Citation
Two little pilgrims' progress

Material Information

Title:
Two little pilgrims' progress a story of the city beautiful
Alternate title:
Story of the city beautiful
Creator:
Burnett, Frances Hodgson, 1849-1924
Macbeth, Robert W ( Robert Walker ), 1848-1910 ( Illustrator )
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Morrison and Gibb ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Frederick Warne and Co., Bedford Street, Strand
Manufacturer:
Morrison and Gibb Ltd.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
215 p., [4] leaves of plates : ill. ; 21 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Aunts -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Altruism -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Consolation -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Orphans -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Farm life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Twins -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Runaway children -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1895
Genre:
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Osborne Coll.,
General Note:
Date from Osborne, cited below.
General Note:
Half-title.
General Note:
Frontispiece has guard-sheet.
General Note:
Includes table of contents; list of illustrations.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Frances Hodgson Burnett ; with illustrations by R.W. Macbeth.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026612847 ( ALEPH )
ALG3288 ( NOTIS )
20546958 ( OCLC )

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Full Text












eect el Ko abe” ee ci eae iam





oy Edun GS).





The Baldwin Library

University
RAD ot
Florida














‘*© Fairy stories DO happen!” she said. ‘Oh! just think how like

9

a fairy king you are.



TWO LITTLE
PILGRIMS PROGRESS

H Story of the City Beautiful

BY

FRANCES HODGSON BURNETT
AUTHOR OF
“LITTLE LORD FAUNTLEROY" ‘*THAT LASS O' LOWRIF’S” “THE CAPTAIN’S YOUNGEST ”
ETC. ETC.

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY R, W. MACBETH, A.R.A.



LONDON
FREDERICK WARNE AND CO.
BEDFORD STREET, STRAND

1895

[All Rights Reserved|



COPYRIGHT

ENTERED AT STATIONERS’ HALL



CHAP.

I

Il.
Ill.

IV,

VI.

Vil.

VIIL.

IX.

XI,
XII.

XIII.

CONTENTS

—t

THERE 7S A CITY BEAUTIFUL . . . .
THE BOTTOM OF THE HILL OF DIFFICULTY .
THE FIRST STEP UP . . ‘ : ‘
A STEP HIGHER . : ‘ .

HUMAN BEINGS CAN DO ANYTHING THEY SET

THEIR MINDS TO . .
“BURDENS DON’T FALL OFF BY THEMSELVES ”

HAND IN HAND THEY WENT OUT ON THE

ROAD TOGETHER . . . . .
“AND WE ARE PEOPLE TOO”

IT IS THE DAY! . . : . .
MORE PILGRIMS ARE COME TO TOWN. .
THE THING THAT THINKS - . . .

“WELL—/szar!”

EVERYBODY IN THE WORLD HAS SOMETHING

TO GIVE. . . : ' . .

103
113

124



CHAP.

XIV.

XV.

XVI.

XVII.

XVIII.

XIX.

XX.

CoNTENTS

BEN

JOHN HOLT

THE BEGINNING OF A FAIRY STORY

THE FAIRY STORY CONTINUED

ENTER AUNT MATILDA

THE BIG HOUSE WOULD SEEM EMPTY NO MORE

IT WON’T VANISH AWAY.

PAGE

145

163

173

184

194



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

BY

R. W. MACBETH, A.R.A.

“ PAIRY STORIES DO HAPPEN!” SHE SAID. ‘OH!
JUST THINK HOW LIKE A FAIRY KING YOU

ARE” . ; . . . . . Lrontispiece
PAGE
SHE HEARD ROBIN HURRYING UP THE LADDER 70 face 20
“HOW OLD WERE YOU WHEN YOU BEGAN TO
WORK?” . ; : . . . . dd
MEG LOOKED RATHER LIKE A LITTLE WITCH AS
SHE STOOD OVER THE BUBBLING OLD POT 78
‘Ik YOU LEAN AGAINST ME, ROB,” SHE SAID,
“IT WILL BE SOFTER” . . . . 95
SHE... PRESENTLY BROUGHT BACK TWO GOOD
CUPS OF HOT COFFEE . : . to face 108
“MEG! MEG! WE ARE THERE!” 115
“THOSE PEOPLE HAVE PLENTY TO EAT”. 132
‘“HAVE YOU A ROOM WHERE MY SISTER COULD
SLEEP?” . : . . . . . 141
“c ” “c , ie + 1» 6
NOW,” SAID MEG, “OPEN THEM—SUDDENLY !” @o face 157
“LOOK HERE,” HE SAID, “YOURE TIRED”, 168
“DON’T YOU THINK YOU KNOW WHAT SHE
WAS LIKE?” , . . . . 211

7






TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

CHAPTER I

THERE IS A CITY BEAUTIFUL



; HE sun had set and the shadows were
§ deepening in the big barn. The last
red glow—the very last bit which
reached the corner the children called
the Straw Parlour—had died away, and Meg drew
her knees up higher so as to bring the pages of her
book nearer to her eyes as the twilight deepened
and it became harder to read. It was her bitterest
grievance that this was what always happened when
she became most interested and excited—the light
began to fade away, and the shadows to fill all the
corners and close in about her.

She frowned as it happened now—a fierce little
frown, which knitted her childish, black brows, as she

pored over her book devouring the page with the
2



10 Two Lirrte Pinegris’ PRocGREss



determination to seize on as much as was possible. It
was like running a desperate race with the darkness.

She was a determined child, and no one could have
failed to guess as much who could have watched her
for a few moments as she sat on her curious perch,
her cheeks supported by her hands, her shock of
straight black hair tumbled over her forehead.

The Straw Parlour was the top of a straw stack in
Aunt Matilda’s barn. Robin had discovered it one
day by climbing a ladder which had been left leaning
against the stack, and when he had found himself on
the top of it he had been enchanted by the feeling it
gave him of being so high above the world, and had
called Meg up to share it with him.

She had been even more enchanted than he.

They both hated the world down below—Aunt
Matilda’s world, which seemed hideous and exaspera-
ting and sordid to them in its contrast to the world
they had lived in before their father and mother had
died and they had been sent to their sole relation,
who did not want them, and only took them in from
respect to public opinion. Three years they had been
with Aunt Matilda, and each week had seemed more
unpleasant than the last. Mrs. Matilda Jennings was
a renowned female farmer of Illinois, and she was far,

too energetic a manager and business woman to have



Two Lirrte Pinertms’ Progress 11

time to spend with children. She had an enormous
farm, and managed it herself with a success and
ability which made her celebrated in agricultural
papers. If she had not given her dead brother's
children a home they would have starved, or been
sent to the poorhouse. Accordingly, she gave them
food to eat and beds to sleep in, but she scarcely ever
had time to notice them. If she had had time to talk
to them, she had nothing to say. She cared for
nothing but crops and new threshing-machines and
fertilisers; and they knew nothing about such things.

“She never says anything but ‘Go to bed,’ ‘ Keep
out of the way. She’s not like a woman at all,” Meg
commented once; “she’s like a man in woman’s
clothes.”

Their father had been rather like a woman in man’s
clothes. He was a gentle, little, slender man, with a
large head. He had always been poor, and Mrs.
Matilda Jennings had regarded him as a contemptible
failure. He had had no faculty for business or farm-
ing. He had taught school and married a school-
teacher. They had had a small house, but somehow
it had been as cosy as it was tiny. They had man-
aged to surround themselves with an atmosphere of
books by buying the cheap ones they could afford, and

borrowing the expensive ones from friends and circu-



12 Two Litrte Pinarims’ PRoGRESS

lating libraries. The twins—Meg and Robin—had
heard stories and read books all the first years of
their lives as they sat in their little seats by the small,
warm fireside. In Aunt Matilda’s bare, cold house
there was not a book to be seen. A few agricultural
papers were scattered about. Meals were hurried
over as necessary evils. The few people who appeared
on the scene were farmers who talked about agricul-
tural implements and the wheat market.

“It’s such a bare place,” Robin used to say, and he
would drive his hands into the depths of his pockets
and set his square little jaw, and stare before him.

Both the twins had that square little jaw. Neither
of them looked like their father and mother—except
that from their mother they inherited black hair.
Robin’s eyes were black, but Meg’s were grey with
thick black lashes. They were handsome little creat-
ures, but their shocks of straight black hair, their
straight black brows and square little jaws, made them
look curiously unlike other children. They both re-
membered one winter evening when, as they sat on their
seat by the fire, their father, after looking at them
with a half smile for a moment or so, began to laugh.

“Margaret,” he said to their mother, “do you know

who those two are like? You have heard me speak
of Matilda often enough.”



Two Lirrte Pinerims’ PRoGREsS 13



“Oh, Robert!” she exclaimed, “surely they are not
like Matilda.”

“Well, perhaps it is too much to say they are like
her,” he answered, “but there is something in their
faces that reminds me of her strongly. I don’t know
what it is exactly, but it is there. It is a good thing,
perhaps,” with a sad tone in his voice; “Matilda
always did what she made up her mind to do.
Matilda was a success. I was always a failure.”

“Oh no, Bob,” she said, “not a failure !”

She had put her hand on his shoulder, and he lifted
it and pressed it against his thin cheek.

“Wasn't I, Maggie?” he said gently. “Wasn't I ?
Well, I think these two will be like Matilda in mak-
ing up their minds and getting what they want.”

Before the winter was over, Robin and Meg were
orphans, and were with Aunt Matilda; and there they
had been ever since.

Until the day they found the Straw Parlour, it
had seemed as if no corner on the earth belonged to
them. Meg slept in a cot in a farm-servant’s room,
Robin shared a room with someone else. Nobody
took any notice of them.

“When anyone meets us,” Meg said, “they always
look surprised. Dogs which are not allowed in the
house are like us. The only difference is that they



14 Two Lirrte Piuerims’ PRroGcRess

don’t drive us out—but we are just as much in the
way.”

“T know,” said Robin, “if it wasn’t for you, Meg,
I should run away.”

“Where?” said Meg.

“Somewhere,” said Robin, setting his jaw; “Id find
a place.” .

“Tf it wasn’t for you,” said Meg, “I should be so
lonely that I should walk into the river. I wouldn’t
stand it.”

It is worth noticing that she did not say, “I could
not stand it.”

But after the day they found the Straw Parlour
they had an abiding-place. It was Meg who pre-
empted it before she had been on the top of the stack
five minutes. After she had stumbled around for a
while looking about her, she stopped short and looked
down into the barn.

“ Robin,” she said, “this is another world. We are
miles and miles away from Aunt Matilda. Let us
make this into our home—just yours and mine, and
live here.”

“We are in nobody’s way—nobody will ever know
where we are,” said Robin; “nobody ever asks, you
know. Meg, it will be just like our own. We will

live here.”



Two Lirrte Pinagrms’ Progress 15

And so they did. On fine days when they were
tired of playing, they climbed the ladder to rest
on the heaps of yellow straw; on wet days they
lay and told each other stories, or built caves, or read
their old favourite books over again. The stack was
a very high one, and the roof seemed like a sort of
big tent above their heads, and the barn floor a
wonderful, exaggeratedly long distance below. The
birds which had nests on the rafters became accustomed
to them, and one of the children’s chief entertainments
was to lie and watch the mothers and fathers carry
on their domestic arrangements, feeding their young
ones, and quarrelling a little sometimes about the way
to bring them up. The twins invented a weird little
ery with which they called each other if one was in
the Straw Parlour and the other one entered the barn,
to find out whether it was occupied or not. They
never mounted to the Straw Parlour or descended
from it if anyone was within sight. This was their
secret. They wanted to feel that it was very high
and far away from Aunt Matilda’s world, and if any-
one had known where they were, or had spoken
to them from below, the charm would have been
broken.

This afternoon, as Meg pored over her book, she was
waiting for Robin. He had been away all day. At



16 Two Lirrte Piteris’ PROGRESS



twelve years old Robin was not of a light mind.
When he had been only six years old he had had
serious plans. He had decided that he would be a
great inventor. He had also decided—a little later—
that he would not be poor like his father, but would
be very rich. He had begun by having a savings _
bank into which he put rigorously every penny that
was given to him. He had been so quaintly system-
atic about it that people were amused and gave him
pennies instead of candy and toys. He kept a little
banking-book of his own. If he had been stingy he
would have been a very unpleasant, little boy, but
he was only strict with himself. He was capable of
taking from his capital to do the gentlemanly thing
by Meg at Christmas.

“He has the spirit of the financier, that is all,” said
his father.

Since he had been with Aunt Matilda he had found
opportunities to earn a trifle now and then, On
the big place there were small troublesome duties the
farm hands found he could be relied on to do, which
they were willing to pay for. They found out that
he never failed them.

“Smart little chap,” they said. “Always up to
time when he undertakes a thing.”

To-day he had been steadily at work under the



Two LittLte Pincrtms’ Procress 17

head man. Aunt Matilda had no objection to his odd
jobs.

“He has his living to earn, and he may as well
begin,” she said.

So Meg had been alone since morning. She
had only one duty to perform and then she was free.
The first Spring they had been with Aunt Matilda
Robin had invested in a few chickens, and their
rigorous care of them had resulted in such success
that the chickens had become a sort of centre of
existence to them. They could always build any
dreams of the future upon the fortune to be gained
by chickens. You could calculate on bits of paper
about chickens and eggs until your head whirled at
the magnitude of your prospects. Meg’s duty was to
feed them and show them scrupulous attention when
Robin was away.

After she had attended to them she went to the barn
and, finding it empty, climbed up to the Straw Par-
lour with an old Pilgrim’s Progress to spend the day.

She was particularly fond of the Pilgrim’s Progress,
and she had made Rob fond of it. She used to read
it aloud to him as they lay on the straw. She was a
child with an imagination, and she used to invent new
adventures for Christian as he toiled up the Hill of

Difficulty. Robin thought her incidents more exciting
3



18 Two Litre Pinerts’ Progress

than John Bunyan’s. She had a realistic way of
relating them. But her great addition to the story was
her description of the City on the Hill, which she
always followed Christian into, and which she called the
City Beautiful. She had invented a City Beautiful
of her own, In it there were all the things she and
Robin wanted and all the joys they yearned for.
Their father and mother were there, and she and
Robin lived with them in a sort of fairy palace, which
it was her delight to add to the plan and contents of,
every time she told the story and they wanted a new
possession. It was so rapturous to be able to say—

“ And on one floor of the house there was a corner
room full of little machines and everything to work
them and mend them—and there were shelves and
shelves—full of books about inventions, and bottles of
chemicals—that was for you, Rob.”

“Electric motors?” Rob would put in eagerly.

“All kinds of motors,” she would answer with
deliberation—“all kinds. You could work anything
and have any number of horse-power you liked,
because there were new inventions there that have
not been made yet.”

When Robin was low-spirited she always described
this room and added to its contents. When he was

in a happier state of mind and the day was beautiful,



Two Lirrite Pinerims’ Procress 19







she would lead him through the streets of the City
Beautiful in a different mood—a dreamy sort of mood.
“There were tall trees covered with white lilies,”
she would say. “They were on each side of the
streets—and they swayed and the lilies swung like
great white bells—and the sweetness shook out of
them and was in all the air the people breathed, and
there was a strange golden light—like the light in
the morning—and the houses were as white as snow,
and had slender pillars and archways, and courts
with flowers and fountains. And you could see
lovely people in delicate, soft-floating robes—not all
white robes, but pale flower colours—and everybody
had a little smile, and a look as if their eyes were
stars.” She would dream on in this way sometimes
for a long time, and her own eyes would grow large
and sometimes shine so that Robin knew that in a
little while the brightness would fill them and brim
over and fall in two large splendid drops on to the
straw, which they would both pretend not to see.
This afternoon, when the light began to redden and
then to die away, she and Christian were very near
the gates. She longed so to go in with him, and
was yearning towards him with breathless eagerness,

when she heard Robin’s ery below coming up from
the barn floor.



20 Two Lirrte Prierims’ PRoGRESS

’ She sprang up with a start, feeling bewildered a
second, before she answered. The City Beautiful was
such millions—such millions of miles away from Aunt
Matilda’s barn. She found herself breathing quickly
and rubbing her eyes as she heard Robin hurrying up
the ladder.

Somehow she felt as if he was rather in a hurry,
and when his small, black shock head and wide-
awake, black eyes appeared above the straw, she hada
vague feeling that he was excited and that he had come
- from another world. He clambered on to the stack,
and made his way to her and threw himself full
length on the straw at her side.

“Meg!” he said. “Hello! you look as if you were
ina dream! Wake up! Jones and Jerry are coming
to the barn. I hurried to get here before them.
They’re talking about something I want you to hear—
something new! Wake up!”

“Oh, Robin!” said Meg, clutching her book and
coming back to earth with a sigh. “I don’t want to
hear Jones and Jerry. I don’t want to hear any of
the people down there; I’ve been reading the Pzl-
grim’s Progress, and I do wish—I do so wish there
was a City Beautiful.”

Robin gave a queer little laugh. He really was
excited.





‘She heard Robin hurrying up the ladder.’



Two LirrLte Pincrims’ PROGRESS 21

“There is going to be one,” he said. “Jones and
Jerry don’t really know it—but it is something like
that they are talking about—a City Beautiful—a real
one—on this earth, and only two hundred miles away.

Let’s get near the edge and listen.”



CHAPTER II

THE BOTTOM OF THE HILL OF
DIFFICULTY

‘HEY drew as near to the edge as they
could without being seen. Meg did

not understand in the least. Robin



was not given to practical jokes, but
what he had said sounded rather as if there was a
joke somewhere. But she saw Jones and Jerry enter
the barn, and saw before they entered that they were
deep in talk. It was Jones who was speaking. Jones
was Aunt Matilda’s head man, and was an authority
on many things.

“There’s been exhibitions and fairs all over the
world,” he was saying, “but there’s been nothing like
what this will be. It will be a City—that’s what it’ll
be—and all the world is going to be in it. They are
going to build it fronting on the water, and bank the
water up into lakes and canals, and build places like
white palaces beside them and decorate the grounds

with statues and palms and flowers and fountains, and
22



Two Lirrte Pinerims Proeress 93



_there’s not a country on earth that won’t send things

to fill the buildings, and there won’t be anything a
man can’t see by going through ’em. It'll be as good
as a college course to spend a week there.”

Meg drew a little closer to Robin on the straw.

“What are they talking about?” she whispered.

“ Listen,” said Rob.

Jerry, who was moving about at some work below,
gave a chuckling laugh.

“Trust ’em to do the biggest thing yet—or bust—
them Chicago people,” he said. “It’s got to be the
biggest thing—a Chicago Fair.”

“Tt’s not goin’ to be the Chicago Fair,” Jones said.
“They're not goin’ to put up with no such idea as
that! It’s the World’s Fair! They’re goin’ to ring in
_ the universe.”

“That’s Chicago out and out,” said Jerry. “ Buildin’s
twenty stories high, an’ the thermometer twenty-five
degrees below zero—an’ a World’s Fair—Christopher
Columbus! Id like to see it!”

“T bet Christopher Columbus would like to see it!”
said Jones. “It’s out of compliment to him they’re
getting it up—for discovering Chicago.”

“Well, I didn’t know he made his name that way
partic’lar,’ said Jerry. “Thought what he prided

hisself on was discoverin’ America.”



24. Two Lirrte Pitertms’ Progress

“Same thing,” said Jones, “same thing! Wouldn’t
have had much to blow about and have statues set up
and comic operas written about him if it had only
been America he’d discovered. Chicago does him full
justice, an’ she’s goin’ to give him a send-off that'll be
a credit to her.”

Robin smothered a little laugh in his coat sleeve.
He was quite used to hearing jokes about Chicago.
The people in the country round were enormously
proud of it, and its great schemes and great buildings
and multi-millionaires, but those who were given to
jokes had the habit of being jocular about it, just as
they had the habit of proclaiming and dwelling upon
its rush and wealth and enterprise. But Meg was not
a jocular person. She was too intense and easily
excited. She gave Robin an impatient nudge with her
elbow, not in reproof, but asa sort of irrepressible
ejaculation.

“I wish they wouldn’t be funny!” she exclaimed.
“T want them to tell more about it. I wish they’d
go on.”

But they did not go on—at least not in the way that
was satisfactory. They only remained in the barn a
short time longer, and they were busy with the work
they had come to do. Meg craned her neck and
listened, but they did not “tell more,” and she was



Two LirrLte Pitcrims’ PRoGRESS 25

glad when they went away, so that she could turn to
Robin.

“Don’t you know more than that?” she said. “Is
it true? What have you heard? Tell me yourself!”

“T’ve heard a lot to-day,” said Robin. “They were
all talking about it all the time, and I meant to tell
you myself, only I saw Jones and Jerry coming, and
thought perhaps we should hear something more if
we listened.”

They clambered over to the corner and made them-
selves comfortable. Robin lay on his back, but Meg
leaned on her elbows as usual, with her cheek resting
on her hands. Her black elf locks hung over her
forehead, and her big eyes shone.

“ Rob,” she said, “go on. What's the rest ?”

“The rest?” he said. “It would take a week to
tell it all, I should think. But it’s going to be the
most wonderful thing in the world. They are going
to build a place that will be like a white, beautiful
city on the borders of the lake—that was why I called
it the City Beautiful. It won’t be on the top of a
hill, of course.”

“But if it is on the edge of the lake, and the sun
shines and the big water is blue, and there are shining
white places, it will be better, I believe,” said Meg.
“What is going to be in the city?”

4



26 Two Lirrite Pinarms’ PRocREss

“Everything in the world,” said Robin. “Things
from everywhere—from every country.”

“There are a great many countries,” said Meg.
“You know how it is in the geography. Europe,
Asia, and Africa, as well as America, Spain and
Portugal, and France and England, and Norway and
Russia and Lapland, and India, and Italy and
Switzerland, and all the others.”

“There will be things, and people, brought from
them all. I heard them say so. They say there will
be villages with people walking about in them.”

“As they walk about when they are at home?”
exclaimed Meg.

“Yes, in the queer clothes they wear in their own
countries. There’s going to be an Esquimaux village.”

“With dogs and sledges?” cried Meg, lifting her
head.

“Yes, and you know that place in Italy, where the
streets are made of water ”—

“It’s Venice,” said Meg. “And they go about in
boats called gondolas ”—

“And the mca who take them about are called
gondoliers,” interrupted Robin. “And they have
scarves and red caps. There will be gondolas at the
Fair, and people can get into them and go about the
canals.”



Two Lirrte Pinerims’ PRocress 27



“Just as they do in Venice?” Meg gasped.

“Just as they do in Venice. And it will be the
same with all the other countries. It will be as if
they were all brought there—Spanish places and
Egyptian places and German places, and French and
Italian and Irish and Scotch and English, and all the
others.”

“To go there would be like travelling all over the
world,” cried Meg.

“Yes,” said Rob excitedly ; “and all the trades will
be there, and all the machines, and inventions, and
books, and statues, and scientific things, and wonder-
‘ful things, and everything anyone wants to learn
about in all the world!”

In his excitement his words had become so rapid
that they almost tumbled over each other, and he said
the last sentence ina rush. There were red spots on
his cheeks, and a queer look in his black eyes. He
had been listening to descriptions of this thing all
day. A new hand, hot from the excitement in
Chicago, had been among the workers. Apparently
he had heard of nothing else, thought of nothing else,
talked of nothing else, and dreamed of nothing else
but the World’s Fair for weeks. Finding himself
among people who had only bucolic and vague ideas
about it, he had poured forth all he knew, and, being



28 Two Lirrte Piterims’ PRoGREsS

a rather good talker, had aroused great excitement.
Robin had listened with eyes and ears wide open.
He was a young human being born so full of energy
and enterprise that the dull prosaic emptiness of his
life in Aunt Matilda’s world had been more horrible
than if he had been old enough to realise. He could
not have explained why it had seemed so maddening
to him, but the truth was that in his small boyish
body was imprisoned the force and ability which in
manhood build great schemes, and not only build but
carry them out. In him was imprisoned one of the
great business men, inventors or political powers of
the new century. But of this he knew nothing, and
so ate his young heart out in Aunt Matilda’s world,
sought refuge with Meg in the Straw Parlour, and was
bitterly miserable and at a loss.

How he had drunk in every word the man from
Chicago had uttered! How he had edged near to
him, and tried not to lose him for a moment, and had
hoarded up every sentence! If he had not been a
man in embryo, and a strong and clear - headed
creature, he would have done his work badly. But
he never did his work badly. He held on like a little
bull-dog, and thought of what Meg would say when
they sat in the straw together. Small wonder that
he looked excited when his black head appeared



Two Lirrte Pincrims’ Progress 29
above the edge of the straw. He was wrought up to
the highest pitch. Small wonder that there were
deep red spots on his cheeks, and that there was a
queer intense look in his eyes and about his obstinate
little mouth. He threw up his arms with a desperate
gesture.

“ Hverything,’ he said again, staring straight before
him, “that anyone could want to learn about—every-
thing in all the world.”

“Oh, Robin!” said Meg, in quite a fierce little
voice. “And we—we shall never see it!”

She saw Robin clench his hands though he said
nothing, and it made her clench her own hands.
Rob’s were rough, little, square-fingered fists, brown
and muscular. Meg’s hands were long - fingered,
flexible, and slender, but they made good little fists
when they doubled themselves up.

“ Rob,” she said, “we never see anything—we never
hear anything—we never learn anything. If some-
thing doesn’t happen, we shall be Nothings—that’s
what we shall be—Nothings.” And she struck her
fists upon the straw.

Rob’s jaw began to look very square, but he did
not speak.

“We are twelve years old,” Meg went on. “We've
been here three years, and we don’t know one thing



30 Two LirrLte Pincrims’ Progress



we didn’t know when we came here. If we had been
with father and mother, we should have been learning
things all the time. We haven’t one thing of our
own, Rob, but the chickens and the Straw Parlour,
and the Straw Parlour might be taken away from us.”

Rob’s square jaw relaxed just sufficiently to allow
of a grim little grin.

“We've got the Treasure, Meg,” he said.

Meg’s laugh had rather a hysterical sound. That
she should not have mentioned the Treasure among
their belongings was queer. They talked so much
about the Treasure. At this moment it was buried, in
an iron bank, deep in the straw, about four feet from
where they sat. It was the very bank Robin had
hoarded his savings in when he had begun at six
years old with pennies, and a ten cent blank-book to
keep his accounts in. Everything they had owned
since then had heen pushed or dropped into it; all
the chicken and egg money, and all Robin had earned
by doing odd jobs for anyone who would give him
one. Nobody knew about the old iron bank, any
more than they knew about the Straw Parlour, and
the children having buried it in the straw, called it
the Treasure. Meg’s stories about it were numerous
and wonderful. Magicians came and multiplied it a

hundredfold; sometimes robbers stole it, and they



Two Lirrite Pinerims’ ProGress 31

pursued them with wild adventure; but perhaps the
most satisfactory thing was to invent ways to spend
it when it had grown to enormous proportions.
Sometimes they bought a house in New York, and
lived there together; sometimes they travelled in
foreign lands with it; sometimes they bought land
which increased in value to such an extent that they
were millionaires in a month. Ah, it was a Treasure
indeed !

After the little, low, overstrained laugh, Meg folded
her arms on the straw, and hid her face in them.
Robin looked at her with a troubled air for about a
minute. Then he spoke to her.

“Tt’s no use doing that,” he said.

“It’s no use doing anything,” Meg answered, her
voice muffled in her arms. “I don’t want to do this
any more than you do. We're so lonely.”

“Yes, were lonely,” said Robin. “That’s a fact.”
And he stared up at the dark rafters above him, and
at some birds who were clinging to them and twitter-
ing about a nest.

“T said I wished there was a City Beautiful,” Meg
said; “but it seems to make it worse—that there ig
going to be something like it—so near—and then
that we should never get any nearer to it than two

hundred miles,”



32 Two LirrLte Pirarims’ PRoGcREss

Rob sat up and locked his hands together round
his knees.

“ How do you know ?” he said.

“How do I know?” cried Meg desperately, and she
lifted her head, turning her wet face sideways to look
at him. He unlocked his hands to give his forehead
a hard rub, as if he was trying either to rub some
thought out of or into it.

“Just because we are lonely there zs use in doing
things,” he said. “ There’s nobody to do them for us.
At anyrate, we’ve got as far on the way to the City
as the bottom of the Hill of Difficulty.”

And he gave his forehead another rub, and looked
straight before him; and Meg drew a little closer to
him in the straw, and the family of birds filled the

silence with domestic twitters.



CHAPTER III

THE FIRST STEP UP



ZURING the weeks that followed they
spent more time than ever in their
hiding-place. They had always been
in the habit of scrambling up to their
paloved refuge, when they could slip away there and
adjust their ladder, and have time to climb up when
there was no one about to see them. This was not
an easy thing when the kind of work was being done
which obliged the farm hands to pass in and out
of the barn or anywhere near it. They had realised
that it would not do for people to see the ladder too
often in one place and position, or to find it moving
itself from one point to another in a way not to be
at all explained by ordinary practical farm reasons.
Together they had discussed the matter with a great
deal of seriousness. It was indeed a serious affair.
Without the aid of the ladder their Straw Parlour
was an unattainable paradise, but to use it without

the exercise of proper precaution would betray them
5



34 Two Lirrrie Pinarts’ ProcReEss



to the enemy. They could not help regarding as an
enemy anyone who might come between them and
their fortress. So when they went to the barn they
first reconnoitred carefully, and then were particular
about mounting at different points. When they took
the ladder they noticed particularly the position it
occupied, and always returned it to exactly the same
place and arranged it at the same angle. But it was
not always possible to follow these precautions when
they were in the mood to desire to retire to seclusion.
And in these days they had so much to talk about
that the mood was upon them even more frequently
than it had ever been.

They had an absorbing topic of conversation. A
new and wonderful thing, better than their old books,
even better than the stories Meg made, when she lay
on the straw, her elbows supporting her, her cheeks
on her hands, and her black-lashed grey eyes staring
into space. Hers were always good stories, full of
palaces and knights and robber-chiefs and fairies,
but this new thing had the thrill of being a fairy
story which was real—so real that one could read
about it in the newspapers, and everybody was talking
about it, even Aunt Matilda, her neighbours, and the
work hands on the farm. To the two lonely children

in their high nest in the straw stack it seemed a



Two Lirrte Pinerms’ Progress 35

curious thing to hear these people in the world below
talk about it in their ordinary everyday way, with-
out excitement or awe—as if it was a new kind of
big ploughing or winnowing machine. To them it
was a thing so beautiful that they could scarcely find
the words to express their thoughts and dreams about
it, and yet they were never alone together without
trying to do so.

On wet cheerless days, in which they huddled close
together in their nest to keep from being chilled, it
was their comfort to try to imagine and paint pictures
of the various wonders, until in their interest they
forgot the dampness of the air and felt the unending
patter of the rain on the barn roof merely a pleasant
sort of accompaniment to the stories of their fancies.

Since the day when they had listened to Jones and
Jerry down there below them in the barn, Rob had
formed the habit of collecting every scrap of news-
paper relating to the wonder. He cut paragraphs out
of Aunt Matilda’s cast-aside newspapers; he begged
them from the farm hands and from the country
storekeeper. Anything in the form of an illustration
he held as a treasure beyond price, and hoarded it to
bring to Meg with exultant joy.

How they pored over these things, reading the

paragraphs again and again until they knew them



36 Two Lirtite Pinerims’ Procress



almost by heart. How they studied the pictures,
trying to gather the proportions and colour of every
column or dome or arch! What enthusiast living in
Chicago itself knew the marvel as they did, and so
dwelt on and revelled in its beauties! No one knew
of their pleasure—like the Straw Parlour, it was a
secret. The strangeness of their lives lay in the fact
that absolutely no one knew anything about them at
all—or asked anything, thinking it quite enough that
their friendlessness was supplied with enough animal
heat and nourishment to keep their bodies alive.

Of that other part of them—their restless, growing
young brains, and naturally craving hearts, which in
their own poor enough but still human little home
had at least been recognised and cared for—Aunt
Matilda knew nothing, and indeed had never given a
thought to. She had not undertaken the care of
intelligences and affections; her own were not of
an order to require supervision. She was too much
occupied with her five-hundred-acre farm and the
amazing things she was doing with it. That the
children could read and write and understand some
arithmetic she knew. She had learned no more
herself, and had found it enough to build her fortune
upon. She had never known what it was to feel

lonely and neglected, because she was a person quite



Two Lirrte Pincrims’ Progress 37



free from affections, and quite enough for herself.
She never suspected that others could suffer from a
weakness of which she knew nothing, because it had
never touched her.

If anyone had told her that these two children, who
ate their plentiful, rough meals at her table, among
field hands and servants, were neglected and lonely,
and that their own knowledge of it burned in their
childish minds, she would have thought the announce-
ment a piece of idle, sentimental folly ; but that there
was no solid detail of her farming a fact more real
than this one, was the grievous truth.

“When we were at home,” was Meg’s summing up
of the situation, “at least we belonged to somebody.
We were poor and wore our clothes a long time, and
had shabby shoes and couldn’t go on excursions; but
we had our own little bench by the fire, and father
and mother used to talk to us and let us read their
books and papers, and try to teach us things. I don’t
know what we were going to be when we grew up,
but we were going to do some sort of work, and know
as much as father and mother did. I don’t know
whether that was a great deal or not—but it was
something.”

“Tt was enough to teach school,” said Robin. “If

we were not so far out in the country now I believe



38 Two Litre Prnertms’ PRoGRESS

Aunt Matilda would let us go to school if we asked
her. It wouldn’t cost her anything if we went to the
public school.”

“She wouldn’t if we didn’t ask her,” said Meg.
“She would never think of it herself. Do you know
what I was thinking yesterday. I was looking at
the pigs in their sty. Some of them were eating, and ©
one was full and was lying down going to sleep.
And I said to myself, ‘Robin and I are just like you.
We live just like you. We eat our food and go to
bed, and get up again and eat some more food. We
don’t learn anything more than you do, and we are
not worth so much to anybody—we are not even
worth killing at Christmas.”

If they had never known any other life, or if Nature

had not given them the big, questioning eyes, and
square little jaws and strong nervous little fists, they
might have been content to sink into careless idleness
and apathy. No one was actively unkind to them—
they had their Straw Parlour and were free to amuse
themselves as they chose. But they had been made
of the material of which the world’s workers are built,
and their young hearts were full of a restlessness and
longing whose full significance they themselves did
not comprehend.

‘And the wonder working in the world beyond them,



Two Lirrte Pinerms’ Progress 39



—this huge, beautiful marvel, planned by the human
brain and carried out by mere human hands, this great
thing with which all the world seemed to them to be
throbbing, and which seemed to set no limit to itself
and prove that there was no limit to the power of
human wills and minds—this filled them with a
passion of restlessness and yearning greater than they
had ever known before.

“Tt is an enchanted thing, you know, Robin—it’s an
enchanted thing,” Meg said one day, looking up from
her study of some newspaper clippings and a magazine
with some pictures in it.

“Tt seems like it,” said Robin.

“Tm sure it’s enchanted,” Meg went on. “It scems
so tremendous that people should think they could do
such huge things—as if they felt as if they could do
anything or bring anything from anywhere in the
world! It almost frightens me sometimes, because it
reminds me of the Tower of Babel. Don’t you re-
member how the people got so proud that they thought
they could do anything—and they began to build
the tower that was to reach to heaven. And then
they all woke up one morning and found they
were all speaking different languages, and could not
understand each other. Suppose everybody was
suddenly struck like that some morning now—I.



40 Two Lirrite Pincgrims’ PRoGREss



mean the Fair people,” widening her eyes with a

little shiver. 7
“They won't be,” said Rob. “Those things have

stopped happening.” ,

«Yes, they have,” said Meg. “Sometimes I wish
they hadn’t. If they hadn’t—perhaps—perhaps if we
made burnt-offerings, we might be taken by a miracle
to see the World’s Fair.”

“We haven’t anything to burn,” said Rob rather
gloomily. ,

“We've got the chickens,” Meg answered as
gloomily, “but it wouldn’t do any good. Miracles
are over.”

“The world is all different,’ said Robin. “ You
have to do your miracle yourself.”

“Tt will be a miracle,” Meg said, “if we ever get
away from Aunt Matilda’s world, and live like people
instead of like pigs who are comfortable; and we
shall have to perform it ourselves.”

“There is no one else,’ said Robin. “You see there
is no one else in the world.”

He threw out his hand and clutched Meg’s, which
was lying on the straw near him. He did not know
why he clutched it; he did not in the least know why,
nor did she know why a quecr sound in his voice

suddenly made her feel their unfriendedness in a way



Two LirrLte Pinerims’ PRocress 41



that overwhelmed her. She found herself looking
at him with a hard lump rising in her throat. It was
one of the rainy days, and the hollow drumming and
patter of the big drops on the roof seemed somehow
to shut them in with their loneliness away from all
the world.

“Tt’s a strange thing,” she said, almost under her
breath, “to be two children—only just twelve years
old—and to be quite by ourselves in such a big world,
where there are such millions and millions of people
all busy doing things and making great plans, and
none of them knowing about us or caring what we
are going to do.”

“Tf we work our miracle ourselves,” said Rob, hold-
ing her hand quite tight, “it will be better than
having it worked for us. Meg!” as if he were begin-
ning a new subject, “Meg!”

“What?” she answered, still feeling the hard lump
in her throat.

“Do you think we are going to stay here always?”

“JT—oh, Robin, I don’t know.”

“Well, I do then. We are not—and that’s the
first step up the Hill of Difficulty.”



CHAPTER IV

A STEP HIGHER

in unison.. When they had been tiny
creatures they had played the same



games and used the same toys. It
had seemed of little importance that their belongings
were those of a boy and girl. When Robin had
played with tops and marbles, Meg had played with
them too. When Meg had been in a domestic and
maternal mood, and had turned to dolls and dolls’
housekeeping, Robin had assumed some masculine
role connected with the amusement. It had enter-
tained him as much at times to be the dolls’ doctor,
or the carpenter who repaired the dolls’ furniture, or
made plans for the enlargement of the dolls’ house,
as it had entertained Meg to sew the flags and dress
the sailors who manned his miniature ships, and assist
him with the tails of his kites. They had had few
playmates, and had pleased each other far better than

outsiders could have done.
42



Two Lirrte Pruarims’ Procress 43



“It’s because we are twins,’ Meg said. “Twins are
made alike, and so they like the same things. I’m
glad I'ma twin. IfI had to be born again and be
an un-twin, I’m sure I should be lonely.”

“T don’t think it matters whether you are a boy or
a girl if you are a twin,” said Robin, “you are a part
of the other one, and so it’s as if you were both.”

They had never had secrets from each other. They
had read the same books as they grew older, been
thrilled by the same stories, and shared in each other's
plans and imaginings or depressions. So it was a
curious thing that at this special time, when they were
drawn nearer to one another by an unusual interest
and sympathy, there should have arrived a morning
when each rose with a thought unshared by the other.

Aunt Matilda was very busy that day. She was
always busy, but this morning seemed more actively
occupied than usual. She never appeared to sit down
unless to dispose of a hurried meal or go over accounts.
She was a wonderful woman, and the twins knew that
the most objectionable thing they could do was not
to remove themselves after a repast was over. But
this morning Meg walked over to a chair and firmly
sat down in it and watched her as she vigorously
moved things about, rubbed dust off them and put them
into their right places. “



44 Two Litre Piterims’ Progress



Meg’s eyes were fixed on her very steadily. She

wondered if it was true that she and Robin were like





‘HOW OLD WERE You WHEN YOU BEGAN TO WORK?”

her, and if they would be more like her when they



Two Litre Pruerms’ Procress 45



had reached her age, and what would have happened
to them before that time came. It was true that
Aunt Matilda had a square jaw also. It was not an
encouraging thing to contemplate. In fact, as she
looked at her, Meg felt her heart begin a slow, steady
thumping. But as it thumped she was getting herself
in hand with such determination that when she at last
spoke her chin looked very square indeed, and her
black-lashed eyes were as nearly stern as a child’s
eyes can look.

“ Aunt Matilda,” she said suddenly.

“Well,” and a tablecloth was whisked off and
shaken.

“JT want to talk to you.”

“Talk in a hurry then—I’ve no time to waste in
tall.”

“ How old were you when you began to work and
make money ?”

Aunt Matilda smiled grimly.

“T worked out for my board when I was ten years
old,” she said. “Me and your father were left orphans
and we had to work—or starve. When I was twelve
I got a place to wash dishes and look after children
and run errands, and I got fifty cents a week, because

it was out in the country and girls wouldn't stay
there.”



46 Two Lirrite Pinerims’ Progress



“Do you know how old J am?” asked Meg.
“Tve forgotten.”

“T’m twelve years old.” She got up from her chair
and walked across the room and stood looking up at
Aunt Matilda. “Tm an orphan too, and so is Robin,”
she said, “and we have to work. You give us a place
to stay in, but—there are other things. We have no
one, and we have to do things ourselves. And we are
twelve—and twelve is a good age for people who have
to do things for themselves. Is there anything in this
house—or in the dairy—or on the farm—that would
be worth wages—that I could do? I don’t care how
hard it is, if I can do it.” ;

If Aunt Matilda had been a woman of sentiment,
she might have been moved by the odd, unchildish
tenseness and sternness of the little figure, and. the
straight, gazing eyes which looked up at her from
under the thick black hair tumbling in short locks
over the forehead. Twelve years old was very young
to stand and stare the world in the face with such
eyes. But she was not a woman of sentiment, and
her life had been spent among people who knew their
right to live could only be won by hard work, and
who began the fight early. So she looked at the
child without any emotion whatever.

“Do you suppose you could more than earn your



Two Litrte Pincrims’ Procress 47



board if I put you in the dairy and let you help
there?” she said.

“Yes,” answered. Meg unflinchingly. “I know I
could. I’m strong for my age, and I’ve watched them
doing things there. I can wash pans and bowls and
cloths, and carry things about, and go anywhere I’m
told. I know how clean things have to be kept.”

“ Well,” said Aunt Matilda, looking her over sharply,
“they have, been complaining about the work being
too much for them lately. You go in there this
morning and see what you can do. You shall have
fifty cents a week, if yowre worth it. You're right
about its being time that you should begin earning
something.”

“Thank you, ma’am,” said Meg, and she turned
round and walked away in the direction of the dairy,
with two deep red spots on her cheeks, and her heart
thumping again — though this time it thumped
quickly.

She reached the scene of action in the midst of a
rush of work, and after their first rather exasperated
surprise at so immature and inexperienced a creature
being supposed to be able to help them, the women
found plenty for her to do. She said so few words
and looked so little afraid that she made a sort of

impression on them.



48 Two Lirrte Prices’ PRoGREsS



“See,” she said to the head woman, “ Aunt Matilda
didn’t send me to do things that need teaching. Just
tell me the little things—it doesn’t matter what—and
Pll do them. I can.”

How she worked that morning—how she ran on
errands—how she carried this and that—how she
washed and scrubbed milk pans—and how all her
tasks were menial and apparently trivial though
entirely necessary, and how the activity and rapidity
and unceasingness of them tried her unaccustomed
young body, and finally made her limbs ache and her
back feel as if it might break at some unexpected
moment,—Meg never forgot. But such was the
desperation of her indomitable little spirit, and the
unconquerable will she had been born with, that when
it was over she was no more in the mood for giving
up than she had been when she walked in among the
workers after her interview with Aunt Matilda.

When dinner-time came she walked up to Mrs.
Macartney, the manager of the dairy work, and asked
her a question.

“ Have I helped you?” she said.

“Yes, you have,” said the woman, who was by no
means an ill-natured creature for a hard - driven
woman. “You’ve done first-rate.” .

“Will you tell Aunt Matilda that?” said Meg.



Two Lirrte Pinerims’ Progress 49

“Yes,” was the answer.

Meg was standing with her hands clasped tightly
behind her back, and she looked at Mrs. Macartney
very straight and hard from under her black brows.

“Mrs. Macartney,” she said, “if I’m worth it, Aunt
Matilda will give me fifty cents a week—and it’s time
I began to work for my living. Am I worth that
much ?”

“Yes, you are,” said Mrs. Macartney, “if you go
on as you've begun.”

“T shall go on as I’ve begun,” said Meg. “Thank
you, ma’am.” And she walked back to the house.

After dinner she waited to speak to Aunt Matilda
again.

“T went to the dairy,” she said.

“T know you did,” Aunt Matilda answered. “Mrs.
Macartney told me about it. You can go on. I'll give
you the fifty cents a week.”

She looked the child over again as she had done in
the morning, but with a shade of expression which
might have meant a touch of added interest. Perhaps
her mind paused just long enough to bring back to
her the time when she had been a worker at twelve
years old, and also had belonged to no one.

“She'll make her living,” she said, as she watched

Meg out of the room. “She’s more like me than she
7



50 Two Lirrite Pinerims’ PROGRESS



is like her father. Robert wasn’t worthless, but he
had no push.”

Having made quite sure that she was not wanted
in the dairy for the time being, Meg made her way to
the barn. She was glad to find it empty, so that she
could climb the ladder without waiting. When she
reached the top and clambered over the straw the
scent of it seemed delightful to her. It was like
something welcoming her home. She threw herself
down full length in the Straw Parlour. Robin had
not been at dinner. He had gone out early, and had
not returned. As she lay stretching her tired limbs
and staring up at the nest in the dark tent-like roof
above her, she hoped he would come. And he did.
In about ten minutes she heard the signal from the
barn floor, and answered it. Robin came up the ladder
rather slowly. When he made his way over the straw
to her corner and threw himself down beside her, she
saw that he was tired too. They talked a few minutes
about ordinary things, and then Meg thought she
would tell him about the dairy. But it appeared
that he had something to tell himself, and he began
first. .

“T’ve been making a plan, Meg,” he said.

“Have you?” said Meg. “ What is it?”

“Tve been thinking about it for two or three days,”



Two Lirtte Pinertms’ Progress 51



he went on; “but I thought I wouldn’t say anything
about it until—till I tried how it would work.”

Meg raised herself on her elbow and looked at him
curiously. It seemed so queer that he should have
had a plan too.

“Have you—tried ?” she said.

“Yes,” he answered. “I have been working for
Jones this morning, and I did quite a lot. I worked
hard. I wanted him to see what I could do. And
then—Meg, I asked him if he would take me on—like
the rest of the hands—and pay me what I was worth.”

“ And what did he say?” said Meg breathlessly.

“He looked at me a minute all over, and half
laughed, and I thought he was going to say I wasn’t
worth anything. It wouldn’t have been true, but I
thought he might because I’m only twelve years old.
It’s pretty hard to be only twelve when you want to
get work. But he didn’t; he said, ‘Well I’m darned
if I won’t give you a show. And I’m to have fifty
cents a week.”

“Robin!” Meg cried, with a gasp of excitement.
“So am I.”

“So are you?” cried Robin, and sat bolt upright.
“You!”

“Tt?s—it’s because we are twins,” said Meg, her eyes

shining like lamps. “I told you twins did things



52 Two Lirrte Pinerims’ PRoGcREss

alike, because they couldn’t help it. We have both
thought of the same thing. I went to Aunt Matilda,
asked her to let me work somewhere—and pay me—
and she let me go into the dairy and try. And Mrs.
Macartney said I was a help—and I am to have
fifty cents a week, if I go on as I've begun.”

Robin’s hand gave hers a clutch just as it had done
before—that day when he had not known why.

“Meg, I believe,” he said—*I believe that we two
will always go on as we begin—I believe we were born
that way. We have to. We can’t help it. And a
dollar a week—if they keep us, and we save it all—
could go—almost anywhere some time.”
_ Meg’s eyes were fixed on him with a searching but
half-frightened expression.

“ Almost anywhere,” she said quite in a whisper—
“anywhere not more than two hundred miles away.”



CHAPTER V

HUMAN BEINGS CAN DO ANYTHING THEY SET THEIR
MINDS TO

HEY did not tell each other of the
strange and bold thought which had
leaped up in their minds that day.



d Each felt an unwonted shyness about
it, —— because it had been in each mind, and,
hidden though it was, it remained furtively in both.

They went on exactly as they had begun. Each
morning Meg went to her drudgery in the dairy, and
Robin followed Jones whithersoever duty led. If the
older people had imagined they would get tired and
give up, they found out their mistake. That they
were often tired was true, but that in either there
arose once the thought of giving up—never! And
they worked hard. The things they did to earn their
weekly stipend would have touched the heart of a
mother of cared-for children; but on Mrs. Jennings’
model farm, people knew how much work a human

being could do when necessity drove. They were all
53



54 Two Lirrtu Pircrims’ ProGcress



driven by necessity, and it was nothing new to know
that muscles ached and feet swelled and burned. In
fact they knew no one who did not suffer as a rule
from these small inconveniences. And these children,
with their set little faces and mature intelligence,
were somehow so unsuggestive of the weakness and
limitations of childhood, that they were often given
work which was usually intrusted only to older
people. Mrs. Macartney found that Meg never
slighted anything, never failed in a task, and never
forgot one, so she gave her plenty to do. Scrubbing
and scouring that others were glad to shirk fell to
her share. She lifted and dragged things about that
grown-up girls grumbled over. What she lacked
in muscle and size, she made up in the indomitable
will-power that made her small face set itself, and
her small body become rigid as iron. Her work ended
by not confining itself to the dairy, but extended to
the house, the kitchen—anywhere where there were
tiresome things to be done.

With Robin it was the same story. Jones was not
afraid to give him any order. He was of use in all
quarters; in the huge fields, in the barn, in the
stables, and as a messenger to be trusted to trudge
any distance when transport was not available.

They both grew thin but sinewy looking, and their



Two Litrte Pirerms’ Progress 55

faces had a rather strained look. Their always
large, bright eyes seemed to grow bigger, and their
little square jaws looked more square every day; but
on Saturday nights they each were paid their fifty
cents, and climbed to the Straw Parlour and unburied
the Treasure, and added to it.

Those Saturday nights were wonderful things. To
the end of life they would never forget them. Through _
all the tired hours of labour they were looked forward
to. Then they lay in their nest of straw and talked
things over. There it seemed that they could relax
and rest their limbs as they could do it nowhere else,
Mrs. Jennings was not given to sofas and easy-chairs,
and it is not safe to change position often when one
has a grown-up bedfellow. But in the straw they
could loll at full length, curl up or stretch out just as
they pleased, and there they could enlarge upon the
one subject that filled their minds and fascinated and
enraptured them.

Who could wonder that it was so! The City
Beautiful was growing day by day, and the develop-
ment of its glories was the one thing they heard
talked of. Robin had continued his habit of collecting
every scrap of newspaper referring to it. He still
cut them out of Aunt Matilda’s old papers; he begged

them from everyone—neighbours, storekeepers, work



56 Two Litre Prnerims’ PRoGREsS

hands. When he was sent on errands he cast all-
embracing glances round every place his orders took
him to. The postmaster of the nearest village
discovered his weakness, and saved paragraphs and
whole papers for him. Before very long there was
buried near the Treasure a treasure even more
valuable of newspaper cuttings, and on the wonderful
Saturday nights they gave themselves up to revelling
in them.

How they watched it and followed it and lived
with it—this great human scheme, which somehow
seemed to their young minds more like the scheme
of giants and genii! How they seized upon every
new story of its wonders, and felt that there could
be no limit to them! They knew every purpose and
plan connected with it,—every arch and tower and
wall and stone they pleased themselves by fancying.
Newspapers were liberal with information. People
talked of it, they heard of it on every side. To them
it seemed that the whole world must be thinking of
nothing else.

“While we are lying here,” Meg said—* while you
are doing chores and I am scouring pans and scrubbing
things, it is all going on. People in France and in
England and in Italy are doing work to send to

it. Artists are painting pictures and machinery is



Two LirrLe Pincers’ PRoGREsS 57

whirring and making things—and everything is pour-
ing in to that one wonderful place. And men and
women planned it, you know—just men and women.
And if we live a few years we shall be men and
women; and they were once children like us—only—
if they had been quite like us, they would never
have known enough to do anything.”

“But when they were children like us,” said Robin,
“they did not know what they would have learned
by this time, and they never dreamed abcut this.”

“That shows how wonderful men and women are,”
said Meg. “I believe they can do anything, if they
set their minds to it”; and she said it stubbornly.

“Perhaps they can,” said Robin slowly. “Perhaps
we could do anything we set our minds to.”

There was the suggestive tone in his voice which
Meg had been thrilled by more than once before. She
had been thrilled by it most strongly when he had
‘said that if they saved their dollar a week they
might be able to go almost anywhere. Unconsciously
she responded to it now.

“Tf I could do anything I set my mind to,” she
said, “do you know what I would set my mind to
first ?”

“ What ?”

“T would set my mind to going to that wonderful
8



58 Two LirrLte Piterims’ PrRoaress

place. I would set it to seeing everything there—and
remembering all I could hold—and learning all there
was to be learned—and I would set at hard !”

“So would J,” said Robin.

It was a more suggestive voice than before he said
the words in, and suddenly he got up and went and
tore away the straw from the burying-place of the
Treasure. He took out the old iron bank and brought
it back to their corner.

He did it so suddenly and with such a determined
air that Meg rather lost her breath.

“What are you going to do with the Treasure?”
she asked.

“T am going to count it.”

“Why?”

He was opening the box, using the blade of a stout
pocket-knife as a screw-driver.

“A return ticket to Chicago costs $9.55,” he said.
“T asked at the depot. That would be $19.10 for two
people. Anyone who is careful can live on a very
little for a while. I want to see if we shall have
money enough to go.”

“To go?” Meg cried out. “Tothe Fair? Robin!”

She could not believe the evidence of her ears. It
sounded so daring.

“Nobody would take us!” she said, “Even if we



Two Lirrte Piterims’ Progress 59

had money enough to pay for ourselves —nobody
would take us.”

“Take!” answered Robin, working at his screws.
“No, nobody would. What’s the matter with taking
ourselves ?”

Meg sat up in the straw, conscious of a sort of
shock.

“To go by ourselves! like grown-up people! To

. buy our tickets ourselves and get on the train and go
all the way alone—and walk about the Fair alone!
Robin !”

“Who takes care of us here?” answered Robin.
“ Who has looked after us ever since father and mother
died? Ourselves! just ourselves! Whose business
are we but our own! Who thinks of us or asks if
we are happy or unhappy?”

“Nobody,” said Meg, and she hid her face in her
arms on her knees.

Robin went on stubbornly.

“Nobody is ever going to do it,” he said, “if we
live to be hundreds of years old. I’ve thought of it
when I’ve been working in the field with Jones, and

_ I’ve thought of it when I’ve been lying awake at
night. It’s kept me awake many and many a time.”

“So it has me,” said Meg.

“And since this thing began to be talked about



60 Two Lirrte Piterims’ Progress



everywhere I’ve thought of it more and more,” said
Rob. “It means more to people like us than it does
to anyone else. It’s the people who never see things,
and who have no chances, it means the most to. And
the more I think of it the more I—I won't let it go
by me.” And all at once he threw himself face down-
ward on the straw and hid his face in his arms.

Meg lifted hers. There was something in the
woeful desperation of his movement that struck her
to the heart. She had never known him do such a
thing in their lives before. That was not his way.
Whatsoever hard thing had happened — howsoever
lonely and desolate they had felt, he had never shown
his feelings this way. She put out her hand and
touched his shoulder.

“Robin,” she said—“ Oh, Robin !”

“T don’t care,” he said from the refuge of his
sleeves; “we are little when we are compared with
grown-up people. They would call us children—and
children usually have someone to help them—tell them
what to do. I’m only like this because I’ve been
thinking so much—and working so hard—and it
does seem like an enchanted city; but no one ever
thinks we could care about it any more than if we
were cats and dogs. It was not like that at home,
even if we were poor.” Then he sat up with as little



Two Lirrte Pincers’ Progress 61



warning as he had thrown himself down, and gave his
eyes a fierce rub. He returned to the Treasure again.

“Tve been making up my mind to it for days,” he
said. “If we have the money we can buy our tickets
and go some night without saying anything to any-
one. We can leave a note for Aunt Matilda to tell
her we are all right and we are coming back. She'll
be too busy to mind.”

“Do you remember that book of father’s we read,”
said Meg—* that one called David Copperfield? David
ran away from the bottle place when he was younger
than we are—and he had to walk all the way to
Dover.”

“We shall not have to walk, and we won’t let any-
one take our money away from us,” said Robin.

“ Are we going really?” said Meg. “You speak as
if we were truly going—and it can’t be!”

“Do you know what you said just now about
believing human beings could do anything if they set
their minds to it? Let’s set our minds to it.”

“Well,” Meg answered rather slowly, as if weighing
the matter—* Let's!”

And she fell to helping to count the Treasure.



CHAPTER VI

“BURDENS DON’T FALL OFF BY
THEMSELVES ”

Ze FTERWARDS when they looked back
upon that day, they knew that the
thing had decided itself then, though
neither of them had said so.

«The truth was,” Robin used to say, “we had both
been thinking the same thing as we always do, but



we had been thinking it in the back part of our
minds. We were afraid to let it come to the front at
first, because it seemed such a big thing. But it went
on thinking by itself. That time when you said, ‘We
shall never see it!’ and I said, ‘How do you know?’
we were both thinking about itin one way. And I
know I was thinking about it when I said, ‘ We are
not going to stay here always. That is the first step
up the Hill of Difficulty,”

“ And that day when you said you would not let it
go by you,” Meg would answer, “that was the day we

reached the Wicket Gate.”
62



Two LittLte Pinaris’ PRoGRESS 63



It seemed very like it, for from that day their
strange unchildish purpose grew and ripened, and
never for an hour was absent from the mind of either.
If they had been like other children, living happy
lives full of young interests and pleasures, it might
have been crowded out by other and nearer things;
if they had been of a slighter mental build, and less
strong, they might have forgotten it. But they never
did. When they had counted the Treasure, and had
realised how small it was after all, they had sat and
gazed at each other for a while with grave eyes, but
they had only been grave and not despairing.

“Fifteen dollars,’ said Robin. “Well, that’s not
much after nearly six years; but we saved it, nearly
all, by cents, you know, Meg.”

“And it takes a hundred cents to make a dollar,”
said Meg, “and we were poor people’s children.”

“ And we bought the chickens,” said Robin.

“And you have always given me a present at
Christmas, Robin, even if it was only a little one.
That’s six Christmases.”

“We have nine months to work in,” said Robin,
calculating. “If you get two dollars a month, and I
get two, that will be thirty-six dollars by next June.
Fifteen dollars and thirty-six dollars make fifty-one.

I believe we could go on that—and come back. I



64 Two Litre Pinerims’ PRoGREss

suppose we shall have to come back,” with a long
breath.

“Oh, dear!’ cried Meg; “how can we come back !”

“T don’t know,” said Robin. “We shall hate it, but
we shall have nowhere else to go.”

“Perhaps we are going to seek our fortunes, and
perhaps we shall find them,” said Meg; “or perhaps
Aunt Matilda won’t let us come back, Rob,” with
some awe. “Do you think she will be angry?”

“T’ve thought about that,’ Robin answered contem-
platively. “And I don’t think she will. She would
be too busy to care much even if we ran away and
said nothing. ButI shall leave a letter and tell her
we have saved our money and gone somewhere for a
holiday—and we're all right and she needn’t bother.”

“She won’t bother, even if she is angry,” Meg said,
with mournful eyes. “She doesn’t care about us
enough.”

“Tf she loved us,” Rob said, “and was too poor to
take us herself, we couldn’t go at all. We couldn’t
run away, because it would worry her so. You can’t
do a thing—however much you want to do it—if it
is going to hurt somebody who is good to you, and
cares.”

“Well, then, we needn’t stay here because of Aunt
Matilda,” said Meg. “That's one sure thing. It



Two Lirtte Prterims’ Progress 65





wouldn’t interfere with her ploughing if we were both
to die at once.”

“No,” said Rob deliberately, “that’s just what it
would not.” And he threw himself back on the straw
and clasped his hands under his head, gazing up into
the dark roof above him with very reflective eyes.

The truth was that, his elderly ways and practical
methods notwithstanding, he was an affectionate little
fellow at heart, and Meg was very like him in this
as in all other ways. Their father’s house had been
home, narrow as its resources were and few as had
been the privileges costing money they could enjoy.
They had not been a very demonstrative family, but
in a quiet unfailing way the two had been loved and
cared for. They had never felt lonely and had never
been really unhappy. What they felt every hour in
Aunt Matilda’s world was that they counted for
nothing with anybody, and were entirely superfluous ;
and the sense of this filled them with a kind of vague
misery they never exactly explained to each other,
even when they talked about the differences between
their life on the farm and their life in their own
home. Their young hearts ached many a day when
they were not quite sure why they were aching, or
that it was veritable heartache they were troubled by.

Being curiously just and given to reasoning by nature,
9



66 Two Lirrte Prnarims’ PROGRESS



they were never unfair to Aunt Matilda, and used to
try to render her what was her due when they talked
her over.

“She doesn’t beat us or scold us or ill-treat us in
any particular way,” Meg would say; “she gives us
plenty to eat, and buys us respectable clothes. If you
notice, Robin, we never wear broken shoes. We were
obliged to wear them now and then when we were at
home, because there was no money to buy new ones
until father was paid, or something like that. Our
toes never come out now.”

And this particular day, after looking up at the
roof, Robin said, “ I should like to be a bird, I believe.
Wouldn't you, Meg? Then we should have a nest.”

But they had reached the Wicket Gate, and from
the hour they passed it there was no looking back.
That in their utter friendlessness and loneliness they
should take their twelve-year-old fates in their own
strong little hands was perhaps a pathetic thing ; that,
once having done so, they moved towards their object
as steadily as if they had been of the maturest years,
was remarkable; but no one ever knew or even
suspected, from the first until the last.

The days went by full of work, which left them
little time to lie and talk in the Straw Parlour. They

could only see each other in the leisure hours which



Two LirrLte Pinerims’ Progress 67

were so few, and only came when the day was
waning.

Finding them faithful and ready, those about them
fell into the natural, easy, human unworthiness of
imposing by no means infrequently on their inex-
perienced willingness and youth. So they were hard
enough worked, but each felt that every day that
passed brought them nearer to the end in view, and
there was always something to think of, some detail
to be worked out mentally and to be discussed in the
valuable moments when they were together.

“It’s a great deal better than it used to be,” Meg
said, “at all events. It’s better to feel tired working
than to be tired of doing nothing but think, and think
dreary things.”

As the weather grew colder, it was hard enough to
keep warm in their hiding-place. They used to sit
and talk huddled close together, bundled in their
heaviest clothing, and with the straw heaped close
around them and over them. There were so many
things to be thought of and talked over. Robin
~ collected facts more sedulously than ever—facts about
entrance fees, facts about prices of things to eat, facts
about places to sleep.

“Going to the Fair yourself, sonny ?” Jones said to
him one day. Jones was fond of his joke. “You're



68 Two Lirrie Pinerims’ Progress



right to be inquirin’ round. Them hotel-keepers is
goin’ to tot up bills several storeys higher than their
hotels is themselves.”

“ But I suppose a person needn’t go to a hotel,” said
Robin. “There must be plenty of poor people who
can’t go to hotels, and they’ll have to sleep some-
where.”

“Oh, there’s plenty of poor people,” responded
Jones cheerfully—*plenty of ’em. Always is. But
they won’t go to Chicago while the Fair’s on. They'll
sleep at home—that’s where they'll sleep.”

“That's the worst of it,’ Rob said to Meg after-
wards. “You see, we have to sleep somewhere. We
could live on bread and milk, or crackers and cheese,
or oatmeal, but we have to sleep somewhere.”

“Tt will be warm weather,’ Meg said reflectively.
“Perhaps we could sleep out of doors. Beggars do.
We don’t mind.”

“JT don’t think the police would let us,’ Robin
answered. “If they would—perhaps we might have
to,some night. But we are going to that place, Meg—
we are gowng.”

Yes, they believed they were going, and lived on
the belief. This being decided, howsoever difficult to
attain, it was like them both that they should dwell

upon the dream, and revel in it in a way peculiarly



Two Litre Pinertms’ PRocress 69



their own. It was Meg whose imagination was the
stronger, and it is true that it was always she who
made pictures in words and told stories. But Robin
was always as ready to enter into the spirit of her
imaginings as she was to talk about them. There
was a word he had once heard his father use which
had caught his fancy—in fact, it had attracted them
both, and they applied it to this favourite pleasure
of theirs of romancing with everyday things. The
word was “ philander.”

“Now we have finished adding up and making
plans,” he would say, putting his ten cent account-
book into his pocket, “let us philander about it.”

And then Meg would begin to talk about the City
Beautiful—a City Beautiful which was a wonderful
and curious mixture of the enchanted one the whole
world was pouring its treasures into two hundred
miles away, and that City Beautiful of her own,
which she had founded upon the one towards which
Christian had toiled through the Slough of Despond —
and up the Hill of Difficulty and past Doubting
Castle. Somehow one could scarcely tell where one
ended and the others began, they were so much alike,
these three cities — Christian’s, Meg’s, and the fair
ephemeral one the ending of the nineteenth century
had built upon the blue lake’s side,



70 Two Littte Pinartms’ Progress



“They must look alike,” said Meg. “I am sure
they must. See what it says in the Pilgrim’s
Progress: ‘Now just as the gates were opened to let
in the men, I looked in after them, and behold, the
city shone like the sun’; and then it says, ‘ The talk
they had with the shining ones was about the glory
of the place, who told them that the beauty and
glory of it were inexpressible. I always think of it,
Robin, when I read about these places like white
palaces and temples and towers that are being built.
I am so glad they are white. Think how the city
will ‘shine like the sun, when it stands under the
blue sky and by the blue water on a sunshiny day.”

They had never read the dear, old, worn Pilgrim’s
Progress as they did in those days. They kept it in
the straw near the treasure, and always had it at
hand to refer to. In it they seemed to find parallels
for everything

“ Aunt Matilda’s world is the City of Destruction,”
Meg would say; “and our loneliness and poorness are
like Christian’s ‘burden.’ We have to carry it like a
heavy weight, and it holds us back.”

“What was it that Goodwill said to Christian
about it?” Robin asked.

Meg turned over the pages. She knew all the

places by heart. It was easy enough to find and read



Two Litrte Pineris’ Progress 71

how, “At last there came a grave person to the gate,
named Goodwill,” and in the end he said—

“ As to thy burden, be content to bear it, until thou
comest to the place of deliverance; for there it will
fall from thy back itself.”

“But out of the Pilgrim’s Progress,’ Robin said,
with his reflective air, “burdens don’t fall off by
themselves. If you are content with them they stick
on and get bigger. Ours would, I know. You have
to do something yourself to get them off. But’”—
with a little pause for thought—“I like that part,
Meg. And I like Goodwill because he told it to him.
It encouraged him, you know. You see, it says
next, ‘Then Christian began to gird up his loins and
addressed himself to his journey.’ ”

“ Robin,” said Meg suddenly, shutting the book and
giving it a little thump on the back, “it’s not only
Christian’s city that is like our city. We are like
Christian. We are pilgrims, and our way to that

place is our Pilgrims’ Progress.”



CHAPTER VII

HAND IN HAND THEY WENT OUT ON THE ROAD
TOGETHER



SGA 2S ND the cold days of hard work kept
going by, and the City Beautiful grew,
{. and huddled close together in the straw
; the children planned and dreamed, and
read and re-read the Pilgrim's Progress, following
Christian step by step. And Aunt Matilda became
busier every day it seemed, and did not remember
that they were alive, except when she saw them.
And nobody guessed, and nobody knew.

Days so quickly grew to weeks, and weeks slip by
so easily until they are months, and at last there came
a time when Meg, going out in the morning, felt a
softer air, and stopped a moment by a bare tree to
breathe ‘it in and feel its lovely touch upon her
cheek. She turned her face upward with a half-
involuntary movement, and found herself looking at
such a limitless vault of tender blueness, that her

~ heart gave a quick throb, a seemed to spring up to
2 .



Two Lirrie Pinerims’ PRoGREss Uo



it and carry her with it. For a moment it seemed as
if she had left the earth far below, and was soaring
in the soft depths of blueness themselves. And
suddenly, even as she felt it, she heard, on the top-
most branch of the bare tree, a brief little rapturous
trill, and her heart gave a leap again, and she felt her
cheeks grow warm.

“Tt is a bluebird,” she said—*“it is a bluebird, and
it is the Spring, and that means that the time is quite
near.”

She had a queer little smile on her face all day as
she worked. She did not know it was there herself,
but Mrs. Macartney saw it.

“What’s pleasing you so, Meggy, my girl?” she
asked.

Meg wakened up with a sort of start.

“J don’t know exactly,” she said.

“You don’t know,” said the woman good-naturedly.
. You look as if you were thinking over a secret, and
it was a pleasant one.”

That evening it was not cold when they sat in the
Straw Parlour, and Meg told Robin about the bluc-
bird.

“Tt gave me a strange feeling to hear it,” she said.
“It seemed as if it was speaking to me. It said,

2”

‘You must get ready; it is quite near.
10



V4. Two Lirrte Pincers PROGRESS

They had made up their minds that they would go
in June, before the weather became so hot that they
might suffer from it.

“Because we have to consider everything,” was
Robin’s idea. “We shall be walking about all the
time, and we have no cool clothes, and we shall have
no money to buy cool things, and if we should be ill,
it would be worse for us than for children who have
someone with them.”

In the little aceount-book, they had calculated all
they should own on the day their pilgrimage began.
They had apportioned it all out—so much for the
price of the railroad tickets, so much for entrance
fees, and—not so much but so little—oh, so little, for
their food and lodging!

“T have listened when Jones and the others were
talking,” said Robin, “and they say that everybody
who has room to spare and wants to make money is
going to let every corner they have. So you see
there will be sure to be people who have quite poor
places that they would be obliged to rent cheap to
people who are poor like themselves. We will go
through the small side streets and look.”

The first bluebird came again day after day, and
others came with it, until the swift dart of blue wings

through the air and the delicious ripple of joyous



Two Lirrte Piterims’ Procress 75



sound were no longer rare things. The days grew
warmer, and the men threw off their coats and began
to draw their shirt sleeves across their foreheads when
they were at work.

One evening when Robin came up into the Straw
Parlour he brought something with him. It was a
battered old tin coffee-pot.

“What is that for?” asked Meg; for he seemed to
carry it as if it was of some value.

“Tt’s old and rusty, but there are no holes in it,”
Robin answered. “I saw it lying in a fence corner
where someone had thrown it—perhaps a tramp—
and it put a new thought into my head. It will do
to boil eggs in.”

“Kegs?” said Meg.

