Citation
Tom Thumb

Material Information

Title:
Tom Thumb
Series Title:
Kriss Kringle series
Creator:
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bros.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1897
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[4] leaves : ill. ; 24 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Folk tales -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre:
Folk tales ( rbgenr )
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Title from cover.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
029441503 ( ALEPH )
28767223 ( OCLC )
AJS8155 ( NOTIS )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
G.
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om

ALIS Lt











NCE upon a time a great ma-
gician went out for a walk,
aud becoming very tired, asked
leave to rest’ at a laborer’s
cottage. The manand his
wife brought him food and
drink, and he, wishing to
reward them, asked them
what they would
mst like to have.
Well, Sit. said the
laborer, we have no ©
children, and if we
had a son no bigger
\than my thumb, we
| MY" would be very proud
THE FULLFILMENT OF THE PROMISE. and happy. You
shall have your wish, said the magician, and when he left
them, he went to a fairy to ask her aid in keeping his
promise. The fairy agreed to assist him.

One day she brought to the wife a tiny baby-boy,
just the size of her husband's thumb, and told her he was
to be called Tom Thumb. :

The parents were delighted and soon became very
fond of him, but as he never grew any bigger, his father
began to fear that Tom would not be able to defend











TOM Wir; Mies



himself from the
attacks of larger
boys. But it was
soon plain that
what the tiny chap
lacked in strength,
he made tp im

cunning. Master Sobek f
Tom used to ply ySâ„¢ =
cherry-stones with >A
the other boys, and
when he had lost ~Â¥ \

allhehad,hewould § ~ \

creep into the bags INTO THE RED COWS MOUTH.

of the others and steal back all his losings. At last he
was caught in the act, and an ugly boy drew the strings
of a bag so tightly around Tom’s neck that he was nearly
strangled. When he released him he was glad “to
promise to play fair” the next time.

One day his mother was making a batter-pudding, and
Tom, climbing to the edge of the bowl to look in, his
foot slipped, and into the batter he went head foremost.
His mother was looking another way, so did not see Tom
and stirred him along with the batter into the pudding-bag,
and put it into the pot to boil. When the water grew
hot, he began to kick and plunge so hard that the lid of
the pot flew off. His mother seeing the pudding behave
so strangely, thought 1t must be bewitched and so threw
it out of doors.

A poor tinker, who was passing at the time, picked










INTO THE BATTER PUDDING.

STIRRED

/

TOM









GRUMBO SWALLOWS TOM LIKE A PILL.







Tt OoMe Sh Ua Mis



up the pudding and
sat down by the
way-side to eat it.
At this Tom began
fo (cry, duet. me
out! let me out!
— The tinker was so
et iniehtencd tat be
—S) - funo, the pudding




“=== over the hedge and

aie —_—
—

-- mother, who, with

ai orcat deal of

trouble, washed off
the batter.

Not long after, his mother took him with her to milk
the cow, and as it was.a windy day, she tied him to a
thistle with a bit of thread. The cow bit off the thistle,
and all at once Tom found himself in a big red cave,
with two rows of white pillars, going champ! champ!

Tom roared at the top of his little voice, for his -
mother. Where are you, my dear son, cried the good
woman in great alarm. Here, in the red cow’s mouth,
cried Tom. ‘The mother wept and wrung her hands, for
she thought he would be killed, but the cow opened her
mouth and dropped him out on the grass without hurting
him.at all. Hus father sometimes took Tom with him,
when he went to plough, and gave him a barley-straw
to drive the horses. He felt very grand and would hallo.

TOM DISAGREES WITH GRUMBO.



OM re OM iB:



and crack his whip
in fine style. One
day, a raven hoyv-
ering near, picked
up the barley-straw
whip, and Tom,
together; luckily,
the raven dropped
Tom on the terrace
_ of giant Grumbo’s.
castle. wr.
Soon'old Grum- 4
bo came on the ter- As?”
race for a walk, and
seeing Master Tom, picked him up and swallowed him
as if he had been.a el Tom made the greedy giant
so sick, that he opened his mouth, and Tom came flying
out, over the terrace into the sea, where a big fish swal
lowed him. It was a fine fish when caught, and was
bought for the table of King Arthur. - The cook took
a knife to open it, and what was her surprise when Tom
popped up his head, and politely said, “ How dye do,
maam?” It was soon known that a wee knight had
come to court, and the King made him his dwarf, and
the whole court thought him the funniest and merriest
little fellow that had ever been seen there. The king
asked Tom about his parents, Tom told him they were
poor people, and that he should like to see them again.
The king gave him leave to visit them and take them
as much money as he could carry. The poor little fellow



A SURPRISE FOR THE COOK.

