Citation
Paddy O'Learey and his learned pig

Material Information

Title:
Paddy O'Learey and his learned pig
Creator:
Champney, Elizabeth W ( Elizabeth Williams ), 1850-1922
Steele, Frederic Dorr, 1873-1944 ( Illustrator )
Dodd, Mead & Company ( Publisher )
Caxton Press (New York) ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Dodd, Mead & Company
Manufacturer:
Caxton Press
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
171, [1] p. : ill. ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Swine -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Pets -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Human-animal relationships -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Animal training -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Social classes -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Poverty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Mothers and sons -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Juvenile fiction -- Ireland ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1895
Genre:
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Elizabeth W. Champney ; illustrations by Frederic Dorr Steele.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026625193 ( ALEPH )
ALG3798 ( NOTIS )
00593336 ( OCLC )
12031338 ( LCCN )

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Full Text



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PADDY O’LEAREY

AND HIS

LEARNED PIG

BY

ELIZABETH W. CHAMPNEY

ILLUSTRATIONS BY FREDERIC DORR STEELE

NEW YORK
DODD, MEAD & COMPANY
- 1895



CopyriGHT, 1895
BY
DODD, MEAD & COMPANY



All rights reserved

THE CAXTON PRESS
NEW YORK



CHAPTER

I.
lle
ITI,
Iv.
Vv.
VI.

VII.

CONTENTS.

An Irisu Fair
A Pic Market
At KILLARNEY
In Hipine .
Tue Fiicut

BLARNEY CAsTLE AND
Fatruer Marrurew

Tur FInpING or THE
Luck Penny

PAGE

28
51
72
98

eeli2i3

145









LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

CHAPTER PAGE
PADDY AND HIs Pic . , . Frontispiece

I. A SCENE AT THE Farr . , 6 , ee 1)
II. PADDY ON THE STONE WALL . . 5 cao)
III, PLayinc CARDS ON THE HEARTH . 5 oO y/
IV. Tur Guost House... : qi : . 85

VI. STARTING OUT FROM THE Rock oF CASHEL . 133

VII, Tur Return Home 5 : A . . 161







CHAPTER I.

AN IRISH FAIR,

Ai
a -

0%) Seog
Us lee oi cscr ae fy; was at one of
LO the merriest fairs
. NWA ever held in Kil-
: aS “Ss larney that Pad-
7 MN é
eee tiie dy O’Learey first



saw a learned pig.
It was a wonder-
ful fair entirely, so Paddy thought, even be-
fore he saw the pig, what with the hurling,
where Pat O’Toole “put” the great hammer
a fabulous distance as easily as Paddy could
have tossed a ball; and the dancing to
Phelim McCarthy’s fiddle, with all the
pretty girls dressed in their best, their
bright eyes shining and their red cheeks
glowing; and the ‘‘’ating!” for Paddy had
never seen in all his short and hungry life so
many good things as were set out in the tip-
carts ranged along the main thoroughfare.
There was one drawback to his perfect enjoy-



8 PADDY O’LEAREY

ment of the last-named attraction. Though
Paddy had walked that morning from the
Desmond estate to the town of Killarney,
a good eight miles, on a scanty breakfast,
and had an appetite whetted to the point of
appreciating all of the pies, turnovers, gin-
gerbread, and’ other dainties displayed, his
mother had provided him with but one penny.
He could only buy one cake of hard ginger-
bread, which resembled an ancient Babylon-
ian tile in its general appearance, and in its
resistance to his eager teeth. Even this was
all too soon devoured and failed to fill an
aching void.

But Paddy was quite accustomed to going
hungry, and there was so much to amuse him
in the fair that he wandered about quite
happy, listening to the entrancing strains of
Garry Owen, the Bedfordshire hornpipe, or
the jolly peddler, and-feasting his eyes on the
brilliant posters which told of the wonders
to be seen inside the tents. The paintings
which described the accomplishments of a
certain educated pig were particularly al-
luring.



AN IRISH FAIR 9

This extraordinary porker was represented
performing as many feats as Mother Hub-
bard’s celebrated dog. He was depicted
clothed in a pair of green trousers, wearing
a takish cocked hat, and as playing upon an
Irish harp, dancing, reading, drilling as a sol-
dier, standing upon his head, feigning death,
carousing and playing many other laughable
antics.

Paddy looked longingly at the privileged
persons who entered the enclosure, but finally
turned away and consoled himself with fit-
ting his eye to a knot-hole in the palings of
the Punch and Judy Theatre, and in watch-
ing all the other varied scenes which passed
before him with such joyous tumult.

There was a quack dentist who blarneyed
people into having their teeth extracted for a
shilling, ‘‘ with or without pain.” He wore
a necklace of molars with great fangs, and
added each new and gory trophy to this can-
nibalistic rosary, never caring that his victims
protested with loud howls that their jaws
were ‘“‘ broke intirely.”

Perceiving Paddy standing before him with



10 PADDY O’LEAREY

a fascinated stare, the dentist, in a pause in
his custom, offered to extract one of the boy’s
sound teeth for nothing, merely as an exhibi-
tion of his skill.

Paddy declined this generous offer, and
hurried away to watch the thimble-man
swindle the unwary.

‘*Only tuppence a guess,” he would cry.
‘“ Now you seeit, and now youdon’t. Under
which of these thimbles, acushla, have I hid
the pea? You guess right, and I gives you
tuppence. You guess wrong, and you gives
it to me.”

Paddy saw one foolish fellow try ten times,
winning twice and losing eight times.

He did not know that the thimble-man
only allowed his customers to win when he
saw that their interest in the game could’be
kept up byso doing. If Paddy had possessed
twopence he would certainly have tried, for
several times he was quite certain under
which thimble the pea would be found. As
he had nothing to risk he watched the for-
tunes of the others. Among those most in-
terested was young Charley Desmond, the



AN IRISH FAIR 11

son of the squire on whose estate Paddy
lived.

He had often gone otter hunting with the
young gentleman, and had been his devoted
follower in many other boyish sports. Paddy
watched with great interest as Charley Des-
mond made his guesses, and even volunteered
his advice as to the thimble which probably
covered the ball.

Suddenly Paddy cried out: ‘‘The dirthy
chate! He’s afther desaving you, sor. The
ball isn’t under nary thimble. He’s got it
up his sleeve, sor. Yees can see for yeeself.”’

And suiting the action to the word, he
passed his hand quickly across the conjurer’s
little table, overturning every thimble and
proving true the first part of his statement,
for none of the thimbles covered the ball.
The conjurer raised his arm to strike Paddy,
who dodged, but not nimbly enough, for the
clinched fist came down upon his shoulder.
At the same time a shout of derision rose from
the crowd, for the ball rolled to the ground
from the swindler’s sleeve.

Charley Desmond caught the man’s arm



12 PADDY O’LEAREY

and prevented any further abuse of Paddy,
who squirmed from the thimble-man’s grasp,
and now stood at a little distance rubbing
his shoulder and regarding his torn shirt
rather ruefully.

‘¢T owe you something, Paddy,’ s fa Char-
ley, ‘‘for getting that knock for me, and I'll
pay your way into any of the shows which
you would like to see.”

‘‘Plaze your honour, I’d rather see the
learned pig. Sure, it’s the gintleman, your
honour is.”

‘‘The learned pig? That is just what
Katy wanted to see. She is over there in
the carriage. We will get her and go in
together.”

Kathleen Desmond, Charley’s sister, was a
dark-eyed girl of fifteen. She nodded pleas-
antly to the ragged boy, and the three passed
into the showman’s tent together.

Paddy was disappointed to see that the pig
wore only a broad belt of green cloth, instead
of the trousers in which he had been rep-
resented. Holes had been cut in his ears,
and in these bows of green ribbon were



AN IRISH FAIR 13

tied, while a third knot of ribbon adorned
his tail.

‘‘And now, me darlint,” said the show-
man, addressing the pig, ‘‘ we will perfarm
the sivinth article of the p’ogramme, and
answer any questions put by the honourable
company.”

The man forthwith placed before the audi-
ence a frame upon which were hung a num-
ber of swinging disks. He then led the pig
back towards the audience and placed a cord
attached to his collar in Kathleen’s hand.

“Tf yer leddyship will plaze to hould him
the minute,” he said; ‘sure, the crayther’s
that eager for l’arnin’, it’s restraint he’s need-
ing. Now, if one of the gintlemen will give
my pig a sum in arithmetic, the answer to
the which is found here,” and he proceeded
to chalk the numbers from one to ten on the
different swinging disks, ‘‘the darlint will
pint it out for you. For insters, how much
does two and one, and one and four make,
Mavourneen?”

He nodded to Kathleen to release the pig,
and as soon as she did so it darted forward,



14 PADDY O’LEAREY

and springing up, hit the disk bearing the
number eight several times with its nose.

The showman led the pig back again and
Charley Desmond asked, ‘‘What is twice
five?”

‘Sure, Pl change the order a bit, to mix
him,” said the showman, and he rearranged
the disks. Again, the instant that Kathleen
let go the string, the pig bounded away and
knocked the figure ten with great vigour.

The experiment was performed again and
again, the pig never making a mistake, but
striking the correct number each time, and
apparently enjoying the feat as much as the
audience. The showman next substituted
words for the figures, and the pig was told
to indicate one of these, and again he made

no mistake.
Kathleen was filled with wonder and ad-
miration. ‘‘Isn’t he clever, though? Did

you ever see a pig that knew so much?”

But Paddy, who was a prying, sharp little
fellow, was not so easily taken in. He had
noticed that the showman, under pretence of
placing the disks in a different order, hung













AN IRISH FAIR 17

something behind the one which he wished
the pig to choose, and the boy at once sur-
nised that it was some dainty of which the
pig was fond. He determined to watch a
little longer before exposing the mounte-
bank, and he merely replied:

‘* Sure, it’s his master that’s clever, I’m
thinking, and by the same token, if I hada
bit pig, it’s meself could train him to the
same tricks and better.”

**Oh! do you think so? But hush, what is
he saying?”

““The crayther will now go through his
catechism like a Christian,’ the showman
announced, and a barrel without head or
bottom was rolled in. When in place the
word ‘‘Catechism” was discovered painted
on the side in large letters, and the pig at
the same instant darted through the barrel.

‘Sure, he’s gone through his catechism
quicker nor you nor I could do it,” said
the showman. The audience shrieked with
laughter, but Charley Desmond cried out
that this was an old trick.

‘* Sure, and it is, your honour,” the show-



18 PADDY O’LEAREY

man admitted, ‘‘and not worth showing to
your honour; but it’s new to some of the
craythers, And now I’ll show your honour
the most wonderful perfarmance of all, for
the pig will play upon the harp and dis-
coorse the foinest music, so that you will
scarce belave so simple acrayther could do
it.” A small chair was produced, in which
the pig was tied. He seemed uncomfortable
and struck out wildly with his fore legs.

‘‘Whist! Hould still, ye vixen,” said the
showman. ‘‘Obsarve how impatient he is
to begin. Distrain yersel’ till I give the
signal by rapping on the floore. Here, me
foine fellow (thisto Paddy), will yees hould
his legs till I gives the signal?”

Paddy assisted with alacrity, while the
showman rolled forward a dilapidated harp,
which he placed between the feet of the
animal. He then rapped loudly upon the
floor, and Paddy letting go his hold on the
swine’s hoofs, it began striking and kicking
in the most lively manner. It certainly
seemed impossible that such wild move-
ments should produce anything but the



AN IRISH FAIR 19

direst discord; but ‘St. Patrick’s Day in the
Morning,” ‘‘ Wearing of the Green,” “Kitty
Tyrrel,” and other well-known airs were
recognised.

‘Did you ever see anything so wonder-
ful?” Kathleen asked, her eyes wide with
amazement,

‘*Plaze you, Miss Kathleen,” said Paddy,
“it’s all a thrick intirely. Sure, it isn’t the
pig’s harp that’s making the music at all, at
all. I had my ear close to the strings and
sorra a sound come from thim. Sure, there’s
some one else playing another harp under
the floore. Watch me close and see if it
isn’t so.”

With a rapid movement, when next the
showman’s back was turned, Paddy pulled the
pig away from his instrument.

The music continued, and the audience
burst into a roar of derisive laughter.

The infuriated showman made a dash at
Paddy, but, made wary by previous encoun-
ter, the boy dodged adroitly and escaped.
There seemed to be no prospect of any fur-
ther performance, for the man refused to



20 PADDY O’LEAREY

show his animal’s skill any longer ‘‘ to sucha
set of ignorant, meddling spalpeens.”’

Charley Desmond at length succeeded in
pacifying him, and the pig was made to
dance, to drill, and ‘‘to talk French,” which
he did by replying emphatically, ‘‘ Oui, oui,
oui,” when asked if he was for O’Connell.
After a few other performances the audience
was dismissed.

Paddy was hanging about waiting for the
Desmonds when they came out. ‘‘Isn’t he
the swindler, though?” Charley remarked.

‘¢ Sure, that he is.”

‘* But did you see through how he made
the creature choose the right letters and
figures in that first trick?”

‘* As aisy as ’ating, your honour.”

‘And could you teach a pig to do all those
things?” Kathleen asked.

‘** And a hunder more bewilderin’, if I only
had the pig. Didn’t I tache your dog to do
more things than you ever thought was in
the capacity of a brute baste? and it is well
known that a pig is more knowledgable,
and more like a Christian mortial intirely.”



AN IRISH FAIR 21

“ How long would it take you to educate a
pig?” Kathleen inquired.

“‘T’'d engage to give you a show the beat
of this in a year’s time,” said Paddy, confi-
dently.

“It’s such a pity we are going back to
London next week,” said Kathleen; ‘I should
so like to see you train it.”

‘‘ Begging your leddyship’s pardon,” said
Paddy, ‘‘ sorra a pig have I to train.”

“Tam going to buy a pig,” Kathleen re-
plied. ‘‘ Will you keep it and educate it for
me until I return?”

“Will Oi? Oi’ll take it to the hedge school
for the Latin. It’sthe illegant scholard it
will be when yees comes back to the Hall.
A happy day that will be for us all, for there’s
not-a gorsoon on the place but worships the
ground your leddyship threads on.”

This was nearly true, for Kathleen had visit-
ed every cabin on the estate, and knew the
name of every child, while she was especially
intimate with the O’Learey children, who were
their nearest neighbours. There was a little
pine grove and a long sandbank between



22 PADDY O’LEAREY

them which was their common playground.
This bank was a fascinating place in which to
dig caves, and as it was overlooked by the
O’Learey cabin, to which Kathleen’s nurse,
pretty Rose Callahan, liked to resort, it was
a favourite meeting-place of the children.

Rose Callahan had been brought up in
Castleisland, Mrs. O’Learey’s birthplace, and
they liked to gossip about their old neighbours,
but especially about Mrs. O’Learey’s brother,
Barney Maloney. While they chatted, Paddy,
who was a wonderful mining engineer, extend-
ed his caves far into the bank, strengthening
them by wooden supports. Kathleen’s imagi-
nation and varied reading endowed this cave
with fictitious interest. Sometimesit figured
as Ali Baba’s hidden treasure-house, broken
crockery standing for the heaps of gold and
jewels; and at others it was a cave-temple
for heathen worship, such as her father had
told her existed in India, her largest doll rep-
resenting the idol to be approached only on
hands and knees.

Again it was the pirate’s cave described in
‘Guy Mannering,” and smuggling raids were



AN IRISH FAIR 23

made on the pantry for booty to secrete with-
in it.

This highly enjoyable play came to an un-
timely end, owing to Kathleen’s having been
buried in the cave by a falling in of the roof
between her and the entrance. Paddy had
worked like a beaver, and had dug her out
before she had time to suffocate; but Rose
Callahan had been so frightened that future
cave-life was strictly forbidden.

Still, intercourse with the O’Leareys had
not entirely ceased, for Charley had always a
troop of ragged urchins at his heels, and
Paddy was a valuable assistant in otter hunt-
ing, being able to lure the animals from
their holes by a clever imitation of their
bark. When Paddy saw his young master
and mistress at the fair he felt that he was
in luck, as indeed he was, for after the ex-
hibition of the learned pig, Kathleen took a
little purse from her pocket and a golden
guinea from the purse.

‘“‘Aunt Henrietta gave me this for my
birthday present,” she said, ‘‘and I know
there is nothing I would like so much as a



24 PADDY O’LEAREY

learned pig. Since you are to train it, I
think it is but fair you should have the
selecting of it. Will you please buy one for
me?”

“Sure,” said honest Paddy, his eyes pro-
truding in wonder, ‘‘it wouldn’t cost more
than a crown to buy the little slip I’d be
wanting at the pig market at Castleisland
next month, and I a-going up to see me
grandmother.”

‘But it may cost you something to get
the pig back to Killarney, and you forget
that you will have to keep him a whole year,
and then you ought to be paid something for
his instruction.”

Thus urged, Paddy accepted the guinea,
and great was the rejoicing in the O’Learey
household when he produced it that evening.

‘“‘And the young leddy was quite right,”
said Paddy’s father, ‘‘to give you something
handsome for the keep of the baste, and as
that comes out of me, sure I'll change the
guinea for you. Here’s your crown, which
yees can spind at the pig market when yees
goes to see your grandmother at Castle-



AN IRISH FAIR 25

island, and I’ll kape the remaining rimnant
on account wid the pig.”

“Give it to me, Dinny, avillish,’”* said Pad-
dy’s mother, ‘‘ and let me take it up to the Hall
to pay the rint. It’s two years we’re afther
bein’ behind, and at that gait of backward
goin’ we won’t catch up till you and I are
babies.”

‘*Sure, what’s the use of payin’ at all, at
all? Our landlord’s that good he would niver
evict us.”

‘*Ts that the way for an honourable Irish-
man to talk? I should think you’d be wantin’
to pay your just debts.”

‘And that’s what I am, acushla, I’m owing
three crowns at the shebeen house, and Mike
says he’ll trust me no more till I’ve paid up
my score, Did you mark that, now? Sure,
it’s mesilf that’s a poet, and I didn’t know it.
The one dibt is as fair as the other. I’m
thinkin’ T’ll pay for the whiskey.”

** Mike can wait as aisy as our landlord.
Sure, I’ve heard that Squire Desmond is not
so rich as he was, and this money came from
him, and it’s like he knows we have it.”



26 PADDY O’LEAREY

‘““There’s no question but that Mike can
wait,” replied Dinnis O’Learey; ‘‘ but kin Oi
wait? Answer me that—me that’s been
awake without a dropof the crayther, barrin’
and exceptin’ the poteen we had at Larry
Lanighan’s wake, and poor stuff it was and
little of it.”

** Dinny,’

y

said Mrs. O’Learey, with a
pleading look in her faithful eyes, ‘‘ Dinny
darlint, sure it’s better off you’d be if you’d
let Mike wait your paymint and niver drink
another drop the rest of your mortial life.
Sure, with the pertaty crop that bad that it
is the winter’s like to be a hard one, and I
misthrust we'll hear the childer cryin’ for
hunger before it’s done.”

‘‘And will it fill their insides to know that
I’ve paid my rint?” asked Dennis O’Learey,
scratching his head. ‘It’s a dilemmy in-
tirely. Kape the guinea for the prisent and
I'll ask Feyther Nooney’s advice when I goes
to confission.”’

Mrs. O’Learey hardly knew what to think
of this decision, for she doubted whether the
priest would advise her husband to pay his



AN IRISH FAIR 27

rent, as he was known to bea strong Repeal,
as well as Catholic Emancipation, agitator. It
was something that her husband had not in-
sisted on giving the money immediately for the
whiskey debt, thus making the way clear for
futureindulgence. Dennis wasa kind-hearted
man when he was not drunk. She heaved a
sigh as she placed the coin in the toe of an
old stocking, and hid it behind a loose stone
in the chimney, and privately determined that
she would have an interview with the priest,
and try to win him over to her view of the
matter before her husband went to confes-
sion.





CHAPTER II.

A PIG MARKET.



AAOTHER MALO-
V7] NEY, Paddy’s
grandmother,
lived in Castle-
island, a little
48 town to the north
of Killarney.

Its name is
misleading, for al-
though it possess-
es the ruins of a
very old castle,
neither the town
nor the fortress
is built upon an island. It may be that the
river Maine, which flows sleepily by, was
once deflected by moats and canals to isolate
the stronghold more completely; but however
this may ,jhave been in the olden time, the

castle moat is now dry, and the ruin accessible
28



A PIG MARKET 7 29

to every curious visitor who cares to climb a
low stone wall.

The owner of the ruin, in one of his rare
visits to Castleisland, noticed that the venera-
able pile was being pulled to pieces by the
townspeople, who found its hewn stones
‘‘very convanient” for building purposes.
Wishing to protect the ancient landmark
from further devastation, he engaged the
town stonemason, Barney Maloney, Paddy’s
uncle, to build a wall around the castle.

On the gentleman’s next visit to his estate
_ he found the wall of which we have spoken,
but on looking within was surprised and dis-
pleased to discover that the finest part of the
castle had been demolished.

“Your bill is big enough, Barney,” said
the irate owner, ‘‘ but the wall seems to be
only of use to screen depredators. What has
become of the old donjon keep?”

‘“¢*Troth, I pulled that down, sir,” replied
Barney, ‘‘ to make the wall, and I’m thinkin’
that, asit’s hardly high enough, I’d best take
what’s left of the castle to grow it a fut

taller.”



380 PADDY O’LEAREY

Barney’s stupidity was entirely assumed.
He had been more accountable than any one
else in the past for plundering the stones
from the ruin, for he looked upon the castle
as the representation of tyranny, which it
was the duty of every good Irishman to resist.
He had hoped, however, that his patron
would not return so soon, and that he would
receive his pay for his honest labour before his
trick was discovered, and he felt it a great
outrage that his employer refused to compen-
sate him for building the wall.

Barney sued the gentleman and the suit
went against him. The injustice of the de-
cision of the courts so rankled in Barney’s
mind that he joined a group of malcontents,
neglected his work and went about the coun-
try listening to incendiary speeches against
landlords and the government. Castleisland
has always been a hotbed of rebellion, and
though Barney never advocated resorting to
violence, there were others who did, and a
middleman was shot while attempting to col-
lect rents. The real murderer escaped and
several innocent persons, Barney amon g them,



A PIG MARKET 31

were arrested. The unfortunate fellow had
no confidence in the law, and one night he
broke jail and fled the country, thereby fas-
tening the suspicion of the authorities upon
himself,

Paddy’s grandmother lived in a lonely
cabin at the foot of Clanruddy Mountain.
Her son Barney had lived with ‘her, had cut
her peat, cultivated the bit garden, and tended
the little Kerry cow until the terrible affair
of the murder. Paddy’s mother was her only
other living child, and the old woman was
very lonely now that Barney had gone. She
was a great talker and dearly loved to tell her’
story. Barney, quite tired out by his rough
day’s work as a stonemason, would sit on one
side of the chimney with his pipe between his
teeth, while his mother sat on the other,
through thc long winter evenings, the son
listening, or apparently listening, to the wild
legends which the old woman would tell over
and over again. Mother Maloney missed her
good listener. Sometimes the neighbours
found her talking to herself, telling the old
stories over from force of habit.



32 PADDY O’LEAREY

She was delighted to see her grandson, who
arrived in Castleisland the week before the
pig market. She hugged him and cried over
him and blessed him, and talked to him about
his uncle, to whom she always referred as
‘‘him that’s gone.”

Paddy remembered his uncle’s visiting, or
rather hiding, at their cabin in Killarney, on
his way to ‘‘furrin parts.” He was a strap-
ping young man of twenty-five, but he hada
hunted look in his face. He had knocked at
Paddy’s window with his blackthorn shillelah
just as morning was dawning. Paddy’s
mother had kept her brother for a day, during
which he had bidden farewell to Rose Calla-
han, and had sent him on his journey with his
green and white striped carpet-bag well filled
with bread and meat and a couple of new
shirts, which she had just made for her hus-
band. Dennis O’Learey was a generous man,
and he gave his brother-in-law all the ready
money which he had to purchase a steerage-
ticket to New York, and none of his family
had seen him since.

“But he’ll come back,” Mother Maloney



A PIG MARKET 33

would say; ‘‘so here’s destruction to his
innemies, and may I live to see it. But to
think, to think, Paddy, that you have thrudged
all the way from Killarney to see your old
grandmother. The illegant gossoon that
you’ve grown to be! Sure, there isn’t another
in the four counties has such fine large teeth
or such big feet for hisage. It’s no thrifle
that they’ll be costing your feyther, I’m
thinkin’.”

‘As for the teeth, Granny, sure, I can ate
with the best, and by the same token I’ve had
only an oat cake for my luncheon.”

Mother Maloney bestirred herself and fried
a bit of bacon, with some cold boiled potatoes,
and Paddy made a more enjoyable dinner
than many a king, washed down as it was
with a bowl of sweet milk.

“And so you’ve come all the way to see
your grandmother!”? Mother Maloney re-
peated.

‘‘ And to buy a pig,” said honest Paddy.

‘*Listen to the likes of him!” exclaimed
Mother Maloney. ‘‘Is it stocking a farm
you’re contrivin’?”



34 PADDY O’LEAREY

Paddy told her the story of the guinea, in
which she was much interested. ‘‘And how
did the dispute between your feyther and
your mother turn out, me bouchal? I'll
warrant Dinny had the best of the argyment,
for you say they left it to the praste, and
who iver heard of a soggart (scholate) advis-
ing any one to pay his rint?”

‘‘Sure, it was Feyther Nooney had the
wisdom of Solomon, Granny. He might
have decided for Mike, but my mither got
the ear of him and tould him how feyther
was better off without the whisky, and thin
it was Feyther Nooney who was ina dilemmy,
for though he had nothing agin our landlord,
Squire Desmond being an Irishman born,
niver sending an agent to evict a tenant,
but calling himself, fri’ndly like, to collect his
rints, and giving us time when we needed it,
still it’s a member of the Union that Feyther
Nooney is, and it’s well known that the Union
isagin alllandlords. Thin, on the other hand,
Mike is a parishioner of his, and it would
never do to advise feyther not to pay him.
So, afther thinking a minute, sure it was an



A PIG MARKET 35

inspiration come to him, and says he—‘A
debt is a debt, Dennis O’Leary, and there’s no
distinction of parsons. Lay the money aside
and pay him that comes first to collect his
dues, and by the same token, you’re owin’ the
church a small matter of five shillings, and
the church comes first,’ says he. With that
feyther paid him and thanked him and told
me mither, ‘They won’t either of them come
to collect,’ says he, ‘so it’s a blessing intirely.’
But me mither knew that Squire Desmond
rode along the lawn lake every afthernoon,
and she planted me by the way to tell him
would he call for the rint, which I did, and
much to me feyther’s botherment, up he come
riding to the doore that very afthernoon. ‘I’m
hearing you’re in luck, Dinny,’ says he, ‘and
are desiring, like an honest man, to pay some-
thing on your rent.’ ‘Bad luck to thim that
tould you so,’ says feyther; ‘but it’s thrue,
anyhow, I’ll not denije it.’ And how could
he do it with me mither counting out the
shillings before his eyes, for Feyther Nooney
had broken the guinea!

***T suppose you have other debts to pay



36 PADDY O’LEAREY

beside the rint,’says Squire Desmond. ‘That
I have, your haner,’ says feyther, ‘and there’s
Mike a-comin’ up the hill to collect his, and
who the sorra tould him there was money in
the house I don’t know, and me not knowing
how we shall get through the winter with
your haner in Lunnon.’

“*Tve been thinkin’ of that,’ says Squire
Desmond, ‘so we'll just wipe out the old
account,’ says he, ‘and you needn’t pay a
penny, and if ye’ll act as gamekeeper in
my absince and see that there’s no poaching
in the forest or on the mountain, ye may
have this cottage rent free, beside all the dead
wood ye can pick up in the forest.’

‘Well, my feyther was all struck of a heap,
and neither he nor my mither could say
enough in praise an’ thanksgivin’. So there’s
my feyther with a donkey and a cart to fetch
wood with, set up for the winter intirely. And
he has paid off Mike, and can get drunk when-
ever the fancy takes him, and that’s not
seldom, for Mike’s shebeen house is on the

way to the forest, bad luck to it, too convan-
ient entirely to rest in comin’ and goin’, and







et





A PIG MARKET 39

Mike that willin’ to take his pay in faggets.”
Paddy sighed deeply, but Mother Maloney did
not share his misgivings.

‘Sure, it’s a dhrap or two of the crayther
will dohim no harm entirely,” saidshe. ‘‘It’s
the landlord and the rint that makes all the
thrubble in Ireland, and if your feyther has
a good landlord and no rint, it’s live like a
lord he may, for there’s more than faggets to
be got out of the forest, I’m thinkin’.”

As Paddy evidently did not understand her
meaning she changed the subject. ‘* The
morrow’s market day,” hesaid. ‘‘A crown’s
little enough to pay for a pig, but you'll see
what your auld grandmither can do for you.”

The next morning Paddy was up bright
and early, and walked to town with his grand-
mother. She was not a pleasant-looking old
lady in her ordinary indoor costume, which
consisted of a frieze petticoat and shortgown,
with wild elf locks straying from under the
broad ruffles of her soiled cotton cap, and a
short clay pipe held firmly between the few
teeth that were left her. She was even less
attractive in her out-of-door garb—a man’s



40 PADDY O’LEAREY

high hat put on over her cap and fastened
under her chin with shoestrings, and a long
red woollen cloak. In summer she went bare-
foot, though she was often seen knitting
woollen stockings of variegated hue from
bits of yarn which kind-hearted neighbours
gave her. She carried a long crooked staff,
and looked like a witch, while many people
believed that she was one. But to Paddy she
was always so tender and kind that he trotted
along with his hand in hers quite unconscious
that she was not a most aristocratic old
lady.

The town presented a lively appearance.
A central strip down the principal street was
filled with booths and tip-carts, displaying a
great variety of merchandise. Two other
rows of carts were backed against the side-
walks, and Paddy and his grandmother walked
between them admiring the kids, the donkeys,
and the sheep grouped for sale. There were
pigs, too, galore—pigs in droves, litters of
pigs comfortably cradled in small donkey-
carts and hand-barrows, and one woman had
brought some tiny pink-nosed baby pigs on





A PIG MARKET 41

her head in a basket. As Paddy paused in
front of one of the carts an ancient man in a
long-tailed blue coat, small clothes, and gait-
ers, and a dilapidated tall hat, came up half
leading, half driving a self-willed porker by
means of a string tied to its hind leg.

‘Six eggs to you, you divil,” said the old
man, addressing the swine; ‘“ six eggs to you,
and a half dozen of them bad for the dance
ye’ve led me the day. It’s sell you chape, I
will, for I’d rather give you away than be
bothered to take you home.”

Now, Paddy had determined the moment
that he noticed this particular pig that it was
the animal for him, and he spoke up joyfully
and hopefully, ‘Sure, I’ll take it off your
hands for you, honest man.”

‘‘Thin hand me over ten shillings,” said
the man; ‘‘an’ he’s dirt chape at that. Just
look at the intelligent face on him; he’ll ’arn
his own living pickin’ and st’alin’ from the
neighbours. Heneedsno kapeat all. There’s
no fince that’ll kape him out or in. He'll
jump thim all, root up a half acre or so of
praties, take his desart off a dozen cabbages,



42 PADDY O’LEAREY

and be back in his shty, and him a squ’aling
as innercent for his supper as the babe in the
cradle.”

‘* Sure, that’s a bad reputation entirely,”
said Mother Maloney. ‘I don’t wonder yeez
want to get rid of him, Ye’ll not find any
one in the market will take him as a gift.
He'd be the ruination of his master,”

“Tl take him, and thank you kindly,”
Paddy persisted.

‘Sure, you’ve r’ason,” replied the old man,
and, addressing Mother Maloney, he ex-
plained: ‘It’s truth I’m telling you, that
this pig would never touch it’s masther’s
crops, barrin’ a first experiment in that direc-
tion, Take him three times round the
garden, b’ating him in the four quarters of it,
and the baste will never offer to threspass on
the ragion, but will go right by the most
timpting display of inions and curlyflowers,
straight for the circumjacent territory of the
neighbours. He comes from a knowledgable
race of blissed bastes, descindints of a pig
belonging to the howly St. Anthony, who
was gifted with a moral sinse, and to whom



A PIG MARKET 43

the saint exposited the difference between
meum and tuum.”

“It’s the soggart he is,” Mother Maloney
murmured in admiration, and Paddy’s eyes
glowed with unconquerable desire. ‘‘ Give
me the pig,” he exclaimed; ‘‘ it’s just the kind
I want to learn him thricks.”

““Sartinly, my little gintleman; but first,
where is your haner’s twelve shillin’s ? ”

“Faith, you said you would give him
away,” Paddy wailed.

‘No, avick, you misunderstood me intirely.
Fifteen shillings is the price of -this illegant
baste, and by the five crosses, I would take
no less if I were dying of hunger, for it
breaks my heart to part with the darlint; but
seein’ that it’s in the professional line your
haner ‘is, and the pig will likely make your
reputation and your fortune in the two king-
doms, not speaking of France, Ameriky,
Dublin, and other furrin parts, why, I’ll not
be hinderin’ the pig and you from going
where glory waits you, and he’s yours for a
pound—fair and square, and neither more nor
less, so don’t ye be talkin’.”



44 PADDY O’LEAREY

“Ye ould villain!’ exclaimed Mother Ma-
loney; ‘ye said yerself but just now that the
price was tin shillings, which is nine shillings
too much, for a thinner, hungrier-looking
crayther I never set eyes on. He would beg-
gar a nobleman to fatten him, and as to only
foraging on the neighbours, I’ll not believe a
word you say. Sure, it’s the lie that slides
aisily from your tongue, I’ll be thinkin’,
Come along wid yez, Paddy, and we'll l’ave
the auld thafe to drive home his pig come
the avenin’.”

Paddy turned reluctantly away. ‘I'll give
you this for it; it’s all I’ve got,” he said at
parting, displaying the crown. ‘The old man
made a derisive gesture, and Mother Maloney
jerked him angrily along. They approached
the booths in the centre of the street, and
she stopped in front of a board placed on two
barrels, which formed the counter and base of
supplies over which Mrs. Finnigan was sell-
ing periwinkles and seagrass which she
had brought from the west coast. She had
no thought of business, but began gossiping

_with her old crony on the state of the fisher-



A PIG MARKET 45

ies. ‘Sure, they’re very poor,” she said to
Mother Maloney, ‘‘ andall because the fishers
didn’t open the s’ason accordin’ to former
custom by taking the praste out with them to
bless the catch.”

Paddy did not listen to them, but looked
back longingly at the pig they had just left.
He was young, but had none of the cherubic
chubbiness of youth. His legs were long and
lean, but cleanly made, the legs of a racer.
His head had an impertinent cock, his eyes,
though small, were active and had a sly ex-
pression, and his saucy snout moved nerv-
ously, as though he longed to be grubbing
for succulent roots and tubers. He was
spotted black and white, the white predomi-
nating on his fore quarters and the black on
his rear. This circumstance gave strangers
a curious surprise when the animal turned
around, the effect being as if one pig had
mysteriously disappeared and another had
been substituted in its place.

Mother Maloney noticed Paddy’s longing
look and said: ‘‘It isn’t the likes of that pig

_you’re wanting, vick machree. He will in-



46 PADDY O’LEAREY

veigle you into more thrubble thin your life
is worth. He’s no descindant of St. An-
thony’s pig. Sure, I knows his race. There
was a pig as like him as two peas whose ac-
quaintance I had whin I was a child in Tip-
perary—the demon pig they called him, for
he was one of thim bastes into which the
divils entered what all ran violently down a
stape place and perished in the say.”

“But if they were all drowned, grand-
mother, how could the demon pig have got
to Tipperary?”

‘‘ My explanation of the matter is that this
particular baste might have swam out to
some outgoin’ st’amer that was just arrivin’,
and so have taken free steerage passage
along with St. Patrick for Ireland.”

“Then, I’m sure, grandmother, St. Pat-
rick’s as good as St. Anthony any day, and
I don’t want a fat, lazy thing that will ate
till the brains of him turns to fat an’ good
looks, like a purty guril what knows her
vally. I likes the looks of this one, and if
he’s a demon pig, so much the better. See
him wrinkle the nose of him. I'll warrant



A PIG MARKET 47

yees, he'll undo any latch, and his legs is like
a greyhound’s; he’d lead the agint a chase if
he tried to collect him for the rint, though
it’s neither agint nor rint to pay that we
have, praise be to the blessed saints.”

‘“The boy’s clane daft,” said Mother Ma-
loney. ‘‘It’s a case of thrue love, I’m
thinkin’, and we all know that the less rayson
there is in that the more persistence. Whist,
Paddy, l’ave it to me, and since it’s that pig
only ye will have, have it ye will; only don’t
yees be lookin’ at it. Go and listen to the
ballad-singer, and purtend ye’re out of con-
sate with the baste.”

Paddy joined the circle of people that were
listening to the blind ballad-singer, but he
could not forbear glancing from time to time
in the direction of the owner of the pig, and
he was glad to see that he found no pur-
chaser.

Late in the afternoon his grandmother
called to him to hurry home with her.

. “*He’s gone,” she explained, ‘‘ gone home,
his pig a-trottin’ afther him likeadog. Don’t
yees be frettin’, his road is our road as far as



48 PADDY O’LEAREY

the cross-ways, and we'll soon come up
with him.”

They overtook the man, who looked up
hopefully and cunningly as he saw them
approach, but Mother Maloney apparently
took no notice of the pig, and Paddy walked
on whistling as he was told. Mother Maloney
had her apron full of periwinkles, which her
friend from the seashore had given her, and
both Paddy and she munched them as they
walked, for they had had no other luncheon,
She talked with the owner of the pig on
different topics, and he did not notice that as
she approached the cross-ways she strewed
her periwinkles along the path at intervals,
and that the pig ate them greedily. As she left
him at the cross-ways, he offered her the pig
for ten shillings, but she scornfully declined
the proposal, and trudged disdainfully on.
The tears gathered in Paddy’s eyes, but he
hurried away the faster that he might not
show his emotion.

Suddenly he heard a galloping and snorting
behind him, and turning, saw that the demon
pig was following them, while its owner was



A PIG MARKET 49

panting and shouting far behind. ‘‘ Whist,
Paddy,” said Mother Maloney, ‘‘look not to
the right hand nor to the left.” Here she let
fall a handful of periwinkles. ‘‘ Sure, the pig’s
a darlint, and he’s as much in love with you
as you with him.”

She quickened her pace and pretended not
to hear the shouts of the irate man. When
he overtook them, and they could no longer
feign to be unconscious that the pig had
followed them, Mother Maloney ordered him
to take his ‘‘ baste” away, and protested that
she would not take him as a gift, at the
same time shaking the last periwinkles from
her apron and walking resolutely into her
cottage.

The swine followed her impudently, and
Mother Maloney could be heard scolding and
dealing vigorous blows with her broom, but
the blows fell harmlessly on her bed, and the
pig was supping from a saucer of milk which
she had placed for it behind the door.
‘Come, rid me of the baste,” she cried,
appearing in the doorway with the broom in
her hand. The man hesitated, and turned



50 PADDY O’LEAREY

to Paddy. ‘‘ Give me the crown yees offered
me and he’s yours.”

‘*Sure, he spent his crown at the market,”
Mother Maloney shrieked, but she was too
late, for Paddy had thrust his coin into the
man’s hand and rushed overjoyed into the
cottage to embrace his demon pig.





CHAPTER III.

AT KILLARNEY.

“a, ADDY was awak-
M ened the next
morning by the
squeals of his
pet. ‘‘He’s cry-
ing for hunger,”
Mother Maloney



explained. ‘‘He’s

,

“that knowledgable he follyed
x me to the shed and watched
me at my milking, and now he’s rampant,

he is, because I won’t fade him before yees
has had yees breakfast.”

Paddy quickly divided his porridge and
milk with his pig, and then expressed his
desire to be off for home. To this Mother
Maloney was very loth to consent.

‘‘Sure, it’s lonely I'll be without yees,”
she pleaded. ‘‘Why can’t yees be con-
tint to stay here in the place of him that’s
gone?”

Paddy declared that he could not live away

51



52 PADDY O’LEAREY

from his own home, but proposed that his
grandmother should return with him, and
the old lady, having taken the time of once
smoking of her pipe to consider, consented.
She did not even delay for a sale of her
effects, for there was nothing left in the
cabin worth selling. Her provisions were
nearly exhausted. She had nothing with
which to face the coming winter but the
little Kerry cow, and she knew that it would
be seized on the next rent day. She there-
fore laid her only decent coverlet on the
floor, and tying what property she had that
was worth moving in one great bundle, she
carried it with Paddy’s help to the cross-
roads and waited until the carrier’s cart
came jingling along, when she begged the
transportation of the bundle to Killarney,
asserting that the expressage would be paid
by her son. ;

This done she returned to the cabin, and
tying a string to one of the hind legs of the
pig, and a rope about the neck of the cow,
she bade farewell to the poor cabin which
had served her so long as a home.





AT KILLARNEY 53

Paddy had great difficulty in inducing his
pig to move forward until he followed his
grandmother’s advice to pull the animal by
the tail. ‘‘For thin,” said she, ‘‘he’ll be
that certain that it’s to Castleisland yees
want him to go, that he’ll be off like mad in
the conthrary direction.”

Mother Maloney’s son-in-law was not over-
rejoiced when he learned that she had come
to visit him for the winter; but hospitality is
a marked vrait of the Irish peasant, however
poor, and Dennis would have scorned to re-
fuse shelter to his wife’s mother. He reflect-
ed also that the little Kerry cow was a very
desirable addition to their live stock, and its
milk a fair return for Mother Maloney’s
board.

For a time things apparently went well
with the family. To have their rent free,
and all their wood for the gathering, was suf-
ficient wages for Dennis’s light duties as game-
keeper. Many a hare and a pheasant, too,
came back from the forest in his donkey-cart
hidden under the fagots, and as this contra-
band game was accepted at the shebeen house



54 PADDY O’LEAREY

instead of money, Dennis drank more and
more, and took no pains to cultivate his
potato plot, or indeed to do any kind of work..

It was of no use to dig the potatoes, for it
was in 1846, the first year of the great famine;
the blight had fallen on the plant, and they
were not too fit toeat. Many of their neigh-
bours were suffering, but as yet the O’ Leareys
were not in distress, and all hoped for better
times the coming year.

The Desmonds had left the country, and
the great Hall was vacant. The ivy did its
best to cover the stately old building and
hide the disrepair. Squire Desmond was
wont to say that there were only two things
about the building which were not falling to
pieces—the ivy and the mortgages.

Financial and other troubles had soured
the Squire. Though an off-shoot of a noble
family, and the heir to many broad acres, he
was land-poor and disappointed in all his am-
bitions. It pained him to see the ruin staring
him in the face, not only on his own estates,
but throughout the country, and he decided
that he would leave. Ireland.



AT KILLARNEY 55

**T will rent the estate,” he said to him-
self, “for the rest of my life, and live hence-
forth on the continent.”

Paddy went up to the Hall, the day before
the Desmonds left, to bid Miss Kathleen good-
by, and to show her the pig which he had
bought with her gift.

Kathleen was much pleased with the
bright, frisky little animal, and Paddy prom-
ised to have it finely instructed by her return.
‘* Sure, he’ll know Latin and dancin’ by that
time, Miss Kathleen. I'll take him with
me to the hedge school and to mass, and
ye’ll not be ashamed to own him as a rela-
tion.”

‘“‘ He is a jolly, saucy little fellow, at any
rate,” said Kathleen; ‘he will probably be
changed when I see him again. I am go-
ing to make a picture of him as he looks
now.”

While Paddy held the cord, Kathleen made
a few characteristic lines, which really gave
something of the spirit of the pig, supple-
menting the drawing with a couplet to re-
mind her still further of her pet.



56 PADDY O’LEAREY

“ This is the pig who, nose in air,
And small tail crisply curled,
‘When all the future seemed most fair,
Set out to see the world. 2

‘*But, Paddy,” she added, ‘‘ he ought to
haveafamousname. Have you decided what
to call him?”

““No, miss. I’d rather you’d have the



namin’ of him, if you’d be so kind.”

“Then we will call him Finn ma Cool.”

‘* Was he an Irishman, miss?”

‘‘ Ves, Paddy, Irish of the Irish, the leader
of the Feni, a warlike tribe who lived cen-
turies before St. Patrick. Finn was a great
hero, but he was imprisoned by enchant-
ment one day when he went hunting in
the forest of the quicken trees, a kind of
mountain ash, that as quickly as they were
cut down shot up saplings which wove their
branches together and kept him in. Beware
of mountain ashes, Paddy, or you and Finn
may come to grief.”

“And if he never came out of his thrap,
how did folks know of it, to be sure?”

“One of his followers, a poet named Oisin,
went away to England on the day that Finn













AT KILLARNEY 59

went hunting. He went to court a beautiful
lady who was a witch, and she did not wish
him to leave her, so she enchanted him, and he
stayed with her, as he supposed, three years,
but really it was three hundred. Finally he in-
sisted on going back to find Finn, and when
he reached Ireland he found that all the Feni
were dead and people had forgotten all about
them, for it was three hundred years since
Finn had gone hunting in the forest of the
quicken trees. But Oisin searched for him
and found that the forest itself had died and
grown black like bog oak, but still, closely
braided together, it shut in the bones of Finn.
Then Oisin went to St. Patrick and told him
all this story.”

«Sure, it’s a wonderful story intirely, but
if St. Patrick said it was thrue I’ll not disbe-
lieve it, and will name the pig Finn ma Cool;
but by the same token, be you gone one year
or three, Miss Kathleen, it’ll seem three hun-
der to me till I hear your foine stories and
your swate singing again. Won't you sing
me one little song before you go, Miss Kath-
leen?”



60 PADDY O’LEAREY

“Certainly, Paddy. Come into the house
and I will sing you my favourite one, ‘ Rich

a,”

and Rare.

The girl made a beautiful picture as she
stood by the old Irish harp, and Paddy, who
sat in the window where he could hold the
pig by its tether, had eyes only for her, and
allowed Finn ma Cool to grub up a whole bed
of tulips while she sang.

He never forgot the singer or the words
of the ballad.

“ Rich and rare were the gems she wore,
And a bright gold ring on her wand she bore ;
But oh! her beauty was far beyond
Her sparkling gems or snow-white wand,
‘Lady, dost thou not fear to stray
So lonely and lovely through this bleak way?
Are Erin’s sons so good or so cold
As not to be tempted by woman or gold ?’
‘Sir Knight, I feel not the least alarm,
No son of Erin will offer me harm,
For though they love beauty and golden store,
Sir Knight, they love honour and virtue more,’
On she went, and her maiden smile,
In safety lighted her round the Green Isle,
And blessed for ever was she who relied
Upon Erin’s honour and Erin’s pride.”

There were hard times in store for the
O’Leareys, when the handsome porker would



AT KILLARNEY 61

have realised a comfortable sum at the county
market, or have made delectable flitches of
bacon for the almost starving family, but
Paddy always insisted that Finn ma Cool was
Miss Kathleen’s pig, not given him, but
simply entrusted to his care, and very hon-
ourably he fulfilled his trust.

He began at once with Finn’s education,
teaching him first the tricks which he had
seen done by the performing pig at the fair.

Father Nooney was instructing a class of
young catechumens preparatory to confirma-
tion, and as Paddy went on every Friday to
the priest’s house to recite his catechism, he
took Finn with him, striving as they walked
to teach the animal the catechism, and in-
deed Finn was nearly as intelligent as some
of the boys into whose heads the reverend
father attempted to beat the answers to the
questions.

Mother Maloney possessed a very ancient
and ‘dirty pack of cards, with which it was
her wont to while away the long evenings by
playing solitaire. Paddy used to watch her
as he sat on the creepy-stool in the opposite



62 PADDY O’LEAREY _

corner of the ingle, with his chin in his hand
and his elbow on his knee, and one evening
his grandmother, tired of arranging and
rearranging the cards on the hearth-stone,
offered to teach him to play the venerable
game of ‘blind-hookey,” placing the creepy-
stool between them as a table. Paddy had a
head for cards, and Mother Maloney fre-
quently invited him to play with her. So
one day Paddy prevailed upon her to allow
him to bring Finn ma Cool into the cabin
and teach him the game. This he did by
spreading the cards in front of the pig,
and when it was his turn to play, deftly slip-
ping a shelled acorn under the proper card.
Finn would make a dash forward, push the
card toward them with his snout and devour
the acorn beneath it. This, it will be seen,
was only an adaptation of the trick of the
swinging disks performed at the fair. Paddy
had gained considerable manual dexterity,
and continued to introduce the acorn so
adroitly as not to be discovered by Mother
Maloney, whose eyes were no longer so sharp
as her tongue. a



AT KILLARNEY 63

This simple device was varied in a hundred
ways, and served as the basis of teaching the
pig the catechism. Paddy practised this feat
on the mud floor of the vestry, while waiting
Father Nooney’s arrival, to the gaping won-
der of his fellow-catechumens. His custom
was to spread a suit of cards before Finn
and then ask one of the questions having
a numerical answer, as, ‘‘ How many sacra-
ments are there?”

Instantly the pig turned the seven-spot,
while Rory O’Flannagan repeated: ‘‘ Baptism,
conflammation, ewcharist, pennies, extreme
onions, howly order, and matrimony. He’s
right, the crather.”

“« How may sins cry to Heaven for venge-
ance?”

Over went the four-spot.

“Nay,” said Phelim Malloy, ‘‘there’s but
three: wilful murder, the sin of Sodom, and
oppression of the poor.”

“« Sure, you’ve forgotten defrauding labour-
ers of their wages, and that’s worst of all.
Sure, the baste knows more than you do,

Phelim. Try him again.”



64 PADDY O’LEAREY

“Thin how many mysteries of the rosary
are there?” asked Phelim, with a sly look.
‘* He can’t answer that, for there are fifteen,
and yees haven’t a card with fifteen spots
to it.”

*‘Can’t he answer them?” Paddy replied
derisively, as he laid down two more cards,
and Finn turned three fives in succession.
‘‘There’s the foive of hearts, that’s the foive
joyful mysteries; and the foive of spades,
thim’s the foive sorrowful mysteries; and the
foive of diamonds, thim’s the foive glawrious
mysteries!”

In like manner the pig turned the four tens
to tell the number of days in Lent, the ten
of clubs to represent the Commandments, the
three of hearts for the theological virtues,

‘the eight of diamonds for the beatitudes, the
four and ten of clubs for the fourteen stations
of the cross.

The boys were so interested that they had
not noticed the coming of the priest, who
stole silently into the vestry and observed
the performance, at first with amusement,
and at last with superstitious dread, being



AT KILLARNEY 65

convinced that the pig was possessed by the
evil one,

Father Nooney was something of an exor-
cist, having practiced with great success on
several old women afflicted with imaginary
disorders. He seized the holy-water can and
was about to empty the contents on the pig
when a sudden thought struck him. He
left the room as silentiy as he had entered,
and betaking himself to the kitchen of
his own house, filled the can with boiling
water from the tea-kettle. Then returning,
just as Finn’s exercise had ended, he or-
dered Paddy sternly to hold the beast while
he put him through a few more questions
from the catechism. Paddy trembled, for
there was malice in Father Nooney’s eye as
he asked:

*‘Have the holy fathers and the ancient
church writers left upon record any miracles
done by holy water?”

The pig was silent, and Paddy replied:
** Plaze, sor, he can only answer by the con-
figuration of the cards.”

“Ow! Thin answer yersel’.”



66 PADDY O’LEAREY

‘*Plaze, sor, they have, agin magical en-
chantments and the power of the divil.”

‘*Right you are. See St. Epiphanius, St.
Hierome, Theodeus, Palladius, and the Histor-
icus Ecclesiasticus. Now, all you repate in
consart ‘ Oxis doxis glorioxis!’” and Father
Nooney threw the false holy water, can and
all, at Finn ma Cool. But Paddy, perceiving
his intention, had let go the tether, and his pet
escaped with only a sprinkle of the scalding
fluid, which descended more liberally on his
own bare feet.

From that time hatred and distrust of
his spiritual instructor took firm root in
Paddy’s soul, and he looked for an op-
portunity to pay him back. His revenge
came at last and will be related pres-
ently.

In the meantime, Finn, though under the
ban of the Church, attended every wedding
and wake in Killarney, and never failed to
create great amusement, and to gather in a
few pennies for Paddy.

He presently developed a new talent, which
commended itself to Dennis as well. When-



AT KILLARNEY 67

ever Paddy went to the forest to assist his
father in gathering wood he took Finn with
him, and Paddy taught the pig to fetch and
carry sticks. One day he brought a young
hare back and laid it at Paddy’s feet. Paddy
raised his arm to beat Finn, but his father
stopped him. The incident convinced Dennis
that Finn could be taught to hunt like a sport-
ine-dog. He knew that his son would not be
a party to such a proceeding, and after this
he left him at home, but took Finn with
him.

