a
describe
'39151' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGL' 'sip-files00161.pro'
e9cd46adf215d4a2d522b4a0c0a552c6
41bf22cdfbae7375fbf2b304b63a991f6d3fbfa3
describe
'26222' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGM' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
8a51899bc6ed1fb25c837c5c3445a882
8be0e667d58ca1a9b5e547abd714afd8fff76f3e
describe
'4394336' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGN' 'sip-files00161.tif'
2dcd27a933556192e230b23a4f75de0e
d7bb3e3271a0cc9f607af1555e745629a985011b
describe
'1540' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGO' 'sip-files00161.txt'
8bed7e4b58222f0ab48ea30e0ae14d4d
053317124d3d24d0c31166e7ebc0bad4685b98d6
describe
'6211' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGP' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
2d85eb7795fe02782e3efa620e20da2b
6ee7f0bdf31db36e5f9fc39876377b4720ba285d
describe
'517794' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGQ' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
fb48cd8c6b419b6d48018e1eb55513e2
c118e22e5fd7419d899798087a49f8b636e9365d
describe
'87504' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGR' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
71480e3b9f98853bb2d071b0c030e45b
f7943f301c258bac71d16f1ffdfea7defb89b360
describe
'37099' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGS' 'sip-files00162.pro'
dfe573101bfa9342ee146d846db6b3d2
23a97bb03da39520c662be268bdd2456cbe9c46a
describe
'28008' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGT' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
09930f0ae189469eac3853f9f82b3c30
d4519189393f195c36ce2583f0f19daa7b017abc
describe
'4154456' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGU' 'sip-files00162.tif'
be17a92530248eb343956afa4cff8bb1
469aa14da957e41d306bb9679cfd781b8599fe3c
describe
'1461' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGV' 'sip-files00162.txt'
f8ffc079d8b81afc824cc0968cc051db
02a112e6e8a70aa6b42f0d17800437949cdffaaf
describe
'6765' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGW' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
ca535b4b120ca87882dc26e4981cf5fc
1aafeb6daf58e94f8f1a534a92b03c24aa851a6c
describe
'527043' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGX' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
c8ffd3a07be8f9ab3cab46a79c0a9f6a
698bcfd39a65e779b5529410d7f2e7a2dd467257
describe
'77413' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGY' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
72fa92e163b91b2f35285e12bf771914
e6a360714df349d7f9741273a23e523724e6fb1b
describe
'32591' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCGZ' 'sip-files00163.pro'
5b233e472bd85575a7154bd4d23d795d
8718d37c259735e6e5512e4de2b9cab7c233db1a
describe
'24920' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHA' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
40e4d35b6384f0deea1652a89f9b80dd
62164f9fbdaa799f5bc7752280c3b5f6724e0fae
describe
'4228208' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHB' 'sip-files00163.tif'
96aa700b61b290c7219aed9e4799a415
452969c51a111c5b5320338b120df7b476081429
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHC' 'sip-files00163.txt'
c1d36eb7633febf564b85bb23f43f176
cb4ae95cab5d58abd03589b700fdef028f78d7b5
describe
'6295' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHD' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
0723bc28e085e0810d710688fe767f0a
1df376095112c97aebf5bf6831853e6b395018e9
describe
'543825' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHE' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
9c8515c8e20d300d5ef81d9e5affe892
93fa1c8de4400f515770623bf21d959435fb5b7a
describe
'82294' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHF' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
c99a42b2e2a94cfc975f8d373fabc9b4
b195e3baf70e53d47fbb0d9a2c6a4f7237d797bd
describe
'39575' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHG' 'sip-files00164.pro'
f4986c730bece15821286985eed57616
6f712ccfe7700169a8d821cc173a81747b3ed856
describe
'26216' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHH' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
14e3a767f1b31264203318ee426d635c
7544a7c14366978150a262ce09402d9497ccda3c
describe
'4362752' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHI' 'sip-files00164.tif'
43656302fd2f7c55e5f979ce36a4b30a
ccf4f5ddcfd7cde91607c208ededd2106edcf5e9
'2011-11-14T17:00:40-05:00'
describe
'1552' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHJ' 'sip-files00164.txt'
989b427a3b2b821895ae49162517b734
feb51b5759b0af977c8fb24f17792952c811971b
describe
'6015' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHK' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
743253f13baf59953b745f98426b1f37
be0802c6718bf83ff1f9c5b2ed8907e14a752e8b
describe
'530625' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHL' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
c1919a08e3f28a21903aa8f003df6b50
cca68f725610e56fdb7fc41437e5a892131685b7
describe
'88446' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHM' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
2ed4974315eb65a377d1518673818f7f
42cd742a33868c3b88825a3ca768cae3415867fc
describe
'37538' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHN' 'sip-files00165.pro'
b6854aceed16fe3326ce548eafe6a9a7
ee417556d9ca63199d194b5ffcc6cba2d9575831
describe
'29476' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHO' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
b07060f7c25eec24ccbea8ec2564e3df
aa903edc382404801081d63265c320674d84cc41
describe
'4257380' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHP' 'sip-files00165.tif'
a365d349568ea40b5cf4730b9a5e3baf
4763caf9ddd383188aab39a3a2140dcc334b06a2
describe
'1509' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHQ' 'sip-files00165.txt'
ad189cf1f88aba803fb8dbd72e6f7510
e85aaf943c9fb9db78e34a9d8e0facba61973432
describe
'6878' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHR' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
490227e4c06dee2ec051a971ee44d1b3
6c6cc129537ed448360f09b832d480db362e5366
describe
'520433' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHS' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
2e682f4d31e5bc0c985e76897c70356c
88fd018ca6f74a8ab7df0aa8b6eb4f7374726763
describe
'69100' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHT' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
2e553ed624c5fbfe682dfc86523b5455
653fee8e202f9dc00a547c00942ab375a2af9737
'2011-11-14T17:04:06-05:00'
describe
'28378' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHU' 'sip-files00166.pro'
74bda00759084436c66d1bc2c51710fe
f1b58625cd2ccd1428c00d7fb971662370d6854e
describe
'22108' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHV' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
d1908ea08e4b479d5f500f850f31bf3f
77fcf90f279369c35e7a1c765ab7e4ba2e15579a
describe
'4175100' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHW' 'sip-files00166.tif'
989ef81962dcab664afec7e623bae295
a0b67f1217b01d9e0d876a3dbaa3ad1f8f7d904c
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHX' 'sip-files00166.txt'
a94f09eebb896c2f804e59d2a253799b
ba9412f3179c939eed5570f735fb4a4175b5ea5f
describe
'5445' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHY' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
771dab9beb7019b7b49e6a812c687c1c
a5e9c69076f4cf8f6e535894464381de5ff10dc0
describe
'520118' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCHZ' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
70a986414efaac39621a7f48f950fb8c
95f6c836ac525e9b158d243d08909ddcb2386615
describe
'73722' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCIA' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
459086faa5ea9e6282bc122c0cae8c34
6d9f166815b2d9ebf68e35c29acc1b87740bc24e
describe
'27748' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCIB' 'sip-files00167.pro'
b0743501fc6366c03032c2f7dd16b25a
2a6de75308be2e66ffe93758113ccd4de4bc7921
describe
'22341' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCIC' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
136da6b986b6870c170327ab9add16e3
9658ffebe678f5c3e420e0834ca86123d3271f31
'2011-11-14T17:06:48-05:00'
describe
'4172208' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCID' 'sip-files00167.tif'
64c3fd1f3d58653ce88918abdbe42db3
3924c915836a4753b64a6400479227ecdb5154e9
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCIE' 'sip-files00167.txt'
2887f45ec31b68c50b99841108b6e564
76024fed1ec996f10a3bbdf93dcf15fe126ff5ce
describe
'5700' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCIF' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
862bfa3bfebe1bd34f3dc41601dad22d
e1602774f701b6b6ee6b29bf3908807c975266f8
describe
'535796' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCIG' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
8ca793d5a54036bce24e65d5b09efb8f
9810ef7d572da33989b2a672fabf0fec3a22c021
describe
'84919' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCIH' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
2632c2e61ef4dc0e8fc1e6cb1a9bd625
1b001c163caf7acb579ccac5d812370188f429dc
describe
'35495' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCII' 'sip-files00168.pro'
b8f33daf25ba00616e24147ae4d3f0c7
ead0dd39611fe6b7d52f08dbc568c3075dffd301
describe
'26484' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCIJ' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
f467ec6fa770fefbb8714b615dced823
8862b8747a4b91044ed30f6d79e911c396d3dc3d
describe
'4298520' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCIK' 'sip-files00168.tif'
1f011b1c1ae133cfa6ce5df44a62a2a9
fd58bee7cebeb8c9faab1b6c774ddcbfa5619307
describe
'1415' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCIL' 'sip-files00168.txt'
47acf19e85d9376ed97877836ef175d2
7781c1ff11f4583d521897e3fc6c697154f28ed5
describe
'6633' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCIM' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
19bc97c2ed01e932d20b5e755b8ac646
9fe5234afa6e5a385f252b30198807942dcd8035
describe
'527181' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCIN' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
fcf85d7db8fd0f916ec3356753d4d05f
b0f2486f511f985e8a2f5ce06698b03b87843188
describe
'83412' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCIO' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
62abb3a9dd9049206dc5ad5768015446
620bcee5515c669dd270db987f720baece5c4844
