Citation
Wymps, and other fairy tales

Material Information

Title:
Wymps, and other fairy tales
Creator:
Sharp, Evelyn, 1869-1955
Lane, John ( Publisher )
Dearmer, Mable ( Illustrator )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
J. Lane
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
5 p. l., [3]-190 p., l l., : 8 col. pl. (incl. front.) ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Fairy tales ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre:
Fairy tales ( rbgenr )
Children's literature ( fast )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
"Wymps' and 'In a sea-green country' have appeared in Harper's round table."
General Note:
Includes 13 p. publisher's catalog.
General Note:
Imprint also notes publisher's location in London.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Evelyn Sharp ; with eight coloured illustrations and a cover, by Mrs. Percy Dearmer.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
023480711 ( ALEPH )
04588298 ( OCLC )
AHL2770 ( NOTIS )
12038464 ( LCCN )

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Full Text














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Wymps

And Other Fairy Tales



BY THE SAME AUTHOR

AT THE RELTON ARMS

A Novel. iI2mo. $1.00









WYMPS

AND OTHER FAIRY
TALES

BY

EVELYN SHARP

WITH EIGHT COLOURED ILLUSTRATIONS
AND A COVER BY MRS. PERCY DEARMER

JOHN LANE

THE BODLEY HEAD
New York aND LoNDON’
1897





CopyriGut, 1896, BY
JOHN LANE

Press of J. J. Little & Co,
Astor Place, New York



TO

MARGARET AND BOY



CHAP,

Il.

Ill.

IV.

VI.

VII.

Vill.

Contents

WYMPS ° ° . .

IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY

TOYLAND

THE BOY WHO LOOKED LIKE A GIRL

THE PRINCESS IN HER GARDEN

THE EXCEPTIONAL TADPOLE

THE LITTLE WITCH OF THE PLAIN

THE SOFT-HEARTED PRINCE

°

PAGE

2I

4l

gt
IIS
137

165



Il,

TIt.

IV.

VI.

Vil.

VIII.

List of Illustrations

BY MRS. PERCY DEARMER

WYMPS

IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY .

TOYLAND . .

THE BOY WHO LOOKED LIKE A GIRL .

THE PRINCESS IN HER GARDEN .
THE EXCEPTIONAL TADPOLE
THE LITTLE WITCH OF THE PLAIN

THE SOFT HEARTED PRINCE

Frontispiece

FACING PAGE

23

43

71

93
117
139

167



Wymps






Wymps

be Lady Daffany had just been be-
trothed to the Prince, and there were great
-rejoicings all over the town in consequence.
The people were allowed to cheer as much as
they liked, and every child in the country hada
whole holiday and a penny bun, and nobody had
an unhappy moment from sunrise to sunset. All
the fairies were invited to a magnificent ban-
quet in the palace, which lasted for five hours
anda half; and the betrothed couple sat at one
end of the table, and talked to one another; and
the King and Queen sat at the other end, and
hoped that everything would go well. The
Queen fanned herself, and murmured at inter-
vals, “ The wish of my heart;” and the King
grumbled to himself, because he could not get
enough to eat. The King had a very healthy
appetite, and he always gave a banquet, when-
ever there was the least occasion for one.
“T really don’t think we have left any one out, ©
this time,” said the Queen, in a satisfied tone.



% WYMPS

One of the fairies ad been left out at the
Prince’s christening, and the usual misfortunes
had followed in consequence.

“That is because I sent out all the invita-
tions myself,” replied the King, crushingly.
“These things only require a little manage-
ment.”

The words were hardly out of his royal
mouth, when a sudden darkness fell upon the
room, just as though a curtain had been drawn
across the sun. One ray of sun continued to
shine, however, and that was the one that shone
over Lady Daffany’s head; and down this one,
something came sliding at a terrific pace, and
tumbled into a dish of peaches, just in front
of her. The conversation stopped with a jerk;
and the people in the street ceased cheering at
the same moment, though they could not have
told any one why they did not go on.

“Tam going to faint,” the Queen was heard
to exclaim; but no one was sufficiently un-
occupied to attend to her. For the eyes of
every one were-fixed on the one ray of sunlight,
that shone over Lady Daffany’s head into the
dish of peaches on the table.

“Now, that’s a stupid place to keep peaches,”
said the cause of all this disturbance; and the
funniest little man imaginable clambered out



-WYMPS 5

of the dish of peaches, and looked inquisitively
down the long table. He was very small, and
of a misty appearance, and he was dressed from
head to foot in dull yellow fog, and his face was
brimful of mischief. He looked as though he
had done nothing all his life but make fun of
people ; for he had very small eyes that twinkled,
and a very large mouth that smiled, and the rest
of his face was one mass of laughter wrinkles.

“So you thought you were going to leave
out the Wymps, did you?” he said, sitting
down comfortably on the edge of a large salt-
cellar, and swinging his legs backwards and
forwards. “ You will say next, that you have
never heard of the Wymps, I suppose !”

Now, that was just what every one in the
room had been thinking, but no one had the
courage to say so.

“To be sure, to be sure; how stupid of us
not to recognise you at once,” said the Queen,
who had not fainted, after all.

“Most absurd! Why, the children in the
schools could have told us that, eh?” added
the King, glancing at the Royal Professor of
Geography, who sat on his right hand.

“No doubt, no doubt; though it does not
belong to my branch of learning,” said the
latter, looking cheerfully at the Royal Professor



6 WYMPS

of History, who was trying, for his part, not to
look at anybody at all.

“Then if you knew such a lot about us, how
was it that you didn’t ask us to the banquet,
eh?” shouted the little Wymp, in a most dis-
agreeable manner.

“Dear me!” said the Queen, “is it possible
you never had the letter ?”

“T have no doubt,” added the King, “that it
was never posted.” .

“Or, perhaps it was not properly addressed,”
suggested Lady Daffany, politely.

The Wymp looked from one to the other, and
winked; then he stood on his head, and burst
into a fit of laughter.

“Tt is no use, dearest,’ said the Prince,
gloomily ; “ we have never heard of the Wymps,
and we had much better own it at once. I sup-
pose that means another bad gift; and I had quite
enough of that sort of thing, at my christening.
It is enough to set one against banquets alto-
gether; there’s always some one left out. First,
it’s fairies; then, its Wymps. Now then, Mr.
Wymp, just tell us where you came from, and
why you are here, and get it over, will you ?”

“Now, that’s sensible. I think I'll shake
hands with you,” said the Wymp, coming down
on his feet again, and standing on tiptoe to



WYMPS 7

grasp the Prince’s hand. To the Prince it seemed
just like shaking hands with a very damp sponge.

“Now, I'll tell you what it is,’ continued the
Wymp, climbing up a decanter, and standing
with one foot on the stopper, and the other
tucked up like a stork’s; “the Wymps have
been left out of this banquet altogether, and
Wymps are not people to be trifled with. Why
people make such a fuss about fairies, I never
can make out. Now, if you'd left out some of
them, it wouldn't have made any difference to
anybody. They just overcrowd everything,
and it’s not fair.”

‘All the fairies fluttered their wings indignantly
at this; but the Fairy Queen reminded them
that it was not polite to make a quarrel in
somebody else’s house; and the Wymp went
on, undisturbed—

“So I have come down from the land of
the Wymps, which is at the back of the sun,
just to remind you that you mustn’t leave us
out again. However, I see I am spoiling the
fun, so I will be off again. But I may as well
mention,” here, he looked straight at the Prince,
and burst out laughing again, “that, in future,
iyou will always tell people what you think of
them. Ha! ha! ha! that is the Wymps’ gift
to youl Good-bye!”



8 WYMPS

And away he sped up the sunbeam again;
and the curtain fell away from the sun; and
the people in the street went on cheering, just
where they had left off; and the conversation
broke out again at the very place it had been
interrupted; and no one would have thought
that anything had happened at all. But the
Prince heard nothing but the Wymp’s mock-
ing laughter; and he sat silent, for the rest of
the day.

“Are you ill, dear Prince?” asked the Queen.

“Of course not; you are a tiresome old
fidget,” said the Prince, crossly. Now, the
Prince was noted for his excellent manners;
he was even known to speak politely to his
horse and his spaniel; so when the courtiers
heard his reply to the Queen, they began to
whisper among themselves, and the guests
made ready to depart.

“It is the heat; you must really excuse
him,” said the King, getting up from the table
with a sigh.

“What nonsense,” said the Prince; “it is
not hot at all. It is your fault for having
such a stupid, long banquet.”

“We have enjoyed ourselves so much,” said
the guests, as they filed past him.

“Oh no, you haven't,” retorted the Prince;



a]

WYMPS 5

“you have been thoroughly bored the whole
time, and so have I.”

“It is the Wymps’ gift,” whispered the
courtiers.

Two large, unshed tears stood in Lady
Daffany’s eyes, when she bade the Prince
good-night.

“ Do you think 7 have been bored the whole
evening ?” she asked him, softly.

“No, dearest,” said the Prince, kissing her
white fingers ; “for you have been with me, all
the time.”

And that of course was the truth, so she

_ went away happy.

The. days rolled on, and everybody began to
wonder at the change in the Prince. He had
always been considered the most charming
Prince in the world; but now, he had suddenly
become one of the most unpleasant. He told
people of their faults, whenever they were in-
troduced to him ; and although he was generally
right, they did not like it at all. He said the
Royal Professor of Geography was a bore; and
although no one in the kingdom could deny
it, the Royal Professor of Geography naturally

_felt annoyed. At the State Ball, he told the

King he could not dance a bit; and although:

_ the King’s partners certainly thought so too,



10 WYMPS

that did not make it any better. But when
he told the Queen, in the presence of the
Royal Professor of History, that her hair was
turning grey, underneath her crown, the Queen
said it was quite time something was done.

“The dear fellow cannot be right in his
head,” she said. “ He must have a doctor.”

So the Royal Physician was sent for; and ,
he came in his coach and four, and looked at
the Prince; and he coughed a good deal, and
said he must certainly have a change of air.

“The Royal Physician always knows,” said
the Queen, looking greatly relieved.

“But what is the matter with me?” asked
the Prince.

“That,” said the Royal Physician, coughing
again, “is too deep a matter for me to go into,
just now. In fact 3

“In fact, you don’t know a bit; do you?”
said the Prince ; and he burst out laughing, just
as unpleasantly as the Wymp had done, when
he stood on his head.

So the Royal Physician drove away again, in
his coach and four; and the Prince went on
telling people exactly what he thought of them.
The only person, to whom he was not rude, was
the little Lady Daffany ; for he thought nothing
but nice things about her, and therefore, he had





WYMPS II

nothing but nice things to say to her. But, for
all that, she was most unhappy; for she could
not bear to hear that people disliked the Prince;
and all the people were beginning to dislike
him very much indeed. So, one day, she
slipped out of her father’s house, quite early in
the morning, and went into the wood at the
end of the garden. Now, she was so kind to
all the animals and flowers, that the fairies had
given her the power of understanding their lan-
guage; so she went straight to her favourite
squirrel, who lived in a beech tree in the mid-
dle of the wood, and she told him all about
the Prince and the Wymps’ gift. The squirrel
stopped eating nuts, and ran after his tail, for
several moments, without speaking. Then, he
winked his eye at her, very knowingly, and
nodded his smart little head several times, and
spoke at last, in a tone of great wisdom.

“You must go to the Wymps, and inter-
cede for the Prince,’ he said, and cracked
another nut.

“ But would they listen to me?” asked Lady
Daffany, doubtfully.

“Go and try,’ said the squirrel. “The
Wymps are not bad little fellows, really. They
like making fun of people, that’s all. And they
saw the Prince was a bit of a prig, so they



12 WYMPS

thought they would give him a lesson, don’t
you see?”

“Perhaps they will think I am a prig too,”
said Lady Daffany, sadly.

“My dear little lady,” laughed the squirrel,
“the Wymps never make fun of people like
you. Just you go and find the biggest sun-
beam you can, and climb up it, until you come
to the land of the Wymps, at the back of the
sun. Only, you must go with bare feet, and
with nothing on your head. Now, be off with
you; I want to finisa my breakfast.”

_ The biggest sunbeam she could find was the
one that came in at the library window, and
sent her father, the Count, to sleep over the
State documents. And there, she took off her
little red shoes and stockings, and pulled the
golden pins out of her hair, and let it fall
loosely round her shoulders; and she began
to climb slowly up the ray of sunlight. At
first, it was very hard work, for it was very
slippery, and she was frightened of falling off;
but she thought of the Prince, and went on as
bravely as she could. And then, it seemed as
though invisible hands came and helped her
upwards; for, after that, it was quite easy,
and she glided up higher, and higher, and
higher, until she came to the sun itself,



WYMPS 13

the big, round sun. And she went straight
through the sun, just as though it were a
paper hoop at the circus; and she tumbled
out on the other side, into a land of yellow
fog. There was no sunshine there, and no
moon, and no stars, and no daylight; nothing
but a dull, red glow over everything, like the
light of a lamp.

“Why,” said Lady Daffany, feeling her
clothes to see if they were singed, “I always
thought the sun was hot.”

“T have no doubt you did: it is quite
absurd what mistakes are made about the
sun,” said a familiar voice behind her; and
looking round, she saw the identical Wymp
who had come to disturb the betrothal banquet.

“Hullo! I’ve been expecting you,” he said,
as he recognised her; “why didn’t you come
before ?”

“Because you didn’t send me an invitation,”
said the Lady Daffany, merrily ; and she made
him a court bow. Now, it is true that the
Wymps spend their lives in laughing at other
people, but they are not accustomed to being
laughed at themselves, so when Lady Daffany
continued to be amused at her own joke, the
Wymp drew himself up very stiffly, aud looked
offended.



14 WYMPS

“T don't see anything whatever to laugh at,”
he said, severely, “and you had better come
along, and explain to the King why you are
here.”

Then, he led her through the dimly lighted
land of yellow fog, and they passed crowds of
other little Wymps, who were all so like him-
self that it was difficult to tell one from another.
For they were all dull yellow, and distinctly
misty in appearance; and they all had small
eyes and large mouths, and their faces were all
covered with laughter wrinkles. They seemed
to be spending their time in turning somer-
saults, and tumbling over one another, and
laughing loudly at nothing at all. But the
Wymp who was with Lady Daffany did not
laugh once; he just trotted along in front of
her, and did not speak a word, so that she
really was afraid she had hurt his feelings, and
she began to feel sorry.

“Please, Mr. Wymp, I didn’t mean to laugh
at you at all,” she said, very humbly.

“That’s all very well,’ said the Wymp,
sulkily; “but no Wymp ever allows any one
else to make a joke. Come along to the King.”

“ But it wasn’t a joke!” cried Lady Daffany.

“Oh well, if it wasn’t a joke that’s another
matter. Not that I should have called it a



WYMPS 15

joke myself, but I thought you meant it for
one,” said the Wymp, more cheerfully. “ Now,
why have you come up here at all ?”

She hastened to tell him all about the Prince,
and how much he had been changed by the
Wymps’ gift, and how she wanted to intercede
for him; and her voice grew so sad as she
thought about it all, that the Wymp had to
turn round and shout at her.

“ Don't get gloomy,” he cried, turning several
somersaults in his agitation; “nobody is ever
gloomy in the land of the Wymps. Make
another bad joke if you like, but stop being
dreary, do!”

At this moment they suddenly came upon
the Wymp King, who was sitting asleep on his
throne, all by himself. He was just like the
other Wymps, except that he looked too lazy
to turn somersaults, and he had no laughter
wrinkles at all.

“Ts that the King? He doesn’t look much
like a king,’ whispered Lady Daffany.

“He hasn’t got to look like a king,” said
the Wymp; “we choose our kings, because they
are harmless, and don’t want to make jokes,
and will keep out of the way. We once had
a king who looked like a king—we used to
live zz the sun then—and he did so much



16 WYMPS

mischief that the sun people turned us out,
and we have had to live at the back of the sun
ever since.”

Lady Daffany felt glad that the kind of king
she was accustomed to @d look like a king;
but she had no time to say so, for just then, the
Wymp jumped on the throne, and woke up the
King by shouting in his ear.

“Does any one want anything?” asked the
Wymp King, waking up with a jerk, and putting
on his crown and his spectacles hurriedly.

Lady Daffany dropped on her knees in front
of the throne, and tried not to look frightened.

“Please your Majesty,” she began, timidly.

“Who is she talking to?” cried the Wymp
King. He had a very gruff voice, through
living in a yellow fog all his life; and he spoke
so loudly, that he completely drowned the rest
of her speech.

“Say what you want, and don’t give him any
titles; he’s not used to them,” whispered the
Wymp.

“Why, I don’t believe he is a king at all,”
said Lady Daffany, standing up again.

“Who says I’m not a king at all?” shouted
the Wymp King, angrily.

“Tf you make any more of your bad jokes,
I won't try to help you at all,” said the



WYMPS 17

Wymp. “Why don’t you say what you want,
at once?”

So Lady Daffany set to work, and told the
whole of her story; and begged the Wymp
King to take back his fatal gift, so that the
Prince should no longer get himself disliked,
through telling people what he thought about
them.

When she had finished, the King gave a great
yawn, and took off his crown.

“Doesn't he tell them the truth, then?” he
asked, sleepily. .

“Ves, I-—I suppose so,” she answered, doubt-
fully.

“Then, why should they mind?” asked the
Wymp King.

Lady Daffany shook her head.

“They do mind,” she said.

“Then it’s very stupid of them,” said the
Wymp King, very drowsily. “ However, if that’s
all, the gift can be passed on to you, instead.
Now, go away ; I am going to sleep again.”

He was already sound asleep, and not another
word could be got out of him. Lady Daffany
tried not to cry, and turned away.

“T suppose every one will dislike se now,”
she said, sorrowfully ; “but of course, that is
better than their disliking the Prince.”

2



18 WYMPS

“ Nonsense,” said the Wymp, as he led her
again to the back of thesun ; “ that would be too
good a joke for the King to make. You wait
andsee. Good-bye.”

» And away she went through thesun again, and
came out on the bright side once more; and she
slid down into the garden, for the sunbeam had
moved on since the morning; and then she ran
indoors to find her shoes and stockings.

“That's all right,” said the Count, putting
away the State documents with a great show of
exhaustion ; “you're just in time for tea. Where
have you been all day?”

“T’ve been for a walk, at least a fly—no, I
mean a ride,” stammered Lady Daffany. “I’m
not quite sure which it was.”

“Never mind,’ chuckled the Count; “I
expect you were with the Prince and didn’t
notice, eh? Then, of course, you have heard
the wonderful news of the Prince’s recovery.”

“Then the Wymp did speak the truth!”
cried Lady Daffany, clapping her hands for

joy.

“What Wymp?” asked the Count. “ 7hds
had nothing to do with the Wymps. It was a
strange physician, who came from a far land,
and he touched the Prince’s tongue and made
him every bit as polite as he used to be. So



WYMPS 19

you can be married at last, and the Prince can
go into society again.” .

“A strange physician?” said his daughter ;
“T wonder where he has gone now.”

“ That’s just it,” said the Count, pouring out
his sixth cup of tea; “he didn’t go anywhere.
He turned three somersaults down the palace
steps, and when they ran to pick him up, there
wasn't anybody to pick up.”

“Then it must have been a Wymp,” thought
Lady Daffany, as she wandered out into the
garden to think it all over.

“IT wonder if I have really got the Wymps’
gift, instead of the Prince,” she said to herself.
Just then, the Prince himself came through the
bushes to find her. He no longer looked grave
and unhappy, and there was a radiant look on
his face.

“Don't you think I have been a very dis-
agreeable Prince lately ?” he whispered, as he
stooped to kiss her.

“T think you are the dearest Prince in all the
world,” she answered, softly.

“ All the same, the Royal Professor of Geo-
graphy zs an old bore, isn’t he?” said the
Prince.

“Oh no, I don’t think so. He is only clever,”
answered Lady Daffany.



20 WYMPS

“But the Queen Mother’s hair zs turning
grey; haven't you noticed it?” persisted the
Prince.

“T really think you are mistaken, dearest,”
said Lady Daffany.

And she never found out whether she really
had the Wymps’ gift or not. But the Prince
and the people loved her to the end of her
days.



In a Sea-Green Country







In a Sea-Green Country

Fak away in the world of dreams, there is a
beautiful Sea-Green Country. It is not to
be found in the atlas, perhaps, for the people
who make maps know very little about the world
of dreams; but little Margaret with the yellow
hair could tell them a great many things about
it that they do not know already. For she
once went to the Sea-Green Country, quite by
herself, and it was she who told the Sea-Green
King why he was green, and—but perhaps it is
worth making into a story.

Margaret is a dear little girl in a blue pina-
fore, with round wondering eyes, and cheeks
like ripe cherries, and a tangled mop of yellow
curls that make a frame round her face. And
she has a laugh just like the note of a black-
bird when he flies out of a bush, and sends all
the worms scuttling out of sight. Nothing runs
away when Margaret laughs, though; not even
the worms.

Now, it all began in this way. Margaret



24 IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY

had been told that she was not to eat the green
gooseberries, at the end of the garden, because
they were not ripe; and this made her very
sad indeed, for green gooseberries, packed as
close as they can be on low bushes, quite near
the ground, are particularly tempting to any
one who is just three feet long. So she fell
to wondering why she was not allowed to eat
them, when they looked so very nice; and
she ran across the lawn, as fast as her brown
legs would carry her, and crawled under the
biggest gooseberry bush she could find, and
then looked up into the middle of the green
branches, to try and find out why green goose-
berries were not to be eaten. That is the best
way to see gooseberries growing,—to lie under
a bush, and look up at the rows and rows of
shining green balls, with their little brown
caps all nodding away as busily as possible.
But, of course, that is only to be done if one
is three feet high.

Margaret had not been there long, when
she discovered that the gooseberries were not
fastened on to the branches at all, as most
people would think, but were all moving about
among the thorns and the leaves; and when
she looked a little closer, she saw that they
had arms and legs, and that there were round



IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY 25

shining faces under the brown caps, and that
they all held sharp thorns in their hands. At
the same moment, the air became full of voices,
not children’s voices, nor grown-up people’s
voices, but voices that seemed made up of the
wind muttering through the grass, and of the
bees humming in the clover, and of the lark
whirring down to her nest; and they were all
calling “ Margaret! Margaret!” and every one
of the little green men was pointing at her
with his spear. At last, the biggest of them
all—he must have been half an inch tall—
dropped down from the end of a branch, on
to her blue pinafore, and began to speak.
Immediately, all the others stopped shouting,
which was exceedingly necessary, for other-
wise, he would not have been heard at all.

“Madam,” began the little man, leaning on
his spear, and taking off his cap with a flourish,
“T am King Emerald’s Prime Minister.”

Margaret had often heard people speak of the
Prime Minister, when she came down to dessert
on Sunday evenings, and she felt very excited
at meeting him in this unexpected way.

“Are you the Prime Minister?” she ex-
claimed in surprise, for he was not at all what
she had imagined him to be. “ Then, how dvead-
Sully naughty you must be, to be sure!”



26 IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY

At that, all the voices broke out again, and
hundreds of little green men dropped down
from the branches, and began pulling at her
blue pinafore. And as they pulled, they grew
larger and larger, until each one of them was
as big as she was; and the bush began to
spread out and grow larger too, until it seemed
like a thick forest all round her; and she grew
bewildered, and rubbed her eyes, and felt in-
clined tocry. Then she felt herself being lifted
up, up, up, into a green leafy country, where
every branch was a road that led away to
nowhere; and here, she was carried along so
swiftly, that everything became a green blurred
mass, and her eyes grew heavy, and closed, and
she fell asleep.

She awoke with a start, for the green men
had dropped her on the ground, with a jerk;
and she sat up and yawned sleepily, and looked
round to see where she was. All round her,
stretched a beautiful, bright green country, with
hills, and plains, and rivers, and lakes, all as
green as anything could be.

“Why,” said little Margaret, “I declare it is
exactly like being inside a geography book.”

“There is nothing whatever about the Sea-
Green Country, in the geography book,” said an
indignant voice at her elbow; and when she



IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY 27

turned round, there was the Prime Minister,
leaning on his spear and looking at her.

“T don’t know,” said Margaret, doubtfully;
“there’s lots about America.”

“ America!” cried the Prime Minister, scorn-
fully. “What's America? 7fzs is the Sea-
Green Country.”

“ If you please,” said Margaret, as soothingly
as she could; “ would you tell me if that is the
same place as Fairyland ?”

“What a stupid child you must be,” said the
Prime Minister, glaring down at her. “ Didn’t
I tell you this was the Sea-Green Country?
No connection with Fairyland whatever; quite
another place altogether. We are unique.”

Margaret did not know what “unique” was,
so she gave a little sigh.

“TI don’t understand,” she said, sadly. “It
must be Fairyland, if it isn’t in the geography
book.”

The Prime Minister lost his temper again.

“Do you think I don’t know Fairyland when
I see it? Haven't I been there for a trip, once
a year, for the last five thousand centuries? I
know every corner of Fairyland, and I consider
it a vastly overrated place. There’s nothing to
do all day, but to dance ina ring, and talk to
the Queen. Too many women in Fairyland for



28 IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY

my taste; frivolous people with wings, / can’t
see anything in them! You come round with
me, and I’ll show you some of the things you'd
never get in Fairyland, or the geography book
either.”

So he took her hand, and they seemed to get
over the green grass, without walking, or run-
ning, or touching the ground at all. They just
glided along, like swans on the water; and now
and then, they stopped for a moment, and the
Prime Minister pointed out something in a very
important manner, just as though everything
in the place belonged to him, and there was no
king at all.

“Why, the rivers have green water in them,
and so have the lakes,” cried Margaret. “And
oh! all the birds are green too, and the flowers,
and the butterflies. Don’t you have any black-
birds here, or robin-redbreasts, Mr. Prime
Minister ?”

“Greenbirds we call them, they’re more
uncommon than blackbirds,’ said the Prime
Minister, in his superior tone. “We have
robin-greenbreasts too, and there’s a greenbottle
fly over there; I suppose ¢/ey are black-in your
country too, eh?”

“No, they’re called blue, but they Zook black,”
said Margaret, thoughtfully.



IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY 29

“ Now, that’s a stupid thing to do,” said the
Prime Minister, quite cheerfully; for he was
always glad when he could prove that some one
else was inferior to him. “ Everything’s green
here, and we call it green; saves a lot of trouble,
don’t you see?”

Everything was green; all the insects, and
all the animals, and all the people. There were
green cows, and green sparrows, and green tad-
poles, and green sticklebacks, and green salmon;
and as for the lobsters and shrimps, they were
all green, too, and boiling didn’t make any
difference to them. But everything was not
of the same shade of green; for instance, the
children in this wonderful country were very
pale green indeed, just the colour of the nut-
leaves, when they are beginning to uncurl
themselves; while the grown-up men were
the colour of the sea, when it is dark, and
stormy, and angry. But the Sea-Green girls
were the colour of the sea, when it is calm,
and smiling, and gentle, the colour of fresh
cowslip leaves, and young daffodil-buds ; and
they never changed to a darker colour at all,
for, in the Sea-Green Country, the girls are
always young.

Suddenly, there was a sound of trumpets
in the distance; and the trees at once bent



30 IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY

their tall heads to the ground, and the birds
stopped singing, in the middle of their songs,
and the very wind itself ceased blowing, and
the fish came up to the top of the water to
see what was happening. Margaret looked
round her with wondering eyes, and saw that
all the people near her had thrown themselves
down on their faces, and were cheering as
loudly as they could in such an uncomfortable
position, while a long procession could be seen,
coming down from the hill to the plain.

“Dear me,” said the Prime Minister, who
had remained upright, and was tapping his
heel with his spear; “here comes the King.
I must give you an introduction to him. Of
course, he is very angry with you; but if you
are very polite to him, and ask after the health
of the Prince Chartreuse, I will do my best to
make him forgive you.”

“But why is the King angry with me?”
asked Margaret, wonderingly.

“Hush!” said the Prime Minister. “Go
down on your face, child, at once. The King
can't bear to see any one standing up, when he
is making a procession.”

“But you are not on your face,” objected
Margaret; because, of course, she wanted to
see the fun.



IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY 31

“fam the Prime Minister,” he returned, in
a superior manner; but, at this moment, the ~
King himself drove up in a beautiful chariot,
made of green bottle-glass, and drawn by sea-
serpents; and by his side sat Prince Chartreuse,
looking very cross and very sleepy.

“T wish they wouldn't cheer so loudly,
they’ve woke me up,” grumbled Prince Char-
treuse.

“Stop cheering,” said the Prime Minister,
with a graceful wave of his spear.

“Ah yes, of course, stop cheering, by all
means,” added the King, hastily; and he put
up his eye-glass, and looked at Margaret.

“Hullo! what's that thing?” asked Prince
Chartreuse, pointing at her, ina most unprincely
manner.

Then Margaret of the yellow hair, with the
round wondering eyes, and the cheeks like ripe
cherries, stepped forward in her blue pinafore,
and looked up fearlessly at the ill-mannered
little Prince.

“It’s very rude to point,” she said, solemnly.

“Dear me,” said the Prime Minister; “that
is not the way to speak to Prince Chartreuse.”

“No, no, of course not,” said the King
immediately; “not the right way at all.”

“T shall point as much as I like,” said Prince



32 IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY

Chartreuse, sulkily. “I always do what I like.
Daddy does what the Prime Minister likes,
don’t you, Daddy? But,I say, what an awfully
funny colour you are,” he added, pointing at
Margaret again. ;

“An extremely odd colour,’ said King
Emerald, putting up his eye-glass once more.
And all the people on the ground rolled over
on one side, and looked at her too, out of the
corner of their eyes, to see what her colour
was like.

“Only temporary, your Majesty,” said the
Prime Minister, smilingly. “It shall be altered
at once.”

But Margaret was beginning to get a little
tired of being patronised by the Prime Minister,
and she objected strongly to being made green
all over, like the Sea-Green people. So she
stamped her foot on the ground, and made the
sea-serpents toss their heads in alarm.

“Pm not a funny colour at all,” she cried,
indignantly. “It’s better than being the
same colour as everybody else. I won't be
made green, just as though I were a cater-
pillar.”

The Prime Minister tapped her curly head
with his spear.

“Don't make the King any angrier with



IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY 33

you,” he said, severely. “The King is very
fierce, when he is roused.”

“To be sure I am,” echoed King Emerald,
in a loud voice. “It’s not safe to come near
me, when I am really in a temper with any one.”

Margaret put her hands behind her, and
smiled up in his face as boldly as possible.

“T don’t believe you are a bit angry with
me, are you?” she said. “I believe the Prime
Minister is talking nothing but nonsense; isn’t
he?”

“Eh? What? Dear me!” said the King,
dropping his eye-glass suddenly, and looking
helplessly at the Prime Minister.

Then Margaret began to laugh her black-
bird’s laugh; and she laughed until the tears
rolled out of her big blue eyes, and tumbled
down her rosy cheeks on to the blue pinafore ;
and the more she laughed, the more the King
and the Prime Minister stared at her, until at
last they began to laugh too; and then all
the people began to laugh, as they lay on the
ground; and the water in the stream bubbled
and laughed, as it danced over the pebbles;
and the flowers nodded their heads with merri-
. ment; and all the birds began to sing again;
and everything was as full of laughter and fun
as it well could be. But Prince Chartreuse did

3



34 IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY

not stop to laugh, for he jumped out of the
glass chariot, and took little laughing, yellow-
haired Margaret by her two hands.

“You have made the Prime Minister laugh,”
he said; “and no one has ever been known to
do that before. I should like you to come and
play with me. If you come home with me,
I will show you my pony with wings, and my
doll who talks, and all my other toys that have
come straight from Fairyland. Will you come
with me?”

“T don’t know,” said Margaret, doubtfully ;
and every one stopped laughing to listen to her.
“Does the dolly really talk ?”

“It talks five languages,” said Prince Char-
treuse.

Of course, that settled the matter at once;
and little Margaret jumped up into the chariot,
next to the Prince; and the sea-serpents took
them away up the hill to the Sea-Green Palace.
And Margaret stayed there a great many days,
and played with Prince Chartreuse, and talked
to the wonderful dolly, and rode on the wonder-
ful flying pony, and enjoyed herself very much
indeed. But the Prime Minister used to come,
every morning, and give them lessons, and
teach them how to speak the language of the
fairies, and the language of the wild flowers,



IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY 35

and the language of the four winds; and how
to write copies in green marble copy-books;
and how to turn a frog into a snake, and a
lizard into a kingfisher; and this, Margaret did
not enjoy at all, for she could never remember
any of the things he tried to teach her. So,
one day, the Prime Minister shut up the book
in despair, and shook his head severely at her.

“It's your absurd colour,” he said, irritably.
“T always knew how it would be, if you didn't
take my advice. Why can you not be the same
colour as every one else? It saves so much
trouble. As it is, you must go away, and not
play any more with Prince Chartreuse. We
shall have Az changing colour next; and then,
what will happen to the country ?”

“Yes,” echoed the King, “what will happen
to the country ?”

But Prince Chartreuse flung himself on the
ground, and burst out crying.

“JT won’t have her sent away, I want her to
stop and play with me,” he shouted at the top
of his voice.

Now, Margaret was a sweet-natured little
girl; and she had grown very fond of the
Prince, although he was so spoilt, and she
could not bear to see him cry; so she knelt
down beside him, with her eyes shining



36 IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY

with tears that were ready to fall, and she made
up her mind on the spot.

“Don't cry, Prince Chartreuse; TPIl be made
green all over like a caterpillar, if they let me
stop with you; I will really,” she said, clasping
her hands together tightly. Then the Prince
sat up and stopped crying, and the Prime
Minister smiled approvingly, and said that if
Prince Chartreuse would take her to the Witch
of the Green Rock, she would make her green
all over, just like every one else.

So King Emerald kissed them both very
affectionately, when the Prime Minister was not
looking; and they went out of the Sea-Green
Palace, hand in hand, and walked down the hill
and across the plain for a very long way, until
they came at last to the seashore, where there
were no people, and no trees, and no flowers,
and no animals—nothing but a single green
rock, rising out of the ground in front of them.

Then Prince Chartreuse struck his spear
three times on the rock, and called out in his
imperious voice. “Ho there! Witch of the
Green Rock,” he shouted. “Come out to Mar-
garet of the yellow hair.”

A door opened in the side of the rock, and
out of it stepped a tall witch-woman, clothed in
flowing green garments, with eyes like moon-



IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY 37

a

light, and hair like seaweed, and a complexion
like sea foam.

“Who wants me?” asked the witch-woman,
sweetly ; and her voice was like the distant
sound of receding waves.

Prince Chartreuse pushed little Margaret for-
ward, and she stood and fumbled shyly at her
blue pinafore. But she was always polite, even
when she was shy, so she began to speak as
bravely as she could. “If you please,” she
said, “I want to be made green all over, just
like a caterpillar, so that I can stay and play
with Prince Chartreuse.”

“ That is very simple,” said the witch-woman,
with a smile; and she stamped on the ground,
and said some strange words, and up sprang a
fountain of bright green paint.

“ Step into that,” she said to Margaret.

“T will come with you,” said Prince Char-
treuse; and they stood together, under the
shower of green spray. But when they came
out again, Margaret was no greener than be-
fore! There were the yellow curls, and the
blue eyes, and the cherry-coloured cheeks, just
the same as ever.

But the blue pinafore had turned bright
green.

“It is no use,” said the witch-woman ; “you



38 IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY

will never be like everybody else;” and she
turned away to her rock again.

“Stop!” cried Prince Chartreuse. “Why .
can’t you make her green ?”

“She will never be like everybody else,” re-
peated the witch-woman, and she shut the door
in their faces.

So they went back again over the plain,
very sadly, and clambered wearily up the hill,
and arrived at the Sea-Green Palace about bed-
time.

“She will never be like everybody else,”
explained Prince Chartreuse, when they went
in. All the courtiers. sighed, and the Prime
Minister looked at Margaret and frowned, and
King Emerald looked at the Prime Minister.

“She will have to be sent away,” said the
Prime Minister, leaning gracefully on his
spear.

“It’s a shame,” declared Prince Chartreuse—
he was too sleepy to cry—‘“and if you send her
away, I will go too.”

The Prime Minister coughed.

“She will have to be sent away,” said King
Emerald in a great hurry; and he pushed his
crown awry.

Margaret rubbed her eyes, and tried hard to
remember something.



IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY 39

“You're all very silly,’she cried, “and I
won't go away unless I want to! Why should
I be green just because you are? You can’t
even tell one from another!” she added,
looking at the crowd of courtiers; and all the
courtiers looked at one another and seemed
surprised, for it had never struck them before
that it mattered which was which. And as they
looked, their bodies grew rounder, and their
legs grew shorter, and their arms tumbled off,
and their brown helmets began nodding, nod-
ding, nodding; and Margaret rubbed her eyes
again and burst out laughing. And her laugh
sounded just like the blackbird, singing in the
hawthorn tree at home.

“T know what it is!” she cried. “You are
all green because you're not ripe! Oh, where
am [ going ?”

“You are going away,” said the Prime Min-
ister, still leaning on his spear.

“Going away, going away,” said the King’s
voice, somewhere in the distance.

“T can’t come with you,’ sobbed Prince
Chartreuse, whom she could not see at all;
“but I will come and find you when I am a
-man, and bring you back again.”

The crowd of courtiers began to close round
her; nearer and nearer they came, until they



40 IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY

were hanging all over her, with their brown
caps nodding, and nodding, and nodding.

And there she lay under the gooseberry bush,
looking up into the network of green branches,
with the rows and rows of green gooseberries
nodding their brown caps at her, and the Prime
Minister hanging at the end of a twig. And
the blackbird was singing his heart out, in the
hawthorn tree close by.

Margaret put up a fat thumb and finger, and
plucked off the Prime Minister, and threw it
away from her as far as she could.

“Tt was all your fault, you stupid thing,”
she said, and ran straight indoors.

That was how Margaret went to the Sea-
Green Country. And perhaps, some day, Prince
Chartreuse will come and fetch her back again,
to ride on the pony with wings, and play with
the doll who speaks five languages.



Toyland



4 WW pra ae
. (S)
( @
“aM

Bs





Toyland

PRINCE POPPET was the King’s son, and

he was shockingly spoilt. Peter was only
the sweep’s son, and nobody spoiled him at
all; but he could turn coach wheels better
than any boy in the town, and that was de-
cidedly an accomplishment. The Prince had
so many toys, that he did not know what to
do with them; and he had to invent new and
exciting ways of breaking them, for the sake
of passing the time. Peter had no toys at
all, but he knew how to make a catapult out
of a merrythought, and a whistle out of a
peach stone, and that was more than the
Prince could do.

One day, when the Prince was looking idly
out of his nursery window, and wishing it was
tea-time, he heard the sound of whistling, just
below; so out he stepped on to the balcony,
and there he saw Peter in the garden strolling’
about just as though the whole place belonged
to him.



44 TOYLAND

“Hullo! Who are you?” asked the Prince.
“ And who taught you to whistle like that?”

“Tt didn’t take any teaching,” said the
sweep’s son, laughing heartily. “And I’m Peter,
of course. Who are you?”

' Prince Poppet stared in amazement. It had
never occurred to him before, that it was pos-
sible for any one not to know who Ze was.

“Tam the King’s son,” he said in a dignified
manner; “ and I have whistling lessons, three
times a week, from Professor Bullfinch.”

“What waste of time,’ remarked Peter.
“Do you have a Professor to teach you how
to eat your dinner, too?”

“Vou are most ill-mannered,’ exclaimed
Prince Poppet, feeling very much inclined to
cry. “I don’t believe any one has ever taught
you how to speak to a King’s son.”

“Well, I haven’t had much experience with
Kings’ sons, certainly,” answered Peter, turn-
ing a few coach wheels across the lawn, by
way of keeping himself in practice. “ Have
you learnt anything else, besides whistling ?”

The Prince reflected a moment.

“T have a Professor of Deportment, who
comes from Fairyland, to teach me dancing
and manners,” he began, very proudly.

“That’s a long way to drag the poor fellow,



TOYLAND 4s

just for that,” observed Peter. “Can you stand
on your head ?”
“YT never tried,” said the Prince.

“TI can,” said Peter, and showed that he
could, in the middle of the Queen’s favourite
geranium bed. “ What else?”

“Ican ride, of course,” said Prince Poppet;
“and shoot woodlarks on the wing, and pierce
a moth’s head fifty yards off. Can you?”

“T shouldn't think of trying,” cried Peter,
angrily. “Those are cruel, unfair things to do.
Can you catch a pony in a wood, and ride her
bareback to the farm, and harness her to a
cart?”

“ Of course not,” said the Prince, disdainfully.
“Tam not a sweep.”

“JT am,” said Peter, with pride in his voice;
“and I don’t think much of all your professors,
if they haven't taught you how to stand on your
head, or to ride a pony bareback. I suppose
you can’t even climb up a chimney, and sit on
the top?”

The Prince shook his head.

“JT can climb the ropes in the palace gymna-
sium, though,” he ventured to say.

“What's the use of that? You won’t find
ropes to climb wherever you go.”

“Then I shan’t climb them,’ said Prince



46 TOYLAND

Poppet, making a joke quite by accident. He
was really feeling very cross. But the sweep’s
son was looking so provokingly good-tempered
that it was impossible to be angry with him.

“Isn't there anything you caz do?” asked
Peter, cheerfully.

“TI can say the pence table up to a hundred.
How far can you go?”

“T never have to go farther than tenpence!
You see, I have only had tenpence for a whole
year, so it is not much good knowing any
more, is it? When I’ve got a shilling, I am
going to buy Bridget the woolly bear that is in
the toy-shop window. Have you seen it? It’s
marked one-and-twopence really, but the toy-
shop man isa friend of mine, and so Iam going
to get it for a shilling.”

“Who is Bridget?” asked the Prince, who
had long forgotten all about his tea, and was
growing more interested every minute.

“Don’t you know Bridget? You don’t seem
to know very much, considering you're a King’s
son. She is my little sister, and she can run as
fast as a hare.” -

“Wait a minute,” shouted the Prince, sud-
denly; and‘he rushed away to find his mother.
The Queen was just getting ready for her after-
noon drive; and the Baroness, who was ar-



TOYLAND 47

ranging the veil over her crown, looked most
annoyed when the Prince burst into the room,
and announced at the top of his voice, that he
was going to give Bridget his new talking bear.
The Baroness could not bear boys, and Prince
Poppet was always playing her tricks.

“Her Majesty has a headache. Who is
Bridget?” she said, very severely.

“ May I, mother ?” shouted the Prince, pour-
ing the scent into the powder-box, and taking
no notice whatever of the Baroness. The Queen
did not know she had a headache, until the
Baroness told her so; but she put her hand
over her eyes at once, and told him to go to his
father instead.

“He has such a sweet nature,” she mur-
mured, as he flew upstairs to look for his
father. The Baroness did not respond to the
Queen’s remark ; but, as the Prince had dropped
a cold hairpin down her back as he passed, per-
haps that was not to be wondered at.

The King was in his study, trying to make
ice-pudding out of moonshine. He had been
trying to make ice-pudding out of moonshine
for the last fifty years, though no one took the
least notice of him, and the country managed
to govern itself perfectly well without him. In
fact, the people had come to think that making



48 TOYLAND

experiments with moonshine was quite a right
and proper occupation for a king, and they
would have been quite upset if he had wanted
to do anything else.

“Father!” cried Prince Poppet, “may I give
Bridget my talking bear ?”

“How noisy you are, my son,” complained
the King, fretfully. “I had nearly done it, that
time; and now I shall have to begin all over
again. Run away to your mother.”

“It’s rather tiring to spend the afternoon
in running backwards and forwards,” said the
Prince, making more noise than ever by hitting
the nutmeg-grater with the rolling-pin. “May
I, father 2?”

“Two pounds of the best moonshine, three
ounces of pounded hail, mix well together, and
flavour with stars to taste,” murmured the old
‘King. “And I’ve quite run out of stars; how
tiresome! Where’s that telephone?”

“Then I may, mayn’t 1? Thanks awfully,”
said Prince Poppet, dropping the half-pound
weight on the King’s toe, and running back
again to the nursery.

A minute later, the two boys were sitting
cross-legged on the lawn together.

“Why does it make that noise?” asked
Peter doubtfully, when the full accomplish-



TOYLAND 49

ments of the talking bear had been revealed
to him.

“ Because—because it’s a bear, I suppose,”
said the Prince. He was rather disappointed
that his princely generosity was not more
appreciated.

“But bears don’t make a noise like a broken
concertina. I know they don’t, because I heard
one up in the mountains last winter, and it
roared enough to make your flesh creep. No-
body would be frightened of a harmless squeak
like this !”

“Nobody wants you to be frightened,” re-
torted the Prince, sulkily. “ Besides, it’s for
Bridget.”

“Oh well, Bridget hasn't heard a real bear,
so she might like this one,” said Peter, more
kindly. “Come along, we'll take it to her, at
all events.”

The townspeople hardly knew what they were
expected to do, when they saw Prince Poppet
and the sweep’s son, walking along side by
side. They were accustomed to cheer loudly
whenever the little Prince appeared in public;
but he had never appeared before on foot, and
without his crown, and they felt that cheer-
ing would be quite out of place under such
remarkable circumstances. So they decided it

4



50 TOYLAND

would be etiquette to stare at him instead, as
he was doing something so very much out of
the common; and as it gave them something
to talk about for a whole week, and as the
Prince and Peter never noticed any of them at
all, everybody was pleased all round.

Now, Bridget was a round-faced little girl,
with curly red hair, and big black eyes; and
she was just as natural and unabashed in the
Prince’s presence, as though he had not been a
King’s son at all. She was the only thing in
the sweep’s cottage that was not black all over;
and when Peter put his sooty arm round her
neck, and kissed her in his rough, careless
manner, it left no mark at all on her fat,
brown cheek.

“Tt is a most beautiful bear,” she said, clap-
ping her hands joyfully. “I never knew bears
were half so beautiful before.”

“No more they are,” said Peter, a little
crossly. “Real bears are not a bit like that.
This thing’s more like a tame cat than a
bear.”

“Tt is like a bear,” cried the Prince, angrily.
“What do you know about bears, I should
like to know ?”

“T’ve seen a real bear,” said Peter stoutly;
“and that’s more than any of your musty old



TOYLAND 51

professors ever have. Just as if a real bear
had a tail like that!” he added, seizing its long
bushy tail, which certainly did remind one ofa
Persian cat.

- “Give it back to me!” cried Prince Poppet,
passionately, grasping it by the head at the
same moment. It would have been hard to
tell which of the two boys was the King’s son,
for they both began tugging violently at the
bear ; while Bridget stood and looked on sadly,
with her mouth puckered up into a round O,
and two shining tears in her big black eyes.

“Oh, my beautiful bear,’ she said with a
sob, as the unhappy animal cracked in the
middle, and fell down on the boards in two
pieces. The boys stopped quarrelling, and
looked a little ashamed of themselves. But
Bridget dropped down on the floor, and cried
bitterly over her broken toy.

“Don’t cry, Bridget. I’ve got my tenpence
still, and I guess we can do without any more
Princes, can’t we?” said Peter, kneeling down
beside her, and glaring up fiercely at Prince
Poppet.

“You can keep your tenpence,” replied the
Prince, walking away to the door. “I am going
to fetch all the toys I like best to give to
Bridget.” For the Prince knew how to behave



52 TOYLAND

like a King’s son, sometimes, though he had
been so badly spoilt. :

But, just at that moment, a very wonderful
thing happened. For directly Bridget’s hot
tears fell on the poor broken bear, the two
pieces joined together with a snap, and the
little, black, woolly animal stretched his legs,
strutted all round the room, and sneezed three
times.

“Dear me,” he said, “you are a very well
brought up little girl, You have freed me by
your tears, and now I can go back to Toyland.”

“Where is Toyland?” they all asked at
once.

“Jump on my back, and you shall see,” said
the bear. Now, whether they shrank as small
as the bear, or whether the bear grew as tall
as the children, they did not have time to
consider, for the next moment they found
themselves flying through the air at a most
tremendous pace; and it was all they could
do to hold on tight to one another, so that
none of their legs or arms should be blown
off on the way.

When they stopped at last, they found them-
selves in a most peculiar looking country, where
the ground was made of cardboard, and all the
trees were pointed in shape, and stood on round



TOYLAND 53

wooden stands. It was the most curious kind
of country that has ever been seen; and when
the three children got off the bear’s back, and
looked round them, they were too full of
wonder to speak. For all the animals were’
made of indiarubber, and conversed in windy
voices; and all the fish had magnets in their
mouths, and lay on their sides on the dry
ground; and there were ninepins, who walked
about and chatted with tennis racquets, and
drums, who rumbled along by the side of
humming tops. But perhaps, the houses were
strangest of all, for they looked just like wine-
cases from behind, and yet were most mag-
nificent red brick dwellings in front, with green
doors, and brass knockers, and windows with
white curtains in them.

“It is just like a huge toy-shop. Isn't it
beautiful ?” whispered Bridget.

“Ym glad you like it,” said the bear, proudly.
“This is a real country, this is. Everything
is so much alike that you can’t tell a pig from a
cow, and that makes things so much easier to
understand. We have only got one kind of
tree, too, so there can’t be any jealousy, don’t
you see; and everything is movable, so that’
we can turn a town into a farm, or a pond into
a forest, at a moment’s notice, which is most



54 TOYLAND

convenient. For instance, the King has taken
a dislike to ponds lately, so we have to move
all the ponds out of his way, whenever we see
him coming. You see how convenient it is.”

The children looked round, and as all the
ponds were round pieces of plate-glass, with
tin ducks floating on the top of them, it did not
seem altogether impossible to clear them out of
the King’s way.

“How do you manage about maps, if the
things are always being moved about ?” asked
Prince Poppet, who wanted to show that he
knew something.

“Maps ?” shouted the bear, waving his long
tail about in his agitation; “don’t mention
such a word in Toyland, again! It makes me
feel quite queer. Come along to the palace,
and see the King.”

They followed him for some little way,
through wonderful forests and farms, and past
butchers’ shops and groups of indiarubber
animals, until he stopped again, and hesitated
for a moment. .

“T say,” he shouted to a venerable wooden
person, who was standing near a large Noah’s
Ark, and might well have been taken either for
aman or a woman; “have you seen the palace
lately ?”



TOYLAND | 55

“It was being moved to the edge of the
forest, when I last saw it,” replied the venerable
person, drawing his wooden cloak more closely
round his wooden form. “ And the forest is
in the same place as it was, a fortnight ago,”
he added.

“Come along,” said the bear, and taking a
short cut across a Swiss village, they arrived
at last in front of the palace, which was a
good sized doll’s house, with a particularly
handsome, green door in front, and the addi-
tional ornament of a green balcony just above
it. There were several wooden soldiers in
brilliant uniforms, strolling about outside, and
they formed into rank with a series of jerks,
and saluted, as the bear came up.

“Ts the King anywhere about?” asked the
bear.

“He's playing skittles with the forest trees,
at the back of the palace,’ answered a tin
Highlander, who had got mounted on an
Arab’s camel by mistake.

“Come along,” said the bear again, and the
three children followed him round to the back
of the doll’s house, where they came at last
into the presence of the King.

The King of Toyland was a very cheerful
looking monarch. He had a body like a gaily



56 TOYLAND

painted top, and a head like a Rugby football,
and his legs were golf clubs, and his arms were
real, spliced cricket bats; and when he spoke,
his voice sounded exactly like Scotch bagpipes.

“Hullo! Who are all these people?” he
cried, and stopped bowling down the forest
trees with tennis balls.

The bear explained how it was that Bridget
had disenchanted him, and how he had brought
them all back with him, to show his gratitude
to her.

“That's all very well,’ said the King, un-
screwing his arms to rest himself a little. “But
what can they do, now they are here, eh?”

“Yes,” echoed the crowd of courtiers, who
consisted of a motley collection of Dutch dolls
and wooden sailors and peg-tops, and many
other curious individuals. “What can you do,
now you are here?”
~“T can turn coach wheels,” spoke up Peter
bravely; and he scattered the courtiers right
and left, to show them how he did it. He
knocked down a few more trees in the opera-
tion, and put the palace itself in danger; but
nobody seemed to mind that in the least.

“Bravo! Well bowled!” shouted the King,
screwing on his arms again, so that he could
clap his hands. “You can stay as long as you



TOYLAND 57

like. I must learn to do that myself. And
you, what can you do, little girl with the big
black eyes ?”

Bridget did not think she could do any-
thing. She always had the cottage to look
after at home, and the dinner to cook, and she
never played any games, and nobody could
find time to teach her how to do things. So
she looked at the King very sorrowfully.

“If you please,” she said, sadly, “I think
I must go back again. I can’t whistle, or
do any of the wonderful things that Peter
does.”

But Peter came and put his arm round her.

“She can run as fast as a hare,” he said,
proudly.

“A race! That’s a new idea. By all means
let us have a race,” said the crowd of courtiers,
eagerly; for if people play games all day long
without stopping, they are quite glad to hear
of a new one.

“ By all means,” said the King. “ Clear some
of those trees out of the way, and fetch the
steam engine.”

In a few minutes, the forest had been entirely
,removed to the front of the palace; and, just as
Bridget had taken off her wooden shoes and
was all ready to start, up puffed a beautiful



58 TOYLAND

little model engine, with real steam coming out
of the funnel.

“ Clear off that fancy engine driver!” shrieked
the King, pointing to a wooden doll who was
tied on at the back, as though he were guiding
the engine. “He’s been marked twopence-
halfpenny in a bazaar, and he can no more
drive a train than any of these sailors can steer
a ship. Bowl him out, I say! Stump him!
How’s that, umpire ?”

“Out!” said Peter, as the engine driver was
put head first into a Noah’s Ark. “ Now then,
Bridget.”

“Due in forty seconds,” snorted the engine,
and off set the two at lightning speed. It was
the fastest engine that was ever made; but for
all that, Bridget was faster still; and when she
came running back to the King’s side, the
engine was several yards behind, and had got
mixed up in a grocer’s store on the way.

“Run it out! Bravo, you're a good sports-
man,” said the King, in great excitement; and
Peter stood on his head with delight. But
Bridget only walked up to Prince Poppet, and
took his hand.

“May we all three stop?” she asked,
anxiously.

“Hullo, there’s another of them! Well,



TOYLAND 59

what can you do?” asked the King, striking
the characteristic attitude of the wicket-keeper.

“T am a Prince,’ he answered haughtily, by
which he meant that there was no necessity for
him to do anything at all.

“Well, what of that?” asked the King in
surprise. “I suppose that doesn’t prevent you
from doing things, does it?”

The Prince had always been taught that it
did. Besides, he was rather cross at being
asked so continually what he could do, so he
poked his princely chin in the air, and answered
in an offhand kind of way that was not at all
polite.

“T can speak seven languages quite fluently ;
and I know all the history of Fairyland for the
last thousand years; and I can draw a map of
the bottom of the sea. That's only a little of
what I can do,” he said, and folded his arms.

“What?” shriecked the King, and his voice
sounded even more out of tune than it had
before. “Do you mean to say you can only
do Zessons, you intolerable, dull, little prig ?”

He could say no more, for his agitation
made his legs drop off with a clatter, and he
sank down in a heap. And at the same mo-
ment, there was a scream of recognition from
two or three of the courtiers.



60 TOYLAND

“Tt’s our Prince!” they cried, in great excite-
ment. And immediately, all the others came
crowding round him, and began shouting abuse
at him as loudly as they could.

“He broke my leg off,” screamed a wooden
horse on wheels.

“He painted a moustache on me,” sobbed
an elegant doll in a columbine’s dress.

“ He fed me with stale cake,” groaned a cloth
donkey, in a peculiarly stuffy voice.

“He sucked my paint off,” said a tin Life-
guardsman.

“He hung me in front of the fire, on a piece
of string,” wept a wax sailor boy.

“He sent me sailing on the lake, in a five-
penny tin steamer,” howled an elephant, who
had just strolled up from the neighbouring
Noah’s Ark.

“And he put me into a Swiss farm, and
called me a goat,” chimed in his companion,
a noble African lion.

“Revenge! Revenge!” they all cried, and
made way for the King to come forward.
Prince Poppet hid his face in his hands, and
wished that Bridget would stop looking at him
in her solemn way, with her great black eyes.
The King screwed on his legs again, and
stood up.



TOYLAND 61

“He must be bowled out at once,” he said.
“What shall be done to him?”

“Pour cold tea into his mouth, out of a tin
cup,” said the columbine, viciously.

“Fix a dry crust in his mouth, and leave
it there for a week,” said the stuffed donkey.

“Brush him down with a clothes brush,”
added the wooden horse, ruefully.

“Suck the paint off his cheeks,” squeaked
the Life-guardsman.

“Drop him into the pond, and forget all about
him,” said a new voice. Every one looked
round to see who had spoken; and when the
Prince saw that it was a handsome humming-
top, he hid his face once more, and shuddered
all over, and felt that there was no hope left for
him at all. For when that humming-top had
been given to him, a year ago, he had begun
by making it his favourite plaything: it had
shared his meals in the daytime, and lain on
his pillow at night. He had considered no-
thing too good for his beautiful humming-top,
until, one day, the columbine had come, and
then the humming-top had been thrown into
the pond, to see if it could float. But it had
been much too proud to try, and so the Prince
had never seen it again.

“What's that about a pond?” said the King,



62 TOYLAND

shivering. “There are no more ponds about,
IT hope? Nasty, slippery things! Who said
apond?” -

For once, the King was not heeded. For all
the Dutch dolls, and the peg-tops, and the tin
soldiers, and the waxen ladies had flung them-
selves upon Prince Poppet in an angry mass,
and it is doubtful if he would ever have seen
his home again, had not little Bridget sat down
on the cardboard ground, and burst out crying.
Tears were an unknown thing in Toyland,
where everybody played games all day long;
so the sight of a little girl sitting on the
ground, and weeping bitterly, soon brought all
the courtiers round her in a ring. The tin
soldiers climbed up on the peg-tops, the animals
squeezed in wherever they could, and the Dutch
dolls stood in a row at the back; and stared
over everybody’s head, with the same impassive
look on their wooden features.

“What is she doing? Is it a new game?”
asked the wax sailor boy.

“It must be very bad for the complexion,”
said the columbine, fanning herself.

“A new game?” said the King, making his
way to the front. “Dear me, how thrilling!
But what are the rules of it? It’s no use hav-
ing a new game, without knowing the rules.



TOYLAND 63

Tell us the rules, little girl with the black
eyes.”

“Tt—it—isn’t a game at all,” sobbed Bridget.

“Then if it isn’t a game, how can we play at
it?” asked the courtiers, sadly.

“We must refer it to the umpire,” said the
King. There was no umpire at all in Toyland,
and there never had been one; but it was a
well known thing that the King always talked
about the umpire, when he did not know what
else to say.

“Nonsense,” said the deep voice of the
humming-top; “she’s only crying. She must
have broken something. They always cry,
the children who treat us so badly, when they
break their toys.”

There was a murmur of indignation among
the courtiers, when they heard this; and they
all began feeling themselves, to see if they
were broken anywhere. But, by this time,
Peter had managed to produce a very sooty
handkerchief, and Bridget wiped her eyes,
and began to smile a watery smile.

“T haven’t broken anything,” she said. “TI
was only crying because I was frightened, and
I thought they were going to hurt the Prince.”

“Quite right, too,” said the King, cheerfully.
“He has broken so many of us, that it is quite



64 TOYLAND

time he should be broken himself. But don’t
you mind about him; you shall stay here and
play, for ever and ever, and your black brother
is going to teach me how to turn coach-
wheels.”

“Tt would be beautiful,” said Bridget, with
a sigh. “But I won't stop if the Prince has
to be broken.”

“It wouldn’t be fair,’ said Peter, sturdily,
though he cast a longing look at the steam
engine.

“It is my own fault,’ said the Prince,
humbly; “and you two must not bother about
me.”

“It is very confusing,” said the King,
bowling down a butcher’s shop with a golf
ball. “We must send for the umpire.”

“Tf we can’t break the Prince, he must be
sent away,” shouted the courtiers. ‘There is
no safety for any of us, as long as he is in
Toyland.”

“Of course,” said the King. “You must
stay without the Prince, or not stay at all.
Make haste and decide; it is time.we had
another game. So much talking is quite
exhausting.”

The Prince looked at his shoes, and felt
very much ashamed of himself, and his seven



TOYLAND 65

languages, and his priggishness. And Peter
looked at Bridget, and Bridget looked at the
King, who had just lost one of his legs, in his
first attempt to turn coach-wheels.

“Please, none of us will stop,” said Bridget.
And the Prince kissed her. But Peter looked
at the steam-engine, and kicked the back of the
palace, until it rattled all over.

“All right; tell the bear to bowl them all
out,” shouted the King, finding his leg in the
forest, and waving it at them. And at the
same moment, there was a sound of penny
pistols, and pop-guns, and tin trumpets; and
in the midst of it all, the King’s voice was
heard shouting, “ Who has thought of a new
game? We must refer it to the umpire!”

And there were the three children, seated on
the bear’s back again, and flying through the air,
even faster than they had gone before. When
they stopped, they found themselves on the
lawn in front of the palace, with the Baroness,
and the Head Nurse, and all the other nurses,
standing and looking at them. And the black
bear had completely disappeared.

“Good gracious,’ said the Head Nurse;
“your Highness gave me quite a turn. Where
did your Highness come from?”

“And who are those common looking chil-

5



66 TOYLAND

“dren?” added the Baroness, who was more
put out than usual, for she had been looking
for the Prince ever since tea-time, and the
Queen was in hysterics upstairs.

“The bear brought us back,” answered the
Prince. “And these are my two friends, Peter
and Bridget, who are coming to live in the
palace with me.”

“Why, they are the sweep’s children,” said
the Head Nurse, and then wished she had not
spoken, for she did not like it to be known
that she knew the sweep’s children.

“They must be sent away at once,” said the
Baroness. “And your Highness must really
come and say good-night to her Majesty.”

But Prince Poppet meant to show that he
was no longera child, and he took no notice
whatever of the Baroness.

“Peter and Bridget are going to stay here,
always,” he said, turning to the Head Nurse,
and looking as dignified as it was possible
for such a very small prince to look. “ Will
you please arrange some rooms for them at
once? Come indoors, Bridget.”

The Head Nurse and all the other nurses did
not know what to do, so they hoped the Baro-
ness would say something. But the Baroness
never had anything to say to a boy, who did



TOYLAND 67

not put cold hair-pins down her back; so she
remained perfectly silent, and waited to see
what would happen next.

And the next thing that did happen was, that
Bridget settled matters in her own prompt little
way; and nobody, not even the Head Nurse,
attempted to contradict her. She said that she
did not want to stay in the palace at all, because
there would be no one to look after Peter if she
did. And Peter said nothing would induce
fim to stop in a place where people were
expected to learn the history of Fairyland, and
all sorts of different languages; and that he
would sooner go on sweeping chimneys, and
turning coach-wheels, and whistling. So the
Prince let them go very sadly, after Peter had
promised to come every week, to teach him to
turn coach-wheels; and he went indoors to say
good-night to the Queen, more peaceably than
his nurses had ever seen him go before. And
when he was tucked up in bed, he remem-
bered that he had let Bridget go, without
kissing her.

Prince Poppet did not altogether forget the
seven languages, and the history of Fairyland;
but he learned how to turn coach-wheels, and
how to make a catapult out of a merrythought,
which of course was much more important;



68 TOYLAND

and he left his father in peace to make ice-
pudding out of moonshine. But one day, |
the old King drank too much moonshine by
itself, and that always kills people, so the
Prince became King in his stead. And he
went down into the town, that very same day,
and brought back a beautiful tall maiden, with
big, solemn, black eyes, to sit on the throne
beside him; and that was how Bridget became
Queen. They offered to make Peter Lord
High Admiral, or Chief Cook, or anything else
he liked. But Peter had been black so long,
that he preferred to be an engine-driver in-
stead. And now he drives the King’s special
trains; and he is still the happiest boy in the
town, for he has next to nothing to do, and he
has not forgotten how to whistle.



The Boy who Looked |
like a Girl







The Boy who Looked
like a Girl

ONCE: a disagreeable old giant lived in a

beech tree. This was quite possible in this
particular beech tree, for it was many thousands
of years old, and had a large hollow trunk;
while the giant had only had five hundred birth-
days, and was therefore quite a young giant,
and not yet full grown. So there was plenty
of room for him inside the beech tree; and he
was very contented, and lived on beech-nuts
and areputation. The reputation was for eat-
ing up little children, and that was why no little
children ever came that way; so the giant had |
plenty of time to himself, and spent it generally
in going to sleep between his meals. But, one
day, he was woke up by a child’s voice; and
looking through a crack in the tree, he saw a
funny little figure in a blue linen smock, sitting
on the ground outside.

“Hullo!” cried the giant, who had lived so



72 THE BOY WHO

long on beech-nuts, that his voice sounded ex-
actly like a mowing-machine; “who are you?”

“Tm Boy,” said the little fellow, standing
up and nodding at him in a friendly manner.

“Boy? which boy?” asked the giant.

“T didn’t know there was another. Can you
tell me where he lives?” asked Boy, eagerly.
“Tm so tired of girls. There are nothing but
girls at home; at least, one of them is a baby,
which is just as bad. So Pve come away to
see if I can’t find some boys.”

“But you're half a girl yourself,” said the
giant. “Look at your frock.”

“It isn’t a frock!” shouted Boy, angrily.
“It’s only a top thing to go over all the others;
and if it wasn’t fastened down the back with
hooks, I should have taken it off long ago.
When it’s buttons, I can do it by myself, but
when it’s hooks, only Nurse can take it off. And
this one is hooks, don’t you see? JI shall ask
the first boy I meet, to take it off. Look!”

The giant did look; and Boy lifted up the
linen smock, and showed his brown stockings
and blue serge knickerbockers, underneath.

“Ah,” said the giant; “most certainly you
are a boy.”

“Are you a boy, too? Then, why do you
stop in that musty old tree? Have you gota



LOOKED LIKE A GIRL 73

nurse, and must you do as she tells you?”
asked Boy, all ina jumble. He was very fond
of asking questions, without waiting for the
answers to them.

“Most certainly I am not a boy,” said the
giant indignantly, for he had just remembered
his reputation. “Iam a giant, and I eat little
boys for my supper.”

“Dear me,” said Boy; “why, that’s exactly
what Nurse always says about giants! But
I never believed it for a moment. You don’t
really eat boys, do you?”

Now, this put the giant in an awkward fix;
for he had never eaten a boy in the whole of
his life, and he did not know in the least how
to begin now. But he had never met one be-
fore, who did not believe in him; and he began
to feel a little cross.

“JT shouldn’t think of eating you,” he said,
very gruffly; “you are much too fond of talk-
ing to be nice to eat. But you had better run
along, or else something will happen to you.”

“But that is just what I want!” cried Boy,
in a joyful tone. “Do you think it will happen |
soon?”

“Tt will happen very soon,” shouted the
giant, “if you don’t go away, and leave me in
peace. Who sent you here to annoy me like



74 THE BOY WHO

this? You are a rough, noisy, tiresome little
boy!”

Oh dear,” sighed Boy, looking up at the
beech-tree very sadly; “1 believe you're only
another girl, after all! Isn’t there azy place
where I can find a boy ?”

“Yes,” said the giant, who had just had a
happy thought; “go to the Land of Bad
Weather. There are nothing but boys there,
and you can’t even hear yourself speak.”

“Which is the way?” asked Boy, holding
up his smock with one hand, so that he could
run quicker.

“T haven't an idea,” replied the giant; “but
the Pimpernel Fairy knows, and she lives on
the edge of the forest.”

“Ts that another girl, though?” asked Boy,
doubtfully. But the giant was too ill-tempered |
to tell him any more; so off he set at a trot for
the edge of the forest.

The Pimpernel Fairy was sitting on the
grass, in the sunshine. She was dressed in
bright scarlet, and she had large black eyes, and
a very red mouth, and straight black hair.

“Please,” said Boy, in a great hurry, “I
want to go to the Land of Bad Weather, be-
cause there aren’t any girls there; and I am
tired of girls, and babies, and all that; and



LOOKED LIKE A GIRL 75

the grumpy old giant, who lives in the beech
tree, said that you knew the way. And, please,
will you tell me as quickly as you can?”