“'There’s nothing much nicer than hard-boiled eggs,”
said Robin; “and you can carry them about with you.
It just came into my mind that we could take some of
our eggs, and go somewhere where no one would be
likely to see us, and build a fire of sticks and boil
some eggs and carry them with us to eat.”

“Robin,” cried Meg, with admiring ecstasy, “I wish
I had thought of that.”

“Tt doesn’t matter which of us thought of it,” said
Rob; “it’s all the same.”

So it was decided that, when the time came, they



76 Two Lirrte Pingrims’ PROGRESS

should boil their supply of eggs very hard, and roll
them up in pieces of paper, and tuck them away
carefully in the one small bag which was to carry all
their necessary belongings. These belongings would
be very few—just enough to keep them decent and
clean, and a brush and comb between them. They
used to lie in bed at night with beating hearts,
thinking it all over, sometimes awakening in a cold
perspiration from a dreadful dream, in which Aunt
Matilda, or Jones or some of the hands, had discovered
their secret and confronted them with it in all its
daring. They were so full of it night and day that
Meg used to wonder that people about them did not
see it in their faces.

“They are not thinking of us,” said Robin. “They
are thinking about crops. I-daresay Aunt Matilda
would like to see the agricultural building, but she
couldn’t waste the time to go through the others.”

Ah, what a day it was! what a thrilling, almost
unbearably joyful day, when Robin gathered sticks
and dried bits of branches, and piled them in a corner
of a field far enough from the house and out-buildings
to be quite safe. He did it in the noon hour, and
as he passed Meg on his way back to his work, he
whispered—

“JT have got the sticks for the fire all ready.”



Two Lirrte Pinerims’ PRoGREss 77

The Slemonts of forethought and executive ability,
which were so strong in them, and which had enabled
them to plan this unusual and unchildish thing,
prevented their committing any of the youthful indis-
cretions which might have betrayed them, through
suggesting to outsiders that they were engaged in
something more than their everyday amusements and
pursuits. If they had exchanged significant glances,
which someone might have intercepted, they would
have been in danger, even though they had been
usually so little observed; if they had been seen in
unusual places, or doing unusual things, somebody
might have asked questions in these days, because it
was the natural result of their new employment that
they were thrown more frequently among those
working in various capacities on the farm. Men and
women were intimate with them in these days who
had scarcely noticed their existence or known their
names before the days of Meg’s work in the dairy and
Robin’s service under Jones. And it was noticeable
that no one worked near them without liking and
feeling friendly towards them. They showed such a
steady intention of doing their best and most, and
such readiness to help others to accomplish their best
and most also ; and, accordingly, the hands had begun
to notice them, and occasionally joined one or other of



78 Two Lirrte Priertms’ PRoGRESS



them as they left the table, and talked with them a
little.

So this eventful evening they lingered about until
all the rest had gone, and even went their way with
cautious glances about them when they crept out
after supper to their trysting-place with matches, the
battered old coffee-pot, and the eggs.



MEG LOOKED RATHER LIKE A LITTLE WITCH AS SHE STOOD OVER
THE BUBBLING OLD POT,

As they made their preparations, they found them-
selves talking in whispers, though there was not’ the
least chance of anyone hearing them. Meg looked
rather like a little witch as she stood over the



Two Lirrte Pincrims’ Progress 79





bubbling old pot, with her strange little dark face and
shining eyes and black elf locks.

“Tt’s like making a kind of sacrifice on an altar,”
she said.

“ You always think queer things about everything,
don’t you?” said Robin. “But they’re all right. I
don’t think them myself, but I like them.”

When the eggs were boiled hard enough, they
carried them to the barn, and hid them in the Straw
Parlour near the Treasure. Then they sat and talked,
in whispers still, almost trembling with joy.

“Somehow, do you know,” Meg said, “it feels as if
we were going to do something more than just go to
the Fair. When people in stories go to seek their
fortunes, ’m sure they feel like this. Does it give
you a kind of creeping in your stomach whenever you
think of it, Rob?”

“Yes, it does,” Robin whispered back, “and when it
comes into my mind suddenly, something gives a queer
jump inside me.”

“That's your heart,” said Meg. “Robin, if any-
thing should stop us, I believe I should drop dead !”

“No, you wouldn’t,” was Rob’s answer; “but it’s
better not to let ourselves think about it. And I
don’t believe anything as bad as that could happen.
We've worked so hard—and we have nobody but



80 Two LirrLte Pincers’ Progress

ourselves—and it can’t do anyone any harm, and we
don’t want to do anyone any harm. There must be
something that wouldn’t let it be!”

“T believe that too,” said Meg; and this time it was
she who clutched at Robin’s hand, but he seemed glad
she did, and held as close as she.

And then, after the bluebirds had sung a few
times more, there came a night when Meg crept out of
her cot, after she was sure that the woman in the other
bed was sleeping heavily enough. Everyone went to
bed early, and everyone slept through the night in
heavy, tired sleep. Too much work was done on the
place to allow people to waste time in sleeplessness.
Meg knew no one would waken as she crept down-
stairs to the lower part of the house, and softly opened
the back-door.

Robin was standing outside with the little leather
satchel in his hand. It was a soft, warm night, and
the dark blue sky was full of the glitter of stars.
Both he and Meg stood still a moment and looked up.

“Tm glad it’s like this,” Meg said; “it doesn’t seen
so lonely. Is your heart thumping, Robin ?”

“Yes, rather,” whispered Robin. “TI left the letter
in a place where Aunt Matilda will be likely to find
it some time to-morrow.”

“What did you say ?” Meg whispered back.



Two Lirrte Pincers’ Progress 81



“What I told you I was going to. There wasn’t
much to say—just told her we had saved our money
and gone away for a few days; and we were all right
and she needn’t worry.”

Everything was very still about them. There was
no moon, and but for the stars it would have been
very dark. As it was, the stillness of night and sleep,
and the sombreness of the hour, might have made
less daring little creatures feel timid and alone.

“Let us take hold of each other’s hands as we walk
along,” said Meg. “It will make us feel nearer and—
and twinner.”

And so, hand in hand, they went out on the road
together.



CHAPTER VIII

“AND WE ARE PEOPLE TOO”

yT was four miles to the depédt, but they
were good walkers. Robin hung the
satchel on a stick over his shoulder,
and they kept in the middle of the
road and walked smartly. There were not many



trees, but there were a few occasionally, and it was
pleasanter to walk where the way before them was
quite clear. And somehow they found themselves
still talking in whispers, though there was certainly
no one to overhear them.

“Let us talk about Christian,” said Meg. “It will
not seem so lonely if we are talking. I wish we
could meet Evangelist.”

“Tf we knew he was Evangelist when we met him,”
said Robin. “If we didn’t know him, we should
think he was someone who would stop us. And, after
all, you see he only showed Christian the shining
light, and told him to go to it. And we are farther
on than that. We have passed the Wicket Gate.”



Two Lirrte Piterims’ ProGRreEss 83

“The thing we want,” said Meg, “is the Roll to
read as we go on, and find out what we are to do.”

And then they talked of what was before them.
They wondered who would be at the little depdt, and
if they would be noticed, and of what the ticket-
agent would think when Robin bought the tickets.

“Perhaps he won't notice me at all,” said Rob;
“and he does not know me. Somebody might be
sending us alone, you know. We are not little
children.”

“That’s true,” responded Meg courageously. “If
we were six years old it would be different; but we
are twelve.”

It did make it seem less lonely to be talking,
and so they did not stop. And there was so much
to say.

“Robin,” broke forth Meg once, giving his hand a
sudden clutch, “we are on the way—we are govng.
Soon we shall be on the train, and it will be carrying
us nearer and nearer! Suppose it was a dream, and
we should wake up!”

“Tt isn’t a dream,” said Rob stoutly; “it’s real.
It’s—as real as Aunt Matilda.”

He was always more practical-minded than Meg.

“We needn’t philander any more,” Meg said. “It
isn’t philandering to talk about a real thing. Oh,



84 Two Lirrte Pinterims’ PRoGREss

Rob, just think of it! waiting for us under the stars
this very moment—the City Beautiful!”

And then walking close to each other in the
dimness, they told each other how they saw it in
imagination, and what its wonders would be to them,
and which they would see first, and how they would
remember it all their lives afterwards, and have
things to talk of and think of. Very few people
would see it as they would, but they did not know
that. It was not a gigantic enterprise to them, a
great scheme, fought for and struggled over for the
divers reasons poor humanity makes for itself. That
it would either make or lose money was not a side of
the question that reached them. They only dwelt on
the beauty and wonder of it, which made it seem like
an enchanted thing.

“I keep thinking of the white palaces, and that it
is like a fairy story,” Meg said ; “and that it will melt
away like those cities travellers sometimes see in the
desert ; and I wish it wouldn’t. But it will have been
real for a while, and everybody will remember it. I
am so glad it is beautiful—and white. I’m so glad it
is white, Robin!”

“And I keep thinking,” said Robin, “of all the
people who have made the things to go in it, and how
they have worked and invented. There have been



Two LirrLe Piterims’ PRoGRESS 85



some people, perhaps, who have worked months and
months making one single thing—just as we have
worked to go to see it. And, perhaps, at first they
were afraid they couldn’t do it; and they set their
minds to it as we did, and tried and tried, and then did
it at last. I like to think of those men and women,
Meg—hbecause, when the city has melted away, the
things won't melt. They will last after the people—
and we are people too. I’m a man and you are a
woman, you know, though we are only twelve; and
it gives me a strong feeling to think of those others.”

“Tt makes you think that perhaps men and women
can do anything, if they set their minds to it,” said
Meg quite solemnly. “Oh, I do like that!”

“JT like it better than anything else in the world,”
said Rob. “Stop a minute, Meg! Come here in the
shade!”

He said the last words quickly, and pulled her to
the roadside, where a big tree grew which threw a
deep shadow. He stood listening.

“Tt’s wheels,” he whispered. “There is a buggy
coming. We mustn’t let anyone see us.”

It was a buggy. They could tell that by the
lightness of the wheels, and it was coming rapidly.
They could hear voices—men’s voices, and they drew

back and stood very close to each other.



86 Two Lirritz Piterims’ PRoGREsS

“Do you think they have found out, and sent
someone after us?” whispered Meg breathlessly.

“No,” answered Robin, though his heart beat like a
trip-hammer. “No—no—no!”

The wheels drew nearer, and they heard one of the
men speaking.

“Chicago by sunrise,” he was saying. “And what
I don’t see of it won’t be worth seeing.”

The next minute the fast-trotting horse spun
swiftly down the road, and carried the voices out of
hearing. Meg and Robin drew twin sighs of relief.
Robin spoke first.

“Tt is someone who is going to the Fair,” he said.

“Perhaps we shall see him on the train,” said Meg.

“T daresay we shall,” said Robin. “It was nobody
who knows us. I didn’t know his voice. Meg, let’s
take hands again, and walk quickly. We might lose
the train.”

They did not talk much more, but walked briskly.
They had done a good day’s work before they set out,
and were rather tired, but they did not lag on that
account. Sometimes Meg took a turn at carrying the
satchel, so that Robin might rest his arm. It was not
heavy, and she was as strong for a girl as he was for
a boy.

At last they reached the depdt. There were a



Two Lirrie Pinerims’ PRoGREsS 87



number of people waiting on the platform to catch
the train to Chicago, and there were several vehicles
outside. They passed one which was a buggy, and
Meg gave Robin a nudge with her elbow.

“ Perhaps that belongs to our man,” she said.

There were people enough before the office to
give the ticket-agent plenty to do. Robin's heart
quickened a little as he passed by with the group of
maturer people, but no one seemed to observe him
particularly, and he returned to Meg with the precious
bits of pasteboard held very tight in his hand. Meg
had waited alone in an unlighted corner, and when
she saw him coming she came forward to meet
hin.

“Have you got them?” she said. “ Did anyone look
at you, or say anything ?”

“Yes, I got them,” Robin answered. “And I'll tell
you what, Meg; these people are nearly all going just
where we are going, and they are so busy thinking
about it, and attending to themselves, that they
haven’t any time to watch anyone else. That’s one
good thing.”

“And the nearer we get to Chicago,” Meg said,
“the more people there will be, and the more they
will have to think of. And at that beautiful place,

where there is so much to see, who will look at two



88 Two Lirtte Pingrims’ PRoGRess

children? I don’t believe we shall have any trouble
at all.”

It really did not seem likely that they would, but
it happened by a curious coincidence that within a
very few minutes they saw somebody looking at
them.

The train was not due for ten minutes, and there
were a few people who, being too restless to sit in the
waiting-rooms, walked up and down on the platform.
Most of these were men, and there were two men who
walked farther than the others did, and so neared
the place where Robin and Meg stood in the shadow.
One was a young man, and seemed to be listening to
instructions his companion, who was older, was giving
him in a rapid, abrupt sort of voice. This companion,
who might have been his employer, was a man of
middle age. He was robust of figure, and had a
clean-cut face, with a certain effect of strong good
looks. It was perhaps rather a hard face, but it was
a face one would look at more than once; and he too,
oddly enough, had a square jaw and straight black
brows. But it was his voice which first attracted
Robin and Meg as he neared them, talking.

“It’s the man in the buggy,” whispered Robin.
“Don’t you know his voice again?” And they watched
him with deep interest.



Two LitrrLe Pinerims’ Procress 89

He passed them once without seeming to see them
at all. He was explaining something to his com-
panion. The second time he drew near he chanced to
look up, and his eye fell on them. It did not rest on
them more than a second, and he went on speaking.
The next time he neared their part of the platform,
he turned his glance towards them as they stood close
together. It was as if involuntarily he glanced
to see if they were still where they had been
before.

“A pair of children,” they heard him say, as if the
fleeting impression of their presence arrested his train
of thought for a second. “Looks as if no one was
with them.”

He merely made the comment in passing, and
returned to his subject the next second; but Meg and
Robin heard him, and drew farther back into the
shadow.

But it was not necessary to stand there much
longer. They heard a familiar sound in the distance,
the shrill cry of the incoming train, the beloved giant
who was to carry them to fairyland. The people
began to flock out of the waiting-rooms with packages
and valises and umbrellas in hand; the porters
suddenly became alert, and hurried about attending
to their duties; the delightful roar drew nearer and

I2



90 Two LirtLte Piterims’ ProGREss

louder, and began to shake the earth—it grew louder
still; a bell began to make a cheerful tolling—people
were rushing to and fro, Meg and Robin rushed with
them—and the train was panting in the depdt.

It was even more thrilling than the children had
thought it would be. They had travelled so very little,
and did not know exactly where to go. It might not
be the right train even. They did not know how long
it would wait. It might rush away again before they
could get on. People seemed in such a hurry and so
excited. As they hurried along they found them-
selves being pushed and jostled. Before the steps of
one of the cars, a conductor stood whom people kept
showing tickets to. There were several persons round
him when Robin and Meg reached the place where he
stood. People kept asking him things, and sometimes
he passed them on and sometimes let them go into his
car.

“Ts this the train to Chicago?” said Robin
breathlessly.

But he was so much less than the other people, and
the man was so busy, he did not hear him.

Robin tried to get nearer.

“Ts this the Chicago train, sir?” he said a little
louder.

He had had to press by a man whom he had been



Two Litrte Pincers’ Progress 91



too excited to see, and the man looked down and
spoke to him,

“Chicago train?” he said in a voice which was
abrupt without being ill-natured. “Yes, you're all
right. Got your sleeping-car tickets?”

Robin looked up at him quickly. He knew the
voice, and was vaguely glad to hear it. He and Meg
had never been in a sleeping-car in their lives, and he
did not quite understand. He held out his tickets.

“We're going to sleep on the train,” he said, “but
we have nothing but these.”

“Next car but two then,” he said. “And you'd
better hurry.”

And when both voices thanked him at once, and
the two caught each other’s hands and ran towards
their car, he looked after them and laughed.

“Tm blessed if they’re not by themselves,” he said,
watching them as they scrambled up the steps. “And
they're going to the Fair, I'll beta dollar. That’s
Young America, and no mistake.”



CHAPTER IX

IT IS THE DAY!

more people than themselves who were
going to the Fair, and were to economise.
gt When the children entered and looked
about them in the dim light, they thought at first that
all the seats were full. People seemed to be huddled

up asleep or sitting up awake in all of them. Every-



body had been trying to get to sleep at least, and the
~ twins found themselves making their whispers even
lower than before.

To people unaccustomed to travel and not so
familiar with railroads and steamboats, that change
of scene and surroundings and the conveniences and
inconveniences invented for the public are old stories
and even tiresome ones, to board a train at night is
by no means an uninteresting or unexciting experience.
Upon children who have made only short journeys
by daylight, under perfectly ordinary circumstances,

it is an event likely to create a very strong impression.
92



Two Lirrte Piterims’ Progress 93

There is something even thrilling and extraordinary
in it. These two imaginative ones felt something
very like a sensation of awe when they had scrambled
up the steps, entered and found themselves standing
at the end of the car looking down the aisle to find
out if there was anywhere a vacant seat where they
might stow themselves without disturbing anybody.
. They were well-mannered children, both by nature
and as a result of their training in the modest and
restricted little household they had spent their first
years in. They had learned there, though quite un-
consciously, to respect other people’s rights as well as
their own, so they looked down the aisle to discover
where their place in it chanced to be, if they were so
lucky as to possess a place. In the seat nearest them
an old gentleman nodded with his arms folded and his
head dropping forward on his chest. He had a black
skull-cap on, and had his back against the side of the
window and his legs up on the seat, so there was no
room for even one of them there. Everybody was
making himself or herself as comfortable as possible
- under the circumstances, and this needed space. One
very big man had turned down the seat next his own
and filled it with his feet and his valise, his hat and
a very large and long overcoat. He was snoring

loudly.



94 Two Litre Prterims’ PROGRESS



“JT think there is a seat empty just behind that
very fat lady,” Meg whispered.

It was at the end of the car, and they went to it
and found she was right. They took possession of it
quietly, putting their satchel under the seat.

“Tt seems so still,” said Meg. “I feel as if I was in
somebody’s bedroom. The sound of the wheels makes
it seem all the quieter. It’s as if we were shut in by
the noise.”

“We mustn’t talk,” said Robin, “or we shall waken
the people. Can you go to sleep, Meg?”

“T can if I can stop thinking,” she answered, with a
joyful sigh. “I’m very tired—but the wheels keep
saying over and over again, ‘We're going — we're
going—we're going!’ It’s just as if they were talking.
Don’t you hear them ?”

“Yes, I do. Do they say that to you too? But
we mustn’t listen,” Robin whispered back. “If we
do, we shall not go to sleep, and then we shall be too
tired to walk about. Let’s put our heads down and
shut our eyes, Meg.”

“Well, let’s,” said Meg.

She curled herself up on the seat and put her head
into the corner.

“Tf you lean against me, Rob,” she said, “it will be
softer. We can take turns.”



Two Lirrtze Pinerims’ Progress 95

They changed position a little two or three times,
but they were worn out with the day’s work and their
walk and the excitement, and the motion of the train
seemed like a sort of rocking which lulled them.

Gradually their muscles relaxed and they settled



‘“‘IF YOU LEAN AGAINST ME, ROB,” SHE SAID, ‘‘IT WILL
BE SOFTER.”

down, though after they had done so Meg spoke once
drowsily.
“Rob,” she said, “did you see that was our man ?”
“Yes,” answered Rob very sleepily indeed; “and
he looked as if he knew us.” .

.



96 Two Lirrte Pruerims’ Progress

If they had been less young, or if they had been
less tired, they might have found themselves awake
a good many times during the night. But they were
such children! and now that the great step was taken
were so happy, and the soft, deep sleepiness of youth
descended upon and overpowered them. Once or
twice during the night they stirred, wakened for a
dreamy blissful moment by some sound of a door
shutting or a conductor passing through. But they
were only conscious of a delicious sense of strange-
ness, of the stillness of the car full of sleepers, of the
half-realised delight of feeling themselves carried
along through the unknown country, and of the rattle
of the wheels which never ceased saying rhythmically, ©
“We're going—we're going—we're going!” Oh, what
a night of dreams, and new vague sensations to be
remembered always! Oh, that heavenly sense of joy
to come, and adventure and young hopefulness and
imaginings! Were there many others carried towards
the City Beautiful that night who bore with them the
same rapture of longing and belief—who saw with
such innocent clearness only the fair and splendid
thought which had created it—and were so innocently
blind to any shadow of sordidness or mere worldly
interest touching its white walls? And after the
passing of this wonderful night, what a wakening in