Finn grew to enjoy this very much and
would squeal with impatience to be taken
on the excursions. He would trot around to
the different traps and snares which Dennis
had laid, sometimes showing great intelli-
gence in springing them, and would come
galloping back to his master’s cart with the
pheasant or hare in his mouth. He even
learned to point and course the game, never
offering to devour it himself. His keeping
cost very little, for he made his living chiefly,
indeed, from other people’s gardens, as had
been predicted, never touching anything that



68 PADDY O’LEAREY

grew in the O’Leareys’ plot. His peculiar
marking, white spotted with black from nose
to middle, and black spotted with white from
middle to tail, had given rise to many amus-
ing experiences and had once saved him from
the just reward of his depredations; an ad-
venture which happened in this wise: The
gardener at the great house, as Desmond
Hall was called, happening to look into his
celery trench, was ‘‘ consternated” to find all
the crisp sprouts eaten off or broken. Look-
ing up, he saw the evident perpetrator of this
mischief—a pig worming its way through the
hedge. He hastily followed it, ‘‘a stern
chase proving a long chase,” and the pig
soon disappearing in a gully which led toward
the gamekeeper’s cottage.

The irate gardener presented himself
shortly at the door, calling for vengeance
on a black pig which had destroyed his
celery.

Paddy was dismayed, but a look of cunning
showed itself on Mother Maloney’s shrewd
features:

‘Sure, we've but the one pig here, and



AT KILLARNEY 69

him slaping as innercent as the babe in its
stoy.” And she led the gardener trium-
phantly to the rear of the cabin, and showed
him Finn reposing peacefully, half in and
half out of the keg which served him as a
sort of kennel.

There was surely something uncanny about
the creature; he lay with his chin on one
fore hoof, his saucy pink snout turned up,
one eye sleepily closed, the other regard-
ing the company with an expression of con-
scious innocence all unafraid. ‘‘It’s the
blessed lamb he is,” said Mother Maloney,
and, save for a fewinky spots, all that was
visible of the pig was of a lamb-like white-
ness. He was utterly unlike the impish black
pig which the gardener had seen squirming in
the hedge and scurrying before him down the
hill, and baffled and deluded, the man reluc-
tantly took his leave.

It was some little time after this that
Paddy conceived the idea of utilising this
physical peculiarity still further. He asked
his granny to make Finn a little coat of black
cloth and a petticoat from an old white silk



70 PADDY O’LEAREY

handkerchief. Paddy had taught the animal
to stand erect, and when clothed in the black
coat, the trim black legs continued the * colour
scheme,” and gave him the appearance of a
natty little gentleman. As the coat was cut
low in the front, the white throat of the pig
carried out the idea of a shirt-front, and in
this guise, resting one hoof on a walking-
stick, and wearing a cocked hat, Finn posed
as a beau. Snatched behind the door, the
coat was removed, the white silk petticoat
took its place, a bit of white net, stich as the
Killarney girls used as the web of their lace,
was thrown over Finn’s head and shoulders,
which gleamed white through its meshes,
and he was introduced as a bride, and it was
difficult, indeed, to believe that one actor had
taken both parts.

Sometimes when his rustic audience ap-
plauded the really clever performances of his
pupil, Paddy longed for wider appreciation,
and he thought how fine it would be to
trudge away to larger towns and exhibit his
pet at the great fairs; but he had a strong
home attachment, and he loved his mother so



AT KILLARNEY 71

dearly that only a desperate crisis could
induce him to such a step as this.

Very steadily and swiftly that crisis was
approaching,





CHAPTER IV.

IN HIDING.

LTHOUGH the
potato crop had

failed during the
past season, and

was likely to do so



again, and Dennis
drank more and worked not a whit, the family
were hopeful, for they relied for the coming
winter on the perquisites which they had en-
joyed from Dennis’s office as gamekeeper.
Much to their disappointment and dismay
this means of a livelihood was suddenly cut
off from the O’Leareys. The tenant who
‘rented Squire Desmond’s place had no knowl-
edge of the verbal contract between the
Squire and his gamekeeper, and even refused
to believe that Dennis had been called to that
office. The Squire, in the multiplicity of his
cares, had forgotton to mention it, and the

new tenant insisted that Dennis should pay
72



IN HIDING 73

rent for his cottage, and should forego the
privilege of gathering wood in the forest.
He even hinted of his intention to prosecute
him for poaching.

Dennis protested his inability to pay rent,
but the tenant pointed to his live stock.
“You have a donkey, a cow, and a pig, and
can raise money on them, and if the rent is
not ready for me when I come again I will
seize the live stock.”

“‘The curse of Jeffrey Lynch be on you”
cried Mother Maloney, ‘‘and may you carry
his coal of fire in your bosom to the end of
your days.”

The entire family united in lamentation
and malediction that evening, but the next
morning, being market-day at Ballyma-
gooley, Dennis led the cow away, announcing
his intention to sell it. The little animal
seemed to understand the situation, for it
struggled and lowed, while the children fol-
lowed in a weeping procession for quite a
distance, the cottagers coming out of their
houses to give their opinion of the hard-
hearted landlord,



74 PADDY O’LEAREY

Paddy came back to the house when quite
tired and found his grandmother crouched
in the chimney corner. He fancied that she
must be overcome with grief, for she had
manifested an amount of self-control quite
foreign to her nature when the cow was led
away.

“It is too bad, Granny,” he said, putting
his hand in hers. ‘ The new landlord has no
right to take Mooley, for she does not belong
to feyther, but to you, and feyther has no
right to sell her from you.”

‘Don’t be afther judging your betthers,”
said Mother Maloney. ‘‘ What your feyther’s
done he’s done with my consint; but the land-
lord will niver resave a pinny from the sale
of the cow. May he sup sorrow for this day,
and may the coal of Jeffrey Lynch burn into
his heart and his brain.”

“What is the coal of Jeffrey Lynch,
Granny ?” Paddy asked.

‘* And you not to know, who have lived in
sight of his house since yees been born!”

‘“Do you mean the house without a roof,
on Purple Mountain, that everybody says is





IN HIDING 75

haunted? I’ve seen every windy of that
house lighted up in the avenin’, and once
feyther said, ‘ Jeffrey Lynch’s coal of fire is
flaming high the night, and by the same
token some poor people are being evicted
from their homes without marcy.’ Whin I
axed him what Jeffrey Lynch’s coal was he
said it was a Satan’s keepsake that the divil
gives every bad man in this life as a foretaste
of what’s to come. But thin I don’t under-
stand him at all, at all; for they say Jeffrey
Lynch is long dead; any way, I’ve seen his
tombstone in the burying-ground.”

‘‘Have you niver heard the story ?” asked
Mother Maloney. ‘‘It goes thisway. Jeffrey
Lynch was a middleman. He rinted land of
the earl, and thin he rinted it again on a
profit to the poor farmers; and if they were
the laste pinny behind he evicted them ivery
time, though he supped sorrow for it there-
after.

“‘Well, he died, sure, and though he was a
bad, cruel man intirely, and must have known
he had no right in the primises, it was the like
insurance that was in him to take stage-coach



76 PADDY O’LEAREY

for heaven, as though he had a billet signed
by the pope giving the angels orders for his
lodging and entertainment. Whin he knocked
at the gate, says St. Peter, says he, ‘ Who’s
there ?’

““*T'm Jeffrey Lynch of Killarney.’

‘**T know you,’ says Peter, ‘ you murderin’,
rack-rintin’ ould vagabond. You evicted
your tinants; you must seek your lodgings
further down,’ says he.

‘*So he takes the back stairs to Purgatory,
and at the doore, thim that runs that board-
ing-house axed him what his business had
been, :

“*T was a land-grabber,’ says Jeffrey.
‘Sure, [niver thought to put up with the likes
of such company as this, but asit’s go furder to
fare worse, if you make me comfortable and
give me the best of iverything you’ve got, ’l
condescind to patronise this establishment.’

*“* Did you evict your tinants?’ says the
landlord of Purgatory.

““*T evicted some,’ says Jeffrey.

“Thin consider yourself evicted,’ says the
landlord, a-handin’ back his gripsack, heavy





IN HIDING 77

- with the earnin’s of starving people, and Jef-
frey Lynch, he went a round lower of the lad-
der.

‘©¢This way, sor,’ says the ould boy, a-takin’
down the key of number two hundred million
from the hook and reaching for Jeffrey’s
overcoat. ‘That’s a basement room,’ says

‘he, ‘convanient to the furnace. You’ll not
complain of slapin’ cold,’ says he. ‘ But first
have the politeness to inscribe your name on
the hotel register.’

““*T’m Jeffrey Lynch, of Killarney,’ says
Jeffrey; but so soon as he uttered his name
all of the evil spirits in the siminary raised
one yell. ‘Give him a coal of fire and sind
him back to Killarney,’ screams they, ‘or
he’ll evict us all.’

**So back he was obliged to trot. And that
is the r’ason that he lives in his house alone
on Purple Mountain to this day, though the
thatch has been gone this fifty year from the
roof, and the moss has kivered his name on
the tombstone. Many a night honest folk
belated see that bit coal that Satan gave
him, and that same Satan’s keepsake is re-



78 PADDY O’LEAREY

morse, mind you that, Paddy; they see that
coal, I say, shining red in his windy, a warn-
ing to hard landlords who have any desire to
live in another country than this after they
die.”

“And won’t feyther get a Satan’s keep-
sake, too, for st’aling Squire Desmond’s
pheasants?” Paddy asked.

‘* Hoot, toot!” replied his grandmother,
who did not relish this application of her
parable. ‘‘Sure, there couldn’t be coals
enough in the pit to go round, if Satan wasted
them by giving them away for alittle thing
like that.”

When Dennis came home that evening
there was a whispered conference between
his mother-in-law, his wife and himself, and
all seemed well pleased, though there was a
pretence at sniffling.

“ And how much did yees get for the cow?”
Paddy asked.

‘“*Don’t yees be afther asking onconvat-
ient questions,’’ Mother Maloney exclaimed.
“Whin the landlord comes and asks that same
ye’ll be glad yees can’t answer.”



IN HIDING 79

The younger children cried that night
because Paddy told them there would be no
milk for their porridge at breakfast, but
what was their surprise on rising to see a
pail of milk standing on the table as usual.

‘¢ Tt’s the kindness of one of the neighbours,”
said Dennis, and Paddy wondered who had
been so generous. The wonder grew, for the
milk was there every morning. Late one
night as Paddy lay in the little loft over the
kitchen, which was his bedroom, he heard
some one open the door and enter the kitchen
stealthily. He slipped from his bed and ap-
plied his eye to a crack in the floor, and saw
his father with the pail of milk in one hand
and a lighted lantern in the other.

It was plain that Dennis went for the milk
secretly, and a suspicion smote the boy that
it was stolen. He had never eaten of the
broiled pheasants and hares which his father
brought from the park, and now he could not
touch the milk. At first he had scruples
about allowing Finn ma Cool to drink it, but
concluded that as the animal had no soul he
could not be depraved by it, and as both pig



80 PADDY O’LEAREY

and milk belonged to the Desmonds, it might
not be wrong for them to travel in company.
But he was troubled for his father, both for
the sin and the danger; for it was a very
daring thing to slip into Squire Desmond’s
barns and milk the cows by night, and Paddy
knew that if his father were discovered, the
new landlord would not condone the offence.

He could only protest by declining the
milk at breakfast, and eating his porridge
with only salt to make it palatable.

But there was more trouble in store for
Paddy. Rent day was approaching, and he
overheard his father say to his mother that
the landlord would probably seize Paddy’s
pig. ‘And I shan’t hinder him,” Dennis
asserted, ‘‘ for I happened to be walking with
Finn outside the park, and the crayther
squeezed himself through the hedge and
caught a fine rabbit and brought it outside to
me, which was all very well, and knowledg-
able in the baste, and he’s done that same be-
foore. But bad luck would have it that the
gardener saw him do it, and though he
. couldn’t arrest me for poaching, for I was not



IN HIDING 81

on the preserves at all, at all; he would have
it that I had taught the pig the thrick, and he
said he would shoot him the next time he
caught him. So it’s fearful I am the baste
can’t be broken ofits bad habits. It must be
the ould innemy taught him; and if he’s shot,
sure we won’t be allowed the ‘atin’ of him;
and it’s just as well not to anger thim that has
authority. We don’t want to be evicted like
the O'Donovans, and we can spare the pig
better than the donkey, and sure, if he gets
the pig, maybe he’ll be asking no questions
about the cow.”

The landlord have Finn ma Cool! Paddy
could scarcely believe his ears, for Finn was
not his pig, but Miss Kathleen’s; surely his
mother would say so. But no, for she only
replied that perhaps it would be better to let
the donkey go and kill the pig and salt him
down for the winter,

Kall Finn ma Cool! Eat Finn ma Cool! The
very idea made Paddy quite sick. There was
only one sympathetic friend to whom he
could go in his distress, and that was his
grandmother.



82 PADDY O’LEAREY

‘‘ Hide the crayther until after rint day,”
she counselled. ‘Your mither’s right; the
pig is worth more than the donkey, for not a
stiver of work does Dinny do with the cray-
ther, and it’s many a penny you’ve brought
in on fair days and from weddings, from the
divartisement of your pig, to say nothin’ of its
poachin’, which might be restrained in proper
limits.”

The more Paddy thought over his grand-
mother’s advice the more reasonable it seemed
to him, and that very night, an hour after all
the family had retired, he slipped down from
his loft, took Finn ma Cool from his sty, and
started with him up the side of Purple Moun-
tain. For Paddy had decided that the safest
hiding-place for his pig would be the haunted
house of Jeffrey Lynch. No one in Killar-
ney, he felt sure, would be so foolhardy as to
dare to explore it, and his own heart beat
rather faster than usual at the idea of ventur-
ing into that ill-omened place by night,

It was true that he had made up his mind
to the very rational conclusion that the red
light in the windows, or rather on them,



IN HIDING 83

which was visible nearly every evening, was
only the reflection of the sunset; but the
story might be true, after all. The windows
were quite dark now, and if there had not
been moonlight Paddy would not have been
able to distinguish the house on the sombre
hill or find his way along the thickly wooded
path. But he had often been out much later
than this on his way home from wakes and
merry-makings, and he whistled ‘‘ The Devil’s
Dream” to keep up his spirits. He thought
of the legend of the quicken trees as he
pushed his way through the thicket which
surrounded the house, and his blood ran cold
as he came out in front of the deserted house
to see that the windows were really lighted
from within, and the light shone through the
naked rafters and outlined them like gallow’s
trees against the sky. The light was not
stationary, but moved about within the house,
and Paddy would certainly have beaten a
precipitate retreat had not Finn ma Cool
walked coolly up to the front door, where he
stood squealing for admittance.

‘It’s hoping I am that Jeffrey Lynch has



84 PADDY O’LEAREY

bad eyesight in his ears,” said Paddy to him-
self, as he approached cautiously and en-
deavoured to secure his pig. As he did so a
pair of horns and a great dark head suddenly
raised themselves before the lighted window,
and Paddy stood rooted to the ground with
horror, thinking that Satan himself must have
come to visit his faithful servant, Jeffrey
Lynch. Another instant and what was his
amazement to see his own father within the
haunted house. Paddy had never had a high
respect for his father, but he had never be-
lieved him so wicked as to keep company
with Jeffrey Lynch and Satan.

His mystification lasted but for a moment,
when his father’s voice, exclaiming: «So,
Mooley. Whist! be aisy now. What ails the
baste?” and a well-known low, explained it
all. His father had only pretended to sell
the little Kerry cow, and had hidden her
away here to keep her from the landlord’s
clutches. At first, Paddy could hardly for-
bear laughing aloud and shouting: ‘ There’s
two of us, feyther. Faix, we’re in the same
box!”







IN HIDING 85

But it occurred to him in good time that
while his father was hiding the cow from the
landlord, he, Paddy, was attempting to hide
the pig from his father. He therefore pru-
dently retired into the thicket with Finn ma
Cool, taking his jacket off and fitting its one
sleeve closely over his pet’s snout to keep him
from grunting. He waited until he saw his
father’s lantern twinkling down the steep
path, and then he entered the cabin, glad at
heart for several reasons: First, his father
had not stolen the milk which they had
every morning for breakfast; second, dear
old Mooley had not been sold; and third,
which was no small consideration after their
insufficient supper, he could now refresh
himself and the pig with a drink of milk,
which he did by milking a fine stream
into his own mouth and then into Finn ma
Cool’s.

But it would not do to hide his pig here.
He dared not leave him even for the night,
for there was no telling when his father might
return. The only other hiding-place which
he could think of was Muchross Abbey. It



86 PADDY O’LEAREY

was a long way to this beautiful ruin around
the lake, but Paddy had no sense of weariness,
now his heart was so light, and he trudged
bravely on, repeating to himself an odd para-
phrase of the ballad which Kathleen Desmond
had sung for him:
“ Finn ma Cool, I feel not the laste alarrum ;
No son of Erin will offer us harrum.

For though they love pork and bacon galore—
Whist, Finn! they love hanner and vartue more.”

Although Muchross Abbey is situated in
the middle of a burial-ground, and contains
many tombs, Paddy was not afraid to venture
there—in the first place; because the people
there were so very dead that it was hardly
conceivable that their ghosts could walk.
No one had been buried there within the
recollection of any living man. No one lived
who felt any grief for, or had even known,
the occupants of those tombs. It wasa show
place and resort for tourists, even at this
time, though they came less frequently then
than at the present day.

It was a favourite spot of Kathleen’s, and
Paddy had often been there with her, She



IN HIDING 87

had shown him the tablet to the memory of
her great-great-grandmother, Geraldine Des-
mond. It was astrange bit of vanity, flaunt-
ing as it did the paltry honours of this life at
the door of death, but Paddy was too simple-
minded to notice any incongruity and always
read it with great respect.
This was what the tablet said:

“A memorial of the trulie vertuous and religious Geraldine
Desmond late of Killarney, lineally descended on her father’s
side from the anncient and worshipfull family of MacCarthy
More of Kerry & on her mothers from the ONeils of UL
ster. ‘his Geraldine was the wife of Hugh Desmond who
was cozin thrice removed of that Earl of Desmond who was
basely betrayed & slain his head sent to London, and his
estates confiscated, but this Hugh being Secretary to the
Lord Deputy managed better with both his head and his
estates, & laid the former to rest in peace under the next
tomb and left the latter to his lodge, whose fervent zeale to
the Gospel her pietie, sanctitie and charitie, both the church
which she endowed, and the poor whom she maintained, can
sufficiently testifie. Aged upon LXXX years she died.

“No better thought than think on God
And daily him to serve
No better gift than to the poor
Who ready are to sterve.”’
Paddy led his charge through the beautiful
ruined abbey church. The moonlight shone

through the shattered Gothic arches and the



88 PADDY O’LEAREY

night wind gently moved the trailing ivy.
This jewel-box, among abbeys, is beautiful
in the sunshine, but—

«« When the broken arches are black in night,
And each shafted oriel glimmers white ;
When the cold light’s uncertain shower
Streams on the ruined central tower ;
When buttress and buttress alternately
Seem framed of ebon and ivory ;

Then home returning soothly swear
Was never scene so sad and fair.”

From the church Paddy passed to the
cloisters around the yew tree, old even then,
and mounted a narrow, winding stair to the
abbot’s room. The roof was open to the
sky, but there was an odd little niche in one
corner which might once have been a shrine
or a secret closet where the abbey silver was
kept. Paddy had filled his arms with straw
as he passed a farmer’s rick, and in the niche
in the abbot’s room Paddy made the pig a
comfortable bed. Finn was not inclined to
stay in it, so Paddy descended again to the
church, and bringing up a small tombstone
barred his friend in. Finn thrust his nose
through the aperture between the tombstone



IN HIDING 89

and the lintel and squealed with indignation
as Paddy left him, but the boy bade him not
to make a ‘‘screech owl” of himself and
hurried away,

It was almost morning when Paddy reached
home, and it seemed to him that he had not
fallen asleep before he heard his mother
calling:

‘Get up, Paddy, Finn ma Cool has run
away, or else the darlint’s been stolen.”

“Run away! And how could the crayther
do that, when I barred him in with a tomb-
stone?” Paddy asked, sleepily.

“With atombstone! Sure, it’s dreaming
you are. Come down to your breakfast, and
then hunt him up, that’s a darlint.”

Paddy came down and surprised his mother
by drinking a large portion of the milk which
he had lately seemed to dislike. After break-
fast he carried a bowlful of the milk away
with him? saying that he would tote Finn
home with it; but it is needless to say that
he came back without the pig. He found
the family in tears, for the landlord had just
carried away the donkey.



90 PADDY O’LEAREY

‘‘Sure, the crayther’s no good, now that
we can’t take him to the forest to carry the
fagots home,” said Paddy.

‘*Ow,” wailed Paddy’s mother, ‘‘if him-
sel’ were only at the Hall he would not have
his own people treated so, but we’ve no one
to send to Lunnon to tell Squire Desmond
how we’re mistreated.”

Paddy mused sadly. It was long past the
time that Kathleen Desmond had promised
to return. Would he be able to keep Finn
ma Cool until her return? Would she ever
come? He determined to ask that afternoon
at the Hall when the family were expected.
But here again he received no comfort. The
housekeeper told him that the present land-
lord had leased the estate for seven years,
but she gave Paddy Miss Kathleen’s address,
a convent in France. No one at home could
write a letter, and the only person whom
Paddy knew who possessed skill enough to
do it was Father Nooney, with whom he was
not now on good terms. That very after-
noon while Paddy was at the Hall a further
cause of estrangement had arisen.



IN HIDING 91

A superstitious woman had visited Father
Nooney and had informed him that she had
heard a ghostly priest chanting a midnight
mass in Muchross Abbey.

Under seal of confession the woman fur-
ther divulged that, driven by extreme pov-
erty, she had gone to the abbey at night for
the purpose of prying some of the brazen
tablets from the walls and selling them for
old brass.

While engaged in this wrongful deed the
blows of her hammer woke dreadful echoes
through the ruined abbey, and not echoes
alone, for presently she heard the sound of
chanting, as though the dead-and-gone monks
were on their way from the cloisters to their
seats in the choir. She fled panic-stricken,
but returned after a time, and on seeing the
spot still deserted, concluded that the sounds
which she thought she had heard were only
the imaginings of a guilty conscience; but at
the very first blow they began again with
redoubled vigour,

The occasion was too suggestive to be
neglected. Father Nooney enjoined on the



92 PADDY O’LEAREY

woman, for the good of her own soul and
the glory of the Church, to make public con-
fession on the next Sunday, when he also
announced that he would hold a “station” at
Muchross Abbey on the following Friday,
confessing all those in the parish who had
like sins upon their minds, receiving their
offerings and saying a mass for the rest of the
troubled spirits in the cloister.

Father Nooney, to tell the truth, did not
believe in these spirits. He cared so little as
to what it was which the woman had heard
or thought she heard that he did not even
visit the abbey to investigate before the
day appointed for the station. If Paddy had
attended church he would have been warned,
and would have removed Finn from his place
of hiding; but since the day that holy water
had been administered boiling he had shunned
the sanctuary.

Mrs, O’Learey reported on her return from
church that Father Nooney had announced
that he would hold a ‘‘station,” but she
neglected to mention the place appointed, and
Paddy gave the matter no attention.



IN HIDING 93

On Friday Father Nooney proceeded to the
abbey a little ahead of time, accompanied by
his catechumens, who were to act as choir-
boys. They carried an altar-cloth, some can-
dles and candlesticks, two china vases filled
with dingy paper flowers, and a few other
ecclesiastical furbishings, and with these he
proceeded to improvise an altar from a
large tomb. Then he gave his choir their
places and explained to them their parts, not
without some grumbling on their part, for
Phelim Malloy, their very best singer, was
absent.

Now, Father Nooney had artfully told
Phelim to hide at the other end of the cloister
in the abbot’s room, and when he heard the
singing in the chapel to roar out responses in
his very loudest tones.

Phelim was an orphan whom Father
Nooney was educating for the priesthood, and
the wily priest felt that he could rely upon
his confederacy in the plot. But Father
Nooney had not reckoned on any real pres-
ence in the haunted chamber, and hardly had
the chanting begun when Phelim, with terror



94 PADDY O’LEAREY

staring from his countenance, rushed into
the chapel exclaiming: ‘‘ A ghost! a ghost!
There is a ghost in the abbot’s chamber.”
The congregation sprang to their feet, and
although it was broad daylight, the greater
part tumbled over each other in their haste
to leave the abbey. But there were others
braver or more incredulous than the rest who
remained and surrounded Father Nooney
while he questioned the trembling boy.

‘‘ Faith, I wint up to the abbot’s chamber,
as you tould me, sor——”

‘*Whist, Phelim, make no circumlocutions
from the truth. Bein’ naturally of a pryin’
disposition, yees was explorin’ and spyin’
about this religious house, when yees chanced
into the abbot’s chamber, and what happened
thin ?”

‘‘Why, I stood by the windy, sor, that
looks down on the cloister, and when the
boys began tosing, I begins, just as you tould
me, sor, whin from a sort of cupboard in the
wall there came sich cries and groans as would
have broken the courage of a gauger, sor.”

‘‘And yeez turned tail and run simply



Full Text



Be ae eae

AND i





GpSERSEREARERER ER EEE ER ER EE SEES CECE REESE EEE

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ot

Hlste KR. Deabur

Bets 5 os soa ss seas aes esse a issers esos

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O>o>eD>eDeDrSpSowrSoSrSsSeDeD>.




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Vs Vas ) ms P / f

PADDY O’LEAREY

AND HIS

LEARNED PIG

BY

ELIZABETH W. CHAMPNEY

ILLUSTRATIONS BY FREDERIC DORR STEELE

NEW YORK
DODD, MEAD & COMPANY
- 1895
CopyriGHT, 1895
BY
DODD, MEAD & COMPANY



All rights reserved

THE CAXTON PRESS
NEW YORK
CHAPTER

I.
lle
ITI,
Iv.
Vv.
VI.

VII.

CONTENTS.

An Irisu Fair
A Pic Market
At KILLARNEY
In Hipine .
Tue Fiicut

BLARNEY CAsTLE AND
Fatruer Marrurew

Tur FInpING or THE
Luck Penny

PAGE

28
51
72
98

eeli2i3

145



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

CHAPTER PAGE
PADDY AND HIs Pic . , . Frontispiece

I. A SCENE AT THE Farr . , 6 , ee 1)
II. PADDY ON THE STONE WALL . . 5 cao)
III, PLayinc CARDS ON THE HEARTH . 5 oO y/
IV. Tur Guost House... : qi : . 85

VI. STARTING OUT FROM THE Rock oF CASHEL . 133

VII, Tur Return Home 5 : A . . 161

CHAPTER I.

AN IRISH FAIR,

Ai
a -

0%) Seog
Us lee oi cscr ae fy; was at one of
LO the merriest fairs
. NWA ever held in Kil-
: aS “Ss larney that Pad-
7 MN é
eee tiie dy O’Learey first



saw a learned pig.
It was a wonder-
ful fair entirely, so Paddy thought, even be-
fore he saw the pig, what with the hurling,
where Pat O’Toole “put” the great hammer
a fabulous distance as easily as Paddy could
have tossed a ball; and the dancing to
Phelim McCarthy’s fiddle, with all the
pretty girls dressed in their best, their
bright eyes shining and their red cheeks
glowing; and the ‘‘’ating!” for Paddy had
never seen in all his short and hungry life so
many good things as were set out in the tip-
carts ranged along the main thoroughfare.
There was one drawback to his perfect enjoy-
8 PADDY O’LEAREY

ment of the last-named attraction. Though
Paddy had walked that morning from the
Desmond estate to the town of Killarney,
a good eight miles, on a scanty breakfast,
and had an appetite whetted to the point of
appreciating all of the pies, turnovers, gin-
gerbread, and’ other dainties displayed, his
mother had provided him with but one penny.
He could only buy one cake of hard ginger-
bread, which resembled an ancient Babylon-
ian tile in its general appearance, and in its
resistance to his eager teeth. Even this was
all too soon devoured and failed to fill an
aching void.

But Paddy was quite accustomed to going
hungry, and there was so much to amuse him
in the fair that he wandered about quite
happy, listening to the entrancing strains of
Garry Owen, the Bedfordshire hornpipe, or
the jolly peddler, and-feasting his eyes on the
brilliant posters which told of the wonders
to be seen inside the tents. The paintings
which described the accomplishments of a
certain educated pig were particularly al-
luring.
AN IRISH FAIR 9

This extraordinary porker was represented
performing as many feats as Mother Hub-
bard’s celebrated dog. He was depicted
clothed in a pair of green trousers, wearing
a takish cocked hat, and as playing upon an
Irish harp, dancing, reading, drilling as a sol-
dier, standing upon his head, feigning death,
carousing and playing many other laughable
antics.

Paddy looked longingly at the privileged
persons who entered the enclosure, but finally
turned away and consoled himself with fit-
ting his eye to a knot-hole in the palings of
the Punch and Judy Theatre, and in watch-
ing all the other varied scenes which passed
before him with such joyous tumult.

There was a quack dentist who blarneyed
people into having their teeth extracted for a
shilling, ‘‘ with or without pain.” He wore
a necklace of molars with great fangs, and
added each new and gory trophy to this can-
nibalistic rosary, never caring that his victims
protested with loud howls that their jaws
were ‘“‘ broke intirely.”

Perceiving Paddy standing before him with
10 PADDY O’LEAREY

a fascinated stare, the dentist, in a pause in
his custom, offered to extract one of the boy’s
sound teeth for nothing, merely as an exhibi-
tion of his skill.

Paddy declined this generous offer, and
hurried away to watch the thimble-man
swindle the unwary.

‘*Only tuppence a guess,” he would cry.
‘“ Now you seeit, and now youdon’t. Under
which of these thimbles, acushla, have I hid
the pea? You guess right, and I gives you
tuppence. You guess wrong, and you gives
it to me.”

Paddy saw one foolish fellow try ten times,
winning twice and losing eight times.

He did not know that the thimble-man
only allowed his customers to win when he
saw that their interest in the game could’be
kept up byso doing. If Paddy had possessed
twopence he would certainly have tried, for
several times he was quite certain under
which thimble the pea would be found. As
he had nothing to risk he watched the for-
tunes of the others. Among those most in-
terested was young Charley Desmond, the
AN IRISH FAIR 11

son of the squire on whose estate Paddy
lived.

He had often gone otter hunting with the
young gentleman, and had been his devoted
follower in many other boyish sports. Paddy
watched with great interest as Charley Des-
mond made his guesses, and even volunteered
his advice as to the thimble which probably
covered the ball.

Suddenly Paddy cried out: ‘‘The dirthy
chate! He’s afther desaving you, sor. The
ball isn’t under nary thimble. He’s got it
up his sleeve, sor. Yees can see for yeeself.”’

And suiting the action to the word, he
passed his hand quickly across the conjurer’s
little table, overturning every thimble and
proving true the first part of his statement,
for none of the thimbles covered the ball.
The conjurer raised his arm to strike Paddy,
who dodged, but not nimbly enough, for the
clinched fist came down upon his shoulder.
At the same time a shout of derision rose from
the crowd, for the ball rolled to the ground
from the swindler’s sleeve.

Charley Desmond caught the man’s arm
12 PADDY O’LEAREY

and prevented any further abuse of Paddy,
who squirmed from the thimble-man’s grasp,
and now stood at a little distance rubbing
his shoulder and regarding his torn shirt
rather ruefully.

‘¢T owe you something, Paddy,’ s fa Char-
ley, ‘‘for getting that knock for me, and I'll
pay your way into any of the shows which
you would like to see.”

‘‘Plaze your honour, I’d rather see the
learned pig. Sure, it’s the gintleman, your
honour is.”

‘‘The learned pig? That is just what
Katy wanted to see. She is over there in
the carriage. We will get her and go in
together.”

Kathleen Desmond, Charley’s sister, was a
dark-eyed girl of fifteen. She nodded pleas-
antly to the ragged boy, and the three passed
into the showman’s tent together.

Paddy was disappointed to see that the pig
wore only a broad belt of green cloth, instead
of the trousers in which he had been rep-
resented. Holes had been cut in his ears,
and in these bows of green ribbon were
AN IRISH FAIR 13

tied, while a third knot of ribbon adorned
his tail.

‘‘And now, me darlint,” said the show-
man, addressing the pig, ‘‘ we will perfarm
the sivinth article of the p’ogramme, and
answer any questions put by the honourable
company.”

The man forthwith placed before the audi-
ence a frame upon which were hung a num-
ber of swinging disks. He then led the pig
back towards the audience and placed a cord
attached to his collar in Kathleen’s hand.

“Tf yer leddyship will plaze to hould him
the minute,” he said; ‘sure, the crayther’s
that eager for l’arnin’, it’s restraint he’s need-
ing. Now, if one of the gintlemen will give
my pig a sum in arithmetic, the answer to
the which is found here,” and he proceeded
to chalk the numbers from one to ten on the
different swinging disks, ‘‘the darlint will
pint it out for you. For insters, how much
does two and one, and one and four make,
Mavourneen?”

He nodded to Kathleen to release the pig,
and as soon as she did so it darted forward,
14 PADDY O’LEAREY

and springing up, hit the disk bearing the
number eight several times with its nose.

The showman led the pig back again and
Charley Desmond asked, ‘‘What is twice
five?”

‘Sure, Pl change the order a bit, to mix
him,” said the showman, and he rearranged
the disks. Again, the instant that Kathleen
let go the string, the pig bounded away and
knocked the figure ten with great vigour.

The experiment was performed again and
again, the pig never making a mistake, but
striking the correct number each time, and
apparently enjoying the feat as much as the
audience. The showman next substituted
words for the figures, and the pig was told
to indicate one of these, and again he made

no mistake.
Kathleen was filled with wonder and ad-
miration. ‘‘Isn’t he clever, though? Did

you ever see a pig that knew so much?”

But Paddy, who was a prying, sharp little
fellow, was not so easily taken in. He had
noticed that the showman, under pretence of
placing the disks in a different order, hung




AN IRISH FAIR 17

something behind the one which he wished
the pig to choose, and the boy at once sur-
nised that it was some dainty of which the
pig was fond. He determined to watch a
little longer before exposing the mounte-
bank, and he merely replied:

‘* Sure, it’s his master that’s clever, I’m
thinking, and by the same token, if I hada
bit pig, it’s meself could train him to the
same tricks and better.”

**Oh! do you think so? But hush, what is
he saying?”

““The crayther will now go through his
catechism like a Christian,’ the showman
announced, and a barrel without head or
bottom was rolled in. When in place the
word ‘‘Catechism” was discovered painted
on the side in large letters, and the pig at
the same instant darted through the barrel.

‘Sure, he’s gone through his catechism
quicker nor you nor I could do it,” said
the showman. The audience shrieked with
laughter, but Charley Desmond cried out
that this was an old trick.

‘* Sure, and it is, your honour,” the show-
18 PADDY O’LEAREY

man admitted, ‘‘and not worth showing to
your honour; but it’s new to some of the
craythers, And now I’ll show your honour
the most wonderful perfarmance of all, for
the pig will play upon the harp and dis-
coorse the foinest music, so that you will
scarce belave so simple acrayther could do
it.” A small chair was produced, in which
the pig was tied. He seemed uncomfortable
and struck out wildly with his fore legs.

‘‘Whist! Hould still, ye vixen,” said the
showman. ‘‘Obsarve how impatient he is
to begin. Distrain yersel’ till I give the
signal by rapping on the floore. Here, me
foine fellow (thisto Paddy), will yees hould
his legs till I gives the signal?”

Paddy assisted with alacrity, while the
showman rolled forward a dilapidated harp,
which he placed between the feet of the
animal. He then rapped loudly upon the
floor, and Paddy letting go his hold on the
swine’s hoofs, it began striking and kicking
in the most lively manner. It certainly
seemed impossible that such wild move-
ments should produce anything but the
AN IRISH FAIR 19

direst discord; but ‘St. Patrick’s Day in the
Morning,” ‘‘ Wearing of the Green,” “Kitty
Tyrrel,” and other well-known airs were
recognised.

‘Did you ever see anything so wonder-
ful?” Kathleen asked, her eyes wide with
amazement,

‘*Plaze you, Miss Kathleen,” said Paddy,
“it’s all a thrick intirely. Sure, it isn’t the
pig’s harp that’s making the music at all, at
all. I had my ear close to the strings and
sorra a sound come from thim. Sure, there’s
some one else playing another harp under
the floore. Watch me close and see if it
isn’t so.”

With a rapid movement, when next the
showman’s back was turned, Paddy pulled the
pig away from his instrument.

The music continued, and the audience
burst into a roar of derisive laughter.

The infuriated showman made a dash at
Paddy, but, made wary by previous encoun-
ter, the boy dodged adroitly and escaped.
There seemed to be no prospect of any fur-
ther performance, for the man refused to
20 PADDY O’LEAREY

show his animal’s skill any longer ‘‘ to sucha
set of ignorant, meddling spalpeens.”’

Charley Desmond at length succeeded in
pacifying him, and the pig was made to
dance, to drill, and ‘‘to talk French,” which
he did by replying emphatically, ‘‘ Oui, oui,
oui,” when asked if he was for O’Connell.
After a few other performances the audience
was dismissed.

Paddy was hanging about waiting for the
Desmonds when they came out. ‘‘Isn’t he
the swindler, though?” Charley remarked.

‘¢ Sure, that he is.”

‘* But did you see through how he made
the creature choose the right letters and
figures in that first trick?”

‘* As aisy as ’ating, your honour.”

‘And could you teach a pig to do all those
things?” Kathleen asked.

‘** And a hunder more bewilderin’, if I only
had the pig. Didn’t I tache your dog to do
more things than you ever thought was in
the capacity of a brute baste? and it is well
known that a pig is more knowledgable,
and more like a Christian mortial intirely.”
AN IRISH FAIR 21

“ How long would it take you to educate a
pig?” Kathleen inquired.

“‘T’'d engage to give you a show the beat
of this in a year’s time,” said Paddy, confi-
dently.

“It’s such a pity we are going back to
London next week,” said Kathleen; ‘I should
so like to see you train it.”

‘‘ Begging your leddyship’s pardon,” said
Paddy, ‘‘ sorra a pig have I to train.”

“Tam going to buy a pig,” Kathleen re-
plied. ‘‘ Will you keep it and educate it for
me until I return?”

“Will Oi? Oi’ll take it to the hedge school
for the Latin. It’sthe illegant scholard it
will be when yees comes back to the Hall.
A happy day that will be for us all, for there’s
not-a gorsoon on the place but worships the
ground your leddyship threads on.”

This was nearly true, for Kathleen had visit-
ed every cabin on the estate, and knew the
name of every child, while she was especially
intimate with the O’Learey children, who were
their nearest neighbours. There was a little
pine grove and a long sandbank between
22 PADDY O’LEAREY

them which was their common playground.
This bank was a fascinating place in which to
dig caves, and as it was overlooked by the
O’Learey cabin, to which Kathleen’s nurse,
pretty Rose Callahan, liked to resort, it was
a favourite meeting-place of the children.

Rose Callahan had been brought up in
Castleisland, Mrs. O’Learey’s birthplace, and
they liked to gossip about their old neighbours,
but especially about Mrs. O’Learey’s brother,
Barney Maloney. While they chatted, Paddy,
who was a wonderful mining engineer, extend-
ed his caves far into the bank, strengthening
them by wooden supports. Kathleen’s imagi-
nation and varied reading endowed this cave
with fictitious interest. Sometimesit figured
as Ali Baba’s hidden treasure-house, broken
crockery standing for the heaps of gold and
jewels; and at others it was a cave-temple
for heathen worship, such as her father had
told her existed in India, her largest doll rep-
resenting the idol to be approached only on
hands and knees.

Again it was the pirate’s cave described in
‘Guy Mannering,” and smuggling raids were
AN IRISH FAIR 23

made on the pantry for booty to secrete with-
in it.

This highly enjoyable play came to an un-
timely end, owing to Kathleen’s having been
buried in the cave by a falling in of the roof
between her and the entrance. Paddy had
worked like a beaver, and had dug her out
before she had time to suffocate; but Rose
Callahan had been so frightened that future
cave-life was strictly forbidden.

Still, intercourse with the O’Leareys had
not entirely ceased, for Charley had always a
troop of ragged urchins at his heels, and
Paddy was a valuable assistant in otter hunt-
ing, being able to lure the animals from
their holes by a clever imitation of their
bark. When Paddy saw his young master
and mistress at the fair he felt that he was
in luck, as indeed he was, for after the ex-
hibition of the learned pig, Kathleen took a
little purse from her pocket and a golden
guinea from the purse.

‘“‘Aunt Henrietta gave me this for my
birthday present,” she said, ‘‘and I know
there is nothing I would like so much as a
24 PADDY O’LEAREY

learned pig. Since you are to train it, I
think it is but fair you should have the
selecting of it. Will you please buy one for
me?”

“Sure,” said honest Paddy, his eyes pro-
truding in wonder, ‘‘it wouldn’t cost more
than a crown to buy the little slip I’d be
wanting at the pig market at Castleisland
next month, and I a-going up to see me
grandmother.”

‘But it may cost you something to get
the pig back to Killarney, and you forget
that you will have to keep him a whole year,
and then you ought to be paid something for
his instruction.”

Thus urged, Paddy accepted the guinea,
and great was the rejoicing in the O’Learey
household when he produced it that evening.

‘“‘And the young leddy was quite right,”
said Paddy’s father, ‘‘to give you something
handsome for the keep of the baste, and as
that comes out of me, sure I'll change the
guinea for you. Here’s your crown, which
yees can spind at the pig market when yees
goes to see your grandmother at Castle-
AN IRISH FAIR 25

island, and I’ll kape the remaining rimnant
on account wid the pig.”

“Give it to me, Dinny, avillish,’”* said Pad-
dy’s mother, ‘‘ and let me take it up to the Hall
to pay the rint. It’s two years we’re afther
bein’ behind, and at that gait of backward
goin’ we won’t catch up till you and I are
babies.”

‘*Sure, what’s the use of payin’ at all, at
all? Our landlord’s that good he would niver
evict us.”

‘*Ts that the way for an honourable Irish-
man to talk? I should think you’d be wantin’
to pay your just debts.”

‘And that’s what I am, acushla, I’m owing
three crowns at the shebeen house, and Mike
says he’ll trust me no more till I’ve paid up
my score, Did you mark that, now? Sure,
it’s mesilf that’s a poet, and I didn’t know it.
The one dibt is as fair as the other. I’m
thinkin’ T’ll pay for the whiskey.”

** Mike can wait as aisy as our landlord.
Sure, I’ve heard that Squire Desmond is not
so rich as he was, and this money came from
him, and it’s like he knows we have it.”
26 PADDY O’LEAREY

‘““There’s no question but that Mike can
wait,” replied Dinnis O’Learey; ‘‘ but kin Oi
wait? Answer me that—me that’s been
awake without a dropof the crayther, barrin’
and exceptin’ the poteen we had at Larry
Lanighan’s wake, and poor stuff it was and
little of it.”

** Dinny,’

y

said Mrs. O’Learey, with a
pleading look in her faithful eyes, ‘‘ Dinny
darlint, sure it’s better off you’d be if you’d
let Mike wait your paymint and niver drink
another drop the rest of your mortial life.
Sure, with the pertaty crop that bad that it
is the winter’s like to be a hard one, and I
misthrust we'll hear the childer cryin’ for
hunger before it’s done.”

‘‘And will it fill their insides to know that
I’ve paid my rint?” asked Dennis O’Learey,
scratching his head. ‘It’s a dilemmy in-
tirely. Kape the guinea for the prisent and
I'll ask Feyther Nooney’s advice when I goes
to confission.”’

Mrs. O’Learey hardly knew what to think
of this decision, for she doubted whether the
priest would advise her husband to pay his
AN IRISH FAIR 27

rent, as he was known to bea strong Repeal,
as well as Catholic Emancipation, agitator. It
was something that her husband had not in-
sisted on giving the money immediately for the
whiskey debt, thus making the way clear for
futureindulgence. Dennis wasa kind-hearted
man when he was not drunk. She heaved a
sigh as she placed the coin in the toe of an
old stocking, and hid it behind a loose stone
in the chimney, and privately determined that
she would have an interview with the priest,
and try to win him over to her view of the
matter before her husband went to confes-
sion.


CHAPTER II.

A PIG MARKET.



AAOTHER MALO-
V7] NEY, Paddy’s
grandmother,
lived in Castle-
island, a little
48 town to the north
of Killarney.

Its name is
misleading, for al-
though it possess-
es the ruins of a
very old castle,
neither the town
nor the fortress
is built upon an island. It may be that the
river Maine, which flows sleepily by, was
once deflected by moats and canals to isolate
the stronghold more completely; but however
this may ,jhave been in the olden time, the

castle moat is now dry, and the ruin accessible
28
A PIG MARKET 7 29

to every curious visitor who cares to climb a
low stone wall.

The owner of the ruin, in one of his rare
visits to Castleisland, noticed that the venera-
able pile was being pulled to pieces by the
townspeople, who found its hewn stones
‘‘very convanient” for building purposes.
Wishing to protect the ancient landmark
from further devastation, he engaged the
town stonemason, Barney Maloney, Paddy’s
uncle, to build a wall around the castle.

On the gentleman’s next visit to his estate
_ he found the wall of which we have spoken,
but on looking within was surprised and dis-
pleased to discover that the finest part of the
castle had been demolished.

“Your bill is big enough, Barney,” said
the irate owner, ‘‘ but the wall seems to be
only of use to screen depredators. What has
become of the old donjon keep?”

‘“¢*Troth, I pulled that down, sir,” replied
Barney, ‘‘ to make the wall, and I’m thinkin’
that, asit’s hardly high enough, I’d best take
what’s left of the castle to grow it a fut

taller.”
380 PADDY O’LEAREY

Barney’s stupidity was entirely assumed.
He had been more accountable than any one
else in the past for plundering the stones
from the ruin, for he looked upon the castle
as the representation of tyranny, which it
was the duty of every good Irishman to resist.
He had hoped, however, that his patron
would not return so soon, and that he would
receive his pay for his honest labour before his
trick was discovered, and he felt it a great
outrage that his employer refused to compen-
sate him for building the wall.

Barney sued the gentleman and the suit
went against him. The injustice of the de-
cision of the courts so rankled in Barney’s
mind that he joined a group of malcontents,
neglected his work and went about the coun-
try listening to incendiary speeches against
landlords and the government. Castleisland
has always been a hotbed of rebellion, and
though Barney never advocated resorting to
violence, there were others who did, and a
middleman was shot while attempting to col-
lect rents. The real murderer escaped and
several innocent persons, Barney amon g them,
A PIG MARKET 31

were arrested. The unfortunate fellow had
no confidence in the law, and one night he
broke jail and fled the country, thereby fas-
tening the suspicion of the authorities upon
himself,

Paddy’s grandmother lived in a lonely
cabin at the foot of Clanruddy Mountain.
Her son Barney had lived with ‘her, had cut
her peat, cultivated the bit garden, and tended
the little Kerry cow until the terrible affair
of the murder. Paddy’s mother was her only
other living child, and the old woman was
very lonely now that Barney had gone. She
was a great talker and dearly loved to tell her’
story. Barney, quite tired out by his rough
day’s work as a stonemason, would sit on one
side of the chimney with his pipe between his
teeth, while his mother sat on the other,
through thc long winter evenings, the son
listening, or apparently listening, to the wild
legends which the old woman would tell over
and over again. Mother Maloney missed her
good listener. Sometimes the neighbours
found her talking to herself, telling the old
stories over from force of habit.
32 PADDY O’LEAREY

She was delighted to see her grandson, who
arrived in Castleisland the week before the
pig market. She hugged him and cried over
him and blessed him, and talked to him about
his uncle, to whom she always referred as
‘‘him that’s gone.”

Paddy remembered his uncle’s visiting, or
rather hiding, at their cabin in Killarney, on
his way to ‘‘furrin parts.” He was a strap-
ping young man of twenty-five, but he hada
hunted look in his face. He had knocked at
Paddy’s window with his blackthorn shillelah
just as morning was dawning. Paddy’s
mother had kept her brother for a day, during
which he had bidden farewell to Rose Calla-
han, and had sent him on his journey with his
green and white striped carpet-bag well filled
with bread and meat and a couple of new
shirts, which she had just made for her hus-
band. Dennis O’Learey was a generous man,
and he gave his brother-in-law all the ready
money which he had to purchase a steerage-
ticket to New York, and none of his family
had seen him since.

“But he’ll come back,” Mother Maloney
A PIG MARKET 33

would say; ‘‘so here’s destruction to his
innemies, and may I live to see it. But to
think, to think, Paddy, that you have thrudged
all the way from Killarney to see your old
grandmother. The illegant gossoon that
you’ve grown to be! Sure, there isn’t another
in the four counties has such fine large teeth
or such big feet for hisage. It’s no thrifle
that they’ll be costing your feyther, I’m
thinkin’.”

‘As for the teeth, Granny, sure, I can ate
with the best, and by the same token I’ve had
only an oat cake for my luncheon.”

Mother Maloney bestirred herself and fried
a bit of bacon, with some cold boiled potatoes,
and Paddy made a more enjoyable dinner
than many a king, washed down as it was
with a bowl of sweet milk.

“And so you’ve come all the way to see
your grandmother!”? Mother Maloney re-
peated.

‘‘ And to buy a pig,” said honest Paddy.

‘*Listen to the likes of him!” exclaimed
Mother Maloney. ‘‘Is it stocking a farm
you’re contrivin’?”
34 PADDY O’LEAREY

Paddy told her the story of the guinea, in
which she was much interested. ‘‘And how
did the dispute between your feyther and
your mother turn out, me bouchal? I'll
warrant Dinny had the best of the argyment,
for you say they left it to the praste, and
who iver heard of a soggart (scholate) advis-
ing any one to pay his rint?”

‘‘Sure, it was Feyther Nooney had the
wisdom of Solomon, Granny. He might
have decided for Mike, but my mither got
the ear of him and tould him how feyther
was better off without the whisky, and thin
it was Feyther Nooney who was ina dilemmy,
for though he had nothing agin our landlord,
Squire Desmond being an Irishman born,
niver sending an agent to evict a tenant,
but calling himself, fri’ndly like, to collect his
rints, and giving us time when we needed it,
still it’s a member of the Union that Feyther
Nooney is, and it’s well known that the Union
isagin alllandlords. Thin, on the other hand,
Mike is a parishioner of his, and it would
never do to advise feyther not to pay him.
So, afther thinking a minute, sure it was an
A PIG MARKET 35

inspiration come to him, and says he—‘A
debt is a debt, Dennis O’Leary, and there’s no
distinction of parsons. Lay the money aside
and pay him that comes first to collect his
dues, and by the same token, you’re owin’ the
church a small matter of five shillings, and
the church comes first,’ says he. With that
feyther paid him and thanked him and told
me mither, ‘They won’t either of them come
to collect,’ says he, ‘so it’s a blessing intirely.’
But me mither knew that Squire Desmond
rode along the lawn lake every afthernoon,
and she planted me by the way to tell him
would he call for the rint, which I did, and
much to me feyther’s botherment, up he come
riding to the doore that very afthernoon. ‘I’m
hearing you’re in luck, Dinny,’ says he, ‘and
are desiring, like an honest man, to pay some-
thing on your rent.’ ‘Bad luck to thim that
tould you so,’ says feyther; ‘but it’s thrue,
anyhow, I’ll not denije it.’ And how could
he do it with me mither counting out the
shillings before his eyes, for Feyther Nooney
had broken the guinea!

***T suppose you have other debts to pay
36 PADDY O’LEAREY

beside the rint,’says Squire Desmond. ‘That
I have, your haner,’ says feyther, ‘and there’s
Mike a-comin’ up the hill to collect his, and
who the sorra tould him there was money in
the house I don’t know, and me not knowing
how we shall get through the winter with
your haner in Lunnon.’

“*Tve been thinkin’ of that,’ says Squire
Desmond, ‘so we'll just wipe out the old
account,’ says he, ‘and you needn’t pay a
penny, and if ye’ll act as gamekeeper in
my absince and see that there’s no poaching
in the forest or on the mountain, ye may
have this cottage rent free, beside all the dead
wood ye can pick up in the forest.’

‘Well, my feyther was all struck of a heap,
and neither he nor my mither could say
enough in praise an’ thanksgivin’. So there’s
my feyther with a donkey and a cart to fetch
wood with, set up for the winter intirely. And
he has paid off Mike, and can get drunk when-
ever the fancy takes him, and that’s not
seldom, for Mike’s shebeen house is on the

way to the forest, bad luck to it, too convan-
ient entirely to rest in comin’ and goin’, and

et


A PIG MARKET 39

Mike that willin’ to take his pay in faggets.”
Paddy sighed deeply, but Mother Maloney did
not share his misgivings.

‘Sure, it’s a dhrap or two of the crayther
will dohim no harm entirely,” saidshe. ‘‘It’s
the landlord and the rint that makes all the
thrubble in Ireland, and if your feyther has
a good landlord and no rint, it’s live like a
lord he may, for there’s more than faggets to
be got out of the forest, I’m thinkin’.”

As Paddy evidently did not understand her
meaning she changed the subject. ‘* The
morrow’s market day,” hesaid. ‘‘A crown’s
little enough to pay for a pig, but you'll see
what your auld grandmither can do for you.”

