Citation
The Robber kitten

Material Information

Title:
The Robber kitten
Creator:
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bros
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[10] p. : ;

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Cats -- Juvenile poetry ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1897
Bldn -- 1897
Genre:
Children's poetry
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
027689345 ( ALEPH )
244153573 ( OCLC )
AJF9225 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text


COPYRIGHT 1897 BY

Af Joserluin J3n0s.
} NewYork.

, : : ‘



go and be a robber fierce.





JU



= ANY We
== mel \\ :
< AY \N
QC





—————

fh







A KITTEN once to its mother said,

“Il never more be good;

But lll go and be a robber fierce,
And live in a dreary wood,
Wood, wood, wood,

And live in a dreary wood.”

So off it went to the dreary wood,
And there it met a cock,
And blew its head, with a pistol, off,
Which gave it an awful shock !
Shock, shock, shock,

Which gave it an awful shock!

It climbed a tree to rob a nest
Of young and tender owls;
But the branch broke off,
and the kitten fell,
With six tremendous howls!
Howls, howls, howls,

With six tremendous howls!





ad, with a pistol, off.

X

is he

ew |

|

And b



he branch broke off,
ano the kitten fell.







ea ¥)
Nae.







Soon after that it met a cat;

“ Now, give to me your purse;
Or I'll shoot you through,
and stab you too,
And kill you, which is worse!
Worse, worse, worse,

And kill you, which is worse.”

One day it met a Robber Dog,
And they sat down to drink ;
The dog did joke, and laugh, and sing,
Which made the kitten wink !
Wink, wink, wink,

Which made the kitten wink!

At last they quarrelled; then they fought,
Beneath the greenwood tree,
— Till puss was felled with an awful club,
Most terrible to see !
See, see, see,

Most terrible to see!



At last they quarvelled:
athen they fought.









Puss was felled ami an awful club,










i \
wy ie | }
SN

Se "7
ty

we

aes a YY y fli Wi hs i
A ML ody M27 ty Wy
A Hd a 4 PIA tiie iy }
FU {lis gy





When Puss got up,
its eye was shut,
And swelled, and black, and blue,
















When puss got up,
its eye was shut,
And swelled

and black, and blue;

Morcover,
all its bones were sore,

So it began to mew!

Mew, mew, mew,

So it began to mew!

Then up it rose, and scratched its nose,
And went home very sad;
“Oh! mother dear, behold me here,
I'll never more be bad,
Bad, bad, bad,

I'll never more be bad.”









BENNIE THE “SCORCHER.”

BEN BRAKELESS
was a bicycle boy
Who lived upon
his wheel
That is, he left it only
To sleep or take a meal.
Ing scorching.
fast and furious
He ’specially



took delight ;
He thought it hard,

One morning indeed, the law
Bennie started out Should say it was
Soon after break of day ; not right.

Had you been there
to listen,
You might have heard
him say,
“I’m going to scorch till
I’ve enough;
For nothing will I stop;

I'll scorch and scorch



forever,

Or at Icast until I drop!”







His wheel he mounts, and off he goes,
Like bullet from a gun;
His spirits rising wildly
With the mad delirious fun.
A flock of hens and ducks he soon
Encounters by the way,
And runs them down, and kills a few,
Without a moment's stay.

A little further on he meets
A pig of strength and pride,
Who thinks he owns
the roadway,
And wheelmen
can’t abide.
Bold Bennie
doesn’t dodge him,—
Indeed, he has no choice



They bump,—
Delighted to have come off and Piggy scampers,
The victor in the row, With anguish in his voice.
Ben pedals swiftly onward,
And passes next a cow.
His handkerchief at her
he flirts; —
Insulted, she gives chase,
But Ben she fails
to overtake,



So rapid is his pace.






Old Bossy’s left far in the rear,
But Ben keeps up his speed,
And soon a fresh assailant meets,

A cur of mongrel breed.
He seizes Ben, determined

That he shall not advance,
But Ben escapes by leaving

A sample of his pants.



A nice long slope
Ben now comes to,
And thinks a “coast”
he'll take.
He starts with glee,
but near the end
His heart
: begins to quake ;
= For, standing ’cross
the road, he sees
A goat of aspect grim,

oe - Who does not show
2. the least intent
To clear the way for him.

They come together
WiltheaesC ies i,
And somersaults both turn
That would in
Barnum’s Circus
Loud plaudits
for them earn.
Ben's clothes are torn,
and he is bruised,
His wheel, though,
is all right,
While Mr. Goat
makes up his mind
To draw out of the fight.







..

Ben mounts again, and scorching still,
Once more he onward steers,
But now a mounted officer
Upon the scene appears.
He sees bold Ben, an hails him,
But Bennie will not stop,
“T’ve won too many scraps,” says he,
“To halt now for a cop.”

Ah! this time
he has meta foe
Who cannot be defied;
"The officer has a lariat
Suspended by his side;
He throws it very deftly
Right over



Bennie’s head,

And he is caught securely

The dismal ending More quickly

here you see

than ‘tis said.