describe
'37535' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCIP' 'sip-files00169.pro'
2ce98fe76059b43bb3c3dec8fec60fbe
5d73cbdd37eb17136000032058f56968a548448a
describe
'27589' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCIQ' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
bb8a64b43cb46ac86dfddd10b06f0f0a
3fb1ad9b4de36d711ab5b32e920c0c12a4553b6c
describe
'4229368' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCIR' 'sip-files00169.tif'
95b8433cf6996568324a2b0c19ab6e86
1c4172733cfe07bc8851b3978fc1ac3d0bb7ae24
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCIS' 'sip-files00169.txt'
9143e3468585ea4a71f1a421236b8ced
8c41d63903c483a2dcdc676c4043dd78c7739d48
describe
'6846' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCIT' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
f4db42842db3a661a29e9fdc27386931
0f14a96dfab72ba0f887cb168c4b8d4fb8a155b1
describe
'524086' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCIU' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
1eb3429af4b1a2145395eabad4d2471a
514b9d32de146dff8a22dd74f65a64bb93939b2a
describe
'82003' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCIV' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
d05d20d9f6f9a1164f2745d6be8ea20a
4212f96ffba21fd0b36584f440d9ebe131ab3aa6
describe
'37331' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCIW' 'sip-files00170.pro'
f719c6df1c08f58d9c5dbb2d323b4d17
125b6b15bbe7784a4a2feeadbb599d6a92f25a47
describe
'27512' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCIX' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
0eb812a4fb2e5f491470d12552b07e90
186bc29e7913039dab1d807401615a8c31acc11b
describe
'4205176' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCIY' 'sip-files00170.tif'
43491e143fbbbaad47b233c1cf947753
18b6b0fc03236ab98fe7ad28440ede65f07ef075
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCIZ' 'sip-files00170.txt'
fc9ced1efb425fbfa2eda406de0b81eb
58ffec5abc9e226b9f177bfd572788216fbeb1a0
describe
'6502' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJA' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
e60c8f1d98cae6dab061dd0de0441b3f
04a6b8963aec098b72264f2f78827101d56eb0fa
describe
'523361' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJB' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
269f012275e8a6f86482fa5dacf0463c
0a26d838dbad7b9f160b373e1eef43fb5f2452a4
describe
'91170' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJC' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
ac3e2bedd4bd79344c437b66ab5c2318
d7d75fd516e36262651838258e1215b33baf3d2f
'2011-11-14T17:05:08-05:00'
describe
'35553' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJD' 'sip-files00171.pro'
578adfc962302389c35c880d3b5a3ddd
4b793be607a8efa27904d2ac3711856d989842da
describe
'27795' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJE' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
9cee0c8db70a8a0f9445bd46e2817212
e77fc419bc36597bc46b3482c0f4dbbeb186cf96
describe
'4199152' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJF' 'sip-files00171.tif'
8a43eb75f33c25a2f01f3b119398f92d
677f2bb5376b83d6ab70542d5fed17d97b7b2a36
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJG' 'sip-files00171.txt'
3bf54ccf6822a3f3cd440300434edd90
525eec9268a8b75fcee09e9bddab85919701fbb5
'2011-11-14T17:05:36-05:00'
describe
'6752' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJH' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
ca5a0a973372113a38115b03634d02d2
df39e77bea38b483366538f4fd972e93169bcbdb
describe
'501372' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJI' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
46ea6fe494a89938c1538a3162d34beb
eaed921714c5bf7ae6cece9e09c0a53d05c35840
describe
'95131' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJJ' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
4d7418f194c52d3183e439260a15d92b
204f4f0972defa3d21f52a4164fb011a38613dcc
describe
'38844' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJK' 'sip-files00172.pro'
826874c1c94ac97859af95965c973a41
0c062bb5681e7197da482e7d87199c6b3ddf1936
describe
'30944' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJL' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
9ae6bbb4fc03d02d98bf563863502357
7dd218dd21284ef915531762522608de03aa0c62
describe
'4023324' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJM' 'sip-files00172.tif'
78d72a62e49edf62ada5a17328bfeb26
b5561d6b99b49a7109310b46e6b6248681de6379
describe
'1538' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJN' 'sip-files00172.txt'
c5012ef8a59e72f80d54acd10b1c60f6
6a1a6c3c76e84e65aefaffe546070ff209afdeaa
describe
'7443' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJO' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
b179c83eeb874d3a1801f7ef231da14c
7059e46777a14b6100153e07fa59f445f7fa3e38
describe
'537898' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJP' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
d959194243d55ec82573d8062a5f15da
e2b4602bc55aa33e3fabfb8dc4015154b5617fbf
describe
'80688' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJQ' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
0193e6f1f843748938f72c00deeb0060
17e80cd2cf40173ecf799b9c90cfe1367a3d2087
describe
'34309' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJR' 'sip-files00173.pro'
6a5411a140bec923f62ff9295ed15935
9195d7c361d879b8314d436b8ff643ffff33c389
'2011-11-14T17:02:37-05:00'
describe
'24972' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJS' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
b8742bc07a252734d5b1b0f4bbb03ad9
61e47d4ad279014d3467310edf60042a02f8e552
describe
'4314716' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJT' 'sip-files00173.tif'
0b03e565edc726b147352e1b503e0f0a
93fb67c0bb827d676bde5d7058afc4dd2b3ceb4c
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJU' 'sip-files00173.txt'
6ede5d7523ffb7b6f2a8c79bb50caafb
74d1a94eb59c85e1b4194ab03a920259b17e85a0
describe
'6148' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJV' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
48f9eeb1a482a5127e2f8da36303a708
4503b73ccd919fd959dff32eb2351aa34592b015
describe
'537548' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJW' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
ec078d2a21e25cd15b42718e8b18ca15
6897d33fcaf2cbc1d6d07a41df0b2a115ff59610
describe
'77045' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJX' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
e1139ee85ad49506d145d44c8d3284b9
b516380ef44d10a6c65eb3119f9d27344abdcb6b
describe
'35041' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJY' 'sip-files00174.pro'
99897d015babd6b1b6b412c40509fa59
8aa148948272cb3d5f225ffc824f9850186195a7
describe
'24942' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCJZ' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
13a6f3aa897848d8d4e163f47978a4b7
c07d534c42d8462e170179ee2fc55001beb7aa37
describe
'4312296' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKA' 'sip-files00174.tif'
69c379e5023d8b5e7f150c523ffd41eb
40f03f9827853595842cb284298ef87e09b103a1
'2011-11-14T17:05:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKB' 'sip-files00174.txt'
44dbe7b387cd258337e8ee986774a89e
58f103b3d3ba75b1fd0d101d8af6f52b6e48b0c3
describe
'6409' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKC' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
6d22ccdc01381e6172ca0143accd65f7
b521d2775fad1e5619ee640a2b36c20112cafc2c
describe
'532531' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKD' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
436ac6bc00ad789908c9b7839c722568
3b26481103f8ab582ed22eeae16e760ede3b064d
describe
'74550' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKE' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
491180ecf7a00c0d7d6e35ca565c640d
53bf0c33d37a25f63d35349fd203d403cd9d135a
'2011-11-14T17:03:21-05:00'
describe
'33228' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKF' 'sip-files00175.pro'
fb4766634d6c80124703d6909a18f591
df772c843b8f5ceada2168360b9fe13d0834dfaf
describe
'25393' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKG' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
8d604bc68eb97e8b467ab523cd4d7b51
5df4e2242b570889cc56170846d0777a37a89614
describe
'4272300' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKH' 'sip-files00175.tif'
3cce959f22ddb29d081449fa2df6f6ba
3aab358b6f58eb6bc0c883039367bc299a711acb
describe
'1330' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKI' 'sip-files00175.txt'
2009e536a67f19c5b1d28f2cdbf69dfc
cd2bac80d725f0fdb67b0c04ef929fb3e2cf2a5d
describe
'6138' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKJ' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
c9d498ff04ef9f054f89517f8a217def
ac2072e47d7f6f64a573bc1e3663097eb33d8e2f
describe
'361287' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKK' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
88e8eaee282c5116c40d88ca155a5bfb
a5e71fd686e8bf571a36218a1cfcf0f93792b06e
describe
'42147' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKL' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
7cbe3aa87a0312d0b68d903683bd0a59
205dc9b5189d404a3fd411c52f609d18032270f7
describe
'17929' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKM' 'sip-files00176.pro'
97bfc8b2d7360cd02a4ca0f213452e99
ec2670b217c5f04f6ca2746ecda2955689c71b71
describe
'13431' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKN' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
996ff0370194328c087e4e914214a4ca
fda49d1ae9888314a76d902eb4c7cba051c11f52
describe
'4475132' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKO' 'sip-files00176.tif'
73a2e66af6ccdecb62333e8c01d25f42
59e786befb4cf089737add97bdeba7f4a34c2e4e
describe
'719' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKP' 'sip-files00176.txt'
6a8db19aaa2127588c236587b636e804
ca1ffe7afa1622e3f1295f9ae10a1239d7aac95e
describe
'3392' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKQ' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
4775e46837a3c29d0493fa6a37aac7a8
95fc09b18bf82197a4f365ad6c72df83f5f3990b
describe
'508176' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKR' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
a9ad431fd78e605c9c072f5e23956e23
173c67819afbd39770f86e970bde462a25981c82
describe
'80773' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKS' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
096974c7928394a1157424d1408be553
82446b0f1b3f9508d9dd48668f774fa2b21daea1