The next morning Paddy was up bright
and early, and walked to town with his grand-
mother. She was not a pleasant-looking old
lady in her ordinary indoor costume, which
consisted of a frieze petticoat and shortgown,
with wild elf locks straying from under the
broad ruffles of her soiled cotton cap, and a
short clay pipe held firmly between the few
teeth that were left her. She was even less
attractive in her out-of-door garb—a man’s
40 PADDY O’LEAREY

high hat put on over her cap and fastened
under her chin with shoestrings, and a long
red woollen cloak. In summer she went bare-
foot, though she was often seen knitting
woollen stockings of variegated hue from
bits of yarn which kind-hearted neighbours
gave her. She carried a long crooked staff,
and looked like a witch, while many people
believed that she was one. But to Paddy she
was always so tender and kind that he trotted
along with his hand in hers quite unconscious
that she was not a most aristocratic old
lady.

The town presented a lively appearance.
A central strip down the principal street was
filled with booths and tip-carts, displaying a
great variety of merchandise. Two other
rows of carts were backed against the side-
walks, and Paddy and his grandmother walked
between them admiring the kids, the donkeys,
and the sheep grouped for sale. There were
pigs, too, galore—pigs in droves, litters of
pigs comfortably cradled in small donkey-
carts and hand-barrows, and one woman had
brought some tiny pink-nosed baby pigs on


A PIG MARKET 41

her head in a basket. As Paddy paused in
front of one of the carts an ancient man in a
long-tailed blue coat, small clothes, and gait-
ers, and a dilapidated tall hat, came up half
leading, half driving a self-willed porker by
means of a string tied to its hind leg.

‘Six eggs to you, you divil,” said the old
man, addressing the swine; ‘“ six eggs to you,
and a half dozen of them bad for the dance
ye’ve led me the day. It’s sell you chape, I
will, for I’d rather give you away than be
bothered to take you home.”

Now, Paddy had determined the moment
that he noticed this particular pig that it was
the animal for him, and he spoke up joyfully
and hopefully, ‘Sure, I’ll take it off your
hands for you, honest man.”

‘‘Thin hand me over ten shillings,” said
the man; ‘‘an’ he’s dirt chape at that. Just
look at the intelligent face on him; he’ll ’arn
his own living pickin’ and st’alin’ from the
neighbours. Heneedsno kapeat all. There’s
no fince that’ll kape him out or in. He'll
jump thim all, root up a half acre or so of
praties, take his desart off a dozen cabbages,
42 PADDY O’LEAREY

and be back in his shty, and him a squ’aling
as innercent for his supper as the babe in the
cradle.”

‘* Sure, that’s a bad reputation entirely,”
said Mother Maloney. ‘I don’t wonder yeez
want to get rid of him, Ye’ll not find any
one in the market will take him as a gift.
He'd be the ruination of his master,”

“Tl take him, and thank you kindly,”
Paddy persisted.

‘Sure, you’ve r’ason,” replied the old man,
and, addressing Mother Maloney, he ex-
plained: ‘It’s truth I’m telling you, that
this pig would never touch it’s masther’s
crops, barrin’ a first experiment in that direc-
tion, Take him three times round the
garden, b’ating him in the four quarters of it,
and the baste will never offer to threspass on
the ragion, but will go right by the most
timpting display of inions and curlyflowers,
straight for the circumjacent territory of the
neighbours. He comes from a knowledgable
race of blissed bastes, descindints of a pig
belonging to the howly St. Anthony, who
was gifted with a moral sinse, and to whom
A PIG MARKET 43

the saint exposited the difference between
meum and tuum.”

“It’s the soggart he is,” Mother Maloney
murmured in admiration, and Paddy’s eyes
glowed with unconquerable desire. ‘‘ Give
me the pig,” he exclaimed; ‘‘ it’s just the kind
I want to learn him thricks.”

““Sartinly, my little gintleman; but first,
where is your haner’s twelve shillin’s ? ”

“Faith, you said you would give him
away,” Paddy wailed.

‘No, avick, you misunderstood me intirely.
Fifteen shillings is the price of -this illegant
baste, and by the five crosses, I would take
no less if I were dying of hunger, for it
breaks my heart to part with the darlint; but
seein’ that it’s in the professional line your
haner ‘is, and the pig will likely make your
reputation and your fortune in the two king-
doms, not speaking of France, Ameriky,
Dublin, and other furrin parts, why, I’ll not
be hinderin’ the pig and you from going
where glory waits you, and he’s yours for a
pound—fair and square, and neither more nor
less, so don’t ye be talkin’.”
44 PADDY O’LEAREY

“Ye ould villain!’ exclaimed Mother Ma-
loney; ‘ye said yerself but just now that the
price was tin shillings, which is nine shillings
too much, for a thinner, hungrier-looking
crayther I never set eyes on. He would beg-
gar a nobleman to fatten him, and as to only
foraging on the neighbours, I’ll not believe a
word you say. Sure, it’s the lie that slides
aisily from your tongue, I’ll be thinkin’,
Come along wid yez, Paddy, and we'll l’ave
the auld thafe to drive home his pig come
the avenin’.”

Paddy turned reluctantly away. ‘I'll give
you this for it; it’s all I’ve got,” he said at
parting, displaying the crown. ‘The old man
made a derisive gesture, and Mother Maloney
jerked him angrily along. They approached
the booths in the centre of the street, and
she stopped in front of a board placed on two
barrels, which formed the counter and base of
supplies over which Mrs. Finnigan was sell-
ing periwinkles and seagrass which she
had brought from the west coast. She had
no thought of business, but began gossiping

_with her old crony on the state of the fisher-
A PIG MARKET 45

ies. ‘Sure, they’re very poor,” she said to
Mother Maloney, ‘‘ andall because the fishers
didn’t open the s’ason accordin’ to former
custom by taking the praste out with them to
bless the catch.”

Paddy did not listen to them, but looked
back longingly at the pig they had just left.
He was young, but had none of the cherubic
chubbiness of youth. His legs were long and
lean, but cleanly made, the legs of a racer.
His head had an impertinent cock, his eyes,
though small, were active and had a sly ex-
pression, and his saucy snout moved nerv-
ously, as though he longed to be grubbing
for succulent roots and tubers. He was
spotted black and white, the white predomi-
nating on his fore quarters and the black on
his rear. This circumstance gave strangers
a curious surprise when the animal turned
around, the effect being as if one pig had
mysteriously disappeared and another had
been substituted in its place.

Mother Maloney noticed Paddy’s longing
look and said: ‘‘It isn’t the likes of that pig

_you’re wanting, vick machree. He will in-
46 PADDY O’LEAREY

veigle you into more thrubble thin your life
is worth. He’s no descindant of St. An-
thony’s pig. Sure, I knows his race. There
was a pig as like him as two peas whose ac-
quaintance I had whin I was a child in Tip-
perary—the demon pig they called him, for
he was one of thim bastes into which the
divils entered what all ran violently down a
stape place and perished in the say.”

“But if they were all drowned, grand-
mother, how could the demon pig have got
to Tipperary?”

‘‘ My explanation of the matter is that this
particular baste might have swam out to
some outgoin’ st’amer that was just arrivin’,
and so have taken free steerage passage
along with St. Patrick for Ireland.”

“Then, I’m sure, grandmother, St. Pat-
rick’s as good as St. Anthony any day, and
I don’t want a fat, lazy thing that will ate
till the brains of him turns to fat an’ good
looks, like a purty guril what knows her
vally. I likes the looks of this one, and if
he’s a demon pig, so much the better. See
him wrinkle the nose of him. I'll warrant
A PIG MARKET 47

yees, he'll undo any latch, and his legs is like
a greyhound’s; he’d lead the agint a chase if
he tried to collect him for the rint, though
it’s neither agint nor rint to pay that we
have, praise be to the blessed saints.”

‘“The boy’s clane daft,” said Mother Ma-
loney. ‘‘It’s a case of thrue love, I’m
thinkin’, and we all know that the less rayson
there is in that the more persistence. Whist,
Paddy, l’ave it to me, and since it’s that pig
only ye will have, have it ye will; only don’t
yees be lookin’ at it. Go and listen to the
ballad-singer, and purtend ye’re out of con-
sate with the baste.”

Paddy joined the circle of people that were
listening to the blind ballad-singer, but he
could not forbear glancing from time to time
in the direction of the owner of the pig, and
he was glad to see that he found no pur-
chaser.

Late in the afternoon his grandmother
called to him to hurry home with her.

. “*He’s gone,” she explained, ‘‘ gone home,
his pig a-trottin’ afther him likeadog. Don’t
yees be frettin’, his road is our road as far as
48 PADDY O’LEAREY

the cross-ways, and we'll soon come up
with him.”

They overtook the man, who looked up
hopefully and cunningly as he saw them
approach, but Mother Maloney apparently
took no notice of the pig, and Paddy walked
on whistling as he was told. Mother Maloney
had her apron full of periwinkles, which her
friend from the seashore had given her, and
both Paddy and she munched them as they
walked, for they had had no other luncheon,
She talked with the owner of the pig on
different topics, and he did not notice that as
she approached the cross-ways she strewed
her periwinkles along the path at intervals,
and that the pig ate them greedily. As she left
him at the cross-ways, he offered her the pig
for ten shillings, but she scornfully declined
the proposal, and trudged disdainfully on.
The tears gathered in Paddy’s eyes, but he
hurried away the faster that he might not
show his emotion.

Suddenly he heard a galloping and snorting
behind him, and turning, saw that the demon
pig was following them, while its owner was
A PIG MARKET 49

panting and shouting far behind. ‘‘ Whist,
Paddy,” said Mother Maloney, ‘‘look not to
the right hand nor to the left.” Here she let
fall a handful of periwinkles. ‘‘ Sure, the pig’s
a darlint, and he’s as much in love with you
as you with him.”

She quickened her pace and pretended not
to hear the shouts of the irate man. When
he overtook them, and they could no longer
feign to be unconscious that the pig had
followed them, Mother Maloney ordered him
to take his ‘‘ baste” away, and protested that
she would not take him as a gift, at the
same time shaking the last periwinkles from
her apron and walking resolutely into her
cottage.

The swine followed her impudently, and
Mother Maloney could be heard scolding and
dealing vigorous blows with her broom, but
the blows fell harmlessly on her bed, and the
pig was supping from a saucer of milk which
she had placed for it behind the door.
‘Come, rid me of the baste,” she cried,
appearing in the doorway with the broom in
her hand. The man hesitated, and turned
50 PADDY O’LEAREY

to Paddy. ‘‘ Give me the crown yees offered
me and he’s yours.”

‘*Sure, he spent his crown at the market,”
Mother Maloney shrieked, but she was too
late, for Paddy had thrust his coin into the
man’s hand and rushed overjoyed into the
cottage to embrace his demon pig.


CHAPTER III.

AT KILLARNEY.

“a, ADDY was awak-
M ened the next
morning by the
squeals of his
pet. ‘‘He’s cry-
ing for hunger,”
Mother Maloney



explained. ‘‘He’s

,

“that knowledgable he follyed
x me to the shed and watched
me at my milking, and now he’s rampant,

he is, because I won’t fade him before yees
has had yees breakfast.”

Paddy quickly divided his porridge and
milk with his pig, and then expressed his
desire to be off for home. To this Mother
Maloney was very loth to consent.

‘‘Sure, it’s lonely I'll be without yees,”
she pleaded. ‘‘Why can’t yees be con-
tint to stay here in the place of him that’s
gone?”

Paddy declared that he could not live away

51
52 PADDY O’LEAREY

from his own home, but proposed that his
grandmother should return with him, and
the old lady, having taken the time of once
smoking of her pipe to consider, consented.
She did not even delay for a sale of her
effects, for there was nothing left in the
cabin worth selling. Her provisions were
nearly exhausted. She had nothing with
which to face the coming winter but the
little Kerry cow, and she knew that it would
be seized on the next rent day. She there-
fore laid her only decent coverlet on the
floor, and tying what property she had that
was worth moving in one great bundle, she
carried it with Paddy’s help to the cross-
roads and waited until the carrier’s cart
came jingling along, when she begged the
transportation of the bundle to Killarney,
asserting that the expressage would be paid
by her son. ;

This done she returned to the cabin, and
tying a string to one of the hind legs of the
pig, and a rope about the neck of the cow,
she bade farewell to the poor cabin which
had served her so long as a home.


AT KILLARNEY 53

Paddy had great difficulty in inducing his
pig to move forward until he followed his
grandmother’s advice to pull the animal by
the tail. ‘‘For thin,” said she, ‘‘he’ll be
that certain that it’s to Castleisland yees
want him to go, that he’ll be off like mad in
the conthrary direction.”

Mother Maloney’s son-in-law was not over-
rejoiced when he learned that she had come
to visit him for the winter; but hospitality is
a marked vrait of the Irish peasant, however
poor, and Dennis would have scorned to re-
fuse shelter to his wife’s mother. He reflect-
ed also that the little Kerry cow was a very
desirable addition to their live stock, and its
milk a fair return for Mother Maloney’s
board.

For a time things apparently went well
with the family. To have their rent free,
and all their wood for the gathering, was suf-
ficient wages for Dennis’s light duties as game-
keeper. Many a hare and a pheasant, too,
came back from the forest in his donkey-cart
hidden under the fagots, and as this contra-
band game was accepted at the shebeen house
54 PADDY O’LEAREY

instead of money, Dennis drank more and
more, and took no pains to cultivate his
potato plot, or indeed to do any kind of work..

It was of no use to dig the potatoes, for it
was in 1846, the first year of the great famine;
the blight had fallen on the plant, and they
were not too fit toeat. Many of their neigh-
bours were suffering, but as yet the O’ Leareys
were not in distress, and all hoped for better
times the coming year.

The Desmonds had left the country, and
the great Hall was vacant. The ivy did its
best to cover the stately old building and
hide the disrepair. Squire Desmond was
wont to say that there were only two things
about the building which were not falling to
pieces—the ivy and the mortgages.

Financial and other troubles had soured
the Squire. Though an off-shoot of a noble
family, and the heir to many broad acres, he
was land-poor and disappointed in all his am-
bitions. It pained him to see the ruin staring
him in the face, not only on his own estates,
but throughout the country, and he decided
that he would leave. Ireland.
AT KILLARNEY 55

**T will rent the estate,” he said to him-
self, “for the rest of my life, and live hence-
forth on the continent.”

Paddy went up to the Hall, the day before
the Desmonds left, to bid Miss Kathleen good-
by, and to show her the pig which he had
bought with her gift.

Kathleen was much pleased with the
bright, frisky little animal, and Paddy prom-
ised to have it finely instructed by her return.
‘* Sure, he’ll know Latin and dancin’ by that
time, Miss Kathleen. I'll take him with
me to the hedge school and to mass, and
ye’ll not be ashamed to own him as a rela-
tion.”

‘“‘ He is a jolly, saucy little fellow, at any
rate,” said Kathleen; ‘he will probably be
changed when I see him again. I am go-
ing to make a picture of him as he looks
now.”

While Paddy held the cord, Kathleen made
a few characteristic lines, which really gave
something of the spirit of the pig, supple-
menting the drawing with a couplet to re-
mind her still further of her pet.
56 PADDY O’LEAREY

“ This is the pig who, nose in air,
And small tail crisply curled,
‘When all the future seemed most fair,
Set out to see the world. 2

‘*But, Paddy,” she added, ‘‘ he ought to
haveafamousname. Have you decided what
to call him?”

““No, miss. I’d rather you’d have the



namin’ of him, if you’d be so kind.”

“Then we will call him Finn ma Cool.”

‘* Was he an Irishman, miss?”

‘‘ Ves, Paddy, Irish of the Irish, the leader
of the Feni, a warlike tribe who lived cen-
turies before St. Patrick. Finn was a great
hero, but he was imprisoned by enchant-
ment one day when he went hunting in
the forest of the quicken trees, a kind of
mountain ash, that as quickly as they were
cut down shot up saplings which wove their
branches together and kept him in. Beware
of mountain ashes, Paddy, or you and Finn
may come to grief.”

“And if he never came out of his thrap,
how did folks know of it, to be sure?”

“One of his followers, a poet named Oisin,
went away to England on the day that Finn




AT KILLARNEY 59

went hunting. He went to court a beautiful
lady who was a witch, and she did not wish
him to leave her, so she enchanted him, and he
stayed with her, as he supposed, three years,
but really it was three hundred. Finally he in-
sisted on going back to find Finn, and when
he reached Ireland he found that all the Feni
were dead and people had forgotten all about
them, for it was three hundred years since
Finn had gone hunting in the forest of the
quicken trees. But Oisin searched for him
and found that the forest itself had died and
grown black like bog oak, but still, closely
braided together, it shut in the bones of Finn.
Then Oisin went to St. Patrick and told him
all this story.”

«Sure, it’s a wonderful story intirely, but
if St. Patrick said it was thrue I’ll not disbe-
lieve it, and will name the pig Finn ma Cool;
but by the same token, be you gone one year
or three, Miss Kathleen, it’ll seem three hun-
der to me till I hear your foine stories and
your swate singing again. Won't you sing
me one little song before you go, Miss Kath-
leen?”
60 PADDY O’LEAREY

“Certainly, Paddy. Come into the house
and I will sing you my favourite one, ‘ Rich

a,”

and Rare.

The girl made a beautiful picture as she
stood by the old Irish harp, and Paddy, who
sat in the window where he could hold the
pig by its tether, had eyes only for her, and
allowed Finn ma Cool to grub up a whole bed
of tulips while she sang.

He never forgot the singer or the words
of the ballad.

“ Rich and rare were the gems she wore,
And a bright gold ring on her wand she bore ;
But oh! her beauty was far beyond
Her sparkling gems or snow-white wand,
‘Lady, dost thou not fear to stray
So lonely and lovely through this bleak way?
Are Erin’s sons so good or so cold
As not to be tempted by woman or gold ?’
‘Sir Knight, I feel not the least alarm,
No son of Erin will offer me harm,
For though they love beauty and golden store,
Sir Knight, they love honour and virtue more,’
On she went, and her maiden smile,
In safety lighted her round the Green Isle,
And blessed for ever was she who relied
Upon Erin’s honour and Erin’s pride.”

There were hard times in store for the
O’Leareys, when the handsome porker would
AT KILLARNEY 61

have realised a comfortable sum at the county
market, or have made delectable flitches of
bacon for the almost starving family, but
Paddy always insisted that Finn ma Cool was
Miss Kathleen’s pig, not given him, but
simply entrusted to his care, and very hon-
ourably he fulfilled his trust.

He began at once with Finn’s education,
teaching him first the tricks which he had
seen done by the performing pig at the fair.

Father Nooney was instructing a class of
young catechumens preparatory to confirma-
tion, and as Paddy went on every Friday to
the priest’s house to recite his catechism, he
took Finn with him, striving as they walked
to teach the animal the catechism, and in-
deed Finn was nearly as intelligent as some
of the boys into whose heads the reverend
father attempted to beat the answers to the
questions.

Mother Maloney possessed a very ancient
and ‘dirty pack of cards, with which it was
her wont to while away the long evenings by
playing solitaire. Paddy used to watch her
as he sat on the creepy-stool in the opposite
62 PADDY O’LEAREY _

corner of the ingle, with his chin in his hand
and his elbow on his knee, and one evening
his grandmother, tired of arranging and
rearranging the cards on the hearth-stone,
offered to teach him to play the venerable
game of ‘blind-hookey,” placing the creepy-
stool between them as a table. Paddy had a
head for cards, and Mother Maloney fre-
quently invited him to play with her. So
one day Paddy prevailed upon her to allow
him to bring Finn ma Cool into the cabin
and teach him the game. This he did by
spreading the cards in front of the pig,
and when it was his turn to play, deftly slip-
ping a shelled acorn under the proper card.
Finn would make a dash forward, push the
card toward them with his snout and devour
the acorn beneath it. This, it will be seen,
was only an adaptation of the trick of the
swinging disks performed at the fair. Paddy
had gained considerable manual dexterity,
and continued to introduce the acorn so
adroitly as not to be discovered by Mother
Maloney, whose eyes were no longer so sharp
as her tongue. a
AT KILLARNEY 63

This simple device was varied in a hundred
ways, and served as the basis of teaching the
pig the catechism. Paddy practised this feat
on the mud floor of the vestry, while waiting
Father Nooney’s arrival, to the gaping won-
der of his fellow-catechumens. His custom
was to spread a suit of cards before Finn
and then ask one of the questions having
a numerical answer, as, ‘‘ How many sacra-
ments are there?”

Instantly the pig turned the seven-spot,
while Rory O’Flannagan repeated: ‘‘ Baptism,
conflammation, ewcharist, pennies, extreme
onions, howly order, and matrimony. He’s
right, the crather.”

“« How may sins cry to Heaven for venge-
ance?”

Over went the four-spot.

“Nay,” said Phelim Malloy, ‘‘there’s but
three: wilful murder, the sin of Sodom, and
oppression of the poor.”

“« Sure, you’ve forgotten defrauding labour-
ers of their wages, and that’s worst of all.
Sure, the baste knows more than you do,

Phelim. Try him again.”
64 PADDY O’LEAREY

“Thin how many mysteries of the rosary
are there?” asked Phelim, with a sly look.
‘* He can’t answer that, for there are fifteen,
and yees haven’t a card with fifteen spots
to it.”

*‘Can’t he answer them?” Paddy replied
derisively, as he laid down two more cards,
and Finn turned three fives in succession.
‘‘There’s the foive of hearts, that’s the foive
joyful mysteries; and the foive of spades,
thim’s the foive sorrowful mysteries; and the
foive of diamonds, thim’s the foive glawrious
mysteries!”

In like manner the pig turned the four tens
to tell the number of days in Lent, the ten
of clubs to represent the Commandments, the
three of hearts for the theological virtues,

‘the eight of diamonds for the beatitudes, the
four and ten of clubs for the fourteen stations
of the cross.

The boys were so interested that they had
not noticed the coming of the priest, who
stole silently into the vestry and observed
the performance, at first with amusement,
and at last with superstitious dread, being
AT KILLARNEY 65

convinced that the pig was possessed by the
evil one,

Father Nooney was something of an exor-
cist, having practiced with great success on
several old women afflicted with imaginary
disorders. He seized the holy-water can and
was about to empty the contents on the pig
when a sudden thought struck him. He
left the room as silentiy as he had entered,
and betaking himself to the kitchen of
his own house, filled the can with boiling
water from the tea-kettle. Then returning,
just as Finn’s exercise had ended, he or-
dered Paddy sternly to hold the beast while
he put him through a few more questions
from the catechism. Paddy trembled, for
there was malice in Father Nooney’s eye as
he asked:

*‘Have the holy fathers and the ancient
church writers left upon record any miracles
done by holy water?”

The pig was silent, and Paddy replied:
** Plaze, sor, he can only answer by the con-
figuration of the cards.”

“Ow! Thin answer yersel’.”
66 PADDY O’LEAREY

‘*Plaze, sor, they have, agin magical en-
chantments and the power of the divil.”

‘*Right you are. See St. Epiphanius, St.
Hierome, Theodeus, Palladius, and the Histor-
icus Ecclesiasticus. Now, all you repate in
consart ‘ Oxis doxis glorioxis!’” and Father
Nooney threw the false holy water, can and
all, at Finn ma Cool. But Paddy, perceiving
his intention, had let go the tether, and his pet
escaped with only a sprinkle of the scalding
fluid, which descended more liberally on his
own bare feet.

From that time hatred and distrust of
his spiritual instructor took firm root in
Paddy’s soul, and he looked for an op-
portunity to pay him back. His revenge
came at last and will be related pres-
ently.

In the meantime, Finn, though under the
ban of the Church, attended every wedding
and wake in Killarney, and never failed to
create great amusement, and to gather in a
few pennies for Paddy.

He presently developed a new talent, which
commended itself to Dennis as well. When-
AT KILLARNEY 67

ever Paddy went to the forest to assist his
father in gathering wood he took Finn with
him, and Paddy taught the pig to fetch and
carry sticks. One day he brought a young
hare back and laid it at Paddy’s feet. Paddy
raised his arm to beat Finn, but his father
stopped him. The incident convinced Dennis
that Finn could be taught to hunt like a sport-
ine-dog. He knew that his son would not be
a party to such a proceeding, and after this
he left him at home, but took Finn with
him.

Finn grew to enjoy this very much and
would squeal with impatience to be taken
on the excursions. He would trot around to
the different traps and snares which Dennis
had laid, sometimes showing great intelli-
gence in springing them, and would come
galloping back to his master’s cart with the
pheasant or hare in his mouth. He even
learned to point and course the game, never
offering to devour it himself. His keeping
cost very little, for he made his living chiefly,
indeed, from other people’s gardens, as had
been predicted, never touching anything that
68 PADDY O’LEAREY

grew in the O’Leareys’ plot. His peculiar
marking, white spotted with black from nose
to middle, and black spotted with white from
middle to tail, had given rise to many amus-
ing experiences and had once saved him from
the just reward of his depredations; an ad-
venture which happened in this wise: The
gardener at the great house, as Desmond
Hall was called, happening to look into his
celery trench, was ‘‘ consternated” to find all
the crisp sprouts eaten off or broken. Look-
ing up, he saw the evident perpetrator of this
mischief—a pig worming its way through the
hedge. He hastily followed it, ‘‘a stern
chase proving a long chase,” and the pig
soon disappearing in a gully which led toward
the gamekeeper’s cottage.

The irate gardener presented himself
shortly at the door, calling for vengeance
on a black pig which had destroyed his
celery.

Paddy was dismayed, but a look of cunning
showed itself on Mother Maloney’s shrewd
features:

‘Sure, we've but the one pig here, and
AT KILLARNEY 69

him slaping as innercent as the babe in its
stoy.” And she led the gardener trium-
phantly to the rear of the cabin, and showed
him Finn reposing peacefully, half in and
half out of the keg which served him as a
sort of kennel.

There was surely something uncanny about
the creature; he lay with his chin on one
fore hoof, his saucy pink snout turned up,
one eye sleepily closed, the other regard-
ing the company with an expression of con-
scious innocence all unafraid. ‘‘It’s the
blessed lamb he is,” said Mother Maloney,
and, save for a fewinky spots, all that was
visible of the pig was of a lamb-like white-
ness. He was utterly unlike the impish black
pig which the gardener had seen squirming in
the hedge and scurrying before him down the
hill, and baffled and deluded, the man reluc-
tantly took his leave.

It was some little time after this that
Paddy conceived the idea of utilising this
physical peculiarity still further. He asked
his granny to make Finn a little coat of black
cloth and a petticoat from an old white silk
70 PADDY O’LEAREY

handkerchief. Paddy had taught the animal
to stand erect, and when clothed in the black
coat, the trim black legs continued the * colour
scheme,” and gave him the appearance of a
natty little gentleman. As the coat was cut
low in the front, the white throat of the pig
carried out the idea of a shirt-front, and in
this guise, resting one hoof on a walking-
stick, and wearing a cocked hat, Finn posed
as a beau. Snatched behind the door, the
coat was removed, the white silk petticoat
took its place, a bit of white net, stich as the
Killarney girls used as the web of their lace,
was thrown over Finn’s head and shoulders,
which gleamed white through its meshes,
and he was introduced as a bride, and it was
difficult, indeed, to believe that one actor had
taken both parts.

Sometimes when his rustic audience ap-
plauded the really clever performances of his
pupil, Paddy longed for wider appreciation,
and he thought how fine it would be to
trudge away to larger towns and exhibit his
pet at the great fairs; but he had a strong
home attachment, and he loved his mother so
AT KILLARNEY 71

dearly that only a desperate crisis could
induce him to such a step as this.

Very steadily and swiftly that crisis was
approaching,


CHAPTER IV.

IN HIDING.

LTHOUGH the
potato crop had

failed during the
past season, and

was likely to do so



again, and Dennis
drank more and worked not a whit, the family
were hopeful, for they relied for the coming
winter on the perquisites which they had en-
joyed from Dennis’s office as gamekeeper.
Much to their disappointment and dismay
this means of a livelihood was suddenly cut
off from the O’Leareys. The tenant who
‘rented Squire Desmond’s place had no knowl-
edge of the verbal contract between the
Squire and his gamekeeper, and even refused
to believe that Dennis had been called to that
office. The Squire, in the multiplicity of his
cares, had forgotton to mention it, and the

new tenant insisted that Dennis should pay
72
IN HIDING 73

rent for his cottage, and should forego the
privilege of gathering wood in the forest.
He even hinted of his intention to prosecute
him for poaching.

Dennis protested his inability to pay rent,
but the tenant pointed to his live stock.
“You have a donkey, a cow, and a pig, and
can raise money on them, and if the rent is
not ready for me when I come again I will
seize the live stock.”

“‘The curse of Jeffrey Lynch be on you”
cried Mother Maloney, ‘‘and may you carry
his coal of fire in your bosom to the end of
your days.”

The entire family united in lamentation
and malediction that evening, but the next
morning, being market-day at Ballyma-
gooley, Dennis led the cow away, announcing
his intention to sell it. The little animal
seemed to understand the situation, for it
struggled and lowed, while the children fol-
lowed in a weeping procession for quite a
distance, the cottagers coming out of their
houses to give their opinion of the hard-
hearted landlord,
74 PADDY O’LEAREY

Paddy came back to the house when quite
tired and found his grandmother crouched
in the chimney corner. He fancied that she
must be overcome with grief, for she had
manifested an amount of self-control quite
foreign to her nature when the cow was led
away.

“It is too bad, Granny,” he said, putting
his hand in hers. ‘ The new landlord has no
right to take Mooley, for she does not belong
to feyther, but to you, and feyther has no
right to sell her from you.”

‘Don’t be afther judging your betthers,”
said Mother Maloney. ‘‘ What your feyther’s
done he’s done with my consint; but the land-
lord will niver resave a pinny from the sale
of the cow. May he sup sorrow for this day,
and may the coal of Jeffrey Lynch burn into
his heart and his brain.”

“What is the coal of Jeffrey Lynch,
Granny ?” Paddy asked.

‘* And you not to know, who have lived in
sight of his house since yees been born!”

‘“Do you mean the house without a roof,
on Purple Mountain, that everybody says is


IN HIDING 75

haunted? I’ve seen every windy of that
house lighted up in the avenin’, and once
feyther said, ‘ Jeffrey Lynch’s coal of fire is
flaming high the night, and by the same
token some poor people are being evicted
from their homes without marcy.’ Whin I
axed him what Jeffrey Lynch’s coal was he
said it was a Satan’s keepsake that the divil
gives every bad man in this life as a foretaste
of what’s to come. But thin I don’t under-
stand him at all, at all; for they say Jeffrey
Lynch is long dead; any way, I’ve seen his
tombstone in the burying-ground.”

‘‘Have you niver heard the story ?” asked
Mother Maloney. ‘‘It goes thisway. Jeffrey
Lynch was a middleman. He rinted land of
the earl, and thin he rinted it again on a
profit to the poor farmers; and if they were
the laste pinny behind he evicted them ivery
time, though he supped sorrow for it there-
after.

“‘Well, he died, sure, and though he was a
bad, cruel man intirely, and must have known
he had no right in the primises, it was the like
insurance that was in him to take stage-coach
76 PADDY O’LEAREY

for heaven, as though he had a billet signed
by the pope giving the angels orders for his
lodging and entertainment. Whin he knocked
at the gate, says St. Peter, says he, ‘ Who’s
there ?’

““*T'm Jeffrey Lynch of Killarney.’

‘**T know you,’ says Peter, ‘ you murderin’,
rack-rintin’ ould vagabond. You evicted
your tinants; you must seek your lodgings
further down,’ says he.

‘*So he takes the back stairs to Purgatory,
and at the doore, thim that runs that board-
ing-house axed him what his business had
been, :

“*T was a land-grabber,’ says Jeffrey.
‘Sure, [niver thought to put up with the likes
of such company as this, but asit’s go furder to
fare worse, if you make me comfortable and
give me the best of iverything you’ve got, ’l
condescind to patronise this establishment.’

*“* Did you evict your tinants?’ says the
landlord of Purgatory.

““*T evicted some,’ says Jeffrey.

“Thin consider yourself evicted,’ says the
landlord, a-handin’ back his gripsack, heavy


IN HIDING 77

- with the earnin’s of starving people, and Jef-
frey Lynch, he went a round lower of the lad-
der.

‘©¢This way, sor,’ says the ould boy, a-takin’
down the key of number two hundred million
from the hook and reaching for Jeffrey’s
overcoat. ‘That’s a basement room,’ says

‘he, ‘convanient to the furnace. You’ll not
complain of slapin’ cold,’ says he. ‘ But first
have the politeness to inscribe your name on
the hotel register.’

““*T’m Jeffrey Lynch, of Killarney,’ says
Jeffrey; but so soon as he uttered his name
all of the evil spirits in the siminary raised
one yell. ‘Give him a coal of fire and sind
him back to Killarney,’ screams they, ‘or
he’ll evict us all.’

**So back he was obliged to trot. And that
is the r’ason that he lives in his house alone
on Purple Mountain to this day, though the
thatch has been gone this fifty year from the
roof, and the moss has kivered his name on
the tombstone. Many a night honest folk
belated see that bit coal that Satan gave
him, and that same Satan’s keepsake is re-
78 PADDY O’LEAREY

morse, mind you that, Paddy; they see that
coal, I say, shining red in his windy, a warn-
ing to hard landlords who have any desire to
live in another country than this after they
die.”

“And won’t feyther get a Satan’s keep-
sake, too, for st’aling Squire Desmond’s
pheasants?” Paddy asked.

‘* Hoot, toot!” replied his grandmother,
who did not relish this application of her
parable. ‘‘Sure, there couldn’t be coals
enough in the pit to go round, if Satan wasted
them by giving them away for alittle thing
like that.”

When Dennis came home that evening
there was a whispered conference between
his mother-in-law, his wife and himself, and
all seemed well pleased, though there was a
pretence at sniffling.

“ And how much did yees get for the cow?”
Paddy asked.

‘“*Don’t yees be afther asking onconvat-
ient questions,’’ Mother Maloney exclaimed.
“Whin the landlord comes and asks that same
ye’ll be glad yees can’t answer.”
IN HIDING 79

The younger children cried that night
because Paddy told them there would be no
milk for their porridge at breakfast, but
what was their surprise on rising to see a
pail of milk standing on the table as usual.

‘¢ Tt’s the kindness of one of the neighbours,”
said Dennis, and Paddy wondered who had
been so generous. The wonder grew, for the
milk was there every morning. Late one
night as Paddy lay in the little loft over the
kitchen, which was his bedroom, he heard
some one open the door and enter the kitchen
stealthily. He slipped from his bed and ap-
plied his eye to a crack in the floor, and saw
his father with the pail of milk in one hand
and a lighted lantern in the other.

It was plain that Dennis went for the milk
secretly, and a suspicion smote the boy that
it was stolen. He had never eaten of the
broiled pheasants and hares which his father
brought from the park, and now he could not
touch the milk. At first he had scruples
about allowing Finn ma Cool to drink it, but
concluded that as the animal had no soul he
could not be depraved by it, and as both pig
80 PADDY O’LEAREY

and milk belonged to the Desmonds, it might
not be wrong for them to travel in company.
But he was troubled for his father, both for
the sin and the danger; for it was a very
daring thing to slip into Squire Desmond’s
barns and milk the cows by night, and Paddy
knew that if his father were discovered, the
new landlord would not condone the offence.

He could only protest by declining the
milk at breakfast, and eating his porridge
with only salt to make it palatable.

But there was more trouble in store for
Paddy. Rent day was approaching, and he
overheard his father say to his mother that
the landlord would probably seize Paddy’s
pig. ‘And I shan’t hinder him,” Dennis
asserted, ‘‘ for I happened to be walking with
Finn outside the park, and the crayther
squeezed himself through the hedge and
caught a fine rabbit and brought it outside to
me, which was all very well, and knowledg-
able in the baste, and he’s done that same be-
foore. But bad luck would have it that the
gardener saw him do it, and though he
. couldn’t arrest me for poaching, for I was not
IN HIDING 81

on the preserves at all, at all; he would have
it that I had taught the pig the thrick, and he
said he would shoot him the next time he
caught him. So it’s fearful I am the baste
can’t be broken ofits bad habits. It must be
the ould innemy taught him; and if he’s shot,
sure we won’t be allowed the ‘atin’ of him;
and it’s just as well not to anger thim that has
authority. We don’t want to be evicted like
the O'Donovans, and we can spare the pig
better than the donkey, and sure, if he gets
the pig, maybe he’ll be asking no questions
about the cow.”

The landlord have Finn ma Cool! Paddy
could scarcely believe his ears, for Finn was
not his pig, but Miss Kathleen’s; surely his
mother would say so. But no, for she only
replied that perhaps it would be better to let
the donkey go and kill the pig and salt him
down for the winter,

Kall Finn ma Cool! Eat Finn ma Cool! The
very idea made Paddy quite sick. There was
only one sympathetic friend to whom he
could go in his distress, and that was his
grandmother.
82 PADDY O’LEAREY

‘‘ Hide the crayther until after rint day,”
she counselled. ‘Your mither’s right; the
pig is worth more than the donkey, for not a
stiver of work does Dinny do with the cray-
ther, and it’s many a penny you’ve brought
in on fair days and from weddings, from the
divartisement of your pig, to say nothin’ of its
poachin’, which might be restrained in proper
limits.”

The more Paddy thought over his grand-
mother’s advice the more reasonable it seemed
to him, and that very night, an hour after all
the family had retired, he slipped down from
his loft, took Finn ma Cool from his sty, and
started with him up the side of Purple Moun-
tain. For Paddy had decided that the safest
hiding-place for his pig would be the haunted
house of Jeffrey Lynch. No one in Killar-
ney, he felt sure, would be so foolhardy as to
dare to explore it, and his own heart beat
rather faster than usual at the idea of ventur-
ing into that ill-omened place by night,

It was true that he had made up his mind
to the very rational conclusion that the red
light in the windows, or rather on them,
IN HIDING 83

which was visible nearly every evening, was
only the reflection of the sunset; but the
story might be true, after all. The windows
were quite dark now, and if there had not
been moonlight Paddy would not have been
able to distinguish the house on the sombre
hill or find his way along the thickly wooded
path. But he had often been out much later
than this on his way home from wakes and
merry-makings, and he whistled ‘‘ The Devil’s
Dream” to keep up his spirits. He thought
of the legend of the quicken trees as he
pushed his way through the thicket which
surrounded the house, and his blood ran cold
as he came out in front of the deserted house
to see that the windows were really lighted
from within, and the light shone through the
naked rafters and outlined them like gallow’s
trees against the sky. The light was not
stationary, but moved about within the house,
and Paddy would certainly have beaten a
precipitate retreat had not Finn ma Cool
walked coolly up to the front door, where he
stood squealing for admittance.

‘It’s hoping I am that Jeffrey Lynch has
84 PADDY O’LEAREY

bad eyesight in his ears,” said Paddy to him-
self, as he approached cautiously and en-
deavoured to secure his pig. As he did so a
pair of horns and a great dark head suddenly
raised themselves before the lighted window,
and Paddy stood rooted to the ground with
horror, thinking that Satan himself must have
come to visit his faithful servant, Jeffrey
Lynch. Another instant and what was his
amazement to see his own father within the
haunted house. Paddy had never had a high
respect for his father, but he had never be-
lieved him so wicked as to keep company
with Jeffrey Lynch and Satan.

His mystification lasted but for a moment,
when his father’s voice, exclaiming: «So,
Mooley. Whist! be aisy now. What ails the
baste?” and a well-known low, explained it
all. His father had only pretended to sell
the little Kerry cow, and had hidden her
away here to keep her from the landlord’s
clutches. At first, Paddy could hardly for-
bear laughing aloud and shouting: ‘ There’s
two of us, feyther. Faix, we’re in the same
box!”

IN HIDING 85

But it occurred to him in good time that
while his father was hiding the cow from the
landlord, he, Paddy, was attempting to hide
the pig from his father. He therefore pru-
dently retired into the thicket with Finn ma
Cool, taking his jacket off and fitting its one
sleeve closely over his pet’s snout to keep him
from grunting. He waited until he saw his
father’s lantern twinkling down the steep
path, and then he entered the cabin, glad at
heart for several reasons: First, his father
had not stolen the milk which they had
every morning for breakfast; second, dear
old Mooley had not been sold; and third,
which was no small consideration after their
insufficient supper, he could now refresh
himself and the pig with a drink of milk,
which he did by milking a fine stream
into his own mouth and then into Finn ma
Cool’s.

But it would not do to hide his pig here.
He dared not leave him even for the night,
for there was no telling when his father might
return. The only other hiding-place which
he could think of was Muchross Abbey. It
86 PADDY O’LEAREY

was a long way to this beautiful ruin around
the lake, but Paddy had no sense of weariness,
now his heart was so light, and he trudged
bravely on, repeating to himself an odd para-
phrase of the ballad which Kathleen Desmond
had sung for him:
“ Finn ma Cool, I feel not the laste alarrum ;
No son of Erin will offer us harrum.

For though they love pork and bacon galore—
Whist, Finn! they love hanner and vartue more.”

Although Muchross Abbey is situated in
the middle of a burial-ground, and contains
many tombs, Paddy was not afraid to venture
there—in the first place; because the people
there were so very dead that it was hardly
conceivable that their ghosts could walk.
No one had been buried there within the
recollection of any living man. No one lived
who felt any grief for, or had even known,
the occupants of those tombs. It wasa show
place and resort for tourists, even at this
time, though they came less frequently then
than at the present day.

It was a favourite spot of Kathleen’s, and
Paddy had often been there with her, She
IN HIDING 87

had shown him the tablet to the memory of
her great-great-grandmother, Geraldine Des-
mond. It was astrange bit of vanity, flaunt-
ing as it did the paltry honours of this life at
the door of death, but Paddy was too simple-
minded to notice any incongruity and always
read it with great respect.
This was what the tablet said:

“A memorial of the trulie vertuous and religious Geraldine
Desmond late of Killarney, lineally descended on her father’s
side from the anncient and worshipfull family of MacCarthy
More of Kerry & on her mothers from the ONeils of UL
ster. ‘his Geraldine was the wife of Hugh Desmond who
was cozin thrice removed of that Earl of Desmond who was
basely betrayed & slain his head sent to London, and his
estates confiscated, but this Hugh being Secretary to the
Lord Deputy managed better with both his head and his
estates, & laid the former to rest in peace under the next
tomb and left the latter to his lodge, whose fervent zeale to
the Gospel her pietie, sanctitie and charitie, both the church
which she endowed, and the poor whom she maintained, can
sufficiently testifie. Aged upon LXXX years she died.

“No better thought than think on God
And daily him to serve
No better gift than to the poor
Who ready are to sterve.”’
Paddy led his charge through the beautiful
ruined abbey church. The moonlight shone

through the shattered Gothic arches and the
88 PADDY O’LEAREY

night wind gently moved the trailing ivy.
This jewel-box, among abbeys, is beautiful
in the sunshine, but—

«« When the broken arches are black in night,
And each shafted oriel glimmers white ;
When the cold light’s uncertain shower
Streams on the ruined central tower ;
When buttress and buttress alternately
Seem framed of ebon and ivory ;

Then home returning soothly swear
Was never scene so sad and fair.”

From the church Paddy passed to the
cloisters around the yew tree, old even then,
and mounted a narrow, winding stair to the
abbot’s room. The roof was open to the
sky, but there was an odd little niche in one
corner which might once have been a shrine
or a secret closet where the abbey silver was
kept. Paddy had filled his arms with straw
as he passed a farmer’s rick, and in the niche
in the abbot’s room Paddy made the pig a
comfortable bed. Finn was not inclined to
stay in it, so Paddy descended again to the
church, and bringing up a small tombstone
barred his friend in. Finn thrust his nose
through the aperture between the tombstone
IN HIDING 89

and the lintel and squealed with indignation
as Paddy left him, but the boy bade him not
to make a ‘‘screech owl” of himself and
hurried away,

It was almost morning when Paddy reached
home, and it seemed to him that he had not
fallen asleep before he heard his mother
calling:

‘Get up, Paddy, Finn ma Cool has run
away, or else the darlint’s been stolen.”

“Run away! And how could the crayther
do that, when I barred him in with a tomb-
stone?” Paddy asked, sleepily.

“With atombstone! Sure, it’s dreaming
you are. Come down to your breakfast, and
then hunt him up, that’s a darlint.”

Paddy came down and surprised his mother
by drinking a large portion of the milk which
he had lately seemed to dislike. After break-
fast he carried a bowlful of the milk away
with him? saying that he would tote Finn
home with it; but it is needless to say that
he came back without the pig. He found
the family in tears, for the landlord had just
carried away the donkey.
90 PADDY O’LEAREY

‘‘Sure, the crayther’s no good, now that
we can’t take him to the forest to carry the
fagots home,” said Paddy.

‘*Ow,” wailed Paddy’s mother, ‘‘if him-
sel’ were only at the Hall he would not have
his own people treated so, but we’ve no one
to send to Lunnon to tell Squire Desmond
how we’re mistreated.”

Paddy mused sadly. It was long past the
time that Kathleen Desmond had promised
to return. Would he be able to keep Finn
ma Cool until her return? Would she ever
come? He determined to ask that afternoon
at the Hall when the family were expected.
But here again he received no comfort. The
housekeeper told him that the present land-
lord had leased the estate for seven years,
but she gave Paddy Miss Kathleen’s address,
a convent in France. No one at home could
write a letter, and the only person whom
Paddy knew who possessed skill enough to
do it was Father Nooney, with whom he was
not now on good terms. That very after-
noon while Paddy was at the Hall a further
cause of estrangement had arisen.
IN HIDING 91

A superstitious woman had visited Father
Nooney and had informed him that she had
heard a ghostly priest chanting a midnight
mass in Muchross Abbey.

Under seal of confession the woman fur-
ther divulged that, driven by extreme pov-
erty, she had gone to the abbey at night for
the purpose of prying some of the brazen
tablets from the walls and selling them for
old brass.

While engaged in this wrongful deed the
blows of her hammer woke dreadful echoes
through the ruined abbey, and not echoes
alone, for presently she heard the sound of
chanting, as though the dead-and-gone monks
were on their way from the cloisters to their
seats in the choir. She fled panic-stricken,
but returned after a time, and on seeing the
spot still deserted, concluded that the sounds
which she thought she had heard were only
the imaginings of a guilty conscience; but at
the very first blow they began again with
redoubled vigour,

The occasion was too suggestive to be
neglected. Father Nooney enjoined on the
92 PADDY O’LEAREY

woman, for the good of her own soul and
the glory of the Church, to make public con-
fession on the next Sunday, when he also
announced that he would hold a “station” at
Muchross Abbey on the following Friday,
confessing all those in the parish who had
like sins upon their minds, receiving their
offerings and saying a mass for the rest of the
troubled spirits in the cloister.

Father Nooney, to tell the truth, did not
believe in these spirits. He cared so little as
to what it was which the woman had heard
or thought she heard that he did not even
visit the abbey to investigate before the
day appointed for the station. If Paddy had
attended church he would have been warned,
and would have removed Finn from his place
of hiding; but since the day that holy water
had been administered boiling he had shunned
the sanctuary.

Mrs, O’Learey reported on her return from
church that Father Nooney had announced
that he would hold a ‘‘station,” but she
neglected to mention the place appointed, and
Paddy gave the matter no attention.
IN HIDING 93

On Friday Father Nooney proceeded to the
abbey a little ahead of time, accompanied by
his catechumens, who were to act as choir-
boys. They carried an altar-cloth, some can-
dles and candlesticks, two china vases filled
with dingy paper flowers, and a few other
ecclesiastical furbishings, and with these he
proceeded to improvise an altar from a
large tomb. Then he gave his choir their
places and explained to them their parts, not
without some grumbling on their part, for
Phelim Malloy, their very best singer, was
absent.

Now, Father Nooney had artfully told
Phelim to hide at the other end of the cloister
in the abbot’s room, and when he heard the
singing in the chapel to roar out responses in
his very loudest tones.

Phelim was an orphan whom Father
Nooney was educating for the priesthood, and
the wily priest felt that he could rely upon
his confederacy in the plot. But Father
Nooney had not reckoned on any real pres-
ence in the haunted chamber, and hardly had
the chanting begun when Phelim, with terror
94 PADDY O’LEAREY

staring from his countenance, rushed into
the chapel exclaiming: ‘‘ A ghost! a ghost!
There is a ghost in the abbot’s chamber.”
The congregation sprang to their feet, and
although it was broad daylight, the greater
part tumbled over each other in their haste
to leave the abbey. But there were others
braver or more incredulous than the rest who
remained and surrounded Father Nooney
while he questioned the trembling boy.

‘‘ Faith, I wint up to the abbot’s chamber,
as you tould me, sor——”

‘*Whist, Phelim, make no circumlocutions
from the truth. Bein’ naturally of a pryin’
disposition, yees was explorin’ and spyin’
about this religious house, when yees chanced
into the abbot’s chamber, and what happened
thin ?”

‘‘Why, I stood by the windy, sor, that
looks down on the cloister, and when the
boys began tosing, I begins, just as you tould
me, sor, whin from a sort of cupboard in the
wall there came sich cries and groans as would
have broken the courage of a gauger, sor.”

‘‘And yeez turned tail and run simply
IN HIDING 95

from the wind a-blowin’ down a chimbly, ye
cowardly spalpeen——”

‘‘ Save your riverence, I did nothing of the
kind, sor. I stood transfigured to the spot,
with the eyes of me bustin’ out of me head;
but they could see all the better for that.
And through a big chink in the wall I sees a
white face, with rid eyes gl’amin’ like to
coals of fire, and thin I knew it was the ould
boy himself, and I came straight to you,
SODMe: ay

‘‘ Belikes it’s some poor crayther that’s
been walled up alive,” said one of the
listeners. ‘‘Let’s go up and pull the wall
down.”

The timid runaways were now gaining
confidence and returning, and Father Noo-
ney, well pleased with the turn affairs were
taking, made haste to take up a collection,
and then marshalled his congregation in
procession, while he took the head and led
the way to lay the ghost. Not a sound was
heard as they threaded the cloister except
their own footfalls and excited breathing.
The little staircase was tortuous and so nar-
96 _ PADDY O’LEAREY

row that only one could mount it at a time,
so that when Father Nooney entered the
abbot’s chamber the rear of the procession
had only just left the abbey chapel. The
priest still believed that the noises heard by
the woman and by Phelim were made by the
wind or by rooks cawing in the chimney, and
he entered the room, exclaiming boldly:
‘Unhappy spirit or guilty demon, I com-
mand you, in the name of all the saints,
leave this holy house in peace.”

He was positive that nothing would be
discovered, and that his fame as an exorcist
would spread far and near; but Phelim, em-
boldened by the presence of the priest, and
desirous of proving his assertions, crowded
by Father Nooney, and seizing the tomb-
stone, forcibly overturned it.

It fell with a crash on the stone flagging
and the liberated pig dashed jubilant from
his imprisonment, overturning the priest,
and scrambling down the staircase over the
heads of the kneeling penitents and between
the legs of the marching ones. Shrieks of
fright were gradually merged into shouts of
IN HIDING 97

laughter as the real character of the appari-
tion was recognised.

The younger men and boys set outin a
wild chase through the abbey burying-
ground after Finn, but he dodged and
doubled and outran them with the wiliness
and agility of a fox which has eluded the
hunters for several seasons, and an hour later
appeared at the O’Learey cottage squealing
loudly for his supper.

Father Nooney was now doubly an enemy.
He felt that he had been made the laughing-
stock of the parish, and he determined to
wreak vengeance on Paddy and on his pig.

He visited the family and upbraided them
in such scorching terms that








both Dennisandhis wife with- / 4
ered before the fire of his \
anger. Nothing would appease tl
it but the surrender of the cul-

prit, and threatened with excom-



munication, Dennis tied a rope Ge
: Mire
around the pig’s neck and //
placed its end in the hand of
the priest.
CHAPTER V.

THE FLIGHT.

@ HEN Paddy learn-
| ed the events of
the day he was
filled with despair.
His beloved Finn
ma Cool in the



possession of
Father Nooney, perhaps already slaughtered
for the priestly table!

‘¢ May the sausages choke him!” Paddy ex-
claimed, in his grief. ‘‘May he never sup
comfort from that meat. To think of his ile-
gant little feet and ears made into souse for
that ould hypocrite! I cannot endure it! I
cannot endure it!”

“Sure, it’s meself is of the bye’s way of
thinkin’,” said Dennis. ‘‘Whin I think of
the salt-pork barrel empty in the cellar, and
the ilegant bacon the crayther would have

98
THE FLIGHT 99

made, not mentionin’ the two hams which
we might have sold, and the chine and the
spare ribs, and the sage hanging there over
the chimney ready for the roast pork.”

Mother Maloney groaned aloud, but Paddy
burst into a louder wail. ‘‘ You're all alike,
you're all ag’inst him, thirstin’ for the blood
of me darlint, and he’s not mine nuther; he’s
Miss Kathleen’s. Ow! yeeshad no right to
gin him to Father Nooney.”