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'2011-11-14T15:56:28-05:00'
describe
'34076' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFGD' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
e7219c4abee9e2026f224d404b105455
a4791a615ac12cc845ad4ad15535000f674f7292
'2011-11-14T15:55:24-05:00'
describe
'12412608' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFGE' 'sip-files00001.tif'
54d0cad5616c053cec13b4d1e2c9e9ad
c13ba01620d2454720857b91cad061d898a8b26b
'2011-11-14T15:52:27-05:00'
describe
'154' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFGF' 'sip-files00001.txt'
26793501c70760fee208ccd357316468
7c880e376e6809d881e154a93f175d692882ad6c
'2011-11-14T15:54:26-05:00'
describe
'8527' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFGG' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
59c863cd36c303f33100abb4350d4096
0a2e3a325d0f574e4ee97da7b33d5de3e963f2d1
'2011-11-14T15:56:14-05:00'
describe
'507053' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFGH' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
bc2c213edb21860e1203cd1e5b7344bb
4a3819a96b14fe4c23eed7de1e26280c6c49be75
'2011-11-14T15:57:09-05:00'
describe
'147444' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFGI' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
435e2f284bbd33d576c5352b8b5c503a
ca818016238c1ce1ddccc0a66d1b153583039635
'2011-11-14T15:56:21-05:00'
describe
'1774' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFGJ' 'sip-files00002.pro'
d1f2ec44a8c2c4d3b327e20bdc4f8bca
e57f808047bc19cbbc6c6dad22a40bf523d985e6
'2011-11-14T15:57:45-05:00'
describe
'35375' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFGK' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
7539d7330ccee5638ae4ef5db03809d4
2e1d57368fefe952a3c328572ed2032d5e51cf97
'2011-11-14T15:52:44-05:00'
describe
'12178772' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFGL' 'sip-files00002.tif'
07fd448e1b6eaef037bd8bde93eb0866
90b2f4751bae1e7f56ff9956789ec53fc15fe2a7
'2011-11-14T15:51:40-05:00'
describe
'177' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFGM' 'sip-files00002.txt'
92180b4c72c658a2afe39c2928d9786a
e01831d157e69269f3097c35a436cbeea24ea277
'2011-11-14T15:53:11-05:00'
describe
'7437' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFGN' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
0355485b069bfe9a3a7ba9c088fa798a
04e39a53c94e9defbe3e1ef8f98602aed9334cac
'2011-11-14T15:58:35-05:00'
describe
'421779' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFGO' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
b6b65e625acaa7708a502c6f657b9643
11e896472cd789580a910b2ab2879c0137488dae
'2011-11-14T15:56:42-05:00'
describe
'129896' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFGP' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
6057e2d243cfa6d87e785ab9588124e9
05812337dd5deb6c6ecd1da04bc7955962f2935c
'2011-11-14T15:54:33-05:00'
describe
'31643' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFGQ' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
c2b870fb0d072b9b33e370428d50d8b3
978dd2e5979e72e59541bc85ec2004eb5502d6ba
'2011-11-14T15:53:22-05:00'
describe
'10132772' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFGR' 'sip-files00003.tif'
529336d03a54c7f2e4624654265516a6
99f5cc1bb2cb8b1ba963245774a7c7a6444a9aed
'2011-11-14T15:54:45-05:00'
describe
'6551' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFGS' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
f82ce69be45602e4c18a729cf0eeb24f
ce349050505ed46cf746595b1a959162344525b6
'2011-11-14T15:53:53-05:00'
describe
'48139' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFGT' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
8635d1e2f35e4bb1d9122a84e0e6c76d
38b90f486fac7c984e7a8afa513cc8b80271331d
'2011-11-14T15:55:05-05:00'
describe
'12746' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFGU' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
b0d506f53135ed0b254e6f2b6b062fa6
7d4d5945faa7cdc874d90efe00a0c7221084002f
'2011-11-14T15:51:54-05:00'
describe
'639' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFGV' 'sip-files00004.pro'
031a344831b5ffc42e922ee4149ef523
cf3180be3c3e41d7459fbab2b39d7f886bef536e
'2011-11-14T15:54:12-05:00'
describe
'4326' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFGW' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
20b0afc27cf05db358b666108e267b02
88e626c499e56a93a1d688876be99cdb0290aa2f
'2011-11-14T15:54:20-05:00'
describe
'2689732' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFGX' 'sip-files00004.tif'
833d8ba788b6fefc6685fb50b7615cc9
82d0f29714d1630d593611f9f89d07cc61258d00
'2011-11-14T15:57:05-05:00'
describe
'42' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFGY' 'sip-files00004.txt'
3439e17fc342b1d2de3ca10e00dc9f17
113d0974b3121bc13c535af01027be356860bb89
'2011-11-14T15:52:49-05:00'
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFGZ' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
2325c37bb5cfa9129b502bef3ec35a94
97999e12c876a94b87816d31decdd1ac0750aa04
'2011-11-14T15:54:10-05:00'
describe
'380164' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHA' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
d3390e0ca956f0b80ebdf09277b2fadd
3667a5eed9753ce8098366b2862d14dcf5e8230c
'2011-11-14T15:53:27-05:00'
describe
'128215' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHB' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
dc2e0533a80de3267843bb4ef12b4775
ccf5f5b82eb6142aeaaee7f2097764a8019d8cd3
'2011-11-14T15:53:00-05:00'
describe
'2973' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHC' 'sip-files00006.pro'
df40680a35b8815e871849e15642008b
e11cb883f6f737bf6d3f19bbb1f3e8dd8d597432
'2011-11-14T15:51:38-05:00'
describe
'35497' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHD' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
7899dcf593a8f2589e84e51c6d30aa50
eed4aba6469cb597e619eb0c7966fad3efa4cc44
'2011-11-14T15:57:16-05:00'
describe
'3055384' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHE' 'sip-files00006.tif'
d215642caeb148ec543cc649fda77db7
00c9ec062e46bb09d5a0a0f21a9597309155513c
'2011-11-14T15:53:16-05:00'
describe
'158' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHF' 'sip-files00006.txt'
3a7fd652692f00f07f8bd81a8715aeb5
f6edf3574f26b927f33916139847cd7880cba256
'2011-11-14T15:54:44-05:00'
describe
'9398' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHG' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
35a718c39c57637d680d5eca8d6e0104
019e3de9b5cf8f91a38267178adec711adbb6513
'2011-11-14T15:58:10-05:00'
describe
'210172' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHH' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
94140c790a3aee9debf7564e7f655783
7d33b1f24c9185b2ec4161dc01ef5c7079f5c2fc
describe
'36643' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHI' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
241f6db86fdafed2594b0d32122a2afa
b0c96ae2df6900445e44794e2b18a956d89a06fd
'2011-11-14T15:53:02-05:00'
describe
'8468' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHJ' 'sip-files00007.pro'
94b11bb23b427f9ded32e5cb5f90e1f4
876bf345064a8bee5cadd6ac01ef19052e89feda
'2011-11-14T15:54:22-05:00'
describe
'13060' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHK' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
46506bdcf617fd1b12dd12ca243297dd
6b29e2b5d60d08f88fe8662da36fd7519938cb9f
'2011-11-14T15:54:21-05:00'
describe
'3275196' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHL' 'sip-files00007.tif'
855f414917360841b46f4b014f13bff9
40fb95c219207863109c352a581ebfc03f33a792
'2011-11-14T15:56:31-05:00'
describe
'502' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHM' 'sip-files00007.txt'
0171fc81a74e72ea283938dd47cbcff3
bb2ab7df0e5ca254021deefb4ee2e9852214e6fa
describe
'4040' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHN' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
528dfdb6ef345e6271d73b39941cb0f2
81c80ad0dae750a02ab1fa9be862a3272b119c6c
'2011-11-14T15:51:55-05:00'
describe
'23333' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHO' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
660e9336cf8278bf35491ee2c4ae8864
afb7caacc678c1ba37fef0e4a1e1ea8dd0b5261e
'2011-11-14T15:52:37-05:00'
describe
'9016' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHP' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
7379c59e0aa654eb6064ffbc3fe4d5b0
b17ccea50f19f344a4a9c151097d1a05f20dc5bf
'2011-11-14T15:56:10-05:00'
describe
'1207' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHQ' 'sip-files00008.pro'
8e79088b101b9ce5e00b7a14f66a378a
226fc794b1a5ca2831e396dfc5760ffb3507cebb
'2011-11-14T15:53:20-05:00'
describe
'2802' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHR' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
f419cad439e36abeb269612521ccae39
062bd1cc77edb9e96ab539370d005579e45ad563
'2011-11-14T15:58:29-05:00'
describe
'2717924' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHS' 'sip-files00008.tif'
5e16eb9ed210f16b0bc503afd8f60767
d7f965129c70e5c3d6b67181a2648b3cd064e547
'2011-11-14T15:55:06-05:00'
describe
'135' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHT' 'sip-files00008.txt'
6adee070b59df43bc5bc174b51544ee3
52edbd51816fec0325fdbb8e4eb1beee478fa4c9
'2011-11-14T15:52:16-05:00'
describe
'1013' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHU' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
e25cb4ef1e265f92216a3215582ea72e
27b604a8d3c856680e90336618a2ad24984155c5
'2011-11-14T15:52:41-05:00'
describe
'227196' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHV' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
31a36862243e1f559944dc286a7ac603
43102d80f1e8ce97388381d370e12ca2f229bd12
'2011-11-14T15:58:17-05:00'
describe
'38799' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHW' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
66d56bae4e3eaee1c6d83178f0f074d4
17d800f656129ea247ba66195a8dcc7d95f14e11
'2011-11-14T15:53:37-05:00'
describe
'17658' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHX' 'sip-files00009.pro'
283c1af3a6c36bfd11cde35f0ba5d69b
6f3ed8357d2c5ef4a429af41fc3de398083c82e3
'2011-11-14T15:55:41-05:00'
describe
'13804' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHY' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
23f3262c26547d51a12751c230877fe7
b6a4a0eeffb1820a0ecd67b3154cb01c050330eb
describe
'3209224' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFHZ' 'sip-files00009.tif'
762bfce7cf1876e7be0e75f6b03414fe
99c82db10b7ae4052c252296c22dde550049759e
'2011-11-14T15:56:30-05:00'
describe
'911' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFIA' 'sip-files00009.txt'
5f4423ef3cbdafe8a22f5aed59e88ca7
64c060cb6d1ed9d4b8c89ca485e68134bc86c7fc
describe
'4092' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFIB' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
24f7f5910a3f567e22fd4d5b382d2ad2
5cded68f20790700e40adc12d17365939bbf6e64
'2011-11-14T15:56:23-05:00'
describe
'108743' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFIC' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
490f445d8a9cbe2e0257ef9adc539303
6f578ac6a40ee02cefaae447708b7968342b7e36
'2011-11-14T15:56:11-05:00'
describe
'21002' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFID' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
3a456aec1d2a8e8f755d4d37b705c547
ae6b4a58c18276a9d8dfd7b29967be041fd9cf36
'2011-11-14T15:55:01-05:00'
describe
'9022' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFIE' 'sip-files00010.pro'
350fe7ca23ec5c3b4013beede5e100de
d0dc2c2406c1f7498f62f3568d50368868946044
'2011-11-14T15:54:05-05:00'
describe
'7375' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFIF' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
87aa9e2ba32d7327d3cd0245932c3ed7
8cec05bba9e1e99c1a09ea50910f72b344737553
describe
'2896740' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFIG' 'sip-files00010.tif'
8547a0ff20ddfbab078ae27d17f6c48f
8b9a025a97820d2d46cf9bfd8f0cf9bcc062e0ae
'2011-11-14T15:56:54-05:00'
describe
'464' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFIH' 'sip-files00010.txt'
51c2469d10a59b6a0a1a8c5b65c41805
f7078464690b2995a43b51502e34250445f730c1
'2011-11-14T15:57:13-05:00'
describe
'2340' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFII' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
929a016211d9d4c2b760ac3ca239df19
2964b52aa90be49782b0c7ef7da819fc1f177ac0
'2011-11-14T15:58:36-05:00'
describe
'320281' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFIJ' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
2fdcda431bb2812fc2d6985dac92b7bf
869a71ac8e17f26146c533d04abf602531e48571
'2011-11-14T15:55:47-05:00'
describe
'53700' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFIK' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
120935e4abe1a3e6e5c606401382ad19
29c2dcf04ee87e27ffb73133bb81271f379ad323
'2011-11-14T15:53:57-05:00'
describe
'21898' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFIL' 'sip-files00011.pro'
d9716cd43620156fecb9b375419b3882
6e6a5c0021bb1add1b6041417a8f19a5b66716c3
'2011-11-14T15:51:48-05:00'
describe
'18077' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFIM' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
8cc4c8588d18fa3a47d2b25870e24d3f
be896d4b0d2db272171e1452f1d874ed584ecb8d
'2011-11-14T15:56:43-05:00'
describe
'3129856' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFIN' 'sip-files00011.tif'
b0845918fbecf52822e45d24fe01158b
53fd5731f8cffc987fbb64d526d0fa27b83a12db
'2011-11-14T15:52:34-05:00'
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFIO' 'sip-files00011.txt'
42b15d6aa9819f00f0fa8deb67c1ed43
be6c63e47e680eebb33867d80eb7bf27cff2e961
'2011-11-14T15:57:22-05:00'
describe
'5045' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFIP' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
62f2e2dc01176ec2f17e34d25a30bf6d
0882321a777d39189d847978788069e79c620e6b
'2011-11-14T15:57:32-05:00'
describe
'6545' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFIQ' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
74487b805a4da905f56c5bc155f8cd8e
959418600d30ff8c3a5a0b08225fff95c524eb2a
'2011-11-14T15:54:52-05:00'
describe
'6975' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFIR' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
b6391d637fef6cc4053d09892060ab34
51b496dd82208b7570cd657ce82b3dcad4fd34ee
'2011-11-14T15:57:46-05:00'
describe
'2074' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFIS' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
d1bf64f10d4e9380e2af1507fd821e66
91a1e69f8de346ca4e3edf34994f59dc0b56a004
'2011-11-14T15:51:39-05:00'
describe
'2675276' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFIT' 'sip-files00012.tif'
a53c65692e3cbbae1deaf0b3ecdca676
818e27e4e98aec82ece14e1927e34545bac96568
'2011-11-14T15:58:15-05:00'
describe
'794' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFIU' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
20ebc2a1d5d7252611d867fbe70f4c7f
2c9dd92ecbb419691e4a987b607032eec0bbe798
'2011-11-14T15:53:24-05:00'
describe
'372072' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFIV' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
c587a92e99046684183a616697fe6e3d
5a0b48c4dfd2fa7d3124d51dae78fda725decf1b
'2011-11-14T15:51:44-05:00'
describe
'65760' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFIW' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
8c185a917e9428cee6de9ad8fd463ac0
48741730924a11158d68b0b394afbd51ad7c3466
'2011-11-14T15:54:04-05:00'
describe
'19995' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFIX' 'sip-files00013.pro'
5ab4e45aee375044002e311715dcddfe
a0df9ddb7dfcfec281fbba4ba09e0af8259964ec
'2011-11-14T15:52:13-05:00'
describe
'22847' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFIY' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
14fda0a13c2026c67a886cb8f1c97dae
3d80f4de4a0ae1be666b94eb241e74ab4bab58d8
'2011-11-14T15:56:38-05:00'
describe
'2987712' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFIZ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
1b85f36cfa48f3244850e00fbc4caeca
24a862c14893e18ce149f66543817eddfc663448
describe
'889' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJA' 'sip-files00013.txt'
9cb96a6f519789e2d84110e041250a86
a5199d2b55b7f69acce25adffed536f242b1cd6f
'2011-11-14T15:52:20-05:00'
describe
'5750' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJB' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
70e0a428633d2f975f46cfaabee97553
5b6e9f347bffc388fa5c73b03c0a8ceab7ffcd6c
'2011-11-14T15:52:36-05:00'
describe
'372430' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJC' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
cd52d59778c7308a03e7340bd82fd66d
8ad6e2dd476d710eaa61a8300d3530b280446ab6
'2011-11-14T15:55:07-05:00'
describe
'102460' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJD' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
81a2a817a5747c42dddec5060f85ba0c
d6b6c0f622bfdecc93e3c83f63b662692664c962
'2011-11-14T15:56:58-05:00'
describe
'35202' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJE' 'sip-files00014.pro'
0854835873795b48b8b2eca8caf05150
8c8457babd019224a4821a9293eae8782a032e89
describe
'35133' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJF' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
a542449ce58645bf4e725e957beacd88
359f3b27db09c11cad8a8a75e4138b1044591149
describe
'2991752' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJG' 'sip-files00014.tif'
6745b93a7b67fc858855cdfe3c30e5e5
c6ee774ef6c32447e8664133da70689b0d0427eb
'2011-11-14T15:54:40-05:00'
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJH' 'sip-files00014.txt'
33b4803177fe2c4d314018c9d7f3bcf1
32aac66de7fe86033a6c8c136a5ee2afeb63b062
'2011-11-14T15:54:59-05:00'
describe
'8948' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJI' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
899b2636f25aabc27f33202b881cd633
9f69c11c4667f3f43aaf9db13cbe59b2d68a2cfc
describe
'378382' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJJ' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
75257510eff7833fdcb8d893cce1655d
e7bbd2bad66c09f4f677c8632e776b9db38dae05
'2011-11-14T15:52:50-05:00'
describe
'96021' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJK' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
d9d280179d747f414e0bf0f97ad7da0d
9a3fc46d4768e27dc966225945779088d64cef73
'2011-11-14T15:56:12-05:00'
describe
'34379' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJL' 'sip-files00015.pro'
1c65d2718fb0524c5c63e8ce783b402b
f69342041cf86e68c04337061b6d0ed8c34c84e8
describe
'32285' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJM' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
1fe6975e9ab950b3af34a81de8c91b50
c417c7c7b1325e9853beaf3e3021a0fe16540df6
describe
'3038816' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJN' 'sip-files00015.tif'
4927459387ca39d9675a7e528e803a54
08f8768b282bdba22f54bdc09c87b4fe58cc8b55
'2011-11-14T15:54:48-05:00'
describe
'1365' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJO' 'sip-files00015.txt'
f14fd7e3435bf9faf01e13b0e4f00144
4827f24e21e4db2019db1fc2dec32bbadb1c268d
'2011-11-14T15:52:39-05:00'
describe
'8630' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJP' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
fde8511bb4c21ae369c00911c1c01f9d
eb9add094e4a19b29f7a2c3535ee7abccb51d085
'2011-11-14T15:54:58-05:00'
describe
'379516' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJQ' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
076015075f312320e20c1b1d53fdd54b
bfacbeb7ed68880d9bee29b3ff7059187fadbfa5
'2011-11-14T15:56:34-05:00'
describe
'101539' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJR' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
7da43acab07526632e25fa4a6a3785a0
0fa77fd1a587ad1c0325917c94a3bead21d2f73d
describe
'35492' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJS' 'sip-files00016.pro'
f74e74d2eb18d6da49e1282ad6f9b937
c578501849bfbc3587dfe80641905a67acad66c9
'2011-11-14T15:56:35-05:00'
describe
'34592' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJT' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
fcf7d264c019abe19439a022ce48ccd4
068faa01eb7cb94695c3505764d1dba403bb07f2
'2011-11-14T15:58:01-05:00'
describe
'3048328' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJU' 'sip-files00016.tif'
387961ed8d176788e16e4c5c936d57c7
2ee60e77e2433786735bab8b8cf863d6b0dbdfea
'2011-11-14T15:52:29-05:00'
describe
'1402' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJV' 'sip-files00016.txt'
726618c37c775a578ec91496f6a96b6d
e65eddf695f5472db842040ccbedc888b15532ba
'2011-11-14T15:55:58-05:00'
describe
'9263' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJW' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
5070af7416924204260e80f5bf73f0b1
d475cba68c6499b17d94b1a066710890001a440a
'2011-11-14T15:54:34-05:00'
describe
'376999' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJX' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
3c4a5e0e88c9ae42b192f1983743374c
738b3b07909a075fd1649081ba65a0e952f8c43b
describe
'90919' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJY' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
3af43ac4d4edf13882e613398d55950f
bb922ef88e339c04016af2c5a7ba3d539c3384f2
'2011-11-14T15:57:35-05:00'
describe
'32537' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFJZ' 'sip-files00017.pro'
a3c1d9b33406717594c8454653603edf
9f34ffd7f7d051dec59ddf27e23393b22874ba78
describe
'31777' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKA' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
b354bdba3a69a441008ca096baf3d8cd
0de74e1d4a3d87cbb55ed47c4eadac8c5bb04892
'2011-11-14T15:52:23-05:00'
describe
'3027792' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKB' 'sip-files00017.tif'
13825ac025f26dfc7a30ef2421da704a
a19c6ff1db9e71963853e95f757311d2257b7c7e
'2011-11-14T15:52:15-05:00'
describe
'1306' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKC' 'sip-files00017.txt'
9bf953727cb92afdc5374c2f1f19e71b
dbf6790adc0436cdd331f0585ab50335b35962ff
'2011-11-14T15:54:35-05:00'
describe
'8257' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKD' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
2d91e03409ed021ee75af86e4106e983
2b7e8189479e99420f4b23ba82854616a0ef2948
describe
'394330' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKE' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
e86d29889fc5e671399a0a18fcec3de5
2bb9b45c5e71bbcb49a5a596c7ee88b943e755a2
'2011-11-14T15:57:20-05:00'
describe
'77890' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKF' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
30c5fc64b5f324bde2511461263c8ef1
3fa9221f6cc4bbc0b04514527a5334bb265c5a3e
'2011-11-14T15:55:57-05:00'
describe
'26854' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKG' 'sip-files00018.pro'
324ea9ab5db4b5f46f8477402f38e32b
5b2b627c2eb8291ea3b2af74b0ac6e853070b07a
'2011-11-14T15:55:53-05:00'
describe
'25750' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKH' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
b1e9c262e44bd4694525c599759ab72b
87367e79c778a16e985bc5c048182ea904adbd5c
'2011-11-14T15:52:22-05:00'
describe
'3166304' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKI' 'sip-files00018.tif'
e1ba3fac32a086cc95b539c15c0bbf45
ae1346c31fa486d1639b7a81bd7ba3e0fff57c10
'2011-11-14T15:55:30-05:00'
describe
'1077' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKJ' 'sip-files00018.txt'
fceb0792754811c1581078940b8afc6a
d33338fd627eaad1feab3561a29d75d159c60f94
'2011-11-14T15:56:07-05:00'
describe
'7472' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKK' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
6e3898c0a6900eb382b0415a61013409
07d0f855a82b8db13a7070cd84d17ccc54da8f4e
'2011-11-14T15:57:44-05:00'
describe
'370664' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKL' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
ae5cd640d33ad8b875754348607b6098
e9de88556193f321c18bbc5349c63ba5994062b1
'2011-11-14T15:54:18-05:00'
describe
'98945' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKM' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
1f1a4a4cfcc2457fc0da5fe85ae07fb1
87f75e0f2d9ac9f26edae5f3d023dfdc824c1f82
describe
'34403' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKN' 'sip-files00019.pro'
edfb4c4a30ea5b281eefd27a091158df
0d30aee8f01d469b5d121b035eabcf16217dc118
describe
'34896' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKO' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
f1692faa624524988996381975a136d7
a9d7c3e54d50078ca7b9150b10af54bd851a694b
'2011-11-14T15:57:04-05:00'
describe
'2977316' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKP' 'sip-files00019.tif'
3ee71423b22971b5ddd30f2e304ae6b6
69e3e17628cf21f427c3943e1faebabece0b2002
'2011-11-14T15:57:40-05:00'
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKQ' 'sip-files00019.txt'
2e6ce62e8a57184abc97e095857f4744
85afdff7e026d376df4e6142e6134cd42849221f
'2011-11-14T15:51:41-05:00'
describe
'9043' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKR' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
8b69aba5b804d66eb7a4aa27e3b10d52
722129bf752342bd15d69cc94b1b71e867f23c5a
'2011-11-14T15:54:47-05:00'
describe
'373303' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKS' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
080a2b923259dc4f5bf8e6bf7b014f70
0a5fc457d397597971aedd4ae5da38511a457341
describe
'91927' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKT' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
9a88328fc75dadcdbe2c048877dd7387
21e882423a27dcd2b907e8aedf1b8be9d7170d62
'2011-11-14T15:53:03-05:00'
describe
'32413' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKU' 'sip-files00020.pro'
9939684ce33e8ba97493b1964ef9eeb2
52fa385bec5393180871b946d357b324587c01e1
describe
'31763' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKV' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
11207567e6014f5aedd54d69f5079944
b27df2106890d1dfa59b6695fed32953cc956699
'2011-11-14T15:53:05-05:00'
describe
'2998600' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKW' 'sip-files00020.tif'
8b2ce068ef473f273f5b6e116d1485a6
a8c18cd4d3fd92f9ebc0d0e0ed8b2675e72fe382
describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKX' 'sip-files00020.txt'
d612735ff6b6e1fcf2f2b9f09dade23e
6a0d87d18745a4b4054c106b9ebc9024d22c630f
'2011-11-14T15:57:57-05:00'
describe
'8595' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKY' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
1ce52d4aedc07ff44e45b76d5f3eb13e
7b731bbfbc74c417679753de00de75860733d2cc
'2011-11-14T15:58:04-05:00'
describe
'383906' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFKZ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
70c4ba93561ed8a0bd93ca6cc9a1a473
f5331a2b935d65f838fe6dcc7a961d7918f2f869
'2011-11-14T15:52:51-05:00'
describe
'95475' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLA' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
d6eb7f4c40966eb9b61a13a397303b53
c227e430ff1b59507c2e2cf669aaf39b2206af16
'2011-11-14T15:56:39-05:00'
describe
'32658' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLB' 'sip-files00021.pro'
f0c1796d22ad948db02fde091efaffa2
f9887b6b0367290a4b7f138fd0821409155a3da2
'2011-11-14T15:56:37-05:00'
describe
'33338' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLC' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
79da2e205ef2d75965e974c6e17fe0bc
9307ebdfc23b4ec06f12ad7025bf72e42bb870f3
'2011-11-14T15:58:19-05:00'
describe
'3083348' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLD' 'sip-files00021.tif'
39c033a23271435831be3fcb3300c39e
c35a78bbbc532ce31fbdf1788c519682c6255ca9
'2011-11-14T15:54:36-05:00'
describe
'1314' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLE' 'sip-files00021.txt'
62f2da0e3ef89159b21d3a5f9e6689d1
860f74f8d36dde26dd91e532415e85cfa63e31ce
'2011-11-14T15:55:54-05:00'
describe
'9242' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLF' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
f3bc1beb6c0e52d146d8d297f35e1f3d
c0206c139924c6ae23de3af7121e0bc981043a22
describe
'375184' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLG' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
52968798223afe07ecb97f2cf1c7ecf0
c093f930b4053a937244d851e0665fd4333d3457
'2011-11-14T15:55:39-05:00'
describe
'97586' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLH' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
84b7af135e5794d2b9888127db3b8825
a7711a02ae327855282c29b17970da5419b7c4a8
'2011-11-14T15:54:42-05:00'
describe
'34290' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLI' 'sip-files00022.pro'
062f2a63972de085821c497b6e529487
72b763a0b6c8fd1f21778956f4cc82e9c277d06d
describe
'33098' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLJ' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
17b131abfa976db79aa49fc829428232
c72187d3d4710c06946f8ace5c03ce5665e9f316
'2011-11-14T15:52:52-05:00'
describe
'3013428' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLK' 'sip-files00022.tif'
77a163b724ef36aa8fdd2c877ca642fc
38417410ea46845e492f6849a9d37d63c8ddcd11
'2011-11-14T15:54:11-05:00'
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLL' 'sip-files00022.txt'
d735986ad69c32595344bff24a544245
f0440889aecf563109b064ddcf2d0d10c1d392f1
'2011-11-14T15:55:25-05:00'
describe
'9218' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLM' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
3c543f9a40747954663f783763e35c56
a675e388842b6d19b2f24923cbb6ccfeaf00bbda
'2011-11-14T15:57:19-05:00'
describe
'383036' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLN' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
3d0d15da3b76a5108afa266a37e73b02
ce008feceaf7870f5e7a4eb95eb03f28f9f69dfb
describe
'98161' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLO' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
922d51f11980d309e5d932aa3969529c
600dd1844ea742e94affa8abcfdc430dd9778dfc
'2011-11-14T15:57:38-05:00'
describe
'34673' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLP' 'sip-files00023.pro'
6715a7c848dbb2dffb2fc24f65c85491
fd6e0e5dcbb39a25b2dab73b0a570c3aa55f1efb
'2011-11-14T15:56:16-05:00'
describe
'33492' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLQ' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
947ca15c77d8411f8bd088d041cbd476
8b6b6c6fd4b798ae29aff5c1f2897800a6dbed30
'2011-11-14T15:51:53-05:00'
describe
'3076400' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLR' 'sip-files00023.tif'
6cb37fddfa0d7aede692f9cedbf1c35f
c3c2a0d582f56c23f38cd9e5c6346bcae5bc1d58
'2011-11-14T15:56:04-05:00'
describe
'1379' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLS' 'sip-files00023.txt'
06c05fb5bfc725e1e9ebc2355c52c9a0
ae6904c292a396850bc2e1ec8a20b0b9933cf48d
'2011-11-14T15:54:37-05:00'
describe
'8909' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLT' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
a7ea6aa6036cb75043f4479c6512ca56
d83a2ac20c80abd8147184abcb149fd448cad05e
describe
'382097' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLU' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
c659251d5c1402a88c16dba77a23855f
1db564dcc420d01bcd2b66ced363bd2866fd02b1
describe
'91044' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLV' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
90d22f005be2323d4c6fb41b53907638
a5ca5e9999bb9efcfe1ba8e9c608d976dadb9aa3
'2011-11-14T15:55:21-05:00'
describe
'31398' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLW' 'sip-files00024.pro'
cf70ff790b8d246a8c0a5c66e88a49e5
5f4bbe173bde3e95dc75fee4d4777e55fe240cd1
'2011-11-14T15:57:56-05:00'
describe
'31742' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLX' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
4094fedc66fdf70301b3eb68ff53f17c
58c9c8fcce41cf18e209f715f4e2ccaae3d75b3e
describe
'3068948' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLY' 'sip-files00024.tif'
049c9d7a736fa2d01fa67811ce888ee3
b2aa07c397d5874fa703cf1df6cc5dc6a6242665
'2011-11-14T15:57:08-05:00'
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFLZ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
7d24cfb2c14c74d797ac7363ef3338ac
ec55256223bdab7ae118bc2cb00fc58c6bf34fb9
describe
'7962' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFMA' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
cd07916f5af4088c6823f307f3db652b
46d580e654224ba1fcb1dab3d28f0f85f4cc95f0
'2011-11-14T15:55:36-05:00'
describe
'399207' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFMB' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
79f63016bc975355358cd61a9cd77598
a33fcfe41a084cc32ae8ee9b507211364bb7ebb7
'2011-11-14T15:58:07-05:00'
describe
'154340' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFMC' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
13b5337b42f95ea555e70ae0ba331d6e
da6ff5c29b47764ec6c0d999fcf252df5043cb3c
describe
'2438' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFMD' 'sip-files00025.pro'
244e7c9c7aa311cac447cf48a17753ba
c7646b239c08484c090f0ae29048924674e6134f
'2011-11-14T15:57:41-05:00'
describe
'38072' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFME' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
018d5f28cfa285f28bc124bd3d6cf6bc
b60bf21913f92bb4bd65b46d3b573cce97c32bbe
describe
'3207508' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFMF' 'sip-files00025.tif'
82813e9c64d191dd6f0e2b7510d17474
59af06cc417162fbb659e5670db5bc932865071e
'2011-11-14T15:52:58-05:00'
describe
'211' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFMG' 'sip-files00025.txt'
908d92ee4dbc4120b4228f4b0fb88d30
f14c4924e824011f19b8fd3d43aeedc6c1804950
'2011-11-14T15:56:09-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'9157' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFMH' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
f167a5dc9e1057089bab5c8772ed1762
bb9ed36d1d3e235f38b1109bce2138724ae0859c
'2011-11-14T15:58:31-05:00'
describe
'147639' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFMI' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
5a54073b9571bf15a557a880d48448b9
d004a4b3ebd295df91b9fbf7e29114f34d42ec58
describe
'27610' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFMJ' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
7cd4caad6b1106a1ece0b4ad4ed8a513
924641fd77db515033c9149646f3e4469c337eca
'2011-11-14T15:55:19-05:00'
describe
'7501' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFMK' 'sip-files00027.pro'
11b9ed044f79d0d76ea5f3ee6b1162d4
072b8ccaaad76422a12a6b18cf86ab8d0779c6f9
'2011-11-14T15:54:00-05:00'
describe
'9292' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFML' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
ff0db0d8641952363a9a3acb97b367cf
efd1b3672a4fa0da087b48061acc39dbeb06df4d
'2011-11-14T15:56:29-05:00'
describe
'3231236' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFMM' 'sip-files00027.tif'
6b36dd9f0e80f70f67a6a95ff921aff6
af310f06c9eb9c4475cebe9cb6e2f9e5f007dc0d
'2011-11-14T15:52:45-05:00'
describe
'313' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFMN' 'sip-files00027.txt'
76cdca314f016ca071517a72225ba749
69b45a557dcd0cec46e6ace9bd98ca978222c4fe
describe
'2601' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFMO' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
754cb013d8514b6cce360ff8d04337e8
9a8bb1993d32cef6cf74b1102025fdc208b93121
describe
'387351' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFMP' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
46355fabe0fed16ad976a06df38be6e1
d4c5a19e8af8af47db1a2fbd6e99777b0574e2ce
'2011-11-14T15:53:33-05:00'
describe
'74260' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFMQ' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
2c2033981049d5148f7610bcf0d35755
301e1b72cd383907f3f4ea837b53a684b99e9843
describe
'24067' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFMR' 'sip-files00028.pro'
22971ab691bc2ffa8b90414afbc0dbef
2d3436c9427b283de134ebecfb464f33d48073f2
describe
'24763' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFMS' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
e7f8a9074da25323ba478b6259eedefa
65f91cc30bac1afefa53de179dd9964e791858a7
'2011-11-14T15:58:24-05:00'
describe
'3110272' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFMT' 'sip-files00028.tif'
e883dc71a4b87ce6676bad719f42c25c
0467baeed629b8af95194e0aac8ca2089c057a69
'2011-11-14T15:55:59-05:00'
describe
'1055' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFMU' 'sip-files00028.txt'
7b90bc89032568375bfd796a75808362
60018f2cf4ad3b0f467dde5a4916cc185d8ca4d0
'2011-11-14T15:51:51-05:00'
describe
'6565' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFMV' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
56489f0636c9c84c4d786b9179821b7d
f2d6c466b11dd4c0c1d3a013b16217878bc2bece
'2011-11-14T15:57:53-05:00'
describe
'392496' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFMW' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
06de06cb2b2e0365b028754341f63091
954cc493e4acbbbc6a134fdeffd07abdb53492dc
'2011-11-14T15:56:05-05:00'
describe
'88784' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFMX' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
e97edfb21a1ce6ff3dc1ff1971291ecd
e43fbee9742d786a83fae08a3dabde5bdd75f4d3
describe
'31397' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFMY' 'sip-files00029.pro'
bc9c32e6a4070170f7771c3c1613692f
bfa53fe1f14036d425d22eed961cde92d5569876
'2011-11-14T15:58:37-05:00'
describe
'29032' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFMZ' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
fe626a5e51f70baa5e7e9a29ee183da8
4a6f18995f4d7b33bdd0212a7d75da2842e9f7b5
describe
'3151708' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFNA' 'sip-files00029.tif'
860ab48b2ff2b2a32a78ec542d810e50
6a8619c97532d1e1e8d5f1ee5c6fd67f160e7b61
describe
'1251' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFNB' 'sip-files00029.txt'
52543d19e6f0a2975c5bb101611e570f
754cb63eb27e45ba00db47371004fc68306681d9
describe
'7760' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFNC' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
384f25121fd5a39c4ae3207b3d14adf1
dcfc72275501c6bbe8d0e85711f4598e9317585c
describe
'402408' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFND' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
03f9e60fb803b94dda013e2766630ff9
d3cb5e028d5603854082bba401ea8e5157133561
describe
'92566' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFNE' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
3606122eca9cb9e14cf084e5450b85f7
d704ea83e14fc8d5fd1a064495bb00235b8f805c
'2011-11-14T15:52:30-05:00'
describe
'33151' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFNF' 'sip-files00030.pro'
f70dd1be2c326a309110f253c3bf87ba
14c558b381a42992ca43ea645fa4569415cd5265
'2011-11-14T15:51:59-05:00'
describe
'31655' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFNG' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
cb21560642345041a4fc473960e32bb9
798743a8faf9041c675a463359bd5b23aa322861
'2011-11-14T15:58:23-05:00'
describe
'3231380' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFNH' 'sip-files00030.tif'
5ddd42ad62e74d2c621197481435b882
c73ae0f9030f405d425fff062634f79cc602d752
'2011-11-14T15:55:20-05:00'
describe
'1307' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFNI' 'sip-files00030.txt'
4cf17f73cd031cc56ac57a37072e48bc
4aeab2e623f709450c713164a7a47b1cf8864a92
'2011-11-14T15:53:35-05:00'
describe
'7807' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFNJ' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
bfa6f5ed27a17c279f8d2e4e4b43228a
9166521738b9953ce80ffca49f9de739d8c8b8d4
'2011-11-14T15:56:40-05:00'
describe
'398381' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFNK' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
c581f0a4e51314ad4ae1918aaf1ca4d0
137291c1440d6313a8eaeec356746dd3e4a9e670
'2011-11-14T15:57:30-05:00'
describe
'89306' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFNL' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
3a9db7b81d04d848df28375dd25cebc0
a2ad7f36a72d1cece6b3182099860420c6f4fa53
'2011-11-14T15:56:15-05:00'
describe
'31887' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFNM' 'sip-files00031.pro'
981e1640eb4c4966e25e98108b25df7b
9ff0bfcb42dbfc16809b7c636958f5f3093108ce
'2011-11-14T15:52:04-05:00'
describe
'29539' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFNN' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
ae336aae1252c2a20ac4fa356cbb2553
e72b0f3230057abea24b4a8f8ea307ed4e9e6cb9
'2011-11-14T15:55:51-05:00'
describe
'3199020' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFNO' 'sip-files00031.tif'
0f360cfa8d00285590b2c286cb8abd50
00c8ed0eadd0523efed70f54d500ef3cb7a6423d
'2011-11-14T15:55:34-05:00'
describe
'1271' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFNP' 'sip-files00031.txt'
789e096ef50c3da4abae506d1ebce0bf
31551ff4c7f33a52be5daecfef28c3064e4473cb
describe
'8046' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFNQ' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
57b8a227506eeb970d850ee74c9dab20
d3a3e567e127162ce8dfde3ab0ffdbaf8235841a
'2011-11-14T15:57:33-05:00'
describe
'378660' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFNR' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
ea1e0cf338206da55769e6239b32b59b
e7253780e28b1e912af2aafe6bc0a91718c5149c
'2011-11-14T15:56:57-05:00'
describe
'84925' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFNS' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
dd56bd34bb56872a4226692452f97849
532b384133a63328ee5f7bb8af46b65703549fb5
'2011-11-14T15:57:23-05:00'
describe
'29225' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFNT' 'sip-files00032.pro'
a49689dd6f3cf51164160b86b22138f6
a153a9d0cab5ffd12eece3230d8c28f1610c4f15
'2011-11-14T15:53:26-05:00'
describe
'29953' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFNU' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
cecda0fc6ff4f3d4483c7f9765607b5a
4c2e30ceddba2678d96bc24b741f490cb1c44cbe
describe
'3041112' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFNV' 'sip-files00032.tif'
59bd334c2d05aef2a9bc58a27619937b
d47f6ffb6c58b4289d2479087a934b6c2c17177e
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFNW' 'sip-files00032.txt'
edfca596da3dc3e0be945194b18b8834
a27a6f301bc97cf05b4ad8a3222d4453138a9ee7
describe
'8181' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFNX' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
3e95a4ebd5572f7b207893991e3b3b8c
1b7fbb34cb63516527b9433f0a6629d981168bd5
'2011-11-14T15:51:45-05:00'
describe
'400747' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFNY' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
3c97ee896f379fb9764f25df8385eddf
9b6eac958713e5a589d96a6f974b548949ceb8b6
describe
'87649' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFNZ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
e601b6c5a24e6f26fb6e30e97bc9d618
64d7b897cdfccc173e01187e6c68b1c0a2be2f55
'2011-11-14T15:55:03-05:00'
describe
'33127' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFOA' 'sip-files00033.pro'
cd29cdbd241c88c48ac999a9a2770c00
028a1f98caa61fba14d9a20498c44e33403bb641
describe
'29673' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFOB' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
28e4f80bf542257deedd3345e0695075
ebc72fac3e97849cdf8bce07ad530c65d9b80cd5
'2011-11-14T15:57:37-05:00'
describe
'3218092' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFOC' 'sip-files00033.tif'
684bd2e329109284120873fc4064ac75
8ea58a91ac706fed02b8c74245669457d4f55dc9
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFOD' 'sip-files00033.txt'
57971d0529a8197ffd71511949285643
41261f305cd7c50ffc482ad06bfeae2ea4c41251
'2011-11-14T15:58:08-05:00'
describe
'7415' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFOE' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
b6c5f69bd261ad2332425fcf8994013d
75ba0253117f91ec7209313e65ffb5e3760ac405
describe
'403097' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFOF' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
0e4bb751d512c5dec49da075dc81903e
396fc106710a8767c76242160bb8ee12826342cb
describe
'98008' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFOG' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
24ecfe6a56328c2d1d9112bc8a84e7bf
5b2fad291ef3eab42576ec46f090ddb0d2c92bb8
'2011-11-14T15:55:35-05:00'
describe
'34883' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFOH' 'sip-files00034.pro'
ac431da0f947f7365b6b8522685db3fc
1f5dd40ffbefbbad3c829f18392bdd0f5739bd3b
'2011-11-14T15:53:14-05:00'
describe
'32433' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFOI' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
ca331d49bc7dfa3cca201851b5b25639
714f905e1e2da580f9ceabf8801bb0cee8041440
describe
'3236168' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFOJ' 'sip-files00034.tif'
14d434bf8ff325cc308105b02581ae7d
37fdc60331e95a44875cf08d11f49e14f8816de4
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFOK' 'sip-files00034.txt'
876ec209c48994e38751b7ad6108ab69
e9d0f40f0a052d342ee24cb074052c8eced4e80c
describe
'8764' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFOL' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
2cf223e97d9c06bc97747c211b419d8d
2d8e480d84f42cc9a20e1de5738570a1bf3680d7
'2011-11-14T15:57:11-05:00'
describe
'412646' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFOM' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
a062d73082a38dcb1a2add9eb8cc8323
a1fd12171ec3bc0351b72ff40c67556ded66b690
describe
'85538' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFON' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
a68222d9d3f28e253e19f902ca588f34
6e04d86df3cb11139c0f3a62bf69adcb7de94f02
'2011-11-14T15:55:56-05:00'
describe
'31131' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFOO' 'sip-files00035.pro'
0113deabac823d168f12cd998a926ecc
87a00a578150e8d5373ae78435791147f646d647
describe
'28516' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFOP' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
4cfe2f24ab386a8e116f81493843d1a2
2b5ef550992c3a14612d227194e43c51d87ca24a
'2011-11-14T15:56:59-05:00'
describe
'3312556' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFOQ' 'sip-files00035.tif'
0f527fba841e3ff1863f3be2357b5f6c
e1852979400b2c305c33eb8fe47ddff5bdd9c726
'2011-11-14T15:56:18-05:00'
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFOR' 'sip-files00035.txt'
6f132f30f162a342bd894c46e72e78be
32ac9f2359e8784757e289ddec03b8b56afce1a3
describe
'7475' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFOS' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
651e83566cd94be50be7231a7ad9b53d
5a677cc6f8d92c8aff92c25b038cb1f21873c93b
describe
'407965' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFOT' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
9b77d1f1e1b46206296dccd71d6b40b0
7e1cd218fb570f5e668f74f005e85599db9bac41
'2011-11-14T15:55:44-05:00'
describe
'92514' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFOU' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
b509694d6eaf597a92c4e131cea1e15f
02398cfd449535463b9d6cea9fd1bb9609b39410
'2011-11-14T15:53:28-05:00'
describe
'34373' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFOV' 'sip-files00036.pro'
95e93b9d0b42a2523b771f57939db434
d5af6f000b47d57f01c658bcfcd0bca491ca37f7
describe
'31760' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFOW' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
435bba8a5e6b01803daf709b72c20d8b
a27fc673cbcb748d6c348c9ea870b879e05e7014
'2011-11-14T15:55:04-05:00'
describe
'3276216' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFOX' 'sip-files00036.tif'
83cfc5485e014568a1f3bb2c9cc1aaa8
43500e732e277a12774b7547b7b2e1d33d5876db
'2011-11-14T15:55:08-05:00'
describe
'1350' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFOY' 'sip-files00036.txt'
b3f53199b0a5359fa8008c18ce4e6fc8
1ae2a35bb2fe534f7d63e5d642443a4707333ed7
describe
'7504' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFOZ' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
d211cbee11a9eb53a22ed66d8442ecaf
6fb0170a99f7dba042a8384a09e3000b04d1ca6d
'2011-11-14T15:52:17-05:00'
describe
'401370' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPA' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
f4faa96596185cfaa0cc47e80ad19554
812b8a94fbd60cf40b656925933233f81e4148a4
describe
'85970' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPB' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
a91275ff1e11d635504f81f71776f4a3
cc9121ff171227dcf09ef6e3b9b9ab880026f036
'2011-11-14T15:56:45-05:00'
describe
'31329' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPC' 'sip-files00037.pro'
91a83f2b372599ec3fdad101c404df80
d16e7bac2aaf7bf9e9504a735fcfad9d91d9628f
describe
'29352' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPD' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
d772726469e7fec08281f2f105dac336
0ef6123922015ab9271ac705cab5a3ee3379d28a
describe
'3222512' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPE' 'sip-files00037.tif'
a74f08725afc45fab3cfe0a43fc77040
2c4ca17200474d9bcdaf503f6be6ed088718c066
'2011-11-14T15:57:06-05:00'
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPF' 'sip-files00037.txt'
607e21e81e3372bd234d00204300f438
d72ff99de82b0fcd4535c273b7b49921df09f1b2
describe
'7618' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPG' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
97200ce29994299f53d203a9ef7fa0f5
747e6a6ebf2b4650aed9f9246963ea1dfe066eeb
'2011-11-14T15:56:56-05:00'
describe
'349890' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPH' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
e5623553972c1efa36330a461da895e7
c9c736937d7dd0e60ec4d4adc497a83419c7430a
describe
'57201' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPI' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
3d1f49a1faca25dfc35825604a18b55b
177c19aeeada6ede4165f43e72f095c0fe3e38d7
'2011-11-14T15:51:47-05:00'
describe
'19607' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPJ' 'sip-files00038.pro'
a908da50ecd8dafdb06a26c5e666d970
267836743f433f446ec6d7d6fbe388d894977049
describe
'18915' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPK' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
7b342334bde057778fb2a1789e2bada2
3c2876a81385b41b6651cf539a73e9c26243592e
'2011-11-14T15:56:06-05:00'
describe
'3174724' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPL' 'sip-files00038.tif'
477f78c8145c60ad53500034c1643eba
28527c3e2581f37b891ea94736ad5f1f4db296dd
'2011-11-14T15:55:55-05:00'
describe
'784' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPM' 'sip-files00038.txt'
112897d6ae3ba328aab3ced76a80da96
615f8e267878ac2386d26f4922af498fbfa7a4e2
'2011-11-14T15:56:51-05:00'
describe
'4973' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPN' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
e129985828f607dd4ca3a95841d3937b
8048685abef94981582e5f8bf087ee9a4a635742
'2011-11-14T15:58:33-05:00'
describe
'402651' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPO' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
2b80c9c0ef49c8f3ff0b7743dde1750a
fee76096004c80f7001c04176fdbf544add3cdc8
describe
'76345' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPP' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
0b2744b42575d58cf0be77dffcfb2db8
b66ac102f0c49f0cd86f6f28773ce8534adbf3e0
describe
'25460' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPQ' 'sip-files00039.pro'
521625221ad16748cb5eb4a080c9d906
3e2e52e069a5b7b11367a174b3107e551a46f8e7
describe
'25651' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPR' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
f468a2705def56b66af5ce9c8c9b7e3d
8dc0db3e93ddf7e88b0909be668662fd75c6f148
'2011-11-14T15:53:58-05:00'
describe
'3232756' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPS' 'sip-files00039.tif'
9d3c8571119ca0ff91473a9ae73e241a
f196609d69ad6aaaf8424b22413daeba7c3236b5
'2011-11-14T15:57:24-05:00'
describe
'1071' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPT' 'sip-files00039.txt'
bdb0777eb29436680b215862b89c74f3
f4ddea8fe4ea035df3cd1544903639b78f21c653
describe
'6554' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPU' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
638f4a290077fc36689cc6184b994aa4
18ad1e4108ea9dfec8668e0dc13286c5636b59da
'2011-11-14T15:54:03-05:00'
describe
'386450' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPV' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
c30c904a8861af62344440a4b656521d
ce5f44e63c9b4e3732ee23dfafa57f3644f70d17
'2011-11-14T15:54:27-05:00'
describe
'98181' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPW' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
34e97c7ddbe19ad1713dbb4f9accd1d5
3dc61b5409dcc12ca6242cce380a22e559c05a86
'2011-11-14T15:53:55-05:00'
describe
'35373' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPX' 'sip-files00040.pro'
2d667ad6b35fa54c385f10550b4489ef
f9d93c572c87b02a618f911c6ea4061d70bd39e6
describe
'33682' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPY' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
be0f7d7be52ce492d13e0a6589b1330d
d8d4db6fa7ebabedb2242e482f03b3f81a0e3c59
'2011-11-14T15:53:32-05:00'
describe
'3103632' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFPZ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
62f57f64bd2fd40376f8eadd537af77b
f35f94431b38ca201c40dfecc906a278648010ea
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQA' 'sip-files00040.txt'
3f53f8070258e835e33df286e5756b80
ff7a166701bada5968b1f98c1f29da86949250d7
'2011-11-14T15:56:27-05:00'
describe
'8116' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQB' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
7882d9f0acd9449a0f913f37967b4173
bff202fad92ee9ac99276311f960edf330095d44
describe
'395580' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQC' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
e3e5258ede985054a18111ab6878ec65
213de23fededa44758da61b5d94aaa38566f282d
'2011-11-14T15:53:07-05:00'
describe
'96512' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQD' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
e1332c2902ca886816f04a4a4104085e
ab6fd650673472573bf930b0c4902994c2cf0fa1
describe
'34705' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQE' 'sip-files00041.pro'
291dfa0a6f4258eca89b0b157c192491
5803edcbfb701c6970e587b224e9988ce91aeaeb
describe
'32748' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQF' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
e556fc8c8d9369e6b9ce6a2ffdd52ec5
4b64aeea7d6a693e522b74ba46183ad9eb032059
describe
'3176452' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQG' 'sip-files00041.tif'
745d70c5ad83d8b06b7907ef83ed0abb
3b000260f7578e1abc71cf32f0834e1baa05268a
'2011-11-14T15:52:25-05:00'
describe
'1364' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQH' 'sip-files00041.txt'
e5a84a9c04bc4c361ca26b8f4c818fc0
85464d47740f74d615c8d853035516cb8d4cd991
'2011-11-14T15:51:46-05:00'
describe
'8534' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQI' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
bddaadde8da018b97a6ddbe20a0c1031
9172b0af83a87af4246afad73e626edec712eed8
'2011-11-14T15:52:43-05:00'
describe
'416152' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQJ' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
7dda0bce2eb53bc0d55f5c63a2044f57
a623d336690bcff456c0dd506bebdc2a18b63aa9
'2011-11-14T15:53:54-05:00'
describe
'92417' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQK' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
7fe44966561800b58ed24f1e8131f6da
e18c1d474c183f27f1188dca3bbfa4b3cb08143f
'2011-11-14T15:51:43-05:00'
describe
'35488' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQL' 'sip-files00042.pro'
9f1a386ee22f06ca2440d914a9161b2f
3c4fbc7a40492bddf7aa3e9062e8b5643eccf20d
describe
'30544' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQM' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
39ce0c95fa5e7f5c3d1a56c0b560a106
0fef4a0ad288842d947e0a59549378463d539f3c
'2011-11-14T15:54:01-05:00'
describe
'3340868' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQN' 'sip-files00042.tif'
06af38d171671dbebbb750a485d5c132
69da8b2015f46a72ec183f6b0437079f8e96e474
'2011-11-14T15:56:33-05:00'
describe
'1389' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQO' 'sip-files00042.txt'
0c56ff7f882c15b62f816222b8ed77f6
43b1f1b316dcfb571b5398db3ac353131a912189
'2011-11-14T15:53:01-05:00'
describe
'7378' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQP' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
6b7a48766a7e8d4f4b36b9baf629ac9a
366141fecc88c8c129f8a74947e1a171f3970f51
'2011-11-14T15:56:46-05:00'
describe
'393426' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQQ' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
fc3e0586b57b710e59c5ef8d1c82bfbf
a7fe9b75d16b5e035c1d498a465c6857a6391eaf
describe
'93867' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQR' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
03fefa4b7fd71965c35bab488a941a86
398d46138a511c2f2234bd946d437fa9ee24c004
describe
'33933' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQS' 'sip-files00043.pro'
88dac5e732ebab5b4fb2a0b6bbe91c77
0988ea0f2e243eb962a31a0e2401fc68a9ee0a2c
'2011-11-14T15:53:23-05:00'
describe
'31940' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQT' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
dbab6cb06c33d28eda6d93259ebb9b46
8831055b49405545db792fac07f402f4e7affb60
describe
'3160100' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQU' 'sip-files00043.tif'
4301f2c2be2af44cbd1cb144f7b68dd0
201ef43cf19653ba1cf4edc60892f912d084760c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQV' 'sip-files00043.txt'
81f4dcc1a18d1bffe4b96b16da09906d
181062276fecad959198605f52bfbe5c4aad69d5
describe
'8064' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQW' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
c0e08dbcfe1b03354b176dd66fb98321
1d55e6f7d503fe3a06d4fccf8b8b555f263bc6e8
'2011-11-14T15:57:03-05:00'
describe
'383883' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQX' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
eb400195f15950f41c55dbaf0d8c9a0d
d6190a9da035d3ec47d80ef52bc7e45232992e49
describe
'95276' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQY' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
79fe00bbce31c7f5f4f9d49fff9f5e38
0ac84558431d7079a0a107bc6964b6974fba379f
'2011-11-14T15:55:40-05:00'
describe
'33412' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFQZ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
c9de8c7853402d9c86af53c8bedc07e8
5f754acccce12c01f832793394855c4c1f628365
'2011-11-14T15:55:16-05:00'
describe
'32011' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRA' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
540620113ffbf0ba15a4398a32a1668e
5dd6fedabda2547e6830b3998cf6ca87a730f19a
'2011-11-14T15:52:59-05:00'
describe
'3082784' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRB' 'sip-files00044.tif'
0e1741467410b528a5f46f6fcfb81a88
90db9710815d67cab0b83cc9cb4d02aa16047bfd
describe
'1318' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRC' 'sip-files00044.txt'
be6693f5d38342d128f18829a2646a05
40dbfa3b13f466417864ec4ee14683591e821e41
describe
'8390' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRD' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
d61eb83a60e5415bbef99e45ce36dbbc
d5584957865bdd093bd1af18b232c0ccda2e21a8
describe
'397480' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRE' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
a123b91c349523e69d1493897d9caf3d
d4c49768576f706b54570b86929f88818b0f3be7
describe
'93887' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRF' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
e7ccd23d0ef52bf6c138fc74ca27b005
e68fb4b93182893ca44afebccf1734832aa8677e
describe
'33702' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRG' 'sip-files00045.pro'
f8802ebe318d828437768eea2886413b
3e5eb179635a14c91a9a9fbe8393e400786c96fa
describe
'30895' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRH' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
75411c1d06f7a7fcc8cb575bcd9a43f9
ab8947bf3448968659ac4eb6f5d93da1047c52d5
'2011-11-14T15:53:09-05:00'
describe
'3191464' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRI' 'sip-files00045.tif'
0567f7e89fcb6bc74ab05535c1c82022
be6277222ebdb041b5467afbcc6817e2e17fa118
'2011-11-14T15:55:32-05:00'
describe
'1354' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRJ' 'sip-files00045.txt'
49503b352fd5dc2c67dc47abb0009cd7
8e36412897de6df375353e34df2dcdb649f66f67
'2011-11-14T15:52:09-05:00'
describe
'7968' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRK' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
84dc107b629b90f90a01838118ce7f88
e08e3410f41fe5c9d3a208ec0a985894816d9015
'2011-11-14T15:54:19-05:00'
describe
'399403' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRL' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
4a96285e3a90ffb9cedc60e849056bbd
97810434a2c2195fb4f67b6324538e1c9a20a090
describe
'81184' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRM' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
596589e01a15b8608f14387c15ab1d04
eb9204e03cef0765df749f3d05232ff1dc14057e
describe
'29222' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRN' 'sip-files00046.pro'
26b85c3bcd84af265224670fd47b1897
5afa75a6f6061fe75dd04d5bba6f71419c439098
'2011-11-14T15:55:02-05:00'
describe
'27288' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRO' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
04c04a8b3237b13480bffe24864bcc17
ab575f1f313445174481827c0c6468f4ca992f48
'2011-11-14T15:53:08-05:00'
describe
'3207012' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRP' 'sip-files00046.tif'
614d71ba103e92567e1ac1f7254c7c19
17f27a37092ab8f2618adffd14b47195e050ee69
'2011-11-14T15:55:09-05:00'
describe
'1165' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRQ' 'sip-files00046.txt'
5aa710fdf5f409b86562808609a1cfaf
f0a2e45d97ca22c16bd8ffcf19adf496736832dc
'2011-11-14T15:58:22-05:00'
describe
'6894' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRR' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
44d0132219721e18eea4b92ad5ba0384
2c38d7748a3e22c0e5dd03fd295798f43fe42ef8
'2011-11-14T15:53:10-05:00'
describe
'341622' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRS' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
0a8624d6d8465fe50b490957f595cf4d
a7e6439697096a44f8b3699547576a70085f105b
'2011-11-14T15:53:06-05:00'
describe
'75312' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRT' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
ab31420e6c9414b55ec8ef15bfd90d1b
03bc960aed3c50262da7a74cfcfed88290ea38c3
describe
'27394' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRU' 'sip-files00047.pro'
eae330db65d8a55def918b338c720502
51649e575e877a6a9b52cada0f6a902b9392d906
'2011-11-14T15:55:37-05:00'
describe
'26102' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRV' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
899329bbff8ffe7476ccfa6db6cefe1e
5e1ceab310faef28d33211fda12b56c8cd621294
describe
'2745368' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRW' 'sip-files00047.tif'
30105485ff2f479926847c30d9b16fc0
fc9316acb31214e0ba5336564aa049bc20b2576b
'2011-11-14T15:58:03-05:00'
describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRX' 'sip-files00047.txt'
9b50fb0e2f8bf9781804943d0c3a7be7
4215874fce7492aa3b71d37d0cc784b1efa1f05e
describe
'6688' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRY' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
7ebc93e93745274048b1b83bf59c6273
59516094598dda9fadaa5d54f04b8c3c9d35a666
describe
'360429' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFRZ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
df78505e17e15cf5b9968acc3d6ebce0
a1ef191c571f9c1afb56398fe8bcf0198bb28f80
describe
'75628' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFSA' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
a26b2bc92cb6efed4d49043334b8bbeb
f0131182fa27ba7a45fa38f3ed4f2b668007d308
describe
'24482' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFSB' 'sip-files00048.pro'
66d6a0c815cbfb45a94af7dde9f49fb4
0e2ed000f5f5e8c775c9a695a7c184dcc96a62b5
describe
'25354' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFSC' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
a49b3e70772f8dfe258f86e92f7f2cc4
5bc1e3052fe478ac33e1f0622159f93688af1fe5
describe
'2894652' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFSD' 'sip-files00048.tif'
abea2914ad14e85b74b3043ff333363a
4c822bac67d6155a63e74a695ee59e5bf9b5fab4
describe
'1025' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFSE' 'sip-files00048.txt'
835503319f9087dbe6ac587387917910
51b1cb55a030328c32bdc67b7e12d25fd13f0c26
describe
'6424' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFSF' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
162463a61d0e865cc5980391b38ce122
06cce4d120f68fd8dae670c7d19a418981178efb
'2011-11-14T15:54:14-05:00'
describe
'388878' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFSG' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
309c3c06dfde1b01687f6aef11963919
61233c6f45f21dd98b298e27c2ef12e029c57bcd
describe
'98207' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFSH' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
aed52e722ba6d3acd3601639be9d750f
3cb260d1669d6d9be69db192f7f3c513a8d7f94a
'2011-11-14T15:52:47-05:00'
describe
'35227' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFSI' 'sip-files00049.pro'
52cb0594cf63a9bb19206eb8e9164b7d
8bb6bcd93390d817dcbc130405d6effb47b1713f
describe
'33286' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFSJ' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
c7393433704b71cb21a3e6bf26d051c4
7bc3d3faeffa0ccd6c34d749ad4763991f8cea98
describe
'3123688' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFSK' 'sip-files00049.tif'
86a95ed648ba68b5131250f72876976e
6a19858c18aff65b299048b6e6fbe5ae1729e379
'2011-11-14T15:56:08-05:00'
describe
'1398' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFSL' 'sip-files00049.txt'
f26a67f8f0567f243cf752aa178fb77f
22cc9c9fb00f4884c7759e766d8379b0ffb6d534
describe
'8122' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFSM' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
2253f8e25fbca8c65979dcb0ca49c337
ead59ace916f5c9bc41f9c17e7c0c281c3f13bc9
'2011-11-14T15:53:49-05:00'
describe
'397952' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFSN' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
c3b403f5faaa60b810181eb93afb21d9
6beeacbcbd8c71a73e0520f836c68cc711f10881
describe
'111648' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFSO' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
9b5cd73a6e19cb72976f61af324bf269
e2f8ecdfa2cb3ac4675962eaf56c722f6a2fc5d3
'2011-11-14T15:51:42-05:00'
describe
'6322' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFSP' 'sip-files00050.pro'
3253b16ebe154f9181c5b5dd935520e6
3f0033af9c69126ef79c71be2ce5eba469991c56
'2011-11-14T15:54:53-05:00'
describe
'28816' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFSQ' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
e7624f901f2f9fd8f3a9533d71e7503d
7a4d363c5de6b7ddc04d19859c2b01afff5d5b65
'2011-11-14T15:52:35-05:00'
describe
'3195560' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFSR' 'sip-files00050.tif'
f6130442ea59348cc4ca5cc5322064ad
94741f39b7121792e8d972758aa2c2df50ab9449
'2011-11-14T15:53:13-05:00'
describe
'261' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFSS' 'sip-files00050.txt'
5f06efa7cd59f4337c300449dc26afa9
c343b2e77042143b61b4b11e1dcc7af69d8a0a00
describe
'7310' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFST' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
9050c1ea010c0cea4046d727a1d830ce
7faf4ee60f8ee8c228e143edd118210fea5d56e4
describe
'391998' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFSU' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
a494f61d5582094f1a9c70acbe2adf3b
cb919964571cb9aeb64f36ced602b5214145630b
'2011-11-14T15:58:18-05:00'
describe
'81560' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFSV' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
040a9b9ef64bcb87b2cfd1e8b781865b
24e6ef364ce54812079db402471c4d5444510c6a
describe
'28569' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFSW' 'sip-files00051.pro'
981251eb814698159bb75a8cb3effd1d
e1e18768d1d40e6624c54473b5d6f00ed5103d23
describe
'28504' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFSX' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
c37df4a8287630d124566b649faa3bb0
d29465bb31a79031987e4628dc8a5090970e2ca2
describe
'3147808' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFSY' 'sip-files00051.tif'
67f754938cf04a6eba5140948c83e6c4
0b1c93c9945fea0b26c5ab7323080427f9bc0944
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFSZ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
db5ca2baea8e6d70b2f61d7ff0dbcd27
54f4597f0b1972e3a81399c9e40620d06442d15d
'2011-11-14T15:56:41-05:00'
describe
'7295' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTA' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
0d86303ca80cdfd7f3aa91df0ebf1674
1bfd9e9d35d488cde888737804f5f22e82b29f27
'2011-11-14T15:58:00-05:00'
describe
'404277' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTB' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
2a544ecf4750a085dfc56d6d37890090
67dc2b178ea9c433fb321635f71c610a1d8c6e64
describe
'91137' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTC' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
3c0770f8013fba45d547b891d53fb15e
3da552c6e8f303932a11db4a71267d4e39d958c1
'2011-11-14T15:53:36-05:00'
describe
'33519' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTD' 'sip-files00052.pro'
9b7e1afa68fb81c6d82d1f58ae89c964
0b692f8df89dbc8bbb4d1834bd964c0fc6fefba9
describe
'30985' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTE' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
6e1614d77d494222bbc8804d91cd977d
844490afed80c6b87bd53c00e32bd7a955549e2c
describe
'3246612' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTF' 'sip-files00052.tif'
d85f7c270eb94fb18272918d4fcd1883
0e169f1673690f1822c5e2420414af7978d4c39b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTG' 'sip-files00052.txt'
3bd51f44ac7d222dc330e952addc92ba
5b34e2b5a2a253bc062ce4d6d9dbcb334cb7983a
describe
'7877' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTH' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
285ae654ef9a2b3eb25f676bb89ce335
e77b810208f6ff9bba7c76d7a97e8b7b71a48fa2
'2011-11-14T15:58:02-05:00'
describe
'406134' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTI' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
c5e0c0161ee708c70c7c32014e041e12
0db49c465bef28953c3aa1b3b2878c33f469900f
describe
'84263' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTJ' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
a7b72fd8d517a083c535f25a4aebd644
15ba604ada8d123256e99cf4c8d62a99976cfc19
describe
'31619' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTK' 'sip-files00053.pro'
533000ce77aa6b9d2a104734fcf1f13d
9abd8a528339aecc69c1d667877324e97eabe7ba
describe
'28295' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTL' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
5449d722887ab3a06a576d7309a50fb7
793fb560bf43077783a6d036af0e5277be8c1f5c
'2011-11-14T15:52:33-05:00'
describe
'3261272' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTM' 'sip-files00053.tif'
c3c408f14d367f4061e5339d3d752edd
3ae9ced62d048ff78fade76cc894c35a69e60140
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTN' 'sip-files00053.txt'
1de87c6f0c992c24d4436017d082f26d
8639f716246a53e84ad006a25caf6cb25f5fd958
'2011-11-14T15:55:15-05:00'
describe
'7277' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTO' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
6707eb2c8ce36ed1677dc17de436b91a
b6e0cf2e62f359efaf13919ce547097120a80a0b
describe
'384997' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTP' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
c07dd38efebb6fd2e06beb3c16b48b56
edac1fbaffb661db875b904ed33ea4c13dd48c39
describe
'91048' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTQ' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
a25f45d34af03716a9e31584c69d3b85
416baf55347080d8144799da727bd3964fe56725
'2011-11-14T15:53:04-05:00'
describe
'32406' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTR' 'sip-files00054.pro'
cae620463f28daaecfb322adce94fa5f
6db9368d5022ea498b53876ad41df2c6daf1471c
'2011-11-14T15:57:02-05:00'
describe
'31443' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTS' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
48a770c5d7a8922f098b2ae815440e2c
7e7ff6a221e2a447ff4aa68a24defaed30286165
'2011-11-14T15:56:17-05:00'
describe
'3091688' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTT' 'sip-files00054.tif'
87819b3805a4700fe136c76d9b2ddc4e
bf4550040215bb373fdff82eb43dbb00ee4367df
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTU' 'sip-files00054.txt'
05f2480eb12d589aa03e240d97b87b20
b66ac31683c2b2c120875c283c66a532d1c382c2
'2011-11-14T15:52:31-05:00'
describe
'8022' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTV' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
de07e94ce3344124ca85caef29ec5a7f
002c9ebc50830f8f4d61dfdd4c3ec375c18b18cb
describe
'395706' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTW' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
e5b979c402ab1ced41e63343fcc1cc00
1e3eb498ce14015740bd3c0bcc2a3483e91debb7
'2011-11-14T15:56:36-05:00'
describe
'85207' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTX' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
f57b6602e3c37b2e789f1f149b01ae85
fc87431d7707b7e4ec03a5786687e275859fe27f
describe
'30394' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTY' 'sip-files00055.pro'
7d74c51dd04fc61e9a676673bb34a564
be9c24e2d58e1291c2d9dc2599ee17b83e75450c
describe
'28645' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFTZ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
ae1f2b2d29bd55e48767638c728a6030
4b3e3a53390251685f52581ab0373a21da208d73
'2011-11-14T15:57:39-05:00'
describe
'3177556' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUA' 'sip-files00055.tif'
b446ebcb0d88ed659f3c5aa088fcf5c8
a30717ae221080302c13a884e2ac625e1199318b
'2011-11-14T15:58:28-05:00'
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUB' 'sip-files00055.txt'
ff8f4c39fe59c082a36cecec639a972c
63c89b804dc1c24e06c1699d6e779f08e9c21be8
describe
'7494' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUC' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
b7c22c2c19e0f1506f9e16a0685b4764
db9f50322cdd9bdedf24e90502d03950d7410ec6
describe
'408727' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUD' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
eba672e585d97e2590ac4deda1fe604d
2e054a9fbf9b5f33bfa1cdf73775e94e544f6a34
describe
'89230' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUE' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
6759e15923b8d4d291ac464f58cb0e0b
f7cba4cc433ef2d0720d0cae96ba0ecb05ea2284
'2011-11-14T15:57:47-05:00'
describe
'32876' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUF' 'sip-files00056.pro'
3ca0370029b4562c846b1b714ddd855c
e9398a490f65feb14233b4693151c82833202e7c
'2011-11-14T15:55:42-05:00'
describe
'30138' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUG' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
4e7bc8ceba1a385b60361d11b5c8502a
1238557b1f2cbd7ae698142facd81099d9fb9351
'2011-11-14T15:52:18-05:00'
describe
'3281856' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUH' 'sip-files00056.tif'
1a635e942d1e5c0835c6d13ce231d9eb
a2e86825d30b7f66bad26dc5fd423f5446a02b58
'2011-11-14T15:53:40-05:00'
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUI' 'sip-files00056.txt'
903882f3f2ba83ec44e3a81dcc559a7e
90a36967c57a960f7f8100476e26c83bed65ac8a
describe
'7955' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUJ' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
6a23c3253b55f43e4362895673b19fe5
8e5cb98742da6e6a1f3b447031a00a5b723bf2eb
'2011-11-14T15:55:23-05:00'
describe
'404229' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUK' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
61891db96cfbe68b7199de495200676f
df4b0f491818b12cf23602ddb37af6170b4fea42
describe
'85721' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUL' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
15363122519514464df73c79a83f3c00
e73fe3ba1d54f30e5bff8ce1be85e4c3982f0528
describe
'30458' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUM' 'sip-files00057.pro'
31a05088d9e210eb3df0102653f00074
6109ba0b9dc46f11d5bfe3504e8fe87deaf15238
describe
'29278' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUN' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
0b4d398cf008bda95fd9ed097a086454
f1f4f0119ef06ccab22c9098f6331c3712c5e779
'2011-11-14T15:52:38-05:00'
describe
'3246316' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUO' 'sip-files00057.tif'
0bb7d7dd798f953b1874aa3a1131e112
0730de265c29993fbf0efd62295237cade3c541e
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUP' 'sip-files00057.txt'
46fc420e742b605d0240d976c19ed018
84f10fc17a158b6919abd8bb1825792c82b10f7d
describe
'7520' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUQ' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
f5c041ae55b536a79a8930cf49f16aac
c19100ca9fe4871b0aa724d662bccf2a17a3a82b
'2011-11-14T15:55:11-05:00'
describe
'406515' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUR' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
6727b7409c395bb5eb06be5c27d15418
cff9131d38e5185345d1417ea9edd74bb1b7b01a
describe
'63819' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUS' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
25e6616c933ad77ffbec5ad2661e5bcc
f2bc37256577acea1deb0fd298828d1a7c77693f
'2011-11-14T15:52:03-05:00'
describe
'22148' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUT' 'sip-files00058.pro'
25a686b0d243b3c8e80a1fa444744dc6
096eabeda5576437aec42f3a4157eaf339f35980
describe
'21666' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUU' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
632c29706cf3001a1921458ad62e0051
947964f681c4063c0b2fb5d9a58cd5fc449fd291
describe
'3284644' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUV' 'sip-files00058.tif'
40a5457909477a3e6127bea0a7586c9b
6ed712ab32c8f9382bd7b7415a5779c119d464a8
describe
'877' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUW' 'sip-files00058.txt'
2f655bfa00b1233c777548d1bc290c06
34dfe885956e2073e8420d555281c94acff59c92
'2011-11-14T15:53:42-05:00'
describe
'5386' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUX' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
b3d922a8c9f0f0f5b3f323aa0d09563e
6459d3f714e669716ff6acd66d61611825a37b88
describe
'387600' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUY' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
7e5939b05cb14950f9574019b58fc453
5cce009521596d59ba17f00a6e86b74468ec3cbc
describe
'74393' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFUZ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
2254f8147749e1516f0e0e4a7e23e991
991cbd6a391bcf346ca8c00ee3a0b80336054587
describe
'24602' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVA' 'sip-files00059.pro'
1ea93abf034b1d65c5d01a4552b37ef2
259b025f54555a9fd0a59e4486eef14b9b6dcddf
'2011-11-14T15:55:48-05:00'
describe
'25127' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVB' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
173bc16e15b9c97810fbbe6625c2fea3
275cf8a16ed66990a1f72101dead62fa343be356
'2011-11-14T15:53:15-05:00'
describe
'3112088' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVC' 'sip-files00059.tif'
93725bfb304480f2463498141c358153
b849971b21916297581430048af6bd65cbcace4f
'2011-11-14T15:54:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVD' 'sip-files00059.txt'
d5e02ee22a9d438ed9c49384a1c753f8
8c514b347b33b36fbfdc76e8428a1d19cafc41ef
describe
'6480' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVE' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
5b42d68eaaf21c3e967b3032ba5772e3
b01096714857c8c2feba7a121fb666075b9ee335
'2011-11-14T15:53:50-05:00'
describe
'418396' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVF' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
536039a5f0449f95fa1ebf83dcc99c3c
f2c36098b4a4babc9af1c82c8c7c7aa249def977
describe
'92556' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVG' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
ac5dd1977cbe791886f6235a01a01596
0c816c950c6f5c3f014c211cc35e8a553c9485ad
'2011-11-14T15:54:06-05:00'
describe
'35191' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVH' 'sip-files00060.pro'
35b374b7718923e798dbd85648e85d10
af45b10105f32c6c8c67ccbe1479f6974ce092e4
'2011-11-14T15:56:32-05:00'
describe
'30687' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVI' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
4e71911296f985905b6a4daf1668daf3
4a2e6727745727ad1fcc7104b981628fad471bfb
'2011-11-14T15:53:44-05:00'
describe
'3358964' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVJ' 'sip-files00060.tif'
4f2a5b63d32121508f9c06cd069db7f6
bf8e6e22cd1af5fa5575aab4306ec2d814462ce2
describe
'1390' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVK' 'sip-files00060.txt'
6a0c1a81290201e7b12dc1fb1cd0bcf4
63b5d54f628ce395d12e696e6fb5918fa8c1fe6e
'2011-11-14T15:58:12-05:00'
describe
'7500' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVL' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
20d2f0ba316a32e939504ad31573edda
56787b7be05571f2d73e08621f71ba381a3c3eba
describe
'416244' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVM' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
2e09dabfedf492c4ec08ccd974d94a5d
9fff859ce85b4116f51c3e9c839a9f9cd5147e2f
'2011-11-14T15:56:03-05:00'
describe
'93135' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVN' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
3c98524aea4e39c129c13e7eb23f47a7
a38239ab46b01e0fe0cb0d49d2eb11ec9e16423e
'2011-11-14T15:56:47-05:00'
describe
'35093' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVO' 'sip-files00061.pro'
4e08956e433e77daa49b515182e3ecd6
8090228724ecf3c1f8c1f17a6724fdad4f6ae962
describe
'29907' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVP' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
c0250d470cd54347e3562e551780ec99
87914fbf836c35cc15457245aa697ddb2cf788d1
describe
'3341332' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVQ' 'sip-files00061.tif'
88e41620627ed24d79b0bf569d8b2989
7e7b53ff275262f8319eefc22edb0acec1401ae9
describe
'1412' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVR' 'sip-files00061.txt'
3f2a1d85dc1bb5c1f5203a65cf1720d6
0ef44bf5c893849b7b8fe6fa0f0f6e91b660c258
describe
'7487' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVS' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
8f6519eeca1fbc34ef9fb795f41f682d
0fe385e2aef1168dadc0f7af4a88aebcb61ebe1b
'2011-11-14T15:55:00-05:00'
describe
'421972' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVT' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
9f643a0e4197bda355fb40604efac2ad
84855c74b4e7962c51317dbf783c9b7af3c324a0
'2011-11-14T15:52:19-05:00'
describe
'89584' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVU' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
a6737d3696080897457b29f7345928df
061b3bfe7231c8259b7d50da5d42a94edda6449a
'2011-11-14T15:53:38-05:00'
describe
'33203' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVV' 'sip-files00062.pro'
7719e768f8885702ce94162ac1bcd102
d91bb97abc0c4d40b5aaffdd2418a74275922d7b
describe
'30426' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVW' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
9c3f40b733e51385dfc52141cb844859
278fc979cb53027e482322d854f70595252049f6
'2011-11-14T15:53:46-05:00'
describe
'3387692' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVX' 'sip-files00062.tif'
7f5e07c65910fe5b4bca9ff2f73d66b8
410509279eae4c04156b876a9f8858f4fc4ca543
describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVY' 'sip-files00062.txt'
a6cdfa66efbf63208bd890eea76b716e
fa8e37216387e8250cd08fbb9fd4a2bfddc5ee8a
describe
'7414' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFVZ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
23b2504763634a066a4c79db264b4624
bbfc4160b02e4fb2f4d7fed5ede02d388cb66f03
describe
'406112' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWA' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
d5e9b9a225fbdcb753806134816599e9
2fafecd8787979215b52659d67e2cd6fa99a14ad
describe
'89581' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWB' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
6f777211b0f3fee541210c232be0d4f6
cdc30c8938b4faaf06e4e7ecbe8d8deadcc8aa1f
'2011-11-14T15:55:52-05:00'
describe
'31317' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWC' 'sip-files00063.pro'
1479c90ab0e0738f6e8dfa3c6ce3cf34
fa6807444ccf4cb85322a5ab6560ba58e3499fdc
describe
'30869' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWD' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
f189bb2e5600de066dcfaf4e3820f9ab
22332bb8b76ebfc0924614f2baae938ba7207233
describe
'3260720' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWE' 'sip-files00063.tif'
17daa8a9cc07d811dd7d052ad3f17ae5
96a33877d711ddc34a243430a8947d4285a3bc5d
'2011-11-14T15:52:10-05:00'
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWF' 'sip-files00063.txt'
ddcc9163d2084d3f4bdeb5b44a1384ea
345f8bf18902021654ab3c88d3f75ce7d80b980e
'2011-11-14T15:52:42-05:00'
describe
'7803' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWG' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
633fd4b71adc6387ec503d4389d45709
0eef438c536e0ef6374508e21ec83b7b88fb36b1
describe
'399135' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWH' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
cd39dc16ac46abf88d4fb562e1bb3202
e17e196eb213cdfe436c134b6c0c4c8ab8fc8bc9
'2011-11-14T15:58:11-05:00'
describe
'83268' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWI' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
65ffd0f0dbae9eed4b5347edb8aa711a
28743aa98a76ddf42e8076d83983c9da2ee4b873
'2011-11-14T15:57:34-05:00'
describe
'28683' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWJ' 'sip-files00064.pro'
0933f51e817f297be70e1980ecf699e0
4d00870b75d278df958d0b3419a1af9cb63fd564
'2011-11-14T15:55:18-05:00'
describe
'28579' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWK' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
737109045c32107a29a8ffdf91793ad2
4349aa2ed2c7627a9d62cc6ab806fcc4d3e0f757
describe
'3205268' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWL' 'sip-files00064.tif'
595f774412426d97305f95e5ac116ae9
c694d3e8e0b3dfa1d0f033dda5b36162ccf9b13f
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWM' 'sip-files00064.txt'
f1001f16e69829cdb77814800dc62c02
858026f20ec7c3525def31a05641a8fb4cca8839
describe
'7543' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWN' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
b748396e57fbbe3c3f8fe8348decc1ac
af7eb56692932f0e6ee38991f8a65d553f3167d3
'2011-11-14T15:58:14-05:00'
describe
'412116' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWO' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
f989fedb20817912cfdbf659bfbece35
b0e89cec207d8c5c0756a045d8d44550fcf3155b
describe
'80205' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWP' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
baf6dd1e8fff9568521705c878ab7666
ca6a0ccf18238a7813cf8b9e765020653b084731
'2011-11-14T15:57:18-05:00'
describe
'28053' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWQ' 'sip-files00065.pro'
d025a4fcdf014dd009cdaa137bf37180
c8f9a21245751d09cc7205ad34dead9ccb32acea
'2011-11-14T15:55:28-05:00'
describe
'27528' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWR' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
d128ccf01f2651a51cb26688cd69af2b
e666bbc227315ef4186b8accd47b9785085cb1f2
'2011-11-14T15:53:43-05:00'
describe
'3308788' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWS' 'sip-files00065.tif'
4f26d4b151a915b0d5905b7032615ee7
618de437029cc98fcdfae2ae47fd843135909585
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWT' 'sip-files00065.txt'
3af776bdaa2f6ed4b5d71d3ab00b35b3
a1af30ef706eb1d56cf2aeea80010bfe1ada61e6
describe
'7154' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWU' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
05299d035902dc6634d532620e4ca268
4abbe873f00344973cf0af77942de317989cefd5
describe
'407290' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWV' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
e30767a6a9c83c2707480522e50febdc
f7a9e47c9f0e0bbfb2e0511816ef9c3ceeee2883
describe
'90861' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWW' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
d07bc0162ba08219a28d6470fdfb9f56
79aefaa4d1743594272fb8858eba01df5375f20c
describe
'34013' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWX' 'sip-files00066.pro'
67a93d279cb04464630f13ada312ebd6
a1ff07abf5c5e720fa105aa236261239bb9c2028
'2011-11-14T15:52:53-05:00'
describe
'31168' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWY' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
fc6fbad9f4c476361dee5edab9a97e1d
eb3aaf1b0a6f262a42bf6a398355f74242195788
describe
'3271228' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFWZ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
07e2c016320ff8a376ce29443d5f2264
dcfa177d7a10414a847f8f491887ec9839ad941b
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXA' 'sip-files00066.txt'
fad6b03f28af3a02563e04d24aa95de6
a31d1f534d1509bb0c841d42ee089b97b7a2b688
describe
'7451' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXB' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
107d75c2d471ead4ce9b4e424c708f06
cacb8dd7e116c1894da433ae6faa2cf90b2edc59
describe
'371607' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXC' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
d3020ff061958a04d1fd8163a06cd860
095847d3f1d4d042a5967e12bade6bda1e6363bd
describe
'81171' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXD' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
90064252711a72667971a363241e320b
7babdf7e465f0819d662db0e6b5c2c57c65a4fbc
describe
'28214' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXE' 'sip-files00067.pro'
3f7d373539a97c9bfebeb3d09ea295f9
288fcc15c67d0c8427adabb22db9db08fa45358a
describe
'28543' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXF' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
a6c99139beeea8c05087e3cd05fddc8c
2bf03812559328424e1e9a4a29597ffd1f4fa204
'2011-11-14T15:52:07-05:00'
describe
'2984968' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXG' 'sip-files00067.tif'
1d13911df8b6c016d7e2acb8b27bab85
cd49b6a5ab6b8a3b927dbdb8e33d3173b60a4dce
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXH' 'sip-files00067.txt'
0b22ba076faa3b41ff5afab921d3c140
ecdbf4ef125eb5151073b49e221a6372446d2ac8
'2011-11-14T15:56:00-05:00'
describe
'7214' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXI' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
a7286bce79bf6c13c89f867eab21f406
48fac6212e1c6729a93dda46136c2e501226c08f
describe
'408498' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXJ' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
0cca82d87688a6c9cc94c1961437ffdb
a6d23719cf52698869eebc8a386a0ee157d8553f
describe
'68644' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXK' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
046521443b76de84dc8c13ce631b80a5
8cfa0b1ff1db489547a5e0a0f928486a27ae3cb9
describe
'23025' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXL' 'sip-files00068.pro'
caa47d96f8dd5ab901749f8edd04c979
dc2e03cf6d21083a190df0b7e19d04f88eb2ed86
describe
'22067' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXM' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
5e4302fb87bed11bfb1a7cbd47c4360a
02a20b026f1db26ef91445db30ada6c9afe4506c
describe
'3279220' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXN' 'sip-files00068.tif'
01973d15e56cfd9c32ae1e22cc5e9788
deae5bb397b3c9095c2e4efd07d4e9634a189fdb
'2011-11-14T15:56:02-05:00'
describe
'983' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXO' 'sip-files00068.txt'
b8afdd0e82f5ae8f9bb4a395b6007e00
5961cb4496f02341cd158c4ffe04668f00085fd4
describe
'5615' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXP' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
dcce001698878235a24b863c3f720d73
420436f619a59c69f2ce33a263dedc0a6c4ad119
describe
'394390' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXQ' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
82e5f755ad45963d35dfa35b7a4f0014
16704e026b3d336c5b0b4b29d636e6a5a04589e4
'2011-11-14T15:55:10-05:00'
describe
'94559' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXR' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
94fd5592baed3d29dfa684572be50d54
310b3c19e87b17beee91c5d98931216302f56782
describe
'34048' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXS' 'sip-files00069.pro'
a24ed70c46c943230d56a33167362712
3a80d3e021fa3645ade6e0329faa402d333ab6af
describe
'32070' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXT' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
a22b118c16266923ca18c05f35708bbb
bad126762041407431e53bdebf7394be1ea926b2
'2011-11-14T15:52:54-05:00'
describe
'3167020' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXU' 'sip-files00069.tif'
cc3ff7015e4e57cad7e1fec3ffe56e85
a3ede466acc4ddb8f00b7ab245c09874f80c32ff
'2011-11-14T15:57:17-05:00'
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXV' 'sip-files00069.txt'
5f5fab3b70991621abb1b17e4b18d62c
a3d14b5539edf0bb790fcbf4d4f22b93934d07fc
describe
'7981' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXW' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
f8c6fdac8ccfc526897dcb1ca86833e5
0174d0d10f38d713502f6aed6dc849e53368b60c
describe
'385817' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXX' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
b642a8156efa9b53c772423895e74baf
e69c7639f4a57aa9fdfa7c4f30014972d770a02b
'2011-11-14T15:52:24-05:00'
describe
'88961' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXY' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
579aae9672b3179f572724112c99ec60
4cadcce5674edafd15a129f4ba5295250fc4b343
describe
'31418' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFXZ' 'sip-files00070.pro'
ecaf235bc056c2f9b8d591d38454aca9
6a3f3ba3603c804d0a89d87becdcd1e27e213d26
'2011-11-14T15:53:30-05:00'
describe
'30771' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYA' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
6870175dc4cc5fbc36ed0ba631c9963e
1328f57a02ad91e0aa9eb21acc61462760501d85
'2011-11-14T15:54:08-05:00'
describe
'3098728' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYB' 'sip-files00070.tif'
38ece656a82bc3ac85911ce06d17f28f
5c23e5019c388216bf62dd9b4db5a9d249ea9da0
'2011-11-14T15:57:26-05:00'
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYC' 'sip-files00070.txt'
8f4a7e5279f0698476423b7ec78a47ae
a1b0dbb67db7ba379f454254f65831c31c244ede
describe
'8234' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYD' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
6c9e4c753613c09093f69ae4b24168a1
de56f81d72c5004e036c9c5083143968bcc6765b
describe
'397360' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYE' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
b5e9d6b22fe00d0e48b92819d0199a87
0cbc3e142d53e06a6cf8e8c7d216ce878b58ac74
describe
'100876' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYF' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
f4da9909df4f2e952d100a967249b927
a98a149a75a56659cce60bd5b5f57d3c02841d61
'2011-11-14T15:57:21-05:00'
describe
'35463' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYG' 'sip-files00071.pro'
439c16a7894002cc6742ddf926be8f6f
76967c8988de0a50defb7f5684d4c6be337450bb
'2011-11-14T15:55:26-05:00'
describe
'34169' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYH' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
07600a2982a83445c82d87ce8cd046af
77a52bb1c2b59180da633b010063f9a80c65d74c
'2011-11-14T15:52:57-05:00'
describe
'3191168' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYI' 'sip-files00071.tif'
4bd5adacd45a32fcf6ecb351646db27f
2e71900007df64aaaf05905d8ac70d462f078aa0
'2011-11-14T15:54:41-05:00'
describe
'1405' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYJ' 'sip-files00071.txt'
6010955ca105f148aec547251bb57292
2a0ed182d5ed393c80b9b299e300e8b03529fb4d
describe
'8763' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYK' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
33ecb11b0671c2f54392338aa493f61a
11a9ecd499504fe251b74bed6dbd39f83a834e00
describe
'401549' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYL' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
863d3616eb390a97e75b75ac4544a836
ef2b2cffa8e0d7fcbb175e35f9d48ffcbdc3e731
describe
'95091' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYM' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
9c9e2563dfc7afb79bd0227feed5e70b
8fe3deea7c2560897590dc5eab5d71ec01e95c4b
describe
'34316' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYN' 'sip-files00072.pro'
0b4ae8a19a90fd20aab9e6cc79e3a138
ed901584c1c403d36d276671e063ba3d3b972d47
describe
'32436' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYO' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
8d2a471132142ca2441a8b7df550127b
e08dd29811e1e9fb56afb7e00ff99747a7b353e8
describe
'3224288' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYP' 'sip-files00072.tif'
abdc3bcdc0ce54e5a958358c45ebb8f2
cc9e5e061d9833906d8a1483f30da5cfc75207c6
'2011-11-14T15:52:00-05:00'
describe
'1353' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYQ' 'sip-files00072.txt'
3f2d6fdcde3f7f1c9b469c9540427f24
7ee3ce86abc74e6032227ef332a5fc8a117660b0
describe
'8138' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYR' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
bb844e7016ff57bac7d57daf23742806
fb01da5768df1e0e3d4d797f708295e38e0bab0b
describe
'388198' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYS' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
d13cd69f43901783e531fa37f0df9a50
69c97c7132de0b4c72ac5c77718beb279b765826
'2011-11-14T15:57:31-05:00'
describe
'94444' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYT' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
c5124bd0615b3644fe8e615143651d7a
6ce02b59a56e80befdc3d396bd65314c7efd147e
describe
'32813' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYU' 'sip-files00073.pro'
1faf77f9f1181abc22111f8e66f4ea0a
2693598dd2b4faafb700b985cd396ff8ba140893
describe
'32846' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYV' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
fe0843d3d71b713ff5436fc5f1a05e17
b8cdf4adbbbde0cbcd63f7235dc27841ba5faf9d
'2011-11-14T15:56:44-05:00'
describe
'3117432' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYW' 'sip-files00073.tif'
37b44455e875d8a2aa020e493447c32c
2377a6bb3c4a94c2f5952c02418fd30a5659be5b
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYX' 'sip-files00073.txt'
2acf4eef651257681484b889d8693836
43ccb390214f09a76f5d23537eac74c8ffdef0a7
describe
'8805' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYY' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
4d911713e270f097b12ebcc9a4013e22
d544cf9ec4c10231ec515c88ca37de412ae6d49b
describe
'416742' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFYZ' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
0733eaaaf0feb64eb31197d31b8b1b8a
8e4126b41ab8777a7049761d20a14be6ced230bd
describe
'82831' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZA' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
acfe385b41135900b7dd58015489e58a
ccf92f5aefc90ca493d264286eee385de337f8ac