“Oh, it is quite simple,” said the Pimpernel
Fairy, in a voice as soft as summer rain, and as
clear as star-shine ; “ you have only to climb into
Cloudland, and there you are. But I am afraid
they won't let you in, because you are a girl.”

“Tm vot a girl,” exclaimed Boy. “It’s all
because of this horrid top thing. Oh, if it
was only buttons, instead of hooks! I wonder
if you would be able to unhook it for me?”

But a cloud came over the sun, while he was
speaking, and the Pimpernel Fairy had already
disappeared; so Boy set to work at once to get
into Cloudland. First of all, he climbed the
highest poplar tree he could find; but although
he felt quite dizzy when he got to the top, he
seemed no nearer Cloudland than before. Just
then, however, a large grey sea-gull swooped
down by his side.

“Hullo!” exclaimed Boy; “why aren't you
at the seaside?”

“That's where I’m going; I’ve been to
Cloudland for a holiday,” said the sea-gull,
panting for breath. “Do you suppose we
never do anything but sit on the waves to
be shot at? One must take a rest sometimes.



76 THE BOY WHO

What are you doing up here, I should like to
know? Little girls ought to be playing with
dolls in the nursery, not sitting on the top of
poplar trees.”

“I’m zof a girl,” protested Boy; “and I
want to go to the Land of Bad Weather,
because there are nothing but boys there.
Only think! No dolls, and no girls, and
nothing stupid at all.”

“T don’t know about that,’ said the sea-
gull, arranging its feathers. “There are lots
of stupid things there, and always will be,
until they let the sea-gulls manage things a
bit. However, if you are really anxious about
it, P11 take you there. Come along.”

Before Boy could say a word, the sea-gull
caught him up in his beak, and flew upwards
with him, right through the sunshine, and
the blue sky that cast purple lights across
his face; and never stopped until they reached
Cloudland.

“There you are,” said the sea-gull, dropping
him at the edge of a large white and grey cloud;
“and next time you travel with a sea-gull, don’t
wriggle so much, or else you'll get taken for a
fish, and swallowed. Good-bye.”

And with one long dive, the beautiful big bird
swept down into the blue, and disappeared.



LOOKED LIKE A GIRL 77

Boy rolled down the cloud, which happened
to be a very slanting one, and fell right on to
a Peal of Thunder.

“ Here, get out of my way,” roared the Peal
_of Thunder, who was rumbling along with his
arms full of big drums and tea-trays, and was
Shooting rockets and catharine-wheels out of
his eyes; “I shall be late for that storm. You
didn’t happen to meet him, did you ?”

At that moment, the Storm came rushing

past in a great hailstone chariot; and the
Peal of Thunder went clattering and rumbling
after him, until they were both out of sight.
But a new noise began almost immediately,
like a hundred engines letting off steam in a
railway-station. It was only the North Wind
taking a stroll with the East Wind, however,
and they were really chatting in quite a friendly
way; but Boy thought they must. be quarrelling
dreadfully, for he had never heard such a noise
in his life.
_ “Why, here is one of the things they call
girls down there in the world,” exclaimed the
East Wind, who had a frost-bitten face, and
wore a crown made of icicles. He seemed very
cross, and he talked as though he had a bad
sore throat.

“Let’s blow her back again,” suggested the



78 THE BOY WHO

North Wind, who seemed a more cheerful per-
son. He was covered with a beautiful cloak
made of snow-drifts, and his voice came in
jerks like loud gusts of wind.

“Tm not a girl,” shouted Boy at the top
of his voice; “and J came to find all the
other boys. Do tell me where they are, will

ou?”

: The East Wind grumbled, and said he must
be a girl because he looked like one, and he
ought not to be there at all; but the North
Wind laughed like the bellows in a blacksmith’s
forge, and said he would blow him to the other
boys, if he liked. So he breathed as gently as
he could; and Boy found himself swept through
the air in a kind of sea fog, and dropped in
the middle of a shrieking, shouting, boisterous
crowd.

“ Are you Joys?” exclaimed Boy, in bewilder-
ment. ‘There were boys everywhere, as far as
he could see; short boys, tall boys, ugly boys,
pretty boys, fat boys, thin boys, every kind of
boy imaginable—except quiet boys. For they
were all as noisy as they could be; instead of
talking, they shouted; instead of smiling, they
roared with laughter; and instead of either,
they knocked one another down. They all
seemed very busy over something or another;



LOOKED LIKE A GIRL 79

rigs a moment or two, Boy was not noticed
at all.

“Thank goodness, we've got that Storm off
at last,” said one.

“No, we haven't; the slugs have been for-
gotten, and I can’t find them,” said another.

Then they all began shouting wildly.

“Has any one seen that parcel of slugs ?”

“It’s your fault, because you threw them at
me !”

“No, it must be yours, because you didn’t
catch them !”

“Here they are,” screamed a very fat boy,
- “under the lightning machine.”

“Take them to the rainbow; it hasn’t started
yet, and it will get them down just in time.
Hurrah! There’s nothing more to do to-day;
those showers are not wanted, until they begin
cutting the hay to-morrow.”

Just then, their eyes fell upon Boy, who was
still on the ground, where he had been blown
by the North Wind.

“Here’s a girl, a girl, a girl!” they all
shrieked, and at once began dancing wildly
round him. “Turn her out; use her up as
a thunderbolt; send her down that rainbow;
put her in the machine, and make her into
lightning !”



80 THE BOY WHO

“T’m,not a girl,” cried Boy, plaintively ; “ it’s
all this horrid top thing. If you'll only un-
hook it, you'll see.

He jumped up on his feet, and offered the
back of his smock to the crowd of inquisitive
boys. But, although many of them came and
fumbled away at the hooks, not one of them
could unfasten it for him.

“If you're not a girl, you shouldn’t wear
girls’ things, then,” they said. “ There’s no-
body here who knows how to undo a thing
like that.”

For a moment, a very short moment, Boy
almost wished for a girl, who would be able
to undo his smock for him ; but he remembered
himself in time, and held up his head, and
looked all his tormentors in the face.

“Tam a boy, all the same,” he said.

They looked at him, doubtfully.

“What is lightning made of?” they asked.
“If yowre a boy, you ought to know that.”

“Of course I know,” he said, remembering
what his nurse always said when there was a
storm; “it’s when two clouds come together.
That makes the lightning, and the lightning
makes the thunder!”

“He doesn’t know!” they all yelled, as they
danced wildly round him. “It’s nothing to do



LOOKED LIKE A GIRL __81

with clouds, you stupid little girl! MWe make
it up here, and it’s made of stale sunbeams.
What else do you suppose is done with all yes-
terday’s sunbeams, eh? You're nothing but a.
girl, and you'd better go over to the Land of,
Fine Weather. They're all girls ‘Here, and
they’ve nothing to do all day long. Blow her
across at once, boys!”

Fortunately, the fat boy came running back
from the rainbow, at this moment.

“The lightning’s given out, and they want
some more at once,” he panted; and the whole
crowd of boys threw themselves on the light-
ning machine, and filled it with stale sunbeams,
and began churning them into lightning like
butter.

Boy was noticed no longer; and he crept
away along the cloud, and wondered sadly if
he would ever be able to prove that he was
a real boy. Just then, he heard the sound
of sobbing, and there, at his feet, was a dear
little fairy girl, weeping bitterly. Her face
and hair were brilliant as the sun itself, and
her eyes were like stars; and she was dressed
in deep blue sky. And Boy quite forgot she
was a girl; and he stooped over her, and
touched her face quite gently.

“What is the matter, little girl?” he asked.

6



82 THE BOY WHO

When she looked up and saw him, she
stopped crying at once, and sprang to her
feet.

“Oh, you are a girl!” she cried, in a joyful
tone. “Iam so glad you are a girl.”

For the first time in his life, he was not in
the least bit anxious to declare that he was a
boy. .

Why are you crying, little girl?” was all
he said.

“Because I am so frightened of all those
boys,” she replied. “I ran away from the ©
Land of Fine Weather, because it was so
dull over there, and there was nothing to do
all day; and then I tumbled down here by
mistake. I am so glad you are not a horrid
boy.”

Boy thought for a whole minute without
speaking, which was a thing he had never
been known to do in his life before.

“T am a boy,” he said, as gently as he could;
“but I will take care of you, and we will go
away from all those other boys. I don’t think
they are the right kind of boys at all. And will
you please unfasten my top thing?”

He turned his back to her very solemnly ;
and the little Fine Weather Fairy understood
perfectly, and unhooked it for him at once; and



LOOKED LIKE A GIRL 83

the blue linen smock fell down on the ground
at last, and he stood before her, a real boy in
sailor clothes.

“ Now, we will go away,” he said, taking her
hand; “and I will kill all the boys who try to
tease you.”

Killing seemed quite easy, now he had got
rid of his linen smock. But the little fairy girl
dried her eyes, and smiled at him, and said she
did not think she wanted any one killed at all.

“T know a quiet way home,” she said; “and
they won't see us as we go.”

So they crept along the soft grey cloud, and
round at the back of all the boys, who were
churning the sunbeams into lightning ; and they
would have got away quite safely, if the Fine
Weather Fairy had not had such bright eyes,
that she cast a gleam of star-shine just across
the fat boy’s face.

“ There’s another girl!” he shouted; and im-
mediately, all the boys gave chase to them both,
and they had to run as fast as their legs would
carry them, towards the end of the cloud.

“Straight on,” panted the little fairy girl.
“ Oh dear, I am so out of breath!”

Boy was not very big, but he stooped and
put his arms round her, and carried her as
fast as he could; though the crowd of shouting



84 THE BOY WHO

boys came nearer and nearer every minute. He
began to wonder if killing was very difficult.
Straight in front of them, across a gulf of blue
sky, was the beautiful sunshiny Land of Fine
Weather.

“Jump,” cried the Fine Weather Fairy; and
Boy shut his eyes and jumped. The fat boy
was just behind, and put out his hand to catch
them, but he only pulled out one of Boy’s yellow
hairs, and the two children landed safely on the
other side.

“Now you must leave me,” said the Fine
Weather Fairy, very sadly. “They are all
girls here, and no boys are allowed to stay
at all.”

Boy’s eyes began to feel funny; and he
blinked them both very hard, and clenched his
fists.

“T don’t want to go,” he said. “I want to
stop here with you.”

“What!” said the fairy girl, with a smile.
“ Among all the girls?”

Boy grew very hot.

“I don’t care, I want to stop,” he said. “I
shouldn’t mind girls so much, if—if 7

He was not quite sure why. The fairy girl
laughed merrily.

“If you stop,” she said, “you must put on





LOOKED LIKE A GIRL 85

your top thing again, and then, no one will
know you are a boy.”

Boy looked at his discarded smock, and
sighed. How it had got there, he never knew;
but there it lay at his feet; and it did seem
hard that he should have to put it on again,
after all the trouble he had gone through to
get it taken off. But it seemed the only thing
to be done, and he stooped down and picked
it up.

NT right,” he said. “But you won't expect
me to like dolls, or babies, or anything like
that, will you?” .

She did not have time to answer; for just
then, a troop of other Fine Weather Fairies
came running up to them. They all had eyes
like stars, and hair like sunshine, and they were
all dressed in blue sky; but for all that, Boy
was quite sure that he could have distin-
guished his own fairy girl from any one of
them.

“The Sun Queen is coming,” they cried;
“and: there has got to be a change in the
weather. So we shall have something to do
at last! Oh dear, there has been no fine
weather sent for, since the summer began.

Then a pale yellow light began to creep over
everything, and it grew deeper and deeper, until



86 THE BOY WHO

the whole place was flooded with it, and Boy
was so dazzled, that he had to keep his eyes on
the ground.

“Tl wish I had some smoked glass,” he said.
“We looked at the eclipse through smoked
glass, the other day.”

“Eclipse 2 Who said an eclipse?” asked a
terrible voice from the middle of the bright
light. “And who brought that great clumsy
earth child into my country ?”

“TI did, your Majesty,” said his fairy girl,
bravely. “I tumbled into the Land of Bad
Weather, and he helped me, I mean she helped
me to get away; and so I asked him, I mean
her, to stop a little. He, I mean she, was very
brave, your Majesty; and I should like to re-
ward him, I mean ey, please your Majesty.”

“That girl is a boy,” said the Sun Queen, in
a more terrible voice than before. “ Nobody but
a boy would dare to mention eclipses in my
presence. I declare, it makes me feel quite
frosty. How dare you bring a boy here?”

“Please your Majesty, he Jooks just like a
girl,’ said the little fairy, growing tearful.
Boy felt he would have done anything just
then, to make her smile again.

“Tm quite sure I look like a girl,” he said,
eagerly.



LOOKED LIKE A GIRL 87

“Are you a girl?” said the voice of the Sun
Queen.

“It is really too bad,” exclaimed Boy, begin-
ning to grow impatient. “They all said I looked
like a girl, when I wanted them to think I was
a boy. I don’t know what I am expected to
say next.”

“Well, you know,” said the Sun Queen,
“you must be one or the other. I suppose you
can’t help it,if you are a boy; but I am exceed-
ingly sorry for you, if you are; and you certainly
can't stop here. We don'tallow boys; we used
to have them, and they played tricks with the
barometers, so that no one ever believes in
barometers now. You really must go, or else
I shall feel obliged to set light to you, or some-
thing, and that is always so inconvenient.”

“Will you come home with me too?” asked
Boy, turning to his little fairy girl, and taking
her hand.

“Why, you said you had too many girls to
play with, already!” she cried.

“That’s quite different,” said Boy.

“Nonsense,” said the voice of the Sun Queen.
“Why, she would burn you all up like wax

jmatches, if she came down to play with you.
But she shall take you home, as far as the
Pimpernel Fairy; and you may ask her for



88 THE BOY WHO

anything you like, when you say good-bye to
her. Now, off you go, earth child!”

And. off he did go, with the fairy girl at his
side; and they just seemed to be running full
tilt down a very steep blue hill, until they
reached the edge of the forest, which they did
without feeling in the least bit out of breath.

“ Good-bye,” said the little fairy girl, putting
up her face to be kissed. “What are you going
to ask me?”

“Tf you please, I should like it always to be
fine on my birthday—on all our birthdays,”
said Boy.

“Even the baby’s?” asked the little fairy,
mischievously.

Boy nodded.

“T shall come back and see you again, some
day,” he said, and kissed her. It was just like
kissing a ripe red apple, that has been hanging
in the hot sunshine.

“ No, you won't!” she cried, laughing.

“Why not? Ishall,” said Boy. ~

“ Because I’m only a girl,” she replied; and
when he looked again, she was gone. But the
place where she had stood was covered with
bright yellow buttercups.

The Pimpernel Fairy was sitting on the
ground, where he had last seen her.