describe
'32288' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKT' 'sip-files00177.pro'
409508e18deeba259d41d5823d1c7f77
a9765b09c20be0b3320d5ff1c99cd9bf542d5bb0
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKU' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
cd79bbb1a81649a1d1bb677c00393270
3ea998e0ecccd14fba3e1896f48b5bc87754c82b
describe
'4077496' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKV' 'sip-files00177.tif'
3bfc64c55ea237dca6339330ea48dd36
338b6838e50a3a9c35786971f9567c9bb948e09c
describe
'1310' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKW' 'sip-files00177.txt'
3628e6059308b8bc9f59aa4efd39294e
6ba778d6bb66016d0717bf83430caad0a6b66a7d
describe
'6170' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKX' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
c3165236cdaa21ea21ef457d43ee5fbc
b4e4d7533f77210e0bcc94e7e8f6ef7e351ae868
describe
'523250' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKY' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
746b4825fca3795d79144e329a83ed6d
6572803c89f28b249e2191d744618eb297c53664
describe
'91606' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCKZ' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
fc72b3f7c5a2b1cc6e78c6daea7a76b7
103328f2e9755d3fa6710d8dbafb650339da0df8
describe
'39368' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLA' 'sip-files00178.pro'
a7aa48a64f37ef4462096dc704ff08d7
7bfb052fdcb26c1ef1f36d97ca568675bf3533e2
describe
'29101' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLB' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
540dce6fb99703863eb7c7c846fef99c
dd49552667418369b8d78d2e5afcb554c3e553cc
describe
'4198680' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLC' 'sip-files00178.tif'
e919b52edf509380066a6c3c418072a7
b1335c819b393c5c603ce2f0c2482baf013f3401
'2011-11-14T17:03:27-05:00'
describe
'1545' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLD' 'sip-files00178.txt'
41ff8ffbc7216d17cb01684de6b7c93b
2b05c02636420e7ae554d0ee013c370cf2105ad7
describe
'6720' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLE' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
505e14e7ff3d0531e34ae0c5c961086f
3fba900df5e977c47640405918f023cc224bba1e
describe
'513947' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLF' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
1bd015e30f4ea56a2c6caa45f0da5b96
14d5e526b099c517ba12c35e47f39fe5cc2b739e
describe
'73556' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLG' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
a43e0a383d8a41a868415602773ed57c
0068b1b75b7094153f7a7ff214b1eebc9059c394
describe
'31833' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLH' 'sip-files00179.pro'
3b8bb1eef4770e76cc7a5325a0ca71e8
041b9c48c8ae9ceb7a0bf03e437b6cbc6d15bb6e
describe
'25471' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLI' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
9d7d126bd0a7a7f2dd889ea2ceb8da8d
0bc0da8d09ba989e8df58f92f9a2c455c13fdfac
describe
'4123512' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLJ' 'sip-files00179.tif'
478ab784380f308e6e91f0575b8605b9
28beec1ac86b4b44e95e4f0843ea188db510d821
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLK' 'sip-files00179.txt'
6c9cb2b1f01526d63273a432f944b576
15effb3ce654ee6d079b00a1ae262352ae3af248
describe
'6365' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLL' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
b7d46974dc30fa9f8ac847f1a6774c77
4aeb81055f86530c8401ac79192d099745337047
'2011-11-14T17:07:03-05:00'
describe
'502633' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLM' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
c60cfaf944addfc755b86d7f26714950
5d42f76961e9bb3011813404f3af581c4e82ef31
describe
'86506' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLN' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
5441763100314a4c28c1c8d61b788d43
dd223a010a73136ca4e380a477a12acc7b9b38e0
describe
'38385' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLO' 'sip-files00180.pro'
b965bc0a7eca2bcd1fe0ea98f62f9451
2b10f3e4cb81d195051cc51a1fc0cb5faab0354d
describe
'29094' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLP' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
710b44238e39da6d531a501887bb4fa2
5efd26c845d179bc69b4b9358f31d1574645160e
describe
'4033420' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLQ' 'sip-files00180.tif'
1a3b23b55d7c73c87427fc19aeca0e7d
9849f134d863eb0bbe38cd369bb453ba71a5113a
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLR' 'sip-files00180.txt'
bfc9d2323e3d2f8bdada978f9c18d14e
9f51e7e75642989dc981233db656cd76ece3ec18
describe
'6698' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLS' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
99e80137b31bf7c17eab8f64b7f7ceb3
b821dd52fb7c712548ebe13e33380f025cc6b532
describe
'499201' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLT' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
9ae56a97a95fa5b8cb7013bfefdf9b1b
cc41dde7e07f1b5ff0ad02ab0095515b9a0ae4d9
describe
'88195' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLU' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
2b8bb2916ab9d09b4ac2776e45b81363
07528a1419cb19547672081a3b1cc60bcb6bb44c
describe
'35983' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLV' 'sip-files00181.pro'
3edfc885a1592df220e4f4f119778f8a
371ea961de441a4840ee2001b2ceaa68a13e25ad
describe
'29970' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLW' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
549947af249cdb8ffc215e1298fa3ee3
615d4e464a4ed7c046d1eeaf7f27fff6562d2095
describe
'4005272' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLX' 'sip-files00181.tif'
6b36e6b8c60e0977fa4419ff2b4c54bc
8896727ba366a184f2c56dc27fcdb58336a7994b
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLY' 'sip-files00181.txt'
efb6aa3a6e84ce1bc378965dcbd923d7
3f0719931c1a4da2c51ace448e3f5f58947b4fe5
describe
'7169' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCLZ' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
9433ec3d64a386f0c7d2b361b874d915
1cfb8add78fa4cee32310996440fb97eeed4a5be
describe
'507286' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCMA' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
829a41ad1b5b804952185aab87b6ff1a
cc7e9f66ffada7cf36064cf870317e6e0d20ef26
describe
'92121' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCMB' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
0d582ee61db19bb090e311ebe2f6a748
294eb033676a39190816ac9bfb9a0d4d6c756f9d
describe
'39268' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCMC' 'sip-files00182.pro'
a9249803d0446363ce19dc5490073393
2dd67c7a0b6ba3a8473f38227315063a549ef5d2
describe
'30559' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCMD' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
109fdcd189d5ec8994cf133b94f2aab6
6ee8d2d62725462e17ca67cbfd3e0b39a36b7278
describe
'4070728' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCME' 'sip-files00182.tif'
9f8de03fb4e1f35ffe8e180bdaea59ec
989f894bf1f6bfaa28494cfdf6bd1e4052e20192
describe
'1544' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCMF' 'sip-files00182.txt'
b51fbc6cb69dfeb17ec470f56dce7e41
0a6d2ee7a22d48d4803448c18a1eb7202cf24ae4
describe
'7214' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCMG' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
18f66eb9ed89b281172476c3cf2fb569
99ecf2637c46605ec614fa891d4ea537c1ffc396
describe
'527176' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCMH' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
f9d1db7b10bbac06d19ab47b48d27755
62c891d05f708cfd41d7733060178d26153ef96e
describe
'87638' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCMI' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
4ca453cd1da988cd759af0a4911f8df6
1615137afc1b16f45371890a3ceb61f6cebe0469
describe
'38535' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCMJ' 'sip-files00183.pro'
f4c4bb1bcbe1db9399224560fe3d1449
acc54ad511f87ed6ed5e770c61577da669c0cf4d
describe
'28335' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCMK' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
eea864b2283393437888dbcd1dcbfb99
ab1f1127b103fb7a5c8cd157e361a8503b8ab723
describe
'4229252' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCML' 'sip-files00183.tif'
dd21c8970001b5b91977fb285b282281
150182f797f7e6213f979f73eacad5c3f96223be
describe
'1518' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCMM' 'sip-files00183.txt'
9d5ee875b0e0cb7906ffa88b444ddb14
fad02f3fa77794b6c95ad7cfbf3e41a2f6424591
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCMN' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
b7b8b525011f14ee8d3535ad94a710cb
b48055966dae06ec0cd6a66d754c51d0331724ef
describe
'520448' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCMO' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
8a84cc5781d7d58907c0a41988543938
e7eb90956b5ba2773402c12b0dc37a7e1b0ca81f
describe
'81218' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCMP' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
994a39b3bc69af5ced111c353d7b74a3
ff6c9422bbd24ed86f08966433cec00f729ee07c
describe
'36177' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCMQ' 'sip-files00184.pro'
47a418741dd19b1ced5fd8006a53a10f
970a8b69d1de2c69e117b73a156fc08a8c1677ba
describe
'25797' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCMR' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
964cc9c05ed2959a4d57704acb3678b9
8d4cee7423d9c9ce27f1b6d39752c85483fc85b1
describe
'4175872' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCMS' 'sip-files00184.tif'
241a98f3ad8415a44a883cf417a2e303
e7a6c7ef2b0de581d14a2dcbfe62fc49696a3752
describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCMT' 'sip-files00184.txt'
070466322c1b06d6807b00e5a74ef469
d8d27682a5980843daa57cc304451f10ff43de82
describe
'6569' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCMU' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
0d76b03c45d8085527186cfe1344d35b
0d5079a47913f11a61c96eb37fee5bb98692ae8d
'2011-11-14T17:03:00-05:00'
describe
'246550' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCMV' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
e256dc2b68b0e2a67534977dfb9d44f6
801cfac6038f5842cc3e0e545d2f5b547ef11170
describe
'35019' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCMW' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
94e1bad754403fc295e360c48be5ea3c
6a44dd99b894a4bd4448fbcafd2e25825f74dc52
describe