A
iss tee ise
loge Oh Ca | errr nea o eke bo) My m7 vat







TOM THUMB RIDING THE MOUSE.







TOM THUMB KNIGHTED BY THE KING.







HOUMa Ew Ml Be



could only carry a sil-
ver three-penny piece.
His parents were glad
to see him, but when
he had stayed
three days he
j. thought he
ought to
return. His
mother, who
was sorry to
part with
him, made a
little para-
chute of paper
and string,

TOM’S MOTHER DISPATCHING HIM TO

THE KING'S PALACE, and tying

Tom to it,
blew him away into the air to the king’s palace. Instead
of alighting in the court, he fell into a bowl of broth
which the royal cook was carrying across the court-yard.
The bowl was dropped and broken. The cook in a’
rage, picked up Tom, and ran with him to the king, and
charged him with jumping into the royal broth, out of
mere mischief. The king was angry, but very busy, and
ordered Tom to be kept under arrest till he had more
leisure. He was shut in a mouse-trap for a week; at
the end of the week the king’s anger was gone, and he
ordered Tom a new suit of clothes, and a good sized
mouse to ride on.










LO Me Te AeuUvieBe



One day when Tom was riding past a farm-house, a
large cat, seeing the mouse, rushed out upon it. Tom
drew his sword and defended himself bravely, until King
Arthur and his followers came. up, but he was so
seriously wounded that his life was despaired of.

The Queen of the Fairies, bore Tom away to fairyland,
and kept him several years. When he returned to court
King Arthur was dead, but Tom was cordially welcomed
by his successor, King Thunston. Here he spent many
happy years and met many wonderful adventures. “But
I must tell of




poor little J)
Tom’s death. UBS 7
One day he S/o MS _
RG agian
was attacked ay. =
° My © th We NA
by an immense yA

spider, and
although Tom
succeeded in
killing him
his poisonous
breath was too
much for the
brave little hero, and he fell into a wasting sickness
‘from which he never recovered.

A neat little slab was raised to his memory, and this
was part of the epitaph !—

THE COMBAT WITH THE SPIDER.

Here ues Tom Tuums, Kine Artuur’s xnicut
WuHo DIED BY CRUEL SPIDER’S BITE!








Full Text


G.
g
$
om

ALIS Lt








NCE upon a time a great ma-
gician went out for a walk,
aud becoming very tired, asked
leave to rest’ at a laborer’s
cottage. The manand his
wife brought him food and
drink, and he, wishing to
reward them, asked them
what they would
mst like to have.
Well, Sit. said the
laborer, we have no ©
children, and if we
had a son no bigger
\than my thumb, we
| MY" would be very proud
THE FULLFILMENT OF THE PROMISE. and happy. You
shall have your wish, said the magician, and when he left
them, he went to a fairy to ask her aid in keeping his
promise. The fairy agreed to assist him.

One day she brought to the wife a tiny baby-boy,
just the size of her husband's thumb, and told her he was
to be called Tom Thumb. :

The parents were delighted and soon became very
fond of him, but as he never grew any bigger, his father
began to fear that Tom would not be able to defend








TOM Wir; Mies



himself from the
attacks of larger
boys. But it was
soon plain that
what the tiny chap
lacked in strength,
he made tp im

cunning. Master Sobek f
Tom used to ply ySâ„¢ =
cherry-stones with >A
the other boys, and
when he had lost ~Â¥ \

allhehad,hewould § ~ \

creep into the bags INTO THE RED COWS MOUTH.

of the others and steal back all his losings. At last he
was caught in the act, and an ugly boy drew the strings
of a bag so tightly around Tom’s neck that he was nearly
strangled. When he released him he was glad “to
promise to play fair” the next time.

One day his mother was making a batter-pudding, and
Tom, climbing to the edge of the bowl to look in, his
foot slipped, and into the batter he went head foremost.
His mother was looking another way, so did not see Tom
and stirred him along with the batter into the pudding-bag,
and put it into the pot to boil. When the water grew
hot, he began to kick and plunge so hard that the lid of
the pot flew off. His mother seeing the pudding behave
so strangely, thought 1t must be bewitched and so threw
it out of doors.

A poor tinker, who was passing at the time, picked







INTO THE BATTER PUDDING.