Paddy’s mother was silent, but her sym-
pathies were with her son. She lay awake
long into the night, while her husband snored
at her side, and when she heard the rafters
creaking, and stealthy footsteps overhead, her
mother’s heart divined that Paddy was pre-
paring to rescue his pig. She stole from her
bed and dressed herself as silently, and when
Paddy slid down the sloping roof of the back
shed and dropped to the ground he met his
mother standing by the gate wrapped in a
coarse frieze cloak.”

‘¢ Vees be goin’ for the pig?” she asked.

‘¢ Ves, mother, if it’s not too late.”

‘But yees can’t kape it here. Father
100 PADDY O’LEAREY

Nooney, let alone the agint, and the gardener
at the great house, and your feyther, are all
set on having the life of the crayther, and I
misthrust hunger will drive even you to it,
ma bouchal, before long.”

“‘ Never, mother, and if I can’t be thrue to
the thrust Miss Kathleen left me, why I'll
just be off with me and take the pig to her.
Don’t hinder me mother; the crayther and I
can perfarm on the way, and it’s good luck
Pll bring back with me when I come.”.

“It’s right you are, I’m thinking,” said
Mrs, O’Learey; ‘‘ for sure there’ll no good luck
find you here. Get the pig and I’ll meet you
at the crossroads with a few little things and
give you my blessing on your way.”

To Paddy’s delight he found that Finn had
not been butchered, but was confined in the
priest’s kitchen. For Father Nooney, fearful
of an attempt at rescue, had not dared to leave
the animal in the sty outside the house.

Paddy cautiously tried both door and win-
dow and found them secure. But Father
Nooney had not thought of the chimney, and
for a boy of Paddy’s agility, it was an easy
THE FLIGHT 101

matter to climb to the roof of the cabin and
to let himself down the wide chimney by
means of the clothes-line which he found in
the back yard. The only trouble was that
Finn, rejoiced at his approach, would not
keep quiet, but greeted him with sqeals of
delight, which awakened Father N ooney.

When Paddy stood on the kitchen hearth,
the priest sprang from his bed and scrambled
for matches; his delay in striking a light was
Paddy’s salvation. He snatched up his pig,
unbolted and flung open the kitchen door,
and the strong draught extinguished the can-
dle in the priest’shand. Then it was “ legs do
your duty ’’—and Paddy’s were younger and
swifter than the portly priest’s. Long before
he reached the crossroads, Father Nooney
gave up the chase, and returned discomfited
to his cabin.

At the crossroads Mrs. O’Learey was wait-
ing with a small bundle in which she had be-
stowed all of Paddy’s belongings, a loaf of
bread, and a silver half-crown.

“It’s to Cork you'll be going,” she said,
“and it’s there you'll be stayin’ till ye’ve a
102 PADDY O’LEAREY

chance to cross over the channel. Now, Shan-
don’s neighbourin’ to Cork, an’ we've friends
there: the Callahans, and Rose Callahan, she
was to have married me brother Barney, and
she was Miss Kathleen’s maid, and would
have follyed her to furrin’ parts, only she
promised Barney to wait for him. She'll be
good to you for the sake of him that’s gone.”

Paddy’s mother trudged along by his side for
a long way; it seemed asif she could not bear
to turn around and leave. At length, when
the gray dawn appeared over Dunloe, she sat
down on a grassy mound and took him in
her arms and wept over him. Paddy had
heard the women raise the keen over the
dead at wakes, but he had never heard so
heart-breaking a wail as this which his mother
sobbed in his ear: ‘*O acushla machree
(pulse of my heart), I’m tearing my heart out
in giving youup. My eyes will wither with-
out the sight of your sweet face. I’ll see you
no more, no more, and I’ll die of the famine—
the heart famine, I’m m’aning.” She was
quite as likely to die of actual starvation, for
her hands were very thin, and Paddy knew
THE FLIGHT 103

that she had often pushed her porridge toward
him, saying: ‘‘ I’m not hungry,” the sweetest
lie that ever mother told.

‘Mother! mother!” Paddy cried, ‘you'll
break my heart with yourkeening. Sure, it’s
yourself bid me go to seek my fortune, and
maybe I'll find the luck-penny that grand-
mother’s always talking about. Sure, I look
at ivery silver coin that folks gives me at fairs
to see if it has the blessed cross on it, and
when I finds it Pll bring it back to you and
we'll never sup sorrow no more.”

Mrs, O’Learey straightened herself up with
a brave, proud smile which was pitiful to see,
and blessed her boy with the most powerful
blessing which she knew, a strange, super-
stitious rigamarole, the enlightened will call
it; but as Paddy saw the steadfast faith shin-
ing through his mother’s tears, and heard
pronounced so solemnly the mystic blessing,
‘‘Christ’s saints stand betwixt you and
harm—Mary and her Son, St. Patrick and
his staff, Martin with his mantle, Bridget
with her veil, Michael with his shield, and
God over all with his strong right hand ”—
104 PADDY O’LEAREY

he felt himself guarded by an invisible com-
pany of angels. Mrs. O’Learey, strengthened
and comforted, pulling her cloak about her
face, turned and ran toward Killarney.
Paddy looked after her mournfully but
bravely. It was the last turn in the road
from which he could see the beautiful lakes,
and memories of the lovely region in which
he had lived all his life almost overcame his
courage. There was sweet Innisfallen, with
its ruined abbey and oratory; one of the old-
est in Ireland, where St. Patrick himself
had lived. There was the Stone Garden,
a formation of strangely shaped stones, the
only garden, as his grandmother often said,
‘‘that never failed in all the failures of Ire-
land, but grew spontaneous from year to
year.” There was O’Donoghue’s Library,
where the broken strata resembled books,
and the meeting of the waters under the old
Weir Bridge, built centuries before by the
Danes, surely the loveliest spot, in lovely
Killarney. There was, too, the Long Range,
where he had watched the deer, and the
eagle’s nest on the cliff, and all the rough
THE FLIGHT 105

wild region about the Upper Lake, McGilli-
cuddy’s Reeks, and the Gap of Dunloe.
How could he leave it all? The pig seemed
to be of the same mind, and turning, started
at a gallop for Killarney. This woke Paddy
from his dreams, and speedily surrounding
Finn, he trudged manfully on his way.

Paddy’s hopes of making his fortune was
not, however, immediately realised. He
found the country in great distress; there
were no fairs and few markets, and he could
hear of no weddings or merry-makings. He
gave performances with his pig at every vil-
lage, but though there were plenty of idle
people who collected about him, very few
gave him anything, and when he begged for
his supper at night he was frequently turned
away hungry. He slept in barns and behind
haymows, and ate raw vegetables and crusts,
becoming hardly more fastidious than his
pig.

At Roikeen he heard of a market in Tip-
perary, and hoping to make alittle money he
turned toward the north instead of pursuing
the direct road to Cork. But the market was
106 PADDY O’LEAREY

a very disappointing affair. It swarmed
with beggars and thieves, and though many
had come to sell, there were few to buy, and
fewer who cared to spend the little money
they possessed in looking at shows. It was
at this market that Paddy nearly lost his pig
and Finn his life; for as it broke up a party
of famished tramps gave chase to them both,
declaring that they would have a barbecue
before they died, and roast the performing
pig. They chased them for several miles,
famine and hope giving speed to their legs,
while fear quickened those of Paddy and
Finn.

At the foot of the Rock of Cashel, Paddy’s
strength gave out, and he sank down ex-
hausted before the rocky road which led to
the summit, where he had hoped to find an
asylum in the ruined monastry. He tried to
drive Finn up the cliff, but the stubborn ani-
mal remained by his side. Panting, but
not quite exhausted, the tramps came lum-
bering up the road like a pack of hounds after
their prey. Paddy gave up all for lost, when
a man dressed in a long gray gown of frieze
THE FLIGHT 107

stepped down the natural staircase and con-
fronted the gang. They stopped, frightened
by his sudden appearance, and one of them
muttered, ‘‘ It’s the ghost that ates the nuts.”

7?

‘¢ By the same token!” exclaimed the man
in gray; ‘‘and why haven’t you brought me
any this long time?”

‘¢Plaze your haner’s haner,’’ said the fore-
most man humbly, ‘‘we haven’t any our-
selves; but if ye’ll be plazed to share the pig
with us, yell be welcome to the best
pickings.”

‘Small thanks to you,” replied the
strange man, ‘‘ when the crayther’s my own,
by this sign,” and standing in front of Finn,
he solemnly winked three times.

‘‘He’s winked at the pig!” screamed the
ringleader of the tramps. ‘‘Begob, he’s
winked at the pig, an’ it’s no eating now for
any Christian man. Be he divil, or ghost,
or man it makes no differ, the pig’s winked
at, and his flesh’ll pizen any mortial.”

A loud grumbling was heard from the
gang, who turned reluctantly away. One
sturdy fellow lingered. ‘‘Sure, it’s meself
108 PADDY O’LEAREY

wouldn’t be afraid to try,’ he said; ‘I’d as
lief die of pizen as hunger.”

“Sure, you don’t know what you're
talkin’,” called one of his companions.
‘Your carkiss would swell bigger than a
hippypotamus, and yer sowl would niver find
its way to Paradise. It’s under inchantment
it is; come away before he puts the evil eye
on you too, you ignyramus.”’

Paddy had somewhat regained his breath
during this parley, and he now begged for
the life of his darling.

‘‘Come up to the top of the rock,” said
the man in gray, ‘‘and we'll see him per-
farm. Sure, it’s little divarshun I’ve had
this many a day, and laughing’s as necessary
to a man’s life as ’atin’.”

The Rock of Cashel is crowned by the
ruins of an old abbey; a graveyard surrounds
it, still used for interment; but no one in-
habits the ruinous pile, and only occasional
burial processions, pilgrims on penance, or
tourists visit the spot. Paddy’s only ideas of a
ruined abbey had been gained from Muchross,
that little jewel-box among ruins; and he
THE FLIGHT 109

was smitten with a feeling of awe as he
viewed the great cathedral of Cashel, the
palace of the Munster kings, Hore Abbey,
the stone-roofed chapel built by Cormac
MacCarthy in 1127, and the great round
tower ninety feet high and fifty-six feet
around,

‘‘ Sure, is it the king of this place ye are?”
he asked of his guide as he led the way into
Cormac’s Chapel; ‘‘and are yees alive or
dead ?”

‘“They say I’m the ghost of Cashel,” re-
plied the unknown, and I’ll not be denijin’
them, for in the first place its unmannerly to
conthradict, and in the second place, it suits
me purpose well. For since I’ve took up
with these quarters and show myself occa-
sionally in the avenin’, there’s always some
one will bring me the bit sup, comin’ at noon
of the day and lavin’ it on one of the tomb-
stones. Thrue for you, there’s a bit of same-
ness in the diet, bein’ principally nuts, but it’s
not for me to object, as that would be giving
the lie to the lagind intirely. So I has chest-
nuts and acorns for breakfast, and walnuts
110 PADDY O’LEAREY

and acorns for dinner, and chestnuts and
walnuts for supper. Help yourself and wel-
come, and give some of the acorns to the

”

pig.

Paddy did as he was bidden and then made
Finn perform, and whether his host were man
or spirit, he felt that he had never had a more
appreciative or generous audience,

“Sure, the baste was worth winking at, and
as long as the nut crop holds out, he’ll not
go to bacon.”

“Will you tell me, plaze yer haner,” Paddy
asked, ‘‘ why the people give yees only nuts?
Is it because the trees are convanient ?”

‘‘Partually, but more on account of the
lagind. Rest ye aisy and I’ll tell it to yees,
The people of Cashel say that there was once
an ould woman who was that sick with the par-
alism that for seven years she hadn’t walked
one step. Well, this ould woman had two
sons, and one of them was that fond of nuts
that he killed himself ’atin’ of them. There’s
thim that do say that he died for love of a gurrl
named Nora, but the most part hold that it’s
much likelier the nuts killed him. Be that
THE FLIGHT 111

as it may, when he lay a-dying he said to the
priest: ‘Do you think there’s any nuts in
heaven ?’ says he.

‘‘ And says the priest: ‘It may beso, but
there are no nuts in Purgatory, and it’s to
Putgatory you be goin’.’

“<< Tf that be so,’ says the young man to his
mother, ‘tell Nora to put a bag of nuts on my
grave and I’ll come back. Such is the love I
bears her.’

‘¢ Some say it was for the love of Nora he’d
come back, but I says it was for the love of
the nuts, as my story will show.

«So those were the last words that iver he
said, and they waked him, and they buried
him there foreninst the round tower; and
Nora she couldn’t deny him that thriflin’
satisfaction, and she put a bag of nuts on his
grave all in the broad daylight, and went her
ways, for she’d no hanker to meet him alive
or dead.

‘“Now, there’s a sayquil to the story, and
there’s two varsions to the sayquil, and the
likeliest to my mind is this: There lived a
poor man in the village of Cashel, and one
112 PADDY O’LEAREY

night there came to his house a robber and
asked could he shtay the night with him.

“*You’re welcome,’ says the poor man;
‘but I’ve nothin’ to set before you, for I’ve
nothin’ myself,’ says he, ‘and by the same
token, my children are cryin’ with hunger.’

“‘Well, the monks lived here thin, and
the robber said: ‘Show me the way to the
abbey shapefold and I’ll stale a shape for
yees.’

‘*So the poor man took a lanthorn, and he
says, ‘ There’s the shapefold; but sure, I’ll not
gowid yees; I’ll just shtep into the graveyard
and wait until yees come back.’ So in he
shtepped and sot down on the young man’s ©
grave, and finding the nuts convanient, began
to crack ’em on his tombstone.

‘Well, just at that time who should come
along but the young man’s brother, who was
curious to see whether his brother’s ghost
would really come back afther the nuts or
the gurrl. And when he saw the poor man
sitting there ’atin’ the nuts he was scared out
of his wits. So home he runs to his mother.
‘And mother,’ says he, ‘I see my brother


THE FLIGHT 113

a-sittin’ on his grave a-crackin’ the nuts on
his tombstone.’

‘** And what did he say to you ?’ says she.

‘¢ « Niver a word,’ says he.

“‘* Oh! take me to him,’ says the mother,
‘and I'll queskin him,’ says she.

‘So, as she was parylised, the son took the
mother on his back and carried her to the
burying-ground; and when the poor man saw
them coming he thought it was the robber
with the shape, so he called out: ‘ Sure, it’s a
fat one you have; bring her along and we'll
ate her betwixt us.’

‘“** Fat or lean there she is for you,’ says
the son, and he dumped his mother in a ditch
that was convanient and run for his life. And
the ould lady she was so scared too, that she
forgot all about her paralism and up and ran
too, and got home before her son, she that
had not walked for seven years.

‘‘Now, that’s one sayquil, and a sinsible
one; but there’s others that say that the son
brought his mother by night with the nuts,
and that the spirit of her son that was dead
appeared to her and wrought a miracle and
114 PADDY O’LEAREY

cured her, and after that Nora repinted her
onkindness and came frequent and walked up
and down the aisles a-convarsin’ with the
spirit of the mighty dead.

‘‘And whichever way the truth may lie,
the conclusion is the same. The poor peo-
ple of Cashel, whether they have parylised
relations at home or sweethearts that’s
givin’ to jiltin’, all the same they brings nuts
and lays them on my tombstone, for I’m the
ghost of the young man. Don’t yees be
laughin’.”

With this remarkable statement, he winked
again in the same sly way that he had done
at the pig, but Paddy did not have the least
fear of the evil eye. Instead he was very
sure that his host was a kindly disposed hu-
man being, who for some reason best known
to himself was hiding in the ruin.

‘« That’s a good story,” Paddy replied medi-
tatively. ‘It’s almost as good as the stories
my grandmother used to tell, and I misdoubt
it’s as thrue as some of them. There may be
ghosts as well as fairies, and it’s not for me to
be doubting the good people. Sure, we’re most
THE FLIGHT 115

of fairy stock ourselves, and that’s the way
we come to have a luck penny.”

“A luck penny!” exclaimed the man in
gray; “there’s only a few old families in
Ireland has that. We had one onst, but
‘twas lost, bad cess to the fairies that shtole it
from us.”

‘“‘But the fairy who gave us ours was a
Leprechawn, good-natured to us, for the good
turn my great-great-great, seventy times
great, grandmother dif him, and he didn’t
stale it from us at all, at all; but we must
have lost it oursel’.”’

‘Tell me the lagind, little one,’”’ said the
man in gray; ‘‘I like laginds, and this one
sounds familiar like.’?’ And while the man
in gray lighted his dudeen and smoked com-
placently, and Finn, who had not had such a
royal feast of acorns for many a day, curled
up by Paddy’s side and grunted contentedly
in his sleep, Paddy told the story of the
blessed luck penny.

“« Ages andages ago, before there were any
lakes in Killarney, and only a little throut
strame that came l’aping and dancing down
116. PADDY O’LEAREY

from the hills, the castle of Prince O’Dono-
hue stood on its banks in the midst of a plain,
where the Upper Lough is now.

«Now, the prince was an ould bachelor, and
he played havoc with the gurrls’ hearts in-
tirely, and not with mortial girls alone, for
the quane of the fairies was in love with him,
and he with her, and the day was set for their
marriage.

“Now, there was an ould bachelor Lepre-
chawn—that’s a fairy, too, but not the hand-
somekind. Some folks calls ’em brownies and
some bogies. They have round little stumicks
and thin arms and legs; and this one wore a
long-tailed red coat and grane knee-breeches,
and a black hat cocked over one ear, anda
big ruff of fine lace, like as I’ve seen in the
portraits at the Hall, gathered around his
wrinkled ould face. Sure, he was the gintle-
man intirely, but not inticein’ to look at.
Well, he loved the fairy quane and she would
have none of him. So, in revinge he went to
the purtiest gurrl in Killarney, and says he:
‘If you will bewitch the O’Donohue so that
he will forsake his fairy bride, I will give youa
THE FLIGHT 117

magic purse containing the silver luck penny
that St. Patrick blessed, so that as long as
that penny is kept in that purse it is never
alone, for if the last shillin’ is spint another
comes to kape company with the luck penny.’

““Now, the gurrl’s name was Ellen, and
she was not only the purtiest girl in Killar-
ney, but the purtiest in all Ireland as well,
and when the O’Donohue saw her, be-
witched he was—for no Irishman could
stand bewitchment like that—and to that ex-
tint that he forgot the fairy quane intirely
and asked her to marry him.

‘‘ But the night of the wedding, when the
dancing and che feasting were going on in the
castle, the fairy quane called all her subjects
together and they built a wall where the val-
ley narrows, just where the old Weir Bridge
is now, and they dammed up the strame, and
the waters riz and riz till they come into the
hall of the castle, and the guests flew about
all shrieking with terror. Thin the Lepre-
chawn flew in on the wings of a bat and carried
the bride away to a safe place, but the in-
chantments of the fairy quane were too much
118 PADDY O’LEAREY

for fim and he couldn’t save the O’Donohue,
who was drowned under the waters or else
changed into a merman by the fairy quane.
I’ve been over the spot where the castle is, in
a boat, and my feyther says he can make out
the battlements with the flag flying, but I
never could quite see it.

‘‘Howsomever the Leprechawn kept his
promise and gave Ellen the luck penny, and
if her beauty brought her suitors before, you
may be sure her wealth didn’t keep them
away, and so at last she married an honest
chap, my siventy-siven times great grand-
father, Barney Maloney.”

‘“«Tare an’ hounds!” exclaimed the man in
gray. ‘‘ By this and that, it’s my own name
you're afther sp’akin’, and since I can’t be
that Barney Maloney, sure, I must be one of
his own sisters comin’ afther him. I’ve
heard my mother tell that story many a time
when I was a bye in Castleisland, and what’s
more, she would have it that I lost the luck
penny the night the middleman was shot.
The saints stand bechuxt us and harm. I’ve
no remimberance of iver having had it.”
THE FLIGHT 119

‘“Then you are him that’s gone,” Paddy
said, meditatively, ‘‘and not a ghost at all,
at all.”

“Ts that what they are after calling me?”
asked Barney; ‘‘and by the same token, you
must be one of my sister O’Learey’s childer
from Killarney. And how are they all this
many year? And my mother, is she still in
Castleisland ? —tell me that.”

Paddy gave his uncle all the family news.
“‘ And since it’s my own flesh and blood ye
are, yees shall fare on somethin’ better nor
nuts,” he said, and removing a slab from
the stone pavement, he lifted a basket from
the hollow beneath—a basket filled with cold
meat and bread, and Paddy feasted as he
had not done since the beginning of the
famine.

He remained for some time with his uncle,
or rather made the Rock of Cashel the
centre of his peregrinations in Tipperary,
strolling about for days at a time with his
pig and returning at intervals to Cormac’s
Chapel, sure of a kindly welcome.

Barney, too, made excursions in the neigh-
120 PADDY O’LEAREY

bourhood of a very mysterious character.
Paddy feared that his trade was not an
honest one, for he was often absent at night;
and once when he returned late, and fancied
that Paddy was sleeping, he took from his
person a heavy belt and counted so many
bright gold pieces that Paddy pinched him-
self to make sure he was not dreaming.
‘Sure, it’s the king of the robbers he is,”
thought Paddy, and his mind was torn with
the desire to have his uncle relieve the dis-
tress of the family at Killarney, and his con-
scientious scruples as to whether it would be
right for them to accept ill-gotten gains.

One night Barney returned utterly dis-
couraged. Paddy had seen him strangely
excited before, but never with such an ut-
terly heart-broken expression as that which
he wore as he sorrowfully bade his nephew
farewell.

«I’m l’avin’ you, little one,’’ he said, ‘‘it’s
to Cork I’m goin’, for the game’s up and Tip-
perary’s no good for me.”’

‘*No more it is for me,’’ Paddy replied.
“It was to Cork I set out to go at first, and
THE FLIGHT 121

wid your consint it’s to Cork I’ll be afther
thravellin’ wid yees now; unless it’s a slight
detour ye’ll be afther makin’ and see me
mother an’ grandmother in Killarney. Bethe
powers, I can’t take Finn back there ayther,
for all the winkin’ of yer eyes’ll not save him
from Father Nooney; he’s such a powerful
exorcist he’d just take the inchantment off
wid a dash of b’ilin’ howly wather, and have
Finn sarved up for supper in the wag of a
black shape’s tail. No, I must deliver him
safe to Miss Kathleen and thin I'll go back to
Killarney wid yez.’’

«« And where is Miss Kathleen?—the saints
save her leddyship!’’ asked Barney. ‘It’s in
furrin parts. I heard she’d gone.”’

‘¢ Sorraa wan of me knows,”’ replied Paddy,
«for I lost the paper that had the address on
it; but it’s Rose Callahan that will know, and
it’s to her I’m goin’ with your permission and
that of the pig.”’

“ Rose Callahan !’’ shouted Barney ; ‘‘ sure,
yees don’t tell me she’s in Ireland. I heard
she'd left Killarney wid the family.”’

«“Thrue for you, but she wint wid thim no
122 PADDY O’LEAREY

further than Shandon, and that’s Cork, and
there she’s awaitin’, so my mother says, for
the return of him that’s gone.”’

‘‘Tare an’ hounds!’ shouted Barney; ‘‘it’s
to Cork we’ll be goin’, and we’ll not be walkin’
nayther. It’s meself will invest in a donkey
and a cart, and we’ll ride along like lards,
wid a horse and six coaches, the pig for our
futman; and blessings on yees, Paddy, ye
rascal, why didn’t ye tell me this before? ’’


CHAPTER VI.

BLARNEY CASTLE AND FATHER MATHEW.

ALTHOUGH Barney
seemed in such haste



to reach Cork, that he
went to the expense of
purchasing a donkey
and cart with which to
“make the journey, and
would not brook the
delay necessary to give
any performances with
the pig upon the way, he wasted several
hours rather than enter the city by day-
light, but turned off from the road and
reached the ruins of Blarney Castle in the
evening.

‘It’s here we'll make our risidence,” he
said to Paddy, ‘‘as foine as if we were di-
scindants of the MacCarthy More. We'll hide
the cart in the thicket yonder, and
123
124 PADDY O’LEAREY

“ ¢T know a cave where
No daylight enters,
But bats and badgers
Are forever bred,
And moss by nature
Makes it complater
Than a coach-and-six
Or a downy bed,’

‘¢ Sure, it’s there we'll introjuice the don-
key, and many a better crayther has had a
worse lodging-place.” ;

Paddy helped his uncle to unharness the
donkey and put him into the cave, the en-
trance to which was so cunningly hidden that it
was evident the locality was well known to
Barney.

‘* Did yees make up that poetry yersel’ ?”
Paddy asked in admiration.

**No, Paddy, but it’s none the worse ‘for
that. Look about yees ma bouchal, did yees
ever see a lovelier place in the moonlight ?
and its purtier still in the sunshine.

«“ «The groves of Blarney,
That look so charming
Down by the purlings
Of sweet quiet brooks,
Are decked by posies
That spontaneous grow there,
Planted in order
In the rocky nooks,’ ”
BLARNEY CASTLE 125

Paddy gazed on the beautiful and peaceful
scene with delight and then looked wonder-
ingly up at the rugged tower of the great don-
jon keep, which towered above them in gloomy
grandeur,

‘‘ Andis it there we’re to lodge the night ?”
he asked. ‘‘Sure, I think a barn would be
cheerfuller. Are yees sure there’s no robbers
or evil folk up there? It’s a mighty dismal-
looking tavern, and I’d rather make its ac-
quaintance in daylight.”

** Right ye are,” Barney replied, ‘for the
staircase is full of twistifications, and some
of the stones are missing. We'll just delay
a thorough exploration of the place till
mornin’, but in the manetime, I knows a
cozy little room, here at the foot of the
tower, that they used to shtarve prisoners in
when Cromwell, the villain, was belabouring
the fortress. Some of the shtones have fal-
len out quite convanient, and we can climb
in. Hand me the pig, but tie my necker-
cher around his nose first to silence his squ’al-
ing, or he’ll disthurb all the jackdaws that
are roostin’ in the circumjacent trees.”
126 PADDY O’LEAREY

Paddy did as he was told, and by clinging
to the great twisted stems of ivy, clambered
after his uncle. He found himself in a small
chamber, which had apparently no connec-
tion with the interior of the castle, as the
window through which they had made an
entrance seemed the only opening in the
solid stone wall, and it had evidently been
enlarged from a mere loophole in compara-
tively modern times.

‘Well, of all the quare rooms,” said
Paddy, ‘‘that I ever shtruck, this is the
quarest. And how did the McCarthys ever
get into it, at all?”

‘Sure, none of the family iver lodged
here,” Barney replied; ‘‘didn’t I tell you it
was for the prisoners?”

“But they couldn’t have boosted the
prisoners from the outside through that hole
in the wall,’ Paddy objected, ‘‘for it was
only a slit of a windy once, and here are
shtaples of an iron grating.”

“No, begob, they didn’t come in that
way, nor did they grow spontaneous; but
the floor was thick with the bones. of thim
BLARNEY CASTLE 127

whin the county perliss broke open the_
windy with pickaxes. Look aloft, will yees,

and then maybe it mayn’t be above the

measure of your understanding to guess how

they descinded.”

Paddy looked up and shuddered, for the
room had apparently no ceiling between it
and the roof of the tower, which, a hundred
feet above them, let the moonbeams through
its broken rafters. Half way up the wall,
however, he could discover a door, and the
idea occurrred to him that a staircase might
have formerly existed, communicating with
different floors of the tower which had been
burned or had otherwise disappeared.

“No,” said Barney, in reply to this sug-
gestion, ‘‘ there niver wor no floors intervan-
ing nor no shtaircase, but the prisoners were
just pushed out of that door to tumble down
and break their bones on these stones, and
this windy was left convanient that their
groans and shrieks might be heard by their
friends who were besieging the castle, and
whin the besiegers came near wid their bat-
tering-rams an’ their culverins, faith, molten
128 PADDY O’LEAREY

lead was poured on them from a swingin’
crate, the ingeniousness of which Ill ex-
plain to you in the morning. An’ those
were the gay boys intirely, the MacCarthy
Mores,”’

Paddy lay down with Finn for a pillow and
his uncle’s frieze coat for a coverlet, but his
strange surroundings and the gruesome tradi-
tions kept him for a long time awake,

When morning came they brought some
water from the brook and made a frugal
breakfast on some food which they had
brought with them, after which Barney told
Paddy to go to Shandon with his pig and
look up Rose Callahan; “for,’’ said he, «I
wouldn’t be surprisin’ the darlint so suddint
like. Get her ear alone and ask her if I may
come this avenin’. But whatam I thinkin’ of,
Come up with me and kiss the Blarney Shtone
that the darlint will not be able to resist
yees.”’

‘“What do yees mane, uncle?’’? Paddy
asked, for he had never heard the local
legend.

“Sure, there’s the poem ag’in for you,”
BLARNEY CASTLE 129

said Barney, quoting once more from Dick
Milliken’s song:

is “«¢ There is a stone
That whoever kisses,
Oh! he never misses
To grow eloquent,
Tis he may clamber
To a lady’s favour
Or become a member
Of Parliament ;
A clever spouter
He'll sure turn out, or
An out and outer,
To be let alone.
Don’t try to hinder him
Or to bewilder him,
For he’s a pilgrim
From the Blarney Stone.

Barney led Paddy to the roof of the castle
and showed him the stone set in the outer
wall below the parapet. ‘‘There’s no re-
sistin’ any one that kisses that shtone,’’ said
Barney; ‘cand I'll hold yees by the heels,
head downward, over the side of the wall till
yees does it.”

It was a fearful experience, as with starting
eyeballs Paddy hung in mid-air, and saw the
tree-tops beneath him. Barney held him
tightly, but, as it seemed to the boy, for an
130 PADDY O’LEAREY

eternity; and when he jerked him up grazed
his chin and forehead against the rough
masonry.

“‘ Have yees iver thried it yersel’?”” Paddy
asked,

‘Faith, no,”’ Barney replied, sadly; «for I
know no one in this neighborhood would give
me the kindness to swing me by the heels,
though there’s many would do that same by
my neck.”’

“Yees might go down overhand with a
good stout rope,” suggested Paddy.

Barney shook his head. ‘Give me but a
chance with Rose Callahan and I’ll not be
needing any blarney but my own, I’m
thinkin’,”” he said with a confident smile,
“You see, Paddy darlint, I’ve a charum
that was given me by an ould witch woman, a
charum of most desperate love. I’ve only to
write it with a raven’s quill in the blood of
the ring finger of my left hand, and then
fasten the charum on to Rose Callahan unbe-
knownst to her, and the colleen will not be
able to live without me. So now I’m afther
catching one of the burrds that's cawing so
BLARNEY CASTLE 131

lively in the tree yonder, and thin I’ll do my
writing. Whist, Paddy, I’ll let yees read it,
for maybe ye’ll have use for it yoursel’ one of
these days.”

The charm, written on very dirty paper,
read as follows:

‘« By the power that Christ brought from
Heaven mayst thou love me, woman! As
the sun follows its course, mayst thou follow
me. As light to the eye, as bread to the
hungry, as joy to the heart, may thy presence
be with me, O woman that I love, till death
parts us asunder.”

‘ Be off wid yees,” said Barney, as Paddy
handed him back the charm; ‘‘ but before yees
come back go to the post-office in Cork and
mail this letter. It’s to America it goes, and
ye must have it weighed and properly
shtamped. Mind yees don’t tell livin’ mor-
tial, except Rose, that I’m here, for it’s into
prison I’d be clapped, and I’m not hanker-
ing again for those quarthers. And bring
back plenty of bread and mate with yees;
here’s money if ye can gain none with the
baste, and by the same token, here’s my
132 PADDY O’LEAREY

whiskey bottle, that’s as dry as me own
throat.”

Paddy hurried down the six flights of stairs
and called Finn, who was squealing at the
foot, much to the perplexity of the jackdaws,
who were chattering with each other about
him in angry altercation, some being plainly
averse to his remaining longer in the vicinity,
The docile creature trotted along by Paddy’s
side as he took a short cut across the fields in
the direction of Shandon, guided by the chimes
of the famous Shandon bells. In after years
Paddy learned to love Father Mahoney’s
‘Bells of Shandon:”

With deep affection and recollection
I often think of those Shandon bells,
Whose sound so wild would, in days of childhood,
Fling round my cradle their magic spells.
On this I ponder, where’er I wander,
And thus grow fonder, sweet Cork, of thee,
With thy bells of Shandon,
That sound so grand on
The pleasant waters of the river Lec.

Even now the melody of the chimes had a
strange power over him, for it was the first
time that he had heard cathedral bells.

The breath of spring was in the air and

ae

Satine
pute
eee


BLARNEY CASTLE 135

energy in the rushing river, and he tramped
on sturdily with a hopeful feeling at his heart
which was quickened at Shandon, for he
found sweet Rose Callahan, who was over-
joyed when told that her old lover was near.
Paddy had not the heart to tell her his sus-
picions of why his uncle was in hiding, but
Rose apparently understood it better than he,
for she said: ‘‘ Tell him to come to-night.
There’s no one in the house but my old mother
and me. We'll keep him safe from thim
that’s watching for him.”

Even as she spoke a policeman turned the
corner, and she retreated precipitately into
her house, shutting Paddy out. The man
eyed Paddy suspiciously, and the boy turned
into the nearest public-house and asked per-
mission to exhibit his pig, but there were only
a few idlers standing about, and the landlord
was surly. ‘‘Get along wid yees,” he said,
‘‘ What with the famine and the temperance
I’ve no custom, bad luck to Feyther Mathew
and his medal.”

The policeman was waiting at the door
when Paddy came out, and the boy asked the
1386 PADDY O’LEAREY

nearest way to the Cork post-office, at the
same time feeling in his pocket for a bit of
twine with which to lead Finn, now that the
streets were becoming more crowded. As
he did so the letter which his uncle had given
him fell out and the policeman picked it up.
Paddy snatched it from him, but not before
the man of law had read the address and
asked in a startled way:

‘* Be the Powers, who gave you that letter?”
Paddy was too cute to answer his question,
and, evading his outstretched hand, dashed
around a corner without waiting to fasten
Finn, who followed him atfull gallop. When
safely out of sight of the policeman he found
the post-office and mailed the letter. But he
had no further success that day. He had
never seen such wretchedness in all his life as
was visible in Cork. The distress had been
sore in the country and in the villages through
which he had passed, but here was a city of
starving people. Men sitting in their door-
ways with apathetic, despairing faces, or
wandering up and down the streets crazed
by hunger. Emaciated children wailed and
BLARNEY CASTLE 137

begged, and wild, perishing women besought
a little crust for the love of God. Suddenly
a famishing dog spied Finn and rushed upon
him; Paddy fought him off and the pig ran
madly down the street. A rabble of half-
starving men and boys started from the dif-
ferent doorways in pursuit, Paddy among
them, though he saw that he could avail noth-
ing against such amob. Fortunately the pig
kept on until it gained the suburbs of the
town, and the men, weakened by fasting,
gave up the chase; but Paddy did not dare to
return with his pet to the shops, and he kept
on to Blarney Castle without the supplies
which he had been told to secure.

Barney was so delighted with the message
from Rose Callahan that he attached little
weight to Paddy’s other experiences, and
fastening the pig in the donjon keep he sent
the boy out again later in the day to make
another attempt at marketing.

As Paddy’s bad luck would have it, he had
scarcely entered Cork when he met the same
policeman whom he had encountered in the
morning at Shandon. Hastily taking to his
138 PADDY O'LEARY

heels, he ran into some of the very boys who
had chased Finn in the forenoon, Instantly
the cry was raised, ‘* The pig!” for he was
recognised as its owner, and a crowd larger
than the first started in pursuit.

Paddy was now at a disadvantage, for in
the forenoon he had had the open before him
and now he was hemmed in by the blind alleys
and crooked streets of Cork, with which he was
totally unfamiliar. The hue and cry started
up new pursuers in front of him, who joined
hands to head him off. Women threw mis-
siles from windows and doorways, and as he
had had no luncheon, he was not so fresh as
in the morning. A broken bit of crockery,
thrown by a boy, cut his forehead, anda power-
ful hag rushed from a doorway flourishing a
stocking containing a heavy stone, Paddy
dodged her, doubled, and, blinded by the blood
which trickled from his eyebrow, dashed reck-
lessly toward the first unguarded opening, not
noticing that it was a sheer declivity of some
twenty feet. Over this he fell, his right leg
doubling under him. He leaped up instantly,
but sank back ina faint, for his leg was broken,
BLARNEY CASTLE 139

Paddy did not know what followed. The
policeman came to him by a circuitous way
and stood scratching his head in perplexity.
Now that his prey was in his power he did
not know what to do with him. There was
no provision in the city jail for broken legs.
He searched the boy’s pockets, but the letter
which he wished to secure was already on its
way to America. The boy was not now ina
state to answer questions, and the captor was
completely nonplussed by his own success.

While the mob was gazing stupidly a
priest came forward, to whom the crowd
opened respectfully. The priest knelt by
Paddy’s side and at once saw the nature of his
injuries. ‘‘ Help me to carry the lad into the
friary,” he said to the policeman, who at
once obeyed, and Paddy was laid on a clean
white bed in the cell of Father Theobald
Mathew, the great temperance reformer of
Ireland.

For days he was delirious, but Father Ma-
thew cared for him faithfully and tenderly,
gaining bits of the boy’s history from his in-
coherent ravings.
140 PADDY O’LEAREY

After Paddy came to himself, it was still
several weeks before he could walk. Father
Mathew came and went, and was always
most kind and attentive, but Paddy was con-
sumed with a wild desire to get to his uncle
and his pig, and his impatience really hindered
his recovery. Father Mathew knew of this
desire from his delirious wailing, but even in
the height of his delirium he had preserved
the secret of his uncle’s name and where-
abouts, ©

“Tf you will tell me where you live, my
dear boy,” Father Mathew would say again
and again, ‘‘I will send a message to your
friends, and they will doubtless come to you.”

But Paddy closed his lips firmly, the hun-
ger in his eyes alone telling what he suffered.
He would not even send for Rose Callahan,
for fear of bringing trouble upon her, or that
the authorities might through her be able to
track his hunted uncle. Hisexperience with
Father Nooney led him to distrust the priest-
hood, and though Father Mathew’s face wasso
kind that he was often almost won, he would
not yield to the impulse to confide in him.
BLARNEY CASTLE 141

When his delirium was at its height, Paddy
had a strange dream, which he remembered
distinctly afterward. It was that his Uncle
Barney was dead, that he saw him wrapped in
his shroud and lying upon his bier, with can-
dles at his head and feet. But while he knelt
in despair at his side the family good genius,
the friendly Leprechawn, appeared and laid
the lost luck penny upon his breast, and his
uncle sprang to his feet alive and well.
‘‘ There you are,” said the Leprechawn, ‘‘for
the love of a sweet Irish girl, a new man.”
And with these words ringing in his ears the
dream vanished. Father Mathew was talking
earnestly near the door with a poor besotted
wretch whom his weeping wife was beseech-
ing to take the pledge. Paddy could see
that the man was only half convinced, but
Father Mathew seemed to possess a magic
compelling power, for when he held out the
pen toward him saying, ‘‘You will sign
here,” the man obeyed mechanically and
went away in a dazed condition, while his wife
called down the blessings of Heaven on the
priest.
142 PADDY O’LEAREY

It was a very ordinary occurrence, and
Paddy saw it enacted over and over again.
Sometimes a man would be dragged in by
his friends, resisting with all his might and
swearing great oaths that nothing could com-
pel him to take the pledge. Father Mathew
would speak to him but a few moments in a
calm but authoritative manner, and the man
would fall upon his knees, all the revolt and
ugliness gone out of him, and completely
melted to repentance and submission. There
seemed to be something almost miraculous
in this man’s influence. He travelled from
one end to the other of Ireland, administer-
ing the pledge to thousands of persons and
effecting so great a reform, that while in
1839, the first year of his crusade, the number
of persons committed for crimes was twelve
thousand, in 1845 it was only seven thousand.
He could not care for Paddy so long with-
out speaking to him of the subject which
was nearest his heart.

‘*T found a whiskey bottle in your pocket,
my lad,” he said to him one day. ‘‘I do not
think it is your own, for you haven’t Satan’s
BLARNEY CASTLE 143

mark on your face; but if it belongs to your
father, I want you to bring him to me, I
have a message for him. He cannot be a
true Irishman and love Ireland if he drinks
now in the midst of this famine and suffer-
ing. Why, Paddy, if all the grain that is
converted into this poison were devoted to
its natural use, it would afford a meal a
day to every man, woman, and child in the
land. The manor woman who drinks, drinks
the food of the starving. Your father
cannot be such a monster as to wish to do
that.”

“The bottle isn’t me feyther’s,” Paddy re-
plied. ‘He drinks, though, but he never
drank till he lost his luck. I wish yees
could spake to him, for it’s breakin’ my poor
mother’s heart heis; but they are far away in
Killarney.”

‘You must take the message to him your-
self, my boy. When you are strong enough
to travel I will send him a letter by you, and
you must go back and help him.”

Paddy was silent; he was not yet ready to
tell Father Mathew his entire history, and
144 PADDY O’LEAREY

the good priest, seeing that he had not quite
won the boy’s heart, wisely desisted.

One day he brought Paddy a crutch and
helped him to limp about the friary court.
‘‘ My broken-winged sparrow is almost ready
to fly,” he said kindly. ‘‘If not back to
Killarney, where do you want to go? Cork
is no place for you. Have you possibly an
uncle in America?”

At this chance question Paddy took instant
alarm and determined to run away that very
night from Father Mathew.


CHAPTER VII.
THE FINDING OF THE LUCK PENNY.

M@&, N the evening that Paddy
A met with his accident,
f, Barney found his way to



Rose Callahan’s and met
withso warm a welcome
that it was nearly morn-
: ing before he found his
way back to Blarney
Castle.

| He was surprised to
see that Paddy was not waiting for him, and
his perplexity grew as several days passed by
and the boy did not return. Had the pig
also been missing, Barney would have con-
cluded that Paddy had found an opportunity
to cross the Channel; but Barney knew that
his nephew would not willingly go far with-
out his darling Finn. For reasons of his
own he could not prosecute an open search
for Paddy, and he waited from day to day,
hoping that he would return and explain the

145
146 PADDY O’LEAREY

mystery. He was quite willing to wait, for
besides the proximity of Rose Callahan, which
would have rendered any region delightful,
it was quite necessary for Barney to receive
an answer to the letter which he had de-
spatched to America before he could deter-
mine his future movements.

Barney was not a robber, as Paddy had sus-
pected, but the agent of a society of young
Irishmen in America, who had entrusted him
with funds to aid O’Connell in his political
agitations. In his youth Barney had attended
the monster meetings addressed by this great
orator, and the memory of the eloquence of
the ‘‘ Liberator ” had quickened his pulse and
nerved his arm to labour while in exile in
America.

He had gathered about him there spirits
like his own, who had followed from afar
O’Connell’s battle for Catholic emancipation
and for the repeal of the Union. They had
flamed into revolt on his trial for “seditious
conspiracy,” and had laid aside their earnings
to aid him on his release from prison,

Barney was their agent, but on his return
THE LUCK PENNY 147

to Ireland he found the political situation
strangely changed. O’Connell’s health and
spirit had been broken by his imprisonment.
The Whigs had regained their power, and he
consented to support their measures. The
malcontents of Ireland reproached him bit-
terly with having betrayed them. There
were secret societies and incendiary meet-
ings in Tipperary, and this explained Barney’s
lurking at the Rock of Cashel. But Ireland
was no longer united. The magician who
had held their hearts and wills in his hand
had lost his power. Barney heard him speak
once, and wept at the change. Lord Lytton
declared of O’Connell that he first learned
from him

“ What spells of infinite choice
To rouse or lull has the sweet human voice.”

Barney had seen him rouse to wildest en-
thusiasm a vast open-air concourse—throwing
his wonderful voice in its softest cadences
across the hush to the remotest limit of the
vast assemblage. Now they would not listen
to him, but jeered and hissed when he rose,
and, attempting to address them, broke down
148 PADDY O’LEAREY

utterly. Barney sought him after the meet-
ing and offered him the money sent by his
American friends. But O’Connell refused to
accept it. |

‘“‘T see no way of using it for the good of
Ireland,’ he said. ‘‘ My heart is broken, and
I am going to Rome to die. Stay, there is
one man with whom you can trust it. Give
it to Father Mathew; he will expend it in
relief for the starving.”

Barney came back to his hiding-place ut-
terly disheartened. O’Connell had written a
line for his friends in America, advising them
to authorise Barney to give the funds to
Father Mathew, and this letter Barney had
enclosed in one of his own and was now
awaiting its answer.

He dared not show himself in public, for he
had been imprisoned as a suspect on his first
arrival in Cork, and since Paddy’s disappear-
ance he depended on Rose Callahan to pur-
chase the supplies necessary for himself, the
donkey, and the pig. Rose, too, kept watch
of the mails, and one day received the ex-
pected letter from America,
THE LUCK PENNY _ 149

But the police had been equally watchful,
and on the night when Rose gave Barney the
letter two policemen knocked at the home of
the Callahans,

The ‘‘ Widdy Callahan” and her daughter
had always borne a good name in Shandon,
and the policemen were not sure of the truth
of their information. They therefore acted
with great caution and politeness.

‘‘A strange man was seen to enter this
house two avenin’s ago,”’ said Policeman Hur-
ley, ‘‘ and he was not seen to depart. Can you
explain me that?”

The Widdy Callahan could have answered
with perfect truth that he had gone away
the same night, but the consciousness of guilt
induces the person charged with it to take
refuge in a lie rather than in the truth, and
the Widdy Callahan replied recklessly : ‘‘ Sure,
that was my third cousin, Donal’ McGilli-
cuddy, and how could he go out again when
he was that sick he died this morning?”’

‘*Died!” exclaimed Policeman Hurley.
‘Then let us have a look. at the corpse, and
we'll be after l’avin’ you.”
150 PADDY O’LEAREY

“‘T dunno that he’s ready for the wake,”
replied the widow, elevating her voice so
that it could be heard by the occupants of
the next room. ‘‘Rose and I were laying
him out as ye knocked at the door.”

Rose and Barney had heard the conversa-
tion. The room in which they were had
only one window opening directly upon the
street. People were passing, and seeing that
there was no escape in this direction, they
took the hint suggested by Mrs. Callahan,
and Barney stretched himself on a couch and
Rose covered him with a sheet. She was
hastily placing lighted candles on a stool at
his feet when Policeman Hurley opened the
door. ze

‘‘Ow! Misther Hurley!” the ready-witted
Rose exclaimed, ‘‘don’t be afther crossin’
the doorsill and spoilin’ the pretty face of
yees wid him dyin’ of the small-pox!”

The policeman started back involuntarily.
He had his suspicions, but the alternative
was too terrible, and he rejoined his com-
panion in the next room. ‘‘ Have yees had
the praste?” he asked of Mrs. Callahan.
THE LUCK PENNY 151

‘“‘Saints presarve us, no. Won't yees be
getting one for us, Misther Hurley?”

‘¢'That I will,” he replied, glad of an ex-
cuse to leave the house. As the two men
left the door, they stumbled against Paddy,
who was carrying out his resolution to run
away from Father Mathew. Hurley collared
the boy, and then held a brief conference
with the other policeman. ‘‘It won’t do to
go away at wanst, I’m thinkin’; we’d bet-
ter watch the house a bit, for maybe it’s play-
ing it on us they are.”

‘All the same, it’ll do no harum to send
for the praste,” said the other.

‘Tf he’s a big felly, he may be too strong
for one of us, and we’d better both stay here.
Here, boy, go and get a praste; tell him
there’s a man dead or dyin’, and he’s wanted
immejiate.”

‘CA man dead!” Who could it be but his
Uncle Barney, and Paddy limped away as fast
as his crutch could carry him. He wakened
Father Mathew, and the good priest willingly
accompanied him. Grief had affected what
nothing else could do, and had opened
152 PADDY O’LEAREY

Paddy’s heart, and on the way he told Father
Mathew everything —that the police were
shadowing his uncle, for what reason he knew
not, and that if he were not actually dead, a
worse fate perhaps awaited him.

The policemen stepped aside from the door
as Father Mathew approached, but Hurley,
touching his hat respectfully, communicated
his doubts.

‘‘T’m fearful,” he said, ‘‘ that the dead man
isn’t dead at all, at all; but is one of O’Con-
nell’s agints.”

‘In that case why did you not arrest him?”
Father Mathew asked.

‘¢Well, your riverence, I was fearful again
that he might be dead, and the saints would
shtand betwuxt your riverence and harum;
but they have more important business on
hand than to be botherin’ about protectin’
the likes. of us from small-pox.”

‘*T see,” Father Mathew replied, with a
slight touch of scorn in his tone. ‘‘Ifit’sa
case of too-exuberant patriotism, the case be-
longs to you; if of death from a malignant
disease, tome. Let mein, Mrs. Callahan, and
THE LUCK PENNY 153

you, Paddy, remain in this outer room. I
will return in a few moments.”

Much against Mrs. Callahan’s will Father
Mathew pushed his way into the inner room.
Paddy could hear his low, serious voice for
what seemed to him a long time, but he
finally returned and said to Hurley: ‘‘ The
case belongs to me. Send Undertaker
O’Malley here.”

The policemen touched their hats and went
away, and Paddy burst into a loud wail.

Father Mathew laid his hand on the boy’s
shoulder. ‘‘Idid not say that your uncle
was dead,” he said reassuringly. ‘‘ The liv-
ing sometimes belong to me, and your uncle
is going to Killarney immediately on my
errands.”

He opened the door as he spoke and
Paddy rushed into the arms of his uncle.
Father Mathew continued to cbnverse with
Barney.

“T know O’Connell well,” he said. ‘A
truer soul never breathed, and though he
and his followers have made mistakes, they
have actedin the main with praiseworthy
154 PADDY O’LEAREY

moderation. I have helped him there, for if
it were not for the temperate habits of the
greater part of Ireland, our unhappy country
would be one wild scene of tumult and blood-
shed.” Father Mathew spoke the truth, for
during his career upward of five millions out
of a population of eight millions had signed

”

the pledge. ‘‘ This money,” he went on,
‘‘has been contributed by Killarney men and
it must be expended for Killarney. Carry
out my instructions exactly as I have given
them, and deliver the letters which I shall
write. But before you go, that I may be
assured of your trustworthiness, and for your
own eternal fortune, take this pledge and
wear this badge.”

As he spoke he fastened to Barney’s breast
asmall medal. It seemed to Paddy that his
dream was realised, and that Father Mathew
was the Leprechawn, and he exclaimed ex-
citedly, ‘‘ The luck penny! Uncle Barney,
you've got the luck penny back again.”

Father Mathew smiled significantly. ‘It
is indeed a luck penny, my boy, and you shall
have one, too, and shall carry one from me to
THE LUCK PENNY 155

your father. Now say the pledge after me.”
Paddy obeyed, ending with the words with
which Father Mathew had begun his remark-
able career: ‘‘ Here goes, with the help of
God.”

‘“‘Plaze your riverence,” asked Barney,
‘““how am I to get through this town, now
that mornin’ has come, with the perliss
a-watchin’?”

““And plaze your riverence,” asked the
Widdy Callahan, ‘‘here’s Mr, O'Malley with
his cart and a coffin, and he wants to know
where’s the corp.”

‘“ The one question answers the other,” re-
plied Father Mathew, and stepping to the
door he asked the undertaker to bring the
rude coffin into the outer room and leave his
cart before the door, and he would himself
attend to the rest. Mr. O’Malley was very
willing to surrender all duties to Father
Mathew, as Policeman Hurley had told him
that it was a case of small-pox.

A short time after the undertaker had
left, Father Mathew and Barney carried the
empty coffin out again and replaced it in the
156 PADDY O’LEAREY

cart, and Paddy mounting beside them, they
drove away in the full light of morning, in
the sight of the population of Shandon and of
Hurley’s brother policeman, who supposed
that Barney, who was driving by the side of
Father Mathew, was the undertaker’s assist-
ant.

They drove directly to Blarney Castle,
where Barney harnessed his donkey, and tak-
ing an affectionate and grateful farewell of
Father Mathew, set out for Killarney.

Paddy and Finn went with him, for Rose
Callahan had communicated the delightful
news that Miss Kathleen and her family had
passed through Cork two days before on their
return to the old Hall. She would have gone
with them but for Barney, but she would
now follow them as soon as possible. Father
Mathew deposited the coffin in the cave and
returned the cart to the undertaker, Barney
insisting on paying Mr. O’ Malley’s charge for
the funeral expenses.

‘Sure, Blarney will be all the dearer to
me now that I’m buried there,” he said.

It seemed indeed that one Barney had been
THE LUCK PENNY 157

buried and a new man had sprung into being
in his place. The enthusiasm which he had
poured out on political schemes was crystal-
ised by Father Mathew into work as patriotic
and more practical for the immediate relief
of the sufferers from the famine. Paddy had
no notion of the extent of the power for
good which was in his uncle’s hands, but he
was relieved to know that he was not a
robber, and he had a superstitious feeling
that now the luck penny was found all would
be right.