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'2011-08-19T15:28:17-04:00'
describe
'95240' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDEV' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
60c26a946d0fce35cfdf1b3624b90cef
08f68a46518c75f14d3e821073e53a04b8c2d87e
'2011-08-19T15:24:06-04:00'
describe
'12735' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDEW' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
e194e98c337fc064baa1aa5043588267
f3f2369ce1c4e2f9f54e37057d0d402493bd3ef9
'2011-08-19T15:23:49-04:00'
describe
'974' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDEX' 'sip-files00005.pro'
8d51761d0e0104729428f0f1e596498e
e9294314f5ba23e9395fc5e7d6aacc98be0a5ea0
'2011-08-19T15:23:42-04:00'
describe
'4146' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDEY' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
de3d41be28e515abd8ef7fcadd513589
40608b8023217ca2a0f9f81717323adee4c2d574
'2011-08-19T15:28:43-04:00'
describe
'3481140' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDEZ' 'sip-files00005.tif'
1fb7a3bd4aee00b6fb5f85098771e27e
de4e8c9c38afb2213c7ee25ce52260396130988b
'2011-08-19T15:34:03-04:00'
describe
'54' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFA' 'sip-files00005.txt'
0d84004d61adee183413c878983501cd
5cb902de4eb687730b31f12a4e7fb3f56949c7a5
'2011-08-19T15:21:44-04:00'
describe
'1386' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFB' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
12826d4aceed591dfc11ca859eaee97c
8618b9d2e041600d15395f5a5c73564522b48c03
'2011-08-19T15:31:40-04:00'
describe
'65009' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFC' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
cac65182da01ab485b1ffa08f18731ab
7b2b29984e7615bc689554948d1895746bb11405
'2011-08-19T15:29:52-04:00'
describe
'10977' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFD' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
2a0e87d19a48a272d77f8e9f2afdcf1a
5180fc32cb767cc08521a811bb112ae54bd5cbe2
'2011-08-19T15:32:54-04:00'
describe
'985' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFE' 'sip-files00007.pro'
ecaec8cd3c41b06d264ef1512a768e1b
489796b7dd019fb75de59843a24195cb556c361a
'2011-08-19T15:33:18-04:00'
describe
'3570' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFF' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
271eb3a77910006463e6520d07285908
a1b1c7aa111944820ac94aa7a0d0f63d70bc2bff
'2011-08-19T15:25:50-04:00'
describe
'3481100' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFG' 'sip-files00007.tif'
e1b0fa6b23de2c50b3648ce0d4076417
59554bb14247e3d9ca3af8fdec9b50c3d754cdca
'2011-08-19T15:28:15-04:00'
describe
'64' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFH' 'sip-files00007.txt'
b36fa6adc94859c2fb7fa128941cbe46
6f8f86eb964db325f04c207ef625ac000c287905
'2011-08-19T15:30:04-04:00'
describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFI' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
8b2fc41a4186dfa5845ede74e68cb4b2
b54a31b0de6d32d19b8d49f446521b72c7bd22ef
'2011-08-19T15:25:12-04:00'
describe
'124436' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFJ' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
78507c6f25f3fc63940fd0de3e1dde0d
4058d0b0b4526141179527364b540a21cd9f7c66
'2011-08-19T15:28:01-04:00'
describe
'12000' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFK' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
4d3b187178b4d3f8a6adb995b26cfbba
d06e98d31f92e01d75c9589e1985eeed2c824f02
'2011-08-19T15:22:44-04:00'
describe
'1766' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFL' 'sip-files00008.pro'
a8040d8de5d69a1f7ae5e96c489a2132
2726676d89a786976f4dea2c2026667b984d2a4a
'2011-08-19T15:31:48-04:00'
describe
'4239' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFM' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
e812f0b07bce67feab6609a65ae4047a
68f010a6ac9725459c2afd3cd322aa8aadb53456
'2011-08-19T15:26:43-04:00'
describe
'3481120' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFN' 'sip-files00008.tif'
bae9a8008d3fa7f2d89dd8abb3a63e85
ae7bf08fd8f64a59ae4281ca399c607bc9f7f552
'2011-08-19T15:21:30-04:00'
describe
'127' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFO' 'sip-files00008.txt'
0397dcf256502f0b1dfa8bf7a8ac2226
20e6721ea2e2fc024a68981c2ca6a67f131962dd
'2011-08-19T15:20:48-04:00'
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFP' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
623251b7d78d4fa0a9e1b5b04344fd23
f16a965a4b84eb6be67e53766e92aa02a0123bed
'2011-08-19T15:34:12-04:00'
describe
'475603' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFQ' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
6052ab9bd41f7d989f21ecdc6038c633
79deeab6f94f2758fe96a1fe8ad8a2718d4d2535
'2011-08-19T15:31:51-04:00'
describe
'160427' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFR' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
3b91310609239f279f6af5702f51c3a0
efafe63021a9077995ee4d4ff09b9efb8c52a6b6
'2011-08-19T15:25:36-04:00'
describe
'41574' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFS' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
b560854894a8c81fdcc9a8242b96f167
10b6c04c634da3d0efb4cf7b32b013a920c90c5e
'2011-08-19T15:24:24-04:00'
describe
'11425180' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFT' 'sip-files00010.tif'
f6bcf1637476014beca767aca4931cc8
08c35aa4d0750f3efd313c6e1aab1c441b2e1529
describe
'11107' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFU' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
88d3e4084ae79b46bd5e69204d810866
cf556a2b435ca6d6fba84a177d614e6f58235b6b
'2011-08-19T15:29:44-04:00'
describe
'460116' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFV' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
78fac95529484e408bc36b1d722c49e4
2b85d89e5903f86a40b03a4b83e952d5ba20233c
'2011-08-19T15:28:16-04:00'
describe
'87157' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFW' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
c80b804cb6b218c16c70252d5acc9d99
dde44c40745521d17887fa1f0bf0144bd86daec6
'2011-08-19T15:32:04-04:00'
describe
'4742' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFX' 'sip-files00013.pro'
ea1f8f2ad8bed724f0ccb765ed18e371
68aea75133fbd34ea8431c20d2c6efe250f8d57f
'2011-08-19T15:23:01-04:00'
describe
'19758' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFY' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
fa8c931daaea43bb85ccb75a2b5fdb96
52ad822a7424b8310332bc248bf2df1424aec511
'2011-08-19T15:21:10-04:00'
describe
'11049276' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDFZ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
72d1532b1e8267d3d91e879df0c24b2a
9364eb5083e62e51926dbb8af2213f90906d24ff
'2011-08-19T15:21:06-04:00'
describe
'273' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGA' 'sip-files00013.txt'
edbed4f44d33f44a5a42bea1d9786607
cebc9cdd5165e7e7df7c8e6040abfbc4bf0cc503
'2011-08-19T15:23:48-04:00'
describe
'4631' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGB' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
7b836cb6da238e625b75db0f55056da8
fb48d2313f471df5d885f13fd9c5e451a50b653d
'2011-08-19T15:25:34-04:00'
describe
'55388' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGC' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
f01ac6050f405d3357e8a2a27408ec85
0968bf1bd17e6b5cb8adc02fdd88592b2d08d60f
'2011-08-19T15:24:11-04:00'
describe
'10339' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGD' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
e625ebd6ba2a972499f47d4b9259a84d
58a1b2990dbfcb5a1b6c683a1d553c0fd082bf2d
'2011-08-19T15:25:04-04:00'
describe
'2287' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGE' 'sip-files00014.pro'
1e163f4b4e0a1b7e401ba6ce7d814630
9e823a8e5127494ac9d0aece7c75f20513edd33a
'2011-08-19T15:21:12-04:00'
describe
'3020' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGF' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
8ead499b321c807a58067088e54a17e7
2d59f0bd8d4a6af682f4e228b82680dccfde0622
'2011-08-19T15:20:53-04:00'
describe
'3480992' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGG' 'sip-files00014.tif'
9ce53c74fbb48f053f85819d2502d9b1
9365462dd12b5b0db8a5a436e3bc0372ca3c7495
'2011-08-19T15:34:15-04:00'
describe
'209' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGH' 'sip-files00014.txt'
83ce9069c55b45133d667adc3263bb7e
97c3050eb8645d7256643237c49476cdababf33b
'2011-08-19T15:29:46-04:00'
describe
'1038' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGI' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
0df51ed32a61cb513afa9c509776e1d4
d631e1e7fb6064920360357c824c60122783544e
'2011-08-19T15:33:44-04:00'
describe
'67576' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGJ' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
77073185e96f8883150611c4ab4e6b3c
96620480ea46b06378787e74f34405b0ee1da27c
'2011-08-19T15:28:03-04:00'
describe
'10545' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGK' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
4efea919535e58e65708da03af786c8d
7e92f1758f985b2283b8a6209680024a4c3e24af
'2011-08-19T15:31:16-04:00'
describe
'826' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGL' 'sip-files00015.pro'
38d665763719d831a7b907cf21be7335
e9e00e2bad6c9f504e472c82d61adf3d8e0b3e29
'2011-08-19T15:24:47-04:00'
describe
'3345' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGM' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
872f83746f89d97ca3904f06db804f78
a9353170bec0236c7d2258685c03965b8264dd65
'2011-08-19T15:32:51-04:00'
describe
'3481056' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGN' 'sip-files00015.tif'
22f83991162dbd85c02cda179dbc5be7
a114d1abe0c3af4dedebdddb71aa729de634ab4b
'2011-08-19T15:21:00-04:00'
describe
'72' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGO' 'sip-files00015.txt'
19b23b5830a2d3efaa9909fef197aa57
ff502f59206633f579d888194fb68bb56dc64538
describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGP' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
06a76c0a7d9b8630a11ce5fa47281478
3ce567e23c492024e406b26ee44ff46612266325
'2011-08-19T15:32:58-04:00'
describe
'196030' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGQ' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
e5c64efaee3d5c0089d440842dd9e55c
a846eb4ebfb1fe9f401e0d601f3a6b1f2ea83399
'2011-08-19T15:28:00-04:00'
describe
'27588' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGR' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
4c93dec9369504582876cc0dc90acafe
1e6287b4b47dc40d7a8430148fc5949ca04bab49
'2011-08-19T15:33:48-04:00'
describe
'8682' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGS' 'sip-files00017.pro'
9c339718f9a7253e8b920a4caca1094f
f2cf338014867c16ed17665201bcd39766e8a565
describe
'9337' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGT' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
1db11913527e121da16da619caa53cd3
3119cc95be0a8d27e8d9d06dfe13ba466d260d24
'2011-08-19T15:32:42-04:00'
describe
'3482016' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGU' 'sip-files00017.tif'
84ccf17befbb2a9c70a245ea66b7af9d
6253bd41d8921101454cd49e5b8914432850c25d
'2011-08-19T15:28:41-04:00'
describe
'526' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGV' 'sip-files00017.txt'
f8c46bb3d7a6031d24fa599f1d03795a
551653f21bf9ef3084714aabf68f130790015ab7
'2011-08-19T15:22:20-04:00'
describe
'3346' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGW' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
d0609f32203cb6e8be4069fbb0871502
75cb3544115422739d999974dc2f67f6f5312806
'2011-08-19T15:21:23-04:00'
describe
'242866' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGX' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
587c28914a052f8b37d8fd9d83db8ff4
ed437161cca1deeee3c5d68abaadbc734eaf6add
'2011-08-19T15:26:28-04:00'
describe
'32101' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGY' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
06f56475ba769b51878aee5a67492843
9dd4b981f5456046023e0e41c6a64acdbbf4c53e
'2011-08-19T15:29:07-04:00'
describe
'9833' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDGZ' 'sip-files00018.pro'
8d535d81866faa1d29250bc465b6a3e1
60c5b5ece5c86a64f6c3c5154a52cae7d8f588df
'2011-08-19T15:25:35-04:00'
describe
'11361' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHA' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
c86bc4571453d97c550e4bfa115d2b54
aed177c5a6857d01ada38a45ae24d1d03a7a5fc7
'2011-08-19T15:24:03-04:00'
describe
'3455992' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHB' 'sip-files00018.tif'
a0d232dca451e7dc5153df510230fafd
fd1ec67e984f0abd675c7ed0573a0e71223f6a61
'2011-08-19T15:23:00-04:00'
describe
'533' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHC' 'sip-files00018.txt'
5127f81e7b8502c6460c75b3a30f1aea
7a77af49a5e1e91ab77501ea5f30b543777a337a
'2011-08-19T15:32:33-04:00'
describe
'3741' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHD' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
73a40c22d6e57c4d16814d1a26151fab
fd1f7f2d51af72d001cca9a8f7c73f200b40210e
'2011-08-19T15:22:17-04:00'
describe
'51331' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHE' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
230c1276bda405f2ad47450a7de74352
006b94a6056d653c0760405cb149372877c4860a
'2011-08-19T15:30:47-04:00'
describe
'8640' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHF' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
3475e871dbcfec12fc7a48afd094cc56
cbf7816785586aa5d3f1665ed353e23c5a115ea6
'2011-08-19T15:32:59-04:00'
describe
'397' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHG' 'sip-files00019.pro'
6d4669acf2b8ad97d6515ae0d0308da9
8adf154707ba56004eab7f337f4f2f335e76f2de
'2011-08-19T15:25:28-04:00'
describe
'2666' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHH' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
05b7a86b6a764cfc176bdad9992e8125
71bcc1baf75bca2e911b7bfdb069669b42da6d01
'2011-08-19T15:33:03-04:00'
describe
'3473476' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHI' 'sip-files00019.tif'
22889fd7a72ba2eaf1df207c7434aedb
82797bad2c4c0d4e2c14c49e0f5ffa6c9316aaeb
'2011-08-19T15:20:59-04:00'
describe
'32' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHJ' 'sip-files00019.txt'
737acea867b72e42b0cfd7730b51553f
2debf6d4de0398321218dcbb8b733cc088c7f39e
describe
'1008' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHK' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
7786f166e4808b20314edefcee277e8b
8d8ff4606ceba84de9abdd31e2dd8bb9c15b6de7
'2011-08-19T15:34:11-04:00'
describe
'69254' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHL' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
ef4438c3d82f4bd1e4759777461fddf5
187b61fa222e372403424c3dc85fa37e7248f9b4
'2011-08-19T15:26:01-04:00'
describe
'7139' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHM' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
ea8a76ca20427cb5d933c885a35af57a
ace7bb675fc52c2b35fb8753a987fed282d2cab7
'2011-08-19T15:26:44-04:00'
describe
'2135' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHN' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
a4f67b01a211882576ede9b9a54f983b
fa6c8c415b9dbb83acafcff85efa8f782e5929ff
'2011-08-19T15:32:07-04:00'
describe
'3480840' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHO' 'sip-files00020.tif'
1bd2b4857e6579f06704f41a8b55aca3
3e9d3328f563deadad8b7ac5e1169721f380b35d
'2011-08-19T15:30:53-04:00'
describe
'809' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHP' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
49a8ad5682f56a9098c9e08f4cba3355
f66bd9d597918d9d46e7e5453000bbddceaf1918
'2011-08-19T15:28:51-04:00'
describe
'434270' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHQ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
bd50fad822dfbc81c5d12bd198d4bb8c
0ce7fbb2336f326ddfffbdb5b9d43cf7f61ce342
'2011-08-19T15:28:27-04:00'
describe
'98992' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHR' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
58bff91b5a45b13750d00c746cd5a415
a2612568bc1d83009bc1e2d04a9ca87a9fb9ccb6
'2011-08-19T15:32:10-04:00'
describe
'25434' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHS' 'sip-files00021.pro'
db6d0e966397800a2eac57a13f5b677f
6509641ee210e90032d48e62ecd026ce507f33b4
describe
'30242' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHT' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
09f30095984d0f5aeb767caf5e038ca0
7e9e49b9ca71bc41b7893c7e400761f56b5424cf
'2011-08-19T15:29:35-04:00'
describe
'3483452' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHU' 'sip-files00021.tif'
581bec2076fe9333d336fedae8477e27
6b8206f0bcf906a109ea7bc0bd07018e4026c7c3
'2011-08-19T15:25:59-04:00'
describe
'1029' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHV' 'sip-files00021.txt'
cc0b80d3d26889c914636809f54b5f30
de4a4aae656761beb9a12967464468f96f1235dd
'2011-08-19T15:28:18-04:00'
describe
'7033' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHW' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
de7d18d45798aba372cacb13aadc619b
e3a0c88124275e361121517ea67efb5f07d79463
'2011-08-19T15:29:22-04:00'
describe
'434203' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHX' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
8fadbef91d5926b299d0a385d637ded4
aa0653d14a1d3758159e4d7b8ae6f419ccf66c01
'2011-08-19T15:33:45-04:00'
describe
'118979' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHY' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
6f6cc6571be3328b82bcc40a2da36957
9822bc15cbce473d80e70afb945bcb42dc8d327e
'2011-08-19T15:30:22-04:00'
describe
'31807' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDHZ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
3776c65f0d41f77b69ea2c35a3ec5948
93631035634ad0f595969079de3e52ae15a132bb
'2011-08-19T15:24:05-04:00'
describe
'36097' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDIA' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
857042b9949311974148d98b54a2a553
fc4f9cac260cba3a30b15d30721e1968ab4ca0d9
'2011-08-19T15:31:38-04:00'
describe
'3483892' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDIB' 'sip-files00022.tif'
49cf130b330fb0542606bde7e5eba9d7
5643e2bd23ad1a448aa2d764caa49522f79804c0
'2011-08-19T15:32:05-04:00'
describe
'1246' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDIC' 'sip-files00022.txt'
f740950bbc7a9ce6ea507c9685fa2aec
bed25357591b00d7c4f533e1d1334acb920babdd
'2011-08-19T15:29:30-04:00'
describe
'8558' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDID' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
0c4212eddde0df598e22ebb0fa05bdab
7ae1759346235680bc92ab06f90dfc4779c16b82
describe
'434324' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDIE' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
f9240758542285150407abc77159a7a1
ac7f6a652a21c1e28f1be5b4f7680c4ce0e970c4
'2011-08-19T15:23:37-04:00'
describe
'122271' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDIF' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
4d0ca4169fb461c02d1265009c903fa4
f8e899d88e24f8e9d2636efe26fb6445f0ab40cb
describe
'32061' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDIG' 'sip-files00023.pro'
aa84181cb73a71bf9c4df1d9b67e8b0c
e127c8a67606be9049fd3e17f2175147489ad7d2
'2011-08-19T15:25:00-04:00'
describe
'37177' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDIH' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
5d1d7d8eb9c597598508d35df64130c5
8bf86541bd378f74fb282c1df2d2710c7c50ed5b
'2011-08-19T15:25:17-04:00'
describe
'3484136' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDII' 'sip-files00023.tif'
7f997feb8ff108f9d8561f2eb327d6a0
0b47b764d003f162d519ab14da0132c422d874dd
'2011-08-19T15:33:57-04:00'
describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDIJ' 'sip-files00023.txt'
46b9b5413649be16970d2e05a1e8dc53
5e775d3015e0a5c9a9dfa22477d2139dbc03459b
'2011-08-19T15:33:28-04:00'
describe
'8843' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDIK' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
ed768fe8e045d13f26c77c1c32c88b2e
15ae20c891e79eeaa50bd79be42584b913e233f9
'2011-08-19T15:33:51-04:00'
describe
'434124' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDIL' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
bec09c538c23fe63b745e9a8d551d4ec
fc7b7383a6d2ecc480b07f116d7665ee2ce8c0e6
'2011-08-19T15:22:06-04:00'
describe
'115772' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDIM' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
81831bbacea67f897154d2edc0c0703c
0c8ffdf5b7765c33059bf18965f8f3758a587ec5
'2011-08-19T15:23:14-04:00'
describe
'30846' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDIN' 'sip-files00024.pro'
03ccc0cd97d7446d2159082564d6f270
ebbd58ae93609da8c650ec12aebc23c0c5fc291b
'2011-08-19T15:32:56-04:00'
describe
'35188' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDIO' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
2ec6b958f3fc4d19a5d0f6c33fe686a4
2fa4ba3ee4b4e528dd62a26390d4020e82aa05a1
'2011-08-19T15:22:12-04:00'
describe
'3482420' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDIP' 'sip-files00024.tif'
f86d3fa1815edc946732cbc890e310aa
e681b0993611154d6773a0d40188078b3bdb165c
'2011-08-19T15:24:36-04:00'
describe
'1215' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDIQ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
c93fb227e1be59e61ff0b0da242494f8
6b821ad0900155986d26c8725668499c573b5c46
'2011-08-19T15:22:07-04:00'
describe
'8586' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDIR' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
07de1d369b9b221ae9ee754b29e3ab67
c4982c1dece9b036a333bbeef5a79c6f20b5e4f3
'2011-08-19T15:27:24-04:00'
describe
'434311' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDIS' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
d2ba6ad5c03c2be9b56aef9cc7a2a32c
c53a6421754d383f0c450a9ddf691c163b980007
'2011-08-19T15:31:50-04:00'
describe
'122146' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDIT' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
db82d0a3463301688e4c2422f0a247bc
fae5872c1a85fc91395eadf96f2ae6a99e72aafa
'2011-08-19T15:28:53-04:00'
describe
'31413' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDIU' 'sip-files00025.pro'
80dfa9db18c14b7eacb5f7259804276a
13838535871987a87b54f133b22ec3973e5ec656
'2011-08-19T15:24:40-04:00'
describe
'37337' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDIV' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
c832627b41431c44a3e49d8d77136b8d
8948eef09818792e75fe9a3174dd7ecff88ee1e4
'2011-08-19T15:29:59-04:00'
describe
'3484052' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDIW' 'sip-files00025.tif'
0f37ba52912f54efa2579c3066e8e43f
166cfec363831c35e4c783b85e9c97d20673fdef
'2011-08-19T15:26:30-04:00'
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDIX' 'sip-files00025.txt'
523991c4c1741b728027098e8fc75416
1ec54e9b85acf0bc8439573f077a5e52e7d908a6
describe
'8974' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDIY' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
9a67e87846a49716a8a3b9616925c2c8
85e84cfe3f591345cb22c9a0facb93ef1a9d9f00
'2011-08-19T15:24:46-04:00'
describe
'434306' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDIZ' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
803882ae02417a5193c931733918ab50
36b5e98c5a6c3d3e3c802693d22b5d6dbf3071d9
'2011-08-19T15:20:51-04:00'
describe
'115944' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJA' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
1c10f788c81bedb3e87542d54a5e211e
eee4278c47d922b4962c218bb7a357900342ad57
'2011-08-19T15:31:45-04:00'
describe
'29846' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJB' 'sip-files00026.pro'
443d05424d7baa4972e8183dc7decba4
80f89332c514bf59190186bc8e7696d30d10ee5b
'2011-08-19T15:29:42-04:00'
describe
'36295' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJC' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
0f00f51e1504aaef645772ea09a8fd0f
fe603e57442b8ea6cbe82427df5e0b7ebf879246
'2011-08-19T15:28:47-04:00'
describe
'3484040' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJD' 'sip-files00026.tif'
68169a67aa07e64213906a8e256bf8c1
906e6acf48a23750917b77039cc6985f64f1176a
'2011-08-19T15:31:01-04:00'
describe
'1178' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJE' 'sip-files00026.txt'
ab8de23f94e99dc1ee934ca0ced5c870
e04f2fe57a9d1fc3f7cd8b9b33e066356b43e68e
'2011-08-19T15:33:22-04:00'
describe
'8808' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJF' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
f865c5cdb45dd8e92b094af7f38a56a9
ee0500e06524519eee4cf65f21d605076416f23b
describe
'434302' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJG' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
fe6cf711157ac4026f9263c7d34fa096
cc4d47ce2d1b0ee9a4f373c26200082bbc8f5a48
'2011-08-19T15:23:40-04:00'
describe
'112606' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJH' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
f1c9f73edc8ad57d994beb9d9fb512c4
0c7bc716932f70482a175e145a35a6e8d09eeadf
describe
'28500' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJI' 'sip-files00027.pro'
fe013ce8a60ff731d1a86c31a649b878
a645d68d319cc5c580cc37ad8257d75fef51dc62
describe
'34627' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJJ' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
3fc5d8ccf54b1d59ad5ee5e22074e546
a16fba1335bc36b1bb46584cac51e01f15a7fe74
'2011-08-19T15:32:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJK' 'sip-files00027.tif'
bd7da895bc1e18e9049116ba8f9ed649
dac4b3865b6c7d87ca1d781f570a1377624447e2
'2011-08-19T15:26:48-04:00'
describe
'1130' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJL' 'sip-files00027.txt'
1471eb86cd5cf2e7aa3786944651da41
913e31bcf57c9c1160a4f7349472669f77d7a666
'2011-08-19T15:22:43-04:00'
describe
'8950' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJM' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
32d1d44776cc2edb063222ed05b79755
e27b4fed8be617379137d46a52dd06abef2666fb
describe
'434120' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJN' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
4954270897df6b13c434e411419e1067
38d12e46947fda84f29c3fb1c0e979fb206ae72c
'2011-08-19T15:31:31-04:00'
describe
'119307' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJO' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
d46d0b558a75eb382b4eda951f62a230
b339a0f419d53af9c0ee0065d9f177993eec95d9
'2011-08-19T15:21:21-04:00'
describe
'30898' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJP' 'sip-files00028.pro'
d2bc69981de59b966782849c9a3df212
88e3306980c4ec753cc24db029a1f571949ae65c
'2011-08-19T15:33:10-04:00'
describe
'36221' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJQ' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
bad4cae2d57b632372162dc54bcf4d9c
50ea702a3f8c5a8fba7b6b1d7cb3f1b6e1e71105
'2011-08-19T15:34:20-04:00'
describe
'3482516' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJR' 'sip-files00028.tif'
a999a8bb73e500c805680049af291464
dda9d34bb8c3df0d7ce34a7bfc287150e5c2a5a1
'2011-08-19T15:27:09-04:00'
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJS' 'sip-files00028.txt'
7a015b4faec555ee33c672908f0c4a2a
5ecfc5bbdadc635555f6d66044be66f47f918feb
'2011-08-19T15:20:54-04:00'
describe
'8789' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJT' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
cd76ca9711cdbe6390b8c6e72fdfab78
b8bc8657c001157750fce2ab2a13230ae3b4c234
'2011-08-19T15:33:01-04:00'
describe
'443400' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJU' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
956f0058741dc75f7c52b7bb3e094a3e
6d139cfa8a46112ddf75f3339cb7bae91231d3a1
'2011-08-19T15:29:09-04:00'
describe
'122745' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJV' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
40834f79b77ed8153802aaf45f64880a
04a62b207265bf2a14e7cdeb8735c041f0259306
'2011-08-19T15:31:42-04:00'
describe
'31996' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJW' 'sip-files00029.pro'
0963e1ab59825db3266dc1aee4a4cedb
7a67b09e4ac899854cb83a37585aba6734f903a7
'2011-08-19T15:28:45-04:00'
describe
'36664' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJX' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
2599e37523b83b7cd85c062effc3d564
0303a7dc170efc590af06f9fbc6feccccd566d80
'2011-08-19T15:27:27-04:00'
describe
'3556488' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJY' 'sip-files00029.tif'
07bed49abf3c21324dc4238a9a16b023
85a330c7607b4ead5370afba840dd9b0ac17e080
'2011-08-19T15:22:01-04:00'
describe
'1265' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDJZ' 'sip-files00029.txt'
ea5bd2ae921061bf6e7ee42c5f35d3b9
2c81fd5a21e70a26251e971e2957961031944f66
'2011-08-19T15:33:58-04:00'
describe
'8911' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKA' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
df8befa76ed204dabd0e9d84ce45e791
ed8cff2fe1e313795d392576d47f4a2b412f5e0d
'2011-08-19T15:20:58-04:00'
describe
'434322' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKB' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
427ae14cae3c20cb77c305c1f755aade
4870e45125c896df9ad7aeb547631fe24115e637
'2011-08-19T15:22:52-04:00'
describe
'120971' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKC' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
ff663f3432daa6b92fa4bf4354777dd0
b6c01f5a2e1bb0f187762979fc0ef85500656a11
'2011-08-19T15:22:58-04:00'
describe
'31625' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKD' 'sip-files00030.pro'
80c618dda525e6c2e8267bc13b7547bf
a2a8be5f96f67b09a5c4738b2d71363be51696e0
'2011-08-19T15:25:40-04:00'
describe
'37313' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKE' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
458ded724b7fe1d005b962b281475730
fb65f921c8d1591ba9100238e8da1b63e03ef6e0
'2011-08-19T15:23:07-04:00'
describe
'3484144' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKF' 'sip-files00030.tif'
ce3157196265d61983a001a8c76f5860
30023dfe87f0bf3e72c1a53860bb2f502efeeb00
'2011-08-19T15:27:35-04:00'
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKG' 'sip-files00030.txt'
ad4c5d3443bd93e316415c9b797d397d
e75e07c2e168f286c18772f5f8a079724977f20a
'2011-08-19T15:33:50-04:00'
describe
'9208' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKH' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
375030b12b94463d2b86744afae4594e
4bcc677ac16cc5a8d7437f86bf3669f9744cfa1e
'2011-08-19T15:21:16-04:00'
describe
'434274' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKI' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
b29975c07fcd1d36502153b23a8f5978
b99058ae02a56232c4d73d62d533c4800d2a1118
'2011-08-19T15:21:07-04:00'
describe
'112764' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKJ' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
df273a0a15e7fb7fdff8801dc83b1cd6
5b504d2f8fdd13faae522e358d8bc3259cf3435a
'2011-08-19T15:21:14-04:00'
describe
'29264' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKK' 'sip-files00031.pro'
f4e0650b4bc79bfe5050c0d3bbab148b
a2933dfc5bd2204b03dd6ce7556f22ff58b9208c
'2011-08-19T15:24:04-04:00'
describe
'34981' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKL' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
22a9443bd665fba3ab58b6cf11e39f60
235ef4723f827ddc797904f3335af9b28f0a6916
'2011-08-19T15:28:10-04:00'
describe
'3483908' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKM' 'sip-files00031.tif'
f7d33e6350e11579b44b184de068402e
cdbaee5dc8eb1dd786c6460363abb59eb52692b1
'2011-08-19T15:28:57-04:00'
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKN' 'sip-files00031.txt'
fc77470c9b2518958957364ec9ff7053
e2c80304a09de74cc06f5373b89a887dd3ee6e2b
'2011-08-19T15:32:02-04:00'
describe
'8387' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKO' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
be3be6a8018bf29da86491d00eb7de08
149b49cac326736b568dda02cd0f4d6ae47dcb66
'2011-08-19T15:25:29-04:00'
describe
'434272' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKP' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
4dea241ff9a296086d4bb4c14fb73569
78b317c7374d15f20fe4c19e0e1b2943fb9848b6
'2011-08-19T15:24:59-04:00'
describe
'121192' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKQ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
455be29c5615c37f90263128041daa98
ea3c6ada0e1f61065f09d346cb8085b767679f8c
'2011-08-19T15:26:42-04:00'
describe
'31729' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKR' 'sip-files00032.pro'
b78bdc286f8c37574f6977e5b1d2ddf8
f1304c9627e5857c397c1bb2fcb7436022926fa6
'2011-08-19T15:26:38-04:00'
describe
'36407' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKS' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
e342751825b1f66e18b1a8e16847abfe
7bc27602f6369780e69c3fd3c897bee99094f986
'2011-08-19T15:33:30-04:00'
describe
'3484064' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKT' 'sip-files00032.tif'
b66bbde15402d54ee3dcaac3305b66cd
f1be3a906839c04da7799d82894258d82ee33aed
'2011-08-19T15:23:09-04:00'
describe
'1247' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKU' 'sip-files00032.txt'
7dc449952876bcc38f3eede83a9d6428
d0c741911502b0a2085632ffdafe2e198dce2ce7
'2011-08-19T15:30:36-04:00'
describe
'8729' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKV' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
fb3420f630dc3fb4f10941fb48833a7b
bb5fa1c0033451c2ab87786bfe5b56e520f1535d
'2011-08-19T15:27:30-04:00'
describe
'434283' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKW' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
6b12d73f78f67482412a73a71ef78186
c3f39582e3e8da5b101dbaa269728451a627e85e
'2011-08-19T15:32:57-04:00'
describe
'114664' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKX' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
e959e8795eda4a87094e954f218b1c69
7b0aba8b891a43dafb69d99308df0b19306b3400
'2011-08-19T15:25:10-04:00'
describe
'29970' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKY' 'sip-files00033.pro'
99608fea97bb7d16068e9abde5cda6cc
5821fb280d33891a672d791223df7548295623a6
'2011-08-19T15:30:02-04:00'
describe
'35165' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDKZ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
a38df7cd7a242ec2fe1ae57a66781152
ac6362f974a3209a3238496caf38c0aeec2157f0
describe
'3483856' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLA' 'sip-files00033.tif'
3f530760b19c4c6446ef3149339319b0
aa69599ca154b0d4e57ca7d283d7ee08661849c5
'2011-08-19T15:24:41-04:00'
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLB' 'sip-files00033.txt'
5b6db8cd4e077df75b8302bb8c77091a
59a7ef15da4a7826eaf522ae2844da98f334ce8d
'2011-08-19T15:22:49-04:00'
describe
'8316' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLC' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
0524e35fbc37746289c4e6c66bdf8fa2
bbf2e3d568a822321d5024ea74888c4a478f3238
'2011-08-19T15:29:08-04:00'
describe
'434295' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLD' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
890c8d6a805662c558869a2ac826f5ed
e4fdc65df46cd78c8657a5b5214248758b0838dc
'2011-08-19T15:25:11-04:00'
describe
'113180' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLE' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
f9ae253e8ab5639f064fb0c4af2ec703
82a8f777b11cebd0f0211d6aaaeb76208ba34ada
describe
'29650' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLF' 'sip-files00034.pro'
e33f2f57ca66105f0fc7ddeeafc0b288
e6919573ea875effab3cdc7207b01741e598c408
describe
'34601' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLG' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
507485813dea638af52b60beccf52b1c
fea1d472d4a7cdf2e7bb879a0781d1a55ac1ce8d
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLH' 'sip-files00034.tif'
33e854593edc12ff2b93a9b5c228c1bb
8d07392a5e8c89b07a4860705bde0cccff2c05b1
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLI' 'sip-files00034.txt'
cbff4a162acc5a65502dc4bf6f90b7e0
2a707de50e082b9db79e443c50de1a8e04d3201e
'2011-08-19T15:26:03-04:00'
describe
'8668' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLJ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
5d27ba6608365aaa880d0517fb4d4fc6
75b0e9cacd3e5a9cb1a72a303a2b7a1db7731cd4
'2011-08-19T15:28:06-04:00'
describe
'434397' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLK' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
781a3f316de4c30eaa76d4aa29a8b379
94042350e3d93d1b86fed64c37cbd20b9f5227d1
describe
'102656' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLL' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
44385358b24d4b269143f91106717119
11ff34292ea2e6f85c70d22542c4d0228024c984
'2011-08-19T15:26:04-04:00'
describe
'26800' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLM' 'sip-files00035.pro'
fad4e24faadf958e753dc9c89b8fbf1c
1360462fb0e3b0734ab9427d3f964c30bbae7bfb
describe
'31600' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLN' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
edf64884e0633e656f4620ba682e1f6f
ba0257aa0996c5a87ed785e5161559da3dcf8c11
'2011-08-19T15:31:11-04:00'
describe
'3484348' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLO' 'sip-files00035.tif'
fbab290ec7db50d71d643f1f118f7838
f148718d02101442ce53233db37c9de6b9667e64
'2011-08-19T15:30:50-04:00'
describe
'1073' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLP' 'sip-files00035.txt'
eb315a51e421a1df6c8fd5e2c53d417f
1fe66713a352853484bce7452436ecbb9d2b79f6
'2011-08-19T15:26:45-04:00'
describe
'8311' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLQ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
104a037d1baa87cc330c7eae6ad83d5f
996c65d0325bdbdb2b044841239e3ab7f97a939e
'2011-08-19T15:30:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLR' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
36e7b272692470275a97f027e233b1ba
71ae8514b2113b9e29d0c25af5b0126cb35a030b
'2011-08-19T15:28:21-04:00'
describe
'112953' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLS' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
660761f72f6ccccd0805cdfc165d2e92
eb5fb4164fc1bfb8e4913f1f35329292c45ec5e5
'2011-08-19T15:32:20-04:00'
describe
'30352' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLT' 'sip-files00036.pro'
1f07ce645248e5dca06cbbdff69b12ce
675ec766ca2183fec0719bc4d7c00a022048e3ab
'2011-08-19T15:24:39-04:00'
describe
'33950' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLU' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
6a14b7135aeb57cb435870df095298fb
b8aa2d4ce2de1365f18da34711a16747db5732e3
'2011-08-19T15:22:33-04:00'
describe
'3483808' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLV' 'sip-files00036.tif'
ba91945a3faa2244b25e6c9d420bfe6c
d698d29125ba23d22f713f430b42bab25382b7ed
'2011-08-19T15:22:09-04:00'
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLW' 'sip-files00036.txt'
6565e0eda9d3ea3620a9bf4214fb045d
32afe0c831258fc8a24782e9c1606b3b26f56d3f
describe
'8465' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLX' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
165965a8fd8fd706843da1ea46cd2abb
bc2a7cd42843a6cb073f167a5ba1e8d6b337fb28
'2011-08-19T15:32:09-04:00'
describe
'434235' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLY' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
1dbaffc7a5a77b905b56ecc956fd0ea6
1ed0a9663ccf4ebca36d8dcb7f868ee5f0f12c00
'2011-08-19T15:30:11-04:00'
describe
'106324' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDLZ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
c9144f8a0b0faca3613206083cb6588d
f78391b3721709b58002ba6b5c95c6fa8ddfa2c0
'2011-08-19T15:26:56-04:00'
describe
'28300' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDMA' 'sip-files00037.pro'
9f5863e04c77f8a70aafc456775b216d
986e84d60829eeb7e503d7756aedce4b6a6029ea
'2011-08-19T15:26:13-04:00'
describe
'32584' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDMB' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
5bab5d9e86a8ee9739f560e7d28009ee
bc28bbbc5d2bcc1fc6e07a520546fe79d3a2f313
describe
'3483636' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDMC' 'sip-files00037.tif'
0ef77365fcda5e7393eb5b6ae97a9689
e6e7ae8287c2866b24d32fe216078f1724083352
'2011-08-19T15:22:28-04:00'
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDMD' 'sip-files00037.txt'
5a077d90e96a2669c731109513fbac35
390608dbb395a098841b91ade62f2658df4cbeff
'2011-08-19T15:24:38-04:00'
describe
'8087' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDME' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
47c5ebc4bd7516ca3061c811cfafcda5
bcec307a181faf1cc1f85005276bbd7a74fc4e18
'2011-08-19T15:30:29-04:00'
describe
'260105' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDMF' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
c37681f313f2ac195a4ec38bafa98244
51be23e96d832caee6534a5187bf3d5f195aa6cb
'2011-08-19T15:21:15-04:00'
describe
'35511' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDMG' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
f1804fea4c02d9e5f1d30b1ef3bf1f47
f9a8c693ba2d0ef779dc280adca25f41fbbe4b01
'2011-08-19T15:26:06-04:00'
describe
'8381' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDMH' 'sip-files00038.pro'
375873bb484401456cf45337e05e0445
eb728e02efdcd17cc95600a589c87a45f9469700
'2011-08-19T15:25:19-04:00'
describe
'11391' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDMI' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
8b990c9572806b474d25aea696afdea1
8609a7773172719bb6fb2dee094154fe5797d2d8
'2011-08-19T15:26:40-04:00'
describe
'3481920' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDMJ' 'sip-files00038.tif'
7f3440eafa48f1bb58b95afdfa587687
d68e1cbd49de2a1c69c5e1e85864ca33fe71d4a2
'2011-08-19T15:28:32-04:00'
describe
'341' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDMK' 'sip-files00038.txt'
4e0aa393d703ce2c88835b4b1ca76e70
978f0cfcec4478881fd005a9bd4107c297180739
describe
'3391' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDML' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
8f28e257f93976aaa174fce2207007db
90c65e629ec9113f05cdb1a36bc87745f76d904e
describe
'69625' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDMM' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
71cf5903c99ae926db71fc79c678bbf1
a64df9e7a4a96a596b0dc42a017fcb65eca209bc
'2011-08-19T15:24:53-04:00'
describe
'11376' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDMN' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
b64773b0a93c89aaeb294a36fd84d8b6
b77e566c905e8c5060dc2ee74982650173d4d138
'2011-08-19T15:27:06-04:00'
describe
'918' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDMO' 'sip-files00039.pro'
0fc64ca6a5f0cb1cc80643d4bf2943ff
8e518bb3b79a8b33eac2d62e56a1aab106c9b328
'2011-08-19T15:32:39-04:00'
describe
'3549' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDMP' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
afe531fd1187da035abcfe68e9e45c74
6d7f1cc3f515f096b231fc6bc12da69f360fc757
'2011-08-19T15:21:26-04:00'
describe
'3481080' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDMQ' 'sip-files00039.tif'
b5ef4e72858fc736eb817cdeecbb06e8
9ed378f591aed13b4b8b9e590b65f9ef7593b087
'2011-08-19T15:25:25-04:00'
describe
'58' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDMR' 'sip-files00039.txt'
7291e252fe49ad00084e716d75b42c9e
94a58a42505916232f962603a4a1bb1682951c22
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDMS' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
384f732dbec363a6ec1e8f7969e06d93
70938f36e8d14bbb90c19675499a3277f03b27e1
describe
'475566' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDMT' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
39feb0eaebe56f2e28c7b9f489302c11
4bc7252d0682856fb0174625d34ddc746fc78144
'2011-08-19T15:26:53-04:00'
describe
'158540' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDMU' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
be917e13b41d6ed23cd7fa41dfe63070
bf94549ee3e6ee725a2d46b3ac68ccee3b346384
'2011-08-19T15:29:16-04:00'
describe
'37534' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDMV' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
0246cbb038729f52fe8f1cbf6d972eba
339b54bebf18867ac4714e62ef61b6786e58d0cd
'2011-08-19T15:23:39-04:00'
describe
'11424472' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDMW' 'sip-files00042.tif'
5fd09594d5523e78741f97a583a02c72
89adf746a8318a31aad156491c1b5d85fd1b3499
'2011-08-19T15:24:28-04:00'
describe
'10027' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDMX' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
2c9012f67eb4c9a91c3b0f22e03ae15f
31b2b12558aa11ea10594457756fcb0729800999
'2011-08-19T15:27:20-04:00'
describe
'429022' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDMY' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
6dd4a0640b84fa80bd2cc43ea679bcea
877f22fc6a51d6aba0d4969993881244cbc5b9a9
'2011-08-19T15:32:35-04:00'
describe
'101468' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDMZ' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
e35a8770cd744e368274fc9b092155fa
4da250c2f5445c2111401234d71f449fa56ca47d
'2011-08-19T15:27:54-04:00'
describe
'24503' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDNA' 'sip-files00043.pro'
33286aa2a1228ca9436c7e1e0d288af7
737cdad7f09dbc102a5fe0aef21880f1c5b98fce
'2011-08-19T15:31:07-04:00'
describe
'31523' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDNB' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
e5698bc0c35b8156a912258fa7bcd997
d74505bc0fedf35128f28c435ba09e4589ad2c9b
'2011-08-19T15:32:53-04:00'
describe
'10304228' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDNC' 'sip-files00043.tif'
e7d7f6fe2f4d3c96fd0796522138ed42
f8afe98e0642f527f4f03065e66a045e43948c24
'2011-08-19T15:22:35-04:00'
describe
'983' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDND' 'sip-files00043.txt'
64dd28c745e3e80b6630b024d6ca5349
bb05f5dc77018c9decdfbb33a07818b54fe598d0
'2011-08-19T15:21:24-04:00'
describe
'7861' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDNE' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
153f63621fa9604e15b52c08ef689c70
5140caffc53a702cf16343acd27b91af253da448
'2011-08-19T15:28:12-04:00'
describe
'434125' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDNF' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
124419067431165a87640a32b76ffe5c
a5268c1ae6b4c073ab6ef182fce197b073e9d9ac
'2011-08-19T15:27:47-04:00'
describe
'124922' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDNG' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
2987dd236c027386dc7ef6b9fde76e37
b2b000ae360882dfdeda9956c635fdc98d244a42
describe
'33360' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDNH' 'sip-files00044.pro'
82c0bf99b4e401d82e2603ae06ea9331
252ac8f8d985f012254ff4e8e14658568a1dc90f
'2011-08-19T15:26:05-04:00'
describe
'38655' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDNI' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
e6faddbfc63333cb30dd25b0dedce501
eb4680b3998f58663c18c2f877642665bd18353d
'2011-08-19T15:24:18-04:00'
describe
'3482484' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDNJ' 'sip-files00044.tif'
9de5d3ed926d176b14f8c2eeef2a908a
a1845c1906b4e738fd065ac25a6001f69694dc29
'2011-08-19T15:26:23-04:00'
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDNK' 'sip-files00044.txt'
abe612d345814ae84cdfc79e0a9346da
79cb02bb12278999a918701133daea2db96b879c
describe
'9184' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDNL' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
93b65fc6c12064c66fc48779d5f3b245
56bd2c69f1637823a4cb8bebf9c3aee38d9dca89
'2011-08-19T15:33:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDNM' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
b528b28a819b75cb8d8bc498e4015040
f8319778303a8bbcd2f04c07690c1fa1c4f7530b
describe
'125186' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDNN' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
0f77b6e189c2739395f21fe3b50bc56b
fb5fdd66b2a2ed1e9d8e0f26d6240e876eeab83d
describe
'33287' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDNO' 'sip-files00045.pro'
2ce7e4b54b48088619a0888c62f12e4d
28ff4839e1afb8737e003e720579b585d3fb0190
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDNP' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
a15a5a33cb165369e669db1fb3f37848
dc1a285850543f6c53a430aa49add00c49a65789
'2011-08-19T15:29:03-04:00'
describe
'3483944' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDNQ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
a3cd702cbb574d94228700f0fde9e5b3
e24b62b90f3a0fcf6183dd128cb7639e45309261
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDNR' 'sip-files00045.txt'
9f7bceb91f15e06e5654e590c8d3117b
df32e3a86655d3ed544a7d58b4c534ebf5d4a549
'2011-08-19T15:31:36-04:00'
describe
'8879' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDNS' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
a473bf48739e3825e04a8ca9497a2a86
7091f38a10ca1b49f8aa94c41f43bd1d0a59e493
'2011-08-19T15:31:12-04:00'
describe
'434323' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDNT' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
82a7384f27febd676d866073e2195301
981ebb5cdf861eb4704ef121bb37cbf1b829aab9
'2011-08-19T15:34:21-04:00'
describe
'124806' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDNU' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
f0be023f91361c1fb243c0e83b68ab87
b68fe884b4969ad831a02a303c46481f0121737b
'2011-08-19T15:21:49-04:00'
describe
'33178' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDNV' 'sip-files00046.pro'
d1ae5cc2c8e3d89c73e4da6d572bb019
a41aa8b6fd6dc48db0d1ee1146e7e6e14b256063
'2011-08-19T15:29:10-04:00'
describe
'37686' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDNW' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
741e8a722b424d7fbff11f60831d1c95
2300d600c607bc512bd415c7d220400962071e69
'2011-08-19T15:31:05-04:00'
describe
'3484036' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDNX' 'sip-files00046.tif'
9f468681c47aadaf6ef436fc5a089dd0
8646c5d4b2079a988509c7a99fede2b7b065f588
'2011-08-19T15:29:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDNY' 'sip-files00046.txt'
63b2fbcd0eefd3569efc3a4a8bbd6723
31b23052988867dcc2f6c5315ed5e67725b40b2e
describe
'8730' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDNZ' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
09f85cfd48296880051f2f2f31d2e789
3522497cbbfaa4d96b4f355d2f78fcfa822854ac
'2011-08-19T15:31:28-04:00'
describe
'434263' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDOA' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
06f837af6d36e8e724d03a5a60548381
dc364e6edc8e7fdc89793b5dee528f517b7a82ca
'2011-08-19T15:22:19-04:00'
describe
'116443' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDOB' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
cde5cd9cbb1181b2b89ae8ad0e5aa638
0355825ab7bc59dfef493d3db432b3cada9a5be6
'2011-08-19T15:31:14-04:00'
describe
'30738' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDOC' 'sip-files00047.pro'
90ce29b6369adf4032eb0ef0bd7dd6f7
93b1c9bd658557e3e7ba172fb15147d4d646a05b
'2011-08-19T15:21:11-04:00'
describe
'35169' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDOD' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
4b064cbf9db02351e8c8de4de05e1f22
d9c87c19394135b9da8c7dd298b89e83abd92cb7
'2011-08-19T15:25:22-04:00'
describe
'3483876' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDOE' 'sip-files00047.tif'
f5c60684bf6db12cc219515325277a92
377ec78f96748d81ea7bb9a948b22a9e980ddd62
'2011-08-19T15:23:51-04:00'
describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDOF' 'sip-files00047.txt'
2cd709ed607c155f195b52bd3c8c9d76
7d325bf6e4580dc5a2a0bec362df80b24b04bb92
'2011-08-19T15:34:16-04:00'
describe
'8673' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDOG' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
de4e1f81bef2a6e39086771a084917b6
baaafa7305749c458088954b0f1c50543922c7cc
'2011-08-19T15:27:10-04:00'
describe
'434318' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDOH' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
3a3655c3bf08b344e2eec85477678f1e
6baa6302742480e43562ad28916d3f0170c08ebe
'2011-08-19T15:24:50-04:00'
describe
'116353' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDOI' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
cd1bf1e6afea33aa55b95b25927fa2ef
e93b9a2c06ee24851157231f517bd5f839f4b027
describe
'30838' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDOJ' 'sip-files00048.pro'
3d380c398bf1bd52f1151881bc12a1d4
56e5acd9e22a86b05fe12ef41a253517606e5780
'2011-08-19T15:31:04-04:00'
describe
'35322' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDOK' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
59e3575cfdf70eb880a23be409e76893
95bfaf538ce488efc41d17677244e4064849f9ea
'2011-08-19T15:33:37-04:00'
describe
'3483960' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDOL' 'sip-files00048.tif'
146f8ba7df0b43af6978286013dc1c85
0a9c5eb40fbdbed62d86439ca7c71e27e2a19150
'2011-08-19T15:31:18-04:00'
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDOM' 'sip-files00048.txt'
6566eac6f7f7b61052051a2ce698c688
a5ef6e845dcef7fd4c09d71acffc178f642dcd9d
'2011-08-19T15:26:02-04:00'
describe
'9258' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDON' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
9d69de98ef528ddf44d3dd1099474f59
7294ab4cfcf6b9cf39ad784168f825f4dde4d72d
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDOO' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
88332f5fe7bb383e967058bca02f0c8b
7039f907278ca96c367dc642db4c53340be49e1b
'2011-08-19T15:28:11-04:00'
describe
'121924' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDOP' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
73d5756733b6f0e0e0d75c57a0cdc1cb
beb41d66a058a0d59d189572ef85cdadfd69899d
'2011-08-19T15:32:23-04:00'
describe
'32332' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDOQ' 'sip-files00049.pro'
3e387e8aa6f2089baa632f911f710165
5bce21bda12d24387487e38f02d55573a8d3568c
'2011-08-19T15:22:21-04:00'
describe
'37024' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDOR' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
b88f4677e8a4e9b7dbe4e28c452b5f63
3615965b57de1484a864d2ddffbd6e2fdc7007df
describe
'3483952' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDOS' 'sip-files00049.tif'
309c13567b6900f51830246a3ca3ba26
fbfc4b4229c33bc39089dbbde837a0a886367daf
describe
'1276' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDOT' 'sip-files00049.txt'
e2cab6558378be1ecfaec350d305a8eb
de8a45477e2de5300b041b17b9f93a12e9e2ce08
describe
'8873' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDOU' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
ecc38321c158bf01b655059c8c7bb89c
417a7b9c487fba8a8245e467044750b597de0d52
'2011-08-19T15:33:07-04:00'
describe
'434321' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDOV' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
56e08511950265a13e39ffe2867e7184
6d7b8332c335287dc117afa926b888822cad5526
describe
'116757' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDOW' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
b22f95bda81e27c36bd3047d899aa061
976cc924ca3d02890a2b624fde575ac3d6ebd915
describe
'31024' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDOX' 'sip-files00050.pro'
78dbc63563596c6e92782d8afdb9aae7
ac80a94a7b5badb6d8050becf956b74e2ecdf1b6
'2011-08-19T15:29:11-04:00'
describe
'35704' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDOY' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
b7e620ab0b36541ede4fae626dbf6b5d
0b734ba95daef90ff84c6389d1cf7b6add5a685a
'2011-08-19T15:28:35-04:00'
describe
'3483828' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDOZ' 'sip-files00050.tif'
30dc0e153b445593a861108293a0bdb6
f399c5b9f83262c2b3c0acab6993d6cb94658049
describe
'1223' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPA' 'sip-files00050.txt'
4850d3fb59701fdab6ffc68d35b8c348
e9eaf973944f360089a678d08a7d65245b70b4ee
'2011-08-19T15:26:39-04:00'
describe
'8615' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPB' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
04f4e870f5d2cf2b918ff5e3dfcc52ba
a7a76a3e4a2290668752c61a632090908ed12fbf
'2011-08-19T15:24:00-04:00'
describe
'434127' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPC' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
ee2f08083bf50fd16639c1df919a74e5
466714f6169089751dc8ecebf522243802fbae76
'2011-08-19T15:23:15-04:00'
describe
'114183' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPD' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
b449b892a939aef0538bb6b6a7890ede
abfc632775822b7ce171008dbf8376a0f8841ccd
'2011-08-19T15:30:46-04:00'
describe
'30295' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPE' 'sip-files00051.pro'
f36a87a9f275f76fb4b5477630104d3b
2921f3851385a0fb0426e474c0822dcee49f08ee
'2011-08-19T15:25:15-04:00'
describe
'35326' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPF' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
5b05b7ad77e5eaa989a4cd8498f6fa8c
3ac3536a813b386fb2fb253ffa4cde42a8f39eb5
'2011-08-19T15:31:24-04:00'
describe
'3482384' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPG' 'sip-files00051.tif'
5527fe6e25244682c9e4360c94017896
683ef6a3b7037d6d12755816be5654887cb7dc4f
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPH' 'sip-files00051.txt'
562eb484de618d0d014a112975ea5be3
1bacc4008a868498af80116f5db57648f808a56b
describe
'8866' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPI' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
0ca45462596e7513dd771bc223470d05
d5775932e63d4d7ee3696bd1ed8a902650507349
'2011-08-19T15:25:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPJ' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
37d961c886c9cd007972763bd33e4278
23bf628da37400acd446f8a965a1a40f949e2ef6
describe
'110350' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPK' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
c364ea5e41ca64625b96989b0a43d6a4
f2cdf6407aabbb47a3b095cb94be335e694f3b01
'2011-08-19T15:29:12-04:00'
describe
'29072' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPL' 'sip-files00052.pro'
6c3ea8e58a0582e71aa8af1fb1b04969
9220e216af96d8d71dd069ff442e1c2416d25160
describe
'34416' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPM' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
e02b71537e5dcbb4b10893abeca3bc1c
6b4f25f50f94b47fecd33904eec1dca47a9a3b76
describe
'3482340' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPN' 'sip-files00052.tif'
6cf2b3ef4e62539b13d39e9013af2abf
448840209f4cac3ce2ee006e4eee0154f0dbe532
'2011-08-19T15:27:41-04:00'
describe
'1148' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPO' 'sip-files00052.txt'
344c7cf081800ffc0ec3591a842c3105
6e9f6a06a74fb39f24bdd8ec8d0f294a174f72c8
'2011-08-19T15:27:25-04:00'
describe
'8842' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPP' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
0298bad050aaff46c1493ff71cc43f78
1aa9e518c3dd602ab245ab41d2803392c4b5688b
'2011-08-19T15:24:16-04:00'
describe
'434312' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPQ' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
7483760fd6b12ca94257dd5bb9c5b226
151e33a44092c05ec211f3b61df475b53ef3f6f2
'2011-08-19T15:30:57-04:00'
describe
'119796' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPR' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
113245f59f0af9c9fe9e7380c2591a8c
bba8447a6ab6c61bfa8c38bf8ebdc9b34ba5482c
describe
'31534' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPS' 'sip-files00053.pro'
1ae1b17a2be00309fe323ede8edeb4fd
fca26ded0c31383fc462754524ae169735eb8312
'2011-08-19T15:21:35-04:00'
describe
'36652' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPT' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
41a1b62d02bde5ff5fdd3e63a00d5774
704eaad360659c92f430a593a3af881bb7fd892f
'2011-08-19T15:25:56-04:00'
describe
'3483900' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPU' 'sip-files00053.tif'
314be2886227a12df25fb71509b9020d
e267934b5abd55397d91e42a164859efd85499ff
'2011-08-19T15:29:04-04:00'
describe
'1250' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPV' 'sip-files00053.txt'
cbca6c3091c59e443e1a7602ed5e5ba7
753520e7a739e9051cdf29a6f79741d675cc91fa
describe
'8720' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPW' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
99eea06445c92aae1ea8feb363060298
8534db3c4be3c6afa20b68dd79497de1cbd7ad65
'2011-08-19T15:25:09-04:00'
describe
'426621' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPX' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
328a992d11001947a4936a85dd6e4a5e
5a571e07e59144151946fb840195d9e897729427
describe
'123821' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPY' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
5bb7be4d2cdd95e018d84f186468b768
45b66fca4891f21650d8149fe4523a818d66aa1b
'2011-08-19T15:34:04-04:00'
describe
'31722' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDPZ' 'sip-files00054.pro'
53c5ea5ba03a08b171a8c1103e61fbce
7b53b5fe5b7b61099de7320c4f5142b0602ba7db
'2011-08-19T15:33:12-04:00'
describe
'37452' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQA' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
fbffd8ba1593558052e71a7efe311040
b0f38a8d03fe46e675c9bb6c0e05ddead70fed2b
'2011-08-19T15:27:23-04:00'
describe
'3422684' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQB' 'sip-files00054.tif'
ebe4fc912a7d8a877ce34778c51127dd
65e7e1cb27dbf9b60e68f0aab13c1f6de0f56b45
'2011-08-19T15:27:16-04:00'
describe
'1245' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQC' 'sip-files00054.txt'
80f5de9a6c73ff0011721d1c7261831f
6f0c96887e9b80ed131bd7d2e8d0fb43def755dd
'2011-08-19T15:26:58-04:00'
describe
'9401' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQD' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
a130931e3b2667656863aa56710c9792
8e32a4facc96b33732238051a6bcf76a6d36eb77
'2011-08-19T15:21:43-04:00'
describe
'434204' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQE' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
2f488798ecd722b06748e94731433954
0b2a0619ef737665f838235fe9832fd3a829c856
'2011-08-19T15:23:28-04:00'
describe
'118461' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQF' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
480c6eb45f64f4746f6825822e3aa97b
a61c41ced7f00ded4fb021792cebf77c96793d18
'2011-08-19T15:23:18-04:00'
describe
'31227' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQG' 'sip-files00055.pro'
f7365b2d5adfb1921541da7f71b2d7bd
efd829e80676c5d74e1bc18261c9d18045bc3311
describe
'36526' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQH' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
7aba234ef33c56b060c539247e57df99
76223b2dec1476193694d13c73773eb78dd38d06
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQI' 'sip-files00055.tif'
6a0d502d2f64a52908d50e8924947470
d97a462fa9e4dbfad4215e1e80effeba1b461bd1
'2011-08-19T15:28:31-04:00'
describe
'1235' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQJ' 'sip-files00055.txt'
09fff4a553fa09e8f56be8f0bac8eb09
371a5cdc401226aa3ec2c8e5eb51ed8b791e7c48
describe
'8980' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQK' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
eef2287ce748432bd22ba7dc10b5ca01
9060059f8fde62a80e99de0a8e1e6e4cde67050f
describe
'434286' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQL' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
59e3053df6acccd98bfd35b15db6eadb
93d307cffaa7aaec8a44cb52342e311893fc0162
'2011-08-19T15:22:00-04:00'
describe
'124821' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQM' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
52f2529524271dfcfcb2b5b5ecbea3ef
e519b2f0c3f32261dc0caf1ccf3d315102d23d90
'2011-08-19T15:31:30-04:00'
describe
'33048' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQN' 'sip-files00056.pro'
e8c2d1248aeed85a0cc4dbc015631e7f
5bd37b9ab01d39fc18d067822a56155637927336
'2011-08-19T15:29:47-04:00'
describe
'38286' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQO' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
e7f9d2535d475166fbab3db8344fd8e9
c9f2753fccfcb47ecbf8ab4a1e24831cda1cf77b
'2011-08-19T15:29:49-04:00'
describe
'3483976' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQP' 'sip-files00056.tif'
f1f4072b2a2e45cc6e4d757b6d2f8296
9eef93c153a9a46edb02a4950e3de762db5d16ac
'2011-08-19T15:27:07-04:00'
describe
'1296' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQQ' 'sip-files00056.txt'
23f609d89086126feea2d6a7a91337a1
d0d7077b6a5d185ab9750c63a9e5c5e4be7009b2
'2011-08-19T15:29:51-04:00'
describe
'8641' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQR' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
012a8e684f31442c7b15b36fbca1d27c
56c4a4e1381a2a18adb9199bbf6c850a5d37b92c
describe
'434325' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQS' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
1299261a8628b325b141ba79d09c3ca4
48716a4713a7c8428d3d640de0fbe274b948f46c
'2011-08-19T15:24:01-04:00'
describe
'111732' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQT' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
13454e87193538e75a1d88dea4a7dfe7
987d761a697d8a2ab9d7f60f0c5caebd02a07b9a
'2011-08-19T15:24:29-04:00'
describe
'29536' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQU' 'sip-files00057.pro'
514d0511a6622f00d479c3ea97778222
888daa846ef002aa8486debc7288ccaa6d2bd58b
'2011-08-19T15:22:23-04:00'
describe
'34098' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQV' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
db641e210ee351a83a09979cfd3654f2
45b2b202f918406b1608fb06b0cc3d714857d8c5
'2011-08-19T15:33:27-04:00'
describe
'3483920' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQW' 'sip-files00057.tif'
8d3aadc7897ef6a68375d3544d8f8043
2dfb15df9868e62cfdd280083f843a0671ca0849
'2011-08-19T15:26:55-04:00'
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQX' 'sip-files00057.txt'
34dc4b4f9c3bbfdedbab8ec77a44c618
36d5b85229c80ac613b691e50a33aac32b04d3d7
'2011-08-19T15:22:15-04:00'
describe
'8595' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQY' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
254006ad016be6d6ee05b935cf1593e4
f50d6029e604fbab50d4dca3b702f6e172e08cb8
'2011-08-19T15:28:30-04:00'
describe
'434243' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDQZ' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
f101cb7fa554cb747d8a74f93b91b899
39e92fee4596aed489a9e27f73887fff66f5410e
'2011-08-19T15:21:45-04:00'
describe
'105959' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRA' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
f5e3d68d42eb550d0c6d4f81909c30e4
1e559ec2648f06d7301e6659e4bee9f3d8a59b9c
'2011-08-19T15:23:26-04:00'
describe
'27408' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRB' 'sip-files00058.pro'
5b2a698689bd89f155deff5f3c9add06
e228f367efc49001b9ea3595de7bee1c6cd3fc64
describe
'32777' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRC' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
e1163810c7d1e0c1b44da13f56eca07c
ea76a0c87f018df2102fb71fb1bacce245d03bed
'2011-08-19T15:26:49-04:00'
describe
'3483800' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRD' 'sip-files00058.tif'
80642c2faa88000aee8f8fed7aac737b
0e9751725cad2a9ea08f5bd1bd722614cfced5db
describe
'1091' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRE' 'sip-files00058.txt'
bba21de9fdc8435b5c8343c2dec2cabd
53d34053f96ad904433982296f98e6cd4d8ee46e
'2011-08-19T15:27:28-04:00'
describe
'8198' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRF' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
a2d58894d711ec38905e5170a733991e
2b4ca695057b1c3cc3f17d44c595ee31ee210cd8
'2011-08-19T15:29:24-04:00'
describe
'434316' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRG' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
eef0e28e13a1fb0ad23542ea6a2a4e6f
f9b402bdcd7a6c212de6337020160c34d8e119ca
'2011-08-19T15:26:09-04:00'
describe
'117183' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRH' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
6c43dcd6751a325c23aefa2cce7aab78
6ca29eacef689047b1a6628f13db45239f7d0844
'2011-08-19T15:24:22-04:00'
describe
'30989' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRI' 'sip-files00059.pro'
da01141ff14638640ecbdc010b61da90
96cc6f18f6135764087adcd0b8ce87e10fe898ed
describe
'36483' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRJ' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
e12538302bba511be6d334763960da96
3cc913a4d369109b38b3516bf7af4f457ea3d397
'2011-08-19T15:27:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRK' 'sip-files00059.tif'
03030e76fcc2b0f0aa41db21c9551ccd
b9d3f36ed4fbbba5632a46283a1fa6142b7cdd56
'2011-08-19T15:29:31-04:00'
describe
'1228' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRL' 'sip-files00059.txt'
838831267411b092f2f276362cb2feb6
2282fa803c594afca9bf87b34cdbf7a6b9c13397
'2011-08-19T15:30:23-04:00'
describe
'8900' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRM' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
65c23f13360d7698e7c31b76fc47c026
722af9f357e90f7f6ce3ce74afc471242bcfa4fd
'2011-08-19T15:23:24-04:00'
describe
'434105' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRN' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
c40d20574954baf74c846015b84a7ab9
a723baba8db9855521c29946d3b810aff4708d6c
'2011-08-19T15:32:49-04:00'
describe
'85807' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRO' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
96dc476ac5428aef93e1b825a8c606b7
686c1f112570e293afe094ed71c9e1f7bd17a58f
'2011-08-19T15:33:52-04:00'
describe
'21966' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRP' 'sip-files00060.pro'
15d60cdd64b76529a5e3f89c1149a4cd
565f316810ff661fcd40a6fa06efd8187af1d0c1
'2011-08-19T15:32:30-04:00'
describe
'26466' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRQ' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
3a8170c4109ba67905fd12f0050a8f2e
d00f0ee1de055dd0be0bcfeadce2cb3f61bdba48
describe
'3481600' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRR' 'sip-files00060.tif'
946357ee4eae0e100e606669ce45b5ae
096a15401b1b5436d21de4fd67f8175ce57d6464
'2011-08-19T15:30:37-04:00'
describe
'867' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRS' 'sip-files00060.txt'
7d06df2159da8b0ab4233c6f7af23587
95d147f583f1465cc011d86204ea0da4c1c5d137
'2011-08-19T15:23:56-04:00'
describe
'6584' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRT' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
fe70d1ae7b5807cde41a46e66445a6c9
6eff5a20909e4991a8c02cb04a73e264a01975f7
'2011-08-19T15:34:22-04:00'
describe
'74759' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRU' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
a21335b565daf8252f1d1dd7eb7eb93d
6e367c67b288e240e0dce1e7692726d260720ea3
'2011-08-19T15:21:18-04:00'
describe
'8771' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRV' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
7195139777effaf761aadceed83d6e70
ee7b4d11d063ac377db73ac00469fd6285ae6490
'2011-08-19T15:33:35-04:00'
describe
'449' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRW' 'sip-files00061.pro'
0bedcdc38eb3a9904df9e34be7719296
b7911a16aa2619475abd6fe9fe69777b8ef05824
'2011-08-19T15:24:45-04:00'
describe
'2706' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRX' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
54ad260cbd5a0f3f33d12a55fc72bb54
725f31330d51ba277e92e1a7001e56a3b5f47caf
'2011-08-19T15:24:17-04:00'
describe
'3483144' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRY' 'sip-files00061.tif'
4e921b15c7249d9dab69bfd8aa420cd6
284269098f2f1ef271660fe906b0035be20614eb
'2011-08-19T15:33:39-04:00'
describe
'34' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDRZ' 'sip-files00061.txt'
1947ac72bc337d9cf50ec61de4566eb4
e1578ac749eee1aa8afb51ddeff7a3c492963e22
'2011-08-19T15:30:15-04:00'
describe
'1049' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDSA' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
34c18a810d9d1b83cd88ec57b1252a87
0b8f281db7fdfd2f612875c26d1058fc92eda9b3
describe
'486787' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDSB' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
68df6daca46e498cf54d5d937479261a
afc03e24325d117003ef8727b05cf0d3d5a2e2a2
describe
'176469' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDSC' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
409965a1d499fdf327eb7c0bb16a1ac3
21b2df672a8889be423ebba02d478cb473fdeb37
'2011-08-19T15:27:39-04:00'
describe
'43991' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDSD' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
e89b2967a3d7a23cb56c8fa1cb09d494
c9044581146829388762e0b525f2d2a6f9ad6709
'2011-08-19T15:26:37-04:00'
describe
'11694396' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDSE' 'sip-files00064.tif'
28b74c78e7ac16e121168f91bcfdd567
603cc2f05abf1061a595131c4b643263e763ccd7
'2011-08-19T15:30:06-04:00'
describe
'11282' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDSF' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
adb2dee55766d3982e34ad267f0e7e62
2591c3216aab3eba809e589407cf99e81c6e3d19
describe
'434558' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDSG' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
a9d9cd3d3ace35b4d8b0fc11539b3904
51e04eee3c872e9c090715d10406916e4d82c613
'2011-08-19T15:21:22-04:00'
describe
'92722' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDSH' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
48e32660d13d4c7c73e6bc997e45d161
713ebff80781fd2c4e7ba0ce19f94c06d7850e7e
describe
'22608' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDSI' 'sip-files00065.pro'
fd442c2f4a36e20930cbd1757a1a524c
e3393f6857dd04923a3ab4fcac34562cca1905a8
describe
'29050' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDSJ' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
ecdc9627d49fe77c77da03a5fa1717f0
e6a8987282c1a80bf3cf105d6c2f1694c037cc2c
'2011-08-19T15:25:21-04:00'
describe
'10437460' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDSK' 'sip-files00065.tif'
7d4dc4dea1383aa4b84cfee4fe393a1a
c308e6c1da118732be7f89b480f0e22d178739f6
'2011-08-19T15:34:09-04:00'
describe
'923' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDSL' 'sip-files00065.txt'
0849824ccb4f874562c416d0e5aadf50
f61723db72de4727704d7510bc811f45493509b9
'2011-08-19T15:29:32-04:00'
describe
'7535' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDSM' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
92ef1231dc39b8bf9b97024ec710f5b5
362e773bb1e39b40347a4bed6e6913754906ddb8
describe
'434310' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDSN' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
0621a0ad07d1d3e6299424f3b80f38f8
4766117d714b5c9296ae092c60e7c8fb623da82a
describe
'116825' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDSO' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
293a5566572400da52b3d0413d789066
e52c1b28b0364b9f76172f18e482529bb16fe52d
describe
'30983' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDSP' 'sip-files00066.pro'
b00ca161700f1f2dafc33bd429298f10
7fde9e873bb4915ca60729e371b80a2809785dd6
describe
'34980' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDSQ' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
0a56c7aa6dce7eab9280718008868d3a
acf31aefbefab80d5193ef8e181833e72abe8b62
'2011-08-19T15:31:57-04:00'
describe
'3483968' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDSR' 'sip-files00066.tif'
2a66dcc0ac6c4793a21dd0a0bd60496b
bdff4bd3cd8c34dc90d364ec1ac36e674a05f1f4
'2011-08-19T15:33:32-04:00'
describe
'1227' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDSS' 'sip-files00066.txt'
8878505537621476f690e530b38f2ce6
2d5a5bae2d6acbbef023e00fcb42d3f1d1d51c62
'2011-08-19T15:27:42-04:00'
describe
'8542' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDST' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
f3b823a783d6e5812b7eecafbf701ead
7d754e70f6e85f4aae6552c8660d2b76821e4d89
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDSU' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
3c1f463d6caf1539fb361147e42d90f7
401a3eb16c14dda89cea4f63c971918f610b3d75
'2011-08-19T15:29:15-04:00'
describe
'106312' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDSV' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
9c7fdd4c19fa875884323c3faddfdbdb
15e0229be5969337d3a9ce925377d982f2029c36
'2011-08-19T15:26:00-04:00'
describe
'28600' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDSW' 'sip-files00067.pro'
9b6bf14121b5e1a24dd8d00994af5fae
8ff584dcacbf06e13326d2d8e3e869c410cd7cc1
describe
'32958' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDSX' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
8b1416900fb8e6c942939d3f5ab9ebac
2cc363639bb8e5f762a81cab06c8efa674ca5f78
'2011-08-19T15:23:53-04:00'
describe
'3483996' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDSY' 'sip-files00067.tif'
649f4908db1c5992e1691adc9e17bee3
62d2916a15e5013736656d05651c54a138d16a4c
'2011-08-19T15:31:46-04:00'
describe
'1146' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDSZ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
195d5accbd94833d5adc7e551b39a8be
55119159a345204665337131238552e67781b876
describe
'8187' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTA' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
e8266c0b4a77036d9fce32bf3853c265
563ca823fcca8c24e89edc0bdc079a8ab5f43e12
'2011-08-19T15:34:01-04:00'
describe
'434319' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTB' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
94ab3d9a665cd3d4ed326e9081122460
bed47a92d2adeb0e88a1cab8e3816f68611af035
'2011-08-19T15:26:15-04:00'
describe
'117070' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTC' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
3a1da2cec3cda309defbae123039eac7
313693d053bb6badf34179b6edef1cb8eafe25d8
describe
'30813' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTD' 'sip-files00068.pro'
711a7fa8661da63d4e49a03be3a8c33b
784e2095bcbd8dfc19368674a3d9315b71b3b562
'2011-08-19T15:31:44-04:00'
describe
'36049' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTE' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
63dc9719b98367d2fa4a38a3d6e989f5
76ff6a8a4580675d5c41c76866bd5fd2d5361a39
'2011-08-19T15:32:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTF' 'sip-files00068.tif'
d03318b11950bcc307f847c5a6c8d66c
e791e36d938bc9cbc3cbf7a4a0c1db88f07762ec
'2011-08-19T15:21:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTG' 'sip-files00068.txt'
79587563d029939a57da9fbf85c56b17
b663f0c465a452dcb3622f47421185bc45c86e5a
describe
'8903' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTH' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
d8a8f37a86f7a65964259c58807873a1
dfeb91c0f60d2c9c4f27c75c26177e627a8ff16f
'2011-08-19T15:24:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTI' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
d9496b0e0e34c6636d2537ab0dbbc8e7
6404b16edc743a57e06aabdc1b53830cb8fa3c68
'2011-08-19T15:21:33-04:00'
describe
'120196' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTJ' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
fee79002028573e60b4ef5b49b7b54c9
93526374b5a7a2107cd775896017c2f497a0c424
'2011-08-19T15:28:56-04:00'
describe
'31940' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTK' 'sip-files00069.pro'
3391d62e2b10ec9e606b9531cbd12321
cf618bd1b6dd07debdb24b1664afc7f97b4bb606
'2011-08-19T15:21:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTL' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
bf6c37a3a2fcead979ff22b59f361bf2
904879cfb60c3987ee0177329dfc71c60d54bd2d
'2011-08-19T15:33:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTM' 'sip-files00069.tif'
6ae4478aa6650d8d8b7f7afb92bb6ec6
1cf30ad3acd357e12e8c2d58c4ee879b8c4ef3d9
'2011-08-19T15:28:37-04:00'
describe
'1261' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTN' 'sip-files00069.txt'
6b1c036c3767be631218b07ff7a2a39d
8b921e9975073cc471b4e8c54727eee2b8c770a9
'2011-08-19T15:22:50-04:00'
describe
'8891' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTO' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
38a9acc6ec1aa3a9779f6dde485b1f63
93762a449428c55cd9d19d8e83cc01de43fd58a7
'2011-08-19T15:32:36-04:00'
describe
'434285' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTP' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
651bd4291e30cc82cf9653461d63f8a2
a2acb2d5fb91be01fd32d812f03646c53dc0bd79
'2011-08-19T15:24:21-04:00'
describe
'115221' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTQ' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
d867aa95b2f79e251d0fe2265d315828
bc711a1eeafbfd04f0772af3c80f1d663424e49c
'2011-08-19T15:31:58-04:00'
describe
'29879' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTR' 'sip-files00070.pro'
0726f61ef7feae3132a1a9916fd5d9e5
657bff7c3ed4dc2f346e2a20a2b309e5619ed678
'2011-08-19T15:21:38-04:00'
describe
'35521' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTS' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
a901b5835ba35707e03ea12866bf9518
583105e293915455b3a8083a566146e9e3420fb7
'2011-08-19T15:21:19-04:00'
describe
'3484000' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTT' 'sip-files00070.tif'
54c45edac3f73fc7243cff547b88a997
e062aad0baec47f5a65346d3b9425e14b33c605f
'2011-08-19T15:30:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTU' 'sip-files00070.txt'
b2c613b0336a646f9ea0a5145d972067
9b01fce7dfb778987d813033462e2edf9f6e8164
'2011-08-19T15:29:36-04:00'
describe
'8433' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTV' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
016ecb22fa2edae6afde7572890b4e1d
9c5fbf9a5f53c4d5091e8e263e3e3ba00019e32c
describe
'434571' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTW' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
368354dc01593c2071a756c1310278e8
afbb92f3cf6f09ffc846b40182ff4e0cce2b6f18
'2011-08-19T15:25:53-04:00'
describe
'110991' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTX' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
b1b1d54a7e1e714ab3cbcc5abdc75e4b
53ec22fd463d4944436efc11dd58f566f9f98978
describe
'28821' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTY' 'sip-files00071.pro'
7c13b47138f76cf6ece82dee903244a3
0ae2d9127f38e0f1a82ebab6c660d9c9422df16f
describe
'34172' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDTZ' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
f8ac3d8b00d8a7394fa53e95249dad3b
ddcd60b784d75c11b182fb97908385895883ef2d
'2011-08-19T15:28:44-04:00'
describe
'3486216' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUA' 'sip-files00071.tif'
da7e02f74f359799b28ae9026b73dbbc
20678953b4be84edcec707684b3e126f72d9320d
'2011-08-19T15:30:44-04:00'
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUB' 'sip-files00071.txt'
1b04f68e52aa744878f72eac3c8248a2
9fb3cf53cb7592636073fe7ecdaea3bea2d52829
describe
'8521' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUC' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
fd3d72179d826031e0fbe40f15f6664d
0b0d553e526ac892ace7ae2c7272dce6a6c31da6
'2011-08-19T15:29:25-04:00'
describe
'434248' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUD' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
f13e285e348e5e50ec25ddc19d286a94
549d4c8e9a96dc87a1d2e6d730ece20708e2f28c
describe
'113122' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUE' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
fd07d7c4b235c7099d2907e561630372
ef526076dca00b3730c8dfb66a23265102f0d3fc
describe
'30319' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUF' 'sip-files00072.pro'
d80324b3746bfceb49e73542a0c1b912
938894eea7508c4a00d9d2adb4b4c2700359bf45
describe
'34747' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUG' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
525dd1359348e68c9336005a8bad9fc5
2629ae96f556acd9a458826dbdb43aaa9ab40837
'2011-08-19T15:31:59-04:00'
describe
'3484032' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUH' 'sip-files00072.tif'
053312ddca986a0987aa4c43bb5f0d3f
aac690256ec0bc76b10b862dca0024ba93bbf330
'2011-08-19T15:21:48-04:00'
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUI' 'sip-files00072.txt'
fda7da70b4dd1dca0ef376052f942b64
3e205455246dbd529d7d1a4b6f1cc506b94e99be
'2011-08-19T15:30:07-04:00'
describe
'8573' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUJ' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
b66ce12d6254fbe4c68fd5c28b1d2622
136a584c046137415a8ee34e3bdbe481740f28db
'2011-08-19T15:29:18-04:00'
describe
'434289' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUK' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
04d3c15a1208912798f76cd79d6a2595
5d7f9a718b9851c81212ae1fc46b69e4e0f09e56
'2011-08-19T15:22:05-04:00'
describe
'117289' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUL' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
433af7549e1fabe41c72ae4db0242aa7
315ed61cae434f1587637981a3f590a006898447
'2011-08-19T15:30:14-04:00'
describe
'30937' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUM' 'sip-files00073.pro'
f071a0ac7a1d93293758ce384b508e3c
ba34d7816d94d378e39a1fac150c293956b97866
describe
'36620' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUN' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
f62d107ec32e05b4c3dac940dcfe9057
c5584237c01bd37dd185add00269738707776747
'2011-08-19T15:34:18-04:00'
describe
'3484088' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUO' 'sip-files00073.tif'
d39d1345ba602278fad22335a5275322
8f56cd83ec7834ad1b52fdc4bae81b0dd555e63f
'2011-08-19T15:24:15-04:00'
describe
'1221' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUP' 'sip-files00073.txt'
5fc743bffbc97ae0695058234ba1b938
c29aa636055f72383fb0a7101322264ba39d6302
describe
'9005' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUQ' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
99d7f0a877b4ff5a0c503e3cd4d0c1aa
e93197c465ead6f63271403f673c77e651dccaa6
'2011-08-19T15:23:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUR' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
38c7a1e65711122c955ce2216df7f66a
51baf3a40ca75b828ad19f7199522d3fe12016a9
'2011-08-19T15:25:27-04:00'
describe
'112197' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUS' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
5a98e760db43b24315fac989303aa85a
3972b6bf3b4e34b4569ae3245dbb8efef257c3eb
'2011-08-19T15:29:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUT' 'sip-files00074.pro'
0601b44e5a784c0c7032cf88549023d0
a4b989db254b1f01adeb2169ac4836a87d2d0cff
describe
'35607' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUU' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
4ba552cf49ab1f0e5c399c6cb16661b5
789d2f1a1ee1d2a5807ca44f6bf7d4070bdad694
'2011-08-19T15:25:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUV' 'sip-files00074.tif'
13857510ef083eab78f948ae065e500c
ff57bab230428d3b505d975954d72a3bffe854b1
'2011-08-19T15:22:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUW' 'sip-files00074.txt'
9fe60ba8bef568d5453ca1de43a64bc4
235c3c7ccb29bf8a462f4da05d1aef73f7a0cb38
'2011-08-19T15:34:19-04:00'
describe
'8436' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUX' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
9a2368052c2a600678e46110cce59f3e
3cf7564f4a1c490ec27f2db5a0043a0f43be9e61
describe
'434599' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUY' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
a6949e3cb3d2a5506b584426739b9065
ae5f98ba2c81bc7c658e9ba0ed1b5bb86d6a3dcd
'2011-08-19T15:26:32-04:00'
describe
'121253' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDUZ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
cf1caa944f6484b76aec9d689bd97153
c6aca3925c8ee61be3ff2280f2e64884e60eb2cb
'2011-08-19T15:31:32-04:00'
describe
'32600' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVA' 'sip-files00075.pro'
13c20111b266322e914e40bb1c16b58e
962ab014e6fbf732cad08e91a0233a10ca5fdd94
'2011-08-19T15:23:43-04:00'
describe
'37092' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVB' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
dd31713d387a59dfca20cb7d08214d5d
8e8126ca30633738bcb3e7934cbfd8e936211088
'2011-08-19T15:21:20-04:00'
describe
'3486200' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVC' 'sip-files00075.tif'
cff7aa5c479398add3a55968fdf18770
7c31ce07a41b71342e034d7f11eb39b1481d4959
'2011-08-19T15:32:14-04:00'
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVD' 'sip-files00075.txt'
236e8c6d0cce58989233cc1b17ba885b
5f8dbc070c142fc99ef140b0f41670c9ec068072
'2011-08-19T15:27:53-04:00'
describe
'8721' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVE' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
6d5703ce9059655c01fd595d65bf9de1
6fb16301c4c1e1a019317b8df737b282502064a3
'2011-08-19T15:33:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVF' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
ef2dacd75adf2ce21e231798d1d7d7e3
c6767af419a207251159481594e48e08a2f9b90c
describe
'113079' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVG' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
e30ae27748c5e75a6562f29a230041b4
373b1a17d0e31131bb3b280a7dd1dfd3144d788d
describe
'29360' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVH' 'sip-files00076.pro'
0bd2efaffc2680ae00ea63eaa29fd462
05534e1f5c32f64bf4c995778eeccf55d308cd63
'2011-08-19T15:24:20-04:00'
describe
'34729' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVI' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
8afbd7585a3ba9d6b8701d4992800569
e656d3db825ee748ed66be033e0d5eca76b4d2e8
'2011-08-19T15:25:07-04:00'
describe
'3483764' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVJ' 'sip-files00076.tif'
fc32139dd1b4b914c8869edeca4c50b4
e185969ebcfb0850e2de58488e38c5a28e3ceba2
'2011-08-19T15:28:14-04:00'
describe
'1154' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVK' 'sip-files00076.txt'
856df2e0094ef4bc7a2afe6f738331e1
1a3106d5edcf426fa5b3e63876414d65b07654f6
describe
'8325' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVL' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
39cd9588f5c3e82ca01659ad97280a9b
25fb61e5c7cbcff1e69b7e92c022b3f4a5cf548f
'2011-08-19T15:34:08-04:00'
describe
'434597' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVM' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
9d908a8b9e630995bdc138ca5bae603a
dcb93cd5f2083d0177bbc5cf4746e0dbf517b4f2
'2011-08-19T15:23:22-04:00'
describe
'112467' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVN' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
e2734119cf177c48174e1a86a7390fb7
ebe4135273c1912d57f74744dcd4c6a91a4da34b
describe
'29915' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVO' 'sip-files00077.pro'
23823fad9acd36b26ff09eedc6d69405
fa902b02a8ac0037f698363644243e2c974e6dd0
'2011-08-19T15:29:26-04:00'
describe
'34790' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVP' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
5e6379f7d914d392eedb18b0796fdef9
7a3fecfa97b63ea9091f489e163777d37836b84d
'2011-08-19T15:27:43-04:00'
describe
'3486196' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVQ' 'sip-files00077.tif'
84e0bdcd7810a0b8ea4385ed1cec66b2
0baed109e2a2175268131fa9fd0ca271c4e09132
'2011-08-19T15:29:50-04:00'
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVR' 'sip-files00077.txt'
becf63ecdf81ac47bfe9b855273e7253
08ef924a43a5f787a23abc220b5e15e6bd99e002
'2011-08-19T15:25:02-04:00'
describe
'8674' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVS' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
cc9d28fc902337b9f85909956379c7f0
b4ded7476834b88e17c381aab9c183baebadd7e8
'2011-08-19T15:28:05-04:00'
describe
'434280' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVT' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
04a3b4ce780dc1bc733f5219ee1216f5
fdf4675ccc51e71e0f7e921bd6646a656b616e7c
describe
'118201' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVU' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
b847e5cb654a71b750908b24d10a30a2
245009aa77894d30cc9dee60f4ff759091eddc4f
'2011-08-19T15:26:07-04:00'
describe
'31229' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVV' 'sip-files00078.pro'
a54d37b2a47d5f905335315420f167a9
dafa467b86c2a17e93b80e120c468cf7b9310d1e
describe
'35975' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVW' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
5ba76fceb1dadc8b76b0ce4447ba5e93
f83ac9e7760d6a2658f3fd5538066876f9a6ca3c
'2011-08-19T15:30:01-04:00'
describe
'3483964' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVX' 'sip-files00078.tif'
8406668888109caad13fee03a10dcba3
9a4871b3a1888014b9ab0d09efed72b874ce94ce
'2011-08-19T15:24:56-04:00'
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVY' 'sip-files00078.txt'
5ef761ce6e8285308a5033fda4fd6fde
04daef43e54b0e59a12f377be0304774e5bb2ed3
'2011-08-19T15:26:21-04:00'
describe
'8610' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDVZ' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
15a89f9a3a7c512f655ae03718cdbe9f
4e9643740465c2d0a835d62560af70a0bd9857db
'2011-08-19T15:23:41-04:00'
describe
'434566' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWA' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
74a6ff5d2b6e57aeae44d119179d1780
53bc592dbc9f86c15a31ee6ab049b251f00c56aa
describe
'107533' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWB' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
f5fcff65d827f1e7fa671c7fd1563d71
dda3d0f28a4bcbb27f02f119e01575dee9c25d30
'2011-08-19T15:33:09-04:00'
describe
'28737' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWC' 'sip-files00079.pro'
e35023e417efeeefa746fb0fb9eb90a0
fd046ab5e225638aa17b3013c88b94d8ef4fe4c7
describe
'33761' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWD' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
658074ce5b8106c62979b3771117245c
d233fdf3c5e5c47e3cbc49ea25a948d7038d7cd0
'2011-08-19T15:21:28-04:00'
describe
'3486160' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWE' 'sip-files00079.tif'
8edc9dc9922c81737c1517234a40e912
f0f928bc6887cdf51f345c5b4e8287cd5d418933
'2011-08-19T15:21:34-04:00'
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWF' 'sip-files00079.txt'
cafdbe264b765a2b34b8258909d61ed5
22a3a28e3b6dff4540e84efc70e096015f790e9b
'2011-08-19T15:23:58-04:00'
describe
'8421' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWG' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
dd73c709d2e27f19355c42129ae94ada
9d7b7083f2948727fdbd30c0269ff0fbc0a0936d
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWH' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
f88dd821b1fd08822f694c3bd6fec697
8a22b675a9fbbd9aae8896ea1b1672a8fcf44909
describe
'109617' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWI' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
25a0eb759c9e0cac489e435c20ba463c
458941a53d0df43c26c07009440c7ea4af78beb0
'2011-08-19T15:23:20-04:00'
describe
'29245' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWJ' 'sip-files00080.pro'
5297d5539fe1a5e062dc8a685eeeedf6
d7c7bda11d8c319801c8c5bf4f49a3190532d2e3
describe
'33579' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWK' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
483039b3423d260798d67a71cee59c5e
c3eebdb7b200bff559ee84baa2c14ccdcf79599f
'2011-08-19T15:33:49-04:00'
describe
'3482380' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWL' 'sip-files00080.tif'
6371effc6d8c17365cb60cf13a006fe0
ff84c68e31c7273c8ece56a2d9c2c31d32c232bb
'2011-08-19T15:33:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWM' 'sip-files00080.txt'
76ee171e44d21f8f5dc900048378b0c8
8343c454b9b09615e12e40ba17811a9c7cf7e1c7
describe
'8188' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWN' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
395c044c7a3256a24790950e191a1cba
a3bbf367c1b25185e35f86ad232ef872890e0a31
'2011-08-19T15:28:23-04:00'
describe
'434586' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWO' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
250ec06167cfcbfc3b2853bfcda07c52
bd549ffcb56a178e347b7dd041929511ef185a9d
describe
'114786' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWP' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
60eda1ca227724e57a3f03e65dec0593
c0be23a3099d44d4d98abb27010e4ab475dfd75f
describe
'31173' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWQ' 'sip-files00081.pro'
8928f5bcc0cf748e2bd87bd6490fa12e
9b9c3b00ee19b47bd696c6879f8497e7be57374e
'2011-08-19T15:26:52-04:00'
describe
'34692' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWR' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
f9e88fa9d6ca9abb01b4e56cb8b5c5f8
b5ffe646d6cfc21c00857435eec9d3acd5c26c98
describe
'3486052' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWS' 'sip-files00081.tif'
0e6d322aa2f883a7a09f32abeddbd10d
1af7cebfe115424ccde3b8043373cc34bcaccebe
describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWT' 'sip-files00081.txt'
ac23c5a1e32fe14831c10f6c3eeef997
b59c58c7fe2d9c34e07109c38ce92aeadfee91ba
'2011-08-19T15:31:21-04:00'
describe
'8355' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWU' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
c41262baf4a9319e7bb2f447e7165302
257a33027cfd8abb187f210b8b2044f0bb7f416e
'2011-08-19T15:27:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWV' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
9646989cd07d8900884174f402016509
4214f06b8e8ea8aa775c153eccf8831c159f78f7
'2011-08-19T15:25:33-04:00'
describe
'107017' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWW' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
d0a5904cf8002e2dea6c95f8061e1952
7b6a0714b61e6627839cc5d6b7915c137b119b76
'2011-08-19T15:24:58-04:00'
describe
'28007' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWX' 'sip-files00082.pro'