STIRRED

/

TOM






GRUMBO SWALLOWS TOM LIKE A PILL.




Tt OoMe Sh Ua Mis



up the pudding and
sat down by the
way-side to eat it.
At this Tom began
fo (cry, duet. me
out! let me out!
— The tinker was so
et iniehtencd tat be
—S) - funo, the pudding




“=== over the hedge and

aie —_—
—

-- mother, who, with

ai orcat deal of

trouble, washed off
the batter.

Not long after, his mother took him with her to milk
the cow, and as it was.a windy day, she tied him to a
thistle with a bit of thread. The cow bit off the thistle,
and all at once Tom found himself in a big red cave,
with two rows of white pillars, going champ! champ!

Tom roared at the top of his little voice, for his -
mother. Where are you, my dear son, cried the good
woman in great alarm. Here, in the red cow’s mouth,
cried Tom. ‘The mother wept and wrung her hands, for
she thought he would be killed, but the cow opened her
mouth and dropped him out on the grass without hurting
him.at all. Hus father sometimes took Tom with him,
when he went to plough, and gave him a barley-straw
to drive the horses. He felt very grand and would hallo.

TOM DISAGREES WITH GRUMBO.
OM re OM iB:



and crack his whip
in fine style. One
day, a raven hoyv-
ering near, picked
up the barley-straw
whip, and Tom,
together; luckily,
the raven dropped
Tom on the terrace
_ of giant Grumbo’s.
castle. wr.
Soon'old Grum- 4
bo came on the ter- As?”
race for a walk, and
seeing Master Tom, picked him up and swallowed him
as if he had been.a el Tom made the greedy giant
so sick, that he opened his mouth, and Tom came flying
out, over the terrace into the sea, where a big fish swal
lowed him. It was a fine fish when caught, and was
bought for the table of King Arthur. - The cook took
a knife to open it, and what was her surprise when Tom
popped up his head, and politely said, “ How dye do,
maam?” It was soon known that a wee knight had
come to court, and the King made him his dwarf, and
the whole court thought him the funniest and merriest
little fellow that had ever been seen there. The king
asked Tom about his parents, Tom told him they were
poor people, and that he should like to see them again.
The king gave him leave to visit them and take them
as much money as he could carry. The poor little fellow



A SURPRISE FOR THE COOK.

A
iss tee ise
loge Oh Ca | errr nea o eke bo) My m7 vat




TOM THUMB RIDING THE MOUSE.




TOM THUMB KNIGHTED BY THE KING.




HOUMa Ew Ml Be



could only carry a sil-
ver three-penny piece.
His parents were glad
to see him, but when
he had stayed
three days he
j. thought he
ought to
return. His
mother, who
was sorry to
part with
him, made a
little para-
chute of paper
and string,

TOM’S MOTHER DISPATCHING HIM TO

THE KING'S PALACE, and tying

Tom to it,
blew him away into the air to the king’s palace. Instead
of alighting in the court, he fell into a bowl of broth
which the royal cook was carrying across the court-yard.
The bowl was dropped and broken. The cook in a’
rage, picked up Tom, and ran with him to the king, and
charged him with jumping into the royal broth, out of
mere mischief. The king was angry, but very busy, and
ordered Tom to be kept under arrest till he had more
leisure. He was shut in a mouse-trap for a week; at
the end of the week the king’s anger was gone, and he
ordered Tom a new suit of clothes, and a good sized
mouse to ride on.







LO Me Te AeuUvieBe



One day when Tom was riding past a farm-house, a
large cat, seeing the mouse, rushed out upon it. Tom
drew his sword and defended himself bravely, until King
Arthur and his followers came. up, but he was so
seriously wounded that his life was despaired of.

The Queen of the Fairies, bore Tom away to fairyland,
and kept him several years. When he returned to court
King Arthur was dead, but Tom was cordially welcomed
by his successor, King Thunston. Here he spent many
happy years and met many wonderful adventures. “But
I must tell of




poor little J)
Tom’s death. UBS 7
One day he S/o MS _
RG agian
was attacked ay. =
° My © th We NA
by an immense yA

spider, and
although Tom
succeeded in
killing him
his poisonous
breath was too
much for the
brave little hero, and he fell into a wasting sickness
‘from which he never recovered.

A neat little slab was raised to his memory, and this
was part of the epitaph !—

THE COMBAT WITH THE SPIDER.

Here ues Tom Tuums, Kine Artuur’s xnicut
WuHo DIED BY CRUEL SPIDER’S BITE!