'11796' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCMX' 'sip-files00185.pro'
9f41093e424952af6a1ca033c17e1182
f0ec368f51628ce9d1536c107d2316dd817e7372
describe
'10814' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCMY' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
4aa9852a0bfeffda315aac61253ae702
0f8583c53bfe026d8ccc3a3422e7f3e1e02684a8
describe
'3902404' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCMZ' 'sip-files00185.tif'
e0427db02c68d2612b1e284992855037
e0abcd5e1cf4982449e1444cfbde6d890c7d1609
describe
'491' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCNA' 'sip-files00185.txt'
4db936989d5c34d7258f0b858d5dfcaf
1f08eb243ad21e731ec3e2f952a89a9c272197b4
describe
'3084' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCNB' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
3958e1d43e9857d701e45b6a66acfc2d
f4a5e51f5d5cad4f8c2e91ac224c1f2afc353052
describe
'536286' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCNC' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
fffa4588a8e60e4223c1cc17337543da
d9b0685b571d1b441d9b7672d1e94c03d34255d3
describe
'67799' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCND' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
d3d47d62a78128be2fbd0b1367dc58f1
dfeee92b695823446a962d4c67e4bfd9591527c9
describe
'29865' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCNE' 'sip-files00186.pro'
45806367af1610e2fcf837941a2daea2
90864cfd6838ca56f607e2fc4b5e81e200ec515c
'2011-11-14T17:05:14-05:00'
describe
'21712' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCNF' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
ad92acfe0f137a54dd6d4183d931a72c
af7cffd487bf2253b341544fc5ec83a5ce6974be
describe
'4302056' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCNG' 'sip-files00186.tif'
6c484f4b58f0a3aa08a8cf0744a18488
899b8b099dc12db69f9afd583e39fe1e2d878a5e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCNH' 'sip-files00186.txt'
15d313294dfc7868823e966271992d6e
1370d0ce41868768ae152f57960e729d2635e22e
describe
'5526' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCNI' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
fcab768e826c83fb3357c72618590012
9c503cf5c9f63cf11fae19283dfd77e96708a54a
describe
'516873' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCNJ' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
3d1db0a4573a5664b206791c588dc4dc
d918befda58b10f9d9e95d69fa77f43fc3ff7b87
describe
'77946' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCNK' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
f0a3344b1a6c06c0c12acd60f86532e2
30e90b7e76dd4cf26bae7e1dff426c7c92b5a4ae
describe
'37799' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCNL' 'sip-files00187.pro'
ce098a850b11a9aa30b627d26bb6df6b
39764f187084c3687e84aef62712456250e3cb1a
describe
'27731' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCNM' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
484ec2c024ba705d1ba3be5a5b165874
1bd021ed77b151d1ac7d125b157064d6dc3f69a3
describe
'4147192' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCNN' 'sip-files00187.tif'
5fa85730e98c3be40aeaba9f61130d48
c36b17a8b871b464369b2297bd4ca6348913ce08
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCNO' 'sip-files00187.txt'
8eb95c9823fdf593b0ea10f90cf4dfe7
75769348dd9be119f76c74153928df502b5a3499
describe
'6851' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCNP' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
48fd9706573db125b03ecde222fa4707
3c62c682122e97e0d44bb74e21f2be0c43bd9d30
describe
'519603' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCNQ' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
2fd48723cc200b4bec552fddd92a8f8d
c167380afdf4e990a4311656f97ba95f3e5cd8cc
describe
'77728' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCNR' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
37d89df0c8125256e782440ee1aaa4bb
b7bd7db57c6d3bb42c29c5e0be56deaf2601c8df
describe
'30728' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCNS' 'sip-files00188.pro'
b4fbded27fad2fe402606db1ec2ddbdc
dfe34d22f916b0319cbf054194edca86459f09b5
describe
'25297' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCNT' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
7bd0ad2486eb91558eab21e7b664b6ff
c4773f684627160deff7eca8b38e26ea1e83208b
describe
'4168800' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCNU' 'sip-files00188.tif'
7a30eafca2a990b8a1dc4fe01e4fe614
baf23aaceb7ac87ae1c001a7107c5e68b50ce1d6
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCNV' 'sip-files00188.txt'
4aec43369482613f1fdb4bd74b62e354
c3256420450419e66d79b71f909985ef2c477214
describe
'6228' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCNW' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
ad3b452c3dd3e41b7313650b25e42ee5
efb0cd2561aad9138a61f13155cfdadcdc20139a
describe
'536830' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCNX' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
d939feb7bc34ad01a40a7c5ffe2d5408
b09c8e529cfe7eba23f0c329dcc6d29ac826e76f
describe
'86664' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCNY' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
1f803c4427389117c951d06f9e1d5812
605f02ecb5e01704cef0dc59c6c1e7c71d7c56a4
describe
'37676' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCNZ' 'sip-files00189.pro'
c9087acbeeea1546f1ef1a4ca8897ecc
a51b6d11a4e91d11ce33512cd966f85e1a3fc6da
describe
'27936' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCOA' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
8182cfc083f2ce1e2b57b1d51da7cdd5
e0965dabe37c017e54db6ad3b4aedc79bcc27785
describe
'4307320' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCOB' 'sip-files00189.tif'
7f5d7e0065b7071cadbee9c26e540fdf
e7e8dee6e136b0acd1d7593627d81f26e88d32b8
describe
'1508' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCOC' 'sip-files00189.txt'
9194622a8f08a39b2d31008e8a7404a0
aaceb3da80ca3b3ab6a1e663a0029e0cbee11392
describe
'6837' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCOD' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
7235f1c28bd6845a8add4cc738971eb9
c6ac6ea6857bfa0b85cc2976f65a1710ae276a26
describe
'512154' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCOE' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
fd97094771e87e877b64292d115e153e
f281c623eb68d5808085bc7079d01fe9ea144720
describe
'82111' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCOF' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
b7852c3ac3bc949f8b1dff02dc8eb83c
bc80b564b6ada241348ca42b017d1c6bf21660ba
describe
'35082' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCOG' 'sip-files00190.pro'
ad3ac8fb1393f2a191b6d2d6c7e58727
4432ea038fc59c73d5a27c06d8f0d777925ac52d
describe
'25624' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCOH' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
cfa0b77ba6960c874bd3f72d9110aafe
0c3c3add55f4e6dd69e17ef07e153c35b3bf7373
describe
'4109208' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCOI' 'sip-files00190.tif'
350de3194c3fa6a1fa85a6df477d901e
a34bdc904d75a3dd694628a06d63b0dfdc8455e8
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCOJ' 'sip-files00190.txt'
57c8dd1ad5e1bd604b9f350572dba2e6
b22a08b9d9d3d7cd27eb894168931318f7ab3aa0
describe
'6433' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCOK' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
9a162bf89e14871c144d9e65945e34dd
6d7cc0fc17441467495d080fb2d079637f33fb5b
describe
'526911' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCOL' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
2d316bbfca83eec901e2a60c0e8f4cc4
12219437e3194d377fe0310e02adb5bad55a4392
describe
'80450' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCOM' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
0ad8c7080c3045a33354ce5aef69867e
3d57710370f124bfa213fedee94a665bd4be4412
describe
'34353' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCON' 'sip-files00191.pro'
22e0eb25dde9f968e89ad91465c6c16e
10727c460f7715c2b00e156ba1eff196460270ee
describe
'26229' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCOO' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
662f8f41bccedfeff8f617f600c9de52
54e56d0086cd9d226d09f392d75481ee1274b2ba
describe
'4227084' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCOP' 'sip-files00191.tif'
92fa6194f74b981c29c1301568b7fbb2
d0d2e9492c1eacb5087968184cea58dae42b7acc
describe
'1391' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCOQ' 'sip-files00191.txt'
26194fc1e1817c86730cf3a3d9f0f585
1b1fdf04e5bd32ab6a62526b3d64b5c8bc6d21d4
describe
'6360' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCOR' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
a8b2a7049a734fdb0552b4f26bc7ec11
3399d78c6488d05b74bceb978670bcc941685922
describe
'520489' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCOS' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
f1d9b66c5e6288ef7a05bf5469d3896c
5e94164c15e47d18bfff9430d0309aea3c60b23b
describe
'87291' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCOT' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
8a6ead0b072e4532e2912ee5f9bc04f5
ef462b4fd395310a4da3dea32115c19abdef6b47
describe
'38111' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCOU' 'sip-files00192.pro'
d969d82b33a79d2f93feeb304cda3989
d2a035aeca3bf9f389c7e270f0fc357d4779a145
describe
'28584' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCOV' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
32ed0f916009524bc45433ef9ed24ed6
a2b20e28c758e5682701b03868a343f4ce16171a
describe
'4176496' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCOW' 'sip-files00192.tif'
a92a9502862898346a8c613d3c0d7cc5
ab321cb1680f9aec9d7fcd4850c2a1f755cd118b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCOX' 'sip-files00192.txt'
a40f899b67a9b946f046c9500049bf92
70c8afd125a1e2d1a5ef76beed7c728af2425ab8
describe
'6889' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCOY' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
7c0c7147845be47498216cd90bff191d
e6a5f078d892823dd2ae70d0bb404535bf8c50bc
describe
'538261' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCOZ' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
bf81a294cd92116d76f7e2f5cedb3008
8e7e67a212e2935f3a90bd899be466f600d7662b
describe
'139086' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPA' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
cb2be8bbc10c8a5c96b86b743b5ad7fb
064a122a73bea199f13529ca9868954baab15a44
describe
'4091' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPB' 'sip-files00193.pro'