3806e08d6ec5d8177aae5defc1660740
0d1edd1ec06b440c307eac4cee4a4fbe547cf149
'2011-08-19T15:32:26-04:00'
describe
'33395' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWY' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
7bf82b19db7f499c4f961d5093b7cf87
3d124fda8e54c8c32502dc358c398bf1886a35bc
'2011-08-19T15:27:55-04:00'
describe
'3483792' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDWZ' 'sip-files00082.tif'
71b3861419016d9a4e7f4272d701e23f
6d9753451cc856ef0a89206d6510347f71875e24
'2011-08-19T15:23:44-04:00'
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXA' 'sip-files00082.txt'
95e7ec473fae4b2cd512407779c5cc32
5e61943fb33c113db6f856f339dbac62fcb084c1
'2011-08-19T15:26:46-04:00'
describe
'8503' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXB' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
3ae79eaa848f1048b128aa4146199af9
5104081019db750adfd9480009f5f619905af5f6
describe
'434061' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXC' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
9ce12780ef62c4ac13b6673ad51304f7
b4fb5a372e0723ad13ad1aed1e33bcbb1fcccb6b
describe
'117333' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXD' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
d1fbcc6feded2252633175f2e0e98641
0895b0e37363e22762cc4cbf29632706cfab6fe3
'2011-08-19T15:22:54-04:00'
describe
'30840' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXE' 'sip-files00083.pro'
40fd7875b63cae9d8d71d9f809a2ce78
056328051244f914c876580075fa12afc4a502f1
describe
'36112' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXF' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
5893ab4a437e6f974d456c8fb93fd528
d00d06afced827adaa9ae5086396386a18fc51d6
'2011-08-19T15:29:55-04:00'
describe
'3482356' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXG' 'sip-files00083.tif'
c0c020f6ecee4a3df6e8594c69f5412e
76cea29efedcc6427ddce41548410a3c8cab7310
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXH' 'sip-files00083.txt'
47eb9b43a4b3a326bdc08aed1698c546
bab05d8e69664130b18fecb37a6817f4a20601bf
'2011-08-19T15:24:27-04:00'
describe
'8885' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXI' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
2344d51e7328001a6cd11aa180ec13ce
7f36829b70cc58f01ca1191a7e528d2aafc8b436
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXJ' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
9727a06e648ab383dd05071b300a9a55
a4c4cd175003f89d6f70c4b95514749929f7aa91
'2011-08-19T15:26:31-04:00'
describe
'120016' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXK' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
ffb08f98fddb6d7c7b172493c935eb7a
0bbaa877112382a11baaadeb7c8cad8aaf0b71ae
'2011-08-19T15:22:25-04:00'
describe
'31336' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXL' 'sip-files00084.pro'
e2ad61c8b5e7d0b96e4838146ec74ece
e6e7593769f710d8281a11733c5f189280f7bcf2
describe
'36199' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXM' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
b7aca90c184184ae1d1cbd96e81f3e98
a2cd6a94639ebc200b8c2b6ae3d19578b4335c1d
describe
'3483928' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXN' 'sip-files00084.tif'
59b27bc80744d2d8987eb9aaded40876
7fd60f14442a2cdd4c94d8ce7bc2990b7a5f6f4e
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXO' 'sip-files00084.txt'
e4cf92a5c7ae50172a8469fe2504e14c
8b29b88b4f9b6d210c800c90a8c75b5fc5d9a1eb
describe
'8546' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXP' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
b8c32cf72697e91c1918fcc4ec52e428
cac44ae1f8d7dfb158bb2fb2d7df539a2d190092
'2011-08-19T15:34:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXQ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
ce0d951b5403cc18a2c36ee18da6fcab
598e8f3eec7eee22c39d0d7c56f1e70fbc34e655
'2011-08-19T15:27:22-04:00'
describe
'111453' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXR' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
9c732f4241f021709105688c648d138c
9c8c4b9b97d5a2d3b56360b626b1008269ee7dc1
'2011-08-19T15:25:16-04:00'
describe
'29780' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXS' 'sip-files00085.pro'
f47d30a2e04cbe5ce0ae3ae3a523eeb7
f349857566f65a551ac63cb0cc5a2bee98445195
describe
'34542' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXT' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
b4d9151a554bd8269ced01af17d7c742
c26fd1247e9c3b32ad9e1a350f282a6fb69ead5c
describe
'3483896' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXU' 'sip-files00085.tif'
7e765b170b15e19be335b6f6aaf36eb5
8f43537518c6f7b76dfef22b950dfdf54a03733c
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXV' 'sip-files00085.txt'
d3fcf723ab6111701936c76da9d11f80
f1183ec0638ae45f7ccd31d6d40a7badbe22134a
'2011-08-19T15:31:10-04:00'
describe
'8642' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXW' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
440506bbc8a03320b16262c6e73a2f31
b04a7feccb8ac29532831d85ff494879960c79dc
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXX' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
ae95bbe76164451a9f0f3d3ae0b7843b
b65339d82c97e03866874a04e5528e892aa96762
describe
'100891' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXY' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
24737a9f97443d56c80b36d76deb2a95
d7f38d5e29d4c73ab1c198f491d80f6281c56581
'2011-08-19T15:27:37-04:00'
describe
'26813' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDXZ' 'sip-files00086.pro'
2cd99ff152952f57e221e81a3b4730ca
01803cb790c43c29eb2a5c189283482c281ef003
'2011-08-19T15:21:41-04:00'
describe
'32352' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYA' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
290d601230c80b77ead7c89aa72b3c15
f0e03197bc71307082f553b0d6c21626f931e6d4
describe
'3483776' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYB' 'sip-files00086.tif'
18a53fcdcecdfeb97df5b692bafb8347
8b662045f934f9a2ec5d4abb53f00c89b62f47f2
'2011-08-19T15:21:59-04:00'
describe
'1062' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYC' 'sip-files00086.txt'
315dd7c2e24db84d5eecdc2f7fb23915
0bb348ec1d783a56562a2b6539ef02d0501475fd
'2011-08-19T15:26:12-04:00'
describe
'8191' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYD' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
b2ac0b3883a661829ebe2ee6068a2a9c
5de997c55c2f5898b57affaec8b083b97a463075
describe
'434107' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYE' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
7aca341921776ea2d9b491167f8c5406
4ef4e7cd137a390d766bb7dca0ae6cd625c4400a
'2011-08-19T15:33:21-04:00'
describe
'120207' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYF' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
61540f45056a65e6eb2d5f5790d4d561
9fe30f92e7522cf1a6654db6fe3a22257cdbd686
describe
'31930' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYG' 'sip-files00087.pro'
374683a31187ec65566ef4b7cdc0de40
a5967e9fba25991d82b7e4063734ea30950c1f77
'2011-08-19T15:24:13-04:00'
describe
'36488' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYH' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
128f2c71423ce45c8b73850cdde650c9
8649489abd6330479070eeb5dea80593a4bd7ab3
'2011-08-19T15:27:02-04:00'
describe
'3482296' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYI' 'sip-files00087.tif'
b7ee896f0f5fb8b06b48694585931dcd
cddf690f7f28e91b744cdefc9a240011303906a9
'2011-08-19T15:24:30-04:00'
describe
'1269' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYJ' 'sip-files00087.txt'
6528b3674bf8bacdadf8d11d659a61bc
fef042d6400a8895babf3b14e696df71fa2835e2
'2011-08-19T15:24:33-04:00'
describe
'8589' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYK' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
0f2190d7930a73ecc924a612bf51af5d
9c1389d3f0d3edf705aaf50c1654227a2718a39d
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYL' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
2ab275728f92ce3bf2e3bb7ec88a3f9c
bae782b7c79a1d8ac7342c05ffec1077c6943f47
'2011-08-19T15:24:26-04:00'
describe
'115270' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYM' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
44718c1696640f03c9593bdb6be6932b
6a35590b13ccb8330260a4acb9068fb0aff935df
describe
'30530' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYN' 'sip-files00088.pro'
81d2c20a45acc15f9501264adf4f933e
bb4979cff868e590fdb3827f0047a94f85b1a83f
'2011-08-19T15:21:05-04:00'
describe
'35732' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYO' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
a2dea11d067db72abd7a87926fff959a
c8bf2b7ef3362e11bbbbfc1eb5822df0ded4df48
describe
'3482304' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYP' 'sip-files00088.tif'
5f04fc28188f30e0e967a83f29044b53
8ae19162e9174cdbe8c90314c58701e32e63b2e2
'2011-08-19T15:26:16-04:00'
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYQ' 'sip-files00088.txt'
df096c1f332741cbc2f003a716ce7b24
6d433f725dc6894f016a2f9c9c5d4dd6b26f3d88
describe
'8328' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYR' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
29330a5abf58115d9fea33ca3f9eda88
c88dad649f3af5940c7bc218fab8996cf1b56d16
describe
'434309' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYS' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
d92cd4150cd331bd49a2c7c3887c0f7f
a830ac8f7988ca8794b13f44af2956956004f891
'2011-08-19T15:20:52-04:00'
describe
'122140' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYT' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
45247919f134da390b8ce0d70e10b455
b726d6a0a908d8bbe2a368c7b7b035e3c6f25911
'2011-08-19T15:22:08-04:00'
describe
'32039' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYU' 'sip-files00089.pro'
83cc6c5ecb82b0a3b2689a42fd32a332
aa1383afd21eab89a157becaf43458dd08d31bde
'2011-08-19T15:27:26-04:00'
describe
'36920' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYV' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
ee61cbe376fb775a40a869ac9bb8a282
2c268a2751f134a6131599de88f720a76ff22487
'2011-08-19T15:30:34-04:00'
describe
'3483988' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYW' 'sip-files00089.tif'
3f25e02826c075c791b1382448fca919
0dbd709dfe6bca0d00ac748106e6576fe78fc499
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYX' 'sip-files00089.txt'
6440478a3e6cb845c3769bc7619952fe
6038105d069ae6b0f2ee11e149dc5146fcd9f943
'2011-08-19T15:29:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYY' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
497432bdf05eeae4f9208d73d8472a3f
10d2e8713f639a52c9c49afe1ed50c35a4675feb
'2011-08-19T15:21:57-04:00'
describe
'434238' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDYZ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
e99a8505d6218002ceaa3389eaee6098
c51f8432982d8697e4e434e717b017830910393e
'2011-08-19T15:21:32-04:00'
describe
'78496' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZA' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
bfaa8bd6b7e11b0928b2282164eb009e
45ce042d3ad5c3861c12b52a9312bfec10ec49a4
'2011-08-19T15:25:39-04:00'
describe
'19965' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZB' 'sip-files00090.pro'
c9c19a8a7c2dcbcb233edc7ce15129da
d89ca3897aaedb7b2b36d16232d63e4bc05cd0e3
'2011-08-19T15:25:43-04:00'
describe
'24083' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZC' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
dbea32a0ddb84bebda9a85f42c809e28
d0836c453d228b757c6ef529f3f04015ed9396d7
'2011-08-19T15:30:32-04:00'
describe
'3482744' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZD' 'sip-files00090.tif'
07a960bd40d8a681492be1c0bde9d056
2a2d74ed7d8a361a00d3ad8bfbbdcbe255eafee1
'2011-08-19T15:27:33-04:00'
describe
'778' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZE' 'sip-files00090.txt'
1913b4d943251d50577f5b3ce7f9c864
b57ed86c97ecfbdcb76430cf6e689c1846a3f8b9
describe
'5721' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZF' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
672d8e6dab87fb0d04b59dc4ff53d8c7
0913337546f292ee911f281965d8cc4b45a7e281
describe
'105243' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZG' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
d6cf4c831a111b95c01228ab012a8d00
c73ca01f5327da55e36ab71013c5b06bb97d2118
'2011-08-19T15:22:53-04:00'
describe
'12276' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZH' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
2e9ff0b5e77b8830e120643e896e410f
954c881b3e8071c3cf6054754a6331838aaa5381
'2011-08-19T15:27:50-04:00'
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZI' 'sip-files00091.pro'
4bb2c64766fa788d82129c87f01e87dc
ad4ad83a3d23eae73ce23cc4a1c34b46449892f4
'2011-08-19T15:29:53-04:00'
describe
'3917' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZJ' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
d52b96a938dd225a22e49476f0d92cd9
e99d57312456e68ebdc3d6cdcf20fbf6c0309d3a
'2011-08-19T15:25:20-04:00'
describe
'3483348' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZK' 'sip-files00091.tif'
fbfea34e99fba848d6a2f5f8334fb92f
8ce4ee47ddb154d628acf2d7e7b3a19b5cdebe65
'2011-08-19T15:30:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZL' 'sip-files00091.txt'
e934ab8d04d3b20f71e5dd4b555a7357
1aa21c6a1fadc2fa473de84fb37e779812979d8d
'2011-08-19T15:26:54-04:00'
describe
'1503' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZM' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
3ea2d95a32709952f8afc8ff6bca6f58
ddb657c9bde0aeba99c37a89a4db26afec449371
describe
'475627' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZN' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
182feeb1985ff7244418530ae89795c5
41034461d0302bc8a1116e207c609aef68bb1d0c
'2011-08-19T15:32:00-04:00'
describe
'150951' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZO' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
e3d5628ac726e8ed53711a390bc24b3d
cf46f047ef654ec03e3760330a8b316df848b4f2
'2011-08-19T15:31:20-04:00'
describe
'36708' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZP' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
5ffbaa56d2349eec7ed24e927a421ee6
b0cbfd75db137d84ed669cb62b7aaabb734d0542
'2011-08-19T15:23:59-04:00'
describe
'11424540' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZQ' 'sip-files00094.tif'
f8a6caef1254c89df57a61718b59c037
ccce7dbf75a6192043fcc9074e16f9c67f3c6a53
'2011-08-19T15:34:07-04:00'
describe
'9940' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZR' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
998febda1dae71e82a3190b2a89487d8
31cc6b5b79323cdaeba3a51673f1403d260fc77c
'2011-08-19T15:26:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZS' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
1f4b7239ab69c3c63770e5d17cb56a69
b93014a72123e7cf11d85a596d5ec06ccb7b5aac
describe
'94411' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZT' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
8a8116b3f1e038f3c72eea0c8c2ef884
f9301abcf728451cd9f1d10bf54f1c3af8ffc94c
'2011-08-19T15:32:32-04:00'
describe
'23460' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZU' 'sip-files00095.pro'
b129881e213f3246f52b358addd0b9d1
49b1fb632a1f0f2320cfea0c395086487b143b08
describe
'29054' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZV' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
d336368603a95b318392a857ad6b0bca
c3050eab7a04fbb2c63d1b923cc45280f1e5d94a
describe
'10431052' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZW' 'sip-files00095.tif'
d67568304c3abe38723f2ce72d4e7693
c7a7549456c88b7e94b69439ebe887cb48eaef11
'2011-08-19T15:22:41-04:00'
describe
'957' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZX' 'sip-files00095.txt'
5284e8dbc042a8a16f4ac5738dc0922f
39dd09dc8ddb3d4e3b8ebf9abe4429c1b92d374a
'2011-08-19T15:24:52-04:00'
describe
'7248' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZY' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
ad0afaaa3fb693b3c428d2af01c44f78
abda4cc5e73cffdb4e35662b81176cf93d0931c9
describe
'434085' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACDZZ' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
72fc5664ba8de4de9f7d0ba59ae94cda
62d16091f50c268c517b597df4d0f2e314d17951
'2011-08-19T15:21:17-04:00'
describe
'117569' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAA' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
da3a904e985ab7781e13f2d4915f82c2
27c527932f16700485fbcd5e8075331c2a517f53
describe
'31613' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAB' 'sip-files00096.pro'
72c80d4e8106ff5c814031f0e4a018c8
f27292a865c4e7c4e44f41eba67f92b7e085a095
describe
'36289' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAC' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
5927b1524b90341168bdd9bbea028b25
ef4aea66e398c06848c2c9aeb774b7134188a2ec
'2011-08-19T15:23:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAD' 'sip-files00096.tif'
88dd2816d2699c2641ae67319d52c36f
6f5dd698d26bed2ed80a9e345ea4604270949d82
'2011-08-19T15:27:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAE' 'sip-files00096.txt'
29b15dd901a16b595afd9e3d299e107b
485f323c5aa578e5777d8ec4eff45c4cf8bae995
describe
'8616' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAF' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
0518ab76b52bedebf6b180920da21b2f
6363f2eab3c3341a6df40d6931e7157c3bf77f9b
'2011-08-19T15:30:59-04:00'
describe
'434314' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAG' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
d24d9a65285b2476bb8daf9c914ca4fa
1a31ca88e60717f20f3d8ca4d816aa067a9c8b3b
'2011-08-19T15:21:29-04:00'
describe
'111269' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAH' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
37db87f697e431643693cb1cb7e3e47c
90dfd3ec68a1c8da24fcf848750787f2faed200b
describe
'30125' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAI' 'sip-files00097.pro'
088bab0c7aabeb0919718f7421bc64c2
e8f758334e54518cf3154ad22cd6599574c29248
'2011-08-19T15:33:05-04:00'
describe
'34831' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAJ' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
d9f187ec1339941acaea03a3feda7a3c
7c0a6235604b5f471c600ca85615a2b1a311cfbf
'2011-08-19T15:23:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAK' 'sip-files00097.tif'
fdcdbdbe952d2257753a2c89f62b7bcd
ab69d1b5339b64160d27b8302d6bb78faf8162c0
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAL' 'sip-files00097.txt'
2f92179b9aed21b905a741219753ad1f
dcd4f762e0b3cb4cc6cd4b4ad10b2d473a118ff5
'2011-08-19T15:23:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAM' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
362cc22a6c36b00148ffbeed23e4dfa8
47b58320f3cae0bb13fd9bf06adcc7d5bbf7d095
describe
'434101' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAN' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
5238867c6baf0cad26109fbc3d0577cd
92bc48de6884093f35fa2ab5d946842217e0dad2
'2011-08-19T15:22:34-04:00'
describe
'111270' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAO' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
cf6c0b0820bc10c8c62016b75e39fef0
96be0f907c2ffa5642c5fa95246629d29eadd484
'2011-08-19T15:22:22-04:00'
describe
'29820' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAP' 'sip-files00098.pro'
c4b0274ad54689dab6e94ff5264d6ff3
42c315e8984d51d05e554b527d94e0a52daf5354
describe
'34131' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAQ' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
793d89470e8433c3369bfec8aae6136d
b255d126c34b0737fcb9ff62329d330b44ecc809
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAR' 'sip-files00098.tif'
e89a6828334558302dc8abb611c37ea8
d343c9e69e02efd94497ed2a6130966f346e5998
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAS' 'sip-files00098.txt'
593d66cffe7b05171c98038790418eeb
58e9b8a307e75b50696015f5b17e18ec8d1be8d3
describe
'8372' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAT' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
8e8b8c24a2ec6a218b78fbab08ce7e77
629bc4541bd01d35d7f87ebd40457d267bcfba70
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAU' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
380bf29d5a8568e92ec1f8aff40b1a74
c796201956a11c1db7e3f0c9e47948f54307991b
'2011-08-19T15:32:28-04:00'
describe
'119914' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAV' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
5af0e4a62e433d69d4449ad906550232
b77470cc40529006aca0593e9baabc890ba9a968
describe
'32176' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAW' 'sip-files00099.pro'
123defea1430f5b8cb6e32ffb6c6f973
0f14c8233c2c92c71f78460e8a9587541663a13f
'2011-08-19T15:22:38-04:00'
describe
'36207' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAX' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
628c52dada4507aef9a58253342c9427
ad4938e11ffed202303f82e8a4198982f5cd2d80
describe
'3486192' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAY' 'sip-files00099.tif'
645b34af20d1dbf2bb94727c32b22919
b840af5999f085410b3876845f969a48deefd430
'2011-08-19T15:31:19-04:00'
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEAZ' 'sip-files00099.txt'
06078bada5f4b5c5a7b402e54dc66e72
87da0bff952f34d344640788d2e90d344d6d22dd
'2011-08-19T15:22:48-04:00'
describe
'8937' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBA' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
9d2773e5c0cd0c63ac088e58c5377c76
280cadb87ad14e906894acaead97b36870c93d04
'2011-08-19T15:31:25-04:00'
describe
'434301' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBB' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
4a4bf80719e0f5db5b85a8858b534f1b
e9da0e42c7ab0d8961656b18b19052db038a4bf4
describe
'115503' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBC' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
38580bccf0e990327dcc3131ca5521b0
984d1685ee646f620d165fb84b2f7d8bc679ebc8
describe
'30678' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBD' 'sip-files00100.pro'
73270e6d57c278f945f1687dff6a15e5
b76960a5109b148641e78ce91b25aa23c1642913
describe
'35375' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBE' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
8f043d8a77a126b89622170e8bf41fb2
f2319eefda6d609e12acfead0ef8cd469425b625
'2011-08-19T15:32:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBF' 'sip-files00100.tif'
08a2eab83fb4270d18a27f4e026ab9a2
26c044ca2ff9f8ab1c9bb783ad9e14b571134439
'2011-08-19T15:22:30-04:00'
describe
'1206' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBG' 'sip-files00100.txt'
927ba328004c3a09f204c3b063acec9a
23b9caa6e0d4dd2a0fb4bed604c86201a1972ac4
'2011-08-19T15:30:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBH' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
46a9fb8373a15cdb2c9c1a5c6faebbd3
bfdb04ce7bea32faf1efd7331d876acd4cc6de30
describe
'434572' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBI' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
bdc76a96f362114568ed80805a115347
a583da9b282e286d65cc0029b016d5ec4b2c160d
'2011-08-19T15:33:24-04:00'
describe
'118513' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBJ' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
640d632d9f742854f1a1f4e8982b4d10
4cd83cfd1309348d410b80d71af757327b15deba
'2011-08-19T15:26:25-04:00'
describe
'31095' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBK' 'sip-files00101.pro'
cd81434e7aecda4c902d8d33a1314afd
b870c7409dbd0e3f0961aefed34d0d705dce2083
'2011-08-19T15:33:43-04:00'
describe
'36930' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBL' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
2f580fca45fdf51cb41b95c8a04e70c6
416fef99c6a0114b650c406bf56385323d754fb2
'2011-08-19T15:29:48-04:00'
describe
'3486168' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBM' 'sip-files00101.tif'
c8800823c89168866258c0604968237b
edbbbb63be1a9b98403e4d9977b18bb0047c8363
'2011-08-19T15:25:41-04:00'
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBN' 'sip-files00101.txt'
996171667232dd4fe6521e1c2110003c
3de7622ea2d710c7dbc126425369717aed12c2e4
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBO' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
59b75823b8b0096fb4d14bb605348e98
dd5db9e907064052744d2fe931d1c18b8ba63d4e
'2011-08-19T15:33:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBP' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
9dcfaf1b584d7e14101e0ef344afeabc
c1f1f718ee7c8a8c4a7b9c7853b686bed21b37fa
'2011-08-19T15:30:31-04:00'
describe
'119118' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBQ' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
b194078ac723f1ef7b63c72495daf6f5
aec94b334cce0b0394912bc840d610fe89f18895
describe
'31408' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBR' 'sip-files00102.pro'
270f6d681d39f7115596fc337c3d3ed0
c34d56975ccfedd19c6d853d3df9fbba02c23fa3
'2011-08-19T15:25:42-04:00'
describe
'36180' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBS' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
63543299a780dfe0b9c08bf77d123bdb
ff1e6cbd96c4fb4af669ae2099faf9a66771ac42
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBT' 'sip-files00102.tif'
4ab7172e7e7611a2216e489207d0012f
358c11028ff2681a523d383522b21b0160bc7747
'2011-08-19T15:32:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBU' 'sip-files00102.txt'
26b98fec2f3986908acdd1796ae13695
1e316e09f34f6bc6f1aebdeca5d38b7eca091165
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBV' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
c77371e69daf8d88e6119c6371f1194e
446e0f8719348d92dc69d04e96938da313f19b48
'2011-08-19T15:22:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBW' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
e100812534fc4580ec5373f2194220c6
3ee1af879596ea95686be5bcb94ed60e9df2705d
describe
'103145' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBX' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
d3437c3a68e850d73bc227e25023aafd
fdb6efbcb5a168f3de66591e84b34d628feb8687
'2011-08-19T15:30:09-04:00'
describe
'27121' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBY' 'sip-files00103.pro'
6591a3f658def4b0c54ae67fedda82a3
e701c7dc4c2c32069b7b465096b43c0de1a722b6
'2011-08-19T15:25:55-04:00'
describe
'32675' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEBZ' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
0716341b1bccf5eca0031eb22ecd4e98
590ff0f2d1936a0e51194f4b555f9d40722b19d8
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECA' 'sip-files00103.tif'
512ca5b2175ee67d76dac2cdcd1bd0be
9d036fbda480c5f3954df1e7fa138ae68046107c
describe
'1088' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECB' 'sip-files00103.txt'
f4d4ec910aee3d60c15a5f03c9559f80
0a99738cd701dc26c8cd474b085169a4478f986e
'2011-08-19T15:26:19-04:00'
describe
'8404' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECC' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
94c5af3f7c631c975170de75439997cb
bc35a0ce8265af11a06ca9577ca6090fba5b4d87
'2011-08-19T15:28:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECD' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
0c67d2b61e0ca9bdface68723f0916f1
8474bd4f275c36663212afa249d0c2876634a2c3
describe
'111810' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECE' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
29021cdf9877a5bb1a774e3b3e66b0e3
7ee3200f885c13ccc92fa7d9f6e6d7c76e02d750
'2011-08-19T15:27:45-04:00'
describe
'29923' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECF' 'sip-files00104.pro'
c3c8c4559f03fad88f5187cf88c1de3c
f63d04b84512ed50b9001ae57879590f321f9934
'2011-08-19T15:23:23-04:00'
describe
'34814' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECG' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
480dbb4f4c945127938e64217e0e9243
e3330cf711c3f59bf3da4397ab2caf45bf394262
'2011-08-19T15:28:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECH' 'sip-files00104.tif'
31a6fd27a850cd31fee6fff37fae7999
a2360d60da872abdc61306849dfeff061eef19e2
'2011-08-19T15:30:00-04:00'
describe
'1184' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECI' 'sip-files00104.txt'
f616a3710757c17ca52e36aff128d1ca
b020cef71439c7d0ab4a011de551b538c06ad601
'2011-08-19T15:25:24-04:00'
describe
'8466' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECJ' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
276c5f5243c51cccc09b36fab2b0cfc3
db07988b0713b263ac9d57f80100800ed23da5b3
describe
'434485' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECK' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
b91b76644159dbe87d3f68cde53c0d41
d332ff77deba77a070e33fb951540c1f202c1708
describe
'118406' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECL' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
29b1d48f4e5b7ea1dbdf722d04ff55e1
81d70f9f54bec2fe99a8a14b32af668702fe1395
'2011-08-19T15:32:12-04:00'
describe
'31367' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECM' 'sip-files00105.pro'
89262b427cb17b0ae1a89e5114c26cec
f70e9f82b0f0e5c9a1b440bf5248ab699fa5f408
'2011-08-19T15:21:01-04:00'
describe
'35676' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECN' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
c87eb796b9cc0aa7632448be387d2fd1
02f95f4367a1fb23fa63f8775294c67e8d263c5c
'2011-08-19T15:30:48-04:00'
describe
'3486208' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECO' 'sip-files00105.tif'
a72617f7d4ccb469a16f969fedc14b0c
305fe816b05976d59a53b31b1355be2d4c9b3eb2
'2011-08-19T15:34:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECP' 'sip-files00105.txt'
fc085bad2c1b68ae50c45826c1879292
97883324f2ec8f0798009a4b84f8e92df8ad20a2
describe
'8969' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECQ' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
0f767ba51b71dcb5fb4d79d1bd34e801
be32f4548926186aa5b975463c635ef2cad417c9
'2011-08-19T15:29:19-04:00'
describe
'434317' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECR' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
79dd165fd2a271f06525af44e1b3f935
aa6f201c0b7c66ee4b3f6973cb3fa69daaa0175f
describe
'105670' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECS' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
a6c747706958b4904d8ada74e4f94d5f
f7f4a5f57e1f32d90c5a2bc81fc6e88115463192
'2011-08-19T15:31:15-04:00'
describe
'28326' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECT' 'sip-files00106.pro'
c8bf2fa9fac390d259575e966536d0ac
8166f3e66c9b6a79e8f718e6e59813e6c3e3f7b9
'2011-08-19T15:27:32-04:00'
describe
'33451' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECU' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
5fabff3c118597a116cf84c034865563
b87dfa5b51e25540e9f573a1da8b10790bb2b716
'2011-08-19T15:23:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECV' 'sip-files00106.tif'
da5dc326bea8e506952cdf48b735904a
c9a85bb2ab0c91c7198fb7db2d6e19521202f678
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECW' 'sip-files00106.txt'
7ddc2f42b2bc5498de7f1b6f08f5b146
27ac54bb0f011685afbed6a7bcdc925dc7d350cd
describe
'8116' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECX' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
0cb47353bfabfdef1f9eda029b56100b
1b1eb44122844cc4214c69e7727fff95ae73f4e4
'2011-08-19T15:21:39-04:00'
describe
'434585' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECY' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
42cac02f59f59b57dfa19e632ce3ed9f
8a75dafbd82c36fc553532a8002d9b0861ff271a
'2011-08-19T15:29:29-04:00'
describe
'114669' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACECZ' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
dd69c915172a92066f5fcbe04c79894b
8c3545b723a9f8e0e591674052ccc1225e95630b
describe
'31245' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDA' 'sip-files00107.pro'
37f84bdaa93c1a51575fa4788b57c84b
7d06ea35fe4ba951e528651b0620bc752c9eef83
'2011-08-19T15:26:24-04:00'
describe
'35484' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDB' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
c88332647ad1f8aee3f25ed43863cb02
63b6404ac9aab4105f59f30430569cdde56acb18
'2011-08-19T15:23:35-04:00'
describe
'3486212' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDC' 'sip-files00107.tif'
9dbc0023c1bd3d1d7feae46c2b7fc1be
26e2bf9f53747ca15825c9bd5741a1a18a2b1e3a
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDD' 'sip-files00107.txt'
0f68c6da9b4842b307a6ec1ad00d6861
8a822830de1c8fc45079b7ebbffe5c52288c6007
'2011-08-19T15:33:23-04:00'
describe
'8513' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDE' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
69b305f0fa504134e4fdbe88ddd1715c
705d0cc74acb4b8b466173fab1cd59b1d3c62a4f
'2011-08-19T15:30:16-04:00'
describe
'434304' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDF' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
e470f976c2f9146acba05d8ad548fdae
ed6cca9edd8ec6548605c640a92814a8d9cd8c64
describe
'102714' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDG' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
51576879948c17b5f2d962e1c9c996c0
e5ba4b1a2585efda61c649d17b6076bd35839a29
describe
'26905' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDH' 'sip-files00108.pro'
497f9678266537c99f5ddcdf090ff75f
b34a76606238ca0f9eda53abb02581476104b2ed
'2011-08-19T15:22:42-04:00'
describe
'31664' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDI' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
337fa5458b5a67ee30fb5f8fbd0ea92f
eb3c55d4a5f1e2a4b33e3c266eda95e0e4abb973
describe
'3484044' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDJ' 'sip-files00108.tif'
f55d833e927b49ea358688cccd9b72a6
6833d65727d87986abd5982c004956820936c739
'2011-08-19T15:29:05-04:00'
describe
'1071' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDK' 'sip-files00108.txt'
d525c166af00d66996cc6ae830404a8b
ba5dcc447fe2df5c968f3bae8485a147136d5e47
'2011-08-19T15:27:15-04:00'
describe
'8514' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDL' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
c0526cfa8146bc47357c54ac9fe41bcc
e221279e07ea777ae1736ca8739ac739b9b60754
describe
'434588' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDM' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
ab222bffcbcb5c25c1e9e32a240ca755
b708751c098c1bee4e8d8848cae0bbc9430d1f59
'2011-08-19T15:31:33-04:00'
describe
'113332' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDN' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
838907f9b698ae88a312287d16b4fa25
a27efc188125a5a2cd88f9307fc71e7a44433593
describe
'29798' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDO' 'sip-files00109.pro'
fe455bf241200b20c79e8b916c1d2687
1566ef010a05997ceb7227a1566921338591e584
describe
'35368' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDP' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
d604f11b686e839ddd8f0aebcae8376a
e7901cee6afbc9b057a70005480c31469125c677
'2011-08-19T15:26:51-04:00'
describe
'3486264' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDQ' 'sip-files00109.tif'
141b673d53d6a5b558226488217af452
c69f911ba37c59346721ae3036b4f134d695ac51
'2011-08-19T15:26:35-04:00'
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDR' 'sip-files00109.txt'
26b51f6bc8df9196629d1ff197b43caf
0178d57283accc99c100b5bcd30401cd707bccd0
'2011-08-19T15:28:07-04:00'
describe
'8566' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDS' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
21974882a240b1b1a41e4a2be07cb670
c27edd0162734d8aea5bc47a810962501bd10256
'2011-08-19T15:30:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDT' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
d08796c545767a78177605ab83bf9ca4
a067f66d77bc03a467cef47fdb7be02f7f6430ef
describe
'114314' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDU' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
e1dd9147aade803bc0ac2c2f774ef7e8
5951342b985ad1560fc265c0f65792ac117cdb29
'2011-08-19T15:33:06-04:00'
describe
'30184' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDV' 'sip-files00110.pro'
64834fbad808b1b2714d008253f65d35
e62d719d0e8a38a5a71d3545d07d9b7b9c26af1c
'2011-08-19T15:32:37-04:00'
describe
'34933' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDW' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
c4548eb7df8daecf067bf302e621f101
ba978819d4f0cf826ac5d5b21323b16260aacb8c
'2011-08-19T15:34:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDX' 'sip-files00110.tif'
d25d9de0c8f7040c0c1085fa0f72fb1c
d7d59c75436c2ebf1e12f40b477dbda630daf73f
'2011-08-19T15:25:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDY' 'sip-files00110.txt'
8869da3ff1d9885be35ffb7ed891b5f5
acde9d83a41b57903b4304a861c21d84d73f74f7
describe
'8592' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEDZ' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
db8e55197b1559e03ec2d4ebd9ff995c
21fe6adc3d42576aaaf0b4d681ce0ad343e6e9d8
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEEA' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
8af56f45d518f75fe340b574e6771871
fa0df6584cd34406ab4be108f5deb50ae1d2351b
describe
'113054' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEEB' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
f5002ad0cf11c93833ea150f2df52b53
915adec828f89f2b2033dc884a3593cc75ef0381
'2011-08-19T15:23:13-04:00'
describe
'30596' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEEC' 'sip-files00111.pro'
cc06463b9f6a3b0d70b0c2215d7b10f6
0bfc52ddbbd2f3ee25fa58862347264d38fa1c4e
'2011-08-19T15:20:49-04:00'
describe
'34710' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEED' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
3777a79a7e318b5670b946a9cc191c83
f8f4ef6800dccb253ef15946debea85de633f053
'2011-08-19T15:25:57-04:00'
describe
'3483868' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEEE' 'sip-files00111.tif'
6eeda110e2bf11054d94c271aaaf78a6
1b2acc4b4d719ec00e6d505bd40e88f8bd51c1c5
'2011-08-19T15:31:47-04:00'
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEEF' 'sip-files00111.txt'
cd193dfb09035f82cb8eadcb78edadf9
c639c9a464d8775b5c6a8cd00f5e67c1a4cd636e
'2011-08-19T15:30:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEEG' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
4b6b609f020ca1d42b20e1e54f750e14
0bbf61a29b6271107c9d42beb2b03e50f5600454
'2011-08-19T15:27:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEEH' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
6a9c037757f6583147bc713751620d55
601492559390ef58d76d33c5d0a4e7a0b2eecbf9
describe
'107126' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEEI' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
7260680855d32e66b8cbd506288801f7
f460b337203cd02f7f6bfa16ab9a55e986dda59d
describe
'28415' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEEJ' 'sip-files00112.pro'
2f0531eca0fc1e3aecc520df4c0a37fe
19178d9ee6286e420d5ef1073e90d39367881db2
'2011-08-19T15:27:34-04:00'
describe
'32402' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEEK' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
07f574b8d01f2675072aeffd8d122891
67b5bd64b4e1967e858d6f55a05a953794c4da9f
describe
'3483796' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEEL' 'sip-files00112.tif'
93ed69e5744c77f050b3bb23d96139c1
3930ad0e3371ad6aef36319ee77bccfc4e14153c
'2011-08-19T15:27:17-04:00'
describe
'1128' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEEM' 'sip-files00112.txt'
4f4a0be68652638c09ffbbf8be8befcb
b1b8f7b4d542ebe64d2d0a2826701fb83472399d
'2011-08-19T15:23:29-04:00'
describe
'8140' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEEN' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
96ea7d67309e87925aca0a6b91b98762
8a7aaadac179e5e86209b183fb99ecbca17d0a6f
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEEO' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
8454beebf19af2de82a7b2f121abb9f1
a592d8605aa6a1d536c719103b994acce4592ce8
'2011-08-19T15:29:56-04:00'
describe
'115979' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEEP' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
c8ce98c2a467be1f2a538e82c0ec7c79
e1b4f4ce0cb29d62236ea773e00aa2615fe89d9c
describe
'31067' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEEQ' 'sip-files00113.pro'
79a6e163a553427b63a096a1043059fd
f5123ff60e60fc4ab03ff647d0c9ff61a20ca876
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEER' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
6db9568d2dad0496b81cdedadd485719
ac5df4c210c5f51ce6ef531f2053f70446350793
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEES' 'sip-files00113.tif'
7371b54d51a0723370f0f999370ba3ed
76d9379a44cab40a980483f39b3c1a2359640c71
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEET' 'sip-files00113.txt'
4046e409fbf4664c86efcb9c16ea7c46
e6a9527a24a26eb9bc75f7fbe2a893904dcbd22e
'2011-08-19T15:29:01-04:00'
describe
'8416' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEEU' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
74533d800e65725b76d7edb308d28f5f
506f7cd1629fd24c6c77c8812b34b53c8a0f7f09
describe
'434299' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEEV' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
12ca53613d40786dce9c81b486814635
2e1325fddf82d684663c9347ec852e8ee6c60b70
'2011-08-19T15:28:28-04:00'
describe
'84602' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEEW' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
4b36ea7f2507c48f59dd2b4559eeb2be
4bfeabf74ff4507c607ad46d86e9de8b6b626be6
describe
'21749' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEEX' 'sip-files00114.pro'
6cc619cfab097c3fb310137c8b8ddbc1
4d4fbe81c11cb605b5a8d1720c378473a79aa500
'2011-08-19T15:21:25-04:00'
describe
'26271' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEEY' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
b14b5a62646d40073b7f3c5f3cf8f0b0
d3ff066deadf60e7aaf861aa0616a1ae46744402
describe
'3483384' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEEZ' 'sip-files00114.tif'
ba4f8da1b9a36f575b20b4c1c47a6c59
aad104f464198aef61777c9096969f6c137b2ebc
'2011-08-19T15:23:21-04:00'
describe
'862' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFA' 'sip-files00114.txt'
2c9979f6e1d9f59899c1e38db208ff06
5ca917845994f7900c98e0a73c78bdbd998ebda8
'2011-08-19T15:30:55-04:00'
describe
'6926' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFB' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
59a86c79252d9c8e1b56c551f45cdfc6
ecdc4358e7059d72f4ba149007fdcab57c785c4c
describe
'84845' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFC' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
e261adddce710568f2793bf8e72435a7
fb536e880ebe41dad35912e53d5eb095165c2714
describe
'11637' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFD' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
909b01ffa5de27d4279c447d2760c594
0c18bafcfa50b260b65621a956fb97c5631902ca
'2011-08-19T15:33:29-04:00'
describe
'941' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFE' 'sip-files00115.pro'
3c0edd2be32280154bfe31af4a371f80
f2598f6821aa58ccdb5111da14acdbb157a56cb3
describe
'3733' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFF' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
3f8b5f91f6614a789eb8d23661271bc3
a06cc09bf95212572bd5cf1a30a929c08fd1fea2
'2011-08-19T15:27:29-04:00'
describe
'3483308' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFG' 'sip-files00115.tif'
45df9ef4769dcd1fbe9d084ddcee5721
88498b99db42ddabeb1f903ce5945ec08e7c3428
describe
'55' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFH' 'sip-files00115.txt'
34a81ce16c371ca236d601c9561bb1f0
dc7a371e64ea9dba900469fabe366ad7c3fc5eee
'2011-08-19T15:30:39-04:00'
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFI' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
35bf335037475abd4fa20a02efbf28dd
04e432a28f10201ea499e9b171fd6e5189e6336a
'2011-08-19T15:22:18-04:00'
describe
'492447' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFJ' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
16875b50dfa9b4e10696bfaac00b06c8
4cf3ebb58887859ce4838513c3a072a1b0a2a730
'2011-08-19T15:24:34-04:00'
describe
'173693' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFK' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
4de54fbc3b5539b7aa2f726511792f7f
23daaf7a5fea39fe1e17aa3af549e7ffffd3bff6
describe
'42907' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFL' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
9965b1144fd53938bc2a75fc2eb69c30
e5131dcb8bd8ddac920105c9cd75fe343c7e41cd
describe
'11828812' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFM' 'sip-files00118.tif'
4063a90e76a1eb8118b4a721d01ecac0
0fd14bbfe5a4480c2d6e82259139fa43f153b5a6
describe
'10520' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFN' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
ec17454d746d3153d6eda569cde690b0
7d3409c99c98107d18982c5094fb7a523396557c
describe
'434258' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFO' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
fc42e9b6b4a71056b61b05c67714dfb7
8b512e021f1d10175242842876332903f0479175
describe
'100721' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFP' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
bdea005dbf575a4da7160c1016c571a3
bcadfd86df80c746120494772196ad0383bd9bfd
'2011-08-19T15:33:34-04:00'
describe
'24788' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFQ' 'sip-files00119.pro'
3984d20fc0dcd52771f4231f43402d3e
fc852286fcd27e706d629c2a9f601210da37ee40
'2011-08-19T15:32:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFR' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
077d7e4bafd5d8c34ad359ede034452a
ce42dd84eed08981d49b5b9b7da8d70b6c8f9f4f
describe
'10431288' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFS' 'sip-files00119.tif'
a8e7aa73bc7c768c9172f794eba77899
9d42a945120263c001d84537aadf3950afb07311
describe
'998' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFT' 'sip-files00119.txt'
3aeba283cb4e03b220d78264585a312b
8112309e4ba6dd52e34d10ec6b5551280e91e65b
'2011-08-19T15:22:14-04:00'
describe
'7775' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFU' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
b0d3c74e9290672532ad23d0f4f4d589
71a44a507614bdea4292839b4a37484c2e1265c7
'2011-08-19T15:23:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFV' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
73b60ebc516b359d9d665815647e6798
8869abb3d7548096cc2d957de1b7bdfef5c6ac0f
'2011-08-19T15:34:17-04:00'
describe
'124501' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFW' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
b0226f91e920cd0344e06601c574d3bc
2d9236d77bd9c00dd985bf913ac7b076eee4cfcd
'2011-08-19T15:21:04-04:00'
describe
'32581' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFX' 'sip-files00120.pro'
508ca93507dd2071c8cffeedc8abf369
6758c0e8febcce4051c9e4a203e2ce08963528a5
'2011-08-19T15:23:04-04:00'
describe
'38418' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFY' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
672ab4ca139e656f2cc47fa2551f56f2
0d3d5884e6338248d94f60f80276dbc43e8dbaa6
describe
'3484264' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEFZ' 'sip-files00120.tif'
b4334d8763344c8cc1ead9008edb56dd
b3f35785faa8c223b23fa4a75eeaafd6b9badbe5
'2011-08-19T15:25:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGA' 'sip-files00120.txt'
8fd307f97228e46b3d8e3df11ae5440e
bd41a64d69483aeda0fc471035275a65ddaa8355
'2011-08-19T15:34:02-04:00'
describe
'9115' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGB' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
ca45aca0a5029651761f4aafb6175777
f0ee73e39956c013e81302631752c7a0e5005a1d
describe
'434357' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGC' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
012f8b7cdb38af531fd5a93aef77c562
016c0593a6f7a4da41374434cade0b8fc625045b
describe
'125170' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGD' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
8040e5817510fc3ccf1008873c94eb99
ba54a7d8911e5b188388217288e6a9bd76afa0d4
'2011-08-19T15:23:54-04:00'
describe
'33019' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGE' 'sip-files00121.pro'
00487b38d07586e553802533f07317b0
611dd92e9a879bdde4e4b6a488c3aca5c53f7225
describe
'37814' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGF' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
67c0ca3e993ff686a55450e3a999be72
078c676421ed4abacdbdb0b1b65f91dab203d3d0
'2011-08-19T15:26:34-04:00'
describe
'3484884' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGG' 'sip-files00121.tif'
cd018b959c2c095ffcc3c94e758d5d98
3c2bd0e8807862dd7af71a53f9b819c7d106dd06
'2011-08-19T15:22:31-04:00'
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGH' 'sip-files00121.txt'
64d4c2324fb555758906cecce8116b78
ff6871897bb110846e6a74d016fd7288d02554f2
'2011-08-19T15:22:03-04:00'
describe
'9014' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGI' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
8fbba2c83066e73d39ba0e822b1f254f
297c3abc58e4ab9d8b3af19da05229af921653cd
'2011-08-19T15:32:16-04:00'
describe
'434100' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGJ' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
c0abc7a9794cf11b5cf446ef0b8f451e
7eb198a2fe07d49fd90e011c8d84bdf89153b6f5
'2011-08-19T15:31:55-04:00'
describe
'120974' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGK' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
a2acbeecea43516898c14c6a645bee3e
48eed6c1544b21b832f0430e1992e9575a059e80
describe
'30941' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGL' 'sip-files00122.pro'
dd7a7a32f9be403b585fe0ab4240831c
0b6d03a9ef9308c45f7a3921fc6863c7306c72c7
describe
'37915' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGM' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
442118dfc7801652c2a4012f004f2a57
c6f0c64874b00c72424ce0e1ad797ee3dc8e0d98
describe
'3482648' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGN' 'sip-files00122.tif'
4974836783c0b8ad41e08146a8a57240
ee46932dd678d11595351ba0bf1e0ec085d0a94f
'2011-08-19T15:32:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGO' 'sip-files00122.txt'
3f35e9eb895168c231da58757434a0fb
2d71df4847beba3c7cd02f43c0c0ec19b6f529f1
'2011-08-19T15:22:32-04:00'
describe
'9238' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGP' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
9226f9b12db70d8da02d1e014a79a378
3cbf862e4bb53e6a9b457a2530f527d3e2895ca2
'2011-08-19T15:23:32-04:00'
describe
'434111' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGQ' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
e209af1075d783fd3bcdad867fe74d82
c2d812d1884793c21c265b24b6b22900adf1288b
describe
'110852' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGR' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
dfd7d933bfb235a5606037aa6baf98b2
583b70f549c3793e59d44924973bb2ca999b05a6
'2011-08-19T15:25:52-04:00'
describe
'28683' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGS' 'sip-files00123.pro'
a73b0c647fd4a608ae53749c86666ac6
8107d4105aff6d2916cb50617c785e54ed7174af
'2011-08-19T15:21:37-04:00'
describe
'34522' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGT' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
cf3f643c3676b3a28a61642abd4dd071
ce272cfdec5afac06df12cd0aa34e903c727e06d
'2011-08-19T15:23:52-04:00'
describe
'3482568' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGU' 'sip-files00123.tif'
0566b6fdb624815168c5513acc9a84b6
5bd77054eb9cde9c0e23c5023d3cfa4d231f15bf
'2011-08-19T15:22:40-04:00'
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGV' 'sip-files00123.txt'
071082a402b6d384b79c12d1a38f1ace
39889cfabbbfa3cb2c37ea331b94efc281f8cfe7
'2011-08-19T15:33:14-04:00'
describe
'8701' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGW' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
4c1f5c544da4983a8cc37ccebde51fbf
3f791c312585c9159ff44cd1281a637423d49960
'2011-08-19T15:33:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGX' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
d9f7b19825100cc500f501f861a65477
d6b3e4d55dd962480aa65e7c6dc4cfff4f2e7e65
describe
'114671' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGY' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
80c0d271a77e0f82a7b14580d4d411d3
19d4496ce92167c1820ec93e3a503f384286f3fd
describe
'30315' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEGZ' 'sip-files00124.pro'
5340fcc6a2182c4967e312945023258e
3a9b4ab19bb66da0b81d0c7c2fb39d63306e7122
'2011-08-19T15:28:48-04:00'
describe
'36629' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHA' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
940d7881c021546b6b58baa2fcbb13c0
1e0f0b91ddce805c365041605964736d41061c2a
describe
'3484028' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHB' 'sip-files00124.tif'
90a2ae2d6dd00ccd2bf58dfd0e0d1804
b9379eb9a5fd5a644a3f1e6eb475c06b90333440
'2011-08-19T15:21:46-04:00'
describe
'1193' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHC' 'sip-files00124.txt'
40288b18fe5d06ad4e4badac00290905
fe49bca9f1e4a3842e5308b0778e62d8ea22fa1e
describe
'8877' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHD' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
139a825ae71340c3673ab31abb4d6c9a
58a4f0c0b140cb5702d6ebdeae0b49dd949eb267
'2011-08-19T15:24:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHE' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
8f8706f2ac43db8a49894d348b9ead6e
d5bd9d4a6348108d9840a6a3edfd6b90e9f3ecc8
describe
'120346' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHF' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
e8d83d84e194264be34c6975ab39a77f
50b6f72452dc2d19b5e6c137d536c4f26f2b558c
describe
'31317' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHG' 'sip-files00125.pro'
7b0e690cbf766fabe5d4c57bc23f880c
a185b7895284c3498e700ea5f2df300cd8ba5b2d
describe
'36895' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHH' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
2ab35bb878a8902c6f63f3121c2c7dab
c7322e41a4215fc4df28b1c912a699e71de30708
'2011-08-19T15:24:32-04:00'
describe
'3486252' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHI' 'sip-files00125.tif'
e66b0fda09369e5f29c290deed9cc7ca
da51f4deefc068b9771950f9033c47080e7d8b8a
'2011-08-19T15:21:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHJ' 'sip-files00125.txt'
13a799081495f0fe46c8d991406a32e6
05a4743b444d85462ee36b69c0ae3f9072cd1f15
describe
'8581' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHK' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
5d07e077ebbfd31cb4609cffff4a5599
dce8946e91ecb2259f225be8f135d32398dcc25a
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHL' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
7903ac33f9fe893cca6f37680d81c224
51ca072efb4a14faa3f3faddcee319ba8651ee9c
'2011-08-19T15:31:49-04:00'
describe
'111548' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHM' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
a76beb8277797ba356b4f757a80cd5ec
098b5581dd70dfef20c866ed8240d0be2e5d5ce6
'2011-08-19T15:26:22-04:00'
describe
'29379' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHN' 'sip-files00126.pro'
817db00b87d0e52823d34b506e35bd62
00fa039270b31653eee193c7b2e404fa71c8a03b
describe
'34595' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHO' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
16762abdd81b9c162349bf366bab2bdb
feba9b984de7f094f3801782c50e1daa359f3c7a
'2011-08-19T15:31:41-04:00'
describe
'3484148' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHP' 'sip-files00126.tif'
b79cb71f545110ec66a6fa502f4b7a05
2239984f346be892ac7ee8d90c24b0722a0187d1
describe
'1164' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHQ' 'sip-files00126.txt'
b7e7d6b2edbc2a54c4de713e4db99aad
0ff233e5b86fd76e9606d456bcdc6f23667102df
'2011-08-19T15:32:43-04:00'
describe
'8828' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHR' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
95b58963a7e2c9f87728543e12e3ed21
3377c2930e0a3ba2b2e1176df5edd9e3923fcd4d
'2011-08-19T15:29:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHS' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
3aa05b5f00224bca4002f98228486393
d7cabd4584b88478cbf2b14c8354c26b17f453b1
describe
'123203' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHT' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
b9257114eb2a2e170b794371745a2c6f
3fed2f1379ad35d12bd747fddf6e752e1b50cd62
describe
'32731' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHU' 'sip-files00127.pro'
44740c11adc664952b8606527e53b62f
97f02cab18195d9f067be9f615a8d73bc0cba22c
'2011-08-19T15:31:03-04:00'
describe
'37763' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHV' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
39246839fc8248fb8cc606f40e835f12
78b3d9897373567ae62c471719232132f8df07fc
'2011-08-19T15:30:12-04:00'
describe
'3484184' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHW' 'sip-files00127.tif'
8632e64003edd25ab09337363bed46ff
4e7bf447e1a2fe5e3b472c568dcdc27c26de4f38
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHX' 'sip-files00127.txt'
870d0b7cdbe01bdf6380d6397cec1148
93900e09b1b29f8d19d8c24eccec2831af960b59
describe
'8899' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHY' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
3e76628a1894fd95e2106f21b476f36f
48293b7135438178bbdc175e6447d5195324790a
'2011-08-19T15:24:49-04:00'
describe
'434119' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEHZ' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
468cc127a0a2cd95433f9a80bd2740c8
9139947a37dc24cbf0f827bcc147422cd9885a97
describe
'117047' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEIA' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
b685cab861a29085ad52928120d4b9b0
d9375d3599fd19a73b5d3520da529bc901237802
describe
'31122' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEIB' 'sip-files00128.pro'
c50f6a74c2f54a13da2d76207825f084
02b8273ae55293fbef0c62703b75579c844e4a28
'2011-08-19T15:22:13-04:00'
describe
'35857' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEIC' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
20f198dd06d8a68083abe67666ebe009
4d0f30092a921e21a69d9079d6fd669da1828953
describe
'3482584' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEID' 'sip-files00128.tif'
1f11e2b565056623a0f7854a0e0cabb1
83a5ca0faa424b2f1cbfa6d30d0235eb3549a72d
'2011-08-19T15:28:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEIE' 'sip-files00128.txt'
90a10ca0f4556ae98a4ca7ccccfd01a7
4e0f78cdeda6a81bae0fe42785252f216c712343
describe
'9044' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEIF' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
5c03c5b6d4df2a7a86da96c46789b30e
089e699d16c47ae1a2c989c3f719c76706b1fb7f
'2011-08-19T15:31:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEIG' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
e619a17522fe96885f279ad6f34ed19e
a16924f188b80c8b7992066ee5e447d2ce3d7e8e
describe
'115397' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEIH' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
f22c29ffcd70ec0afead36f8928969ab
e138cf6b149991314ac3c474065703db321e08b1
describe
'30539' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEII' 'sip-files00129.pro'
646eba05079777420b629bf50e523ccf
6d50486d476fe601407f2783b0cfe4258385ba5d
describe
'36710' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEIJ' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
fb64902e97129ba7a6fe6562803fa4a7
e5f581ebd79d8ccd6070335fe884836e75c4a829
'2011-08-19T15:31:08-04:00'
describe
'3482564' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEIK' 'sip-files00129.tif'
a3cf28ab9149f5b2d3c505a3bb3cc77f
cf866c70448087f378f9a2bc02a2dfbe0c77c2ed
'2011-08-19T15:31:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEIL' 'sip-files00129.txt'
eb13608a84a376cea5f3680b60b72707
50c09a7e5da57215cc52a892fff6459e7f75b0cd
describe
'8865' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEIM' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
254a81ec429c7170210cff55ce47ff06
fd4464f92e03d96f04c62b34bd60053778dbe311
describe
'434217' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEIN' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
1c56a88b82500e4850a34a39944a57e0
aaf15df8998b9043f13eb5720b39cdf4e0a0e485
describe
'117136' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEIO' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
dc558d1a8e44b3c16a80704c277d09cd
a33c383e8383be8c7d1753f1db5c0ff4a89400db
describe
'31121' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEIP' 'sip-files00130.pro'
3dc9fa1b23c1a7463e841dbee2e0fce3
335b7c8891b7e4bb8a34371e8157ff53ce463862
describe
'36139' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEIQ' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
34ec9219284c293fac5097fa8d7c70e3
e3a929f6ef429d70ae15e3270131e78291a9a7b9
describe
'3484100' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEIR' 'sip-files00130.tif'
94bf90546e6d21259956d4f3a4339751
650661bd381947d44da8d985c6476a3625c0ff99
'2011-08-19T15:25:05-04:00'
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEIS' 'sip-files00130.txt'
095805e54decce28899fba2c20b2ace2
8b91824535f525e8badf1330f755ea5757c997b4
describe
'9035' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEIT' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
d3d7c89b3978dac9960ec7e3550de96e
238793a42ba321e23296a818b955c80e6ec17e65
describe
'434524' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEIU' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
37ee3710a1388bc68949e0e931f46bd7
1956ad5ee165c0200008e0d9e1698b5da5d33791
describe
'119715' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEIV' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
d68a3114ace515cb8fc6b921656dadc7
3690625c542d35ef0a158345628994f5c0c9e610
describe
'31458' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEIW' 'sip-files00131.pro'
9dc824f80ee704ca9158d99f74c23374
b8eee1e740020e2e12eecd049438e4db7f3b7eb5
describe
'36886' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEIX' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
d59f8e8a7529a57add89e6081645d51a
f75bc65ac10fd5b1c950647190b288a1cd5a6204
describe
'3486272' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEIY' 'sip-files00131.tif'
0f3d34fb60373579c1d16fcf1b6a2318
57b389a2ba6abbf5c8a4a5ccde48fed06989fdff
'2011-08-19T15:32:45-04:00'
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEIZ' 'sip-files00131.txt'
d402ef39c97e5e895b056b4597da729a
fd516498eda8b038e724dc53ed36f315374d6a5a
describe
'8971' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJA' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
53aac9d1e4254bcdea6492d405d8cf85
2fa61a10520fad1c8f9fccf9c32cc048c405d406
'2011-08-19T15:21:55-04:00'
describe
'431807' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJB' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
88aa7f848deb667351a20a618088d64d
ba1aaf972c50f8fa26c80ec88797932b89066664
'2011-08-19T15:30:20-04:00'
describe
'113124' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJC' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
d89c78c178ae599967b17be953102e65
4aba2be3dad8c4eff1dc51811faccb7c071cec9d
describe
'29474' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJD' 'sip-files00132.pro'
17526a1607d2375d9f704a030f365df4
c6655169d583137ed2c9aca80efb241ba373263c
'2011-08-19T15:31:00-04:00'
describe
'35585' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJE' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
3b892c1c82d67dbd74a3973ad1f3a8c6
1b9119440daefc486f4f9ed7b36340452c85a056
describe
'3464184' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJF' 'sip-files00132.tif'
57c11a1d60f03119a7da4b989782a6d3
93c725e3edf03cc9b1c955e636ca77c97b57c4a6
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJG' 'sip-files00132.txt'
363ba1289d98da8319c8c63aa0f7d452
7a8aa623a2aa5a57d49fb31ea8633e2e24c46fd0
describe
'8775' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJH' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
468f0053ed7451ff8ad4df26b09f8f10
419b89311a92ca8a17aefbe3b5721c6df913a56f
'2011-08-19T15:25:44-04:00'
describe
'431013' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJI' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
30209feea0a5f5f657253f1bea26c180
9ca7384a0a92aa5078489c2a2ad37f47225bf30b
describe
'107403' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJJ' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
e809bee17e010d0c2e97b6da23c71b6a
4cfd9b0fdb7f114dd18bcdd65ec51ecd701b4d3e
'2011-08-19T15:27:48-04:00'
describe
'28162' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJK' 'sip-files00133.pro'
4af29768e64eed7039d3d1a0d03e1c17
2daf7864b8041106fe821cede26219f2c142717f
describe
'34036' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJL' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
a56d42b904e187fc76f9620eb2bf727d
3f7ca4098b5aec4ee26e599cb30e88882b4609d7
describe
'3457684' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJM' 'sip-files00133.tif'
68fa84f0099cf9c017d9bfb833e9aae2
309e8177fd638ce0a325fa522cd9d14da2f50c00
'2011-08-19T15:23:36-04:00'
describe
'1125' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJN' 'sip-files00133.txt'
472b90c908db4fdfdb6d7fe3ec8ad130
c2c8c2a81b5202c90ae979c0cc8a9fb6de41faff
'2011-08-19T15:23:34-04:00'
describe
'8565' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJO' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
e9bd6741f684a6500f933b2237ac00d8
a5e4ef8ba4f085767fa280ea36f1b5eecdcbf1e5
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJP' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
655b166ea19e641939fc1351f56b955f
88435532b79f6e585285e2388dffd1ff90caa13a
'2011-08-19T15:22:45-04:00'
describe
'105515' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJQ' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
77c56b5be8c99ac13da4ed0596cba6f0
8332b91262c32039a8a91a46973d7dbadb19d0f1
'2011-08-19T15:29:33-04:00'
describe
'27453' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJR' 'sip-files00134.pro'
7e3ba5f169e4c4ec2752a6161949d7d6
4a92a44b63d66fa49361d344cfe52847e8f8bbc0
'2011-08-19T15:30:25-04:00'
describe
'33960' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJS' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
86df8be6298913b27815bde023637921
c1e6dca14b5b30d917cc8cfcf9f6d38473774fe9
describe
'3484076' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJT' 'sip-files00134.tif'
e9b8b3c8d0d5e22d74b4e7f93cd7bc64
3431251b04afb0286896134015c7738a18f1955f
'2011-08-19T15:33:13-04:00'
describe
'1100' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJU' 'sip-files00134.txt'
78109d50e2d03bd247abeb6993f09777
1dddbd5247e976b62404a699fd2549409bb7d221
describe
'8710' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJV' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
2266e461ad9cc2907a85322f106c190d
4fb1dcf01c5903a6ba799328f83da009c014a372
'2011-08-19T15:25:45-04:00'
describe
'429418' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJW' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
a6269b38a7e56daf93f1179f37e206cc
82acf521c0181fb5e5bf4a01a6ecff36b3a7a1b9
'2011-08-19T15:30:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJX' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
48618e0adc33128aa1f6d84e11eaea58
2a3e782e880925465a15cb8393ab817c06483894
'2011-08-19T15:33:36-04:00'
describe
'30590' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJY' 'sip-files00135.pro'
c84d2e01448153604c1f8d01eb49e5eb
9eb65401c61007bedf87a2a142eacb1d952b96e5
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEJZ' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
7ff41e9fb35adaebd1747d2868e5e2b3
ba10fcf24d6cf3cf271c8dec40a3151523e5257d
describe
'3444836' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKA' 'sip-files00135.tif'
25a72203bc0cea7b42b304fc27490edd
e04ee50dfee9d1adb6e23fac125eda69f8129caa
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKB' 'sip-files00135.txt'
0154381fc69a0ecde6a8fedca17ae060
99766a7b7ffda06639b856cc4f216bc988f1f131
describe
'8785' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKC' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
d58ba39883c014ea73616a7a57848f9a
cc7dba64c14fffcc72eb48c8ab6174711a75c6c5
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKD' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
d1b003209e7ac7e6db422d37ad2a5ab4
1d4f9162d26241f97a4b681f03a369b44fa1c771
describe
'114413' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKE' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
226f52eb1efe137a9f4fd1e744cc32b8
1b66e4163902e894deb429dab5ea3febc10bcc9a
'2011-08-19T15:24:23-04:00'
describe
'29822' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKF' 'sip-files00136.pro'
fc62125b1a7a96d9b8da6be2a1b0282e
f82b31fedcb4dfaac9d96b370a73588df0860058
describe
'34783' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKG' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
eb805586d241f0a5dbdfaa0e2477334c
4d0dfa3e08f475d13bbee65f82552878e32fb058
describe
'3483904' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKH' 'sip-files00136.tif'
417b4d6ea12f55880b5bbdd12b33911f
46960ebdcf422d7a49cc16b90beba82efd377499
'2011-08-19T15:25:46-04:00'
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKI' 'sip-files00136.txt'
e5fc89f367f6538cb50ad14a9387ff76
c62d5e84f02049c8d2656830b32f257df79a76ca
describe
'8948' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKJ' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
767905b9cb99e127b0c24276bce03570
d8eb941f4ae36b5a9df65a40df75353879a7d5d0
'2011-08-19T15:27:19-04:00'
describe
'434264' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKK' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
bedb2fc3b50bb383f9ba2add626a6128
7abc9e01f018ae79fcf74890921e6c7feccf6db2
describe
'117345' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKL' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
cc6e7452672164d7bb7c1eade0c04c7f
55fe59acbd3907bfb552b49b718bad9c7facd99b
describe
'30974' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKM' 'sip-files00137.pro'
13253a647946d3c2f777daf2e76769c3
5ebb2d8a98aee3deacdbe70aa021d1e7fa6f9980
'2011-08-19T15:26:20-04:00'
describe
'36347' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKN' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
af2f136d32489cfbef89ae4e6480178e
e4cdb252546e3eab125849ebbb5a8b9ca636751a
describe
'3483972' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKO' 'sip-files00137.tif'
e07ffee927546a318d743ea3128e74df
2d4c06e5bc1f2d28a057875040f87b0119f33e1e
'2011-08-19T15:25:30-04:00'
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKP' 'sip-files00137.txt'
0304bfb09f2b1f8b2a10815e8c9ea659
0bfef875d2e146ec18c7ad970f2a04a8edff896f
'2011-08-19T15:23:27-04:00'
describe
'8787' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKQ' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
c0202d9c236fedd29d74f37df8cd5d51
ef18f13c788c24904dbb62fe7ab9a9abd28372b1
describe
'434122' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKR' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
d3c0bdee58e50252c167dbaaf25f0308
74ead6981323807906a99611093459b52fd4eca7
describe
'110020' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKS' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
604869c0d0b1535311afa5d967c8cfa2
e450c0616da3ec73560ab79cdf0a89d12e71b34c
describe
'28601' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKT' 'sip-files00138.pro'
6732526a78592c92f5f216bb1f530e94
5e58aef36dee401993544c1bb97604ecbd441359
describe
'33570' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKU' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
b5aedd81b68e4b3865b9d7cff5dec292
5c51ed68b7622bcbb2cb7c9ff1698bdfaaaf4d3a
describe
'3482464' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKV' 'sip-files00138.tif'
c2f85c79189aed2521d55136abdb1e14
935dbf2458b3b92aeefbc9570cbe23c958855639
'2011-08-19T15:28:08-04:00'
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKW' 'sip-files00138.txt'
1e8dcb80fe04fef35668ad8facf33b05
95c94c604468be2418b5e67a1c3eb72ae7dd4c53
describe
'8633' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKX' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
304b1e605f099734bffbce1df41c37f2
bbbfb96d46126075445d29a491c0e21b0e38f641
'2011-08-19T15:30:30-04:00'
describe
'275916' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKY' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
763ddb1582333bfeb726ef4047935a2c
50c527ef26137523c72c56783b755fe50a93bf90
'2011-08-19T15:34:00-04:00'
describe
'41703' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEKZ' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
a37632177bb42856f9e82fdad8a6a344
22549fa00f4c23f45a4f174ad18a8a7b011189a2
describe
'9346' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELA' 'sip-files00139.pro'
d40e8e51e553a8f06b49d72f07c55750
5914e61ecd182b94c0b53289996588191ab4ee53
describe
'12717' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELB' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
1a39190de57ae6c69f99508058ccd108
a308d869cf716aab3f6269a6d4e70c21be1f4f63
'2011-08-19T15:30:24-04:00'
describe
'3480412' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELC' 'sip-files00139.tif'
1454b5f22633dbc85a1b80c69ee093a4
e49f05da73244fe9f3f0a5511bdf4d76a4997f8d
'2011-08-19T15:26:08-04:00'
describe
'392' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELD' 'sip-files00139.txt'
4491033b8718dd417ca9532724387c67
3ccbe3af3c1f007de308802460310165cfe9c40b
describe
'3562' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELE' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
0b5c1456f8e4b34d93ed3a13a841df49
dc9d34230d9c67a0f8e3b0377fcd542c39b9cbb1
'2011-08-19T15:23:03-04:00'
describe
'42516' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELF' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
dc4297e5a40623a50f7d1223aa1b69cd
926d2c2ee2c8216420b78c0c77fd1b1d0ae1b401
describe
'7136' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELG' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
55a14625d880bac9448b2818b84d02fb
6bad92cd31b839dfcc276ce3772c6fdc8806d252
'2011-08-19T15:32:34-04:00'
describe
'2114' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELH' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
a7bfe38b8a3bdce90e2438a22cee579d
d2aff09593f14e65a3a2960a2f4f06ddbbe9dcea
describe
'3480844' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELI' 'sip-files00140.tif'
b3ba1dbaea350345a9916958de9112c6
e6345304753a6f8e828180f006cfc39032981a0c
describe
'794' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELJ' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
7aaf97e8e1e89d3989675e7787daa1e8
7e9111108825bb53ced472c052be22fa282fc0dc
describe
'69031' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELK' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
b2722f5346a1122c4b6ad5523c464c15
e631fa8630bc1f93bcca0184402fe1eb269fed26
describe
'11535' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELL' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
6bdf7bf33c721ca9a78c8832e9fba314
55772970a4b30e0a65fde57e9c665124032fa28a
'2011-08-19T15:25:14-04:00'
describe
'863' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELM' 'sip-files00141.pro'
a8c57fe78e94dfa989973f1d1b0ea190
3c71c8daec8f1e2934d87cf5673318ac27d3a0a7
'2011-08-19T15:29:45-04:00'
describe
'3727' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELN' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
da8804ba739a112eea62fa49dc6fd044
15ee471ae970a2853af7cc0e5ec6714c1fa8a10a
describe
'3481152' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELO' 'sip-files00141.tif'
fdf40962d1609ff2762cb426324bae49
cbcda5a31aba67b97ba86856ab95efb69d0ae031
describe
'50' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELP' 'sip-files00141.txt'
e5310c21f8638a753a3dd89f557a5d77
0ab062c5b7199c77d3773a82c7f302553e8ce2d1
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELQ' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
6816379f384f46598b369ac365018dd4
5305c6e2a427007c77d1b27f670856cc8b7f172f
describe
'475552' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELR' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
f43d11f6fb593e987dff7fe4af60d6d7
82614a4fe8a5f0008ac3cd906d4d74cc2e145749
describe
'133398' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELS' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
47ba1587f51d4219fc6205240c4bd2e2
7bf98afd3adebef2b2d2275fe7c47421e3a4d0c3
describe
'34557' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELT' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
f4c3742b42f464bfef08b66eecf2d69e
5b1f1e588a0a90fdb816d6293dfec1547dc1081d
'2011-08-19T15:22:47-04:00'
describe
'11424424' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELU' 'sip-files00144.tif'
b2faef8cdecd4692325db186e1dcbbf5
b4d7a16840d1effdd2408554a53e117f7b7c8a47
describe
'9598' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELV' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
37603de63057dd5869637e47fbc81292
408798cbdbb9396249d2e173b72f3434b7e45b73
describe
'434050' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELW' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
8f1de7c4db357d64f0f80fab54c9609f
03c450605e805c65708b3215bf20040cb03f0584
'2011-08-19T15:27:58-04:00'
describe
'107764' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELX' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
27b9de3fbe8ea06ee9ba372fb96114b3
6e885c880e843ef00278ee59e357874b10843884
describe
'26580' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELY' 'sip-files00145.pro'
6ebd686e3f7abcaa570df882c142dc83
d23dfd11d4d8051a9e2063d9ceb4d5860c03f43a
describe
'33004' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACELZ' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
275bf06714425eaf8c3778c7c32ef8d2
f6a958f494d0a2dbd5505174b0d1384d60a60d34
'2011-08-19T15:22:39-04:00'
describe
'10426424' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEMA' 'sip-files00145.tif'
457ba80b3ae5cde4815a92469af47c66
57d08a3770ea2c24d689670ca6580d190d2104d9
'2011-08-19T15:22:24-04:00'
describe
'1060' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEMB' 'sip-files00145.txt'
112cf56d8e53cbb243bd52caa3cbb056
6f70202f265845524bc24150064956bd41f22cbc
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEMC' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
857b3fb80c70130e718a775cac855359
9e31cba3af1e50f44fbcfeadbfe7d087468f7e9c
describe
'434294' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEMD' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
3910fa8dc016b0d978a3a81d5d78cf3d
a52888ca1b02020eaeb14489454ff19350a9284b
describe
'125173' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEME' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
51efeba6a6542d5d4182af79ee0c95cc
a8384e5dbf2f75302d4fe36c92b6d0a661a0bfc8
describe
'32805' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEMF' 'sip-files00146.pro'
49a94e53c727d2d078978c9255591181
4957219c6fdfabe72889a8409ac5c251856c037e
'2011-08-19T15:20:56-04:00'
describe
'37616' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEMG' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
b5a64e646d20c97d0a7896a3d2bb1e16
29732050ab6a34c39a2f25ddff2e6c941102520d
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEMH' 'sip-files00146.tif'
e929d6643ee5eb9798c9571e2e6ee551
01bbec60e4694559795fd5c93dc5b74ae9522724
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEMI' 'sip-files00146.txt'
14a1376c408c9a67590a1ff925a7fbb4
de54e9c44018696a32ebae893c853bc3187cc552
describe
'9256' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEMJ' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
ca7fdc422eff37e1f52be78bdc2694d3
4cbae23c41c3bd9b8d22200eee3a878d60beccc0
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEMK' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
18a79b43acbd00c1c764a1159ad0d200
f9c712d0e9413b59822f240d9074022a4b1127a2
describe
'117531' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEML' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
bb98210ce6d6271782c7c928c4fa6b68
7d7e2ac6b484b80906180b35fbffd64479c5ab8a
'2011-08-19T15:27:05-04:00'
describe
'30456' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEMM' 'sip-files00147.pro'
4510f82f4d82356363d420912982b491
03451af9e455dd0fdfc980fda593af9037977fda
'2011-08-19T15:28:39-04:00'
describe
'35963' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEMN' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
80da41583146ed5fdc0b235395e5965f
297bda4bed2b38470a180364dbd0160b56b245f3
describe
'3482428' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEMO' 'sip-files00147.tif'
c7d658c2a340d2da44dca4bfcf8a62c5
d1aa23d71a934e2b913a5e99164445c2f174acf4
describe
'1214' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEMP' 'sip-files00147.txt'
7e936aa73364c2d3287627dfb4ef4a1b
9787ae5cc2682a74d1411181f9d13bc21d92baca
describe
'8958' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEMQ' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
419e44703c80dc489451af1b78de3204
aabbc6cd440764423c36ce3e575bfd4f537e803e
'2011-08-19T15:22:46-04:00'
describe
'434305' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEMR' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
2d3c4963ea65254c3ed88f56f7fe9f5a
3ca77fa2e52bf6f199bcbd2887c11da4bc02732b
'2011-08-19T15:33:40-04:00'
describe
'120190' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEMS' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
3db4c2bac97115af8feee48ae5727128
b4e4db92e2c27512857e7931f0fefde7c73dd06c
'2011-08-19T15:22:57-04:00'
describe
'31469' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEMT' 'sip-files00148.pro'
2b186be061f3f5498956b84b12e93f02
70dacd81c1db93966039c04817ad5e318ea03b4c
describe
'37048' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEMU' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
2c376da5d370e752b42a892eb133f87b
243eb2e9acbe116dc66ed352faff8451cb61953c
'2011-08-19T15:28:38-04:00'
describe
'3484104' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEMV' 'sip-files00148.tif'
f9c0a88fb178eb41698973dd95709aa9
2980efd6159d78b9b681f6507c107e2dc67407a3
'2011-08-19T15:25:38-04:00'
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEMW' 'sip-files00148.txt'
fca5eade97220206b63a4fda93632e2e
1cce20417146eaeb5220d4b1c345471c468411b5
describe
'8868' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEMX' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
b320b8fdfeb0a039f1a2a1bdee2d0263
af9c2f4564ee1347bb3b6b3485a50202fc102123
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEMY' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
20fb4aa67b13cabbcc0fa43b2889caa1
e1b091638f7133a22923da66741b64b300f5027f
'2011-08-19T15:32:13-04:00'
describe
'124914' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEMZ' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
6421bd2b5be51d56f7ab7f4532cc0c35
986b03feaee211c40f14dcbd5776a2967fa015fd
'2011-08-19T15:33:11-04:00'
describe
'33035' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACENA' 'sip-files00149.pro'
78dc8f27e464a87b4bf7bed0cf7ca8cb
d92a0d32a2a5f848ed6feff6d5ef1e3686c4c30a
describe
'38450' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACENB' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
f74ba06f67a514a851d659792805758e
e208a0d8be3c02f301318aad827fdf761711f549
'2011-08-19T15:24:55-04:00'
describe
'3486236' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACENC' 'sip-files00149.tif'
556f77341105fff9111f528654137273
7892c755285da79bce94387f3380192522911c8c
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEND' 'sip-files00149.txt'
d116e7773267feed438d2e51ec3982ce
13ea416c469181f82f726d4cae368d606c3532aa
'2011-08-19T15:28:50-04:00'
describe
'9114' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACENE' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
5c9e251feaf7051d478a7e35cdc905c7
c27bd6d6ca2520e79c787122e181a2d99c6ee1b0
'2011-08-19T15:30:40-04:00'
describe
'434533' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACENF' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
332f421a68a03cb92c14205d9319fde9
a046eb706884cf5f5f021ee9d33cbc87d3f07f46
'2011-08-19T15:27:12-04:00'
describe
'105716' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACENG' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
2bd7dbf7f7e0cd2bb576eb9b3eed6dfd
1480a190441cb1c1bcc3bea4826e1710404c39bd
'2011-08-19T15:30:38-04:00'
describe
'28004' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACENH' 'sip-files00150.pro'
1b755fda157819388962cf407e29104b
c3bf9cb2bc3ff125ae6b3811a7adb0013e9c7520
describe
'33704' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACENI' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
4dd30cf16cadbe75bc19575e22e4b491
5acfb1dc7dc42f429594f2590085e8065a806bc6
describe
'3486088' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACENJ' 'sip-files00150.tif'
362f06e83e5c815f0232172c5daddc9e
3ede113d7c618282c692787b1e0fb05935e0d35f
'2011-08-19T15:22:10-04:00'
describe
'1108' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACENK' 'sip-files00150.txt'
06aaec7eb9aab6d04c68cd51d854796a
1500c8fb5639f0d42d3750e41facce888dcc7c94
describe
'8689' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACENL' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
c00b803f1485d364c9aaf061efd9fb49
85afc091d2bad2e53e31ca86eacd48c252f50f19
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACENM' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
81490bf4ae00de96642ea9076e1edf77
44fdcaf8d3600de5098ae1d18c52a4900acac072
'2011-08-19T15:20:55-04:00'
describe
'116982' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACENN' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
8b1a60ca30275bb783c5e10555a05abd
53b73cc9c7cc9f9c683e67e078998b87f22b6b15
describe
'31468' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACENO' 'sip-files00151.pro'
01d70f65c9beaec440e2f0a6982a7ed4
b0db88432fe818e3a2686532171833f4a56c79ac
describe
'35549' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACENP' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
03dc1965aa0d20d2ef07f12875b98471
fe1980e8995b3ef00668b8642a8296eec4c9d157
describe
'3483992' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACENQ' 'sip-files00151.tif'
331623b4b11289e94af17d8fbd44e6dd
57ef9ec406616cabb67641b0772f8df26c4eb367
'2011-08-19T15:30:45-04:00'
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACENR' 'sip-files00151.txt'
d8e0659e47f49ce00c69dae6bdf5963b
790e0b6b3c56d238496b8b81801fb56af4f98360
'2011-08-19T15:26:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACENS' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
693a46bbb0819a5e2fc5f367cbeff479
4854f66b5a6fe2b562ab35e0028b4a365099f3c0
'2011-08-19T15:26:50-04:00'
describe
'434279' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACENT' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
c80c4eff0da27f5cc228bc005fa55b28
6ce72b66efb2c501b4305f06f17232402561c866
describe
'114012' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACENU' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
beef0129c5a6c73f5c9bfe5853a342da
8678c798d6557ae91618274e153e10a1b79aeb29
'2011-08-19T15:21:56-04:00'
describe
'30251' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACENV' 'sip-files00152.pro'
d740a1c0a931773240473d435d7d20c8
32e1c7d28e89b136025fdc6819cc34f7a78135fa
describe
'35021' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACENW' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
c0449805a7e71334aada751a52f278b9
f62b37b85aa68fa5306ab4ad4005f099991b3419
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACENX' 'sip-files00152.tif'
2fa7b1236af7fb1048c139176df49303
ce78d86f0c57fbc81f6846fac1d7b03fe4866bd3
'2011-08-19T15:29:41-04:00'
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACENY' 'sip-files00152.txt'
caa0d156fec265b2042c712404e113f8
b89f10dbea57b85691868151f9609c0642c93f82
describe
'9000' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACENZ' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
c5edce1dd710008055d44f08c0391d33
bb71da4ee14d642c25b8b274e86090a60aedad17
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEOA' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
2118dac412a94f4c0cac6ff6dcacf108
5ce1f6334f0cf96354960339cea3e1f189add709
describe
'106252' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEOB' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
933a4bc175ab3c8ac80715c5a8e76ac0
19f76bb153b824bf17793c394b5d5b29c61bbb37
'2011-08-19T15:27:31-04:00'
describe
'29655' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEOC' 'sip-files00153.pro'
61237bc25c939c492a8e2b29eadd0a3d
8c1fc75105b51bd319dee4fa5f1e0408633bfa53
describe
'32818' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEOD' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
0885e30cd0e708325a6c5aae274fb074
527a71b02469d757a5b2f27aeda5240c79be442d
describe
'3483880' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEOE' 'sip-files00153.tif'
61767d68836d5421a7db05878d03da09
116a3c99c3c691f694800f17c94efd995616cec5
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEOF' 'sip-files00153.txt'
372cf3f42d4c537dae92d57b266b6017
3632ceba62228a42c2fa93765e86681e0700a254
'2011-08-19T15:21:51-04:00'
describe
'8238' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEOG' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
4136a8b2f19362321aa41aaff3551984
3fa6dd9f6ceacf3a0f81dcfe7164c79f06893c0e
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEOH' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
1e2460ac32bebbfb698fd5484c75fa7b
44ba21cb74a748cb67010c22ecece7945c21c45a
'2011-08-19T15:22:36-04:00'
describe
'115078' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEOI' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
f4507fdd8135b2bf726e14af572adaf5
f3865426bf187ce4767c38465881f6ed4f284ce6
'2011-08-19T15:23:46-04:00'
describe
'30404' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEOJ' 'sip-files00154.pro'
da2b61ae5b014d0dcb3231733091b859
f6d0fc5ff291389a4efa14b46dab66421a976e53
'2011-08-19T15:22:26-04:00'
describe
'36003' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEOK' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
bf4ba0f679ab5b232c63a004cc4ccb85
73055fbf7151b31c36f1f69dcfb039e8eb3e3a21
describe
'3484132' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEOL' 'sip-files00154.tif'
8c0497b11dd8286000c923ab0beea8ef
140132ded6a8ce6f83520e835f7a5d2724405386
'2011-08-19T15:21:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEOM' 'sip-files00154.txt'
8b30b2b600d95eb71f5358c6d2da9f0e
fe3a029426ad7385a832e3d22664b3b1de9c9f89
describe
'9147' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEON' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
5f40a734c0b866416405fae4e0d889a7
fd348b6697f4105aca4f7b3c72293eda9156ffd9
describe
'434569' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEOO' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
81b3695354e215b1b4ccaaba458a9859
fda9e291fac0d0e6c46075098932a878c012ab76
'2011-08-19T15:33:59-04:00'
describe
'117074' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEOP' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
25743c5e32c7d1054811ba3ffbfcdc79
5bd468d0f7208e3f0af5b7101fee19738d761cce
describe
'30784' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEOQ' 'sip-files00155.pro'
e70edba37d04fba8bc7cb88cda6307a1
573425344e2d27f78df98ca87d7f0ceca96fe085
describe
'35553' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEOR' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
81558fd107c310389eb7768dfa698305
126d10052e36ad42900069ecee6a75ed1a4f1f84
'2011-08-19T15:26:36-04:00'
describe
'3486260' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEOS' 'sip-files00155.tif'
501c7c539ec3de75a910262be42e5706
6ad15c6fa8acd19f8c9671c4dd6abfc68de314bd
'2011-08-19T15:33:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEOT' 'sip-files00155.txt'
de28a26c6ac1a91a2ba407e8bf3c8ff2
3ad8c8dcdf0721d0f46c8368a419cc3be2f752b6
describe
'8979' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEOU' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
a9e78cedb077a988a71b19e922f25edc
bed0c0eb9982ed0ca9b46727bd1564cd836e7465
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEOV' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
fc99e3eb70b79eafc4d26bb57c573477
4b976474420ab54a5d2c49ed3fb0b0c713fb2067
describe
'111147' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEOW' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
e91bdbc3bd5d7cb8c02cda98f47137b5
6d6ce49d8624afa07696bf2325542044fe96d8ad
describe
'29706' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEOX' 'sip-files00156.pro'
7f50a1b5e8508723a8060893ca59f3d2
2f00c8858c081c954a42cd99a56bc0cc146081df
describe
'34490' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEOY' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
c9ff5057ae97d93dc869a496ff0cce2d
e9699489581968432ab36180ef9fea7b4d8af1fa
describe
'3484012' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEOZ' 'sip-files00156.tif'
6638f5eaa2840b6c0ad3736021c74cb5
214413e4f4138d9daa14f337ad47671d9103a918
'2011-08-19T15:26:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPA' 'sip-files00156.txt'
950611c39c3513561c69b4b1da79e052
bcca141b42dcd835c57db68bc95d965e9195d159
describe
'8827' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPB' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
a2e66898374e31b17f7da16533c39b82
1faed7f4e5aeba6f53304d8b70af46f4f3514c8e
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPC' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
cba42afb7195c42d2cc8a9dd54e75737
de43e631793d7f006277bd0e1836b7d35d72d5e0
'2011-08-19T15:29:21-04:00'
describe
'112935' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPD' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
d451ba3e717de35d3183db365dd439b3
38bc09deb88e65ded4366b1a27a97e9ba177c07c
'2011-08-19T15:23:17-04:00'
describe
'30595' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPE' 'sip-files00157.pro'
7e61f577ebb4f93282747e2d631b77cf
e0127c8c90ad19ba9e5654342d65c4449309d4b6
describe
'34727' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPF' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
86d64771405e5f1e4531714d4589a9c3
7404435ec2b40ebb3edd86f1e3605ecb29ff23bb
'2011-08-19T15:27:04-04:00'
describe
'3486132' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPG' 'sip-files00157.tif'
2458900a13753b9d8a9c45450b433a59
d9b610be5442b508102b82007d736a96ff142e0c
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPH' 'sip-files00157.txt'
7f6f5a585898931d2cfba2abf9b3e063
356de3c77a99dbb04788e0b5601f8e1f9a5fd728
'2011-08-19T15:26:26-04:00'
describe
'8717' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPI' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
47c9a02c8a368e2a95ada3eaeac31a5a
cf4783665902077bf4b0e2e058ab9fd480b0a84a
describe
'434308' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPJ' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
b8207ba357b6dc30dc6798ae1b1282e3
836f733e6dec7168d023c1465dc144291d7eeb77
'2011-08-19T15:30:27-04:00'
describe
'118328' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPK' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
7f791e728331cb9303e91ca95bba47b3
01ceaf36eb4b98952a11d1f53b73e65684ed8adc
'2011-08-19T15:23:10-04:00'
describe
'30807' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPL' 'sip-files00158.pro'
467e3807f18d374e90e26d6764256c1f
9c5d50035c990658794bd02dc70bc04af968d78b
'2011-08-19T15:26:10-04:00'
describe
'36081' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPM' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
c19405cfa2e2a03fa80c39f15f0a14b6
d7da1e2400d702fbd64bfc33dd5bf41921cf81af
'2011-08-19T15:28:29-04:00'
describe
'3484164' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPN' 'sip-files00158.tif'
99a21298bd4ba07fb55756e0dc9773a1
1f066b53610287065731742650c618b37891a34b
'2011-08-19T15:32:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPO' 'sip-files00158.txt'
4d404a068bd9936f8d5d78828d72a115
94785f88cd74f87d37da5920ec323c82b80e13c8
'2011-08-19T15:31:54-04:00'
describe
'9186' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPP' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
fb9ab5b9b8a9402c1b29458da16509bf
565b83349b2d5c6f48fe945f9904ece409cec1ad
describe
'434576' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPQ' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
24b3840788fd8d2da942b9f024968fa6
93f6f5849436aa3379c266edef6b9b2673373012
describe
'114568' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPR' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
ebef1f895fd82f4f8baaab43c76c8793
8ffcbf1f39a76c1327138f62d5a62753eecdde8d
describe
'30096' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPS' 'sip-files00159.pro'
d56c61af7e976e201d03317b1971c711
c66b21538818cd5e65b232f0ad6818fab59a1879
'2011-08-19T15:21:40-04:00'
describe
'35459' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPT' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
f25083a38fe05c0b7a4825f3077fa8a5
54df95372d4fa863228f2bb0e09d566e70b87720
describe
'3486232' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPU' 'sip-files00159.tif'
527dd09a802fa3cdb535de7eb6641b97
c58ff86e6625e81f8f90c5f232c133d2327f5c79
'2011-08-19T15:31:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPV' 'sip-files00159.txt'
6103e5d72307e7033b37b74d8f598c7a
a6435ff7a2070f259f00c5f348e6b8fd4cab99c4
'2011-08-19T15:30:26-04:00'
describe
'8912' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPW' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
cb391ce2b7fba63d1548480191aa69a9
1f27f9686d349e391fa123b4b5d54f92234d5075
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPX' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
4017199700abb9a11fd263f642719f33
48ddb8af76c99a0f3bcfa318182ad8cfd4522e99
'2011-08-19T15:29:23-04:00'
describe