'2011-11-14T15:53:17-05:00'
describe
'31836' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZB' 'sip-files00074.pro'
15288f8afa7cef6d35b3678b4974a992
1d876c95f06a127eeda6a8b4973966bd78869beb
describe
'27455' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZC' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
83bcb47e09dfdf3d09bb96bf1c144126
d1ca55e3e236585407325296aae85f2414b6cdc7
'2011-11-14T15:56:19-05:00'
describe
'3345536' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZD' 'sip-files00074.tif'
61a0a84aedc3ddaf6dccff9aaedae40c
b7f692c39f938860c13cef8b58cdbc45add21240
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZE' 'sip-files00074.txt'
2dcbee9a948314777014be56ed73503b
ab9837b2579151be47eeb8d62355e63f3ea62cd9
describe
'7138' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZF' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
b09e52fa4bbc05c1850792a00f325f3c
bcfcbe2e65949de11d4673f9a1a91276704e90aa
'2011-11-14T15:57:36-05:00'
describe
'385735' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZG' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
6f75db0b7fbabbf132f343ad63163c06
1fea72a98e8c1755c75f5e9badacdbbdfefa909e
describe
'99592' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZH' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
5aa7fcd0bc183f510049e61a2fd4c0a4
aa67d1d35288978b170ea1cef279292da0195aec
'2011-11-14T15:52:55-05:00'
describe
'34182' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZI' 'sip-files00075.pro'
addc557ea2e09e252b6721ac72c52ae8
fb7e8dfd8a6b2f5c9f60f7a663ffca7be0417bc4
describe
'34112' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZJ' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
18d4807588e438a67f6554b16b6e5dec
f03f78545ce73fc3bbfa5038065485ac12bf38e5
'2011-11-14T15:55:43-05:00'
describe
'3098044' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZK' 'sip-files00075.tif'
6651eee4c8ef3f1b971baf20d7bdcee2
1efb13adfc1f2bdd8cdb0afd3dbe807fb8f37f8f
'2011-11-14T15:54:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZL' 'sip-files00075.txt'
d33ea8067205bfe00f984889374caeae
c83757624e426883d57ca432d222f592af5ca0f3
describe
'8649' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZM' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
4ba9efd336d6124b1458676f569d8a34
123457097df3addc964735d6e2c2f666cd8387c0
describe
'399469' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZN' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
59512bb66fdfb64a03553763ed9033a7
435517f523c895d230b12a5b73cba8cfbb1caf03
describe
'91592' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZO' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
946545e4bcd8a99a6fa2e0868d1953e9
dffff5a690fbb022bbb0ba0caf4d8e40b7d0fba7
describe
'33596' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZP' 'sip-files00076.pro'
fa09123f56e0c4352690f8c4466bb5c2
668524e18f9132f41e84bf3bf8635f9aeeec9ca1
describe
'31460' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZQ' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
a002528bab9a871fd48c0286361fadb9
b4352310ea77b75005c1fa85ac1d32f913be506c
'2011-11-14T15:57:10-05:00'
describe
'3207968' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZR' 'sip-files00076.tif'
7d7369aafe6c810acf296961e7f912f9
f2e7242e3298434c4252e9654f8e526961f15613
describe
'1328' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZS' 'sip-files00076.txt'
995403bcdffde927d5973121d698ccd9
0205539d796a87b6b4f1e39e15979279abe275c3
'2011-11-14T15:57:54-05:00'
describe
'7972' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZT' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
04f12b02d0263d4c8a65a7cef3ba4cbb
81b77f9c8215a0805bccba67ddf8b6336d48f11b
describe
'391131' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZU' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
16f1071fbb328188b11a9391a74c8fdf
0f20ddcbaeea8d5a6a68975f3206eea3377dcbe2
'2011-11-14T15:54:30-05:00'
describe
'73018' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZV' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
01f1f7362aecca97d112c9dbcec010bf
be6ee262753f706d01f737e997e10a69381d7e8e
describe
'26261' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZW' 'sip-files00077.pro'
a662dafad620ec02742e70ba081ed200
18cecb7d57e124f0dd8b3b7139d82965e7b9de5d
describe
'24645' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZX' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
8b97d43d6b4f831ea0a40797ced81c1c
d0e8258256d38e50096b72896623b21e17487540
describe
'3141032' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZY' 'sip-files00077.tif'
01b32b5adf5053317f2a25946c59d944
249881c75fa80de5f2a5c9424358108244385ebb
describe
'1047' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABFZZ' 'sip-files00077.txt'
95e1289bdafb973828addb2ed89a998a
f53891af616d2d67489efc3d794147ef4c6ab3ba
describe
'6538' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAA' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
1dafbf063610380fe3dda512e17cbee4
1ef2a4f2da74803dc8a3fce40a2a34f16e6fa617
describe
'397786' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAB' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
ea6c024c3ba538744e1d9cc626a98a19
f0604a1d682765de52f7b2de03af49d71500e45a
describe
'73893' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAC' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
c6055c159fa8afa0f5f6a7196dbc097a
aa47196be6174e117a8386a7ed80063375f3c857
describe
'24191' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAD' 'sip-files00078.pro'
79f8128557590b60920b4a4c7e63bc19
9f72d54d7ab5855c552304f317385d33b3eaa57e
describe
'24406' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAE' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
b5844b0ca6647e09d88d0cca2c775d8e
c4278149c4f2bac2a34db900ac68c6bf52baa6fe
describe
'3193976' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAF' 'sip-files00078.tif'
1fb7d1a6742f936ec841cd53d934aec4
a8f8797cdc0359e22692e649d3fcaafcf7552931
'2011-11-14T15:51:52-05:00'
describe
'1054' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAG' 'sip-files00078.txt'
211c80abddeeb284853b127c001628d5
24c762ce8742ed99ffc73654e693d45e3664d480
describe
'6149' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAH' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
b5042fa4eb6945587c7206836c3950d0
afc1c35cb6566010e4dd68931e752fb542235ce5
describe
'378837' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAI' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
b7b340c898e0f8c0093c81ba213400e6
98a6ee558d6aa16b241beb43bc0a05d5511ec483
'2011-11-14T15:51:57-05:00'
describe
'84520' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAJ' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
96c8f4780739b312dd09814df2811e97
2c6a574108d3d58b37f6c282ac2261e0be1cbe1c
describe
'29553' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAK' 'sip-files00079.pro'
4bad68a78aaef3618ea434bfd74d4683
7307782d5aa53e3490de5b710cb1095b69cb8941
describe
'28582' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAL' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
1f05c2e5beaab95fb7782387855077fe
90190f1af3c46eb1d42ae685832e361e79e49a21
describe
'3043016' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAM' 'sip-files00079.tif'
7abc1239fc739644497938df2799ce6c
b73d6e62aaa59059b3a056bd4c82a95e9a93943a
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAN' 'sip-files00079.txt'
fa92efe5a48e26679a30a95fcb0c361f
560888418c55d3f9f3915064e4239bf94e56f887
describe
'8069' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAO' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
3ac2295f9b2a8b2adbd6b24c4508330f
fdfbc4712e7f01eeebf96c1c8a54f97b65d69bf3
describe
'404340' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAP' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
30ad93656f46b98c5d98f9a921c79456
ec9abbea07d37251b36c1e97ccaa4a9f58f6906b
describe
'92609' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAQ' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
14fd4b9fa535e3c919cbfc01a3dfb939
9ec394598f57c41907c89621d8fe616ca2e00e55
'2011-11-14T15:57:52-05:00'
describe
'33227' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAR' 'sip-files00080.pro'
468d2f8138d1c6e7ca807ec4eea59338
08805dcf5c7f45aa8793849e6fcc72c3ff0ace26
'2011-11-14T15:58:21-05:00'
describe
'30997' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAS' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
47d83c00f8070a1cb766abc6c25364cd
a4c9e82cfd7299639120788a45f083740ff52100
describe
'3246596' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAT' 'sip-files00080.tif'
329a502636db953505d37ba7dea59158
8e505b9c30d497786bbd2d6a45df039748744a02
describe
'1310' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAU' 'sip-files00080.txt'
f2af755d1537350f1b84ae310421ecdf
d65263365b1862cc66c7afd255b6c140ec2091c8
'2011-11-14T15:55:49-05:00'
describe
'8229' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAV' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
27c58d592d82dc8591502c824b4075bb
fb3a42fc2efc56b2774b1f78be651b8919b775bb
'2011-11-14T15:55:33-05:00'
describe
'401423' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAW' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
ee7ad910b8a239d73942174bc89e2112
bf4079faef414461db249451466ce962c0132ff7
'2011-11-14T15:56:13-05:00'
describe
'86806' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAX' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
3a67a92ada30a7adf1aec344907928a9
073f354f855486ade8ee9c727dc55c255f58de60
describe
'30756' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAY' 'sip-files00081.pro'
bc2ff6ecbc857923ef782c5327acf494
41d345187f4022cad566b63eda944d136b02326e
describe
'29072' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGAZ' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
222b9f5b58b8f5c432f3b3718c85428a
0378a4f8d529cc366256423102bd7ed21c409f18
describe
'3223116' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBA' 'sip-files00081.tif'
ff54b54d4eff5558759088cb0871d9bf
00e2b7c34812601068c8771817dc9e252fed83a0
'2011-11-14T15:52:21-05:00'
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBB' 'sip-files00081.txt'
4de80de617bf8d63a3b4ad0f593d782b
13e54fb7e29026949084a1ae7e0a03fa1375a68f
describe
'7851' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBC' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
3cfe56e9f0ea1f2acbbed4a1a47d9cb8
2d69d60c08b45f02858954a74d56f671d628b00b
describe
'416281' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBD' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
65b759ac308b525baa0d366216da9cb4
413a2cc5e2b8c919b26a1fb5a8980ca5e116cc6f
describe
'89431' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBE' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
e6eb6fd9ea9e7e6ea4c04be626fc8e12
2928ff0e412a1d36c0fd0573b8d43dcb6b0f5b1b
describe
'33957' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBF' 'sip-files00082.pro'
78b04baf081e5a2add17660fcad411a2
c590ad2bac1b99ad169ea9bb180faf68f2ea3218
describe
'30293' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBG' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
9054fda777654277b511179201a096b4
5dd622127b3a8ed24358e734a69aec25e4e10d8a
describe
'3342288' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBH' 'sip-files00082.tif'
766a1eb76fbc4a8d70e7bda178e6a271
68ac514a89d45589fb47210eae87516159219ee1
'2011-11-14T15:57:01-05:00'
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBI' 'sip-files00082.txt'
9bc5c55c64b35fe2540dea69f9b52258
0f40a9951fc0d6e2e8c31f1f5b759f79927b44a8
describe
'7365' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBJ' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
6ab716d07c8ef2512e7afca393fdb862
5a3b5bd2a0d43b844a1aaccf81689da02e498097
describe
'395815' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBK' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
aa4f7e7ab7981f705632000713afb04f
6d987bc3fd2ed2aaa63be2fb06d3c284576edd01
describe
'103151' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBL' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
258c7e61dde606024b1570035ba21f00
02886e4eef5abccad02d398e156d2acabf3d213e
describe
'35637' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBM' 'sip-files00083.pro'
2f16f13701d4b8bfa95749e6dbc62ada
dd11820a490b1103d45723184975530c652b7096
describe
'35032' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBN' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
a98a828c2afb789cbad3df727cc96f79
65167e7f58c2cfdbbeba9f3f50ac7d78d41a2641
'2011-11-14T15:55:46-05:00'
describe
'3178840' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBO' 'sip-files00083.tif'
6357371006bb5962bc6a23e2a151580e
2e4fdb2e2be06df8519d83fe6997bd2215f79c07
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBP' 'sip-files00083.txt'
4db72794a29f205896a12c51a3fd5a8b
55c5e71ddb8599e7f956000b9a5ab44e4d7221ec
describe
'8622' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBQ' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
8aa3695435e55be27554c932c3ba715c
88df4751194ace561fcb3b582518e70c5367927a
'2011-11-14T15:53:29-05:00'
describe
'410431' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBR' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
9cacaecfa16710f1570c72a4dd813e95
c742eab221b4de3016017b1cd2356587214c8c10
'2011-11-14T15:52:12-05:00'
describe
'104293' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBS' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
71b225ae3d9d1fefcfad873e32b718c2
729ab2e6619a8fa00c448483e70d02104f4488a8
describe
'16159' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBT' 'sip-files00084.pro'
3048731aaaf1341b3a5b1e71c43c3e53
58f65a01cb6cf6cc6d84c6e7638633c0ce1efad1
describe
'29594' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBU' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
1e06439978adac06d76fd5adcb34904d
d07c7ebb0e245b3b069e249369d091091b4726df
describe
'3295660' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBV' 'sip-files00084.tif'
2e0b34629eb8180808857ef0f62714b0
fe86fcedcc222aa41e1acf99ffe873ae0b30be75
describe
'674' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBW' 'sip-files00084.txt'
a314c2dc02075fe2c72a6f40aa41314c
6c53ea60260479da144f583c231c4cf1a69c1c1d
'2011-11-14T15:58:30-05:00'
describe
'7221' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBX' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
fc3357b761987fe415bb13d53369c507
34ffcbedd19457d13aea9eb6291d5d6d4bf1e76a
describe
'390155' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBY' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
db8559bb46a22ffdcc7dc2620e0d771c
86b098e659167eee640ad4f035e248ee7f3735b4
describe
'92000' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGBZ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
ec89f85708820a3c206e6229e70934dd
4ea061c6341346232ae3ea1cca03721be95dd4e1
'2011-11-14T15:52:46-05:00'
describe
'32103' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCA' 'sip-files00085.pro'
b19f4b1b9cf5e7a18a8200ad8338bf6d
34bf30c058d43334fc45073013b61596afa7144d
describe
'31564' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCB' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
5e4c13694a966d5fd5671dc2912fd127
bb26544135d1bbf2cfba20841189021822ca8f64
describe
'3133588' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCC' 'sip-files00085.tif'
f05352cdec7335fa867bf27dfbd9b968
ed22e54db214fabddc74893bea2ae2d6aee0529f
describe
'1286' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCD' 'sip-files00085.txt'
2f4fcb44ef8d141cced9f0a38b2bed81
8003edfb4ed86df7535b5d0413e673a95708a497
'2011-11-14T15:58:16-05:00'
describe
'8231' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCE' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
e199eb5ce57c3ebc3d1fdf1196f17dca
deea45ffb55d9373a60eed7a83440c5da9b29a92
describe
'398551' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCF' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
e9703824a8d6c00d1627062223c35d58
5e13023741609ca2ed1a601ac9dea2b69797337a
'2011-11-14T15:56:50-05:00'
describe
'89937' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCG' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
b6d5ffc6b0bf7e4f52a410908dd84700
0ea68f1c4dd3374e8de0415a02e5749302af2bab
describe
'33331' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCH' 'sip-files00086.pro'
3a9b4c16d9eabfede61e2f6151dc3aca
6400b40d9edbd72b62729ce286077beb1651d027
'2011-11-14T15:54:39-05:00'
describe
'30437' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCI' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
430370748d61860467f5039c3daf7f8b
95dc263c5c5112d548ac2ba6fc99efeddd6b89c3
'2011-11-14T15:51:50-05:00'
describe
'3200796' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCJ' 'sip-files00086.tif'
0dae1275ea457c60f85b589fbbd9bd99
0ac573d1612d3a6cdb79ab08ed2dbc4307fc521b
'2011-11-14T15:54:16-05:00'
describe
'1319' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCK' 'sip-files00086.txt'
81de892aea77c57aaa8fc2e5c94afc51
d04c4233aaaa7cb5826c085c986c018a13207301
describe
'7694' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCL' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
202c02e9364b3d07c62b1426f9185911
a932caea16824f236fe7edea9f582608c973ceb6
'2011-11-14T15:55:22-05:00'
describe
'309007' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCM' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
515c5b9a032a018fce74120049527053
dd13fba852dd31eb1067b99a51f0f61f5d94b995
describe
'49413' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCN' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
a1c81f1d433fb5d029802828a722da45
b47d16c16548f390e409b820d52ad830e22434b7
'2011-11-14T15:57:43-05:00'
describe
'16924' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCO' 'sip-files00087.pro'
7eca704b45f783ccd83c347635269d9f
79a78591561b59bff1650bc15258c6fc760fcb66
'2011-11-14T15:57:28-05:00'
describe
'16580' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCP' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
1eeeff9dcc50030e01b8496d8fbfe1fd
adf0c0ceb54f5f9a230ef273fa6f87cfd22e013b
'2011-11-14T15:54:56-05:00'
describe
'3100504' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCQ' 'sip-files00087.tif'
83750542894b1b8ccf7de4750b80eb2f
a016cb527281dc3f80d33970919cf5a80dc4203c
describe
'687' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCR' 'sip-files00087.txt'
b997de8f4da1d38791eed96f52652715
85d8b657143a29e558e803109a97e6cac9a374b7
describe
'4789' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCS' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
9d1c2db202cfa8f691792245043e4a44
a494640bae09d7b0915a0c000e339f28b443279b
'2011-11-14T15:55:31-05:00'
describe
'391367' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCT' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
785b1f7b78b2f9c7fce9db63603ca51b
0d4bc9173b324c5f64cc5a0d8c798f9ce3477681
describe
'71457' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCU' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
294c756a99c96ecddc77d0f5860e19f1
7f54e89bd70f7cd53060b75554d3ae1c85573da3
describe
'23451' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCV' 'sip-files00088.pro'
fa4e123bb3d56baadc917f5c98245f83
61b0f05f55c96536cc69dc569263ee6aec782825
describe
'24467' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCW' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
11d60a3fd69d6c4eae3315ee4d23dcc1
060cfb15278ed78e1088a512074801a76a4eee7b
'2011-11-14T15:55:27-05:00'
describe
'3142696' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCX' 'sip-files00088.tif'
e7c3f4f9ab38e72018213bb97649c348
e1887e3adb03560957780d2fd8ec8f1d48d53dc1
'2011-11-14T15:52:05-05:00'
describe
'1020' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCY' 'sip-files00088.txt'
0b91e289d08ae384a4e37471a03b1c32
4145105980f7822938f999b6e1a26a3a73371e5d
'2011-11-14T15:52:32-05:00'
describe
'6127' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGCZ' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
2507aeadb4e10aff95b6edae7e875f05
3edae4cdc1b5c81645dfe8d09606f3fef31ef4dc
describe
'386852' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDA' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
cb91c9664cc1ad52eea4c7f28b2d0249
d3da35c04dbf74416e83b41b2b0ef51709a2bced
describe
'89032' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDB' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
e884606ef10ca385c3f2e774cf90ac92
dc2103012839e8706895113e9359a173f1853095
describe
'30052' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDC' 'sip-files00089.pro'
9410d16a3b911230b4ac6f333989893b
987de8d82b4a1fb76b3adfc7c8cca533d996cdaf
describe
'31070' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDD' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
642be79215778ed07eaeeaff13823136
f8a9202491e1c3e5e8653d72d98a7dc433531dcc
describe
'3107068' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDE' 'sip-files00089.tif'
7d43f15abee2d2064740ec8ce21b747a
f5a5312b9b06cf333168bff346437f64b61e3a77
describe
'1199' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDF' 'sip-files00089.txt'
c48e6a85f7b4a26bea028e0472d36de3
5dbdd5eb87809b62997d641b93cb58c782353446
describe
'8497' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDG' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
ac55d06c04894e889eb94a6a5359421b
5b8a8ffbe36db1b9cb7cc3de4855ba739ee68979
describe
'402137' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDH' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
89cc7710809891f8b906546a583ae1d6
4da64dc357a6dd11bd409aa67a75bcb582358d47
describe
'94340' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDI' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
9390160e2eecdd6f46659549c1a170a2
4bfa2188104eac8b616683e44aab4bc727f4225c
'2011-11-14T15:54:57-05:00'
describe
'34057' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDJ' 'sip-files00090.pro'
f93ec7fd5fa161a9933ebc9e960d9f55
3d0f1bab28960c44793bc7a846e4c37702849ef4
describe
'32057' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDK' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
0e0de1c6a97c8ec02e2f53af7e3a1555
28e2823867c9d5a94d048a67ff1b3368020cf539
describe
'3229600' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDL' 'sip-files00090.tif'
a06d7093caa123c728594be9e470d1d6
543e5cb136336a7b8743a24bd457fc61bd9ed9ec
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDM' 'sip-files00090.txt'
a481a228fe321ac41bd1c3ae14e8e222
217f94a34246f04e4b109b57a7bf96b28eb0b700
describe
'7881' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDN' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
5c4c852e679fad48e6801f46c1057d3a
bc42aa8e7c605ae03b1c3fcd32bc61035ef1ff6c
describe
'407846' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDO' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
cef716bba66c98ec0321544a17d0f55d
abb6eb4340ea90d2ddd6b88bec5ec0327287e720
describe
'92642' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDP' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
4c90205b6d32be234698b04afa9f22c3
52bca72a2c7147b8f95b0da2ff9ca6bedf6148b9
describe
'33091' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDQ' 'sip-files00091.pro'
13399e1486851291d31415596fe86485
8a59a948739f02c1d5f0ccda3057d581110be1b8
'2011-11-14T15:54:09-05:00'
describe
'30719' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDR' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
6ee8abf4eb95a98a441e305a2e48af23
cdc9a44e77ee9dbf1a787354c331f1f47e817c26
describe
'3274480' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDS' 'sip-files00091.tif'
a83c6d1dfe90c6a5667f7b1ac0412354
2f617fffb156711534cf48689fa8941ac7661ffe
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDT' 'sip-files00091.txt'
6fb854ca81855d751d37d86ee16abb7b
5b7b6524c676080c33afcdef4b804d14b30ef2f3
describe
'8011' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDU' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
0f66301d51074ceb3e0e47cf890377ef
48b5bab537ae585d4bf8b29521859b4f1da0024f
describe
'406956' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDV' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
456a24d8309e35b72052c1f0c995208c
db7464b46cdf80a0e6055dfc2e287e502e9b1200
describe
'85924' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDW' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
9b2919eac78ba8d270f9c37247f53cf0
5447e2f840e55e051313aed783044e2a47fc4d9a
describe
'30461' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDX' 'sip-files00092.pro'
239d682b38e720b2316dd5109e570e76
03bc5422eec180ea219af45ff28e8d0d0aceff0a
describe
'29088' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDY' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
96926352b0b72aeb7c7609c2c458de16
ebbf952c349202f90f07257deadc54e455cd8fe2
describe
'3267864' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGDZ' 'sip-files00092.tif'
962217034119027a5132792136a42f7b
ad8e7009b61461f3be270d0a240e67d72132b270
describe
'1213' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGEA' 'sip-files00092.txt'
9672d10fca8360e898548f02bb241d87
21ba51454fc2abd4ebcc6abe6c36adf0dd3b0b67
describe
'7207' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGEB' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
f1dcef3340c8bb3021bf2253a50339b9
ba60f373db6ae3628683899fedffacacaff503c3
describe
'401643' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGEC' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
3c5e04cb156c6e399eaa72b17b122437
4643bf9242b013a0b1c9d14b81e2a06cace83c58
describe
'92659' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGED' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
583533e3e3a6dd5b225635575fd364aa
e501bf72e5c0950fca25dea07b71e284393af3eb
describe
'32090' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGEE' 'sip-files00093.pro'
272b3fd1c0331b0ac63415ef973feab6
e9ec96d5597ada2b477e7530efc853b688436a1c
describe
'31870' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGEF' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
fba0432e9cdec17c9cc1bc4b8099c54f
d56808e20fc8e8d25a611db434a19e7e64bb8922
'2011-11-14T15:53:25-05:00'
describe
'3225128' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGEG' 'sip-files00093.tif'
7ee3de29b70218203789233bad5a8414
4a768892e68ae6dc122aeb2d29e9ae1a920f8c38
describe
'1278' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGEH' 'sip-files00093.txt'
f3094eb33d2833a7ac1371a2e72f4eb8
d1aeeb31f9ee40431f5456d672b0ff195ebe64cf
'2011-11-14T15:57:29-05:00'
describe
'7916' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGEI' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
8af1aa18aba24a678005100373b3edad
6c1b521b603a66d58e61e5ac31aebad3380d609e
describe
'402783' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGEJ' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
b5a2a0f4d9d578d3595dc7610f8045a2
4b02a71764fed26596053eedaa6d19923d09444d
describe
'91182' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGEK' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
12b14fe3143cb5b937d2ae8d357ce426
f2137c719b1b8d235b7a809abbdb3a6b3b3cd18c
'2011-11-14T15:56:25-05:00'
describe
'32648' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGEL' 'sip-files00094.pro'
ce519a9d789364fca1dee37dc154bf6d
e00a503a5e5f7e1384df2aad1fd5e15481680782
describe
'30832' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGEM' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
ea71f0dadfd71e0b39d64a7d9e62a824
8d5b425249abf328b1127d05b2c0ba9bee8d5a66
describe
'3234300' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGEN' 'sip-files00094.tif'
bda793af52f3a8ed2be4a3f8dc658bdc
afafccd3b93504a76bd6c9cca06e2f0d0001e38b
'2011-11-14T15:55:29-05:00'
describe
'1282' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGEO' 'sip-files00094.txt'
09e97ae6030b5eaf439996bf385d3324
4c0916b91daacce580c9418ddedf290ed619a313
describe
'7925' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGEP' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
fa92bd7ad684bad6322f84857b48560c
349d03ec07256117db6edd6225700074b951bc92
describe
'413209' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGEQ' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
74a3a3be4f0859e2361fa2ca4e75f0cd
dc5d86eba42d774a1577091c10c01862be6e6011
'2011-11-14T15:54:51-05:00'
describe
'86978' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGER' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
d0eb98c34f6acb4caf872ac8706fb4e1
841235b7d56e41ba91c4ba862c9b7ca144e82b19
describe
'32378' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGES' 'sip-files00095.pro'
715ecff3c0300ee715d5845b83bb05bd
728174690f8f89a84950d72eaec942771248fab8
describe
'29546' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGET' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
88677389b7be26bab930159d7d16ab08
7565adc142df8bc7fd5f3260d009e012958b0b3c
describe
'3317540' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGEU' 'sip-files00095.tif'
8140a8790d25ee1d084647449f9a6bf3
f04d66db4fe711b4b560e87f7c91fb2fe96e8ee4
describe
'1292' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGEV' 'sip-files00095.txt'
52363524004054ce798b26971a03d15a
13c0742453577909708aad0dbbee7ee937498a2c
describe
'7476' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGEW' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
73f6130c39f155f3b027835677e02920
ef8e42307fdedae7309b0a5ead8320b8f53a1a86
describe
'415143' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGEX' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
e4cfe64c12c1ba7907d9eb6088d66a4e
d6b3a99adf07a50e51bffda22e59c78828a6fb86
describe
'84421' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGEY' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
0f7901f5f52a3da46ac1b2a4967b7efb
bbf8bcf515f659782df62d0ba2018b50e5789c12
describe
'31747' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGEZ' 'sip-files00096.pro'
659c5e5f4d09eb120694d2b47a08b20d
d10fb904661cd94181eaa47272562cb905cb7fcc
'2011-11-14T15:52:02-05:00'
describe
'27886' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFA' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
871a40fe3cc2f128157c3e06905aa408
29d3830d369fc7dc2cf04e95e0fe8b0c82ccee64
describe
'3333572' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFB' 'sip-files00096.tif'
b95cd332d83ea95fec67729cec0ee717
1d9c68457adba2dc9c6ff2647f082891d5fdd870
'2011-11-14T15:55:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFC' 'sip-files00096.txt'
c870499d2c676ee8970e0ba72517d7a4
c6a76fa19d537f80a7da814c8a75f0ee8be72717
describe
'7083' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFD' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
aba08535ce7f9dc1b7984fe5450ccf6b
e1c83cc0f1743766e52e4a3bdb2c7e74833a830e
'2011-11-14T15:57:07-05:00'
describe
'360400' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFE' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
a8ee61fc094005687dd928fc929fad31
a52525936a05aae3f8d2bb0919c9335ca608ab13
describe
'66393' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFF' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
c3f622c7fde408b279e792bed70cc3c3
a5d367c67d2bd308faedf0444f9785c9c2d5cf71
describe
'23858' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFG' 'sip-files00097.pro'
8e13ec439f4ca8fc68ece44cb5c71eee
1d8e751aeff3f3e4249856698577c8c5973e40c7
'2011-11-14T15:56:24-05:00'
describe
'22425' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFH' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
4d7b6aa6f8a1e47d80bb07d03b5f9517
39deafb5de2745794f21cd25f5c750071295caa6
describe
'2895468' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFI' 'sip-files00097.tif'
30b95beefa910f036a009b5a21200900
0651812918edfb7bb41a786e32d31c1a05ded16c
describe
'948' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFJ' 'sip-files00097.txt'
c92499f0c1f4b71b762b1adbf42878e4
b3f21a100e165707f0c8aff543aa6b18aac9605f
describe
'5993' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFK' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
4686093e02b4def9b6349af9eb6a6d06
4e3c0f5d876f291d36cf0c0af20205f6a6951efd
describe
'387194' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFL' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
8c62eb5d7918343275c1b60b85d8f620
8a293626abba6c113bfda1e89da9b647bc646ec0
describe
'74993' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFM' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
e141d8452ed6a70701db69ed749cbfa1
1e4fc31822bc579713137d8939dc7415dd094d9d
describe
'25225' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFN' 'sip-files00098.pro'
26504c6539eeb3b991eb1aecbac4420e
30c51faad802ee10ef8bb0aff090e457bab83328
'2011-11-14T15:56:26-05:00'
describe
'24672' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFO' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
9f45516eb843baf6e85e6645b4ac2075
ce9f44dd9e6e1a37ca7c5a88b3a1363ba60f6a0e
'2011-11-14T15:55:14-05:00'
describe
'3109616' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFP' 'sip-files00098.tif'
16abfa8b8cad7bf09699e300c2eb0d04
79c370fd845aba9a4721ac40e1e44db11be6dcaa
describe
'1076' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFQ' 'sip-files00098.txt'
953db02f0caeb1044aea19f8b1b0fe8e
e72705ae098038fd3094ff0c4431f45010ec304d
describe
'6404' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFR' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
a579475a0571a17942eb7a229749a1c2
b7c9e27ab513d615f1a709d07bba904f90493d33
describe
'404228' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFS' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
94b534a0e71dac00480c45871d218bd3
0e2281beaa1f8b2c0211cdb32e5d596ff228148f
describe
'100831' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFT' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
648d24380278ff9ec2075b5da839ef30
20ab101f8972ce2383b91bcc91b28308dd680a26
describe
'35393' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFU' 'sip-files00099.pro'
33b8697f1cfe4c74b5cc74b2c02e1eae
712d8adcec4e9aea08b39f610b9a6a13450d25b6
describe
'33889' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFV' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
c1da3bcadb74df9365b79b327cf630e5
767026f2c237e04d6fea6c76a15f0c04485eca4e
'2011-11-14T15:53:59-05:00'
describe
'3245652' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFW' 'sip-files00099.tif'
31986e93f36091045a2a4eeb0b8f4547
9348665d4c406abffa2abe74213039bf6f2675fe
'2011-11-14T15:58:13-05:00'
describe
'1383' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFX' 'sip-files00099.txt'
b57968d7e6c176f385e6994ad16ce05f
a3e5da468b919ad1c8258c55b6e03b035c1ad3e0
describe
'8815' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFY' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
5df240ce7970a8b4b32ab2d0252a5628
aadb47172b1cd8ed3fc85a12ca30ba2522b96eea
'2011-11-14T15:55:45-05:00'
describe
'408804' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGFZ' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
b392b0122a3b54ab78457ebd99ee52f2
75b47568e6d87743c021ed66281fccd5cf37621b
'2011-11-14T15:57:42-05:00'
describe
'81921' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGA' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
ca1830fe193bd97f889612a66c7bd08b
e8949597f2182b25a3d9bbfe48024c715ee72438
describe
'30379' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGB' 'sip-files00100.pro'
6a38215698aa8731dc3e40565ea968b0
56f51695f358a1aed732b8e4c0712b86e460c02e
describe
'27649' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGC' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
679f5218b69a0b52b5ce18d090c541b4
4c49e707b5735cb0482514b99a638988a9023b23
describe
'3282480' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGD' 'sip-files00100.tif'
af82c1a33345a4400191cb81764d7bc4
852854f68cacaa2c74a4ebce0698fcf0aac3cff0
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGE' 'sip-files00100.txt'
5444521814b5c8e8ead06288fb14159f
5330da280e75d386235fa668d2dc4fa5a10379db
describe
'7097' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGF' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
414c77ad65240daac150e672041394e4
e56c5f04d5c4fa4ed6930e8250937ae6dfbc2018
describe
'395685' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGG' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
02ded23c64a31769824705e6c33d5e8d
635010128abcb80921a0b39010a6d2d485040091
describe
'110320' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGH' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
3c1ab5ac99a3ed60dec5055d25903dba
aef23d7ff3afabb1acaddeb51f2592bb4b303432
describe
'14246' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGI' 'sip-files00101.pro'
35eac6e9b0a249e7361879f750e38e8d
d93dd010f8010e651145d72c9c25f5ec9b48308d
'2011-11-14T15:57:12-05:00'
describe
'30816' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGJ' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
3040be5f798e3c073be6f2d322bc27dd
ea8f08ec0724260fbab723b6e0334f6654189c90
describe
'3177752' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGK' 'sip-files00101.tif'
3437d7fa24a24607ecf0dd872c7f265c
326e1fcf429e42a0f45efddfd6941962291eed15
'2011-11-14T15:51:56-05:00'
describe
'600' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGL' 'sip-files00101.txt'
504736ca4c0e3592fde34dd0a4a470d1
d15d66bfecf9b9820ca88f378db1a92b01cee0f3
describe
'8070' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGM' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
4cfbc43111f74424f374e1c9b9be4a00
e9b7431f6214ed1276dac64cf5c811141407ef4c
describe
'412029' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGN' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
f6132f84ca719ccad69005d1b68b2b3e
222b77e6a8ec02045865e5a0e4b3848a6dccd0e6
describe
'100368' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGO' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
f3d6e7164957241ae57c880bcbd07dd7
276ba6dffdbd44db01ddd085f0a81c074fc88e09
describe
'35983' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGP' 'sip-files00102.pro'
f19506f2bede3f87fd5f34d24e67e713
9c6da3bac5e25358a11cd075a2569f7dcd3953bc
describe
'33866' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGQ' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
fda5bcde88ddac1bc2d7f41acbccb00e
46e74b2d646c03bbca16fd7f73a2b779b85e7ea0
describe
'3308528' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGR' 'sip-files00102.tif'
9b000f4a5fd2f66f5dd79a677c5da440
5d1d489cd568195a8ce95e88e66db9d2b0449216
describe
'1406' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGS' 'sip-files00102.txt'
d382fd95ba88d71480be4729cb20d8eb
ef0925378c4dcd498dcda6a6f7def0f3dc19b3a0
describe
'8384' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGT' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
797ad9efd690861dfa3082b0802c4e1a
e79cc5fbcfaba279982742e8a229b3c0463bf060
describe
'407082' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGU' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
17c5eb6a33f788ab162bbc0e9fc51750
517edca635a24c159cbc79e08642fc46245d0d3c
describe
'94999' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGV' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
1640edd42f6d7e65b5d27bc2833bec18
fa31a3bd112f4ae9bc4fec179ff132484350b678
'2011-11-14T15:57:27-05:00'
describe
'32992' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGW' 'sip-files00103.pro'
750ea7517a251c663d553b427cdc4b65
9b84dbc4fc80b883874cd3115bef470564a7878c
describe
'32750' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGX' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
d5eac8a6f687661fca829e0d3cf9efaf
462d5c2c9163dc9c5d8e132a5045ced4cd3852ad
describe
'3268208' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGY' 'sip-files00103.tif'
4d8d0eb2e70a2c8ce8eeaa31777596e4
cd62c9e3255505933e7147ce1b8d4e8656012067
describe
'1315' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGGZ' 'sip-files00103.txt'
61d9825ca07683537981dd681ce12424
f8775d8888ccf249b700f13071e56a5360600496
describe
'8059' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHA' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
2df60eb9a9e69c1bb2adc991c371a51e
b90bff805351efe6b3586061c0b876773673466a
describe
'418262' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHB' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
1f8a3a61d82550f986426d9002f25dd9
d4057c3a3412ba33ee05ca3d288a0773c64e0228
describe
'86614' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHC' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
2a2bd8600b2e17d15bed411c3c420eb1
cf8a8665ddf4e2cc166abf22a78820eb8873f4de
describe
'32601' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHD' 'sip-files00104.pro'
60eff048e3b14609df2b66ff28dc5f21
c8873ecac7c5e4c80dd242333ab0224c952019ab
'2011-11-14T15:58:32-05:00'
describe
'30240' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHE' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
671b7f1c358a7a2197224bc4e86fa39e
ee3fc4dae349b8c3d02c345ed19d4188b83de60c
describe
'3358420' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHF' 'sip-files00104.tif'
6712d15afb69b494e7636ff5a3ec9cb1
0baa4471ff241360672b9d88619e74e2707a2377
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHG' 'sip-files00104.txt'
dd0b2fd66a232bc85a8addf9b88c5af8
652aeacd5d6fbbe010530db14ee461f533014ffb
'2011-11-14T15:57:58-05:00'
describe
'7468' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHH' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
fbc4a62a1a9e618f1bd7745bf61a1289
4c2fb51d2ed66ff26c0469717701498861c87fc6
describe
'391735' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHI' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
8e91143c310742cf8c1ba229f8b33701
26c8bcd781b37d52720ead844d2ac01d77d91711
'2011-11-14T15:54:54-05:00'
describe
'93680' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHJ' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
3e984dcfba6d755edca98c6991b07cea
76c1c442c228093d553b9afcfdcc03493b7500cb
describe
'32131' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHK' 'sip-files00105.pro'
01f20b7176e5d3ac24ff20c9d9960b1b
54027048697f13f3f288c8da7396d80b25ebdd60
describe
'32019' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHL' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
710b736e385def7d2ebf8308c88b1c3c
c8061ca24dc2ff309af7e048769e4a8c0ff63221
'2011-11-14T15:54:15-05:00'
describe
'3145732' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHM' 'sip-files00105.tif'
c87b2c9c6fc91510e8ae567ff572b6a3
8b4b4b2c31a27ded4b5957289ba6def14584116c
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHN' 'sip-files00105.txt'
6e3c3afa7eae92354ffced7f5814a679
f472067a970db1f70a16a44d06d539c124b89b69
describe
'8377' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHO' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
508ef09817dd9698aa835f1bc75f828c
689d0b1774908258314eb46b4218e75586238cb3
describe
'415399' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHP' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
5d66504167a6c3e153d31a9318396931
3eae829491748099a37dc1b33e15cea0fe1d13f0
describe
'92339' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHQ' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
7e997d698edbeb5e78339de06c26e279
32f736efd155a14331c6cce0fd1d42585bb869a3
describe
'33262' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHR' 'sip-files00106.pro'
514e6c72a6523dc88205dd2de9f0e06e
9b8de91fc4a6a325cff2b95b9145b7bc6238f0c3
describe
'30075' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHS' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
aae77fb9c9c2b9de4e615f78aeb82cf9
f3176df760c0b50e24512f0bc29c1944f8887628
describe
'3335408' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHT' 'sip-files00106.tif'
981b4310368ba9d3b5ec3de91b908701
9d5fda7a877d25419b369e35c35b7874f3cd24a9
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHU' 'sip-files00106.txt'
88abf4c36fa7259ae92c46de0952f75f
58e496131f5c209f7f2f230decd22a4c36bb2016
describe
'7433' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHV' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
b654f2cdf24f0f5776a248b35d3b81ac
d6d0e06e6544b97020ab840281585322f362bd99
describe
'399537' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHW' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
08686a72df8450cbb1fcc540f75f645e
af92d78ff8fd1438cb04435f44389c590657bbee
describe
'97123' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHX' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
82ef5f1b0732beacb6b8bbd83a6ad2fc
6ed23af548f55ba560f75e6edb0afd0244ba7a3e
'2011-11-14T15:52:01-05:00'
describe
'33677' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHY' 'sip-files00107.pro'
ac726b98fc14dca066f0e07365a4105f
6a241e456f2dfc4cff4135e7e16bd0390a3521fc
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGHZ' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
f6f65c86160a5310966a2214da6ef824
a91cf4459020da5a36a5e5854f8ade5b674b28d9
describe
'3208696' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGIA' 'sip-files00107.tif'
1320ae2c7bef78e31375cba44d3f625a
7d6e36d5561911f9acf42599b33031bc2a89af03
'2011-11-14T15:57:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGIB' 'sip-files00107.txt'
d191bf38fd60268c9986e75778d098f9
1fa8d9c17c49328d8b5a3176306191c5bcf204d6
describe
'8494' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGIC' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
a9c78bb5cf9a01c88bc1b8ed7d083cb8
b2642c3b5c98036d9a39ff09e2a723365aededce
describe
'221648' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGID' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
a8ad7c2d990677cceab575131d964b8d
a670ea945ff30ba673770e2a3f74f05c8d60d5f9
'2011-11-14T15:56:52-05:00'
describe
'38049' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGIE' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
42c5aa5399a9807cf3b98f507a09e4cf
15a90d578d0c67c157570e9878b1a907670d6c9f
describe
'11592' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGIF' 'sip-files00108.pro'
2c6df52a8aa673c1b288aeabd9658d59
3616d742b69403a33c17be4fba0a00017a56f4bc
describe
'12877' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGIG' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
d807220635d5bee44c3bf4c89b3c6dd6
16239b5620a76b5eca3dcde9191c3c0983a7f611
'2011-11-14T15:52:40-05:00'
describe
'3195440' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGIH' 'sip-files00108.tif'
7eefb9518a421f749f66db66c1a51023
f59e9ff6c5fc189e754cdaa1615f14185ce2a8d4
describe
'470' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGII' 'sip-files00108.txt'
a013ca5fd1905b9d48e5e54a09bf42da
a163c5fc2e35021ffe6d67100e802635fd0c0644
describe
'3739' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGIJ' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
244a69667b325184799b82c5620021d6
10669d9742d36644dc225e09b116e146384267ad
describe
'390669' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGIK' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
97e5619ac06e3736c2d6e18e004019eb
52d352a5509b21293955c527e912fcab6252ef72
describe
'74493' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGIL' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
39fdfb60fe36c91a9975199c4b9a4ad6
e0737de335d60f9a0d0fa18a770241065013e747
describe
'23604' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGIM' 'sip-files00109.pro'
93e19de830d4dc8921c98f84bfc4a4b8
88dfc13f78fdb76e5e01e2e53250667809d937a1
describe
'25675' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGIN' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
ecfabe91db00d13d9b1357ab31562bb5
3b735dd284ef99eb985ad81a52c1c317c0c1b3e9
describe
'3137088' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGIO' 'sip-files00109.tif'
c7bdb56184c5604729969aec53914088
0605636a6eb5cb0b61c3db652311a80e76f7b04b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGIP' 'sip-files00109.txt'
e7e9fcb6015d76ce0525e47a1f8c7158
9e47d9807ab3ec3ff9fcf1a39ffd455e4c932419
describe
'6625' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGIQ' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
0df069406231bab7bc8c705e8787ca1e
de9b30db947fd84982d2539f7b74a10e89175f5a
describe
'405165' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGIR' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
56076e3b7204b70ba3684f64eb8b9862
5f04bef9cba07811feccefa46dfa3f7188c17ffb
describe
'91256' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGIS' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
710aadab8f9e3c10f26ee49dcc106357
9e3c3ba4830a14181783975a16f0aac0d734aae9
describe
'33367' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGIT' 'sip-files00110.pro'
183a5f773880f11c6de29eb3b1e3037a
c2bf69cc21c18ed68838fbd3f11d225138f8a95e
describe
'31806' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGIU' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
6f73db704381beb7d55ac82dd092c0ec
eefef574988522a919d862520e529ca43266b6a5
describe
'3253424' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGIV' 'sip-files00110.tif'
c559c1e64a2612c17af767a8fcc42a67
c5302399b774504def4e8f93471e574ac706a488
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGIW' 'sip-files00110.txt'
ba3a51e3c8ac4fd8edc93e5a50a0e7a5
a8f75d3a07d5321b21ec652887a8e92ca023b968
describe
'7867' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGIX' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
f2776625e31c23f036f4988ee4fbb136
5c8830a56e3d2911b22e1de63624859d1cd15455
describe
'391420' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGIY' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
2c2e3a9f790d2ed92dbabe459d5c6bf0
6d507f20fea890cf7fec2fe063677a108785c3a5
describe
'98636' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGIZ' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
7d27abf352a5e52c42cde9b6654f28d3
a873181a5e08a2d6178111c996bee58d2092b25e
describe
'34453' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJA' 'sip-files00111.pro'
d939dcfd1d04bc8891fbf3186d797b64
cfe0c6aaea571b239cfacd6e3fa33920cace6221
describe
'34197' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJB' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
7218e549481a7f002ea8d85c1c891ee1
4cfab0aad6e81b4cec0ee9c6fdbcb979037b04f7
describe
'3143868' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJC' 'sip-files00111.tif'
64c9bb9b3867cd879a2adaa74f7044a5
0ec5e8624a798a705cc530836fcbd81e84e9d82f
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJD' 'sip-files00111.txt'
55ff2ad2431e2a31754d0a8535affa83
3bef7fd7039d58c2f113ebd9ab07b6e74c0c41ec
'2011-11-14T15:54:29-05:00'
describe
'8559' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJE' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
802bb3757c84b89d482f0b4243ccc8b5
7f8cf73832474d268aeeb65018395531a88d421a
describe
'416524' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJF' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
e8803d963fe2977b34b66519eff72e32
18117be6e3d83758ef330c0e79a8eca204370c37
describe
'80166' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJG' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
ab9cf5e1cd7fa2fc0b90c2923921cbc9
4e81ee772f8e08d7da62073c622216ef9c53fd9f
describe
'31207' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJH' 'sip-files00112.pro'
8fd7dd69a73dbd48c67982b1de1dcffc
65661855c3a9aa6f7935a6f2937cf8e1f59979fe
describe
'26055' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJI' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
974cab5ecf954b90f680802dc55f5d65
81fd5f9c1450ddf01ed20326e4c7d474b26a7eb8
describe
'3343600' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJJ' 'sip-files00112.tif'
81564ed5621f4b2a4e2331741e255518
09bf42813b5bc1128fea48b347e61814abb970a5
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJK' 'sip-files00112.txt'
c5133fc36b503da79539b250bb592e20
923ca25028d5cbd8ed4b7911efa9202485f05097
'2011-11-14T15:52:14-05:00'
describe
'6802' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJL' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
7a97118942938da05c0750aae7f9cb0c
c91ce03d5e8b49238de78c89a5719caf0fa0a307
'2011-11-14T15:57:59-05:00'
describe
'410964' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJM' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
d53a045b951b0036a481181214bde84d
b5a6100da7265dc68ac0c8cefd74da51b712a51f
describe
'90215' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJN' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
38b27a90ab918d014d493966788b9ed6
dd2789aa42663e8e5b8ae72a43012889313bfe97
describe
'34499' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJO' 'sip-files00113.pro'
f854336d7547316a207e76ac3fd1ed47
4c7c331cfdaa28aea6b87941d56ac27593582b61
describe
'29815' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJP' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
3993c109641909af9c3b8b2f930bd1fc
df2b8a357ce3059b27c98c05776adb515ab623fc
describe
'3299384' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJQ' 'sip-files00113.tif'
7fc434501ad31af11c4f673ae455090a
c41200e197140520aa7375d29503c0cc746afa33
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJR' 'sip-files00113.txt'
a416958935e5f31364b1e992b76b310b
b55f2835aa0bd785d2c297a5042e79db9af1f883
describe
'7630' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJS' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
ec0cab8e32d46a2faab9ec7ce7c54b66
97604d8ec8bcfccb830c80a3330e93a6d3e5f8d5
describe
'399237' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJT' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
2f94aea1fcab656c3042f9f8509ed29a
704e419d93c1db4397507afcb1e366f12ee06754
describe
'87218' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJU' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
adee87a2551d09f9b7a7079fccd02dcb
b54205cf96ead18200637589bf3491aeb72ff0a3
describe
'31341' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJV' 'sip-files00114.pro'
2a1d324524d39e0e5d89be035c58dbd5
69737597f6c1c58e4ef32de7c60c84d8799dfc82
describe
'28533' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJW' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
0a0036cc7d3cdec76e3d721390e9f695
8000e257f39080059a021698bb83096a52ddcaef
describe
'3205296' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJX' 'sip-files00114.tif'
31fd51dc776376940828fcf7b786dd60
ce0de84cc51739c48405c2b94fa614b0660c23cd
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJY' 'sip-files00114.txt'
b66615f5aa8cd761bfd67422c76ca650
d3cf27a8b28a5f91248cbc8603d28c54bc62dc0c
describe
'7575' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGJZ' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
c0f3907366c2a6f61ccd55dbcff749d1
7531f0f033863703e4b9cd0f18b03fe4f1c1e47e
describe
'399937' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKA' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
de6b58ddd1ad3a910552be2d14158460
5fceb105c1f4253bc8057e57bab2873ebcb8aa07
describe
'115144' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKB' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
73f503867205e5b82dd452de77b188a4
331dc66a5d8a13e8ca1d7f4fedba776df79b2ff8
describe
'2133' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKC' 'sip-files00115.pro'
280a8ef44f33e3c2d980b4edf13af325
303bdc8fa8f4e2ba9dcbb9b772f512b48b620b39
'2011-11-14T15:55:13-05:00'
describe
'30274' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKD' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
de2a16393b4281a96aa49cbfca3b109e
6251bc23f7012857badd2eced6a2b754ab3ba416
'2011-11-14T15:56:55-05:00'
describe
'3213300' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKE' 'sip-files00115.tif'
b040588a975017d8b8c1aff5bf1e4b42
0e8468011a889564ddc6164f7b0ffdd962bef071
'2011-11-14T15:58:09-05:00'
describe
'225' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKF' 'sip-files00115.txt'
636ef84147a4f58ff220e53b09928ee1
6d79601692cad9d124fd156cdd5032e15f5795db
describe
'7775' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKG' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
3dca99086270e7f96cece9da41d5ae2f
2bc18182d0527130a3ac14e85e8be0f4293bb114
'2011-11-14T15:53:39-05:00'
describe
'400752' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKH' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
f839d306ea83ae5f621cc4ee6772c142
a0b8c941d584685cb90e465c38ed7803ba88fa0e
describe
'92853' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKI' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
8d2d7e9f03c951858df308b028e52e4b
ad797c8368bc3ff36cf09a417a4aabb1c815738b
describe
'32934' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKJ' 'sip-files00117.pro'
acc8d38dafb86743eb0441c1923721b6
9944ea486ef0f3f32c518d95fc5d2456d45e81d9
describe
'31509' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKK' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
cc526c5b8be82a5f94a264d9f9bbdea6
d42fb93da854aaed67cfc6290c8c4fa3972ad214
describe
'3218316' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKL' 'sip-files00117.tif'
1e1536bd4711425bd1b34c13f5be7ce1
6460a3634be911444c91fc6c1071097c804be8fd
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKM' 'sip-files00117.txt'
c68cd8feee4f5416dc63177efad2b771
57c35c6a5a121a17e3ae4ab14507e7a1d9bf3945
'2011-11-14T15:54:07-05:00'
describe
'8205' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKN' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
08212eb6216d122fc91dd3bb226d3ec6
bad8e7486444e27e0ecd7c2d790abddb7237d10d
describe
'402708' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKO' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
339a542fb8cbe09eea23b2b481725b90
29438e34791037ca80b14b26181d249d7678a558
'2011-11-14T15:52:56-05:00'
describe
'94275' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKP' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
dda56fdab0086f2746b74f56b95b5e28
c3cc8ab5a5522a73f550ee6373d40e1da105995d
describe
'34103' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKQ' 'sip-files00118.pro'
bb175bf23dfbb000e8ff1ce3fa89da98
4074a60ac495ad5be5adcc7bc926bc1b5cf1b5e5
'2011-11-14T15:56:22-05:00'
describe
'31324' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKR' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
a9b61e4ef7078197c8246e357a0e32fe
6839280799246ff64e2989e1dba7cf73f871016b
describe
'3233320' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKS' 'sip-files00118.tif'
3844ccf5ee911183ced564e962b15aa0
77a0c2fb0daff28c6e5393eb7596bff5368c6437
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKT' 'sip-files00118.txt'
3244d8f3e6e00fbc7049ddf6aa95cd20
bc25c13c6354669aaef8ecd7ceb3e216626f1be5
describe
'7799' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKU' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
cbeb44de20d6cc58e133e5f41cb0415e
bb0a8b34c7151f601f9e3ab9982f576553f1eb21
describe
'412503' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKV' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
ca883c1984251356dab148bcb7c0b9f9
a127940f20c0abe7cc44114a0be96785d631a9a1
'2011-11-14T15:53:48-05:00'
describe
'94978' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKW' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
783de629d8b93dd98043dca160c00ba4
2edf95d7bf803def0267941f8318feddda7cad08
describe
'34894' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKX' 'sip-files00119.pro'
9e00de877539a3dcb7de870040022b95
74905240da22bd46857b794234bc61bbfba65ddc
describe
'31193' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKY' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
77319c598b0e2b924b197f494d0102b3
9e3639c273ac7692c17bb0692f8182496a2da087
describe
'3311804' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGKZ' 'sip-files00119.tif'
704c28c4c0dc7c43f56a1a19b931287e
c7c044984a53a074d67bf8c395a60a999f24c68d
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLA' 'sip-files00119.txt'
28330744c2e96f52ff938794045ffb0f
ff424e8708b25e8aa45b3ff82c48d6136b7152e4
describe
'8021' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLB' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
36efdaa0c3639acc598b31c8cc7f3bc5
f9f560ed948e76d68eae00514a065a880e076650
describe
'381231' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLC' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
12a314e37099b6e5c937e91c95b73411
adf760bb627244f5f857dfd0601d30d35090f794
describe
'75140' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLD' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
a0bdb8039f28349407ce39874d779b6f
2f400caba3bb69f6b719f9df24c642047188d36e
'2011-11-14T15:58:26-05:00'
describe
'27144' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLE' 'sip-files00120.pro'
0c3ab82c3dc06c6326f71dd36ce3c450
ad8504055683fb18e9cef4c5a87bdec01f5d2338
describe
'25543' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLF' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
d2ae271d9a2ef8e8bd097ab2a7e93af9
2c1cffe689e9ea635b88945d3bbc7d7e05bb2666
describe
'3062284' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLG' 'sip-files00120.tif'
f9166d82764d07d71224e072ecb7cc44
11f615850dff458c0f1ef44950d84dff57f524ad
'2011-11-14T15:58:06-05:00'
describe
'1070' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLH' 'sip-files00120.txt'
6a270140e24780ffe30f709ac5cf4ec3
c5af1a20eb082dcb771e68dd941bd2afdbd622f2
describe
'6160' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLI' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
d49344128e84600f630b22809e30de77
98aa9a17346bbe6a4a66285c09d354caed6da7d9
describe
'402264' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLJ' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
ecaa053e1dc41263d864a797f62a8fbf
8fb3e2c929fd536f398cc79bf1f8e4687cb0e6f3
describe
'72667' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLK' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
8508d3b08be872a7a03cfcbb58624383
7e91a1b314af130bbbab5cd058c0750c2e796539
describe
'24473' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLL' 'sip-files00121.pro'
3ea0f2f98042cfd38d61a917244d8953
fcdecf62282a73290bb9bd0ee9f445158067927e
describe
'24553' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLM' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
3f8b3ea42655ff8d057f28622b085ce3
01b4138256131a41f0faef8286d22eab8005210f
describe
'3229248' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLN' 'sip-files00121.tif'
6c9e2359df29eda653fae49ebdf23250
67d71a75e016efb574c4dd13766489c3332a6220
'2011-11-14T15:51:58-05:00'
describe
'1035' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLO' 'sip-files00121.txt'
0c85091c3ccf327712fc0b39000e1b3b
9b65abf224323686d04292b2306366831e623886
describe
'6236' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLP' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
6b45e50a6f73bf4a9f385dd34cef3696
18b66129fa4fa856e055766539a02e90a2d0b573
describe
'409397' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLQ' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
af9eb03c837b7c4c66f6dafbcf307717
3d0113323d8b901da7d520ceefa2707dce015749
describe
'81445' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLR' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
7f3b94af0720c014769449a7b9dcb142
6440486c07649c9b9c419dab73b5f90883e8d068
describe
'29449' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLS' 'sip-files00122.pro'
121f85d0817804a9e9dfc977337d4fb4
9eed55421da5775383019c8d0f511e3d676a79b6
describe
'27463' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLT' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
6f2421f3a7b112ed2c43d8eb764da8e6
b8ccdbeac69cca502e182fa53bafc96f141cc217
describe
'3287004' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLU' 'sip-files00122.tif'
75c06ab1da2a3a0990f25a941f6b48d6
e9d61e58e31b55fd515f25bd8c0e42c387e65118
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLV' 'sip-files00122.txt'
890c3e13307f2163cfbb64129b136313
9e55f7a7d62279af47ef062fad1c9567393bc87a
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLW' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
36134d414dc813a75646b439895ffb1b
7ec2db7dd1713c44b3d8ca9b62a03c6dca32e0e9
describe
'400865' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLX' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
bef88b2fa8204a78bc5393306ee86ff8
2ca308ddc80ba142961f5ebcd35dc9426c9d642f
describe
'115314' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLY' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
c1777188a5d6f275e0f5e3b0688715e1
f72582077d0149ee9ee9bcea98bb0a1529754bc5
describe
'6111' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGLZ' 'sip-files00123.pro'
3fe2e42d59bd4ca1d3769740f902a814
651168809b9ae519434a7d4f677381c4b2a40b5e
describe
'29044' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGMA' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
cf00ecf06d93f01fb17ad24a5dcc235d
592988a9f6f47e42f62dafa65e9dbe7bb2b5feeb
describe
'3218956' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGMB' 'sip-files00123.tif'
f98c597431482930eb923d6e259ebaee
cf68ee43bfaee5b42124770ec945a6cf5fe5b273
'2011-11-14T15:54:02-05:00'
describe
'276' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGMC' 'sip-files00123.txt'
a5d6b4663195317e2badb1106384a455
e5c7d1ab9c483799852e24efaa89fe952de4f7bc
describe
'7470' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGMD' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
432f8b4c3ea0a4224b395e4ac09d0b74
b58b4e63349f89fa18aaf846191f0a5f40c42c7e
describe
'414399' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGME' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
0cd9347cf8bf1f9f9f50251c13bfb7f2
280f6afc8ecd92e15be36bab40b9a93856466c5b
'2011-11-14T15:53:41-05:00'
describe
'93125' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGMF' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
97b17b754860c8df00d3c4e4608acff4
1cbaa094859fdb32cdfeb00afac8d0067ae55e57
'2011-11-14T15:53:51-05:00'
describe
'34609' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGMG' 'sip-files00124.pro'
523a8715c2756a34c98ea536c5bf0ecb
fc3d2fb29ae90b15dae22645d115523a11ef1af9
describe
'30620' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGMH' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
d9cb588fbc5702f920363e80c5609367
02e08693102f47e896248e2e953d101d0bd695b8
describe
'3327304' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGMI' 'sip-files00124.tif'
cf9c88c235bcc1afa68f191dcc6129f8
80102ffea69b8a5311af1882bd231e13d511caca
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGMJ' 'sip-files00124.txt'
dcbaf008fe2a7d8c6b2bde99ac05684a
7b904a247fd8c999c7d700b9a1520f133d04738d
describe
'7447' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGMK' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
ddebfa3b1cd24d29f14c889c20de58c0
1d6ecf7f3b3519ce1a7d4d2969e7af4bad849557
describe
'424576' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGML' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
5b017c4cce5ac4afd01e144ebfbdcc53
6f6e031f65d43cd08ede122a1df5d6a5311c1c35
describe
'89430' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGMM' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
e303f53cc1f3ac08f753d65ccab3343f
b256eded192f6fef52ccf85f6b84a069dd3d0bf1
describe
'34277' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGMN' 'sip-files00125.pro'
a2a55590ecec94cf100f57d91100ff6a
0f8237f40c00e4bc8c254e1cabf871fabb7f6e59
describe
'30939' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGMO' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
315d12cad3e21f38d71a8bf416234c97
729497375dfad529b4fc480e73ddb42259b65329
describe
'3408776' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGMP' 'sip-files00125.tif'
0f587b473c606037e741a7f691fccb65
3ffdb32121633ba14f05dc0f994215a6ed9f5323
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGMQ' 'sip-files00125.txt'
c92747e35f3da4c0cdb04f32584cbef9
6c5e02dade1397b8114f947188af2c2738112b69
describe
'7703' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGMR' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
a02b858033ffcfcfab2520e2c5b4b1c7
d4639e2b475b3714873edfe4c95ab0092af147bb
describe
'414835' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGMS' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
7e5a3e458fa443409026c265643a555e
efdca1ebb3a284a5a12f617069fa93c6961cb545
describe
'91827' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGMT' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
d1542c0cf0f4975721c4301026e68093
b0503d565a31ea70a1bf7b366f52dc5e0973d751
'2011-11-14T15:53:31-05:00'
describe
'34561' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGMU' 'sip-files00126.pro'
71324e195febf73ef49b08f5863373c4
b1516638640732c4d2d754f72decfa171564c989
describe
'31514' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGMV' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
49853dd8033d06b419dcad5296ad60b7
250d0a4c1ecc1718ecd9baf67acb0be341e01eae
describe
'3331260' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGMW' 'sip-files00126.tif'
a6865281c732f73dacd397ffce224f57
30ad50583abb7f98122abc1aa4667a88da49930d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGMX' 'sip-files00126.txt'
ba0cb5f944d629e81528ebb5d85bf3bd
1edd95ed9e5d9671e7d7413e307ff22b12b3b681
describe
'7643' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGMY' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
dc067a064365fdae258a5c6381f0072e
2f57d49386662979fedb30a9af3e3996100c71a0
describe
'399358' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGMZ' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
f05f1b29111934e08fbb7c3b263f591b
aeda7bc4e7103a4a6af5185157a3cfc60f6f37c8
describe
'93530' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGNA' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
a5c72699250599dd159b165f8fb77ab0
dc9b1f96bd0471210be24fda3b7352a98bd193b4
describe
'32584' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGNB' 'sip-files00127.pro'
2c5e3aae49d7f791ff5e144ac03db5de
36efc6b76605f20b750861092e37fc7a2d312f28
describe
'31724' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGNC' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
f2fd4b2210e6bc6f851793da4dc899f0
d0a5f3815afd10b7b06d00fecc871b3107e12890
describe
'3207184' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGND' 'sip-files00127.tif'
a20244aa4c1f74d489941eb62ffe0857
66b19f455036838ff50d14a46344df4cdb402307
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGNE' 'sip-files00127.txt'
8cc821b8fdf0af9a906ecd9ac0e7dd54
641f0947656c15252f970f427d69db757965ea19
describe
'8208' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGNF' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
bd1aed402d321c7ba2a2fb093c6a74ed
5a2fd6ed462638ea604a92db3cd3b650aaa2e387
describe
'409694' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGNG' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
9e313f8f06a0f4c18d8d50b450d3d777
f7bbc20ea8a91622478316ccd56f02769b49c624
describe
'87825' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGNH' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
0031c8833b52419d9698b00bcc991310
7c497ba4ef6c02bbfbd4a214568c759533d3d206
describe
'32685' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGNI' 'sip-files00128.pro'
3849fdf50278fb71d9733575b1afa38a
dc9f3e5f3dc9ce9d6cead74e5c0c9ee688619b97
describe
'29983' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGNJ' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
adcf835a383744f2a5b2bb9120a76583
2dd52e42300c4078c20401e3e19b11acd6402833
'2011-11-14T15:52:28-05:00'
describe
'3289524' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGNK' 'sip-files00128.tif'
3d1368aaa77a649ff2c2402efb811d91
f660cdb80229855e0c852a32b60204565330709c
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGNL' 'sip-files00128.txt'
43aebc4b144041f16364b717982ef99c
8e4efeb6d72e55e01396862a6daa052cf624ea27
'2011-11-14T15:58:20-05:00'
describe
'7185' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGNM' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
73f34df4e588d04cd257d5a11e22b2a4
dbe43b4b876ae9587fec8b3848ab3899ba1c7e0e
describe
'398084' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGNN' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
7864cc1780ea455d7089141490e17b22
9bdaf6d74b2c4ddb17db75d90adb1365e916a6dc
'2011-11-14T15:53:56-05:00'
describe
'96583' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGNO' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
b9514e25525eb3d191cc53b744fd4c25
38c1f54742387ee8baae1576c549e7c4b9193a5f
describe
'33795' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGNP' 'sip-files00129.pro'
b5fa09c2c6177874a574f16ff3ab3dd7
2c855c72e3b56b7415535d26365ad9a7cb7a2188
describe
'33544' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGNQ' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
91dd8b7894e8a0a5a96cef163a30d5f5
a3eba535a9a8ee43afd2065732d1565e38ba35dc
describe
'3196988' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGNR' 'sip-files00129.tif'
c90f35eef6ecca5b9e0be239329eb8e1
71c7beee7a5f6709e3a853070117969b375949e5
describe
'1345' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGNS' 'sip-files00129.txt'
38de9e2cc7274075b56fdbeabfc984c6
5a13f6c4587413335f856cba7e56daa6ddee96df
describe
'8618' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGNT' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
9145da347c104911bad4fe4f5bf895de
9741571a3b55d7fe3b6b7178ee393ee4fe1b7d64
'2011-11-14T15:52:11-05:00'
describe
'416418' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGNU' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
1592cd932ea602c2c3668ac0cbd57ef1
42fb04e8f062b26466b8298b15418579720998cf
describe
'80801' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGNV' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
5f2541b4b0393b3d296c3ac1204fd46f
25988704e144d00793b21516ddcaf939f71b8c8a
'2011-11-14T15:53:18-05:00'
describe
'29332' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGNW' 'sip-files00130.pro'
fb512b2fa9fe242329e885878160bb14
633ba70c2fd5fb36223b627b8667b53d097bcdcc
describe
'27668' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGNX' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
e6302c9fa6940b6599adc489f17eba2e
d05b125a43ed652fd7d5be153c19a4f3e8670c2e
describe
'3343452' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGNY' 'sip-files00130.tif'
bbf2f2b16561a23ed19ca2a8b97bbb61
453bac8a56eb1be2183c5fc5756329220914b397
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGNZ' 'sip-files00130.txt'
0489eb67373221532894df1f76e56e4f
cf66b53fd4de94db6829f48afe622138a4fb38e4
describe
'7005' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGOA' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
c15623e7e834563677f4e4fef5afbf46
91dc87513a2b427fdef64ddeb57f869b775d6c1a
describe
'134600' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGOB' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
6715a95bf1da2b7bd6e4f65cd6159e1d
ddd449066f481054db3c4c84a3ee83094b0d8242
'2011-11-14T15:57:15-05:00'
describe
'24362' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGOC' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
03291fc61a3f2b6aaba0e7bf709f2087
e6b99fd79980ac620f1e1cc1e43844aa768deb6d
describe
'6490' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGOD' 'sip-files00131.pro'
06177e1c505095ded438c4055d8043f1
4716d5a9f783666daa42891cbe1ad1d27fa11de6
describe
'8113' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGOE' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
d4d96c518a678cc3bb0be10882d28a72
97bf55555a5a4831486680aa1e6122b1b11772cb
describe
'3425256' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGOF' 'sip-files00131.tif'
e49e64578e8bb5ff58f420c299000f45
b5470242ed6911d9f3351bd81572227b5692c666
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGOG' 'sip-files00131.txt'
27b97f9fd4216c8804d701fd8070acc1
2e763a27f18c2449ee822c790dc09aed131dbab7
'2011-11-14T15:53:34-05:00'
describe
'2337' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGOH' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
2082e084f634612dc6447519748cca3f
7063ad6c2170cd415cc8c73d174520523b071976
'2011-11-14T15:54:24-05:00'
describe
'404552' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGOI' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
72ead57a8d140f58ee9db86a3eaa6332
d0dedfb6cf2f5cc72b4a0e9605767fe44f90d109
describe
'60893' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGOJ' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
e6d742311d78795e15f46c748ea54c35
dc9352b29a4f64a52430bdef54c642dccd41e937
describe
'20557' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGOK' 'sip-files00132.pro'
fc2ea7fb7328fd85c28a5214527bb553
398f088c1b5bfc78e5fb93cc7ad34aa2917327c5
'2011-11-14T15:58:34-05:00'
describe
'20178' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGOL' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
caf549918ba27e8868272872cfb45ad7
36a6eee9fef7dd318de5792edb0dbf97b0fc1cdb
describe
'3247380' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGOM' 'sip-files00132.tif'
0d1891a753037550cefc994c762007c6
a8e18275502e3d30dffdc3d4905042c7c3f24370
describe
'914' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGON' 'sip-files00132.txt'
d14013d1b3d06968053033b0215fcfdf
fbd648653cc789836bf4958281f3dd9b9deca473
describe
'5608' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGOO' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
7e4e1155bf03dba1bee4751a866780ec
1579fc86266b0b1c4971419a88d92257ff23a8a9
describe
'424735' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGOP' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
c8ffb3b2bbe2b82a9972d82410fad1c8
80b1f86619437b503c357c7ead8537024184b51e
describe
'89545' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGOQ' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
2b32fde5e51975a654dcd9b095f846d0
bdfc9b0bfa3c36628eeb3ff3f0c944a35efccc4b
describe
'33787' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGOR' 'sip-files00133.pro'
dfdd3fde63a995c559df885bb3ba24f3
47129ddb63c41d29a82fc69f596b47ba508e20c2
'2011-11-14T15:53:47-05:00'
describe
'29971' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGOS' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
2fe239514ce92142f5358e6adb14ebc4
79cb332764cfa4d4d9fae11a03ae63f5e0f9a30e
describe
'3409640' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGOT' 'sip-files00133.tif'
7804476e5d2e898d2c6eb81f45d2a245
a48ef1b91b138905e573d3cbc34c9cacb2808c01
'2011-11-14T15:58:27-05:00'
describe
'1343' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGOU' 'sip-files00133.txt'
1ba9e73e562e7f25966c3c1c7e4bd3dd
869e359f081936200ac6fb5948cbc336b985dbb6
describe
'7357' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGOV' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
f87561d18496af6918b0f7af193bb824
7c98872b4f2bc2a8e5b7d9e2756ecf687a55df76
describe
'418307' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGOW' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
025a5a14eb76b1eb0f403842d1b99f91
536ad0a6095e426f9ea62aa3810ed69f396b59b3
describe
'80963' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGOX' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
50918f441e965473255f45c2b106b87e
427f75861e034bfd72733722c9490db28099c3c7
'2011-11-14T15:53:52-05:00'
describe
'29419' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGOY' 'sip-files00134.pro'
0b3d47ad6a5ccd5c7f2db2effe013855
2ea405a9b562b512e543c4300b1668f097cfafc0
describe
'27338' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGOZ' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
df38d6e3d02e13b363a3415e18b7727d
a3d00fd7f99a8f1360b5851019c5266aff317162
describe
'3358344' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPA' 'sip-files00134.tif'
638fe3abab8d5cc3362be8ddb8cc1b5c
72d9497d4fba0019bd77bf9ec67a0c3688eed033
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPB' 'sip-files00134.txt'
d06a3bd090d80d3b5a37ef921a11316d
92ea49ef0c25125e494b9d2da50d17eb95542627
describe
'7114' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPC' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
7510f91c13188e069b4c9c5da76eb684
6cc1782f3f9b266d8115e02b18503d6908b8dc3e
describe
'408677' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPD' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
01a4728389a87fa961486e9af2141c23
54a66608acc132fba3107142e2ee864b07d8af54
describe
'79788' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPE' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
2c8dc12b165a25305e0fe7d79611182a
057c5b3b405b86fcd6c1ac756718c282fd88cd97
describe
'27815' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPF' 'sip-files00135.pro'
2d6eb38bc51624a26cf11ea11f05b048
315ee113abb929b37a80a1502e47b976907e69de
describe
'26740' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPG' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
d439dc0e9a826705a57989005d9529fa
57ed59f50591a5adb4e8c7fb90f6a143f7a1ae68
describe
'3281632' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPH' 'sip-files00135.tif'
cf48de3a1b19e45f79bfd1d16c05b0b8
db1f019d3463e0553dbbcf9179110fa0cc1ed1b5
'2011-11-14T15:57:00-05:00'
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPI' 'sip-files00135.txt'
93f5f9abd69d05244a9cb500f13aa209
202dc98a634807aa51af5bb197aea28440096566
describe
'7345' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPJ' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
4ddf30efd59c610dc5777996e48c3073
b73a3c0f8e097c9086ccc48ac5ba0cbe10e9b73c
'2011-11-14T15:51:49-05:00'
describe
'417472' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPK' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
51fbd1d0393153c59ea845becd3de5db
7817057d7fda34acc5deb0c5bdaec18a954feecd
describe
'94762' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPL' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
8c2dc903723cf3a3856cf6fa98f43f71
12718e3918278ed70cb68f8db41a7092a8fb055a
describe
'36291' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPM' 'sip-files00136.pro'
bbd8e7e8608af8d0abc464ba17ce33b5
58c057117bd3d2812e629e93f4ee8fa2b7c7d6a1
describe
'31687' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPN' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
b9b07b03e0fbe7607bccda481e75bf95
34c91535b828edcee2a8dde288d2f5464874171d
describe
'3352232' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPO' 'sip-files00136.tif'
d19e91e002faa73877f7b12ff577c028
dfcf2d268df05027740b279542c950a5ee1bd40d
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPP' 'sip-files00136.txt'
7609a8893ec133c2119c257ffa906678
d511e9539418f1586daa5eebf3e13b5f8b202bcd
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPQ' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
5630579efce98f7e81d4e1cf5175dfe7
b82d8cabbc83d1816388365ec517be5a832f91d9
describe
'384678' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPR' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
814988ec1750b4eb9fe4de4c018b373c
5d2f6016375fd8d4f9ee43cfc40f6f6507b732c4
describe
'96181' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPS' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
563e0f2ff8c0911b231c7fada1c825c9
cfdb3071d8ead3ea2fa7874b742110139b3f6060
describe
'33248' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPT' 'sip-files00137.pro'
d7d85e907898925b15bf3c28454e8462
58f6c0c0761e60d6a7c2163c937c0eae17c217cc
describe
'33269' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPU' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
f5654af3879cac5a463c318222e7c150
cfeb5dbe681eb305f3eb5ceff004137df1cdd4db
describe
'3089992' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPV' 'sip-files00137.tif'
0683c3bfd50bed916d18f27e5b61f0d1
b2444e5de14163947033b6199f738e21b77a0f38
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPW' 'sip-files00137.txt'
a0cd53b2aa3477e150851623e9bb6a6f
97b5baa4a56033ee9953e7a002977dbe7e6e7e7c
describe
'8058' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPX' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
398556036a77a31492fb9bb75ec933eb
a68fbed520f899d7b69ebbdf2f1da5a497b22d50
'2011-11-14T15:58:25-05:00'
describe
'412989' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPY' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
db41e802cff77a6001bda22d2956278e
6ed9d78d0c7a782beb5b09c6ab183cdcea661bae
describe
'90061' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGPZ' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
bb035ca84a9e6b93653a7c6358099471
89ac5e8aaa4f11c817501dd94d29bcc094d91dcc
describe
'34485' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQA' 'sip-files00138.pro'
951c426a80253c422d3ce2fc8cb8fd93
dc7ea51b0d8764371332859b09082717579c0430
describe
'30893' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQB' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
d5439a81a0f4c159044093310ba46175
1aa8edb2f13e0561fef99ae5a3128ddea5b3fcd7
'2011-11-14T15:54:49-05:00'
describe
'3316116' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQC' 'sip-files00138.tif'
b9e7d3f6044d3ce49e8133a6a2df181b
f6fb92056b14ee461618e0ae358f6f851b71fc76
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQD' 'sip-files00138.txt'
0b6723c6a22b57a6e12651cf8ad69890
6faed451fd864d6be5a3997305be0da3978aab16
describe
'7591' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQE' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
316dcac5cd25a28e7a755eb8b5e761c9
e233a8bbf0b56252d4adf8d8c323ff2fff00c111
describe
'409772' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQF' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
5ee8ed66541850bb95d808e9b973cb1d
f1dff9eb0ea963517620ad3d4a393baa999a7c9c
describe
'95514' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQG' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
27402a9b7c4ec39e68a51fde5c89658e
530d3b7478f3fad6cfa02a2873c06420eda5c4a4
describe
'34844' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQH' 'sip-files00139.pro'
9b645007af93b081ba0c82177908c1eb
b19865f92314f0c1466b0a5506f6d8e4a69b3e93
describe
'32272' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQI' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
971902452273b4de7713a843dc95f105
7b69aa256bc3a62825d463af35243efba149fd10
describe
'3290056' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQJ' 'sip-files00139.tif'
49308ab71e861251e3470004a767dc6b
c2f7520567004ec642aa90de069c4f2945572558
'2011-11-14T15:54:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQK' 'sip-files00139.txt'
93041a668dba4c1d6fd35f712b9d4433
a47372d4349b81b7d223a8cd3a47b4c30f4c028c
describe
'7942' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQL' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
962ed6b71c6e69601d6ec40ac199a186
03025dc4431a964f5c216ccbe0c361e740c1b481
describe
'419324' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQM' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
fb2c9ddebaa90aff9cc5111cc2d7cc0e
5fe5d2775c3026d5a81cc6c3f91e3e7a3530818d
describe
'100300' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQN' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
9c0f3e2ce1661b749b2546bf1f3274a8
d038e2b060748b3386a4b8ecfabfa10e75208dd4
describe
'15789' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQO' 'sip-files00140.pro'
f00b02cd0a97c5dcb2464ceeeb072975
4d3c1a27075e801c734547a23981dcdf961ef2e7
describe
'29407' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQP' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
f43ace904f90f06679bd9092dfaddf82
16511dfaafd5031367d2c6cf381cc3e60ed0be16
'2011-11-14T15:52:48-05:00'
describe
'3367340' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQQ' 'sip-files00140.tif'
58f24f3e26b29d19d034bdf502194db4
1f7029a4fca5380e591afe395c7b7e594ea24b64
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQR' 'sip-files00140.txt'
ed9762173073b2a642c321c9cbce8f46
70774c227f009576a490d15d1fff63bff0e6a87d
describe
'7395' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQS' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
a2fd582e54df1c17bed616a87c775e30
c877e78386145a65cc186316a09d2dc1c244aef8
'2011-11-14T15:53:12-05:00'
describe
'415055' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQT' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
8151f2593254e721435e22510850b3e1
6336299d0d80c5dfb2d76b2d5a3a2c5f9d0a140b
'2011-11-14T15:55:50-05:00'
describe
'77471' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQU' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
2a991f3a8014d6d91621e4dc4d2a90be
997ac75e1f0fb2736717615785f0c2735ea43a92
describe
'27370' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQV' 'sip-files00141.pro'
27407dc17c957d6fc1a2a26f92872f36
3619419db6aa49d18fee9d389d9260f6e634923e
describe
'25484' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQW' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
b64e85d37dcdfee41f2cc941b3505932
104b7e35bc80078495f38f393b83ae867247defb
describe
'3332180' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQX' 'sip-files00141.tif'
3fdc3fcace4acc03547e929f44b98083
e344199ae078514b3ffca871e79eb662c02e58f3
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQY' 'sip-files00141.txt'
c95f6d08aeac82fa08ba83636ef9e595
f32c41fc5a093f6bba12353df1d3f8e6248a9bc0
describe
'7225' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGQZ' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
2bd9fa5f45b50f1ca9d560bf313d3bed
73dca7678540b6d19eac801ec88c958ee2bf37c9
describe
'305681' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRA' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
397b9c3c7336c92d0d976a1dfb93677a
a10398739913e585202e2d20d6c2b75878107c0a
describe
'49565' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRB' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
522153b306953fcf7f5046cde2b5e798
f16396e5524df00c39269bf094e80b035ea250ab
describe
'16547' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRC' 'sip-files00142.pro'
1dd18e642e12943478e5b17dbd4bb601
b099a2f81265451e20da4b57afa439ab25c3c058
describe
'16711' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRD' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
5b6d55a7c32e02b9bc5d640279f5c4f5
991b9899e773b63d21356146db8148a214907482
describe
'3144236' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRE' 'sip-files00142.tif'
e86206112ae40186e60c776b20a7263a
f1b3409487671d1667dcd1ea28c1b96f0d0ccdf2
'2011-11-14T15:54:50-05:00'
describe
'660' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRF' 'sip-files00142.txt'
1dae1d2c72866c0e9dfff56d836d83eb
d3dc0e1b96a0ee3c88dce98cbab0946c63ca7911
describe
'4457' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRG' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
ccd5691b5c1a353c148a707b543ed0f4
29d983e07abd75eca1f610c3636829b942846d2d
describe
'394580' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRH' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
7a2ec24bda5ad0fc2477e623a544b971
176769e15b25bc144b351ad35d251d7418998cae
describe
'77062' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRI' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
35f3fd775a32fcc089cb6f902297bede
5b27d712d6d2fda854c696c775a0f38217e9fc7c
describe
'24884' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRJ' 'sip-files00143.pro'
364de5a046b7c5d451e7afaeec847131
9720ff509d18902b4e3a29f13142ea4fb45a53eb
describe
'25052' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRK' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
b2dc2a3d067d54ffd66c160f33164b70
9714536c2e23c0ffcf28b1c9f61a24bcd4ac313c
describe
'3168008' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRL' 'sip-files00143.tif'
6952c6c0e3535ad2f2b6e72bc162b52d
09651ef0d412b5e8a0e594d3c48c2ee8ffe872e8
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRM' 'sip-files00143.txt'
3436ccd431994005788e6d36ba0c404b
675dc5c45b16b0baff163828a58fba093b761f8a
describe
'6344' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRN' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
12a0d3684726a49f4f0eef86f1a35657
cfae365b2746856b7369af58ee8abb7727751b01
describe
'421228' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRO' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
f02aef1c8e55682656b8e9b23b51fee4
0911108ff8607f96aa17c7beb77051e36cdd013e
describe
'93527' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRP' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
1132901d78df3f03e38a20ebfb26ef3d
a7d33222999d3e161ca659c192e7800bef3193ab
describe
'34133' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRQ' 'sip-files00144.pro'
f4463e1e04941850ad2eaf3dcd185892
ae02552bacbc8c476c6fd0cf70f39b1618bdad6e
describe
'30910' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRR' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
e931463391abd192203f402644fc5dd6
3fd9e9a7971ede26d782d2694f4ed454265f5b80
describe
'3382092' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRS' 'sip-files00144.tif'
0d15e56b0553a4098432093f8a08ace1
034d9e0e3f00751ca6bdab5b494db7b8b980f804
describe
'1340' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRT' 'sip-files00144.txt'
ff97fe970750cc60b6ee81856ee218f5
e93bab0b0b4b0d625e90909f839cb81936afeffe
describe
'7649' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRU' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
c3990455f9a67db117a502abbca05540
160733da0c6e818b3e10582b38f3c02f4ccc45ad
describe
'410053' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRV' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
01ef214e68e8fb3e42e888ec7c8af300
338ad720e55c4aa147ab658f1577e366d907d2fc
describe
'94294' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRW' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
c21ac21fccb9bcaa1bd554e2365b2cdf
ec989a8ff289afcfafad140e992c5a47c9a3200d
describe
'35777' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRX' 'sip-files00145.pro'
92730be66f7dcaa3e0857e7746236cf7
37ba25f7d6ddd36d5bf93eeae612114267a8fd4e
describe
'32494' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRY' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
6d1b8d93365083a9a4859e34445ed8ec
607a66ab19d621639d4e5cd4c8f754f2ead2e168
describe
'3292612' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGRZ' 'sip-files00145.tif'
2b68b3672b00c0396bd9be3a6f67116b
9b0f9e5973f80aa38d6118e7355a85d407f4e575
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGSA' 'sip-files00145.txt'
ea5ecddd5d8d7124eea4eb41ad9230d2
fb1f4aea39ee8448c33ef50af64458ee07d1482b
describe
'7961' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGSB' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
cc1da29c5b118415e355802c63349bcc
fec311cebc8c1dfa165fcb7fb684a7e62f79a567
describe
'398401' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGSC' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
9bbc6c050462543a414a7b7f34c3efb6
ed23da92325a00c8b03d318db335f47189cf622e
describe
'95441' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGSD' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
be142ec2a7bfe323729d2a354ee5f83a
e273eee92779066b9b56e85b31e72d77d26055be
describe
'35818' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGSE' 'sip-files00146.pro'
a96cd17ecf2c7ec40e5712dc755f3c29
f9743fcc9852ff5ca41a643e533ac4ed540c190e
describe
'32705' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGSF' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
e0c6b66159b9296baacf8935dc0cc602
898f564cf2bc764e5125d5cf6e334d2be30e5ee6
describe
'3200196' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGSG' 'sip-files00146.tif'
60d606cf98788226547cefc5e3283277
a4d30a6a9dc6a48923c96cd26fa1e01f5a65b9f6
describe
'1400' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGSH' 'sip-files00146.txt'
6ff0f000c9afadfb03aef4a65461c082
9dec2a70b214fbee06f761c4003fef5c1b222a9a
describe
'7843' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGSI' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
7facdab026b7515afefe1228d29747a6
cb4e5ae97ccb6248e8e818e02247348126041fe2
describe
'407397' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGSJ' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
91c7ca9e82afbe982a413a9a06613267
e21b6bb30d69c8cec86a3f1014302898504d963f
describe
'95824' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGSK' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
8939682595a94fe6dd0024e9324e9f0b
a9e644bba201ccb08426dbc43baf9feb417c3986
describe
'33747' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGSL' 'sip-files00147.pro'
6bdd08a7cf9713593ec3f346b19ace5d
046afb608b1a80ccc02fafde4c5688ec2ee99e11
describe
'32054' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGSM' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
72654c122b8eda40d84bdb348651707c
b6f680e32c5e9c48416c3b97e57b6129492c6afb
describe
'3271264' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGSN' 'sip-files00147.tif'
92457b6fe199093b34fb258a036acbef
140147ac8a2574f5445f845b0e2a3dfa43fd169f
describe
'1326' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGSO' 'sip-files00147.txt'
1876341b8efba920062b91818daf6963
735b5f74ac563938f89b9627c94bf1956ff0e5d6
describe
'7772' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGSP' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
85ca80244a68820e67b4b43770027d5d
fc06ef5936a99218131c9a3cb2cae660fad0f22d
describe
'434518' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGSQ' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
c24db58b39f5ed313be6ef3b90adc877
ac155edc1e5cbf02aa6a0760a7963bcbafe8ee60
describe
'83496' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGSR' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
f1691c1d667d12828057d55aad711809
ced6479d92b3a33a5977d4a7af75965eae54d7c0
describe
'32773' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGSS' 'sip-files00148.pro'
f637eda4047cbb5ecb609bd67930e291
1fde34fa0e2d401bcc7ff07918ecd335121b0a61
describe
'28420' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGST' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
94727039cfad39dab450b1116ecb0c8a
7767116ba812a1e618f5e7d2d190dd8605d54457
describe
'3487832' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGSU' 'sip-files00148.tif'
2e6c892ae29c29d311e1ba218beab38e
dd696955ccfb1111f0e81edb14fbc26a45f5d082
describe
'1297' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGSV' 'sip-files00148.txt'
d9f6bf5e7826b5d22df474c993d36921
4eb797c0984ede9ca395a97f0e4fafeff175eaa0
describe
'6931' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGSW' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
bfba4019b4b132daec432066bccf5b9a
9e049d3be1f71b8dbd2903f35b8ee4a30adbccdb
describe
'410500' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGSX' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
a4897127acf77dab3eedeab4b64415b3
38871ed056143919768c50384d32c2bab0eb2700
describe
'108422' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGSY' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
7aa43a6ef9b7a3dbd5353cd9c7c5d10a
0eeda20a9f89dbcab7861e381b6a2c23bb3dc9eb
describe
'13560' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGSZ' 'sip-files00149.pro'
1ad59a29084f4af981b0148b2524a41a
727205f912fd54f65a86cf1b33b68e71071999eb
describe
'29589' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTA' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
4d67a3de84a0eea2dbfe3b7f8b475e71
f1306adc338a4594c74338a70fea0cf78c606b77
describe
'3296508' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTB' 'sip-files00149.tif'
d61fb8ad3076234db98fe42fd256b2ee
47895a9ebcb7ac1cc3113ef9e30c8d3c61f8308d
describe
'564' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTC' 'sip-files00149.txt'
b77669af47cb0936260d9260b44893f7
fbf75175be990a18c3a595b047ff5be0bf1e4aa1
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTD' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
c5c4028e399e16bed37b512e1f73f7c1
7c3e28a1bf0bb98bc72941baf357790d48df881f
describe