Paddy’s heart had been torn for a long
time by conflicting longings to return to his
mother and to deliver up the pig to Miss
Kathleen, and now that he approached Kil-
larney, and both desires centred in the same
spot, his impatience knew no bounds. As
they came in sight of the beautiful lakes
the donkey seemed absolutely to crawl,
and leaping from the cart Paddy announced
his intention of running on in advance with
Finn.

‘‘Right you are,” said Barney, ‘‘for I
must stop in the village on the business of
158 PADDY O’LEAREY

his riverence, but tell my mother and sister
Pll be with them the night.”

Paddy ran until he was out of breath, and
Finn actually seemed to recognise the locality,
for he galloped on ahead, and when they
reached the cabin, dashed into the barrel
which had served him as a sty and stood
empty in the rear of the house.

Never, not even when he looked longingly
back upon it after his mother’s farewell bless-
ing, had the region looked so beautiful to
Paddy. It wasthe early spring. The ever-
greens gave rich, dark touches here and there,
the glossy holly and the beautiful arbutus
were in full leaf, while every crumbling ruin
was draped with ivy. The wayside was yel-
low with gorse, the rhododendrons in Des-
mond park were in bloom, and more tender
trees and shrubs, loiterers in the spring pro-
cession, were uncurling tiny leaves, or with
their terminal buds giving a soft, purplish
blur to the outline of twigs and branches. A
wave of tender green was stealing over the
landscape, encroaching on the purple reaches
of the bare fields and on the browns and rus-
THE LUCK PENNY 159

sets of last year’s grasses. Veils of delicate
mist were rising from the lakes and drifting
away over the mountains. It was the season
of mystery and hope, and Paddy’s heart
swelled with happiness. And yet the loneli-
ness of the scene struck him with a certain
vague foreboding. The season was quite far
advanced, and yet none of the fields belong-
ing to the small holders were ploughed, and
no one was putting in potatoes. No one was
cutting peat or passing along the road toa
farm town. Away over there in the church-
yard was the only faint evidence of life vis-
ible in all the landscape, and that was con-
nected with death: a little group stood
around an open grave, and a priest, presum-
ably Father Nooney, was officiating. But
in the olden days, whenever there was a
funeral, even of the poorest in the parish,
the neighbours turned out with ready sym-
pathy at the wake and funeral, whereas
Paddy could only count five figures about
this grave.

As he passed the O’Flannagan cottage he
thought he had never seen a more desolate
160 PADDY O’LEAREY

dwelling. ‘‘Surely,” he thought, ‘ the fam-
ily must have been evicted,” for the thatch
was off the roof and the door hanging by
one hinge. But there at the well stood his
old friend Rory, his companion in grief in
Father Nooney’s catechism class, though so
changed that he hardly knew him. Rory had
been short and fat and jolly; he was now
tall and emaciated, with a heart-break of des-
olation in his eyes.

‘““Why, what’s come to you, Rory?” Paddy
cried, as he seized his old comrade’s hand.

‘““What’s come to all Killarney,” the boy
teplied—‘ the famine and the fever.” ;

“It’s sick you are,” Paddy cried. ‘* Why
don’t you go into the house and let your
mother nurse you ?”

“« She’s dead.”

‘Your sister, then, or your feyther ?”

‘‘She’s dead, and he’s dead—they’re all
dead, rest their souls. There isn’t ahouse in
Killarney that’s escaped, Paddy.”

‘“Not a house in Killarney, blessed Var-
gin! Does ye mane there’s any one dead at
my house?”
Wea

2 CORR NA
a! 2 2 >
a al 2g ;



THE LUCK PENNY 163

Rory nodded silently. The beautiful land-
scape seemed to whirl down, and Paddy sat
down.

‘“Yees be afther m’aning me grandmither,”
he said after amoment. ‘‘She’s ould enough
to die, puir body.”

‘*No,” Rory replied, ‘‘she’d got used to
livin’ without food, she said, and she’s alive
yet and does the wurruk of the house. It
was the littlest ones that went first afther
there was no more milk, for the cow was
found and tuk for the rint.” :

Paddy burst into tears. ‘‘ The littlest ones!
Thin, is Ellen gone, the darlint, and Donal’,
who used to go fishin’ with me?”

**Gone, ivery one of ’em.”

‘What! not my oldest sister Mary, not
Mary, now?”

‘‘Ivery oneof ’em. Mary held out the long-
est, but she towld me one day when I tuk her
a carrot, ‘I’ve got to die, Rory,’ says she,
‘formy mither won’t ate as long as I’m livin’,
She pushes the food onto my plate, and some-
times the hunger overpowers me that bad
that I ate it; but maybe she'll ate when I’m
164 PADDY O’LEAREY

gone.’ And so she did. But little good it
did your mother, for she ——” ‘

“Rory!” Paddy shrieked with a mighty
ery, ‘‘ don’t be afther telling me my mother’s
dead—don’t be telling me that, for I couldna
bear it.”

‘“‘ Find it out for yersel’, then,” said Rory,
pointing to the group in the graveyard,

The boy started to run, but the shock
was too great, and he fainted at the first
bound. Rory dashed some water in his face
and said as he recovered: ‘I don’t know
that she is dead for certain. I only know that
she’s been sick two weeks with the fever,
and they mostly dies, but maybe she isn’t
dead yit.”

“Thank yees for that, Rory,” Paddy re-
plied feebly, and he hurried toward his home,
repeating “‘ Maybe she isn’t dead yit.”

And his mother was not dead. She had
lain all night in a muttering delirium, talking
of her oldest boy and repeating the mighty
blessing with which she had blessed him
when he left her. ‘‘ Christ’s saints stand be-
twixt him and harum—St. Patrick and all the


THE LUCK PENNY 165

rest of them, and God over all with His
sthrong right arm.”

Mother Maloney sat in the chimney and
listened to the chirping of the crickets and
muttered in response, ‘‘ There’s the thor-
daal back. I haven’t heard them chirp since
the cow was took. Well they know, the
craythers, whether there’s food in the
cabin for them. And what have they
come for now, I wonder. Sure all the
trenches are bare; there’s not a crumb of
bread or a grain of male to set before thim.
Sure, they’re hundreds of years old, and
they betrayed our Lord when he was hidin’
from the Jews, sayin’: ‘He’s here, he’s
here,’ and for that rayson they run from
all Christians; but it’s not I would offend
them or refuse thim the bit sup if I had it.
Tell me, ye craythers, why ye’vecome to an
empty house.”

The crickets were silent, but the sick
woman made answer: ‘‘He’s coming—
Paddy’s coming, and he’s got the luck
penny. He loved his pig, but he loves
his mother better, and he’ll kill Finn for
166 PADDY O’LEAREY

her sake, and there’ll be roast pork for us
all.”

‘‘They hear that, the craythers,” said
Mother Maloney, crossing herself—‘‘ roast
pork for us all. Begob, it isn’t likely but the
thordaal spoke up at that word as they did to
the Jews. He’s here, he’s here!”

As she spoke a shrill cry was heard out-
side the house, and Mother Maloney crossed
herself again and cried: ‘It’s the banshee!
The Maloneys have their banshee, that always
come to foretell the death of any of the
family.”

“It is not,” cried Dennis O’Learey, spring-
ing up from his wife’s bedside—“‘ it’s Paddy’s
pig, Finn ma Cool, squ’aling for his supper,
and by the same token, she’s right, and Paddy
himsel’ not far distant.”

He went to the door and saw Paddy com-
ing across the fields. ‘‘ Mavourneen, acushla
ma chree, you are right,” he cried to his
wife. ‘*Paddy’s comin’ home. Sure, it’s
not so impolite as to be dying you are, with
your boy coming down the road as fast as his
legs can carry him.”
THE LUCK PENNY 167

She opened her eyes, and they rested on
Paddy with a smile of ineffable tenderness
and then closed again.

‘* Love’s brought her back from the grave,”
said Mother Maloney, ‘‘ but it’s only food’ll
kape her here. It’s just this minute she was
longing for a bit of roast pork.”

SOV kill Finny Paddy. .cried.- “' lve
no right to, but Miss Kathleen will forgive
me.”

As he left the cabin with his father they
met Miss Kathleen, followed by a maid bear-
ing a basket.

‘‘Miss Kathleen, Miss Kathleen,” cried
the boy; ‘‘you’ve come in time to kape me
from committing a sin. I was going to kill
Finn, your pig, Miss Kathleen, for my
mother’s starving; but here’s the crayther,
and he’s yours, and I’ve sought you all over
Ireland, and praise be to the saints, I’ve got
him to you safe at last; but oh! come and
help my mother!”

“That I will, Paddy, for I heard she was
suffering, though I did not know you were
here, and I’ve food better suited to her con-
168 PADDY O’LEAREY

dition than pork would be; but you shall not
be denied that either, for I will send you down
one of my father’s best Suffolks in exchange
for Finn. You may drive him up to the Hall
if you like, simply to keep him safe, for I fear
you would not be allowed to possess him long
here.”

Slowly, in the days that followed, Mrs.
O’Leary drifted back to health and strength,
and little by little the dire distress about
them was relieved, at first by the distribution
of the American funds brought by Barney Ma-
loney, and later by the first good potato crop
in three years.

Squire Desmond, too, had met with good
fortune during his absence from Ireland,
and had come back with plans and means
for the establishment of a manufactory of
tweeds, which would give employment to
a large number of the inhabitants of the
region.

Finn ma Cool lived to a green old age,
growing more and more intelligent and
dying at last, as Paddy declared, ‘‘ from an
excess of eddication.”
THE LUCK PENNY 169

On the occasion of Miss Kathleen’s birth-
day, when Paddy was requested to show
Finn’s accomplishments at the Hall, he dis-
covered while the entertainment was in prog-
ress, and when it was too late to supply the
deficiency, that he had no dainties to place be-
hind the swinging discs. He had already
asked the pig to spell his name when this
occurred to him, and he expected certain
failure.

What was his surprise when Finn indicated
the proper letters, showing that he not
only understood the question, but had ac-
tually learned to spell. Paddy could hardly
believe the evidence of his own senses until
he had put his pet through all his usual
questions, and found that he spelled every
word correctly without the help of any trick
or suggestion from him.

As he grew older Finn became not only
wiser but better, entirely dropping his old
vice of poaching, though this was possibly
occasioned by an excess of fat and laziness.

One day Miss Kathleen showed Paddy the
humorous sketch which she had made of
170 PADDY O’LEAREY

Finn on the day that she left Ireland, and to
which she now added a companion piece.

YOUTH.
“ This is the pig who, nose in air
And small tail crisply curled,

While all the future seemed most fair,
Set out to see the world.”

EXPERIENCE,

“ This is the pig, the self-same pig,
Potential pork and ham,
Who, disappointed, tells his friends
He’s found the world a sham.” *

Notwithstanding the bettered condition of
the country, Barney, who had had a taste of
the New World, could not be induced to re-
main permanently in Ireland, but after his
marriage with Rose Callahan, a wedding
which will be famous in Killarney for many

a day, took his bride and his mother-in-law
* Verses by Mrs, Poultney Bigelow.
THE LUCK PENNY 171

back to America. He wrote regularly to his
mother, sending her considerable sums of
money, and she had the satisfaction before
her death to hear that he had become an alder-
man in the city of New York. He frequently
invited Paddy to come over and ‘‘ make his
fortin,’ but the boy could not be induced
again to leave his mother. Paddy rose to be
foreman of the new factory and a most in-
fluential man in his native place. Dennis
O’Learey reformed his drinking habits. The
temperance medal proved indeed a luck
penny for the entire household, and to Kil-
larney as well. It seemed as if the mantle of
Father Mathew had fallen upon Paddy, for
he busied himself earnestly in winning all
his associates to the temperance cause, for
he had learned that

« Man may work with the great God—yea ours
This privilege, all others how beyond—
Effectually the planet to subdue,

And break old savagehood in claw and tusk, -
To draw our fellows up as with a cord

Of love unto their high appointed place,

Till from our state, barbaric and abhorred,
We do arrive unto a royal race,

To be the blest companions of the Lord.”

[THE END. ]