'102882' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPY' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
78ee06c2bd9b11dfe778d47e061bc19d
3595c9262bbf92b7d32108e2b63df1d41af40ed1
describe
'27295' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEPZ' 'sip-files00160.pro'
f8e032270411a4087dcde28577dc0ed0
78fa0148ed77de4fe9d730e8bdedd41634ce194b
describe
'32413' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQA' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
a0405694fe9593a2bf656d8e95bed798
9e729a299946ce4eb8a37f47732e28f5452a51e7
describe
'3483788' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQB' 'sip-files00160.tif'
7c72ec3c85b28222553edb395fcf7d4b
ad568a40398f66842d9078ee4d2cb8a1dfeafed9
'2011-08-19T15:24:35-04:00'
describe
'1083' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQC' 'sip-files00160.txt'
a20e6792987c4c0be59ed94f6e15f891
5a55d6e23d22e036ed433d59d13146e3093daf1f
describe
'8588' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQD' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
5950b38773b37019b060328c1cb28d36
c335fabc694c70d7b73e3d2f39fb47f00c168024
'2011-08-19T15:30:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQE' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
e5614c765cf5d2b4c5e888eccf34c2bb
feb65de1d4014fff871ea8e52e51df6f626d2209
describe
'101168' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQF' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
3cf27d419368f9d4aadc862e49eea7b7
4a31a8349667dba4f66abe417ccc329b56698f9c
'2011-08-19T15:28:20-04:00'
describe
'27211' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQG' 'sip-files00161.pro'
7aa5d3ea2703e81bc36ab12e3875334b
92fdcb00e0cd4316565e96273aa9038aae7cb11c
describe
'31558' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQH' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
b1ccf96d7743754b23ab56f461fcb816
475b6e7db1115059d577bf9fefa4dc69472544f8
describe
'3485996' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQI' 'sip-files00161.tif'
04a64019fcac93d748891672ed436e8a
df557699c7eda3879679616f018f0979d8a68333
'2011-08-19T15:20:46-04:00'
describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQJ' 'sip-files00161.txt'
df860498e41afbe1ade61c1b8f95ee72
0eb74315def8fbdab9c766bdc69b6ca61f9e7caf
'2011-08-19T15:25:54-04:00'
describe
'7982' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQK' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
72fcd6580870673bcfc29888869b1214
8262f5e28be47a201d37962633e5e1a567090360
'2011-08-19T15:21:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQL' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
51b54462d2ec9af078e000a4100714b7
e0bd71660f5aa55ecfd18f0d15fe44341bdfc78c
'2011-08-19T15:29:54-04:00'
describe
'101710' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQM' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
0f3926137568f11ee452970bd6f306ec
85734ea2c8625da9a2a8a52f183de039a67809ca
describe
'27530' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQN' 'sip-files00162.pro'
d6b7ce92c8449ca5370d8b999c4d6df9
53d7a5b45c403eef382e0df0badb4bd37da379cf
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQO' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
392ed728c1efe9d03abc87bfe8d783f6
0962268ecce55c03e549818de933e4a49749d3f3
describe
'3483700' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQP' 'sip-files00162.tif'
cc2d31a327f502a1227900edd26ca4f1
4bc06c92c1f947c3652ddfd8276b4bcc3f1537e6
'2011-08-19T15:22:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQQ' 'sip-files00162.txt'
e19013a7fe6975759d25d91ba7ac63e0
49142a3888ecc9052143ac5f54ef0bcd06eafee9
describe
'8055' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQR' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
2f80076524d29d8a35f02a7d44b2b03c
2579d0bce2e8c90a65f0dedd4f3c00746e3362b8
'2011-08-19T15:28:24-04:00'
describe
'434090' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQS' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
fe1d72632147f5ff6ec42b339cd48152
f3b8b86721e26405893f842d47e81d3eed16be33
describe
'83071' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQT' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
ac2f67c3d35698a470ad838051d9d8cc
7018abfcc4bc0dee1c2cec0e4043e9abffefb2af
'2011-08-19T15:25:18-04:00'
describe
'21288' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQU' 'sip-files00163.pro'
43f9f33743e09555205fbc4b9f08183e
947a2e6215f293ad5f93374cc6ddb0d83e48c8e5
describe
'26078' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQV' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
acc563402d19fd6e197f6511ca6c6eb8
4037a48dd8fe07c236f492acb694e32c27f044f7
'2011-08-19T15:28:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQW' 'sip-files00163.tif'
dff9f267845b65605ade4059f29f6052
d83cd97c46401aefa1baeb6850323d8371d966d1
'2011-08-19T15:23:55-04:00'
describe
'855' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQX' 'sip-files00163.txt'
695a0f20e19c475985f6afec8a06f24f
96082ebbfd463499de4981b87f877524ca789048
'2011-08-19T15:23:38-04:00'
describe
'6549' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQY' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
0a44ef002f112afe22f5a5e77c5bcf7c
14b43416a09e369db3414296cf30c4d0461abfa6
describe
'88839' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEQZ' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
ae437d43f9b6d43c603cb53d8c100652
a38c5d15199135bbb77f0aa2d6acc56565343bac
describe
'7580' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERA' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
978760031a6965f94c5fe12f947d806d
282c7d915f2b63a2aeadffd924820b5a71f9fd55
'2011-08-19T15:23:47-04:00'
describe
'2224' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERB' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
b3901c6cb695219a40c0f139739f1499
66e5d219b10b414501e8a5c8ad9fdadbab55e09c
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERC' 'sip-files00164.tif'
c7df4f99bb8ee5fda41da74f37668b50
d09a81d6b0e02fd148c2b3dc75c1a54d1ab062f1
describe
'833' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERD' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
1c139a6baaa60c516bf3841e6fd63108
68d72ebe85096bd942f149802a2aa3eaf1c6bcc4
'2011-08-19T15:31:53-04:00'
describe
'78130' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERE' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
38af010b333f1c7cf00d0ec928706e45
09b8252028af36d3bc48321fcc10a0b51b5cf677
describe
'11695' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERF' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
ce638877a1fedf25ba1603902009f34b
fb910b42b6ca78c9485706fd05d457e556135a70
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERG' 'sip-files00165.pro'
fcc662e2f610e0c22f8941bcdf723cc7
13a08714ff311f1a8f9c15af01ec525bda2b75d1
describe
'3651' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERH' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
b8054830b714d37f34cc31966286b27d
61b4d825a16ff711eafaa764145dbc04fa00393e
describe
'3483304' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERI' 'sip-files00165.tif'
45a3165aa925c4b746d2471616c8cd9a
cd73070488b84a91764273c36d24af9f4a9f8ce2
'2011-08-19T15:33:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERJ' 'sip-files00165.txt'
20d4c90171cd878f08cacb1a614d6d8e
0c4cc1bef7a6fd5f24cfdb3fb36a6276f6b0f16d
describe
'1441' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERK' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
f1def19d628f62e0fba4db63bc982f77
e1483113b01b98b6fefd676bf12a75691fbfb8ef
describe
'455281' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERL' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
63e22b7853b49d8e8622283a16e7baf1
8353ea8945fee6caf5b397849d031dbe527ed535
'2011-08-19T15:24:02-04:00'
describe
'159765' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERM' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
1b0984fecf359dd0132740e9e516d484
11a697a8ce6a619ac96ef9fa3ee1a179ac5957a0
describe
'35866' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERN' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
a94d3f10cb1264d1ad2836c2c12fcc5c
5ed519f56f3e2ae6fd1fcdd88c1c0624d1598192
describe
'10936456' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERO' 'sip-files00168.tif'
faa914c44cba66aec588ec3f0d5aa232
a2aabcd8b1ba4084059b1c0647a0045bef3f8be7
'2011-08-19T15:32:41-04:00'
describe
'9869' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERP' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
0789da8f3d892666b2c6287a14000425
80d164fa243d6fcd8cfe475a718b658eb6cb0dc7
describe
'434577' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERQ' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
0603d101fac77107e9a7fa3726473950
a0e2e699df506fdea498ca5d4f42beb5ac7cd3f6
'2011-08-19T15:24:14-04:00'
describe
'95554' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERR' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
e8ca2519a77149e1887334dc2aeda8d1
250b7c5574248f41f9735bdea0f4d330484b5188
describe
'23052' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERS' 'sip-files00169.pro'
86df87d47a91d48671b2c9f8cd99f9c6
91c65e9578a58c2f097aad3ce2fd9f4414760731
describe
'29648' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERT' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
c61a56b26f025621012516f351fdf441
fb103e6c2ed65b1b00493729dd913d34891e42c9
'2011-08-19T15:25:32-04:00'
describe
'10437616' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERU' 'sip-files00169.tif'
888c60491873987adaab53f1ba85986a
684d8b840278fa7fbab1e31d9de79995892ea9d8
'2011-08-19T15:33:33-04:00'
describe
'944' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERV' 'sip-files00169.txt'
04e8bb48c430fce38b382b7cf9cd0239
c72b637d269b928df4154b58e42fe50231e4a236
describe
'7805' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERW' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
a3e7d57b401114462bbea3ac19a0c8a7
12fcfd1416924bb79b24deec03eb5cd00d28d749
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERX' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
ffe36bdc7d80ade33f7c29396ae4b207
8292cbb6a39d50ee386ac89a0eee1223f839bb1b
describe
'123771' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERY' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
a4eeaf723a5d25999c9f6a256f5c941e
6f9a452f2300d10b51f6ba01733b3aaab8f56012
'2011-08-19T15:27:03-04:00'
describe
'33484' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACERZ' 'sip-files00170.pro'
9673debb86dd4eb10edb4c9452ee60fa
663543c589ae55991d3054e68d0622ba4cc9e8fe
describe
'38397' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACESA' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
1ced42021ba90cbc8ff2202e436013a3
5546d180d3c8ae2945ec8b092437897333449e00
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACESB' 'sip-files00170.tif'
76ce11515a2426c50d8469f96f3c0792
74ea756de6c57b8fc811a7c233099da9de2e4c0e
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACESC' 'sip-files00170.txt'
267142521ba29f430aee5e7e3355008d
49d51487feb8de4be48d9ebe15dfe1917e7f8f88
describe
'9071' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACESD' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
7aabeefba03e44713de659f7c65b3181
123eaf699cae92d8dab132a98b887fc3eafea483
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACESE' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
83bf23d1301d838c50cfe4db2a962b5c
94314aba222be666eba4306a23130a779fbf7b70
describe
'127462' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACESF' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
1591de5ab6d6b9c8c970be02bed0dde8
b66aa72b61af5234425c4df15fd7539a6138cd2f
'2011-08-19T15:22:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACESG' 'sip-files00171.pro'
14a21adbff81375bd772d0492e26618c
d1ff929a0ee3cb113a42f55aa7b1a53a88201341
describe
'38228' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACESH' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
5a0ec304362a27f2dfbbec0bf226fbba
9022ee32e9a528336db60d76e1f9f4281095ff92
'2011-08-19T15:33:55-04:00'
describe
'3484080' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACESI' 'sip-files00171.tif'
4096439abd70c2eb18dd3f76fd20294b
9de4f369d8bd3e025d918cec0ca806b565728708
describe
'1310' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACESJ' 'sip-files00171.txt'
7a3898dc2aeb36505685a6f97bcf1604
45104b99d9173cf1badb23034dd1709f6e8ced87
describe
'9160' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACESK' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
89d580a1ce1eda6a3ad8efad2e704cbe
d42f9be1764415ba3decca1aab541b97b4fd4a35
describe
'434222' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACESL' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
760a0f4b837ccc2eb7096b5d16e23a25
6f6ff4ca03e118a76031002e89693b56ad34f836
describe
'112844' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACESM' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
fbc9b9ff52c5cb65115e46bbeda1ef20
d5870d568fd1d2ced59d3200beaeb9ca5cfe07f6
describe
'29460' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACESN' 'sip-files00172.pro'
d2f1eec8e99685a3224d028b29ab605b
2b314ffa881d4e49f52f7e0f9876e362bf33c864
describe
'34996' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACESO' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
7eb40a84cb78d62070e47a3c4e1603d2
b547a80af3e2db4be3917f86dc7a0ad07fc834c6
describe
'3484188' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACESP' 'sip-files00172.tif'
0bde9c490b68ec716a4a4fc82ad7f110
254e0a0460af7cc9af51a5b827b71468a027bf37
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACESQ' 'sip-files00172.txt'
3233b47c4e17e04564a91511ccef5ab5
a2d68618d08ca0790a829271c51d6c066fd95645
describe
'8972' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACESR' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
7879c46520f7f2576cca35c34e6c3c02
dc053171bab89c3317c86c8745f1577e29439f01
describe
'434320' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACESS' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
bc053e2aafe0d1b7a4976270d1739a95
9bd4be90945dc11ecd3bfdb7de4e2e9b128bfa39
describe
'118141' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEST' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
a2dfa41d8fcf3b747ce9288f2c40f0f2
3dbe54ca7117eae85eca8602ec683f79049c9495
describe
'31442' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACESU' 'sip-files00173.pro'
30754f4815d645b9a8b03f905c2873b8
f9edba480f6b9d39324ce75b24878532f8505ecc
'2011-08-19T15:23:05-04:00'
describe
'36155' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACESV' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
1e3c46b2a59c3eb86ec492cddda6f8ec
80489b57386b7a342be8b18c9bff137acc0c5b5d
describe
'3484168' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACESW' 'sip-files00173.tif'
f30865318b36cff9d80cec3d5422953d
c580e12804513cafc1519399b517c8f61e05eac9
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACESX' 'sip-files00173.txt'
d2fe607a55679a851feebbeb5d0d48cc
636253fecf89889ab848586504d6ac05e9375b5c
describe
'9012' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACESY' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
366df61878872d42afdd9cdb4dd679a5
deffba4d0c424877b7e67a58eada5b87edfc3047
describe
'434313' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACESZ' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
d0495b48118bea9268f16ffecba9ecce
1fac79cb1d114cd0b7d7e1107ef13b57f79d6b8d
describe
'110709' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETA' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
2e48c28ccb08988f4167240daa7f8121
0156f8b56bf6acbeea9b7dbaadb3ea10a8543919
describe
'30126' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETB' 'sip-files00174.pro'
309e0b7ca2005de59725e4311fff0a0d
6964bded22806e11c6de9ff4696acbd8c416f63d
describe
'33633' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETC' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
4a24f264bb3522e76a3ffe0770e3d899
3515f1394351428f143e8e0c5a47cb39245ecb83
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETD' 'sip-files00174.tif'
4ec3aedfbc4b064025203511a14377cd
23a11d83728500a3589eeac6f7fb6d7b92c677b2
'2011-08-19T15:28:33-04:00'
describe
'1197' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETE' 'sip-files00174.txt'
170aa231579dacab9875ad93768a72dd
4d3606f343f41d9d87da0886d1bef63f4408c681
'2011-08-19T15:29:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETF' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
ac4adc7f3e937ec6fc6a43f94b6890ad
f9e85e83bcd24d8c3f2789c2fb948d2608f25062
'2011-08-19T15:28:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETG' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
02ab3b7ffd0a1101eceadaafdfc07c9a
c6d39476033a0fa49cdae40752ba428513680522
describe
'111571' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETH' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
515abd7e3f21409c67851ece5b13ed33
c217301b78bac488c9a96d15dbea2ad21b6da645
describe
'30137' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETI' 'sip-files00175.pro'
7132197767fdbd772f600d4b25bbaaa0
e397e64eb4dfd3f8a37a8da0120de04fdcd4028f
describe
'34970' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETJ' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
1bbe224fb0f3a183f38ea84576397fd3
6c837719f358fe142fbcb99f12d210e4c9c66955
describe
'3484020' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETK' 'sip-files00175.tif'
4a89a9de131115306e4ddb13b325160f
e1fb3aee01c64a0bef492a50c91df706ddc2fdd4
'2011-08-19T15:26:41-04:00'
describe
'1200' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETL' 'sip-files00175.txt'
fe9766c0dfafd9f1209bcdc297dff16a
de6bf04c5603128a93146412600f19a1dffa8294
describe
'8694' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETM' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
fe976cf3a2c2d12f8b81631414964ea2
3eb34f4d5c417a74cb29ffb5048f620f7cd0f0fd
describe
'434290' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETN' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
67c0ed63b59cf8cb384a0f76e652655d
c27ee6f614f48aefd5b861fd1b698ded0ddc9677
'2011-08-19T15:21:53-04:00'
describe
'104557' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETO' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
754aa78fa92611671058f73ea5537fdc
ba8d42bcba63166842bd3b7cb42994aa46e93bab
describe
'27692' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETP' 'sip-files00176.pro'
e79cd0014a217ce9dea62d7ce86ee397
797239bd987496fd9b59b561fe79e2f19ecb959c
describe
'32748' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETQ' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
4643be344b62e9c20cd54ef82f530f04
c02e00ffb0633b251bd56fb8b46f9ede6830eb4f
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETR' 'sip-files00176.tif'
f224e15edfe8cc5fdc3cd2249f5b0e20
e6465c8e6738ad37153ba465885c88a5fd202789
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETS' 'sip-files00176.txt'
0bb6fda1c42d8df300f4f98350c0f87e
7139603cc26f7fed7ed1970361e54a0aa39ebb52
'2011-08-19T15:32:29-04:00'
describe
'8798' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETT' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
66cb75c8acb73a5620f9436ccfee7d53
8072e1a5bca4bc319e5ff0d36d7a9ce03a0b5ba9
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETU' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
25f34e161cd8042853b8f1621bfe04c5
cd1223cf4046c1ae0fb76319a3608621b8256256
describe
'117452' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETV' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
bd3d54246bc3619d55eb4bf366421cc8
68de90c7bed450ee33cb2ba2f7be4446ce88bda1
describe
'31466' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETW' 'sip-files00177.pro'
e2ddc501fdfa403c8bc48d5d6a7dcaf8
003b716db88c02a15568026856ac7eb56ff9daa7
describe
'37192' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETX' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
a2102868daacb99cac09c78efb9b397e
9433645b0430e9e1928de4ec10eafded5e986e28
'2011-08-19T15:22:56-04:00'
describe
'3484096' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETY' 'sip-files00177.tif'
10dc2edd7331aca02fb9bff8d624f96f
7c922230197f6875d19e6748567680a4021fd164
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACETZ' 'sip-files00177.txt'
911826df3394e2f5b67d7b349ad5f368
234f86d04f7847d6859cc2110bd180299a263735
'2011-08-19T15:32:01-04:00'
describe
'9267' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUA' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
462f9e362fcc863dd2072026d79e3a4b
ce127def62da096b2d303749cda9fa4b91afecae
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUB' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
e6bf74ac224c5f17a17dd882676fce6d
a6c13c4f83af88b148c8e5ee2a89203978df6931
'2011-08-19T15:31:26-04:00'
describe
'110162' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUC' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
c4a5d8477569c812acb77406c85ed4d0
eae8845de1226410876783c455ba93c3ff1f8e1c
describe
'29290' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUD' 'sip-files00178.pro'
0c65d7bb8e58cc3874c98a93b56d0e63
83a69cfda315e4dd0c00a590a1ecb55216ab04a5
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUE' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
319f637a61f68e4660a0f7265f0045e3
ba98e95420f19603bb86fe19c15245f4c9de10e9
'2011-08-19T15:21:31-04:00'
describe
'3483916' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUF' 'sip-files00178.tif'
473b41002148590a503a9a08a42d5f9d
90e9340b25edaae0fbc238f617d5627da7210c26
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUG' 'sip-files00178.txt'
6a968af6ffbd617c3d60cdf3030ad19c
55e3355efa21827e8c21f9ce213ec182fc456956
describe
'8909' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUH' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
f4785dcda47d1137d0d810a40b113a59
45226f62c9e3ece4b07c1d91cf8db4ee9536d585
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUI' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
e26a10119a8e13567b556ba23e7fbe29
334dd135f993aec53c82d3656ca064ebdc3b0b05
describe
'120979' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUJ' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
de311df3d6a1af5d4118372bfc841833
2ec8e0a93fb7e5dc716ccc83aa55218ebb4138b4
describe
'32185' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUK' 'sip-files00179.pro'
91014c4af7d6e6a74baf31ef922fad79
2cbd4911f1a52a8131bbcb1c94813f9ce2674a25
describe
'35998' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUL' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
61a9a26a248e9d384fb0db13a4992b77
21df946e5928c2e2be48a0dbc7586886e3655b1c
'2011-08-19T15:34:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUM' 'sip-files00179.tif'
8cd51ea0e06c656b2a0eee32b85748f2
a682e695ecfd37c18e14ca3891e88247cc71a859
'2011-08-19T15:22:27-04:00'
describe
'1271' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUN' 'sip-files00179.txt'
e61183cc4534e1fe95ae7b690dc2ac0a
4c423ced3a082594a941e6d30fc03091ce21ab08
describe
'8676' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUO' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
6b0e139ebbe4019f840998886691e3c1
ec18f0ccad5338080034582f04cbc3879f15c7fc
'2011-08-19T15:32:06-04:00'
describe
'434297' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUP' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
1f13d058826aae7c4c343365a2046c47
cacfd49aeb445dbfdd01a9f04149a37c977baca1
'2011-08-19T15:32:31-04:00'
describe
'119902' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUQ' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
6bbaf5bfd2c46978f5d98bf72e72a8a9
6fa83ec089494742ce9767e3dcde61af8d34c222
'2011-08-19T15:24:44-04:00'
describe
'31462' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUR' 'sip-files00180.pro'
2646afdaecdd51a49568961ccc0b7818
ed33f2fde1682194d4653d35fe521b4118344acc
describe
'36826' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUS' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
790d9b80b5d5e3630304445be8da08d3
d9ebe25a80004fc5d74ab8904df6544b46b0616f
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUT' 'sip-files00180.tif'
1ae75b5f0ce8eb0d5d50da34eecb81af
8c09335cf63dfab8eec6d4c73c84507061983846
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUU' 'sip-files00180.txt'
4d86356eb59f9b4fa370af2ef9dd13fc
b9f0dc5775de13abe69ac62ebd0e8b487bac5fee
describe
'9323' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUV' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
5b1320d5ddea1f6768ae6b98e2f33176
b7d17e8aa3148d02647f47b517b8b3fe1220fa59
'2011-08-19T15:27:11-04:00'
describe
'434582' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUW' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
172da43842fb66ba66e64d5118d31a37
24a536112e8d64dd1185757afff2400d912f468a
'2011-08-19T15:30:17-04:00'
describe
'110834' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUX' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
233e8d3f803242806035224f72043abd
58acf6550b386498703d2213af75fdf56ef1238c
describe
'29201' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUY' 'sip-files00181.pro'
3b28d88e13a66c63bf578f6fc673963d
6b1478ea8e897f9319c4450eb749193ff6ebc6ff
'2011-08-19T15:34:23-04:00'
describe
'34908' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEUZ' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
8ae5ec6a7758632b55d0bb61c377fd2f
e8226626f2b9809c5877aca6aad7de175ed6f2dd
describe
'3486344' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVA' 'sip-files00181.tif'
c77503c12a13368588d0914455be3ac7
68cc4165e8414020ac71dc7bdb7c884b2693e83e
'2011-08-19T15:33:25-04:00'
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVB' 'sip-files00181.txt'
8555e5260bfa495d6d0a28cbaed6d1ab
8044d8fb22bded6b04471dc07d389288e60ad7b4
describe
'8684' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVC' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
767455fd02d9953f6d0ad3cbd71d2364
3c50f1b65e741b78f1f20cf4495fd0c3144a2bb5
'2011-08-19T15:21:08-04:00'
describe
'434219' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVD' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
963874397cf51188823ce81e68553ea3
02984d5f9ea65ec3bdfa7efa261789e240359da9
'2011-08-19T15:21:42-04:00'
describe
'124702' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVE' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
f80a48156bd5cc42ab204b1f791d95d6
296e512d3233cae7fc956873599069369355c4aa
'2011-08-19T15:30:43-04:00'
describe
'33253' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVF' 'sip-files00182.pro'
26c9b8be42cef37b5c9d05758020b8e9
d8874cf935f1789fb5baf24ec52cf6196a403df5
describe
'37690' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVG' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
8aa1c17e175bc457cbb89000798bf639
1ae035ab270b04e5a3c22473b3e931c8ff0f85a3
'2011-08-19T15:26:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVH' 'sip-files00182.tif'
18a457bea17addfede195422b4c61fce
a5171c94837f6a8cb9e0d844e632d17464ad0bc3
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVI' 'sip-files00182.txt'
c7e4801a16ab52a418769b3aa3da6ef5
398f5a1c37b5f42bc9fb74b395d52e30fe798c70
describe
'9013' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVJ' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
7823e447fc229677f001489d984f9489
c05bfa003cfd595e42f1aea62440009af4798f86
'2011-08-19T15:28:58-04:00'
describe
'434242' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVK' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
60135659b34b23c63004a1d89cb25c16
0222d578177de34f13bf8f7d7298e50d6748051d
describe
'111055' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVL' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
548a8ebff356656bd8e1efc0e8cdc43b
bd5564fd949814d66b8b3894b74c923ccff9e7f9
describe
'29691' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVM' 'sip-files00183.pro'
955a72fbb013d25f5a2f3ce87dd0ae5f
c22fa1e21e7837696b06848381c7fa6774bb7863
describe
'34400' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVN' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
66b63f586b651cfc247aa1d37086d9aa
4d628130a4b7cd00c1a528b9536cb099defcc8b6
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVO' 'sip-files00183.tif'
4209692e4a4868ee447ea732fac635c8
ae55d55998a2b93a2eb8fa270f40e99705acd5cd
'2011-08-19T15:32:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVP' 'sip-files00183.txt'
0d9ce49ce00725fc0cd964b8ce170d50
fa247c547b813ab109a6162f2dabf69e570f524e
describe
'8359' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVQ' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
e7f48ca228946b7bce7c30de1f2f1777
c6e0c3fa6022f36f8535656023a8b2cd472bf5d0
describe
'434098' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVR' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
cb63a484d429e5a5444f5a223d827c83
4cc4a8c44057a959485acf1069fbce0b124161ef
describe
'116729' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVS' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
224a433fec52ab2395c9b8fb541d9c0c
47a85f0543f85d85435d7ecee0e56abb2aef9b35
describe
'30397' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVT' 'sip-files00184.pro'
b9e1506fdbf7c19ef40bc46a2a3da5ec
906721e3c918b9bdc9383857357132b574056a79
describe
'35708' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVU' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
4340d18f7155791aac13e9345917e867
eb8c97983ec1c37ba475aaf4b541c656895d5b57
describe
'3482520' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVV' 'sip-files00184.tif'
91f3644cafa1f0af318677513b1f0606
b047d4761f68fb7d371dd870af739b3937cbd7b1
'2011-08-19T15:33:02-04:00'
describe
'1199' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVW' 'sip-files00184.txt'
8b76a66236e2432137c0c6aa6d095b0d
f5346776ecc7f3b567e200ad314d8579e53624a6
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVX' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
373b1e770a66fdbdc078c15c851965a6
1ca54b3784cfef2cba2798ab9f8bc44e6c610d75
'2011-08-19T15:28:52-04:00'
describe
'434260' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVY' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
563d5eedf22632e8d88788ba24d1290a
f7b1a5a62ab4a448c6b588882b37a84be319c2ae
describe
'102673' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEVZ' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
a4a3bb71af6810366f910b1314b3c728
21142484691edf055bbf878579132e9b58288a24
describe
'27719' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWA' 'sip-files00185.pro'
2e129cf50e8e56681062eecab71b278c
37e5da1d4b3c4124e7ca35a7403f8e375be074f4
describe
'32565' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWB' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
f095df85f6d3fdd687d6759e48131e46
195e411c47c90ca86c32dfd7352c3f9657497bd5
'2011-08-19T15:23:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWC' 'sip-files00185.tif'
03b12cb35b78d18de5384b8d7870fe6c
f2705f76deface20677ac8f7985f00542d9f0d66
'2011-08-19T15:27:01-04:00'
describe
'1115' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWD' 'sip-files00185.txt'
02d7939f759d0b63982120855adbfdc6
14a4bd4ac049465629e51a62f00562c8a64ae1e6
describe
'8349' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWE' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
a817a63f99d3d491f34de2f15ca3c8e8
981b9f66666a0f23c8dd5771945550b29e4e9881
describe
'432693' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWF' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
540ebff6e5b7cee891278a8011c1b18c
e2338d75beadff1271972184668e46baa448e189
describe
'123669' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWG' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
adfd962dcf728da5e328c4d5f048a4fb
0e69456e840ea1ca4fec86536a3e6d1f2857bc3e
'2011-08-19T15:30:52-04:00'
describe
'33209' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWH' 'sip-files00186.pro'
6794c760c4f767493cb3846cda326d0a
3e69d154804759a5e0361b36d59a0fe65dc5f379
describe
'38322' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWI' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
8e6f58face899011f79bc18e5d1332ce
8b01bc1836eed67a8f867c890126cc5e23eda4d8
describe
'3471312' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWJ' 'sip-files00186.tif'
0ee9e8f111fe0c1644d32a3291c75626
a5ec54650f4051ca9516521dafe5c9a4ff87b44c
'2011-08-19T15:29:34-04:00'
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWK' 'sip-files00186.txt'
566d5c3f427d18233e1fbc11d1049635
98e575ce663e3edae7d6a6ccd41b22c28f1c7681
describe
'9179' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWL' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
b9ca916fdb67dbb55152657013756088
7c72ef62dd1486b90d02683db2774ac026d36bf9
'2011-08-19T15:27:00-04:00'
describe
'434562' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWM' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
ac702f6c8073b30d02a26ce170c7a43b
b71d91283d97e2a5a2ecdbab9c74ae9195240d83
describe
'114397' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWN' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
c3506ee66a04327527553f4f9731fa4d
1546ca3638ab5e9a6eae4c7eacb68a5a399fef23
'2011-08-19T15:25:06-04:00'
describe
'30464' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWO' 'sip-files00187.pro'
baffd91d2b585f63d609d0a0efe91437
d5eb8180c2df991e802620feafae63690a96a536
describe
'35219' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWP' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
603bf47b9d58df49892677a2fef02efc
b0e791deffdc683bc08bf9701e532024e3b287e3
describe
'3486128' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWQ' 'sip-files00187.tif'
f8a5b6d2d5f9398fa700785c02cb020f
a412ad9bf0f0c8f7ce25eaf7690ad6ed1746d9cc
describe
'1219' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWR' 'sip-files00187.txt'
20d34a02dc054066af8a32ed63ee0f73
8933afc04e2413fd33b5d142606c470d8470912a
describe
'8537' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWS' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
71d35a9f00b0c7744b4d336f1c35c8f2
c1bbd3dd51939a4ea3bd5a09f01542b7be47adc4
'2011-08-19T15:30:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWT' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
b619323d5dd7b8a9309784b09b7cf029
974e0b02f07fe363679e49bee4aef75a7f3b8d53
'2011-08-19T15:21:50-04:00'
describe
'116486' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWU' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
9db6eed72c4126f858983d3746b3cce5
21494d810298f36aad2bd05dd3031dbdf6256e2b
'2011-08-19T15:32:44-04:00'
describe
'30252' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWV' 'sip-files00188.pro'
86f02e39a275fdae4ed74cbfabe38840
c37a08a77d98694b8f98e179d8f9b45b217577ff
describe
'35912' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWW' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
31d4c76de52fd225e4e3cba8d0239e63
273204eea218f34305731689f84d3a460dd9e293
'2011-08-19T15:24:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWX' 'sip-files00188.tif'
d2063ebcebe4d41a1fea873ebb7e7237
a983de70b1c956e9e38b8d1bd2db15ef10a4e6f5
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWY' 'sip-files00188.txt'
5fc67150aed74e5cf2802caf2b0aed61
75d786412b9f13d6b2d8085963ec635f3e22bb0a
'2011-08-19T15:23:50-04:00'
describe
'9133' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEWZ' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
f6d62b48f972be76724f4b19016ef8b0
1dfd4bcdc1157f7474a4f2d8600454441a2e873c
describe
'434086' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXA' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
2685730744237973effcf8351d5ac056
a51416c5458e8167448114b06eb90dd2848fec3e
describe
'114489' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXB' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
887f5218f145a535e5e23a24d7d3114d
671ec43e9c354d25af052444c07ad63ffeab8b6c
'2011-08-19T15:29:37-04:00'
describe
'30719' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXC' 'sip-files00189.pro'
c6353cbdbbae975cd44641514332f81a
6bbd55c2967dc97748fcabb20933a9b7e5617670
'2011-08-19T15:28:19-04:00'
describe
'36062' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXD' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
fe5c01ea762171d76f8af3c98d1596fe
a6e02f978269979ae6b14d6533c71d7c46e78fc1
describe
'3482508' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXE' 'sip-files00189.tif'
b3a624c4c289a0cdf3b6d4fa0452636f
58ce747434af832803eaed3097e89466a91ef1d6
'2011-08-19T15:33:38-04:00'
describe
'1218' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXF' 'sip-files00189.txt'
1e8b6e99ad9558c871625478a9c24ba1
7067fb381c617368e3d32a9258376db2307706b7
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXG' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
faa3e44d83b138a5dc2bb3dda0087942
caded662f1ea9a6fcca8f65096600a5346601d1e
describe
'434303' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXH' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
be2780ad29d9e15b25fb9c75bdc1f105
397729354567f4237ee62c0da2e4ab7b981d2f37
describe
'113964' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXI' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
a023afd4734483731ccc6b0af7d39c78
eddf6b1e54410711c845ac7cf104e105b5ed924d
describe
'30693' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXJ' 'sip-files00190.pro'
6f8e6817cacab37c6e841eb71b33e6ea
f5c43f7661850ec7a57ee4fb6c5580dd02623348
'2011-08-19T15:24:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXK' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
9327fd06b54b14a246af9d1b07d6494e
07734d01344ac55b94ad1b349425c50355fde486
describe
'3483940' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXL' 'sip-files00190.tif'
204ecdb9e910b1b2a8597cdb9de759c2
9d7928504208494c3f8022fc5d78d7cb8ddcd5ab
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXM' 'sip-files00190.txt'
c37406ce823fe125c33ac5080c2270fd
83ae120604fd32f417c4e51fe28dfeb740941fe7
describe
'8685' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXN' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
f603f16b116ae12e8dd65ef292504a8e
969bfde8b86d9e7e92451f0ad927344976aca0f2
'2011-08-19T15:27:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXO' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
cee561960c6f0167286e877f4a82538d
7aa5f4c192e15462404d30ee8c194c8256681f22
describe
'111622' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXP' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
35151a801a1d03b70e9c4bfad1d00845
a00dfc577dc397328b399d31ff9fde17123fdc68
describe
'30122' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXQ' 'sip-files00191.pro'
1636d62337697bf918fc05b3661489f6
1e7658f2897e0dcbe406f5824cbd78f61f673d45
describe
'34823' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXR' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
eb001e323b015c662fdd056204676b42
61329f657b09e91c93a69d5a2c91e15695169a9e
describe
'3483888' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXS' 'sip-files00191.tif'
20ea1ab6fc81e7f905561677b8572394
3b903cf77446821fe8ab4aee0db7f4553e4e8651
describe
'1207' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXT' 'sip-files00191.txt'
c0ea5741c3b285a53606d6552006bd89
120cefe329d3ca8c7b86eb47245c996ffd50fda5
describe
'8681' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXU' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
a6de13152f0a7b21c3c7b4551b4b0f7f
2d032711670c49d8caef9d313c9bdd67343f0ad1
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXV' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
2e6e5a9345802443088a4bccd54a0eb7
fea4a21bf2f803e0e1d208153f4856f72e58dbb5
describe
'113376' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXW' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
881079378b9dcdc12e6083b09e960ca8
a64d8f716e3d356bb0e583d7365b2c75f6d52d29
describe
'29394' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXX' 'sip-files00192.pro'
11eb23af19f9df04d658c8d20f6def76
479460649c69ec983839d995331ec6076d1a8afa
describe
'36039' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXY' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
e9272712b86db3764323ad1d3f835b27
b813cd1c58480526f36ce3af36f2a67c9ee33076
describe
'3484124' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEXZ' 'sip-files00192.tif'
7d2291933b29669a6e58baaf5b29188b
35ee9897d2e775785872d8473eb4ef5141647820
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYA' 'sip-files00192.txt'
0d4d8bca331648b077197063e49568e2
5986ed8e9ded225c0ace4c0806f3ff364f0b384b
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYB' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
9c039cbaec5caeae728a5c957b69167d
0290cb6a5a4724a664fb77dc5ff2bb193c6730b1
'2011-08-19T15:29:02-04:00'
describe
'418657' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYC' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
e643d0399ca284bb5a482693c32398e0
435f1755732e38937005ac3ceb1ab55e33030fe9
'2011-08-19T15:28:40-04:00'
describe
'67211' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYD' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
c11f6392be1727d3c0f2efadd8e1141e
2dad206b3bca1a476ab9e8401ade133875dff6fc
describe
'17324' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYE' 'sip-files00193.pro'
7d40721e0e5543589b7b92015c34a9cb
514f52d0ba249a9e6d26255de74869a3ceeccc10
describe
'21079' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYF' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
7de9a4c7755cc16eb898c52a92f78a97
eeedca22ad2470711041eabcd1d7c2bade38dba4
describe
'3482628' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYG' 'sip-files00193.tif'
0f41dc40792a9d74d4110fa79e450738
68b6d61ca79a35cbc8eb8c33debbb128938b112c
describe
'706' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYH' 'sip-files00193.txt'
aae355cecba5796120110ea5a069a2ed
43da873a3a4c846f934860f58fcfc8970ff1ff65
describe
'5145' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYI' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
eb2d802c06f2ebdb0e805b1360fe8af8
f974e13aa0f489bd22173521dfd0d2eec619f364
describe
'68679' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYJ' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
586ddb3f00b22436ae90f83c8fb5eb97
a43be770dc29938fb59c498a7eabc5733f260048
'2011-08-19T15:31:43-04:00'
describe
'7707' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYK' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
b77361dc18036d39c5bea98f32d6e47e
7b786e490b952a0318a96d1e9447b21b7cbf9d79
describe
'2261' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYL' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
6d4bd353179bf74d5aa2615ac367256f
38494b31b0c0b5a66e3978a8d2d93be0cba6c80b
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYM' 'sip-files00194.tif'
cce6ef8152194c832669bcb401f05646
ed851d3e671726babe34a747c43b8fc4a34a19df
'2011-08-19T15:27:46-04:00'
describe
'812' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYN' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
ad9d850775185f57bd86ef5156fccdce
e061d70d2d36a7761c538625d0ee8b95ba07b1ff
describe
'60943' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYO' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
69278935cc898b18ecadf74bfc961189
59206612778962ab6c12c67a27c2c4c1e42d3d61
describe
'10695' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYP' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
480ca98c4e89eb39c57feb505cbfc350
9c15e5366c26d13f2836e098c0718c6b4db4552b
describe
'866' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYQ' 'sip-files00195.pro'
3891717ff0137f62997f681b52745f1c
0c9d11c79d9a501e2d04297dfe4b682d33a8e8a8
'2011-08-19T15:27:40-04:00'
describe
'3672' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYR' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
17c463efec85c1cc312a5b49ba1d1f52
0b7b3d7b38646c85e349523c5587d4c284ca1cd2
describe
'3483276' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYS' 'sip-files00195.tif'
6dcef9b60e7d4b3228d8f271e0a929cf
a9b620d3620e750e6993074dc47c720647d742a4
'2011-08-19T15:28:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYT' 'sip-files00195.txt'
53d8e4380fd56eea94cc2dd43bad50df
6aa07dbf59dfbee020a0ca792f324762a7aaa724
'2011-08-19T15:25:23-04:00'
describe
'1394' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYU' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
38dd01e40d131ef74c91ce20f560f040
51e84f517f1ae13b454e55e0d3abeff5767bf010
'2011-08-19T15:33:41-04:00'
describe
'475626' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYV' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
16e6c79ee6e892d13dba3457f880cbd0
a3d6e11c53f945c5ff6bbce43a05fce1ac24cef2
'2011-08-19T15:31:39-04:00'
describe
'127107' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYW' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
ac64966bbe9ca4a5c7650e7cbc92db6f
60b6bfd8b6aa03ac0c3ae9354495f5e475973fbb
'2011-08-19T15:27:36-04:00'
describe
'33256' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYX' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
9b7fe3d9734ca4402274484327e5251a
9c690ffdea2d5d3f9349e7d7ff113211d00bad49
describe
'11424180' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYY' 'sip-files00198.tif'
bc89eb014c5582e93fb162740bfdd4d9
a01e898476872121bb3513e4c764b8bdf06c92ba
describe
'9227' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEYZ' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
0ada3c1a23bf388e0b2b87d6ac244f23
dd32ee26692b91703a481494bad75589391b3186
describe
'434315' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZA' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
3aeaa8f9f2143c1d5b886fafb6d71fb7
ac652d8a1eaa53ec3c86ccdd8db917dc340335ed
describe
'102975' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZB' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
3586ad137a7ddf9e1d3cc0b6da884952
48f3c20849a86c599ff99f4a6a4ede107610608d
describe
'25262' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZC' 'sip-files00199.pro'
ccf33ed5a4cfce374376240c68488876
1d3b2a5bd715ff8a7e9f3203b505f8023df1320e
describe
'31691' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZD' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
cf20e0826c0bb59063cf123632462249
4b734da2b9fe3523dc6aa6e5c9a805849f3fa024
'2011-08-19T15:28:04-04:00'
describe
'10431428' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZE' 'sip-files00199.tif'
a57759c314fe5b6bf40c9b8dae991bf8
53dec0ab35871141aea97158247061db13ecbf73
'2011-08-19T15:21:03-04:00'
describe
'1006' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZF' 'sip-files00199.txt'
54f3a09ae64da1ce30a71182ddd3e63d
f90d2060059346a650456a29570d86e4f0a345ce
describe
'8136' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZG' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
fbd2cb3c50e6deed43ecf49f943b958f
69276ef42193b5476f7965b03dfb3dc57499208d
describe
'432107' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZH' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
cc01ae01b4a57ed2a1415900ad65aca4
cae4ee94c6de27b284a4d27f423143a64e092421
describe
'122443' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZI' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
af3cb497b24ae3e17469a3c2571611d0
19fe8964f789dd6cc28c725ded7513256c44ee6d
'2011-08-19T15:29:58-04:00'
describe
'31858' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZJ' 'sip-files00200.pro'
8b47a6af427d457102043d353d813415
73d19d24c44f4807299b02bba1d8791e900f83e3
describe
'37317' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZK' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
73d481a7867dee64e9cae50df45636f1
bf850ca879229ff27df1242d75b3c0866f5aa45e
'2011-08-19T15:31:35-04:00'
describe
'3466484' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZL' 'sip-files00200.tif'
0639df99c99a79704ba159c3780a994b
6b95ba4ecfcbe91504c594e1e501ef5ceeefcc6f
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZM' 'sip-files00200.txt'
089e69552254de29dd76649bda6a6177
137dc0f0d957fca963f063ed2d6f2892a37674ec
describe
'8727' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZN' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
7dc70b505148e6db7eb417a0e16beca8
21b764a0bf881e02b4c7f425113e9fa53bbc4bdc
'2011-08-19T15:27:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZO' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
82cb54152b98ae1e7ab38801b8ac72fa
ac8b468ed717218c7ac4282cad8700ebd0414b5d
'2011-08-19T15:30:18-04:00'
describe
'104575' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZP' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
5ff03c567cacab4c70824ad35da31aab
c22a638e271421c19a778838555c2adba88573d5
'2011-08-19T15:33:17-04:00'
describe
'27688' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZQ' 'sip-files00201.pro'
21076c39893cd31c8294a4d160d25708
3a9d5d26a75f8cce75707d9714778546e220299c
describe
'33266' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZR' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
94ec368e568c3af9bf49a151dc3fba9e
77fc8492c99ecf19d8600eaa2f931fe20c8d4e1d
'2011-08-19T15:25:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZS' 'sip-files00201.tif'
818a3e19749769fd80209ab4eb0c8ff9
ef3930b4f70223cd7c7ff41dbe3844e5c7a56e58
'2011-08-19T15:26:47-04:00'
describe
'1121' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZT' 'sip-files00201.txt'
aed30daf9e5047664cbafd85ed32565a
a2cb0ee45974908cd0b80e78f0d1cca5d2483f08
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZU' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
a73f97eec495d415aa840742c2a493de
dd9272ca8f7057b7b9adfaad0340edfe03f37e94
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZV' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
af2f5724942a9ba360a475c96a9dc051
f34c4e9ae60025b9b1aae69faab09e31a39e38cf
describe
'110988' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZW' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
305a0d2e2480e48eb0c42c776b8ec2c6
ab7b9ef1d7601db8f60224333fb182a301377449
describe
'28827' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZX' 'sip-files00202.pro'
18be6d9fb75777de6721d3432031045d
863b89cd86de1a2979ab5105306e0d1d52ad250b
'2011-08-19T15:21:02-04:00'
describe
'35038' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZY' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
2f9c514662af3b8dd09303fdfeedb1dc
8ba3a67820f94b74cb185979d8bc949a3d8a5c0c
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACEZZ' 'sip-files00202.tif'
9d91298bf198c33063cd9cd93ffc9547
5dae6a4e7250614f35e3a84cfd81b601b5aa7d67
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAA' 'sip-files00202.txt'
8acb38d9d19bb625509c906771a8c7e3
80a911c1934172eb5d3aae31b0e5054907313d79
'2011-08-19T15:24:19-04:00'
describe
'8770' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAB' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
80fe540b14343b19ca22022814abfed4
1e7875de9f8299eeb239b6efe8d301ff759cb214
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAC' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
cb2937416f670da29f4ab003b98127c6
bfbc5e9b16e56d1c81daa537c23f139312525b55
describe
'108936' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAD' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
177636a7266f8ea6a76e3583d4e7abc8
38206e1474fcf6fde07218ed989c597b3aa3303c
describe
'28400' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAE' 'sip-files00203.pro'
357d7082d4a7873b4bd5bd323cbcbfd7
5dfdaf3e46c40af0fa57687ca6b27984da459823
describe
'34945' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAF' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
74d18ef757df1abcc3ea676a35c71fbf
87d3844dfd92319716ef199b0a2895f1fb751f17
describe
'3484196' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAG' 'sip-files00203.tif'
c6fbfe09bdcf2a47adec6cf7526eaa6e
8e4f569b39042751b8fae891e43ce2a837d6b140
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAH' 'sip-files00203.txt'
9796143a8ecbb0ffceb60097be27cae2
a25542356637241e246f5a54a3267c04416b509a
describe
'8754' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAI' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
f01ad3c4a79738f1593f11bde7aff789
64ceccb089300dfa3a0f6ad0c583417e721550d6
'2011-08-19T15:23:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAJ' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
76e0bccef174392185e5759ddb73092f
d4118adbad52e3198f9199e72924541f1067b628
describe
'117239' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAK' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
506d234ded4307bec26c84514690c7ae
1015618a3ff2c748879e37e5621281dd52a82cf9
describe
'30748' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAL' 'sip-files00204.pro'
ca5de66609c12db75b3a3fc5a0d035f9
82791c173c20d3270c8bfe2e61e3301275cda2ef
describe
'35749' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAM' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
9ec07f219f598d945248d333afd678d6
9058cdc2d4c13916ee60d3008bcae799ae5c5bf4
'2011-08-19T15:24:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAN' 'sip-files00204.tif'
0a573a09cb2da8f584f668eb685c53e9
65e1026a981d8a9bc9252743c66e983b95ee14d1
'2011-08-19T15:30:49-04:00'
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAO' 'sip-files00204.txt'
9e7704d6d26fc5c55d68d8e08aaf6f29
5c4e716aef5ceedd6eb25d98aaedbc11758a67ce
describe
'9178' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAP' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
5a5faf99fd3f43e8506d91f7f396ab96
292e1d3c6ec7ca4b2909b7f548ec392b03883add
describe
'434525' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAQ' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
957f871f7f934b16804826b5e027cfbf
e4f8dbb403513e994beca335f701df26001764fb
describe
'107357' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAR' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
ea1f58efaa10fc3db606131c2ab4bad8
b6e303416371a2ed88b0dc01667a51919f3ec334
describe
'28664' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAS' 'sip-files00205.pro'
31443bfa8ba12da68f5e452310e6e2b6
8e9c31f07b84aec7a29fe303d3f891b720c9ad47
describe
'33604' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAT' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
9b9fb0366ae3db76d2d123b4d87d554a
3fc6d5eb1ab4dfec8dde6d6f16a7bc019d09c6e5
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAU' 'sip-files00205.tif'
79e96533eaf2056451ee8ce86abf814d
940f6fa2d727215ac846d415530e427782df5b31
'2011-08-19T15:21:13-04:00'
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAV' 'sip-files00205.txt'
e7f7d637202f97aeede6b8c1d40c415d
e00a0c04085b780aae4325000958e6506b808ac4
describe
'8279' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAW' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
3ddd57719ba3b7aa70b07c957db74520
e131c7767db79ecf592aefe00ed274d50dac8000
describe
'434401' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAX' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
03300c196ff2270f80866176c98224b2
148c5b9fdf4a13022c07522e9b16cb042210090c
describe
'108815' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAY' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
259a2089aac18f7bf97ee9c195642737
a8876e2df29650b4c5e392591a262c761e07872b
'2011-08-19T15:27:18-04:00'
describe
'28894' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFAZ' 'sip-files00206.pro'
00ee2293bb079b8882004364bf15ee4f
4efe6bf04712a9dcc48379f299eae0ad4f03a9f3
describe
'33850' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBA' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
37b2f7beaaecadaa39696a7a6d337d2e
8a2cc1c74c1ae276ade20b1cc0b992dce50395fc
describe
'3484720' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBB' 'sip-files00206.tif'
ac833239163ed796dc66d9c711cbc9d0
466e72f13149a706c214ef9f6236537c7f207617
describe
'1145' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBC' 'sip-files00206.txt'
8b1157929cd817a292cacb9fc4110b48
24549e15a4fab1eb510af8b568c1324561efafad
'2011-08-19T15:24:48-04:00'
describe
'8864' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBD' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
ca3eddfc2052e5c8ea0ef8b236ba64be
4aa400e4af8a783e37275cecad0aece1ec143b3a
'2011-08-19T15:23:30-04:00'
describe
'434536' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBE' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
7953fcbb880369517a90684531dd7335
3e11ef46e7549984bbb2d54c6998aa4d5872902b
'2011-08-19T15:28:22-04:00'
describe
'113082' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBF' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
7afa2e7f38fe2f72450ec0d5b94a93ef
a2f06d629d1c991fe54217045f5cf1ea3b585de3
describe
'30197' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBG' 'sip-files00207.pro'
e3ddbafd408b78e9a01e010cf224a180
3edf83de8d52f02333c3b88f5df95df36785167b
'2011-08-19T15:24:57-04:00'
describe
'35598' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBH' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
0dc173827e9559618d11d16a263595bc
b5dc9eea38c7f07447e5f4a3681b006bca0f823f
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBI' 'sip-files00207.tif'
41eb1b5e85bfecacfdf8f4ffbeb16e65
84ec0a19c5f5b1492819ba85beb9396c1165035c
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBJ' 'sip-files00207.txt'
829300300589d705d099b6d34ea88f67
94d76dbcc386361656ab21cd77ac140d3f290f24
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBK' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
a149087788520d1303a1327ed3063e68
ca826d2e9b15d6403a4f6b7e925a155473d07d4a
describe
'434108' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBL' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
54b9d517dbda6cdff369897fef337e20
910950531bf0ea17e50598ce6919c2e1ee01f89d
describe
'116347' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBM' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
ae3310fcd876deaa9c8c9dc13381d2bd
4744e0abded09f840147e472dd2f8dc27bc33e84
describe
'31092' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBN' 'sip-files00208.pro'
ca94a8f895d123a3b9e64d0b7de5c563
e2f16cd397ef51ac7b2539f303098e018d1907f6
describe
'36203' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBO' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
dafc58e1012254a4633ec0d7c363446c
3ca10a9d2277e87a2edbbb89be0cbdb8461e227e
describe
'3482652' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBP' 'sip-files00208.tif'
1b3841c21f0634b9225cb61d08ede08a
5d64a329a3f1a5183b2f834044cd7038f9a7275d
'2011-08-19T15:31:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBQ' 'sip-files00208.txt'
40f5d99d48c72f783274a76033fa115b
87ad5e7fbd58bf537d10fd5a6662054ce162bfcd
describe
'9307' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBR' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
0b384c8ff8a8007dd766686c927a3f40
9c161c32ec9cd5583a83c84613622591a3f21d9d
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBS' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
06957dedabc61640b40d53ff7ee26096
f44aa64c113a0d518a39d87aca9f2750013ebdb8
describe
'114488' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBT' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
de1d6772a754d92784652ca4ecee3986
c95f7f7954ca30958f08e6985debbd4ba8e925b2
describe
'30476' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBU' 'sip-files00209.pro'
bd90327fdf43ec6cbd930610eaccaeba
6c62c72acc6441c1b30cbe37fceb999a7286fc4b
describe
'35939' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBV' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
d64e18ddc2aa0990dd82097d04c96ec0
7e324931c2d313528206b88747bf334c51b6e139
describe
'3484220' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBW' 'sip-files00209.tif'
9fde131bb42528c8ca6dc2624d62c08f
1875009f05063aa17b835c65f117de612aa31c4d
'2011-08-19T15:31:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBX' 'sip-files00209.txt'
c4f000fd697d3c7e0e7eacc2f4377c39
e9fe8bbc550d850bb8eae7f14e5a4b4338630e8b
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBY' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
0fd1e3386b27dca83f4cb89ce64e7280
2c7f7897d5c1a6b0f5c94f980844f7f30732c283
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFBZ' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
fddaeb0a6fcd4e7c0b9ce91603a0296a
7de78847631bc147885cb7bf4634df96e6da3f0c
describe
'109882' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCA' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
6b723b337e5524e8e748eb03b54c91e1
e634cdffaa5c1844384e0183070139f15dfea869
describe
'29194' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCB' 'sip-files00210.pro'
1078f87a570cdde6b86f7f2ace99fa61
c509cc30490f39c1ef93d2cd77c54f4b944e4b6d
describe
'35414' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCC' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
318632e0adb6732d12c65e3f3e8316fe
96893027901dbd5cbfee7a13b9175f13e495bc5f
'2011-08-19T15:27:13-04:00'
describe
'3484152' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCD' 'sip-files00210.tif'
ac7aee631bff03c8455ff060efe12b91
051f529ac526c2ce21e12e77c8cf7065d5155e6f
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCE' 'sip-files00210.txt'
6992a441cea1e2c74b1bb60ac6dbb53d
0357161c01f07ee53859ec44e3482e22bdd55fe1
describe
'8931' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCF' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
75e4d4583daa07311ab99daf53d1e528
742cdc3808e0ca32844ce8e0f8058319af42009a
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCG' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
1441e439fe97763e4ec579df73896a7a
a2f588fc317fef93d77686f840e91afd96bd8f31
describe
'120243' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCH' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
a3be77ac9795b9b89d2540ecf17b2cb6
e431867efde0316c770b8dc74855f038ae69252b
describe
'32181' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCI' 'sip-files00211.pro'
128504084d864a4d6e9f0ff8e16277f5
3916ab42b9063ca73cf3565196813a2e5ec70893
describe
'37478' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCJ' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
976b7a55766a46b3c58d69096c7b3731
adac79eec6f6398ddc565b2f60ed85ca18dfe343
describe
'3482580' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCK' 'sip-files00211.tif'
7e3a4981b59fa4dd04e520bb711518dc
0ea43cb4fafd70cda98b5021929158ea5d745e3c
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCL' 'sip-files00211.txt'
475859f0ca9f57faf8a2ad48b3eb4fad
91f0f7737d05029a27d9cc9c09c26cbd6f989fa1
describe
'9275' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCM' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
cb5b76141682ccec114ffdd9eff349c1
2bfaaa777ada2ad8684a8f0d4929a946fa3dfc59
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCN' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
a843feee7a83ad5a1337ddd393f0ff18
be0af370717ff709c6385afc3cf7da70cfeef974
describe
'116215' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCO' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
38782d1a9b9cd8965b0a5df4879430b3
3df26c29c583604726218c39cd66005be8945f8b
'2011-08-19T15:28:36-04:00'
describe
'30428' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCP' 'sip-files00212.pro'
5ddeb339dd2bea3e3b8333de425b1540
3bc2538cc5842142160e60c161c6b4f01508633d
describe
'36198' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCQ' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
f0c8ce180c90370d7f3aac1862200dc9
7307ae6a7eaf6478b72798e0c38586b4fb94f559
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCR' 'sip-files00212.tif'
328e70ac1c7b1ed764c6eedc9f5c1ca9
078741a4c87938d49a08928d73cdf6966aac2b7f
'2011-08-19T15:20:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCS' 'sip-files00212.txt'
63d61c14fe2dc241556f376935a3f2c9
b7830a05527bed18a69aa5bf4bbca4f9103f0797
describe
'8833' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCT' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
12b6404c06ca6222479e10de20e8e92c
3c32d179158422aa9bd2a52a8d4b119677e39c27
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCU' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
23aa8318f0456674c38ac71445a2ad00
6940622a5c1ea31cd8b98e24032463713cd9763f
describe
'112600' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCV' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
b6d8bf919b0de6c6f0c7607eebb1835d
9b6749c83e291ad0fcc0b849234683f573bc01c6
describe
'29049' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCW' 'sip-files00213.pro'
0e7d91c40d5a8a91f980cd3dd5881005
bf90851c06896fc0b5271ad80e64c7f10fa63a5d
describe
'35374' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCX' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
64ee4db7cdfdf0b75425c2ae422daf43
471087609b20326b9d26e296027db2dfb111f6a1
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCY' 'sip-files00213.tif'
163587e701ed83543e12dfad23cddae0
e6fd61a6a3c2d268f6e9d2628fb259c86f55d7e6
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFCZ' 'sip-files00213.txt'
41d872a39feb1a71afd781a85400257f
713320f127d881b403b4eade13508c8787782844
'2011-08-19T15:22:37-04:00'
describe
'8859' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDA' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
4ffcfb02e2fedd99f37341698790c10a
02865d92dc67e040d962f95159e00396c95c4dec
describe
'434093' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDB' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
dbeb680c28f8d17791d6711e779cf2af
3eebf4fdf342109576e11d6603e6a4f72969abeb
describe
'110479' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDC' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
b6b62565cfc6699d4b3fd040d5b2e2f6
052e4b1b3fd5eb3a4d11a3474666f598ec665e0f
describe
'29364' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDD' 'sip-files00214.pro'
2f24f7fbb7d9875749c3ce12a4dda3f9
3464f3e1b6c9ce73f29273f8eb48f783fdc421f0
describe
'35268' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDE' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
315fe21cfe56f71cc7a715995e53cde0
a9b06d0a51ed32386cf9428f3e3b1a9c789c3b2d
'2011-08-19T15:25:03-04:00'
describe
'3482476' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDF' 'sip-files00214.tif'
0f9143a5737f111250955c599b19c7db
bb10b7cddcef19fb45833d7d06a0582b7a270f4f
'2011-08-19T15:32:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDG' 'sip-files00214.txt'
79ae29af9639328f5c961a661cb516d1
cb15f14b638c3bb6097990383db1b611e95fb8ab
describe
'9052' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDH' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
5079607ed79b764e34d578eb84b980e9
21c5b8d1a3241889d1a70a405d1c72ae04c15936
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDI' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
3a408cff0f0143c8b2ac88b3cecb7caa
0566a6081c4f3fcc0ea8a6c007b1dec9327aa32d
'2011-08-19T15:22:16-04:00'
describe
'110289' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDJ' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
165d28ce21162f45ff6ffd1db26137b7
6bbdcebadb89791887c97f01cdea4e9022d34aa6
describe
'28266' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDK' 'sip-files00215.pro'
42a7bd0887eb1563d8337e2e5a1ff953
76b118626d85f9f8914b19e93e085552e71e4d04
describe
'34869' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDL' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
711019acb8a4769f5c51ff8dfc88c60a
dd531cf0f8c3e96f0b5867fd4cf1ac0ce351dfd7
describe
'3486356' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDM' 'sip-files00215.tif'
eabc417519d2714ad17a0f7bde7249e2
edac02ee64c702f0a4741720cbc692f391c82961
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDN' 'sip-files00215.txt'
4c950ae7318d9b1226a9c6245fb1f010
c4d776f5bf97d3e6d846fef99f0a548a7cdc046f
describe
'9007' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDO' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
cb2fa834c8e773025dc529d745ff9770
6e6e4a2dd71f15771e98f0482616835eb2d90225
describe
'434307' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDP' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
ee7aa40dea5d763873e52b3995fc1975
15eebd1b436c3a40e80e7d83be27fbdef4b68fa2
describe
'120235' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDQ' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
c730cc85c595079ac52afad8f56024a6
7ccabd58967192c5646dbe3927149885e1b32754
describe
'31430' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDR' 'sip-files00216.pro'
f807f76ca9ff9c9ef7375085105e274d
9b1b0a0db00ebfde09e9ab9a5135a9c21de9437c
describe
'36650' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDS' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
53d2f1495270f28533ee986e963503b8
68d36be194793987620f01c15a161cb71ee8b5fa
describe
'3484192' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDT' 'sip-files00216.tif'
46e5a164fdfbd3a77dfc5130d5986a1c
afb4457f1b1ce2537ec7bc6bb67c711a51ebfad1
describe
'1236' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDU' 'sip-files00216.txt'
eb1667a277905fc316c449d7c77a0f03
78d37f358b73fdb3bf13407f1a711a1a4f2f8902
describe
'8700' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDV' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
8cdbd268e5779e3722f3408a3b4fe1eb
0f6cca166aba30fda4ad470d611c182764e772df
describe
'434072' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDW' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
a4102d543f5667bc3ba110bee2dcc92d
67e918216ac72d826932162bcdd4ce5d9bbbd31c
describe
'115735' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDX' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
1b8e33cd7022868e4a5653096f645c09
e9c357bd4c2bfb00922de073d591014c8f1c67cd
'2011-08-19T15:31:34-04:00'
describe
'29858' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDY' 'sip-files00217.pro'
7988cbc6796fe9dc492f380ee208a7a9
6df58de45f9ec2139fd3d202b6738b00ef32813d
'2011-08-19T15:28:25-04:00'
describe
'36059' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFDZ' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
0e203a39310673f0846d503f096ddaa7
f8b0ad6d5754ebb6fe630bc2b76cb2d15e1851ae
describe
'3482412' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFEA' 'sip-files00217.tif'
bad00c4c074efeb835df5d67c0c73675
7c576dc5dca61991d830006dacc9d992cbca500f
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFEB' 'sip-files00217.txt'
5fbf7151a993e9251105656281c18501
9617a011e7b1c5425acca8ea35948d258c774ed6
describe
'8858' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFEC' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
377efa07cc719028092c117ef7c4f870
cbf496d2c778f6bbb78d9bfbcd4e67bd23d7e7d0
'2011-08-19T15:33:04-04:00'
describe
'434249' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFED' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
6b747c6ce645fd5d706d3f8856fbc59d
e7e608b61c915980576b30c0e545d5fd62618f76
describe
'109083' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFEE' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
63c1ce28e9f9e1960de4dbe445ed27d2
8ee15edcc871f32e61b503e6f19e1dec3f1e3df4
describe
'28246' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFEF' 'sip-files00218.pro'
b260a01d56f859176c47522f7ca63f0b
c7a9b5226d3eecedbf12ddfa35d2d9eb6a29ec1b
describe
'33494' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFEG' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
911aea0115181c5894b94ec61383a228
60b58487b1f96c412fcc2f0c80ce3352856fea90
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFEH' 'sip-files00218.tif'
7d69bb86a87f57d8ab5e04205bfda086
2f6546303097538f7e40e9e6af4b24571af0f145
describe
'1116' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFEI' 'sip-files00218.txt'
776f1c285eaa9e4192c87edf8b319f08
67aefe6b6a62cd96015451102dd8204e724709ef
describe
'8562' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFEJ' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
db48c716d3a7b9e676010e58f9fd9494
46f956984c3915050d4391235cbda1f62197f7b9
'2011-08-19T15:33:47-04:00'
describe
'434535' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFEK' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
50b79412ef52d80f191e14a0d863445e
e3d3ab1e484c9e80500b6d5a5320858a6a7eb514
'2011-08-19T15:32:48-04:00'
describe
'113361' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFEL' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
e9e03367931b8b54f5c0ee90a86763b7
5a05ea39b3ad17fb94dc32dbb18c0a45aaff9c97
describe
'29974' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFEM' 'sip-files00219.pro'
93e25465fb00ac44000bd40fd863e617
117f89587be2cfa67812d5c2cfcf563a3c888e30
describe
'35269' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFEN' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
9d4f897cc9a82b4f7e76b224ebdb487a
7b2f9410a07da0881a2fa553a61a77ceb768099c
'2011-08-19T15:25:51-04:00'
describe
'3486224' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFEO' 'sip-files00219.tif'
25dad443bc47100435180577f4dcf852
ab8a682c8e923afd9865c3b4466f888c31bf34ec
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFEP' 'sip-files00219.txt'
a7602958e82287da4b14334e33b02dc2
1de5de59b515e5d7bf51985d8958ff393ce831e9
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFEQ' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
ca65661200031a07b4bfb674bb7c5f7b
2540ab2c9aff0cb343caf6eb59de747f2e00717f
describe
'434096' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFER' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
da453c83c1483c63f6fe33c5c427f237
45518f91a254554f412d1e64b347ccadb0073741
'2011-08-19T15:29:40-04:00'
describe
'104919' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFES' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
a0fc74dd75bb80b15d3c36b683329fbe
f096d4d9bdc86e9dadf28962ba59ff61bade40d7
describe
'27289' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFET' 'sip-files00220.pro'
fe822d815f287082569fa04b00963be4
41931df634c0f38a31ce7daf8da96dcead6fbb61
describe
'33642' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFEU' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
e0adc3ff5a43bfbc9ce1647981539eda
bcab475792fba83e1357a00bbc3c7f468f8f547b
describe
'3482444' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFEV' 'sip-files00220.tif'
f13f2a74afa40c1159269aaa7ba50f61
6e8941bf07cec77ac933fce642d090be1970fbb9
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFEW' 'sip-files00220.txt'
5262425acd39ffaa3bdc2860caf1ad23
674bc88696b652bdb539cd6a54c22f9f8233fe4f
describe
'8769' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFEX' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
21ef617a25b44ece970f098797ad3d34
b12858217c4fa1e358f454fc79ea4c6feadacc69
'2011-08-19T15:21:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFEY' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
1f38cb4cd21fc6cfdd90ca0971a0c21d
a609682e720138714830a9cfff0cd3c7e90653fd
describe
'114971' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFEZ' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
fff3ad695e025f2ac94db1da01ce7283
70cf3cff3ead39329fd50079c9515d29a9e4383e
describe
'29954' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFA' 'sip-files00221.pro'
119ba47a48b71d591096b6474ff2af54
b1a56e78aa6d46535f0fa9dcc6611c781ea45416
describe
'35792' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFB' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
227261184af6ac9cd406d9a6a78240c8
de1e955d0e3f84af38580ef3fc074929b36b2ca1
'2011-08-19T15:33:56-04:00'
describe
'3486292' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFC' 'sip-files00221.tif'
72f6a428daaf582962eeaebfe572f7b4
d4d30c9225757ef540a2363c481020221b8a30d8
'2011-08-19T15:31:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFD' 'sip-files00221.txt'
1354133d09b6effc959a29252ca98d25
1d9587848e042bb5248d25e504c94b5e396d4da0
describe
'9047' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFE' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
6760760b040bc229b23285f29022a390
58e60902a03198e1abffbe60ed35e6a2ffd73148
describe
'309841' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFF' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
7f9db301d22be1629765bf98f93bc929
7253fc222b9cd9524ecc9449e21eaa0b0dcb8c47
'2011-08-19T15:24:25-04:00'
describe
'43789' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFG' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
fc802f92e76e09f76ded75144289e7ff
1e6a6ed3bd44586cb2e77733096fa142c6b836b3
describe
'9905' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFH' 'sip-files00222.pro'
ed6cee469e50ddb346829cf5d64a9c8f
3ee8a385b7f4012f3d14562c13f5d5624923455f
describe
'13805' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFI' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
6e36be16033b2c21ccc268f9eac16420
8d9e733c3f9b9138ee0e7d41467631281a71db8e
describe
'3482136' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFJ' 'sip-files00222.tif'
ab0c21495229bbbefd864c028e319a60
035a2f3e3a9dce233b6f6120d2c0418afcfbce05
describe
'394' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFK' 'sip-files00222.txt'
01ce18a4448a00f3b08d3d2676619c2c
9f47dbe131d1fbcc92f6ebf65574aa9a2093e7f5
describe
'3597' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFL' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
5d0a1f537e6affa376d8a267d8a8adfc
280477dbd8f36b187c0141682a2a0010017a7328
describe
'90027' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFM' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
253dbade09db339ae44c2b453ea43e6f
6dfe95fb098e977164e1b7a0114bc71aad24ec2b
describe
'12011' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFN' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
751becbcc4e1f5ab66ed8b353f08d2b1
199246c052d7ce0f14998b6ffb257efb15dc9ab3
describe
'2223' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFO' 'sip-files00223.pro'
ff31b4d184cf78bb372d751052334b9f
ec2e9d845f3b77c5adc5b49718d25cff60daf328
'2011-08-19T15:30:28-04:00'
describe
'4135' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFP' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
cc30c3c142fff537d4304d3aa60ccc26
12e7ab5bd04f04d00d4e20f563f3391566e53852
describe
'3483284' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFQ' 'sip-files00223.tif'
f149a5cac74b276393922249e5666e2a
44a40cd1da08aa7382f352c5f2da487134c82ebd
'2011-08-19T15:34:13-04:00'
describe
'145' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFR' 'sip-files00223.txt'
b58d6d67380d151f2db8b87bdf4f3572
ddc78fd3db841b4ee77e26276e3dfbd77f1d344c
'2011-08-19T15:32:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFS' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
99058fae6cda68f3c09600d45cbe918e
389a1b918c6ebbf7b7220b49a355ffc1ee985762
describe
'52178' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFT' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
e3f96e373824a1fb2582bbd6656153cf
31a3d03f6e298bd3fc21c1a4c7b8a8b61db6183e
'2011-08-19T15:24:12-04:00'
describe
'7129' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFU' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
734e0340d4b0dfd7dc840b4ddccfa677
643953fbd13bf52070b2d91addbdecaca848c5ee
describe
'2154' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFV' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
e9d42efe943b61d3f4a9ce1e8dc57948
8557bf192543f59bdee95206c309d81f99b5b2e1
describe
'3480856' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFW' 'sip-files00224.tif'
703be4efd160fde539679a27ff4658d9
71c01b7a677bc32f30e3e66674175fa30c3fc56b
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFX' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
89ab32f37562d25d443d302ed90ffdbc
43690dcae7d44909bc3396063aa19a46b9d3145c
describe
'205680' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFY' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
de2893ab33dad65ef4d91c556c01df9f
2cc3040359ef1acc69546a48f9f9ee95f5181fdc
describe
'27486' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFFZ' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
cbf3fcf77f93896e4d8bd91feeb71bb2
d2f9ce08f6c2146468edebe0d54762c8c35bc077
'2011-08-19T15:33:46-04:00'
describe
'2676' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGA' 'sip-files00225.pro'
3f33600761707ae1451d24ffe901be77
115c3c3b4aac2829c2a52f45bb2b23ba2ac163d9
describe
'8507' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGB' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
b938c7ee9fa626c28877ecdd8705f136
0871b91ef99e555767fd2ac0992169e951fbd2cd
describe
'3481868' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGC' 'sip-files00225.tif'
638877c17706bdc24c2211f3775d8206
e54d313ac4b4e96d7839c012943383bca6f38233
describe
'161' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGD' 'sip-files00225.txt'
acc2ce55f6621ff8f6bc03adddb7ca4d
718aae984e9503f7dfe064a3f3222ec65df6ff2f
describe
'2782' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGE' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
a032e74d7deace0d5f9b7116563a567f
37105e929eb5d7a5f73cfbd393a590d5484ceff3
'2011-08-19T15:30:33-04:00'
describe
'66811' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGF' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
7ae82061288f1bfc2ccea8d790a3343a
639ffae376735ca44626f4fc922485b789a99f85
describe
'7211' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGG' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
da8f0b144664090793779a71f2ee896d
8833df50615d6334582f49a555aa9d95fdc96359
describe
'2221' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGH' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
9786f4fdb71c33ae18acd0801c771710
5988b17a6c817378eae2d9521c4337661e2e9f61
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGI' 'sip-files00226.tif'
4f191d349955f7064708c81098eadd09
a289fa88449c37ef7cf95db622fb52c5d0211aeb
describe
'816' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGJ' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
fc6a7b982d15b3ca906910959a0c165f
33840e4e904952d3d7086f800f6eb71fee9f38fc
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGK' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
cc02107778d8a8a5f18fb2e1bb49ed97
da05d87ab38c31f82c5e819daae70b17154835f7
describe
'63755' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGL' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
c690d0ff3d7587b20f8bd4d3cad6a098
cf8f4a468f349714356573457e19d1d2cedcf16f
describe
'34052' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGM' 'sip-files00227.pro'
6467dfecc2fa4efa716d939fe6601ecf
a886e6eacda4c0af8caae2b772dcd23934e3ca16
describe
'17485' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGN' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
5be34282169c29dea9a08592c29f40d5
0ccd05e7d796a9e76af8ee1850721175f1c1b997
describe
'3484604' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGO' 'sip-files00227.tif'
f577aab48a5320e49e73b89074b941ca
7b5a701713e119b638667e73f6568a1e957134a5
'2011-08-19T15:31:02-04:00'
describe
'1597' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGP' 'sip-files00227.txt'
2f5e88bd52465b3502a1487468298da5
3990884b46b933cd9d6a0ce9e81d91f7c20d15d2
describe
'4735' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGQ' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
cd7d24c3ff4cbe819385890074d708a7
5a060d9f62210a9d48e5e59b84668fd95c8db88d
describe
'434591' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGR' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
2eea16cc16931dafaae97107dd7b21d9
4d650ae9fb9fee8c35feae29062ec591a9b5e7d7
describe
'81694' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGS' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
e6fa3b8427da0a81dbeb25299970dd96
35934a65bd6195ebcc00bd229fc6c22348d78223
'2011-08-19T15:25:26-04:00'
describe
'43902' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGT' 'sip-files00228.pro'
fc9b4adb4365e683789d541fbfff011c
a624898f0debc17979985fc7d5b7900935146c2b
describe
'21752' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGU' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
9a08fa668cfbc653bc120b1758b19b73
a82f6801272403d5382545644b5f767c6b885bbd
describe
'3484916' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGV' 'sip-files00228.tif'
60c9b1ff04e76d269ba37cc9ef1c6dbe
9b7b7876cc008c661eb9648b373a0a0ac2b56114
describe
'2141' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGW' 'sip-files00228.txt'
dca0653c35342a566c76598969c21e9d
489b29804efde3a2f95c9c873fd564fc82a71ae4
describe
'5693' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGX' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
62b19f44f072437ce79cb8b4637ca3cb
1c5ee1e41dba77f4824962e04f8e852f44e3da2c
describe
'434287' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGY' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
a63080260e89d166fb7f6825363dd7d4
c17c7f95b9299ab9e0fd8e5df08c7905bb72fa02
describe
'74872' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFGZ' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
cf80bfbb0a26e2290de76fa0a01f94ae
26c59342d74a39b1f2856e2c2ab1851708d22eb6
describe
'40465' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHA' 'sip-files00229.pro'
6a386b95587c58e1ed6f6dd5f9c6cd70
4bdd7f02f324bebe019c002435335a9028c6c332
describe
'20615' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHB' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
348ffe0ade56cab368997eaccf430c87
33104a410629bb53404aae823b9c3a3d97411562
describe
'3482704' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHC' 'sip-files00229.tif'
f9b8d2bbfea4b55578896c75f7f8be5d
aadcb681653a5a0b600d32a8609f0dc4102cdbe2
'2011-08-19T15:30:56-04:00'
describe
'1958' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHD' 'sip-files00229.txt'
cc5b4c34cb50071acd812bd7d2a05fdb
d870c046bbce2e322b01bed776deec3e82e62237
describe
'5192' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHE' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
0241b0da078d329f57bd47b80ad69722
3a329f6cd75235c9566cc384248c9299a55fab8e
'2011-08-19T15:28:46-04:00'
describe
'434546' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHF' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
04ed9fead0ab5cd247ba498af7d817d3
66da295c3d6618ae91a2e7665faa898b361229a7
describe
'81868' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHG' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
f0e3bfc3f422bfed16359057cf21aa25
6ef43cb02909ea3ff59b9353e71e79e2ff911e3f
describe
'51206' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHH' 'sip-files00230.pro'
137ff8df22ba12f279391dbd6e48dd8c
f4482e29192390fb110edfa8e449d9b32b9da6d2
describe
'22032' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHI' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
670926667a303726acc7894471a0f280
e57491c4b7d0220d5b1bfc9babcf93125572d99d
describe
'3484980' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHJ' 'sip-files00230.tif'
f9edf3db62b8af237952b73bd93af47b
771f30e3d4d9b0469199a4d22f8aab56d648b8f3
describe
'2395' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHK' 'sip-files00230.txt'
337901c28ad5fbaa337125b9f94f6712
ec8059a78ff0f67398221e34fae3c272d2d2c6d8
describe
'5334' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHL' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
feface3c34264a7d06d1ccf9a2b3b88a
617e71852102babd5461b95e6a233072e179305d
describe
'434247' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHM' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
e8131c5383b5a97f0fbceb8efa19572c
ff8c0cabd9ee28653f39c20670f4c836f43eda06
describe
'81804' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHN' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
b760e028dfa2e5a7c430ab35b6207275
4c5fadce3c585f2368a206240b4c95198ecdba78
describe
'48705' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHO' 'sip-files00231.pro'
c54af1556d5036e209d60517f467d0f3
af361d53c76c13bfcaa780bdfbbcd447e15ac0e6
describe
'21421' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHP' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
a9ca397ab7874c55165882370a06c770
ba2b9ba5ea1e4bfb57e2851868c217c5c8b4b771
describe
'3482764' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHQ' 'sip-files00231.tif'
9e3de9f3be7b82515b9f049ee2dcb269
64828e90bf70dec59e925dddc60a4f9de4257137
describe
'2240' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHR' 'sip-files00231.txt'
0f6458fc6571b19d6b8faa50deb4c383
edc2068241c3c8fe06b1cf55892dde0f4e73b876
describe
'5345' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHS' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
46a6089a3b463c99bbb746f67d64e2c4
6ce4bad8c15d39e408a1eb4ffb8aae84620f624a
describe
'434555' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHT' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
57886ef209ef7d7947633fafd48a34c9
f641694a2e92cb62ee6370a0c52763add5cff74a
describe
'95674' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHU' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
36828766a08e29a6723ffbacb9ffe352
57f6e1d0ac9b9137a4bf760acc51a54b0bddbb73
'2011-08-19T15:28:13-04:00'
describe
'73387' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHV' 'sip-files00232.pro'
7b17b76c09bc1fc2c22dd04803b62806
5b35920dcfae6c607660fe7bbee8fc796b651110
describe
'23450' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHW' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
ac8fbe815c29055212621671e3596fa9
b8b3bceb2dea434a48159b2969657aa5d1954ea0
describe
'3484968' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHX' 'sip-files00232.tif'
15a6d8be0fbb26143af81baf466d56e7
df6be38f53b2e32fa698c8e99d68fe00c4cc99cc
'2011-08-19T15:23:19-04:00'
describe
'3338' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHY' 'sip-files00232.txt'
4a8a30798b03320135fe6f8539f1d0d5
b7478edcbc01dc4282f3e382c93254cc950994e9
describe
'5735' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFHZ' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
7d61b0f551e6c63cce099b2cb8e99b12
d46eddc5425144c04e99ac2422ab663adbdbb997
describe
'434531' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFIA' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
1d7d5330b1f5e7c88f6781295de54fe7
b5b660cfb6aa920e5f10c9932c24d701888cdd13
'2011-08-19T15:26:14-04:00'
describe
'80188' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFIB' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
20c7bb3924fd87fa785c321dd63ff221
afeeeaaa9acdace7be2ed591bcff8a40d03bcf79
describe
'37397' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFIC' 'sip-files00233.pro'
1feb99557515dd4d4180ce9942b51c07
6cc7016dcfe3870c197e7dab197f8c2f14ef3ce1
describe
'21955' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFID' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
038b25a9a557507e5df9b893e501e1d7
e7788250c1bec6684bb16b3e2a0fc9a4082065af
describe
'3485008' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFIE' 'sip-files00233.tif'
3d20a9f94a70206a93ad22e4d22a194d
90a1ce3cc161ea91a2898804fef4cce4f13c524b
describe
'1723' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFIF' 'sip-files00233.txt'
2e5d353257c85ce097627e37e0e3c119
5fefa356c585be6f2d3773ec0b65401b3d458e81
'2011-08-19T15:32:24-04:00'
describe
'5643' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFIG' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
112188ee981f2a971d2908eb90cd368d
4c609a4f6e0c2014551299471557febfa0e91ee7
describe
'434198' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFIH' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
5b426539c2e7e1d81d4d071e4ab8db04
7d0d99c449c17b1bb12c8138035d26c8007dceb3
describe
'94344' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFII' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
376d9347e077049d2c13509e980c377d
b178e4634622a0bbea5a42f1bcaf89892ee810db
describe
'62282' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFIJ' 'sip-files00234.pro'
d73bb6e7f9bae2097bf5d32d6d384972
6dec6c1a330907b9d76f6deb06346922780e7220
describe
'23604' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFIK' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
be9675d8a90e654f9b404d30de9d33bb
b1ecc4524f51aab8d3d018ccb12fb4f4a1b6f0f3
'2011-08-19T15:31:37-04:00'
describe
'3482740' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFIL' 'sip-files00234.tif'
f31ace754001988eb9b9d59c6a516168
5d62c6fdd59212803b1be9afe39aef815cc37226
describe
'2848' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFIM' 'sip-files00234.txt'
221bdeff41efd47b4cf40d13d5450d1d
18522b4ea17b465538df900029eed4ca9d37dd5c
describe
'5788' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFIN' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
710f7e82bad0dfcd075f5a7f69998cb9
e7df1773ea9f8ab01279702cd518d15371db6f04
'2011-08-19T15:32:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFIO' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
10d8d0b965c509a2193e1cf7c560f38a
b9b7b013987d21d55fe6d3b26b8b16508885e09d
'2011-08-19T15:25:13-04:00'
describe
'82651' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFIP' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
259a50157c720ddc1e9ecd47d6042bfb
45e2de0c26d2d05d4b9b4399d156b37c7d8dbf85
describe
'54053' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFIQ' 'sip-files00235.pro'
2a5741ff3e03889d6bd5a419b7ecf499
cf5e0166a5075d58303521d9864d36c124c5138c
describe
'21436' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFIR' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
0a407e29d8461c7787746fdac5cb03a3
9bb97f9884a22b1102c044847b7d7611280d28ca
describe
'3482676' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFIS' 'sip-files00235.tif'
3124ea2ed98c7edfd150053e6e5120d9
8070882eed70218e942c5aee6789461543ec9174
'2011-08-19T15:29:39-04:00'
describe
'2500' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFIT' 'sip-files00235.txt'
b75cf9d519f8801326bb4054f512bc6d
61f0d3c02f63b32612a9b92d97cb76091985612b
'2011-08-19T15:27:08-04:00'
describe
'5412' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFIU' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
6c7f5224234c5d3396d9d7bf18bb15f0
7534ffd15923b3f6e3b6c2b541eb019ac8e1160c
'2011-08-19T15:24:07-04:00'
describe
'434584' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFIV' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
2e169e99c3a5434e95e38ccfd2d12e98
06ca630d6429f8ac5cd2bb92c947313f24e726de
describe
'64214' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFIW' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
bfe01715c68ad56589642d6e2ca808ba
b5b75b0b126a3259bfdb53ff760409a9879534df
describe
'38891' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFIX' 'sip-files00236.pro'
a0c590e53a988e5dc198ae04e5a11b49
1d9b19e08994e17965c0d8d4d3563bf0a20932d5
describe
'17972' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFIY' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
0b9faabfdc5d58c1d40b9d14ed116305
e7fbe429655898f8c09d15ec15bba73d5c8a6109
describe
'3484608' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFIZ' 'sip-files00236.tif'
1ae1e8f379461c3f9ac550adabcb44ea
030c8f3025892f747765021b37c0b7ab03d00af6
describe
'1897' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFJA' 'sip-files00236.txt'
e09b12bbe60e70e487f9cd2bd46344c1
44b0dce3228b4920c13c16c1fbf0b4e1e5d05a34
describe
'4817' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFJB' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
71796e845e5b3844a818d878e5e14b48
bd6cfcc97824dea23da7b5d33cc8417aace8a2e5
describe
'417753' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFJC' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
71a679130e3ca89e7d492e3bf81a490c
e241af89c4aa9ef4de8e38209824a128208cf1b7
describe
'56592' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFJD' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
9a450bf6202816457cf9b80ea674cc6d
c9f2782698bde925ee262195bc0cc2abaadba00d
describe
'26739' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFJE' 'sip-files00237.pro'
e050d159a093796ad7546b3bf9202f95
e529e8344bdf2bd51d3b6e34269fbd1d5e5a512d
describe
'15166' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFJF' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
e0455cdd90107b0cce714b38b2620b6f
083ce95de1e9018147c476c36a70ebd7d564d844
'2011-08-19T15:24:37-04:00'
describe
'3482096' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFJG' 'sip-files00237.tif'
a7ef5a5a3a8f4c97914d1392427a2b63
539ae911f75fa8c8ae355420adeda3d8ca90d35a
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFJH' 'sip-files00237.txt'
149a58e596ea00198ad5be25712074bb
a7578676cc31602dd6c796e28be69810674047bd
describe
'3913' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFJI' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
8bc680965563f828ca0188d8ee7cfc9f
48c5b254c23c9d9f5c508faa497418131569bda0
describe
'542169' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFJJ' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
f33a72016ec19c3abaa9364b0ebf2139
916620fbf9fcbd2a6a8428a181cc9b93f5e4326a
describe
'80657' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFJK' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
c2c6a18d75bdfd4ba970d40c17f228e1
0dcf8fad352c333c78719abe493d068e03ba208c
describe
'16254' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFJL' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
d8b42ab0a7c0d11e5db1e69ad5073a81
8c9117ff41b21ad0046e9ef6ba8418fc8876320f
describe
'13030300' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFJM' 'sip-files00238.tif'
c1092396daa2be1b5ebda99eb0d409ba
68305cdf65827ff43dd8446fe5da60bf6a8fe75a
'2011-08-19T15:24:31-04:00'
describe
'3927' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIJfileF20080803_AACFJN' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
3c7dabeccf88125db71e90c40540c704
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describe
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vA AC ertrerl

