Citation
Little Polly Flinders and other rhymes

Material Information

Title:
Little Polly Flinders and other rhymes
Series Title:
Linen nursery series
Creator:
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bros.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 27 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Nursery rhymes -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Baldwin -- 1897
Genre:
Nursery rhymes ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry ( rbgenr )
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Title from illustrated paper cover.
General Note:
First and last pages pasted to cover.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
024610503 ( ALEPH )
25998954 ( OCLC )
AHP8946 ( NOTIS )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




et cies
tr rea
ponte an





l ITTLE Polly Flinders sat among the cinders,
Lo Narming her pretty little toes.
Her mother came and caught her,
And whipped her Itttle daughter
For spoiling her nice new clothes.

Â¥ HAD a little pony ;
They called him dapple-gray ;
Yjent him toalady, —
To ride a mile away.
She whipped him, she slashed him,
She rode him through the mire;
I would not lend my pony now
For all the lady’s hire.

Pe ed 6

i caught a hare alive;
G27. 5 0 10

I let her go again.



RJ MAT are little boys made of, made of,

W What are little boys made of ?

Snaps and snails, and puppy-dog’s tails, .

And that’s what little boys are made of, made of. |

What are little girls made of, made of, made of,
What are little girls made of ?
Sugar and spice, and all that is nice,

And that’s what little girls are made of, made of.

gn ‘Gara

\S, i HERE wasa fat man
LLGa® ) (Ge € Bombay
a(S Niec’s SS, Oh Ob en ey:

“Who was smoking
one sunshiny day;
When a bird,
called a snipe,
Flew away
with his pipe,

Which vexed the fat man
SS of Bombay.










The Baldwin Library

Rm Rr





‘HE lion and the unicorn
Were fighting for the crown:
The lion beat the unicorn
All round about the town.
Some gave them white bread,
And some gave them brown;
Some gave them plum cake,
And sent them out of town

shall I wander ?
ee Upstairs and downstairs, and in

my lady’s chamber.
There I met an old man who would not say

his prayers,
I took him by the left leg, and threw him
down the stairs.

Ce LY Locks! Curly locks!

Wilt thou be mine ?
ve shalt not wash dishes;

Nor yet feed the swine;

But sit on a cushion

And sew a fine seam,

And feed upon strawberries,
Sugar, and cream.

(7° x Goosey, ea whither.










Four corners round about.
[ a CHIMNEY. |

Ke came fiddling out of. a barn,
With a pair of bagpipes under her arm.
ee could sing ‘nothing
but fiddle cum fee:
The mouse has married the
humble bee;
Pipe cat—dance mouse—
We'll-have a wedding at our
~ good house.







HE North wind doth blow,

And we shail have snow,

And what will poor Robin
do then ?



He ‘will hop tO. a. barn,
And to. keep hi mself warm,
Will hide his head under
a ae owing,

Poor: thing |







ACK SPRAT
--could eat no fat,

His wife could eat no.lean,
And so between them both,



3) 2 YOU. See):
The) y licked the platter clean.





as





BMUMET? YY. DUMP TY.



UMPTY- DUMPTY sat on a. wall;
Humpty-Dumpty had a great fall ;
All the king’s horses, and all the kin 1g s men,
Cannot put Humpty-Dumpty together aoe

[ aN EGé. ]

HIS little . gS”. gyi? —.2. This little pig
pig went =F yo stayed at home.

to market,



4. This little pig cS. This little pig cried, “Wee, wee,
had none. a can’t find my way home!”



USSY-CAT, Pussy-cat,
p where have you been ?
I’ve been to London to visit
the Queen!
Pussy-cat, Pussy-cat, what did
you there?
I frightened a little mouse under
her: chai




y¥ USH-A- BYE , baby,
Pen the tree top;
a ee — a : When. the wind, blows,
OM, Tom, the piper’s son, a The eA bough eat
EE Stole a pig, and : away he ran; | ;
The pig twas cat, .
And Tom was ‘Beat 2 S
And he ran crying done street. =



HERE was a manin our town,
And he was wondrous | wise,
He nee into a a

: bush; :

ee scratched out “boll his eyes;




1G Saw his eyes were



With all his might and main, -

He jumped into another bush, AHERE. Pi 5a ae on ef
And scratched them i in again. :

Tobago, ae
Wha. lived on rice, , gruel and
Sago, a
Till, much to his. bliss,
His physician said this,
“To a leg, sir, of mutton, you
ee go.”



HERE was a crooked man, and he went a crooked ole,

And he found a crooked sixpence against 2 crooked stile
He bought a crooked cat, which caught a crooked mouse,
And they all lived together in a little crooked house.



(bucnr
ae7 ai
SLUG HLTA ORIE



THE CROOKED MAN.