'426111' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTE' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
5f62460b8e5bd12dcc4fc72ade2ed473
945e4757dde29d9631c013ddefdd5b44e74e6c39
describe
'79331' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTF' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
8d875d65174ecabaad012cfdc2cd81a9
0a159ed1a5d675a3453cc5cf7069ed3e4ed82038
describe
'30208' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTG' 'sip-files00150.pro'
cd4debd85e5f9caebbc38689015f79ab
ed380f783e745f604047cf65dfb1ccc6a7ff07a3
describe
'25945' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTH' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
c423417faf7dec8159406cafa6905f0a
cfeb996b74c0fab703b6225fd75651b16b4e3bc0
describe
'3420772' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTI' 'sip-files00150.tif'
9989d0caf17a0f7644ff4952a0b6622d
911ebc3249062165c9a95a1bd1573263c9d83f56
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTJ' 'sip-files00150.txt'
615fa1625967af0e2c9f773422f2cf5a
d1aba5bb43d7c57b449758efe695365f72f22e29
describe
'6781' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTK' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
7a482c4c8c511e3f877dc647b1c1ae8a
fda7a66a652306385b2f178bb980d9bb1d927c32
describe
'396916' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTL' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
e66e33873711176ede559d6aa762ba32
f0bb9a2c7c4f646e7820351ad01a6ef86ce83e8c
'2011-11-14T15:53:45-05:00'
describe
'91038' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTM' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
125f1ec0852b2c69c7b5a385edc874e8
a5039b467feb1ea7e0b497eb6ea70fe25aa549f2
describe
'32088' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTN' 'sip-files00151.pro'
665e4beca2372d92557d02644f20e392
1c0a5ecde679951d8ebd34722472b4d72bd4d373
describe
'31220' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTO' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
44ae9a2df187a623220c1200c4a3a06b
24ea7bd5874f28dfeb9f29913a496017b4a12fea
describe
'3187464' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTP' 'sip-files00151.tif'
82381ba0e9f9f638966ecaf6b08a4a1a
28622b71992bea7df3bd3919cea748f40f30c8a2
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTQ' 'sip-files00151.txt'
4a82c88970505d3eff02ce58b2b04ff8
2f8032d6ca86b4b44353dc99bfe30da9948fcfc4
'2011-11-14T15:54:25-05:00'
describe
'8857' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTR' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
862a3b35dfba37f8fdfd4b5030b042d5
bb651b3b33efca85e1f9e6102246d7c57d208bc4
describe
'389376' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTS' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
7b3f0165feb004a63b50993d5db7beb1
2143aae68d047f0737b9e4d1226dfb370db61754
describe
'73820' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTT' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
2deec15aa34672b2e3e96a713ad6dbc0
c4a366629b4e03ee92416edd43b49a4962074708
describe
'27635' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTU' 'sip-files00152.pro'
ce7f6a963464783316786971b1d9f9b2
af25487e28bdd374be9a90afe398e034976e39eb
describe
'24691' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTV' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
049490b5d0ce185c44823c1e1aa15526
561d7025aaf7be952fe07b755bccf82cf59f6eb6
'2011-11-14T15:53:19-05:00'
describe
'3127144' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTW' 'sip-files00152.tif'
3a18ed30b113c9183cecae171d3f5a80
f47a32b19934a8e8716cee730430459a2f8ef16d
describe
'1108' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTX' 'sip-files00152.txt'
d06420f3a94c51edda286a10e62e31a6
f30e4fc6210d9caaf59cb8d5f52e0a85102c96b9
describe
'6556' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTY' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
27936d85e3ed1013c4cfef5f1fd7cb06
dde3aa2d051f0fd7aa404ea46a38c5727888c767
describe
'407993' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGTZ' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
7550517655db11d32510eddf23ec02bc
d5c4b94c83fa8a5ba039bb245b7e8ce95e5cec00
describe
'70345' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUA' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
cb6f93c14e42210e03b6dfeb8cce3bd4
14ce0f33cfcc9c94225723f039eca5b9da180901
describe
'23065' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUB' 'sip-files00153.pro'
6e3e8c3aa07bae524675c9db1024b3af
5938bc8b0ea8178b0ee4d75df2907799518cabee
describe
'23565' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUC' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
5714956d1ac6eb9b95b74897d3146c2f
545f970df756954e5f1b08cacc25588aeb78b6ba
describe
'3275236' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUD' 'sip-files00153.tif'
fdffe458dfcb2f72482f3b8f4202b4cc
2ca395a3e82105ccdd16ee9425f09af7783a270a
describe
'996' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUE' 'sip-files00153.txt'
ccaf13c4f1f3de0cd7e82d0d100be131
79a2997affa5d2e858931df41d9e9b2308d3faf9
describe
'6258' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUF' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
e7b30fa9e63b16194e1a48c3d950b4ae
84050062d7ab84939fe11ff889ce2d976afa7fb7
describe
'426091' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUG' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
f0c8bc0a417bafa9f92393e70c804dfa
322d477719375e7118bb0507fca043010a96bd5c
describe
'79044' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUH' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
c598b280d5eea3a52819d57fbba3a3e8
1d0bdf28a08fb9499e5fceddf035ceb17b467aa5
describe
'29388' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUI' 'sip-files00154.pro'
ce365eee2a11363cecb3c18d7385af36
16803386350ef736e9cf6fbde1990f599978e40e
describe
'27025' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUJ' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
a4ce3ad11c3fba9a9e321532ba5b6462
914569c572c04aae328bc8094c2b7b40a70f56ed
describe
'3420844' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUK' 'sip-files00154.tif'
4935f70e153e989730ed89c2f2351062
2f5683cc9d2eca557779ea922a7afc91d9f9982a
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUL' 'sip-files00154.txt'
242acca6a6f1d72121df7e00db269e2f
73f22e3bdfaf3eeabf09e55cff9a4bbaf2d63db3
describe
'6841' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUM' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
d922a95453f20705e575f0fd77bbd813
3163bd5a22acd0af7ea6069326fa00acd28e20a6
describe
'412776' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUN' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
29adf073915f3ae67bebe5243f622608
35d13b08c3ded7f65651c629aabd624bec390170
describe
'81905' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUO' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
5e93a5d61921b95a1f40a78819fada0f
c629858b0687e0e190316267f8e74e08d5cd8193
describe
'29198' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUP' 'sip-files00155.pro'
895e0d4c2be91209a3306c6621a0438d
e6f10c88711b0a06400941c08a76828e14075842
describe
'28250' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUQ' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
4872f4a9483c971716206425e7e3b138
2cdc513a1a2854551f6d4e6c3bb92f5ad8c503ad
'2011-11-14T15:56:01-05:00'
describe
'3314088' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUR' 'sip-files00155.tif'
140ad81c110bbf75faef91db26ba8f60
5fd73a67a9ffbfd67679470d6cc5a84b376f2eee
'2011-11-14T15:54:28-05:00'
describe
'1178' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUS' 'sip-files00155.txt'
ff87bd094ac4aa3403371f8b4c6fa13d
a679431966f59c0feb75fdc84021c4d3b651ae44
describe
'7380' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUT' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
dc894677bf1192bf2810d0ab8ffdd426
32e831153b6b25f69bacf2816e1c364ea4be7c21
describe
'400211' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUU' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
7621921579b5739c2716a27260ce6bca
dbbb3149dacce796acf73be3efa67b06ec299cdf
describe
'87115' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUV' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
f7e450124cc00eaebaa29a520d8ec473
046640c226d3858da21aa597c404d59325bad1f4
describe
'31454' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUW' 'sip-files00156.pro'
f01c0cee0046f552646c249404ca9d99
9cfe979d187e79fcf83e7073b3e396f6548c9427
describe
'30142' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUX' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
49403dc8b4bb9bf7f233323aa641cf09
da17196581537fff4869b6db017cefe7f1477dfe
describe
'3213892' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUY' 'sip-files00156.tif'
b66defa31b7698b5029020999ce9de59
4c35a95a47a4de08d304f5e0bddfca99e3a9b898
describe
'1250' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGUZ' 'sip-files00156.txt'
2a9e0fb58470a3a388e2d31cad724857
ba58f3bb29c1fa0eb2f6addcdf85057721d719a9
describe
'7657' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVA' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
14666472c6be9603b57cd7d86e537ec1
b7252660410863924cc0b71c9bb07ce0f3d86a4f
describe
'428538' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVB' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
af65fa94ff366d010528ade80656b90c
1d6eeeff180290bf71e758805cc4f2256532db69
describe
'84845' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVC' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
9a9ec9d8ba5fed71d0adae9ac26722f0
a2ec809ff456da554702254df677ee6a74ae35e9
describe
'31129' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVD' 'sip-files00157.pro'
ae60db12bdbb722bfdf38f1185d80e27
f08f7570dd95141e8d8e222e0f13f8133b023683
describe
'28327' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVE' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
c9a3605ec0300e667b1e66cb30045931
effdd079fa42ca5d13cc2b1c4f3f3126592375cc
describe
'3440036' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVF' 'sip-files00157.tif'
0e673dae43e9b57305e0949b4d671c46
594a899761aba9510e0e56d21bc88c8b8dfad1d4
describe
'1253' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVG' 'sip-files00157.txt'
44c9cea4ab07f327fa0d7f453b33b43b
3a31bb5aadb0e3a4840101dd491bc3763a7cdbed
describe
'7381' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVH' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
85ace034a3f28e4402bb866a1f9cd93e
8ebe1570adcc71fcff3a544567a0443c1aee849c
describe
'425772' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVI' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
7afe176c14af76c413cb27b08faad13c
2252825fc0d5de9793c2798d04074b0c5d18855c
'2011-11-14T15:52:26-05:00'
describe
'77283' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVJ' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
a8e81ab158417ad509f933ac2f855ded
cee745d6c36926bdb651816a53557e4a8dad0d16
describe
'29841' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVK' 'sip-files00158.pro'
05b5095ef6dd32e0967ca554aa97ddaf
2b5af3caf8803022dfd043320e7db925c88ce6b5
describe
'25154' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVL' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
2241624bfcffef80eb73cd6405b7263f
9d0c616b0f399620eeac98a8b9f190c1b2916d9f
describe
'3418080' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVM' 'sip-files00158.tif'
2791c9b7074097bee39a34a37e6d3909
a07f5924ce62177cc60c56506c7b3517821ecf4f
describe
'1186' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVN' 'sip-files00158.txt'
f1dfe35a359df91c2f54060a7c7ad8fc
c8d7d628df7be9b9c0351b4e28cc668d470dc686
describe
'6701' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVO' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
910a1a94e9df208c8bef41bd217da43f
435ab3f69dcacdaf271f77693f3ba40e7e55f5e0
describe
'402761' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVP' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
b4d1e0dc590427b3f68bc08e5987c347
d638a1ebe14f32e877b5c97ba75cb770d5b581ee
describe
'87913' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVQ' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
d36fcf7d6c0415e371a68f6afc62acf1
21531c302d4e4be8dd52a28d930ce22cd0af7815
describe
'31326' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVR' 'sip-files00159.pro'
ed7734ec73f51dcecf60242ec035e46a
91913bd9a5d03ceb15c3419dd249406a2fce08dd
describe
'29497' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVS' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
99d80b59f84159360815393bd5e803a6
97c31e272a87d8dcd687107b87e5beb2cec4cd6c
describe
'3233912' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVT' 'sip-files00159.tif'
94e6d318bc818a092abf06ee294de14d
9be013996c1d6e100b2f2bc5750634d02c756e05
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVU' 'sip-files00159.txt'
aa684892c18a4a5ab072393c10512a00
68a7e7af19d34392600d206666ffd6007a80204e
describe
'8447' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVV' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
6b6753cee7053555f526350ecf59e92e
f51d3f56c0864cfd8c7e2d318bee3aa7e2777383
'2011-11-14T15:56:48-05:00'
describe
'419439' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVW' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
d3e9887394456cb95283fedee432a42b
a1079a1f2e80ef3d1a094a6013691cfc24eba063
describe
'84596' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVX' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
579bef953b383d481cc6c4c66a593ec6
5bfbade92b895df23242c99a43822d64c1c410e4
describe
'31822' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVY' 'sip-files00160.pro'
382d3ac1ea4e126ed65d9c69d034b648
00e03c57afee8ace5f89d3e2172cb2bca4e7c142
describe
'28606' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGVZ' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
abc3c0c6a7a3e7209a0c8368e075e004
370dca6109b49ebcecce2aa5cd9f0c193df6548c
describe
'3368244' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWA' 'sip-files00160.tif'
26bda04e70957e0ddd52cc3ae98a3aa2
27da6aed0101b23cd7de9eca7eec61ed81d8e15a
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWB' 'sip-files00160.txt'
37353f3cdc5eb6861f20ea04704aaeba
276d5744cd64ab5a6b1abd3e95ffadb98cf77b49
describe
'7249' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWC' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
4ca67bc41e39b5001d7bc4c8c51af5e1
b2b270f62eebf5a703294da52edd99aa8b2327f3
describe
'409157' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWD' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
e2518b18ba96e0b2400b6e805d5d5e2e
ebddcbe03d8190e9e7ae0b845e1fe24fc2ceb888
describe
'77273' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWE' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
d56a594f9ffc22bcc040091b11bb6e94
67bb9011ba1ae73ba1f650ef727b3ab6b6d02315
describe
'28186' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWF' 'sip-files00161.pro'
d1900ec86fba6eb93da0aede6b50a1d2
14dc06494f07059854916d5dc4f8177a1c941018
describe
'26184' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWG' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
7c7a4687c8340ff1f823692f218ccd2a
f88c356f57f322db431172b8b264afe6ee8e2779
describe
'3284540' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWH' 'sip-files00161.tif'
ea84bcc2be023f799a624548c09a4573
0c97a3388d2044734b876cc8b900476ff6b7153a
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWI' 'sip-files00161.txt'
9111c98bc275cc355ebccef478ebf115
f047e50825cd8a85b04d495aab74e2460a4f38dc
'2011-11-14T15:57:14-05:00'
describe
'6746' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWJ' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
111fc6561c14d2ffdd9eee1888a9f183
c658d78546f2bd9899d963c994b1bb66ad91afaa
describe
'425569' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWK' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
daf1f769cd8256b85e05a51654f8b199
0f3b34a2755f22132acd8a92a6727caac8159b43
describe
'62108' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWL' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
34cab33152a6d61c3b4b1e7f85087d85
814e435ee17973b977a2bb6fea289ca2a18644e5
describe
'21368' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWM' 'sip-files00162.pro'
2d97e4575ad58eee4ff3f6cd75813bc2
9dadfc8f780531bd87d642b8660c094185697b89
describe
'20609' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWN' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
0a5e912b4cd7b25ba740f2eed983bb58
6a66e60916841fa5bfec4257eaf50d9ed0057a4e
describe
'3415672' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWO' 'sip-files00162.tif'
4bd3f863fb5db505462b9560c131c7ed
1ef21c2248ce6ac1eb61c5f2fe19c1144ecf0dc1
describe
'922' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWP' 'sip-files00162.txt'
22ec306f50c6bf1648b487e7a4d15baa
bb2049b3eaef16b59b8f96ad14ea4a0e806c8a2c
describe
'5293' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWQ' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
81d6feb4553a75274b97de40dd1fcff1
2f312d56a698eaee7ee961dc6977a08f5c7dc3a9
describe
'413689' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWR' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
5a286f4d75c00bea64cb731a4023059e
f612a4dc077e3b8c6f5abec1272d369484233b1d
describe
'96825' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWS' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
74be69408b8922b6cf4c959cb95f067e
15a22fa5210756874a3ee731ed63e0855014047a
describe
'35229' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWT' 'sip-files00163.pro'
dcbe5e4a444ca66318eb092d732b5be2
a672387b031fada91042f158d9d09b2b731aabfd
describe
'32590' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWU' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
42ea39e5594fcd1527e197bc989e1197
c42f8df34d4f6d979bb4ec8e07b8fcfe91c28ef3
describe
'3320932' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWV' 'sip-files00163.tif'
47f07a32518332fd8a67df275f102ff6
889d07d675307ee3f83375ef0f4650fe523aabda
describe
'1396' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWW' 'sip-files00163.txt'
3388ee18f2cedce80e02571e8291a359
fdb6b8406c4d1c677ecd28ef97457d4e3ab054aa
describe
'7764' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWX' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
be5bb3c8d6669bb44ec631818bcd8d14
f21170c926caea3c6186503dfe9e3bca089778cb
describe
'405705' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWY' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
da5ff521a359a7beecacdf78943c08f8
55ca5db778adc19187824dfbea54f6855daa8919
describe
'89841' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGWZ' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
c1ecdfe110f1780e750bfeea42b29842
3655d94c26ba2681bc3791291465c7f5d9ee6c29
describe
'33249' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXA' 'sip-files00164.pro'
7218c5a25abf0522612cc256a05ec3a4
3e33cb8a7f459bee0d46e241cf77177c8f1dc6c4
'2011-11-14T15:54:55-05:00'
describe
'30640' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXB' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
e1722369cab84e62797681baa2c98cc0
afa4d009ee4ad3e709b1e06ced0eaf225e5e9353
describe
'3257428' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXC' 'sip-files00164.tif'
d08afff4ede4f3299b61d951612873bb
7cba34dd001a0193a84a3f402f4e4fd42fccfd2e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXD' 'sip-files00164.txt'
c8e68996f807dd4d8b59c3305bb6721c
02a5bbce9b5ab9f15636934d211e3928d61b8f3c
describe
'7737' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXE' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
6809c46a132173f11351cc23ef279405
902535d6b9b4131695cfbee5b52962b7a6d990d9
describe
'399091' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXF' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
3193ba4f8f49f042150c278cd9d37d30
4915cb1a9104ba0c1abd04b276dc21f1cdb89aa1
describe
'127657' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXG' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
3ae7374a22c811c01dd6249a549e9759
62f8b15186ccf7e3148c1e9e4fb527b0738e4d73
describe
'2737' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXH' 'sip-files00166.pro'
3bb84e4ffa9c3a246db7524da1b6c72a
35a4763231ca0e95532e5ee718ec39b4833f5ca6
describe
'33647' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXI' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
2e1657e2ca6c31d4819f84e9d6e4ed4d
a5ab5e7c452286009caf9a858ca963a00d0d0e36
describe
'3206560' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXJ' 'sip-files00166.tif'
59aabab55fe39f7fd41e549ee8246510
01c4d7841ec26a13982e4f4fd75b255674837b1a
describe
'192' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXK' 'sip-files00166.txt'
50fdf78441653cc7a590e2e241249ad7
8039e3d7f361cf384f06fec78e407b5dd7958eb3
describe
Invalid character
'8902' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXL' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
4d0a4ca519f3947a2c826af4689840f1
5e60d4c082458cb283896b9a3691b23f0e2eb4b7
describe
'401418' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXM' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
a1ab066843b6ec3ca9b97afeb8f81a5a
9060e8daeb3c6a82daca9b186c36dbc8d97a5863
describe
'93407' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXN' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
478815eb911d2ece1b58c1af94cde4e1
a49003a58d0a1bc888491d2d752dc5753f89c8c3
describe
'33920' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXO' 'sip-files00167.pro'
4273c18b020847b5af1355487dd74c5e
8c7b6be5923ba7e47693b61d9aea0f6ebdfa1209
describe
'31743' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXP' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
c11aad85e4865b0b42fd84af27343eee
b3b1ff6737fb77804692dd9a59e35a8dc8ab4e46
describe
'3223664' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXQ' 'sip-files00167.tif'
7dac194643c0ab17f0f4537021d703a9
3da3ce2a0e67f05b84e98b356c48cae194b16218
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXR' 'sip-files00167.txt'
82c87e3f4e0b08dbd436330a9a91b60d
21a28322bbd7d105c90f476200effe09d57f5946
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXS' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
776f45f2c122abff5d35130cd0f0bafb
72122293b9c8254633dae611e7963f80eedb6c85
describe
'405008' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXT' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
083b3e6a8004a6314011ecfbd515f403
9acd3eb94c9fca114e7904cc2f96f727f5e534e7
describe
'82523' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXU' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
b9ab8d0eb54be266f06f2549854377f6
b19059a743d02d25c9c4a09bf3752efa512fb163
describe
'29510' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXV' 'sip-files00168.pro'
4534706fe5a673c57ee838f27cd5fe52
477a0cd9928c6d9ce8f4eeda115a37591a08fcc0
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXW' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
8d60d31a0368e5f93cbe8270887c9fb2
cf309456b5567072f59d259e1fb77f8cd8d22861
describe
'3251808' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXX' 'sip-files00168.tif'
1ac86bff05257bc8ae5198f4229f2ad2
75e175bffc3129c50276c16ca7ace4196d2c7c73
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXY' 'sip-files00168.txt'
895f66db4ab0440e8404e55acb4a75ac
4dfaf8466cd616f64e13d14493dca4f00aab648f
describe
'7697' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGXZ' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
17571867d31b6a61d03ccafdd4d9e9f9
639a575ef77b0f74966c5000dca7e97bec530e81
describe
'405093' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYA' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
24fb17b96e54b4faa85f6fa84ea05c0c
57d5e6a567e3b8153e84bf3957f25a2e0a12170c
describe
'80747' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYB' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
ebad52d4276ff7c830583e7be5e17ece
08ef16e17a645a6df53546316ea84a0619ebc915
describe
'28813' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYC' 'sip-files00169.pro'
3791ac523ca2efb8ec2429fd455029fc
64b9ff3bb3ff066b88c4dca125164d2ae399e44f
describe
'27674' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYD' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
e1063075718e627efa9bd1124e84fb6f
1d15a112619515e42f7347cbb75378668168bd1a
describe
'3253232' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYE' 'sip-files00169.tif'
53ca498a16fb59dcade4dc23cc197338
9ab03d01cb5b6ff270b990e95182861198238078
describe
'1164' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYF' 'sip-files00169.txt'
379e9e6f7ef01bd47760e12ae668b235
9bafe6e6ca4163a4e999ff6e68835082077d6039
describe
'7220' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYG' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
b4cefe0ef5e6893375e62b7a7dca08e1
b795f09ac5b32a9597fb6df5dc5addd646c3a97e
describe
'419048' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYH' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
d2880a39aba213ffd964a99975fc14d2
661456111a268dd576eed85faef9b56d8e8c3924
describe
'66735' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYI' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
8ff134d5933d0939d394c3d8fa7e9157
0efb6122d4cfb2827bda0ac10dcaabc45e033a28
describe
'25429' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYJ' 'sip-files00170.pro'
dc50d070fc8db7618da214cae0523d49
42860833f658bdbc09a42fd0aa52fd5bbc02645b
describe
'22191' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYK' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
3476b495c7e9c678567064d69ca0bb2e
2cf4b9453c3faafb9c472c996e72ab878ccc2ba0
describe
'3363636' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYL' 'sip-files00170.tif'
bcd844ca2303238e1395f7928cf658aa
e8575c77d158ebd00884ae297d1470dfac7ea01f
describe
'1040' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYM' 'sip-files00170.txt'
a1145ef260d9da4080e8c6cc8b4eca6f
ffc0494dd544b62b466f6d4f55402ef2d278d125
describe
'6251' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYN' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
6bd3523553431d6a92efae1b30a07082
f464ed6e11ce70064200951671492cf9269efaf7
describe
'436701' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYO' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
f1be7500ef8516f325df87013a097f70
38bc88456afc6e1b051eeb2905298d9a74823588
'2011-11-14T15:55:17-05:00'
describe
'76333' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYP' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
ec2b4054fb1ca511b7ae721c55594a52
7eca914f1e3dcf2051979efdc3d1992e7069e3bc
describe
'30177' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYQ' 'sip-files00171.pro'
3ea9ee4b5e0f31734ce55be04dde2997
c1b8cb31d2e76662fb172de3435f80729544966a
describe
'25223' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYR' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
aaf51f9a3cda1ffeac7583cf422c94d4
d98385ab880c11fe607b623eda8a311bc86bca7a
describe
'3505172' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYS' 'sip-files00171.tif'
e53e2491b4fff3e71be7ddbe0ef8e592
3949bde71451fdd12b06e3cd4805ead065ce480a
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYT' 'sip-files00171.txt'
4bba2d3ada85e4d702a2e049293e8774
7846de115490468d94e462fc061a943b49545a5a
describe
'6333' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYU' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
d3e6abf5e9cbaab1e778050104302c80
0a202632e1f6fdc59cbe3de5ab8e2fb6b28eac1b
describe
'421235' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYV' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
71739857fdd2e8b2c5859fc17057d932
5e1208099445bec73494b188027ab03f6e03e111
describe
'70805' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYW' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
19ccb3a5f0040210f2f43d0aa74930e8
e713e790f171118be3626bce19956ea6a34b6806
describe
'25123' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYX' 'sip-files00172.pro'
acaa0d2b060417bf2f04d59ca255f539
095b22156c7fd992622d422a75cd6e73567f55aa
describe
'24078' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYY' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
708735ff1f7adb2f17f08f437490a3c5
87d64a0f6b34e21ad6c11b8aa48d1a6f7d031378
describe
'3381588' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGYZ' 'sip-files00172.tif'
58573ac800a53b12987581174882f10b
85b11eff8d761c3301204b9e121698e9412522f6
describe
'1009' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZA' 'sip-files00172.txt'
450b8e32ef1c2fd5bc56aa6b4d1d4aa8
f0d913f5751f8dd4c006bbfb326b065666ae0254
describe
'6526' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZB' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
9ee3d322ccbb8d29abccae575b6733d5
a48a24a98a8666c9b5be45ff7ad8503f197b3e6f
describe
'425146' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZC' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
9426c114fc1378961b150820c2387d12
5d6924b96fc48b65ee73a38f4126da08ef78321d
describe
'69008' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZD' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
c4035d0af03b6dad06f6b96063199246
717afb69d4614e8b5f62fca96367a769261ff6d2
describe
'23207' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZE' 'sip-files00173.pro'
336512798d77018e1d1f9553bccda60a
bd607b1ea47b553c5eb83e83a88ec319910f0a8b
describe
'22489' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZF' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
52be7dd88a3b9c0be696ddb1d28fe126
7c2cf03e96420c72b0c5040d1cab8b2ff17dd39b
describe
'3411892' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZG' 'sip-files00173.tif'
101a8765f05a608f876103b500ebf598
5f1e6c473d5cfc44bac8babae46a56f930f7b123
describe
'1029' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZH' 'sip-files00173.txt'
4150bf5859faf334aa581a0bda0472b0
e0e44ca71121bff03b930ff0d4047574b42c54e3
describe
'5924' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZI' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
e1b04167102346c79b084f3c665df15d
46fe6a8f848ededb57d2883f28aa02accc94a340
describe
'419491' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZJ' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
208aa631f34a22c78bffd75589ba3c99
3ac68d10a9784b3cf367343c3b1daa3a44d82957
describe
'84100' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZK' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
e3f1873386b00dce02ddfd11ffa75994
7fd047e0f706731b60ff79abd3f2610adfe0b3f6
describe
'31390' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZL' 'sip-files00174.pro'
7d2835adc7898ba673c3c56a0b7b615c
620890490d8bd875eb7e64027e40dfadc3e8d7e7
describe
'28113' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZM' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
2531f7899a895e6e65f9237ef35e7313
766f0d7a0a4693e45d723285aa7d2e3495d98619
describe
'3368052' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZN' 'sip-files00174.tif'
63d53ec2fafa079b333cb857f9a42e33
73368d6742b312e3bc04a41ea243195c6dd5785b
describe
'1242' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZO' 'sip-files00174.txt'
852d9a1379e74cc1db8ca777a898f7fd
318bcc1ecf25c675ba048ed41ebc2502d166a9f1
describe
'7179' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZP' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
98f5545ccf3740d84a070ef80eee7e41
6825a2d6efc00f3fb6046d2e859829aad7010bc3
describe
'413204' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZQ' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
e5bd669199819310c2019d8d135b6efd
e9e2afdc41990091eb6f00c04d4d71dfeb5551ff
describe
'84580' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZR' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
e4c10b8475e319e2e5c1ed31ce9ea5ec
90e8e5a3dc0f28dabffee388a67ef9b794c2c740
describe
'32129' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZS' 'sip-files00175.pro'
d962b8ce8016b90a9d381d280c7f1887
fc9f8db148189f43dcd47577dd3e6519e001163f
describe
'27884' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZT' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
b2539a302904d47e600596a3df4e29bc
ee3422f2eae3aedecb3c134e62c65b79b354d842
describe
'3317732' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZU' 'sip-files00175.tif'
ccc027f82964ebd91f2fc1fa04d69b1c
139c2658cfbefe142aabc424c414cde31b4583b5
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZV' 'sip-files00175.txt'
18d192a64debdddf4a47e7fee72173d3
4a7d5381b049eb68ab89d3887920d403ab6f44ce
describe
'7145' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZW' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
566ba75e81d9609fc6427c2647fcef73
1b519976cc930c6278b6c9c9b8e6af34a9f11674
describe
'404166' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZX' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
e6b0815ce02615f0d907d3bbf97bf99c
058caef3b5ad1f6e7b18780f84058e4d99914762
describe
'95940' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZY' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
247113e63c06a8033a0c93e4fa6a57bd
e52792ed52038724d76ce100239184b0376d44a2
describe
'33904' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABGZZ' 'sip-files00176.pro'
7c12c222b1e600a519c44379a754b620
f0d3d5576a9ff7246af13313b8aaf8ca88ba6973
describe
'31373' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAA' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
6bf04c781ea1dc6ed40523d646f9780d
b00c445ea2b8de228bf124e59c584381b4c309f0
describe
'3245276' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAB' 'sip-files00176.tif'
039f705b2ce0f33e52544eaf758f91dc
1b43492a3ddb2bae25a4e7e4681fdc80ee00341d
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAC' 'sip-files00176.txt'
76cb0903ed2e857e98d7058b63ff2d83
c9ef3cf4083f32ba9f30511dca7780646ac5dbdd
describe
'8280' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAD' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
5510d2f53f43899d0d920fedd7f0d8c6
9a0010a7172b78250f5f239bbf8aff7392cbe97a
describe
'414988' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAE' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
54f21cd4f0cdadf1aa5c84d0fa4ce8a5
4ba5d6a4635b1a9ebc322ddd7d5568e6c1cbf1ec
describe
'81238' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAF' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
60c035a83de59ebf422efbdce78d78cc
fd741042805e987c8629ddae152986463236e60c
describe
'31101' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAG' 'sip-files00177.pro'
e0eacbdd09fb4aa74297962b45c144a8
dbed6763f1068434862f0a6a8f2275f78e3d0185
describe
'27168' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAH' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
631d2b644fd54f4eec77d6383cd4c636
39edb2a30f90f935aa87757336eb1985e6a6b2fa
describe
'3331780' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAI' 'sip-files00177.tif'
13989899f2d8014413e9c30ab58e38e2
8eb97090d9d24fdc45ae0aec6bee96d77fc97ede
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAJ' 'sip-files00177.txt'
29fe69ecab9d8907811e7b50fc11c4b5
9baea69afd09b4178ebe6ef554727bebe06341a0
describe
'6640' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAK' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
840ee8de118d46ca96f9151f1295546f
47dbd7fdaec887e68757e9fc079ef208effce732
describe
'406957' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAL' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
e797e88531ddd0507277fd502fe7f737
303e0412532544c582869672f7c6bd0d80c5c133
describe
'84289' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAM' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
ffea2e2659460cefbf401c832178e9f9
a292b2c3c2145d94b5ce890a5638ca9b0ba8fae6
describe
'9613' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAN' 'sip-files00178.pro'
cffecf5ddfd48d2d111149c5c9cdc21c
45fd7470670d0bc4bf4188bc5169e8bb8b238838
describe
'23884' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAO' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
6d2a2f5088c3f3fe2a33c45266c9c6be
79e565bebfca5cf0d5035962342159ff4dd4d601
describe
'3267464' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAP' 'sip-files00178.tif'
f527ac21fd504cbe89cc64ac53754481
15eae4f26fe736ea3dd1c0312a6b55122c7eeb46
'2011-11-14T15:56:20-05:00'
describe
'405' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAQ' 'sip-files00178.txt'
0d5e5900fdec2cc744dbeb2500fa2026
ec2277f2e73d4920c393c02690a1209b92b60f10
describe
'6715' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAR' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
f7769a2b5f95739363a26a89d5c5a0ab
324a807d28b7372b8811216f023eb40b82316edd
describe
'410515' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAS' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
82d731ffd95c2040351c7e804eac4d2f
e4624072949341820948474e3f3c997b1f576bdb
describe
'85802' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAT' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
dea095d8dd744706aa829be0d119153a
cebca0f9809d79e0da20e3cd3384bef160284a7e
describe
'30666' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAU' 'sip-files00179.pro'
cdf824c5707d09fdf4bce487b5bba063
206296bef90172cf4020903d3d043b3433ae8723
describe
'28577' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAV' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
66ff9569e8389086b90004084a7c31fd
d7777a518c8990fd867d29919281e0bde7a4c7b2
describe
'3295672' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAW' 'sip-files00179.tif'
9cf0f561a464faf1f0198bd5c1e7d52d
9e92860aedbd6f71fe3840d1a3e2f654b41e48a6
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAX' 'sip-files00179.txt'
315d46ea5a1cf48abb6f4dce7eacbc96
199c04a8f26d0efae61de5ab76b6b099175b0b71
describe
'7542' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAY' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
896a70f1f5ffa3b72d7fc25fa4914abc
ccb6ab9eb9e3664e9a252821c7ff3c348e91a3c8
describe
'402518' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHAZ' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
b59f8b3d68c67713ce15c4ebd9a2488e
d4a1ef3f97caabd0994c5cef2aad24bc851cec39
describe
'101865' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBA' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
468b86ed8288b846be4244d1a68b156f
9419013a399a7376aa4fd010a1c05efcd6a34065
describe
'36363' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBB' 'sip-files00180.pro'
4d78efdbba0a15cddbb141e94a3d1d82
9c59f21d6c2f001f383ce9c9408f8a9f55302c73
describe
'34958' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBC' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
a099f71b6aa4f944668f0ba25bcef297
f19bb0a5dbcef4b9eaabc75d2eeee4d97090372f
describe
'3231744' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBD' 'sip-files00180.tif'
f180c9aaf3d065029c0914c1bb1c4517
b038f4afbcc54100b6b9ebcd4e3f453a77cc7e91
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBE' 'sip-files00180.txt'
0955d9f343d3a18c9fe29a368d5169f5
4f68d77f3673175559e954b171d9260e872a37ad
describe
'8375' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBF' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
0fb2fd4a3fac34e1f9124d1e0c7f2c14
ea42ad971a8a3d3b8a725c71ae82e13951cc6581
describe
'416728' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBG' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
b1ea0bc3bbd0c7ec6fa800b6cfad343b
a4c6a5a475f9214eea298d09aa3410e2c9f278bf
describe
'88393' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBH' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
866225d30cac9c6c8bc4802cca0f5c63
15a2d26078bd0a21ce06a71e435314b908d1aaf1
'2011-11-14T15:58:05-05:00'
describe
'32335' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBI' 'sip-files00181.pro'
5a5a8d5ef64e2940123ecad7032b3caa
9171e872539a1e3ded8cd32d3c3e835d1ce3dbbc
describe
'29643' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBJ' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
5e64194a7cccf22c8d8e3cfebb6c1613
daf0b9c85f2319a7a1371493f8d0691b98d720ca
describe
'3345544' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBK' 'sip-files00181.tif'
a96dbe54563292369a359d3a42c83618
23bc044f60b57f37256e06040c7124890fc05b7c
describe
'1295' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBL' 'sip-files00181.txt'
a2070328eaf386c4833f9d51082d1227
2789ccab83cbb31c9d0c4257365dd8d59645456e
'2011-11-14T15:54:32-05:00'
describe
'7740' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBM' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
1a31a29a8e8f4585e1181043c2a15dcd
548cb8bc8cf3e73c0c23884698e5d0325e7e207f
'2011-11-14T15:54:31-05:00'
describe
'392539' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBN' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
0152a60edcd70a310704e1bf0e1d17cd
7c61c50f8c4ed4a327a8362e7a635eeb89a17111
describe
'65222' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBO' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
b7f5bc05fc65be91bb97a7b8234bed29
dda6b2a685614d376678d713f6bdfd5b7502cc28
describe
'24176' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBP' 'sip-files00182.pro'
7e96e5271dca014cf996eae1cd0455a8
d5bbec81e98729fb21998dd2a3b61437e927621d
describe
'20860' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBQ' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
06937015c2be32085a8f04764fc58e62
ebb19e839e18320b7e4f367e17c962519252ff2e
describe
'3152164' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBR' 'sip-files00182.tif'
684b6637312e99a4ec85edd87ae4b40b
fdd350c18e1cc163033e8b9154f1df203655c728
describe
'955' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBS' 'sip-files00182.txt'
af15d28e1498713ad2245d7dc6667d82
2c55f21c680c3b9a35ed55e642f293a51f3fbdde
describe
'5441' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBT' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
2b7fca76a8da641bb328ad1eb06b72c6
46030d7c1ee92d668785a28e2825178a6d01d4b0
describe
'405631' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBU' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
0af1f64b4070694967c051bd58e99b17
8b9185c1ae275de1aa65a6f045d840d9830d4624
describe
'71428' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBV' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
145236f60aa674ffd5398ccf370414eb
47c4a61ff02320c8d3236bf6ece7f7799ad0f6f7
describe
'22796' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBW' 'sip-files00183.pro'
91495fdb8531763a0249e15bfbead6cc
71373fd153f898e40458220b1d52e4ed535dbda0
describe
'23464' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBX' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
4e3a547d2483ddc9dc3ba95b91c3f966
687ef52978928b49b851c5d867be6675f5c81f96
describe
'3256628' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBY' 'sip-files00183.tif'
1933700950a98dc53be07cab38b0d2ef
9ab271c63634976b379168df046b249edd20b830
describe
'1006' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHBZ' 'sip-files00183.txt'
e588432ee15a9b87133869f7468720fb
b47a6fa942aca960563d9f053682c681eaf706f1
describe
'6154' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCA' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
84695b30ad72c7d7e93ba5b57aebc94c
7cee26c92c49c16b3d26d7c93a274dc9bfdb57c6
describe
'415723' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCB' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
de40621273855c2bbaf2e29383172c45
3ba9f27713470b59d7ef3d35560574b31ed5fdd9
describe
'87822' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCC' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
dc923522590682580bf8b5f6eed45dcd
d5dfbb8f458c096fd1a4bf2603655d07d399d88e
describe
'32225' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCD' 'sip-files00184.pro'
54d7c53320c7d3ef186d3309e1e9e286
765c8d0208ec0c79bd584047fe1cbbc7c8dda8ae
describe
'30149' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCE' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
b523f8f9d98b5cbfc88e6028fc0a21f4
fbf94ffa278ebd67af213be7cc2af8cdc84fc803
'2011-11-14T15:54:23-05:00'
describe
'3338080' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCF' 'sip-files00184.tif'
0793a3b2f7e3d9856db7bce0df8c2c24
c33b3ab0cb43687e0677f6c28e16e9656c1c2f60
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCG' 'sip-files00184.txt'
52be036d4ef75cc58054560f65a53b31
70d2986d1439d6aa0d75481a9bd52f2c30480359
describe
'7903' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCH' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
4556334762e061b9959840f02819c59d
1be1fded13a945830f983f19110f6c1ce8a8c483
describe
'432758' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCI' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
e73012695b3ff09e9869df2e440eec3b
f83fb76e8b1c1baa50ff9c12c33abb485c104209
describe
'82530' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCJ' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
d5e767498577038438bbf729e1e821a0
6f6599a1b34bafe59cc396f4339ed279664c07f7
describe
'31627' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCK' 'sip-files00185.pro'
be9574b1d47ec3c377e2affc105c98ea
9367ceab415ed14955168ef649567688bb083986
describe
'28929' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCL' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
a544d6e7c51efc8fdfe3e6767755e6bf
7fc77f3668a90f7ec239ef684b3bcf3be2285e66
describe
'3474252' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCM' 'sip-files00185.tif'
45b68dfe9e1605c8e8020fd427c00eeb
fc597f6345b7dc414e04c0b788bb7d8b3525c56d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCN' 'sip-files00185.txt'
59a10cd6aaf51bedf0c1b89be3ceb8b2
595c1615b72d56ae2b912b0f777e3265673726a9
describe
'6904' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCO' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
f046a5404d8f1bb852f49372d8f7a3eb
25047d331c89df104c90bab9922c9a60a4b9b18c
describe
'387065' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCP' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
7dd5f3941bd3aaab4e19606ba56e8850
3d7b447b2a96adbea150b07b58fbc5bfe088858e
describe
'97106' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCQ' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
91c731a9b42d5b225048eb70f56f73d9
75d6599be22d96ce84c71003541294b47c7b13b8
describe
'34102' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCR' 'sip-files00186.pro'
3f88f0e1b0d13403d3d4232c47600af3
b2f112d1df33b514e72fda4a54133e3ff7080ea7
describe
'32456' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCS' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
8d59fb37f83be9713ab6ce07fca7df7b
17a5468d4db16b6723a7cd84129e06d41c927b84
describe
'3108832' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCT' 'sip-files00186.tif'
80b8db8803949914a483797e83562ea6
1eb4c358b14bfa617dee6431e36956c92a003510
describe
'1344' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCU' 'sip-files00186.txt'
8e0b0fb4141169303c617e094cd9f2f5
b2f1a7a51baae11283aa252deff5afb516cef47d
describe
'8579' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCV' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
a47701c159513d75c0e3309ff5d0ce27
6f0aade0461e929fd3dd41fa3f7b1dc36614e07f
describe
'416518' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCW' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
5c361e223a7c53748067a088cf13e494
cbf8bd936cd4cc998de0e2551fb2bd976931aecc
describe
'90065' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCX' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
32555efe72761b85ca3bf0fddafe1e91
95aa9a1f84077261deea4c4b03645652dacda5ab
describe
'32795' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCY' 'sip-files00187.pro'
a57781d4fa4f56c5282818f6001872e3
d4e8840ad4a50b9f623b0c4851f3f59bd1658e5f
describe
'30942' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHCZ' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
f7ee85570f72fc0acaf01e86ae45a383
7dd1059846ae2c1cab5dcb55d0c3ab84a18d02d1
describe
'3344092' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDA' 'sip-files00187.tif'
50a3ecb911d01882d2b96e70e49b3956
3f23e75929cc180f14dd73ab08cca416835e4261
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDB' 'sip-files00187.txt'
ffcbabe6c70f725df3a5c1032032245e
b113ffbad5489b0d3bd8a60c259a1e8961740fd2
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDC' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
1c3c5ef55572dce0fc1d17927669046d
5db99741494d7e95930bd92eecf35fdcd5332665
describe
'427648' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDD' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
3182efe304127a4d6005d5fb1b34a036
b9c078652a4ce09ef6cecb07aae71e8e81540553
describe
'85660' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDE' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
ab4e84e7880c70dc6ec3967217b7dcfc
458cff758c4e952c4e90a3d8f7e96b906da53e80
describe
'32782' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDF' 'sip-files00188.pro'
41640c89800ffe0657ffee0fda00be60
468159d47aaa749983b49186d3cbd11b377577b8
describe
'29629' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDG' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
d02f6120cd4dc74ea139dd5e7cfbd138
e6752ff51dda718187cf7423c71be6263d5d3c8a
describe
'3433676' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDH' 'sip-files00188.tif'
4ab1fb27ede479baebe5076fe7d1d09a
c73263754ff24b875fcd99511f64419bf3854109
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDI' 'sip-files00188.txt'
4e90fbf69a2a95a5f2ca8e4d995cdf1b
41456d3f05f34cfab4aa6c42e36c0e7a915c7802
describe
'7109' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDJ' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
83e085349b6f1d685cdf5f7aaf6b15c7
3f7eb4692287de39269651e021e7d12ba605e139
describe
'416785' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDK' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
ad415f21faa62cb4c451fa37a4df45cc
fa00ed963eedffbd77f9f174282f736b9bd9b68e
describe
'90259' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDL' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
a33297b7e5a73841f8dbd90944065868
e23a35e8b6417d766e56ce2a369a92390e57886d
describe
'34129' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDM' 'sip-files00189.pro'
bc1fe627d6284fa025f53ad39f93ed2b
91516389d5ceb8ef95bb8bf9afc91b124a0f3663
describe
'30011' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDN' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
3f7f0d391cfea726e69de988b0125a55
8bc95b16b7fdbaf1e9246d32ba21096ca3712a69
describe
'3346756' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDO' 'sip-files00189.tif'
f9004e6a6287f95f8cc7d830a6e6769d
92eb8907672d7b2b6c9f85ab1f1d957fd95cca9d
describe
'1351' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDP' 'sip-files00189.txt'
298e28826c723f6bc133e06cc1ed7b17
21692698a97bb8285292d3fb4e97a64c8d31bcad
describe
'7441' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDQ' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
eafaf26ade524fefb3b61ab11d001db5
d1bf6b48f244313dfac8ce78b008a7725e0f4fa8
describe
'388091' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDR' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
2f1a0ba45c5f711e8e06b44e31897849
375e58619839cc880b0e87411c727eb3d5aab33a
describe
'90696' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDS' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
78d5fe413e1f17f97d26a01ac9ea9e0c
ea024d87480a478758504410c0b9c2295a6a98ba
describe
'32051' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDT' 'sip-files00190.pro'
28849e18d59fa7b812a0e0639e2d1b18
fcc0c1897475b28cad65e5fdeac12b2f8c253fdd
describe
'31059' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDU' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
3a8aa4afeb5254219ba683c1862943f1
83c9205d4dbf1b483dcd238139e1a592e10e0c38
describe
'3117088' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDV' 'sip-files00190.tif'
4eac596b274645ac5817288cf169a1f7
48090e0cd64bf6610d79851815084b2067875d5f
describe
'1269' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDW' 'sip-files00190.txt'
a87006efe8b83f0bf1bdd69ffe13583b
fead92577cac088af7a9d65bb1216e7fc4448d8a
describe
'8012' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDX' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
1932b484ded26de64d1f5fe84ee2edea
743c3fc21431f6628c82edea057140b463dafe7c
describe
'415613' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDY' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
d327d7eef0fae0c13230bbb4c4026a1c
b0c5d0f718be0698361cdec305573d033b9794cc
describe
'83975' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHDZ' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
55ba4140b15cc3cb0969ea7329ff476c
add420bcae9cac4128d105485a0888a3c4789bf8
describe
'30463' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHEA' 'sip-files00191.pro'
994a22dafb29f1eae5153c3f1db02a51
b3b91c1c9dbdeb1db3a38a6813e59754e4d8cb69
describe
'27930' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHEB' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
220333498894aa93a74652b1daa1af98
2d4a3cf44f671d5047362da11f6ca4fa6d9d6111
describe
'3336892' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHEC' 'sip-files00191.tif'
460d64e28497ed9d091b57bd760cd0e3
32cd106c31e8fca27449059e73f3caf19a84fbc7
describe
'1223' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHED' 'sip-files00191.txt'
a6dd35c737c6c94f3e6385e0bfd6e5b1
6a29bf157796067ff70675a537e6b9ed5eb8cde9
describe
'7304' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHEE' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
05a4d01399c5f7fb6a500ebd04858c9a
a72ab5ad798086c9bd282c405c10bbcf852df97b
describe
'407707' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHEF' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
812aacdcc8017830d5b4ec368904c112
00335333dbf2eaa0d316870b0ddcaeccd6fbe68b
describe
'87662' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHEG' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
1793bb787eb45a8eacdbd0d058424ed3
dc16f7056e0bd3e11295722cf0bc66fd80bc1f97
describe
'31285' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHEH' 'sip-files00192.pro'
3fe2d47510dc16042a526c1893c26154
1af65e3817e4535c08fcabba54f8f6401ae64ff2
describe
'29358' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHEI' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
951e4c32a950aa0737c60427a3a47253
2610d23044b6be68bae784db38e2b414265db573
describe
'3273896' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHEJ' 'sip-files00192.tif'
f33753ecee31fa8e5d4d3fcc51d56560
c3d800afb028d65e097e941ea84a94ed945a075f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHEK' 'sip-files00192.txt'
75667d6ec9dca34a35522d66c19e8831
1eb8c52be5a2018877f1a63644ec2e4f09513618
describe
'7756' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHEL' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
f11900333bea9a5ba93a544d7546411b
32136f4a1b0808282dc6454921150554c17a2e36
describe
'363114' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHEM' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
1737784ced41d958fd22595d4a0f92d2
37c00c4fa9ed30eff0da76f4fd27b3ab5eab22ce
describe
'58311' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHEN' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
d4efceb9a7fdcedfb95d8ac19316be73
a74c88204a4d960d546d9afb6ac68cb9900405af
describe
'20210' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHEO' 'sip-files00193.pro'
5a6b5b2a9ed81f167cc55659cebe6006
86c8898447cada81604fd278dc4bbb30216e565c
describe
'19692' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHEP' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
5645f630324ea564264c99402d194894
8e6661a65d75796736072aa5d02ef673242e4187
describe
'2916908' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHEQ' 'sip-files00193.tif'
e0b8b0899f6702ca838b82c8e04ec071
8efbe78fa0ff1134c132c1b3385006a8ea4c488f
describe
'814' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHER' 'sip-files00193.txt'
d19da6fec21bd9fb9f5319211e7fa1f4
f5b30bbb43962ca0b4b7e926ab6639e1a7c75fbc
describe
'4975' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHES' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
c11c01bf431c1c3dba174d68ae20b7dd
b9b41f30fa39dccfc67d301e2dff4e7378e3c253
describe
'406069' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHET' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
8f3602e98560494324b87399bd7e3195
e87d86a741278796909db3ed7cd247263c46c81c
describe
'78006' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHEU' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
3dddefffcb59cb5fa61af9185c5e51d7
b2749c544d7f74da75aecd51a033aef013b91ced
describe
'26207' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHEV' 'sip-files00194.pro'
b52a127901233684667a43b9924d98ae
d0742a64278bf1e9833b5e08a3ab592b9fe8b453
describe
'25516' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHEW' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
733521f2e2035e5b9af4c15c131728a0
edb4c8b4313e09ea4fd726ba0bb3bbc2f7df5514
describe
'3260020' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHEX' 'sip-files00194.tif'
a25eddf56ee2124accb67ba920960f39
cc72e405b07ef53737cbbe57ea51edd75c04605f
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHEY' 'sip-files00194.txt'
8876da22bf8af1f071eb20dbd573443d
4fcef2d2c32ea995c27c199b46f1a664013a4e0b
describe
'6276' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHEZ' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
b63c364827821e33bbcbf535ba5b7066
51b146095d3480873cc10757bea9e69fe291f029
describe
'409778' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFA' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
e5a42a28cbbf3860b91d51cb81fa38a3
3ebeaac610c543ef6eae4038102c6cc8cf9bc973
describe
'96004' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFB' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
e680344b1a430e1a7b20abc5f05eaef5
d6a977107eb4727eeb689c4553b25613a6374413
describe
'34408' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFC' 'sip-files00195.pro'
17854e374d2803774b52e537dcb944fb
6a9a51bb617d16ebafdb748840b259ca30757491
describe
'32364' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFD' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
cf4f8d20fc0d8a02aac8644becd73314
e5cfc25971fb4cfd820fc57bbcf010169fa17b90
describe
'3290824' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFE' 'sip-files00195.tif'
795c33b6fd521ad1b2374a080a8c93ae
65e438fd4f56b575fc2c419cf530f00570d0fc32
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFF' 'sip-files00195.txt'
3eab31390f9fe70c4c8475538cdd035b
c22999dad5e780e25beebd0bd8079407dbd6c62f
describe
'7792' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFG' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
b4e2aeef8ff74e55dfc1fcec48d3c99d
164d54304cfe004d1f296c7ad909b823746e28f2
describe
'404584' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFH' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
a3f3154de15d8c9aa114fbf38e36b282
1473a03d3b7665c24535d01027ed3fb0c7a61d74
describe
'82943' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFI' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
b56cd99c05683a845ed639ab4a153bde
d51c98b733d6e9a0c333a06872c0c7376ba9021a
describe
'29269' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFJ' 'sip-files00196.pro'
df8238fa121e5cd67240391ab29aeb61
0389bc3a0fa293b6550078ff7bc1c43e7c620c5b
describe
'28623' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFK' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
d72ed0f3405dd4b6c5299fd36c493c0d
e8b692cee3ebfbb10e9db014c75557c1c0d93a2c
describe
'3248760' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFL' 'sip-files00196.tif'
e31788632352a9a69fd6592bba3a163c
141784d9b31d9cdc118b575494b6f92a89dba6e7
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFM' 'sip-files00196.txt'
33b747161c009792fe1ea0c15fe45fff
dc335dd93e8db06410aa3f0cb42021e891f30298
describe
'7184' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFN' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
397bba0302ac0b786384cad058d34387
8262169e145a272bfb60a38d3480abf9e473acd9
describe
'422358' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFO' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
6d28b939ef0b7717fb218a79179659d3
06d47ec4f04ab56eeafd58177b8ef1322a7de2c4
describe
'90486' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFP' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
9a1cedaba7c9871e1c7fbc322a68e39e
c70a4239aab9dc64a4ecc628300f30070ec4ce44
describe
'33720' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFQ' 'sip-files00197.pro'
7a898b7e528083b3f403114d712b4734
df4741c2f1e0eaca05117362b75cc270fcd878ac
describe
'29898' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFR' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
b75b90eafe18c0eebf95f3832d8c452a
d72dbdfe78f38e3c9442284653348ca7acdd9123
describe
'3391448' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFS' 'sip-files00197.tif'
1f8b4af483a3ca5c74040e23612521ca
a5985fada8d93f52cefd967da3bbdcc4029b861f
describe
'1331' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFT' 'sip-files00197.txt'
2a7cab048d85bb42e847266b4ef7ecd4
bfdd96c3bd68850e41e62ad2b9880dd290fc5f86
describe
'7531' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFU' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
637b6e5f5d84d4613c11771b353e78ae
3c26efa6fa1cec0fd2d2daf7052739b761344bb9
describe
'422823' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFV' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
8e8038c79c157767ac3191c9bf02ed3b
a652db923142551eeaba30875fc8e23cbbb70153
describe
'87460' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFW' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
7772837b475578cba698af573ef871b4
c32d1959604b8a2c7a83bc667a7f0def9f3d4ce3
describe
'32988' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFX' 'sip-files00198.pro'
15a87b06c039631ee82576d9abe4bc00
4213f0110dcc705fae1b3f91cbae28ab5fd72454
describe
'28415' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFY' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
6a10db92abc29a5777f53b6d98d72bd1
c34ed1b7b92ff4f636ea8f9479f4f2e39af60879
describe
'3394484' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHFZ' 'sip-files00198.tif'
a7097d9a6c7edd54f89f8ec2bcd4ff06
d160233c2f437d31fbb91dc5f50ba2f3b882ca02
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGA' 'sip-files00198.txt'
75c2d35bead6e4be7d85e8cdcb465efa
34529482cc51364023d7f451c5ecd5dbb870621d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGB' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
828a56d95039c01ae53c5152223cc90d
421c0076d697b51a725d29b8315c8db534e4fbb0
describe
'423468' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGC' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
7b0f89f10ea5da3a4df514a82d46ce30
1b557fca629ed3871da96a939ecdd90b3f1a4235
describe
'87224' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGD' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
4428115ba4962283d576625813e6187d
4e929757f3cd01de4e2acebc432444961c563507
describe
'32144' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGE' 'sip-files00199.pro'
5f7110251a85a91af6698b1d1440f808
c69d2f2383ae85c1f08132e4fe39081f9f944fad
describe
'28864' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGF' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
a6f9973402aad3213ac81a62d993f9ca
232c7d830388491431b015bf042bc458a4d6f11a
describe
'3399128' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGG' 'sip-files00199.tif'
b444b42e4497df1cbcea14a3e56d62a3
3ad7b4d039e8f1794109b1a5c8b0fe5a692b7712
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGH' 'sip-files00199.txt'
28f6f5cf51732e69d4695e5b21795b9e
f3d46c391955a69e1114d39cdd7a43cfd99e923c
describe
'7373' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGI' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
0836c202ad1d8fb0abfcc315ac0e6f5c
efd2040c34c6f939da57e2859e33b2ec71509e3d
describe
'394147' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGJ' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
595dd4da386e6dfe3ebfcced20839af5
d1fb7f6d49fb05f0ef8e903da9f8d66017d7c013
describe
'91715' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGK' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
d5520251bf3f6a5c611ec9bae03f4938
7fa01008831e923e5939d7f9279c159be6ca90ce
describe
'33601' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGL' 'sip-files00200.pro'
50a295d5df4e68ea3b5ba8214d8fa46d
c8a113c4b621fa112275ddc25ae9cdc762c0bf0e
describe
'31590' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGM' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
061dc8ae7096b4811d1d43bfb40818f2
9437f86fbe5ae627a3e2a09d12b6b53b3b9848f2
describe
'3165768' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGN' 'sip-files00200.tif'
60936f17caa2eb270909431ac32d4d92
c6a1e7137125782b71d46f44295677967c2cfcd6
describe
'1323' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGO' 'sip-files00200.txt'
416ef01be738f6c36c014266d7614c0f
ef5bcd641663ae64a02c68adcea8d06d7a8a2f29
describe
'7578' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGP' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
6c53feb65daf4dab53e1461d54bc60e5
3b9bd9e3eabdc127c15618d85ba4d49e4e921df1
describe
'400676' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGQ' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
b24fcd8ff230659f710aedc9ea0d8bf0
4294f5bf455a0c92a3e4e924a43ba445b25ea869
describe
'89014' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGR' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
8083e962f750d5a40cfd8853b0f40f52
98f8ebe8b4f836483a9966a22126e8ee6d2a6718
describe
'33259' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGS' 'sip-files00201.pro'
cf836f56104694bc79e9c21a1d004be8
91f45884c5e68a6891d1a14cf7b9a271c1902090
describe
'29811' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGT' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
ac0f8ae635811ca89b317ab56de196a2
0d448088ecf4d7a8919cb965989ff95c0824df8e
describe
'3217180' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGU' 'sip-files00201.tif'
b1a94f132e4ddc9ccbbec18cec243fe3
3238d688268759fac939bed57ea24dcaf841f332
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGV' 'sip-files00201.txt'
978f5103fbce0b7ad44c592f5be480ed
1c419a4f10a8bd4426427f88b9cad9a9875c2a88
describe
'7574' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGW' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
ca6252698b881e8e6fc7595fcfbd06b8
314534ee983bdd30c0a151cf26728c871af846cc
describe
'396449' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGX' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
722e12949b5474a6303f91a73a89f36a
543392efc2e360efe669b33f413e4951a8c0204c
'2011-11-14T15:55:38-05:00'
describe
'89234' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGY' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
cecd7767ef91abb1e3b2e628e26ad049
98723e96660fe317fadbd32feaf6e120a828311a
describe
'31563' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHGZ' 'sip-files00202.pro'
48c2fa7010b9874c189de553978cc1a6
52304204734d649b408e15eb14c3fca6288ce298
describe
'31185' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHA' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
19ac2da400dd18090656e8e9618037d9
71ee17a035069820c5789b64fdfa6b740dba44cc
describe
'3183292' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHB' 'sip-files00202.tif'
03dbe9b912f08021b00c2be87fa713f8
eaa5bc8786bdd91a960439eff33bcd66a2951fa3
describe
'1265' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHC' 'sip-files00202.txt'
4f688e62d9ba7075a691f2e8a65949f2
800131234c5d5f424072fbaf3ab88ef0856072ac
describe
'7947' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHD' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
9e0bf51e19b93955b62c7209a61681aa
bfc148cfac10b07903014443b05719ea8857df6b
describe
'332814' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHE' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
c58d33a07230d62911909e7c3639fdf2
60af6ff2ad79d6444a25d5f3aef30ceeb1a47619
describe
'53978' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHF' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
11dc237339a57d8fe22c9fb8b165cb73
51c95c329520eac98da389c5b0830137eccf2514
describe
'17468' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHG' 'sip-files00203.pro'
984546e6ae1ccd556fe0d86cb965a0ff
9ce90950c384d2f961dff0fde110d7a39c860a74
describe
'18236' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHH' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
7efafe219ab7ecee73f31955274bb45e
e7736d7b21bf4c2fefff7ea584066d6316e1324d
describe
'3227292' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHI' 'sip-files00203.tif'
ff6ffbf985c3e9a672abe13a0d925060
34c9b97a8b366094a35faf05ba8e8b5a1fa80cdb
describe
'709' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHJ' 'sip-files00203.txt'
551057df5b625acc6c9c1586169e0562
6dbbe7d6cbed97dd53de2bb4b2a5f6c02f7b309c
describe
'4708' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHK' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
8aeecf09b109a4ca8cea18706cb9343a
01e7b8b9be26bf24b59ede504d816a1864cf8ff6
describe
'375605' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHL' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
3dce0d8665621197451f22789a381915
7239c210e750b5c1b345c6c28fde1543a843d88a
describe
'66103' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHM' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
0f77f1857747dbd810487a9f970f8b98
97e3747230423bc2d2da756d2a9e630a378f6eb3
describe
'21553' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHN' 'sip-files00204.pro'
a24272dfdb93521ef2d8dd08be7b3595
ae0fcc8e7da63430e2cae0773227133a77890146
describe
'22649' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHO' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
9ed100778e25ebe537962e9bc746503d
f750072d27a6d4858e1bfbc0ab2b054741fcc983
describe
'3015868' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHP' 'sip-files00204.tif'
35a467a8877929d6cf86b17b2370a4e0
15d163b711f7f9da49e25988a7cf28cc21b08a40
describe
'951' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHQ' 'sip-files00204.txt'
f6e8cf1163519289c5b0ef0af3df505f
5979194fc958e85305eebbec3aa8b6550ddd9138
describe
'5781' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHR' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
60a9274de95f00a01b546cc1d176c4cb
cda0e2bc6f81a388839617d6fe429b45e2141482
describe
'419060' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHS' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
d3366df8b38dbd2aea6b40edd75ab7e0
4dfe10c9812e0cf34a5b13e35971f718d630835d
describe
'84868' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHT' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
f51c5ea580c6bfd63b4c214711289ce1
a433618c9184a89af5edf3e93b5e035394bae9ba
describe
'33124' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHU' 'sip-files00205.pro'
aecb605eb71c43a44f99a726d7496910
f9c845886850b1925764e95b1e9ce4e90ff86181
describe
'28739' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHV' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
9a1e753aeb3aa96c1a22c9f8e5993c10
f2869ca2190afd6cf8b1db03f488af23c6977b0c
describe
'3364500' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHW' 'sip-files00205.tif'
47ceb3bbf80164759af269d27dbcfbae
97e0caeb899905f53169c67aa53323e72cde3fc4
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHX' 'sip-files00205.txt'
a6414cf522ed9c2d41948bfb5a8e7d00
36ee61069d21fed7a6ba87f9a930758b2a72ff87
describe
'7424' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHY' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
960378b9532c57b86688fbc0c2041e9e
738e20935a0a5854065be3246aa561e7b16e4ce5
'2011-11-14T15:54:43-05:00'
describe
'422800' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHHZ' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
156eb774cba232534d5c35c2e6403071
f3bfb7247d72ecc601cdd38dc2f710185e7b0d38
describe
'80142' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHIA' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
31b58aebb3265c62071bcff8928f3a4b
700a96f1fd02a306379fce07e1ca09a45faff138
describe
'30045' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHIB' 'sip-files00206.pro'
c5a2a96a544170624016cab5673da09f
e768acc04d6300c5d7ba34e9ba72958cc6e0e29f
describe
'27066' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHIC' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
a2e4b30c8425919c95fdc741447f3da1
53ba25a4fbcc88d25343ef835f32bfa14e205564
describe
'3393920' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHID' 'sip-files00206.tif'
fdf492714e0abe46a5b07bd84e8f1274
c6472022a3373e66dec6e035214df4bf2e609057
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHIE' 'sip-files00206.txt'
fd469dcab67f4fc6d6e6b5d8aeb0f330
f3d24ed1b117a5581328f1e0824de66c9d4f1489
describe
'6808' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHIF' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
2a14149081c8c5ccb44a330abecfa10b
52d446dbedc6254ea95c402bfc5782c0167ad5a1
describe
'435205' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHIG' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
d44538a66ac8f63f04c1d524e275a306
183127929db5d86d962bfb42dc7f43497e0740c0
describe
'71019' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHIH' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
4824de387a434faaca1f5c53c78885d5
c248e3bf1b8d9cc52e808ba70e3a3b4f9d55fcf3
describe
'27416' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHII' 'sip-files00207.pro'
f591167ff8378b66662bfde5bef6cddb
314a060dab9d68b1519df4b71f388be9d7cc8510
describe
'24194' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHIJ' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
6106ef5832a93b2a35475ed262d37dd4
77dd9fbd50e6be095a042c94e54128c5500bea28
describe
'3493052' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHIK' 'sip-files00207.tif'
3931ced744e4d6b5667227828fb81593
b53e1353b91969db79704c535b47a450c4381b91
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHIL' 'sip-files00207.txt'
a50048388e4770df017c055d119d148d
9feeaea8ff2046bd691792c275661cd0e6d34880
describe
'6748' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHIM' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
4b4d95473249d3f3cf6e41d0d89d930e
f7a7a93945b6492794e9295b24a1d31fe94fc016
describe
'422623' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHIN' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
ab8475eec5aef68d672a49ec4dcb9c40
4eac5a0fbf770414d8f6c3c0bd28c224ef66d274
describe
'88969' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHIO' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
c893cdf4cab8d87826d635313c6123fe
0c30cdba034acebca575712fad6247092f8175d5
describe
'34569' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHIP' 'sip-files00208.pro'
e58336ac7774d63bfff766e426352e2e
6092acf63d4ad4abf3b422f543fc8f578cd85e3f
describe
'29131' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHIQ' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
fb12bd40542b0f4ded61322bb15acb3a
94195434a7430c3a09e45967a964e9dd7490db26
describe
'3393064' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHIR' 'sip-files00208.tif'
25acb4312f9556048c895c16e951e6f4
5517e3c56359b56aa3c047d1ab54c8eaf8b150b6
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHIS' 'sip-files00208.txt'
da312b001a0a878f4da5c2c89cf42c3a
c6fb78a364bc0ef0d2bc42d2541b79f27dd20097
describe
'7061' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHIT' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
14c436911187fc46d5e8862e23e9af8c
c14bb6cba215135240bbdd13a71a705eb598a654
describe
'414266' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHIU' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
3273289e678e883853372b30a17c9047
c4dc14e3c9611b8379e274411c0c539a3025b678
describe
'86162' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHIV' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
93226ce3eb718405e75c129862e34e97
8520146bfaa6e3f9147f1f9bb7b35092d255fe6b
describe
'30710' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHIW' 'sip-files00209.pro'
f501e44870f5b08dcb1a2e962b71493d
12673b5e0ac554f8932412e2030d66fb3d3bad1a
describe
'29660' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHIX' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
e7db591a3b9c21070ce1fb3f8b84dbe6
13521c0064b46f3162f2ef17d44c42b7f3f1f388
describe
'3326024' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHIY' 'sip-files00209.tif'
5e42f644c06bf9a78ae7696036e9f271
d1b387c3844489c9ecb91c43ca0f7db248da5686
describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHIZ' 'sip-files00209.txt'
1a0506e244323a352523332d75ccea07
aea407b5f5a85d0b2b4e9e5874676db6896982d8
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJA' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
6cde975e693a20f47e492e95e40e3f0c
3a8daabd99c8c5a0a6f04f83ec3ab9c83aaa4cc9
describe
'431038' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJB' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
dadf44bcdfb9b6525617f9c7c0362d2e
84bbcd1ac65b50a7ad2fe0f15f14a05cce8bb2d5
describe
'83621' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJC' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
81632678a39947fa6e86ac731d7f855d
8aef14608732c767388cd125bf03eda7ee79d604
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJD' 'sip-files00210.pro'
1bd22fb9d354e79f6e2eef8841d1e7d9
adeb17329cf0b8e82beb14ce69def1d0af283c1d
describe
'28158' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJE' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
05f36bede9b3c0791b35123b99992461
a598abb9f2c34602601fe3633eef53212aecf521
describe
'3460660' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJF' 'sip-files00210.tif'
bcecb18b24fc32bf7767ff39efa86141
67316160275d41573ceaa38dbfc3c438392f9a12
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJG' 'sip-files00210.txt'
844c536b5df64ef950020840b62bbd17
dee429c20dd51df4e2959415031f51df996c8feb
describe
'7265' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJH' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
d0f2f964d3cc44aa36c56c56a0d6bea9
0394a002165f6f04cf146d2a78e253c080cb296e
describe
'416902' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJI' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
1a8c273c01b389c9f9d939462d431d72
1033583833bef3bb85217a624107e2ee5aca678c
describe
'93229' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJJ' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
270022c8e289911d60676ab5bd06dfe2
7409d853c3b90864b7925921f193fb37bb4c6da6
describe
'33793' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJK' 'sip-files00211.pro'
7f7749a053f6055b839047d9b7b8415a
7a2540141e93d1ca2d5eea66129e320594920635
describe
'31624' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJL' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
91c1cf38aad8a3b0a0ef559795213e58
ad94d84248cb9a803563fa12979f6944a945d504
describe
'3347228' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJM' 'sip-files00211.tif'
b07b11b7e3205a56496a0472916c5a8d
59b4d9afc0d171d6b77592e6c4f3164996048d2a
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJN' 'sip-files00211.txt'
707c5ee38f06fba43f0c5dad71d487de
6a4ec681c3af319b8d8cb95d046686b57c818e41
describe
'7647' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJO' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
68c31d59d61620304171da46eedc0d2c
bcf7577b1ed7fc9aad7092f4e38e5e9b777742e1
describe
'386077' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJP' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
48b77f00746ae60f3a11e5fedc3a4a4d
7248e7d3e64516db035a11e62201075bddcdc9b6
describe
'97682' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJQ' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
04bd4cdcc5447349c465678941e52be1
b3d060ddbaa52adf96e0db587227b3a205286aa2
describe
'35706' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJR' 'sip-files00212.pro'
b87d937d0fdbf060ddfde0339bf06f63
28274f41fbb255aa074a5de84da991794df09283
describe
'33305' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJS' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
36684d0ca185d20f9c25aeb115db124a
3af48810c6dae087abbc51e586a8947bb9fe78ca
describe
'3100920' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJT' 'sip-files00212.tif'
3c7f98ae197a41f171eacf5b558ad872
ba044a2b6f1e5f987db8ed1c2d35bfa653bde0eb
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJU' 'sip-files00212.txt'
664d01785c499afac3c72b53debfbfe5
0e2e7356578eeb41f26461bc9f24285f7c3eb65f
describe
'7937' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJV' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
0ce57ac1379b9a56ee7d58e8a149b5fc
6f04c8cd9e77360c92c081d3df558ab4fcec5079
describe
'431312' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJW' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
d776a4dd66d80a8fb7817cce886d760f
a69dfa034d76d8c44d02a0669e45a38e545e7dab
describe
'83011' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJX' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
bdb65419b5c9d20b48ea6b490c57c166
5447556d044a2bcbf67d1c9c27ff5a22eaee025d
describe
'32553' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJY' 'sip-files00213.pro'
bd849d7b9f13534a1a3b0f2f0accbb89
b402d82d85e462497e5151a5677f7ff8334700bc
describe
'27584' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHJZ' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
2007d047b7876aaea451ac720688cad8
dd9206a5b1e1374913e7c201fc7f1641da0be48a
describe
'3462116' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKA' 'sip-files00213.tif'
5ced7458754d02b528fa4828c4ca13e5
81b22250e196c4e5b2b8022825c97e988ea5156b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKB' 'sip-files00213.txt'
c413c8dc705de0c33b3453a6abb308e7
44a4c3de0365ac77ac1fd22fa3b849340329dca8
describe
'6768' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKC' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
d1ef114873d55a3e295bbc19e77be095
55d1a3805c407b174a5744129c22f13e8d07f0bf
describe
'406832' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKD' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
568c21c5ca1fe10d42557a162bc7e7bf
a15082e30d044d3608b8e905cc1f4cb34566c037
describe
'82363' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKE' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
48b75a89d5860af2a536369af90e2c85
52e5e549472ac7ae5e868468bfcda42fab620580
describe
'29179' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKF' 'sip-files00214.pro'
16decf19fcf2127ef4c29db8fdadb556
9d20f0016a5afbcf320fe1ea42f01caba65eb8d6
describe
'28320' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKG' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
14a37237a343ef9b1333690f8f02e1fe
f29078b7832c3429ec7fc8652a8c2702a2fa0271
describe
'3266728' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKH' 'sip-files00214.tif'
f24b98782df0721b9afa736e1c39277c
c1040af3ac91ed5bf0e5450997d1c9897f4ec3e1
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKI' 'sip-files00214.txt'
55192b782d322c2cab35c2623e647ac2
eb0d556263ce7fd04f62a8f1e52b2d8aea8a4775
describe
'7347' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKJ' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
49ed8c0e97331fd086bc91c139563180
50621543f8cdd836370d764a018eff496f746090
describe
'185582' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKK' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
b0664cc7cba7e648ba3a3692d4866110
cbb8ece2d0cde7ccfec48f346783fd72c854f934
describe
'29835' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKL' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
0400e0e915b8580c5937ab7560edd97f
f9a95b12869a6c53de72f2064d4925bc94a3b037
describe
'9244' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKM' 'sip-files00215.pro'
f29e93df35a306cbee686d68be1467a7
0728687aac8828791b58f392f2c3ae3475c8d135
describe
'9454' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKN' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
9606f14f94eac1c1cc438c186bbd47e3
fbc7ec2bcd08e33e0b6b1b14870d0d87a51a0c9d
describe
'2998524' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKO' 'sip-files00215.tif'
61906e32ef4a1122d2363f4c2af485d1
80e9e738df6cc905216d9e93f32403e9956086b2
describe
'382' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKP' 'sip-files00215.txt'
f9f325933f2724be5589d3d4ef9f6a92
285e644b332bc368b316604c1604cc2287284942
describe
'2563' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKQ' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
2851d9f16a1a021e05fa0895cb683bc5
7c68f62d7cba7c298746d6635ee62e0f33543796
describe
'404923' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKR' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
b2328856fb42f7e1867a73b9377227f5
8e15cab1f39483638a032e96ff3ab34bedf45ef1
describe
'71645' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKS' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
0882afc3dadfbbf638437960903fee29
defba5e4864efe70c3002d4c737e2f4578e70413
describe
'25615' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKT' 'sip-files00216.pro'
5deb33a2a4faf9e3ad1c87d232d7525d
440fb3757c910a033085461a2705c6c48375482b
describe
'23548' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKU' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
554200507a634714c33c4282c15c29d7
33b669bf420156c9f5ed2ec48f8b622257a1172d
describe
'3251004' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKV' 'sip-files00216.tif'
baf7972bb86cc6fc6cde584d42cc6a5b
7535565e8d209702ea4e5522cd83ad3ebf3ee34e
describe
'1084' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKW' 'sip-files00216.txt'
eb8a49e6aa77b34dd6c19a1e5859e930
0572b0a29ef22b38ffdf58bc12ca33ce176010e5
describe
'5914' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKX' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
de54be6bb7338fe2183a9e8516c23551
bccdb09e5a2176643702d01d7992f2d119262630
describe
'422913' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKY' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
1f52ca93efab71cb5c79664b13766573
766d10a2dc1c62e272c3001f1663b4d3f26507c6
describe
'86869' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHKZ' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
d82dae918374d71e57c1f346989bb984
baa6d68577ebff6d67a54c77222251e8e5541768
describe
'33693' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLA' 'sip-files00217.pro'
acd22a024b61b8da06d20d032707a493
aa33b9b5d043422a0ecc0493b45cd2c052cfd82b
describe
'28861' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLB' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
dad8674bc22fa1d722f062ee21a9f3d6
170a2f9ccb66cf801268f386ea585dba0cd3a579
describe
'3394928' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLC' 'sip-files00217.tif'
9a8671785889e25e2a5358ace7c39a58
e1219beaa93b6f08e4173f283763f8a16759b0de
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLD' 'sip-files00217.txt'
1400ec7bbeba710e11e32432216f8ffd
af79c3a3cd6424951317b53819bcae0fbc7b4704
describe
'7884' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLE' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
43c38706050083f30670735e2fed0940
ae894ccf5077c77dca095a776b20dc81714409b1
describe
'417048' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLF' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
1dc20adf39fcd170220c834966243c63
bff152c153c4e51b291cc5acef71dc99f5e3612c
describe
'87148' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLG' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
94bb2edd5a18c88c08414e048ad4e4f8
88c2f87413e4eb56446bb023dab05cd70610abd3
describe
'33755' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLH' 'sip-files00218.pro'
409b824b2d720c94f8b53aa53c42295c
0447de4a01ea5cc71035f87e95634ad2eb128b6a
describe
'28915' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLI' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
108b89b2beec6eb08ed105f4d5d629bd
670dcb0a76ba2030267400538e510b2b706ad01b
describe
'3348640' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLJ' 'sip-files00218.tif'
bdf2391a134e1754021a697f223f3620
658c53d4ffa934e78e0841eb86ea50d70818fcfc
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLK' 'sip-files00218.txt'
4fe3ed9d16e241444f74c24f911eb9aa
7a1f1a66e11600da5590d33ac8516f5ef4198e60
describe
'7259' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLL' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
43443bef4c2576d20bf617e2f4a892c9
009fae45b05d58772eb747fe3c62ce5516a3d658
describe
'409185' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLM' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
4b4b9677ef484ed951fe86fb0be81ce5
852a2e292c68a6e4d810c7e1c0925978ee655816
describe
'90987' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLN' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
cbedaefb9197f7a94039df25dfef36e3
8a25a639dd4dc1905a15ff2ba5d4f366d890039e
describe
'33924' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLO' 'sip-files00219.pro'
cd0469122082f56b685d2e495a26efb7
400307706d86deee82c53a90607b86b3a15e0cc1
describe
'31162' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLP' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
2ea1f4bb30f15593ef5fae9e6a3ed642
091434ad912cf39b62c19c4200d82cf459dcb374
describe
'3285096' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLQ' 'sip-files00219.tif'
7471e389e804b4e272eef5ef3d389df4
58ee5a3d6fbfabe59afe466771fe9919ee4c8944
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLR' 'sip-files00219.txt'
0f885ffef8db0a181821026a16d4f66f
f1b9a162a2565bb50a767778367c80081af9e9c0
describe
'7688' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLS' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
0f076bca016bac19fd994605d0bbdce9
8891dcbaa9c9c7d195f52a060de1e1fbd578ff72
describe
'409023' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLT' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
ed38e7008f70e983d871e6a6c5b16152
de31b3235c0e96ba2cb0c96680edfaa1ccb34266
describe
'83788' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLU' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
c631dd349af920384416e70384efa9d5
46c2e00bf294f50e7d578d5bb5847ff8a6bc2055
describe
'33952' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLV' 'sip-files00220.pro'
7154fe91b0f632cc15033705727f0054
1ec11a3c5ca2f3a5c1ed7e9d6ff64be30f7315d4
describe
'28100' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLW' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
9540e4bc2155de0100bfbc9e8ef4d47e
c644ca7ecc4717040e247f25c3af6e790ed1beac
describe
'3284196' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLX' 'sip-files00220.tif'
0560faed8495bfda34fe5c0ac88df798
2ef2ebc2da53915e2d280e1a0d9145c580bb623f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLY' 'sip-files00220.txt'
7ee64a651e2bcb5c9b8e2cd602289912
85ed40c3b6e60e32e789980426776c541c512121
describe
'6928' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHLZ' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
99920f58280ff787138c711a21097090
99d396d5bcdb8424f44d09a4abfdc4b26edfe0b5
describe
'429527' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHMA' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
78582460f52b408ff377dabe7a4948ca
3fcd38eb38f32465701979d091bb55c9e1dbcfc8
describe
'91082' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHMB' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
be2af81867ed5345dcd1a4d3e35be47c
a429b29df8d21e6b1480373ff5d1841c56245ab5
describe
'14526' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHMC' 'sip-files00221.pro'
0ce86a4ee7e01dcf566a3a1953af9ab1
1b46dc8af48897b6f5ced9cfcdd6694fc627eec2
describe
'26573' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHMD' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
1f0d1307396fa5ac0c26c9bb573f3de2
784d655c33c70d784d1ba4538544e31538a5ce3d
describe
'3448168' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHME' 'sip-files00221.tif'
b27bf403196e7306453407215ea2d74e
8f3a19b5eb29fb3d420086cdff93e3e18131ee57
describe
'624' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHMF' 'sip-files00221.txt'
04c613c6fa95d5c3e82ca832e4c6b4d2
fe7873435941ca1a9bc2b0f7464f5ace00256ff3
describe
'6543' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHMG' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
061e553ee759bbb59bcd14e41b61d3a2
73875680c1b9a7385e63298a936bdb651475dc29
describe
'439304' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHMH' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
1e037da1e28bd92d498ea67007ba5794
dfe840607da07c7bd792f1dd67cd465c4d523306
describe
'77889' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHMI' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
197acb7e024d5a814e6859a1131845a1
08fac14d4e9fe97ba5e8062b79de2d26796dde97
describe
'32044' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHMJ' 'sip-files00222.pro'
0e962dfd19f410e67b92bdc0256fed76
b6bf8454a41a9f48c37a6d52927ab5bf7358bb01
describe
'25564' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHMK' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
726da3973bc945940fed8b3e21e401fc
f8b5ee54e60b87fa1c392717dabb3de5c5a42789
describe
'3525684' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHML' 'sip-files00222.tif'
518bd3aaa053e9c62683d77a46839304
f5e6f4c4782e2bcbf7f3a5f8a314f321dd7b99a7
describe
'1268' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHMM' 'sip-files00222.txt'
d7aabf75d8c7e8d63c5e971745189740
afeeae92569779523222ac17eb0fde8fd2944e6a
describe
'6654' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHMN' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
42e11a47158670de0900bd67c7a334f7
0a78b3d2dd8314513c760c72441176ea170382de
describe
'375166' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHMO' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
9f9de2cc00f143d7bbd5bf9807e75593
802d349295ec0d149bfffc8bb51fdb5d0a227470
describe
'88966' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHMP' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
18826d1947f1c57b81bef8c72fed2dc6
3cdd3b32810c4376c2ba19d281549483587efa45
describe
'32418' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHMQ' 'sip-files00223.pro'
faa1d9fb9348b7b9a0fee7b4992bba00
8799c1912cffbef5498f7cabd6a5fc774746262d
describe
'30538' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHMR' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
4186d25dafff5f40a7bb69f511c7eccf
50a9385889d2301880e573589b061c42427a71e2
describe
'3013276' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHMS' 'sip-files00223.tif'
6b431e121585a4f0b2b64f0c2b402f8e
407162e1dac6076389be335d16b324e6b0de8ada
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHMT' 'sip-files00223.txt'
33d61365fd0832d584e8da354bc95e12
c53e6a329fb69c9aec710a6a276c29f6a4ad244c
describe
'8094' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHMU' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
79586a2f1067c022dc1e26e7b5d3b71c
d00a42effb02bcfe568352b524a1fc4a420df39b
describe
'359827' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHMV' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
6a31240717964c43ef399f67464323de
4b326c32364056432487bd2f7d29a8e44cb8d909
describe
'93219' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHMW' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
e36ec99200fe54f3933597a2f7f6af2f
f1d4097eaeaa25ceec6407e25b2548b057c37d25
describe
'33352' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHMX' 'sip-files00224.pro'
0e42ed6638c4c2f42cc370d74064a34f
b46fb2f155629bd43b4135d85fae2a680249b477
describe
'32137' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHMY' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
a36dc94e39622922609a2f943af8d314
279c9e017202ce86da819bd30232f2282435bfd8
describe
'2890704' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHMZ' 'sip-files00224.tif'
b466eabf6084d042cc38464a0bb2e623
7576d56e3b34f5c6f4601b8447572531cf0b128a
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHNA' 'sip-files00224.txt'
858c07e6e682db81ee95e880864f5a9a
391a280d29253d08cb39d9ecf58f7fe03cbc24da
describe
'8342' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHNB' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
ef75877835d18646e10aba18c83dc8d9
2f4913713432db6985428e366293a2ec56f803e1
describe
'288514' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHNC' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
65d08be507a84efb4cb735561f0f8cb5
00fcf0a345fc63b3fe24b279430bfa28f1aabfdf
describe
'47611' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHND' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
d013d49ba4b6be814dcde5bb1ebb408e
c4958f4924c333a7afcbd5913152ad5b724975d2
describe
'16152' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHNE' 'sip-files00225.pro'
0139736e07ca32f885ed4995431a806f
a571b278ec7c18c81e7fa227768be859ecce475c
describe
'15998' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHNF' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
2ff398f987a0ca7c0b974f801bafa1eb
9906c738e93afe74b7cc78d59b3c4f09eab5d0f6
describe
'3243920' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHNG' 'sip-files00225.tif'
57e546f1f7fbf32d0d86048ca4f7bc2b
209378ec522b50a6b4a6682bcc8ddc7215f75b88
describe
'657' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHNH' 'sip-files00225.txt'
488da7afda6366ae057146107ef43b18
df3a20102895ed3ef8e8de8a7dc171c7c010ccad
describe
'4129' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHNI' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
4984076d5ac8949d27d29c8ee2804483
9619dfe367c54e39358827dbad4e28777104b743
describe
'33026' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHNJ' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
8b6d402244cd1929d6ee9c5f002fc8b3
d9535d4d23165dc6de1dc14293418051e95e8b09
describe
'8921' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHNK' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
2b8f2a9f92fbe78f8019773c6221b8ad
a4dc54153329cc1e4bf70b7fb6b9cf563807d427
describe
'383' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHNL' 'sip-files00227.pro'
78ec7f82a5e222e6b75fe4b3dcfdcbbf
e45463f721400c40b9deebf0e5edd808f80535f7
describe
'2771' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHNM' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
2520545c51483188efac9ae5ab6f56ad
fa0fe07db3788b59f127813dd5724fa27f31a602
describe
'3643024' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHNN' 'sip-files00227.tif'
0fb3960cde1db3788edf47a0d3bdb18c
4f0b6c980bbbb6da2e7400d0fddde524e7aa6e21
describe
'12' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHNO' 'sip-files00227.txt'
76229c518fba3262738f67414e5f7c2d
ed92939cf739edcea246afd818aa053ae912b130
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHNP' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
e9712f0480027b0e7dce1d9db5275d30
bd197d654062314abe5afba3bcd3e6c86ea62156
describe
'455638' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHNQ' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
8f1f1be795625c1adcdb16b0f84f0aa9
e80139d4a9e2640df6ca043349bfcdcf116dad95
'2011-11-14T15:52:06-05:00'
describe
'118568' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHNR' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
947f3597bd05d01bca51451b9b2cbf3d
fc5ddb56f4d16acaa044b2ee0f6e61cb97ef8522
describe
'28385' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHNS' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
689931d0a44a3e0aa0d64e41ab3c8e4b
eb1447dba6ab08a5ec7df930f8f5b11d271aad94
describe
'10945308' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFEfileF20080809_AABHNT' 'sip-files00228.tif'
821d72de13c4ac175852a2f2a4edc75c
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eect el Ko abe” ee ci eae iam