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'3454' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQXZ' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
cbbb2fd8e3e6fc32ef574098667482a1
59d71c5c345465efef17471563e0721e3aa9d4e6
'2011-11-14T17:23:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYA' 'sip-files00011.tif'
cfe602668bf34f5e18728622e4c3a087
689f70e9135af3fc910c712d1503ab37d4ec5674
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYB' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
2d1dac89c387a367ae09f51df0fd95c0
09a44f8963418da29fe4859e6ff0b36a2f0f28c5
'2011-11-14T17:25:55-05:00'
describe
'319896' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYC' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
fc2b93d7c8244d2c8e6168c26b54ce42
f1cd83ea73ccf8087a1d364b963af142a59d0e2a
'2011-11-14T17:25:15-05:00'
describe
'32734' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYD' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
db1df08f56f2c2764c45ce4d02cae9ab
abceeaa63f0945439c1652285829c57fcc030c48
'2011-11-14T17:27:06-05:00'
describe
'8848' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYE' 'sip-files00012.pro'
df5b0c004b28174a741d156ae23f040c
7aa89b3af046a90435e28dd764d9959126764e6f
describe
'10801' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYF' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
6ed3625c49e6f44cf412dda9ec00b789
beeb1cf1add773585e67dd011bace4dda9eebe28
'2011-11-14T17:27:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYG' 'sip-files00012.tif'
7a9c777c3a5cb1919c8bb67120b919e3
15e85ddcf87772405f6fcfe3a9c4458f8dc3ac5b
'2011-11-14T17:23:40-05:00'
describe
'455' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYH' 'sip-files00012.txt'
7e2a20d20568b9cc6ccc34c7eb84b8a9
f766c8091a52b2419af590ff31a58d19c9698bd4
'2011-11-14T17:23:56-05:00'
describe
'3581' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYI' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
1a8b853608f4f10b9ca15c6a93bf8a19
0ff0575a0c52c1cba8d30b63e7bc56f212169dfc
'2011-11-14T17:25:00-05:00'
describe
'320015' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYJ' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
3eff5188991831234de4b4eb60395b9e
3eb7671237fac8bb4a7e6bd1466fc63d5be50ef4
'2011-11-14T17:22:09-05:00'
describe
'13942' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYK' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
8a8297bf2e204e53d35957dd0e53e675
b1425b91a64fe984dff204f5443ce86df49bc537
'2011-11-14T17:22:12-05:00'
describe
'3335' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYL' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
8b51c14981ac2bd52538ecb884e62cb5
8730e1fd037f2d80bd599185817f6e5d2ae4ad9b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYM' 'sip-files00013.tif'
462621d07d2fd019d8d3f62d7e7c8434
aaec087cd2eb820e26ddb3bf4897920fa8284e7b
'2011-11-14T17:23:53-05:00'
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYN' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
150954d76b4f78d7b15706883f18085a
44fa2e3b5e7c985d621e54164333b05d88e324d6
'2011-11-14T17:25:02-05:00'
describe
'320003' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYO' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
148cc7907996a51733fdd50712878ddf
1cb71e816876523d53cf1168d1b16dfe310afff2
'2011-11-14T17:28:01-05:00'
describe
'89722' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYP' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
59d15ac2d40554bb2e27918b520ea357
706a4af58a7179283a12b1247ac7440c1d9b8618
describe
'19186' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYQ' 'sip-files00014.pro'
6d7d7372c80da7169b2eed8043349c79
71d0e9238574c0dfd427bfcd70e92016bd67e73d
'2011-11-14T17:25:26-05:00'
describe
'27888' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYR' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
65f070c1a0f7d142dd426485f7fdd31d
48b392c9c521257362e21f7c8091cc2309383c9b
'2011-11-14T17:23:55-05:00'
describe
'2580584' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYS' 'sip-files00014.tif'
a60e7ba3957a37f4ce338615ef146f29
57bf6cad049a1a0b5c7610097310d2bbad1793e5
'2011-11-14T17:24:31-05:00'
describe
'952' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYT' 'sip-files00014.txt'
dd358c07006cffecc42431c79ed33a7f
3f01a73ce1941d254b26bd3a1b30da3b6d3ead8e
'2011-11-14T17:24:46-05:00'
describe
'7609' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYU' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
45fb8867db6ddf7d121d8485a68155fb
160c9692d0e92ee03f0ce82a422a4056164af4c1
'2011-11-14T17:26:04-05:00'
describe
'320002' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYV' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
d0029bbb60febdf9d73043f59542784a
3df5c2c4c847b85ce309dd46a962f39ac11c08ff
'2011-11-14T17:23:38-05:00'
describe
'99019' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYW' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
85342f1b3b058843747e36814e180fa5
0bd078bf42fbed3d97f9fae8e864909b4c1f98c5
'2011-11-14T17:24:43-05:00'
describe
'26397' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYX' 'sip-files00015.pro'
473e6f05d02095a0590348da71075f70
95f6d1f5fae3284d5d9c18b05af93e397867a770
'2011-11-14T17:26:58-05:00'
describe
'31579' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYY' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
8eb56f9b523e305d17d352e32ca3b643
6c7ff92a07f0dc732a8f1726578e80da63b47304
'2011-11-14T17:22:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQYZ' 'sip-files00015.tif'
6c53a66345178adf6269f29b0d938a30
c548c61d57140de43b75acb12c8871e43fe50680
'2011-11-14T17:22:05-05:00'
describe
'1076' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZA' 'sip-files00015.txt'
6380ddbd7cd7db1f31868c39c6bc47b0
a962cab43634991b0f1402d41e0e42190b8d39a4
'2011-11-14T17:26:19-05:00'
describe
'7906' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZB' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
66796ecc992cb562b104f8f322167d06
52691ee88cd01ccffc1f579a903d1812ff573cb7
'2011-11-14T17:23:29-05:00'
describe
'319980' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZC' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
e577cf6ec7edb32f714bc0a657a1e409
e0b039df980f1a5523deedb4d52d0c5284b2f076
describe
'98244' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZD' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
4158710982f72c88b69abd4fa0ee620c
e30615b8e308e1ae8e555c309e0e38bbf3642f5f
'2011-11-14T17:22:51-05:00'
describe
'26386' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZE' 'sip-files00016.pro'
3090436aee686c4f3f0b9881cf60047c
74dac0376788f50bc0c0f25248ac0d67fe16a96c
describe
'31894' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZF' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
9c9ae15947651adb890f0dc1008069ef
358f746faf3cc3db6e8cdb6fa3e8a1603a3ea4c9
'2011-11-14T17:27:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZG' 'sip-files00016.tif'
62509cf92b12a551b8d4de78c5442301
105111fbb48e9072d17c107b05dde10eb7e31b25
'2011-11-14T17:23:37-05:00'
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZH' 'sip-files00016.txt'
24d201e14ef5a7439866b2a9ae2afcb2
b99514acef13781d04c07ce53034fe47478e1981
'2011-11-14T17:25:21-05:00'
describe
'8379' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZI' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
d159d98b0f6a91595706caaa5847e8fe
4e4fae5fe566c1ca395ed60f51ff2ec38a874374
'2011-11-14T17:28:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZJ' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
a0b7330327e3e5fb71d3e356acec9595
f8400bb062948621cb0d1bb4ffdcc8e78748d844
'2011-11-14T17:28:04-05:00'
describe
'94255' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZK' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
6646490aee2d64a66e2231d736028211
f9a8cb220abec13e7361bef60fd9850a36d1b884
'2011-11-14T17:28:18-05:00'
describe
'25965' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZL' 'sip-files00017.pro'
916fe4f668600dc9402723b8be8b3681
62f4d774ff5757b90ad1a34add3001bad6247400
'2011-11-14T17:26:59-05:00'
describe
'30965' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZM' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
66fd36953ab7a851d1a86339b6b9bc72
325e0eedf39608822ff9ed8d955caf9fa0a1ce89
'2011-11-14T17:26:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZN' 'sip-files00017.tif'
751ac57bbaa00ad26d7a6769d435988b
3030481cbb2318ccf6526483cd61bebee380c414
'2011-11-14T17:26:22-05:00'
describe
'1045' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZO' 'sip-files00017.txt'
e3f78eecddb994a1617701ae40e7e978
7b7a9af2ad827747626dd526376c743fe8e0b227
'2011-11-14T17:25:17-05:00'
describe
'8269' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZP' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
9f5d810c9728bf21efdb7e062cced83c
2aadf02af259b14fd7a946d4a208f2bd0fc0a374
'2011-11-14T17:25:18-05:00'
describe
'319965' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZQ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
19199a752f4daa87c4bd5aa3e18c198e
5949be2dbdae5e7e2deee11f4fc0e455dd848bec
describe
'98301' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZR' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
5346afe1d27dc1dff245de9338e77352
c6dcd2e62e3efe4474f9fc0e89e5fc428af2d024
describe
'26178' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZS' 'sip-files00018.pro'
fef7d4d4824de25274d07db6200bfa72
776bc186fee8e7a232035fbe20be41bb7fbec5c9
describe
'31582' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZT' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
9bf035f03b83f7218eb590310f6a57b7
648c44b2ba9f9a2be1592f0365b60631232ac8f5
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZU' 'sip-files00018.tif'
1fa9f5ac371adbf92651cdc9cbc78c61
11ed3bd05aa0162778513cd56b9461a921de21e5
'2011-11-14T17:27:45-05:00'
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZV' 'sip-files00018.txt'
f28a26919c6a78bc76a95dbcf28060a7
e260f5158906c95138fcf5121bd864c23e8992a6
'2011-11-14T17:26:35-05:00'
describe
'8537' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZW' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
2721d03795f4150189f35d8e532d071f
c2c52c9f0d433179e5ac0b1fef69f023364ecb37
'2011-11-14T17:25:33-05:00'
describe
'320014' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZX' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
1e9bd81f69b0ed8d52e1f68992a327a3
0fc0afc9e2ec65b9ff2a846e076b4f2ef75da13a
'2011-11-14T17:24:27-05:00'
describe
'92820' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZY' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
8fa5dac4a5ba70c5ed4949465fc40654
4eee8c3fbfd1410f0f5c155f072725589a9430b7
'2011-11-14T17:24:08-05:00'
describe
'25485' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAQZZ' 'sip-files00019.pro'
95863d0e0648de36908a1dca2a267c7e
0fa716782e3aa40974f58a4b4ef3ff10f79a3131
'2011-11-14T17:28:23-05:00'
describe
'29789' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAA' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
1c1f3fdcb5dce0aa36221a359ffb75c7
1501367f1721bf1f66c89b957b85f986d39f0504
describe
'2576448' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAB' 'sip-files00019.tif'
6482cf2248eb815e40c1fddc2bb1838d
63683a5f4d312ebbff4a81698a54dbeb67384dc8
describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAC' 'sip-files00019.txt'
3bf52a08230fa3588af893d13a1b286c
d5995e3fb20c8972a4c20018eecabe5700f340d5
'2011-11-14T17:25:44-05:00'
describe
'8000' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAD' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
6a0cbf87b87dd80a09ab1495917ef53b
fbdae8d5425e694e90f64a1066e58565e6daa4f4
'2011-11-14T17:25:24-05:00'
describe
'312003' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAE' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
e0a1600769dae394746b56959ca58c8e
1b6a9d269acd3a4eca545e968586e9ebeff28b9e
describe
'95202' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAF' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
36e10b425ef19e470752978267280783
4d8dd974841ea9342586640b53f3aa6f8afb7ece
describe
'25988' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAG' 'sip-files00020.pro'
0ea053099ffe31284cfee568b0b860c2
05e71c8cce06f70916ddb64ff582b21dbddd37ce
'2011-11-14T17:25:12-05:00'
describe
'30984' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAH' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
0cef9858df7c3482c8742c13c89eb0d7
ad51434e78192a046f6da2408cfa009dfb84e230
'2011-11-14T17:23:18-05:00'
describe
'2512468' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAI' 'sip-files00020.tif'
e3e2e5bc277fccc069d12676cd8d34cf
1fc814bbc06eaa66c5ca7d6aff0e853909b8ba0c
'2011-11-14T17:27:47-05:00'
describe
'1044' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAJ' 'sip-files00020.txt'
54285390ade10e1b1ca0a714baf3dd67
dbaaac645ec351991ad179f49fde5086c7b1961e
describe
'8956' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAK' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
35a90f696ef588823c497ddd8f38fa86
40efdf3d9c3afc0d6db53bb7bb8ce8dadb059b28
'2011-11-14T17:24:40-05:00'
describe
'320158' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAL' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
4dfa87468483cacb6ea48917747522fd
e3b3d2317a1be82be1e50fe5fa0b36dff06c0b07
'2011-11-14T17:21:55-05:00'
describe
'97656' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAM' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
366fb7b0c4d24f6dba0877d284df2f4a
4187fbda509ebb5a4589c2da65b2b819162fadda
describe
'26609' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAN' 'sip-files00021.pro'
9994cd70fd0631b4eaebe7433fcb4318
f9b23f45605751bd0a93f93bbac7a90ccd864a1e
'2011-11-14T17:28:38-05:00'
describe
'31538' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAO' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
7cf52dc53222a05b173aaa4a46b66bf7
d7e5b6ef1a297ea4b845a01d676cac6310270235
describe
'2577692' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAP' 'sip-files00021.tif'
211ec69ba086bb873bfe63a06dc17982
38e9859aa50e36e8c7f10525ab27873197912ec5
'2011-11-14T17:27:09-05:00'
describe
'1051' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAQ' 'sip-files00021.txt'
8375485806664f14efdc1f6ed9e897cb
ea029d483095481954c9e16dcfd5659c4c037c32
'2011-11-14T17:24:19-05:00'
describe
'8585' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAR' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
5bde21f9c88f71d1d6a8f997fa726868
61bf132b5289603e0e133867c3bcba6697413fb6
'2011-11-14T17:27:48-05:00'
describe
'315852' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAS' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
d322d3c246772cb8e24ca84ffe772b1f
fd8cad67f3eb72a35bcab7571c54b03321af7097
'2011-11-14T17:28:39-05:00'
describe
'117341' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAT' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
840b0a6b54e9dfba2c09ba421ddaa28d
41a3a027d2185766456c8f1b9d023a7a0b104c5b
'2011-11-14T17:27:41-05:00'
describe
'30969' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAU' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
4b4e438176fe4e262f735b5fbdc42b7a
6e1929fe69d074bbc2ba4cf2c09e582ba6a5b9fb
describe
'2543428' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAV' 'sip-files00022.tif'
c69109eb2899de00cebd76db2d77a5ab
b639aa0bb036cf6b202bebeef9fc63fada49d433
'2011-11-14T17:28:29-05:00'
describe
'8493' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAW' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
07441c669265252ae285d4a50bd5c688
3019ef9afb4b3f1fda2911959d4300334db0c9b3
'2011-11-14T17:22:31-05:00'
describe
'319931' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAX' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
35304bbd20ca3643c0779cf599a03de7
e8e618a50ee283c21bc983de2ee564c57649dc40
'2011-11-14T17:26:14-05:00'
describe
'13599' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAY' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
9ef27d8f0e9e4b36dc00a9cf34de2ea8
13c42d20b344248ae1ed8b5de3f3a2e31de13fb9
'2011-11-14T17:26:12-05:00'
describe
'3101' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARAZ' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
ba732d70acdee5b577e36b594f822253
47af47fce0271da280143aa2c2ab963820e1d92b
'2011-11-14T17:26:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBA' 'sip-files00023.tif'
60242ab1c169230bfca205d8c294b2e8
7d0d218d45dfee4dadd7e83dffe9efac22eeb7b8
'2011-11-14T17:26:28-05:00'
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBB' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
247f527d2ebe66eefdf38b4b43bbaf38
c8398e7bda35a08772548e5d3808925cd7b04563
describe
'311914' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBC' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
cc70d8be4fce482b7ca9aaeff99cfa4a
491ae4c091ecb561b54963fac3a54e9a96931eeb
describe
'93180' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBD' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
fdf40d0cf5a4a90ba8b70a2339429268
da06c68d61a8c7e3a14c4ca7f57a86b1efa1a526
describe
'25586' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBE' 'sip-files00024.pro'
e627cfeea8cef192764ef3e84c31c869
e4bcf472f5095f5f4fe949ed12352f9c65be1aaa
'2011-11-14T17:24:51-05:00'
describe
'31305' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBF' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
9853c1278014add1f9e7feae651a4168
07e40c4a3ef7f7621c2ac7426fddbae74aabbef3
'2011-11-14T17:21:49-05:00'
describe
'2511612' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBG' 'sip-files00024.tif'
96e09254f1afa65c90cb3f66b4dce987
87424e0b2b4b6abd18033bef690880b40c206a09
'2011-11-14T17:28:24-05:00'
describe
'1033' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBH' 'sip-files00024.txt'
74590231ac2b637c40ada4edd77d57d0
ddfdc0e2c9a9118bcaa240c3e2523bdd14f42347
'2011-11-14T17:23:22-05:00'
describe
'9094' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBI' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
b77d4cf5426f0644304462747e0501e2
e1e34ef8fa1056c0fa32bbde58db7ffd2928d228
'2011-11-14T17:27:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBJ' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
d0a097c392483dfd444ba8e9574a4f0a
ac6b0c950647e297dd4bde5e8ae43a608bdb7f8f
'2011-11-14T17:26:02-05:00'
describe
'98902' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBK' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
bc5963e9f02911e2a7a70c51ea41848d
19070389eaf7a899880e0fad594e7537a46c2093
'2011-11-14T17:26:50-05:00'
describe
'27923' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBL' 'sip-files00025.pro'
e81cc45c6c1a7b9de9f66fa314e359b2
30e50b184e6d6321a0cf85ef4865bf1db8b278f1
'2011-11-14T17:22:42-05:00'
describe
'33039' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBM' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
1f6df4d42041b0f75ed5c8d1874cb922
ac2214268a04ec82a93c45f7f90af4b3e0001e76
'2011-11-14T17:25:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBN' 'sip-files00025.tif'
7097b996e8ab9dfea914581c196cbb08
34cd34ab4060beb667747d0a6982b998eb1070ef
'2011-11-14T17:27:37-05:00'
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBO' 'sip-files00025.txt'
cb69ba8f7dedc689317a3475967169b1
946d80420e7f5355483c5b5cf60dd232a7ab4200
'2011-11-14T17:22:11-05:00'
describe
'8629' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBP' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
272df301cd42ee0e859cff35c49d4d2a
462ae94ccb2989e9b75cf3a2a4806cfffc09dc32
'2011-11-14T17:22:52-05:00'
describe
'315790' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBQ' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
c6b04325a71c0cd0df638b5023ad6d6e
e02bb92546fbad4798521675f73668fc571288d0
describe
'91406' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBR' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
e05c5aff46c728abff56615800638e9a
79af35a3df30ac8c9b9ab493a53401e60353fc57
describe
'25109' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBS' 'sip-files00026.pro'
c4e386a9cab80fccae61b2ab2da2a2fe
2192ea4390efa6f29f1174a55640d89f1b0e82c6
'2011-11-14T17:21:53-05:00'
describe
'29614' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBT' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
d2c2a3cfc075d1218fae7fa95dedf59f
b1810ffeda6e085a4eb1ee09b4e90405b02b9ecf
'2011-11-14T17:23:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBU' 'sip-files00026.tif'
ed5a694d3766950b996a629165693ba0
ead79b5ba30bc07a290640ba86c5cdd4f67dae0a
'2011-11-14T17:26:18-05:00'
describe
'1016' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBV' 'sip-files00026.txt'
51ba4d2177857b060b1d9ba16ce6aac4
3b99421c6847512e7f80b2ed7c5dd70255ca6629
'2011-11-14T17:28:08-05:00'
describe
'8285' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBW' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
5d44f3bf694cf77490f18c243b4e5893
b92211ee4e494e2db8d70d62614f97b9fb138523
describe
'319937' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBX' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
d61ffa60158f40cf788495bd5cfa77c0
dc3b399e63fe481722a2c0e73577ac44c5ac8e41
'2011-11-14T17:21:42-05:00'
describe
'94596' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBY' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
46b7bc29ef26af135e9f0a612a8f05c3
f0a51e76d8cb4800e9295a766b863a7c2b424acb
'2011-11-14T17:27:57-05:00'
describe
'25047' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARBZ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
15302c05f9a64809186212a898d742b4
27ba42322c023192c56d27f3212ae4abab292c86
describe
'30820' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCA' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
c2d866461095f3d8bc7cf3a6b63ebcce
558341021e149863259569d304f9f399a4beb5f4
'2011-11-14T17:28:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCB' 'sip-files00027.tif'
ed45c327657f7f33425bd3c05b49870f
42dd57ba91a7e3b8305231a9e7cc4accd8f26864
describe
'1046' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCC' 'sip-files00027.txt'
a95d473365e977b687434ecda436a397
4a53a4fbdc53207385e69b1df3cd845a9b3ca21b
'2011-11-14T17:27:31-05:00'
describe
'8292' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCD' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
fcec227bf3566ed7a7400fd4e222c737
b0fbe9f10ed8f9836f1ed191104be7d5aede5871
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCE' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
de6a7e1a30dc103826d67b6a9f15037a
796d429f3bf8e1be77221f90f460787cecd28b0a
describe
'93890' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCF' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
295d19504df21b2c88c11db39abd8a5a
8bd5f797dbbdae725901694aae154d7dcea891e9
describe
'26366' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCG' 'sip-files00028.pro'
acddf118110356cdbd3cad0e4ef66026
ca836a1ca4d566478254db133a3d3d96839c976b
describe
'30801' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCH' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
6d2e943b7993f3f12d93ffc957b51edc
d4d6b8441a1524b3455754f21b4b83ce03db3662
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCI' 'sip-files00028.tif'
da749e621d21c53e33930d2e83aed0bf
0fb8e39b912b5e73938f4ce8d4ff3f63b00d0a5b
'2011-11-14T17:28:27-05:00'
describe
'1057' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCJ' 'sip-files00028.txt'
b73d0c0d83ff910ac6c6d37a6c7a99e1
b5ead3201db065038745facbc4685f058499a119
'2011-11-14T17:22:06-05:00'
describe
'8009' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCK' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
0aec4dfcfd1988974d50afbb6e565f4d
86e19388ff78bf6bfac35aab599576dc82ffd584
'2011-11-14T17:23:45-05:00'
describe
'320000' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCL' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
5d0d5acf9dfa627eff4843c158008b5f
551ea18fe392312f21b991ba196f24410b46e812
'2011-11-14T17:26:39-05:00'
describe
'103977' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCM' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
4cebd962f2c047579d9b6795516ef5ac
9fcc5e9718a7b116b40326a101107e36616fb8d1
'2011-11-14T17:22:54-05:00'
describe
'28872' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCN' 'sip-files00029.pro'
be3934ab708b91631ef9e13f26df2682
3d22783d22b67cee9be45f52243eae8c2a72145b
'2011-11-14T17:24:59-05:00'
describe
'33469' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCO' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
08d6d8992ca96f8bfd6ed1cd97a48e4d
276088176b5057218cabeba86c59360d6850bbc9
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCP' 'sip-files00029.tif'
bb3757fdf2ba02db3cc994d17ca6dc95
fd33916e364e5e12cd5a222aaca46d981ff2a9a3
'2011-11-14T17:24:14-05:00'
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCQ' 'sip-files00029.txt'
4a6b678b08bf269759105c13716cca11
94fcc44576c84ce6402ace831be0c51b3d4bbeb4
'2011-11-14T17:25:47-05:00'
describe
'8635' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCR' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
42ee21ee0abbf957f833f356d8b093c1
962f620c6febcbc031d5d5077fb922212b94fc74
'2011-11-14T17:22:49-05:00'
describe
'316047' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCS' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
8e6684b394e0f77f90651b05fd73c995
72cf65a3f68c96984f0eeb064bc705eefc6b0650
'2011-11-14T17:26:13-05:00'
describe
'96618' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCT' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
ca43181bbea2c9dd5b5d6d4b9236807b
12ce65ee9f56ad0cee1d501fbc87a3974b989856
'2011-11-14T17:26:06-05:00'
describe
'26730' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCU' 'sip-files00030.pro'
319f181b6a6ffa7385fe744d3c63e51a
f83c734145f62db6fb2d0e049ce97bf268606cb0
'2011-11-14T17:26:00-05:00'
describe
'31922' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCV' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
e6ce754f460b12ce226dae684f064293
c1890978197c591dc26e013d511004ff6b09db66
'2011-11-14T17:24:33-05:00'
describe
'2544652' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCW' 'sip-files00030.tif'
492999b7ce77aff71928876080ece4ef
2ba1601d0868c499890caf6199937b3eb043cf83
describe
'1071' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCX' 'sip-files00030.txt'
b73deb9fecd94b149204e37255abf443
1de4420aa79cb7c5232dfae2ebea62f9fdb14173
describe
'8717' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCY' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
7f1237aae1c88aad8f39ef3b6e178a89
57c1ccf3933fed6351731b410e7029c754cd5668
'2011-11-14T17:27:29-05:00'
describe
'320029' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARCZ' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
f7c24fcdc7aadd3b811c2b3af1630e2f
8b3540c5a68ce921cb5ddcbf33e59f8fa6e5af9a
'2011-11-14T17:26:32-05:00'
describe
'93239' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDA' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
6690f7a7debb5145899e28d444fac198
20e27eda24e271a69803c6293cacfdfaeb0b6005
'2011-11-14T17:23:07-05:00'
describe
'25983' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDB' 'sip-files00031.pro'
1debb7f5ad01eec307ddf31fa27d6328
7331b4d1993e71ac4cb4f97953bf959eab173319
'2011-11-14T17:25:56-05:00'
describe
'30831' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDC' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
400cc6a2ef0b0033bd00789478314199
6f190201bd87f3e52dd62b7543bbeaed07de5aa4
'2011-11-14T17:22:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDD' 'sip-files00031.tif'
5de7cddde762807320119ef87ca75b57
2b4ec687b44b3e8ec16e8d3ab4e586d63a3f8360
'2011-11-14T17:25:04-05:00'
describe
'1026' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDE' 'sip-files00031.txt'
740519ee357e5e6f4ff2bc1c106bd60b
f74c656c6ed82bdf314a77ac4d08ebe89fffc2aa
'2011-11-14T17:21:59-05:00'
describe
'8443' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDF' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
d5b04ba994125a1c91e2cd9da7e5802e
b38b8882cdf7a8a15962f748f262aa268a60fa25
describe
'319831' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDG' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
28ec4e5cf3ec585dc51fc90a5937ef8d
582eee548e08a784e1eafa51ed9a24a5c77eea1c
describe
'92690' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDH' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
a86673a51ffa89b92cbef7cf663ec916
2d199ffac5a566164902425c83cd399e192a3673
'2011-11-14T17:27:16-05:00'
describe
'26238' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDI' 'sip-files00032.pro'
42a4fb0406513f2910a099ca85914d28
694d61984bdfc86cc0074c177516715485940446
describe
'30181' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDJ' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
a91f06fa00132be681eb53b6f7156c56
0407a9063f3d41ff3ae92e6cc761c7d67ff13029
'2011-11-14T17:28:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDK' 'sip-files00032.tif'
de2305cae1e2a75f9882478618c7e98f
b1d6dc56162ee54a3226ea5164832fe8abc1ddff
'2011-11-14T17:25:59-05:00'
describe
'1052' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDL' 'sip-files00032.txt'
46c67bb344f7f91f2e75d9e1cd3e3aba
f16acba23777d674a3826424f37ffb1430009caa
describe
'8272' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDM' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
aaa35b0879ed6cf9fd429202807dd2a8
06a8e66d3bc5f19fb179edd8f48cf52acfb2ba49
'2011-11-14T17:22:10-05:00'
describe
'320020' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDN' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
4b19e54bbf07ad932c7ba45571e0096e
ae1aeeabe44875445ffa9199f4a0c81bab2dae31
'2011-11-14T17:27:02-05:00'
describe
'95944' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDO' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
e89ebeaa94572c3a6ae12e32e3b03cfd
7619d8cc43992c6ebbf9ccd9fd3ad4f02770d5e4
describe
'27171' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDP' 'sip-files00033.pro'
bf42729f2613928383fc6e947289c162
c9dbd9032d8ac1f9f589946ada42a30824d6be7e
'2011-11-14T17:25:43-05:00'
describe
'32136' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDQ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
85705aab94d7b3d5ab1ecd78934f2dd6
8e9338fff8f88aeea29b89f17e236b97ff584d7a
'2011-11-14T17:23:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDR' 'sip-files00033.tif'
b9218e44a7d1d4901d1e43a5f8473bb8
29293390b256154da4da11abe5261c2992def700
'2011-11-14T17:28:31-05:00'
describe
'1073' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDS' 'sip-files00033.txt'
109a81efe7484c236ce6bbcc21f07b2d
8e4900fe74abfd45ad2ccc245e0356b7f1fad52b
describe
'8410' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDT' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
da6de3579653cc676f11bbcf3c290301
62f913411567d37ed4f0a0c16dc82349e033927e
'2011-11-14T17:27:19-05:00'
describe
'311849' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDU' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
653716fe5bfcfa0a1194af130edc856d
3730330ea8572630ad9763a1782a08c275101c2d
describe
'71692' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDV' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
f1389e5fd45cd010cd49e6ea99cdf20a
078ecbe2069b3231bf40c8b4541f3b4a141d6055
describe
'15591' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDW' 'sip-files00034.pro'
d0c3d56e4bc4444bd6b58f4fe195adf3
3af5cbcf8a605521ec957c671ce489d92d573c60
'2011-11-14T17:27:30-05:00'
describe
'22737' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDX' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
4f944975785bf269c283476cd676a13b
904ff40fe10c56dfe70db2995feb398fa09e6e1d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDY' 'sip-files00034.tif'
47b36110b783c39bf7f9c82e0998b17f
367b20158f5222a6761baeab3a1beca7590652ba
describe
'655' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARDZ' 'sip-files00034.txt'
4b29d9dddbd308fdbd9698ab90ee3fd6
f8a2611dfc9fbd2005a6731fb10c954faf40f789
'2011-11-14T17:27:42-05:00'
describe
'6562' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAREA' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
a3f48e495668c7e0717d9aab2fc0007c
35528a1a9292dbd0301e4aaba3f32b492b8df0f4
'2011-11-14T17:28:25-05:00'
describe
'320001' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAREB' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
70821712dbacb3c171fce891eeb8ddf7
9d8e4a9bb19a5eb9067571de900ac99d34f3552d
'2011-11-14T17:25:37-05:00'
describe
'73534' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAREC' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
4f4ff15978b511847f26257683512805
905eed01fc0dd795aad8c359175f7b8f98747eb9
'2011-11-14T17:28:33-05:00'
describe
'14560' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARED' 'sip-files00035.pro'
9b7f040e5492de47fd64eb105f425cfd
50fe2c6bfcf08562699b512b60f2157fcc9aed95
'2011-11-14T17:28:26-05:00'
describe
'24114' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAREE' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
207b0ae8be5b32ca0c145e11b1f31e60
af0feefe9046b32cece7bb6d0321cb739535e54a
'2011-11-14T17:26:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAREF' 'sip-files00035.tif'
6994e29eae935b9c8f8ab39cdd8a4d9d
4e61174ac165173880bf9ac72bc7db33db552c58
'2011-11-14T17:25:32-05:00'
describe
'948' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAREG' 'sip-files00035.txt'
b3a093b68755e9f2c4eeb4b5a7bf1327
74381cf6186bee55b5537c1c999990222f739754
'2011-11-14T17:26:08-05:00'
describe
'6652' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAREH' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
eebc5e83d50035ebcca35b4c077373d9
c48409d572d7f698a56bbfcb8f653863c1393d23
'2011-11-14T17:27:58-05:00'
describe
'317373' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAREI' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
a42f502bd07ee2a8ff50e8293147d425
9d7922cdaa315a0851e4054df2d561e8ce991c59
'2011-11-14T17:23:16-05:00'
describe
'95582' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAREJ' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
501e3efce74ce03c2c650dae8b549271
694b76b690adb327a68df29edda6f743080a33bd
describe
'25502' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAREK' 'sip-files00036.pro'
4bf0d95f2f2c213b2ccf35c595426aa6
3fe4b305293168f6a6a6dff8c044c35da3eacccf
describe
'30921' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAREL' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
8b68f0634f8dc6931c33afbc637a4d85
c684e5bb47c7e56c521a659cf470527c19fa11f4
'2011-11-14T17:28:03-05:00'
describe
'2555372' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAREM' 'sip-files00036.tif'
25afc929ec4b3b65fcf27c848093c26d
c1ddd3926e1533819ede6a3631941f91dd37c730
'2011-11-14T17:27:28-05:00'
describe
'1060' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAREN' 'sip-files00036.txt'
7233d4eee7924aa9b5c860bcaac0f921
ba3acd13d23ff818544cd956db31c80c0af8c3f3
describe
'8732' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAREO' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
3582d00e2f21ee8b10c7d37cefac1017
c6703ea54c352eee950f753bf8e40084b72e0ec7
describe
'320031' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAREP' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
933955df93d3a31525cf0b72f8cbe007
951b976575cc2483bc04cbff4a0186b83fd40f93
'2011-11-14T17:26:55-05:00'
describe
'103191' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAREQ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
d638f8962060e7ecc90a11a2b80a2bf3
27c3ad31e70a646a5fd573550ca77ad08cc4456b
'2011-11-14T17:24:45-05:00'
describe
'28763' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARER' 'sip-files00037.pro'
60d806be618ac082d2eb7680dbffc612
8cef92c03c2335817266a6ea46bedfbffcfb0dbb
'2011-11-14T17:23:13-05:00'
describe
'33383' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARES' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
f2b36e5626009abe8343f3647c45a685
c17c4f52acff1f621be2a555e49c64f79742f8f4
'2011-11-14T17:22:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARET' 'sip-files00037.tif'
a5172e8b46f79f67f6921475262d6cd1
b1a515ca5b7801110b808fb2b6687ed9493d22f3
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAREU' 'sip-files00037.txt'
247d466ee2ef89bec248f35bcf1dffb7
9115e9616d214365e38b66eacb0766c49b208fa9
describe
'8796' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAREV' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
57e0759c91696b4fefc8dbb6768d6bd6
aeb2aa8e8be636676091cadab3736b8d80d2075a
describe
'304136' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAREW' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
8de1f00ca9d762c8f23103f6c5793a8e
fe529ec81224decf7f290c2aeeb4e3e9b30d15fa
'2011-11-14T17:24:00-05:00'
describe
'97755' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAREX' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
096778cb5e282c968da90d92f43dcfd1
67c7d42133fdf6ed1fdf826378b2f5b41f58a147
describe
'26796' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAREY' 'sip-files00038.pro'
bc9cf05e135d984ded7f3d6c4750179f
a67033a6fe26b3c297d63b1eff54b91c6553a092
describe
'31638' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAREZ' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
61c8c5b5ebcf43dc2350eee6607e2206
1d34accbf93f010b7a759614f41adc7ab48ffbaf
'2011-11-14T17:25:23-05:00'
describe
'2449452' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFA' 'sip-files00038.tif'
5e4fb0342eada10ccade64be991e063d
0507727c6a3463862567e506c6855b73141d674a
'2011-11-14T17:28:37-05:00'
describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFB' 'sip-files00038.txt'
7941d06b3cbcb3bcc3c2584f5e95f1b3
4210b0dc967021b722f0dbd9351613c5bae593f5
describe
'9080' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFC' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
ca5793126887d4ea3ed0bf12383c7516
2b428e15cc5e1d004b34885983dcd4779804cb23
describe
'320167' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFD' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
6aeb806f97f1839d7183458df1b91047
4e2baf2a9542020a68245515f0fd6bb6766f5775
'2011-11-14T17:25:50-05:00'
describe
'99872' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFE' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
77e07e98bf64257067d3c9a152848c2b
15c955997a93fbca5f22ca0f518fdc7c89a17cf2
describe
'27925' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFF' 'sip-files00039.pro'
8a4dfe6a52d0cd99ce776a00e66a6287
5e6af607dec72845b10e728c2a9a5c1260fce203
'2011-11-14T17:26:05-05:00'
describe
'31511' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFG' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
a29331b4d46e6c08cf5d48838616eae6
bb4512d9ee62d7b44daebd5a7da5bd57d8077400
'2011-11-14T17:23:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFH' 'sip-files00039.tif'
374fa3d0ad3e96341a56fe4f0a1c1d3f
87afc10bbea29d429766c6b49ba621f5b136a157
'2011-11-14T17:28:11-05:00'
describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFI' 'sip-files00039.txt'
e395e343d39033eddc840710fa284ca4
8b878965e045c45bdfee3d5e055b0ce06708f0bf
'2011-11-14T17:25:30-05:00'
describe
'8437' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFJ' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
dd11934a3c139ca768457dcad3ffa544
243bb3977604a88cc079da5a257635eff722b7f6
'2011-11-14T17:27:46-05:00'
describe
'309618' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFK' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
968387c3116e7882c7e98a4d619df6b5
cb7b93617e937f22325765103f803b54b5977979
describe
'91774' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFL' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
fb4af00d713a3bef851d083560077d17
40e273489f2c44e7f392b5d3961684c9c10bfc3d
'2011-11-14T17:24:26-05:00'
describe
'25378' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFM' 'sip-files00040.pro'
c07e4daca34b3e2b43c8795f81659156
7d2ee265d6a090d2b1acd8dd1c107f43c0af5b80
describe
'29713' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFN' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
c63bddc16c617d3aec5eab861a4131c6
93301aced1d7cc16ec2fca64d1ecce2a84e44ba5
describe
'2493208' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFO' 'sip-files00040.tif'
5bb78c6ec2419858681ff8b70dc1bce5
d55995a4e7c64076464f826efe700694f706a78b
'2011-11-14T17:27:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFP' 'sip-files00040.txt'
2f1d3bb3fba926e290b9775570ef0152
cbe216a4fe83ce3fd3e5c5db3c0af3af7922b11c
'2011-11-14T17:26:46-05:00'
describe
'8491' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFQ' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
7166c91e3297c78dd78de3c8f36f00e7
efed5005b720e9f67fede8887cfe8b3a9bf2bd7f
describe
'319754' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFR' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
644d81bb1d718b053d5595a92ad30315
ded3a20ec9edcbd42f283e725c01e3e1e6628016
'2011-11-14T17:24:29-05:00'
describe
'100563' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFS' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
72fb4bd68bc63ffa05a537c64dc242b6
28229252dad6eefb64dfc02471494973c806facd
'2011-11-14T17:26:15-05:00'
describe
'28482' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFT' 'sip-files00041.pro'
7ed07a523cc210265bbd31c1e2b166d8
9ac50aa36f795bd819e2f60a21d36944ad582a52
describe
'32035' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFU' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
960812d85e601742d64b11e301559c6b
60729e825ddd61c2397bc803bfd52f4979281ac8
describe
'2574388' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFV' 'sip-files00041.tif'
639a76f17770db9f035ce1da0639d756
d781db442c6e354c29e16c4983802b93e086eb00
'2011-11-14T17:27:26-05:00'
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFW' 'sip-files00041.txt'
acc625b6ae3811015df9af330028ae95
ae0da9955fb0a78a6f894e35ae3897b30145dc07
'2011-11-14T17:23:14-05:00'
describe
'8788' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFX' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
7626afb05c33654be3dd45941faf40c9
fefed4a7a36faacfd07b071b1d55abcc1e0bde0a
'2011-11-14T17:26:21-05:00'
describe
'304418' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFY' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
22bf86cc2e9e9dcf8657e0b41c60c363
fb12f8f62cc83898c26e5dd359db376836a564e7
describe
'100702' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARFZ' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
e26e95048bcb648aec72c2f25481e4b1
46044aec217028cea0cf4952c60b33bfd72776fa
'2011-11-14T17:23:58-05:00'
describe
'27910' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGA' 'sip-files00042.pro'
d9361e578310b14e3333bb76cceb1ca7
e39199e684976f590ce8129abd9c5ecfccd5209c
describe
'33241' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGB' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
5edb511e7b0be90ea37a137b3f1f925b
67ae7a4f47750062ca65382e64ecb9d3f7ac514a
describe
'2452148' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGC' 'sip-files00042.tif'
f0256902329e7efae867e3409b3a4553
63dbfab557b6d1aa4ef1d9e7468fb530612a7a1f
describe
'1145' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGD' 'sip-files00042.txt'
5e66b37c76c893e67d58d43a6d5f9a6a
1f9e61fc3befa44fc7a6ee03a2bd26412a80fa3f
'2011-11-14T17:24:35-05:00'
describe
'9198' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGE' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
09ee5990ccb14116513ddffa0e972cfc
a713ecd608fc230c24c69e38105ede1bbbd75fca
'2011-11-14T17:28:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGF' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
606aeea48054df119a14a6bba7d94daa
b08ff2d8051ea7440ade80ec547ab5f27b58d2e5
'2011-11-14T17:26:23-05:00'
describe
'99670' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGG' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
3e2efe40a08132181cd1d17b2c932e63
5120758d85ebed84111fa7d8970d41271b22ecc4
'2011-11-14T17:25:48-05:00'
describe
'27904' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGH' 'sip-files00043.pro'
af6a9514ee4f887791c8ab748a61badd
6cf1caa65932fc5b824713891e7a9e5c4fa9e87a
describe
'32117' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGI' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
ff89737013779d93e28fcdb2a5061b07
8b2110ba9392addf7d28077cb77b865c66ca93e5
'2011-11-14T17:27:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGJ' 'sip-files00043.tif'
cc90d284f3cfc954473b04327b4590d4
6e93c395119e32060f8d2ea22fbdd0a940340243
describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGK' 'sip-files00043.txt'
b2a25256a151db324d7fd66ae31368fc
2f4cdf1855b1882cd24707809624b67e1fa7f203
describe
'8222' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGL' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
60cb8ff88b6c8a05f958e1fb68a4889f
af422d8962504bf91e5745b1b11e95368204a605
describe
'309153' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGM' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
fc8222267837a9208e1709f822c6cf47
e930c02a0def3aa13e242b38ab9cb82bf820f648
describe
'131035' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGN' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
6f5e46b2f1fdf69469a3da356ecf3e05
f795b5091241cf360dd210d5977b8fc146613adb
'2011-11-14T17:25:22-05:00'
describe
'35009' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGO' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
62f1a3128c7cd336bb12bbadf3f752c6
4953caf8a01915cbb7287288ca7f1fa93c50a4ac
describe
'2489572' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGP' 'sip-files00044.tif'
70344fab61376a1fb8277de7ccbbe705
467fa4133fe08f1a4daa252f1eb142dffa5c6d81
'2011-11-14T17:23:36-05:00'
describe
'9708' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGQ' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
1177bfa077ee05482561d8cdea42d99d
228e1d7b3847ecb565a484cf57df4089ece5c2af
'2011-11-14T17:25:38-05:00'
describe
'319889' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGR' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
d826cb13edbb5787406a60e524799af7
fa9291b92e7cc603949dc94d40466a1873883356
describe
'13186' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGS' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
660d2bb768e88e2227fe6b9700a6d468
da66c966b3f42f17a964ab73eb43c4cf6257cf84
'2011-11-14T17:24:28-05:00'
describe
'3092' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGT' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
645d105b7b44b7ac391e21388818956d
eef97499e56e34bec24ff170106e080e72b73f06
'2011-11-14T17:22:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGU' 'sip-files00045.tif'
ed88ec5a7faa8ffdf5803686b886fa04
bc19f200f5bc5b11683636337103ca68828d4a87
'2011-11-14T17:24:52-05:00'
describe
'1089' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGV' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
ab9bb0afec47add4f3ef03040c48d361
435ecfcee3ae851b1dd993b31c1539f49fd6b20c
'2011-11-14T17:24:02-05:00'
describe
'315285' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGW' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
e959c1a9920076c73b25b24e0d7dbc4f
b452188fab1ab535012321a8e3d3ee6bfa1a1896
'2011-11-14T17:26:25-05:00'
describe
'101253' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGX' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
e9f619bfc7c8f8dc3bee5aff9e9b26ca
9c405821cb7ef5846b7410d2b267b91f36f19921
'2011-11-14T17:28:19-05:00'
describe
'27664' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGY' 'sip-files00046.pro'
44b1d83d9dcf08ef5522a261c5f0b218
0de2f55459738fdb6cc8054a9f509052b3c6eac8
'2011-11-14T17:22:17-05:00'
describe
'32919' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARGZ' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
8ef5252c13a4c34014b213c3e900a997
3abc698dd9763efdb7160b15ac2fbb81a27de32b
describe
'2539300' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHA' 'sip-files00046.tif'
b8cf486b34a04dc63a4b74dbd12af555
32091c7b98ed60f438e7dd9c96b39974571f64fe
'2011-11-14T17:26:17-05:00'
describe
'1143' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHB' 'sip-files00046.txt'
193381c1e88a3b8e89c6d6bde42d829a
7fb45e001c659fa85044975ea2eb2ec197456bb5
'2011-11-14T17:28:06-05:00'
describe
'8971' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHC' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
cdfee76a0a2d616f2f89384b15622d55
7f828f965baa096089440b47d3aeb4eea0f81580
describe
'320184' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHD' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
2165ef347076a5303445906c4b0bff8c
ce3dd9c74374ba7e8c5116e34d2590ed39e43704
describe
'101652' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHE' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
16d939fa9eed3587b709bea19c65d52d
3b6304a582e39a1eb574fdd85f2a60288a5a0287
describe
'27158' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHF' 'sip-files00047.pro'
bb793ec227eb4cb2bbe416054f5d9611
b2b3a538dce3c165363aa23b4090f7f89653071f
'2011-11-14T17:27:35-05:00'
describe
'33403' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHG' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
85112140f3acd648e6a42c3fd52fdcd6
f19a72b3d05134750e263379f9f663d368e9e161
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHH' 'sip-files00047.tif'
e5ffb02a3603a7473520efd04c8159d3
94c64081329242eaf7444be97b438ed411f8ac02
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHI' 'sip-files00047.txt'
567208ddad38860790b6ab597ba4b94c
0b34df7d5bdc0919fc8a22f04029ba049cb4dc05
describe
'8741' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHJ' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
69f8397d17674f6125c92e52e6495d74
86d4c4e6f62423c948b68272888ed91d7be30f05
describe
'319953' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHK' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
508cd564aebce86359df48425a872c0f
d34ec2f59a243cd07688b7536e9a9f666d7103b5
'2011-11-14T17:24:13-05:00'
describe
'98972' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHL' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
2a98ea01c9adb443059f3ecfc38cce82
b1bad474545848a44d5c2ee02fd316c18777bb80
'2011-11-14T17:22:20-05:00'
describe
'28178' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHM' 'sip-files00048.pro'
2cea8a634ff72d93aab0c11275adcc17
1facc4093d385d4142644d260c11533066a1bb71
describe
'32214' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHN' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
d81d8c702d901d040e3c1867f9fccb1c
30809c2cb010ca680a5a8177eb4586cd2470027b
'2011-11-14T17:23:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHO' 'sip-files00048.tif'
01fcc0771f3394ce649209eff374f9ac
e8ea03ba8c5153581ac66c8d9ccbfee1d01524db
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHP' 'sip-files00048.txt'
c164da28b7ccfbaaea7a372bd4c037ed
8f91646caac62f54f997a195272162d5c4792162
describe
'8163' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHQ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
157f13f66575094c17d41241de0b67a2
5f707123b407ea2c50ca653740f73975472f97f3
describe
'320022' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHR' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
c9a2007526a24331c8ab13bcebcfbeb0
dca3e7e7d8eea0967436bec43ee24eb223d7699f
describe
'96236' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHS' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
2ee847cc2da883df24fe1b8cfeffc7a5
d17a674108ce8d71083f752f7eaed52de45c0149
'2011-11-14T17:28:09-05:00'
describe
'27472' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHT' 'sip-files00049.pro'
b3f18a07d53e7b50d64cc05bfa0ec6a2
271f027780473a1db031c2dcb7172aa64e23abe3
describe
'30808' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHU' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
fd9158e3bb8b4c8e1825cba7d2b8881d
0eb51a9ba40b0256187428c2af7a1cfb5383d7b9
'2011-11-14T17:27:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHV' 'sip-files00049.tif'
b62aeebaeafc0bf00406e2bc64f278e0
8e454ccbcb20e70195f81f37cab347db341dfc4c
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHW' 'sip-files00049.txt'
63bd5c161b7d57e4fa85490079e922ca
a84fd047820e041c3058d8ad8428b2b004f437fd
describe
'8198' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHX' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
1178cca7ffd7a2da3e9cd38629fadb39
7d1761564ccae5809549e9487b5f8404a2dbed8b
'2011-11-14T17:27:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHY' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
559645b8fe1a28a7376c69a3c5801cd5
c30e3c394957ee34b58b9162efe1a7981cd3fc39
describe
'92362' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARHZ' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
e7c88176e78472fd3ac7cd00c86346bc
344ad433fc54248f39ff929ba7b513cee2fe8280
'2011-11-14T17:22:36-05:00'
describe
'26873' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARIA' 'sip-files00050.pro'
ac56b46ba2a66c9c4f4f250ecb32b231
d09b3ad76b2d9b67d82e027f03decd94bf16c6d2
describe
'30178' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARIB' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
c6d3ca7087d36359f823687c2be43176
b787550b840131dc9a93ef091af6ba1dbae23544
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARIC' 'sip-files00050.tif'
2b8f1b346f1f534d1f615b04c0c99cee
5944a48df178c9853f7e65e25a198a7722a41d33
'2011-11-14T17:25:52-05:00'
describe
'1084' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARID' 'sip-files00050.txt'
9bd896178f6b12dd922d2c4002c1b1c4
e7773115ad601670fc592ec34625f8c7eb5e2ce6
'2011-11-14T17:22:33-05:00'
describe
'8303' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARIE' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
6b36459a086df00de53225a63f3a1f9b
7d99deacf58b69e828d969344119e9392f006c27
describe
'319983' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARIF' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
3b3cf14b2304447204f102adaaea417e
6987103d81c9610bfa6a58918043668f4086f762
describe
'99847' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARIG' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
5a6f9c3761411cb9ba0a9849f771c561
045d82fdb0d34e1165a6c5ca8f454b1a7f8147b6
'2011-11-14T17:23:09-05:00'
describe
'28907' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARIH' 'sip-files00051.pro'
35b375f349a13cdec3ca7a62cea912d8
65f17a46fba02c60c953a8bb2b8d889359bb4391
describe
'32417' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARII' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
913ffa560bf662287dc6eb7bec3311ef
3fa3185b4a235417a95c1a2cd2e951733f80854e
'2011-11-14T17:26:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARIJ' 'sip-files00051.tif'
30099e4fb0139e698248d877fadfbfc4
b65b137d9b36abeea87c972ce39943dd1a740e19
'2011-11-14T17:25:03-05:00'
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARIK' 'sip-files00051.txt'
1236e32bdba4d4536f360f2a989f8749
84eefba06d6749c223aa09272e9ead38c2fa3184
'2011-11-14T17:26:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARIL' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
3447f3aa241b90f62d8530c0981e3db9
af9fcb3af724ed722aaf38ca22ec2ffeea04f5fd
'2011-11-14T17:25:49-05:00'
describe
'309098' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARIM' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
bb59c9d1d91cc972b654afa8b72b85e1
93f3ef3556d0dc6e40d0ca7b6c0241256091eddd
'2011-11-14T17:23:17-05:00'
describe
'100039' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARIN' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
53c6308259ed13404917338f2d1a60b2
1131e49479de9078db17e40bdc17d55d562a553e
describe
'26718' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARIO' 'sip-files00052.pro'
f679ebd4cb3e22e88e3c282b40a48bce
c421d7e086f31091fdba1c8b31e6b8db340d03f6
'2011-11-14T17:24:24-05:00'
describe
'32806' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARIP' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
ae41b3524219b5f62e36317fe679ba23
ab8c7f1f1284736bde3df461555e2a9cb1d372cc
describe
'2489868' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARIQ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
388f9d50cc8ca82348c88985392a0b89
54ccb96f9c32d8dbb01ce9f55eadf6351809d871
'2011-11-14T17:26:43-05:00'
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARIR' 'sip-files00052.txt'
4c5e5ea93762ad3f5b730ec6fb84c657
f6f350906fc8621c19c7f4d47857673512a74976
'2011-11-14T17:25:25-05:00'
describe
'9119' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARIS' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
6151c52132945d3bcf1fec0c117452c7
c912466987e9369e033c5312b133c4ce4dc276fd
describe
'320009' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARIT' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
d5e8bd64b5bdbec11aeb31547647813e
aec6709f9482bb6e0d08cc536f4955ed03c80e98
describe
'95133' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARIU' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
30443e68123132b578a8a4dae047d6d5
a6303004eab8ab6cefae0929d96d31bb0cd64515
'2011-11-14T17:26:09-05:00'
describe
'27709' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARIV' 'sip-files00053.pro'
d9be21ebbeb23c3e24b632493de55310
a349f8b37f9139b4b8472076ba6abed1f7ea24ed
'2011-11-14T17:26:26-05:00'
describe
'31493' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARIW' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
44c13169eded0935e432461e4d207809
422387b3de159498c18538cb9766167d21a1f16f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARIX' 'sip-files00053.tif'
f4dd3e2be26622d88a450da0fce99351
04c8771636ae9fbdd98bd60c3072ff9b99e6800f
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARIY' 'sip-files00053.txt'
eb6188a51fbd6cba75de1e64809157b3
8066e5e3023dd45989dbe0979b1126e79413d6d2
'2011-11-14T17:26:49-05:00'
describe
'8226' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARIZ' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
40d73429113ba4f304b811bc71747c0a
50e381f382da1a87d40e48273901245491972611
describe
'305481' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJA' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
7db3baa59d229575ab4a5fbd520ef5fd
423249c5e497ee2f2a6b15b1139153f701747fe4
'2011-11-14T17:25:54-05:00'
describe
'96189' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJB' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
e424344ea592fbbb8f0d35e7a1218e9e
6a9cac97445f2b7249cc7764824ed41f5ca18bc0
describe
'27639' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJC' 'sip-files00054.pro'
7245e29654aa2b42716e2e3ea8dac5c4
b871e2b6620d875052608376d6679c312dfd0ae6
describe
'31353' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJD' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
5606ff21bdfb5c794348c4759f851878
fede3cc86d1bd28fc262bda32267f2e7cb001e05
describe
'2460292' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJE' 'sip-files00054.tif'
b046ecf80be7887bd912c6939d4e8104
91f8673d2a76f07ae1bf971dfbb19036a9a503de
'2011-11-14T17:23:41-05:00'
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJF' 'sip-files00054.txt'
2a0a3e1d2b5066a1037cbbbc24ea5322
fc28fd1d5b880d946ca12beb4416cf63d112ba43
describe
'8982' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJG' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
75091c188d9330c1ecd746dd762f571b
3f90b1a517e216ac73b48304305f0ab1962aa7af
describe
'312734' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJH' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
e5530b80f2ab7ae0d7a42fa052c4b95a
c633c840d0d71a57cae37d20154e3c5288e29d88
'2011-11-14T17:25:58-05:00'
describe
'100453' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJI' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
0c0bb5fd06a7ba65be1e74805ff2a91b
89d124b797bcfc23eef1b7ce550e8ad97ee5e381
describe
'26537' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJJ' 'sip-files00055.pro'
3e70c81651a74ddee7adff21258bc447
e130e872ba421f1a623ffe2a08d8d1b85715aef8
describe
'32886' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJK' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
0c1c0b17ae6f2c618689ffc5741b1d4f
02f904e25d404eded912809dfffc359dc74a89cf
describe
'2518660' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJL' 'sip-files00055.tif'
d9fd83ef7e15edb4615581296c8e8f7e
96ed14e5d8cf902b1a2d73b96377fa0aaa853aab
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJM' 'sip-files00055.txt'
b09a0944ded9dcbf72e17ea0c1b477eb
e0260dda2d05e2b42034b68a70d8d13cbec76452
describe
'9265' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJN' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
98a79adef80e04a66952358dccae2698
54930dc1f1ac2a129f1976412e41013b28fd6f57
describe
'304552' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJO' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
250f2bc0717dde0f949be3aee14a626b
30774af59c9d873981f883c872038ba51589e44a
describe
'99330' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJP' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
180d6a247df96bd0c8e8316c24945341
7c5e585aaf02cb5f55f471c23fc83594a58af5b8
describe
'25922' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJQ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
7ad8aaa9f2ddf4203c1e4fb2db826302
439844f0a64778f478ccb44f929aa58695218547
describe
'33389' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJR' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
cebe6e00a61904289a22b8263ee121d2
a5aa40d5ba43f2f6b12a1a72a2ec56771370a63f
describe
'2453136' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJS' 'sip-files00056.tif'
c857ee109a44572cdbb48ea5f14ac698
c218cac6c32b560f0a1498abbcbd7c197cfc0816
describe
'1066' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJT' 'sip-files00056.txt'
1bbba9f047b649dea7dc3b370fe18627
c5afcf34554109e7fbc104b11f0703da27224fc0
describe
'9767' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJU' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
a98d9d410c4ed5420d0cb33e48125461
56ea19ffcf8eccb5204904d83ea2f9caa6978e1c
'2011-11-14T17:28:15-05:00'
describe
'320155' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJV' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
597e5e70f3133c77b7237d51d25ddbef
f240053864fda6d0863e1732902a3e4a600a376b
'2011-11-14T17:28:02-05:00'
describe
'47515' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJW' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
cabf287a83603fa92d7c976a9f1d252c
fea43bb06f187f9048222c03fc7ac5c32e65ee6f
'2011-11-14T17:22:34-05:00'
describe
'7400' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJX' 'sip-files00057.pro'
36bd7a7237ced1128fe749f25b742ab0
bdb385ac0294cef3c0783ba64993aa34ed54e377
describe
'14507' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJY' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
633a0c7f918f741f58eead1633c5b588
8b30ec21e394c10ef61643da563a1f180f7093bd
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARJZ' 'sip-files00057.tif'
83574cb8b087f18cbe5232304b18d5c8
d548815b0a614240860ecd0a463e0c95028c7605
'2011-11-14T17:23:35-05:00'
describe
'306' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKA' 'sip-files00057.txt'
45511d6c552c8bb3688e1b6836ff8303
579b2d93b5a4710d0e7bd94601966a7acdf1f463
'2011-11-14T17:22:19-05:00'
describe
'4300' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKB' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
b3e0e2c7da207c4e806d86d7af51e83d
83663606c1042a96325a6351c9a53accffa8ebc0
describe
'319840' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKC' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
c5456b5a35609ca57afa08045c9a2ee8
fea2953a52e54fcbbb3bbe8b1dcc6c8971222bfe
describe
'80715' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKD' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
42b3022376db2af8e9c53edef016c346
8fc6eccce2abf177de136e92070e17964ce27bb5
describe
'18870' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKE' 'sip-files00058.pro'
46c6dabdbdd9aa168d55ed719ce01dbc
492e5760b04f7e1033fd4e0058386564a9cfff3a
'2011-11-14T17:26:16-05:00'
describe
'26995' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKF' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
7eec16fef20980206687f43e0414489f
ffb8ab8581a93a38e7a356a06eb7f33580b94175
describe
'2575628' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKG' 'sip-files00058.tif'
e31c6db83277d3bf9c34b26135d2a2e1
087ef82989600eba2b2bc03c4eb4e9a43beca89e
describe
'922' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKH' 'sip-files00058.txt'
819677faea59c8c58a92333e65ebf5f5
f960a4e8850c9e1a27a6a794dc83a8577b8439e0
describe
'7514' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKI' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
218420a6647aa79c0159ab7c8a73ebd8
9dacc6e2d19bfa03604151ae65a16f18a92c536f
'2011-11-14T17:28:10-05:00'
describe
'320017' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKJ' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
d8a14bb9a16e1593ffc0e0f54f49583b
0e5f56ef847492bb5e49c94d4cdc6f07e2a9a232
describe
'97642' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKK' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
cafb55bfcbe408d557d5b971006bc255
e6081624122a2c1535335f3cc8ab4d3519703db4
describe
'27193' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKL' 'sip-files00059.pro'
205b18ce25b1b581d5a446eb44478055
9c173f90185633c1bd9efcbec56455a9e324a275
describe
'32140' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKM' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
08ad80f10f38b41822d1bd6cf7fa2a9a
2521d8511e5196da9b0fd3c09633bea7becce511
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKN' 'sip-files00059.tif'
98460bd075dee4fa04ce7688969c47d0
2535f5b83bcee794ea0006eb4512bfc6ea43448e
'2011-11-14T17:27:50-05:00'
describe
'1080' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKO' 'sip-files00059.txt'
8818e58fea0a0a63192b155cb13a2fac
0ef22f45b8551be5a7990b47abdb707181a7bbb4
describe
'8347' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKP' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
2882c5e757280b31fbbda8560d7b119a
eb3fd8d2e67b99ff9d235da5c6282053991f859f
describe
'319935' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKQ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
fcb60ece89d17e644852030931ffc864
a55d0cf0a40cb36ed22a85be77a8bcb087e44d9d
'2011-11-14T17:23:20-05:00'
describe
'98042' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKR' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
b306e67c04749e2d11962fd9225d5ce0
634e7b151f7695e44f279a2aa1e2a181814f34c7
describe
'26797' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKS' 'sip-files00060.pro'
2ef87e6ccc32f19bb2160dc300ea8c84
d7c293a517d09a7efe06ac495b259633819250ec
describe
'33076' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKT' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
5085e0bf1f5c13fdb4102439472be811
03e8bbfe7c33d996775262cc826bdd5c457c5588
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKU' 'sip-files00060.tif'
f00f3f9cc88af57282bfeeba95443d09
257c243a75e2633f40a5613caee163b7a206b95a
'2011-11-14T17:28:12-05:00'
describe
'1113' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKV' 'sip-files00060.txt'
da03a8933017d9c60bac7f0b5ba6a2ff
f0a7d8481fc44a8aa4eeeaec0ee10b0556974c42
describe
'8651' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKW' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
8e516e83905e12c0976511e5948f2ac9
12b20a9c47391fb6ba81276ff651abb0dd71023a
'2011-11-14T17:26:33-05:00'
describe
'319905' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKX' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
b9c1142fefac399f5d8104fa96afd9e2
4af6ddd8799592c7875adae5772ee86ecf124ff6
describe
'100095' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKY' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
5b2e799391058dd8e6ffde12fee6e342
1c698e0d4514ce2f88a9a352438ddabf1a35cc87
'2011-11-14T17:27:03-05:00'
describe
'28368' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARKZ' 'sip-files00061.pro'
d677bf3ad233d9caa38826c5a6c29330
1d01057483554683450724076d045a40307830d1
'2011-11-14T17:26:36-05:00'
describe
'32598' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLA' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
52440bff7152646040a5e95c6ad7062f
9742266296babb4ac785ce0b1e8ed14ddd3029f9
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLB' 'sip-files00061.tif'
fbcd20e2cb812fdd268a70df21047653
902409366cd4e35267f82a7785619da3111db506
describe
'1119' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLC' 'sip-files00061.txt'
8111bef98c2e9efeeb829930f9d2d2b3
26fae46e33d9cf21fd32ef6bd8b7728162990005
'2011-11-14T17:22:43-05:00'
describe
'8718' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLD' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
ca0904780f95c6509851107062b0918e
4380200538c0d6d212749acce5eeeccf4b26cc72
'2011-11-14T17:26:24-05:00'
describe
'319986' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLE' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
6dece832a95e02d9f4fe54c1c01d9cf6
cbea8036de95a50d1f2d937cc9ddbeb07636b5fd
describe
'90335' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLF' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
6f9db1d93db53a1d151d2589c9be3605
3a12dee098a7e5b39df6a95c3a8c59cbc052eabd
'2011-11-14T17:27:52-05:00'
describe
'25093' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLG' 'sip-files00062.pro'
bd3250dc4e5b816223e681998a90ec58
0151ea1b8f695d28581eec0c4ef86f12a75887d0
describe
'29528' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLH' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
257e732d91c75028a238d1a4ea24aeab
deeedcddba8329b72a9844a771d42ec9c76b821b
'2011-11-14T17:27:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLI' 'sip-files00062.tif'
5b05535811d7b3e664b031ac973faa0f
52cdd2d41b8fac13c93d0ff10600148f77add26e
describe
'1035' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLJ' 'sip-files00062.txt'
e409062aa5c2bd5200360a552c408210
5a247f279caee92f592e5a76cd8dd7c812902648
describe
'8186' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLK' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
5f7425423610478d3de9b029ec2f2a0f
0a9c9ca599908461624368f689d9286c5b76f30e
describe
'319987' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLL' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
d2601a5523feed6d8c06b8f650d710d7
3af50edac4bfe7ffcdaccf1992b5a934a9393edc
describe
'90741' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLM' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
ceeb972769bd5c15524ff136742b3181
34a2ca9cf304402904d5aad83bda05fc136981f7
describe
'25473' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLN' 'sip-files00063.pro'
30098ea3f7f0532a0ac1df3d45431435
b861153087ba5b36693d806b87d9ba532470bbf3
describe
'29856' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLO' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
8fbc50d8ad7b1c130efb676f0a9889be
261df6decda50c0e4e15707f5f3dc6be2fa78410
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLP' 'sip-files00063.tif'
22d06a1130e7f90b3ab5391850f96e32
cc64e2a8a09eb9dfcc3bce2283e9a99d5f1dbca7
describe
'1085' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLQ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
365982953ceae3f3da4a2303a122a98a
ecac9c295e2f284f2e8e188829d6ca672699e129
describe
'7982' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLR' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
e35cafe32ac83cd7fd205a680a0c9e96
19c92d9656fa719b24ab9aa02a0ae09cccf06388
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLS' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
e758da7fb397dc48f4d9b8d514dea6a1
bc5b3a63bdae48679621b46dba5bf7d67ce98ddf
'2011-11-14T17:24:04-05:00'
describe
'167757' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLT' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
6fbcb4c7cc8b56d4428cbed514826875
b05ffd74b2a867488a880687dd96a5b1d36d27ef
describe
'41483' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLU' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
80c160444802abdeaad0bd3ea31c8a5a
9cf8768a51a5ddf70dca86373bbe0af2840e630d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLV' 'sip-files00064.tif'
22b8a6c9026a79663f3cdd2ff470c248
80c1a196d92805eff097175abc3493229ca60ac1
describe
'10189' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLW' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
6c003fcdaf3790b4e649d54afb54fb5f
7262372a6581880dc6f99a60b9ae8c062350cbfb
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLX' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
3e50556266b84513f26003347d2f7f76
79e6bebd94f704f8fefed8c51314b58c2c3cccd5
'2011-11-14T17:22:38-05:00'
describe
'13219' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLY' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
2796c23bbde25ef1ed5e167eb090812f
94a2f3487113b920eda1a67a57a0702a8a55dba0
'2011-11-14T17:23:33-05:00'
describe
'3144' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARLZ' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
ff31d10898d1f2f5585e7eb586143232
dc070be04ecf6d714b8b75aa72c0d8120fab301d
'2011-11-14T17:27:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARMA' 'sip-files00065.tif'
ca227c0334dcb7a950819e8b8c6f88cb
7724c44aa4b56756e0ee6e5f703e5a572f8ba25d
'2011-11-14T17:23:42-05:00'
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARMB' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
b627962bad602b07f99592368d3eabfd
45be25fa2b68ff29472723eec4244be9dbf8d35f
describe
'319972' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARMC' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
d1fa8162ff54a575867e20f91082ff01
e6883d5d0e43d349efdaa22856ea24142c995a0a
describe
'100062' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARMD' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
aa4b11483d6b7bb2603727b0dad71eb3
4ff7ab8a2245f6baba15ecf85081e874c566abfc
describe
'27947' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARME' 'sip-files00066.pro'
bd2ba5b06d00b17b70be038cdbd9121b
5f59e53b0daae1b635bdb1f0ca5a1b5bf6a4980d
describe
'32667' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARMF' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
8436be4cf05405acee872bba21677b45
a47dc2e30b61873bd7c4551c70412a6963716823
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARMG' 'sip-files00066.tif'
47f2fc06e3a9699c827472fb9671b969
130039cfd96f6d13e9eb444ba28292f3dc457107
describe
'1115' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARMH' 'sip-files00066.txt'
1ab080abd220ee06402b6922cf0b1412
cbc28e056b44bf94ae7dd2499da85c55a9ccd33b
describe
'8829' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARMI' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
33ac2d6bf5d079708f4e067bd89817f7
750bc04c7ac5acaa7f38e060ba1ce1fc50a28e36
describe