rie
TV Cop a

whov~ FG /9y2
Wymps

And Other Fairy Tales
BY THE SAME AUTHOR

AT THE RELTON ARMS

A Novel. iI2mo. $1.00



WYMPS

AND OTHER FAIRY
TALES

BY

EVELYN SHARP

WITH EIGHT COLOURED ILLUSTRATIONS
AND A COVER BY MRS. PERCY DEARMER

JOHN LANE

THE BODLEY HEAD
New York aND LoNDON’
1897


CopyriGut, 1896, BY
JOHN LANE

Press of J. J. Little & Co,
Astor Place, New York
TO

MARGARET AND BOY
CHAP,

Il.

Ill.

IV.

VI.

VII.

Vill.

Contents

WYMPS ° ° . .

IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY

TOYLAND

THE BOY WHO LOOKED LIKE A GIRL

THE PRINCESS IN HER GARDEN

THE EXCEPTIONAL TADPOLE

THE LITTLE WITCH OF THE PLAIN

THE SOFT-HEARTED PRINCE

°

PAGE

2I

4l

gt
IIS
137

165
Il,

TIt.

IV.

VI.

Vil.

VIII.

List of Illustrations

BY MRS. PERCY DEARMER

WYMPS

IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY .

TOYLAND . .

THE BOY WHO LOOKED LIKE A GIRL .

THE PRINCESS IN HER GARDEN .
THE EXCEPTIONAL TADPOLE
THE LITTLE WITCH OF THE PLAIN

THE SOFT HEARTED PRINCE

Frontispiece

FACING PAGE

23

43

71

93
117
139

167
Wymps
Wymps

be Lady Daffany had just been be-
trothed to the Prince, and there were great
-rejoicings all over the town in consequence.
The people were allowed to cheer as much as
they liked, and every child in the country hada
whole holiday and a penny bun, and nobody had
an unhappy moment from sunrise to sunset. All
the fairies were invited to a magnificent ban-
quet in the palace, which lasted for five hours
anda half; and the betrothed couple sat at one
end of the table, and talked to one another; and
the King and Queen sat at the other end, and
hoped that everything would go well. The
Queen fanned herself, and murmured at inter-
vals, “ The wish of my heart;” and the King
grumbled to himself, because he could not get
enough to eat. The King had a very healthy
appetite, and he always gave a banquet, when-
ever there was the least occasion for one.
“T really don’t think we have left any one out, ©
this time,” said the Queen, in a satisfied tone.
% WYMPS

One of the fairies ad been left out at the
Prince’s christening, and the usual misfortunes
had followed in consequence.

“That is because I sent out all the invita-
tions myself,” replied the King, crushingly.
“These things only require a little manage-
ment.”

The words were hardly out of his royal
mouth, when a sudden darkness fell upon the
room, just as though a curtain had been drawn
across the sun. One ray of sun continued to
shine, however, and that was the one that shone
over Lady Daffany’s head; and down this one,
something came sliding at a terrific pace, and
tumbled into a dish of peaches, just in front
of her. The conversation stopped with a jerk;
and the people in the street ceased cheering at
the same moment, though they could not have
told any one why they did not go on.

“Tam going to faint,” the Queen was heard
to exclaim; but no one was sufficiently un-
occupied to attend to her. For the eyes of
every one were-fixed on the one ray of sunlight,
that shone over Lady Daffany’s head into the
dish of peaches on the table.

“Now, that’s a stupid place to keep peaches,”
said the cause of all this disturbance; and the
funniest little man imaginable clambered out
-WYMPS 5

of the dish of peaches, and looked inquisitively
down the long table. He was very small, and
of a misty appearance, and he was dressed from
head to foot in dull yellow fog, and his face was
brimful of mischief. He looked as though he
had done nothing all his life but make fun of
people ; for he had very small eyes that twinkled,
and a very large mouth that smiled, and the rest
of his face was one mass of laughter wrinkles.

“So you thought you were going to leave
out the Wymps, did you?” he said, sitting
down comfortably on the edge of a large salt-
cellar, and swinging his legs backwards and
forwards. “ You will say next, that you have
never heard of the Wymps, I suppose !”

Now, that was just what every one in the
room had been thinking, but no one had the
courage to say so.

“To be sure, to be sure; how stupid of us
not to recognise you at once,” said the Queen,
who had not fainted, after all.

“Most absurd! Why, the children in the
schools could have told us that, eh?” added
the King, glancing at the Royal Professor of
Geography, who sat on his right hand.

“No doubt, no doubt; though it does not
belong to my branch of learning,” said the
latter, looking cheerfully at the Royal Professor
6 WYMPS

of History, who was trying, for his part, not to
look at anybody at all.

“Then if you knew such a lot about us, how
was it that you didn’t ask us to the banquet,
eh?” shouted the little Wymp, in a most dis-
agreeable manner.

“Dear me!” said the Queen, “is it possible
you never had the letter ?”

“T have no doubt,” added the King, “that it
was never posted.” .

“Or, perhaps it was not properly addressed,”
suggested Lady Daffany, politely.

The Wymp looked from one to the other, and
winked; then he stood on his head, and burst
into a fit of laughter.

“Tt is no use, dearest,’ said the Prince,
gloomily ; “ we have never heard of the Wymps,
and we had much better own it at once. I sup-
pose that means another bad gift; and I had quite
enough of that sort of thing, at my christening.
It is enough to set one against banquets alto-
gether; there’s always some one left out. First,
it’s fairies; then, its Wymps. Now then, Mr.
Wymp, just tell us where you came from, and
why you are here, and get it over, will you ?”

“Now, that’s sensible. I think I'll shake
hands with you,” said the Wymp, coming down
on his feet again, and standing on tiptoe to
WYMPS 7

grasp the Prince’s hand. To the Prince it seemed
just like shaking hands with a very damp sponge.

“Now, I'll tell you what it is,’ continued the
Wymp, climbing up a decanter, and standing
with one foot on the stopper, and the other
tucked up like a stork’s; “the Wymps have
been left out of this banquet altogether, and
Wymps are not people to be trifled with. Why
people make such a fuss about fairies, I never
can make out. Now, if you'd left out some of
them, it wouldn't have made any difference to
anybody. They just overcrowd everything,
and it’s not fair.”

‘All the fairies fluttered their wings indignantly
at this; but the Fairy Queen reminded them
that it was not polite to make a quarrel in
somebody else’s house; and the Wymp went
on, undisturbed—

“So I have come down from the land of
the Wymps, which is at the back of the sun,
just to remind you that you mustn’t leave us
out again. However, I see I am spoiling the
fun, so I will be off again. But I may as well
mention,” here, he looked straight at the Prince,
and burst out laughing again, “that, in future,
iyou will always tell people what you think of
them. Ha! ha! ha! that is the Wymps’ gift
to youl Good-bye!”
8 WYMPS

And away he sped up the sunbeam again;
and the curtain fell away from the sun; and
the people in the street went on cheering, just
where they had left off; and the conversation
broke out again at the very place it had been
interrupted; and no one would have thought
that anything had happened at all. But the
Prince heard nothing but the Wymp’s mock-
ing laughter; and he sat silent, for the rest of
the day.

“Are you ill, dear Prince?” asked the Queen.

“Of course not; you are a tiresome old
fidget,” said the Prince, crossly. Now, the
Prince was noted for his excellent manners;
he was even known to speak politely to his
horse and his spaniel; so when the courtiers
heard his reply to the Queen, they began to
whisper among themselves, and the guests
made ready to depart.

“It is the heat; you must really excuse
him,” said the King, getting up from the table
with a sigh.

“What nonsense,” said the Prince; “it is
not hot at all. It is your fault for having
such a stupid, long banquet.”

“We have enjoyed ourselves so much,” said
the guests, as they filed past him.

“Oh no, you haven't,” retorted the Prince;
a]

WYMPS 5

“you have been thoroughly bored the whole
time, and so have I.”

“It is the Wymps’ gift,” whispered the
courtiers.

Two large, unshed tears stood in Lady
Daffany’s eyes, when she bade the Prince
good-night.

“ Do you think 7 have been bored the whole
evening ?” she asked him, softly.

“No, dearest,” said the Prince, kissing her
white fingers ; “for you have been with me, all
the time.”

And that of course was the truth, so she

_ went away happy.

The. days rolled on, and everybody began to
wonder at the change in the Prince. He had
always been considered the most charming
Prince in the world; but now, he had suddenly
become one of the most unpleasant. He told
people of their faults, whenever they were in-
troduced to him ; and although he was generally
right, they did not like it at all. He said the
Royal Professor of Geography was a bore; and
although no one in the kingdom could deny
it, the Royal Professor of Geography naturally

_felt annoyed. At the State Ball, he told the

King he could not dance a bit; and although:

_ the King’s partners certainly thought so too,
10 WYMPS

that did not make it any better. But when
he told the Queen, in the presence of the
Royal Professor of History, that her hair was
turning grey, underneath her crown, the Queen
said it was quite time something was done.

“The dear fellow cannot be right in his
head,” she said. “ He must have a doctor.”

So the Royal Physician was sent for; and ,
he came in his coach and four, and looked at
the Prince; and he coughed a good deal, and
said he must certainly have a change of air.

“The Royal Physician always knows,” said
the Queen, looking greatly relieved.

“But what is the matter with me?” asked
the Prince.

“That,” said the Royal Physician, coughing
again, “is too deep a matter for me to go into,
just now. In fact 3

“In fact, you don’t know a bit; do you?”
said the Prince ; and he burst out laughing, just
as unpleasantly as the Wymp had done, when
he stood on his head.

So the Royal Physician drove away again, in
his coach and four; and the Prince went on
telling people exactly what he thought of them.
The only person, to whom he was not rude, was
the little Lady Daffany ; for he thought nothing
but nice things about her, and therefore, he had


WYMPS II

nothing but nice things to say to her. But, for
all that, she was most unhappy; for she could
not bear to hear that people disliked the Prince;
and all the people were beginning to dislike
him very much indeed. So, one day, she
slipped out of her father’s house, quite early in
the morning, and went into the wood at the
end of the garden. Now, she was so kind to
all the animals and flowers, that the fairies had
given her the power of understanding their lan-
guage; so she went straight to her favourite
squirrel, who lived in a beech tree in the mid-
dle of the wood, and she told him all about
the Prince and the Wymps’ gift. The squirrel
stopped eating nuts, and ran after his tail, for
several moments, without speaking. Then, he
winked his eye at her, very knowingly, and
nodded his smart little head several times, and
spoke at last, in a tone of great wisdom.

“You must go to the Wymps, and inter-
cede for the Prince,’ he said, and cracked
another nut.

“ But would they listen to me?” asked Lady
Daffany, doubtfully.

“Go and try,’ said the squirrel. “The
Wymps are not bad little fellows, really. They
like making fun of people, that’s all. And they
saw the Prince was a bit of a prig, so they
12 WYMPS

thought they would give him a lesson, don’t
you see?”

“Perhaps they will think I am a prig too,”
said Lady Daffany, sadly.

“My dear little lady,” laughed the squirrel,
“the Wymps never make fun of people like
you. Just you go and find the biggest sun-
beam you can, and climb up it, until you come
to the land of the Wymps, at the back of the
sun. Only, you must go with bare feet, and
with nothing on your head. Now, be off with
you; I want to finisa my breakfast.”

_ The biggest sunbeam she could find was the
one that came in at the library window, and
sent her father, the Count, to sleep over the
State documents. And there, she took off her
little red shoes and stockings, and pulled the
golden pins out of her hair, and let it fall
loosely round her shoulders; and she began
to climb slowly up the ray of sunlight. At
first, it was very hard work, for it was very
slippery, and she was frightened of falling off;
but she thought of the Prince, and went on as
bravely as she could. And then, it seemed as
though invisible hands came and helped her
upwards; for, after that, it was quite easy,
and she glided up higher, and higher, and
higher, until she came to the sun itself,
WYMPS 13

the big, round sun. And she went straight
through the sun, just as though it were a
paper hoop at the circus; and she tumbled
out on the other side, into a land of yellow
fog. There was no sunshine there, and no
moon, and no stars, and no daylight; nothing
but a dull, red glow over everything, like the
light of a lamp.

“Why,” said Lady Daffany, feeling her
clothes to see if they were singed, “I always
thought the sun was hot.”

“T have no doubt you did: it is quite
absurd what mistakes are made about the
sun,” said a familiar voice behind her; and
looking round, she saw the identical Wymp
who had come to disturb the betrothal banquet.

“Hullo! I’ve been expecting you,” he said,
as he recognised her; “why didn’t you come
before ?”

“Because you didn’t send me an invitation,”
said the Lady Daffany, merrily ; and she made
him a court bow. Now, it is true that the
Wymps spend their lives in laughing at other
people, but they are not accustomed to being
laughed at themselves, so when Lady Daffany
continued to be amused at her own joke, the
Wymp drew himself up very stiffly, aud looked
offended.
14 WYMPS

“T don't see anything whatever to laugh at,”
he said, severely, “and you had better come
along, and explain to the King why you are
here.”

Then, he led her through the dimly lighted
land of yellow fog, and they passed crowds of
other little Wymps, who were all so like him-
self that it was difficult to tell one from another.
For they were all dull yellow, and distinctly
misty in appearance; and they all had small
eyes and large mouths, and their faces were all
covered with laughter wrinkles. They seemed
to be spending their time in turning somer-
saults, and tumbling over one another, and
laughing loudly at nothing at all. But the
Wymp who was with Lady Daffany did not
laugh once; he just trotted along in front of
her, and did not speak a word, so that she
really was afraid she had hurt his feelings, and
she began to feel sorry.

“Please, Mr. Wymp, I didn’t mean to laugh
at you at all,” she said, very humbly.

“That’s all very well,’ said the Wymp,
sulkily; “but no Wymp ever allows any one
else to make a joke. Come along to the King.”

“ But it wasn’t a joke!” cried Lady Daffany.

“Oh well, if it wasn’t a joke that’s another
matter. Not that I should have called it a
WYMPS 15

joke myself, but I thought you meant it for
one,” said the Wymp, more cheerfully. “ Now,
why have you come up here at all ?”

She hastened to tell him all about the Prince,
and how much he had been changed by the
Wymps’ gift, and how she wanted to intercede
for him; and her voice grew so sad as she
thought about it all, that the Wymp had to
turn round and shout at her.

“ Don't get gloomy,” he cried, turning several
somersaults in his agitation; “nobody is ever
gloomy in the land of the Wymps. Make
another bad joke if you like, but stop being
dreary, do!”

At this moment they suddenly came upon
the Wymp King, who was sitting asleep on his
throne, all by himself. He was just like the
other Wymps, except that he looked too lazy
to turn somersaults, and he had no laughter
wrinkles at all.

“Ts that the King? He doesn’t look much
like a king,’ whispered Lady Daffany.

“He hasn’t got to look like a king,” said
the Wymp; “we choose our kings, because they
are harmless, and don’t want to make jokes,
and will keep out of the way. We once had
a king who looked like a king—we used to
live zz the sun then—and he did so much
16 WYMPS

mischief that the sun people turned us out,
and we have had to live at the back of the sun
ever since.”

Lady Daffany felt glad that the kind of king
she was accustomed to @d look like a king;
but she had no time to say so, for just then, the
Wymp jumped on the throne, and woke up the
King by shouting in his ear.

“Does any one want anything?” asked the
Wymp King, waking up with a jerk, and putting
on his crown and his spectacles hurriedly.

Lady Daffany dropped on her knees in front
of the throne, and tried not to look frightened.

“Please your Majesty,” she began, timidly.

“Who is she talking to?” cried the Wymp
King. He had a very gruff voice, through
living in a yellow fog all his life; and he spoke
so loudly, that he completely drowned the rest
of her speech.

“Say what you want, and don’t give him any
titles; he’s not used to them,” whispered the
Wymp.

“Why, I don’t believe he is a king at all,”
said Lady Daffany, standing up again.

“Who says I’m not a king at all?” shouted
the Wymp King, angrily.

“Tf you make any more of your bad jokes,
I won't try to help you at all,” said the
WYMPS 17

Wymp. “Why don’t you say what you want,
at once?”

So Lady Daffany set to work, and told the
whole of her story; and begged the Wymp
King to take back his fatal gift, so that the
Prince should no longer get himself disliked,
through telling people what he thought about
them.

When she had finished, the King gave a great
yawn, and took off his crown.

“Doesn't he tell them the truth, then?” he
asked, sleepily. .

“Ves, I-—I suppose so,” she answered, doubt-
fully.

“Then, why should they mind?” asked the
Wymp King.

Lady Daffany shook her head.

“They do mind,” she said.

“Then it’s very stupid of them,” said the
Wymp King, very drowsily. “ However, if that’s
all, the gift can be passed on to you, instead.
Now, go away ; I am going to sleep again.”

He was already sound asleep, and not another
word could be got out of him. Lady Daffany
tried not to cry, and turned away.

“T suppose every one will dislike se now,”
she said, sorrowfully ; “but of course, that is
better than their disliking the Prince.”

2
18 WYMPS

“ Nonsense,” said the Wymp, as he led her
again to the back of thesun ; “ that would be too
good a joke for the King to make. You wait
andsee. Good-bye.”

» And away she went through thesun again, and
came out on the bright side once more; and she
slid down into the garden, for the sunbeam had
moved on since the morning; and then she ran
indoors to find her shoes and stockings.

“That's all right,” said the Count, putting
away the State documents with a great show of
exhaustion ; “you're just in time for tea. Where
have you been all day?”

“T’ve been for a walk, at least a fly—no, I
mean a ride,” stammered Lady Daffany. “I’m
not quite sure which it was.”

“Never mind,’ chuckled the Count; “I
expect you were with the Prince and didn’t
notice, eh? Then, of course, you have heard
the wonderful news of the Prince’s recovery.”

“Then the Wymp did speak the truth!”
cried Lady Daffany, clapping her hands for

joy.

“What Wymp?” asked the Count. “ 7hds
had nothing to do with the Wymps. It was a
strange physician, who came from a far land,
and he touched the Prince’s tongue and made
him every bit as polite as he used to be. So
WYMPS 19

you can be married at last, and the Prince can
go into society again.” .

“A strange physician?” said his daughter ;
“T wonder where he has gone now.”

“ That’s just it,” said the Count, pouring out
his sixth cup of tea; “he didn’t go anywhere.
He turned three somersaults down the palace
steps, and when they ran to pick him up, there
wasn't anybody to pick up.”

“Then it must have been a Wymp,” thought
Lady Daffany, as she wandered out into the
garden to think it all over.

“IT wonder if I have really got the Wymps’
gift, instead of the Prince,” she said to herself.
Just then, the Prince himself came through the
bushes to find her. He no longer looked grave
and unhappy, and there was a radiant look on
his face.

“Don't you think I have been a very dis-
agreeable Prince lately ?” he whispered, as he
stooped to kiss her.

“T think you are the dearest Prince in all the
world,” she answered, softly.

“ All the same, the Royal Professor of Geo-
graphy zs an old bore, isn’t he?” said the
Prince.

“Oh no, I don’t think so. He is only clever,”
answered Lady Daffany.
20 WYMPS

“But the Queen Mother’s hair zs turning
grey; haven't you noticed it?” persisted the
Prince.

“T really think you are mistaken, dearest,”
said Lady Daffany.

And she never found out whether she really
had the Wymps’ gift or not. But the Prince
and the people loved her to the end of her
days.
In a Sea-Green Country

In a Sea-Green Country

Fak away in the world of dreams, there is a
beautiful Sea-Green Country. It is not to
be found in the atlas, perhaps, for the people
who make maps know very little about the world
of dreams; but little Margaret with the yellow
hair could tell them a great many things about
it that they do not know already. For she
once went to the Sea-Green Country, quite by
herself, and it was she who told the Sea-Green
King why he was green, and—but perhaps it is
worth making into a story.

Margaret is a dear little girl in a blue pina-
fore, with round wondering eyes, and cheeks
like ripe cherries, and a tangled mop of yellow
curls that make a frame round her face. And
she has a laugh just like the note of a black-
bird when he flies out of a bush, and sends all
the worms scuttling out of sight. Nothing runs
away when Margaret laughs, though; not even
the worms.

Now, it all began in this way. Margaret
24 IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY

had been told that she was not to eat the green
gooseberries, at the end of the garden, because
they were not ripe; and this made her very
sad indeed, for green gooseberries, packed as
close as they can be on low bushes, quite near
the ground, are particularly tempting to any
one who is just three feet long. So she fell
to wondering why she was not allowed to eat
them, when they looked so very nice; and
she ran across the lawn, as fast as her brown
legs would carry her, and crawled under the
biggest gooseberry bush she could find, and
then looked up into the middle of the green
branches, to try and find out why green goose-
berries were not to be eaten. That is the best
way to see gooseberries growing,—to lie under
a bush, and look up at the rows and rows of
shining green balls, with their little brown
caps all nodding away as busily as possible.
But, of course, that is only to be done if one
is three feet high.

Margaret had not been there long, when
she discovered that the gooseberries were not
fastened on to the branches at all, as most
people would think, but were all moving about
among the thorns and the leaves; and when
she looked a little closer, she saw that they
had arms and legs, and that there were round
IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY 25

shining faces under the brown caps, and that
they all held sharp thorns in their hands. At
the same moment, the air became full of voices,
not children’s voices, nor grown-up people’s
voices, but voices that seemed made up of the
wind muttering through the grass, and of the
bees humming in the clover, and of the lark
whirring down to her nest; and they were all
calling “ Margaret! Margaret!” and every one
of the little green men was pointing at her
with his spear. At last, the biggest of them
all—he must have been half an inch tall—
dropped down from the end of a branch, on
to her blue pinafore, and began to speak.
Immediately, all the others stopped shouting,
which was exceedingly necessary, for other-
wise, he would not have been heard at all.

“Madam,” began the little man, leaning on
his spear, and taking off his cap with a flourish,
“T am King Emerald’s Prime Minister.”

Margaret had often heard people speak of the
Prime Minister, when she came down to dessert
on Sunday evenings, and she felt very excited
at meeting him in this unexpected way.

“Are you the Prime Minister?” she ex-
claimed in surprise, for he was not at all what
she had imagined him to be. “ Then, how dvead-
Sully naughty you must be, to be sure!”
26 IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY

At that, all the voices broke out again, and
hundreds of little green men dropped down
from the branches, and began pulling at her
blue pinafore. And as they pulled, they grew
larger and larger, until each one of them was
as big as she was; and the bush began to
spread out and grow larger too, until it seemed
like a thick forest all round her; and she grew
bewildered, and rubbed her eyes, and felt in-
clined tocry. Then she felt herself being lifted
up, up, up, into a green leafy country, where
every branch was a road that led away to
nowhere; and here, she was carried along so
swiftly, that everything became a green blurred
mass, and her eyes grew heavy, and closed, and
she fell asleep.

She awoke with a start, for the green men
had dropped her on the ground, with a jerk;
and she sat up and yawned sleepily, and looked
round to see where she was. All round her,
stretched a beautiful, bright green country, with
hills, and plains, and rivers, and lakes, all as
green as anything could be.

“Why,” said little Margaret, “I declare it is
exactly like being inside a geography book.”

“There is nothing whatever about the Sea-
Green Country, in the geography book,” said an
indignant voice at her elbow; and when she
IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY 27

turned round, there was the Prime Minister,
leaning on his spear and looking at her.

“T don’t know,” said Margaret, doubtfully;
“there’s lots about America.”

“ America!” cried the Prime Minister, scorn-
fully. “What's America? 7fzs is the Sea-
Green Country.”

“ If you please,” said Margaret, as soothingly
as she could; “ would you tell me if that is the
same place as Fairyland ?”

“What a stupid child you must be,” said the
Prime Minister, glaring down at her. “ Didn’t
I tell you this was the Sea-Green Country?
No connection with Fairyland whatever; quite
another place altogether. We are unique.”

Margaret did not know what “unique” was,
so she gave a little sigh.

“TI don’t understand,” she said, sadly. “It
must be Fairyland, if it isn’t in the geography
book.”

The Prime Minister lost his temper again.

“Do you think I don’t know Fairyland when
I see it? Haven't I been there for a trip, once
a year, for the last five thousand centuries? I
know every corner of Fairyland, and I consider
it a vastly overrated place. There’s nothing to
do all day, but to dance ina ring, and talk to
the Queen. Too many women in Fairyland for
28 IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY

my taste; frivolous people with wings, / can’t
see anything in them! You come round with
me, and I’ll show you some of the things you'd
never get in Fairyland, or the geography book
either.”

So he took her hand, and they seemed to get
over the green grass, without walking, or run-
ning, or touching the ground at all. They just
glided along, like swans on the water; and now
and then, they stopped for a moment, and the
Prime Minister pointed out something in a very
important manner, just as though everything
in the place belonged to him, and there was no
king at all.

“Why, the rivers have green water in them,
and so have the lakes,” cried Margaret. “And
oh! all the birds are green too, and the flowers,
and the butterflies. Don’t you have any black-
birds here, or robin-redbreasts, Mr. Prime
Minister ?”

“Greenbirds we call them, they’re more
uncommon than blackbirds,’ said the Prime
Minister, in his superior tone. “We have
robin-greenbreasts too, and there’s a greenbottle
fly over there; I suppose ¢/ey are black-in your
country too, eh?”

“No, they’re called blue, but they Zook black,”
said Margaret, thoughtfully.
IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY 29

“ Now, that’s a stupid thing to do,” said the
Prime Minister, quite cheerfully; for he was
always glad when he could prove that some one
else was inferior to him. “ Everything’s green
here, and we call it green; saves a lot of trouble,
don’t you see?”

Everything was green; all the insects, and
all the animals, and all the people. There were
green cows, and green sparrows, and green tad-
poles, and green sticklebacks, and green salmon;
and as for the lobsters and shrimps, they were
all green, too, and boiling didn’t make any
difference to them. But everything was not
of the same shade of green; for instance, the
children in this wonderful country were very
pale green indeed, just the colour of the nut-
leaves, when they are beginning to uncurl
themselves; while the grown-up men were
the colour of the sea, when it is dark, and
stormy, and angry. But the Sea-Green girls
were the colour of the sea, when it is calm,
and smiling, and gentle, the colour of fresh
cowslip leaves, and young daffodil-buds ; and
they never changed to a darker colour at all,
for, in the Sea-Green Country, the girls are
always young.

Suddenly, there was a sound of trumpets
in the distance; and the trees at once bent
30 IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY

their tall heads to the ground, and the birds
stopped singing, in the middle of their songs,
and the very wind itself ceased blowing, and
the fish came up to the top of the water to
see what was happening. Margaret looked
round her with wondering eyes, and saw that
all the people near her had thrown themselves
down on their faces, and were cheering as
loudly as they could in such an uncomfortable
position, while a long procession could be seen,
coming down from the hill to the plain.

“Dear me,” said the Prime Minister, who
had remained upright, and was tapping his
heel with his spear; “here comes the King.
I must give you an introduction to him. Of
course, he is very angry with you; but if you
are very polite to him, and ask after the health
of the Prince Chartreuse, I will do my best to
make him forgive you.”

“But why is the King angry with me?”
asked Margaret, wonderingly.

“Hush!” said the Prime Minister. “Go
down on your face, child, at once. The King
can't bear to see any one standing up, when he
is making a procession.”

“But you are not on your face,” objected
Margaret; because, of course, she wanted to
see the fun.
IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY 31

“fam the Prime Minister,” he returned, in
a superior manner; but, at this moment, the ~
King himself drove up in a beautiful chariot,
made of green bottle-glass, and drawn by sea-
serpents; and by his side sat Prince Chartreuse,
looking very cross and very sleepy.

“T wish they wouldn't cheer so loudly,
they’ve woke me up,” grumbled Prince Char-
treuse.

“Stop cheering,” said the Prime Minister,
with a graceful wave of his spear.

“Ah yes, of course, stop cheering, by all
means,” added the King, hastily; and he put
up his eye-glass, and looked at Margaret.

“Hullo! what's that thing?” asked Prince
Chartreuse, pointing at her, ina most unprincely
manner.

Then Margaret of the yellow hair, with the
round wondering eyes, and the cheeks like ripe
cherries, stepped forward in her blue pinafore,
and looked up fearlessly at the ill-mannered
little Prince.

“It’s very rude to point,” she said, solemnly.

“Dear me,” said the Prime Minister; “that
is not the way to speak to Prince Chartreuse.”

“No, no, of course not,” said the King
immediately; “not the right way at all.”

“T shall point as much as I like,” said Prince
32 IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY

Chartreuse, sulkily. “I always do what I like.
Daddy does what the Prime Minister likes,
don’t you, Daddy? But,I say, what an awfully
funny colour you are,” he added, pointing at
Margaret again. ;

“An extremely odd colour,’ said King
Emerald, putting up his eye-glass once more.
And all the people on the ground rolled over
on one side, and looked at her too, out of the
corner of their eyes, to see what her colour
was like.

“Only temporary, your Majesty,” said the
Prime Minister, smilingly. “It shall be altered
at once.”

But Margaret was beginning to get a little
tired of being patronised by the Prime Minister,
and she objected strongly to being made green
all over, like the Sea-Green people. So she
stamped her foot on the ground, and made the
sea-serpents toss their heads in alarm.

“Pm not a funny colour at all,” she cried,
indignantly. “It’s better than being the
same colour as everybody else. I won't be
made green, just as though I were a cater-
pillar.”

The Prime Minister tapped her curly head
with his spear.

“Don't make the King any angrier with
IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY 33

you,” he said, severely. “The King is very
fierce, when he is roused.”

“To be sure I am,” echoed King Emerald,
in a loud voice. “It’s not safe to come near
me, when I am really in a temper with any one.”

Margaret put her hands behind her, and
smiled up in his face as boldly as possible.

“T don’t believe you are a bit angry with
me, are you?” she said. “I believe the Prime
Minister is talking nothing but nonsense; isn’t
he?”

“Eh? What? Dear me!” said the King,
dropping his eye-glass suddenly, and looking
helplessly at the Prime Minister.

Then Margaret began to laugh her black-
bird’s laugh; and she laughed until the tears
rolled out of her big blue eyes, and tumbled
down her rosy cheeks on to the blue pinafore ;
and the more she laughed, the more the King
and the Prime Minister stared at her, until at
last they began to laugh too; and then all
the people began to laugh, as they lay on the
ground; and the water in the stream bubbled
and laughed, as it danced over the pebbles;
and the flowers nodded their heads with merri-
. ment; and all the birds began to sing again;
and everything was as full of laughter and fun
as it well could be. But Prince Chartreuse did

3
34 IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY

not stop to laugh, for he jumped out of the
glass chariot, and took little laughing, yellow-
haired Margaret by her two hands.

“You have made the Prime Minister laugh,”
he said; “and no one has ever been known to
do that before. I should like you to come and
play with me. If you come home with me,
I will show you my pony with wings, and my
doll who talks, and all my other toys that have
come straight from Fairyland. Will you come
with me?”

“T don’t know,” said Margaret, doubtfully ;
and every one stopped laughing to listen to her.
“Does the dolly really talk ?”

“It talks five languages,” said Prince Char-
treuse.

Of course, that settled the matter at once;
and little Margaret jumped up into the chariot,
next to the Prince; and the sea-serpents took
them away up the hill to the Sea-Green Palace.
And Margaret stayed there a great many days,
and played with Prince Chartreuse, and talked
to the wonderful dolly, and rode on the wonder-
ful flying pony, and enjoyed herself very much
indeed. But the Prime Minister used to come,
every morning, and give them lessons, and
teach them how to speak the language of the
fairies, and the language of the wild flowers,
IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY 35

and the language of the four winds; and how
to write copies in green marble copy-books;
and how to turn a frog into a snake, and a
lizard into a kingfisher; and this, Margaret did
not enjoy at all, for she could never remember
any of the things he tried to teach her. So,
one day, the Prime Minister shut up the book
in despair, and shook his head severely at her.

“It's your absurd colour,” he said, irritably.
“T always knew how it would be, if you didn't
take my advice. Why can you not be the same
colour as every one else? It saves so much
trouble. As it is, you must go away, and not
play any more with Prince Chartreuse. We
shall have Az changing colour next; and then,
what will happen to the country ?”

“Yes,” echoed the King, “what will happen
to the country ?”

But Prince Chartreuse flung himself on the
ground, and burst out crying.

“JT won’t have her sent away, I want her to
stop and play with me,” he shouted at the top
of his voice.

Now, Margaret was a sweet-natured little
girl; and she had grown very fond of the
Prince, although he was so spoilt, and she
could not bear to see him cry; so she knelt
down beside him, with her eyes shining
36 IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY

with tears that were ready to fall, and she made
up her mind on the spot.

“Don't cry, Prince Chartreuse; TPIl be made
green all over like a caterpillar, if they let me
stop with you; I will really,” she said, clasping
her hands together tightly. Then the Prince
sat up and stopped crying, and the Prime
Minister smiled approvingly, and said that if
Prince Chartreuse would take her to the Witch
of the Green Rock, she would make her green
all over, just like every one else.

So King Emerald kissed them both very
affectionately, when the Prime Minister was not
looking; and they went out of the Sea-Green
Palace, hand in hand, and walked down the hill
and across the plain for a very long way, until
they came at last to the seashore, where there
were no people, and no trees, and no flowers,
and no animals—nothing but a single green
rock, rising out of the ground in front of them.

Then Prince Chartreuse struck his spear
three times on the rock, and called out in his
imperious voice. “Ho there! Witch of the
Green Rock,” he shouted. “Come out to Mar-
garet of the yellow hair.”

A door opened in the side of the rock, and
out of it stepped a tall witch-woman, clothed in
flowing green garments, with eyes like moon-
IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY 37

a

light, and hair like seaweed, and a complexion
like sea foam.

“Who wants me?” asked the witch-woman,
sweetly ; and her voice was like the distant
sound of receding waves.

Prince Chartreuse pushed little Margaret for-
ward, and she stood and fumbled shyly at her
blue pinafore. But she was always polite, even
when she was shy, so she began to speak as
bravely as she could. “If you please,” she
said, “I want to be made green all over, just
like a caterpillar, so that I can stay and play
with Prince Chartreuse.”

“ That is very simple,” said the witch-woman,
with a smile; and she stamped on the ground,
and said some strange words, and up sprang a
fountain of bright green paint.

“ Step into that,” she said to Margaret.

“T will come with you,” said Prince Char-
treuse; and they stood together, under the
shower of green spray. But when they came
out again, Margaret was no greener than be-
fore! There were the yellow curls, and the
blue eyes, and the cherry-coloured cheeks, just
the same as ever.

But the blue pinafore had turned bright
green.

“It is no use,” said the witch-woman ; “you
38 IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY

will never be like everybody else;” and she
turned away to her rock again.

“Stop!” cried Prince Chartreuse. “Why .
can’t you make her green ?”

“She will never be like everybody else,” re-
peated the witch-woman, and she shut the door
in their faces.

So they went back again over the plain,
very sadly, and clambered wearily up the hill,
and arrived at the Sea-Green Palace about bed-
time.

“She will never be like everybody else,”
explained Prince Chartreuse, when they went
in. All the courtiers. sighed, and the Prime
Minister looked at Margaret and frowned, and
King Emerald looked at the Prime Minister.

“She will have to be sent away,” said the
Prime Minister, leaning gracefully on his
spear.

“It’s a shame,” declared Prince Chartreuse—
he was too sleepy to cry—‘“and if you send her
away, I will go too.”

The Prime Minister coughed.

“She will have to be sent away,” said King
Emerald in a great hurry; and he pushed his
crown awry.

Margaret rubbed her eyes, and tried hard to
remember something.
IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY 39

“You're all very silly,’she cried, “and I
won't go away unless I want to! Why should
I be green just because you are? You can’t
even tell one from another!” she added,
looking at the crowd of courtiers; and all the
courtiers looked at one another and seemed
surprised, for it had never struck them before
that it mattered which was which. And as they
looked, their bodies grew rounder, and their
legs grew shorter, and their arms tumbled off,
and their brown helmets began nodding, nod-
ding, nodding; and Margaret rubbed her eyes
again and burst out laughing. And her laugh
sounded just like the blackbird, singing in the
hawthorn tree at home.

“T know what it is!” she cried. “You are
all green because you're not ripe! Oh, where
am [ going ?”

“You are going away,” said the Prime Min-
ister, still leaning on his spear.

“Going away, going away,” said the King’s
voice, somewhere in the distance.

“T can’t come with you,’ sobbed Prince
Chartreuse, whom she could not see at all;
“but I will come and find you when I am a
-man, and bring you back again.”

The crowd of courtiers began to close round
her; nearer and nearer they came, until they
40 IN A SEA-GREEN COUNTRY

were hanging all over her, with their brown
caps nodding, and nodding, and nodding.

And there she lay under the gooseberry bush,
looking up into the network of green branches,
with the rows and rows of green gooseberries
nodding their brown caps at her, and the Prime
Minister hanging at the end of a twig. And
the blackbird was singing his heart out, in the
hawthorn tree close by.

Margaret put up a fat thumb and finger, and
plucked off the Prime Minister, and threw it
away from her as far as she could.

“Tt was all your fault, you stupid thing,”
she said, and ran straight indoors.

That was how Margaret went to the Sea-
Green Country. And perhaps, some day, Prince
Chartreuse will come and fetch her back again,
to ride on the pony with wings, and play with
the doll who speaks five languages.
Toyland
4 WW pra ae
. (S)
( @
“aM

Bs


Toyland

PRINCE POPPET was the King’s son, and

he was shockingly spoilt. Peter was only
the sweep’s son, and nobody spoiled him at
all; but he could turn coach wheels better
than any boy in the town, and that was de-
cidedly an accomplishment. The Prince had
so many toys, that he did not know what to
do with them; and he had to invent new and
exciting ways of breaking them, for the sake
of passing the time. Peter had no toys at
all, but he knew how to make a catapult out
of a merrythought, and a whistle out of a
peach stone, and that was more than the
Prince could do.

One day, when the Prince was looking idly
out of his nursery window, and wishing it was
tea-time, he heard the sound of whistling, just
below; so out he stepped on to the balcony,
and there he saw Peter in the garden strolling’
about just as though the whole place belonged
to him.
44 TOYLAND

“Hullo! Who are you?” asked the Prince.
“ And who taught you to whistle like that?”

“Tt didn’t take any teaching,” said the
sweep’s son, laughing heartily. “And I’m Peter,
of course. Who are you?”

' Prince Poppet stared in amazement. It had
never occurred to him before, that it was pos-
sible for any one not to know who Ze was.

“Tam the King’s son,” he said in a dignified
manner; “ and I have whistling lessons, three
times a week, from Professor Bullfinch.”

“What waste of time,’ remarked Peter.
“Do you have a Professor to teach you how
to eat your dinner, too?”

“Vou are most ill-mannered,’ exclaimed
Prince Poppet, feeling very much inclined to
cry. “I don’t believe any one has ever taught
you how to speak to a King’s son.”

“Well, I haven’t had much experience with
Kings’ sons, certainly,” answered Peter, turn-
ing a few coach wheels across the lawn, by
way of keeping himself in practice. “ Have
you learnt anything else, besides whistling ?”

The Prince reflected a moment.

“T have a Professor of Deportment, who
comes from Fairyland, to teach me dancing
and manners,” he began, very proudly.

“That’s a long way to drag the poor fellow,
TOYLAND 4s

just for that,” observed Peter. “Can you stand
on your head ?”
“YT never tried,” said the Prince.

“TI can,” said Peter, and showed that he
could, in the middle of the Queen’s favourite
geranium bed. “ What else?”

“Ican ride, of course,” said Prince Poppet;
“and shoot woodlarks on the wing, and pierce
a moth’s head fifty yards off. Can you?”

“T shouldn't think of trying,” cried Peter,
angrily. “Those are cruel, unfair things to do.
Can you catch a pony in a wood, and ride her
bareback to the farm, and harness her to a
cart?”

“ Of course not,” said the Prince, disdainfully.
“Tam not a sweep.”

“JT am,” said Peter, with pride in his voice;
“and I don’t think much of all your professors,
if they haven't taught you how to stand on your
head, or to ride a pony bareback. I suppose
you can’t even climb up a chimney, and sit on
the top?”

The Prince shook his head.

“JT can climb the ropes in the palace gymna-
sium, though,” he ventured to say.

“What's the use of that? You won’t find
ropes to climb wherever you go.”

“Then I shan’t climb them,’ said Prince
46 TOYLAND

Poppet, making a joke quite by accident. He
was really feeling very cross. But the sweep’s
son was looking so provokingly good-tempered
that it was impossible to be angry with him.

“Isn't there anything you caz do?” asked
Peter, cheerfully.

“TI can say the pence table up to a hundred.
How far can you go?”

“T never have to go farther than tenpence!
You see, I have only had tenpence for a whole
year, so it is not much good knowing any
more, is it? When I’ve got a shilling, I am
going to buy Bridget the woolly bear that is in
the toy-shop window. Have you seen it? It’s
marked one-and-twopence really, but the toy-
shop man isa friend of mine, and so Iam going
to get it for a shilling.”

“Who is Bridget?” asked the Prince, who
had long forgotten all about his tea, and was
growing more interested every minute.

“Don’t you know Bridget? You don’t seem
to know very much, considering you're a King’s
son. She is my little sister, and she can run as
fast as a hare.” -

“Wait a minute,” shouted the Prince, sud-
denly; and‘he rushed away to find his mother.
The Queen was just getting ready for her after-
noon drive; and the Baroness, who was ar-
TOYLAND 47

ranging the veil over her crown, looked most
annoyed when the Prince burst into the room,
and announced at the top of his voice, that he
was going to give Bridget his new talking bear.
The Baroness could not bear boys, and Prince
Poppet was always playing her tricks.

“Her Majesty has a headache. Who is
Bridget?” she said, very severely.

“ May I, mother ?” shouted the Prince, pour-
ing the scent into the powder-box, and taking
no notice whatever of the Baroness. The Queen
did not know she had a headache, until the
Baroness told her so; but she put her hand
over her eyes at once, and told him to go to his
father instead.

“He has such a sweet nature,” she mur-
mured, as he flew upstairs to look for his
father. The Baroness did not respond to the
Queen’s remark ; but, as the Prince had dropped
a cold hairpin down her back as he passed, per-
haps that was not to be wondered at.

The King was in his study, trying to make
ice-pudding out of moonshine. He had been
trying to make ice-pudding out of moonshine
for the last fifty years, though no one took the
least notice of him, and the country managed
to govern itself perfectly well without him. In
fact, the people had come to think that making
48 TOYLAND

experiments with moonshine was quite a right
and proper occupation for a king, and they
would have been quite upset if he had wanted
to do anything else.

“Father!” cried Prince Poppet, “may I give
Bridget my talking bear ?”

“How noisy you are, my son,” complained
the King, fretfully. “I had nearly done it, that
time; and now I shall have to begin all over
again. Run away to your mother.”

“It’s rather tiring to spend the afternoon
in running backwards and forwards,” said the
Prince, making more noise than ever by hitting
the nutmeg-grater with the rolling-pin. “May
I, father 2?”

“Two pounds of the best moonshine, three
ounces of pounded hail, mix well together, and
flavour with stars to taste,” murmured the old
‘King. “And I’ve quite run out of stars; how
tiresome! Where’s that telephone?”

“Then I may, mayn’t 1? Thanks awfully,”
said Prince Poppet, dropping the half-pound
weight on the King’s toe, and running back
again to the nursery.

A minute later, the two boys were sitting
cross-legged on the lawn together.

“Why does it make that noise?” asked
Peter doubtfully, when the full accomplish-
TOYLAND 49

ments of the talking bear had been revealed
to him.

“ Because—because it’s a bear, I suppose,”
said the Prince. He was rather disappointed
that his princely generosity was not more
appreciated.

“But bears don’t make a noise like a broken
concertina. I know they don’t, because I heard
one up in the mountains last winter, and it
roared enough to make your flesh creep. No-
body would be frightened of a harmless squeak
like this !”

“Nobody wants you to be frightened,” re-
torted the Prince, sulkily. “ Besides, it’s for
Bridget.”

“Oh well, Bridget hasn't heard a real bear,
so she might like this one,” said Peter, more
kindly. “Come along, we'll take it to her, at
all events.”

The townspeople hardly knew what they were
expected to do, when they saw Prince Poppet
and the sweep’s son, walking along side by
side. They were accustomed to cheer loudly
whenever the little Prince appeared in public;
but he had never appeared before on foot, and
without his crown, and they felt that cheer-
ing would be quite out of place under such
remarkable circumstances. So they decided it

4
50 TOYLAND

would be etiquette to stare at him instead, as
he was doing something so very much out of
the common; and as it gave them something
to talk about for a whole week, and as the
Prince and Peter never noticed any of them at
all, everybody was pleased all round.

Now, Bridget was a round-faced little girl,
with curly red hair, and big black eyes; and
she was just as natural and unabashed in the
Prince’s presence, as though he had not been a
King’s son at all. She was the only thing in
the sweep’s cottage that was not black all over;
and when Peter put his sooty arm round her
neck, and kissed her in his rough, careless
manner, it left no mark at all on her fat,
brown cheek.

“Tt is a most beautiful bear,” she said, clap-
ping her hands joyfully. “I never knew bears
were half so beautiful before.”

“No more they are,” said Peter, a little
crossly. “Real bears are not a bit like that.
This thing’s more like a tame cat than a
bear.”

“Tt is like a bear,” cried the Prince, angrily.
“What do you know about bears, I should
like to know ?”

“T’ve seen a real bear,” said Peter stoutly;
“and that’s more than any of your musty old
TOYLAND 51

professors ever have. Just as if a real bear
had a tail like that!” he added, seizing its long
bushy tail, which certainly did remind one ofa
Persian cat.

- “Give it back to me!” cried Prince Poppet,
passionately, grasping it by the head at the
same moment. It would have been hard to
tell which of the two boys was the King’s son,
for they both began tugging violently at the
bear ; while Bridget stood and looked on sadly,
with her mouth puckered up into a round O,
and two shining tears in her big black eyes.

“Oh, my beautiful bear,’ she said with a
sob, as the unhappy animal cracked in the
middle, and fell down on the boards in two
pieces. The boys stopped quarrelling, and
looked a little ashamed of themselves. But
Bridget dropped down on the floor, and cried
bitterly over her broken toy.

“Don’t cry, Bridget. I’ve got my tenpence
still, and I guess we can do without any more
Princes, can’t we?” said Peter, kneeling down
beside her, and glaring up fiercely at Prince
Poppet.

“You can keep your tenpence,” replied the
Prince, walking away to the door. “I am going
to fetch all the toys I like best to give to
Bridget.” For the Prince knew how to behave
52 TOYLAND

like a King’s son, sometimes, though he had
been so badly spoilt. :

But, just at that moment, a very wonderful
thing happened. For directly Bridget’s hot
tears fell on the poor broken bear, the two
pieces joined together with a snap, and the
little, black, woolly animal stretched his legs,
strutted all round the room, and sneezed three
times.

“Dear me,” he said, “you are a very well
brought up little girl, You have freed me by
your tears, and now I can go back to Toyland.”

“Where is Toyland?” they all asked at
once.

“Jump on my back, and you shall see,” said
the bear. Now, whether they shrank as small
as the bear, or whether the bear grew as tall
as the children, they did not have time to
consider, for the next moment they found
themselves flying through the air at a most
tremendous pace; and it was all they could
do to hold on tight to one another, so that
none of their legs or arms should be blown
off on the way.

When they stopped at last, they found them-
selves in a most peculiar looking country, where
the ground was made of cardboard, and all the
trees were pointed in shape, and stood on round
TOYLAND 53

wooden stands. It was the most curious kind
of country that has ever been seen; and when
the three children got off the bear’s back, and
looked round them, they were too full of
wonder to speak. For all the animals were’
made of indiarubber, and conversed in windy
voices; and all the fish had magnets in their
mouths, and lay on their sides on the dry
ground; and there were ninepins, who walked
about and chatted with tennis racquets, and
drums, who rumbled along by the side of
humming tops. But perhaps, the houses were
strangest of all, for they looked just like wine-
cases from behind, and yet were most mag-
nificent red brick dwellings in front, with green
doors, and brass knockers, and windows with
white curtains in them.

“It is just like a huge toy-shop. Isn't it
beautiful ?” whispered Bridget.

“Ym glad you like it,” said the bear, proudly.
“This is a real country, this is. Everything
is so much alike that you can’t tell a pig from a
cow, and that makes things so much easier to
understand. We have only got one kind of
tree, too, so there can’t be any jealousy, don’t
you see; and everything is movable, so that’
we can turn a town into a farm, or a pond into
a forest, at a moment’s notice, which is most
54 TOYLAND

convenient. For instance, the King has taken
a dislike to ponds lately, so we have to move
all the ponds out of his way, whenever we see
him coming. You see how convenient it is.”

The children looked round, and as all the
ponds were round pieces of plate-glass, with
tin ducks floating on the top of them, it did not
seem altogether impossible to clear them out of
the King’s way.

“How do you manage about maps, if the
things are always being moved about ?” asked
Prince Poppet, who wanted to show that he
knew something.

“Maps ?” shouted the bear, waving his long
tail about in his agitation; “don’t mention
such a word in Toyland, again! It makes me
feel quite queer. Come along to the palace,
and see the King.”

They followed him for some little way,
through wonderful forests and farms, and past
butchers’ shops and groups of indiarubber
animals, until he stopped again, and hesitated
for a moment. .

“T say,” he shouted to a venerable wooden
person, who was standing near a large Noah’s
Ark, and might well have been taken either for
aman or a woman; “have you seen the palace
lately ?”
TOYLAND | 55

“It was being moved to the edge of the
forest, when I last saw it,” replied the venerable
person, drawing his wooden cloak more closely
round his wooden form. “ And the forest is
in the same place as it was, a fortnight ago,”
he added.

“Come along,” said the bear, and taking a
short cut across a Swiss village, they arrived
at last in front of the palace, which was a
good sized doll’s house, with a particularly
handsome, green door in front, and the addi-
tional ornament of a green balcony just above
it. There were several wooden soldiers in
brilliant uniforms, strolling about outside, and
they formed into rank with a series of jerks,
and saluted, as the bear came up.

“Ts the King anywhere about?” asked the
bear.

“He's playing skittles with the forest trees,
at the back of the palace,’ answered a tin
Highlander, who had got mounted on an
Arab’s camel by mistake.

“Come along,” said the bear again, and the
three children followed him round to the back
of the doll’s house, where they came at last
into the presence of the King.

The King of Toyland was a very cheerful
looking monarch. He had a body like a gaily
56 TOYLAND

painted top, and a head like a Rugby football,
and his legs were golf clubs, and his arms were
real, spliced cricket bats; and when he spoke,
his voice sounded exactly like Scotch bagpipes.

“Hullo! Who are all these people?” he
cried, and stopped bowling down the forest
trees with tennis balls.

The bear explained how it was that Bridget
had disenchanted him, and how he had brought
them all back with him, to show his gratitude
to her.

“That's all very well,’ said the King, un-
screwing his arms to rest himself a little. “But
what can they do, now they are here, eh?”

“Yes,” echoed the crowd of courtiers, who
consisted of a motley collection of Dutch dolls
and wooden sailors and peg-tops, and many
other curious individuals. “What can you do,
now you are here?”
~“T can turn coach wheels,” spoke up Peter
bravely; and he scattered the courtiers right
and left, to show them how he did it. He
knocked down a few more trees in the opera-
tion, and put the palace itself in danger; but
nobody seemed to mind that in the least.

“Bravo! Well bowled!” shouted the King,
screwing on his arms again, so that he could
clap his hands. “You can stay as long as you
TOYLAND 57

like. I must learn to do that myself. And
you, what can you do, little girl with the big
black eyes ?”

Bridget did not think she could do any-
thing. She always had the cottage to look
after at home, and the dinner to cook, and she
never played any games, and nobody could
find time to teach her how to do things. So
she looked at the King very sorrowfully.

“If you please,” she said, sadly, “I think
I must go back again. I can’t whistle, or
do any of the wonderful things that Peter
does.”

But Peter came and put his arm round her.

“She can run as fast as a hare,” he said,
proudly.

“A race! That’s a new idea. By all means
let us have a race,” said the crowd of courtiers,
eagerly; for if people play games all day long
without stopping, they are quite glad to hear
of a new one.

“ By all means,” said the King. “ Clear some
of those trees out of the way, and fetch the
steam engine.”

In a few minutes, the forest had been entirely
,removed to the front of the palace; and, just as
Bridget had taken off her wooden shoes and
was all ready to start, up puffed a beautiful
58 TOYLAND

little model engine, with real steam coming out
of the funnel.

“ Clear off that fancy engine driver!” shrieked
the King, pointing to a wooden doll who was
tied on at the back, as though he were guiding
the engine. “He’s been marked twopence-
halfpenny in a bazaar, and he can no more
drive a train than any of these sailors can steer
a ship. Bowl him out, I say! Stump him!
How’s that, umpire ?”

“Out!” said Peter, as the engine driver was
put head first into a Noah’s Ark. “ Now then,
Bridget.”

“Due in forty seconds,” snorted the engine,
and off set the two at lightning speed. It was
the fastest engine that was ever made; but for
all that, Bridget was faster still; and when she
came running back to the King’s side, the
engine was several yards behind, and had got
mixed up in a grocer’s store on the way.

“Run it out! Bravo, you're a good sports-
man,” said the King, in great excitement; and
Peter stood on his head with delight. But
Bridget only walked up to Prince Poppet, and
took his hand.

“May we all three stop?” she asked,
anxiously.

“Hullo, there’s another of them! Well,
TOYLAND 59

what can you do?” asked the King, striking
the characteristic attitude of the wicket-keeper.

“T am a Prince,’ he answered haughtily, by
which he meant that there was no necessity for
him to do anything at all.

“Well, what of that?” asked the King in
surprise. “I suppose that doesn’t prevent you
from doing things, does it?”

The Prince had always been taught that it
did. Besides, he was rather cross at being
asked so continually what he could do, so he
poked his princely chin in the air, and answered
in an offhand kind of way that was not at all
polite.

“T can speak seven languages quite fluently ;
and I know all the history of Fairyland for the
last thousand years; and I can draw a map of
the bottom of the sea. That's only a little of
what I can do,” he said, and folded his arms.

“What?” shriecked the King, and his voice
sounded even more out of tune than it had
before. “Do you mean to say you can only
do Zessons, you intolerable, dull, little prig ?”

He could say no more, for his agitation
made his legs drop off with a clatter, and he
sank down in a heap. And at the same mo-
ment, there was a scream of recognition from
two or three of the courtiers.
60 TOYLAND

“Tt’s our Prince!” they cried, in great excite-
ment. And immediately, all the others came
crowding round him, and began shouting abuse
at him as loudly as they could.

“He broke my leg off,” screamed a wooden
horse on wheels.

“He painted a moustache on me,” sobbed
an elegant doll in a columbine’s dress.

“ He fed me with stale cake,” groaned a cloth
donkey, in a peculiarly stuffy voice.

“He sucked my paint off,” said a tin Life-
guardsman.

“He hung me in front of the fire, on a piece
of string,” wept a wax sailor boy.

“He sent me sailing on the lake, in a five-
penny tin steamer,” howled an elephant, who
had just strolled up from the neighbouring
Noah’s Ark.

“And he put me into a Swiss farm, and
called me a goat,” chimed in his companion,
a noble African lion.

“Revenge! Revenge!” they all cried, and
made way for the King to come forward.
Prince Poppet hid his face in his hands, and
wished that Bridget would stop looking at him
in her solemn way, with her great black eyes.
The King screwed on his legs again, and
stood up.
TOYLAND 61

“He must be bowled out at once,” he said.
“What shall be done to him?”

“Pour cold tea into his mouth, out of a tin
cup,” said the columbine, viciously.

“Fix a dry crust in his mouth, and leave
it there for a week,” said the stuffed donkey.

“Brush him down with a clothes brush,”
added the wooden horse, ruefully.

“Suck the paint off his cheeks,” squeaked
the Life-guardsman.

“Drop him into the pond, and forget all about
him,” said a new voice. Every one looked
round to see who had spoken; and when the
Prince saw that it was a handsome humming-
top, he hid his face once more, and shuddered
all over, and felt that there was no hope left for
him at all. For when that humming-top had
been given to him, a year ago, he had begun
by making it his favourite plaything: it had
shared his meals in the daytime, and lain on
his pillow at night. He had considered no-
thing too good for his beautiful humming-top,
until, one day, the columbine had come, and
then the humming-top had been thrown into
the pond, to see if it could float. But it had
been much too proud to try, and so the Prince
had never seen it again.

“What's that about a pond?” said the King,
62 TOYLAND

shivering. “There are no more ponds about,
IT hope? Nasty, slippery things! Who said
apond?” -

For once, the King was not heeded. For all
the Dutch dolls, and the peg-tops, and the tin
soldiers, and the waxen ladies had flung them-
selves upon Prince Poppet in an angry mass,
and it is doubtful if he would ever have seen
his home again, had not little Bridget sat down
on the cardboard ground, and burst out crying.
Tears were an unknown thing in Toyland,
where everybody played games all day long;
so the sight of a little girl sitting on the
ground, and weeping bitterly, soon brought all
the courtiers round her in a ring. The tin
soldiers climbed up on the peg-tops, the animals
squeezed in wherever they could, and the Dutch
dolls stood in a row at the back; and stared
over everybody’s head, with the same impassive
look on their wooden features.