USH, baby,
my doll,

i pray you,

don’t cry,























And I'll give you some
- bread and some

: milk by-and-by ;
Or, perhaps, you like
custard, or, maybe,

a tart,

Then to either youre
welcome with all

my. heart.



PHERE was an old
1 woman lived underey,
the hill,

And if she’s not gone,
‘she lives there stills
Baked apples she sold.
and cranberry pies,

And she’s the old woman
that never told lies |.

i



iti ie Cole

eva,

Was.a merry old soul,
And a merry old soul

was he;




He called for his pipe
And he called for his bowl,

And he called for his fiddlers
Coree.
And every fiddler he had
fine fiddle, —
And a very fine fiddle
had he; Gar
““Tweedle dee, tweedle dee,” said the fiddlers >.
‘Ch there’s none so rare, they can compare, _
With King Cole and his fiddlers three !”’

Vy F HEN I was a bachelor,
i . .T lived by myself,
"And all the bread and
_. cheese I got, I put
upon the shelf;
But the rats and the mice, they
made such a strife ;
i had to go to market, to buy
myself a wife.



1¢ streéts were so broad, and the lanes were so narrow,
ad to bring my wife home on a wheelbarrow;

e wheelbarrow broke, my wife got a fall,

Pics iN

AWA, BA-A, black sheep,

Have you any wool?
“Yes, Sit, yes, Sit,



ates Rees) heats
i ne ie Dags ULL
e for my master,
SA RRS
One for mv dame,.

t

ind one for the httle boy”
Phat ves in our lane.”







NING a song of sixpence, ee
A pocket full of rye; SS






Four and twenty black- WS

birds LS Ais & «:
:— * S ¥ é - ‘ He — x
Baked in a pie. a oer ie



When the pie was opened,
The birds began to sing; /
Was not that a dainty dish
To set before the king ?

The king was in his counting-
house,
Counting out his money ;
The queen was in the parior,
Eating bread and honey ;
The maid was in the garden,
Hanging out the clothes;
Down came a blackbird,
And pecked off her nose!

ONG legs, crooked thighs,
Little head, and no eyes.

[ ParR o¥ Tones. |








HERE was an old woman W~~_-~<= ee
: A : or

tossed up in a basket, : meg! ‘ ; ee
Ninety times as high as Fe ae UKE

the moon;
And where she was going, I
couldn’t but ask it;
For in her hand she carried
a broom.

“OLD woman, old woman, old woman,” said I,
© Whither, oh whither, ol whither so high?”
“To sweep the cobwebs off the sky.”

“Shall I go with thee.” “Aye. by-and-by ”







Full Text






et cies
tr rea
ponte an


l ITTLE Polly Flinders sat among the cinders,
Lo Narming her pretty little toes.
Her mother came and caught her,
And whipped her Itttle daughter
For spoiling her nice new clothes.

Â¥ HAD a little pony ;
They called him dapple-gray ;
Yjent him toalady, —
To ride a mile away.
She whipped him, she slashed him,
She rode him through the mire;
I would not lend my pony now
For all the lady’s hire.

Pe ed 6

i caught a hare alive;
G27. 5 0 10

I let her go again.



RJ MAT are little boys made of, made of,

W What are little boys made of ?

Snaps and snails, and puppy-dog’s tails, .

And that’s what little boys are made of, made of. |

What are little girls made of, made of, made of,
What are little girls made of ?
Sugar and spice, and all that is nice,

And that’s what little girls are made of, made of.

gn ‘Gara

\S, i HERE wasa fat man
LLGa® ) (Ge € Bombay
a(S Niec’s SS, Oh Ob en ey:

“Who was smoking
one sunshiny day;
When a bird,
called a snipe,
Flew away
with his pipe,

Which vexed the fat man
SS of Bombay.










The Baldwin Library

Rm Rr


‘HE lion and the unicorn
Were fighting for the crown:
The lion beat the unicorn
All round about the town.
Some gave them white bread,
And some gave them brown;
Some gave them plum cake,
And sent them out of town

shall I wander ?
ee Upstairs and downstairs, and in

my lady’s chamber.
There I met an old man who would not say

his prayers,
I took him by the left leg, and threw him
down the stairs.

Ce LY Locks! Curly locks!

Wilt thou be mine ?
ve shalt not wash dishes;

Nor yet feed the swine;

But sit on a cushion

And sew a fine seam,

And feed upon strawberries,
Sugar, and cream.

(7° x Goosey, ea whither.










Four corners round about.
[ a CHIMNEY. |

Ke came fiddling out of. a barn,
With a pair of bagpipes under her arm.
ee could sing ‘nothing
but fiddle cum fee:
The mouse has married the
humble bee;
Pipe cat—dance mouse—
We'll-have a wedding at our
~ good house.