oy Edun GS).


The Baldwin Library

University
RAD ot
Florida





‘*© Fairy stories DO happen!” she said. ‘Oh! just think how like

9

a fairy king you are.
TWO LITTLE
PILGRIMS PROGRESS

H Story of the City Beautiful

BY

FRANCES HODGSON BURNETT
AUTHOR OF
“LITTLE LORD FAUNTLEROY" ‘*THAT LASS O' LOWRIF’S” “THE CAPTAIN’S YOUNGEST ”
ETC. ETC.

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY R, W. MACBETH, A.R.A.



LONDON
FREDERICK WARNE AND CO.
BEDFORD STREET, STRAND

1895

[All Rights Reserved|
COPYRIGHT

ENTERED AT STATIONERS’ HALL
CHAP.

I

Il.
Ill.

IV,

VI.

Vil.

VIIL.

IX.

XI,
XII.

XIII.

CONTENTS

—t

THERE 7S A CITY BEAUTIFUL . . . .
THE BOTTOM OF THE HILL OF DIFFICULTY .
THE FIRST STEP UP . . ‘ : ‘
A STEP HIGHER . : ‘ .

HUMAN BEINGS CAN DO ANYTHING THEY SET

THEIR MINDS TO . .
“BURDENS DON’T FALL OFF BY THEMSELVES ”

HAND IN HAND THEY WENT OUT ON THE

ROAD TOGETHER . . . . .
“AND WE ARE PEOPLE TOO”

IT IS THE DAY! . . : . .
MORE PILGRIMS ARE COME TO TOWN. .
THE THING THAT THINKS - . . .

“WELL—/szar!”

EVERYBODY IN THE WORLD HAS SOMETHING

TO GIVE. . . : ' . .

103
113

124
CHAP.

XIV.

XV.

XVI.

XVII.

XVIII.

XIX.

XX.

CoNTENTS

BEN

JOHN HOLT

THE BEGINNING OF A FAIRY STORY

THE FAIRY STORY CONTINUED

ENTER AUNT MATILDA

THE BIG HOUSE WOULD SEEM EMPTY NO MORE

IT WON’T VANISH AWAY.

PAGE

145

163

173

184

194
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

BY

R. W. MACBETH, A.R.A.

“ PAIRY STORIES DO HAPPEN!” SHE SAID. ‘OH!
JUST THINK HOW LIKE A FAIRY KING YOU

ARE” . ; . . . . . Lrontispiece
PAGE
SHE HEARD ROBIN HURRYING UP THE LADDER 70 face 20
“HOW OLD WERE YOU WHEN YOU BEGAN TO
WORK?” . ; : . . . . dd
MEG LOOKED RATHER LIKE A LITTLE WITCH AS
SHE STOOD OVER THE BUBBLING OLD POT 78
‘Ik YOU LEAN AGAINST ME, ROB,” SHE SAID,
“IT WILL BE SOFTER” . . . . 95
SHE... PRESENTLY BROUGHT BACK TWO GOOD
CUPS OF HOT COFFEE . : . to face 108
“MEG! MEG! WE ARE THERE!” 115
“THOSE PEOPLE HAVE PLENTY TO EAT”. 132
‘“HAVE YOU A ROOM WHERE MY SISTER COULD
SLEEP?” . : . . . . . 141
“c ” “c , ie + 1» 6
NOW,” SAID MEG, “OPEN THEM—SUDDENLY !” @o face 157
“LOOK HERE,” HE SAID, “YOURE TIRED”, 168
“DON’T YOU THINK YOU KNOW WHAT SHE
WAS LIKE?” , . . . . 211

7
TWO LITTLE PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

CHAPTER I

THERE IS A CITY BEAUTIFUL



; HE sun had set and the shadows were
§ deepening in the big barn. The last
red glow—the very last bit which
reached the corner the children called
the Straw Parlour—had died away, and Meg drew
her knees up higher so as to bring the pages of her
book nearer to her eyes as the twilight deepened
and it became harder to read. It was her bitterest
grievance that this was what always happened when
she became most interested and excited—the light
began to fade away, and the shadows to fill all the
corners and close in about her.

She frowned as it happened now—a fierce little
frown, which knitted her childish, black brows, as she

pored over her book devouring the page with the
2
10 Two Lirrte Pinegris’ PRocGREss



determination to seize on as much as was possible. It
was like running a desperate race with the darkness.

She was a determined child, and no one could have
failed to guess as much who could have watched her
for a few moments as she sat on her curious perch,
her cheeks supported by her hands, her shock of
straight black hair tumbled over her forehead.

The Straw Parlour was the top of a straw stack in
Aunt Matilda’s barn. Robin had discovered it one
day by climbing a ladder which had been left leaning
against the stack, and when he had found himself on
the top of it he had been enchanted by the feeling it
gave him of being so high above the world, and had
called Meg up to share it with him.

She had been even more enchanted than he.

They both hated the world down below—Aunt
Matilda’s world, which seemed hideous and exaspera-
ting and sordid to them in its contrast to the world
they had lived in before their father and mother had
died and they had been sent to their sole relation,
who did not want them, and only took them in from
respect to public opinion. Three years they had been
with Aunt Matilda, and each week had seemed more
unpleasant than the last. Mrs. Matilda Jennings was
a renowned female farmer of Illinois, and she was far,

too energetic a manager and business woman to have
Two Lirrte Pinertms’ Progress 11

time to spend with children. She had an enormous
farm, and managed it herself with a success and
ability which made her celebrated in agricultural
papers. If she had not given her dead brother's
children a home they would have starved, or been
sent to the poorhouse. Accordingly, she gave them
food to eat and beds to sleep in, but she scarcely ever
had time to notice them. If she had had time to talk
to them, she had nothing to say. She cared for
nothing but crops and new threshing-machines and
fertilisers; and they knew nothing about such things.

“She never says anything but ‘Go to bed,’ ‘ Keep
out of the way. She’s not like a woman at all,” Meg
commented once; “she’s like a man in woman’s
clothes.”

Their father had been rather like a woman in man’s
clothes. He was a gentle, little, slender man, with a
large head. He had always been poor, and Mrs.
Matilda Jennings had regarded him as a contemptible
failure. He had had no faculty for business or farm-
ing. He had taught school and married a school-
teacher. They had had a small house, but somehow
it had been as cosy as it was tiny. They had man-
aged to surround themselves with an atmosphere of
books by buying the cheap ones they could afford, and

borrowing the expensive ones from friends and circu-
12 Two Litrte Pinarims’ PRoGRESS

lating libraries. The twins—Meg and Robin—had
heard stories and read books all the first years of
their lives as they sat in their little seats by the small,
warm fireside. In Aunt Matilda’s bare, cold house
there was not a book to be seen. A few agricultural
papers were scattered about. Meals were hurried
over as necessary evils. The few people who appeared
on the scene were farmers who talked about agricul-
tural implements and the wheat market.

“It’s such a bare place,” Robin used to say, and he
would drive his hands into the depths of his pockets
and set his square little jaw, and stare before him.

Both the twins had that square little jaw. Neither
of them looked like their father and mother—except
that from their mother they inherited black hair.
Robin’s eyes were black, but Meg’s were grey with
thick black lashes. They were handsome little creat-
ures, but their shocks of straight black hair, their
straight black brows and square little jaws, made them
look curiously unlike other children. They both re-
membered one winter evening when, as they sat on their
seat by the fire, their father, after looking at them
with a half smile for a moment or so, began to laugh.

“Margaret,” he said to their mother, “do you know

who those two are like? You have heard me speak
of Matilda often enough.”
Two Lirrte Pinerims’ PRoGREsS 13



“Oh, Robert!” she exclaimed, “surely they are not
like Matilda.”

“Well, perhaps it is too much to say they are like
her,” he answered, “but there is something in their
faces that reminds me of her strongly. I don’t know
what it is exactly, but it is there. It is a good thing,
perhaps,” with a sad tone in his voice; “Matilda
always did what she made up her mind to do.
Matilda was a success. I was always a failure.”

“Oh no, Bob,” she said, “not a failure !”

She had put her hand on his shoulder, and he lifted
it and pressed it against his thin cheek.

“Wasn't I, Maggie?” he said gently. “Wasn't I ?
Well, I think these two will be like Matilda in mak-
ing up their minds and getting what they want.”

Before the winter was over, Robin and Meg were
orphans, and were with Aunt Matilda; and there they
had been ever since.

Until the day they found the Straw Parlour, it
had seemed as if no corner on the earth belonged to
them. Meg slept in a cot in a farm-servant’s room,
Robin shared a room with someone else. Nobody
took any notice of them.

“When anyone meets us,” Meg said, “they always
look surprised. Dogs which are not allowed in the
house are like us. The only difference is that they
14 Two Lirrte Piuerims’ PRroGcRess

don’t drive us out—but we are just as much in the
way.”

“T know,” said Robin, “if it wasn’t for you, Meg,
I should run away.”

“Where?” said Meg.

“Somewhere,” said Robin, setting his jaw; “Id find
a place.” .

“Tf it wasn’t for you,” said Meg, “I should be so
lonely that I should walk into the river. I wouldn’t
stand it.”

It is worth noticing that she did not say, “I could
not stand it.”

But after the day they found the Straw Parlour
they had an abiding-place. It was Meg who pre-
empted it before she had been on the top of the stack
five minutes. After she had stumbled around for a
while looking about her, she stopped short and looked
down into the barn.

“ Robin,” she said, “this is another world. We are
miles and miles away from Aunt Matilda. Let us
make this into our home—just yours and mine, and
live here.”

“We are in nobody’s way—nobody will ever know
where we are,” said Robin; “nobody ever asks, you
know. Meg, it will be just like our own. We will

live here.”
Two Lirrte Pinagrms’ Progress 15

And so they did. On fine days when they were
tired of playing, they climbed the ladder to rest
on the heaps of yellow straw; on wet days they
lay and told each other stories, or built caves, or read
their old favourite books over again. The stack was
a very high one, and the roof seemed like a sort of
big tent above their heads, and the barn floor a
wonderful, exaggeratedly long distance below. The
birds which had nests on the rafters became accustomed
to them, and one of the children’s chief entertainments
was to lie and watch the mothers and fathers carry
on their domestic arrangements, feeding their young
ones, and quarrelling a little sometimes about the way
to bring them up. The twins invented a weird little
ery with which they called each other if one was in
the Straw Parlour and the other one entered the barn,
to find out whether it was occupied or not. They
never mounted to the Straw Parlour or descended
from it if anyone was within sight. This was their
secret. They wanted to feel that it was very high
and far away from Aunt Matilda’s world, and if any-
one had known where they were, or had spoken
to them from below, the charm would have been
broken.

This afternoon, as Meg pored over her book, she was
waiting for Robin. He had been away all day. At
16 Two Lirrte Piteris’ PROGRESS



twelve years old Robin was not of a light mind.
When he had been only six years old he had had
serious plans. He had decided that he would be a
great inventor. He had also decided—a little later—
that he would not be poor like his father, but would
be very rich. He had begun by having a savings _
bank into which he put rigorously every penny that
was given to him. He had been so quaintly system-
atic about it that people were amused and gave him
pennies instead of candy and toys. He kept a little
banking-book of his own. If he had been stingy he
would have been a very unpleasant, little boy, but
he was only strict with himself. He was capable of
taking from his capital to do the gentlemanly thing
by Meg at Christmas.

“He has the spirit of the financier, that is all,” said
his father.

Since he had been with Aunt Matilda he had found
opportunities to earn a trifle now and then, On
the big place there were small troublesome duties the
farm hands found he could be relied on to do, which
they were willing to pay for. They found out that
he never failed them.

“Smart little chap,” they said. “Always up to
time when he undertakes a thing.”

To-day he had been steadily at work under the
Two LittLte Pincrtms’ Procress 17

head man. Aunt Matilda had no objection to his odd
jobs.

“He has his living to earn, and he may as well
begin,” she said.

So Meg had been alone since morning. She
had only one duty to perform and then she was free.
The first Spring they had been with Aunt Matilda
Robin had invested in a few chickens, and their
rigorous care of them had resulted in such success
that the chickens had become a sort of centre of
existence to them. They could always build any
dreams of the future upon the fortune to be gained
by chickens. You could calculate on bits of paper
about chickens and eggs until your head whirled at
the magnitude of your prospects. Meg’s duty was to
feed them and show them scrupulous attention when
Robin was away.

After she had attended to them she went to the barn
and, finding it empty, climbed up to the Straw Par-
lour with an old Pilgrim’s Progress to spend the day.

She was particularly fond of the Pilgrim’s Progress,
and she had made Rob fond of it. She used to read
it aloud to him as they lay on the straw. She was a
child with an imagination, and she used to invent new
adventures for Christian as he toiled up the Hill of

Difficulty. Robin thought her incidents more exciting
3
18 Two Litre Pinerts’ Progress

than John Bunyan’s. She had a realistic way of
relating them. But her great addition to the story was
her description of the City on the Hill, which she
always followed Christian into, and which she called the
City Beautiful. She had invented a City Beautiful
of her own, In it there were all the things she and
Robin wanted and all the joys they yearned for.
Their father and mother were there, and she and
Robin lived with them in a sort of fairy palace, which
it was her delight to add to the plan and contents of,
every time she told the story and they wanted a new
possession. It was so rapturous to be able to say—

“ And on one floor of the house there was a corner
room full of little machines and everything to work
them and mend them—and there were shelves and
shelves—full of books about inventions, and bottles of
chemicals—that was for you, Rob.”

“Electric motors?” Rob would put in eagerly.

“All kinds of motors,” she would answer with
deliberation—“all kinds. You could work anything
and have any number of horse-power you liked,
because there were new inventions there that have
not been made yet.”

When Robin was low-spirited she always described
this room and added to its contents. When he was

in a happier state of mind and the day was beautiful,
Two Lirrite Pinerims’ Procress 19







she would lead him through the streets of the City
Beautiful in a different mood—a dreamy sort of mood.
“There were tall trees covered with white lilies,”
she would say. “They were on each side of the
streets—and they swayed and the lilies swung like
great white bells—and the sweetness shook out of
them and was in all the air the people breathed, and
there was a strange golden light—like the light in
the morning—and the houses were as white as snow,
and had slender pillars and archways, and courts
with flowers and fountains. And you could see
lovely people in delicate, soft-floating robes—not all
white robes, but pale flower colours—and everybody
had a little smile, and a look as if their eyes were
stars.” She would dream on in this way sometimes
for a long time, and her own eyes would grow large
and sometimes shine so that Robin knew that in a
little while the brightness would fill them and brim
over and fall in two large splendid drops on to the
straw, which they would both pretend not to see.
This afternoon, when the light began to redden and
then to die away, she and Christian were very near
the gates. She longed so to go in with him, and
was yearning towards him with breathless eagerness,

when she heard Robin’s ery below coming up from
the barn floor.
20 Two Lirrte Prierims’ PRoGRESS

’ She sprang up with a start, feeling bewildered a
second, before she answered. The City Beautiful was
such millions—such millions of miles away from Aunt
Matilda’s barn. She found herself breathing quickly
and rubbing her eyes as she heard Robin hurrying up
the ladder.

Somehow she felt as if he was rather in a hurry,
and when his small, black shock head and wide-
awake, black eyes appeared above the straw, she hada
vague feeling that he was excited and that he had come
- from another world. He clambered on to the stack,
and made his way to her and threw himself full
length on the straw at her side.

“Meg!” he said. “Hello! you look as if you were
ina dream! Wake up! Jones and Jerry are coming
to the barn. I hurried to get here before them.
They’re talking about something I want you to hear—
something new! Wake up!”

“Oh, Robin!” said Meg, clutching her book and
coming back to earth with a sigh. “I don’t want to
hear Jones and Jerry. I don’t want to hear any of
the people down there; I’ve been reading the Pzl-
grim’s Progress, and I do wish—I do so wish there
was a City Beautiful.”

Robin gave a queer little laugh. He really was
excited.


‘She heard Robin hurrying up the ladder.’
Two LirrLte Pincrims’ PROGRESS 21

“There is going to be one,” he said. “Jones and
Jerry don’t really know it—but it is something like
that they are talking about—a City Beautiful—a real
one—on this earth, and only two hundred miles away.

Let’s get near the edge and listen.”
CHAPTER II

THE BOTTOM OF THE HILL OF
DIFFICULTY

‘HEY drew as near to the edge as they
could without being seen. Meg did

not understand in the least. Robin



was not given to practical jokes, but
what he had said sounded rather as if there was a
joke somewhere. But she saw Jones and Jerry enter
the barn, and saw before they entered that they were
deep in talk. It was Jones who was speaking. Jones
was Aunt Matilda’s head man, and was an authority
on many things.

“There’s been exhibitions and fairs all over the
world,” he was saying, “but there’s been nothing like
what this will be. It will be a City—that’s what it’ll
be—and all the world is going to be in it. They are
going to build it fronting on the water, and bank the
water up into lakes and canals, and build places like
white palaces beside them and decorate the grounds

with statues and palms and flowers and fountains, and
22
Two Lirrte Pinerims Proeress 93



_there’s not a country on earth that won’t send things

to fill the buildings, and there won’t be anything a
man can’t see by going through ’em. It'll be as good
as a college course to spend a week there.”

Meg drew a little closer to Robin on the straw.

“What are they talking about?” she whispered.

“ Listen,” said Rob.

Jerry, who was moving about at some work below,
gave a chuckling laugh.

“Trust ’em to do the biggest thing yet—or bust—
them Chicago people,” he said. “It’s got to be the
biggest thing—a Chicago Fair.”

“Tt’s not goin’ to be the Chicago Fair,” Jones said.
“They're not goin’ to put up with no such idea as
that! It’s the World’s Fair! They’re goin’ to ring in
_ the universe.”

“That’s Chicago out and out,” said Jerry. “ Buildin’s
twenty stories high, an’ the thermometer twenty-five
degrees below zero—an’ a World’s Fair—Christopher
Columbus! Id like to see it!”

“T bet Christopher Columbus would like to see it!”
said Jones. “It’s out of compliment to him they’re
getting it up—for discovering Chicago.”

“Well, I didn’t know he made his name that way
partic’lar,’ said Jerry. “Thought what he prided

hisself on was discoverin’ America.”
24. Two Lirrte Pitertms’ Progress

“Same thing,” said Jones, “same thing! Wouldn’t
have had much to blow about and have statues set up
and comic operas written about him if it had only
been America he’d discovered. Chicago does him full
justice, an’ she’s goin’ to give him a send-off that'll be
a credit to her.”

Robin smothered a little laugh in his coat sleeve.
He was quite used to hearing jokes about Chicago.
The people in the country round were enormously
proud of it, and its great schemes and great buildings
and multi-millionaires, but those who were given to
jokes had the habit of being jocular about it, just as
they had the habit of proclaiming and dwelling upon
its rush and wealth and enterprise. But Meg was not
a jocular person. She was too intense and easily
excited. She gave Robin an impatient nudge with her
elbow, not in reproof, but asa sort of irrepressible
ejaculation.

“I wish they wouldn’t be funny!” she exclaimed.
“T want them to tell more about it. I wish they’d
go on.”

But they did not go on—at least not in the way that
was satisfactory. They only remained in the barn a
short time longer, and they were busy with the work
they had come to do. Meg craned her neck and
listened, but they did not “tell more,” and she was
Two LirrLte Pitcrims’ PRoGRESS 25

glad when they went away, so that she could turn to
Robin.

“Don’t you know more than that?” she said. “Is
it true? What have you heard? Tell me yourself!”

“T’ve heard a lot to-day,” said Robin. “They were
all talking about it all the time, and I meant to tell
you myself, only I saw Jones and Jerry coming, and
thought perhaps we should hear something more if
we listened.”

They clambered over to the corner and made them-
selves comfortable. Robin lay on his back, but Meg
leaned on her elbows as usual, with her cheek resting
on her hands. Her black elf locks hung over her
forehead, and her big eyes shone.

“ Rob,” she said, “go on. What's the rest ?”

“The rest?” he said. “It would take a week to
tell it all, I should think. But it’s going to be the
most wonderful thing in the world. They are going
to build a place that will be like a white, beautiful
city on the borders of the lake—that was why I called
it the City Beautiful. It won’t be on the top of a
hill, of course.”

“But if it is on the edge of the lake, and the sun
shines and the big water is blue, and there are shining
white places, it will be better, I believe,” said Meg.
“What is going to be in the city?”

4
26 Two Lirrite Pinarms’ PRocREss

“Everything in the world,” said Robin. “Things
from everywhere—from every country.”

“There are a great many countries,” said Meg.
“You know how it is in the geography. Europe,
Asia, and Africa, as well as America, Spain and
Portugal, and France and England, and Norway and
Russia and Lapland, and India, and Italy and
Switzerland, and all the others.”

“There will be things, and people, brought from
them all. I heard them say so. They say there will
be villages with people walking about in them.”

“As they walk about when they are at home?”
exclaimed Meg.

“Yes, in the queer clothes they wear in their own
countries. There’s going to be an Esquimaux village.”

“With dogs and sledges?” cried Meg, lifting her
head.

“Yes, and you know that place in Italy, where the
streets are made of water ”—

“It’s Venice,” said Meg. “And they go about in
boats called gondolas ”—

“And the mca who take them about are called
gondoliers,” interrupted Robin. “And they have
scarves and red caps. There will be gondolas at the
Fair, and people can get into them and go about the
canals.”
Two Lirrte Pinerims’ PRocress 27



“Just as they do in Venice?” Meg gasped.

“Just as they do in Venice. And it will be the
same with all the other countries. It will be as if
they were all brought there—Spanish places and
Egyptian places and German places, and French and
Italian and Irish and Scotch and English, and all the
others.”

“To go there would be like travelling all over the
world,” cried Meg.

“Yes,” said Rob excitedly ; “and all the trades will
be there, and all the machines, and inventions, and
books, and statues, and scientific things, and wonder-
‘ful things, and everything anyone wants to learn
about in all the world!”

In his excitement his words had become so rapid
that they almost tumbled over each other, and he said
the last sentence ina rush. There were red spots on
his cheeks, and a queer look in his black eyes. He
had been listening to descriptions of this thing all
day. A new hand, hot from the excitement in
Chicago, had been among the workers. Apparently
he had heard of nothing else, thought of nothing else,
talked of nothing else, and dreamed of nothing else
but the World’s Fair for weeks. Finding himself
among people who had only bucolic and vague ideas
about it, he had poured forth all he knew, and, being
28 Two Lirrte Piterims’ PRoGREsS

a rather good talker, had aroused great excitement.
Robin had listened with eyes and ears wide open.
He was a young human being born so full of energy
and enterprise that the dull prosaic emptiness of his
life in Aunt Matilda’s world had been more horrible
than if he had been old enough to realise. He could
not have explained why it had seemed so maddening
to him, but the truth was that in his small boyish
body was imprisoned the force and ability which in
manhood build great schemes, and not only build but
carry them out. In him was imprisoned one of the
great business men, inventors or political powers of
the new century. But of this he knew nothing, and
so ate his young heart out in Aunt Matilda’s world,
sought refuge with Meg in the Straw Parlour, and was
bitterly miserable and at a loss.

How he had drunk in every word the man from
Chicago had uttered! How he had edged near to
him, and tried not to lose him for a moment, and had
hoarded up every sentence! If he had not been a
man in embryo, and a strong and clear - headed
creature, he would have done his work badly. But
he never did his work badly. He held on like a little
bull-dog, and thought of what Meg would say when
they sat in the straw together. Small wonder that
he looked excited when his black head appeared
Two Lirrte Pincrims’ Progress 29
above the edge of the straw. He was wrought up to
the highest pitch. Small wonder that there were
deep red spots on his cheeks, and that there was a
queer intense look in his eyes and about his obstinate
little mouth. He threw up his arms with a desperate
gesture.

“ Hverything,’ he said again, staring straight before
him, “that anyone could want to learn about—every-
thing in all the world.”

“Oh, Robin!” said Meg, in quite a fierce little
voice. “And we—we shall never see it!”

She saw Robin clench his hands though he said
nothing, and it made her clench her own hands.
Rob’s were rough, little, square-fingered fists, brown
and muscular. Meg’s hands were long - fingered,
flexible, and slender, but they made good little fists
when they doubled themselves up.

“ Rob,” she said, “we never see anything—we never
hear anything—we never learn anything. If some-
thing doesn’t happen, we shall be Nothings—that’s
what we shall be—Nothings.” And she struck her
fists upon the straw.

Rob’s jaw began to look very square, but he did
not speak.

“We are twelve years old,” Meg went on. “We've
been here three years, and we don’t know one thing
30 Two LirrLte Pincrims’ Progress



we didn’t know when we came here. If we had been
with father and mother, we should have been learning
things all the time. We haven’t one thing of our
own, Rob, but the chickens and the Straw Parlour,
and the Straw Parlour might be taken away from us.”

Rob’s square jaw relaxed just sufficiently to allow
of a grim little grin.

“We've got the Treasure, Meg,” he said.

Meg’s laugh had rather a hysterical sound. That
she should not have mentioned the Treasure among
their belongings was queer. They talked so much
about the Treasure. At this moment it was buried, in
an iron bank, deep in the straw, about four feet from
where they sat. It was the very bank Robin had
hoarded his savings in when he had begun at six
years old with pennies, and a ten cent blank-book to
keep his accounts in. Everything they had owned
since then had heen pushed or dropped into it; all
the chicken and egg money, and all Robin had earned
by doing odd jobs for anyone who would give him
one. Nobody knew about the old iron bank, any
more than they knew about the Straw Parlour, and
the children having buried it in the straw, called it
the Treasure. Meg’s stories about it were numerous
and wonderful. Magicians came and multiplied it a

hundredfold; sometimes robbers stole it, and they
Two Lirrite Pinerims’ ProGress 31

pursued them with wild adventure; but perhaps the
most satisfactory thing was to invent ways to spend
it when it had grown to enormous proportions.
Sometimes they bought a house in New York, and
lived there together; sometimes they travelled in
foreign lands with it; sometimes they bought land
which increased in value to such an extent that they
were millionaires in a month. Ah, it was a Treasure
indeed !

After the little, low, overstrained laugh, Meg folded
her arms on the straw, and hid her face in them.
Robin looked at her with a troubled air for about a
minute. Then he spoke to her.

“Tt’s no use doing that,” he said.

“It’s no use doing anything,” Meg answered, her
voice muffled in her arms. “I don’t want to do this
any more than you do. We're so lonely.”

“Yes, were lonely,” said Robin. “That’s a fact.”
And he stared up at the dark rafters above him, and
at some birds who were clinging to them and twitter-
ing about a nest.

“T said I wished there was a City Beautiful,” Meg
said; “but it seems to make it worse—that there ig
going to be something like it—so near—and then
that we should never get any nearer to it than two

hundred miles,”
32 Two LirrLte Pirarims’ PRoGcREss

Rob sat up and locked his hands together round
his knees.

“ How do you know ?” he said.

“How do I know?” cried Meg desperately, and she
lifted her head, turning her wet face sideways to look
at him. He unlocked his hands to give his forehead
a hard rub, as if he was trying either to rub some
thought out of or into it.

“Just because we are lonely there zs use in doing
things,” he said. “ There’s nobody to do them for us.
At anyrate, we’ve got as far on the way to the City
as the bottom of the Hill of Difficulty.”

And he gave his forehead another rub, and looked
straight before him; and Meg drew a little closer to
him in the straw, and the family of birds filled the

silence with domestic twitters.
CHAPTER III

THE FIRST STEP UP



ZURING the weeks that followed they
spent more time than ever in their
hiding-place. They had always been
in the habit of scrambling up to their
paloved refuge, when they could slip away there and
adjust their ladder, and have time to climb up when
there was no one about to see them. This was not
an easy thing when the kind of work was being done
which obliged the farm hands to pass in and out
of the barn or anywhere near it. They had realised
that it would not do for people to see the ladder too
often in one place and position, or to find it moving
itself from one point to another in a way not to be
at all explained by ordinary practical farm reasons.
Together they had discussed the matter with a great
deal of seriousness. It was indeed a serious affair.
Without the aid of the ladder their Straw Parlour
was an unattainable paradise, but to use it without

the exercise of proper precaution would betray them
5
34 Two Lirrrie Pinarts’ ProcReEss



to the enemy. They could not help regarding as an
enemy anyone who might come between them and
their fortress. So when they went to the barn they
first reconnoitred carefully, and then were particular
about mounting at different points. When they took
the ladder they noticed particularly the position it
occupied, and always returned it to exactly the same
place and arranged it at the same angle. But it was
not always possible to follow these precautions when
they were in the mood to desire to retire to seclusion.
And in these days they had so much to talk about
that the mood was upon them even more frequently
than it had ever been.

They had an absorbing topic of conversation. A
new and wonderful thing, better than their old books,
even better than the stories Meg made, when she lay
on the straw, her elbows supporting her, her cheeks
on her hands, and her black-lashed grey eyes staring
into space. Hers were always good stories, full of
palaces and knights and robber-chiefs and fairies,
but this new thing had the thrill of being a fairy
story which was real—so real that one could read
about it in the newspapers, and everybody was talking
about it, even Aunt Matilda, her neighbours, and the
work hands on the farm. To the two lonely children

in their high nest in the straw stack it seemed a
Two Lirrte Pinerms’ Progress 35

curious thing to hear these people in the world below
talk about it in their ordinary everyday way, with-
out excitement or awe—as if it was a new kind of
big ploughing or winnowing machine. To them it
was a thing so beautiful that they could scarcely find
the words to express their thoughts and dreams about
it, and yet they were never alone together without
trying to do so.

On wet cheerless days, in which they huddled close
together in their nest to keep from being chilled, it
was their comfort to try to imagine and paint pictures
of the various wonders, until in their interest they
forgot the dampness of the air and felt the unending
patter of the rain on the barn roof merely a pleasant
sort of accompaniment to the stories of their fancies.

Since the day when they had listened to Jones and
Jerry down there below them in the barn, Rob had
formed the habit of collecting every scrap of news-
paper relating to the wonder. He cut paragraphs out
of Aunt Matilda’s cast-aside newspapers; he begged
them from the farm hands and from the country
storekeeper. Anything in the form of an illustration
he held as a treasure beyond price, and hoarded it to
bring to Meg with exultant joy.

How they pored over these things, reading the

paragraphs again and again until they knew them
36 Two Lirtite Pinerims’ Procress



almost by heart. How they studied the pictures,
trying to gather the proportions and colour of every
column or dome or arch! What enthusiast living in
Chicago itself knew the marvel as they did, and so
dwelt on and revelled in its beauties! No one knew
of their pleasure—like the Straw Parlour, it was a
secret. The strangeness of their lives lay in the fact
that absolutely no one knew anything about them at
all—or asked anything, thinking it quite enough that
their friendlessness was supplied with enough animal
heat and nourishment to keep their bodies alive.

Of that other part of them—their restless, growing
young brains, and naturally craving hearts, which in
their own poor enough but still human little home
had at least been recognised and cared for—Aunt
Matilda knew nothing, and indeed had never given a
thought to. She had not undertaken the care of
intelligences and affections; her own were not of
an order to require supervision. She was too much
occupied with her five-hundred-acre farm and the
amazing things she was doing with it. That the
children could read and write and understand some
arithmetic she knew. She had learned no more
herself, and had found it enough to build her fortune
upon. She had never known what it was to feel

lonely and neglected, because she was a person quite
Two Lirrte Pincrims’ Progress 37



free from affections, and quite enough for herself.
She never suspected that others could suffer from a
weakness of which she knew nothing, because it had
never touched her.

If anyone had told her that these two children, who
ate their plentiful, rough meals at her table, among
field hands and servants, were neglected and lonely,
and that their own knowledge of it burned in their
childish minds, she would have thought the announce-
ment a piece of idle, sentimental folly ; but that there
was no solid detail of her farming a fact more real
than this one, was the grievous truth.

“When we were at home,” was Meg’s summing up
of the situation, “at least we belonged to somebody.
We were poor and wore our clothes a long time, and
had shabby shoes and couldn’t go on excursions; but
we had our own little bench by the fire, and father
and mother used to talk to us and let us read their
books and papers, and try to teach us things. I don’t
know what we were going to be when we grew up,
but we were going to do some sort of work, and know
as much as father and mother did. I don’t know
whether that was a great deal or not—but it was
something.”

“Tt was enough to teach school,” said Robin. “If

we were not so far out in the country now I believe
38 Two Litre Prnertms’ PRoGRESS

Aunt Matilda would let us go to school if we asked
her. It wouldn’t cost her anything if we went to the
public school.”

“She wouldn’t if we didn’t ask her,” said Meg.
“She would never think of it herself. Do you know
what I was thinking yesterday. I was looking at
the pigs in their sty. Some of them were eating, and ©
one was full and was lying down going to sleep.
And I said to myself, ‘Robin and I are just like you.
We live just like you. We eat our food and go to
bed, and get up again and eat some more food. We
don’t learn anything more than you do, and we are
not worth so much to anybody—we are not even
worth killing at Christmas.”

If they had never known any other life, or if Nature

had not given them the big, questioning eyes, and
square little jaws and strong nervous little fists, they
might have been content to sink into careless idleness
and apathy. No one was actively unkind to them—
they had their Straw Parlour and were free to amuse
themselves as they chose. But they had been made
of the material of which the world’s workers are built,
and their young hearts were full of a restlessness and
longing whose full significance they themselves did
not comprehend.

‘And the wonder working in the world beyond them,
Two Lirrte Pinerms’ Progress 39



—this huge, beautiful marvel, planned by the human
brain and carried out by mere human hands, this great
thing with which all the world seemed to them to be
throbbing, and which seemed to set no limit to itself
and prove that there was no limit to the power of
human wills and minds—this filled them with a
passion of restlessness and yearning greater than they
had ever known before.

“Tt is an enchanted thing, you know, Robin—it’s an
enchanted thing,” Meg said one day, looking up from
her study of some newspaper clippings and a magazine
with some pictures in it.

“Tt seems like it,” said Robin.

“Tm sure it’s enchanted,” Meg went on. “It scems
so tremendous that people should think they could do
such huge things—as if they felt as if they could do
anything or bring anything from anywhere in the
world! It almost frightens me sometimes, because it
reminds me of the Tower of Babel. Don’t you re-
member how the people got so proud that they thought
they could do anything—and they began to build
the tower that was to reach to heaven. And then
they all woke up one morning and found they
were all speaking different languages, and could not
understand each other. Suppose everybody was
suddenly struck like that some morning now—I.
40 Two Lirrite Pincgrims’ PRoGREss



mean the Fair people,” widening her eyes with a

little shiver. 7
“They won't be,” said Rob. “Those things have

stopped happening.” ,

«Yes, they have,” said Meg. “Sometimes I wish
they hadn’t. If they hadn’t—perhaps—perhaps if we
made burnt-offerings, we might be taken by a miracle
to see the World’s Fair.”

“We haven’t anything to burn,” said Rob rather
gloomily. ,

“We've got the chickens,” Meg answered as
gloomily, “but it wouldn’t do any good. Miracles
are over.”

“The world is all different,’ said Robin. “ You
have to do your miracle yourself.”

“Tt will be a miracle,” Meg said, “if we ever get
away from Aunt Matilda’s world, and live like people
instead of like pigs who are comfortable; and we
shall have to perform it ourselves.”

“There is no one else,’ said Robin. “You see there
is no one else in the world.”

He threw out his hand and clutched Meg’s, which
was lying on the straw near him. He did not know
why he clutched it; he did not in the least know why,
nor did she know why a quecr sound in his voice

suddenly made her feel their unfriendedness in a way
Two LirrLte Pinerims’ PRocress 41



that overwhelmed her. She found herself looking
at him with a hard lump rising in her throat. It was
one of the rainy days, and the hollow drumming and
patter of the big drops on the roof seemed somehow
to shut them in with their loneliness away from all
the world.

“Tt’s a strange thing,” she said, almost under her
breath, “to be two children—only just twelve years
old—and to be quite by ourselves in such a big world,
where there are such millions and millions of people
all busy doing things and making great plans, and
none of them knowing about us or caring what we
are going to do.”

“Tf we work our miracle ourselves,” said Rob, hold-
ing her hand quite tight, “it will be better than
having it worked for us. Meg!” as if he were begin-
ning a new subject, “Meg!”

“What?” she answered, still feeling the hard lump
in her throat.

“Do you think we are going to stay here always?”

“JT—oh, Robin, I don’t know.”

“Well, I do then. We are not—and that’s the
first step up the Hill of Difficulty.”
CHAPTER IV

A STEP HIGHER

in unison.. When they had been tiny
creatures they had played the same



games and used the same toys. It
had seemed of little importance that their belongings
were those of a boy and girl. When Robin had
played with tops and marbles, Meg had played with
them too. When Meg had been in a domestic and
maternal mood, and had turned to dolls and dolls’
housekeeping, Robin had assumed some masculine
role connected with the amusement. It had enter-
tained him as much at times to be the dolls’ doctor,
or the carpenter who repaired the dolls’ furniture, or
made plans for the enlargement of the dolls’ house,
as it had entertained Meg to sew the flags and dress
the sailors who manned his miniature ships, and assist
him with the tails of his kites. They had had few
playmates, and had pleased each other far better than

outsiders could have done.
42
Two Lirrte Pruarims’ Procress 43



“It’s because we are twins,’ Meg said. “Twins are
made alike, and so they like the same things. I’m
glad I'ma twin. IfI had to be born again and be
an un-twin, I’m sure I should be lonely.”

“T don’t think it matters whether you are a boy or
a girl if you are a twin,” said Robin, “you are a part
of the other one, and so it’s as if you were both.”

They had never had secrets from each other. They
had read the same books as they grew older, been
thrilled by the same stories, and shared in each other's
plans and imaginings or depressions. So it was a
curious thing that at this special time, when they were
drawn nearer to one another by an unusual interest
and sympathy, there should have arrived a morning
when each rose with a thought unshared by the other.

Aunt Matilda was very busy that day. She was
always busy, but this morning seemed more actively
occupied than usual. She never appeared to sit down
unless to dispose of a hurried meal or go over accounts.
She was a wonderful woman, and the twins knew that
the most objectionable thing they could do was not
to remove themselves after a repast was over. But
this morning Meg walked over to a chair and firmly
sat down in it and watched her as she vigorously
moved things about, rubbed dust off them and put them
into their right places. “
44 Two Litre Piterims’ Progress



Meg’s eyes were fixed on her very steadily. She

wondered if it was true that she and Robin were like





‘HOW OLD WERE You WHEN YOU BEGAN TO WORK?”

her, and if they would be more like her when they
Two Litre Pruerms’ Procress 45



had reached her age, and what would have happened
to them before that time came. It was true that
Aunt Matilda had a square jaw also. It was not an
encouraging thing to contemplate. In fact, as she
looked at her, Meg felt her heart begin a slow, steady
thumping. But as it thumped she was getting herself
in hand with such determination that when she at last
spoke her chin looked very square indeed, and her
black-lashed eyes were as nearly stern as a child’s
eyes can look.

“ Aunt Matilda,” she said suddenly.

“Well,” and a tablecloth was whisked off and
shaken.

“JT want to talk to you.”

“Talk in a hurry then—I’ve no time to waste in
tall.”

“ How old were you when you began to work and
make money ?”

Aunt Matilda smiled grimly.

“T worked out for my board when I was ten years
old,” she said. “Me and your father were left orphans
and we had to work—or starve. When I was twelve
I got a place to wash dishes and look after children
and run errands, and I got fifty cents a week, because

it was out in the country and girls wouldn't stay
there.”
46 Two Lirrite Pinerims’ Progress



“Do you know how old J am?” asked Meg.
“Tve forgotten.”

“T’m twelve years old.” She got up from her chair
and walked across the room and stood looking up at
Aunt Matilda. “Tm an orphan too, and so is Robin,”
she said, “and we have to work. You give us a place
to stay in, but—there are other things. We have no
one, and we have to do things ourselves. And we are
twelve—and twelve is a good age for people who have
to do things for themselves. Is there anything in this
house—or in the dairy—or on the farm—that would
be worth wages—that I could do? I don’t care how
hard it is, if I can do it.” ;

If Aunt Matilda had been a woman of sentiment,
she might have been moved by the odd, unchildish
tenseness and sternness of the little figure, and. the
straight, gazing eyes which looked up at her from
under the thick black hair tumbling in short locks
over the forehead. Twelve years old was very young
to stand and stare the world in the face with such
eyes. But she was not a woman of sentiment, and
her life had been spent among people who knew their
right to live could only be won by hard work, and
who began the fight early. So she looked at the
child without any emotion whatever.

“Do you suppose you could more than earn your
Two Litrte Pincrims’ Procress 47



board if I put you in the dairy and let you help
there?” she said.

“Yes,” answered. Meg unflinchingly. “I know I
could. I’m strong for my age, and I’ve watched them
doing things there. I can wash pans and bowls and
cloths, and carry things about, and go anywhere I’m
told. I know how clean things have to be kept.”

“ Well,” said Aunt Matilda, looking her over sharply,
“they have, been complaining about the work being
too much for them lately. You go in there this
morning and see what you can do. You shall have
fifty cents a week, if yowre worth it. You're right
about its being time that you should begin earning
something.”

“Thank you, ma’am,” said Meg, and she turned
round and walked away in the direction of the dairy,
with two deep red spots on her cheeks, and her heart
thumping again — though this time it thumped
quickly.

She reached the scene of action in the midst of a
rush of work, and after their first rather exasperated
surprise at so immature and inexperienced a creature
being supposed to be able to help them, the women
found plenty for her to do. She said so few words
and looked so little afraid that she made a sort of

impression on them.
48 Two Lirrte Prices’ PRoGREsS



“See,” she said to the head woman, “ Aunt Matilda
didn’t send me to do things that need teaching. Just
tell me the little things—it doesn’t matter what—and
Pll do them. I can.”

How she worked that morning—how she ran on
errands—how she carried this and that—how she
washed and scrubbed milk pans—and how all her
tasks were menial and apparently trivial though
entirely necessary, and how the activity and rapidity
and unceasingness of them tried her unaccustomed
young body, and finally made her limbs ache and her
back feel as if it might break at some unexpected
moment,—Meg never forgot. But such was the
desperation of her indomitable little spirit, and the
unconquerable will she had been born with, that when
it was over she was no more in the mood for giving
up than she had been when she walked in among the
workers after her interview with Aunt Matilda.

When dinner-time came she walked up to Mrs.
Macartney, the manager of the dairy work, and asked
her a question.

“ Have I helped you?” she said.

“Yes, you have,” said the woman, who was by no
means an ill-natured creature for a hard - driven
woman. “You’ve done first-rate.” .

“Will you tell Aunt Matilda that?” said Meg.
Two Lirrte Pinerims’ Progress 49

“Yes,” was the answer.

Meg was standing with her hands clasped tightly
behind her back, and she looked at Mrs. Macartney
very straight and hard from under her black brows.

“Mrs. Macartney,” she said, “if I’m worth it, Aunt
Matilda will give me fifty cents a week—and it’s time
I began to work for my living. Am I worth that
much ?”

“Yes, you are,” said Mrs. Macartney, “if you go
on as you've begun.”

“T shall go on as I’ve begun,” said Meg. “Thank
you, ma’am.” And she walked back to the house.

After dinner she waited to speak to Aunt Matilda
again.

“T went to the dairy,” she said.

“T know you did,” Aunt Matilda answered. “Mrs.
Macartney told me about it. You can go on. I'll give
you the fifty cents a week.”

She looked the child over again as she had done in
the morning, but with a shade of expression which
might have meant a touch of added interest. Perhaps
her mind paused just long enough to bring back to
her the time when she had been a worker at twelve
years old, and also had belonged to no one.

“She'll make her living,” she said, as she watched

Meg out of the room. “She’s more like me than she
7
50 Two Lirrite Pinerims’ PROGRESS



is like her father. Robert wasn’t worthless, but he
had no push.”

Having made quite sure that she was not wanted
in the dairy for the time being, Meg made her way to
the barn. She was glad to find it empty, so that she
could climb the ladder without waiting. When she
reached the top and clambered over the straw the
scent of it seemed delightful to her. It was like
something welcoming her home. She threw herself
down full length in the Straw Parlour. Robin had
not been at dinner. He had gone out early, and had
not returned. As she lay stretching her tired limbs
and staring up at the nest in the dark tent-like roof
above her, she hoped he would come. And he did.
In about ten minutes she heard the signal from the
barn floor, and answered it. Robin came up the ladder
rather slowly. When he made his way over the straw
to her corner and threw himself down beside her, she
saw that he was tired too. They talked a few minutes
about ordinary things, and then Meg thought she
would tell him about the dairy. But it appeared
that he had something to tell himself, and he began
first. .

“T’ve been making a plan, Meg,” he said.

“Have you?” said Meg. “ What is it?”

“Tve been thinking about it for two or three days,”
Two Lirtte Pinertms’ Progress 51



he went on; “but I thought I wouldn’t say anything
about it until—till I tried how it would work.”

Meg raised herself on her elbow and looked at him
curiously. It seemed so queer that he should have
had a plan too.

“Have you—tried ?” she said.

“Yes,” he answered. “I have been working for
Jones this morning, and I did quite a lot. I worked
hard. I wanted him to see what I could do. And
then—Meg, I asked him if he would take me on—like
the rest of the hands—and pay me what I was worth.”

“ And what did he say?” said Meg breathlessly.

“He looked at me a minute all over, and half
laughed, and I thought he was going to say I wasn’t
worth anything. It wouldn’t have been true, but I
thought he might because I’m only twelve years old.
It’s pretty hard to be only twelve when you want to
get work. But he didn’t; he said, ‘Well I’m darned
if I won’t give you a show. And I’m to have fifty
cents a week.”

“Robin!” Meg cried, with a gasp of excitement.
“So am I.”

“So are you?” cried Robin, and sat bolt upright.
“You!”

“Tt?s—it’s because we are twins,” said Meg, her eyes

shining like lamps. “I told you twins did things
52 Two Lirrte Pinerims’ PRoGcREss

alike, because they couldn’t help it. We have both
thought of the same thing. I went to Aunt Matilda,
asked her to let me work somewhere—and pay me—
and she let me go into the dairy and try. And Mrs.
Macartney said I was a help—and I am to have
fifty cents a week, if I go on as I've begun.”

Robin’s hand gave hers a clutch just as it had done
before—that day when he had not known why.

“Meg, I believe,” he said—*I believe that we two
will always go on as we begin—I believe we were born
that way. We have to. We can’t help it. And a
dollar a week—if they keep us, and we save it all—
could go—almost anywhere some time.”
_ Meg’s eyes were fixed on him with a searching but
half-frightened expression.

“ Almost anywhere,” she said quite in a whisper—
“anywhere not more than two hundred miles away.”
CHAPTER V

HUMAN BEINGS CAN DO ANYTHING THEY SET THEIR
MINDS TO

HEY did not tell each other of the
strange and bold thought which had
leaped up in their minds that day.



d Each felt an unwonted shyness about
it, —— because it had been in each mind, and,
hidden though it was, it remained furtively in both.

They went on exactly as they had begun. Each
morning Meg went to her drudgery in the dairy, and
Robin followed Jones whithersoever duty led. If the
older people had imagined they would get tired and
give up, they found out their mistake. That they
were often tired was true, but that in either there
arose once the thought of giving up—never! And
they worked hard. The things they did to earn their
weekly stipend would have touched the heart of a
mother of cared-for children; but on Mrs. Jennings’
model farm, people knew how much work a human

being could do when necessity drove. They were all
53
54 Two Lirrtu Pircrims’ ProGcress



driven by necessity, and it was nothing new to know
that muscles ached and feet swelled and burned. In
fact they knew no one who did not suffer as a rule
from these small inconveniences. And these children,
with their set little faces and mature intelligence,
were somehow so unsuggestive of the weakness and
limitations of childhood, that they were often given
work which was usually intrusted only to older
people. Mrs. Macartney found that Meg never
slighted anything, never failed in a task, and never
forgot one, so she gave her plenty to do. Scrubbing
and scouring that others were glad to shirk fell to
her share. She lifted and dragged things about that
grown-up girls grumbled over. What she lacked
in muscle and size, she made up in the indomitable
will-power that made her small face set itself, and
her small body become rigid as iron. Her work ended
by not confining itself to the dairy, but extended to
the house, the kitchen—anywhere where there were
tiresome things to be done.

With Robin it was the same story. Jones was not
afraid to give him any order. He was of use in all
quarters; in the huge fields, in the barn, in the
stables, and as a messenger to be trusted to trudge
any distance when transport was not available.

They both grew thin but sinewy looking, and their
Two Litrte Pirerms’ Progress 55

faces had a rather strained look. Their always
large, bright eyes seemed to grow bigger, and their
little square jaws looked more square every day; but
on Saturday nights they each were paid their fifty
cents, and climbed to the Straw Parlour and unburied
the Treasure, and added to it.

Those Saturday nights were wonderful things. To
the end of life they would never forget them. Through _
all the tired hours of labour they were looked forward
to. Then they lay in their nest of straw and talked
things over. There it seemed that they could relax
and rest their limbs as they could do it nowhere else,
Mrs. Jennings was not given to sofas and easy-chairs,
and it is not safe to change position often when one
has a grown-up bedfellow. But in the straw they
could loll at full length, curl up or stretch out just as
they pleased, and there they could enlarge upon the
one subject that filled their minds and fascinated and
enraptured them.

Who could wonder that it was so! The City
Beautiful was growing day by day, and the develop-
ment of its glories was the one thing they heard
talked of. Robin had continued his habit of collecting
every scrap of newspaper referring to it. He still
cut them out of Aunt Matilda’s old papers; he begged

them from everyone—neighbours, storekeepers, work
56 Two Litre Prnerims’ PRoGREsS

hands. When he was sent on errands he cast all-
embracing glances round every place his orders took
him to. The postmaster of the nearest village
discovered his weakness, and saved paragraphs and
whole papers for him. Before very long there was
buried near the Treasure a treasure even more
valuable of newspaper cuttings, and on the wonderful
Saturday nights they gave themselves up to revelling
in them.

How they watched it and followed it and lived
with it—this great human scheme, which somehow
seemed to their young minds more like the scheme
of giants and genii! How they seized upon every
new story of its wonders, and felt that there could
be no limit to them! They knew every purpose and
plan connected with it,—every arch and tower and
wall and stone they pleased themselves by fancying.
Newspapers were liberal with information. People
talked of it, they heard of it on every side. To them
it seemed that the whole world must be thinking of
nothing else.

“While we are lying here,” Meg said—* while you
are doing chores and I am scouring pans and scrubbing
things, it is all going on. People in France and in
England and in Italy are doing work to send to

it. Artists are painting pictures and machinery is
Two LirrLe Pincers’ PRoGREsS 57

whirring and making things—and everything is pour-
ing in to that one wonderful place. And men and
women planned it, you know—just men and women.
And if we live a few years we shall be men and
women; and they were once children like us—only—
if they had been quite like us, they would never
have known enough to do anything.”

“But when they were children like us,” said Robin,
“they did not know what they would have learned
by this time, and they never dreamed abcut this.”

“That shows how wonderful men and women are,”
said Meg. “I believe they can do anything, if they
set their minds to it”; and she said it stubbornly.

“Perhaps they can,” said Robin slowly. “Perhaps
we could do anything we set our minds to.”

There was the suggestive tone in his voice which
Meg had been thrilled by more than once before. She
had been thrilled by it most strongly when he had
‘said that if they saved their dollar a week they
might be able to go almost anywhere. Unconsciously
she responded to it now.

“Tf I could do anything I set my mind to,” she
said, “do you know what I would set my mind to
first ?”

“ What ?”

“T would set my mind to going to that wonderful
8
58 Two LirrLte Piterims’ PrRoaress

place. I would set it to seeing everything there—and
remembering all I could hold—and learning all there
was to be learned—and I would set at hard !”

“So would J,” said Robin.

It was a more suggestive voice than before he said
the words in, and suddenly he got up and went and
tore away the straw from the burying-place of the
Treasure. He took out the old iron bank and brought
it back to their corner.

He did it so suddenly and with such a determined
air that Meg rather lost her breath.

“What are you going to do with the Treasure?”
she asked.

“T am going to count it.”

“Why?”

He was opening the box, using the blade of a stout
pocket-knife as a screw-driver.

“A return ticket to Chicago costs $9.55,” he said.
“T asked at the depot. That would be $19.10 for two
people. Anyone who is careful can live on a very
little for a while. I want to see if we shall have
money enough to go.”

“To go?” Meg cried out. “Tothe Fair? Robin!”

She could not believe the evidence of her ears. It
sounded so daring.

“Nobody would take us!” she said, “Even if we
Two Lirrte Piterims’ Progress 59

had money enough to pay for ourselves —nobody
would take us.”

“Take!” answered Robin, working at his screws.
“No, nobody would. What’s the matter with taking
ourselves ?”

Meg sat up in the straw, conscious of a sort of
shock.

“To go by ourselves! like grown-up people! To

. buy our tickets ourselves and get on the train and go
all the way alone—and walk about the Fair alone!
Robin !”

“Who takes care of us here?” answered Robin.
“ Who has looked after us ever since father and mother
died? Ourselves! just ourselves! Whose business
are we but our own! Who thinks of us or asks if
we are happy or unhappy?”

“Nobody,” said Meg, and she hid her face in her
arms on her knees.

Robin went on stubbornly.

“Nobody is ever going to do it,” he said, “if we
live to be hundreds of years old. I’ve thought of it
when I’ve been working in the field with Jones, and

_ I’ve thought of it when I’ve been lying awake at
night. It’s kept me awake many and many a time.”

“So it has me,” said Meg.

“And since this thing began to be talked about
60 Two Lirrte Piterims’ Progress



everywhere I’ve thought of it more and more,” said
Rob. “It means more to people like us than it does
to anyone else. It’s the people who never see things,
and who have no chances, it means the most to. And
the more I think of it the more I—I won't let it go
by me.” And all at once he threw himself face down-
ward on the straw and hid his face in his arms.

Meg lifted hers. There was something in the
woeful desperation of his movement that struck her
to the heart. She had never known him do such a
thing in their lives before. That was not his way.
Whatsoever hard thing had happened — howsoever
lonely and desolate they had felt, he had never shown
his feelings this way. She put out her hand and
touched his shoulder.

“Robin,” she said—“ Oh, Robin !”

“T don’t care,” he said from the refuge of his
sleeves; “we are little when we are compared with
grown-up people. They would call us children—and
children usually have someone to help them—tell them
what to do. I’m only like this because I’ve been
thinking so much—and working so hard—and it
does seem like an enchanted city; but no one ever
thinks we could care about it any more than if we
were cats and dogs. It was not like that at home,
even if we were poor.” Then he sat up with as little
Two Lirrte Pincers’ Progress 61



warning as he had thrown himself down, and gave his
eyes a fierce rub. He returned to the Treasure again.

“Tve been making up my mind to it for days,” he
said. “If we have the money we can buy our tickets
and go some night without saying anything to any-
one. We can leave a note for Aunt Matilda to tell
her we are all right and we are coming back. She'll
be too busy to mind.”

“Do you remember that book of father’s we read,”
said Meg—* that one called David Copperfield? David
ran away from the bottle place when he was younger
than we are—and he had to walk all the way to
Dover.”

“We shall not have to walk, and we won’t let any-
one take our money away from us,” said Robin.

“ Are we going really?” said Meg. “You speak as
if we were truly going—and it can’t be!”

“Do you know what you said just now about
believing human beings could do anything if they set
their minds to it? Let’s set our minds to it.”

“Well,” Meg answered rather slowly, as if weighing
the matter—* Let's!”

And she fell to helping to count the Treasure.
CHAPTER VI

“BURDENS DON’T FALL OFF BY
THEMSELVES ”

Ze FTERWARDS when they looked back
upon that day, they knew that the
thing had decided itself then, though
neither of them had said so.

«The truth was,” Robin used to say, “we had both
been thinking the same thing as we always do, but



we had been thinking it in the back part of our
minds. We were afraid to let it come to the front at
first, because it seemed such a big thing. But it went
on thinking by itself. That time when you said, ‘We
shall never see it!’ and I said, ‘How do you know?’
we were both thinking about itin one way. And I
know I was thinking about it when I said, ‘ We are
not going to stay here always. That is the first step
up the Hill of Difficulty,”

“ And that day when you said you would not let it
go by you,” Meg would answer, “that was the day we

reached the Wicket Gate.”
62
Two LittLte Pinaris’ PRoGRESS 63



It seemed very like it, for from that day their
strange unchildish purpose grew and ripened, and
never for an hour was absent from the mind of either.
If they had been like other children, living happy
lives full of young interests and pleasures, it might
have been crowded out by other and nearer things;
if they had been of a slighter mental build, and less
strong, they might have forgotten it. But they never
did. When they had counted the Treasure, and had
realised how small it was after all, they had sat and
gazed at each other for a while with grave eyes, but
they had only been grave and not despairing.

“Fifteen dollars,’ said Robin. “Well, that’s not
much after nearly six years; but we saved it, nearly
all, by cents, you know, Meg.”

“And it takes a hundred cents to make a dollar,”
said Meg, “and we were poor people’s children.”

“ And we bought the chickens,” said Robin.

“And you have always given me a present at
Christmas, Robin, even if it was only a little one.
That’s six Christmases.”

“We have nine months to work in,” said Robin,
calculating. “If you get two dollars a month, and I
get two, that will be thirty-six dollars by next June.
Fifteen dollars and thirty-six dollars make fifty-one.

I believe we could go on that—and come back. I
64 Two Litre Pinerims’ PRoGREss

suppose we shall have to come back,” with a long
breath.

“Oh, dear!’ cried Meg; “how can we come back !”

“T don’t know,” said Robin. “We shall hate it, but
we shall have nowhere else to go.”

“Perhaps we are going to seek our fortunes, and
perhaps we shall find them,” said Meg; “or perhaps
Aunt Matilda won’t let us come back, Rob,” with
some awe. “Do you think she will be angry?”

“T’ve thought about that,’ Robin answered contem-
platively. “And I don’t think she will. She would
be too busy to care much even if we ran away and
said nothing. ButI shall leave a letter and tell her
we have saved our money and gone somewhere for a
holiday—and we're all right and she needn’t bother.”

“She won’t bother, even if she is angry,” Meg said,
with mournful eyes. “She doesn’t care about us
enough.”

“Tf she loved us,” Rob said, “and was too poor to
take us herself, we couldn’t go at all. We couldn’t
run away, because it would worry her so. You can’t
do a thing—however much you want to do it—if it
is going to hurt somebody who is good to you, and
cares.”

“Well, then, we needn’t stay here because of Aunt
Matilda,” said Meg. “That's one sure thing. It
Two Lirtte Prterims’ Progress 65





wouldn’t interfere with her ploughing if we were both
to die at once.”

“No,” said Rob deliberately, “that’s just what it
would not.” And he threw himself back on the straw
and clasped his hands under his head, gazing up into
the dark roof above him with very reflective eyes.

The truth was that, his elderly ways and practical
methods notwithstanding, he was an affectionate little
fellow at heart, and Meg was very like him in this
as in all other ways. Their father’s house had been
home, narrow as its resources were and few as had
been the privileges costing money they could enjoy.
They had not been a very demonstrative family, but
in a quiet unfailing way the two had been loved and
cared for. They had never felt lonely and had never
been really unhappy. What they felt every hour in
Aunt Matilda’s world was that they counted for
nothing with anybody, and were entirely superfluous ;
and the sense of this filled them with a kind of vague
misery they never exactly explained to each other,
even when they talked about the differences between
their life on the farm and their life in their own
home. Their young hearts ached many a day when
they were not quite sure why they were aching, or
that it was veritable heartache they were troubled by.

Being curiously just and given to reasoning by nature,
9
66 Two Lirrte Prnarims’ PROGRESS



they were never unfair to Aunt Matilda, and used to
try to render her what was her due when they talked
her over.

“She doesn’t beat us or scold us or ill-treat us in
any particular way,” Meg would say; “she gives us
plenty to eat, and buys us respectable clothes. If you
notice, Robin, we never wear broken shoes. We were
obliged to wear them now and then when we were at
home, because there was no money to buy new ones
until father was paid, or something like that. Our
toes never come out now.”

And this particular day, after looking up at the
roof, Robin said, “ I should like to be a bird, I believe.
Wouldn't you, Meg? Then we should have a nest.”

But they had reached the Wicket Gate, and from
the hour they passed it there was no looking back.
That in their utter friendlessness and loneliness they
should take their twelve-year-old fates in their own
strong little hands was perhaps a pathetic thing ; that,
once having done so, they moved towards their object
as steadily as if they had been of the maturest years,
was remarkable; but no one ever knew or even
suspected, from the first until the last.

The days went by full of work, which left them
little time to lie and talk in the Straw Parlour. They

could only see each other in the leisure hours which
Two LirrLte Pinerims’ Progress 67

were so few, and only came when the day was
waning.

Finding them faithful and ready, those about them
fell into the natural, easy, human unworthiness of
imposing by no means infrequently on their inex-
perienced willingness and youth. So they were hard
enough worked, but each felt that every day that
passed brought them nearer to the end in view, and
there was always something to think of, some detail
to be worked out mentally and to be discussed in the
valuable moments when they were together.

“It’s a great deal better than it used to be,” Meg
said, “at all events. It’s better to feel tired working
than to be tired of doing nothing but think, and think
dreary things.”

As the weather grew colder, it was hard enough to
keep warm in their hiding-place. They used to sit
and talk huddled close together, bundled in their
heaviest clothing, and with the straw heaped close
around them and over them. There were so many
things to be thought of and talked over. Robin
~ collected facts more sedulously than ever—facts about
entrance fees, facts about prices of things to eat, facts
about places to sleep.

“Going to the Fair yourself, sonny ?” Jones said to
him one day. Jones was fond of his joke. “You're
68 Two Lirrie Pinerims’ Progress



right to be inquirin’ round. Them hotel-keepers is
goin’ to tot up bills several storeys higher than their
hotels is themselves.”

“ But I suppose a person needn’t go to a hotel,” said
Robin. “There must be plenty of poor people who
can’t go to hotels, and they’ll have to sleep some-
where.”

“Oh, there’s plenty of poor people,” responded
Jones cheerfully—*plenty of ’em. Always is. But
they won’t go to Chicago while the Fair’s on. They'll
sleep at home—that’s where they'll sleep.”

“That's the worst of it,’ Rob said to Meg after-
wards. “You see, we have to sleep somewhere. We
could live on bread and milk, or crackers and cheese,
or oatmeal, but we have to sleep somewhere.”

“Tt will be warm weather,’ Meg said reflectively.
“Perhaps we could sleep out of doors. Beggars do.
We don’t mind.”

“JT don’t think the police would let us,’ Robin
answered. “If they would—perhaps we might have
to,some night. But we are going to that place, Meg—
we are gowng.”

Yes, they believed they were going, and lived on
the belief. This being decided, howsoever difficult to
attain, it was like them both that they should dwell

upon the dream, and revel in it in a way peculiarly
Two Litre Pinertms’ PRocress 69



their own. It was Meg whose imagination was the
stronger, and it is true that it was always she who
made pictures in words and told stories. But Robin
was always as ready to enter into the spirit of her
imaginings as she was to talk about them. There
was a word he had once heard his father use which
had caught his fancy—in fact, it had attracted them
both, and they applied it to this favourite pleasure
of theirs of romancing with everyday things. The
word was “ philander.”