34dbde95a1463998d66e197333822f86
257314b29610495eea3f7d33eecec024dc57a06d
describe
'34922' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPC' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
506a5d414cd9a1f422b1ba1c09191bb5
f84777a0f599a0f6e1e26cabcda7489a478334e1
describe
'4320888' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPD' 'sip-files00193.tif'
b4ddd5cd39ef5a5026668d5b6d5394ea
ca22e11146bc816211eb31374616f2e15e10fd38
describe
'226' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPE' 'sip-files00193.txt'
2408be17c5e0d978dff03fee36301058
9d1e222de1287176298c8ac0bd0a7934534d81ef
describe
'8782' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPF' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
2f467c718b058ff5527afb31fd14b3e6
47fada43bae8a782fdf0f708adaecc30094f2a30
describe
'10891' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPG' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
6159832842849f6b8258897a3ba65a1e
374028fb3484a41b0bcd4c4fbf07cec06b29ee17
describe
'7048' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPH' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
b2da2b46951522ca74dae84a2cf65351
412b986fb0e1d790ae41a1a883a6cab99057e729
describe
'2112' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPI' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
2c67c8db7c93a6b8b968b6c053c88bc9
7739093c3e6112396a5cce57000941a864613c56
describe
'4080372' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPJ' 'sip-files00194.tif'
cdf6c951f3d1d6689ac6a75c042f1a9f
d3600e1a7f01865220296edaf670cc519ac8a442
'2011-11-14T17:06:49-05:00'
describe
'793' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPK' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
12b923a6c80e8e5c69c052b2fb6880d2
58d5e7f3a528331ae38712b2a1c8f238dd87cf74
describe
'522130' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPL' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
f6b4590cf27cb7e839faab8fec2ec6a5
544d40133427fd35ffcb1c5a1a3216e41d065eda
describe
'88545' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPM' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
88bc5fa1f3fd8a95283ea97ded665797
a00c3608ee91df45e8fa208e2476b850d2a5dd03
describe
'38480' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPN' 'sip-files00195.pro'
fd225fb1c213498f1383200fbe5fae77
2e589bb3c65d4f0104955b55bd7da5c8aec6b2e1
describe
'28122' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPO' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
96db4fe8f5df705462db4c123e80b915
f6cea02694c27e4f00e471579564f3dbbc1c48ae
describe
'4189356' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPP' 'sip-files00195.tif'
ca8f6265e230e9a04020d8eaa4dde2d1
081c65b0ab29b7b3b98f43244bf7d6fc052f0d9c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPQ' 'sip-files00195.txt'
629998a51465414efc89bfbcf59d51fe
6892cf8979db362ae92a26f103822e5f7b1e9e52
describe
'6417' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPR' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
13ca437cfae4b9b5e6f80c8ee8cfc400
51df93fb4359f380e244a8850d727e3453dee935
describe
'537391' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPS' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
c59e5c8b0b287ad3612fb542234886cb
81374c3d3e3e05b7091b9b4c02f4e9c132c3edb4
describe
'81217' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPT' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
af830afd5485454c0a9732488a9dd151
95b7c85047b00839ee108d22c1eb0da4ed4a177d
describe
'36658' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPU' 'sip-files00196.pro'
661f39a8e49b56007124e894f3b57486
22b6fe56de7bf2cefddfdcc8154fad17a313369b
describe
'26118' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPV' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
c691dd18d75397caafd0f3b24ab8b526
08d4378bd8e9bc0959e9687a0e4b2ba846d7b7e0
describe
'4310976' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPW' 'sip-files00196.tif'
d614628b111bf4a87962ceca36b92e8d
ae87048402bb3aa293d6324cb8093df4b38a8d4d
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPX' 'sip-files00196.txt'
b4d5a05d1e45fcb44ce033e9fae84745
4372da5b650dd62502867a92b60a10fa59865f2f
describe
'6272' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPY' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
8e3b1bef57bf6d749eca964caedd8f2d
058f74d39448c90a82702327cac1e7582573b3ed
describe
'521160' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCPZ' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
53c23291b91ee185f8649ec93a546854
7bc3067c17dc7059bed7982af5134faab0fb7ea9
describe
'64547' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQA' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
6a55e05b5d479f5e32ba374f0206ba95
c861338375069e9475101046d3986a4aa5bb1ba6
describe
'28053' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQB' 'sip-files00197.pro'
ade6027dd38619c7d2e191172ff4343d
f7eaf9fc46f83e6db9952c0dbbee8c8d10636f5f
describe
'20571' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQC' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
bb85c5fe2c1f5966746ddb415eda0d41
842b3c5516ebe0bab7bef512c5f0d92930f3a16f
describe
'4181248' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQD' 'sip-files00197.tif'
c3f23859bf396d0ed60d152135916e86
7ab9e7249c185cc93847c843d87c8b0a9c138b99
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQE' 'sip-files00197.txt'
3598964900c37c1f7e353a6aefec79ec
c2b3ee8a964ad090a5f68c43d008fc733c399ead
describe
'5128' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQF' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
44cfd11f25233f60d7b7936d72cb98cd
2bd3e93a1c3ba7b48abe784d8a6e9447317381aa
describe
'501660' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQG' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
18a053ca8bc30e551d3208ade5284a2c
047ce298717de9121bcb8cd54e76f607148c48fc
describe
'83434' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQH' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
39911fad0ae0c4728b652b983efcde74
cc98ad070040036d05a1c05330586a7945efd731
describe
'34096' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQI' 'sip-files00198.pro'
db79fe93872253239b4cedf833cd4a2c
7073d49bede7771454367b9d5df90fb4f801368b
describe
'27848' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQJ' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
bdbf20617f5f385becbb6c555f956cd7
5708ea846d27dc5b2f894f48aaf79b490fb39e7d
describe
'4025696' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQK' 'sip-files00198.tif'
60b036b9e3427eeb50cc209ebddd0f22
e1371dc362e9d9b3d0a850a799e0408c216beee7
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQL' 'sip-files00198.txt'
24bd3f020386c76faa0566ae619ce76a
fdcb898d3546df1d3bdb7cd7b244c2e5cf83aa6d
describe
'6544' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQM' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
5ec76c1000236e0f7e84f0e2026c9052
53a19894ef4de7eadd22f6eb1edf81064024c7e3
describe
'499556' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQN' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
371583687ecf5a4fc65630eca943f08a
c463e4965bb5e907529ec385d598b9cb0ef0e8cb
describe
'94093' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQO' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
8ffa3aa7154fda0d83574f3e4c434105
7b160673d11fb3a24e3f362b17f1988fc3af1fc9
describe
'39493' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQP' 'sip-files00199.pro'
7d7d5b54889e2f9337a411f63ffc484f
fef7ca54c379a304452156e24cad297c5d65dd46
describe
'30076' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQQ' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
668e99e2234ef7e62dca435f953c11f3
f22bc6be1bbc2f416005800f07e20398fb548e01
describe
'4009116' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQR' 'sip-files00199.tif'
752498d672e6db3a9c57561f63852605
0b2625ade5753833b5cbfbf083ee35e9d475f7f5
describe
'1572' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQS' 'sip-files00199.txt'
7964921db16f1a3a34205712ba6cd5f6
dab17b6729b4e694ddc465ace063dbf73e1fbe4a
describe
'7321' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQT' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
30019a8c50dc212f606112ba5791dd25
ac932b6f86af2febb33e98971a858ed486f763c7
describe
'536579' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQU' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
c7d80511e9e3b3b806985a7f1146ef18
604356e5961065eeb54a11e8461dc6bbb007e80c
describe
'87300' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQV' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
bd7bfb94de37acb01e9d1f9b5a459bf7
c1bbb1eee5362411caa0126734a16e48375b8030
describe
'38420' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQW' 'sip-files00200.pro'
a6712a42ccd922a1ba2bfb67ce9d2474
47df40a88848131d735745548c509d7704a55343
describe
'28820' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQX' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
d65feaa4323b11e37c81695812be5b8d
6bd1d3058171cdeab798781b4098692f6741f783
describe
'4304884' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQY' 'sip-files00200.tif'
d41b49cbbfeb96ef5516f41080a782d7
04ae66f6fa3b09fcaf0ff60e385d6ee6c3cc3f0b
describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCQZ' 'sip-files00200.txt'
f7cc5d47a576019f63b7a7d689ee78ba
3c4672196110b594e267f2cce45b1c0e0be0b836
describe
'7118' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRA' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
f6a387ce65e7c8d9779bb5ebece9962a
4bf38bb6354e6b7aaca2a9c9e39dc4d540640447
describe
'521396' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRB' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
981f162b545d52fd356608459612efdb
3d406ab70eef8cb93100df4a50c4e3987dec3259
describe
'88462' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRC' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
3322dbf25888dc54fefb7a84930093d3
12e18acf5abfab567515984cb2b1f84e1793e0be
describe
'36551' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRD' 'sip-files00201.pro'
36318d3e206972ead33164c1c0814197
da3682e7523d6c0d207c427fc8801160815cfc47
describe
'26995' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRE' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
37925817b5413a69d00fa7a564360ad5
22d838290fbbdadc8c77c63a2f27c871ae48543c
describe
'4183172' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRF' 'sip-files00201.tif'
ca9f8bbb9f91f1b004949cfe105b5d66