“What is she doing? Is it a new game?”
asked the wax sailor boy.

“It must be very bad for the complexion,”
said the columbine, fanning herself.

“A new game?” said the King, making his
way to the front. “Dear me, how thrilling!
But what are the rules of it? It’s no use hav-
ing a new game, without knowing the rules.
TOYLAND 63

Tell us the rules, little girl with the black
eyes.”

“Tt—it—isn’t a game at all,” sobbed Bridget.

“Then if it isn’t a game, how can we play at
it?” asked the courtiers, sadly.

“We must refer it to the umpire,” said the
King. There was no umpire at all in Toyland,
and there never had been one; but it was a
well known thing that the King always talked
about the umpire, when he did not know what
else to say.

“Nonsense,” said the deep voice of the
humming-top; “she’s only crying. She must
have broken something. They always cry,
the children who treat us so badly, when they
break their toys.”

There was a murmur of indignation among
the courtiers, when they heard this; and they
all began feeling themselves, to see if they
were broken anywhere. But, by this time,
Peter had managed to produce a very sooty
handkerchief, and Bridget wiped her eyes,
and began to smile a watery smile.

“T haven’t broken anything,” she said. “TI
was only crying because I was frightened, and
I thought they were going to hurt the Prince.”

“Quite right, too,” said the King, cheerfully.
“He has broken so many of us, that it is quite
64 TOYLAND

time he should be broken himself. But don’t
you mind about him; you shall stay here and
play, for ever and ever, and your black brother
is going to teach me how to turn coach-
wheels.”

“Tt would be beautiful,” said Bridget, with
a sigh. “But I won't stop if the Prince has
to be broken.”

“It wouldn’t be fair,’ said Peter, sturdily,
though he cast a longing look at the steam
engine.

“It is my own fault,’ said the Prince,
humbly; “and you two must not bother about
me.”

“It is very confusing,” said the King,
bowling down a butcher’s shop with a golf
ball. “We must send for the umpire.”

“Tf we can’t break the Prince, he must be
sent away,” shouted the courtiers. ‘There is
no safety for any of us, as long as he is in
Toyland.”

“Of course,” said the King. “You must
stay without the Prince, or not stay at all.
Make haste and decide; it is time.we had
another game. So much talking is quite
exhausting.”

The Prince looked at his shoes, and felt
very much ashamed of himself, and his seven
TOYLAND 65

languages, and his priggishness. And Peter
looked at Bridget, and Bridget looked at the
King, who had just lost one of his legs, in his
first attempt to turn coach-wheels.

“Please, none of us will stop,” said Bridget.
And the Prince kissed her. But Peter looked
at the steam-engine, and kicked the back of the
palace, until it rattled all over.

“All right; tell the bear to bowl them all
out,” shouted the King, finding his leg in the
forest, and waving it at them. And at the
same moment, there was a sound of penny
pistols, and pop-guns, and tin trumpets; and
in the midst of it all, the King’s voice was
heard shouting, “ Who has thought of a new
game? We must refer it to the umpire!”

And there were the three children, seated on
the bear’s back again, and flying through the air,
even faster than they had gone before. When
they stopped, they found themselves on the
lawn in front of the palace, with the Baroness,
and the Head Nurse, and all the other nurses,
standing and looking at them. And the black
bear had completely disappeared.

“Good gracious,’ said the Head Nurse;
“your Highness gave me quite a turn. Where
did your Highness come from?”

“And who are those common looking chil-

5
66 TOYLAND

“dren?” added the Baroness, who was more
put out than usual, for she had been looking
for the Prince ever since tea-time, and the
Queen was in hysterics upstairs.

“The bear brought us back,” answered the
Prince. “And these are my two friends, Peter
and Bridget, who are coming to live in the
palace with me.”

“Why, they are the sweep’s children,” said
the Head Nurse, and then wished she had not
spoken, for she did not like it to be known
that she knew the sweep’s children.

“They must be sent away at once,” said the
Baroness. “And your Highness must really
come and say good-night to her Majesty.”

But Prince Poppet meant to show that he
was no longera child, and he took no notice
whatever of the Baroness.

“Peter and Bridget are going to stay here,
always,” he said, turning to the Head Nurse,
and looking as dignified as it was possible
for such a very small prince to look. “ Will
you please arrange some rooms for them at
once? Come indoors, Bridget.”

The Head Nurse and all the other nurses did
not know what to do, so they hoped the Baro-
ness would say something. But the Baroness
never had anything to say to a boy, who did
TOYLAND 67

not put cold hair-pins down her back; so she
remained perfectly silent, and waited to see
what would happen next.

And the next thing that did happen was, that
Bridget settled matters in her own prompt little
way; and nobody, not even the Head Nurse,
attempted to contradict her. She said that she
did not want to stay in the palace at all, because
there would be no one to look after Peter if she
did. And Peter said nothing would induce
fim to stop in a place where people were
expected to learn the history of Fairyland, and
all sorts of different languages; and that he
would sooner go on sweeping chimneys, and
turning coach-wheels, and whistling. So the
Prince let them go very sadly, after Peter had
promised to come every week, to teach him to
turn coach-wheels; and he went indoors to say
good-night to the Queen, more peaceably than
his nurses had ever seen him go before. And
when he was tucked up in bed, he remem-
bered that he had let Bridget go, without
kissing her.

Prince Poppet did not altogether forget the
seven languages, and the history of Fairyland;
but he learned how to turn coach-wheels, and
how to make a catapult out of a merrythought,
which of course was much more important;
68 TOYLAND

and he left his father in peace to make ice-
pudding out of moonshine. But one day, |
the old King drank too much moonshine by
itself, and that always kills people, so the
Prince became King in his stead. And he
went down into the town, that very same day,
and brought back a beautiful tall maiden, with
big, solemn, black eyes, to sit on the throne
beside him; and that was how Bridget became
Queen. They offered to make Peter Lord
High Admiral, or Chief Cook, or anything else
he liked. But Peter had been black so long,
that he preferred to be an engine-driver in-
stead. And now he drives the King’s special
trains; and he is still the happiest boy in the
town, for he has next to nothing to do, and he
has not forgotten how to whistle.
The Boy who Looked |
like a Girl

The Boy who Looked
like a Girl

ONCE: a disagreeable old giant lived in a

beech tree. This was quite possible in this
particular beech tree, for it was many thousands
of years old, and had a large hollow trunk;
while the giant had only had five hundred birth-
days, and was therefore quite a young giant,
and not yet full grown. So there was plenty
of room for him inside the beech tree; and he
was very contented, and lived on beech-nuts
and areputation. The reputation was for eat-
ing up little children, and that was why no little
children ever came that way; so the giant had |
plenty of time to himself, and spent it generally
in going to sleep between his meals. But, one
day, he was woke up by a child’s voice; and
looking through a crack in the tree, he saw a
funny little figure in a blue linen smock, sitting
on the ground outside.

“Hullo!” cried the giant, who had lived so
72 THE BOY WHO

long on beech-nuts, that his voice sounded ex-
actly like a mowing-machine; “who are you?”

“Tm Boy,” said the little fellow, standing
up and nodding at him in a friendly manner.

“Boy? which boy?” asked the giant.

“T didn’t know there was another. Can you
tell me where he lives?” asked Boy, eagerly.
“Tm so tired of girls. There are nothing but
girls at home; at least, one of them is a baby,
which is just as bad. So Pve come away to
see if I can’t find some boys.”

“But you're half a girl yourself,” said the
giant. “Look at your frock.”

“It isn’t a frock!” shouted Boy, angrily.
“It’s only a top thing to go over all the others;
and if it wasn’t fastened down the back with
hooks, I should have taken it off long ago.
When it’s buttons, I can do it by myself, but
when it’s hooks, only Nurse can take it off. And
this one is hooks, don’t you see? JI shall ask
the first boy I meet, to take it off. Look!”

The giant did look; and Boy lifted up the
linen smock, and showed his brown stockings
and blue serge knickerbockers, underneath.

“Ah,” said the giant; “most certainly you
are a boy.”

“Are you a boy, too? Then, why do you
stop in that musty old tree? Have you gota
LOOKED LIKE A GIRL 73

nurse, and must you do as she tells you?”
asked Boy, all ina jumble. He was very fond
of asking questions, without waiting for the
answers to them.

“Most certainly I am not a boy,” said the
giant indignantly, for he had just remembered
his reputation. “Iam a giant, and I eat little
boys for my supper.”

“Dear me,” said Boy; “why, that’s exactly
what Nurse always says about giants! But
I never believed it for a moment. You don’t
really eat boys, do you?”

Now, this put the giant in an awkward fix;
for he had never eaten a boy in the whole of
his life, and he did not know in the least how
to begin now. But he had never met one be-
fore, who did not believe in him; and he began
to feel a little cross.

“JT shouldn’t think of eating you,” he said,
very gruffly; “you are much too fond of talk-
ing to be nice to eat. But you had better run
along, or else something will happen to you.”

“But that is just what I want!” cried Boy,
in a joyful tone. “Do you think it will happen |
soon?”

“Tt will happen very soon,” shouted the
giant, “if you don’t go away, and leave me in
peace. Who sent you here to annoy me like
74 THE BOY WHO

this? You are a rough, noisy, tiresome little
boy!”

Oh dear,” sighed Boy, looking up at the
beech-tree very sadly; “1 believe you're only
another girl, after all! Isn’t there azy place
where I can find a boy ?”

“Yes,” said the giant, who had just had a
happy thought; “go to the Land of Bad
Weather. There are nothing but boys there,
and you can’t even hear yourself speak.”

“Which is the way?” asked Boy, holding
up his smock with one hand, so that he could
run quicker.

“T haven't an idea,” replied the giant; “but
the Pimpernel Fairy knows, and she lives on
the edge of the forest.”

“Ts that another girl, though?” asked Boy,
doubtfully. But the giant was too ill-tempered |
to tell him any more; so off he set at a trot for
the edge of the forest.

The Pimpernel Fairy was sitting on the
grass, in the sunshine. She was dressed in
bright scarlet, and she had large black eyes, and
a very red mouth, and straight black hair.

“Please,” said Boy, in a great hurry, “I
want to go to the Land of Bad Weather, be-
cause there aren’t any girls there; and I am
tired of girls, and babies, and all that; and
LOOKED LIKE A GIRL 75

the grumpy old giant, who lives in the beech
tree, said that you knew the way. And, please,
will you tell me as quickly as you can?”

“Oh, it is quite simple,” said the Pimpernel
Fairy, in a voice as soft as summer rain, and as
clear as star-shine ; “ you have only to climb into
Cloudland, and there you are. But I am afraid
they won't let you in, because you are a girl.”

“Tm vot a girl,” exclaimed Boy. “It’s all
because of this horrid top thing. Oh, if it
was only buttons, instead of hooks! I wonder
if you would be able to unhook it for me?”

But a cloud came over the sun, while he was
speaking, and the Pimpernel Fairy had already
disappeared; so Boy set to work at once to get
into Cloudland. First of all, he climbed the
highest poplar tree he could find; but although
he felt quite dizzy when he got to the top, he
seemed no nearer Cloudland than before. Just
then, however, a large grey sea-gull swooped
down by his side.

“Hullo!” exclaimed Boy; “why aren't you
at the seaside?”

“That's where I’m going; I’ve been to
Cloudland for a holiday,” said the sea-gull,
panting for breath. “Do you suppose we
never do anything but sit on the waves to
be shot at? One must take a rest sometimes.
76 THE BOY WHO

What are you doing up here, I should like to
know? Little girls ought to be playing with
dolls in the nursery, not sitting on the top of
poplar trees.”

“I’m zof a girl,” protested Boy; “and I
want to go to the Land of Bad Weather,
because there are nothing but boys there.
Only think! No dolls, and no girls, and
nothing stupid at all.”

“T don’t know about that,’ said the sea-
gull, arranging its feathers. “There are lots
of stupid things there, and always will be,
until they let the sea-gulls manage things a
bit. However, if you are really anxious about
it, P11 take you there. Come along.”

Before Boy could say a word, the sea-gull
caught him up in his beak, and flew upwards
with him, right through the sunshine, and
the blue sky that cast purple lights across
his face; and never stopped until they reached
Cloudland.

“There you are,” said the sea-gull, dropping
him at the edge of a large white and grey cloud;
“and next time you travel with a sea-gull, don’t
wriggle so much, or else you'll get taken for a
fish, and swallowed. Good-bye.”

And with one long dive, the beautiful big bird
swept down into the blue, and disappeared.
LOOKED LIKE A GIRL 77

Boy rolled down the cloud, which happened
to be a very slanting one, and fell right on to
a Peal of Thunder.

“ Here, get out of my way,” roared the Peal
_of Thunder, who was rumbling along with his
arms full of big drums and tea-trays, and was
Shooting rockets and catharine-wheels out of
his eyes; “I shall be late for that storm. You
didn’t happen to meet him, did you ?”

At that moment, the Storm came rushing

past in a great hailstone chariot; and the
Peal of Thunder went clattering and rumbling
after him, until they were both out of sight.
But a new noise began almost immediately,
like a hundred engines letting off steam in a
railway-station. It was only the North Wind
taking a stroll with the East Wind, however,
and they were really chatting in quite a friendly
way; but Boy thought they must. be quarrelling
dreadfully, for he had never heard such a noise
in his life.
_ “Why, here is one of the things they call
girls down there in the world,” exclaimed the
East Wind, who had a frost-bitten face, and
wore a crown made of icicles. He seemed very
cross, and he talked as though he had a bad
sore throat.

“Let’s blow her back again,” suggested the
78 THE BOY WHO

North Wind, who seemed a more cheerful per-
son. He was covered with a beautiful cloak
made of snow-drifts, and his voice came in
jerks like loud gusts of wind.

“Tm not a girl,” shouted Boy at the top
of his voice; “and J came to find all the
other boys. Do tell me where they are, will

ou?”

: The East Wind grumbled, and said he must
be a girl because he looked like one, and he
ought not to be there at all; but the North
Wind laughed like the bellows in a blacksmith’s
forge, and said he would blow him to the other
boys, if he liked. So he breathed as gently as
he could; and Boy found himself swept through
the air in a kind of sea fog, and dropped in
the middle of a shrieking, shouting, boisterous
crowd.

“ Are you Joys?” exclaimed Boy, in bewilder-
ment. ‘There were boys everywhere, as far as
he could see; short boys, tall boys, ugly boys,
pretty boys, fat boys, thin boys, every kind of
boy imaginable—except quiet boys. For they
were all as noisy as they could be; instead of
talking, they shouted; instead of smiling, they
roared with laughter; and instead of either,
they knocked one another down. They all
seemed very busy over something or another;
LOOKED LIKE A GIRL 79

rigs a moment or two, Boy was not noticed
at all.

“Thank goodness, we've got that Storm off
at last,” said one.

“No, we haven't; the slugs have been for-
gotten, and I can’t find them,” said another.

Then they all began shouting wildly.

“Has any one seen that parcel of slugs ?”

“It’s your fault, because you threw them at
me !”

“No, it must be yours, because you didn’t
catch them !”

“Here they are,” screamed a very fat boy,
- “under the lightning machine.”

“Take them to the rainbow; it hasn’t started
yet, and it will get them down just in time.
Hurrah! There’s nothing more to do to-day;
those showers are not wanted, until they begin
cutting the hay to-morrow.”

Just then, their eyes fell upon Boy, who was
still on the ground, where he had been blown
by the North Wind.

“Here’s a girl, a girl, a girl!” they all
shrieked, and at once began dancing wildly
round him. “Turn her out; use her up as
a thunderbolt; send her down that rainbow;
put her in the machine, and make her into
lightning !”
80 THE BOY WHO

“T’m,not a girl,” cried Boy, plaintively ; “ it’s
all this horrid top thing. If you'll only un-
hook it, you'll see.

He jumped up on his feet, and offered the
back of his smock to the crowd of inquisitive
boys. But, although many of them came and
fumbled away at the hooks, not one of them
could unfasten it for him.

“If you're not a girl, you shouldn’t wear
girls’ things, then,” they said. “ There’s no-
body here who knows how to undo a thing
like that.”

For a moment, a very short moment, Boy
almost wished for a girl, who would be able
to undo his smock for him ; but he remembered
himself in time, and held up his head, and
looked all his tormentors in the face.

“Tam a boy, all the same,” he said.

They looked at him, doubtfully.

“What is lightning made of?” they asked.
“If yowre a boy, you ought to know that.”

“Of course I know,” he said, remembering
what his nurse always said when there was a
storm; “it’s when two clouds come together.
That makes the lightning, and the lightning
makes the thunder!”

“He doesn’t know!” they all yelled, as they
danced wildly round him. “It’s nothing to do
LOOKED LIKE A GIRL __81

with clouds, you stupid little girl! MWe make
it up here, and it’s made of stale sunbeams.
What else do you suppose is done with all yes-
terday’s sunbeams, eh? You're nothing but a.
girl, and you'd better go over to the Land of,
Fine Weather. They're all girls ‘Here, and
they’ve nothing to do all day long. Blow her
across at once, boys!”

Fortunately, the fat boy came running back
from the rainbow, at this moment.

“The lightning’s given out, and they want
some more at once,” he panted; and the whole
crowd of boys threw themselves on the light-
ning machine, and filled it with stale sunbeams,
and began churning them into lightning like
butter.

Boy was noticed no longer; and he crept
away along the cloud, and wondered sadly if
he would ever be able to prove that he was
a real boy. Just then, he heard the sound
of sobbing, and there, at his feet, was a dear
little fairy girl, weeping bitterly. Her face
and hair were brilliant as the sun itself, and
her eyes were like stars; and she was dressed
in deep blue sky. And Boy quite forgot she
was a girl; and he stooped over her, and
touched her face quite gently.

“What is the matter, little girl?” he asked.

6
82 THE BOY WHO

When she looked up and saw him, she
stopped crying at once, and sprang to her
feet.

“Oh, you are a girl!” she cried, in a joyful
tone. “Iam so glad you are a girl.”

For the first time in his life, he was not in
the least bit anxious to declare that he was a
boy. .

Why are you crying, little girl?” was all
he said.

“Because I am so frightened of all those
boys,” she replied. “I ran away from the ©
Land of Fine Weather, because it was so
dull over there, and there was nothing to do
all day; and then I tumbled down here by
mistake. I am so glad you are not a horrid
boy.”

Boy thought for a whole minute without
speaking, which was a thing he had never
been known to do in his life before.

“T am a boy,” he said, as gently as he could;
“but I will take care of you, and we will go
away from all those other boys. I don’t think
they are the right kind of boys at all. And will
you please unfasten my top thing?”

He turned his back to her very solemnly ;
and the little Fine Weather Fairy understood
perfectly, and unhooked it for him at once; and
LOOKED LIKE A GIRL 83

the blue linen smock fell down on the ground
at last, and he stood before her, a real boy in
sailor clothes.

“ Now, we will go away,” he said, taking her
hand; “and I will kill all the boys who try to
tease you.”

Killing seemed quite easy, now he had got
rid of his linen smock. But the little fairy girl
dried her eyes, and smiled at him, and said she
did not think she wanted any one killed at all.

“T know a quiet way home,” she said; “and
they won't see us as we go.”

So they crept along the soft grey cloud, and
round at the back of all the boys, who were
churning the sunbeams into lightning ; and they
would have got away quite safely, if the Fine
Weather Fairy had not had such bright eyes,
that she cast a gleam of star-shine just across
the fat boy’s face.

“ There’s another girl!” he shouted; and im-
mediately, all the boys gave chase to them both,
and they had to run as fast as their legs would
carry them, towards the end of the cloud.

“Straight on,” panted the little fairy girl.
“ Oh dear, I am so out of breath!”

Boy was not very big, but he stooped and
put his arms round her, and carried her as
fast as he could; though the crowd of shouting
84 THE BOY WHO

boys came nearer and nearer every minute. He
began to wonder if killing was very difficult.
Straight in front of them, across a gulf of blue
sky, was the beautiful sunshiny Land of Fine
Weather.

“Jump,” cried the Fine Weather Fairy; and
Boy shut his eyes and jumped. The fat boy
was just behind, and put out his hand to catch
them, but he only pulled out one of Boy’s yellow
hairs, and the two children landed safely on the
other side.

“Now you must leave me,” said the Fine
Weather Fairy, very sadly. “They are all
girls here, and no boys are allowed to stay
at all.”

Boy’s eyes began to feel funny; and he
blinked them both very hard, and clenched his
fists.

“T don’t want to go,” he said. “I want to
stop here with you.”

“What!” said the fairy girl, with a smile.
“ Among all the girls?”

Boy grew very hot.

“I don’t care, I want to stop,” he said. “I
shouldn’t mind girls so much, if—if 7

He was not quite sure why. The fairy girl
laughed merrily.

“If you stop,” she said, “you must put on


LOOKED LIKE A GIRL 85

your top thing again, and then, no one will
know you are a boy.”

Boy looked at his discarded smock, and
sighed. How it had got there, he never knew;
but there it lay at his feet; and it did seem
hard that he should have to put it on again,
after all the trouble he had gone through to
get it taken off. But it seemed the only thing
to be done, and he stooped down and picked
it up.

NT right,” he said. “But you won't expect
me to like dolls, or babies, or anything like
that, will you?” .

She did not have time to answer; for just
then, a troop of other Fine Weather Fairies
came running up to them. They all had eyes
like stars, and hair like sunshine, and they were
all dressed in blue sky; but for all that, Boy
was quite sure that he could have distin-
guished his own fairy girl from any one of
them.

“The Sun Queen is coming,” they cried;
“and: there has got to be a change in the
weather. So we shall have something to do
at last! Oh dear, there has been no fine
weather sent for, since the summer began.

Then a pale yellow light began to creep over
everything, and it grew deeper and deeper, until
86 THE BOY WHO

the whole place was flooded with it, and Boy
was so dazzled, that he had to keep his eyes on
the ground.

“Tl wish I had some smoked glass,” he said.
“We looked at the eclipse through smoked
glass, the other day.”

“Eclipse 2 Who said an eclipse?” asked a
terrible voice from the middle of the bright
light. “And who brought that great clumsy
earth child into my country ?”

“TI did, your Majesty,” said his fairy girl,
bravely. “I tumbled into the Land of Bad
Weather, and he helped me, I mean she helped
me to get away; and so I asked him, I mean
her, to stop a little. He, I mean she, was very
brave, your Majesty; and I should like to re-
ward him, I mean ey, please your Majesty.”

“That girl is a boy,” said the Sun Queen, in
a more terrible voice than before. “ Nobody but
a boy would dare to mention eclipses in my
presence. I declare, it makes me feel quite
frosty. How dare you bring a boy here?”

“Please your Majesty, he Jooks just like a
girl,’ said the little fairy, growing tearful.
Boy felt he would have done anything just
then, to make her smile again.

“Tm quite sure I look like a girl,” he said,
eagerly.
LOOKED LIKE A GIRL 87

“Are you a girl?” said the voice of the Sun
Queen.

“It is really too bad,” exclaimed Boy, begin-
ning to grow impatient. “They all said I looked
like a girl, when I wanted them to think I was
a boy. I don’t know what I am expected to
say next.”

“Well, you know,” said the Sun Queen,
“you must be one or the other. I suppose you
can’t help it,if you are a boy; but I am exceed-
ingly sorry for you, if you are; and you certainly
can't stop here. We don'tallow boys; we used
to have them, and they played tricks with the
barometers, so that no one ever believes in
barometers now. You really must go, or else
I shall feel obliged to set light to you, or some-
thing, and that is always so inconvenient.”

“Will you come home with me too?” asked
Boy, turning to his little fairy girl, and taking
her hand.

“Why, you said you had too many girls to
play with, already!” she cried.

“That’s quite different,” said Boy.

“Nonsense,” said the voice of the Sun Queen.
“Why, she would burn you all up like wax

jmatches, if she came down to play with you.
But she shall take you home, as far as the
Pimpernel Fairy; and you may ask her for
88 THE BOY WHO

anything you like, when you say good-bye to
her. Now, off you go, earth child!”

And. off he did go, with the fairy girl at his
side; and they just seemed to be running full
tilt down a very steep blue hill, until they
reached the edge of the forest, which they did
without feeling in the least bit out of breath.

“ Good-bye,” said the little fairy girl, putting
up her face to be kissed. “What are you going
to ask me?”

“Tf you please, I should like it always to be
fine on my birthday—on all our birthdays,”
said Boy.

“Even the baby’s?” asked the little fairy,
mischievously.

Boy nodded.

“T shall come back and see you again, some
day,” he said, and kissed her. It was just like
kissing a ripe red apple, that has been hanging
in the hot sunshine.

“ No, you won't!” she cried, laughing.

“Why not? Ishall,” said Boy. ~

“ Because I’m only a girl,” she replied; and
when he looked again, she was gone. But the
place where she had stood was covered with
bright yellow buttercups.

The Pimpernel Fairy was sitting on the
ground, where he had last seen her.
LOOKED LIKE A GIRL 89

“There's going to bea change in the weather,”
he told her. “The Sun Queen says so.”

“Tm delighted to hear it,” said the Pimpernel
Fairy. “Perhaps I shall be able to stop here
for more than five minutes at a time. It is very
tiring to have to disappear so often; it gives
one quite a headache.”

“Tt is always going to be fine on all our
birthdays,” said Boy. “Aren't you glad?”

“On the baby’s birthday, too?” she asked,
smiling ; and Boy walked indignantly into the
forest.

When he came to the beech tree, the giant
was just waking up from his afternoon sleep.

“Hullo!” he said, in his mowing-machine
voice ; “did you find any boys ?”

“Oh, lots,” said Boy; “but I didn’t think
very much of them. I should think they
would turn into giants, some day, and live
inside stuffy old beech trees; they were just
that kind of boy, you know.”

“T don’t know,” said the giant, who half
suspected he was being laughed at, but was not
quite sure. “Did you see any one else 2”

“Oh yes; there were lots of girls too,” began
Boy; and then he stopped, because a sound of
wheezy laughter came from inside the tree.
When a giant, who has lived on beech nuts for
go THE BOY WHO LOOKED LIKE A GIRL

five hundred years, suddenly begins to laugh,
it sounds like the wind whistling down the
chimney on a winter's night.

“What's the joke?” asked Boy, rather crossly.
“T wouldn’t make that noise again, if I were
you; it sounds as though you wanted oiling.”

But as the giant only continued to laugh,
and did not explain what the joke was, Boy
made up his mind that it must have been a
very stupid joke, and turned his face home-
wards.

“At all events, it is always going to be fine
on all our birthdays,” he said in an important
tone.

“Oho!” said the giant. “On the baby’s
birthday too?”

But Boy ran away through the forest, and did
not say another word.

The giant is still living on beech nuts and a
reputation. And as for Boy, he never found
his way to the same beech tree again.
The Princess in her Garden
ge St

4


The Princess in her Garden

THE Princess was walking in her garden.
It was a very beautiful garden, full of
many coloured flowers and rare exotics; but
the Princess was not fond of flowers, and she
walked down the path without looking at them
at all, and she felt dreadfully dull. For she had
quarrelled with her yesterday’s lover, and had
just sent him away; so she had no one left to
tease, and was therefore without an occupation.

“Weare very beautiful,” whispered the flowers
on either side of her. “Won’t you look at us ?”

“Only look at our exquisite colouring,” sim-
pered the scarlet bigonias; “surely you must
admire us?”

“J,” said a particularly ugly shrub, with a
foreign accent, “am unique. I am surprised
that you should pass me over.”

But the Princess wandered on listlessly, until
she came to the high prickly hedge at the end
of her garden, and here she stopped, because
the path ended, and she could go no further.
94 THE PRINCESS IN HER GARDEN

She was feeling so dull, however, that she
actually scratched her white hands in making
a hole in the hedge, so that she could look
through and see what was on the other side.
She had always been told that nothing outside
the palace was at all amusing; but she felt sure
that anything would be better than her secluded
garden path, and her beautiful, uninteresting
flowers. So she yawned lazily, and held on her
crown with both hands, and peeped through the
hedge. To her surprise, she saw nothing but
potatoes growing, acres and acres of potatoes,
stretching as far as her eye could reach, and in
the middle of them all, a tall man digging.

“Oh,” said the Princess, in a disappointed
tone; “only potatoes. How dull!”

“Nonsense,” said the tall man, without turn-
ing round, “they are only grown for you to eat.
If you don’t want to see them growing, you
must not expect to eat them.”

“But I don’t eat your potatoes,” said the
Princess, “because I have a garden of my
own.”

“There are no potatoes in your garden,”
answered the tall man, just as roughly as be-
fore; “there are nothing but flowers there for
you to look at. But here in our garden, we
have no flowers to look at; we have to live in
THE PRINCESS IN HER GARDEN 95

an ugly place, and do ugly work all day long,
so that you should have your potatoes to eat.”
“ Dear me,” exclaimed the Princess; “I never
met such a rude man before! Does he know I
am the Princess, I wonder?” And she walked
back hastily to the palace. .
“We are very beautiful,” said the flowers
again, as her dress brushed against them.
“Won't you look at us ?”
But the Princess passed them by as before.
“Where do potatoes come from?” she asked
suddenly, at dinner-time. There was great con-
sternation all round the table, for no one in the
palace was ever supposed to know anything so
common or useful as that. At last a strange
and needy courtier, who had just come to apply
for the post of Lord High Treasurer, or any-
thing else that was vacant, made a very good
guess, as soon as he was quite certain that no
one else knew anything whatever about it.
“They are washed up on the seashore, at
certain periods of the year,” he said; and the
King nodded at him gratefully, and felt that he
would make a very useful foreign ambassador.
But the Princess suggested that he should be
offered the post of head-gardener instead, as
it was a pity so much useful learning should
be wasted on a foreign ambassador. And the
96 THE PRINCESS IN HER GARDEN

needy courtier, who had no sense of humour,
gratefully accepted the post.

The next morning, the Princess sent her
page secretly to the hole in the hedge, and
told him to bring the tall man back to speak
to her. But the tall man sent her a message
that he was too busy to come, and that the
Princess must go to him, if she had anything
to say.

The little page trembled very much, as he
delivered this message.

“Shall I order him to be beheaded, your
Highness?” he asked. The Princess’ cheeks
were smarting; but she merely smiled at the
little page, with a royal indifference.

“ No,” she said; “only Princes are beheaded.”

And when the little page was safely playing
marbles with all the other pages in the ante-
room, she opened her window, and stepped
out on the fresh dewy grass, and ran down
the garden path as fast as she could. The
flowers were silent, this morning, and did not
call out to her as she passed; but she noticed
their silence no more than she had noticed
their words, the day before, for she had never
understood their language.

The tall man was digging busily, when she
looked through the hole in the hedge; and now
THE PRINCESS IN HER GARDEN 97

that the full light of day was on him, she saw
that he was very, very ugly, and had the
wrinkled, tired face of an old man, although
he was as straight and vigorous as a youth.

“TI have come back,” said the Princess, for
she could not think of anything wiser to say.
The tall man glanced round at her, and then
went on digging.

“That doesn’t make any difference to any-
body,” he said.

“Why,” she exclaimed, haughtily; “do you
know who I am ?”

“ Not in the least,” said the tall man. “Who
are you?”

She drew a long breath of astonishment.

“JT am the Princess,” she said.

The man stopped digging, and looked at her
for a moment.

“Ts that all? No name ?” he asked.

“ Of course there’s a name,” said the Princess,
almost crying. “My real name is Gyldea, but
Princess is enough for most people. Is it pos-
sible that you did not know who I was? Can’t
you see I am standing in my own garden?”

“Oh yes,” said the tall man. “But you
might have been the gardener’s daughter, or
one of the ladies-in-waiting, mightn’t you?”
And he returned to his digging.

7
98 THE PRINCESS IN HER GARDEN

“Did you get my message?” asked the Prin-
cess, fighting to keep back her angry tears.

“Let me see; there was a message of some
sort,” answered the tall man. “ You sent for
me, didn’t you ?”

“Ves,” said the Princess, haughtily; “and
you said I was to come and see you instead.
It is positively shameful !”

“But you needn't have come, need you ?”
said the tall man.

Then the Princess stamped her tiny foot, and

went away again, up the garden path. And as
she went, she thought unconsciously of her
yesterday's lover, the first one who had ever
interested her at all; and she almost wished
she had not sent him away, just because he
did not dance well. It struck her now, for
the first time, that perhaps there was some-
thing else he could do, such as digging potatoes,
for instance.
“No, not digging potatoes!” she corrected
herself, angrily. “That is a horrid, vulgar
occupation. But something else, perhaps; for
I dare say there are some people, who do
things that I have never heard of. I wonder
what it feels like to do things of that. descrip-
tion? Oh dear, I wish King Marigold would
come back again.”
THE PRINCESS IN HER GARDEN 99

Her yesterday’s lover had been a young
king, with a serious face, and the Princess
could never bear people who looked serious ;
for, clearly, no one had any right to do that,
unless he happened to be a beggar, or a prime
minister. All the same, she had wanted him ~
back again, ever since the tall man had been
rude to her.

That evening, there was a great ball at the
palace. And the Princess was dressed for it
by her eleven maids of honour; and they took
three hours and a half over it, and only had
twenty minutes left in which to dress them-
selves. When they came back again, the Prin-
_ cess Gyldea was gone, and no one knew where
she was. The little page guessed, but he did
not say anything, because he did not want to
go down the garden path by moonlight, when
the fairies were about, and might turn him into
a frog, or something unpleasant. Besides, the
dew was falling, and he had his best dancing
shoes on, with real diamond buckles. .

Sure enough, at the bottom of the garden,
the Princess was again looking through the
hole in the hedge.

“ Are you still digging potatoes ?” she asked.

“ The potatoes have still to be dug,” answered
the tall man.
100 THE PRINCESS IN HER GARDEN

“T want you to come and dance instead,”
said the Princess, imperiously.

“Then who will dig your potatoes ?” he asked.

“Some one else will dig them,” said the
Princess, who always found that when she
wanted anything done, it came to pass without
any further trouble.

“There is no one else,” said the tall man.
“Go away and dance.”

“There is some one else!” cried the Princess.
“ J will dig the potatoes, and you shall go and
dance!”

“You are being an absurd child,” laughed
the tall man. “ Why, you areon the wrong side
of the hedge to begin with.”

“But you could help me to get over the
hedge,” said the Princess, eagerly. “I want to
do something new. I am so tired of being a
princess. You really don’t know how dull it.
is to be a princess, always.”

“No,” said the tall man; “I only know how
dull it is to dig potatoes always, for some one
else to eat. Go away and dance, you foolish
child. Do you suppose you could dig potatoes
in a dress like that ?”

And the Princess looked down at her fine
silken robes, and she went away up the garden
path, more sadly than before.
THE PRINCESS IN HER GARDEN to1

“T have been walking in my garden,” she
said, when she found the King and Queen and
all the courtiers waiting for her, in the ball-
room.

“She is so fond of flowers, the sweet child,”
said the Queen, trying to hide that she had been
seriously alarmed; for the guests were begin-
ning to arrive, and it would never do for them
to suspect that anything unusual was happening.

“That is all very well,” grumbled the King,
who was not fond of balls; “ but we must have
the garden brought into the house, or some-
thing, if she wants to do those things. I have
been standing at the open door in my court
suit for half-an-hour.”

The next morning, the Princess set to work
to find a dress in which she could dig potatoes.
But none of her own were simple enough; and
when she asked her maids of honour if they
had any old clothes, they were quite offended,
and said they had never had such a thing in
their lives. So she called her little page, who
was teaching the cat to stand on its head in the
ante-room ; and she promised him a real sword
in a gold sheath, if he would find her an old
dress to wear. But the little page came back
again, in an hour’s time, and said there was not
an old dress to be had in the palace.
102 THE PRINCESS IN HER GARDEN

“ What am I to do 2?” said the Princess, who
had never been thwarted in her life before.
“How do dresses grow old, I wonder, and
why has no one in the palace got an old dress
that I can wear ?”

“Please your Highness, I think it is because
none of the ladies in the palace slide down the
balusters,” said the little page. “That is the
way I tear my coats, and make them old. But
I have heard, your Highness, that there are
certain people outside the palace gates, who wear
old clothes, sometimes; only his Majesty does
not like us to mix with such people, and I do
not know where they live, your Highness.”

“ Oh dear! oh dear!” sighed the Princess. “I
wonder how long it would take to wear out my
dress, and make it old enough to dig potatoes
in?”

The little page shook his head.

“T do not think it will ever be an old dress,
please your Highness,” he said; “but perhaps
the White Witch of the Waterfall could help
you to find one.”

“Who is the White Witch of the Water-
fall?” asked Princess Gyldea.

“She lives by the waterfall, in the wood
that skirts the edge of your garden,” said the
little page ; “and she appears to those who call
THE PRINCESS IN HER GARDEN 103

her name three times, and grants them but
one wish. At least, that is what folk say, but
I have never dared to seek her myself, your
Highness.”

So Princess Gyldea sent her page back to
play with the other pages in the ante-room;
and she slipped out of the palace, and hastened
across to the wood, away from the high prickly
hedge with the hole in it; and she arrived at last
before the shimmering, glistening Waterfall.
Then she raised her voice, and called three
times for the White Witch. And out of the
rushing, dancing water came a white mist, and
out of the white mist stepped a wonderful, tall
witch-woman, who looked as though the rivers,
and the dew, and the sunshine had all helped
one another to make her.

“Only one wish can I grant you, Princess,
so think well before you ask,” she said.

But the Princess Gyldea answered at once,
without thinking at all.

“Turn my silk robe into an old dress, so
that I can go and dig potatoes,” she begged.

“As you like,’ answered the White Witch;
“but, for that you must give me one of three

ifts.”
Pi Tell me,” said the Princess; “is it my
crown, or my jewels, or my wealth? You
104 THE PRINCESS IN HER GARDEN

may have them all, if you care for them; only,
give me an old dress quickly.”

“YT must have either your beauty, or your
strength, or your happiness,” said the White
Witch, with a smile. “That is my price for
an old dress.”

“Will not all my wealth do as well?” she
asked.

“No,” said the witch-woman; “for that is
of no use to me, nor is it yours to give. I
must have something that is your very own.”

“TI cannot let my beauty go,” thought the
Princess, as she looked at her reflection in the
clear mantle of the White Witch; “and if I
lose my strength, I shall never be able to dig
potatoes at all. No, it must be my happiness;
for after all, Iam very dull, and it will not be
a big gift to give.”

So she gave the White Witch her happiness ;
and the wonderful witch-woman laughed like
the trickling of water over stones; and her
laugh mingled with the rush of the waterfall ;
and she stepped back into the white mist again,
and was gone. And Princess Gyldea looked
down at her dress; and it was no longer woven
of silk, and covered with precious jewels; nor
was it plain and clean, as she had fancied an
old dress would be; but it was soiled, and
THE PRINCESS IN HER GARDEN ios

ugly, and torn; and she shivered with cold,
as she stood in it, and put her hands over her
eyes to shut out the ugliness of it. And she
walked back into her garden, very slowly; and
went down the path with her head bent, for
she felt heavy-hearted and downcast. The little
page ran across her path, just behind her, as
she went; and he stopped, and stared after her.

“What fun!” he cried. “Here is an old
beggar woman in the Princess’ garden!” and
he took up a stone, and threw it at her. But
a red rose-bush caught the stone, and stopped
it; and the little page went singing back to
the palace, while the Princess crept sobbing
towards the whole in the hedge.

“Look at us, Princess,” whispered the flowers,
“for we are very beautiful.”

And the Princess stooped and picked a
handful, and fastened them in her torn, ragged
dress.

“Help me over, I am so unhappy,” she said,
through the hedge, and stretched out her hands
to the tall man. And the tall man dropped his
spade, and came and lifted her right over; and
there she stood before him, a woebegone, tear-
stained little figure, in a ragged gown.

“What have you come for?” he asked, and
smiled down at her.
106 THE PRINCESS IN HER GARDEN

“T knew you would only laugh,” she said,
indignantly ; “and now, I can’t get back again.”

“So you want to go back again already?
I suppose it is a nice new game to wear an old
dress, and pretend to dig potatoes,” said the
tall man.

“It is not a game,” said the Princess, humbly.
“T gave the White Witch my happiness for
an old dress, so that I might come and dig
potatoes, and you could go and learn to dance.
And now you only laugh at me.”

“So you have been to the White Witch,
too?” said the tall man. “Then you shall
come if you like, and dig potatoes, while I go
and learn to dance.” .

So she took the spade, and dug all day until
the night-time; and then she lay down under
the high prickly hedge, and went to sleep in
the starlight. And in the morning, the tall
man came back again, and spoke with her.

“Are you tired of your new game yet?” he
asked.

“Tt is not a game,” she said, and looked at
the blisters and the scratches on her soft white
hands.

Then the tall man took up the potatoes she
had dug, and went away for another day.

And every morning, he came and asked the
THE PRINCESS IN HER GARDEN 107

same question ; and every morning, the Princess
gave him the same answer; and after that, he
took away the potatoes she had dug.

At the end of a month, the Princess was so
tired with digging all day, and her hands were’
so sore with holding the heavy spade, and she
felt she could do no more.

“JT am sure I must be going to die,” she said,
as she looked up at the stars. But she did not
die; and the next morning, the tall man came
as before.

“ But you have dug no potatoes since yester-
day, Gyldea,” he said to her.

“JT am too tired, look at my hands,” she said,
and held them out to him.

Then the tall man knelt down beside her,
and kissed her two hands; and as he kissed
them, all the sore places were suddenly healed,
and the ugly scars vanished, and they grew
white and soft again.

“YT shall be able to dig, now,’ she said,
joyfully.

“There are no more potatoes to dig,” said
the tall man.

Then she looked round, and saw that all the
potatoes were gone, and that everything was
covered with flowers instead, as far as she
could see.
108 THE PRINCESS IN HER GARDEN

“Oh how beautiful!” she exclaimed, and
then looked down at her rags. ‘“ Everything is
beautiful except me.”

“ And me,” added the tall man.

“Vet you look different, somehow,” she said,
wonderingly, and put her hand on his face,
where the wrinkles had been, a month ago.

“T have been learning to dance for a whole
month, you see,” he said, and laughed merrily.

“Jt is my turn to work again, now; and you
shall go back to the palace.”

The Princess did not look at all pleased at
that. .

“T don’t want to go back a bit,” she said.
“ And besides, I can’t go to the palace in this
ragged old dress, can I?”

“The White Witch will give you back your
fine clothes,” he said.

“Oh no, because you see I have cheated the
White Witch out of her gift,’ cried Gyldea,
laughing.

“How?” he asked.

- “Because I gave her my happiness, and
you have made it come back to me,” said the
Princess, and laughed again.

“T have cheated her too,” said the tall man.

“ How ?” she asked.

“T gave her my good looks, so that I could
THE PRINCESS IN HER GARDEN tog

come and work near you, and you have made
them come back again,” he said, and kissed her.

“Let us go to the palace,” she said, presently.

“Just as we are?” he asked.

She was uncertain, just for one minute.

“Yes,” she said, and took his hand.

So he lifted her over the hedge again, and
they walked up the garden path to the palace.

“How beautiful the flowers are!” said the
Princess, and the flowers felt immensely proud
of themselves.

“Who allowed these dreadfully ragged people
to come in here?” exclaimed the Queen, who
was taking a stroll with the King, in the hopes
of getting an appetite for lunch.

“T have come back,” said the Princess, stand-
ing in front of her parents.

“So have IJ,” added the tall man.

“ Preposterous |” exclaimed the King. “ They
actually have the impudence to confess that
they have been here before!”

“Ts it possible ?” said all the courtiers.

“ At last, there will be an execution!” gasped
the little page with delight, and he ran round to
get a better view.

“Why, it is our Princess!” he screamed, and
he waved his hat, and forgot he was in the
royal presence, and stood on his head with
110 THE PRINCESS IN HER GARDEN

delight. For no one had given him any sweets,
since the Princess Gyldea had disappeared.

Every one who had an eye-glass put it on at
once, and said that the little page was quite
right; and those, who only had their own eyes
to depend upon, believed what the others told
them, and were all dumb with amazement.

The Queen was so astonished, that she said
the first thing that came into her head, which
of course was a thing she never did asa rule.

“Then we need not have gone into mourning
at all!” she exclaimed She remembered her-
self the next moment, however, and held out
her arms affectionately. “Come and kiss me,
my sweet child, and then go and change your
clothes at once.”

But the Princess led up the tall man.

“T have brought back a lover too,” she said.

There was a great sensation among the
courtiers.

“This must be looked into,” said the Queen,
ceasing to be affectionate; and she trod on the
King’s toe.

“Of course, of course: at once!” added the
King, hastily.

“To have our daughter in rags is bad
enough,” continued the Queen, “but a ragged
son-in-law is really too much.”
THE PRINCESS IN HER GARDEN 111

“Tn fact, he must be beheaded at once. Let
us come in to lunch,” said the King, with great
presence of mind.

“So after all, there wz// be an execution,”
said the little page to all the other pages; but
none of them were in the least bit excited,
because they had all seen as many executions in
their day, as any page could possibly wish to see.

Then a very wonderful thing happened. A
white mist began to rise slowly out of the
ground, and it rolled all round the two ragged
lovers, and grew thicker and thicker, until no
one could see them at all.

“Tt is the White Witch of the Waterfall,”
whispered the little page.

“T shall catch a bad cold,” said the Queen,
sneezing. “ Whata lot of uncomfortable things
seem to be happening this morning !”

“ And so near lunch-time too,’ added the
King. “Do you suppose it would be any
good to turn on the garden hose, or fire a
few cannons ?”

Then the mist began to roll away again, and
the two ragged lovers were no longer there;
but in their place, stood the Princess Gyldea in
her court-robes, looking ten times more beauti-
ful than she had ever looked before, and by her
side—King Marigold himself!
112 THE PRINCESS IN HER GARDEN

“Now I know why I fell in love with you,
when I saw you digging potatoes,” said the
Princess. “But why did you disguise yourself
in that horrible way ?”

“T did it for both of us. We both had to
be taught. Don’t you understand?” said the
young King, with the serious face.

And the Princess thought she did, at last.

“But you can dance well, now?” she said,
anxiously.

“Ah yes. And I know how to laugh too,”
he replied.

The Queen came up with her face covered
with smiles.

“T am delighted,” she said; “and you may
both kiss my hand.”

“T thought I saw a resemblance all the time,”
said the King; “and if there are going to be no
more mists, supposing we go in to lunch.”

All the courtiers, of course, had also known
King Marigold all the time, but had not liked
to say so; and the Princess kissed the little
page on both cheeks, and they really did go in
to lunch, at last.

And every year, in the far away country,
where King Marigold and his Queen are still
ruling over a nation of happy people, a very
curious thing happens. For, just about the
THE PRINCESS IN HER GARDEN 113

time when most people go to the seaside for a
holiday, the King and Queen come down from
their throne, and go out into the fields, and all
the courtiers go with them; and there they
spend a whole month, digging potatoes among
the peasants.

And there is no one in the whole kingdom
who does not know how to dance.
The Exceptional Tadpole

The Exceptional Tadpole

FoR a tadpole, Wriggles was exceptional. If
his parents had only known him at that
age, they would have swelled with pride, as only
a frog knows how to swell, at his precocity.
But unfortunately, frogs- never do have the
pleasure of knowing their children while they
are young, for tadpoles have to go out into
the world by themselves and learn experience,
before they can turn into frogs and make the
acquaintance of their own father and mother.
So Wriggles and his four brothers swam about
unguarded, in the muddy old canal where they
lived; and not one of them had any idea that
the frogs, who sat along the bank and hated
being splashed, were their own relations.
Wriggles was very soon the only survivor of
the five; for two of the others were killed by
a dragon-fly grub, and one fell a prey to a
stickleback, and the fourth was pulled out of
the water in a fish net, and ended his days
in a corn field, close by. All these sad events
made Wriggles very old for his age; and he
118 THE EXCEPTIONAL TADPOLE

gave up playing games with other tadpoles,
and took to reflecting on the unexpected nature
of catastrophes instead, which in a frog might
have been tolerated, but in a tadpole was posi-
_ tively impertinent. So all the tadpoles disliked
him for his wisdom, and all the frogs disliked
him for his foolishness; and between the two,
Wriggles was left quite to himself, and had
nothing to do but to fall in love with the
Princess.

Now, the Princess had a taste for natural
history. She caught butterflies, and put pins
through them; and she pressed the warm life
out of bright coloured flowers, and shut them
up in a book, and never looked at them again ;
and she kept caterpillars inside cardboard boxes,
and singing-birds inside gilded cages; and
everybody said how delightful it was for a
Princess of the royal blood to show so much
love for ordinary dumb animals, that belonged
to nobody in particular.

And one day, the Princess came along the
bank of the public canal, with a net in her
hand. In front of her, marched a guard of
soldiers, to prevent the townspeople from walk-
ing along their own canal, while the Princess
was there; and behind her, followed her seven
maids of honour, and her seven little pages,
THE EXCEPTIONAL TADPOLE 11g

who all disliked natural history very much
indeed, but pretended out loud that they were
most interested in it, because the Princess knew
so much about it.

“There is a wonderful beauty in muddy
water,” observed the youngest maid of honour,
with her smelling bottle in her hand.

“T like nothing better than snails myself,”
proclaimed one of the pages, putting a large
one on the arm of the youngest maid of honour,
who would have shrieked if she had not been
so much occupied in holding up her skirts.

“Ts it not a delightful occupation,” exclaimed
the Princess, “to walk along just the same
path as the ordinary townspeople walk, and to
catch dear little fishy things out of a common
canal? It makes such a change, after the
receptions in the palace.”

“A wonderful change!” echoed the seven
maids of honour, and the seven little pages,
with one accord.

“Tam so glad you agree with me,” smiled
the Princess; and she deftly plunged her silken
net among the green pond-weed, and the rank
figwort.

“What a sweet creature,’ exclaimed the
youngest maid of honour, as they all crowded
round in a circle to view the Princess’ capture.
120 THE EXCEPTIONAL TADPOLE

“That,” said the Princess, in a superior
manner, “is a tadpole.”

“A tadpole! Only fancy,’ whispered the
seven maids of honour to the seven little pages ;
“and our Princess actually knew it without
reading it in a book.”

“Do put me into the water again,” poor
little Wriggles was gasping faintly. It was
true that he had deliberately swum into the
Princess’ net, but he was already regretting his
foolish sacrifice. That is what happens, when
a tadpole falls in love with a princess.

“Tadpoles,” continued the Princess, “are
really frogs—that is to say, they get tired of
being tadpoles after a while, and then they
turn into frogs all in a moment, just as quickly
as my fairy godmother might turn a water
melon into a Lord Chancellor.”

“ How charming of them,” said the youngest
maid of honour.

Fortunately for Wriggles, the Princess picked
him up at last, between her dainty white finger
and thumb, and popped him into a dark tin of
water, where he found himself jerked every
moment against a common minnow, with whom
he would never have exchanged a civil greeting
if they had met in the canal. He was carried
home by one of the pages to the palace, where
THE EXCEPTIONAL TADPOLE tar

he was placed alone in a valuable china bowl;
and the Princess came and looked at him.

“Tt is the first tadpole I have ever had,” she
murmured. “How charming he is.”

And she put her white hand in the water,
and laughed with pleasure, when Wriggles
swam in and out of her jewelled fingers. He
was quite happy, now that he was so close to
her; and he looked back with horror upon his
life in the canal, where no one had appreciated
him, and he had only seen the Princess in the
distance as she walked along the bank. But
when she had gone down to dinner, he re-
membered that he was very hungry, and that
she had given him nothing to eat. However,
one must expect to pay something for being in
love with a Princess.

Every night, before she went to bed, the
Princess came into the conservatory, and visited
all her pets, and said a few words to each of
them, and was especially pleased if any of them
had grown sufficiently tame to respond to _her.
And she visited her singing bird in its gilded
cage, and her caterpillars in their cardboard
boxes, and her frogs in the rockery; and last
of all, she came and spoke to Wriggles in his
valuable china bowl. And the singing bird
sang loudly to her; and the caterpillars crawled
122 THE EXCEPTIONAL TADPOLE

on the palm of her hand; and the frogs croaked
~when she bade them good-night; and Wriggles
swam in and out of her jewelled fingers. But
this time, he was not nearly so active as
before.

“Dear Princess,” he was saying, faintly; “I
love you dearly, but can you not give me
a little pond-weed, or even a few ants’
eggs?”

But the Princess did not understand him,
and only drew out her fingers, and wiped them
daintily on a lace handkerchief.

“How delightful it is to keep pets, and to
feel that they really love me,” she said to her
maids of honour, as they unrobed her for the
night.

“That is because you are so kind to them,
your Highness,” they replied.

The next morning, the Princess’ fairy god-
mother paid her an unexpected visit. It was
so unexpected that the Princess had gone for
a ride with the King, and the Queen was
sitting in her boudoir without her crown,
when she suddenly appeared in the middle
of the room.

“You seem surprised,” said the fairy god-
mother, as the Queen screamed, and put her
hand to her head.
THE EXCEPTIONAL TADPOLE 123

“Not at all,—charmed,” gasped the poor
Queen, and rang for her crown.

“I came to see how the Princess is getting
on,” continued the fairy godmother, taking a
comfortable chair. “Surely it is time that the
child thought about marriage?”

“No doubt,” said the Queen, with more
composure, as her crown was brought to her
on a gold tray; “though she has not men-
tioned it yet. In fact, the dear child seems to
care about nothing but her animals, just at
present. She is quite wrapped up in them, and
it is beautiful to see how they all love her.”

“That is all very well,” said the fairy god-
mother; “but she is getting too old to be
making so many lives wretched. She must
have a husband.” ;

“T beg your pardon?” said the Queen, who
thought she could not have heard correctly.

“T know of a most estimable Prince,” con-
tinued the fairy, without noticing her, “who
is also a godchild of mine, and would make
an excellent husband for the Princess. I will
call on him to-day; he lives just a hundred
leagues from here, and could be with you in
a month’s time. So that is séttled.”

At that moment, the Princess entered; and
having been prepared to find her godmother,
124 THE EXCEPTIONAL TADPOLE

she came in looking very tidy, and with a smile
on her face.

“Dear godmother,” she said, kissing her;
“T am so pleased to see you again. Would

you like to come and see my pets ?”

“JT have no time to-day,” replied the fairy.
“J must see three hundred and fifty god-
children before sundown. I came to settle
your marriage with your mother, and to leave
you a little useful present for yourself.”

The Princess trembled. As long as she
could remember, her godmother had arrived.
at inopportune moments and given her useful
presents, such as a gift for history, or an accu-
rate memory, or a love of industry. But this
time, she was really delighted, for the gift the
fairy conferred upon her was the power of
understanding the animal language.

“How beautiful,’ exclaimed the Princess.
“T will go and use it at once.” And just as the
fairy godmother disappeared, in the middle of
the Queen’s polite thanks, off ran the Princess
to her pets.

“T have come to talk to you, birdie,” she
said, as she stopped by the gilded cage.
“Won't you sing to me?”

And the bird sang the song it had sung
every day for a whole year.
THE EXCEPTIONAL TADPOLE 125

“Let me go, let me go, let me go!
Back where the palm trees grow ;
Where the warm, soft breezes sigh for me,
And my green-wine’d lover dies for me,
Let me go, let me go, let me go!”

“What an ungrateful bird!” exclaimed the
astonished Princess; and’ she ran away to her
caterpillars, to escape from its song.

“Are you happy, dear little caterpillars ?”
she whispered to them.

“Happy? How can we be happy when you
give us lily leaves, instead of cabbages, to eat ?”
grumbled the caterpillars.

“What a vulgar taste,” said the Princess, in
a disdainful tone; and she ran away to her
frogs.

“ Dear little frogs, tell me one of your charm-
ing stories,” she begged them.

“We have no charming stories to tell,” they
croaked. . “We are so tired of one another that
we cannot even quarrel any more. How would
you like to be shut up in a cork rockery, with
a tin creeper, two goldfish, and one newt ?”

“T never met so much wicked discontent in
my life,” said the Princess, and she went slowly
and thoughtfully towards the valuable china
bowl on the window sill.

“Oh dear, oh dear!” she cried in distress.
126 THE EXCEPTIONAL TADPOLE

“My darling tadpole is dying! Whatever can
be the matter?”

Wriggles was very nearly exhausted for want
of food, but he just managed to flap himself
against the Princess’ delicate fingers.

“Dear, beautiful Princess,” he said, faintly ;
“T love you so dearly, that it is a pleasure even
to die in your hand. But if you had only
given me a little pond-weed, or even a few
ants’ eggs, I might have lived much longer to
be your humble slave.”

“How foolish of me not to think of that
before,’ exclaimed the Princess. “But, at
least, here is one of my pets who knows how
to appreciate kindness.” And away she ran to
fetch him some food, which she gave him out
of her own hands. Wriggles very soon re-
vived, and told her as much of his history as
he could remember, which immensely pleased
the Princess.

“Indeed, this is no ordinary tadpole,’ she
said to herself, when she left him. “He
can distinguish a Princess from a common
person.”

“ How fortunate I am,” murmured Wriggles,
with his mouth full of pond-weed. “Iam glad,
now, that I did not associate with all those
dull people in the canal; for I do not feel at all
THE EXCEPTIONAL TADPOLE 127

embarrassed when the Princess gives me her
confidence. I always said I was exceptional.”

When the Princess came to visit her pets
the next morning, she ran past the green and
white bird in the gilded cage, and past the
caterpillars in their cardboard boxes, and past
the frogs in the cork rockery; and she stopped
up her ears with two fingers, so that she might
not hear their complaints. For the Princess
was so tenderhearted, that she could not bear
to listen to people who were in trouble. When
she got to the valuable china bowl on the
window sill, she sighed deeply, as she looked
down into the clear water.

“You are sad, Princess,” said Wriggles,
sympathetically. “What can I do to comfort

ou?”
ee Alas,” sighed the Princess, “no one can
comfort me, little friend. My godmother says
Iam to be married, and my lover arrives in a
month’s time.”

Wriggles trembled all over with emotion,
but he did not allow his feelings to be seen.

“Do you not want to be married, dear,
beautiful Princess?” he asked, as he nestled in
the palm of her hand.
' “Not to the husband of my godmother’s
choice,” replied the Princess; “for he is one of
128 THE EXCEPTIONAL TADPOLE ©

her godchildren, and she says he is a most esti-
mable young Prince. I cannot bear estimable
young Princes, and to be married to one of
them will be intolerable. How shall I ever
endure it?”

“There is a whole month before he comes,”
said Wriggles, to whom a month was a very
long time indeed.

And he calculated every day of that precious
month, by the number of the Princess’ visits,
until at last it drew to a close, and there was
such a commotion in the palace, that it even
reached the ears of all the pets in the con-
servatory.

“Only one day more,” sighed the Princess,
as she dabbled her dainty fingers in the clear
water of the valuable china bowl; “and then, I
shall have to be married, and you will have to
turn into a frog.”

“A what?” exclaimed Wriggles, who cer-
tainly had been feeling remarkably faint lately,
and had been obliged to come up for fresh air
oftener than usual. “I turn into a frog?
Surely you must be mistaken.”

“Oh no,” said the Princess, smiling; “for
all tadpoles turn into frogs. And so will you,
little friend.”

“Never!” declared Wriggles, proudly.
THE EXCEPTIONAL TADPOLE 129

“Dear, beautiful Princess, you forget that 7
am an exceptional tadpole.”

“Ah, one forgets those things, when one
is unhappy,” said the Princess, still smiling.
“ Little friend, you may kiss my smallest finger,
if you like.”

All that day, and the night that followed,
Wriggles lived on the memory of that kiss.
He had never felt so miserable in his life
before; when he was in the water, he wanted
to breathe the air; and when he crawled out
into the air, he at once wanted to be back in
the water again.

“Undoubtedly,” he murmured sadly to him-
self; “my brain is affected by my grief. I
cannot bear the shock of the Princess’ marriage.
That is what comes of being an exceptional
tadpole. I almost wish I had died of love
for her in the canal, although then I should
never have kissed her small white finger.”

And on the whole, he was glad that he never
need associate again with his companions of
the canal. a

When the day dawned, there was more com-
motion than ever in the palace.

“There will be no more natural history now,”
said the seven maids of honour to the seven
little pages. And the seven little pages stood

9
130 THE EXCEPTIONAL TADPOLE

on their seven little heads, all in a row, and
cheered as loudly as seven little throttled
throats can be expected to cheer.

About midday, the estimable young Prince
arrived. Every one pronounced him charming,
as he rode through the town; although he
took very little notice of anybody, and went
straight towards the palace, with a singularly
gloomy expression on his face. If he had
not been a prince, people would have said he
looked disagreeable. However, his manners
were perfect, and the King and Queen fell in
love with him from the first.

“He is decidedly handsome,” said the Prin-
cess to her little friend, as she waited to be
summoned to meet her lover; “for I looked
out of the window to see him arrive. But,
of course, I shall hate him.”

“Do not be cruel to him, dear, beautiful
Princess,” said Wriggles, with a generosity
that no one but an exceptional tadpole could
have shown. “He may make a delightful
husband.”

“That is impossible,” declared the Princess.
“What can you expect from a prince, who has
had useful presents from a fairy godmother, for
twenty-one birthdays?”

Just then, the youngest maid of honour came
THE EXCEPTIONAL TADPOLE 131

in, and asked when her Highness would be
ready to receive her royal suitor.

“YT am ready now,” answered the Princess,
with a very bad grace; “if he is not too proud
to come and visit me here, among my pets.”

The youngest maid of honour deputed the

youngest page to take her Highness’ message;
and as the youngest page disliked the com-
mission as much as she did, there was some
delay before the Prince was told of the Princess’
wish.
“You see, he is far too proud,” said the
Princess to her little friend, as the time passed,
and no one came into the conservatory. “ How-
ever, I am only too glad for him to keep
away.”

Then she looked round, and saw the hand-
somest man she had ever seen in her life.

“Oh dear,” said the Princess, with a little
scream of surprise. ‘Why did no one an-
nounce you?”

“T did not wish to be announced,” answered
the Prince, shortly. He was thinking that the
Princess was very beautiful, although he was
quite prepared to dislike her exceedingly.

“Oh,” said the Princess, rather awkwardly.
She was thinking that, if she had not already
made up her mind to hate everything about
132 THE EXCEPTIONAL TADPOLE

him, she might almost have liked the sound of
his voice.

“T suppose,” said the Prince, gloomily, “ that
I have got to ask you to marry me.”

“T suppose you have,” replied the Princess,
with a sigh. “It is all because of my fairy
godmother.”

“Why,” exclaimed the Prince, “that is ex-
actly my case! I have suffered from a fairy
godmother all my life.”

“This is most interesting,” said the Princess,
a little more cheerfully. “ Let us sit down and
talk about it.”

“Did she ever give you a useful present?”
asked the Prince.

“ Quantities,” replied the Princess. “And
was she always paying you unexpected visits ?”

“Constantly,” replied the Prince; “and she
invariably arrived when I had been naughty,
and she could put a climax on my punish-
ment.”

“Really,” said the Princess, “we seem to
have many grievances in common. I have
never met any one else with a fairy godmother
like mine.”

“And I,” said the Prince, politely, “I have
never met so charming a godchild of so tire-
some a godmother.”
THE EXCEPTIONAL TADPOLE 133

The Princess blushed a little, and looked
. down. .

“Do you know,” she said, timidly ; “ my god-
mother told me that you were estimable, and I
thought I should hate you ?”

“Ts it possible?” exclaimed the Prince.
“And, would you believe it, she told me that
you would make me an excellent wife, and I
quite meant to dislike you exceedingly.”

“But you are not estimable, are you?” asked
the Princess.

“Not a bit,” laughed the Prince. “And
you?”

“Oh no,” said the Princess, warmly.

“T am glad,” continued the Prince with an
effort, “that we both see the absurdity of such
a marriage.”

“Ve-es,” stammered the Princess.

“Our godmother won't have her own way
this time, will she?” he went on, with a forced
laugh. But the Princess did not reply, for her
eyes were brimful of tears.

“Dearest,” said the Prince in dismay; “ have
I said anything to hurt you?” And he took

her two dainty hands in his.

’ “Not at all,’ sobbed the Princess. “ But
before we part, you—you may kiss my hand
if you like.”
134 THE EXCEPTIONAL TADPOLE

But that did not satisfy the Prince, and he
took her in his arms, and kissed her two cheeks
as well. So the fairy godmother did have her
own way, after all.

And then they both fell to talking; and they
had so much to tell one another, that they
talked, and talked, and talked, and then found
that they were still at the very beginning.

“What are all these cages and boxes for?”
asked the Prince, looking round the conserva-
tory for the first time.

“ Oh,” said the Princess, indifferently ; “they .
are only a few pets I used to keep, to pass away
the time.”

As she spoke, the white and green bird burst
out into its melancholy song again:

“ Let me go, let me go, let me go!
Back where the palm-trees grow ;
Where the warm soft breezes sigh for me,
And my green-winged lover dies for me,
Let me go, let me go, let me go!’

The Princess sprang forward, and flung open
the cage door. And the white and green bird
dived out through the window, and vanished
from sight.

“Why did you let him go?” asked the
Prince.
THE EXCEPTIONAL TADPOLE 135

“ Because / have a lover now,” answered the
Princess ; and she went on to the caterpillars.
But alas! they were all lying dead upon a bed
of lily leaves; so the Princess went on to the
cork rockery, and opened the door that led into
the garden, and away hopped the frogs, without
waiting to say even so much as thank you.

“How ungrateful, after all my kindness!”
said the Princess; and she strolled towards the
valuable china bowl on the window-sill.

Wriggles was right. He would never be-
come a frog.

“My dear little friend,’ said the Princess,
weeping ; “ why did you die before I could tell
you of my happiness ?”

“What a fuss to make about a tadpole,
sweetest,” said the Prince, who was a little
jealous.

“ Ah,” explained the Princess, “but this was
an exceptional tadpole.”
The Little Witch of
the Plain

The Little Witch of
the Plain

HERE was once a cross old witch, who
had a charming little daughter. How she
came to have such a charming daughter no one
could imagine, for she was as unpleasant an>
old witch as ever belonged to a fairy tale, and
she had spent her long life of a thousand years
in making as many people unhappy as she
could. Yet, for all that, she had the dearest
little daughter imaginable, and her name was
Blarnie, and she was just as beautiful as any
one could wish. For her skin was as white
as the softest white cloud, and her hair was
the colour of the setting sun, and her big eyes
were like the deep purple. flowers that grow on |
the borders of Fairyland. She lived with her
mother on the edge of a wide green plain, and
she sang songs to the sun all day long; and
when evening came, she went indoors to her
mother, and was taught how to turn people
140 THE LITTLE WITCH

into all sorts of shapes that they never wanted
to be at all.

Now Blarnie, for all her charming qualities,
was a little witch-girl, all the same; and she
was just bubbling over with mischief and fun;
and she loved nothing better than playing
tricks on the simple people, who came to ask
her mother for advice. She never did them
any real harm, like the old witch; but she very
often frightened them exceedingly, or made
them look foolish, which, of course, was worse
' still; and then, she would lie on the grass, and
shout with laughter, until they were out of
sight. For instance, a neighbouring king,
who was the terror of his subjects, once came
to ask the old witch for a charm to bewitch his
ptivate secretary. And his private secretary
arrived by another road, at the same moment,
to ask for a charm to bewitch his master.
And Blarnie never took them in to her mother
at all, but turned the king into a mouse, and
the private secretary into a cat; so that, for
full five minutes, the old tyrant was terrified of
his servant, and for ever afterwards he was
so afraid so seeing him turn into a cat again,
- that he did not tyrannise over him any more.

And to a man, who wanted a potion for his
gossiping wife, she gave one that turned his
OF THE PLAIN 141

wife dumb, which exasperated him so much
more than her talking had done, that he very
soon came and begged Blarnie for another
potion, to make her speak again. And in
many other ways did she turn people’s wishes
against themselves; until at last, they grew
wise, and learned to avoid the beautiful girl,
who sat at the edge of the wide green plain,
and sang to the sun all day. And they almost
preferred to go inside the hut, and run the risk
of being enchanted by the old woman, who
never saw the sunlight at all, but sat continually
over a fire that sent up green smoke.