Of Bennie’s scorching trip;
He’s going off to prison,
Held in the law’s firm grip!
How long he'll have
to stay there,
I really cannot tell,
But scorching i is a practice
That should be
punished well.









Full Text


COPYRIGHT 1897 BY

Af Joserluin J3n0s.
} NewYork.

, : : ‘
go and be a robber fierce.





JU



= ANY We
== mel \\ :
< AY \N
QC





—————

fh




A KITTEN once to its mother said,

“Il never more be good;

But lll go and be a robber fierce,
And live in a dreary wood,
Wood, wood, wood,

And live in a dreary wood.”

So off it went to the dreary wood,
And there it met a cock,
And blew its head, with a pistol, off,
Which gave it an awful shock !
Shock, shock, shock,

Which gave it an awful shock!

It climbed a tree to rob a nest
Of young and tender owls;
But the branch broke off,
and the kitten fell,
With six tremendous howls!
Howls, howls, howls,

With six tremendous howls!


ad, with a pistol, off.

X

is he

ew |

|

And b
he branch broke off,
ano the kitten fell.




ea ¥)
Nae.




Soon after that it met a cat;

“ Now, give to me your purse;
Or I'll shoot you through,
and stab you too,
And kill you, which is worse!
Worse, worse, worse,

And kill you, which is worse.”

One day it met a Robber Dog,
And they sat down to drink ;
The dog did joke, and laugh, and sing,
Which made the kitten wink !
Wink, wink, wink,

Which made the kitten wink!

At last they quarrelled; then they fought,
Beneath the greenwood tree,
— Till puss was felled with an awful club,
Most terrible to see !
See, see, see,

Most terrible to see!
At last they quarvelled:
athen they fought.






Puss was felled ami an awful club,







i \
wy ie | }
SN

Se "7
ty

we

aes a YY y fli Wi hs i
A ML ody M27 ty Wy
A Hd a 4 PIA tiie iy }
FU {lis gy





When Puss got up,
its eye was shut,
And swelled, and black, and blue,













When puss got up,
its eye was shut,
And swelled

and black, and blue;

Morcover,
all its bones were sore,

So it began to mew!

Mew, mew, mew,

So it began to mew!

Then up it rose, and scratched its nose,
And went home very sad;
“Oh! mother dear, behold me here,
I'll never more be bad,
Bad, bad, bad,

I'll never more be bad.”






BENNIE THE “SCORCHER.”

BEN BRAKELESS
was a bicycle boy
Who lived upon
his wheel
That is, he left it only
To sleep or take a meal.
Ing scorching.
fast and furious
He ’specially



took delight ;
He thought it hard,

One morning indeed, the law
Bennie started out Should say it was
Soon after break of day ; not right.

Had you been there
to listen,
You might have heard
him say,
“I’m going to scorch till
I’ve enough;
For nothing will I stop;

I'll scorch and scorch



forever,

Or at Icast until I drop!”




His wheel he mounts, and off he goes,
Like bullet from a gun;
His spirits rising wildly
With the mad delirious fun.
A flock of hens and ducks he soon
Encounters by the way,
And runs them down, and kills a few,
Without a moment's stay.

A little further on he meets
A pig of strength and pride,
Who thinks he owns
the roadway,
And wheelmen
can’t abide.
Bold Bennie
doesn’t dodge him,—
Indeed, he has no choice



They bump,—
Delighted to have come off and Piggy scampers,
The victor in the row, With anguish in his voice.
Ben pedals swiftly onward,
And passes next a cow.
His handkerchief at her
he flirts; —
Insulted, she gives chase,
But Ben she fails
to overtake,



So rapid is his pace.



Old Bossy’s left far in the rear,
But Ben keeps up his speed,
And soon a fresh assailant meets,

A cur of mongrel breed.
He seizes Ben, determined

That he shall not advance,
But Ben escapes by leaving

A sample of his pants.



A nice long slope
Ben now comes to,
And thinks a “coast”
he'll take.
He starts with glee,
but near the end
His heart
: begins to quake ;
= For, standing ’cross
the road, he sees
A goat of aspect grim,

oe - Who does not show
2. the least intent
To clear the way for him.

They come together
WiltheaesC ies i,
And somersaults both turn
That would in
Barnum’s Circus
Loud plaudits
for them earn.
Ben's clothes are torn,
and he is bruised,
His wheel, though,
is all right,
While Mr. Goat
makes up his mind
To draw out of the fight.




..

Ben mounts again, and scorching still,
Once more he onward steers,
But now a mounted officer
Upon the scene appears.
He sees bold Ben, an hails him,
But Bennie will not stop,
“T’ve won too many scraps,” says he,
“To halt now for a cop.”

Ah! this time
he has meta foe
Who cannot be defied;
"The officer has a lariat
Suspended by his side;
He throws it very deftly
Right over



Bennie’s head,

And he is caught securely

The dismal ending More quickly

here you see

than ‘tis said.

Of Bennie’s scorching trip;
He’s going off to prison,
Held in the law’s firm grip!
How long he'll have
to stay there,
I really cannot tell,
But scorching i is a practice
That should be
punished well.