1ca5b165a33540991156561b54fafce03015b2c2
describe
'1440' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRG' 'sip-files00201.txt'
131853ad6b00b3dbd9e16b009a495d49
a40c0d9b0270bc61ed2b55d31b18b23f1298febc
describe
'6390' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRH' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
c0dc66b9dc75ee0689a94b59927b1847
4a9cd6dfee72a88eec15e5d24c22e9c9bee49f63
describe
'528532' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRI' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
e824f11f7865d7c2a9a5daf38b56bbfe
bcd100ba3eeb2d9ce5633e475c746415302cdc2c
'2011-11-14T17:05:22-05:00'
describe
'90438' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRJ' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
1c561fdc54f300c15b1aac31b0ba7686
b43feccb4858aa9dc034a6f66bdb9c06028183fc
describe
'35904' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRK' 'sip-files00202.pro'
1c209b07b1500c7c9b5fbdbfcd23ab59
74eaab90633d22ddf48a622266210541d2836540
describe
'28768' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRL' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
3216f1dc847ddf2893c6d5db5d3f586e
29f4a7293be34fa8b6e6861ef8b7ef8f76fa0238
describe
'4240460' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRM' 'sip-files00202.tif'
34c0804bed51f7ccfd87c9542ec8b709
3a9c9680178c8d930812a2755362574e38a67e87
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRN' 'sip-files00202.txt'
fac74462ba7a7e83ae25e263ee2dc9cc
5390b7b18530deaf7d3517d7dc14634495edaa87
describe
'6897' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRO' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
e368d5eeb3bcc502143164aed2db47cd
0894b91d2e77a202cab7db3250808af656e205e2
describe
'541938' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRP' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
d4aadb66a59a4ff017798fdf3e09ab4f
a81354a1562f1d1112af5c17318f430ae2483569
describe
'81386' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRQ' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
5afd71eb01f80cfcfbb31f7747b2d92c
2015e6f015027b64cb72561b78fa0bc4352a3f4d
describe
'34347' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRR' 'sip-files00203.pro'
f712e3bb8f8bf51734f4c9effb6ccd4f
e41266eff9b3060df04bc06242857e67bed5be45
describe
'26373' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRS' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
9559fd4bf42523e2048d4c875103e6ca
185f06328390705b3e8e36040156c6d6d863c36e
describe
'4347872' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRT' 'sip-files00203.tif'
84c2376a984175b25a5256215b6e996e
4089ccc93a86ed9833f8b8f59ae8396502a48c45
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRU' 'sip-files00203.txt'
c95a192ce00261625276e7794a54344b
69761f284114f3a112083dd6dfeeb1bd50a29a17
describe
'6545' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRV' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
96456a34409870872a3f1f87b83ac620
eaeae3050410ee6a6c2d3aa2133ad1ce436a8f7e
describe
'545446' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRW' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
1b79640589e7cbe7225f2b07cc3b1629
ddbd974e6c0cf6586a56d7a0387b77d4d976c769
describe
'84954' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRX' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
1ac3bf70a53fea36622b07ba5e899a7f
45b1ad913e7efdebfc2def9953a4d3dc8919b8da
describe
'37817' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRY' 'sip-files00204.pro'
efbfd85c5771865b2442a865dd80e9ad
97e71ee069eed935cf896c3c29ef9f42a52de197
describe
'27411' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCRZ' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
6a2f2bd8bbd3ec4c587e1f1e6dda54e1
7de7c0d6c620b19d9829fe18380ce8dfcb261a70
describe
'4376404' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCSA' 'sip-files00204.tif'
aecb90d53cfe1bf25bd71d969ccb9886
3a5190094adbb5ec286291e45de7091026d3b21f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCSB' 'sip-files00204.txt'
9efad2574101f3ae69aa99a5dd0d8995
98c8a61efc4f463fb43ad348fc1f27f7ad403239
describe
'6549' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCSC' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
c6f2a79f2191f54d3622d4464512a3d3
d01a5c949f18719e33f41b10367ae725b43b67d8
describe
'416770' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCSD' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
998ef5687af436813d82410517ece781
26e53db5286ed8fa3866d4a4f0e7fcb5c0ee9ffd
describe
'50659' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCSE' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
5199e5cbf8388d3004967ebbcc1e74bc
bc557de2bc322dcd2e558f699f407f6c4ba226cc
describe
'20789' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCSF' 'sip-files00205.pro'
fc912136e3c6fd35ba5150905af1c6d4
deccaa35f2e5490ba9edbd2ea1d09c72dd69844f
describe
'16938' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCSG' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
09896ba389e28f4e3d292cc70fd195d5
8b9bf2b320668bfbee58c9edf30872891b639feb
describe
'4281008' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCSH' 'sip-files00205.tif'
1452eab925bb68e6e67083720aa390d0
931564fa5ea36a71d1bed6fdcbb88dec23e43276
describe
'819' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCSI' 'sip-files00205.txt'
2cd37117bd4fc78b5245f715c234575f
d169995e207b669e6f50e8b4ee73cb9dece061f2
describe
'4206' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCSJ' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
d018b4ea7d2b64389c1d56aef82248bb
b465388a95747e70421c6e3f16f2dfe961e0f8c7
describe
'14135' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCSK' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
ecc5052e3e5e0b1b418aad99debb59bd
a7881250b4a2d9e7cd99016ef06092edd810e7a0
describe
'6895' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCSL' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
0ea66b8c28d40e265f8d0ae0587b13c8
1468fc7ca8da8aa4e612a5ab58fe1c478a0d349c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCSM' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
07f6dd24bb21cf4c4f8904c65e8fb407
c3de6f0ee15cd9050d896d17303c5bb9cd63d1c9
describe
'4218204' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCSN' 'sip-files00206.tif'
195e25d97d8058c7269c03763e5b65ca
7d944d07ac7825b3218bd118b8623566c34b0fea
describe
'786' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCSO' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
eba3fbc38424988842f85f863c91ac4d
c590cb049577e2f2a1b9f0671c5824901328fb29
describe
'572489' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCSP' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
8c22cb78bba8fcc0ceb3f3632cfcb46f
8b20ecc8befc05d41ec0c365427f1bbf0e00c4b8
describe
'108370' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCSQ' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
b0f54bbfa7344a2b6d4ab02b7daf3a1a
ba7b9378b09a2157fbade145c7e24c0d7a2c33b0
describe
'67214' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCSR' 'sip-files00207.pro'
69d57e646ff2386442c06ce158432c47
645b8c305c06c71c690b8f215ddde0f3f007e3ea
describe
'29250' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCSS' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
daf1ec6f8a845c93e6aa75f56875c932
fcd5e3e2c0a124516e90c49aa97b78c37df4d184
'2011-11-14T17:03:02-05:00'
describe
'4593880' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCST' 'sip-files00207.tif'
508848a1f0e8646016cfcefc81f34475
a4c3af14c0cf077aed62198fee47bb8ba543e331
describe
'3241' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCSU' 'sip-files00207.txt'
49aeeee2b7a154b432e9bf35f77ce920
659fb667ab1b7e6995b6752ce82c183db8ef6f75
describe
'7550' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCSV' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
e23dc3c690657faef772a2cc0b97b289
b7e74fdb9fc64752e25aab0dd16326b240aa3907
describe
'582983' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCSW' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
eefbc2e659c41d008915b1d0646b605a
1279ae43b76d350d8ef3a8244a5aa4e98d6d70cb
describe
'100664' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCSX' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
d10e48e1bf4d95ec45cc7f00e01f9852
4037415d1eafda882b90ec2ac2ff1a5653dea213
describe
'50155' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCSY' 'sip-files00208.pro'
85df98661cd5c12e5d5a2f5a14903c80
732611e40bd269dca38cbbb75392bb7745b9f900
describe
'26925' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCSZ' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
b6ae80be59d81bded207b006476f20f6
6894b9574df087bfbc8e2a8b6dd0d0c20d2b9cc4
describe
'4677236' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTA' 'sip-files00208.tif'
1b626bc5e7539843aca1e19fa81bcd67
255901cb686d168ad6a4f5ef5ecf1682ea8be084
describe
'2404' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTB' 'sip-files00208.txt'
ae86f15ee01ae042c80d9de1db54ea37
9f92ad46b387df09ac034ee4da2f14d2fdee418e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTC' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
580ca82364be8b44678fee3ecfe07ed8
d2df662abbfd1870d39b8972b1e142a7eb88bfa5
describe
'537292' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTD' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
3cafd778e0426d1d793567444f050fd1
d89c36951aa6ded2622c709f41b4b60f269fbc86
describe
'94768' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTE' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
189864fd38fd59c3edc5dcd8cde3d940
e826f1a8cbdebffea8733a7bceceddb99a75a407
describe
'56125' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTF' 'sip-files00209.pro'
dc83d0d3a57a8cbd9b1d766b910f2213
5e64b34bb5998c5b139ecd86e0f78f4ae26d4ead
describe
'27596' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTG' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
b90d065e22912e0638bf08ee6a1330b6
6688c563f8cff36c5d21926ea35c6f7204019b5b
describe
'4311160' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTH' 'sip-files00209.tif'
2aaa225d59f966028e27674de3778587
b2132f2330a57baa4e79435105768ee667390298
describe
'2590' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTI' 'sip-files00209.txt'
4b7e6db362ec04174c7b298e105ae349
138ab0d1a638d98f292f0cbdf8895e5827b80dbb
describe
'6879' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTJ' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
30891d673a17f2c94ec7494a45c002c7
0bf0a92d5d1c8a077455b55f8df49a58db3e826e