“Now we have finished adding up and making
plans,” he would say, putting his ten cent account-
book into his pocket, “let us philander about it.”

And then Meg would begin to talk about the City
Beautiful—a City Beautiful which was a wonderful
and curious mixture of the enchanted one the whole
world was pouring its treasures into two hundred
miles away, and that City Beautiful of her own,
which she had founded upon the one towards which
Christian had toiled through the Slough of Despond —
and up the Hill of Difficulty and past Doubting
Castle. Somehow one could scarcely tell where one
ended and the others began, they were so much alike,
these three cities — Christian’s, Meg’s, and the fair
ephemeral one the ending of the nineteenth century
had built upon the blue lake’s side,
70 Two Littte Pinartms’ Progress



“They must look alike,” said Meg. “I am sure
they must. See what it says in the Pilgrim’s
Progress: ‘Now just as the gates were opened to let
in the men, I looked in after them, and behold, the
city shone like the sun’; and then it says, ‘ The talk
they had with the shining ones was about the glory
of the place, who told them that the beauty and
glory of it were inexpressible. I always think of it,
Robin, when I read about these places like white
palaces and temples and towers that are being built.
I am so glad they are white. Think how the city
will ‘shine like the sun, when it stands under the
blue sky and by the blue water on a sunshiny day.”

They had never read the dear, old, worn Pilgrim’s
Progress as they did in those days. They kept it in
the straw near the treasure, and always had it at
hand to refer to. In it they seemed to find parallels
for everything

“ Aunt Matilda’s world is the City of Destruction,”
Meg would say; “and our loneliness and poorness are
like Christian’s ‘burden.’ We have to carry it like a
heavy weight, and it holds us back.”

“What was it that Goodwill said to Christian
about it?” Robin asked.

Meg turned over the pages. She knew all the

places by heart. It was easy enough to find and read
Two Litrte Pineris’ Progress 71

how, “At last there came a grave person to the gate,
named Goodwill,” and in the end he said—

“ As to thy burden, be content to bear it, until thou
comest to the place of deliverance; for there it will
fall from thy back itself.”

“But out of the Pilgrim’s Progress,’ Robin said,
with his reflective air, “burdens don’t fall off by
themselves. If you are content with them they stick
on and get bigger. Ours would, I know. You have
to do something yourself to get them off. But’”—
with a little pause for thought—“I like that part,
Meg. And I like Goodwill because he told it to him.
It encouraged him, you know. You see, it says
next, ‘Then Christian began to gird up his loins and
addressed himself to his journey.’ ”

“ Robin,” said Meg suddenly, shutting the book and
giving it a little thump on the back, “it’s not only
Christian’s city that is like our city. We are like
Christian. We are pilgrims, and our way to that

place is our Pilgrims’ Progress.”
CHAPTER VII

HAND IN HAND THEY WENT OUT ON THE ROAD
TOGETHER



SGA 2S ND the cold days of hard work kept
going by, and the City Beautiful grew,
{. and huddled close together in the straw
; the children planned and dreamed, and
read and re-read the Pilgrim's Progress, following
Christian step by step. And Aunt Matilda became
busier every day it seemed, and did not remember
that they were alive, except when she saw them.
And nobody guessed, and nobody knew.

Days so quickly grew to weeks, and weeks slip by
so easily until they are months, and at last there came
a time when Meg, going out in the morning, felt a
softer air, and stopped a moment by a bare tree to
breathe ‘it in and feel its lovely touch upon her
cheek. She turned her face upward with a half-
involuntary movement, and found herself looking at
such a limitless vault of tender blueness, that her

~ heart gave a quick throb, a seemed to spring up to
2 .
Two Lirrie Pinerims’ PRoGREss Uo



it and carry her with it. For a moment it seemed as
if she had left the earth far below, and was soaring
in the soft depths of blueness themselves. And
suddenly, even as she felt it, she heard, on the top-
most branch of the bare tree, a brief little rapturous
trill, and her heart gave a leap again, and she felt her
cheeks grow warm.

“Tt is a bluebird,” she said—*“it is a bluebird, and
it is the Spring, and that means that the time is quite
near.”

She had a queer little smile on her face all day as
she worked. She did not know it was there herself,
but Mrs. Macartney saw it.

“What’s pleasing you so, Meggy, my girl?” she
asked.

Meg wakened up with a sort of start.

“J don’t know exactly,” she said.

“You don’t know,” said the woman good-naturedly.
. You look as if you were thinking over a secret, and
it was a pleasant one.”

That evening it was not cold when they sat in the
Straw Parlour, and Meg told Robin about the bluc-
bird.

“Tt gave me a strange feeling to hear it,” she said.
“It seemed as if it was speaking to me. It said,

2”

‘You must get ready; it is quite near.
10
V4. Two Lirrte Pincers PROGRESS

They had made up their minds that they would go
in June, before the weather became so hot that they
might suffer from it.

“Because we have to consider everything,” was
Robin’s idea. “We shall be walking about all the
time, and we have no cool clothes, and we shall have
no money to buy cool things, and if we should be ill,
it would be worse for us than for children who have
someone with them.”

In the little aceount-book, they had calculated all
they should own on the day their pilgrimage began.
They had apportioned it all out—so much for the
price of the railroad tickets, so much for entrance
fees, and—not so much but so little—oh, so little, for
their food and lodging!

“T have listened when Jones and the others were
talking,” said Robin, “and they say that everybody
who has room to spare and wants to make money is
going to let every corner they have. So you see
there will be sure to be people who have quite poor
places that they would be obliged to rent cheap to
people who are poor like themselves. We will go
through the small side streets and look.”

The first bluebird came again day after day, and
others came with it, until the swift dart of blue wings

through the air and the delicious ripple of joyous
Two Lirrte Piterims’ Procress 75



sound were no longer rare things. The days grew
warmer, and the men threw off their coats and began
to draw their shirt sleeves across their foreheads when
they were at work.

One evening when Robin came up into the Straw
Parlour he brought something with him. It was a
battered old tin coffee-pot.

“What is that for?” asked Meg; for he seemed to
carry it as if it was of some value.

“Tt’s old and rusty, but there are no holes in it,”
Robin answered. “I saw it lying in a fence corner
where someone had thrown it—perhaps a tramp—
and it put a new thought into my head. It will do
to boil eggs in.”

“Kegs?” said Meg.

“'There’s nothing much nicer than hard-boiled eggs,”
said Robin; “and you can carry them about with you.
It just came into my mind that we could take some of
our eggs, and go somewhere where no one would be
likely to see us, and build a fire of sticks and boil
some eggs and carry them with us to eat.”

“Robin,” cried Meg, with admiring ecstasy, “I wish
I had thought of that.”

“Tt doesn’t matter which of us thought of it,” said
Rob; “it’s all the same.”

So it was decided that, when the time came, they
76 Two Lirrte Pingrims’ PROGRESS

should boil their supply of eggs very hard, and roll
them up in pieces of paper, and tuck them away
carefully in the one small bag which was to carry all
their necessary belongings. These belongings would
be very few—just enough to keep them decent and
clean, and a brush and comb between them. They
used to lie in bed at night with beating hearts,
thinking it all over, sometimes awakening in a cold
perspiration from a dreadful dream, in which Aunt
Matilda, or Jones or some of the hands, had discovered
their secret and confronted them with it in all its
daring. They were so full of it night and day that
Meg used to wonder that people about them did not
see it in their faces.

“They are not thinking of us,” said Robin. “They
are thinking about crops. I-daresay Aunt Matilda
would like to see the agricultural building, but she
couldn’t waste the time to go through the others.”

Ah, what a day it was! what a thrilling, almost
unbearably joyful day, when Robin gathered sticks
and dried bits of branches, and piled them in a corner
of a field far enough from the house and out-buildings
to be quite safe. He did it in the noon hour, and
as he passed Meg on his way back to his work, he
whispered—

“JT have got the sticks for the fire all ready.”
Two Lirrte Pinerims’ PRoGREss 77

The Slemonts of forethought and executive ability,
which were so strong in them, and which had enabled
them to plan this unusual and unchildish thing,
prevented their committing any of the youthful indis-
cretions which might have betrayed them, through
suggesting to outsiders that they were engaged in
something more than their everyday amusements and
pursuits. If they had exchanged significant glances,
which someone might have intercepted, they would
have been in danger, even though they had been
usually so little observed; if they had been seen in
unusual places, or doing unusual things, somebody
might have asked questions in these days, because it
was the natural result of their new employment that
they were thrown more frequently among those
working in various capacities on the farm. Men and
women were intimate with them in these days who
had scarcely noticed their existence or known their
names before the days of Meg’s work in the dairy and
Robin’s service under Jones. And it was noticeable
that no one worked near them without liking and
feeling friendly towards them. They showed such a
steady intention of doing their best and most, and
such readiness to help others to accomplish their best
and most also ; and, accordingly, the hands had begun
to notice them, and occasionally joined one or other of
78 Two Lirrte Priertms’ PRoGRESS



them as they left the table, and talked with them a
little.

So this eventful evening they lingered about until
all the rest had gone, and even went their way with
cautious glances about them when they crept out
after supper to their trysting-place with matches, the
battered old coffee-pot, and the eggs.



MEG LOOKED RATHER LIKE A LITTLE WITCH AS SHE STOOD OVER
THE BUBBLING OLD POT,

As they made their preparations, they found them-
selves talking in whispers, though there was not’ the
least chance of anyone hearing them. Meg looked
rather like a little witch as she stood over the
Two Lirrte Pincrims’ Progress 79





bubbling old pot, with her strange little dark face and
shining eyes and black elf locks.

“Tt’s like making a kind of sacrifice on an altar,”
she said.

“ You always think queer things about everything,
don’t you?” said Robin. “But they’re all right. I
don’t think them myself, but I like them.”

When the eggs were boiled hard enough, they
carried them to the barn, and hid them in the Straw
Parlour near the Treasure. Then they sat and talked,
in whispers still, almost trembling with joy.

“Somehow, do you know,” Meg said, “it feels as if
we were going to do something more than just go to
the Fair. When people in stories go to seek their
fortunes, ’m sure they feel like this. Does it give
you a kind of creeping in your stomach whenever you
think of it, Rob?”

“Yes, it does,” Robin whispered back, “and when it
comes into my mind suddenly, something gives a queer
jump inside me.”

“That's your heart,” said Meg. “Robin, if any-
thing should stop us, I believe I should drop dead !”

“No, you wouldn’t,” was Rob’s answer; “but it’s
better not to let ourselves think about it. And I
don’t believe anything as bad as that could happen.
We've worked so hard—and we have nobody but
80 Two LirrLte Pincers’ Progress

ourselves—and it can’t do anyone any harm, and we
don’t want to do anyone any harm. There must be
something that wouldn’t let it be!”

“T believe that too,” said Meg; and this time it was
she who clutched at Robin’s hand, but he seemed glad
she did, and held as close as she.

And then, after the bluebirds had sung a few
times more, there came a night when Meg crept out of
her cot, after she was sure that the woman in the other
bed was sleeping heavily enough. Everyone went to
bed early, and everyone slept through the night in
heavy, tired sleep. Too much work was done on the
place to allow people to waste time in sleeplessness.
Meg knew no one would waken as she crept down-
stairs to the lower part of the house, and softly opened
the back-door.

Robin was standing outside with the little leather
satchel in his hand. It was a soft, warm night, and
the dark blue sky was full of the glitter of stars.
Both he and Meg stood still a moment and looked up.

“Tm glad it’s like this,” Meg said; “it doesn’t seen
so lonely. Is your heart thumping, Robin ?”

“Yes, rather,” whispered Robin. “TI left the letter
in a place where Aunt Matilda will be likely to find
it some time to-morrow.”

“What did you say ?” Meg whispered back.
Two Lirrte Pincers’ Progress 81



“What I told you I was going to. There wasn’t
much to say—just told her we had saved our money
and gone away for a few days; and we were all right
and she needn’t worry.”

Everything was very still about them. There was
no moon, and but for the stars it would have been
very dark. As it was, the stillness of night and sleep,
and the sombreness of the hour, might have made
less daring little creatures feel timid and alone.

“Let us take hold of each other’s hands as we walk
along,” said Meg. “It will make us feel nearer and—
and twinner.”

And so, hand in hand, they went out on the road
together.
CHAPTER VIII

“AND WE ARE PEOPLE TOO”

yT was four miles to the depédt, but they
were good walkers. Robin hung the
satchel on a stick over his shoulder,
and they kept in the middle of the
road and walked smartly. There were not many



trees, but there were a few occasionally, and it was
pleasanter to walk where the way before them was
quite clear. And somehow they found themselves
still talking in whispers, though there was certainly
no one to overhear them.

“Let us talk about Christian,” said Meg. “It will
not seem so lonely if we are talking. I wish we
could meet Evangelist.”

“Tf we knew he was Evangelist when we met him,”
said Robin. “If we didn’t know him, we should
think he was someone who would stop us. And, after
all, you see he only showed Christian the shining
light, and told him to go to it. And we are farther
on than that. We have passed the Wicket Gate.”
Two Lirrte Piterims’ ProGRreEss 83

“The thing we want,” said Meg, “is the Roll to
read as we go on, and find out what we are to do.”

And then they talked of what was before them.
They wondered who would be at the little depdt, and
if they would be noticed, and of what the ticket-
agent would think when Robin bought the tickets.

“Perhaps he won't notice me at all,” said Rob;
“and he does not know me. Somebody might be
sending us alone, you know. We are not little
children.”

“That’s true,” responded Meg courageously. “If
we were six years old it would be different; but we
are twelve.”

It did make it seem less lonely to be talking,
and so they did not stop. And there was so much
to say.

“Robin,” broke forth Meg once, giving his hand a
sudden clutch, “we are on the way—we are govng.
Soon we shall be on the train, and it will be carrying
us nearer and nearer! Suppose it was a dream, and
we should wake up!”

“Tt isn’t a dream,” said Rob stoutly; “it’s real.
It’s—as real as Aunt Matilda.”

He was always more practical-minded than Meg.

“We needn’t philander any more,” Meg said. “It
isn’t philandering to talk about a real thing. Oh,
84 Two Lirrte Pinterims’ PRoGREss

Rob, just think of it! waiting for us under the stars
this very moment—the City Beautiful!”

And then walking close to each other in the
dimness, they told each other how they saw it in
imagination, and what its wonders would be to them,
and which they would see first, and how they would
remember it all their lives afterwards, and have
things to talk of and think of. Very few people
would see it as they would, but they did not know
that. It was not a gigantic enterprise to them, a
great scheme, fought for and struggled over for the
divers reasons poor humanity makes for itself. That
it would either make or lose money was not a side of
the question that reached them. They only dwelt on
the beauty and wonder of it, which made it seem like
an enchanted thing.

“I keep thinking of the white palaces, and that it
is like a fairy story,” Meg said ; “and that it will melt
away like those cities travellers sometimes see in the
desert ; and I wish it wouldn’t. But it will have been
real for a while, and everybody will remember it. I
am so glad it is beautiful—and white. I’m so glad it
is white, Robin!”

“And I keep thinking,” said Robin, “of all the
people who have made the things to go in it, and how
they have worked and invented. There have been
Two LirrLe Piterims’ PRoGRESS 85



some people, perhaps, who have worked months and
months making one single thing—just as we have
worked to go to see it. And, perhaps, at first they
were afraid they couldn’t do it; and they set their
minds to it as we did, and tried and tried, and then did
it at last. I like to think of those men and women,
Meg—hbecause, when the city has melted away, the
things won't melt. They will last after the people—
and we are people too. I’m a man and you are a
woman, you know, though we are only twelve; and
it gives me a strong feeling to think of those others.”

“Tt makes you think that perhaps men and women
can do anything, if they set their minds to it,” said
Meg quite solemnly. “Oh, I do like that!”

“JT like it better than anything else in the world,”
said Rob. “Stop a minute, Meg! Come here in the
shade!”

He said the last words quickly, and pulled her to
the roadside, where a big tree grew which threw a
deep shadow. He stood listening.

“Tt’s wheels,” he whispered. “There is a buggy
coming. We mustn’t let anyone see us.”

It was a buggy. They could tell that by the
lightness of the wheels, and it was coming rapidly.
They could hear voices—men’s voices, and they drew

back and stood very close to each other.
86 Two Lirritz Piterims’ PRoGREsS

“Do you think they have found out, and sent
someone after us?” whispered Meg breathlessly.

“No,” answered Robin, though his heart beat like a
trip-hammer. “No—no—no!”

The wheels drew nearer, and they heard one of the
men speaking.

“Chicago by sunrise,” he was saying. “And what
I don’t see of it won’t be worth seeing.”

The next minute the fast-trotting horse spun
swiftly down the road, and carried the voices out of
hearing. Meg and Robin drew twin sighs of relief.
Robin spoke first.

“Tt is someone who is going to the Fair,” he said.

“Perhaps we shall see him on the train,” said Meg.

“T daresay we shall,” said Robin. “It was nobody
who knows us. I didn’t know his voice. Meg, let’s
take hands again, and walk quickly. We might lose
the train.”

They did not talk much more, but walked briskly.
They had done a good day’s work before they set out,
and were rather tired, but they did not lag on that
account. Sometimes Meg took a turn at carrying the
satchel, so that Robin might rest his arm. It was not
heavy, and she was as strong for a girl as he was for
a boy.

At last they reached the depdt. There were a
Two Lirrie Pinerims’ PRoGREsS 87



number of people waiting on the platform to catch
the train to Chicago, and there were several vehicles
outside. They passed one which was a buggy, and
Meg gave Robin a nudge with her elbow.

“ Perhaps that belongs to our man,” she said.

There were people enough before the office to
give the ticket-agent plenty to do. Robin's heart
quickened a little as he passed by with the group of
maturer people, but no one seemed to observe him
particularly, and he returned to Meg with the precious
bits of pasteboard held very tight in his hand. Meg
had waited alone in an unlighted corner, and when
she saw him coming she came forward to meet
hin.

“Have you got them?” she said. “ Did anyone look
at you, or say anything ?”

“Yes, I got them,” Robin answered. “And I'll tell
you what, Meg; these people are nearly all going just
where we are going, and they are so busy thinking
about it, and attending to themselves, that they
haven’t any time to watch anyone else. That’s one
good thing.”

“And the nearer we get to Chicago,” Meg said,
“the more people there will be, and the more they
will have to think of. And at that beautiful place,

where there is so much to see, who will look at two
88 Two Lirtte Pingrims’ PRoGRess

children? I don’t believe we shall have any trouble
at all.”

It really did not seem likely that they would, but
it happened by a curious coincidence that within a
very few minutes they saw somebody looking at
them.

The train was not due for ten minutes, and there
were a few people who, being too restless to sit in the
waiting-rooms, walked up and down on the platform.
Most of these were men, and there were two men who
walked farther than the others did, and so neared
the place where Robin and Meg stood in the shadow.
One was a young man, and seemed to be listening to
instructions his companion, who was older, was giving
him in a rapid, abrupt sort of voice. This companion,
who might have been his employer, was a man of
middle age. He was robust of figure, and had a
clean-cut face, with a certain effect of strong good
looks. It was perhaps rather a hard face, but it was
a face one would look at more than once; and he too,
oddly enough, had a square jaw and straight black
brows. But it was his voice which first attracted
Robin and Meg as he neared them, talking.

“It’s the man in the buggy,” whispered Robin.
“Don’t you know his voice again?” And they watched
him with deep interest.
Two LitrrLe Pinerims’ Procress 89

He passed them once without seeming to see them
at all. He was explaining something to his com-
panion. The second time he drew near he chanced to
look up, and his eye fell on them. It did not rest on
them more than a second, and he went on speaking.
The next time he neared their part of the platform,
he turned his glance towards them as they stood close
together. It was as if involuntarily he glanced
to see if they were still where they had been
before.

“A pair of children,” they heard him say, as if the
fleeting impression of their presence arrested his train
of thought for a second. “Looks as if no one was
with them.”

He merely made the comment in passing, and
returned to his subject the next second; but Meg and
Robin heard him, and drew farther back into the
shadow.

But it was not necessary to stand there much
longer. They heard a familiar sound in the distance,
the shrill cry of the incoming train, the beloved giant
who was to carry them to fairyland. The people
began to flock out of the waiting-rooms with packages
and valises and umbrellas in hand; the porters
suddenly became alert, and hurried about attending
to their duties; the delightful roar drew nearer and

I2
90 Two LirtLte Piterims’ ProGREss

louder, and began to shake the earth—it grew louder
still; a bell began to make a cheerful tolling—people
were rushing to and fro, Meg and Robin rushed with
them—and the train was panting in the depdt.

It was even more thrilling than the children had
thought it would be. They had travelled so very little,
and did not know exactly where to go. It might not
be the right train even. They did not know how long
it would wait. It might rush away again before they
could get on. People seemed in such a hurry and so
excited. As they hurried along they found them-
selves being pushed and jostled. Before the steps of
one of the cars, a conductor stood whom people kept
showing tickets to. There were several persons round
him when Robin and Meg reached the place where he
stood. People kept asking him things, and sometimes
he passed them on and sometimes let them go into his
car.

“Ts this the train to Chicago?” said Robin
breathlessly.

But he was so much less than the other people, and
the man was so busy, he did not hear him.

Robin tried to get nearer.

“Ts this the Chicago train, sir?” he said a little
louder.

He had had to press by a man whom he had been
Two Litrte Pincers’ Progress 91



too excited to see, and the man looked down and
spoke to him,

“Chicago train?” he said in a voice which was
abrupt without being ill-natured. “Yes, you're all
right. Got your sleeping-car tickets?”

Robin looked up at him quickly. He knew the
voice, and was vaguely glad to hear it. He and Meg
had never been in a sleeping-car in their lives, and he
did not quite understand. He held out his tickets.

“We're going to sleep on the train,” he said, “but
we have nothing but these.”

“Next car but two then,” he said. “And you'd
better hurry.”

And when both voices thanked him at once, and
the two caught each other’s hands and ran towards
their car, he looked after them and laughed.

“Tm blessed if they’re not by themselves,” he said,
watching them as they scrambled up the steps. “And
they're going to the Fair, I'll beta dollar. That’s
Young America, and no mistake.”
CHAPTER IX

IT IS THE DAY!

more people than themselves who were
going to the Fair, and were to economise.
gt When the children entered and looked
about them in the dim light, they thought at first that
all the seats were full. People seemed to be huddled

up asleep or sitting up awake in all of them. Every-



body had been trying to get to sleep at least, and the
~ twins found themselves making their whispers even
lower than before.

To people unaccustomed to travel and not so
familiar with railroads and steamboats, that change
of scene and surroundings and the conveniences and
inconveniences invented for the public are old stories
and even tiresome ones, to board a train at night is
by no means an uninteresting or unexciting experience.
Upon children who have made only short journeys
by daylight, under perfectly ordinary circumstances,

it is an event likely to create a very strong impression.
92
Two Lirrte Piterims’ Progress 93

There is something even thrilling and extraordinary
in it. These two imaginative ones felt something
very like a sensation of awe when they had scrambled
up the steps, entered and found themselves standing
at the end of the car looking down the aisle to find
out if there was anywhere a vacant seat where they
might stow themselves without disturbing anybody.
. They were well-mannered children, both by nature
and as a result of their training in the modest and
restricted little household they had spent their first
years in. They had learned there, though quite un-
consciously, to respect other people’s rights as well as
their own, so they looked down the aisle to discover
where their place in it chanced to be, if they were so
lucky as to possess a place. In the seat nearest them
an old gentleman nodded with his arms folded and his
head dropping forward on his chest. He had a black
skull-cap on, and had his back against the side of the
window and his legs up on the seat, so there was no
room for even one of them there. Everybody was
making himself or herself as comfortable as possible
- under the circumstances, and this needed space. One
very big man had turned down the seat next his own
and filled it with his feet and his valise, his hat and
a very large and long overcoat. He was snoring

loudly.
94 Two Litre Prterims’ PROGRESS



“JT think there is a seat empty just behind that
very fat lady,” Meg whispered.

It was at the end of the car, and they went to it
and found she was right. They took possession of it
quietly, putting their satchel under the seat.

“Tt seems so still,” said Meg. “I feel as if I was in
somebody’s bedroom. The sound of the wheels makes
it seem all the quieter. It’s as if we were shut in by
the noise.”

“We mustn’t talk,” said Robin, “or we shall waken
the people. Can you go to sleep, Meg?”

“T can if I can stop thinking,” she answered, with a
joyful sigh. “I’m very tired—but the wheels keep
saying over and over again, ‘We're going — we're
going—we're going!’ It’s just as if they were talking.
Don’t you hear them ?”

“Yes, I do. Do they say that to you too? But
we mustn’t listen,” Robin whispered back. “If we
do, we shall not go to sleep, and then we shall be too
tired to walk about. Let’s put our heads down and
shut our eyes, Meg.”

“Well, let’s,” said Meg.

She curled herself up on the seat and put her head
into the corner.

“Tf you lean against me, Rob,” she said, “it will be
softer. We can take turns.”
Two Lirrtze Pinerims’ Progress 95

They changed position a little two or three times,
but they were worn out with the day’s work and their
walk and the excitement, and the motion of the train
seemed like a sort of rocking which lulled them.

Gradually their muscles relaxed and they settled



‘“‘IF YOU LEAN AGAINST ME, ROB,” SHE SAID, ‘‘IT WILL
BE SOFTER.”

down, though after they had done so Meg spoke once
drowsily.
“Rob,” she said, “did you see that was our man ?”
“Yes,” answered Rob very sleepily indeed; “and
he looked as if he knew us.” .

.
96 Two Lirrte Pruerims’ Progress

If they had been less young, or if they had been
less tired, they might have found themselves awake
a good many times during the night. But they were
such children! and now that the great step was taken
were so happy, and the soft, deep sleepiness of youth
descended upon and overpowered them. Once or
twice during the night they stirred, wakened for a
dreamy blissful moment by some sound of a door
shutting or a conductor passing through. But they
were only conscious of a delicious sense of strange-
ness, of the stillness of the car full of sleepers, of the
half-realised delight of feeling themselves carried
along through the unknown country, and of the rattle
of the wheels which never ceased saying rhythmically, ©
“We're going—we're going—we're going!” Oh, what
a night of dreams, and new vague sensations to be
remembered always! Oh, that heavenly sense of joy
to come, and adventure and young hopefulness and
imaginings! Were there many others carried towards
the City Beautiful that night who bore with them the
same rapture of longing and belief—who saw with
such innocent clearness only the fair and splendid
thought which had created it—and were so innocently
blind to any shadow of sordidness or mere worldly
interest touching its white walls? And after the
passing of this wonderful night, what a wakening in
Two Lirrte Pincrims’ Progress 97

the morning, at the first rosiness of dawn, when all
the other occupants of the car were still asleep or
restlessly trying to be at ease.

It was as if they both wakened at almost the same
moment. The first shaft of early sunlight streaming
in the window touched Meg’s eyelids, and she slowly
opened them. Then something joyous and exultant
rushed in upon her heart, and she sat upright—and
Robin sat up too, and they looked at each other.

“It’s the day, Meg!” said Robin,—‘it’s the day !”
Meg caught her breath.

« And nothing has stopped us,” she said. “And we
are getting nearer and nearer! Rob, let us look out
of the window.”

For a while they looked out, pressed close together
and full of such ecstasy of delight in the strangeness
of everything, that at first they did not exchange even
their whispers.

It is rather a good thing to see—rather well worth
while even for a man or woman—the day waking, and
waking the world, as one is borne swiftly through the
morning light and one looks out of a car window.
What it was to these two children only those who
remember the children who were themselves long ago
can realise at all, The country went hurrying past

them, making curious sudden revelations, and giving
13
98 ° Two Litrte Piterims’ PRoGREss

half hints in its haste; prairie and field, farmhouse
and wood and village, all wore a strange, exciting,
ravishing aspect.

“Té seems,’ Meg said, “as if it were all going
somewhere—in a great hurry—as if it couldn’t wait
to let us see it.”

“But we are the ones that are going,” said Rob.
“ Listen to the wheels—and we shall soon be there.”

After awhile the people who were asleep began to
stir and stretch themselves. Some of them looked
cross and some looked tired. The very fat lady in
the seat before them had a coal smut on her nose.

“Robin,” said Meg, after looking at her seriously
a moment, “let’s get our towel out of the bag, and '
wet it and wash our faces.”

They had taken the liberty of borrowing a towel
from Aunt Matilda. It was Meg who had thought of
it, and it had indeed been an inspiration. Robin wet
two corners of it, and they made a vigorous if limited
toilette. At least they had no smuts on their noses,
and, after a little touching-up with the mutual comb
and brush, they looked none the worse for wear.
Their plain and substantial garments were not of the
order which has any special charm to lose.

“And it’s not our clothes that are going to the
Fair,” said Meg. “It’s us.”
Two Lirrtte Pinerims’ PRoGREsS 99

And by the time they were in good order, the farms
and villages they were flying past had grown nearer
together. The platforms at the depdts were full of
people who wore a less provincial air, the houses grew
larger and so did the towns; they found themselves
flashing past advertisements of all sorts of things, and
especially of things connected with the Fair.

“You know how we used to play hunt the thimble ?”
said Robin; “and how when anyone came near the
place where it was hidden, we said ‘ Warm—warmer—
warmer still—hot!’ It’s like that now. We have
been getting warmer and warmer every minute, and
now we are getting ”—

“We shall be in in a minute,” said a big man at the
end of the car, and he stood up and began to take
down his things.

“Hot!” said Robin, with an excited little laugh.
“Meg, were not going—going—going any more.
Look out of the window!”

“We are steaming into the big depét,” cried Meg:
“ How big it is! What crowds of people! Robin, we
are there!”

Robin bent down to pick up their satchel, the people
all rose in their seats and began to move in a mass
down the aisle towards the door. Everybody seemed

suddenly to become eager and in a hurry, as if they
100 Two Litrite Piucrms’ Progress

thought the train would begin to move again and
carry them away. Some were expecting friends to
meet them, some were anxious about finding accom-
modations. Those who knew each other talked, asked
questions over people’s shoulders, and there was a
general anxiety about valises, parcels, and umbrellas.
Robin and Meg were pressed back into their section |
by the crowd, against which they were too young to
make headway.

“We shall have to wait until the grown-up people
have passed by,” Rob said.

But the crowd in the aisle soon lost its compactness,
and they were able to get out. The porter who stood
on the platform near the steps looked at them curiously
and glanced behind them to see who was with them,
but he said ncthing.

It seemed to the two as if all the world must have
poured itself into the big depét, or be passing through
it. People were rushing about, friends were searching
for one another, pushing their way through the surging
crowd; some were greeting each other with exclama-
tions and hand-shaking and stopping up the way;
there was a babel of voices, a clamour of shouts within
the covered space, and from outside came a roar of
sound issuing from the city.

For a few moments Robin and Meg were over-
Two Lirrte Piterims’ Progress 101

whelmed. They did not quite know what to do;
everybody pushed past and jostled them. No one
was ill-natured, but no one had time to be polite.
They were so young and so strange to all such worlds
of excitement and rush. Involuntarily they clutched
each other’s hands after their time-honoured fashion
when they were near each other and overpowered.
The human vortex caught them up and carried them
along, not knowing where they were going.

“We seem so little!” gasped Meg. “'There—there
are so many people. Rob, Rob, where are we going?”

Robin had lost his breath too. Suddenly the world
seemed so huge—so huge! Just for a minute he felt
himself turn pale, and he looked at Meg and saw that
she was pale too.

“Everybody is going out of the depdt,” he said.
“Hold on to me tight, Meg. It will be all right.
We shall get out.”

And so they did. The crowd surged and swayed
and struggled, and before long they saw it was surging
towards the entrance gate, and it took them with it.
Just as they were thrust through, they found them-
selves pushed against a man, who good-naturedly drew
a little back to save Meg from striking against his
valise, which was avery substantial one. She looked
up to thank him, and gave a little start. It was the
102. Two Lirrte Pitarims’ Proaress

man she had called “our man” the night before when
she spoke of him to Robin, and he gave them a sharp
but friendly nod.

“Hello!” he exclaimed. “It’s you two again! You
are going to the Fair.”

Robin looked up at his shrewd face with a civil
little grin.

“Yes, sir; we are,” he answered.

“Hope you'll enjoy it,” said the man. “ Big thing!”

And he was pushed past them, and soon lost in the

crowd.
CHAPTER X

MORE PILGRIMS ARE COME TO
TOWN

HE crowd in the depdt surged into the
streets and melted into and became an

addition to the world of people there.



The pavements were moving masses of
human beings, the centre of the streets were pande-
moniums of waggons and vans, street cars, hotel
omnibuses, and carriages. The brilliant morning
sunlight dazzled the children’s eyes; the roar of
wheels, the clamour of car bells, of clattering horses’
feet, of cries and shouts and passing voices mingled
in a volume of sound that deafened them. The great
tidal wave of human life and work and pleasure
almost took them off their feet.

They knew too little of cities to have had before-
hand any idea of what the overwhelming rush and
roar would be, and what slight straws they would
feel themselves, upon the current. If they had
been quite ordinary children, they might well have
104. Two Lirrie Prterims’ PRroGREss



been frightened. But they were not ordinary
children, little as they were aware of that im-
portant factor in their young lives. They were
awed for this first moment, but somehow they were
fascinated as much as they were awed while they
stood for a brief breathing space looking on. They
did not know—no child of their age can possibly know
such things of him or herself—that Nature had made
them of the metal out of which she welds strong
things and great ones. As they had not compre-
hended the restless sense of wrong and misery the
careless, unlearning, and ungrowing life in Aunt
Matilda’s world filled them with, so they did not
understand that because they had been born creatures
who belong to the great moving, working, venturing
world, they were not afraid of it, and felt their first
young face-to-face encounter with it a thing which
thrilled them with an exultant emotion they could
not have explained.

“This is not Aunt Matilda’s world,” said Rob. “It
—I believe it is ours, Meg; don’t you?”

Meg was staring with entranced eyes at the passing
multitude.

“‘More pilgrims are come to town,” she said,
quoting the Pilgrim’s Progress with a far off look on
her intense little black-browed face. “You remember
Two Lirrte Pircrims’ Progress 105



what it said, Rob, ‘Here also all the noise of them
that walked in the streets was, “More pilgrims have
come to town.”’ Qh, isn’t it like it!”

It was. And the exaltation and thrill of it got into
their young blood and made them feel as if they
walked on air, and that every passing human thing
meant somehow life and strength to them.

Their appetites were sharpened by the morning air,
and they consulted as to what their breakfast should
be. They had no money to spend at restaurants, and
every penny must be weighed and calculated.

“Let’s walk on,” said Meg, “until we see a bakery
that looks as if it was kept by poor people. Then we can
buy some bread and eat it with our eggs somewhere.”

“ All right,” said Robin.

They marched boldly on. The crowd jostled them, .
and there was so much noise that they could hardly
hear each other speak; but oh, how the sun shone, and
how the pennons fluttered and streamed on every
side, and how excited and full of living the people’s
faces looked! It seemed splendid only to be alive in
such a world on such a morning. The sense of the
practical which had suggested that they should go to
a small place led them into the side streets. They
passed all the big shops without a glance, but at last

Meg stopped before a small one.
14
106 Two Lirrte Pincers’ PROGRESS

“There’s a woman in there,” she said. “I just saw
her for a minute. She had a nice face. She looked
as if she might be good-natured. Let’s go in there,
Robin. It’s quite a small place.”

They went in. It was a small place, but a clean
one, and the woman had a good-natured face. She
was a German, and was broad and placid and com-
fortable. They bought some fresh rolls from her, and
as she served them and was making the change, Meg
watched her anxiously. She was thinking that she
did look very peaceable indeed. So, instead of turn-
ing away from the counter, she planted herself directly
before her and asked her a question.

“Tf you please,” she said, “we have some hard-
boiled eggs to eat with our bread—and we are not
going home. If we are very careful, would you mind if
we ate our breakfast in here instead of outside? We
won't let any of the crumbs or shells drop on the floor.”

“You not going home?” said the woman. “You
from out town ?”

“Yes,” answered Meg.

“ You look like you was goin’ to der Fair,” said the
woman, with a good-tempered smile. “Who was with
you?”

“No one,” said Robin. “We are going alone. But
we're all right.”
Two Lirtte Pinerims’ Progress 107

“ My crayshious!” said the woman. “ But you wass
young for that. But your ’Merican childrens is queer
ones. You can sit down an’ eat your breakfast.
That make no matter to me if you is careful. You
can sit down.”

There were two chairs near a little table, where
perhaps an occasional customer ate buns, and they sat
down to their rolls and eggs and salt as to a feast.

“T was hungry,” said Rob, cracking his fourth egg.

“So was I,” said Meg, feeling that her fresh roll
was very delicious.

It was a delightful breakfast. The German woman
watched them with placid curiousness as they ate it.
She had been a peasant in her own country, and had
lived in a village among rosy, stout, and bucolic little
Peters and Gretchens, who were not given to enter-
prise, and the American child was a revelation to her.
And somehow, also, these two had an attraction all
American children had not; they looked so well able
to take care of themselves, and yet had such good
manners and no air of self-importance at all. They
ate their rolls and hard-boiled eggs with all the gusto
of very young appetites, but they evidently meant to
keep their part of the bargain and leave her no
crumbs and shells to sweep up. The truth was that
they were perfectly honourable little souls, and had a
108 Two Litriz Pinerims’ Progress

sense of justice. They were in the midst of their
breakfast when they were rather startled by hearing
her voice from the end of the counter, where she had
been standing leaning against the wall, her arms
folded.

“You like a cup coffee?” she asked.

They both looked round, uncertain what to say, not
knowing whether or not she meant that she sold coffee.
They exchanged rather disturbed glances, and then
Robin answered.

“We can’t afford it, thank you, ma’am,” he said.
“We've got so little money.”

“Never mind,” she astonished them by answering.
“That cost me nothing. There some coffee left on
the back of the stove from my man’s breakfast. I
give you each a cup.” And she actually went into
the little back room and presently brought back two
good cups of hot coffee.

“There, you drink that,” she said, setting them down
on the little table. “If you children goin’ to der Fair
in that crowd by yourselves, you want something in
your stomachs.”

It was so good—it was so unexpected—it seemed
such luck! They looked at each other with beaming
eyes, and at her with quite disproportionate gratitude.

It was much more than two cups of coffee to them,




teenie Ve eye ~~ A



Swayiyee



‘She... presently brought back two good cups of hot coffee.’
Two Littte Pirerims’ Progress 109



“Oh, thank you,” they both exclaimed. “We're so
much obliged to you, ma’am.”

Their feast ‘seemed to become quite a royal thing.
They never had felt so splendidly fed in their lives.
It seemed as if they had never tasted such coffee.

When the meal was finished, they rose refreshed
enough to feel ready for anything. They went up to
the counter and thanked the German woman again.
It was Meg who spoke to her.

“We want to say thank you again,” she said. “We
are very much obliged to you for letting us eat our
breakfast in here. It was so nice to sit down, and the
coffee was so splendid. I suppose we do seem rather
young to be by ourselves—but that makes us all the
more thankful.”

“That’s all right,” said the woman. “I hope you
don’t get lost by der Fair—and have a good time.”

And then they went forth on their pilgrimage, into
the glorious morning,.into the rushing world that
seemed so splendid and so gay—into the fairyland that
only themselves and those like them could see.

“Tsn’t it nice when some one’s kind to you, Rob?”
Meg exclaimed joyfully when they got into the sun-
shine. “Doesn’t it make you feel happy somehow,—
not because they’ve done something, but just because
they’ve been kind,”
110 ‘Two Lirtite Pinerims’ Progress



“Yes, it does,” answered Rob, stepping out bravely.
“ And I'll tell you what I believe. I believe there are
a lot of kind people in the world.”

“So do I,” said Meg. “TI believe they’re in it, even
when we don’t see them.”

And all the more with springing steps and brave
young faces they walked on their way to fairyland.

They had talked it all over—how they would enter
their City Beautiful. It would be no light thing to
them—their entrance into it. They were innocently
epicurean about it, and wanted to see it at the very

‘first in all its loveliness. They knew that there were
gates of entrance here and there through which
thousands poured each day, but Meg had a fancy of
her own, founded of course upon that other progress
of the pilgrims.

“Oh, we must go in by the water, Robin,” she said,
“just like those other pilgrims who came to town. You
know that part at the last where it says, ‘And so
many went over the water and were let in at the
golden gates to-day.” Let us go over the water and
be let in at the golden gates! But the water we shall
go over won’t be dark and bitter; it will be blue and
splendid, and the sun will be shining everywhere.
Oh, Rob! how can it be true that we are here?”

They knew all about the great arch of entrance and
Two Lirrtte Pitearims’ Progress 111

stately peristyle; they had read in the newspapers all
about its height and the height of the statues adorning
it; they knew how many columns formed the peristyle ;
but it was not height or breadth, or depth or width
they remembered. The picture which remained with
them and haunted them like a fair dream was that of
a white and splendid archway, crowned with one
of the great stories of the world in marble, the
story of the triumph of the man, in whom the god
was so strong that his dreams, the working of his
mind, his strength, his courage, his suffering wrested
from the silence of the Unknown a new and splendid
world. It was this great white arch they always
thought of, with this marble story crowning it, the
blue, blue water spread before, the stately columns at
its side, and the City Beautiful within the courts
it guarded. And it was to this they were going
when they found their way to the boat which would
take them to it.

It was such a heavenly day of June. The water was
so amethystine, the sky such a vault of rapture!
What did it matter to them that they were jostled and
crowded and counted for nothing among those about
them! What did it matter that there were often
near them common faces, speaking of nothing but

common, stupid pleasure, or common sharpness and
112 Two Litrte Pinerims’ Progress

greed! What did it matter that scarcely anyone saw
what they saw, or seeing it, realised its splendid,
hopeful meaning! Little recked they of anything
but the entrancement of blue sky and water, and the
City Beautiful they were drawing near to.

When first out of the blueness there rose the fair
shadow of the whiteness, they sprang from their seats,
and, hand in hand, made their way to the side, and
there stood watching as silent as if they did not dare
to speak lest it should melt away. And from a fair,
white spirit it grew to a real thing—more white—more
fair—more stately and more an enchanted thing than
even they had believed or hoped.

And the crowd surged about them, and women
exclaimed and men talked, and there was a rushing
to and fro, and the ringing of a bell, and movement
and action and excitement were on every side. But
somehow these two children stood hand in hand and
only looked.

For their dream had come true, though it had been
a child dream of an enchanted thing!
CHAPTER XI

THE THING THAT THINKS

stateliness of the great arch, still hand
in hand and silent. They walked



softly, almost as if they felt them-
selves treading upon holy ground. To their youth
and unworn souls it was like holy ground. They had
so dreamed of it, they had so longed for it, it had
been so mingled in their minds with the story of a
city not of this world.

And they stood within the court beyond the arch-
way, the fair and noble colonnade, its sweep of
columns statue-crowned behind them, the wonder
of the City Beautiful spread before. The water of
blue lagoons lapped the bases of white palaces as
if with a caress of homage to their beauty. On
every side these marvels stood, everywhere there
was the green of sward and broad-leaved plants,
the sapphire of water, the flood of colour and human

life passing by, and above it all and enclosing it,
15
114. Two Litriz Prucrms’ Procress



the warm, deep, splendid blueness of the summer
sky.

It was so white—it was so full of the marvel of
colour—it was so strange—it was so radiant and
unearthly in its beauty!

The two children only stood still and gazed and
gazed with widening eyes and parted lips. They
could not have moved about at first; they only stood
and lost themselves as in a dream.

Meg was still for so long that Robin, turning slowly
to look at her at last, was rather awed.

“Meg!” he said, “Meg!”

“ Yes,” she answered in a voice only half awake.

“Meg! Meg! We are there!”

“T know,” said Meg; “only it is so like—that
other city—that it seems as if’— She gave a
queer little laugh, and turned to look at him.
“Rob,” she said, “perhaps we are dead, and have
just wakened up.”

That brought them back to earth. They laughed
together. No, they were not dead. They were
breathless and uplifted by an ecstasy, but they had
never been so fully alive before. It seemed as if they
were in the centre of the world, and the world was
such a bright and radiant beautiful place, as they had
never dreamed of. ,
Two Litre Piterims’ Proaress 115



“ Where shall we go first?” said Meg. “ What shall
we do?”



“une! MEG! WE ARE ryerze!”

But it was so difficult to decide that. It did not
seem possible to make a plan and follow it. It was
116 Two Littte Piuerims’ Procress

not possible for them, at least. They were too happy
and too young. Surely visitors to fairyland could
not make plans. They gave themselves up to the
spell, and went where fancy led them. And it led
them far, and through strange beauties, which seemed
like dreams come true. They wandered down broad
pathways, past green sward, waving palms, glowing
masses of flowers, white balustrades bordering lagoons
lightly ruffled by a moment’s wind. Wonderful statues
stood on silent guard, sometimes in groups, sometimes
majestic colossal figures.

“They look as if they were all watching the
thousands and thousands go by,” said Robin.

“Tt seems as if they must be thinking something
about it all,” Meg answered. “It could not be that they
could stand there, and look like that, and not know.”

It was she who soon after built up for them the only
scheme they made during those enchanted days. It
could scarcely be called a plan of action, it was so
much an outcome of imagination and part of a vision,
but it was a great joy to them through every hour of
their pilgrimage.

Standing upon a fairy bridge, looking over shining
canals crossed by these fairy bridges again and again,
the gold sun lighting snow-white columns, archways,

towers and minarets, statues and rushing fountains,
Two Littite Pinerms’ Progress 117



flowers and palms, her child eyes filled with a deep,
strange glow of joy and dreaming.

She leaned upon the balustrade in her favourite
fashion, her chin upon her hands.

“We need not pretend it isa fairy story, Robin,”
she said. “It 7s a fairy story—but it is real. Who
ever thought a fairy story could come true. I’ve
made up how it came to be like this.”

“Tell us how ?” said Robin, looking over the jewelled
water almost as she did.

“Tt was like this,’ she said: “There was a great
Genie who was the ruler of all the other Genii in all
the world. They were all powerful and rich and
wonderful magicians, but he could make them all
obey him, and give him what they stored away. And
he said, ‘I-will build a splendid city that all the world
shall flock to, and wonder at, and remember for ever.
And in it some of all the things in the world shall be
seen, so that the people who see it shall learn what
the world is like—how huge it is, and what wisdom it
has in it, and what wonders. And it will make them
know what they are like themselves, because the
wonders will be made by hands and feet and brains
just like their own. And so they will understand
how strong they are, if they only knew it, and it will

299

give them courage and fill them with thoughts.
118 Two Lirriz Pincrims’ PRrocress

She stopped a moment, and Rob pushed her gently
with his elbow.

“Go on,” he said. “I like it; it sounds quite true.
What else?”

“And he called all the Genii together, and called
them by their names. There was a Genie who was
the king of all the pictures and statues, and the people
who worked at making them. They did not know
they had a Genie, but they had, and he put visions
into their heads and made them feel restless until they
had worked them out into statues and paintings.
And the Great Genie said to him, ‘ You must build a
palace for your people, and make them pour their finest
work into it, and all the people who are made to be
your workers, whether they know it or not, will look
at your palace and see what other ones have done, and
wonder if they cannot do it themselves’ And there
was a huge, huge Genie who was made of steel and iron
and gold and silver and wheels, and the Great One said
to him, ‘ Build a great palace and make your workers
fill it, with all the machines and marvels they have
made, and all who see will know what wonders can be
done, and feel that there is no wonder that isn’t done
that is too great for human beings to plan” And
there was a Genie of the strange countries, and one
who .knew all the plants and flowers and trees that
Two LirrLte Pinerims’ Proaress 119

grew, and one who lived at the bottom of the sea and
knew the fishes by name, and strode about among
them. And each one was commanded to build a
palace or to make his people work; and they grew so
interested that in the end each one wanted his palace
and his people to be the most wonderful of all. And
so the city was built, and we are in it, Robin, though
we are only twelve years old and nobody cares about
us.”

“Yes,” said Robin, “and the city is as much ours as
if we were the Great Genie himself. Meg, who was
the Great Genie. What was he?”

“T don’t know,” said Meg; “nobody knows. He is
that—that ”—she gave a sudden, queer little touch to
her forehead and one to her side. “ That, you know,
Rob! The thing that thinks—and makes us want to
do things and be things. Don’t you suppose so,
Rob?”

“The thing that made us want so to come here that
we could not bear not to come,” said Robin. “The
thing that makes you make up stories about every-
thing, and always have queer thoughts ?”

“Yes—that!” said Meg; “and everyone has some of
it—and there are such millions of people, and so there
is enough to make the Great Genie. Robin, come
along, let us go to the palace the picture Genie built,
120 ‘Two Litrte Pinarims’ Proaress



and see what his people put in it. Let us be part of
the fairy story when we go anywhere. It will make
it beautiful.”

They took their fairy story with them and went
their way. They made it as much the way of a fairy
story as possible. They found a gondola with a rich-
hued, gay-scarfed gondolier, and took their places.

“Now we are in Venice,” Meg said as they shot
smoothly out upon the lagoon. “We can be in any
country we like. Now we are in Venice.’

Their gondola stopped and lay rocking on the
lagoon before the palace’s broad white steps. They
mounted them and entered into a rich glowing world
all unknown.

They knew little of pictures, they knew nothing of
statuary, but they went from room to room throbbing
with enjoyment. They stopped before beautiful faces
and happy scenes, and vaguely smiled, though they
did not know they were smiling; they lingered before
faces and figures that were sad, and their own dark
little faces grew soft and grave. They could not
afford to buy a catalogue, so they could only look and
pity and delight or wonder.

“We must make up the stories and thoughts of
them ourselves,” Robin said. “Let’s take it in turns,

Meg. Yours will be the best ones, of course.”
Two Littte Pinerims’ Progress 121

And this was what they did. As they passed from
picture to picture each took turns at building up
explanations. Some of them might have been at once
surprising and instructive to the artist concerned, but
some were very vivid, and all were full of young
directness and clear sight and the fresh imagining
and colouring of the unworn mind, They were so
interested that it became like a sort of exciting game.
They forgot all about the people around them; they
did not know that their two small unchaperoned
figures attracted more glances than one. They were
so accustomed to being alone that they never exactly
counted themselves in with other people. And now it
was as if they were at a banquet feasting upon
strange viands, and the new flavours were like wine
to them. They went from side to side of the rooms,
drawn sometimes by a glow of colour, sometimes by a
hinted story.

“We don’t know anything about pictures, I
suppose,” said Meg, “but we can see everything is in
them. There are the poor people working in the fields
and the mills, being glad or sorry—and there are the
rich ones dancing at balls and standing in splendid
places.”

“And there are the good ones and the bad ones.

You can see it in their faces,” Rob went on for her.
16
122 Two Littrte Pinerims’ Progress

“Yes,” said Meg. “Richness and poorness, and
goodness and badness, and happiness and gladness.
The Genie who made this palace was a very proud
one, and he said he would put all the world in it,
even if his workers could only make pictures and
statues.”

“Was he the strongest of all?” asked Robin, taking
up the story again with interest.

“JT don’t know,” Meg answered. “Sometimes I
think he was. He was strong—he was very
strong.”

They had been too deeply plunged into their mood
to notice a man who stood near them looking at a
large picture. In fact the man himself had not at
first noticed them; but when Meg began to speak,
her voice attracted him. He turned his head and
looked at her odd little reflecting face, and after
having looked at it he stood listening to her.
An expression of recognition came into his strong
face.

“You two again!” he said, when she had finished.
“And you have got here?” It was their man
again.

“Yes,” answered Meg, her black eyes revealing, as
she lifted them to his face, that she came back to
earth with some difficulty.
Two Lirrte Pincrims’ Progress 123

“How do you like it as far as you've gone?” he
asked.

“We are making believe that it is a fairy story,”
Meg answered, “and it’s very easy.”

And then a group of people came between and
separated them.
CHAPTER XII

“ WELL—JEM !”

POW tired they were when they came
S out from the world of pictures into

the world of thronging people! How



their limbs ached, and they were
brought back to the realisation that they were
creatures with human bodies, which somehow they
seemed to have forgotten.

When they stood in the sunshine again Robin drew
a long breath.

“Jt is like coming out of one dream into another,”
he said. “We must have been there a long time. I
didn’t know I was tired, and I didn’t know I was
hungry; but Iam. Are you?”

She was as tired and hungry as he was.

“Dare we buy a sandwich to eat with our eggs?”
she said.

“Yes, I think we dare,” Robin answered. “Where
shall we go and eat them ?”

There was no difficulty in deciding. She had
124
Two Litre Pinerms’ Progress 125



planned it all out, and they so knew the place by
heart that they did not need to ask their way. It
was over one of the fairy bridges which led to a fairy
island. It was softly wooded, and among the trees
were winding paths and flowers and rustic seats and
quaint roofs peering above the greenness of branches.
And it was full of the warm scent of roses growing
together in sumptuous thousands, their heavy sweet
heads uplifted to the sun, or nodding and leaning
towards their neighbour clusters.

The fairy bridge linked it to the wonderful world
beyond, but by comparison its bowers were almost
quiet. The crowd did not jostle there.

“ And we shall be eating our lunch near thousands
and thousands of roses. It will be like the Arabian
Nights. Let us pretend that the rose who is queen of
them all invited us—because we belong to nobody,”
Meg said. .

They brought the modest addition to their meal
and carried the necessary ever-present satchel to their
bower. They were tired of dragging the satchel
about, but they were afraid to lose sight of it.

“Tt’s very well that it is such a small one, and that
we have so little in it,” Robin said.

They chose the most secluded corner they could

find, as near to the Rose Garden as possible, and sat
126 Two Lirtte Pitcrims’ Procress



down and fell upon their’ scant lunch as they had
fallen upon their breakfast.

It was very scant for two ravenously hungry
children, and they tried to make it last as long as
possible. But scant as it was and tired as they were,
their spirits did not fail them.

“Perhaps if we eat it slowly it will seem more,”
said Meg, peeling an egg with deliberation, but with
a very undeliberate feeling in her small stomach.
“Robin, did you notice our man?”

“T saw him, of course,” answered Rob. “He's too
big not to see.”

“T noticed him,” continued Meg. “Robin, there’s
something the matter with that man. He is a gloomy
man.”

“Well, you noticed him quickly,” Robin responded,
with a shade of fraternal incredulity. “What's
happened to him.” 7

Meg’s eyes fixed themselves on a glimpse of blue
water she saw through the trees. She looked as if
she was thinking the matter over.

“How do I know?” she said. “I couldn't. But
somehow he has a dreary face—as if he had been
thinking of dreary things. I don’t know why I
thought that all in a minute—but I did, and I believe
it’s true.”
Two Lirrte Pincrims’ Procress 127

“Well, if we should see him again,” Robin said,
“TI look and see.”

“TI believe we shall see him again,” said Meg.
“How many eggs have we left, Robin?”

“We only brought three dozen,” he answered,
looking into the satchel. “And we ate seven
this morning.”

“When you have nothing but eggs you eat a good
many,” said Meg reflectively. “They won't last very
long. “But we couldn't have carried a thousand
eggs, even if we had had them.” Which was a sage
remark.

“We shall have to buy some cheap things,” was
Robin’s calculation. “They'll have to be very cheap
though. We have to pay a dollar, you know, every
day to come in, and if we have no money we can’t
go into the places that are not free—and we want to
go into everything.”

“Td rather go in hungry, than stay outside and
have real dinners, wouldn’t you?” Meg put it to
him.

“Yes, I would,” he answered. “Though it’s pretty
hard to be hungry.”

They had chosen a secluded corner to sit in, but it
was not so secluded that they had it entirely to
themselves.
128 Two Littte Pinerims’ PROGRESS

Just after they sat down and opened their satchel
they saw two people turn into the place they had hit
upon as the one where they would be the least likely
to be disturbed by passers-by. But these were not
passers-by, and did not look as if they were likely to
disturb anyone. They were evidently on the lookout
for a quiet spot themselves. They seemed to be a
young country couple, husband and wife, plain and
awkward, and making the most of their holiday visit
to the Fair. They looked simple and primitive and
good-natured, and as. if they had been enjoying them-
selves immensely. The man was tall and _ broad-
shouldered and gawky. He had on a broadcloth coat
which shone with obtrusive newness, wrinkled on the
shoulders, and was too short in the sleeves. ‘He had
a starched shirt-front and collar, which the heat had
destroyed the stiffness of, and which were at once
creased and crackling; he wore a Derby hat, rather
too small for him and set on the back of his head.
He was neither handsome nor particularly intelligent-
looking, but he had a face which somehow said he
was a good fellow just as surely as he was a very
unfashionable one. His wife was of the same style as
himself. She was tall and big-boned; her dregs did
not fit her, and was a desperate country dressmaker
attempt at following the prevailing fashion, though at
Two LitrLteE Pinerims’ Progress 129

a very safe distance. But she had a nice common
face too, and while it was glowing and shining with
heat, it was also glowing and shining with enjoyment.

Both Robin and Meg cast a quiet glance over them
as they drew near.

“That’s the kind of people this means everything
in the world to,” Robin said in a low voice; “it means
as much to them as it does to us. They are just like
us, Meg. They live on a farm, I imagine. They look
as if they did. They never see anything or go any-
where or learn anything. I suppose they can’t afford
books.” ;

“T don’t believe they have been educated enough
to know what books to choose, even if they could
afford to buy them,” said Meg. “She cooks and
scrubs and churns and washes, and he ploughs and
does all the other farmer things. But they look as
if they were good-natured; don’t they? And I guess
they are tramping about to see everything.”

“And they will look at pictures and statues and
things from strange countries and people from foreign
lands,” Robin said, with another furtive glance at
them. “They'll go home and tell their children all
they can remember, if they have any children. Won't
it be fun for the children? They'll play World’s Fair

for ever so long, I believe.”
17
130 Two LirTLe Piterims PRoGREss

“Just as we used to play circus when father and
mother couldn't afford to send us,” Meg said.

The young couple loitered along the walk, looking
around them for a few yards, and then they seemed to
decide to come back to a seat not far from where the
children were making the. most of their eggs. As
she passed Meg and Robin, the woman glanced at the
scanty little spread on the seat between them. She
did not do it curiously or rudely, and she looked away
and went on talking to her husband at once.

“This is as good a place as any, Jem,” they heard
her say. “Let’s sit here; P’m ready to drop. I’m so
tired, an’ I’m starving hungry; ain’t you?”

“Guess I am,” he answered, with a grin; “I hope
you have got plenty in your basket, Em. I could
eat a steer an’ not stop to chaw him nuther.”

The woman laughed too. “ Well,” she said, “I know
what you can get outside of when you've been
ploughing, an’ I’m used to perviding fer ye. I ain’t
one to stint a man; I guess ye know that by
experience ; I believe ye'll have a plenty.”

“If there was any poor appetites come in at the
gate this morning,” said Jem, “I guess they won’t
be likely to be took through it when night comes.”

They sat down, and when they did it each of

them heaved a sigh of relieved fatigue. The woman
Two Lirrte Pinerims’ Procress 131

opened the basket and took a coarse but big and clean
napkin out and laid it between them on the seat, just
as Meg and Robin had done their pieces of newspaper.
And as she did this she was so near that Meg could
not avoid glancing at her and seeing what she did.
It was not a fortunate thing that the seat was so near.
It is easier, when one is ravenously hungry, to force
oneself to pretend one is satisfied with a little when
there is nothing more within sight, than it is when
someone else is making an agreeable and hearty meal
within sight and scent. Meg was suddenly conscious
of the odour of something savoury, and of wishing it
was not so near her at the same time. In spite of
their neighbours’ cheap clothes and tanned, hard-
worked hands and faces, their basket evidently
~ contained good home-made things to eat. Meg caught
glimpses of ham and chicken, and something that
looked like cake. Just at that moment they looked
so desperately good that she turned away her eyes,
because she did not want to stare at them rudely. And
as she averted them she saw that Robin had seen too.

“Those people have plenty to eat,” he said, with a
short awkward laugh.

“Yes,” she answered. “Don’t let us look. We are
here, Robin, anyway—and we knew we couldn’t come
as the other people do.”
132 Two Lirrte Pinerims’ Progress

“Ves,” he said. “We are here.”

The man and his wife finished their lunch and
began putting things in order in their basket. As
they did it, they talked together in a low voice, and
seemed to be discussing something. Somehow, in
spite of her averted eyes, Meg suddenly felt as



‘‘THOSE PEOPLE HAVE PLENTY TO EAT.”

if they were discussing Robin and _ herself, and
she wondered if they had caught her involuntary
look.

“T think,” Robin said, “Meg—TI think that woman
is going to speak to us.”

It was evident that she was. She got up and came
Two Lirrte Pinerims’ Progress 133

towards them, her husband following her rather
awkwardly.

She stopped before them, and the two pairs of dark
eyes lifted themselves to her face. _

“T’ve just been talking to my man about you two,”
she said. “We couldn’t help looking at you. Have
you lost your friends ?”

“No, ma’am,” said Robin. “We haven’t got any.
I mean we're not with anyone.”

The woman turned and looked at her husband.

“Well—Jem!” she exclaimed.

The man drew near and looked them over. He
was a raw-boned, big young man, with a countrified,
good-natured face.

“You hain’t come here alone?” he said.

“Yes,” said Robin. “We couldn’t have come if we
hadn’t come alone. We're not afraid, thank you.
We're getting along very well.”

“Well—Jem!” said the woman again.

She seemed quite stirred. There was something in
her ordinary good-natured face that was quite like a
sort of rough emotion.

“Have you plenty of money?” she asked.

“No,” said Rob. “Not plenty—but we have a
little.”

She put her basket down, and opened it. She
134 Two Lirrte Pincrims’ Procress



took.out some pieces of brown fried chicken; then
she took out some big slices of cake with raisins in it.
She even added some biscuits and slices of ham. Then
she put them in a coarse clean napkin.

“Now, look here,” she said. “Don’t you go filling
up with candy and peanuts just because you are by
yourselves. You put this in your bag and eat it
when youre ready. “I'anyrate it’s good home-made
victuals and won’t harm you.”

And, in the midst of their shy thanks, she shut the
basket again and went off with her husband, and they
heard her say again before she disappeared—

“ Well—Jem !”
CHAPTER XTII

EVERYBODY IN THE WORLD HAS SOMETHING
TO GIVE.



1 ES, there were plenty of kind people in
!) the world. And one of the best proofs
of it was that in that busy, wonderful
place, through which all the world
seemed passing, and where on every side were a thou-
sand things to attract attention and so fill eyes and
mind that forgetfulness and carelessness of small
things might not have been quite unnatural, these two
small things, utterly insignificant and unknown to the
crowds they threaded, met many a passing friend of
the moment, and found themselves made happier by
many a kindly helpful word or look. Officials were
good-natured to them; guides were good-humoured.
Motherly women and fatherly men protected them in
awkward crowds. They always saw that those who
noticed them glanced about for their chaperons, and
again and again they were asked who was taking

care of them; but Robin’s straightforward, civil little
135
136 Two Lirrite Pinarims’ PRocREss

answer, “ We're taking care of ourselves,” never failed
to waken as much friendly interest as surprise.

They kept up their fairy story of the Great Genie,
and called things by fairy story names, and talked to
each other of their fairy story fancies about them.
It was so much more delightful to say, “Let us go to
the Palace of the Genie of the Sea,” than to say, “ Let
us go to the Fisheries Buildings.” And once in the
palace standing among great rocks and pools and
fountains, with water plashing and trickling over
strange sea plants, and strange sea monsters swim-
ming beneath their eyes in green sea water, it was
easy to believe in the Genie who had brought them
all together.

“He was very huge,” Meg said, making a picture
of him. “He had monstrous eyes that looked like
the sea when it is blue; he had great white coral
teeth, and he had silver scaly fish skin wound round
him, and his hair was long sea grass and green and
brown weeds.”

They stood in grottos, and looked down into clear
pools at swift darting things of gold and silver and
strange prismatic colours. Meg made up stories of
tropical rivers with palms and jungle cane fringing
them, and tigers and lions coming to lap at the brink.

She invented rushing mountain streams and lakes
Two Lirrte Pincrims’ Progress 137

with speckled trout leaping, and deep, deep seas, where
whales lay rocking far below, and porpoises rolled,
and devil fish spread hideous far-reaching tentacles
for prey.

Oh! What a day it was! What wonders they
saw and hung over and dwelt on with passions of
young delight! The great sea gave up its deeps to
them, great forests and trackless jungles their wonder-
ful growths; kings’ palaces and queens’ coffers their
rarest treasures; the ages of long ago their relics and ~
strange legends in stone and wood and brass and gold.

They did not know how often people turned or
stopped to look at their two close leaning figures and
vivid, dark, ecstatic-eyed faces. -They certainly never
chanced to see that one figure was often behind them
at a safe distance, and seemed rather to have fallen
into the habit of going where they went and listening
to what they said. It was their Man curiously
enough, and it was true that he was rather a gloomy-
looking man when one observed him well. His keen,
business-like, well-cut face had a cloud resting upon
it; he looked listless and unsmiling even in the palaces
that most stirred the children’s souls, and in fact it
seemed to be their odd enthusiasm which had attracted
him a little, because he was in the mood to feel none

himself. He had been within hearing distance when
18
138 Two Lirrite Prucris’ PROGRESS

Meg had been telling her stories of the Genie of the
Palace of the Sea, and a faint smile had played about
his mouth for a moment. Then he had drawn a trifle
nearer, still keeping out of sight, and when they had
moved he had followed them. He had been a hard,
ambitious, wealth-gaining man all his life. A few
years before he had found a new happiness which
softened him for a while and made his world seem a
brighter thing. Then a black sorrow had come upon
him, and everything had changed. He had come to
the Enchanted City, not as the children had come,
because it shone before them a radiant joy, but
because he wondered if it would distract him at all.
All other things had failed,—his old habits of work
and scheme, his successes, his ever-growing fortune,—
they were all as nothing. The world was empty to
him, and he walked about it feeling like a ghost,
The little, dark, vivid faces had attracted him, he did
not know why, and when he heard the story of the
Palace of the Sea, he was led on by a vague interest.

He was near them often during the day, but it was
not until late in the afternoon that they saw him
themselves when he did not see them. They came
upon him in a quiet spot, where he was sitting alone.
On a seat near him sat a young woman resting with

a baby asleep in her arms. The young woman was
Two LittLE Pinertms’ Progress 139



absorbed in her child, and was apparently unconscious
of him. His arms were folded and his head bent, but
he was looking at her in an absent, miserable way. It
was as if she made him think of something bitter
and sad.

Meg and Robin passed him quietly.

“T see what you meant, Meg,’ Robin said. “He
does look as if something was the matter with him.
I wonder what it is.”

When they passed out of the gates at dusk, it was |
with worn-out bodies, but enraptured souls. In the
street car, which they indulged in the extravagance
of taking, the tired people, sitting exhaustedly on the
seats and hanging on to straps, looked with a sort of
wonder at them; their faces shone so like stars. They
did not know where they were going to sleep, and
they were more than ready for lying down, but they
were happy beyond words.

They went with the car until it reached the city’s
heart, and then they got out and walked. The streets
were lighted and the thoroughfares were a riot of life
and sound. People were going to theatres, restaur-
ants, and hotels, which were a blaze of electric radiance.
They found themselves limping a little, but they kept
stoutly on, holding firmly to the satchel. “We needn’t
be afraid of going anywhere, however poor it looks,”
140 Two Lirrie Pincrims’ PRoaress

Robin said, with his grave little elderly air. He was
curiously grave for his years sometimes. “Anybody
can see we have nothing to steal. I think anyone
would know that we only want to go to bed.”

It was a queer place they finally hit upon. It was
up a side street, which was poorly lighted and where
the houses were all shabby and small. On-the steps
of one of them a tired-looking woman was sitting with
a little, pale, old-faced boy beside her. Robin stopped
before her.

“Have you a room where my sister could sleep,
and I could have a mattress on the floor, or lie down
on anything?” he said. “We can’t afford to go any-
where where it will cost more than fifty cents.”

The woman looked at them indifferently. She was
evidently very much worn out with her day’s work,
and discouraged by things generally.

“JT haven't anything worth more than fifty cents,
goodness knows!” she answered. “You must be
short of money to come here. I’ve never thought of
having roomers.”

“We're poor,” said Robin. “And we know we can’t
have anything but.a poor room. If we can lie down,
we are so tired we shall go to sleep anywhere.
We've been at the Fair all day.”

The pale, little, old-faced boy leaned forward,
Two Lirrte Pincrtms Progress 141



resting his arm on his mother’s knee. They saw that he
was a very poor little fellow indeed, with a hunch back.
“Mother,” he said, “let em stay. Ill sleep on the
floor.”
The woman gave a dreary half laugh, and got up



”

“HAVE YOU A ROOM WHERE MY SISTER COULD SLEEP

e

from the step. “He’s crazy about the Fair,” she said.
“We haint no money to spend on fairs, an’ he’s most
wild about it. You can stay here to-night if you
want to.”

She made a sign to them to follow her. The
142 Two Lirrte Piterims’ PRocREss

hunchback boy rose too, and went into the dark
passage after them. He seemed to regard them with
a kind of hunger in his look.

They went up a narrow, steep staircase. It was
only lighted by a dim gleam from a room below,
whose door was open. The balustrades were rickety,
and some of them were broken out. It was a forlorn
enough place. The hunchback boy came up the steps
awkwardly behind them. It was as if he wanted to
see what would happen.

They went up two flights of the crooked, crazy
stairs, and at the top of the second flight the woman
opened a door.

“That’s all the place there is,” she said. “It isn’t
anything more than a place to lie down in, you see.
I can put.a mattress on the floor for you, and your
sister can sleep on the cot.”

“That's all we want,” replied Robin.

But it was a poor place. A room both small and
bare, and with broken windows. There was nothing
in it but the cot and a chair.

“Ben sleeps here,” the woman said. “If I couldn’t
make him a place on the floor near me I couldn’t let
it to you.” ,

Meg turned and looked at Ben. He was gazing at
her with a nervous interest.
Two Litre Pingrims’ Proeress 143

“We're much obliged to you,” she said.

“Tt’s all right,” he said, with eager shyness. “Do
you want some water to wash yourselves with? I
can bring you up a tin basin anda jug. You can set
it on the chair.”

«Thank you,” they said both at once, and Robin
added, “We want washing pretty badly.”

Ben turned about and went downstairs for the
water, as if he felt a sort of excitement in doing the
service. These two children, who looked as poor as .
himself, set stirring strange thoughts in his small
unnourished brain.