Yet, in spite of her mischievous ways, there
were many suitors who came and begged Blar-
nie to marry them. But she shook her head at
all the poor men, and said she would marry no
one but a prince; and when the princes heard
of her wonderful beauty, and came to woo her
too, she shook her head again, and said that no
one but a king was good enough for her. —

“She is a conceited minx,” said the prettiest
girl in the neighbouring town, who had just
confessed that the woodcutter’s son was good
enough for er. But the saucepan boiled over
at that moment, and spoiled the dinner, and
scalded her hands; and this taught her not to
speak against the Little Witch of the Plain again.
142 THE LITTLE WITCH

But, one day, when Blarnie was sitting as
usual at the edge of the wide, green plain,
singing songs to the sun, a stately horseman,
wearing a gold crown and a princely dress,
rode up and saluted her.

“So I suppose you are the Little Witch of
the Plain, eh?” he asked.

“Tam Blarnie,” she replied, carelessly; “and
if choose, I can turn you into a black cat.”

“That is exactly as you like,” answered the
stranger; “but I fancy you would be sorry for
it afterwards.”

Then he dismounted, and asked her to fetch
him some water for his horse.

“It is not my business to fetch water for
anybody’s horse. The stream is in the wood,
at the back of the cottage,” said Blarnie; and
she began to sing again. She did not turn
him into a black cat, because she wanted to see
what would happen next. Then the stranger
came a little nearer, and looked down at her
with a smile, without saying a word.

“Why don’t you go away? What are you
looking at?” cried Blarnie, angrily. “Do you
know I could turn you into a black cat zow ?”

“But you know you won't,” laughed the
stranger.

“Why not?” asked Blarnie.
OF THE PLAIN 143

“Because you are a little girl, as well as a
little witch,’ he said, and mounted his horse
again, and rode away out of sight.

Blarnie rolled over and over on the grass, in
a passion, and vowed that if ever he came back
again, she would turn him into a black cat
before he had time to speak. And for the first
time in her life, she did not wait to see the sun
set, but went indoors, and sulked till bed-time.

The next day, at the same time, there came
a speck on the horizon. Blarnie tried her”
hardest not to look in that direction, but for
all that, she found herself watching it with
the greatest eagerness, and it came nearer,
and nearer, and nearer, and finally proved to
be the horseman of the day before.

“Good-day to you,” he said, and saluted her.

“Why have you come back?” she asked,
ungraciously.

“I have come to see you get angry,” he re-
plied, and dismounted from his horse, and came
and stood near her, as before.

Blarnie thought to herself that he should be
disappointed, this time. So she looked away
over the wide green plain, and made up her
mind that she would not turn him into a black
Cat, just yet, after all.

_ “Are you a king?” she asked, indifferently.
144 THE LITTLE WITCH

_ “Qh dear no,” said the stranger; “I wouldn’t
be a king for anything.”

“ But you have got a crown,” she exclaimed,
in much disappointment; for she had half hoped
all the time that he might turn out to be a king,
although she was determined not to marry him
in any case.

“That belonged to the last king I killed,”
said the stranger, cheerfully.

“Do you go about killing kings, then? How
dreadfully cruel of you!” cried Blarnie, shud-
dering.

“Don’t you go about breaking hearts, eh?”
retorted the stranger. “Besides, I only kill
bad kings, when I happen to come across them.
It isn’t at all the same thing.”

“J think it is much worse to kill people, than
to break their hearts. Besides, I don’t break
them. At any rate, I shall never marry you,
because you are not a king.”

“Yes, you will, some day,” said the stranger,
still smiling in the most provoking manner
possible. “It is only a matter of time.”

“A very long matter,” cried Blarnie, angrily ;
and that time, she really did turn him into a
black cat.

“Oh dear, oh dear!” she said, with her eyes
full of tears. “I never meant to do it, really.
OF THE PLAIN 145

Now, there is no one to talk to; and what ever
shall I do with that great horse? I wonder if
I can turn him back again.”

Then she tried all the spells she knew, to
turn him into a man again; but none of them
succeeded, and at last, she gave up trying in
despair.

“After all, he was terribly conceited, and
he deserved to be punished,” she said, im-
patiently; and went indoors to escape from
the cat’s eyes.

“What is the use of being able to turn a
man into a black cat, if I cannot turn him back
into a man again ?” she asked her mother.

“ But you can,” said the old witch. “I taught
you how to do that, long ago. Can you have
forgotten so soon, you lazy child ?”

“TI have not forgotten, but I cannot succeed
with this one,” said Blarnie, and told the whole
story to her mother. The old witch chuckled.

“That must be because you are in love with
him,” she said. “You will never be able to
turn him back again. Nor can I help you,
for I am too old, and have lost half my cun-
ning. You must drive him away, and forget
all about him.”

But poor little Blarnie sat down, and wept
miserably, until the witch began to scold her.

10
146 THE LITTLE WITCH

“That is a ridiculous fuss to make over a
lover, who was not even a king,” she said,
sharply.

“But is there nothing I can do?” asked
Blarnie, beseechingly; for the black cat had
followed her into the cottage, and was looking
at her with its piercing green eyes, in a most
uncomfortable and cat-like manner.

“There is only one thing,” said the old witch.

“ And what is that?” cried Blarnie, clasping
her hands together eagerly.

“You must give him the most precious thing
on earth,” said the old witch; “ but what that is,
I may not tell you; nor can any one in the wide
world, witch, or fairy, or wymp, or goblin, tell
you either.”

“Then how am I to find out?” asked
Blarnie in despair.

“Every one finds out, sooner or later,” said
the old witch, and chuckled again.

“Did you?” asked Blarnie.

“Maybe,” said the old witch; “before the
world grew old.”

“Then can’t you give it to the black cat,
instead of me?”

“That would be of no use; you must do it
yourself,” said the old witch; and she chuckled
a third time. |
OF THE PLAIN 147

Blarnie slept very little that night, for she
lay awake thinking, instead. And when the
dawn broke, she crept downstairs, and. stole
out of the house on to the dewy green plain.
The horse and the cat were both outside to-
gether, but although she patted the horse, and
spoke to him, she had nothing whatever to
say to the black cat; for she could not get
out of her head for a moment, that he was
really the stranger with the gold crown, who
had laughed at her, and that still made her
feel shy.

“I am going to look for the most precious
thing in the world,” said Blarnie. “Will you
come with me?”

But the horse shook his head in reply.

“Will you?” said the little witch-girl, turn-
ing to the black cat. And the black cat mewed,
and seemed to say “yes”; so Blarnie stroked
the horse again, and told him to wait there,
until they came back; and then off she set with
her strange companion. And that was how
the little Witch of the Plain started out, with
a black cat, to search the world for the most
precious thing that was in it.

Well, they walked for a long time across
the wide green plain, and followed the course
of the sun, until they came to a solitary cherry
148 THE LITTLE WITCH

tree, that lived by itself, and never had its
cherries stolen; and Blarnie walked up to it,
and asked it the way to the most precious
thing on earth.

“Ah,” said the cherry tree, wisely; “ that
must be the diamond in the head of the
Goblin King, who. lives in the Red Moun-
tain. It is the most precious thing I have
ever heard of.”

Blarnie hardly waited to thank the cherry
tree, but hastened joyfully on towards the set-
ting sun, with the black cat trotting at her
side ; and just as evening was closing in, the
Red Mountain loomed out of the darkness;
and stood across their path. Blarnie walked
up to the mountain, and tapped on it seven
times. Then a small door opened in the
mountain side, and an ugly little goblin,
dressed in black and yellow like a wasp, with
a very big head, and a lighted wax candle
stuck on the top of ‘it, looked out, and asked
her what she wanted.

“T am the Witch of the Plain, and I have
come to dance with his Majesty the King,” said
Blarnie.

“His Majesty the King is not dancing to-
night,” said the little goblin, rudely; and shut
the door in her face.
OF THE PLAIN 149

But Blarnie stamped her foot twice, and
clapped her hands, and the door flew open again.

“Please, witch - girl, kind witch - girl, do not
enchant me,” implored the goblin in a terrified
voice, when he saw Blarnie appear again. “It
was my master’s orders indeed, sweet Witch of
the Plain.”

“You don’t suppose I should take the trouble
to enchant a thing like you ?” said Blarnie, con-
temptuously ; and she walked straight into the
mountain, along a narrow dark passage, with
the black cat at her heels. She passed a number
of other goblins, dressed like wasps, with wax
candles stuck on their heads; and they all
shrieked at her, and tried to stop her from
going any further. But Blarnie merely uttered
one of her spells, which extinguished all their
wax candles, so that they tumbled over one
another in the dark, and ended in hurting them-
selves. And Blarnie and her companion walked
on ahead; for darkness makes no difference
whatever to witch - girls and cats.

Presently, the path widened out into a brill-
iantly lighted chamber, across the entrance of
which lay a huge scarlet dragon, with three
heads, and many claws shaped like corkscrews,
and more bad tempers than any one could count
in a hurry.
150 THE LITTLE WITCH

“What impertinence!” he snarled, when he
saw Blarnie. “Can’t you see I am a dragon,
and am going to eat you up?” And he
rushed towards her with his three mouths wide
open.

ic Can’t you see I am a witch-girl, and am
going to put you into a deep sleep ?” observed
Blarnie, without stepping back an inch. And
immediately, the scarlet dragon sank down on
the rocky floor, with his six eyes tightly closed,
and all his corkscrew claws waving harmlessly
in the air.

“You may lie there for a hundred years
now,” said Blarnie. And she stepped over his
great body, and the black cat jumped after her,
and they stood side by side in the brilliantly
lighted chamber. It was the most magnificent
room they had ever beheld before. All the
walls were of burnished copper, and the floor
was of beaten gold; and in the middle of it all
sat the Goblin King on a silver throne, with a
crown on his head that was cut out of a single
diamond. And as they looked at him, they
saw that all the light in the chamber came from
his wonderful diamond crown, for it shone as
brightly as a thousand candles. .

“What is that dragon up to?” said the
Goblin King, fretfully. “I never allow any
OF THE PLAIN 151

one in here at all, it prevents me from thinking.
There is so much thinking to be. done, and
no one can do it but me; and I get muddled
directly I am interrupted. How did you
get past that dragon ?”

“J fancy he was dozing as I came by,”
answered Blarnie, with a twinkle in her eye.
“But that need not trouble you at all. I only
came for a chat, you know.” .

“T never chat,’ said the Goblin King, in
the same tone of complaint. “That is why
I don’t allow visitors. They want to talk so
much. There is too much talking done, as
it is.”

“That is better than too much thinking,”
said the witch-girl, getting a little closer to
the throne as she spoke.

“Thinking? I’ve been thinking, and think-
ing, and thinking, ever since I’ve been here,
and that’s as long as the mountain has,” said
the Goblin King, leaning his head on his hand,
and sighing deeply.

“That's a long time to spend in thinking,”
remarked Blarnie, getting quite close to the
throne, and laying her hand softly on the
Goblin King’s arm. “And what have you
thought about, all that time?”

“Oh, I haven’t got so far as that, yet,” he
152 THE LITTLE WITCH

replied, wearily. “You have to think much
longer than I’ve been at it, before you begin
to think about something. But oh, I get so
muddled sometimes, I don’t know what to do.”

“Then stop thinking for a while, and have
a dance with me,” said Blarnie, cheerfully; and
flinging her arm round the Goblin King’s
waist, she suddenly whisked him off his
throne, and whirled him round and round on
the golden floor, in a mad, wild, witch dance,
until he implored her, with the little breath
he had left, to stop and let him rest. But
when a witch-girl once begins to dance, it takes
a good deal of asking to make her stop; and
so the Goblin King was very much out of
breath, long before Blarnie let him go again.

“Ts your crown too heavy for you? Let me
take it off,” she said; and then, while a dismal
howl from the Goblin King filled every nook
and corner of the Red Mountain, and echoed
outside for many miles round, she lifted the
crown off his head, and placed it on that of
the black cat. But alas! he remained a black
cat as before, and mewed piteously, as if that
was what he had expected all along.

“All that trouble for nothing! Here, you
may take your diamond crown, I want some-
thing more precious still,” cried Blarnie, throw-
OF THE PLAIN 153

ing the crown towards the gasping little King.
“ At all events, you have something to think
about, at last.”

And she picked up the black cat and walked
round the throne three times, and sneezed
once, and there they were, outside the mountain
again.

“Now we have got to begin all over again,”
said Blarnie to the black cat. “And we may
as well start at once.”

So off went the curious pair together again,
and they walked, and walked, and walked, and
did not stop until dawn broke, and they came
to a little boy, throwing stones into a brook.

“ Little boy, what is the most precious thing
in the world ?” asked Blarnie.

The little boy lifted up his face, which was a
remarkable fat and rosy one, and answered,
“ Breakfast!” and ran away into the cottage.
And Blarnie laughed, and went on again, for
witch-girls and black cats can do without break-
fast for a very long time.

Next, they came to a miser in a cave, who
was greedily counting his piles of gold; but
when he saw Blarnie standing outside, he put
his long thin arms round his. money, and
shrieked at her to go away.

“Surely that must be the most precious
154 THE LITTLE WITCH

thing in the world, since he guards it so care-
fully,” said Blarnie, who was still very ignorant
in some ways, although she was a witch’s
daughter.

“Old man, lend me some of your gold, that
I may disenchant my black cat.”

“No, no, go away!” shrieked the old miser.
But Blarnie turned him into a sparrow, that
flew round and round her head, twittering
feebly, while she took a handful of gold pieces,
and poured them over the black cat. But, alas!
he still remained a black cat, and he mewed
piteously as before; and Blarnie sighed again,
and turned the sparrow back into a miser.

“You may keep your gold,” she said, as
she walked away with the black cat at her
heels ; “for I want something more precious
still.”

And the miser, who had come back with his
head swimming, was far too glad to have his
money again, to make any complaint.

So away went the curious pair once more,
and they followed the sun again towards its
setting-place ; and just before night-time, they
met two wood-pigeons.

“ Please, can you tell me which is the most
precious thing in the world ?” asked Blarnie.

“That we may not tell you,” they replied,
OF THE PLAIN 155

softly ; “but perhaps, we could show you how
to find it.”

“ At last!” cried Blarnie, joyfully. “Oh, tell
me quickly, quickly! Is it far off? Shall I
get to it soon? Is it difficult to find? Oh,
tell me quickly, quickly.”

“Not quickly nor easily is it to be found,”
they both cooed. “But every ore finds it once,
and so may you. And there are many ways
of getting to it.”

“Tell me one of them ow,” begged Blarnie,
impatiently.

“You see that little path before you?” they
cooed in reply. “ Follow that wherever it leads
you, until you find a prince who needs your
help. Do whatever he asks you, and then
walt and see.”

“T call that a stupid way of getting a thing,”
said Blarnie, a little crossly. “To do what
the first prince I meet tells me to do, and then
wait. 1 hate waiting! Can’t I ask him for it,
directly I see him ?”

“Oh no,” they said; “for you must learn
first what it is.”

“Have I got to learn something, too? It,
gets worse and worse as it goes on,” said
Blarnie; and she wished them good evening,
very ungraciously.
156 THE LITTLE WITCH

“Wood-pigeons are the dullest, slowest
people I have ever met,” she muttered, as she
trotted quickly along the path.

“You had better wait here,” she said to the
black cat, when they reached the outskirts of a
thick wood; “for it is dark and dangerous in
there, and I shall have to use my witchcraft to
come out of it alive. But I could not protect
you too, so I will not take you with me.”

Then the black cat mewed, and curled him-
self up on a heap of dry leaves, and Blarnie
waved her hand to him, and plunged into the
wood. The path grew narrower and narrower
as she went on; and at last, the brambles and
bushes closed up in front of her, and she had to
use spells to make them roll back and let her
through. On and on she went, until suddenly
she came to a tall dismal castle. The great
iron gates were shut and barred; but in spite
of this, a young prince was beating against
them violently with his sword, and calling
angrily on the warder to come out and open
them. But no one inside the castle stirred;
only the wind whistled round the tall turrets,
and made them seem more gloomy than before.

“That is a foolish thing to do with a sword,”
observed Blarnie. “Why do you want to
enter where you are evidently not wanted ?”
OF THE PLAIN 157

“The Princess whom I love has been carried
away by a cruel giant, and shut up in this
castle. And it has been predicted that she
will never be released until the little Witch of
the Plain comes, and casts a spell over the
giant. But how am I to find the little Witch
of the Plain?” sighed the Prince, and he began
striking the gates again with his sword.

“That is certainly not the way to find her,”
said Blarnie, a little scornfully. “I am the
little Witch of the Plain, and I have come on
purpose to help you. So stop making that
noise, and tell me quickly what you want.”

The Prince was overjoyed when he heard
that she was really the witch-girl of the Plain;
and he at once begged her to cast a spell over
the giant, and release the Princess whom he
loved.

“Wait outside, then,” said Blarnie; “and I
will bring her out to you.”

Then up to the gates she walked, and called
on the warder to come out at once, and open
to her. But still, there was no sound from
within; only the wind whistled round the
tall turrets, and made them seem more dismal
than before.

“T am the Witch of the Plain,” cried
Blarnie; “and you shall sneeze your seven
158 THE LITTLE WITCH

heads off, unless you come and open to me
quickly.”

Immediately, there ran out an ugly little
dwarf, who, sure enough, had seven heads, and
each one of them was sneezing as busily as it
could.

“You may stop sneezing now, and go to
sleep instead,” said Blarnie, as the gates swung
open; and she stepped into the court-yard,
and down fell the dwarf in a sound sleep. And
Blarnie walked into the hall, and up a great
staircase, and knocked at the drawing-room
door. She could easily have run off with the
Princess without any trouble, but she was a
witch-girl, and she wanted to have some fun
first.

“Come in,” said a gruff voice, that sounded
like the breaking of dinner plates, and the
banging of doors, and people tumbling down-
stairs, all at once. So in she walked, and
there sat a very handsome giant, writing an
account of his childhood in a large red diary.
It had to be a very large diary, because the
childhood of a giant extends over many cen-
turies, and is very full of events.

“Good morning,” said Blarnie, in her cheer-
ful manner. “I am glad to see you looking
so pleasant. How giants are improving, to be
OF THE PLAIN 159

sure! A few generations ago, you would have
been a very fat and ugly giant, dining off bul-
locks and sheep.”

“ A few generations ago,” shouted the giant,
angrily, “you would not have dared to come in
and disturb any ordinary bad tempered giant,
whatever he was doing! Where is that lazy
en of mine, and how did he let you come
by F »”

“Is there a dwarf? I expect he didn’t notice
me,” answered Blarnie, with a twinkle in her
eye. “Things are so altered that I don’t sup-
pose you would think I am a witch-girl, would
you now?”

“That alters the case altogether,” observed
the giant, a little more pleasantly. “If you
will allow me, I will make a note of that;” and
he scribbled busily in the large red diary.

“Oh, I have no objection,” answered Blarnie,
sitting carelessly on the edge of the table, and
smiling at him. “ You may make any use of
me you please, but I should certainly like to
know what you intend doing with the beautiful
Princess, who sits mending your socks in the
dungeon downstairs. It is hardly an occupa-
tion for a royal princess, is it ?”

“Why not?” snapped the giant. “I must
get some one to do it, and no one ever comes
160 THE LITTLE WITCH

this way except beautiful princesses. It is not
your business, and I shall have to put you into
a trance for a hundred years. Dear me, it is
such a long time since I did it, that I must
really look it up first.” And he took down a
heavy book from the shelf, and turned to the
letter T.

“No need,’ smiled Blarnie. “/ know the
way.” And she straightway put zm into a
trance, and down he fell on the floor in a sound
sleep. Then away went Blarnie singing, and
blew on the dungeon door till it opened, and
fetched out the beautiful Princess, who was
weeping over the holes in the giant’s socks,
and took her into the wood where the Prince
was waiting. And straight they ran into each
other’s. arms, and at once forgot all about
Blarnie, who stood watching them, and won-
dering how she was going to get the most
precious thing in the world.

“ Dearest, how brave of you to come and
release me from that horrid giant,” said the
Princess.

“ Alas!” said the Prince; “but now, we have
nothing to live upon, because they have taken
away your kingdom, and I am a younger son.”

“But there is one thing I cam give you,”
said the Princess, softly.
OF THE PLAIN 161

“ And what is that?” he asked in surprise. -

“The most precious thing on earth,” she
said, and gave him a big kiss.

“ After all, it is quite easy. Why did I not
think of that before?” thought Blarnie. And
she went away, and left the two lovers to find
their own way out of the wood. Which they
probably never did; so there they may be still,
as far as anybody can tell.

But Blarnie went straight to the black cat,
who had been too anxious to wait any longer,
and so had made his way over the brambles
and brushwood after her, which of course was
an easy matter for a black cat.

“Oh, Iam so glad,” cried Blarnie, dropping
down on her knees beside him. “And I have
found the most precious thing on earth, at
last!”

But the black cat did not look in the least
bit surprised, for he had certainly known what
it was, all the time.

“There!” said the little witch- girl, and gave
him a quick, frightened, little kiss. For, being
a witch-girl, she had never happened to kiss
anybody before. And immediately, a stately
man, in a gold crown and a princely dress,
stood looking down at her.

“This is just what the other two are doing

It
162 THE LITTLE WITCH

over there,” said Blarnie, when she had jumped
up into his arms, and they had kissed each
other a great many times.

But when they tried to get out of the wood,
the bushes and brambles seemed to close up
more thickly than ever; and this time, when
Blarnie used a spell to make them give way, it
had no effect at all.

“T have lost my witchcraft,” she said in
despair. “I can never do anything for you
again.”

“Never mind,” replied the stranger. “It is
my turn to help you now.” And he drew his
sword, and very soon hacked a way out of the
wood for her.

When they got back to the cottage, at the
edge of the wide green plain, they found that
the old witch had blown up one day in a puff
of green smoke, and that they had the whole
place to themselves. The horse was still there,
however, and that was something.

“ Now, you must tell me who you are,” said
Blarnie, when they had got settled.

“Twas a real king,” he said, “ until I said I
was going to marry you, and then my people
drove me out of my kingdom. So now I must
work for you instead. But, of course, I shall
enjoy doing that.”
OF THE PLAIN 163

“And I,” said Blarnie, “was a real witch-
girl, until I gave you that kiss in the wood.
So now I must work too. But I don’t like it
a bit.”

After all, she did not have to work very hard.
For the people came just as much as before,
to ask her for advice; and when she told them
to cross their fire-irons on the floor to cure their
rheumatism, they always found that it did cure
them; and when she told the mothers to kiss
their children seven times to cure them of dis-
obedience, that was always successful too. So
Blarnie is still the beautiful Little Witch of the
Plain. And she has married a king, as she
always said she would.
The Soft Hearted Prince

. : The Soft Hearted Prince

‘THERE was once a Prince, who had a soft

heart. Now, an ordinary person may
have a soft heart without any inconvenience
whatever, but to a Prince of the royal blood
it is a serious drawback. And this particular
Prince was so afraid of being irritated by other
people’s troubles, that he went away from his
father’s palace in the great city, and chose to
live quite alone in an old house in the country,
where nobody ever came, and where the Prince
ran no risk of hearing anything that was
unpleasant. For, in the great city, he was told
that there were people who were poor, and
hungry, and unhappy; and that was more than
such a very soft hearted Prince could be
expected to endure. For all that, he did not
find life a very amusing thing, when it was
passed entirely alone in an old house, sur-
rounded by a moat; for there was no one to
talk to, except the fish in the moat; and con-
versation with a fish, especially when it is
168 THE SOFT HEARTED PRINCE

nearly always the same fish, is apt to become
monotonous. But still, even that was better
than staying in the great city, and being irri-
tated by other people’s troubles.

One day, when he was walking in his garden,
wondering when the world would be a suffi-
ciently happy place for him to return to it, he
suddenly came face to face with a girl, who
was sitting on the opposite side of the moat,
feeding the fish with bread-crumbs. Such a
thing as that was most preposterous, for the
Prince had given orders that no one should be
allowed to come within several miles of his
house; so he immediately became very angry,
and frowned fiercely at the girl, on the opposite
side of the moat. But there she sat, dangling
her feet in the water, and went on feeding the
fish with bread-crumbs.

“Who said you might come here?” said the
Prince, in a stern voice.

“ Nobody,” she replied, with a smile. “I
just came.” a,

“Do you know that this is my garden, and
that I never allow anybody to come here?”
said the Prince, not quite so sternly as before.
It was impossible to be very angry, even with
a beggar-girl whose clothes were ragged, when
she had such a wonderful smile as that.
THE SOFT HEARTED PRINCE | 169

“No,” she replied, shaking her head. “I
never even heard of you before. But it doesn’t
matter, does it?”

“Of course it matters,” said the Prince.
“ And you must go away at once.”

The girl stopped feeding the fish with bread-
crumbs, and got up from the ground, very
slowly.

“Why must I go away?” she asked.

“Because you might cry, or do something to
make me feel sad. And I cannot endure to
be made sad. It annoys me,” said the Prince,
irritably. .

“How funny,” she said, smiling again. “Is
that why you live all alone, in this horribly dull
old place ?”

“Tam not at all dull,” exclaimed the Prince.

“Oh,” said the girl, “I thought you were.”
And with that she walked away.

“Stop!” cried the Prince. “I want you to
come back.”

“JT would rather not, thank you,” said the
girl, and she walked a little faster.

“Why not?” he asked, in surprise.

“Because you make me feel sad,” she replied,
and this time she disappeared among the trees.

“What a ridiculous notion!” exclaimed the
Prince. “Why, I am the only happy man in
170 THE SOFT HEARTED PRINCE

the whole world. But, of course, it does not
matter what such a very ill-bred person as that
chooses to say ; and I am really quite glad
she has gone.”

All the same, it was rather earlier than usual
when he came out into his garden, the next
morning. And there sat the girl, on the
opposite side of the moat, jeoaing the fish
with bread-crumbs.

“Oh,” he exclaimed, without stopping to
think, which is an extraordinary thing for a
Prince to do; “I am so very glad you have
come back.”

“JT knew you would be,” she said, smiling.
“So I came. Besides, I ‘wanted to ask you
something. Are youa ‘poet? ¢

“No, I am not a poet,” replied the Prince,
rather indignantly. He would have liked to
explain to her that he was a Prince of the
royal blood, which was ever so much more
important than being a poet; but he felt
that perhaps she would not understand the
difference.

“T’m sorry you’re not a poet,” she said. “T
thought you must be, because you are so sorry
for the poor people who live in the city. And
poets are always sorry for the poor people,
aren’t they ?”
THE SOFT HEARTED PRINCE 171

“How do you know so much about poets,
a child like you?” asked the Prince, who had
never had much to do with poets himself.

“ Ah,” she laughed. “I come from the great
city, you see.”

And she ran away, before he could stop her.

That day seemed even longer than the one
before. But the next morning came at last,
and the Prince hastened out into his garden,
while the grass was still grey with the dew.
And there sat the girl on the opposite side
of the moat, feeding the fish with bread-
crumbs.

“Well, child,” he said. “Have you dis-
covered who I am, yet ?”

“T have been thinking,” she replied, with her
wonderful smile. “And I am quite sure you
must be a wise man, because you live all by
yourself, and try to think what you can do
for the poor people in the city. Are you a
wise man?”

The Prince hesitated. He could not quite
make up his mind to contradict her.

“How do you know so much about wise
men?” he asked. “Are there so many in
your great city?”

“There are none over there at all,’ she
laughed. “So I thought you must be a wise
172 THE SOFT HEARTED PRINCE

man, because you live by yourself. I have
been looking all my life for a wise man.”

“T am not a wise man,” said the Prince,
faintly. But she had already disappeared
among the trees, and he was left to get through
another day by himself.

The next morning, he was out in his garden
so early, that he had to wait some time before
she came strolling through the trees towards
him. ‘This time, he pretended he had not ex-
pected to see her at all. .

“Oh, there you are,” he said. “Have you
thought of another name for me?”

“T have been thinking,” she replied, with her
wonderful smile. “And I should like to come
across the water and tell you what I have been
thinking about.”

And the Prince quite forgot that her clothes
were ragged, and that she might at any moment
say something to make him feel sad, and he
held out both his hands to her, as she stepped
into the water and came over to the bank where
he stood waiting. Then the Prince bent down.
and lifted her up, until she stood beside him on
the dewy grass.

“Well,” said the Prince; “if I am not a poet,
or a wise man, what am I] ?”

“You are a poet,” she replied; “and a wise
THE SOFT HEARTED PRINCE 173

man, too. But I think you are something else
as well. You are very lonely, and you are
tired of staying here all by yourself, thinking
what you can do for the poor people, who live
in the city over there. So I have come to see
if I can help you.”

“You?” said the Prince. “What can you
do? You are only a child.” He did not tell
her that his greatest desire was to forget all
about the poor people, who lived in the great
city.

eee I can think of something,” said
the girl. “I come from the poor people my-
self, you see. Besides, you are lonely, and I
am sorry for you. / have never been lonely
in my whole life.”

The Prince had never felt less lonely than
he did at that moment; but after all, the pity
of a beggar-girl is just as good as the pity
of a princess, and he accepted hers with a
royal smile.

“Don’t you want to know who I really
am?” he asked her. He was longing to tell
her that the very best royal blood ran in his
veins. But the girl only smiled.

“It doesn’t matter to me,” she said. “ Be-
sides, you don’t know who I am, yet. Do
you?”
174 THE SOFT HEARTED PRINCE

The Prince did not like to point out to her,
that that was not at all the same thing; so
he asked her in his most princely manner to
be kind enough to tell him who she was.

“They call me Jolly in the street where I
live,” laughed the beggar-girl. “That is be-
cause I am always laughing. Do you think
it is a nice name?”

The Prince thought it was a dreadfully ugly
name, even for a beggar-girl, but he was too
polite to tell her so.

“T do not believe you live in a street at all,”
he said. “I believe you are some great prin-
cess in disguise.” ,

He hoped very much that she was; but
Jolly only smiled again.

“A princess? What is that?” she asked.
“Ts it the same thing as a wise woman ?”

“Not always,’ said the Prince, and he
changed the subject. Then they sat in the gar-
den and talked all day long, until the cedar-
trees cast long shadows across the water in
the moat, and Jolly jumped up and said she
must go home.

“Let us go together,” said the Prince. “I
am going home too.” The beggar-girl looked
doubtful.

“But if you go back to the great city,” she
THE SOFT HEARTED PRINCE 175

said, “ you will not be able to think of some-
thing to do for the poor people.”

“T have forgotten what the poor people are
like,” said the Prince. “I am going back to
my own home, to learn all about them.”

“Is your home in one of the dark streets
where | live?” asked Jolly. ,

“T think not,” answered the Prince, proudly.
He was thinking how pleasant it would be to
lead her up to his own beautiful palace, and to
tell her that everything, as far as she could see,
would belong to him some day, when the old
king died. But when he tried to walk across
the moat with her, he was held back by in-
visible hands, and his feet were fixed to the
ground, so that he could not take a single
step forward.

“Tt is no use,” he said, sadly. “I have been
here so long that the fairies will not let me go,
now. You must go without me—Jolly.”

“But I shall come back to-morrow,” she
said, and she ran away through the trees.
Now, when the Prince had gone indoors, she
crept back in the moonlight, and knelt down
by the side of the moat, and she put her hand
into the water. :

“ Fishes, fishes, are you there?” she asked,
softly.
176 THE SOFT HEARTED PRINCE

“Yes, yes, we are here,” answered the fish,
which was quite unnecessary on their part, for
‘they had never been anywhere else in their
lives.

“Dear fishes, I want you to help me,” she
said to them. “The fairies have shut the
Prince up in this horribly dull old place, just
because he is sorry for the poor people over
there, in the city; and now, they will not let
him come out again.”

“Nonsense,” said the fish, who were not
fond of the Prince, because they found his
conversation so dull. “He shut himself up,
because he did not want to be bothered; and
it serves him right.”

“ Ah,” said Jolly, “you say that, because you
don’t know how good the Prince is. And you
must own it becomes a little dull, after a time,
to live in a house surrounded by a moat.”

“It is a very nice moat,” said the fish, in-
dignantly, for fish are always local in their
sympathies, and they felt obliged to support
the only spot in the world that was known to
them. “And we think the Prince had much
better stop where he is.”

On hearing this, the beggar-girl’s eyes began
to fill with tears, for she had really thought
that the fish would be willing to help her.
THE SOFT HEARTED PRINCE 1977

“Tow shall I ever get to Fairyland, and ask
the Queen to set the Prince free?” she sobbed ;
and the fish splashed about in great agitation,
for much as they liked plenty of water them-
selves, it always upset them very much to see
anybody cry.

“Tf you will bring us back some of the
yellow poppies that grow in Fairyland, and
sprinkle us with their gold dust, so that we
may be gold-fish for the rest of our days, we
will tell you how to get there,” they said in
a chorus.

“Dear fishes, I will bring back as. many
yellow poppies as I can carry,” cried Jolly.
“ Only tell me how to get to Fairyland.”

“ Nothing could be easier,” they said. “ First,
you must kiss some one who is dear to you.”

“Oh dear,” sighed Jolly, “that is not very
easy.”

“Tt is not so difficult as it sounds,” said the
fish. “Then, you must bid farewell to some
one who is dear to you.”

“T think I could do that,” said Jolly.

“Tt is more difficult than you think,” said
the fish. “And, thirdly, you must be quite
sure you are the happiest person in the whole
world. Then, you will find yourself in Fairy-
land. And all this you must do in the early

12
178 THE SOFT HEARTED PRINCE

morning, before the grass grows green, and
the cedar trees are shadowless.”

When the Prince came out into his garden
at sunrise, there sat the beggar maid on the
opposite side of the moat, with her feet dangling
in the water. But she was not feeding the fish
with bread-crumbs as usual, for she was much
too occupied with her own troubles to give a
thought to them.

“Why, Jolly,” said the Prince; “what is the
matter with you?” ;

“T have found out the way to get to Fairy-
land,” said Jolly sadly; “but it is so difficult,
that I do not think I shall ever get there, and
then you will never be set free. Oh dear, oh
dear!”

“Come over here, and tell me all about it,”
said the Prince. “Very likely, I shall be able
to help you.”

“Oh no,” said Jolly. “I am quite sure you
will not be able to help me.” However, she
came across the water to him, and he lifted her
up again, until she stood beside him on the
grass that was still grey with the dew. Only,
this time, the Prince kept hold of her two
hands. .

“Now,” said the Prince,“ what must you
do to get to Fairyland ?”
THE SOFT HEARTED PRINCE 179

“First,” said Jolly, as though she were say-
ing a lesson, “I have got to kiss some one who
is dear to me. But I’m sure I don’t know
wliom to kiss !”

“T do,” said the Prince, and he promptly
« kissed her round, sunburnt cheek.

“Oh,” said Jolly; “I never thought of that!”
And without thinking any more about it, she
stood on tiptoe and kissed the Prince’s chin,
which was the only place on his face she could
possibly reach.

“T do believe,” said Jolly, with her wonderful
smile, “ that I have done the first thing I had to
do! Perhaps I shall get to Fairyland after all.”

“Ts not this Fairyland?” murmured the
Prince, who was still holding her two hands.

“Oh no,” Jolly explained. “I have always
heard it is quite a different place. And,
secondly, I have to bid farewell to some one
who is dear to me. But I don’t want to!”

“We needn't begin yet,” said the Prince, con-
solingly. And so they talked about something
else instead; and they talked, and talked, and
talked, while the sun rose higher, and the grass
grew greener, and the shadows of the cedar
trees grew less; and there is no doubt that
Jolly would never have got to Fairyland at all,
had not the fishes made a great splashing in
18 THE SOFT HEARTED PRINCE

the moat, just before noon, so that they both
looked up and discovered how late it was.

“TI must go at once,” cried Jolly. “Oh, I
do wish it was easier to say good-bye.” .

“All the same,” said the Prince, “I feel
much happier than when I came out into the
garden at sunrise.”

And as for Jolly, she clasped her hands
tightly together, and laughed out loud, as only
Jolly could laugh. .

“T am perfectly positive,” she said, “that
there couldn’t be any one in the whole world,
who is happier than I am.”

And as she said the words, a warm wind
swept over the ground, and the grass and the
moat and the cedar trees began to melt into
the sky, and she found herself in the middle
of a gorgeous plain, covered entirely with rich
yellow poppies, such poppies as she had never
seen before, for they were all full of the finest
gold dust, and they glittered as they shivered
in the breeze.

“Tam in Fairyland,” said Jolly, breathlessly.
Then she looked down at her ragged clothes,
and sighed. “I am not fit to come before
the Queen,” she said.

But she fell to picking the yellow poppies
as fast as she could, in case she should be
THE SOFT HEARTED PRINCE 181

blown away from Fairyland as suddenly as
she had been brought there, and would not,
therefore, be able to keep her promise to the
fishes. And as she was picking them, she
heard some one calling her name, and she
looked up and saw a tall woman standing
among the poppies, a little way off. She was
all dressed in yellow, just like the poppies
that were growing up around her, and she
had wonderful black hair, and black eyes, and
black eyebrows.

“Oh, I am so glad to see you,” said Jolly,
without any shyness at all. “And will you
please tell me the nearest way to the Fairy
Queen ?”

“The nearest way is the shortest way, and
that takes no time at all,” said the strange
lady, coming towards her. “And what do you
want with the Fairy Queen?”

“TI want to ask her something,” replied
Jolly. “But, alas! I am not fit to appear
before her in these clothes.”

“But what is the matter with your clothes,
now?” asked the strange lady. And Jolly
looked down, and saw that she was covered
from head to foot with poppy gold, so that
she shone almost as brightly as the strange
lady.
182 THE SOFT HEARTED PRINCE

“And what will you say to the Fairy Queen
when you see her?”

“That will not be difficult,” said Jolly.
“JT shall say, ‘Please, your Majesty, will you
please take away the spell from the Prince,
and please, may I go back to him at once?’
That is what I shall say to the Queen!”

“But, supposing the Queen will not think
the Prince is good enough to be set free?”
objected the strange lady.

“Oh, but I shall tell her how good and
wise and wonderful the Prince is; and then
of course, she will let him go,” said Jolly,
confidently.

“ And supposing the Queen will not let you
go back too, what then?” asked the strange
lady.

2 Oh, but I shall tell her how much I want
to go, and then of course she will let me,”
said Jolly, as confidently as before. “Don’t
you think she will?”

“Well,” said the strange lady, “I should
not be surprised if she did.” And the words
were hardly out of her mouth, before Jolly
again found herself sitting on the opposite
side of the moat, with her feet dangling in
the water, and her arms full of yellow poppies.
And there was the Prince in his garden,
THE SOFT HEARTED PRINCE 183

digging away so busily that he never saw
her at all.

“What can have happened to make him
work so hard all at once?” thought Jolly.
Then she noticed that all the flowers in the
trim round beds spelt “Jolly,” and all the
tops of the shrubs were cut into “Jolly,” and
all the white pebbles along the gravel paths
made “Jolly.” Wherever she looked, she
saw her name; and there stood the Prince,
labouring away like any ordinary gardener,
. try and make his garden renend him of

er.

“Prince, Prince, I have come back!” cried
Jolly, joyfully. “Won’t you come across and
meet me?”

And the Prince threw down his spade with
a shout, and came over the water with one
jump, and met Jolly on the other side of the
moat.

“Now we shall be able to go back to the
great city,” said Jolly. But the fish made a
great splashing at that moment, and she
remembered what they had asked her to do,
and picked up her bundle of yellow poppies,
and shook them over the water, until every
one of the fish had turned bright gold.

“There have never been such large gold-
184 THE SOFT HEARTED PRINCE

fish in the world before,” exclaimed the Prince.
“And what was the Fairy Queen like ?”

“T never saw her at all,” said Jolly. And
the fish laughed. But, of course, that may
have been because they were so proud of being
the largest gold fish in the world.

Then the Prince and the beggar-girl went
back to the great city, hand in hand.

“We will go to my home first,’ said the
Prince, as they walked through the gates.

“T have never been in this part of the city
before,” said Jolly, as she looked round at the
tall houses, and the clean streets, and the richly
dressed people. Her own clothes had become
dull and ragged again, since she came back
from Fairyland. Nobody took any notice of
the Prince; but, of course, that was only to
be expected. One must have soldiers, or flags,
or something like that, to distinguish a Prince
from every one else.

“This is my home,” said the Prince, proudly,
when he arrived in front of the King’s palace.
But no one answered him; and when he looked
round, the beggar-girl was gone. The Prince
smiled.

“She is not used to such splendour,” he said.
“When I have made myself known, it will be
time enough to send for her.”
THE SOFT HEARTED PRINCE 185

“Who are you? Stand back,” said. the
guards, who remained in front of the palace
all day, and longed for an opportunity to
assert themselves.

“Tam your Prince. Let me pass,” said the
Prince, haughtily.

“That is a good joke,” laughed the guards,
who were thoroughly enjoying the fun after
being idle for so long. “We have no Prince,
now; he went away a long time ago, and no
one has heard of him since. Stand back, or
we shallreally be obliged to take you before the
King, and it will probably end in an execution.”

“But I want to be taken before the King,”
exclaimed the Prince, who was beginning to
feel annoyed. But, at that moment, the King
himself came down the steps of the palace,
attended by the Prime Minister, and the Lord
Mayor, and everybody else who had nothing
whatever to do with himself.

“What is all this fuss about?” asked the
King, in an interested voice. “Has something
actually happened at last?”

“We shall have to make a new law to put
a stop to it,’ said the Prime Minister, looking
eagerly over the King’s shoulder. “Really,
it may be almost worth while to summon a
Parliament.”
186 THE SOFT HEARTED PRINCE

“Let us send for the militia,’ added the
Lord Mayor, looking eagerly over the Prime
Minister’s shoulder. “It will make quite a
change from being perpetually drilled.”

But the Prince forced his way in front of
the guards, and held out his hands appealingly
to the King.

“Surely, you must remember me,” he said.
“IT am your son, and I have come home
again.”

“Tt will certainly end in an execution,” said
the guards, who were beginning to tremble for
their own heads.

The King put on his spectacles, and stared
over them at the Prince.

“There is certainly a slight resemblance,”
he said, doubtfully. “But why did they say
you were dead? These reports are most dis-
quieting, and the matter must be looked into,
at once.”

“Oh no, your Majesty,’ said the Prime
Minister, who was answerable for the reports,
and had been promised the crown on the
King’s death. “This is some gross impostor,
who wishes to take advantage of your extreme
good nature. Your son’s eyebrows were of a
different colour.”

“ Quite so,” added the Lord Mayor, who was
THE SOFT HEARTED PRINCE § 187

afraid of the Prime Minister. “He must be a
gross impostor.”

“He is certainly a gross impostor,’ echoed
the guards, who were afraid of everybody
present, except the King and the Prince; “for
he was walking with some poor beggar-girl from
the other part of the town.”

Of course, that settled the matter at once,
and the Prince found himself hustled out of
the palace gates, and driven away through the
wide streets and the beautiful squares, until he
came to a part of the city where he had never
been before.

“Dear me,’ exclaimed the Prince, looking
round him. ‘What a very extraordinary
place! And how picturesque! ”

“JT knew you would come for me,” said a
familiar voice beside him. “That is why I
left you at the palace. Why did you not tell
me you were a Prince ?”

And there was little Jolly, staring up at his
face, and smiling her wonderful smile.

“Do not consider me a Prince,” he replied,
hastily. “They do not want me at the palace,
and I am never going there any more. I like
this street ever so much better. But tell me
the name of this curious flower that grows
between the paving-stones ?”
188 THE SOFT HEARTED PRINCE

“That,” said Jolly, “is orange peel. Now,
you shall come and see wy people.” And she
led him down the darkest and narrowest street
of all; and when the people saw her, they came
flocking out of the houses, and the children ran
to meet her, and the air resounded with her
name.

“But who is this stranger?” they asked,
when they had welcomed her back.

“This is a Prince, and he has come to live
here too,” she said, very proudly indeed. But
the people looked bewildered. |

“A Prince! What is a Prince?” they
asked. “We have never heard of such a
thing.”

“A Prince is a wise man who loves the
poor people,” explained Jolly. “And he
spends all his life in trying to think what he
can do for the poor people, to make them
happier.”

“Why, then, has he not done it before?”
they asked. And the Prince felt uncomfort-
able.

“Because he hasn't thought of anything
yet,” said Jolly. “Perhaps, when he has been
here a little while, he will be able to think of
something.” -

But the people shook their heads.
THE SOFT HEARTED PRINCE 189

“You shall stay with us, Jolly,” they said,
“and cheer us up, and make us feel young,
as you did before. But we don’t want any
Princes.”

“T am not wanted anywhere,” sighed the
Prince. “I will go back to my lonely house
in the country, and you shall stay with your
own people.” .

But he knew quite well that she would not
let him do that. And no more she did.

“I am coming too,” she said. “And we
will both think of something to do, that shall
make the poor people happier.”

So they had a wedding, there and then, in
the little narrow street where Jolly lived. And
it was the funniest royal wedding that ever
happened in a fairy tale. There was as much
ginger-beer as any one could drink, and the
Prince kissed every child in the place, and the
street grew orange peel for the next six
weeks. And at the end of it all, the bride and
bridegroom walked back, under the stars, to the
old house that was surrounded by a moat.

“We have been expecting you,” said the
fish, with a great deal of splashing. “We
could not tolerate anything but royalty about
the place, now that we are the largest gold-fish
in the world.”
190 THE SOFT HEARTED PRINCE

So there the Prince and Jolly took up their
abode. And there they are still, in the house
surrounded by a moat, where the cedar trees
cast shadows across the water, and the largest
gold-fish in the world condescend to eat bread-
crumbs.

And they are still trying to think of some-
thing, that shall make the poor people happier.

THE END.
“Wymps” and “In a Sea-Green Country” have appeared in
farper’s Round Table.
A

List of Books |

IN

BELLES LETTRES



JOHN LANE: THE BODLEY HEAD
140 FIFTH AVENUE.
New York
1896
A

List of Books in Belles Lettres



ALLEN (GRANT).
Tur Lower SLopEs. With a Titlepage by J. Intine-
wortH Kay. Crown 8vo. $1.50.

That Mr. Allen is a poet, quite individual, if limited, these ex-
cursions leave no manner of doubt. — Bookman (London).

The power of passionate and pointed utterance displayed in
this little volume ought certainly not to be allowed to run to
waste. — Westininster Gazette (London).

ATHERTON (GERTRUDE).
PATIENCE SPARHAWK AND HER TimMES. A Novel.
Crown 8vo. $1.50. [Zn preparation.
BELCHING (REV. H. C.).
- Sp, AUGUSTINE AT Ostia: Oxford Sacred Poem.
Crown 8vo, wrappers. 50 cents.

The work of a man of genuine poetic feeling and of erudition
besides, who has known how to give a gracefully imaginative ren-
dering to that struggle between. conflicting ideas and faiths of
which St, Augustine was the outcome. — Teves (London).

BENNETT (E. A.).
A Man rrom ‘tux Nortu. A Novel. Crown 8vo.
Pr.25. [Lu preparation,
BENSON (ARTHUR CHRISTOPHER).
LorD VYET AND OTHER PorMs. Feap. 8vo. $1.25.
BROTHERTON (MARY).
RosEMARY FOR REMEMBRANCE. With Titlepage and

Cover Design by WALTER West. Feap. 8vo.
$1.25.

A rarely beautiful little volume of verse. Suggests the work of
one or two very famous women poets. — Realm (London).

BROWN (VINCENT).
Two In Captivity. A Novel. 16mo._ 75 cents.

[Ln preparation.
4 BOOKS IN BELLES LETTRES



CHAPMAN (ELIZABETH RACHEL).
MARRIAGE QUESTIONS IN MODERN Fiction, Crown
8vo. $1.50. [ie preparation.

CHARLES (JOSEPH F)).
Tue DuKE oF LinpEN. A Novel. Crown 8vo. $1.25.
[Lz preparation.
CRACKANTHORPE (HUBERT).
VIGNETTES: a Miniature Journal of Whim and Sen-
timent. Feap. 8vo. Boards. $1.00.

CRANE (WALTER).
Toy Booxs. A Re-issue. Each with new Cover
Designs and end papers. 25 cents each.
I. Mother Hubbard.
II. The Three Bears.
III. The Absurd A BC.
The group of three bound in one volume, with a deco-
rative cloth cover, end papers, and a newly written
and designed Titlepage and Preface. 4to. $1.25.

CROSKEY (JULIAN).
Max. A Novel. Crown 8vo. $1.50.

[Zu preparation.
CUSTANCE (OLIVE).
Love’s First Fruirs. Poems. Fcap. 8vo, $1.25.

[/2 preparation.
DAVIDSON (JOHN).
New Batiaps. With a Titlepage and Cover Design
by WaLKER West. Fcap. 8vo. $1.50.

BALLADS AND Sones. With a Titlepage and Cover
Design by WALTER WEST. Feap. 8vo. $1.50.
[Fourth edition.

We must acknowledge that Mr. Davidson’s work in this volume
displays great power... + There is strength and to spare. —
Times (London). .

Mr. Davidson’s new book is the best he has done, and to say
this, is a good deal. Here, at all events, is a poet who is never tame
or dull; who, at all events, never leaves us indifferent, His verse
speaks to the blood, and there are times when “ the thing becomes
a trumpet.’ — Saturday Review (London),

A Ranpom ITINERARY AND A BALLAD. With a
Frontispiece and Titlepage by LAURENCE Hous-
MAN. Feap. 8vo. $1.50.

One part of “A Random Itinerary” should not be praised above
the others... .. The whole volume is of wholesome flavour, and
is beautiful withal. — Literary Worid (London).
PUBLISHED BY JOHN LANE 5



DAVIDSON (JOHN), continued.

Prays: An Unhistorical Pastoral; A Romantic Farce;
Bruce, a Chronicle Play; Smith, a Tragic Farce;
Scaramouch in Naxos, a Pantomime. Witha Fron-
tispiece and Cover Design by AUBREY BEARDSLEY.
soo copies. Small 4to. $2.50.

The best play in the present volume is entitled “Smith, a
Tragic Farce.’ The motive is as modern as Ibsen, the method is

as ancient as Shakespeare; and yet, in spite of this incongruity,
the play must be pronounced a fine one. — Liverpool Daily Post.

A notable volume, .... “The ‘ Unhistorical Pastoral isa
charming conception, delicately wrought. — Saturday Review
(London). .

DAWSON (A. J.).
MIDDLE GREYNESS. A Novel. Crown Svo, $1.50.
[Ln preparation,

‘EGERTON (GEORGE).
SyMPHONIES. Crown 8vo. $1.00. [lz preparation.

EGLINTON (JOHN).
Two Essays ON THE REMNANT. Post 8vo, wrappers.
50 cents. [Second edition.
The appreciation of Wordsworth and the caustic criticism of

Goethe are particularly delightful, and from first to last the book
is simply a work of genius. — Pad? Mall Budget (London).

FEA (ALLAN).
Tue Fuicur or THE Kine. A full, true, and_par-
ticular Account of the Escape of His Most
Sacred Majesty King Charles II., after the Battle
of Worcester. With twelve Portraits in Photo-
gravure, and nearly 100 other Illustrations. Demy
8vo. $7. 50.

FIFTH (GEORGE). :
THE Martyr’s Brie, A Novel. Crown8vo. $1.50.
[Ln preparation.
FLETCHER (J. 8.).
Gop’s FAILuRES. Feap. 8vo. $1.25.
BALLADS OF REVOLT. Fcap. 8vo. $1.00.

FLOWERDEW (HERBERT).
A CELIBATE’S WIFE. A Novel. Crown 8vo. $1.50.
[La preparation.
6 BOOKS IN BELLES LETTRES



GARNETT (RICHARD).
Poems. With Titlepage by J. ILLINGcworTH Kay.
Crown 8vo. $1.50.
A book of high poetic merit and charm. — Acadenty (London).

DANTE, PETRARCH, CAMOENS, cxxiv Sonnets rendered
in English. With Titlepage and Cover Design by
PATTEN WILSON. Crown 8vo. $1.50.

Dr. Garnett once more shows his versatility and his gift of fine
workmanship in verse by this book. — Temes (London).

Quite apart from their value as translations, Dr, Garnett’s
sonnets, Petrarchan in form but saturated with the Shakespearian
spirit, form a notable contribution to the treasury of English poetic
literature. — Graphic (London),

GRIMSHAWE (BEATRICE).
Broken Away. A Novel. Crown 80. $1.25.
[ln preparation.
HAVES (ALFRED).
THE VALE OF ARDEN AND OTHER POEMS. With
a Titlepage and Cover designed by E. H. New.
Feap. 8vo. $1.25. .

Mr. Hayes is a refined writer of unpretentious verse, and his
contented mood is sufficiently rare in modern poetry to make his
volume notable. — Daily Chronicle (London).

This little volume contains very beautiful workmanship. _ It is
especially beautiful in the piece which gives its title to the volume.
— Daily News (London).

JAMES (W. P.).
RoMANTIC Proressions: A Volume of Essays.
With Titlepage designed by J. ILLINGwoRTH
Kay. Crown 8vo. $1.50.

These essays are chiefly remarkable for the charm of their style

and their wealth of illustration, The author’s knowledge of fiction

of all kinds, and his critica] insight into the merits and demerits of
writers of fiction, are considerable. — Morning Post (London.)

JOHNSTONE (C. E.).
BALLADS oF Boy AND BEAK. With a Titlepage by
F, H. TownsenD. Square 32mo. 75 cents.

It is impossible to do other than covet the juvenile spirit of a
grown-up poet who lingers so lovingly over the experiences of desk
and playground, and whose every written page only lacks the inky
smudge of the schoolboy-hand to make it perfect. — Dundee
A advertiser.

LANDER (HARRY).
WEIGHED IN THE BALANCE. A Novel. Crown 8vo.
$1.50.
PUBLISHED BY JOHN LANE 7



LEFROY (EDWARD CRACROFT).
Porms. With a Memoir by W. A. GILL, and a reprint
of J. A. Symonp’s Critical Essay on ECHOES
FROM THEOCRITUS. Crown 8vo. $1.50.

LE GALLIENNE (RICHARD).
THE QUEST OF THE GOLDEN GIRL. With a Cover
designed by WiLL H. Brapizy. Crown 8vo.

$1.50.
EnciisH Porms. Revised. Crown 8vo. Purple
cloth. $1.50. [Fourth edition.

In “English Poems” rhyme, rhythm, and diction are worthy of
a writer of ability and high ambition. —A theneeum (Loudon).

There is plenty of accomplishment, there is abundance of tuneful
notes, sentiment often very pleasing, delicacy, grace... . . The
best thing in the book to one’s own taste is the last half of * Sunset
in the City.” ‘Paolo and Francesca’’ is very clever. — Mr.
Anprew Lana, ix New Review (London).

Roserr Louis STEVENSON: An Elegy. And other
Poems, mainly Personal. Crown Svo. $1.50.

Few, indeed, could be more fit to sing the dirge of the ‘Virgil
of prose”? than the poet whose curdosa _felicitas is so close akin to
Stevenson’s own charm. — Daily Chronicle (London).

LOCKE (W. J.).
Dereticrs. A Novel. Crown 8vo. $1.50.

LOWRY (H. D.).
MAKE BELIEVE. Illustrated by CHARLES ROBINSON.
Crown 8vo, $1.50.
Tue Happy Exiin.- With etched Illustrations by
E. Pur Pimiorr. (Arcady Library.) Crown
8vo. $I.50.

MARZIALS (THEO.).
Tur GALLERY OF PIGEONS AND OTHER POEMS.
Post 8vo. $1.50.

Endless combinations of wonderfully vivid perceptions, and the
picturesque inventions of a joyous fancy. Picturesque and vivid
are only words — they are not definite enough to give a clear con-
ception of the peculiar quality or the peculiar limits of the pleasure
to be found in it. — Acadenzy (Londoz).

MEREDITH (GEORGE).
THE FIRST PUBLISHED PORTRAIT OF THIS AUTHOR.
Engraved on the wood by W. BiscomBE GARD-
NER, after the painting by G. F. Warts. Proof
copies on Japanese vellum, signed by Painter and
Engraver. $7.50.
8 BOOKS IN BELLES LETTRES

MEYVNELL (ALICE).
THE CHILDREN. Feap. 8vo. $1.25.

This is the first book printed at the Wayside Press, by
Will H. Bradley.

Poems. Feap. 8vo. $1.25, [Third edition,

To the metrical themes attempted by her she brings emotion,
sincerity, together with an exquisite play upon our finer chords
quite her own, not to be heard from another. Some of her lines
have the living tremor in them. The poems are beautiful in idea
as in grace of touch. — Mr. Gzorce MEREDITH, iz The National
Review, August, 1896.

She. sings with a very human sincerity, a singular religious
intensity — rare, illusive, curiously perfumed verse, so_ simple
always, yet so subtle in its simplicity. — 4 ¢theneum (London).

THE RHYTHM OF LIFE AND OTHER Essays. Fcap.
8vo, $1.25. [ Third edition.

Full of profound, searching, sensitive appreciation of all kinds
of subjects. Exercises in close thinking and exact expression,
almost unique in the literature of the day. —A thena@um (London).

I am about to direct attention to one of the very rarest products
of nature and grace, —a woman of genius, one who I am bound to
confess has falsified the assertion I made some time ago that no
female writer of our time has attained to true “distinction.” ... .
Mrs. Meynell has shown an amount of perceptive reason and
ability to discern self-evident things as yet undiscerned, a reticence,
fulness, and effectiveness of expression which place her in the
very front rank of living writers in prose. At least half of the
volume is classical work, embodying as it does new thought in
perfect language, and bearing in every sentence the hall-mark of
genius, namely, the marriage of masculine force of insight with
feminine grace and tact of expression. — Mr, Coventry Patmorg,
tn Fortnightly Review.

THE COLOUR OF LIFE AND OTHER Essays. Fcap.
8vo. $1.25. [Third edition.

Mrs. Meynell’s papers are little sermons, ideal sermons, — let no
one uninstructed by them take fright at the title, — they are not
preachments ; they are of the sermon’s right length, about as long
as the passage of a cathedral chant in the ear, and keeping
thoughout to the plain step of daily speech, they leave a sense of
stilled singing in the mind they fill. ‘The writing is limpid in its
depths. She must bea diligent reader of the Saintly Lives. Her
manner presents to me the image of one accustomed to walk in holy
places and keep the eye of a fresh mind on our tangled world,
happier in observing than in speaking. And I can fancy Matthew
Arnold lighting on such Essays as I have named, saying with
refreshment, “She can write!” It does not seem to me too bold
to imagine Carlyle listening, without the weariful gesture, to his
wife’s reading of the same, hearing them to the end, and giving
his comment, ‘‘ That woman thinks.” — Mr. GEorGE MEREDITH,
in The National Review, August, 1896.
PUBLISHED BY JOHN LANE 9



MAKOWER (STANLEY V.).
Crecitia. A Novel. Crown 8vo. $1.25,

OPPENHEIM (MICHAEL).

A History OF THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE ROYAL
Navy, and of Merchant Shipping in the relation
to the Navy from MDIX. to MDCLX., with an
Introduction treating of the earlier period. Plates.
Demy 8vo. $7.50.

MILMAN (HELEN). .

In THE GARDEN OF PEACE. With Illustrations by
Epmunp H. New. (Arcady Library.) Crown
8vo. $1.50. [Le preparation.

ROBERTSON (JOHN M.).

EssaAyS TOWARDS A CRITICAL METHOD. (New
Series.) Crown 8vo. $1.50. [in preparation,

ST. CYRES (LORD).

Tue Lrrrt—E FLowers or St. Francis. A_ new
rendering into English of the Fioretti di San Fran-
cesco. Crown 8vo. $1.50. [ln preparation.

SEAMAN (OWEN).

Tue BATTLE OF THE Bays. With Titlepage and
Cover Design by PaTren WILSon. Fcap. 8vo.
$1.25.

SETOUN (GABRIEL).

Tur CHILD WorLD: Poems. IIustrated by CHARLES

Roginson. Crown 8vo, gilt top. 1.50.
SHARP (EVELYN).

Wymprs: Fairy Tales. With 8 Coloured Illustrations
and Decorative Cover by MABEL DEARMER.
4to. $1.75.

SHARP (LOUISA).

Porms. With a Memoir by FREDERICK HARRISON.

Fcap. 8vo. $1.50. [Zn preparation.

STEVENSON (ROBERT LOUIS).

Prince Otro. A Rendering in French by EGERTON
CasTLE. Crown 8vo. With Frontispiece, Title-
page, and Cover Design by D. ¥Y. CAMERON. $2.50.

Also 50 copies on large paper, uniform in size with the
Edinburgh Edition of the works. $7.50.

Mr. Egerton Castle’s excellent translation of Stevenson’s “ Prince
Io BOOKS IN BELLES LETTRES



STEVENSON (ROBERT LOUIS), continued.
Otto’? will undoubtedly bring many new readers to the book. Is
beautifully printed. — Morning Post (London).
To say that the French is worthy of the English isto pay it a
compliment which is fully deserved. — Yorkshire Herald.
Mr. Castle’s French is perfect, and he preserves in his translation
all the virility of the author. — Pall Mall Gazette (London),
STREET (G. 8.)

THE WISE AND THE WAYWARD. A Novel. Crown
8vo. $1.50.
TENNYSON (FREDERICK).
PoEMS OF THE DAY AND YEAR. With a Titlepage
designed by PATTEN WiLson. Crown 8vo. $1.50.
His soul is satisfied with the contemplation of beautiful things,
and the utterance in flowing imagery of the emotions they excite

in him. Lovers of pure poetry will find much to satisfy them. —
Daily Chronicle (London).

He has no small share of the Tennysonian music, and in two
points at least he falls short of no writer of his generation, — in his
Jove of nature and in his belief in the dignity of the poet’s function.
—Times (London).

THIMM (CARL A.).

A COMPLETE BIBLIOGRAPHY OF FENCING AND DUEL-
LING, as Practiced by all European Nations from
the Middle Ages to the Present Day. With a
Classified Index, arranged Chronologically accord-
ing to Languages. Illustrated with numerous
Portraits of Ancient and Modern Masters of the
Art. Titlepages and Frontispieces of some of
the earliest works. Portrait of the Author by
WILSON STEER, and Titlepage designed by
PATTEN WILSON. 4to. $7.50.

THOMPSON (FRANCIS).

Poems. With Frontispiece, Titlepage, and Cover
Design by Laurence HovusMAn. Post 4to.
$1.50. [fourth edition.

T can hardly doubt that at least that minority who can recognise
the essentials under the accidents of poetry, and who feel that it is
to poetic Form only, and not to forms, that eternity belongs, will
agree that, alike in wealth and dignity of imagination, in depth
and subtlety of thought, and in magic and mastery of language,

a new poet of the first rank is to be welcomed in the author of this

volume. —Mr. H. D. Trai, 2a Nineteenth Century.

Profound thought and far-fetched splendour of imagery, and
nimble-witted discernment of those analogies which are the roots
of the poet’s language, abound. .... Qualities which ought to
place him, even should he do no more than he has done, in the
prominent ranks of fame, with Cowley and Crawshaw. — Mr.
Coventry Patmors, zz Fortnightly Review.
PUBLISHED BY JOHN LANE if



THOMPSON (FRANCIS), continued.

SISTER Soncs. An Offering to Two Sisters. With
Frontispiece, Titlepage, and Cover Design by
LAURENCE Housman. Post 4to. Buckram. $1.50.

Mr. Thompson is the only one of the young poets of the day
who peristently tempts one, page after page, to waive one’s critic
right, and contentedly to stand and admire. — Academy (London).

If any were uncertain, after the publication of Mr. ‘thompson’s

“Poems,” that a new Star was added to the galaxy, the splendid

succession of which has never failed in the English poetic firma-

ment, let them read “ Sister Songs” and be assured, — Sgeaker

(Loudon).

TRAILL (H. D,).

THe BARBAROUS BRITISHERS. A Tip-top Novel.
With Title and Cover Design by AUBREY
BEARDSLEY. Crown 8vo, wrapper. 50 cents.

Nothing funnier has been written.—Dazly Telegraph (London).

A cleverer or more genuinely mirth-provoking, and withal useful
parody, we have not read for many a long day. A very large cir-
culation may be predicted. — Sz. James's | Gazette (London).

TYNAN (KATHARINE HINKSON).
Cuckoo Sones. With Titlepage by LauRENCE
Housman. Fcap. 8vo. $1.25.

Enchantingly simple, innocent, and light, a book of aerial
music in delicate cadencies. — /Hustrated London News.

WALTON AND COTTON.

Tur CoMPLEAT ANGLER, a new Edition of. Edited
by Ricuarp LE GALLIENNE. Illustrated by
EpMUND H. New. 4to. $6.00.

It would have been difficult to have selected an artist to
illustrate this work more in sympathy with it than Mr, New is
proving himself to be. ‘This, edition shows every promise of
being one of the most desirable to possess of this quaint and ad-
mirable work. — Stzdto (London).

Copiously illustrated and exquisitely printed, it promises to be “
thing of beauty anda joy for ever” to book lovers who value alike
intrinsic ‘excellence and a fair exterior. — Publishers’ Circular
(Loudoz).

WATSON (H. B. MARRIOTT).
THE CAREER OF DELIA Hastincs. Crown 8vo.
$1.50. [Lu preparation.

WATT (FRANCIS).
Tue Laws LuMBER Room. Second series. Feap.
8vo. $1.25. [Zn preparation,
12 BOOKS IN BELLES LETTRES.



WHYTE (WALTER).
LESLIE WARDEN. A Novel. Crown 8vo. $1.50.
[f12 preparation.

THE YELLOW BOOK.
AN: ILLUSTRATED QUARTERLY. Small gto. $1.50
each volume.
Vol. I., of which Four Editions were issued, is
now out of print.
Vol. II. Third Edition. [A few copies remain,

The second volume is better than the first. — Dadly Chronicle
(Londoz).
7 A decided improvement on the first. — Daly Telegraph (Lon-
002)
Vol. III. Third Edition.
A considerable improvement on its predecessors. — Sfeaker
(London).

Vol. IV. Second Edition.

On the whole, the new “Yellow Book” has more that is attractive
and less that is repellant than any of its predecessors. — Globe
(Loudon).

Vol. V. Second Edition.

This ‘* Yellow Book’? has left its predecessors far behind ‘in gen-
eral interest. — Daily Chronicle (London).

Vol. VI. Second Edition.

None of the other five volumes have reached the mark of excel-
lence attained by the sixth. From all points of view the “‘ Vellow
Book” seems to improve quarterly. — Vanity Fair (London).

Vol. VII. Second Edition.

The new ‘Yellow Book’? need not fear the rivalry of any of its
predecessors. — Daily Chronicle (London).

Vol. VITI. Second Edition.

The eighth number is far the best that has yet appeared. — Sz.
Fanes’s Gazette (London).

Vol. IX. Second Edition.

This number of the ‘* Yellow Book”? is likely to be one of the
most popular. — Globe (London).

Vol. X. Second Edition,

A particularly strong number. — Gextlewoman (London).

Vol. XI. Small 4to. $1.50. [ Just ready.
Mr. Lane is the sole agent for the sale in America of the
books issued from the Vale Press, all of which are printed
under the supervision of the well-known English artist
CHARLES RICKETTS. The following books are now ready :

THE POEMS OF SIR JOHN SUCKLING.
Edited by Joun Gray. With Honeysuckle Border
and Initial Letters designed and cut on the wood
by CHARLES RICKETYTS. Demy 8vo. $7.50 vet.

EPICURUS, LEONTION, AND TERNISSA.
By WALTER SAvaGE Lanpor. With a Border de-
signed and cut on the wood by CHARLES RICKETTS.
Crown 8vo. $3.50 zet.

THE EARLY POEMS OF JOHN MILTON.
Reprinted from the edition seen through the press by
the author. With a Frontispiece, Border, and
Initial Letters designed and cut on the wood by
CHARLES RICKETTS. Crown 4to. $10.00 et.

SPIRITUAL POEMS.
By JouHn Gray. With a Frontispiece, Border, and
Cover designed and cut on the wood by CHARLES
Rickrrrs. Crown octavo. {4.00 set.

These books are among the most beautiful produced this
century, Only a very few copies are printed for America.
Prospectuses on application.
© 28h dS



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