describe
'568415' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTK' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
673446c72a22cb0f3e84fb2ee8acec57
bce7afb9ce965393eaddca6230f21aa7b9909cf2
describe
'119645' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTL' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
9586a6464d510a9e6d3d8e0bcbca805e
b83e780010ff6b4684b029d431287dacc389d87a
describe
'86293' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTM' 'sip-files00210.pro'
64cc4472ce74dd89054f0953bc10ee9e
a8c7fa18b923f6de1486f9105a221e2d7e96e67b
describe
'33607' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTN' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
d4d810e5abc7767f749b2fd3d83cf4f3
92aaaf75da68a838ae2bf2ec0ed87dd5fbed8862
describe
'4560456' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTO' 'sip-files00210.tif'
ad09cc1eca394965fdec08b86224bc67
f02a6f72083e889451e03737c1860dbcf7d111cb
describe
'4058' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTP' 'sip-files00210.txt'
95a60394d9684a52dc529781e3ffc8d6
eab4f75904e284196000fc02ec2b8a7c956b68db
describe
'7874' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTQ' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
e014c2ad6a1cefdcc6e7d7d3db8aae9b
6b4d1bb4769de798696316d46b390dff999ede52
describe
'524401' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTR' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
6ec319b394d90e3d2f7084b98f8e3d1f
8e21f32f2d2d6b6fb553bd88695553267e0bd6ec
describe
'109853' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTS' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
7a506d7778ca925749a025bf37dce98e
1d141af299419b27611478299ff5c99a460ba83e
describe
'78688' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTT' 'sip-files00211.pro'
154570357067dc03712051c178ea8acc
6e7f08c93a897b50e2fcff735535ccc08b03e495
describe
'29636' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTU' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
93a72866880999b0fb59ebba1218c8f8
59d5991fed4864ca431ae9380ff348726272274a
describe
'4208092' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTV' 'sip-files00211.tif'
473030abe371017f89144166b528b730
2907be8e8bd5b1dd21809c0c9732e32b112ce686
describe
'3686' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTW' 'sip-files00211.txt'
8860f9749c6dd6e40255ffdb5d957bb2
bc22c31d939dfbf47f46172e2b6967badd382090
describe
'7491' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTX' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
6a973ec7f462f7070504ba5a7e66bf88
6c21b036af30e9927c46c95331067e9bfa18d09e
describe
'553157' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTY' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
14a768231d248563793c339bbd7f340e
5307cdb8386369c4db1990455eab5885296c2ef6
describe
'77859' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCTZ' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
20e013557d17a0c1805356df20c46e82
75b7a3eae8b798565a0ed463aa662c94d5556b58
describe
'62938' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUA' 'sip-files00212.pro'
c8a7c2eff7355d5f5e6ecb4063978ec5
d408b0cbf58bde0096ed878a92f1bf0540345603
describe
'21654' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUB' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
cacd7ebf1b10f887be64441cfac122ab
356c07a544a1158d95c1bab33ad3679f787bb28b
describe
'4437260' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUC' 'sip-files00212.tif'
504c196041331b381513ac93bd0c0885
d10f508afdef763af735cc9d1115504842766282
describe
'2672' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUD' 'sip-files00212.txt'
8f6b69b87e6e693c7b80845670be75fb
af80b118ad9116f07678cfb655f1404c53f46673
describe
'5925' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUE' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
0640aa2f64cddb88e576bec8fac7125d
066f22f91b86bb45831bbb0d61e9d1eee8ee1822
describe
'549492' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUF' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
dfa9da6ea80d99ab5c7032ab824d3184
e319f12b05b2740279f29a64cdd65ef02ed013d9
describe
'99069' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUG' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
410ac27f38f6ca912daa27fc0853ba67
9f32d544a5bccb1e7e38d988f408800b643fdeb6
describe
'52464' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUH' 'sip-files00213.pro'
8e65b6ffe35dbc57bf363ee35028f772
5a69b4cac8179a6a025754228c0ccc6ee74537ce
describe
'28887' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUI' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
0f5754d30368f13d44271e4a9c6d7590
a9cd17fd411b9a6180717574ef58eb9fc1788530
describe
'4409280' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUJ' 'sip-files00213.tif'
e6644fcc757e5584e48e03e0967686a0
3da3d7fd8ef4812250335bed6d6aeaa385f20931
describe
'2902' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUK' 'sip-files00213.txt'
f23c8f23167b98b28318f9ebfc5f98df
0c01af8d127c2bc23874ec5fa24b5050a3a56562
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUL' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
2aa03bab49328a9e58b801038a3e1c54
3f4adbd829130059654d7cf5798bc15c00d011b7
describe
'555004' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUM' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
9beb11c03a35faf0f081b87b53afa814
9d513922e4310797f0e8890925106813e41245b5
describe
'93752' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUN' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
0e71eb54ed115fab7c81567d69e9e31b
c53a84f299b19627da8c2c2962ddb77b45a6efa6
describe
'64428' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUO' 'sip-files00214.pro'
7fe9af6b11b322f397800ad326c69abe
a363ce2b537c02877f8ebe1ca4e0d59bc60bd410
describe
'26321' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUP' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
37e6e17ec3f9f3a3b7e2a4cfcffdf80b
36032e9632c737fe1aa17ad9e581226ee9fa5be8
describe
'4452664' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUQ' 'sip-files00214.tif'
c72c51ec72a0575c714ffc77c51507b5
1ce0af884435e77ae0d4bb2321fb14cb42f1a18e
describe
'2863' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUR' 'sip-files00214.txt'
beb2237ca6ebcadc46baef0c625bb7d9
5dda1783d655ca609567340dcc593a9c7aeee58d
describe
'7191' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUS' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
78dd1c7e730d8bb945978b5e2568aaa6
b5c75e7259954534913f313d4be0407a7452f267
describe
'553713' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUT' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
b103a61562e9b58e11a8fa1f306d080d
5dff429806dfa5258e090244a88ac7f2149c437d
describe
'104236' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUU' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
9bd9f69fff15aaa079db4409333825fc
07052a232968e14f426d1221d28114f6171aedab
describe
'63425' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUV' 'sip-files00215.pro'
91e13daae6ddae7c515e9915c520031b
5310542b72a4202a2537f5c481b28bc5988cc6e3
describe
'29527' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUW' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
f1febc6d5f47f0724d94a486ddbc56c5
c4b220a456d84564b7242acc274ea0136bf32495
describe
'4442412' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUX' 'sip-files00215.tif'
fa97b20d1bc74b2c6c03bb8bbe89d1eb
ce0cb49084c134df7e1808798ca823115bc9bcb3
describe
'3340' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUY' 'sip-files00215.txt'
14751a4254e9cbdc9a9f4f0fe4570457
a1a9d8c977fae91d58b763870e222cb815be0c7f
describe
'7193' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCUZ' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
0c2373574cfa9d128b1e56d4547bcbf3
b88ceff77eeeae69bc80f24e6391e5efbdfba6a5
describe
'562763' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVA' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
1566877a17afd73a3d5841526ead3122
95e839a38368031c9c1ce255018df8d87b61b2db
describe
'105742' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVB' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
1da0fe01ee772a00d76accb0266b16bc
992d5e59ae8decd263678c5327a44821b9d0f2a5
describe
'61228' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVC' 'sip-files00216.pro'
6785a876934ecce1326d80881468c7b1
08e1a8b27478080eed52d1cadd51f378587539a1
describe
'28016' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVD' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
9ccae9ab2b3aec0b123dbaebbd22c913
edb009d2c15ae0fa124f01f41926a7f6dcba397e
describe
'4515160' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVE' 'sip-files00216.tif'
61b70fd509909723b2733e5914044ffb
87237355897991c2485b2e1e2329cb0dd8bbfc92
describe
'3103' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVF' 'sip-files00216.txt'
06692160db11f7969da8e27e2ae8a438
ad99549536c133d882de4a5d48477f41a1626c1d
describe
'7301' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVG' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
153297132fccaaecc67638f067b15495
5088080a1917496b2c78a3d4fd23f79823025b1f
describe
'544646' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVH' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
7bbff1dd215cc36c037ed54aad2e8889
4b99e2ad10fc934af08c9f8bb9399d22f3aa1012
describe
'109054' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVI' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
5925ba3f335be5f035590ea542d35fea
58214b6b1871206118a3081023c8082df9cd290e
describe
'65828' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVJ' 'sip-files00217.pro'
293493426424ebe34a1b73e43fbdf697
597e19a7608c81320405af08fb44855a5af5c53a
describe
'30631' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVK' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
c4f02f9bf1d17dfb21b2f11d62e9ffb8
a6c810de42206892844b82db7b3ad1246b4f09d1
describe
'4370040' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVL' 'sip-files00217.tif'
5758da52b2ca9e57eb6e6a6d19141594
7c6a65dc08233c1589372d24bba074f5e0416227
describe
'3126' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVM' 'sip-files00217.txt'
5c006888daa016ac2b70aeb948d71807
75341a9bdaaf02efe40390b76ad428cbfe207fdb
describe
'7872' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVN' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
37d2ab9c540b8340a116a1cef5a3a123
6214dd1c4a98703b124a9db81ea2b93cd58495e3
describe