He brought back the tin basin and water, a piece
of yellow soap, and even a coarse, rather dingy towel.
He had been so eager that he was out of breath when
he returned; but he put the basin on the chair and
the. tin jug beside it with a sort of exultant look in
his poor face.

“Thank you,” said Meg again. “Thank you, Ben.”

She could not help watching him as his mother
prepared the rather wretched mattress for Robin.
Once he caught the look of her big grey eyes, as it
rested upon him with questioning sympathy, and he
flushed up, so that even by the light of the little
smoky lamp she saw it. When the woman had
finished, she and the boy went away and left them,
144 Two Lirrie Pinerims’ Procress



and they stood a moment looking at each other. They
were both thinking of the same thing, but somehow
they did not put it into words.

“We'll wash off the dust first,” said Robin. “And
then we'll eat some of the things we have left from
what the woman gave us. And then we'll go to bed
—and we shall drop just like logs.”

And this they did, and it was certainly a very short
time before the smoky little lamp was out, and each
had “dropped like a log,” and lay stretched in the
darkness with a sense of actual ecstasy, in limbs laid
down to rest and muscles relaxed for sleeping.

“Robin,” said Meg drowsily, through the dark that
divided them, “everybody—in the world—has some-
thing to give to—somebody else.”

“Tm thinking that too,” Robin answered, just as
sleepily. “Nobody is so poor—that—he—hasn’t
anything. That—boy ”—

“He let us have his hard bed,” Meg murmured ;
“and he—hastn’t seen ”—

But her voice died away—and Robin would not
have heard her if she said more. And they were
both fast—fast asleep.
CHAPTER XIV

BEN



T would have been a loud sound which
would have awakened them during
those deep sleeping hours of the night.
They did not even stir on their poor
pillows, when long after midnight there was the noise
of heavy, drunken footsteps and heavy, drunken
stumbling in the passage below, and then the raising
of a man’s rough voice, and the upsetting of chairs
and the slamming of doors, mingled with the ex-
postulations of the woman, whose husband had come
home in something even worse than his frequent ill
fashion. They slept sweetly through it all; but
when the morning came, and hours of unbroken
rest had made their slumber lighter, and the sun-
shine streamed in through the broken windows,
they were called back to the world by loud and
angry sounds.

“What is it?” said Meg, sitting bolt upright and

rubbing her eyes. “Somebody’s shouting.”
19
146 Two Lirrte Pinerims’ PRrRoaress

“ And somebody’s erying,” said Robin, sitting up
too, but more slowly.

It was quite clear to them as soon as they were
fully awake, that both these things were happening.
A man seemed to be quarrelling below. They could
hear him stamping about and swearing savagely, and
they could hear the woman’s voice, which sounded as
if she was trying to persuade him to do or leave
undone something. They could not hear her words,
but she was crying, and somebody else was crying
too, and they knew it was the boy with the little
old face and the hump back.

“TI suppose it’s the woman’s husband?” said Meg.
“Tm glad he wasn’t here last night.”

“T wonder if he knows we are here?” said Robin,
listening anxiously.

It was plain that he did know. They heard
him stumbling up the staircase, grumbling and swear-
ing as he came, and he was coming up to their room,
it was evident.

“What shall we do?” exclaimed Meg, in a
whisper.

“Wait,” Robin answered breathlessly. “We can’t
do anything.”

The heavy feet blundered up the short second
flight and blundered to their door. It seemed that
Two Lirrtze Pinerims’ Proaress 147



the man had not slept off his drunken fit. He struck
the door with his foot.

“Hand out that fifty cents,” he shouted. “When
my wife takes roomers, I’m goin’ to be paid. Hand
it out.”

They heard the woman hurrying up the stairs after
him. She was out of breath with crying, and there
was a choking sound in her voice when she spoke to
them through the door.

“You'd better let him have it,” she said.

“T guess they’d better!” said the man roughly. |
“Who'd they suppose owns the house.”

Rob got up and took fifty cents from their very
small store, which was hidden in the lining of his
trousers. He went to the door and opened it a little,
and held the money out.

“Here it is,” he said.

The man snatched it out of his hand and turned
away, and went stumbling downstairs, still growling.
The woman stood a minute on the landing, and they
heard her make a pitiful sort of sound—half sob,
half sniff.

Meg sat up in bed with her chin in her hands and
glared like a little lioness.

“What do you think of that?” she said.

“He’s a devil,” said Rob, with terseness, and he was
148 Two Lirrte Prterims’ ProcrEss

conscious of no impropriety. “I wanted that boy to
have it—and go.” It was not necessary to say where.

“So did I,” answered Meg. “And I believe his
mother would have given it to him too.”

They heard the man leave the house a few minutes
later, and then it did not take them long to dress and
go down the narrow, broken, balustraded stairs again.
As they descended the first flight, they saw the
woman cooking something over the stove in her
kitchen, and as she moved about they saw her brush
her apron across her eyes.

The squalid street was golden with the early
morning sunshine, which is such a joyful thing; and
in the full happy flood of it a miserable little figure
sat crouched on the steps. It was the boy Ben, and
they saw that he looked paler than he had looked the
night before, and his little face looked older. His
elbow was on his knee and his cheek in his hand, and
there were wet marks on his cheeks.

A large lump rose up in Meg’s throat.

“TI know what’s the matter,’ she whispered to
Robin.

“So—so do I,” Rob answered rather unsteadily.
“And he’s poorer than anybody else. It ought not
to go by him.”

“No, no!” said Meg, “it oughtn’t!”
Two Littte Prucrims’ Procress 149



She walked straight to the threshold and sat down
on the step beside him. She was a straightforward
child, and she was too much moved to stand on
ceremony. She sat down quite close to the poor
little fellow, and put her hand on his arm.

“Never you mind!” she said. “Never you mind!”
and her throat felt so full that for a few seconds she
could say nothing more.

Robin stood against the door-post. The effect of
this upon him was to make his small jaw square .
itself.

“Don’t mind us at all,” he said. “We—we know!”

The little fellow looked at Meg and then up at him.
In that look he saw that they did know.

“Mother was going to give that money to me,” he
said brokenly. “I was going to the Fair on it.
Everybody is going—everybody is talking about it
and thinking about it. Nobody’s been talking of
nothing else for months and months. The streets are
full of people on their way, and they all pass me by.”

He rubbed his sleeve across his forlorn face and
swallowed hard.

“There’s pictures in the shops,” he went on, “ and
flags flying, and everything’s going that way—and me
staying behind.”

Two of the large splendid drops, which had some-
150 Two Lirtie Pitcrms’ PRoGRESS

times gathered in Meg’s eyelashes and fallen on the
straw when she had been telling stories in the barn,
fell now upon her lap.

“Robin!” she said.

Robin stood and stared very straight before him
for a minute, and then his eyes turned and met hers.

“We're very poor,” he said to her, “ but everybody
has—has something.”

“We couldn’t leave him behind,” Meg said. “We
couldn’t! Let’s think.” And she put her head down,
resting her elbows on her knee, and clutching her
forehead with her supple, strong little hands.

“What can we do without?” said Robin. “Let’s
do without something.”

Meg lifted her head.

“We will eat nothing but the eggs for breakfast,”
she said, “and go without lunch—if we can; perhaps
we can’t, but we'll try. And we will not go into
some of the places we have to pay to go into. And I
will make up stories about them for you—Robin, it is
true. Everybody has something to give. That’s
what I have—the stories I make up.. It’s something
—Jjust a little.”

“Tt isn’t so little,” Robin answered. “It fills in the
empty places. Meg?” with a questioning tone in his
voice.
Two Littte Pinartms Progress 151

She answered it with a little nod, and then put her
hand on Ben’s arm again. During their rapid inter-
change of words, he had been gazing at them in a
dazed, uncomprehending way. To his poor little
starved nature they seemed so strong and different
from himself, that there was something wonderful
about them. -Meg’s glowing face quite made his
weak heart beat as she turned it upon him.

“We are not much better off than you are,” she
said; “but we think we’ve got enough to take you |
into the grounds. You let us have your bed. Come
along with us.”

“To—to—the Fair ?” he said tremulously.

“Yes,” she answered. “And when we get in I'll
try and think up things to tell you and Robin about
the places we can’t afford to go into. We can go into
the palaces for nothing.”

“Palaces!” he gasped, his wide eyes on her face.

She laughed.

“That's what we call them,” she said. “That’s
what they are. It’s part of a story. Tl tell it to
you as we go.”

“Oh!” he breathed out with a sort of gasp again.

He evidently did not know how to express himself ;
his hands trembled, and he looked half frightened.

“Tf you'll do it,” he said, “I'll remember you all
152 Two Lirtte Pincrims’ Procress

my life! “TPM—TM— If it wasn’t for father, I
know mother would let you sleep here every night
for nothing, and I’d give you my bed and be glad to
do it, I would. Ill be so thankful to you. I haint
got nothin’—nothin’—but Tl be that thankful—I ”—
There was a kind of hysterical break in his voice.
“Let me go and tell mother,” he said, and he got up,
stumbling, and rushed into the house.

Meg and Robin followed him to the kitchen, as
excited as he was. The woman had just put a
cracked bowl of something hot on the table, and as he
came in she spoke to him.

“Your mush is ready,” she said. “Come and eat
while it’s hot.”

“Mother!” he cried out, “they are going to take
me in! I’m going! They’re going to take me!”

The woman stopped short and looked at the twins,
who stood in the doorway. It seemed as if her chin
rather trembled.

“Youre going—?” she began, and broke off.
“ You're as poor as he is,” she ended. “You must be,
or you wouldn’t have come here to room.”

“We're as poor in one way,” said Meg, “ but we
worked and saved money to come. It isn’t much, but
we can do without something that would cost fifty
cents, and that will pay for his ticket.”
Two Lirrite Pinertms Progress 153





The woman’s chin trembled more still.

“Well,” she said, “I—I—O Lord!” And _ she
threw her apron over her head, and sat down
suddenly.

Meg went over to her not exactly knowing why.

“We couldn’t bear not to go ourselves,” she said,
“and he is like us.”

She was thinking, as she spoke, that this woman
and her boy were very fond of each other. The
hands holding the apron were trembling as his had .
done. They dropped as suddenly as they had been
thrown up. The woman lifted her face eagerly.

“What were you thinking of going without?” she
asked. “Was it things to eat?”

“We—we've got some hard-boiled eggs,” faltered
Meg a little guiltily.

“There's hot mush in the pan,” said the woman,
“There’s nothing to eat with it, but it’s healthier than
cold eggs. Sit down and eat some.”

And they did; and in half an hour they left the
poor house, feeling full fed and fresh, and—his mother
standing on the step looking after him—with them
went Ben, his pale old face almost flushed and young,
as it set itself toward the City Beautiful.

20
CHAPTER XV

JOHN HOLT

Meg stopped them both. She was
palpitating with excitement.



“Robin,” she said, “let us make him
shut his eyes. Then you can take one of his hands
and I can take the other, and we will lead him. And
when we have taken him to the most heavenly place,
he shall look—suddenly !”

“TI should like that,” said Ben, tremulous with
anticipation.

“ All right,” said Robin.

By this time it was as if they had been friends all
their lives. They knew each other. They had not
ceased talking a moment since they had set out, but
it had not been about the Fair. Meg had decided
that nothing’ should be described beforehand—that
all the entrancement of beauty should burst upon
Ben’s hungry soul, as paradise bursts upon translated

spirits.
154
Two Littir Pinarms’ Progress 155

“T don’t want it to be gradual,” she said anxiously.
“T want it to be sudden! It can be gradual after.”

She was an artist and an epicure in embryo, this
child. She tasted her joys with a delicate palate, and
lost no flavour of them. The rapture of yesterday
was intensified tenfold to-day, because she felt it
throbbing anew in this frail body beside her, in which
Nature had imprisoned a soul as full of longings as
her own, but not so full of power.

They took Ben by either hand and led him with .
the greatest care. He shut his eyes tight, and walked
between them. People who glanced at them, smiled,
recognising the time-honoured and familiar child-
trick. They did not know that this time it was
something more than that.

“The trouble is,’ Meg said in a low voice to Robin,
“T don’t know which is the most heavenly place to
stand. Sometimes I think it is at one end, and some-
times at the other, and sometimes at the side.”

They led their charge for some minutes indefinitely.
Sometimes they paused and looked about them, speak-
ing in undertones. Ben was rigidly faithful, and kept
his eyes shut. As they hesitated for a moment near
one of the buildings, a man who was descending the
steps looked in their direction, and his look was one of
recognition, It was the man who had watched them
156 Two Litrie Pincers’ Proaress



the day before, and he paused upon the steps, in-
terested again, and conscious of being curious.

“What are they ‘going to do?” he said to himself.
“They are going to do something. Where did they
pick up the other one ?—poor little chap!”

Meg had been looking very thoughtful during that
moment of hesitancy. She spoke, and he was near
enough to hear her.

“He shall open them where he can hear the water
splashing in the fountain,” she said. “TI think that’s
the best.”

It seemed that Robin thought so too. They turned
and took their way to the end of the court where the
dome lifted itself wonderful against the sky, and a
splendour of rushing water from which magnificent
sea-monsters rose, stood guard before.

Their Man followed them. He had had a bad night,
and had come out ina dark world. The streams of
pleasure-seekers, the gaily fluttering flags, the ex-
hilaration in the very air seemed to make his world
blacker and more empty. A year before he had
planned to see this wonder with the one soul on earth
who would have been most thrilled, and who would
have made him most thrill to its deepest and highest
meaning. Green grass and summer roses were waving
over the earth that had shut in all dreams like these


*«* Now,” said Meg, ‘‘open them —suddenly.”’
Two Lirrte Pincers’ Progress 157



for him. As he had wandered about he had told
himself that he had been mad to come and see it all,
so alone. Sometimes he turned away from the crowd
and sat in some quiet corner of palace or fairy garden
—and it was because he was forced to do it, for it was
at times when he was in no condition to be looked at
by careless passers-by.

He had never been particularly fond of children ;
but somehow these two waifs, with their alert faces
and odd independence, had wakened his interest. He
was conscious of rather wanting to know where they
had come from and what they would do next. The
bit of the story of the Genie of the Palace of the Sea
had attracted him. He had learned to love stories
from the one who should have seen with him the
Enchanted City. She had been a story-lover and full
of fancies.

He followed the trio to the end of the great court.
When they reached there, three pairs of cheeks were
flushed, and the eyes that were open were glowing.
Meg and Robin chose a spot of ground and stopped.

“Now,” said Meg, “open them—suddenly !”

The boy opened them. The man saw the look that
flashed into his face. It was a strange, quivering look.
Palaces which seemed of pure marble surrounded him.

He had never even dreamed of palaces. White stair-
158 Two Lirrite Piuerims’ PRocRess

ways rose from the lagoon, leading to fair open portals
the wondering world passed through to splendours
held within. and marvellous with uplifted arms, holding high the
emblems of its spirit and power, and at the end of
this vista, through the archway, and between the line
of columns bearing statues poised against the back-
ground of sky, he caught glimpses of the lake’s
scintillating blue.

He uttered a weird little sound. It was part
exclamation and a bit of a laugh, cut short by some-
thing like a nervous sob which did not know what to
do with itself.

“Oh!” he said. And then—‘Oh!” again. And
then “I—I don’t know—what it’s—like!” And he
cleared his throat and stared, and Meg saw his narrow
chest heave up and down.

“Té isn’t like anything, but—something we've
dreamed of perhaps,” said Meg, gazing in ecstasy with
him.

“No—no!” answered Ben. “But I’ve never
dreamed like it.”

Meg put her hand on his shoulder.

“But you will now,” she said. “You will now.”

And their Man had been near enough to hear, and
he came to them. :
Two Lirrte Pinertms’ Progress 159

“Good-morning,” he said. “You're having another
day of it, I see.”

Meg and Robin looked up at him radiant. They
were both in a good enough mood to make friends.
They felt friends with everybody.

“Good-morning,” they answered ; and Robin added,
“We're going to come every day, as long as we can
make our money last.”

“That’s a good enough idea,” said their Man.
“Where are your father and mother?”

Meg lifted her searching black-lashed eyes to his.
She was noticing again the dreary look in his face.

“They died nearly four, years ago,” she answered
for Robin.

“Who is with you?” asked the man, meeting her
questioning gaze with a feeling that her great eyes
were oddly thoughtful for a child’s, and that there was
a look in them he had seen before in a pair of eyes
closed a year ago. It gave him an almost startled
feeling. ;

“Nobody is with us,” Meg said, “except Ben.”

“You came alone?” said the man.

“Yes.”

He looked at her for a moment in silence, and then
turned away and looked across the court to where
the lake gleamed through the colonnade.
160 Two Lirrite Pinertms’ PrRoaress



“So did I,” he said reflectively. “So did I. Quite
alone.”

Meg and Robin glanced at each other.

“Yesterday Rob and I came by ourselves,” said Meg
next, and she said it gently. “But we were not
lonely—and to-day we have Ben.”

The man turned his eyes on the boy.

“You're Ben, are you?” he said.

“Yes,” Ben answered. “And but for them I couldn’t
never have seen it—never.”

“Why?” the man asked. “Almost everybody can
see it.”

“But not me,” said Ben. “And I wanted to
more than anyone—seemed like to me. And when
they roomed at our house last night, mother was
going to give me the fifty cents, but—but father
—father, he took it away from us. And they
brought me.”

Then the man turned on Robin.

“Have you plenty of money?” he asked un-
ceremoniously.

“No,” said Rob.

“They're as poor as I am,” put in Ben. “They
couldn’t afford to room anywhere but with poor
people.”

“ But everybody ”—Meg began impulsively, and then
Two LirrLte PitGRims’ PROGRESS 161

stopped, remembering that it was not Robin she was
talking to.

“ But everybody—what ?” said the man.

It was Robin who answered for her this time.

“She said that last night,” he explained, with a half-
shy laugh—*that everybody had something they
could give to somebody else.”

“Oh! well, it isn’t always money, of course—or
anything big,” said Meg hurriedly. “It might be
something that is ever so little.”

The man laughed, but his eyes seemed to be re-
membering something as he looked over the lagoon
again.

“Thats a pretty good thing to think,” he said.
“ Now ”—turning on Meg rather suddenly—* I wonder
what you have to give to me.”

“JT don’t know,” she answered, perhaps a trifle
wistfully. “The thing I give to Rob and Ben is a
very little one.”

“She makes up things to tell us about the places
we can’t pay to go into, or don’t understand,” said
Robin. “It’s not as little as she thinks it is.”

“Well,” said the man, “look here! Perhaps that’s
what you have to give to me. You came to this place
alone, and so did I. I believe you're enjoying your-

selves more than I am. You're going to take Ben
2I
162 Two Lirrie Pirerims’ ProGREss



about and tell him stories. Suppose you take
me!”

“You!” Meg exclaimed, “But you're a man, and
you know all about it, I daresay—and I only tell
things I make up—fairy stories and—and other
things. A man wouldn’t care for them. He—he
knows.”

“ He knows too much perhaps—that’s the trouble,”
said the man, “A fairy or so might do me good.
Im not acquainted enough with them. And if I know
things you don’t—perhaps that’s what I have to give
to you.”

“Why!” said Meg, her eyes widening as she looked
up at his odd, clever face, “do you want to go about
with us?”

“Yes,” said the man, with a quick, decided nod, “I
believe that’s just what I want to do. I’m lonelier
than you two. At least you are together. .Come on,
children,” but it was to Meg he held out his hand.
“Take me with you.”

And bewildered as she was, Meg found herself
giving her hand to him and being led away, Robin
and Ben close beside them.
CHAPTER XVI

THE BEGINNING OF A FAIRY
STORY



/T was such a strange thing—so unlike
the things of every day, and so totally
an unexpected thing, that for a little
while they all three had a sense of
scarcely knowing what to do with themselves. If
Robin and Meg had not somehow rather liked the
man and vaguely felt him friendly, and if there had
not been in their impressionable minds that fancy
about his being far from as happy as the other people
of the crowds looked, it is more than probable that
they would not have liked their position, and would
have felt that it might spoil their pleasure.

But they were sympathetic children, and they had
been lonely and sad enough themselves to be moved
by a sadness in others, even if it was an uncom-
prehended one.

As she walked by the man’s side, still letting her

hand remain in his, Meg kept giving him scrutinising
164 Two Lirrte Pruerims’ Progress

looks aside, and trying in her way to read him. He
was a man just past middle life; he was powerful and
well built, and had keen and at the same time rather
unhappy-looking blue eyes, with brows and lashes as
black as Rob’s and her own. There was something
strong in his fine-looking, clean-cut face, and the
hand which held hers had a good, firm grasp, and felt
like a hand which had worked in its time.

As for the man himself, he was trying an experi-
ment. He had been suddenly seized with a desire to
try it and see how it would result. He was not sure
that it would be a success, but if it proved one it might
help to rid him of gloom he would be glad to be
relieved of. He felt it rather promising when Meg
went at once to the point and asked him a practical
question.

“You don’t know our names?” she said.

“You don’t know mine,” he answered. “It’s John
Holt. You can call me that.”

“John Holt,’ said Meg. “Mr. John Holt.”

The man laughed. Her grave, practical, little air
pleased him.

“Say John Holt without the handle to it,” he said.
“Tt sounds well.”

Meg looked at him inquiringly. Though he had
laughed, he seemed to mean what he said,
Two Lirtte Pincrims’ Progress 165

“Tt’s queer, of course,” she said, “because we don’t
know each other well; but I can do it, if you like.”

“J do like,” he said, and he laughed again.

“Very well,” said Meg. “My name’s Margaret
Macleod. I’m called Meg, for short. My brother's
name is Robin, and Ben’s is Ben Nowell. Where
shall we go first?”

“You are the leader of the party,” he answered, his
face beginning to brighten a little. “Where shall
it be?”

“The Palace of the Genie of the Flowers,” she said.

“Ts that what it is called?” he asked.

“That’s what we call it,” she explained. “That's
part of the fairy story. We are part of a fairy story,
and all these are palaces that the Genii built for the
Great Magician.”

“That’s first-rate,’ he said. “Just tell us about it.
Ben and I have not heard.”

At first she had wondered if she could tell her
stories to a grown-up person, but there was something
in his voice and face that gave her the feeling that
she could. She laughed a little when she began; but
he listened with enjoyment that was so plain, and
Ben walking by her side looked up with such eager,
enraptured, and wondering eyes, that she went on
bravely. It grew, as stories will, in being told, and
166 Two Lirrte Pirertms’ Procress



it was better than it had been the day before. Robin
himself saw that and leaned towards her as eagerly
as Ben.

By the time they entered the Palace of the Flowers,
and stood among the flame of colours and beneath the
great palm-fronds swaying under the crystal globe
that was its dome, she had warmed until she was all
aglow and as full of fancies as the pavilions were of
blossoms.

As she dived into the story of the Genie who strode
through tropical forests and deep jungles, over purple
moors and up mountain-sides where strange-hued, pale
or vivid things grew in tangles, or standing in the sun
alone, John Holt became of the opinion that his experi-
ment would be a success. It was here that he began
to find he had gifts to give. She asked him questions,
Robin and Ben asked him questions, the three drew
close to him and hung on his every word.

“You know the things and the places where they
grow,’ Meg said.. “We have never seen anything.
We can only try to imagine. You can tell us.” And
he did tell them, and as they went from court to
pavilion, surrounded by sumptuous bloom and sumptu-
ous leafage and sumptuous fragrance, the three began
to cling to him, to turn to him with every new
discovery, and to forget he was a stranger. He knew
Two Lirrte Pinerims’ Progress 167



that he was less gloomy than he had been before, and
that somehow this thing seemed worth doing.

And in this way they went from place to place.
As they had seen beauties and wonders the day
before, they saw wonders and beauties to-day, but
to-day their pleasure had a flavour new to them. For
the first time in years, since they had left their little
seat ab their own fireside, they were not alone, and
someone seemed to mean to look after them. John
Holt was an eminently practical person, and when
they left the Palace of the Flowers they began
vaguely to realise that, stranger or not, he had taken
charge of them. It was evident that he was in the
habit of taking charge of people and things. He took
charge of the satchel. It appeared that he knew
where it was safe to leave it.

“Can we get it at lunch-time?” Robin asked, with
some anxiety.

“You can get it when you want it,” said John Holt.

A little later he looked at Ben’s pale small face
scrutinisingly.

“Look here,” he said, “you're tired.” And without
any further question he called up a rolling chair.

“Get into that,” he said.

“Me?” said Ben, a little alarmed.

“Yes.”
168 Two LirrLte Pinerimus’ PRoGREss



And almost a shade paler at the thought of such
grandeur, Ben got in and fell back with a luxurious
sigh. .

And at midday, when they were beginning to feel



‘LOOK HERE,” HE SAID, “YOU'RE TIRED.”

ravenous, though no one mentioned the subject, he
asked Meg a blunt question.

“Where did you eat your lunch yesterday?” he
asked.
Two Litrte Piterims’ Progress 169

Meg flushed a little, feeling that hospitality
demanded that they should share the remaining eggs
with such a companion, and she was afraid there
would be very few to offer when Ben was taken into
consideration. |

“We went to a quiet place on the Wooded Island,”
she said, “and ate it with the roses. We pretended
they invited us. We had only hard-boiled eggs and a
sandwich each; but a kind woman gave us something
of her own.”

“We brought the eggs from home,” explained Rob.
“We have some chickens of our own who laid them.
We thought that would be cheaper than buying things.”

“Oh!” said John Holt. “So you’ve been living on
hard-boiled eggs. Got any left?”

“A few,” Meg answered. “They’re in the satchel.
We shall have to go and get it.”

“Come along then,” said John Holt. “Pretty
hungry by this time, aren’t you?”

“Yes,” said Meg, with heartfelt frankness. “We
are !”

It was astonishing how much John Holt had found
out about them during this one morning. They did
not know themselves how much their answers to his
occasional questions had told him. He had not known

himself when he asked the questions, how much their
22
170 Two Lirrie Piterms’ PRoGREsS



straightforward, practical replies would reveal. They
had not sentimentalised over their friendless loneliness,
but he had found himself realising what desolate, un-
noticed, and uncared-for things their lives were. They
had not told him how they had tired their young
bodies with work too heavy for them, but he had
realised it. In his mind there had risen a picture of
the Straw Parlour under the tent-like roof of the barn,
with these two huddled together in the cold, buried in
the straw while they talked over their desperate plans.
They had never thought of calling themselves strong
and determined and clear of wit, but he knew how
strong and firm of purpose and endurance two
creatures so young and unfriended and so poor must
have been to form a plan so bold, and carry it out in
the face of the obstacles of youth and inexperience and
empty pockets and hands. He had laughed at the
story of the Treasure saved in pennies and hidden
deep in the straw, but as he had laughed he had
thought with a quick, soft throb of his heart, that the
woman he had loved and lost would have laughed
with him with tears in the eyes which Meg’s reminded
him of. He somehow felt as if she might be wander-
ing about with them in their City Beautiful this
morning, they were so entirely creatures she would
have been drawn to, and longed to make happier.
Two Lirrte Pincrms’ Progress 171



He liked their fancy of making their poor little
feast within scent of the roses. It was just such a
fancy as she might have had herself. And he wanted
to see what they had to depend on. He knew it must
be little, and it touched him to know that, little as they
had, they meant to share it with their poorer friend.

They went for the satchel, and when they did so
they began to calculate as to what they could add to
its contents. They were few things and poor ones.

He did not sit down, but stood by and watched
them for a moment, when, having reached their
sequestered nook, they began to spread out their
banquet. It was composed of the remnant eggs, some
bread, and a slice of cheese. It looked painfully scant,
and Meg had an anxious eye.

“Ts that all?” asked John Holt abruptly.

“Yes,” said Meg. “We shall have to make it do.”

“My Lord!” ejaculated John Holt suddenly in his
blunt fashion, And he turned round and walked
away.

“Where's he gone?” exclaimed Ben timidly.

But they none of them could guess. Nice as he
had been, he had a brusque way, and perhaps he
meant to leave them.

But by the time they had divided the eggs and the

bread and cheese, and had fairly begun, he came
172. Two Lirrte Pinertms’ PRoGRESS

marching back. He had a basket on his arm, and
two bottles stuck out of one coat pocket, while a
parcel protruded from the other. He came and threw
himself down on the grass beside them and opened
the basket. It was full of good things.

“Tm going to have lunch with you,” he said; “and
I have a pretty big appetite, so I've brought you
something to eat. You can’t tramp about on that
sort of thing.”

The basket they had seen the day before had been
a poor thing compared to this. The contents of this
would have been a feast for much more fastidious
creatures than three ravenous children. There were
chicken and sandwiches and fruit and cake, the
bottles held lemonade, and the package in the coat
pocket was a box of candy.

“We—never had such good things in our lives,”
Meg gasped amazed.

“Hadn't you?” said John Holt, with a kind and
even a happy grin. “Well, pitch in!”
CHAPTER XVII
THE FAIRY STORY CONTINUED

WHAT a feast it was—what a feast!
| They were so hungry, they were so
i happy, they were so rejoiced. And

John Holt watched them as if he had

never enjoyed himself so much before. He laughed,



he made jokes, he handed out good things, he poured
out lemonade.
~ “Tet’s drink to the Great Magician !” he said, filling
the little glasses he had brought, and he made them
drink it, standing, as a toast. In all the grounds that
day there was not sucha party. It was so exhilarated
and so amazed at itself, Little Ben looked and ate
and laughed as if the lemonade had gone to his
head.
“Oh, my!” he said, “if mother could see me!”
“We'll bring her to-morrow !” said John Holt.
“Are you”—faltered Meg, looking at him with
wide eyes—‘are you coming again to-morrow ?”

“Yes,” John Holt answered, “and you are coming
173
174 Two Litre PILGRIMS’ PROGRESS

with me—and we'll come every day until you’ve seen
it all—if you three will pilot me around.”

“You must be very rich, John Holt,” said Meg.
She had found out that it was his whim to want her
to call him so.

“T have plenty of money,” he said, “if that’s being
rich, Oh! yes, I've got money enough. I’ve more
land than Aunt Matilda.”

And then it was that suddenly Robin remembered
something. “I believe,” he said, “that I’ve heard
Aunt Matilda speak about you to Jones. I seem to
remember your name. You have the biggest farm in
Illinois, and you have houses and houses in town.
Meg, don’t you remember—when he got married, and
everybody talked about how rich he was?”

And Meg did remember. She looked at him softly,
and thought she knew why he had seemed gloomy,
for she remembered that this rich and envied man’s
wife had had a little child and died suddenly. And
she had even heard once that it had almost driven him
mad, because he had been fond of her.

“ Are you—that one?” she said.

“Yes,” he answered. “I’m the one who got
married.” And the cloud fell on his face again, and
for a minute or so rested there. For he thought this

thing which had happened to him was cruel and
Two Litrte Pincers’ Procress 175



hideous, and he had never ceased to rebel against it
bitterly.

Meg drew a little closer to him, but she said no
more about what she knew he was thinking of. She
was a clever little thing, and knew this was not the
time.

And after they had eaten of the good things, until
hunger seemed a thing of the past, the afternoon
began as a fairy story indeed. Little by little they
began to realise that John Holt was their good and
powerful giant, for it seemed that he was not only
ready to do everything for them, but was rich enough.

“Have you been to the Midway Plaisance?” he
askedthem. He felt very sure, however, that they had
not, or that if they had, with that scant purse, they
had not seen what they longed to see.

“No, we haven't,” said Meg. “We thought we
would save it until we had seen so many other things
that we should not mind so very much only seeing
the outsides of places. We knew we should have to
make up stories all the time.”

“We won’t save it,” said John Holt. “We'll go
now. We will hobnob with Bedouins and Japanese
and Turks, and shake hands with Amazons and
Indians; we'll ride on camels and go to the Chinese
Theatre. Come along.”
176 Two Littte Piuerims’ PRoGRESS

And to this Arabian Nights’ Entertainment he
took them all. They felt as if he was a prince. And
oh! the exciting strangeness of it! To be in sucha
place and amid such marvels with a man who seemed
to set no limit to the resources of his purse. They
had never even been near a person who spent money
as if it were made for spending, and the good things
of life were made to be bought by it. What John
Holt spent was only what other people with full
purses spent in the Midway Plaisance, but to Meg and
Robin and Ben it seemed that he poured forth money
in torrents. They looked at him with timorous
wonder and marvelling gratitude. It seemed that he
meant them to see everything and to do everything.
They rode on camels down a street in Cairo, they
talked to chiefs of the desert, they listened to strange
music, they heard strange tongues, and tasted strange
confections. Robin and Ben went about like creatures
in a delightful dream. Every few minutes during
the first hour Robin would sidle close to Meg and
clutch her dress or her hand with a grasp of
rapture.

“Oh, Meg!” he would say, “and yesterday we were
so poor! And now we are seeing everything |”

And when John Holt heard him, he would laugh
half to himself, a laugh with a touch of pleasant
Two Lirrte Pinertms’ Progress 177

exultation in it and no gloom atall. He had found
something to distract him at last.

He liked to watch Meg’s face as they went from
one weirdly foreign place to another. Her eyes were
immense with delight, and her face had the flush of
an Indian peach. Once she stopped suddenly in such
a glow of strange delight that her eyes were full of
other brightness than the shining of her pleasure.

. Fairy stories do happen!” she said. “You have
made one! It was a fairy story yesterday—but now
—oh! just think how like a fairy king you are, and
what you are giving to us! It will be enough to
make stories of for ever!”

He laughed again, She found out in time that he
often laughed—that short half laugh—when he was
moved by something. He had had a rough sort of
life, successful as it had been, and it was not easy for
him to express all he felt.

“That's all right,” he said. “That’s just as it
should be. But you are giving something to me too
—you three.”

And so they were, and it was not a little thing.

Their afternoon was a thing of which they could
never have dreamed, and for which they could never
have hoped. Before it was half over, they began to

feel that not only John Holt was a prince, but that by
23
178 Two Lirtte Pitcrims’ PRoGREss



some magic metamorphosis they had become princes
themselves. It seemed that nothing in that City
Beautiful was to be closed to them. It was John
Holt’s habit to do things in a thorough business-like
way, and he did this thing ina manner which was a
credit to his wit and good sense.

Ben, who had never been taken care of in his life,
was taken about in a chair, and looked after in a way
that made him wonder if he was not dreaming, and if
he should not be wakened presently by the sound of
his father’s drunken voice.

Robin found himself more than once rubbing his
forehead in a puzzled fashion.

Meg felt rather as if she had become a princess.
_ Somehow she and John Holt seemed to have known
each other along time. He seemed to like to keep
her near him, and always kept his eye on her, to see
if she was enjoying herself, and was comfortable or
tired. She found herself being wheeled by Ben’s side
when John Holt decided it was time for her to rest.
He walked by her, and talked to her, answering all
her questions. More than once it flashed into her
mind that it would be very awful when all this
joy was over, and they parted, as they would. But
they were going to see him to-morrow, he had
said,
Two Litrte Pruerims’ Proacress 179



It seemed as if they marched from one climax of
new experience to another.

“Youre going to dine with me,” he announced.
“You've had enough hard-boiled eggs. And we'll see
the illuminations afterwards.”

He took them to what seemed to them a dining
place for creatures of another world. It was so
brilliant with light, so decorated, so gorgeous.
Servants moved to and fro, electric globes gleamed,
palms and flowers added to the splendour of colour
and brightness. John Holt gave them an excellent
dinner; they thought it was a banquet. Ben kept
his eyes on John Holt’s face at every mouthful. He
felt as if he might vanish away. He looked as if he
had done this every day of his life. He called the
waiters as if he knew no awe of any human being,
and the waiters flew to obey him.

In the evening he took them to see the City
Beautiful as it looked at night. It was set, it seemed
to them, with myriads of diamonds all alight. Endless
chains of jewels seemed strung and wound about it.
The Palace of the Flowers held up a great crystal of
light glowing against the dark blue of the sky, towers
and domes were crowned and diademed, thousand of
jewels hung among the masses of leaves, or reflected
themselves sparkling in the darkness of the lagoons,
180 Two Lirrte Pinerims’ PRoGREss

fountains of molten jewels sprung up and flamed and
changed. The City Beautiful stood out whiter and
more spirit-like than ever in the pure radiance of
these garlands of clearest flame.

When first they came out upon it, Robin involun-
tarily pressed close to Meg, and their twin hands
clasped each other.

“Oh, Meg!” cried Robin.

“Oh, Robin!” breathed Meg, and she turned to John
Holt and caught his hand too.

“Oh, John Holt!” she said, “ John Holt!”

Very primitive and brief exclamations of joy, but
somehow human beings have uttered them just as
simply in all great moments through centuries.

John Holt knew just the degree of rapturous
feeling they expressed, and he held Meg’s hand close
and with a warm grasp.

They saw the marvellously fairy spectacle from all
points and from all sides. Led by John Holt, they
lost no view and no beauty. They feasted full of all
the delight of it, and at last he took them to a quiet
corner, where through the trees sparkled lights and
dancing water, and let them talk it out.

The day had been such an incredible one, with its
succession of excitements and almost unreal pleasures,
that they had actually forgotten that the night must
Two Lirrte Pincrims’ Progress 181

come. They were young enough for that indiscretion,
and when they sat down and began to realise how
tired they were, they also began to realise a number
of other things.

A little silence fell upon them. Ben’s head began
to droop slightly upon his shoulder, and John Holt’s
quick eye saw it.

“ Have you had a good day ?” he asked.

“ Rob,” said Meg, “ when we sat in the Straw Parlour
and talked about the City Beautiful, and the people
who would come to it—when we thought we could
never see it ourselves—did we ever dream that any-
body—even if they were kings and queens—could
have such a day?”

“Never,” answered Robin—“never! We didn’t
know such a day was in the world.”

“That's right,” said John Holt. “I’m glad it’s
seemed as good as that. Now, where did you think
of spending the night?”

Meg and Rob looked at each other. Since Rob had
suggested to her in the morning a bold thought, they
had had no time to discuss the matter, but now each
one remembered the bold idea, Rob got up and came
close to John Holt.

“This morning I thought of something,” he said,

“and once again this afternoon I thought of it. I
182 Two Lirrte Piterims’ PrRoGREss

don’t know whether we could do it, but you could tell
us. Do you think—this is such a big place and there
are so many corners we could creep into, and it’s such
a fine night—do you think we could wait until all the
people are gone, and then find a place to sleep without
going out of the grounds. It would save us buying
the tickets in the morning, and Ben could stay with
us. I told his mother that perhaps he might not come
home—and he could have another day.”

John Holt laughed his short laugh.

“ Were you thinking of doing that ?” he said; “ well,
you have plenty of sand, anyway.”

“Do you think we could do it?” asked Meg.
“ Would they find us and drive us out?”

John Holt laughed again.

“Great Caesar!” he said. “No, I don’t think they’d
find youtwo. Luck would be with you. But I know
a plan worth two of that. I’m going to take you all
three to my hotel.”

“A hotel?” said Meg.

Ben lifted his sleepy head from his shoulder.

“Yes,” said John Holt. “I can make them find
corners for you, though they’re pretty crowded. I’m
not going to lose sight of you. This has begun to be
_ my tea-party.”

Meg looked at him with large and solemn eyes.
Two Litre Pinerims’ Progress 183

“ Weil,” she said, “it’s a fairy story, and it’s getting
fairyer and fairyer every minute.”

She leaned forward with her heart quite throbbing.
Because it was he who did this splendid thing—he to
whom all things seemed possible—it actually seemed
a thing to be accepted as if a magician had done it.

“Oh, how good you are to us!” she said. “How
good and how good! And what is the use of saying
only ‘Thank you. Ishould not be surprised,” with a
touch of awe, “if you took us to a hotel built of gold.”

How heartily John Holt laughed then.

“Well, some of them ought to be by the time this
thing’s over,” he said. “But the lights will soon be
out, the people are going, and Ben’s nearly dead.
Let’s go and find a carriage.
CHAPTER XVIII

ENTER AUNT MATILDA





7 KS, they went home in a carriage. John
!) Holt put them into it, and settled back
into it himself, as if comfortable

POSE cushions were only what belonged to
tired people. And he took them to one of the hotels
whose brilliantly lighted fronts they had trudged
wearily by the night before; and they had a good
supper and warm baths and delicious beds, and Meg
went to sleep with actual tears of wonder and grati-
tude on her lashes, and they all three slept the sleep
of Eden, and dreamed the dreams of Paradise. And
in the morning they had breakfast with John Holt in
the hotel dining-room, and a breakfast as good as the
princely dinner he had given them, and after it, they
all went back with him to the City Beautiful, and the
fairy story began again. For, near the entrance where
they went in, they actually found Ben’s mother in
a state of wonder beyond words, for by the use of

' Some magic messenger, that wonderful John Holt had
184
Two Lirrte Pinerims’ Progress 185

sent word to her that Ben was in safe hands and that
she must come and join him, and the money to make
this possible had been in the letter.

Poor, tired, discouraged, down-trodden woman, how
she lost her breath when Ben threw himself upon her
and poured forth his story! And what a face she
wore through all that followed! How Ben led her
from triumph to triumph with the exultant air of one
to whom the City Beautiful almost belonged, and
who, consequently, had it to bestow as a rich gift on
those who did not know it as he did. What wonder-
ing glances his mother kept casting on his face, which
had grown younger with each hour! She had never
seen him look like this before. And what glances she
cast aside at John Holt! This was one of the rich
men poor people heard of. She had never been near
one of them. She had often rather hated them.

Before the day was over, Robin and Meg realised
that this wonder was to go on as long as there was
anything of the City Beautiful they had not seen.
They were to drink deep draughts of delight as long
as they were thirsty for more. John Holt made this
plain to them in his blunt, humorous way. He was
going to show them everything and share all their
pleasures, and they were to stay at the golden hotel

every night.
24
186 Two Lirrite Pinerims’ Procress



And John Holt was getting almost as much out of
it as they were. He wandered about alone no more;
he did not feel as if he were only a ghost with nothing
in common with the human beings passing by. In
the interest and excitement of generalship and
management, and the amusement of seeing this
unspoiled freshness of his charges’ delight in all
things, the gloomy look faded out of his face, and he
looked like a different man. Once they came upon
two men who seemed to know him, and the first one
who spoke to him glanced at the children in some
surprise.

“Hello, John!” he said; “set up a family ?”

“ Just what I’ve done,” answered John Holt. “Set
up a family. A man’s no right to be going round a
place like this without one.”

“How do you get on with it?” asked the other.
“Find it pay?”

“Pay!” said John Holt, with a big laugh. “Great
Scott! I should say so! It’s worth twice the price of
admission !”

“Glad of it,” said hig friend, giving him a curious
look.

And, as he went away, Meg heard him say to his

companion—

“Tt was time he found something that paid—John
Two Littte Pincers’ PRrocress 187



Holt. He was in a pretty bad way—a pretty bad
way.”

As they became more and more intimate and spoke
more to each other, Meg understood how bad a “way ”
he had been in. She was an observing, old-fashioned
child, and she saw many things a less sympathetic
creature might have passed by; and when John Holt
discovered this—which he was quite shrewd enough
to do rather soon—he gradually began to say things
to her he would not have said to other people. She
understood somehow that though the black look
passed away from his face, and he laughed and made
them laugh, there was a thing that was never quite
out of his mind. She saw that pictures brought it
back to him, that strains of music did, that pretty
mothers with children hurt him when they passed,
and that every now and then he would cast a broad
glance over all the whiteness and blueness and beauty
and grace, and draw a long, quick sigh, as if he was
homesick for something.

“You know,” he said once when he did this and
looked round and found Meg’s eyes resting yearningly
upon him—* you know she was coming with me! We
planned it all. Lord! how she liked to talk of it!
She said it would be an enchanted city—just as you
did, Meg. That was one of the first things that made
188 Two Lirrue Pitarims’ PRrocRess



me stop to listen—when I heard you say that. An
enchanted city!” he repeated pondering. “Lord,
Lord !”

“Well,” said Meg, with a little catch in her oreath
—“well, you know, John Holt, she’s got to an en-
chanted city that won’t vanish away; hasn’t she?”

She did not say it with any sanctified little air.
Out of their own loneliness and the Pilgrim’s
Progress and her ardent fancies, the place she and
Robin had built to take refuge in was a very real
thing. It had many modern improvements upon the
vagueness of harps and crowns. There were good
souls who might have been astounded and rather
shocked by it, but they believed in it very implicitly,
and found great comfort in their confidence in its
joyfulness. They thought of themselves as walking
about its streets exactly as rapturously as they walked
about this earthly City Beautiful. And because it
was so real, there was a note in Meg’s voice which
gave John Holt a sudden touch of new feeling as he
looked back at her.

“Do you suppose she is?” he said. “You believe
in that, don’t you—you believe in it?”

Meg looked a little troubled for a moment.

“Why,” she said, “Rob and I talk to each other

and invent things about it, just as we talked about
Two Litrte Prucrims’ Progress 189



this. We just have to, you see. Perhaps we say
things that would seem very funny to religious people.
I don’t think we’re religious—but—but we do like it.”

“Do you?” said John Holt. “Perhaps I should
too. You shall tell me some stories about it—and
you shall put her there. If I could feel as if she was
somewhere |”

“Oh,” said Meg, “she must be somewhere, you know !
She couldn’t go out, John Holt.”

He cast his broad glance all round, and caught his
breath as if remembering.

“Lord, Lord!” he said. “No! She couldn’t go
out!”

Meg knew afterwards why he said this with such
force. “She” had been a creature who was so full of
life and of the joy of living. She had been gay, and
full of laughter and humour. She had had a wonder-
ful, vivid mind, which found colour and feeling and
story in the commonest things. She had been so
clever and so witty, and such a bright and warm
thing in her house. When she had gone away from
earth so suddenly people had said with wonder, “ But
it seemed as if she could not die!” But she had
died, and her child had died too, scarcely an hour
after it was born, and John Holt had been left
stunned and aghast, and almost stricken into gloomy
190 Two Lirrie Piuertms’ Procress



madness, And in some way Meg was like her, with her
vivid little face and her black-lashed eyes, her City
Beautiful and her dreams and stories, which made
the realities of her life. It was a strange chance
—a marvellously kind chanece—which had thrown
them together—these two who were of such different
worlds, and yet who needed each other so much.

During the afternoon, seeing that Meg looked a
little tired, and also realising in his practical fashion
that Ben’s mother would be more at ease in the
society she was used to, John Holt sent her to ramble
about with her boy, and Robin went with them, and
Meg and John went to rest with the thousands of
roses among the bowers of the fairy island, and there
they said a good deal to each other. John Holt
seemed to find a kind of comfort in finding words
for some of the thoughts he had been silent about
in the past.

“Tt’s a queer thing,” he said, “but when I talk to
you about her, I feel as if she was somewhere near.”

“Perhaps she is,” said Meg, in her matter-of-fact
little way. “We don’t know what they are doing.
But if you had gone into another world, and she had
stayed here, you know you would have come to take
care of her.”

“ That’s true,” said John Holt. “I took care of her
Two LirtrLte Pinegrtms’ Procress 191



when she was here, the Lord knows. There wasn’t
anything on earth she liked that I wouldn’t have
broken my neck to get at. When I built that house
for her,—I built a big house to take her to when we
were married,—she said I hadn’t left out a thing she
cared for. And she knew what things ought to be.
She wasn’t like me, Meg. Id spent my life trying to
make a fortune. I began when I was a boy, and I
worked hard. She belonged to people with money,
and she’d read books, and travelled and seen things.
She knew it all. I didn’t, when first I knew her, but
I learned fast enough afterwards. I couldn’t help
it while I was with her. We planned the house
together. It was one of the best in the country—
architecture, furniture, pictures, and all the rest. The
first evening we spent there’— He stopped and
cleared his throat, and was silent a few seconds. Then
he added, in a rather unsteady voice, “ We were pretty
happy people that evening.”

Later he showed Meg her miniature. He carried
it in an oval case in his inside pocket. It was the
picture of a young woman with a brilliant face,
lovely laughing eyes, and a bright, curving, red
mouth.

“No,” he said as he looked at it, “she couldn't go
out. She’s somewhere.”
192 Two Lirrte Pinertms’ Progress



Then he told Meg about the rooms they had made
ready for “John Holt, Junior,” as they had called the
little child who died so quickly.

“Tt was her idea,” he said. “There was a nursery
with picture-paper on the walls. There was a bath-
room with tiles that told stories about little mermen
and mermaids that she had made up herself. There
was a bedroom with a swinging cot, frilled with lace
and tied with ribbons. And there were picture-books
and toys. The doors never were opened. John Holt,
Junior, never slept in his cot. He slept with his
mother.”

There he broke off a moment again.

“She used to be sorry he wouldn’t be old enough to
appreciate all this,” he said next. “She used to laugh
about him and say, he was going to be cheated out of
it. But she said he should come with us, so that he
could say he had been. She said he had to see it, if
he only stared at it and said ‘ goo,”

“Perhaps he does see it,” said Meg. “I should think
those who have got away from here, and know more
what being alive really means, would want to see
what earth people are trying to do—though they
know so little.”

“That sounds pretty good,” said John Holt. “I
like that.”
Two LITTLE PILGRIMS’ Progress 193

They had been seated long enough to feel rested,
and they rose and went on their way to begin their
pilgrimage again. Just as they were crossing the
bridge, they saw Robin coming tearing towards them.
He had evidently left Ben and his mother somewhere.
He was alone. His hat was on the back of his head,
and he was hot with running.

“Something has happened,” said Meg. “And I
believe I know”.

But Robin had reached them.

“Meg,” he said, panting for breath, “Aunt Matilda’s -
here! She didn’t see me, but I saw her. She’s in the
Agricultural Building, standing before a new steam
plough and she’s chewing a sample of wheat.”

25
CHAPTER XIX

THE BIG HOUSE WOULD SEEM EMPTY NO
MORE



“NHE two children did not know exactly
whether they were frightened or not.
If it had not seemed impossible that
Ls anything should go entirely wrong
while J ohn Holt was near them, they would have felt
rather queer. But John Holt was evidently not the
least alarmed.

“Look here,” he said, “I’m glad of it. I want to
see that woman.”

“Do you?” exclaimed Robin and Meg together.

“Yes, I do,” he said. “Come along, and let’s go and
find her.” And he strode out towards the Agricultural
Building as if he were going towards something
interesting.

It is true that the Agricultural Building had
been too nearly connected with Aunt Matilda’s
_ world to hold the greatest attractions for the little
pilgrims. It had indeed | gone rather hard with
Two Littte Pinerims’ Progress 195

them to find a name for it with a_ beautiful
sound,

“But it is something,” Meg had said; “and it’s a
great huge thing whether we care for it or not. That
it isn’t the thing we care for doesn’t make it any less.
We should be fools if we thought that, of course.
And you know we're not fools, Rob.”

“No,” Rob had said, standing gazing at rakes and
harrows with his brows knit and his legs pretty wide
apart. “And if there’s one thing that shows human
beings can do what they set their minds to, it’s this
place. Why, they used to thresh wheat with flails—
two pieces of wood hooked together. They banged
the wheat on the barn floor—with things like that!
Pll tell you what—as soon as a man gets any
sense he begins to make machines. He bangs at
things with his brain, instead of with his arms and
legs.”

And in the end they had called it the Palace of the
Genie of the Earth and the Seasons and the Sun.
They walked manfully by John Holt through the
place, Robin leading the way, until they came to the
particular exhibit where he had caught sight of Aunt
Matilda. Being a business-like and thorough person,
she was still there, though she had left the steam-
plough and directed her attention to a side-delivery
196 Two Litrite Pincrims’ Procress

hay-rake, which she seemed to find very well worth
study. .

If the children and John Holt had not walked up
and planted themselves immediately in her path, she
would not have seen them. It gave Meg a little
shudder to see how like her world she looked, with
her hard, strong-featured face, her straight skirt and
her square shoulders. They waited until she moved,
and then she looked up and saw them. She did not
start or look nervous in the least. She stared at
them.

“ Well,” she said; “so this was the place you came
to.”

“Yes, Aunt Matilda,” said Robin. “We couldn’t
let it go by us—and we took our own money.”

“ And we knew you wouldn’t be anxious about us,”
said Meg, looking up at her, with a shade of curiosity.

Aunt Matilda gave a dry laugh.

“No,” she said, “I’ve no time to be anxious about
children. I took care of myself when I was your
age; and I had a sort of notion you'd come here.
Who are you with?”

John Holt lifted his hat, but without too much
ceremony. He knew Mrs. Matilda Jennings’ principles
_ were opposed to the ceremonious.

“Ym a sort of neighbour of yours, Mrs. Jennings,”
Two Litrte Pruerms’ Procress 197

he explained. “I have some land near your farm,
though I don’t live on the place. My name is John
Holt.”

Aunt Matilda glanced from him to Robin.

She knew all about John Holt, and was quite
sufficiently business-like to realise that it would be
considered good luck to have him for a friend.

“Well,” she said to them, “you've got into good
hands.”

John Holt laughed.

“By this time we all three think we've got into
good hands,” he said, “and we're going to see this
thing through.”

“They haven’t money enough to see much of it,”
said Mrs. Jennings.

“No,” said John Holt, “but I have, and it’s to be
my treat.”

“Well,” said Aunt Matilda, “I suppose you can
afford it. I couldn’t. Tve come here on business.”

“You'd better let us help you to combine a little
pleasure with it,” said John Holt. “This won't
happen twice in your life or mine.”

“There’s been a lot of money wasted in decorations,”
said Mrs. Jennings. “I don’t believe it will pay
them.”

“Oh, yes; it will pay them,” said John Holt. “ It
198 Two Lirrie Piterims’ PRoGRESS



would pay them if they didn’t make a cent out of it.
It would have paid me, if I'd done it, and lost money.”

“Now, see here,” said Mrs. Matilda Jennings, with
a shrewd air, “the people that built this didn’t do it
for their health—they did it for what they’d make
out of it.”

“Perhaps they did,” said John Holt, “and perhaps
all of them didn’t. And even those that did have
made a bigger thing than they knew—by Jupiter!”

They were all sauntering along together as they
spoke. Meg and Robin wondered what John Holt
was going todo. It looked rather as if he wanted to
see more of Aunt Matilda. And it proved that he did.
He had a reason of his own, and combined with this
a certain keen sense of humour made her entertaining
to him. He wanted to see how the place affected her,
as he had wanted to look on at its effect on Meg and
Robin. But he knew that Aunt Matilda had come to
accumulate new ideas on agriculture, and that she
must be first allowed to satisfy herself on that point,
and he knew the children were not specially happy
in the society of ploughs and threshing-machines,
and he did not think Aunt Matilda’s presence would
add to their pleasure in the Palace of the Earth, the
Seasons, and the Sun; besides, he wanted to talk to
Mrs. Jennings a little alone.
Two Lirtte Pinegrims’ Progress 199

“You know where Ben and his mother are?” he
said to Robin after a few minutes.

“Yes,” Robin answered.

“Then take Meg and go to them for a while. Mrs.
Jennings wants to stay here about an hour more, and
I want to walk round with her. In an hour come
back to the entrance here, and I will meet you.”

Meg and Robin went away as he told them. It
was in one sense rather a relief.

“JT wonder what she'll say to him?” said Meg.

“There’s no knowing,’ Robin answered. “But
whatever it is he will make it all right. He’s one of
those who have found out that human beings can da
things if they try hard enough. He was as lonely
and poor as we are when he was twelve. He told
me so.”

What Aunt Matilda said was very matter of fact.

“T must say,” she said as the children walked off,
“you seem to have been pretty good to them.”

“They’ve been pretty good to me,” said John Holt.
“They’ve been pretty good for me—though they’re
not old enough to know it.”

“They’re older than their age,” said Aunt Matilda.
“Tf they’d been like other children, the Lord knows
what I should have done with them. They’ve been

no trouble in particular.”
200 Two Lirrte Pinerims’ Proaress



“T should imagine not,” said John Holt.

“It was pretty business-like of them,” said Mrs.
Jennings, with another dry laugh, “to make up their
minds without saying a word to anyone, and just
hustle around and make their money to come here.
They both worked pretty steady, I can tell you, and
it wasn’t easy work either. Most young ones would
have given in. But they were bound to get here.”

“They'll be bound to get pretty much where they
make up their minds to, as life goes on,” remarked
John Holt. “That’s their build.”

“Thank goodness, they’re not like their father,”
Mrs. Jennings commented. “Robert hadn’t any
particular fault, but he never made anything.”

“He and his wife seem to have made a home that
was a pretty good start for these children,’ was what
John Holt said.

“Well,” said Mrs. Jennings, “they’ve got to do the
rest themselves. He left them nothing.”

“No other relations but you?” John Holt asked.

“Not asoul, I shall keep them and let them work
on the farm, I suppose.”

“It would pay to educate them well and let them
see the world,” said John Holt.

“I daresay it would pay them,” replied Aunt
Matilda, “but I’ve got all I can do, and my husband’s
Two Lirrte Pingrims’ Progress 201

family have a sort of claim on me. Half the farm
belonged to him.”

They spent their remaining hours in the Agricultural
Building very profitably. Mrs. Jennings found John
Holt an excellent companion. He knew things very
thoroughly, and had far-seeing ideas of how far things
would work, and how much they would pay. He
did not expect Mrs. Jennings to tell him fairy stories,
and he told her none, but before they left the place
they had talked a good deal. John Holt had found out
all he wanted to know about the two children, and
he had made a proposition which certainly gave Aunt
Matilda something new to think of.

She was giving some thought to it when they went
out to meet the party of four at the entrance. She
looked as if she had been rather surprised by some
occurrence, but she did not look displeased, and the
glances she gave to Meg and Robin expressed a new
sense of appreciation of their practical value.

“Tve promised Mr. Holt that I'll let him take me
through the Midway Plaisance,” she said. “I’ve seen
the things I came to see, and I may as well get my
ticket’s worth.”

Meg and Robin regarded her with interest. Aunt
Matilda and the Midway Plaisance taken together

would be such a startling contrast that they must be
26
202 Two Lirtte Pincrims’ PRoGREss

interesting. And as she looked at John Holt’s face
as they went on their way, Meg knew he was thinking
the same thing. And it wasasingular experience. Mrs.
Jennings strode through the curious places rather as if
she were following a plough down a furrow. She
looked at Samoan beauties, Arab chiefs, and Persian
Jersey Lilys with unmovedly scrutinising eyes. She
did not waste time anywhere, but she took all in as
if it were a matter of business. Camel drivers and
donkey boys seemed to strike her merely as samples
of slow travelling; she ascended, as it were, into
mid-heaven on the Ferris Wheel with a grim air of
determination. Being so lifted from earth and poised
above in the clear air, Meg had thrilled with a strange
exultant sense of being a bird, and felt that with a
moment's flutter of wings she could soar higher and
higher and lose herself in the pure sea of blue above.
Aunt Matilda only looked below with cool interest.

“Pretty big power this,” she said to John Holt.
“T guess it’s made one man’s fortune.”

John Holt was a generous host. He took her
from place to place—to Lapland villages, cannibals’
huts, and Moorish palaces. She tramped about and
inspected them all with a sharp, unenthusiastic eye.
She looked at the men and women and their strange
costumes, plainly thinking them rather mad,
Two Lirrte Pinerims’ Progress 203



“It’s a queer sight,” she said to John Holt; “ but I
don’t see what good all this is going to do anyone.”

“Tt saves travelling expenses,” answered John
Holt, laughing. His shrewd, humorous face was
very full of expression all the time they were
walking about together. She had only come for the
day, and she was going back by a night train. When
she left them, she gave them both one of those newly-
appreciative looks.

“Well,” she said, “Mr. Holt’s going to look after
you, he says. He’s got something to tell you when
I’m gone. We've talked it over, and it’s all right.
There’s one thing sure. You're two of the luckiest
young ones Ive heard of.” And she marched away
briskly.

Meg and Robin looked at each other and at John
Holt. What was he going to tell them? But he
told them nothing until they had all dined, and Ben
and his mother had gone home, prepared to come
again the next day.

By that time the City Beautiful was wreathed
with its enchanted jewels of light again, and in the
lagoon’s depths they trembled and blazed. John
Holt called a gondola with a brilliant gondolier, and
they got into it and shot out into the radiant night.

The sight was so unearthly in its beauty that for
204 Two LitrLe Piterims’ PRoGREss

a few moments they were quite still. Meg sat in her
Straw Parlour attitude, with her elbows on her knees
and her chin on her hands. Her eyes looked very
big, and as lustrous as the jewels in the lagoon.

“Tm going to ask you something,” said John Holt,
in a quiet sort of voice at last.

“Yes,” said Meg dreamily.

“Would you two like to belong to me?”

Meg’s hands dropped, and she turned her shining
eyes.

“Tve been talking to your Aunt Matilda about
that big house of mine,” he went on. “It’s empty.
There’s too much room in it. I want to take you
two and see if you can fill it up. Will you come and
live with me?”

Meg and Robin turned their eyes upon each other
in a dazed way.

“Will we come?” they stammered. “Live with
you!”

“Mrs. Jennings is willing,” said John Holt. “You
two have things to do in the world. I'll help you to
learn to do them, You”—with the short laugh-—
“you shall tell me fairy stories.”

_ Fairy stories! What was this? Their hearts beat
. in their breasts like little hammers. The gondola
moved smoothly over the scintillating water, and the
Two Littte Pinerims’ Proaress 205

jewel-strung towers and domes rose white against the
lovely night. Meg looked around her, and uttered
a little ery.

“Oh, Rob!” she said. “Oh, dear John Holt. We
have got into the City Beautiful, and you are going
to let us live there always.”

And John Holt knew that the big house would
seem empty no more.
CHAPTER XX

f IT WON'T VANISH AWAY
a 9



T would have seemed that this was the
climax of wonders and delights. To
know that they had escaped for ever
from Aunt Matilda’s world; that they
were not to be parted from John Holt; that they were
to be like his children, living with him, sharing his
great house, and learning all they could want to learn.
All this, even when it was spoken of as possible,
seemed more than could be believed; but it seemed
almost more unbelievable day by day as the truth
began to realise itself in detail. What a marvellous
thing it was to find out that they were not lonely,
uncared-for creatures any more, but that they be-
longed to a man who seemed to hold all power in his
hands. When John Holt took them to the big stores
and bought them all they needed—new clothes and
new trunks, and new comforts and luxuries, such as
- they had never thought of as belonging to them—they

felt almost aghast. He was so practical, and seemed
206
Two Lirtte Piuerims’ Progress 207



to know so well how to do everything, that each hour
convinced them more and more that everything was
possible to him. And he seemed to like so much to
be with them. Day after day he took them to their
City Beautiful, and enjoyed with them every treasure
in it. And they had so much time before them, they
could see it all at rapturous leisure and ease. No
more hungry hours, no more straining of tired bodies
and spurring of weary feet, because there was so
much to see and so little time to see it in, since there
was so little money to be spent. There was time to
loiter through palaces and linger before pictures and
marvellous things. And John Holt could explain
them all. No more limited and vague imaginings.
There was time to hear everything, and Meg could
tell fairy stories by the hour if she was in the mood.
She told them in tropical bowers, she told them as
they floated on the lagoons, she read them in strange
savage or Oriental faces.

“T shall have enough to last all my life, John
Holt,” she would say. “I see a new one every
half-hour. If you like I will tell them all to
you and Robin when you have nothing else to
do.”

“Tt will be like the Arabian Nights,” said
Robin. “Meg, do you remember that old book
208 Two Litrie Piterims’ PRoGRESS

we had where all the leaves we wanted most were
torn out, and we had to make the rest up our-
selves ?”

There was one story Meg found John Holt liked
better than all the rest. It was the one about the
City Beautiful into which she used to follow Christian
in the days when she and Robin lay in the Straw
Parlour. It had grown so real to her that she made
it very real and near in the telling. John Holt liked
the way she had of filling it with people and things
she knew quite well. Meg was very simple about
it all, but she told that story well; and often when
they were resting in some beautiful place alone, John
Holt would lead her back to it, and sit beside her
listening with a singular expression in his eyes. Ah,
those were wonderful days!

Ben and his mother shared them, though they were
not always with John Holt and Robin and Meg.
John Holt made comfortable plans for them, and let.
them wander about and look their fill.

“It’s a great thing for him, Mr. Holt,” said the
poor woman once, with a side glance at Ben. “Seems
like he’s been born over again. The way he talks
when we go home at night is as if he’d never be tired
again as long as he lives. And a month ago, I used
to think he’d wear himself out fretting, Seemed like
Two Lirrte Prngrims’ PRoGRESS 209



I could see him getting thinner and peakeder every
day. My, it’s a wonderful thing!”

And John Holt’s kindness did not end there, though
it was some time before Meg and Robin heard all he
had done. One day when they had left the grounds
earlier than usual because they were tired, he spent
the evening in searching out Ben’s disreputable father,
and giving him what he called “a straight talk.”

“Look here,” he said, “I’m going tou keep my eye on
that boy of yours and your wife. I intend to make
the house decent, and see that the boy has a chance
to learn something, and take care they’re not too hard
run. But I’m going to keep my eye on you too—at
least I shall see that someone else does, and if you
make things uncomfortable, you'll be made pretty
uncomfortable yourself, that’s all. I’d advise you to
try the new recreation of going to work. It'll be
good for your health. Sort of athletics”

And he kept his word.

It was a marvel of a holiday. It is not possible
that among all the holiday-makers there were two
others who were nearer the rapture of paradise than
these two little pilgrims.

When it was at an end they went home with John
Holt. It was a wonderful home-going. The house

was a wonderful house. It was one of the remarkable
27
210 Two Lirrte Piterims’ PRoGREsS



places that some self-made Western men have built
and furnished with the aid of unlimited fortunes, and
the unlimited shrewd good sense which has taught
most of those of them whose lives have been spent in
work and bold ventures, that it is more practical to
buy taste and experience, than to spend money with-
out it. John Holt had also had the aid and taste of
a wonderful little woman, whose life had been easier
and whose world had been broader than his own.
Together they had built a beautiful and lovable home
to live in. It contained things from many countries,
and its charm and luxury might well have been the
result of a far older civilisation.

“Don’t you think, Robin,” said Meg in a low voice,
the first evening, as they sat in a deep - cushioned
window-seat in the library together—“don’t you
think you know what she was like?”

They had spoken together of her often, and somehow
it was always in a rather low voice, and they always
called her “she.”

Robin looked up from the book he held on his knee.
It was a beautiful volume she had been fond of.

“I know why you say that,” he said. “You mean
that somehow the house is like her. Yes, I’m sure it

is, Just as Aunt Matilda’s house is like her. People’s’
houses are always like them.”
Two Lirrte Pincers’ Progress 211



“This one is full of her,’ said Meg. “I should
think John Holt would feel as if she must be in it
and she might speak to him any moment. I feel as
if she might speak to me. And it isn’t only the

pictures of her everywhere, with her eyes laughing at



‘DON’T YOU THINK YOU KNOW WHAT SHE WAS LIKE?”

you from the wall and the tables and the mantels.
It’s herself. Perhaps it is because she helped John
Holt to choose things, and was so happy here.”

“Perhaps it is,” said Robin; and he added softly,
“This was her book.”
212 Two Lirrte Piuerms ProcRess

They went once more to Aunt Matilda’s world.
They did it because John Holt wanted to see the Straw
Parlour, and they wanted to show it to him and bid it
good-bye.

Aunt Matilda treated them with curious considera-
tion. It almost seemed as if she had begun to regard
them with respect. It seemed to her that any
business-like person would respect two penniless
children, who had made themselves attractive to a
man with the biggest farm in Illinois, and other
resources still larger. They went out to the barn in
their old way, when no one knew where they were
going, and when no one was about to see them place
their ladder against the stack and climb up to the top.
The roof seemed more like a dark tent than ever, and
they saw the old birds’ nests, which by this time were
empty.

“Meg,” said Robin, “do you remember the day we
lay in the straw and told each other we had got work ?
And do you remember the afternoon I climbed up
with the old coffee-pot to boil the eggs in?”

“And when we counted the Treasure?” said Meg.

“And when we talked about miracles?” said Robin.

“And when it made me think human beings

could do anything if they tried hard enough?” said
Meg.
Two Lirrite Pinertms’ Progress 213



“ And when you read the Pilgrim’s Progress?” said
John Holt.

“ And the first afternoon when we listened to Jones
and Jerry, and you said there was a City Beautiful ?”
said Meg.

“And there was,” said Robin, “and we’ve been
there.”

“Tt was just this time in the afternoon,” said Meg,
looking about her, “the red light was dying away, for
I could not see to read any more.”

And for a little while they sat in the Straw Parlour
while the red light waned, and afterwards when they
spoke of it, they found they were all thinking of the
same thing, and it was of the last day they had spent
at the Enchanted City, when they had gone about
together in a strange, tender, half-sad mood, loitering
through the white palaces, lingering about the clear
pools of green sea-water, where strange creatures swam
lazily or darted to and fro; looking their last at
pictures and stories in marble, and listening to the
tinkle of water plashing under great tropical leaves
and over strange mosses; strolling through temples
and past savage huts, and gazing in final questioning
at mysterious, barbarous faces; and at last passing
through the stately archway, and being borne away on -

the waters of the great lake.
214 ‘Two Lirrie Pinagrims’ Procress



As they had been carried away farther and farther,
and the white wonder had begun to lose itself and
fade into a white spirit of a strange and lovely thing,
Meg had felt the familiar throb at her heart and the
familiar lump in her throat, and she had broken
into a piteous little ery.

“Oh, John Holt,” she said, “it is going—it is going,
and we shall never see it again! For it will vanish
away—it will vanish away!” And the tears rushed
down her cheeks, and she hid her face on his arm.

But though he had laughed his short laugh, John
Holt had made her lift up her head.

“No,” he said, “it won’t vanish away. It’s not one
of the things that vanish. Things don’t vanish away
that a million or so of people have seen as they’ve
seen this. They stay—where they're not forgotten
and time doesn’t change them. Theyre put where
they can be passed on—and passed on again. And
thoughts that grew out of them bring other ones.
And what things may grow out of it that never would
have been—and where the end is the Lord only knows,

for no human being can tell. It won’t vanish away.”

Dear little children and big ones, this is a Fairy
Story. And why not? There are not many people
who believe it, but fairy stories are happening every
Two Lirrte Pircrims’ Progress 915



day. There are beautiful things in the world; there
are many people with kind and generous hearts:
there are those who do their work well, giving what
is theirs to give, and being glad in the giving; there
are birds in the skies, and flowers and leaves in the
woods—and Spring comes every year. These make
the fairy stories. Every fairy story has a moral, and
this one has two. They are these :—

The human creature is a strong thing—when it is
a brave one.

Nature never made a human hand without putting

into it something to give.

MORRISON AND GIBB, PRINTERS, EDINBURGH.
WN

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