HE North wind doth blow,

And we shail have snow,

And what will poor Robin
do then ?



He ‘will hop tO. a. barn,
And to. keep hi mself warm,
Will hide his head under
a ae owing,

Poor: thing |







ACK SPRAT
--could eat no fat,

His wife could eat no.lean,
And so between them both,



3) 2 YOU. See):
The) y licked the platter clean.





as


BMUMET? YY. DUMP TY.
UMPTY- DUMPTY sat on a. wall;
Humpty-Dumpty had a great fall ;
All the king’s horses, and all the kin 1g s men,
Cannot put Humpty-Dumpty together aoe

[ aN EGé. ]

HIS little . gS”. gyi? —.2. This little pig
pig went =F yo stayed at home.

to market,



4. This little pig cS. This little pig cried, “Wee, wee,
had none. a can’t find my way home!”
USSY-CAT, Pussy-cat,
p where have you been ?
I’ve been to London to visit
the Queen!
Pussy-cat, Pussy-cat, what did
you there?
I frightened a little mouse under
her: chai




y¥ USH-A- BYE , baby,
Pen the tree top;
a ee — a : When. the wind, blows,
OM, Tom, the piper’s son, a The eA bough eat
EE Stole a pig, and : away he ran; | ;
The pig twas cat, .
And Tom was ‘Beat 2 S
And he ran crying done street. =



HERE was a manin our town,
And he was wondrous | wise,
He nee into a a

: bush; :

ee scratched out “boll his eyes;




1G Saw his eyes were



With all his might and main, -

He jumped into another bush, AHERE. Pi 5a ae on ef
And scratched them i in again. :

Tobago, ae
Wha. lived on rice, , gruel and
Sago, a
Till, much to his. bliss,
His physician said this,
“To a leg, sir, of mutton, you
ee go.”



HERE was a crooked man, and he went a crooked ole,

And he found a crooked sixpence against 2 crooked stile
He bought a crooked cat, which caught a crooked mouse,
And they all lived together in a little crooked house.
(bucnr
ae7 ai
SLUG HLTA ORIE



THE CROOKED MAN.
USH, baby,
my doll,

i pray you,

don’t cry,























And I'll give you some
- bread and some

: milk by-and-by ;
Or, perhaps, you like
custard, or, maybe,

a tart,

Then to either youre
welcome with all

my. heart.



PHERE was an old
1 woman lived underey,
the hill,

And if she’s not gone,
‘she lives there stills
Baked apples she sold.
and cranberry pies,

And she’s the old woman
that never told lies |.

i
iti ie Cole

eva,

Was.a merry old soul,
And a merry old soul

was he;




He called for his pipe
And he called for his bowl,

And he called for his fiddlers
Coree.
And every fiddler he had
fine fiddle, —
And a very fine fiddle
had he; Gar
““Tweedle dee, tweedle dee,” said the fiddlers >.
‘Ch there’s none so rare, they can compare, _
With King Cole and his fiddlers three !”’

Vy F HEN I was a bachelor,
i . .T lived by myself,
"And all the bread and
_. cheese I got, I put
upon the shelf;
But the rats and the mice, they
made such a strife ;
i had to go to market, to buy
myself a wife.



1¢ streéts were so broad, and the lanes were so narrow,
ad to bring my wife home on a wheelbarrow;

e wheelbarrow broke, my wife got a fall,

Pics iN

AWA, BA-A, black sheep,

Have you any wool?
“Yes, Sit, yes, Sit,



ates Rees) heats
i ne ie Dags ULL
e for my master,
SA RRS
One for mv dame,.

t

ind one for the httle boy”
Phat ves in our lane.”




NING a song of sixpence, ee
A pocket full of rye; SS






Four and twenty black- WS

birds LS Ais & «:
:— * S ¥ é - ‘ He — x
Baked in a pie. a oer ie



When the pie was opened,
The birds began to sing; /
Was not that a dainty dish
To set before the king ?

The king was in his counting-
house,
Counting out his money ;
The queen was in the parior,
Eating bread and honey ;
The maid was in the garden,
Hanging out the clothes;
Down came a blackbird,
And pecked off her nose!

ONG legs, crooked thighs,
Little head, and no eyes.

[ ParR o¥ Tones. |








HERE was an old woman W~~_-~<= ee
: A : or

tossed up in a basket, : meg! ‘ ; ee
Ninety times as high as Fe ae UKE

the moon;
And where she was going, I
couldn’t but ask it;
For in her hand she carried
a broom.

“OLD woman, old woman, old woman,” said I,
© Whither, oh whither, ol whither so high?”
“To sweep the cobwebs off the sky.”

“Shall I go with thee.” “Aye. by-and-by ”