'320043' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARMJ' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
be08ad1a0d396d5a413b08428519f139
e7ac8d037757f864c83a59795229955dce58d790
describe
'90487' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARMK' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
48aae19507e705568b8b61d8d7545c8b
652e7128a87f2774f2e6138bf4cf8dcfd1601553
describe
'29061' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARML' 'sip-files00067.pro'
4c586aed7572d13d679e14aaf20a0a4e
4c14730888880b4d306479aaa25bd0635f5a73d5
describe
'28106' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARMM' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
6bf272e7e5ef2c77dba44953ee50dcb3
2d4a641ed460f7e4abfc2d22ff657396394cffad
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARMN' 'sip-files00067.tif'
845da3a83defd66e6ba232803d4d341e
ed138a4258320f60ee4abfd60acb621c01dbd839
'2011-11-14T17:25:41-05:00'
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARMO' 'sip-files00067.txt'
d324e8e4c7c9354b9a27b3adb52ce2e2
a3801d52fa6503bdb958f0c9ddec939bfd171e49
'2011-11-14T17:28:21-05:00'
describe
'7684' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARMP' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
5774f8604ebce36eb1194e33ab849f83
9c28d9cc66cd31468564de11912587df12f69358
'2011-11-14T17:25:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARMQ' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
78ae9b23b85490dceb4a45c533a95b35
3252304ebf37f8952ad15b08ef80127cfaccbd0d
describe
'99016' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARMR' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
c553a95f75f6c182d3c752a1f6111947
b3e095261bbb8fd8911aea5ac6b93c7cc7b90808
describe
'26770' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARMS' 'sip-files00068.pro'
3ad08b04a14f78c582d7ee65ccf128dc
23a91d372e488ccc41f67edf0a1a22cf6a6cefab
describe
'32640' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARMT' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
e51b0b0d528505ff72c23c29d010260d
56a7a575aa7cc0cf697150327442e77d311997d8
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARMU' 'sip-files00068.tif'
20afe822971e82085c42097d548c46aa
faef886d74ae4b2af949bac2a338a6a6db78626f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARMV' 'sip-files00068.txt'
4b5e7db58f5b1fb25c93dd7f1a2dc3ba
bb8d47fee96afe3bae1b44dd131e9a4511c4fd8b
describe
'8755' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARMW' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
35cf32cabe4c95f15f6195f90d42f065
3a573eae993353740be75a1f11e169a1c6cdbae6
describe
'319942' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARMX' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
f08b7ea5df4b3947394bd894daa256c0
0469edd0e3601c5a6f5b8a3cbf36c1c24306cb23
describe
'99105' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARMY' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
c9f49e4d9af3a75a8fd2ebdb325f87a5
c63d2db4f7ccfc12cd7e219d994e80e9ec328f1a
describe
'27997' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARMZ' 'sip-files00069.pro'
98808aa64bbac88898523715f84521a8
8f8ca12828d300d319ed07d2e864187af6c4ff0e
'2011-11-14T17:28:41-05:00'
describe
'32953' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARNA' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
3fd5fe47cd7acf1bab484b97b884c144
fee3edf6832e765d0791de17e1822cf98c6e8031
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARNB' 'sip-files00069.tif'
91d89c37ce910c69ddab2442e96226a5
5f4cf4ae512497cbeeac02ef0364a7d3a14ab076
'2011-11-14T17:24:15-05:00'
describe
'1094' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARNC' 'sip-files00069.txt'
facb9df9e89c66229c672f04006168b8
06c00075336731533065fbfba315c45297ba6862
describe
'8523' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARND' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
c74cdf2bbe324cdee4bd7ef7890513f3
d1fb3e763d38fa4e3630b9cc8f2f092fad23c3c1
describe
'319911' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARNE' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
04a98f6ad13a3b020b6898190c5731a0
78e8eb7268383e2bd5f12c1e6509364c949bd48f
describe
'87389' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARNF' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
bf5a144b09146535045790be012a1cbb
ec5910cd7156ab7f8ae3fff36ca17dc6e95c1439
describe
'24043' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARNG' 'sip-files00070.pro'
5de5a526346f61ac6791cda75b4d74aa
bf9f2392ffcc5b43deaff5df8a9747fbe1085b4b
describe
'28917' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARNH' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
8ff70f755f410c9e01f2af012dbfeb26
b6dddde84624d4657d1c9d2d945e7ec61ea42cf6
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARNI' 'sip-files00070.tif'
3cc7b5ff75666e05a384d00b72628aeb
58cff687524ef096a688ade692a7451fa5c0f91e
describe
'1005' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARNJ' 'sip-files00070.txt'
c67b4e1764f0aa8a81b35d5d4e533cc2
a975e8427216dbc3c1a73d38234badfa693b03b2
describe
'7668' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARNK' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
0df20ab180fc49467ee285ad3ae06fb7
4e8fec32b465886b79c06d20eb906ffa3943aa3a
'2011-11-14T17:27:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARNL' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
83dbe4f4e0a43daf2ef60304ed8112df
6253c040340668baeebd2ff46a80d67933f9dc5e
describe
'94275' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARNM' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
c9f1378f6c36ae855f3464af9710c097
0a80974a8eddc69dc5a78072d576c1405c4bd366
describe
'26932' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARNN' 'sip-files00071.pro'
410bc08f24b4d23cfac7b43658d0f423
d89851524827dd7c3c849f930ccd8e5633694537
describe
'31170' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARNO' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
c73082944604bd384adb57a6a2277849
6d8b10dc0ad18eb8463207321a0fe99ad2397304
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARNP' 'sip-files00071.tif'
641002e041f39ecbdb41c65d06835865
26c6a3bea0273f283603c5b9cf8fa6ea8ca37ff5
'2011-11-14T17:25:42-05:00'
describe
'1062' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARNQ' 'sip-files00071.txt'
b2d5e73f653c1c9267473f98566ba21d
57390fe144488ce2647d488fa054ff2d57818cd1
describe
'8224' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARNR' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
9679ea65f4126e391c930692f0aa7619
db5de66618ae0cea6a677bb6116cbd27f245a783
'2011-11-14T17:25:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARNS' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
9ef4d497ad18ed3bf2d6d95387d9ee8b
456b7753fadc581ebc4a0a71c8b493991d872f4f
'2011-11-14T17:23:49-05:00'
describe
'89361' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARNT' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
1f7211e79ab568cc592ff7e77d03a6aa
99a5201eb9d48dcc26775ac0726500296e0466cf
'2011-11-14T17:27:25-05:00'
describe
'25120' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARNU' 'sip-files00072.pro'
b9cfe66d238bae624990ac88276cb312
7c9494e19e6df1c1358b2169462d51add7ae14aa
'2011-11-14T17:25:01-05:00'
describe
'29364' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARNV' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
2b02edac8af1177d10325ad8005651d3
470967e8e4ed179bb04c6b37fd331995d292c763
'2011-11-14T17:27:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARNW' 'sip-files00072.tif'
6fc68b49a2b302a3fae45f1c870d1d98
4f7809e12baf2fb079bbdc577c30bc89fe0a8a9f
describe
'1001' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARNX' 'sip-files00072.txt'
600ae588b0cb63fdfcd2f169a5dc2578
7fac5f3b4db0f207a3fd3107c7fb575fdd8af02a
'2011-11-14T17:24:49-05:00'
describe
'7729' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARNY' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
bdda7131c25ef5b24b10db97ff1ac72f
349f599b11413e7fff946265fdf30f62da9897eb
'2011-11-14T17:24:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARNZ' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
e5e4199c0900796dc2a87c9b8ad02b1a
09f37637eec0d5d01ed0c1e1b871cf41e89a1018
describe
'92724' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAROA' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
92ee7cd2b0ee82442d2f465013f95695
b309f0e922dba2973504f9232816ba2efcb9e753
describe
'25610' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAROB' 'sip-files00073.pro'
a187376414357220e101993b7763256d
4d84ecfb3cae81bf33d3446c013752853090985e
describe
'30230' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAROC' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
042d151e5191401cbe0df79fce165178
6792ae3733d0d82bf7a7702f8b90d14117e3b283
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAROD' 'sip-files00073.tif'
8be257ad1a4b072cf2285fa407b33b60
cdf8d9b310e794fc1a0b73b92ee6402a13e6eec7
describe
'1050' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAROE' 'sip-files00073.txt'
f491f665343d3291d3ddc6730eaf5625
4a5b4ae26ce2de23ac045cd916a3a2aeec6ad350
describe
'7975' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAROF' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
f59e61a11399c7a30d3c8aebb0d88f6c
a6aee8d895734d797026eaf7caeb78d96e1d9466
'2011-11-14T17:26:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAROG' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
cac4f2e5b82a5e587d1d90fa6db0cf38
735fd983da62381aa2407e36c8a28d2fd4b3b9e9
describe
'96870' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAROH' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
53c6ecf4d2e84d1bbcee0217590744cb
df3c597e59406340bd09e422f163c59f95be259c
describe
'27803' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAROI' 'sip-files00074.pro'
69561d7d5a2a0e1b1c9a5acfff7b6697
86e7fa0a5d1afc1a81048ad4a7e80938e99263af
describe
'31168' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAROJ' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
92b864909e028c8cd1c882c5f71a775c
9422484521c9bb1d85ed7ec5013ab2d83dbdeb20
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAROK' 'sip-files00074.tif'
339176bc9c21375f779d05cefb0bec8f
5b1686df41435aa5423c9fb503518d8a26ac5843
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAROL' 'sip-files00074.txt'
c73d0410ae8277a4d8a515148995fc1c
2e869595020369ac1a2c44f7ba80274601ae8623
describe
'8052' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAROM' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
394f511171f946856a857e0cb7fc2bb9
6be243772b94a457df10cb559044b1f8b3994456
describe
'319981' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARON' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
82a5ff0cf67b113a5845f9fc6059f0bb
18e7de5a38c168fcc364d587f6e3fa45a67e4e13
describe
'95624' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAROO' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
4cd9e2cf33f05a273a1e786df1806353
eae31a58c2dc162f0343ebfc92cd377909aa181f
'2011-11-14T17:22:03-05:00'
describe
'25704' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAROP' 'sip-files00075.pro'
9d0f09f43bd787901ea6e6202ad76cff
ba1817f861620e465252b592b03cf09807c6bd04
describe
'31242' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAROQ' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
7d6addd30e32182d88ac2e9e6da1e1c7
a274d6db1ec7f598f4dd3729cce02632857530ac
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAROR' 'sip-files00075.tif'
c6065bbed2c6b4ccd0365223debb0a21
a1b2f73724262f54f6291ba4cf4b98105b223dc6
describe
'1053' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAROS' 'sip-files00075.txt'
72a263114dfe945f177f801d7078ebf2
9ce514ff5e9b792a0c21bc7f88e0c655a3bf653d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAROT' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
7c4e44f124dc9935ff63af268dab0cd3
68a4fc4b58f290781b8a425f0632d3cfe5a8e3ec
'2011-11-14T17:27:43-05:00'
describe
'320110' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAROU' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
c19528e7e3d1293e0f609e0acd47d818
0a2799efc4999d104eb99cb5e835effb4504f243
'2011-11-14T17:28:36-05:00'
describe
'96522' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAROV' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
62a94871d6d65d7476d4ae2e95b65e69
345c98af99643ab0822c4d500abd2384d0df6bcc
describe
'26694' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAROW' 'sip-files00076.pro'
62eaa6c9c8e0b1a01c06d55269279a81
67b99cd95f7b4d8396921864d1e30a84e711bf6c
describe
'31400' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAROX' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
bf41f678770a02a34fc6353a2d855c13
726483e326291be41ada02e705c5235fdf926c31
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAROY' 'sip-files00076.tif'
846ab9e5fed953993fdbd432220364bc
2a8c6957d721b98cf1d758948f681d8a3c0604b8
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAAROZ' 'sip-files00076.txt'
5693058b0af21ed60b584954ef88771d
cfa7371c9196f67318ae6679b5d909e870a3d602
'2011-11-14T17:26:41-05:00'
describe
'8654' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPA' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
5b062cce3c1d5eab9899f9c7937e4da8
00cd678672192e345b79b3c950615d0dcaf55561
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPB' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
2362250b30294b7a589003272f5e975d
79c7713fb7e32b9dc13d37ab92edf471aea86227
describe
'99587' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPC' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
660a30f5e6bc26f2a6004ced34b4e4ca
cff12e31f9a3a4eb2f98440d8e439556001504cd
describe
'27804' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPD' 'sip-files00077.pro'
b16cea1ed75a7350f364a2f0115d6122
fb786b5d1ff73c377e0fdd0e46864c6eaf39ecde
describe
'32466' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPE' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
cb3832cfc7a81fa2e919b2b4d9ea02cc
9a5f9599833dd051cd2c736509bb0395c4b6fa43
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPF' 'sip-files00077.tif'
d907f887386090da677a38ff510c9bb9
c5e336aef8a8e6e30d4243d1de494f7217a4577c
'2011-11-14T17:26:03-05:00'
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPG' 'sip-files00077.txt'
adb544f2da6f5d64d32a3fbad9a94927
9e2558416abf1c4e20badf8003d62c8a1962920a
describe
'8252' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPH' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
e959ceb329d340814ec40b3625b6a9b4
516d3047349c8e9e5ba72d9e0f20f4ab93659103
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPI' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
a4a4b586e42447be56300d0d1141a9f7
fd1414a130abe520eb80b8c09e964ca3b50b206c
describe
'44591' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPJ' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
2692a54c05927ee82442ac0ff22749b1
d03f2816cc76527d131f5601fa142be0f5e07708
'2011-11-14T17:27:20-05:00'
describe
'4512' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPK' 'sip-files00078.pro'
4ea5e844d2badbbe9ce7705fd9295b54
cc7652079aa2ce8d5c69c459a6b2ac008e49a0be
'2011-11-14T17:25:39-05:00'
describe
'12697' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPL' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
df6b9ae191ebb8fb4e9a64b5d07eca09
f60cc199ec282db644bf3088e0a4091e5d2eb8f4
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPM' 'sip-files00078.tif'
69ad3b5de163af11d0e3b45ff1954bc0
b3845e90e5f7d2c50d44db0fe28f3548b637b208
'2011-11-14T17:27:15-05:00'
describe
'194' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPN' 'sip-files00078.txt'
f9f5d5ab5907f7f7c55de29fab422925
d7265706d92b5e8f3dcd40cb9ea87bd340b5f677
describe
Invalid character
'3798' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPO' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
abc71d28617d558f73a3188aa2326d27
928c0147e1febc54085b6f27e79d9799697d5d5f
'2011-11-14T17:24:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPP' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
841dc6896f6e5c70eb6e13c4204c5a5d
4a2c6e5a8c5c95e32a7142f84f9fba792a7bf57b
describe
'86331' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPQ' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
b308499a76e14581a9e44d486767cf38
2775564420bb5ed9771177b03dbd986555fb3ea7
describe
'19952' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPR' 'sip-files00079.pro'
1dc07f07d060406c6a9af4bcdc00d1cd
fa2d9ba20da21a229c459d3c1f31bd4493d6bc93
describe
'26753' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPS' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
d52d531bf4ea3f8e2da1378359e16a3d
32a2b00725ca66df07073f772f292a1def66a5f2
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPT' 'sip-files00079.tif'
4d3dae76570b95f68b07c1a294f734aa
c1beba5044c1a0f233113264687c5d869784651b
describe
'956' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPU' 'sip-files00079.txt'
f29df6c12d61e2276635146561500c7a
b8fd0378fba2d5295a32ab7668135e4b5d05ff51
'2011-11-14T17:28:14-05:00'
describe
'7189' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPV' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
2f4e379f302a6d9308613700d480f5d6
0b4a4a28dfcf0e095076b6397ba7f5178f678a1f
'2011-11-14T17:25:46-05:00'
describe
'319890' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPW' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
4a3689acbf4017bb14a1b022eff01d4c
803305ddb276e1ae57b871429710b05342e422b1
'2011-11-14T17:26:37-05:00'
describe
'90169' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPX' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
0438199747ee3c4a4d0c4923e76d5172
ca843684013d716b04143e841ac8909acc3d2919
describe
'25134' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPY' 'sip-files00080.pro'
5bdfedf2fb0db923c067ee3f42626e8f
b61593f9aa8a85597ba8bcfafb81b1a5f5b3c096
'2011-11-14T17:22:57-05:00'
describe
'28918' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARPZ' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
d5b107b8ec67faa1082869287368ca06
c2eb5065d887f360f545c0d854dfb2ee4f449248
'2011-11-14T17:26:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQA' 'sip-files00080.tif'
ca778cb8b7dc09e7749b8b6730078ad1
bd70f91ad52c1446eaf78fc1ac4a74c2e7c379af
describe
'1027' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQB' 'sip-files00080.txt'
31445b5d0284375b8cc118509f23dc4e
ed04dbbfde25b4416fa7c88c9228803cd0e8218d
describe
'7675' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQC' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
7ee0558c2445f79a559a5663da81bb63
83461e3cb23d30ceed619a065e0e4db1f4505fc2
describe
'320012' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQD' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
2751c75a837539226d8d8aa5e4e55080
b707c5d2df66c7714c17cdfea4dd262f6ea337f0
describe
'92538' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQE' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
f56e6cca4854c282a6b1f1a3a4e9828e
cce2bbfb03b4c9e41b58bd06558902d6833fd87f
describe
'26230' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQF' 'sip-files00081.pro'
05cf336b137d5778a1f83eaa24cad19c
a7b9c5e14d5356e84f08ace12802cf1dcaf3de3d
'2011-11-14T17:22:16-05:00'
describe
'29731' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQG' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
f8ac6bf2e82def39fb1d8bdef6534333
f236b774ff3be290986c28ad3a7c4b7c5ed655bd
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQH' 'sip-files00081.tif'
c78e063f9f588d3feb4f6ab22767b034
8bcc77a0221dbaa6857da9902a6bc9d22ad857b1
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQI' 'sip-files00081.txt'
321d718dce08f7d8b698a0dd31e10479
25405bde100e256b7447a1d4dc55c016934b076d
describe
'7972' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQJ' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
a62908b93ab30048f0cf49283653f867
7bb47994330c69d83db7996c9971aa3fc1104fed
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQK' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
8aa6b2a5e59054dbcfacd79b50862a35
5725633cc865e9b4cf18cd9f3178b5a525f753a6
'2011-11-14T17:26:44-05:00'
describe
'96570' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQL' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
ef91c860d39612802201f3370e82376c
af9a7edf20ae0acc0466060639e6a3e31dde96a5
describe
'27821' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQM' 'sip-files00082.pro'
5e11f22b73eff006ffbf6b42db0ff652
a327795368568f2760944bc937eed7d7c136b49e
describe
'31517' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQN' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
bdaf529978a87e15d3566af82167956e
37a0c4575f03de5111aaf497df3f961555b6b37f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQO' 'sip-files00082.tif'
d3c658e0780403f71ddf2e632b9eaa4e
4d983b81f14b0a78f910b8a889a10b66f54accd8
describe
'1102' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQP' 'sip-files00082.txt'
361391c9e3d8181e9c5bca9cf7ce3e10
629acaadb91d9de7fd9c537def73c2c63ca8af8f
describe
'8572' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQQ' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
a2333711518a0cb5e589426f645bdf11
2e59d592118ad3ae5c9e685d9d0e6e0d8a6bfa2e
'2011-11-14T17:26:47-05:00'
describe
'319992' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQR' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
51168ae00c7af8ef9bac471c2e86aa2e
84c3bdce8d39b0ac46db77b89357816f102e6132
describe
'92138' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQS' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
725fb26a37ab1ccba6b68c4dcc2f4556
43d70f349393f601dbfc8001eeae8c15c791ec22
describe
'26257' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQT' 'sip-files00083.pro'
401a56c29094b7846930d3fd56c01434
31f20f94e5757b9f2a06574f92a78a67667f8816
describe
'29865' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQU' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
be8a2b8daa132858dee7eff9556ac990
c31abba523c51360ae64732cb14bb863b120d01b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQV' 'sip-files00083.tif'
ef9d2894b82de744cd54a88112ae37d4
e5fcff4caa86fabbcf3073222563a6761a6f0f00
'2011-11-14T17:27:07-05:00'
describe
'1056' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQW' 'sip-files00083.txt'
f2f81c47897c97e95998e9ea22d32653
754972ea03ba1b71ddcff51d66473dd405746a69
describe
'7901' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQX' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
0bd7d5ab6dab58468d904f2409af9d7d
a6a05563cd881e874ef2b5c8a90668036d6cea55
describe
'319928' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQY' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
841f92971609cf42c9422df2e5309c95
c5766f285afa2a5f3ae1d8b9bf140ab930fd7dc6
describe
'93935' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARQZ' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
290db6bc457fc2f1ddd842bb03013d5f
6ed16bf898a5a58d00c803a7acea908905921b87
describe
'27153' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRA' 'sip-files00084.pro'
21920e5b16786d4a2533bf871c4ff2b0
15740ba8f92f9167e8ba045300d0b5c83d97b938
describe
'30173' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRB' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
5bdeb3bd8c7ecb3c4fb93dbe72784a7f
117f3b5a525d08a8a733137debc785de346b25db
'2011-11-14T17:27:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRC' 'sip-files00084.tif'
c09e09a520be85545747dc6fbde701c0
298520a25358ec9d7201cc43b508e86d0b25c363
describe
'1095' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRD' 'sip-files00084.txt'
d77d13804de740eef596dac2231a81de
c3686ab5d5444beab66605f93a4a5b11f3318478
describe
'8229' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRE' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
952778277a6773eb3b2f62ced10309a9
fccb4c567ed10e07abb19849028372886dbd005f
describe
'319878' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRF' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
5743ce9b80da0f56ded456e9cc8f74fe
6f8dfe985b8e652e698e978cfd6d3453795e630a
'2011-11-14T17:28:17-05:00'
describe
'88675' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRG' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
bccadfb482b1097c616f1ea9ed765097
f13f6b62e1891ef0e137b78b20c31c466bb7b104
describe
'24105' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRH' 'sip-files00085.pro'
5fb3f37500b1e258b82ddd05852143d1
103e116a500c8f287854aedeb059a183fbe359ee
describe
'29302' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRI' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
6dc31b0c894f044ff4f6d622d5bedac1
0cb493acac6a1d60cf6a401d27e44b8928b12360
'2011-11-14T17:24:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRJ' 'sip-files00085.tif'
1a8eda59c8ccce693bb6c66fe02c18a2
0953094edc2febd85d5a67fdd51cb08de18a735f
describe
'992' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRK' 'sip-files00085.txt'
51442ecd854da8ada34d950be16e2e97
a00d9c0834ed6ba71023cd60e92b0b28d799c960
describe
'7792' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRL' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
0215f1398335f1e14acf662a8cf9cfda
c6012b0c982fedf0a0d8a0802bbfb4ecf13cf594
describe
'316733' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRM' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
58c71cc98a3e266dd3f6d7bc9a0f269b
b0bdf590be5dc2f180adc970a843cd511ec49db8
describe
'101394' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRN' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
a1ab0726aa0d93c05c387c5df44b48c2
43455c470896ec6887b5103d00188b5a1e3b3ad3
describe
'27892' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRO' 'sip-files00086.pro'
c9711594732c1ff5f992b3c6de8e62fe
5aa07fe9a574e245f9d0dd7beefd37d9b975c21e
describe
'32239' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRP' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
a7f67a09adce7f971a5af21e5f8e5c1c
db7b573fe41d3fd10997b8c1bab4b830a70ab214
describe
'2550412' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRQ' 'sip-files00086.tif'
673b25b653cbf2e9b55f13088bf3847f
3cab63e553800bd99bc552a3f24b73c2336441bf
'2011-11-14T17:22:25-05:00'
describe
'1133' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRR' 'sip-files00086.txt'
8f8f695d3cc56d36a4a1482842bf0288
b73e693568cc9bb6f2bc1a510dd62451abf40e16
describe
'8708' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRS' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
da21cc4b23cd63e9549286a341319e2a
ebd6329bbbdfc3b08eb2aadd9ad907502835a29c
describe
'320130' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRT' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
e0cae32252f2814aee47bcbf994c3539
92d4da0672c08d29a8fcb81784ced2609f924356
describe
'100033' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRU' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
df6c1114157fe161c8e6bea51fe26a25
ee4a176577fd929aac601ad1c2e38cd8735d2017
describe
'28663' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRV' 'sip-files00087.pro'
df0f84ade85da02d3311125f01c0db80
01068b4cd1edcf7e2bcc8c82754e7fe9180afe87
'2011-11-14T17:28:34-05:00'
describe
'32627' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRW' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
fb92066dd127403873dc838f898118fa
5e8d1bdd64f10bf1398e806d55618d2e65e0de91
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRX' 'sip-files00087.tif'
fa6bad77f9fcc1628db5664ec488b319
e845361b5ef7684c540754c34b6a4ec45295a1d4
describe
'1125' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRY' 'sip-files00087.txt'
d05eac9b6521d55695b67a2a96ad3cfa
48246027f7baf628bae10d6a4917c0239d627cc1
'2011-11-14T17:25:51-05:00'
describe
'8849' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARRZ' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
a3d3b6b79ed8021aa62ac692547f2d65
390e6bedbfc283d1969719b87a649b37d1862cc8
'2011-11-14T17:22:15-05:00'
describe
'319951' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARSA' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
39bc34d8f44e7bdc3d7169837f8834f9
d072a67908aaccdecd8485260190028d165a396b
describe
'93720' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARSB' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
8f040e22b7068da7783cbbef07453dd5
df21b6018344286241f45d12e875f57d720fb7d2
describe
'26801' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARSC' 'sip-files00088.pro'
b975a2ecfc701cb130ec188931334e2a
6cc8fc3e3611c070607c3eeefdfb6815428132b9
describe
'30589' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARSD' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
dbcfd81b0dc9626e5e7e30aa44cda665
8cf1ed2e960df6f095da5c030e69112b35db49ea
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARSE' 'sip-files00088.tif'
de4075ab770d625c99404c4bd57c553b
f6672f673af0b2c6bd89f19d0a34863f30e5072c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARSF' 'sip-files00088.txt'
289363f1b5f8399a689de08a4689419f
88970f44bebe19d0f342f612696de905f831f771
describe
'8102' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARSG' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
df2edaf4e1ed780ce2bb05b1808cab0a
7c175030773c7cce12a3fb5ccd63c8b01e57cd56
describe
'319968' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARSH' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
07e1ba6228161ba575a503a8b614ab87
b293f407071685b62831cb9d9872bf618410014c
'2011-11-14T17:23:21-05:00'
describe
'101403' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARSI' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
a21a6ea0aee8097cc6b11d6e9dad1e1f
67c4a72b36171bca0dc770ebf829961418a6d3bb
describe
'28426' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARSJ' 'sip-files00089.pro'
f3f5a90c46ededb32ae1075156c78d27
1e9d627ab153daf32e92867430faabb71a3c5ba1
describe
'32245' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARSK' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
c973693d3c19eb656a7a8a0ea1438c3a
d544a0b5dc7ecb562b7cae35af807b43d44f1d0c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARSL' 'sip-files00089.tif'
84e4983d4cfbe1a9c674e71638677823
d9f0625ae6f0066ab1378ef7084bc4e205d224be
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARSM' 'sip-files00089.txt'
eef975ff8cc32a105f4f7719acc4075f
4ace6cfbb2375da95802124ec6dd987883bc4aaf
describe
'8404' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARSN' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
743813fa99d1909da9a8274d41a9309f
d35aacad866aed3c6f2c036f72eee12f63443074
describe
'319996' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARSO' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
cf7fe7e5ca4c081b72167243add70a77
c1f0e30f367b55b14ac048992c4230db981ea589
describe
'100056' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARSP' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
f246dac6c52ae946768506e5086754b9
63c6dc7644b2acbeaefbcd11a190169358a372af
describe
'28484' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARSQ' 'sip-files00090.pro'
4d16c3f201876025928f8ad1f1578e6a
09cedf84468bc54b789168e8bd0473360ea24daf
describe
'32592' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARSR' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
7b5ab1619ac871909d17fa5a01538919
126e67bfd8570bbd52a2f81f7ed11b6ba0359c8f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARSS' 'sip-files00090.tif'
99cbd640e9edcb9b912f40575f5e36d4
12401dd8462c8f54dd5415f5a59a48bf1ed5f67e
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARST' 'sip-files00090.txt'
55ee536ad11050990e4726a9021bd402
b7c3d44e98a71b55f771b03d3a44f714b4bb6fdb
describe
'8517' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARSU' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
c1449eb647bb1354dba866e7809ee2ba
fbd31ddf8a1d519ed79b6ef0490681328aafb414
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARSV' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
ce3b38b8a4b6fcc0496f2dcb3539b834
5a2e111a1f3e2b93014818c07818514c244af5d1
describe
'98516' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARSW' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
73a5c4605483d31c3b804c54ce877a66
7aa6fc4a81a40c5c9973e2422cef6518905d3872
describe
'26970' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARSX' 'sip-files00091.pro'
306c86f6328034a282bf34884203c7c3
461811f08dae3c1dc6142af774c89356a9533dbe
describe
'31838' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARSY' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
31c5b459c400a564d92ae1936af869bd
59d68f426e1f111e50df5f2871011acd8ae8a637
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARSZ' 'sip-files00091.tif'
233813a1093df9335411f43b17f95ea2
bb5d0b07c07249602be0ff5e60ad10255add65f9
describe
'1088' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTA' 'sip-files00091.txt'
a6a227618d5829b89c0092ee71a8b78f
6063256874ec81de9ac2448aabd4e3c214a0757e
describe
'8183' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTB' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
f73e87239308c73b080a989f14cff184
f27c80c90cd90bba5afb41ffea2d77b4cb369352
describe
'319866' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTC' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
13cf2084817624d2575b0d0d06c1d72f
64af96ff8f8056b70d0e35e1d44076c5f3d118f8
describe
'45696' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTD' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
f9acee3d38bcfefe391a500ff9999756
21a605a0b3e1b46f632e1685accc6cd0470d8a9b
describe
'11056' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTE' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
d590d6c6d95f10a17b07c2e2dcb99dc5
fe08281e8af93ac26a725bce0ea44fc6f238425e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTF' 'sip-files00092.tif'
ed250d2a01330c1fa3de51be74e4bcd5
044ff3f277235ab5df76cd3485562a84593601a9
describe
'2824' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTG' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
14db8161e30f57554570b331b00aec0c
ceeb6907c885313c620aad8853f48199a1333315
'2011-11-14T17:23:08-05:00'
describe
'320172' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTH' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
e915bf9dac117a038509d3303f9dacd1
e3e2d540d585b9e5f419bf7d5d2dbf960dc07314
describe
'98469' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTI' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
3ab1f1cdfcced2ee202e2ecb51ed4dad
ae21ffffb1c9fe5182f20ac2327c8f122b608654
describe
'27704' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTJ' 'sip-files00094.pro'
3c75f32fe334abaf620878a5d53a1976
10f0e4676efb87f0cc3624abf89be7af0acd936e
describe
'32786' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTK' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
ee9fa14a1bfa5630fd7997ceb205fe3f
6decbe5752f289520c6d2b351384307ecb2e0666
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTL' 'sip-files00094.tif'
61f8866f2471a2cddb08311318913598
b57c597020e2043b702bcf967b1b1550311f7a3a
describe
'1096' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTM' 'sip-files00094.txt'
a0d9463509d56d5b12055ebeb46a6957
14cd6baf89f6d3f29b2b4b8605cfffc0e697246c
'2011-11-14T17:23:52-05:00'
describe
'8534' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTN' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
b813ee0b7fc4c8b1a18b154f1665c616
9561416026b34f30a1f8782bc27359d412fdd5bb
describe
'320005' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTO' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
3f3204ab53d71b7d00c230bcb11afdd6
acc4dcd75ad909184f3ff8166cb66c10a3eaa5de
describe
'93433' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTP' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
150155a0e349b0ba527f84cedd2e3dc8
9b295b287571e22c4be6816f6f9404182402be68
describe
'27556' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTQ' 'sip-files00095.pro'
77a8bcd246a788e7287a3c702481084a
a7e2c9ce921fc1f786902c294e67054de2ad50c7
'2011-11-14T17:25:31-05:00'
describe
'30188' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTR' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
d4d2ce44cfd8118719693cbc93592d75
44847e2149373a0859101230c568667bf28ad6fe
'2011-11-14T17:24:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTS' 'sip-files00095.tif'
a3d652842788aea6dbf6f775b15765d5
d1d25b54476bb02861570c90d796edc19ef5fc39
'2011-11-14T17:27:36-05:00'
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTT' 'sip-files00095.txt'
346ae5de5a574000d72d193397feb13c
a4a662dd6adb2f26cef753da442bd263bda969a8
'2011-11-14T17:26:42-05:00'
describe
'7865' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTU' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
0cf50e6673340f691357e000393a2780
df7657966234c2c3d156743a4c504b392c5ca683
describe
'319963' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTV' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
dcb7a5e1bf5adcd09c87c06b75420481
187c77245d22e4ab79199a7d9b1cb48b6a1f8224
'2011-11-14T17:25:29-05:00'
describe
'100443' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTW' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
a06b7d1014222219ba0f664aafcdd4c2
aa29ec69d6bd90a9350c591ac8c24d7d6e2f6c81
describe
'35631' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTX' 'sip-files00096.pro'
359577459354af8b1a1dec3e0bda46a2
552062868d208d763fba6d1195f636cc5cc031c9
describe
'30981' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTY' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
77b05ae9e6f8756fa107ef261b372e7f
7e35495f732ff896dfb5f59f6f5616fbb7ff590b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARTZ' 'sip-files00096.tif'
e16928d2f3a9221760fd7afe34128b11
445bac5aa3320904f1442b7ee65046abba33c10e
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUA' 'sip-files00096.txt'
8ebbafe2160a12d9232f495eed92043a
6b14723be4f2b0aaa467c89e7966cfade228e273
describe
'7761' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUB' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
342e54b2e99e9ad8ff8a1dd3b8b7b066
7f35c92b09b9be054787f94217900474b055563e
describe
'320083' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUC' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
2a7053932bcc89b510ddaf3037c3df7b
b215c19daf8c52533e33ef42aa086f2acb3ff10f
describe
'91657' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUD' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
b61cc3e4ccb6a1a0c1afea41bbc34b6c
574f88d547f12944ccf79c83dbf29a7144f1225b
describe
'27213' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUE' 'sip-files00097.pro'
11dde1284eb9c399129d63eff97bb3f6
0d8de522853e9bc212f71a4743828fd2c3363237
describe
'29116' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUF' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
541af28ef2c358f54f82cbd153e89d0e
7a3ca74e353a6b3f82ce39688d0fc0ba5d4fe079
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUG' 'sip-files00097.tif'
97bd1899e15546be22eed7d816df101d
24c475e93a2945c60344e229b88cdd6c5ec2dc39
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUH' 'sip-files00097.txt'
f76b6874cb4d18818ee006ff9cce49aa
5937459d64b5e93aa414cb66da9f3a9ff3704b0c
describe
'7735' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUI' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
90e74eb79e52b2b80925832fb7a084c0
df80ca2432757c55e1da867a62e5b84e68377f6e
describe
'319913' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUJ' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
cc320a99cf10a24dcad464671b0c120a
bca1505668dbe0a07e8c07aa72092df887a742bf
describe
'92006' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUK' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
3883d45720338f7954433ecc05605a98
d9868bb8b2da8357b6195c61cc0fa86e482f55ee
'2011-11-14T17:28:22-05:00'
describe
'25397' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUL' 'sip-files00098.pro'
1ed72f4ecc6cd261372aebbe8993402a
b0c82c475cc25ffb22f608db0077d781d8770881
describe
'29525' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUM' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
d3c93736dd95bad7b402869570f099f9
5b9a4e508ce07378b48390166bb1799dc0649b54
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUN' 'sip-files00098.tif'
624a273914802f34451494cb2d694c5c
4bfbaf0fed3ad0c2144216f5e0706e01e95766ac
describe
'1031' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUO' 'sip-files00098.txt'
a3f09b96becad2cdf5e8e33081d9d1f7
e2fefe4d102cb11189fcea59ee710ae39c1d9e1d
describe
'8012' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUP' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
56ba33b47de9156dc3528d1e022cf340
6e9aa7eae1ecc26801e0283f35bc8b2b38d1a6bb
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUQ' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
1417a9aed89dcd5d3c65fe9ece81afd1
0b977f1e64191b85b53032b3206619538f26659d
describe
'96882' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUR' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
1381aa6338be31857a2b58d6ebb03246
0c8a93f16d0ab7319d62db292146695045cf6fd8
'2011-11-14T17:23:47-05:00'
describe
'27147' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUS' 'sip-files00099.pro'
8a4041c181a85ad2caed8c4bb24a06e7
0bdbf96af5519e12f0726047f8e1e5f34acd1f73
describe
'31777' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUT' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
fa2d3574066c8314f992f114d371ca5e
7b370d111c76128812c8cb901cb8d0785dcb26e2
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUU' 'sip-files00099.tif'
5f814c555a96b1724b90b5c1087496a3
a1ce69692100a80a387cf35a126ca8fde41d918f
describe
'1070' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUV' 'sip-files00099.txt'
3aa1c39110f16eb3913c93bbfedc6a75
c0af6d88ba116ed69e432df561070790fd570609
describe
'8589' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUW' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
05e52d7ba5469e242fa28b0047068db4
5ccc23c548b9d9f035bcca5aa17ebfe8f65244c5
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUX' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
736d99cc4b641cb806a0221ccf262662
b6183aa1c33dd7eb1d8d0d2c2b6234afcd16bf71
describe
'95167' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUY' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
fd96c6b2ad2c8e893e16aaa62d78befd
92e21be128537423377b20a4b1df24f9495eb8d4
describe
'25416' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARUZ' 'sip-files00100.pro'
cc98b2d0626fe3bf4e0da301519231a2
f76bb23114400f8e884ac8c0570050b24f6b4d59
'2011-11-14T17:22:08-05:00'
describe
'30904' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVA' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
6d0877463c190d3e81d6aa3f3565df3d
7e41cf55dea3b938b77c6871af39726308620ecb
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVB' 'sip-files00100.tif'
8eb0b76dfaabc85a1168b7b9857ababe
5a36485433e62fb6e9dce8a2eec197e127f9d6df
describe
'1061' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVC' 'sip-files00100.txt'
baa1bc35c3eba287fd5f8981c982e853
00a54013d918bb658ae92d8d3af5eb4e6e2c2309
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVD' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
f15b00c6d47d3306eb7712033cd4e242
e8700ee73775c3cf7d19d610907ff83218a9e3e3
describe
'319993' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVE' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
c5cd26b2c3ed066b8f847768d9a1e2bb
bb03801ff855d03ce0b29f7065d0950920cd915b
describe
'104301' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVF' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
ee8289b8ceb9cf2f339bd1a8b001ed8e
ba686dd13ac7d7f33ddb17c119daec8afcfcc1d2
describe
'27855' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVG' 'sip-files00101.pro'
9eb0ea1313070bfc0d131cdc91f95c70
d86b6de85c981b74acd3698a0473017f2636e02f
describe
'32774' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVH' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
458f4451d8f0c816c2d182a6f619b5e1
2af9561e103ccaeeb5790b46f1091c5cc99495fa
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVI' 'sip-files00101.tif'
081512c6f3618219103410d7fe39c59a
ffd2c83db04ae49f93430c42c3ca949a6593423d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVJ' 'sip-files00101.txt'
b049bc20a43a32cba20fb409a2ed4f94
b5d795837580b5b14f8134ec229119cd34535f7f
describe
'8621' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVK' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
ac3fd6d84f529d71589b3c57816fb5c3
4e7f018cb59b4790052db32976e3f575892d8881
describe
'320007' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVL' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
6b02b503eda71ccb585af6e090149fb7
58e1051212d0281412332feb9433ae04713e0f88
describe
'101793' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVM' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
6feed2b33c025e454370e743157bc075
b2442c5ed81dbdfe1075e1a63c921f1f45c625d9
describe
'26224' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVN' 'sip-files00102.pro'
f29e4e216ac066e3495de09c19a0631f
7e7e05e74b37d02cf6aea0b59082e4d26aa90091
describe
'32861' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVO' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
b50070629d59858331579f2d95beb0f4
362ddc154e3832e144322c62a5c5a819052e9dc1
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVP' 'sip-files00102.tif'
71463068dd66872d0fe4b3165b42c497
dc968917d4ceaadd9101d73358ef1a6069bbf327
describe
'1117' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVQ' 'sip-files00102.txt'
94f8bdf94f18e1d361c490fb83835658
9115b34954f91b0dd9fc1310cf7414b60f164155
describe
'8620' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVR' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
5b9c950ebf5e02f6dec6169046c38e9a
f8a53ff237ebbc1e91b043d28dbdc72c71f74a34
describe
'320008' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVS' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
a59d80f151dbc048cfdf2fc41d836f20
69277ba239bd18dfb7b058176d169631bc5e2795
describe
'99385' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVT' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
0bd744e7e046a8ff365708e3ad0cab9a
6d6dabd074fe157099072ebd95681f2680ab36c2
describe
'27269' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVU' 'sip-files00103.pro'
99a50f69342012dc3aa800804bfbb67c
b093c57586d3c473cc6a88cc141e77fc979f6ab3
'2011-11-14T17:22:24-05:00'
describe
'32373' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVV' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
8daf07ea04af6c6503a49fa132edee4c
c215ef5822ac716c1dda7e02c22fad0477bb6d34
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVW' 'sip-files00103.tif'
0681618c44f1f79d386bb14023467371
ce3e6d20f84acda1e0fc5d1becb1ed75a9911747
describe
'1077' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVX' 'sip-files00103.txt'
f0e6155dc2141d9b7e109ce09d8dcb5d
f5de21960b5ed1a4475b67ffa56ff78faa399620
describe
'8442' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVY' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
b187bf6b0f7a592dd39837742abd931d
7a9daac1bd0e7c21665c9ef34e027194ede9223b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARVZ' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
f2f9bf58f4239c015510a9b672cc7c83
3bcc064e3828ef31dffe291e942682822949d707
describe
'90592' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWA' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
75d45aa625cbedddbbbe919668844238
5a7c95b4068910d6c3631cec18a9f631a8222adb
describe
'26076' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWB' 'sip-files00104.pro'
69e6173d2da853329e8404b58c5c613c
e795c63ebdd50832ae30d85590179df80d0f0d24
'2011-11-14T17:24:23-05:00'
describe
'30039' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWC' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
3de83c32ba124814f009325c41bf19a8
22cff50a4ed51f991d31c08c806b78358e65ff67
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWD' 'sip-files00104.tif'
2801ce1d94da19bce8c4021b56cc06a3
30da1864cd385795dcf153a02aa8d79faeebcf90
'2011-11-14T17:23:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWE' 'sip-files00104.txt'
157a69f13f861054e23e0ee1e9a53e41
4c99bf86a0fa0a3bef5a6d6a90cfb4128553d111
'2011-11-14T17:27:12-05:00'
describe
'8179' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWF' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
01f7e7b3c1bc555a31208053cbbcf675
d40bd4968c5dcc9b0e39e7997d8c245b61b67210
'2011-11-14T17:22:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWG' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
e77ed84b002568eab2cf3817afe45103
70f705d4c3326372d4220a73129ba04f38a08dd4
describe
'102475' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWH' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
f9c28d598169cad142229ceb03498701
7b86924a9e7050650c4dbd6655b6b5e18d3c658e
describe
'27977' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWI' 'sip-files00105.pro'
fd6fa77397576f2c0dec61ebebefe5c9
351c2bcec571c0e8eeb53aa3d69ce8caa1ef01f6
describe
'33729' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWJ' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
7bee533e7b41ab9024b0436560b7bd29
60bd263d172f2d2ae795f3147beb436a35727c92
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWK' 'sip-files00105.tif'
f8984c64c8b547eba7a554b659613452
b091930c60b0ed28e6597bc5942e5f336e947604
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWL' 'sip-files00105.txt'
c3cff17ab2d8007826f944d668bdfed7
ac05f2bd803501c76577b0927105a861f6f65a7c
describe
'8864' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWM' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
3492d064655daba7008e8022b777f53e
9c41911d8f21865437ed1141deab9490aea7cfc0
describe
'320004' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWN' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
efa72f1a15df21f8eeb1b8920d30075a
d44a8718be2625f13aeecc49632dd4b06a6d69d8
describe
'102824' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWO' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
ad2dd22a64236fd7ad3d2d2190d5a57d
e2ed23761b4a0a1737508502395242033b81a98d
describe
'22901' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWP' 'sip-files00106.pro'
bad6763508c0695e79e1e62e994b7e4a
9ba41c7acd01e8dbfb32ffac3f4b8a77d919c077
describe
'33191' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWQ' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
599a858db97363b5876219c5f9b1daf3
99c915105961bd10e5c455f0264106a39530ef04
'2011-11-14T17:24:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWR' 'sip-files00106.tif'
0f5cc6da6db3103833c6e65be94fde91
5765cfbe038ea9f829598c4fddc6cf47b764e6d1
describe
'971' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWS' 'sip-files00106.txt'
4081f75fcc2be49a48bce1b91390b61b
ae9934975ca5b16974ba6e61f034dea846f2ba30
describe
'8875' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWT' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
2b59506dde698a19b2e939bceb7a7a7a
9a6204458635e2f0e3db26ea9929d4ee16b77b91
describe
'319914' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWU' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
422f89fb3f5a3c899c11d4bd7b28bd4d
3bb444b6b7bfd14b169f1d72a8018c49ca106561
describe
'76910' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWV' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
926645e31cdd6ed31c317c56c8c881cc
d8c6760b78f0bfd45127a1af2a3b06b15e49b03c
describe
'16488' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWW' 'sip-files00107.pro'
f6129bb043159ae45238a2978654092b
b29e7deaa1f07e726c22a4987538debb488c81ee
describe
'24009' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWX' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
da3883d125f11bc0bf80d5ac4d52d995
19036465e8e15327e799f92af5b5d6dff2df9a1f
'2011-11-14T17:27:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWY' 'sip-files00107.tif'
c6c2ffa907eb712495cc4b1f6a5903dc
1b0d8ed0ba93d7c97623c5f31f6d08b820855b95
describe
'774' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARWZ' 'sip-files00107.txt'
f96415626f5336b8f8d93a7345ee1cce
e9aa3979dbccc0733b1d95a96bf3334806047d4e
'2011-11-14T17:28:35-05:00'
describe
'6966' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXA' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
a015946c87240f7c379ab7c04d31325c
38cb6962e670d07e3c83219b6fb1379a3d900e31
describe
'319978' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXB' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
30aaa61aa80607202051dff62a991d78
a57292f7439e21e0ea8005346dbafa335389a40e
describe
'99061' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXC' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
5988eba4f173427bf1bc2c6cdbf8fd1a
e2263a153820ac3ecca1f1a2de6c53229bd77023
describe
'26720' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXD' 'sip-files00108.pro'
a5bc25cfe8d977e3143a053d0d03d8ae
390cf5e7b4f560415515c4880090b0aa885f14a5
describe
'32016' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXE' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
5a85ed26e16407277c66e17b363e3d24
75114c51d4cf431f037ce692aa6dd7f3a8514376
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXF' 'sip-files00108.tif'
31080a34cbc8456bc992ead7b1bf3101
ec0963c8a5a2f900d73286773e6edb9481fd2f32
'2011-11-14T17:26:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXG' 'sip-files00108.txt'
03a8b61583a5a8f81ed45815b63bc4e5
447cddaef6e90e3fbe5fc42469db8547ef5568e1
'2011-11-14T17:23:43-05:00'
describe
'8753' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXH' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
6c3ca2c7b7bf515720cb41dc6891f41c
5148834764a263a727d0ae0619fc5acee3797c9d
describe
'320018' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXI' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
d40ee45d9bfda3b1235d2dfaa815284a
1dcfa27b698b32d9c80fc66a7c78f93e0e81ba3f
describe
'101754' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXJ' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
03b1f440ae66b2a1238f64ee633b3e74
9cbee7b4e41c8f4fa6c09df46e6445e4c46829ac
describe
'27694' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXK' 'sip-files00109.pro'
cf8f74b6423237fcf7615975cc6b30f4
5df8e85e952ddb33966463e508dcb3599d2496b5
describe
'33099' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXL' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
454f96165ac7cb90d71a0ee9b78eea3e
ae2c0f010b83de125ba6616195cc58c4c97ba954
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXM' 'sip-files00109.tif'
c1029d315ce2a536133461f9eb5b6222
7a69eba241b7167bd3f12175d4ab02d463ba4a06
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXN' 'sip-files00109.txt'
ad31e906aed7b665c00e73ae6a899aae
2cf64fa490b118a05355488293a06e984758d162
describe
'8734' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXO' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
e1c3c2a39b369204fba635ed083acd61
b32eff447514db801b3c767f0c187845ebbef04a
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXP' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
12d1208efa1d12d7fac5632caa9228e6
fa0e0ee94d22d66bca7cf074dbf9fafcb8ccd1b4
describe
'98900' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXQ' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
1aef712039b5a0b3de326eb6a135c056
2456018ae7bacb52f10703b67cc9abad6f3424ef
describe
'27156' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXR' 'sip-files00110.pro'
d26a301276a4afe6dc4e191faff28b9c
1ec86f74bb7dde352fa874f2c09f3bac4598ddc8
describe
'32234' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXS' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
e6918bcf270982193d2a7928c4a04aba
d9e0abec08d81f10baa25e5a23c9b95f4f3a6b47
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXT' 'sip-files00110.tif'
f976d8323e1dc72337d9b10e2cac0915
974a356b7433f3d108ed0d43c93a548670ae6c9c
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXU' 'sip-files00110.txt'
5d71649c317136b9087c4faa8b2cdcdc
7ee0bb683d77e9fa021bbdc98c427b6d537f127f
describe
'8413' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXV' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
67a4b27758db6f18dd9f72134738e023
5fba57b2138868f82b9903324bee17cd58fe8b6e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXW' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
8225d90b3dd74a217a3a2041e23e5859
5d9ef3dca31d77a48fad69884f892843a9a3ff32
describe
'104429' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXX' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
4637287bbd70e2eff49ce988d6a89627
dcc2c757326a43f190badd939ee6f2a5be30b0a2
'2011-11-14T17:25:27-05:00'
describe
'28800' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXY' 'sip-files00111.pro'
5efa690b7795f98db6e5a0e4e94e7971
8e3b072b35d873742940319c1539e56ae70e7140
'2011-11-14T17:27:22-05:00'
describe
'33708' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARXZ' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
303894bb36aa17c589895f9ebc45071d
3586e4599256698dac1af0fc1206df78a92f0d47
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYA' 'sip-files00111.tif'
9dae117985a5b1e8551c4ec04bcfb099
4fe9028101e72bfc3a9558e1182802fe42a500fb
describe
'1160' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYB' 'sip-files00111.txt'
4dec211b8a770d4678272ee8a4bfb634
35ee5602407d14dacd072dc7d32e4a8b64e35abd
'2011-11-14T17:28:07-05:00'
describe
'8997' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYC' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
970cd545e45a87000376dc08580a8f5b
49b98dc941d0d8498329e296a900892cd378d2d0
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYD' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
fc5ad93a49f71cdeffdc74e4d996267e
61146fce6ac4c7695bf38fd7ddf75bf28914569d
describe
'101322' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYE' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
809923bc06333b089bead10fabc14ab6
8272db0e54b6037aca0f2b1d91412dc86f7d436b
describe
'28430' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYF' 'sip-files00112.pro'
bf80cecdbd4e359a95d977214814ce0f
3bdb59d19cdba75839787ac10b7c26d1f492d757
describe
'32635' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYG' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
b264129fb871b7ec0069052d909244bc
c437815daf9c2d13287dd53d7eb418660711245f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYH' 'sip-files00112.tif'
2a254abc228ecb341cd73237cad5b1ea
fc1e217ddb4149ac1817a0721bb84a445b108b80
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYI' 'sip-files00112.txt'
6e24484b0152e5ba3c89eb7dc6f7f538
c27b81b86b98bfcf7dc377acc79a5911955c2896
describe
'8486' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYJ' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
adeb2daef84d844c6036285aebdd448f
2fe6f76362d01c5406ef493e4dd28a9c4827a8d9
describe
'319950' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYK' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
4ef29f332e1288d5def2df1e76f1309e
e9c5d4b1b4d134107b922951c5535ec8021b4741
describe
'101411' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYL' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
e33baa988798dd9afb5766cb2db37d27
b6a70120aac8d55db211ffdc5b60a439d1bbc1b6
describe
'27750' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYM' 'sip-files00113.pro'
0876c9038de111ba56613ef6923a0d85
e65135dbd6c00374bf82b4753cd05913b0b11331
describe
'32794' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYN' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
4a00f7e65e48b0a58ed71a5b74cac629
6a933f0be93d9e0ae10636421e559d474a48eb4f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYO' 'sip-files00113.tif'
763ddb4f8e5d8bffb10b1be40466dc7b
9a45632f76772da5f4b09611ea9665975c566541
describe
'1146' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYP' 'sip-files00113.txt'
cb296556ce336841c60a10ae07b98d84
4dc8dab133c12f28f43d7fdfca4fc4e093cf3251
describe
'8295' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYQ' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
4ededc76a20e6d15c105fdb7919427c3
4896503955683bb4b41b7b0fdf05e1616d3fd504
describe
'317476' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYR' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
015bc3ab618bdd24b5b47fc265a198db
218e73b61adb8dc400ff70c50426a5696b362cc4
'2011-11-14T17:23:54-05:00'
describe
'99787' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYS' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
f7754dadb6d760c0a8f105165db18ac2
b161a953dc1dd1fb99128558d33b498e1b8385c8
describe
'27029' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYT' 'sip-files00114.pro'
9b3c7feba1b006873f00d274edb55ce1
78b805dde69e8f8022b291d98b8e92cdf917b118
'2011-11-14T17:25:13-05:00'
describe
'32253' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYU' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
a8bda6c96d706581547dad0c2f68f308
89c91f76bf4a9ddf8ec0c8818010011b8e196911
describe
'2556612' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYV' 'sip-files00114.tif'
8f7cac24b624b6248b0096f182a84df8
63f245985a893527fe4890c20a5d05e6afdd441b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYW' 'sip-files00114.txt'
a92553ebeaa483cce533a49f05404620
b1951465eb2a0266a6058afb1cea4a27ae2e58fd
describe
'8683' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYX' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
48057a00f7d6d3f6fc8cc75a94dcba2f
54773e88144241ec89fca47d0ce606e5351f8032
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYY' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
8c3eefb60d1cf59b9ffbb11d2c182883
796dc213001a9e8d24833b6b3f02539a1dcfb27e
describe
'99801' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARYZ' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
df3d6d143f4f50093f83e940d9a8166b
fa4f62f689a3a2ac86b882100ea00a8d49dfb498
'2011-11-14T17:22:13-05:00'
describe
'28048' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZA' 'sip-files00115.pro'
9cc654522c5215252e3eb5cacd79b17e
3d10a95dacd8c1fdb3f6be329d8ee9b21af0d88e
describe
'32493' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZB' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
1ad5a6e9fd5beb977c35a3d6a0028d46
3d742049bf878aaf93ecefa9f473011f110e3c64
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZC' 'sip-files00115.tif'
19d1f88295084ef24dcb318648e75b72
43e509cf7416b2ce6aa043a7aab9d99c9c095cac
'2011-11-14T17:23:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZD' 'sip-files00115.txt'
8081c577190240e2be5a238b2b460550
62a9935daaa4a3e2b05737691a40da82b3670354
describe
'8357' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZE' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
1ec7c443b1a0abc6b33749cfc9e1cb4b
53325aac28629001f4b7c45c6d43c6bf82cfb906
describe
'320176' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZF' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
c48aa299b02906c7ee380b0ff3a7c7cc
54ef495f81a6b24e2e47d1ebbf6811a05b2b269d
describe
'94227' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZG' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
a767e96444cadc7a3b4842d8d06fb19f
b4b4ea97505b1fbd628d7114f1cc3ac6f15fee70
describe
'25458' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZH' 'sip-files00116.pro'
6994f468608948b2c4427449499b5af6
65d0c145ffe1916fda0554cbc4cd992a09c01d81
describe
'30352' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZI' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
5b4c531b8713be78989c9596c9db769b
308fb91d8560fcbaa5824ea8bf40c38801611458
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZJ' 'sip-files00116.tif'
fd8d386ea8928886e8dfbd6ed7875968
4fde2f3a1367ac87a3ab6860190092f0d65694c3
describe
'1048' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZK' 'sip-files00116.txt'
8cb9f5a234a2784be132fcc2ff984e9e
a5e6de538f1436143fd01697ad57e841b217098b
describe
'8278' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZL' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
6d628b878718b1a6065684a233d1b2fe
e4855f3c9db1fe863f33918dcc56e94ccfe7c71e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZM' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
a49ab1964713f8f34be287367bfbd982
150824bbc2dc841b7c738d672a1e104175fcc670
describe
'95030' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZN' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
df0be6a6a325fa313ca2fd0da1b2206a
1300429250d1c6f97bda0d6e4d54019e6f45c699
describe
'26912' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZO' 'sip-files00117.pro'
94a20bc218660fa19a6a3bee5c6488b8
eda6b4a913e1a492f083f98edaac162b6cd69fd8
'2011-11-14T17:22:50-05:00'
describe
'31094' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZP' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
343c8332030a67ff52b48037826176f1
3e929baa310608906695be5f8b0014e4407dfd18
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZQ' 'sip-files00117.tif'
47c89004f8555baccb62a6bb10d7d86d
c303f13cefc82e0dc41515ec5d304efabfc9f0dd
describe
'1083' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZR' 'sip-files00117.txt'
17748a7103cd763b3d1dc7c2c4a39b60
63ad3125f140c2f964ec14c84f77597c28a17f21
describe
'8184' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZS' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
ce36708314ded6baffba8c9e1f120862
1f572567059599eaa368f7fb8cd70639530b52a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZT' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
ade1bb3fa954d6a5ca7324b351dcbba1
5bcd49aba42eb694371138a289b629bf9778301a
describe
'96859' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZU' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
bb06898cedf790a6291320d56aed2344
d27040170f481258b2789da21d3a33fa8a915e87
describe
'27086' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZV' 'sip-files00118.pro'
b090d347defd4fd8a6f8a45fef5a4882
640e4612589e7f1195c533158997fe6f2d3b1bd9
describe
'31708' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZW' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
f2eb0fa8db1e76297a8cf908fe10e5ca
64e4c46e4ab16a61095636a0a658570c09057f21
'2011-11-14T17:27:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZX' 'sip-files00118.tif'
ed1bee8b3bdf9efb42f0d00e1722bd75
aec88a039d955968751694c00b9273d5f290d9f5
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZY' 'sip-files00118.txt'
b43bd37c557f454a87dad1de374ca9bc
beab818b2827a75c23be325505345c90d6e141ae
describe
'8358' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAARZZ' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
7bdba3dd560116ac157685a4902159cc
41f03546e41eb986019b862d9edccfeeb73ad0be
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAA' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
8b007a2b6011f012416d48394562d89e
4fc50ef1a76b06dd9dcd5d3f65fdb2fa275c3f3e
describe
'95857' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAB' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
dd37521700a7a755fbe708f7dc69e497
229a5508e713f0e222a633fb699ec34e4329ec24
describe
'27668' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAC' 'sip-files00119.pro'
e6d74701fc1ea364bff5e9a954d5bea4
36526536d0aecd1aad97849de3262513ad488105
describe
'30555' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAD' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
e39c7ddfffb7afb9c956be97c84b2c19
7dd1b3c7662349a76989d550dd7267da2e50836c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAE' 'sip-files00119.tif'
9cb659e280b36b0f2d3db47c5406c684
64e7927de5125c61279890fbd879edac6a083eb3
describe
'1100' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAF' 'sip-files00119.txt'
030e0fd407069ca293248155c633f474
be531144b23d9987e7c438741d65a8a1fa686d98
describe
'8156' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAG' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
ce658fe9e8b950904e9940d5e8e45230
7f4e903e35d96c14566a9ea49795b808a4331c8b
describe
'319989' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAH' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
c0b6a477efe70c73cb2aced9f9cfa29e
d745c79e0b816f176b4f41acc321ffaf752cf44c
describe
'90336' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAI' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
66951e41be4ebf52183f5030504a05ee
03038bb0d913cf1c3e6694f970478cc173c6a8c9
describe
'26073' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAJ' 'sip-files00120.pro'
6178b0221f64ae774213c8d2229842da
d320fad57684b3297c17377b412b91723a3b38c9
describe
'29844' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAK' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
3d3bee5a4e468517b38481074ed4281a
fd7ee90ac6b9e1202d4c392d637bff5dd05ea258
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAL' 'sip-files00120.tif'
42e7bf3dd7a1c3aefccdcc35da362eba
f2ead4f955c7b1900123b15995560195f9af49c8
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAM' 'sip-files00120.txt'
4bf9bf9779f3a443838754944ab5a2e9
482a28278193da6ecb9d9d01b470d2451193d654
describe
'7935' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAN' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
76ea4664386c77bccd067b7b155a45c6
c69dfe5ae5367068553634fd141e2613ea906797
describe
'320011' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAO' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
105cfdb10f9902114a2dbe8b8a59ea4f
8e0c5019bbbc2eb22b13bf8cc6f38ed5fa9d6629
describe
'99407' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAP' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
c0eb2623f00fe0890defbaf93013f195
b82353a3029ac7561d13876ea4ce71e30a4d595c
describe
'26688' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAQ' 'sip-files00121.pro'
c0e3942d0b7f80865dcb5405e92b188e
8fb3b9e6e8ee19a56148d386ad13c9a01566cd26
describe
'32659' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAR' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
ce76d6faa4b3e58b9ed7091abe47fec5
72a7ab357fd43805c4c8abe049eff1a6a68c2f5b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAS' 'sip-files00121.tif'
5150497fcfc5b0ce29743578b44df871
8657dbf8f22f3678b5d09650315f1b96b255781c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAT' 'sip-files00121.txt'
f0f94ea9eda49eba871ff3439de83faf
d2837549fdd54a5685e3d8b2ae033717f1a45631
'2011-11-14T17:21:44-05:00'
describe
'8469' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAU' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
4527143d2f23e4c183a22db6a8357b0c
957e3d72d245f80dee4fcbd32b91755f13fdba98
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAV' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
7f47f69044acd07e81e37b6c5b14a175
d63429eb43f3448b9a1fb6e7a10c09ab69493988
describe
'94135' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAW' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
6263478c3c67e5ab90054628ee96717d
2fa85171bca534f530e27d5a4a28cd435daf432c
describe
'26670' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAX' 'sip-files00122.pro'
821d2c040b297fc3603e2bf0b39bd15c
08b3e4f6c593d9cfd93c313165eb71cd74d6d19e
describe
'31203' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAY' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
53994cfd90c3a0bcd4c9af3b45deb599
785229d5b33e3b65b0edf0fd5364b10dd40c0e19
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASAZ' 'sip-files00122.tif'
67a252296d5a1b1a85b107cc30672178
de240378d8f04bd6b6077529fb4183d243f55dc2
describe
'1081' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBA' 'sip-files00122.txt'
857a0d5b315dbaa729243b5d0e7dc170
8d3a2634a3c618fb0e75ea92d98db5c88f08fbbb
describe
'8328' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBB' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
ab872f7a382d7dff024308f98389a574
172ca97f5e68572c08d1a2abbf80f699ba2fbd3d
describe
'320021' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBC' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
e68ecab228421591d5ba65ab290b4ae5
117ff8c5b9578e83bec31d31d62100415a5795a6
describe
'98366' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBD' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
3f7e025f4894a4076a7cc491167ea5ae
7b12b5ba44c93c3ba142980e70ebc5eaf5995328
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBE' 'sip-files00123.pro'
ad268590071a8d033aead2aef2f1a775
e47d915a830abac0324fbd66ea8ace67d897b2c2
describe
'31149' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBF' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
9db0865745949dbedd61df3f3e710fb9
fa0109317a9f1b334b8365058b1b27f6fc7eaab5
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBG' 'sip-files00123.tif'
3ae3a9289906795e5ac1577d431f08c0
1cffd3686bb21d8b4c5b5bae43c3283f0d84aedf
describe
'1091' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBH' 'sip-files00123.txt'
1a88adf819495881c7159db82c31a72b
27182a86db59e8c092085cd0c8b71ebe6720b094
describe
'8515' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBI' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
e7e9ad120eef55916add5575e8e99575
f86f3e6f9357295736cfce2ee95bf4e80b1b11e5
describe
'319977' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBJ' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
11ecb34b3f597d3bcfedfb6fa4f118d1
7d9916bf425c1b8df088fbad74146d24b07145be
describe
'91470' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBK' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
d4bb09abc4a4ba06094619686c827e75
bbcbb8104a8f7be1c29cde7cfb965f74efa0285e
describe
'26046' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBL' 'sip-files00124.pro'
48902bbd41d51662c31f25e4d63cf1e8
8b0804cfc20f8bc35f8d1711543ce2c861f1f0d9
describe
'30365' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBM' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
04bca434586c1b92b76d58837e307a9c
7f3741864e84723d344c1a3d8b8dacdb810733c4
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBN' 'sip-files00124.tif'
b9ce425708be2daa0bc646d33df7bb95
4e03f22c3385623b544b648ac6873a535eb371fa
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBO' 'sip-files00124.txt'
05abe59878ca55396c075605b876b7da
419f983d002a95e87c25bba5ac1c36c69878d6a9
describe
'8093' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBP' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
49d302bdfc136780d60b1cf2699eb3c3
61e31b24c4e57880b5bb62c72881ee43be77033c
describe
'320108' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBQ' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
f740465f23b0b77c43647fa3ef6c375f
364810f0a228cb0256a118872198573f6efc30c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBR' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
33fe6b762f8f260050e10b332b678525
2d3b5b4b7be08f39957d61637f1cf4cb19b2c577
describe
'29115' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBS' 'sip-files00125.pro'
c6b5a9c17992990009b9276f4579e7c8