'563956' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVO' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
e9ed6c2dc242f7ab042efc66ec7d92f9
b57ac78b16e08176d5405eb2caaff9d1b82da45d
describe
'97158' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVP' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
6195b36ed0b5b191a3c15ca22f786e6e
f98dd43a29b915f4c1c278ffa0eaff91a59f7abd
describe
'68718' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVQ' 'sip-files00218.pro'
101bda8a0b33708ee3d3c92a393f30bd
3f918042173ccce6693ea19e2f4f8797d45e8958
describe
'27489' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVR' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
6b935a7e83b9cab6b50fb9f6202b4ed4
0bcf1a265ec82a05b669c1990e2863eb48793e68
describe
'4524464' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVS' 'sip-files00218.tif'
9d32b8318ef5fca85a577df639fe7ced
5d4386f679dae71f7081496a16e5c7e5f25f86a2
describe
'3252' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVT' 'sip-files00218.txt'
7f9485181518ab19996f06cb2286588f
b745ff8074269858894bcaeff5104ce7ab714ff8
describe
'7170' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVU' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
9a7d96381a23a45bca41a4adc9623341
5a1c1778268ce89f492fcea1cf2173c060aa0664
describe
'558539' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVV' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
0616b7c5bb708c29099b48c2a907030e
9359a1ba8aeca5acc4a912bea86931beffc39599
describe
'111961' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVW' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
0231b03cd2c51fcf7bf454230f419061
010b09b86f7e55d6137dc01cf3b461f0189f28a5
describe
'53051' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVX' 'sip-files00219.pro'
580672d727c071ad2200c185c1cf361c
48d2768688627a8cf4683b4929434fc8be279ae0
describe
'31764' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVY' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
434b7ae39c52951e06675a95d5966e40
6323e23d0a1f2770f173b6e6181ebf9dc69eba3a
describe
'4481504' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCVZ' 'sip-files00219.tif'
bd4adb03306704f63b8f16ea86494865
7f651299d23d8f2db11a9911ca933ca4e3bacbfe
describe
'2750' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWA' 'sip-files00219.txt'
d8b5b45fc3f3f08c84820a34bc6cee0e
d17cf0e8cb7c0f3f07fdb9d50cddc196faf09807
describe
'7623' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWB' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
15c10828f426d294cc614d6f1f1b166b
4757e4b1acf202a1787fee46e814194c8f6e14c1
describe
'551132' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWC' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
76ae2c89153d6a1d54344ae41c94afac
c0bd3c79f8ef469525b91a784454d1bb9a7eecaa
describe
'102597' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWD' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
bb407336178eb491263f3d4eac219b0a
7110bdace6801543acec89ac9783eafdfcd5c5ce
describe
'60370' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWE' 'sip-files00220.pro'
690221193023e66bdc2fce1bd1f76d9b
de69735ad8a17ee63503dd5cd6b6a63233f77ee1
describe
'28844' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWF' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
71cf3f5f3f4dd1ba8e45abaa1f736440
50a7ed6f29b4457ec08abdca047af6c6806bc3ba
describe
'4423812' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWG' 'sip-files00220.tif'
343aec615428110e015b491336015b26
ec5e34ef01ee3826470358576532efd8bd7921fd
describe
'3563' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWH' 'sip-files00220.txt'
c450ff9cbe02570ee1cdca864d269514
958ac15aae9ae4fb4a47b289ba2683b16fbc3e70
describe
'7296' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWI' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
770ac1bacaa8fbc32c4b9b1ad45002a6
1c2725cd6eb135c8432106e8b54c3d32bf92f695
describe
'558240' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWJ' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
0049dc82945e672cc19a23e876609264
20f19d5f37b03c3b50d6ef2e513ed98489f64b19
describe
'107195' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWK' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
b1b11e9cbbf373cbbd3c46bea533c5be
bf39d28ce76d994f39cc2bc3b1aa9b3d594699d4
describe
'50700' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWL' 'sip-files00221.pro'
2c27a33a3ad846ad8970bc3bd501c470
042a94e6ec5e86b8e87f28c5d611ed631688832c
describe
'28580' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWM' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
349e81dc7da2fdaf59f09b0a4c11dac5
99ab386e43a346d4e6ecd4404763c2bf4dbf383e
describe
'4478908' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWN' 'sip-files00221.tif'
7b6a04338f06d38c2ccbee981b73bacf
5298bfdda1e73490ea9495be128aaa89325d922b
describe
'2761' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWO' 'sip-files00221.txt'
7d8146472881b85a5e972394182f7210
4a8b933e529b1962799ed5c0baeec2b58d78d950
describe
'7229' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWP' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
3bf1845dbdd5ee09818cd16604b5ac80
8d15a8f52afba2159faff57bb51ffd46007654c1
describe
'524460' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWQ' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
704dafe1c8c5f77608b12d0f77ab7d37
2df530e383db7c0c33683caa8eb01acc9daa78c9
describe
'109830' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWR' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
8c971eb46ad25ca23f449a15d5e5b67f
eed1d2baab2bbae30b4c669ae521e27cf2855aa4
describe
'63079' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWS' 'sip-files00222.pro'
54238ead21576abdaa59f0952a7152e2
6b3ae2d88ea0039303825379f3af471ea665d02a
describe
'31543' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWT' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
1b19a4c11b0a96a65f2271a40617ff60
81179ea9517adb356a1db3f53330ffdfe85e541a
describe
'4209532' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWU' 'sip-files00222.tif'
851ee25d2b004d7287570e5671adcc96
4113b8d5f6b4460288bb8fc3a563e3b3a227fba9
describe
'3174' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWV' 'sip-files00222.txt'
edb4b8327bbbd7143238d3b05bd22563
af85050e927f30c6e8ab8c0b42c270820a65369a
describe
Invalid character
'7909' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWW' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
775adca1fb298fc591d6b6595841b6af
fce3b8e8913d28adaae47a5b1acbcb596af5ce5e
describe
'620203' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWX' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
835390659871ff609b11ef3eb60f41b3
c786b32cca6cd49dd3dabbdbc9f8ac30acc7243a
describe
'24575' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWY' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
f6df70703187287ef976c03f2c0c5555
187cd4faeef44619230e5d27aea53595da6b8c7c
describe
'7188' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCWZ' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
180c1a6285f617ebd895165efc0c8f0d
f972abc6b334ee90d707366ff891117e56eefdbd
describe
'14893312' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCXA' 'sip-files00225.tif'
d7891a9723cab1a13230c2e6346a090f
4da440719eb5e0359fb9dacd0eaa5ea7d8189ec6
describe
'2649' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCXB' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
8f7304ba8abf9f260fe9ab3aa135daa3
c76741f49e71e7f311c3a1b4bb7534d5281b9659
describe
'599662' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCXC' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
b688beb5c6c2368255f62731e68e1ba1
88cae2d645c8027c00591ac02518436cb2566b9c
describe
'46391' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCXD' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
65394b95e847180967aad802fffc2e72
f77d5c6bd08359710eea8f580f26073405a0fb80
describe
'9362' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCXE' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
fbeeed58299016a8abb30369c2f61bbb
a29b9876996687e8fed648b4540a8761e429857c
describe
'14400776' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCXF' 'sip-files00226.tif'
4b9a7f1a48f762e9502a5290ece54fcf
5b6ab3b7af93434b8543f7003c0b83d713f882db
describe
'2499' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCXG' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
6a72072d5b582156bc1ad4db357cce0e
273d32897a497d4c12d20c976ea19753b79fb3d2
describe
'117868' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCXH' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
2e938b5fbc2189d49d84c51fb7aba0c5
d3457663374a609b9a13eedaf616c5bcf199a749
describe
'29831' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCXI' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
40a9e96f435a2af3cfb5d7061b01d938
ab9666c9d5f26721d040cac96d29ef4ee019d359
describe
'480' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCXJ' 'sip-files00227.pro'
46d9d53206f5f7dc061edd75f4f0fe7c
2cacbbd4a22aaf679a47db7a066d703f8f6164f8
describe
'8346' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCXK' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
4c4e51d03f30ddb30bb7965a74fd1b8a
512b22c74c4fe9819c0613b6e97ecb54b7e59636
describe
'2841352' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCXL' 'sip-files00227.tif'
08e2ddce9fbf75a8bb850a833cb7a496
9a188110c7ef108ea8b43447d6e96cc9b6c9bbdb
describe
'21' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCXM' 'sip-files00227.txt'
c49865a2823f02e03776e72dc836f2b4
27f1055ea1adf670bb75de385f8ae58cbc187b9f
describe
'3517' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCXN' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
6fec51caad1c3479225e3cb4449c5c84
3b1d860bf192718eaeab21cb92f03c3d306b5f62
describe
'96' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCXO' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
f017790a1aaaf6c0dc4326ce668c04c9
f92cd95618775c41512e0bc5aac078e354d4cb9f
describe
'364607' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCXP' 'sip-filesUF00083786_00001.mets'
1e9ea13d2cd14e34a08b1668cb1d9e96
13398812b85f0d1df0b1684332b0b869749e0fdb
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-16T13:42:55-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'472385' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFCfileF20080809_AABCXS' 'sip-filesUF00083786_00001.xml'
ecd6a1b5a5d47d14263674a1b73bd0cb
6319ad72f0eaf77b2f3f40cf43ba535abfe5f0ea
describe
'2013-12-16T13:42:51-05:00'
xml resolution