c4f7b5ae4ec2509d79bd5161c18522c2d1609445
describe
'33107' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBT' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
ca0ec7e0f874ad11da861b7e00c57223
80d5c7d7f7a840fa52898c95ecc5443a2f571836
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBU' 'sip-files00125.tif'
7fb13088b7fe975f80ca367e25028f77
46ed1767e54ce7ea067ec36ce6769e294c03e20e
'2011-11-14T17:25:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBV' 'sip-files00125.txt'
fe5258f42f395fa744cd9bd5e270b8c3
128eceab8ad7076a91d68cd327eecb1a6f45c202
describe
'8940' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBW' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
d086e9efeba6b8ea583201ab83b7c740
d59d232a38bce1fd4c2b5e3ae070d959a49c3754
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBX' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
956bc93668cead8bd73e82c4992ac612
29bf0121758a6c5bb823004557ca6917e2c5400b
describe
'100833' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBY' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
43760c05ccb6abf6ba99e10a4d0a7879
da69368904276a5aab1d20680433dddf9fc42fc7
'2011-11-14T17:23:32-05:00'
describe
'29022' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASBZ' 'sip-files00126.pro'
9de4065d597d6c706aa113caccd33ac1
94557e88d14e3cf913d89890408a1e1b951326fe
describe
'32365' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCA' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
e8abc85c5b0073116ea11fe096480d44
89c7993264da652d0ef200087d066cd59ddfeb47
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCB' 'sip-files00126.tif'
27ccf918c8874c8b761884c92a1de208
a398e60e03e8d09f1a48721b5b2c5abf9feb94da
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCC' 'sip-files00126.txt'
a1e0707aaffac22e26193e36e12a6ab5
471f7f175ff6ea1fccad65d4461e34aa1596412a
describe
'8317' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCD' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
a726c2c3623c33001d2a2dbdea0ba385
4b74cca5237e6b2b017ba85ab5cf43548ad5122f
describe
'319724' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCE' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
aa6c6830befc4b4ba58e128c18bc29f5
a08b91da0be090d5eb6fbd6bb41d235e807c7ced
describe
'99603' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCF' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
7db9b70837673ef84e7a8ffe8e4b2a9b
00bdf93bdfaa63c7a501d62b89560e831bb80188
describe
'27058' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCG' 'sip-files00127.pro'
855154d6943414dc07dbaea243ec7f7f
40298ec0e6ea8bdebf7a1fe0311fe5cdf4b4921a
describe
'32539' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCH' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
488d06357e485c474a5e7780afc5b4e6
891aa3a3e96049e517599b45961c50c9e8177130
'2011-11-14T17:28:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCI' 'sip-files00127.tif'
b503a476b35f46f47469be1897596c8a
a4833d303ed276576294ba15b76d484e7305a43e
'2011-11-14T17:22:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCJ' 'sip-files00127.txt'
bd30f2a67a9bad8b94bcaecb72956092
c45f875e2ecef01d986e8a238130140161e5e231
describe
'8468' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCK' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
b66cf58e7b2f2ce1cabffceb4549b6ef
176c769e5764aec1c2031b82fce8f3b5264a056d
describe
'319820' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCL' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
94052132619cde1c0d9d7fa9d1df95e4
525d7af12f9280efe7f099fa2c760eff70ed86b6
describe
'91886' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCM' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
12ef1f3f134c3cad2a448cb18dcea389
59d5ddae2c767cfb2b0e5cbab8bc3692011fc5a6
describe
'24974' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCN' 'sip-files00128.pro'
b815e937c983755dfb08e846f27d6bb2
f39b429b120c7b3474acbc54fafdd0f853a8e638
describe
'30398' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCO' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
792a2bb8e2b41a8541cb5e555eb3491e
01096b344c40e3ea9a2f87eab131d7ae16d8df1e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCP' 'sip-files00128.tif'
73303250e92efc8ae19cd7ac4f12e4cf
449b663d66e8b192d092fc439285ec3737b82057
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCQ' 'sip-files00128.txt'
528e77994b25fca5cd2defcd4389b18e
bc0e5ad52c437f837176cf904317a6a20ac0fa9d
describe
'7881' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCR' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
7ef4601e1dac3194c0fe93e6d343f6b8
4e361a0be94051247b7fc1dbd9fa4e59afcbac9f
describe
'319767' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCS' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
0afd76f3f7198b97a50b1acad47c619e
81290226a66e96089787caa4807ac84d120b694a
describe
'99342' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCT' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
c5a4f23a4e104a3182461d4e76e8760c
c7606676d4a0252fb4ff095ac623d6f813276843
describe
'27135' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCU' 'sip-files00129.pro'
2f56f10e3dd921ab79137f0ad77cb363
36b33a92c45a7227c1b2c39b361b5150c0937b1f
describe
'32146' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCV' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
ec2996d544ffeb73a4c975648739cdff
92f7df8759adb48299fbb0c622cde244e6ecabac
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCW' 'sip-files00129.tif'
235771ff77c6bf57d5997857678f2905
f0fab531aeec81a91b9840b41ef2f9d13a234a1d
'2011-11-14T17:27:08-05:00'
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCX' 'sip-files00129.txt'
d5d3bd748d8de146e20bcf4443bea689
c9ce04bf62e9e409f2781d8e865a1fd4cd599334
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCY' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
dfa6950065ef2c22f06defe96ddeca7b
50693b58edcd20382de12fe8ba8ee6e6109de8ae
describe
'320016' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASCZ' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
a847df6b4241f6b31296c6d1150f7f6b
120eb482f6ed7aea8af988b0ef41e3ca7ab73524
describe
'99062' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDA' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
6d60fc28360002b733dd9368eb0e7b83
545f8c0bb445e02dc773bdc270e1b6c48acfe0ed
describe
'27686' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDB' 'sip-files00130.pro'
0ab15e4e44080fdb05278ee34dcdd2ea
9312c5925b0d2f8dd9505081fbb1d9d3926fdfdb
describe
'32283' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDC' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
b4049abb70ab8d143038743d0ced382f
f47a13ee46c7fc3ee351147e5be8dd45596f7e6b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDD' 'sip-files00130.tif'
22543ba7f19f9208540be741ac1e5a5b
60175d19e190f3d0079a79c606785e29101c2259
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDE' 'sip-files00130.txt'
49153ba7357a0835e8e261cea804dd94
cd2a702086ecfaf099cd0281ab44155a730b2bbf
describe
'8289' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDF' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
7767c11cf5400bca0df9cd25019069a7
4222a7ed20c863203cea73d6ac9e734945bfdf88
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDG' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
5f0cd0d81fd59f9d8f8fcbf04cb1a304
4540e6683a3641c2888b2edb8a8155a6f308faf5
describe
'64895' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDH' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
9177d89eeb56b0725d723bc87822c053
9b2ff507c7ea05f3145762ba7a2c5ba816ba8293
describe
'12191' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDI' 'sip-files00131.pro'
6cd092575af93d5037ea23aed92d3f50
b4317262f75e00485030cc976e6d7150da5bf179
describe
'18855' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDJ' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
fc9bb5193e8115344c6c59034e8dd89e
8fdb0bb856dcafc3d0e4ac3417c8965dbc9b9a05
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDK' 'sip-files00131.tif'
97c34488ca65568c12bc03cb6af5a902
9670d170a68ae1f4ba551f7b0eb1d558a856343d
describe
'486' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDL' 'sip-files00131.txt'
6120d650be16b621974b309c25ef9c55
2aa9215f79a2eba64b8d3003f4eecc1302407c6d
describe
'5180' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDM' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
2b067df91f66e625685e53c571811f5d
b109be37597a0080236cac105e9256f29f217315
describe
'319897' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDN' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
f32fa44a3eb59c345f4d35ca5ab2864b
7b830a581882be395c1b616c25841585f9eb7614
describe
'77233' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDO' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
bf02bb68e0eff328fb44937ae1df8d13
2163e1863196df9ccbb76dc16ceb3e6bf409cd62
describe
'16545' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDP' 'sip-files00132.pro'
15ded14dc59b65dff1092cf1470ee04e
3f8ea3c474bacb22385edf84cd95cc32643e40e8
describe
'24077' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDQ' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
7b8b72a7fa16b90825e12d42e43eba02
7c369818e6db2ab42e6de22930a5fcf849adc87c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDR' 'sip-files00132.tif'
bf37535c96c9dbbc1bf2836393c46033
316e4ca2d72f12f6cef79e77f4fffe4d39cd0a7a
describe
'856' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDS' 'sip-files00132.txt'
94a5a48c6c2c9788750051b61ffea5f4
2cd0e84ff044fc5827b362e44605d8d0ee5eef78
'2011-11-14T17:26:30-05:00'
describe
'6865' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDT' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
b46a6b7ab5bd3f087aae9f7bebd62e25
9d5c9c82c2b03efc93a062b830272f733035361d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDU' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
b62a40cc1b1319493c0f71b1e64928ba
b3f5494e96f83faf1f27b31b31c9770f2d4b9239
describe
'77961' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDV' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
507ce0f49ec58b80e935429f84b2d92c
14b1bd28c10f97637de78ba40d9a7427384ed221
describe
'23225' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDW' 'sip-files00133.pro'
49a08e3c42b81f77fc801d06ffd71b0f
4672f313526d752f72747ac6e9585c95dcba0122
describe
'22923' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDX' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
b533039f4c5d658f077816d3e8243c8f
c2933a260fe5982dcb902f12299856c52cf6f170
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDY' 'sip-files00133.tif'
97a6fb3bab942aa340a73de1230880d2
3a3a577d373255f5753775ba84f0074356217376
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASDZ' 'sip-files00133.txt'
83d0514315bc967ba4a99d4caa10108d
c5f8f768e65837ee6cd9da5532936c07aada1cd1
describe
'6238' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASEA' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
89e405ebb81d53eabfb594bf00a35718
a8ff234e66608e33b0c0d0583201d3ccb071a89f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASEB' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
8b58e8c5c5539f60bfe40bbfc669c8ba
fe0b98ef68363971c87bb60486dc6ca2a61b19fa
describe
'97958' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASEC' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
e9e4f9457deefb57c3d3f5b9f4424bb4
3b11765d41f497a004d4464ffb5ae970c491b354
describe
'27746' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASED' 'sip-files00134.pro'
2ffb28ad6e6fbe87b781ffca0058556d
c61e731d44538bee4fa74bf0bdf6d77cdcb5b821
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASEE' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
c80e9a445e100120ad961f770196559f
62cfe99d1c535b8d8602221658c8afc7663c5fd1
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASEF' 'sip-files00134.tif'
52dab9224b227b5521f3f55e20c4991e
7568c5d1edbf456b1fdac24f993ddee9c71b1f0e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASEG' 'sip-files00134.txt'
b326539ce798df69ed522e14265e0c34
dedd2e46c4a0dfe3702a824be8d7f7218a129633
describe
'8598' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASEH' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
ee44c3698dc72de2500e85863974bd8b
c0dfabce76ffe9900b5fba6f0234b5aaba5983df
describe
'319926' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASEI' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
c8d191ea12a8804e29cf6f48cf9772d5
2db9142263a8f3dd61c24ada6b636a930a336a49
'2011-11-14T17:26:01-05:00'
describe
'93541' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASEJ' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
b5d77b7ea4003305031a488fa0001741
7e9a41e9b2b51294f98f4c5b0eb8c920129ad795
describe
'25794' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASEK' 'sip-files00135.pro'
275d2ed48e2a130ed588d03c85c28350
0ee4a4c1e1ae31bc6ad584f858e721e75e67e2a7
describe
'30392' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASEL' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
86f1c00415c492b573a32028aba248dd
9e97b355b1fafcabd9a850936fe7f7a59eb9d9b6
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASEM' 'sip-files00135.tif'
22111ed52bc758983b87b2cb89087cc3
a5e5a30150ceacde96a2d6a4e176c91ce8f114a0
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASEN' 'sip-files00135.txt'
73759422ab2837570367dd04c7471b3d
c25f6e205b74a0caf0cf4f7b4861585dee3845a8
describe
'8691' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASEO' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
a85833917a30a0f53d1d970b0c4591bf
ceec09bdd2d1eb5f084038ba105183271d9298c5
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASEP' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
bb2ef279b1399432c0533c7ea750dc75
72fb20c653316974dc26c2050b8097ce7543e76a
describe
'99878' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASEQ' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
b22303bdc7596ff6130f1c3fb07c0365
a51f0d7e26e93e3cf278fd0e8d710bc47f576b10
describe
'27772' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASER' 'sip-files00136.pro'
6da855b78575d9045a5c170380817bce
860a05340972450cd601f7f05d178c5d4f0e35c1
describe
'32396' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASES' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
638230b990957c1cd1843c4114e78d68
fabba1e977195da9222ade7ad2bc042ea76417d5
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASET' 'sip-files00136.tif'
a021c634be0d8baf693b812b7be178ac
0190236850c6dc08d246978cad052cd35ca27861
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASEU' 'sip-files00136.txt'
febae54a0f7b96c804a50b67afc59622
4312f04d566a36c7b0408ff0297d6deff8446b79
describe
'8664' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASEV' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
782fe90118b5cc6926cd1ebd9d7d62a1
02f9e313be4faa4a318a494ad3f77ea7d763bd55
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASEW' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
02fd0bbe5dca63a8b0aefafa188d6c79
22ca3fd1899c0ffb4af4f257afb8b5d858c98fdb
describe
'94622' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASEX' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
d6ec568834a115901198ab5cfe08f7a3
ba02a2631b6c6cf01107373cc3ff3c7edaaa8df0
describe
'24525' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASEY' 'sip-files00137.pro'
ad93a495b1798c0af7d75ced641751a2
c663610f90645cbbd848471a2dea3f9bd31a5d45
describe
'30598' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASEZ' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
3a033554044cc240cb9ebcb483e1a023
3991637d7712ac2620871f7de1995bdff7687cab
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFA' 'sip-files00137.tif'
21e93fc8e1fc422393ef9f06323be35e
df9bff60e5e7b7cb1550794df8cc30e6b784e8fb
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFB' 'sip-files00137.txt'
22897e616f0ca883b857d3479c9c6b5e
b80427a060e16c45c91e4e11d648aa16b48dc073
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFC' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
184c19c5e10c918acdd97758641e572b
a84311ef3515ea0d58500532558ea09460bf479a
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFD' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
265c5723266f6dbd57b3071bee99efa0
8d5533947cf7893ac3fe04542e41d5888bb80ea5
describe
'74831' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFE' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
e9511c008a95faf6c29dc7cf739a61e0
7dfb95dd632be8ccd168f852c6f7ca240750408d
describe
'22278' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFF' 'sip-files00138.pro'
022452d34dd457eadae1302b6b6df8b3
7503e3488d8a130e797304cfb6cda605b22bcde9
'2011-11-14T17:21:43-05:00'
describe
'23498' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFG' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
9f505b2ec5bd6b511a2dff270e4dc030
d2c4b7b0a54c7b0a3f6eb25743c8da91019d61a2
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFH' 'sip-files00138.tif'
6bdd31a7b441ff47cc1e931893faa1d7
43de6b2b5638518aa2aa61d8609b6bf4836d8fe9
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFI' 'sip-files00138.txt'
0795890aff4d4f47f41020ed8e5fb45f
6bd7db5329986dcd143d5c005dee10c0a8fb69c1
describe
'6391' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFJ' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
590716b55b81eace4a0bf24778c95fa1
c70d3ca5e84ab9591968c5df17bdce4f052a0ee0
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFK' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
876c1e84491a7a85479245b95245c74b
ffbc9b721c6482214cb8d7153fa1ccb17cafa711
describe
'93901' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFL' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
e7794031a99cfc4b9f7cba6e284b1a48
29ee14aacee2e52ac0e2ed5ea23f7db62102a4a9
describe
'25377' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFM' 'sip-files00139.pro'
0dc2d79b33f838d62b3cec46f2a0256a
d538fd81479ce34e69aec054fdc9137ea55053de
describe
'30722' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFN' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
8f3cc027cb9a272e2c83167820d40094
6108ba6f4fd320cd589803c83b67bf3721163833
'2011-11-14T17:28:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFO' 'sip-files00139.tif'
e5d1e13ca19afb04b1531d7fd937912d
f5d031d623dff047bcd5d085c813a2db2d764009
'2011-11-14T17:25:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFP' 'sip-files00139.txt'
8fc398be0e7b2b829e02dafb4828d5c8
5c09a262fdf6ae2972473d87858bc3b47793e1dd
describe
'8484' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFQ' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
f47d3145ff10d542d5e3320be45f50d2
3c433d96975babd3e18d3c08282dda4ac14d434f
describe
'320025' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFR' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
95cf3bfaa699646b8734bef06b513125
999b436119bb5582e34efcaa08a28d3d2fb79f62
describe
'94970' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFS' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
9740fbd18878f92504507ea00dfe2420
f33b7212cc2df6eb1a8181446985bf358568e78a
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFT' 'sip-files00140.pro'
3fd22842768b88a9b5bf6c737e3ef89c
48827a8ed326722f8199a3c11d3a7ef7b967effa
describe
'30985' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFU' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
ec31722112f34d0743d92b9a4f68cb83
4b261e772e1f258854a2a5cf82160314e567ddda
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFV' 'sip-files00140.tif'
87345e63b5b24cbeae8fc7e9adc2c248
d2e3985d0fa5a7e4918099e33012a48d9479bd83
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFW' 'sip-files00140.txt'
a22ab39b163ded55764aaf5a3d3e9645
2e687f7a6f3860bb32655f9f1774b0f4e3631f3d
describe
'8197' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFX' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
34acdf982a07a974b57cc78fdd601224
9570936b2da68fd3b9b74e0c7e322860c89e045e
describe
'320019' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFY' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
69e3b867b1d4efede9be13083b2ceada
5aeccb659d478f851cd5dcfa0886e857fabab2db
describe
'95164' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASFZ' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
a2ac4a077b8a6902286cc2c3b6c561b1
581ee6676b4398ab19f7938b2e59ed09f8ca97a8
describe
'28220' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGA' 'sip-files00141.pro'
bc66451dcb030605606a999060a5e4a8
57c15345b66fcd1ad60c91030c986b8256a27fb6
describe
'30072' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGB' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
0c2bd6490c2b526849d3fc14fe771d71
3f32229ba055ead7ac81e6bb79c8bedece202744
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGC' 'sip-files00141.tif'
0574ec056082367ae002a672188d872d
ffc51bd0a4c661b37783a422a87c404e8482d372
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGD' 'sip-files00141.txt'
bb3fed27010e82611412de6e19115c90
d837725a095c91d41554d74eb290953fe65a2163
describe
'7987' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGE' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
e44ab27a1eb499fce2b3f38c3e5a0d2f
f9f5a74688d78dab2433e5a2a9031c627a5461d9
describe
'316094' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGF' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
c505c827bf0cd2439f8cfe3788cd8cd5
9e2c4c25ea5cb5a5522024a5a2884f74fc2b49ea
describe
'31230' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGG' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
01ba9868117c68d99abd5c7eafc95e77
bfd065b7bb4e8901eeec8bf4101946f166411db8
describe
'8027' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGH' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
6fb71ee11337ce130adfea9aa56e8251
85f12d0a158b49e74d7c06cdff0b6dba387f9bea
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGI' 'sip-files00142.tif'
e21ee383fbcea82f1cf277cc6bf123fe
5d2c9078fcb3cf80fc0bf97137b538c7c3aed4e8
describe
'2326' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGJ' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
4b29ea95ed00be239304fee11131f961
a0dfb136b89f160efd2ab8bd192258aa1bcb1ba7
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGK' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
b81fd3029de248ed733ca9c1ac578809
b55973b541267892c4a06cbe8173fb28b99e9257
describe
'13127' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGL' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
617fbcdad5ae58879190ec343130404d
616857b2942f69d06e67d26e1ff2a1ed25f3bfcc
describe
'3064' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGM' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
65cfabbd248f99620ee516bfee433132
6e4d67dbb545b99d1a34ac810aede727307fd48e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGN' 'sip-files00143.tif'
4db725c18c513958102016872a182184
bd90abfcb1e7c5c3dd161d28936c317c49944dea
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGO' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
0135852959ea0042602001fe4e9b5dbd
ebf75101bd361115b33c42ef93a7aa43e9cc7105
describe
'319984' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGP' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
ff961ae9491b1cd180139aa9fff0a73b
8e4dfe76e67d12666ab4e6a5f477ea7ece526bf2
describe
'99848' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGQ' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
c28aaf67fd984e76b6d3a26c2da04a15
176741d46a21fe49a078991a83cc98332397cccd
describe
'27659' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGR' 'sip-files00144.pro'
92d0a1d1b7c8e40cc2e05fd1c04bcd38
614e3fbad653fb2b7543b59964d2fe2a84315622
'2011-11-14T17:26:11-05:00'
describe
'32556' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGS' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
8111f09ab068f5471b391559dbdcf579
4bdddc1e873baf6adc5e84b517f9ba321a96ecf9
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGT' 'sip-files00144.tif'
1fc55205e9ede37b33f1b0709a5381bb
1e6365776d06be5249eef14c146bf8a3e7b4cd2e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGU' 'sip-files00144.txt'
7efb86e82e6324cb588e4cd686af7a9f
8d1c15ed58ff3d415df57e7e8e33bc934a51f38e
describe
'8644' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGV' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
3ab0ed2c50ac628a69ea585bdfb70f92
19f5222685e6575c42ea15d9ffdc4915f65bd93e
describe
'320026' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGW' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
a88011c0482ca7044c639e4612e2cb41
64ec2313dd2ebaa78bf7cc46fe6c5ccd395b2ec4
describe
'103876' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGX' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
63ef54ce3ac7e7b7aba4b7bd5318d91a
26faa98723c3f5552e82f37dde0b457a5a3c6647
describe
'28824' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGY' 'sip-files00145.pro'
e3d63653345995e2d47274b3bfb9074d
46954c7def99fa5ea994b6ed4c12904af85ab855
describe
'33656' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASGZ' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
257638094145b879979a8a2face94e67
7ded24a8673cc9fc886d20d9d5aa709afa8de027
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHA' 'sip-files00145.tif'
0681118e3be6528555424e25c46d229a
a51c64b1ceb9b2a4f2767b76ad8171a96ae6b168
describe
'1130' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHB' 'sip-files00145.txt'
1bc96e39a42b08ac1de6d5a7f56b5d23
303412ffe9338df15e8e67b51b6683e6dcf0a0db
describe
'8870' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHC' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
cbd02dd34c936af6f49ff0d577df34c1
d246aad40dd91aa37039ac1b6915d755ae4e7bf6
describe
'320010' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHD' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
7ff54b369cfbeff038b985119ae8dcd6
c45e037e23af3a05e4afc9da107c4a003eba7ee6
describe
'100865' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHE' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
888ee173f3b71a63444984ff537c6a49
003776ff8499e17d3c288c67fd240a321df608a3
describe
'27573' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHF' 'sip-files00146.pro'
5f1de9e9b09e9b7d25125fab50f2070f
c08d22f89e75eb3951e9c3430b1242793c5d2712
describe
'32706' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHG' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
2bf6bccfab34b40c7d3349e48da6dbbc
e4090faf2189fbdeedf08c2a9a6088f1b6d8b08a
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHH' 'sip-files00146.tif'
abe73b539797aef1a704e807168aaadf
7493a095fca6a4d717a4a83176486c6228d93990
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHI' 'sip-files00146.txt'
eff23137644ede4b2ecf390e43752b94
b2ea865d327d7bf6acd8760e216b172423e78496
describe
'8588' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHJ' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
6d24082aba0ef708aec3766f78085cc6
e60c32b4d86b79864835c72b7b0dd2a9efc47e23
describe
'319960' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHK' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
b50e4f99072e7361b660225cf5321b07
8a2331669ae5408457fc6d7cf2ef4f914322f8a9
describe
'105648' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHL' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
45082c5e349b766544186f66d0d36ea4
eb5cd16fbb974a0de9ef9c097b7ff1715ab13c70
describe
'28577' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHM' 'sip-files00147.pro'
fe4f8bd767a5cceccdceb0109835708e
1e5f98d838f2ba13c26c6baedb67cfe88b4fbda1
describe
'33555' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHN' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
dba328fb472209648c634d3a0eec8f79
6980fee4a19589a923b11de9ee9ff7dd8ada80db
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHO' 'sip-files00147.tif'
b35f38a4502731ed30d7d27f91ca41e0
95ebc2a7e967645f3bc743ee41a3913a428e0024
describe
'1178' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHP' 'sip-files00147.txt'
d549fc944bc72052f4e71cbad54202b3
394591a59a95d1e49a8345e36d540a196fbc4939
describe
'8711' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHQ' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
ba288cdf5c40ba67748f3812d97e7e22
2de078043f1c97040a2c8da0e51dcefd59696ea4
describe
'319949' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHR' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
568ee04671785e2a8643feadb664b70e
7585e927c534dc179ffdb72fc6298cfc0debb885
describe
'97231' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHS' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
6e6a6fa0487768737c0d36cf9514fdc0
7cba1c9750dbb635266b28c0283e8c6b09801ca3
describe
'25978' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHT' 'sip-files00148.pro'
d8d73ed1529743f821739633741b0f9c
f766dd4e5a1bedec3f90110e62bc8011101bfaec
describe
'31915' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHU' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
4908264b8c8c8d08122a98d671766bcf
3462048078d2e946d91ba0b4d822dbd512f442bc
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHV' 'sip-files00148.tif'
70d38b1b94a81c4d38feb5fff7184ae9
8e8252757a76a55b65f92a3a5b318346e2523c7d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHW' 'sip-files00148.txt'
028431c32f108d91ddd835e8ba7761a9
e9e522796b2a7a6dfffd24f101e757112a740664
describe
'8111' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHX' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
9f56b0633a8e37fce9d1cbf274bef8ee
26fef9fa17c1e408b5e42e778c6196b073649fba
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHY' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
51ed603fc3e9803c6e8dffa9e4503fa9
173eaa88c1883924110148296c7f0889a50c493c
describe
'102232' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASHZ' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
804264367add0021c2fa2f40f256d69b
40c04e73ca225d59bd7f3fb6ab4ca82342700e06
describe
'28483' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASIA' 'sip-files00149.pro'
e7e1be47faa65d48984b6d5b8950812e
c770c3adf8dc3043eb18720aaba2810247ba36fd
describe
'32857' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASIB' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
e6a212d245d392be7276eb82553512d5
a6c54f32cd6735177f0c0cd712be930da8e4b07d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASIC' 'sip-files00149.tif'
aeefce32f67b6525e7ccde8baa2e2939
e65c0d9eff0b3682f88e2dd67b8d5f9a763ac598
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASID' 'sip-files00149.txt'
284007a233809b923ea6365f885d11c7
76b85df11c92388381afe9501961dc5920cf9f45
describe
'8868' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASIE' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
254e726f87c64218358bf6237f48756a
8396e3f7dbca9f93bf6a602c3e69a7c562fa3211
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASIF' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
54891bc718e277ab40fc905bcef18ee3
04ad2199b487cff492e62bc4866d13dc9c49f434
describe
'100562' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASIG' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
da9bdc90b9e7418ad9c3e8db0dd98c0a
5c082838a735b6a3700cfc7daaba3bd02ff2efc4
describe
'26857' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASIH' 'sip-files00150.pro'
174b9547581d92ca3cff71740383c46c
9ba2e01b5d3ca41ebada32d17fa1e4bca9c87be5
describe
'33159' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASII' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
ba0976c5e1824eff3ea14587f3170118
1302ba22315b9c1eb67e4ef203671bf7d02cc866
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASIJ' 'sip-files00150.tif'
7d8e9f5bf6a2f200891babaf8f1c0d07
72ee94272041ce842a30cee777057dd9e239bcd4
describe
'1104' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASIK' 'sip-files00150.txt'
2251174401829bbd7731fe1eb28bce18
2becd50264853adce151b7e2f0dbf7031bb4f977
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASIL' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
b2430ce316377fd2485be60ed318b6c9
aaca92dd8262e574cf5bb63aefe9307474f13f13
describe
'320181' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASIM' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
188934552251b1cb3eac9e56c226f8ba
08bbb9a995a5a8a0c4a7e7fa122f5884e981a4b4
describe
'101220' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASIN' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
1af9b8d3e5770b45ed80123b2598433e
9facec7c978cdd93906ea688e53b4b3e2e4f4e49
describe
'28526' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASIO' 'sip-files00151.pro'
5058129eb7fcbdba63d878923e02b828
1061fa8df70be43993b6956ba551b381b929b6f0
describe
'32622' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASIP' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
01fb13789aff2487dfdab3c92d1ba205
05fa27b05960787b3b6b5820d5564469da3de67a
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASIQ' 'sip-files00151.tif'
460745739b1fc1044918e82274aa2c52
6a8b630c90ade0388c775907fbcd0fc63adcb9f5
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASIR' 'sip-files00151.txt'
36a7c7a4eae2f40a24cc070705f0536e
3d1134b0a2c768de79246d1778a04a99933b9d3f
describe
'8276' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASIS' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
f3f7ad5095af2601d751014db77775b3
1d10fc4c2d6c7e5ae9df0e9920b328fb7260494e
describe
'319934' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASIT' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
1f78a0f0ece666c3ebb1c30a5d52bab6
8530356f132312754e6ee37a721f56d00c2dd358
describe
'92034' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASIU' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
ad845423b55dad09c558bdc09d092542
0d381bea53aa95b6946dd5bdf19baf33d0b44263
describe
'26523' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASIV' 'sip-files00152.pro'
6532a67a684ac328c5361e701edadf9b
7ffd1a5ad52a174fabce53ce041e190585c9f360
describe
'30377' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASIW' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
3cd030e519e77986f345cc7db6b9aa99
a963d8e346358d73ccd7b29bcfb8a1454cf28720
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASIX' 'sip-files00152.tif'
eae98e0fca641446b27c2c7323d4831a
acb106ead0505f7a3def186cecd915f45e13ed13
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASIY' 'sip-files00152.txt'
ac802cf83048f7ffb77119fa02e650f6
8f360eb2f362b1f8d48c750436985076d9ce9bc5
describe
'8416' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASIZ' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
03fb7913eb6fcba0638eedaca386e6b7
123ca591aa8ae176ecb69f552ecf64b7fbe2bd0f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJA' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
113287987a186bf74fdc73d3a78f6fd9
8c17ec8d67d36e5e97924f8224b356df53177149
describe
'84799' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJB' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
28f32e2d38c8fc1b531aebab06bb3c8c
cff757a2856f88a8c5e2f56b655b992688305696
describe
'12484' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJC' 'sip-files00153.pro'
b06e40af74babe46d12357d6a3d0a08e
f613d9e60affa7da3234bcf735435d98420c5989
describe
'25151' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJD' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
9f35664a6416efac9e9139e33243423b
2fa06a6b372032a8812bbe2563376d72c837f248
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJE' 'sip-files00153.tif'
2e01b9a60fec333add5d1e3578fc6fef
ef03e078d9fb7e3bd8613a6736184f0441401814
'2011-11-14T17:23:00-05:00'
describe
'519' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJF' 'sip-files00153.txt'
ec1cde441eb97967a5f4e54e403f00fa
d0f4618ef2056e560528aab76b2cd080e2c70766
describe
'6996' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJG' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
c397e98ee2006ced8358f75825c921aa
b56929b7e2f3086330a3e4a07c8d2b1432a3d95c
describe
'317505' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJH' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
8051cc23a27550f7f033fb696973c7eb
bbae1caa63c49139121decb16920839cb47ce530
describe
'90553' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJI' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
7468c98793139cf7d29b677f1e8ca9c2
3946977c932c9fb61b64881854b70d2ffed1a39c
describe
'20147' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJJ' 'sip-files00154.pro'
396f30909842b8e93d205040051d6d10
e3556bd850c83a0f9658b11182c1d7ed45b7126e
describe
'29095' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJK' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
021b2264a5fdac3bcf2da3473d3100e0
b17762a99629e123468d13e5183dc4dbb53dfa66
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJL' 'sip-files00154.tif'
f80a2fa79836e7524f0c5dbd8fb199b3
dc42d2420260930e2620a3e03b82558e35970ed4
describe
'981' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJM' 'sip-files00154.txt'
b3038becb8ce3769fb7e215a6d45525d
cb4c4cc21dacf22f57c15da6ebd79800be575a59
describe
'7841' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJN' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
ec97f68ed60581dd25bb1a313bb884a1
ea6c167c835017d6453af13e19d09c75e69e90d2
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJO' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
008aff377a8f89adbc3788c33dbf4dbe
a7f5e72289c6ddbada01f5c5f14226350abb5cbe
describe
'99207' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJP' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
1054b08d33c02557454e4270507a1ec9
1d904ddfe3511bb1a34d5e00048afaf6c8b9d213
describe
'27980' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJQ' 'sip-files00155.pro'
c01591cc5b045d8a1cca925b33a58dfb
c2f75b3f344c170663b24038b801aff37534dcf7
describe
'31764' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJR' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
164e1d4223d7850e89b6dc1d1680aeac
22051e4f08647a9acb474363322f9898275a5024
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJS' 'sip-files00155.tif'
da1f84ddb8267e3962015c7b19026593
539537afeef2dc6a2aa2d2e42da17a4585b1795f
describe
'1112' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJT' 'sip-files00155.txt'
7f57fe50d7947a48fe30cb90fceff9af
ca537504f3607e346a2a2240a6b21b9c61a88b75
describe
'8290' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJU' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
d21b0c7df484d1d0ad816363eb9d4711
52a8f7a95a6c5a80b948484b0d22c85ff8f4ee30
describe
'319956' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJV' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
75701c206b85e9596277d993b6cfc2c4
2e910674ae316a204b1442f63d1deb7ba5c10101
describe
'96640' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJW' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
c011db12775f6402ae2fe24dc3793665
1fd4a4f393c4d7f8c769efd016c5f7f3d47cb758
describe
'26641' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJX' 'sip-files00156.pro'
dff22aaa480ce5c8831b991375b38856
a2c18264d1f8990cfa5002e11405f64b803570cb
describe
'31587' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJY' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
384829ce6c6fb0cc82221a31efff9e14
658d82091c666dc590caa1d5f9d654318d6591af
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASJZ' 'sip-files00156.tif'
681bdec4b1520e4c1d55a04326bfe51b
4ad6cd418f16f81273515ecf4eaee690548a47fc
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKA' 'sip-files00156.txt'
56f95afa653bbd6a71905b1c835754c8
d08f1818073a89f0889eaf168115a11ca18cc966
describe
'8210' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKB' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
3624ae3f25ab3300b9721e07d5ae9611
9eb8f381b94fb3f56e247d920e56b938bf167db7
describe
'320174' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKC' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
20161cfa3a78b195305a0fac37fd7576
bd8f6664a4e42d0161594d920e24c6d0e8144f10
describe
'96134' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKD' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
1c2bdb7afaa9ec902f5c97603b8899b5
01c0ab6b1353dd6394b16a888652743a43ec9471
describe
'26616' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKE' 'sip-files00157.pro'
549ae1e2cfbf51bd5feb6175cc533afa
2d23c66dc072d6f6f802c72d0951fa212e48cd62
describe
'31318' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKF' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
1ed24c1d1308ac26d858bfa48b32dfb5
77180256c57f48fca7cba520337aaf871c8cbd8d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKG' 'sip-files00157.tif'
b7fd382157689d54f7c6ed64384b2688
ee0c9e8bf800469d46515129f4286c4f687abbdc
describe
'1054' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKH' 'sip-files00157.txt'
a7eb719b4736ac2518f7d45cc02008c7
eab61cab005c11753c007f16c96f45526fdbadd1
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKI' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
f5f0f97dfab07e8ac7125613b67a88be
e6bfd2e93b09f9d7bbd2c0c69706549ac0a1821b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKJ' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
0255f37b7dafc241d13bf71b2aac3504
82a325fde0a2cdb396e8a782d4f4d20c885fa055
describe
'96238' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKK' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
bcd7ee6571264508118128434fe72750
70f539c59c4318618ad0ab3be3239620236efffe
describe
'25597' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKL' 'sip-files00158.pro'
63f4328d492bdd4de345c45fc6e72f29
dc9baee4d71aebdd1401687c4750d1fc7a05af9d
describe
'30767' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKM' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
f3f82084764430839908051d1d6f20b9
ea45e8aad287ca741cf24c333449694369f67017
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKN' 'sip-files00158.tif'
418b18306ea7f6525b019d13d8b12de8
a4c19b11a901537c9e443cca0bebd4bcfa371267
describe
'1067' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKO' 'sip-files00158.txt'
f4b93f8d99346ccb50e2c63a49f64635
c6480083162b4ba636c03b5eb5055500067dc1cc
describe
'8340' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKP' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
977f7dacd8b0643d600ee0119f5d4166
c465c8d6b92ad1774c66ecda2a1145f253fc1ba3
describe
'320151' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKQ' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
c55a828d15ba99b850e800e24335b69c
40440045e4c6285cf11423733b34a10dea42d59d
describe
'96195' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKR' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
bca6ef4d5ed072794f09031e93e1d457
77925fe019bd485ba4240c6003519b513f9865ce
describe
'27116' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKS' 'sip-files00159.pro'
83f962c8bbaa8a0e61f38c29e8defd16
47fca568b220a6c2577d2c1777795f05d24d606e
describe
'30949' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKT' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
ef64232cc89e748e33a849cf0652a35e
5d1a25cd2e48112f9d600e2e4f581516b9ed3b97
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKU' 'sip-files00159.tif'
2c051d4123127ec0055f082ff8a89a0b
38061af7145d3ac4a2aee6c3c3ae9cba5459a05d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKV' 'sip-files00159.txt'
98d75845dfff074e5440d54e000095da
d69c7c00c427d742ea355b9ee2e4280c506b9631
describe
'8071' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKW' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
1533647b0f459e6957bdaa804e6e2c13
3b9bb9447b59c77f0ba291c18a24dc9a9e4a719e
describe
'319941' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKX' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
831f81fbafa1495bed6bb221028b07c6
d726a8cf3e70fd6aea8996fb591376e293b7b86a
describe
'95159' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKY' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
6ad1efb5dbbc9ef72d3e5138fabc6f14
571dd25b21ab728472d7887a50824f7f369d6432
describe
'25793' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASKZ' 'sip-files00160.pro'
d96b201ad1119255261204df8d26798a
ec796b9e8300e3fb68cc86140091587b5f3a2f77
describe
'31279' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLA' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
86874ded61004d40c4cfe638eeb24f9a
5057970842faac84ae2b1b7024e0e245f9f8978d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLB' 'sip-files00160.tif'
3e55f898d32135fcec79e0b9c2df65c2
f3fd5691901f2b6089eec8668ccc13b96fd21451
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLC' 'sip-files00160.txt'
d44fb65c6d89a41dddf301892b59f98c
c26d321153c269d4c274e46ad1bcd72aadd0dbd6
describe
'8296' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLD' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
3ee328ec4c73492fd0255bf99bc00515
6289b3a8e15c6f2b02ed8f11f1d2205e762cbfe1
describe
'319827' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLE' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
95ddb28b2851bbbe4e17d349c9dc214d
22daca3ec3fee6532f0b0802d5c60a5e3233fd68
describe
'96529' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLF' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
85a38886d1d4887318699f31feed1a8c
e2bdb669878fcb753fd264ae60b95a1e25e1c28d
describe
'25750' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLG' 'sip-files00161.pro'
f52dc7f4ffcb50f5f2101363de27faf8
3e64e991a9cf9570e2aa5832b551997e196d54f2
describe
'30611' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLH' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
3adc0057412d7f16982922a45dda68a4
8b05b3eb40bddd3a9e1daf7f075762af3ed9c1c5
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLI' 'sip-files00161.tif'
bab09163a2cf6a6bd1369ad1a84bf226
ada8ed95c7a42dc8ff218f2abbcd81a5bcf33999
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLJ' 'sip-files00161.txt'
3fe5a6bc08ef8d49bd6c745f73b9123d
c4a7a03425edbe370e35ad1ca792006c14d58735
describe
'8368' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLK' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
203ab486ed919083e1c662eb6b6edba7
efa2d83d41324a449a2d2fe7095034d1362574a4
describe
'319713' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLL' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
4e1bd38c3e40368ee6c350fdf7a3fdff
24be65dc4c74fa028918ae048f18720223e0e1f3
describe
'92089' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLM' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
4aedc638c4610af53e25170d458cd88c
0114bced8f22aad4e524dd991dd6faafa3d52a9e
describe
'23900' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLN' 'sip-files00162.pro'
a3e1d592c713d91c7da846d50fec941e
09697537c4da9bdcf22dd135e907c8af872490b4
describe
'31405' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLO' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
4ba2a5c64af7f3c5ed4437aa77b3cb06
dbf384eb230d12b48fd29b345574a6e59c98c53e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLP' 'sip-files00162.tif'
fb518a5caf0ae46eeec5252268ebde7e
b84694b6ea4e5ab6fa52f31e873a5944f798bb91
describe
'993' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLQ' 'sip-files00162.txt'
b3633c4ef9ade1b0eee657272b511a06
75a3a75b30c84c9f0fc349f4b5d187bd00d74dc4
describe
'8260' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLR' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
a3f4b6881bb8230b51f1e42267a9c66f
bb1182fc1a7972104ccdebe80eb630dcc5e2d1fd
describe
'319900' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLS' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
9bb4b8fb522ce7ec46810bb58c1e4a91
363a40fdd9e3f9888ad7477f6caa77ff4fa6d2c1
describe
'101245' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLT' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
277b1abdca622ea5d5b14f11fff23f4c
1beb5ea18be771c54777a35a167819d77f6f962f
describe
'28263' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLU' 'sip-files00163.pro'
e855352a8c9e22207537b10a8ac5dde9
26800bdc82b5c450fbe74fbb685305707410b949
describe
'33787' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLV' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
30fec4fa91ae2e8a152677bd4e243581
8d12476bfee8c0e39408e9fe3331ee539b75a1bb
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLW' 'sip-files00163.tif'
a9ba7b8ef9d6e3f19cfb56838248a4f6
cffc30c746dda3217409ae3e3ba97a9a81cf5b73
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLX' 'sip-files00163.txt'
53838d63aee05b11fd09327258571778
68ffedc65ed0f9976d1fb2751bef000e7ea904d7
describe
'8842' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLY' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
4f6da26d7560f01b522cb7d57a48566f
fe2b35e750eb3b23226ec26e703231becedf6383
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASLZ' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
04741b1e89bc680f3ae4e4e82446a8d3
a8ba837f5810689d2e62540177e61b58edfbc59f
describe
'91557' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASMA' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
efe77ffe4c2f0a56fef7b88063c5b171
a7b913037f5c356158bc4b0fc313da53b0fb0f79
describe
'25389' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASMB' 'sip-files00164.pro'
6da33b4b687955b9b2ddd4f890b550ff
22d1ce57fe28fb015a745779b35dc750ba5695c4
describe
'30448' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASMC' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
73356b824b7722d56122fd62ed6e39d8
2278c728df76ee770ab7aef85031d3552ff143dc
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASMD' 'sip-files00164.tif'
f2feea63c3d670fe7327611b489a4524
88b2a145957004ae75745c70ea1f6e66eb46ee78
'2011-11-14T17:24:55-05:00'
describe
'1043' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASME' 'sip-files00164.txt'
b59125e6cfc14eae51a2900230726b2c
6cf9b58f767cfc9a9f3139cd078e37c1ed964094
describe
'8341' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASMF' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
544723d3668d7b3587c22378e695ae2b
ff5f887395624e18289dd790cc41c4c46ed1439d
describe
'319898' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASMG' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
54cea46f81c05419760aac7b2f4c87a9
263db1983588c2a7a2e39d6febcb15f280c7cceb
describe
'99210' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASMH' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
4f6a129c44ef5d6ea4aae276263cbed7
e2f45c46a784b453cf116c441ce7b113e783cf0d
describe
'26963' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASMI' 'sip-files00165.pro'
0c7005cd845596c696f8a4f29dd55002
e28bde95d17112f05043235912fe875abae38ce3
describe
'31897' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASMJ' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
ed613ab0251a26fae53a5ef8191a6bc9
911760ef10e8e9a4db1bca88b4b1804dd31d0333
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASMK' 'sip-files00165.tif'
06cd6f5b47a86c01b3018b0716b03b7d
34a59b2c3d2d5d681ce0b8f2c9d0b3989418509f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASML' 'sip-files00165.txt'
2d11254450e5adeaac42b53faffe18c4
52db80f8b0a14cfde5a4504b6a8c720631e1af38
describe
'8775' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASMM' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
ee0d46f0b68eec638c2db2cd1c7afdff
b5e28ccdf8406af8c2a729db26b28a5172ed348c
'2011-11-14T17:25:10-05:00'
describe
'320175' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASMN' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
965246e9af87e99b95a035f1ac53b750
e4826fbf42995a0796e24911ba556af622ccd3f1
describe
'94632' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASMO' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
6b714fecd5225834a41faecce261ec0d
2f84fe84c6559d7d1b91a0f2a75a22b19e6e04d6
describe
'25484' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASMP' 'sip-files00166.pro'
66c2e4a6080f23f222a50ec9a12f8785
07650cf1d45d5b866aba602c66c7b3b18bc801f5
describe
'30858' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASMQ' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
2f93ca62145b58df49487c8a248ddafc
466478e99459b10d6f5c7fe6f8278dbd25474919
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASMR' 'sip-files00166.tif'
f1d4d2924908e0604c61655b2e378cb9
2304cf5dd665f6f64bdd35f35e2bf3cabd6fa940
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASMS' 'sip-files00166.txt'
aa9c50ecef24e25c8f72fd2382c5a4a6
6b575b43d3d80c7f97b43381c26f073150db0b8f
describe
'8594' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASMT' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
c842853ae2ef254956baf8ef191f2d5d
74a237e98ce10fe94cbc47992d65a642fa11501f
describe
'319946' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASMU' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
e0642310d3a65798416a3cf51b74ae7f
d8e3b9d2e9396767f53b045464ef4b791452e4da
describe
'102867' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASMV' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
173680cfef7ee31ad68898b96e1b69b4
150f39756e703a542a61c7934eb30888c9fb2e53
describe
'28399' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASMW' 'sip-files00167.pro'
23b28c66e4adec51883912621706ef5d
2d129a3cb0550004ff91e30f3316202ea9b3aab9
describe
'33021' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASMX' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
8228b40c0595a9d15291464175f01630
f9fbae80307d0f87a4ef579ac958d570b3f2e30e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASMY' 'sip-files00167.tif'
9243bf73dd2d77d21211ad78996972f5
503b7b12f7e63eb200a5be5c7b0c4a1c191b3815
describe
'1148' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASMZ' 'sip-files00167.txt'
cddfe1e909089eeb840de94391dace60
34454c8df480fac711019e7f8bfc5c257325435f
describe
'8637' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASNA' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
38f81e8d33d28707da44df5c84d3ec26
247741821d0176b578fee3e072295c641d461a18
describe
'319991' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASNB' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
8a96999e83a367c967e396f8f7c455fa
589875e0de4666e843da40cf05fd66f5db7bf5c0
describe
'97211' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASNC' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
b8d94d37a21ff2a868e6584630e198a6
285838f9afead6c1ed9fafcc45f07c3b01cd9dab
describe
'26818' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASND' 'sip-files00168.pro'
4cf428ae741bdf1bba0d798be621a269
6da19b78031e478d6b479a013bc471434d571fcb
describe
'32133' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASNE' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
fe15b98aa9dd9fec858ae1084c0d0a46
aed7bb57c1b28f5d652f3e819035926c974dfdfe
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASNF' 'sip-files00168.tif'
e9e2def1fa7aaa5c366785efff72ee96
2096c2362993bf7aba1f8ef3a5e7a5ad11cee9b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASNG' 'sip-files00168.txt'
5fb3bd8608a00d02cc949fb5858b4114
24f72810b71f94c6e7c6764a8c44ff7df15c2ebe
describe
'8264' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASNH' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
35d525ddf6aede44615b0ec0aa963c39
a515d607f13dffe5a286d1d60993f6508ad9ca70
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASNI' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
8a40b8f777fbf2a95bf02a971b8afe6d
2f8aebb15aec9125ea170964ae0b55618a9ec22a
describe
'92476' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASNJ' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
655f57416cdd8dc2cb96b87385d8b359
2df0aad5ca32896cb01a4b14aa035205de5d76eb
describe
'24509' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASNK' 'sip-files00169.pro'
15469273585d8bc903654d0933e13139
0f4afd8134e79351a263dcc521e9583f2b4dfbed
describe
'29858' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASNL' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
05ca387a696b00215698d1ca6c1f0033
357f07302e44cf75bc619429a0f6ed4eb53bcb5c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASNM' 'sip-files00169.tif'
3150e94b576632e7ec678a56b71f2222
4afb564948375527b7fa0eb392b9c0181b80c001
describe
'1014' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASNN' 'sip-files00169.txt'
e37c5756b6a68eb64a5202a50ce31aac
1b8d4c56c42c378cd6b2dd247cf74fac09f87cf0
describe
'7968' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASNO' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
7f6fadfb10a9951af135473674af65a2
148f0eacdc492d7145844edb7869a95d6ed15514
describe
'319997' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASNP' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
2058d38e2d36522e48918b4b40d769ea
6b568dac95064724a99e2145deb59d423526af6f
'2011-11-14T17:21:51-05:00'
describe
'134940' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASNQ' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
3dea53d4c185ac06f4ab9e1e99a486ab
a07140369c3ddd1016b9e5103188d3e7a25d2c38
describe
'36124' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASNR' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
3eea1a38b2dfacb6a38c9b29e0d01d6d
6b4dd7caa072c81c56d23d9a0769116d40ff9dc1
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASNS' 'sip-files00170.tif'
7a8ca36f84c38e085dcae9ad751c7209
0fe38ac822fcf2e701d7f5dacede44107f19bee0
describe
'9331' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASNT' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
d0ac67b911c2482aed4febe7605b02a5
d36562864bcd14c160c9245c3c949e18612452c5
describe
'319957' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASNU' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
1ebe6c9e2131d7a992665f63f50a90a5
a5f61fa93238f3671f69a842e87b8d7d7772c600
describe
'14173' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASNV' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
9050210bdf5f6fd1dcd6fca7af24c96e
dbfe28e04c46d674672bdb30b2d22387a2fd3b3b
describe
'3076' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASNW' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
271cc52125c89505ec82c67b9b6e8427
b398dd668e314064e60ec9e0197971746c0f3458
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASNX' 'sip-files00171.tif'
c9641fbec0bffcf16e1cc2efcc1d8bac
a301c111f8e4e9da93c15059616463bb3a497a23
describe
'1059' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASNY' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
6ed0bca5a2638473e357f20854f80c77
04dcb314c7847bc81bfab81eb338d5895155ee5d
describe
'319954' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASNZ' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
f132e25096a6333915678cdc0efc6107
ad0cd20b792065942fe92868109498b523095f84
describe
'89921' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASOA' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
1afc2431233cd64a7267c91f38fb1007
068769f0d1e083821efecde2665110b2b00ed8aa
describe
'24564' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASOB' 'sip-files00172.pro'
d330a70925c30203b381c8d94b0a1e38
784e6d321404387c2bf5fe573b8743a6704aaf75
describe
'29204' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASOC' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
cabfaa4e784ff124a37e0233db00352d
49b2a6a84c55cadc3734bf5eb2ebfb52624e4eab
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASOD' 'sip-files00172.tif'
6dd020dd1c5cc40a395134624d36c5a6
9750888b585632b03474d812394fd2bb5853f1b0
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASOE' 'sip-files00172.txt'
434443c909b7ff0631f4338763513566
b4cdff24625a3078f408b03709ed1b9f093bb202
describe
'8140' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASOF' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
e79e61e5c5d34e22d837b304968c2fdf
1cf4a2e59b34505a5c444f2092f3ed9a3610a038
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASOG' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
daa8ba9a89ced1c82e359edfb5863926
37bd985c11dfccbf69ceaef9ed1e306cac983bbe
describe
'93642' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASOH' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
f9f2d78aeb1dc013c60e292bc1806a87
cabd8bff5bd872e77e7790167bf841f0541dd359
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASOI' 'sip-files00173.pro'
0c5fa01d9724a7bc4ebaa30b873fafc0
0748ada1c7ebabf1d8e38b5e142172fa63eb9e12
describe
'30288' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASOJ' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
bc1edad1e85c45ece809f385caeaf33e
86e3608e0ea515ed32986cfcce8b6faf5e559c2d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASOK' 'sip-files00173.tif'
c803f5fc303ad8d8cdfa7e5737d39aaa
44c442ed59a4a8021a9f26504bc98dabbcc0f79d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASOL' 'sip-files00173.txt'
a0b25024b3a283afa4c484a4df2c9130
79a5e87e80ee0407c3423dd6dae35a3a23c1e348
describe
'8162' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASOM' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
a531c01bb092727be97e41e6beef93cd
3d9ee5c1c184d427ff422810c324a50a7ebc2ac9
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASON' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
cfa71b020df9c96bd87f89f54d5a86a1
b848aea1b02261a2fd83855b23488ea683b309bb
describe
'92306' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASOO' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
e77d5db469fa155237527a095bf0a8f7
497e6cf5c69ed4950db16941b5ad66dfd865ece4
describe
'25129' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASOP' 'sip-files00174.pro'
ce306f2a1884b0d644318cbe9757be4b
774bd484df881eeebce41e383223c25f01c4b2a7
describe
'31181' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASOQ' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
345212f64f59ceec21eea211d0a9f547
00ad45d0637e76fc9548559e481e01fb83f25b53
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASOR' 'sip-files00174.tif'
e0ecc9bdbaf51806277389eea70bb354
17b0c65baad0b71ef166858192941a9f09abf71e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASOS' 'sip-files00174.txt'
66d54d3b233f70d4b62a14fb8e3e686b
11a2a1e830ed97059c5c1704aaf7fdad9ae193a8
describe
'8539' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASOT' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
8bf130e438f25d6ae58ce70bab880096
8aaef51ac8d2ab6981b00c8c3334a2519395278c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASOU' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
617ebc819462042399a8ee5db680595f
5831a0a2f3b775ca9a8ec6c4d05cc5bac263e6ee
describe
'93368' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASOV' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
5869e64ef53d21827e92e88d1e656ee7
38109b0661d243867a15b4be6650c4db4f763916
describe
'25985' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASOW' 'sip-files00175.pro'
d8962108d41e79c9883182fc4b311247
4d95870fdde2e893e880afcb79d5e6ff48637b66
describe
'29826' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASOX' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
7b50d139274a02a49f39eda0b68bd5a1
a69edcd531d67a88ad53638453a583711d275e4b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASOY' 'sip-files00175.tif'
cea449f423b580323e1bf7ee48064159
889961166022ddf3fac678e9ad04ef80c56acf1e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASOZ' 'sip-files00175.txt'
93f9592b426fccd9db559090b6229433
5101183cdd0be49cab2ddc27c0cff041b43267d1
describe
'8196' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPA' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
8ad6043e13ba2a34b92d8f2fa82a43b2
5fa084bcfabcdbfc5d1cdebb95f47022605d017d
describe
'319974' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPB' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
9a813f8d0d346d992ce3c5b0a976981e
4ff2fdcca1051b20944be5ddda6035c75c32ea60
describe
'91188' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPC' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
d78bd01a37ac8d377372f7ed4e62eac4
c1822c41f3d74d00ac01bef629e5e378128f8f2c
describe
'24380' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPD' 'sip-files00176.pro'
03d4ee72e5f6630faec17999e16a780a
c3c3645c9d8903500bff34bd113370a644cf0277
describe
'29630' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPE' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
5eb352233ee4e35cbd106b78ad4a6c89
45d4fac210614ba9610bc49bcfe6f0e858e34a7f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPF' 'sip-files00176.tif'
770a2a064813b889d737572cef6b39b2
30784aa41af6077e8e86afa7cd4d4f35e8f83460
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPG' 'sip-files00176.txt'
630d34af492e4d717581a70b5803cf00
c9cc3e8e6d23a564dd4c1c1ef9d6584806c89097
describe
'7648' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPH' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
d9f5e7a8382ffc52f9c5e8827e8a7fc8
64356eac53e2a2fb7404733219ddf285b2ea20b1
describe
'320162' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPI' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
725e7dd057d18cd477e4bb89d9e444fb
6665065c23c26a9b149a19e714dcb6cf9b2a85cd
describe
'95475' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPJ' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
59704439f827403047edf06d738af8d8
c21a19c8f7eedd5314ab7e39ad064ed28c3eccec
describe
'24968' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPK' 'sip-files00177.pro'
ab296b407de4af3e318e1ca3770cb425
e76855342833595e8361bc4a592ed13625fbd653
describe
'31162' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPL' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
088bad2f8dc377160f9b83cc43b304d9
1b08eb2beee6b99dc87b92e95eeb9c5c89af80b9
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPM' 'sip-files00177.tif'
ed3ad6af7284198642fe0056980af7c7
b7a2acfb4b7a1f766616b9b4dc303a02435e1057
describe
'1023' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPN' 'sip-files00177.txt'
85eaa6fcdcecbfddb091616ddbc57ad7
972a8f98968336badd2fb2c27ba5f8b3b76a646f
describe
'8214' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPO' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
eeae5cc790983b2386c082a156b7b814
a970d08c463805b0d757f29eac07cb320880f2b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPP' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
c1fd4e4960cad65285c7f20093465529
95ca5f9e675e12c811697162c9bdc81393ccc1e4
describe
'99394' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPQ' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
bc7ed248337ecb9a6b3f277a81e2edff
d4a7259e6334e815389140ea3e8dfd0b88fc3469
describe
'26978' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPR' 'sip-files00178.pro'
6991d0e6cca18e8207f706a2077f5435
458cd54febd04ffe1b646ae488322e307776c0d5
describe
'32199' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPS' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
ae08af66d3eb65776c7dff98799ab9f1
ed4cc5183924650a04be0786b367d14ec6b2c603
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPT' 'sip-files00178.tif'
7a0d43abedfb27f56dd82bafc0e01855
e3554c2442934364555a02940c2e88d8f95ba8c8
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPU' 'sip-files00178.txt'
528f95a8a51743c1f2fce4f53b2abafb
d441f636cd8b3697f7bfb60abc5e0db8942f2962
describe
'8257' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPV' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
a48fae97e165643ef0354aa5028c2e24
b8bcf5460a3be490c850149e97f8067d76bb660a
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPW' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
111a16b531fdbb96f0e0c48e32cba18a
a2bc148a96b5fce28c86fbcc205fd136320068a7
describe
'68455' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPX' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
db0c1214055372471e2f95496f78b79f
86b5662873961772a820dd6f622fe909d238c951
describe
'18395' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPY' 'sip-files00179.pro'
edbab02eb9eecda9b852e61c80b74fa4
4608eae1c47066235ad1661b851cf4f40ad9655c
'2011-11-14T17:23:23-05:00'
describe
'21427' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASPZ' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
87482b45e274705e4833f50f1cef3051
b2e9c29fdf61e25b71d942e82e34da7fa9749df5
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQA' 'sip-files00179.tif'
d863ec7ed1a5f47b4f48720e5bf052dd
d4ee8cc0db437d9b46c33302e0bc3e43e6687457
describe
'924' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQB' 'sip-files00179.txt'
c57c2a0c0ac0af0dc4784e0dbe310224
17860c6e61499becc174bc782a89e9dbc16cfc16
describe
'5905' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQC' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
e06d9c424ab388b7e3fe7b5dc5946c6c
5d1f076ffeb27fe15d8120be58dc9db9b8fd8c0b
describe
'316772' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQD' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
d8bcd10c7d1b301389e1fe4465819371
f15dcf3707eefeb9635b6c92af20705431f894a2
describe
'95968' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQE' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
5ed1f2034bc84fb51d0bebb39249a8a2
7b397dec44478de5df1eb7004693d39d05305c9f
describe
'28687' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQF' 'sip-files00180.pro'
5f99128c3260951504dd3fef2d6e9b4e
afefec8661ef0e08b3641dbdb1f6293fcce41a46
describe
'29735' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQG' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
c00f2ac65b7c3d1e415f88ed444037f9
b7dabc0e2c3b472eff5e98c471a8951a6fcb143c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQH' 'sip-files00180.tif'
e28e4d7f7e42f45afdf28645314680c2
9c7e82a0eaec932d5612da9bdaec438aa5aeca8b
describe
'1245' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQI' 'sip-files00180.txt'
501fba38d91e9cf863fd56bcdc50f287
4e9ca113af243342c2002828b97ab249fb030b67
describe
'8065' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQJ' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
e5b3ec349eb845e75d7b8bc21a2db1c2
8d29aa425d4cd6a61b2b0c8389b073c9042d62f9
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQK' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
0729abf6809b18eed6d2462cb4ee1f5a
8e097741f555ec038741c504931e64a08ae2a969
'2011-11-14T17:24:42-05:00'
describe
'34457' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQL' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
881d9d30d960667125e91cbe96ff9521
3dbb162e8b47b4221ab9fd6df42ca417396ea5e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQM' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
3f433065775412e7923faef4616a4d86
687eaa8465137a1c7ce6961ade73c5d5062b946a
'2011-11-14T17:23:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQN' 'sip-files00181.tif'
bf4adfbb85f480a5fe5ba79eb1789fd0
768f8bc05a5db391c8a258a1b662058c8bb66009
describe
'2532' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQO' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
c64ac23a31c2d9805602edf7cfebc7b1
ac87c711375276433af6533d5ed23e3c7200d5a5
describe
'360366' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQP' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
cbb0ef3f9de43144159281686113b650
158e4087496d64cb9019fd15a90c88f48f8c564e
describe
'75886' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQQ' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
534d4c617d7d95e0504a6fad46ed0daf
3d2cc7634bff87ae58a0bdb585f949d6e095f3dc
describe
'15188' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQR' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
75c1ed3b850337cdc7cc7449932f0959
c302f37dd9ffa1ec2171d6630e1219db0e533c1f
describe
'8666116' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQS' 'sip-files00184.tif'
0dc434ccacb7428dc0f5362c418bbd1d
20d2909d37972316e7c2c391cf9502998589a018
'2011-11-14T17:24:38-05:00'
describe
'3847' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQT' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
0d27c793ee73c172d2f1ce76869e8877
0c7eb42e1468b4ab26dd84258510807437b3e6e7
describe
'340644' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQU' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
83b2e15681b31ea4d133f3acdd04a91d
fc8d86e341da19faed2cea676d5e56bfbb2dc472
describe
'100457' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQV' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
15009482eeb91a700f11656346fece10
ea5a1ebc1ef94b32f80c89ff4d48478b4fecca15
describe
'17684' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQW' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
4c5adbd44ead5b3bdf189e2c8820206c
f35e564230b8c4227186ed021a3d845f79f6c95b
describe
'8192604' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQX' 'sip-files00185.tif'
eb466e4596ce024dd6978989b02487bf
0c06b8a882b7112409da17d235d2a7b2ff711465
describe
'4022' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQY' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
22f8c0d4cd6a46eb6ff4b2908a7a54a8
05043449accc8fc7a7b80c1f7c66cfd7e2152e79
describe
'68961' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASQZ' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
5787aa245719cf92b19bcbc40223ef60
a5ed5bf01f0a6e13c1a2d35f595df61d4c8561fd
describe
'37271' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASRA' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
c6a6eef35b1f1c409d042acb1eb69af0
280ea61a5c00f7ab0d401686c345536dff955fb2
describe
'360' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASRB' 'sip-files00186.pro'
487e1841d854499514af59165486619d
b543a5a01f5542880d18f51d29ff7b128ab70ede
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASRC' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
5273832c17349cde7111b2ac24883e3d
6e6a82f03795a4d72946032bdac657652b659ef3
describe
'1671752' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASRD' 'sip-files00186.tif'
4e5131b3e2cb5d5837c40ae0e9d85286
4ffc0493125333191ca89f06811121a890faa002
describe
'158' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASRE' 'sip-files00186.txt'
c8445ad25d6b16204f8f0b6e4e878693
f4af106dedc137a1b7ff88486f06eb8e0f3870c6
describe
'3566' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASRF' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
2172fe1dfbb74e54e85c309669299c28
3705fe1f60bf01f8bc34c5009e904ebc341358c7
describe
'144' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASRG' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
b47dc71293f4712d775712d67b167016
6aab8b3487f75e373f76acdbc667218f088812f9
describe
'292532' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASRH' 'sip-filesUF00083399_00001.mets'
ea82cca78f2fbb6ece95e1073c75c514
b9b1098caf24417228970d81b02f7f2e3e1a8115
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-16T14:26:41-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'380849' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAEXfileF20080809_AAASRK' 'sip-filesUF00083399_00001.xml'
df7a2ae31c85643cf14424c82bfba2a8
768c29a4c6f9af9c262976bfa12bb93acba11524
describe
'2013-12-16T14:26:38-05:00'
xml resolution